Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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=JSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION










int Depot
Mt Royal Ave& °
~ Durham St.
P.O.Box N3723
Tel:326-1875

Volume: 105 No.73



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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

SSS






assault ON SIX-year- Ol

Incident
reportedly
took place
on school
property

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
claims that a six-year-old gov-
ernment primary school student
was sexually assaulted on school
property by a group of older
boys, reportedly enrolled at a
separate secondary school.

The assault reportedly took
place shortly after school was
dismissed at 3 pm on January
23.

The girl, said to be about six
years old, was taken to hospital
for injures from the attack, head
of the CDU Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said. Her pre-
sent condition and the extent



WENO ITE
with murder

to Fg) on,




HIS EXCELLENCY HUI
LIANGYU Vice Premier of the
State Council of The People’s
Republic of China takes in
the stunning waters of the
Bahamas.

¢ MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE SIX

â„¢ By PAUL G










WSS

Tm mE
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Felipé Major/Tribune staff







PRICE —75¢ |

Police officers
alleged to have

‘hustled’ or
extorted money

The RBPF Complaints and
Corruption Unit investigating

THE Complaints and
Corruption Unit of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force is
investigating two new inci-
dents in which officers are
alleged to have “hustled” or
extorted money from indi-
viduals within the past two
weeks.

The first case, involving a
government official who
owns a stall at Arawak Cay,
first began nearly two weeks
ago when a senior officer
visited his stall.

Not wanting to be identi-
fied for fear of being perse-
cuted by elements within
government, the source
alleges that the officer in
question approached his
stall with a former candidate
of a political party in tow.

As his stall was busy with
people, the proprietor said
the officer approached him
quietly and informed him



that there were a number of
complaints about his estab-
lishment.

“He pulled me aside and
said, ‘Look here, we been
having meetings, but don’t
worry I have you straight.
Give me something.’ So one
of my employees who was
nearby went into the drawer
and took out $200 and gave
it to him,” he said.

A week later, the senior
officer returned. This time
he demanded a weekly
stipend of $500, the source
said. Visiting the stall during
the height of the evening,
the officer approached the
DJ and told him to “shut
off” the music.

Watching the event
unfold from the sidelines,
the owner of the stall said
he approached the officer

SEE page 12

GB Power Company majority shareholder ‘sells
90% stake in Caribbean operations holding firm’

eecig, TURNQUEST
of her injuries were not known If e ; GRAND Bah P C Ss 55 t majority share-
- Tribune Staff Reporter ahama Power Company’s 55 per cent majority share
up to press time yesterday. O Oscarsin pturnquest@ . holder was last night said to have sold a 50 per cent stake in the
The name of the school has

been withheld to protect the
identity of the victim.
Education Minister Carl
Bethel yesterday said education
officials turned the matter over
to the police the same day the
attack occurred.
But at least one concerned
citizen, who learned of the inci-
dent through her granddaugh-

SEE page 11



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

4

S 2
Heico Duran Fowler

OUT Eris

A MAN initially charged
with attempted murder was
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison yesterday after being
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court on a murder charge.

Police have now charged
Heico Duran Fowler, 23, of
Palm Breeze Road in the Jan-
uary 16 shooting death of
Oscarsin Williams. Fowler was
on bail on an attempted mur-
der charge in relation to the
incident.

According to police, the vic-
tim and another man got into
an altercation sometime after
8 pm on Friday, January 16,
on Cox Way. During the
altercation, according to
police, Williams was shot in
his chest. He was taken to hos-
pital where he died on Febru-

ary 15.

According to court dockets,





tribunemedia.net





THE Vice Premier of
State Council for the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China left
New Providence yesterday
for Grand Bahama after tak-
ing an early morning tour of
the Clifton Heritage site and
the agricultural facility at
Lucayan Tropical.

Having just signed a mem-
orandum of understanding
between the Bahamas gov-
ernment and the People’s
Republic of China on Agri-
culture and Marine
Resources matters on Tues-
day, His Excellency Hui
Liangyu showed a keen
interest in the development
and sustainability of food
crops at the multi-million
dollar produce facility.

Guided on the tour by the
general manager and main
grower Tim Hauber, Mr
Liangyu asked questions
about the stages of growth
for the lettuce and tomato






























holding firm for its Caribbean operations to a Middle Eastern

energy company.

Gulf newspapers reported that Japanese-based Marubeni Cor-
poration had sold a 50 per cent shareholding in its Caribbean util-
ities holding vehicle to The Abu Dhabi National Energy Compa-
ny PJSC (Taga). The Caribbean holding vehicle holds Marubeni’s
55.4 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power Company.

SEE page 11

Woman dies
after suffering
seizure in pool

MRS NOELLE ROBERTS,
39, who suffered a seizure while }
swimming in St Andrew’s swim- }
? to Freeport.

ming pool Tuesday afternoon

died at Doctor’s Hospital yes- }
? of Bellevue Business Depot,
? Queen’s Highway, has entered
? into an agreement with Region-
: al Air Charter Service to fly the
i morning newspaper
? Freeport for Bellevue Business
? Depot customers. To cover the
? cost of delivery, The Tribune

terday afternoon without gain-
ing consciousness.

Mrs Roberts, the mother of
two young boys, is the wife of R
Montagu Roberts, and the
youngest daughter of Mrs Susan
Roberts and the late Mr Noel
Roberts. Her death was unex-

Tribune
returns to
Freeport

THE Tribune has returned

Mr Robert Osbourne, owner

into

Fowler intentionally caused : : pected. ? will now be sold for $1.25 in
Williams’ death on Penne pane Biome aes “Noelle had battled epileptic Freeport.
SEE page 12 SEE page 11 SEE page 14 SEE page 14





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NASSAU AND BA

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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Cabinet agrees on Marine Protected Areas



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Bahama’ Health

Feet Gooo AsouT

Fishing, spearing and setting traps to be banned in six zones

Move to promote healthy habitats and sustainable fisheries

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FISHING, spearing, setting traps and diving
conch will be permanently prohibited in the
country’s first six Marine Protected Areas,
Cabinet has agreed.

A network of protected areas across the
Bahamas will be established in the Abaco
Cays; Bimini; South Eleuthera; from Chub
Cay to Whale Cay in the Berry Islands, and
two sites in Exuma, from the Jewfish Cays to
mainland George Town, and the area east of
Blacks Rocks between little Exuma and North
Long Island.

Although the precise boundaries have yet to
be established in Abaco, Bimini, South
Eleuthera and southern Exuma, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright said he hopes negotiations will be
completed “as soon as possible.”

A 1999 study determined the scientific

validity of a list of marine reserve sites fol-
lowing observation of overfishing, habitat loss
and the degradation of water quality to marine
life resources.

The first five Fishery Reserves were creat-
ed in 2000 after thorough consultation with
local communities, stakeholders and scien-
tists. Once established, the removal of marine
resources will be prohibited in Marine Pro-
tected Areas to promote healthy marine habi-
tats and sustainable fisheries.

Key fishery species are expected to increase
and create a greater reproductive output and
replenishment of fish outside the reserves.

And it is hoped more plentiful marine
resources will contribute to the economic
growth and a better quality of life for Bahami-
ans. Mr Cartwright said: “Now the Cabinet has
agreed, we have to put the monitoring in
place, like who is going to monitor the areas.

“We want to consult local people, and espe-
cially the local fishermen who work there,
because that is their home ground, their back-

INAGUA ALL AGE SCHOOL was presented with hurricane relief gifts.

Your HEALTHPLAN

Apex Management Services

Family Guardian and its group health division, BahamaHealth, are major sponsors of this year's
“Celebrate Heart Month,” which runs through February. Family Guardian's Vice President, Group
Life and Health Division, Linda Jarrett (left) recently presented the company’s sponsorship pledge
to Nellie Brown of the Bahamas Heart Association. In making the presentation, Mrs. Jarrett noted:
“We are happy to partner with the Heart Association in this important health initiative which runs
concurrentlywith BahamaHealth’s 100-Day Challenge. BahamaHealth’s focusis to bring awareness
and solutions to the serious health risks associated with obesity, including heart disease, and our

partnership with the Heart Association is very timely.”

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yard and front yard. However, it will help for
breeding and nurturing baby fish, crawfish,
conch and whatever else in the area because
once no one can fish there they can breed
and spill out over into other areas and provide
species for fishermen. It will help ensure that
we have fish and conch for years to come.”

Director of the Department of Marine
Resources Michael Braynen explained that
while there is currently seasonal protection
of fish in place, and fishing is prohibited in
Bahamas National Trust National Parks, this
is the first network of protected areas admin-
istered by the Department.

“We don’t see the establishment of a num-
ber of marine resources as the salvation of
commercial fisheries in the Bahamas, but we
see it as one of the things that needs to hap-
pen. We expect the establishment of this net-
work, and there will be more to come, to
make some contribution to helping us main-
tain sustainable fisheries in the Bahamas,”
Mr Braynen said.

STUDENTS and teachers of
the Inagua All Age School were
presented with hurricane relief
gifts by the New Providence
Methodist Churches and Queen’s
College. At a recent special
assembly at the island’s school,
Elmena Bethell, vice-president
of the Bahamas Conference of
the Methodist Church (BCMC),
handed out the gifts to every stu-
dent and teacher.

After hearing of the plight of
the students as a result of Hurri-
cane Ike in September 2008, the
Nassau-based staff of the BCMC
met in a special meeting to dis-
cuss the impact of the hurricane
on the children of the island.

Not only were the homes of
the children damaged in the hur-
ricane, but the students also
missed weeks of classes as a
result of the damage caused to
the school and utility infrastruc-
ture on the island.

“We often forget the little ones
when disasters strike. We focus
on repairing homes and cleaning
up communities, but we never
stop to realise the long-term trau-
matic effects of the disasters on
the children. It is very hard on
them to experience those terri-
fying winds and the storm’s after-
math,” said Mrs Bethell.

Immediately after the passing
of Hurricane Ike over the island,
the BCMC activated its disaster
relief agency, Methodist Habitat,
and coordinated supplies and vol-
unteer teams who travelled to
the island to repair the roofs of
homes. More than 50 homes and
two churches were repaired by
112 volunteers.

Rev Bill Higgs, president of
the Methodist Conference, said
that he felt it was important to do
something tangible for the chil-
dren of Inagua. “We worked with
Christopher Pinder, chairperson
of the Inagua Methodist Church,
to get the names and grade levels
of every student on the island.
These names were then distrib-
uted throughout our churches in
New Providence and special gifts
were purchased and addressed
to each child,” said Rev Higgs.

In addition to a personalised
gift, each student also received a
new backpack with school sup-
plies. Andrea Gibson, principal
of Queen’s College, also partici-
pated in the special meeting and
said, “Queen’s College is a part
of the Bahamas Conference of

A DIVISION OF :
the Methodist Church and we,

FAMILY GUARDIAN too, had thought about doing
sd INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED something for the Inagua

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3



Police seize
$25,000
worth of
suspected
cocaine

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police seized
$25,000 worth of suspected
cocaine and took a 37-year-old
man into custody during a
drug bust in the Lucaya area
on Monday.

Press liaison officer Asst
Supt Clarence Reckley report-
ed that police, acting on infor-
mation, searched a property in
Lucaya at around 5.30pm.

During the search of the
premises, police discovered a
black taped package contain-
ing suspected cocaine.

Mr Reckley said the drugs
weighed 2.2 lbs and have an
estimated street value of
$25,000.

Investigations are continu-
ing into the matter.

Gunman who
shot officer
earlier injured
another man,
says witness

A MAN who shot a police
officer in the leg in Nassau
Village on Tuesday afternoon
had shot another man three
times in the leg that morning,
according to an eye witness.

The police shooting incident
had “nothing to do” with any
tension between police and
Nassau Village residents, said
local Tia Thurston.

Meanwhile, according to Ms
Thurston, the man who shot
the policeman was also a close
friend of Onado Newbold, the
man murdered in Nassau Vil-
lage in January.

The two men worked for
the same person, she said.

Weapon

Ms Thurston alerted police
to the gunman’s whereabouts
when she saw them on patrol
in the area at around 4pm on
Tuesday after he had threat-
ened her with his weapon.

“T flagged them down and I
told them that he had a gun
and he pull it on me and he
ran through one yard to go
over onto Alexandra Boule-
vard East. So when police
gone round I ran round ...
when I went round all I hear
was shots just start opening
up.

“He was shooting at police
and that’s when police started
shooting at him,” she said.

Contrary to some reports,
the resident claimed, the man
was alone when he was con-
fronted by police, not with a
group.

Messages left for senior
police officers seeking com-
ment on the matter were not
returned up to press time yes-
terday.

However, another police
source said that they are near-
ing the end of their investiga-
tion and will be in a better
position to comment on the
matter today.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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322-2157



SUPREME COURT

Prosecution witnesses testify
in Keith Carey murder retrial

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE retrial of the February
2006 murder of local business-
man Keith Carey continued in
the Supreme Court yesterday
with three prosecution witness-
es being called to give testimo-
ny.
Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are
charged in Mr Carey’s murder
and are also facing charges of
armed robbery and conspiracy
to commit armed robbery.

Detective Sergeant Anton
Rahming, the first witness to
take the stand, told the court
that on Monday, February 27,
2006, he received information
regarding a shooting and also
received information regarding
the victim.

He told the court that as a
result of this, he and Detective
Sergeant 217 Ferguson went to
Doctors Hospital.

The officer told the court that
upon arrival, he saw medical
personnel attending to a light-
skinned man who he later iden-
tified as Keith Carey.

Sergeant Rahming told the
court that he observed a brass-
coloured projectile fall from Mr
Carey’s clothes while a nurse
was removing them. He told the
court that he collected several
articles of Mr Carey’s clothing,
which he handed over to anoth-
er officer.

The second prosecution wit-
ness (name withheld) told the
court that she had known mur-
der accused Jamal Glinton five
years prior to the incident.

She testified that she slept at
Glinton’s Nassau Village home

Officer tells of seeing medical
personnel attend victim in hospital

on the night of February 26,
2006.

The witness told the court
that on the morning of February
27, 2006, two men came to Glin-
ton’s home in a white Nissan
Maxima. She described the dri-
ver of the vehicle as skinny and
fair skinned. She told the court
that she and Glinton got into
the car with the two men and
they travelled to Homestead
Street where a female friend of
hers lives.

The witness testified that
after her friend got dressed for
work, they both got into the car
with the three men and drove to
Police Headquarters on East
Street, where she and her friend
worked with the Englerston
Urban Renewal Project.

Barracks

The woman told the court she
and her friend were dropped
off at the police barracks at
around 9.45am. The woman
told the court that she never
saw Glinton again that day.

Reginald Rigby, an auto body
repair man and the final prose-
cution witness to testify yester-
day, told the court on Monday,
February 27, 2006, that he was
at work when two men pulled
up in a green Nissan Maxima.

Mr Rigby said one of the men
asked him how much it would
cost to paint a vehicle. Mr Rig-
by testified that he told the man
that it would cost $1,000. The

eee ee

TROLLEY

AWFUL!

eae re
inadequate, say
baggage handlers

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAGGAGE handlers at Lynden Pindling
International Airport claim the new trolleys
issued by the Nassau Airport Development
Company are not adequate for the job.

She said: “They were brought in as part of a

witness told the court that the
men left and about 20 minutes
later, the man who had been a
passenger in the green Maxima
returned in a white Maxima. He
said that the man gave him a
deposit of $500 and gave his
name as Morley.

Despite an objection by attor-
ney Craig Butler, Mr Rigby was
allowed to identify Dwight
Knowles as the man who had
identified himself as Morley.
According to Mr Rigby, the
man wanted the car’s colour to
be changed from white to black.
He told the court that the vehi-
cle did not have licence plates.

The retrial into the February
2006 murder of businessman
Keith Carey began on Monday.
On February 27, 2006, Carey,
43, a married father of three
and former High School coach
was shot and killed on the steps
of The Bank of the Bahamas
on Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway before he was able to
deposit $40,000 that belonged
to the Esso Service Station,
which he operated.

Deputy director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel, Stephanie Pintard,
Anthony Delaney and Lennox
Coleby are prosecuting the case.

Attorneys Craig Butler and
Devard Francis are representing
Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey
McPhee is representing Sean
Brown and attorney Perry
Albury is representing Dwight
Knowles.



customer service initiative and what we are
trying to do is work with the porters to create
a better customer service at the airport and

near future.”

The porters, who used to carry large loads of
luggage on hefty wooden carts which held 10 or
more bags at a time, are now forced to use

folding metal carts.

But large packages brought in by Bahamians
after shopping trips to the United States are
now falling off the new carts which the porters

say are insufficient.

They are not able to stack as many bags on
the smaller, neater, better looking trolleys, and
luggage will not stack as high, they say.

Shonalee Johnson, Manager of Communi-
cations for NAD, said the folding trolleys were
brought in on January 12 in an effort to meet

international standards.

meet international standards.
“We brought in 20 carts which are able to be
folded and we hope to introduce 20 more in the

Standard

Ms Johnson maintains the carts are of a
standard size used in airports around the world
and while the old trolleys may have held more,

they were not necessarily best for the airport.

the issue.

She added: “They may have been able to
have more bags on them, but it’s a safety issue,
carrying more bags is not necessarily safer.”

The communications manager said she is
aware that some porters have expressed con-
cern and NAD is working with them to resolve

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PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

Obama offers carrots for mortgage firms

WASHINGTON (AP) — The same mort-
gage lenders that candidate Barack Obama
accused last year of causing the housing mess
would get a windfall from President Obama's
government under his foreclosure rescue pro-
gramme.

The $75 billion plan announced Wednesday
has the potential to be far more effective than
past federal efforts to help struggling home-
owners lower their mortgage payments and stay
in their homes. But for that to happen, investors
in complex mortgage securities have to agree to
participate — something the government has so
far failed miserably to persuade them to do.

That's where the goodies for the much-
maligned industry come in.

Companies would get $1,000 for agreeing to
give a strapped homeowner a lower monthly
payment instead of foreclosing — more if the
borrower hasn't yet fallen behind on what they
owe. They can get up to another $3,000 over the
next three years. And they get government
insurance to cover part of the money they might
lose if the homeowner ultimately defaults on the
house anyway.

Last October in Reno, Nev., Obama vowed,
"I won't let banks and lenders off the hook
when it was their greed and irresponsibility that
got us into this mess." But the outlines of his
plan were an acknowledgment that he will need
cooperation from firms that collect mortgage
payments — known as loan servicers — if he
intends to reach his goal of preventing up to 9
million foreclosures.

"The truth is that at the end of the day, loan
modification remains voluntary, so the servicers
need to see it as sufficient incentive to partici-
pate,” said Andrew Jakabovics of the Centre for
American Progress, who has worked with Oba-
ma's team on housing issues.

Still, Jakabovics called some of the payments
an "unnecessary windfall” that is "overly gen-
erous" — particularly since avoiding a costly
foreclosure is a financial imperative for mort-
gage servicers anyway.

"You still have the very serious question of
what kind of incentives you're providing for
what's essentially bad behaviour," said David C.
John, an analyst at the conservative Heritage
Foundation.

Even tough mortgage industry critics con-
cede, however, that such enticements are nec-
essary to get companies to step up and help
homeowners, given the legal and financial chal-
lenges that modifying home loans can pose.

"It's just what needs to happen, wherever the
blame lies" for the housing mess, said Debbie
Goldstein, the executive vice president of the
Centre for Responsible Lending, a consumer
group. The plan also abandons an aspect of
the Democratic-written foreclosure rescue pro-
gramme enacted last year that proved anathema
to mortgage holders: requiring that they take a
loss up front before the government would help

PSirst Baptist Church

289 Market St. South « P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

“No Greater love hath a man
that he would lay down

his life for a friend.”
SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

renegotiate a loan. The programme failed mis-
erably, helping fewer than 40 homeowners com-
pared to the 400,000 promised.

Under Obama's new plan, mortgage holders
only have to take a hit on the interest payments
they receive each month, and would in most
cases be made whole by the government for
the value of their loans.

"It's a veritable garden full of carrots," said
Howard Glaser, a mortgage industry consul-
tant who served in the Clinton administration.

A key element would loosen lending rules at
government home loan giants Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac to let as many as 5 million home-
owners who owe more than their homes are
worth refinance to bring down their monthly
payments. But that's little comfort to many bor-
rowers in places like Arizona, California, Neva-
da and Florida — they owe far too much to
qualify. The plan "seems to offer little help to
borrowers whose loan exceeds their property
value by more than 5 percent," John Courson,
chief executive of the Mortgage Bankers Asso-
ciation, said in a statement.

The plan beefs up the role of Fannie and
Freddie, which were seized by federal regulators
last year, allowing them to hold an additional
$50 billion each in mortgage investments.

The plan isn't all about sweeteners for mort-
gage holders. Obama's plan also requires that
any financial institution benefiting from the
$700 billion Wall Street bailout develop plans to
help homeowners avoid foreclosures. Those
rules apply to the largest banks, which are also
the largest holders of home loans.

Yet some doubt that even those new rules
will prod financial players that have so far been
unwilling to help homeowners to do so now.

"It maintains a voluntary system of compli-
ance," said John Taylor, chief executive of the
National Community Reinvestment Coalition,
a consumer group.

"The investors and banks have shown great
hesitancy in voluntarily participating in these
mortgage programmes."

Many Democrats and housing analysts
believe that the only true way to force mortgage
holders to help strapped borrowers is to give
judges power to modify bankrupt homeown-
ers’ loans, cutting the total they owe and their
monthly payments. Obama is backing that move
as part of his housing plan, although it will be up
to Congress to work out the details.

Meanwhile, housing specialists say the mort-
gage industry will be slow to act on the new
incentives Obama has laid out for helping home-
owners — if they end up working.

"It's going to be a long, slow process because
these mortgages have to be redone one by one,”
the Heritage Foundation's John said. "You
can't just snap your fingers and solve this one.”

(This article was written by Julie Hirschfeld
Davis and Alan Zibel of the Associated Press).



We should
think about
national
development

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I believe at this time our
thoughts should be directed as a
people toward national devel-
opment. May I suggest the fol-
lowing:

1) Create a township on the
island of Andros preferably in
North Andros - Everything
should be done to encourage a
population shift from New
Providence to the family islands
as soon as possible. It is quite
possible that much of the crime
occurring in New Providence is
due to the overcrowding of our
population in New Providence.
This can be facilitated if we con-
sider:

a) Putting a Defence Force
base on the island of Andros
thereby creating the much-
needed focal point.

b) Developing a plan for a
properly laid out city or town
rather than allowing one to
spring up on its own.

c) Setting aside a portion of
the annual budget over a five -
10 year period to develop the
nucleus of the new city since
our resources are limited.

d) Developing the abundance
of Crown land into acreage
plots making it available to per-
sons who agree to move to the
family islands and who agree to
build within a specified period

letters@tribunemedia net



of time thereby giving landless
Bahamians a stake in their own
country.

2) Provide the economic stim-
ulus to BAIC or other agencies
for the construction of homes
and businesses.

3) Relocate a branch of The
College of The Bahamas/Uni-
versity of The Bahamas on
Andros.

4) Develop a fleet of fishing
vessels thereby encouraging the
development of our marine
resources and creating much
needed employment for a seg-
ment of the Bahamian popu-
lace. It may be observed that
too much Crown land is lying
vacant when too many Bahami-
ans cannot afford a parcel of
land in New Providence or the
family islands. In relation to the
same idea, I ask the following
questions: Do we have a nation-
al plan of development for our
country for the next five, 10 or
15 years?

What plans are being made
to provide employment for the
thousands of high school grad-
uates leaving school every year?

Are we prepared to diversify

our economy in any way and
where may we start?

With the aid of the United
Nations or any other agency can
we get any technical assistance
with a development plan?

Since governments over a
period of the last several years
have not come up with any fea-
sible national development plan
is it time for the private sector
or civic groups to put their
heads together and come up
with a plan to present to gov-
ernment? I do not think we can
leave this to chance. There are
far too many uninhabited
Bahamian islands which are left
vacant and invite illegal immi-
grants to fill the vacuum. Will
our authorities please give these
suggestions some serious con-
sideration?

Finally, can we look at creat-
ing coconut plantations? The
bamboo plant which should
grow well in our climate? The
growing of sisal? And why not
invite suggestions from groups
such as The College of The
Bahamas rather than saying
what can't be done? The worst
thing we can do as a people is to
do nothing.

SOUTH BEACH
RESIDENT
Nassau,

February 16, 2009.

For too long we have voted out of ignorance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

For far too long I think Bahamians have vot-
ed out of ignorance. We are ignorant because
we do not know the people for whom we are
voting. We only know what they or their oppos-
ing party deems is important for us to know.

Why can’t we have full disclosure on the
candidates that are being placed before us so
that we can make an intelligent decision on
who we feel would best represent us? Both

our government. Now is the time for us to
speak out and say that we do not want anoth-

the country.

backwards.

this administration and the previous one have ple.

done an excellent job of abusing their power
and embarrassing the Bahamian people.
It has become a norm for Bahamians to think

that all politicians lie.

Why is that? No one is perfect but at some
point we should make these people accountable
for their actions. It is better to have a candidate
that says, “I made mistakes and I have learnt
from them” than to have someone sweep

er MP, Cabinet Minister or Senator who is
going to do nothing but bring embarrassment to

Our leaders are forgetting how far we have
come as a nation and are progressively stepping

These political parties need to stop nomi-
nating who their benefactors want and start
nominating who is best for the Bahamian peo-

Change within our country has to start on an
individualistic level.
We have to change as a people. We have to

change the way we view politics and the pow-

everything under the rug and then spend five

years surprising us with the skeletons in their

closets.

As Bahamians we should demand more from

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We need to stand and say enough is enough.
At the end of the day we are all still Bahamians
and should do what is best for the country
regardless of party affiliations.

JANA STUBBS
February, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief :

soneevereecrecsesersossseecnsrecsesceuesssorssecnsesseressssoees

Churches

to offer
family crisis
counselling

DISTURBED by the rising
tide of suicidal behaviour,
numerous churches announced
earlier this week that they will be
coming together to offer family
crisis counselling.

“This is not a programme to
offer financial assistance, but
instead one of offering hope to
those who, for whatever reason,
are living on the edge of quiet
desperation,” said a statement
from the churches.

“We have found that many
persons feeling hopeless and in
despair simply need someone to
listen and to show compassion.”

The churches offering coun-
selling are: Trinity Assembly; St
Barnabas Anglican Church; St
Michael’s Methodist Church; All
Saints Anglican Church, St
Paul’s Baptist Church, Golden
Gates Assembly; Voice of Deliv-
erance; New Covenant Baptist
Church; Southside Christian
Ministries; Ebenezer Baptist
Church; the Hope Centre;
Bahamas Harvest Church, and
Christ Community Church.

In the statement, the clergy-
men also called on other church-
es to “decrease their emphasis
on Mammon and raw material-
ism.”

“This emphasis on things and
the pursuit thereof is placing
undue pressure on some believ-
ers, who when disappointed,
turn inward and do harm to
themselves.”

Noting that many people sim-
ply need the comfort of having
someone listen to them talk, the
churches said, “Christians and
all persons of goodwill should
at this time of economic scarcity
show themselves friendly with
a listening ear and a bentness to
be each others brother.”



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Man hits out at lack of mental health help-line

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IN THE wake of a sharp esca-
lation in attempted and successful
suicides, a distressed man has hit
out at the lack of a dedicated
national mental health help-line.

Wishing to be identified only
as Peter, the man, who lost his
job last year, said that he was
unable to find reassurance when
he called around various psychi-
atric health offices yesterday hop-
ing to hear a friendly voice.

“They don’t even have a hot-
line where people can pick up the
phone and talk to a mental health
counsellor. There’s not even a
hotline that could divert some-
one from maybe committing sui-
cide,” he said.

Since last year, Peter said, he
has been surviving with assistance
from his elderly mother, and help-
ing her with her stall in the straw
market, after being unable to find
a secure job.

Feeling as though he was “in
crisis”, Peter said he decided to
call the Community Assessment
Centre, an outpost of Sandilands
on Market Street.

But instead of getting a load
off his chest, Peter claims he was
put on hold for what seemed like
“an eternity.” In despair, he
“hung up in disgust” and tried
Sandilands directly, only to again

be put on hold.

Peter said that in times like
these, in which greater numbers
of people are being placed under
serious economic strain, there is
all the more need for some sort of
national help-line.

Hearing about his experience,
director of the Bahamas Crisis
Centre and co-ordinator of psy-
chiatric services for the Depart-
ment of Social Services, Dr San-
dra Dean Patterson, expressed
surprise and disappointment that
he was unable to speak with any-
one.

Dr Patterson encouraged peo-
ple like Peter to call the Crisis
Centre’s 24/7 hotline if they are
feeling helpless.

Manned by trained volunteers,
the Crisis Centre hotline (328-
0922) was originally set up to
offer advice and counselling to
victims of abuse, but Dr Patterson
said that no call will be turned
down.

“It is primarily for victims of
violence, whatever that violence
is, but we do have persons who
call who feel like they want to
die. Like they want to end things,
they are feeling helpless, so we
do take all calls,” she said.

“T’d encourage people to call
the crisis hotline because there is
always a line and it is 24/7.”

She urged people considering
suicide to remember that they are
not seeing things clearly — and

SYTHE "i for Visual Arts Exhibition

IN A display of talent and skills,
student artists from the primary
and secondary schools demon-
strated what they were capable of
at the 11th annual Visual Arts
Exhibition.

The exhibition represents the
collaboration between the Min-
istry of Education and stakeholder
RBC Finco.

The exhibition was first staged in
1999 by the Department of Edu-
cation “to continue to showcase
the art work produced in our
schools by students in the Art and
Design Programme.” Under the
direction of senior education offi-
cer Pamela Chandler, the students
demonstrated skills with a wide
variety of materials such as sea
shells, beads, straw, fabrics, paints,
and glass.



In attendance was Carl Bethel,
Minister of Education, who said:
“Art and artistic development is
an essential characteristic of human
development.”

RESULTS

Junior High School Division:

LW Young Junior High School —
3rd Place

SC McPherson Junior High School
— 2nd Place

TA Thompson Junior High School —
1st Place

Senior High School:

CV Bethel Senior High School -—
3rd Place

C C Sweeting Senior High School —
2nd Place

Government High School — 1st Place



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there is always help.

“People who are suicidal or are
thinking of suicide are depressed.
That’s the bottom line, and when
you are depressed you don’t see
things the way people see them
when they are not depressed. The
lens you are looking at life
through is very distorted, so you
don’t see clearly, so it is important
to talk to someone outside of
yourself,” she said.

Those taking the calls are well-
equipped to handle such situa-
tions, assured the director.

“They are trained volunteers. If
they can’t do something then they
will refer the person, to let the
person know they can go into
community counselling or Sandi-
lands or whatever, and if it is
something urgent then we would
obviously call the police.”

Meanwhile, the experienced

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psychiatric health worker said
awareness needs to be raised that
mental illness is as common, if
not more common, than physical
ill health.

“We need to be alert to it, be
aware of it and respond to it, and
let people know most of all that
there is help.

“People should just keep call-
ing,” she said. The hotline can be
contacted on 328-0922.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

CHINESE VIP ENJOYS BAHAMIAN HOSPITALITY

iw

DR SELIMA HAUBER, horticulturlist, shows His Excellency bh
Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s
Republic of China the way they grow different crops.





Dress to Impress In your SENATOR Dr Jicinta Higgs speaks to His Excellency Hui
5 Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s

hat, shoes, accessories or : Republic of China.
i DEPUTY Prime Minister Brent Symonette along
that special dress from with His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of

the State Council of The People’s Republic of

ORALEE’S FACHIONS China waves goodbye as the head to Freeport.

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ote ee He eae













BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES
P.O.Box CB 11416
Nassau, Bahamas

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Bishop Gloria Redd

February 22nd - February 27th - 1 Week
Pastor Stanely Ferguson
New Free Community Holiness Baptist Church
Malcolm Allotment
7:30p.m. nightly
There will be no service on Thursday 26th of February.

Cri Dil Ge

TIM HAUBER, General Manager of the Lucayan Tropical, shows His
Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s
Republic of China how they grow crops.



SENATOR Dr Jicinta

pcelengy ul | Ua
Liangyu Vice Premier

of the State Council FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

of The People’s
Republic of China : : : :
some of the ruins Mid-sized company is seeking a

that slaves left Financial Controller. Successful

7 rr iy . 7 pening. candidate must have a minimum
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experience in Cost Accounting.
PHOTOS:
HOPE TOWN Send Resumes To:
Felipe Major/ controllerfinancial@ ymail.com

Tribune staff DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 28th, 2009



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Freeport Lions :
Club equipped —
to give children :
free eye tests

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The
Freeport Lions Club is
now equipped to conduct
free eye screening tests
for children at its Sight
Centre in Freeport.

President Aira Newball
said the club has acquired
a sight screening machine
to assist with their
sight conservation pro-
gramme here on Grand
Bahama.

The Lions Club has
been assisting school chil-
dren with sight problems
by providing eye exams
and eye glasses. The
organisation has also
raised funds for children
requiring eye surgery.

Ms Newball said that
many children with sight
problems have been
referred over the years to
the club by their school,
Social Services, family
members and concerned
citizens.

“Having the sight
screening equipment will
provide quick and accu-
rate assessments of
school children, especial-
ly in the outlying settle-
ments.

“Once an assessment is
made the children will be
given further assistance
as needed,” she said.

Ms Newball said that
screenings will be con-
ducted by trained mem-
bers of the Lions Club at
its centre on East Beach
Drive.

Machine

Dr Carl Dehmel, a
retired internist, said the
machine is very sophisti-
cated and is capable of
detecting various sight
disorders.

He said the machine is
able to detect the early
stages of short-sighted-
ness and far-sightedness,
cross eye, and colour
blindness.

“The individual looks
into the machine and we
run different tests. It
takes only 15 minutes per
child and we can tell if
everything is okay. If not,
the child will be referred
to take additional tests,”
he said.

Ms Newball said they
want to extend the sight
conservation programme
to other Family Islands.
They are planning to
travel to Abaco next
month, she said.

She said several
fundraising events have
been planned to raise
money for the mainte-
nance of the equipment,
doctor visits and eye
glasses purchases for chil-
dren.

A Fun Run Walk for
Sight will be held on
February 22, starting at
6am at the Lions Club
house on East Beach
Drive.

The Sight Seals Drive
will be held in March and
a steak-out will be held in
April.

Ms Newball said indi-
viduals, small businesses
and corporations will be
asked to make a financial
contribution to use the
Lions Sight Seals on their
mail.

She is urging the com-
munity to support the
various fundraising
events as the money
raised goes toward their
ongoing sight conserva-
tion programme.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
YR
PHONE: 322-2157

(be Bayer HealthCare

Govt in talks over EPA services schedule

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government is in talks
with the Caribbean Regional
Negotiating Machinery over the
services schedule it submitted as
part of the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement with Europe,
according to the minister of state
for finance.

Confirming that the schedule,
outlining the ways in which the
Bahamas proposes to liberalise
trade in services with the EU and
CARICOM under the EPA, was
forwarded to the CRNM for
scrutiny in early 2009, Zhivargo
Laing said the government “‘is in
discussions with them over it.”

Mr Laing said the government
has “just received” comments
from the CRNM on its offer, but
remained tight-lipped on the con-
tent of those observations.

“I don’t want to get into that at
the moment. We are in discus-
sion with (the CRNM) on them.
They are more procedural than
anything else though,” he said.

The CRNM is a regional facil-
ity established by CARICOM

THE ETHIOPIA Africa Black
International Congress led the
African National Anthem during
the opening of the African
Heritage Conference 2009
sponsored by the International
Phoenix Society on Tuesday,
February 17 at the British
Colonial Hilton.




Zhivargo Laing

heads of state to conduct trade
negotiations jointly for their
countries.

While the facility hammered
out the overall details of the EPA
with Europe, individual countries
were given the opportunity to
mould more specific elements of
the agreement — such as which
industries would be liberalised
and which would be protected
from foreign competition.

As a country with “Most

aw, hi Lar
40 Year Warranties

Metal Roofing

trey ie Pai
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eek Repose:

acbhahin boat hoe ber
gd Ska Sec
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shai Lec

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Developed Country” status in
CARIFORUM, the Bahamas is
committed to freeing-up trade in
83 per cent of its 155 services
industries.

The Bahamas was given a six
month extension beyond the
October 16, 2008 EPA signing
date to submit its services sched-
ule, which was being formulated
throughout last year after discus-
sion between the government
and private sector stakeholders.

The EPA is a trade agreement
that provides for more liberalised
trade in both goods and services
between CARIFORUM coun-
tries and the European Commu-
nity.

Mr Laing said that there were
“no adjustments” made to the
services schedule released to the
public in August 2008 prior to its
submission to the CRNM around
January 2009 for review.

After the review, the govern-
ment intends to submit its ser-
vices schedule to the European
Union by April 15 for inclusion in
the Annexes of the Agreement.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said the
government is “moving steadily”
to produce an implementation





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12,000 btu A/C, Sleeps 4

Stove, refrigerator, Microwave, Head/Shower





Water Maker/Ice Maker

Electronics equipped for fishing and Island Hopping.

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Reason for selling is to upgrade to larger boat.

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schedule for the EPA.

This would define the timeline
over which certain obligations
required under the agreement
would come into effect.

“We are working with the
Trade Commission and the stake-
holders who will be involved with
understanding what is proposed
as an implementation schedule
and what has to be done so that it
can be put into effect,” he said.

As for legislation to enact the
EPA, Mr Laing suggested that
this is far off and on the back-
burner given present economic
conditions.

“We are far from preparing
legislation. You have to remem-










ber that this is a process which
we have a minimum of three
years to at least do preliminary
things. We and all others in the
Caribbean are in preparatory
talks about what it is that we are
required to do. Regard being had
to that and the economic cir-
cumstances we find ourselves in,
et cetera, I think we will all agree
that the country has some prior-
ities which might trump that at
the moment.”

The government has indicat-
ed that reform of Customs
administration is the “most criti-
cal” issue facing the country as
it moves to fulfill its commitments
under the EPA.

= snoe (tae








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unless your doctor tells you otherwise.



PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



China’s Vice Premier of State visits Grand Bahama

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - His Excellency
Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the





faders)
MLC ae
Governors Harbour.
Reck Saund....... 7
pee 1 = =| |

State Council of the People’s
Republic of China, yesterday vis-
ited Grand Bahama - the nation’s
second city - as part of his official
visit to the Bahamas.

Vice Premier Hui and his dele-

Take MeL
) Carnival.

FUN FOR ALL. ALL FOR FUN:

2Q.-
from person

ry Carnival Victory.

Southern Caribbean
From San Juan

Carnival eeserves the right to re-instate the fel supplement forall guests.at ap
to89 per persen perday if the NYMEX od exceeds #70 per barrel,
Fricesiare based omcategory o', crmse anly, per person, double accopancy,
capacity controlled aad subject sochange at. any time, Gaverament taves and fee
and gratuities not inchaded. Ships Registry: Bahamas & Panama

ree eo tel
Carnichaal Rd

Lyford Gay........

Mall at Maratha 5
Shirley Street _........32%

gation were taken on a tour of
Freeport’s tourist attractions and
its industrial sector, including the
Lucayan Harbour and the
Freeport Container Port.

A luncheon was held at the



March 29th, 2009

Sy ae
Pere em steer es ae



Westin at Our Lucaya Resort
for the Chinese group and
various prominent residents of
Freeport.

“It gives me great pleasure to
welcome you and your distin-
guished delegation to our second
city, Freeport, in Grand
Bahama,” said Brent Symonette,
Minister of Foreign Affairs.

“Your visit here today speaks
volumes of you and your govern-
ment’s keen interest in the
Bahamas.”

China and the Bahamas estab-
lished diplomatic relations more
than a decade ago, which has led
to partnerships in areas of nation-
al priority such as education, cul-
ture, trade and investment.

On Tuesday, the Chinese gov-
ernment agreed to loan over $160
million to the Bahamas govern-
ment for road works and other
projects.

Mr Symonette told Vice Pre-
mier Hui that Freeport has end-
less potential. He also noted that
investments made in Freeport by
Hutchison-Whampoa have inex-
tricably linked the Bahamas and
China for nearly a generation.

“T wish to note that despite the
tough economic times being expe-
rienced by the entire world, the
commitment of your country to
the relationship we share has
enabled a measure of constancy
for the economy of Freeport and,
therefore, a steady life for many
of the residents here,” he said.

Hutchison is the largest
employer on Grand Bahama. Its
developments in Freeport include
the Our Lucaya Resort, the
Freeport Container Port, and the
Harbour and Airport Companies.

Noting that these are challeng-
ing times for all countries, Mr
Symonette said the impact of the
presence of important industrial

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amines and Fittings for SALE

As e Summit Academy

SUMMIT

ACADEMY

is registering for the 2009/2010 academic year.

A limited amount of spaces are available in Playgroup through Grade 5.
(Wait list option is available for filled classes)
We are also pleased to announce the additional expansionjof, oul
early- childhood program. |

Summit is proud to offer:

Peel at alae |

scholarship program for

upper elementary
autem eet te 2)

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A challenging, inquiry-based curriculum)

Small class sizes

Highly qualified teachers

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Swimming/Spanish/Gymnastics/
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Beautiful, well-maintained campus with on-site pool.

Summit Academy...A Smaller, Smarter School.
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Email: summitacademy @coralwave.com
summitacademy @coralwave.com

Tel: (242) 394-478 1/3
Fax: (242) 394-4790




Refrigerator
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wee ete







$300

) Bee

KitchewClean-u}
APPLIAN

Now COW) March 12





partners like Hutchison-Wham-
poa and the Grand Bahama Port
Authority remain a critical com-
ponent to the long-term success
of the Freeport and the Bahamas.

“We are, therefore, confident
that the well-laid planning we car-
ry out today will ensure, for all,
our well-deserved and mutual
benefits tomorrow,” he said.

and/or Mr Glean

PICTURED with a gold fish that is part of the Gold Fish Experience

at Pelican Bay, left to right, are: Tara Knowles, guest services asso-
ciate; Della Bridgewater, front office manager, and Eleanor Bullard,
front office associate.

Gold fish for company
at Pelican Bay at Lucaya

EXTENDED stay guests at Pelican Bay now have a new expe-
rience to look forward to when staying at the hotel.

Pelican Bay at Lucaya recently introduced a programme where-
by extended stay guests are welcomed with a gold fish in a bowl and
given one as a pet to care for during a stay at the hotel.

“The gold fish have been well received by our long stay guests,”
said Della Bridgewater, front office manager at the hotel.

“Being away from home, our guests may be lonely and having a
pet for companionship while on the road is comforting.

“All gold fish are all named and carry names such as “Lola.” We
do all we can to give our guests a home away from home experi-
ence.”

Pelican Bay at Lucaya prides itself on its guest experiences and
the gold fish is one of many other initiatives.

The accompanying note for guests enjoying the gold fish expe-
rience is, “Hi, my name is Lola.

“T realise you’re away from home and you may get a little lone-
ly at times so Iam happy to be your companion during your stay. I
need to be fed at least twice daily and my water should be changed
often.

“T hope I make you feel more at home. If you have any questions
or concerns about my care, please contact the front desk.”

Pelican Bay at Lucaya is owned by Sundt AS, a private invest-
ment company based in Norway. Pelican Bay is the only investment
that Sundt AS has in the Bahamas.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



WE EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS
TO GING 3. MILLER ON HIS RECENT ATTAINMENT OF A
WASTER OF ART DEGREE WITH HONORS IN INSURANCE
AND RSE MANAGEMENT FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTTINGHAM [IN ENGLAND
FROM YOUR MOM: ROZENA, GRANDMOTHER, BUGLE,
BROTHERS; JASON & JAIME, HELEN, FAMILY AND
FRIENDS. WE ARE PROUD OF YOU, GOD BLESS YOU.

APPLIANCE = eee

cow Mai wh OO] 11

Name:

Fc. Box lland

Ph: day

‘Question: hat iafuiieeiecen
are bang geen ang?

c__jj

Evry denies Parth Ii, Ey dens Prob (2, 200, Err at Pntar Tacha Enter at Plaster Techabciues, Wilage Pid or Asa A Prichard Lid Robineca Rd.
Piprvinsa pes! — Deena fp Becks ecg! ce peel lee he dee pee pre pee ey fe ee ld eee ep
en hag cee: Den, Peg ped ee preted bn cae prc. Progen aes caine Ope ca, beeping Petal Li, A rg bd ee

ely Yel reyes
Paes ahd enterto

obinson Rd

Buy any 2-

ty besgs} es bss) Sais Ltd

as Master Technicians on Village Rd.













THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9



EEE
SkyBahamas Airlines introduces Panhandle airports

new service to Marsh Harbour

SKYBAHAMAS Airlines
today celebrates the inaugural
flight of a new afternoon ser-
vice into Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.

The inaugural flight will
depart Nassau at 4.30pm today
and will return to Nassau at
6.20pm.

To celebrate the event, the
airline will host a mix and min-
gle reception at the Faith Con-
vention Centre in Marsh Har-
bour between 6pm and Spm
tonight.

An official ribbon-cutting
ceremony will take place at
Spm. Both local and national
leaders are expected to attend.

“We're excited to extend
our services to the beautiful

RU a ULE

a
=
=
oS
n
=
oS
cc
—
o
=
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a



“We look forward to
providing each customer
with a memorable experience
in an environment where
safety is our culture and
service is our passion.”



SkyBahamas Airlines statement

city of Marsh Harbour, Abaco.
We look forward to providing
each customer with a memo-
rable experience in an envi-

ronment where safety is our
culture and service is our pas-
sion,” the airline said ina
statement.



STUDENTS AND TEACHERS of the Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School in Freeport, Grand Bahama
visited Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham during a visit to Nassau on Monday, February 16. The students

are also expected to visit Eleuthera.

i Kisskadee Drive

ee



Mires ae al) Mele Lo







COMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:
Paved Roads * Water & Sewerage

Phone * Cable ° Electricity ¢ Street Lights
RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:

Tennis Courts * Ornamental Pond Jogging Trails
Playground ¢ Basketball Court Gazebos ¢ Grills

Rapidly developing communtty
ONLY 23 LOTS LEFT

Open \ House

ARY 21, 2009
10AM TO 5PM

On the spot

Bank financing available

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:
Sanctuary Investments Ltd.

Church Street Plaza, Shirley & Church Sts.

325-6456 * 325-6447/9

Persons are able to book
flights to and from Marsh Har-
bour by visiting the SkyBa-
hamas Airline ticket counter
located at the Marsh Harbour
Airport in Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, or the Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)
in Nassau.

Customers can also book
flights through the SkyBa-
hamas reservations office
located at LPIA.

On January 23, 2008, Sky-
Bahamas Airlines launched its
regular service into Marsh
Harbour, making Abaco its
newest travel destination after
with Exuma, Freeport, and
Bimini.

The company gained new
ownership in September 2006,
and under the direction of
Captain Randy Butler, its
focus has been servicing high
demand travel zones with con-
venient flight schedules and
dependable service.

In addition to their regular
flights, they offer on-demand
charter services throughout
the Bahamas and_ the
Caribbean.

SkyBahamas Airlines Ltd
utilises three SAAB 340A 33-
seater aircraft as well as one
Beechcraft 1900D 19-seater.

According to SkyBahamas,
all of its planes are adequate-
ly equipped for safety and out-
standing for cleanliness. Sky-
Bahamas Airlines also pro-
vides full cabin service that
includes cocktails, a compli-
mentary beverage service, and
special Bahamian-made treats
for every customer.

Thee Fohamers
Agrivalteral, Marine Reseurces
ted Agrihavines Expo

Poebruary 26te-2ah, 2008



fight for traffic

m@ FORT WALTON BEACH, Fla.

LEADERS in a Panhandle county are accusing officials in a
nearby county of spreading rumors to weaken their airport busi-
ness, according to Associated Press.

Okaloosa commissioners voted Tuesday night to consider
suing the Panama City-Bay County International Airport for
slanderous attacks.

The Okaloosa officials also questioned a Panama City Beach
Chamber of Commerce e-mail claiming the Air Force would end
a lease for the Northwest Florida Regional Airport near Fort
Walton Beach in 2010. The lease was renewed through 2032.

Joe Tannehill, airport authority chairman in Bay County, says
Okaloosa County leaders appear paranoid about a new airport
scheduled to open in Bay County next year.

















The Lyford Cay Foundations

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS
Application Is Open

The Lyford Cay Foundations are pleased to announce that
applications are now being accepted for academic scholarships
for study at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels
at colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and
the Caribbean.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens and pledge to return to
The Bahamas upon graduation.

Please visit our website at www.lyfordcayfoundation.org
for additional information and application forms.

Forms may also be obtained from high school guidance
counselors, The College of The Bahamas Financial Aid Office, and
the Lyford Cay Foundation office. Please address your application
to: The Chairman, Screening Committee.

DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS IS MARCH 31, 2009.










Your Dreams. Our Mission.

SROATION, ty,
< ¥ Inspired Philanthropy for a Better Bahamas



P. O. Box N 7776, Nassau, Bahamas
T 242.362.4910 / F 242.362.5449
E info@lyfordcayfoundation.org

2 ;
9 W www.lyfordcayfoundation.or;
a ota wxeoâ„¢ yf yf 8



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

: ai Pil kee

4 ert tation Make$ Cent$ i= SE re Lt a soe we :
Nassau y ee Se S a 1
irae Grouper

Honeymoon...

EAT OA Keyevevel

LIONFISH!

Season

December 1, 2008
To
February 28, 2009

| UR MLL
contact BREEF
RO RID
www. breef.org

The closed season allows the fish to breed
successfully. Let’s ensure that we have Nassau
grouper to enjoy in the future!

Q
lf you recognize this Georgeous Gal Third

wish her a Happy 90th Birthday
Lots of love from husband: Patrick,



children: Michael, Ginny, Donna,
TAILS are wagging, pot-
Tim, Terri cakes are howling and pot-

cats are purring louder
than ever in anticipation of
the third Weekend That
Went to the Dogs.

The Grand Bahama
Humane Society said it
is proud to host the
event, which will be held
on March 6 to 8 in
Freeport.

The weekend will kick
off with the Pink Poodle
Ladies Lunch Friday,
March 6.

Attendees are invited to THIS little kitten poses with a Humane Society worker
“while away a spring after-
noon with fine food by
Freeport’s own guest chef

rious garden of the The Good Ole Boys.”
Boathouse, and enjoy the The ladies are encour-
Michael Higgs in the luxu- 4422 sounds of Joe Fox and aged to wear pink and take
part in the “Petit Pink
Silent Auction”.
On Saturday, March 7,

(Fo there will be an “Animal

(é 1} House” night at the GB

Feburary 2009 ey } Yacht Club, and attendees
Se" are invited to “dance the

night away and howl at the

r. " rer » h i f k
OAKWOOD ACADEMY SCHOOL bad Th hal aad the
Other’ from Louisville,
Kentucky.

Sojourner-Douglass

College Reintroduces the
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE Finale
The grand finale of the
Tin PSYCHOLOGY AND Saturday, March 14, 2009 weekend is the ever popu-
lar 24th annual Pet Show
O20Oan on Sunday afternoon.
Cou nye NEL | | ? Pippics met be at least
For students applying to Grades 1-3 four months old to enter
the show.

for September 2009 All dogs must be on
leash and under control at
Applications will be accepted until all times, the Humane Soci-

ety said.
March 6% s009 Local vets and the

Humane Society have com-

; ; iled a list of the various
For further information contact the eroupé and categories

995-95 Visi yi 7 which dogs can enter.
school at 325-3517 or visit our website The cont ciiiors dom't
at: have to be pure-bred — pot-

——s hae ak, cakes and mixed breeds are
www.oakwoodacademybahamas.com cg weieane.





NASSAU GLASS COMPANY

will be

CLOSED
Saturday February 21st

for our company’s

FUN BY

in order to give our staff
a well-deserved break.

5
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We will reopen on Monday February 23rd
We apologise for any inconvenience caused

ee tt ee eee dee ere Mackey Street 393-8165

: Or visit us at waw,sdc.edu
POEL LL 1, ily cia anaiele Pere











THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Claims of
student sex
assault on
six-year-old

FROM page one

ters two days ago, is upset that
the school had not called a gen-
eral meeting to inform parents
of the incident. She also criti-
cised school security for not pre-
venting the attack through vig-
ilant patrols.

It was also claimed teachers
were convened for a general
meeting about the incident last
week. The school's principal did
not return messages up to press
time to confirm this.

"We don't know what's going
on in this school. I would like
answers — these things are sup-
posed to be brought to light so
we know what we're dealing
with. These securities need to
get off their fat (backsides) and
walk ‘round the schools, espe-
cially the primary school
because half of these schools
are open and anybody could
snatch these children," said the
concerned citizen.

"On any given day you get
about 10,000 lil’ five-year-olds
walking the streets — and any-
body could pick them off the
road. Let us know what's going
on so we can protect our chil-
dren better."

Both police and Minister
Bethel said the matter was not
made public because of the sen-
sitivity of the case. Minister
Bethel said that proper school
procedure regarding patrols
might not have been followed in
this case.

Should this be proven at the
end of a ministry review,
"appropriate action” will be
taken, he said.

"The school has established
procedures, which were not fol-
lowed in the particular instance.
The senior teachers and secu-
rity are supposed to walk
around and check all of the
blind spots around that school
after school, make sure that all
persons who are supposed to
be on buses are out in front of
the school.

"They are supposed to make
sure no one is behind in the
classes, also there are supposed
to be perimeter checks at the
times when students are out of
the classrooms. If in this
instance the established proce-
dures were not followed prop-
erly, action is taken by the min-
istry to address those prob-
lems," he said.

Supt Moss confirmed that
there was active police investi-
gation into the allegations. He
said that the attack involved at
least two perpetrators. Howev-
er, he did not specify the nature
of the assault.

Police hope to bring the case
to a swift resolution. Charges
have yet to be filed in connec-
tion with the incident.

"T think we can bring conclu-
sion to this in a little bit, in the
next couple of days," Supt Moss
said.

When asked why the incident
was not brought to public atten-
tion he said: "If the investiga-
tion had revealed the impor-
tance of alerting other students
at the school, they would have
gone ahead in that end. But we
don't think this was a case
where we need to at this stage
make an alert to hype up par-
ents."

Minister Bethel said it was
not the ministry's place to make
announcements on unproved
allegations that are before the
police.

"We can't presume that
because an allegation is made
it is proven. We can't presume
and start making announce-
ments. . that’s why we have a
police force. When matters are
brought to our attention we
have our officials produce state-
ments so that we are able to see
upon review that it has some
basis and we then immediately
refer it to police. To make state-
ments on matters like this that
are under investigation preju-
dices the investigation,” he said.

Up to press time no suspects
were in custody.

GB Power Company
majority shareholder ‘sells

50% stake in Caribbean
operations holding firm’

FROM page one

Taga will now become Marubeni’s joint venture partner for the
Caribbean, both holding a 50 per cent stake. This effectively means
that the Abu Dhabi company will now hold a 27.7 per cent stake in
Grand Bahama Power Company, the same as Marubeni.

This will only be slightly larger than the 25 per cent interest
held by Canadian power giant Emera, which acquired its interest in
November 2008 by buying Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent
stake in BISX-listed ICD Utilities for $41 million.

Yesterday’s deal means that Grand Bahama Power Company will
now be supported by three global utility heavyweights from Japan,

Canada and the Middle East.

What Taga will bring to the table is unclear, but with the deal set
to close at the end of the 2009 first quarter, it said yesterday it would
have an operational role and Board representation at all the
Caribbean utilities, including Grand Bahama Power Company.

Peter Barker-Homek, Taqa’s chief executive, said: “The trans-
action we bring to you today is another endorsement of our strate-
gic objective to deliver profitable growth in multiple markets
where we can access stable cash flows, which complement and
enhance our existing diversified energy portfolio.

“Taga shares the same outlook on long-term investment as
Marubeni, and brings solid experience in power sector and a strong
financial position to the joint venture. Together, we have previously
delivered successful partnerships in other regions, having jointly
invested in power generation and water production globally.

“Our joint venture in the region will act as a platform to explore
multiple opportunities, beyond the downstream segment, which may
assist in creating a more sustainable energy environment for

Caribbean countries.”

Apart from the Bahamas investment, Marubeni’s Caribbean

interests include:

e An 80 per cent equity interest in Jamaica Public Service Com-
pany in Jamaica, which owns and operates ten generating facilities,
including six hydroelectric plants. These plants expand Taqa’s
downstream business into this sustainable energy source.

¢ A 39 per cent equity interest in PowerGen, which is an IPP that
supplies 80 per cent of total electricity demand in Trinidad and

Tobago.

e A 25.5 per cent equity interest in Curacao Utilities Company,
which supplies electric, steam and water to refinery plant of
Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. in Curagao Island.

Taqq has a $24 billion asset base, and in 2008 generated $4.6 bil-

lion in revenues.

Taga employs 2,800 people from 38 different nations and oper-
ates from its offices in Abu Dhabi; Ann Arbor, Michigan;
Aberdeen; Amsterdam; Calgary and The Hague. This footprint is
further extended through alliances with partners across Africa,
the Middle East, Europe, North America and India.

touring the Grand Bahama Shipyard,
the Freeport Container Port, the Garden
of Groves, and finally Dolphin Encoun-
ters.

Mr Liangyu will leave the Bahamas from
Grand Bahama’s International Airport at
9am today to return to the People’s Repub-
lic of China.

FROM page one

China's Vice Premier of State

Following the tour, Mr Liangyu boarded
a plane at the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport and was accompanied by
Mr Symonette on his flight to Grand
Bahama. Mr Liangyu spent the evening

diplomatic officers followed him.

Also present was Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette, who was accompanied by the
Bahamas’ Ambassador to China Elma
Campbell.






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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

Agape Chitin Selool

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour desapel Chapel
FO. ae APLOTLO, Marsh Rarbour, Abaco, Patanias

Nau Pe ep

TEACHER POSITIONS

Primary Grades

&
ATMEL Mra aa oy School

UR Ree eRe aCe MCUs

Ce Ue emer oun)

mM ee Mat ie Oe a
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Applicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere to toe Staterent of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel

Teachers must aso have al Ieast a Pachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Erahamnas with work status,
Qualtying persons art asked to contact te office a
Telephone (242) 341-411 830 AM. ~ 346 PM, or fax (242!) 301-4771
oc venil oor websibe ~ wiewagapeschool come ~ for jab or student applications
Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values ag well as a very high standard of education

and is approved by the Bahamas Minisiry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality,



THE TRIBUNE

Police officers alleged to have

‘hustled’ or extorted money

FROM page one

to find out what had happened
this time.

“When I came out he told the
DJ, ‘OK you can turn the music
back on.’ So he pulled me over
in the corner and said: “Look
here now, I understand a lot of
money is being made in the
back here. I already have the
figure in my head. You need to
take care of me. I looking for
$500 a week.’

“So I said to him, ‘$500 a
week? I might as well come
work for you.’ He said to me,
‘Man, $500 a week and I’ll keep
everybody off ya back. That’s
what I lookin for.’ But I told
him: ‘Let’s talk another day, I
can’t deal with that right now.’
But what I really didn’t want is
for him to turn off the music
again because that would run
all my customers. But I really
was just trying to put him off,
because I am not in a position
to give this man $500 a week
for doing his job when I am not
breaking the law,” he said.

The second case, involving
20-year-old Travis Brown,
occurred two days ago when Mr
Brown was in the East Street

area.

According to Mr Brown,
three police officers approached
him and informed him that
there was a warrant out for his
arrest. Handcuffing him and
putting him in the back of their
vehicle, the officers drove
around for a time before ques-
tioning him as to “what he was
going to do.”

When he asked what his
options were, Mr Brown said
he was told that he could either
spend the next few days in a
holding cell, or he could pay
them a “fine of $100.”

“So I told him I didn’t have
$100, but I could call my broth-
er. But he asked me how much
Thad,” he said.

It is here that the officer, who
was in the back seat with Mr
Brown, reached into Mr
Brown’s trouser pocket, took
out $50 and split it between
himself and the officer in the
front passenger seat.

Having already essentially
robbed the young man, the offi-

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Bahamas State Council Prepares for an exciting

5 9. ANNUAL GENERAL CONVENTION

OF THE PENTECOSTAL ASSEMBLIES OF THE WORLD INC.

MARCH Ist - 6th, 2009

Greater Bethel Cathedral,
Faith Way, off Blue Hill Road South
(Corner of Carlton E. Francis School)

EARLY MORNING PRAYER ----- 5:00AM - 6:00AM
DAY SESSIONS ------- 12:00no0o0n - 2:00pm

Host Pastor
Suffragan Bishop
Christopher Minnis

roeme; "GOD WILL DO WHATEVER HE SAYS"

EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE —- 7:30pm

"May word be that goeth forth out of my mouth; tt shall not return unto me void,

but tt shall accomplish that which I please...

Bishop Horace Smith

Suffragan Bishop Winston Redwood

Suffragan Bishop Wilfred Mackey
Bishop Ellis Farrington J.P.
Rev. Hilda Symonette

Bishop Ellis Farrington

Suff. Bishop Ezekiel Munnings

" Scripture text: Isaiah 55: 7-11

cers then had to take him to
Quackoo Street Police Station
to have the handcuffs removed
as they did not have a key.

The officers then dropped the
young man off at Spotless
Cleaners on East Street. Mr
Brown, like the first com-
plainant, has filed a report with
the Complaints and Corruption
Unit.

This practice of “shaking
down” persons and demanding
“protection money” is not new
in the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, The Tribune was told.

However, as the force con-
tinues to evolve it has taken a
no-nonsense approach to cor-
ruption, and has publicly placed
officers before the courts —
sending a strong and unequivo-
cal message that where corrup-
tion is found, it will be weeded
out.

Yesterday, Acting Commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson said
such activities must be stopped.
He encouraged citizens to con-
tinue to come forward to report
incidents at the Force’s Com-
plaints and Corruption Unit.

Man charged
with murder
of Oscarsin
Williams
FROM page one

15. Twelve witnesses are listed
on court dockets. Fowler, who
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane was not required
to plead to the murder charge.
A preliminary inquiry will be
held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence
against him for him to stand
trial in the Supreme Court.
The case was adjourned to
April 14 for the commence-
ment of the preliminary
inquiry. Fowler was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday. He is represented by
lawyers, Ian Cargill and Tai
Pinder.

Pastor Knowles

Evening Worship Speakers:

Bishop Ellis Farrington J.P.

Suffragan Bishop Ezekiel Munnings
District Elder Lilymae Knowles
Suffragan Bishop Christopher Minnis
Bishop Horace E. Smith, Chicago Illinois,
Presiding Bishop of the P .A. W. Ine.
Prophet Pastor Jason Strachan

Donv Miss: Yoww blessing! (Be there!/





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

St. Cecilia’s Catholic

Church



Cultural & Heritage Site, Arawak Cay
Saturday 21st, February, 2009

Venue

THE TRIBUNE



Woman dies after

suffering seizure
in swimming pool

FROM page one

seizures for nearly a decade and
suffered a seizure while swim-
ming,” said a statement from
the family. “She never regained
consciousness.”

St Andrew’s school, which is
now on its winter break and was
informed of the swimming acci-
dent in its pool late Tuesday,
said the school has been in con-
tact with Mrs Roberts’ family
“who remain in our thoughts
and prayers.”

School principal Robert F

Club, of which Mrs Roberts was
a member, “for the use of its
pool to offer private swimming
lessons to the open communi-
ty.”

Mrs Roberts, owner of the
local restaurant Nelly’s Deli,
was carrying out routine train-
ing exercises designed for Fit-
ness and Master swimmers in
one of the pool's lanes on Tues-
day afternoon when the inci-
dent occurred.

She had been a member of
the club for about a year and a
half and swam about twice a

Mrs Roberts was swimming
“in the lane at the far side of
the pool, which is designated
for masters,” a statement
released yesterday by Carol
Misiewicz, the lawyer for the
directors of SWIFT, said.

“The learn to swim pro-
gramme was going on in the
other five lanes, separated by
one free lane,” said the state-
ment.

"After about 40 minutes of
training in the pool, the fitness
swimmer apparently had a
seizure in the water and was

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week, according to the swim observed face-down in the
club. water.

“A parent jumped into the

water to pull her out, and

SWIFT Swimming’s Coach

Tribune returns to Freeport Maria Piazza who was conduct-

ing a class at the time, immedi-
FROM page one

ately began performing CPR.
Moments later the parent of a
Tuesday, February 11, was the last day that The Tribunes were competitive swimmer arrived
flown to the Family Islands by Bahamasair. The newspaper had to who happened to be a trained,
stop all Bahamasair deliveries because of the airline’s exorbitant registered nurse, and took over
increase in cargo rates. the CPR while the coach con-
In the meantime, The Tribune went online to provide an elec- tinued to assist. She was able to
tronic newspaper for Family Island readers. This was enthusiasti- revive the swimmer by the time
cally received by subscribers who were on line, but it presenteda the ambulance arrived. The
problem for readers without computers. swimmer was taken to Doctor’s
However, behind the scenes Bellevue Business Depot in Marsh Hospital accompanied by her
Harbour, Abaco, and in Freeport, Grand Bahama, in response to husband and the parent/nurse
the demand of their customers, made their own arrangements for and was handed over to the
delivery of the newspapers. As Bellevue Business Depot in each doctor on duty at the hospital
island is paying for the transport of the newspapers, the cost of The alive,” the statement said.
Tribune will be slightly higher for subscribers in both Marsh Har- Earlier yesterday, a family
bour and Freeport. friend said that Mrs Roberts
The Tribune is now available online at was “clinging to life” and
The newspaper is posted online at 2pm on the day of publication depending on life support. Mrs

— Monday through Saturday. Roberts remained in a coma

Wade said the school has a con-
tract with SWIFT Swimming










*FOOD & DRINKS until her death later yesterday
afternoon.

SWIFT Club explained that

BOOKS ETC. i OT (Os = its swim club is open to adults

NOTICE is hereby given that JADE GREENSWORD of | ©Ver the age of 18 years, who
HIGH VISTA DRIVE, P.O. BOX EE-16486, NASSAU, are given an assessment before
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for starting any training.

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization The Directors/Head Coach-
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who | ¢s for SWIFT Swimming, Andy
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should and Nancy Knowles had left
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement Nassau Tuesday for Alabama
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4! day of | for the SEC Championships
February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and to visit their son. However

and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. they are now on their way back
to Nassau.

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THE TRIBUNE

S '
T

HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19,

n By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he Bahamas Associa-

tion of Independent

Secondary Schools’

reigning champions
survived the most anticipated
matchup of the Hugh Campbell
Tournament’s opening round
with a high scoring second half
and dominating play inside by
arguably the country’s most dom-
inant big man.

Westminster Diplomats - 54

Jack Hayward Wildcats - 45

Rashard Morley had one of his
best performances of the year
when it mattered most, leading
the Diplomats with a double dou-
ble of “Dwight Howard-like” pro-
portions — 17 points, 22 rebounds
and two blocked shots.

Morley’s tip in gave the Diplo-
mats a comfortable 50-45 lead
with less than one minute remain-
ing, sealing the win.

After overcoming a first quar-
ter (12-8) and half-time (25-21)
deficit, the Diplomats outscored
the Wildcats 33-20 in the second
half, limiting them to just 10
points in each respective quarter.

Continuing momentum estab-
lished in the third quarter, West-
minster built a 43-37 lead on the
heels of an acrobatic lay-up by
Larry Smith with 3:36 left to play.

A resilient Wildcats squad
clawed back into the game, after
forcing turnovers on three of four
trips upcourt for the Diplomats.

Edison Davis tied the game at
45 with a running lay-up to cap an
8-2 run.

After giving up two turnovers
on backcourt and traveling penal-
ties, Shaquille Bain came up with
the biggest turnover of the night
when he played the passing lanes
perfectly and intercepted a pass.
Bain was fouled on his way to the
basket and made one of two free
throws.

After the Wildcats were sig-
naled for a technical foul, BAISS
MVP Christorr Stuart made both
free throws to give the Diplomats
a 48-45 lead with 1:10 left to play.

After a miss by Smith, Morley
tipped in what turned out to be
the game clinching lay-up.

Stuart led the Diplomats with
19 points (eight in the fourth
quarter), five rebounds and five
steals.

Smith finished with nine points,
nine rebounds and three assists
while Bain had his three points
and three steals all in the fourth
quarter.

Davis, Kenrick Hanna, and
Justin Monroe all finished with
eight points apiece.

Dimaggio Wilson and sharp
shooting point guard Chavano
Hield finished with six points
apiece.

Diplomats head coach Geno

PAGE

15



Bullard said the high expectations
placed on his team may have con-
tributed to its slow start but he
said his team adjusted well in the
second half.

“We had a long layoff between
BAISS and our first game in this
tournament, so they came out a
little slow, but we know we have
a lot of pressure on us... A lot of
people out there are expecting us
to do well and my guys were able
to recover and did what they had
to do to come out here and get
this first win. Now we just have to
focus on our next matchup and
move on.”

Bullard, who has coached his
Diplomats to consecutive BAISS
senior boys titles, said the win
goes a long way in validating pub-
lic expectation and the efforts of
the entire BAISS.

“This win was big and allevi-
ates pressure not only for us but
for our whole association,” he
said. “The private schools were
not doing too well at this point
and we feel like we have to shoul-
der the load not only for us but
for the rest of our association
also.”

The Diplomats advance to face
the Bimini Big Game 2pm today
in the opening session.

Game Notes: Shaquille Kemp
and Shaquille Bain both came off
the bench to provide key contri-
butions for the Diplomats —
Bain’s key steal and free throw
and Fernander finished with six
points and seven rebounds. The
second quarter featured three ties
and four lead changes. Morely
gave the Diplomats their first tie
at 12 all and their first lead 17-
16, both in the second quarter.

Stuart ignited the Diplomats in
the third quarter when he was
fouled on a dunk opportunity
which sent the crowd into a fren-
zy and changed his team’s body
language. His free throws gave
the Diplomats a 33-31 lead, their
first of the second half...

In addition, the third day of the
27th Annual Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic featured the
first slate of games for Family
Island teams with many of the
nation's powerhouses in the sec-
ond city making early statements
in decisive wins.

Catholic High Crusaders - 55

South Andros Cheetahs - 38

The Crusaders’ size and ath-
leticism turned what looked to be
a competitive game early into a
lopsided affair for much of the
second half.

Tied at five in the opening
moments of the first quarter, the
Crusaders ended the period on a
10-2 run to take command of the
game. They led 17-5 heading into
the second.

Backed by a stifling half court
trap, the Crusaders forced a series
of turnovers, which translated to
easy baskets and extended their
lead to a 33-18 advantage at the

Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



GOING UP STRONG — Temple Christian Suns’ Kemico Sands...

ts

2009





FLYING HIGH — Westminster Diplomats’ Shaquille Bain...

half.

The Crusaders reached their
biggest lead of the game on a
Kenneth Taylor three pointer,
which gave his team a 40 - 21 lead
in the third quarter.

Taylor finished with 10 points,
while Delario Rolle led the Cru-
saders with 12.

Kalim Munninigs finished with
eight points and 10 rebounds
while Carlton Forbes finished
with a double double - 11 points,
11 rebounds and four blocks.

The Cheetahs’ Cordero Smith
led all scorers with 15 points while
Leonardo Forbes chipped in with
nine.

Tabernacle Baptist Falcons -

50

Temple Christian Suns - 24

After giving up eight points in
the first quarter, the Falcons
allowed just two field goals over
the next two quarters in a route of
the Suns for an impressive open-
ing win in the tournament.

Tied at six early in the game,
the Falcons ended the quarter on
a 13-2 run to take a 19-8 lead at
the end of the first quarter.

The Falcons clamped down
defensively in the second, giving
up just one field goal and a long-
range three pointer from the
Suns’ Randy Smith.

Astin Lewis, who finished with
a game high 14 points, outscored
the Falcons on his own in the
quarter with five.

Tabernacle led 29-11 at half-
time.

The third produced much of
the same as the Suns were again
held to three points in the quar-
ter, a basket by Kemico Sands
and one of two free throws by
Mario Stubbs.

The Falcons took a 41-14 lead
into the final quarter and cruised
to a seemingly effortless 26-point
win.

The Suns managed to outscore
the Falcons in the final quarter
10-9, all coming from Stubbs, who
led the Suns with 11.

Lewis led the Falcons in scor-
ing while Robin Lafrance chipped
in with eight and Sam Beauzile
and Arlington Wells added six
points apiece.

Bimini Big Game - 44

Alpha Omega Owls - 23

After a closely contested open-
ing half, Bimini outscored their
opponents by 20 in the final two
quarters to pull away for the
blowout win.

The teams posted just eight
field goals and 10 points between
them both in one of the lowest
scoring quarters of the tourna-
ment as the Owls led 6-4 at the
end of the first.

Bimini took their first lead of
the game midway through the
second quarter on a lay-up by
Cleo Sears to give his team a 10-
9 lead.

Sears followed with a pair of
assists to Tristan Kelly and the
Big Game took a slim 14-13 lead
into the half.

They began to pull away easily

in the third, outscoring the Owls
15-3.

Bimini reached a double-digit
advantage late in the third when
Sears delivered another assist to

Kelly.

Jack Levarity ended the quar-
ter with a three-point play to give
the Big Game a 29-17 lead head-
ed into the fourth quarter.

In another dominant quarter,
the Big Game outscore the Owls
15-6.

They reached a 20 point advan-
tage, the largest of the game, on a
lay-up by Kelly to make the score
39-19.

Sears finished with 17 points
and five assists, Kelly added eight
points, Levarity finished with sev-
en points and 10 rebounds and
Kirirrie Brown added 10 points
and nine rebounds.

Devan Hepburn led the Owls
with 11 points.

Sunland Baptist Stingers - 42

Mt Carmel Cavaliers - 31

The Stingers sported a bal-
anced scoring attack where their
leading scorers finished with just
six points apiece. However the
distribution was enough to out-
last the Cavaliers in the fourth
quarter.

Trailing 31-24 heading into the
fourth, the Cavaliers opened the
quarter on a 7-3 run capped by
Keron Pratt's lay-up to bring his
team within three, 34-31.

The Stingers responded with a
run of their own, ending the game
on an 8-0 flourish over the last
1:30.

Troy Bullard and Tronard
Nicholls each paced the Stingers
with six, Rashad Knowles and
Johnathon Moss each finished
with five, while Valentino
Mitchell added four.

Pratt led the Cavaliers with 10
and Rashad Ferguson finished
with nine.

McGrady says
he’s out for
season with

knee injury...
See page 17

Ha Tay

Session One

lpm - Tabernacle Baptist
Falcons vs. Winner of Jor-
dan Prince William/Bishop
Michael Eldon

2pm - Bimini Big Game
vs. Westminster Diplomats

3pm - Catholic High Cru-
saders vs. Winner of Eight
Mile Rock Bluejays/St Paul’s

4pm - Sunland Baptist
Stingers vs. Winner of North
Eleuthera/St George’s
Jaguars

Session Two
(Elimination Games)

6pm - NCA Crusaders vs.
QC Comets

7pm - CW Saunders
Cougars vs. RM Bailey Pac-
ers

8pm - South Andros
Cheetahs vs. St John’s
Giants

9pm - Galilee Miracles vs.
Kingsway Saints



The Stingers led just 9-8 after
the first quarter, but Bullard came
off the bench and sparked a 6-0
run.

The Cavs missed six consecu-
tive free throws during the run as
the Stingers took a 17-10 lead.
They led 20-14 at the half.

Mt Carmel trimmed the deficit,
25-24 midway through the third
quarter, however the Stingrays

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



NOTICE

The Bahamas Public Services Union
Contributory Medical Plan will conduct a
Membership Meeting for The Medical Plan
Members Only, at 7:00p.m. on Friday, March
6, 2009 at the Bahamas Public Services Union
Meeting Hall, East Street South, off Soldier
Road.

All Members are urged to attend

Refreshments will be served following the
meeting.

Stephen J. Miller
General Secretary



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INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



MESERET DEFAR, of Ethiopia, kisses the tracks after winning the 5000m during the GE Athletics Gala at

Stockholm Globe Arena, Sweden, Wednesday...

Defar breaks women’s
5,000 indoor record

n By STEPHAN NASSTROM
AP Sports Writer

STOCKHOLM (AP) —
Meseret Defar of Ethiopia
broke the women's 5,000-meter
indoor world record by more
than three seconds at the GE
Gala on Wednesday night.

Defar was timed in 14 min-
utes, 24.37 seconds. Tirunesh




Dibaba, also of Ethiopia, set the
old mark of 14:27.42 in 2007.

With excellent pacemaking,
Detar was two or three seconds
under Dibaba's split times
throughout the race.

During the final laps, many
of the fans at the sold out Eric-
sson Globe Arena stood up to
cheer her on.

With the win, Defar extended

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KHOMINIE ORLANDO SÂ¥LVANUS.
ADDERLEY OF P.O. BOX 58-52479, SEAWELLS MANOR,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, && apolying to the Minister responsible
for Matianality and Citizenship, for registration‘naturalization 2
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration’ naturalization should mot be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
teanty-aight days fram the 127TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Catizenship, PS.Box














N-7147, Nassau, Baharnas.

(AP Photo: Jessica Gow)

her unbeaten indoor streak to
18 races since March 2003.

Defar took the lead with
about 3,000 meters left in the
34-lap race and lapped most of
the seven other finishers twice.

Maria Konovalova of Russia
was a distant runner-up in
15:42.37.

It was the seventh record set
at the Globe since 1989.

In the men's 800, 2004
Olympic champion Yuriy
Borzakovskiy outkicked Ismail
Ahmed Ismail of Sudan for his
fifth victory in seven races at
the Globe.

Borzakovskiy, who has never
finished worse than second
here, clocked a relatively slow
1:48.13. Ismail, the Olympic sil-
ver medalist last year, was sev-
en-hundredths of a second
behind.

Olympic champion Wilfred
Bungei of Kenya finished fifth
in 1:50.11.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 17

NBA Today McGrady says he’s out for

season with knee injury

n By The Associated Press—

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, February 20

San Antonio at Detroit (8 pm
EST). The Pistons have won
just two of their past 11 at the
Palace of Auburn Hills and are
14-14 at home after going 34-7
last season.

STARS

Tuesday

— Dwight Howard, Magic,
had a career-high 45 points to
go with 19 rebounds and eight
blocks in Orlando's 107-102 win
over Charlotte.

— Nate Robinson, Knicks,
had 32 points and 10 rebounds
to lead New York to a 112-107
overtime victory over San
Antonio.

— Antawn Jamison, Wizards,
had 29 points and 11 rebounds
in Washington's 111-103 win
over Minnesota.

— Richard Jefferson, Bucks,
scored 29 points and grabbed
11 rebounds to lead Milwaukee
to a 92-86 victory at Detroit.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Kevin Durant followed an
All-Star weekend to remember
with a career-high 47 points, but
Chris Paul's driving layup in the
closing seconds gave New
Orleans a 100-98 win over Okla-
homa City. Durant had scored a
record 46 points in the Rookie
Challenge game last year and
won the inaugural HORSE
competition during All-Star fes-
tivities in Phoenix over the
weekend.

WELCOME BACK,

BIG GUY

Andrei Kirilenko returned
from an ankle injury to spark a
key fourth-quarter run and help
the Utah Jazz beat the Mem-
phis Grizzlies 117-99 Tuesday
night.

C J Miles scored 24 points
and Deron Williams had 20
points and 15 assists. Kirilenko
finished with 14 points.

SO FAR, SO GOOD

The Phoenix Suns looked like
a different team in interim
coach Alvin Gentry's debut,
routing the Los Angeles Clip-
pers 140-100 Tuesday night.
Leandro Barbosa scored 24
points and Amare Stoudemire
added 23 for the Suns, who had
81 points by halftime in their
first game since Terry Porter
was fired as coach.

SWAPS

The Thunder acquired cen-
ter Tyson Chandler from New
Orleans in a deal that sends vet-
erans Joe Smith and Chris
Wilcox to the Hornets. For New
Orleans, the trade provides an
opportunity to shed salary in an
uncertain economy by adding
two contracts that expire at the
end of the season.

The Sacramento Kings
acquired veteran guard Sam
Cassell from Boston for a con-
ditional second-round draft pick
in 2015. The 39-year-old Cas-
sell hasn't played this season for
the Celtics, who acquired him in
early March before their run to
the NBA title.

MISFIRING

Richard Jefferson scored 29
points, Ramon Sessions added
17 and the Milwaukee Bucks
beat Detroit 92-86 on Tuesday
night, sending .

SPEAKING

"Tam so tired. But today is a
triple joy. I came back from my
injury, we win and I have a
birthday.”

— Utah's Andrei Kirilenko
after returning ahead of schedule

ANNOUNCING,
the appaintment of Toast Master Ron
Bethel as a Director of Storm Frame
Windows. Ron, maried to Ruthnell,

n By CHRIS DUNCAN



HOUSTON (AP) — Hous-
ton Rockets star Tracy
McGrady will have surgery on
his left knee and miss the rest of
the season.

The star forward said on his
Web site Wednesday that the
pain has been persistent and he
will have microfracture surgery.
He's confident he'll return next
season.

McGrady is Houston's third-
leading scorer. He had arthro-
scopic surgery in May and has
missed 18 games this season
because of his sore knee. He
said before the All-Star break
he wanted to consult with doc-
tors before deciding on the best
course of treatment.

ESPN.com first reported that
McGrady was out for the sea-
son after the Rockets beat the
Nets on Tuesday night.

Rockets spokesman Nelson
Luis said Wednesday morning
that the team had no comment.
But Luis said McGrady met
with a doctor in New York on
Tuesday and had another out-
of-state doctor's appointment
scheduled Wednesday.

McGrady said he would have
the surgery "immediately."

"It has been extremely frus-
trating dealing with the knee
injury this season,” McGrady
said. "It's been tough on me
both physically and mentally
and while we've come to this
conclusion after much deliber-
ation, we truly feel this is best
for both me and the Rockets in
the long term."

The Rockets have won their
last two games without
McGrady and 13 of 19 without
him this season. Houston is 33-
21 overall this season and in
fifth place in the Western Con-
ference.

Houston acquired McGrady
in June 2004 in a trade with
Orlando, but the seven-time
All-Star has been a disappoint-
ment here in four seasons. His
scoring numbers have steadily
decreased while his health
issues have increased.

McGrady missed 34 games in
2005-06 and 10 in 2006-07 with
back pain, then sat out 12 games
last season with a bone bruise
and tendinitis in his left knee,
prompting him to have the pro-
cedure in May.

McGrady said on the day
before training camp began in



HOUSTON ROCKETS guard Tracy McGrady (1) shoots while defended by
Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol (left) in the third quarter of a game
on February 4 in Memphis, Tenn. McGrady led the Rockets with 21

points, but he Grizzlies won 104-93...

late September that his knee
was not healed from the surgery
and was still painful.

By December, McGrady was
skipping the second games of
back-to-back sets and took two
weeks off in January to rest his
knee. He returned and played
seven games, then stopped play-
ing after going 1-for-9 in the
Rockets’ 124-112 loss to Mil-
waukee on Feb. 9.

Two days later, McGrady said
he was going to seek doctors to
discuss his knee, but expected to
play again this season. He
added that he would only con-
sider surgery as a last resort.

"We've tried just playing
through it, taking back-to-backs
off, and extended periods of
rest," McGrady wrote. "But
none of it has really been effec-
tive in limiting the discomfort
and allowing me to just go out
there and play."

McGrady is due to make $23

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC ANTOINE NAPOLEON
OF P.O. BOX CR-56272, MONTELL HEIGHTS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NORVELYNE
AZOR of Robinson Road, intend to change my son’s
name from MAX STEVENSON FERTILIEN to MAX
STEVENSON AZOR. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.



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(AP Photo: Nikki Boertman)

million next season, the last year
of his contract. Considering the
expectations, he’s been a bust in
Houston as the Rockets have
gone winless in three playoff
series.

But team owner Les Alexan-
der said before Tuesday's game
that the Rockets would not try
to deal McGrady before Thurs-
day's trade deadline. Alexan-
der also said he still believes the
29-year-old McGrady is a key
component to making the
Rockets contenders again.

"I always thought he was
injured and had (health) prob-
lems," Alexander said. "He's a
great player when he's healthy,
and a great competitor."



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TARA TONISHKA ADDERLEY
OF P.O. BOX SB-52479, SEAWELLS MANOR, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

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SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL







PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Davis Cup: Bahamas will get back in Zone One eventually

THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Federation has announced the
final list of players that are
expected to travel to the Amer-
icas Zone One Davis Cup tie in
Paraguay next month.

As expected, the team will be
made up of basically the same
group of young players that the
federation has been grooming
to take over from the old guard
that included Roger Smith,
Mark Knowles and Mark
Merklein.

Considered to be one of the
veterans of the group is Bjorn
Munroe, who is returning after a
hiatus of a couple years.

Munroe came home in
December for the federation’s
invitational tournament that
served as a qualifier for the
national team and he performed
exceptionally well, just falling
short of advancing to the final
that featured reigning champion
Devin Mullings against Timo-
thy Neilly.

Munroe, at age 30, brings
some of the experience and
maturity that the team lacks in
the absence of touring pro Mark
Knowles, who has opted not to
travel to South America where
the home crowd has been very
unruly in the past.

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.

The Candidate should have the following requirements:
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Attention: Office Administrator, or email

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NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this

position will be contacted.



Instead, Knowles has decid-
ed to continue his tour on the
ATP circuit with Indian Mahesh
Bhupathi. They are currently
sitting in second place in the
computer rankings following
their final appearance at the
Australian Open, the first
Grand Slam tournament for the
year.

Before taking a break to recu-
perate from injuries, Munroe
had played for five years on the
team. He joins both Mullings
and Marvin Rolle, who have six
years under their belt and Neil-
ly, who is in his second year.
The team will once again be
captained by John Farrington,
who has played for seven years.

The Davis Cup tie is sched-
uled for March 6-8, but it will
probably be a very emotional
one for Munroe and his team-
mates. Munroe is mourning the
loss of his younger brother
Lavaughn, who was tragically
killed in a car accident Sunday
on Midshipman Road in
Lucaya, Grand Bahama.

Lavaughn, 26, was a former
Davis Cup player who played
in three ties for the Bahamas,

teaming up

eek STUBBS
Knowles,
Munnings
and his j
brother
Bjorn, at
least once.
At the time, |
Lavaughn
was consid-
ered one of
the two
players that
the BLTA q
had hoped C)PIN
to groom tO mmm
take over

the reigns

from Knowles and the rest of
the old guard.

Lavaughn and Dentry Mor-
timer were two of the key play-
ers who were playing at the time
when the Bahamas was going
through the transitional period
of either staying in Zone One
or being relegated to Zone IL.

