Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

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Volume: 105 No.72



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 PRICE — 75¢

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Tensions sae te
police wks sHid

Residents concerned

about possible stand-off

in Nassau Village

RESIDENTS of Nassau Vil-
lage were concerned last night
about a possible stand-off
between civilians and police
after an officer was shot and
injured in the area earlier yes-
terday.

Police yesterday surrounded
a large area of the island,
stretching from Nassau Village
to Seabreeze Estates, and
launched a manhunt for per-
sons believed to be responsible
for the shooting of Corporal 518
Johnson of the Southeastern
Division.

tigation into the matter. They
were still looking for other sus-
pects believed to be connected
to the incident.

Asst Commissioner of Police
Hulan Hanna told The Tribune
that the man who is believed to
have shot the officer is a “per-
son of interest” to police.

Officer Johnson was taken to
Doctors Hospital and treated
for his injuries.

Tensions in Nassau Village
rose after the police officer was
shot in the thigh shortly after
4pm while he was reportedly



At press time last night, attempting to arrest a man in
police had a Nassau Village connection with a shooting that

man in custody. He is now 3
assisting them with their inves- SEE page six

Former MP ‘not being held in Cuba’

The Tribune was reliably informed yesterday by high level
sources within government that a former parliamentarian, rumoured
to be jailed in Cuba was in fact not being held in the communist
country.

While no new information was released regarding the status of
the politician, the government source said that he had spoken with
the former MP “yesterday”, adding only that the rumours regard-
ing the individual were totally “untrue.”

Recently, the former Director of Immigration, and now Ambas-
sador to Cuba Vernon Burrows, said that he was instructed by
government to take another look into the matter as the allegations
surrounding the former MP continued to persist.



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham shares a laugh with His Excellency
Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Repub-
lic of China, as he introduces him to members of his Cabinet at the
Churchill Building yesterday.

Man, 32, charged with

Valentine’s Day murder

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A 32-YEAR-OLD electrician was
arraigned in magistrate’s court yesterday
charged with the murder of Philip Mar-
cellus who was stabbed to death on Valen-
tine’s Day.

Kendrick Dames, of Palm Breeze
, Avenue, off Carmichael Road, New Prov-

SEE page six

BEC is criticised by
environmental activist

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

SEE page six
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less than transparent way the Schneider Power that will allow
“greening” of the Bahamas is
being conducted.

Yesterday, Schneider Power

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Government

to borrow
$160 million

from





Felipé Major/Tribune staff






Alpha Early Learning Centre was
one of the schools robbed.

“DE OTT:
TT
private schools

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





SCHOOLS are being
warned to be on high alert
after a single masked gun-
man is believed to have
robbed three private
schools in broad daylight.
Cash, jewellery and other
personal items were stolen
from the Southwest Christ-
ian Academy, Bayview
Academy and the Alpha
Early Learning Centre

SEE page six

Located on Ernest & Mackey Streets @ Mon-Fri l0am-ipm. Sal ltam-zpm *



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Loan to go on roadworks
and other projects

China



m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net









DESPITE the downturn in
the global economy, the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China has
agreed to loan the government
of the Bahamas over $160 mil-
lion for roadworks and other
projects. The agreement was
announced yesterday during the
official visit of China’s Vice Pre-
mier of State Council.

Being ushered from the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port in a convoy of armed
guards and dignitaries, His
Excellency Hui Liangyu paid a
courtesy call on the Governor
General before visiting with
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and his entire Cabinet at
the Churchill Building.



















Expressing his gratitude for

SEE page two


















Unconfirmed
reports of woman
drowning in
St Andrew’s pool

AN UNIDENTIFIED
woman reportedly drowned
in St Andrew’s swimming
pool yesterday afternoon.

Unconfirmed reports reach-
ing The Tribune last night
were sketchy, however, it is
known that Swift Swim Club
meets at the school’s pool in
the afternoons.

Swim coaches Andy and
Nancy Knowles could not be
reached for comment.





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Message from the
Chinese Ambassador

@ Message from
H E Mr HU Dingxian,
Ambassador
Extraordinary and
Plenipotentiary of the
People's Republic
of China in the
Commonwealth of
the Bahamas

AT THE invitation of the
government of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas, H E
Mr HUI Liangyu, Vice Pre-
mier of the State Council of
the People's Republic of Chi-
na, will pay an official visit to
the Bahamas from February
17 to 19, 2009. This is an event
of great significance in China-
Bahamas relations. Vice Pre-
mier HUI will bring with him
the friendship and goodwill of
the Chinese people to the
Bahamian people. Let's give
him a warm welcome here.

During his visit, Vice Pre-
mier HUI will meet with the
top leaders of the Bahamas,
and they will sign a series of
bilateral agreements of co-
operation. I firmly believe that
the visit will yield fruitful
results, further strengthen dia-
logue and exchanges between
China and the Bahamas fea-
turing mutual respect, equali-
ty, mutual benefit and win-win
co-operation, and contribute
greatly to the promotion of
sound, stable and in-depth
growth of our constructive and
co-operative relationship.

In 1997, diplomatic relations
were established between Chi-

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na and the Bahamas, which
marked a new chapter in the
history of our bilateral rela-
tions.

For the past 12 years, China
and the Bahamas have
respected each other, treated
each other on an equal footing
and had sincere co-operation.
Our all-round friendly rela-
tions have been continuously
deepened and broadened, and
maintained a healthy and
robust momentum, thanks to
the concerted efforts to the
two governments and peoples.
The Chinese government
highly appreciates the
Bahamian government's
unremitting commitments by
adhering to the one China pol-
icy.

Recent years have wit-
nessed fruitful exchanges and
co-operation in a wide range
of areas between the two
countries, including politics,
economics, culture, education
and tourism. These facts have
proven that the establishment
and development of relations
between China and the
Bahamas serve the funda-
mental interests of our two
peoples and go along with the
trend of the times. Bilateral
trade increased by 9.8 per cent
to $181 million in 2007 and by
74.9 per cent to $244 million
for the first 10 months in 2008.
Thanks to the joint efforts of
both sides, the China-
Bahamas friendly co-opera-
tion has reached a new level.

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ing complex and profound
changes. Under the new cir-
cumstances and in the face of
new opportunities and chal-
lenges, China stands ready to
work with the Bahamas to
build on past achievements,
sum up and draw on experi-
ence in the development of
our bilateral relations, and
remains committed to the
development of a constructive
and co-operative relationship.

PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham talks with His
Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice
Premier of the State Council of
The People’s Republic of China
yesterday at the Cabinet Office
on Bay Street.





rey TU eMC SAMA OU AMSTEL

MINISTER OF STATE for Lands and Local Government Byran Woodside shakes the hand of His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State
Council of The People’s Republic of China yesterday at the Cabinet Office yesterday.

Government to borrow
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FROM page one

meeting with the Prime Minis-
ter, Mr Liangyu wished both Mr
Ingraham and his colleagues
good health before the two coun-
tries signed four memorandums
of understanding.

The most financially promi-
nent of these agreements was
signed by the Minister of State
for Finance, Zhivargo Laing and
the Honourable Li Jun, Vice
President of the China Export-
Import Bank (Eximbank).

Under this agreement, China’s
Eximbank has agreed to loan the
Bahamas $150 million, of which
the “airport highway project is
of high priority.”

According to the document
signed yesterday, the estimated
cost of the project is currently
being prepared by the Bahamas
government, and will be con-
veyed to the China Eximbank
shortly after it is finalized.

“China Eximbank, as the sole
arm of the government of the
People’s Republic of China for

the operation of the concession-
ary lending, attaches great impor-
tance to such a request from the
government of the Bahamas,”
the document read. “China
Eximbank and the Ministry of
Finance of the Bahamas will dis-
cuss and agree on the terms and
conditions of the loan and sign
the loan agreement under the
umbrella of the Framework
Agreement.”

The second agreement, of Eco-
nomic and Technical Coopera-
tion between the Bahamas and
the People’s Republic of China
was again signed by Mr Symon-
ette for the Bahamas, and Mr
Wang Chao, the assistant Minis-
ter of Commerce for China.

Under this agreement, the gov-
ernment of China will provide a
grant to the Bahamas in the
amount of 70 million yuan, or
over $10 million, to be used for
the implementation of projects
“to be decided through consul-
tations between the two govern-
ments.”

The specific matters in this
regard, the document read, will

be stipulated in the agreements
that will be subsequently signed
between the two countries.

The third agreement — a waiv-
er of visa requirements for hold-
ers of diplomatic passports was
signed by the deputy Prime Min-
ister Brent Symonette and the
Honourable Song Tao, deputy
minister of Foreign Affairs of the
People’s Republic of China.

Under this agreement citizens
of either country, who are holders
of valid diplomatic passports, may
enter, exit, transit, and stay in the
country of the other party for a
period not exceeding 30 days
without having to obtain a visa. If
citizens of either country —
excluding diplomatic and con-
sular staff — will have to apply
for visas if they intend to stay
longer than 30 days.

Additionally, either county
reserves the right to refuse entry
of any person who is deemed to
be an “undesirable” without hav-
ing to cite any grounds for the
refusal.

And finally, a memorandum
of understanding was signed on
Agricultural Cooperation
between the Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources of
the Bahamas and the People’s
Republic of China.

Under this agreement, both
parties shall be committed to the
development of cooperation in
the fields of crop farming, ani-
mal husbandry and fish farming.
Additionally, the agreement pro-
vides for cooperation in farming
of tropical fruits and vegetables,
grain crop production — such as
peas, beans, and corn — flower
production, small ruminant pro-
duction systems, poultry farming,
and fish farming, inclusive of crab
culture and processing.

Today Mr Liangyu will take a
brief tour of Atlantis before vis-
iting the Clifton Heritage site at
Clifton Pier. Following this stop,
he will take a brief tour of the
Lucayan Tropical farm at the
Airport Industrial Park before
leaving the Lynden Pindling
International Airport for Grand
Bahama.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



._- | PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
0 In brief

Anger over PMH
pharmacy waiting

Guatemala

apologises
to Cuba for
Bay of Pigs

HAVANA

Guatemalan President Alvaro
Colom apologized to Cuba on
Tuesday for his country's having
allowed the CIA to train exiles
in the Central American coun-
try for the 1961 Bay of Pigs
invasion, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

"Today I want to ask Cuba's
forgiveness for having offered
our country, our territory, to
prepare an invasion of Cuba. It
wasn't us, but it was our territo-
ry," Colom said during a speech
at the University of Havana.

He added that he wished to
apologize "as president and
head of state, and as comman-
der in chief of the Guatemalan
army."

About 1,500 Cuban exiles
trained under CIA guidance in
Guatemala before invading the
island in April 1961 in an unsuc-
cessful bid to overthrow Fidel
Castro's communist govern-
ment. The Bay of Pigs invasion
ended after three days with
about 100 invaders killed and
another 1,000 captured by
Cuban forces.

During his official visit to
Cuba, Colom was awarding
Guatemala's highest honor to
Castro. It was unclear if the ail-
ing 82-year-old former president
would receive the medal in per-
son or if it would be delivered to
him later. Castro met in recent
days with two other visiting
Latin American presidents,
Cristina Fernandez of Argenti-
na and Chile's Michelle
Bachelet. Photographs of him
with each of the presidents were
later released by their respec-
tive governments.

Guadeloupe
strikers block
roads and
close airport

@ BASSE-TERRE,
Guadeloupe

The French Caribbean island
of Guadeloupe was on the verge
of rebellion, a political leader
said Tuesday after stone-throw-
ing protesters set cars and build-
ings ablaze, forced the interna-
tional airport to close and
clashed with police, according to
the Associated Press.

Nearly four weeks of work
stoppages and demonstrations
for lower prices and higher pay
have caused thousands of
tourists to flee or cancel holi-
days on the normally tranquil
island, prompting many hotels
to close and cruise ships to head
elsewhere. “It is a political cri-
sis, an institutional crisis and we
are on the brink of sedition,”
Guadeloupe’s Regional Council
President Victorin Lurel told
France-Info radio.

From Paris, France’s Interior
Minister Michele Alliot-Marie
said the protests had caused
“degradation, devastation and
confrontations” on Guadeloupe
and its sister island, Martinique,
where most shops and offices
have been closed by the
protests. She urged “calm,
responsibility and restraint” and
said she hoped for a resumption
of talks with protesters that
broke down last week.

Police said they arrested 18
people overnight as protesters
burned cars, a library and a
boat-rental store in Sainte-Anne
and Point-a-Pitre. An official,
speaking on the standard condi-
tion of anonymity, said at least
three officers suffered minor
wounds due to gunshots fired by
looters taking advantage of the
chaos. Guadeloupe’s main air-
port was closed Tuesday
because workers could not pass
through barricaded and debris-
clogged roads, said Guade-
loupe’s top appointed official,
Nicolas Desforges, and several
flights were canceled.

Paris has refused to budge on
strikers’ demands for a 200 euro
($250) monthly raise for low-
paid workers who now make
roughly 900 euros ($1,130) a
month. But business leaders in
Martinique have agreed to low-
er prices by 20 percent on 100
products, including food items.

Strikers want prices cut on
nearly all supermarket products
—a step that Stephane Hayot, a
spokesman for the National
Union of Wholesale Distribu-
tors, said “would represent our
death sentence” by forcing them
to sell at prices that don’t cover
their costs. Police detained 50
demonstrators on Monday after
they were pelted by stones as
they tried to take down barri-
cades. Roadblocks were being
gradually lifted Tuesday morn-
ing and a trickle of vehicle traf-
fic was resuming, the police offi-
cial said.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ANGRY customers expressed
their outrage yesterday after some
had to wait as long as six hours
for service at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital pharmacy.

But a hospital official explained
that the delays were caused by
the process of recording patient
data in a newly implemented soft-
ware system — which ironically,
was designed to create more effi-
ciency at the pharmacy.

The system is supposed to allow
patient information to be quickly
accessed, and simplify the process
of prescription filling.

The Tribune received a call
from one frustrated patient yes-
terday morning, who was so
angered over the lengthy wait that
he left the hospital to get his med-
ication elsewhere.

When The Tribune visited the
hospital a short time later, around
10.30am, dozens of patients
crowded the pharmacy's waiting
room. A few elderly patients —
who said they often have to set
aside a whole morning, and some-
times the afternoon as well to fill
prescriptions at PMH - were
upset about the lack of a senior
citizens’ window at the pharmacy.

A number of patients claimed
that sometimes nerves become so
frayed in the waiting room, that
rows and shoving matches erupt.

A few others noted that many
people had become so fed up with
waiting that they left the pharma-
cy in a huff before being served.

"T like how they have the num-
ber system set up because you can

Some customers forced to
wait six hours for service



“A lot of
people left
because they
were taking too
long to call
their number.”



T Storr

just pick a number and sit down.

“But it seems like when they
get your file they just completely
shut down.

Line-jumping

“A lot of people left because
they was taking too long to call
their number," said T Storr, a
patient who had been waiting at
the pharmacy since 7am. "Some-
times we lucky but I don't know
what’s happening today. When I
don't have nothing to do I come
to this pharmacy so I can stay here
until 2, 3 o’clock but not when I
have things to do”.

Retired civil servant Coralee
Curtis, 66, thinks the hospital

needs to serve patients on a "first
come, first serve" basis to elimi-
nate line-jumping.

"This number system ain’ work-
ing because people meet you here
since 6 in the morning, they meet
you sitting waiting for the ticket
window to open, and jump in
front of you. Minister (of Health
Hubert) Minnis needs to be here
to see how people carry on
around here.”

Usually, when a patient’s num-
ber is called, they can approach
the window and hand their pre-
scription to hospital staff.

However, if that patient has yet
to visit the hospital since the new
Centricity Software programme
was launched last month, they
must answer a few personal ques-
tions to update their records,
PMH public relations officer Thel-
ma Rolle said yesterday.

"We warned the public to
expect some delays in registering
patients in the new system. This is
going to be a new step necessary
to get patients in the system and
so we had asked them to be
patient with us during the transi-
tion process,” Mrs Rolle said.

She said she was not aware of
rows erupting over line-jumping,
but would raise the issue, along
with the idea of a window for
senior citizens, during the next
management meeting.

Mother seeks answers

into son’s shooting death

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE mother of a 22-year-old man allegedly shot
dead by police in a Garden Hills sub-division was
seeking answers at the start of an inquest into his
2004 shooting yesterday.

The first day of testimony about the death of Lin-
coln Forbes got underway in the Coroner’s Court
with five witnesses appearing, including Mr Forbes’
mother Ruth Julian.

Jurors and Ms Julian were shown photographs
taken by Central Detective Unit (CDU) crime scene
investigator and witness, Det Sgt James Colebrooke.

In the photos, they saw the victim’s body — found
at the edge of residential property next to a “large
quantity of cash” — as well as two vehicles, two guns
and views of the street where the incident took
place. Civilian witness Gavin Ellis said he saw Mr
Forbes lying on his stomach holding a gun in his
hand. However, in the photographs taken around 40
minutes later by Det Sgt Colebrooke, the victim
was on his back and neither of the two guns record-
ed in evidence appeared to be in his hand.

Mr Ellis, of Garden Hills, told the court that he
and his wife were in bed at around 11pm when they
heard what he recognised as gunshots being fired
nearby outside.

Hearing people “rambling around” in the yard
afterward, he looked out the window to see two
men he identified as police officers walking casual-
ly across his property, from back to front.

When they reached the front of the house he
opened the front door, and was approached by one
of the two men, who he said was carrying an “Uzi”-
type weapon. The man identified himself as a police
officer and told him to stay inside. It was while
standing on his porch that Mr Ellis said he saw a
body, apparently lifeless, lying face down on the
south western side of his property.

Later, he said the officer came back and ques-
tioned him about what he’d heard.

During the questioning of Mr Ellis in court, Mr
Forbes’ mother inquired why, if Mr Ellis had seen a
gun in the hand of her son as he lay dead, there

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INQUEST

were only two guns photographed in the police’s
crime scene evidence album — neither in the vic-
tim’s hand. Mr Ellis said he did not know, but was
“sure” there was a gun in Mr Forbes’ hand when he
saw him that night.

Asked by Mrs Julian if the two officers he saw
walking around the house were the only two officers
on the scene, Mr Ellis said he was not sure. He said
when one returned to interview him, officers were
“all around.”

Mrs Julian, a teacher and Ministry of Education
employee, testified that her son had lived with her
“all of his life” up until shortly before he was killed.

Although he was shot on Thursday, June 3, 2004,
she did not learn of his death until the following
Sunday when she was urged to make inquiries by a
young man who lived in her neighbourhood who
said he had “heard something happened” to her
son. After her own testimony, Mr Forbes’ mother
stood on numerous occasions, when permitted by
Coroner William Campbell, to press other witness-
es on certain points, apparently keen to clarify in her
own mind what had happened to her son on the
night of his death.

Road Traffic Department supervisor Dwayne
Pratt told the court he had lent his black Toyota
Corolla to his cousin, Trevon Thompson (also
known as Trevon Stewart) on June 3, after Thomp-
son told him he needed to go and get some cash
from an ATM.

Despite telling him to “come right back”, the
Golden Gates sub-division number two resident
said he did not see his cousin again that night.

The vehicle was later found at the scene of the
killing of Lincoln Forbes, along with a blue Ford
Taurus. When he retrieved it from the CDU com-
pound, the car had a bullet hole in the windshield,
Mr Pratt said.

Dr Nicole Adderley, a doctor at Princess Margaret
Hospital, testified that she pronounced Mr Forbes
dead on June 4. She said he had been “brought in
dead” by police, who did not identify him.

The inquest resumes on Thursday.

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a a f
VINCENT Vanderpool-Wallace

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

PRELIMINARY data from an independent audit of the
Department of Civil Aviation reveals that in many areas the
agency exceeds international safety regulations.

This was disclosed by Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace during an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday.

"It (the audit) was quite comprehensive and the one com-
ment that sticks out in my head, in a number of cases our pro-
cedures that are now in place and operating are ahead of the
regulations. So this is a case where the people are operating in
a much more sophisticated fashion than the regulations
require, which as far as I'm concerned is the best indication of
staff intent," he said.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) —a
United Nations Specialised Agency — spent one week auditing
the department's safety guidelines and presented its prelimi-
nary findings to the minister and aviation officials on Monday.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said he would not divulge the
specifics of the report until he has a chance to give it a thor-
ough appraisal and discuss the findings with aviation person-
nel.

"There were specific recommendations, except as you would
understand, I would like to have a chance to sit and talk to the
staff first so I'm very clear on what some of the priorities are
before I start talking about them publicly,” he said.

Rating

However he did say that preliminary information does not
suggest that Civil Aviation’s rating will be downgraded, as it
was nine years ago.

In 2000 the Bahamas Civil Aviation Authority was down-
graded to a Category 2 agency by the Federal Aviation Admin-
istration (FAA) after an assessment team found that industry
safety oversight was not up to international standards.

In November 2001 the authority was restored to Category
1 status. To restore the Authority to Category 1, the govern-
ment made several policy changes, including an amendment to
the Civil Aviation Act, 1976; repealed the colonial Air Navi-
gation Order, 1961; and implemented the Bahamas Air Nav-
igation Regulations, 2001 and the Bahamas Air Safety Regu-
lations, 2001. That year government also implemented a cer-
tification and surveillance system that mirrored that of the
FAA and the ICAO and established a safety issue resolu-
tion process that meets all ICAO standards and practices.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said government will be engag-
ing in conversations with the ICAO before deciding what, if
any, recommendations will be adopted.

"There is a 90-day process, first for us to be able to get
back to them regarding some of the specifics in it. So I would
suspect it's probably going to take that long before we go
public with it so that people are very clear on those issues we
have identified and will work on together.

"There are certain regulations that are a part of ICAO that
don't necessarily apply to the Bahamas and we have to decide
whether we want them to apply to the Bahamas, depending on
what kind of initiatives we want to pursue. The completed
report will be posted on ICAO's website later this year for
public viewing.

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e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com



PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Not the right incentive for police

A LETTER published on this page today
outlines what the writer believes should be the
standard required before a police officer can
receive either an increase in salary or a pro-
motion.

If implemented it could take us back to the
head-hunting days of the Red Indians in early
American history when the number of scalped
heads strapped to a brave warrior’s waist band
decided his standing among the tribe’s head
honchos and proved his valour in battle.

Our letter writer is now suggesting that our
police officers bring home their human trophies
if they want to succeed in the Force.

He suggests that each commanding officer in
each police station must understand that unless
80 per cent of the crimes committed in his divi-
sion are solved he has no chance of promotion
or a pay increase.

What an incentive to plant evidence to bring
home the bacon, and get the payoff.

The writer further suggests that each homi-
cide must be assigned to a specific officer “with
the clear understanding that its resolution is
his responsibility within a specific time frame.”

No reputable police force would put such
pressure on any member of its department. If
anyone watches any of America’s crime files
on television, they will know that many crimes
are not easy of solution, no matter how clever
the police officer. Many take years to solve,
most only by the dogged determination of an
officer resolved not to let a criminal get away
with what he might think is “the perfect crime.”
Over the years while working on other cases, an
officer will keep returning to the old case, always
looking for new clues. Very often, with modern
investigative techniques, he tracks down his
prey.

Because our police officers don’t always suc-
ceed does not necessarily point to a lack of abil-
ity.

Of course, there are cases of careless officers;
officers who either through ignorance or pre-
conceived notions look at evidence, but don’t
see it. We shall never forget not too long ago
one of our reporters was with two police officers
looking at a murder scene — a scene where it
was suspected that someone had tried to scrub
away blood and with it all evidence. The police
had searched the room, but could find nothing
suspicious. However, our reporter with a mem-
ber of the murdered man’s family, did a thor-
ough search in the presence of the officers. On
the inside edge of a cabinet they found what
looked like a blood stain. They found other
small brownish coloured smudges, and then a
faded smudge about a foot square on the porous
tile. The reporter turned to the policeman: “This
looks like blood to me.” “No,” replied the
policeman, “that’s only rust.” The second police-
man, seeing the concern of the two young men,

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suggested that a scrapping be made. We do not
know the outcome of that scraping — we
believe the family was told that it was negative
for blood — but we do know that the investi-
gation was being done by two overworked
policemen. One of them complained that he
had so many cases to investigate and solve, that
he had to work long hours, that he hadn’t seen
his family in days and here it was Christmas
and another crime was added to his file. This
man could not have taken any more pressure
even if it meant losing a promotion and an
increase in pay.

It reminds us of the fabricated evidence in the
murder of Sir Harry Oakes on July 8, 1943 that
almost put the hangman’s noose around the
neck of his son-in-law, Count Alfred (‘“Fred-
die”) de Marigny. Instead of calling in Scot-
land Yard or the FBI, the Duke of Windsor,
governor at the time, brought in two hick Mia-
mi police officers, who were introduced as a
homicide investigator and an identification
expert with the Miami police department. The
Duke knew Capt E W Melchen, who had been
assigned to meet him and his wife on their vis-
its to Miami. Obviously, here was an opportu-
nity to give his friend a chance to make his
name and solve what turned out to be one of the
best-known unsolved murder cases of the cen-
tury.

So anxious were they to make headlines that
shortly after their arrival de Marigny, who
because of his animosity towards Sir Harry
became a subject of interest, was arrested.

The case collapsed, however, when the late
Godfrey Higgs, de Marigny’s counsel, proved
that de Marigny’s fingerprint upon which the
whole case turned, had not been taken from
the chinese patterned screen in Sir Harry’s
burned bedroom as “identification expert”
James Barker had claimed. It was believed to
have come from the smooth surface of a glass
from which de Marigny drank some water while
he awaited his interrogators in an adjourning
room.

Planted, mistake made, deliberate fraud, call
the fingerprint what you will, but this is what
happens when a carrot is dangled before inves-
tigators as a reward for swift solutions. In this
case the two investigators had hoped to reap
fame from newspaper headlines that were to
announce a sensational fingerprint conviction
by two American investigators in a gruesome
murder of a lord by his French son-in-law.
Instead they were laughed out of court and
returned home in disgrace.

We agree that our police should get the best
training possible, have only the number of cas-
es that they can handle, and, with the help of the
public, honestly solve as many cases as they
can. But no bribes — be they pay or promotions
— should be dangled before them.



Police Force
leadership
needs to be

creative

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Our Police Force has taken a
big hit recently. At least one local
newspaper, has reported that one
of its sources informed them that
some officers are selling cocaine
confiscated from alleged drug
dealers. This brought immediate
responses not only from the Min-
ister with responsibility for the
force but also the Prime Minis-
ter himself. Both expressed their
disappointment with the report.

One cannot be faulted to think
that one of the more crippling
aspects of criminal behaviour on
the Bahamian psyche is not just
the alarming crime rate, but noth-
ing workable and sustainable ever
seems to be on the horizon.

It is more than amazing that
serious crimes have been a thorn
in our country’s side for many
years, yet to date the country has
not witnessed any creative
approach or initiative emanating
from the security forces.

All that is coming out of the
police is that recycled excuse that

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



more citizen cooperation is need-
ed to solve crime. While the help
of citizens is needed to solve
crime, it must be remembered
that the existence of difficulty in
the execution of one's task is no
reason not to get the job done. If
the police officers are convinced
that the cooperation of citizens
is so crucial to the fight against
crime but is not forthcoming,
maybe they should consider
resigning en bloc.

Our failure over the years to
speak frankly about the terrible
inefficiencies and lack of creative
thinking associated with the
Police Force is a direct contribu-
tor to its near irrelevance. In light
of this, the following recommen-
dations should be given due con-
sideration:

1) Each new police officer must
have a minimum of a first degree,

with the ability to think creative-
ly and strategically, and whose
specialised area of training will
be in cutting-edge investigating
techniques.

2) Each commanding officer of
the CID in each Police Station
and CDU must be given a man-
date that unless 80 per cent of
crimes committed in his division is
cleared up there is no chance of
promotion or pay increase.

3) Each homicide must be
assigned to a specific officer, with
the clear understanding that its
resolution is his responsibility,
within a specific time frame.

4) Every officer from the rank
of Inspector up who does not pos-
sess the requisite skills and com-
petence to function within a
result-oriented organisation
should be redeployed.

The leadership of the Police
Force needs to be creative and
decisive.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
February, 2009.

Three questions for our MPs

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This week was not a good one for the People -
worldwide and particularly in the Bahamas.

Firstly I find it very scary that the US recently vot-
ed in a new President, Barrack Obama, who has a lot
of political capital behind him but what happens
when Congress votes on the Bail Out Bill he pre-
sented to them this week. Not one Republican found
enough good in it to vote for it and not one Demo-
crat found enough faults in it to vote against it. How
is that for bi-partisanship. I just think the politi-
cians do not get it. We are in trouble — they may not
be but we are.

Secondly, The World Economic Forum in Davos,
Switzerland is meeting this week and giving us a
message of doom and gloom. A number of the peo-
ple attending the Forum are those same people that
got us into this economic mess in the first place.
Many of these same people are in Davos telling us
how bad it is and with no ideas how to solve the
problems they created. And if they are not bankers,
then they are wacky economists who are not the
doers in this world, and therefore unlikely to solve
anything.

Thirdly, we have one of the largest political parties
in the Bahamas, telling us just how dreadful and

cynical their party culture is. What appears to be
most important to them is that one of their members
should not give evidence against another member or
she is threatened with being expelled from the par-
ty. Regardless of the fact that whoever that person
is everyone is obliged to tell the truth in any court.
When are they going to learn that the country comes
first and their petty party second?

However, fourthly on the positive side the present
government is prepared to stand up to the pervasive
culture of corruption in this country and retire “pub-
lic” servants who are not up to the mark. I am sure
not all of them are corrupt but who knows — one
bad egg spawns another.

I suggest that all voters in this country ask their
MP three questions:

1) What are you doing for your Constituency?

2) What are you doing for the Country?

3) What are you doing for Yourself?

If you do not get hard facts — look for a replace-
ment that can give you good answers next time you
have to vote and maybe we will make this country a
wonderful place again.

PATRICK H THOMSON
Nassau,
January 31, 2009.

Letter was vile and hateful

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your letter, Ms Russell, about
“opposing homosexual rights” is
vile and hateful. Your ignorance
is boundless and your accusations
are groundless. To me they recall
the witch hunts of the past when

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untold thousands of innocent
women were drowned or burned
at the stake.

Homosexuals are born as they
are.

They cannot change, like you
cannot change the colour of your
skin (I know, Michael Jackson
did).

Just like heterosexuals, many
homosexuals are creative and
artistic.

The list of names of famous
artists, actors, TV personalities,
and athletes are impressive.

These lovely islands, home to
about 600 churches or more are in
danger of becoming hate filled,
divided and violent if we allow
this anger and prejudice to per-
petuate itself.

Instead of hateful letters like
yours, messages of acceptance,
tolerance and respect for others
should be published and advo-
cated.

WALTER ABSIL
Nassau,
February, 2009.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Tensions high after
police officer is shot

FROM page one

It was further claimed that yesterday’s shoot-
ing incidents are connected to the murder of
Onado Newbold, 32, last month.

Newbold, known to family and friends as
“Bain Town Fella”, was shot dead in Nassau
Village in late January.

According to police, the victim died at the
scene after being shot multiple times in the
chest — between nine and 12 times, according to

had occurred in the area yesterday morning.
According to police, the two incidents are
believed to be connected.
Persons calling The Tribune from Nassau Vil-
lage yesterday evening said that the “talk on
the street” was that there would be “trouble” in

eens os won 4a : some witnesses on the scene.
ee eee eer However, police press liaison officer

mous, said that while she was on the phone to A get Supt Walter Evans told The Tribune
The Tribune she thought she could hear noises that he could not confirm any connection

which sounded like gunshots, but did not want between yesterday’s shooting and Newbold’s
to look outside. murder.

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Man charged with murder

FROM page one

| Former MP ‘not
_ being held in Cuba’

FROM page one

idence, arrived at the courthouse in Bank Lane with four

officers in an unmarked police car just after noon, and was
escorted upstairs to Court One with shackles on his wrists

and ankles.

Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez dismissed the court
momentarily before returning to read the charges.

Dames, dressed in jeans, and an orange polo shirt and
flannel fleece-lined jacket, stood quietly listening as Mag-
istrate Gomez told him he was charged with murder for
intentionally causing the death of Philip Marcellus on Feb-

ruary 14.

Marcellus, 27, who is believed to be a resident of Gold-
en Isles Road, was stabbed multiple times about the body
in the area of Rocky Pine Road, off McKinney Drive, on

Saturday, February 14.

He was found lying in the street and Emergency Medical
Services pronounced him dead at the scene.

A preliminary inquiry will begin in court five on Friday,
February 24, to determine whether there is enough evidence
against Dames to place a trial before the Supreme Court.

A total of 17 witnesses are listed to give evidence. The
accused is represented by attorney Murrio Ducille.

Dames will be remanded in custody until the inquiry

begins.

FROM page one

within the space of four and a half
hours on Monday.

Police reported that in each
instance a “gunman standing
about six feet tall and dressed in
dark clothing” committed the
crimes.

Yesterday police press liaison
officer Walter Evans said that,
based on the descriptions given,
there is a “strong possibility” that
the robberies are linked but this
cannot be determined with cer-
tainty at this early stage in inves-
tigations.

No-one was injured during the
bold robberies.

According to police reports,
the gunman entered the South-
west Christian Academy, which
provides schooling for children
from infancy to around five years,
at about 1lam.

Employee Lawronamae Stra-
chan said he bypassed the door to
the “baby room” where classes
were underway and headed

? ons.

: Contacting the Director of the
? Caribbean and Latin American desk,
? Mr Burrows said that an initial search
i revealed that there were only 10
? Bahamians being held in Cuban pris-

? ‘These 10 persons, he said, were all
? males, and all were being held for
: attempting to bring either cocaine or
? marijuana into the country.

i While this initial search was limited to
? the most highly populated districts on
? the island, Mr Burrows admitted that
? there were a number of small provinces
: that have not reported back “as yet.”

i However, the likelihood that the for-
? mer MP would be held in any of them,
i he said, was very “unlikely”.

: “Officially, there is no proof,” Mr Bur-
? rows said.

: “While some of those small provinces
: have not reported as yet, it is very
; unlikely that that will change,” he said.

Masked gunman

straight to the secretary’s office,
where he was able to escape with
about $1,300 in cash.

Other employees of the Shrimp
Road school reported seeing the
man head directly to the office
— leading Ms Strachan to believe
that a parent or someone who
may have done some work on the
property may have been involved.

“He closed the door, she
looked up, and he had a shotgun
under his arm. He had it pointing
at her and he said “Give me the
money.” She gave him the money
and he ran out.

“T went to the outside door and
Isaw him running away. He went
about half a block down and a
blue Explorer was waiting for
him. He jumped in the passenger
side and another person, shorter
than him, jumped in the driver’s
side and they sped off,” she said.

The “light brown-skinned”
gunman was wearing blue
trousers, a white shirt and a dark

tam, she said.

He did not have a cloth cover-
ing his face as police reports indi-
cated to be the case at the two
other schools.

Ms Strachan yesterday said that
she planned to call around a few
schools to warn them to be extra
careful in the wake of the inci-
dent.

She said Southwest Christian
Academy is reviewing its own
security measures to ensure that
similar incidents cannot happen
so easily in the future.

According to police, the rob-
bery at Bayview Academy on
Augusta Street took place at 3pm
and saw an employee robbed of
jewellery.

Meanwhile, the incident at the
Alpha Early Learning Centre on
Pigeon Plum Street in Pinewood
Gardens occurred at 3.30pm. A
handbag containing personal
items was taken from a staff
member.



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FROM page one

both companies to collaborate on at least three pro-
jects that have been offered through BEC’s Request
for Proposals for Renewable Energy Projects.

The projects short-listed by BEC are located in
New Providence, Abaco and Harbour Island and
total over 24 megawatts of capacity.

BREC said that it was informed by BEC that its
project proposal had been shortlisted and will pro-
ceed to the next stage.

Thomas Schneider, chairman of BREC and pres-
ident of Schneider Power called the signing a “major
step” in establishing BREC as a “true player in
renewable energy in the Caribbean”.

Wayne Crawley, vice president corporate devel-
opment of Emera said, "We look forward to work-
ing with BREC and their local partners to support
BEC's renewable energy programme. This is an
important economic energy source for the
Bahamas".

Emera owns 25 per cent of Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company through their 50 per cent ownership of
ICD Utilities.

BREC, is a joint-venture with the Nassau based
Winso Company to develop renewable energy pro-
jects in the country.

While Schneider Power owns a controlling inter-
est in the jomt venture, BREC’s website lists Vincent
MacDonald as Chief Executive Officer and Presi-
dent and Kevin Ingraham as the Vice President of
Corporate Finance.

However, local environmentalist Sam Duncombe
is very concerned about the vagueness of the release,
pointing out that it does not say what the projects
are other than they are renewable energy projects.

“T find it very disturbing that the projects that
are on the table have not been made available to the

BEC is criticised

public for input. As we are going to be the ones
paying for the energy. Don’t you think we should
have a say in which companies are allowed to oper-
ate here,” she said.

Calls and e-mails to both BEC General Manager
Kevin Basden and BREC’s Chief Executive Officer
Vincent MacDonald went unanswered up to press
time.

Ms Duncombe said that successive governments
really need to stop “treating the Bahamian people
like children and let us in on these projects.”

“While fossil fuel certainly has more costs than
buying transporting and burning fuel that is direct-
ly linked to global warming, the Bahamian public
should be a party of our collective renewable future?
Additionally what is the Energy Policy of The
Bahamas? When are the laws that prohibit an indi-
vidual to supply their own homes with alternative
energy going to be changed so that we can become
truly independent from an energy standpoint,” she
asked.

Ms Duncombe admitted that supplying homes
independently may be financially out of reach at
the moment but the more independent systems that
are sold will ultimately bring down the cost so that
more people can afford to energize their homes
independently of government.

“This would create a huge spin off in jobs as we
will need people trained to install all of this new
technology. When is the public going to be involved
in that process? Ultimately we should know who
the companies are who their Bahamian partners
are and we should absolutely have a say in which
companies get chosen to supply us with power,” Ms
Duncombe said.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



THE CASE OF THE NASSAU GROUPER HIGHLIGHTS THE CRITICAL CHALLENGE OF CAREFUL MANAGEMENT

from Bahamas and Florida sponge fishery

Lessons

arpon Springs,

Florida — As the

mist rolled in across

the bayou, local
community leaders gathered in
the Heritage Museum here last
Thursday evening to celebrate
their shared history with the
Bahamas.

This city of 23,000 on Flori-
da's west coast — about 30 miles
north of Tampa — has had a
Bahamian connection ever since
an "adventurer from Nassau"
named Joshua Boyer started the
first family homestead here in
1877. At the time, both black and
white Bahamian 'conchs' were
hooking sponges and catching tur-
tles from Key West all the way
up the gulf coast.

In a 1928 newspaper article,
Boyer reminisced about those
pioneer days: "I came up the
Anclote River on a fishing trip
and by chance stopped off at Mr.
Ormond's residence. I built a res-
idence there, and the same year
Miss Mary Ormond and I were
married. Everything there was
ours. The land and the game and
fish were as free as air."

Sponger Money Never Done

But the biggest and best-
known Bahamian connection —
and the one that was celebrated
last week — is the link between
the Greek communities of Tar-
pon Springs and Nassau. Both
had their origins in the sponge
trade, which lasted less than a
century and was one of the
biggest revenue earners for both
the Bahamas and Florida. As the
song goes, in those days it seemed
that sponger money was never
done.

At its peak before the Second
World War, the northern
Caribbean fishery removed 47
million pounds of live sponge
annually and employed thousands
of people and hundreds of ships
in the Bahamas. But over-
exploitation and disease wiped
out the sponge beds in 1939, leav-
ing the fishermen destitute. And
the invention of synthetic substi-
tutes after the war sharply
reduced demand for natural
sponges. So, aside from souvenir
sales, only a remnant of this once
thriving industry exists today. At
Red Bays, Andros it is kept alive
by a lone 76-year-old Greek-
American sponger named Peter
Skaroulis, who provides the only
regular employment for a few
dozen fishermen. The Skaroulis
family operates a sponge market
in Tarpon Springs, continuing a
way of life that began in the late
19th century, when Greeks from
the Aegean islands of Kalymnos,
Skopelos, Symi, Hydra and Aegi-
na arrived in Nassau and Flori-
da.

An Intertwined History

The shared history of these
two intertwined communities was
the subject of a special exhibit at
the Heritage Museum in Tarpon
Springs last week, and Tough Call
was invited to attend. Funded by
the Florida Humanities Council,
the exhibit was developed by
folklife researcher Dr Tina Bucu-
valas, an ethnographer who is
herself part Greek and who spent
time in the Bahamas recently



“Today, although some
commercial harvesting still takes
place, the sponge trade is more of
a tourist attraction in Florida.”



looking into family backgrounds.

"Through my research over
the last couple years, I gradually
came to realize that for almost a
century there has been sustained
interaction between the Tarpon
Springs and Bahamian Greek
communities," she told me.
"Residents are closely related
through ties of marriage, family,
and culture in addition to busi-
ness. These ties have developed
from a shared history originating
in the Greek sponge producing
islands."

Until recently Dr Bucuvalas
was director of the Florida Folk-
life Programme in the state's
Bureau of Historic Preservation.
But she has been named curator
for the City of Tarpon Springs, a
post which makes her responsi-
ble for several small museums as
well as a planned folk arts gallery.
She will be researching other eth-
nic cultures — including the city's
African-American community
which also has Bahamian roots.

Although marine sponges have
been sought after since ancient
times, industrialisation created a
growing demand for them in the
cleaning, ceramics, shoe-finish-
ing, and printing industries in
addition to household, bathing,
and medical uses. And this gen-
erated a lucrative international
trade during the late 19th and ear-
ly 20th centuries.

According to Dr Bucuvalas in
her research paper for the exhib-
it. "The greater portion of the
world trade was conducted by
crews and merchants from
Greece. Later, the trade dimin-
ished due to war, sponge disease
and toxic algae blooms. Today
the sponge industry continues on
a smaller scale, its memory fuels
tourism, and many aspects of its
traditional culture linger.”

A New Industry

Until the 1840s, the sponge
business was concentrated in the
Mediterranean. But in 1841, a
French merchant found Bahami-
ans harvesting sponges, and he
started exporting sponges to
Paris. This trade eventually
encompassed Jamaica, Honduras,
Nicaragua, and Mexico—
although the Bahamas, Cuba, and
Florida were always the largest
producers.

The west side of Andros was
one of the world’s great sponge
beds, and sponges grew near
many other Bahamian islands as
well. The earliest local record, in
1843, reported the export of 32
sponge bales. Forty years later,
when the first Greeks arrived,
sponges were our most important
marine product, despite the fact

that most of the shallow-water
sponge beds were being fished
out. By 1900 the most valuable
sponges became commercially
extinct in near-shore waters.

According to a memoir written
by the late Charles Alexiou, who
arrived in Nassau in 1925, the
Vouvalis Company brought in the
first Greek sponge experts from
Kalymnos in 1887. "Vouvalis
established his sponge room on
West Bay Street between where is
now the Mayfair Hotel and the
(defunct) Ocean Spray Restau-
rant and Hotel," Mr Alexiou
wrote. "He sent Aristide Dami-
anos to manage his business.
Along with Aristide came his
brother George.”

The Damianos brothers later
set up their own business at the
top of Frederick Street by the
steps. Constantinos Christophilis
was in Virginia Street. Pericles
Maillis was based on the proper-
ty where his grandson (of the
same name) now has his law
office. In the 1920s Christodoulos
Esfakis (the father of Dr Andrew
Esfakis) established an operation
on Market Street. And Theopha-
nis Mangos also worked for Vou-
valis before setting up on his own
business. James Mosko was
brought in to rebuild the Vou-
valis operatiion after the 1926
hurricane, and his son founded
Mosko's Construction.

