Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

Downloads

This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
{T)\

Pim blowin’ it

15F
64F

SUNNY AND

HIGH
LOW

BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.71

6)
par
ce
rad
<<
ar
ro



At the
barber
shop

SEE WOMAN SECTION

Owntow

Guests check out of
hotel after hearing
gunshots nearby

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TOURISTS woke to the
sound of gunshots in the streets
of downtown Nassau early yes-
terday when violence erupted
across from a hotel on the
Western Esplanade.

Police cars filled Augusta
Street at around 4am and a 28-
year-old man who had been
shot in the lower back was tak-
en to hospital by ambulance.
His condition is not life-threat-
ening.

The injured man told police
that three men outside his
Augusta Street home next to
the Envy nightclub on Bay
Street, called him. He said shots
were fired when he went out-
side to speak to them.

Guests at El Greco Hotel
across the street, who had been
kept awake until 4am by music
blaring from the nearby night-
club, rushed down to reception
after hearing the shots to find
out what had happened.

The following morning 10 of
the 24 guests in the 27-room
hotel checked out because they
did not feel safe.

They told staff they had been
kept awake nightly by noise
from the club which persists
until 4am, and some had been

solicited by prostitutes on the
street.

The Mayfair building, oppo-
site the hotel on Augusta Street,
was raided by police and immi-
gration officials last year when it
was found that a brothel was
being operated from the apart-
ments. And although activity
stopped for some time, hotel
guests are again complaining of
streetwalkers.

Mike Pikramenos, part own-
er of El Greco, said such activ-
ity is ruining the area.

He said: “They are attracting
the wrong elements and it
makes it hard for anybody to
stay here for a couple of nights.
It’s extremely dangerous for
anyone.

“It’s affecting the Strip
adversely, and they are trying
to improve it, but it’s difficult
when you get elements which
should be controlled by the
police.

“We have people running
around with guns and it’s crazy.

“With the economy as bad as
it is, these people are just mak-
ing it worse.”

Hotel manager Yolanda Stra-
chan added: “People will stay
here for a few days or a week
and they come back, but now

SEE page eight

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

etfetss

Bi 4 ‘sifin yc o more.
ife ofetigtes i Gal laimedium
Itoi | (FFA) & SONA

ae

F\ eer
= a

Valid only on Tuesdays!



The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

Ba oS
aL
aE as

UPSET et



njured i
shooting

i

VALDEZ BOWLEG outside of court yesterday.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 26-YEAR-OLD man of Yellow Elder Gardens
was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on
charges of murder, burglary and attempted armed rob-
bery.

Police have charged Valdez Bowleg in the March 14,
2008 murder of Edward Clarke. Clarke, 52, the country’s
16th murder victim for 2008, was found shot to death on
Old Boat Alley, off Market Street where he lived. Ini-
tial police reports stated that two armed men attempt-
ed to enter a home in the inner city neighbourhood
near the time of the murder, but were thwarted when
the home owner alerted neighbours of the attempted
break-in. Residents of the area reportedly caused a
ruckus, which prompted the assailants to flee the area.
Gun shots were reportedly heard as the armed men
escaped the area and Clarke’s lifeless body was later
found in the street with gun shot wounds.

Bowleg, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday, is also

SEE page eight





PRICE — 75¢

Four years for

Haitian boat captain

in connection
with drug seizure

39-year-old man pleads
guilty to charges

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A HAITIAN boat captain was sentenced to four years in
prison yesterday after pleading guilty to charges stemming
from the seizure of nearly $14 million worth of cocaine in
Great Inagua last week.

Lucio Blanc, 39, of La Tortue, Haiti, with the aid of a Cre-
ole interpreter, pleaded guilty before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel yesterday to charges of conspiring to import cocaine,
conspiring to possess cocaine with intent to supply, impor-
tation of cocaine with intent to supply and possession of
cocaine with intent to supply. Blanc’s lawyer, Mary Bain, told
the Magistrate that Blanc has a wife and seven children in
Haiti and submitted that he had not wasted the court's time
having pleaded guilty to the charges.

Magistrate Bethel took into consideration the fact that he
had been forthright and pleaded guilty to the charges. She
also noted that there was a significant amount of drugs
involved.

Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor, told the court
that officers from the police Drug Enforcement Unit,
Defence Force base in Inagua and US Coast Guard had
intercepted the 77-foot blue and white vessel Blanc had
captained, just off Great Inagua. He told the court that six
men were discovered onboard the vessel. The prosecutor
told the court that after removing several planks onboard the
vessel, 361 packages of cocaine were found.

He said that the drugs weighed 900 pounds and had a

SEE page eight



Police officer accused
of bribery testifies

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— The trial of a
police officer accused of bribery
resumed in the Supreme Court
on Monday with the accused
giving sworn testimony from the
witness stand in his defence.

Constable 2372 Pierre Mar-
tin, 25, is charged with soliciting
a bribe. He is also charged with
two counts of accepting a bribe.

Lawyer Carlson Shurland is
representing Martin, who has
been interdicted from the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force.

Justice Vera Watkins is pre-
siding over the trial. Prosecu-
tors Jillian Williams, Simon
Rolle and Erica Kemp of the
Attorney General’s Office
appear on behalf of the Crown.

Officer Martin is accused of
bribing Garrick Lewis on Feb-
ruary 14, 2007.

Lewis was arrested on Feb-

cee eee eal) Fidelity DebtSAVER



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

ruary 5 at West End for using
obscene language, resisting
arrest, and making threats of
death against Officer Martin.
It is alleged that Martin
approached Lewis after his
arraignment in the Eight Mile

SEE page eight

Pilot crashes on
way to Bimini

A FLORIDA pilot on his way
to Bimini crashed his plane after
hitting a flock of vultures in Ft
Lauderdale.

No-one was killed in the crash.

The birds cracked the window
of the Cessna twin-engine plane
and the pilot radioed that he
would make an emergency land-
ing.

He landed safely at the Fort
Lauderdale airport, sustaining
minor injuries.





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eek Crash victim was

former Davis Cup
Team member

THE FORD MUSTANG crashed into a tree on Midshipman Road.

ColinaImperial.

medical emergencies
dont study economics

... they don’t know the word “recession” either.

That's why you need to maintain your insurance coverage
with Colinalmperial even when the economy is weak — to
make sure hard times don't get harder just because you
fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

confidence for life

www.colinaimperial.com

FIRST AID








m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The man killed in a traffic accident
on Sunday has been identified as 26-year-old La’-
vaughn Fernando Kristain Munroe of Grand
Bahama, a former member of the Bahamas’ Davis

Cup Team (see Sports).

The death of the tennis player pushed the island’s
traffic fatality count to three for the year.

The accident occurred around 1.15pm on Sun-
day on Midshipman Road in the vicinity of Palm

Gardens.

Mr Munroe, an employee at the Freeport Con-
tainer Port, was driving a black 1995 Ford Mustang
with the licence plate number 45532.

Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said Mr Munroe lost
control of the vehicle and crashed into a tree.

Mr Munroe was taken by ambulance to Rand

Memorial Hospital, where doctors officially pro-

nounced him dead.

The vehicle, police said, was extensively dam-

aged.



THE FRONT section of the vehicle ‘broke off’.

Mr Reckley said the front section of the car broke

off and was thrown some 45 feet on impact.

accident.

Police are continuing their investigations into the

Pro-gambling committee chairman applauds
Rotary Club for gaming night decision

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE CHAIRMAN of the com-
mittee which wants to see gambling
legalised in the Bahamas yesterday
applauded the Rotary Club of East
Nassau for deciding to stage a gam-
ing night as part of its fundraising
efforts.

The night of “Texas Hold’em,
Roulette, Blackjack and a grand
raffle” is set to be held on February
28.

No cash prizes will be won as a
result of the poker/roulette/black-
jack, according to Rotary club
organiser, Joanne Smith, but par-
ticipants will get a chance to win
raffle prizes and test their gambling
talents for charity.

Sidney Strachan, chairman of the
Bahamas Gaming Reform com-
mittee, said the more Bahamians
who show they may be for a change
in the country’s “antiquated” gam-
ing laws, the better. He said he
would “love to attend the event”
and thinks the club should go fur-
ther and play for money.

“Definitely I will be there - I
can’t wait. I think we need a lot
more Bahamians to openly chal-
lenge the law. Atlantis just held one
(a poker tournament) so I don’t
see why Bahamians can’t hold
one,” he said.

The BGR committee maintains
that the country’s gaming laws —
which prohibit Bahamians from,
among other activities, gambling in
casinos, playing the lottery or par-
ticipating in poker games for cash —
are discriminatory and outdated.

Yesterday Brent Symonette,
Deputy Prime Minister and an East
Nassau Rotarian, said he would not
be attending the Rotary game night.

But he confirmed when asked
that he is still for a referendum on
the question of whether gambling
should be legalised in the Bahamas,
as he stated in the House of Assem-
bly in 2005.

At the time he suggested that

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING















“Lowest Prices On The Island”

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM

STILL ALIVE

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

the government was “hypocritical”
for failing to hold a nationwide vote
on the issue.

An email advertising the
Rotary’s “Mock Casino” event
states that admission will be $20
and raffle tickets $100. It adds that
first place prize for those playing
poker, roulette or blackjack will be
“18 per cent of the purse”, while
second place will win 12 per cent
and third place, seven.

But Rotarian Ms Smith main-
tained in an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday that no monetary
prizes will be awarded and all funds
raised and prizes will be through
the raffle. “We’ve gotten permis-
sion from the Gaming Board (for
the raffle),” she added.

Secretary of the Gaming Board
and former police commissioner
Bernard “BK” Bonamy empha-
sised that to play for cash would be
illegal - even if the majority of the
proceeds go to charity.

Raffle

While entities can apply to the
Ministry of Tourism, which will
seek the advice of the board, for
approval to hold a raffle, “there is
no such thing as a poker permit,” he
said.

Mr Strachan said the illegality of
gambling for Bahamians is a civil
rights issue, and reflective of an
“18th century mindset.”

He said the country “wants to sit
on both sides of the divide” when it
comes to the subject — with gov-
ernment so far supporting the status
quo, while appearing impotent to
enforce the law, which is widely
known to be broken by citizens
from a broad cross-section of soci-
ety.

Hoping to push their agenda to
another level, the BGR committee
is shortly set to conduct its own sur-
vey, likely in conjunction with the
College of the Bahamas, into the
prevalence of gambling and
Bahamian attitudes towards it.

Mr Strachan said he expects the
findings to show that many
Bahamians take part in gambling
on a regular basis and support a
change in the law.

“We'll make another appeal to
the government based on those
findings. We’ve met with the Gam-
ing Board and we’re kind of confi-
dent that they want it (to change),”
he said. “Our intention is to bring it
(the debate) to a place where the
government can actually act on it,”
he added.

Conditions under the present

government appear to be the most
favourable for a shift in policy.

In late 2008 Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told a Meet the
Press conference, in response to a
question, that he would not be a
“proposer or proponent” of chang-
ing the law.

However, he encouraged those
who are pro-change to “step up,
make their positions known and
tell the public”, adding: “I will not
be a vote that stands against you.”

He has previously declared that
the law against Bahamians gam-
bling is “not an enforceable law and
society is doing it everyday.”

School receives
donation of a
defibrillator

THE DW Davis Junior High
School received a defibrillator
donated by Doctors Hospital and
the South Miami Heart Centre.

Making the presentation to the
school’s principal Abraham Stubbs
was Janisse Post, senior manager of
project development and research
outcomes at the South Miami
Heart Centre.

She said several defibrillators
were purchased for schools in
South Miami and the Bahamas
through a donation from a caring
philanthropist.

A defibrillator is an apparatus
used to control and regulate the
heart beat by application of an elec-
tric current to the chest wall.

Bringing remarks on behalf of
Minister of Education Carl Bethel
was Lionel Sands, acting director
of education, who said the govern-
ment aims to ensure that the coun-
try’s children are in an environ-
ment that is safe, healthy and con-
ducive to learning.

He explained that on any given
day, our school campuses house
thousands of children of varying
needs, which may include health
issues,

For this reason, he said, the Min-
istry of Education is grateful for
the defibrillator, which will be of
great assistance in emergencies
related to the heart.

Mr Sands explained the school
began to prepare for the defibrilla-
tor in the summer of 2008, when
training sessions were held for
administrators and teachers in car-
dio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
and First Aid procedures.

#1 Debt Collection Agency In The Country

Need Help Collecting
Past Due Accounts?

Phone: 328-8301

A

wy
“ WeCan ©
V2 Help You -

ny Get Paid!
L, pA

|

/,Apex Management Services



Resario West Condominiums Under Construction

2 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bathroom 3 storey Townhouses.
Gated property includes pool, well appointed interiors, modern kitchens,
granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, large bedrooms w/ private
baths, hurricane impact windows.

From $249,000 with only $5,000 reservation deposit required
READY FOR OCCUPANCY MARCH ‘09
PH. 325-1325

| aoe







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Job prospects for school
leavers ‘worse than 2008’

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

JOB prospects for students
leaving school this year will be
worse than in 2008, Labour Min-
ister Dion Foulkes told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

The global economic turmoil
has led to a series of lay-offs —
around 1,000 last year from the
hospitality sector alone and
dozens already this year — and
this spells bad news for new
entrants into the job market.

But Minister Foulkes said
there may be an increase in
white-collar jobs in the con-
struction industry, with oppor-
tunities in clerical, architectural
and engineering work due to
government's capital works pro-
jects.

"We are experiencing a down-
turn, the (job) prospects will not
be as bright as they were last
year, but there are still jobs out
there to be gotten. The Labour
Exchange for example referred
successfully last month 60 new
persons into (job) placements.
So there are jobs that are becom-
ing available, but the job market
isn't as vibrant as it was last year.

"The jobs that the government
is focused on creating hopefully
will also create some opportuni-
ties for some of the persons who
are graduating,” Mr Foulkes said.

About 500 people are cur-
rently employed in several Min-



le
Ya

Dion anes

istry of Works projects in various
infrastructure programmes, Mr
Foulkes said in a recent inter-
view with The Tribune.

Since July 2008, some 1,500
people have been employed in
the Ministry of Housing’s build-
ing programme, while another
500 are currently working on the
Department of Environmental
Services’ beautification pro-
gramme for New Providence.

By June 2009, government
expects 400 workers to be
employed in the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
ject and other similar road infra-
structure works throughout the
islands.

Another 400 persons are
expected to be hired for phase
one of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)

redevelopment, Mr Foulkes said
earlier.

However, many of these jobs
will be short-term and have a
high turn-over rate.

As the uncertainty surround-
ing job opportunities increases,
some officials at the College of
the Bahamas (COB) are strong-
ly encouraging students to
become more “versatile.”

"With the recession, I don't
think we're going to have lots of
opportunities like we normally
would. And a lot of the hotels
are laying off people, so I see
this year as being a little bit dif-
ficult in terms of finding certain
types of jobs,” said an educator
at the college who asked not to
be named.

“We don't know if it’s going to
get worse, if it's going to get bet-
ter — it's a little bit scary.”

Students

The educator said most stu-
dents in her department search
for hospitality related jobs.

However, due to the down-
turn in that sector, she is encour-
aging them to branch out into
other fields.

"They are going to now have
to start thinking about other
fields, not just hospitality. Make
themselves more marketable
and studying things that are
going to make them attractive
not just in one field, but in dif-

Retrial of men accused of murder
of businessman gets underway

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE retrial of the men accused of the 2006
murder of local businessman Keith Carey began
in the Supreme Court yesterday.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged in Carey’s murder and are
also standing trial on charges of armed robbery
and conspiracy to commit armed robbery.

During his opening statement, prosecutor
Anthony Delaney told the jurors that the prose-
cution intends to call Vaughn Carey — the victim’s
cousin — as a witness in the case.

Vaughn Carey had initially been charged with
conspiring to commit armed robbery. Those
charges have however been dropped.

Dwight Knowles previously served as a prose-
cution witness but was later charged in connection
with Carey’s murder.

This came after Knowles testified in court that
police had coached him to give his statement and
that the statement he gave to police was false.

On February 27, 2006, Carey, 43, a father of
three, was gunned down on the steps of The Bank
of the Bahamas on the Tonique Williams-Darling

Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000
that belonged to the Esso Service Station which
he operated.

According to the prosecution, a young man
got out of a white Maxima, robbed Carey, then
shot him twice before fleeing the scene in the
car.

Detective Corporal 1212 Lavardo Sherman, a
crime scene technician, was the first witness called
to testify yesterday.

Mr Sherman told the court that he pho-
tographed the crime scene. He also told the court
that he took pictures of the victim at the morgue
of the Princess Margaret Hospital and was present
for the post mortem examination by Dr Govinda
Raju on Friday March 2, 2006.

Detective Constable Garnell Rolle testified
that he took photographs of a white Nissan Max-
ima allegedly used in the crime.

Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethel is the lead prosecutor in the case.
Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are
representing Jamal Glinton, attorney
Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown and
attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight
Knowles.




TUT
PETIA
EEC

PV ath

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

BAHAMASAIR said there is
no cause for alarm following the
deadly plane crash in New York
which involved an aircraft manu-
factured by the company which
supplies a portion of the national
flag carrier's fleet.

Preliminary information emerg-
ing from US Federal investiga-
tions into the crash have linked
the disaster to the use of autopilot
during severe icy conditions — not
any manufacturing flaw.

"We don't have any need to be
overly concerned and that (infor-
mation) doesn't suggest that there
was a problem with the aircraft,”
Bahamasair managing director
Henry Woods told The Tribune
yesterday. "So we still feel as
though the aircraft is most suit-
able for our services and very reli-
able. So there is no cause for
alarm".

Bahamasair operates six 50-
seater Dash 8 Q300s, a smaller
and older model than the Dash 8
Q400 which crashed last week.
Both models are made by Cana-
dia-based firm Bombardier.

Since the crash last Thursday, it
has emerged the plane's crew were
flying on autopilot during severe
icy conditions until 26 seconds
before it barreled into a home out-
side Buffalo, New York.

Some aviation experts contend
that the use of autopilot in icy con-
ditions can prevent pilots from real-
ising the severity of icy weather.








Dave Sherman/AP

THE WRECKAGE of Continental flight 3407 lies amid smoke at the
scene after crashing into a suburban Buffalo home and erupting into
flames late Thursday Feb. 12, 2009.

It was also reported that both
the American National
Transportation Safety Board
(NTSB) and the plane's manufac-
turer recommend that pilots
disengage autopilot during
severe icy conditions, but the Fed-
eral Aviation Administration has
not adopted that recommenda-
tion.

A complete report on the cause
of the crash is not expected for at
least a year, the NTSB told the
media.

In the meantime, Mr Woods
stressed that Bahamasait's fleet is
subjected to rigorous maintenance
checks that trump some interna-
tional standards.

"It's a combination of calendar,
landings, daily and hourly (checks)
prescribed by the manufacturer
and the Airways Authority to
determine the maintenance pro-
gramme and the frequency of
maintenance to be performed. But
it's a very rigid programme, very
rigid,” he said.

"T would say in-house we do
check, and we have a preventa-
tive maintenance programme that
goes above and beyond the
requirements of the manufacturer

and the Airways Authority. We
exceed that".

Mr Woods urged the public not
be afraid to fly in the aftermath
of this latest crash, explaining that
a person has a better chance of
being injured at home than
onboard an airplane.

"You have to take into consid-
eration the tens of thousands of
aircraft in operation and the hun-
dreds of thousands of flights that
operate per day. Well, a single
incident — “fraction” is not a fitting
word of a percentage of people
that fly. So I don't think this will
be a deterrent," he said.

On Thursday, Continental Con-
nection Flight 3407 en route to
Buffalo from Newark crashed,
killing 49 people including the
crew, and one person on the
ground.

It was the first deadly crash in
commercial aviation in two years.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ferent fields, more versatile,"
said the educator.

COB career and placement
counsellor Norma Turnquest
told The Tribune that her office
has seen a significant decline in
requests for student placement
over the past few months.

"T noticed since December
actually, whereas we used to
have calls just about every day in
terms of requests for students,
in late December I got maybe
two calls. Definitely the employ-
ment market is down because
we do not get the kind of calls
we used to in the past,” she said.

Ue
UC
WHT DED hy

A FREEPORT man was
yesterday arraigned in the
Grand Bahama Magis-
trates Court Three on
armed robbery and receiv-
ing charges.

It is alleged that on Feb-
ruary 7, Bernard Ferguson,
while in Freeport, robbed
two expatriates of cash.

He was not required to
enter a plea to the armed
robbery charge and the
matter was adjourned to
June 9.

In a separate matter,
Ferguson was also
arraigned along with Javar-
do Cooper on robbery
charges in Court One.

It is alleged that on Feb-
ruary 7, Ferguson and
Cooper robbed the Sav-A-
Dollar store in the West
Mall Plaza.

Cooper was granted
$1,000 cash bail and Fer-
guson was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison in
New Providence. The mat-
ter was adjourned to July
30, 2009.




















0%
Storewide Sale

BOTH LOCATIONS

0% Clearance
On Selected Items

Baypar! Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Most Treo
asa s Oey Peo:

aa Retoanoyd & Cuiasmoc Ever, on Tun Jon & Fam!
SOHAL, Commo Soosn Cape & Unley Caen Ser,

* Carpet, Upholstery, Sone and Marhic L-keaningy o&
Resordion Spocmist.

* Prochomn Cleaning Sysnome romans. Danap i Heaney
SL, Hecteres, Liressc, Watermarks and Sisire inom
Cupetng & Farmitire, restoring thom to like ac
ate Trectios of replaceme ne one.

Cape, Sofas, Lowpanas Chairs. Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boos, Croat, Tiles, Marte & Some
* Pomaan, Worl d& Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist

* Miatle Polishiag. Reworation & Cane
* Woed Floor Resteralion

Suiteriaed Stent Tech Profesdinal Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHOMSE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OOD FF RIGHTY

ere ec er at ° RIT ee bare 0 * WRT, OF
* pr] ed eat

AS A, Ae oe

PROCHEM SYSTEM jenn

HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

15TH OCTOBER 1930 - 14TH FEBRUARY 2008.

Well loved educator & community leader

“A man 18 loved not for how tall he stands
but for how often he bends to help, comfort and teach.”

x

CAUCE Lhugh

Remembered by his wife, Sylvia; son, Gregory;
all family members & friends





PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Washington: All about trust — or lack of it

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not biparti-
sanship that's on life support in Washington.
It's basic trust and confidence.

The government this week was all about
projecting reasons to believe things will get bet-
ter:

That lawmakers will be able to handle the
economic rescue quickly and effectively; that
President Barack Obama can handle the crisis
with a competent and steady team; that he can
work productively with a Congress controlled by
his own party.

Indeed, that Democrats in Congress can
work with each other.

Instead, this week's rollout of Obama's bank-
rescue update bombed. His treasury secretary
was pilloried for a less-than-surefooted debut.
His second nominee for commerce secretary
said, on second thought, no thanks.

And on Capitol Hill, the Democratic leader
of the House let her Senate counterpart
announce a deal on the history-making eco-
nomic stimulus plan and convene negotiators to
work out the last differences — and then stood
him up.

Why? She was following Ronald Reagan's
famous dictum: Trust, but verify.

"We wanted to see the language" of the bill
before endorsing it, House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi told reporters the next day.

Pelosi and Reid did finally agree on the pack-
age — $787 billion to get consumers spending
and companies rehiring. And Congress moved
to pass it Friday, meeting the Democrats’ self-
imposed deadline and allowing lawmakers to
leave for official trips around the globe.

Like anything that becomes the law of the
land, this legislation was succeeding because it
was in a lot of people's interest. Perhaps, as
White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel sug-
gested, its very passage should reassure investors
and consumers.

But in the process, Washington did not exact-
ly radiate the confidence its leaders are trying to
inspire.

Obama's presidency and the 111th Congress
are only a few weeks old, wrestling with an eco-
nomic meltdown beyond the experience of any-
one charting the course to recovery.

Lawmakers are ill-tempered because their
constituents are angry and letting them know
about it. Some key relationships are new or
rejiggered because of last fall's elections.

The jitters are showing everywhere, from
the false starts to not-for-attribution sniping.

Obama asked the nation to trust him to slow
the economic slide. But three weeks into his
administration, he's still getting his footing.

Timothy Geithner, the chief of Obama's eco-
nomic team, looked nervous and younger than
his years this week when he rolled out a bank
bailout plan that lacked the details Wall Street
wanted. The stock market tanked.

And late Thursday, Obama's second nomi-
nee for commerce secretary, Republican Sen.
Judd Gregg of New Hampshire, abruptly with-
drew from consideration, citing "irresolvable
conflicts" on key policy items. Obama's first
choice for commerce, his nominee for health

secretary and his pick as a federal efficiency
overseer all had withdrawn earlier.

Obama joked about the latest problem, won-
dering aloud in Springfield, IIL, if Abraham
Lincoln had ever thought about the commerce
job. White House chief of staff Emanuel
acknowledged that some might see the admin-
istration's hiring problems as amateur hour, but
he suggested Bill Clinton's transition, which
included Rahm, was even shakier.

But whatever the spin, the situation hardly
was a confidence builder for the nation.

Neither was the way Congress was dealing
with the bank bailout.

The first, deeply unpopular $700 billion
bailout bill last year contained no strong require-
ments for recipients to account for the taxpay-
er money. That was Congress’ doing.

But members of the House Financial Services
Committee took it out this week on eight CEOs
of the nation's biggest banks who had been the
first to receive the bailout money.

It almost didn't matter what the banking
titans had to say for themselves at a televised
hearing. They were the faces behind a housing
crisis that escalated into a recession that makes
it hard to raise any kind of cash, let alone cam-
paign contributions. And every member of the
House is up for re-election in 2010.

House members ripped into the former mas-
ters of the universe.

One suggested they should be thrown in
prison. "America doesn't trust you anymore,"
railed Rep. Michael Capuano, D-Mass.

Many Americans feel the same way about
Congress. And some members of Congress feel
that way about each other.

Last Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, his leadership team and moderate
Republicans at his side, triumphantly announced
on live television that the House and Senate
had agreed on new legislation to bail out trou-
bled industries and boost homeowners.

Pelosi did not respond.

Reid then lit the stately parlour named for
Lyndon Baines Johnson for television and
instructed his Senate negotiators to meet there
with their House counterparts to iron out any
remaining issues.

The senators waited. And waited. Pelosi,
meanwhile, summoned Reid to her office for a
talking-to. Finally, she signed onto the agree-
ment, though that didn't stop the sniping
between her aides and Reid's.

"One person's understanding of a spoken
description might vary from another's," she
said. "We wanted to see it. We wanted to
remove all doubt that the purpose of the mon-
ey was reflected in the language that was there.”

Reagan? Or lawmakers’ favourite
euphemism, an “abundance of caution"?

"T don't want to come to you later and say,
"We thought it said yes and it said no," Pelosi
said. "It said what we want it to say, and we're
very pleased with that outcome.”

(This article was written by Laurie Kellman
who has covered Congress and politics since
1997 for The Associated Press).



Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED

Frustration
with medical
and nursing
‘professionals’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK you for allowing
me to vent my ever increas-
ing frustration with the med-
ical and nursing “profession-
als” of this nation. Recently I
had a relative admitted to our
“illustrious” government-
operated hospital. They had
undergone surgery and was
then placed on one of the pub-
lic wards.

To my chagrin each day that
I visited said relative I
received the most unsettling,
blood-boiling reports of frank
negligence on both the part of
the nurses and physicians con-
cerned with their care.

The paramount complaint
was that no one either physi-
cian or nurse had the forth-
rightness to explain/teach:

1) the client’s condition in
light of the presenting signs
and symptoms

2) the planned procedures
ie blood tests, radiology or
surgical plans

3) pre-and post-operative
preparatory activities for the
patient, including pain man-
agement; the withholding of
oral sustenance for a period
of time; how and when activi-
ties of daily living/self-care
activities would resume fol-
lowing surgery.

Hence, I wonder how
informed consent was
obtained seeing that the nec-
essary teaching (a standard
part of pre-op preparation)
was not provided despite the
questioning by the patient of
the “professionals” responsi-
ble for her care.

Wouldn’t it be a case of
assault since the patient
although lucid and oriented in
all spheres signed a consent
form without the obligated
information?

To add insult to injury my
relative remarked that when-
ever she asked either doctor
or nurse questions regarding
her condition and care she was
made to feel “crazy” and dis-
missed with inappropriate
comments and feigned igno-
rance of the case.

Funny how a client will be
informed by the grapevine
that their case is the hottest
topic around the water cooler,
but they themselves cannot
formally receive said infor-

Short Term Apartment

Cheaper than a Hotel

CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!

week weeks

month

hs, Ped
HOME Away

FROM HOME

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



mation.

Secondly, is it customary to
train physicians and nurses to
be cold, uncaring, uncivilised,
disrespectful, asinine purvey-
ors and practitioners of the art
of medicine and nursing?

I think it not too difficult or
too much to ask or expect that
they

1) are professional at all
times.

2) actually listen to and con-
verse with (and not at or over
the heads of) their patients,
especially when they are clear-
ly conscious and alert, capa-
ble of understanding the infor-
mation/feedback that is
required to be given.

3) uphold the sanctity of the
oath they took when receiv-
ing their so long sought after
“white coat” and upon receipt
of licensure with the Nursing
Council.

4) treat their patients (which
for those who didn’t know
includes the family or care-
givers) as though it were
themselves or a relative, best
friend with tender loving care,
and at least a modicum of
respect and honour.

5) exude passion for serv-
ing patients — going above
and beyond the call of duty
for both the pauper and the
king, even in the worst cir-
cumstance or environment.

Also, why is it painfully
obvious that too many nurses
and doctors at our premiere
medical institution cannot be
bothered to teach clients
about anything related to their
care or even ensure if taught
that it was understood? Is it a
practice that is shunned or is it
simply too much to add to the
workload? I have on numer-

ous occasions witnessed both
grades of “professionals”
ignore or squander opportu-
nities to provide critical teach-
ing to patients and their rela-
tives/caregivers alike.

I cannot fathom why they
wouldn’t work to achieve the
best possible outcome for the
client. Perhaps the client will
succumb to their injury or dis-
ease, but the relatives could
have received life saving infor-
mation that would change the
course of their lives and con-
sequently that of another gen-
eration.

Iam appalled, even utterly
disgusted at the lackadaisical,
“T aim to be negligent and
ineffective,” “I’m only work-
ing for a pay cheque” rhetoric
that is so pervasive within the
health care community. I have
been a nurse over seven years
and cringe at the thought of
being grouped together with
this lot. I am sickened and
many times driven livid at the
thought that, my clients, rela-
tives, friends or even strangers
could fall victim to the perils
of this much dysfunctional,
mismanaged, under
regulated, toxic health care
system.

Remember, although very
cliché...one rotten apple spoils
the whole bunch!

I challenge nurses and
physicians, those with enough
intestinal fortitude to change
the system by first changing
themselves.

At any one time we will all
need medical care and it is
crucial that the highest level
of service, yes — excellence
— be rendered to all and
sundry.

Think about it.

PATIENTLY
AWAITING CHANGE!
Nassau,

January 26, 2009.

Govt should pursue
language teaching

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE, IN THIS contemporary age, concerning The Bahamas,
have been, and continuously are provided with irrefutable evi-
dence that Bahamian Tourism officials are extremely compe-
tent in their profession of promoting our country.

I believe that there would be no dissension amongst Bahami-
ans, Caribbean peoples and those around the world if I were to
adopt the position that these Tourism professionals in The
Bahamas and elsewhere can be counted with the choicest of the

lot on the globe.

And so, being of the opinion myself, it is my sincere belief
that the best of the best Bahamian tourism officials, and even
the ordinary citizen would be receptive to innovative ideas to
catapult Tourism progression even further than it has come

today.

It is my humble opinion that the government of The
Bahamas should take the initiative to approach the Chinese
government, the Japanese government, the German govern-

ment, Spanish speaking governments, French speaking govern-
ments and the Haitian government, with a view to requesting of
them (except Haiti) that they sponsor whatever number of
teachers they are able to spare to teach Bahamian children
their native languages beginning at age four-five years old and
ending the last year in high school - a span of approximately 12
years.

Obviously, The Bahamas government would not be able to
afford these additional teachers (or would they’).

Hence my use of the word sponsor (by these foreign govern-
ments) previously.

It is my humble opinion that if it became public knowledge in
these respective countries over the years that The Bahamas is
replete with individuals speaking their native languages fluent-
ly, it would make our destination that much more attractive.

Additionally, the fact that Bahamians would be able to read,
write and speak another language fluently could present them
with a plethora of other opportunities; as I am sure you would
be able to appreciate.

And also, The Bahamas (I believe) would gain an unmatch-
able reputation within the Caribbean, the wider region, and the
world as being one of the few wonders of the world; and a
“must see.”

It is my sincere hope that the government of The Bahamas
initiates the necessary processes to ensure that this vision comes
to fruition so that The Bahamas and Bahamians would stand

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘06 ARIS #3
‘01 HYUNDAI ACCENT 49%
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘03 DAIHATSU TERIOS
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
‘02 SUZUKI XL-7
‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL

DESIGN

ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

TRUSSES

Q U ITY: u 0 head and shoulders above our counterparts.
, Thank you for your time.
A [ Sales |
UMITED MARVIN G
#1 ALTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS - LIGHTBOURN
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079 AUTHORIZED Nassau,

Wig. gam phew toes oe Seca itp Ale Sey hee Freemaeel Lid der cred dak, Qeceets Map, 27 b 1 E
of Ave: Aberin Mel Chery eels Fld, ATG

MANUFACTURER February, 2009





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Court staff threaten to stay
home until repairs are done



Hurricane =
hunter aircraft.
tocometo
the Bahamas

THE United States’

National Oceanic and

Atmospheric Administra-

tion (NOAA) will dispatch :
one of its Hurricane hunter }
aircraft to Nassau on March :
22 for a one-day exhibition :
on March 23 at the Lynden :

Pindling International Air-
port.

Call for future

leadlers to push

for education

FUTURE political leaders
of the country should also be
leaders in the field of educa-
tion, according to one sena-
tor.

PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald is calling on future
political leaders to put them-
selves forward to not only be
prime minister of the
Bahamas, but also to be the
next Minister of Education.

“That’s how serious I am
about education being at the
centre of any national devel-
opment plan,” he said.

Senator Fitzgerald was
giving his contribution to the
debate on an Act to establish
a National Library and
Information Services
Authority last week.

He said if the Bahamas is
to sustain its economic
growth, education, learning
and research must be at the
core of its efforts.

“T believe that while we
have made significant steps
in this regard, I am of the
view that recently successive
governments have unfortu-
nately failed to channel ade-
quate focus and sufficiently
significant resources into
education and research in
our country,” he said.

“There are many books in
our libraries written about
leadership and while our
present prime minister is
strong-willed and decisive,
that alone does not make
him a good leader. Where is
the vision, where is the plan,
where is ability to inspire a
people so as to give them
hope, where is the environ-
ment of creativity, of think-
ing big.”

Senator Fitzgerald said
that he is concerned by the
number of Bahamian stu-
dents that are leaving the
country to attend universities
abroad and are not returning
home because they see no
professional opportunities in
the Bahamas or simply can-
not find a job in their field of
study.

“The brain drain is truly
alarming and we are not
addressing it. This issue, too,
requires focus and clarity of
purpose. I am also con-
cerned that the female to
male ratio at the college is
two to one,” he said.

The senator said that there
needs to be more focus by
way of human and financial
capital in early childhood
development, with serious
consideration given to
extending school hours and
shortening the long summer
breaks, along with a focus on
science and technology.

COURT staff plagued by mould
growing on the walls and ceilings and
the lack of air-conditioning have
threatened to stay home until repairs
are complete.

Employees of the Coroner’s Court in
Victoria Gardens maintain the work-
place has become unbearable since the
air conditioning stopped working
upstairs, affecting the Coroner’s Court,
magistrates’ offices and clerical offices.

A number of inquests are scheduled
this week but the magistrate, staff and
legal representatives are struggling to
carry out their duties in the stifling
heat, it was claimed.

A member of staff who called The
Tribune yesterday said there has been
no effort to repair the air conditioning

Employees say workplace
has become unbearable

since it broke down and was reported
last week.

And the lack of air is creating an
inhospitable environment across the
whole upper floor of the aging build-
ing.

He said: “They are becoming very
uncomfortable, very agitated and they
are saying they won’t come into work
tomorrow.

“The weather is getting warmer and
it’s really miserable.

“There were several counsel here
(yesterday) and they found it unbear-
able.”

The employee said it’s impossible
to get a breeze flowing through the
building by opening the windows
because an adjacent building blocks
all airflow.

Black mould growing on the wall
behind the magistrate’s bench in the
Family Court located downstairs in
court three, was reported to the Min-
istry of Works last month but staff say
it has still not been remedied.

The Ministry of Works ascertained
that the mould was nothing out of the
ordinary, but employees fear it poses a
danger to staff, visitors and particu-
larly children.

“IT know they sent somebody to look
at it,” the staff member said. “But I
don’t know when it is going to be
cleaned up. I haven’t seen anybody
cleaning it up.”

The Ministry of Works failed to
return calls before The Tribune went to
press.