As it tuned out, both
Lavaughn and Dentry experi-
enced some disciplinary prob-
lems on one of the ties and it
hurt the Bahamas’ chances of

_

ION

GN828

Ministry of Finance

NOTICE

THE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES REGULATION ACT, 2000

Notice is hereby given that the Governor, pursuant to
Section 18(1)(a)(iii) of the Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000, has revoked by Order dated the
11th February 2009 the bank and trust licence granted
on 13th August.1998 to Pribanco Internacional Ltd.
(now called “Cabex Internacional Ltd.”) and amended
from time to time, on the grounds that the company
has been placed into liquidation.

Wendy Craigg
Govenor

The Central Bank of The Bahamas

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staying in zone one. Eventually,
the Bahamas was dropped all
the way down to Zone III.

In 2002, the BLTA assembled
what was considered then the
"Dream Team" of the next gen-
eration of players with John Far-
rington captaining the squad
made up of Mortimer, the
Munroe brothers and Mullings
playing together for the first
time in Ecuador.

However, the Bahamas was
blanked 5-0.

And to avoid being relegated
to Zone II, Knowles and
Merklein teamed up with
Mullings and Marvin Rolle at
the National Tennis Center in
September, pulling off a huge
3-2 victory over Mexico to keep
our hopes alive.

But it was short lived as in
2003, Farrington worked with a
new combo that comprised of
Mullings, Rolle, Matthew Sands
and Davin Russell, only to fall
victim to Peru and Venezuela
before being relegated to Zone
II in 2004.

In 2005 in Colombia, the
Bahamas was relegated all the
way to Zone III where we
remained until 2007 when the
present team, Minus H’Cone
Thompson, who has been
replaced by Neilly, was re-ele-
vated to Zone IT in Guatemala.

Had it not been for the disci-
plinary problems that those
players encountered back in
2002, who knows where the
Bahamas could have been
today. Many felt that the young
core of players had the potential
to at least keep us in Zone One
and possibly by now be chal-
lenging for a spot in the presti-
gious World Group.

While Lavaughn, who ended
up hosting a Tennis Academy
in Grand Bahama where he was
passing on his expertise, has just
passed away, Mortimer is no
longer playing, but he has been
working with some of the
younger players in New Provi-
dence.

Without a shadow of a doubt,
Mortimer had the best chance of
cracking the elite ATP profes-
sional ranking than all of the
other players. At least one of
the Munroe brothers, if not the
two, along with Ryan Sweeting,
who migrated to the US, were
next in line.

Presently, Mullings has now
surpassed them all with the best
ATP rankings, but Neilly is a

champion of the Orange Bowl,
the highly acclaimed junior ten-
nis tournament. We just haven't
had any one who has come close
to the status of Smith, Knowles
or Merklein, the three top play-
ers who excelled at the senior
level.

In time, as this group of young
players continues to excel, the
Bahamas will eventually get
back into Zone One and we will
have another player or two play-
ing competitive on the circuit.

It's just unfortunate that
we've lost some of the best play-
ers along the way, including the
late Lavaughn Munroe. May his
soul rest in peace.

NATIONAL STADIUM

IN SIGHT?

IT seems as if the arrival of
the high powered Chinese dele-
gation to the country this week
has brought some good news for
our sporting arena.

While they didn't specifically
address the matter, Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette said the much anticipated
national stadium at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Center will
finally become a reality.

The former PLP Government
had initiated the plans for the
reconstruction of the sports
complex, including a new track
and field stadium, baseball and
softball parks and another mul-
ti-purpose indoor arena.

The first phase of the project,
the state-of-the-art national sta-
dium, was to have already been
completed.

However, when the FNM
government took office in 2007,
the entire project was put on
hold. While track and field and
softball is still functioning, the
sport that suffered the most was
baseball.

Although there are two
vibrant junior leagues being
staged at Freedom Farm and
the St Andrew's Field of
Dreams every weekend, there
is no baseball being played at
the senior level because of the
lack of a proper venue.

And in these tough economic
times, the arrival of the Chinese
should bring a ray of hope, shin-
ing on the fact that work on
these sporting facilities will com-
mence soon.

We look forward to the con-
struction progress, which should
also help to decrease our unem-
ployment rate.

NOTICE

MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE
NATIONAL YOUTH LEADERS CERTIFICATION

PROGRAMME

The Youth Department of the Ministry of Youth,

Sports and Culture will convene it’s Annual
Youth Leaders Certification Programme on
Monday, 23rd February 2009, beginning at 6:
00 p.m. at the Ministry’s Headquarters, Ground
Floor Conference Room, Thompson Blvd.

All youth

leaders and workers,

church,

civic, school and musical bands are invited
to collect an application at the Ministry’s
Youth Department between the hours of
9a.m.-5 p.m. Deadline for receipt of applications
will be 18th February 2009.

For additional information you may call
502-0600/4 of 502-0736.





THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

LOCAL NEWS
BTVI to hold Walk-A-Thon for financially challenged students

STUDENTS and faculty of the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocational Institute will take to the streets
in an effort to promote technical and career educa-
tion awareness and support.

The institute is holding a walk-a-thon beginning at
the BTVI campus on Old Trial Road on Saturday,
February 21.

Registration begins at 6am.

Participants will walk to the Paradise Island
Bridge and then return to the campus for a junkanoo
rush-out, mini massages, a souse-out and an awards
ceremony.

“This event is about BTVI community awareness

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“BTVI faculty, staff, alumni and friends are com-
ing together to do something to assist our students,”
said Sean Adderley, public relations officer at BT VI.

The organisers aim to raise money to assist stu-
dents who have trouble finding funds for books and
supplies. Many students receive financial assistance
which does not cover the entire cost of the BT'VI
programme.

The public is invited to take part in the walk-a-
thon. Further information can be found at:
www.btviorg.bs.

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THE TRIBUNE





—_

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY



Soe



L930 2-0°-0°9

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Failure to enforce
rules undermines
regulation integrity

n By NEIL HARTNELL ~



THE Securi-
tics Commis-
sion’s failure to |
enforce key
rules potential-
ly undermines
the integrity of
the Bahamian
capital mar-
kets/invest-
ment funds
industry,
senior financial

Brian Moree



* Financial executives warn
poor compliance sends
‘wrong message’ to
capital markets/investment
funds industry

* Commission told: ‘If you’re
not going to enforce the
rules, don’t put them
on the books’

executives said yesterday, telling

SEE page 10B

Development Bank:
Loans in arrears see
30% annual increase

n By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE Bahamas Development
Bank (BDB) yesterday said it saw

Bank only expecting to
recover $36m or 63.2%
of $57m loan book

loans in arrears increase by 30 per cent year-over-year, as the eco-
nomic downturn squeezed down on small and medium-sized busi-
nesses, leaving it with some $27 million in defaulted loans on the

books.

The BDB’s acting managing
director, Anthony Woodside, said

SEE page 8B

‘Break mindset of three-
tier client service’

n By NEIL HARTNELL
Tri Busi Edit

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
urged businesses to “break this
mindset” among staff that they
do not have to offer the same
customer service quality to a
Bahamian as they do a tourist,
given that companies were des-
perate to earn every dollar they
can.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is
Superwash’s president, told Tri-
bune Business that three differ-
ent tiers of customer service
quality existed in the Bahamas.
The first tier was the service

SEE page 2B

Delaporte
NEW PROVIDENCE, BAHAMAS

* Chamber chief says staff
must be made to understand
all dollars and customers
equally important, and give
same service quality to a
Bahamian as a tourist/
foreigner

* Businesses ‘walking a
tightrope’ on survival, as
productivity improves
in economy

* Companies warned to be
careful on letting go
best workers

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Marina removed from receivership

n By NEIL HARTNELL —

key 116-slip
Freeport mari-
na has been
removed from
the receivership
affecting New Hope Holdings
by a January 27, 2009, court
order, Tribune Business can
reveal, with the property
ordered returned to the two
companies involved in its own-
ership/management.

Justice Estelle Gray-Evans
ruled that the Port Lucaya
Marina, related land assets and
another parcel of land be
returned to New Hope Marina
Development, one of two com-
panies that had petitioned the
Supreme Court for its removal
from a receivership initiated
over a dispute involving the
repayment of loans worth $23-

116-slip Port Lucaya Marina taken out, but other New Hope
Holdings assets remain under care of accountant Phil Galanis

$24 million.

Justice Evans altered the
October 2, 2008, order that
appointed ex-PLP Senator and
MP, accountant Philip Galanis,
as the receiver for the assets
owned Scandinavian investor
Preben Olsen and his New
Hope Holdings company.

A copy of the January 27,
2009, court order, which has
been seen by Tribune Business,
stated that among the assets
removed from the receivership
are “100 per cent of the shares
of Port Lucaya Marina ltd,
which owns the following prop-
erties comprising Port Lucaya
Marina”.

These properties include a
14,506 square foot parcel of
land, situated in Block 3, Unit 2,

of the Bell Channel Subdivision
in Freeport; an 813 square foot
parcel of land on Lot 13, Block
3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel
Subdivision and a portion of
Tract ‘O’, Unit 3 in the same
subdivision; a 6,051 square foot
land tract comprising a portion
of the same Tract ‘O’; and a
10.6 acre parcel of land com-
prising a portion of the seabed
in the Bell Channel Subdivision.

In addition, a separate par-
cel of land, consisting of 6.19
acres, and also in the Bell Chan-
nel Bay Subdivision, was also
removed from the receivership
by order of the Supreme Court.

Justice Evans, in her order,
also directed Mr Galanis “to
release and deliver over to New
Hope Marina Development Ltd

Shooting a ‘serious turn-off for
Nassau redevelopment plan

n By NEIL HARTNELL |



THIS week’s shooting out-
side Bay Street’s El Greco
Hotel, and other problems
being experienced by the prop-
erty, are potentially a “serious
turn-off” to downtown Nassau’s
redevelopment into an attrac-
tive destination for tourists and
Bahamians alike, a senior pri-
vate sector official told Tribune
Business yesterday.

Charles Klonaris, the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board’s (NTDB) chairman, said
the shooting near the West Bay


















Features:

Street Hotel, which sparked the
subsequent departure of 40 per
cent of its guests, showed that
downtown Nassau still had a
security problem that the police
and other stakeholders needed
to tackle.

And given the El Greco’s
separate complaints about noise
from a nearby nightclub in the
former Mayfair hotel, which it
claimed was also costing it busi-
ness, Mr Klonaris said the
Licensing Authority would have
to be careful when it came to
granting liquor and nightclub
licences for the Bay Street area.
He explained that it would need
to ensure such facilities were

compatible with other nearby
property uses.

“It’s the security problem
we’re all concerned with,” Mr
Klonaris told Tribune Business
“And not only security, but
determining how properties are
operated and who comes in.

“We know security is a prob-
lem for downtown. Without
security, the redevelopment of
the city will not happen. If we’re
going to have a living city, secu-
rity is vital.”

Mr Klonaris said episodes
such as Monday morning’s
shooting, which is unconnected

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all of the licences, permits, cer-
tificates, deeds, agreements,
records, bank accounts, nego-
tiable instruments, documents,
correspondence and papers
relating to Port Lucaya Marina
Company Ltd, doing business
as Port Lucaya Marina” and the
related land assets.

Port Lucaya Marina’s
removal from the receivership
came after attorneys acting New
Hope Marina Development Ltd
and AP Holdings Ltd petitioned
the Supreme Court.

The two companies were rep-
resented by Robert Adams and
Dwayne Fernander of Graham,
Thompson & Co, and it is
understood they were success-

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Old Fort Bay gets ‘green light’ for energy efficiency

OLD Fort Bay’s Board of
Directors have given the ‘green
light’ to a project that aims to
equip every street light in the
private community with an
energy efficient bulb, a move
intended to produce “dramatic
savings” in electricity costs.

“First and foremost, given the

Butler & Sands
Company Limited

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exorbitant cost of electricity
nowadays, deploying energy
efficient ‘green’ technology
makes financial sense” said Dr
Harold Munnings, chairman of
the Board of the Old Fort Bay
Property Owners Association.

“We expect to see a dramatic
savings in the cost of our elec-

TO TEMPTATION

tricity, given that we have
almost 100 street lights in Old
Fort Bay. Another attractive
feature of the HEF lights is
their life expectancy. While
changing a household bulb is a
simple matter, a street light is
altogether more difficult and we
are told that these bulbs can last
for up to 25e years. If this
proves to be true then the sav-
ings in maintenance costs alone
will be significant”.

Energy efficient High Effi-
ciency Fluorescent (HEF) bulbs
are designed to reduce energy
and maintenance costs by as
much as 75 per cent and,
according to the manufacturer,
to provide consistent quality
light output for over 25 years.

Old Fort Bay researched a
number of lighting technologies.
The HEF lights were chosen,



BRIGHT FUTURE - Dr Harold Munnings holds one of the High Efficiency
Fluorescent (HEF) bulbs...

because specifications showed
them to be more efficient, pro-
vide better quality light, last
longer and cost less than half
the price of other leading ener-
gy efficient bulbs.

“Everyone comments on the
natural beauty of Old Fort Bay.
Old Fort Beach is locally and
internationally renowned, as is
the magnificent ancient silk cot-
ton tree that overlooks the Old
Fort Bay Club,” said Dr
Munnings “Our community
cares about the environment in
which we live. The HEF Green
Light project is just one exam-
ple of that belief.”

Other members of the Old
Fort Bay Board of Directors
include Sir William Allen,
Anthony Myers and Alistair
Henderson, with Dwayne Mor-
timer as secretary.

‘Break mindset of three-tier client service’

provided to tourists and for-
eigners; the second tier was that
received by fellow Bahamians;
and the lowest or third tier was
reserved for the service quality
provided to Haitian and
Jamaican nationals.

“It’s a mindset you have to
change,” the Chamber presi-
dent said, acknowledging the
key role customer service
played in encouraging patrons
to not only spend more, but
keep returning to the same busi-
ness. This was never more
important than in the current
economic climate.

“There’s three tiers of ser-
vice, and everyone’s got the
same dollar. It’s very, very frus-
trating to get people to break
this mindset they’re in. You’ve
got to offer quality customer
service all the time.”

Mr D’Aguilar added:
“There’s a general impression
that if Bahamian companies
deal with Bahamian companies,
you don’t have to offer the
same quality of customer ser-
vice as you do a foreign visitor.

“T believe that in businesses
in areas that deal predominant-
ly with local clientele, Bahami-
ans don’t expect, and you don’t
have to give, the same quality of
service as you give to a foreign-
er.

“A customer is a customer

irrespective of nationality, and
businesses have to impress upon
staff the importance of making
a sale, as opposed to who yowre
making the sale to.”

Mr D’Aguilar said the fre-
quency with which customers
came into his business unhappy
with the quality of customer ser-
vice, and asking for their money
back, “boggles my mind”. “I'd
be lying if I said it did not hap-
pen on a far too frequent basis,”
he added.”

“It’s very hard to get my staff
to say it’s an important $10. I
don’t know if that message has
resonated yet. US$, BS, it all
ends up in the same account.
What we are trying to impress
on our staff is that Bahamian
customers are equally impor-
tant.

“Pve tried to emphasise to
my staff that every little bit of
business that comes through the
door, you’ve got to strive like
hell to keep that coming in.”

One positive from the cur-
rent economic downturn is that
it has improved productivity
levels in the Bahamian hotel
industry, as workers fearing for
their jobs seek to give bosses
no reason to axe them.

When asked whether pro-
ductivity improvements had
taken place across the Bahami-
an economy, Mr D’ Aguilar said

it largely depended on the busi-
ness and sector employees
worked in. Those industries
already hit by the downturn had
seen improvements, the Cham-
ber president said, whereas
there was little noticeable dif-
ference in sectors not feeling
the chill.

“It depends on the environ-
ment in your business,” he
added. “I went over to Atlantis
and noticed a vast improvement
in customer service. I was blown
away - everyone smiled, every-
one was helpful. This was a cou-
ple of weeks after lay-offs had
taken place.”

However, in many govern-
ment agencies there was “no
incentive or motivation” to
improve customer service.
“That also happens in compa-
nies in the private sector that
at this stage have seen no need
to cut back,” Mr D’Aguilar
added.

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
(BECon) president, agreed that
worker productivity had picked
up across the Bahamian econo-
my as the chill from the global
recession continued to bite.

“I believe there is some cor-
relation,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business. “Everyone is aware
of what the economic situation
is.” Employees who previously

bounced from job to job, believ-
ing they would always be able
to find employment somewhere,
were realising this was becom-
ing “tougher and tougher to do,
so to make themselves valuable
to employers productivity is
increasing”.

Mr Nutt added that many
Bahamian businesses were cur-
rently “walking a tightrope” in
their attempts to survive, and
he urged them not to lay-off
experienced employees, as this
could be counterproductive.

“What we see is a raised lev-
el of concern with businesses as
to what they have to do to try
and survive this economic
downturn. They’re looking at
any way they can reduce costs,”
Mr Nutt said.

“One of the big cost expenses
is labour and, of course, we’ve
seen that result in a number of
the lay-offs that have occurred.

“Businesses need to be care-
ful in that scenario, and prudent
enough not to let go experi-
enced staff who know their jobs
well, and bring in people who
don’t know their jobs well,
because the business will suffer
as well.

“Tt’s like walking a tightrope
right now - what can be done
to survive the crisis, and then
be in a position to rebound
when the economy picks up.”

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3B

5
Prosperity Award seeking

Bahamian business pioneers

n By CHESTER ROBARDS



THE INTERNATIONAL-
LY-recognised Pioneers of
Prosperity (PoP) launched its
Bahamas chapter of the
Caribbean Awards Programme
yesterday, which will provide a
small to medium-sized business
with a $100,000 grant sponsored
by major Bahamas-based finan-
cial firms.

Companies that employ five
to 250 individuals, earn between
$100,000 to $5 million per year,
are for-profit and have been
profitable for two of the last
three years, are eligible to apply
for the grant, which will be
awarded to a single company in

the Bahamas. A regional grant
will be given to an outstanding
company from select countries
in the wider Caribbean.

Other businesses that apply
for the grant could be eligible to
win prizes ranging from $5,000
to $50,000. Eligible companies
will come from the Bahamas,
Barbados, Belize, Guyana,
Haiti, Jamaica or Trinidad and
Tobago.

According to organisers, com-
panies will be judged based on
their ability to create unique
value for customers through
innovative products and/or ser-
vices; generate a sustainable
profit for owners/shareholder;
invest in their employees
through training, safe working
conditions and high and rising

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salaries; and protect the future
by strengthening local and glob-
al environments and communi-
ties.

“T wish to encourage every
Bahamian-based business own-
er that is eligible to participate
in this unique awards pro-
gramme to take full advantage
of this wonderful opportunity.
For in doing so, they stand to
improve their businesses
through financial awards, as
well as be connected to net-
works of technical expertise and
other dynamic entrepreneurs
both locally and globally,” said
the Bahamas Development
Bank’s acting managing direc-
tor, Anthony Woodside.

The PoP award was designed
to not only include a sum of
money, but also an opportunity
for the business to build con-
tacts with technical experts and
connect with other entrepre-
neurs to foster future develop-
ment.

“Unlike other award pro-
grammes, PoP does not end
with the distribution of the
award. Rather, the award is just
the beginning,” said organisers.

“PoP will focus on a post-
award communications effort
that showcases the winning
firms, and connects participants
to networks of other entrepre-
neurs, technical expertise and
financial capital, to inspire a cul-
ture of entrepreneurship and
innovation.”

Key partners involved in the
PoP endeavour are the John
Templeton Foundation, the
Inter-American Development
Bank, SEVEN and the OTF
group.

President of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, Dioni-
sio D’Aguilar, touted the PoP
programme, saying that thou-
sands of eligible small and medi-
um-sized business owners can
now compete for the award
with a view to furthering their
entrepreneurial dream.

“T firmly believe that the Pio-
neers of Prosperity awards pro-
gramme is indeed timely, and
will stand to benefit, encourage
and renew the hopes and
dreams of Bahamian entrepre-
neurs, particularly during these
challenging economic times. I
am encouraging Bahamian
Businesses to full embrace this
unique opportunity,” Mr

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





SNINIVHL

KING'S WAY

KINGSWAY ACADEMY ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be holding entrance

examinations

for

students wishing to enter

Kindergarten 4 on SATURDAY MARCH 13, 2009.
Parents are asked to collect Application Forms
from The Elementary school office before the testing
date from 8:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.

For further information contact the school at
telephone numbers:

324-5049, 324-2158 or 324-6269

The Bahamas Humane Society

Donated in memory of Mr. & Mrs. Trevor Kelly

Shooting a ‘serious
turn-off for Nassau
redevelopment plan

FROM page 1B

Mayfair Hotel, would also deter
downtown Nassau property
owners and business owners
from reinvesting in upgrades to
their premises.

“Who’s going to develop
their properties when they see
that happening on their
doorstep? It’s a turn-off, and a
serious one, too,” Mr Klonaris
said.

“Tf you can’t have families
coming down and walking with
their children and strollers, then
forget it. Our commitment is to
make the city consumer and

family friendly, and safe.”

Given the El Greco’s con-
cerns about noise emanating
from the Envy Beach Club, par-
ticularly during the period
Thursday through to Sunday
every week, Mr Klonaris said it
was “key” to control what Bay
Street properties were being
used for, and ensure this was
compatible with the surround-
ing neighbourhood and overall
plans for downtown.

“IT think the Licensing
Authority has to be careful,
especially when it comes to issu-
ing licences for nightclubs in
areas where, unless they are
managed properly, they could
attract undesirables,” the

NTDB chairman said. There is
nothing to suggest this is the
case at the Envy Beach Club.
Mr Klonaris added that the
Government and private sector
also needed to tackle the
derelict buildings dotting down-
town Nassau’s landscape.
Meanwhile, Mr Klonaris said
the private sector and Road
Traffic Department were “on
the same page” when it came
to downtown Nassau’s redevel-
opment and solving its parking
and transportation problems.
He added: “There is an
understanding in terms of what
they’re looking for and what
we’re looking for is the same
thing. We are on the same

page.”

Mr Klonaris said the NTDB
and private sector were seek-
ing to pedestrianise all the side
streets between Navy Lion
Road and East Street, in addi-
tion to resolving the chronic
Bay Street problems of park-
ing, parking management via
metering, taxis and jitneys.

Mr Klonaris described Bay
Street east of East Street as a
“drag strip”, where vehicles
raced along at 40-50 miles per
hour, creating an environment
that was not conducive to retail-
ing. This was why so many
shops in that area had closed
down, with no replacements in
sight.

CKIAD
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NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

NOTICE

CIT CLUB HOUSE LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, commencing on the 18° day of February,
2009. Articles of dissolution have been duly registered by
the Registrar. The Liquidator is Kyrene Kelty of Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named Company are required on or before the 18° day
of March, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are
proved.

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), OFF-
SHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 27th day of

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c/o GO TRUST S.A.,
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Liquidator

BSi

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting
applications for:-

Dated this 18% day of February, 2009

Kyrene Kelty
Liquidator



Nassau Airport

Development Company

CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

Construction Project Manager/
Coordinator

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

The Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) is seeking candidates

for the position of Construction Project
Manager/Coordinator. Reporting directly to
the Construction Manager, the duties and
responsibilities of the successful applicant
will include:

Potential candidates will possess an
Engineering Degree, EIT or other technical
qualifications required and 5-10 years of
construction related experience on one or
more large scale projects with emphasis
on heavy civil, utilities, earthworks and
paving. Applicants must have the ability to
read and interpret construction drawings.
They should have excellent computer skills
including MS Office, AutoCAD, scheduling
software or other related software.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Reviewing design drawings and
technical specifications

Providing feedback to the design

team as it relates fo scope, schedule,
constructability, phasing and budget
Working with the Project Team on tasks
related to tendering, procurement and
evaluation of contractors and vendors
Coordination of quality assurance and
quality control testing and Ministry of
Works inspections

Liaising with local utility companies and
stakeholders to facilitate the sequencing
and phasing of the project and to
maintain the overall schedule
Communicating and interfacing with a
multi-disciplined design and construction
team including architectural, structural,
mechanical, electrical, civil and
environmental

Assisting with contract administration,
reporting, site inspection and
commissioning of project contracts

Excellent analytical and problem solving
skills, oral and written communications
skills required. Candidates should

also have superior interpersonal and
organizational skills.

Prior experience working in an airport
environment a plus but not required.

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follow up account relationships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports

Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking
professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

If you are qualified and interested,
please submit your resume by

March 6, 2009 to:

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre
P. O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Manager, People
Nassau Airport Development Co.
P.O. Box AP59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be

pee Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted





THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Dollar climbs as
Obama unveils
S$75bn mortgage
relief plan

Bm By ERIN CONROY
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar climbed against most
major currencies in midday
trading Wednesday as President
Barack Obama unveiled a $75
billion mortgage relief plan,
amid bleak reports that industry
production and construction of
new homes in the US have
plunged to record lows.

The 16-nation euro fell to
$1.2553 in midday New York
trading, its lowest point since
early December and below the
$1.2615 it bought late Tuesday.
The British pound slipped to
$1.4196 from $1.4266, while the
dollar rose to 93.29 Japanese
yen from 92.42 yen.

President Obama's plan to
tackle the foreclosure crisis is
meant to prevent up to nine
million Americans from losing
their homes. The plan is more
expensive than initially expect-
ed and aims to aid borrowers
who owe more on their mort-
gages than their homes are cur-
rently worth, as well as those
on the verge of foreclosure.

The Federal Reserve report-
ed Wednesday that production
at the nation's factories, mines
and utilities fell to a record low
of 1.8 per cent last month. Many
economists expected a smaller
1.5 per cent decline. The Fed's
report showed that factory pro-
duction dropped by 2.5 per cent
in January, with shutdowns at
plants making autos and related
parts figuring prominently in
that decline.

Another report from the
Commerce Department said
construction of new homes and
applications for future projects

va

SyAV STALL men Ty



both plunged to record lows in
January.

Also Wednesday, the Euro-
pean Commission said France
and Germany will see their bud-
get deficits go way above the
ceiling of three per cent of gross
domestic product, a maximum
fixed by rules designed to boost
the stability of the euro. The
EC said it will cut countries —
both in and out of the 16-nation
euro zone — some slack in com-
plying with the bloc’s sound
finances rules.

The euro dropped Tuesday
after ratings agency Moody's
said that faltering economic
conditions in eastern Europe
would hit the local subsidiaries
of major Western banks and
potentially hurt their corporate
parents, primarily in Austria,
Italy, France, Belgium, Ger-
many and Sweden.

"It is clear that the dollar has
been benefiting from weak eco-
nomic data, both at home and
abroad, as well as rising risk
aversion,” said Michael Wool-
folk, an analyst at Bank of New
York Mellon. "We're seeing

safe haven flows to the US dol-
lar, and we've seen the dollar
now move into a new trading
range."

One of the biggest surprises
overnight, Woolfolk said, was
the dollar's rally against the
Japanese yen. Earlier this week,
Japan's government said the
country's economy shrank at its
fastest rate in 35 years in the
fourth quarter and shows no
signs of reversing course any-
time soon.

Also this week, Japanese
Finance Minister Shoichi Nak-
agawa said he would step down
after allegations that he seemed
inebriated at the Group of Sev-
en meeting in Rome. The move
dealt a major blow to Prime
Minister Taro Aso's already
shaky government.

A renewed decline in oil
prices has weighed on curren-
cies such as the Russian ruble,
Polish zloty and the Hungarian
forint. Benchmark oil prices lan-
guished around $35 a barrel
Wednesday.

Polish Prime Minister Don-
ald Tusk has pledged govern-
ment intervention in the foreign
exchange market to prop up the
currency if it continues to fall,
while the Russian currency is
edging closer to the trading lim-
it the Central Bank announced
in January. The Central Bank
set the official exchange rate for
Thursday at 36.4 rubles against
the dollar — the lowest point
for the ruble since January 1998
when Russia re-denominated
its currency.

In other midday trading
Wednesday, the dollar slipped
to 1.2599 Canadian dollars from
1.2644, and advanced to 1.1766
Swiss francs from 1.1695.

The Bahamas

Agricultural, Marine Resources (5
Agribusiness Expo




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mproving

Date: 26th-28th February, 2009
Location: Gladstone Road Agricultural
Research Centre (GRAC)

Nassau N.P., The Bahamas

For more information contact:
(242) 356-3100

(242) 322-3740
Email: bahamasagribusinessexpo@yahoo.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5B

BAHAMAS FAITH MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL

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BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently
accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI RDINATI
STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is
definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example

Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others

Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Possess analytical qualities

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved
Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae
to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman Bay Corporate Centre
P. O. Box N - 7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE

@ By ANIKA KENTISH
Associated Press Writer

ST JOHN’S, Antigua (AP)

to pull money from banks and
leaders in the Caribbean and
Latin America urged calm on
Wednesday, concerned that
their slumping economies could
be harmed by the fraud case
against Texas financier R Allen
Stanford.

Hundreds of people lined up
outside two branches of the
Bank of Antigua, a Stanford-
owned institution that has been
flooded with fearful customers
since the US Securities and
Exchange Commission filed a
complaint Tuesday accusing
him of an $8 billion fraud.

“People have to come to get
their money,” said Rasta Kente,
an electrician who joined a line
that stretched around the corner
at a downtown bank branch.
Three security officers allowed
only a few people to enter at a
time.

Many of those waiting
clutched portable radios to lis-
ten to financial news.

Local regulators said the
bank’s finances are sound and
appealed for calm. The bank,
though owned by the Stanford
Financial Group, Stanford’s
Houston-based financial advi-
sory firm, is not part of the U.S.
complaint.

“Tf individuals persist in rush-
ing to the bank in a panic they
will precipitate the very situa-
tion that we are all trying to
avoid,” said K Dwight Venner,
governor of the Eastern
Caribbean Central Bank, the
banking regulator for Antigua
and seven other island
economies.

US regulators on Tuesday
charged Stanford, one of the
most prominent businessmen in
the Caribbean, and three of his
companies with a “massive”
fraud that centered around

high-interest-rate certificate of

deposits.

The US Securities and
Exchange Commission on Tues-
day froze the three companies’
assets, including the Antigua-
based Stanford International
Bank, which also has offices in

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7B

Hundreds pull money from

Stanford-owned bank

BANK OF ANTIGUA’S customers form a line outside the St John’s branch

on the Caribbean island Wednesday...

Mexico, Panama, Colombia,
Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela.

The charges have “profound-
ly serious implications” for
Antigua, Prime Minister Bald-
win Spencer said in a speech
late Tuesday, adding that the
government is developing a
contingency plan.

The central bank said it will
do “what it takes” to preserve
the soundness of the banking
system in the twin-island nation
of Antigua and Barbuda.

Colombian authorities, mean-
while, suspended the activities
of Stanford International
Bank’s local brokerage
Wednesday morning to protect
“clients and investors,” accord-
ing to a statement from the
Colombian Finance Superin-
tendency.

In Venezuela, where Stanford
Bank has 14 local branches and
about 15,000 clients, the nation’s
top bank regulator also urged
calm.

Banking Superintendent
Edgar Hernandez warned that
in addition to local depositors, a
group of Venezuelans has an
additional $2.5 billion in assets
in Stanford’s Bank in Antigua
— fueling reports that some
wealthy investors were travel-
ing to Antigua Wednesday to
talk to bank officials.

Regulators in Panama mean-
while took over branches of
Stanford’s unit there following a
run on deposits Tuesday. The
Superintendent of Banks said
it was responding to “an isolat-

ed event as a consequence of

decisions adopted by foreign
authorities,” and said that it did
not reflect “a deterioration in
the financial situation of the
bank in Panama.”

Bank of The Bahamas

T E D

(AP Photo: Andres Leighton)

Assets at the bank’s four
Panama branches, which La
Prensa said held $200.8 million
in deposits at the end of 2008,
are held largely in liquid, fixed-
income investments that can
easily be converted into cash to
cover deposits if necessary,
Martinez Stagg said.

In the Virgin Islands, Gover-
nor John deJongh said he is
worried the probe will worsen
the US territory’s flagging econ-
omy, potentially costing jobs
and investment in local projects.

Stanford had pledged to build
an office complex on land adja-
cent to St Croix’s airport.

Stanford, 58, owns a home in
St Croix and operates his busi-
nesses from Houston and
Antigua. He was knighted in
this Caribbean island in 2006
and helped sponsor high-stakes
cricket matches.

Forbes magazine has esti-
mated his personal fortune at
$2.2 billion.

In addition to Stanford him-
self, the civil lawsuit filed Tues-
day in federal court in Dallas
names as defendants James
Davis, the chief financial offi-
cer of Stanford International
Bank, as well as Laura Pen-
dergest-Holt, the chief invest-
ment officer of Stanford Finan-
cial Group.

While not named in the
SEC’s civil complaint, regula-
tors said Stanford was aided i in
running the Antigua-based
operation by his father, who
lives in Mexia, Texas, and
another Mexia resident with a
background in cattle ranching
and car sales.

Davis, who was named in the
lawsuit, was Stanford’s college
roommate.

Head Office

Claughton House

Charlotte & Shirley Streets

NOTICE

P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas

TO SHAREHOLDERS

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED IS PLEASED TO ADVISE
THAT A DIVIDEND OF TEN CENTS (10¢) PER
SHARE WAS DECLARED ON 13" FEBRUARY
2009 TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS OF RECORD AS
AT 24â„¢ FEBRUARY 2009 AND PAYABLE AS OF
3 MARCH 2009.

LAURA A. WILLIAMS
CORPORATE SECRETARY





PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

FROM page 1B

Lucaya Marina and related land
parcels were outside the New
Hope Holdings ownership
structure.

Neither Mr Galanis nor the
lead attorney for the plaintiff
in the case, Maurice Glinton,
returned Tribune calls seeking
comment yesterday. Mr Glin-
ton is understood to be prepar-
ing an appeal, on behalf of TG
Investments LLC, to try and
overturn the order removing
the Port Lucaya Marina.

However, the marina’s
removal does not end Mr
Galanis’s receivership over New
Hope Holdings’ assets. These
include the Grand Bahama
Yacht Club Marina and Grand
Bahama Yacht Club, plus mul-
tiple parcels of land owned in
freehold by New Hope Hold-
ings that are mainly situated in

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the Lucayan Marina and Bell
Channel areas. Another 10
parcels of land that have been
leased to New Hope Holdings
were also covered by the origi-
nal receivership order.
Tribune Business previously
exclusively revealed that Mr
Olsen's main financial backer,
T.G. Investments, had been
seeking a court-appointed
receiver for the New Hope
properties, alleging that Mr
Olsen had defaulted on repay-
ing loans worth $23-$24 million.
Maurice Glinton and Arnold
Forbes, acting for American
investor Tom Gonzalez, the
man behind T.G. Investments,
obtained a Mareva Injunction
to freeze the assets of Mr Olsen
and New Hope Holdings.
They are alleging T.G. Invest-
ments lent $23-$24 million,
secured by two promissory
notes to Mr Olsen and New
Hope Holdings to finance the

million or 36.8 per cent of the
total.

With a grim economic out-
look for 2009, and numerous
businesses having to trim their
operations back, the BDB could
see more borrowers start to
default on their repayments,
and the predicted arrears fig-
ure inflate.

“We have that difficulty
because we only finance small
and medium enterprises, and 70
to 80 per cent of small busi-
nesses fail within the first three
years, so that creates a prob-
lem. But it’s gotten a little bit
worse during this recessionary
period,” said Mr Woodside.

He admitted that borrowers
who seldom missed payments
in the past had, last year, began
to show difficulties in maintain-
ing this performance.

“Some of our real good cus-
tomers, who have never missed
a payment in a couple of years,
are now having problems,” Mr
Woodside said.

Last year, the BDB attempt-
ed to spark repayments on
some $29 million worth of loans
in arrears by offering a three-
month moratorium ,during
which borrowers were being
encouraged to go into the bank
to speak to their loan officers
about payment options. The
Government and BDB also dis-
cussed, during that same period,
writing off that 51 per cent of
the bank’s total loan portfolio.

Like many banks suffering
chronic loan defaults, the BDB
is trying to encourage its bor-
rowers to come in for a consul-
tation. Mr Woodside said cus-
tomers are encouraged to walk
into the BDB in order to work
out payment arrangements if
they feel their firms might be
in danger of falling down on
payments.

“We also offer to restructure
(the loans) and we give them
grace periods,” he said.

Though it expects things to
get worse this year, the BDB is
still lending money to those who
can meet the more stringent
requirements, brought on by the
global economic downturn.

“We’re still lending but we’re
being very selective because of
the slowdown in the economy,”
said Mr Woodside.

He said he has also noticed
that the BDB has seen a
decrease in applications for
loans, and believes that indi-
viduals might be reserving their
ideas for when the economy
takes an upswing.

Marina removed

from receivership

acquisition of the Port Lucaya
Marina and associated proper-
ties, but this has not been
repaid. They are also claiming
the company financed other
obligations of New Hope Hold-
ings.

Yet this newspaper under-
stands that Mr Olsen’s and New
Hope’s attorneys are vigorous-
ly contesting the default allega-
tions and the receivership.

They are alleging that respon-
sibility for any loan repayment
default lies squarely with Mr
Gonzalez. They are claiming he
failed to live up to several oblig-
ations, one of which was to pro-
vide New Hope Holdings with
$12 million in working capital -
over and above the initial pur-
chase price - to fund its opera-
tions.

This, Mr Olsen and New
Hope’s attorneys are alleging,
never happened, and without
that capital New Hope ended

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up defaulting. Essentially, the
core allegation in their argu-
ments rests on the claim that
any responsibility for the loan
default lies with Mr Gonzalez
himself.

All parties are understood to
be back before the Supreme
Court later this month for fur-
ther hearings related to the sub-
stantive issues raised by the
case.

In 2006, New Hope Holdings
announced the acquisition of
Port Lucaya Marina as part of
the company’s $500 million, 70-
acre waterfront expansion sur-
rounding Bell Channel Bay.

The project, included 300
yacht slips (available by the day,
week, month, year or even a 99-
year lease) and 300 new luxuri-
ous waterfront condominiums,
townhouses and private resi-
dences. Port Lucaya Marina is
situated just across the bay from
the Grand Bahama Yacht Club.

D)

u“

program will take place at Queen's College pool on
Saturday February 28", 2009
from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 noon.

ALL SWIMMERS, NEW OR RETURNING, MUST REGISTER:

1) LEARN TO SWIM FOR CHILDREN
2) LEARN TO SWIM FOR ADULTS

See our website for registration forms, start
dates, prices and full swim schedules:

26’ BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Year: 2001
Price: $55,000.00
Hull: Fiberglass

Engine: Twin Mercury CXL OPTIMAX, 225 HP, 450 Hours

YW#: 55032-1853792

26 Outrage in great condition! Fully loaded with Auto-pilot, Fish finder, Chart plotter/GPS,
Stereo/CD, Head, Freshwater, Bow cushions. Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and

smart craft gauges.

Standard Equipment

Integral bow pulpit w/anchor roller and chafe plate

Bow anchor storage w/hatch

Port & starboard forward deck storage
Seats w/drainage

Integral swim platform

Port & starboard fish boxes w/drains
Rod holders

Bait prep area

Lockable console storage w/plexi door
Under gunnel rod racks

Vertical rod holders at forward deck seat
Self bailing fiberglass cockpit

S/S steering wheel

S/S console grab rail

Drink Holders

Fiberglass transom door

Livewellat transom w/washdown
Forward coaming bolsters

Hydraulic steering w/tilt



Optional Equipment

Porta potti w/pump out & 0/8 discharge
T-top w/top gun outriggers

Leaning post w/cooler

Windlass

Anchor

Full electronics including radar, chart plotter,
auto-pilot, fish finder, VHF, stereo

CONTACT:

Kingsley Edgecombe, Jr.
Ph: 424-4959

E-mail: kedgecombe@gmail.com

MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY

Andros Ave.

Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:
The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009



— Englerston Subdivision

2 bedrooms,
1 bath

© Comprises:
Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

For conditions of
sale and other
information,
please contact:

Phone:
356-1685,
502-1929

or 356-1608



THE TRIBUNE

Trust chief
to speak on
National

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9B



PunBnLtLic NOTICE
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSE ARCHITECTS

Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliament 1994
P. O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street — Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act 1994, empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons qualified to practice as Professional Architects
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless
he is the holder of a valid licence.” Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offense and is liable on summary conviction to a fine, imprisonment
or both. Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional
Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2009.

P| 3 Pa LICENCE # rea ADDRESS Ale ee
Rodney W. Braynen, F.IB.A. Phone No (242) 393-1874 001 Leo D. Ferguson Phone (242) 324-5566 067
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1423 P.O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
John W. Darville, R.LB.A. Phone (242) 394-2600 002 Patrick A. Rahming Phone (242) 356-9080 070
Dip. Arch., LB.A P.O. Box N-4556 B. Sc., B. Arch. P. O. Box N9926
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
Amos J. Ferguson, FLB.A., Phone (242) 393-0079 003 Timothy H. Neill, R.LB.A. Phone (242) 367-5415 071
APA. B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box SS 6261 LB.A., Dip. Arch. P. O. Box AB 20006
THE Bahamas National Nassau, Bahamas Marsh Harbour, Abaco
> : : : Anthony J. Jervis, FLB.A. Phone (242) 323-2628 005 John W. McCardy Phone (242) 332-2987 072
trust's executive director, Eric BED., B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N 7273 B. Arch. P.O. Box EL-25078
Carey, is scheduled to speak at Nassau, Bahamas Govents's Harbour
. euthera
the upcoming 11th annual Alvan K. Rolle, LB.A. Phone (242) 326-8141 006
: . B. Arch. Tech. P.O. Box N7401 Alberto G. Suighi, LB.A. Phone (242) 327-2335 073
Grand Bahama Business Out Nassau, Bahamas Phd. Arch. P.O. Box CB 13177
look (GBBO) next Monday. . Nassau, Bahamas
Hi : ill f Douglas RA. Smith R.I.B.A. Phone (242) 394-2600 007 ;
1s presentation will focus on FLB.A., Dip. Arch. BSc. MSc. P.O, Box N 4556 Hyacinth Allen Phone (242) 323-4991 074
? 1 Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch, P. O. Box N-966
Grand Bahama’s unique Nore. Balers
National Park system on and Gordon C. Major Phone (242) 008
B. Arch. Tech. P. O. Box 3326 Tyrone Burrows Phone (242) 382-0611 075
offshore. Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P.O. Box N 9876
6 7 Nassau, Bahamas
The Bahamas National . Arthur Colebrook, LB.A. Phone (242) 322-4061 009
Trust is celebrating its 50th ERIC CAREY P.O. Box N 3745 Dwight M, Thompson Phone (242) 327-3220 076
anniversary this year,” Mr ema po ee Nassau, Bahamas
4 “ 4 4 Jonathan A. Adderley Phone (242) 393-8893 010
Carey said. ‘The ‘Trust, with its . : LB.A., B.ED., Dip. Arch. P.O. Box N 9585 Jennifer A. Saunders Phone (242) 327-1411 077
mandate of national park man- ogy and Game Birds Commit- WA. PUG. Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. PO. Box CB 12364
sos Jassau, S
agement, has a clear vision for tees. Michael C. Alexiou, LB.A. Phone (242) 325-7383 011
; : B. Arch. P.O. Box N 672 Livingston Forbes Phone (242) 356-9738 078
the next 50 years, and an impor Mr Carey has represented the Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P.O. Box N 4230
tant part of that vision are the | Bahamas at numerous interna- cic w kaa hanes (uaarsusatie at Nassau, Bahamas
3 : 3 5 él ter a
three national parks on Grand tional and regional meetings, B.Arch, = PO. Bex Ee e704 Hiram H. Lockhart Phone (242) 328-7789 079
Bahama: The Lucayan Nation- and has received training in Nassau, Bahamas oe
al Park, the Rand Nature Cen- wildlife conservation in such RiBA De Anh Po Bor CB 18) o Pier Baldacci Phone (242) 323-4764 080
tre and Pelican Cays Land and countries as Malaysia, Thailand, eee gee Nassau, Bahamas 7 ; ee aaa
a 1 m1 = Nassau, Bahamas
Sea Park. , Chile, ‘Trinidad & Tobago, Bar ee Ane Phone (242) 367-2496 1d
Mr Carey will address BNT’s bados, Jamaica, the United B, Arch. P. O, Box AB-20676 Lawrence Chisholm Phone (242) 356-6261 082
vision for the future of the Kingdom and the United States. Busan imoceeevers eae
1 1 j Trevor Bridgewater Phone (242) 394-0014 015
organisation, and the important In 2000, the US government B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N 8244 Bruce M. Stewart Phone (242) 323-8800 083
role Grand Bahama has to play — appointed Mr Carey as a mem- Nassau, Bahamas 1B.A.,ALA,,B. Arch. P.O. Box N 366
fe . . ee . N: B
in the creation of a national _ ber of the prestigious Kirtland’s Victor R. Cartwright Phone (242) 324-1896 016 Te .
j B. Arch, P.O. Box N 4383 Michael A. Diggiss Phone (242) 327-8916 084
park system that will be the Warbler Recovery Team. He se oeeenae es ie ae Os ttc CB 1iaae
envy of every country in the has received international Nassau, Bahamas
: sa: : Ashward G. Ferguson Phone (242) 324-7334 018
region. awards and recognition for his B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N8156 Thomas M. Dean Phone (242) 324-1170 085
“Just this past week the Trust work in nature conservation, Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., M. Arch. Cieceata Stine
opened the new bridge and inclusive of the Partners-In- Winston G. Jones Phone (242) 325-1520 019 ,
: 7 RIB.A., Dip. Arch. P. O. Box SS 5377 Robert M. Isaacs Phone (242) 324-1680 086
boar dwalk at the Luc ayan Flight International Conserva- Dip. Urban Design Nassau, Bahamas Dip. Arch, P.O. Box 1207
National Park — the most visited tion Award in 1999 and the Nassau, Bahamas
: : : : Kenneth V. Lam Phone (242) 326-2114 020
park in the Bahamas. This 2005 Wings Across the Ameri- RIB.A., MBA. P, O. Box SS 5730 Dirk K. Saunders Pone (242) 557-2308 087
investment of over $250,000 cas Research and Management Nastay, Bahamae Baek, ea
i i Iram D. Lewis Phone (242) 361-4972 021
shows the commitment that the Partnership Award. ares oe Sadewcagii Phone Gay aseonie bas
BNT has to Grand Bahama, Mr Carey is one of 10 speak- Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box EE-16270
: ? Nassau, Bahamas
Mr Carey added. ers at this year’s Grand Bahama John L. McKenzie Phone (242) 393-8415 022 7
Prior to his appointment to Business Outlook. The event is B. Arch. P. 0. B ox N 3356 Robert Whittingham Phone (242) 322-6591 089
a 2 Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box CB-13846
the post of executive director, sponsored by the Grand Nassau, Bahamas
: : Clinton W. Pearce Phone (242) 424-1463 023
Mr Carey served as director of | Bahama Port Authority, Bank B Arch. P.O. Box EE 17980 Stephen J. Bain Phone (242) 356-6029 090
parks and science at BNT. Pre- of the Bahamas International, Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P.O. Box N-10083
: es jassau, Bahamas
viously, he held the position of - FOCOL, Emera, The Central Andrew O. Stirling, Phone (242) 328-7982 024 e a :
‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ote R.IB.A., B. Arch. P. O. Box SS 5399 Jeremiah Moxey jone (242) 341-484: 091
bid a eatery epee ae of eo een British Nassau, Bahamas BAe BO Box CR54501
Wi e Government, and sa Nassau, Bahamas
pe Mmerican Financial, Ministry W. Kevin Sweeting, LB.A. Phone (242) 394-8150 025
on the BNT Wildlife, Ornithol- of Tourism and Scotiabank. B. Arts Arch. B. Arch. P.O. Box N 3211 C. Bemardo Deleveaux Phone (242) 325-5103 092
Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas
Benjamin M. Albury Phone (242) 393-3552 027
B. Arch, P.O, Box N 1731 Lawrence C, Smith Phone (242) 427-1565 093
Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box N1412
Nassau, Bahamas
Frederick D. Albury Phone (242) 325-5916 028
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1677 Mark W. Henderson, LB.A. Phone (242) 327-3274 096
Nassau, Bahamas R.LB.A., B. Sc., B. Arch. P. O. Box CB 12436
Nassau, Bahamas
Andre W. Braynen, LB.A. Phone (242) 393-1874 029
a B. Arts Arch, Sc., B. Arch, P. O, Box N1423 Kevin R. Bryce Phone (242) 356-4538 097
e a | O oS a a a @ Ss fe Nassau, Bahamas B. Sc. Arch. Arch. Eng. P. O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas
Sean A. Farrington Phone (242) 465-3738 031
B. Sc. Arch. B. Arch. P.O. Box N 7627 Mark A. Smith Phone (242) 323-0486 098
+ . tae + soo ee st ee eae ee Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., MLA P. O. Box SS 6888
Small Retail Store specializing in girls accessories Nassau, Bahamas
. ki . © : | hich! Michael Foster Phone (242) 394-3385 032
S Seeking . ni 7 anercvetic anc go y B. Sc., B. Arch. P.O. Box N 1190 Copeland Moxey Phone (242) 457-2107 099
Is see ing a dynamic, energetic , and ug 1 V Nassau, Bahamas Bach, PO Bux CB 12689
ivated © ra NMAanacar par ith “TAT Ni , Bahama
motiv ated Store Manager (30-40 years) W ith pl 10T Henry A. Hepbum, R.LB.A Phone (242) 341-9389 033 one 5
ee ees: : LB.A. ALA. B. Arch., P.O. Box 7248 Carlos J. Hepburn Phone (242) 394-5166 101
retail manager experience to handle all aspects of M. Arch, MRCP, Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., LB.A. P.O. Box CR-54090
Jassau, S
Ea es Sean R. Mathews Phone (242) 356-4538 035
store operation. Dip. Arch. P.O. Box SS 19909 Tan A. Bullard Phone (242) 362-2719 102
Nassau, Bahamas B., Arch, P. O. Box CR-54746
Nassau, Bahamas
Pl ase sen | resumes b >-ma : | tc Charles ae Phone (242) 352-5204 036 ie fs 1 ea
ise § res s by e-m: : B. Sc. Arch. P.O. Box F 41247 Timothy F. Johnson one (242) 364-7813 103
ease send resumes Dy e-mail to Freeport, Grand Babama B. Arch, P.O. Box $S-6906
) * Nassau, Bahamas
bahamas.com @ gmail.com Alicia C-A. Oxley Phone (242) 394-3251 038
= B. Arch. M. Arch. P.O. Box CB11836 Tariq J. O’Brien, R.ILB.A. Phone (242) 326-2114 104
Nassau, Bahamas B. A. Dip., Arch. Dip. P. O. Box 9116
Uban Design Nassau, Bahamas
David S. White Phone (242) 324-1547 039
RILBA,RALC. P.O. Box N 1013 Mark M, Braithwaite Phone (242) 327-7259 105
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arts, B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas
GN-825 Douglas A. Minns, L.B.A. Phone (242) 394-4736 042
P.O. Box N 7936 Stefan P. Russell Phone (242) 341-4982 106
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., LB.A. P. O. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas
R. John Paine, RA.LA. Phone (242) 322-2945 044
B. Arch. P. O. Box CB 11499 Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson Phone (242) 362-6306 107
Nassau, Bahamas 1B.A., B.E.D.S. P. O. Box N 402
Nassau, Bahamas
Jackson L. Burnside II, LB.A. Phone (242) 394-1886 049
R.IB.A., M. Arch. P.O. Box N 1207 Kesna M. Hunt Phone (242) 352-4835 108
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P. O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Larry Forbes Phone (242) 322-2021 050
B. Arch, P. O. Box SS 6351 Jan Brent Creary Phone (242) 394-1886 109
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch, P. O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas
Jason P. Lorandos, LB.A. Phone (242) 393-4372 055
M | N | STRY OF TH E ENVI RON M ENT B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box 5-607 Samuel R. Williams Phone (242) 110
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P. O. Box CR-54385
Nassau, Bahamas
= David K. Griffiths Phone (242) 559-7200 056
Dep a rtment Of Envi ron mental Dip. Arch. P.O. Box F 40257 Carlan A. Johnson Phone (242) 356-9080 111
Freeport, Grand Bahama B. Arts. Arch Sc. P. O. Box N 9926
. B, Arch, Nassau, Bahamas
Health Services Donald A. Dean Phone (242) 352-4835 057
P.O. Box F 41609 Dezon A. Curry Phone (242) 424-1541 112
Freeport, Grand Bahama B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box 29151
. . Exuma, Bahamas
Environmental Health Services Bruce LaFleur Bhone (242) 228-7240 060
APA, ALA. P.O. Box FH 14435 Jechelle T. Rolle Phone (242) 328-2767 113
B. Sc. Envin. Des., M. Arch. Nassau, Bahamas Bs. Arch. Studies P. O. Box SB-50045
Bulletin No. 1 Nassau, Bahamas
Michael J. Moss, B.A. Phone (242) 356-5913 061
P.O. Box N 7091 Wilfred B. Dorsett, B.A. Phone (242) 324-5529 114
Nassau, Bahamas B. Sc. Tech. P.O. Box N 842
Nassau, Bahamas
Th G | Public i dvised t : Garth W. Sawyer Phone (242) 464-1798 063
P.O. Box Ex 29276 Vanru S. Hepburn Phone (242) 326-2829 115
e General FuDIIC IS aQvised to exercise Exuma, Bahamas B. Sc., B Arch. P.O. Box GT-2368
1 1 1 Nassau, Bahamas
special care and attention when shopping Neville Rosfield Phone (242) 322-1900 065
B. Arch. P.O. Box 85 6351 February 2009



Nassau, Bahamas

for meat, poultry, seafood and other food
products.

Consumers are asked to be vigilant about
the sell, use by and expiration dates which
appear on food products. Ensure that
these dates are in the future and that the
product can be safely used before the
date indicated.

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994
Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board”

to practice as “Professional Architectural Technicians” until 31 January 2010.

|S Ped) tt) LICENCE # P| ADDRESS LICENCE #
Leo A. Miller Phone (242) 326-8141 T006
P. O. Box 6583 Solomon J. Smith Phone (242) 361-6517 T045
Customers are asked to ensure that all Nassau, Bahamas P.O. BoxN 10888
iat ret : Henry A. Delani Phone (242) 334-0458 TO16
food packages Is In good condition prior om o Wonvss Bight Elesthera Coralyn T Adderley Phone (242) 341-1247 To49
to purchasing. Michael A. Jones Phone (242) 327.7486 To18 " Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Babamas Jermaine Evans Phone (242) 646-3801 TOS!
. OU. Box
1 Laurin L. Knowles Phone (242) 337-0025 T026 Freeport, Grand Bahama
Suspect or outdated items should be Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas ‘Trevor Butterfield Phone (242) 352-7154 1053
reported to the store manager and the Ryan A Archer POBorsD — Pepa Gad Batam
* ac. . Lech. + U. Box
Department of Environmental Health Marsh Hezbous, Abaco Brent Key Phone (242) 367-4143 7054
Services C. Jenkin Williams Phone (242) 352-2500 T032 Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Lockhart W.Tumquest Phone (242) 337-1086 T038

Director
Environmental Health Services



P. O. Box DC 30607
Grey’s, Long Island





PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bernanke vows to do all he can to revive economy

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke pledged anew
Wednesday to do everything in
his power to lift the country out
of recession, while defending
the extraordinary steps the Fed
has taken to fight the worst
credit and financial crisis since
the 1930s.

The central bank has slashed
a key interest rate to record
lows and has launched a series
of radical programmes in hopes
of getting credit — the econo-
my's oxygen — to flow more
freely again to American con-
sumers and businesses, and sta-
bilize Wall Street. Such relief
would help revive the US econ-
omy, which has been mired in
recession since December 2007.

"Recent economic statistics
have been dismal, with many
economies, including ours, hav-
ing fallen into recession,"
Bernanke said in remarks to the
National Press Club. "In the
United States, the Federal
Reserve has done, and will con-
tinue to do, everything possible
within the limits of its authority
to assist in restoring our nation
to financial stability and eco-
nomic prosperity as quickly as
possible.”

The Fed has been exploring
new tools — as well as expand-
ing existing programmes — to
provide further economic and
financial relief, although
Bernanke didn't provide any
new details on Wednesday.

With all the Fed's pro-
grammes to provide loans or
buy debt, its balance sheet has
mushroomed to just under $2

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
RODEL INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, RODEL INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in
dissolution as of February 17, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





GN-823

> GOVERNMENT

NOTICE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES

trillion, from around $900 bil-
lion in September.

Critics worry the Fed's
actions have the potential to put
ever-more taxpayers’ dollars at
risk, spur inflationary pressure
in the future and encourage
"moral hazard," where compa-
nies feel more comfortable
making high-stakes gambles
because the government will
rescue them.

Bernanke, however, sought
to downplay some of those con-
cerns.

"The credit risk with our non-
traditional policies is excep-
tionally low," he said, adding
that when the economy is on
the mend, the Fed's pro-
grammes can be quickly
reversed "to avoid risks of
future inflation."

The great bulk of the Fed's
lending is generally short term

BEN BERNANKE (AP)



and backed by more than ample
assets, Bernanke said.

In other controversial moves,
the Fed last year provided
financial backing for JPMorgan
Chase's take over of Bear
Stearns, and bailed out insurer
American International Group.
Although this carries "more risk
than our traditional activities,"
Bernanke said the Fed intends
over time to sell the assets it
holds from those bailouts in a
way that maximizes the return
to taxpayers.

The Fed chief also repeated a
pledge — made last week — to
keep Americans. better
informed about its efforts to
ease credit and financial prob-
lems.

On that front, the central
bank is developing a new Web
site that will provide detailed
information on its efforts. The

Fed hopes to have the site oper-
ational in the coming days.

The Fed's No. 2 official, vice
chairman Donald Kohn, also is
leading a committee to review
the central bank's disclosure
policies related to its lending
programmes and its balance
sheet, which outlines its efforts
to ease credit problems by pro-
viding loans and buying debt.

"The presumption of the
committee will be that the pub-
lic has a right to know,"
Bernanke said.

In another move to provide
Wall Street and Main Street
with better insights into the
Fed's thinking about the econ-
omy, Bernanke said the central
bank will start publishing
longer-term projections on eco-
nomic activity, unemployment
and inflation beyond the three
years now provided.

Failure to enforce rules undermines regulation integrity

FROM page 1B

ness: “If you’re not going to
enforce the rules, don’t put
them on the books.”

Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, told Tribune Business
that the relatively low level of
compliance with the Securities
Commission’s regulations in
some key areas - and the regu-
lator’s failure to properly
enforce what was on the books
- “sends the wrong message” to
the capital markets/investment
funds industry about the
strength of regulation they will
be subjected to.

And James Smith, the former
minister of state for finance,
who is now CFAL’s chairman,
suggested that the situation
showed the Bahamas had yet
to “find the proper balance”
between regulation and per-
mitting the free conduct of busi-
ness in its capital markets.

The Securities Commission
earlier this week acknowledged
that it had not properly
enforced the regulations with
respect to broker/dealer regu-
latory capital and investment
funds filing their audited finan-
cials within four months of year-
end.

Its data showed just 45.45 per
cent of Class IT broker/dealers
met the $120,000 minimum reg-
ulatory capital threshold, while
82.5 per cent of securities invest-
ment advisers met the $25,000
threshold. The greatest area of
non-compliance was for the
$300,000 Class I broker/dealer
threshold, with a 33.4 per cent
compliance rate, and the major
issues were with standalone

companies.

The Securities Commission is
now working on developing a
more realistic formula for regu-
latory capital requirements, one
industry source telling Tribune
Business yesterday that the
Bahamas’ stipulations for bro-
ker/dealers were more onerous
than their equivalent in the US,
UK and Canada.

A similar review of invest-
ment fund filing deadlines is
also underway, but Tribune
Business was told yesterday that
if it was not going to enforce
the rules/regulations it had, the
Securities Commission should
not have had them on the books
in the first place because of the
mixed message sent to the mar-
kets it regulated.

Saying that the statistics
released by the Securities Com-
mission were “both surprising
and disturbing”, Mr Moree said
yesterday: “It seems to me that
in order to establish the credi-
bility of the Securities Commis-
sion as a regulator, it needs to
ensure that it’s going to enforce
its rules and regulations that it
passes or has on its books.

“Tf they don’t think, for what-
ever reason, the regulations or
certain rules should not be
enforced, they should not have
been promulgated. If you’re not
going to enforce the regulations,
do not put them on the books.”

Mr Moree added: “I think it’s
an unusual position for a regu-
lator to be sending a message
to the market that there is wide-
spread non-compliance with
certain of its regulations.

“In my view, that sends the
wrong message. Simply put, you
should only adopt and pass the
regulations you intend to

enforce. If you don’t think the
market is ready or they’re too
onerous to enforce, you should
not promulgate them.

“What I don’t think is helpful
to the future credibility of the
Securities Commission is for the
market to think it can treat rules
and regulations as a target to
try and comply with, and don’t
suffer any penalties for not
doing so.”

Mr Moree said that given the
current global financial crisis, it
was “extremely important” for
the Securities Commission to
“have a strong enforcement
unit, and send a clear, unequiv-
ocal message that rules and reg-
ulations are passed to protect
the industry, and the consumer
and the general public, and
those regulations are not
options that licensees can or
cannot comply with.

“They are required to com-
ply with the regulations, and if

not there will be serious conse-
quences. If the sector is going to
be well-regulated, we’ve got to
put some enforcement teeth
behind the regulation side.”

The Securities Commission,
Mr Moree said, needed to tell
the market that failure to com-
ply with its rules and regula-
tions would result in enforce-
ment penalties and sanctions.
It was a problem, he added, that
needed fixing “immediately”.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said
the situation reflected the fact
that the Securities Commission
and Bahamian capital markets
were both in their respective
infancy, and needed time to
mature and properly develop
systems of regulation.

He questioned whether the
rules and regulations, as they
currently stood, had “struck the
proper balance between effec-
tive oversight and not restricting
trade”.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
LEOCAM LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, LEQCAM LTD. is in dissolution as of February

17, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting
tenders for the supply of the following assorted
vehicles.

1. Single cab pickup truck (s)
2. Double cab pickup truck (s)
3. Flat bed truck (s)

4. Van (s)

5. Car (s)

Interested parties may obtain further information
including eligibility to participate and may collect
the bidding document upon payment of a non
refundable fee of twenty dollars ($20.00) as of
February 11th, 2009 from:

The Department of Environmental Health
Services

Farrington Road

Nassau, Bahamas

P.O. Box SS-19048

Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No.
(242) 322-8073 between the hours of 9:00 A.M.
and 5:00 P.M. Monday and Friday.

The method of payment will be certified cheque
or cash. Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate
(3) in sealed envelope(s) addressed to:

The Tenders Board

C/O The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, N.P.

The Bahamas

No later than February 27th, 2009.

Tenders will be open at 10:00 A.M. on March
3rd, 2009 at the office of the Tenders Board,
Ministry of Finance.

The government reserves the right to reject any
or all Tenders.



GN-821

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS
& TRANSPORT

Request for Tender for Security Operations at
the Existing Downtown Straw Market Plaza,
at Navy Lion Road & Bay Street, N.P., Bahamas.

The Ministry of Public Works & Transport invites Tender
applications for the provision of security services at the
Downtown Straw Market Plaza at Navy Lion Road and
Bay Street.

The contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the
first instance and interested security firms are invited to
submit Tenders with comprehensive details of their proposal
for security operation between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and
6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends and public holidays).
The contract will be awarded to the applicant providing

the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full
duration of the contract period.

Interested companies may collect the Tender specifications
from Mr. D. William Munnings’ office: Room 12, located
at the Ministry of Public Works & Transport on John F.
Kennedy Drive, 2nd Floor, West Wing, between the hours
of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
beginning Wednesday, February 11, 2009.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Security, Straw Market” and delivered to Mr.
D. William Munnings’ office for the attention of:

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received by 4:00 p.m. Thursday,
March 12, 2009 accompanied by an endorsed copy of a
current Business Licence and a verification letter from the
National Insurance Board.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening
of bids in the Conference Room, 3rd Floor East Wing, at
the Ministry of Public Works & Transport, John F. Kennedy
Drive on Friday, March 13, at 10:00 a.m.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.



Regent Street, P. O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Jeannine Marie
Therese Dusseault a.k.a. Jeannine
Marie Therese Buraglia’ a.k.a
Jeannine Buraglia late of 300 Joliette
#208 Longueuil, Quebec in Canada in
the Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of The Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the above Estate are required
to send the same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before
the 5th day of March A.D., 2009, after
which date the Executors will proceed
to distribute the assets having regard
only to the claims of which they shall
then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons in indebted to the said Estate
if Jeannine Marie Therese Dusseault

a.k.a. Jeannine Marie Therese
Buraglia a.k.a. Jeannine Buragila
are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

NADIA A. WRIGHT
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box N-4589
Nassau, Bahamas





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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

Precious Memories

Legacy of Love

A wife, a mother, a grandma too,
This is the legacy we have from you.
You taught us love and how to Hah,
You gave us strength, you gave us might.
A stronger person would be hard to find,
And in your heart, you were always kind.
You fought for us all in one way or another,
Not just as a wife not just as mother.
For all of us you gave your best,
Now the time has come for you to rest.
So go in peace, you’ ve earned your sleep,
As we look back over time.
Weer ourselves wondering...
Did we remember to thank you enough?
For all you have done for us?
For all the times you were by our sides.
To help and support us....
To celebrate our successes
To understand our problems
And accept our defeats?
Or for teaching us by your example,
The value of hard work, good judgment,
Courage and integrity?
We wonder if we ever thanked you
For the sacrifices you made.
To let us have the very best?
And for the simple things
Like laughter, smiles and times we shared?
If we have forgotten to show our

ratitude enough for all the things you did,
We’re thanking you now.
And we are hoping you knew all along,
How much you meant to us.
Your love in our hearts, we’ll eternally keep:

Your children ere and great grand’s, nieces
and nephews Church family at Zion Baptist
East and Shirley Streets and your friends

We miss you



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

In ‘Fond &
Loving Memory

of

MR. CTL
AMESIING RAIA

Sunrise: March 4, 1959 - Sunset: February 18, 2007

Our son, brother, uncle, nephew, cousin,
co-worker and friend.

“Phillo”, two years has gone swiftly by
But it seems as yesterday
Since we’ve said our last goodbyes
The day you went away
So as we take time to reminisce today
We who are left behind are admonish to pray
As we envisioned your unforgettable smile
We know that it will be alright - after a while
You certainly did so much for so many
Without the means you sure did plenty
So as we fondly remember you - we would simply smile and say

The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away.

Missed by his parents, sisters, brothers, uncles, aunts, nieces,
nephews, cousins, the rest of the family including the Higgs
& Johnson family.



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3

Phil
Smit

ways 7th, 1957
Decem Aber M8th, 200



Thank you to the people of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas for their outpouring of love and support
for Phil and the family during his illness and death.

The Executive Board, Management and the entire staff of The Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas,
the Presidents and members of all Sporting Federations, Associations and clubs in The Bahamas, the
local radio stations, television stations and news dailies, Fr Martin Gomes, Deacon Gregory Taylor and
the Parish Community of St Joseph’s Catholic Church. The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.,
Archbishop Patrick C Pinder, the Clergy of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese and Sisters of St Martin’s
Convent; the Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Hon
Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth & Sports, Members Of Parliament, Senate and the official
Opposition Party (Progressive Liberal Party). The Doctors, Nurses and entire staff of Doctors’ Hospital
especially the Dialysis Unit and Dr Judson Eneas and staff. The Prayer warriors, from all religious
denominations, who prayed for Phil tirelessly during his illness. Management and staff of Bethel’s
Brothers Mortuary, management and staff of Lakeview Memorial Gardens and those who traveled to be
with us for Phil’s burial. We appreciate your prays, kindness and thoughtfulness.

The family





PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

On Koning Meme

“If tears could build a stairway and memories were a lane, we would walk straight to
heaven and bring you home again. No farewell words were spoken, no time to say good-
bye you were gone before we knew it and only God knows why. Our hearts still ache
in sadness and secret tears still flow, what it meant to lose you no one will ever know.”

is
VIEMORY
Chie

=

——— = Bernard Terrance Rolle jr
16th October 1990 - 21st February 2007

To all of his friends of C.R. Walker, Class of ’08 and the entire Sunset Park Crew, I
hope you never lose your sense of purpose, may you never take one single breath for
granted. Promise me you give faith a fighting chance and when you get the chance
to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance, I hope you dance.

Sadly missed by Parents, Bernard & Coralee; brother, Jermaine; sister Nikita and uncle Kello.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

* TERRELL A. ROLLE

We, the family of the late Terrell A. Rolle, say
thank you to all, for your words of condolences,
gifts, acts of kindness, prayers and support on the
passing of our loved one. Thank you to the
emergency personnel of the Rand Memorial
Hospital, Dr. Winston Forbes and the first
respondents, Dr. Reneé Lockhart, the entire
management and staff of Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation, especially the staff of Freeport,
Minister of Housing, Mr. Kenneth Russell and
his staff, the Principal and staff of Eight Mile
Rock High School, the families of the Bishop
Michael Eldon School, St. Georges High School
and the Freeport Junior High School, Ministry of
Education Officials, the staff of First Caribbean,
Pastor Mark and Vanena Smith and our Dominion
Community Church family, the Freeport Bible
Church family, the Amazing Grace Church family,
Bishop Neil Ellis and the Mount Tabor Church
family, Yager Funeral Home, persons who would
have travelled from Nassau to support us and
ALL of our friends and relatives.

~ The Family ~

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5

Hutler’s Funeral Aomes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Service For

Ms. Rosenell Rose
Bodie, 69

of Regency Park and formerly
of Black Point, Exuma will
be held on Saturday 21st
February 2009 at 11:00 a.m.
at Zion Baptist Church, East
and Shirley Street. Officiating
will be Rev. T. G. Morrison
along with other Ministers.
Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish her memories are: one daughter; Emily Miller,
three sons: Brooks, Ramond, and Martin Miller, four
granddaughters: Lynette Smith, Remona, Brokara and Natajia
Miller, six grandsons: Roderic, Datavious, Damien, Ramond
Jr. and Miquel Miller, and Sharrado Ferguson ;four great-
grandsons: La-Vance Jr. and La-Quan Smith, Jabari Miller,
and Gianno Taylor, one great-granddaughter: Rashantai
Miller, one brother: Bertram Bodice, two daughters-in-law:
Sandra and Ylonka Miller, one granddaughter-in-law:
Charisma Miller, one grandson-in-law: La-Vance Smith,
seven nieces: Veronica Rolle, Lillimae Herandez, Barbara
and Yvonne Gray, Penelope Nixon, Peevan McIntosh and Ivy
Cornish, six nephews: Ruel, Tony, Freddie, and Sandy Gray,
Oliver Munroe and Dennis Baker; Numerous grand nieces
and Nephews; two aunts: Bernice and Millie Robinson, one
uncle: Walter Robinson, three god-children: Phillip Smith,
Elvis Anderson and Percy Patton, A host of other Relatives
and Friends including: Alfred Ferguson, Ruthmae Edwards,
Sharon Woods, Barbara & Charlie Saunders (Fort Lauderdale,
Florida) Cedric Baker, Florine Smith, Burke Smith, Gloria
Wilson, Willamae Nottage, Joe, Albert & Wendall Smith,
Shirley Culmer, Constance, Inez, Icellee Smith, George &
Zeletta Adderley, Sandra Johnson, Rowena Rolle, Beryl Kemp,
Ineka Ferguson, Loretha Miller, Fredricka, Rhonda and Allsette
Miller, Curline Rolle, Shirley Curling, Persis Adderley, Birdie
Pearce, Solomon Robinson, Pam Duncanson, and the entire
Community of Black Point, Staniel Cay, Farmers Cay and
Hermitage, Exuma, Zion Baptist, East and Shirley Street,
Church family and others to numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Homes
& Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00
a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 10:00
a.m. until service time.





PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar ©Crest funeral Hlome

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

Nelson Patrick Smith, 68

a resident of Sea Beach Estates and Bamboo Town
and formally of United States San Salvador, will
be held 1pm Saturday, February 21st, 2008 at St
Francis Xaviers Cathedral, West Hill Street,
Officiating will be Monsignor Alfred Culmer. Rev
Fr Glen Nixon, Rev Fr Pio Galumalemana and
Deacon Samuel Mitchell. Interment will be made
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F
Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road.

Left with cherish memories are his loving and
devoted wife Ruth Idell Smith, his mother, Emily
Smith, 4 sons Patrick, Oscar, Courtney and Derek
Smith, 7 daughters, Debbie, Katie, Sharon and
Kelly Smith, Glenda Thompson, Roberta Deleveaux
and Garnell Dames, 20 Grandchildren, Jamal,
Deangelo, Kenny, Neka, Corporal 5323 Thompson,
Timothy Jr, Diondre, Glentany, Laquisha, Brittany, Elshadeh, Courtney Jr, Vardo,
Dejah, Alliyah, Niki, Trenee, Beauford Jr, Dehjon, Patrick Jr, Patricia, Triston, Elvardo,
Makcerio, and Anthon, 6 sisters Rose McPhee, Agnes, Lotti, Nora, Francina and Verl
Smith, 2 brothers, Kipling and Supt. of Police Prince Smith, 2 brothers-in-law,
Peter McPhee and Audley Bain, 5 sisters-in-law, Louise Smith, Helen Fritz, Dorothy
Godet, Clara Bain and Pat Smith, 3 sons-in-law, Beauford Deleveaux, Timothy
Thompson, and Roseoe Dames, 1 daughter-in-law, Janet Ferguson, numerous nieces
and nephews including Linda, Anne, Evans, Keith, Erica, Shan, Toniqua, Vanessa,
Craig, Vonette, Davita, Deena, David Jr, Devard, Anatole, Garfield, Malary, Ricco,
Tony, Shaniqua, Glenda, Marvin, Jennaine, Stephen, Chivago, Ando, Joey, Devon,
Michael, Nardo, Lanette, Keno, Dario, Jason, Curry, Kareem, Deangelo, Elva, Romell,
Oscar, Darren, Nakita, Demarko, Arnette, Adrian, Deena, Danny, Denise, Ashante,
Audra, Michael, Gawaine, Alexandria, and Anne, numerous Grand nieees and nephews
and other relatives and friends including Rt Hon Perry Gladstone Christie, Iva Bain,
Mr & Mrs Duke Hanna, Mr & Mrs Duke Smith, Mr & Mrs Duke Dorsette, Mr &
Mrs Andy Gomez, Mr & Mrs Robert Elliott, Mr & Mrs Leon Reekley, Mr & Mrs
Anvil Lightfoot, Mr & Mrs Robert Lightfoot., the Ferguson family, Alvin Rolle &
family, Levi Charlton, Sam Charlton, Arlington Miller, Captain Anthony Allens,
Michael Hamilton, Cedric Smith, Mr & Mrs Dewitt Duncanson, Patrice Dean &
family, Mr & Mrs Elton Williamson, Mr & Mrs Elton Taylor & family, The Godet
family, Edward Miller and the entire Batelco family and retirees, the entire Mecca
Grand Lodge and Modem Free families, Kenneth Kelly and the Nights of Columbus,
the Ressurection family especially the Ladies Auxillary, Ena North, Julia Thompson
& family, Hazel Chipman & family, The Sea Beach community, Leah Obrien &
family, the Bamboo Town community, Aunt Agnes and Aunt Dorothy of Miami Fla,
Hazel Williams & family, The Poitier family, Mrs Brice, Mr Weech and family, Dr
Rhonda Chipman, Asa Ferguson, Aunt Edith Collie & family, Aunt Loretta McPhee
& family, Gregg Femander & family, The Central Bank, Charlene Smith, Delta
Airlines, Jet Blue Airways, Doreen Ferguson, Atlantis Casino, John Bull, Charlie
Bethell, Scotia Bank, ZNS, Commonwealth Brewery, The British Colonial Hilton,
The P .L.P. Stalwart Council, Angela Sands, Margaret Small, Mr & Mrs Garaway,
William Nottage, Richard Darville & family, Shane Albury & family, Anthony Cooke,
Cartwright and all the Viking Brothers, The Roker family, Sister Agatha Hunt and
Sister Cleare, Mrs Simmons and Maxine Munroe, Mr & Mrs Lionel Dorsette, Mr &
Mrs Eddie Burrows & family, the entire San Salvador and Mayaguana communities
and others too numerous to mention.

Special thanks to Fr Pio Galwnalemana, Monsignor Alfred Culmer, Deacon Samuel
Mitchell & family, to all the Doctors and nurses at the Princess Margaret Hospital
Intensive Care Unit and Doctors Hospital including Dr Yoheny, Dr Palacuri, Dr Bimal
Francis, Dr Roberts, Dr Weech and Dr Conville Brown. Also to all those who offered
prayers for the family.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at the Gambier House, Farrington Road,
Progressive Liberal Party Headquarters, from 10am - 4pm and at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30p.m. and at the church from 1:0Op.m..
until service time.

Melvin Alfred Bonamy, 61

AD a resident of Baillou Hill Road, Golden Gates
) 1, and formally of Arthur's Town Cat Island
will be held 11am Saturday, February 21st
2009 at St Gregory's Anglican Church,
Carmichael Road. Officiating will be Rev
Fr Stephen Davies and Canon Warren Rolle.
Interment will be made in the Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, John F Kennedy and
Gladstone Roads.
Left with cherish his memories are his wife,
Melvina Bonamy (nee Miller); children,
Kerry, Clover, Kaylene, Candida, Melvin Jr,
Inga, Kendra, Macio, Spencer and Lynden;
grandchildren, Krysten, Haydn, Amare,
Spendrica, Lashanda, Nicole, Nathaniel,
Kenrise, Wefly Jr., Wefnique, Kenron, Keiano
SONS-IN-LAW, Hensel Kemp Jr., Pastor Wefty Ferguson Sr,.
SIBLINGS, Prince, Bernard, Eugene, Estelle, Delrona, Ann, Veronica.
UNCLE, Elsworth Munnings
NIECES AND NEPHEWS, Antoinette, Gilliane, Patrice, Daria, Isadora,
Ebony, Shirley, Daphne, Lauria, Nicole, Zanda, Sharon, Deborah, Irene,
Wendy, Agatha, Patricia, Jennifer, Edward, Gaetano, Wayne, Gregory,
Steve, Keith, John Jr., Dwight, Ricardo, Bernard Jr., Lynden, Jason, Quinton,
Bernard, Melvin, Shawn, John, Ashley.
IN-LAWS, Carol, Shirley, Ena Bonamy, John Robinson. Ethel Miller &
Family, Joyce Miller & Family, Betty & Daniel Reckly & family, Harold
& Saralee Miller, Kay & Stanley Forbes & Family, Donna Miller & Family,
Faydora Miller & Family, Ida Miller and family
GOD DAUGHTER, Philippa Bain
EXTENDED FAMILY, Shirley Ambrose & Family, Edgar & Natalie
Bonamy & Family, Vernitta Curry & Family, Karen Bonamy & Family,
Effiemae Bonamy, Victoria Saunders & Family, Maxwell Newbold &
Family, Macelene Larramore & Family, Edmund Stubbs, Jerome King
(USA), Margaret, Doreen Campbell & Family, Arabella Tynes, Rosamae
McIntosh & Family, Canon Warren Rolle & Family, Mary & Tom Basden
& Family, Rose Huyler & Family, the Munnings, Campbells, Millers,
Smith, Pratt, Webb, Armbristers, Russells, Thompsons, Rolle, Culmer,
Seymour, Dean and the entire Bonamy families.
GOOD BUDDIES, Father Stephen Davies, Anthony Farrah, Javen Dean,
Jack Thompson, Norman Fox (England), Bennet Seymour, Ornan Johnson,
James Dean, Henry Bain, McDonald & Judy Rolle, Eddie Rolle, Collin
Francis, Rev. Zephaniah Newbold, Roderick Coakley, Felix Russell, Cecile
Stuart, Jean Culmer, Tiger Rose, Paul & Willamae Pratt, Richard Ferguson,
Dicky Boy, Levi Webb, Charlie & Sammie Miller
OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS, Prince Hall Grand Lodge, Dr.
Evanette & McPhee and the McPhee family, The Bahamas Teacher's
College class of 1972, the communities of Arthur's Town, Cat Island,
Cooper's Town, Abaco, Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera, Mangrove Cay,
Andros. The staff at the Department of Public Service, Nurse Yvonne
Symonette, Nurse Claudia Seymour, Troy and Mark Gardiner, Canon Neil
Roach, Fr. Delano Archer, Cat Island Old Scholars Association.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road & First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m. and
at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m to service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Codar Crest fmeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Service For
Harold Gardiner, 48

a resident of Barc, North Andros and
formally of Governors Harbour Eleuthera,
will be held 11 :OOa.m. Saturday,
February 21st , 2009 at St Michaels
Methodist Church, Churchill Avenue Boyd
Subdivision, Officiating will be the Rev
William "Bill" Higgs, assisted by other
Ministers, Cremation will follow the
service.

Fond and loving memories will forever
linger in the hearts of his mother Louella
Prescod, father Nelson Sands, 15 children
Ericka, Anya, Nadia, Rashad, Tia,
Devante, Tiffany, Darron, Dario, Dekita,
Louella, Densel, Nathan, Naquel and
Lanique, 3 adopted children Prince and Clint Mackey and Kevin Smith,
10 Grandchildren, his siblings Sonja Gardiner, Don Conover, Joann and
Dwight Cambridge, Emeline and Morine, Prescod, Dora and John Stephens,
Gregory and Denise Prescod, Darold Sands and Scorpio Evans, adopted
mother Janet Gierzewski, his Aunts and Uncles Edgar and Doreen Gardiner,
Millard Gardiner, Patrick and Viola Gardiner, Genet Brown, James and
Mildred Thompson, Mavis Johnson, Joseph and Freda Deal, Mabel Gibson,
Lilymae Maycock and Margueritte Trotman, 21 nephews David, Andrey,
Evan, Carl and Romeo Gardiner, Rana and Mc Arthur Charlton, Donardo,
Harrison and Darold Sands Jr, Sylvester Prescod, Jammal Scavella,
Christopher Darling, Akeem Thompson, Carlos and DJ Conover, Elrick
Rolle, Jafari Stephens, Zephaniah Cambridge, Leonard Taylor and Lavaldo
Fernander, 21 nieces Alexis Fernander, Catrina, Gabriella and Courtney
Prescod, Nickita Taylor, Ashara, Zena and Jamila Stephens, Adaphiline
and Logan Scavella, Rachea Conover, Janesta, Celina, Rhonda, Shonta,
Darelle, Kyla and Zaniah Sands, Hariett, Sydnease and Maria Gardiner,
Special family and friends including Nicky Lafleur, Hon Vincent Peet,
Ephriam and Alice Lafleur, Irene and Wayne Cleare, John Tony, Betsy
Woodside, Earl and Alice Lafleur, Roshell Lafleur, Pastor Minerva Pratt,
Genieve Mackey and Olive Lafleur, numerous other relatives and friends
including Agnes Bethel & family, Emily Petty & family, Gierzewshi
family, John, Peter and James Sands & family, David McKlewhite &
family, Viona Smith & family, Deidre Prescott & family, Phil, Greg,
Pinkie and Anishka Maycock, Beryl McDonald & family, Butch, Pritchard,
Derek, Brian, Paula, Hank, Michael and Jackie Johnson, Naomi Taylor,
Garnell Knowles, Oswald, Chuckie, Karen, Carlton, Juan, Gertrude, Janet
and Lisa Gardiner, Gaye Johnson, Toni, Ricky, Phyllis, Kenroy, Bradley
and Thelsene Thompson, Madeline Dean, Valencia Curtis, Eric and Emily
Russell, Arlington Johnson & family, Cynthia McKinney, McIntosh, Pratt,
Mackey and Lafleur families of North Andros, Bennett Knowles & family,
Fredrick Rolle & family, Arthur and Richard Rolle & family, the family
of the late Freda Burrows, Y.E.A.S. T., North Andros and the communities
of Governors Harbour and Barc North Andros, Thomas, Oniel, Carl,
Tiffaney, and Marsha Gibson, Ann Simmons, Althea Gibson and others
too numerous to mention.

In Lieu of floral contributions donations may be sent to St Michaels
Methodist Church, c/o P.O.Box N1484, Nassau Bahamas, In memory of
Harold Gardiner.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m.
and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to service time.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7

Yager Lmeral Home (Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

LaVaughn
Fernando Kristain
Munroe, 27

a resident of #45 Fortune Bay
Inlet, Fortune Village Freeport,
will be held on Saturday, February
21, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at The
Church of the Good Shepherd,
Pinder’s Point, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev’d Father
Curtis Robinson and Cremation
will follow.

A Pre-Service will be held at the church from 9:00 a.m. until
10:00 a.m.

He is survived by: parents: Patrick and Lonna Munroe; brothers:
Patrick (Bjorn) and Parysh Munroe; grandmother: Joyce
Taylor; nine uncles: Daniel (Dennis) and Angela Taylor and
children - Daniel Jr., Amier, Adrian and Denise, Angeles,
Ameri, Terron and Adrian Taylor; Lester and Gena Taylor and
their children - Tami Tynes-Ross, Lesley, Lester, Kelly and
Lamar Taylor, Kadesha Culmer, Melissa Jones, Aaron and
Keenah Ross; John and Janet Taylor and their children - John
and Omar; Edward and Norma Taylor and their children -
Norvette, Edward and Nopiel and grandson Edward II; Alfine
Wallace and his children - Ryan , Courtney and Christian
Wallace; Jerome and Portia Wallace and son - Trell Wallace;
Derek Munroe; Norman Munroe; Wendell Munroe; five aunts:
Alma and Donald Griffin and their children - Donald and
Debjahnee Griffin; Barbara Munroe-Cooper and her children
Keriston Cooper and Kenton Mitchell; Joanne and Arnold
Knowles and their children - Samantha and Anthony Rahaming,
Ageria and Jeremy Knowles; Pauline and Llewellyn Ferguson
and their daughter - Shanell Ferguson; Rosemary and Bernal
Bullard; four grand aunts: Elaine Major, Gloria Knowles,
Oraline Butler and Gloria Flowers; two grand uncles: Levon
Moxey and Leonard Knowles and a host of other relatives
and friends.

In lieu of floral arrangements donations may be made to
Munroe’s Tennis Academy, at P.O. Box F-43299,

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home and Crematorium Queens Highway on Friday from
12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 9:00 a.m. until service time.





PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home (& Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CLIFFORD
‘Rolly Polly”
ROLLE, 69

Freetown Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Idamae Williams ; |

Rolle; two sons: Calvin Rolle and Wendell Stubbs; five :
daughters: Patricia Pratt, Shirleen and Rita Rolle, Royanne :
McIntosh and Dellamae Newton; three sisters: Virginia Rolle, :

ee ee in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Frobisher Drive.

grandchildren: Calvinique, Bionca and Paige Rolle, Anthony, } . ;
Marquita, Marcel, Sophia Pratt-Smith, James Jr. II, Patrick, ! Cherished ee ale held by two sons: Garin and Kevin
: Burrows; four sisters: Harriet, Andy and Rhona Forbes and

: Consula Williams; nieces: Barbara Jones, Tiffany Lawrence,
Anton, James and Anthony Morrison Jr., Denny McIntosh Jr. i Delores Braynen, Louise Kacw les. Metis Tics... Beatice

- | Pupo, Rosita Forbes, Joycelyn, Jeaniemae and Carol Rigby,
reat srandson: James Pratt Jr. Il; one great granddaughter: : ; :
Summ: Smith; one daughter-in-law: Sande Rolle: ae son- } pes = Bae ae ao aa J ey er a
ra ; es : an ervin Rigby grand nieces: Shaunte and Arne Basden,
in-laws: James Pratt Sr., Denny McIntosh Sr., Minister Anthony Miacle and Star Lawrence, Shantell Betheliand lashan Lowe.

: : : . . : grand nephews: Jan and Lavardo Lowe, Christopher Forbes,
Smith Jr. nieces and nephews include: Mary Carter-Rolle, i Mario, @harles-and @recory Bethel ereat rand nieces.

Annie Stuart, Judymae Harvey, Ilene and Nettie Stubbs and K’Shura Hanna, Charlize and Mariah Bethel; great grand
Claudette Smith and a host of other relatives and friends : 8¢Phew: Tracey Jr; special friends include: Midlean and Peter
including: Gelata Knowles, Mr. and Mrs. Prince Bridgewater, ! Basden, Richard Swann, Charles Lawrence, Loise Jones and

Sister Betty Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Jefford Kemp, Mr. and Lavrence: Richard Swanni(Dick): Ica Bain, Hadley Borbes.

‘ Nellie Robinson, Vicky Bain, Muriel Smith, Olga Garland
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Russell, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald ! 3 - ae Dy ee 3
Cooper, Pleasant Bridgewater, Pastor Delton Russell, Rev. : Cherrybelle Forbes, Anita Missick, Cornelius Williams and
Preston Co oper Jr. Reginald Smith Mr and Mrs. Areal | Daphne Hamilton and a host of other relatives and friends.

Newman, Queenie Mader, Jenny Carey, Olease Cooper, Mr. Relati araead fies Heat F |
Wasington Smith, Minister Fredrick Carey, Aliceson McBride, } ae d a G oe By Dey. street ae rad ay
Mr. John Rolle, Rodrick Thomas, Rev. John C. Wallace, : I ae Eaten a — gu i Ht ee ae
Gordon Rolle, Officers and Members of High Rock Church : .°° 16. uot 4 Pos Cae ale eau ee Oi Satureay
of God and the Communities of Holmes Rock and East End } OM *1-2Â¥ a.m. eA

John, Gabriel, Christina Pratt, Santeria Stubbs, Anthonique,

Chantavia and Anthonice Newton and Valencia Johnson; one

Morrison Sr., and Quincy Newton; grandson-in-law: Harry

Hubert Jr., James, Richard, Myrtis and Anaiska Williams,

Mrs. Remo Bridgewater, Mr. and Mrs. Lesco Pennerman,

! Grand Bahama.

‘ Relatives and Friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
: Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway, Freeport on Friday
: from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
‘ from 11:30 a.m. until service time.

a resident of Bevans Town, Grand }
Bahama and formerly Holmes Rock, :
Grand Bahama will be held on :
Saturday, February 21, 2009 at 1:00 :
p.m. at New Zion Baptist Church, :
Freetown Grand Bahama. :
Officiating will be Pastor Delton Russell, assisted by Rev. }
Preston Cooper Jr. and interment will follow in the }

CARRIE LOUISE
JOHNSON, 54

a resident of #37 Edgar Place,
Freeport and formerly of Middle
Caicos, Turks Island will be held
on Saturday, February 21, 2009 at
1:00 p.m. at St. Paul’s Methodist
| Church, East Sunrise Highway and
Beachway Drive, Freeport.
Officiating will be Rev. Theophilus
N. Rolle and interment will follow

Stacey Davis; cousins: Minna Outten-Winters, Charles





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

f
i, #

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9

©) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

A MEMORIAL SERVICE
FOR

ARTHUR LEEMOURN

LAMPHIER MAYCOCK, 73

of #13 Narcissus Avenue, Garden Hills #1 |
and formerly of Duncan Town, Ragged Island |
will be held on Thursday, February 19th, |
7:30 p.m. at Church of God of Prophecy, |
Baillou Hill Road. Bishop Shelton Beneby, |
assisted by other ministers of the gospel will ;

officiate.

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ARTHUR LEEMOURN LAMPHEIR
MAYCOCK, 73

of #13 Narcissus Avenue, Garden Hills #1 and formerly of Duncan Town, |
Ragged Island will be held on Saturday, February 21, 2009, 10:00a.m. at Church |
of God of Prophecy, East Street Tabernacle. Bishop Shelton L. Beneby and |
Bishop Hartman Rolle, assisted by other ministers of the gospel will officiate. |
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road. |

Left to cherish his earthly loss and celebrating his heavenly home going are |
Children - Daughters: Euricka Rolle, Christine Heastie & Joy Dean; Sons: |
Minister Arthur Leroy, Herman, Petty Officer (Ret.) RBDF Patrick (Tony), |
Audley, Lynden, Dereo, Lampheir, Richmond & Mark Maycock; Daughters- |
in-law: Judith, Sabrina, Michelle, Carolyn, Lynette, Sheanda, Amoranna & |
Trayetter Maycock; Sons-in-law: Everette Rolle, Franklyn Heastie & Andrew |
Dean; Foster Daughters: Merlene Dames, Delmetta Seymour, Arizona Rolle, |
Erica McKinney & Orion Munroe; Foster Sons: Michael Munroe, Dereck Cox |
& Granville Collie; Sister: Carol Johnson; Brothers: Lawrence & Robert Smith, |
Timothy Pinder; Sisters-in-law: Joanne & Sylvia Smith, Doris Taylor, Laura |
Williams, Hannah Rahming-Grant, Loletha Gaitor, Cynthia Armbrister, Vivian |
Rahming, Linda, Barbara & Pamela Moss; Brothers-in-law: Stafford & Wilfred |
Rahming, Christopher, Bishop Sterling & Basil Moss, Walton Taylor, James |
Williams, Thomas Grant, Wayne Gaitor; Grand Children: Krystle, Katrice, |
Kandice, Karissa, Hermanda, Herman Jr., Hermandell, Alexis, Marine Seaman |
RBDF Patrick & Aniesha Maycock; Lacretia, Latura & Lathel Rolle; Leemourn |
Maycock, Ishmael Bethel; Jamesha, Christa & Christon Heastie; Lynden Favian, |
Lyle, Derean, De'Shanel, Dereal, D.PARCE, Orlando, Lance, Lavant, Richmond |
Jr., Rashad, Rashion, Rashantia & Angel Maycock; Alexa, Joshua & Amber- |
Rose Dean; Marquel, Mark Jr. & Malia Maycock; Other Grand Children: |
Ashanti & Clement Clarke, Jaunita Gardiner, Carlos Dames, Zanovia Ferguson, |
Chantelle Colebrooke, Delano Dames; Delmar, Delray, Darren, Delbert & |
Dalhia Seymour; Tanya Turnquest, Narissa King, Sean & Ryan Munroe; Chavez |
Munroe; Aunts: Jane Adderley & Eloise Armbrister; Uncles: Rev. Matthias |
Munroe, Lamon Maycock, Reuben Stubbs & Leroy Armbrister; Numerous |
Nieces & Nephews including: Jancie & Pastor Stephen Green, Patricia, George |
& Regina Pratt & Pandora Major; Patrice & Nathan Stone (Mississippi), |
Ranford, Nekita, Randy & Tietchka Johnson, Ann Williams, Petra Smith; |
Robert, Racquel, & Ryan Smith; Karen & Latoya Rolle, Shamel Sands, |
Lawrence Sr., Leonice, Inderia, Lashanna & Lashae Smith; Leroy Armbrister; |
Paula, Marie, Dwight, Randy, Stephanie & Richard Rahming; Wilfred Rahming |

Jr.; Judd, Kera, Jenson & Jocklano Williams; Thomas Jr. & Zharroh Grant;
Valencia, Vernita & Valentino Moss; Christopher Jr., Deangelo, Nicara, Lynden,
Kevin, Joy, Candia, Keyshawn, Alicia, Latrell, Brittany & Mya Moss; Matthew
& Wayne Gaitor, Myrtle Stubbs, Sharon Farrington, Rosalee Dean, Genesta
Bethel, Bridgette Armbrister; God Children: Kosygen Forbes, Jacob Culmer,
Charmaine Munroe, Anastacia Fearon, Lashanda McNiel; Other Relatives and
Friends including: Marina Smith, Oraline Maycock, Edwin Wallace, Patrick,
Fritzgerald & Clement Maycock, Maryjane Moxey, Marjorie Wallace, Savaleta
Lockhart, Clorita Wilson, Verdell Ferguson, Errol Munroe, Bishop Cephas &
Clothilda Ferguson & Family, Willamae, Roland & Harold Bridgewater, Creswal
Wilson, Karen Bell, Herman Munroe, Verdue Maycock, Francina Thurston,
Edmond Moxey, Eliza Wallace, James Lockhart, Louise Curling, Eugene
Wallace, Demison Nesbitt, Descendents of Marion Johnson, Mable Bogis,
Emma Munnings, Seva Dillet, Emily Greenwich, Charlotte Moss, Berdina
Taylor, Conrad Maycock, Cephas Maycock, Annamaria Smith, Vernelle Carey,
Patricia Fountain, Sonjia Roberts, Vernal Brian Adderley, Coralee Pratt-Odoms,
Vernelle Davis, Ronald & Edward Pratt; Adena, Vanessa, Christine, Oscar,
Pastor Myles & Garth Munroe, Elva Moxey, Cyril Joffre, Advara Higgs, Frankie
Thompson, Deloris Moxey, Ada Munroe, Inez Williams, Loomine Wilson,
Bernard Wilson, Harriet Munroe, Sarah Bridgewater, Maurice Wallace, Frederick
Wallace, Mildred Wallace, Lorna Major, Margo, Anne, Calvin Wallace, Cecil,
Perry Wallace, Beryl Mortimer, D'Glanville Panza, Evelyn, Verva Wallace,
Clyde, Cora Hepburn, Anthony Hepburn, Sonia Johnson, Camille Johnson,
Kirk, Ernie Wallace, Christina Ellis, Anna-Rosa Hepburn, Emmette, Oscar,
Juanita, Bertie & Angela Munroe; Descendents of Lorenzo & Robert Hepburn,
Ragged Island Nurse Pauline Maycock, Sheila Curling, Florinda Hepburn,
Leanda “Big Mama” Maycock, Bishop Solomon & Patricia Humes & Family,
Pastor Bishop Shelton & Shelly Beneby & The Entire Baillou Hill Road
Community Church of God of Prophecy, Mother Eulease Dames & Family,
Minister Denver Dames, Eulease Munroe, Sheila Seymour, Letisha Clarke,
Cardinal & Minerva Edwards, Clifford, Ruben, Patsy, Gregory, Dorman, &
Debra Stubbs, Kishka Rolle, Areta Bastian, Shannie Victor, Bishop Samuel &
Shirley Greene, Bishop John & Prophetess Jeaniemae Humes, Myrtle Deveaux
& Family, Steven & Carmen Hepburn, Bishop Arthur & Ivamae Ferguson,
Bishop Hartman & Cynthia Rolle & Family, Ruby Hepburn, Ralph & Doroth
Rolle, Felix & Thelma Beneby, Pandora & Dr. Shequel Pearce, Virginia Butler,
Hollan & Elsie Dean, Edward Heastie Dolly Pinder, Heskic Dean, Queen Vealca
Dean (Freeport, Grand Bahama), Beatrice Heastic, Stafford Dorsette & Family,
Prince & Princess Brown, Bishop Brice Thompson & Family, Bishop Elgarnet
Rahming & Family, Victoria Beneby & Family, Helen Alleyne & Family, Bishop
Anthony Roker & Family, Katherine Demeritte, Emery & Sharon Symonette,
Wilfred & Gloria Douglas & Family, The Simmons Family, Adam Munroe,
Ruth Rahming, Huria & Cynthia Ferguson, Buford & Shelly Curtis, Dorlan &
Kaylisa Curtis, Miriam & The Entire Curtis Family, Alvin & Jacqueline Rolle,
Dorothy Roach, Minister Romeo & Beatrice Ferguson, Dorothy Bastian, The
Coconut Grove, Garden Hills, Sunlight Village, Ragged Island & Cat Island
Communities, Road Traffic Department, Straw Vendors, Progressive Liberal
Party, Taxi Union Staff, Dr. Channa Jagadeesh, Dr. Glen Beneby, Dr. Valentine
Grimes IT, Dr. Beverton Moxey, Veronica Owens (former Member of Parliament),
Hon. Brensil Rolle MP (Garden Hills Constituency), & The Entire Church of
God of Prophecy Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Church of God of Prophecy, Baillou
Hill Road (located opposite the National Insurance Board), on Friday from
10am to Spm and on Saturday at the Church from 9am until service time.

The Family requests that in lieu of flowers please make donations to: Big
Harvest Community Sunday School, P.O. Box N-3571, Tel 341-0665. Building
Fund: RBC Prince Charles Account - #126-297-1.





PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MARRIETH
ROLLE, 83

of Nicholl's Town, Andros will be held |
on Saturday, February 21st, 10am at St. |
Margaret's Anglican Church, Nicholl's |
Town, Andros. Fr. Chazz Turnquest, |
assisted by Fr. Roland Hamilton, Fr. |
Crosley Walkine and Canon John Clarke |
will officiate. Interment will follow in |
Nicholl's Town Public Cemetery, |

Nicholl's Town, Andros.

Marrieth will be sadly missed by her loving husband, John Rolle; |
sons, Bartholomew Bowleg, Kirk, Clyde, Ben and Loftus Rolle;
daughters, Meryl Mackey, Dorothy Coleby, Tracy and Loren Rolle; |
adopted daughters, Clara Evans, Bassiemae Storr and Natheria Pratt;
grandchildren, Donald and Neville Evans, Christopher, Andrea and ;
Faye Oliver, Van and Latoya Mackey, Anthres, Bentley, Christopher |
Maurice, Javon, Shekera, Kranze and Kassy Bowleg, Desmond,
Stacy, Tovar and Indira Coleby, Baxter, Marcus, Jeremy, Gabrielle, |
Arielle, Donavon, Bernard, Clyde Jr., Davano, Antonio, Lavonnia
and Latonya Rolle, Anthranique Mather, Jacquon Rolle and Dominick |
Evans, Dr. Gertrude Holder, Thalia Conyers, Kedra, Latoya, Jessica |
and Kessie Storr; great grandchildren, Cameron, Phillippa, Deandrea,
and Zion Evans, Rashad Clyde, Sarah, Sheena, Rashea, Ragine, Colin |
Jr., Aailiah, Christopher Jr., India and Joel Oliver, Ashley, Vanneisha
and Veronique Mackey, Lavardo, Latoya, Lathario and Leah Coleby ;
and Kai Rolle; grand daughters-in-law, Elizabeth and Marie Evans, |
Angelique and Latoya Oliver, Roslyn and Joanne Coleby and Caroline |
Mackey, Krista Rolle; sons-in-law, Clayton Mackey and Herman |
Coleby; brothers, Bernard Evans Sr. and Yurick Evans Sr.; sisters-
in-law, Ruth, Gloria and Merlene Evans, Albertha Dames and Madge ;
Rolle; brothers-in-law, Boisie Rolle and Reginald Dames; aunt, Rita |
Evans; twenty seven nephews including, Earl and Peter Russell, |
Yorrick Jr., Bernard Jr., Wendell, Michael, Kenny, Dale, Lorenzo, |
Milton, Lionel and Ivan Evans, James, Edward and Joseph Wallace,
Alvin and Lawrence Paul, Othneil, Rondel, Dewitt and Daxon Dames, |
Benjamin Rahming, Milton Evans, Alfred Evans, Carole and Edwin |
Lightbourn, Kendrick Selvin, Basil Rolle; thirty six nieces, Diane,
Lorraine, Paulette, Sally, Constance, Mae, Ruby and Darnell Evans, |
Valarie Basden, Yvonne Bannister, Kim Dean, Iris Russell, Judy
Rahming, Anne Lightbourn, Ida Ramsey, Ruthnell Jeannimae Dames, |
Luenna Dawkings, Marion Evans, Martha Evans, Sybline Evans, |
Carol Dames Smith, Michelle, Monique and Delores Rolle; other
relatives and friends include, ASP Nigel Clarke, Samuel and Muriel |
Storr and family, Charles Bowleg and family, Rosa Wilson and family, |
Alphonso Smith and family, Daisy and Michelle Bowleg, Bertram '

Murphy and family, Julia Davis and family, Sheila Rolle and family,
Granville Coleby and family, Monica Evans and family, Blossom,
Branhilda and Norma Hutchinson, Barbara Sweeting and family,
Vanria Rahming and family, Aramentha Saunders and family, Marjorie
Russell and family, Menesha Simms and family, Helen Lord and
family, the Pickstock family, the Pratt family, the staff and students
of Nicholl's Town Primary School, St. Margaret's Anglican Church
family, the staff of Doctors Hospital ICU, staff of Femal Surgical
Ward Princess Margaret Hospital, Hon. Vincent Peet (M.P. North
Andros, Berry Island), Rosalie Minus and family, Dale Davis and
family, Naomi Brown, Eddie Francis and family, Franeise Johnson
and family, Natasha Evans and family, Dorothy Walkes and family,
Charmaine King and Wendy Bullard, Angela McDonald and family,
Nicole Evans, Nedra Carey and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 11am to 5pm and on Friday at
St. Margaret's Anglican Church, Nicholl's Town, Andros from 1pm
to 12 midnight and on Saturday from 9am until service time.

DANIEL LUTHER
NAIRN "Doc", 88

of Jasmine Drive, High Vista and
formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros will
be held on Saturday, February 21st,
10am at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street. Fr. Glen Nixon will
officiate. Interment will follow in St.
Joseph's Cemetery, Boyd Road.

Dan "Doc" as he was fondly known is
survived by a host of relatives and friends including his wife: Ruth
Jones-Nairn; daughters: Loretta Nairn-Francisco, Permal Nairn-
Schimpf and Cherol Nairn-Johnson; son: Perry Nairn; grandchildren:
Henry Dummett Jr., Charmaine Dummett-Coleby, Sean Darrell,
Prince McPhee, Patrice Knowles, Altrese Schimpf, Steaman, Linksley,
Carola and Oprah; brothers: Gerald Pennerman and Noral Pennerman
of Mangrove Cay, Andros; sisters: Ismae Nairn and Halston; numerous
great grandchildren, nieces, nephews and cousins and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at
the church from 9am until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 11

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ELLA LOUISE
LARIMORE
MISSICK, 96

of McKinney Drive off Carmichael |
Road, will be held on Saturday, |
February 21st, lpm at Holy Family |
Catholic Church, Robinson and :
Claridge Roads. Rev. Fr. Kendrick J.
; ry Forbes, assisted by Deacon Andrew |
Burrows will officiate. Interment will :

follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.

Precious memories will forever linger in the hearts of her |
daughters, Ednamae Dean and Eloise Moncur; ten(10) grand :
children: Cynthia Washington of Virginia, Deborah Dupuch |
(Lewis), Jennifer Bodie (Duke Sr.) Lona Thompson (Brando |
Sr.) Charles Dupuch, Allan Dean (Josephine), Mark Dean, |
Arlette; Morley (Steven I), Jeffrey Moncur (Sherrell) and Julian :
Moncur; twenty-six (26) great -grandchildren: Ryan Fisher, |
Shawn Thompson, Karen Bastian, Raquel Crumblin, Anitrah |
Rolle, Alexandria Thompson, Duke Bodie Jr., Medwick IIT & |
Kenricka Rolle, Shanique Dupuch, Dominique Bodie, Louann |
Thompson, Brando Thompson, Jr. Loonise Thompson, Eric |
Henry Thompson, |
Champayne Bodie, Jade Moncur, Jalen Moncur, Lolita |
Thompson, Camile & Bridgette Dupuch, Charles Dupuch Jr., |
Steven II & Azzarria Morley; six(6) great-great grandchildren: |
Katorie, Mya, Melick, Jahkai, Medwick III, and Karen Jr.; two(2) |
nieces: Dorothy Thompson and Mary Meadows;three (3) :
nephews: Anthony, Ortnell and Fredrick Saunders; One (I) Son- |
in-Law David Dean;one (1) sister-in-law, Olga Rigby. Other |
relatives including: Tom and Mary Basden & family, Leroy and |
Rose Huyler & family, Lois Bethel & Family, Lolomae Rolle |
& family, Lillith Womack & Family, Christine Anderson & |
family, Deborah Major, Ken Rolle, Charlene Sturrup and family, :
Marie Davis & family, Eloise Huyler & family, Blaise Taylor |
& family, Tony Farah, Doris Farah & family; friends including: |
Robert Elliott & family, Herbert Styles & family, Joseph & |
Emily Glass & family, Bentley & Peggy Hall & family, Boston |
& Patsy Morley, Pastor Shameka Morley, Michael & Cindy |
Smith, Sandy & Mikita Morly, Officers & Members of Anointed |
to Reign Kingdom Ministries staff, Bahamas Telecommunications |
Company and many friends and loved ones too numerous to |

Washington Jr., Lewis Thompson Jr.,

mention.

She was predeceased by her husband, a daughter, five
grandchildren and two sons-in-Iaw.

( Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
| #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday

from 10am to 11am and at the church from 11:30am until service

EDWARD HENRY
STORR, 62

of St. Alban’s Drive and formerly of

| Arthur's Town, Cat Island and

| Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held

} on Monday, February 23rd, 3pm at

St. Christopher's Anglican Church,

~| Lyford Cay. Archdeacon Keith
} Cartwright will officiate.

He is survived by his wife, Michaela;
son, Virgil Henry; daughter-in-law, Nona; devoted niece,
Cherrylee; sisters and brothers, Clifford, Miriam, Stafford,
Phillip, Bernice, Brenda, Marjorie and Margaret and a large
extended family of Storrs and Virgills including sisters-in-law,
Marcia, Myra, Margot, Myrna, Michelle Linda, Maltina and
Florence; brothers-in-law, Franklyn Winder, Ronald Storr and
Osborne Pintard Sr.; nieces, Dominique Storr, Georgia Taylor,
Shennen Braynen, Bernadette Storr, Patrice Ramsey, Tanya
Pintard, Nicola Virgill Rolle, Janis Cox, Christina Lundy and
Megan Virgill; nephews, Clifford, Christian, Martin, Stephen,
Marcus, Bernard, Dion, Rhett, Jose Storr, Timothy Cooper,
Franklyn, Ian and Edward Winder, Spence Ramsey, Osborne
Pintard Jr., Charles Wesley Virgill II, Graham Michael Wilson,
Craig Michael Lundy and James Scott Virgill and the Pratt,
Miller and Darrell families.

The family wishes especially to thank Drs. Nicolas Hepburn,
Delton Farquharson, Duane Sands, Paul Ramphal and Ronald
Knowles, Archdeacon Keith Cartwright, Fr. Peter Scott and the
family of St. Christopher's Church for their kind assistance and
support during Eddie's short but traggic illness.

In lieu of flowers donations can be made to: The Cancer Society
of The Bahamas, East Terrace Centreville, P.O. Box SS-6539,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.





PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

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Sore
ay, —

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Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JOHNNY
HIGGINS, 54

of Quarry Mission and formerly of Meeting |
Street will be held on Saturday, February |
21st, 2pm at St. John's Native Baptist |
Cathedral, Meeting Street. Rev. Dr. Michael |
C. Symonette and Rev. Dr. Hervis L. Bain ;
Jr. will officiate. Interment will follow in |
Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife, |

Angela Higgins; his mother, Ethel Stuart; |
three brothers, Sidney Higgins, James Dean and Eric Stuart; two sisters, |
Bettymae and Leonamae Dean; one aunt, Inet Stuart; one uncle, Floyd ;
Jones; his stepchildren, Tshia Brightly, Komoa and Rick Bennett, Omoro |
Douse, Jerome and Donald Adderley; one adopted grandson, Kevon Nelson, ;
six nephews, Eric, Derek and Taquan Stuart, Shawn Higgins, Nathan and :
James Dean Jr.; five nieces, Janet, Judy and Jarvia Dean, Shadia Stuart, |
and Lashante Higgins; two sisters-in-law, Suzette Dean and Suelyn Higgins; |
one godchild, Miguel Cooper; other relatives and friends including, Jeffrey |
Nottage and family, Ervin Lightbourne, Patricia Whylly, Sherry Kemp and |
family, Shirley Bryan, Monica Ferguson, Gelita Hall, Cecile Dean, Beverly |
Adderely, Diane Dean, Yvette Saunders Hall, Cecelia Albert and family, |
Louise Tinker, Elaine Kemp Wells, John Marche, Patrick Russell, Edward |
Outten (Toya), Jeffrey Arthur, Caralee Rolle-Major, Arthur Maycock, Paul
Tynes, Kevin Lockhart, Dario Wood, Stanville Thompson, the Quarry |
Mission Road family, the Linden's, Minnis, Fowlers, Bethels, McKinney's, |
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the former Meeting Street families. |

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 |
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday from 10am |
to 12 noon and at the church from 12:30pm until service time. |

ROWENA "Beulah"
CONLIFFE
ARCHER, 104

of #68 Falcon Cres, Eastern Estates and |
formerly of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, will |
be held on Saturday, February 21st, 11am |
at Holy Spirit Anglican Church, Howard ;
Street, Chippingham. Fr. Harry W. Ward |
and Canon Delano Archer will officiate. |
Interment will follow in Woodlawn |
Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road. |

She is survived by one son, Noel Conliffe; one daughter, Althea Conliffe; |
grandchildren, Earnest, Anthony, William and Ricardo Thompson, Brian

and Van Hall, Vincent Minus, Glen, Talbot and Marsha Lightbourn, Carol
Pinder, Pamela Hall, Valencia and Noella Conliffe; nieces and nephews,
Cynthia Musgrove, Dr. Vernell Allen, Floridell Adderley, Pauline Allen-
Dean, Michael Allen, Algernon S.P.B. Allen Sr., Patsy Major, Audrey Dean,
Betty Barnett, Allen and Stafford Major, and a host of other relatives and
friends including, the Turnquest family, the Johnson family and the
Williamson family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday from 10am
until service time.

SHARRON ROSSETTA
SCOTT, 42

of Johnson Road will be held on Friday,
February 20th, llam at St. George's
Anglican Church, Montrose Avenue. Rev.
Fr. Kingsley Knowles, assisted by Fr.
Kirkland Russell will officiate. Interment
will follow in the Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.

She will be sadly missed by her family:

sisters, Carolyn Scott Azikiwe, Hazel Scott

Taylor; brothers, Herbert Scott Jr., Harold
Scott, Ernest Scott; sisters-in-law, Lillian Scott, Melena Scott; nieces, Dr.
Nneka Azikiwe Holder, (Ohio USA) Dr. Ndidi Azikiwe Manuel North
Carolina (USA), Tishka and Krista Scott, D'sya Scott; nephews, Devon
Scott, Scott Terrell Taylor, Harold Taylor Jr., Trumaine, Taylor, Amaechi
Azikiwe, Devonte Scott; nephews-in-law, Dr. Michael Holder and Shane
Manuel; niece-in-law, Noel Nottage Scott; grand nephews, Christian Seth
Scott, Michael Holder Jr., Sean Azikiwe Manuel; grand niece, Chiara Devi
Scott; a host of relatives and friends including, Naomi Brown and family,
Catherine "Eddie" Francis and fanily, James Johnson and family, Subleecka
Thompson and family, Wenzel Lightbourne and family, Julia Davis and
family, Ophelia Fox and family, Clara Evans, Dr. Gertrude Holder and
family, Maculisher Beach and family, Donald Scott and family (Ft. Pierce,
Florida); Rhoda Hanna and family, Crystal Murray, Jalna and Barbara
Bullard, Shirley Taylor, Catherine Cate, Jeremiah Johnson and family,
Arthur Johnson and family and the Johnson Road family; special thanks
to: Kianté Stuart, Carol Thompson, Peggy Coakley, Nathalie Brooks and
family, Patrice Higgs, Ms. Munroe, Lana Deal and family, Patricia Cartwright,
Blovena Mackey, Ms. Gaitor, Chrysler Taylor, Shelly Johnson, Jackie
Rahming, Gladys Roberts and family, Gloria Sweeting, Renamae Roberts,
Dianne Kemp, Mother Symonette, Pastor Yvonne and Wendell Cornish,
Pastor Trecor Stubbs, Pastor Bodie, Pastor Campbell, Pastor Adline Jones,
Linda Williams. A team of doctors and nurses from the Trauma Room and
the Female Medical Ward of the Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Thursday from 10am to Spm and on Friday at the church
from 10am until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 13

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street

PO. Box N-3572, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Ira John Dwight
Smith, 46

of Ameryllis Avenue, Garden
Hills #1 and formerly of Orange

Gardens & Mausoleums, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Cherishing Ira's memories are those who loved him dearly: His }
devoted mother: Sarahmae Smith; siblings: Keith Smith, Anthony :
Stuart, Paige Smith and Matilda McPhee; nephews: Renaldo Smith, :
Travis Stuart and Garvin Robinson; nieces: Sarahnecia McPhee, !
Robynique Maynard and Nakeitha Robinson; adopted brother: |
Norman Humes; aunts and uncles: Kathleen (Ethelyn) and Hayward :
Dorsette, Miriam Seymour, Emeline and James Lockhart, Eulean :!
and Nathaniel Green, Henry and Gertrude Seymour, Roland Seymour, !
Albeana Seymour, Alfred and Joanna Johnson, Laura Smith, Herbert
: and Steven Stubbs; sister: Evelyn Ellis; brothers: Jacob and Steven
‘ Campbell; two daughters-in-law: Horice Stubbs and Sheila Stubbs;
: three sons-in-law: Bishop Michael Ferguson Sr., Patrick Moncur
and Arthur Major; five sisters-in-law: Mary Wells, Thelma, Janine
: and Martha Campbell, Christine Delancy; one brother-in-law:
: Joseph Campbell; eighteen grandchildren: Lathera and Lakera
‘ Major, Michael Jr., Alexcio Marcellus, Trevantae Ferguson, Kenneth,
‘ Petra and Javon Moncur, Myra Stubbs, Devon Rox, Renaldo and
‘ Renique Stubbs, Jonathon, Karice Damallie, Jayden and Jarron
: Stubbs; three great-grandchildren: Anthonique Gilbert, Tre’ Taylor
: and Devon Rox Jr.; one aunt: Maud Clarke; two uncles: Emmanuel
‘ Campbell and Lambert Ferguson; fifteen nieces: Donna, Mary,

Johnson and Lucine Stubbs; grand aunts and uncles: Arabella
Stubbs, Carnal and Fanny Seymour, Everette and Newtie Seymour,
Eula Mae Hepburn, Deaconess Doris Collie and Delores Seymour,
James Stubbs, McNeil Newbold and Lily Stubbs; sister-in-law:
Thelma Smith; godparents: Lawrence Hepburn, Ruby Cambridge
and Althamese Carey; cousins: Shirley and Nelson, Clarice, Emerick
and Deann, Floyd and Cheryl, Louise, Denise, Dahlia, Stacy, Tisa,
Tamica, Darial, Dennis, Davanti, Jayshree, Shekera and Arjohwa
Johnson, Louise, Sandra, Michael, Daniel and Rebecca Newbold,
Clifford and Cheryl, Dave, Mitzi, Pedro, Sheniquia, Evangelist
Charlene Duncombe, Sharon Williams, Shantel Charles, Ethelyn,
Christine, Agnes, Carla, Peggy Newbold and Shenique Watkins;

relatives and friends including: Glenn and Margaret Seymour and }
: Bridgette, Calsada, Venecia and Manecia; twelve nephews: Pastor
‘ Dean Wells Jr., Apostle Raymond Wells, Edward, Sammy, Joey,
‘ Obert, Floyd, Ashwood, Shawn, Kendo, Tristan and Deneko.
Brooks, Iva Bain, Alex Farrington, Sam Carter, Kevin McPhee and

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
‘ Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market and East
: Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the
: church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

family, Evelyn Seymour, William and Joyce McDonald, Rev'd Carl
Campbell, Bennett, Francita, Remelda, Leona, Laura Williams and
the Crew, Annamae Ferguson, Alvin and Sabrina Thurston, Hensley

family, Sarahmae Stubbs and family, Mabel "Gold" Rolle and
family, Rose and Tanya McCartney, Patrick and Constance Bethel,
Mr. & Mrs. Francis Naronha, Sherman and Sharlene Smith, Lois,
Shakera and Shaquille, The Stuart, Stubbs, Newbold, Bonimy, Pratt

: and Duncombe families, the communities of Orange Creek, Cat
: Island, The Greater Bethel Methodist Church family, Nassau Village
: and Garden Hills #1 family and the Parish of Christ The King, New
: Providence.

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
: Chapel, Palmetto A venue and Acklins Street off Market & East

Creek, Cat Island will be held on : Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the

Saturday, February 21st, 2009, } church from 9:00 a.m. until service
at 10:00 a.m., at Christ the King :!
Anglican Church, Ridgeland }
Park, West. Officiating will be :
Rev'd. Fr. Rodney Burrows, :
assisted by Rev'd. Fr. Ivan Eldon, :

" %) Deacon Bradley Miller and Rev'd }

EY Carl C. Campbell. Interment
follows in Lakeview Memorial :

Gloria Madeline
Stubbs, 66

of #86 Peardale Road, will be held
on Saturday, February 21st, 2009
at 11:00 a.m., at Pentecostal
Church of Faith in God, Bell Road,
Montell Heights. Officiating will
be Pastor Dean Wells Jr. Interment
follows in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

She is survived by five children:

Patrice Major, Rose Moncur,
Deaconess Terry Ferguson, Howard

Martha, Ruth, Karen, Sally, Terri, Christine, Maria, Crystal, Kera,





PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

will follow.

the state room of Jones Brothers Morticians
from Friday 12noon until 5pm.

He is survived by his wife, Sharlene Knowles, :
step-sons, Tyrek and Thaxter, parents, Olive :
Knowles-Dean and Maurice Knowles:
(deceased), step-father, Ezra Dean, two sisters: :
Rosemary Knowles and Viola Mckinney, one :
brother: Eric Knowles, numerous uncles :
including, Eddie Miller, Sam and Burley :
Knowles and Fred McAlpine, numerous aunts :
including: Elva, Queenie, Gloria, Cora, Louis, :
Thelma and Glenys mother- in-law: Josephine :
Thomas, sisters- in-law, Sharlette Moore and :
Brenda Knowles, brothers-inlaw, Roger :
Murdock, Andrew McKinney and Eugine :
Turnquest, numerous nieces and nephews :

including: Mycka, Deborah, Alexa, Sophia,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
P.O. Box N-1546

Telephone: 328-4900

Fax: 328-4903 ¢ Cell: 456-9062
Robert D. Cox, Managing Director

: Godfrey, Evette Sands, Monique Thompson,

: Edna and Betty Mills, Wendel and Alington,
of Millers, Long Island :
will be held at St. Georges :
Anglican Church on:
Saturday, February 21st at :
llam, officiating will be |
Fr. Kingsley Knowles, Fr. :
Dr. Hamilton and Bishop :
E. Ferguson cremation :
: Turnquest, Pinder, Deal, and Taylor Families,
: Darren and the Long Island Community.
Viewing will be held in} ©<_ ——___

cousins, Joseph and Robert, Deloris, Winifred,
Clifford, Melissa, Shantel, Deloris, Sam and
Dave Butler, Donahe, Levette, Mac, Glen, Peggy
and Dewitt,- numerous other relatives and friends
including, Washington LaFleur and family,
Barbara Thurston and family, Joe Deal and
family, the Baker, Gardiner, Cooper, Miller,
Knowles, Bridgewater, Adderley, lark, McPhee,

DEATH
ANNOUNCEMENT

Lolitha Virginia Belle, 37

of Franklyn Avenue off
Boyd Road,

she is survived by her two
daughters; Trenice Belle
}and Charleasa Bain,
"| mother; Virginia Evans
| four sisters; Marie Evans,
Edith Evans, Portia
Saunders and Raquel
Curry three brothers;

: Jeremiah Gaitor, Min. Ivan Evans and Mr.
Sherell, Dino, Pedson, Dino Jr., Aldanya, :
Giovanni, Rosy, Mariah, Arlicia, Brennick and :
Barin, Alaigh, Arlington, Wintrop, Ricardo, :
Burley, John, Brian, Lisa and Linda Knowles, :

Theodore Curry and other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements to be announced at a later
date.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



Saretequ Memorial Funeral Chane!
Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
Preddeal Maregheg Merctor
“rel

ee ee eee)
=
aes

CEE saerey aera f ta |
SrrrD rere oreiere |

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

Leona Lucinda
Kemp Thompson
(Lee), 47

a resident of Deep Creek,
Eleuthera will be held on
Saturday, 21’ February, 2009
at 10:00 am at All Saints
Anglican Church, Joan’s
Height East. Officiating will
be Father James Palacious and
interment will follow in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen
and Spikenard Roads. Services entrusted to GateWay
Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenilworth Street.

Left to cherish her memories are One Daughter: Victoria
Anderson, Two Sons: Elroy Kemp and Kevin Anderson,
Two Brothers: Howard Thompson and Ezra Sands, One
sister: Helen Goodman, One Granddaughter: Aaliyah
Kemp, Three Nieces: Vanessa, Shelly and Kendra, Five
Nephews: Jarrod, Howard Jr., Kenhrone, Kareem and
Romel, Three Uncles: Ivan Thompson, Ernest Gibson
and Leonard Thompson, Twenty-eight Cousins: Ronald
Thompson, Kingsley, Jacqueline, Kendal, Rodney,
Garfield, Leonard, Ruth, Vernita, Henrietta, Susanna,
Delphina, Jerry, Irvin, Ian, Dianne, Melvin and Marion
Sweeting, Andrea, Vernardo and Jamal Gibson, Antionette
Gibson-Major, Sheldon, Mickell, Erica, Cecila, Nicholas
and Luke. Two Grandaunts: Merthy Taylor and Thelma
Duncombe, and a Host of other relatives and friends
including: Gloria Anderson and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Oral Pinder and family, Rowena Anderson and family,
Mervin Sweeting and family, The Thompson, Sweeting,
Sands, Goodman, Mckenzie, Cleare, Anderson and
Strachan families, Stencil Anderson, Cyril and Ali
Mckinney, The Staff of Female Medical 1 and 2 and the
entire community of Deep Creek, Eleuthera.

Friends may pay their last respects at GateWay Memorial
Funeral Chapel on Friday, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
and on Saturday from 9:15 a.m. until service time at the
church.



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 15

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

of Millennium Gardens will be held
on Saturday February 21, 2009 at
2:30pm at Bethel Baptist Church,
Meeting Street. Officiating will
bePastor Timothy Stewart, assisted
by associate Ministers. Interment
will be made in The Church's
Cemetery.

Samuel McFall is survived by his

| wife, Brenda McFall; children

Samuel Jr., Raymond and Ramone

McFall, Shenique Fernander,

Lincoln & Marilyn Gay;

Grandchildren, Mark and Malek

Sawyer, Da'vantae and Sha'vantae Williams, Lincoln Jr. and
Maya Gay; parents, Rev. Pedro & Yvonne McFall, siblings,
Lester & Deborah, Andrew & Phoebe, Melany, Patrick &
Lavette and Jamaine McFall, siblings-in-laws, Sandra
Sweeting, Michael & Sherry, Terrance & Charmaine Sands,
Jeffrey & Marilyn Brown and Jamaro Humes; aunts and uncles,
Maxine Adderley, Doris McFall, Neilor Johnson, John & Mary
Hutchinson, Simeon & Dresslar Brown, Charles Deveaux,
Merley Conyer, Margaret Hanna and Otnell Colebrooke;
nephews and nieces, Ashton, Ciji, Dimitri, Dominic McFall;
close relatives, Aaron & Phyllis, Harold & Patricia, Joanne,
Dan, Creswell & Judith, Helena, Louise, Azeal & Genean,
Nelson & Martha, Eric, Shantillya, Jermico, Arnold, Rudolf,
William, Pedro, Theresa, Camron & Lisa, Linda, Dexter &
Mary, Annamae, Daisymae, Clem & Artis, Bradley & Rosie,
George & Sherese, Rodney, Leroy & Tina, Dwight & Esther,
Kwame David, Tonette, Terez, Tennille, Jatara, Tamica,
Shonna, Michael Jr Macina, Jermaine, Samantha, Raheen,
Perez, Toran, Takia,, Tanicha, Ragen, Jamaro Jr, Don, Melinda
and numerous others; close friends; Nurse Theresa Deal,
Hon Frank Watson, Hon Sidney Collie, Philip Turner, Brad
Smith, John Rolle, Kelly Kemp, David Williams, Freda
Farrington, the Brook’s family, Bethel Baptist Church family,
Department of Road Traffic, Sandilands Food Services, Golden
Gates Constituency, St Joseph’s Church family, Hudson,
Munroe, Thompson, Winders, Virgil, Missics, Pratt, Brown,
Rahming, Symonette and others too numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at
Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on
Friday from 10 a.m to: 5 p.m. and at the church on: Saturday
from 1:30pm until service time.



PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Publish your
CARD OF THANKS
or
INN LOVING MEMORY

in ‘The 'Iribune’s
INUE! W

OBDTTUARY

SECTION

Cvall us today

SO2-2352
or 302-2354





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ws Ee

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 17

EAST St SUN. @ RISE MC ISE MORTUARY

““” New Commitment to Serve

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Deaconess Vernita
Valerie Butler, 65

of Golden Gates #2 and formerly of Simms,
Long Island will be held on Saturday at 11 a.m.
at Shaw Temple A. M. E. Zion, Baillou Hill
Road & Peter Street. Officiating will be Elder
Kendall Mackey, assisted by Other Ministers.
Interment will follow in Lakeview Gardens,
J. EK. Drive.

She is survived by her husband: William Butler;

7 children: Rudolph, William Jr., Dewitt, Raquel,

Karen Simmons and Anthony Butler; 2 daughters-in-law: Verniece and Elsie
Butler; 2 sons-in-law: Freddie Simmons and Anthony Nesbitt; 29 grandchildren:
Julia, Irendo, Raqueria, Lorenzo, Tramaine, Anniqua, Raunice, Juliann, Justin,
Julian Jr., Denzil, Dewitt, Kenwitt, Devon, Blanche, Regina, Jenniemae, Shaquae,
Kristin, Ladia, Laquell, Davonnia, Tatyanna, Nikalia, Anfernee, Daquonn, Zayvion,
Abraham, and Jeremiah; 2 adopted granddaughters: Kyshon and Shornique; 1
sister: Beatrice Edgecombe; 4 brothers: Bernard, Edward, Kirklin and Ednol
McPhee; 11 sisters-in-law: Rev. Francina Watson, Cathleen and Karina Butler,
Luella Watkins, Lillian, Ruthmae and Mary McPhee, Pecola Mackey of Delray
Beach Fla., Essie McPhee of South Bay Fla., Lillian Solomon and Sylvia
McPhee of Orlando Fla., 5 brothers-in-law: Samuel, Alexander and Epheus Butler
and Heman Nixon of Waterford, Eleuthera; and George Edgecombe of Miami,
Fla; 33 nieces: Curly, Brenda, Theresa, Thelma, Sherrine, Ronnie, Val, Roslyn,
Eugenie, Allison, Jennifer, Shereice, Elloise, Cyprianna, Beverly, Eulapearl,
Laticia, Dianne, Debbie, Sharon, Terry, Vernita, Judy, Portia, Tamika, Sherry,
Mari, Jean, Velma, Lillian Eullean, and Catherine McPhee and Angel Hepburn;
26 nephews: Anthony, Bernard, Wendall, Gregory; Lawrence, Derek, Dwayne,
Ricardo, Trevor, Chester, Rollin, Kevin, Gordon, Allan, Ronald, Andrew, Ricky,
Ednol Jr., Marvin, Johnny, Alexander Jr., Lewis, Nelson, James, Tyrone, and
Lynden Hepburn; 4 God-children: Stephanai, Torio, Sashay & Carissa; Other
relatives and friends including: Pastor Kendall & Susan Mackey & Family, Shaw
Temple A.M.E. Zion Church Family, Varick Memorial A. M. E. Church Family,
Pastor Madeline Wells & The Holy Trinity A.M.E Church Family, Pastor Jacob
Hanna & Smith’s Chapel A.M.E Church Family, Pastor Louise Barr & The Christ
Chapel A.M.E Church Family, Dennis & Sandralee Taylor & Family, Kenneth
& Evelyn Johnson, Nora Gibbins, Lavada Sands, Ruthmae Newbold, Rowena
Gilbert, Gladys Lightfoot & family, Angela Brooks, Angeline Pierre, Elva Johnson,
Lloyd Nesbitt & family, Sheldon & Virginia Gray, Peter & Emma Whyte &
family, Janet Saunders & Almathae McCoy of Miami Fla., Weston & Andrea
Saunders & family, Arlington & Arementha Winters & family, George Henfield,
Dorothy Newman, Henry Cunningham, Antoinette Nesbitt, Beatrice Seymour &
family, Ida Smith, Leonna Major, Valarie Delancey & family, Stephanie & Emma
Smith, Mario & Michael Simms of Long Island, Fred & Monica Neely & family,
Janice Adderley & family, Beryl Rolle & family, Jaycinth Taylor, Frank & Carla
Nixon, Wilfred & Lulie Kelly, Paul Roberts & family, Cyke Greenslade & family,

Iva Roberts & family, Iva Johnson & family, Dianna Rahming & family, James
Anderson & family, Dominique Kelly, Velina Taylor & family, Comelius Ambrose
& family, Donnalee Higgins & family. Phillip & Yvana Bethel & family, Barbara
Deveaux, Bobby & Lynette Ambrose & family, Wendy Rolle & family, Ruthnell
Strachan, Cynthia Williams, Irene Sawyer & family, Willie & Karen Rolle,
Dwayne McGregor, Emily Hu utchinson, Dr. Beverton Moxey, Dr. Valentine Grimes
& Staff of Doctors Hospital 4°" Floor, Management & Staff of Tropical Shipping,
Dr. Joyous Pickstock & the staff of Faith Dental Clinic, Rev. Victor Cooper &
New Bethany Baptist Church Family, The Key West St. Family & the old staff
of Royal Bahamian.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 10 a.m. at the
Church until service time.

Mary
Hepburn, 77

of Balfour Avenue and formerly of Oneil’s,
Long Island will be held on Saturday at 10 a.m.
at The Church of God of Prophecy, Shirley
Street. Officiating will be Pastor Dale Moss
assisted by Pastor Terrance Forbes. Interment
will follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant
Life Road.

She is survived by her sisters: Sarah Horton,

Idella McPhee, Pastor Pearlene Cartwright,

Queen E. Hepburn and Norris Smith;

eranddaughters: Adreanna Mary and Lonell

Burrows; grandson and granddaughter-in-law:

Pastor Renardo and Ramona Bethel ; great-grandchildren: Renardo Jr. and Revere
Bethel; sister-in-law: Mayna Hepburn; brother-in-law: Freeman Cartwright;
numerous nieces and nephews and their families: Joy and Michael Tucker, Freda
and Sam Farrington, Spessard Horton, Tyrone and Bernadette Hepburn, Linda
Pratt, Monalisa, Veronica Collie, Gertrude and Oswald McClain, Robertha
Knowles, Michael and Florina Turner, Ophelia & Anna Turner, David and Shamorn
Tumer, Ruth and Chandrew Dawkins, Esther and Jerome Gilbert, Joan and Leon
Cox, Corporal Ann Damas, Constable Edroy and Sargeant Gregory Cartwright,
Beryl and Nekia Shearer, Prison Officer Ronald Cartwright and Raymond
Cartwright; Patrick Bethel; Mr. and Mrs. George Smith , The Cornish Family,
The Armbrister Family, Pedro and Elka Smith; other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention including, Lynn Thurston and family, Annie Morley, Delores
Knowles, Cressel and Dorothy Clarke, Sandra Bullard and family, the Church of
God of Prophecy Shirley Street (notably the Prayer Band), the Church of God
of Prophecy, East Street family and the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital .

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, #27 Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 9 a.m. at the
Church until service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale, Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 323-EAST —

(242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957

24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117





PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ROSNI
LOUIS, 43

of Brougham Street, will be
held on Saturday, 21
February 2009, 10:00 a.m.,
will be held at Queen of
Peace Catholic Church, Faith
Ave., North off Carmichael
Road. Officiating: Rev. Fr.
Roland Vilfort S.M.M.
Internment: Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his loving wife: Clenise
Jenny Louis; Two (2) Children: Rosline and Jean-Raynard
Louis; Mother: Ovillia Louis; Five (5) Sisters: Ceramant
Blanc, Rose-Marie and Lydia Franco's, Margarite St. John
and Jadan Louis all of Ft. Lauderdale, Flordia; Five (5)
Brothers: Modira and St. Hilaire Bissainthe of Miami
Florida, Michel and Willie Le-Gere, Franck, Dennee, Prenne'
and Verlandie Francio's of Pompano Beach, Florida; Three
(3) Aunts: Marie Therese, Vionie, Lorealia and Raynette
Louis of Miami, Florida; Two (2) Uncles: Lamein and Ringo
Louis , both of Chicago; Three (3) Sisters-in-law: Christine
and Josette Bissainthe of Haiti and Marie Franco's of Miami,
Florida; One (1) Brother-in-law: Ceramant Blanc of Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida; Numerous Nieces and Nephews
including: Jennifer, Modlyn, Christie, Rachel, Stephanie,
Kenny, Kevin and Megiver Bissainthe, Punnie, Jeffery,
Kenol, Rodney and Isabel Blanc of Miami, Flordia; A Host
Other Relatives and Friends including: Edna, John, Yves,
Mark and Edlyn Barrett, Roland Jaques, Dalitha, Linda
Barrett, Milan Louis, Merlande, Dianna and Claudette Barrett,
Francisco and Marco Louis, Giovanni, Anishka, Shaquille,
Marckell and Mark Barrett Jr.; Rhonda, Ronald Jr. and Raven
Jacques, Augustine and Yolyn; Special Friends including:
E'Rose and Missouri, Ms. Malik, Theresa, Verge, Marcel
and Gilbert, the entire Brougham Street, Olde Corner and
Peter Street family and special thanks to staff at the Intensive
Care Unit at The Princess Margaret Hospital, and a host of
other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE
ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD
AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9 A.M
UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ROSALEE
WELLS, 56

OF #252 POLARIS DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21,
2009 AT 11:00 A.M. AT
CENTRAL CHURCH OF GOD,
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA.
OFFICIATING WILL BE BISHOP LESLIE R. WOODSIDE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE GRAND BAHAMA
MEMORIAL PARK SECTION #2, FROBISHER DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.

Left to cherish her memories are her 2 daughters: Sharon
Sturrup and Charlene Russell; 2 sons: Theodore and Shawn
Russell; 5 grandchildren: David Thompson Jr., Daniel
Sturrup, Dathan, Damara and Dwayne Sturrup Jr.; mother:
Pearline Wells; 4 sisters: Thelma Saunders, Remelda Walker,
Gelina and Jessiemae Wells; 3 brothers: Stafford, Lennex
and Jason Wells; 67 nieces including: Desamona Musgrove,
Roshand Cox, Delshae Miller, Portia, Jasmine, Alicia and
Shamika Wells; 14 nephews including: Deon, Dexter and
Christopher Clarke, Lavard Wells, Denrick Miller, Leroy,
Lavado, Leron, Leo and Lenard Brice, Rufus Wells, Edwin
and Maxwell Wells; aunt: Florence Levarity of Bimini; son-
in-law: Dwayne Sturrup; sister-in-law: Yvette Wells; 2
brothers-in-law including: Shawn Walker and a host of other
relatives and friends including: Raymond Albury and family,
Shirley Hamilton and family, Janet Bowleg and family, Eloise
Sturrup and family, Delores Russell and family, Leotha Moss,
Nickae Olurin, Michelle Gibson, Katherine Wilson, Dixie
Jones, Bernice Cox and family, management and staff at the
Rand Memorial Hospital especially the Kitchen staff, Female
Surgical Ward and the Female Medical 1 at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and the Cancer Society.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE”
OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON
SATURDAY FROM 9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 19

TRestscs Memovual
a

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICES FOR

UNERAL SE

: (Texas), Queenie Hepburn and family; 3 god sisters: Valerie and
i Marquerite Johnson and Tessa Vaughn, Rev. L. Carl R. Culmer and
i member of Grants Town Wesley Church and others too numerous to
i mention.

ANTHONY LAVERN
GREENSLADE, 52

of Nassau Street will be held on }
Saturday, February 21st at 11:00am at }
Grants Town Wesley Methodist Church, }
Balliou Hill Road and Chapel Road, }
Officiating will be Rev. L. Carla R. }
Culmer, assisted by Brother Ernest }
Miller. Interment will be made in }
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Roads.

Cherished memories are held by his 6 }
sisters, Evangeline, Dianna, Pamela and Paula Greenslade, Mrs. Sonia :
Dean and Mrs.Lenora Johnson; 4 brothers: Thomas, Goerge, Philip |
and Bradley Greenslde.; 11 nieces, Sgt 1719 Alice Gilbert, Mrs. Gina
McCarthy (California), Mrs. Juliette Pinder (New Jersey), Attorney ;
Michelle Dean, Georgette and Gayle Greenslade, Renetta and Dellarese :
Johnson, Shenique Lewis, Lavion Smith; 18 Nephews: Deputy :
Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslde Sr., Desmond Greenslade }
Sr., ASP Ashton Greenslade Sr., Det. Sgt. 464 Kevin Greenslade Sr.,
Stephen Greenslade, Teireince Greenslade (Texas), Master Chief Mark }
Greenslade( US Navy) (California), Patrick Greenslde( Canada) Edwin ;

Greenslade, John and Jeffrey Greenslade (Sarasota) Michael, Marvin }

and Madian Dean, Marvin and Romell Johnson, Ashton and Anton | his children, Corrine, Anwar, Sharonda, Travis, Ron and Glennard

Greenslade; Numerous grand nieces and nephews including: Anna, ; Holmes; brothers, Rafael, Jules, and Kha’iel; sisters, Yvette, Tiffany,

Kimel, Keva, Ashti, Stephenique, Greenslade, Alicia Murphy, and | Carlene, Kim, Anishka and Juliette Holmes; step-brother and sister,
Chiara McCarthy, Ellison Jr., Desmond Jr., Kevin Jr, and Ashton Jr., }

Several great grand nieces and nephews, 3 sisters-in-law: Patricia, | Bowe (Godmother); uncle, Alonzo Holmes; nieces and nephews, Iman

Virginia and Verna Greenslade; 2 brothers-in-law: Maxwell Dean and i Joseph, Raven and Rihanna Holmes, Erin, Diamond, Geremy Mullings,

Levi Johnson; Extended relatives: Yvonne Greenslade-Rolle and : Erin Delancy, Jerard Holmes, Jerome Gaitor, Jayden Lockhart, Joey

family, Oswald and Basil Greenslade, Karen Andrews and family, Sister } and Jeremy; cousins, Patice Bowe, Tina Lockhart, Patrick Bowe,

Annie Thompson and Family, Barbra Bullard and Family, Rev. Emmet } Ricardo Holmes, Dwayne, Antoinette, Anton, Tia, T. J., Darius and

Weir and Family, Mrs. Miriam Curling and family, Vernell Richardson, Makella; sister-in-law, Renee Holmes; grand nieces and nephews
Aubrianna and Derek Butler, Mrs. Emerald Winder, Franklyn and Leslie :

Winder and family, Hyacinth Pratt and family, Willamae Salkey and ; Mullings, Ebony and Edon Bowe, Wayne Farah, Jourdan Lockhart and

family, Naomi Brown and family, Catherine Francis and family, Veronica | Ciatra Bowe; other relatives and friends including, Felix Joseph,

Seymour and family, Sybil Seymour and family, Carmetta Rolle and | Atthur Lockhart, Mary Dames and family, Enid Bowe Ferguson and

family; Other relatives and friends including: Janet Gomez, Paul } family, Francina Bowe and family, Gladys Bowe and family, Carrie
McCarthy, Kendal Pinder, Cpl. 2461 Yvette Deveaux, Petty Officer }

Gary Hanna and family, Alvin Mackey and family, Deacon George } and family, Kenneth Bowe and family, Joan Bowe and family, Helen

Richardson and family, Deidre Cooper and family, Kimberley ! Butler and family, Creola Taylor and family, Rozelda Humes and family,

Greenslade, Mitchell Gilbert, Hazel, Prenell and Jacqueline Greenslade, } Patsy Bridgewater and family, the Premier Importers family, the Original

Barbara Dean and family, Security Department, Cove Atlantis, The Wrecker Boys, Mr. Arlington Butler and family and other relatives and
Staff of J.S.Johnson, Honourable Sydney Collie MP, Percy (Vola) :

Francis, Eddie Dames, Iris Hanna, Ellen Adderley, Rochelle Bain, }

Daisy Thompson, Pamela Rahming, George and John Deveaux, Rev. | Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Mortuary and

Charles Wallace and Family, Wayne Edgecombe, Ruth and Norma | Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00

Gardiner, and family, Robert Sturrup and Family (All of Miami Florida), | 2â„¢ to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30 am at the church

Ian Campbell (Texas), Dr. Carter Womack (Ohio), Maurice King

Viewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Mortuary and
Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00
am to 6:00 pm and at the church from 9:30 am to service time.

GLEN WENDELL
HOLMES, 48

of McKinney Drive will be held on
Saturday morning at 10:00am at Salem
Union Baptist Church, Taylor Street.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. C.W.
Saunders, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and interment will be in
the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his
parents, Alice Bowe Holmes and
Glenn Holmes and his wife, Cynthia,

Corel and Claudette, aunts, Dornel King, Debroh Gaitor and Brenda

including, Makiko Holmes, Nishan and Yukari Joseph, Genesys

McKenzie and family, Nigel Bowe and family, Visna Bowe Mackay

friend too numerous to mention.

until service time.





PAGE 20, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Limited

i Eicatniens Gincad”

FREEPORT
11A East Coral se poeee G.B., Bahamas

Telephone: (243) ‘37a ris 7 (042) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier ears bieaiehy N.P., Bahamas

P.O. Box CB-
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 : (342) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

KENDAL STEPHAN |

BRICE, 43

of St. James Road will be held |
on Sturdy February 21st 2009 :
at 11:00 am at St. Matthews |
Anglican Church Shirley Street :
Officiating will Be Father James |
Moultrie, assisted by Father Don }
Haynes and Interment will be |
in the Southern Cemetery :

Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Williams,

numerous to mention.

DEATH NOTICES

MS. ELVERIA
NEELY, 68

of Congo Town, Andros died at
the Princess Margaret Hospital on
the 13th of February 2009.

She is survived by her father,
Leonard Neely; sons: Dale,
Ricardo, Leonard, Elvis, Fred,
Hurbert, Renardo, and Randolph
Neely; sisters, Melrose Neely and

’ : a host of other relatives too numerous to mention.
He is survived by his mother: Thelma Brice, brothers: :

Paul and Gilbert Brice, Aunts Rosie Thrower, Thelma :
Pyfrom, Swen Doit of Bermuda, Mary Hanna, Elva :
Rahming, Rev. Harriet Fernander, Orian Rahming, :
Hortence Rahming, Charoiette Rahming , Uncles: Basil |
Rahming, Edwin Rahming, Winston Hanna; Cousins: |
Erlist Miller, Ellen Simms, Natasha Smith, Asatha Greene, |
Marilyn Rahming, Sherry Dean, Sheila Rahming, Anne : |
Taylor, Joan Dilworth, Shirley Girling, Vamgie Rahming, |

Lucia Broughton, Betty Mills, Edna Jones, Beverly : |.)
Petisla Carter, Michelle Hanna, Deborah : }47
Ferguson, Lavoughn Fernander, Sussette Uriasz, Leslie | [79
Pyfrom, Drexwell Rahming, Herbert Rahming, Wenzel ; | 7
Rahming, Morris Rahming, David Rhming, Loran | |
Rahming, Oral Rahming, Clement Knowles, Raymond :
Doit, Philip Doit, Hammond Rahming, Dr. Charles |
Rahming, ndrea Rahming, Vernon Rahming, Kevin }
rahming, Edmund Rahming, Winston Hanna Jr. Brain :
Fernander, Kevin Fernander, Sheldon Fernander, Jason :
Fernander, and a host of other relatives and friends too | Rozelda Flowers: 2 sisters: Nezima Rahming and Melverne
| Flowers; 3 brothers: Lindsey Davis, Bertram and Garvin
: Flowers; grandmother: Mellie Flowers; 6 aunts; 7 uncles;
Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview |
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and :
Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and }
at the church from 9:30 am to service time.

Funeral arrangements will be made at a later date.

MRS. ZONNIA
MARLO FORBES,
48

»| of Hawkins Hill, Nassau, New
»))| Providence and formerly of Hanna
Hill, Eight Mile Rock, Grand
»)*) Bahama died at the Princess
t*)) Margaret Hospital, Nassau, New
Providence on Thursday, February

12, 2009;

She is survived by her husband: Welton Forbes; 5 children:
Nathania, Anya, Ashli, Ashton and Antonis Forbes; 4
grandchildren: Kevonia, Kylah, Dazaria and Patrick; mother:
Joan Hanna-Davis; father: Rev. Clyde Flowers; stepmother:

numerous nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 21

and Crematouum Liniled

Bod Cacedniees Bin?

EEPORT
11A East Coral oat eee G.B., Bahamas
Box F-4
Telephone: 22) 473- iisy 42) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

LO WUE SERVICE FOR

MERLEAN
McKINNEY, 82

OF #12 BENTLY DRIVE,

ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21,

FATHER CURTIS E. ROBINSON.

PINDER’S POINT, GRAND BAHAMA.

Jr., Ahmad, Marco Jr., Adaejah, Geshan, Anthon, Devonte,

Deshawn, Destiny, Kymano, Leroy, Leandrea, Cherie, Jerrick, }
Jerricak, Jerenae, Jeremiah. Savannah, Vastachea, Tony Jr., James }
Jr., Vashawn, Brane, Clarissa, Cordero, Basaneo, Phyllicia, Troy, :
Michael, Gary Jr., Neko and Jonathan; seven grand sons-in-law: }
Mario Taylor, Remano Bain, Stafford Albury, Geon Russell, Tony }
Russell, Eddie Bodie and Pastor James Williams; three grand |
daughters—in-law: Eva Bain, Amanda Greenslade and Dorcas ;
Armbrister; grand niece and nephews: Jevillo, Willard Jr., Jarvis }
and Trevor Williams, Tony Jr., and Terry; two god children: :

Myrtle Carroll and Chester Walker; nieces: Alice Williams,

Deaconess Joyce Williams, Viola Davis & Family, Effie Walker }
& Family, Lealeen, Hepburn, Sandy, Edwards, Buiah, Lorine }
Walker and Joanna Russell; nephews: Leo Russell, Superintendent :
of Police Leland Russell, Pastor Mervin Burrows and Simon }

Russell, Floyd, Charles, Chester and Douglas Walker, Marcus,

: Bain, Wilma Gibson of West Palm Beach, The Home for the
Aged, Solomon of Palm Security, St. Jude’s Anglican Church,
: Premier Fund Services, James Alfred Newbold of Florida, Edna
: Russell, Doris and Maxine Bain, Wendy Pratt, Marilee Frith,
? Reatah Douglas, Susan Adderley, Theophilus Adderley, Margaritta
i Williams, Robert Lloyd, Joseph Bain & Family, Virtual Rolle &
_ | FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA }
AND FORMERLY OF CROSSING }
ROCK, ABACO WILL BE HELD :
: Lewis and Romeo Carroll, George and Erma Williams, Kenneth
2009 AT 2:00 P.M. AT ST. JUDE’S }
ANGLICAN CHURCH, SMITH’S :
POINT, GRAND BAHAMA. }
OFFICIATING WILL BE REV’D }
INTERMENT WILL :
FOLLOW IN THE PINDER’S POINT PUBLIC CEMETERY, :
: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
: A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY

Left to cherish fond memories are her three daughters: Ann }
Coakley, Berlene Bain and Augustine Greenslade; two sons: }
Glenn McKinney and John Newbold Jr.; three sons-in-law: Basil }
Greenslade, Willis Bain and Lorenzo Coakley; 20 grand children: :
Pamela Newbold-Taylor, Faron, Marco and Deangelo Greenslade, :
Jerry Martin, Whitney Armbrister, Rochelle Bain, Rhonda Russell, }
Princess Albury, Peggy Bain, Christina Bain, Hubert Bain, Susan }
Russell, Samantha Bodie, Merale McKinney, Wendy, Vernice, :
Maedonne, Shawn and Shanique McKinney; thirty-six great }
grand children: Alicia, Ebony, Dominique, Sharriasha, Stafford |

Family, Mama Liz and family, Jennifer Walkins, Violet Roberts,
Sandra Bodie, Marilyn Kemp, Monique Storr, Richard Walker,
Prince and Joseph Bodie, Romeo Archer, Janice, Yolanda, Juliet,

and Deserea Taylor and a host of other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “CELESTIAL SUITE”
OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FROM 1:00 P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

MS. LISA MARTHA
SMITH, 37

OF FLAMIGO GARDENS,
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE
AND FORMERLY OF
HAWKSBILL, GRAND
BAHAMA DIED AT THE
PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL, NASSAU, NEW
PROVIDENCE ON MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 16, 2009.

She is survived by her children: Nioshi Smith, Nataria Cooper
and Javon Adderley Jr.; mother: Verlene Smith; father: Paul
Smith; sisters: Pauline, Montana and Monica Smith; brothers;
Doyle, Edwin, Geard and Shoghi Smith; Fianceé: Javon Adderley

: : : 4 : | Sr., numerous nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and a host of
Michael Merioun Davis and a host of other relative and friend :

including: Raymond & Sharon Meadows, Bob & Pearl Feldman }
of West Palm Beach, Estella Knowles, Robinette Gibson, Shelly |
Pinder-Wilson & Family, Wendell & Georgette Thurston, Wilma }

other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.





PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MISSIONARY
FIRSTENA
CHRISTIE, 94

a resident of Garden Hills Estates & }
formerly of New Bight, Cat Island, will : |
be held at St. John's Native Baptist : |
Cathedral, Meeting Street, on Saturday ;
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop }

Michael C. Symonette, assisted by Rev.

Dr. Hervis L. Bain & other Ministers |
of the Gospel. Interment follows in the ;

Church's Cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are 2 |
children, daughter Nellie Brooks; son, Eldric Miller; 2 daughters-in-law: Miriam : |
Miller and Ella; 1 brother: Samuel Romer; 2 sisters: Elizabeth Gibson and }
Gladys McKenzie; 1 sister-in-law: Millicent Romer; adopted son: Alonzo }

Smith; 17 grandchildren: Vanda (Ross) Smith, Brent (Preola) Brooks, Perry

(Bridgette) Brooks, Peggy McKinney, Carolyn (Rev. Dr. Kendal) Stubbs, Sebrin

rere Peek pores eet aes, Wey a ee vee foster children: Henrietta T. Miller, 1904 Sgt. Robert Goodman, Captain Glen

: «ys Bi . i Bain; brother: Rudolph Lewis; foster sister: Doris Henfield; grandchildren:
eae one ee pens Sea pra kere le oe i Valderez Miller, Yolanda, Marvin, Cordero, Berdiesha, & Deanglo Goodman,
gt ae nae & : i Misty, Glen Jr. & Graham Bain, Giovani & Keturah Bethel; aunts: Olga Nairn,

. : : . i Teresita Bain, Lillian Johnson, Hester Kerr, Rowena Ferguson; grand aunts:
DOT a Oe ee ey ca ae : Edith Saunders & Eula Gayle; daughters-in-law: Michelle Bain & Norma

? Goodman; neices: Jasmine Lewis, Cheryl Campbell, Arlene Brown, Francita

Jonathan aud) Been Mound, Joel row 2 erent eteot erangeni linen: es | Colebrooke, Glendamae McIntosh & Lillian Rolle; nephews: Jamaal Lewis &

i Ryan Lewis, Craig C. Laing, Charles, Lynden, & Sean Gaitor, K.C., Kamal,
: Keno, Brendan, & Carlton Rolle; sisters-in-law: Antoinette Lewis, Dorothy
? Laing & Sandra Rolle; brothers-in-law: Carl Rolle, Amos Gaiter & Keith Rolle;

: . : i Numerous cousins including: Hetty Goodman, Albert Moxey, Donna Nairn,

pours Pomiee, 207 . acupbell, “anita Johnson and oe reget Featets, Hah ? Bernadette Rolle, Leonard Neely Jr., Judy Gayle, Anthony Neely, Gloria

Romer, Thelma Adderley, Sandra Lawyer, Rachel Gordon, Valerie Thomas of ; : : : : :

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, Lauretta Anderson of Sarasota, Florida and Marcia Dawkins, Shirley Rolle, Janice Brooks, Ollie Taylor, lona, Sharon, Algeria and
; ‘ : , i Shelly Lewis, Margaret Campbell, Ruth Ferguson, Ophelia Cooper, Andrea

! Pegues, Betty Cash, Althea Kerr, Naomi King, Patricia Deveaux, Brenda
i Henfield, Rev. Charles Lewis, James, William, Wilfred, Sean, Elvis, Patrick,
: i & Ian Lewis, Wellington and Edward Johnson, Eugene Coakley, Wellington,

Dorsette, Theodore and Lester Romer of Fort Lauderdale, Florida and Gerald ! Rudolph, Walter, Clyde and Tyrone Ferguson, Alphonso and Dencil Kerr:
? numerous godchildren including: Juanita Gibson, Bernadette Rolle, Ralph
: : Severe : ? Russell, Monique Simmons, Marguerite Taylor, Portia Sturrup, Bernard Sturrup,
Antonique,Julia, Maria Williams, Gilda Scavella, Joylene Rolle, Gaynell Green, § Dorece Henfield, Margo Stuart, Caryn Francois, Samuel Saunders & Shonte
: Sturrup, other relatives and friends including: Patsy Patton & Family, Benjamin
i Bain & Family, Phyllis Taylor & Family, Cynthia Russell & family, Rollen
: Ts Se : Goffe & family, Karl & Donna Wallace, Carolyn Taylor & family, Cynthia

Estella, Nicky, Portia, Linda, Tasha, Marsha, Kathleen, Wendy, Patricia, Tina, {Stuart & family, Monique Simmons & family, Yvette Taylor & family, Sandra
: : : : : : i Fenelon & family, George Goodman, Patrice McKinney, Coralee Bethel, Duane
Dip vane, Maras pop hia, Nandi 2etee, daden brand nephews: Dale Rome i Miller, Andrew Winder, Arlington Brown, Cornelius Gray, Samuel Dean &
: family, Rosalie Neymour & family, Florinda Bastian & family, Delores Nottage
: a ees . i & family, Doreen Fernander, Philip Sturrup, Dr. Winston C. Rolle, Franklyn
Henry, Henrico, Henricks, Joshua, Jeremiah, Rodger, Vincent, Hem, Shem, : : : : :
Shawn, Timothy, Clayton, Dino, Tino, Ricardo; other relatives and friends Rolle, Louis Soncaire, the Lewis family, Mary Ann Clarke, Mary Churtum, Fr.
including: Hazel Penn, Garnet Rolle and family, Levi Charlton and family, }
Rey. Dr. Teuton Stubbs and Helena Stubbs and the family of Southland Church ;
of God, Elmetta Rolle, Rev. Stanley Pinder, Frederick Pratt, Berlin Pratt, Ethelyn of Our Lady's Catholic School, Our Lady's Church Faith Community, the
King, Marina Fernander (godchild), Pandora (godchild), Patrick and Sheila Windsor Lane community, doctors & nurses of A&E, the Eye Ward, Female

Seymour, Dr. Davidson Hepburn, Deacon Ekron Pratt and family, Deacon Medical II and numerous other relatives and friends.

Miller, Chinua (Kimra) Miller, Kenny Miller, Bishop Lloyd (Sandra) Mortimer,

Smith, Lorrell and Keanu Brooks, Perez, Brianna and Breon Brooks, Raschard,
and Sebrin Brooks, Jr., Destiny and Ashanee Adu, Shantina, Steven, L'Ekeva,
Brooks and Reyanah Smith; nieces: Pearliemae, Linda and Vanera, Delores,
Idamae, Doreen, Christina, Alberthamae, Sharon Creary, Elizabeth Knowles,

Mainy, Sara, Jermeek, Rosenell Mackey, Bettymae, Martha and Angela
McKenzie, Coral, Seberina, Dina, Kimbler, Dienice, Bonita, Christina and

Allen of Tampa, Florida; Nephews: Anthony "Spiderman", John Lewis, Charles,
Sammy, Leroy McKenzie, Glenn, Dale and Bruno Romer, Maxwell, Kermit,
Nathan, Dolson and Sidney Romer, Joseph 'Doc’ Dorsette, Gloria, Dr. Rudolph

Romer, Jr. of Bradenton, Florida; grandnieces: Glenita, Gia, Shonell, Brynae,
Mitzi, Omiece, Sara, Malinda, Shakera, Nadia, Anoja, Devonia, Yolanda,

Lorene Smith, Lynette and Peggy Johnson, Donna Bridgewater, Louise Moss,
Veronica, Andrea, Shantel, Samantha, Kenrea, Rashae, Rashanna McKenzie,
Yvette Francis, Charima Rolle, Pamela Kelly, Tamico, Jewcilla McKenzie,
Shanell, Shaneka, Rodesha,Tameka, Crystal, Nakera, Christin, Katrina, Nicole,

Jr., Valentino, Nicholas, Brevin, Brayden, Daniel, Nathaniel, Stephen, Rashad,
Samuel, Eugene Jr., Kendal Jr., Jonah, Samuel, Gabriel, Anthony, Mark, Devon,

Mortimer, Gertrude Dames, Laura Benson (godchild), Elsaida Porter, Dorothy

Hexon Pratt and family, Mother Catherine Pratt, Pastors, Officers and members

Armbrister, Rev. Lernis and Rowena Cornish and family and Lucy Sturrup.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,

i from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m.
; until service time.

FLORENCE
ZABETH ROLLE,
63

a resident of Windsor Lane West, will

| be held at Our Lady of the Holy Souls
Catholic Church, on Saturday at 12:00
p.m. Officiating will be Fr. Michael

| Kelly, ss.cc., & Fr. David Cooper,

| assisted by Deacon Peter Rahming &
Deacon Maxwell Johnson. Interment
follows in Catholic Cemetery, Tyler
Street.

Left to cherish the memories of this kind
hearted and wonderful woman are: her

Michael Kelly, ss.cc. Deacon Maxwell Johnson, Deacon Peter Rahming, Mser.
John Johnson, Fr. David Cooper, Rev. Terrance Morrison, Claudette Rolle,
(Director of Catholic Education), present & former staff, teachers and students

1 : : : : Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,
of St. John's Native Baptist Cathedral, Sis. Catherine McDonald, Curlene from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 11:00 a.m.

? until service time.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 23

Demeritte’s Suneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET °¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CLEVELAND
CLEMENT
SIMMONS, 78

Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are two sons: Cleveland Jr. and Marlo; }
five daughters: Eldora James, Sandra Simmons, Judy McFall, :
Monica Simmons and Ophelia Miller; two brothers: Benjamin and }
Oneal Williams; three sisters: Corine Pinder, Anthea McIntosh and :
Sarah Williams; twenty three grand children: Detective Sargeant :
1520 Sidney James of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Vaneke, :
James, Jameco, Edisa, Renaldo, Jurich, Clevette, Clement, Dion }
Jr., Janré, Corazine, David Jr., Dennison Jr., Clevandra, Darren, ;
Dionette, Clevon, Marlo Jr., Cletus, Justin Jr., and Jameel and }
Destiny; adopted grandchildren: Sheen and Sanchez Nabbie; sixteen :
great grand children: Sidney Jr., Aaron, Mesach, Macvaughna, }

Dezur, Clydisa, Justin, Malika, Jabez, Jurreo, Amana, Kamea, } ie
Chicai, Montel, Montel,Jermaine and Chad; two daughters-in-law: } Cherished memories are held by his son, Elvis; adopted son, Vincent
Debbie Ferguson and Adrian Simmons; brothers-in-law: Cleveland } Simms, Anthony Adderley and Clinton Ferguson; one sister, Isabell

: ; : Miller; two brothers, Neville and Norward Dean; seven

i grandchildren, Charlotte, Mary, Elvis Jr., Laurel, Emily Ann and
: Vannie; four great grandchildren, Naken, Tonya, Randy Jr. and Aria;

Rav MeCdrla Rolle Rosanna. Debbie. Keahorm. Damelca: Deanna : sisters-in-law, Helen Hall, Vernice Wallace, Julia, Martha and Lilly
Donna, Jackie Shelly Sadesha, Deborah Latson, Gabriellee, | Dea; brothers-in-law, Alexander Russell and Edison Miller;
Brendalee, Ida, Cecile, Annette, Lillian, Latrocia and Demetrius; £ TOMCTOUS DCCRS and nephews including, Tezel, Lillian, Irene,

nephews: Rev. Arlington Rolle, Apostle David Williams, Carrol, ; Ezekiel, Bill, Bradly, Hazel, Betty, Helena, Shirley, Elizabeth, Ruth,

Tony, Crofton, Roy and Barry Williams, Gregory, Solomon Williams i Gaynell, Alfred, Prince, Haldore, Oneezer, Luther, Duncan, Dereck,

i Ruby, Cheryl, Thomasina, Mazella, Kino, Elva, Neville, Patricia,

Edith Lockhart, Branhilda Laing, Winifred Oliver, Trevor Oliver oe J site renee aoc Sit ee Clyde,
and Christine; other relatives and friends including, Beverley | 30% Pames Amici, eva, barry, Jan, Py his;#sptll, tanessa,

: : : Charles Beneby, Philip, Maggie and Madline; numerous cousins,
Marshall, George Davis, Petula Black, Alice Stubbs, James Stubbs, i Di and’ Mie, Munir Rashad, Dn ahd Mis. Joseph evans, Dt Ceoree

and Danny Rolle, Lillisbelle Swann, Marvin Belle, Rose Rahming, ee a ok 7 ee a ee eel
Renee Bullard, Nurse Emmanuel, Sylvia Tynes, Allan Lightbourne, } peat ens a - A ie a cn Oiclia Jacques, Wayne Bass, Kiki, Tony of Floénda, Valderne:? ee eee ae bee Bevis Be ee

Cooper, Peter Walkes, Dion Miller and family, Wanda Darville : Campbell, Bernetta Evans and family, other relatives and friends,

: Bro. and Sis. Curtis, Rufus Dean and family, the Adderley family,
i Mr and Mrs Valentine Grimes and family, Bro. Wood and family,

Bowe and family, Alexander Burrows and family, Taylor family, Sis. Moses, Boyd Road Community, Johnson Park Church family.

Quincy Taylor, Paulette Whylly & Family, Feaste family, Mr. Riley, : ,.. ; Sones
Michelle Williams, Velma Forbes, Ms. Bullard, the Big Pond | Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

Community, Domino Boys at Potters Cay Dock, Bain & Grant's : Market Street, from 10am - 6pm on Saturday and on Sunday at the

: church from 10am until service time.

Newbold and Donald Davis and Sonny Stubbs, Jay Ferguson and
James Ferguson; sisters-in-law: Edith Newbold, Charlamae and
Carol Williams; nieces: Sandradee Henfield, Dellereese, Daisymae,

Jr., Prince, Franklyn, Dominique and Naboth Newbold; cousins:

Sharnell Wiliams, Sam and Rosemary Cambridge, Barry, Lafayette

Oswald and Lillian Williams, Debbie Ferguson, Monique Williams,
Eulease Smith and family, Roslyn and Millicent Smith, Louise

: Town Senior Citizen Association, Five Porches of Deliverance
? Church family, True Vine Christian Centre of Hollywood, Florida,
: staff of KFC, Wemss Security, Kelly's Home Centre, Registrar
: General's Department and the National Insurance Board, Tyrone's
? Conch Stall, staff of Demeritte's Funeral Home; other relatives and
: friends too numerous to mention.

a resident of Water Street, Big |
Pond, will be held at Peniel :

Kingdom Ministries, Market Street i Market Street, from 10am - 6pm on Friday and on Saturday from

and Palmetto Avenue, on Saturday { 9 a.m. - 12 noon and at the church from 1pm until service time.
at 2pm. Officiating will be Rev. }
A. Samuel Rolle, assisted by }
Pastor James Womack. Interment :

follows in Woodlawn Gardens,

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

ZEPHANIAH
DEAN, 89

aresident of Munson Village, Boyd
Road and formerly of Lowe Sound,
Andros, will be held at Johnson
Park Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Farrington Road, on
Sunday at llam. Officiating will
be Pastor Leroy Sewell, assisted
by Elder Melvin Lewis and Elder
J. Carter. Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.





PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aremeritte’s SJ uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ° TEL: 323-5782

DEATH NOTICES FOR

Jonas Alfred Edwards, 73

a resident of Crooked Island Street & formerly of i
Knowles, Cat Island, died at PMH on Monday 16 |

February, 2009.

He is survived by his children: Lindall J., Sandra, 7
Juan, Mateo, Jonal & Petrocelli Edwards, Roslyn |
Cartwright, Nathalie Nairn & Sophia Deveaux; 3 |
sisters: Alma Cox, Alva Thurston & Hilda Wilson |
& a host of other relatives & friends.

James "Tim"
Newell Williams, 71

_ aresident of Greencastle, Eleuthera died on Monday
_ 16 February, 2009.

| He is survived by his wife: Florence Williams;
' daughters: Esther Williams, Ms. Timalee Williams,
| Ms. Perry Hall & Nora Smith; sons: Glen Smith,
| Pastor Wilshire Smith & Rodney Williams; sisters:
| Janet Williams, Jennie Basden, Katrina Brown,
| Lorraine Clarke & Minerva Williams; brothers:
| Richard Williams, Shane, Jeff, Frank, Dendi &
| Joseph Williams & a host of other relatives &
. friends.

Isadora Williamson, 69

i a resident of Palm Tree Estates & formerly of
| Mangrove Cay, Andros, died at PMH on Thursday
_ 12 February, 2009.

_ She is survived by her husband: Ervin Williamson;
_ L son: Charles Greene; 2 daughters: Monique &
| Stacey Williams; | sister: Ethlyn Smith; 5 brothers:
' Stephen Garnet & Percy Miller, Donnie & Clifford
| Moxey; 6 grandchildren & a host of other relatives
| & friends.





THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 25

Aremeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET °¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

DEATH NOTICES FOR

Winifred Sunday
Adderley, 50

a resident of Calvin Street, Soldier Road, died at PMH 2

on Saturday 14 February, 2009.

She is survived by her mother: Eloise Adderley; children: :
Shonell & Shane Minns; sisters: Maria Adderley & Daisy |

Munroe; | brother: Raymond Adderley.

Ricardo Vincent
Farrington, 35

a resident of Laird Street, died at his residence on Tuesday

3 February, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Raymar Farrington; mother: |
Sylvia Ramsey; father: Leonard Farrington; 2 sons: }
: Governors Harbour, Eleuthera, died at Doctors Hospital
: on Thursday 12 February, 2009.

Sayshawn Farrington; 3 sisters Christine Bethel, Enid |
Falconer & Monalisa Farrington; grandmother: Maria |
Louise Farrington; stepfather: Kermit Hepburn; |
: Windsor Bethell; sister: Anita Williams, Agatha

Ricardo Jr. & Rashard; 2 daughters: Khadesha & Wensi;
4 brothers: Charles Falconer, Leonard Jr., Marco &

stepmother: Loretta Farrington; grandfather: Frank

Farrington; numerous aunts & uncles & a host of other
: of other relatives & friends.

relatives & friends.

Patrick Leonard
Bethel, 40

a resident of Deveaux Street, died at PMH on 12 February,

2009.

He is survived by his mother: Fredrica Bethel; 1 son:
Patrick Bethel Jr.; 9 brothers: Benjamin, Daniel, Dale,
: Darren, Kenwood, Adrian, Terrence, Ralph & Rodney
: Bethel; 5 sisters: Coralee Smith, Gaylean Gibson,
| Cyprianna Thompson, Deneice & Rosemary Curtis; 2
; aunts: Carnella Williams & Martha McPhee & a host of
: other relatives & friends.

Lowell Douglas
Bethell, 70

a resident of Johnson Terrace, Fox Hill & formerly of

He is survived by his 3 sons: Tracy, Theron & Laron; 4
daughters: Nancy, Carlisa, Jamie & Anishka; | brother:

Cumberbatch, Sharon McKinney, Emily Petty & a host





Sy Va
CRA

The Tribune §
—



oe

Pg. 26



RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
Se Se

CHURCH as
aie SiS



The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, February 19, 2009 ® PG 27

Standing

Golden G

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net



DID you wake up today to the
reality of unemployment? Well, for
hundreds of Bahamians, the unfor-
tunate response to this question is
yes, bringing with it an array of
challenges, obstacles, and hurdles
which now more than ever may seen
completely overwhelming.

However, a message of hope may
reside in a local church’s pastoral
celebrations later this month.

“Hope above all else is what the
people need,” said founder of the
Shield of Faith Evangelistic Church,
Bishop Christopher Burrows.

The church is celebrating Bishop
Burrows'’s fifteenth pastoral anniver-
sary February 25-27 by assisting
financially challenged people in the
Golden Gates community.

According to Bishop Burrows, the
downturn global and local economy,
remains the single greatest chal-
lenge for hundreds of Bahamians
now forced to join the unemploy-
ment line.

Bishop Burrows says his ministry
is responding to the cries of people
within its community by offering
more counseling, and financial,
emotional, and consultative support.

He said within the past several
weeks, he has received more than a
dozen calls from hurting people who
are either out of work, unable to
make their monthly obligations, or
on the verge of committing suicide.

“For some persons, they’ve been
forced to pull their kids out of pri-
vate schools, and for them that deci-
sion affected their pride.

“T guess after learning of other
folks in our community willing to
take their own lives, we’ve had calls
from some persons who wanted to
go down that same road, but we’ve
had to continue to encourage
them.”