Greek Immigration

By the time Charles Alexiou
arrived, the Greeks seemed to
have no problem with immigra-
tion restrictions, although they
were not allowed to compete with
local fishermen. But initially,
Bahamian merchants had been
deeply worried over the prospect
of foreign competition. Writing
to The Nassau Guardian in 1887,
sponge merchant Joseph Brown
called for legal protection:

"Twenty-four aliens have
arrived, experts in the gathering,
clipping and packaging of sponge,
and if I am rightly informed,
determined to handle it them-
selves in all stages from the gath-
ering to the packing, thus exclud-
ing native labour. If the experi-
ment should be successful, it is
quite probable that we should
soon have hundreds of men in
our midst, whose ways are not
our ways, who would form a dis-
tinct section of the population,
and who would only continue to
remain here until such time as
the sponge beds become exhaust-
ed, or the business ceases to be
profitable."

Over time the Greeks were
more or less assimilated, and the
second, third and fourth genera-

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tions now form a close-knit com-
munity of more than 300 profes-
sionals and business people clus-
tered around the Annunciation
Greek Orthodox Church on Vir-
ginia Street. Built in 1932 it was
the first Greek church in the West
indies, and almost all of its pre-
sent congregation derive from the
original spongers sent from the
islands of the Aegean Sea.

"The Greek Bahamian com-
munity has remained small and
close, perhaps because of their
initial isolation and their com-
mitment to maintaining their her-
itage," Dr Bucuvalas said. "Most
first and second generation Greek
Bahamians married other Greeks
for social and religious reasons,
but like most Diaspora peoples
each succeeding generation
chooses more marriage partners
from outside the community.
Nevertheless, Greek Bahamians
maintain their culture through
religion, family ties, values, lan-
guage, foodways, and social
events."

Bahamian Descent

By 1890 Tarpon Springs had
also become a significant sponge
market. The first Greeks arrived
there in 1897, moving the com-
mercial sponge centre from Key
West to the gulf coast where pris-
tine sponge beds had been dis-
covered offshore. They revolu-
tionised the industry with diving
equipment, and by the first
decade of the 20th century they
outnumbered the traditional Key
West fishermen, who were large-
ly of Bahamian descent.

This led to social conflict
between the two groups of fish-
ermen, which was "heightened by
overstressed sponge resources
that eventually disappeared
entirely due to a synergistic rela-
tionship between overfishing and
disease in the marine environ-
ment," according to Loren
McClenachan writing in a 2007
Earthscan publication on marine
environmental history called
Oceans Past. “Understanding
synergistic stresses on structural
elements of the marine commu-
nity is central to environmental
conservation."

The eventual death of the
sponge fishery can be traced to
this unfortunate synergy. With-
out management controls, inten-
sive fishing lowered prices which
stimulated more intensive fish-

ing. And ultimately the lack of a
conservation ethic — particularly
with respect to the taking of
undersized sponges — led to the
collapse of the fishery in the
1930s. According to the Earth-
scan publication, "In December
1938, spongers on the other side
of the Gulf Stream in the
Bahamas began to have an odd
and disconcerting experience, one
which the old-timers had never
witnessed. Instead of pulling up
intact sponges, hooks came to the
surface with only slivers and
strings; the rest of the sponge
skeleton had disintegrated ... The
mysterious blight that struck the
sponge beds quickly reached epi-
demic proportions ... The culprit
appeared to be a fungus-like fila-
ment."

Sponger Money Gone

By 1940 the disease had
worked its way up to Tarpon
Springs, putting the remaining
sponge fishermen out of work.
Experts say the epidemic was
"intimately linked to overfishing”.
In fact, the sponge divers them-
selves probably helped spread the
disease by squeezing the sponge
"gurry" into the water. Just as
overfishing only increased the
concentrations of disease-causing
bacteria and fungal cells in the
seawater over sponge beds.

Sponges filter bacteria out of
the water as they feed. And
according to Earthscan, "Over
the course of the fishery tradi-
tional spongers and divers took
more than 1.5 billion pounds of
living sponges from the norhern
Caribbean, so that the water dur-
ing the 1930s was certainly richer
in bacteria, fungi, algae and other
tiny particles than it had been a
century earlier...evidence exists
that at high concentrations bac-
teria that are typically benign can
become virulent and...diseases
more prevalent."

In 1992 state and federal gov-
ernments outlawed all sponging in
South Florida's national parks.
And since then sponges have
joined a list of once abundant ani-
mals — including lobster, conch,
turtles, and grouper — that are
now protected by law. And a
related law makes it a felony to
trade any wildlife taken in con-
travention of those protections.

Today, although some com-
mercial harvesting still takes
place, the sponge trade is more

Ua ee
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of a tourist attraction in Florida.
But Tarpon Springs has managed
to preserve a strong Greek char-
acter and maritime heritage. In
fact, the museum where the
Bahamian Connection exhibit
was held sits on the edge of a
marine inlet where the Greeks
celebrate the Epiphany each year
by throwing a cross into the sea
for divers to retrieve — the same
ceremony practised by Nassau
Greeks. And the imposing St
Nicolas Greek Orthodox Church
is not far away.

Conservation and Culture

According to Dr Bucuvalas,
"The Greeks gradually began to
control municipal politics as the
majority or by allying themselves
with black Tarponites. Blacks of
Bahamian descent had arrived in
Tarpon Springs from Key West
in the late 19th century. They
often developed close relation-
ships with the Greeks when they
worked on the boats, and some
learned to speak Greek with a
Dodecanese accent.

"Since the Bahamian Greek
community is small, many mem-
bers have sought marriage part-
ners in Tarpon Springs. The dom-
inant population in both locations
is from the Dodecanese Islands
and particularly Kalymnos, so
people have also looked to their
home islands when they decided
to marry. Consequently, the two
communities share an extensive
and intricate network of family
ties...and Greeks still control the
sponge business in both commu-
nities.”

But aside from its cultural fas-
cination, the history of the
Bahamas and Florida sponge fish-
ery has important lessons for the
future of other valuable marine
resources like conch, lobster and
grouper. These resources are not
limitless. And they are valuable
not just in terms of our own pock-
etbook, but because of the con-
tribution they make to the health
of the natural ecosystems on
which we rely. As is the case
today with the Nassau grouper,
careful management is a critical
challenge. It is a challenge we
must overcome if we are to main-
tain our present way of life.

What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com




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TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 9





SPORTS

Hugh Campbell: Day 2 highlights

Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

=

(LEFT) - Queen's College Comets Nathaniel Carter shoots over Church of God Flames players. (RIGHT) -
Flames player Leonardo Hepburn above the rim. Church of God won the game 35-33 in overtime...





CV Bethel Stingrays’ Pateico Leadon tied the game at
58 on a jumpshot in traffic...

BUTCH



C R Walker Knights’ Alex Rolle finished with 21 points

FROM page 11

Armaly added 12 points, five assists and three
steals while Rakeem Smith chipped in with six
points and six rebounds.

A basket by Cooper put the Cherubims up
54-51 with under one minute left to play.

After the Pacers Tamar Carey converted one
of two free throws, the Pacers forced a turnover
on the inbound with 16.4 seconds left to play.

Travis Ramsey tied the game at 54 with a
jumper from the right wing with just 3.2 seconds
left to play to send the game into overtime.

Church of God Flames - 35

Queen's College Comets - 33

The Comets’ woes from the free throw line in
the fourth quarter became the deciding factor in
a hard fought loss in the second game of yester-
day's opening session.

After they tied the game at 24 early in the
fourth quarter, the Comets made just two of 12



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free throws in the final quarter,

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With an opportunity to widen the margin, the
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The Comets reached the bonus with 3:13 left to
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Joseph gave the Flames the go ahead free
throws from the line to go ahead 35-33 with 2:07
left to play. He finished with a game high 16
points while Andron Hanna added six. Delancey
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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

SPORTS



Davis Cup team
are ready for
Paraguay

FROM page 11

If there’s one thing Farring-
ton feels the players will have to
get adjusted to is the boister-
ous response from the South
American crowd.

But he said they are going
down a couple days earlier to
get acclimatized so that it won’t
be a major culture shock for
them when they play.

“IT always believe that we
have the capability of winning a
tie whenever we play,” Far-
rington stressed. “But as far as
being competitive, I believe that
we have a chance to win.

“All of the guys know each
other and they have been
together for a while, so I feel
that we will come together and
play very strong when we get
there.”

The absence of Knowles once
again leaves the team without a
player with any ATP computer
rankings, but Farrington said
he’s convinced that the team
will defy the odds and rise to
the occasion.

“They are not accustomed to
guys hitting the ball that hard,
but the guys we have are capa-
ble of playing at a competitive
level because they’ve played
college ball and they’ve played
on the Futures and Satellite
tour,” he stressed.

“So they have some experi-
ence and as you know, anything
can happen in Davis Cup. So I
give us a good chance to win
just like I do whenever we
play.”

Despite the fact that he lost
his brother, Farrington said
Bjorn Munroe has confirmed
with the BLTA that he will still
be a part of the team in
Paraguay.

But there’s a possibility that
because the funeral service for
Lavaughn will be held next
weekend, Bjorn will end up
meeting the team in Paraguay.

“We will be there for him and
try to keep him to get through
this difficult time,” Farrington
said. “It’s unfortunate that his
brother died, but we offer our
condolences to his family.”

Rolle confident that she will BYainet

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a
=)
wjed
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is
co)
—
i

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t wasn’t the start that Georgette

Rolle had anticipated, but she’s con-

fident that before the Sun Coast

Ladies Series Developmental Golf
Tour is completed Thursday, she will play
up to par.

The St Augustine’s College graduate now
attending Texas Southern University fin-
ished 28th out of a field of 31 competitors
who completed the first round of competi-
tion yesterday at the Errol Estate Country
Club in Orlando, Florida.

Rolle, 23, shot rounds of 43-41 for a total
of 84, which is 12-over-par. American Bri-
ana Vega shot a one-under-par 71 (35-36-
71) to snatch the early lead in the three-
day tournament.

Disappointed in her performance, Rolle
noted that she made one mistake that cost
her dearly.

“Tt was kind of rough,” said Rolle, who
admitted that she took some medication
before she teed out and it left her sluggish
during play. “I won’t make that mistake
again.”

During play yesterday, Rolle tried to
keep the ballin play, but she ended up with
a pair of birdies, two triple bogeys and three
double bogeys.

“Tt was kind of rough,” she explained
about her scoring chart. “My mental game
wasn’t on today, but I’m definitely going
to learn from today and play better tomor-
row.”

Despite the fact that she’s still under the
weather, Rolle said she doesn’t intend to
take any medication like she did yesterday
before she plays.

“That was my only bad decision, but that
was because I wasn’t feeling well this morn-
ing,” she pointed out. “So I hope to be
much better tomorrow.”

The competition is extremely tough and
in order to make up some ground, Rolle
acknowledges that she will have to be at
her best.

Behind Vega is Noriko Nakazaki with
even-par 72. Two players shot one-over-
par 73 and five shot two-over-par 74.

Rolle is the only Caribbean player par-
ticipating in the tournament. She’s using it
to prepare for the Ladies’ Professional Golf
Association’s Futures Tour that is scheduled
to start at the end of March.

As a result of her performance, Rolle is
due to tee off in the second group at about
7:23 am today. Yesterday, she teed off in the
first group at 7:15 am.

FROM page 11

Handed: Right-handed
(Double handed backhand)
School: Central Christian
Academy

Rankings: N/A

No. of Davis Cup Ties: 2,
starting in 2008

Davis Cup Record: 1-2
(Singles)

JOHN FARRINGTON
Age: 50

Davis Cup
experience:

12 ties in

seven years,
starting in

1989 A A
Record: 4-114 = |

(Singles) - 5-4 [iglddlateytery

(Doubles)

Team Captain: Fourth
Bahamian in his ninth year,
starting in 2001 against Peru
in the first round of the

American Zone One

BJORN MUNROE

Age: 30

Height: 6-feet-1

Weight - 175 lbs
Handed: Right

School: Ohio State
University

Ranking: 885 (Doubles)
No. of Davis Cup Ties: 9,
starting in 1998

Davis Cup Record: 0-5
(Singles) - 3-5 (Doubles)

MARVIN ROLLE

Age: 25

Height: 5-feet-11

Weight: 170 lbs

Handed: Right
Rankings: 1738 (Singles) -
1560 (Doubles)

No. Davis Cup Ties: 15,
starting in 2001

Davis Cup Record: 7-7
(Singles) - 6-5 (Doubles)



Pine Forest at
Coral Harbour
South of the Airport
Saturday, February 21

at 8am

Explore the Pine Barrens with eminent
botanist Dr Ethan Freid as your guide.

Drive south from the airport towards Coral Harbour,
pass the sharp curves at the end of the runway
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THE TRIBUNE

fe io

»

WEDNESDAY,

Davis Cup team
are ready for
Paraguay

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH
they are mourning
the loss of former
team-mate
Lavaughn
Munroe, captain
John Farrington
said the Bahamas
four-man team
going to Paraguay
next weekend are
ready to play in |
the first round of
the American
Zone Two Davis
Cup tie.

Farrington will
travel to Paraguay
with Munroe’s
older brother,
Bjorn Munroe,
fellow Grand
Bahamians Devin
Mullings and Tim-
othy Neilly and
Marvin Rolle next
Friday for the tie
that will run from
March 6-8.

“We want to
offer our condo-
lences to the
Munroe family,”
said Farrington,
who served as
captain of the
team when the |Â¥
deceased Munroe | |
played on two [io ae
national teams in
1999 and another
one in 2002.

Farrington said
it was a shock to
hear about the tragic death of
26-year-old Munroe, who was
killed after his black Mustang
crashed into a large tree on
Midshipman Road, Lucaya,
Grand Bahama at about 1 pm
Sunday.

But he noted that he’s confi-
dent that the players selected
for the team will be able to pull
through when they face
Paraguay on their red clay court
with a chance to either play
towards promotions to the
American Zone One over the
weekend of July 10-12 or
towards relegation to Zone II.

The Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association had waited for tour-
ing pro Mark Knowles to con-
firm whether or not he would
travel before they announced
the final team selection. But last
week, Knowles informed the
BLTA that he will skip the trip
and continue his pro career.

“T expect us to be competi-
tive,” Farrington proclaimed. “I
thought we were competitive
when we played them last April
at home and as a part of the
team, Mark gave us a big boost.

“Tf we had him, we would
have really been in a good posi-
tion to at least win the doubles
again. But now we have to rely
on the younger players to pull
us through on the red clay.”





SEE page 10

Tennis profiles

HERE’S a look at the
Bahamas’ Davis Cup team
heading to Paraguay next week-
end:

DEVIN MULLINGS
Age: 23

Height: 5-feet-7
Weight: 150 Ibs
Handed: Left-handed

PAGE 11

r



ts

2009



FEBRUARY 18,

Hugh Campbell:
Action on day 2

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Day two of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational fea-
tured a crowd thrilling opening session which featured the first
overtime game, first double overtime game, and first win for a
private school in the tournament.

CR Walker Knights - 75

CV Bethel Stingrays - 73

Double Overtime

It took two overtime periods, a pesky ball hawking defense
down the stretch and a tournament high from their dynamic two
guard for the defending champions to close out yesterday’s
Opening session as the first two win team of the tournament.

Jackson Jacobs led all scorers with 33 points and converted the
go-ahead free throws late in the second overtime to give the
Knights the two point advantage with under 10 seconds remain-
ing.

Jacobs also sent the game into the second overtime with a run-
ner across the lane in transition with just over three seconds left
to play.

The Knights led 50-48 with 1:19 left to play in regulation,
but went on a frenetic 8-2 run to give them a 58-50 lead with just
42 remaining, seemingly clinching the win.

The Stingrays led a resilient comeback effort with a 6-0 run,
capped by Samuel Johnson’s steal and lay-up to bring his team
within two, 58-56, with 15 seconds left to play.

With the momentum heavily in their favour, the Stingrays
forced a turnover and with 8 seconds remaining, Pateico Lead-
on tied the game at 58 on a jumpshot in traffic.

In the first overtime, Leadon, who finished with a team high
26 points, continued his hot shooting in overtime with a pair of
baskets to put the Stingrays ahead 64-61.

Johnson followed with a basket and a pair of free throws on
the ensuing possession to give the Stingrays a 68-63 lead with 39
seconds left to play.

The Knights mounted a comeback of their own in the waning
moments.

Jacobs converted a tough three point play and after C V
Bethel’s Kendal Fowler made one of two free throws, Jacobs
made both at the line to bring the Knights within one, 69-68 with
20 seconds left to play.

Fowler again made just one of two at the line, making the
score 70-68 before Jacobs’ late game heroics.

Jacobs’ backcourt mate Alex Rolle finished with 21 points
while Jason Rolle led the Knights frontcourt with 12.

Leadon’s 26 led the Stingrays while Johnson finished with 14,
Dustin McKenzie added 13 and Fowler chipped in with nine.

Game Notes: In what is becoming a budding rivalry, the
Knights avenged a loss to the Stingrays in the GSSSA regular sea-
son finale which eliminated them from playoff contention.

Stingrays forward Rio Johnson sat for much of the game but
finished four blocks, two in the waning moments of the second
overtime. Both teams enjoyed their largest leads of the game
with under one minute left to go in respective periods (CR Walk-
er-eight points in the fourth with 42 seconds left, CV Bethel-six
points in the first overtime with 39 seconds left).

After Fowler’s free throw which gave the Stingrays a 70-68
lead, the Stingrays came up with a steal and possession. Howev-
er the referees signaled a controversial jumpball, rather than a foul
which would have sent C V Bethel to the line with just seconds
remaining. All five of the Knights points in the second overtime
came from the free throw line where they shot 5-9

Teleos Cherubims - 62

RM Bailey Pacers - 57

Overtime

The reigning Bahamas Scholastic Association champions held
the Pacers to just three points in the overtime period to become
the first private school to record a win in this year's tournament.

Lamont Armaly scored the first three points of overtime to
give his team a 57-54 lead.

After both teams exchanged free throws, Brian Francis gave
the Cherubims a 60-55 lead on a tip in with 1:47 remaining.

Chauncey Cooper's lay-up gave Teleos a 62-55 lead with just
42 seconds remaining to seal the win.

Cooper finished with a double double - 18 points, 11 rebounds
and five steals.

SEE page 9



C R WALKER KNIGHTS’ Jackson Jacobs goes for a layup yesterday...

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SEE page 10







OU

Government
eyeing $50m
aviation sector
transformation

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Gov-
ernment :
eyeing

potential $50
million trans-
formation of
the aviation
industry in a
move to pro-
vide “critical”
building blocks
for this
nation’s
tourism and
economic future, with the
Bahamas “needing more air-
ports per capita than anywhere
else in the world”.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
minister of tourism and avia-
tion, confirmed yesterday to
Tribune Business that the Gov-
ernment was in the earliest
stages of overhauling its
Bahamian aviation sector policy
and infrastructure, after this
newspaper obtained details on
the proposed $50 million, Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB) financed, Air Transport
Reform Programme.

The minister, who said he was
speaking after meeting with
International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO) officials
to review their audit findings
on the Bahamas’ aviation regu-
latory and safety regime, indi-
cated the Government was
looking to create the most effi-
cient, cost effective air trans-
portation industry possible in
this nation.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace has
long advocated the need to
reduce airfares and airlift costs
into the Bahamas to a mini-
mum, given that these are effec-
tively the ‘access costs’ for
tourists coming on vacation
here.

He explained that the pro-
gramme, of which the ICAO
audit study is part, was designed
to fully integrate the aviation
sector with the wider Bahamian
economy over time, a move
designed to enhance national
infrastructure and open up
Family Island destinations to
improved accessibility by visi-
tors.

Service quality would be key,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added,
and the Government hoped to
pin down what it wanted to
achieve on aviation sector
reform, and how this would be
done, “by the end of summer”
2009.

Describing the reform and
development of the Bahamian



Vanderpool-
Wallace

SEE page 6B



























Just 33.4% of
Class I dealers

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY,

ine

FEBRUARY 18,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

British American in
talks to buy CLICO

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ritish American Financial

was yesterday said to be in

“advanced discussions” to

acquire CLICO

(Bahamas), sources close
to the company told Tribune Business, a
deal that could potentially solve the reg-
ulatory headaches created by a $57 mil-
lion guarantee extended by the latter’s
troubled Trinidadian parent. That under-
writes 59 per cent of the Bahamian com-
pany’s assets.

“British American will soon purchase
CLICO (Bahamas). They’re in advanced
discussions,” a source told Tribune Busi-
ness, as others in the business communi-
ty confirmed that the “vultures are cir-
cling” the Bahamian insurer, following
the much-publicised woes of its parent,
CL Financial.

I. Chester Cooper, British American
Financial’s president and chief executive,
did not return Tribune Business’s call
seeking comment before press time,
despite a message being left.

His cell phone was also turned off, with
sources telling Tribune Business he was
yesterday in a series of meetings related
to the potential CLICO (Bahamas) pur-
chase.

A major impediment to any potential
CLICO (Bahamas) acquisition is the fact
that almost 59 per cent of the company’s
$97.352 million in total assets are invest-
ed in loans to its subsidiary, CLICO
Enterprises Ltd.

Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), in its
2007 audit report on CLICO (Bahamas),
revealed that CLICO Enterprises had
invested the bulk of those funds in a Flori-
da-based real estate project called

meet capital
requirements

Business Reporter

THE SECURITIES Com-

mission is looking to retool the
formula responsible for calcu-
lating the regulatory capital
Bahamas-based broker/dealers
must maintain, with just 33.4
per cent of Class I firms in com-
pliance with these thresholds.

The new formula is part of
the Commission’s wider efforts
to restructure its legislation, in
order to better serve the capital
markets/investment funds
industry it regulates, and boost
compliance by it registered
firms. The Commission is also
adamant that it will begin
enforcing its laws and penalising
companies for non-compliance,
as the legislation allows.

The Commission’s market
surveillance manager, Sally
Moss, said it was previously
unfair for the regulator to
enforce its laws while
broker/dealer regulatory capi-
tal levels were being calculated
using a faulty/incorrect formula
provided by her department.

However, she said some
firms, despite the formula
issues, simply chose not to com-

y.

“While the majority of the
companies are able to meet it,
some of our more complicated
companies that do much more
involved business have not been
able to meet the standards,” Ms
Moss said.

SEE page 4B

St. Michael:

‘Advanced discussions’ taking place
on deal to acquire Bahamian unit of
troubled Trinidad conglomerate

Wellington Preserve.

This had suffered
a more than 20 per
cent decline in mar-
ket value, falling
from an appraised
$104 million at year-
end 2006 to $80.5
million at year-end
2007, due to the col-
lapsing Florida real
estate market.

“This reduction in
value has resulted in
[CLICO Bahamas]
management consid-
ering the possibility of impairment of the
loan,” Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas)
wrote in its audit report.

“Although the market forecast for
Florida shows recovery of the real estate
market in 2008, management obtained a
guarantee from C L Financial (CLICO
Bahamas ultimate parent), whereby C L
Financial states that it will honour the
obligations of CLICO Enterprises to the
company if the need arises. As such, no
provision has been made for impair-
ment.”

Needless to say, the anticipated Florida
real estate market recovery has not taken
place, and may not do so for some years
to come.

Several sources suggested that any pur-
chaser of CLICO (Bahamas) would have
to make a major capital injection into the

| Chester Cooper

company to cover the liabilities owed to
life and annuity policyholders.

As previously revealed by Tribune
Business, at the December 31, 2007, bal-
ance sheet date, a full impairment of the
$57 million loan would leave CLICO
(Bahamas) with just over $40 million in
total assets.

That would be insufficient to meet lia-
bilities worth almost $85.5 million, espe-
cially some $79.37 million in reserves set
aside to pay future policyholder benefits.

However, sources monitoring devel-
opments said ways to isolate the Florida
real estate investment - and potentially
splitting it off from the assets/liabilities
any purchaser may acquire - were being
explored. Such a move might allow
British American Financial to only take
with it the quality assets from CLICO
(Bahamas) life and annuity business.

“There are some dynamics in play that
give them some cautious optimism that
can happen,” one source said. “I think
they’re very close; close to the point
where an announcement can be made
very soon.” British American Financial is
likely to also be able to acquire CLICO
(Bahamas) at a very keen price point.

Protecting the Bahamian policyhold-
ers of CLICO (Bahamas) has been upper-
most in the minds of the Government
and Registrar of Insurance’s Office, as
the news from Trinidad has worsened,

SEE page 3B





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Major
Caribbean
insurer
sets-up
Bahamas
branch

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A MAJOR pan-Caribbean
general insurer has established a
branch office in the Bahamas
some 35 years after it began
insuring risks in this nation, its
country manager telling Tribune
Business it “certainly expects to
grow” its estimated $2 million
per annum in premium income
through expanding its agency
force to at least eight.

Charles V. Sands III, of The
Insurance Company of the West
Indies (Bahamas), said the firm
had already signed up three
agent companies to sell its poli-
cies since it formally set up the
branch office on December 1,
2008, and was in talks to add
five more.

Mr Sands, a Bahamian and
former Summit Insurance Com-
pany executive, said agents had
greeted The Insurance Compa-
ny of the West Indies’ arrival
in the Bahamas as “a breath of
fresh air”, welcoming the addi-
tional underwriting capacity and
options it offered their clients.

Mr Sands said: “They’ve [the
company] been here since 1974,
writing business in the
Bahamas, and I think they
wanted to increase their pres-

SEE page 4B

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THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

UV INpex Tooay Wort Cries Marine Forecast

































Today Tsay WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
. = ’ a High = Low W High = Low NASSAU Today: = Sat 10-20Knots =———(itsti(<«é«i Sz Feet = 10-20 Miles = 74°F
Sage a at ie: ee: ie: ie o|1 |2 3|4|5 6|7 [shot Fc FIC Fc FC Thursday: _ SW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet ___10-20 Miles 74° F
ie d “ Mie soa aire se re Acapulco 90/32 72/22 s 88/31 72/22 S$ FREEPORT Today: § at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
' = i a ’ wean anaes SSE see aa why LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V. HIGH Amsterdam 45 34/1 45/7 39/3 + Thursday: SW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
~itill ORLANDO . He Ankara, Turkey 45/7 28/-2 pe 41/5 30/-1¢ = ABACO ‘Today: SE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
| High: 76° F/24°C Breezy with bright Clear and breezy. Partly sunny and Clouds giving way to Partly sunny and Clouds and sun; The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 54/12 41/5 sh 55/12 40/4 sh Thursday: _ SW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Lew: 50° FAO°C <> sunshine. breezy. sun. nice. breezy in the p.m.. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 74/23 68/20 + 75/23 74/23 c
te OW: et @ ea High: 83° High: 75° High: 75° High: 78° Bangkok 95/35 79/26 c 94/34 78/25 pce
: eens High: 79° Low: 67° Low: 65° Low: 62° Low: 65° Low: 67° TIDES FOR NASSAU ee ae ene cope) SASS a TS
TAMPA: ie fe EE EAT Belin 320 72 sn ~—=S«C«DD THB pt
High: 75° F/24° C i fie [81°-68°F 78°-63° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft.) poiti 59/15 53/11 70/21 61/16 p
~ Low:53°F/12°C é ae The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of t t ind, humidi ine intensi ipitati : 4 ale te
i! 7 I rf perature IS an Index that combines tne eifects of temperature, wind, numi ity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 2:32 a.m. 2.3 8:51 a.m. 0.5 Bel rade 31/0 95/-3 sn 96/-3 18/-7 C
i ib @ = = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:41 p.m. 18 847pm. 03 aaa 98/-2 19/-7 ¢ 30/-1 23/-5 ¢
ede tg: ; aa 44pm. 19 9:48pm. 0. Bogota 66/18 46/7 t 66/18 46/7 +
- illic. Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Friday 733am. 23 1044am. 04 Brussels 39/3 30/-1 pc 43/6 36/2 c
cual ABACO Temperature 441pm. 20 10:43pm. 02 Budapest 32/0 24/-4 sf 30/-1 20/-6 s
f ees cat (Ol seseee eee Soe ° F/23° : Buenos Ai 95/35 75/23 95/35 77/25
- ad <>. ee ue LOW de> rige ¢ Saturday salon. 21 som, 61 Cairo TH/21 GiNN6 s 78 57/13 6
oe fo ea Low: 55° F/13°C Normal high 7 Fasc EN Calcutta 92/33 64/17 s 91/32 68/20 s
ies eiast f : f Normal low 64° F/18° C Calgary 30/-1 18/-7 c 35/1 16/-8 pc
lB copes @ WEST PALM BEACH ij a Med Last year's High or nertctnettnee 83° F/28° C SUN AND ify Cancun 84/28 66/18 s 87/30 67/19 s
ie seme: High:77°F/25°C = ead e a Last year's JOW: seecteetiisaecnet laces 69° F/21° C " " Caracas 80/26 65/18 sh 83/28 68/20 c
Low: 57° F/14°C oa anni {> Precipitation = me ae Be am. Hoot toe 2 am. Casablanca 6719 50/10 s 71/21 48/8 s
ps As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.0.0 0.01" unsel....... ‘Vo p.m. Moonset... 1200 P.M. Copenhagen 33/0 30/-1 sn 36/2 32/0 pc
C.. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full ast Dublin 48/8 41/5 pc 45/7 36/2 pc
High: 76° F/24° C @ High: 74° F/23°C ; Hj Normal year to date oo... cece 2.78" : Frankfurt 36/2 19/-7 pc 37/2 25/-3 pe
Low: 60° F/16°C Low: 53° F/12°C AccuWeather ’ ee Geneva 35/1 25/-3 pc 35/1 34/1 s
.com } Ree oe Halifax 30/-1 17/-8 c 35/1 32/0 sn
I Forecasts and graphics provided by bh “ Havana 83/28 58/14 s 85/29 53/11 s
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feh. 24 Mar. 4 Mar. 10 Mar. 18 Helsinki 23/-5 18/-7 sf 27/-2 23/-5 sn
ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 70/21 66/18 73/22 64/17 1
NASSAU High: 76° F/24°C Islamabad 78/25 48/8 s 76/24 50/10 sh
High:79° F/26°C i Low: 57° FA4°C Istanbul 52/11 43/6 pe 51/10 43/6 r
Low: 67° FA9°C Jerusalem 56/13 45/7 s 72/22 47/8 pc
i Johannesburg 78/25 59/15 t 78/25 60/15 t
KEY WEST @ CATISLAND Kingston 83/28 74/23 pe 83/28 75/23 sh
High: 75° F/24°C rf S 3 Lima 87/30 66/18 pc 85/29 67/19 c
Low:64°F/A8°C High: 74° F/23° London 50/10 39/3 pe 48/8 39/3 pc
: i = é __-Low:53°F/12°C Madrid 61/16 30/-1 s 63/17 34/1 s
@: : H Ee Manila 90/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t
hy |! Mexico City 81/27 50/10 s 72/22 S/T pc
; ee GREATEXUMA Monterrey 88/31 59/15 s 74/23 53/11 pe
4 Montreal 30/-1 28/-2 sn 34/1 21/-6 sn
©... High: 80° F/27° C herrea Moscow 32/0 14/-10 sn 27/-2 14/-10 pc
soa | aNoRos ines en ioe a ve ee
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; Hh a OO ae pe 7
highs and tonights's lows. High: 81° F/27°C New Delhi 77/25 49/9 s 77/25 521s
Low: 59° F/15°C Oslo 25/-3 16/-8 sn 27/-2 18/-7 sn
Paris 45/7 39/3 pe 43/6 36/2 +
Prague 25/-3 19/-7 sn 25/-3 22/-5 ¢
| Rio de Janeiro 84/28 73/22 s 83/28 75/23 pc
High: 76° F/24°C Riyadh 75/23 51/10 pe 75/23 54/12 pe
Low: 57° F/14°C Rome 43/6 23/-5 pe 46/7 25/-3 s
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 81/27 71/21 sh 83/28 72/22 s
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 78° F/26° C San Juan 99/37 71/21 t 103/39 71/21 s =F Showers smart
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC Low: 57°F/14°C ee omae ae s cama an s i a 79/65
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Anchorage 27/-2 24/-4 peo 33/0 24/-4 sn Jacksonville 72/22 55/12 pc 65/18 32/0 t Phoenix 6618 45/7 s 73/22 478 s CROOKED ISLAND/ ACKLINS sani Damnings Bee Doe De Boies 112s ea écia
Atlanta BO15 425 t 5241 25/3 s Kansas City 40/4 14/-10 c 87/2 24/6 +s __ Pittsburgh 46/7 28/-2 sn 32/0 18-7 sf RAGGEDISLAND — igh:80°F/27°c — crEarTET pomeriEE A snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and naan
Atlantic City 42/5 36/2 + 47/8 24/-4 pc Las Vegas 6015 37/2 s 64/17 41/5 s Portland,OR 52/41 38/3 pce 5412 354 c High: 78° F/26° C Low: 59° F/15°C einekh oa 5 a pe PB a j om = eee
Baltimore 42/5 36/2 + 46/7 25/-3 pc Little Rock 70/21 354 t 5613 31/0 s Raleigh-Durham 50/10 43/4 1 52/11 26/-3 Low: 56°F/13°C A — vee EAA : SOT Ene ” : —
Boston 38/3 35/1 c 43/6 32/0 c LosAngeles 64/17 48/8 s 72/22 50/0 s St. Louis 48/8 20/-6 c 34/1 20/-6 pe . a ae ESA = STE Ee
Buffalo 38/3 31/0 sn 32/0 21/-6 sn Louisville 54/12 29/-1 sh 35/1 20/6 sf SaltLakeCity 42/5 26/-3 sn 43/6 25/-3 s GREAT INAGUA Tol : 47/8 36/2 - 467 AS
Charleston, SC 60/15 53/11 t 62/16 32/0 pc Memphis 66/18 34/1 t 50/10 28/-2 s San Antonio 80/26 48/8 pc 73/22 488 s High:81°F/27°C aaa AS 28/-2 Ee a5 20/5 Fe
Chicago 38/3 14/-10 + 20/6 14/-10 sf = Miami 79/26 65/18 s 80/26 53/11 pc — San Diego 65/18 49/9 s 68/20 51/10 Low. 60°FAG°C Trinidad 90/32 73/20 t 86/30 72/92 t
Cleveland 44/6 23/-5 sn 27/-2 19/-7 — sf Minneapolis 20/-6 3/-16 sf 14/10 7/-13 pc SanFrancisco 61/16 47/8 pe 61/16 46/7 pc : Se Tana 45/7 34/1 pc 47/8 33/0 pe
Dallas 75/23 39/3 s 50/15 38/3 s Nashville 63/17 32/0 t 39/3 25/-3 sf Seattle 50/10 39/3 po 5110 37/2 c paar ipl 99/-1 20/-8 sn 29/-1 23/-5 ¢
Denver 44/6 20/-6 c 46/7 21/6 s New Orleans 75/23 50/10 t 65/18 40/4 s Tallahassee 70/21 51/10 c 62/16 28/-2 pc Warsaw 98/-2 23/-5 sn 97/-2 24/-6 sn
Honolulu «7/25 68/20 sh 78/25 65/18 po OWahomaCiy 606 30-1 s| S52 330 $ Tuom eat? 3BR © THD1 a2 eonipee CO eae ee on
onolulu S pc anoma UI i S s ucson s S 7
Houston 78/25 48/8 t 6719 40/4 s Orlando 76/24 59/15 po 74/23 42/5 t Washington,DC 44/6 38/3 r 46/7 26/-3_ pc Te ha ee ee





THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 3B



Alliance ‘strengthens’
BEC renewables bid

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Canadian renewable ener-
gy company yesterday said its
developing alliance with a 25
per cent shareholder in Grand
Bahama Power Company would
“strengthen” its bid to win a
power supply contract from the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC).

Jonathan Lundy, chief execu-
tive of Schneider Power Com-
pany, which was already in a
joint venture with Bahamian
company WINSO Ltd to pro-
vide 24 Mega Watts (MW) of
electricity on three Bahamian
islands, via wind and solar pow-
er, said the joint venture Letter
of Intent signed with Emera
would only enhance the pro-
posal submitted to BEC.

“There’s a capability as far as
what both partners bring to the
mix,” Mr Lundy told Tribune
Business, with Schneider Pow-
er/WINSO’s joint venture, the
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Corporation (BREC), already
having qualified among the 13
renewable energy bidders short-
listed by BEC.

He added: “We wouldn’t
have done it [the Emera
alliance] if we did not think it
would strengthen our bid and
our team.

“That was a clear motivation
for us. We’re adding a very
sophisticated, strong partner
that brings a lot to the table. We
definitely think we’re a stronger
entity working with them than
without them.”

Mr Lundy said the Letter of
Intent aimed to marry Emera’s
strengths in power generation
and asset management with
Schneider’s expertise in renew-
able energies, especially wind
and solar. Both could benefit
and learn from the other, Emera
providing Schneider with scale,
generation and financing capa-
bilities, and the latter giving the
Canadian power giant expertise
in fields it is keen to break into.

“It is a Letter of Intent, but I
suspect we’re going to find ways
to work together on these pro-
jects and other projects in the
region,” Mr Lundy said.

Sasha Irving, an Emera
spokeswoman, told Tribune
Business that the company
planned to invest a further $400
million in the Caribbean over
the next four years, and the
alliance with Schneider - giving
it access to BEC’s renewable
energy tender - was “one piece
of that”.

She reaffirmed that the com-
pany was “very open to discus-
sions” should the Government
decide to privatise BEC, and

added of the planned $400 mil-
lion outlay: “The Bahamas
already figures predominantly
in that, and will continue to do
so.”

Ms Irving said the Schneider
Power tie-up would work in well
with the renewable energies
Emera and Grand Bahama
Power Company would be
exploring, including the use of
wind, hydro/tidal and waste-to-
energy options.

Mr Lundy, meanwhile, added
that there was “substantial”
potential for the Bahamas to
harness renewable energies in
its electricity generation mix,
but the percentage of the total
power supply it accounted for
had to be determined.

“It’s got to make sense for
everybody. There should be a
significant mix of renewable
energies comprising the energy
mix for the Bahamas,” Mr
Lundy said.

The Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation has sub-
mitted a proposal to BEC for
the construction and operation
of wind turbines and solar pan-
els on three different islands -
New Providence, Abaco and
Harbour Island.

BREC has proposed that the
three projects would collective-
ly generate 24 Mega Watts
(MW) of electricity per day,

enough to power 25,000 homes.

In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, Thomas
Schneider, Schneider Power’s
president, said the BREC pro-
posal would require $60 million
in capital financing, of which $15
million would be equity and the
remainder debt financing. He
added that $40 million of that
figure was likely to be spent in
the Bahamas.

“Such a capital infrastructure
spend in the Bahamas can cre-
ate a lot of services as well as
jobs,” Mr Schneider said at the
time. “That’s going to be a key
benefit for the Bahamas, as
we're going to be putting money
into the economy.” Some 10-15
full-time jobs were likely to be
created.

Some 20-30 jobs construction
jobs would be created on each
of the three islands involved in
the BREC project, meaning that
some 60-90 jobs would be cre-
ated in total if it won govern-
ment/BEC approval.

Meanwhile, Emera has made
no secret of its desire to expand
its foothold in the Bahamas,
which was achieved last Novem-
ber when the company paid $41
million to acquire Lady Henri-
etta St George’s 50 per cent
ICD Utilities stake (translating
into a 25 per cent stake in Grand
Bahama Power).

British American in talks to buy CLICO



FROM page 1B

with regulators there suggesting CL Finan-
cial has a TT$10 billion (the equivalent of
around US$1 billion) deficit in its statutory
reserve funds. CL Financial has some
TT$16.7 billion in policyholder liabilities.

Other insurance industry sources con-
firmed British American Financial was in
talks to acquire CLICO (Bahamas), as syn-
ergies could be obtained with the former’s
home service business.

“From the British American point of
view, it may fit in with some of the business
they have,” said one contact.

“T don’t thing the insurance book of busi-
ness is bad,” said one. “It is the investment

one that is problematic. There are some
buildings [owned by CLICO Bahamas]. It’s
a chance to pick up a sales crew and some
business.”

However, others suggested British Amer-
ican Financial would face competition for
CLICO (Bahamas), with rival Bahamian
insurer Colinalmperial Insurance Company
also said to be keen on taking a look.

“Blood has been shed and the vultures
are coming out to pick over what’s left,”
said one source in relation to CLICO
(Bahamas). “It’s weak, and they’re com-
ing out to exploit the situation.”

CLICO (Bahamas) has previously denied
that its parent’s woes would have any
impact on its business in this nation, but

NOTICE

MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE
NATIONAL YOUTH LEADERS CERTIFICATION

PROGRAMME

The Youth Department of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture will convene it’s Annual
Youth Leaders Certification Programme on
Monday, 23rd February 2009, beginning at 6:
00 p.m. at the Ministry’s Headquarters, Ground

Floor Conference Room, Thompson Blvd.

All youth

leaders and _ workers,
civic, school and musical bands are invited
to collect an application at the Ministry’s
Youth Department between the hours of
9a.m.-5 p.m. Deadline for receipt of applications

will be 18th February 2009.

For additional information you may call
502-0600/4 of 502-0736.

church,

Lennox McCartney, the Registrar of Insur-
ance, said his office was in touch with
Trinidad regulators and “monitoring the
situation”.

He and minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, have been unable to meet
with CLICO (Bahamas) and CL Financial
representatives as hoped for, but have been
in contact with the Trinidadian parent, the
regulator said.

Mr McCartney added that CLICO
(Bahamas) investment in US real estate
was supported by the property assets, and
he declined to comment on a potential sale
of the company and whether this would be
the best way to protect Bahamian policy-

holders.
BSi

Dare Le Be Great
TV Show

PA *

Popular motivational speaker and corporate trainer Spence
Finlayson recently hosted a very dynamic and inspiring

program on his "Dare Te Be Great "TV show with the
following guests: Celi Moss, Bahamian Filmmaker, Ruby
Saunders, Youth Alive Marching Band and Local singing
sensation, Spice.

The show aired last night on ZNS TV13 and will be replayed
again on Sunday at 10pm, so tune in and be motivated.

BOAT FOR SALE

2003 38 FT. INTREPID

Three 275 HP Mercury Engines
Generator, Cabin, GPS and Depth Finder
Well maintained - Asking $300,000.00 O.N.O

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
TANYA ERDEG at

376-4091 or 396-1134



BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for:-

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Responsibilities :-

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Service & advise customers
Maintain & follow up account relationships

professionals

vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted





THE TRIBUNE



BTC’s Long Island team flanked by senior vice-presidents Antonio Stubbs (right) and Tellis Symonette (left)

Long Island
tops for BTC
customer
service

THE islands of Long Island,
San Salvador, Rum Cay and
Ragged Island won the coveted
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) Be Amazing
Customer Service Award for
2008.

BTC set the mandate to end
each week with zero faults. The
four islands complied by com-
pleting all installations and
repairs within the set time-
frame.

These islands are managed
by Ramona Taylor, a 20-year
veteran of the telecommunica-
tions industry. “With just 16
employees covering these four
islands, teamwork is both cru-
cial and essential,” she said.

"To me it’s about constantly
reinforcing to my team that
they are the ones that are

BSi

responsible not just for provid-
ing telecommunications ser-
vices, but for keeping our resi-
dents, businesses and our
tourists connected to the world
365 days a year.”

Technician Garvin Simmons
said: “Winning this award is a
good feeling. ’'m just glad I was
part of the process. This came
with multi-tasking, a lot of hard
work and dedication.”

Antonio Stubbs and Tellis
Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-
presidents, flew to Long Island
for the presentation.

Ms Taylor and her Long
Island team members received
high praise during Tropical
Storm Noel in 2007. Despite
excessive flooding, the team
managed to provide a fibre link
for ZNS TV 1,3 which allowed

them to transmit updates and
news stories during the storm.
They were also responsible for
ensuring that officers of the
Royal Bahamas Police were
equipped with mobile phones
as they patrolled throughout
the communities to provide
assistance to residents.