Minister and AG to
participate in UN
crime conference

MINISTER of National
Security Tommy Turnquest and
Attorney General Michael Bar-
nett will participate in a spe-
cial United Nations conference
on crime this week.

The “Ministerial Conference
on Security, Drug Trafficking,
Transnational Organised Crime
and Terrorism as Challenges to
Development in the
Caribbean” is organised by the
United Nations Office on
Drugs and Crime (UNDOC)
and the government of the
Dominican Republic.

The conference will take
place in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic, from Feb-
ruary 17-20.

Speaking on the Bahamas’
decision to participate in the
conference, Minister Turnquest
said, “In light of current crime
trends in the Caribbean region,
the issues the ministerial con-
ference will take up are those
with which a majority of CARI-
COM governments, including
the Bahamas, are tackling, and
have been tackling for several
years now.”

Minister Turnquest said it is
critical for the Bahamas to have
an input in the “action plan”
the conference is to develop for
the region, to ensure that the
country’s concerns are taken
fully into account.

He pointed to the recent sig-
nificant seizures of cocaine on
board two Haitian sloops as an
indication of the ongoing illicit
drug transit traffic. Mr Turn-
quest commended the police
and the Defence Force for the
exemplary work they continue
to do in the area of drug con-
trol.

The overall objective of the
conference is to develop a
regional strategy that will
strengthen the response of
Caribbean governments, includ-
ing the Bahamas, to the many
very serious challenges that
drug trafficking, transnational
organised crime, security and

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tes
Py

322-2157

Tommy Turnquest

terrorism present to develop-
ment in the Caribbean region.

The conference will be con-
vened in two parts. In the first
part, to take place from Febru-
ary 17-19, senior officials and
experts from Caribbean coun-
tries will review the agenda of
the Ministers’ Meeting. In addi-
tion to discussing matters on
the conference’s agenda, the
officials and experts will also
complete drafts of the two doc-
uments the ministers will con-
sider and adopt — a “Political
Declaration” and an “Action
Plan.”

In reviewing the threats and
challenges posed by illicit
drugs, transnational organised
crime and related matters, the
ministerial part of the confer-
ence, to be held from February
19-20, will discuss issues includ-
ing law enforcement; organised
crime; the legal framework;
drug demand reduction, and
national strategies for counter-
ing terrorism and transnational
organised crime.














NASSAU GLASS COMPANY

will be

CLOSED

Saturday February 21st

for our company’s

FUN BAY

in order to give our staff
a well-deserved break.

We will reopen on Monday February 23rd
We apologise for any inconvenience caused
Mackey Street 393-8165









Madonna set to play wife of
former Bahamian governor

INTERNATION-
AL recording artist
Madonna is set to play
the wife of a former
Bahamian governor in
an upcoming movie.

Madonna will take
on the role of Wallis
Simpson, wife of
Prince Edward, Duke
of Windsor, who
served as the

Bahamas’ governor
from 1940 until the
end of World War II
in 1945.

In 1936, King
Edward VIII abdicat-
ed the British throne

to marry Mrs Simpson,
an American who had
been married twice
already.

Project

The Guardian of London reported that
the movie is expected to be a true-life
romantic drama and is a labour-of-love
project for the 50-year-old pop singer.

Bahamas Film Commissioner Craig
Woods said there has been no word yet on
whether scenes for the movie will be shot
on location in the Bahamas.

"No, it hasn't gotten to that stage yet so
it's all speculative. Nothing happened yet,
so once they decide to do it, they'll be
down here, they'll be scouting the location
- everybody in the country will know. So
nothing has happened yet,” he said.

According to some historians, the Duke
of Windsor did not enjoy his time in the
Bahamas and referred to the islands as “a
third-class British colony.”

However, the Duke was praised for his
efforts to combat poverty in the country,
although he was said to have been con-
temptuous of Bahamians.

MADONNA (above) will
play Wallis Simpson,
wife of Prince Edward,
Duke of Windsor (both
pictured left).

Many historians have suggested that
Hitler was prepared to reinstate the Duke
as King in the hope of establishing a fas-
cist Britain.

It is widely believed that the Duke, and
especially the Duchess, sympathised with
fascism before and during World War II,
and had to remain in the Bahamas to min-
imise their opportunities to act on those
feelings.

Roles

Casting of the other major roles in the
movie — Edward VIII and Adolf Hitler —
has yet to be announced.

The movie would be the first major the-
atrical release for the subject matter,
although many made-for-television ver-
sions have been produced over the years.

These television films include “The
Woman I Love” (1972); “Edward and Mrs
Simpson” (1978, a seven-part mini-series);
“The Woman He Loved” (1988); “Wallis
and Edward” (2005).



NS

Now Available on all 2008 Almera’s
Great on Gas! 4 Cylinder, 1.6L Engine Excellent Air
Condition, Power Windows, Locks & Side Mirrors, Drivers Air
Bag, Keyles Entry with Immobilizer Alarm System & Lots
More Options

NOW $17,995

ALMERA
ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED *7
#289 Wulf Road
PO, Box NAO
L242] Idee? [/242) 29RD BE

——~ hy
SHIFT _the way you move enna,
—

COMMONWEALTH BARS

Thompson Blvd. « Qakes Field
t. 242.326.6377" £ 242,326.6315
&, sanpin@coralbwave.com

INSURANCE AVAILABLE 1TH
ADVANTAGE INSLIRA RCE
BROKERS & AGENTS. LTD.





PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Reachout Outreach Lowell Mortimer wins Lady

Sassoon Golden Heart Award

Ministry aiming to —
make a difference |

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — The Reachout Outreach Ministry aims to make
a positive difference in the lives of hundreds of young men on ;

Grand Bahama.

Co-founder Dudley Seide said the ministry plans to launch a
mentoring programme for young boys and establish a half-way :

facility for troubled young men who want to change their lives.

Mr Seide said the goal is to reach out to those vulnerable
young men in society and inspire them to be godly men of prin- :

ciple.

involved in criminal activities and going to prison.

“We have a lot of young men who have problems with identi- i
ty and we want to expose them to positive role models through }

our mentoring programme,” he said.

Last Saturday, Reachout Outreach Ministry kicked off its
mentoring programme by hosting a “Boys to Men” conference at }
Calvary Temple Church for some 600 young men throughout :

Grand Bahama.

Conference

The conference was held under the theme “Transforming our

youth through Godly Principle.”

Mr Seide said many prominent men in the community partic-
ipated in the conference, including Assistant Commissioner of }
Police Marvin Dames and MPs Kwasi Thompson and Kenneth ;

Russell, who encouraged the young men to be good citizens.

He thanked the business community and religious leaders
who also supported the event, including Grand Bahama busi- }

nessman Havard Cooper.

Mr Seide said the ministry is focusing its attention particular-
ly on inner-city children of single-parent families in the Garden }
Villas and Columbus Drive areas, as well as the Hawksbill com- }

munity.

“We want to provide positive role models for our young men
to emulate and it was just overwhelming to see so many of them

come out on Saturday,” he said.

“We honoured Mr Havard Cooper who is a very successful
businessman, but he is also a man of God and man of principle

and we want our young men to aspire to that.

“We started this ministry one year ago, but the lives we touched
in that one year, (it) is unbelievable and I am happy to see we are }
said }

making a difference and changing lives in Grand Bahama,”
Mr Seide.

Co-founder Elmor Smith said he made many mistakes as a
teenager and missed out on many opportunities. He does not }

want other young men to follow in his footsteps.

“I was dealing drugs at age 14 and I had opportunities to
receive athletic scholarships to play football and run track, but I }
threw it all way and decided to deal drugs and went to prison,” he }

said.

down,” said Mr Smith.

He said that many young men are ruining their lives by getting

“T have given my life to the Lord and I felt the need to give
back and help transform the lives of our young men ina positive
way. I don’t want them to go down the same path that I went ;

A LOCAL businessman
and philanthropist was this
year’s winner of the Lady
Sassoon Golden Heart
Award at the Annual Heart
Ball on Valentine’s Day
held at the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort.

Lowell Mortimer, the
award recipient, is the son
of Ulric Jason Mortimer and
Winifred Caroline Mortimer
of the famous Mortimer’s
Candies.

Chairman of the Sir Vic-
tor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation R E
Barnes said that once again
many worthy Bahamians
were nominated for the
Golden Heart Award, but
that Mr Mortimer had stood
out in the crowded field.

“The Golden Heart
Award goes to a member of
our community who gives of
themselves selflessly for the
betterment of their fellow
man,” said Mr Barnes.

“It is the people’s award,
as the nominations come
from the public.”

Support

In response to receiving
his award, Mr Mortimer
thanked all who came to
support him and asked these
persons to stand. His sup-
porters included Dr Keva
Bethel, Dr Gail Saunders
and Minister of State for
Health and Social Develop-
ment Loretta Butler-Turn-
er.

Mrs Turner said that it is
important to support such a
worthy cause which benefits
children, particularly those
less fortunate suffering with
heart problems.

She said she felt Mr Mor-
timer was an excellent
choice for a nominee.

The eighth of ten children,
Mr Mortimer said he comes
from a “sweet tradition”,
having grown up around the

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini,
Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Banamian
beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a
plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and

operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

oes

Rew OPPORTUN ms

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a qualified professional

individual for the following position:

DIRECTOR OF RESORT OPERATIONS

Seeking effective communicator with strong leadership and interpersonal skills. This
individual will develop strategy and execution plans to include revenue generation,
financial performance, growth and development, recruitment and staff development.
Solid background in operations, sales, and marketing and financial management is

required.

Job responsibilities include:

Assist inthe development of short andlong range plans for performance and profitability
of designated segment. Focus to be placed not only on fiscal responsibility but also
culture development for seasonal and regular employees. Understands managing the

bottom line.

* Oversee management of resort property including adherence to budget and

compliance with all operating processes.
Recruit and develop local staff.

Work effectively with corporate capabilities (development, marketing, Human
Resources, Finance, IT and Legal) working with district fo execute on strategies,



identify opportunities/issue and ensure goals are achieved.

Ensure that company culture is developed and grown to support overall

corporate objectives.
Perform other duties as assigned.

Requirements:
Bachelor degree/diploma in business or related field.



5 or more years experience in management.
Mega Marina Management knowledge required

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation.

5 or more years experience of overseas resort management

For full

consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resumé to the
attention of DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING
at CRolle@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.





LOWELL MORTIMER (LEFT) receives his award from Chairman of the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)

Heart Foundation R E Barnes.

family’s candy business.

He attended St John’s
College, Bethune Cookman,
Temple University and
received his law degree in
London in 1972.

He returned to Nassau to
practice law and worked at
several local law firms,
including Christie, Ingraham
and Co, Darrell Rolle and
Co and Cash, and Fountain
and Co, before starting his
own firm, Mortimer and Co
in 1996.

It was many years after,
that Mr Mortimer became
interested in helping those
less fortunate than himself.
A family friend, Gwen
McDeigan, had a mentally
challenged child and he
wanted to help her out. This
encouraged him to join the
Bahamas Association for
the Mentally Retarded in
1964.

He helped in just about
every capacity with the
Association, including as
president.

He is also a founding

member of Abilities Unlim-
ited and has served there as
a director and secretary. He
worked closely with former
Golden Heart Award win-
ner David Smalley in getting
this organisation up and
going.

Mr Mortimer is also active
with the Bahamas AIDS
Foundation, where he has
served as vice-president,
director and chairman, and
also worked in a fundrais-
ing capacity.

Restoration

He actively supports the
Beaux Arts Ball and has
been chairman of their ball
committee for fundraising
to help with the restoration
of the Dundas Centre. He
has also been a supporter of
the James Catalyn and
Friends Theatrical Group.

Additionally, Mr Mor-
timer is a founding member
of the local chapter of the
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

re

2 Sanpin Motors Ltd.
= re Owned Department

a Your Fast Lane to

= Vehicle Purchasing

a ieee it,

a owaee.. Sa nee ee =

=



o
=



== Comejor on: in downgand=visit-us us =
at OF me iemorlinetier oungpecial ~
i _,,

oe NoHagglephric

= Constant Everyday low Prices!

= www.preownedbahama
Thompson Blvd. Ph325-0881/2 Fax: 3

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZU



i:
ing” A









better known as the Pi Xi
Chapter of the Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity.

His father supported the
YWCA for years and when
he died in 1980, Mr Mor-
timer took up his father’s
post with that organisation.

He has served as a trustee
for the YWCA and provided
free legal advice for them
for years.

He serves as Honourary
Consul for the Republic of
Turkey and is also chairman
of the Christ Church Cathe-
dral Endowment Trust and a
member of the vestry.

Mr Mortimer said he was
truly honoured to receive
this prestigious award and
he thanked the Heart Foun-
dation and his many friends
for their support.

The Heart Ball is the
major fundraiser for the Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation, which
provides support for chil-
dren.

Additionally, the Founda-
tion works in conjunction
with the Bahamas Heart
Association to educate and
inform Bahamians about
heart care and healthy heart
lifestyles.

The Lady Sassoon Gold-
en Heart Award is named in
honour of the late Lady
Evelyn Sassoon, who estab-
lished the Foundation in
memory of her late husband,
Sir Victor Sassoon.

The deadline for nomina-
tions is normally the third
Monday in January of each
year.

1ONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN RIA SUZURI



as.com
325-0883



=39000 IHAZNS BIH



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 7



KWIB welcomes its first

official teenage members

”
a
~—
o
=
=
o
=
~
oO
—
=
o
a



STUDENTS OF C W SAWYER PRIMARY perform a dance entitled ‘Splash from the Past’ which was

choreographed by Shaketra Knowles.

Students take to the stage

in “Talent Splash 2009’

PRE-SCHOOL, primary and secondary school students last week displayed their talents at the
Department of Education southwestern district's “Talent Splash 2009.” The event was held at the

Holy Trinity Activity Centre in Stapledon Gardens.



F ‘at ate hal i
PICTURED FROM LEFT viewing the performances, including song, dance and skits, are Olga Richards,

southwestern district superintendent; Lionel Sands, acting director of Education and Elma Garraway,

permanent secretary.

@) :

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

LEARN ABOUT YOUR ROLE AS RESEARCHERS

Attend this historical
College of The Bahamas School
of Education [SEDUC]
Conference 2009 focusing on
Teachers As Researchers!
Wednesday, Feb. 18th - Friday,
Feb. 20th, 2009
Registration fee - $50.00
(Public school teachers see
principals for MOED suport)
Reduced fee for COB students
(see SEDLUC office)
Registration Forms are available at
School of Education, Michael H.
Eldon Complex, or online at:
educcontform=

For more info call: 397-2603

SEE YOU THERE!

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING B4HAMIANS

NINE Government
High School students
made their mark as the
first official teenage
members of the King-
dom Women In Business
organisation.

Already having Dia-
mond and Pearl mem-
berships available for
women, KWIB_ has
dubbed it’s teen mem- |
bers the “OPALS”
(Opening and Preparing
Avenues for young
Ladies to Succeed).

The 10th grade girls got to meet and share their
career aspirations with some of the KWIB mem-
bers, including founder Melisa Hall, teen speaker
Cashena Thompson and core leaders Charlene
Paul, Deegenera Jones-Dixon and Arthia Nixon at
their school.

The girls will also be taking part in KWIB’s
annual conference to be held this year at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel from February 26 to
February 28.

During the conference, the students will have a
special session featuring pageant director Michelle
Malcolm, Mrs Jones-Dixon, Ms Thompson and
Yvette Strachan, who will cover a broad range of
timely topics for today’s teenage girls.

Anja Farquharson, GHS guidance counsellor,
expressed her thanks to KWIB for not only invit-
ing the students, but for also garnering corporate



and individual sponsors to
cover the cost of their
membership materials.
“We are so thrilled to
be launching our teen divi-
sion,” said Mrs Hall.

“We didn’t want them
to just come for a pep talk,
but have them actually
come, network and con-
nect with women who are
in the professions they
aspire to be in and meet
with their peers.

“At this age, we want
them to be on a great path to success and some of
the connections they make at this conference might
actually lead to their internships or jobs in the
future.”

Spearheading the OPALS is Mrs Jones-Dixon,
a youth advocate and teen motivational speaker.

“As a society we tend to complain a lot about
our young people, but we sit back and watch the
news and don’t do anything to prevent them from
making negative headlines,” she said.

“At KWIB we see the urgency for us to actual-
ly get physically involved in these young girls’ lives
and invest in their futures. Life is too short to
waste time being idle and not walking into your
purpose. Sure, we are businesswomen, but at the
same time we are big sisters trying to help our lit-
tle sisters avoid being statistics on lists that include
AIDS, teen pregnancy, drugs, domestic abuse and
the like.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Personal Development - Spring Semester 012009

COURSE SECT COURSE

TIME DAY START |DUR |FEES

ll

ACCOUNTING
ACCAROO a
ACCARDT a
|AOCABOZ aT
BUSINESS
BUSROo

BUSSE) 01 CREMT 4 COLLECTIONS &
CUSTSO0 on
ASEH

TSMo00

ACCCOUNTIAMGS FOR BEGINNERS |
ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS II

ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS Ill

: _ ee

6:0Gor-O:00pm TuesiThunt?-Feb | oavks $278
6:08 -00pm Huestis Path 1Oves | 5300

ser oa

‘SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Ww

P~ Femeomans papain oro
THME & STRESS MANAGEMENT WG |S ater4aadpm Fi a pap

COMPUTERS

COMPSO4 a
COMPa7
COMPO
COMPS 1 1 QUICKBOOKS
COMPSaD 11 WEE PAGE DESIGN Wis |

COMPS341

COSMETOLOGY
COsMags

COSMans

DECORATING

DECK Bo0

(COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |

f00pm-5:00pm Mon

a

ee eee
RKETEOAA DING Aig BOtpm Thur lll il hana

fom 8:00pm Tues

O:30am-4:30pm ThurFri

wes
cay

a1 WEE PAGE DESION Wie II O:3hem-4:30pm (That! F ri eee ae ee

6: 00om-3:00pm MoniWved 24-feb

FLORBOD

SCHEDULE

Wednesday Feb. 18th & &:30p.m.

+ Oficial Gontaranca Opening
National Ganbre tor the Pertorming Arts,
East Shiney Street
* Featuring 4 Tribute to Mrs. Shela Seymour
(Foomer Chair - SBDLA
* Exhibited Works of 2007-2008 SEDUG
shudents - OPEN TO ALL

Thursday Feb. 18h @ dau, - 3520p.m.
Michael 4. Ekfon Complex
* Conéerence Aegetration Continues
2:00am = 12:30pum, Conference Sessions
Featured international quest speckars:
Dr. Joyos Bainbridge, University of Alberta,
‘(Ganada and Dr. Jane Haren,
University of Virginia
9:30 = 230p.m. Workshop Sessions

Friday Feb, 20¢h @ Se0Oa.mn. - Sino,
National Gantre tor the Partorming Arts
£:O0a.m. - 11500e.m. Pane Discussion
“Current Issues in Education:
What Arsearch Has To Do tWeth ih*
14:15a.m. = 1:15p.m. - Research
a Competition Awards
00pm. - S2Spun - Dramatic Production
by College of The Bahamas SEDUC sbudents
focusing on “Teachers as Researchers”
Conferenon Close

SEWa02

EDICAL

1 INTERIOR DECORATING | fior- flip Tues oe ae $225
FLORAL DESIGN | G:or-feltipm Mon pe per

LORSAL DESKSM

tks tH20
2 dye $00
UMN FESOURCE MANAGEMENT | G:00pm-&:00pm (Thur

“Feb |1Owks $260

ee
Slang ot ASK: OF FREEHAND CUTTING | 6: O0pm-S: 00pm po Peres

AASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING Il) = &:00pm-S:00pm pas ere ae t250

EDC AL TERMINGILOGY Aiipm-S opm ie sill as $225

EMOGUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 2268714 | (242) 328-0063 / 328-1956 f 08-4900 eat. 8201
or email: perdevg@ocb.edu.bs

CONFERENCE 2009 N

AU fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one tine},

CARS nanweaer Nee hi to cinreee Tattios, Fees, Conrer Content, Cowert Seieduie and Corse Moreriaty





PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Patrons flock to |
Annual Heart Ball

MORE than 500 patrons gathered in the Independence
Ballroom of the Sheraton Nassau to raise funds for chil-
dren with heart disease at the 45th Annual Heart Ball —
the major fundraiser for the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation.

Heart Ball Committee co-chair Portia Nottage said,
“The Foundation is grateful and thankful to all who have
helped to make this event a success. We look forward to
your continued support as we help to repair children’s
hearts, one child at a time”.

The committee for the Heart Ball promised an evening
of fun, elegance, dancing, prizes and surprises. Guests
thoroughly enjoyed the 45th Annual Heart Ball, which was
held on Valentine’s Day under the theme “Taking care of
our future — Fixing little hearts.

Music was provided by the Ed Brice Orchestra, the SG
Band and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Dinner
Band.

The silent auction featuring more than 20 items, was also
a great success.

The most coveted auction items for the night were a
four-day stay at Echo Valley in British Columbia; round-
trip tickets to anywhere in Canada; a mahogany pool
table with matching cabinets; signed Chan Pratt prints, and
a Tiffany & Co necklace set donated by John Bull.

Raffle

The room raffle was a resounding success as well. The
top winner was Andy Fowler, who won two round-trip
World Traveller Plus tickets donated by British Airways;
a diamond necklace and earring set donated by Colombian
Emeralds International; a framed print “Ocean Colours”
by John Paul; a free basic home alarm system installation
compliments of SSI, and a wellness assessment donated by
the Family Medicine Centre.

Second prize winner Kyron Strachan won the hand-
coloured lithograph “Red Coral” from Bamboo Bamboo,
Lyford Cay; an amethyst and citrine bracelet from M
Fondas Jewellers, Lyford Cay; a Vietnamese lacquer box
donated by an anonymous donor; a Motorola cellular
phone from BTC, and a three-day, two-night stay in Ben-
nett’s Harbour at Sammy T’s Resort, Cat Island.

Third prize winner Edison Darville won a 19” Toshiba
flat screen television from SAVECO; a whole body scan,
digital mammogram and coronary calcium score donated
by the Centreville Medical Pavilion - Dr Conville Brown;
a 18 kt yellow gold and blue enamel shell ring from Coin
of the Realm, and a Moyna beaded evening bag donated
by Marcie Bond, Lyford Cay.

The Ballroom was decorated by Symone’s Baskets of
Happiness, Therez McKenzie. Table favours were pro-
vided by Maria Antoinette Special Events; Pasion Tea;
Island Merchant; Island Rose; Bahama Sol; Botani Bath,
and Bacardi and Co.

The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation
was established in 1961 to assist persons with heart disease.
Today, the Foundation’s main goal is to assist children
who suffer from heart disease.

Donations are accepted throughout the year to help
this cause.

Police officer accused
of bribery testifies

FROM page one

Rock Magistrate’s Court on February 14
and asked Lewis to give him $3,000 not to
show up in court.

Lewis testified that he had given Martin
$1,500 on one occasion and $1,000 at anoth-
er time.

Officer Martin told the court that he was
arrested for bribery around 9.30am on Sep-
tember 12, 2007, at the Fish Fry in Eight
Mile Rock.

Before his arrest, Martin said he was at
the Fish Fry waiting for the Eight Mile
Rock Magistrate’s Court to open when a
burgundy coloured vehicle pulled up and
the passenger called out to him.

As he walked toward the vehicle, he said
an object was thrown through the window
at him. When he picked up the object, he
said two DEU officers arrested him for
bribery.

Mr Shurland asked Martin whether he
knew what the object was. He replied that
it was ten $100 notes balled up.

Officer Martin was wearing his police
uniform at the time of his arrest. He said he
was taken to the Eight Mile Rock Police
Station and denied his right to speak with a
lawyer.

Martin said he did not know Lewis, but
saw him on occasions in the West End area.

He said Lewis was using obscene lan-
guage at the Coffee on the Bay Sports Bar
in West End on February 5.

He called officers for assistance and
Lewis was arrested.

Martin said Lewis offered him money to
not show up in court. He said he rejected
Lewis’s offer.

He appeared in court on April 30 as
required. He also went to court on July 18,
but said he was not feeling well and asked
the magistrate if he could be excused. The
matter was then adjourned to December
12, 2007.

Prosecutor Williams asked Martin to tell
the court when Lewis offered him money,
but he said he could not recall.

When asked if he reported to police that
Lewis tried to bribe him, officer Martin
said he did not report it.

The trial continues Tuesday.

Man is injured in
downtown shooting

FROM page one

this happens and they don’t
want to come here. They don’t
feel safe.

“We can’t afford for guests
to go home and tell their family
and friends they stayed in a
hotel and there was a shoot-out.

“People won’t want to come
to the Bahamas on vacation.”

Harry Pikramenos, also a part
owner in El] Greco, said prob-
lems have been emanating from
the nearby building for years.
However, it was compounded
when the nightclub was estab-
lished about three months ago.

“We don’t really object to
people doing business, but that’s
not doing business,” he said.
“Tt’s attracting riff-raff outside
our front door.”

Keith Aranaj, owner of the
Mayfair building on the corner

of Bay and Augusta Streets,
said the club has a licence to
operate nightly until 4am.

He said: “Since the nightclub
opened people have com-
plained about the noise and I
can't blame them for that, but
they should talk to the woman
who rents the place, and they
should come to some under-
standing.

“If the police say close it
down then fine, close it down.

“T can’t do anything until she
violates her lease, so it depends
on what the police do.”

Mr Aranaj denied any knowl-
edge of prostitutes returning to
the building or soliciting in the
street in recent months.

He said he understands the
women living in the building

have work permits and are not
prostitutes, but he does not
know what work they do.
Assistant Commissioner
Hulan Hanna said: “We don’t
know at this point what con-
nection the shooting would
have with any other activity in
the area, but we are following
significant leads as to who may
have carried out the shooting.”

Four years for Haitian boat captain
in connection with drug seizure

FROM page one

wholesale street value of $5 million.

Blanc was sentenced to four years on each
charge. The sentences are to run concurrently.
Blanc was also ordered to be deported after he
serves his sentence.

Ernst Petit-Homme, 32, Jean Marc Pierre, 43
and Dennis Placide, 52, Meckly Mazard, 28, and
Simeon Monestine, 39, who were charged with
Blanc have been remanded to Her Majesty's

Prison and are expected to stand trial on July
15.

Alexandre Jean, 50, Landaize Lessage, 45,
Olindieu Pierre, 33, Robenson Francois, 39, Rod-
ly Jean, 19, and Marie Slyvida Davilmar, 47, who
are alleged to have been on the first vessel on
which $8 million worth of cocaine was seized,
pleaded not guilty to the drug charges during
their arraignment yesterday and were remanded
to Her Majesty's Prison. They are expected back
in court today at 2 pm. They are represented by
lawyer Murrio Ducille.

Man charged with murder

FROM page one

accused of breaking into the
home of Theophilus Knowles
on Friday, March 14. It is
alleged that while armed with
a silver handgun he attempted

to rob Theophilus Knowles.
Bowleg, who was repre-
sented by attorney
Willie Moss, was not required
to enter a plea to the charges.
A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence

against Bowleg for him to
stand trial in the Supreme
Court.

The preliminary inquiry is
set to open on March 27.

Bowleg has been
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Land Cruiser Prado 4 X 4

three engine options: 2.7L 4 cyl,
4.0L V6 or 3.0L turbo diesel

automatic transmission with overdrive
power windows, locks & mirrors
Smiter

immobiliser and remote keyless entry
alloy wheels and full size spare

ABS brakes

dual airbags

CD player

elt lM am CeO OR Rielle mts leeoL i





EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Available in Grand Bahama af Quality Auto Se

Open Mon to Fri am - 5:30pm
Sat Ram - |2noon

Tel: 397-1700

Se Ream IReRr te eri te Lita mar]

EC RCO au eur ried aa

ei ge da



ROP EO ee oe MB | Ba eee

French and
British subs
in collision

m@ By JOHN F. BURNS
c.2009 New York Times News Service

LONDON — In a freak accident, two submarines
carrying nuclear weapons, one French and the other
British, collided while submerged on operational
patrols in the Atlantic earlier this month, the British
and French defense ministries said Monday.

Both vessels returned damaged but otherwise safe
to their home ports, with the 250 crew members
abroad uninjured and with “no compromise to nuclear
safety,” the defense ministries said in terse state-
ments that appeared to have been agreed between the
nations. The reference appeared to cover the nuclear
reactors that power the submarines and the 16 ballistic
missiles carrying nuclear warheads that the British and
French vessels each routinely carry on patrols.

But military experts said the episode raised trou-
bling questions about the safety of ballistic-missile
submarines patrolling the oceans while hiding their
whereabouts even from NATO allies. They said that
agreements on “waterspace management,” requir-
ing NATO nations to advise each other of the where-
abouts of submerged submarines, did not include
vessels carrying ballistic missiles with nuclear war-
heads.

The collision spurred a fresh outcry from groups in
Britain and France that have demanded that the
nations scrap their nuclear arsenals, with representa-
tives saying that only chance had prevented a more
serious impact that could have sunk both vessels,
along with their missiles. The collision “could have
released vast amounts of radiation and scattered
scores of nuclear warheads across the seabeds,” said
Kate Hudson, the chairwoman of the Campaign for
Nuclear Disarmament, a long-established protest
group in Britain.

The collision of the vessels on the night of Feb. 3, at
a location neither nation disclosed, was described by
military experts in London and Paris as a million-to-
one occurrence, given the expanse of the oceans and
the low number of submarines carrying ballistic mis-
siles on patrol at any time from nations with such
vessels. Those nations include the United States, Rus-
sia and China, as well as Britain and France.

Just as startling, the experts said, was that the
French Defense Ministry appeared not to have known



PA, Chris Bacon, File/AP

=

IN THIS OCT. 25, 1992 file photo, sailors are seen
aboard the HMS Vanguard, in Holy Loch, Scotland.
Nuclear-armed submarines from Britain and France
collided deep under the Atlantic Ocean earlier this
month, causing damage to both vessels but releasing
no radioactivity, a British official said Monday, Feb. 16,
2009. The HMS Vanguard, Britain's first Trident class
nuclear-armed submarine, and the French Le Triom-
phant submarine, which was also carrying nuclear
missiles, both suffered minor damage.

in the immediate aftermath that its submarine, Le Tri-
omphant, had struck the British submarine, HMS
Vanguard. On Feb. 6, the ministry released a state-
ment in Paris saying that the French vessel had “col-
lided with an immersed object,” which it described as
probably a drifting cargo container, and that the sub-
marine’s sonar dome, located in its nose and crucial to
its ability to track other vessels, had been seriously
damaged.

Official confirmation of the collision came only
after a report of the episode appeared Monday in
The Sun a British tabloid newspaper. French offi-
cials said Monday they only realized that Le Triom-
phant had struck the British vessel after sending
inquiries to other navies about the deep-sea impact —
an admission that appeared to underline the extreme
secrecy NATO allies impose on the whereabouts of
their missile-carrying submarines.

The HMS Vanguard, which is 492 feet long, was
towed back to its home port at Faslane on the Firth of
Clyde, near Glasgow, Scotland, with “very visible
dents and scrapes,” according to the BBC. The simi-
larly-sized French submarine took three days after the
impact to return to its home port, at LTle Longue near
Brest, according to reports in the French news media.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



© GOLF __

Jolinson wins Pebble
without hitting a final shot

m@ PEBBLE BEACH, California

Dustin Johnson walked out the door and into the rain Monday
morning, still expecting to show up on the first tee with a four-shot lead
to play the final round at Pebble Beach, reports the Associated Press.

He won not with a big drive or a clutch putt, rather a phone call.

“Tt was Michael Letzig, one of my buddies out here,” Johnson said.
“IT was walking out the door to go have breakfast. He called to con-
gratulate me and I didn’t know what he was talking about.”

Some 40 hours after hitting his last shot of the tournament, Johnson
won the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am when rain washed out
the final round for the second straight day.

Pebble Beach received nearly 1 1/2 inches of rain, enough to create
a tiny river in one fairway and produce puddles on most of the greens.
It was the first rain-shortened tournament on the PGA Tour in near-
ly three years, and the first 54-hole event at Pebble Beach since the late
Payne Stewart also hit the winning shot on Saturday in 1999.

And it was historic for at least one reason.

“T’ve never won a tournament in tennis shoes,” said Johnson, who
came to the course to collect his trophy, thank the rain-soaked volun-
teers and grasp the timing of his great week, even if he only got in three
rounds. The victory was the second in his last nine starts, and it puts him
in the conversation with a growing cast of rising stars. The 24-year-old
Johnson joins Anthony Kim as the only players under 25 with multiple
PGA Tour victories.

He moved up to No. 45 in the world, putting him into the 64-man
field at the Accenture Match Play Championship next week. More
importantly — at least for a guy who grew up less than an hour away
from Augusta National — it earned Johnson a trip to the Masters. He
has had a few offers to play the course, but each time turned it down.

“T just really wanted to be in the tournament before I went and
played it,” he said. Johnson finished at 15-under 201 and earned $1.098
million. The winning round came at Poppy Hills on Saturday, when
Johnson overpowered the five par 5s with birdies on all of them — he
had three eagle attempts — and shot a 67. That gave him a four-shot
lead over Mike Weir, who would have been playing in the final group
at Pebble for the second time in four years.

None of this would have seemed possible to Johnson eight years ago.

According to a story published two weeks ago in Golf World mag-
azine, Johnson was suspended from his high school golf team for skip-
ping classes as he struggled to cope with his parents’ divorce.

Then came an incident that nearly cost him much more.

Intimidated by Steve Gillian, a menacing older brother of one of his
friends, Johnson was among five kids involved in the break-in of a
house, where someone took a gun. Johnson says he stayed in the car
during the burglary, but he was there. According to appellate court doc-
uments, Johnson then was persuaded, reluctantly, to buy bullets for the
gun. Later that month in 2001, Gillian was charged with murder after
shooting the victim multiple times in the head. Because of the loose con-
nection to the crime, Johnson had to pay restitution for the theft and
agree to testify at the murder trail.

Gillian is serving life without parole.

“T always knew I wanted to play on the PGA Tour,” Johnson said.
“Eight years ago, however long ago that was, I couldn’t see myself being
here. But after I got through all that stuff, I went on to play golf at
Coastal Carolina. And coach (Allen) Terrell helped me a bunch.”

The victory at Pebble comes nearly three weeks after the Probation,
Pardon and Parole Services Board of South Carolina granted Johnson
a full pardon relating to his guilty plea in the second-degree burglary
case. And with his second tour victory, Johnson is ready to see how far
he can go.

It took Johnson only 36 starts to record his second tour victory,
compared with 42 tournaments for Kim and 87 for Camilo Villegas.

“Obviously, I’ve proved myself to be just as good as they are,”
Johnson said. “Anthony is a great player. He’s a good friend of mine,
and he’s done great things in the last two years. Just to be mentioned
with them is an honor. I’m just looking forward to the rest of the year
and proving myself a little more.”

BUTCH

CRICKET: ENGLAND VS WEST INDIES, 3RD TEST





=e it

ie _ cae
ENGLAND'S BOWLER S$





teve Harmison, right, celebrat



a

after taking the



WEST INDIES' cricket
captain Chris Gayle
defends his wicket
during the second day
of the third cricket Test
match against England
at the Antigua

Recreation Ground in
St. John's, Monday,
Feb. 16, 2009. England
declared their first
innings at 566 for nine
| and West Indies reach

| 55-1 at close of day

two.

PHOTOS: Andres
Leighton/
AP Photo





wicket of West Indies’ captain Chris Gayle, left, who was caught by team-
mate James Anderson for 30 runs, during the second day of the third crick-
et Test match at the Antigua Recreation Ground in St. John's, Monday, Feb.
16, 2009. England declared their first innings at 566 for nine.

ENGLAND'S BATSMAN Paul Collingwood points with his bat to the pavil-
ion while celebrating his century during the second day of the third crick-
et Test match against the West Indies at the Antigua Recreation Ground
in St. John's, Monday, Feb. 16, 2009.

ENGLISH SOCCER: FA CUP
Eduardo makes dream return to send Arsenal into Sth rount

m@ By FRANK GRIFFITHS
LONDON

Eduardo da Silva scored twice in his
return to Arsenal after a nearly one-year
layoff caused by a broken leg, leading the
Gunners over Cardiff 4-0 Monday night
and into the fifth round of the FA Cup,
reports the Associated Press.

Eduardo scored in the 20th minute with a
header off a cross from Carlos Vela, then
beat goalkeeper Tom Heaton with a penal-
ty kick in the 60th after he was brought
down by Gavin Rae.

After the first goal, Eduardo ran toward
acorner, fell to his knees and smiled before
being teammates enveloped him. Arsenal
fans erupted into celebrations and sang
Eduardo’s name.

“Of course everybody is happy for him
but I believe it was a good team perfor-
mance, dynamic, convincing, mobile, with
the kind of game we love to play,” Arsenal
manager Arsene Wenger said. “Eduardo
played a big part in that and everybody is, of
course, pleased for him tonight.”