Bishop Burrows said by no means
is his ministry, at its current level,
able to cater to the large numbers of
those in need, however they are try-
ing to do all they can to identify and
assist the discouraged.

Consisting of mostly teachers and

SEE page 29 Bishop Burrows and his wife





PG 28 ® Thursday, February 19, 2009

«The Christian Book Sho

Si gh ae gi Bb

Rosetta Street at Mt. Royal Avenue ¢ T: 322-1306

MYLES

vi,

DISCOVER THE LEADER YOU WERE MEANT TO BE!

BECOM]

LEADER

International known author and minister, Dr. Myles Munroe
We will be at The Christian Book Shop this Saturday February 21st at
3pm to sign his latest book, Becoming A Leader. You are invited to
come in and purchase your own autographed copy. That's this Saturday
at 3om, at The Christian Book Shop, Roseta Street,
Dr. Myles Munroe in person.



RELIGION

The Tribune

Following

IN the well-known story of the
Hebrews in the desert, we find the
prophet Nehemiah recounting: “You in
your great mercies did not forsake
them in the wilderness; the pillar of
cloud that led them in the way did not
leave them by day, nor the pillar of fire
by night that gave them light or the way
by which they should go” (Nehemiah
9:19). The idea was to have something
so visible to every person in the crowd
that they would not be able to doubt
that God was with them, and they
would follow the path that had been
chosen for them. What are the pillars
of clouds and pillars of fire in our lives?
How do we know that we are on the
right path? How can we feel sure that
God is with us?

Most of us had someone, and still
have some special people, who pray
with and for us, offering Godly counsel
from time to time. They may be living
out their truth to such a degree that we
admire them for their consistency. For
example, a financial advisor who is
doing well by following the same guide-
lines given is far more credible than
someone who is not taking the same
risks, or using the same principles, or
one who is almost bankrupt. Even the
best guide is fallible, so we need to look
for an infallible one.

Books written over the years that
have become classics are another great
source of enlightenment. There are
timeless spiritual aids written by the
famous and the obscure, along with
hymns and folk songs that highlight
various truths.

When you are in the desert, stripped
down to the lightest possible load that
you may have to carry for forty years, it
is quite a different story. It helps to be
with a group traveling in the same
direction to keep your company, help
you with the burdens and offer encour-
agement. It is wonderful to have spiri-
tual leaders who are obedient enough
to part the Red Sea and intercede on
your behalf. It is still necessary to keep
your own eye on the pillar of cloud and
the pillar of fire from time to time. You
do not want to just follow any crowd
and go anywhere.

Your prayer life allows God to reveal
to you the signs of your own times. As
you settle and become still, your own
thoughts will part like the Red Sea and
your spirit will walk through to the
other side, where you will find the
answers you need. Certain scriptures
will come to your remembrance, if you
read your Bible daily, and allow them
to become recorded permanently in
your memory bank. Your participation
in regular workshop and fellowship
opportunities exposes you to the wis-

’ REV. ANGELA
. PALACIOUS

dom and teaching of others, to their
experiences and hopeful expectations.
Your faithful and enthusiastic service
will bless you with the lessons only to
be learnt from giving and loving self-
lessly, with no desire for reciprocation
or favour being returned.

You want to stay with the crowd
when you lose sight of the pillars for
brief periods of time, but do not
become so dependent on others that
you neglect your ability to see and
believe for yourself. God wants to be
seen and heard in your everyday life in
quiet ways. God wants you to follow
the path of loving obedience. You will
not be forsaken, no matter how vast or
distressing your wilderness. God will
be your oasis in the desert, and keep
you fed and watered all along the way.

God wants to be
seen and heard in
your everyday life in
quiet ways. God wants
you to follow the path
of loving obedience.
You will not be forsaken,
no matter how vast or
distressing your
wilderness.



The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, February 19, 2009 ® PG 29

CC Standing in
Disestablishment and

Disendowment

IN 1729, the newly constituted
Parliament of the Bahamas effected
the establishment and endowment
of the Church of England in The
Bahamas under the Bishop of
London. On behalf of the English
Monarch, one of the governor's
duties was ‘to take notice of religion
and exercise it' and to oversee, ‘the
maintenance of true religion and
virtue’. The purpose was to minister
to the needs of the English colonists
and form a Christian Society. The
1662 Common Prayer Book was to
be read each Sunday and Holy Day
along with the rite of Blessed
Sacrament. This religious mandate
was to be accompanied by the erec-
tion and maintenance of schools to
facilitate slaves to convert to the
Christian religion.

In 1824 the Bahamas became part
of the newly established Diocese of
Barbados and Jamaica. In 1834 the
Anglican Church was charged with
preparing slaves for responsible cit-
izenship through civilisation and
conversion. All through the West
Indies, Anglican Churches spon-
sored education and teaching by
the use of the 1662 Prayer Book.
Anglicans believed that education
and liturgy, as prescribed by the
1662 Prayer Book, were intertwined
but the dissenters disagreed.

In 1836, the requirement that all
scholars were to be taught the litur-
gy and catechism of the established
church was vehemently protested by
Reverend Thomas Lofthouse,
Chairman of the Methodist Church
in the Bahamas. And the act form-
ing the Board of Education in 1841
was strongly protested by
Presbyterian Minister, William
McClure and Baptist Minister,
Henry Capron on the grounds that
it was biased toward the Anglican
Church. The 1841 Act was over-
turned in 1847 by a ruling that both
the board members and the school
curriculum were to be non-sectari-
an. Thus the dissenting ministers
achieved their goal of being ‘dead
level’ in education with the
Anglicans.

There was another area in which
the dissenters were not 'dead level’.
Only Anglican priests were allowed
to bury the dead in the public burial
grounds. Dissenting ministers could
not conduct committal services at the

1 ai 4

jf JM
) LAWLOR
a

graveside of their deceased mem-
bers. The Presbyterians were out-
raged when two of their prominent
members were denied this last rite
and appealed to the church wardens.
The wardens laid the matter before
Governor Gregory but he ignored it
and the wardens refused to consider
it further. In 1849, eight hundred cit-
izens petitioned the House of
Assembly praying for the removal of
this restriction. Finally, the governor
referred the matter to Rev Aubrey
Spence D.D, the Bishop of Jamaica.
The bishop not only approved of the
removal of the ban but advised that a
bill be passed to remove the prohibi-
tion - the bill was passed the follow-
ing year.

In the early part of the 19th centu-
ry, the Anglican and Presbyterian
families, acting as a unit, ruled the
country, with the Baptists and
Methodists having no influence in
government. Denominational differ-
ences over the education curriculum,
a ban on the use of burial grounds
for non-Anglican ministers and the
lack of Government funds to rebuild
non-Anglican churches after the
1866 hurricane led to a split between
the Anglicans and Presbyterians,
whereupon the latter formed an
alliance with the Methodists.

This alliance proved to be very
important in the political arena.

On Sunday, April 26, 1868, prior to
the election in Harbour Island,
Methodist Minister, F A Moon, told
the people from the pulpit that the
governor had sent down a number of
men but that they were not to be
daunted:

“Next week the trial will
come...let there be such an outburst
of loyalty, not only to Methodism
but to yourselves...the Churchmen
are here, they must take the conse-
quences...the Policemen have
arrived; they have come to eat your
Johnny Cakes”.

Hearing that over 200 Hercules
Clubs had arrived that morning for

use on the day of the election,

Harbour Island Police Magistrate i
urged }
Governor Rawson to send down 50 }
men from the 2nd WI Regiment to :
supplement the detachment of }

George C Camplejohn

police under G A McGregor.
After the election,

Abaco, Harbour Island

body united with the

which they were opposed, and in
Eleuthera without a contest”. The
winning candidates on the highly
charged election day at Harbour
Island were
Menendez

and S Higgs, and

opposed to the endowed churches
had lost their 4 leaders and returned
only 7 (instead of 11) members,

bers from 11 electoral districts.

As a result of the 1868 election, i
the Methodists took control of the }
Lower House but Presbyterians :

controlled the Legislative and :
Executive Council. Robert H }
Sawyer, formerly the }

Representative for Harbour Island, : ikinadoieike task Of renewals

now a Methodist Member of the : Bs : :
House of Assembly for the Nassau ; connection in his family, this years
City District, presented a resolution } d idier of Christ.”
for the disestablishment and dis- ? “7 peer ee se th eae it
endowment of the United Churches : eee
of England and Ireland within the :
Bahamas Islands and the Church of }
St. Andrews. The bill was eventual- }
ly passed in 1869. The Methodists :
vowed to take full control and from :
that time there was considerable :
the }
Methodist and Presbyterian groups }
and they almost became almost one :

family - an oligarchy that controlled :

intermarrying between

the Bahamas for many years.

(Next Week - Part 18 - Roman
Catholics gain a foothold ‘Upon }

These Rocks’)

Governor : ‘
Rawson deplored Moon's actions. } feelings of being to proud to ask for
He reported that “in the Islands of :

and ; s10on.
Eleuthera, in which Methodism i
clieily prevails, the members oe : don’t like to ask for handouts.”
Baptists, who's coloured leader : : .
used all his influence in their favour, } cases eepeieen saison tia lee
carried away every seat by large }

majorities in the two islands in } neighbour or spanking a neighbour’s

: child in their parents’ absence if they

? misbehaved. Bishop Burrows said the
? abandonment of traditional communi-
: i ty relations has contributed to the rise
Methodists, M ? in crime, increased pride, and the
? inability for many to ask for help
Presbyterian, G W Higgs. Overall }
the Methodists, who were radically ;



the gap for
Golden Gates

FROM page 26

i other government workers, Bishop
? Burrows said his congregation has not

been greatly affected by the recent
economic tsunami. He explained those
mostly affected and seeking support
from his ministry, are those in the
Golden Gates community.

As he explained, a common symp-
tom for those that are suffering are

help, which can then lead to depres-

“T’ve discovered in my years of min-
istry, that Bahamians are persons who

He said while growing up in South

seemed like the natural thing to do.
This included sharing a meal with a

when in need.
To identify the far reaching effects

? of pride in the Bahamian culture,

? Bishop Burrows discussed a recent

? family gathering, where his once close-
while the Pesbyterians, whose own }
church was endowed, joined the }
Methodists adding 3 to 5 seats ( for }
a total of eight seats).” The House :

of Assembly comprised of 26 mem- : >
? was happening, we came to one con-

knit extended family are today oblivi-
ous to the issues that affect other
members.

“When we really began to talk and
examine each other to discover what

clusion, and that was that we’ve drift-
ed very far apart.”

He said although there were annual
family reunions for the past 35 years
in his family, there is now an obvious
divide among them.

Bishop Burrows said as he is now

aptly titled pastoral theme: “A faithful

ment to the larger community.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
ate AM corse er-7(6 LT
on Mondays



PG 30 ® Thursday, February 19, 2009

ernie

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE act of contemplation for many
Catholic followers, is considered an
important aspect in connecting with and
understanding one’s walk with God.

The practise which dates back to fourth
century Christians, has also been refer-
enced in several books published by three
Trappist monks of St Joseph's Abbey in
Spencer, Massachusetts in the 1970s.

This past weekend, the contemplative
outreach of Los Angeles, California, held
a retreat at the Emmaus Centre, Bernard
Road.

Consisting of around thirty participants
from several inter-denominational groups,
the attendants participated in a silent
weekend where they learnt methods of
Centering Prayer or meditation.

Included in the group, the majority of
whom were women, was a 17-year-old
young man who hailed the event as a life
changing experience.

Marie Howard, on her third visit to the
Bahamas conducted the retreat. She first
introduced the practise to members of the
Bahamian Catholic family more than 10
years ago.

Mrs Howard is an international presen-
ter, working along with Father Thomas
Keating, one of the founders of
Contemplative Outreach.

The organisation which promotes this
method of prayer as a preparation for the
gift of contemplation and the living of the
contemplative way of life, offered four
conferences during the weekend while all
participants remained in silence.

The participants also took part in multi-
ple experiences of the Centering Prayer
scattered through each day, and were
offered sacred tabled readings as food for
thought.

Readings for the retreat included:
Open Mind, Open Heart, and Invitation to
Love by Thomas Keating, Centering
Prayer and Inner Awakening by Cynthia
Bourgeaul, and Silence by Carl Arico.

On Sunday, the group attended the
Sunday worship at St Anselm’s Roman
Catholic Church on Bernard Road, where
they fellowshiped with church members in
silence.

During the closing session, participants
described the experience as “refreshing”,
“renewing”, “restful”, “affirming”,
“peaceful” and “enthusiastic”. They were
overall surprised at their ability to remain
silent for such a long period.

The presenter in a final blessing,
signed the hands of the participants and
prayed a peaceful prayer, asking the
attendants to trust and know who God is.

Many participants also promised to
meet together in groups to support each
other in continuing the practise of
Centering Prayer.

As a result of the retreat, a core group
has been formed to spread and develop
this particular method of prayer among
Christians in the Bahamas.

Longtime Catholic Joan Missick who
was a part of the event, said this experi-
ence allowed her to establish a deeper
friendship with God as she was able to
become intimate with him

“Our faith is rich and this was just one
part of it, however it was a powerful
experience.”

RELIGION

The Tribune

behead ae hUole



te Bae

"a Ke

Annunciation Greek -Orthodox-GC hurch
presents

ORTHODOX ICONOGRAPHER
ELIAS DAMIANAKIS

February 21" & February 22"

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, West Street

Admission $3

Presentations at 2pm, 4pm, 7pm
Topics inchide: Bywvantine influence on

western art. Vheologw of Color, amecl
Tceonography ws. Western Religious Paintings





The Tribune

RELIGION

Jesus

suicide”

m@ By DR MYLES MUNROE

DID Jesus the Christ commit sui-
cide? Absolutely no! Did Jesus Christ
kill himself? Absolutely no! Was the
death of Jesus a result of personal
hopelessness and despair? Absolutely
no! Was the death of Jesus Christ self-
imposed? Absolutely no! Did Jesus
Christ die under compulsion?
Absolutely no!

In fact, the death of Jesus Christ can-
cels any and all justification for the act
of suicide and was intended to provide
a reason and desire for life and living.
His divine love imposed on him the
decision to become a substitute for our
deserved death sentence produced by
our sin.

Did Jesus Christ lay his life down on
his own accord? Absolutely yes! Did
Jesus willingly offer his life as a sacri-
fice for mankind? Absolutely yes! Was
the death of Jesus Christ initiated by
God the Father? Absolutely yes!

On a recent occasion, I made a state-
ment that I wish to clarify and correct
to prevent any misunderstanding or
misinterpretation of my intent, posi-
tion or theological convictions regard-

ing the issue of Suicide. My statement
was poorly worded and stated and it
may have suggested that the death of
Jesus was a suicidal act and thus may
justify the actions of those who did or
may intend to inflict terminal harm
upon their own self. This was absolute-
ly not my intent, but rather quite the
opposite.

I therefore wish to officially with-
draw any words or statement that may
have implied, suggested, or seemed to
convey the notion that the death of
Jesus was an act of suicide, and I apol-
ogise to anyone whom I may have
caused confusion or misunderstanding.

The redemptive mystery of the
death of Jesus has been, and will
always be a complex issue that exceeds
the limitations of the intellectual and
mental faculties of humans and defies
our ability to explain it. The many
questions above indicate the magni-
tude of this perceived dilemma and
mystery.

The death of Jesus Christ was a sov-
ereign act of love initiated by God the
Creator in response to the rebellion of
his ultimate creation, mankind. This
self-initiated sacrificial death of Jesus

ST a ee tat ky

Christ was no suicide, but an expres-
sion of selfless love for man.

Matt 20:28 says, “-just as the Son of
Man did not come to be served, but to
serve, and to give his life as a ransom
for many." NIV

It is also important to note that the
motivation for most, if not all acts of
suicide, is the result of an individual
being driven to an unbearable state of
depression, despair, hopelessness and
loss of meaning and purpose.

There is no question as to the dispo-
sition, mental state or attitude of Jesus
Christ during his thirty three and a half
years of earthly living; or the motiva-
tion for his death, which he constantly
declared was not for his personal ben-
efit or a result of personal hopeless-
ness, depression or despair, but an
intentional act of redemptive substitu-
tion sacrificed for all men. Jesus did
not die because he could not live any-
more, he died so we could live. He died
so we could find a reason to live forev-
er and face every day with hope and
purpose.

The following Scriptures are his own
words:

John 10:17-18 “The reason my Father
loves me is that I lay down my life-only
to take it up again. 18 No one takes it
from me, but I lay it down of my own
accord. I have authority to lay it down
and authority to take it up again. This
command I received from my Father."
NIV

The Scriptures further state that His
death was imposed by God Himself
and is a result of a divine imperative:

Isa 53:4 “Surely he hath borne our
grief, and carried our sorrows: yet we
did esteem him stricken, smitten of
God, and afflicted.” K]V

Isa 53:6 “All we like sheep have gone
astray; we have turned every-one to his
own way, and the LORD hath laid on
him the iniquity of us all.” KJV

Isa 53:10 “Yet it pleased the LORD to
bruise him; he hath put him to grief:
when thou shall make his soul an offer-
ing for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall
prolong his days, and the pleasure of
the LORD shall prosper in his hand.”
KIV

It is essential to note, according to

Thursday, February 19, 2009 ® PG 31

the above statements, that the death of
Jesus Christ was orchestrated by God
himself and not by mankind. In
essence, if the doctrine of the Trinity is
in fact and truth a reality, which I
believe it to be, then the death of Jesus,
the Son of God, was imposed on him
by the Father, the God-Head, for the
redemption of mankind. Our sins were
laid on him by the heavenly Father. In
essence, God sacrificed himself for
everyone.

It was this mystery that I attempted
to express and explain in a recent
presentation, but my concern is that
my words were poorly chosen and had
the potential to be misleading. My
original intent was to state that the
death of Jesus was a divine self-
imposed sacrifice not for himself or as
an escape from personal pressure or
despair, but rather to take away our
pressure and despair, so that we could
have and abundantly desire life.

Therefore, I want to state emphati-
cally that I do not believe that the
death of Jesus was a suicide, but on
the contrary, it cancels the need and
justification for suicide. He died so we
could live. He laid down his life so we
could take ours up every day and face
its challenges. He lost his life so we
don’t have to lose ours. He took our
hopelessness so we could have hope.

Finally, it is God our Creator who
gave us life by creating and breathing
into us “the breath of life.” Therefore,
because we did not give ourselves life,
we have no legal or moral right to
take our own lives or the lives of oth-
ers. I therefore strongly warn all of us
to avoid any consideration of self-
imposed destruction, but rather to
cast all our cares upon the One who
carried our despair and can restore
our hope and desire to live beyond
any temporary problem. If all prob-
lems are temporary, then the option of
suicide is an attempt to apply a per-
manent solution to a temporary prob-
lem.

Remember the words of Jesus is the
gospel of John 10:10 which says, “The
thief comes only to steal and kill and
destroy; I have come that they may
have life, and have it to the full.” NIV

e With the sudden rise of suicidal tendencies in our
communities it is imperative that we all become our
sisters’ and brothers’ keeper with a keen sensitivity
to the state of mind of those in our families, work-
place and neighbourhoods. The spirit of suicide is
usually preceded by a string sense of hopelessness,
depression and sense of despair.

There are signs that you can watch for in the behav-
ior of others that may help you recognise the Signs
Of Depression and Possible Suicide Risk, some of
these include:

Lat: ying) any mention of dying, dis-
appearing, jumping, shooting oneself, or other
types of self-harm.

through death, divorce, separation,
broken relationship, loss of job, money, status,

self-confidence, self-esteem, loss of religious
faith, loss of interest in friends, sex, hobbies,

activities previously enjoyed
Se a

anxious, tired, indecisive, apathetic

(ang eueiBekaviour can't concentrate on
school, work, routine tasks

qT Cm id insomnia, often with

early waking or oversleeping, nightmares
loss of appetite and

weight, or overeating

strual abnormalities (often missed periods)
going crazy, harming self

or others

feem) fecling worthless, shame, over-
whelming guilt, self-hatred, “everyone would be

better off without me"

Lea rrr ra AREAS HL
never get better; that nothing will ever change.

Other things to watch for- suicidal impulses,
statements, plans; giving away favourite things;
previous suicide attempts, substance abuse, mak-
ing out wills, arranging for the care of pets,
extravagant spending, agitation, hyperactivity,
restlessness or lethargy.

For additional information I recommend you
click the following link or Google "suicide warn-
ing signs": http://www.sfsuicide.org/html/warn-
suokeavolwoedl

Let us do our part in building a Community of
hope and a network of support for others espe-
cially during this time of social and economic
challenges.





Godfrey Arthur/ACM PR

PG 32 © Thursday, February 19, 2009



KURTH
WALLCE on a
scale signifying
St. Georges
ACM branch
Healhty Lifestyle
Challenge.




Godfrey Arthur/ACM PR



RELIGION

The Tribune

GET SET FOR MEN!

The Anglican Church Men con-
ference committee began planning
for its upcoming conference to be
held on March 19-21. The venue
will be St Gregory's Anglican
Church on Carmichael Road.
Delegates from around the family
of islands are expected to be in
attendance. This year’s theme is
Men! Launch in Faith. There will be
dynamic speakers and workshops
for attendees.

All men in the Anglican commun-
ion are urged to attend.
Registration can be done through
the various branch presidents.

Pictured are members of the 37th
annual ACM Conference
Committee. Back row, standing left
to right: Mario Williams, ACM
Council Secretary, Keith Sands,
Committee member, Leonard
Mcphee, ACM Council Treasurer,
Danny Tynes, committee member,
Phillip Watkins, committee member,
Ken O'Brien, committee member,
Seated L-R: Trevor Bethel, commit-
tee member, Kurth Wallace, ACM
Council President, Kevin Ryan,
ACM Conference Chairman and
Erick Hepburn, committee member.



MEMEBERS of St. =
George's ACM. at

ACM PROMOTES HEALTHY LIFESTYLES LIVING FOR MEN

The Anglican Church Men’s (ACM) branch at St
George's Anglican Church has adopted this year as it's
healthy lifestyles living mandate. To start things off,
group member Wendell Barry who is also a member of
US TOO spoke to the men about prostrate cancer. Mr
Barry informed the men that a prostate check up is a
must for all men especially those over the age of 40. He
stressed that there have been many early diagnoses
and urged men to get regular check-ups. Mr Barry also
indicated that there are free screenings throughout the
year at various clinics around the island which men
can take full advantage of.

“While the numbers have increased over the

years, there is still more that needs to be done
through education,” Mr Barry said.

During the meeting, President Patrick Carroll reit-
erated the need to live healthier and challenged
members to a weight loss competition from March to
December.

The branch meets every second Thursday in the
month in the parish hall beginning at 8 pm Officers
include: President Patrick Carroll, Vice- President,
Godfrey Arthur, Secretary, Trevor Davies, Assistant
Secretary, Ivan Carroll, Treasurer, Roscow Davies,
Assistant Treasurer, Herbert Scott, Chaplin Leslie L
Smith.



Full Text
{T)\

Pim blowin’ it

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ai CLOUDS
“=e AND SUN

he Tribune
=JSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION










int Depot
Mt Royal Ave& °
~ Durham St.
P.O.Box N3723
Tel:326-1875

Volume: 105 No.73



Petes ata



i

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

SSS






assault ON SIX-year- Ol

Incident
reportedly
took place
on school
property

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter

tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE are investigating
claims that a six-year-old gov-
ernment primary school student
was sexually assaulted on school
property by a group of older
boys, reportedly enrolled at a
separate secondary school.

The assault reportedly took
place shortly after school was
dismissed at 3 pm on January
23.

The girl, said to be about six
years old, was taken to hospital
for injures from the attack, head
of the CDU Superintendent
Elsworth Moss said. Her pre-
sent condition and the extent



WENO ITE
with murder

to Fg) on,




HIS EXCELLENCY HUI
LIANGYU Vice Premier of the
State Council of The People’s
Republic of China takes in
the stunning waters of the
Bahamas.

¢ MORE PHOTOS ON PAGE SIX

â„¢ By PAUL G










WSS

Tm mE
IN TODAY’S TRIBUNE

Felipé Major/Tribune staff







PRICE —75¢ |

Police officers
alleged to have

‘hustled’ or
extorted money

The RBPF Complaints and
Corruption Unit investigating

THE Complaints and
Corruption Unit of the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force is
investigating two new inci-
dents in which officers are
alleged to have “hustled” or
extorted money from indi-
viduals within the past two
weeks.

The first case, involving a
government official who
owns a stall at Arawak Cay,
first began nearly two weeks
ago when a senior officer
visited his stall.

Not wanting to be identi-
fied for fear of being perse-
cuted by elements within
government, the source
alleges that the officer in
question approached his
stall with a former candidate
of a political party in tow.

As his stall was busy with
people, the proprietor said
the officer approached him
quietly and informed him



that there were a number of
complaints about his estab-
lishment.

“He pulled me aside and
said, ‘Look here, we been
having meetings, but don’t
worry I have you straight.
Give me something.’ So one
of my employees who was
nearby went into the drawer
and took out $200 and gave
it to him,” he said.

A week later, the senior
officer returned. This time
he demanded a weekly
stipend of $500, the source
said. Visiting the stall during
the height of the evening,
the officer approached the
DJ and told him to “shut
off” the music.

Watching the event
unfold from the sidelines,
the owner of the stall said
he approached the officer

SEE page 12

GB Power Company majority shareholder ‘sells
90% stake in Caribbean operations holding firm’

eecig, TURNQUEST
of her injuries were not known If e ; GRAND Bah P C Ss 55 t majority share-
- Tribune Staff Reporter ahama Power Company’s 55 per cent majority share
up to press time yesterday. O Oscarsin pturnquest@ . holder was last night said to have sold a 50 per cent stake in the
The name of the school has

been withheld to protect the
identity of the victim.
Education Minister Carl
Bethel yesterday said education
officials turned the matter over
to the police the same day the
attack occurred.
But at least one concerned
citizen, who learned of the inci-
dent through her granddaugh-

SEE page 11



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

4

S 2
Heico Duran Fowler

OUT Eris

A MAN initially charged
with attempted murder was
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison yesterday after being
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court on a murder charge.

Police have now charged
Heico Duran Fowler, 23, of
Palm Breeze Road in the Jan-
uary 16 shooting death of
Oscarsin Williams. Fowler was
on bail on an attempted mur-
der charge in relation to the
incident.

According to police, the vic-
tim and another man got into
an altercation sometime after
8 pm on Friday, January 16,
on Cox Way. During the
altercation, according to
police, Williams was shot in
his chest. He was taken to hos-
pital where he died on Febru-

ary 15.

According to court dockets,





tribunemedia.net





THE Vice Premier of
State Council for the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China left
New Providence yesterday
for Grand Bahama after tak-
ing an early morning tour of
the Clifton Heritage site and
the agricultural facility at
Lucayan Tropical.

Having just signed a mem-
orandum of understanding
between the Bahamas gov-
ernment and the People’s
Republic of China on Agri-
culture and Marine
Resources matters on Tues-
day, His Excellency Hui
Liangyu showed a keen
interest in the development
and sustainability of food
crops at the multi-million
dollar produce facility.

Guided on the tour by the
general manager and main
grower Tim Hauber, Mr
Liangyu asked questions
about the stages of growth
for the lettuce and tomato






























holding firm for its Caribbean operations to a Middle Eastern

energy company.

Gulf newspapers reported that Japanese-based Marubeni Cor-
poration had sold a 50 per cent shareholding in its Caribbean util-
ities holding vehicle to The Abu Dhabi National Energy Compa-
ny PJSC (Taga). The Caribbean holding vehicle holds Marubeni’s
55.4 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power Company.

SEE page 11

Woman dies
after suffering
seizure in pool

MRS NOELLE ROBERTS,
39, who suffered a seizure while }
swimming in St Andrew’s swim- }
? to Freeport.

ming pool Tuesday afternoon

died at Doctor’s Hospital yes- }
? of Bellevue Business Depot,
? Queen’s Highway, has entered
? into an agreement with Region-
: al Air Charter Service to fly the
i morning newspaper
? Freeport for Bellevue Business
? Depot customers. To cover the
? cost of delivery, The Tribune

terday afternoon without gain-
ing consciousness.

Mrs Roberts, the mother of
two young boys, is the wife of R
Montagu Roberts, and the
youngest daughter of Mrs Susan
Roberts and the late Mr Noel
Roberts. Her death was unex-

Tribune
returns to
Freeport

THE Tribune has returned

Mr Robert Osbourne, owner

into

Fowler intentionally caused : : pected. ? will now be sold for $1.25 in
Williams’ death on Penne pane Biome aes “Noelle had battled epileptic Freeport.
SEE page 12 SEE page 11 SEE page 14 SEE page 14





2
ag» Cotte © forme Wear
‘_ Phe: (242) 825-2576



NASSAU AND BA

HAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





LOCAL NEWS

Cabinet agrees on Marine Protected Areas



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Bahama’ Health

Feet Gooo AsouT

Fishing, spearing and setting traps to be banned in six zones

Move to promote healthy habitats and sustainable fisheries

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

FISHING, spearing, setting traps and diving
conch will be permanently prohibited in the
country’s first six Marine Protected Areas,
Cabinet has agreed.

A network of protected areas across the
Bahamas will be established in the Abaco
Cays; Bimini; South Eleuthera; from Chub
Cay to Whale Cay in the Berry Islands, and
two sites in Exuma, from the Jewfish Cays to
mainland George Town, and the area east of
Blacks Rocks between little Exuma and North
Long Island.

Although the precise boundaries have yet to
be established in Abaco, Bimini, South
Eleuthera and southern Exuma, Minister of
Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry
Cartwright said he hopes negotiations will be
completed “as soon as possible.”

A 1999 study determined the scientific

validity of a list of marine reserve sites fol-
lowing observation of overfishing, habitat loss
and the degradation of water quality to marine
life resources.

The first five Fishery Reserves were creat-
ed in 2000 after thorough consultation with
local communities, stakeholders and scien-
tists. Once established, the removal of marine
resources will be prohibited in Marine Pro-
tected Areas to promote healthy marine habi-
tats and sustainable fisheries.

Key fishery species are expected to increase
and create a greater reproductive output and
replenishment of fish outside the reserves.

And it is hoped more plentiful marine
resources will contribute to the economic
growth and a better quality of life for Bahami-
ans. Mr Cartwright said: “Now the Cabinet has
agreed, we have to put the monitoring in
place, like who is going to monitor the areas.

“We want to consult local people, and espe-
cially the local fishermen who work there,
because that is their home ground, their back-

INAGUA ALL AGE SCHOOL was presented with hurricane relief gifts.

Your HEALTHPLAN

Apex Management Services

Family Guardian and its group health division, BahamaHealth, are major sponsors of this year's
“Celebrate Heart Month,” which runs through February. Family Guardian's Vice President, Group
Life and Health Division, Linda Jarrett (left) recently presented the company’s sponsorship pledge
to Nellie Brown of the Bahamas Heart Association. In making the presentation, Mrs. Jarrett noted:
“We are happy to partner with the Heart Association in this important health initiative which runs
concurrentlywith BahamaHealth’s 100-Day Challenge. BahamaHealth’s focusis to bring awareness
and solutions to the serious health risks associated with obesity, including heart disease, and our

partnership with the Heart Association is very timely.”

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yard and front yard. However, it will help for
breeding and nurturing baby fish, crawfish,
conch and whatever else in the area because
once no one can fish there they can breed
and spill out over into other areas and provide
species for fishermen. It will help ensure that
we have fish and conch for years to come.”

Director of the Department of Marine
Resources Michael Braynen explained that
while there is currently seasonal protection
of fish in place, and fishing is prohibited in
Bahamas National Trust National Parks, this
is the first network of protected areas admin-
istered by the Department.

“We don’t see the establishment of a num-
ber of marine resources as the salvation of
commercial fisheries in the Bahamas, but we
see it as one of the things that needs to hap-
pen. We expect the establishment of this net-
work, and there will be more to come, to
make some contribution to helping us main-
tain sustainable fisheries in the Bahamas,”
Mr Braynen said.

STUDENTS and teachers of
the Inagua All Age School were
presented with hurricane relief
gifts by the New Providence
Methodist Churches and Queen’s
College. At a recent special
assembly at the island’s school,
Elmena Bethell, vice-president
of the Bahamas Conference of
the Methodist Church (BCMC),
handed out the gifts to every stu-
dent and teacher.

After hearing of the plight of
the students as a result of Hurri-
cane Ike in September 2008, the
Nassau-based staff of the BCMC
met in a special meeting to dis-
cuss the impact of the hurricane
on the children of the island.

Not only were the homes of
the children damaged in the hur-
ricane, but the students also
missed weeks of classes as a
result of the damage caused to
the school and utility infrastruc-
ture on the island.

“We often forget the little ones
when disasters strike. We focus
on repairing homes and cleaning
up communities, but we never
stop to realise the long-term trau-
matic effects of the disasters on
the children. It is very hard on
them to experience those terri-
fying winds and the storm’s after-
math,” said Mrs Bethell.

Immediately after the passing
of Hurricane Ike over the island,
the BCMC activated its disaster
relief agency, Methodist Habitat,
and coordinated supplies and vol-
unteer teams who travelled to
the island to repair the roofs of
homes. More than 50 homes and
two churches were repaired by
112 volunteers.

Rev Bill Higgs, president of
the Methodist Conference, said
that he felt it was important to do
something tangible for the chil-
dren of Inagua. “We worked with
Christopher Pinder, chairperson
of the Inagua Methodist Church,
to get the names and grade levels
of every student on the island.
These names were then distrib-
uted throughout our churches in
New Providence and special gifts
were purchased and addressed
to each child,” said Rev Higgs.

In addition to a personalised
gift, each student also received a
new backpack with school sup-
plies. Andrea Gibson, principal
of Queen’s College, also partici-
pated in the special meeting and
said, “Queen’s College is a part
of the Bahamas Conference of

A DIVISION OF :
the Methodist Church and we,

FAMILY GUARDIAN too, had thought about doing
sd INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED something for the Inagua

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THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3



Police seize
$25,000
worth of
suspected
cocaine

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Police seized
$25,000 worth of suspected
cocaine and took a 37-year-old
man into custody during a
drug bust in the Lucaya area
on Monday.

Press liaison officer Asst
Supt Clarence Reckley report-
ed that police, acting on infor-
mation, searched a property in
Lucaya at around 5.30pm.

During the search of the
premises, police discovered a
black taped package contain-
ing suspected cocaine.

Mr Reckley said the drugs
weighed 2.2 lbs and have an
estimated street value of
$25,000.

Investigations are continu-
ing into the matter.

Gunman who
shot officer
earlier injured
another man,
says witness

A MAN who shot a police
officer in the leg in Nassau
Village on Tuesday afternoon
had shot another man three
times in the leg that morning,
according to an eye witness.

The police shooting incident
had “nothing to do” with any
tension between police and
Nassau Village residents, said
local Tia Thurston.

Meanwhile, according to Ms
Thurston, the man who shot
the policeman was also a close
friend of Onado Newbold, the
man murdered in Nassau Vil-
lage in January.

The two men worked for
the same person, she said.

Weapon

Ms Thurston alerted police
to the gunman’s whereabouts
when she saw them on patrol
in the area at around 4pm on
Tuesday after he had threat-
ened her with his weapon.

“T flagged them down and I
told them that he had a gun
and he pull it on me and he
ran through one yard to go
over onto Alexandra Boule-
vard East. So when police
gone round I ran round ...
when I went round all I hear
was shots just start opening
up.

“He was shooting at police
and that’s when police started
shooting at him,” she said.

Contrary to some reports,
the resident claimed, the man
was alone when he was con-
fronted by police, not with a
group.

Messages left for senior
police officers seeking com-
ment on the matter were not
returned up to press time yes-
terday.

However, another police
source said that they are near-
ing the end of their investiga-
tion and will be in a better
position to comment on the
matter today.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. If so, call us on 322-
1986 and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tas
da Me re ay
322-2157



SUPREME COURT

Prosecution witnesses testify
in Keith Carey murder retrial

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE retrial of the February
2006 murder of local business-
man Keith Carey continued in
the Supreme Court yesterday
with three prosecution witness-
es being called to give testimo-
ny.
Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown
and Dwight Knowles are
charged in Mr Carey’s murder
and are also facing charges of
armed robbery and conspiracy
to commit armed robbery.

Detective Sergeant Anton
Rahming, the first witness to
take the stand, told the court
that on Monday, February 27,
2006, he received information
regarding a shooting and also
received information regarding
the victim.

He told the court that as a
result of this, he and Detective
Sergeant 217 Ferguson went to
Doctors Hospital.

The officer told the court that
upon arrival, he saw medical
personnel attending to a light-
skinned man who he later iden-
tified as Keith Carey.

Sergeant Rahming told the
court that he observed a brass-
coloured projectile fall from Mr
Carey’s clothes while a nurse
was removing them. He told the
court that he collected several
articles of Mr Carey’s clothing,
which he handed over to anoth-
er officer.

The second prosecution wit-
ness (name withheld) told the
court that she had known mur-
der accused Jamal Glinton five
years prior to the incident.

She testified that she slept at
Glinton’s Nassau Village home

Officer tells of seeing medical
personnel attend victim in hospital

on the night of February 26,
2006.

The witness told the court
that on the morning of February
27, 2006, two men came to Glin-
ton’s home in a white Nissan
Maxima. She described the dri-
ver of the vehicle as skinny and
fair skinned. She told the court
that she and Glinton got into
the car with the two men and
they travelled to Homestead
Street where a female friend of
hers lives.

The witness testified that
after her friend got dressed for
work, they both got into the car
with the three men and drove to
Police Headquarters on East
Street, where she and her friend
worked with the Englerston
Urban Renewal Project.

Barracks

The woman told the court she
and her friend were dropped
off at the police barracks at
around 9.45am. The woman
told the court that she never
saw Glinton again that day.

Reginald Rigby, an auto body
repair man and the final prose-
cution witness to testify yester-
day, told the court on Monday,
February 27, 2006, that he was
at work when two men pulled
up in a green Nissan Maxima.

Mr Rigby said one of the men
asked him how much it would
cost to paint a vehicle. Mr Rig-
by testified that he told the man
that it would cost $1,000. The

eee ee

TROLLEY

AWFUL!

eae re
inadequate, say
baggage handlers

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

BAGGAGE handlers at Lynden Pindling
International Airport claim the new trolleys
issued by the Nassau Airport Development
Company are not adequate for the job.

She said: “They were brought in as part of a

witness told the court that the
men left and about 20 minutes
later, the man who had been a
passenger in the green Maxima
returned in a white Maxima. He
said that the man gave him a
deposit of $500 and gave his
name as Morley.

Despite an objection by attor-
ney Craig Butler, Mr Rigby was
allowed to identify Dwight
Knowles as the man who had
identified himself as Morley.
According to Mr Rigby, the
man wanted the car’s colour to
be changed from white to black.
He told the court that the vehi-
cle did not have licence plates.

The retrial into the February
2006 murder of businessman
Keith Carey began on Monday.
On February 27, 2006, Carey,
43, a married father of three
and former High School coach
was shot and killed on the steps
of The Bank of the Bahamas
on Tonique Williams-Darling
Highway before he was able to
deposit $40,000 that belonged
to the Esso Service Station,
which he operated.

Deputy director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel, Stephanie Pintard,
Anthony Delaney and Lennox
Coleby are prosecuting the case.

Attorneys Craig Butler and
Devard Francis are representing
Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey
McPhee is representing Sean
Brown and attorney Perry
Albury is representing Dwight
Knowles.



customer service initiative and what we are
trying to do is work with the porters to create
a better customer service at the airport and

near future.”

The porters, who used to carry large loads of
luggage on hefty wooden carts which held 10 or
more bags at a time, are now forced to use

folding metal carts.

But large packages brought in by Bahamians
after shopping trips to the United States are
now falling off the new carts which the porters

say are insufficient.

They are not able to stack as many bags on
the smaller, neater, better looking trolleys, and
luggage will not stack as high, they say.

Shonalee Johnson, Manager of Communi-
cations for NAD, said the folding trolleys were
brought in on January 12 in an effort to meet

international standards.

meet international standards.
“We brought in 20 carts which are able to be
folded and we hope to introduce 20 more in the

Standard

Ms Johnson maintains the carts are of a
standard size used in airports around the world
and while the old trolleys may have held more,

they were not necessarily best for the airport.

the issue.

She added: “They may have been able to
have more bags on them, but it’s a safety issue,
carrying more bags is not necessarily safer.”

The communications manager said she is
aware that some porters have expressed con-
cern and NAD is working with them to resolve

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380-FLIX


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352

Obama offers carrots for mortgage firms

WASHINGTON (AP) — The same mort-
gage lenders that candidate Barack Obama
accused last year of causing the housing mess
would get a windfall from President Obama's
government under his foreclosure rescue pro-
gramme.

The $75 billion plan announced Wednesday
has the potential to be far more effective than
past federal efforts to help struggling home-
owners lower their mortgage payments and stay
in their homes. But for that to happen, investors
in complex mortgage securities have to agree to
participate — something the government has so
far failed miserably to persuade them to do.

That's where the goodies for the much-
maligned industry come in.

Companies would get $1,000 for agreeing to
give a strapped homeowner a lower monthly
payment instead of foreclosing — more if the
borrower hasn't yet fallen behind on what they
owe. They can get up to another $3,000 over the
next three years. And they get government
insurance to cover part of the money they might
lose if the homeowner ultimately defaults on the
house anyway.

Last October in Reno, Nev., Obama vowed,
"I won't let banks and lenders off the hook
when it was their greed and irresponsibility that
got us into this mess." But the outlines of his
plan were an acknowledgment that he will need
cooperation from firms that collect mortgage
payments — known as loan servicers — if he
intends to reach his goal of preventing up to 9
million foreclosures.

"The truth is that at the end of the day, loan
modification remains voluntary, so the servicers
need to see it as sufficient incentive to partici-
pate,” said Andrew Jakabovics of the Centre for
American Progress, who has worked with Oba-
ma's team on housing issues.

Still, Jakabovics called some of the payments
an "unnecessary windfall” that is "overly gen-
erous" — particularly since avoiding a costly
foreclosure is a financial imperative for mort-
gage servicers anyway.

"You still have the very serious question of
what kind of incentives you're providing for
what's essentially bad behaviour," said David C.
John, an analyst at the conservative Heritage
Foundation.

Even tough mortgage industry critics con-
cede, however, that such enticements are nec-
essary to get companies to step up and help
homeowners, given the legal and financial chal-
lenges that modifying home loans can pose.

"It's just what needs to happen, wherever the
blame lies" for the housing mess, said Debbie
Goldstein, the executive vice president of the
Centre for Responsible Lending, a consumer
group. The plan also abandons an aspect of
the Democratic-written foreclosure rescue pro-
gramme enacted last year that proved anathema
to mortgage holders: requiring that they take a
loss up front before the government would help

PSirst Baptist Church

289 Market St. South « P.O. Box N-7984 ¢ Nassau, Bahamas

“No Greater love hath a man
that he would lay down

his life for a friend.”
SUNDAY SERVICES
7:00am, 9:00am, 11:15am
PASTOR EARLE FRANCIS J.P.,D.D.
Marriage Officer, Counsellor, Intercessor
Phone: 323-6452 ¢ 393-5798
Fax: 326-4488/394-4819

renegotiate a loan. The programme failed mis-
erably, helping fewer than 40 homeowners com-
pared to the 400,000 promised.

Under Obama's new plan, mortgage holders
only have to take a hit on the interest payments
they receive each month, and would in most
cases be made whole by the government for
the value of their loans.

"It's a veritable garden full of carrots," said
Howard Glaser, a mortgage industry consul-
tant who served in the Clinton administration.

A key element would loosen lending rules at
government home loan giants Fannie Mae and
Freddie Mac to let as many as 5 million home-
owners who owe more than their homes are
worth refinance to bring down their monthly
payments. But that's little comfort to many bor-
rowers in places like Arizona, California, Neva-
da and Florida — they owe far too much to
qualify. The plan "seems to offer little help to
borrowers whose loan exceeds their property
value by more than 5 percent," John Courson,
chief executive of the Mortgage Bankers Asso-
ciation, said in a statement.

The plan beefs up the role of Fannie and
Freddie, which were seized by federal regulators
last year, allowing them to hold an additional
$50 billion each in mortgage investments.

The plan isn't all about sweeteners for mort-
gage holders. Obama's plan also requires that
any financial institution benefiting from the
$700 billion Wall Street bailout develop plans to
help homeowners avoid foreclosures. Those
rules apply to the largest banks, which are also
the largest holders of home loans.

Yet some doubt that even those new rules
will prod financial players that have so far been
unwilling to help homeowners to do so now.

"It maintains a voluntary system of compli-
ance," said John Taylor, chief executive of the
National Community Reinvestment Coalition,
a consumer group.

"The investors and banks have shown great
hesitancy in voluntarily participating in these
mortgage programmes."

Many Democrats and housing analysts
believe that the only true way to force mortgage
holders to help strapped borrowers is to give
judges power to modify bankrupt homeown-
ers’ loans, cutting the total they owe and their
monthly payments. Obama is backing that move
as part of his housing plan, although it will be up
to Congress to work out the details.

Meanwhile, housing specialists say the mort-
gage industry will be slow to act on the new
incentives Obama has laid out for helping home-
owners — if they end up working.

"It's going to be a long, slow process because
these mortgages have to be redone one by one,”
the Heritage Foundation's John said. "You
can't just snap your fingers and solve this one.”

(This article was written by Julie Hirschfeld
Davis and Alan Zibel of the Associated Press).



We should
think about
national
development

LETTERS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I believe at this time our
thoughts should be directed as a
people toward national devel-
opment. May I suggest the fol-
lowing:

1) Create a township on the
island of Andros preferably in
North Andros - Everything
should be done to encourage a
population shift from New
Providence to the family islands
as soon as possible. It is quite
possible that much of the crime
occurring in New Providence is
due to the overcrowding of our
population in New Providence.
This can be facilitated if we con-
sider:

a) Putting a Defence Force
base on the island of Andros
thereby creating the much-
needed focal point.

b) Developing a plan for a
properly laid out city or town
rather than allowing one to
spring up on its own.

c) Setting aside a portion of
the annual budget over a five -
10 year period to develop the
nucleus of the new city since
our resources are limited.

d) Developing the abundance
of Crown land into acreage
plots making it available to per-
sons who agree to move to the
family islands and who agree to
build within a specified period

letters@tribunemedia net



of time thereby giving landless
Bahamians a stake in their own
country.

2) Provide the economic stim-
ulus to BAIC or other agencies
for the construction of homes
and businesses.

3) Relocate a branch of The
College of The Bahamas/Uni-
versity of The Bahamas on
Andros.

4) Develop a fleet of fishing
vessels thereby encouraging the
development of our marine
resources and creating much
needed employment for a seg-
ment of the Bahamian popu-
lace. It may be observed that
too much Crown land is lying
vacant when too many Bahami-
ans cannot afford a parcel of
land in New Providence or the
family islands. In relation to the
same idea, I ask the following
questions: Do we have a nation-
al plan of development for our
country for the next five, 10 or
15 years?

What plans are being made
to provide employment for the
thousands of high school grad-
uates leaving school every year?

Are we prepared to diversify

our economy in any way and
where may we start?

With the aid of the United
Nations or any other agency can
we get any technical assistance
with a development plan?

Since governments over a
period of the last several years
have not come up with any fea-
sible national development plan
is it time for the private sector
or civic groups to put their
heads together and come up
with a plan to present to gov-
ernment? I do not think we can
leave this to chance. There are
far too many uninhabited
Bahamian islands which are left
vacant and invite illegal immi-
grants to fill the vacuum. Will
our authorities please give these
suggestions some serious con-
sideration?

Finally, can we look at creat-
ing coconut plantations? The
bamboo plant which should
grow well in our climate? The
growing of sisal? And why not
invite suggestions from groups
such as The College of The
Bahamas rather than saying
what can't be done? The worst
thing we can do as a people is to
do nothing.

SOUTH BEACH
RESIDENT
Nassau,

February 16, 2009.

For too long we have voted out of ignorance

EDITOR, The Tribune.

For far too long I think Bahamians have vot-
ed out of ignorance. We are ignorant because
we do not know the people for whom we are
voting. We only know what they or their oppos-
ing party deems is important for us to know.

Why can’t we have full disclosure on the
candidates that are being placed before us so
that we can make an intelligent decision on
who we feel would best represent us? Both

our government. Now is the time for us to
speak out and say that we do not want anoth-

the country.

backwards.

this administration and the previous one have ple.

done an excellent job of abusing their power
and embarrassing the Bahamian people.
It has become a norm for Bahamians to think

that all politicians lie.

Why is that? No one is perfect but at some
point we should make these people accountable
for their actions. It is better to have a candidate
that says, “I made mistakes and I have learnt
from them” than to have someone sweep

er MP, Cabinet Minister or Senator who is
going to do nothing but bring embarrassment to

Our leaders are forgetting how far we have
come as a nation and are progressively stepping

These political parties need to stop nomi-
nating who their benefactors want and start
nominating who is best for the Bahamian peo-

Change within our country has to start on an
individualistic level.
We have to change as a people. We have to

change the way we view politics and the pow-

everything under the rug and then spend five

years surprising us with the skeletons in their

closets.

As Bahamians we should demand more from

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We need to stand and say enough is enough.
At the end of the day we are all still Bahamians
and should do what is best for the country
regardless of party affiliations.

JANA STUBBS
February, 2009.

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ROWAN RL TWRER


THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief :

soneevereecrecsesersossseecnsrecsesceuesssorssecnsesseressssoees

Churches

to offer
family crisis
counselling

DISTURBED by the rising
tide of suicidal behaviour,
numerous churches announced
earlier this week that they will be
coming together to offer family
crisis counselling.

“This is not a programme to
offer financial assistance, but
instead one of offering hope to
those who, for whatever reason,
are living on the edge of quiet
desperation,” said a statement
from the churches.

“We have found that many
persons feeling hopeless and in
despair simply need someone to
listen and to show compassion.”

The churches offering coun-
selling are: Trinity Assembly; St
Barnabas Anglican Church; St
Michael’s Methodist Church; All
Saints Anglican Church, St
Paul’s Baptist Church, Golden
Gates Assembly; Voice of Deliv-
erance; New Covenant Baptist
Church; Southside Christian
Ministries; Ebenezer Baptist
Church; the Hope Centre;
Bahamas Harvest Church, and
Christ Community Church.

In the statement, the clergy-
men also called on other church-
es to “decrease their emphasis
on Mammon and raw material-
ism.”

“This emphasis on things and
the pursuit thereof is placing
undue pressure on some believ-
ers, who when disappointed,
turn inward and do harm to
themselves.”

Noting that many people sim-
ply need the comfort of having
someone listen to them talk, the
churches said, “Christians and
all persons of goodwill should
at this time of economic scarcity
show themselves friendly with
a listening ear and a bentness to
be each others brother.”



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Man hits out at lack of mental health help-line

mg By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IN THE wake of a sharp esca-
lation in attempted and successful
suicides, a distressed man has hit
out at the lack of a dedicated
national mental health help-line.

Wishing to be identified only
as Peter, the man, who lost his
job last year, said that he was
unable to find reassurance when
he called around various psychi-
atric health offices yesterday hop-
ing to hear a friendly voice.

“They don’t even have a hot-
line where people can pick up the
phone and talk to a mental health
counsellor. There’s not even a
hotline that could divert some-
one from maybe committing sui-
cide,” he said.

Since last year, Peter said, he
has been surviving with assistance
from his elderly mother, and help-
ing her with her stall in the straw
market, after being unable to find
a secure job.

Feeling as though he was “in
crisis”, Peter said he decided to
call the Community Assessment
Centre, an outpost of Sandilands
on Market Street.

But instead of getting a load
off his chest, Peter claims he was
put on hold for what seemed like
“an eternity.” In despair, he
“hung up in disgust” and tried
Sandilands directly, only to again

be put on hold.

Peter said that in times like
these, in which greater numbers
of people are being placed under
serious economic strain, there is
all the more need for some sort of
national help-line.

Hearing about his experience,
director of the Bahamas Crisis
Centre and co-ordinator of psy-
chiatric services for the Depart-
ment of Social Services, Dr San-
dra Dean Patterson, expressed
surprise and disappointment that
he was unable to speak with any-
one.

Dr Patterson encouraged peo-
ple like Peter to call the Crisis
Centre’s 24/7 hotline if they are
feeling helpless.

Manned by trained volunteers,
the Crisis Centre hotline (328-
0922) was originally set up to
offer advice and counselling to
victims of abuse, but Dr Patterson
said that no call will be turned
down.

“It is primarily for victims of
violence, whatever that violence
is, but we do have persons who
call who feel like they want to
die. Like they want to end things,
they are feeling helpless, so we
do take all calls,” she said.

“T’d encourage people to call
the crisis hotline because there is
always a line and it is 24/7.”

She urged people considering
suicide to remember that they are
not seeing things clearly — and

SYTHE "i for Visual Arts Exhibition

IN A display of talent and skills,
student artists from the primary
and secondary schools demon-
strated what they were capable of
at the 11th annual Visual Arts
Exhibition.

The exhibition represents the
collaboration between the Min-
istry of Education and stakeholder
RBC Finco.

The exhibition was first staged in
1999 by the Department of Edu-
cation “to continue to showcase
the art work produced in our
schools by students in the Art and
Design Programme.” Under the
direction of senior education offi-
cer Pamela Chandler, the students
demonstrated skills with a wide
variety of materials such as sea
shells, beads, straw, fabrics, paints,
and glass.



In attendance was Carl Bethel,
Minister of Education, who said:
“Art and artistic development is
an essential characteristic of human
development.”

RESULTS

Junior High School Division:

LW Young Junior High School —
3rd Place

SC McPherson Junior High School
— 2nd Place

TA Thompson Junior High School —
1st Place

Senior High School:

CV Bethel Senior High School -—
3rd Place

C C Sweeting Senior High School —
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Government High School — 1st Place



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there is always help.

“People who are suicidal or are
thinking of suicide are depressed.
That’s the bottom line, and when
you are depressed you don’t see
things the way people see them
when they are not depressed. The
lens you are looking at life
through is very distorted, so you
don’t see clearly, so it is important
to talk to someone outside of
yourself,” she said.

Those taking the calls are well-
equipped to handle such situa-
tions, assured the director.

“They are trained volunteers. If
they can’t do something then they
will refer the person, to let the
person know they can go into
community counselling or Sandi-
lands or whatever, and if it is
something urgent then we would
obviously call the police.”

Meanwhile, the experienced

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psychiatric health worker said
awareness needs to be raised that
mental illness is as common, if
not more common, than physical
ill health.

“We need to be alert to it, be
aware of it and respond to it, and
let people know most of all that
there is help.

“People should just keep call-
ing,” she said. The hotline can be
contacted on 328-0922.

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PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

CHINESE VIP ENJOYS BAHAMIAN HOSPITALITY

iw

DR SELIMA HAUBER, horticulturlist, shows His Excellency bh
Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s
Republic of China the way they grow different crops.





Dress to Impress In your SENATOR Dr Jicinta Higgs speaks to His Excellency Hui
5 Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s

hat, shoes, accessories or : Republic of China.
i DEPUTY Prime Minister Brent Symonette along
that special dress from with His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of

the State Council of The People’s Republic of

ORALEE’S FACHIONS China waves goodbye as the head to Freeport.

Mackey Street + Telephone: 393-0744
ote ee He eae













BISHOP GLORIA REDD MINISTRIES
P.O.Box CB 11416
Nassau, Bahamas

Revival Revival
Bishop Gloria Redd

February 22nd - February 27th - 1 Week
Pastor Stanely Ferguson
New Free Community Holiness Baptist Church
Malcolm Allotment
7:30p.m. nightly
There will be no service on Thursday 26th of February.

Cri Dil Ge

TIM HAUBER, General Manager of the Lucayan Tropical, shows His
Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s
Republic of China how they grow crops.



SENATOR Dr Jicinta

pcelengy ul | Ua
Liangyu Vice Premier

of the State Council FINANCIAL CONTROLLER

of The People’s
Republic of China : : : :
some of the ruins Mid-sized company is seeking a

that slaves left Financial Controller. Successful

7 rr iy . 7 pening. candidate must have a minimum
HERITAGE DAY of five (5) years experience, with
experience in Cost Accounting.
PHOTOS:
HOPE TOWN Send Resumes To:
Felipe Major/ controllerfinancial@ ymail.com

Tribune staff DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 28th, 2009



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THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Freeport Lions :
Club equipped —
to give children :
free eye tests

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The
Freeport Lions Club is
now equipped to conduct
free eye screening tests
for children at its Sight
Centre in Freeport.

President Aira Newball
said the club has acquired
a sight screening machine
to assist with their
sight conservation pro-
gramme here on Grand
Bahama.

The Lions Club has
been assisting school chil-
dren with sight problems
by providing eye exams
and eye glasses. The
organisation has also
raised funds for children
requiring eye surgery.

Ms Newball said that
many children with sight
problems have been
referred over the years to
the club by their school,
Social Services, family
members and concerned
citizens.

“Having the sight
screening equipment will
provide quick and accu-
rate assessments of
school children, especial-
ly in the outlying settle-
ments.

“Once an assessment is
made the children will be
given further assistance
as needed,” she said.

Ms Newball said that
screenings will be con-
ducted by trained mem-
bers of the Lions Club at
its centre on East Beach
Drive.

Machine

Dr Carl Dehmel, a
retired internist, said the
machine is very sophisti-
cated and is capable of
detecting various sight
disorders.

He said the machine is
able to detect the early
stages of short-sighted-
ness and far-sightedness,
cross eye, and colour
blindness.

“The individual looks
into the machine and we
run different tests. It
takes only 15 minutes per
child and we can tell if
everything is okay. If not,
the child will be referred
to take additional tests,”
he said.

Ms Newball said they
want to extend the sight
conservation programme
to other Family Islands.
They are planning to
travel to Abaco next
month, she said.

She said several
fundraising events have
been planned to raise
money for the mainte-
nance of the equipment,
doctor visits and eye
glasses purchases for chil-
dren.

A Fun Run Walk for
Sight will be held on
February 22, starting at
6am at the Lions Club
house on East Beach
Drive.

The Sight Seals Drive
will be held in March and
a steak-out will be held in
April.

Ms Newball said indi-
viduals, small businesses
and corporations will be
asked to make a financial
contribution to use the
Lions Sight Seals on their
mail.

She is urging the com-
munity to support the
various fundraising
events as the money
raised goes toward their
ongoing sight conserva-
tion programme.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
YR
PHONE: 322-2157

(be Bayer HealthCare

Govt in talks over EPA services schedule

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE government is in talks
with the Caribbean Regional
Negotiating Machinery over the
services schedule it submitted as
part of the Economic Partner-
ship Agreement with Europe,
according to the minister of state
for finance.

Confirming that the schedule,
outlining the ways in which the
Bahamas proposes to liberalise
trade in services with the EU and
CARICOM under the EPA, was
forwarded to the CRNM for
scrutiny in early 2009, Zhivargo
Laing said the government “‘is in
discussions with them over it.”

Mr Laing said the government
has “just received” comments
from the CRNM on its offer, but
remained tight-lipped on the con-
tent of those observations.

“I don’t want to get into that at
the moment. We are in discus-
sion with (the CRNM) on them.
They are more procedural than
anything else though,” he said.

The CRNM is a regional facil-
ity established by CARICOM

THE ETHIOPIA Africa Black
International Congress led the
African National Anthem during
the opening of the African
Heritage Conference 2009
sponsored by the International
Phoenix Society on Tuesday,
February 17 at the British
Colonial Hilton.




Zhivargo Laing

heads of state to conduct trade
negotiations jointly for their
countries.

While the facility hammered
out the overall details of the EPA
with Europe, individual countries
were given the opportunity to
mould more specific elements of
the agreement — such as which
industries would be liberalised
and which would be protected
from foreign competition.

As a country with “Most

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Developed Country” status in
CARIFORUM, the Bahamas is
committed to freeing-up trade in
83 per cent of its 155 services
industries.

The Bahamas was given a six
month extension beyond the
October 16, 2008 EPA signing
date to submit its services sched-
ule, which was being formulated
throughout last year after discus-
sion between the government
and private sector stakeholders.

The EPA is a trade agreement
that provides for more liberalised
trade in both goods and services
between CARIFORUM coun-
tries and the European Commu-
nity.

Mr Laing said that there were
“no adjustments” made to the
services schedule released to the
public in August 2008 prior to its
submission to the CRNM around
January 2009 for review.

After the review, the govern-
ment intends to submit its ser-
vices schedule to the European
Union by April 15 for inclusion in
the Annexes of the Agreement.

Meanwhile, Mr Laing said the
government is “moving steadily”
to produce an implementation





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schedule for the EPA.

This would define the timeline
over which certain obligations
required under the agreement
would come into effect.

“We are working with the
Trade Commission and the stake-
holders who will be involved with
understanding what is proposed
as an implementation schedule
and what has to be done so that it
can be put into effect,” he said.

As for legislation to enact the
EPA, Mr Laing suggested that
this is far off and on the back-
burner given present economic
conditions.

“We are far from preparing
legislation. You have to remem-










ber that this is a process which
we have a minimum of three
years to at least do preliminary
things. We and all others in the
Caribbean are in preparatory
talks about what it is that we are
required to do. Regard being had
to that and the economic cir-
cumstances we find ourselves in,
et cetera, I think we will all agree
that the country has some prior-
ities which might trump that at
the moment.”

The government has indicat-
ed that reform of Customs
administration is the “most criti-
cal” issue facing the country as
it moves to fulfill its commitments
under the EPA.

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PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



China’s Vice Premier of State visits Grand Bahama

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - His Excellency
Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the





faders)
MLC ae
Governors Harbour.
Reck Saund....... 7
pee 1 = =| |

State Council of the People’s
Republic of China, yesterday vis-
ited Grand Bahama - the nation’s
second city - as part of his official
visit to the Bahamas.

Vice Premier Hui and his dele-

Take MeL
) Carnival.

FUN FOR ALL. ALL FOR FUN:

2Q.-
from person

ry Carnival Victory.

Southern Caribbean
From San Juan

Carnival eeserves the right to re-instate the fel supplement forall guests.at ap
to89 per persen perday if the NYMEX od exceeds #70 per barrel,
Fricesiare based omcategory o', crmse anly, per person, double accopancy,
capacity controlled aad subject sochange at. any time, Gaverament taves and fee
and gratuities not inchaded. Ships Registry: Bahamas & Panama

ree eo tel
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Lyford Gay........

Mall at Maratha 5
Shirley Street _........32%

gation were taken on a tour of
Freeport’s tourist attractions and
its industrial sector, including the
Lucayan Harbour and the
Freeport Container Port.

A luncheon was held at the



March 29th, 2009

Sy ae
Pere em steer es ae



Westin at Our Lucaya Resort
for the Chinese group and
various prominent residents of
Freeport.

“It gives me great pleasure to
welcome you and your distin-
guished delegation to our second
city, Freeport, in Grand
Bahama,” said Brent Symonette,
Minister of Foreign Affairs.

“Your visit here today speaks
volumes of you and your govern-
ment’s keen interest in the
Bahamas.”

China and the Bahamas estab-
lished diplomatic relations more
than a decade ago, which has led
to partnerships in areas of nation-
al priority such as education, cul-
ture, trade and investment.

On Tuesday, the Chinese gov-
ernment agreed to loan over $160
million to the Bahamas govern-
ment for road works and other
projects.

Mr Symonette told Vice Pre-
mier Hui that Freeport has end-
less potential. He also noted that
investments made in Freeport by
Hutchison-Whampoa have inex-
tricably linked the Bahamas and
China for nearly a generation.

“T wish to note that despite the
tough economic times being expe-
rienced by the entire world, the
commitment of your country to
the relationship we share has
enabled a measure of constancy
for the economy of Freeport and,
therefore, a steady life for many
of the residents here,” he said.

Hutchison is the largest
employer on Grand Bahama. Its
developments in Freeport include
the Our Lucaya Resort, the
Freeport Container Port, and the
Harbour and Airport Companies.

Noting that these are challeng-
ing times for all countries, Mr
Symonette said the impact of the
presence of important industrial

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As e Summit Academy

SUMMIT

ACADEMY

is registering for the 2009/2010 academic year.

A limited amount of spaces are available in Playgroup through Grade 5.
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We are also pleased to announce the additional expansionjof, oul
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partners like Hutchison-Wham-
poa and the Grand Bahama Port
Authority remain a critical com-
ponent to the long-term success
of the Freeport and the Bahamas.

“We are, therefore, confident
that the well-laid planning we car-
ry out today will ensure, for all,
our well-deserved and mutual
benefits tomorrow,” he said.

and/or Mr Glean

PICTURED with a gold fish that is part of the Gold Fish Experience

at Pelican Bay, left to right, are: Tara Knowles, guest services asso-
ciate; Della Bridgewater, front office manager, and Eleanor Bullard,
front office associate.

Gold fish for company
at Pelican Bay at Lucaya

EXTENDED stay guests at Pelican Bay now have a new expe-
rience to look forward to when staying at the hotel.

Pelican Bay at Lucaya recently introduced a programme where-
by extended stay guests are welcomed with a gold fish in a bowl and
given one as a pet to care for during a stay at the hotel.

“The gold fish have been well received by our long stay guests,”
said Della Bridgewater, front office manager at the hotel.

“Being away from home, our guests may be lonely and having a
pet for companionship while on the road is comforting.

“All gold fish are all named and carry names such as “Lola.” We
do all we can to give our guests a home away from home experi-
ence.”

Pelican Bay at Lucaya prides itself on its guest experiences and
the gold fish is one of many other initiatives.

The accompanying note for guests enjoying the gold fish expe-
rience is, “Hi, my name is Lola.

“T realise you’re away from home and you may get a little lone-
ly at times so Iam happy to be your companion during your stay. I
need to be fed at least twice daily and my water should be changed
often.

“T hope I make you feel more at home. If you have any questions
or concerns about my care, please contact the front desk.”

Pelican Bay at Lucaya is owned by Sundt AS, a private invest-
ment company based in Norway. Pelican Bay is the only investment
that Sundt AS has in the Bahamas.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



WE EXTEND CONGRATULATIONS
TO GING 3. MILLER ON HIS RECENT ATTAINMENT OF A
WASTER OF ART DEGREE WITH HONORS IN INSURANCE
AND RSE MANAGEMENT FROM THE UNIVERSITY OF
NOTTINGHAM [IN ENGLAND
FROM YOUR MOM: ROZENA, GRANDMOTHER, BUGLE,
BROTHERS; JASON & JAIME, HELEN, FAMILY AND
FRIENDS. WE ARE PROUD OF YOU, GOD BLESS YOU.

APPLIANCE = eee

cow Mai wh OO] 11

Name:

Fc. Box lland

Ph: day

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are bang geen ang?

c__jj

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ty besgs} es bss) Sais Ltd

as Master Technicians on Village Rd.










THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9



EEE
SkyBahamas Airlines introduces Panhandle airports

new service to Marsh Harbour

SKYBAHAMAS Airlines
today celebrates the inaugural
flight of a new afternoon ser-
vice into Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.

The inaugural flight will
depart Nassau at 4.30pm today
and will return to Nassau at
6.20pm.

To celebrate the event, the
airline will host a mix and min-
gle reception at the Faith Con-
vention Centre in Marsh Har-
bour between 6pm and Spm
tonight.

An official ribbon-cutting
ceremony will take place at
Spm. Both local and national
leaders are expected to attend.

“We're excited to extend
our services to the beautiful

RU a ULE

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=
oS
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=
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“We look forward to
providing each customer
with a memorable experience
in an environment where
safety is our culture and
service is our passion.”



SkyBahamas Airlines statement

city of Marsh Harbour, Abaco.
We look forward to providing
each customer with a memo-
rable experience in an envi-

ronment where safety is our
culture and service is our pas-
sion,” the airline said ina
statement.



STUDENTS AND TEACHERS of the Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School in Freeport, Grand Bahama
visited Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham during a visit to Nassau on Monday, February 16. The students

are also expected to visit Eleuthera.

i Kisskadee Drive

ee



Mires ae al) Mele Lo







COMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:
Paved Roads * Water & Sewerage

Phone * Cable ° Electricity ¢ Street Lights
RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:

Tennis Courts * Ornamental Pond Jogging Trails
Playground ¢ Basketball Court Gazebos ¢ Grills

Rapidly developing communtty
ONLY 23 LOTS LEFT

Open \ House

ARY 21, 2009
10AM TO 5PM

On the spot

Bank financing available

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL:
Sanctuary Investments Ltd.

Church Street Plaza, Shirley & Church Sts.

325-6456 * 325-6447/9

Persons are able to book
flights to and from Marsh Har-
bour by visiting the SkyBa-
hamas Airline ticket counter
located at the Marsh Harbour
Airport in Marsh Harbour,
Abaco, or the Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)
in Nassau.

Customers can also book
flights through the SkyBa-
hamas reservations office
located at LPIA.

On January 23, 2008, Sky-
Bahamas Airlines launched its
regular service into Marsh
Harbour, making Abaco its
newest travel destination after
with Exuma, Freeport, and
Bimini.

The company gained new
ownership in September 2006,
and under the direction of
Captain Randy Butler, its
focus has been servicing high
demand travel zones with con-
venient flight schedules and
dependable service.

In addition to their regular
flights, they offer on-demand
charter services throughout
the Bahamas and_ the
Caribbean.

SkyBahamas Airlines Ltd
utilises three SAAB 340A 33-
seater aircraft as well as one
Beechcraft 1900D 19-seater.

According to SkyBahamas,
all of its planes are adequate-
ly equipped for safety and out-
standing for cleanliness. Sky-
Bahamas Airlines also pro-
vides full cabin service that
includes cocktails, a compli-
mentary beverage service, and
special Bahamian-made treats
for every customer.

Thee Fohamers
Agrivalteral, Marine Reseurces
ted Agrihavines Expo

Poebruary 26te-2ah, 2008



fight for traffic

m@ FORT WALTON BEACH, Fla.

LEADERS in a Panhandle county are accusing officials in a
nearby county of spreading rumors to weaken their airport busi-
ness, according to Associated Press.

Okaloosa commissioners voted Tuesday night to consider
suing the Panama City-Bay County International Airport for
slanderous attacks.

The Okaloosa officials also questioned a Panama City Beach
Chamber of Commerce e-mail claiming the Air Force would end
a lease for the Northwest Florida Regional Airport near Fort
Walton Beach in 2010. The lease was renewed through 2032.

Joe Tannehill, airport authority chairman in Bay County, says
Okaloosa County leaders appear paranoid about a new airport
scheduled to open in Bay County next year.

















The Lyford Cay Foundations

ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS
Application Is Open

The Lyford Cay Foundations are pleased to announce that
applications are now being accepted for academic scholarships
for study at the undergraduate, graduate and doctoral levels
at colleges and universities in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and
the Caribbean.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens and pledge to return to
The Bahamas upon graduation.

Please visit our website at www.lyfordcayfoundation.org
for additional information and application forms.

Forms may also be obtained from high school guidance
counselors, The College of The Bahamas Financial Aid Office, and
the Lyford Cay Foundation office. Please address your application
to: The Chairman, Screening Committee.

DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS IS MARCH 31, 2009.










Your Dreams. Our Mission.

SROATION, ty,
< ¥ Inspired Philanthropy for a Better Bahamas



P. O. Box N 7776, Nassau, Bahamas
T 242.362.4910 / F 242.362.5449
E info@lyfordcayfoundation.org

2 ;
9 W www.lyfordcayfoundation.or;
a ota wxeoâ„¢ yf yf 8



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PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

: ai Pil kee

4 ert tation Make$ Cent$ i= SE re Lt a soe we :
Nassau y ee Se S a 1
irae Grouper

Honeymoon...

EAT OA Keyevevel

LIONFISH!

Season

December 1, 2008
To
February 28, 2009

| UR MLL
contact BREEF
RO RID
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The closed season allows the fish to breed
successfully. Let’s ensure that we have Nassau
grouper to enjoy in the future!

Q
lf you recognize this Georgeous Gal Third

wish her a Happy 90th Birthday
Lots of love from husband: Patrick,



children: Michael, Ginny, Donna,
TAILS are wagging, pot-
Tim, Terri cakes are howling and pot-

cats are purring louder
than ever in anticipation of
the third Weekend That
Went to the Dogs.

The Grand Bahama
Humane Society said it
is proud to host the
event, which will be held
on March 6 to 8 in
Freeport.

The weekend will kick
off with the Pink Poodle
Ladies Lunch Friday,
March 6.

Attendees are invited to THIS little kitten poses with a Humane Society worker
“while away a spring after-
noon with fine food by
Freeport’s own guest chef

rious garden of the The Good Ole Boys.”
Boathouse, and enjoy the The ladies are encour-
Michael Higgs in the luxu- 4422 sounds of Joe Fox and aged to wear pink and take
part in the “Petit Pink
Silent Auction”.
On Saturday, March 7,

(Fo there will be an “Animal

(é 1} House” night at the GB

Feburary 2009 ey } Yacht Club, and attendees
Se" are invited to “dance the

night away and howl at the

r. " rer » h i f k
OAKWOOD ACADEMY SCHOOL bad Th hal aad the
Other’ from Louisville,
Kentucky.

Sojourner-Douglass

College Reintroduces the
ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE Finale
The grand finale of the
Tin PSYCHOLOGY AND Saturday, March 14, 2009 weekend is the ever popu-
lar 24th annual Pet Show
O20Oan on Sunday afternoon.
Cou nye NEL | | ? Pippics met be at least
For students applying to Grades 1-3 four months old to enter
the show.

for September 2009 All dogs must be on
leash and under control at
Applications will be accepted until all times, the Humane Soci-

ety said.
March 6% s009 Local vets and the

Humane Society have com-

; ; iled a list of the various
For further information contact the eroupé and categories

995-95 Visi yi 7 which dogs can enter.
school at 325-3517 or visit our website The cont ciiiors dom't
at: have to be pure-bred — pot-

——s hae ak, cakes and mixed breeds are
www.oakwoodacademybahamas.com cg weieane.





NASSAU GLASS COMPANY

will be

CLOSED
Saturday February 21st

for our company’s

FUN BY

in order to give our staff
a well-deserved break.

5
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We will reopen on Monday February 23rd
We apologise for any inconvenience caused

ee tt ee eee dee ere Mackey Street 393-8165

: Or visit us at waw,sdc.edu
POEL LL 1, ily cia anaiele Pere








THE TRIBUNE

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS

Claims of
student sex
assault on
six-year-old

FROM page one

ters two days ago, is upset that
the school had not called a gen-
eral meeting to inform parents
of the incident. She also criti-
cised school security for not pre-
venting the attack through vig-
ilant patrols.

It was also claimed teachers
were convened for a general
meeting about the incident last
week. The school's principal did
not return messages up to press
time to confirm this.

"We don't know what's going
on in this school. I would like
answers — these things are sup-
posed to be brought to light so
we know what we're dealing
with. These securities need to
get off their fat (backsides) and
walk ‘round the schools, espe-
cially the primary school
because half of these schools
are open and anybody could
snatch these children," said the
concerned citizen.

"On any given day you get
about 10,000 lil’ five-year-olds
walking the streets — and any-
body could pick them off the
road. Let us know what's going
on so we can protect our chil-
dren better."

Both police and Minister
Bethel said the matter was not
made public because of the sen-
sitivity of the case. Minister
Bethel said that proper school
procedure regarding patrols
might not have been followed in
this case.

Should this be proven at the
end of a ministry review,
"appropriate action” will be
taken, he said.

"The school has established
procedures, which were not fol-
lowed in the particular instance.
The senior teachers and secu-
rity are supposed to walk
around and check all of the
blind spots around that school
after school, make sure that all
persons who are supposed to
be on buses are out in front of
the school.

"They are supposed to make
sure no one is behind in the
classes, also there are supposed
to be perimeter checks at the
times when students are out of
the classrooms. If in this
instance the established proce-
dures were not followed prop-
erly, action is taken by the min-
istry to address those prob-
lems," he said.

Supt Moss confirmed that
there was active police investi-
gation into the allegations. He
said that the attack involved at
least two perpetrators. Howev-
er, he did not specify the nature
of the assault.

Police hope to bring the case
to a swift resolution. Charges
have yet to be filed in connec-
tion with the incident.

"T think we can bring conclu-
sion to this in a little bit, in the
next couple of days," Supt Moss
said.

When asked why the incident
was not brought to public atten-
tion he said: "If the investiga-
tion had revealed the impor-
tance of alerting other students
at the school, they would have
gone ahead in that end. But we
don't think this was a case
where we need to at this stage
make an alert to hype up par-
ents."

Minister Bethel said it was
not the ministry's place to make
announcements on unproved
allegations that are before the
police.

"We can't presume that
because an allegation is made
it is proven. We can't presume
and start making announce-
ments. . that’s why we have a
police force. When matters are
brought to our attention we
have our officials produce state-
ments so that we are able to see
upon review that it has some
basis and we then immediately
refer it to police. To make state-
ments on matters like this that
are under investigation preju-
dices the investigation,” he said.

Up to press time no suspects
were in custody.

GB Power Company
majority shareholder ‘sells

50% stake in Caribbean
operations holding firm’

FROM page one

Taga will now become Marubeni’s joint venture partner for the
Caribbean, both holding a 50 per cent stake. This effectively means
that the Abu Dhabi company will now hold a 27.7 per cent stake in
Grand Bahama Power Company, the same as Marubeni.

This will only be slightly larger than the 25 per cent interest
held by Canadian power giant Emera, which acquired its interest in
November 2008 by buying Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent
stake in BISX-listed ICD Utilities for $41 million.

Yesterday’s deal means that Grand Bahama Power Company will
now be supported by three global utility heavyweights from Japan,

Canada and the Middle East.

What Taga will bring to the table is unclear, but with the deal set
to close at the end of the 2009 first quarter, it said yesterday it would
have an operational role and Board representation at all the
Caribbean utilities, including Grand Bahama Power Company.

Peter Barker-Homek, Taqa’s chief executive, said: “The trans-
action we bring to you today is another endorsement of our strate-
gic objective to deliver profitable growth in multiple markets
where we can access stable cash flows, which complement and
enhance our existing diversified energy portfolio.

“Taga shares the same outlook on long-term investment as
Marubeni, and brings solid experience in power sector and a strong
financial position to the joint venture. Together, we have previously
delivered successful partnerships in other regions, having jointly
invested in power generation and water production globally.

“Our joint venture in the region will act as a platform to explore
multiple opportunities, beyond the downstream segment, which may
assist in creating a more sustainable energy environment for

Caribbean countries.”

Apart from the Bahamas investment, Marubeni’s Caribbean

interests include:

e An 80 per cent equity interest in Jamaica Public Service Com-
pany in Jamaica, which owns and operates ten generating facilities,
including six hydroelectric plants. These plants expand Taqa’s
downstream business into this sustainable energy source.

¢ A 39 per cent equity interest in PowerGen, which is an IPP that
supplies 80 per cent of total electricity demand in Trinidad and

Tobago.

e A 25.5 per cent equity interest in Curacao Utilities Company,
which supplies electric, steam and water to refinery plant of
Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. in Curagao Island.

Taqq has a $24 billion asset base, and in 2008 generated $4.6 bil-

lion in revenues.

Taga employs 2,800 people from 38 different nations and oper-
ates from its offices in Abu Dhabi; Ann Arbor, Michigan;
Aberdeen; Amsterdam; Calgary and The Hague. This footprint is
further extended through alliances with partners across Africa,
the Middle East, Europe, North America and India.

touring the Grand Bahama Shipyard,
the Freeport Container Port, the Garden
of Groves, and finally Dolphin Encoun-
ters.

Mr Liangyu will leave the Bahamas from
Grand Bahama’s International Airport at
9am today to return to the People’s Repub-
lic of China.

FROM page one

China's Vice Premier of State

Following the tour, Mr Liangyu boarded
a plane at the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport and was accompanied by
Mr Symonette on his flight to Grand
Bahama. Mr Liangyu spent the evening

diplomatic officers followed him.

Also present was Deputy Prime Minister
and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent
Symonette, who was accompanied by the
Bahamas’ Ambassador to China Elma
Campbell.






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PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

Agape Chitin Selool

A Ministry of Marsh Harbour desapel Chapel
FO. ae APLOTLO, Marsh Rarbour, Abaco, Patanias

Nau Pe ep

TEACHER POSITIONS

Primary Grades

&
ATMEL Mra aa oy School

UR Ree eRe aCe MCUs

Ce Ue emer oun)

mM ee Mat ie Oe a
For the school year beginning SEPTEMBER 2004

Applicants mast be Born Again Christians and adhere to toe Staterent of Faith of Marsh Harbour Gospel Chapel

Teachers must aso have al Ieast a Pachelors Degree in Education or a Teacher's Certificate
and must be a Bahamian or a permanent resident of the Erahamnas with work status,
Qualtying persons art asked to contact te office a
Telephone (242) 341-411 830 AM. ~ 346 PM, or fax (242!) 301-4771
oc venil oor websibe ~ wiewagapeschool come ~ for jab or student applications
Agape Christian School uses the A Beka Pook Curriculum
which emphasizes Christian values ag well as a very high standard of education

and is approved by the Bahamas Minisiry of Education.

We seek to train the mind, quide the person, and love the personality,



THE TRIBUNE

Police officers alleged to have

‘hustled’ or extorted money

FROM page one

to find out what had happened
this time.

“When I came out he told the
DJ, ‘OK you can turn the music
back on.’ So he pulled me over
in the corner and said: “Look
here now, I understand a lot of
money is being made in the
back here. I already have the
figure in my head. You need to
take care of me. I looking for
$500 a week.’

“So I said to him, ‘$500 a
week? I might as well come
work for you.’ He said to me,
‘Man, $500 a week and I’ll keep
everybody off ya back. That’s
what I lookin for.’ But I told
him: ‘Let’s talk another day, I
can’t deal with that right now.’
But what I really didn’t want is
for him to turn off the music
again because that would run
all my customers. But I really
was just trying to put him off,
because I am not in a position
to give this man $500 a week
for doing his job when I am not
breaking the law,” he said.

The second case, involving
20-year-old Travis Brown,
occurred two days ago when Mr
Brown was in the East Street

area.

According to Mr Brown,
three police officers approached
him and informed him that
there was a warrant out for his
arrest. Handcuffing him and
putting him in the back of their
vehicle, the officers drove
around for a time before ques-
tioning him as to “what he was
going to do.”

When he asked what his
options were, Mr Brown said
he was told that he could either
spend the next few days in a
holding cell, or he could pay
them a “fine of $100.”

“So I told him I didn’t have
$100, but I could call my broth-
er. But he asked me how much
Thad,” he said.

It is here that the officer, who
was in the back seat with Mr
Brown, reached into Mr
Brown’s trouser pocket, took
out $50 and split it between
himself and the officer in the
front passenger seat.

Having already essentially
robbed the young man, the offi-

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Bahamas State Council Prepares for an exciting

5 9. ANNUAL GENERAL CONVENTION

OF THE PENTECOSTAL ASSEMBLIES OF THE WORLD INC.

MARCH Ist - 6th, 2009

Greater Bethel Cathedral,
Faith Way, off Blue Hill Road South
(Corner of Carlton E. Francis School)

EARLY MORNING PRAYER ----- 5:00AM - 6:00AM
DAY SESSIONS ------- 12:00no0o0n - 2:00pm

Host Pastor
Suffragan Bishop
Christopher Minnis

roeme; "GOD WILL DO WHATEVER HE SAYS"

EVENING WORSHIP SERVICE —- 7:30pm

"May word be that goeth forth out of my mouth; tt shall not return unto me void,

but tt shall accomplish that which I please...

Bishop Horace Smith

Suffragan Bishop Winston Redwood

Suffragan Bishop Wilfred Mackey
Bishop Ellis Farrington J.P.
Rev. Hilda Symonette

Bishop Ellis Farrington

Suff. Bishop Ezekiel Munnings

" Scripture text: Isaiah 55: 7-11

cers then had to take him to
Quackoo Street Police Station
to have the handcuffs removed
as they did not have a key.

The officers then dropped the
young man off at Spotless
Cleaners on East Street. Mr
Brown, like the first com-
plainant, has filed a report with
the Complaints and Corruption
Unit.

This practice of “shaking
down” persons and demanding
“protection money” is not new
in the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, The Tribune was told.

However, as the force con-
tinues to evolve it has taken a
no-nonsense approach to cor-
ruption, and has publicly placed
officers before the courts —
sending a strong and unequivo-
cal message that where corrup-
tion is found, it will be weeded
out.

Yesterday, Acting Commis-
sioner Reginald Ferguson said
such activities must be stopped.
He encouraged citizens to con-
tinue to come forward to report
incidents at the Force’s Com-
plaints and Corruption Unit.

Man charged
with murder
of Oscarsin
Williams
FROM page one

15. Twelve witnesses are listed
on court dockets. Fowler, who
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane was not required
to plead to the murder charge.
A preliminary inquiry will be
held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence
against him for him to stand
trial in the Supreme Court.
The case was adjourned to
April 14 for the commence-
ment of the preliminary
inquiry. Fowler was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison yes-
terday. He is represented by
lawyers, Ian Cargill and Tai
Pinder.

Pastor Knowles

Evening Worship Speakers:

Bishop Ellis Farrington J.P.

Suffragan Bishop Ezekiel Munnings
District Elder Lilymae Knowles
Suffragan Bishop Christopher Minnis
Bishop Horace E. Smith, Chicago Illinois,
Presiding Bishop of the P .A. W. Ine.
Prophet Pastor Jason Strachan

Donv Miss: Yoww blessing! (Be there!/


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

St. Cecilia’s Catholic

Church



Cultural & Heritage Site, Arawak Cay
Saturday 21st, February, 2009

Venue

THE TRIBUNE



Woman dies after

suffering seizure
in swimming pool

FROM page one

seizures for nearly a decade and
suffered a seizure while swim-
ming,” said a statement from
the family. “She never regained
consciousness.”

St Andrew’s school, which is
now on its winter break and was
informed of the swimming acci-
dent in its pool late Tuesday,
said the school has been in con-
tact with Mrs Roberts’ family
“who remain in our thoughts
and prayers.”

School principal Robert F

Club, of which Mrs Roberts was
a member, “for the use of its
pool to offer private swimming
lessons to the open communi-
ty.”

Mrs Roberts, owner of the
local restaurant Nelly’s Deli,
was carrying out routine train-
ing exercises designed for Fit-
ness and Master swimmers in
one of the pool's lanes on Tues-
day afternoon when the inci-
dent occurred.

She had been a member of
the club for about a year and a
half and swam about twice a

Mrs Roberts was swimming
“in the lane at the far side of
the pool, which is designated
for masters,” a statement
released yesterday by Carol
Misiewicz, the lawyer for the
directors of SWIFT, said.