The Be Amazing Customer
Service Award was given last
year to the island that went
above and beyond in providing
superior service and improving
the quality of life for the
Bahamian people.

Annual targets were set for
each Family Island to measure
their level of productivity.
These four islands exceeded the
set expectations through their
demonstration of superior cus-
tomer service on a daily basis.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently
accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI RDINATI
STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is
definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example

Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others

Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Possess analytical qualities

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved
Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae
to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman Bay Corporate Centre
P. O. Box N - 7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 5B

Go %

VACANCY NOTICE

Senior Manager - Investments “Wy
“ANCE ®

Applications ate invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Senior Manager
- Investments with the National Insurance Board:

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
Manage portfolio of the National Insurance Board’s Investments, ensuring that
Investment dectstons that are made conform to Compliance, Strategic, Risk and Yteld
objectives of the Board.

Matntatn Statutory limuts of all investments nolan with respective financtal institutions,
preparing management reports to show compliance.

Represent the National Insurance Board as requested and required tn stakeholder
meetings, investment discussions, and/or Public Relations events relative to invest-
ment portfolio.

Design and prepare as needed/requested, management reports of all investments,
inclusive of Investment Holdings, Risk Status, Outstanding issues, and/or other key
mettics.

Develop and/or maintain relationships with the National Insurance Board approved
Brokers, with specific focus on compliance, increasing investment opportunities and/
of maximizing returns.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SKILL & EXPERIENCE
At least a Bachelors Degree in a Business related discipline, preferably Finance or
Accounting,

Professional designation in Finance (CFA or its equivalent) and/or have completed a
professional designation tn Accounting (CPA or its equivalent). (Consideration will be
given to applicants nearing CHA qualification).

Prior experience in managing a diverstfied investment portfolio

APPLICATION
Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the
necessaty proof of qualification on or before Friday, February 27, 2009, to:

Assistant Director
Human Resources Department
National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
Nassau, Bahamas



GN-827

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Invitation For Tenders

Maintenance of Public Cemeteries in
New Providence

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas through the Ministry of Public
Works & Transport invites Tenders for the maintenance of the under-mentioned public
cemeteries in New Providence:

¢ Old Trail Cemetery Section A
e Marshall View and Veterans Cemetery

The main scope of services to be provided for the maintenance of each cemetery is as
follows:

e Weeding

¢ Mowing and weeding of grass

e Removal of debris

e Pruning of trees

The Ministry of Public Works & Transport now invites interested contractors to collect
tender documents and to complete and submit same in accordance with the instructions
therein.

Tender documents may be obtained by interested parties as of Monday, 16th February,
2009 from:

The Civil Engineering Section
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

PO. Box N-8156

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 322-4830 Extension 4042
Fax: (242) 302-9770

between the hours of 9:30a.m. and 4:30p.m. Mondays to Fridays.

The completed tender document is to be deposited in the Tender Box located at the
office of the Director of Public Works, Ministry of Public Works & Transport, 3rd Floor,
John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, The Bahamas no later than 1:00p.m. on or before
Monday, 23rd February, 2009.

A Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 10:00a.m. on Friday, 20th February, 2009 in the
Conference Room of the Ministry of Public Works & Transport.

The Opening of Tenders for the maintenance of the aforementioned cemeteries will take
place at 2:00 p.m. on Monday, 23rd February, 2009 in the Conference Room of the
Ministry of Public Works & Transport.

All clarifications and/or questions are to be directed to th Chief Civil Engineer at
the above mentioned address.

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
12th February, 2009





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 7B



700m project at a standstill

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE DEVELOPERS
behind the $700 million Royal
Island project in North
Eleuthera discontinued work
last November, yesterday cit-
ing the global economic crisis
as the reason for the stoppage,
a move that left 40 -50
Eleutherans out of work.

The attorney for Dallas-
based development company
Cypress Equities, Joe Enos,
released a statement in
response to repeated Tribune
Business inquiries to conform

that the project’s principals
were restructuring the devel-
opment, prompting the shut-
down of operations.

Cypress Equities, an affiliate
of Staubach Retail, a company
owned by former Dallas Cow-
boys quartterback, Roger
Staubach, said it was hoping to
implement the proposed
changes and continue the pro-
ject. However, it could not say
when work would resume on
Royal Island.

“In light of the global eco-
nomic crisis, the Royal Island
development is on hold while
the principals restructure the

project,” the statement read.

“Restructuring includes prod-
uct offerings, overall island
development, pricing and pro-
ject financing. The principals
hope to implement these
changes and re-launch the pro-
ject soon.”

The Royal Island develop-
ment was also affliated with for-
mer Dallas Cowboys running
back, Emmitt Smith, and its
seed financing came from US-
based private equity fund, the
Carlyle Group.

MP for North Eleuthera,
Alvin Smith, said he was confi-
dent the developers would

restart the project later this
year.

He added that before
Cypress Equities had discon-
tinued work on the island, it
had sold real estate within the
development, leading him to
believe that the developers
would have to fulfill their oblig-
ations to the purchasers.

The $700 million investment
is expected to contain, when
completed, a Jack Nicklaus
Golf course, spa facilities and
restaurants, a marina and prop-
erties selling for three million
dollars and higher.

Mr Smith said the economy
of North Eleuthera was

here. That whole island is like a
community, so you find that the
guys who have the construction
company or who are working
elsewhere and probably have

some cottages, if they know
they have people are not work-
ing, they would share informa-
tion relating to job opportuni-
ties.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL JAMES GRAHAM
GRAHAM of APT. 3301 CORAL BEACH HOTEL, P.O. BOX F-
42468, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and



MO cra
——

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
SAFENS LTD, is in dissolution. Continental Liquidators Inc.
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square,
P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before 16th day of March, 2009.

Vor: Comtuaaita Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MARATHON INVESTMENT
HOLDINGS LIMITED

— _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MARATHON INVESTMENT HOLD-
INGS LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-

fore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SCATTERGUN LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SCATTERGUN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
































adversely affected with the ter-
mination of the project, as 40-50
individuals were put out of
work. He said, though, that
Eleutherans in general remain
optimistic despite the closure.

Tourism in the area, howev-
er, has not slackened due to
vacationing second home own-
ers. He said workers have also
been cushioned by other small
projects going on in the area.

Mr Smith contends that Roy-
al Island is a “very good pro-
ject”, and will be a major addi-
tion to North Eleuthera when
complete.

He said, in the interim, that
Eleutherans displaced by the
project’s closure will be able to
find odd jobs with the island’s
communities, as they have
always done during hard times.

“Eleuthera and so many oth-
er islands have been through
this before, and so I find them
to be very resilient, very indus-
trious and they find some ways
of making a few dollars,” said
Mr Smith.

“Sometimes not as easy as
they would wish but they would
peck away there and find a job

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INDY ROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of INDY ROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRZEWALSKI HOLDINGS CORP.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PRZEWALSKI HOLDINGS CORP.. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JONAAL TRADING LTD.

—/%,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JONAAL TRADING LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
18th day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

SEVEN SEVEN SEVEN LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), the Dissolution of SEVEN SEVEN
SEVEN LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 12th day of February, 2009.

thsfe

Liquidatér

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HALLSCOMBE INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HALLSCOMBE INVESTMENTS PTE.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EMIVAL LTD.

— 4,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EMIVAL LTD. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUECHIP HOLDINGS LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BLUECHIP HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







JUDGE PARKER HAS
A NICE RING TO IT!

I COULDN'T

THEN DON'T OPEN
IT! WHY UPSET



© 2009 by King eatures

MGER

WELL THEN, WITH THAT AT
STAKE, OUR DEMANDS SHOULD
SEEM VERY REASONABLE /



“LOOKS LIKE THE KIPS ARE READY FoR
WINTER TO ENP.”






Across
Tips for making financial 1
gains (7) 2
5 Victor’s opposite



number (5)

8 They figure a great deal in 3
population surveys (13)

9 Spirit with which the band 4

starts producing dance

music (5) 5
10 Away team not yet

admitted (7) 6

11 Fighting together and all
about to die (6)
12 Child brings back 10 lines 7
of verse (6) 11
15 Endure the French type of
beer (4,3) 13
17 River of silver (5)
19 Defeated by the elements? 14

(7-6)
20 Rise after start of day 16
looking glum (5) 18

21 Wastes the rewards (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9
Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate,
16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23
Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26
Souvenir, 27 Close.

Down: 2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4
Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12
Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15
Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21
Shout, 22 Green.



THANKS, SAM---



HAVE DONE IT
WITHOUT YOU!

I HEAR YOU AND =
DAD ARE GOING INTO 2
BUSINESS TOGETHER?



























IM STARVING, HELLO, MARGO.
WHAT'S FOR / GOODBYE,
DINNER, < ROMANCE.
TOMMIE ?
(FE a

ces

OH, BROTHER—
Pan WHAT A DAYS

FRAN BOLLE



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

I PItY ANYONE
WHO CROSSES
MY PATH TODAY?!

I PITY ANYONE
WHO CROSSES
MY PATH TODAY !!

DISCRETION IS ADVISED

The violence depicted in
this panel may be too
intense for younger
readers.

nw kingfeatures.com



Ne
FAD.

Sy N
Hist

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down



WOUL? I BE
STILL STANPING
HERE \F THE
Bus HAP



Sunday

ANN DEMANDS! UNLOCK
THIS Door!

UL



MISSED (T!









5S
Py
t/
bb

paniasa! siyBu pyom, H

gis

©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

+P RET




Y TORPEDO TUBE
READY, CAP'N!

CATCH ON
QUICKER.
WE SHOULD



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to



RE, ES eS

WHERES YOUR
BOAT, HAGAR ?



Oe)

Le
PN

y
cH 4
ae

The
Target



1 << IM EEHIND ONA
DON'T | FEW PAYMENTS...

COULP JT
HAVE BEEN

REPOSSESSED

















HOW many words of four
letlers or More tan Vou make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may

uses be used once only, Each must
words in contain the centre letter and
- there must be at least one
the main nine-letter word. No plurals.
hody of TODAY'S TARGET
Good 19: very good 29; excellent
Chambers 38 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.

21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition).



















Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

diet dirt duet edit erupt pert
pitted putrid putt putted
putter puttied rite rutted
tepid tide tied tier tire tired
titre tried trip tripe true
trued TURPITUDE tutu utter



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer





















Difficulty Level *& *&

Model question (5)
Climbing a low hill, but not



to any great extent
(2,1,5,5)

Employ someone else as a
model (7)

Attacks with stones,



perhaps (4,2)
Solicitors hold it to be
permissible (5)

Changing to steam



trains? He should
know (13)

Honour a relation (7)
After all, we do turn out
with official sanction (7)
Overburden journalists
with work (7)

Sorted out and put
away (6)

Choice example (5)
Ernest hasn't got time for
birds (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9
Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12
Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18
Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25
Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty.
Down: 2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4
Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12
Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run
for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21
Minor, 22 Snipe.























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

2/17

























Across Down
1 Archetypal 1 Quick-witted (5)
miser (7) 2 Meriting rebuke (13)
5 One of The Three 3 Behind time

Musketeers (5) specified (7)
Greatly cherished
person (5,2,3,3)

Appeal

4 Serious attempt (6)
5 Plant pest (5)
6 Writing in

earnestly (5) symbols (13)







Sequoia (7) 7 Accelerate (5,2)
Type of engine (6) 11 Fault (7)

Stimulus (6) 13 Enter uninvited (7)
Identify wrongly (7) 14 Be of good heart
Heavy drinker (5) (4,2)

Demagogic (6-7) 16 Mixture of

Very small (5) metals (5)

Glad (7) 18 Strictly observed (5)





















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.















2/17





















9/6]3 a SES
7/4/18 MS 7 9 IN 2/3
11512 7 9/82 5111/3
tala Oo 8RN1 3 4(RWs8 9
a 8517/9 M819 7
ate} BN 3c oN
37/6 NEGRI “AER!
8/1/7 cei 2 om 2
6/219 M2113 43/4 1
4131/5 [| 41 1/2



Famous Hand — 2

North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
#109764
VAK4
#310
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3 NT

Opening lead — five of diamonds.

The semifinal match between
Brazil and the United States at the
1985 Bermuda Bowl in Sao Paulo,
Brazil, could not have been any
tighter. Incredibly, with just one deal
of the 160-board confrontation
remaining, the two teams found
themselves in a dead tie.

AS reported yesterday, the dead-
lock was created when the Ameri-
cans gained 6 IMPs on Board 159
after the Brazilians failed to cash in
on opportunities for substantial gains
at both tables. That set the stage for
this dramatic last deal, with a place








in the final — and possibly the world
championship — at stake.

When the hand was first played,
Bob I lamman of the U.S. opened one
notrump with the North cards, and
everyone passed. After an opening
heart lead by East, Hamman had nine
top tricks, using the acc of diamonds
as an entry to cash dummy’s clubs.

When the deal arrived at the sec-
ond table, with a large partisan audi-
cnee watching on Vu-Graph, the
question was whether the Brazilians
would bid the game the Americans
had missed. Using a strong club sys-
tem, the Brazilians, to the accompa-
niment of wild cheers, proceeded to
reach three notrump as shown.

However, many of thosc watching
failed to realize that with South as
declarer, a different opening lead
would be made. And if that lead were
a diamond, the acc of diamonds
would be driven out before declarer
could score his long clubs.

Sure enough, the U.S. West, Lew
Stansby, led the five of diamonds,
and when the smoke cleared, the
contract was down two, giving the
Americans a gain of 9 IMPs on the
deal and a place in the final.

Three days later, the U.S. team
completed a relatively easy win over
Austria to capture the world title, but
those who were there will never for-
get the last two deals of the semi-
final match with Brazil, which pro-
pelled the Americans into the cham-
pionship round.

Tomorrow: Actions speak louder than words.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



eS



The Tribune







wmperedpets

@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

WITH the many commercially pre-
pared dog foods available on today's
market, it is often difficult to tell which
ones are better than others. To make
things worse, many dog foods and
treats have been removed from shelves
do to fear of contamination. However,
one Bahamian dog lover sought an
alternative and baked her own batch of
homemade gourmet dog treats right at
home. She affectionately named the
treats after the native Bahamian dog
called a Potcake- thus “Pampered Pot-

cakes” was formed.

Tara Klonaris Holcombe,
a Bahamian wife and mother
of a two year old son, said
she decided to start Pam-
pered Potcakes in 2007 but
did not launch the business
until May 2008 at the
Bahamas Humane Society's
Annual Fun Day.

“T wanted to bake some-
thing healthy for my dog,
Snickers, and realised that
there were no homemade
dog treat businesses in the
market. I wanted something
natural and better for him. I
thought maybe this would be
something other people
would want because they like
to spend money on their
dogs,” Mrs Holcombe said.

Mrs Holcombe explained
that the process for baking
the tasty dog treats is quite
time consuming.

“T work fulltime so it is a
lot to come home and bake.
For the Jollification,( held at
the Bahamas National Trust
in December) I baked every
night for a month. I have it
down to a science now where
I can bake a full batch in an
hour and a half and that’s
like 300 or more,” Mrs Hol-
combe said.

The most popular flavors
are "Nassau Nutters" and
"Chops Lickin' Chicken
Souse" and the treats come
in basic dog bone shapes.

“They are all made from
natural products- no preser-
vatives. I had another one
called “Bimini’s Barkin’
Banana Bites” made with
Banana and Oatmeal. I
refrigerate them because
they last for months if kept in
the refrigerator,” Mrs Hol-
combe said.

For those who would
rather have treats that reflect
the many seasons celebrated
in the Bahamas, Pampered
Potcakes can make just about
any shape for any festive sea-
son although the bone shapes




SNICKERS the inspiration

behind the pampered potcakes
brand.

are more popular.

“When I first started I did
the cookie cutters for Christ-
mas. I had gingerbread men,
Christmas trees, angels, and
whatever cookie cutters I
had. I do colored ribbons on
the packaging such as red
and green for Christmas,
Valentine’s Day colors and
the blue and gold as those
are Bahamian colors,” Mrs
Holcombe said.

Mrs Holcombe said she
created the product to cater
to both Bahamians and
tourists.

“My products are being
sold in the local market of
which I would like to expand
and eventually I would like
to have my products sold in
stores catering to tourists.
Why shouldn't they take
home a souvenir from the
Bahamas for their dogs?
They take everything else for
their family and friends- why

not the family dog?” Mrs
Holcombe said.

Other animal lovers may
have to wait a while longer
for their own homemade nat-
ural treats from Pampered
Potcakes.

“T want to expand the
treats to all animals. I really
would like to get into making
them for cats but cats are so
finicky. I have even thought
about doing some for horses
but I have to research some
more,” Mrs Holcombe said.

Currently, Pampered Pot-
cake dog treat products are
being sold at the Bahamas
Humane Society, Palmdale
Vet Clinic (both Palmdale
and the Caves Village loca-
tions) and Simply Gourmet
(located on Shirley Street
and Kemp Road). Pampered
Potcakes has also already giv-
en back to the animal com-
munity by donating treats to
Proud Paws events.






















——

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

(ABOVE)
SMOOCHIE enjoy-
ing a small bone
pampered potcakes
treat proving that
one is never too
young to be a pam-
pered potcake.

(LEFT) PAMPERED
POTCAKES makes
a variety of snack
sizes to suit any
dogs snack crav-
ings.

CR-V

Head-turning styling. Side curtain airbags and power moonroof available.
Talk about pure bliss. Presenting the all-new CR-V. It’s something new to crave.

Shirley Street, 328-2288 IN| MC
www.hondabahamas.com NASSAU MOTOR CO LTD,





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

eS
nl t

e
@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Mr and Mrs | | ) t k
Tribune Features Editor Allen were thrilled ] S e ar, a e an
—_ by the assistance of

WHEN Gerord Allen, a Ue ek aune eter

eae? 5 pating in an “Island
local sanitation officer on lence
Eleuthera, and his wife, “With a new roof
homemaker Vernice, needed ve" our head, we








——



The Tribune





will have a better

a new roof for their home, life,” they said.

help came from an unexpect- on suet is Ft 7 rae
Go exactly the premise | f |

ed source - a group of visi- ae eee j 4 i

tors to the island, who neys, a non- prof- i :

instead of spending their it/non-government '

: (ine lath entity which seeks
vacation lying In the sun, Roere GuniC minds

donated their time to making nities in Eleuthera
life better for complete while giving visitors

a vacation that tru-
strangers. ly refreshes the
soul.

“Our goal is to
create a more holistic approach to community develop-
ment with the primary focus on challenging volunteers
to engage in their own transformation,” Shaun Ingraham,
the head of the organisation, told Tiibune Features.

It is asimple premise, Shaun explained, groups or indi-
viduals contact the organisation outlining their skills and
talents, Island Journeys then finds a suitable project in the
community, arranges accommodations and a schedule of
work, and the island journey begins.

Volunteers pay a small daily stipend of around $75
which includes room and board at a local home, sight-
seeing and transportation.

“Tt can be as strenuous as constructing a new roof, or as
untaxing as a group of nurses who volunteered in the clin-
ic, or a Writer who documents island life, we tap into your
vocation and create an experience that will truly transform
your life,” he said.

Since its inception in 2005, Island Journeys has impact-
ed many lives and forged strong partnerships with a num-
ber of volunteers and organisations like the prestigious Nell
Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory Univer-
sity in Atlanta, Georgia; the Wesley Foundation at Clem-
son University; the Windermere Island Foundation, and
the Cotton Bay Foundation. Participants have primarily
come from oversees.

However, Shaun said that given the current state of the
US economy, Island Journeys, like countless other non-
profit organisations, has seen a dramatic drop in the num-
ber of persons who can donate their time, which means
that in addition to the projects in the community that are
impacted, a significant revenue base for the island has
also been decreased.

“We had about 125 people last year, where some years
we have had 200 to 225 people. This year we are hopeful
for at least 100 people. Island Journeys has had phenom-
enal success, people say that other people just don’t care,
but that is not true,” he said.

Through its donations and the money which volunteers
spend on room and board and personal expenses, Island
Journeys has been able to inject more than half a million
dollars into the Eleuthera’s economy.

Recently, Island Journeys merged with another non-
profit organisation — the South Eleuthera Emergency
Partners (SEEP) which has been actively developing an
emergency operation centre. The project was divided into
two phases. Phase one included raising significant funds to
restore the ambulance, purchase a fire truck and con-
struct a building to house the vehicles. This was aided by
a number of community donations.

Phase two includes the completion of the community
centre which will have an office, a training centre and
will offer an activity hub for locals.

Shaun said that this year they are trying to get as many
Bahamians as possible to participate in the process and also
hope to extend the project to other Family Islands.

They are extending an invitation to businesses for fun
days, to civic organisations and to persons who wish to cel-
ebrate reunions with family and friends.

“We really want to encourage Bahamians to come and
give back to their country and reconnect with island life.
There is a redemptive quality in this experience, that even
if you’ve lost your job, you can give back and share your
time and talents on the Family Island.

“People pack a lot of stuff into life and what we are say-
ing is ‘unpack everything you don’t need on this journey,
because in addition to the sense of accomplishment in
helping persons, you can also experience the peaceful
tranquility of Eleuthera’,” Shaun said.

Dazzling performance at the Centre for Performing Arts

TWO young



a

VOLUNTEERS work
on projects while
experiencing an
island journey. Also
pictured -the new fire
truck, which was
donated to the com-
munity and a beauti-
ful beach where vis-
tors can unwind after
a day of giving back.





m@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Writer

TWO young Dancesport per-
formers wowed the over 100
students that attended the
World Dance Council’s benefit
performance for the children of
Nassau at the National Centre
for the Performing Arts, Shirley
Street last week.

Students from schools such
as CC Sweeting, CI Gibson and
GHS, got a chance to experi-
ence other forms of dance
besides our own local and
native dances. They even took
time out to get involved and
learn a few moves from dances
such as the give and mambo.

A dance couple from Italy
demonstrated the tango and
foxtrot along with another cou-
ple who demonstrated a Latin
dance from Spain depicting the
drama of the bullfight.

John Gaylan 13, and Alexan-
dra Gotkovich, 9, both from
New York have been dancing
for the past three years sepa-
rately. Although they have been
partners for only six months,
they dance as though they have
known each other since birth.

Alexandra said she is very

proud to be able to dance at
this level at her age.

“T really enjoy being able to
dance. I want to be able to go to
school for dance and be able to
do this as a profession,”she said.

John said dancing has not
been an easy road for him.

“Tt’s really difficult because
most of the time you spend your
whole day dancing and not
hanging out with your friends.
You would end up doing your
homework at night and it starts
to catch up with you. Howev-
er, it is really fun because you
get to go everywhere and its an
opportunity not a lot of people
get,” he said.

John said this trip to the
Bahamas was his second trip
out of the United States to per-
form.

“My first trip was to Canada
but I really like being in the
Bahamas. We spent a lot of
time at the park at Atlantis on
the water slides and the beach-
I really want to come back,”
Gaylan said.

Ambassador of Dance for the
World Dance Council, Anna
Smart, said both young dancers
train between two and six hours
a day to be at the levels they
are today.

“They train like Olympic ath-
letes and I think it is pretty safe
to predict that they will be
future world champions,”she
said.

Mrs Smart said the Bahamas
was chosen to host the World
Dance Sport Championship and
Benefit Performance for many
reasons.

“For us it was two-fold. We
wanted a beautiful location so
that when they had an oppor-
tunity to leave the ballroom
they had a beautiful place to
look at. Secondly, the history
of the liturgical dances in the
islands is what draws us here
because our Latin dances all
originate from those liturgical
dances, so for us it is a bit of a
homecoming,” Mrs Smart said.

Special Project officer for the
benefit event, Anne Higgins,
said they are hoping to make
this event and expression of
dance an annual event.

“By the time the dancers
come back next year we want to
have some Bahamians compet-
ing and doing ballroom danc-
ing throughout the year. We
hope Mrs Smart can bring some
teachers to help us get started,”
Mrs Higgins said.



dancesport per-
formers wow the
audience at the
Atlantis Resort, on
February 8, 2009,
during a demon-
stration at the
2009 World Pro-
Am Champi-
onships. They will
also be a part of
the World Dance
Council's benefit
performance for
children of Nas-
sau, on Tuesday
Feb. 10 at the
National Centre for
the Performing
Arts, Shirley
Street. The tickets
for that event cost
$10 and perfor-
mances will be at
9:30 and 11:30
a.m.

Eric Rose/Photo



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 11B





At tot

excellence

With scores of
Bahamians affected by
financial and social
change, an important
element sometimes

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

AS the cycle of rough
economic times and
increased violence has
once again hit the global
scene, the importance of
using art to calm the spirit
continues to live on in
many Bahamian high
school students today.

of change on children.
However, the Min-
istry of Education’s

Art Exhibition, is help-
ing dozens of students
tell their life stories.
Showcased last week
at the Marathon Mall’s
main atrium, hundreds

stories of love, peace,
nature, and emotions.

MOE Education Officer Pamela Chandler, explained that
this year’s theme, Promoting Excellence, not only gives the
public a chance to view the art curriculum in local schools, but
also shows the students’ diversity.

“We have a number of indigenous materials where we use
what we have in our environment, where we are trying to pro-
mote the creation of souvenir craft items. We have drawings,
paintings, and if you look around you will see bits of macramé,
Junkanoo and mosaic pieces.”

Mrs Chandler explained, that all government junior and

senior schools were welcomed to participate in the event, how-

ever some out island school have not been able to take part
because of travel and accommodation issues.

overlooked is the effects

(MOE) eleventh annual

of art pieces designed by
students showcase their

emotions.

CI Gibson senior Mariel Pierre explained that with increased
incidents of violence in her school and community, using art as
an outlet to express herself has over the years developed into
second nature.

“T though that everybody needs a little more love, and the
lack of it may be the reason for a lot of violence in our schools.”

Mariel said she draws in her spare time, especially if she is
angry or experience a rough emotional hurdle.

“T finds it calming, and if more young people did it, I think
they would come off the streets and see art as a positive hob-
by. 2

CI Gibson’s Widline Guillaume, a self described abstract
visionary, has embraced nature as a common theme in many of
her pieces.

A participant in last years Central Bank Art Exhibit and com-
petition, this youngster has over the last three years worked on
refining her talent while telling nature’s story.

Describing a piece she calls Nature, Wildine explained: “I
stick to pastel colours, this piece has different creatures found
in the Bahamas. There’s the Sand-dollar, a shell, the Yellow
Elder, lizards, and the Paradise bird.

“There is also a face that is revealed to anyone who pays
attention and it gives admiration to nature itself.

“T like to be free, but also spend alot of time detailing my
work. I’d say this is one of my favorites.”

Art enthusiast Tanya Bowe, said that over the past ten years
she has been collecting small yet unique exclusively Bahamian
art pieces.

At the exhibition, she was particularly draw to a figurative
piece designed by CI Gibson Deputy Head-Boy Lukson Tous-
saint.

The drawing which depicts an eagle, is described as a symbol



Overall, she feels that those students who have embraced the
subject, are discovering a tool which from the beginning of time
has helped in telling stories, and one used to visually describe

of hope through the power of God.
Mrs Bowe said: “I just like to see young people doing positive
things, and if my decision of purchasing one of the pieces could



Tina sana waves

B By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

EMERGING artist Philip Michael
Thomas, is making waves in the music indus-
try as one of the newest artists to visit the

Bahamian scene.

Hitting the stage last week where he was
the opening act for performers Ginuwine
and Morgan Heritage, this budding star is
setting his goals high to become one of the
best in the industry.

The 22-year-old Miami native, describes
his sound as a cool and easy flow, which
some may think of as Rhythm and Blues,
but what he explained as a new form of
modern RnB.

He says his love for music has been fos-
tered over many years of listening to and
watching the likes of Michael Jackson, Bob
Marley, Marvin Gaye, and Elvis Presley.

“T remember watching Michael Jackson’s
moonwalker at my crib, while my mom was
around the house doing her errands and
cleaning, I was sitting at the TV watching
Michael Jackson.”

Philip says he has also been compared to
the likes of John Legend, and Anthony
Hamilton, but wants to be known for his
own style.

One of his first songs, entitled Jane, is
about an old friend who provided him with
something far more intense than just visu-
al beauty. He explained his connection
with Jane as an experience that “was a
meeting of the minds, that took me to a
higher level.

“Overall, my music is inspired by life,
family and friends, experiences, TV, and it is
also about positive subjects on love and how
people deal with each other in relationships.

“Love is God, God is love, and God is
good, and its good that I can speak that

through my music.’

Not a stranger to
the Bahamas, Philip
said he has always
been a fan of the local
cuisine. One of his
favourite island food
is conch salad, which
he insists is far better
than the salad he’s
tried in Coconut
Grove, Miami.

During his inter-
view with the Tribune
while a guest at the
Marley Resort, Philip
said his family has
been close friends with
the Marleys and oth-
er big names in enter-
tainment, but was a bit
shy in talking about
his own famous back-
ground - his father
whom he is named
after starred in the hit
1980’s TV series Mia-
mi Vice.

Although he
acknowledged the mega success achieved by
his father during his time, Philip aims to
become successful in his own merit.

“My dad is an awesome singer also, but
alot of people don’t know that. I believe
stardom is in my genes, and I guess I’m
next in continuing with Michael Thomas
brand.”

The young artist said he could not talk
about inspiration as an artist without men-
tioning the achievements of Barrack Oba-
ma.

“T think its impacted the world in what
America has done in putting finally a man
of another race besides white, in the White



House. That inspires me to then go ahead
and believe in myself in the dream that I
have.”

Philip said through his music he has had
a chance to talk about the social issues that
are going on, and feels he is able to create a
higher conscience for people to meditate
on.

Returning to Nassau next month where
he will open for Tanya Stephens and Tada,
Philip said he is excited to jump start his
career in the Bahamas and looks forward to
bringing real music to the music scene.

For more on this artist visit www. philip-
michael2.com





ty
encourage someone to continue with their passion, then I would
have done my job.”

Apart from the actual exhibit, an important element to the cre-
ation of the pieces is in the support factor that many students seek
from their instructors.

CC Sweeting senior Laquan Rolle, names his art instructor
Jackie Sainville as his mentor. He says where some teachers are
non-approachable and unwilling to be a friend to students, Mrs
Sainville’s kind yet assertive nature has shown him that there is
beauty in everyone, and a story to be told in every creation.

Laquan who designed a miniature African Elephant, said he
used paint, glue, cardboard, and newspapers- but “not from The
Tribune,” - he stressed to create the structure.

Mrs Sainville who has been there with Laquan and others
from the start, said she has witnessed time and time again, a
complete transformation in many of her students who embrace art
as an extension and expression of themselves.

“The kids who occupy their time in the art room, don’t have
time to be getting involved in negative things, it’s unfortunate that
we have two small art rooms, but even so both rooms are always
occupied.”

Climaxing with an awards ceremony last Thursday, Government
High School walked away victorious as the overall winners in the
senior school division.

CC Sweeting took second place, and CV Bethel were awarded
third place.

In the Junior division, TA Thompson -Formally CC Sweeting
Junior- took first place, with SC McPherson in at second, and LW
Young in third.

In the out-island category, Exuma’s LN Coakley won first
prize, with Grand Bahama’s St George’s Secondary in second
place, followed by Eleuthera’s Preston Albury winning third
place.

With this exposition acting as a training ground for the up-and-
coming artist, MOE said they are just excited to be a part of the
training process for the students.

THOMAS
describes his
sound as a cool
and easy flow,
which some may
think of as
Rhythm and
Blues, but what
he explained as a
new form of
modern RnB.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

The Lyford Cay Foundations

SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE ARTS
Application Is Open

The Lyford Cay Foundations are pleased to announce that applications
are now being accepted for the following academic scholarships for
study in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and the Caribbean.

HARRY MOORE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN THE ARTS
One scholarship worth up to US$10,000 per annum.

For study at the undergraduate and graduate levels with preference
given to the latter. Approved fields of study are the fine, visual and
performing arts, as well as arts education.

NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP

One scholarship worth up to US$7,500 per annum.

For study at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Approved fields
of study are classical instrument, voice and musical composition.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens and pledge to return to The
Bahamas upon graduation. Work samples and auditions will be required.

Please visit our website at www.lyfordcayfoundation.org for
additional information and application forms.

Forms may also be obtained from high school guidance counselors,
The College of The Bahamas Financial Aid Office, and the Lyford Cay
Foundation office, Please address your application to: The Chairman,
Screening Committee.

DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS IS MARCH 31, 2009.



Your Dreams. Our Mission.
Inspired Philanthropy for a Better Bahamas



P. O. Box N 7776, Nassau, Bahamas

T 242.362.4910 / F 242.362.5449
E info@lyfordcayfoundation.org

W www.lyfordcayfoundation.org

rs
VAdiaN ieo*







This year Bahamian






take an homemaie “|
island gourmet
journey (log treats —
see page 10 see page nine |
rr wall

They

WLS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009



LAND SCAPE 4





Full Text


The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

{\

im lovin’ it

HIGH 79F
LOW 67F

BREEZY WITH
SUNSHINE

Volume: 105 No.72



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 PRICE — 75¢

CARS FOR SALE,

UTC tein

aU

a2D

; tae |

AND REAL a
BAHAMAS BIGGEST



Tensions sae te
police wks sHid

Residents concerned

about possible stand-off

in Nassau Village

RESIDENTS of Nassau Vil-
lage were concerned last night
about a possible stand-off
between civilians and police
after an officer was shot and
injured in the area earlier yes-
terday.

Police yesterday surrounded
a large area of the island,
stretching from Nassau Village
to Seabreeze Estates, and
launched a manhunt for per-
sons believed to be responsible
for the shooting of Corporal 518
Johnson of the Southeastern
Division.

tigation into the matter. They
were still looking for other sus-
pects believed to be connected
to the incident.

Asst Commissioner of Police
Hulan Hanna told The Tribune
that the man who is believed to
have shot the officer is a “per-
son of interest” to police.

Officer Johnson was taken to
Doctors Hospital and treated
for his injuries.

Tensions in Nassau Village
rose after the police officer was
shot in the thigh shortly after
4pm while he was reportedly



At press time last night, attempting to arrest a man in
police had a Nassau Village connection with a shooting that

man in custody. He is now 3
assisting them with their inves- SEE page six

Former MP ‘not being held in Cuba’

The Tribune was reliably informed yesterday by high level
sources within government that a former parliamentarian, rumoured
to be jailed in Cuba was in fact not being held in the communist
country.

While no new information was released regarding the status of
the politician, the government source said that he had spoken with
the former MP “yesterday”, adding only that the rumours regard-
ing the individual were totally “untrue.”

Recently, the former Director of Immigration, and now Ambas-
sador to Cuba Vernon Burrows, said that he was instructed by
government to take another look into the matter as the allegations
surrounding the former MP continued to persist.



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham shares a laugh with His Excellency
Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Repub-
lic of China, as he introduces him to members of his Cabinet at the
Churchill Building yesterday.

Man, 32, charged with

Valentine’s Day murder

= By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A 32-YEAR-OLD electrician was
arraigned in magistrate’s court yesterday
charged with the murder of Philip Mar-
cellus who was stabbed to death on Valen-
tine’s Day.

Kendrick Dames, of Palm Breeze
, Avenue, off Carmichael Road, New Prov-

SEE page six

BEC is criticised by
environmental activist

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

SEE page six
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announced that it signed a letter
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pursue renewable energy projects
in the Bahamas through the

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Bahamas, a local environmental __ the letter of intent outlines a part-
activist is criticising BEC for the nership between Emera and
less than transparent way the Schneider Power that will allow
“greening” of the Bahamas is
being conducted.

Yesterday, Schneider Power

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Government

to borrow
$160 million

from





Felipé Major/Tribune staff






Alpha Early Learning Centre was
one of the schools robbed.

“DE OTT:
TT
private schools

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net





SCHOOLS are being
warned to be on high alert
after a single masked gun-
man is believed to have
robbed three private
schools in broad daylight.
Cash, jewellery and other
personal items were stolen
from the Southwest Christ-
ian Academy, Bayview
Academy and the Alpha
Early Learning Centre

SEE page six

Located on Ernest & Mackey Streets @ Mon-Fri l0am-ipm. Sal ltam-zpm *



NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

Loan to go on roadworks
and other projects

China



m@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net









DESPITE the downturn in
the global economy, the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China has
agreed to loan the government
of the Bahamas over $160 mil-
lion for roadworks and other
projects. The agreement was
announced yesterday during the
official visit of China’s Vice Pre-
mier of State Council.

Being ushered from the Lyn-
den Pindling International Air-
port in a convoy of armed
guards and dignitaries, His
Excellency Hui Liangyu paid a
courtesy call on the Governor
General before visiting with
Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham and his entire Cabinet at
the Churchill Building.



















Expressing his gratitude for

SEE page two


















Unconfirmed
reports of woman
drowning in
St Andrew’s pool

AN UNIDENTIFIED
woman reportedly drowned
in St Andrew’s swimming
pool yesterday afternoon.

Unconfirmed reports reach-
ing The Tribune last night
were sketchy, however, it is
known that Swift Swim Club
meets at the school’s pool in
the afternoons.

Swim coaches Andy and
Nancy Knowles could not be
reached for comment.


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Message from the
Chinese Ambassador

@ Message from
H E Mr HU Dingxian,
Ambassador
Extraordinary and
Plenipotentiary of the
People's Republic
of China in the
Commonwealth of
the Bahamas

AT THE invitation of the
government of the Common-
wealth of the Bahamas, H E
Mr HUI Liangyu, Vice Pre-
mier of the State Council of
the People's Republic of Chi-
na, will pay an official visit to
the Bahamas from February
17 to 19, 2009. This is an event
of great significance in China-
Bahamas relations. Vice Pre-
mier HUI will bring with him
the friendship and goodwill of
the Chinese people to the
Bahamian people. Let's give
him a warm welcome here.

During his visit, Vice Pre-
mier HUI will meet with the
top leaders of the Bahamas,
and they will sign a series of
bilateral agreements of co-
operation. I firmly believe that
the visit will yield fruitful
results, further strengthen dia-
logue and exchanges between
China and the Bahamas fea-
turing mutual respect, equali-
ty, mutual benefit and win-win
co-operation, and contribute
greatly to the promotion of
sound, stable and in-depth
growth of our constructive and
co-operative relationship.

In 1997, diplomatic relations
were established between Chi-

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na and the Bahamas, which
marked a new chapter in the
history of our bilateral rela-
tions.

For the past 12 years, China
and the Bahamas have
respected each other, treated
each other on an equal footing
and had sincere co-operation.
Our all-round friendly rela-
tions have been continuously
deepened and broadened, and
maintained a healthy and
robust momentum, thanks to
the concerted efforts to the
two governments and peoples.
The Chinese government
highly appreciates the
Bahamian government's
unremitting commitments by
adhering to the one China pol-
icy.

Recent years have wit-
nessed fruitful exchanges and
co-operation in a wide range
of areas between the two
countries, including politics,
economics, culture, education
and tourism. These facts have
proven that the establishment
and development of relations
between China and the
Bahamas serve the funda-
mental interests of our two
peoples and go along with the
trend of the times. Bilateral
trade increased by 9.8 per cent
to $181 million in 2007 and by
74.9 per cent to $244 million
for the first 10 months in 2008.
Thanks to the joint efforts of
both sides, the China-
Bahamas friendly co-opera-
tion has reached a new level.

The world is now undergo-

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ing complex and profound
changes. Under the new cir-
cumstances and in the face of
new opportunities and chal-
lenges, China stands ready to
work with the Bahamas to
build on past achievements,
sum up and draw on experi-
ence in the development of
our bilateral relations, and
remains committed to the
development of a constructive
and co-operative relationship.

PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham talks with His
Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice
Premier of the State Council of
The People’s Republic of China
yesterday at the Cabinet Office
on Bay Street.





rey TU eMC SAMA OU AMSTEL

MINISTER OF STATE for Lands and Local Government Byran Woodside shakes the hand of His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State
Council of The People’s Republic of China yesterday at the Cabinet Office yesterday.

Government to borrow
$160 million from China

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FROM page one

meeting with the Prime Minis-
ter, Mr Liangyu wished both Mr
Ingraham and his colleagues
good health before the two coun-
tries signed four memorandums
of understanding.

The most financially promi-
nent of these agreements was
signed by the Minister of State
for Finance, Zhivargo Laing and
the Honourable Li Jun, Vice
President of the China Export-
Import Bank (Eximbank).

Under this agreement, China’s
Eximbank has agreed to loan the
Bahamas $150 million, of which
the “airport highway project is
of high priority.”

According to the document
signed yesterday, the estimated
cost of the project is currently
being prepared by the Bahamas
government, and will be con-
veyed to the China Eximbank
shortly after it is finalized.

“China Eximbank, as the sole
arm of the government of the
People’s Republic of China for

the operation of the concession-
ary lending, attaches great impor-
tance to such a request from the
government of the Bahamas,”
the document read. “China
Eximbank and the Ministry of
Finance of the Bahamas will dis-
cuss and agree on the terms and
conditions of the loan and sign
the loan agreement under the
umbrella of the Framework
Agreement.”

The second agreement, of Eco-
nomic and Technical Coopera-
tion between the Bahamas and
the People’s Republic of China
was again signed by Mr Symon-
ette for the Bahamas, and Mr
Wang Chao, the assistant Minis-
ter of Commerce for China.

Under this agreement, the gov-
ernment of China will provide a
grant to the Bahamas in the
amount of 70 million yuan, or
over $10 million, to be used for
the implementation of projects
“to be decided through consul-
tations between the two govern-
ments.”

The specific matters in this
regard, the document read, will

be stipulated in the agreements
that will be subsequently signed
between the two countries.

The third agreement — a waiv-
er of visa requirements for hold-
ers of diplomatic passports was
signed by the deputy Prime Min-
ister Brent Symonette and the
Honourable Song Tao, deputy
minister of Foreign Affairs of the
People’s Republic of China.

Under this agreement citizens
of either country, who are holders
of valid diplomatic passports, may
enter, exit, transit, and stay in the
country of the other party for a
period not exceeding 30 days
without having to obtain a visa. If
citizens of either country —
excluding diplomatic and con-
sular staff — will have to apply
for visas if they intend to stay
longer than 30 days.

Additionally, either county
reserves the right to refuse entry
of any person who is deemed to
be an “undesirable” without hav-
ing to cite any grounds for the
refusal.

And finally, a memorandum
of understanding was signed on
Agricultural Cooperation
between the Ministry of Agricul-
ture and Marine Resources of
the Bahamas and the People’s
Republic of China.

Under this agreement, both
parties shall be committed to the
development of cooperation in
the fields of crop farming, ani-
mal husbandry and fish farming.
Additionally, the agreement pro-
vides for cooperation in farming
of tropical fruits and vegetables,
grain crop production — such as
peas, beans, and corn — flower
production, small ruminant pro-
duction systems, poultry farming,
and fish farming, inclusive of crab
culture and processing.

Today Mr Liangyu will take a
brief tour of Atlantis before vis-
iting the Clifton Heritage site at
Clifton Pier. Following this stop,
he will take a brief tour of the
Lucayan Tropical farm at the
Airport Industrial Park before
leaving the Lynden Pindling
International Airport for Grand
Bahama.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



._- | PRINCESS MARGARET HOSPITAL
0 In brief

Anger over PMH
pharmacy waiting

Guatemala

apologises
to Cuba for
Bay of Pigs

HAVANA

Guatemalan President Alvaro
Colom apologized to Cuba on
Tuesday for his country's having
allowed the CIA to train exiles
in the Central American coun-
try for the 1961 Bay of Pigs
invasion, according to the Asso-
ciated Press.

"Today I want to ask Cuba's
forgiveness for having offered
our country, our territory, to
prepare an invasion of Cuba. It
wasn't us, but it was our territo-
ry," Colom said during a speech
at the University of Havana.