The 25-year-old forward’s left fibula was
broken and ankle dislocated during a tack-

KERZNER

SUMMIT FOUNDATION

Open to public starting on

Saturdays Feb 21

le by Birmingham’s Martin Taylor last Feb.
23. Eduardo played his first official game
after that last Wednesday, setting up the
go-ahead goal for Croatia in a 2-1 exhibition
win over Romania.

In the fourth-round replay, Arsenal also
got goals from Nicklas Bendtner in the 33rd
minute and Robin van Persie in the 88th.
Van Persie entered in the 67th for Eduardo,
who left with a slightly strained hamstring.

The Gunners host Burnley in the fifth
round on March 7 or 8, with the winner
meeting Sheffield United or Hull in the
sixth round.

Ht BiG DER CHE

Phone number 363-0626
Ages 7-18 years.
Parents must accompany
under 14 years

PT OF? OF THE OH -BMDOE AND OOATINUE WEST Tt
UNTE Fou AXAIVE AD THE TEA CEA TEA POR

Hours of operation
Tuesday-Saturday 9-5pm

Parents must sign waiver for
all climbers





PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORT

S



SPORTS



@ GOLF

Georgette Rolle tees off for

first tournament of year

caked

OO CO Made LMM OU pm re) celluicm ae) te

BASKETBALL: HUGH CAMPBELL TOURNAMENT
Government Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominate

Mark Knowles
rules out Davis
Cup travel

FROM page 11

still ranked at number two in
the ATP World Tour Doubles
Team Rankings with 1,335
points. The list is headed by
Australian Open champions
Bob and Mike Bryan with 2,295.

Knowles’ former partner
Daniel Nestor of Canada and
his Nemad Zimonjic of Serbia,
won their first title on Sunday at
the ABN Amro World Tennis
Tournament in Rotterdam, The
Netherlands.

Knowles said it was gratifying
win for them since they didn’t
do that well at the Australian
Open. But he admitted that he’s
not too concerned about Nestor
and Zimonjic.

“They’re one of the toip
teams in the world, so I expect
them to be right there at the end
of the year,” Knowles stated.
“But we’re not friends at all, so
I’m really going to talk about
him anymore.”

With the schedule ahead of
him, Knowles has opted not to
travel with the national team to
Paraguay for the first round of
the American Zone II Davis
Cup tie.

“The hardest part for me was
the schedule and playing on the
red clay in Paraguay,” Knowles
stressed. “T have a pretty hectic
schedule and I probably would
not have arrived in Paraguay
until the Wednesday before the
doubles is played on Saturday.

“So the preparation didn’t
allow me to be an assess to the
team. But I think the guys can
pull through and if they do, I
will be available for the second
round, as long as the guys want
me and I can help the team.”

The team, captained by John
Farrington, will be made up of
Devin Mullings, Timothy Neely,
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin
Rolle. The team is scheduled to
leave on Friday, February 27,
but it’s not known if Munroe
will travel with them due to the
death of his younger brother
Lavaughn in a traffic accident
on Sunday.

Tennis in mourning
FROM page 11

made the Davis Cup team in
1999 with Mark Knowles and
Mark Merklein when the
Bahamas hosted Canada at the
National Tennis Center in July.

Canada won the match 4-1
with Munroe losing in a reverse
singles match 6-1, 6-3 to Fred-
eric Niemeyer.

In September that same year
when the Bahamas traveled to
Caracas, Venezuela, Munroe
again teamed up with Knowles
and Merklein.

As the Bahamas won the tie
3-1 to remain in Zone One,
Munroe didn’t play.

Then in 2002 when the
Bahamas traveled to Ecuador
the Americas Group One rele-
gation tie, Munroe traveled with
his brother BJ, Mullings and
Dentry Mortimer.

The Bahamas was blanked 5-
0 and were relegated to Zone II
in 2003. Munroe played in the
second match, losing 6-3, 6-3,
6-0 to Luis Morejon.

Although he had stopped
playing competitively to make
another national team, Munroe
was working with a number of
the young tennis players in
Grand Bahama. Munroe’s
lessons were conducted at the
CA Smith Park, but his dream,
according to his mother, was to
construct a Tennis Academy
and they will be pursuing that
goal as they keep his memory
alive.

May his soul rest in peace.

FROM page 11

that gave his team a 25-5 advantage with 4:42 left in the half.

Denis, the lone starter to log significant minutes in the second, fin-
ished with 19 points to lead all scorers.

He ended the half on a 4-0 run, with consecutive steals and lay-ups
to give his team a 35-18 advantage headed into the third quarter.

The Rattlers came out just as aggressive in the second half led by
Rashad Sturrup who finished in the open court and followed with a steal
and three point play on the ensuing possession.

With his team leading 44-25, Drew Rolle stripped Cougars’ point
guard Kendal Simmons at half court and finished with a dunk to put his
team ahead by 21.

The basket triggered a 16-3 run, capped by a pair of free throws by
Denis just before the end of the third.

The Rattlers outscored the Cougars 25-10 in the third quarter to take
a 60-28 lead into the fourth.

With the reserves going the distance in the final period the Rattlers
scored just six points the rest of the way.

Ramano King scored on consecutive tip ins on the offensive glass ear-
ly in the quarter, but the Cougars outscored the Rattlers 14-2 thereafter.

Rolle finished with 11 points, while King, Sturrup and Denirado Mott
added eight points apiece.

Rashad Woodside led the Cougars with 15 points, Stephen Rolle
added 12 and Kareem Thompson finished with 10.

The Rattlers will advance to tonight's evening session at 9pm when
they will face the winners of this afternoon's matchup between R.M.
Bailey Pacers and Teleos Cherubims.

The Cougars, relegated to the loser’s bracket will face the loser of the
Pacers/Cherubims matchup, Thursday at 7pm.

DDJ Mystic Marlins - 49
NCA Crusaders - 34

The defending GSSSA runners up shrugged off a sluggish start and
overcame a half-time deficit in the first game of the tournament.

In a low scoring affair, the Crusaders led 6-5 after the opening quar-
ter and 17-14 at the half.

The Mystic Marlins completely turned the game around in the sec-
ond half, as the outscored the Crusaders 35-17 in the third and fourth
quarters.

A 14 point third quarter, led by four points each from Charles
Walker and Prince Pinder, in a quarter where they limited the Cru-
saders to five, gave the Mystic Marlins a 28-22 lead.

Walker, who finished with 12 points, scored eight in the final period
as the Mystic Marlins opened their first double figure margin of the
afternoon.

Pinder finished with 12 while Patrick Brice added six.

Leonardo Ferguson led the Crusaders with nine points while Trevor
Adderley added seven.

The Mystic Marlins will advance to today’s evening session to face
the winner of this afternoon’s matchup between the Church of God
Academy Flames and the Queen’s College Comets.

The Crusaders, relegated to the loser’s bracket will face the loser of
the Flames/Comets matchup, Thursday at 6pm.

CV Bethel Stingrays - 56
St. Anne's Blue Waves - 26

The Stingrays, fresh off the season's biggest win in the GSSSA reg-
ular season finale which vaulted them into the playoffs, continued
their momentum with a dominating performance to open up the tour-
nament.

After a slim 12-9 lead after the first, the Stingrays held the Blue
Waves without a field goal for the entire second quarter.

The struggling Blue Waves only points came from the free throw line
when Gordan Ferguson converted a pair with 2:30 left to play in the
quarter. The Stingrays led 30-11 at the half.

The third produced much of the same as the Stingrays outscored the
Blue Waves 14-8 in the third to take a 44-19 lead into the final period.

C.V. Bethel dominated the final period led by Pateico Leadon who
scored eight of his team leading 16 points in the fourth quarter.

Dustin McKenzie and Travis Dawkins added eight points apiece.

Ferguson led Blue Waves with 12 points.

The Stingrays advance to face the winners of last night’s St. John’s
College/C.R. Walker Knights matchup, today at 5:30pm



DENIRADO MOTT is fouled on his way
to the basket against the C.W. Saunders
Cougars yesterday. Mott finished with
eight points off the bench in the Rat-
tlers’ 66-52 win

PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DREW ROLLE finishes a fastbreak with
a dunk in the Rattlers opening day win
of the Hugh Campbell Invitational.

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

GEORGETTE Rolle, still looking for
her break through on the Ladies Profes-
sional Golf Tour, will be teeing off today in
her first tournament for the year in in the
Sun Coast Ladies Series Developmental
Golf Tour.

Rolle, the only Bahamian entered in the
field of 33 players, will be in the first group
to tee off at 7:15 am. She is paired with
Jackie Gonzalez from Valencia, Venezucla
and Susan Choi from Natick, Ma.

In an interview as she arrived at the tour-
nament site at Errol Estates in Orlando,
Florida, Rolle said she’s eager to get on the
greens and make her presence felt.

“T came to win. That’s my goal,” said
Rolle, who has never played on the course.

But she’s confident that if she can get
“good ball striking, manage the course and
stay focus,” she should be able to achieve
her goal at the end of the tournament on
Thursday.

While the LPGA’s Futures Tour doesn’t
start until the end of March, Rolle hopes to
play in the Sun Coast Series to stay sharp.
The next series tournament is March 3-5,
followed by March 9-11 and finally March
17-19.

“So [’'m just going to play in these tour-



naments to get ready,” Rolle revealed.

But she noted that she’s been preparing at
school at Texas Southern University where
she’s practiced in the afternoons on her
game.

“T feel pretty confident and very eager
to begin,” said the biology undergraduate
major. “So once the tournament start, I
know that I will be ready.”

During the Christmas holiday when she
was home on a break, Rolle had indicated
that she was looking for a sponsor to help
her in her quest to crack the professional
barrier.

But even though there are some people
who have supported her in part, Rolle said
she’s still looking forward to a major spon-
sor to come through as it will take a con-
siderable amount of funds for her to play on
the tour.

She’s still encouraging the public to sup-
port her financially.

“T think if I can win a few of these tour-
naments, or at least place very high, it
should help my quest to get some funding,”
said Rolle, who has the opportunity to
become the first Bahamian female pro
golfer.

Rolle, 23, is a 2002 St. Augustine’s Col-
lege graduate who excelled in the Bahamas
Golf Federation’s Junior Programme before
she received an athletic scholarship to Texas
Southern.







GRESTWELL PRATT brings the ball upcourt for the C.V. Bethel Stingrays in their 56-26 win over the St. Ann
Blue Waves yesterday.



RASHAD WOODSIDE is fouled by a pair of C.1. Gibson Rattlers on
his way to the basket. Woodside finished with a team high 15
points for the C.W. Saunders Cougars in their 66-52 loss yes-
terday.

C.V. BETHEL’S Patieco Leadon scores two of his game
high 16 points on a finger roll in the Stingrays’ 56-26 win
over the St. Anne’s Blue Waves.





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,




wl
val

Knowles rules
out travelling
with Davis
Cup team to
Paraguay

4

Mark Knowles



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

WITH a hectic schedule
ahead of him, Mark Knowles
has announced that he will not
travel with the Davis Cup team
to Paraguay for the first round
of the American Zone II tie.

After taking a two-week
break from finishing as the run-
ners-up with Mahesh Bhupathi
from India in the Australian
Open, Knowles will be back in
action this week at the Regions
Morgan Keegan Championships
in Memphis, Tennessee.

But instead of teaming up
with Bhupathi, who is still in
India waiting for next week’s
tournament in Dubai, Knowles
will play with Mardy Fish from
the United States.

Seeded at number four, the
duo will play their first match
against the team of Christophe
Rochus from Belgium and Flo-
rent Serra from France.

“The expectations are pretty
high,” said Knowles of Fish,
whom he played with in Delray
Beach, Florida last year where
they made it to the semifinal.

“T’m coming off playing well
and he’s been playing well, so I
think we have the making of a
pretty good doubles team. So
it’s going to be exciting. He’s a
pretty good singles player and
doubles player. We get along
pretty well, so things should go
pretty good for us.”

Fish, ranked No.24 in the
world and No.3 in the United
States behind Andy Roddick
and James Blake in singles, is
coming off a 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 loss in
the final of the SAP Open in
San Jose, California on Sunday.

“The hardest part for him is
that he won’t have much time to
prepare, so our first round
match should be tricky,”
Knowles noted. “But we know
each other very well, so that
should help us.”

From Memphis Knowles will
travel to Dubai for the Barclays
Dubai Tennis Championships
that get started on Monday
where he will hook back up with
Bhupathi.

That will be followed by a
pair of ATP World Tour Mas-
ters 1000, starting on March 12
in Indian Wells, California and
in Miami, Florida from March
25.

“We're hoping to build on the
momentum that we got started
in Australia,” Knowles project-
ed about his partnership with
Bhupathi. “These are big weeks
for us, which are the biggest
tournaments outside of the
Grand Slam.”

Knowles and Bhupathi are

SEE page 10



Mardy Fish

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

| ESS than
two weeks

before the Bahamas
national team head to the
Americas Zone II Davis Cup
tie in Paraguay, members are
mourning the tragic death of
a former three-time member
and younger brother of their
current team-mate.

Lavaughn Munroe, 26, was
killed in a traffic accident in
the Lucaya area in Grand
Bahama on Sunday. His black
Mustang crashed into a large
tree on Midshipman Road
around 1 pm.

Munroe is the brother of
Bjorn Munroe, who has been
named by the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association to the four-
man team heading to Paraguay



2009

6G He was a very fun loving
guy who got along very
well with everybody.”

on February 27. BJ Munroe,
along with Devin Mullings,
Timothy Neely and Marvin
Rolle are due to travel with
captain John Farrington, a
week in advance to the tie,
scheduled for March 6-8. He
leaves behind his parents, Lor-
na and Patrick Munroe, anoth-
er brother, Parris, and a num-
ber of family members and
friends, including a group of
students whom he instructed
in tennis lessons.

“It’s really tragic,” said
Munnings, who noted that he

2

Devin Mullings

received the sad news on Sun-
day afternoon. “I want to wish
BJ and his family all of the
best. It was so sudden.

“But I know they are a
tough family and they will get
through this.”

While he played with
Lavaughn on the Davis Cup
team, Mullings said he never
got a chance to play against
him.

But as a Grand Bahamian
native, Mullings said he knew
he very well.

“He was a very fun loving



BADLY MISSED: Lavaughn Munroe

guy who got along very well
with everybody,” Mullings
reflected. “He had a strong
personality with a lot of chris-
ma.”

Mullings said he had a
chance to speak to BJ (who
was unavailable for comments)
and he offered him his condo-
lences. He extended it to the
rest of the family.

Also sending his condo-
lences was Mark Knowles from
Mepmhis, Tennessee where he
is preparing to play Mardy Fish
at the Regions Morgan Kee-
gan Championships this week.

BASKETBALL: HUGH CAMPBELL INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT, DAY ONE

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DREW ROLLE scores two of his 11 points in the Rattlers 66-52 win in yesterday's opening ses-
sion of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational.



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

The nation’s most prestigious basketball tournament officially tipped
off yesterday at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium, with Government
Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominating each of the

“Tt’s tragic. We had a strong
relationship, having played
together on the Davis Cup
team,” Knowles pointed out.
“T also know BJ very well
because we played together
too.

“T know it’s going to be hard
for their family. But I want to
let them know that everything
will be alright. I want to give
them my condolences. My
prayers are with them.”

Lavaughn Munroe first

SEE page 10



three games in the opening session of the tournament.

Cl Gibson Rattlers — 66
CW Saunders Cougars — 52

The Rattlers built a two digit margin early and got an opportunity to

rest their starters for much of the second half for an opening day win.
CI Gibson began the game on a 10-0 run with a defense that held the

Cougars without a field goal for the first 3:17 of the game.

With the starters in the game for much of the first, the Rattlers led
18-2 at the end of the first quarter.
In the second, the lead reached 20 on a Junior Denis three pointer

SEE page 10



US SSS er | i

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



ficnting, ALL ica

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

ealil

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST



TT Sa NY































} = Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
/ | ee Vv = High Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
a vse, : - 0| 1 | 2\3 \4 [5 6 | 7/18 | gl10 FIC OFC F/C F/C Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
f in. ii. i al il Acapulco 88/31 70/21 s 88/31 73/22 S FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
‘ia : LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT = Amsterdam 43/6 36/2 r 39/3 34/1 ¢ Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ORLANDO \ Ankara, Turkey 39/3 25/-3 ¢ 43/6 28/-2 © = ABACO _Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
High:68°F/20°C. Mostly sunny, breezy Clear and breezy. Breezy with bright Breezy with a full day Sunshine and patchy Mostly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 50/10 40/4 pe 48/8 41/5 pe Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
a ta A5° F/T°C - © and pleasant. sunshine. of sunshine. clouds. pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 74/23 63/17 sh 74/23 66/18 sh
; op la Hi h: 79° Hi h: 83° Hi h: 75° Hi h: 75° Bangkok 95/35 79/26 pc 95/35 79/26 c
li @ caine ae Ig : g " g é g 4 Barbados 84/28 75/23 pc 84/28 74/23 s '
TAMPA are High: 75 Low: 64 Low: 67 Low: 65 Low: 62 Low: 63 SS ES Barcelona 55/12 42/5 s 50/15 44/6 s So Eee
2 a ti} r, UCM AccuWeather RealFeel Beijing 32/0 23/-5 pc 36/2 27/-2 sn
High: 70° F/21°C as oe. 12°-63° F High Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft. Beirut 63/17 54/12 sh 63/17 59/15 c
Low: 45° F/7°C a. r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:29 a.m. 2.3 7:48am. 05 Belgrade 36/2 33/0 sn 34/1 25/-3 sn
‘ r “ levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tl flect the high and the low for the day. : :
@ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day 1:39pm. 18 7:45pm. 0.3 Berlin 30/-1 24/6 pe 98/-2 19/-7 c
| a . 18 8:47pm. 0. Bogota 67/19 44/6 + 66/18 46/7 sh
5 lie Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Thursday an am. 23 O5lam. 05 Brussels 45/7 34/1 5 45/7 36/2 sh
_ ABACO Temperature 3:44pm. 19 9:48pm. 0.3 Budapest 32/0 25/-3 sn 30/-1 19/-7 sn
j be ese one one HIGH wassassdoaias-bstesiasadjessasts awtiosbeceuse 84° F/29° C : : Buenos Aires 93/33 72/22 s 93/33 73/22 s
. _ 1 Cr ore Low... ea rizec Friday em fousem og Cairo 66/18 50/10 s 74/23 67/19 po
c J ow: 55° F/1 Normal high... 77° F/25° CO Calcutta 92/33 69/20 s 92/33 66/18 s Denver,(m)
. r Normal low 64° F/18° C Calgary 26/-3 7/-13 pc 28/-2 14/-10 pc 48/21 | =
fA a @ WEST PALM BEACH —_ Last year's Hight ocsocsssseenensseseee 83° F/28° C SuN Ay Ty ify Cancun 81/27 66/18 s 85/29 67/19 s
' eal High: 72° F/22°C Last year's lOW oes 67° F/20° C ; Caracas 84/28 68/20 sh 83/28 68/20 r Los Angele
‘ae Low: 55° F/13°C i> Precipitation _ vente ee a.m. oe ve tee a.m. Casablanca 64/17 48/8 s 679 48/8 s : f
As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo... trace unsel....... ‘Yo p.m. Moonset. ... 11-4/ a.m. Copenhagen 32/0 28/-2 pc 33/0 32/0 c
ip Paso.
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full fact Dublin 52/11 39/3 pc 48/8 41/5 pe
High: 75° F/24° C @ High: 67° F/19°C Normal year to date ........cecceceesceeseeeeeeees 272" . a os Frankfurt 37/2 19/-7 34/1 25/-3 pe
Low: 59° F/15°C Low: 53° F/12°C AccuWeather i Geneva 35/1 31/0 sn 35/1 22/-5 sf
.com iS me Halifax 32/0 12/-11 pc 35/1 20-6 pc iy
Ne @ = Forecasts and graphics provided by a = 5 Havana 79/26 56/13 s 83/28 58/14 s Se ae 374/60
‘ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb. 24 Mar. 4 Mar. 10 Mar. 18 Helsinki 23/-5 14/-10 sf 25/-3 18/-7 pc oF) Rain
jah: 74° F/23° ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 70/21 65/18 ¢ 7222 66/18 ogy M24 Rain Fronts
High: 74° F/23° C Fah. PEO 0 [*_* Flurries Cold ==
an. Low:58°F/14°C NASSAU High: 72° F/22° C Islamabad 77/25 = 48/8 pe 78/25 = 48/8 s Be] Shown are noon positions of weather systems and W.
} High: 75° F/24°C Low: 61° F/16°C Istanbul 41/5 36/2 pe 49/9 43/6 sh Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ALM Mintle
Low: 64°F18°C Jerusalem 51/10 38/3 sh 50/15 52/15 [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
J : Johannesburg 78/25 59/15 t 78/25 59/15 t . F
KEY WEST eX 2 CATISLAND Kingston 84/28 72/22 s 83/28 74/23 s 10s| -Os (0S) 10s 20s [BSH] 40s
High: 72° F/22°C a = 3 - Lima 86/30 66/18 pc 87/30 66/18 pe
Low: 61°F/1G°C High: 70° F/21°C London 50/10 41/5 pc 48/8 39/3 pc
: dl Low:58°F/14°C Madrid 57/13 30/-1 pc 5915 30/-1 s
. Manila 86/30 75/23 sh 86/30 75/23 sh QO S 2
Mexico City 77/25 46/7 pc 79/26 48/8 pc pay oy N a easy N ‘7
a Monterrey 79/26 63/17 pc 87/30 56/13 pc
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 27/-2 14/-10 s 27/-2 23/-5 sn
High: 73° F/23° C Rs mao 6 Moscow 32/0 28/-2 sn 32/0 21/-6 sn
Low: 62°F/17°C ee ee Munich 33/0 12/-11 sn 19/-7 12/-11 pc
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ice re B6/90 60/15 186/90 50/15 | Never st ou r
highs and tonights's lows. : ew Delhi pe s ec
g g _— J Low:61°F/16°C ©: i Oslo 23/-5 10/-12 sn 27/-2 12/-11 pc Oo
<< Paris 49/9 41/5 sh 50/10 40/4 c i { C
Prague 28/-2 19/-7 sn 25/-3 18/-7 ¢ aac Ine WI O us!
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 84/28 75/23 s 84/28 73/22 pe ;
Ce craic or S00 372 wo = a8/T 800 pe Auto I
Le 6" Rome 50/10 37/2 pc 45/7 3210 pc eS to Auto Insurance,
Today Wetliastay Today Wollestay Today Wadhestiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 72/22 s 81/27 71/21 + 12 Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 78° F/26° C San Juan 99/37 70/21 s 103/39 73/22 s
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC nae Low: 62° F/17°C gee oe oan s a oom s ace Management.
Albuquerque 54/12 31/0 sh 51/10 28/-2 pc _ Indianapolis 48/8 39/3 pc 48/8 23/-5 Philadelphia 42/5 27/-2 s 42/5 37/2 + antago sl S
Anchorage 30/-1 18/-7 sf 27/2 22/-5 sf Jacksonville 6216 44/6 s 73/22 55/412 pc Phoenix 63/17 45/7 sh 66/18 45/7 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 81/27 65/18 s 82/27 66/18 pe ke you can trust.
Atlanta 60/15 39/3 s 5945 42/5 t Kansas City 50/10 33/0 pce 39/3 14/-10 c Pittsburgh 40/4 29/-1 po 46/7 28/-2 sn RAGGEDISLAND — High: 79° F/26°c = — oe ea pe — ro sh _
Atlantic City 42/5 22/5 s 44/6 37/2 + Las Vegas 56/13 38/3 pe 6045 37/2 s Portland,OR 46/7 36/2 c S31 36/2 pe High: 77° F/25° C Low: 65° F/18°C Sokal le : a , eras am : an
Baltimore 42/5 28/-2 s 42/5 36/2 + Little Rock 52/11 48/8 po 69/20 35/1 t Raleigh-Durham 50/10 32/0 s 5010 43/6 r Low:61°F/16°C en 5 Ben Lam : THs 63/00 -
Boston 34/1 25/3 s 38/3 354 c LosAngeles 60/15 46/7 sh 66/18 48/8 s St.Louis 50/10 43/6 po 52/11 20/6 + : Se a SaCERE AME SiaeURR Ot INSURANCE M ANAGEMENT
Buffalo 36/2 25/-3 c 38/3 31/0 sn Louisville B42 45/77 s S73 29-1 1 Salt Lake City 38/3 28/-2 sn 42/5 26/-3 sn GREATINAGUA Tula mean eo x
Charleston,SC 56/13 39/3 s 6116 49/9 ¢t Memphis 56/13 53/11 po 66/18 341 © San Antonio 68/20 59/15 c 80/26 43/6 pc «a one ei T y 34/1 26/-3 P 36/2 30/-4 P (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
i hetial : High: 80° F/27° C oronto c sn I |
Chicago 41 32/0 ¢ 41/5 18/-7 sn Miami 74/23 60/15 s 77/25 65/18 s San Diego 59/15 50/10 sh 65/18 49/9 s¢s Low: 66° F/19°C Trinidad 83/28 73/22 t 88/31 76/24 t Ea
Cleveland 42/5 28/-2 47/8 28/-2 sn Minneapolis 34/1 18/-7 c 20/6 3/-16 sn Sanfrancisco 57/13 47/8 sh 58/14 47/8 pc : yapenene 467 34/1. pe 47/8 35/1 po Wa. ~ Hew Providence Crone Sotoma Aharo Fleutherg Fyn
Dallas 68/20 52/41 sh 70/21 37/2 s Nashville 56/13 44/6 s 6847 35/1 4 Seattle 46/7 37/2 pe 50410 37/2 pe Viana 33/0 24/-6 sn 29/1 20/6 po
Denver 48/8 21/6 c 40/4 17/8 c NewOrleans 65/18 58/14 pc 75/23 52/11 t Tallahassee 66/18 44/6 po 70/21 55/12 c ae RS, 39/0 23/5 ¢ 30/1 24/6 sn Reh a We PAD SSE ISN | Mee YDAT) SAPAADOS | Tel (2062) SND-DB5D | Tek: (242) EOG-T304
Detroit 40/4 29/-1 c 42/5 27/-2 sn New York 40/4 30/-1 s 42/5 37/2 ¢ Tampa 70/21 53/11 $s 75/23 60/15 pc Winnipeg 10/-12 -5/-20 c 5/-15 -13/-25 pc .
Honolulu 80/26 69/20 pc 80/26 68/20 pc OklahomaCity 68/20 43/6 pc 58/14 27/-2 s Tucson 61/16 39/3 sh 64/17 38/3 s — ie : ———_—__—________—
Houston 68/20 63/17 sh 78/25 48/8 t Orlando 68/20 50/10 s 77/25 59/15 pc Washington,DC 47/8 30/-1 s 46/7 383 + Seen ee









in new Bahamas @f

THE TRIBUNE

usines

TUESDAY,

FEBRUARY

lai.

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Grand Bahama Hotel owners threaten

Power investor

renewable tie-up

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EMERA, the expansion-
minded Canadian power giant
that last year acquired 25 per
cent of Grand Bahama Power
Company, yesterday moved to
strengthen its presence in the
Bahamian energy sector by
agreeing a joint venture that
aims to pursue renewable ener-
gy projects in this nation.

Emera said in a statement
that it had signed a Letter of
Intent with Schneider Power
Inc, the Canadian renewable
energy specialist that has quali-
fied for the second stage of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) renewable ener-
gy search, that will see the two
link-up for the latter’s
wind/solar power proposals.

Schneider Power, which is
involved in the Bahamas
Renewable Energy Corporation
(BREC), itself a joint venture
with Bahamian company WIN-
SO Ltd, had submitted a pro-

Emera in joint venture link
with fellow Canadian power
provider that has qualified for
BEC renewable energy search

posal to BEC for the construc-
tion and operation of wind tur-
bines and solar panels on three
different islands - New Provi-
dence, Abaco and Harbour
Island.

BREC had proposed that the
three projects would collective-
ly generate 24 Mega Watts
(MW) of electricity per day,
enough to power 25,000 homes.

Wayne Crawley, Emera’s
vice-president of corporate
development, said yesterday:
“We look forward to working
with Schneider Power and their
local partners to support BEC’s
renewable energy programme.
This is an important economic
energy source for the
Bahamas”.

SEE page 4B

Bahamas First hires ex-Colina
executive for agency finances

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First, the gen-
eral insurer, yesterday con-
firmed it had hired a former
leading Colinalmperial Insur-
ance Company executive to run
the finances at an agency it has
just taken managerial control
of, in a bid to get a better han-
dle on the company’s trading
and financial position.

Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First’s president and chief exec-
utive, told Tribune Business that
the company had hired Michele
Fields, wife of well-known
Kerzner International and
Atlantis spokesman, Ed Fields,
on a contract basis to take care
of General Brokers & Agents
(GBA) finances.

“Her background is in
finance and accounting,” Mr
Ward explained. “Since the
operation [General Brokers &
Agents] had no one in there as
a qualified accountant, we felt
we needed to put someone in
place to look after the agency’s
financial affairs on a contract
basis.

“Her remit is finance, not
managing the agency’s overall
affairs.”

Mr Ward said Bahamas First
“needs to know from our case
how the company is trading”.
He added that GBA’s two for-
mer principals and owners, hus-

LYPORD CAY #480)
eu ty cae will Bind succesful peo

quality ling. This newly renoested 3 bedroom, 5 beth bore

é Who know how to reward thenrcaehves

band and wife team Franklyn
and Orinthia Nesbitt, were now
at home.

“You can use the word
‘retirement’,” the Bahamas First
chief said. Mr Nesbitt was in the
news last year, after he was kid-
napped at gun point from his
home and taken to GBA, where
he was robbed of $2,000 in cash
and $6,000 in cheques.

Apart from Bahamas First,
GBA is also understood to
write business for Security &
General and Atlantic Medical.

Tribune Business recently
revealed how Bahamas First
had effectively taken manage-
ment control of GBA, a move
that could eventually result in
the carrier acquiring the out-
standing 70 per cent stake in
the latter that it does not yet
own.

Bahamas First Holdings, the
general insurance carrier's par-
ent company, acquired a 30 per
cent stake in GBA in 2007 in
return for writing-off a $500,000
receivable balance, which rep-
resented premium income that
the agent/broker owned.

Mr Ward had previously
acknowledged "it was not
secret” that Bahamas First
wanted to obtain 100 per cent
ownership of GBA, but said the
management agreement did not
necessarily mean this would

SEE page 4B

Sehind the gates of this umigque com
wh

2 features TÂ¥

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamian co-

owners of a Bay

Street hotel yes-

terday threatened

to end their mil-
lion-dollar investment pro-
gramme for the property after a
“Wild West’ style shoot-out took
place outside early yesterday
morning, the latest development
in what they claim is an
unsavoury atmosphere for
tourism in the area.

Harry Pikramenos, co-own-
er of the 27-room El Greco
Hotel, said that following the
shooting “four to five rooms”
of guests checked out due to
fears for their safety. The
episode cost the property 10 of
its 24 guests, or almost 40 per
cent of business.

He added that another fac-
tor costing the hotel, located
across from the Western
Esplanade, business “left, right
and centre” was the loud music
being played from a nightclub in
the Mayfield building, located
across Augusta Street from the

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

d to $1m investment

* Say shooting outside Bay Street 27-room Bay Street property, and unrelated
nightclub noise, costing them business ‘left, right and centre’

* “Four to five rooms’ check out after shooting

* El Greco running 60-70% occupancies, but struggling to keep it there
as neighbourhood not conducive to tourism

* Incidents last think Bahamian tourism/downtown project needs

E] Greco.

This music, Mr Pikramenos
said, often went on until 4am
in the morning from Thursday-
Sunday every week, depriving
his guests of a good night’s
sleep.

No connection has been
made between the nightclub
and yesterday morning’s shoot-
ing, but Mr Pikramenos told
Tribune Business: “It’s not the
best atmosphere for tourism.

“There was a shooting out in
front of the hotel yesrerday, at
about 2am. Four to five rooms
last night just checked out
because of this shooting.”

A full-fledged gun battle in
what is regarded as a key tourist
area is likely to be the last thing

the Bahamian tourism industry
and economy needs at a time
when it is struggling to attract
every visitor possible.

If the Bahamas is perceived
as unsafed, it could exacerbate
the current downturn even fur-
ther. And the word could
spread very quickly, if those
who checked out of the El Gre-
co yesterday talk about their
experience with friends and
family, and spread the word via
e-mail and Internet postings.

Such shootings also hold the
potential for undermining plans
to revitalise downtown Bay
Street and the City of Nassau,
since few landlords and busi-
nesses will want to invest in
upgrading until the security cli-

Ex-John S George chief back

home after Turks close

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EX-JOHN S George and
Freeport Concrete chief exec-
utive, Ken Hutton, yesterday
confirmed he had returned to
Nassau after closing his Turks &
Caicos-based wholesale/retail
operation, a move forced by the
‘triple whammy’ of hurricanes
and that nation’s political and
economic implosion.

Mr Hutton told Tribune Busi-
ness that after coming through
three hurricanes in 2008, the
sharp economic downturn -
which he said was much worse

Make ita

° Pension Plans

* Mutual Funds



Hutton closes wholesale/retail venture and selling building, due to
‘triple whammy’ of hurricanes and economic/political meltdown

in the Turks & Caicos than in
the Bahamas - and absence of
any government in that nation
had prompted him to “cut” his
losses and shut his Cost Right
business.

Mr Hutton said of the ven-
ture: “It was a gamble to start
with - a pretty good gamble -
but with the place the way it is,
it was time to cut.”

He added that after Turks &
Caicos was struck by multiple
storms last year, Cost Right

reality.

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

° Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

PU Pk

recovered to a position where it
had “turned the corner”, only
for the business to feel the full
force of the global economic
meltdown.

All construction and invest-
ment projects in Turks & Caicos
had ground to a halt, a devel-
opment most Bahamians are all
too-familiar with. That nation’s
high-end tourism product also
experienced a major reduction

SEE page 4B

mate and atmosphere improves.

“We own the hotel, and are
making improvements, sub-
stantial improvements to it,” Mr
Pikramenos said of the proper-
ty owned by himself and his
brother.

“Right now, we’ve invested
in the hotel in excess of $1 mil-
lion. It’s been going on for a
while, and in a year the pro-
gramme should be completed.
There’s been significant
progress with the rooms. We’ve
done more of a West Indies-
type feel, and are trying to ante
up the product and improve the
hotel. We are trying to turn the
area around, but it’s not going

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



We can get you there!

roonalstudy. spactous Iring roam, separate dining room and screened In porch

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

The hall gore bot offers quiet iounds of nature ofed & private back garden woth pour

owe frelt reas, Mo ptress of veoeticn with Gis lew maintinaece home 40 pest

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

bring pour oF chebs. Chualisy finishes and conspienely furnisbed USL ote

George. DamianosaSothebysRealtycom 242.562.4211

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

Damianos |

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Monber a
SKinhamascom tS | Pa od The Gatos MS





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USI eee
VAT’s the way to go on tax reform

THIS is the second part in a
series on tax reform.

Last week, I presented a case
for tax reform highlighting some
of the challenges presented by
our current system of taxation.
In the next two articles, I will
examine several types of tax
regimes that we can obviously
consider. Today, I will discuss
the Sales Tax and the Value
Added Tax (VAT).

Consumption-based taxes

Both systems are consump-
tion-based taxes, which would
take the collection process out
of the hands of a bureaucratic
and often inefficient agency (the
Customs Department in our
case), and replace it with multi-
ple ‘private sector’ collection
points.

Many persons would argue
that, historically, the Bahamas
has never had a culture of mer-
cantile honesty. As a result,
there is a lot of scepticism about
putting tax collection in the
hands of the merchant class.
However, on the other hand,
there is a perception of wide-
spread dishonesty and corrup-
tion among some officers with-
in the Customs Department,
making it almost impossible to
determine what would be the
lesser of the two evils. Talking
about being between ‘a rock
and a hard place’...what a posi-
tion to be in.









A successful transition to a
tax system with widespread col-
lection points requires that we
have computer systems and net-
works, monitoring regimes,
strict rules and the political and
legal resolve to enforce compli-
ance.

Notwithstanding the above,
there are two aspects of con-
sumption-based taxes that
intrigue me. First is the fact that
it collects taxes from everybody
in the economy — citizens, resi-
dents and foreigners. The lat-
ter point is particularly relevant
to a society like ours, with an
extremely large illegal immi-
grant population who elude our
tax base to a large extent. Sec-
ond,there is the potential to tax
the ‘underground’ cash econo-
my, as consumption triggers
some degree of taxation. For
instance, just imagine the poten-
tial revenue that can be derived
by taxing the ‘numbers’ indus-
try.

Our current national pretence
that the numbers business is ille-
gal is an absolute joke...when,
in truth, it is now one of the
most ‘open’ businesses that
exist.

Numbers can be openly pur-
chased at beauty salons, restau-
rants, barber shops, bars, ‘cor-
ner stores’ and, of course, the
ever present, web café. The only
persons who are seemingly
unaware of this are the police.

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.










The Candidate should have the following requirements:
Have 5-7 years experience with the Caterpillar or
similar Product Line, have worked in a Caterpillar
dealership or a similar Organization;

Have training in Ordering and Receiving Parts









Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count






Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University would be an



asset;

Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the

Parts Department;



Must have experience in process statistical control in
planning, programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.