“The learn to swim pro-
gramme was going on in the
other five lanes, separated by
one free lane,” said the state-
ment.

"After about 40 minutes of
training in the pool, the fitness
swimmer apparently had a
seizure in the water and was

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week, according to the swim observed face-down in the
club. water.

“A parent jumped into the

water to pull her out, and

SWIFT Swimming’s Coach

Tribune returns to Freeport Maria Piazza who was conduct-

ing a class at the time, immedi-
FROM page one

ately began performing CPR.
Moments later the parent of a
Tuesday, February 11, was the last day that The Tribunes were competitive swimmer arrived
flown to the Family Islands by Bahamasair. The newspaper had to who happened to be a trained,
stop all Bahamasair deliveries because of the airline’s exorbitant registered nurse, and took over
increase in cargo rates. the CPR while the coach con-
In the meantime, The Tribune went online to provide an elec- tinued to assist. She was able to
tronic newspaper for Family Island readers. This was enthusiasti- revive the swimmer by the time
cally received by subscribers who were on line, but it presenteda the ambulance arrived. The
problem for readers without computers. swimmer was taken to Doctor’s
However, behind the scenes Bellevue Business Depot in Marsh Hospital accompanied by her
Harbour, Abaco, and in Freeport, Grand Bahama, in response to husband and the parent/nurse
the demand of their customers, made their own arrangements for and was handed over to the
delivery of the newspapers. As Bellevue Business Depot in each doctor on duty at the hospital
island is paying for the transport of the newspapers, the cost of The alive,” the statement said.
Tribune will be slightly higher for subscribers in both Marsh Har- Earlier yesterday, a family
bour and Freeport. friend said that Mrs Roberts
The Tribune is now available online at was “clinging to life” and
The newspaper is posted online at 2pm on the day of publication depending on life support. Mrs

— Monday through Saturday. Roberts remained in a coma

Wade said the school has a con-
tract with SWIFT Swimming










*FOOD & DRINKS until her death later yesterday
afternoon.

SWIFT Club explained that

BOOKS ETC. i OT (Os = its swim club is open to adults

NOTICE is hereby given that JADE GREENSWORD of | ©Ver the age of 18 years, who
HIGH VISTA DRIVE, P.O. BOX EE-16486, NASSAU, are given an assessment before
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for starting any training.

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization The Directors/Head Coach-
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who | ¢s for SWIFT Swimming, Andy
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should and Nancy Knowles had left
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement Nassau Tuesday for Alabama
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4! day of | for the SEC Championships
February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality and to visit their son. However

and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas. they are now on their way back
to Nassau.

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THE TRIBUNE

S '
T

HURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19,

n By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

he Bahamas Associa-

tion of Independent

Secondary Schools’

reigning champions
survived the most anticipated
matchup of the Hugh Campbell
Tournament’s opening round
with a high scoring second half
and dominating play inside by
arguably the country’s most dom-
inant big man.

Westminster Diplomats - 54

Jack Hayward Wildcats - 45

Rashard Morley had one of his
best performances of the year
when it mattered most, leading
the Diplomats with a double dou-
ble of “Dwight Howard-like” pro-
portions — 17 points, 22 rebounds
and two blocked shots.

Morley’s tip in gave the Diplo-
mats a comfortable 50-45 lead
with less than one minute remain-
ing, sealing the win.

After overcoming a first quar-
ter (12-8) and half-time (25-21)
deficit, the Diplomats outscored
the Wildcats 33-20 in the second
half, limiting them to just 10
points in each respective quarter.

Continuing momentum estab-
lished in the third quarter, West-
minster built a 43-37 lead on the
heels of an acrobatic lay-up by
Larry Smith with 3:36 left to play.

A resilient Wildcats squad
clawed back into the game, after
forcing turnovers on three of four
trips upcourt for the Diplomats.

Edison Davis tied the game at
45 with a running lay-up to cap an
8-2 run.

After giving up two turnovers
on backcourt and traveling penal-
ties, Shaquille Bain came up with
the biggest turnover of the night
when he played the passing lanes
perfectly and intercepted a pass.
Bain was fouled on his way to the
basket and made one of two free
throws.

After the Wildcats were sig-
naled for a technical foul, BAISS
MVP Christorr Stuart made both
free throws to give the Diplomats
a 48-45 lead with 1:10 left to play.

After a miss by Smith, Morley
tipped in what turned out to be
the game clinching lay-up.

Stuart led the Diplomats with
19 points (eight in the fourth
quarter), five rebounds and five
steals.

Smith finished with nine points,
nine rebounds and three assists
while Bain had his three points
and three steals all in the fourth
quarter.

Davis, Kenrick Hanna, and
Justin Monroe all finished with
eight points apiece.

Dimaggio Wilson and sharp
shooting point guard Chavano
Hield finished with six points
apiece.

Diplomats head coach Geno

PAGE

15



Bullard said the high expectations
placed on his team may have con-
tributed to its slow start but he
said his team adjusted well in the
second half.

“We had a long layoff between
BAISS and our first game in this
tournament, so they came out a
little slow, but we know we have
a lot of pressure on us... A lot of
people out there are expecting us
to do well and my guys were able
to recover and did what they had
to do to come out here and get
this first win. Now we just have to
focus on our next matchup and
move on.”

Bullard, who has coached his
Diplomats to consecutive BAISS
senior boys titles, said the win
goes a long way in validating pub-
lic expectation and the efforts of
the entire BAISS.

“This win was big and allevi-
ates pressure not only for us but
for our whole association,” he
said. “The private schools were
not doing too well at this point
and we feel like we have to shoul-
der the load not only for us but
for the rest of our association
also.”

The Diplomats advance to face
the Bimini Big Game 2pm today
in the opening session.

Game Notes: Shaquille Kemp
and Shaquille Bain both came off
the bench to provide key contri-
butions for the Diplomats —
Bain’s key steal and free throw
and Fernander finished with six
points and seven rebounds. The
second quarter featured three ties
and four lead changes. Morely
gave the Diplomats their first tie
at 12 all and their first lead 17-
16, both in the second quarter.

Stuart ignited the Diplomats in
the third quarter when he was
fouled on a dunk opportunity
which sent the crowd into a fren-
zy and changed his team’s body
language. His free throws gave
the Diplomats a 33-31 lead, their
first of the second half...

In addition, the third day of the
27th Annual Hugh Campbell
Basketball Classic featured the
first slate of games for Family
Island teams with many of the
nation's powerhouses in the sec-
ond city making early statements
in decisive wins.

Catholic High Crusaders - 55

South Andros Cheetahs - 38

The Crusaders’ size and ath-
leticism turned what looked to be
a competitive game early into a
lopsided affair for much of the
second half.

Tied at five in the opening
moments of the first quarter, the
Crusaders ended the period on a
10-2 run to take command of the
game. They led 17-5 heading into
the second.

Backed by a stifling half court
trap, the Crusaders forced a series
of turnovers, which translated to
easy baskets and extended their
lead to a 33-18 advantage at the

Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



GOING UP STRONG — Temple Christian Suns’ Kemico Sands...

ts

2009





FLYING HIGH — Westminster Diplomats’ Shaquille Bain...

half.

The Crusaders reached their
biggest lead of the game on a
Kenneth Taylor three pointer,
which gave his team a 40 - 21 lead
in the third quarter.

Taylor finished with 10 points,
while Delario Rolle led the Cru-
saders with 12.

Kalim Munninigs finished with
eight points and 10 rebounds
while Carlton Forbes finished
with a double double - 11 points,
11 rebounds and four blocks.

The Cheetahs’ Cordero Smith
led all scorers with 15 points while
Leonardo Forbes chipped in with
nine.

Tabernacle Baptist Falcons -

50

Temple Christian Suns - 24

After giving up eight points in
the first quarter, the Falcons
allowed just two field goals over
the next two quarters in a route of
the Suns for an impressive open-
ing win in the tournament.

Tied at six early in the game,
the Falcons ended the quarter on
a 13-2 run to take a 19-8 lead at
the end of the first quarter.

The Falcons clamped down
defensively in the second, giving
up just one field goal and a long-
range three pointer from the
Suns’ Randy Smith.

Astin Lewis, who finished with
a game high 14 points, outscored
the Falcons on his own in the
quarter with five.

Tabernacle led 29-11 at half-
time.

The third produced much of
the same as the Suns were again
held to three points in the quar-
ter, a basket by Kemico Sands
and one of two free throws by
Mario Stubbs.

The Falcons took a 41-14 lead
into the final quarter and cruised
to a seemingly effortless 26-point
win.

The Suns managed to outscore
the Falcons in the final quarter
10-9, all coming from Stubbs, who
led the Suns with 11.

Lewis led the Falcons in scor-
ing while Robin Lafrance chipped
in with eight and Sam Beauzile
and Arlington Wells added six
points apiece.

Bimini Big Game - 44

Alpha Omega Owls - 23

After a closely contested open-
ing half, Bimini outscored their
opponents by 20 in the final two
quarters to pull away for the
blowout win.

The teams posted just eight
field goals and 10 points between
them both in one of the lowest
scoring quarters of the tourna-
ment as the Owls led 6-4 at the
end of the first.

Bimini took their first lead of
the game midway through the
second quarter on a lay-up by
Cleo Sears to give his team a 10-
9 lead.

Sears followed with a pair of
assists to Tristan Kelly and the
Big Game took a slim 14-13 lead
into the half.

They began to pull away easily

in the third, outscoring the Owls
15-3.

Bimini reached a double-digit
advantage late in the third when
Sears delivered another assist to

Kelly.

Jack Levarity ended the quar-
ter with a three-point play to give
the Big Game a 29-17 lead head-
ed into the fourth quarter.

In another dominant quarter,
the Big Game outscore the Owls
15-6.

They reached a 20 point advan-
tage, the largest of the game, on a
lay-up by Kelly to make the score
39-19.

Sears finished with 17 points
and five assists, Kelly added eight
points, Levarity finished with sev-
en points and 10 rebounds and
Kirirrie Brown added 10 points
and nine rebounds.

Devan Hepburn led the Owls
with 11 points.

Sunland Baptist Stingers - 42

Mt Carmel Cavaliers - 31

The Stingers sported a bal-
anced scoring attack where their
leading scorers finished with just
six points apiece. However the
distribution was enough to out-
last the Cavaliers in the fourth
quarter.

Trailing 31-24 heading into the
fourth, the Cavaliers opened the
quarter on a 7-3 run capped by
Keron Pratt's lay-up to bring his
team within three, 34-31.

The Stingers responded with a
run of their own, ending the game
on an 8-0 flourish over the last
1:30.

Troy Bullard and Tronard
Nicholls each paced the Stingers
with six, Rashad Knowles and
Johnathon Moss each finished
with five, while Valentino
Mitchell added four.

Pratt led the Cavaliers with 10
and Rashad Ferguson finished
with nine.

McGrady says
he’s out for
season with

knee injury...
See page 17

Ha Tay

Session One

lpm - Tabernacle Baptist
Falcons vs. Winner of Jor-
dan Prince William/Bishop
Michael Eldon

2pm - Bimini Big Game
vs. Westminster Diplomats

3pm - Catholic High Cru-
saders vs. Winner of Eight
Mile Rock Bluejays/St Paul’s

4pm - Sunland Baptist
Stingers vs. Winner of North
Eleuthera/St George’s
Jaguars

Session Two
(Elimination Games)

6pm - NCA Crusaders vs.
QC Comets

7pm - CW Saunders
Cougars vs. RM Bailey Pac-
ers

8pm - South Andros
Cheetahs vs. St John’s
Giants

9pm - Galilee Miracles vs.
Kingsway Saints



The Stingers led just 9-8 after
the first quarter, but Bullard came
off the bench and sparked a 6-0
run.

The Cavs missed six consecu-
tive free throws during the run as
the Stingers took a 17-10 lead.
They led 20-14 at the half.

Mt Carmel trimmed the deficit,
25-24 midway through the third
quarter, however the Stingrays

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PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



NOTICE

The Bahamas Public Services Union
Contributory Medical Plan will conduct a
Membership Meeting for The Medical Plan
Members Only, at 7:00p.m. on Friday, March
6, 2009 at the Bahamas Public Services Union
Meeting Hall, East Street South, off Soldier
Road.

All Members are urged to attend

Refreshments will be served following the
meeting.

Stephen J. Miller
General Secretary



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INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



MESERET DEFAR, of Ethiopia, kisses the tracks after winning the 5000m during the GE Athletics Gala at

Stockholm Globe Arena, Sweden, Wednesday...

Defar breaks women’s
5,000 indoor record

n By STEPHAN NASSTROM
AP Sports Writer

STOCKHOLM (AP) —
Meseret Defar of Ethiopia
broke the women's 5,000-meter
indoor world record by more
than three seconds at the GE
Gala on Wednesday night.

Defar was timed in 14 min-
utes, 24.37 seconds. Tirunesh




Dibaba, also of Ethiopia, set the
old mark of 14:27.42 in 2007.

With excellent pacemaking,
Detar was two or three seconds
under Dibaba's split times
throughout the race.

During the final laps, many
of the fans at the sold out Eric-
sson Globe Arena stood up to
cheer her on.

With the win, Defar extended

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KHOMINIE ORLANDO SÂ¥LVANUS.
ADDERLEY OF P.O. BOX 58-52479, SEAWELLS MANOR,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, && apolying to the Minister responsible
for Matianality and Citizenship, for registration‘naturalization 2
a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration’ naturalization should mot be granted,
should send a written and signed statement of the facts within
teanty-aight days fram the 127TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Catizenship, PS.Box














N-7147, Nassau, Baharnas.

(AP Photo: Jessica Gow)

her unbeaten indoor streak to
18 races since March 2003.

Defar took the lead with
about 3,000 meters left in the
34-lap race and lapped most of
the seven other finishers twice.

Maria Konovalova of Russia
was a distant runner-up in
15:42.37.

It was the seventh record set
at the Globe since 1989.

In the men's 800, 2004
Olympic champion Yuriy
Borzakovskiy outkicked Ismail
Ahmed Ismail of Sudan for his
fifth victory in seven races at
the Globe.

Borzakovskiy, who has never
finished worse than second
here, clocked a relatively slow
1:48.13. Ismail, the Olympic sil-
ver medalist last year, was sev-
en-hundredths of a second
behind.

Olympic champion Wilfred
Bungei of Kenya finished fifth
in 1:50.11.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 17

NBA Today McGrady says he’s out for

season with knee injury

n By The Associated Press—

SCOREBOARD

Thursday, February 20

San Antonio at Detroit (8 pm
EST). The Pistons have won
just two of their past 11 at the
Palace of Auburn Hills and are
14-14 at home after going 34-7
last season.

STARS

Tuesday

— Dwight Howard, Magic,
had a career-high 45 points to
go with 19 rebounds and eight
blocks in Orlando's 107-102 win
over Charlotte.

— Nate Robinson, Knicks,
had 32 points and 10 rebounds
to lead New York to a 112-107
overtime victory over San
Antonio.

— Antawn Jamison, Wizards,
had 29 points and 11 rebounds
in Washington's 111-103 win
over Minnesota.

— Richard Jefferson, Bucks,
scored 29 points and grabbed
11 rebounds to lead Milwaukee
to a 92-86 victory at Detroit.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Kevin Durant followed an
All-Star weekend to remember
with a career-high 47 points, but
Chris Paul's driving layup in the
closing seconds gave New
Orleans a 100-98 win over Okla-
homa City. Durant had scored a
record 46 points in the Rookie
Challenge game last year and
won the inaugural HORSE
competition during All-Star fes-
tivities in Phoenix over the
weekend.

WELCOME BACK,

BIG GUY

Andrei Kirilenko returned
from an ankle injury to spark a
key fourth-quarter run and help
the Utah Jazz beat the Mem-
phis Grizzlies 117-99 Tuesday
night.

C J Miles scored 24 points
and Deron Williams had 20
points and 15 assists. Kirilenko
finished with 14 points.

SO FAR, SO GOOD

The Phoenix Suns looked like
a different team in interim
coach Alvin Gentry's debut,
routing the Los Angeles Clip-
pers 140-100 Tuesday night.
Leandro Barbosa scored 24
points and Amare Stoudemire
added 23 for the Suns, who had
81 points by halftime in their
first game since Terry Porter
was fired as coach.

SWAPS

The Thunder acquired cen-
ter Tyson Chandler from New
Orleans in a deal that sends vet-
erans Joe Smith and Chris
Wilcox to the Hornets. For New
Orleans, the trade provides an
opportunity to shed salary in an
uncertain economy by adding
two contracts that expire at the
end of the season.

The Sacramento Kings
acquired veteran guard Sam
Cassell from Boston for a con-
ditional second-round draft pick
in 2015. The 39-year-old Cas-
sell hasn't played this season for
the Celtics, who acquired him in
early March before their run to
the NBA title.

MISFIRING

Richard Jefferson scored 29
points, Ramon Sessions added
17 and the Milwaukee Bucks
beat Detroit 92-86 on Tuesday
night, sending .

SPEAKING

"Tam so tired. But today is a
triple joy. I came back from my
injury, we win and I have a
birthday.”

— Utah's Andrei Kirilenko
after returning ahead of schedule

ANNOUNCING,
the appaintment of Toast Master Ron
Bethel as a Director of Storm Frame
Windows. Ron, maried to Ruthnell,

n By CHRIS DUNCAN



HOUSTON (AP) — Hous-
ton Rockets star Tracy
McGrady will have surgery on
his left knee and miss the rest of
the season.

The star forward said on his
Web site Wednesday that the
pain has been persistent and he
will have microfracture surgery.
He's confident he'll return next
season.

McGrady is Houston's third-
leading scorer. He had arthro-
scopic surgery in May and has
missed 18 games this season
because of his sore knee. He
said before the All-Star break
he wanted to consult with doc-
tors before deciding on the best
course of treatment.

ESPN.com first reported that
McGrady was out for the sea-
son after the Rockets beat the
Nets on Tuesday night.

Rockets spokesman Nelson
Luis said Wednesday morning
that the team had no comment.
But Luis said McGrady met
with a doctor in New York on
Tuesday and had another out-
of-state doctor's appointment
scheduled Wednesday.

McGrady said he would have
the surgery "immediately."

"It has been extremely frus-
trating dealing with the knee
injury this season,” McGrady
said. "It's been tough on me
both physically and mentally
and while we've come to this
conclusion after much deliber-
ation, we truly feel this is best
for both me and the Rockets in
the long term."

The Rockets have won their
last two games without
McGrady and 13 of 19 without
him this season. Houston is 33-
21 overall this season and in
fifth place in the Western Con-
ference.

Houston acquired McGrady
in June 2004 in a trade with
Orlando, but the seven-time
All-Star has been a disappoint-
ment here in four seasons. His
scoring numbers have steadily
decreased while his health
issues have increased.

McGrady missed 34 games in
2005-06 and 10 in 2006-07 with
back pain, then sat out 12 games
last season with a bone bruise
and tendinitis in his left knee,
prompting him to have the pro-
cedure in May.

McGrady said on the day
before training camp began in



HOUSTON ROCKETS guard Tracy McGrady (1) shoots while defended by
Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol (left) in the third quarter of a game
on February 4 in Memphis, Tenn. McGrady led the Rockets with 21

points, but he Grizzlies won 104-93...

late September that his knee
was not healed from the surgery
and was still painful.

By December, McGrady was
skipping the second games of
back-to-back sets and took two
weeks off in January to rest his
knee. He returned and played
seven games, then stopped play-
ing after going 1-for-9 in the
Rockets’ 124-112 loss to Mil-
waukee on Feb. 9.

Two days later, McGrady said
he was going to seek doctors to
discuss his knee, but expected to
play again this season. He
added that he would only con-
sider surgery as a last resort.

"We've tried just playing
through it, taking back-to-backs
off, and extended periods of
rest," McGrady wrote. "But
none of it has really been effec-
tive in limiting the discomfort
and allowing me to just go out
there and play."

McGrady is due to make $23

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARC ANTOINE NAPOLEON
OF P.O. BOX CR-56272, MONTELL HEIGHTS, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, NORVELYNE
AZOR of Robinson Road, intend to change my son’s
name from MAX STEVENSON FERTILIEN to MAX
STEVENSON AZOR. If there are any objections to
this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-
742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days
after the date of publication of this notice.



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(AP Photo: Nikki Boertman)

million next season, the last year
of his contract. Considering the
expectations, he’s been a bust in
Houston as the Rockets have
gone winless in three playoff
series.

But team owner Les Alexan-
der said before Tuesday's game
that the Rockets would not try
to deal McGrady before Thurs-
day's trade deadline. Alexan-
der also said he still believes the
29-year-old McGrady is a key
component to making the
Rockets contenders again.

"I always thought he was
injured and had (health) prob-
lems," Alexander said. "He's a
great player when he's healthy,
and a great competitor."



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that TARA TONISHKA ADDERLEY
OF P.O. BOX SB-52479, SEAWELLS MANOR, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 12TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PRO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

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“OUR WORLD. YOUR MOVE. BECOME
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SATURDAY,
MARCH 7'", 2009
12 NOON - UNTIL




PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Davis Cup: Bahamas will get back in Zone One eventually

THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Federation has announced the
final list of players that are
expected to travel to the Amer-
icas Zone One Davis Cup tie in
Paraguay next month.

As expected, the team will be
made up of basically the same
group of young players that the
federation has been grooming
to take over from the old guard
that included Roger Smith,
Mark Knowles and Mark
Merklein.

Considered to be one of the
veterans of the group is Bjorn
Munroe, who is returning after a
hiatus of a couple years.

Munroe came home in
December for the federation’s
invitational tournament that
served as a qualifier for the
national team and he performed
exceptionally well, just falling
short of advancing to the final
that featured reigning champion
Devin Mullings against Timo-
thy Neilly.

Munroe, at age 30, brings
some of the experience and
maturity that the team lacks in
the absence of touring pro Mark
Knowles, who has opted not to
travel to South America where
the home crowd has been very
unruly in the past.

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.

The Candidate should have the following requirements:
* Have 5-7 years experience with the Caterpillar or
similar Product Line, have worked in a Caterpillar
dealership or a similar Organization;
Have training in Ordering and Receiving Parts

Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count

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Degree from an accredited University would be an

asset;

Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the

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Must have experience in process statistical control in
planning, programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.

This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts

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Send complete resume with education and work

experience to:

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P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email

me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this

position will be contacted.



Instead, Knowles has decid-
ed to continue his tour on the
ATP circuit with Indian Mahesh
Bhupathi. They are currently
sitting in second place in the
computer rankings following
their final appearance at the
Australian Open, the first
Grand Slam tournament for the
year.

Before taking a break to recu-
perate from injuries, Munroe
had played for five years on the
team. He joins both Mullings
and Marvin Rolle, who have six
years under their belt and Neil-
ly, who is in his second year.
The team will once again be
captained by John Farrington,
who has played for seven years.

The Davis Cup tie is sched-
uled for March 6-8, but it will
probably be a very emotional
one for Munroe and his team-
mates. Munroe is mourning the
loss of his younger brother
Lavaughn, who was tragically
killed in a car accident Sunday
on Midshipman Road in
Lucaya, Grand Bahama.

Lavaughn, 26, was a former
Davis Cup player who played
in three ties for the Bahamas,

teaming up

eek STUBBS
Knowles,
Munnings
and his j
brother
Bjorn, at
least once.
At the time, |
Lavaughn
was consid-
ered one of
the two
players that
the BLTA q
had hoped C)PIN
to groom tO mmm
take over

the reigns

from Knowles and the rest of
the old guard.

Lavaughn and Dentry Mor-
timer were two of the key play-
ers who were playing at the time
when the Bahamas was going
through the transitional period
of either staying in Zone One
or being relegated to Zone IL.

As it tuned out, both
Lavaughn and Dentry experi-
enced some disciplinary prob-
lems on one of the ties and it
hurt the Bahamas’ chances of

_

ION

GN828

Ministry of Finance

NOTICE

THE BANKS AND TRUST COMPANIES REGULATION ACT, 2000

Notice is hereby given that the Governor, pursuant to
Section 18(1)(a)(iii) of the Banks and Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000, has revoked by Order dated the
11th February 2009 the bank and trust licence granted
on 13th August.1998 to Pribanco Internacional Ltd.
(now called “Cabex Internacional Ltd.”) and amended
from time to time, on the grounds that the company
has been placed into liquidation.

Wendy Craigg
Govenor

The Central Bank of The Bahamas

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staying in zone one. Eventually,
the Bahamas was dropped all
the way down to Zone III.

In 2002, the BLTA assembled
what was considered then the
"Dream Team" of the next gen-
eration of players with John Far-
rington captaining the squad
made up of Mortimer, the
Munroe brothers and Mullings
playing together for the first
time in Ecuador.

However, the Bahamas was
blanked 5-0.

And to avoid being relegated
to Zone II, Knowles and
Merklein teamed up with
Mullings and Marvin Rolle at
the National Tennis Center in
September, pulling off a huge
3-2 victory over Mexico to keep
our hopes alive.

But it was short lived as in
2003, Farrington worked with a
new combo that comprised of
Mullings, Rolle, Matthew Sands
and Davin Russell, only to fall
victim to Peru and Venezuela
before being relegated to Zone
II in 2004.

In 2005 in Colombia, the
Bahamas was relegated all the
way to Zone III where we
remained until 2007 when the
present team, Minus H’Cone
Thompson, who has been
replaced by Neilly, was re-ele-
vated to Zone IT in Guatemala.

Had it not been for the disci-
plinary problems that those
players encountered back in
2002, who knows where the
Bahamas could have been
today. Many felt that the young
core of players had the potential
to at least keep us in Zone One
and possibly by now be chal-
lenging for a spot in the presti-
gious World Group.

While Lavaughn, who ended
up hosting a Tennis Academy
in Grand Bahama where he was
passing on his expertise, has just
passed away, Mortimer is no
longer playing, but he has been
working with some of the
younger players in New Provi-
dence.

Without a shadow of a doubt,
Mortimer had the best chance of
cracking the elite ATP profes-
sional ranking than all of the
other players. At least one of
the Munroe brothers, if not the
two, along with Ryan Sweeting,
who migrated to the US, were
next in line.

Presently, Mullings has now
surpassed them all with the best
ATP rankings, but Neilly is a

champion of the Orange Bowl,
the highly acclaimed junior ten-
nis tournament. We just haven't
had any one who has come close
to the status of Smith, Knowles
or Merklein, the three top play-
ers who excelled at the senior
level.

In time, as this group of young
players continues to excel, the
Bahamas will eventually get
back into Zone One and we will
have another player or two play-
ing competitive on the circuit.

It's just unfortunate that
we've lost some of the best play-
ers along the way, including the
late Lavaughn Munroe. May his
soul rest in peace.

NATIONAL STADIUM

IN SIGHT?

IT seems as if the arrival of
the high powered Chinese dele-
gation to the country this week
has brought some good news for
our sporting arena.

While they didn't specifically
address the matter, Deputy
Prime Minister Brent Symon-
ette said the much anticipated
national stadium at the Queen
Elizabeth Sports Center will
finally become a reality.

The former PLP Government
had initiated the plans for the
reconstruction of the sports
complex, including a new track
and field stadium, baseball and
softball parks and another mul-
ti-purpose indoor arena.

The first phase of the project,
the state-of-the-art national sta-
dium, was to have already been
completed.

However, when the FNM
government took office in 2007,
the entire project was put on
hold. While track and field and
softball is still functioning, the
sport that suffered the most was
baseball.

Although there are two
vibrant junior leagues being
staged at Freedom Farm and
the St Andrew's Field of
Dreams every weekend, there
is no baseball being played at
the senior level because of the
lack of a proper venue.

And in these tough economic
times, the arrival of the Chinese
should bring a ray of hope, shin-
ing on the fact that work on
these sporting facilities will com-
mence soon.

We look forward to the con-
struction progress, which should
also help to decrease our unem-
ployment rate.

NOTICE

MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE
NATIONAL YOUTH LEADERS CERTIFICATION

PROGRAMME

The Youth Department of the Ministry of Youth,

Sports and Culture will convene it’s Annual
Youth Leaders Certification Programme on
Monday, 23rd February 2009, beginning at 6:
00 p.m. at the Ministry’s Headquarters, Ground
Floor Conference Room, Thompson Blvd.

All youth

leaders and workers,

church,

civic, school and musical bands are invited
to collect an application at the Ministry’s
Youth Department between the hours of
9a.m.-5 p.m. Deadline for receipt of applications
will be 18th February 2009.

For additional information you may call
502-0600/4 of 502-0736.


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

LOCAL NEWS
BTVI to hold Walk-A-Thon for financially challenged students

STUDENTS and faculty of the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocational Institute will take to the streets
in an effort to promote technical and career educa-
tion awareness and support.

The institute is holding a walk-a-thon beginning at
the BTVI campus on Old Trial Road on Saturday,
February 21.

Registration begins at 6am.

Participants will walk to the Paradise Island
Bridge and then return to the campus for a junkanoo
rush-out, mini massages, a souse-out and an awards
ceremony.

“This event is about BTVI community awareness

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“BTVI faculty, staff, alumni and friends are com-
ing together to do something to assist our students,”
said Sean Adderley, public relations officer at BT VI.

The organisers aim to raise money to assist stu-
dents who have trouble finding funds for books and
supplies. Many students receive financial assistance
which does not cover the entire cost of the BT'VI
programme.

The public is invited to take part in the walk-a-
thon. Further information can be found at:
www.btviorg.bs.

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY



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SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Failure to enforce
rules undermines
regulation integrity

n By NEIL HARTNELL ~



THE Securi-
tics Commis-
sion’s failure to |
enforce key
rules potential-
ly undermines
the integrity of
the Bahamian
capital mar-
kets/invest-
ment funds
industry,
senior financial

Brian Moree



* Financial executives warn
poor compliance sends
‘wrong message’ to
capital markets/investment
funds industry

* Commission told: ‘If you’re
not going to enforce the
rules, don’t put them
on the books’

executives said yesterday, telling

SEE page 10B

Development Bank:
Loans in arrears see
30% annual increase

n By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE Bahamas Development
Bank (BDB) yesterday said it saw

Bank only expecting to
recover $36m or 63.2%
of $57m loan book

loans in arrears increase by 30 per cent year-over-year, as the eco-
nomic downturn squeezed down on small and medium-sized busi-
nesses, leaving it with some $27 million in defaulted loans on the

books.

The BDB’s acting managing
director, Anthony Woodside, said

SEE page 8B

‘Break mindset of three-
tier client service’

n By NEIL HARTNELL
Tri Busi Edit

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
urged businesses to “break this
mindset” among staff that they
do not have to offer the same
customer service quality to a
Bahamian as they do a tourist,
given that companies were des-
perate to earn every dollar they
can.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, who is
Superwash’s president, told Tri-
bune Business that three differ-
ent tiers of customer service
quality existed in the Bahamas.
The first tier was the service

SEE page 2B

Delaporte
NEW PROVIDENCE, BAHAMAS

* Chamber chief says staff
must be made to understand
all dollars and customers
equally important, and give
same service quality to a
Bahamian as a tourist/
foreigner

* Businesses ‘walking a
tightrope’ on survival, as
productivity improves
in economy

* Companies warned to be
careful on letting go
best workers

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Marina removed from receivership

n By NEIL HARTNELL —

key 116-slip
Freeport mari-
na has been
removed from
the receivership
affecting New Hope Holdings
by a January 27, 2009, court
order, Tribune Business can
reveal, with the property
ordered returned to the two
companies involved in its own-
ership/management.

Justice Estelle Gray-Evans
ruled that the Port Lucaya
Marina, related land assets and
another parcel of land be
returned to New Hope Marina
Development, one of two com-
panies that had petitioned the
Supreme Court for its removal
from a receivership initiated
over a dispute involving the
repayment of loans worth $23-

116-slip Port Lucaya Marina taken out, but other New Hope
Holdings assets remain under care of accountant Phil Galanis

$24 million.

Justice Evans altered the
October 2, 2008, order that
appointed ex-PLP Senator and
MP, accountant Philip Galanis,
as the receiver for the assets
owned Scandinavian investor
Preben Olsen and his New
Hope Holdings company.

A copy of the January 27,
2009, court order, which has
been seen by Tribune Business,
stated that among the assets
removed from the receivership
are “100 per cent of the shares
of Port Lucaya Marina ltd,
which owns the following prop-
erties comprising Port Lucaya
Marina”.

These properties include a
14,506 square foot parcel of
land, situated in Block 3, Unit 2,

of the Bell Channel Subdivision
in Freeport; an 813 square foot
parcel of land on Lot 13, Block
3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel
Subdivision and a portion of
Tract ‘O’, Unit 3 in the same
subdivision; a 6,051 square foot
land tract comprising a portion
of the same Tract ‘O’; and a
10.6 acre parcel of land com-
prising a portion of the seabed
in the Bell Channel Subdivision.

In addition, a separate par-
cel of land, consisting of 6.19
acres, and also in the Bell Chan-
nel Bay Subdivision, was also
removed from the receivership
by order of the Supreme Court.

Justice Evans, in her order,
also directed Mr Galanis “to
release and deliver over to New
Hope Marina Development Ltd

Shooting a ‘serious turn-off for
Nassau redevelopment plan

n By NEIL HARTNELL |



THIS week’s shooting out-
side Bay Street’s El Greco
Hotel, and other problems
being experienced by the prop-
erty, are potentially a “serious
turn-off” to downtown Nassau’s
redevelopment into an attrac-
tive destination for tourists and
Bahamians alike, a senior pri-
vate sector official told Tribune
Business yesterday.

Charles Klonaris, the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board’s (NTDB) chairman, said
the shooting near the West Bay


















Features:

Street Hotel, which sparked the
subsequent departure of 40 per
cent of its guests, showed that
downtown Nassau still had a
security problem that the police
and other stakeholders needed
to tackle.

And given the El Greco’s
separate complaints about noise
from a nearby nightclub in the
former Mayfair hotel, which it
claimed was also costing it busi-
ness, Mr Klonaris said the
Licensing Authority would have
to be careful when it came to
granting liquor and nightclub
licences for the Bay Street area.
He explained that it would need
to ensure such facilities were

compatible with other nearby
property uses.

“It’s the security problem
we’re all concerned with,” Mr
Klonaris told Tribune Business
“And not only security, but
determining how properties are
operated and who comes in.

“We know security is a prob-
lem for downtown. Without
security, the redevelopment of
the city will not happen. If we’re
going to have a living city, secu-
rity is vital.”

Mr Klonaris said episodes
such as Monday morning’s
shooting, which is unconnected

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all of the licences, permits, cer-
tificates, deeds, agreements,
records, bank accounts, nego-
tiable instruments, documents,
correspondence and papers
relating to Port Lucaya Marina
Company Ltd, doing business
as Port Lucaya Marina” and the
related land assets.

Port Lucaya Marina’s
removal from the receivership
came after attorneys acting New
Hope Marina Development Ltd
and AP Holdings Ltd petitioned
the Supreme Court.

The two companies were rep-
resented by Robert Adams and
Dwayne Fernander of Graham,
Thompson & Co, and it is
understood they were success-

SEE page 8B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



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THE TRIBUNE





Old Fort Bay gets ‘green light’ for energy efficiency

OLD Fort Bay’s Board of
Directors have given the ‘green
light’ to a project that aims to
equip every street light in the
private community with an
energy efficient bulb, a move
intended to produce “dramatic
savings” in electricity costs.

“First and foremost, given the

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exorbitant cost of electricity
nowadays, deploying energy
efficient ‘green’ technology
makes financial sense” said Dr
Harold Munnings, chairman of
the Board of the Old Fort Bay
Property Owners Association.

“We expect to see a dramatic
savings in the cost of our elec-

TO TEMPTATION

tricity, given that we have
almost 100 street lights in Old
Fort Bay. Another attractive
feature of the HEF lights is
their life expectancy. While
changing a household bulb is a
simple matter, a street light is
altogether more difficult and we
are told that these bulbs can last
for up to 25e years. If this
proves to be true then the sav-
ings in maintenance costs alone
will be significant”.

Energy efficient High Effi-
ciency Fluorescent (HEF) bulbs
are designed to reduce energy
and maintenance costs by as
much as 75 per cent and,
according to the manufacturer,
to provide consistent quality
light output for over 25 years.

Old Fort Bay researched a
number of lighting technologies.
The HEF lights were chosen,



BRIGHT FUTURE - Dr Harold Munnings holds one of the High Efficiency
Fluorescent (HEF) bulbs...

because specifications showed
them to be more efficient, pro-
vide better quality light, last
longer and cost less than half
the price of other leading ener-
gy efficient bulbs.

“Everyone comments on the
natural beauty of Old Fort Bay.
Old Fort Beach is locally and
internationally renowned, as is
the magnificent ancient silk cot-
ton tree that overlooks the Old
Fort Bay Club,” said Dr
Munnings “Our community
cares about the environment in
which we live. The HEF Green
Light project is just one exam-
ple of that belief.”

Other members of the Old
Fort Bay Board of Directors
include Sir William Allen,
Anthony Myers and Alistair
Henderson, with Dwayne Mor-
timer as secretary.

‘Break mindset of three-tier client service’

provided to tourists and for-
eigners; the second tier was that
received by fellow Bahamians;
and the lowest or third tier was
reserved for the service quality
provided to Haitian and
Jamaican nationals.

“It’s a mindset you have to
change,” the Chamber presi-
dent said, acknowledging the
key role customer service
played in encouraging patrons
to not only spend more, but
keep returning to the same busi-
ness. This was never more
important than in the current
economic climate.

“There’s three tiers of ser-
vice, and everyone’s got the
same dollar. It’s very, very frus-
trating to get people to break
this mindset they’re in. You’ve
got to offer quality customer
service all the time.”

Mr D’Aguilar added:
“There’s a general impression
that if Bahamian companies
deal with Bahamian companies,
you don’t have to offer the
same quality of customer ser-
vice as you do a foreign visitor.

“T believe that in businesses
in areas that deal predominant-
ly with local clientele, Bahami-
ans don’t expect, and you don’t
have to give, the same quality of
service as you give to a foreign-
er.

“A customer is a customer

irrespective of nationality, and
businesses have to impress upon
staff the importance of making
a sale, as opposed to who yowre
making the sale to.”

Mr D’Aguilar said the fre-
quency with which customers
came into his business unhappy
with the quality of customer ser-
vice, and asking for their money
back, “boggles my mind”. “I'd
be lying if I said it did not hap-
pen on a far too frequent basis,”
he added.”

“It’s very hard to get my staff
to say it’s an important $10. I
don’t know if that message has
resonated yet. US$, BS, it all
ends up in the same account.
What we are trying to impress
on our staff is that Bahamian
customers are equally impor-
tant.

“Pve tried to emphasise to
my staff that every little bit of
business that comes through the
door, you’ve got to strive like
hell to keep that coming in.”

One positive from the cur-
rent economic downturn is that
it has improved productivity
levels in the Bahamian hotel
industry, as workers fearing for
their jobs seek to give bosses
no reason to axe them.

When asked whether pro-
ductivity improvements had
taken place across the Bahami-
an economy, Mr D’ Aguilar said

it largely depended on the busi-
ness and sector employees
worked in. Those industries
already hit by the downturn had
seen improvements, the Cham-
ber president said, whereas
there was little noticeable dif-
ference in sectors not feeling
the chill.

“It depends on the environ-
ment in your business,” he
added. “I went over to Atlantis
and noticed a vast improvement
in customer service. I was blown
away - everyone smiled, every-
one was helpful. This was a cou-
ple of weeks after lay-offs had
taken place.”

However, in many govern-
ment agencies there was “no
incentive or motivation” to
improve customer service.
“That also happens in compa-
nies in the private sector that
at this stage have seen no need
to cut back,” Mr D’Aguilar
added.

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
(BECon) president, agreed that
worker productivity had picked
up across the Bahamian econo-
my as the chill from the global
recession continued to bite.

“I believe there is some cor-
relation,” Mr Nutt told Tribune
Business. “Everyone is aware
of what the economic situation
is.” Employees who previously

bounced from job to job, believ-
ing they would always be able
to find employment somewhere,
were realising this was becom-
ing “tougher and tougher to do,
so to make themselves valuable
to employers productivity is
increasing”.

Mr Nutt added that many
Bahamian businesses were cur-
rently “walking a tightrope” in
their attempts to survive, and
he urged them not to lay-off
experienced employees, as this
could be counterproductive.

“What we see is a raised lev-
el of concern with businesses as
to what they have to do to try
and survive this economic
downturn. They’re looking at
any way they can reduce costs,”
Mr Nutt said.

“One of the big cost expenses
is labour and, of course, we’ve
seen that result in a number of
the lay-offs that have occurred.

“Businesses need to be care-
ful in that scenario, and prudent
enough not to let go experi-
enced staff who know their jobs
well, and bring in people who
don’t know their jobs well,
because the business will suffer
as well.

“Tt’s like walking a tightrope
right now - what can be done
to survive the crisis, and then
be in a position to rebound
when the economy picks up.”

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THE TRIBUNE



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3B

5
Prosperity Award seeking

Bahamian business pioneers

n By CHESTER ROBARDS



THE INTERNATIONAL-
LY-recognised Pioneers of
Prosperity (PoP) launched its
Bahamas chapter of the
Caribbean Awards Programme
yesterday, which will provide a
small to medium-sized business
with a $100,000 grant sponsored
by major Bahamas-based finan-
cial firms.

Companies that employ five
to 250 individuals, earn between
$100,000 to $5 million per year,
are for-profit and have been
profitable for two of the last
three years, are eligible to apply
for the grant, which will be
awarded to a single company in

the Bahamas. A regional grant
will be given to an outstanding
company from select countries
in the wider Caribbean.

Other businesses that apply
for the grant could be eligible to
win prizes ranging from $5,000
to $50,000. Eligible companies
will come from the Bahamas,
Barbados, Belize, Guyana,
Haiti, Jamaica or Trinidad and
Tobago.

According to organisers, com-
panies will be judged based on
their ability to create unique
value for customers through
innovative products and/or ser-
vices; generate a sustainable
profit for owners/shareholder;
invest in their employees
through training, safe working
conditions and high and rising

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salaries; and protect the future
by strengthening local and glob-
al environments and communi-
ties.

“T wish to encourage every
Bahamian-based business own-
er that is eligible to participate
in this unique awards pro-
gramme to take full advantage
of this wonderful opportunity.
For in doing so, they stand to
improve their businesses
through financial awards, as
well as be connected to net-
works of technical expertise and
other dynamic entrepreneurs
both locally and globally,” said
the Bahamas Development
Bank’s acting managing direc-
tor, Anthony Woodside.

The PoP award was designed
to not only include a sum of
money, but also an opportunity
for the business to build con-
tacts with technical experts and
connect with other entrepre-
neurs to foster future develop-
ment.

“Unlike other award pro-
grammes, PoP does not end
with the distribution of the
award. Rather, the award is just
the beginning,” said organisers.

“PoP will focus on a post-
award communications effort
that showcases the winning
firms, and connects participants
to networks of other entrepre-
neurs, technical expertise and
financial capital, to inspire a cul-
ture of entrepreneurship and
innovation.”

Key partners involved in the
PoP endeavour are the John
Templeton Foundation, the
Inter-American Development
Bank, SEVEN and the OTF
group.

President of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, Dioni-
sio D’Aguilar, touted the PoP
programme, saying that thou-
sands of eligible small and medi-
um-sized business owners can
now compete for the award
with a view to furthering their
entrepreneurial dream.

“T firmly believe that the Pio-
neers of Prosperity awards pro-
gramme is indeed timely, and
will stand to benefit, encourage
and renew the hopes and
dreams of Bahamian entrepre-
neurs, particularly during these
challenging economic times. I
am encouraging Bahamian
Businesses to full embrace this
unique opportunity,” Mr

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Pricer bared area beg A, risa cath, uit eb, cba ornpa,
copecityrm reed ara eae tn change at any te. Covesramen caves ad fee
dane gotta, ps gay ahora Pirin










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Reporting to the Claims Manager, the Claims Officer will be responsible for the processing of claims
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daily operational tasks within the Claims Department. The successful candidate should possess:

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A minimum of three years experience handling and negotiating settlements of Personal Lines claims
Strong administration skills and claims negotiation experience

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Lea
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Security & General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Attn: Human Resources
PO. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas

Or by email to: bs_hr@atlantichouse.com.bs

The closing date for applications is February 27th, 2009.

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PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





SNINIVHL

KING'S WAY

KINGSWAY ACADEMY ELEMENTARY

ENTRANCE EXAMINATION

Kingsway Academy will be holding entrance

examinations

for

students wishing to enter

Kindergarten 4 on SATURDAY MARCH 13, 2009.
Parents are asked to collect Application Forms
from The Elementary school office before the testing
date from 8:30a.m. - 4:00p.m.

For further information contact the school at
telephone numbers:

324-5049, 324-2158 or 324-6269

The Bahamas Humane Society

Donated in memory of Mr. & Mrs. Trevor Kelly

Shooting a ‘serious
turn-off for Nassau
redevelopment plan

FROM page 1B

Mayfair Hotel, would also deter
downtown Nassau property
owners and business owners
from reinvesting in upgrades to
their premises.

“Who’s going to develop
their properties when they see
that happening on their
doorstep? It’s a turn-off, and a
serious one, too,” Mr Klonaris
said.

“Tf you can’t have families
coming down and walking with
their children and strollers, then
forget it. Our commitment is to
make the city consumer and

family friendly, and safe.”

Given the El Greco’s con-
cerns about noise emanating
from the Envy Beach Club, par-
ticularly during the period
Thursday through to Sunday
every week, Mr Klonaris said it
was “key” to control what Bay
Street properties were being
used for, and ensure this was
compatible with the surround-
ing neighbourhood and overall
plans for downtown.

“IT think the Licensing
Authority has to be careful,
especially when it comes to issu-
ing licences for nightclubs in
areas where, unless they are
managed properly, they could
attract undesirables,” the

NTDB chairman said. There is
nothing to suggest this is the
case at the Envy Beach Club.
Mr Klonaris added that the
Government and private sector
also needed to tackle the
derelict buildings dotting down-
town Nassau’s landscape.
Meanwhile, Mr Klonaris said
the private sector and Road
Traffic Department were “on
the same page” when it came
to downtown Nassau’s redevel-
opment and solving its parking
and transportation problems.
He added: “There is an
understanding in terms of what
they’re looking for and what
we’re looking for is the same
thing. We are on the same

page.”

Mr Klonaris said the NTDB
and private sector were seek-
ing to pedestrianise all the side
streets between Navy Lion
Road and East Street, in addi-
tion to resolving the chronic
Bay Street problems of park-
ing, parking management via
metering, taxis and jitneys.

Mr Klonaris described Bay
Street east of East Street as a
“drag strip”, where vehicles
raced along at 40-50 miles per
hour, creating an environment
that was not conducive to retail-
ing. This was why so many
shops in that area had closed
down, with no replacements in
sight.

CKIAD
) KIA MOTORS

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)
OFFSHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED

In Voluntary liquidation

NOTICE

CIT CLUB HOUSE LIMITED
In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Company is
in dissolution, commencing on the 18° day of February,
2009. Articles of dissolution have been duly registered by
the Registrar. The Liquidator is Kyrene Kelty of Nassau,
Bahamas. All persons having claims against the above-
named Company are required on or before the 18° day
of March, 2009 to send their names and addresses and
particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the
Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are
proved.

“Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), OFF-
SHORE CONTRACTORS LIMITED is in Dissolution.”

The date of commencement of dissolution is the 27th day of

KIA MOTORS
GIFT CERTIFICATE January, 2009.

$1, 000. 0 from SUPER WALUE

4th Prize $500. GIFT CERTIFICATE
from~ Cole’s Of Nassau

5th Prize $385. GIFT CERTIFICATE
from~ Windermere West
Day Spa and Salon

TO BE DRAWN ON...

* Saturday 28th March ‘09

at The Mall at Marathon Broadcast live over Radio Bahamas,
Tickets go on sale February Ist, 2009

Mrs. Gillian Albert,

c/o GO TRUST S.A.,
Rue des Pierres-du-Niton 17,
1207 Geneva, Switzerland
Liquidator

BSi

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting
applications for:-

Dated this 18% day of February, 2009

Kyrene Kelty
Liquidator



Nassau Airport

Development Company

CAREER

OPPORTUNITY

Construction Project Manager/
Coordinator

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

The Nassau Airport Development
Company (NAD) is seeking candidates

for the position of Construction Project
Manager/Coordinator. Reporting directly to
the Construction Manager, the duties and
responsibilities of the successful applicant
will include:

Potential candidates will possess an
Engineering Degree, EIT or other technical
qualifications required and 5-10 years of
construction related experience on one or
more large scale projects with emphasis
on heavy civil, utilities, earthworks and
paving. Applicants must have the ability to
read and interpret construction drawings.
They should have excellent computer skills
including MS Office, AutoCAD, scheduling
software or other related software.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Reviewing design drawings and
technical specifications

Providing feedback to the design

team as it relates fo scope, schedule,
constructability, phasing and budget
Working with the Project Team on tasks
related to tendering, procurement and
evaluation of contractors and vendors
Coordination of quality assurance and
quality control testing and Ministry of
Works inspections

Liaising with local utility companies and
stakeholders to facilitate the sequencing
and phasing of the project and to
maintain the overall schedule
Communicating and interfacing with a
multi-disciplined design and construction
team including architectural, structural,
mechanical, electrical, civil and
environmental

Assisting with contract administration,
reporting, site inspection and
commissioning of project contracts

Excellent analytical and problem solving
skills, oral and written communications
skills required. Candidates should

also have superior interpersonal and
organizational skills.

Prior experience working in an airport
environment a plus but not required.

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follow up account relationships

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors

Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports

Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking
professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis

Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

If you are qualified and interested,
please submit your resume by

March 6, 2009 to:

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum
vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre
P. O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Manager, People
Nassau Airport Development Co.
P.O. Box AP59229
Nassau, Bahamas

Only those applicants short listed will be

pee Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted


THE TRIBUNE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS



Dollar climbs as
Obama unveils
S$75bn mortgage
relief plan

Bm By ERIN CONROY
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — The
dollar climbed against most
major currencies in midday
trading Wednesday as President
Barack Obama unveiled a $75
billion mortgage relief plan,
amid bleak reports that industry
production and construction of
new homes in the US have
plunged to record lows.

The 16-nation euro fell to
$1.2553 in midday New York
trading, its lowest point since
early December and below the
$1.2615 it bought late Tuesday.
The British pound slipped to
$1.4196 from $1.4266, while the
dollar rose to 93.29 Japanese
yen from 92.42 yen.

President Obama's plan to
tackle the foreclosure crisis is
meant to prevent up to nine
million Americans from losing
their homes. The plan is more
expensive than initially expect-
ed and aims to aid borrowers
who owe more on their mort-
gages than their homes are cur-
rently worth, as well as those
on the verge of foreclosure.

The Federal Reserve report-
ed Wednesday that production
at the nation's factories, mines
and utilities fell to a record low
of 1.8 per cent last month. Many
economists expected a smaller
1.5 per cent decline. The Fed's
report showed that factory pro-
duction dropped by 2.5 per cent
in January, with shutdowns at
plants making autos and related
parts figuring prominently in
that decline.

Another report from the
Commerce Department said
construction of new homes and
applications for future projects

va

SyAV STALL men Ty



both plunged to record lows in
January.

Also Wednesday, the Euro-
pean Commission said France
and Germany will see their bud-
get deficits go way above the
ceiling of three per cent of gross
domestic product, a maximum
fixed by rules designed to boost
the stability of the euro. The
EC said it will cut countries —
both in and out of the 16-nation
euro zone — some slack in com-
plying with the bloc’s sound
finances rules.

The euro dropped Tuesday
after ratings agency Moody's
said that faltering economic
conditions in eastern Europe
would hit the local subsidiaries
of major Western banks and
potentially hurt their corporate
parents, primarily in Austria,
Italy, France, Belgium, Ger-
many and Sweden.

"It is clear that the dollar has
been benefiting from weak eco-
nomic data, both at home and
abroad, as well as rising risk
aversion,” said Michael Wool-
folk, an analyst at Bank of New
York Mellon. "We're seeing

safe haven flows to the US dol-
lar, and we've seen the dollar
now move into a new trading
range."

One of the biggest surprises
overnight, Woolfolk said, was
the dollar's rally against the
Japanese yen. Earlier this week,
Japan's government said the
country's economy shrank at its
fastest rate in 35 years in the
fourth quarter and shows no
signs of reversing course any-
time soon.

Also this week, Japanese
Finance Minister Shoichi Nak-
agawa said he would step down
after allegations that he seemed
inebriated at the Group of Sev-
en meeting in Rome. The move
dealt a major blow to Prime
Minister Taro Aso's already
shaky government.

A renewed decline in oil
prices has weighed on curren-
cies such as the Russian ruble,
Polish zloty and the Hungarian
forint. Benchmark oil prices lan-
guished around $35 a barrel
Wednesday.

Polish Prime Minister Don-
ald Tusk has pledged govern-
ment intervention in the foreign
exchange market to prop up the
currency if it continues to fall,
while the Russian currency is
edging closer to the trading lim-
it the Central Bank announced
in January. The Central Bank
set the official exchange rate for
Thursday at 36.4 rubles against
the dollar — the lowest point
for the ruble since January 1998
when Russia re-denominated
its currency.

In other midday trading
Wednesday, the dollar slipped
to 1.2599 Canadian dollars from
1.2644, and advanced to 1.1766
Swiss francs from 1.1695.

The Bahamas

Agricultural, Marine Resources (5
Agribusiness Expo




d

mproving

Date: 26th-28th February, 2009
Location: Gladstone Road Agricultural
Research Centre (GRAC)

Nassau N.P., The Bahamas

For more information contact:
(242) 356-3100

(242) 322-3740
Email: bahamasagribusinessexpo@yahoo.com

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5B

BAHAMAS FAITH MINISTRIES INTERNATIONAL

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Visit us at www.realmenbahamas.org



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently
accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI RDINATI
STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is
definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example

Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others

Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Possess analytical qualities

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved
Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae
to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman Bay Corporate Centre
P. O. Box N - 7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE

@ By ANIKA KENTISH
Associated Press Writer

ST JOHN’S, Antigua (AP)

to pull money from banks and
leaders in the Caribbean and
Latin America urged calm on
Wednesday, concerned that
their slumping economies could
be harmed by the fraud case
against Texas financier R Allen
Stanford.

Hundreds of people lined up
outside two branches of the
Bank of Antigua, a Stanford-
owned institution that has been
flooded with fearful customers
since the US Securities and
Exchange Commission filed a
complaint Tuesday accusing
him of an $8 billion fraud.

“People have to come to get
their money,” said Rasta Kente,
an electrician who joined a line
that stretched around the corner
at a downtown bank branch.
Three security officers allowed
only a few people to enter at a
time.

Many of those waiting
clutched portable radios to lis-
ten to financial news.

Local regulators said the
bank’s finances are sound and
appealed for calm. The bank,
though owned by the Stanford
Financial Group, Stanford’s
Houston-based financial advi-
sory firm, is not part of the U.S.
complaint.

“Tf individuals persist in rush-
ing to the bank in a panic they
will precipitate the very situa-
tion that we are all trying to
avoid,” said K Dwight Venner,
governor of the Eastern
Caribbean Central Bank, the
banking regulator for Antigua
and seven other island
economies.

US regulators on Tuesday
charged Stanford, one of the
most prominent businessmen in
the Caribbean, and three of his
companies with a “massive”
fraud that centered around

high-interest-rate certificate of

deposits.

The US Securities and
Exchange Commission on Tues-
day froze the three companies’
assets, including the Antigua-
based Stanford International
Bank, which also has offices in

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7B

Hundreds pull money from

Stanford-owned bank

BANK OF ANTIGUA’S customers form a line outside the St John’s branch

on the Caribbean island Wednesday...

Mexico, Panama, Colombia,
Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela.

The charges have “profound-
ly serious implications” for
Antigua, Prime Minister Bald-
win Spencer said in a speech
late Tuesday, adding that the
government is developing a
contingency plan.

The central bank said it will
do “what it takes” to preserve
the soundness of the banking
system in the twin-island nation
of Antigua and Barbuda.

Colombian authorities, mean-
while, suspended the activities
of Stanford International
Bank’s local brokerage
Wednesday morning to protect
“clients and investors,” accord-
ing to a statement from the
Colombian Finance Superin-
tendency.

In Venezuela, where Stanford
Bank has 14 local branches and
about 15,000 clients, the nation’s
top bank regulator also urged
calm.

Banking Superintendent
Edgar Hernandez warned that
in addition to local depositors, a
group of Venezuelans has an
additional $2.5 billion in assets
in Stanford’s Bank in Antigua
— fueling reports that some
wealthy investors were travel-
ing to Antigua Wednesday to
talk to bank officials.

Regulators in Panama mean-
while took over branches of
Stanford’s unit there following a
run on deposits Tuesday. The
Superintendent of Banks said
it was responding to “an isolat-

ed event as a consequence of

decisions adopted by foreign
authorities,” and said that it did
not reflect “a deterioration in
the financial situation of the
bank in Panama.”

Bank of The Bahamas

T E D

(AP Photo: Andres Leighton)

Assets at the bank’s four
Panama branches, which La
Prensa said held $200.8 million
in deposits at the end of 2008,
are held largely in liquid, fixed-
income investments that can
easily be converted into cash to
cover deposits if necessary,
Martinez Stagg said.

In the Virgin Islands, Gover-
nor John deJongh said he is
worried the probe will worsen
the US territory’s flagging econ-
omy, potentially costing jobs
and investment in local projects.

Stanford had pledged to build
an office complex on land adja-
cent to St Croix’s airport.

Stanford, 58, owns a home in
St Croix and operates his busi-
nesses from Houston and
Antigua. He was knighted in
this Caribbean island in 2006
and helped sponsor high-stakes
cricket matches.

Forbes magazine has esti-
mated his personal fortune at
$2.2 billion.

In addition to Stanford him-
self, the civil lawsuit filed Tues-
day in federal court in Dallas
names as defendants James
Davis, the chief financial offi-
cer of Stanford International
Bank, as well as Laura Pen-
dergest-Holt, the chief invest-
ment officer of Stanford Finan-
cial Group.

While not named in the
SEC’s civil complaint, regula-
tors said Stanford was aided i in
running the Antigua-based
operation by his father, who
lives in Mexia, Texas, and
another Mexia resident with a
background in cattle ranching
and car sales.

Davis, who was named in the
lawsuit, was Stanford’s college
roommate.

Head Office

Claughton House

Charlotte & Shirley Streets

NOTICE

P.O. Box N-7118
Nassau, Bahamas

TO SHAREHOLDERS

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF BANK OF THE
BAHAMAS LIMITED IS PLEASED TO ADVISE
THAT A DIVIDEND OF TEN CENTS (10¢) PER
SHARE WAS DECLARED ON 13" FEBRUARY
2009 TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS OF RECORD AS
AT 24â„¢ FEBRUARY 2009 AND PAYABLE AS OF
3 MARCH 2009.

LAURA A. WILLIAMS
CORPORATE SECRETARY


PAGE 8B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

FROM page 1B

Lucaya Marina and related land
parcels were outside the New
Hope Holdings ownership
structure.

Neither Mr Galanis nor the
lead attorney for the plaintiff
in the case, Maurice Glinton,
returned Tribune calls seeking
comment yesterday. Mr Glin-
ton is understood to be prepar-
ing an appeal, on behalf of TG
Investments LLC, to try and
overturn the order removing
the Port Lucaya Marina.

However, the marina’s
removal does not end Mr
Galanis’s receivership over New
Hope Holdings’ assets. These
include the Grand Bahama
Yacht Club Marina and Grand
Bahama Yacht Club, plus mul-
tiple parcels of land owned in
freehold by New Hope Hold-
ings that are mainly situated in

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CHEZ WILLIE books, valued at almost $57 mil-
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expects to see a “net realisable
value” of $36 million, meaning

that it is unlikely to recover $21

BRITISH
COLONIAL HILTON WEST BAY ST.



SECURITIES OFFICER - WINTERBOTHAM INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES

Winterbotham is seeking a professional to assume responsibility, reporting directly to the VP
Wintcrbotham International Securities, for the broker/dealer business.

The candidate should be young, energetic, self motivated and be well educated, hold a
Series 7 and/or Canadian Securities qualification and preferably hold a degree in finance,
economics or business administration. Relevant post graduate studies and/or professional
qualifications will also be beneficial. In depth knowledge of financial and capital markets
is a must. It is vital that the candidate have hands on trading (FX, Equities and Bonds)
and securities back office experience (maintaining records of transactions, recording of
dividends, stock splits, interest, corporate actions, duties as related to the administration
of securities, portfolio valuations and reporting), and be able to demonstrate that he/she
has successfully generated revenue producing business in the past. Fluency in Spanish/
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Winterbotham is in an exciting period of evolution as it adapts to developments in the
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Candidates should send a detailed CV together with a covering letter describing why
you think you are qualified for the job, directly to the Chairman, The Winterbotham Trust
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before 11th March 2009.

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the Lucayan Marina and Bell
Channel areas. Another 10
parcels of land that have been
leased to New Hope Holdings
were also covered by the origi-
nal receivership order.
Tribune Business previously
exclusively revealed that Mr
Olsen's main financial backer,
T.G. Investments, had been
seeking a court-appointed
receiver for the New Hope
properties, alleging that Mr
Olsen had defaulted on repay-
ing loans worth $23-$24 million.
Maurice Glinton and Arnold
Forbes, acting for American
investor Tom Gonzalez, the
man behind T.G. Investments,
obtained a Mareva Injunction
to freeze the assets of Mr Olsen
and New Hope Holdings.
They are alleging T.G. Invest-
ments lent $23-$24 million,
secured by two promissory
notes to Mr Olsen and New
Hope Holdings to finance the

million or 36.8 per cent of the
total.

With a grim economic out-
look for 2009, and numerous
businesses having to trim their
operations back, the BDB could
see more borrowers start to
default on their repayments,
and the predicted arrears fig-
ure inflate.

“We have that difficulty
because we only finance small
and medium enterprises, and 70
to 80 per cent of small busi-
nesses fail within the first three
years, so that creates a prob-
lem. But it’s gotten a little bit
worse during this recessionary
period,” said Mr Woodside.

He admitted that borrowers
who seldom missed payments
in the past had, last year, began
to show difficulties in maintain-
ing this performance.

“Some of our real good cus-
tomers, who have never missed
a payment in a couple of years,
are now having problems,” Mr
Woodside said.

Last year, the BDB attempt-
ed to spark repayments on
some $29 million worth of loans
in arrears by offering a three-
month moratorium ,during
which borrowers were being
encouraged to go into the bank
to speak to their loan officers
about payment options. The
Government and BDB also dis-
cussed, during that same period,
writing off that 51 per cent of
the bank’s total loan portfolio.

Like many banks suffering
chronic loan defaults, the BDB
is trying to encourage its bor-
rowers to come in for a consul-
tation. Mr Woodside said cus-
tomers are encouraged to walk
into the BDB in order to work
out payment arrangements if
they feel their firms might be
in danger of falling down on
payments.

“We also offer to restructure
(the loans) and we give them
grace periods,” he said.

Though it expects things to
get worse this year, the BDB is
still lending money to those who
can meet the more stringent
requirements, brought on by the
global economic downturn.

“We’re still lending but we’re
being very selective because of
the slowdown in the economy,”
said Mr Woodside.

He said he has also noticed
that the BDB has seen a
decrease in applications for
loans, and believes that indi-
viduals might be reserving their
ideas for when the economy
takes an upswing.

Marina removed

from receivership

acquisition of the Port Lucaya
Marina and associated proper-
ties, but this has not been
repaid. They are also claiming
the company financed other
obligations of New Hope Hold-
ings.

Yet this newspaper under-
stands that Mr Olsen’s and New
Hope’s attorneys are vigorous-
ly contesting the default allega-
tions and the receivership.

They are alleging that respon-
sibility for any loan repayment
default lies squarely with Mr
Gonzalez. They are claiming he
failed to live up to several oblig-
ations, one of which was to pro-
vide New Hope Holdings with
$12 million in working capital -
over and above the initial pur-
chase price - to fund its opera-
tions.

This, Mr Olsen and New
Hope’s attorneys are alleging,
never happened, and without
that capital New Hope ended

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OF NASSAU BAHAMAS

Registration for the second session of the “Learn to Swim



up defaulting. Essentially, the
core allegation in their argu-
ments rests on the claim that
any responsibility for the loan
default lies with Mr Gonzalez
himself.

All parties are understood to
be back before the Supreme
Court later this month for fur-
ther hearings related to the sub-
stantive issues raised by the
case.

In 2006, New Hope Holdings
announced the acquisition of
Port Lucaya Marina as part of
the company’s $500 million, 70-
acre waterfront expansion sur-
rounding Bell Channel Bay.

The project, included 300
yacht slips (available by the day,
week, month, year or even a 99-
year lease) and 300 new luxuri-
ous waterfront condominiums,
townhouses and private resi-
dences. Port Lucaya Marina is
situated just across the bay from
the Grand Bahama Yacht Club.

D)

u“

program will take place at Queen's College pool on
Saturday February 28", 2009
from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 noon.

ALL SWIMMERS, NEW OR RETURNING, MUST REGISTER:

1) LEARN TO SWIM FOR CHILDREN
2) LEARN TO SWIM FOR ADULTS

See our website for registration forms, start
dates, prices and full swim schedules:

26’ BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Year: 2001
Price: $55,000.00
Hull: Fiberglass

Engine: Twin Mercury CXL OPTIMAX, 225 HP, 450 Hours

YW#: 55032-1853792

26 Outrage in great condition! Fully loaded with Auto-pilot, Fish finder, Chart plotter/GPS,
Stereo/CD, Head, Freshwater, Bow cushions. Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and

smart craft gauges.

Standard Equipment

Integral bow pulpit w/anchor roller and chafe plate

Bow anchor storage w/hatch

Port & starboard forward deck storage
Seats w/drainage

Integral swim platform

Port & starboard fish boxes w/drains
Rod holders

Bait prep area

Lockable console storage w/plexi door
Under gunnel rod racks

Vertical rod holders at forward deck seat
Self bailing fiberglass cockpit

S/S steering wheel

S/S console grab rail

Drink Holders

Fiberglass transom door

Livewellat transom w/washdown
Forward coaming bolsters

Hydraulic steering w/tilt



Optional Equipment

Porta potti w/pump out & 0/8 discharge
T-top w/top gun outriggers

Leaning post w/cooler

Windlass

Anchor

Full electronics including radar, chart plotter,
auto-pilot, fish finder, VHF, stereo

CONTACT:

Kingsley Edgecombe, Jr.
Ph: 424-4959

E-mail: kedgecombe@gmail.com

MUST SELL

SINGLE FAMILY RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY

Andros Ave.

Interested persons should submit offers in writing to:
The Manager
Credit Risk Management
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than March 13, 2009



— Englerston Subdivision

2 bedrooms,
1 bath

© Comprises:
Property 3,600 sq. ft/
Building 733 sq. ft.

For conditions of
sale and other
information,
please contact:

Phone:
356-1685,
502-1929

or 356-1608
THE TRIBUNE

Trust chief
to speak on
National

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9B



PunBnLtLic NOTICE
PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD LICENSE ARCHITECTS

Commonwealth of The Bahamas
Established by Act of Parliament 1994
P. O. Box CB-13040, 143 Nassau Street — Nassau, Bahamas

The Professional Architects Act 1994, empowers the “Professional Architects Board” to issue licenses to persons qualified to practice as Professional Architects
in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The Act stipulates, “no person shall hold himself out as a Professional Architect or engage in public practice unless
he is the holder of a valid licence.” Any person who contravenes this provision is guilty of an offense and is liable on summary conviction to a fine, imprisonment
or both. Public Notice is hereby given that only the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board” to practice as “Professional
Architects” in the Bahamas until January 31, 2009.

P| 3 Pa LICENCE # rea ADDRESS Ale ee
Rodney W. Braynen, F.IB.A. Phone No (242) 393-1874 001 Leo D. Ferguson Phone (242) 324-5566 067
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1423 P.O. Box SS 6261
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
John W. Darville, R.LB.A. Phone (242) 394-2600 002 Patrick A. Rahming Phone (242) 356-9080 070
Dip. Arch., LB.A P.O. Box N-4556 B. Sc., B. Arch. P. O. Box N9926
Nassau, Bahamas Nassau, Bahamas
Amos J. Ferguson, FLB.A., Phone (242) 393-0079 003 Timothy H. Neill, R.LB.A. Phone (242) 367-5415 071
APA. B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box SS 6261 LB.A., Dip. Arch. P. O. Box AB 20006
THE Bahamas National Nassau, Bahamas Marsh Harbour, Abaco
> : : : Anthony J. Jervis, FLB.A. Phone (242) 323-2628 005 John W. McCardy Phone (242) 332-2987 072
trust's executive director, Eric BED., B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N 7273 B. Arch. P.O. Box EL-25078
Carey, is scheduled to speak at Nassau, Bahamas Govents's Harbour
. euthera
the upcoming 11th annual Alvan K. Rolle, LB.A. Phone (242) 326-8141 006
: . B. Arch. Tech. P.O. Box N7401 Alberto G. Suighi, LB.A. Phone (242) 327-2335 073
Grand Bahama Business Out Nassau, Bahamas Phd. Arch. P.O. Box CB 13177
look (GBBO) next Monday. . Nassau, Bahamas
Hi : ill f Douglas RA. Smith R.I.B.A. Phone (242) 394-2600 007 ;
1s presentation will focus on FLB.A., Dip. Arch. BSc. MSc. P.O, Box N 4556 Hyacinth Allen Phone (242) 323-4991 074
? 1 Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch, P. O. Box N-966
Grand Bahama’s unique Nore. Balers
National Park system on and Gordon C. Major Phone (242) 008
B. Arch. Tech. P. O. Box 3326 Tyrone Burrows Phone (242) 382-0611 075
offshore. Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P.O. Box N 9876
6 7 Nassau, Bahamas
The Bahamas National . Arthur Colebrook, LB.A. Phone (242) 322-4061 009
Trust is celebrating its 50th ERIC CAREY P.O. Box N 3745 Dwight M, Thompson Phone (242) 327-3220 076
anniversary this year,” Mr ema po ee Nassau, Bahamas
4 “ 4 4 Jonathan A. Adderley Phone (242) 393-8893 010
Carey said. ‘The ‘Trust, with its . : LB.A., B.ED., Dip. Arch. P.O. Box N 9585 Jennifer A. Saunders Phone (242) 327-1411 077
mandate of national park man- ogy and Game Birds Commit- WA. PUG. Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. PO. Box CB 12364
sos Jassau, S
agement, has a clear vision for tees. Michael C. Alexiou, LB.A. Phone (242) 325-7383 011
; : B. Arch. P.O. Box N 672 Livingston Forbes Phone (242) 356-9738 078
the next 50 years, and an impor Mr Carey has represented the Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P.O. Box N 4230
tant part of that vision are the | Bahamas at numerous interna- cic w kaa hanes (uaarsusatie at Nassau, Bahamas
3 : 3 5 él ter a
three national parks on Grand tional and regional meetings, B.Arch, = PO. Bex Ee e704 Hiram H. Lockhart Phone (242) 328-7789 079
Bahama: The Lucayan Nation- and has received training in Nassau, Bahamas oe
al Park, the Rand Nature Cen- wildlife conservation in such RiBA De Anh Po Bor CB 18) o Pier Baldacci Phone (242) 323-4764 080
tre and Pelican Cays Land and countries as Malaysia, Thailand, eee gee Nassau, Bahamas 7 ; ee aaa
a 1 m1 = Nassau, Bahamas
Sea Park. , Chile, ‘Trinidad & Tobago, Bar ee Ane Phone (242) 367-2496 1d
Mr Carey will address BNT’s bados, Jamaica, the United B, Arch. P. O, Box AB-20676 Lawrence Chisholm Phone (242) 356-6261 082
vision for the future of the Kingdom and the United States. Busan imoceeevers eae
1 1 j Trevor Bridgewater Phone (242) 394-0014 015
organisation, and the important In 2000, the US government B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N 8244 Bruce M. Stewart Phone (242) 323-8800 083
role Grand Bahama has to play — appointed Mr Carey as a mem- Nassau, Bahamas 1B.A.,ALA,,B. Arch. P.O. Box N 366
fe . . ee . N: B
in the creation of a national _ ber of the prestigious Kirtland’s Victor R. Cartwright Phone (242) 324-1896 016 Te .
j B. Arch, P.O. Box N 4383 Michael A. Diggiss Phone (242) 327-8916 084
park system that will be the Warbler Recovery Team. He se oeeenae es ie ae Os ttc CB 1iaae
envy of every country in the has received international Nassau, Bahamas
: sa: : Ashward G. Ferguson Phone (242) 324-7334 018
region. awards and recognition for his B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box N8156 Thomas M. Dean Phone (242) 324-1170 085
“Just this past week the Trust work in nature conservation, Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., M. Arch. Cieceata Stine
opened the new bridge and inclusive of the Partners-In- Winston G. Jones Phone (242) 325-1520 019 ,
: 7 RIB.A., Dip. Arch. P. O. Box SS 5377 Robert M. Isaacs Phone (242) 324-1680 086
boar dwalk at the Luc ayan Flight International Conserva- Dip. Urban Design Nassau, Bahamas Dip. Arch, P.O. Box 1207
National Park — the most visited tion Award in 1999 and the Nassau, Bahamas
: : : : Kenneth V. Lam Phone (242) 326-2114 020
park in the Bahamas. This 2005 Wings Across the Ameri- RIB.A., MBA. P, O. Box SS 5730 Dirk K. Saunders Pone (242) 557-2308 087
investment of over $250,000 cas Research and Management Nastay, Bahamae Baek, ea
i i Iram D. Lewis Phone (242) 361-4972 021
shows the commitment that the Partnership Award. ares oe Sadewcagii Phone Gay aseonie bas
BNT has to Grand Bahama, Mr Carey is one of 10 speak- Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box EE-16270
: ? Nassau, Bahamas
Mr Carey added. ers at this year’s Grand Bahama John L. McKenzie Phone (242) 393-8415 022 7
Prior to his appointment to Business Outlook. The event is B. Arch. P. 0. B ox N 3356 Robert Whittingham Phone (242) 322-6591 089
a 2 Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box CB-13846
the post of executive director, sponsored by the Grand Nassau, Bahamas
: : Clinton W. Pearce Phone (242) 424-1463 023
Mr Carey served as director of | Bahama Port Authority, Bank B Arch. P.O. Box EE 17980 Stephen J. Bain Phone (242) 356-6029 090
parks and science at BNT. Pre- of the Bahamas International, Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P.O. Box N-10083
: es jassau, Bahamas
viously, he held the position of - FOCOL, Emera, The Central Andrew O. Stirling, Phone (242) 328-7982 024 e a :
‘ ‘ ‘ ‘ ote R.IB.A., B. Arch. P. O. Box SS 5399 Jeremiah Moxey jone (242) 341-484: 091
bid a eatery epee ae of eo een British Nassau, Bahamas BAe BO Box CR54501
Wi e Government, and sa Nassau, Bahamas
pe Mmerican Financial, Ministry W. Kevin Sweeting, LB.A. Phone (242) 394-8150 025
on the BNT Wildlife, Ornithol- of Tourism and Scotiabank. B. Arts Arch. B. Arch. P.O. Box N 3211 C. Bemardo Deleveaux Phone (242) 325-5103 092
Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box GT-2277
Nassau, Bahamas
Benjamin M. Albury Phone (242) 393-3552 027
B. Arch, P.O, Box N 1731 Lawrence C, Smith Phone (242) 427-1565 093
Nassau, Bahamas P. O. Box N1412
Nassau, Bahamas
Frederick D. Albury Phone (242) 325-5916 028
B. Arch. P.O. Box N-1677 Mark W. Henderson, LB.A. Phone (242) 327-3274 096
Nassau, Bahamas R.LB.A., B. Sc., B. Arch. P. O. Box CB 12436
Nassau, Bahamas
Andre W. Braynen, LB.A. Phone (242) 393-1874 029
a B. Arts Arch, Sc., B. Arch, P. O, Box N1423 Kevin R. Bryce Phone (242) 356-4538 097
e a | O oS a a a @ Ss fe Nassau, Bahamas B. Sc. Arch. Arch. Eng. P. O. Box SS-19909
Nassau, Bahamas
Sean A. Farrington Phone (242) 465-3738 031
B. Sc. Arch. B. Arch. P.O. Box N 7627 Mark A. Smith Phone (242) 323-0486 098
+ . tae + soo ee st ee eae ee Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., MLA P. O. Box SS 6888
Small Retail Store specializing in girls accessories Nassau, Bahamas
. ki . © : | hich! Michael Foster Phone (242) 394-3385 032
S Seeking . ni 7 anercvetic anc go y B. Sc., B. Arch. P.O. Box N 1190 Copeland Moxey Phone (242) 457-2107 099
Is see ing a dynamic, energetic , and ug 1 V Nassau, Bahamas Bach, PO Bux CB 12689
ivated © ra NMAanacar par ith “TAT Ni , Bahama
motiv ated Store Manager (30-40 years) W ith pl 10T Henry A. Hepbum, R.LB.A Phone (242) 341-9389 033 one 5
ee ees: : LB.A. ALA. B. Arch., P.O. Box 7248 Carlos J. Hepburn Phone (242) 394-5166 101
retail manager experience to handle all aspects of M. Arch, MRCP, Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., LB.A. P.O. Box CR-54090
Jassau, S
Ea es Sean R. Mathews Phone (242) 356-4538 035
store operation. Dip. Arch. P.O. Box SS 19909 Tan A. Bullard Phone (242) 362-2719 102
Nassau, Bahamas B., Arch, P. O. Box CR-54746
Nassau, Bahamas
Pl ase sen | resumes b >-ma : | tc Charles ae Phone (242) 352-5204 036 ie fs 1 ea
ise § res s by e-m: : B. Sc. Arch. P.O. Box F 41247 Timothy F. Johnson one (242) 364-7813 103
ease send resumes Dy e-mail to Freeport, Grand Babama B. Arch, P.O. Box $S-6906
) * Nassau, Bahamas
bahamas.com @ gmail.com Alicia C-A. Oxley Phone (242) 394-3251 038
= B. Arch. M. Arch. P.O. Box CB11836 Tariq J. O’Brien, R.ILB.A. Phone (242) 326-2114 104
Nassau, Bahamas B. A. Dip., Arch. Dip. P. O. Box 9116
Uban Design Nassau, Bahamas
David S. White Phone (242) 324-1547 039
RILBA,RALC. P.O. Box N 1013 Mark M, Braithwaite Phone (242) 327-7259 105
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arts, B. Arch. P.O. Box CB-11454
Nassau, Bahamas
GN-825 Douglas A. Minns, L.B.A. Phone (242) 394-4736 042
P.O. Box N 7936 Stefan P. Russell Phone (242) 341-4982 106
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch., LB.A. P. O. Box CR-54423
Nassau, Bahamas
R. John Paine, RA.LA. Phone (242) 322-2945 044
B. Arch. P. O. Box CB 11499 Terry-Jeanne P. Thompson Phone (242) 362-6306 107
Nassau, Bahamas 1B.A., B.E.D.S. P. O. Box N 402
Nassau, Bahamas
Jackson L. Burnside II, LB.A. Phone (242) 394-1886 049
R.IB.A., M. Arch. P.O. Box N 1207 Kesna M. Hunt Phone (242) 352-4835 108
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P. O. Box F-43578
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Larry Forbes Phone (242) 322-2021 050
B. Arch, P. O. Box SS 6351 Jan Brent Creary Phone (242) 394-1886 109
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch, P. O. Box N-3857
Nassau, Bahamas
Jason P. Lorandos, LB.A. Phone (242) 393-4372 055
M | N | STRY OF TH E ENVI RON M ENT B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box 5-607 Samuel R. Williams Phone (242) 110
Nassau, Bahamas B. Arch. P. O. Box CR-54385
Nassau, Bahamas
= David K. Griffiths Phone (242) 559-7200 056
Dep a rtment Of Envi ron mental Dip. Arch. P.O. Box F 40257 Carlan A. Johnson Phone (242) 356-9080 111
Freeport, Grand Bahama B. Arts. Arch Sc. P. O. Box N 9926
. B, Arch, Nassau, Bahamas
Health Services Donald A. Dean Phone (242) 352-4835 057
P.O. Box F 41609 Dezon A. Curry Phone (242) 424-1541 112
Freeport, Grand Bahama B. Arch., M. Arch. P.O. Box 29151
. . Exuma, Bahamas
Environmental Health Services Bruce LaFleur Bhone (242) 228-7240 060
APA, ALA. P.O. Box FH 14435 Jechelle T. Rolle Phone (242) 328-2767 113
B. Sc. Envin. Des., M. Arch. Nassau, Bahamas Bs. Arch. Studies P. O. Box SB-50045
Bulletin No. 1 Nassau, Bahamas
Michael J. Moss, B.A. Phone (242) 356-5913 061
P.O. Box N 7091 Wilfred B. Dorsett, B.A. Phone (242) 324-5529 114
Nassau, Bahamas B. Sc. Tech. P.O. Box N 842
Nassau, Bahamas
Th G | Public i dvised t : Garth W. Sawyer Phone (242) 464-1798 063
P.O. Box Ex 29276 Vanru S. Hepburn Phone (242) 326-2829 115
e General FuDIIC IS aQvised to exercise Exuma, Bahamas B. Sc., B Arch. P.O. Box GT-2368
1 1 1 Nassau, Bahamas
special care and attention when shopping Neville Rosfield Phone (242) 322-1900 065
B. Arch. P.O. Box 85 6351 February 2009



Nassau, Bahamas

for meat, poultry, seafood and other food
products.

Consumers are asked to be vigilant about
the sell, use by and expiration dates which
appear on food products. Ensure that
these dates are in the future and that the
product can be safely used before the
date indicated.

PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS BOARD

LICENSED ARCHITECTURAL TECHNICIANS PROFESSIONAL ARCHITECTS ACT, 1994
Public Notice is hereby given that the persons listed hereunder are licensed by the “Professional Architects Board”

to practice as “Professional Architectural Technicians” until 31 January 2010.

|S Ped) tt) LICENCE # P| ADDRESS LICENCE #
Leo A. Miller Phone (242) 326-8141 T006
P. O. Box 6583 Solomon J. Smith Phone (242) 361-6517 T045
Customers are asked to ensure that all Nassau, Bahamas P.O. BoxN 10888
iat ret : Henry A. Delani Phone (242) 334-0458 TO16
food packages Is In good condition prior om o Wonvss Bight Elesthera Coralyn T Adderley Phone (242) 341-1247 To49
to purchasing. Michael A. Jones Phone (242) 327.7486 To18 " Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, Babamas Jermaine Evans Phone (242) 646-3801 TOS!
. OU. Box
1 Laurin L. Knowles Phone (242) 337-0025 T026 Freeport, Grand Bahama
Suspect or outdated items should be Mangrove Bush
Long Island, Bahamas ‘Trevor Butterfield Phone (242) 352-7154 1053
reported to the store manager and the Ryan A Archer POBorsD — Pepa Gad Batam
* ac. . Lech. + U. Box
Department of Environmental Health Marsh Hezbous, Abaco Brent Key Phone (242) 367-4143 7054
Services C. Jenkin Williams Phone (242) 352-2500 T032 Marsh Harbour, Abaco
Freeport, Grand Bahama
Lockhart W.Tumquest Phone (242) 337-1086 T038

Director
Environmental Health Services



P. O. Box DC 30607
Grey’s, Long Island


PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Bernanke vows to do all he can to revive economy

@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke pledged anew
Wednesday to do everything in
his power to lift the country out
of recession, while defending
the extraordinary steps the Fed
has taken to fight the worst
credit and financial crisis since
the 1930s.

The central bank has slashed
a key interest rate to record
lows and has launched a series
of radical programmes in hopes
of getting credit — the econo-
my's oxygen — to flow more
freely again to American con-
sumers and businesses, and sta-
bilize Wall Street. Such relief
would help revive the US econ-
omy, which has been mired in
recession since December 2007.

"Recent economic statistics
have been dismal, with many
economies, including ours, hav-
ing fallen into recession,"
Bernanke said in remarks to the
National Press Club. "In the
United States, the Federal
Reserve has done, and will con-
tinue to do, everything possible
within the limits of its authority
to assist in restoring our nation
to financial stability and eco-
nomic prosperity as quickly as
possible.”

The Fed has been exploring
new tools — as well as expand-
ing existing programmes — to
provide further economic and
financial relief, although
Bernanke didn't provide any
new details on Wednesday.

With all the Fed's pro-
grammes to provide loans or
buy debt, its balance sheet has
mushroomed to just under $2

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
RODEL INTERNATIONAL LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, RODEL INTERNATIONAL LTD. is in
dissolution as of February 17, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A
Regent Street, P.O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is

the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR





GN-823

> GOVERNMENT

NOTICE

MINISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT

DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH SERVICES

trillion, from around $900 bil-
lion in September.

Critics worry the Fed's
actions have the potential to put
ever-more taxpayers’ dollars at
risk, spur inflationary pressure
in the future and encourage
"moral hazard," where compa-
nies feel more comfortable
making high-stakes gambles
because the government will
rescue them.

Bernanke, however, sought
to downplay some of those con-
cerns.

"The credit risk with our non-
traditional policies is excep-
tionally low," he said, adding
that when the economy is on
the mend, the Fed's pro-
grammes can be quickly
reversed "to avoid risks of
future inflation."

The great bulk of the Fed's
lending is generally short term

BEN BERNANKE (AP)



and backed by more than ample
assets, Bernanke said.

In other controversial moves,
the Fed last year provided
financial backing for JPMorgan
Chase's take over of Bear
Stearns, and bailed out insurer
American International Group.
Although this carries "more risk
than our traditional activities,"
Bernanke said the Fed intends
over time to sell the assets it
holds from those bailouts in a
way that maximizes the return
to taxpayers.

The Fed chief also repeated a
pledge — made last week — to
keep Americans. better
informed about its efforts to
ease credit and financial prob-
lems.

On that front, the central
bank is developing a new Web
site that will provide detailed
information on its efforts. The

Fed hopes to have the site oper-
ational in the coming days.

The Fed's No. 2 official, vice
chairman Donald Kohn, also is
leading a committee to review
the central bank's disclosure
policies related to its lending
programmes and its balance
sheet, which outlines its efforts
to ease credit problems by pro-
viding loans and buying debt.

"The presumption of the
committee will be that the pub-
lic has a right to know,"
Bernanke said.

In another move to provide
Wall Street and Main Street
with better insights into the
Fed's thinking about the econ-
omy, Bernanke said the central
bank will start publishing
longer-term projections on eco-
nomic activity, unemployment
and inflation beyond the three
years now provided.