He added that he wished to
apologize "as president and
head of state, and as comman-
der in chief of the Guatemalan
army."

About 1,500 Cuban exiles
trained under CIA guidance in
Guatemala before invading the
island in April 1961 in an unsuc-
cessful bid to overthrow Fidel
Castro's communist govern-
ment. The Bay of Pigs invasion
ended after three days with
about 100 invaders killed and
another 1,000 captured by
Cuban forces.

During his official visit to
Cuba, Colom was awarding
Guatemala's highest honor to
Castro. It was unclear if the ail-
ing 82-year-old former president
would receive the medal in per-
son or if it would be delivered to
him later. Castro met in recent
days with two other visiting
Latin American presidents,
Cristina Fernandez of Argenti-
na and Chile's Michelle
Bachelet. Photographs of him
with each of the presidents were
later released by their respec-
tive governments.

Guadeloupe
strikers block
roads and
close airport

@ BASSE-TERRE,
Guadeloupe

The French Caribbean island
of Guadeloupe was on the verge
of rebellion, a political leader
said Tuesday after stone-throw-
ing protesters set cars and build-
ings ablaze, forced the interna-
tional airport to close and
clashed with police, according to
the Associated Press.

Nearly four weeks of work
stoppages and demonstrations
for lower prices and higher pay
have caused thousands of
tourists to flee or cancel holi-
days on the normally tranquil
island, prompting many hotels
to close and cruise ships to head
elsewhere. “It is a political cri-
sis, an institutional crisis and we
are on the brink of sedition,”
Guadeloupe’s Regional Council
President Victorin Lurel told
France-Info radio.

From Paris, France’s Interior
Minister Michele Alliot-Marie
said the protests had caused
“degradation, devastation and
confrontations” on Guadeloupe
and its sister island, Martinique,
where most shops and offices
have been closed by the
protests. She urged “calm,
responsibility and restraint” and
said she hoped for a resumption
of talks with protesters that
broke down last week.

Police said they arrested 18
people overnight as protesters
burned cars, a library and a
boat-rental store in Sainte-Anne
and Point-a-Pitre. An official,
speaking on the standard condi-
tion of anonymity, said at least
three officers suffered minor
wounds due to gunshots fired by
looters taking advantage of the
chaos. Guadeloupe’s main air-
port was closed Tuesday
because workers could not pass
through barricaded and debris-
clogged roads, said Guade-
loupe’s top appointed official,
Nicolas Desforges, and several
flights were canceled.

Paris has refused to budge on
strikers’ demands for a 200 euro
($250) monthly raise for low-
paid workers who now make
roughly 900 euros ($1,130) a
month. But business leaders in
Martinique have agreed to low-
er prices by 20 percent on 100
products, including food items.

Strikers want prices cut on
nearly all supermarket products
—a step that Stephane Hayot, a
spokesman for the National
Union of Wholesale Distribu-
tors, said “would represent our
death sentence” by forcing them
to sell at prices that don’t cover
their costs. Police detained 50
demonstrators on Monday after
they were pelted by stones as
they tried to take down barri-
cades. Roadblocks were being
gradually lifted Tuesday morn-
ing and a trickle of vehicle traf-
fic was resuming, the police offi-
cial said.

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ANGRY customers expressed
their outrage yesterday after some
had to wait as long as six hours
for service at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital pharmacy.

But a hospital official explained
that the delays were caused by
the process of recording patient
data in a newly implemented soft-
ware system — which ironically,
was designed to create more effi-
ciency at the pharmacy.

The system is supposed to allow
patient information to be quickly
accessed, and simplify the process
of prescription filling.

The Tribune received a call
from one frustrated patient yes-
terday morning, who was so
angered over the lengthy wait that
he left the hospital to get his med-
ication elsewhere.

When The Tribune visited the
hospital a short time later, around
10.30am, dozens of patients
crowded the pharmacy's waiting
room. A few elderly patients —
who said they often have to set
aside a whole morning, and some-
times the afternoon as well to fill
prescriptions at PMH - were
upset about the lack of a senior
citizens’ window at the pharmacy.

A number of patients claimed
that sometimes nerves become so
frayed in the waiting room, that
rows and shoving matches erupt.

A few others noted that many
people had become so fed up with
waiting that they left the pharma-
cy in a huff before being served.

"T like how they have the num-
ber system set up because you can

Some customers forced to
wait six hours for service



“A lot of
people left
because they
were taking too
long to call
their number.”



T Storr

just pick a number and sit down.

“But it seems like when they
get your file they just completely
shut down.

Line-jumping

“A lot of people left because
they was taking too long to call
their number," said T Storr, a
patient who had been waiting at
the pharmacy since 7am. "Some-
times we lucky but I don't know
what’s happening today. When I
don't have nothing to do I come
to this pharmacy so I can stay here
until 2, 3 o’clock but not when I
have things to do”.

Retired civil servant Coralee
Curtis, 66, thinks the hospital

needs to serve patients on a "first
come, first serve" basis to elimi-
nate line-jumping.

"This number system ain’ work-
ing because people meet you here
since 6 in the morning, they meet
you sitting waiting for the ticket
window to open, and jump in
front of you. Minister (of Health
Hubert) Minnis needs to be here
to see how people carry on
around here.”

Usually, when a patient’s num-
ber is called, they can approach
the window and hand their pre-
scription to hospital staff.

However, if that patient has yet
to visit the hospital since the new
Centricity Software programme
was launched last month, they
must answer a few personal ques-
tions to update their records,
PMH public relations officer Thel-
ma Rolle said yesterday.

"We warned the public to
expect some delays in registering
patients in the new system. This is
going to be a new step necessary
to get patients in the system and
so we had asked them to be
patient with us during the transi-
tion process,” Mrs Rolle said.

She said she was not aware of
rows erupting over line-jumping,
but would raise the issue, along
with the idea of a window for
senior citizens, during the next
management meeting.

Mother seeks answers

into son’s shooting death

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE mother of a 22-year-old man allegedly shot
dead by police in a Garden Hills sub-division was
seeking answers at the start of an inquest into his
2004 shooting yesterday.

The first day of testimony about the death of Lin-
coln Forbes got underway in the Coroner’s Court
with five witnesses appearing, including Mr Forbes’
mother Ruth Julian.

Jurors and Ms Julian were shown photographs
taken by Central Detective Unit (CDU) crime scene
investigator and witness, Det Sgt James Colebrooke.

In the photos, they saw the victim’s body — found
at the edge of residential property next to a “large
quantity of cash” — as well as two vehicles, two guns
and views of the street where the incident took
place. Civilian witness Gavin Ellis said he saw Mr
Forbes lying on his stomach holding a gun in his
hand. However, in the photographs taken around 40
minutes later by Det Sgt Colebrooke, the victim
was on his back and neither of the two guns record-
ed in evidence appeared to be in his hand.

Mr Ellis, of Garden Hills, told the court that he
and his wife were in bed at around 11pm when they
heard what he recognised as gunshots being fired
nearby outside.

Hearing people “rambling around” in the yard
afterward, he looked out the window to see two
men he identified as police officers walking casual-
ly across his property, from back to front.

When they reached the front of the house he
opened the front door, and was approached by one
of the two men, who he said was carrying an “Uzi”-
type weapon. The man identified himself as a police
officer and told him to stay inside. It was while
standing on his porch that Mr Ellis said he saw a
body, apparently lifeless, lying face down on the
south western side of his property.

Later, he said the officer came back and ques-
tioned him about what he’d heard.

During the questioning of Mr Ellis in court, Mr
Forbes’ mother inquired why, if Mr Ellis had seen a
gun in the hand of her son as he lay dead, there

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INQUEST

were only two guns photographed in the police’s
crime scene evidence album — neither in the vic-
tim’s hand. Mr Ellis said he did not know, but was
“sure” there was a gun in Mr Forbes’ hand when he
saw him that night.

Asked by Mrs Julian if the two officers he saw
walking around the house were the only two officers
on the scene, Mr Ellis said he was not sure. He said
when one returned to interview him, officers were
“all around.”

Mrs Julian, a teacher and Ministry of Education
employee, testified that her son had lived with her
“all of his life” up until shortly before he was killed.

Although he was shot on Thursday, June 3, 2004,
she did not learn of his death until the following
Sunday when she was urged to make inquiries by a
young man who lived in her neighbourhood who
said he had “heard something happened” to her
son. After her own testimony, Mr Forbes’ mother
stood on numerous occasions, when permitted by
Coroner William Campbell, to press other witness-
es on certain points, apparently keen to clarify in her
own mind what had happened to her son on the
night of his death.

Road Traffic Department supervisor Dwayne
Pratt told the court he had lent his black Toyota
Corolla to his cousin, Trevon Thompson (also
known as Trevon Stewart) on June 3, after Thomp-
son told him he needed to go and get some cash
from an ATM.

Despite telling him to “come right back”, the
Golden Gates sub-division number two resident
said he did not see his cousin again that night.

The vehicle was later found at the scene of the
killing of Lincoln Forbes, along with a blue Ford
Taurus. When he retrieved it from the CDU com-
pound, the car had a bullet hole in the windshield,
Mr Pratt said.

Dr Nicole Adderley, a doctor at Princess Margaret
Hospital, testified that she pronounced Mr Forbes
dead on June 4. She said he had been “brought in
dead” by police, who did not identify him.

The inquest resumes on Thursday.

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VINCENT Vanderpool-Wallace

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

PRELIMINARY data from an independent audit of the
Department of Civil Aviation reveals that in many areas the
agency exceeds international safety regulations.

This was disclosed by Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vin-
cent Vanderpool-Wallace during an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday.

"It (the audit) was quite comprehensive and the one com-
ment that sticks out in my head, in a number of cases our pro-
cedures that are now in place and operating are ahead of the
regulations. So this is a case where the people are operating in
a much more sophisticated fashion than the regulations
require, which as far as I'm concerned is the best indication of
staff intent," he said.

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) —a
United Nations Specialised Agency — spent one week auditing
the department's safety guidelines and presented its prelimi-
nary findings to the minister and aviation officials on Monday.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said he would not divulge the
specifics of the report until he has a chance to give it a thor-
ough appraisal and discuss the findings with aviation person-
nel.

"There were specific recommendations, except as you would
understand, I would like to have a chance to sit and talk to the
staff first so I'm very clear on what some of the priorities are
before I start talking about them publicly,” he said.

Rating

However he did say that preliminary information does not
suggest that Civil Aviation’s rating will be downgraded, as it
was nine years ago.

In 2000 the Bahamas Civil Aviation Authority was down-
graded to a Category 2 agency by the Federal Aviation Admin-
istration (FAA) after an assessment team found that industry
safety oversight was not up to international standards.

In November 2001 the authority was restored to Category
1 status. To restore the Authority to Category 1, the govern-
ment made several policy changes, including an amendment to
the Civil Aviation Act, 1976; repealed the colonial Air Navi-
gation Order, 1961; and implemented the Bahamas Air Nav-
igation Regulations, 2001 and the Bahamas Air Safety Regu-
lations, 2001. That year government also implemented a cer-
tification and surveillance system that mirrored that of the
FAA and the ICAO and established a safety issue resolu-
tion process that meets all ICAO standards and practices.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said government will be engag-
ing in conversations with the ICAO before deciding what, if
any, recommendations will be adopted.

"There is a 90-day process, first for us to be able to get
back to them regarding some of the specifics in it. So I would
suspect it's probably going to take that long before we go
public with it so that people are very clear on those issues we
have identified and will work on together.

"There are certain regulations that are a part of ICAO that
don't necessarily apply to the Bahamas and we have to decide
whether we want them to apply to the Bahamas, depending on
what kind of initiatives we want to pursue. The completed
report will be posted on ICAO's website later this year for
public viewing.

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e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Not the right incentive for police

A LETTER published on this page today
outlines what the writer believes should be the
standard required before a police officer can
receive either an increase in salary or a pro-
motion.

If implemented it could take us back to the
head-hunting days of the Red Indians in early
American history when the number of scalped
heads strapped to a brave warrior’s waist band
decided his standing among the tribe’s head
honchos and proved his valour in battle.

Our letter writer is now suggesting that our
police officers bring home their human trophies
if they want to succeed in the Force.

He suggests that each commanding officer in
each police station must understand that unless
80 per cent of the crimes committed in his divi-
sion are solved he has no chance of promotion
or a pay increase.

What an incentive to plant evidence to bring
home the bacon, and get the payoff.

The writer further suggests that each homi-
cide must be assigned to a specific officer “with
the clear understanding that its resolution is
his responsibility within a specific time frame.”

No reputable police force would put such
pressure on any member of its department. If
anyone watches any of America’s crime files
on television, they will know that many crimes
are not easy of solution, no matter how clever
the police officer. Many take years to solve,
most only by the dogged determination of an
officer resolved not to let a criminal get away
with what he might think is “the perfect crime.”
Over the years while working on other cases, an
officer will keep returning to the old case, always
looking for new clues. Very often, with modern
investigative techniques, he tracks down his
prey.

Because our police officers don’t always suc-
ceed does not necessarily point to a lack of abil-
ity.

Of course, there are cases of careless officers;
officers who either through ignorance or pre-
conceived notions look at evidence, but don’t
see it. We shall never forget not too long ago
one of our reporters was with two police officers
looking at a murder scene — a scene where it
was suspected that someone had tried to scrub
away blood and with it all evidence. The police
had searched the room, but could find nothing
suspicious. However, our reporter with a mem-
ber of the murdered man’s family, did a thor-
ough search in the presence of the officers. On
the inside edge of a cabinet they found what
looked like a blood stain. They found other
small brownish coloured smudges, and then a
faded smudge about a foot square on the porous
tile. The reporter turned to the policeman: “This
looks like blood to me.” “No,” replied the
policeman, “that’s only rust.” The second police-
man, seeing the concern of the two young men,

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suggested that a scrapping be made. We do not
know the outcome of that scraping — we
believe the family was told that it was negative
for blood — but we do know that the investi-
gation was being done by two overworked
policemen. One of them complained that he
had so many cases to investigate and solve, that
he had to work long hours, that he hadn’t seen
his family in days and here it was Christmas
and another crime was added to his file. This
man could not have taken any more pressure
even if it meant losing a promotion and an
increase in pay.

It reminds us of the fabricated evidence in the
murder of Sir Harry Oakes on July 8, 1943 that
almost put the hangman’s noose around the
neck of his son-in-law, Count Alfred (‘“Fred-
die”) de Marigny. Instead of calling in Scot-
land Yard or the FBI, the Duke of Windsor,
governor at the time, brought in two hick Mia-
mi police officers, who were introduced as a
homicide investigator and an identification
expert with the Miami police department. The
Duke knew Capt E W Melchen, who had been
assigned to meet him and his wife on their vis-
its to Miami. Obviously, here was an opportu-
nity to give his friend a chance to make his
name and solve what turned out to be one of the
best-known unsolved murder cases of the cen-
tury.

So anxious were they to make headlines that
shortly after their arrival de Marigny, who
because of his animosity towards Sir Harry
became a subject of interest, was arrested.

The case collapsed, however, when the late
Godfrey Higgs, de Marigny’s counsel, proved
that de Marigny’s fingerprint upon which the
whole case turned, had not been taken from
the chinese patterned screen in Sir Harry’s
burned bedroom as “identification expert”
James Barker had claimed. It was believed to
have come from the smooth surface of a glass
from which de Marigny drank some water while
he awaited his interrogators in an adjourning
room.

Planted, mistake made, deliberate fraud, call
the fingerprint what you will, but this is what
happens when a carrot is dangled before inves-
tigators as a reward for swift solutions. In this
case the two investigators had hoped to reap
fame from newspaper headlines that were to
announce a sensational fingerprint conviction
by two American investigators in a gruesome
murder of a lord by his French son-in-law.
Instead they were laughed out of court and
returned home in disgrace.

We agree that our police should get the best
training possible, have only the number of cas-
es that they can handle, and, with the help of the
public, honestly solve as many cases as they
can. But no bribes — be they pay or promotions
— should be dangled before them.



Police Force
leadership
needs to be

creative

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Our Police Force has taken a
big hit recently. At least one local
newspaper, has reported that one
of its sources informed them that
some officers are selling cocaine
confiscated from alleged drug
dealers. This brought immediate
responses not only from the Min-
ister with responsibility for the
force but also the Prime Minis-
ter himself. Both expressed their
disappointment with the report.

One cannot be faulted to think
that one of the more crippling
aspects of criminal behaviour on
the Bahamian psyche is not just
the alarming crime rate, but noth-
ing workable and sustainable ever
seems to be on the horizon.

It is more than amazing that
serious crimes have been a thorn
in our country’s side for many
years, yet to date the country has
not witnessed any creative
approach or initiative emanating
from the security forces.

All that is coming out of the
police is that recycled excuse that

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



more citizen cooperation is need-
ed to solve crime. While the help
of citizens is needed to solve
crime, it must be remembered
that the existence of difficulty in
the execution of one's task is no
reason not to get the job done. If
the police officers are convinced
that the cooperation of citizens
is so crucial to the fight against
crime but is not forthcoming,
maybe they should consider
resigning en bloc.

Our failure over the years to
speak frankly about the terrible
inefficiencies and lack of creative
thinking associated with the
Police Force is a direct contribu-
tor to its near irrelevance. In light
of this, the following recommen-
dations should be given due con-
sideration:

1) Each new police officer must
have a minimum of a first degree,

with the ability to think creative-
ly and strategically, and whose
specialised area of training will
be in cutting-edge investigating
techniques.

2) Each commanding officer of
the CID in each Police Station
and CDU must be given a man-
date that unless 80 per cent of
crimes committed in his division is
cleared up there is no chance of
promotion or pay increase.

3) Each homicide must be
assigned to a specific officer, with
the clear understanding that its
resolution is his responsibility,
within a specific time frame.

4) Every officer from the rank
of Inspector up who does not pos-
sess the requisite skills and com-
petence to function within a
result-oriented organisation
should be redeployed.

The leadership of the Police
Force needs to be creative and
decisive.

JERRY ROKER
Nassau,
February, 2009.

Three questions for our MPs

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This week was not a good one for the People -
worldwide and particularly in the Bahamas.

Firstly I find it very scary that the US recently vot-
ed in a new President, Barrack Obama, who has a lot
of political capital behind him but what happens
when Congress votes on the Bail Out Bill he pre-
sented to them this week. Not one Republican found
enough good in it to vote for it and not one Demo-
crat found enough faults in it to vote against it. How
is that for bi-partisanship. I just think the politi-
cians do not get it. We are in trouble — they may not
be but we are.

Secondly, The World Economic Forum in Davos,
Switzerland is meeting this week and giving us a
message of doom and gloom. A number of the peo-
ple attending the Forum are those same people that
got us into this economic mess in the first place.
Many of these same people are in Davos telling us
how bad it is and with no ideas how to solve the
problems they created. And if they are not bankers,
then they are wacky economists who are not the
doers in this world, and therefore unlikely to solve
anything.

Thirdly, we have one of the largest political parties
in the Bahamas, telling us just how dreadful and

cynical their party culture is. What appears to be
most important to them is that one of their members
should not give evidence against another member or
she is threatened with being expelled from the par-
ty. Regardless of the fact that whoever that person
is everyone is obliged to tell the truth in any court.
When are they going to learn that the country comes
first and their petty party second?

However, fourthly on the positive side the present
government is prepared to stand up to the pervasive
culture of corruption in this country and retire “pub-
lic” servants who are not up to the mark. I am sure
not all of them are corrupt but who knows — one
bad egg spawns another.

I suggest that all voters in this country ask their
MP three questions:

1) What are you doing for your Constituency?

2) What are you doing for the Country?

3) What are you doing for Yourself?

If you do not get hard facts — look for a replace-
ment that can give you good answers next time you
have to vote and maybe we will make this country a
wonderful place again.

PATRICK H THOMSON
Nassau,
January 31, 2009.

Letter was vile and hateful

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Your letter, Ms Russell, about
“opposing homosexual rights” is
vile and hateful. Your ignorance
is boundless and your accusations
are groundless. To me they recall
the witch hunts of the past when

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untold thousands of innocent
women were drowned or burned
at the stake.

Homosexuals are born as they
are.

They cannot change, like you
cannot change the colour of your
skin (I know, Michael Jackson
did).

Just like heterosexuals, many
homosexuals are creative and
artistic.

The list of names of famous
artists, actors, TV personalities,
and athletes are impressive.

These lovely islands, home to
about 600 churches or more are in
danger of becoming hate filled,
divided and violent if we allow
this anger and prejudice to per-
petuate itself.

Instead of hateful letters like
yours, messages of acceptance,
tolerance and respect for others
should be published and advo-
cated.

WALTER ABSIL
Nassau,
February, 2009.

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Tensions high after
police officer is shot

FROM page one

It was further claimed that yesterday’s shoot-
ing incidents are connected to the murder of
Onado Newbold, 32, last month.

Newbold, known to family and friends as
“Bain Town Fella”, was shot dead in Nassau
Village in late January.

According to police, the victim died at the
scene after being shot multiple times in the
chest — between nine and 12 times, according to

had occurred in the area yesterday morning.
According to police, the two incidents are
believed to be connected.
Persons calling The Tribune from Nassau Vil-
lage yesterday evening said that the “talk on
the street” was that there would be “trouble” in

eens os won 4a : some witnesses on the scene.
ee eee eer However, police press liaison officer

mous, said that while she was on the phone to A get Supt Walter Evans told The Tribune
The Tribune she thought she could hear noises that he could not confirm any connection

which sounded like gunshots, but did not want between yesterday’s shooting and Newbold’s
to look outside. murder.

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Man charged with murder

FROM page one

| Former MP ‘not
_ being held in Cuba’

FROM page one

idence, arrived at the courthouse in Bank Lane with four

officers in an unmarked police car just after noon, and was
escorted upstairs to Court One with shackles on his wrists

and ankles.

Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez dismissed the court
momentarily before returning to read the charges.

Dames, dressed in jeans, and an orange polo shirt and
flannel fleece-lined jacket, stood quietly listening as Mag-
istrate Gomez told him he was charged with murder for
intentionally causing the death of Philip Marcellus on Feb-

ruary 14.

Marcellus, 27, who is believed to be a resident of Gold-
en Isles Road, was stabbed multiple times about the body
in the area of Rocky Pine Road, off McKinney Drive, on

Saturday, February 14.

He was found lying in the street and Emergency Medical
Services pronounced him dead at the scene.

A preliminary inquiry will begin in court five on Friday,
February 24, to determine whether there is enough evidence
against Dames to place a trial before the Supreme Court.

A total of 17 witnesses are listed to give evidence. The
accused is represented by attorney Murrio Ducille.

Dames will be remanded in custody until the inquiry

begins.

FROM page one

within the space of four and a half
hours on Monday.

Police reported that in each
instance a “gunman standing
about six feet tall and dressed in
dark clothing” committed the
crimes.

Yesterday police press liaison
officer Walter Evans said that,
based on the descriptions given,
there is a “strong possibility” that
the robberies are linked but this
cannot be determined with cer-
tainty at this early stage in inves-
tigations.

No-one was injured during the
bold robberies.

According to police reports,
the gunman entered the South-
west Christian Academy, which
provides schooling for children
from infancy to around five years,
at about 1lam.

Employee Lawronamae Stra-
chan said he bypassed the door to
the “baby room” where classes
were underway and headed

? ons.

: Contacting the Director of the
? Caribbean and Latin American desk,
? Mr Burrows said that an initial search
i revealed that there were only 10
? Bahamians being held in Cuban pris-

? ‘These 10 persons, he said, were all
? males, and all were being held for
: attempting to bring either cocaine or
? marijuana into the country.

i While this initial search was limited to
? the most highly populated districts on
? the island, Mr Burrows admitted that
? there were a number of small provinces
: that have not reported back “as yet.”

i However, the likelihood that the for-
? mer MP would be held in any of them,
i he said, was very “unlikely”.

: “Officially, there is no proof,” Mr Bur-
? rows said.

: “While some of those small provinces
: have not reported as yet, it is very
; unlikely that that will change,” he said.

Masked gunman

straight to the secretary’s office,
where he was able to escape with
about $1,300 in cash.

Other employees of the Shrimp
Road school reported seeing the
man head directly to the office
— leading Ms Strachan to believe
that a parent or someone who
may have done some work on the
property may have been involved.

“He closed the door, she
looked up, and he had a shotgun
under his arm. He had it pointing
at her and he said “Give me the
money.” She gave him the money
and he ran out.

“T went to the outside door and
Isaw him running away. He went
about half a block down and a
blue Explorer was waiting for
him. He jumped in the passenger
side and another person, shorter
than him, jumped in the driver’s
side and they sped off,” she said.

The “light brown-skinned”
gunman was wearing blue
trousers, a white shirt and a dark

tam, she said.

He did not have a cloth cover-
ing his face as police reports indi-
cated to be the case at the two
other schools.

Ms Strachan yesterday said that
she planned to call around a few
schools to warn them to be extra
careful in the wake of the inci-
dent.

She said Southwest Christian
Academy is reviewing its own
security measures to ensure that
similar incidents cannot happen
so easily in the future.

According to police, the rob-
bery at Bayview Academy on
Augusta Street took place at 3pm
and saw an employee robbed of
jewellery.

Meanwhile, the incident at the
Alpha Early Learning Centre on
Pigeon Plum Street in Pinewood
Gardens occurred at 3.30pm. A
handbag containing personal
items was taken from a staff
member.



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FROM page one

both companies to collaborate on at least three pro-
jects that have been offered through BEC’s Request
for Proposals for Renewable Energy Projects.

The projects short-listed by BEC are located in
New Providence, Abaco and Harbour Island and
total over 24 megawatts of capacity.

BREC said that it was informed by BEC that its
project proposal had been shortlisted and will pro-
ceed to the next stage.

Thomas Schneider, chairman of BREC and pres-
ident of Schneider Power called the signing a “major
step” in establishing BREC as a “true player in
renewable energy in the Caribbean”.

Wayne Crawley, vice president corporate devel-
opment of Emera said, "We look forward to work-
ing with BREC and their local partners to support
BEC's renewable energy programme. This is an
important economic energy source for the
Bahamas".

Emera owns 25 per cent of Grand Bahama Pow-
er Company through their 50 per cent ownership of
ICD Utilities.

BREC, is a joint-venture with the Nassau based
Winso Company to develop renewable energy pro-
jects in the country.

While Schneider Power owns a controlling inter-
est in the jomt venture, BREC’s website lists Vincent
MacDonald as Chief Executive Officer and Presi-
dent and Kevin Ingraham as the Vice President of
Corporate Finance.

However, local environmentalist Sam Duncombe
is very concerned about the vagueness of the release,
pointing out that it does not say what the projects
are other than they are renewable energy projects.

“T find it very disturbing that the projects that
are on the table have not been made available to the

BEC is criticised

public for input. As we are going to be the ones
paying for the energy. Don’t you think we should
have a say in which companies are allowed to oper-
ate here,” she said.

Calls and e-mails to both BEC General Manager
Kevin Basden and BREC’s Chief Executive Officer
Vincent MacDonald went unanswered up to press
time.

Ms Duncombe said that successive governments
really need to stop “treating the Bahamian people
like children and let us in on these projects.”

“While fossil fuel certainly has more costs than
buying transporting and burning fuel that is direct-
ly linked to global warming, the Bahamian public
should be a party of our collective renewable future?
Additionally what is the Energy Policy of The
Bahamas? When are the laws that prohibit an indi-
vidual to supply their own homes with alternative
energy going to be changed so that we can become
truly independent from an energy standpoint,” she
asked.

Ms Duncombe admitted that supplying homes
independently may be financially out of reach at
the moment but the more independent systems that
are sold will ultimately bring down the cost so that
more people can afford to energize their homes
independently of government.

“This would create a huge spin off in jobs as we
will need people trained to install all of this new
technology. When is the public going to be involved
in that process? Ultimately we should know who
the companies are who their Bahamian partners
are and we should absolutely have a say in which
companies get chosen to supply us with power,” Ms
Duncombe said.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



THE CASE OF THE NASSAU GROUPER HIGHLIGHTS THE CRITICAL CHALLENGE OF CAREFUL MANAGEMENT

from Bahamas and Florida sponge fishery

Lessons

arpon Springs,

Florida — As the

mist rolled in across

the bayou, local
community leaders gathered in
the Heritage Museum here last
Thursday evening to celebrate
their shared history with the
Bahamas.

This city of 23,000 on Flori-
da's west coast — about 30 miles
north of Tampa — has had a
Bahamian connection ever since
an "adventurer from Nassau"
named Joshua Boyer started the
first family homestead here in
1877. At the time, both black and
white Bahamian 'conchs' were
hooking sponges and catching tur-
tles from Key West all the way
up the gulf coast.

In a 1928 newspaper article,
Boyer reminisced about those
pioneer days: "I came up the
Anclote River on a fishing trip
and by chance stopped off at Mr.
Ormond's residence. I built a res-
idence there, and the same year
Miss Mary Ormond and I were
married. Everything there was
ours. The land and the game and
fish were as free as air."

Sponger Money Never Done

But the biggest and best-
known Bahamian connection —
and the one that was celebrated
last week — is the link between
the Greek communities of Tar-
pon Springs and Nassau. Both
had their origins in the sponge
trade, which lasted less than a
century and was one of the
biggest revenue earners for both
the Bahamas and Florida. As the
song goes, in those days it seemed
that sponger money was never
done.

At its peak before the Second
World War, the northern
Caribbean fishery removed 47
million pounds of live sponge
annually and employed thousands
of people and hundreds of ships
in the Bahamas. But over-
exploitation and disease wiped
out the sponge beds in 1939, leav-
ing the fishermen destitute. And
the invention of synthetic substi-
tutes after the war sharply
reduced demand for natural
sponges. So, aside from souvenir
sales, only a remnant of this once
thriving industry exists today. At
Red Bays, Andros it is kept alive
by a lone 76-year-old Greek-
American sponger named Peter
Skaroulis, who provides the only
regular employment for a few
dozen fishermen. The Skaroulis
family operates a sponge market
in Tarpon Springs, continuing a
way of life that began in the late
19th century, when Greeks from
the Aegean islands of Kalymnos,
Skopelos, Symi, Hydra and Aegi-
na arrived in Nassau and Flori-
da.

An Intertwined History

The shared history of these
two intertwined communities was
the subject of a special exhibit at
the Heritage Museum in Tarpon
Springs last week, and Tough Call
was invited to attend. Funded by
the Florida Humanities Council,
the exhibit was developed by
folklife researcher Dr Tina Bucu-
valas, an ethnographer who is
herself part Greek and who spent
time in the Bahamas recently



“Today, although some
commercial harvesting still takes
place, the sponge trade is more of
a tourist attraction in Florida.”



looking into family backgrounds.

"Through my research over
the last couple years, I gradually
came to realize that for almost a
century there has been sustained
interaction between the Tarpon
Springs and Bahamian Greek
communities," she told me.
"Residents are closely related
through ties of marriage, family,
and culture in addition to busi-
ness. These ties have developed
from a shared history originating
in the Greek sponge producing
islands."

Until recently Dr Bucuvalas
was director of the Florida Folk-
life Programme in the state's
Bureau of Historic Preservation.
But she has been named curator
for the City of Tarpon Springs, a
post which makes her responsi-
ble for several small museums as
well as a planned folk arts gallery.
She will be researching other eth-
nic cultures — including the city's
African-American community
which also has Bahamian roots.

Although marine sponges have
been sought after since ancient
times, industrialisation created a
growing demand for them in the
cleaning, ceramics, shoe-finish-
ing, and printing industries in
addition to household, bathing,
and medical uses. And this gen-
erated a lucrative international
trade during the late 19th and ear-
ly 20th centuries.

According to Dr Bucuvalas in
her research paper for the exhib-
it. "The greater portion of the
world trade was conducted by
crews and merchants from
Greece. Later, the trade dimin-
ished due to war, sponge disease
and toxic algae blooms. Today
the sponge industry continues on
a smaller scale, its memory fuels
tourism, and many aspects of its
traditional culture linger.”

A New Industry

Until the 1840s, the sponge
business was concentrated in the
Mediterranean. But in 1841, a
French merchant found Bahami-
ans harvesting sponges, and he
started exporting sponges to
Paris. This trade eventually
encompassed Jamaica, Honduras,
Nicaragua, and Mexico—
although the Bahamas, Cuba, and
Florida were always the largest
producers.

The west side of Andros was
one of the world’s great sponge
beds, and sponges grew near
many other Bahamian islands as
well. The earliest local record, in
1843, reported the export of 32
sponge bales. Forty years later,
when the first Greeks arrived,
sponges were our most important
marine product, despite the fact

that most of the shallow-water
sponge beds were being fished
out. By 1900 the most valuable
sponges became commercially
extinct in near-shore waters.

According to a memoir written
by the late Charles Alexiou, who
arrived in Nassau in 1925, the
Vouvalis Company brought in the
first Greek sponge experts from
Kalymnos in 1887. "Vouvalis
established his sponge room on
West Bay Street between where is
now the Mayfair Hotel and the
(defunct) Ocean Spray Restau-
rant and Hotel," Mr Alexiou
wrote. "He sent Aristide Dami-
anos to manage his business.
Along with Aristide came his
brother George.”

The Damianos brothers later
set up their own business at the
top of Frederick Street by the
steps. Constantinos Christophilis
was in Virginia Street. Pericles
Maillis was based on the proper-
ty where his grandson (of the
same name) now has his law
office. In the 1920s Christodoulos
Esfakis (the father of Dr Andrew
Esfakis) established an operation
on Market Street. And Theopha-
nis Mangos also worked for Vou-
valis before setting up on his own
business. James Mosko was
brought in to rebuild the Vou-
valis operatiion after the 1926
hurricane, and his son founded
Mosko's Construction.

Greek Immigration

By the time Charles Alexiou
arrived, the Greeks seemed to
have no problem with immigra-
tion restrictions, although they
were not allowed to compete with
local fishermen. But initially,
Bahamian merchants had been
deeply worried over the prospect
of foreign competition. Writing
to The Nassau Guardian in 1887,
sponge merchant Joseph Brown
called for legal protection:

"Twenty-four aliens have
arrived, experts in the gathering,
clipping and packaging of sponge,
and if I am rightly informed,
determined to handle it them-
selves in all stages from the gath-
ering to the packing, thus exclud-
ing native labour. If the experi-
ment should be successful, it is
quite probable that we should
soon have hundreds of men in
our midst, whose ways are not
our ways, who would form a dis-
tinct section of the population,
and who would only continue to
remain here until such time as
the sponge beds become exhaust-
ed, or the business ceases to be
profitable."

Over time the Greeks were
more or less assimilated, and the
second, third and fourth genera-

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tions now form a close-knit com-
munity of more than 300 profes-
sionals and business people clus-
tered around the Annunciation
Greek Orthodox Church on Vir-
ginia Street. Built in 1932 it was
the first Greek church in the West
indies, and almost all of its pre-
sent congregation derive from the
original spongers sent from the
islands of the Aegean Sea.

"The Greek Bahamian com-
munity has remained small and
close, perhaps because of their
initial isolation and their com-
mitment to maintaining their her-
itage," Dr Bucuvalas said. "Most
first and second generation Greek
Bahamians married other Greeks
for social and religious reasons,
but like most Diaspora peoples
each succeeding generation
chooses more marriage partners
from outside the community.
Nevertheless, Greek Bahamians
maintain their culture through
religion, family ties, values, lan-
guage, foodways, and social
events."

Bahamian Descent

By 1890 Tarpon Springs had
also become a significant sponge
market. The first Greeks arrived
there in 1897, moving the com-
mercial sponge centre from Key
West to the gulf coast where pris-
tine sponge beds had been dis-
covered offshore. They revolu-
tionised the industry with diving
equipment, and by the first
decade of the 20th century they
outnumbered the traditional Key
West fishermen, who were large-
ly of Bahamian descent.

This led to social conflict
between the two groups of fish-
ermen, which was "heightened by
overstressed sponge resources
that eventually disappeared
entirely due to a synergistic rela-
tionship between overfishing and
disease in the marine environ-
ment," according to Loren
McClenachan writing in a 2007
Earthscan publication on marine
environmental history called
Oceans Past. “Understanding
synergistic stresses on structural
elements of the marine commu-
nity is central to environmental
conservation."

The eventual death of the
sponge fishery can be traced to
this unfortunate synergy. With-
out management controls, inten-
sive fishing lowered prices which
stimulated more intensive fish-

ing. And ultimately the lack of a
conservation ethic — particularly
with respect to the taking of
undersized sponges — led to the
collapse of the fishery in the
1930s. According to the Earth-
scan publication, "In December
1938, spongers on the other side
of the Gulf Stream in the
Bahamas began to have an odd
and disconcerting experience, one
which the old-timers had never
witnessed. Instead of pulling up
intact sponges, hooks came to the
surface with only slivers and
strings; the rest of the sponge
skeleton had disintegrated ... The
mysterious blight that struck the
sponge beds quickly reached epi-
demic proportions ... The culprit
appeared to be a fungus-like fila-
ment."

Sponger Money Gone

By 1940 the disease had
worked its way up to Tarpon
Springs, putting the remaining
sponge fishermen out of work.
Experts say the epidemic was
"intimately linked to overfishing”.
In fact, the sponge divers them-
selves probably helped spread the
disease by squeezing the sponge
"gurry" into the water. Just as
overfishing only increased the
concentrations of disease-causing
bacteria and fungal cells in the
seawater over sponge beds.

Sponges filter bacteria out of
the water as they feed. And
according to Earthscan, "Over
the course of the fishery tradi-
tional spongers and divers took
more than 1.5 billion pounds of
living sponges from the norhern
Caribbean, so that the water dur-
ing the 1930s was certainly richer
in bacteria, fungi, algae and other
tiny particles than it had been a
century earlier...evidence exists
that at high concentrations bac-
teria that are typically benign can
become virulent and...diseases
more prevalent."

In 1992 state and federal gov-
ernments outlawed all sponging in
South Florida's national parks.
And since then sponges have
joined a list of once abundant ani-
mals — including lobster, conch,
turtles, and grouper — that are
now protected by law. And a
related law makes it a felony to
trade any wildlife taken in con-
travention of those protections.

Today, although some com-
mercial harvesting still takes
place, the sponge trade is more

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of a tourist attraction in Florida.
But Tarpon Springs has managed
to preserve a strong Greek char-
acter and maritime heritage. In
fact, the museum where the
Bahamian Connection exhibit
was held sits on the edge of a
marine inlet where the Greeks
celebrate the Epiphany each year
by throwing a cross into the sea
for divers to retrieve — the same
ceremony practised by Nassau
Greeks. And the imposing St
Nicolas Greek Orthodox Church
is not far away.

Conservation and Culture

According to Dr Bucuvalas,
"The Greeks gradually began to
control municipal politics as the
majority or by allying themselves
with black Tarponites. Blacks of
Bahamian descent had arrived in
Tarpon Springs from Key West
in the late 19th century. They
often developed close relation-
ships with the Greeks when they
worked on the boats, and some
learned to speak Greek with a
Dodecanese accent.

"Since the Bahamian Greek
community is small, many mem-
bers have sought marriage part-
ners in Tarpon Springs. The dom-
inant population in both locations
is from the Dodecanese Islands
and particularly Kalymnos, so
people have also looked to their
home islands when they decided
to marry. Consequently, the two
communities share an extensive
and intricate network of family
ties...and Greeks still control the
sponge business in both commu-
nities.”

But aside from its cultural fas-
cination, the history of the
Bahamas and Florida sponge fish-
ery has important lessons for the
future of other valuable marine
resources like conch, lobster and
grouper. These resources are not
limitless. And they are valuable
not just in terms of our own pock-
etbook, but because of the con-
tribution they make to the health
of the natural ecosystems on
which we rely. As is the case
today with the Nassau grouper,
careful management is a critical
challenge. It is a challenge we
must overcome if we are to main-
tain our present way of life.

What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com




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TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 9





SPORTS

Hugh Campbell: Day 2 highlights

Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

=

(LEFT) - Queen's College Comets Nathaniel Carter shoots over Church of God Flames players. (RIGHT) -
Flames player Leonardo Hepburn above the rim. Church of God won the game 35-33 in overtime...





CV Bethel Stingrays’ Pateico Leadon tied the game at
58 on a jumpshot in traffic...

BUTCH



C R Walker Knights’ Alex Rolle finished with 21 points

FROM page 11

Armaly added 12 points, five assists and three
steals while Rakeem Smith chipped in with six
points and six rebounds.

A basket by Cooper put the Cherubims up
54-51 with under one minute left to play.

After the Pacers Tamar Carey converted one
of two free throws, the Pacers forced a turnover
on the inbound with 16.4 seconds left to play.

Travis Ramsey tied the game at 54 with a
jumper from the right wing with just 3.2 seconds
left to play to send the game into overtime.

Church of God Flames - 35

Queen's College Comets - 33

The Comets’ woes from the free throw line in
the fourth quarter became the deciding factor in
a hard fought loss in the second game of yester-
day's opening session.

After they tied the game at 24 early in the
fourth quarter, the Comets made just two of 12



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free throws in the final quarter,

Bristol Delancey put the Comets ahead 29-
24 with a three point play and fastbreak basket
with 4:45 left to play.

With an opportunity to widen the margin, the
Comets missed five consecutive free throws
before making one at the line to stay ahead 30-
26.

The Flames came back to tie with a pair of bas-
kets from Able Joseph and Leonardo Hepburn.
Joseph gave the Flames a 31-30 lead at the line.

The Comets reached the bonus with 3:13 left to
play but failed to take advantage on numerous
trips to the line.

Joseph gave the Flames the go ahead free
throws from the line to go ahead 35-33 with 2:07
left to play. He finished with a game high 16
points while Andron Hanna added six. Delancey
led the Comets with 12 while Nathaniel Carter
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PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009

SPORTS



Davis Cup team
are ready for
Paraguay

FROM page 11

If there’s one thing Farring-
ton feels the players will have to
get adjusted to is the boister-
ous response from the South
American crowd.

But he said they are going
down a couple days earlier to
get acclimatized so that it won’t
be a major culture shock for
them when they play.

“IT always believe that we
have the capability of winning a
tie whenever we play,” Far-
rington stressed. “But as far as
being competitive, I believe that
we have a chance to win.

“All of the guys know each
other and they have been
together for a while, so I feel
that we will come together and
play very strong when we get
there.”

The absence of Knowles once
again leaves the team without a
player with any ATP computer
rankings, but Farrington said
he’s convinced that the team
will defy the odds and rise to
the occasion.

“They are not accustomed to
guys hitting the ball that hard,
but the guys we have are capa-
ble of playing at a competitive
level because they’ve played
college ball and they’ve played
on the Futures and Satellite
tour,” he stressed.

“So they have some experi-
ence and as you know, anything
can happen in Davis Cup. So I
give us a good chance to win
just like I do whenever we
play.”

Despite the fact that he lost
his brother, Farrington said
Bjorn Munroe has confirmed
with the BLTA that he will still
be a part of the team in
Paraguay.

But there’s a possibility that
because the funeral service for
Lavaughn will be held next
weekend, Bjorn will end up
meeting the team in Paraguay.

“We will be there for him and
try to keep him to get through
this difficult time,” Farrington
said. “It’s unfortunate that his
brother died, but we offer our
condolences to his family.”

Rolle confident that she will BYainet

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—
i

mg By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t wasn’t the start that Georgette

Rolle had anticipated, but she’s con-

fident that before the Sun Coast

Ladies Series Developmental Golf
Tour is completed Thursday, she will play
up to par.

The St Augustine’s College graduate now
attending Texas Southern University fin-
ished 28th out of a field of 31 competitors
who completed the first round of competi-
tion yesterday at the Errol Estate Country
Club in Orlando, Florida.

Rolle, 23, shot rounds of 43-41 for a total
of 84, which is 12-over-par. American Bri-
ana Vega shot a one-under-par 71 (35-36-
71) to snatch the early lead in the three-
day tournament.