This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts






Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work







experience to:

M & E Limited,

P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email




me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this












position will be contacted.

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers

Thursday, February 19, 2009
Topic
“HOW SMALL BUSINESSES
CAN SURVIVE THE
ECONOMIC DOWNTURN”

GUEST SPEAKER:

MR. ANTHONY FERGUSON

PRESIDENT
CIRCLE VISION FINANCIAL PLANNING,

THE NASSAU GUARDIAN GROUP

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m.
Donations: $25.00 per person

If possible please confirm your attendance by e-mail

Gracesharma05@yahoo.com or JEElliott@bahamaselectricty.com
or quentin.knowles@flameless.com

Financial

By Larry Gibson



Sales tax

A Sales Tax is a tax that is
imposed every time a retail (end
user) sale occurs. It is probably
safe to say that most Bahamians
are familiar with a sales tax as a
result of ‘Florida’ shopping
trips.

A Sales Tax is a tax on con-
sumption, levied on goods and
services at the point of pur-
chase. They are typically
detailed as a percentage on the
price of the item in question,
but may simply be a flat fee. So
a sales tax could be 5 per cent of
the purchase price, or a stan-
dard amount such as 10 cents.

A sales tax as a percentage
of the purchase price is far more
common. For example, the cur-
rent Sales Tax rate in Florida
is 6 per cent.

The underlying philosophy of
a Sales Tax is that a person is
taxed on the basis of what he
consumes rather than what he
earns. Such taxes are consid-
ered to be regressive, as it turns
out that the lower your income
is, the greater the proportion of
your income you wind up pay-
ing in sales taxes. This is
because they are not deter-
mined on income, and even the
poor must consume a certain
baseline quantity of goods and
services. This is part of the rea-
son why many foods are fre-
quently exempted from sales
taxes.

While the concept is straight-
forward, this system places a
heavy reliance on the honesty of
merchants, who are responsible
for first, collecting these taxes,
and second, remitting these tax-
es to the national treasury in a
timely and accurate manner.

Value Added Tax (VAT)
Value Added Tax, popularly

known as ‘VAT”, is a special
type of indirect tax in which a
sum of money is levied at a par-
ticular stage in the sale of a
product or service.

VAT came into effect for the
first time on 10 April, 1954.
From its inception, the VAT
system was imposed on all
major sectors of the French
economy — the first country to
use this system. Once instituted,
it was immediately clear that
revenues collected from the
VAT system constituted a sub-
stantial share of the govern-
ment’s revenue in the French
economy.

VAT is similar to a sales tax.
But instead of implementing
one tax on a given percentage at
the time of a retail sale, there is
a smaller tax, added each time
the product is resold or when
‘value has been added toa
product’. For example, a tax is
added when a product is passed
from a manufacturer to whole-
saler, and again from the whole-
saler to the retailer.

Example
This is best demonstrated by
a simple easy to follow example:

Cat Island Fabrics is a manu-
facturer of upholstery fabrics.
It sells fabric to Sleeptime Mat-
tresses, a manufacturer of bed
mattresses. The Furniture
Gallery, a furniture store, buys
its mattresses from Sleeptime,
and in turn sells its mattresses to
Gerald Stubbs.

Under a Sales Tax system,
the only person who pays taxes
would be Gerald Stubbs, the
purchaser of the mattress. How-
ever, under a VAT system, Cat
Island Fabrics would pay tax
when it buys cotton and turns it
into fabric; Sleeptime would pay

Hotel owners threaten

FROM page 1B

to turn around like this.”

Referring to the shooting and
the nightclub issues, Mr Pikra-
menos added: “It obviously puts
investment in jeopardy here,
that’s for sure. We’re kind of
thinking about holding off and
seeing what the Government is
going to do.

“We're just going to consider
whether we take it any further.
We are seriously reconsidering
going any further if there’s not
going to be any progress by the
authorities, there not going to
get more involved.

“We’re just losing a ton of

business. We’re just losing busi-
ness left, right and centre
because of this.”

Mr Pikramenos said the El
Greco Hotel’s occupancies were
currently running at 60-70 per
cent, and the property was “try-
ing to keep it there”. The hotel,
he added, had a strong Bahami-
an client base, and was also
attracting a lot of Europeans -
something the owners hoped
would increase with additional
airlift.

“We’re not going to be able
to hold the business if the
atmosphere causes three to four
rooms to check out,” Mr Pikra-
menos added.

“Ever since this nightclub

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that THOMAS ANTOINIER

EMMANUEL,

of GREGORY TOWN, ELEUTHERA,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Weer: = ier
Price: 55/000.00)
Hull: Piberglaia

Engine: Tein Mercy CML OPTS, 225 HP, 4) Bowes

We: S-1e

a

i. Getrage in greet condities! Suby loaded vith Auip-pint, Pith firder, Chart plotiersGPS,
Shere, Need, Poesvweter, Bow counties, Powered with twin idercery 22 Optimise ara

menart cratt gauges.

Standard Equiprrient

Sd ed ee Ber
fire tached Ug? wok

fon 6 mated ferme det nore
es Brairege

ir eis

Pout dated Frubs becmen, sayfa
ced Packer

Sisk prep area

iochebis pomunls wosege wlokenl door
Lecer pure os races

‘whet jad uel Pooh ri at tora ed ee ea
ee bol ng ple cack

SS operirg wel

2/5 romsgie grak rl

Teint tory

Ploy fener dee

Us| Wee care ar ed mers
ford coming Lawes

Heda © mee win

Optional [quiprreeer

Pict peli eens od BS dehege
Died eftop gen aerriggen
Leaning por wicaler

a ‘eden
darkee
ool ey nb DaRarog e, Pcae p ,
wete-pler, fink fieder, WEF, ees

CONTACT:

Kingsley Ldgecornéa, ir.
Pr d]4-2and
E-mal) beigrarehe @ypeai care

tax when it uses that fabric to
create a mattress; the Furniture
Gallery would pay tax when it
purchases the mattress for
resale; and finally, Gerald
Stubbs would pay tax when he
buys his new mattress. There-
fore, tax is paid at four points of
‘value adding’, instead of once
at the point of final sale.

VAT Philosophy

It is believed that VAT is a
better tax collection system than
a sales tax, and most countries
worldwide have adopted some
variation of the VAT, especial-
ly in Europe and Africa. More
than 120 countries have imple-
mented this system, and it is
estimated that more than 70 per
cent of the world’s population
live under such a system.

The risk of not recovering tax
from all the intermediaries
involved in VAT’s collection is
said to be the biggest risk of
such a system. The counter
argument is that this is actually
reduced because the tax is col-
lected in stages, and the tax bur-
den is not left to the final retail-
er, but spread over the multi-
stage collection system. (I have
my personal views on this...this
is the counter-argument
nonetheless).

Under VAT, every person
trading (or adding value) is
required to register as a trader.
This then begs the question:
What is a trader? A trader
under VAT is everyone who
provides a professional, trade
or business service on an ongo-
ing basis...an extremely wide
definition.

Criticisms

According to Wikipedia,
rvenues from VAT are fre-
quently lower than expected
because they are difficult and
costly to administer and collect.
In many countries, however,
where collection of personal
income taxes and corporate
profit taxes has been historical-
ly weak, VAT collection has
been more successful than oth-
er types of taxation.

VAT has become more
important in many jurisdictions,
as tariff levels have fallen world-
wide due to trade liberalisation.
It has essentially replaced lost
tariff revenues. Whether the

end to S$1m

came on stream, we are losing
business evbery weekend.
Every weekend we’ve got
check-outs due to the noise.
They’re afraid to stay in the
hotel.”

Mr Pikramenos said he had
spoken to the Licensing
Authority to discover what
licence the Mayfield had, and
had also approached the build-
ing’s owner, Keith Aranaj,
without success.

Mr Aranaj yesterday said he
understands the nightclub has
a license to operate until 4am
nightly.

He said: "Since the nightclub
opened people have com-
plained about the noise and I
can't blame them for that, but
they should talk to the woman
who rents the place, and they
should come to some under-
standing.

"If the police say close it
down then fine, close it down. I

costs and distortions of value
added taxes are lower than the
economic inefficiencies and
enforcement issues ( such as
smuggling) from high import
tariffs is debatable, theory sug-
gests value added taxes are far
more efficient.

Similarly, certain industries
(small-scale services, for exam-
ple) tend to have more VAT
avoidance, particularly where
cash transactions predominate,
and VAT may be criticised for
encouraging this. From the per-
spective of government, how-
ever, VAT may be preferable
because it captures at least some
of the value-added.

For example, a carpenter may
offer to provide services for
cash (without a receipt, and
without VAT) to a homeowner,
who usually cannot claim input
VAT back. The homeowner
will hence bear lower costs and
the carpenter may be able to
avoid other taxes (profit or pay-
roll taxes).

The Government, however,
may still receive VAT for vari-
ous other inputs (lumber, paint,
gasoline, tools) sold to the car-
penter, who would be unable
to reclaim the VAT on these
inputs. While the total tax
receipts may be lower com-
pared to full compliance, it may
not be lower than under other
feasible taxation systems. Next
week, we will continue our
exploration of alternative tax
systems with an examination of
income tax.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

investment

can’t do anything until she vio-
lates her lease, so it depends on
what the police do.”

He added: “The shooting
wasn't on my property and I
don’t think the shooting was
connected to the club. From
what I understand, the man was
shot at home. I am worried
about it but I don’t think it is
connected here.”

According to acting director
of hotel licensing, Monique
Hepburn, the Mayfield is no
longer licensed to operate as a
hotel and is listed as under ren-
ovation. The building itself,
however, still houses a coffee
shop, night club and liquor
store.

Ms Hepburn said that though
the former hotel is under reno-
vations, other businesses are
able to rent and operate in
available commercial space
once they hold a valid business
license.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN RONY DORCELY
of WILSON ST. NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10 day of February, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MAKUM L. INVESTMENTS LTD

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), the Dissolution of MAKUM L. INVESTMENTS

LTD has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 9th

day of February, 2009.

hi-=
“fie
faip 5 Foeer
Fat Gerdierae Lig dors, inc
Lepetlaens





THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 3B

Regulator: Just 22% of fiwannaeii
filings meet deadline TV SHOW







m By CHESTER ROBARDS

Business Reporter



THE SECURITIES Commis-
sion, in an effort to boost com-
pliance rates that are as low as
22 per cent when it comes to
Bahamas-registered investment
funds filing their audited year-
end financials within the pre-
scribed time, will roll out new
legislation this year to tighten
regulation.

The Commission’s market sur-
veillance manager, Sally Moss,
revealed in a presentation at the
British Colonial Hilton that in
2007 only 22 per cent of all reg-
istered investment funds turned
in audited financial statements
within the statutory deadline of
four months after year end.

Ms Moss, speaking to Com-
mission registrants, admitted
that this low figure could be
attributed to laxity in enforcing
regulatory obligations.

“You can say: “You haven’t

enforced the rules’, and so this
exists as bad on you as it does us
- and you’re probably right,” she
said.

“We don’t want to have laws
that strangle the industry. We
want to enforce the law, but not
at all costs, and so we are trying
to look at the proportionality of
regulation. It has to make sense
for us and also for you.”

According to Ms Moss, a
financial extension rule was
adopted in 2004, so that compa-
nies who were in danger of not
meeting the Commission’s dead-
line for turning in audited finan-
cial statements would receive a
grace period. However, busi-
nesses failed to take advantage
of the grace period, she said, and
the Commission year after year
failed to enforce its laws regard-
ing financial reporting.

Yesterday’s meeting was the
Commission’s third annual
industry briefing, which focused
on introducing the upcoming

amendments to the Investment
Funds Act 2003. Some of the
changes being pursued are: a
change in definition of invest-
ment funds; change in definition
of professional funds; change in
definition of recognized foreign
funds and the extension of the
audit deadline from four to six
months.

Speaking at the briefing, Com-
misison chairman Philip Stubbs
said that after his appointment it
was made obvious to him that
some “change and reform” was
needed.

“One of the major criticisms
was that the Commission was
not as responsive to the industry
as might be expected,” he said.

Mr Stubbs said theCommis-
sion recently underwent a review
of its operations by an indepen-
dent consultant, who provided
a report to the Ministry of
Finance. Mr Stubbs said an
analysis from the findings of this
report will lead to plans to sup-

plement the Commission’s short
and long-term goals.

The Commission, which regu-
lates the capital markets and
investment funds industry,
released its ‘Statement of Prior-
ities for 2009’ yesterday.

They pledged for 2009 to:

* Conduct a comprehensive
review of the Commission to
identify areas of risk and
required improvements.

* Improve the efficiency of the
Commission.

* Enhance the legislative
framework of the Commission.

* Enhance transparency in the
operations of the Commission.

The Commission is strained
by the environment in which it
operates, as it seeks to ensure
confidence in local capital mar-
Kets that apply to both domestic
and international market partic-
ipants. “We recognise the chal-
lenges,” said Mr Stubbs. “We as
the regulator are committed to
successfully meeting them.”

Businesses urged: Do not end
critical group memberships

Chamber, BECon finding it tough
to collect same level of dues

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce official has
urged businesses to maintain
their membership in organisa-
tions like his, and not simply let
it lapse in a bid to cut costs. The
Chamber has so far collected
75 per cent of the membership
fees due for the upcoming year.

Philip Simon, the Chamber’s
executive director, told Tribune
Business: “We’re heading into
the renewal period beginning
in March, and we’ve pretty
much collected, from last year
to now, about three-quarters of
the total membership [fees].

“Tt is anticipated there might
be a challenge getting higher
than that this time, because of

BSi

the economic downturn.”

The Chamber has about 500
fully paid-up members, and Mr
Simon added: “We want to
encourage them to renew.
Membership in organisations
that can provide support in dif-
ficult times, be it structural,
financial or technical advice, is
recommended. We have pro-
grammes designed to assist
businesses in these tough
times.”

Mr Simon pointed to the
Chamber’s training pro-
grammes, newly-launched Small
and Medium Sized Business

Unit, its pension plan for mem-
bers, and the proposed group
health plan as examples of prac-
tical initiatives designed to ben-
efit the business community.

“Now is not the time to aban-
don membership in organisa-
tions that can help you through
these tough economic times,”
Mr Simon added.

Brian Nutt, head of the 100-
member Bahamas Employers
Confederation (BECon), con-
firmed that his organisation was
also feeling the effects of the
depressed economy, with some
members either not renewing

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for:-

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking

professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

Vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

or paying their dues late.

“One of the things that is
happening is that businesses are
examining all their costs, includ-
ing the cost of subventions to
organisations like BECon, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and all the other organi-
sations,” Mr Nutt said. “We
have seen a slowdown in dues
payments.”

Within “the next month or
so”, companies that had not
paid their dues may no longer
be BECon members, Mr Nutt
said, because they would not be

in “good standing”.
ro

ISLANDS BY DESIGN ] REISS ENGINEERING

Master Motivator Spence Finlayson, Bahamian-born, world
renowned motivational speaker and corporate trainer is pictured
during the taping of his highly popular TV show “Dare To Be
Great” at the Hilton Hotel. “Dare To Be Great” airs tonight at

8:30pm on ZNS TV13.

Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spence Finlayson
are his guests, Minister Dwight Armbrister of ZNS, Gaynell Rolle-
Stubbs, Co-Franchise owner, Miss Bahamas Company Lid., and
Mustafa Khalfani, owner of Ashanti Oils and community activist.

2003 38 FT. INTREPID
Three 275 HP Mercury Engines
Generator, Cabin, GPS and Depth Finder

Well maintained - Asking $300,000.00 O.N.O

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
TANYA ERDEG at

376-4091 or 396-1134

Two Great Firms
Have Now Joined to Become the Largest

Bahamian Owned Engineering Team





Bt

- Same Commitment to Quality and Service -
- New Resources to Serve YOU -

STRONGER Technical Capabilities
LARGER Staff of Experts
WIDER Range of Services

Keith Bishop and Robert Reiss, Ph.D., P.E.

Islands by Design Reiss Engineering

BAHAMIAN OWNED | BAHAMIAN OWNED

Bes

Proudly Serving the Bahamas

CIVIL * RESORTS *« COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL « MARINE CONSULTING
ENVIRONMENTAL = WILDUIFE = UTILITIES

Keith Bishop

e-mail: keithi@islandsbydesign.cam

WATER * OPERATIONS

cir abet es

=o Es) ee)

C. Robert Reiss, Ph.D., P.E.

cle

ia ee

ae





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Grand Bahama Power investor in
new Bahamas renewable tie-up

FROM page 1B

“We are excited to have
Emera as our financial and
development partner, as we
pursue renewable energy pro-
jects in this region,” said
Thomas Schneider, Schneider
Power’s president.

“Their power generation
development experience and
understanding of the Bahamas
will enhance these and future
projects.”

In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, Mr Schnei-
der said the BREC proposal
would require $60 million in
capital financing, of which $15

Ex-John

FROM page 1B

in demand, Mr Hutton added,
and some 1,000 families had left
the islands.

Describing Turks & Caicos
as being in “economic melt-
down”, Mr Hutton said the
problems facing him and other
businessmen there were exac-
erbated by the uncertain invest-

BSi

million would be equity and the
remainder debt financing. He
added that $40 million of that
figure was likely to be spent in
the Bahamas.

“Such a capital infrastructure
spend in the Bahamas can cre-
ate a lot of services as well as
jobs,” Mr Schneider said at the
time. “That’s going to be a key
benefit for the Bahamas, as
we’re going to be putting mon-
ey into the economy.” Some 10-
15 full-time jobs were likely to
be created.

Some 20-30 jobs construction
jobs would be created on each
of the three islands involved in
the BREC project, meaning

S George chief back home

ment climate created by an
absence of government.

The island’s governance has
been paralysed by the ongoing
Commission of Inquiry, which
last week resulted in the resig-
nation of Premier Michael Mis-
sick. The upshot has been that
there have been no policymak-
ers around to take decisions on
business and investment-related

that some 60-90 jobs would be
created in total if it won gov-
ernment/BEC approval.

Meanwhile, Emera has made
no secret of its desire to expand
its foothold in the Bahamas,
which was achieved last Novem-
ber when the company paid $41
million to acquire Lady Henri-
etta St George’s 50 per cent
ICD Utilities stake (translating
into a 25 per cent stake in
Grand Bahama Power).

Chris Huskilson, its chief
executive, indicated that Emera
wanted to explore various forms
of renewable energy in the
Bahamas, and was looking to
erect several towers in Grand

proposals.

“T closed the business,” Mr
Hutton told Tribune Business
yesterday. “I’m in the middle
of selling the property right
now. It’s [Turks & Caicos] a
neat place, I enjoyed it, but it
was time to make a business
decision and get out of it.

“The first year was not bad,
and then we had some trouble .

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently

accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI

RDINATI

STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is

definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example
Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others
Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Possess analytical qualities
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved

Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae

to :-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N - 7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr @bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity?



AVAILABLE POSITION:
INSURANCE OFFICER

Accountable for acquisition and
promotion of the full range of
insurance products and services.

Bahama to study the island’s
suitability for wind power gen-
eration.

Company

Both itself and Grand
Bahama Power Company are
also looking to experiment with
tidal/hydro energy and waste-
to-energy.

Mr Huskilson said Emera
hoped to bring significantly low-
er electricity costs to Grand
Bahama Power customers
while, like many alternative
energy projects, reducing the
carbon footprint of the
Bahamas.

I got more involved, we had it
going, and then there were
three hurricanes, a global melt-
down, and a political meltdown.

“There’s no one in charge
down there. There’s no govern-
ment, no decisions are being
made, and there’s no invest-
ment. It’s absolutely a train
wreck. When you’re a whole-
sale supplier to the hotels, and
the hotels are running at 12 per
cent occupancies, there’s no
business.”

When asked what he planned
to do now he was back full-time
in the Bahamas, Mr Hutton told
Tribune Business: “I’ve got
some options I’m looking at,
but I’m happy to be home. I’ve
been a way for a year and it’s
been a struggle.”

The Turks & Caicos store Mr
Hutton has closed has endured
a somewhat turbulent time
under different Bahamian own-
ership over the past seven to
eight years. The Cost Right ven-
ture has closed a little less than
two years after Mr Hutton
acquired the business from
BISX-listed Bahamian compa-
ny, Abaco Markets, which in
turn had bought it in 2000 as
TC Trading, a grocery whole-

"The approach that we have
to the electricity business in gen-
eral is that moving the industry
further away from hydrocar-
bons is an important part of
where we are going for the
future, so anything we can do
to bring more renewables - and
to bring lower costs into the
market -that’s a very strong
focus for us, lowering emissions,
lowering costs and making elec-
tricity more stable for cus-
tomers," Mr Huskilson told a
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce luncheon earlier this
year.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany chief executive, E.O. Fer-

rell, said his company was work-
ing closely with Emera on this
project and others in order to
develop its own technology and
improve services to Grand
Bahamians.

"We have been working
jointly to determine the poten-
tial for wind on the island, and
they are helping us with a cou-
ple of other things,” he said.
"We actually have Emera peo-
ple in Freeport today working
with our folks on a project, so
we're looking for opportunities
where their utilities expertise
can augment our capabilities
and improve service to our cus-
tomers."

after Turks close

saler.

Mr Hutton and fellow
investors paid $2.7 million for
the store, which was also named
Cost Right then, via their com-
pany Entervant Holdings (TCD
Ltd, with $2.5 million paid
upfront and the remaining
$200,000 payable over a three-
year period.

When it was closed, Cost
Right employed some 22 staff,
at one time having employed
32 persons.

“[’m not the only one,” Mr
Hutton said of the Cost Right
closure. “This is happening all
over the world, and I’ve still got
my health, ’ve got my family
and the sun will rise tomorrow.

“It’s a shame, but again, ’m
not the only one. Atlantis
knows what it’s all about, Cable
Beach knows what it’s all about,
and the phone company in the
Turks & Caicos has laid off half
its staff.”

Mr Hutton pointed out that
some of the most successful
businessmen in history had to
endure several corporate fail-
ures before they tasted success.

The economic downturn had
also resulted in a crime spike in
the Turks & Caicos Islands, Mr

Hutton added, with several
armed robberies taking place
there in the last few weeks.

“T’ve never seen anything like
that before,” he said. “It’s still a
lot better here in the Bahamas
than it is down there.”

Mr Hutton focused full-time
on his Turks & Caicos venture
after the John S George Hold-
ings private equity group he put
together decided to sell the
Bahamian retailer, following a
boardroom split.

The argument spilt into pub-
lic when one of the group’s
investors, Benchmark
(Bahamas) and its president,
Julian Brown, voiced public crit-
icism of Mr Hutton’s manage-
ment style.

Apart from Benchmark,
which had a 20 per cent stake,
and Mr Hutton and his relatives
with a 40 per cent stake, the
remainder of the company was
held by the Morley and
Pritchard families with 15 per
cent each, and Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) head Robert Lot-
more with 10 per cent.

John S George was subse-
quently sold to its current own-
er, Bahamian retail entrepre-
neur Andrew Wilson.

Bahamas First
hires ex-Colina
executive for
agency finances

FROM page 1B

happen.

He explained: “We have a 30 per cent equity
interest in GBA. That has not changed. It is no
secret that we have expressed an interest in
acquiring the balance of the shares that we don’t
already own.

“In the process of doing that, we agreed with
the existing shareholders that in order for us to do
proper due diligence as necessary, certain aspects
of recordkeeping and certain elements in the way
the business was being managed and operated
needed to change.

“There’s been an agreement reached where
elements of the day-to-day management are going
to be done by a new slate of directors and man-
agers. That may lead to a change in ownership
down the road.”

If Bahamas First does ultimately acquire BGA,
which has offices on Collins Avenue in Nassau
and Freeport, the general insurance carrier —
which has the largest market share in terms of
annual gross premiums, now standing at more
than $100 million — will own a 100 per cent inter-

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

a 92 BR Of

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www.firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

© ay
@s ©

est in five agencies. The others would be Moseley
Burnside, Nassau Underwriters (NUA), Carib
Insurance Agency and Star General in Freeport.

In addition, industry sources said several other
agents — Confidence Insurance Agents & Bro-
kers, Colina General, Bethel-Thompson and one
other — while not owned by Bahamas First, wrote
business 100 per cent exclusively for the carrier.

One insurance sector source told Tribune Busi-
ness that Bahamas First’s expanding agency force
was now close to matching the Bahamian mar-
ket’s largest brokers/agents, J. S. Johnson and
Insurance Management, in terms of size. While
those companies placed the majority of their busi-
ness through tied carriers, Insurance Company of
the Bahamas and Summit, respectively, Bahamas
First had grown through acquiring agents, and
now had a force of ‘tied’ agents.

Several insurance industry sources yesterday
likened 100 per cent-owned or ‘tied’ agents to a
form of ‘direct selling’ of insurance policies to
consumers by a carrier. They suggested that it
raised competition concerns, especially among
the broker and agent segment of the Bahamian
insurance market.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.







JUDGE PARKER
l

Ht CONGRATULATIONS, GON. --
YOU'RE OFFICIALLY
JUDGE PARKER!



( HE JUST CAME IN
THIS MORNING

ke

RORY
sesecend

Wy WHAT ARE
THEY FIGHTING



CALVIN & HOBBES

CALVIN, YOU'VE GOT TWO
SECONDS TO UNLOCK THIS
DOOR AND GIVE ME BACK
WY SCIENCE NOTES!








©1989 Universal Press Syndicate

*A LAND OF MILI AN’ HONEY MUST BE FULL

OF COWS AN’ BEES.”

Across
1 Builder of a lodge (5) 2
8 Purchase from bar before 3






time (8)
9 It pours tea to us quietly, 4
by design (5)
10 Get a tube-shaped 5
loaf (8)
11. Consented to give up a 6
vice (5)
12 Was no faster (3) 7

16 Performs a new ascent (6)

17 It may be pronounced with 12
conviction (6)

18 Massaging the middle may 13
prevent it! (3)

23 Brew of beer left to 14
rise (5)

24 Succeeds with a will (8) 15

25 Beautiful girl one may ring, 19
we hear (5) 20

26 One virus possibly picked
up on holiday (8) 21
27 It’s near the
cathedral (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Lion's share, 6 Fair, 10
Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone,
13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19
Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24
Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29
Seal, 30 Celebrated.

Down: 1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam,
4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod
and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars,
16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea
mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager,
26 Heed.



TM TOLD THAT WHEN YOU
3f TUG THAT STRING, HE RECITES
5, WASHINGTON’S FAREWELL SPEECH



YOU KNOW, ROSALYN, I'D
SUGGEST YOU ADOPT A MORE
HUMBLE ATTITUDE, You
NOOLDNT WANT ANYTHING
To HAPPEN YO THESE a



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

THERE WILL ONLY
BE ONE JUDGE
PARKER, DAD!

RS

www.Blondie.com

YOU SCUMMY ~
LITTLE TROLLS?
WHEN YOUR
PARENTS GET

Sunday

ANP, YOU'LL NEED A
SEASONED GAVEL..-
WITH MY COMPLIMENTS!



(T LOOKS *
LiKE DiRT










THANKS-_-
IT WILL BE AN
HONOR TO
USE IT!






O LONG,

sainjead Bury fa S03)

peniesal s} 44 pyony “ouy ‘sleapuig s

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

















Difficulty Level *

Ambitious candidate (8)
Clue mixed with open



abundance (8)

Withdraw in a sort of
trance (6)

Rolled up for the
opening (5)

Italian food father’s taken
without knowing (5)
Plane going up or

down (5)

Some areas short of a
means of transport (3)

It may be consumed from
a cup (3)

Team not assumed to be
of star quality (8)

High church features (8)
Achieve gain? (6)

Oldest tree on the

street (5)

Loudly call out after a plea
for silence (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Colour for putting on (5)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10
Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13
Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19
Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24
Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt,
29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker.

Down: 1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3
Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7
Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14
Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go
berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23
Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star.











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

APT 3-G

I WENT TO A PLAY WITH
JOE KELLY. DON'T TELL ME

I BE, .| ON YOUR

YOU'RE JEALOUS, GARY?/ TOMMIEP| SIDE.

‘i

MARVIN

TM A MEAN,
LEAN FIGHTING
MACHINE!

7 Yow pip
HAGAR GET To











www. kingfaatures.com

uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)



SHOULD | NEVER. BESIDES, JOE'S



HE THINKS YOu'RE A GOOD
GUY WHOS

UNDER A LOT

OF PRESSURE

AT WoRK,



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. Warld rights reserved.

WELL, AT
LEAST I'M
MEAN/

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc, Workd rights reserved,



PLUS HES Te ONLY ONE WHO OWNS A
HAT WITH HORNS ON IT /




HOW many words of four
letters or more tan vou make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may he used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word, No plurals,
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 15; very food 22;
excellent 29 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

SATURDAY'S SOLUTION

adage agar aged agpue arrue
argued auger drag drudge
drug garda gaud gear grade
praded guard guarded
HEADGUARD huge raga
rage raged urge urged













Saturday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Saturday’s
Kakuro Answer























O}N 01/0} Go) PO

OO A/M/—-|o






























Across Down
1 Justice (5) 2 Excessive
8 Count for nothing adoration (8)
(3,2,3) 3 Art of
9 White with clockmaking (8)
age (5) 4 Dome (6)
10 Suffer fall in prestige 2. ele)
6 Extremely
(4.4) important (5)
TM Sortie ts) 7 Debated at length (5)
12. Shrill bark (3) 12 Japanese monetary
16 Czech capital (6) unit (3)
17 Refuge (6) 13 Clawed foot (3)
18 As things are (3) 14 Fortuitously (2,6)
23 Banter (5) 15 Attempt to escape
24 Estrange (8) (3,3,2)
25 Angry growl (5) 19 Right to choose (6)
ini 20 Fortunate (5)
26 Dismiss
contemptuously (4-4) eo
22 Shoot from

27

Small-minded (5)

concealment (5)























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

o B\/oO
o
eON
wt
Nh oO;o

NM] O)® co] oo}c);4+



PO O;WIM/O —/Rigi~N

2/16





North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.



NORTH
@A73
Â¥10865
#Q
&A 10832
WEST EAST
@K8642 #310
Â¥KQ92 VAI743
4105 A98743
KG >
SOUTH
4095
y_
@#KIJ62
&O19754
The bidding:
North East South West
Pass lv 2 & 49
5 & 5 Pass Pass
6 & Pass Pass Dble

Opening lead — king of hearts.

The 160-deal semifinal match
between Brazil and the United States
at the 1985 Bermuda Bowl in Sao
Paulo, Brazil, was one of the most
exciting in world team championship
history. After a nip-and-tuck battle
that the Brazilians led most of the
way, the Americans trailed by only 6
IMPs going into the last two hands.
This was the penultimate deal.

In the Open Room, with a large
partisan audience watching on Vu-
Graph, the Brazilians, seated North-
South, reached six clubs doubled as
shown. The declarer was Marcelo
} Branco, and the cheering throng



















+/O1/ 0) NN] ©] 00)



























3]/9/4/8| i
4\7\6l2| WR7 8(3\9/2Mi1\2
7lsiaii| (eS 4\2/6|1 3 9
stolole| M23, 1 BS 7 M7 [9
MNS 4/817 9 M8 l2
5/8/1/3 6 5/819 RWS 9 /6/1
1|4/5/7| Is cic /2 5\3 aN
1/8/4| Wo 38 WW7\9 BBs (1/9
6/2/5| MNO 3 4 9 7/6/38
3/7/9 | NE 1 8[5\2]7



re AIL Nery ee



Famous Hand

could see that the slam was unbeat-
able, provided Branco guessed how
to play the clubs.

After ruffing the opening heart
Icad, Branco tabled the club qucen,
on which West smoothly followed
low. With the audience — _ far
removed from the playing area —
shrieking “finesse, finesse,” Branco
pondered the situation and finally
called for the ace. Down one for a
loss of 200 points.

At the second table, with a Brazil-
ian pair now holding the East-West
cards, the bidding went as follows:

North East South West
Pass Pass Pass 1@
Pass 29 Pass 49
Pass 5 & Pass s¥

Here, the American North-South
pair didn’t even enter the bidding,
and the Brazilians climbed to five
hearts under their own steam. The
critical bid was West’s leap to four
hearts on minimal values, which
encouraged East to try for slam with
a cuebid of five clubs.

Five hearts might have succeeded
on another day, but on this occasion
declarer found it impossible to over-
come the bad breaks in hearts and
diamonds, and finished down one.

Thus Brazil, with chances to gain
significantly at both tables, instcad
lost 250 points — exactly 6 IMPs —
to throw the match into a dead tie
with one deal remaining. We’ll see
what happened on that deal tomor-
row.

‘Tomorrow: Famous Hand — 2.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 7B



a Ne



The Tribune



ec



oo N D



ith



Carefully consider having a hysterectomy

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Writer

aving a hysterectomy is a

serious decision and one

that should be carefully

considered. A physician
may recommend a hysterectomy for a
variety of reasons, however, in most
cases it is optional and an informed
decision based on one’s medical his-
tory must be made.

In the Bahamas, according to data
collected by the Planning Unit of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, there have
been 1,017 hysterectomies in the past
six years.

Gynecologist/obstetrician, Leon
Dupuch, has been doing hysterec-

tomies for about 15 years and has per-
formed and seen many Bahamian
women who do and do not need this
procedure.

“The most common reason for a
hysterectomy in our country is for the
removal of multiple fibroids. Other
causes include, prolapse, cancer,
endometriosis, pelvic pain, or irregular
bleeding,” Dr Dupuch said.

Dr Dupuch said before a hysterec-
tomy there are a lot of things to con-
sider.

“It depends on their age first of all.
You would not want to do a hysterec-
tomy on someone who has not had
children or who is still quite young.
So if they have completed their fami-
ly, then they can consider the proce-

dure,” Dr Dupuch said.

However, Dr Dupuch stressed that
there are possible alternative thera-
pies which one might wish to try
before choosing to have a hysterecto-
my. Depending on one’s medical con-
dition, drug treatments, D & C, or
pelvic exercises are sometimes helpful.
In the case of pre cancerous cells, cone
biopsy, cryosurgery, or laser therapy
are some of the options available.

“They can try the Mirena coil, which
can help with bleeding, the shot, the
pill and many others. So these things
can be used to help treat the patient.
Another procedure is the endometri-
al ablation, where the lining of the
womb is cut away which avoids having
a hysterectomy in someone who is

within childbearing age,” Dr Dupuch
said.

Many women also fear depression
or other emotional changes following
a hysterectomy. Some women are
afraid they will lose their desire for
sex. Dr Dupuch said this too is untrue
and that their sex life should remain as
pleasurable, if not more pleasurable
once they are free of the cause of the
hysterectomy.

“In parts of Europe, especially in
France, it is quite common to have a
sub total hysterectomy where they
take out just the top part of the womb
and leave the cervix behind because it
is thought that it maintains sexual
function and pleasure but some
women would come in and request

i en '
a F

‘Make a

CO

Miseioetony
to a healthy heart ©

through your feet

FEBRUARY is Heart Month, and you
need to ask yourself what you're doing to
celebrate your own healthy heart? Are you
ensuring that your feet are contributing to a
healthy heart?

You should always be mindful that the
foot, a complex structure composed of
bones, muscles, ligaments, nerves, and blood
vessels must support the entire weight of
the body during walking and standing. Dur-
ing running and jumping, the forces on the
foot can be several times greater than the
weight of the body.

Regular activity goes a long way towards
keeping you and your heart healthy, as well
as lowering your risks for other diseases.

Walking

The easiest exercise out there is walking.
It's simple to do, is low stress on aging knees
and hips, and is incredibly good for you.
The benefits of walking 15 minutes per day
are astounding, and can lead to decreased
chances of heart disease, diabetes and obe-
sity. If you haven't been as active as you
should due to foot pain, seek help. In many
cases you are not wearing proper footwear
for walking and as a result you are doing
more damage to your health than good. I
urge you to get active today, it will save you
money and add years to your life!!!

Specific design

Footwear today is designed for specific
activities, with the support in the area where
pressure may be present, given that partic-
ular activity. For example, if you are walking
for fitness, then you should purchase a 'walk-
er-sneaker' because the pressures on the
foot would be very different than if you
were running. Similarly, many walkers com-
plain of knee pains, which may be because
they are using footwear designed for other
activities.

High tech footwear

If you're looking for something a little
different, consider something revolutionary





like a rocker-soled shoe to enhance your
exercise program and add a little pep to
your step. This type of footwear will defi-
nitely rock your world by directing the body
into a stable and correct walk and reduce the
stress on the joints.

For example, the "MBT" and the ‘Chung
Shi’ line of footwear have been scientifical-
ly designed as dynamic workout tools. Their
unique ‘rocker sole’ design benefits the user

eHelping to reduce cellulite

eToning muscles

eIncreasing circulation

eImproving posture

Reducing lower back pain
Strengthening joints; and
eDiminishing spider and varicose veins

Foot pain

Finally, to avoid foot pain, seek profes-
sional help to assist you with the correct
footwear and support (orthotic) to not only
support your body and foot type but to ade-
quately relieve the pressure presented by
the underlying terrain. Runners who want to
continue running for many more years, need
to ensure that there is enough support
between your foot and the flat and hard
surfaces you run on. Depending on the activ-
ity to which you are doing, you need to seek
the appropriate footwear and support for
that purpose. A professional in the field of
footwear can help you best with your selec-
tion.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
tions, a health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit,
located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of the
author and does not necessarily represent
those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any
of its subsidiary and/or affiliated compa-
nies. Please direct any questions or com-
ments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 327-
FEET (3338).