Failure to enforce rules undermines regulation integrity

FROM page 1B

ness: “If you’re not going to
enforce the rules, don’t put
them on the books.”

Brian Moree, senior partner
at McKinney, Bancroft &
Hughes, told Tribune Business
that the relatively low level of
compliance with the Securities
Commission’s regulations in
some key areas - and the regu-
lator’s failure to properly
enforce what was on the books
- “sends the wrong message” to
the capital markets/investment
funds industry about the
strength of regulation they will
be subjected to.

And James Smith, the former
minister of state for finance,
who is now CFAL’s chairman,
suggested that the situation
showed the Bahamas had yet
to “find the proper balance”
between regulation and per-
mitting the free conduct of busi-
ness in its capital markets.

The Securities Commission
earlier this week acknowledged
that it had not properly
enforced the regulations with
respect to broker/dealer regu-
latory capital and investment
funds filing their audited finan-
cials within four months of year-
end.

Its data showed just 45.45 per
cent of Class IT broker/dealers
met the $120,000 minimum reg-
ulatory capital threshold, while
82.5 per cent of securities invest-
ment advisers met the $25,000
threshold. The greatest area of
non-compliance was for the
$300,000 Class I broker/dealer
threshold, with a 33.4 per cent
compliance rate, and the major
issues were with standalone

companies.

The Securities Commission is
now working on developing a
more realistic formula for regu-
latory capital requirements, one
industry source telling Tribune
Business yesterday that the
Bahamas’ stipulations for bro-
ker/dealers were more onerous
than their equivalent in the US,
UK and Canada.

A similar review of invest-
ment fund filing deadlines is
also underway, but Tribune
Business was told yesterday that
if it was not going to enforce
the rules/regulations it had, the
Securities Commission should
not have had them on the books
in the first place because of the
mixed message sent to the mar-
kets it regulated.

Saying that the statistics
released by the Securities Com-
mission were “both surprising
and disturbing”, Mr Moree said
yesterday: “It seems to me that
in order to establish the credi-
bility of the Securities Commis-
sion as a regulator, it needs to
ensure that it’s going to enforce
its rules and regulations that it
passes or has on its books.

“Tf they don’t think, for what-
ever reason, the regulations or
certain rules should not be
enforced, they should not have
been promulgated. If you’re not
going to enforce the regulations,
do not put them on the books.”

Mr Moree added: “I think it’s
an unusual position for a regu-
lator to be sending a message
to the market that there is wide-
spread non-compliance with
certain of its regulations.

“In my view, that sends the
wrong message. Simply put, you
should only adopt and pass the
regulations you intend to

enforce. If you don’t think the
market is ready or they’re too
onerous to enforce, you should
not promulgate them.

“What I don’t think is helpful
to the future credibility of the
Securities Commission is for the
market to think it can treat rules
and regulations as a target to
try and comply with, and don’t
suffer any penalties for not
doing so.”

Mr Moree said that given the
current global financial crisis, it
was “extremely important” for
the Securities Commission to
“have a strong enforcement
unit, and send a clear, unequiv-
ocal message that rules and reg-
ulations are passed to protect
the industry, and the consumer
and the general public, and
those regulations are not
options that licensees can or
cannot comply with.

“They are required to com-
ply with the regulations, and if

not there will be serious conse-
quences. If the sector is going to
be well-regulated, we’ve got to
put some enforcement teeth
behind the regulation side.”

The Securities Commission,
Mr Moree said, needed to tell
the market that failure to com-
ply with its rules and regula-
tions would result in enforce-
ment penalties and sanctions.
It was a problem, he added, that
needed fixing “immediately”.

Meanwhile, Mr Smith said
the situation reflected the fact
that the Securities Commission
and Bahamian capital markets
were both in their respective
infancy, and needed time to
mature and properly develop
systems of regulation.

He questioned whether the
rules and regulations, as they
currently stood, had “struck the
proper balance between effec-
tive oversight and not restricting
trade”.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
LEOCAM LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(4) of the International Business Companies Act.
2000, LEQCAM LTD. is in dissolution as of February

17, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated at 35A

INVITATION FOR TENDERS

The Government of The Bahamas is inviting
tenders for the supply of the following assorted
vehicles.

1. Single cab pickup truck (s)
2. Double cab pickup truck (s)
3. Flat bed truck (s)

4. Van (s)

5. Car (s)

Interested parties may obtain further information
including eligibility to participate and may collect
the bidding document upon payment of a non
refundable fee of twenty dollars ($20.00) as of
February 11th, 2009 from:

The Department of Environmental Health
Services

Farrington Road

Nassau, Bahamas

P.O. Box SS-19048

Telephone No. (242) 322-8037, Facsimile No.
(242) 322-8073 between the hours of 9:00 A.M.
and 5:00 P.M. Monday and Friday.

The method of payment will be certified cheque
or cash. Tenders are to be submitted in triplicate
(3) in sealed envelope(s) addressed to:

The Tenders Board

C/O The Financial Secretary
Ministry of Finance

Cecil V. Wallace Whitfield Centre
P.O. Box N-3017

Nassau, N.P.

The Bahamas

No later than February 27th, 2009.

Tenders will be open at 10:00 A.M. on March
3rd, 2009 at the office of the Tenders Board,
Ministry of Finance.

The government reserves the right to reject any
or all Tenders.



GN-821

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

MINISTRY OF PUBLIC WORKS
& TRANSPORT

Request for Tender for Security Operations at
the Existing Downtown Straw Market Plaza,
at Navy Lion Road & Bay Street, N.P., Bahamas.

The Ministry of Public Works & Transport invites Tender
applications for the provision of security services at the
Downtown Straw Market Plaza at Navy Lion Road and
Bay Street.

The contract is for a period of twelve (12) months in the
first instance and interested security firms are invited to
submit Tenders with comprehensive details of their proposal
for security operation between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and
6:00 a.m. daily (including weekends and public holidays).
The contract will be awarded to the applicant providing

the most economical and acceptable Tender for the full
duration of the contract period.

Interested companies may collect the Tender specifications
from Mr. D. William Munnings’ office: Room 12, located
at the Ministry of Public Works & Transport on John F.
Kennedy Drive, 2nd Floor, West Wing, between the hours
of 9:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
beginning Wednesday, February 11, 2009.

Tenders must be submitted in sealed envelopes marked
“Tender for Security, Straw Market” and delivered to Mr.
D. William Munnings’ office for the attention of:

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive
Nassau, Bahamas

All Tenders must be received by 4:00 p.m. Thursday,
March 12, 2009 accompanied by an endorsed copy of a
current Business Licence and a verification letter from the
National Insurance Board.

Persons who submit Tenders are invited to a public opening
of bids in the Conference Room, 3rd Floor East Wing, at
the Ministry of Public Works & Transport, John F. Kennedy
Drive on Friday, March 13, at 10:00 a.m.

The Ministry reserves the right to reject any or all
Tenders.



Regent Street, P. O. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is
the Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF Jeannine Marie
Therese Dusseault a.k.a. Jeannine
Marie Therese Buraglia’ a.k.a
Jeannine Buraglia late of 300 Joliette
#208 Longueuil, Quebec in Canada in
the Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of The Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the above Estate are required
to send the same duly certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before
the 5th day of March A.D., 2009, after
which date the Executors will proceed
to distribute the assets having regard
only to the claims of which they shall
then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons in indebted to the said Estate
if Jeannine Marie Therese Dusseault

a.k.a. Jeannine Marie Therese
Buraglia a.k.a. Jeannine Buragila
are requested to make full settlement
on or before the date hereinbefore
mentioned.

NADIA A. WRIGHT
Attorney for the Executors
Chambers
P.O. Box N-4589
Nassau, Bahamas


The Tribune oe

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RELIGION



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PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

Precious Memories

Legacy of Love

A wife, a mother, a grandma too,
This is the legacy we have from you.
You taught us love and how to Hah,
You gave us strength, you gave us might.
A stronger person would be hard to find,
And in your heart, you were always kind.
You fought for us all in one way or another,
Not just as a wife not just as mother.
For all of us you gave your best,
Now the time has come for you to rest.
So go in peace, you’ ve earned your sleep,
As we look back over time.
Weer ourselves wondering...
Did we remember to thank you enough?
For all you have done for us?
For all the times you were by our sides.
To help and support us....
To celebrate our successes
To understand our problems
And accept our defeats?
Or for teaching us by your example,
The value of hard work, good judgment,
Courage and integrity?
We wonder if we ever thanked you
For the sacrifices you made.
To let us have the very best?
And for the simple things
Like laughter, smiles and times we shared?
If we have forgotten to show our

ratitude enough for all the things you did,
We’re thanking you now.
And we are hoping you knew all along,
How much you meant to us.
Your love in our hearts, we’ll eternally keep:

Your children ere and great grand’s, nieces
and nephews Church family at Zion Baptist
East and Shirley Streets and your friends

We miss you



THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

In ‘Fond &
Loving Memory

of

MR. CTL
AMESIING RAIA

Sunrise: March 4, 1959 - Sunset: February 18, 2007

Our son, brother, uncle, nephew, cousin,
co-worker and friend.

“Phillo”, two years has gone swiftly by
But it seems as yesterday
Since we’ve said our last goodbyes
The day you went away
So as we take time to reminisce today
We who are left behind are admonish to pray
As we envisioned your unforgettable smile
We know that it will be alright - after a while
You certainly did so much for so many
Without the means you sure did plenty
So as we fondly remember you - we would simply smile and say

The Lord giveth and the Lord taketh away.

Missed by his parents, sisters, brothers, uncles, aunts, nieces,
nephews, cousins, the rest of the family including the Higgs
& Johnson family.
THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3

Phil
Smit

ways 7th, 1957
Decem Aber M8th, 200



Thank you to the people of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas for their outpouring of love and support
for Phil and the family during his illness and death.

The Executive Board, Management and the entire staff of The Broadcasting Corporation of The Bahamas,
the Presidents and members of all Sporting Federations, Associations and clubs in The Bahamas, the
local radio stations, television stations and news dailies, Fr Martin Gomes, Deacon Gregory Taylor and
the Parish Community of St Joseph’s Catholic Church. The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.,
Archbishop Patrick C Pinder, the Clergy of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese and Sisters of St Martin’s
Convent; the Rt Hon Hubert Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas, the Hon
Desmond Bannister, Minister of Youth & Sports, Members Of Parliament, Senate and the official
Opposition Party (Progressive Liberal Party). The Doctors, Nurses and entire staff of Doctors’ Hospital
especially the Dialysis Unit and Dr Judson Eneas and staff. The Prayer warriors, from all religious
denominations, who prayed for Phil tirelessly during his illness. Management and staff of Bethel’s
Brothers Mortuary, management and staff of Lakeview Memorial Gardens and those who traveled to be
with us for Phil’s burial. We appreciate your prays, kindness and thoughtfulness.

The family


PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

On Koning Meme

“If tears could build a stairway and memories were a lane, we would walk straight to
heaven and bring you home again. No farewell words were spoken, no time to say good-
bye you were gone before we knew it and only God knows why. Our hearts still ache
in sadness and secret tears still flow, what it meant to lose you no one will ever know.”

is
VIEMORY
Chie

=

——— = Bernard Terrance Rolle jr
16th October 1990 - 21st February 2007

To all of his friends of C.R. Walker, Class of ’08 and the entire Sunset Park Crew, I
hope you never lose your sense of purpose, may you never take one single breath for
granted. Promise me you give faith a fighting chance and when you get the chance
to sit it out or dance, I hope you dance, I hope you dance.

Sadly missed by Parents, Bernard & Coralee; brother, Jermaine; sister Nikita and uncle Kello.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

* TERRELL A. ROLLE

We, the family of the late Terrell A. Rolle, say
thank you to all, for your words of condolences,
gifts, acts of kindness, prayers and support on the
passing of our loved one. Thank you to the
emergency personnel of the Rand Memorial
Hospital, Dr. Winston Forbes and the first
respondents, Dr. Reneé Lockhart, the entire
management and staff of Bahamas Mortgage
Corporation, especially the staff of Freeport,
Minister of Housing, Mr. Kenneth Russell and
his staff, the Principal and staff of Eight Mile
Rock High School, the families of the Bishop
Michael Eldon School, St. Georges High School
and the Freeport Junior High School, Ministry of
Education Officials, the staff of First Caribbean,
Pastor Mark and Vanena Smith and our Dominion
Community Church family, the Freeport Bible
Church family, the Amazing Grace Church family,
Bishop Neil Ellis and the Mount Tabor Church
family, Yager Funeral Home, persons who would
have travelled from Nassau to support us and
ALL of our friends and relatives.

~ The Family ~

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5

Hutler’s Funeral Aomes
& Crematorium

Telephone: 393-2822, York & Ernest Sts.
P.O. Box N-712, Nassau, Bahamas

Funeral Service For

Ms. Rosenell Rose
Bodie, 69

of Regency Park and formerly
of Black Point, Exuma will
be held on Saturday 21st
February 2009 at 11:00 a.m.
at Zion Baptist Church, East
and Shirley Street. Officiating
will be Rev. T. G. Morrison
along with other Ministers.
Interment will follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road.

Left to cherish her memories are: one daughter; Emily Miller,
three sons: Brooks, Ramond, and Martin Miller, four
granddaughters: Lynette Smith, Remona, Brokara and Natajia
Miller, six grandsons: Roderic, Datavious, Damien, Ramond
Jr. and Miquel Miller, and Sharrado Ferguson ;four great-
grandsons: La-Vance Jr. and La-Quan Smith, Jabari Miller,
and Gianno Taylor, one great-granddaughter: Rashantai
Miller, one brother: Bertram Bodice, two daughters-in-law:
Sandra and Ylonka Miller, one granddaughter-in-law:
Charisma Miller, one grandson-in-law: La-Vance Smith,
seven nieces: Veronica Rolle, Lillimae Herandez, Barbara
and Yvonne Gray, Penelope Nixon, Peevan McIntosh and Ivy
Cornish, six nephews: Ruel, Tony, Freddie, and Sandy Gray,
Oliver Munroe and Dennis Baker; Numerous grand nieces
and Nephews; two aunts: Bernice and Millie Robinson, one
uncle: Walter Robinson, three god-children: Phillip Smith,
Elvis Anderson and Percy Patton, A host of other Relatives
and Friends including: Alfred Ferguson, Ruthmae Edwards,
Sharon Woods, Barbara & Charlie Saunders (Fort Lauderdale,
Florida) Cedric Baker, Florine Smith, Burke Smith, Gloria
Wilson, Willamae Nottage, Joe, Albert & Wendall Smith,
Shirley Culmer, Constance, Inez, Icellee Smith, George &
Zeletta Adderley, Sandra Johnson, Rowena Rolle, Beryl Kemp,
Ineka Ferguson, Loretha Miller, Fredricka, Rhonda and Allsette
Miller, Curline Rolle, Shirley Curling, Persis Adderley, Birdie
Pearce, Solomon Robinson, Pam Duncanson, and the entire
Community of Black Point, Staniel Cay, Farmers Cay and
Hermitage, Exuma, Zion Baptist, East and Shirley Street,
Church family and others to numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Butlers’ Funeral Homes
& Crematorium, Ernest & York Streets on Friday from 10:00
a.m. until 5:00 p.m. and on Saturday at the church from 10:00
a.m. until service time.


PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

(Cedar ©Crest funeral Hlome

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street « P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Services For

Nelson Patrick Smith, 68

a resident of Sea Beach Estates and Bamboo Town
and formally of United States San Salvador, will
be held 1pm Saturday, February 21st, 2008 at St
Francis Xaviers Cathedral, West Hill Street,
Officiating will be Monsignor Alfred Culmer. Rev
Fr Glen Nixon, Rev Fr Pio Galumalemana and
Deacon Samuel Mitchell. Interment will be made
in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F
Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road.

Left with cherish memories are his loving and
devoted wife Ruth Idell Smith, his mother, Emily
Smith, 4 sons Patrick, Oscar, Courtney and Derek
Smith, 7 daughters, Debbie, Katie, Sharon and
Kelly Smith, Glenda Thompson, Roberta Deleveaux
and Garnell Dames, 20 Grandchildren, Jamal,
Deangelo, Kenny, Neka, Corporal 5323 Thompson,
Timothy Jr, Diondre, Glentany, Laquisha, Brittany, Elshadeh, Courtney Jr, Vardo,
Dejah, Alliyah, Niki, Trenee, Beauford Jr, Dehjon, Patrick Jr, Patricia, Triston, Elvardo,
Makcerio, and Anthon, 6 sisters Rose McPhee, Agnes, Lotti, Nora, Francina and Verl
Smith, 2 brothers, Kipling and Supt. of Police Prince Smith, 2 brothers-in-law,
Peter McPhee and Audley Bain, 5 sisters-in-law, Louise Smith, Helen Fritz, Dorothy
Godet, Clara Bain and Pat Smith, 3 sons-in-law, Beauford Deleveaux, Timothy
Thompson, and Roseoe Dames, 1 daughter-in-law, Janet Ferguson, numerous nieces
and nephews including Linda, Anne, Evans, Keith, Erica, Shan, Toniqua, Vanessa,
Craig, Vonette, Davita, Deena, David Jr, Devard, Anatole, Garfield, Malary, Ricco,
Tony, Shaniqua, Glenda, Marvin, Jennaine, Stephen, Chivago, Ando, Joey, Devon,
Michael, Nardo, Lanette, Keno, Dario, Jason, Curry, Kareem, Deangelo, Elva, Romell,
Oscar, Darren, Nakita, Demarko, Arnette, Adrian, Deena, Danny, Denise, Ashante,
Audra, Michael, Gawaine, Alexandria, and Anne, numerous Grand nieees and nephews
and other relatives and friends including Rt Hon Perry Gladstone Christie, Iva Bain,
Mr & Mrs Duke Hanna, Mr & Mrs Duke Smith, Mr & Mrs Duke Dorsette, Mr &
Mrs Andy Gomez, Mr & Mrs Robert Elliott, Mr & Mrs Leon Reekley, Mr & Mrs
Anvil Lightfoot, Mr & Mrs Robert Lightfoot., the Ferguson family, Alvin Rolle &
family, Levi Charlton, Sam Charlton, Arlington Miller, Captain Anthony Allens,
Michael Hamilton, Cedric Smith, Mr & Mrs Dewitt Duncanson, Patrice Dean &
family, Mr & Mrs Elton Williamson, Mr & Mrs Elton Taylor & family, The Godet
family, Edward Miller and the entire Batelco family and retirees, the entire Mecca
Grand Lodge and Modem Free families, Kenneth Kelly and the Nights of Columbus,
the Ressurection family especially the Ladies Auxillary, Ena North, Julia Thompson
& family, Hazel Chipman & family, The Sea Beach community, Leah Obrien &
family, the Bamboo Town community, Aunt Agnes and Aunt Dorothy of Miami Fla,
Hazel Williams & family, The Poitier family, Mrs Brice, Mr Weech and family, Dr
Rhonda Chipman, Asa Ferguson, Aunt Edith Collie & family, Aunt Loretta McPhee
& family, Gregg Femander & family, The Central Bank, Charlene Smith, Delta
Airlines, Jet Blue Airways, Doreen Ferguson, Atlantis Casino, John Bull, Charlie
Bethell, Scotia Bank, ZNS, Commonwealth Brewery, The British Colonial Hilton,
The P .L.P. Stalwart Council, Angela Sands, Margaret Small, Mr & Mrs Garaway,
William Nottage, Richard Darville & family, Shane Albury & family, Anthony Cooke,
Cartwright and all the Viking Brothers, The Roker family, Sister Agatha Hunt and
Sister Cleare, Mrs Simmons and Maxine Munroe, Mr & Mrs Lionel Dorsette, Mr &
Mrs Eddie Burrows & family, the entire San Salvador and Mayaguana communities
and others too numerous to mention.

Special thanks to Fr Pio Galwnalemana, Monsignor Alfred Culmer, Deacon Samuel
Mitchell & family, to all the Doctors and nurses at the Princess Margaret Hospital
Intensive Care Unit and Doctors Hospital including Dr Yoheny, Dr Palacuri, Dr Bimal
Francis, Dr Roberts, Dr Weech and Dr Conville Brown. Also to all those who offered
prayers for the family.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at the Gambier House, Farrington Road,
Progressive Liberal Party Headquarters, from 10am - 4pm and at Cedar Crest Funeral
Home, on Saturday from 10:00 a.m. to 12:30p.m. and at the church from 1:0Op.m..
until service time.

Melvin Alfred Bonamy, 61

AD a resident of Baillou Hill Road, Golden Gates
) 1, and formally of Arthur's Town Cat Island
will be held 11am Saturday, February 21st
2009 at St Gregory's Anglican Church,
Carmichael Road. Officiating will be Rev
Fr Stephen Davies and Canon Warren Rolle.
Interment will be made in the Lakeview
Memorial Gardens, John F Kennedy and
Gladstone Roads.
Left with cherish his memories are his wife,
Melvina Bonamy (nee Miller); children,
Kerry, Clover, Kaylene, Candida, Melvin Jr,
Inga, Kendra, Macio, Spencer and Lynden;
grandchildren, Krysten, Haydn, Amare,
Spendrica, Lashanda, Nicole, Nathaniel,
Kenrise, Wefly Jr., Wefnique, Kenron, Keiano
SONS-IN-LAW, Hensel Kemp Jr., Pastor Wefty Ferguson Sr,.
SIBLINGS, Prince, Bernard, Eugene, Estelle, Delrona, Ann, Veronica.
UNCLE, Elsworth Munnings
NIECES AND NEPHEWS, Antoinette, Gilliane, Patrice, Daria, Isadora,
Ebony, Shirley, Daphne, Lauria, Nicole, Zanda, Sharon, Deborah, Irene,
Wendy, Agatha, Patricia, Jennifer, Edward, Gaetano, Wayne, Gregory,
Steve, Keith, John Jr., Dwight, Ricardo, Bernard Jr., Lynden, Jason, Quinton,
Bernard, Melvin, Shawn, John, Ashley.
IN-LAWS, Carol, Shirley, Ena Bonamy, John Robinson. Ethel Miller &
Family, Joyce Miller & Family, Betty & Daniel Reckly & family, Harold
& Saralee Miller, Kay & Stanley Forbes & Family, Donna Miller & Family,
Faydora Miller & Family, Ida Miller and family
GOD DAUGHTER, Philippa Bain
EXTENDED FAMILY, Shirley Ambrose & Family, Edgar & Natalie
Bonamy & Family, Vernitta Curry & Family, Karen Bonamy & Family,
Effiemae Bonamy, Victoria Saunders & Family, Maxwell Newbold &
Family, Macelene Larramore & Family, Edmund Stubbs, Jerome King
(USA), Margaret, Doreen Campbell & Family, Arabella Tynes, Rosamae
McIntosh & Family, Canon Warren Rolle & Family, Mary & Tom Basden
& Family, Rose Huyler & Family, the Munnings, Campbells, Millers,
Smith, Pratt, Webb, Armbristers, Russells, Thompsons, Rolle, Culmer,
Seymour, Dean and the entire Bonamy families.
GOOD BUDDIES, Father Stephen Davies, Anthony Farrah, Javen Dean,
Jack Thompson, Norman Fox (England), Bennet Seymour, Ornan Johnson,
James Dean, Henry Bain, McDonald & Judy Rolle, Eddie Rolle, Collin
Francis, Rev. Zephaniah Newbold, Roderick Coakley, Felix Russell, Cecile
Stuart, Jean Culmer, Tiger Rose, Paul & Willamae Pratt, Richard Ferguson,
Dicky Boy, Levi Webb, Charlie & Sammie Miller
OTHER RELATIVES AND FRIENDS, Prince Hall Grand Lodge, Dr.
Evanette & McPhee and the McPhee family, The Bahamas Teacher's
College class of 1972, the communities of Arthur's Town, Cat Island,
Cooper's Town, Abaco, Governor's Harbour, Eleuthera, Mangrove Cay,
Andros. The staff at the Department of Public Service, Nurse Yvonne
Symonette, Nurse Claudia Seymour, Troy and Mark Gardiner, Canon Neil
Roach, Fr. Delano Archer, Cat Island Old Scholars Association.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road & First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m. and
at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m to service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Codar Crest fmeral Home

DIGNITY IN SERVICE
Robinson Road and First Street ¢ P.O.Box N-603 ¢ Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
Telephone: 1-242-325-5168/328-1944/393-1352

Funeral Service For
Harold Gardiner, 48

a resident of Barc, North Andros and
formally of Governors Harbour Eleuthera,
will be held 11 :OOa.m. Saturday,
February 21st , 2009 at St Michaels
Methodist Church, Churchill Avenue Boyd
Subdivision, Officiating will be the Rev
William "Bill" Higgs, assisted by other
Ministers, Cremation will follow the
service.

Fond and loving memories will forever
linger in the hearts of his mother Louella
Prescod, father Nelson Sands, 15 children
Ericka, Anya, Nadia, Rashad, Tia,
Devante, Tiffany, Darron, Dario, Dekita,
Louella, Densel, Nathan, Naquel and
Lanique, 3 adopted children Prince and Clint Mackey and Kevin Smith,
10 Grandchildren, his siblings Sonja Gardiner, Don Conover, Joann and
Dwight Cambridge, Emeline and Morine, Prescod, Dora and John Stephens,
Gregory and Denise Prescod, Darold Sands and Scorpio Evans, adopted
mother Janet Gierzewski, his Aunts and Uncles Edgar and Doreen Gardiner,
Millard Gardiner, Patrick and Viola Gardiner, Genet Brown, James and
Mildred Thompson, Mavis Johnson, Joseph and Freda Deal, Mabel Gibson,
Lilymae Maycock and Margueritte Trotman, 21 nephews David, Andrey,
Evan, Carl and Romeo Gardiner, Rana and Mc Arthur Charlton, Donardo,
Harrison and Darold Sands Jr, Sylvester Prescod, Jammal Scavella,
Christopher Darling, Akeem Thompson, Carlos and DJ Conover, Elrick
Rolle, Jafari Stephens, Zephaniah Cambridge, Leonard Taylor and Lavaldo
Fernander, 21 nieces Alexis Fernander, Catrina, Gabriella and Courtney
Prescod, Nickita Taylor, Ashara, Zena and Jamila Stephens, Adaphiline
and Logan Scavella, Rachea Conover, Janesta, Celina, Rhonda, Shonta,
Darelle, Kyla and Zaniah Sands, Hariett, Sydnease and Maria Gardiner,
Special family and friends including Nicky Lafleur, Hon Vincent Peet,
Ephriam and Alice Lafleur, Irene and Wayne Cleare, John Tony, Betsy
Woodside, Earl and Alice Lafleur, Roshell Lafleur, Pastor Minerva Pratt,
Genieve Mackey and Olive Lafleur, numerous other relatives and friends
including Agnes Bethel & family, Emily Petty & family, Gierzewshi
family, John, Peter and James Sands & family, David McKlewhite &
family, Viona Smith & family, Deidre Prescott & family, Phil, Greg,
Pinkie and Anishka Maycock, Beryl McDonald & family, Butch, Pritchard,
Derek, Brian, Paula, Hank, Michael and Jackie Johnson, Naomi Taylor,
Garnell Knowles, Oswald, Chuckie, Karen, Carlton, Juan, Gertrude, Janet
and Lisa Gardiner, Gaye Johnson, Toni, Ricky, Phyllis, Kenroy, Bradley
and Thelsene Thompson, Madeline Dean, Valencia Curtis, Eric and Emily
Russell, Arlington Johnson & family, Cynthia McKinney, McIntosh, Pratt,
Mackey and Lafleur families of North Andros, Bennett Knowles & family,
Fredrick Rolle & family, Arthur and Richard Rolle & family, the family
of the late Freda Burrows, Y.E.A.S. T., North Andros and the communities
of Governors Harbour and Barc North Andros, Thomas, Oniel, Carl,
Tiffaney, and Marsha Gibson, Ann Simmons, Althea Gibson and others
too numerous to mention.

In Lieu of floral contributions donations may be sent to St Michaels
Methodist Church, c/o P.O.Box N1484, Nassau Bahamas, In memory of
Harold Gardiner.

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Cedar Crest Funeral Home,
Robinson Road and First Street on Friday from 12:00 noon to 6:00p.m.
and at the church on Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to service time.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7

Yager Lmeral Home (Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

MEMORIAL SERVICE FOR

LaVaughn
Fernando Kristain
Munroe, 27

a resident of #45 Fortune Bay
Inlet, Fortune Village Freeport,
will be held on Saturday, February
21, 2009 at 10:00 a.m. at The
Church of the Good Shepherd,
Pinder’s Point, Grand Bahama.
Officiating will be Rev’d Father
Curtis Robinson and Cremation
will follow.

A Pre-Service will be held at the church from 9:00 a.m. until
10:00 a.m.

He is survived by: parents: Patrick and Lonna Munroe; brothers:
Patrick (Bjorn) and Parysh Munroe; grandmother: Joyce
Taylor; nine uncles: Daniel (Dennis) and Angela Taylor and
children - Daniel Jr., Amier, Adrian and Denise, Angeles,
Ameri, Terron and Adrian Taylor; Lester and Gena Taylor and
their children - Tami Tynes-Ross, Lesley, Lester, Kelly and
Lamar Taylor, Kadesha Culmer, Melissa Jones, Aaron and
Keenah Ross; John and Janet Taylor and their children - John
and Omar; Edward and Norma Taylor and their children -
Norvette, Edward and Nopiel and grandson Edward II; Alfine
Wallace and his children - Ryan , Courtney and Christian
Wallace; Jerome and Portia Wallace and son - Trell Wallace;
Derek Munroe; Norman Munroe; Wendell Munroe; five aunts:
Alma and Donald Griffin and their children - Donald and
Debjahnee Griffin; Barbara Munroe-Cooper and her children
Keriston Cooper and Kenton Mitchell; Joanne and Arnold
Knowles and their children - Samantha and Anthony Rahaming,
Ageria and Jeremy Knowles; Pauline and Llewellyn Ferguson
and their daughter - Shanell Ferguson; Rosemary and Bernal
Bullard; four grand aunts: Elaine Major, Gloria Knowles,
Oraline Butler and Gloria Flowers; two grand uncles: Levon
Moxey and Leonard Knowles and a host of other relatives
and friends.

In lieu of floral arrangements donations may be made to
Munroe’s Tennis Academy, at P.O. Box F-43299,

Relatives and friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
Home and Crematorium Queens Highway on Friday from
12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
from 9:00 a.m. until service time.


PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Yager funeral Home (& Crematorium

Queen’s Highway
P.O. Box F-40288, Freeport, Grand Bahama, Bahamas
Tel: 352-8118 © Paging: 352-6222 #1724
Fax: 351-3301

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CLIFFORD
‘Rolly Polly”
ROLLE, 69

Freetown Cemetery.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife: Idamae Williams ; |

Rolle; two sons: Calvin Rolle and Wendell Stubbs; five :
daughters: Patricia Pratt, Shirleen and Rita Rolle, Royanne :
McIntosh and Dellamae Newton; three sisters: Virginia Rolle, :

ee ee in the Grand Bahama Memorial Park Frobisher Drive.

grandchildren: Calvinique, Bionca and Paige Rolle, Anthony, } . ;
Marquita, Marcel, Sophia Pratt-Smith, James Jr. II, Patrick, ! Cherished ee ale held by two sons: Garin and Kevin
: Burrows; four sisters: Harriet, Andy and Rhona Forbes and

: Consula Williams; nieces: Barbara Jones, Tiffany Lawrence,
Anton, James and Anthony Morrison Jr., Denny McIntosh Jr. i Delores Braynen, Louise Kacw les. Metis Tics... Beatice

- | Pupo, Rosita Forbes, Joycelyn, Jeaniemae and Carol Rigby,
reat srandson: James Pratt Jr. Il; one great granddaughter: : ; :
Summ: Smith; one daughter-in-law: Sande Rolle: ae son- } pes = Bae ae ao aa J ey er a
ra ; es : an ervin Rigby grand nieces: Shaunte and Arne Basden,
in-laws: James Pratt Sr., Denny McIntosh Sr., Minister Anthony Miacle and Star Lawrence, Shantell Betheliand lashan Lowe.

: : : . . : grand nephews: Jan and Lavardo Lowe, Christopher Forbes,
Smith Jr. nieces and nephews include: Mary Carter-Rolle, i Mario, @harles-and @recory Bethel ereat rand nieces.

Annie Stuart, Judymae Harvey, Ilene and Nettie Stubbs and K’Shura Hanna, Charlize and Mariah Bethel; great grand
Claudette Smith and a host of other relatives and friends : 8¢Phew: Tracey Jr; special friends include: Midlean and Peter
including: Gelata Knowles, Mr. and Mrs. Prince Bridgewater, ! Basden, Richard Swann, Charles Lawrence, Loise Jones and

Sister Betty Roberts, Mr. and Mrs. Jefford Kemp, Mr. and Lavrence: Richard Swanni(Dick): Ica Bain, Hadley Borbes.

‘ Nellie Robinson, Vicky Bain, Muriel Smith, Olga Garland
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Russell, Mr. and Mrs. McDonald ! 3 - ae Dy ee 3
Cooper, Pleasant Bridgewater, Pastor Delton Russell, Rev. : Cherrybelle Forbes, Anita Missick, Cornelius Williams and
Preston Co oper Jr. Reginald Smith Mr and Mrs. Areal | Daphne Hamilton and a host of other relatives and friends.

Newman, Queenie Mader, Jenny Carey, Olease Cooper, Mr. Relati araead fies Heat F |
Wasington Smith, Minister Fredrick Carey, Aliceson McBride, } ae d a G oe By Dey. street ae rad ay
Mr. John Rolle, Rodrick Thomas, Rev. John C. Wallace, : I ae Eaten a — gu i Ht ee ae
Gordon Rolle, Officers and Members of High Rock Church : .°° 16. uot 4 Pos Cae ale eau ee Oi Satureay
of God and the Communities of Holmes Rock and East End } OM *1-2Â¥ a.m. eA

John, Gabriel, Christina Pratt, Santeria Stubbs, Anthonique,

Chantavia and Anthonice Newton and Valencia Johnson; one

Morrison Sr., and Quincy Newton; grandson-in-law: Harry

Hubert Jr., James, Richard, Myrtis and Anaiska Williams,

Mrs. Remo Bridgewater, Mr. and Mrs. Lesco Pennerman,

! Grand Bahama.

‘ Relatives and Friends may pay their respects at Yager Funeral
: Home & Crematorium, Queens Highway, Freeport on Friday
: from 12:00 noon until 6:00 p.m. and at the church on Saturday
‘ from 11:30 a.m. until service time.

a resident of Bevans Town, Grand }
Bahama and formerly Holmes Rock, :
Grand Bahama will be held on :
Saturday, February 21, 2009 at 1:00 :
p.m. at New Zion Baptist Church, :
Freetown Grand Bahama. :
Officiating will be Pastor Delton Russell, assisted by Rev. }
Preston Cooper Jr. and interment will follow in the }

CARRIE LOUISE
JOHNSON, 54

a resident of #37 Edgar Place,
Freeport and formerly of Middle
Caicos, Turks Island will be held
on Saturday, February 21, 2009 at
1:00 p.m. at St. Paul’s Methodist
| Church, East Sunrise Highway and
Beachway Drive, Freeport.
Officiating will be Rev. Theophilus
N. Rolle and interment will follow

Stacey Davis; cousins: Minna Outten-Winters, Charles


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

f
i, #

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9

©) Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

A MEMORIAL SERVICE
FOR

ARTHUR LEEMOURN

LAMPHIER MAYCOCK, 73

of #13 Narcissus Avenue, Garden Hills #1 |
and formerly of Duncan Town, Ragged Island |
will be held on Thursday, February 19th, |
7:30 p.m. at Church of God of Prophecy, |
Baillou Hill Road. Bishop Shelton Beneby, |
assisted by other ministers of the gospel will ;

officiate.

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ARTHUR LEEMOURN LAMPHEIR
MAYCOCK, 73

of #13 Narcissus Avenue, Garden Hills #1 and formerly of Duncan Town, |
Ragged Island will be held on Saturday, February 21, 2009, 10:00a.m. at Church |
of God of Prophecy, East Street Tabernacle. Bishop Shelton L. Beneby and |
Bishop Hartman Rolle, assisted by other ministers of the gospel will officiate. |
Interment will follow in Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road. |

Left to cherish his earthly loss and celebrating his heavenly home going are |
Children - Daughters: Euricka Rolle, Christine Heastie & Joy Dean; Sons: |
Minister Arthur Leroy, Herman, Petty Officer (Ret.) RBDF Patrick (Tony), |
Audley, Lynden, Dereo, Lampheir, Richmond & Mark Maycock; Daughters- |
in-law: Judith, Sabrina, Michelle, Carolyn, Lynette, Sheanda, Amoranna & |
Trayetter Maycock; Sons-in-law: Everette Rolle, Franklyn Heastie & Andrew |
Dean; Foster Daughters: Merlene Dames, Delmetta Seymour, Arizona Rolle, |
Erica McKinney & Orion Munroe; Foster Sons: Michael Munroe, Dereck Cox |
& Granville Collie; Sister: Carol Johnson; Brothers: Lawrence & Robert Smith, |
Timothy Pinder; Sisters-in-law: Joanne & Sylvia Smith, Doris Taylor, Laura |
Williams, Hannah Rahming-Grant, Loletha Gaitor, Cynthia Armbrister, Vivian |
Rahming, Linda, Barbara & Pamela Moss; Brothers-in-law: Stafford & Wilfred |
Rahming, Christopher, Bishop Sterling & Basil Moss, Walton Taylor, James |
Williams, Thomas Grant, Wayne Gaitor; Grand Children: Krystle, Katrice, |
Kandice, Karissa, Hermanda, Herman Jr., Hermandell, Alexis, Marine Seaman |
RBDF Patrick & Aniesha Maycock; Lacretia, Latura & Lathel Rolle; Leemourn |
Maycock, Ishmael Bethel; Jamesha, Christa & Christon Heastie; Lynden Favian, |
Lyle, Derean, De'Shanel, Dereal, D.PARCE, Orlando, Lance, Lavant, Richmond |
Jr., Rashad, Rashion, Rashantia & Angel Maycock; Alexa, Joshua & Amber- |
Rose Dean; Marquel, Mark Jr. & Malia Maycock; Other Grand Children: |
Ashanti & Clement Clarke, Jaunita Gardiner, Carlos Dames, Zanovia Ferguson, |
Chantelle Colebrooke, Delano Dames; Delmar, Delray, Darren, Delbert & |
Dalhia Seymour; Tanya Turnquest, Narissa King, Sean & Ryan Munroe; Chavez |
Munroe; Aunts: Jane Adderley & Eloise Armbrister; Uncles: Rev. Matthias |
Munroe, Lamon Maycock, Reuben Stubbs & Leroy Armbrister; Numerous |
Nieces & Nephews including: Jancie & Pastor Stephen Green, Patricia, George |
& Regina Pratt & Pandora Major; Patrice & Nathan Stone (Mississippi), |
Ranford, Nekita, Randy & Tietchka Johnson, Ann Williams, Petra Smith; |
Robert, Racquel, & Ryan Smith; Karen & Latoya Rolle, Shamel Sands, |
Lawrence Sr., Leonice, Inderia, Lashanna & Lashae Smith; Leroy Armbrister; |
Paula, Marie, Dwight, Randy, Stephanie & Richard Rahming; Wilfred Rahming |

Jr.; Judd, Kera, Jenson & Jocklano Williams; Thomas Jr. & Zharroh Grant;
Valencia, Vernita & Valentino Moss; Christopher Jr., Deangelo, Nicara, Lynden,
Kevin, Joy, Candia, Keyshawn, Alicia, Latrell, Brittany & Mya Moss; Matthew
& Wayne Gaitor, Myrtle Stubbs, Sharon Farrington, Rosalee Dean, Genesta
Bethel, Bridgette Armbrister; God Children: Kosygen Forbes, Jacob Culmer,
Charmaine Munroe, Anastacia Fearon, Lashanda McNiel; Other Relatives and
Friends including: Marina Smith, Oraline Maycock, Edwin Wallace, Patrick,
Fritzgerald & Clement Maycock, Maryjane Moxey, Marjorie Wallace, Savaleta
Lockhart, Clorita Wilson, Verdell Ferguson, Errol Munroe, Bishop Cephas &
Clothilda Ferguson & Family, Willamae, Roland & Harold Bridgewater, Creswal
Wilson, Karen Bell, Herman Munroe, Verdue Maycock, Francina Thurston,
Edmond Moxey, Eliza Wallace, James Lockhart, Louise Curling, Eugene
Wallace, Demison Nesbitt, Descendents of Marion Johnson, Mable Bogis,
Emma Munnings, Seva Dillet, Emily Greenwich, Charlotte Moss, Berdina
Taylor, Conrad Maycock, Cephas Maycock, Annamaria Smith, Vernelle Carey,
Patricia Fountain, Sonjia Roberts, Vernal Brian Adderley, Coralee Pratt-Odoms,
Vernelle Davis, Ronald & Edward Pratt; Adena, Vanessa, Christine, Oscar,
Pastor Myles & Garth Munroe, Elva Moxey, Cyril Joffre, Advara Higgs, Frankie
Thompson, Deloris Moxey, Ada Munroe, Inez Williams, Loomine Wilson,
Bernard Wilson, Harriet Munroe, Sarah Bridgewater, Maurice Wallace, Frederick
Wallace, Mildred Wallace, Lorna Major, Margo, Anne, Calvin Wallace, Cecil,
Perry Wallace, Beryl Mortimer, D'Glanville Panza, Evelyn, Verva Wallace,
Clyde, Cora Hepburn, Anthony Hepburn, Sonia Johnson, Camille Johnson,
Kirk, Ernie Wallace, Christina Ellis, Anna-Rosa Hepburn, Emmette, Oscar,
Juanita, Bertie & Angela Munroe; Descendents of Lorenzo & Robert Hepburn,
Ragged Island Nurse Pauline Maycock, Sheila Curling, Florinda Hepburn,
Leanda “Big Mama” Maycock, Bishop Solomon & Patricia Humes & Family,
Pastor Bishop Shelton & Shelly Beneby & The Entire Baillou Hill Road
Community Church of God of Prophecy, Mother Eulease Dames & Family,
Minister Denver Dames, Eulease Munroe, Sheila Seymour, Letisha Clarke,
Cardinal & Minerva Edwards, Clifford, Ruben, Patsy, Gregory, Dorman, &
Debra Stubbs, Kishka Rolle, Areta Bastian, Shannie Victor, Bishop Samuel &
Shirley Greene, Bishop John & Prophetess Jeaniemae Humes, Myrtle Deveaux
& Family, Steven & Carmen Hepburn, Bishop Arthur & Ivamae Ferguson,
Bishop Hartman & Cynthia Rolle & Family, Ruby Hepburn, Ralph & Doroth
Rolle, Felix & Thelma Beneby, Pandora & Dr. Shequel Pearce, Virginia Butler,
Hollan & Elsie Dean, Edward Heastie Dolly Pinder, Heskic Dean, Queen Vealca
Dean (Freeport, Grand Bahama), Beatrice Heastic, Stafford Dorsette & Family,
Prince & Princess Brown, Bishop Brice Thompson & Family, Bishop Elgarnet
Rahming & Family, Victoria Beneby & Family, Helen Alleyne & Family, Bishop
Anthony Roker & Family, Katherine Demeritte, Emery & Sharon Symonette,
Wilfred & Gloria Douglas & Family, The Simmons Family, Adam Munroe,
Ruth Rahming, Huria & Cynthia Ferguson, Buford & Shelly Curtis, Dorlan &
Kaylisa Curtis, Miriam & The Entire Curtis Family, Alvin & Jacqueline Rolle,
Dorothy Roach, Minister Romeo & Beatrice Ferguson, Dorothy Bastian, The
Coconut Grove, Garden Hills, Sunlight Village, Ragged Island & Cat Island
Communities, Road Traffic Department, Straw Vendors, Progressive Liberal
Party, Taxi Union Staff, Dr. Channa Jagadeesh, Dr. Glen Beneby, Dr. Valentine
Grimes IT, Dr. Beverton Moxey, Veronica Owens (former Member of Parliament),
Hon. Brensil Rolle MP (Garden Hills Constituency), & The Entire Church of
God of Prophecy Family.

Friends may pay their last respects at the Church of God of Prophecy, Baillou
Hill Road (located opposite the National Insurance Board), on Friday from
10am to Spm and on Saturday at the Church from 9am until service time.

The Family requests that in lieu of flowers please make donations to: Big
Harvest Community Sunday School, P.O. Box N-3571, Tel 341-0665. Building
Fund: RBC Prince Charles Account - #126-297-1.


PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MARRIETH
ROLLE, 83

of Nicholl's Town, Andros will be held |
on Saturday, February 21st, 10am at St. |
Margaret's Anglican Church, Nicholl's |
Town, Andros. Fr. Chazz Turnquest, |
assisted by Fr. Roland Hamilton, Fr. |
Crosley Walkine and Canon John Clarke |
will officiate. Interment will follow in |
Nicholl's Town Public Cemetery, |

Nicholl's Town, Andros.

Marrieth will be sadly missed by her loving husband, John Rolle; |
sons, Bartholomew Bowleg, Kirk, Clyde, Ben and Loftus Rolle;
daughters, Meryl Mackey, Dorothy Coleby, Tracy and Loren Rolle; |
adopted daughters, Clara Evans, Bassiemae Storr and Natheria Pratt;
grandchildren, Donald and Neville Evans, Christopher, Andrea and ;
Faye Oliver, Van and Latoya Mackey, Anthres, Bentley, Christopher |
Maurice, Javon, Shekera, Kranze and Kassy Bowleg, Desmond,
Stacy, Tovar and Indira Coleby, Baxter, Marcus, Jeremy, Gabrielle, |
Arielle, Donavon, Bernard, Clyde Jr., Davano, Antonio, Lavonnia
and Latonya Rolle, Anthranique Mather, Jacquon Rolle and Dominick |
Evans, Dr. Gertrude Holder, Thalia Conyers, Kedra, Latoya, Jessica |
and Kessie Storr; great grandchildren, Cameron, Phillippa, Deandrea,
and Zion Evans, Rashad Clyde, Sarah, Sheena, Rashea, Ragine, Colin |
Jr., Aailiah, Christopher Jr., India and Joel Oliver, Ashley, Vanneisha
and Veronique Mackey, Lavardo, Latoya, Lathario and Leah Coleby ;
and Kai Rolle; grand daughters-in-law, Elizabeth and Marie Evans, |
Angelique and Latoya Oliver, Roslyn and Joanne Coleby and Caroline |
Mackey, Krista Rolle; sons-in-law, Clayton Mackey and Herman |
Coleby; brothers, Bernard Evans Sr. and Yurick Evans Sr.; sisters-
in-law, Ruth, Gloria and Merlene Evans, Albertha Dames and Madge ;
Rolle; brothers-in-law, Boisie Rolle and Reginald Dames; aunt, Rita |
Evans; twenty seven nephews including, Earl and Peter Russell, |
Yorrick Jr., Bernard Jr., Wendell, Michael, Kenny, Dale, Lorenzo, |
Milton, Lionel and Ivan Evans, James, Edward and Joseph Wallace,
Alvin and Lawrence Paul, Othneil, Rondel, Dewitt and Daxon Dames, |
Benjamin Rahming, Milton Evans, Alfred Evans, Carole and Edwin |
Lightbourn, Kendrick Selvin, Basil Rolle; thirty six nieces, Diane,
Lorraine, Paulette, Sally, Constance, Mae, Ruby and Darnell Evans, |
Valarie Basden, Yvonne Bannister, Kim Dean, Iris Russell, Judy
Rahming, Anne Lightbourn, Ida Ramsey, Ruthnell Jeannimae Dames, |
Luenna Dawkings, Marion Evans, Martha Evans, Sybline Evans, |
Carol Dames Smith, Michelle, Monique and Delores Rolle; other
relatives and friends include, ASP Nigel Clarke, Samuel and Muriel |
Storr and family, Charles Bowleg and family, Rosa Wilson and family, |
Alphonso Smith and family, Daisy and Michelle Bowleg, Bertram '

Murphy and family, Julia Davis and family, Sheila Rolle and family,
Granville Coleby and family, Monica Evans and family, Blossom,
Branhilda and Norma Hutchinson, Barbara Sweeting and family,
Vanria Rahming and family, Aramentha Saunders and family, Marjorie
Russell and family, Menesha Simms and family, Helen Lord and
family, the Pickstock family, the Pratt family, the staff and students
of Nicholl's Town Primary School, St. Margaret's Anglican Church
family, the staff of Doctors Hospital ICU, staff of Femal Surgical
Ward Princess Margaret Hospital, Hon. Vincent Peet (M.P. North
Andros, Berry Island), Rosalie Minus and family, Dale Davis and
family, Naomi Brown, Eddie Francis and family, Franeise Johnson
and family, Natasha Evans and family, Dorothy Walkes and family,
Charmaine King and Wendy Bullard, Angela McDonald and family,
Nicole Evans, Nedra Carey and a host of other relatives and friends
too numerous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Thursday from 11am to 5pm and on Friday at
St. Margaret's Anglican Church, Nicholl's Town, Andros from 1pm
to 12 midnight and on Saturday from 9am until service time.

DANIEL LUTHER
NAIRN "Doc", 88

of Jasmine Drive, High Vista and
formerly of Mangrove Cay, Andros will
be held on Saturday, February 21st,
10am at St. Francis Xavier Cathedral,
West Hill Street. Fr. Glen Nixon will
officiate. Interment will follow in St.
Joseph's Cemetery, Boyd Road.

Dan "Doc" as he was fondly known is
survived by a host of relatives and friends including his wife: Ruth
Jones-Nairn; daughters: Loretta Nairn-Francisco, Permal Nairn-
Schimpf and Cherol Nairn-Johnson; son: Perry Nairn; grandchildren:
Henry Dummett Jr., Charmaine Dummett-Coleby, Sean Darrell,
Prince McPhee, Patrice Knowles, Altrese Schimpf, Steaman, Linksley,
Carola and Oprah; brothers: Gerald Pennerman and Noral Pennerman
of Mangrove Cay, Andros; sisters: Ismae Nairn and Halston; numerous
great grandchildren, nieces, nephews and cousins and a host of other
relatives and friends.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
#44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at
the church from 9am until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 11

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

ELLA LOUISE
LARIMORE
MISSICK, 96

of McKinney Drive off Carmichael |
Road, will be held on Saturday, |
February 21st, lpm at Holy Family |
Catholic Church, Robinson and :
Claridge Roads. Rev. Fr. Kendrick J.
; ry Forbes, assisted by Deacon Andrew |
Burrows will officiate. Interment will :

follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.

Precious memories will forever linger in the hearts of her |
daughters, Ednamae Dean and Eloise Moncur; ten(10) grand :
children: Cynthia Washington of Virginia, Deborah Dupuch |
(Lewis), Jennifer Bodie (Duke Sr.) Lona Thompson (Brando |
Sr.) Charles Dupuch, Allan Dean (Josephine), Mark Dean, |
Arlette; Morley (Steven I), Jeffrey Moncur (Sherrell) and Julian :
Moncur; twenty-six (26) great -grandchildren: Ryan Fisher, |
Shawn Thompson, Karen Bastian, Raquel Crumblin, Anitrah |
Rolle, Alexandria Thompson, Duke Bodie Jr., Medwick IIT & |
Kenricka Rolle, Shanique Dupuch, Dominique Bodie, Louann |
Thompson, Brando Thompson, Jr. Loonise Thompson, Eric |
Henry Thompson, |
Champayne Bodie, Jade Moncur, Jalen Moncur, Lolita |
Thompson, Camile & Bridgette Dupuch, Charles Dupuch Jr., |
Steven II & Azzarria Morley; six(6) great-great grandchildren: |
Katorie, Mya, Melick, Jahkai, Medwick III, and Karen Jr.; two(2) |
nieces: Dorothy Thompson and Mary Meadows;three (3) :
nephews: Anthony, Ortnell and Fredrick Saunders; One (I) Son- |
in-Law David Dean;one (1) sister-in-law, Olga Rigby. Other |
relatives including: Tom and Mary Basden & family, Leroy and |
Rose Huyler & family, Lois Bethel & Family, Lolomae Rolle |
& family, Lillith Womack & Family, Christine Anderson & |
family, Deborah Major, Ken Rolle, Charlene Sturrup and family, :
Marie Davis & family, Eloise Huyler & family, Blaise Taylor |
& family, Tony Farah, Doris Farah & family; friends including: |
Robert Elliott & family, Herbert Styles & family, Joseph & |
Emily Glass & family, Bentley & Peggy Hall & family, Boston |
& Patsy Morley, Pastor Shameka Morley, Michael & Cindy |
Smith, Sandy & Mikita Morly, Officers & Members of Anointed |
to Reign Kingdom Ministries staff, Bahamas Telecommunications |
Company and many friends and loved ones too numerous to |

Washington Jr., Lewis Thompson Jr.,

mention.

She was predeceased by her husband, a daughter, five
grandchildren and two sons-in-Iaw.

( Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians,
| #44 Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday

from 10am to 11am and at the church from 11:30am until service

EDWARD HENRY
STORR, 62

of St. Alban’s Drive and formerly of

| Arthur's Town, Cat Island and

| Freeport, Grand Bahama will be held

} on Monday, February 23rd, 3pm at

St. Christopher's Anglican Church,

~| Lyford Cay. Archdeacon Keith
} Cartwright will officiate.

He is survived by his wife, Michaela;
son, Virgil Henry; daughter-in-law, Nona; devoted niece,
Cherrylee; sisters and brothers, Clifford, Miriam, Stafford,
Phillip, Bernice, Brenda, Marjorie and Margaret and a large
extended family of Storrs and Virgills including sisters-in-law,
Marcia, Myra, Margot, Myrna, Michelle Linda, Maltina and
Florence; brothers-in-law, Franklyn Winder, Ronald Storr and
Osborne Pintard Sr.; nieces, Dominique Storr, Georgia Taylor,
Shennen Braynen, Bernadette Storr, Patrice Ramsey, Tanya
Pintard, Nicola Virgill Rolle, Janis Cox, Christina Lundy and
Megan Virgill; nephews, Clifford, Christian, Martin, Stephen,
Marcus, Bernard, Dion, Rhett, Jose Storr, Timothy Cooper,
Franklyn, Ian and Edward Winder, Spence Ramsey, Osborne
Pintard Jr., Charles Wesley Virgill II, Graham Michael Wilson,
Craig Michael Lundy and James Scott Virgill and the Pratt,
Miller and Darrell families.

The family wishes especially to thank Drs. Nicolas Hepburn,
Delton Farquharson, Duane Sands, Paul Ramphal and Ronald
Knowles, Archdeacon Keith Cartwright, Fr. Peter Scott and the
family of St. Christopher's Church for their kind assistance and
support during Eddie's short but traggic illness.

In lieu of flowers donations can be made to: The Cancer Society
of The Bahamas, East Terrace Centreville, P.O. Box SS-6539,
Nassau, N.P., Bahamas.


PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Bethel Brothers Morticians

\
\te Ab
Sore
ay, —

a

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030

Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026
FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

JOHNNY
HIGGINS, 54

of Quarry Mission and formerly of Meeting |
Street will be held on Saturday, February |
21st, 2pm at St. John's Native Baptist |
Cathedral, Meeting Street. Rev. Dr. Michael |
C. Symonette and Rev. Dr. Hervis L. Bain ;
Jr. will officiate. Interment will follow in |
Woodlawn Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are his wife, |

Angela Higgins; his mother, Ethel Stuart; |
three brothers, Sidney Higgins, James Dean and Eric Stuart; two sisters, |
Bettymae and Leonamae Dean; one aunt, Inet Stuart; one uncle, Floyd ;
Jones; his stepchildren, Tshia Brightly, Komoa and Rick Bennett, Omoro |
Douse, Jerome and Donald Adderley; one adopted grandson, Kevon Nelson, ;
six nephews, Eric, Derek and Taquan Stuart, Shawn Higgins, Nathan and :
James Dean Jr.; five nieces, Janet, Judy and Jarvia Dean, Shadia Stuart, |
and Lashante Higgins; two sisters-in-law, Suzette Dean and Suelyn Higgins; |
one godchild, Miguel Cooper; other relatives and friends including, Jeffrey |
Nottage and family, Ervin Lightbourne, Patricia Whylly, Sherry Kemp and |
family, Shirley Bryan, Monica Ferguson, Gelita Hall, Cecile Dean, Beverly |
Adderely, Diane Dean, Yvette Saunders Hall, Cecelia Albert and family, |
Louise Tinker, Elaine Kemp Wells, John Marche, Patrick Russell, Edward |
Outten (Toya), Jeffrey Arthur, Caralee Rolle-Major, Arthur Maycock, Paul
Tynes, Kevin Lockhart, Dario Wood, Stanville Thompson, the Quarry |
Mission Road family, the Linden's, Minnis, Fowlers, Bethels, McKinney's, |
The Bahamas Electricity Corporation and the former Meeting Street families. |

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44 |
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday from 10am |
to 12 noon and at the church from 12:30pm until service time. |

ROWENA "Beulah"
CONLIFFE
ARCHER, 104

of #68 Falcon Cres, Eastern Estates and |
formerly of Gregory Town, Eleuthera, will |
be held on Saturday, February 21st, 11am |
at Holy Spirit Anglican Church, Howard ;
Street, Chippingham. Fr. Harry W. Ward |
and Canon Delano Archer will officiate. |
Interment will follow in Woodlawn |
Memorial Gardens, Soldier Road. |

She is survived by one son, Noel Conliffe; one daughter, Althea Conliffe; |
grandchildren, Earnest, Anthony, William and Ricardo Thompson, Brian

and Van Hall, Vincent Minus, Glen, Talbot and Marsha Lightbourn, Carol
Pinder, Pamela Hall, Valencia and Noella Conliffe; nieces and nephews,
Cynthia Musgrove, Dr. Vernell Allen, Floridell Adderley, Pauline Allen-
Dean, Michael Allen, Algernon S.P.B. Allen Sr., Patsy Major, Audrey Dean,
Betty Barnett, Allen and Stafford Major, and a host of other relatives and
friends including, the Turnquest family, the Johnson family and the
Williamson family.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Friday from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday from 10am
until service time.

SHARRON ROSSETTA
SCOTT, 42

of Johnson Road will be held on Friday,
February 20th, llam at St. George's
Anglican Church, Montrose Avenue. Rev.
Fr. Kingsley Knowles, assisted by Fr.
Kirkland Russell will officiate. Interment
will follow in the Western Cemetery, Nassau
Street.

She will be sadly missed by her family:

sisters, Carolyn Scott Azikiwe, Hazel Scott

Taylor; brothers, Herbert Scott Jr., Harold
Scott, Ernest Scott; sisters-in-law, Lillian Scott, Melena Scott; nieces, Dr.
Nneka Azikiwe Holder, (Ohio USA) Dr. Ndidi Azikiwe Manuel North
Carolina (USA), Tishka and Krista Scott, D'sya Scott; nephews, Devon
Scott, Scott Terrell Taylor, Harold Taylor Jr., Trumaine, Taylor, Amaechi
Azikiwe, Devonte Scott; nephews-in-law, Dr. Michael Holder and Shane
Manuel; niece-in-law, Noel Nottage Scott; grand nephews, Christian Seth
Scott, Michael Holder Jr., Sean Azikiwe Manuel; grand niece, Chiara Devi
Scott; a host of relatives and friends including, Naomi Brown and family,
Catherine "Eddie" Francis and fanily, James Johnson and family, Subleecka
Thompson and family, Wenzel Lightbourne and family, Julia Davis and
family, Ophelia Fox and family, Clara Evans, Dr. Gertrude Holder and
family, Maculisher Beach and family, Donald Scott and family (Ft. Pierce,
Florida); Rhoda Hanna and family, Crystal Murray, Jalna and Barbara
Bullard, Shirley Taylor, Catherine Cate, Jeremiah Johnson and family,
Arthur Johnson and family and the Johnson Road family; special thanks
to: Kianté Stuart, Carol Thompson, Peggy Coakley, Nathalie Brooks and
family, Patrice Higgs, Ms. Munroe, Lana Deal and family, Patricia Cartwright,
Blovena Mackey, Ms. Gaitor, Chrysler Taylor, Shelly Johnson, Jackie
Rahming, Gladys Roberts and family, Gloria Sweeting, Renamae Roberts,
Dianne Kemp, Mother Symonette, Pastor Yvonne and Wendell Cornish,
Pastor Trecor Stubbs, Pastor Bodie, Pastor Campbell, Pastor Adline Jones,
Linda Williams. A team of doctors and nurses from the Trauma Room and
the Female Medical Ward of the Princess Margaret Hospital.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel Brothers Morticians, #44
Nassau Street on Thursday from 10am to Spm and on Friday at the church
from 10am until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 13

NEWBOLD BROTHERS
CHAPEL

#10 Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street

PO. Box N-3572, Nassau, Bahamas
Tel: (242) 326-5773

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Ira John Dwight
Smith, 46

of Ameryllis Avenue, Garden
Hills #1 and formerly of Orange

Gardens & Mausoleums, John F. Kennedy Drive.

Cherishing Ira's memories are those who loved him dearly: His }
devoted mother: Sarahmae Smith; siblings: Keith Smith, Anthony :
Stuart, Paige Smith and Matilda McPhee; nephews: Renaldo Smith, :
Travis Stuart and Garvin Robinson; nieces: Sarahnecia McPhee, !
Robynique Maynard and Nakeitha Robinson; adopted brother: |
Norman Humes; aunts and uncles: Kathleen (Ethelyn) and Hayward :
Dorsette, Miriam Seymour, Emeline and James Lockhart, Eulean :!
and Nathaniel Green, Henry and Gertrude Seymour, Roland Seymour, !
Albeana Seymour, Alfred and Joanna Johnson, Laura Smith, Herbert
: and Steven Stubbs; sister: Evelyn Ellis; brothers: Jacob and Steven
‘ Campbell; two daughters-in-law: Horice Stubbs and Sheila Stubbs;
: three sons-in-law: Bishop Michael Ferguson Sr., Patrick Moncur
and Arthur Major; five sisters-in-law: Mary Wells, Thelma, Janine
: and Martha Campbell, Christine Delancy; one brother-in-law:
: Joseph Campbell; eighteen grandchildren: Lathera and Lakera
‘ Major, Michael Jr., Alexcio Marcellus, Trevantae Ferguson, Kenneth,
‘ Petra and Javon Moncur, Myra Stubbs, Devon Rox, Renaldo and
‘ Renique Stubbs, Jonathon, Karice Damallie, Jayden and Jarron
: Stubbs; three great-grandchildren: Anthonique Gilbert, Tre’ Taylor
: and Devon Rox Jr.; one aunt: Maud Clarke; two uncles: Emmanuel
‘ Campbell and Lambert Ferguson; fifteen nieces: Donna, Mary,

Johnson and Lucine Stubbs; grand aunts and uncles: Arabella
Stubbs, Carnal and Fanny Seymour, Everette and Newtie Seymour,
Eula Mae Hepburn, Deaconess Doris Collie and Delores Seymour,
James Stubbs, McNeil Newbold and Lily Stubbs; sister-in-law:
Thelma Smith; godparents: Lawrence Hepburn, Ruby Cambridge
and Althamese Carey; cousins: Shirley and Nelson, Clarice, Emerick
and Deann, Floyd and Cheryl, Louise, Denise, Dahlia, Stacy, Tisa,
Tamica, Darial, Dennis, Davanti, Jayshree, Shekera and Arjohwa
Johnson, Louise, Sandra, Michael, Daniel and Rebecca Newbold,
Clifford and Cheryl, Dave, Mitzi, Pedro, Sheniquia, Evangelist
Charlene Duncombe, Sharon Williams, Shantel Charles, Ethelyn,
Christine, Agnes, Carla, Peggy Newbold and Shenique Watkins;

relatives and friends including: Glenn and Margaret Seymour and }
: Bridgette, Calsada, Venecia and Manecia; twelve nephews: Pastor
‘ Dean Wells Jr., Apostle Raymond Wells, Edward, Sammy, Joey,
‘ Obert, Floyd, Ashwood, Shawn, Kendo, Tristan and Deneko.
Brooks, Iva Bain, Alex Farrington, Sam Carter, Kevin McPhee and

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
‘ Chapel, Palmetto Avenue & Acklins Street off Market and East
: Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the
: church from 10:00 a.m. until service time.

family, Evelyn Seymour, William and Joyce McDonald, Rev'd Carl
Campbell, Bennett, Francita, Remelda, Leona, Laura Williams and
the Crew, Annamae Ferguson, Alvin and Sabrina Thurston, Hensley

family, Sarahmae Stubbs and family, Mabel "Gold" Rolle and
family, Rose and Tanya McCartney, Patrick and Constance Bethel,
Mr. & Mrs. Francis Naronha, Sherman and Sharlene Smith, Lois,
Shakera and Shaquille, The Stuart, Stubbs, Newbold, Bonimy, Pratt

: and Duncombe families, the communities of Orange Creek, Cat
: Island, The Greater Bethel Methodist Church family, Nassau Village
: and Garden Hills #1 family and the Parish of Christ The King, New
: Providence.

: Relatives and friends may pay their last respects at Newbold Brothers
: Chapel, Palmetto A venue and Acklins Street off Market & East

Creek, Cat Island will be held on : Streets on Friday from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Saturday at the

Saturday, February 21st, 2009, } church from 9:00 a.m. until service
at 10:00 a.m., at Christ the King :!
Anglican Church, Ridgeland }
Park, West. Officiating will be :
Rev'd. Fr. Rodney Burrows, :
assisted by Rev'd. Fr. Ivan Eldon, :

" %) Deacon Bradley Miller and Rev'd }

EY Carl C. Campbell. Interment
follows in Lakeview Memorial :

Gloria Madeline
Stubbs, 66

of #86 Peardale Road, will be held
on Saturday, February 21st, 2009
at 11:00 a.m., at Pentecostal
Church of Faith in God, Bell Road,
Montell Heights. Officiating will
be Pastor Dean Wells Jr. Interment
follows in Southern Cemetery,
Cowpen & Spikenard Roads.

She is survived by five children:

Patrice Major, Rose Moncur,
Deaconess Terry Ferguson, Howard

Martha, Ruth, Karen, Sally, Terri, Christine, Maria, Crystal, Kera,


PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

will follow.

the state room of Jones Brothers Morticians
from Friday 12noon until 5pm.

He is survived by his wife, Sharlene Knowles, :
step-sons, Tyrek and Thaxter, parents, Olive :
Knowles-Dean and Maurice Knowles:
(deceased), step-father, Ezra Dean, two sisters: :
Rosemary Knowles and Viola Mckinney, one :
brother: Eric Knowles, numerous uncles :
including, Eddie Miller, Sam and Burley :
Knowles and Fred McAlpine, numerous aunts :
including: Elva, Queenie, Gloria, Cora, Louis, :
Thelma and Glenys mother- in-law: Josephine :
Thomas, sisters- in-law, Sharlette Moore and :
Brenda Knowles, brothers-inlaw, Roger :
Murdock, Andrew McKinney and Eugine :
Turnquest, numerous nieces and nephews :

including: Mycka, Deborah, Alexa, Sophia,

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

103 Mt. Royal Ave. & Talbot St.
P.O. Box N-1546

Telephone: 328-4900

Fax: 328-4903 ¢ Cell: 456-9062
Robert D. Cox, Managing Director

: Godfrey, Evette Sands, Monique Thompson,

: Edna and Betty Mills, Wendel and Alington,
of Millers, Long Island :
will be held at St. Georges :
Anglican Church on:
Saturday, February 21st at :
llam, officiating will be |
Fr. Kingsley Knowles, Fr. :
Dr. Hamilton and Bishop :
E. Ferguson cremation :
: Turnquest, Pinder, Deal, and Taylor Families,
: Darren and the Long Island Community.
Viewing will be held in} ©<_ ——___

cousins, Joseph and Robert, Deloris, Winifred,
Clifford, Melissa, Shantel, Deloris, Sam and
Dave Butler, Donahe, Levette, Mac, Glen, Peggy
and Dewitt,- numerous other relatives and friends
including, Washington LaFleur and family,
Barbara Thurston and family, Joe Deal and
family, the Baker, Gardiner, Cooper, Miller,
Knowles, Bridgewater, Adderley, lark, McPhee,

DEATH
ANNOUNCEMENT

Lolitha Virginia Belle, 37

of Franklyn Avenue off
Boyd Road,

she is survived by her two
daughters; Trenice Belle
}and Charleasa Bain,
"| mother; Virginia Evans
| four sisters; Marie Evans,
Edith Evans, Portia
Saunders and Raquel
Curry three brothers;

: Jeremiah Gaitor, Min. Ivan Evans and Mr.
Sherell, Dino, Pedson, Dino Jr., Aldanya, :
Giovanni, Rosy, Mariah, Arlicia, Brennick and :
Barin, Alaigh, Arlington, Wintrop, Ricardo, :
Burley, John, Brian, Lisa and Linda Knowles, :

Theodore Curry and other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements to be announced at a later
date.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES



Saretequ Memorial Funeral Chane!
Harewood Sinclair Higgs L.F.D.
Preddeal Maregheg Merctor
“rel

ee ee eee)
=
aes

CEE saerey aera f ta |
SrrrD rere oreiere |

FUNERAL ANNOUNCEMENT FOR

Leona Lucinda
Kemp Thompson
(Lee), 47

a resident of Deep Creek,
Eleuthera will be held on
Saturday, 21’ February, 2009
at 10:00 am at All Saints
Anglican Church, Joan’s
Height East. Officiating will
be Father James Palacious and
interment will follow in the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen
and Spikenard Roads. Services entrusted to GateWay
Memorial Funeral Chapel, Mount Royal Avenue and
Kenilworth Street.

Left to cherish her memories are One Daughter: Victoria
Anderson, Two Sons: Elroy Kemp and Kevin Anderson,
Two Brothers: Howard Thompson and Ezra Sands, One
sister: Helen Goodman, One Granddaughter: Aaliyah
Kemp, Three Nieces: Vanessa, Shelly and Kendra, Five
Nephews: Jarrod, Howard Jr., Kenhrone, Kareem and
Romel, Three Uncles: Ivan Thompson, Ernest Gibson
and Leonard Thompson, Twenty-eight Cousins: Ronald
Thompson, Kingsley, Jacqueline, Kendal, Rodney,
Garfield, Leonard, Ruth, Vernita, Henrietta, Susanna,
Delphina, Jerry, Irvin, Ian, Dianne, Melvin and Marion
Sweeting, Andrea, Vernardo and Jamal Gibson, Antionette
Gibson-Major, Sheldon, Mickell, Erica, Cecila, Nicholas
and Luke. Two Grandaunts: Merthy Taylor and Thelma
Duncombe, and a Host of other relatives and friends
including: Gloria Anderson and family, Mr. and Mrs.
Oral Pinder and family, Rowena Anderson and family,
Mervin Sweeting and family, The Thompson, Sweeting,
Sands, Goodman, Mckenzie, Cleare, Anderson and
Strachan families, Stencil Anderson, Cyril and Ali
Mckinney, The Staff of Female Medical 1 and 2 and the
entire community of Deep Creek, Eleuthera.

Friends may pay their last respects at GateWay Memorial
Funeral Chapel on Friday, from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
and on Saturday from 9:15 a.m. until service time at the
church.



THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 15

“Rendering the finest in caring and compassionate service
regardless of financial condition.”

7th Terrace, Collins Avenue * (242) 356-2187 *
P.O. Box GT-2679 * Nassau, Bahamas

of Millennium Gardens will be held
on Saturday February 21, 2009 at
2:30pm at Bethel Baptist Church,
Meeting Street. Officiating will
bePastor Timothy Stewart, assisted
by associate Ministers. Interment
will be made in The Church's
Cemetery.

Samuel McFall is survived by his

| wife, Brenda McFall; children

Samuel Jr., Raymond and Ramone

McFall, Shenique Fernander,

Lincoln & Marilyn Gay;

Grandchildren, Mark and Malek

Sawyer, Da'vantae and Sha'vantae Williams, Lincoln Jr. and
Maya Gay; parents, Rev. Pedro & Yvonne McFall, siblings,
Lester & Deborah, Andrew & Phoebe, Melany, Patrick &
Lavette and Jamaine McFall, siblings-in-laws, Sandra
Sweeting, Michael & Sherry, Terrance & Charmaine Sands,
Jeffrey & Marilyn Brown and Jamaro Humes; aunts and uncles,
Maxine Adderley, Doris McFall, Neilor Johnson, John & Mary
Hutchinson, Simeon & Dresslar Brown, Charles Deveaux,
Merley Conyer, Margaret Hanna and Otnell Colebrooke;
nephews and nieces, Ashton, Ciji, Dimitri, Dominic McFall;
close relatives, Aaron & Phyllis, Harold & Patricia, Joanne,
Dan, Creswell & Judith, Helena, Louise, Azeal & Genean,
Nelson & Martha, Eric, Shantillya, Jermico, Arnold, Rudolf,
William, Pedro, Theresa, Camron & Lisa, Linda, Dexter &
Mary, Annamae, Daisymae, Clem & Artis, Bradley & Rosie,
George & Sherese, Rodney, Leroy & Tina, Dwight & Esther,
Kwame David, Tonette, Terez, Tennille, Jatara, Tamica,
Shonna, Michael Jr Macina, Jermaine, Samantha, Raheen,
Perez, Toran, Takia,, Tanicha, Ragen, Jamaro Jr, Don, Melinda
and numerous others; close friends; Nurse Theresa Deal,
Hon Frank Watson, Hon Sidney Collie, Philip Turner, Brad
Smith, John Rolle, Kelly Kemp, David Williams, Freda
Farrington, the Brook’s family, Bethel Baptist Church family,
Department of Road Traffic, Sandilands Food Services, Golden
Gates Constituency, St Joseph’s Church family, Hudson,
Munroe, Thompson, Winders, Virgil, Missics, Pratt, Brown,
Rahming, Symonette and others too numerous to mention.

The body will repose in the Blessed Redeemer Chapel at
Ferguson's Funeral Directors, 7th Terrace Collins Avenue on
Friday from 10 a.m to: 5 p.m. and at the church on: Saturday
from 1:30pm until service time.
PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Publish your
CARD OF THANKS
or
INN LOVING MEMORY

in ‘The 'Iribune’s
INUE! W

OBDTTUARY

SECTION

Cvall us today

SO2-2352
or 302-2354


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

ws Ee

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 17

EAST St SUN. @ RISE MC ISE MORTUARY

““” New Commitment to Serve

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

Deaconess Vernita
Valerie Butler, 65

of Golden Gates #2 and formerly of Simms,
Long Island will be held on Saturday at 11 a.m.
at Shaw Temple A. M. E. Zion, Baillou Hill
Road & Peter Street. Officiating will be Elder
Kendall Mackey, assisted by Other Ministers.
Interment will follow in Lakeview Gardens,
J. EK. Drive.

She is survived by her husband: William Butler;

7 children: Rudolph, William Jr., Dewitt, Raquel,

Karen Simmons and Anthony Butler; 2 daughters-in-law: Verniece and Elsie
Butler; 2 sons-in-law: Freddie Simmons and Anthony Nesbitt; 29 grandchildren:
Julia, Irendo, Raqueria, Lorenzo, Tramaine, Anniqua, Raunice, Juliann, Justin,
Julian Jr., Denzil, Dewitt, Kenwitt, Devon, Blanche, Regina, Jenniemae, Shaquae,
Kristin, Ladia, Laquell, Davonnia, Tatyanna, Nikalia, Anfernee, Daquonn, Zayvion,
Abraham, and Jeremiah; 2 adopted granddaughters: Kyshon and Shornique; 1
sister: Beatrice Edgecombe; 4 brothers: Bernard, Edward, Kirklin and Ednol
McPhee; 11 sisters-in-law: Rev. Francina Watson, Cathleen and Karina Butler,
Luella Watkins, Lillian, Ruthmae and Mary McPhee, Pecola Mackey of Delray
Beach Fla., Essie McPhee of South Bay Fla., Lillian Solomon and Sylvia
McPhee of Orlando Fla., 5 brothers-in-law: Samuel, Alexander and Epheus Butler
and Heman Nixon of Waterford, Eleuthera; and George Edgecombe of Miami,
Fla; 33 nieces: Curly, Brenda, Theresa, Thelma, Sherrine, Ronnie, Val, Roslyn,
Eugenie, Allison, Jennifer, Shereice, Elloise, Cyprianna, Beverly, Eulapearl,
Laticia, Dianne, Debbie, Sharon, Terry, Vernita, Judy, Portia, Tamika, Sherry,
Mari, Jean, Velma, Lillian Eullean, and Catherine McPhee and Angel Hepburn;
26 nephews: Anthony, Bernard, Wendall, Gregory; Lawrence, Derek, Dwayne,
Ricardo, Trevor, Chester, Rollin, Kevin, Gordon, Allan, Ronald, Andrew, Ricky,
Ednol Jr., Marvin, Johnny, Alexander Jr., Lewis, Nelson, James, Tyrone, and
Lynden Hepburn; 4 God-children: Stephanai, Torio, Sashay & Carissa; Other
relatives and friends including: Pastor Kendall & Susan Mackey & Family, Shaw
Temple A.M.E. Zion Church Family, Varick Memorial A. M. E. Church Family,
Pastor Madeline Wells & The Holy Trinity A.M.E Church Family, Pastor Jacob
Hanna & Smith’s Chapel A.M.E Church Family, Pastor Louise Barr & The Christ
Chapel A.M.E Church Family, Dennis & Sandralee Taylor & Family, Kenneth
& Evelyn Johnson, Nora Gibbins, Lavada Sands, Ruthmae Newbold, Rowena
Gilbert, Gladys Lightfoot & family, Angela Brooks, Angeline Pierre, Elva Johnson,
Lloyd Nesbitt & family, Sheldon & Virginia Gray, Peter & Emma Whyte &
family, Janet Saunders & Almathae McCoy of Miami Fla., Weston & Andrea
Saunders & family, Arlington & Arementha Winters & family, George Henfield,
Dorothy Newman, Henry Cunningham, Antoinette Nesbitt, Beatrice Seymour &
family, Ida Smith, Leonna Major, Valarie Delancey & family, Stephanie & Emma
Smith, Mario & Michael Simms of Long Island, Fred & Monica Neely & family,
Janice Adderley & family, Beryl Rolle & family, Jaycinth Taylor, Frank & Carla
Nixon, Wilfred & Lulie Kelly, Paul Roberts & family, Cyke Greenslade & family,

Iva Roberts & family, Iva Johnson & family, Dianna Rahming & family, James
Anderson & family, Dominique Kelly, Velina Taylor & family, Comelius Ambrose
& family, Donnalee Higgins & family. Phillip & Yvana Bethel & family, Barbara
Deveaux, Bobby & Lynette Ambrose & family, Wendy Rolle & family, Ruthnell
Strachan, Cynthia Williams, Irene Sawyer & family, Willie & Karen Rolle,
Dwayne McGregor, Emily Hu utchinson, Dr. Beverton Moxey, Dr. Valentine Grimes
& Staff of Doctors Hospital 4°" Floor, Management & Staff of Tropical Shipping,
Dr. Joyous Pickstock & the staff of Faith Dental Clinic, Rev. Victor Cooper &
New Bethany Baptist Church Family, The Key West St. Family & the old staff
of Royal Bahamian.

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 10 a.m. at the
Church until service time.

Mary
Hepburn, 77

of Balfour Avenue and formerly of Oneil’s,
Long Island will be held on Saturday at 10 a.m.
at The Church of God of Prophecy, Shirley
Street. Officiating will be Pastor Dale Moss
assisted by Pastor Terrance Forbes. Interment
will follow in Old Trail Cemetery, Abundant
Life Road.

She is survived by her sisters: Sarah Horton,

Idella McPhee, Pastor Pearlene Cartwright,

Queen E. Hepburn and Norris Smith;

eranddaughters: Adreanna Mary and Lonell

Burrows; grandson and granddaughter-in-law:

Pastor Renardo and Ramona Bethel ; great-grandchildren: Renardo Jr. and Revere
Bethel; sister-in-law: Mayna Hepburn; brother-in-law: Freeman Cartwright;
numerous nieces and nephews and their families: Joy and Michael Tucker, Freda
and Sam Farrington, Spessard Horton, Tyrone and Bernadette Hepburn, Linda
Pratt, Monalisa, Veronica Collie, Gertrude and Oswald McClain, Robertha
Knowles, Michael and Florina Turner, Ophelia & Anna Turner, David and Shamorn
Tumer, Ruth and Chandrew Dawkins, Esther and Jerome Gilbert, Joan and Leon
Cox, Corporal Ann Damas, Constable Edroy and Sargeant Gregory Cartwright,
Beryl and Nekia Shearer, Prison Officer Ronald Cartwright and Raymond
Cartwright; Patrick Bethel; Mr. and Mrs. George Smith , The Cornish Family,
The Armbrister Family, Pedro and Elka Smith; other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention including, Lynn Thurston and family, Annie Morley, Delores
Knowles, Cressel and Dorothy Clarke, Sandra Bullard and family, the Church of
God of Prophecy Shirley Street (notably the Prayer Band), the Church of God
of Prophecy, East Street family and the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital .

Friends may pay their last respects at East Sunrise Mortuary, #27 Rosetta Street,
Palmdale from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and on Saturday from 9 a.m. at the
Church until service time.

EAST SUNRISE MORTUARY.

“A New Commitment To Service”

#27 Rosetta Street, P.O.Box C.B. 12248 / Palmdale, Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 323-EAST —

(242) 326-4209 Fax: 356-2957

24 hrs. Emergency Service
Cell #: 357-9151 ¢ Beeper: 380-1450 or 380-1117


PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

Rock of Ages Funeral Chapel

Wulff Road & Pinedale
Tel: 323-3800 or 322-1431 ¢ Fax: 328-8852

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ROSNI
LOUIS, 43

of Brougham Street, will be
held on Saturday, 21
February 2009, 10:00 a.m.,
will be held at Queen of
Peace Catholic Church, Faith
Ave., North off Carmichael
Road. Officiating: Rev. Fr.
Roland Vilfort S.M.M.
Internment: Southern
Cemetery, Cowpen &
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his loving wife: Clenise
Jenny Louis; Two (2) Children: Rosline and Jean-Raynard
Louis; Mother: Ovillia Louis; Five (5) Sisters: Ceramant
Blanc, Rose-Marie and Lydia Franco's, Margarite St. John
and Jadan Louis all of Ft. Lauderdale, Flordia; Five (5)
Brothers: Modira and St. Hilaire Bissainthe of Miami
Florida, Michel and Willie Le-Gere, Franck, Dennee, Prenne'
and Verlandie Francio's of Pompano Beach, Florida; Three
(3) Aunts: Marie Therese, Vionie, Lorealia and Raynette
Louis of Miami, Florida; Two (2) Uncles: Lamein and Ringo
Louis , both of Chicago; Three (3) Sisters-in-law: Christine
and Josette Bissainthe of Haiti and Marie Franco's of Miami,
Florida; One (1) Brother-in-law: Ceramant Blanc of Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida; Numerous Nieces and Nephews
including: Jennifer, Modlyn, Christie, Rachel, Stephanie,
Kenny, Kevin and Megiver Bissainthe, Punnie, Jeffery,
Kenol, Rodney and Isabel Blanc of Miami, Flordia; A Host
Other Relatives and Friends including: Edna, John, Yves,
Mark and Edlyn Barrett, Roland Jaques, Dalitha, Linda
Barrett, Milan Louis, Merlande, Dianna and Claudette Barrett,
Francisco and Marco Louis, Giovanni, Anishka, Shaquille,
Marckell and Mark Barrett Jr.; Rhonda, Ronald Jr. and Raven
Jacques, Augustine and Yolyn; Special Friends including:
E'Rose and Missouri, Ms. Malik, Theresa, Verge, Marcel
and Gilbert, the entire Brougham Street, Olde Corner and
Peter Street family and special thanks to staff at the Intensive
Care Unit at The Princess Margaret Hospital, and a host of
other relatives and friends too numerous to mention.

FRIENDS MAY PAY THEIR LAST RESPECT AT THE
ROCK OF AGES FUNERAL CHAPEL, WULFF ROAD
AND PINEDALE ON FRIDAY FROM 9 A.M. TO 5 P.M.
AND ON SATURDAY AT THE CHURCH FROM 9 A.M
UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

FREEPORT NASSAU
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312 P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 Fax: (242) 373-3005

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

ROSALEE
WELLS, 56

OF #252 POLARIS DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA
WILL BE HELD ON
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21,
2009 AT 11:00 A.M. AT
CENTRAL CHURCH OF GOD,
CORAL ROAD, FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA.
OFFICIATING WILL BE BISHOP LESLIE R. WOODSIDE.
INTERMENT WILL FOLLOW IN THE GRAND BAHAMA
MEMORIAL PARK SECTION #2, FROBISHER DRIVE,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA.

Left to cherish her memories are her 2 daughters: Sharon
Sturrup and Charlene Russell; 2 sons: Theodore and Shawn
Russell; 5 grandchildren: David Thompson Jr., Daniel
Sturrup, Dathan, Damara and Dwayne Sturrup Jr.; mother:
Pearline Wells; 4 sisters: Thelma Saunders, Remelda Walker,
Gelina and Jessiemae Wells; 3 brothers: Stafford, Lennex
and Jason Wells; 67 nieces including: Desamona Musgrove,
Roshand Cox, Delshae Miller, Portia, Jasmine, Alicia and
Shamika Wells; 14 nephews including: Deon, Dexter and
Christopher Clarke, Lavard Wells, Denrick Miller, Leroy,
Lavado, Leron, Leo and Lenard Brice, Rufus Wells, Edwin
and Maxwell Wells; aunt: Florence Levarity of Bimini; son-
in-law: Dwayne Sturrup; sister-in-law: Yvette Wells; 2
brothers-in-law including: Shawn Walker and a host of other
relatives and friends including: Raymond Albury and family,
Shirley Hamilton and family, Janet Bowleg and family, Eloise
Sturrup and family, Delores Russell and family, Leotha Moss,
Nickae Olurin, Michelle Gibson, Katherine Wilson, Dixie
Jones, Bernice Cox and family, management and staff at the
Rand Memorial Hospital especially the Kitchen staff, Female
Surgical Ward and the Female Medical 1 at the Princess
Margaret Hospital and the Cancer Society.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “SERENITY SUITE”
OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON
SATURDAY FROM 9:30 A.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 19

TRestscs Memovual
a

FREEPORT
11A East Coral Road, Freeport, G.B., Bahamas
P.O. Box F-42312
Telephone: (242) 373-1115 / (242) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 « Fax: (242) 340-8034

iy RVICES FOR

UNERAL SE

: (Texas), Queenie Hepburn and family; 3 god sisters: Valerie and
i Marquerite Johnson and Tessa Vaughn, Rev. L. Carl R. Culmer and
i member of Grants Town Wesley Church and others too numerous to
i mention.