Disappointed in her performance, Rolle
noted that she made one mistake that cost
her dearly.

“Tt was kind of rough,” said Rolle, who
admitted that she took some medication
before she teed out and it left her sluggish
during play. “I won’t make that mistake
again.”

During play yesterday, Rolle tried to
keep the ballin play, but she ended up with
a pair of birdies, two triple bogeys and three
double bogeys.

“Tt was kind of rough,” she explained
about her scoring chart. “My mental game
wasn’t on today, but I’m definitely going
to learn from today and play better tomor-
row.”

Despite the fact that she’s still under the
weather, Rolle said she doesn’t intend to
take any medication like she did yesterday
before she plays.

“That was my only bad decision, but that
was because I wasn’t feeling well this morn-
ing,” she pointed out. “So I hope to be
much better tomorrow.”

The competition is extremely tough and
in order to make up some ground, Rolle
acknowledges that she will have to be at
her best.

Behind Vega is Noriko Nakazaki with
even-par 72. Two players shot one-over-
par 73 and five shot two-over-par 74.

Rolle is the only Caribbean player par-
ticipating in the tournament. She’s using it
to prepare for the Ladies’ Professional Golf
Association’s Futures Tour that is scheduled
to start at the end of March.

As a result of her performance, Rolle is
due to tee off in the second group at about
7:23 am today. Yesterday, she teed off in the
first group at 7:15 am.

FROM page 11

Handed: Right-handed
(Double handed backhand)
School: Central Christian
Academy

Rankings: N/A

No. of Davis Cup Ties: 2,
starting in 2008

Davis Cup Record: 1-2
(Singles)

JOHN FARRINGTON
Age: 50

Davis Cup
experience:

12 ties in

seven years,
starting in

1989 A A
Record: 4-114 = |

(Singles) - 5-4 [iglddlateytery

(Doubles)

Team Captain: Fourth
Bahamian in his ninth year,
starting in 2001 against Peru
in the first round of the

American Zone One

BJORN MUNROE

Age: 30

Height: 6-feet-1

Weight - 175 lbs
Handed: Right

School: Ohio State
University

Ranking: 885 (Doubles)
No. of Davis Cup Ties: 9,
starting in 1998

Davis Cup Record: 0-5
(Singles) - 3-5 (Doubles)

MARVIN ROLLE

Age: 25

Height: 5-feet-11

Weight: 170 lbs

Handed: Right
Rankings: 1738 (Singles) -
1560 (Doubles)

No. Davis Cup Ties: 15,
starting in 2001

Davis Cup Record: 7-7
(Singles) - 6-5 (Doubles)



Pine Forest at
Coral Harbour
South of the Airport
Saturday, February 21

at 8am

Explore the Pine Barrens with eminent
botanist Dr Ethan Freid as your guide.

Drive south from the airport towards Coral Harbour,
pass the sharp curves at the end of the runway
and Odyssey Aviation. After the road straightens

look for BNT signs.

Coming from the south, drive north from the Coral
Harbour roundabout approximately for a mile.
Look for BNT sign on the right side of the road.

Tel: 393-1317 © bnt@bnt.bs

Remember
to wear
comfortable

shoes, a hat and
bring binoculars

and a cool


THE TRIBUNE

fe io

»

WEDNESDAY,

Davis Cup team
are ready for
Paraguay

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH
they are mourning
the loss of former
team-mate
Lavaughn
Munroe, captain
John Farrington
said the Bahamas
four-man team
going to Paraguay
next weekend are
ready to play in |
the first round of
the American
Zone Two Davis
Cup tie.

Farrington will
travel to Paraguay
with Munroe’s
older brother,
Bjorn Munroe,
fellow Grand
Bahamians Devin
Mullings and Tim-
othy Neilly and
Marvin Rolle next
Friday for the tie
that will run from
March 6-8.

“We want to
offer our condo-
lences to the
Munroe family,”
said Farrington,
who served as
captain of the
team when the |Â¥
deceased Munroe | |
played on two [io ae
national teams in
1999 and another
one in 2002.

Farrington said
it was a shock to
hear about the tragic death of
26-year-old Munroe, who was
killed after his black Mustang
crashed into a large tree on
Midshipman Road, Lucaya,
Grand Bahama at about 1 pm
Sunday.

But he noted that he’s confi-
dent that the players selected
for the team will be able to pull
through when they face
Paraguay on their red clay court
with a chance to either play
towards promotions to the
American Zone One over the
weekend of July 10-12 or
towards relegation to Zone II.

The Bahamas Lawn Tennis
Association had waited for tour-
ing pro Mark Knowles to con-
firm whether or not he would
travel before they announced
the final team selection. But last
week, Knowles informed the
BLTA that he will skip the trip
and continue his pro career.

“T expect us to be competi-
tive,” Farrington proclaimed. “I
thought we were competitive
when we played them last April
at home and as a part of the
team, Mark gave us a big boost.

“Tf we had him, we would
have really been in a good posi-
tion to at least win the doubles
again. But now we have to rely
on the younger players to pull
us through on the red clay.”





SEE page 10

Tennis profiles

HERE’S a look at the
Bahamas’ Davis Cup team
heading to Paraguay next week-
end:

DEVIN MULLINGS
Age: 23

Height: 5-feet-7
Weight: 150 Ibs
Handed: Left-handed

PAGE 11

r



ts

2009



FEBRUARY 18,

Hugh Campbell:
Action on day 2

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

Day two of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational fea-
tured a crowd thrilling opening session which featured the first
overtime game, first double overtime game, and first win for a
private school in the tournament.

CR Walker Knights - 75

CV Bethel Stingrays - 73

Double Overtime

It took two overtime periods, a pesky ball hawking defense
down the stretch and a tournament high from their dynamic two
guard for the defending champions to close out yesterday’s
Opening session as the first two win team of the tournament.

Jackson Jacobs led all scorers with 33 points and converted the
go-ahead free throws late in the second overtime to give the
Knights the two point advantage with under 10 seconds remain-
ing.

Jacobs also sent the game into the second overtime with a run-
ner across the lane in transition with just over three seconds left
to play.

The Knights led 50-48 with 1:19 left to play in regulation,
but went on a frenetic 8-2 run to give them a 58-50 lead with just
42 remaining, seemingly clinching the win.

The Stingrays led a resilient comeback effort with a 6-0 run,
capped by Samuel Johnson’s steal and lay-up to bring his team
within two, 58-56, with 15 seconds left to play.

With the momentum heavily in their favour, the Stingrays
forced a turnover and with 8 seconds remaining, Pateico Lead-
on tied the game at 58 on a jumpshot in traffic.

In the first overtime, Leadon, who finished with a team high
26 points, continued his hot shooting in overtime with a pair of
baskets to put the Stingrays ahead 64-61.

Johnson followed with a basket and a pair of free throws on
the ensuing possession to give the Stingrays a 68-63 lead with 39
seconds left to play.

The Knights mounted a comeback of their own in the waning
moments.

Jacobs converted a tough three point play and after C V
Bethel’s Kendal Fowler made one of two free throws, Jacobs
made both at the line to bring the Knights within one, 69-68 with
20 seconds left to play.

Fowler again made just one of two at the line, making the
score 70-68 before Jacobs’ late game heroics.

Jacobs’ backcourt mate Alex Rolle finished with 21 points
while Jason Rolle led the Knights frontcourt with 12.

Leadon’s 26 led the Stingrays while Johnson finished with 14,
Dustin McKenzie added 13 and Fowler chipped in with nine.

Game Notes: In what is becoming a budding rivalry, the
Knights avenged a loss to the Stingrays in the GSSSA regular sea-
son finale which eliminated them from playoff contention.

Stingrays forward Rio Johnson sat for much of the game but
finished four blocks, two in the waning moments of the second
overtime. Both teams enjoyed their largest leads of the game
with under one minute left to go in respective periods (CR Walk-
er-eight points in the fourth with 42 seconds left, CV Bethel-six
points in the first overtime with 39 seconds left).

After Fowler’s free throw which gave the Stingrays a 70-68
lead, the Stingrays came up with a steal and possession. Howev-
er the referees signaled a controversial jumpball, rather than a foul
which would have sent C V Bethel to the line with just seconds
remaining. All five of the Knights points in the second overtime
came from the free throw line where they shot 5-9

Teleos Cherubims - 62

RM Bailey Pacers - 57

Overtime

The reigning Bahamas Scholastic Association champions held
the Pacers to just three points in the overtime period to become
the first private school to record a win in this year's tournament.

Lamont Armaly scored the first three points of overtime to
give his team a 57-54 lead.

After both teams exchanged free throws, Brian Francis gave
the Cherubims a 60-55 lead on a tip in with 1:47 remaining.

Chauncey Cooper's lay-up gave Teleos a 62-55 lead with just
42 seconds remaining to seal the win.

Cooper finished with a double double - 18 points, 11 rebounds
and five steals.

SEE page 9



C R WALKER KNIGHTS’ Jackson Jacobs goes for a layup yesterday...

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School: Ft Lauderdale
Preparatory, Ohio State
University

Rankings: 1067 (South
African Airways ATP
Singles)- 1617 (Doubles)
No. of Davis Cup Ties: 15,
starting in 2002

Davis Cup Record: 9-9
(Singles) - 2-5 (Doubles)

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SEE page 10




OU

Government
eyeing $50m
aviation sector
transformation

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



THE Gov-
ernment :
eyeing

potential $50
million trans-
formation of
the aviation
industry in a
move to pro-
vide “critical”
building blocks
for this
nation’s
tourism and
economic future, with the
Bahamas “needing more air-
ports per capita than anywhere
else in the world”.

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace,
minister of tourism and avia-
tion, confirmed yesterday to
Tribune Business that the Gov-
ernment was in the earliest
stages of overhauling its
Bahamian aviation sector policy
and infrastructure, after this
newspaper obtained details on
the proposed $50 million, Inter-
American Development Bank
(IDB) financed, Air Transport
Reform Programme.

The minister, who said he was
speaking after meeting with
International Civil Aviation
Organisation (ICAO) officials
to review their audit findings
on the Bahamas’ aviation regu-
latory and safety regime, indi-
cated the Government was
looking to create the most effi-
cient, cost effective air trans-
portation industry possible in
this nation.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace has
long advocated the need to
reduce airfares and airlift costs
into the Bahamas to a mini-
mum, given that these are effec-
tively the ‘access costs’ for
tourists coming on vacation
here.

He explained that the pro-
gramme, of which the ICAO
audit study is part, was designed
to fully integrate the aviation
sector with the wider Bahamian
economy over time, a move
designed to enhance national
infrastructure and open up
Family Island destinations to
improved accessibility by visi-
tors.

Service quality would be key,
Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added,
and the Government hoped to
pin down what it wanted to
achieve on aviation sector
reform, and how this would be
done, “by the end of summer”
2009.

Describing the reform and
development of the Bahamian



Vanderpool-
Wallace

SEE page 6B



























Just 33.4% of
Class I dealers

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY,

ine

FEBRUARY 18,



2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

British American in
talks to buy CLICO

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

ritish American Financial

was yesterday said to be in

“advanced discussions” to

acquire CLICO

(Bahamas), sources close
to the company told Tribune Business, a
deal that could potentially solve the reg-
ulatory headaches created by a $57 mil-
lion guarantee extended by the latter’s
troubled Trinidadian parent. That under-
writes 59 per cent of the Bahamian com-
pany’s assets.

“British American will soon purchase
CLICO (Bahamas). They’re in advanced
discussions,” a source told Tribune Busi-
ness, as others in the business communi-
ty confirmed that the “vultures are cir-
cling” the Bahamian insurer, following
the much-publicised woes of its parent,
CL Financial.

I. Chester Cooper, British American
Financial’s president and chief executive,
did not return Tribune Business’s call
seeking comment before press time,
despite a message being left.

His cell phone was also turned off, with
sources telling Tribune Business he was
yesterday in a series of meetings related
to the potential CLICO (Bahamas) pur-
chase.

A major impediment to any potential
CLICO (Bahamas) acquisition is the fact
that almost 59 per cent of the company’s
$97.352 million in total assets are invest-
ed in loans to its subsidiary, CLICO
Enterprises Ltd.

Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), in its
2007 audit report on CLICO (Bahamas),
revealed that CLICO Enterprises had
invested the bulk of those funds in a Flori-
da-based real estate project called

meet capital
requirements

Business Reporter

THE SECURITIES Com-

mission is looking to retool the
formula responsible for calcu-
lating the regulatory capital
Bahamas-based broker/dealers
must maintain, with just 33.4
per cent of Class I firms in com-
pliance with these thresholds.

The new formula is part of
the Commission’s wider efforts
to restructure its legislation, in
order to better serve the capital
markets/investment funds
industry it regulates, and boost
compliance by it registered
firms. The Commission is also
adamant that it will begin
enforcing its laws and penalising
companies for non-compliance,
as the legislation allows.

The Commission’s market
surveillance manager, Sally
Moss, said it was previously
unfair for the regulator to
enforce its laws while
broker/dealer regulatory capi-
tal levels were being calculated
using a faulty/incorrect formula
provided by her department.

However, she said some
firms, despite the formula
issues, simply chose not to com-

y.

“While the majority of the
companies are able to meet it,
some of our more complicated
companies that do much more
involved business have not been
able to meet the standards,” Ms
Moss said.

SEE page 4B

St. Michael:

‘Advanced discussions’ taking place
on deal to acquire Bahamian unit of
troubled Trinidad conglomerate

Wellington Preserve.

This had suffered
a more than 20 per
cent decline in mar-
ket value, falling
from an appraised
$104 million at year-
end 2006 to $80.5
million at year-end
2007, due to the col-
lapsing Florida real
estate market.

“This reduction in
value has resulted in
[CLICO Bahamas]
management consid-
ering the possibility of impairment of the
loan,” Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas)
wrote in its audit report.

“Although the market forecast for
Florida shows recovery of the real estate
market in 2008, management obtained a
guarantee from C L Financial (CLICO
Bahamas ultimate parent), whereby C L
Financial states that it will honour the
obligations of CLICO Enterprises to the
company if the need arises. As such, no
provision has been made for impair-
ment.”

Needless to say, the anticipated Florida
real estate market recovery has not taken
place, and may not do so for some years
to come.

Several sources suggested that any pur-
chaser of CLICO (Bahamas) would have
to make a major capital injection into the

| Chester Cooper

company to cover the liabilities owed to
life and annuity policyholders.

As previously revealed by Tribune
Business, at the December 31, 2007, bal-
ance sheet date, a full impairment of the
$57 million loan would leave CLICO
(Bahamas) with just over $40 million in
total assets.

That would be insufficient to meet lia-
bilities worth almost $85.5 million, espe-
cially some $79.37 million in reserves set
aside to pay future policyholder benefits.

However, sources monitoring devel-
opments said ways to isolate the Florida
real estate investment - and potentially
splitting it off from the assets/liabilities
any purchaser may acquire - were being
explored. Such a move might allow
British American Financial to only take
with it the quality assets from CLICO
(Bahamas) life and annuity business.

“There are some dynamics in play that
give them some cautious optimism that
can happen,” one source said. “I think
they’re very close; close to the point
where an announcement can be made
very soon.” British American Financial is
likely to also be able to acquire CLICO
(Bahamas) at a very keen price point.

Protecting the Bahamian policyhold-
ers of CLICO (Bahamas) has been upper-
most in the minds of the Government
and Registrar of Insurance’s Office, as
the news from Trinidad has worsened,

SEE page 3B





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Major
Caribbean
insurer
sets-up
Bahamas
branch

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A MAJOR pan-Caribbean
general insurer has established a
branch office in the Bahamas
some 35 years after it began
insuring risks in this nation, its
country manager telling Tribune
Business it “certainly expects to
grow” its estimated $2 million
per annum in premium income
through expanding its agency
force to at least eight.

Charles V. Sands III, of The
Insurance Company of the West
Indies (Bahamas), said the firm
had already signed up three
agent companies to sell its poli-
cies since it formally set up the
branch office on December 1,
2008, and was in talks to add
five more.

Mr Sands, a Bahamian and
former Summit Insurance Com-
pany executive, said agents had
greeted The Insurance Compa-
ny of the West Indies’ arrival
in the Bahamas as “a breath of
fresh air”, welcoming the addi-
tional underwriting capacity and
options it offered their clients.

Mr Sands said: “They’ve [the
company] been here since 1974,
writing business in the
Bahamas, and I think they
wanted to increase their pres-

SEE page 4B

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THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST

UV INpex Tooay Wort Cries Marine Forecast

































Today Tsay WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
. = ’ a High = Low W High = Low NASSAU Today: = Sat 10-20Knots =———(itsti(<«é«i Sz Feet = 10-20 Miles = 74°F
Sage a at ie: ee: ie: ie o|1 |2 3|4|5 6|7 [shot Fc FIC Fc FC Thursday: _ SW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet ___10-20 Miles 74° F
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' = i a ’ wean anaes SSE see aa why LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V. HIGH Amsterdam 45 34/1 45/7 39/3 + Thursday: SW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
~itill ORLANDO . He Ankara, Turkey 45/7 28/-2 pe 41/5 30/-1¢ = ABACO ‘Today: SE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
| High: 76° F/24°C Breezy with bright Clear and breezy. Partly sunny and Clouds giving way to Partly sunny and Clouds and sun; The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 54/12 41/5 sh 55/12 40/4 sh Thursday: _ SW at 12-25 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Lew: 50° FAO°C <> sunshine. breezy. sun. nice. breezy in the p.m.. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 74/23 68/20 + 75/23 74/23 c
te OW: et @ ea High: 83° High: 75° High: 75° High: 78° Bangkok 95/35 79/26 c 94/34 78/25 pce
: eens High: 79° Low: 67° Low: 65° Low: 62° Low: 65° Low: 67° TIDES FOR NASSAU ee ae ene cope) SASS a TS
TAMPA: ie fe EE EAT Belin 320 72 sn ~—=S«C«DD THB pt
High: 75° F/24° C i fie [81°-68°F 78°-63° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft.) poiti 59/15 53/11 70/21 61/16 p
~ Low:53°F/12°C é ae The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of t t ind, humidi ine intensi ipitati : 4 ale te
i! 7 I rf perature IS an Index that combines tne eifects of temperature, wind, numi ity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 2:32 a.m. 2.3 8:51 a.m. 0.5 Bel rade 31/0 95/-3 sn 96/-3 18/-7 C
i ib @ = = elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2:41 p.m. 18 847pm. 03 aaa 98/-2 19/-7 ¢ 30/-1 23/-5 ¢
ede tg: ; aa 44pm. 19 9:48pm. 0. Bogota 66/18 46/7 t 66/18 46/7 +
- illic. Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Friday 733am. 23 1044am. 04 Brussels 39/3 30/-1 pc 43/6 36/2 c
cual ABACO Temperature 441pm. 20 10:43pm. 02 Budapest 32/0 24/-4 sf 30/-1 20/-6 s
f ees cat (Ol seseee eee Soe ° F/23° : Buenos Ai 95/35 75/23 95/35 77/25
- ad <>. ee ue LOW de> rige ¢ Saturday salon. 21 som, 61 Cairo TH/21 GiNN6 s 78 57/13 6
oe fo ea Low: 55° F/13°C Normal high 7 Fasc EN Calcutta 92/33 64/17 s 91/32 68/20 s
ies eiast f : f Normal low 64° F/18° C Calgary 30/-1 18/-7 c 35/1 16/-8 pc
lB copes @ WEST PALM BEACH ij a Med Last year's High or nertctnettnee 83° F/28° C SUN AND ify Cancun 84/28 66/18 s 87/30 67/19 s
ie seme: High:77°F/25°C = ead e a Last year's JOW: seecteetiisaecnet laces 69° F/21° C " " Caracas 80/26 65/18 sh 83/28 68/20 c
Low: 57° F/14°C oa anni {> Precipitation = me ae Be am. Hoot toe 2 am. Casablanca 6719 50/10 s 71/21 48/8 s
ps As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.0.0 0.01" unsel....... ‘Vo p.m. Moonset... 1200 P.M. Copenhagen 33/0 30/-1 sn 36/2 32/0 pc
C.. FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full ast Dublin 48/8 41/5 pc 45/7 36/2 pc
High: 76° F/24° C @ High: 74° F/23°C ; Hj Normal year to date oo... cece 2.78" : Frankfurt 36/2 19/-7 pc 37/2 25/-3 pe
Low: 60° F/16°C Low: 53° F/12°C AccuWeather ’ ee Geneva 35/1 25/-3 pc 35/1 34/1 s
.com } Ree oe Halifax 30/-1 17/-8 c 35/1 32/0 sn
I Forecasts and graphics provided by bh “ Havana 83/28 58/14 s 85/29 53/11 s
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feh. 24 Mar. 4 Mar. 10 Mar. 18 Helsinki 23/-5 18/-7 sf 27/-2 23/-5 sn
ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 70/21 66/18 73/22 64/17 1
NASSAU High: 76° F/24°C Islamabad 78/25 48/8 s 76/24 50/10 sh
High:79° F/26°C i Low: 57° FA4°C Istanbul 52/11 43/6 pe 51/10 43/6 r
Low: 67° FA9°C Jerusalem 56/13 45/7 s 72/22 47/8 pc
i Johannesburg 78/25 59/15 t 78/25 60/15 t
KEY WEST @ CATISLAND Kingston 83/28 74/23 pe 83/28 75/23 sh
High: 75° F/24°C rf S 3 Lima 87/30 66/18 pc 85/29 67/19 c
Low:64°F/A8°C High: 74° F/23° London 50/10 39/3 pe 48/8 39/3 pc
: i = é __-Low:53°F/12°C Madrid 61/16 30/-1 s 63/17 34/1 s
@: : H Ee Manila 90/32 75/23 t 91/32 75/23 t
hy |! Mexico City 81/27 50/10 s 72/22 S/T pc
; ee GREATEXUMA Monterrey 88/31 59/15 s 74/23 53/11 pe
4 Montreal 30/-1 28/-2 sn 34/1 21/-6 sn
©... High: 80° F/27° C herrea Moscow 32/0 14/-10 sn 27/-2 14/-10 pc
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Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ; Hh a OO ae pe 7
highs and tonights's lows. High: 81° F/27°C New Delhi 77/25 49/9 s 77/25 521s
Low: 59° F/15°C Oslo 25/-3 16/-8 sn 27/-2 18/-7 sn
Paris 45/7 39/3 pe 43/6 36/2 +
Prague 25/-3 19/-7 sn 25/-3 22/-5 ¢
| Rio de Janeiro 84/28 73/22 s 83/28 75/23 pc
High: 76° F/24°C Riyadh 75/23 51/10 pe 75/23 54/12 pe
Low: 57° F/14°C Rome 43/6 23/-5 pe 46/7 25/-3 s
Today Thursday Today Thursday Today Thursday MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 81/27 71/21 sh 83/28 72/22 s
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 78° F/26° C San Juan 99/37 71/21 t 103/39 71/21 s =F Showers smart
Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC Fc FIC FIC FIC FIC FIC Low: 57°F/14°C ee omae ae s cama an s i a 79/65
Albuquerque 53/11 28/-2 po 54/12 28/-2 s Indianapolis 52/11 20/-6 sh 26/-3 14/-10 sf Philadelphia 42/5 37/2 ¢ 46/7 26/-3 pc aaa pk antago pe pe :
Anchorage 27/-2 24/-4 peo 33/0 24/-4 sn Jacksonville 72/22 55/12 pc 65/18 32/0 t Phoenix 6618 45/7 s 73/22 478 s CROOKED ISLAND/ ACKLINS sani Damnings Bee Doe De Boies 112s ea écia
Atlanta BO15 425 t 5241 25/3 s Kansas City 40/4 14/-10 c 87/2 24/6 +s __ Pittsburgh 46/7 28/-2 sn 32/0 18-7 sf RAGGEDISLAND — igh:80°F/27°c — crEarTET pomeriEE A snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and naan
Atlantic City 42/5 36/2 + 47/8 24/-4 pc Las Vegas 6015 37/2 s 64/17 41/5 s Portland,OR 52/41 38/3 pce 5412 354 c High: 78° F/26° C Low: 59° F/15°C einekh oa 5 a pe PB a j om = eee
Baltimore 42/5 36/2 + 46/7 25/-3 pc Little Rock 70/21 354 t 5613 31/0 s Raleigh-Durham 50/10 43/4 1 52/11 26/-3 Low: 56°F/13°C A — vee EAA : SOT Ene ” : —
Boston 38/3 35/1 c 43/6 32/0 c LosAngeles 64/17 48/8 s 72/22 50/0 s St. Louis 48/8 20/-6 c 34/1 20/-6 pe . a ae ESA = STE Ee
Buffalo 38/3 31/0 sn 32/0 21/-6 sn Louisville 54/12 29/-1 sh 35/1 20/6 sf SaltLakeCity 42/5 26/-3 sn 43/6 25/-3 s GREAT INAGUA Tol : 47/8 36/2 - 467 AS
Charleston, SC 60/15 53/11 t 62/16 32/0 pc Memphis 66/18 34/1 t 50/10 28/-2 s San Antonio 80/26 48/8 pc 73/22 488 s High:81°F/27°C aaa AS 28/-2 Ee a5 20/5 Fe
Chicago 38/3 14/-10 + 20/6 14/-10 sf = Miami 79/26 65/18 s 80/26 53/11 pc — San Diego 65/18 49/9 s 68/20 51/10 Low. 60°FAG°C Trinidad 90/32 73/20 t 86/30 72/92 t
Cleveland 44/6 23/-5 sn 27/-2 19/-7 — sf Minneapolis 20/-6 3/-16 sf 14/10 7/-13 pc SanFrancisco 61/16 47/8 pe 61/16 46/7 pc : Se Tana 45/7 34/1 pc 47/8 33/0 pe
Dallas 75/23 39/3 s 50/15 38/3 s Nashville 63/17 32/0 t 39/3 25/-3 sf Seattle 50/10 39/3 po 5110 37/2 c paar ipl 99/-1 20/-8 sn 29/-1 23/-5 ¢
Denver 44/6 20/-6 c 46/7 21/6 s New Orleans 75/23 50/10 t 65/18 40/4 s Tallahassee 70/21 51/10 c 62/16 28/-2 pc Warsaw 98/-2 23/-5 sn 97/-2 24/-6 sn
Honolulu «7/25 68/20 sh 78/25 65/18 po OWahomaCiy 606 30-1 s| S52 330 $ Tuom eat? 3BR © THD1 a2 eonipee CO eae ee on
onolulu S pc anoma UI i S s ucson s S 7
Houston 78/25 48/8 t 6719 40/4 s Orlando 76/24 59/15 po 74/23 42/5 t Washington,DC 44/6 38/3 r 46/7 26/-3_ pc Te ha ee ee


THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 3B



Alliance ‘strengthens’
BEC renewables bid

B By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Canadian renewable ener-
gy company yesterday said its
developing alliance with a 25
per cent shareholder in Grand
Bahama Power Company would
“strengthen” its bid to win a
power supply contract from the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC).

Jonathan Lundy, chief execu-
tive of Schneider Power Com-
pany, which was already in a
joint venture with Bahamian
company WINSO Ltd to pro-
vide 24 Mega Watts (MW) of
electricity on three Bahamian
islands, via wind and solar pow-
er, said the joint venture Letter
of Intent signed with Emera
would only enhance the pro-
posal submitted to BEC.

“There’s a capability as far as
what both partners bring to the
mix,” Mr Lundy told Tribune
Business, with Schneider Pow-
er/WINSO’s joint venture, the
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Corporation (BREC), already
having qualified among the 13
renewable energy bidders short-
listed by BEC.

He added: “We wouldn’t
have done it [the Emera
alliance] if we did not think it
would strengthen our bid and
our team.

“That was a clear motivation
for us. We’re adding a very
sophisticated, strong partner
that brings a lot to the table. We
definitely think we’re a stronger
entity working with them than
without them.”

Mr Lundy said the Letter of
Intent aimed to marry Emera’s
strengths in power generation
and asset management with
Schneider’s expertise in renew-
able energies, especially wind
and solar. Both could benefit
and learn from the other, Emera
providing Schneider with scale,
generation and financing capa-
bilities, and the latter giving the
Canadian power giant expertise
in fields it is keen to break into.

“It is a Letter of Intent, but I
suspect we’re going to find ways
to work together on these pro-
jects and other projects in the
region,” Mr Lundy said.

Sasha Irving, an Emera
spokeswoman, told Tribune
Business that the company
planned to invest a further $400
million in the Caribbean over
the next four years, and the
alliance with Schneider - giving
it access to BEC’s renewable
energy tender - was “one piece
of that”.

She reaffirmed that the com-
pany was “very open to discus-
sions” should the Government
decide to privatise BEC, and

added of the planned $400 mil-
lion outlay: “The Bahamas
already figures predominantly
in that, and will continue to do
so.”

Ms Irving said the Schneider
Power tie-up would work in well
with the renewable energies
Emera and Grand Bahama
Power Company would be
exploring, including the use of
wind, hydro/tidal and waste-to-
energy options.

Mr Lundy, meanwhile, added
that there was “substantial”
potential for the Bahamas to
harness renewable energies in
its electricity generation mix,
but the percentage of the total
power supply it accounted for
had to be determined.

“It’s got to make sense for
everybody. There should be a
significant mix of renewable
energies comprising the energy
mix for the Bahamas,” Mr
Lundy said.

The Bahamas Renewable
Energy Corporation has sub-
mitted a proposal to BEC for
the construction and operation
of wind turbines and solar pan-
els on three different islands -
New Providence, Abaco and
Harbour Island.

BREC has proposed that the
three projects would collective-
ly generate 24 Mega Watts
(MW) of electricity per day,

enough to power 25,000 homes.

In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, Thomas
Schneider, Schneider Power’s
president, said the BREC pro-
posal would require $60 million
in capital financing, of which $15
million would be equity and the
remainder debt financing. He
added that $40 million of that
figure was likely to be spent in
the Bahamas.

“Such a capital infrastructure
spend in the Bahamas can cre-
ate a lot of services as well as
jobs,” Mr Schneider said at the
time. “That’s going to be a key
benefit for the Bahamas, as
we're going to be putting money
into the economy.” Some 10-15
full-time jobs were likely to be
created.

Some 20-30 jobs construction
jobs would be created on each
of the three islands involved in
the BREC project, meaning that
some 60-90 jobs would be cre-
ated in total if it won govern-
ment/BEC approval.

Meanwhile, Emera has made
no secret of its desire to expand
its foothold in the Bahamas,
which was achieved last Novem-
ber when the company paid $41
million to acquire Lady Henri-
etta St George’s 50 per cent
ICD Utilities stake (translating
into a 25 per cent stake in Grand
Bahama Power).

British American in talks to buy CLICO



FROM page 1B

with regulators there suggesting CL Finan-
cial has a TT$10 billion (the equivalent of
around US$1 billion) deficit in its statutory
reserve funds. CL Financial has some
TT$16.7 billion in policyholder liabilities.

Other insurance industry sources con-
firmed British American Financial was in
talks to acquire CLICO (Bahamas), as syn-
ergies could be obtained with the former’s
home service business.

“From the British American point of
view, it may fit in with some of the business
they have,” said one contact.

“T don’t thing the insurance book of busi-
ness is bad,” said one. “It is the investment

one that is problematic. There are some
buildings [owned by CLICO Bahamas]. It’s
a chance to pick up a sales crew and some
business.”

However, others suggested British Amer-
ican Financial would face competition for
CLICO (Bahamas), with rival Bahamian
insurer Colinalmperial Insurance Company
also said to be keen on taking a look.

“Blood has been shed and the vultures
are coming out to pick over what’s left,”
said one source in relation to CLICO
(Bahamas). “It’s weak, and they’re com-
ing out to exploit the situation.”

CLICO (Bahamas) has previously denied
that its parent’s woes would have any
impact on its business in this nation, but

NOTICE

MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE
NATIONAL YOUTH LEADERS CERTIFICATION

PROGRAMME

The Youth Department of the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture will convene it’s Annual
Youth Leaders Certification Programme on
Monday, 23rd February 2009, beginning at 6:
00 p.m. at the Ministry’s Headquarters, Ground

Floor Conference Room, Thompson Blvd.

All youth

leaders and _ workers,
civic, school and musical bands are invited
to collect an application at the Ministry’s
Youth Department between the hours of
9a.m.-5 p.m. Deadline for receipt of applications

will be 18th February 2009.

For additional information you may call
502-0600/4 of 502-0736.

church,

Lennox McCartney, the Registrar of Insur-
ance, said his office was in touch with
Trinidad regulators and “monitoring the
situation”.

He and minister of state for finance,
Zhivargo Laing, have been unable to meet
with CLICO (Bahamas) and CL Financial
representatives as hoped for, but have been
in contact with the Trinidadian parent, the
regulator said.

Mr McCartney added that CLICO
(Bahamas) investment in US real estate
was supported by the property assets, and
he declined to comment on a potential sale
of the company and whether this would be
the best way to protect Bahamian policy-

holders.
BSi

Dare Le Be Great
TV Show

PA *

Popular motivational speaker and corporate trainer Spence
Finlayson recently hosted a very dynamic and inspiring

program on his "Dare Te Be Great "TV show with the
following guests: Celi Moss, Bahamian Filmmaker, Ruby
Saunders, Youth Alive Marching Band and Local singing
sensation, Spice.

The show aired last night on ZNS TV13 and will be replayed
again on Sunday at 10pm, so tune in and be motivated.

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knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Responsibilities :-

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence

Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background

Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Service & advise customers
Maintain & follow up account relationships

professionals

vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager

Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted


THE TRIBUNE



BTC’s Long Island team flanked by senior vice-presidents Antonio Stubbs (right) and Tellis Symonette (left)

Long Island
tops for BTC
customer
service

THE islands of Long Island,
San Salvador, Rum Cay and
Ragged Island won the coveted
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) Be Amazing
Customer Service Award for
2008.

BTC set the mandate to end
each week with zero faults. The
four islands complied by com-
pleting all installations and
repairs within the set time-
frame.

These islands are managed
by Ramona Taylor, a 20-year
veteran of the telecommunica-
tions industry. “With just 16
employees covering these four
islands, teamwork is both cru-
cial and essential,” she said.

"To me it’s about constantly
reinforcing to my team that
they are the ones that are

BSi

responsible not just for provid-
ing telecommunications ser-
vices, but for keeping our resi-
dents, businesses and our
tourists connected to the world
365 days a year.”

Technician Garvin Simmons
said: “Winning this award is a
good feeling. ’'m just glad I was
part of the process. This came
with multi-tasking, a lot of hard
work and dedication.”

Antonio Stubbs and Tellis
Symonette, BTC’s senior vice-
presidents, flew to Long Island
for the presentation.

Ms Taylor and her Long
Island team members received
high praise during Tropical
Storm Noel in 2007. Despite
excessive flooding, the team
managed to provide a fibre link
for ZNS TV 1,3 which allowed

them to transmit updates and
news stories during the storm.
They were also responsible for
ensuring that officers of the
Royal Bahamas Police were
equipped with mobile phones
as they patrolled throughout
the communities to provide
assistance to residents.

The Be Amazing Customer
Service Award was given last
year to the island that went
above and beyond in providing
superior service and improving
the quality of life for the
Bahamian people.

Annual targets were set for
each Family Island to measure
their level of productivity.
These four islands exceeded the
set expectations through their
demonstration of superior cus-
tomer service on a daily basis.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently
accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI RDINATI
STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is
definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example

Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others

Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills

Possess analytical qualities

Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook

Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved
Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae
to :-

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman Bay Corporate Centre
P. O. Box N - 7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 5B

Go %

VACANCY NOTICE

Senior Manager - Investments “Wy
“ANCE ®

Applications ate invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Senior Manager
- Investments with the National Insurance Board:

DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES
Manage portfolio of the National Insurance Board’s Investments, ensuring that
Investment dectstons that are made conform to Compliance, Strategic, Risk and Yteld
objectives of the Board.

Matntatn Statutory limuts of all investments nolan with respective financtal institutions,
preparing management reports to show compliance.

Represent the National Insurance Board as requested and required tn stakeholder
meetings, investment discussions, and/or Public Relations events relative to invest-
ment portfolio.

Design and prepare as needed/requested, management reports of all investments,
inclusive of Investment Holdings, Risk Status, Outstanding issues, and/or other key
mettics.

Develop and/or maintain relationships with the National Insurance Board approved
Brokers, with specific focus on compliance, increasing investment opportunities and/
of maximizing returns.

REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SKILL & EXPERIENCE
At least a Bachelors Degree in a Business related discipline, preferably Finance or
Accounting,

Professional designation in Finance (CFA or its equivalent) and/or have completed a
professional designation tn Accounting (CPA or its equivalent). (Consideration will be
given to applicants nearing CHA qualification).

Prior experience in managing a diverstfied investment portfolio

APPLICATION
Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the
necessaty proof of qualification on or before Friday, February 27, 2009, to:

Assistant Director
Human Resources Department
National Insurance Board
Clifford Darling Complex
Nassau, Bahamas



GN-827

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

Ministry of Public Works & Transport
Invitation For Tenders

Maintenance of Public Cemeteries in
New Providence

The Government of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas through the Ministry of Public
Works & Transport invites Tenders for the maintenance of the under-mentioned public
cemeteries in New Providence:

¢ Old Trail Cemetery Section A
e Marshall View and Veterans Cemetery

The main scope of services to be provided for the maintenance of each cemetery is as
follows:

e Weeding

¢ Mowing and weeding of grass

e Removal of debris

e Pruning of trees

The Ministry of Public Works & Transport now invites interested contractors to collect
tender documents and to complete and submit same in accordance with the instructions
therein.

Tender documents may be obtained by interested parties as of Monday, 16th February,
2009 from:

The Civil Engineering Section
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
John F. Kennedy Drive

PO. Box N-8156

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel: (242) 322-4830 Extension 4042
Fax: (242) 302-9770

between the hours of 9:30a.m. and 4:30p.m. Mondays to Fridays.

The completed tender document is to be deposited in the Tender Box located at the
office of the Director of Public Works, Ministry of Public Works & Transport, 3rd Floor,
John F. Kennedy Drive, Nassau, The Bahamas no later than 1:00p.m. on or before
Monday, 23rd February, 2009.

A Pre-Bid Meeting will be held at 10:00a.m. on Friday, 20th February, 2009 in the
Conference Room of the Ministry of Public Works & Transport.

The Opening of Tenders for the maintenance of the aforementioned cemeteries will take
place at 2:00 p.m. on Monday, 23rd February, 2009 in the Conference Room of the
Ministry of Public Works & Transport.

All clarifications and/or questions are to be directed to th Chief Civil Engineer at
the above mentioned address.

Permanent Secretary
Ministry of Public Works & Transport
12th February, 2009


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 7B



700m project at a standstill

m By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

THE DEVELOPERS
behind the $700 million Royal
Island project in North
Eleuthera discontinued work
last November, yesterday cit-
ing the global economic crisis
as the reason for the stoppage,
a move that left 40 -50
Eleutherans out of work.

The attorney for Dallas-
based development company
Cypress Equities, Joe Enos,
released a statement in
response to repeated Tribune
Business inquiries to conform

that the project’s principals
were restructuring the devel-
opment, prompting the shut-
down of operations.

Cypress Equities, an affiliate
of Staubach Retail, a company
owned by former Dallas Cow-
boys quartterback, Roger
Staubach, said it was hoping to
implement the proposed
changes and continue the pro-
ject. However, it could not say
when work would resume on
Royal Island.

“In light of the global eco-
nomic crisis, the Royal Island
development is on hold while
the principals restructure the

project,” the statement read.

“Restructuring includes prod-
uct offerings, overall island
development, pricing and pro-
ject financing. The principals
hope to implement these
changes and re-launch the pro-
ject soon.”

The Royal Island develop-
ment was also affliated with for-
mer Dallas Cowboys running
back, Emmitt Smith, and its
seed financing came from US-
based private equity fund, the
Carlyle Group.

MP for North Eleuthera,
Alvin Smith, said he was confi-
dent the developers would

restart the project later this
year.

He added that before
Cypress Equities had discon-
tinued work on the island, it
had sold real estate within the
development, leading him to
believe that the developers
would have to fulfill their oblig-
ations to the purchasers.

The $700 million investment
is expected to contain, when
completed, a Jack Nicklaus
Golf course, spa facilities and
restaurants, a marina and prop-
erties selling for three million
dollars and higher.

Mr Smith said the economy
of North Eleuthera was

here. That whole island is like a
community, so you find that the
guys who have the construction
company or who are working
elsewhere and probably have

some cottages, if they know
they have people are not work-
ing, they would share informa-
tion relating to job opportuni-
ties.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MICHAEL JAMES GRAHAM
GRAHAM of APT. 3301 CORAL BEACH HOTEL, P.O. BOX F-
42468, FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written and



MO cra
——

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
SAFENS LTD, is in dissolution. Continental Liquidators Inc.
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at 60 Market Square,
P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names, addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator before 16th day of March, 2009.

Vor: Comtuaaita Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MARATHON INVESTMENT
HOLDINGS LIMITED

— _—
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MARATHON INVESTMENT HOLD-
INGS LIMITED has been completed; a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-

fore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SCATTERGUN LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SCATTERGUN LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)
































adversely affected with the ter-
mination of the project, as 40-50
individuals were put out of
work. He said, though, that
Eleutherans in general remain
optimistic despite the closure.

Tourism in the area, howev-
er, has not slackened due to
vacationing second home own-
ers. He said workers have also
been cushioned by other small
projects going on in the area.

Mr Smith contends that Roy-
al Island is a “very good pro-
ject”, and will be a major addi-
tion to North Eleuthera when
complete.

He said, in the interim, that
Eleutherans displaced by the
project’s closure will be able to
find odd jobs with the island’s
communities, as they have
always done during hard times.

“Eleuthera and so many oth-
er islands have been through
this before, and so I find them
to be very resilient, very indus-
trious and they find some ways
of making a few dollars,” said
Mr Smith.

“Sometimes not as easy as
they would wish but they would
peck away there and find a job

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INDY ROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of INDY ROSE HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
PRZEWALSKI HOLDINGS CORP.

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PRZEWALSKI HOLDINGS CORP.. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
JONAAL TRADING LTD.

—/%,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JONAAL TRADING LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
18th day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, PO.BoxN-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000

SEVEN SEVEN SEVEN LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act,
(No. 45 of 2000), the Dissolution of SEVEN SEVEN
SEVEN LIMITED has been completed, a Certificate of
Dissolution has been issued and the Company has there-
fore been struck off the Registrar. The date of completion
of the dissolution was the 12th day of February, 2009.

thsfe

Liquidatér

Legal Notice

NOTICE
HALLSCOMBE INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

——

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HALLSCOMBE INVESTMENTS PTE.
LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
EMIVAL LTD.

— 4,—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EMIVAL LTD. has been completed; a Cer-
tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
BLUECHIP HOLDINGS LIMITED

— —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BLUECHIP HOLDINGS LIMITED has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




JUDGE PARKER HAS
A NICE RING TO IT!

I COULDN'T

THEN DON'T OPEN
IT! WHY UPSET



© 2009 by King eatures

MGER

WELL THEN, WITH THAT AT
STAKE, OUR DEMANDS SHOULD
SEEM VERY REASONABLE /



“LOOKS LIKE THE KIPS ARE READY FoR
WINTER TO ENP.”






Across
Tips for making financial 1
gains (7) 2
5 Victor’s opposite



number (5)

8 They figure a great deal in 3
population surveys (13)

9 Spirit with which the band 4

starts producing dance

music (5) 5
10 Away team not yet

admitted (7) 6

11 Fighting together and all
about to die (6)
12 Child brings back 10 lines 7
of verse (6) 11
15 Endure the French type of
beer (4,3) 13
17 River of silver (5)
19 Defeated by the elements? 14

(7-6)
20 Rise after start of day 16
looking glum (5) 18

21 Wastes the rewards (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9
Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate,
16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23
Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26
Souvenir, 27 Close.