ANDISAVE!

that,” Dr Dupuch said.

Dr Dupuch said the removal of the
ovaries may cause a decrease in sexu-
al desire because the woman goes into
premature menopause. However, if
the ovaries are not removed during
the procedure, the woman then pro-
duces hormones that continue to stim-
ulate sexual desire

For many women, a hysterectomy
provides an enhanced sense of well-
being and a chance to start a new life,
free of the pain and symptoms which
caused them to choose a hysterectomy.
Whatever method or option she
chooses, it is in the woman’s best inter-
est to explore all the treatment options
available for her particular condition
before choosing a hysterectomy.


















ENERGY SAVING FLOURESCE
COOL & WARM LIGHT BULBS

(Medium & Regular Based Bulbs)

DUTY FREE <=
ITEM!

15 Watt (equal to 75w)....from $4.30
20 Watt (equal to 100w)...from 94, ebeD

23 Watt (equal to 115w)...from $4.55

24 Watt (equal to 120w)...from $8.0 J

AYLOR INDUSTRI

SHIRLEY STREET ° TEL: 322-8941
JPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm ¢ SAT 8:00 am - 12 noo!
Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ae

Eating for a healthy heart

‘Loving
Relationships’

@ By MAGGIE BAIN



Intimacy

WHATdoes
being intimate with
someone really
mean? Is it the
sharing and show- |
ing of passion and
desire for some-
one? Is it an emo-
tional connection |â„¢
with someone? One
is sexual intimacy
and the other is an
emotional or psy-
chological intimacy. We see this psy-
chological intimacy in several forms
and it can be either one or two sided.
For example our intimate relation-
ships with our doctors and perhaps
lawyers and accountants can be one
sided as one person is usually the
speaker and the other the listener.
Friends, family and love relationships
are two sided and require both per-
sons to be speakers and listeners. It is
the sharing of our innermost self that
is the basis of the emotional connec-
tion. Not only is each relationship
unique but each person may gain dif-
ferent things from the same relation-
ship. The speaker's pleasure is a sense
of peace or contentment showing
their inner self being listened to with
interest and being understood. The
listener's pleasure is in listening to
the speaker's innermost thoughts.
There is no doubt that we can show
intimacy towards someone in one or
many areas of our lives such as social,
intellectual, spiritual but it is the deep-
ening of this two sided emotional con-
nection that is usually the basis of a
love relationship.

The first step for psychological inti-
macy is for a person to be able to put
their innermost experiences into
thought, and be able to express them
in words. This is often very hard for
people to do particularly if they have
not been brought up in an environ-
ment where they were encouraged to
talk and express their feelings. Sec-
ondly the listener has to be able to
respond in a non critical and accepting
manner to what is being said.
Responding with 'you shouldn't feel
this way’ or ‘couldn't this wait?’ will
not encourage the speaker to open
up and express themselves. A grasp of
what is being said and the importance
of the moment for the speaker is
required. The wonderful effect of this
connection brings great comfort and
security to the relationship. It calms
and sustains individuals because they
feel seen, accepted, and understood.
However for some people the excite-
ment that this new attachment cre-
ates is too difficult to handle and they
run from the relationship. They feel
the emotional closeness but turn away
from it when near the person. They
have difficulty understanding why
they do this and may repeat it in sub-
sequent relationships.

We see the effect of this emotional
attachment in relationship therapy
and the delight and also the distress
that it can cause. The emotional peace
to a person's sense of well being is so
important that if the relationship
comes to an abrupt end a person can
experience depression, anxiety or
stress symptoms.

We can see then that it is essential
early on in a relationship to learn and
develop the skills necessary to emo-
tionally connect to another individ-
ual as this lays the groundwork for
love relationships. It is usually
assumed that women are the ones
who most value the importance of
emotional connection because it is a
way to measure their relationships.
However men also prosper in emo-
tionally rich relationships and do bet-
ter maintaining them when they
develop these skills. Psychological
intimacy is often the trigger for falling
in love and the subsequent sexual inti-
macy allows persons to further know
each other. Understanding the impor-
tance of encouraging this intimacy to
grow allows individuals to shed their
inhibitions during love making and
discover their full sexual potential.

For couples who have not worked
this out, have not been able to con-
nect emotionally, unable to express
themselves, or are overwhelmed with
outside demands, this can become a
difficult problem to overcome. Over
time it becomes increasingly difficult
to behave sexually together when the
emotional connection has become
depleted. A period of dating and get-
ting to know each other prior to intro-
ducing sexual intimacy provides a cou-
ple with an atmosphere of substance
and hopefully longevity to the rela-
tionship. It takes a lot of courage to
realise and also admit to this discon-
nect or loss in the relationship, but it
is this that often brings couples to
relationship therapy.

To rekindle or even fire up for the
first time the desire and intimacy can
bring real energy and passion to the
relationship. With out a doubt it is
worth all the time and effort that it
will require from you. The tantalis-
ing reward will be peace, joy and hap-
piness.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Therapist.
She is a Registered Nurse and a Certi-
fied Clinical Sex Therapist located at
The Centre for Renewing Relation-
ships, Grosvenor's Close West. She
can be contacted by calling 356-7953
or by email at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com

Maggie mn



DID you know that heart disease is
one of the top causes of death in
The Bahamas? The heart is one of
the most important organs in the
body. For it to function well, it is
important that you take care of it.
The food you eat can affect the way
that blood flows through your heart
and blood vessels. If you have a
diet that is high in fat and choles-
terol, it can gradually cause a build
up called plaque in your arteries.
Plaque slows down the blood flow
and blocks small arteries. If the
blockage is in an artery that carries
blood to the heart muscle, then one
suffers a heart attack. If the block-
age is in an artery that carries
blood to the brain, then one suffers
a stroke. The good news is that you
can prevent heart disease or lower
your risk for it. Having a healthy
diet helps to keep your arteries
clear allowing blood to flow freely,
thus reducing your risk for heart
disease.

Here are some tips for a heart-
healthy diet from the American
Academy of Family Physicians:

*Eat less fat (especially butter,
coconut and palm oil, saturated or
hydrogenated vegetable fats such
as Crisco, animal fat in meats and
fats in dairy products.

eUse non-stick vegetable cooking
sprays instead of oils.

eBuy lean cuts of meats and eat
fish, skinless chicken and turkey
instead of beef.

e Try low fat snacks that have been
baked instead of fried, such as pret-
zels.

eTry to limit how many sweets you
eat.

Eat no more than 3 egg yolks per
week (2 if you already have heart
disease), use egg whites or egg sub-
stitutes.

¢Bake, broil, boil or grill foods
instead of frying them.

eHat fewer “fast foods” (burgers,
fried foods) which are high in fat.
Instead, eat more fruits, vegetables
and complex carbohydrates (brown
rice, pasta, whole wheat bread,
grains).

eDrink low calorie beverages, such
as water, unsweetened tea, 100 per
cent fruit juices, and low fat milk.
eMaintain or improve your weight.
Here are some additional heart
healthy tips from the Department
of Health and Human Services,
Food and Drug Administration,
United States of America.

Eat less Fat

eSome fats are more likely to cause
heart disease-saturated fats and
trans fats. These fats are usually
found in foods from animals, such
as meat, milk, cheese, and butter.
They also are found in foods with
palm and coconut oils. Eat less of
these foods. Rather, eat foods con-
taining monounsaturated fats(olive,
canola, peanut, avocado, nuts,

Depression isn’t something you can

ACCORDING to a local physician,
contrary to popular belief, depression is
not something that you can just ‘snap
out’ of. It's more than just a feeling of
being "down in the dumps" or "blue".
More than 14 million Americans, or
more than 6 per cent of adults experi-
ence depression in any given year.
Despite these statistics, depression is
not a normal part of life, regardless of
your age, sex, or health status.

It is thought to be caused by an
imbalance of brain chemicals, and oth-
er factors. When certain chemicals in
the brain (such as serotonin norepi-
nephrine, and dopamine) are out of
balance, depression can occur. Antide-
pressants improve the symptoms of
depression by bringing these chemicals
back into balance.

These are the facts given to an audi-
ence at Doctors Hospital during the
second lecture of their 2009 Distin-
guished Lecture Series schedule. Eager
to gain insight on a topic that has
seemed to affected many Bahamian
families in recent days; the free lecture
was designed to promote awareness
and prevention.

Dr Michael Neville, leading psychia-
trist at Doctors Hospital presented on
the topic of Depression. “The good
news is that depression is very treat-
able. Most patients, even those with
severe depression, show improvement
after they seek treatment. Your doc-
tor will prescribe treatment based on
the pattern of your depression, its sever-
ity, persistence of symptoms, and his-
tory,” said Dr Neville

Depression is a serious medical ill-
ness that involves the brain and the
feelings do not go away. They persist
and interfere with your everyday life.
Symptoms can include:

eSadness

eLoss of interest or pleasure in activ-
ities you used to enjoy

eChange in weight

eDifficulty sleeping or oversleeping

eEnergy loss

eFeelings of worthlessness

eThoughts of death or suicide

The fact is that anyone can get
depression. The first step in fighting
depression is to understand what it is,
how it affects you, and what causes it.
There are also things you can do to

MeL Nie CUM ACCOM wotlte
Camelta Barnes, Shandera Smith
and Lathera Lotmore, Nutritionists
from the Department of Public /
Health Ministry of Health

seeds) and polyunsaturated fats
(Safflower oil, corn oil) found in
plants and seafood.

Eat less Sodium

Eating less sodium can help lower
some people's blood pressure. This
can help reduce the risk of heart
disease.

Sodium is something we need in
our diets, but most of us eat too
much of it. Much of the sodium we
eat comes from salt we add to our
food at the table or that food com-
panies add to their foods. So, avoid
adding salt to foods at the table.

Eat fewer Calories

When we eat more calories than we
need, we gain weight. Being over-
weight can cause heart disease.
When we eat fewer calories than
we need, we lose weight.

Eat more Fiber

Eating fiber from fruits, vegetables,
and grains may help lower your
chances of getting heart disease.

DALE CAN YOU DO SOME

Instead of: Do This:
Whole or 2 percent milk, and
cream- Use 1 per cent or skim
milk

Fried foods- Eat baked,
steamed, boiled, broiled, or
microwaved foods

Lard, butter, palm, and coconut
oils- Cook with unsaturated
vegetable oils, such as corn, olive,
canola, safflower, sesame, soybean,
sunflower, or peanut

Fatty cuts of meat, such as prime
rib- Eat lean cuts of meat or cut off
the fatty parts

One whole egg in recipes- Use two
egg whites

Sour cream and mayonnaise-

Use plain low-fat yogurt, low-fat
cottage cheese, or low-fat or “light”
sour cream

Sauces, butter, and salt- Season
vegetables with herbs and spices

Regular hard and processed
cheeses- Eat low-fat, low-sodium
cheeses

Salted potato chips and other
snacks -Choose low-fat, unsalted

Doctors Hospital lecture

help yourself feel better. Go online
and research the topic. Depression.com
gives these tips to help you understand
depression:

eRecognise early signs. It's impor-
tant to recognise and treat depression as
early as possible, which decreases your
risk of becoming depressed again. If
you pretend the problem isn't there,
it’s probably going to get worse. You
need to watch for the types of events
that contributed to depression in the
past, and be alert for early symptoms.

eSet realistic goals. You may feel
overwhelmed by everything you
"should" be doing at home or at work.
Try not to be hard on yourself. Remem-
ber that depression is an illness and
that you can't force yourself out of it.
Focus on small, realistic goals to ease
yourself back into your work and fam-
ily routine.

eDo what you enjoy. Even if you
don't really feel like it, set aside time to
do things that you like. Get together
with friends. Take a walk. Go to the
movies. Take up a hobby that you set
aside years ago.

eHold off on big decisions. Since
depression can color your outlook on
everything, it’s best to avoid making
any big decisions-quitting a job or mov-
ing, for instance-until you feel better.

eAvoid alcohol. Although you might
think it will help you feel better, alcohol
can make your depression worse.
Depressed people are at special risk of
developing substance abuse problems,
and alcohol interacts with many anti-
depressants.

eExercise. There's more and more
evidence that exercise helps with mild
to moderate depression. When you're
considering an exercise plan, don't be
too ambitious. Find an activity that you
like, start slowly, and work up to exer-
cising three times a week or more for 20
to 30 minutes.

Dr Neville agrees that physical activ-
ity can help people overcome mild to
moderate depression. Any type of exer-
cise seems to help. In addition, he sug-
gested keeping a journal. It may not
always be easy and it can be painful to

tortilla and potato chips and unsalt-
ed pretzels and popcorn

Read the Food Label

The food label can help you eat less
fat and sodium, fewer calories, and
more fiber.

Look for certain words on food
labels. The words can help you spot
foods that may help reduce your
chances of getting heart disease.
The FDA has set rules on how
these words can be used. So, if the
label says “low-fat,” the food must
be low in fat.

Look at the side or back of the
package. Here, you will find
“Nutrition Facts.” Look for these
words:

eTotal fat
eSaturated fat
Cholesterol
eSodium.

Look at the per cent Daily Value
listed next to each term. If it is 5
per cent or less for fat, saturated
fat, cholesterol, and sodium, the
food is low in these nutrients.
That's good. It means the food fits
in with a diet that may help reduce
your chances of getting heart dis-
ease.

Some Other Things You Can Do

eAsk your doctor to check your
cholesterol level. This is done with
a blood test. The test will show the
amount of cholesterol in your
blood with a number. Below 200 is
good. The test will also show the
amount of “good” and “bad” cho-
lesterol. Your doctor can tell you
more about what these numbers
mean.

elf your cholesterol is high, your
doctor may suggest diet changes,
exercise, or drugs to bring it down.
eRegular exercise-such as walking,
swimming, or gardening-can help
you keep your weight and choles-
terol down.

So the conclusion of all this is:
Eat less fat

Eat less sodium

Reduce your calories if you're
overweight

eEat more fibre

eEat a variety of foods

eEat plenty of bread, rice, cereal,
vegetables and fruits

®Reduce or eliminate alcohol con-
sumption

You only have one heart. If you
want to live a long and healthy life,
it is important that you take care of
it by practising healthy eating prin-
ciples, being active and checking
your blood pressure and choles-
terol levels regularly, especially if
you are at risk.

Remember, a healthy heart is a
happy heart and a happy heart is a
healthy heart!



just snap out of’

focuses on depression



write about bad feelings. However, Dr
Neville says writing a journal is one of
the best self-help methods you can use
to learn more about your thoughts and
feelings

Researchers have found that a lot of
people who are depressed feel self-crit-
ical, and may even doubt that their
loved ones really care for them. These
feelings may be symptoms of depres-
sion. Try to push aside these feelings
and talk to the people close to you.
Explain what you're going through.
Ask them for help. Having someone
on your side-someone who encourages
you in your treatment or goes with you
to doctor's appointments-can make a
huge difference in your recovery.

What can you do to help someone
through depression?

eLearn about depression-its causes,
symptoms, and treatments. Knowing
about the condition will help you better
understand what a depressed person is
going through.

¢Do what you can to make sure that
a person with depression gets medical
care. Encourage your friend or loved
one to stick with his or her therapy or
medication. Offer to go with him or
her to appointments as support.

eBe supportive and patient. Listen
to what the depressed person has to
say.

eWithout being pushy, encourage
your friend or loved one to do the
things that he or she used to enjoy. See
friends. Go to the movies. Take a walk.

If someone you know is thinking
about suicide, don't ignore it. Do what-
ever you can to get help for that person.
Get in touch with his or her doctor or
therapist. Depression can run in fami-
lies, and usually starts between the ages
of 15 and 30 and it is much more com-
mon in women. Women can also get
postpartum depression after the birth of
a baby.

There are effective treatments for
depression, including antidepressants
and talk therapy. Talk to your doctors
to find out the best course of treatment
for you.

Small animal
poisonings:
Facts or Fiction

H O W
many times
throughout
his career
does a veteri-
narian hear
the com- lies
plaint “ T is
think my ©
neighbor is
trying or has
poisoned my
pet”- on a
regular basis.

Often the
pertinent
clinical signs are unrelated to any tox-
in, however many times toxicosis is the
source of clinical signs. My colleagues
in the veterinary profession reliably
inform me, that intentional poisonings
inflicted by people are on the rise in
The Bahamas. However, most toxic
exposure in animals are accidental.

Many pets may ingest plants, pesti-
cides, automotive products, and over
the counter prescription drugs avail-
able in or around the home despite the
owner’s best efforts to prevent them
from doing so.

Today because of the age of the
Internet, there are a lot of truths, half
truths, and untruths traversing the
cyber space. There are so many rumors
and misinformation that one must be
careful of the Internet. I will try to give
good information that has been verified
as good about certain poisoning.



1) Ingestion of grapes and raisins may
result in acute renal failure in dogs

This is true- vomiting, lethargy and
polydypsia (drinking a lot of water)
may occur 5 to 6 hours after ingestion
followed by anorexia and diarrhea. The
owner should induce vomiting and
place the animal on fluids.

2) Ingestion of sugarless candy/gum
containing XYLITOL is poisonous to
dogs

‘True- weakness, ataxia and total col-
lapse may occur 30 to 60 minutes fol-
lowing ingestion. Xylitol promotes
insulin release by the pancreases, which
results inprofound hypoglycemia.

3) Ingestion of chocolate can poison
cats and dogs

True- all chocolates contain caffeine
and Theobromine which are toxic. This
causes restlessness, cardiac arrhythmia,
seizures, vomiting and diarrhea.

4) Onions and garlic can be bad for
dogs

True- too much dietary onion and
garlic produce depression rapid heart
and respiratory rates and pale mucus
membranes.

5) Ingestion of poinsettia flowers or
leaves can make cats and dogs sick

True- this plant contains a milky lard
sap that contains diesterpinoid esters.
These are irritants to the animals G.I
systems.

6) Macadamia nuts produce muscle
weakness in dogs

True: weakness, depression, and
vomiting usually occur 6 hours after
ingestion.

7) Centipedes if eaten by pets can
cause harm

True: all centipedes are venomous
and can inflict harm by their bites or
because they have been ingested.

8) Vitamins A and D have toxic
potential for many animals

True: excessive amounts of vitamin
A promotes bone lesions. Excessive
amounts of vitamin D will result in
hypercalcemia and calcium deposits on
soft tissues.

9) Herbal products can harm cats
and dogs

True: when left open and available,
potpourri, garden herbs, cooking pow-
ders, perfumes and any various odor-
ants are similar scent products are
attractive to cats; they are very irritat-
ing to the G.I tract

10) Ingestion of greenie treats is enjoy-
able but not risk free for cats and dogs

True- greenies are hard green, mold-
ed bone shape treats that contain wheat
glutein and other additives. They are
intended to be chewed before inges-
tion to help prevent oral odors, tarter
build up and gingivitis. Unfortunate-
ly, pets occasionally will swallow large
pieces of the hand treats rather than
chew them resulting in gastrointesti-
nal upset.

11) Clorox bleach contains lye and
therefore is potentially dangerous for
dogs

False- this bleach contains Sodium
hypochlorite and not lye. However, this
sodium hypochlorite is still corrosive
and may cause harm for eye and skin
contact. Too often Bahamian owners
wash their floors or kennels on a daily
basis resulting in a lot of skin lesions as
a result of this bleach.

12) Anything and everything can be
potentially toxic for a companion ani-
mal

True- the dose alone makes all the
difference

Every day I am sent an e-mail that
may have some validity, may be clear-
ly erroneous, and sometimes are half-
truths concerning different toxins. I am
called to respond to client concerns
about such electronic posting or rumors
and therefore, I have to use my knowl-
edge, experience and common sense
to provide appropriate, realistic and
professional information. Because there
is on true toxicology labs available to
veterinarians in The Bahamas, many
times we are at a disadvantage and
hence, we do miss some diagnoses.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 9B





Overwhelming stress: What
is your coping capacity?

“The key to managing and coping
with stress is to build the mental agili-
ty and clarity to calmly face your
problems rather than avoiding them.”

If overwhelming stress is taking hold
of you, this article seeks to help.

Stress is really your mental, physical
and behavioural response to anxiety-
producing events. Left unchecked, it
can result in serious physical, psycho-
logical, interpersonal or performance
problems.

Stress is quoted as the number one
cause of many adverse health condi-
tions; reducing efficiency and produc-
tivity at work, causing increased irri-
tability, work pressures and annoy-
ance, all of which directly affects your
overall state of wellness.

Problems stress can cause include:
Heart attacks or strokes

Drug abuse

Ulcers

Physical illness

Hypertension

Migraines

High cholesterol

Insomnia

Depression

Unless you find creative ways to
understand and effectively manage
your stress it will continue to create
much havoc in your personal and pro-
fessional life.

Signs and Symptoms of Stress Over-
load

Often because the word ‘stress’ is
used so loosely, many people do not
appreciate what stress is and how it
can adversely affect their mental and
physical disposition.

In addition, most people pay atten-
tion only to physical aspects of them-
selves; causing stress to go undetected
and inadvertently ignored. In such cas-
es, even neon signs and symptoms
result in no specific change in the way
we manage or deal with stress.

Stress symptoms may include:

Muscle tension

Fatigue

Migraine headaches

Back pain

Problems in relationships

Aggressive behaviour

Weight gain or loss

Fears

Low self-esteem



Anxiety
Inability to concentrate
Spiritual emptiness

The first step to fixing or coping with
any challenge is to acknowledge that
you have a challenge.

It is also important for you to recog-
nise that not all stress is ‘bad’; so you
must understand the full complexity

of stress in order to build your mental
capacity to cope and reduce its adverse
affects on your health.

Here are Ten Ways Reduce Your
Stress:-
1. Work no more than ten hours dai-

ly.

2. Allow at least half an hour for
each meal.

3. Eat slowly and chew well, with-
out too much conversation.

4. Cultivate the habit of listening to
relaxing music.

5. Actively cultivate the habit of
walking, talking and moving at a slow-
er pace.

6. Smile and respond cheerfully
whenever meeting anyone.

7. Consider ways to relax and just
breathe.

8.If emotional and/or sexual rela-
tionships are upsetting you, seek
advice.

9. If you're unhappy at work, take

Peaches & Cream

stock and examine your choices (con-
sider training in a new area etc.). We all
have choices.

10. Concentrate on the present;
avoid the tendency to dwell on past
events and future uncertainties.

Final thoughts...Stress is about atti-
tude. Stress alone does not cause ill-
ness. Stress is neutral until it lands on
us. What we choose to do about it
determines how it will affect us.

Remember- if you continue to use
ineffective methods of dealing with
your challenges, you will continue to
achieve ineffective results.

You can improve your capacity to
cope; but it will only begin when you
decide to make the changes needed.

No matter what you are experienc-
ing, you have the personal power to
make positive change happen.

If you are ready to build your coping
skills and effectively manage your
stress, you are the ideal candidate for
my upcoming No Excuses Goals Pro-
gram. Please send an email to
coach4ward@ Yahoo.com or call

429-6770. Seats Are Limited!

LATE February is a fine time to plant corn
because we can expect dry and sunny weather
through most of April and June, giving ideal
conditions for corn cobs to develop.

The corn we favour these days is far removed
from the flint corn that our grandparents used
to make grits. The accent is on tenderness and
sweetness, but that also means we have to deal
with a myriad of insects that like tenderness
and sweetness. Corn is easy enough to grow
but it is tricky to get perfect full-kernel form
without worms.

Corn needs fertile soil and should be planted
in blocks rather than rows. The size of the block
can vary. If you live in Kansas the block can be
several miles by several miles. Here in The
Bahamas a block is more likely to be about
the size of a dining table.

Plant the seeds as deep as the package tells
you to (usually about 2 inches) and somewhat
closer together than the package suggests.
About 12 inches is fine so long as your soil is
rich and you water regularly.

When your corn approaches maturity you
will notice the male parts (tassels) form on the
top. The ears of corn, usually two to a plant,
develop and then produce ‘silk’, masses of
pearly-white threads that protrude from the
ears. Pollen is produced from the tassels in a
cloud like smoke. Each thread of silk leads to a
position on the cob where a kernel will grow,
once the silk has been pollinated. Wind spreads
the pollen to the silk and the corncob begins to
fatten.

Most corn varieties these days are called ‘sug-
ar enhanced’ (se) and are really sweet. This
sweetness is somewhat ephemeral and the old
advice to have your pot of water boiling before
you pick and shuck your corn (and run back) is
still good.

When is your corn ready for the pot? Peel

back the covering and press a thumbnail against
a kernel. If it spurts milky, it’s mealtime. Any

FROM page 10C

do unto you,” Mrs Stubbs said.
Other winners at the Cacique
awards included:

* Transportation — Glender
Archer-Knowles, Abaco
* Human Resources Devel-
opment — Donald Glass, Grand
Bahama
* Sports, Leisure & Events —
Ambrose Gouthro, Grand
Bahama
* Creative Arts — Steve
Dodge, Abaco
* Handicraft — Eloise Smith,
Nassau
* Sustainable Tourism —
Kingsley Holbert, Exuma
* Minister’s Award for Hos-
pitality - Peggy Thompson, Aba-
co
* Lifetime Achievement —
John “Billy Joe” Gilbert, Grand
Bahama
* Manager of the Year —
Janet Stubbs Rolle, Four Sea-
sons; Exuma
* Employee of the Year —



Standley Williams, Pelican Bay;
Grand Bahama
* Chef of the Year — Car-
olyn Elaine Bowe, Wyndham
Nassau Resort; Nassau
* Supervisor of the Year —
Kevin McKenzie, Atlantis; Nas-
sau
* Sales Executive of the
Year — Myron Jones, Sheraton
Nassau Beach; Nassau
* Hotelier of the Year —
Russell Miller, Ritz Carlton; Nas-
sau
* People’s Choice Secular
Music — Kenneth “KC” Wallace-
Whitfield, Nassau
* People’s Choice Gospel
Music — Minister Charles Drake
and CMA Ensemble
* International Travel
Writer — Jean-Luc Marty, Geo
Magazine; France
* International Tour Oper-
ator — Steffen Boehnke, TUI;
Germany
* Cruise Line of the Year —
Norwegian Cruise Line
* Airline of the Year —
British Airways

LATE February is a fine time to plant corn because we can expect dry and sunny weather through most of
April and June, giving ideal conditions for corn cobs to develop.

days to go.

resistance or a clear juice means a couple more

GARDENER

Let’s get back to those critters. Corn is
attacked by insects more than any other veg-
etable I can think of. Once the silk has formed
the tops of the cobs should be dusted with Sevin
insecticide or an equivalent every two days
without fail. A small and inexpensive dust dis-
penser is handy here. If you shake from the
can you will be wasting a lot of insecticide and
your corn will be horribly costly.

One of the insects that enjoys eating corn is
our old green friend the giant tomato horn-
worm. When it attacks corn, however, it
changes its name to giant corn hornworm.

I was introduced to the se variety Peaches &
Cream in Ontario a few years ago and it is the
variety I recommend for home growing. It is so
called because the kernels are white and yellow.
It has good flavour and is exceptionally sweet.

I personally prefer to boil my ears of corn in
salted and sugared water. The sugar in the
water is not to add sweetness to the corn but to
prevent it losing sweetness. Osmosis and all
that. Once on the plate I use an excess of butter
to help bring out the flavour. An old friend of
mine, a Bajan, likes to boil his ears of corn in
water that has had a few goat peppers and slices
of salt beef added to it.

Definitely different.

There are many other se corn varieties avail-
able besides Peaches & Cream and I would
recommend full season types rather than early
types. We have no fear of frosts here so why not
let our corn develop flavour over a long period.

Plant your blocks of corn every month and
you will have a regular supply of this popular
veggie all through the barbecue season.



Transforming young girls

FROM page 10C

She said there will also be at least one
weekend camp training session to prepare
the new leaders for the upcoming Cari-
Camp in April.

With the training open to all leaders, Mrs
Archer said this will also be a good chance
to prepare camp organizers for the organi-
zations future expansion.

Currently, there are GGA Districts in
Exuma, Eleuthera, Abaco, and Grand
Bahama, however this year the organisa-
tion will work toward establishing addi-
tional districts in Bimini, Long Island,
Andros, and Inaqua.

Past ranger, Chitra Pennerman, said she
hopes to become an active participant of
GGA as a leader, and said her decision to

do so comes from the group being an instru-
mental factor in her success as an adult.

Ms Pennerman said: “When I was
younger it was a must that I go to girl
guides. After school, the routine was for
me to catch the bus from Aquinas every
Friday. Girl guides has instilled morals and
values that I may have lost at home. It has
taught me a lot, and I would like to see
that passed on to girls today.”

Remembers

She remembers her time in the organisa-
tion, where on camping trips she had to
learn how to pitch tents, and learn to cook
an entire meal in one pot.

Rev Higgs who has taken the helm of
the organisation from former President Gail
Saunders, said Girl Guides has always held
a special place in her heart.

Reflecting on her initial days in the organ-
isation as a patrol leader, Rev Higgs said
back then she thought it was the best posi-
tion she could have ever held.

“Tt really gave us a time to get together in
our little groups, and the things that we did
were so wonderful. Throughout guiding
I’ve learnt so much that has helped me in
my career, as a wife, as a mother, it’s just
been wonderful.”

Responding to the importance of the
organisation in any young girl’s life, Rev
Higgs said: “Not only are we aiming to help
and speak up for our girls, but we would
like to allow them to speak out for them-
selves and other girls and young women in
our society.”

Currently, Girl Guides has a member-
ship of 2,303 young leaders in training, with
hope of increased membership in particu-
larly over the next year.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION






THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

PAGES 7-8 © HEALTH: Body and mind

FEBRUARY



17, 2009

Transforming young girls to women

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen @tribunemedia.net

he Girl Guides Associa-

tion (GGA) of the

Bahamas has for a long

time been known as a

body of change, in its
approach to transforming young girls to
women.

From senators to teachers, this group
has spread its wings and been a factor
for positive change in many Bahamian
women for the past 94 years.

In keeping with that tradition, the
organisation’s newest president Rev
Beryl Higgs, said during her inaugural
press conference last Monday, that
increased recruitment and growth are
among major changes to take place
under the new administration.

GGA Chief Commissioner Julia
Burnside explained that with so many
girls being vulnerable to peer pressure
during their early to mid-teens, the
responsibility falls on the organisation
to inject positive influences as early as
possible.

“In our re-branding, we want to
especially launch a campaign aimed at
attracting girls between the ages of 11
and 16, because we realise that they
present some of the challenges that we
have in society today.

“We’ve found that girls who have
stayed committed to guiding, general-
ly have made some of the better social
and moral choices, and this is some-
thing that we need to use as part of
our re-branding, to attract new mem-
bers,” she said.

The organisation began its annual
guide week last Sunday under the

theme of Stop The Spread of AIDS
and Malaria and Other Disease.

Starting with a division-wide pro-
cession from the RM Bailey field on
Robinson Rd, the group marched to
the Christ the King Anglican Church in
Ridgeland Park for a church service.

On Monday both Brownies and
Sunflowers gathered at their division
headquarters, where they were taught
about the causes and symptoms of
many diseases affecting the world
today.

The youngsters were also given tips
on how they can now influence change
through GGA, and later on in their
adult lives.

The same group along with their
leaders prepared gift baskets for resi-
dents of the AIDS Camp, which was an
important initiative for the organisa-
tion.

GGA executives explained, the exer-
cise was not only planned to show its
commitment to those affected by the
disease, but to also sensitize others on
the importance of prevention and pro-
tection.

On Friday, the older guides and
rangers are scheduled to take part in an
expedition, where they'll hopefully dis-
cover cleverly hidden ribbons in vari-
ous parts of Nassau.

In the end, organisers envision the
girls gaining a more comprehensive
understanding about multiple life-
threatening diseases, and ways to stay
healthy.

The following day, all girls along
with their leaders will go into several
communities, where they will share
their knowledge on the diseases by
becoming prevention ambassadors.

GGA International Commissioner

Karen Lightbourne, said the highlight
of Girl Guide week, will be an organ-
ised tea party for the all local GGA
members.

“Because talking about diseases can
be tough for some of the girls, we will
bring in a guest speaker to talk about
the benefits of living a healthy life.”

In an effort to continue the tradition
of Girl Guides with young women who
have grown past the rangers level,
GGA deputy chief commissioner for
training Nicolette Archer, said she is
looking forward to training “The new
flock of leaders” this March.

“We're going to begin level one and
orientation training on March 2, which
will durate for five consecutive Mon-
days at GGA headquarters from 6pm
to 8.”

SEE page 9

The barber shop, ‘where men are free to be men’

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen @tribunemedia.net

WHEN compared to women, men in many
respects have suffered the negative results of not
being able to discuss, share, and reveal without
bias the issues that truly matter to them with
each other.

From their fears of not measuring up as a “real
man,” to their sexual, emotional, and religious
insecurities, many men have fallen victim to this
social crisis that some argue may have far reach-
ing effects.

In many communities there is however one
haven where men are free to be men, a place
where they can be as candid and as blunt about
issues such as the effects of the feminists move-
ment, their views on God, or even their thoughts
on intimacy and love, where they are not criticised
for the way they feel.

The barber shop is that place, where men can
let their guards down and just speak their minds
on the things that matter to them.

This week, Tribune Features visited New Links
Barber and Beauty Salon located on Bay Street,
where a small group of guys were discussing the
recent spate of suicides, and were trying to under-
stand why men seemed to be the most at risk in
this growing problem.

Proprietor Rodger Lloyd feels, there is a direct
link between the lack of men discussing their



ae es
RODGER LLOYD hard at work in the barber shop...
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

feelings, and the growing number of men willing
to take their own lives.

“You don’t really know who you could trust to
talk to, so most men prefer to keep things deep
down inside and try to rationalise it within them-
selves.”

Being a family man, Rodger feels men in his
position are particularly under threat, and should
reach out to their male counterparts for support
and guidance.

He said in a society where the fear of not mak-
ing the grade can result in a man being ostracised,
and where the appearance of having around-the-
clock confidence is considered normal male

AY bi AN $I uN!
Bar er, 0]
behaviour, the realities of feeling bad or showing
emotions are forced into a box.

He explained this forced internal battle, is now
telling the community that men just like women
need to be able to talk about their feelings.

Keith Minus, a 37-year-old church minister,
said there is a spiritual air of depression and sui-
cide, taking hold of many men- who feel cor-
nered by the pressures of a tough economic peri-
od.

“The devil is out for the man, because the Bible
declares that we are made in the image and like-
ness of Christ. If he (Satan) can remove the fam-
ily head with that spirit of suicide, then he will suc-
ceed in weakening the family structure.”

Keith explained that through his understanding
of the Bible, the female is the “weaker vessel” in
any marriage or union, and as good men are
forced to take their own lives, future generations
will become easy targets for Satan.

Entrepreneur Stephen St Clair-Serrette also
shared those sentiments, and said because both
men and women over the years have walked
away from traditional Christian values, it is not
hard to understand the decision of committing sui-

cide by some people.

This issue, is one that hit Stephen close as sui-
cide victim 42-year-old Nikita Brennen was his
close and dear friend.

Despite the common Christian belief that an act
of suicide essentially serves as a one way ticket to
Hell, Stephen said he believes because of the
love his friend had for God, “he is resting in the
Almighty’s arms,”.

He insisted that society get back to the basics.

“Those things that worked in the past will work
again, we have to raise our children in the fear
and the admonition of God, we must follow the
commandments of God.

“We need to go back to the days when we
picked in the neighbours’ clothes from the rain,
where we can share bread and sugar with them,
go back to those things to show that we care.”

Rodger feels the lack of a good social model
for young people to follow, has also played a role
in the disappearance on “the old ways” that has
kept the Bahamian people together in the past.

“On basic cable you have homosexuality, nudi-
ty, profanity, corruption, on public transporta-
tion there are children watching and listening to
explicit materials, we just need to go back to the
values that protect our children and in essence
protect all of us.”

Although these men share diverse views on
the recent cases of suicide and other incidents of
violence in the country, they share a common
desire that through talking, change can come.

13th Cacique Awards: Outstanding women recognised for work in tourism

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Writer

AS women continue to make
great strides professionally in the
work world, two outstanding
young women in the tourism
industry have been recognised
for their work in service to the
country’s number one industry
during the 13th annual Cacique
Awards.

Chef Carolyn Elaine Bowe
had always wanted to be a chef
from the age of 12. She never let
go of those dreams and took on
every opportunity she had. Since
then she has been employed as a
chef since 1988 and presently is
the head chef at Seaside Restau-
rant, overseeing 28 staff.

Ms Bowe said being a female
chef in the Bahamas is not a day
at the park as there are a lot of
things that may get in the way.

“T think the fight is so much
greater for women because we
have to show our strength in
many different ways. We have
to prove we can lift things, show
that we are aggressive, and be
able to show that we can lead
and not follow,” Ms Bowe said.