ANTHONY LAVERN
GREENSLADE, 52

of Nassau Street will be held on }
Saturday, February 21st at 11:00am at }
Grants Town Wesley Methodist Church, }
Balliou Hill Road and Chapel Road, }
Officiating will be Rev. L. Carla R. }
Culmer, assisted by Brother Ernest }
Miller. Interment will be made in }
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier Roads.

Cherished memories are held by his 6 }
sisters, Evangeline, Dianna, Pamela and Paula Greenslade, Mrs. Sonia :
Dean and Mrs.Lenora Johnson; 4 brothers: Thomas, Goerge, Philip |
and Bradley Greenslde.; 11 nieces, Sgt 1719 Alice Gilbert, Mrs. Gina
McCarthy (California), Mrs. Juliette Pinder (New Jersey), Attorney ;
Michelle Dean, Georgette and Gayle Greenslade, Renetta and Dellarese :
Johnson, Shenique Lewis, Lavion Smith; 18 Nephews: Deputy :
Commissioner of Police Ellison Greenslde Sr., Desmond Greenslade }
Sr., ASP Ashton Greenslade Sr., Det. Sgt. 464 Kevin Greenslade Sr.,
Stephen Greenslade, Teireince Greenslade (Texas), Master Chief Mark }
Greenslade( US Navy) (California), Patrick Greenslde( Canada) Edwin ;

Greenslade, John and Jeffrey Greenslade (Sarasota) Michael, Marvin }

and Madian Dean, Marvin and Romell Johnson, Ashton and Anton | his children, Corrine, Anwar, Sharonda, Travis, Ron and Glennard

Greenslade; Numerous grand nieces and nephews including: Anna, ; Holmes; brothers, Rafael, Jules, and Kha’iel; sisters, Yvette, Tiffany,

Kimel, Keva, Ashti, Stephenique, Greenslade, Alicia Murphy, and | Carlene, Kim, Anishka and Juliette Holmes; step-brother and sister,
Chiara McCarthy, Ellison Jr., Desmond Jr., Kevin Jr, and Ashton Jr., }

Several great grand nieces and nephews, 3 sisters-in-law: Patricia, | Bowe (Godmother); uncle, Alonzo Holmes; nieces and nephews, Iman

Virginia and Verna Greenslade; 2 brothers-in-law: Maxwell Dean and i Joseph, Raven and Rihanna Holmes, Erin, Diamond, Geremy Mullings,

Levi Johnson; Extended relatives: Yvonne Greenslade-Rolle and : Erin Delancy, Jerard Holmes, Jerome Gaitor, Jayden Lockhart, Joey

family, Oswald and Basil Greenslade, Karen Andrews and family, Sister } and Jeremy; cousins, Patice Bowe, Tina Lockhart, Patrick Bowe,

Annie Thompson and Family, Barbra Bullard and Family, Rev. Emmet } Ricardo Holmes, Dwayne, Antoinette, Anton, Tia, T. J., Darius and

Weir and Family, Mrs. Miriam Curling and family, Vernell Richardson, Makella; sister-in-law, Renee Holmes; grand nieces and nephews
Aubrianna and Derek Butler, Mrs. Emerald Winder, Franklyn and Leslie :

Winder and family, Hyacinth Pratt and family, Willamae Salkey and ; Mullings, Ebony and Edon Bowe, Wayne Farah, Jourdan Lockhart and

family, Naomi Brown and family, Catherine Francis and family, Veronica | Ciatra Bowe; other relatives and friends including, Felix Joseph,

Seymour and family, Sybil Seymour and family, Carmetta Rolle and | Atthur Lockhart, Mary Dames and family, Enid Bowe Ferguson and

family; Other relatives and friends including: Janet Gomez, Paul } family, Francina Bowe and family, Gladys Bowe and family, Carrie
McCarthy, Kendal Pinder, Cpl. 2461 Yvette Deveaux, Petty Officer }

Gary Hanna and family, Alvin Mackey and family, Deacon George } and family, Kenneth Bowe and family, Joan Bowe and family, Helen

Richardson and family, Deidre Cooper and family, Kimberley ! Butler and family, Creola Taylor and family, Rozelda Humes and family,

Greenslade, Mitchell Gilbert, Hazel, Prenell and Jacqueline Greenslade, } Patsy Bridgewater and family, the Premier Importers family, the Original

Barbara Dean and family, Security Department, Cove Atlantis, The Wrecker Boys, Mr. Arlington Butler and family and other relatives and
Staff of J.S.Johnson, Honourable Sydney Collie MP, Percy (Vola) :

Francis, Eddie Dames, Iris Hanna, Ellen Adderley, Rochelle Bain, }

Daisy Thompson, Pamela Rahming, George and John Deveaux, Rev. | Viewing will be held in the Perpetual Suite at Restview Mortuary and

Charles Wallace and Family, Wayne Edgecombe, Ruth and Norma | Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00

Gardiner, and family, Robert Sturrup and Family (All of Miami Florida), | 2â„¢ to 6:00pm and at the church on Saturday from 8:30 am at the church

Ian Campbell (Texas), Dr. Carter Womack (Ohio), Maurice King

Viewing will be held in the Irenic Suite at Restview Mortuary and
Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00
am to 6:00 pm and at the church from 9:30 am to service time.

GLEN WENDELL
HOLMES, 48

of McKinney Drive will be held on
Saturday morning at 10:00am at Salem
Union Baptist Church, Taylor Street.
Officiating will be Rev. Dr. C.W.
Saunders, assisted by other ministers
of the gospel and interment will be in
the Southern Cemetery, Cowpen and
Spikenard Roads.

Left to cherish his memories are his
parents, Alice Bowe Holmes and
Glenn Holmes and his wife, Cynthia,

Corel and Claudette, aunts, Dornel King, Debroh Gaitor and Brenda

including, Makiko Holmes, Nishan and Yukari Joseph, Genesys

McKenzie and family, Nigel Bowe and family, Visna Bowe Mackay

friend too numerous to mention.

until service time.


PAGE 20, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

and Crematouum Limited

i Eicatniens Gincad”

FREEPORT
11A East Coral se poeee G.B., Bahamas

Telephone: (243) ‘37a ris 7 (042) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier ears bieaiehy N.P., Bahamas

P.O. Box CB-
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 : (342) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

KENDAL STEPHAN |

BRICE, 43

of St. James Road will be held |
on Sturdy February 21st 2009 :
at 11:00 am at St. Matthews |
Anglican Church Shirley Street :
Officiating will Be Father James |
Moultrie, assisted by Father Don }
Haynes and Interment will be |
in the Southern Cemetery :

Cowpen and Spikenard Roads.

Williams,

numerous to mention.

DEATH NOTICES

MS. ELVERIA
NEELY, 68

of Congo Town, Andros died at
the Princess Margaret Hospital on
the 13th of February 2009.

She is survived by her father,
Leonard Neely; sons: Dale,
Ricardo, Leonard, Elvis, Fred,
Hurbert, Renardo, and Randolph
Neely; sisters, Melrose Neely and

’ : a host of other relatives too numerous to mention.
He is survived by his mother: Thelma Brice, brothers: :

Paul and Gilbert Brice, Aunts Rosie Thrower, Thelma :
Pyfrom, Swen Doit of Bermuda, Mary Hanna, Elva :
Rahming, Rev. Harriet Fernander, Orian Rahming, :
Hortence Rahming, Charoiette Rahming , Uncles: Basil |
Rahming, Edwin Rahming, Winston Hanna; Cousins: |
Erlist Miller, Ellen Simms, Natasha Smith, Asatha Greene, |
Marilyn Rahming, Sherry Dean, Sheila Rahming, Anne : |
Taylor, Joan Dilworth, Shirley Girling, Vamgie Rahming, |

Lucia Broughton, Betty Mills, Edna Jones, Beverly : |.)
Petisla Carter, Michelle Hanna, Deborah : }47
Ferguson, Lavoughn Fernander, Sussette Uriasz, Leslie | [79
Pyfrom, Drexwell Rahming, Herbert Rahming, Wenzel ; | 7
Rahming, Morris Rahming, David Rhming, Loran | |
Rahming, Oral Rahming, Clement Knowles, Raymond :
Doit, Philip Doit, Hammond Rahming, Dr. Charles |
Rahming, ndrea Rahming, Vernon Rahming, Kevin }
rahming, Edmund Rahming, Winston Hanna Jr. Brain :
Fernander, Kevin Fernander, Sheldon Fernander, Jason :
Fernander, and a host of other relatives and friends too | Rozelda Flowers: 2 sisters: Nezima Rahming and Melverne
| Flowers; 3 brothers: Lindsey Davis, Bertram and Garvin
: Flowers; grandmother: Mellie Flowers; 6 aunts; 7 uncles;
Viewing will be held in the Celestial Suite at Restview |
Memorial Mortuary and Crematorium Ltd. Robinson and :
Soldier Roads on Friday from 10:00 am to 6:00 pm and }
at the church from 9:30 am to service time.

Funeral arrangements will be made at a later date.

MRS. ZONNIA
MARLO FORBES,
48

»| of Hawkins Hill, Nassau, New
»))| Providence and formerly of Hanna
Hill, Eight Mile Rock, Grand
»)*) Bahama died at the Princess
t*)) Margaret Hospital, Nassau, New
Providence on Thursday, February

12, 2009;

She is survived by her husband: Welton Forbes; 5 children:
Nathania, Anya, Ashli, Ashton and Antonis Forbes; 4
grandchildren: Kevonia, Kylah, Dazaria and Patrick; mother:
Joan Hanna-Davis; father: Rev. Clyde Flowers; stepmother:

numerous nieces, nephews and a host of other relatives
and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 21

and Crematouum Liniled

Bod Cacedniees Bin?

EEPORT
11A East Coral oat eee G.B., Bahamas
Box F-4
Telephone: 22) 473- iisy 42) 373-1471
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 373-3005

NASSAU
Robinson and Soldier Roads, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
P.O. Box CB-12072
Telephone: (242) 394-8043 / (242) 394-8047
Pager: (242) 340-8043 * Fax: (242) 340-8034

LO WUE SERVICE FOR

MERLEAN
McKINNEY, 82

OF #12 BENTLY DRIVE,

ON SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 21,

FATHER CURTIS E. ROBINSON.

PINDER’S POINT, GRAND BAHAMA.

Jr., Ahmad, Marco Jr., Adaejah, Geshan, Anthon, Devonte,

Deshawn, Destiny, Kymano, Leroy, Leandrea, Cherie, Jerrick, }
Jerricak, Jerenae, Jeremiah. Savannah, Vastachea, Tony Jr., James }
Jr., Vashawn, Brane, Clarissa, Cordero, Basaneo, Phyllicia, Troy, :
Michael, Gary Jr., Neko and Jonathan; seven grand sons-in-law: }
Mario Taylor, Remano Bain, Stafford Albury, Geon Russell, Tony }
Russell, Eddie Bodie and Pastor James Williams; three grand |
daughters—in-law: Eva Bain, Amanda Greenslade and Dorcas ;
Armbrister; grand niece and nephews: Jevillo, Willard Jr., Jarvis }
and Trevor Williams, Tony Jr., and Terry; two god children: :

Myrtle Carroll and Chester Walker; nieces: Alice Williams,

Deaconess Joyce Williams, Viola Davis & Family, Effie Walker }
& Family, Lealeen, Hepburn, Sandy, Edwards, Buiah, Lorine }
Walker and Joanna Russell; nephews: Leo Russell, Superintendent :
of Police Leland Russell, Pastor Mervin Burrows and Simon }

Russell, Floyd, Charles, Chester and Douglas Walker, Marcus,

: Bain, Wilma Gibson of West Palm Beach, The Home for the
Aged, Solomon of Palm Security, St. Jude’s Anglican Church,
: Premier Fund Services, James Alfred Newbold of Florida, Edna
: Russell, Doris and Maxine Bain, Wendy Pratt, Marilee Frith,
? Reatah Douglas, Susan Adderley, Theophilus Adderley, Margaritta
i Williams, Robert Lloyd, Joseph Bain & Family, Virtual Rolle &
_ | FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA }
AND FORMERLY OF CROSSING }
ROCK, ABACO WILL BE HELD :
: Lewis and Romeo Carroll, George and Erma Williams, Kenneth
2009 AT 2:00 P.M. AT ST. JUDE’S }
ANGLICAN CHURCH, SMITH’S :
POINT, GRAND BAHAMA. }
OFFICIATING WILL BE REV’D }
INTERMENT WILL :
FOLLOW IN THE PINDER’S POINT PUBLIC CEMETERY, :
: FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA ON FRIDAY FROM 10:00
: A..M. TO 6:00 P.M AND AT THE CHURCH ON SATURDAY

Left to cherish fond memories are her three daughters: Ann }
Coakley, Berlene Bain and Augustine Greenslade; two sons: }
Glenn McKinney and John Newbold Jr.; three sons-in-law: Basil }
Greenslade, Willis Bain and Lorenzo Coakley; 20 grand children: :
Pamela Newbold-Taylor, Faron, Marco and Deangelo Greenslade, :
Jerry Martin, Whitney Armbrister, Rochelle Bain, Rhonda Russell, }
Princess Albury, Peggy Bain, Christina Bain, Hubert Bain, Susan }
Russell, Samantha Bodie, Merale McKinney, Wendy, Vernice, :
Maedonne, Shawn and Shanique McKinney; thirty-six great }
grand children: Alicia, Ebony, Dominique, Sharriasha, Stafford |

Family, Mama Liz and family, Jennifer Walkins, Violet Roberts,
Sandra Bodie, Marilyn Kemp, Monique Storr, Richard Walker,
Prince and Joseph Bodie, Romeo Archer, Janice, Yolanda, Juliet,

and Deserea Taylor and a host of other relatives and friends too
numerous to mention.

VIEWING WILL BE HELD IN THE “CELESTIAL SUITE”
OF RESTVIEW MEMORIAL MORTUARY AND
CREMATORIUM LIMITED, 11-A EAST CORAL ROAD,

FROM 1:00 P.M. UNTIL SERVICE TIME.

MS. LISA MARTHA
SMITH, 37

OF FLAMIGO GARDENS,
NASSAU, NEW PROVIDENCE
AND FORMERLY OF
HAWKSBILL, GRAND
BAHAMA DIED AT THE
PRINCESS MARGARET
HOSPITAL, NASSAU, NEW
PROVIDENCE ON MONDAY,
FEBRUARY 16, 2009.

She is survived by her children: Nioshi Smith, Nataria Cooper
and Javon Adderley Jr.; mother: Verlene Smith; father: Paul
Smith; sisters: Pauline, Montana and Monica Smith; brothers;
Doyle, Edwin, Geard and Shoghi Smith; Fianceé: Javon Adderley

: : : 4 : | Sr., numerous nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles and a host of
Michael Merioun Davis and a host of other relative and friend :

including: Raymond & Sharon Meadows, Bob & Pearl Feldman }
of West Palm Beach, Estella Knowles, Robinette Gibson, Shelly |
Pinder-Wilson & Family, Wendell & Georgette Thurston, Wilma }

other relatives and friends.

Funeral arrangements will be announced at a later date.


PAGE 22, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Demeritie’s Funeral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET « P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

MISSIONARY
FIRSTENA
CHRISTIE, 94

a resident of Garden Hills Estates & }
formerly of New Bight, Cat Island, will : |
be held at St. John's Native Baptist : |
Cathedral, Meeting Street, on Saturday ;
at 10:00 a.m. Officiating will be Bishop }

Michael C. Symonette, assisted by Rev.

Dr. Hervis L. Bain & other Ministers |
of the Gospel. Interment follows in the ;

Church's Cemetery.

Left to cherish her memories are 2 |
children, daughter Nellie Brooks; son, Eldric Miller; 2 daughters-in-law: Miriam : |
Miller and Ella; 1 brother: Samuel Romer; 2 sisters: Elizabeth Gibson and }
Gladys McKenzie; 1 sister-in-law: Millicent Romer; adopted son: Alonzo }

Smith; 17 grandchildren: Vanda (Ross) Smith, Brent (Preola) Brooks, Perry

(Bridgette) Brooks, Peggy McKinney, Carolyn (Rev. Dr. Kendal) Stubbs, Sebrin

rere Peek pores eet aes, Wey a ee vee foster children: Henrietta T. Miller, 1904 Sgt. Robert Goodman, Captain Glen

: «ys Bi . i Bain; brother: Rudolph Lewis; foster sister: Doris Henfield; grandchildren:
eae one ee pens Sea pra kere le oe i Valderez Miller, Yolanda, Marvin, Cordero, Berdiesha, & Deanglo Goodman,
gt ae nae & : i Misty, Glen Jr. & Graham Bain, Giovani & Keturah Bethel; aunts: Olga Nairn,

. : : . i Teresita Bain, Lillian Johnson, Hester Kerr, Rowena Ferguson; grand aunts:
DOT a Oe ee ey ca ae : Edith Saunders & Eula Gayle; daughters-in-law: Michelle Bain & Norma

? Goodman; neices: Jasmine Lewis, Cheryl Campbell, Arlene Brown, Francita

Jonathan aud) Been Mound, Joel row 2 erent eteot erangeni linen: es | Colebrooke, Glendamae McIntosh & Lillian Rolle; nephews: Jamaal Lewis &

i Ryan Lewis, Craig C. Laing, Charles, Lynden, & Sean Gaitor, K.C., Kamal,
: Keno, Brendan, & Carlton Rolle; sisters-in-law: Antoinette Lewis, Dorothy
? Laing & Sandra Rolle; brothers-in-law: Carl Rolle, Amos Gaiter & Keith Rolle;

: . : i Numerous cousins including: Hetty Goodman, Albert Moxey, Donna Nairn,

pours Pomiee, 207 . acupbell, “anita Johnson and oe reget Featets, Hah ? Bernadette Rolle, Leonard Neely Jr., Judy Gayle, Anthony Neely, Gloria

Romer, Thelma Adderley, Sandra Lawyer, Rachel Gordon, Valerie Thomas of ; : : : : :

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, Lauretta Anderson of Sarasota, Florida and Marcia Dawkins, Shirley Rolle, Janice Brooks, Ollie Taylor, lona, Sharon, Algeria and
; ‘ : , i Shelly Lewis, Margaret Campbell, Ruth Ferguson, Ophelia Cooper, Andrea

! Pegues, Betty Cash, Althea Kerr, Naomi King, Patricia Deveaux, Brenda
i Henfield, Rev. Charles Lewis, James, William, Wilfred, Sean, Elvis, Patrick,
: i & Ian Lewis, Wellington and Edward Johnson, Eugene Coakley, Wellington,

Dorsette, Theodore and Lester Romer of Fort Lauderdale, Florida and Gerald ! Rudolph, Walter, Clyde and Tyrone Ferguson, Alphonso and Dencil Kerr:
? numerous godchildren including: Juanita Gibson, Bernadette Rolle, Ralph
: : Severe : ? Russell, Monique Simmons, Marguerite Taylor, Portia Sturrup, Bernard Sturrup,
Antonique,Julia, Maria Williams, Gilda Scavella, Joylene Rolle, Gaynell Green, § Dorece Henfield, Margo Stuart, Caryn Francois, Samuel Saunders & Shonte
: Sturrup, other relatives and friends including: Patsy Patton & Family, Benjamin
i Bain & Family, Phyllis Taylor & Family, Cynthia Russell & family, Rollen
: Ts Se : Goffe & family, Karl & Donna Wallace, Carolyn Taylor & family, Cynthia

Estella, Nicky, Portia, Linda, Tasha, Marsha, Kathleen, Wendy, Patricia, Tina, {Stuart & family, Monique Simmons & family, Yvette Taylor & family, Sandra
: : : : : : i Fenelon & family, George Goodman, Patrice McKinney, Coralee Bethel, Duane
Dip vane, Maras pop hia, Nandi 2etee, daden brand nephews: Dale Rome i Miller, Andrew Winder, Arlington Brown, Cornelius Gray, Samuel Dean &
: family, Rosalie Neymour & family, Florinda Bastian & family, Delores Nottage
: a ees . i & family, Doreen Fernander, Philip Sturrup, Dr. Winston C. Rolle, Franklyn
Henry, Henrico, Henricks, Joshua, Jeremiah, Rodger, Vincent, Hem, Shem, : : : : :
Shawn, Timothy, Clayton, Dino, Tino, Ricardo; other relatives and friends Rolle, Louis Soncaire, the Lewis family, Mary Ann Clarke, Mary Churtum, Fr.
including: Hazel Penn, Garnet Rolle and family, Levi Charlton and family, }
Rey. Dr. Teuton Stubbs and Helena Stubbs and the family of Southland Church ;
of God, Elmetta Rolle, Rev. Stanley Pinder, Frederick Pratt, Berlin Pratt, Ethelyn of Our Lady's Catholic School, Our Lady's Church Faith Community, the
King, Marina Fernander (godchild), Pandora (godchild), Patrick and Sheila Windsor Lane community, doctors & nurses of A&E, the Eye Ward, Female

Seymour, Dr. Davidson Hepburn, Deacon Ekron Pratt and family, Deacon Medical II and numerous other relatives and friends.

Miller, Chinua (Kimra) Miller, Kenny Miller, Bishop Lloyd (Sandra) Mortimer,

Smith, Lorrell and Keanu Brooks, Perez, Brianna and Breon Brooks, Raschard,
and Sebrin Brooks, Jr., Destiny and Ashanee Adu, Shantina, Steven, L'Ekeva,
Brooks and Reyanah Smith; nieces: Pearliemae, Linda and Vanera, Delores,
Idamae, Doreen, Christina, Alberthamae, Sharon Creary, Elizabeth Knowles,

Mainy, Sara, Jermeek, Rosenell Mackey, Bettymae, Martha and Angela
McKenzie, Coral, Seberina, Dina, Kimbler, Dienice, Bonita, Christina and

Allen of Tampa, Florida; Nephews: Anthony "Spiderman", John Lewis, Charles,
Sammy, Leroy McKenzie, Glenn, Dale and Bruno Romer, Maxwell, Kermit,
Nathan, Dolson and Sidney Romer, Joseph 'Doc’ Dorsette, Gloria, Dr. Rudolph

Romer, Jr. of Bradenton, Florida; grandnieces: Glenita, Gia, Shonell, Brynae,
Mitzi, Omiece, Sara, Malinda, Shakera, Nadia, Anoja, Devonia, Yolanda,

Lorene Smith, Lynette and Peggy Johnson, Donna Bridgewater, Louise Moss,
Veronica, Andrea, Shantel, Samantha, Kenrea, Rashae, Rashanna McKenzie,
Yvette Francis, Charima Rolle, Pamela Kelly, Tamico, Jewcilla McKenzie,
Shanell, Shaneka, Rodesha,Tameka, Crystal, Nakera, Christin, Katrina, Nicole,

Jr., Valentino, Nicholas, Brevin, Brayden, Daniel, Nathaniel, Stephen, Rashad,
Samuel, Eugene Jr., Kendal Jr., Jonah, Samuel, Gabriel, Anthony, Mark, Devon,

Mortimer, Gertrude Dames, Laura Benson (godchild), Elsaida Porter, Dorothy

Hexon Pratt and family, Mother Catherine Pratt, Pastors, Officers and members

Armbrister, Rev. Lernis and Rowena Cornish and family and Lucy Sturrup.

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,

i from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 9:00 a.m.
; until service time.

FLORENCE
ZABETH ROLLE,
63

a resident of Windsor Lane West, will

| be held at Our Lady of the Holy Souls
Catholic Church, on Saturday at 12:00
p.m. Officiating will be Fr. Michael

| Kelly, ss.cc., & Fr. David Cooper,

| assisted by Deacon Peter Rahming &
Deacon Maxwell Johnson. Interment
follows in Catholic Cemetery, Tyler
Street.

Left to cherish the memories of this kind
hearted and wonderful woman are: her

Michael Kelly, ss.cc. Deacon Maxwell Johnson, Deacon Peter Rahming, Mser.
John Johnson, Fr. David Cooper, Rev. Terrance Morrison, Claudette Rolle,
(Director of Catholic Education), present & former staff, teachers and students

1 : : : : Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte’s Funeral Home, Market Street,
of St. John's Native Baptist Cathedral, Sis. Catherine McDonald, Curlene from 10 a.m.-6:00 p.m. on Friday & on Saturday at the church from 11:00 a.m.

? until service time.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 23

Demeritte’s Suneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET °¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR

CLEVELAND
CLEMENT
SIMMONS, 78

Soldier Road.

Left to cherish his memories are two sons: Cleveland Jr. and Marlo; }
five daughters: Eldora James, Sandra Simmons, Judy McFall, :
Monica Simmons and Ophelia Miller; two brothers: Benjamin and }
Oneal Williams; three sisters: Corine Pinder, Anthea McIntosh and :
Sarah Williams; twenty three grand children: Detective Sargeant :
1520 Sidney James of the Royal Bahamas Police Force; Vaneke, :
James, Jameco, Edisa, Renaldo, Jurich, Clevette, Clement, Dion }
Jr., Janré, Corazine, David Jr., Dennison Jr., Clevandra, Darren, ;
Dionette, Clevon, Marlo Jr., Cletus, Justin Jr., and Jameel and }
Destiny; adopted grandchildren: Sheen and Sanchez Nabbie; sixteen :
great grand children: Sidney Jr., Aaron, Mesach, Macvaughna, }

Dezur, Clydisa, Justin, Malika, Jabez, Jurreo, Amana, Kamea, } ie
Chicai, Montel, Montel,Jermaine and Chad; two daughters-in-law: } Cherished memories are held by his son, Elvis; adopted son, Vincent
Debbie Ferguson and Adrian Simmons; brothers-in-law: Cleveland } Simms, Anthony Adderley and Clinton Ferguson; one sister, Isabell

: ; : Miller; two brothers, Neville and Norward Dean; seven

i grandchildren, Charlotte, Mary, Elvis Jr., Laurel, Emily Ann and
: Vannie; four great grandchildren, Naken, Tonya, Randy Jr. and Aria;

Rav MeCdrla Rolle Rosanna. Debbie. Keahorm. Damelca: Deanna : sisters-in-law, Helen Hall, Vernice Wallace, Julia, Martha and Lilly
Donna, Jackie Shelly Sadesha, Deborah Latson, Gabriellee, | Dea; brothers-in-law, Alexander Russell and Edison Miller;
Brendalee, Ida, Cecile, Annette, Lillian, Latrocia and Demetrius; £ TOMCTOUS DCCRS and nephews including, Tezel, Lillian, Irene,

nephews: Rev. Arlington Rolle, Apostle David Williams, Carrol, ; Ezekiel, Bill, Bradly, Hazel, Betty, Helena, Shirley, Elizabeth, Ruth,

Tony, Crofton, Roy and Barry Williams, Gregory, Solomon Williams i Gaynell, Alfred, Prince, Haldore, Oneezer, Luther, Duncan, Dereck,

i Ruby, Cheryl, Thomasina, Mazella, Kino, Elva, Neville, Patricia,

Edith Lockhart, Branhilda Laing, Winifred Oliver, Trevor Oliver oe J site renee aoc Sit ee Clyde,
and Christine; other relatives and friends including, Beverley | 30% Pames Amici, eva, barry, Jan, Py his;#sptll, tanessa,

: : : Charles Beneby, Philip, Maggie and Madline; numerous cousins,
Marshall, George Davis, Petula Black, Alice Stubbs, James Stubbs, i Di and’ Mie, Munir Rashad, Dn ahd Mis. Joseph evans, Dt Ceoree

and Danny Rolle, Lillisbelle Swann, Marvin Belle, Rose Rahming, ee a ok 7 ee a ee eel
Renee Bullard, Nurse Emmanuel, Sylvia Tynes, Allan Lightbourne, } peat ens a - A ie a cn Oiclia Jacques, Wayne Bass, Kiki, Tony of Floénda, Valderne:? ee eee ae bee Bevis Be ee

Cooper, Peter Walkes, Dion Miller and family, Wanda Darville : Campbell, Bernetta Evans and family, other relatives and friends,

: Bro. and Sis. Curtis, Rufus Dean and family, the Adderley family,
i Mr and Mrs Valentine Grimes and family, Bro. Wood and family,

Bowe and family, Alexander Burrows and family, Taylor family, Sis. Moses, Boyd Road Community, Johnson Park Church family.

Quincy Taylor, Paulette Whylly & Family, Feaste family, Mr. Riley, : ,.. ; Sones
Michelle Williams, Velma Forbes, Ms. Bullard, the Big Pond | Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

Community, Domino Boys at Potters Cay Dock, Bain & Grant's : Market Street, from 10am - 6pm on Saturday and on Sunday at the

: church from 10am until service time.

Newbold and Donald Davis and Sonny Stubbs, Jay Ferguson and
James Ferguson; sisters-in-law: Edith Newbold, Charlamae and
Carol Williams; nieces: Sandradee Henfield, Dellereese, Daisymae,

Jr., Prince, Franklyn, Dominique and Naboth Newbold; cousins:

Sharnell Wiliams, Sam and Rosemary Cambridge, Barry, Lafayette

Oswald and Lillian Williams, Debbie Ferguson, Monique Williams,
Eulease Smith and family, Roslyn and Millicent Smith, Louise

: Town Senior Citizen Association, Five Porches of Deliverance
? Church family, True Vine Christian Centre of Hollywood, Florida,
: staff of KFC, Wemss Security, Kelly's Home Centre, Registrar
: General's Department and the National Insurance Board, Tyrone's
? Conch Stall, staff of Demeritte's Funeral Home; other relatives and
: friends too numerous to mention.

a resident of Water Street, Big |
Pond, will be held at Peniel :

Kingdom Ministries, Market Street i Market Street, from 10am - 6pm on Friday and on Saturday from

and Palmetto Avenue, on Saturday { 9 a.m. - 12 noon and at the church from 1pm until service time.
at 2pm. Officiating will be Rev. }
A. Samuel Rolle, assisted by }
Pastor James Womack. Interment :

follows in Woodlawn Gardens,

Friends may pay their last respects at Demeritte's Funeral Home,

ZEPHANIAH
DEAN, 89

aresident of Munson Village, Boyd
Road and formerly of Lowe Sound,
Andros, will be held at Johnson
Park Seventh Day Adventist
Church, Farrington Road, on
Sunday at llam. Officiating will
be Pastor Leroy Sewell, assisted
by Elder Melvin Lewis and Elder
J. Carter. Interment follows in Old
Trail Cemetery, Old Trail Road.


PAGE 24, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009

THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

Aremeritte’s SJ uneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET ° P.O. BOX GT-2097 ° TEL: 323-5782

DEATH NOTICES FOR

Jonas Alfred Edwards, 73

a resident of Crooked Island Street & formerly of i
Knowles, Cat Island, died at PMH on Monday 16 |

February, 2009.

He is survived by his children: Lindall J., Sandra, 7
Juan, Mateo, Jonal & Petrocelli Edwards, Roslyn |
Cartwright, Nathalie Nairn & Sophia Deveaux; 3 |
sisters: Alma Cox, Alva Thurston & Hilda Wilson |
& a host of other relatives & friends.

James "Tim"
Newell Williams, 71

_ aresident of Greencastle, Eleuthera died on Monday
_ 16 February, 2009.

| He is survived by his wife: Florence Williams;
' daughters: Esther Williams, Ms. Timalee Williams,
| Ms. Perry Hall & Nora Smith; sons: Glen Smith,
| Pastor Wilshire Smith & Rodney Williams; sisters:
| Janet Williams, Jennie Basden, Katrina Brown,
| Lorraine Clarke & Minerva Williams; brothers:
| Richard Williams, Shane, Jeff, Frank, Dendi &
| Joseph Williams & a host of other relatives &
. friends.

Isadora Williamson, 69

i a resident of Palm Tree Estates & formerly of
| Mangrove Cay, Andros, died at PMH on Thursday
_ 12 February, 2009.

_ She is survived by her husband: Ervin Williamson;
_ L son: Charles Greene; 2 daughters: Monique &
| Stacey Williams; | sister: Ethlyn Smith; 5 brothers:
' Stephen Garnet & Percy Miller, Donnie & Clifford
| Moxey; 6 grandchildren & a host of other relatives
| & friends.


THE TRIBUNE OBITUARIES

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 25

Aremeritte’s Huneral Home

BAHAMAS’ OLDEST MORTUARY
MARKET STREET °¢ P.O. BOX GT-2097 ¢ TEL: 323-5782

DEATH NOTICES FOR

Winifred Sunday
Adderley, 50

a resident of Calvin Street, Soldier Road, died at PMH 2

on Saturday 14 February, 2009.

She is survived by her mother: Eloise Adderley; children: :
Shonell & Shane Minns; sisters: Maria Adderley & Daisy |

Munroe; | brother: Raymond Adderley.

Ricardo Vincent
Farrington, 35

a resident of Laird Street, died at his residence on Tuesday

3 February, 2009.

He is survived by his wife: Raymar Farrington; mother: |
Sylvia Ramsey; father: Leonard Farrington; 2 sons: }
: Governors Harbour, Eleuthera, died at Doctors Hospital
: on Thursday 12 February, 2009.

Sayshawn Farrington; 3 sisters Christine Bethel, Enid |
Falconer & Monalisa Farrington; grandmother: Maria |
Louise Farrington; stepfather: Kermit Hepburn; |
: Windsor Bethell; sister: Anita Williams, Agatha

Ricardo Jr. & Rashard; 2 daughters: Khadesha & Wensi;
4 brothers: Charles Falconer, Leonard Jr., Marco &

stepmother: Loretta Farrington; grandfather: Frank

Farrington; numerous aunts & uncles & a host of other
: of other relatives & friends.

relatives & friends.

Patrick Leonard
Bethel, 40

a resident of Deveaux Street, died at PMH on 12 February,

2009.

He is survived by his mother: Fredrica Bethel; 1 son:
Patrick Bethel Jr.; 9 brothers: Benjamin, Daniel, Dale,
: Darren, Kenwood, Adrian, Terrence, Ralph & Rodney
: Bethel; 5 sisters: Coralee Smith, Gaylean Gibson,
| Cyprianna Thompson, Deneice & Rosemary Curtis; 2
; aunts: Carnella Williams & Martha McPhee & a host of
: other relatives & friends.

Lowell Douglas
Bethell, 70

a resident of Johnson Terrace, Fox Hill & formerly of

He is survived by his 3 sons: Tracy, Theron & Laron; 4
daughters: Nancy, Carlisa, Jamie & Anishka; | brother:

Cumberbatch, Sharon McKinney, Emily Petty & a host


Sy Va
CRA

The Tribune §
—



oe

Pg. 26



RELIGIOUS
NEWS,
Se Se

CHURCH as
aie SiS
The Tribune RELIGION Thursday, February 19, 2009 ® PG 27

Standing

Golden G

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net



DID you wake up today to the
reality of unemployment? Well, for
hundreds of Bahamians, the unfor-
tunate response to this question is
yes, bringing with it an array of
challenges, obstacles, and hurdles
which now more than ever may seen
completely overwhelming.

However, a message of hope may
reside in a local church’s pastoral
celebrations later this month.

“Hope above all else is what the
people need,” said founder of the
Shield of Faith Evangelistic Church,
Bishop Christopher Burrows.

The church is celebrating Bishop
Burrows'’s fifteenth pastoral anniver-
sary February 25-27 by assisting
financially challenged people in the
Golden Gates community.

According to Bishop Burrows, the
downturn global and local economy,
remains the single greatest chal-
lenge for hundreds of Bahamians
now forced to join the unemploy-
ment line.

Bishop Burrows says his ministry
is responding to the cries of people
within its community by offering
more counseling, and financial,
emotional, and consultative support.

He said within the past several
weeks, he has received more than a
dozen calls from hurting people who
are either out of work, unable to
make their monthly obligations, or
on the verge of committing suicide.

“For some persons, they’ve been
forced to pull their kids out of pri-
vate schools, and for them that deci-
sion affected their pride.

“T guess after learning of other
folks in our community willing to
take their own lives, we’ve had calls
from some persons who wanted to
go down that same road, but we’ve
had to continue to encourage
them.”

Bishop Burrows said by no means
is his ministry, at its current level,
able to cater to the large numbers of
those in need, however they are try-
ing to do all they can to identify and
assist the discouraged.

Consisting of mostly teachers and

SEE page 29 Bishop Burrows and his wife


PG 28 ® Thursday, February 19, 2009

«The Christian Book Sho

Si gh ae gi Bb

Rosetta Street at Mt. Royal Avenue ¢ T: 322-1306

MYLES

vi,

DISCOVER THE LEADER YOU WERE MEANT TO BE!

BECOM]

LEADER

International known author and minister, Dr. Myles Munroe
We will be at The Christian Book Shop this Saturday February 21st at
3pm to sign his latest book, Becoming A Leader. You are invited to
come in and purchase your own autographed copy. That's this Saturday
at 3om, at The Christian Book Shop, Roseta Street,
Dr. Myles Munroe in person.



RELIGION

The Tribune

Following

IN the well-known story of the
Hebrews in the desert, we find the
prophet Nehemiah recounting: “You in
your great mercies did not forsake
them in the wilderness; the pillar of
cloud that led them in the way did not
leave them by day, nor the pillar of fire
by night that gave them light or the way
by which they should go” (Nehemiah
9:19). The idea was to have something
so visible to every person in the crowd
that they would not be able to doubt
that God was with them, and they
would follow the path that had been
chosen for them. What are the pillars
of clouds and pillars of fire in our lives?
How do we know that we are on the
right path? How can we feel sure that
God is with us?

Most of us had someone, and still
have some special people, who pray
with and for us, offering Godly counsel
from time to time. They may be living
out their truth to such a degree that we
admire them for their consistency. For
example, a financial advisor who is
doing well by following the same guide-
lines given is far more credible than
someone who is not taking the same
risks, or using the same principles, or
one who is almost bankrupt. Even the
best guide is fallible, so we need to look
for an infallible one.

Books written over the years that
have become classics are another great
source of enlightenment. There are
timeless spiritual aids written by the
famous and the obscure, along with
hymns and folk songs that highlight
various truths.

When you are in the desert, stripped
down to the lightest possible load that
you may have to carry for forty years, it
is quite a different story. It helps to be
with a group traveling in the same
direction to keep your company, help
you with the burdens and offer encour-
agement. It is wonderful to have spiri-
tual leaders who are obedient enough
to part the Red Sea and intercede on
your behalf. It is still necessary to keep
your own eye on the pillar of cloud and
the pillar of fire from time to time. You
do not want to just follow any crowd
and go anywhere.

Your prayer life allows God to reveal
to you the signs of your own times. As
you settle and become still, your own
thoughts will part like the Red Sea and
your spirit will walk through to the
other side, where you will find the
answers you need. Certain scriptures
will come to your remembrance, if you
read your Bible daily, and allow them
to become recorded permanently in
your memory bank. Your participation
in regular workshop and fellowship
opportunities exposes you to the wis-

’ REV. ANGELA
. PALACIOUS

dom and teaching of others, to their
experiences and hopeful expectations.
Your faithful and enthusiastic service
will bless you with the lessons only to
be learnt from giving and loving self-
lessly, with no desire for reciprocation
or favour being returned.

You want to stay with the crowd
when you lose sight of the pillars for
brief periods of time, but do not
become so dependent on others that
you neglect your ability to see and
believe for yourself. God wants to be
seen and heard in your everyday life in
quiet ways. God wants you to follow
the path of loving obedience. You will
not be forsaken, no matter how vast or
distressing your wilderness. God will
be your oasis in the desert, and keep
you fed and watered all along the way.

God wants to be
seen and heard in
your everyday life in
quiet ways. God wants
you to follow the path
of loving obedience.
You will not be forsaken,
no matter how vast or
distressing your
wilderness.
The Tribune

RELIGION

Thursday, February 19, 2009 ® PG 29

CC Standing in
Disestablishment and

Disendowment

IN 1729, the newly constituted
Parliament of the Bahamas effected
the establishment and endowment
of the Church of England in The
Bahamas under the Bishop of
London. On behalf of the English
Monarch, one of the governor's
duties was ‘to take notice of religion
and exercise it' and to oversee, ‘the
maintenance of true religion and
virtue’. The purpose was to minister
to the needs of the English colonists
and form a Christian Society. The
1662 Common Prayer Book was to
be read each Sunday and Holy Day
along with the rite of Blessed
Sacrament. This religious mandate
was to be accompanied by the erec-
tion and maintenance of schools to
facilitate slaves to convert to the
Christian religion.

In 1824 the Bahamas became part
of the newly established Diocese of
Barbados and Jamaica. In 1834 the
Anglican Church was charged with
preparing slaves for responsible cit-
izenship through civilisation and
conversion. All through the West
Indies, Anglican Churches spon-
sored education and teaching by
the use of the 1662 Prayer Book.
Anglicans believed that education
and liturgy, as prescribed by the
1662 Prayer Book, were intertwined
but the dissenters disagreed.

In 1836, the requirement that all
scholars were to be taught the litur-
gy and catechism of the established
church was vehemently protested by
Reverend Thomas Lofthouse,
Chairman of the Methodist Church
in the Bahamas. And the act form-
ing the Board of Education in 1841
was strongly protested by
Presbyterian Minister, William
McClure and Baptist Minister,
Henry Capron on the grounds that
it was biased toward the Anglican
Church. The 1841 Act was over-
turned in 1847 by a ruling that both
the board members and the school
curriculum were to be non-sectari-
an. Thus the dissenting ministers
achieved their goal of being ‘dead
level’ in education with the
Anglicans.

There was another area in which
the dissenters were not 'dead level’.
Only Anglican priests were allowed
to bury the dead in the public burial
grounds. Dissenting ministers could
not conduct committal services at the

1 ai 4

jf JM
) LAWLOR
a

graveside of their deceased mem-
bers. The Presbyterians were out-
raged when two of their prominent
members were denied this last rite
and appealed to the church wardens.
The wardens laid the matter before
Governor Gregory but he ignored it
and the wardens refused to consider
it further. In 1849, eight hundred cit-
izens petitioned the House of
Assembly praying for the removal of
this restriction. Finally, the governor
referred the matter to Rev Aubrey
Spence D.D, the Bishop of Jamaica.
The bishop not only approved of the
removal of the ban but advised that a
bill be passed to remove the prohibi-
tion - the bill was passed the follow-
ing year.

In the early part of the 19th centu-
ry, the Anglican and Presbyterian
families, acting as a unit, ruled the
country, with the Baptists and
Methodists having no influence in
government. Denominational differ-
ences over the education curriculum,
a ban on the use of burial grounds
for non-Anglican ministers and the
lack of Government funds to rebuild
non-Anglican churches after the
1866 hurricane led to a split between
the Anglicans and Presbyterians,
whereupon the latter formed an
alliance with the Methodists.

This alliance proved to be very
important in the political arena.

On Sunday, April 26, 1868, prior to
the election in Harbour Island,
Methodist Minister, F A Moon, told
the people from the pulpit that the
governor had sent down a number of
men but that they were not to be
daunted:

“Next week the trial will
come...let there be such an outburst
of loyalty, not only to Methodism
but to yourselves...the Churchmen
are here, they must take the conse-
quences...the Policemen have
arrived; they have come to eat your
Johnny Cakes”.

Hearing that over 200 Hercules
Clubs had arrived that morning for

use on the day of the election,

Harbour Island Police Magistrate i
urged }
Governor Rawson to send down 50 }
men from the 2nd WI Regiment to :
supplement the detachment of }

George C Camplejohn

police under G A McGregor.
After the election,

Abaco, Harbour Island

body united with the

which they were opposed, and in
Eleuthera without a contest”. The
winning candidates on the highly
charged election day at Harbour
Island were
Menendez

and S Higgs, and

opposed to the endowed churches
had lost their 4 leaders and returned
only 7 (instead of 11) members,

bers from 11 electoral districts.

As a result of the 1868 election, i
the Methodists took control of the }
Lower House but Presbyterians :

controlled the Legislative and :
Executive Council. Robert H }
Sawyer, formerly the }

Representative for Harbour Island, : ikinadoieike task Of renewals

now a Methodist Member of the : Bs : :
House of Assembly for the Nassau ; connection in his family, this years
City District, presented a resolution } d idier of Christ.”
for the disestablishment and dis- ? “7 peer ee se th eae it
endowment of the United Churches : eee
of England and Ireland within the :
Bahamas Islands and the Church of }
St. Andrews. The bill was eventual- }
ly passed in 1869. The Methodists :
vowed to take full control and from :
that time there was considerable :
the }
Methodist and Presbyterian groups }
and they almost became almost one :

family - an oligarchy that controlled :

intermarrying between

the Bahamas for many years.

(Next Week - Part 18 - Roman
Catholics gain a foothold ‘Upon }

These Rocks’)

Governor : ‘
Rawson deplored Moon's actions. } feelings of being to proud to ask for
He reported that “in the Islands of :

and ; s10on.
Eleuthera, in which Methodism i
clieily prevails, the members oe : don’t like to ask for handouts.”
Baptists, who's coloured leader : : .
used all his influence in their favour, } cases eepeieen saison tia lee
carried away every seat by large }

majorities in the two islands in } neighbour or spanking a neighbour’s

: child in their parents’ absence if they

? misbehaved. Bishop Burrows said the
? abandonment of traditional communi-
: i ty relations has contributed to the rise
Methodists, M ? in crime, increased pride, and the
? inability for many to ask for help
Presbyterian, G W Higgs. Overall }
the Methodists, who were radically ;



the gap for
Golden Gates

FROM page 26

i other government workers, Bishop
? Burrows said his congregation has not

been greatly affected by the recent
economic tsunami. He explained those
mostly affected and seeking support
from his ministry, are those in the
Golden Gates community.

As he explained, a common symp-
tom for those that are suffering are

help, which can then lead to depres-

“T’ve discovered in my years of min-
istry, that Bahamians are persons who

He said while growing up in South

seemed like the natural thing to do.
This included sharing a meal with a

when in need.
To identify the far reaching effects

? of pride in the Bahamian culture,

? Bishop Burrows discussed a recent

? family gathering, where his once close-
while the Pesbyterians, whose own }
church was endowed, joined the }
Methodists adding 3 to 5 seats ( for }
a total of eight seats).” The House :

of Assembly comprised of 26 mem- : >
? was happening, we came to one con-

knit extended family are today oblivi-
ous to the issues that affect other
members.

“When we really began to talk and
examine each other to discover what

clusion, and that was that we’ve drift-
ed very far apart.”

He said although there were annual
family reunions for the past 35 years
in his family, there is now an obvious
divide among them.

Bishop Burrows said as he is now

aptly titled pastoral theme: “A faithful

ment to the larger community.

INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
ate AM corse er-7(6 LT
on Mondays
PG 30 ® Thursday, February 19, 2009

ernie

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE act of contemplation for many
Catholic followers, is considered an
important aspect in connecting with and
understanding one’s walk with God.

The practise which dates back to fourth
century Christians, has also been refer-
enced in several books published by three
Trappist monks of St Joseph's Abbey in
Spencer, Massachusetts in the 1970s.

This past weekend, the contemplative
outreach of Los Angeles, California, held
a retreat at the Emmaus Centre, Bernard
Road.

Consisting of around thirty participants
from several inter-denominational groups,
the attendants participated in a silent
weekend where they learnt methods of
Centering Prayer or meditation.

Included in the group, the majority of
whom were women, was a 17-year-old
young man who hailed the event as a life
changing experience.

Marie Howard, on her third visit to the
Bahamas conducted the retreat. She first
introduced the practise to members of the
Bahamian Catholic family more than 10
years ago.

Mrs Howard is an international presen-
ter, working along with Father Thomas
Keating, one of the founders of
Contemplative Outreach.

The organisation which promotes this
method of prayer as a preparation for the
gift of contemplation and the living of the
contemplative way of life, offered four
conferences during the weekend while all
participants remained in silence.

The participants also took part in multi-
ple experiences of the Centering Prayer
scattered through each day, and were
offered sacred tabled readings as food for
thought.

Readings for the retreat included:
Open Mind, Open Heart, and Invitation to
Love by Thomas Keating, Centering
Prayer and Inner Awakening by Cynthia
Bourgeaul, and Silence by Carl Arico.

On Sunday, the group attended the
Sunday worship at St Anselm’s Roman
Catholic Church on Bernard Road, where
they fellowshiped with church members in
silence.

During the closing session, participants
described the experience as “refreshing”,
“renewing”, “restful”, “affirming”,
“peaceful” and “enthusiastic”. They were
overall surprised at their ability to remain
silent for such a long period.

The presenter in a final blessing,
signed the hands of the participants and
prayed a peaceful prayer, asking the
attendants to trust and know who God is.

Many participants also promised to
meet together in groups to support each
other in continuing the practise of
Centering Prayer.

As a result of the retreat, a core group
has been formed to spread and develop
this particular method of prayer among
Christians in the Bahamas.

Longtime Catholic Joan Missick who
was a part of the event, said this experi-
ence allowed her to establish a deeper
friendship with God as she was able to
become intimate with him

“Our faith is rich and this was just one
part of it, however it was a powerful
experience.”

RELIGION

The Tribune

behead ae hUole



te Bae

"a Ke

Annunciation Greek -Orthodox-GC hurch
presents

ORTHODOX ICONOGRAPHER
ELIAS DAMIANAKIS

February 21" & February 22"

Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, West Street

Admission $3

Presentations at 2pm, 4pm, 7pm
Topics inchide: Bywvantine influence on

western art. Vheologw of Color, amecl
Tceonography ws. Western Religious Paintings


The Tribune

RELIGION

Jesus

suicide”

m@ By DR MYLES MUNROE

DID Jesus the Christ commit sui-
cide? Absolutely no! Did Jesus Christ
kill himself? Absolutely no! Was the
death of Jesus a result of personal
hopelessness and despair? Absolutely
no! Was the death of Jesus Christ self-
imposed? Absolutely no! Did Jesus
Christ die under compulsion?
Absolutely no!

In fact, the death of Jesus Christ can-
cels any and all justification for the act
of suicide and was intended to provide
a reason and desire for life and living.
His divine love imposed on him the
decision to become a substitute for our
deserved death sentence produced by
our sin.

Did Jesus Christ lay his life down on
his own accord? Absolutely yes! Did
Jesus willingly offer his life as a sacri-
fice for mankind? Absolutely yes! Was
the death of Jesus Christ initiated by
God the Father? Absolutely yes!

On a recent occasion, I made a state-
ment that I wish to clarify and correct
to prevent any misunderstanding or
misinterpretation of my intent, posi-
tion or theological convictions regard-

ing the issue of Suicide. My statement
was poorly worded and stated and it
may have suggested that the death of
Jesus was a suicidal act and thus may
justify the actions of those who did or
may intend to inflict terminal harm
upon their own self. This was absolute-
ly not my intent, but rather quite the
opposite.

I therefore wish to officially with-
draw any words or statement that may
have implied, suggested, or seemed to
convey the notion that the death of
Jesus was an act of suicide, and I apol-
ogise to anyone whom I may have
caused confusion or misunderstanding.

The redemptive mystery of the
death of Jesus has been, and will
always be a complex issue that exceeds
the limitations of the intellectual and
mental faculties of humans and defies
our ability to explain it. The many
questions above indicate the magni-
tude of this perceived dilemma and
mystery.

The death of Jesus Christ was a sov-
ereign act of love initiated by God the
Creator in response to the rebellion of
his ultimate creation, mankind. This
self-initiated sacrificial death of Jesus

ST a ee tat ky

Christ was no suicide, but an expres-
sion of selfless love for man.

Matt 20:28 says, “-just as the Son of
Man did not come to be served, but to
serve, and to give his life as a ransom
for many." NIV

It is also important to note that the
motivation for most, if not all acts of
suicide, is the result of an individual
being driven to an unbearable state of
depression, despair, hopelessness and
loss of meaning and purpose.

There is no question as to the dispo-
sition, mental state or attitude of Jesus
Christ during his thirty three and a half
years of earthly living; or the motiva-
tion for his death, which he constantly
declared was not for his personal ben-
efit or a result of personal hopeless-
ness, depression or despair, but an
intentional act of redemptive substitu-
tion sacrificed for all men. Jesus did
not die because he could not live any-
more, he died so we could live. He died
so we could find a reason to live forev-
er and face every day with hope and
purpose.

The following Scriptures are his own
words:

John 10:17-18 “The reason my Father
loves me is that I lay down my life-only
to take it up again. 18 No one takes it
from me, but I lay it down of my own
accord. I have authority to lay it down
and authority to take it up again. This
command I received from my Father."
NIV

The Scriptures further state that His
death was imposed by God Himself
and is a result of a divine imperative:

Isa 53:4 “Surely he hath borne our
grief, and carried our sorrows: yet we
did esteem him stricken, smitten of
God, and afflicted.” K]V

Isa 53:6 “All we like sheep have gone
astray; we have turned every-one to his
own way, and the LORD hath laid on
him the iniquity of us all.” KJV

Isa 53:10 “Yet it pleased the LORD to
bruise him; he hath put him to grief:
when thou shall make his soul an offer-
ing for sin, he shall see his seed, he shall
prolong his days, and the pleasure of
the LORD shall prosper in his hand.”
KIV

It is essential to note, according to

Thursday, February 19, 2009 ® PG 31

the above statements, that the death of
Jesus Christ was orchestrated by God
himself and not by mankind. In
essence, if the doctrine of the Trinity is
in fact and truth a reality, which I
believe it to be, then the death of Jesus,
the Son of God, was imposed on him
by the Father, the God-Head, for the
redemption of mankind. Our sins were
laid on him by the heavenly Father. In
essence, God sacrificed himself for
everyone.

It was this mystery that I attempted
to express and explain in a recent
presentation, but my concern is that
my words were poorly chosen and had
the potential to be misleading. My
original intent was to state that the
death of Jesus was a divine self-
imposed sacrifice not for himself or as
an escape from personal pressure or
despair, but rather to take away our
pressure and despair, so that we could
have and abundantly desire life.

Therefore, I want to state emphati-
cally that I do not believe that the
death of Jesus was a suicide, but on
the contrary, it cancels the need and
justification for suicide. He died so we
could live. He laid down his life so we
could take ours up every day and face
its challenges. He lost his life so we
don’t have to lose ours. He took our
hopelessness so we could have hope.

Finally, it is God our Creator who
gave us life by creating and breathing
into us “the breath of life.” Therefore,
because we did not give ourselves life,
we have no legal or moral right to
take our own lives or the lives of oth-
ers. I therefore strongly warn all of us
to avoid any consideration of self-
imposed destruction, but rather to
cast all our cares upon the One who
carried our despair and can restore
our hope and desire to live beyond
any temporary problem. If all prob-
lems are temporary, then the option of
suicide is an attempt to apply a per-
manent solution to a temporary prob-
lem.

Remember the words of Jesus is the
gospel of John 10:10 which says, “The
thief comes only to steal and kill and
destroy; I have come that they may
have life, and have it to the full.” NIV

e With the sudden rise of suicidal tendencies in our
communities it is imperative that we all become our
sisters’ and brothers’ keeper with a keen sensitivity
to the state of mind of those in our families, work-
place and neighbourhoods. The spirit of suicide is
usually preceded by a string sense of hopelessness,
depression and sense of despair.

There are signs that you can watch for in the behav-
ior of others that may help you recognise the Signs
Of Depression and Possible Suicide Risk, some of
these include:

Lat: ying) any mention of dying, dis-
appearing, jumping, shooting oneself, or other
types of self-harm.

through death, divorce, separation,
broken relationship, loss of job, money, status,

self-confidence, self-esteem, loss of religious
faith, loss of interest in friends, sex, hobbies,

activities previously enjoyed
Se a

anxious, tired, indecisive, apathetic

(ang eueiBekaviour can't concentrate on
school, work, routine tasks

qT Cm id insomnia, often with

early waking or oversleeping, nightmares
loss of appetite and

weight, or overeating

strual abnormalities (often missed periods)
going crazy, harming self

or others

feem) fecling worthless, shame, over-
whelming guilt, self-hatred, “everyone would be

better off without me"

Lea rrr ra AREAS HL
never get better; that nothing will ever change.

Other things to watch for- suicidal impulses,
statements, plans; giving away favourite things;
previous suicide attempts, substance abuse, mak-
ing out wills, arranging for the care of pets,
extravagant spending, agitation, hyperactivity,
restlessness or lethargy.

For additional information I recommend you
click the following link or Google "suicide warn-
ing signs": http://www.sfsuicide.org/html/warn-
suokeavolwoedl

Let us do our part in building a Community of
hope and a network of support for others espe-
cially during this time of social and economic
challenges.


Godfrey Arthur/ACM PR

PG 32 © Thursday, February 19, 2009



KURTH
WALLCE on a
scale signifying
St. Georges
ACM branch
Healhty Lifestyle
Challenge.




Godfrey Arthur/ACM PR



RELIGION

The Tribune

GET SET FOR MEN!

The Anglican Church Men con-
ference committee began planning
for its upcoming conference to be
held on March 19-21. The venue
will be St Gregory's Anglican
Church on Carmichael Road.
Delegates from around the family
of islands are expected to be in
attendance. This year’s theme is
Men! Launch in Faith. There will be
dynamic speakers and workshops
for attendees.

All men in the Anglican commun-
ion are urged to attend.
Registration can be done through
the various branch presidents.

Pictured are members of the 37th
annual ACM Conference
Committee. Back row, standing left
to right: Mario Williams, ACM
Council Secretary, Keith Sands,
Committee member, Leonard
Mcphee, ACM Council Treasurer,
Danny Tynes, committee member,
Phillip Watkins, committee member,
Ken O'Brien, committee member,
Seated L-R: Trevor Bethel, commit-
tee member, Kurth Wallace, ACM
Council President, Kevin Ryan,
ACM Conference Chairman and
Erick Hepburn, committee member.



MEMEBERS of St. =
George's ACM. at

ACM PROMOTES HEALTHY LIFESTYLES LIVING FOR MEN

The Anglican Church Men’s (ACM) branch at St
George's Anglican Church has adopted this year as it's
healthy lifestyles living mandate. To start things off,
group member Wendell Barry who is also a member of
US TOO spoke to the men about prostrate cancer. Mr
Barry informed the men that a prostate check up is a
must for all men especially those over the age of 40. He
stressed that there have been many early diagnoses
and urged men to get regular check-ups. Mr Barry also
indicated that there are free screenings throughout the
year at various clinics around the island which men
can take full advantage of.

“While the numbers have increased over the

years, there is still more that needs to be done
through education,” Mr Barry said.

During the meeting, President Patrick Carroll reit-
erated the need to live healthier and challenged
members to a weight loss competition from March to
December.

The branch meets every second Thursday in the
month in the parish hall beginning at 8 pm Officers
include: President Patrick Carroll, Vice- President,
Godfrey Arthur, Secretary, Trevor Davies, Assistant
Secretary, Ivan Carroll, Treasurer, Roscow Davies,
Assistant Treasurer, Herbert Scott, Chaplin Leslie L
Smith.






PAGE 1

GRAND Bahama Power Company’s 55 per cent majority share holder was last night said to have sold a 50 per cent stake in the holding firm for its Caribbean operations to a Middle Eastern energy company. Gulf newspapers reported that Japanese-based Marubeni Corporation had sold a 50 per cent shareholding in its Caribbean utilities holding vehicle to The Abu Dhabi National Energy Company PJSC (Taqa 55.4 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power Company. N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.73THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER CLOUDS ANDSUN HIGH 75F LOW 62F n By TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net P OLICE are investigating claims that a six-year-old gov ernment primary school student w as sexually assaulted on school p roperty by a group of older boys, reportedly enrolled at a separate secondary school. T he assault reportedly took place shortly after school was dismissed at 3 pm on January2 3. T he girl, said to be about six years old, was taken to hospital for injures from the attack, heado f the CDU Superintendent Elsworth Moss said. Her present condition and the extent of her injuries were not known up to press time yesterday. The name of the school has been withheld to protect the identity of the victim. Education Minister Carl Bethel yesterday said education officials turned the matter over to the police the same day the attack occurred. But at least one concerned citizen, who learned of the incident through her granddaugh Incident r eportedly took place on sc hool pr operty The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY I N S I D E CLASSIFIEDSTRADER I N S I D E CARS! CARS! CARS!!! CLASSIFIEDSTRADER JOBSAND HELPWANTED OBITUARIES and RELIGION INTODAY’STRIBUNE L L O O A A D D S S O O F F Claims of student sex assault on six-year-old Police officers alleged to have ‘hustled’ or extorted money THE Complaints and Corruption Unit of the Roy al Bahamas Police Force is i nvestigating two new incidents in which officers are alleged to have “hustled” or e xtorted money from indi viduals within the past two weeks. T he first case, involving a g overnment official who owns a stall at Arawak Cay, first began nearly two weeksa go when a senior officer visited his stall. Not wanting to be identi f ied for fear of being persecuted by elements within government, the source alleges that the officer in q uestion approached his stall with a former candidate of a political party in tow. As his stall was busy with people, the proprietor said the officer approached him quietly and informed him that there were a number of complaints about his estab lishment. He pulled me aside and said, ‘Look here, we been having meetings, but don’t w orry I have you straight. Give me something.’ So one of my employees who wasn earby went into the drawer a nd took out $200 and gave it to him,” he said. A week later, the senior o fficer returned. This time he demanded a weekly stipend of $500, the sources aid. Visiting the stall during the height of the evening, the officer approached the DJ and told him to “shut o ff” the music. Watching the event unfold from the sidelines, the owner of the stall said he approached the officer SEE page 11 The RBPF Complaints and Corruption Unit investigating F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f CHIN A’SVICEPREMIEROFSTATE ATCLIFTONHERITAGESITE SEE page 12 n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@ tribunemedia.net THE Vice Premier of State Council for the People’s Republic of China left New Providence yesterday for Grand Bahama after tak ing an early morning tour of the Clifton Heritage site and the agricultural facility at Lucayan Tropical. Having just signed a memorandum of understanding between the Bahamas government and the People’s Republic of China on Agri culture and Marine Resources matters on Tues day, His Excellency Hui Liangyu showed a keen interest in the development and sustainability of food crops at the multi-million dollar produce facility. Guided on the tour by the general manager and main grower Tim Hauber, Mr Liangyu asked questions about the stages of growth for the lettuce and tomato plants as his contingent of HISEXCELLENCYHUI LIANGYU Vice Premier of the S tate Council of The People’s Republic of China takes in the stunning waters of the Bahamas. MOREPHOTOSONPAGESIX SEE page 11 A MAN initially charged with attempted murder was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday after being arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court on a murder charge. Police have now charged Heico Duran Fowler, 23, of Palm Breeze Road in the January 16 shooting death of Oscarsin Williams. Fowler was on bail on an attempted mur der charge in relation to the incident. According to police, the victim and another man got into an altercation sometime after 8 pm on Friday, January 16, on Cox Way. During the altercation, according to police, Williams was shot in his chest. He was taken to hos pital where he died on February 15. According to court dockets, Fowler intentionally caused Williams’ death on February SEE page 11 MRS NOELLE ROBERTS, 39, who suffered a seizure while swimming in St Andrew’s swim ming pool Tuesday afternoon died at Doctor’s Hospital yes terday afternoon without gain ing consciousness. Mrs Roberts, the mother of two young boys, is the wife of R Montagu Roberts, and the youngest daughter of Mrs Susan Roberts and the late Mr Noel Roberts. Her death was unex pected. “Noelle had battled epileptic W oman dies after suf fering seizure in pool SEE page 14 THE Tribune has returned to Freeport. Mr Robert Osbourne, owner of Bellevue Business Depot, Queen’s Highway, has entered into an agreement with Regional Air Charter Service to fly the morning newspaper into Freeport for Bellevue Business Depot customers. To cover the cost of delivery, The Tribune will now be sold for $1.25 in Freeport. T ribune returns to Freeport SEE page 14 GB Power Company majority shareholder ‘sells 50% stake in Caribbean operations holding fir Man charged with murder of Oscarsin Williams Heico Duran Fowler F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 12

PAGE 2

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 3 26,7,21$9$,/$%/()XOO7LPH(PHUJHQF\,&8XUVH 0XVWKDYHDWOHDVWWKUHH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHSRVW JUDGXDWLRQ +ROGHURIDFXUUHQW%/6t$&/6&HUWLFDWH 0XVWEHLQGHSHQGHQWUHVSRQVLEOHZLWKJRRG FRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV $WWUDFWLYH&RPSHQVDWLRQDFNDJH 6HQG&9WRJLJLDLUDPEXODQFH#FRUDOZDYHFRPE\ )HEUXDU\WK CHARITABLE SUPPORTA Heartfelt DonationFamily Guardian and its group health division, BahamaHealth, are major sponsors of this year’s “Celebrate Heart Month,” which runs through February. Family Guardian’s Vice President, Group Life and Health Division, Linda Jarrett (lefts sponsorship pledge toNellieBrownoftheBahamasHeartAssociation.Inmakingthepresentation,Mrs.Jarrettnoted: e are happy to partner with the Heart Association in this important health initiative which runs concurrentlywithBahamaHealth’s100-DayChallenge.BahamaHealth’sfocusistobringawareness andsolutionstotheserioushealthrisksassociatedwithobesity,includingheartdisease,andour partnership with the Heart Association is very timely A DIVISION OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating 100 DAYCHALLENGE n B y MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net FISHING, spearing, setting traps and diving c onch will be permanently prohibited in the country’s first six Marine Protected Areas, Cabinet has agreed. A network of protected areas across the Bahamas will be established in the Abaco Cays; Bimini; South Eleuthera; from ChubC ay to Whale Cay in the Berry Islands, and two sites in Exuma, from the Jewfish Cays to mainland George Town, and the area east of Blacks Rocks between little Exuma and North Long Island. A lthough the precise boundaries have yet to be established in Abaco, Bimini, South Eleuthera and southern Exuma, Minister of Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright said he hopes negotiations will be c ompleted “as soon as possible.” A 1999 study determined the scientific validity of a list of marine reserve sites foll owing observation of overfishing, habitat loss and the degradation of water quality to marine life resources. The first five Fishery Reserves were created in 2000 after thorough consultation with local communities, stakeholders and scientists. Once established, the removal of marine resources will be prohibited in Marine Protected Areas to promote healthy marine habi-t ats and sustainable fisheries. Key fishery species are expected to increase and create a greater reproductive output and replenishment of fish outside the reserves. And it is hoped more plentiful marine resources will contribute to the economic growth and a better quality of life for Bahamians. Mr Cartwright said: “Now the Cabinet has agreed, we have to put the monitoring in p lace, like who is going to monitor the areas. “We want to consult local people, and espec ially the local fishermen who work there, because that is their home ground, their backyard and front yard. However, it will help for b reeding and nurturing baby fish, crawfish, conch and whatever else in the area because once no one can fish there they can breed and spill out over into other areas and provide species for fishermen. It will help ensure that we have fish and conch for years to come.” Director of the Department of Marine Resources Michael Braynen explained that while there is currently seasonal protectiono f fish in place, and fishing is prohibited in Bahamas National Trust National Parks, this is the first network of protected areas administered by the Department. “We don’t see the establishment of a number of marine resources as the salvation of commercial fisheries in the Bahamas, but we see it as one of the things that needs to happen. We expect the establishment of this netw ork, and there will be more to come, to make some contribution to helping us maint ain sustainable fisheries in the Bahamas,” Mr Braynen said. STUDENTS and teachers of t he Inagua All Age School were presented with hurricane reliefg ifts by the New Providence Methodist Churches and Queen’s C ollege. At a recent special assembly at the island’s school, Elmena Bethell, vice-president of the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church (BCMCh anded out the gifts to every student and teacher. A fter hearing of the plight of the students as a result of Hurri cane Ike in September 2008, the Nassau-based staff of the BCMC met in a special meeting to dis c uss the impact of the hurricane on the children of the island. N ot only were the homes of the children damaged in the hurr icane, but the students also missed weeks of classes as a result of the damage caused to the school and utility infrastruc ture on the island. We often forget the little ones when disasters strike. We focus o n repairing homes and cleaning up communities, but we never s top to realise the long-term traumatic effects of the disasters on the children. It is very hard on them to experience those terri fying winds and the storm’s after math,” said Mrs Bethell. Immediately after the passing o f Hurricane Ike over the island, the BCMC activated its disasterr elief agency, Methodist Habitat, and coordinated supplies and volu nteer teams who travelled to the island to repair the roofs of homes. More than 50 homes and two churches were repaired by 112 volunteers. R ev Bill Higgs, president of the Methodist Conference, said t hat he felt it was important to do something tangible for the child ren of Inagua. “We worked with Christopher Pinder, chairperson of the Inagua Methodist Church, to get the names and grade levels of every student on the island. These names were then distributed throughout our churches in New Providence and special gifts were purchased and addressed to each child,” said Rev Higgs. In addition to a personalised gift, each student also received a new backpack with school sup plies. Andrea Gibson, principal of Queen’s College, also participated in the special meeting and said, “Queen’s College is a part of the Bahamas Conference of the Methodist Church and we, too, had thought about doing something for the Inagua School.” Cabinet agrees on Marine Protected Areas Fishing, spearing and setting traps to be banned in six zones Move to promote healthy habitats and sustainable fisheries Nassau Methodist Churches and Queen’s College give hurricane relief gifts to Inagua children INAGUA ALL AGE SCHOOL was presented with hurricane relief gifts.

PAGE 3

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3 Police seize $25,000 worth of suspected cocaine Gunman who shot officer earlier injured another man, says witness In brief n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Police seized $25,000 worth of suspected cocaine and took a 37-year-oldman into custody during a drug bust in the Lucaya area on Monday. Press liaison officer Asst Supt Clarence Reckley reported that police, acting on information, searched a property in Lucaya at around 5.30pm. During the search of the premises, police discovered a black taped package containing suspected cocaine. Mr Reckley said the drugs weighed 2.2 lbs and have an estimated street value of $25,000. Investigations are continuing into the matter. n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net BAGGAGE handlers at Lynden Pindling I nternational Airport claim the new trolleys issued by the Nassau Airport Development Company are not adequate for the job. The porters, who used to carry large loads of luggage on hefty wooden carts which held 10 or more bags at a time, are now forced to use folding metal carts. But large packages brought in by Bahamians after shopping trips to the United States are now falling off the new carts which the porters say are insufficient. They are not able to stack as many bags on the smaller, neater, better looking trolleys, and luggage will not stack as high, they say. Shonalee Johnson, Manager of Communi cations for NAD, said the folding trolleys were brought in on January 12 in an effort to meet international standards. She said: “They were brought in as part of a customer service initiative and what we are trying to do is work with the porters to create a better customer service at the airport and meet international standards. We brought in 20 carts which are able to be folded and we hope to introduce 20 more in the near future.” S S t t a a n n d d a a r r d d Ms Johnson maintains the carts are of a standard size used in airports around the world and while the old trolleys may have held more, they were not necessarily best for the airport. She added: “They may have been able to have more bags on them, but it’s a safety issue, carrying more bags is not necessarily safer.” The communications manager said she is aware that some porters have expressed concern and NAD is working with them to resolve the issue. n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE retrial of the February 2006 murder of local business-m an Keith Carey continued in the Supreme Court yesterday with three prosecution witnesses being called to give testimony. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged in Mr Carey’s murder and are also facing charges of armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. Detective Sergeant Anton Rahming, the first witness to take the stand, told the court that on Monday, February 27, 2006, he received information regarding a shooting and also received information regarding the victim. He told the court that as a result of this, he and Detective Sergeant 217 Ferguson went to Doctors Hospital. The officer told the court that upon arrival, he saw medical personnel attending to a lightskinned man who he later iden tified as Keith Carey. Sergeant Rahming told the court that he observed a brasscoloured projectile fall from Mr Carey’s clothes while a nurse was removing them. He told the court that he collected several articles of Mr Carey’s clothing, which he handed over to another officer. The second prosecution wit ness (name withheld court that she had known murd er accused Jamal Glinton five years prior to the incident. She testified that she slept at Glinton’s Nassau Village home on the night of February 26, 2006. The witness told the court that on the morning of February 27, 2006, two men came to Glinton’s home in a white Nissan Maxima. She described the driver of the vehicle as skinny and fair skinned. She told the court that she and Glinton got into the car with the two men and they travelled to Homestead Street where a female friend of hers lives. The witness testified that after her friend got dressed for work, they both got into the car with the three men and drove to Police Headquarters on East Street, where she and her friend worked with the Englerston Urban Renewal Project. B B a a r r r r a a c c k k s s The woman told the court she and her friend were dropped off at the police barracks at around 9.45am. The woman told the court that she never saw Glinton again that day. Reginald Rigby, an auto body repair man and the final prosecution witness to testify yesterday, told the court on Monday, February 27, 2006, that he was at work when two men pulled up in a green Nissan Maxima. Mr Rigby said one of the men asked him how much it would cost to paint a vehicle. Mr Rigby testified that he told the mant hat it would cost $1,000. The witness told the court that the men left and about 20 minutes later, the man who had been a passenger in the green Maxima returned in a white Maxima. He said that the man gave him a deposit of $500 and gave his name as Morley. Despite an objection by attorney Craig Butler, Mr Rigby was allowed to identify Dwight Knowles as the man who had identified himself as Morley. According to Mr Rigby, the man wanted the car’s colour to be changed from white to black. He told the court that the vehicle did not have licence plates. The retrial into the February 2006 murder of businessman Keith Carey began on Monday. On February 27, 2006, Carey, 43, a married father of three a nd former High School coach was shot and killed on the steps of The Bank of the Bahamas on Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able to d eposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station, which he operated. Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl GrantBethel, Stephanie Pintard, Anthony Delaney and Lennox Coleby are prosecuting the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown and attorney PerryA lbury is representing Dwight Knowles. A MAN who shot a police officer in the leg in Nassau Village on Tuesday afternoon had shot another man three times in the leg that morning, according to an eye witness. The police shooting incident had “nothing to do” with any tension between police and Nassau Village residents, said local Tia Thurston. Meanwhile, according to Ms Thurston, the man who shot the policeman was also a close friend of Onado Newbold, the man murdered in Nassau Village in January. The two men worked for the same person, she said. W W e e a a p p o o n n Ms Thurston alerted police to the gunman’s whereabouts when she saw them on patrol in the area at around 4pm on Tuesday after he had threat ened her with his weapon. “I flagged them down and I told them that he had a gun and he pull it on me and he ran through one yard to go over onto Alexandra Boule vard East. So when police gone round I ran round ... when I went round all I hear was shots just start opening up. “He was shooting at police and that’s when police started shooting at him,” she said. Contrary to some reports, the resident claimed, the man was alone when he was con fronted by police, not with a group. Messages left for senior police officers seeking comment on the matter were not returned up to press time yesterday. However, another police source said that they are nearing the end of their investigation and will be in a better position to comment on the matter today. Prosecution witnesses testify in Keith Carey murder retrial S UPREME COURT Officer tells of seeing medical personnel attend victim in hospital Share your news The T ribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 3221986 and share your story. TROLLEY AWFUL! New carts are inadequate, say baggage handlers n L YNDEN PINDLING INTERNA TIONAL AIRPORT

PAGE 4

E DITOR, The Tribune. I believe at this time our thoughts should be directed as a people toward national development. May I suggest the following: 1) Create a township on the island of Andros preferably in North Andros Everything should be done to encourage a population shift from New Providence to the family islands as soon as possible. It is quite possible that much of the crime occurring in New Providence is due to the overcrowding of our population in New Providence. T his can be facilitated if we consider: a) Putting a Defence Force base on the island of Andros thereby creating the muchneeded focal point. b) Developing a plan for a properly laid out city or town rather than allowing one to spring up on its own. c) Setting aside a portion of the annual budget over a five 10 year period to develop the nucleus of the new city since our resources are limited. d) Developing the abundance of Crown land into acreage p lots making it available to persons who agree to move to the family islands and who agree to build within a specified period of time thereby giving landless Bahamians a stake in their own country. 2) Provide the economic stimulus to BAIC or other agencies for the construction of homes and businesses. 3) Relocate a branch of The College of The Bahamas/University of The Bahamas on Andros. 4) Develop a fleet of fishing v essels thereby encouraging the development of our marine resources and creating much needed employment for a seg ment of the Bahamian populace. It may be observed that too much Crown land is lying vacant when too many Bahamians cannot afford a parcel of land in New Providence or the family islands. In relation to the same idea, I ask the following questions: Do we have a national plan of development for our country for the next five, 10 or 15 years? What plans are being made to provide employment for the thousands of high school graduates leaving school every year? Are we prepared to diversify o ur economy in any way and where may we start? With the aid of the United Nations or any other agency can we get any technical assistance with a development plan? Since governments over a period of the last several years have not come up with any feasible national development plan is it time for the private sector or civic groups to put their heads together and come up with a plan to present to government? I do not think we can leave this to chance. There are far too many uninhabited Bahamian islands which are left v acant and invite illegal immigrants to fill the vacuum. Will our authorities please give these suggestions some serious consideration? Finally, can we look at creating coconut plantations? The bamboo plant which should grow well in our climate? The growing of sisal? And why not invite suggestions from groups such as The College of The Bahamas rather than saying what can't be done? The worst thing we can do as a people is to do nothing. S OUTH BEACH RESIDENT Nassau, February 16, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 Obama offers carrots for mortgage firms WASHINGTON (AP gage lenders that candidate Barack Obamaa ccused last year of causing the housing mess would get a windfall from President Obama'sg overnment under his foreclosure rescue pro g ramme. T he $75 billion plan announced Wednesday h as the potential to be far more effective than past federal efforts to help struggling homeo wners lower their mortgage payments and stay in their homes. But for that to happen, investors i n complex mortgage securities have to agree to participate something the government has sof ar failed miserably to persuade them to do. That's where the goodies for the muchm aligned industry come in. Companies would get $1,000 for agreeing to give a strapped homeowner a lower monthly payment instead of foreclosing more if the borrower hasn't yet fallen behind on what theyo we. They can get up to another $3,000 over the next three years. And they get government i nsurance to cover part of the money they might lose if the homeowner ultimately defaults on the house anyway. Last October in Reno, Nev., Obama vowed, "I won't let banks and lenders off the hook w hen it was their greed and irresponsibility that got us into this mess." But the outlines of hisp lan were an acknowledgment that he will need cooperation from firms that collect mortgage p ayments known as loan servicers if he intends to reach his goal of preventing up to 9 million foreclosures. "The truth is that at the end of the day, loan modification remains voluntary, so the servicers n eed to see it as sufficient incentive to participate," said Andrew Jakabovics of the Centre for A merican Progress, who has worked with Oba ma's team on housing issues. S till, Jakabovics called some of the payments an "unnecessary windfall" that is "overly gen erous" particularly since avoiding a costly foreclosure is a financial imperative for mortgage servicers anyway. " You still have the very serious question of what kind of incentives you're providing for w hat's essentially bad behaviour," said David C. John, an analyst at the conservative Heritage F oundation. Even tough mortgage industry critics con cede, however, that such enticements are necessary to get companies to step up and help homeowners, given the legal and financial challenges that modifying home loans can pose. "It's just what needs to happen, wherever the b lame lies" for the housing mess, said Debbie Goldstein, the executive vice president of the Centre for Responsible Lending, a consumer group. The plan also abandons an aspect oft he Democratic-written foreclosure rescue programme enacted last year that proved anathema t o mortgage holders: requiring that they take a loss up front before the government would help renegotiate a loan. The programme failed miserably, helping fewer than 40 homeowners com p ared to the 400,000 promised. Under Obama's new plan, mortgage holders o nly have to take a hit on the interest payments t hey receive each month, and would in most c ases be made whole by the government for t he value of their loans. "It's a veritable garden full of carrots," said H oward Glaser, a mortgage industry consultant who served in the Clinton administration. A key element would loosen lending rules at government home loan giants Fannie Mae andF reddie Mac to let as many as 5 million home owners who owe more than their homes are w orth refinance to bring down their monthly payments. But that's little comfort to many borrowers in places like Arizona, California, Nevada and Florida they owe far too much to qualify. The plan "seems to offer little help tob orrowers whose loan exceeds their property value by more than 5 percent," John Courson, c hief executive of the Mortgage Bankers Asso ciation, said in a statement. The plan beefs up the role of Fannie and Freddie, which were seized by federal regulators last year, allowing them to hold an additional $ 50 billion each in mortgage investments. The plan isn't all about sweeteners for mort g age holders. Obama's plan also requires that any financial institution benefiting from the $ 700 billion Wall Street bailout develop plans to help homeowners avoid foreclosures. Those rules apply to the largest banks, which are also the largest holders of home loans. Yet some doubt that even those new rules w ill prod financial players that have so far been unwilling to help homeowners to do so now. " It maintains a voluntary system of compli ance," said John Taylor, chief executive of the N ational Community Reinvestment Coalition, a consumer group. "The investors and banks have shown great hesitancy in voluntarily participating in these mortgage programmes." M any Democrats and housing analysts believe that the only true way to force mortgage h olders to help strapped borrowers is to give judges power to modify bankrupt homeown e rs' loans, cutting the total they owe and their monthly payments. Obama is backing that move as part of his housing plan, although it will be up to Congress to work out the details. Meanwhile, housing specialists say the mortgage industry will be slow to act on the new incentives Obama has laid out for helping home-o wners if they end up working. "It's going to be a long, slow process because these mortgages have to be redone one by one," the Heritage Foundation's John said. "Youc an't just snap your fingers and solve this one." ( T his article was written by Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Alan Zibel of the Associated Press) . We should think about national development LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* $67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP EDITOR, The Tribune. For far too long I think Bahamians have vote d out of ignorance. We are ignorant because we do not know the people for whom we are voting. We only know what they or their oppos-i ng party deems is important for us to know. Why can’t we have full disclosure on the c andidates that are being placed before us so that we can make an intelligent decision on who we feel would best represent us? Botht his administration and the previous one have done an excellent job of abusing their power and embarrassing the Bahamian people. I t has become a norm for Bahamians to think that all politicians lie. Why is that? No one is perfect but at some point we should make these people accountable for their actions. It is better to have a candidate that says, “I made mistakes and I have learnt from them” than to have someone sweep everything under the rug and then spend five years surprising us with the skeletons in their closets. As Bahamians we should demand more from our government. Now is the time for us to speak out and say that we do not want another MP, Cabinet Minister or Senator who isg oing to do nothing but bring embarrassment to the country. Our leaders are forgetting how far we have c ome as a nation and are progressively stepping backwards. T hese political parties need to stop nominating who their benefactors want and start nominating who is best for the Bahamian peo-p le. Change within our country has to start on an individualistic level. W e have to change as a people. We have to change the way we view politics and the power of our voices collectively. We need to stand and say enough is enough. At the end of the day we are all still Bahamians and should do what is best for the country regardless of party affiliations. JANA STUBBS Nassau, February, 2009. For too long we have voted out of ignorance

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n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net IN THEwake of a sharp escalation in attempted and successful suicides, a distressed man has hit out at the lack of a dedicated national mental health help-line. Wishing to be identified only as Peter, the man, who lost his job last year, said that he was unable to find reassurance when he called around various psychiatric health offices yesterday hoping to hear a friendly voice. “They don’t even have a hotline where people can pick up the phone and talk to a mental health counsellor. There’s not even a hotline that could divert someone from maybe committing suicide,” he said. Since last year, Peter said, he has been surviving with assistance from his elderly mother, and helping her with her stall in the straw market, after being unable to find a secure job. Feeling as though he was “in crisis”, Peter said he decided to call the Community Assessment Centre, an outpost of Sandilands on Market Street. But instead of getting a load off his chest, Peter claims he was put on hold for what seemed like “an eternity.” In despair, he “hung up in disgust” and tried Sandilands directly, only to again be put on hold. Peter said that in times like these, in which greater numbers of people are being placed under serious economic strain, there is all the more need for some sort of n ational help-line. Hearing about his experience, director of the Bahamas Crisis Centre and co-ordinator of psychiatric services for the Department of Social Services, Dr Sandra Dean Patterson, expressed surprise and disappointment that he was unable to speak with any-o ne. Dr Patterson encouraged people like Peter to call the Crisis Centre’s 24/7 hotline if they are feeling helpless. Manned by trained volunteers, the Crisis Centre hotline ( 3280922 ) was originally set up to offer advice and counselling tov ictims of abuse, but Dr Patterson said that no call will be turned down. “It is primarily for victims of violence, whatever that violence is, but we do have persons who call who feel like they want to die. Like they want to end things, they are feeling helpless, so wed o take all calls,” she said. “I’d encourage people to call the crisis hotline because there isa lways a line and it is 24/7.” She urged people considering suicide to remember that they are not seeing things clearly – and there is always help. “People who are suicidal or are thinking of suicide are depressed. That’s the bottom line, and when you are depressed you don’t see things the way people see them w hen they are not depressed. The lens you are looking at life through is very distorted, so you don’t see clearly, so it is important to talk to someone outside of yourself,” she said. Those taking the calls are wellequipped to handle such situations, assured the director. “They are trained volunteers. If they can’t do something then they will refer the person, to let the p erson know they can go into community counselling or Sandilands or whatever, and if it is something urgent then we would obviously call the police.” Meanwhile, the experienced psychiatric health worker said awareness needs to be raised that mental illness is as common, if not more common, than physical ill health. “We need to be alert to it, be a ware of it and respond to it, and let people know most of all that there is help. “People should just keep calling,” she said. The hotline can be contacted on 328-0922 . C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464W E SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 DISTURBED by the rising tide of suicidal behaviour, numerous churches announced earlier this week that they will be coming together to offer family crisis counselling. This is not a programme to offer financial assistance, but instead one of offering hope to those who, for whatever reason, are living on the edge of quiet desperation,” said a statement from the churches. “We have found that many persons feeling hopeless and ind espair simply need someone to listen and to show compassion.” The churches offering counselling are: Trinity Assembly; St Barnabas Anglican Church; St Michael’s Methodist Church; All Saints Anglican Church; St Paul’s Baptist Church; Golden Gates Assembly; Voice of Deliv-e rance; New Covenant Baptist Church; Southside Christian Ministries; Ebenezer Baptist Church; the Hope Centre; Bahamas Harvest Church, and Christ Community Church. In the statement, the clergymen also called on other churche s to “decrease their emphasis on Mammon and raw materialism.” “This emphasis on things and the pursuit thereof is placing undue pressure on some believers, who when disappointed, turn inward and do harm to themselves.” Noting that many people simply need the comfort of having someone listen to them talk, the churches said, “Christians and all persons of goodwill should at this time of economic scarcity show themselves friendly with a listening ear and a bentness to be each others brother.” Churches t o offer family crisis counselling In brief Man hits out at lack of mental health help-line IN A display of talent and skills, student artists from the primary and secondary schools demonstrated what they were capable of at the 11th annual Visual Arts Exhibition. The exhibition represents the collaboration between the Ministry of Education and stakeholder RBC Finco. The exhibition was first staged in 1999 by the Department of Edu cation “to continue to showcase the art work produced in our schools by students in the Art and Design Programme.” Under the direction of senior education offi cer Pamela Chandler, the students demonstrated skills with a wide variety of materials such as sea shells, beads, straw, fabrics, paints, and glass. In attendance was Carl Bethel, Minister of Education, who said: “Art and artistic development is an essential characteristic of human development.” RESULTS Junior High School Division: L W Young Junior High School – 3rd Place S C McPherson Junior High School 2nd Place T A Thompson Junior High School – 1st Place Senior High School: C V Bethel Senior High School – 3rd PlaceC C Sweeting Senior High School – 2nd Place Government High School – 1st Place Students brush up for Visual Arts Exhibition

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE -2%,7<),1$1&,$/&21752//(5 '($'/,1( )(%58$5< %,6+23*/25,$5(''0,1,675,(6 3 %R[&% 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 5HYLYDO 5HYLYDO TIM HAUBER, General Manager of the Lucayan Tropical, shows His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’sR epublic of China how they grow crops . PHOTOS: Felip Major/ Tribune staff CHINESEVIP ENJOYS BAHAMIAN HOSPITALITY DR SELIMA HAUBER, horticulturlist, shows His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Republic of China the way they grow different crops. SENATOR Dr Jicinta Higgs shows His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Republic of China some of the ruins that slaves left behind. SENATOR Dr Jicinta Higgs speaks to His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Republic of China. DEPUTY Prime Minister Brent Symonette along with His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Republic of China waves goodbye as the head to Freeport.