Down: 2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4
Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12
Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15
Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21
Shout, 22 Green.



THANKS, SAM---



HAVE DONE IT
WITHOUT YOU!

I HEAR YOU AND =
DAD ARE GOING INTO 2
BUSINESS TOGETHER?



























IM STARVING, HELLO, MARGO.
WHAT'S FOR / GOODBYE,
DINNER, < ROMANCE.
TOMMIE ?
(FE a

ces

OH, BROTHER—
Pan WHAT A DAYS

FRAN BOLLE



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

I PItY ANYONE
WHO CROSSES
MY PATH TODAY?!

I PITY ANYONE
WHO CROSSES
MY PATH TODAY !!

DISCRETION IS ADVISED

The violence depicted in
this panel may be too
intense for younger
readers.

nw kingfeatures.com



Ne
FAD.

Sy N
Hist

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down



WOUL? I BE
STILL STANPING
HERE \F THE
Bus HAP



Sunday

ANN DEMANDS! UNLOCK
THIS Door!

UL



MISSED (T!









5S
Py
t/
bb

paniasa! siyBu pyom, H

gis

©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

+P RET




Y TORPEDO TUBE
READY, CAP'N!

CATCH ON
QUICKER.
WE SHOULD



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to



RE, ES eS

WHERES YOUR
BOAT, HAGAR ?



Oe)

Le
PN

y
cH 4
ae

The
Target



1 << IM EEHIND ONA
DON'T | FEW PAYMENTS...

COULP JT
HAVE BEEN

REPOSSESSED

















HOW many words of four
letlers or More tan Vou make
from the letters shown here? In
making a word, each letter may

uses be used once only, Each must
words in contain the centre letter and
- there must be at least one
the main nine-letter word. No plurals.
hody of TODAY'S TARGET
Good 19: very good 29; excellent
Chambers 38 (or more).

Solution tomorrow.

21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition).



















Yesterday’s

Sudoku Answer

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

diet dirt duet edit erupt pert
pitted putrid putt putted
putter puttied rite rutted
tepid tide tied tier tire tired
titre tried trip tripe true
trued TURPITUDE tutu utter



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday’s
Kakuro Answer





















Difficulty Level *& *&

Model question (5)
Climbing a low hill, but not



to any great extent
(2,1,5,5)

Employ someone else as a
model (7)

Attacks with stones,



perhaps (4,2)
Solicitors hold it to be
permissible (5)

Changing to steam



trains? He should
know (13)

Honour a relation (7)
After all, we do turn out
with official sanction (7)
Overburden journalists
with work (7)

Sorted out and put
away (6)

Choice example (5)
Ernest hasn't got time for
birds (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9
Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12
Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18
Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25
Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty.
Down: 2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4
Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12
Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run
for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21
Minor, 22 Snipe.























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

2/17

























Across Down
1 Archetypal 1 Quick-witted (5)
miser (7) 2 Meriting rebuke (13)
5 One of The Three 3 Behind time

Musketeers (5) specified (7)
Greatly cherished
person (5,2,3,3)

Appeal

4 Serious attempt (6)
5 Plant pest (5)
6 Writing in

earnestly (5) symbols (13)







Sequoia (7) 7 Accelerate (5,2)
Type of engine (6) 11 Fault (7)

Stimulus (6) 13 Enter uninvited (7)
Identify wrongly (7) 14 Be of good heart
Heavy drinker (5) (4,2)

Demagogic (6-7) 16 Mixture of

Very small (5) metals (5)

Glad (7) 18 Strictly observed (5)





















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.















2/17





















9/6]3 a SES
7/4/18 MS 7 9 IN 2/3
11512 7 9/82 5111/3
tala Oo 8RN1 3 4(RWs8 9
a 8517/9 M819 7
ate} BN 3c oN
37/6 NEGRI “AER!
8/1/7 cei 2 om 2
6/219 M2113 43/4 1
4131/5 [| 41 1/2



Famous Hand — 2

North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.
NORTH
#109764
VAK4
#310
eAKQ
WEST EAST
®AS85 #KI32
¥863 ¥Q972
@#K865 @Q72
#762 hs 3
SOUTH
4Q
W105
@#A943
hI10984
The bidding:
North East South West
1 *& Pass 1¢ Pass
1¢ Pass 2NT Pass
3 NT

Opening lead — five of diamonds.

The semifinal match between
Brazil and the United States at the
1985 Bermuda Bowl in Sao Paulo,
Brazil, could not have been any
tighter. Incredibly, with just one deal
of the 160-board confrontation
remaining, the two teams found
themselves in a dead tie.

AS reported yesterday, the dead-
lock was created when the Ameri-
cans gained 6 IMPs on Board 159
after the Brazilians failed to cash in
on opportunities for substantial gains
at both tables. That set the stage for
this dramatic last deal, with a place








in the final — and possibly the world
championship — at stake.

When the hand was first played,
Bob I lamman of the U.S. opened one
notrump with the North cards, and
everyone passed. After an opening
heart lead by East, Hamman had nine
top tricks, using the acc of diamonds
as an entry to cash dummy’s clubs.

When the deal arrived at the sec-
ond table, with a large partisan audi-
cnee watching on Vu-Graph, the
question was whether the Brazilians
would bid the game the Americans
had missed. Using a strong club sys-
tem, the Brazilians, to the accompa-
niment of wild cheers, proceeded to
reach three notrump as shown.

However, many of thosc watching
failed to realize that with South as
declarer, a different opening lead
would be made. And if that lead were
a diamond, the acc of diamonds
would be driven out before declarer
could score his long clubs.

Sure enough, the U.S. West, Lew
Stansby, led the five of diamonds,
and when the smoke cleared, the
contract was down two, giving the
Americans a gain of 9 IMPs on the
deal and a place in the final.

Three days later, the U.S. team
completed a relatively easy win over
Austria to capture the world title, but
those who were there will never for-
get the last two deals of the semi-
final match with Brazil, which pro-
pelled the Americans into the cham-
pionship round.

Tomorrow: Actions speak louder than words.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 9B



eS



The Tribune







wmperedpets

@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Reporter

WITH the many commercially pre-
pared dog foods available on today's
market, it is often difficult to tell which
ones are better than others. To make
things worse, many dog foods and
treats have been removed from shelves
do to fear of contamination. However,
one Bahamian dog lover sought an
alternative and baked her own batch of
homemade gourmet dog treats right at
home. She affectionately named the
treats after the native Bahamian dog
called a Potcake- thus “Pampered Pot-

cakes” was formed.

Tara Klonaris Holcombe,
a Bahamian wife and mother
of a two year old son, said
she decided to start Pam-
pered Potcakes in 2007 but
did not launch the business
until May 2008 at the
Bahamas Humane Society's
Annual Fun Day.

“T wanted to bake some-
thing healthy for my dog,
Snickers, and realised that
there were no homemade
dog treat businesses in the
market. I wanted something
natural and better for him. I
thought maybe this would be
something other people
would want because they like
to spend money on their
dogs,” Mrs Holcombe said.

Mrs Holcombe explained
that the process for baking
the tasty dog treats is quite
time consuming.

“T work fulltime so it is a
lot to come home and bake.
For the Jollification,( held at
the Bahamas National Trust
in December) I baked every
night for a month. I have it
down to a science now where
I can bake a full batch in an
hour and a half and that’s
like 300 or more,” Mrs Hol-
combe said.

The most popular flavors
are "Nassau Nutters" and
"Chops Lickin' Chicken
Souse" and the treats come
in basic dog bone shapes.

“They are all made from
natural products- no preser-
vatives. I had another one
called “Bimini’s Barkin’
Banana Bites” made with
Banana and Oatmeal. I
refrigerate them because
they last for months if kept in
the refrigerator,” Mrs Hol-
combe said.

For those who would
rather have treats that reflect
the many seasons celebrated
in the Bahamas, Pampered
Potcakes can make just about
any shape for any festive sea-
son although the bone shapes




SNICKERS the inspiration

behind the pampered potcakes
brand.

are more popular.

“When I first started I did
the cookie cutters for Christ-
mas. I had gingerbread men,
Christmas trees, angels, and
whatever cookie cutters I
had. I do colored ribbons on
the packaging such as red
and green for Christmas,
Valentine’s Day colors and
the blue and gold as those
are Bahamian colors,” Mrs
Holcombe said.

Mrs Holcombe said she
created the product to cater
to both Bahamians and
tourists.

“My products are being
sold in the local market of
which I would like to expand
and eventually I would like
to have my products sold in
stores catering to tourists.
Why shouldn't they take
home a souvenir from the
Bahamas for their dogs?
They take everything else for
their family and friends- why

not the family dog?” Mrs
Holcombe said.

Other animal lovers may
have to wait a while longer
for their own homemade nat-
ural treats from Pampered
Potcakes.

“T want to expand the
treats to all animals. I really
would like to get into making
them for cats but cats are so
finicky. I have even thought
about doing some for horses
but I have to research some
more,” Mrs Holcombe said.

Currently, Pampered Pot-
cake dog treat products are
being sold at the Bahamas
Humane Society, Palmdale
Vet Clinic (both Palmdale
and the Caves Village loca-
tions) and Simply Gourmet
(located on Shirley Street
and Kemp Road). Pampered
Potcakes has also already giv-
en back to the animal com-
munity by donating treats to
Proud Paws events.






















——

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

(ABOVE)
SMOOCHIE enjoy-
ing a small bone
pampered potcakes
treat proving that
one is never too
young to be a pam-
pered potcake.

(LEFT) PAMPERED
POTCAKES makes
a variety of snack
sizes to suit any
dogs snack crav-
ings.

CR-V

Head-turning styling. Side curtain airbags and power moonroof available.
Talk about pure bliss. Presenting the all-new CR-V. It’s something new to crave.

Shirley Street, 328-2288 IN| MC
www.hondabahamas.com NASSAU MOTOR CO LTD,


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

eS
nl t

e
@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Mr and Mrs | | ) t k
Tribune Features Editor Allen were thrilled ] S e ar, a e an
—_ by the assistance of

WHEN Gerord Allen, a Ue ek aune eter

eae? 5 pating in an “Island
local sanitation officer on lence
Eleuthera, and his wife, “With a new roof
homemaker Vernice, needed ve" our head, we








——



The Tribune





will have a better

a new roof for their home, life,” they said.

help came from an unexpect- on suet is Ft 7 rae
Go exactly the premise | f |

ed source - a group of visi- ae eee j 4 i

tors to the island, who neys, a non- prof- i :

instead of spending their it/non-government '

: (ine lath entity which seeks
vacation lying In the sun, Roere GuniC minds

donated their time to making nities in Eleuthera
life better for complete while giving visitors

a vacation that tru-
strangers. ly refreshes the
soul.

“Our goal is to
create a more holistic approach to community develop-
ment with the primary focus on challenging volunteers
to engage in their own transformation,” Shaun Ingraham,
the head of the organisation, told Tiibune Features.

It is asimple premise, Shaun explained, groups or indi-
viduals contact the organisation outlining their skills and
talents, Island Journeys then finds a suitable project in the
community, arranges accommodations and a schedule of
work, and the island journey begins.

Volunteers pay a small daily stipend of around $75
which includes room and board at a local home, sight-
seeing and transportation.

“Tt can be as strenuous as constructing a new roof, or as
untaxing as a group of nurses who volunteered in the clin-
ic, or a Writer who documents island life, we tap into your
vocation and create an experience that will truly transform
your life,” he said.

Since its inception in 2005, Island Journeys has impact-
ed many lives and forged strong partnerships with a num-
ber of volunteers and organisations like the prestigious Nell
Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory Univer-
sity in Atlanta, Georgia; the Wesley Foundation at Clem-
son University; the Windermere Island Foundation, and
the Cotton Bay Foundation. Participants have primarily
come from oversees.

However, Shaun said that given the current state of the
US economy, Island Journeys, like countless other non-
profit organisations, has seen a dramatic drop in the num-
ber of persons who can donate their time, which means
that in addition to the projects in the community that are
impacted, a significant revenue base for the island has
also been decreased.

“We had about 125 people last year, where some years
we have had 200 to 225 people. This year we are hopeful
for at least 100 people. Island Journeys has had phenom-
enal success, people say that other people just don’t care,
but that is not true,” he said.

Through its donations and the money which volunteers
spend on room and board and personal expenses, Island
Journeys has been able to inject more than half a million
dollars into the Eleuthera’s economy.

Recently, Island Journeys merged with another non-
profit organisation — the South Eleuthera Emergency
Partners (SEEP) which has been actively developing an
emergency operation centre. The project was divided into
two phases. Phase one included raising significant funds to
restore the ambulance, purchase a fire truck and con-
struct a building to house the vehicles. This was aided by
a number of community donations.

Phase two includes the completion of the community
centre which will have an office, a training centre and
will offer an activity hub for locals.

Shaun said that this year they are trying to get as many
Bahamians as possible to participate in the process and also
hope to extend the project to other Family Islands.

They are extending an invitation to businesses for fun
days, to civic organisations and to persons who wish to cel-
ebrate reunions with family and friends.

“We really want to encourage Bahamians to come and
give back to their country and reconnect with island life.
There is a redemptive quality in this experience, that even
if you’ve lost your job, you can give back and share your
time and talents on the Family Island.

“People pack a lot of stuff into life and what we are say-
ing is ‘unpack everything you don’t need on this journey,
because in addition to the sense of accomplishment in
helping persons, you can also experience the peaceful
tranquility of Eleuthera’,” Shaun said.

Dazzling performance at the Centre for Performing Arts

TWO young



a

VOLUNTEERS work
on projects while
experiencing an
island journey. Also
pictured -the new fire
truck, which was
donated to the com-
munity and a beauti-
ful beach where vis-
tors can unwind after
a day of giving back.





m@ BY ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Writer

TWO young Dancesport per-
formers wowed the over 100
students that attended the
World Dance Council’s benefit
performance for the children of
Nassau at the National Centre
for the Performing Arts, Shirley
Street last week.

Students from schools such
as CC Sweeting, CI Gibson and
GHS, got a chance to experi-
ence other forms of dance
besides our own local and
native dances. They even took
time out to get involved and
learn a few moves from dances
such as the give and mambo.

A dance couple from Italy
demonstrated the tango and
foxtrot along with another cou-
ple who demonstrated a Latin
dance from Spain depicting the
drama of the bullfight.

John Gaylan 13, and Alexan-
dra Gotkovich, 9, both from
New York have been dancing
for the past three years sepa-
rately. Although they have been
partners for only six months,
they dance as though they have
known each other since birth.

Alexandra said she is very

proud to be able to dance at
this level at her age.

“T really enjoy being able to
dance. I want to be able to go to
school for dance and be able to
do this as a profession,”she said.

John said dancing has not
been an easy road for him.

“Tt’s really difficult because
most of the time you spend your
whole day dancing and not
hanging out with your friends.
You would end up doing your
homework at night and it starts
to catch up with you. Howev-
er, it is really fun because you
get to go everywhere and its an
opportunity not a lot of people
get,” he said.

John said this trip to the
Bahamas was his second trip
out of the United States to per-
form.

“My first trip was to Canada
but I really like being in the
Bahamas. We spent a lot of
time at the park at Atlantis on
the water slides and the beach-
I really want to come back,”
Gaylan said.

Ambassador of Dance for the
World Dance Council, Anna
Smart, said both young dancers
train between two and six hours
a day to be at the levels they
are today.

“They train like Olympic ath-
letes and I think it is pretty safe
to predict that they will be
future world champions,”she
said.

Mrs Smart said the Bahamas
was chosen to host the World
Dance Sport Championship and
Benefit Performance for many
reasons.

“For us it was two-fold. We
wanted a beautiful location so
that when they had an oppor-
tunity to leave the ballroom
they had a beautiful place to
look at. Secondly, the history
of the liturgical dances in the
islands is what draws us here
because our Latin dances all
originate from those liturgical
dances, so for us it is a bit of a
homecoming,” Mrs Smart said.

Special Project officer for the
benefit event, Anne Higgins,
said they are hoping to make
this event and expression of
dance an annual event.

“By the time the dancers
come back next year we want to
have some Bahamians compet-
ing and doing ballroom danc-
ing throughout the year. We
hope Mrs Smart can bring some
teachers to help us get started,”
Mrs Higgins said.



dancesport per-
formers wow the
audience at the
Atlantis Resort, on
February 8, 2009,
during a demon-
stration at the
2009 World Pro-
Am Champi-
onships. They will
also be a part of
the World Dance
Council's benefit
performance for
children of Nas-
sau, on Tuesday
Feb. 10 at the
National Centre for
the Performing
Arts, Shirley
Street. The tickets
for that event cost
$10 and perfor-
mances will be at
9:30 and 11:30
a.m.

Eric Rose/Photo
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 11B





At tot

excellence

With scores of
Bahamians affected by
financial and social
change, an important
element sometimes

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

AS the cycle of rough
economic times and
increased violence has
once again hit the global
scene, the importance of
using art to calm the spirit
continues to live on in
many Bahamian high
school students today.

of change on children.
However, the Min-
istry of Education’s

Art Exhibition, is help-
ing dozens of students
tell their life stories.
Showcased last week
at the Marathon Mall’s
main atrium, hundreds

stories of love, peace,
nature, and emotions.

MOE Education Officer Pamela Chandler, explained that
this year’s theme, Promoting Excellence, not only gives the
public a chance to view the art curriculum in local schools, but
also shows the students’ diversity.

“We have a number of indigenous materials where we use
what we have in our environment, where we are trying to pro-
mote the creation of souvenir craft items. We have drawings,
paintings, and if you look around you will see bits of macramé,
Junkanoo and mosaic pieces.”

Mrs Chandler explained, that all government junior and

senior schools were welcomed to participate in the event, how-

ever some out island school have not been able to take part
because of travel and accommodation issues.

overlooked is the effects

(MOE) eleventh annual

of art pieces designed by
students showcase their

emotions.

CI Gibson senior Mariel Pierre explained that with increased
incidents of violence in her school and community, using art as
an outlet to express herself has over the years developed into
second nature.

“T though that everybody needs a little more love, and the
lack of it may be the reason for a lot of violence in our schools.”

Mariel said she draws in her spare time, especially if she is
angry or experience a rough emotional hurdle.

“T finds it calming, and if more young people did it, I think
they would come off the streets and see art as a positive hob-
by. 2

CI Gibson’s Widline Guillaume, a self described abstract
visionary, has embraced nature as a common theme in many of
her pieces.

A participant in last years Central Bank Art Exhibit and com-
petition, this youngster has over the last three years worked on
refining her talent while telling nature’s story.

Describing a piece she calls Nature, Wildine explained: “I
stick to pastel colours, this piece has different creatures found
in the Bahamas. There’s the Sand-dollar, a shell, the Yellow
Elder, lizards, and the Paradise bird.

“There is also a face that is revealed to anyone who pays
attention and it gives admiration to nature itself.

“T like to be free, but also spend alot of time detailing my
work. I’d say this is one of my favorites.”

Art enthusiast Tanya Bowe, said that over the past ten years
she has been collecting small yet unique exclusively Bahamian
art pieces.

At the exhibition, she was particularly draw to a figurative
piece designed by CI Gibson Deputy Head-Boy Lukson Tous-
saint.

The drawing which depicts an eagle, is described as a symbol



Overall, she feels that those students who have embraced the
subject, are discovering a tool which from the beginning of time
has helped in telling stories, and one used to visually describe

of hope through the power of God.
Mrs Bowe said: “I just like to see young people doing positive
things, and if my decision of purchasing one of the pieces could



Tina sana waves

B By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

EMERGING artist Philip Michael
Thomas, is making waves in the music indus-
try as one of the newest artists to visit the

Bahamian scene.

Hitting the stage last week where he was
the opening act for performers Ginuwine
and Morgan Heritage, this budding star is
setting his goals high to become one of the
best in the industry.

The 22-year-old Miami native, describes
his sound as a cool and easy flow, which
some may think of as Rhythm and Blues,
but what he explained as a new form of
modern RnB.

He says his love for music has been fos-
tered over many years of listening to and
watching the likes of Michael Jackson, Bob
Marley, Marvin Gaye, and Elvis Presley.

“T remember watching Michael Jackson’s
moonwalker at my crib, while my mom was
around the house doing her errands and
cleaning, I was sitting at the TV watching
Michael Jackson.”

Philip says he has also been compared to
the likes of John Legend, and Anthony
Hamilton, but wants to be known for his
own style.

One of his first songs, entitled Jane, is
about an old friend who provided him with
something far more intense than just visu-
al beauty. He explained his connection
with Jane as an experience that “was a
meeting of the minds, that took me to a
higher level.

“Overall, my music is inspired by life,
family and friends, experiences, TV, and it is
also about positive subjects on love and how
people deal with each other in relationships.

“Love is God, God is love, and God is
good, and its good that I can speak that

through my music.’

Not a stranger to
the Bahamas, Philip
said he has always
been a fan of the local
cuisine. One of his
favourite island food
is conch salad, which
he insists is far better
than the salad he’s
tried in Coconut
Grove, Miami.

During his inter-
view with the Tribune
while a guest at the
Marley Resort, Philip
said his family has
been close friends with
the Marleys and oth-
er big names in enter-
tainment, but was a bit
shy in talking about
his own famous back-
ground - his father
whom he is named
after starred in the hit
1980’s TV series Mia-
mi Vice.

Although he
acknowledged the mega success achieved by
his father during his time, Philip aims to
become successful in his own merit.

“My dad is an awesome singer also, but
alot of people don’t know that. I believe
stardom is in my genes, and I guess I’m
next in continuing with Michael Thomas
brand.”

The young artist said he could not talk
about inspiration as an artist without men-
tioning the achievements of Barrack Oba-
ma.

“T think its impacted the world in what
America has done in putting finally a man
of another race besides white, in the White



House. That inspires me to then go ahead
and believe in myself in the dream that I
have.”

Philip said through his music he has had
a chance to talk about the social issues that
are going on, and feels he is able to create a
higher conscience for people to meditate
on.

Returning to Nassau next month where
he will open for Tanya Stephens and Tada,
Philip said he is excited to jump start his
career in the Bahamas and looks forward to
bringing real music to the music scene.

For more on this artist visit www. philip-
michael2.com





ty
encourage someone to continue with their passion, then I would
have done my job.”

Apart from the actual exhibit, an important element to the cre-
ation of the pieces is in the support factor that many students seek
from their instructors.

CC Sweeting senior Laquan Rolle, names his art instructor
Jackie Sainville as his mentor. He says where some teachers are
non-approachable and unwilling to be a friend to students, Mrs
Sainville’s kind yet assertive nature has shown him that there is
beauty in everyone, and a story to be told in every creation.

Laquan who designed a miniature African Elephant, said he
used paint, glue, cardboard, and newspapers- but “not from The
Tribune,” - he stressed to create the structure.

Mrs Sainville who has been there with Laquan and others
from the start, said she has witnessed time and time again, a
complete transformation in many of her students who embrace art
as an extension and expression of themselves.

“The kids who occupy their time in the art room, don’t have
time to be getting involved in negative things, it’s unfortunate that
we have two small art rooms, but even so both rooms are always
occupied.”

Climaxing with an awards ceremony last Thursday, Government
High School walked away victorious as the overall winners in the
senior school division.

CC Sweeting took second place, and CV Bethel were awarded
third place.

In the Junior division, TA Thompson -Formally CC Sweeting
Junior- took first place, with SC McPherson in at second, and LW
Young in third.

In the out-island category, Exuma’s LN Coakley won first
prize, with Grand Bahama’s St George’s Secondary in second
place, followed by Eleuthera’s Preston Albury winning third
place.

With this exposition acting as a training ground for the up-and-
coming artist, MOE said they are just excited to be a part of the
training process for the students.

THOMAS
describes his
sound as a cool
and easy flow,
which some may
think of as
Rhythm and
Blues, but what
he explained as a
new form of
modern RnB.

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

The Lyford Cay Foundations

SCHOLARSHIPS IN THE ARTS
Application Is Open

The Lyford Cay Foundations are pleased to announce that applications
are now being accepted for the following academic scholarships for
study in the U.S., Canada, the U.K. and the Caribbean.

HARRY MOORE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP IN THE ARTS
One scholarship worth up to US$10,000 per annum.

For study at the undergraduate and graduate levels with preference
given to the latter. Approved fields of study are the fine, visual and
performing arts, as well as arts education.

NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIP

One scholarship worth up to US$7,500 per annum.

For study at the undergraduate and graduate levels. Approved fields
of study are classical instrument, voice and musical composition.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens and pledge to return to The
Bahamas upon graduation. Work samples and auditions will be required.

Please visit our website at www.lyfordcayfoundation.org for
additional information and application forms.

Forms may also be obtained from high school guidance counselors,
The College of The Bahamas Financial Aid Office, and the Lyford Cay
Foundation office, Please address your application to: The Chairman,
Screening Committee.

DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATIONS IS MARCH 31, 2009.



Your Dreams. Our Mission.
Inspired Philanthropy for a Better Bahamas



P. O. Box N 7776, Nassau, Bahamas

T 242.362.4910 / F 242.362.5449
E info@lyfordcayfoundation.org

W www.lyfordcayfoundation.org

rs
VAdiaN ieo*




This year Bahamian






take an homemaie “|
island gourmet
journey (log treats —
see page 10 see page nine |
rr wall

They

WLS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009



LAND SCAPE 4





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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.72WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER BREEZYWITH SUNSHINE HIGH 79F LOW 67F F E A T U R E S SEE‘THEARTS’SECTION Modification SEEPAGEELEVEN 2D Defending champs win R ESIDENTS of Nassau Vil lage were concerned last night about a possible stand-off between civilians and policea fter an officer was shot and injured in the area earlier yesterday. P olice yesterday surrounded a large area of the island, stretching from Nassau Villaget o Seabreeze Estates, and launched a manhunt for persons believed to be responsible for the shooting of Corporal 518 J ohnson of the Southeastern Division. At press time last night, p olice had a Nassau Village man in custody. He is now assisting them with their invest igation into the matter. They were still looking for other suspects believed to be connected to the incident. A sst Commissioner of Police Hulan Hanna told The Tribune that the man who is believed to h ave shot the officer is a “person of interest” to police. Officer Johnson was taken to D octors Hospital and treated for his injuries. Tensions in Nassau Village rose after the police officer was s hot in the thigh shortly after 4pm while he was reportedly attempting to arrest a man inc onnection with a shooting that The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Tensions high after police officer shot Residents concerned about possible stand-off in Nassau V illage n By PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net D ESPITE the downturn in the global economy, the Peo ple’s Republic of China has a greed to loan the government o f the Bahamas over $160 mil lion for roadworks and other projects. The agreement wasa nnounced yesterday during the official visit of China’s Vice Pre mier of State Council. B eing ushered from the Lynden Pindling International Airport in a convoy of armedg uards and dignitaries, His Excellency Hui Liangyu paid a courtesy call on the Governor General before visiting with Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham and his entire Cabinet at the Churchill Building. E xpressing his gratitude for Government to borrow $160 million from China Loan to go on roadworks and other projects SEE page two PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham shares a laugh with His Excellency Hui Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Repub lic of China, as he introduces him to members of his Cabinet at the Churchill Building yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f CHIN A’S VICE PREMIEROFSTATECOUNCILVISITS n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net SCHOOLS are being warned to be on high alert after a single masked gun man is believed to have robbed three private schools in broad daylight. Cash, jewellery and other personal items were stolen from the Southwest Christian Academy, Bayview Academy and the Alpha Early Learning Centre Masked gunman believed to have robbed three private schools A lpha Early Learning Centre was one of the schools robbed. SEE page six n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net AS Alocal company comes closer to providing a source of renewable energy for the Bahamas, a local environmental activist is criticising BEC for the less than transparent way the “greening” of the Bahamas is being conducted. Yesterday, Schneider Power announced that it signed a letter of intent with Emera to jointly pursue renewable energy projects in the Bahamas through the Bahamas Renewable Energy Corporation. According to a press release the letter of intent outlines a partnership between Emera and Schneider Power that will allow ANUNIDENTIFIED woman reportedly drowned in St Andrew’s swimming pool yesterday afternoon. Unconfirmed reports reach ing The Tribune last night were sketchy, however, it is known that Swift Swim Club meets at the school’s pool in the afternoons. Swim coaches Andy and Nancy Knowles could not be reached for comment. Unconfirmed reports of woman drowning in St Andrew’s pool SEE page six BEC is criticised by environmental activist n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A 32-YEAR-OLD electrician was arraigned in magistrate’s court yesterday charged with the murder of Philip Mar cellus who was stabbed to death on Valentine’s Day. Kendrick Dames, of Palm Breeze Avenue, off Carmichael Road, New ProvSEE page six Man, 32, charged with V alentine’s Day murder Kendrick Dames The Tribune was reliably informed yesterday by high level sources within government that a former parliamentarian, rumoured to be jailed in Cuba was in fact not being held in the communist country. While no new information was released regarding the status of the politician, the government source said that he had spoken with the former MP “yesterday”, adding only that the rumours regarding the individual were totally “untrue.” Recently, the former Director of Immigration, and now Ambassador to Cuba Vernon Burrows, said that he was instructed by government to take another look into the matter as the allegations surrounding the former MP continued to persist. SEE page six SEE page six For mer MP ‘not being held in Cuba’ S P O R T S

PAGE 2

m eeting with the Prime Minis ter, Mr Liangyu wished both Mr Ingraham and his colleagues good health before the two coun t ries signed four memorandums of understanding. T he most financially promin ent of these agreements was signed by the Minister of State for Finance, Zhivargo Laing and the Honourable Li Jun, Vice President of the China ExportImport Bank (Eximbank Under this agreement, China’s Eximbank has agreed to loan the Bahamas $150 million, of which the “airport highway project is of high priority.” According to the document signed yesterday, the estimated cost of the project is currently being prepared by the Bahamas government, and will be conveyed to the China Eximbank shortly after it is finalized. “China Eximbank, as the sole arm of the government of the People’s Republic of China for the operation of the concessionary lending, attaches great importance to such a request from the g overnment of the Bahamas,” the document read. “China Eximbank and the Ministry ofF inance of the Bahamas will discuss and agree on the terms and conditions of the loan and signt he loan agreement under the umbrella of the Framework Agreement.” The second agreement, of Eco nomic and Technical Coopera tion between the Bahamas and the People’s Republic of China was again signed by Mr Symonette for the Bahamas, and Mr Wang Chao, the assistant Minister of Commerce for China. Under this agreement, the gov ernment of China will provide a grant to the Bahamas in the amount of 70 million yuan, or over $10 million, to be used for the implementation of projects “to be decided through consul tations between the two governments.” The specific matters in this regard, the document read, will be stipulated in the agreements that will be subsequently signed between the two countries. T he third agreement a waiver of visa requirements for holders of diplomatic passports wass igned by the deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette and the Honourable Song Tao, deputym inister of Foreign Affairs of the People’s Republic of China. Under this agreement citizens of either country, who are holders of valid diplomatic passports, may enter, exit, transit, and stay in the country of the other party for a period not exceeding 30 days without having to obtain a visa. If citizens of either country excluding diplomatic and consular staff will have to apply for visas if they intend to stay longer than 30 days. Additionally, either county reserves the right to refuse entry of any person who is deemed to be an “undesirable” without hav ing to cite any grounds for the refusal. And finally, a memorandum of understanding was signed on Agricultural Cooperation between the Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources of the Bahamas and the People’s Republic of China. Under this agreement, both parties shall be committed to the development of cooperation in the fields of crop farming, ani mal husbandry and fish farming. Additionally, the agreement pro vides for cooperation in farming of tropical fruits and vegetables, grain crop production such as peas, beans, and corn flower production, small ruminant production systems, poultry farming, and fish farming, inclusive of crab culture and processing. Today Mr Liangyu will take a brief tour of Atlantis before visiting the Clifton Heritage site at Clifton Pier. Following this stop, he will take a brief tour of the Lucayan Tropical farm at the Airport Industrial Park before leaving the Lynden Pindling International Airport for Grand Bahama. n Message from H E Mr HU Dingxian, Ambassador Extraordinary and P lenipotentiary of the P eople's Republic of China in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas AT THEinvitation of the government of the Commonw ealth of the Bahamas, H E M r HUI Liangyu, Vice Premier of the State Council of the People's Republic of China, will pay an official visit to the Bahamas from February 1 7 to 19, 2009. This is an event o f great significance in ChinaB ahamas relations. Vice Prem ier HUI will bring with him t he friendship and goodwill of t he Chinese people to the Bahamian people. Let's give him a warm welcome here. D uring his visit, Vice Premier HUI will meet with the top leaders of the Bahamas, and they will sign a series of b ilateral agreements of cooperation. I firmly believe that the visit will yield fruitfulr esults, further strengthen dialogue and exchanges between C hina and the Bahamas featuring mutual respect, equality, mutual benefit and win-win c o-operation, and contribute greatly to the promotion of s ound, stable and in-depth growth of our constructive and co-operative relationship. I n 1997, diplomatic relations were established between China and the Bahamas, which marked a new chapter in the history of our bilateral relations. For the past 12 years, China a nd the Bahamas have r espected each other, treated e ach other on an equal footing and had sincere co-operation. Our all-round friendly relations have been continuously deepened and broadened, and maintained a healthy andr obust momentum, thanks to t he concerted efforts to the t wo governments and peoples. T he Chinese government highly appreciates the Bahamian government'su nremitting commitments by adhering to the one China policy. Recent years have witn essed fruitful exchanges and co-operation in a wide range of areas between the twoc ountries, including politics, economics, culture, education a nd tourism. These facts have proven that the establishment and development of relations b etween China and the Bahamas serve the fundam ental interests of our two peoples and go along with the trend of the times. Bilateral t rade increased by 9.8 per cent to $181 million in 2007 and by 7 4.9 per cent to $244 million for the first 10 months in 2008. Thanks to the joint efforts ofb oth sides, the ChinaBahamas friendly co-operat ion has reached a new level. The world is now undergoing complex and profound changes. Under the new circumstances and in the face of new opportunities and challenges, China stands ready to w ork with the Bahamas to b uild on past achievements, s um up and draw on experience in the development of our bilateral relations, and remains committed to the development of a constructive and co-operative relationship. P RIME MINISTER H ubert I ngraham talks with His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of T he People’s Republic of China yesterday at the Cabinet Office on Bay Street. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE MINISTER OF STATE for Lands and Local Government Byran Woodside shakes the hand of His Excellency Hui Liangyu Vice Premier of the State Council of The People’s Republic of China yesterday at the Cabinet Office yesterday. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Message from the Chinese Ambassador Go vernment to borrow $160 million from China FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 3 T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong Plaza • Madeira St. Wong’s Plaza • Madeira St. Tel: (242 Tel: (242 2335 2335 Soft and durable Diversatex Soft and durable DiversatexTM TMcushion is fade and mildew cushion is fade and mildew resistant and is available in resistant and is available in blue, green or terracotta blue, green or terracotta x xChairs Chairsx xTables Tablesx xBenches Benchesx xUmbrellas Umbrellasx xLoungers Loungersx xDrinks Trolleys Drinks Trolleysx xCoffee Tables Coffee Tablesx xEnd Tables End Tablesx xCushions CushionsOutdoor Elegance Outdoor Elegance Guatemala apologises to Cuba for Bay of Pigs Guadeloupe strikers blockr oads and close airport In brief n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net ANGRY customers expressed their outrage yesterday after some had to wait as long as six hours for service at the Princess Margaret Hospital pharmacy. But a hospital official explained that the delays were caused by the process of recording patient data in a newly implemented software system – which ironically, w as designed to create more efficiency at the pharmacy. The system is supposed to allow p atient information to be quickly accessed, and simplify the process of prescription filling. T he Tribune r eceived a call from one frustrated patient yesterday morning, who was soa ngered over the lengthy wait that h e left the hospital to get his medication elsewhere. When The Tribune visited the h ospital a short time later, around 10.30am, dozens of patients c rowded the pharmacy's waiting r oom. A few elderly patients – who said they often have to seta side a whole morning, and some t imes the afternoon as well to fill prescriptions at PMH – were u pset about the lack of a senior c itizens’ window at the pharmacy. A number of patients claimed t hat sometimes nerves become so frayed in the waiting room, thatr ows and shoving matches erupt. A few others noted that many people had become so fed up with w aiting that they left the pharma cy in a huff before being served. "I like how they have the number system set up because you can just pick a number and sit down. But it seems like when they get your file they just completely shut down. L L i i n n e e j j u u m m p p i i n n g g A lot of people left because they was taking too long to call their number," said T Storr, a patient who had been waiting att he pharmacy since 7am. "Somet imes we lucky but I don't know what’s happening today. When I don't have nothing to do I come to this pharmacy so I can stay here u ntil 2, 3 o’clock but not when I have things to do". Retired civil servant Coralee C urtis, 66, thinks the hospital needs to serve patients on a "first come, first serve" basis to elimin ate line-jumping. " This number system ain' working because people meet you here since 6 in the morning, they meet you sitting waiting for the ticket window to open, and jump in front of you. Minister (of Health Hubert) Minnis needs to be here to see how people carry on a round here.” Usually, when a patient’s numb er is called, they can approach the window and hand their pre-s cription to hospital staff. However, if that patient has yet to visit the hospital since the new Centricity Software programme w as launched last month, they must answer a few personal quest ions to update their records, PMH public relations officer Thelma Rolle said yesterday. "We warned the public to e xpect some delays in registering p atients in the new system. This is going to be a new step necessary to get patients in the system ands o we had asked them to be patient with us during the transit ion process,” Mrs Rolle said. S he said she was not aware of r ows erupting over line-jumping, but would raise the issue, along with the idea of a window for senior citizens, during the next m anagement meeting. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE mother of a 22-year-old man allegedly shot dead by police in a Garden Hills sub-division was seeking answers at the start of an inquest into his 2004 shooting yesterday. The first day of testimony about the death of Lincoln Forbes got underway in the Coroner’s Court with five witnesses appearing, including Mr Forbes’ mother Ruth Julian. Jurors and Ms Julian were shown photographs taken by Central Detective Unit (CDU investigator and witness, Det Sgt James Colebrooke. In the photos, they saw the victim’s body – found a t the edge of residential property next to a “large quantity of cash” – as well as two vehicles, two guns and views of the street where the incident took place. Civilian witness Gavin Ellis said he saw Mr Forbes lying on his stomach holding a gun in his hand. However, in the photographs taken around 40 minutes later by Det Sgt Colebrooke, the victim was on his back and neither of the two guns record ed in evidence appeared to be in his hand. Mr Ellis, of Garden Hills, told the court that he and his wife were in bed at around 11pm when they heard what he recognised as gunshots being fired nearby outside. Hearing people “rambling around” in the yard afterward, he looked out the window to see two men he identified as police officers walking casually across his property, from back to front. When they reached the front of the house he opened the front door, and was approached by one of the two men, who he said was carrying an “Uzi”type weapon. The man identified himself as a police officer and told him to stay inside. It was while standing on his porch that Mr Ellis said he saw a body, apparently lifeless, lying face down on the south western side of his property. Later, he said the officer came back and questioned him about what he’d heard. During the questioning of Mr Ellis in court, Mr Forbes’ mother inquired why, if Mr Ellis had seen a gun in the hand of her son as he lay dead, there were only two guns photographed in the police’s crime scene evidence album – neither in the vic tim’s hand. Mr Ellis said he did not know, but was “sure” there was a gun in Mr Forbes’ hand when he saw him that night. A sked by Mrs Julian if the two officers he saw walking around the house were the only two officers o n the scene, Mr Ellis said he was not sure. He said when one returned to interview him, officers were “all around.” Mrs Julian, a teacher and Ministry of Education employee, testified that her son had lived with her all of his life” up until shortly before he was killed. Although he was shot on Thursday, June 3, 2004, s he did not learn of his death until the following Sunday when she was urged to make inquiries by a young man who lived in her neighbourhood who said he had “heard something happened” to her son. After her own testimony, Mr Forbes’ mother stood on numerous occasions, when permitted by Coroner William Campbell, to press other witnesses on certain points, apparently keen to clarify in her own mind what had happened to her son on the night of his death. Road Traffic Department supervisor Dwayne Pratt told the court he had lent his black Toyota Corolla to his cousin, Trevon Thompson (also known as Trevon Stewart) on June 3, after Thomp son told him he needed to go and get some cash from an ATM. Despite telling him to “come right back”, the Golden Gates sub-division number two resident said he did not see his cousin again that night. The vehicle was later found at the scene of the killing of Lincoln Forbes, along with a blue Ford Taurus. When he retrieved it from the CDU compound, the car had a bullet hole in the windshield, Mr Pratt said. Dr Nicole Adderley, a doctor at Princess Margaret Hospital, testified that she pronounced Mr Forbes dead on June 4. She said he had been “brought in dead” by police, who did not identify him. The inquest resumes on Thursday. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net PRELIMINARY data from an independent audit of the Department of Civil Aviation reveals that in many areas the agency exceeds international safety regulations. This was disclosed by Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace during an interview with The Tri bune yesterday. "It (the audit m ent that sticks out in my head, in a number of cases our procedures that are now in place and operating are ahead of the regulations. So this is a case where the people are operating in a much more sophisticated fashion than the regulations require, which as far as I'm concerned is the best indication of staff intent," he said. The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO United Nations Specialised Agency – spent one week auditing the department's safety guidelines and presented its preliminary findings to the minister and aviation officials on Monday. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said he would not divulge the s pecifics of the report until he has a chance to give it a thorough appraisal and discuss the findings with aviation personn el. "There were specific recommendations, except as you would understand, I would like to have a chance to sit and talk to the staff first so I'm very clear on what some of the priorities are before I start talking about them publicly," he said. R R a a t t i i n n g g However he did say that preliminary information does not suggest that Civil Aviation’s rating will be downgraded, as it was nine years ago. In 2000 the Bahamas Civil Aviation Authority was downgraded to a Category 2 agency by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA safety oversight was not up to international standards. In November 2001 the authority was restored to Category 1 status. To restore the Authority to Category 1, the govern ment made several policy changes, including an amendment to the Civil Aviation Act, 1976; repealed the colonial Air Navigation Order, 1961; and implemented the Bahamas Air Navigation Regulations, 2001 and the Bahamas Air Safety Regulations, 2001. That year government also implemented a certification and surveillance system that mirrored that of the FAA and the ICAO and established a safety issue resolution process that meets all ICAO standards and practices. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said government will be engag ing in conversations with the ICAO before deciding what, if any, recommendations will be adopted. "There is a 90-day process, first for us to be able to get back to them regarding some of the specifics in it. So I would suspect it's probably going to take that long before we go public with it so that people are very clear on those issues we have identified and will work on together. "There are certain regulations that are a part of ICAO that don't necessarily apply to the Bahamas and we have to decide whether we want them to apply to the Bahamas, depending on what kind of initiatives we want to pursue. The completed report will be posted on ICAO's website later this year for public viewing. n HAVANA Guatemalan President Alvaro Colom apologized to Cuba on Tuesday for his country's having a llowed the CIA to train exiles i n the Central American country for the 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion, according to the Associated Press . " Today I want to ask Cuba's forgiveness for having offered our country, our territory, to prepare an invasion of Cuba. It w asn't us, but it was our territor y," Colom said during a speech at the University of Havana. He added that he wished to apologize "as president and h ead of state, and as commander in chief of the Guatemalan army." About 1,500 Cuban exiles t rained under CIA guidance in G uatemala before invading the island in April 1961 in an unsuccessful bid to overthrow FidelC astro's communist government. The Bay of Pigs invasione nded after three days with about 100 invaders killed and a nother 1,000 captured by Cuban forces. During his official visit to Cuba, Colom was awarding Guatemala's highest honor toC astro. It was unclear if the ailing 82-year-old former presidentw ould receive the medal in person or if it would be delivered to h im later. Castro met in recent days with two other visiting L atin American presidents, Cristina Fernandez of Argentina and Chile's Michelle Bachelet. Photographs of him with each of the presidents were l ater released by their respective governments. n B ASSE-TERRE, Guadeloupe The French Caribbean island of Guadeloupe was on the verge o f rebellion, a political leader said Tuesday after stone-throwi ng protesters set cars and build ings ablaze, forced the internat ional airport to close and clashed with police, according to the Associated Press . Nearly four weeks of work stoppages and demonstrations f or lower prices and higher pay have caused thousands of t ourists to flee or cancel holidays on the normally tranquil island, prompting many hotels to close and cruise ships to head elsewhere. “It is a political crisis, an institutional crisis and we are on the brink of sedition,” Guadeloupe’s Regional Council President Victorin Lurel told France-Info radio. From Paris, France’s Interior Minister Michele Alliot-Marie said the protests had caused “degradation, devastation and confrontations” on Guadeloupe and its sister island, Martinique, where most shops and offices have been closed by the protests. She urged “calm, responsibility and restraint” and said she hoped for a resumption of talks with protesters that broke down last week. Police said they arrested 18 people overnight as protesters burned cars, a library and a boat-rental store in Sainte-Anne and Point-a-Pitre. An official, speaking on the standard condi tion of anonymity, said at least three officers suffered minor wounds due to gunshots fired by looters taking advantage of the chaos. Guadeloupe’s main airport was closed Tuesday because workers could not pass through barricaded and debrisclogged roads, said Guade loupe’s top appointed official, Nicolas Desforges, and several flights were canceled. Paris has refused to budge on strikers’ demands for a 200 euro ($250 paid workers who now make roughly 900 euros ($1,130 month. But business leaders in Martinique have agreed to lower prices by 20 percent on 100 products, including food items. Strikers want prices cut on nearly all supermarket products a step that Stephane Hayot, a spokesman for the National Union of Wholesale Distributors, said “would represent our death sentence” by forcing them to sell at prices that don’t cover their costs. Police detained 50 demonstrators on Monday after they were pelted by stones as they tried to take down barricades. Roadblocks were being gradually lifted Tuesday morn ing and a trickle of vehicle traf fic was resuming, the police official said. Anger over PMH pharmacy waiting Some customers forced to wait six hours for service Audit spotlights strength of Dept of Civil Aviation safety regulations V INCENT V anderpool-Wallace PRINCESSMARGARET HOSPITAL “A lot of people left because they were taking too long to call their number T Storr Mother seeks answers into son’s shooting death INQUEST