Ms Bowe said she was very

excited to know that she was
recognised for such an award and
to win.

“T have never looked for any-
thing in my life in terms of peo-
ple rewarding me because I do
what I do because I enjoy it,”
Ms Bowe said.

Ms Bowe said as a part time
chef instructor at the University
of the West Indies, she would
encourage students to enjoy their
passion.

“T always encourage students,
especially those coming out of
high school, to enter the young
chef competition because I think
that is a good start for them to
pursue their career. The compe-
tition gives a bit of pressure and
it gives them a feel to see if being
a chef is what they really want to
do and if they can handle that,
they can go further,” Ms Bowe
said.

Chief Concierge at Four Sea-
sons Resort Great Exuma at
Emerald Bay, Janet Rolle
Stubbs, was instrumental in
establishing the Concierge and
Guest Services departments at
the property. Her efforts in the
field have raised service levels
among her employees.

Carolyn Seine Bowe

Mrs Stubbs said her initial
reaction to winning is one she
will soon not forget.

“My initial reaction was shock
and I felt that my heart was
going to burst. My husband
nudged me and said ‘Janet that's
you' I took a deep breath and
started walking up to the podi-
um. While I was walking up I
realised it was real! I am deeply
appreciative and greatly hum-
bled and honored,” Mrs Stubbs
said.

Being able to be recognised
from a Family Island is a great

1,
Janet Rolle Stubbs



accomplishment not only for her
but also for the Four Seasons
Resort in Exuma she added.
“When you live on an out
island it is harder for you to be
recognised, because of the loca-
tion. Working on the island and
especially in the area that I am
in, it is sometimes challenging
because everything is not at your
fingertips like in Nassau or
Freeport. When guest asks for
items that are not on the island,
you have to go above and
beyond to ensure that the guests
requests are honoured and they

are happy,” Mrs Stubbs said.

Mrs Stubbs said the support
from her bosses, coworkers, her
mother and the smiles of satis-
faction on the faces of the guests
as they depart is her inspiration
to continue to in the service
industry.

“When people believe in you
and allow you to make decisions
on your own, it encourages and
inspires you to know that you
have their support. We also have
an awesome training program,
that helps you grow in many
areas in regards to your job and
performance. Four Seasons
gives you so many opportunities
for growth and their main inter-
est is to promote and focus from
within. I am a people person that
Four Seasons took and trained,
supported and encouraged so
that I could enjoy the structure
and be successful in it. Over the
years, in my life's journey, I have
had a lot of people who believed
in me and seen my true potential
before I have realised it. They
brought out the best in me and
believed in me. I am indeed
grateful to every one of them,”
Mrs Stubbs said.

Mrs Stubbs, in offering words

of wisdom to other young
women in tourism, said she
would encourage them to stay
focused and to set achievable
goals.

“Once you work with people
you must be approachable and
be a team player. It is important
to give your best every day at
everything you do. Do not limit
yourself to one area, and try to
learn all you can about different
jobs in your field because knowl-
edge is indeed power. There will
be days you will not get every-
thing right, but you will know
what to do better for next time.
There is nothing wrong with
making mistakes, the good thing
is, you can learn from them.
Once you do your job because
you love it, you will achieve
much more, because it comes
from your heart. Do not get dis-
couraged and listen to what peo-
ple may say about you or do to
try to discourage you. Remem-
ber that people only talk about
people who are making a differ-
ence. Most important, always
remember the golden rule- Do
unto other as you will have them

SEE page 9

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





Full Text
{T)\

Pim blowin’ it

15F
64F

SUNNY AND

HIGH
LOW

BREEZY

Volume: 105 No.71

6)
par
ce
rad
<<
ar
ro



At the
barber
shop

SEE WOMAN SECTION

Owntow

Guests check out of
hotel after hearing
gunshots nearby

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TOURISTS woke to the
sound of gunshots in the streets
of downtown Nassau early yes-
terday when violence erupted
across from a hotel on the
Western Esplanade.

Police cars filled Augusta
Street at around 4am and a 28-
year-old man who had been
shot in the lower back was tak-
en to hospital by ambulance.
His condition is not life-threat-
ening.

The injured man told police
that three men outside his
Augusta Street home next to
the Envy nightclub on Bay
Street, called him. He said shots
were fired when he went out-
side to speak to them.

Guests at El Greco Hotel
across the street, who had been
kept awake until 4am by music
blaring from the nearby night-
club, rushed down to reception
after hearing the shots to find
out what had happened.

The following morning 10 of
the 24 guests in the 27-room
hotel checked out because they
did not feel safe.

They told staff they had been
kept awake nightly by noise
from the club which persists
until 4am, and some had been

solicited by prostitutes on the
street.

The Mayfair building, oppo-
site the hotel on Augusta Street,
was raided by police and immi-
gration officials last year when it
was found that a brothel was
being operated from the apart-
ments. And although activity
stopped for some time, hotel
guests are again complaining of
streetwalkers.

Mike Pikramenos, part own-
er of El Greco, said such activ-
ity is ruining the area.

He said: “They are attracting
the wrong elements and it
makes it hard for anybody to
stay here for a couple of nights.
It’s extremely dangerous for
anyone.

“It’s affecting the Strip
adversely, and they are trying
to improve it, but it’s difficult
when you get elements which
should be controlled by the
police.

“We have people running
around with guns and it’s crazy.

“With the economy as bad as
it is, these people are just mak-
ing it worse.”

Hotel manager Yolanda Stra-
chan added: “People will stay
here for a few days or a week
and they come back, but now

SEE page eight

The Taste
on
Tuesdays!!

etfetss

Bi 4 ‘sifin yc o more.
ife ofetigtes i Gal laimedium
Itoi | (FFA) & SONA

ae

F\ eer
= a

Valid only on Tuesdays!



The Tribune

=USA TODAY.

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

Ba oS
aL
aE as

UPSET et



njured i
shooting

i

VALDEZ BOWLEG outside of court yesterday.

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A 26-YEAR-OLD man of Yellow Elder Gardens
was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on
charges of murder, burglary and attempted armed rob-
bery.

Police have charged Valdez Bowleg in the March 14,
2008 murder of Edward Clarke. Clarke, 52, the country’s
16th murder victim for 2008, was found shot to death on
Old Boat Alley, off Market Street where he lived. Ini-
tial police reports stated that two armed men attempt-
ed to enter a home in the inner city neighbourhood
near the time of the murder, but were thwarted when
the home owner alerted neighbours of the attempted
break-in. Residents of the area reportedly caused a
ruckus, which prompted the assailants to flee the area.
Gun shots were reportedly heard as the armed men
escaped the area and Clarke’s lifeless body was later
found in the street with gun shot wounds.

Bowleg, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday, is also

SEE page eight





PRICE — 75¢

Four years for

Haitian boat captain

in connection
with drug seizure

39-year-old man pleads
guilty to charges

m@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A HAITIAN boat captain was sentenced to four years in
prison yesterday after pleading guilty to charges stemming
from the seizure of nearly $14 million worth of cocaine in
Great Inagua last week.

Lucio Blanc, 39, of La Tortue, Haiti, with the aid of a Cre-
ole interpreter, pleaded guilty before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel yesterday to charges of conspiring to import cocaine,
conspiring to possess cocaine with intent to supply, impor-
tation of cocaine with intent to supply and possession of
cocaine with intent to supply. Blanc’s lawyer, Mary Bain, told
the Magistrate that Blanc has a wife and seven children in
Haiti and submitted that he had not wasted the court's time
having pleaded guilty to the charges.

Magistrate Bethel took into consideration the fact that he
had been forthright and pleaded guilty to the charges. She
also noted that there was a significant amount of drugs
involved.

Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor, told the court
that officers from the police Drug Enforcement Unit,
Defence Force base in Inagua and US Coast Guard had
intercepted the 77-foot blue and white vessel Blanc had
captained, just off Great Inagua. He told the court that six
men were discovered onboard the vessel. The prosecutor
told the court that after removing several planks onboard the
vessel, 361 packages of cocaine were found.

He said that the drugs weighed 900 pounds and had a

SEE page eight



Police officer accused
of bribery testifies

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— The trial of a
police officer accused of bribery
resumed in the Supreme Court
on Monday with the accused
giving sworn testimony from the
witness stand in his defence.

Constable 2372 Pierre Mar-
tin, 25, is charged with soliciting
a bribe. He is also charged with
two counts of accepting a bribe.

Lawyer Carlson Shurland is
representing Martin, who has
been interdicted from the Roy-
al Bahamas Police Force.

Justice Vera Watkins is pre-
siding over the trial. Prosecu-
tors Jillian Williams, Simon
Rolle and Erica Kemp of the
Attorney General’s Office
appear on behalf of the Crown.

Officer Martin is accused of
bribing Garrick Lewis on Feb-
ruary 14, 2007.

Lewis was arrested on Feb-

cee eee eal) Fidelity DebtSAVER



NASSAU AND BAHAMEA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER

ruary 5 at West End for using
obscene language, resisting
arrest, and making threats of
death against Officer Martin.
It is alleged that Martin
approached Lewis after his
arraignment in the Eight Mile

SEE page eight

Pilot crashes on
way to Bimini

A FLORIDA pilot on his way
to Bimini crashed his plane after
hitting a flock of vultures in Ft
Lauderdale.

No-one was killed in the crash.

The birds cracked the window
of the Cessna twin-engine plane
and the pilot radioed that he
would make an emergency land-
ing.

He landed safely at the Fort
Lauderdale airport, sustaining
minor injuries.


PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



eek Crash victim was

former Davis Cup
Team member

THE FORD MUSTANG crashed into a tree on Midshipman Road.

ColinaImperial.

medical emergencies
dont study economics

... they don’t know the word “recession” either.

That's why you need to maintain your insurance coverage
with Colinalmperial even when the economy is weak — to
make sure hard times don't get harder just because you
fall ill or fall down on your luck.

Stay confident. Stay connected.

confidence for life

www.colinaimperial.com

FIRST AID








m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The man killed in a traffic accident
on Sunday has been identified as 26-year-old La’-
vaughn Fernando Kristain Munroe of Grand
Bahama, a former member of the Bahamas’ Davis

Cup Team (see Sports).

The death of the tennis player pushed the island’s
traffic fatality count to three for the year.

The accident occurred around 1.15pm on Sun-
day on Midshipman Road in the vicinity of Palm

Gardens.

Mr Munroe, an employee at the Freeport Con-
tainer Port, was driving a black 1995 Ford Mustang
with the licence plate number 45532.

Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said Mr Munroe lost
control of the vehicle and crashed into a tree.

Mr Munroe was taken by ambulance to Rand

Memorial Hospital, where doctors officially pro-

nounced him dead.

The vehicle, police said, was extensively dam-

aged.



THE FRONT section of the vehicle ‘broke off’.

Mr Reckley said the front section of the car broke

off and was thrown some 45 feet on impact.

accident.

Police are continuing their investigations into the

Pro-gambling committee chairman applauds
Rotary Club for gaming night decision

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE CHAIRMAN of the com-
mittee which wants to see gambling
legalised in the Bahamas yesterday
applauded the Rotary Club of East
Nassau for deciding to stage a gam-
ing night as part of its fundraising
efforts.

The night of “Texas Hold’em,
Roulette, Blackjack and a grand
raffle” is set to be held on February
28.

No cash prizes will be won as a
result of the poker/roulette/black-
jack, according to Rotary club
organiser, Joanne Smith, but par-
ticipants will get a chance to win
raffle prizes and test their gambling
talents for charity.

Sidney Strachan, chairman of the
Bahamas Gaming Reform com-
mittee, said the more Bahamians
who show they may be for a change
in the country’s “antiquated” gam-
ing laws, the better. He said he
would “love to attend the event”
and thinks the club should go fur-
ther and play for money.

“Definitely I will be there - I
can’t wait. I think we need a lot
more Bahamians to openly chal-
lenge the law. Atlantis just held one
(a poker tournament) so I don’t
see why Bahamians can’t hold
one,” he said.

The BGR committee maintains
that the country’s gaming laws —
which prohibit Bahamians from,
among other activities, gambling in
casinos, playing the lottery or par-
ticipating in poker games for cash —
are discriminatory and outdated.

Yesterday Brent Symonette,
Deputy Prime Minister and an East
Nassau Rotarian, said he would not
be attending the Rotary game night.

But he confirmed when asked
that he is still for a referendum on
the question of whether gambling
should be legalised in the Bahamas,
as he stated in the House of Assem-
bly in 2005.

At the time he suggested that

FOR ALL YOUR DECORATING















“Lowest Prices On The Island”

FREE DELIVERY ANY WHERE IN NASSAU AND TO THE MAIL BOAT

STORE HOURS:
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

BILLY’S DREAM

STILL ALIVE

¢ E-Z CREDIT TERMS AVAILABLE

Donald’s Furniture
And Appliance Centre

SIXTH TERRACE CENTREVILLE TEL: 322-1731 OR 322-3875

the government was “hypocritical”
for failing to hold a nationwide vote
on the issue.

An email advertising the
Rotary’s “Mock Casino” event
states that admission will be $20
and raffle tickets $100. It adds that
first place prize for those playing
poker, roulette or blackjack will be
“18 per cent of the purse”, while
second place will win 12 per cent
and third place, seven.

But Rotarian Ms Smith main-
tained in an interview with The Tri-
bune yesterday that no monetary
prizes will be awarded and all funds
raised and prizes will be through
the raffle. “We’ve gotten permis-
sion from the Gaming Board (for
the raffle),” she added.

Secretary of the Gaming Board
and former police commissioner
Bernard “BK” Bonamy empha-
sised that to play for cash would be
illegal - even if the majority of the
proceeds go to charity.

Raffle

While entities can apply to the
Ministry of Tourism, which will
seek the advice of the board, for
approval to hold a raffle, “there is
no such thing as a poker permit,” he
said.

Mr Strachan said the illegality of
gambling for Bahamians is a civil
rights issue, and reflective of an
“18th century mindset.”

He said the country “wants to sit
on both sides of the divide” when it
comes to the subject — with gov-
ernment so far supporting the status
quo, while appearing impotent to
enforce the law, which is widely
known to be broken by citizens
from a broad cross-section of soci-
ety.

Hoping to push their agenda to
another level, the BGR committee
is shortly set to conduct its own sur-
vey, likely in conjunction with the
College of the Bahamas, into the
prevalence of gambling and
Bahamian attitudes towards it.

Mr Strachan said he expects the
findings to show that many
Bahamians take part in gambling
on a regular basis and support a
change in the law.

“We'll make another appeal to
the government based on those
findings. We’ve met with the Gam-
ing Board and we’re kind of confi-
dent that they want it (to change),”
he said. “Our intention is to bring it
(the debate) to a place where the
government can actually act on it,”
he added.

Conditions under the present

government appear to be the most
favourable for a shift in policy.

In late 2008 Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham told a Meet the
Press conference, in response to a
question, that he would not be a
“proposer or proponent” of chang-
ing the law.

However, he encouraged those
who are pro-change to “step up,
make their positions known and
tell the public”, adding: “I will not
be a vote that stands against you.”

He has previously declared that
the law against Bahamians gam-
bling is “not an enforceable law and
society is doing it everyday.”

School receives
donation of a
defibrillator

THE DW Davis Junior High
School received a defibrillator
donated by Doctors Hospital and
the South Miami Heart Centre.

Making the presentation to the
school’s principal Abraham Stubbs
was Janisse Post, senior manager of
project development and research
outcomes at the South Miami
Heart Centre.

She said several defibrillators
were purchased for schools in
South Miami and the Bahamas
through a donation from a caring
philanthropist.

A defibrillator is an apparatus
used to control and regulate the
heart beat by application of an elec-
tric current to the chest wall.

Bringing remarks on behalf of
Minister of Education Carl Bethel
was Lionel Sands, acting director
of education, who said the govern-
ment aims to ensure that the coun-
try’s children are in an environ-
ment that is safe, healthy and con-
ducive to learning.

He explained that on any given
day, our school campuses house
thousands of children of varying
needs, which may include health
issues,

For this reason, he said, the Min-
istry of Education is grateful for
the defibrillator, which will be of
great assistance in emergencies
related to the heart.

Mr Sands explained the school
began to prepare for the defibrilla-
tor in the summer of 2008, when
training sessions were held for
administrators and teachers in car-
dio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR)
and First Aid procedures.

#1 Debt Collection Agency In The Country

Need Help Collecting
Past Due Accounts?

Phone: 328-8301

A

wy
“ WeCan ©
V2 Help You -

ny Get Paid!
L, pA

|

/,Apex Management Services



Resario West Condominiums Under Construction

2 Bedroom, 2 1/2 Bathroom 3 storey Townhouses.
Gated property includes pool, well appointed interiors, modern kitchens,
granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, large bedrooms w/ private
baths, hurricane impact windows.

From $249,000 with only $5,000 reservation deposit required
READY FOR OCCUPANCY MARCH ‘09
PH. 325-1325

| aoe




THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Job prospects for school
leavers ‘worse than 2008’

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

JOB prospects for students
leaving school this year will be
worse than in 2008, Labour Min-
ister Dion Foulkes told The Tri-
bune yesterday.

The global economic turmoil
has led to a series of lay-offs —
around 1,000 last year from the
hospitality sector alone and
dozens already this year — and
this spells bad news for new
entrants into the job market.

But Minister Foulkes said
there may be an increase in
white-collar jobs in the con-
struction industry, with oppor-
tunities in clerical, architectural
and engineering work due to
government's capital works pro-
jects.

"We are experiencing a down-
turn, the (job) prospects will not
be as bright as they were last
year, but there are still jobs out
there to be gotten. The Labour
Exchange for example referred
successfully last month 60 new
persons into (job) placements.
So there are jobs that are becom-
ing available, but the job market
isn't as vibrant as it was last year.

"The jobs that the government
is focused on creating hopefully
will also create some opportuni-
ties for some of the persons who
are graduating,” Mr Foulkes said.

About 500 people are cur-
rently employed in several Min-



le
Ya

Dion anes

istry of Works projects in various
infrastructure programmes, Mr
Foulkes said in a recent inter-
view with The Tribune.

Since July 2008, some 1,500
people have been employed in
the Ministry of Housing’s build-
ing programme, while another
500 are currently working on the
Department of Environmental
Services’ beautification pro-
gramme for New Providence.

By June 2009, government
expects 400 workers to be
employed in the New Provi-
dence Road Improvement Pro-
ject and other similar road infra-
structure works throughout the
islands.

Another 400 persons are
expected to be hired for phase
one of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport (LPIA)

redevelopment, Mr Foulkes said
earlier.

However, many of these jobs
will be short-term and have a
high turn-over rate.

As the uncertainty surround-
ing job opportunities increases,
some officials at the College of
the Bahamas (COB) are strong-
ly encouraging students to
become more “versatile.”

"With the recession, I don't
think we're going to have lots of
opportunities like we normally
would. And a lot of the hotels
are laying off people, so I see
this year as being a little bit dif-
ficult in terms of finding certain
types of jobs,” said an educator
at the college who asked not to
be named.

“We don't know if it’s going to
get worse, if it's going to get bet-
ter — it's a little bit scary.”

Students

The educator said most stu-
dents in her department search
for hospitality related jobs.

However, due to the down-
turn in that sector, she is encour-
aging them to branch out into
other fields.

"They are going to now have
to start thinking about other
fields, not just hospitality. Make
themselves more marketable
and studying things that are
going to make them attractive
not just in one field, but in dif-

Retrial of men accused of murder
of businessman gets underway

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE retrial of the men accused of the 2006
murder of local businessman Keith Carey began
in the Supreme Court yesterday.

Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight
Knowles are charged in Carey’s murder and are
also standing trial on charges of armed robbery
and conspiracy to commit armed robbery.

During his opening statement, prosecutor
Anthony Delaney told the jurors that the prose-
cution intends to call Vaughn Carey — the victim’s
cousin — as a witness in the case.

Vaughn Carey had initially been charged with
conspiring to commit armed robbery. Those
charges have however been dropped.

Dwight Knowles previously served as a prose-
cution witness but was later charged in connection
with Carey’s murder.

This came after Knowles testified in court that
police had coached him to give his statement and
that the statement he gave to police was false.

On February 27, 2006, Carey, 43, a father of
three, was gunned down on the steps of The Bank
of the Bahamas on the Tonique Williams-Darling

Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000
that belonged to the Esso Service Station which
he operated.

According to the prosecution, a young man
got out of a white Maxima, robbed Carey, then
shot him twice before fleeing the scene in the
car.

Detective Corporal 1212 Lavardo Sherman, a
crime scene technician, was the first witness called
to testify yesterday.

Mr Sherman told the court that he pho-
tographed the crime scene. He also told the court
that he took pictures of the victim at the morgue
of the Princess Margaret Hospital and was present
for the post mortem examination by Dr Govinda
Raju on Friday March 2, 2006.

Detective Constable Garnell Rolle testified
that he took photographs of a white Nissan Max-
ima allegedly used in the crime.

Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl
Grant-Bethel is the lead prosecutor in the case.
Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are
representing Jamal Glinton, attorney
Dorsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown and
attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight
Knowles.




TUT
PETIA
EEC

PV ath

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia. net

BAHAMASAIR said there is
no cause for alarm following the
deadly plane crash in New York
which involved an aircraft manu-
factured by the company which
supplies a portion of the national
flag carrier's fleet.

Preliminary information emerg-
ing from US Federal investiga-
tions into the crash have linked
the disaster to the use of autopilot
during severe icy conditions — not
any manufacturing flaw.

"We don't have any need to be
overly concerned and that (infor-
mation) doesn't suggest that there
was a problem with the aircraft,”
Bahamasair managing director
Henry Woods told The Tribune
yesterday. "So we still feel as
though the aircraft is most suit-
able for our services and very reli-
able. So there is no cause for
alarm".

Bahamasair operates six 50-
seater Dash 8 Q300s, a smaller
and older model than the Dash 8
Q400 which crashed last week.
Both models are made by Cana-
dia-based firm Bombardier.

Since the crash last Thursday, it
has emerged the plane's crew were
flying on autopilot during severe
icy conditions until 26 seconds
before it barreled into a home out-
side Buffalo, New York.

Some aviation experts contend
that the use of autopilot in icy con-
ditions can prevent pilots from real-
ising the severity of icy weather.








Dave Sherman/AP

THE WRECKAGE of Continental flight 3407 lies amid smoke at the
scene after crashing into a suburban Buffalo home and erupting into
flames late Thursday Feb. 12, 2009.

It was also reported that both
the American National
Transportation Safety Board
(NTSB) and the plane's manufac-
turer recommend that pilots
disengage autopilot during
severe icy conditions, but the Fed-
eral Aviation Administration has
not adopted that recommenda-
tion.

A complete report on the cause
of the crash is not expected for at
least a year, the NTSB told the
media.

In the meantime, Mr Woods
stressed that Bahamasait's fleet is
subjected to rigorous maintenance
checks that trump some interna-
tional standards.

"It's a combination of calendar,
landings, daily and hourly (checks)
prescribed by the manufacturer
and the Airways Authority to
determine the maintenance pro-
gramme and the frequency of
maintenance to be performed. But
it's a very rigid programme, very
rigid,” he said.

"T would say in-house we do
check, and we have a preventa-
tive maintenance programme that
goes above and beyond the
requirements of the manufacturer

and the Airways Authority. We
exceed that".

Mr Woods urged the public not
be afraid to fly in the aftermath
of this latest crash, explaining that
a person has a better chance of
being injured at home than
onboard an airplane.

"You have to take into consid-
eration the tens of thousands of
aircraft in operation and the hun-
dreds of thousands of flights that
operate per day. Well, a single
incident — “fraction” is not a fitting
word of a percentage of people
that fly. So I don't think this will
be a deterrent," he said.

On Thursday, Continental Con-
nection Flight 3407 en route to
Buffalo from Newark crashed,
killing 49 people including the
crew, and one person on the
ground.

It was the first deadly crash in
commercial aviation in two years.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eR UE
PHONE: 322-2157



ferent fields, more versatile,"
said the educator.

COB career and placement
counsellor Norma Turnquest
told The Tribune that her office
has seen a significant decline in
requests for student placement
over the past few months.

"T noticed since December
actually, whereas we used to
have calls just about every day in
terms of requests for students,
in late December I got maybe
two calls. Definitely the employ-
ment market is down because
we do not get the kind of calls
we used to in the past,” she said.

Ue
UC
WHT DED hy

A FREEPORT man was
yesterday arraigned in the
Grand Bahama Magis-
trates Court Three on
armed robbery and receiv-
ing charges.

It is alleged that on Feb-
ruary 7, Bernard Ferguson,
while in Freeport, robbed
two expatriates of cash.

He was not required to
enter a plea to the armed
robbery charge and the
matter was adjourned to
June 9.

In a separate matter,
Ferguson was also
arraigned along with Javar-
do Cooper on robbery
charges in Court One.

It is alleged that on Feb-
ruary 7, Ferguson and
Cooper robbed the Sav-A-
Dollar store in the West
Mall Plaza.

Cooper was granted
$1,000 cash bail and Fer-
guson was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison in
New Providence. The mat-
ter was adjourned to July
30, 2009.




















0%
Storewide Sale

BOTH LOCATIONS

0% Clearance
On Selected Items

Baypar! Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145
Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

CARPET, FURNITURE, MARBLE & TILE CARE

Tue Most Treo
asa s Oey Peo:

aa Retoanoyd & Cuiasmoc Ever, on Tun Jon & Fam!
SOHAL, Commo Soosn Cape & Unley Caen Ser,

* Carpet, Upholstery, Sone and Marhic L-keaningy o&
Resordion Spocmist.

* Prochomn Cleaning Sysnome romans. Danap i Heaney
SL, Hecteres, Liressc, Watermarks and Sisire inom
Cupetng & Farmitire, restoring thom to like ac
ate Trectios of replaceme ne one.

Cape, Sofas, Lowpanas Chairs. Dining Chairs, Cars,
Boos, Croat, Tiles, Marte & Some
* Pomaan, Worl d& Silk Canpet Cleaning Specialist

* Miatle Polishiag. Reworation & Cane
* Woed Floor Resteralion

Suiteriaed Stent Tech Profesdinal Contractor

CALL PROCHEM BAHAMAS
PHOMSE: 323-8083 or 323-1594
ONLY WE CAN OOD FF RIGHTY

ere ec er at ° RIT ee bare 0 * WRT, OF
* pr] ed eat

AS A, Ae oe

PROCHEM SYSTEM jenn

HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

15TH OCTOBER 1930 - 14TH FEBRUARY 2008.

Well loved educator & community leader

“A man 18 loved not for how tall he stands
but for how often he bends to help, comfort and teach.”

x

CAUCE Lhugh

Remembered by his wife, Sylvia; son, Gregory;
all family members & friends


PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Washington: All about trust — or lack of it

WASHINGTON (AP) — It's not biparti-
sanship that's on life support in Washington.
It's basic trust and confidence.

The government this week was all about
projecting reasons to believe things will get bet-
ter:

That lawmakers will be able to handle the
economic rescue quickly and effectively; that
President Barack Obama can handle the crisis
with a competent and steady team; that he can
work productively with a Congress controlled by
his own party.

Indeed, that Democrats in Congress can
work with each other.

Instead, this week's rollout of Obama's bank-
rescue update bombed. His treasury secretary
was pilloried for a less-than-surefooted debut.
His second nominee for commerce secretary
said, on second thought, no thanks.

And on Capitol Hill, the Democratic leader
of the House let her Senate counterpart
announce a deal on the history-making eco-
nomic stimulus plan and convene negotiators to
work out the last differences — and then stood
him up.

Why? She was following Ronald Reagan's
famous dictum: Trust, but verify.

"We wanted to see the language" of the bill
before endorsing it, House Speaker Nancy
Pelosi told reporters the next day.

Pelosi and Reid did finally agree on the pack-
age — $787 billion to get consumers spending
and companies rehiring. And Congress moved
to pass it Friday, meeting the Democrats’ self-
imposed deadline and allowing lawmakers to
leave for official trips around the globe.

Like anything that becomes the law of the
land, this legislation was succeeding because it
was in a lot of people's interest. Perhaps, as
White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel sug-
gested, its very passage should reassure investors
and consumers.

But in the process, Washington did not exact-
ly radiate the confidence its leaders are trying to
inspire.

Obama's presidency and the 111th Congress
are only a few weeks old, wrestling with an eco-
nomic meltdown beyond the experience of any-
one charting the course to recovery.

Lawmakers are ill-tempered because their
constituents are angry and letting them know
about it. Some key relationships are new or
rejiggered because of last fall's elections.

The jitters are showing everywhere, from
the false starts to not-for-attribution sniping.

Obama asked the nation to trust him to slow
the economic slide. But three weeks into his
administration, he's still getting his footing.

Timothy Geithner, the chief of Obama's eco-
nomic team, looked nervous and younger than
his years this week when he rolled out a bank
bailout plan that lacked the details Wall Street
wanted. The stock market tanked.

And late Thursday, Obama's second nomi-
nee for commerce secretary, Republican Sen.
Judd Gregg of New Hampshire, abruptly with-
drew from consideration, citing "irresolvable
conflicts" on key policy items. Obama's first
choice for commerce, his nominee for health

secretary and his pick as a federal efficiency
overseer all had withdrawn earlier.

Obama joked about the latest problem, won-
dering aloud in Springfield, IIL, if Abraham
Lincoln had ever thought about the commerce
job. White House chief of staff Emanuel
acknowledged that some might see the admin-
istration's hiring problems as amateur hour, but
he suggested Bill Clinton's transition, which
included Rahm, was even shakier.

But whatever the spin, the situation hardly
was a confidence builder for the nation.

Neither was the way Congress was dealing
with the bank bailout.

The first, deeply unpopular $700 billion
bailout bill last year contained no strong require-
ments for recipients to account for the taxpay-
er money. That was Congress’ doing.

But members of the House Financial Services
Committee took it out this week on eight CEOs
of the nation's biggest banks who had been the
first to receive the bailout money.

It almost didn't matter what the banking
titans had to say for themselves at a televised
hearing. They were the faces behind a housing
crisis that escalated into a recession that makes
it hard to raise any kind of cash, let alone cam-
paign contributions. And every member of the
House is up for re-election in 2010.

House members ripped into the former mas-
ters of the universe.

One suggested they should be thrown in
prison. "America doesn't trust you anymore,"
railed Rep. Michael Capuano, D-Mass.

Many Americans feel the same way about
Congress. And some members of Congress feel
that way about each other.

Last Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader
Harry Reid, his leadership team and moderate
Republicans at his side, triumphantly announced
on live television that the House and Senate
had agreed on new legislation to bail out trou-
bled industries and boost homeowners.

Pelosi did not respond.

Reid then lit the stately parlour named for
Lyndon Baines Johnson for television and
instructed his Senate negotiators to meet there
with their House counterparts to iron out any
remaining issues.

The senators waited. And waited. Pelosi,
meanwhile, summoned Reid to her office for a
talking-to. Finally, she signed onto the agree-
ment, though that didn't stop the sniping
between her aides and Reid's.

"One person's understanding of a spoken
description might vary from another's," she
said. "We wanted to see it. We wanted to
remove all doubt that the purpose of the mon-
ey was reflected in the language that was there.”

Reagan? Or lawmakers’ favourite
euphemism, an “abundance of caution"?

"T don't want to come to you later and say,
"We thought it said yes and it said no," Pelosi
said. "It said what we want it to say, and we're
very pleased with that outcome.”

(This article was written by Laurie Kellman
who has covered Congress and politics since
1997 for The Associated Press).



Quality Auto Sales

PRE-OWNED

Frustration
with medical
and nursing
‘professionals’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

THANK you for allowing
me to vent my ever increas-
ing frustration with the med-
ical and nursing “profession-
als” of this nation. Recently I
had a relative admitted to our
“illustrious” government-
operated hospital. They had
undergone surgery and was
then placed on one of the pub-
lic wards.

To my chagrin each day that
I visited said relative I
received the most unsettling,
blood-boiling reports of frank
negligence on both the part of
the nurses and physicians con-
cerned with their care.

The paramount complaint
was that no one either physi-
cian or nurse had the forth-
rightness to explain/teach:

1) the client’s condition in
light of the presenting signs
and symptoms

2) the planned procedures
ie blood tests, radiology or
surgical plans

3) pre-and post-operative
preparatory activities for the
patient, including pain man-
agement; the withholding of
oral sustenance for a period
of time; how and when activi-
ties of daily living/self-care
activities would resume fol-
lowing surgery.

Hence, I wonder how
informed consent was
obtained seeing that the nec-
essary teaching (a standard
part of pre-op preparation)
was not provided despite the
questioning by the patient of
the “professionals” responsi-
ble for her care.

Wouldn’t it be a case of
assault since the patient
although lucid and oriented in
all spheres signed a consent
form without the obligated
information?

To add insult to injury my
relative remarked that when-
ever she asked either doctor
or nurse questions regarding
her condition and care she was
made to feel “crazy” and dis-
missed with inappropriate
comments and feigned igno-
rance of the case.

Funny how a client will be
informed by the grapevine
that their case is the hottest
topic around the water cooler,
but they themselves cannot
formally receive said infor-

Short Term Apartment

Cheaper than a Hotel

CARS & TRUCKS

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!

week weeks

month

hs, Ped
HOME Away

FROM HOME

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



mation.

Secondly, is it customary to
train physicians and nurses to
be cold, uncaring, uncivilised,
disrespectful, asinine purvey-
ors and practitioners of the art
of medicine and nursing?

I think it not too difficult or
too much to ask or expect that
they

1) are professional at all
times.

2) actually listen to and con-
verse with (and not at or over
the heads of) their patients,
especially when they are clear-
ly conscious and alert, capa-
ble of understanding the infor-
mation/feedback that is
required to be given.

3) uphold the sanctity of the
oath they took when receiv-
ing their so long sought after
“white coat” and upon receipt
of licensure with the Nursing
Council.

4) treat their patients (which
for those who didn’t know
includes the family or care-
givers) as though it were
themselves or a relative, best
friend with tender loving care,
and at least a modicum of
respect and honour.

5) exude passion for serv-
ing patients — going above
and beyond the call of duty
for both the pauper and the
king, even in the worst cir-
cumstance or environment.

Also, why is it painfully
obvious that too many nurses
and doctors at our premiere
medical institution cannot be
bothered to teach clients
about anything related to their
care or even ensure if taught
that it was understood? Is it a
practice that is shunned or is it
simply too much to add to the
workload? I have on numer-

ous occasions witnessed both
grades of “professionals”
ignore or squander opportu-
nities to provide critical teach-
ing to patients and their rela-
tives/caregivers alike.

I cannot fathom why they
wouldn’t work to achieve the
best possible outcome for the
client. Perhaps the client will
succumb to their injury or dis-
ease, but the relatives could
have received life saving infor-
mation that would change the
course of their lives and con-
sequently that of another gen-
eration.

Iam appalled, even utterly
disgusted at the lackadaisical,
“T aim to be negligent and
ineffective,” “I’m only work-
ing for a pay cheque” rhetoric
that is so pervasive within the
health care community. I have
been a nurse over seven years
and cringe at the thought of
being grouped together with
this lot. I am sickened and
many times driven livid at the
thought that, my clients, rela-
tives, friends or even strangers
could fall victim to the perils
of this much dysfunctional,
mismanaged, under
regulated, toxic health care
system.

Remember, although very
cliché...one rotten apple spoils
the whole bunch!

I challenge nurses and
physicians, those with enough
intestinal fortitude to change
the system by first changing
themselves.

At any one time we will all
need medical care and it is
crucial that the highest level
of service, yes — excellence
— be rendered to all and
sundry.

Think about it.

PATIENTLY
AWAITING CHANGE!
Nassau,

January 26, 2009.

Govt should pursue
language teaching

EDITOR, The Tribune.

WE, IN THIS contemporary age, concerning The Bahamas,
have been, and continuously are provided with irrefutable evi-
dence that Bahamian Tourism officials are extremely compe-
tent in their profession of promoting our country.

I believe that there would be no dissension amongst Bahami-
ans, Caribbean peoples and those around the world if I were to
adopt the position that these Tourism professionals in The
Bahamas and elsewhere can be counted with the choicest of the

lot on the globe.

And so, being of the opinion myself, it is my sincere belief
that the best of the best Bahamian tourism officials, and even
the ordinary citizen would be receptive to innovative ideas to
catapult Tourism progression even further than it has come

today.

It is my humble opinion that the government of The
Bahamas should take the initiative to approach the Chinese
government, the Japanese government, the German govern-

ment, Spanish speaking governments, French speaking govern-
ments and the Haitian government, with a view to requesting of
them (except Haiti) that they sponsor whatever number of
teachers they are able to spare to teach Bahamian children
their native languages beginning at age four-five years old and
ending the last year in high school - a span of approximately 12
years.

Obviously, The Bahamas government would not be able to
afford these additional teachers (or would they’).

Hence my use of the word sponsor (by these foreign govern-
ments) previously.

It is my humble opinion that if it became public knowledge in
these respective countries over the years that The Bahamas is
replete with individuals speaking their native languages fluent-
ly, it would make our destination that much more attractive.

Additionally, the fact that Bahamians would be able to read,
write and speak another language fluently could present them
with a plethora of other opportunities; as I am sure you would
be able to appreciate.