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n By ALISON LOWE T ribune Staff Reporter a lowe@tribunemedia.net THEgovernment is in talks with the Caribbean Regional Negotiating Machinery over the services schedule it submitted asp art of the Economic Partners hip Agreement with Europe, a ccording to the minister of state for finance. Confirming that the schedule, outlining the ways in which the Bahamas proposes to liberaliset rade in services with the EU and C ARICOM under the EPA, was forwarded to the CRNM for scrutiny in early 2009, Zhivargo Laing said the government “is in discussions with them over it.” Mr Laing said the government h as “just received” comments f rom the CRNM on its offer, but remained tight-lipped on the content of those observations. “I don’t want to get into that at the moment. We are in discuss ion with (the CRNM They are more procedural than anything else though,” he said. T he CRNM is a regional facility established by CARICOM heads of state to conduct trade n egotiations jointly for their countries. While the facility hammered out the overall details of the EPA with Europe, individual countries were given the opportunity to m ould more specific elements of the agreement – such as which i ndustries would be liberalised a nd which would be protected from foreign competition. A s a country with “Most Developed Country” status in CARIFORUM, the Bahamas is committed to freeing-up trade in8 3 per cent of its 155 services i ndustries. The Bahamas was given a six month extension beyond the October 16, 2008 EPA signing date to submit its services schedule, which was being formulated throughout last year after discus-s ion between the government and private sector stakeholders. The EPA is a trade agreement that provides for more liberalised trade in both goods and services between CARIFORUM countries and the European Commu-n ity. Mr Laing said that there were “no adjustments” made to the services schedule released to the public in August 2008 prior to its submission to the CRNM around January 2009 for review. A fter the review, the government intends to submit its serv ices schedule to the European Union by April 15 for inclusion in t he Annexes of the Agreement. M eanwhile, Mr Laing said the g overnment is “moving steadily” t o produce an implementation schedule for the EPA. This would define the timeline over which certain obligationsr equired under the agreement w ould come into effect. “We are working with the Trade Commission and the stakeholders who will be involved with understanding what is proposed as an implementation schedule and what has to be done so that itc an be put into effect,” he said. As for legislation to enact the EPA, Mr Laing suggested that this is far off and on the backburner given present economic conditions. “We are far from preparing l egislation. You have to remember that this is a process which we have a minimum of three years to at least do preliminaryt hings. We and all others in the C aribbean are in preparatory talks about what it is that we are required to do. Regard being had to that and the economic circumstances we find ourselves in, et cetera, I think we will all agree that the country has some prior-i ties which might trump that at the moment.” The government has indicated that reform of Customs administration is the “most critical” issue facing the country as it moves to fulfill its commitmentsu nder the EPA. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7 n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORTThe Freeport Lions Club is now equipped to conduct free eye screening testsfor children at its Sight Centre in Freeport. P resident Aira Newball said the club has acquired a sight screening machine to assist with their sight conservation programme here on Grand Bahama. T he Lions Club has been assisting school child ren with sight problems b y providing eye exams a nd eye glasses. The organisation has also raised funds for children requiring eye surgery. M s Newball said that m any children with sight problems have been r eferred over the years to the club by their school, Social Services, family members and concerned citizens. Having the sight screening equipment will provide quick and accu-r ate assessments of school children, especially in the outlying settlem ents. Once an assessment is made the children will be given further assistancea s needed,” she said. Ms Newball said that screenings will be con-d ucted by trained memb ers of the Lions Club at its centre on East Beach D rive. Machine D r Carl Dehmel, a retired internist, said the machine is very sophisti c ated and is capable of detecting various sight disorders. He said the machine is a ble to detect the early stages of short-sighted ness and far-sightedness, c ross eye, and colour blindness. “The individual looks i nto the machine and we run different tests. It takes only 15 minutes per child and we can tell ife verything is okay. If not, the child will be referred to take additional tests,” h e said. M s Newball said they want to extend the sight conservation programmet o other Family Islands. They are planning to travel to Abaco next month, she said. She said several fundraising events have been planned to raise money for the maintenance of the equipment, doctor visits and eye glasses purchases for children. A Fun Run Walk for Sight will be held on February 22, starting at6am at the Lions Club house on East Beach Drive. The Sight Seals Drive will be held in March and a steak-out will be held in April. Ms Newball said individuals, small businesses and corporations will be asked to make a financial contribution to use the Lions Sight Seals on their mail. She is urging the com munity to support the various fundraising events as the money raised goes toward their ongoing sight conserva tion programme. Freeport Lions Club equipped to give children free eye tests THE ETHIOPIA Africa Black International Congress led the African National Anthem duringt he opening of the African Heritage Conference 2009 sponsored by the InternationalP hoenix Society on Tuesday, F ebruary 17 at the British Colonial Hilton. AFRICANHERITAGECONFERENCE2009 Govt in talks over EPA services schedule Z hivargo Laing

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – His Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of China, yesterday visited Grand Bahama – the nation’s second city as part of his official visit to the Bahamas. Vice Premier Hui and his delegation were taken on a tour of Freeport’s tourist attractions and its industrial sector, including the Lucayan Harbour and the Freeport Container Port. A luncheon was held at the Westin at Our Lucaya Resort for the Chinese group and various prominent residents of Freeport. “It gives me great pleasure to welcome you and your distinguished delegation to our second city, Freeport, in GrandB ahama,” said Brent Symonette, Minister of Foreign Affairs. “Your visit here today speaks volumes of you and your government’s keen interest in the Bahamas.” China and the Bahamas established diplomatic relations more than a decade ago, which has ledt o partnerships in areas of national priority such as education, culture, trade and investment. On Tuesday, the Chinese government agreed to loan over $160 million to the Bahamas government for road works and other projects. Mr Symonette told Vice Prem ier Hui that Freeport has endless potential. He also noted that investments made in Freeport by Hutchison-Whampoa have inextricably linked the Bahamas and China for nearly a generation. “I wish to note that despite the tough economic times being experienced by the entire world, thec ommitment of your country to the relationship we share has enabled a measure of constancy for the economy of Freeport and, therefore, a steady life for many of the residents here,” he said. Hutchison is the largest employer on Grand Bahama. Its developments in Freeport include the Our Lucaya Resort, the Freeport Container Port, and the Harbour and Airport Companies. Noting that these are challenging times for all countries, Mr Symonette said the impact of the presence of important industrial partners like Hutchison-Whampoa and the Grand Bahama Port Authority remain a critical component to the long-term success of the Freeport and the Bahamas. “We are, therefore, confident that the well-laid planning we carry out today will ensure, for all, our well-deserved and mutual benefits tomorrow,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 50-80 Off Fixtures and Fittings for SALE % SALE PAL MDA LE SHO PPING P LAZA 9AM 6PM ( MON S AT) 3 26-5556 Closing Down Eve ryt hing Must G o!!! PLUS China’s Vice Premier of State visits Grand Bahama EXTENDED stay guests at Pelican Bay now have a new experience to look forward to when staying at the hotel. Pelican Bay at Lucaya recently introduced a programme where by extended stay guests are welcomed with a gold fish in a bowl and given one as a pet to care for during a stay at the hotel. “The gold fish have been well received by our long stay guests,” said Della Bridgewater, front office manager at the hotel. “Being away from home, our guests may be lonely and having a pet for companionship while on the road is comforting. “All gold fish are all named and carry names such as “Lola.” We do all we can to give our guests a home away from home experience.” Pelican Bay at Lucaya prides itself on its guest experiences and the gold fish is one of many other initiatives. The accompanying note for guests enjoying the gold fish experience is, “Hi, my name is Lola. “I realise you’re away from home and you may get a little lonely at times so I am happy to be your companion during your stay. I need to be fed at least twice daily and my water should be changed often. “I hope I make you feel more at home. If you have any questions or concerns about my care, please contact the front desk.” Pelican Bay at Lucaya is owned by Sundt AS, a private investment company based in Norway. Pelican Bay is the only investment that Sundt AS has in the Bahamas. PICTURED with a gold fish that is part of the Gold Fish Experience a t Pelican Bay, left to right, are: Tara Knowles, guest services assoc iate; Della Bridgewater, front office manager, and Eleanor Bullard, f ront office associate. Gold fish for company at Pelican Bay at Lucaya Shar e your news The T r ibune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9 RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:7HQQLV&RXUWVUQDPHQWDORQG-RJJLQJUDLOV 3OD\JURXQG%DVNHWEDOO&RXUW*D]HERV*ULOOVCOMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:3DYHGRDGV:DWHUtHZHUDJH KRQH&DEOH(OHFWULFLW\WUHHW/LJKWVOpen HouseFEBRUARY 21, 2009 10AM TO 5PMOn the spot %DQNQDQFLQJDYDLODEOHFORMORE INFORMATION CALL:6DQFWXDU\,QYHVWPHQWV/WG&KXUFKWUHHWOD]DKLUOH\t&KXUFKWV325-6456 325-6447/9Rapidly developing communityONLY 23 LOTS LEFT SKYBAHAMAS Airlines today celebrates the inaugural flight of a new afternoon service into Marsh Harbour, Abaco. The inaugural flight will d epart Nassau at 4.30pm today and will return to Nassau at 6.20pm. To celebrate the event, the airline will host a mix and mingle reception at the Faith Convention Centre in Marsh Harbour between 6pm and 8pm t onight. An official ribbon-cutting ceremony will take place at 5pm. Both local and national leaders are expected to attend. We’re excited to extend our services to the beautiful city of Marsh Harbour, Abaco. We look forward to providinge ach customer with a memorable experience in an environment where safety is our culture and service is our pas-s ion,” the airline said in a statement. Persons are able to book flights to and from Marsh Harbour by visiting the SkyBahamas Airline ticket counter located at the Marsh Harbour Airport in Marsh Harbour, A baco, or the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA in Nassau. Customers can also book flights through the SkyBahamas reservations office located at LPIA. On January 23, 2008, SkyB ahamas Airlines launched its regular service into Marsh Harbour, making Abaco its newest travel destination after with Exuma, Freeport, andB imini. The company gained new ownership in September 2006, and under the direction of Captain Randy Butler, its focus has been servicing highd emand travel zones with convenient flight schedules and d ependable service. In addition to their regular flights, they offer on-demand c harter services throughout t he Bahamas and the C aribbean. S kyBahamas Airlines Ltd utilises three SAAB 340A 33s eater aircraft as well as one Beechcraft 1900D 19-seater. According to SkyBahamas, a ll of its planes are adequatel y equipped for safety and outs tanding for cleanliness. SkyBahamas Airlines also provides full cabin service that includes cocktails, a complimentary beverage service, ands pecial Bahamian-made treats for every customer. SkyBahamas Airlines introduces new service to Marsh Harbour W W e e l l o o o o k k f f o o r r w w a a r r d d t t o o p p r r o o v v i i d d i i n n g g e e a a c c h h c c u u s s t t o o m m e e r r w w i i t t h h a a m m e e m m o o r r a a b b l l e e e e x x p p e e r r i i e e n n c c e e i i n n a a n n e e n n v v i i r r o o n n m m e e n n t t w w h h e e r r e e s s a a f f e e t t y y i i s s o o u u r r c c u u l l t t u u r r e e a a n n d d s s e e r r v v i i c c e e i i s s o o u u r r p p a a s s s s i i o o n n . . SkyBahamas Airlines statement n FORT WALTON BEACH, Fla. LEADERSin a Panhandle county are accusing officials in a nearby county of spreading rumors to weaken their airport busi-n ess, a ccording to Associated Press. Okaloosa commissioners voted Tuesday night to consider suing the Panama City-Bay County International Airport for slanderous attacks. The Okaloosa officials also questioned a Panama City Beach Chamber of Commerce e-mail claiming the Air Force would enda lease for the Northwest Florida Regional Airport near Fort W alton Beach in 2010. The lease was renewed through 2032. Joe Tannehill, airport authority chairman in Bay County, says Okaloosa County leaders appear paranoid about a new airport scheduled to open in Bay County next year. Panhandle airports fight for traffic STUDENTS AND TEACHERS of the Mary Star of the Sea Catholic School in Freeport, Grand Bahama visited Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham during a visit to Nassau on Monday, February 16. The students are also expected to visit Eleuthera. P e t e r R a m s a y / B I S STUDENTSVISITTHEPRIMEMINISTER

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TAILS are wagging, potcakes are howling and potcats are purring loudert han ever in anticipation of the third Weekend That W ent to the Dogs. The Grand Bahama Humane Society said it i s proud to host the event, which will be held on March 6 to 8 in Freeport. T he weekend will kick o ff with the Pink Poodle Ladies Lunch Friday,M arch 6. A ttendees are invited to “while away a spring after noon with fine food by Freeport’s own guest chefM ichael Higgs in the luxu r ious garden of the B oathouse, and enjoy the jazz sounds of Joe Fox and T he Good Ole Boys.” T he ladies are encour aged to wear pink and take part in the “Petit Pink Silent Auction”. O n Saturday, March 7, there will be an “Animal House” night at the GBY acht Club, and attendees a re invited to “dance the night away and howl at the moon” to the music of rock band ‘This, That and the Other’ from Louisville, Kentucky. Finale The grand finale of the weekend is the ever popular 24th annual Pet Show on Sunday afternoon. Puppies must be at least four months old to enter the show. All dogs must be on leash and under control at all times, the Humane Soci ety said. Local vets and the Humane Society have com piled a list of the various groups and categories which dogs can enter. The competitors don’t have to be pure-bred – potcakes and mixed breeds are also welcome. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE N N a a s s s s a a u u G G r r o o u u p p e e r r C C l l o o s s e e d d S S e e a a s s o o n nD D e e c c e e m m b b e e r r 1 1 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 8 8 T T o o F F e e b b r r u u a a r r y y 2 2 8 8 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9For more information contact BREEF 327-9000 or w ww.breef.org I’m on my Honeymoon E AT LIONFISH! D O N O T D I S T U R B !N a s s a u G r o u p e r S p a w n i n g N o v e m b e r t o M a r c h T T h h e e c c l l o o s s e e d d s s e e a a s s o o n n a a l l l l o o w w s s t t h h e e f f i i s s h h t t o o b b r r e e e e d d s s u u c c c c e e s s s s f f u u l l l l y y . . L L e e t t s s e e n n s s u u r r e e t t h h a a t t w w e e h h a a v v e e N N a a s s s s a a u u g g r r o o u u p p e e r r t t o o e e n n j j o o y y i i n n t t h h e e f f u u t t u u r r e e ! ! C Co o n n $ $ e e r r v v a a t t i i o o n nM Ma a k k e e $ $C Ce e n n t t $ $ NASSAU GLASS COMPANYwill be CLOSED Saturday February 21stfor our company’s in order to give our staff a well-deserved break.We will reopen on Monday February 23rdWe apologise for any inconvenience causedMackey Street 393-8165 Third weekend’s going to the dogs T HIS little kitten poses with a Humane Society worker

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 11 ters two days ago, is upset that the school had not called a general meeting to inform parents of the incident. She also criticised school security for not preventing the attack through vigilant patrols. It was also claimed teachers were convened for a general meeting about the incident last week. The school's principal didn ot return messages up to press time to confirm this. "We don't know what's going on in this school. I would like answers these things are supposed to be brought to light so we know what we're dealing with. These securities need to get off their fat (backsides walk 'round the schools, especially the primary school because half of these schools are open and anybody could s natch these children," said the c oncerned citizen. " On any given day you get about 10,000 lil' five-year-olds walking the streets and any body could pick them off the road. Let us know what's goingon so we can protect our children better." Both police and Minister Bethel said the matter was not made public because of the sensitivity of the case. Minister Bethel said that proper school procedure regarding patrols might not have been followed in this case. Should this be proven at the end of a ministry review, "appropriate action" will be taken, he said. "The school has established procedures, which were not fol lowed in the particular instance. The senior teachers and secu rity are supposed to walk around and check all of the blind spots around that school after school, make sure that all persons who are supposed to be on buses are out in front of the school. "They are supposed to make sure no one is behind in the classes, also there are supposed to be perimeter checks at the times when students are out of the classrooms. If in this instance the established proced ures were not followed prope rly, action is taken by the ministry to address those problems," he said. Supt Moss confirmed that there was active police investigation into the allegations. He said that the attack involved at least two perpetrators. However, he did not specify the nature of the assault. Police hope to bring the case to a swift resolution. Charges have yet to be filed in connection with the incident. "I think we can bring conclusion to this in a little bit, in the next couple of days," Supt Moss said. When asked why the incident was not brought to public attention he said: "If the investigation had revealed the importance of alerting other students at the school, they would have gone ahead in that end. But we don't think this was a case where we need to at this stage make an alert to hype up parents." Minister Bethel said it was not the ministry's place to make announcements on unproved allegations that are before thep olice. " We can't presume that because an allegation is made it is proven. We can't presume and start making announce ments. . .that's why we have a police force. When matters are brought to our attention weh ave our officials produce statements so that we are able to see upon review that it has some basis and we then immediately refer it to police. To make state ments on matters like this that are under investigation preju dices the investigation," he said. Up to press time no suspects were in custody. diplomatic officers followed him. Also present was Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs Brent Symonette, who was accompanied by the Bahamas’ Ambassador to China Elma Campbell. Following the tour, Mr Liangyu boarded a plane at the Lynden Pindling International Airport and was accompanied by Mr Symonette on his flight to Grand Bahama. Mr Liangyu spent the evening touring the Grand Bahama Shipyard, the Freeport Container Port, the Garden of Groves, and finally Dolphin Encounters. Mr Liangyu will leave the Bahamas from Grand Bahama’s International Airport at 9am today to return to the People’s Republic of China. Taqa will now become Marubeni’s joint venture partner for the Caribbean, both holding a 50 per cent stake. This effectively means that the Abu Dhabi company will now hold a 27.7 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power Company, the same as Marubeni. This will only be slightly larger than the 25 per cent interest held by Canadian power giant Emera, which acquired its interest in November 2008 by buying Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent stake in BISX-listed ICD Utilities for $41 million. Yesterday’s deal means that Grand Bahama Power Company will now be supported by three global utility heavyweights from Japan, Canada and the Middle East. What Taqa will bring to the table is unclear, but with the deal set to close at the end of the 2009 first quarter, it said yesterday it would have an operational role and Board representation at all the Caribbean utilities, including Grand Bahama Power Company. Peter Barker-Homek, Taqa’s chief executive, said: “The transaction we bring to you today is another endorsement of our strategic objective to deliver profitable growth in multiple markets where we can access stable cash flows, which complement and enhance our existing diversified energy portfolio. “Taqa shares the same outlook on long-term investment as Marubeni, and brings solid experience in power sector and a strong financial position to the joint venture. Together, we have previously delivered successful partnerships in other regions, having jointly invested in power generation and water production globally. “Our joint venture in the region will act as a platform to explore multiple opportunities, beyond the downstream segment, which may assist in creating a more sustainable energy environment for Caribbean countries.” Apart from the Bahamas investment, Marubeni’s Caribbean interests include: An 80 per cent equity interest in Jamaica Public Service Company in Jamaica, which owns and operates ten generating facilities, including six hydroelectric plants. These plants expand Taqa’s downstream business into this sustainable energy source. A 39 per cent equity interest in PowerGen, which is an IPP that supplies 80 per cent of total electricity demand in Trinidad and Tobago. A 25.5 per cent equity interest in Curaao Utilities Company, which supplies electric, steam and water to refinery plant of Petroleos de Venezuela, S.A. in Curaao Island. Taqq has a $24 billion asset base, and in 2008 generated $4.6 bil lion in revenues. Taqa employs 2,800 people from 38 different nations and operates from its offices in Abu Dhabi; Ann Arbor, Michigan; Aberdeen; Amsterdam; Calgary and The Hague. This footprint is further extended through alliances with partners across Africa, the Middle East, Europe, North America and India. GB Power Company majority shareholder ‘sells 50% stake in Caribbean operations holding firm’ Claims of student sex assault on six-year-old FROM page one F ROM page one F ROM page one China’s Vice Premier of State

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to find out what had happened this time. “When I came out he told the DJ, ‘OK you can turn the music back on.’ So he pulled me over in the corner and said: “Look here now, I understand a lot of money is being made in the back here. I already have the figure in my head. You need to take care of me. I looking for $500 a week.’ “So I said to him, ‘$500 a week? I might as well come work for you.’ He said to me, ‘Man, $500 a week and I’ll keep everybody off ya back. That’s what I lookin for.’ But I told him: ‘Let’s talk another day, I can’t deal with that right now.’ But what I really didn’t want is for him to turn off the music again because that would run all my customers. But I really was just trying to put him off, because I am not in a position to give this man $500 a week for doing his job when I am not breaking the law,” he said. The second case, involving 20-year-old Travis Brown, occurred two days ago when Mr Brown was in the East Street area. According to Mr Brown, three police officers approached him and informed him that there was a warrant out for his arrest. Handcuffing him and putting him in the back of their vehicle, the officers drove around for a time before questioning him as to “what he was going to do.” When he asked what his options were, Mr Brown said he was told that he could either spend the next few days in a holding cell, or he could pay them a “fine of $100.” “So I told him I didn’t have $100, but I could call my brother. But he asked me how much I had,” he said. It is here that the officer, who was in the back seat with Mr Brown, reached into Mr Brown’s trouser pocket, took out $50 and split it between himself and the officer in the front passenger seat. Having already essentially robbed the young man, the officers then had to take him to Quackoo Street Police Station to have the handcuffs removed as they did not have a key. The officers then dropped the young man off at Spotless Cleaners on East Street. Mr Brown, like the first complainant, has filed a report with the Complaints and Corruption Unit. This practice of “shaking down” persons and demanding “protection money” is not new in the Royal Bahamas Police Force, The Tribune was told. However, as the force continues to evolve it has taken a no-nonsense approach to corruption, and has publicly placed officers before the courts sending a strong and unequivocal message that where corruption is found, it will be weeded out. Yesterday, Acting Commissioner Reginald Ferguson said such activities must be stopped. He encouraged citizens to continue to come forward to report incidents at the Force’s Complaints and Corruption Unit. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 1 5. Twelve witnesses are listed on court dockets. Fowler, whoa ppeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane was not requiredt o plead to the murder charge. A preliminary inquiry will be h eld to determine whether there is sufficient evidence against him for him to standt rial in the Supreme Court. The case was adjourned to April 14 for the commencement of the preliminary inquiry. Fowler was remandedt o Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday. He is represented by lawyers, Ian Cargill and Tai Pinder. FROM page one Man charged with murder of Oscarsin Williams F ROM page one Police officers alleged to have ‘hustled’ or extorted money

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seizures for nearly a decade and suffered a seizure while swimming,” said a statement from the family. “She never regained consciousness.” St Andrew’s school, which is now on its winter break and was informed of the swimming accident in its pool late Tuesday, said the school has been in contact with Mrs Roberts’ family “who remain in our thoughts and prayers.” School principal Robert F Wade said the school has a contract with SWIFT Swimming Club, of which Mrs Roberts was a member, “for the use of its pool to offer private swimming lessons to the open community.” Mrs Roberts, owner of the local restaurant Nelly’s Deli, was carrying out routine training exercises designed for Fitness and Master swimmers in one of the pool's lanes on Tuesday afternoon when the incident occurred. She had been a member of the club for about a year and a half and swam about twice a week, according to the swim c lub. Mrs Roberts was swimming “in the lane at the far side of the pool, which is designated for masters,” a statement released yesterday by Carol Misiewicz, the lawyer for the directors of SWIFT, said. “The learn to swim programme was going on in the other five lanes, separated by one free lane,” said the statement. "After about 40 minutes of training in the pool, the fitness swimmer apparently had a seizure in the water and was observed face-down in the w ater. A parent jumped into the water to pull her out, and SWIFT Swimming’s Coach Maria Piazza who was conducting a class at the time, immediately began performing CPR. Moments later the parent of a competitive swimmer arrived who happened to be a trained, registered nurse, and took over the CPR while the coach con-t inued to assist. She was able to revive the swimmer by the time the ambulance arrived. The swimmer was taken to Doctor’s Hospital accompanied by her husband and the parent/nurse and was handed over to the doctor on duty at the hospital alive,” the statement said. Earlier yesterday, a family friend said that Mrs Roberts was “clinging to life” and depending on life support. Mrs Roberts remained in a coma until her death later yesterday afternoon. SWIFT Club explained that its swim club is open to adults over the age of 18 years, who are given an assessment before starting any training. The Directors/Head Coaches for SWIFT Swimming, Andy and Nancy Knowles had left Nassau Tuesday for Alabama for the SEC Championships and to visit their son. However they are now on their way back to Nassau. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE IN CONCERT AT 8:30 PMSaturday, March 7, 2009DOORS OPEN: 7:30 PMCall the Atlantis Live Box Ofce for ticket information at 363-6601 Join Us for THE JONAS BROTHERSMarch 14th, April 18th, & May 9th, 2009Tickets are available with the purchase of a room for a minimum of a (1tay. Maximum of (4ets will be assigned to each room. Call 954-809-2100 to reserve your spot! SHOW TICKET: $95 PER PERSONDEMI LOVATOPRESENTS 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -$'(*5((16:25'RI + ,*+9,67$'5,9(3%2;1$66$8 %$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRU 1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQ D FLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDWDQ\SHUVRQZKR NQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQQDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOG QRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQDQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQW RIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKWGD\VIURPWKH WK GD\RI )HEUXDU\ WRWKH0LQLVWHUUHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\ D QG&LWL]HQVKLS 127,&( Tuesday, February 11, was the last day that The Tribunes were flown to the Family Islands by Bahamasair. The newspaper had to stop all Bahamasair deliveries because of the airline’s exorbitant increase in cargo rates. In the meantime, The Tribune went online to provide an electronic newspaper for Family Island readers. This was enthusiastically received by subscribers who were on line, but it presented a problem for readers without computers. However, behind the scenes Bellevue Business Depot in Marsh Harbour, Abaco, and in Freeport, Grand Bahama, in response to the demand of their customers, made their own arrangements for delivery of the newspapers. As Bellevue Business Depot in each island is paying for the transport of the newspapers, the cost of The Tribune will be slightly higher for subscribers in both Marsh Harbour and Freeport. The Tribune is now available online at The newspaper is posted online at 2pm on the day of publication Monday through Saturday. F ROM page one Tribune returns to Freeport Woman dies after suffering seizure in swimming pool F ROM page one

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n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net T he Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ reigning champions survived the most anticipated matchup of the Hugh Campbell Tournament’s opening round with a high scoring second half and dominating play inside by arguably the country’s most dominant big man. Westminster Diplomats 54 Jack Hayward Wildcats 45 Rashard Morley had one of his b est performances of the year when it mattered most, leading the Diplomats with a double dou ble of “Dwight Howard-like” proportions – 17 points, 22 reboundsand two blocked shots. Morley’s tip in gave the Diplo mats a comfortable 50-45 lead with less than one minute remaini ng, sealing the win. After overcoming a first quarter (12-825-21 deficit, the Diplomats outscored the Wildcats 33-20 in the second half, limiting them to just 10 points in each respective quarter. Continuing momentum established in the third quarter, West minster built a 43-37 lead on the heels of an acrobatic lay-up by Larry Smith with 3:36 left to play. A resilient Wildcats squad clawed back into the game, after forcing turnovers on three of four trips upcourt for the Diplomats. Edison Davis tied the game at 45 with a running lay-up to cap an 8-2 run. After giving up two turnovers on backcourt and traveling penalties, Shaquille Bain came up with the biggest turnover of the night when he played the passing lanes perfectly and intercepted a pass. Bain was fouled on his way to the basket and made one of two free t hrows. After the Wildcats were signaled for a technical foul, BAISS MVP Christorr Stuart made both free throws to give the Diplomatsa 48-45 lead with 1:10 left to play. After a miss by Smith, Morley tipped in what turned out to be the game clinching lay-up. S tuart led the Diplomats with 19 points (eight in the fourth quarter), five rebounds and five steals. Smith finished with nine points, nine rebounds and three assists while Bain had his three points and three steals all in the fourth quarter. Davis, Kenrick Hanna, and Justin Monroe all finished with eight points apiece. Dimaggio Wilson and sharp shooting point guard Chavano Hield finished with six points apiece. Diplomats head coach Geno Bullard said the high expectations placed on his team may have contributed to its slow start but he said his team adjusted well in the second half. “We had a long layoff between BAISS and our first game in this tournament, so they came out a little slow, but we know we have a lot of pressure on us... A lot of people out there are expecting us to do well and my guys were able to recover and did what they had to do to come out here and get this first win. Now we just have to focus on our next matchup and move on.” Bullard, who has coached his Diplomats to consecutive BAISS senior boys titles, said the win goes a long way in validating public expectation and the efforts of the entire BAISS. “This win was big and alleviates pressure not only for us but for our whole association,” he said. “The private schools were not doing too well at this point and we feel like we have to shoulder the load not only for us but for the rest of our association also.” The Diplomats advance to face the Bimini Big Game 2pm today in the opening session. Game Notes: Shaquille Kemp and Shaquille Bain both came off the bench to provide key contributions for the Diplomats – Bain’s key steal and free throw and Fernander finished with six points and seven rebounds. The second quarter featured three ties and four lead changes. Morely gave the Diplomats their first tie at 12 all and their first lead 1716, both in the second quarter. Stuart ignited the Diplomats in the third quarter when he was fouled on a dunk opportunity which sent the crowd into a fren zy and changed his team’s body language. His free throws gave the Diplomats a 33-31 lead, their first of the second half... In addition, the third day of the 27th Annual Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic featured the first slate of games for Family Island teams with many of the nation's powerhouses in the second city making early statements in decisive wins. Catholic High Crusaders 55 South Andros Cheetahs 38 The Crusaders’ size and ath leticism turned what looked to be a competitive game early into a lopsided affair for much of the second half. Tied at five in the opening moments of the first quarter, the Crusaders ended the period on a 10-2 run to take command of the game. They led 17-5 heading into the second. Backed by a stifling half court trap, the Crusaders forced a series of turnovers, which translated to easy baskets and extended their lead to a 33-18 advantage at the half. The Crusaders reached their biggest lead of the game on a Kenneth Taylor three pointer, which gave his team a 40 21 lead in the third quarter. Taylor finished with 10 points, while Delario Rolle led the Crusaders with 12. Kalim Munninigs finished with eight points and 10 rebounds while Carlton Forbes finished with a double double 11 points, 11 rebounds and four blocks. The Cheetahs' Cordero Smith led all scorers with 15 points while Leonardo Forbes chipped in with nine. Tabernacle Baptist Falcons 50 Temple Christian Suns 24 After giving up eight points in the first quarter, the Falcons allowed just two field goals over the next two quarters in a route of the Suns for an impressive opening win in the tournament. Tied at six early in the game, the Falcons ended the quarter on a 13-2 run to take a 19-8 lead at the end of the first quarter. The Falcons clamped down defensively in the second, giving up just one field goal and a longrange three pointer from the Suns' Randy Smith. Astin Lewis, who finished with a game high 14 points, outscored the Falcons on his own in the quarter with five. Tabernacle led 29-11 at half time. The third produced much of the same as the Suns were again held to three points in the quarter, a basket by Kemico Sands and one of two free throws by Mario Stubbs. The Falcons took a 41-14 lead into the final quarter and cruised to a seemingly effortless 26-point win. The Suns managed to outscore the Falcons in the final quarter 10-9, all coming from Stubbs, who led the Suns with 11. Lewis led the Falcons in scoring while Robin Lafrance chipped in with eight and Sam Beauzile and Arlington Wells added six points apiece. Bimini Big Game 44 Alpha Omega Owls 23 After a closely contested open ing half, Bimini outscored their opponents by 20 in the final two quarters to pull away for the blowout win. The teams posted just eight field goals and 10 points between them both in one of the lowest scoring quarters of the tournament as the Owls led 6-4 at the end of the first. Bimini took their first lead of the game midway through the second quarter on a lay-up by Cleo Sears to give his team a 109 lead. Sears followed with a pair of assists to Tristan Kelly and the Big Game took a slim 14-13 lead into the half. They began to pull away easily in the third, outscoring the Owls 15-3. Bimini reached a double-digit advantage late in the third when Sears delivered another assist to Kelly. Jack Levarity ended the quarter with a three-point play to give the Big Game a 29-17 lead headed into the fourth quarter. In another dominant quarter, the Big Game outscore the Owls 15-6. They reached a 20 point advantage, the largest of the game, on a lay-up by Kelly to make the score 39-19. Sears finished with 17 points and five assists, Kelly added eight points, Levarity finished with seven points and 10 rebounds and Kirirrie Brown added 10 points and nine rebounds. Devan Hepburn led the Owls with 11 points. Sunland Baptist Stingers 42 Mt Carmel Cavaliers 31 The Stingers sported a balanced scoring attack where their leading scorers finished with just six points apiece. However the distribution was enough to outlast the Cavaliers in the fourth quarter. Trailing 31-24 heading into the fourth, the Cavaliers opened the quarter on a 7-3 run capped by Keron Pratt's lay-up to bring his team within three, 34-31. The Stingers responded with a run of their own, ending the game on an 8-0 flourish over the last 1:30. Troy Bullard and Tronard Nicholls each paced the Stingers with six, Rashad Knowles and Johnathon Moss each finished with five, while Valentino Mitchell added four. Pratt led the Cavaliers with 10 and Rashad Ferguson finished with nine. The Stingers led just 9-8 after t he first quarter, but Bullard came off the bench and sparked a 6-0 run. The Cavs missed six consecu tive free throws during the run as the Stingers took a 17-10 lead. They led 20-14 at the half. Mt Carmel trimmed the deficit, 25-24 midway through the third quarter, however the Stingrays C M Y K C M Y K THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 PAGE 18 Brent Strubbs’ opinion on Davis Cup... McGrady says h s out for season withk nee injury... S ee page 17 Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff Hugh Campbell highlights FLYING HIGH Westminster Diplomats’ Shaquille Bain... GOING UP STRONG Temple Christian Suns’ Kemico Sands... S ession One 1 pm Tabernacle Baptist Falcons vs. Winner of Jord an Prince William/Bishop M ichael Eldon 2 pm Bimini Big Game v s. Westminster Diplomats 3pm Catholic High Crus aders vs. Winner of Eight Mile Rock Bluejays/St Paul’s 4 pm Sunland Baptist S tingers vs. Winner of North E leuthera/St George’s J aguars Session Two (Elimination Games 6 pm NCA Crusaders vs. QC Comets 7 pm CW Saunders Cougars vs. RM Bailey Pacers 8pm South Andros Cheetahs vs. St John’s G iants 9pm Galilee Miracles vs. Kingsway Saints Day 4 schedule

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Defar breaks women’s 5,000 indoor record n B y STEPHAN NASSTROM AP Sports Writer STOCKHOLM (AP Meseret Defar of Ethiopia broke the women's 5,000-meter indoor world record by more than three seconds at the GE Gala on Wednesday night. Defar was timed in 14 min utes, 24.37 seconds. Tirunesh Dibaba, also of Ethiopia, set the old mark of 14:27.42 in 2007. With excellent pacemaking, Defar was two or three seconds under Dibaba's split times throughout the race. During the final laps, many of the fans at the sold out Ericsson Globe Arena stood up to cheer her on. With the win, Defar extended her unbeaten indoor streak to 18 races since March 2003. Defar took the lead with about 3,000 meters left in the 34-lap race and lapped most of the seven other finishers twice. Maria Konovalova of Russia was a distant runner-up in 15:42.37. It was the seventh record set at the Globe since 1989. In the men's 800, 2004 Olympic champion Yuriy Borzakovskiy outkicked Ismail Ahmed Ismail of Sudan for his fifth victory in seven races at the Globe. Borzakovskiy, who has never finished worse than second here, clocked a relatively slow 1:48.13. Ismail, the Olympic silver medalist last year, was seven-hundredths of a second behind. Olympic champion Wilfred Bungei of Kenya finished fifth in 1:50.11. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS PAGE 16, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS MESERET DEFAR , of Ethiopia, kisses the tracks after winning the 5000m during the GE Athletics Gala at Stockholm Globe Arena, Sweden, Wednesday... (AP Photo: Jessica Gow

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n By CHRIS DUNCAN AP Sports Writer HOUSTON (AP ton Rockets star Tracy McGrady will have surgery on his left knee and miss the rest of the season. The star forward said on his Web site Wednesday that the pain has been persistent and he will have microfracture surgery. He's confident he'll return next season. McGrady is Houston's thirdleading scorer. He had arthroscopic surgery in May and has missed 18 games this season because of his sore knee. He said before the All-Star break he wanted to consult with doctors before deciding on the best course of treatment. ESPN.com first reported that McGrady was out for the season after the Rockets beat the Nets on Tuesday night. Rockets spokesman Nelson Luis said Wednesday morning that the team had no comment. But Luis said McGrady met with a doctor in New York on Tuesday and had another outof-state doctor's appointment scheduled Wednesday. McGrady said he would have the surgery "immediately." "It has been extremely frustrating dealing with the knee injury this season," McGrady said. "It's been tough on me both physically and mentally and while we've come to this conclusion after much delibera tion, we truly feel this is best f or both me and the Rockets in the long term." The Rockets have won their last two games without McGrady and 13 of 19 without him this season. Houston is 3321 overall this season and inf ifth place in the Western Conference. Houston acquired McGrady in June 2004 in a trade with Orlando, but the seven-time All-Star has been a disappoint ment here in four seasons. His scoring numbers have steadily decreased while his health issues have increased. McGrady missed 34 games in 2005-06 and 10 in 2006-07 with back pain, then sat out 12 games last season with a bone bruise and tendinitis in his left knee, prompting him to have the procedure in May. McGrady said on the day before training camp began in late September that his knee was not healed from the surgery and was still painful. By December, McGrady was skipping the second games of back-to-back sets and took two weeks off in January to rest his knee. He returned and played seven games, then stopped playing after going 1-for-9 in the Rockets' 124-112 loss to Mil waukee on Feb. 9. Two days later, McGrady said he was going to seek doctors to discuss his knee, but expected to play again this season. He added that he would only consider surgery as a last resort. "We've tried just playing through it, taking back-to-backso ff, and extended periods of r est," McGrady wrote. "But none of it has really been effective in limiting the discomfort and allowing me to just go out there and play." McGrady is due to make $23 million next season, the last year of his contract. Considering the expectations, he's been a bust in Houston as the Rockets have gone winless in three playoff series. But team owner Les Alexander said before Tuesday's game that the Rockets would not try to deal McGrady before Thursday's trade deadline. Alexan der also said he still believes the 29-year-old McGrady is a key component to making the Rockets contenders again. "I always thought he was injured and had (health lems," Alexander said. "He's a great player when he's healthy, and a great competitor." NBA Today C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 17 n By The Associated Press SCOREBOARD Thursday, February 20 San Antonio at Detroit (8 pm EST). The Pistons have won just two of their past 11 at the Palace of Auburn Hills and are 14-14 at home after going 34-7 last season. STARS Tuesday Dwight Howard, Magic, had a career-high 45 points to go with 19 rebounds and eight blocks in Orlando's 107-102 win over Charlotte. Nate Robinson, Knicks, had 32 points and 10 rebounds to lead New York to a 112-107 overtime victory over San Antonio. Antawn Jamison, Wizards, had 29 points and 11 rebounds in Washington's 111-103 win over Minnesota. Richard Jefferson, Bucks, scored 29 points and grabbed 11 rebounds to lead Milwaukee to a 92-86 victory at Detroit. STRONG IN DEFEAT Kevin Durant followed an All-Star weekend to remember with a career-high 47 points, but Chris Paul's driving layup in the closing seconds gave New Orleans a 100-98 win over Okla-homa City. Durant had scored a record 46 points in the Rookie Challenge game last year and won the inaugural HORSE competition during All-Star festivities in Phoenix over the weekend. W ELCOME BACK, B IG GUY Andrei Kirilenko returned from an ankle injury to spark akey fourth-quarter run and help the Utah Jazz beat the Memphis Grizzlies 117-99 Tuesday night. C J Miles scored 24 points and Deron Williams had 20 points and 15 assists. Kirilenko finished with 14 points. SO FAR, SO GOOD The Phoenix Suns looked like a different team in interim coach Alvin Gentry's debut, routing the Los Angeles Clippers 140-100 Tuesday night. Leandro Barbosa scored 24 points and Amare Stoudemire added 23 for the Suns, who had 81 points by halftime in their first game since Terry Porter was fired as coach. SWAPS The Thunder acquired cen ter Tyson Chandler from New Orleans in a deal that sends veterans Joe Smith and Chris Wilcox to the Hornets. For New Orleans, the trade provides an opportunity to shed salary in an uncertain economy by adding two contracts that expire at the end of the season. The Sacramento Kings acquired veteran guard Sam Cassell from Boston for a conditional second-round draft pickin 2015. The 39-year-old Cassell hasn't played this season for the Celtics, who acquired him in early March before their run to the NBA title. MISFIRING Richard Jefferson scored 29 points, Ramon Sessions added17 and the Milwaukee Bucks beat Detroit 92-86 on Tuesday night, sending . SPEAKING "I am so tired. But today is a triple joy. I came back from my injury, we win and I have a birthday." Utah's Andrei Kirilenko after returning ahead of schedule McGrady says he’s out for season with knee injury HOUSTON ROCKETS guard Tracy McGrady (1 Memphis Grizzlies center Marc Gasol (left on February 4 in Memphis, Tenn. McGrady led the Rockets with 21 points, but he Grizzlies won 104-93... (AP Photo: Nikki Boertman

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THE Bahamas Lawn Tennis Federation has announced the final list of players that are expected to travel to the Americas Zone One Davis Cup tie in Paraguay next month. As expected, the team will be made up of basically the same group of young players that the federation has been grooming to take over from the old guard that included Roger Smith, Mark Knowles and Mark Merklein. Considered to be one of the veterans of the group is Bjorn Munroe, who is returning after a hiatus of a couple years. Munroe came home in December for the federation's invitational tournament that served as a qualifier for the national team and he performed exceptionally well, just falling short of advancing to the final that featured reigning champion Devin Mullings against Timothy Neilly. Munroe, at age 30, brings some of the experience and maturity that the team lacks in the absence of touring pro Mark Knowles, who has opted not to travel to South America where the home crowd has been very unruly in the past. Instead, Knowles has decided to continue his tour on the ATP circuit with Indian Mahesh Bhupathi. They are currently sitting in second place in the computer rankings following their final appearance at the Australian Open, the first Grand Slam tournament for the year. Before taking a break to recuperate from injuries, Munroe had played for five years on the team. He joins both Mullings and Marvin Rolle, who have six years under their belt and Neilly, who is in his second year. The team will once again be captained by John Farrington, who has played for seven years. The Davis Cup tie is scheduled for March 6-8, but it will probably be a very emotional one for Munroe and his teammates. Munroe is mourning the loss of his younger brother Lavaughn, who was tragically killed in a car accident Sunday on Midshipman Road in Lucaya, Grand Bahama. L avaughn, 26, was a former D avis Cup player who played in three ties for the Bahamas, teaming up with Knowles, Munnings and his brother Bjorn, at least once. At the time, Lavaughn was considered one of the two players that the BLTA had hoped to groom to take over the reigns from Knowles and the rest of the old guard. Lavaughn and Dentry Mortimer were two of the key players who were playing at the time when the Bahamas was going through the transitional period of either staying in Zone One or being relegated to Zone II. As it tuned out, both Lavaughn and Dentry experi-e nced some disciplinary probl ems on one of the ties and it hurt the Bahamas' chances of staying in zone one. Eventually, the Bahamas was dropped all the way down to Zone III. In 2002, the BLTA assembled what was considered then the "Dream Team" of the next generation of players with John Farrington captaining the squad made up of Mortimer, the Munroe brothers and Mullings playing together for the first time in Ecuador. However, the Bahamas was blanked 5-0. And to avoid being relegated to Zone II, Knowles and Merklein teamed up with Mullings and Marvin Rolle at the National Tennis Center in September, pulling off a huge 3-2 victory over Mexico to keep our hopes alive. But it was short lived as in 2003, Farrington worked with a new combo that comprised of Mullings, Rolle, Matthew Sands and Davin Russell, only to fall victim to Peru and Venezuela before being relegated to Zone II in 2004. I n 2005 in Colombia, the B ahamas was relegated all the way to Zone III where we remained until 2007 when the present team, Minus H’Cone Thompson, who has been replaced by Neilly, was re-elevated to Zone II in Guatemala. Had it not been for the disciplinary problems that those players encountered back in 2002, who knows where the B ahamas could have been today. Many felt that the young core of players had the potential t o at least keep us in Zone One and possibly by now be chal lenging for a spot in the presti gious World Group. W hile Lavaughn, who ended up hosting a Tennis Academy i n Grand Bahama where he was p assing on his expertise, has just p assed away, Mortimer is no longer playing, but he has been working with some of the younger players in New Provi d ence. Without a shadow of a doubt, M ortimer had the best chance of cracking the elite ATP professional ranking than all of the other players. At least one of the Munroe brothers, if not the two, along with Ryan Sweeting, who migrated to the US, were next in line. Presently, Mullings has now surpassed them all with the best ATP rankings, but Neilly is a champion of the Orange Bowl, the highly acclaimed junior tennis tournament. We just haven't had any one who has come close to the status of Smith, Knowles or Merklein, the three top players who excelled at the senior level. In time, as this group of young players continues to excel, the Bahamas will eventually get back into Zone One and we will have another player or two playing competitive on the circuit. It's just unfortunate that we've lost some of the best players along the way, including the late Lavaughn Munroe. May his soul rest in peace. N N A A T T I I O O N N A A L L S S T T A A D D I I U U M M I I N N S S I I G G H H T T ? ? IT seems as if the arrival of the high powered Chinese delegation to the country this week has brought some good news for our sporting arena. While they didn't specifically address the matter, Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symon-e tte said the much anticipated n ational stadium at the Queen Elizabeth Sports Center will finally become a reality. The former PLP Government had initiated the plans for the reconstruction of the sports complex, including a new track and field stadium, baseball and softball parks and another multi-purpose indoor arena. The first phase of the project, t he state-of-the-art national stadium, was to have already been completed. H owever, when the FNM government took office in 2007, the entire project was put on hold. While track and field ands oftball is still functioning, the sport that suffered the most was b aseball. A lthough there are two v ibrant junior leagues being staged at Freedom Farm and the St Andrew's Field of Dreams every weekend, there i s no baseball being played at the senior level because of the l ack of a proper venue. And in these tough economic times, the arrival of the Chinese should bring a ray of hope, shin ing on the fact that work on these sporting facilities will commence soon. We look forward to the construction progress, which should also help to decrease our unemployment rate. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL SPORTS PAGE 18, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS 0DFKLQHU\t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t&8/785( 1$7,21$/<287+/($'(56&(57,),&$7,21 352*5$00(7KH
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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 19 it’s all about PEACE OF MIND Nassau Collins Ave 242 322 2341 Thompson Blvd 242 325 8776 Soldier Rd North 242 393 6286 Family Islands Freeport 242 352 7119 Abaco 242 367 2688 Exuma 242 336 2420 www. jsjohnson.comMOTOR HOME LIFE TRAVEL A D W O R K S 2 0 0 8all is safe and secure BTVI to hold Walk-A-Thon for financially challenged students STUDENTSand faculty of the Bahamas Technical and Vocational Institute will take to the streets in an effort to promote technical and career education awareness and support. T he institute is holding a walk-a-thon beginning at the BTVI campus on Old Trial Road on Saturday, February 21. Registration begins at 6am. Participants will walk to the Paradise Island Bridge and then return to the campus for a junkanoo rush-out, mini massages, a souse-out and an awards ceremony. “This event is about BTVI community awareness with so many people out of work and challenging economic times. “BTVI faculty, staff, alumni and friends are coming together to do something to assist our students,” s aid Sean Adderley, public relations officer at BTVI. The organisers aim to raise money to assist students who have trouble finding funds for books and supplies. Many students receive financial assistance which does not cover the entire cost of the BTVI programme. The public is invited to take part in the walk-athon. Further information can be found at: www.btvi.org.bs.

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A key 116-slip Freeport marina has been removed from t he receivership a ffecting New Hope Holdings b y a January 27, 2009, court order, Tribune Business can reveal, with the property ordered returned to the two companies involved in its ownership/management. Justice Estelle Gray-Evans ruled that the Port Lucaya Marina, related land assets and another parcel of land be returned to New Hope Marina Development, one of two companies that had petitioned the Supreme Court for its removal from a receivership initiated over a dispute involving the repayment of loans worth $23$24 million. Justice Evans altered the October 2, 2008, order that appointed ex-PLP Senator and MP, accountant Philip Galanis, as the receiver for the assets owned Scandinavian investor Preben Olsen and his New Hope Holdings company. A copy of the January 27, 2009, court order, which has been seen by Tribune Business, stated that among the assets removed from the receivership are per cent of the shares of Port Lucaya Marina ltd, which owns the following prop erties comprising Port LucayaM arina”. T hese properties include a 14,506 square foot parcel of land, situated in Block 3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel Subdivision in Freeport; an 813 square foot parcel of land on Lot 13, Block 3, Unit 2, of the Bell Channel Subdivision and a portion of Tract ‘O’, Unit 3 in the same subdivision; a 6,051 square foot land tract comprising a portion of the same Tract ‘O’; and a 10.6 acre parcel of land comprising a portion of the seabed in the Bell Channel Subdivision. In addition, a separate parcel of land, consisting of 6.19 acres, and also in the Bell Channel Bay Subdivision, was also removed from the receivership by order of the Supreme Court. J ustice Evans, in her order, a lso directed Mr Galanis “to release and deliver over to New Hope Marina Development Ltd all of the licences, permits, certificates, deeds, agreements, records, bank accounts, negotiable instruments, documents, correspondence and papers relating to Port Lucaya Marina Company Ltd, doing business as Port Lucaya Marina” and the related land assets. Port Lucaya Marina’s removal from the receivership came after attorneys acting New Hope Marina Development Ltd and AP Holdings Ltd petitioned the Supreme Court. The two companies were represented by Robert Adams and Dwayne Fernander of Graham, T hompson & Co, and it is u nderstood they were successn By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE Bahamas Development Bank (BDB loans in arrears increase by 30 per cent year-over-year, as the eco nomic downturn squeezed down on small and medium-sized busi nesses, leaving it with some $27 million in defaulted loans on the books. The BDB’s acting managing director, Anthony Woodside, said C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission f rom the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a t hird party and The T ribune can not be held responsible for e rrors and/or o mission from the d aily report. $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 ' 0+(,&2'0$$12-062-5,'-31$.0-+(1(,&.$ "$.0(4 "6 ,#"-,4$,($,2*(4 (,&-.$,*(4(,& ,##(,(,& 0$ .0-4(#$1 .$0%$"2!*$,#-%"' 0+ ,#1. "(-31,$115'(*$ 1$ 1(#$. 2(-(12'$.$0%$"21.-22-3,5(,#5'(*$2 )(,&(, 1--2'(,&1$ 4(12 1'(1& 2$#"-++3,(26' 1'-301$"30(2625-.--*1 ,# 5'(2$ ,#!$ "'$0$716-30-..-023,(262-*(4$!62'$1$ 1/%2 b %%% (",-5*$1,#0$51f4("'&"'0(12($"-+ *2# n b t b b f r n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce’s president has urged businesses to “break this mindset” among staff that they do not have to offer the same customer service quality to a Bahamian as they do a tourist, given that companies were des perate to earn every dollar they can. Dionisio D’Aguilar, who is Superwash’s president, told Tri b une Business that three differe nt tiers of customer service quality existed in the Bahamas. The first tier was the service ‘Break mindset of threetier client service’ * Chamber chief says staff must be made to understand all dollars and customers equally important, and give same service quality to a Bahamian as a tourist/ foreigner * Businesses ‘walking a tightrope’ on survival, as productivity improves in economy * Companies warned to be careful on letting go best workers SEE page 2B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T HIS week’s shooting outside Bay Street’s El Greco Hotel, and other problems being experienced by the property, are potentially a “serious turn-off” to downtown Nassau’s redevelopment into an attrac tive destination for tourists and Bahamians alike, a senior pri vate sector official told Tribune Business yesterday. Charles Klonaris, the Nassau Tourism and Development Board’s (NTDB the shooting near the West Bay Street Hotel, which sparked the subsequent departure of 40 per cent of its guests, showed that downtown Nassau still had a security problem that the police and other stakeholders needed to tackle. And given the El Greco’s separate complaints about noise from a nearby nightclub in the former Mayfair hotel, which it claimed was also costing it busi ness, Mr Klonaris said the Licensing Authority would have to be careful when it came to granting liquor and nightclub licences for the Bay Street area. He explained that it would need to ensure such facilities were compatible with other nearby property uses. “It’s the security problem we’re all concerned with,” Mr Klonaris told Tribune Business “And not only security, but determining how properties are operated and who comes in. “We know security is a prob lem for downtown. Without security, the redevelopment of the city will not happen. If we’re going to have a living city, secu rity is vital.” Mr Klonaris said episodes such as Monday morning’s shooting, which is unconnected Shooting a ‘serious turn-off’ for Nassau redevelopment plan SEE page 4B SEE page 8B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Securities Commission’s failure to enforce key rules potentially undermines the integrity of the Bahamian capital markets/investment funds industry, senior financial executives said yesterday, telling Failure to enforce rules undermines regulation integrity Development Bank: Loans in arrears see 30% annual increase B ank only expecting to recover $36m or 63.2% of $57m loan book * Financial executives warn poor compliance sends ‘wrong message’ to capital markets/investment funds industry * Commission told: ‘If you’re not going to enforce the rules, don’t put them on the books’ SEE page 10B SEE page 8B Brian Moree Marina removed from receivership 116-slip Port Lucaya Marina taken out, but other New Hope Holdings assets remain under care of accountant Phil Galanis

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OLD Fort Bay’s Board of Directors have given the ‘green light’ to a project that aims to equip every street light in the p rivate community with an e nergy efficient bulb, a move i ntended to produce “dramatic savings” in electricity costs. “First and foremost, given the exorbitant cost of electricity nowadays, deploying energy efficient ‘green’ technology makes financial sense” said Dr H arold Munnings, chairman of t he Board of the Old Fort Bay P roperty Owners Association. “We expect to see a dramatic savings in the cost of our electricity, given that we have almost 100 street lights in Old Fort Bay. Another attractive feature of the HEF lights is t heir life expectancy. While c hanging a household bulb is a s imple matter, a street light is altogether more difficult and we are told that these bulbs can last for up to 25e years. If this proves to be true then the savings in maintenance costs alone will be significant”. Energy efficient High Efficiency Fluorescent (HEF are designed to reduce energy and maintenance costs by as much as 75 per cent and, according to the manufacturer, to provide consistent quality light output for over 25 years. Old Fort Bay researched a number of lighting technologies. The HEF lights were chosen, because specifications showed them to be more efficient, provide better quality light, last longer and cost less than half t he price of other leading energ y efficient bulbs. Everyone comments on the natural beauty of Old Fort Bay. Old Fort Beach is locally and internationally renowned, as is the magnificent ancient silk cotton tree that overlooks the Old Fort Bay Club,” said Dr Munnings “Our community cares about the environment in which we live. The HEF Green Light project is just one example of that belief.” Other members of the Old Fort Bay Board of Directors include Sir William Allen, Anthony Myers and Alistair Henderson, with Dwayne Mortimer as secretary. Old Fort Bay gets ‘green light’ for energy efficiency C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE BRIGHT FUTURE Dr Harold Munnings holds one of the High Efficiency Fluorescent (HEF ‘Break mindset of three-tier client service’ provided to tourists and foreigners; the second tier was that received by fellow Bahamians; and the lowest or third tier was reserved for the service quality provided to Haitian and Jamaican nationals. “It’s a mindset you have to change,” the Chamber president said, acknowledging the key role customer service played in encouraging patrons to not only spend more, but keep returning to the same business. This was never more important than in the current economic climate. “There’s three tiers of service, and everyone’s got the same dollar. It’s very, very frustrating to get people to break this mindset they’re in. You’ve got to offer quality customer service all the time.” Mr D’Aguilar added: “There’s a general impression that if Bahamian companies deal with Bahamian companies, you don’t have to offer the same quality of customer ser vice as you do a foreign visitor. “I believe that in businesses in areas that deal predominant ly with local clientele, Bahami ans don’t expect, and you don’t have to give, the same quality of service as you give to a foreigner. “A customer is a customer irrespective of nationality, and businesses have to impress upon staff the importance of making a sale, as opposed to who you’re making the sale to.” Mr D’Aguilar said the frequency with which customers came into his business unhappy with the quality of customer service, and asking for their money back, “boggles my mind”. “I’d be lying if I said it did not happen on a far too frequent basis,” he added.” “It’s very hard to get my staff to say it’s an important $10. I don’t know if that message has resonated yet. US$, B$, it all ends up in the same account. What we are trying to impress on our staff is that Bahamian customers are equally important. “I’ve tried to emphasise to my staff that every little bit of business that comes through the door, you’ve got to strive like hell to keep that coming in.” One positive from the current economic downturn is that it has improved productivity levels in the Bahamian hotel industry, as workers fearing for their jobs seek to give bosses no reason to axe them. When asked whether productivity improvements had taken place across the Bahamian economy, Mr D’Aguilar said it largely depended on the business and sector employees worked in. Those industries already hit by the downturn had seen improvements, the Cham ber president said, whereas there was little noticeable difference in sectors not feeling the chill. “It depends on the environment in your business,” he added. “I went over to Atlantis and noticed a vast improvement in customer service. I was blown away everyone smiled, everyone was helpful. This was a couple of weeks after lay-offs had taken place.” However, in many government agencies there was “no incentive or motivation” to improve customer service. “That also happens in companies in the private sector that at this stage have seen no need to cut back,” Mr D’Aguilar added. Brian Nutt, the Bahamas Employers Confederation’s (BECon worker productivity had picked up across the Bahamian economy as the chill from the global recession continued to bite. “I believe there is some correlation,” Mr Nutt told Tribune Business. “Everyone is aware of what the economic situation is.” Employees who previously bounced from job to job, believing they would always be able to find employment somewhere, were realising this was becoming “tougher and tougher to do, so to make themselves valuable to employers productivity is increasing”. Mr Nutt added that many Bahamian businesses were currently “walking a tightrope” in their attempts to survive, and he urged them not to lay-off experienced employees, as this could be counterproductive. “What we see is a raised level of concern with businesses as to what they have to do to try and survive this economic downturn. They’re looking at any way they can reduce costs,” Mr Nutt said. “One of the big cost expenses is labour and, of course, we’ve seen that result in a number of the lay-offs that have occurred. “Businesses need to be careful in that scenario, and prudent enough not to let go experienced staff who know their jobs well, and bring in people who don’t know their jobs well, because the business will suffer as well. “It’s like walking a tightrope right now what can be done to survive the crisis, and then be in a position to rebound when the economy picks up.”

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE INTERNATIONALLY-recognised Pioneers of Prosperity (PoP Bahamas chapter of the Caribbean Awards Programme yesterday, which will provide a small to medium-sized business with a $100,000 grant sponsored by major Bahamas-based financial firms. Companies that employ five to 250 individuals, earn between $100,000 to $5 million per year,are for-profit and have been profitable for two of the last three years, are eligible to apply for the grant, which will be awarded to a single company in the Bahamas. A regional grant will be given to an outstanding company from select countries in the wider Caribbean. Other businesses that apply for the grant could be eligible to win prizes ranging from $5,000 to $50,000. Eligible companies will come from the Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica or Trinidad and T obago. A ccording to organisers, companies will be judged based on their ability to create unique value for customers through innovative products and/or services; generate a sustainable profit for owners/shareholder; invest in their employees through training, safe working conditions and high and rising salaries; and protect the future by strengthening local and global environments and communities. “I wish to encourage every Bahamian-based business owner that is eligible to participate in this unique awards programme to take full advantage of this wonderful opportunity. For in doing so, they stand to i mprove their businesses t hrough financial awards, as well as be connected to networks of technical expertise and other dynamic entrepreneurs both locally and globally,” said the Bahamas Development Bank’s acting managing director, Anthony Woodside. The PoP award was designed to not only include a sum of money, but also an opportunity for the business to build contacts with technical experts and connect with other entrepreneurs to foster future development. “Unlike other award programmes, PoP does not end with the distribution of the award. Rather, the award is just the beginning,” said organisers. “PoP will focus on a postaward communications effort that showcases the winning firms, and connects participants to networks of other entrepreneurs, technical expertise and financial capital, to inspire a culture of entrepreneurship and innovation.” Key partners involved in the PoP endeavour are the John Templeton Foundation, theI nter-American Development Bank, SEVEN and the OTF group. President of the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, Dionisio D’Aguilar, touted the PoP programme, saying that thou s ands of eligible small and medi um-sized business owners can now compete for the award with a view to furthering their entrepreneurial dream. “I firmly believe that the Pio neers of Prosperity awards prog ramme is indeed timely, and w ill stand to benefit, encourage and renew the hopes and dreams of Bahamian entrepreneurs, particularly during these challenging economic times. I am encouraging Bahamian Businesses to full embrace this unique opportunity,” Mr C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 3B Security & General Insurance Company (S&G a subsidiary of Colonial Group International Limited (CGI is seeking to appoint an individual to the position of Claims Of cer. CGI, with of ces in Bermuda, the Cayman Islands, the British Virgin Islands as well as The Bahamas, offers a complete range of premier nancial and insurance services and continues to demonstrate signi cant growth in these areas of business.This is an opportunity to be part of a rapidly growing and innovative company focused on providing our clients with rst class service linked to competitive products. Reporting to the Claims Manager, the Claims Of cer will be responsible for the processing of claims enquiries using the Compans procedural guidelines and coordinating with the Claims Supervisor on the daily operational tasks within the Claims Department.The successful candidate should possess: A CERT CII or equivalent quali cation A minimum of three years experience handling and negotiating settlements of Personal Lines claims Strong administration skills and claims negotiation experience Competency in the use and application of standard Microsoft software applications Good communication, presentation, and writing skills Compensation for the successful candidate will be attractive and linked to performance. S&G offers an attractive bene ts package that includes comprehensive medical & life insurance, a contributory pension plan and long term disability coverage. If you have a keen commitment to quality, are results oriented with a desire to contribute your talents to a dynamic company, contact us about this opportunity.Applications will be treated in the strictest con dence and should be made in writing to: Security & General Insurance Co. Ltd. Attn: Human Resources P.O. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas Or by email to: bs_hr@atlantichouse.com.bs The closing date for applications is February 27th, 2009.SECURITY & GENERAL INSURANCE CO. LTD. Personal & Business Insurance Atlantic House, 2nd Terrace & Collins Avenue P.O. Box N-3540, Nassau, Bahamas tel. 326 7100 www.cgigroup.bmA member of Colonial Group International Insurance, Health, Pensions, Life CLAIMS OFFICER Colonial Group International is rated A(ExcellentyAM Best P P r r o o s s p p e e r r i i t t y y A A w w a a r r d d s s e e e e k k i i n n g g B B a a h h a a m m i i a a n n b b u u s s i i n n e e s s s s p p i i o o n n e e e e r r s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD for the position of Construction Project Manager/Coordinator. Reporting directly to the Construction Manager, the duties and responsibilities of the successful applicant will include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otential candidates will possess an Engineering Degree, EIT or other technical qualifications required and 5-10 years of construction related experience on one or more large scale projects with emphasis on heavy civil, utilities, earthworks and paving. Applicants must have the ability to read and interpret construction drawings. They should have excellent computer skills including MS Office, AutoCAD, scheduling software or other related software. Excellent analytical and problem solving skills, oral and written communications skills required. Candidates should also have superior interpersonal and organizational skills. Prior experience working in an airport environment a plus but not required. Construction Project Manager/ CoordinatorIfyouarequaliedandinterested, pleasesubmityourresumeby March 6, 2009to: Manager, People Nassau Airport Development Co. P.O. Box AP59229 Nassau, Bahamas Onlythoseapplicantsshortlistedwillbe contacted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hooting a ‘serious turn-off’ for Nassau redevelopment plan Mayfair Hotel, would also deter downtown Nassau property owners and business owners from reinvesting in upgrades to their premises. Who’s going to develop t heir properties when they see that happening on their doorstep? It’s a turn-off, and a serious one, too,” Mr Klonaris said. “If you can’t have families coming down and walking with their children and strollers, then forget it. Our commitment is to make the city consumer and family friendly, and safe.” Given the El Greco’s concerns about noise emanating from the Envy Beach Club, particularly during the period Thursday through to Sunday every week, Mr Klonaris said it was “key” to control what Bay Street properties were being used for, and ensure this was compatible with the surrounding neighbourhood and overall plans for downtown. “I think the Licensing Authority has to be careful, especially when it comes to issuing licences for nightclubs in areas where, unless they are managed properly, they could attract undesirables,” the NTDB chairman said. There is nothing to suggest this is the case at the Envy Beach Club. Mr Klonaris added that the Government and private sector also needed to tackle the derelict buildings dotting downtown Nassau’s landscape. Meanwhile, Mr Klonaris said the private sector and Road Traffic Department were “on the same page” when it came to downtown Nassau’s redevelopment and solving its parking and transportation problems. He added: “There is an understanding in terms of what they’re looking for and what we’re looking for is the same thing. We are on the same page.” Mr Klonaris said the NTDB and private sector were seeking to pedestrianise all the side streets between Navy Lion Road and East Street, in addition to resolving the chronic Bay Street problems of parking, parking management via metering, taxis and jitneys. Mr Klonaris described Bay Street east of East Street as a “drag strip”, where vehicles raced along at 40-50 miles per hour, creating an environment that was not conducive to retailing. This was why so many shops in that area had closed down, with no replacements in sight. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 5B n By ERIN CONROY AP Business Writer NEW YORK (AP dollar climbed against most major currencies in midday trading Wednesday as President Barack Obama unveiled a $75 billion mortgage relief plan, amid bleak reports that industry production and construction of new homes in the US have plunged to record lows. The 16-nation euro fell to $1.2553 in midday New York trading, its lowest point since early December and below the $1.2615 it bought late Tuesday. The British pound slipped to $1.4196 from $1.4266, while the dollar rose to 93.29 Japanese yen from 92.42 yen. President Obama's plan to tackle the foreclosure crisis is meant to prevent up to nine million Americans from losing their homes. The plan is more expensive than initially expect-ed and aims to aid borrowers who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are currently worth, as well as those on the verge of foreclosure. The Federal Reserve reported Wednesday that productionat the nation's factories, mines and utilities fell to a record low of 1.8 per cent last month. Many economists expected a smaller 1.5 per cent decline. The Fed's report showed that factory pro duction dropped by 2.5 per cent in January, with shutdowns at plants making autos and related parts figuring prominently in that decline. Another report from the Commerce Department said construction of new homes and applications for future projects both plunged to record lows in January. Also Wednesday, the European Commission said France and Germany will see their budget deficits go way above the ceiling of three per cent of gross domestic product, a maximum fixed by rules designed to boost the stability of the euro. The EC said it will cut countries both in and out of the 16-nation euro zone some slack in complying with the bloc's sound finances rules. The euro dropped Tuesday after ratings agency Moody's said that faltering economic conditions in eastern Europe would hit the local subsidiaries of major Western banks and potentially hurt their corporate parents, primarily in Austria, Italy, France, Belgium, Germany and Sweden. "It is clear that the dollar has been benefiting from weak economic data, both at home and abroad, as well as rising risk aversion," said Michael Woolfolk, an analyst at Bank of New York Mellon. "We're seeing safe haven flows to the US dollar, and we've seen the dollar now move into a new trading range." One of the biggest surprises overnight, Woolfolk said, was the dollar's rally against the Japanese yen. Earlier this week, Japan's government said the country's economy shrank at its fastest rate in 35 years in the fourth quarter and shows no signs of reversing course anytime soon. Also this week, Japanese Finance Minister Shoichi Nakagawa said he would step down a fter allegations that he seemed i nebriated at the Group of Seve n meeting in Rome. The move dealt a major blow to Prime Minister Taro Aso's already shaky government. A renewed decline in oil prices has weighed on currencies such as the Russian ruble, Polish zloty and the Hungarian forint. Benchmark oil prices languished around $35 a barrel Wednesday. Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk has pledged government intervention in the foreign exchange market to prop up the currency if it continues to fall, while the Russian currency is edging closer to the trading limit the Central Bank announced in January. The Central Bank set the official exchange rate for Thursday at 36.4 rubles against the dollar the lowest point for the ruble since January 1998 when Russia re-denominated its currency. In other midday trading Wednesday, the dollar slipped to 1.2599 Canadian dollars from 1.2644, and advanced to 1.1766 Swiss francs from 1.1695. Dollar climbs as Obama unveils $75bn mortgage relief plan BARACK OBAMA (AP

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C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 7B n By ANIKA KENTISH Associated Press Writer ST JOHN’S, Antigua (AP Panicky depositors rushed to pull money from banks and leaders in the Caribbean and Latin America urged calm on Wednesday, concerned that their slumping economies could be harmed by the fraud case against Texas financier R Allen Stanford. Hundreds of people lined up outside two branches of the Bank of Antigua, a Stanfordowned institution that has been flooded with fearful customers since the US Securities and Exchange Commission filed a complaint Tuesday accusing him of an $8 billion fraud. “People have to come to get their money,” said Rasta Kente, an electrician who joined a line that stretched around the cornerat a downtown bank branch. Three security officers allowed only a few people to enter at a time. Many of those waiting clutched portable radios to listen to financial news. Local regulators said the bank’s finances are sound and appealed for calm. The bank, though owned by the Stanford Financial Group, Stanford’s Houston-based financial advisory firm, is not part of the U.S. complaint. “If individuals persist in rushing to the bank in a panic they will precipitate the very situation that we are all trying to avoid,” said K Dwight Venner, governor of the Eastern Caribbean Central Bank, the banking regulator for Antigua and seven other island economies. US regulators on Tuesday charged Stanford, one of the most prominent businessmen in the Caribbean, and three of his companies with a “massive” fraud that centered around high-interest-rate certificate of deposits. The US Securities and Exchange Commission on Tuesday froze the three companies’ assets, including the Antiguabased Stanford International Bank, which also has offices in Mexico, Panama, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. The charges have “profoundly serious implications” for Antigua, Prime Minister Baldwin Spencer said in a speech late Tuesday, adding that the government is developing a contingency plan. The central bank said it will do “what it takes” to preserve the soundness of the banking system in the twin-island nation of Antigua and Barbuda. Colombian authorities, meanwhile, suspended the activities of Stanford International Bank’s local brokerage Wednesday morning to protect “clients and investors,” according to a statement from the Colombian Finance Superintendency. In Venezuela, where Stanford Bank has 14 local branches and about 15,000 clients, the nation’s top bank regulator also urged calm. Banking Superintendent E dgar Hernandez warned that in addition to local depositors, a g roup of Venezuelans has an additional $2.5 billion in assets in Stanford’s Bank in Antigua fueling reports that some wealthy investors were travel-i ng to Antigua Wednesday to t alk to bank officials. Regulators in Panama meanwhile took over branches of Stanford’s unit there following a run on deposits Tuesday. The Superintendent of Banks said it was responding to “an isolat-e d event as a consequence of decisions adopted by foreign authorities,” and said that it did not reflect “a deterioration in the financial situation of the bank in Panama.” Assets at the bank’s four Panama branches, which La Prensa said held $200.8 million in deposits at the end of 2008, are held largely in liquid, fixedincome investments that can easily be converted into cash to cover deposits if necessary, Martinez Stagg said. In the Virgin Islands, Governor John deJongh said he is worried the probe will worsen the US territory’s flagging economy, potentially costing jobs and investment in local projects. Stanford had pledged to build an office complex on land adjacent to St Croix’s airport. Stanford, 58, owns a home in St Croix and operates his businesses from Houston and Antigua. He was knighted in this Caribbean island in 2006 and helped sponsor high-stakes cricket matches. Forbes magazine has estimated his personal fortune at $2.2 billion. In addition to Stanford hims elf, the civil lawsuit filed Tuesday in federal court in Dallas n ames as defendants James Davis, the chief financial officer of Stanford International Bank, as well as Laura Pendergest-Holt, the chief invest-m ent officer of Stanford Financ ial Group. While not named in the SEC’s civil complaint, regulators said Stanford was aided in running the Antigua-based operation by his father, who lives in Mexia, Texas, anda nother Mexia resident with a background in cattle ranching and car sales. Davis, who was named in the lawsuit, was Stanford’s college roommate. Hundreds pull money from Stanford-owned bank BANK OF ANTIGUA’S customers form a line outside the St John’s branch on the Caribbean island Wednesday... (AP Photo: Andres Leighton

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Lucaya Marina and related land parcels were outside the New Hope Holdings ownership structure. Neither Mr Galanis nor the lead attorney for the plaintiff in the case, Maurice Glinton, returned Tribune calls seeking comment yesterday. Mr Glinton is understood to be preparing an appeal, on behalf of T G Investments LLC, to try and overturn the order removing the Port Lucaya Marina. However, the marina’s removal does not end Mr Galanis’s receivership over New Hope Holdings’ assets. These include the Grand Bahama Yacht Club Marina and Grand Bahama Yacht Club, plus multiple parcels of land owned in freehold by New Hope Holdings that are mainly situated in the Lucayan Marina and Bell Channel areas. Another 10 parcels of land that have been leased to New Hope Holdings were also covered by the original receivership order. Tribune Business previously exclusively revealed that Mr Olsen's main financial backer, T.G. Investments, had been seeking a court-appointed receiver for the New Hope properties, alleging that Mr Olsen had defaulted on repaying loans worth $23-$24 million. Maurice Glinton and Arnold Forbes, acting for American investor Tom Gonzalez, the man behind T.G. Investments, obtained a Mareva Injunction to freeze the assets of Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings. They are alleging T.G. Investments lent $23-$24 million, secured by two promissory notes to Mr Olsen and New Hope Holdings to finance the acquisition of the Port Lucaya Marina and associated properties, but this has not been repaid. They are also claiming the company financed other obligations of New Hope Holdings. Yet this newspaper understands that Mr Olsen’s and New Hope’s attorneys are vigorously contesting the default allegations and the receivership. They are alleging that responsibility for any loan repayment default lies squarely with Mr Gonzalez. They are claiming he failed to live up to several obligations, one of which was to provide New Hope Holdings with $12 million in working capital over and above the initial purchase price to fund its operations. This, Mr Olsen and New Hope’s attorneys are alleging, never happened, and without that capital New Hope ended up defaulting. Essentially, the core allegation in their arguments rests on the claim that any responsibility for the loan default lies with Mr Gonzalez himself. All parties are understood to be back before the Supreme Court later this month for further hearings related to the substantive issues raised by the case. In 2006, New Hope Holdings announced the acquisition of Port Lucaya Marina as part of the company’s $500 million, 70acre waterfront expansion surrounding Bell Channel Bay. The project, included 300 yacht slips (available by the day, week, month, year or even a 99year lease) and 300 new luxurious waterfront condominiums, townhouses and private residences. Port Lucaya Marina is situated just across the bay from the Grand Bahama Yacht Club. books, valued at almost $57 million. Of that sum, the BDB expects to see a “net realisable value” of $36 million, meaning that it is unlikely to recover $21 million or 36.8 per cent of the total. With a grim economic outlook for 2009, and numerous businesses having to trim their operations back, the BDB could see more borrowers start to default on their repayments, and the predicted arrears figure inflate. “We have that difficulty because we only finance small and medium enterprises, and 70 to 80 per cent of small businesses fail within the first three years, so that creates a problem. But it’s gotten a little bit worse during this recessionary period,” said Mr Woodside. He admitted that borrowers who seldom missed payments in the past had, last year, began to show difficulties in maintaining this performance. “Some of our real good customers, who have never misseda payment in a couple of years, are now having problems,” Mr Woodside said. Last year, the BDB attempt ed to spark repayments on some $29 million worth of loans in arrears by offering a threemonth moratorium ,during which borrowers were being encouraged to go into the bank to speak to their loan officersa bout payment options. The Government and BDB also dis cussed, during that same period, writing off that 51 per cent of the bank’s total loan portfolio. Like many banks suffering chronic loan defaults, the BDBi s trying to encourage its bor rowers to come in for a consul tation. Mr Woodside said cus tomers are encouraged to walk into the BDB in order to work out payment arrangements if they feel their firms might be i n danger of falling down on payments. “We also offer to restructure (the loans grace periods,” he said. Though it expects things to get worse this year, the BDB is still lending money to those who can meet the more stringent requirements, brought on by the global economic downturn. “We’re still lending but we’re being very selective because of the slowdown in the economy,” said Mr Woodside. He said he has also noticed that the BDB has seen a decrease in applications for loans, and believes that individuals might be reserving their ideas for when the economy takes an upswing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f D QGVHFXULWLHVEDFNRIFHH[SHULHQFHPDLQWDLQLQJUHFRUGVRIWUDQVDFWLRQVUHFRUGLQJRI GLYLGHQGVVWRFNVSOLWVLQWHUHVWFRUSRUDWHDFWLRQVGXWLHVDVUHODWHGWRWKHDGPLQLVWUDWLRQ RIVHFXULWLHVSRUWIROLRYDOXDWLRQVDQGUHSRUWLQJf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arina removed from receivership B B A A N N K K , , f f r r o o m m p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B I I N N S S I I G G H H T T F o o r r t t h h e e s s t t o o r r i i e e s s b b e e h h i i n n d d t t h h e e n n e e w w s s , , r r e e a a d d I I n n s s i i g g h h t t o o n n M M o o n n d d a a y y s s

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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009, PAGE 9B THE Bahamas National trust’s executive director, Eric Carey, is scheduled to speak at the upcoming 11th annual Grand Bahama Business Outlook (GBBO His presentation will focus on Grand Bahama’s unique National Park system on and offshore. “The Bahamas National Trust is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year,” Mr Carey said. “The Trust, with its mandate of national park mana gement, has a clear vision for t he next 50 years, and an import ant part of that vision are the three national parks on Grand Bahama:The Lucayan National Park, the Rand Nature Centre and Pelican Cays Land and Sea Park.” Mr Carey will address BNT’s vision for the future of the organisation, and the important role Grand Bahama has to play in the creation of a national park system that will be the envy of every country in the r egion. Just this past week the Trust opened the new bridge and boardwalk at the Lucayan National Park – the most visitedpark in the Bahamas. This investment of over $250,000 shows the commitment that theBNT has to Grand Bahama,” Mr Carey added. Prior to his appointment to the post of executive director, Mr Carey served as director of parks and science at BNT. Previously, he held the position of Wildlife Conservation Officer with the Government, and saton the BNT Wildlife, Ornithology and Game Birds Committees . Mr Carey has represented the Bahamas at numerous international and regional meetings, and has received training in wildlife conservation in such countries as Malaysia, Thailand, Chile, Trinidad & Tobago, Barbados, Jamaica, the United K ingdom and the United States. I n 2000, the US government a ppointed Mr Carey as a member of the prestigious Kirtland’s Warbler Recovery Team. He has received international awards and recognition for his work in nature conservation, inclusive of the Partners-InFlight International Conservation Award in 1999 and the 2005 Wings Across the Americas Research and Management Partnership Award. Mr Carey is one of 10 speak ers at this year’s Grand Bahama Business Outlook. The event is sponsored by the Grand Bahama Port Authority, Bank of the Bahamas International, FOCOL, Emera, The Central Bank of The Bahamas, British American Financial, Ministry of Tourism and Scotiabank. Trust chief to speak on National Parks ERIC CAREY

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ness: “If you’re not going to enforce the rules, don’t putt hem on the books.” Brian Moree, senior partner a t McKinney, Bancroft & Hughes, told Tribune Business that the relatively low level of compliance with the Securities Commission’s regulations in some key areas and the regulator’s failure to properly enforce what was on the books - “sends the wrong message” to the capital markets/investment funds industry about the strength of regulation they will be subjected to. And James Smith, the former minister of state for finance, who is now CFAL’s chairman, suggested that the situation showed the Bahamas had yet to “find the proper balance” between regulation and permitting the free conduct of business in its capital markets. The Securities Commission earlier this week acknowledged that it had not properly enforced the regulations with respect to broker/dealer regu latory capital and investment funds filing their audited financials within four months of yearend. Its data showed just 45.45 per cent of Class II broker/dealers met the $120,000 minimum regulatory capital threshold, while 82.5 per cent of securities invest ment advisers met the $25,000 threshold. The greatest area of non-compliance was for the $300,000 Class I broker/dealer threshold, with a 33.4 per cent compliance rate, and the major issues were with standalone companies. The Securities Commission is now working on developing a more realistic formula for regulatory capital requirements, one industry source telling Tribune Business yesterday that the Bahamas’ stipulations for broker/dealers were more onerous than their equivalent in the US, UK and Canada. A similar review of investment fund filing deadlines is also underway, but Tribune Business was told yesterday that if it was not going to enforce the rules/regulations it had, the Securities Commission should not have had them on the booksi n the first place because of the mixed message sent to the markets it regulated. Saying that the statistics released by the Securities Commission were “both surprising and disturbing”, Mr Moree saidy esterday: “It seems to me that in order to establish the credibility of the Securities Commission as a regulator, it needs to ensure that it’s going to enforce its rules and regulations that it passes or has on its books. If they don’t think, for whate ver reason, the regulations or certain rules should not be enforced, they should not have been promulgated. If you’re not going to enforce the regulations, do not put them on the books.” Mr Moree added: “I think it’s an unusual position for a regulator to be sending a message to the market that there is wide spread non-compliance with certain of its regulations. “In my view, that sends the wrong message. Simply put, you should only adopt and pass the regulations you intend to enforce. If you don’t think the market is ready or they’re too onerous to enforce, you should not promulgate them. “What I don’t think is helpful to the future credibility of the Securities Commission is for the market to think it can treat rules and regulations as a target to try and comply with, and don’t suffer any penalties for not doing so.” Mr Moree said that given the current global financial crisis, it was “extremely important” for the Securities Commission to “have a strong enforcement unit, and send a clear, unequivocal message that rules and reg-u lations are passed to protect the industry, and the consumer and the general public, and those regulations are not options that licensees can or cannot comply with. “They are required to com p ly with the regulations, and if not there will be serious consequences. If the sector is going to be well-regulated, we’ve got to put some enforcement teeth behind the regulation side.” The Securities Commission, Mr Moree said, needed to tell the market that failure to comply with its rules and regulations would result in enforcement penalties and sanctions. It was a problem, he added, that needed fixing “immediately”. Meanwhile, Mr Smith said the situation reflected the fact that the Securities Commission and Bahamian capital markets were both in their respective infancy, and needed time tom ature and properly develop systems of regulation. He questioned whether the rules and regulations, as they currently stood, had “struck the proper balance between effective oversight and not restrictingt rade”. n By JEANNINE AVERSA AP Economics Writer WASHINGTON (AP Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke pledged anew Wednesday to do everything in his power to lift the country out of recession, while defending the extraordinary steps the Fed has taken to fight the worst credit and financial crisis since the 1930s. The central bank has slashed a key interest rate to record lows and has launched a series of radical programmes in hopes of getting credit the economy's oxygen to flow more freely again to American consumers and businesses, and stabilize Wall Street. Such relief would help revive the US economy, which has been mired in recession since December 2007. "Recent economic statistics have been dismal, with many economies, including ours, having fallen into recession," Bernanke said in remarks to the National Press Club. "In the United States, the Federal Reserve has done, and will continue to do, everything possible within the limits of its authority to assist in restoring our nation to financial stability and economic prosperity as quickly as possible." The Fed has been exploring new tools as well as expanding existing programmes to provide further economic and financial relief, although Bernanke didn't provide any new details on Wednesday. With all the Fed's programmes to provide loans or buy debt, its balance sheet has mushroomed to just under $2 trillion, from around $900 billion in September. Critics worry the Fed's actions have the potential to put ever-more taxpayers' dollars at risk, spur inflationary pressure in the future and encourage "moral hazard," where companies feel more comfortable making high-stakes gambles because the government will rescue them. Bernanke, however, sought to downplay some of those concerns. "The credit risk with our nontraditional policies is exceptionally low," he said, adding that when the economy is on the mend, the Fed's programmes can be quickly reversed "to avoid risks of future inflation." The great bulk of the Fed's lending is generally short term and backed by more than ample assets, Bernanke said. In other controversial moves, the Fed last year provided financial backing for JPMorgan Chase's take over of Bear Stearns, and bailed out insurer American International Group. Although this carries "more risk than our traditional activities," Bernanke said the Fed intends over time to sell the assets it holds from those bailouts in a way that maximizes the return to taxpayers. The Fed chief also repeated a pledge made last week to keep Americans better informed about its efforts to ease credit and financial problems. On that front, the central bank is developing a new Web site that will provide detailed information on its efforts. The Fed hopes to have the site operational in the coming days. The Fed's No. 2 official, vice chairman Donald Kohn, also is leading a committee to review the central bank's disclosure policies related to its lending programmes and its balance sheet, which outlines its efforts to ease credit problems by providing loans and buying debt. "The presumption of the committee will be that the public has a right to know," Bernanke said. In another move to provide Wall Street and Main Street with better insights into the Fed's thinking about the economy, Bernanke said the central bank will start publishing longer-term projections on economic activity, unemployment and inflation beyond the three years now provided. C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PAGE 10B, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Bernanke vows to do all he can to revive economy BEN BERNANKE (AP Failure to enforce rules undermines regulation integrity F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 B B

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