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EDITOR, The Tribune. Your letter, Ms Russell, about “opposing homosexual rights” is vile and hateful. Your ignorance is boundless and your accusations are groundless. To me they recall the witch hunts of the past when untold thousands of innocent women were drowned or burned at the stake. Homosexuals are born as they are. They cannot change, like you cannot change the colour of your skin (I know, Michael Jackson did). Just like heterosexuals, many homosexuals are creative and artistic. The list of names of famous artists, actors, TV personalities, and athletes are impressive. These lovely islands, home to about 600 churches or more are in danger of becoming hate filled, divided and violent if we allow this anger and prejudice to per petuate itself. Instead of hateful letters like yours, messages of acceptance, tolerance and respect for others should be published and advocated. WALTER ABSIL Nassau, February, 2009. E DITOR, The Tribune. Our Police Force has taken a big hit recently. At least one local n ewspaper, has reported that one o f its sources informed them that some officers are selling cocaine confiscated from alleged drug dealers. This brought immediater esponses not only from the Minister with responsibility for the force but also the Prime Minis ter himself. Both expressed their disappointment with the report. One cannot be faulted to think t hat one of the more crippling aspects of criminal behaviour ont he Bahamian psyche is not just the alarming crime rate, but nothi ng workable and sustainable ever seems to be on the horizon. It is more than amazing that serious crimes have been a thorn in our country’s side for manyy ears, yet to date the country has not witnessed any creativea pproach or initiative emanating from the security forces. A ll that is coming out of the police is that recycled excuse that more citizen cooperation is needed to solve crime. While the help o f citizens is needed to solve crime, it must be remembered that the existence of difficulty in t he execution of one's task is no r eason not to get the job done. If t he police officers are convinced t hat the cooperation of citizens is so crucial to the fight against c rime but is not forthcoming, maybe they should consider r esigning en bloc. Our failure over the years to s peak frankly about the terrible inefficiencies and lack of creative t hinking associated with the Police Force is a direct contributor to its near irrelevance. In light o f this, the following recommendations should be given due cons ideration: 1) Each new police officer must h ave a minimum of a first degree, w ith the ability to think creatively and strategically, and whose specialised area of training will be in cutting-edge investigating t echniques. 2 ) Each commanding officer of the CID in each Police Station and CDU must be given a mandate that unless 80 per cent ofc rimes committed in his division is cleared up there is no chance of promotion or pay increase. 3) Each homicide must be assigned to a specific officer, with the clear understanding that itsr esolution is his responsibility, within a specific time frame. 4 ) Every officer from the rank of Inspector up who does not poss ess the requisite skills and competence to function within a result-oriented organisation should be redeployed. The leadership of the Police F orce needs to be creative and decisive. JERRY ROKER N assau, February, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Not the right incentive for police A LETTER published on this page today o utlines what the writer believes should be the standard required before a police officer can receive either an increase in salary or a prom otion. If implemented it could take us back to the head-hunting days of the Red Indians in early American history when the number of scalped heads strapped to a brave warrior’s waist band d ecided his standing among the tribe’s head honchos and proved his valour in battle. Our letter writer is now suggesting that our p olice officers bring home their human trophies if they want to succeed in the Force. He suggests that each commanding officer in each police station must understand that unless 80 per cent of the crimes committed in his divis ion are solved he has no chance of promotion or a pay increase. What an incentive to plant evidence to bring h ome the bacon, and get the payoff. The writer further suggests that each homic ide must be assigned to a specific officer “with the clear understanding that its resolution is his responsibility within a specific time frame.” N o reputable police force would put such pressure on any member of its department. If anyone watches any of America’s crime files o n television, they will know that many crimes are not easy of solution, no matter how clevert he police officer. Many take years to solve, most only by the dogged determination of an officer resolved not to let a criminal get away w ith what he might think is “the perfect crime.” Over the years while working on other cases, an officer will keep returning to the old case, always looking for new clues. Very often, with modern investigative techniques, he tracks down his prey. Because our police officers don’t always suc ceed does not necessarily point to a lack of abil ity. Of course, there are cases of careless officers; officers who either through ignorance or preconceived notions look at evidence, but don’t see it. We shall never forget not too long ago one of our reporters was with two police officers looking at a murder scene a scene where it was suspected that someone had tried to scrub a way blood and with it all evidence. The police had searched the room, but could find nothing suspicious. However, our reporter with a member of the murdered man’s family, did a thorough search in the presence of the officers. On the inside edge of a cabinet they found what looked like a blood stain. They found other small brownish coloured smudges, and then a f aded smudge about a foot square on the porous tile. The reporter turned to the policeman: “This looks like blood to me.” “No,” replied the policeman, “that’s only rust.” The second policeman, seeing the concern of the two young men, suggested that a scrapping be made. We do not k now the outcome of that scraping we believe the family was told that it was negative for blood but we do know that the investig ation was being done by two overworked policemen. One of them complained that he had so many cases to investigate and solve, that he had to work long hours, that he hadn’t seen his family in days and here it was Christmas a nd another crime was added to his file. This man could not have taken any more pressure even if it meant losing a promotion and ani ncrease in pay. It reminds us of the fabricated evidence in the murder of Sir Harry Oakes on July 8, 1943 that almost put the hangman’s noose around the neck of his son-in-law, Count Alfred (“Fredd ie”) de Marigny. Instead of calling in Scotland Yard or the FBI, the Duke of Windsor, governor at the time, brought in two hick Miam i police officers, who were introduced as a homicide investigator and an identification e xpert with the Miami police department. The Duke knew Capt E W Melchen, who had been assigned to meet him and his wife on their vis i ts to Miami. Obviously, here was an opportu nity to give his friend a chance to make his name and solve what turned out to be one of the b est-known unsolved murder cases of the cen tury. S o anxious were they to make headlines that shortly after their arrival de Marigny, who because of his animosity towards Sir Harry b ecame a subject of interest, was arrested. The case collapsed, however, when the late Godfrey Higgs, de Marigny’s counsel, proved that de Marigny’s fingerprint upon which the whole case turned, had not been taken from the chinese patterned screen in Sir Harry’s burned bedroom as “identification expert” James Barker had claimed. It was believed to have come from the smooth surface of a glass from which de Marigny drank some water while he awaited his interrogators in an adjourning room. Planted, mistake made, deliberate fraud, call the fingerprint what you will, but this is what happens when a carrot is dangled before inves tigators as a reward for swift solutions. In this c ase the two investigators had hoped to reap fame from newspaper headlines that were to announce a sensational fingerprint conviction by two American investigators in a gruesome murder of a lord by his French son-in-law. Instead they were laughed out of court and returned home in disgrace. We agree that our police should get the best t raining possible, have only the number of cases that they can handle, and, with the help of the public, honestly solve as many cases as they can. But no bribes be they pay or promotions should be dangled before them. Police Force leadership needs to be creative LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net -2%,7<),1$1&,$/&21752//(5 '($'/,1( )(%58$5< EDITOR, The Tribune. This week was not a good one for the People w orldwide and particularly in the Bahamas. Firstly I find it very scary that the US recently vot ed in a new President, Barrack Obama, who has a lot of political capital behind him but what happens when Congress votes on the Bail Out Bill he pre s ented to them this week. Not one Republican found enough good in it to vote for it and not one Democ rat found enough faults in it to vote against it. How is that for bi-partisanship. I just think the politic ians do not get it. We are in trouble they may not be but we are. Secondly, The World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland is meeting this week and giving us a message of doom and gloom. A number of the peo ple attending the Forum are those same people that got us into this economic mess in the first place. M any of these same people are in Davos telling us how bad it is and with no ideas how to solve thep roblems they created. And if they are not bankers, then they are wacky economists who are not the d oers in this world, and therefore unlikely to solve anything. Thirdly, we have one of the largest political parties in the Bahamas, telling us just how dreadful and cynical their party culture is. What appears to be m ost important to them is that one of their members should not give evidence against another member or s he is threatened with being expelled from the party. Regardless of the fact that whoever that person is everyone is obliged to tell the truth in any court. When are they going to learn that the country comes first and their petty party second? H owever, fourthly on the positive side the present government is prepared to stand up to the pervasive c ulture of corruption in this country and retire “public” servants who are not up to the mark. I am sure n ot all of them are corrupt but who knows one bad egg spawns another. I suggest that all voters in this country ask their MP three questions: 1) What are you doing for your Constituency? 2) What are you doing for the Country? 3) What are you doing for Yourself? I f you do not get hard facts look for a replacement that can give you good answers next time youh ave to vote and maybe we will make this country a wonderful place again. PATRICK H THOMSON Nassau, January 31, 2009. Three questions for our MPs Letter was vile and hateful

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE had occurred in the area yesterday morning. According to police, the two incidents are believed to be connected. Persons calling The Tribune from Nassau Vill ageyesterday evening said that the “talk on t he street” was that there would be “trouble” in the community last night. One woman, who wished to remain anonymous, said that while she was on the phone to The Tribune she thought she could hear noises which sounded like gunshots, but did not wantt o look outside. It was further claimed that yesterday’s shooti ng incidents are connected to the murder of O nado Newbold, 32, last month. N ewbold, known to family and friends as “Bain Town Fella”, was shot dead in Nassau Village in late January. According to police, the victim died at the scene after being shot multiple times in thec hest between nine and 12 times, according to some witnesses on the scene. However, police press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans told The Tribune that he could not confirm any connection between yesterday’s shooting and Newbold’s murder. Contacting the Director of the C aribbean and Latin American desk, M r Burrows said that an initial search revealed that there were only 10 Bahamians being held in Cuban prisons. These 10 persons, he said, were all m ales, and all were being held for attempting to bring either cocaine or marijuana into the country. While this initial search was limited to the most highly populated districts on the island, Mr Burrows admitted that there were a number of small provincest hat have not reported back “as yet.” H owever, the likelihood that the former MP would be held in any of them, he said, was very “unlikely”. “Officially, there is no proof,” Mr Burrows said. “While some of those small provinces have not reported as yet, it is veryu nlikely that that will change,” he said. idence, arrived at the courthouse in Bank Lane with four officers in an unmarked police car just after noon, and was escorted upstairs to Court One with shackles on his wristsa nd ankles. Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez dismissed the court m omentarily before returning to read the charges. Dames, dressed in jeans, and an orange polo shirt and flannel fleece-lined jacket, stood quietly listening as Magistrate Gomez told him he was charged with murder for intentionally causing the death of Philip Marcellus on Feb-r uary 14. M arcellus, 27, who is believed to be a resident of Golden Isles Road, was stabbed multiple times about the body in the area of Rocky Pine Road, off McKinney Drive, on Saturday, February 14. He was found lying in the street and Emergency Medical Services pronounced him dead at the scene. A preliminary inquiry will begin in court five on Friday, F ebruary 24, to determine whether there is enough evidence against Dames to place a trial before the Supreme Court. A total of 17 witnesses are listed to give evidence. The accused is represented by attorney Murrio Ducille. Dames will be remanded in custody until the inquiry b egins. both companies to collaborate on at least three projects that have been offered through BEC’s Request for Proposals for Renewable Energy Projects. The projects short-listed by BEC are located in New Providence, Abaco and Harbour Island andt otal over 24 megawatts of capacity. BREC said that it was informed by BEC that its project proposal had been shortlisted and will proceed to the next stage. Thomas Schneider, chairman of BREC and pres ident of Schneider Power called the signing a “major step” in establishing BREC as a “true player in renewable energy in the Caribbean”. Wayne Crawley, vice president corporate devel o pment of Emera said, "We look forward to working with BREC and their local partners to support BEC's renewable energy programme. This is an important economic energy source for the Bahamas". Emera owns 25 per cent of Grand Bahama Power Company through their 50 per cent ownership of ICD Utilities. BREC, is a joint-venture with the Nassau based Winso Company to develop renewable energy projects in the country. While Schneider Power owns a controlling inter est in the joint venture, BREC’s website lists Vincent MacDonald as Chief Executive Officer and Presi dent and Kevin Ingraham as the Vice President of Corporate Finance. However, local environmentalist Sam Duncombe is very concerned about the vagueness of the release, pointing out that it does not say what the projects are other than they are renewable energy projects. “I find it very disturbing that the projects that are on the table have not been made available to the public for input. As we are going to be the ones paying for the energy. Don’t you think we should have a say in which companies are allowed to oper ate here,” she said. Calls and e-mails to both BEC General Manager Kevin Basden and BREC’s Chief Executive Officer Vincent MacDonald went unanswered up to press time. Ms Duncombe said that successive governments really need to stop “treating the Bahamian people like children and let us in on these projects.” “While fossil fuel certainly has more costs than buying transporting and burning fuel that is direct ly linked to global warming, the Bahamian public should be a party of our collective renewable future? Additionally what is the Energy Policy of The Bahamas? When are the laws that prohibit an individual to supply their own homes with alternative energy going to be changed so that we can become truly independent from an energy standpoint,” she asked. Ms Duncombe admitted that supplying homes independently may be financially out of reach at the moment but the more independent systems that are sold will ultimately bring down the cost so that more people can afford to energize their homes independently of government. “This would create a huge spin off in jobs as we will need people trained to install all of this new technology. When is the public going to be involved in that process? Ultimately we should know who the companies are who their Bahamian partners are and we should absolutely have a say in which companies get chosen to supply us with power,” Ms Duncombe said. within the space of four and a half hours on Monday. Police reported that in each instance a “gunman standing about six feet tall and dressed in dark clothing” committed the crimes. Yesterday police press liaison officer Walter Evans said that, based on the descriptions given, there is a “strong possibility” that the robberies are linked but this cannot be determined with certainty at this early stage in investigations. No-one was injured during the bold robberies. According to police reports, the gunman entered the Southwest Christian Academy, which provides schooling for children from infancy to around five years, at about 11am. Employee Lawronamae Strachan said he bypassed the door to the “baby room” where classes were underway and headed straight to the secretary’s office, where he was able to escape with about $1,300 in cash. Other employees of the Shrimp Road school reported seeing the man head directly to the office leading Ms Strachan to believe that a parent or someone who may have done some work on the property may have been involved. “He closed the door, she looked up, and he had a shotgun under his arm. He had it pointing at her and he said “Give me the money.” She gave him the money and he ran out. “I went to the outside door and I saw him running away. He went about half a block down and a blue Explorer was waiting for him. He jumped in the passenger side and another person, shorter than him, jumped in the driver’s side and they sped off,” she said. The “light brown-skinned” gunman was wearing blue trousers, a white shirt and a dark tam, she said. He did not have a cloth covering his face as police reports indicated to be the case at the two other schools. Ms Strachan yesterday said that she planned to call around a few schools to warn them to be extra careful in the wake of the incident. She said Southwest Christian Academy is reviewing its own security measures to ensure that similar incidents cannot happen so easily in the future. According to police, the robbery at Bayview Academy on Augusta Street took place at 3pm and saw an employee robbed of jewellery. Meanwhile, the incident at the Alpha Early Learning Centre on Pigeon Plum Street in Pinewood Gardens occurred at 3.30pm. A handbag containing personal items was taken from a staff member. Tensions high after police officer is shot F ROM page one Man charged with murder F ROM page one Former MP ‘not being held in Cuba’ FROM page one FROM page one BEC is cr iticised FROM page one Masked gunman

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T arpon Springs, Florida – As the mist rolled in across the bayou, local community leaders gathered in the Heritage Museum here last T hursday evening to celebrate their shared history with the Bahamas. This city of 23,000 on Florida's west coast – about 30 miles north of Tampa – has had a Bahamian connection ever since an "adventurer from Nassau" named Joshua Boyer started the f irst family homestead here in 1877. At the time, both black and white Bahamian 'conchs' were hooking sponges and catching turtles from Key West all the way up the gulf coast. In a 1928 newspaper article, Boyer reminisced about those pioneer days: "I came up the A nclote River on a fishing trip and by chance stopped off at Mr. Ormond's residence. I built a residence there, and the same year M iss Mary Ormond and I were m arried. Everything there was ours. The land and the game and f ish were as free as air." Sponger Money Never Done But the biggest and bestk nown Bahamian connection and the one that was celebratedl ast week – is the link between the Greek communities of Tarp on Springs and Nassau. Both had their origins in the sponge trade, which lasted less than a century and was one of the biggest revenue earners for botht he Bahamas and Florida. As the song goes, in those days it seemedt hat sponger money was never done. At its peak before the Second World War, the northern Caribbean fishery removed 47 m illion pounds of live sponge annually and employed thousandso f people and hundreds of ships in the Bahamas. But overe xploitation and disease wiped out the sponge beds in 1939, leaving the fishermen destitute. And the invention of synthetic substi tutes after the war sharply r educed demand for natural sponges. So, aside from souvenirs ales, only a remnant of this once thriving industry exists today. At R ed Bays, Andros it is kept alive by a lone 76-year-old GreekAmerican sponger named Peter Skaroulis, who provides the only regular employment for a few dozen fishermen. The Skaroulis family operates a sponge market i n Tarpon Springs, continuing a way of life that began in the late 1 9th century, when Greeks from the Aegean islands of Kalymnos, Skopelos, Symi, Hydra and Aegi na arrived in Nassau and Florida. An Intertwined History The shared history of these t wo intertwined communities was the subject of a special exhibit at the Heritage Museum in TarponS prings last week, and T ough Call was invited to attend. Funded by t he Florida Humanities Council, the exhibit was developed by f olklife researcher Dr Tina Bucuvalas, an ethnographer who is herself part Greek and who spent time in the Bahamas recently looking into family backgrounds. "Through my research over t he last couple years, I gradually came to realize that for almost a century there has been sustained interaction between the Tarpon S prings and Bahamian Greek c ommunities," she told me. "Residents are closely related through ties of marriage, family, and culture in addition to busin ess. These ties have developed from a shared history originating in the Greek sponge producingi slands." Until recently Dr Bucuvalas w as director of the Florida Folklife Programme in the state's B ureau of Historic Preservation. But she has been named curator for the City of Tarpon Springs, a post which makes her responsible for several small museums asw ell as a planned folk arts gallery. She will be researching other eth-n ic cultures including the city's African-American community w hich also has Bahamian roots. Although marine sponges have been sought after since ancient t imes, industrialisation created a growing demand for them in the c leaning, ceramics, shoe-finish ing, and printing industries in a ddition to household, bathing, and medical uses. And this gen erated a lucrative international trade during the late 19th and ear ly 20th centuries. According to Dr Bucuvalas in her research paper for the exhib it. "The greater portion of the world trade was conducted by c rews and merchants from Greece. Later, the trade dimin ished due to war, sponge disease and toxic algae blooms. Today the sponge industry continues on a smaller scale, its memory fuels tourism, and many aspects of its traditional culture linger." A New Industry Until the 1840s, the sponge business was concentrated in the Mediterranean. But in 1841, a French merchant found Bahami ans harvesting sponges, and he started exporting sponges to Paris. This trade eventually e ncompassed Jamaica, Honduras, Nicaragua, and Mexico a lthough the Bahamas, Cuba, and Florida were always the largest producers. The west side of Andros was one of the world’s great spongeb eds, and sponges grew near many other Bahamian islands as w ell. The earliest local record, in 1843, reported the export of 32 s ponge bales. Forty years later, when the first Greeks arrived, sponges were our most important marine product, despite the fact that most of the shallow-water sponge beds were being fished o ut. By 1900 the most valuable sponges became commercially extinct in near-shore waters. According to a memoir written b y the late Charles Alexiou, who a rrived in Nassau in 1925, the Vouvalis Company brought in the first Greek sponge experts from Kalymnos in 1887. "Vouvalis e stablished his sponge room on West Bay Street between where is now the Mayfair Hotel and the( defunct) Ocean Spray Restaurant and Hotel," Mr Alexiouw rote. "He sent Aristide Damianos to manage his business. A long with Aristide came his brother George." The Damianos brothers later set up their own business at the top of Frederick Street by thes teps. Constantinos Christophilis was in Virginia Street. PericlesM aillis was based on the property where his grandson (of the s ame name) now has his law office. In the 1920s Christodoulos Esfakis (the father of Dr Andrew E sfakis) established an operation on Market Street. And Theopha n is Mangos also worked for Vou valis before setting up on his own b usiness. James Mosko was brought in to rebuild the Vou valis operatiion after the 1926 hurricane, and his son founded Mosko's Construction. Greek Immigration By the time Charles Alexiou a rrived, the Greeks seemed to have no problem with immigra tion restrictions, although they were not allowed to compete with local fishermen. But initially, Bahamian merchants had been deeply worried over the prospect of foreign competition. Writing to The Nassau Guardian in 1887, s ponge merchant Joseph Brown called for legal protection: "Twenty-four aliens have arrived, experts in the gathering, clipping and packaging of sponge, and if I am rightly informed, determined to handle it themselves in all stages from the gath ering to the packing, thus excludi ng native labour. If the experi ment should be successful, it is q uite probable that we should soon have hundreds of men in our midst, whose ways are not our ways, who would form a distinct section of the population,a nd who would only continue to remain here until such time as t he sponge beds become exhausted, or the business ceases to be p rofitable." Over time the Greeks were more or less assimilated, and the second, third and fourth genera tions now form a close-knit community of more than 300 professionals and business people clust ered around the Annunciation G reek Orthodox Church on Virginia Street. Built in 1932 it was the first Greek church in the West indies, and almost all of its pres ent congregation derive from the original spongers sent from the islands of the Aegean Sea. "The Greek Bahamian comm unity has remained small and c lose, perhaps because of their initial isolation and their commitment to maintaining their heritage," Dr Bucuvalas said. "Most f irst and second generation Greek Bahamians married other Greeks for social and religious reasons, but like most Diaspora peoples e ach succeeding generation c hooses more marriage partners from outside the community. Nevertheless, Greek Bahamians maintain their culture through r eligion, family ties, values, language, foodways, and social events." B ahamian Descent By 1890 Tarpon Springs had also become a significant spongem arket. The first Greeks arrived there in 1897, moving the com-m ercial sponge centre from Key West to the gulf coast where prist ine sponge beds had been discovered offshore. They revolutionised the industry with diving equipment, and by the first decade of the 20th century theyo utnumbered the traditional Key West fishermen, who were large-l y of Bahamian descent. This led to social conflict b etween the two groups of fishermen, which was "heightened by overstressed sponge resources that eventually disappeared entirely due to a synergistic relationship between overfishing and disease in the marine environm ent," according to Loren McClenachan writing in a 2007 E arthscan publication on marine environmental history called O ceans Past . "Understanding synergistic stresses on structural e lements of the marine commu nity is central to environmental conservation." The eventual death of the sponge fishery can be traced to t his unfortunate synergy. Without management controls, inten s ive fishing lowered prices which stimulated more intensive fish ing. And ultimately the lack of a conservation ethic particularly with respect to the taking of u ndersized sponges led to the c ollapse of the fishery in the 1930s. According to the Earthscan publication, "In December 1938, spongers on the other side o f the Gulf Stream in the Bahamas began to have an odd and disconcerting experience, one which the old-timers had never w itnessed. Instead of pulling up i ntact sponges, hooks came to the surface with only slivers and strings; the rest of the sponge skeleton had disintegrated The m ysterious blight that struck the sponge beds quickly reached epidemic proportions ... The culprit appeared to be a fungus-like filam ent." Sponger Money Gone By 1940 the disease had w orked its way up to Tarpon Springs, putting the remaining sponge fishermen out of work. Experts say the epidemic was " intimately linked to overfishing". I n fact, the sponge divers themselves probably helped spread the disease by squeezing the sponge" gurry" into the water. Just as overfishing only increased thec oncentrations of disease-causing bacteria and fungal cells in the s eawater over sponge beds. Sponges filter bacteria out of the water as they feed. And according to Earthscan, "Over the course of the fishery tradi-t ional spongers and divers took more than 1.5 billion pounds ofl iving sponges from the norhern Caribbean, so that the water duri ng the 1930s was certainly richer in bacteria, fungi, algae and other tiny particles than it had been a century earlier...evidence exists that at high concentrations bacteria that are typically benign can become virulent and...diseases m ore prevalent." In 1992 state and federal gove rnments outlawed all sponging in South Florida's national parks. A nd since then sponges have joined a list of once abundant ani m als including lobster, conch, turtles, and grouper that are now protected by law. And a related law makes it a felony to trade any wildlife taken in cont ravention of those protections. Today, although some com m ercial harvesting still takes place, the sponge trade is more of a tourist attraction in Florida. But Tarpon Springs has managed to preserve a strong Greek chara cter and maritime heritage. In f act, the museum where the Bahamian Connection exhibit was held sits on the edge of a marine inlet where the Greeks c elebrate the Epiphany each year by throwing a cross into the sea for divers to retrieve – the same ceremony practised by Nassau G reeks. And the imposing St N icolas Greek Orthodox Church is not far away. Conservation and Culture According to Dr Bucuvalas, "The Greeks gradually began to control municipal politics as the m ajority or by allying themselves w ith black Tarponites. Blacks of Bahamian descent had arrived in Tarpon Springs from Key West in the late 19th century. They o ften developed close relationships with the Greeks when they worked on the boats, and some learned to speak Greek with a D odecanese accent. " Since the Bahamian Greek community is small, many members have sought marriage part-n ers in Tarpon Springs. The dominant population in both locationsi s from the Dodecanese Islands and particularly Kalymnos, so p eople have also looked to their home islands when they decided to marry. Consequently, the two communities share an extensive and intricate network of familyt ies...and Greeks still control the sponge business in both commu-n ities." But aside from its cultural fasc ination, the history of the Bahamas and Florida sponge fishery has important lessons for the future of other valuable marine resources like conch, lobster and grouper. These resources are not limitless. And they are valuable n ot just in terms of our own pock etbook, but because of the con-t ribution they make to the health of the natural ecosystems on w hich we rely. As is the case today with the Nassau grouper, c areful management is a critical challenge. It is a challenge we must overcome if we are to maintain our present way of life. W hat do you think? Send comments to larry@tribunemedia.net O r visit www.bahamapundit.com < http://www.bahamapundit.com/ > C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 7 Lessons from Bahamas and Florida sponge fishery T HECASEOFTHENASSAUGROUPER HIGHLIGHTSTHECRITICALCHALLENGEOFCAREFULMANAGEMENT oday, although some commercial harvesting still takes place, the sponge trade is more of a tourist attraction in Florida.”

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 9 Hugh Campbell: Day 2 highlights Photos by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff Armaly added 12 points, five assists and three steals while Rakeem Smith chipped in with six points and six rebounds. A basket by Cooper put the Cherubims up 54-51 with under one minute left to play. After the Pacers Tamar Carey converted one of two free throws, the Pacers forced a turnover on the inbound with 16.4 seconds left to play. Travis Ramsey tied the game at 54 with a jumper from the right wing with just 3.2 seconds left to play to send the game into overtime. C C h h u u r r c c h h o o f f G G o o d d F F l l a a m m e e s s 3 3 5 5 Q Q u u e e e e n n ' ' s s C C o o l l l l e e g g e e C C o o m m e e t t s s 3 3 3 3 The Comets’ woes from the free throw line in the fourth quarter became the deciding factor in a hard fought loss in the second game of yesterday's opening session. A fter they tied the game at 24 early in the fourth quarter, the Comets made just two of 12 free throws in the final quarter, Bristol Delancey put the Comets ahead 2924 with a three point play and fastbreak basket with 4:45 left to play. With an opportunity to widen the margin, the Comets missed five consecutive free throws before making one at the line to stay ahead 30-26. The Flames came back to tie with a pair of bas kets from Able Joseph and Leonardo Hepburn. Joseph gave the Flames a 31-30 lead at the line. T he Comets reached the bonus with 3:13 left to play but failed to take advantage on numerous trips to the line. Joseph gave the Flames the go ahead free throws from the line to go ahead 35-33 with 2:07 left to play. He finished with a game high 16 points while Andron Hanna added six. Delanceyl ed the Comets with 12 while Nathaniel Carter added seven. F F R R O O M M p p a a g g e e 1 1 1 1 C R WALKER KNIGHTS players in action (above and bottom left against the C V Bethel Stingrays yesterday. The Knights won the game 75-73 in double overtime... (LEFTRIGHT F lames player Leonardo Hepburn above the rim. Church of God won the game 35-33 in overtime... C V Bethel Stingrays’ Pateico Leadon tied the game at 58 on a jumpshot in traffic... C R Walker Knights’ Alex Rolle finished with 21 points

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Davis Cup team are ready for Paraguay If there’s one thing Farring ton feels the players will have to get adjusted to is the boister-ous response from the South American crowd. But he said they are going down a couple days earlier to get acclimatized so that it won’tbe a major culture shock forthem when they play. “I always believe that we have the capability of winning atie whenever we play,” Far rington stressed. “But as far as being competitive, I believe that we have a chance to win. “All of the guys know each other and they have beentogether for a while, so I feelthat we will come together andplay very strong when we getthere.” The absence of Knowles once again leaves the team without a player with any ATP computer rankings, but Farrington saidhe’s convinced that the teamwill defy the odds and rise tothe occasion. “They are not accustomed to guys hitting the ball that hard,but the guys we have are capa ble of playing at a competitivelevel because they’ve played college ball and they’ve played on the Futures and Satellite tour,” he stressed. “So they have some experience and as you know, anythingcan happen in Davis Cup. So Igive us a good chance to winjust like I do whenever we play.” Despite the fact that he lost his brother, Farrington said Bjorn Munroe has confirmedwith the BLTA that he will stillbe a part of the team inParaguay. But there’s a possibility that because the funeral service forLavaughn will be held nextweekend, Bjorn will end upmeeting the team in Paraguay. “We will be there for him and try to keep him to get throughthis difficult time,” Farringtonsaid. “It’s unfortunate that his brother died, but we offer our condolences to his family.” FROM page 11 C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS P AGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Smart ChoiceDRIVESales n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net It wasn’t the start that Georgette Rolle had anticipated, but she’s confident that before the Sun Coast Ladies Series Developmental Golf Tour is completed Thursday, she will playup to par. The St Augustine’s College graduate now attending Texas Southern University fin ished 28th out of a field of 31 competitors who completed the first round of competi-tion yesterday at the Errol Estate Country Club in Orlando, Florida. Rolle, 23, shot rounds of 43-41 for a total of 84, which is 12-over-par. American Bri-ana Vega shot a one-under-par 71 (35-36-71) to snatch the early lead in the three-day tournament. Disappointed in her performance, Rolle noted that she made one mistake that costher dearly. “It was kind of rough,” said Rolle, who admitted that she took some medication before she teed out and it left her sluggish during play. “I won’t make that mistakeagain.” During play yesterday, Rolle tried to keep the ball in play, but she ended up witha pair of birdies, two triple bogeys and threedouble bogeys. “It was kind of rough,” she explained about her scoring chart. “My mental game wasn’t on today, but I’m definitely going to learn from today and play better tomorrow.” Despite the fact that she’s still under the weather, Rolle said she doesn’t intend totake any medication like she did yesterdaybefore she plays. “That was my only bad decision, but that was because I wasn’t feeling well this morning,” she pointed out. “So I hope to be much better tomorrow.” The competition is extremely tough and in order to make up some ground, Rolleacknowledges that she will have to be ather best. Behind Vega is Noriko Nakazaki with even-par 72. Two players shot one-overpar 73 and five shot two-over-par 74. Rolle is the only Caribbean player par ticipating in the tournament. She’s using itto prepare for the Ladies’ Professional Golf Association’s Futures Tour that is scheduledto start at the end of March. As a result of her performance, Rolle is due to tee off in the second group at about 7:23 am today. Yesterday, she teed off in the first group at 7:15 am. Rolle confident that she will be ‘up to par’ for golf tour Handed: Right-handed (Double handed backhandSchool: Central Christian Academy Rankings: N/ANo. of Davis Cup Ties: 2, starting in 2008 Davis Cup Record: 1-2 (Singles JOHN FARRINGTON Age: 50 Davis Cup experience: 12 ties in seven years, starting in 1989Record: 4-11 (Singles (Doubles Team Captain: Fourth Bahamian in his ninth year, starting in 2001 against Peru in the first round of the American Zone One BJORN MUNROE Age: 30 Height: 6-feet-1 Weight 175 lbs Handed: RightSchool: Ohio State University Ranking: 885 (DoublesNo. of Davis Cup Ties: 9, starting in 1998Davis Cup Record: 0-5 (SinglesDoubles MARVIN ROLLE Age: 25 Height: 5-feet-11 Weight: 170 lbs Handed: Right Rankings: 1738 (Singles 1560 (Doubles No. Davis Cup Ties: 15,starting in 2001 Davis Cup Record: 7-7 (SinglesDoubles Tennis profiles FROM page 11 Farrington GEORGETTE ROLLE is confident that before the Sun Coast Ladies Series Developmental Golf Tour is completed Thursday, she will play up to par...

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Hugh Campbell: Action on day 2 HERE’S a look at the Bahamas’ Davis Cup team heading to Paraguay next week end: DEVIN MULLINGS Age: 23 Height: 5-feet-7 Weight: 150 lbs Handed: Left-handed School: Ft Lauderdale Preparatory, Ohio State University Rankings: 1067 (South African Airways ATP Singles)1617 (Doubles) No. of Davis Cup Ties: 15, starting in 2002 Davis Cup Record: 9-9 (SinglesDoubles TIMOTHY NEILLY Age: 21 Height: 5-feet-10 Weight: 160 lbs C M Y K C M Y K WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 P AGE 10 Rolle confident over golf tour... n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH they are mourning the loss of former team-mate Lavaughn Munroe, captain John Farrington said the Bahamas four-man team going to Paraguay next weekend are ready to play in the first round of the American Zone Two Davis Cup tie. Farrington will travel to Paraguay with Munroe’s older brother, Bjorn Munroe, fellow Grand Bahamians Devin Mullings and Timothy Neilly and Marvin Rolle next Friday for the tie that will run from March 6-8. “We want to offer our condolences to the Munroe family,” said Farrington, who served as captain of the team when the deceased Munroe played on two national teams in 1999 and another one in 2002. Farrington said it was a shock to hear about the tragic death of 26-year-old Munroe, who wask illed after his black Mustang crashed into a large tree on Midshipman Road, Lucaya, Grand Bahama at about 1 pm Sunday. But he noted that he’s confi dent that the players selected f or the team will be able to pull t hrough when they face Paraguay on their red clay court with a chance to either play towards promotions to the American Zone One over the weekend of July 10-12 or t owards relegation to Zone III. The Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association had waited for touring pro Mark Knowles to confirm whether or not he would travel before they announced the final team selection. But last week, Knowles informed the BLTA that he will skip the trip and continue his pro career. “I expect us to be competitive,” Farrington proclaimed. “I thought we were competitive when we played them last April at home and as a part of the team, Mark gave us a big boost. “If we had him, we would have really been in a good position to at least win the doubles again. But now we have to rely on the younger players to pull us through on the red clay.” Davis Cup team are ready for Paraguay Mullings Rolle Neilly Rolle S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 1 1 0 0 Tennis profiles n B y RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net Day two of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational featured a crowd thrilling opening session which featured the first overtime game, first double overtime game, and first win for a private school in the tournament. C C R R W W a a l l k k e e r r K K n n i i g g h h t t s s 7 7 5 5 C C V V B B e e t t h h e e l l S S t t i i n n g g r r a a y y s s 7 7 3 3 Double Overtime It took two overtime periods, a pesky ball hawking defense down the stretch and a tournament high from their dynamic two guard for the defending champions to close out yesterday’s opening session as the first two win team of the tournament. Jackson Jacobs led all scorers with 33 points and converted the go-ahead free throws late in the second overtime to give the K nights the two point advantage with under 10 seconds remaini ng. J acobs also sent the game into the second overtime with a runner across the lane in transition with just over three seconds left to play. The Knights led 50-48 with 1:19 left to play in regulation, but went on a frenetic 8-2 run to give them a 58-50 lead with just 42 remaining, seemingly clinching the win. The Stingrays led a resilient comeback effort with a 6-0 run, c apped by Samuel Johnson’s steal and lay-up to bring his team within two, 58-56, with 15 seconds left to play. With the momentum heavily in their favour, the Stingrays forced a turnover and with 8 seconds remaining, Pateico Leadon tied the game at 58 on a jumpshot in traffic. In the first overtime, Leadon, who finished with a team high 26 points, continued his hot shooting in overtime with a pair of baskets to put the Stingrays ahead 64-61. Johnson followed with a basket and a pair of free throws on the ensuing possession to give the Stingrays a 68-63 lead with 39 seconds left to play. The Knights mounted a comeback of their own in the waning moments. Jacobs converted a tough three point play and after C V Bethel’s Kendal Fowler made one of two free throws, Jacobs made both at the line to bring the Knights within one, 69-68 with 20 seconds left to play. Fowler again made just one of two at the line, making the score 70-68 before Jacobs’ late game heroics. Jacobs’ backcourt mate Alex Rolle finished with 21 points while Jason Rolle led the Knights frontcourt with 12. Leadon’s 26 led the Stingrays while Johnson finished with 14, Dustin McKenzie added 13 and Fowler chipped in with nine. Game Notes: In what is becoming a budding rivalry, the Knights avenged a loss to the Stingrays in the GSSSA regular sea son finale which eliminated them from playoff contention. Stingrays forward Rio Johnson sat for much of the game but finished four blocks, two in the waning moments of the second overtime. Both teams enjoyed their largest leads of the game with under one minute left to go in respective periods (CR Walk er-eight points in the fourth with 42 seconds left, CV Bethel-six points in the first overtime with 39 seconds left). After Fowler’s free throw which gave the Stingrays a 70-68 lead, the Stingrays came up with a steal and possession. However the referees signaled a controversial jumpball, rather than a foul which would have sent C V Bethel to the line with just seconds remaining. All five of the Knights points in the second overtime came from the free throw line where they shot 5-9 T T e e l l e e o o s s C C h h e e r r u u b b i i m m s s 6 6 2 2 R R M M B B a a i i l l e e y y P P a a c c e e r r s s 5 5 7 7 Overtime The reigning Bahamas Scholastic Association champions held the Pacers to just three points in the overtime period to become the first private school to record a win in this year's tournament. Lamont Armaly scored the first three points of overtime to give his team a 57-54 lead. After both teams exchanged free throws, Brian Francis gave the Cherubims a 60-55 lead on a tip in with 1:47 remaining. Chauncey Cooper's lay-up gave Teleos a 62-55 lead with just 42 seconds remaining to seal the win. Cooper finished with a double double 18 points, 11 rebounds and five steals. C R WALKER KNIGHTS’ Jackson Jacobs goes for a layup yesterday... (Photo by Tim Clarke/Tribune staff See more photos on page 9 S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 9 9