And also, The Bahamas (I believe) would gain an unmatch-
able reputation within the Caribbean, the wider region, and the
world as being one of the few wonders of the world; and a
“must see.”

It is my sincere hope that the government of The Bahamas
initiates the necessary processes to ensure that this vision comes
to fruition so that The Bahamas and Bahamians would stand

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY
‘06 ARIS #3
‘01 HYUNDAI ACCENT 49%
‘01 HYUNDAI COUPE
‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘03 DAIHATSU TERIOS
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
‘00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
‘02 SUZUKI XL-7
‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL

DESIGN

ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING

FAST BIDDING INFORMATION

361-7764

Road to City Dump after Premix
Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

TRUSSES

Q U ITY: u 0 head and shoulders above our counterparts.
, Thank you for your time.
A [ Sales |
UMITED MARVIN G
#1 ALTO DEALER IM THE BAHAMAS - LIGHTBOURN
EAST SHIRLEY STREET * 322-3775 * 325-3079 AUTHORIZED Nassau,

Wig. gam phew toes oe Seca itp Ale Sey hee Freemaeel Lid der cred dak, Qeceets Map, 27 b 1 E
of Ave: Aberin Mel Chery eels Fld, ATG

MANUFACTURER February, 2009


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Court staff threaten to stay
home until repairs are done



Hurricane =
hunter aircraft.
tocometo
the Bahamas

THE United States’

National Oceanic and

Atmospheric Administra-

tion (NOAA) will dispatch :
one of its Hurricane hunter }
aircraft to Nassau on March :
22 for a one-day exhibition :
on March 23 at the Lynden :

Pindling International Air-
port.

Call for future

leadlers to push

for education

FUTURE political leaders
of the country should also be
leaders in the field of educa-
tion, according to one sena-
tor.

PLP Senator Jerome
Fitzgerald is calling on future
political leaders to put them-
selves forward to not only be
prime minister of the
Bahamas, but also to be the
next Minister of Education.

“That’s how serious I am
about education being at the
centre of any national devel-
opment plan,” he said.

Senator Fitzgerald was
giving his contribution to the
debate on an Act to establish
a National Library and
Information Services
Authority last week.

He said if the Bahamas is
to sustain its economic
growth, education, learning
and research must be at the
core of its efforts.

“T believe that while we
have made significant steps
in this regard, I am of the
view that recently successive
governments have unfortu-
nately failed to channel ade-
quate focus and sufficiently
significant resources into
education and research in
our country,” he said.

“There are many books in
our libraries written about
leadership and while our
present prime minister is
strong-willed and decisive,
that alone does not make
him a good leader. Where is
the vision, where is the plan,
where is ability to inspire a
people so as to give them
hope, where is the environ-
ment of creativity, of think-
ing big.”

Senator Fitzgerald said
that he is concerned by the
number of Bahamian stu-
dents that are leaving the
country to attend universities
abroad and are not returning
home because they see no
professional opportunities in
the Bahamas or simply can-
not find a job in their field of
study.

“The brain drain is truly
alarming and we are not
addressing it. This issue, too,
requires focus and clarity of
purpose. I am also con-
cerned that the female to
male ratio at the college is
two to one,” he said.

The senator said that there
needs to be more focus by
way of human and financial
capital in early childhood
development, with serious
consideration given to
extending school hours and
shortening the long summer
breaks, along with a focus on
science and technology.

COURT staff plagued by mould
growing on the walls and ceilings and
the lack of air-conditioning have
threatened to stay home until repairs
are complete.

Employees of the Coroner’s Court in
Victoria Gardens maintain the work-
place has become unbearable since the
air conditioning stopped working
upstairs, affecting the Coroner’s Court,
magistrates’ offices and clerical offices.

A number of inquests are scheduled
this week but the magistrate, staff and
legal representatives are struggling to
carry out their duties in the stifling
heat, it was claimed.

A member of staff who called The
Tribune yesterday said there has been
no effort to repair the air conditioning

Employees say workplace
has become unbearable

since it broke down and was reported
last week.

And the lack of air is creating an
inhospitable environment across the
whole upper floor of the aging build-
ing.

He said: “They are becoming very
uncomfortable, very agitated and they
are saying they won’t come into work
tomorrow.

“The weather is getting warmer and
it’s really miserable.

“There were several counsel here
(yesterday) and they found it unbear-
able.”

The employee said it’s impossible
to get a breeze flowing through the
building by opening the windows
because an adjacent building blocks
all airflow.

Black mould growing on the wall
behind the magistrate’s bench in the
Family Court located downstairs in
court three, was reported to the Min-
istry of Works last month but staff say
it has still not been remedied.

The Ministry of Works ascertained
that the mould was nothing out of the
ordinary, but employees fear it poses a
danger to staff, visitors and particu-
larly children.

“IT know they sent somebody to look
at it,” the staff member said. “But I
don’t know when it is going to be
cleaned up. I haven’t seen anybody
cleaning it up.”

The Ministry of Works failed to
return calls before The Tribune went to
press.

Minister and AG to
participate in UN
crime conference

MINISTER of National
Security Tommy Turnquest and
Attorney General Michael Bar-
nett will participate in a spe-
cial United Nations conference
on crime this week.

The “Ministerial Conference
on Security, Drug Trafficking,
Transnational Organised Crime
and Terrorism as Challenges to
Development in the
Caribbean” is organised by the
United Nations Office on
Drugs and Crime (UNDOC)
and the government of the
Dominican Republic.

The conference will take
place in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic, from Feb-
ruary 17-20.

Speaking on the Bahamas’
decision to participate in the
conference, Minister Turnquest
said, “In light of current crime
trends in the Caribbean region,
the issues the ministerial con-
ference will take up are those
with which a majority of CARI-
COM governments, including
the Bahamas, are tackling, and
have been tackling for several
years now.”

Minister Turnquest said it is
critical for the Bahamas to have
an input in the “action plan”
the conference is to develop for
the region, to ensure that the
country’s concerns are taken
fully into account.

He pointed to the recent sig-
nificant seizures of cocaine on
board two Haitian sloops as an
indication of the ongoing illicit
drug transit traffic. Mr Turn-
quest commended the police
and the Defence Force for the
exemplary work they continue
to do in the area of drug con-
trol.

The overall objective of the
conference is to develop a
regional strategy that will
strengthen the response of
Caribbean governments, includ-
ing the Bahamas, to the many
very serious challenges that
drug trafficking, transnational
organised crime, security and

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
IAA Tes
Py

322-2157

Tommy Turnquest

terrorism present to develop-
ment in the Caribbean region.

The conference will be con-
vened in two parts. In the first
part, to take place from Febru-
ary 17-19, senior officials and
experts from Caribbean coun-
tries will review the agenda of
the Ministers’ Meeting. In addi-
tion to discussing matters on
the conference’s agenda, the
officials and experts will also
complete drafts of the two doc-
uments the ministers will con-
sider and adopt — a “Political
Declaration” and an “Action
Plan.”

In reviewing the threats and
challenges posed by illicit
drugs, transnational organised
crime and related matters, the
ministerial part of the confer-
ence, to be held from February
19-20, will discuss issues includ-
ing law enforcement; organised
crime; the legal framework;
drug demand reduction, and
national strategies for counter-
ing terrorism and transnational
organised crime.














NASSAU GLASS COMPANY

will be

CLOSED

Saturday February 21st

for our company’s

FUN BAY

in order to give our staff
a well-deserved break.

We will reopen on Monday February 23rd
We apologise for any inconvenience caused
Mackey Street 393-8165









Madonna set to play wife of
former Bahamian governor

INTERNATION-
AL recording artist
Madonna is set to play
the wife of a former
Bahamian governor in
an upcoming movie.

Madonna will take
on the role of Wallis
Simpson, wife of
Prince Edward, Duke
of Windsor, who
served as the

Bahamas’ governor
from 1940 until the
end of World War II
in 1945.

In 1936, King
Edward VIII abdicat-
ed the British throne

to marry Mrs Simpson,
an American who had
been married twice
already.

Project

The Guardian of London reported that
the movie is expected to be a true-life
romantic drama and is a labour-of-love
project for the 50-year-old pop singer.

Bahamas Film Commissioner Craig
Woods said there has been no word yet on
whether scenes for the movie will be shot
on location in the Bahamas.

"No, it hasn't gotten to that stage yet so
it's all speculative. Nothing happened yet,
so once they decide to do it, they'll be
down here, they'll be scouting the location
- everybody in the country will know. So
nothing has happened yet,” he said.

According to some historians, the Duke
of Windsor did not enjoy his time in the
Bahamas and referred to the islands as “a
third-class British colony.”

However, the Duke was praised for his
efforts to combat poverty in the country,
although he was said to have been con-
temptuous of Bahamians.

MADONNA (above) will
play Wallis Simpson,
wife of Prince Edward,
Duke of Windsor (both
pictured left).

Many historians have suggested that
Hitler was prepared to reinstate the Duke
as King in the hope of establishing a fas-
cist Britain.

It is widely believed that the Duke, and
especially the Duchess, sympathised with
fascism before and during World War II,
and had to remain in the Bahamas to min-
imise their opportunities to act on those
feelings.

Roles

Casting of the other major roles in the
movie — Edward VIII and Adolf Hitler —
has yet to be announced.

The movie would be the first major the-
atrical release for the subject matter,
although many made-for-television ver-
sions have been produced over the years.

These television films include “The
Woman I Love” (1972); “Edward and Mrs
Simpson” (1978, a seven-part mini-series);
“The Woman He Loved” (1988); “Wallis
and Edward” (2005).



NS

Now Available on all 2008 Almera’s
Great on Gas! 4 Cylinder, 1.6L Engine Excellent Air
Condition, Power Windows, Locks & Side Mirrors, Drivers Air
Bag, Keyles Entry with Immobilizer Alarm System & Lots
More Options

NOW $17,995

ALMERA
ELITE MOTORS LTD. SANPIN MOTORS LIMITED *7
#289 Wulf Road
PO, Box NAO
L242] Idee? [/242) 29RD BE

——~ hy
SHIFT _the way you move enna,
—

COMMONWEALTH BARS

Thompson Blvd. « Qakes Field
t. 242.326.6377" £ 242,326.6315
&, sanpin@coralbwave.com

INSURANCE AVAILABLE 1TH
ADVANTAGE INSLIRA RCE
BROKERS & AGENTS. LTD.


PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Reachout Outreach Lowell Mortimer wins Lady

Sassoon Golden Heart Award

Ministry aiming to —
make a difference |

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — The Reachout Outreach Ministry aims to make
a positive difference in the lives of hundreds of young men on ;

Grand Bahama.

Co-founder Dudley Seide said the ministry plans to launch a
mentoring programme for young boys and establish a half-way :

facility for troubled young men who want to change their lives.

Mr Seide said the goal is to reach out to those vulnerable
young men in society and inspire them to be godly men of prin- :

ciple.

involved in criminal activities and going to prison.

“We have a lot of young men who have problems with identi- i
ty and we want to expose them to positive role models through }

our mentoring programme,” he said.

Last Saturday, Reachout Outreach Ministry kicked off its
mentoring programme by hosting a “Boys to Men” conference at }
Calvary Temple Church for some 600 young men throughout :

Grand Bahama.

Conference

The conference was held under the theme “Transforming our

youth through Godly Principle.”

Mr Seide said many prominent men in the community partic-
ipated in the conference, including Assistant Commissioner of }
Police Marvin Dames and MPs Kwasi Thompson and Kenneth ;

Russell, who encouraged the young men to be good citizens.

He thanked the business community and religious leaders
who also supported the event, including Grand Bahama busi- }

nessman Havard Cooper.

Mr Seide said the ministry is focusing its attention particular-
ly on inner-city children of single-parent families in the Garden }
Villas and Columbus Drive areas, as well as the Hawksbill com- }

munity.

“We want to provide positive role models for our young men
to emulate and it was just overwhelming to see so many of them

come out on Saturday,” he said.

“We honoured Mr Havard Cooper who is a very successful
businessman, but he is also a man of God and man of principle

and we want our young men to aspire to that.

“We started this ministry one year ago, but the lives we touched
in that one year, (it) is unbelievable and I am happy to see we are }
said }

making a difference and changing lives in Grand Bahama,”
Mr Seide.

Co-founder Elmor Smith said he made many mistakes as a
teenager and missed out on many opportunities. He does not }

want other young men to follow in his footsteps.

“I was dealing drugs at age 14 and I had opportunities to
receive athletic scholarships to play football and run track, but I }
threw it all way and decided to deal drugs and went to prison,” he }

said.

down,” said Mr Smith.

He said that many young men are ruining their lives by getting

“T have given my life to the Lord and I felt the need to give
back and help transform the lives of our young men ina positive
way. I don’t want them to go down the same path that I went ;

A LOCAL businessman
and philanthropist was this
year’s winner of the Lady
Sassoon Golden Heart
Award at the Annual Heart
Ball on Valentine’s Day
held at the Sheraton Nassau
Beach Resort.

Lowell Mortimer, the
award recipient, is the son
of Ulric Jason Mortimer and
Winifred Caroline Mortimer
of the famous Mortimer’s
Candies.

Chairman of the Sir Vic-
tor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation R E
Barnes said that once again
many worthy Bahamians
were nominated for the
Golden Heart Award, but
that Mr Mortimer had stood
out in the crowded field.

“The Golden Heart
Award goes to a member of
our community who gives of
themselves selflessly for the
betterment of their fellow
man,” said Mr Barnes.

“It is the people’s award,
as the nominations come
from the public.”

Support

In response to receiving
his award, Mr Mortimer
thanked all who came to
support him and asked these
persons to stand. His sup-
porters included Dr Keva
Bethel, Dr Gail Saunders
and Minister of State for
Health and Social Develop-
ment Loretta Butler-Turn-
er.

Mrs Turner said that it is
important to support such a
worthy cause which benefits
children, particularly those
less fortunate suffering with
heart problems.

She said she felt Mr Mor-
timer was an excellent
choice for a nominee.

The eighth of ten children,
Mr Mortimer said he comes
from a “sweet tradition”,
having grown up around the

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini,
Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Banamian
beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a
plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and

operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

oes

Rew OPPORTUN ms

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire a qualified professional

individual for the following position:

DIRECTOR OF RESORT OPERATIONS

Seeking effective communicator with strong leadership and interpersonal skills. This
individual will develop strategy and execution plans to include revenue generation,
financial performance, growth and development, recruitment and staff development.
Solid background in operations, sales, and marketing and financial management is

required.

Job responsibilities include:

Assist inthe development of short andlong range plans for performance and profitability
of designated segment. Focus to be placed not only on fiscal responsibility but also
culture development for seasonal and regular employees. Understands managing the

bottom line.

* Oversee management of resort property including adherence to budget and

compliance with all operating processes.
Recruit and develop local staff.

Work effectively with corporate capabilities (development, marketing, Human
Resources, Finance, IT and Legal) working with district fo execute on strategies,



identify opportunities/issue and ensure goals are achieved.

Ensure that company culture is developed and grown to support overall

corporate objectives.
Perform other duties as assigned.

Requirements:
Bachelor degree/diploma in business or related field.



5 or more years experience in management.
Mega Marina Management knowledge required

We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive compensation.

5 or more years experience of overseas resort management

For full

consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resumé to the
attention of DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES AND TRAINING
at CRolle@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.





LOWELL MORTIMER (LEFT) receives his award from Chairman of the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)

Heart Foundation R E Barnes.

family’s candy business.

He attended St John’s
College, Bethune Cookman,
Temple University and
received his law degree in
London in 1972.

He returned to Nassau to
practice law and worked at
several local law firms,
including Christie, Ingraham
and Co, Darrell Rolle and
Co and Cash, and Fountain
and Co, before starting his
own firm, Mortimer and Co
in 1996.

It was many years after,
that Mr Mortimer became
interested in helping those
less fortunate than himself.
A family friend, Gwen
McDeigan, had a mentally
challenged child and he
wanted to help her out. This
encouraged him to join the
Bahamas Association for
the Mentally Retarded in
1964.

He helped in just about
every capacity with the
Association, including as
president.

He is also a founding

member of Abilities Unlim-
ited and has served there as
a director and secretary. He
worked closely with former
Golden Heart Award win-
ner David Smalley in getting
this organisation up and
going.

Mr Mortimer is also active
with the Bahamas AIDS
Foundation, where he has
served as vice-president,
director and chairman, and
also worked in a fundrais-
ing capacity.

Restoration

He actively supports the
Beaux Arts Ball and has
been chairman of their ball
committee for fundraising
to help with the restoration
of the Dundas Centre. He
has also been a supporter of
the James Catalyn and
Friends Theatrical Group.

Additionally, Mr Mor-
timer is a founding member
of the local chapter of the
Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

re

2 Sanpin Motors Ltd.
= re Owned Department

a Your Fast Lane to

= Vehicle Purchasing

a ieee it,

a owaee.. Sa nee ee =

=



o
=



== Comejor on: in downgand=visit-us us =
at OF me iemorlinetier oungpecial ~
i _,,

oe NoHagglephric

= Constant Everyday low Prices!

= www.preownedbahama
Thompson Blvd. Ph325-0881/2 Fax: 3

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZU



i:
ing” A









better known as the Pi Xi
Chapter of the Omega Psi
Phi Fraternity.

His father supported the
YWCA for years and when
he died in 1980, Mr Mor-
timer took up his father’s
post with that organisation.

He has served as a trustee
for the YWCA and provided
free legal advice for them
for years.

He serves as Honourary
Consul for the Republic of
Turkey and is also chairman
of the Christ Church Cathe-
dral Endowment Trust and a
member of the vestry.

Mr Mortimer said he was
truly honoured to receive
this prestigious award and
he thanked the Heart Foun-
dation and his many friends
for their support.

The Heart Ball is the
major fundraiser for the Sir
Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation, which
provides support for chil-
dren.

Additionally, the Founda-
tion works in conjunction
with the Bahamas Heart
Association to educate and
inform Bahamians about
heart care and healthy heart
lifestyles.

The Lady Sassoon Gold-
en Heart Award is named in
honour of the late Lady
Evelyn Sassoon, who estab-
lished the Foundation in
memory of her late husband,
Sir Victor Sassoon.

The deadline for nomina-
tions is normally the third
Monday in January of each
year.

1ONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN RIA SUZURI



as.com
325-0883



=39000 IHAZNS BIH
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 7



KWIB welcomes its first

official teenage members

”
a
~—
o
=
=
o
=
~
oO
—
=
o
a



STUDENTS OF C W SAWYER PRIMARY perform a dance entitled ‘Splash from the Past’ which was

choreographed by Shaketra Knowles.

Students take to the stage

in “Talent Splash 2009’

PRE-SCHOOL, primary and secondary school students last week displayed their talents at the
Department of Education southwestern district's “Talent Splash 2009.” The event was held at the

Holy Trinity Activity Centre in Stapledon Gardens.



F ‘at ate hal i
PICTURED FROM LEFT viewing the performances, including song, dance and skits, are Olga Richards,

southwestern district superintendent; Lionel Sands, acting director of Education and Elma Garraway,

permanent secretary.

@) :

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

LEARN ABOUT YOUR ROLE AS RESEARCHERS

Attend this historical
College of The Bahamas School
of Education [SEDUC]
Conference 2009 focusing on
Teachers As Researchers!
Wednesday, Feb. 18th - Friday,
Feb. 20th, 2009
Registration fee - $50.00
(Public school teachers see
principals for MOED suport)
Reduced fee for COB students
(see SEDLUC office)
Registration Forms are available at
School of Education, Michael H.
Eldon Complex, or online at:
educcontform=

For more info call: 397-2603

SEE YOU THERE!

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

EDUCATING & TRAINING B4HAMIANS

NINE Government
High School students
made their mark as the
first official teenage
members of the King-
dom Women In Business
organisation.

Already having Dia-
mond and Pearl mem-
berships available for
women, KWIB_ has
dubbed it’s teen mem- |
bers the “OPALS”
(Opening and Preparing
Avenues for young
Ladies to Succeed).

The 10th grade girls got to meet and share their
career aspirations with some of the KWIB mem-
bers, including founder Melisa Hall, teen speaker
Cashena Thompson and core leaders Charlene
Paul, Deegenera Jones-Dixon and Arthia Nixon at
their school.

The girls will also be taking part in KWIB’s
annual conference to be held this year at the
British Colonial Hilton Hotel from February 26 to
February 28.

During the conference, the students will have a
special session featuring pageant director Michelle
Malcolm, Mrs Jones-Dixon, Ms Thompson and
Yvette Strachan, who will cover a broad range of
timely topics for today’s teenage girls.

Anja Farquharson, GHS guidance counsellor,
expressed her thanks to KWIB for not only invit-
ing the students, but for also garnering corporate



and individual sponsors to
cover the cost of their
membership materials.
“We are so thrilled to
be launching our teen divi-
sion,” said Mrs Hall.

“We didn’t want them
to just come for a pep talk,
but have them actually
come, network and con-
nect with women who are
in the professions they
aspire to be in and meet
with their peers.

“At this age, we want
them to be on a great path to success and some of
the connections they make at this conference might
actually lead to their internships or jobs in the
future.”

Spearheading the OPALS is Mrs Jones-Dixon,
a youth advocate and teen motivational speaker.

“As a society we tend to complain a lot about
our young people, but we sit back and watch the
news and don’t do anything to prevent them from
making negative headlines,” she said.

“At KWIB we see the urgency for us to actual-
ly get physically involved in these young girls’ lives
and invest in their futures. Life is too short to
waste time being idle and not walking into your
purpose. Sure, we are businesswomen, but at the
same time we are big sisters trying to help our lit-
tle sisters avoid being statistics on lists that include
AIDS, teen pregnancy, drugs, domestic abuse and
the like.”

THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs

EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS

CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES
Personal Development - Spring Semester 012009

COURSE SECT COURSE

TIME DAY START |DUR |FEES

ll

ACCOUNTING
ACCAROO a
ACCARDT a
|AOCABOZ aT
BUSINESS
BUSROo

BUSSE) 01 CREMT 4 COLLECTIONS &
CUSTSO0 on
ASEH

TSMo00

ACCCOUNTIAMGS FOR BEGINNERS |
ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS II

ACCOUNTING FOR BEGINNERS Ill

: _ ee

6:0Gor-O:00pm TuesiThunt?-Feb | oavks $278
6:08 -00pm Huestis Path 1Oves | 5300

ser oa

‘SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE Ww

P~ Femeomans papain oro
THME & STRESS MANAGEMENT WG |S ater4aadpm Fi a pap

COMPUTERS

COMPSO4 a
COMPa7
COMPO
COMPS 1 1 QUICKBOOKS
COMPSaD 11 WEE PAGE DESIGN Wis |

COMPS341

COSMETOLOGY
COsMags

COSMans

DECORATING

DECK Bo0

(COMPUTER APPLICATIONS |

f00pm-5:00pm Mon

a

ee eee
RKETEOAA DING Aig BOtpm Thur lll il hana

fom 8:00pm Tues

O:30am-4:30pm ThurFri

wes
cay

a1 WEE PAGE DESION Wie II O:3hem-4:30pm (That! F ri eee ae ee

6: 00om-3:00pm MoniWved 24-feb

FLORBOD

SCHEDULE

Wednesday Feb. 18th & &:30p.m.

+ Oficial Gontaranca Opening
National Ganbre tor the Pertorming Arts,
East Shiney Street
* Featuring 4 Tribute to Mrs. Shela Seymour
(Foomer Chair - SBDLA
* Exhibited Works of 2007-2008 SEDUG
shudents - OPEN TO ALL

Thursday Feb. 18h @ dau, - 3520p.m.
Michael 4. Ekfon Complex
* Conéerence Aegetration Continues
2:00am = 12:30pum, Conference Sessions
Featured international quest speckars:
Dr. Joyos Bainbridge, University of Alberta,
‘(Ganada and Dr. Jane Haren,
University of Virginia
9:30 = 230p.m. Workshop Sessions

Friday Feb, 20¢h @ Se0Oa.mn. - Sino,
National Gantre tor the Partorming Arts
£:O0a.m. - 11500e.m. Pane Discussion
“Current Issues in Education:
What Arsearch Has To Do tWeth ih*
14:15a.m. = 1:15p.m. - Research
a Competition Awards
00pm. - S2Spun - Dramatic Production
by College of The Bahamas SEDUC sbudents
focusing on “Teachers as Researchers”
Conferenon Close

SEWa02

EDICAL

1 INTERIOR DECORATING | fior- flip Tues oe ae $225
FLORAL DESIGN | G:or-feltipm Mon pe per

LORSAL DESKSM

tks tH20
2 dye $00
UMN FESOURCE MANAGEMENT | G:00pm-&:00pm (Thur

“Feb |1Owks $260

ee
Slang ot ASK: OF FREEHAND CUTTING | 6: O0pm-S: 00pm po Peres

AASIC OF FREEHAND CUTTING Il) = &:00pm-S:00pm pas ere ae t250

EDC AL TERMINGILOGY Aiipm-S opm ie sill as $225

EMOGUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 2268714 | (242) 328-0063 / 328-1956 f 08-4900 eat. 8201
or email: perdevg@ocb.edu.bs

CONFERENCE 2009 N

AU fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one tine},

CARS nanweaer Nee hi to cinreee Tattios, Fees, Conrer Content, Cowert Seieduie and Corse Moreriaty


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Patrons flock to |
Annual Heart Ball

MORE than 500 patrons gathered in the Independence
Ballroom of the Sheraton Nassau to raise funds for chil-
dren with heart disease at the 45th Annual Heart Ball —
the major fundraiser for the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas)
Heart Foundation.

Heart Ball Committee co-chair Portia Nottage said,
“The Foundation is grateful and thankful to all who have
helped to make this event a success. We look forward to
your continued support as we help to repair children’s
hearts, one child at a time”.

The committee for the Heart Ball promised an evening
of fun, elegance, dancing, prizes and surprises. Guests
thoroughly enjoyed the 45th Annual Heart Ball, which was
held on Valentine’s Day under the theme “Taking care of
our future — Fixing little hearts.

Music was provided by the Ed Brice Orchestra, the SG
Band and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Dinner
Band.

The silent auction featuring more than 20 items, was also
a great success.

The most coveted auction items for the night were a
four-day stay at Echo Valley in British Columbia; round-
trip tickets to anywhere in Canada; a mahogany pool
table with matching cabinets; signed Chan Pratt prints, and
a Tiffany & Co necklace set donated by John Bull.

Raffle

The room raffle was a resounding success as well. The
top winner was Andy Fowler, who won two round-trip
World Traveller Plus tickets donated by British Airways;
a diamond necklace and earring set donated by Colombian
Emeralds International; a framed print “Ocean Colours”
by John Paul; a free basic home alarm system installation
compliments of SSI, and a wellness assessment donated by
the Family Medicine Centre.

Second prize winner Kyron Strachan won the hand-
coloured lithograph “Red Coral” from Bamboo Bamboo,
Lyford Cay; an amethyst and citrine bracelet from M
Fondas Jewellers, Lyford Cay; a Vietnamese lacquer box
donated by an anonymous donor; a Motorola cellular
phone from BTC, and a three-day, two-night stay in Ben-
nett’s Harbour at Sammy T’s Resort, Cat Island.

Third prize winner Edison Darville won a 19” Toshiba
flat screen television from SAVECO; a whole body scan,
digital mammogram and coronary calcium score donated
by the Centreville Medical Pavilion - Dr Conville Brown;
a 18 kt yellow gold and blue enamel shell ring from Coin
of the Realm, and a Moyna beaded evening bag donated
by Marcie Bond, Lyford Cay.

The Ballroom was decorated by Symone’s Baskets of
Happiness, Therez McKenzie. Table favours were pro-
vided by Maria Antoinette Special Events; Pasion Tea;
Island Merchant; Island Rose; Bahama Sol; Botani Bath,
and Bacardi and Co.

The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas) Heart Foundation
was established in 1961 to assist persons with heart disease.
Today, the Foundation’s main goal is to assist children
who suffer from heart disease.

Donations are accepted throughout the year to help
this cause.

Police officer accused
of bribery testifies

FROM page one

Rock Magistrate’s Court on February 14
and asked Lewis to give him $3,000 not to
show up in court.

Lewis testified that he had given Martin
$1,500 on one occasion and $1,000 at anoth-
er time.

Officer Martin told the court that he was
arrested for bribery around 9.30am on Sep-
tember 12, 2007, at the Fish Fry in Eight
Mile Rock.

Before his arrest, Martin said he was at
the Fish Fry waiting for the Eight Mile
Rock Magistrate’s Court to open when a
burgundy coloured vehicle pulled up and
the passenger called out to him.

As he walked toward the vehicle, he said
an object was thrown through the window
at him. When he picked up the object, he
said two DEU officers arrested him for
bribery.

Mr Shurland asked Martin whether he
knew what the object was. He replied that
it was ten $100 notes balled up.

Officer Martin was wearing his police
uniform at the time of his arrest. He said he
was taken to the Eight Mile Rock Police
Station and denied his right to speak with a
lawyer.

Martin said he did not know Lewis, but
saw him on occasions in the West End area.

He said Lewis was using obscene lan-
guage at the Coffee on the Bay Sports Bar
in West End on February 5.

He called officers for assistance and
Lewis was arrested.

Martin said Lewis offered him money to
not show up in court. He said he rejected
Lewis’s offer.

He appeared in court on April 30 as
required. He also went to court on July 18,
but said he was not feeling well and asked
the magistrate if he could be excused. The
matter was then adjourned to December
12, 2007.

Prosecutor Williams asked Martin to tell
the court when Lewis offered him money,
but he said he could not recall.

When asked if he reported to police that
Lewis tried to bribe him, officer Martin
said he did not report it.

The trial continues Tuesday.

Man is injured in
downtown shooting

FROM page one

this happens and they don’t
want to come here. They don’t
feel safe.

“We can’t afford for guests
to go home and tell their family
and friends they stayed in a
hotel and there was a shoot-out.

“People won’t want to come
to the Bahamas on vacation.”

Harry Pikramenos, also a part
owner in El] Greco, said prob-
lems have been emanating from
the nearby building for years.
However, it was compounded
when the nightclub was estab-
lished about three months ago.

“We don’t really object to
people doing business, but that’s
not doing business,” he said.
“Tt’s attracting riff-raff outside
our front door.”

Keith Aranaj, owner of the
Mayfair building on the corner

of Bay and Augusta Streets,
said the club has a licence to
operate nightly until 4am.

He said: “Since the nightclub
opened people have com-
plained about the noise and I
can't blame them for that, but
they should talk to the woman
who rents the place, and they
should come to some under-
standing.

“If the police say close it
down then fine, close it down.

“T can’t do anything until she
violates her lease, so it depends
on what the police do.”

Mr Aranaj denied any knowl-
edge of prostitutes returning to
the building or soliciting in the
street in recent months.

He said he understands the
women living in the building

have work permits and are not
prostitutes, but he does not
know what work they do.
Assistant Commissioner
Hulan Hanna said: “We don’t
know at this point what con-
nection the shooting would
have with any other activity in
the area, but we are following
significant leads as to who may
have carried out the shooting.”

Four years for Haitian boat captain
in connection with drug seizure

FROM page one

wholesale street value of $5 million.

Blanc was sentenced to four years on each
charge. The sentences are to run concurrently.
Blanc was also ordered to be deported after he
serves his sentence.

Ernst Petit-Homme, 32, Jean Marc Pierre, 43
and Dennis Placide, 52, Meckly Mazard, 28, and
Simeon Monestine, 39, who were charged with
Blanc have been remanded to Her Majesty's

Prison and are expected to stand trial on July
15.

Alexandre Jean, 50, Landaize Lessage, 45,
Olindieu Pierre, 33, Robenson Francois, 39, Rod-
ly Jean, 19, and Marie Slyvida Davilmar, 47, who
are alleged to have been on the first vessel on
which $8 million worth of cocaine was seized,
pleaded not guilty to the drug charges during
their arraignment yesterday and were remanded
to Her Majesty's Prison. They are expected back
in court today at 2 pm. They are represented by
lawyer Murrio Ducille.

Man charged with murder

FROM page one

accused of breaking into the
home of Theophilus Knowles
on Friday, March 14. It is
alleged that while armed with
a silver handgun he attempted

to rob Theophilus Knowles.
Bowleg, who was repre-
sented by attorney
Willie Moss, was not required
to enter a plea to the charges.
A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether
there is sufficient evidence

against Bowleg for him to
stand trial in the Supreme
Court.

The preliminary inquiry is
set to open on March 27.

Bowleg has been
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison.

ON-THE-SPOT FINANCING

Land Cruiser Prado 4 X 4

three engine options: 2.7L 4 cyl,
4.0L V6 or 3.0L turbo diesel

automatic transmission with overdrive
power windows, locks & mirrors
Smiter

immobiliser and remote keyless entry
alloy wheels and full size spare

ABS brakes

dual airbags

CD player

elt lM am CeO OR Rielle mts leeoL i





EXECUTIVE
MOTORS LTD

AUTHORISED TOYOTA DEALER

Available in Grand Bahama af Quality Auto Se

Open Mon to Fri am - 5:30pm
Sat Ram - |2noon

Tel: 397-1700

Se Ream IReRr te eri te Lita mar]

EC RCO au eur ried aa

ei ge da



ROP EO ee oe MB | Ba eee

French and
British subs
in collision

m@ By JOHN F. BURNS
c.2009 New York Times News Service

LONDON — In a freak accident, two submarines
carrying nuclear weapons, one French and the other
British, collided while submerged on operational
patrols in the Atlantic earlier this month, the British
and French defense ministries said Monday.

Both vessels returned damaged but otherwise safe
to their home ports, with the 250 crew members
abroad uninjured and with “no compromise to nuclear
safety,” the defense ministries said in terse state-
ments that appeared to have been agreed between the
nations. The reference appeared to cover the nuclear
reactors that power the submarines and the 16 ballistic
missiles carrying nuclear warheads that the British and
French vessels each routinely carry on patrols.

But military experts said the episode raised trou-
bling questions about the safety of ballistic-missile
submarines patrolling the oceans while hiding their
whereabouts even from NATO allies. They said that
agreements on “waterspace management,” requir-
ing NATO nations to advise each other of the where-
abouts of submerged submarines, did not include
vessels carrying ballistic missiles with nuclear war-
heads.

The collision spurred a fresh outcry from groups in
Britain and France that have demanded that the
nations scrap their nuclear arsenals, with representa-
tives saying that only chance had prevented a more
serious impact that could have sunk both vessels,
along with their missiles. The collision “could have
released vast amounts of radiation and scattered
scores of nuclear warheads across the seabeds,” said
Kate Hudson, the chairwoman of the Campaign for
Nuclear Disarmament, a long-established protest
group in Britain.

The collision of the vessels on the night of Feb. 3, at
a location neither nation disclosed, was described by
military experts in London and Paris as a million-to-
one occurrence, given the expanse of the oceans and
the low number of submarines carrying ballistic mis-
siles on patrol at any time from nations with such
vessels. Those nations include the United States, Rus-
sia and China, as well as Britain and France.

Just as startling, the experts said, was that the
French Defense Ministry appeared not to have known



PA, Chris Bacon, File/AP

=

IN THIS OCT. 25, 1992 file photo, sailors are seen
aboard the HMS Vanguard, in Holy Loch, Scotland.
Nuclear-armed submarines from Britain and France
collided deep under the Atlantic Ocean earlier this
month, causing damage to both vessels but releasing
no radioactivity, a British official said Monday, Feb. 16,
2009. The HMS Vanguard, Britain's first Trident class
nuclear-armed submarine, and the French Le Triom-
phant submarine, which was also carrying nuclear
missiles, both suffered minor damage.

in the immediate aftermath that its submarine, Le Tri-
omphant, had struck the British submarine, HMS
Vanguard. On Feb. 6, the ministry released a state-
ment in Paris saying that the French vessel had “col-
lided with an immersed object,” which it described as
probably a drifting cargo container, and that the sub-
marine’s sonar dome, located in its nose and crucial to
its ability to track other vessels, had been seriously
damaged.

Official confirmation of the collision came only
after a report of the episode appeared Monday in
The Sun a British tabloid newspaper. French offi-
cials said Monday they only realized that Le Triom-
phant had struck the British vessel after sending
inquiries to other navies about the deep-sea impact —
an admission that appeared to underline the extreme
secrecy NATO allies impose on the whereabouts of
their missile-carrying submarines.

The HMS Vanguard, which is 492 feet long, was
towed back to its home port at Faslane on the Firth of
Clyde, near Glasgow, Scotland, with “very visible
dents and scrapes,” according to the BBC. The simi-
larly-sized French submarine took three days after the
impact to return to its home port, at LTle Longue near
Brest, according to reports in the French news media.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



© GOLF __

Jolinson wins Pebble
without hitting a final shot

m@ PEBBLE BEACH, California

Dustin Johnson walked out the door and into the rain Monday
morning, still expecting to show up on the first tee with a four-shot lead
to play the final round at Pebble Beach, reports the Associated Press.

He won not with a big drive or a clutch putt, rather a phone call.

“Tt was Michael Letzig, one of my buddies out here,” Johnson said.
“IT was walking out the door to go have breakfast. He called to con-
gratulate me and I didn’t know what he was talking about.”