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British American in talks to buy CLICO C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report. $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor B ritish American Financial was yesterday said to be in “advanced discussions” to acquire CLICO (Bahamas to the company told Tribune Business , a deal that could potentially solve the regulatory headaches created by a $57 million guarantee extended by the latter’s troubled Trinidadian parent. That underwrites 59 per cent of the Bahamian company’s assets. “British American will soon purchase CLICO (Bahamas discussions,” a source told Tribune Busi ness, as others in the business community confirmed that the “vultures are circling” the Bahamian insurer, following the much-publicised woes of its parent, CL Financial. I. Chester Cooper, British American F inancial’s president and chief executive, did not return Tribune Business’s call seeking comment before press time, despite a message being left. His cell phone was also turned off, with sources telling Tribune Business he was y esterday in a series of meetings related t o the potential CLICO (Bahamas chase. A major impediment to any potential CLICO (Bahamas that almost 59 per cent of the company’s $97.352 million in total assets are invested in loans to its subsidiary, CLICOE nterprises Ltd. Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas 2007 audit report on CLICO (Bahamas revealed that CLICO Enterprises had invested the bulk of those funds in a Florida-based real estate project called Wellington Preserve. This had suffered a more than 20 per cent decline in market value, fallingf rom an appraised $104 million at yearend 2006 to $80.5 million at year-end 2007, due to the collapsing Florida real estate market. “This reduction in value has resulted in [CLICO Bahamas] management considering the possibility of impairment of the loan,” Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas wrote in its audit report. “Although the market forecast for F lorida shows recovery of the real estate market in 2008, management obtained a guarantee from C L Financial (CLICO Bahamas ultimate parent), whereby C L Financial states that it will honour the obligations of CLICO Enterprises to the company if the need arises. As such, no provision has been made for impairment.” Needless to say, the anticipated Florida real estate market recovery has not taken place, and may not do so for some years to come. Several sources suggested that any purchaser of CLICO (Bahamas to make a major capital injection into the company to cover the liabilities owed to life and annuity policyholders. As previously revealed by Tribune Business, at the December 31, 2007, balance sheet date, a full impairment of the$ 57 million loan would leave CLICO (Bahamas total assets. That would be insufficient to meet liabilities worth almost $85.5 million, especially some $79.37 million in reserves set aside to pay future policyholder benefits. However, sources monitoring developments said ways to isolate the Florida real estate investment and potentially splitting it off from the assets/liabilities any purchaser may acquire were being explored. Such a move might allow British American Financial to only take with it the quality assets from CLICO( Bahamas) life and annuity business. “There are some dynamics in play that give them some cautious optimism that can happen,” one source said. “I think they’re very close; close to the point where an announcement can be made very soon.” British American Financial is likely to also be able to acquire CLICO (Bahamas Protecting the Bahamian policyholders of CLICO (Bahamas most in the minds of the Government and Registrar of Insurance’s Office, as the news from Trinidad has worsened, n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A MAJOR pan-Caribbean general insurer has established a branch office in the Bahamas some 35 years after it began insuring risks in this nation, its c ountry manager telling T ribune B usiness i t “certainly expects to g row” its estimated $2 million per annum in premium income through expanding its agency force to at least eight. Charles V. Sands III, of The Insurance Company of the West Indies (Bahamas had already signed up three agent companies to sell its policies since it formally set up the branch office on December 1, 2008, and was in talks to add five more. Mr Sands, a Bahamian and former Summit Insurance Company executive, said agents had greeted The Insurance Compa ny of the West Indies’ arrival in the Bahamas as “a breath of fresh air”, welcoming the addi tional underwriting capacity and options it offered their clients. Mr Sands said: “They’ve [the company] been here since 1974, writing business in the Bahamas, and I think they wanted to increase their presMajor Caribbean insurer sets-up Bahamas branch n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor THE Government is eyeing a potential $50 million transformation of the aviation industry in a move to provide “critical” building blocks for this nation’s tourism and economic future, with the Bahamas “needing more airports per capita than anywhere else in the world”. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, minister of tourism and aviation, confirmed yesterday to Tribune Business that the Government was in the earliest stages of overhauling its Bahamian aviation sector policy and infrastructure, after this newspaper obtained details on the proposed $50 million, InterAmerican Development Bank (IDB Air Transport Reform Programme . The minister, who said he was speaking after meeting with International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO to review their audit findings on the Bahamas’ aviation regulatory and safety regime, indicated the Government was looking to create the most efficient, cost effective air trans portation industry possible in this nation. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace has long advocated the need to reduce airfares and airlift costs into the Bahamas to a minimum, given that these are effectively the ‘access costs’ for tourists coming on vacation here. H e explained that the prog ramme, of which the ICAO audit study is part, was designed to fully integrate the aviation sector with the wider Bahamian economy over time, a move designed to enhance national i nfrastructure and open up F amily Island destinations to improved accessibility by visitors. Service quality would be key, Mr Vanderpool-Wallace added, and the Government hoped to pin down what it wanted to achieve on aviation sector reform, and how this would be done, “by the end of summer” 2009. Describing the reform and development of the Bahamian Government eyeing $50m aviation sector transformation VanderpoolWallace S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 6 6 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 3 3 B B n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter T HE SECURITIES Commission is looking to retool the formula responsible for calcu lating the regulatory capital Bahamas-based broker/dealers must maintain, with just 33.4 per cent of Class I firms in compliance with these thresholds. The new formula is part of the Commission’s wider efforts to restructure its legislation, in order to better serve the capital markets/investment funds industry it regulates, and boost compliance by it registered firms. The Commission is also adamant that it will begin enforcing its laws and penalising companies for non-compliance, as the legislation allows. The Commission’s market surveillance manager, Sally Moss, said it was previously unfair for the regulator to enforce its laws while broker/dealer regulatory capital levels were being calculated using a faulty/incorrect formula provided by her department. However, she said some firms, despite the formula issues, simply chose not to com ply. “While the majority of the companies are able to meet it, some of our more complicated companies that do much more involved business have not been able to meet the standards,” Ms Moss said. Just 33.4% of Class I dealers meet capital requirements Advanced discussions’ taking place on deal to acquire Bahamian unit of troubled Trinidad conglomerate I Chester Cooper S S E E E E p p a a g g e e 4 4 B B

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SAL V ADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather . T emperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDO Low: 50F/10C Low: 53F/12C Low: 57F/14C Low: 60F/16C Low: 60 F/16 C Low: 64F/18C Low: 67 F/19 C Low: 53 F/12 C High: 76F/24C High: 75F/24C High: 77 F/25 C High: 76 F/24 C High: 79F/26C High: 75 F/24C High: 79F/26C Low: 55F/13C High: 74F/23C Low: 57 F/14 C High: 76F/24C RAGGED ISLAND Low: 56F/13C High: 78 F/26 C Low: 63F/17C High: 80 F/27 Low: 53F/12C High: 74F/23C Low: 55 F/13C High: 76F/24C Low: 59 F/15 C High: 80F/27C Low: 57 F/14 C High: 76F/24C Low: 57 F/14 C High: 78F/26C Low: 60F/16C High: 81 F/27 C Low: 59F/15C High: 81F/27C High: 74 F/23 C FREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI THE WEATHER REPORT 5-D AY F ORECAST Breezy with bright sunshine. Clear and breezy.Partly sunny and breezy. Clouds giving way to sun. Partly sunny and nice. High: 79 Low: 67 High: 83 High: 75 High: 75 A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel A ccuWeather RealFeel Clouds and sun; breezy in the p.m.. High: 78 Low: 65 Low: 62 Low: 65 AccuWeather RealFeel 74F T he exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature i s an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and e levation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 66F 81-68F 72-57F 72-67F 78-63F Low: 67 TODAYTONIGHTTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAYSUNDAY A LMANAC High ..................................................73F/23C Low ....................................................66F/19C Normal high ......................................77F/25C Normal low ........................................64F/18C Last year's high .................................. 83 F/28C Last year's low .................................. 69 F/21C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.01" Year to date ..................................................0.68" Normal year to date ......................................2.78" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation S UN AND M OON T IDESFOR N ASSAU New First Full Last Feb. 24 Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:42 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:06 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 2:05 a.m. Moonset . . . . 12:36 p.m. Today Thursday Friday Saturday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. AD SPOT 2:32 a.m.2.38:51 a.m.0.5 2:41 p.m.1.88:47 p.m.0.3 3:36 a.m.2.39:51 a.m.0.5 3:44 p.m.1.99:48 p.m.0.3 4:33 a.m.2.310:44 a.m.0.4 4:41 p.m.2.010:43 p.m.0.2 5:22 a.m.2.411:31 a.m.0.3 5:31 p.m.2.111:33 p.m.0.1 W ORLD C ITIES Acapulco90/3272/22s88/3172/22s Amsterdam41/534/1c45/739/3r Ankara, Turkey45/728/-2pc41/530/-1c Athens54/1241/5sh55/1240/4sh Auckland74/2368/20r75/2374/23c Bangkok95/3579/26c94/3478/25pc Barbados84/2874/23pc84/2875/23c Barcelona57/1342/5s57/1342/5s Beijing32/027/-2sn32/017/-8pc Beirut59/1553/11c70/2161/16pc Belgrade31/025/-3sn26/-318/-7c Berlin28/-219/-7c30/-123/-5c Bermuda60/1558/14pc65/1861/16pc Bogota66/1846/7t66/1846/7r Brussels39/330/-1pc43/636/2c Budapest32/024/-4sf30/-120/-6s Buenos Aires95/3575/23s95/3577/25pc Cairo71/2161/16s77/2557/13c Calcutta92/3364/17s91/3268/20s Calgary30/-118/-7c35/116/-8pc Cancun84/2866/18s87/3067/19s Caracas80/2665/18sh83/2868/20c Casablanca67/1950/10s71/2148/8s Copenhagen33/030/-1sn36/232/0pc Dublin48/841/5pc45/736/2pc Frankfurt36/219/-7pc37/225/-3pc Geneva 35/1 25/-3 pc 35/134/1s Halifax 30/-1 17/-8 c 35/1 32/0 sn Havana 83/28 58/14 s 85/29 53/11 s Helsinki 23/-5 18/-7sf27/-223/-5sn Hong Kong 70/21 66/18 c 73/22 64/17r Islamabad 78/25 48/8 s 76/24 50/10 sh Istanbul52/1143/6pc51/1043/6r Jerusalem 56/13 45/7s72/2247/8pc Johannesburg 78/2559/15t78/2560/15t Kingston 83/2874/23pc83/2875/23sh Lima87/3066/18pc85/2967/19c London50/1039/3pc48/839/3pc Madrid61/1630/-1s63/1734/1s Manila90/3275/23t91/3275/23t Mexico City81/2750/10s72/2245/7pc Monterrey88/3159/15s74/2353/11pc Montreal30/-128/-2sn34/121/-6sn Moscow32/014/-10sn27/-214/-10pc Munich21/-616/-8c22/-520/-6pc Nairobi84/2859/15pc89/3155/12c New Delhi 77/2549/9s77/2552/11s Oslo25/-316/-8sn27/-218/-7sn Paris45/739/3pc43/636/2r Prague 25/-3 19/-7 sn 25/-3 22/-5 c Rio de Janeiro84/2873/22s83/2875/23pc Riyadh75/2351/10pc75/2354/12pc Rome 43/6 23/-5 pc 46/7 25/-3 s St. Thomas81/2771/21sh83/2872/22s San Juan99/3771/21t103/3971/21s San Salvador 90/32 66/18 s 92/33 71/21 s Santiago 84/2854/12pc84/2852/11pc Santo Domingo82/2766/18pc85/2967/19s Sao Paulo 82/27 66/18 sh 81/27 65/18t Seoul37/225/-3pc43/618/-7sn Stockholm 28/-2 23/-5 pc 27/-2 21/-6 sf Sydney 77/25 64/17 sh82/2768/20pc Taipei81/2768/20pc82/2761/16pc T okyo 47/8 36/2 pc 46/7 41/5 pc T oronto 41/528/-2sn35/122/-5sn Trinidad90/3273/22t86/3072/22t V ancouver 45/7 34/1 pc 47/833/0pc Vienna 29/-120/-6sn29/-123/-5c W arsaw 28/-2 23/-5 sn 27/-2 21/-6 sn Winnipeg 1/-17 -13/-25 pc 6/-14-6/-21c H ighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday Weather (Ws -sunny, pc -partly cloudy, c -cloudy, sh -showers, t -thunderstorms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace Y ESTERDAY ' S S ATELLITE V IEW T ODA Y ' S U.S. F ORECAST M ARINE F ORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:S at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles74F Thursday:SW at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:S at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles74F Thursday:SW at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:SE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles74F Thursday:SW at 12-25 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. C ITIES Albuquerque53/1128/-2pc54/1228/-2s Anchorage27/-224/-4pc33/024/-4sn Atlanta59/1542/5t52/1125/-3s Atlantic City42/536/2r47/824/-4pc Baltimore42/536/2r46/725/-3pc Boston38/335/1c43/632/0c Buffalo38/331/0sn32/021/-6sn Charleston, SC60/1553/11t62/1632/0pc Chicago38/314/-10r20/-614/-10sf Cleveland44/623/-5sn27/-219/-7sf Dallas75/2339/3s59/1538/3s Denver44/620/-6c46/721/-6s Detroit40/422/-5sn28/-217/-8sf Honolulu78/2568/20sh78/2565/18pc Houston78/2548/8t67/1940/4s HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C T odayThursday TodayThursdayTodayThursday Indianapolis52/1120/-6sh26/-314/-10sf Jacksonville72/2255/12pc65/1832/0t Kansas City40/414/-10c37/221/-6s Las Vegas60/1537/2s64/1741/5s Little Rock70/2135/1t56/1331/0s Los Angeles64/1748/8s72/2250/10s Louisville54/1229/-1sh35/120/-6sf Memphis66/1834/1t50/1028/-2s Miami79/2665/18s80/2653/11pc Minneapolis20/-63/-16sf14/-107/-13pc Nashville63/1732/0t39/325/-3sf New Orleans75/2350/10t65/1840/4s New York40/437/2sn45/730/-1pc Oklahoma City60/1530/-1s55/1233/0s Orlando76/2459/15pc74/2342/5t Philadelphia42/537/2c46/726/-3pc Phoenix 66/18 45/7 s 73/2247/8s Pittsburgh46/728/-2sn32/018/-7sf Portland, OR 52/1138/3pc54/1235/1c Raleigh-Durham 50/10 43/6 r 52/11 26/-3 s St. Louis48/820/-6c34/120/-6pc Salt Lake City 42/5 26/-3 sn 43/625/-3s San Antonio 80/26 48/8 pc 73/22 48/8 s San Diego65/1849/9s68/2051/10s San Francisco 61/16 47/8 pc 61/1646/7pc Seattle50/1039/3pc51/1037/2c T allahassee 70/2151/10c62/1628/-2pc T ampa 75/23 60/15 pc 70/21 44/6t Tucson64/1738/3s71/2142/5s W ashington, DC 44/6 38/3r46/726/-3pc UV I NDEX T ODAY T he higher the A ccuWeather UV Index T M n umber, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. Cold Warm Stationary Fronts Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. 1 1 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 s s 2 2 0 0 s s 3 3 0 0 s s 4 4 0 0 s s 5 5 0 0 s s 6 6 0 0 s s 7 7 0 0 s s 8 8 0 0 s s 9 9 0 0 s s 1 1 0 0 0 0 s s 1 1 1 1 0 0 s s Showers T-storms Rain Flurries Snow Ice AccuW eather .com

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n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Canadian renewable energy company yesterday said its developing alliance with a 25 per cent shareholder in Grand Bahama Power Company would “strengthen” its bid to win a power supply contract from the Bahamas Electricity Corporation (BEC Jonathan Lundy, chief execut ive of Schneider Power Company, which was already in a joint venture with Bahamian company WINSO Ltd to provide 24 Mega Watts (MW electricity on three Bahamiani slands, via wind and solar power, said the joint venture Letter of Intent signed with Emera would only enhance the prop osal submitted to BEC. There’s a capability as far as what both partners bring to them ix,” Mr Lundy told Tribune Business, with Schneider Pow er/WINSO’s joint venture, theB ahamas Renewable Energy Corporation (BREC having qualified among the 13 r enewable energy bidders shortlisted by BEC. He added: “We wouldn’t h ave done it [the Emera alliance] if we did not think it would strengthen our bid and o ur team. “That was a clear motivation for us. We’re adding a very sophisticated, strong partner that brings a lot to the table. We definitely think we’re a stronger entity working with them thanw ithout them.” Mr Lundy said the Letter of Intent aimed to marry Emera’s strengths in power generation and asset management with Schneider’s expertise in renew-a ble energies, especially wind and solar. Both could benefit and learn from the other, Emera providing Schneider with scale, generation and financing capabilities, and the latter giving theC anadian power giant expertise in fields it is keen to break into. “It is a Letter of Intent, but I suspect we’re going to find ways to work together on these projects and other projects in the region,” Mr Lundy said. S asha Irving, an Emera spokeswoman, told Tribune Business that the company p lanned to invest a further $400 million in the Caribbean over the next four years, and the a lliance with Schneider giving it access to BEC’s renewable energy tender was “one piece of that”. She reaffirmed that the company was “very open to discussions” should the Government decide to privatise BEC, and added of the planned $400 million outlay: “The Bahamas already figures predominantly in that, and will continue to do so.” Ms Irving said the Schneider P ower tie-up would work in well with the renewable energies Emera and Grand Bahama Power Company would be exploring, including the use of wind, hydro/tidal and waste-to-e nergy options. Mr Lundy, meanwhile, added that there was “substantial” potential for the Bahamas to harness renewable energies in its electricity generation mix,b ut the percentage of the total power supply it accounted for had to be determined. “It’s got to make sense for everybody. There should be a significant mix of renewable energies comprising the energy m ix for the Bahamas,” Mr Lundy said. The Bahamas Renewable E nergy Corporation has submitted a proposal to BEC for the construction and operation o f wind turbines and solar panels on three different islands New Providence, Abaco and Harbour Island. BREC has proposed that the three projects would collectively generate 24 Mega Watts (MW enough to power 25,000 homes. In a previous interview with Tribune Business, Thomas Schneider, Schneider Power’s president, said the BREC proposal would require $60 millioni n capital financing, of which $15 million would be equity and the remainder debt financing. He added that $40 million of that figure was likely to be spent in the Bahamas. Such a capital infrastructure spend in the Bahamas can create a lot of services as well as jobs,” Mr Schneider said at the time. “That’s going to be a key benefit for the Bahamas, asw e’re going to be putting money into the economy.” Some 10-15 full-time jobs were likely to be created. Some 20-30 jobs construction jobs would be created on each of the three islands involved in t he BREC project, meaning that some 60-90 jobs would be created in total if it won governm ent/BEC approval. Meanwhile, Emera has made no secret of its desire to expand i ts foothold in the Bahamas, which was achieved last Novem ber when the company paid $41 million to acquire Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent ICD Utilities stake (translating into a 25 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power). C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 3B 127,&( 0,1,675<<287+t&8/785( 1$7,21$/<287+/($'(56&(57,),&$7,21 352*5$00(7KH
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C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 5B Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the position of Senior Manager Investments with the National Insurance Board: DUTIES & RESPONSIBILITIES 1.Manage portfolio of the National Insurance Board’s Investments, ensuring that I nvestment decisions that are made conform to Compliance, Strategic, Risk and Yield objectives of the Board. 2.Maintain Statutory limits of all investments holdings with respective financial institutions, preparing management reports to show compliance. 3.Represent the National Insurance Board as requested and required in stakeholder meetings, investment discussions, and/or Public Relations events relative to investment portfolio. 4.Design and prepare as needed/requested, management reports of all investments, inclusive of Investment Holdings, Risk Status, Outstanding issues, and/or other key m etrics. 5.Develop and/or maintain relationships with the National Insurance Board approved Brokers, with specific focus on compliance, increasing investment opportunities and/ or maximizing returns. REQUIRED KNOWLEDGE, SKILL & EXPERIENCE At least a Bachelors Degree in a Business related discipline, preferably Finance or A ccounting. Professional designation in Finance (CFA or its equivalent) and/or have completed a p rofessional designation in Accounting (CPA or its equivalent). (Consideration will be given to applicants nearing CFA qualification). Prior experience in managing a diversified investment portfolio. APPLICATION Interested persons may apply by submitting a completed application form, along with the necessary proof of qualification on or before Friday, February 27, 2009 , to: Assistant Director Human Resources Department National Insurance Board Clifford Darling Complex Nassau, Bahamas VACANCY NOTICESenior Manager Investments THE islands of Long Island, S an Salvador, Rum Cay and Ragged Island won the covetedB ahamas Telecommunications Company (BTC Be Amazing C ustomer Service Award f or 2008. B TC set the mandate to end each week with zero faults. The four islands complied by completing all installations and repairs within the set time frame. These islands are managed by Ramona Taylor, a 20-year veteran of the telecommunica tions industry. “With just 16 employees covering these four islands, teamwork is both cru cial and essential,” she said. "To me it’s about constantly reinforcing to my team that they are the ones that are responsible not just for providi ng telecommunications services, but for keeping our resi-d ents, businesses and our tourists connected to the world 3 65 days a year.” Technician Garvin Simmons s aid: “Winning this award is a good feeling. I’m just glad I was part of the process. This came with multi-tasking, a lot of hard work and dedication.” Antonio Stubbs and Tellis Symonette, BTC’s senior vicepresidents, flew to Long Island for the presentation. Ms Taylor and her Long Island team members received high praise during Tropical Storm Noel in 2007. Despite excessive flooding, the team managed to provide a fibre link for ZNS TV 1,3 which allowed them to transmit updates and n ews stories during the storm. They were also responsible fore nsuring that officers of the Royal Bahamas Police were e quipped with mobile phones as they patrolled throughoutt he communities to provide assistance to residents. The Be Amazing Customer Service Award was given last year to the island that went above and beyond in providing superior service and improving the quality of life for the Bahamian people. Annual targets were set for each Family Island to measure their level of productivity. These four islands exceeded the set expectations through their demonstration of superior customer service on a daily basis. Long Island tops for BTC customer service BTC’s Long Island team flanked by senior vice-presidents Antonio Stubbs (rightleft

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n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter T HE DEVELOPERS b ehind the $700 million Royal Island project in North Eleuthera discontinued work last November, yesterday cit-i ng the global economic crisis as the reason for the stoppage, a move that left 40 -50 Eleutherans out of work. The attorney for Dallasbased development company Cypress Equities, Joe Enos, released a statement in r esponse to repeated Tribune Business inquiries to conform that the project’s principals were restructuring the develo pment, prompting the shutdown of operations. Cypress Equities, an affiliate of Staubach Retail, a company o wned by former Dallas Cowboys quartterback, Roger Staubach, said it was hoping to implement the proposed c hanges and continue the project. However, it could not say when work would resume on Royal Island. In light of the global economic crisis, the Royal Island development is on hold while the principals restructure the project,” the statement read. “Restructuring includes produ ct offerings, overall island development, pricing and project financing. The principals hope to implement these c hanges and re-launch the project soon.” The Royal Island development was also affliated with form er Dallas Cowboys running back, Emmitt Smith, and its seed financing came from USbased private equity fund, theC arlyle Group. MP for North Eleuthera, Alvin Smith, said he was confident the developers would restart the project later this year. H e added that before Cypress Equities had discontinued work on the island, it had sold real estate within the d evelopment, leading him to believe that the developers would have to fulfill their obligations to the purchasers. T he $700 million investment is expected to contain, when completed, a Jack Nicklaus Golf course, spa facilities andr estaurants, a marina and properties selling for three million dollars and higher. Mr Smith said the economy of North Eleuthera was adversely affected with the termination of the project, as 40-50 individuals were put out of w ork. He said, though, that Eleutherans in general remain o ptimistic despite the closure. Tourism in the area, however, has not slackened due to vacationing second home owners. He said workers have also been cushioned by other smallp rojects going on in the area. Mr Smith contends that Roya l Island is a “very good pro ject”, and will be a major addition to North Eleuthera when complete. H e said, in the interim, that Eleutherans displaced by the p roject’s closure will be able to find odd jobs with the island’s communities, as they have always done during hard times. Eleuthera and so many other islands have been through t his before, and so I find them to be very resilient, very indus-t rious and they find some ways of making a few dollars,” said M r Smith. “Sometimes not as easy as t hey would wish but they would peck away there and find a job here. That whole island is like a community, so you find that the g uys who have the construction company or who are working elsewhere and probably have some cottages, if they know they have people are not worki ng, they would share information relating to job opportunities.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 7B $700m project at a standstill

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APT3-G BLONDIE M ARVIN population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of b eer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day l ooking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not t o any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam t rains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 1 1 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 1 8 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 1 4 1 5161718 1 9 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 1 4 1 5161718 1 9 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleY esterday s Sudoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerK akuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished p erson (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial g ains (7 5 Victors opposite n umber (5 8 They figure a great deal in p opulation surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet a dmitted (7 11 Fighting together and all a bout to die (6 1 2 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 1 5 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 2 0 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a m odel (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should k now (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists w ith work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 1 6 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1 234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 1 5 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 2 0 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 1 3 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite n umber (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band s tarts producing dance music (5 1 0 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines o f verse (6 15 Endure the French type of b eer (4,3 1 7 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? ( 7-6) 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not t o any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, p erhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be p ermissible (5 6 Changing to steam t rains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 1 1 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 910 1 11213 1 4 15161718 1 9 2021 1 234567 8 910 1 11213 14 15161718 1 9 2021Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf J UDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7) 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 910 111213 14 15161718 19 2021Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle Yesterday s S udoku Answer Yesterday s K akuro Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u t a r g e t Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 D own 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 10 111213 14 1 5161718 19 2021 1 234567 8 9 10 111213 14 1 5161718 19 2021Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleY esterday s S udoku Answer Y esterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S Across 1 Archetypal miser (7 5 One of The Three Musketeers (5 8 Greatly cherished person (5,2,3,3 9 Appeal earnestly (5 10 Sequoia (7 11 Type of engine (6 12 Stimulus (6 15 Identify wrongly (7 17 Heavy drinker (5 19 Demagogic (6-7 20 Very small (5 21 Glad (7 Down 1 Quick-witted (5 2 Meriting rebuke (13 3 Behind time specified (7 4 Serious attempt (6 5 Plant pest (5 6 Writing in symbols (13 7 Accelerate (5,2 11 Fault (7 13 Enter uninvited (7 14 Be of good heart (4,2 16 Mixture of metals (5 18 Strictly observed (5 nfbrf JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Tips for making financial gains (7 5 Victors opposite number (5 8 They figure a great deal in population surveys (13 9 Spirit with which the band starts producing dance music (5 10 Away team not yet admitted (7 11 Fighting together and all about to die (6 12 Child brings back 10 lines of verse (6 15 Endure the French type of beer (4,3 17 River of silver (5 19 Defeated by the elements? (7-6 20 Rise after start of day looking glum (5 21 Wastes the rewards (7 Down 1 Model question (5 2 Climbing a low hill, but not to any great extent (2,1,5,5 3 Employ someone else as a model (7 4 Attacks with stones, perhaps (4,2 5 Solicitors hold it to be permissible (5 6 Changing to steam trains? He should know (13 7 Honour a relation (7 11 After all, we do turn out with official sanction (7 13 Overburden journalists with work (7 14 Sorted out and put away (6 16 Choice example (5 18 Ernest hasn’t got time for birds (5 Across:1 Mason, 8 Leverage, 9 Spout, 10 Baguette, 11 Greed, 12 Ate, 16 Enacts, 17 Guilty, 18 Sag, 23 Rebel, 24 Inherits, 25 Belle, 26 Souvenir, 27 Close. Down:2 Aspirant, 3 Opulence, 4 Recant, 5 Debut, 6 Pasta, 7 Level, 12 Ass, 13 Egg, 14 Sidereal, 15 Steeples, 19 Attain, 20 First, 21 Shout, 22 Green. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Right, 8 Cut no ice, 9 Hoary, 10 Lose face, 11 Sally, 12 Yap, 16 Prague, 17 Asylum, 18 Now, 23 Chaff, 24 Alienate, 25 Snarl, 26 Pooh-pooh, 27 Petty. Down:2 Idolatry, 3 Horology, 4 Cupola, 5 Infer, 6 Vital, 7 Vexed, 12 Yen, 13 Paw, 14 By chance, 15 Run for it, 19 Option, 20 Happy, 21 Minor, 22 Snipe. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 1234567 8 9 10 111213 14 15161718 19 2021 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleYesterday s Sudoku Answer Yesterday s Kakuro AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. P AGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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Tara Klonaris Holcombe, a Bahamian wife and mother o f a two year old son, said she decided to start Pampered Potcakes in 2007 but did not launch the business until May 2008 at the Bahamas Humane Society's Annual Fun Day. “I wanted to bake some t hing healthy for my dog, Snickers, and realised that t here were no homemade dog treat businesses in the m arket. I wanted something natural and better for him. I t hought maybe this would be something other people would want because they like to spend money on their dogs,” Mrs Holcombe said. Mrs Holcombe explained that the process for baking the tasty dog treats is quite time consuming. “I work fulltime so it is a lot to come home and bake. For the Jollification,( held at the Bahamas National Trust in December) I baked every night for a month. I have it down to a science now whereI can bake a full batch in an hour and a half and that’s like 300 or more,” Mrs Holcombe said. The most popular flavors are "Nassau Nutters" and "Chops Lickin' Chicken Souse" and the treats come in basic dog bone shapes. “They are all made from natural productsno preser vatives. I had another one called “Bimini’s Barkin’ Banana Bites” made with Banana and Oatmeal. I refrigerate them because they last for months if kept in the refrigerator,” Mrs Holcombe said. For those who would rather have treats that reflect the many seasons celebratedin the Bahamas, Pampered Potcakes can make just about any shape for any festive sea son although the bone shapes are more popular. “When I first started I did t he cookie cutters for Christmas. I had gingerbread men, Christmas trees, angels, and whatever cookie cutters I had. I do colored ribbons on the packaging such as red and green for Christmas, Valentine’s Day colors and t he blue and gold as those are Bahamian colors,” Mrs H olcombe said. Mrs Holcombe said she c reated the product to cater to both Bahamians and t ourists. “My products are being sold in the local market of which I would like to expand and eventually I would like to have my products sold in stores catering to tourists. Why shouldn't they take home a souvenir from the Bahamas for their dogs? They take everything else for their family and friendswhy not the family dog?” Mrs Holcombe said. O ther animal lovers may have to wait a while longer for their own homemade nat ural treats from Pampered Potcakes. “I want to expand the treats to all animals. I really would like to get into making t hem for cats but cats are so finicky. I have even thought a bout doing some for horses but I have to research somem ore,” Mrs Holcombe said. Currently, Pampered Pot c ake dog treat products are being sold at the Bahamas Humane Society, Palmdale Vet Clinic (both Palmdale and the Caves Village loca tions) and Simply Gourmet (located on Shirley Street and Kemp Road). Pampered Potcakes has also already giv en back to the animal community by donating treats to Proud Paws events. Pmpered C M Y K C M Y K TASTE THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 9B T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e n BY ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Reporter W ITH the many commercially prepared dog foods available on today'sm arket, it is often difficult to tell which o nes are better than others. To make things worse, many dog foods andt reats have been removed from shelves do to fear of contamination. However, o ne Bahamian dog lover sought an alternative and baked her own batch of h omemade gourmet dog treats right at home. She af fectionately named the t reats after the native Bahamian dog called a Potcakethus “Pampered Potcakes” was formed. pets SNICKERS the inspiration behind the pampered potcakes brand. (LEFT POTCAKES makes a variety of snack sizes to suit any dogs snack cravings. (ABOVE SMOOCHIE enjoying a small bonep ampered potcakes treat proving that one is never too young to be a pam pered potcake. Felip Major /Tribune staff

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Mr and Mrs Allen were thrilled by the assistance of the group participating in an “Island Journey.” “With a new roof over our head, we will have a better life,” they said. And that is exactly the premise behind Island Journeys, a nonprofit/non-government entity which seeks to rebuild commun ities in Eleuthera while giving visitors a vacation that truly refreshes the soul. “Our goal is to create a more holistic approach to community development with the primary focus on challenging volunteers to engage in their own transformation,” Shaun Ingraham, the head of the organisation, told Tribune Features. It is a simple premise, Shaun explained, groups or individuals contact the organisation outlining their skills and talents, Island Journeys then finds a suitable project in the community, arranges accommodations and a schedule of work, and the island journey begins. Volunteers pay a small daily stipend of around $75 which includes room and board at a local home, sightseeing and transportation. “It can be as strenuous as constructing a new roof, or as untaxing as a group of nurses who volunteered in the clinic, or a writer who documents island life, we tap into your vocation and create an experience that will truly transform your life,” he said. Since its inception in 2005, Island Journeys has impact ed many lives and forged strong partnerships with a number of volunteers and organisations like the prestigious Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing at Emory Univer sity in Atlanta, Georgia; the Wesley Foundation at Clem son University; the Windermere Island Foundation, and the Cotton Bay Foundation. Participants have primarily come from oversees. However, Shaun said that given the current state of the US economy, Island Journeys, like countless other nonprofit organisations, has seen a dramatic drop in the number of persons who can donate their time, which means that in addition to the projects in the community that are impacted, a significant revenue base for the island has also been decreased. “We had about 125 people last year, where some years we have had 200 to 225 people. This year we are hopeful for at least 100 people. Island Journeys has had phenomenal success, people say that other people just don’t care,but that is not true,” he said. Through its donations and the money which volunteers spend on room and board and personal expenses, Island Journeys has been able to inject more than half a million dollars into the Eleuthera’s economy. Recently, Island Journeys merged with another nonprofit organisation – the South Eleuthera Emergency Partners (SEEP emergency operation centre. The project was divided into two phases. Phase one included raising significant funds to restore the ambulance, purchase a fire truck and con s truct a building to house the vehicles. This was aided by a number of community donations. Phase two includes the completion of the community centre which will have an office, a training centre and will offer an activity hub for locals. Shaun said that this year they are trying to get as many Bahamians as possible to participate in the process and also hope to extend the project to other Family Islands. They are extending an invitation to businesses for fun days, to civic organisations and to persons who wish to celebrate reunions with family and friends. “We really want to encourage Bahamians to come and give back to their country and reconnect with island life. There is a redemptive quality in this experience, that even if you’ve lost your job, you can give back and share your time and talents on the Family Island. “People pack a lot of stuff into life and what we are say ing is ‘unpack everything you don’t need on this journey, because in addition to the sense of accomplishment in helping persons, you can also experience the peaceful tranquility of Eleuthera’,” Shaun said. C M Y K C M Y K TASTE PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T T h h e e T T r r i i b b u u n n e e n BY ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Write r r TWO young Dancesport performers wowed the over 100 students that attended the World Dance Council’s benefit performance for the children of Nassau at the National Centre for the Performing Arts, Shirley Street last week. Students from schools such as CC Sweeting, CI Gibson and GHS, got a chance to experi ence other forms of dance besides our own local and native dances. They even took time out to get involved and learn a few moves from dances such as the give and mambo. A dance couple from Italy demonstrated the tango and foxtrot along with another cou ple who demonstrated a Latin dance from Spain depicting the drama of the bullfight. John Gaylan 13, and Alexandra Gotkovich, 9, both from New York have been dancing for the past three years sepa rately. Although they have been partners for only six months, they dance as though they have known each other since birth. Alexandra said she is very proud to be able to dance at this level at her age. “I really enjoy being able to dance. I want to be able to go to school for dance and be able to do this as a profession,”she said. John said dancing has not been an easy road for him. “It’s really difficult because most of the time you spend your whole day dancing and not hanging out with your friends. You would end up doing your homework at night and it starts to catch up with you. Howev er, it is really fun because you get to go everywhere and its an opportunity not a lot of people get,” he said. John said this trip to the Bahamas was his second trip out of the United States to per form. “My first trip was to Canada but I really like being in the Bahamas. We spent a lot of time at the park at Atlantis on the water slides and the beachI really want to come back,” Gaylan said. Ambassador of Dance for the World Dance Council, Anna Smart, said both young dancers train between two and six hours a day to be at the levels they are today. “They train like Olympic ath letes and I think it is pretty safe to predict that they will be future world champions,”she said. Mrs Smart said the Bahamas was chosen to host the World Dance Sport Championship and Benefit Performance for many reasons. “For us it was two-fold. We wanted a beautiful location so that when they had an oppor tunity to leave the ballroom they had a beautiful place to look at. Secondly, the history of the liturgical dances in the islands is what draws us here because our Latin dances all originate from those liturgical dances, so for us it is a bit of a homecoming,” Mrs Smart said. Special Project officer for the benefit event, Anne Higgins, said they are hoping to make this event and expression of dance an annual event. “By the time the dancers come back next year we want to have some Bahamians competing and doing ballroom danc ing throughout the year. We hope Mrs Smart can bring some teachers to help us get started,” Mrs Higgins said. Dazzling performance at the Centre for Performing Arts TWO young dancesport per formers wow the audience at the Atlantis Resort, on February 8, 2009, during a demonstration at the 2009 World ProAm Champi onships. They will also be a part of the World Dance Council's benefit performance for children of Nassau, on Tuesday Feb. 10 at the National Centre for the Performing Arts, Shirley Street. The tickets for that event cost $10 and performances will be at 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. E r i c R o s e / P h o t o n n By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL Tribune Features Editor W HEN Gerord Allen, a local sanitation officer on Eleuthera, and his wife, h omemaker Vernice, needed a new roof for their home, help came from an unexpecte d source a group of visitors to the island, who instead of spending their v acation lying in the sun, donated their time to making life better for complete strangers. Island Journey This year, take an VOLUNTEERS work o n projects while experiencing an island journey. Alsop ictured -the new fire truck, which was donated to the com munity and a beauti ful beach where vis t ors can unwind after a day of giving back.

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C M Y K C M Y K ARTS THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009, PAGE 11B W ith scores of B ahamians affected by financial and social change, an important element sometimes overlooked is the effects of change on children. However, the Ministry of Education’s (MOE Art Exhibition, is helping dozens of students tell their life stories. Showcased last week a t the Marathon Mall’s m ain atrium, hundreds of art pieces designed by students showcase their stories of love, peace, nature, and emotions. MOE Education Officer Pamela Chandler, explained that this year’s theme, Promoting Excellence, not only gives the public a chance to view the art curriculum in local schools, but also shows the students’ diversity. “We have a number of indigenous materials where we use what we have in our environment, where we are trying to promote the creation of souvenir craft items. We have drawings, paintings, and if you look around you will see bits of macram, Junkanoo and mosaic pieces.” Mrs Chandler explained, that all government junior and senior schools were welcomed to participate in the event, however some out island school have not been able to take part because of travel and accommodation issues. O verall, she feels that those students who have embraced the s ubject, are discovering a tool which from the beginning of time has helped in telling stories, and one used to visually describe e motions. C I Gibson senior Mariel Pierre explained that with increased incidents of violence in her school and community, using art as an outlet to express herself has over the years developed into second nature. “I though that everybody needs a little more love, and the lack of it may be the reason for a lot of violence in our schools.” Mariel said she draws in her spare time, especially if she is angry or experience a rough emotional hurdle. “I finds it calming, and if more young people did it, I think they would come off the streets and see art as a positive hobby.” CI Gibson’s Widline Guillaume, a self described abstract visionary, has embraced nature as a common theme in many of h er pieces. A participant in last years Central Bank Art Exhibit and competition, this youngster has over the last three years worked on refining her talent while telling nature’s story. Describing a piece she calls Nature, Wildine explained: “I stick to pastel colours, this piece has different creatures found in the Bahamas. There’s the Sand-dollar, a shell, the Yellow Elder, lizards, and the Paradise bird. “There is also a face that is revealed to anyone who pays attention and it gives admiration to nature itself. “I like to be free, but also spend alot of time detailing my work. I’d say this is one of my favorites.” Art enthusiast Tanya Bowe, said that over the past ten years she has been collecting small yet unique exclusively Bahamian art pieces. At the exhibition, she was particularly draw to a figurative piece designed by CI Gibson Deputy Head-Boy Lukson Toussaint. The drawing which depicts an eagle, is described as a symbol o f hope through the power of God. M rs Bowe said: “I just like to see young people doing positive things, and if my decision of purchasing one of the pieces could e ncourage someone to continue with their passion, then I would h ave done my job.” Apart from the actual exhibit, an important element to the creation of the pieces is in the support factor that many students seek from their instructors. CC Sweeting senior Laquan Rolle, names his art instructor Jackie Sainville as his mentor. He says where some teachers are non-approachable and unwilling to be a friend to students, Mrs Sainville’s kind yet assertive nature has shown him that there is beauty in everyone, and a story to be told in every creation. Laquan who designed a miniature African Elephant, said he used paint, glue, cardboard, and newspapersbut “not from The Tribune,” he stressed to create the structure. Mrs Sainville who has been there with Laquan and others f rom the start, said she has witnessed time and time again, a c omplete transformation in many of her students who embrace art as an extension and expression of themselves. “The kids who occupy their time in the art room, don’t have time to be getting involved in negative things, it’s unfortunate that we have two small art rooms, but even so both rooms are always occupied.” Climaxing with an awards ceremony last Thursday, Government High School walked away victorious as the overall winners in the senior school division. CC Sweeting took second place, and CV Bethel were awarded third place. In the Junior division, TA Thompson -Formally CC Sweeting Juniortook first place, with SC McPherson in at second, and LW Young in third. In the out-island category, Exuma’s LN Coakley won first prize, with Grand Bahama’s St George’s Secondary in second place, followed by Eleuthera’s Preston Albury winning third place. W ith this exposition acting as a training ground for the up-andc oming artist, MOE said they are just excited to be a part of the training process for the students. n By LLOYD L ALLEN T ribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net AS the cycle of rough e conomic times and increased violence has o nce again hit the global scene, the importance of u sing art to calm the spirit continues to live on in many Bahamian high s chool students today. The Art excellence of n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net EMERGING artist Philip Michael Thomas, is making waves in the music indus try as one of the newest artists to visit the Bahamian scene. Hitting the stage last week where he was the opening act for performers Ginuwine and Morgan Heritage, this budding star is setting his goals high to become one of the best in the industry. The 22-year-old Miami native, describes his sound as a cool and easy flow, which some may think of as Rhythm and Blues, but what he explained as a new form of modern RnB. He says his love for music has been fostered over many years of listening to and watching the likes of Michael Jackson, Bob Marley, Marvin Gaye, and Elvis Presley. “I remember watching Michael Jackson’s moonwalker at my crib, while my mom was around the house doing her errands and cleaning, I was sitting at the TV watching Michael Jackson.” Philip says he has also been compared to the likes of John Legend, and Anthony Hamilton, but wants to be known for his own style. One of his first songs, entitled Jane, is about an old friend who provided him with something far more intense than just visual beauty. He explained his connection with Jane as an experience that “was a meeting of the minds, that took me to a higher level. “Overall, my music is inspired by life, family and friends, experiences, TV, and it is also about positive subjects on love and how people deal with each other in relationships. “Love is God, God is love, and God is good, and its good that I can speak that through my music.” Not a stranger to the Bahamas, Philip said he has always been a fan of the local cuisine. One of his favourite island food is conch salad, which he insists is far better than the salad he’s tried in Coconut Grove, Miami. During his inter view with the Tribune while a guest at the Marley Resort, Philip said his family has been close friends with the Marleys and other big names in enter tainment, but was a bit shy in talking about his own famous background his father whom he is named after starred in the hit 1980’s TV series Miami Vice. Although he acknowledged the mega success achieved by his father during his time, Philip aims to become successful in his own merit. “My dad is an awesome singer also, but alot of people don’t know that. I believe stardom is in my genes, and I guess I’m next in continuing with Michael Thomas brand.” The young artist said he could not talk about inspiration as an artist without mentioning the achievements of Barrack Obama. “I think its impacted the world in what America has done in putting finally a man of another race besides white, in the White House. That inspires me to then go ahead and believe in myself in the dream that I have.” Philip said through his music he has had a chance to talk about the social issues that are going on, and feels he is able to create a higher conscience for people to meditate on. Returning to Nassau next month where he will open for Tanya Stephens and Tada, Philip said he is excited to jump start his career in the Bahamas and looks forward to bringing real music to the music scene. For more on this artist visit www.philipmichael2.com Thomas making waves T HOMAS describes his sound as a cool and easy flow, which some may think of as Rhythm and Blues, but what he explained as a new form of modern RnB. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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Both brothers who are Bahamian but of Haitian heritage, have been actively prac tising art for about as long as they can remember. Specifically concentrating on painting, Jackson has participated in numerous competitions and exhibitions. “This show is probably my sixth show, however it is the second show I have done with my brother. We are trying to have shows more regularly, probably once or twice a year. The next show we have we will work on pieces together,” he said. He added that his purpose for continuing with the show is the many different pieces they have developed over the past year. Jackson’s “Landscape” theme for this exhibition came from legendary director Sergio Leone who is known for films such as “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.” “He liked to use wide landscapes in his films and he also did a lot of extreme face close ups. I wanted to see if I would not necessarily replicate it, but use it as a jumping point for the work I wanted to do. So I wanted to incorporate the face as a part of the landscape and have everything around it to be sort of formed by the face,” he said. Jackson said he also wanted to show how there are duel personalities in every one by the use of two different colors in the faces of his work. “I was always interested in how internally we have two things going on. So I figured just halving the face would make people think about the individual and how they have two personalities,” he said. The methods used in Jackson’s pieces were acrylic, charcoal, collage and pastel on paper, whereas Bernard’s pieces were acrylic on canvas. Bernard Petit’s theme of “ Deconstructing Bottles” came from a simpler place. “It was a class assignment and we had a free choice for what we wanted to do and I wanted to work with bottles which allowed me to deal into a little bit of Cubism. Cubism allows you to take your subject and move it around –it’s an interesting composition,” Bernard said. Jackson said he will continue to do art as it is his calling and indeed his passion. “I don’t know anything else. It’s not just something to doit is who I am. I can’t see myself doing anything else, I need to be an artist. Doing art is me at my best,” Jackson said. The show runs from February 10 to March 10. C M Y K C M Y K The Tribune SECTIONB I N S I D E This year take an island journey See page 10 Bahamian homemade gourmet dog treats See page nine WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 2009 n BY ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Writer EMER GIN G artists Jackson and Bernard Petit also known as The Petit brothers” are displaying their developing talent at a showing of t heir r ecent w ork entitled Modif ication 2D at the Blake Road Community Centre. 2 d M ODIFICATION I don’t know anything else. It’s not just something to doit is who I am. I can’t see myself doing anything else, I need to be an artist. Doing art is me at my best, J A CK SON PETIT L AND SCAPE 4 DECONSTRUCTING BOTTLES III L AND SCAPE 1