Some 40 hours after hitting his last shot of the tournament, Johnson
won the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am when rain washed out
the final round for the second straight day.

Pebble Beach received nearly 1 1/2 inches of rain, enough to create
a tiny river in one fairway and produce puddles on most of the greens.
It was the first rain-shortened tournament on the PGA Tour in near-
ly three years, and the first 54-hole event at Pebble Beach since the late
Payne Stewart also hit the winning shot on Saturday in 1999.

And it was historic for at least one reason.

“T’ve never won a tournament in tennis shoes,” said Johnson, who
came to the course to collect his trophy, thank the rain-soaked volun-
teers and grasp the timing of his great week, even if he only got in three
rounds. The victory was the second in his last nine starts, and it puts him
in the conversation with a growing cast of rising stars. The 24-year-old
Johnson joins Anthony Kim as the only players under 25 with multiple
PGA Tour victories.

He moved up to No. 45 in the world, putting him into the 64-man
field at the Accenture Match Play Championship next week. More
importantly — at least for a guy who grew up less than an hour away
from Augusta National — it earned Johnson a trip to the Masters. He
has had a few offers to play the course, but each time turned it down.

“T just really wanted to be in the tournament before I went and
played it,” he said. Johnson finished at 15-under 201 and earned $1.098
million. The winning round came at Poppy Hills on Saturday, when
Johnson overpowered the five par 5s with birdies on all of them — he
had three eagle attempts — and shot a 67. That gave him a four-shot
lead over Mike Weir, who would have been playing in the final group
at Pebble for the second time in four years.

None of this would have seemed possible to Johnson eight years ago.

According to a story published two weeks ago in Golf World mag-
azine, Johnson was suspended from his high school golf team for skip-
ping classes as he struggled to cope with his parents’ divorce.

Then came an incident that nearly cost him much more.

Intimidated by Steve Gillian, a menacing older brother of one of his
friends, Johnson was among five kids involved in the break-in of a
house, where someone took a gun. Johnson says he stayed in the car
during the burglary, but he was there. According to appellate court doc-
uments, Johnson then was persuaded, reluctantly, to buy bullets for the
gun. Later that month in 2001, Gillian was charged with murder after
shooting the victim multiple times in the head. Because of the loose con-
nection to the crime, Johnson had to pay restitution for the theft and
agree to testify at the murder trail.

Gillian is serving life without parole.

“T always knew I wanted to play on the PGA Tour,” Johnson said.
“Eight years ago, however long ago that was, I couldn’t see myself being
here. But after I got through all that stuff, I went on to play golf at
Coastal Carolina. And coach (Allen) Terrell helped me a bunch.”

The victory at Pebble comes nearly three weeks after the Probation,
Pardon and Parole Services Board of South Carolina granted Johnson
a full pardon relating to his guilty plea in the second-degree burglary
case. And with his second tour victory, Johnson is ready to see how far
he can go.

It took Johnson only 36 starts to record his second tour victory,
compared with 42 tournaments for Kim and 87 for Camilo Villegas.

“Obviously, I’ve proved myself to be just as good as they are,”
Johnson said. “Anthony is a great player. He’s a good friend of mine,
and he’s done great things in the last two years. Just to be mentioned
with them is an honor. I’m just looking forward to the rest of the year
and proving myself a little more.”

BUTCH

CRICKET: ENGLAND VS WEST INDIES, 3RD TEST





=e it

ie _ cae
ENGLAND'S BOWLER S$





teve Harmison, right, celebrat



a

after taking the



WEST INDIES' cricket
captain Chris Gayle
defends his wicket
during the second day
of the third cricket Test
match against England
at the Antigua

Recreation Ground in
St. John's, Monday,
Feb. 16, 2009. England
declared their first
innings at 566 for nine
| and West Indies reach

| 55-1 at close of day

two.

PHOTOS: Andres
Leighton/
AP Photo





wicket of West Indies’ captain Chris Gayle, left, who was caught by team-
mate James Anderson for 30 runs, during the second day of the third crick-
et Test match at the Antigua Recreation Ground in St. John's, Monday, Feb.
16, 2009. England declared their first innings at 566 for nine.

ENGLAND'S BATSMAN Paul Collingwood points with his bat to the pavil-
ion while celebrating his century during the second day of the third crick-
et Test match against the West Indies at the Antigua Recreation Ground
in St. John's, Monday, Feb. 16, 2009.

ENGLISH SOCCER: FA CUP
Eduardo makes dream return to send Arsenal into Sth rount

m@ By FRANK GRIFFITHS
LONDON

Eduardo da Silva scored twice in his
return to Arsenal after a nearly one-year
layoff caused by a broken leg, leading the
Gunners over Cardiff 4-0 Monday night
and into the fifth round of the FA Cup,
reports the Associated Press.

Eduardo scored in the 20th minute with a
header off a cross from Carlos Vela, then
beat goalkeeper Tom Heaton with a penal-
ty kick in the 60th after he was brought
down by Gavin Rae.

After the first goal, Eduardo ran toward
acorner, fell to his knees and smiled before
being teammates enveloped him. Arsenal
fans erupted into celebrations and sang
Eduardo’s name.

“Of course everybody is happy for him
but I believe it was a good team perfor-
mance, dynamic, convincing, mobile, with
the kind of game we love to play,” Arsenal
manager Arsene Wenger said. “Eduardo
played a big part in that and everybody is, of
course, pleased for him tonight.”

The 25-year-old forward’s left fibula was
broken and ankle dislocated during a tack-

KERZNER

SUMMIT FOUNDATION

Open to public starting on

Saturdays Feb 21

le by Birmingham’s Martin Taylor last Feb.
23. Eduardo played his first official game
after that last Wednesday, setting up the
go-ahead goal for Croatia in a 2-1 exhibition
win over Romania.

In the fourth-round replay, Arsenal also
got goals from Nicklas Bendtner in the 33rd
minute and Robin van Persie in the 88th.
Van Persie entered in the 67th for Eduardo,
who left with a slightly strained hamstring.

The Gunners host Burnley in the fifth
round on March 7 or 8, with the winner
meeting Sheffield United or Hull in the
sixth round.

Ht BiG DER CHE

Phone number 363-0626
Ages 7-18 years.
Parents must accompany
under 14 years

PT OF? OF THE OH -BMDOE AND OOATINUE WEST Tt
UNTE Fou AXAIVE AD THE TEA CEA TEA POR

Hours of operation
Tuesday-Saturday 9-5pm

Parents must sign waiver for
all climbers


PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORT

S



SPORTS



@ GOLF

Georgette Rolle tees off for

first tournament of year

caked

OO CO Made LMM OU pm re) celluicm ae) te

BASKETBALL: HUGH CAMPBELL TOURNAMENT
Government Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominate

Mark Knowles
rules out Davis
Cup travel

FROM page 11

still ranked at number two in
the ATP World Tour Doubles
Team Rankings with 1,335
points. The list is headed by
Australian Open champions
Bob and Mike Bryan with 2,295.

Knowles’ former partner
Daniel Nestor of Canada and
his Nemad Zimonjic of Serbia,
won their first title on Sunday at
the ABN Amro World Tennis
Tournament in Rotterdam, The
Netherlands.

Knowles said it was gratifying
win for them since they didn’t
do that well at the Australian
Open. But he admitted that he’s
not too concerned about Nestor
and Zimonjic.

“They’re one of the toip
teams in the world, so I expect
them to be right there at the end
of the year,” Knowles stated.
“But we’re not friends at all, so
I’m really going to talk about
him anymore.”

With the schedule ahead of
him, Knowles has opted not to
travel with the national team to
Paraguay for the first round of
the American Zone II Davis
Cup tie.

“The hardest part for me was
the schedule and playing on the
red clay in Paraguay,” Knowles
stressed. “T have a pretty hectic
schedule and I probably would
not have arrived in Paraguay
until the Wednesday before the
doubles is played on Saturday.

“So the preparation didn’t
allow me to be an assess to the
team. But I think the guys can
pull through and if they do, I
will be available for the second
round, as long as the guys want
me and I can help the team.”

The team, captained by John
Farrington, will be made up of
Devin Mullings, Timothy Neely,
Bjorn Munroe and Marvin
Rolle. The team is scheduled to
leave on Friday, February 27,
but it’s not known if Munroe
will travel with them due to the
death of his younger brother
Lavaughn in a traffic accident
on Sunday.

Tennis in mourning
FROM page 11

made the Davis Cup team in
1999 with Mark Knowles and
Mark Merklein when the
Bahamas hosted Canada at the
National Tennis Center in July.

Canada won the match 4-1
with Munroe losing in a reverse
singles match 6-1, 6-3 to Fred-
eric Niemeyer.

In September that same year
when the Bahamas traveled to
Caracas, Venezuela, Munroe
again teamed up with Knowles
and Merklein.

As the Bahamas won the tie
3-1 to remain in Zone One,
Munroe didn’t play.

Then in 2002 when the
Bahamas traveled to Ecuador
the Americas Group One rele-
gation tie, Munroe traveled with
his brother BJ, Mullings and
Dentry Mortimer.

The Bahamas was blanked 5-
0 and were relegated to Zone II
in 2003. Munroe played in the
second match, losing 6-3, 6-3,
6-0 to Luis Morejon.

Although he had stopped
playing competitively to make
another national team, Munroe
was working with a number of
the young tennis players in
Grand Bahama. Munroe’s
lessons were conducted at the
CA Smith Park, but his dream,
according to his mother, was to
construct a Tennis Academy
and they will be pursuing that
goal as they keep his memory
alive.

May his soul rest in peace.

FROM page 11

that gave his team a 25-5 advantage with 4:42 left in the half.

Denis, the lone starter to log significant minutes in the second, fin-
ished with 19 points to lead all scorers.

He ended the half on a 4-0 run, with consecutive steals and lay-ups
to give his team a 35-18 advantage headed into the third quarter.

The Rattlers came out just as aggressive in the second half led by
Rashad Sturrup who finished in the open court and followed with a steal
and three point play on the ensuing possession.

With his team leading 44-25, Drew Rolle stripped Cougars’ point
guard Kendal Simmons at half court and finished with a dunk to put his
team ahead by 21.

The basket triggered a 16-3 run, capped by a pair of free throws by
Denis just before the end of the third.

The Rattlers outscored the Cougars 25-10 in the third quarter to take
a 60-28 lead into the fourth.

With the reserves going the distance in the final period the Rattlers
scored just six points the rest of the way.

Ramano King scored on consecutive tip ins on the offensive glass ear-
ly in the quarter, but the Cougars outscored the Rattlers 14-2 thereafter.

Rolle finished with 11 points, while King, Sturrup and Denirado Mott
added eight points apiece.

Rashad Woodside led the Cougars with 15 points, Stephen Rolle
added 12 and Kareem Thompson finished with 10.

The Rattlers will advance to tonight's evening session at 9pm when
they will face the winners of this afternoon's matchup between R.M.
Bailey Pacers and Teleos Cherubims.

The Cougars, relegated to the loser’s bracket will face the loser of the
Pacers/Cherubims matchup, Thursday at 7pm.

DDJ Mystic Marlins - 49
NCA Crusaders - 34

The defending GSSSA runners up shrugged off a sluggish start and
overcame a half-time deficit in the first game of the tournament.

In a low scoring affair, the Crusaders led 6-5 after the opening quar-
ter and 17-14 at the half.

The Mystic Marlins completely turned the game around in the sec-
ond half, as the outscored the Crusaders 35-17 in the third and fourth
quarters.

A 14 point third quarter, led by four points each from Charles
Walker and Prince Pinder, in a quarter where they limited the Cru-
saders to five, gave the Mystic Marlins a 28-22 lead.

Walker, who finished with 12 points, scored eight in the final period
as the Mystic Marlins opened their first double figure margin of the
afternoon.

Pinder finished with 12 while Patrick Brice added six.

Leonardo Ferguson led the Crusaders with nine points while Trevor
Adderley added seven.

The Mystic Marlins will advance to today’s evening session to face
the winner of this afternoon’s matchup between the Church of God
Academy Flames and the Queen’s College Comets.

The Crusaders, relegated to the loser’s bracket will face the loser of
the Flames/Comets matchup, Thursday at 6pm.

CV Bethel Stingrays - 56
St. Anne's Blue Waves - 26

The Stingrays, fresh off the season's biggest win in the GSSSA reg-
ular season finale which vaulted them into the playoffs, continued
their momentum with a dominating performance to open up the tour-
nament.

After a slim 12-9 lead after the first, the Stingrays held the Blue
Waves without a field goal for the entire second quarter.

The struggling Blue Waves only points came from the free throw line
when Gordan Ferguson converted a pair with 2:30 left to play in the
quarter. The Stingrays led 30-11 at the half.

The third produced much of the same as the Stingrays outscored the
Blue Waves 14-8 in the third to take a 44-19 lead into the final period.

C.V. Bethel dominated the final period led by Pateico Leadon who
scored eight of his team leading 16 points in the fourth quarter.

Dustin McKenzie and Travis Dawkins added eight points apiece.

Ferguson led Blue Waves with 12 points.

The Stingrays advance to face the winners of last night’s St. John’s
College/C.R. Walker Knights matchup, today at 5:30pm



DENIRADO MOTT is fouled on his way
to the basket against the C.W. Saunders
Cougars yesterday. Mott finished with
eight points off the bench in the Rat-
tlers’ 66-52 win

PHOTOS: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DREW ROLLE finishes a fastbreak with
a dunk in the Rattlers opening day win
of the Hugh Campbell Invitational.

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

GEORGETTE Rolle, still looking for
her break through on the Ladies Profes-
sional Golf Tour, will be teeing off today in
her first tournament for the year in in the
Sun Coast Ladies Series Developmental
Golf Tour.

Rolle, the only Bahamian entered in the
field of 33 players, will be in the first group
to tee off at 7:15 am. She is paired with
Jackie Gonzalez from Valencia, Venezucla
and Susan Choi from Natick, Ma.

In an interview as she arrived at the tour-
nament site at Errol Estates in Orlando,
Florida, Rolle said she’s eager to get on the
greens and make her presence felt.

“T came to win. That’s my goal,” said
Rolle, who has never played on the course.

But she’s confident that if she can get
“good ball striking, manage the course and
stay focus,” she should be able to achieve
her goal at the end of the tournament on
Thursday.

While the LPGA’s Futures Tour doesn’t
start until the end of March, Rolle hopes to
play in the Sun Coast Series to stay sharp.
The next series tournament is March 3-5,
followed by March 9-11 and finally March
17-19.

“So [’'m just going to play in these tour-



naments to get ready,” Rolle revealed.

But she noted that she’s been preparing at
school at Texas Southern University where
she’s practiced in the afternoons on her
game.

“T feel pretty confident and very eager
to begin,” said the biology undergraduate
major. “So once the tournament start, I
know that I will be ready.”

During the Christmas holiday when she
was home on a break, Rolle had indicated
that she was looking for a sponsor to help
her in her quest to crack the professional
barrier.

But even though there are some people
who have supported her in part, Rolle said
she’s still looking forward to a major spon-
sor to come through as it will take a con-
siderable amount of funds for her to play on
the tour.

She’s still encouraging the public to sup-
port her financially.

“T think if I can win a few of these tour-
naments, or at least place very high, it
should help my quest to get some funding,”
said Rolle, who has the opportunity to
become the first Bahamian female pro
golfer.

Rolle, 23, is a 2002 St. Augustine’s Col-
lege graduate who excelled in the Bahamas
Golf Federation’s Junior Programme before
she received an athletic scholarship to Texas
Southern.







GRESTWELL PRATT brings the ball upcourt for the C.V. Bethel Stingrays in their 56-26 win over the St. Ann
Blue Waves yesterday.



RASHAD WOODSIDE is fouled by a pair of C.1. Gibson Rattlers on
his way to the basket. Woodside finished with a team high 15
points for the C.W. Saunders Cougars in their 66-52 loss yes-
terday.

C.V. BETHEL’S Patieco Leadon scores two of his game
high 16 points on a finger roll in the Stingrays’ 56-26 win
over the St. Anne’s Blue Waves.


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17,




wl
val

Knowles rules
out travelling
with Davis
Cup team to
Paraguay

4

Mark Knowles



m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

WITH a hectic schedule
ahead of him, Mark Knowles
has announced that he will not
travel with the Davis Cup team
to Paraguay for the first round
of the American Zone II tie.

After taking a two-week
break from finishing as the run-
ners-up with Mahesh Bhupathi
from India in the Australian
Open, Knowles will be back in
action this week at the Regions
Morgan Keegan Championships
in Memphis, Tennessee.

But instead of teaming up
with Bhupathi, who is still in
India waiting for next week’s
tournament in Dubai, Knowles
will play with Mardy Fish from
the United States.

Seeded at number four, the
duo will play their first match
against the team of Christophe
Rochus from Belgium and Flo-
rent Serra from France.

“The expectations are pretty
high,” said Knowles of Fish,
whom he played with in Delray
Beach, Florida last year where
they made it to the semifinal.

“T’m coming off playing well
and he’s been playing well, so I
think we have the making of a
pretty good doubles team. So
it’s going to be exciting. He’s a
pretty good singles player and
doubles player. We get along
pretty well, so things should go
pretty good for us.”

Fish, ranked No.24 in the
world and No.3 in the United
States behind Andy Roddick
and James Blake in singles, is
coming off a 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 loss in
the final of the SAP Open in
San Jose, California on Sunday.

“The hardest part for him is
that he won’t have much time to
prepare, so our first round
match should be tricky,”
Knowles noted. “But we know
each other very well, so that
should help us.”

From Memphis Knowles will
travel to Dubai for the Barclays
Dubai Tennis Championships
that get started on Monday
where he will hook back up with
Bhupathi.

That will be followed by a
pair of ATP World Tour Mas-
ters 1000, starting on March 12
in Indian Wells, California and
in Miami, Florida from March
25.

“We're hoping to build on the
momentum that we got started
in Australia,” Knowles project-
ed about his partnership with
Bhupathi. “These are big weeks
for us, which are the biggest
tournaments outside of the
Grand Slam.”

Knowles and Bhupathi are

SEE page 10



Mardy Fish

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

| ESS than
two weeks

before the Bahamas
national team head to the
Americas Zone II Davis Cup
tie in Paraguay, members are
mourning the tragic death of
a former three-time member
and younger brother of their
current team-mate.

Lavaughn Munroe, 26, was
killed in a traffic accident in
the Lucaya area in Grand
Bahama on Sunday. His black
Mustang crashed into a large
tree on Midshipman Road
around 1 pm.

Munroe is the brother of
Bjorn Munroe, who has been
named by the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association to the four-
man team heading to Paraguay



2009

6G He was a very fun loving
guy who got along very
well with everybody.”

on February 27. BJ Munroe,
along with Devin Mullings,
Timothy Neely and Marvin
Rolle are due to travel with
captain John Farrington, a
week in advance to the tie,
scheduled for March 6-8. He
leaves behind his parents, Lor-
na and Patrick Munroe, anoth-
er brother, Parris, and a num-
ber of family members and
friends, including a group of
students whom he instructed
in tennis lessons.

“It’s really tragic,” said
Munnings, who noted that he

2

Devin Mullings

received the sad news on Sun-
day afternoon. “I want to wish
BJ and his family all of the
best. It was so sudden.

“But I know they are a
tough family and they will get
through this.”

While he played with
Lavaughn on the Davis Cup
team, Mullings said he never
got a chance to play against
him.

But as a Grand Bahamian
native, Mullings said he knew
he very well.

“He was a very fun loving



BADLY MISSED: Lavaughn Munroe

guy who got along very well
with everybody,” Mullings
reflected. “He had a strong
personality with a lot of chris-
ma.”

Mullings said he had a
chance to speak to BJ (who
was unavailable for comments)
and he offered him his condo-
lences. He extended it to the
rest of the family.

Also sending his condo-
lences was Mark Knowles from
Mepmhis, Tennessee where he
is preparing to play Mardy Fish
at the Regions Morgan Kee-
gan Championships this week.

BASKETBALL: HUGH CAMPBELL INVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT, DAY ONE

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

DREW ROLLE scores two of his 11 points in the Rattlers 66-52 win in yesterday's opening ses-
sion of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational.



m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

The nation’s most prestigious basketball tournament officially tipped
off yesterday at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium, with Government
Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominating each of the

“Tt’s tragic. We had a strong
relationship, having played
together on the Davis Cup
team,” Knowles pointed out.
“T also know BJ very well
because we played together
too.

“T know it’s going to be hard
for their family. But I want to
let them know that everything
will be alright. I want to give
them my condolences. My
prayers are with them.”

Lavaughn Munroe first

SEE page 10



three games in the opening session of the tournament.

Cl Gibson Rattlers — 66
CW Saunders Cougars — 52

The Rattlers built a two digit margin early and got an opportunity to

rest their starters for much of the second half for an opening day win.
CI Gibson began the game on a 10-0 run with a defense that held the

Cougars without a field goal for the first 3:17 of the game.

With the starters in the game for much of the first, the Rattlers led
18-2 at the end of the first quarter.
In the second, the lead reached 20 on a Junior Denis three pointer

SEE page 10
US SSS er | i

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST



ficnting, ALL ica

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

ealil

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Marine FORECAST



TT Sa NY































} = Today Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
/ | ee Vv = High Low W High Low W NASSAU Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
a vse, : - 0| 1 | 2\3 \4 [5 6 | 7/18 | gl10 FIC OFC F/C F/C Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
f in. ii. i al il Acapulco 88/31 70/21 s 88/31 73/22 S FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
‘ia : LOW | MODERATE | HIGH | V.HIGH | EXT = Amsterdam 43/6 36/2 r 39/3 34/1 ¢ Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
ORLANDO \ Ankara, Turkey 39/3 25/-3 ¢ 43/6 28/-2 © = ABACO _Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 1-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
High:68°F/20°C. Mostly sunny, breezy Clear and breezy. Breezy with bright Breezy with a full day Sunshine and patchy Mostly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens 50/10 40/4 pe 48/8 41/5 pe Wednesday: ENE at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
a ta A5° F/T°C - © and pleasant. sunshine. of sunshine. clouds. pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 74/23 63/17 sh 74/23 66/18 sh
; op la Hi h: 79° Hi h: 83° Hi h: 75° Hi h: 75° Bangkok 95/35 79/26 pc 95/35 79/26 c
li @ caine ae Ig : g " g é g 4 Barbados 84/28 75/23 pc 84/28 74/23 s '
TAMPA are High: 75 Low: 64 Low: 67 Low: 65 Low: 62 Low: 63 SS ES Barcelona 55/12 42/5 s 50/15 44/6 s So Eee
2 a ti} r, UCM AccuWeather RealFeel Beijing 32/0 23/-5 pc 36/2 27/-2 sn
High: 70° F/21°C as oe. 12°-63° F High Ht.(ft.) Low __Ht.(ft. Beirut 63/17 54/12 sh 63/17 59/15 c
Low: 45° F/7°C a. r The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines o effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:29 a.m. 2.3 7:48am. 05 Belgrade 36/2 33/0 sn 34/1 25/-3 sn
‘ r “ levati the h body— thing that effects h Id feels. Te tl flect the high and the low for the day. : :
@ elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day 1:39pm. 18 7:45pm. 0.3 Berlin 30/-1 24/6 pe 98/-2 19/-7 c
| a . 18 8:47pm. 0. Bogota 67/19 44/6 + 66/18 46/7 sh
5 lie Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Thursday an am. 23 O5lam. 05 Brussels 45/7 34/1 5 45/7 36/2 sh
_ ABACO Temperature 3:44pm. 19 9:48pm. 0.3 Budapest 32/0 25/-3 sn 30/-1 19/-7 sn
j be ese one one HIGH wassassdoaias-bstesiasadjessasts awtiosbeceuse 84° F/29° C : : Buenos Aires 93/33 72/22 s 93/33 73/22 s
. _ 1 Cr ore Low... ea rizec Friday em fousem og Cairo 66/18 50/10 s 74/23 67/19 po
c J ow: 55° F/1 Normal high... 77° F/25° CO Calcutta 92/33 69/20 s 92/33 66/18 s Denver,(m)
. r Normal low 64° F/18° C Calgary 26/-3 7/-13 pc 28/-2 14/-10 pc 48/21 | =
fA a @ WEST PALM BEACH —_ Last year's Hight ocsocsssseenensseseee 83° F/28° C SuN Ay Ty ify Cancun 81/27 66/18 s 85/29 67/19 s
' eal High: 72° F/22°C Last year's lOW oes 67° F/20° C ; Caracas 84/28 68/20 sh 83/28 68/20 r Los Angele
‘ae Low: 55° F/13°C i> Precipitation _ vente ee a.m. oe ve tee a.m. Casablanca 64/17 48/8 s 679 48/8 s : f
As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo... trace unsel....... ‘Yo p.m. Moonset. ... 11-4/ a.m. Copenhagen 32/0 28/-2 pc 33/0 32/0 c
ip Paso.
i FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT Year to date New First Full fact Dublin 52/11 39/3 pc 48/8 41/5 pe
High: 75° F/24° C @ High: 67° F/19°C Normal year to date ........cecceceesceeseeeeeeees 272" . a os Frankfurt 37/2 19/-7 34/1 25/-3 pe
Low: 59° F/15°C Low: 53° F/12°C AccuWeather i Geneva 35/1 31/0 sn 35/1 22/-5 sf
.com iS me Halifax 32/0 12/-11 pc 35/1 20-6 pc iy
Ne @ = Forecasts and graphics provided by a = 5 Havana 79/26 56/13 s 83/28 58/14 s Se ae 374/60
‘ MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb. 24 Mar. 4 Mar. 10 Mar. 18 Helsinki 23/-5 14/-10 sf 25/-3 18/-7 pc oF) Rain
jah: 74° F/23° ELEUTHERA Hong Kong 70/21 65/18 ¢ 7222 66/18 ogy M24 Rain Fronts
High: 74° F/23° C Fah. PEO 0 [*_* Flurries Cold ==
an. Low:58°F/14°C NASSAU High: 72° F/22° C Islamabad 77/25 = 48/8 pe 78/25 = 48/8 s Be] Shown are noon positions of weather systems and W.
} High: 75° F/24°C Low: 61° F/16°C Istanbul 41/5 36/2 pe 49/9 43/6 sh Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. ALM Mintle
Low: 64°F18°C Jerusalem 51/10 38/3 sh 50/15 52/15 [v_¥] Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary Menge
J : Johannesburg 78/25 59/15 t 78/25 59/15 t . F
KEY WEST eX 2 CATISLAND Kingston 84/28 72/22 s 83/28 74/23 s 10s| -Os (0S) 10s 20s [BSH] 40s
High: 72° F/22°C a = 3 - Lima 86/30 66/18 pc 87/30 66/18 pe
Low: 61°F/1G°C High: 70° F/21°C London 50/10 41/5 pc 48/8 39/3 pc
: dl Low:58°F/14°C Madrid 57/13 30/-1 pc 5915 30/-1 s
. Manila 86/30 75/23 sh 86/30 75/23 sh QO S 2
Mexico City 77/25 46/7 pc 79/26 48/8 pc pay oy N a easy N ‘7
a Monterrey 79/26 63/17 pc 87/30 56/13 pc
GREAT EXUMA SAN SALVADOR Montreal 27/-2 14/-10 s 27/-2 23/-5 sn
High: 73° F/23° C Rs mao 6 Moscow 32/0 28/-2 sn 32/0 21/-6 sn
Low: 62°F/17°C ee ee Munich 33/0 12/-11 sn 19/-7 12/-11 pc
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's ice re B6/90 60/15 186/90 50/15 | Never st ou r
highs and tonights's lows. : ew Delhi pe s ec
g g _— J Low:61°F/16°C ©: i Oslo 23/-5 10/-12 sn 27/-2 12/-11 pc Oo
<< Paris 49/9 41/5 sh 50/10 40/4 c i { C
Prague 28/-2 19/-7 sn 25/-3 18/-7 ¢ aac Ine WI O us!
LONGISLAND Rio de Janeiro 84/28 75/23 s 84/28 73/22 pe ;
Ce craic or S00 372 wo = a8/T 800 pe Auto I
Le 6" Rome 50/10 37/2 pc 45/7 3210 pc eS to Auto Insurance,
Today Wetliastay Today Wollestay Today Wadhestiay MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 72/22 s 81/27 71/21 + 12 Smart choice is
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 78° F/26° C San Juan 99/37 70/21 s 103/39 73/22 s
FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FC FIC FIC FIC nae Low: 62° F/17°C gee oe oan s a oom s ace Management.
Albuquerque 54/12 31/0 sh 51/10 28/-2 pc _ Indianapolis 48/8 39/3 pc 48/8 23/-5 Philadelphia 42/5 27/-2 s 42/5 37/2 + antago sl S
Anchorage 30/-1 18/-7 sf 27/2 22/-5 sf Jacksonville 6216 44/6 s 73/22 55/412 pc Phoenix 63/17 45/7 sh 66/18 45/7 s CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS Santo Domingo 81/27 65/18 s 82/27 66/18 pe ke you can trust.
Atlanta 60/15 39/3 s 5945 42/5 t Kansas City 50/10 33/0 pce 39/3 14/-10 c Pittsburgh 40/4 29/-1 po 46/7 28/-2 sn RAGGEDISLAND — High: 79° F/26°c = — oe ea pe — ro sh _
Atlantic City 42/5 22/5 s 44/6 37/2 + Las Vegas 56/13 38/3 pe 6045 37/2 s Portland,OR 46/7 36/2 c S31 36/2 pe High: 77° F/25° C Low: 65° F/18°C Sokal le : a , eras am : an
Baltimore 42/5 28/-2 s 42/5 36/2 + Little Rock 52/11 48/8 po 69/20 35/1 t Raleigh-Durham 50/10 32/0 s 5010 43/6 r Low:61°F/16°C en 5 Ben Lam : THs 63/00 -
Boston 34/1 25/3 s 38/3 354 c LosAngeles 60/15 46/7 sh 66/18 48/8 s St.Louis 50/10 43/6 po 52/11 20/6 + : Se a SaCERE AME SiaeURR Ot INSURANCE M ANAGEMENT
Buffalo 36/2 25/-3 c 38/3 31/0 sn Louisville B42 45/77 s S73 29-1 1 Salt Lake City 38/3 28/-2 sn 42/5 26/-3 sn GREATINAGUA Tula mean eo x
Charleston,SC 56/13 39/3 s 6116 49/9 ¢t Memphis 56/13 53/11 po 66/18 341 © San Antonio 68/20 59/15 c 80/26 43/6 pc «a one ei T y 34/1 26/-3 P 36/2 30/-4 P (BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
i hetial : High: 80° F/27° C oronto c sn I |
Chicago 41 32/0 ¢ 41/5 18/-7 sn Miami 74/23 60/15 s 77/25 65/18 s San Diego 59/15 50/10 sh 65/18 49/9 s¢s Low: 66° F/19°C Trinidad 83/28 73/22 t 88/31 76/24 t Ea
Cleveland 42/5 28/-2 47/8 28/-2 sn Minneapolis 34/1 18/-7 c 20/6 3/-16 sn Sanfrancisco 57/13 47/8 sh 58/14 47/8 pc : yapenene 467 34/1. pe 47/8 35/1 po Wa. ~ Hew Providence Crone Sotoma Aharo Fleutherg Fyn
Dallas 68/20 52/41 sh 70/21 37/2 s Nashville 56/13 44/6 s 6847 35/1 4 Seattle 46/7 37/2 pe 50410 37/2 pe Viana 33/0 24/-6 sn 29/1 20/6 po
Denver 48/8 21/6 c 40/4 17/8 c NewOrleans 65/18 58/14 pc 75/23 52/11 t Tallahassee 66/18 44/6 po 70/21 55/12 c ae RS, 39/0 23/5 ¢ 30/1 24/6 sn Reh a We PAD SSE ISN | Mee YDAT) SAPAADOS | Tel (2062) SND-DB5D | Tek: (242) EOG-T304
Detroit 40/4 29/-1 c 42/5 27/-2 sn New York 40/4 30/-1 s 42/5 37/2 ¢ Tampa 70/21 53/11 $s 75/23 60/15 pc Winnipeg 10/-12 -5/-20 c 5/-15 -13/-25 pc .
Honolulu 80/26 69/20 pc 80/26 68/20 pc OklahomaCity 68/20 43/6 pc 58/14 27/-2 s Tucson 61/16 39/3 sh 64/17 38/3 s — ie : ———_—__—________—
Houston 68/20 63/17 sh 78/25 48/8 t Orlando 68/20 50/10 s 77/25 59/15 pc Washington,DC 47/8 30/-1 s 46/7 383 + Seen ee






in new Bahamas @f

THE TRIBUNE

usines

TUESDAY,

FEBRUARY

lai.

2009

SECTION B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

Grand Bahama Hotel owners threaten

Power investor

renewable tie-up

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EMERA, the expansion-
minded Canadian power giant
that last year acquired 25 per
cent of Grand Bahama Power
Company, yesterday moved to
strengthen its presence in the
Bahamian energy sector by
agreeing a joint venture that
aims to pursue renewable ener-
gy projects in this nation.

Emera said in a statement
that it had signed a Letter of
Intent with Schneider Power
Inc, the Canadian renewable
energy specialist that has quali-
fied for the second stage of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion’s (BEC) renewable ener-
gy search, that will see the two
link-up for the latter’s
wind/solar power proposals.

Schneider Power, which is
involved in the Bahamas
Renewable Energy Corporation
(BREC), itself a joint venture
with Bahamian company WIN-
SO Ltd, had submitted a pro-

Emera in joint venture link
with fellow Canadian power
provider that has qualified for
BEC renewable energy search

posal to BEC for the construc-
tion and operation of wind tur-
bines and solar panels on three
different islands - New Provi-
dence, Abaco and Harbour
Island.

BREC had proposed that the
three projects would collective-
ly generate 24 Mega Watts
(MW) of electricity per day,
enough to power 25,000 homes.

Wayne Crawley, Emera’s
vice-president of corporate
development, said yesterday:
“We look forward to working
with Schneider Power and their
local partners to support BEC’s
renewable energy programme.
This is an important economic
energy source for the
Bahamas”.

SEE page 4B

Bahamas First hires ex-Colina
executive for agency finances

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMAS First, the gen-
eral insurer, yesterday con-
firmed it had hired a former
leading Colinalmperial Insur-
ance Company executive to run
the finances at an agency it has
just taken managerial control
of, in a bid to get a better han-
dle on the company’s trading
and financial position.

Patrick Ward, Bahamas
First’s president and chief exec-
utive, told Tribune Business that
the company had hired Michele
Fields, wife of well-known
Kerzner International and
Atlantis spokesman, Ed Fields,
on a contract basis to take care
of General Brokers & Agents
(GBA) finances.

“Her background is in
finance and accounting,” Mr
Ward explained. “Since the
operation [General Brokers &
Agents] had no one in there as
a qualified accountant, we felt
we needed to put someone in
place to look after the agency’s
financial affairs on a contract
basis.

“Her remit is finance, not
managing the agency’s overall
affairs.”

Mr Ward said Bahamas First
“needs to know from our case
how the company is trading”.
He added that GBA’s two for-
mer principals and owners, hus-

LYPORD CAY #480)
eu ty cae will Bind succesful peo

quality ling. This newly renoested 3 bedroom, 5 beth bore

é Who know how to reward thenrcaehves

band and wife team Franklyn
and Orinthia Nesbitt, were now
at home.

“You can use the word
‘retirement’,” the Bahamas First
chief said. Mr Nesbitt was in the
news last year, after he was kid-
napped at gun point from his
home and taken to GBA, where
he was robbed of $2,000 in cash
and $6,000 in cheques.

Apart from Bahamas First,
GBA is also understood to
write business for Security &
General and Atlantic Medical.

Tribune Business recently
revealed how Bahamas First
had effectively taken manage-
ment control of GBA, a move
that could eventually result in
the carrier acquiring the out-
standing 70 per cent stake in
the latter that it does not yet
own.

Bahamas First Holdings, the
general insurance carrier's par-
ent company, acquired a 30 per
cent stake in GBA in 2007 in
return for writing-off a $500,000
receivable balance, which rep-
resented premium income that
the agent/broker owned.

Mr Ward had previously
acknowledged "it was not
secret” that Bahamas First
wanted to obtain 100 per cent
ownership of GBA, but said the
management agreement did not
necessarily mean this would

SEE page 4B

Sehind the gates of this umigque com
wh

2 features TÂ¥

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamian co-

owners of a Bay

Street hotel yes-

terday threatened

to end their mil-
lion-dollar investment pro-
gramme for the property after a
“Wild West’ style shoot-out took
place outside early yesterday
morning, the latest development
in what they claim is an
unsavoury atmosphere for
tourism in the area.

Harry Pikramenos, co-own-
er of the 27-room El Greco
Hotel, said that following the
shooting “four to five rooms”
of guests checked out due to
fears for their safety. The
episode cost the property 10 of
its 24 guests, or almost 40 per
cent of business.

He added that another fac-
tor costing the hotel, located
across from the Western
Esplanade, business “left, right
and centre” was the loud music
being played from a nightclub in
the Mayfield building, located
across Augusta Street from the

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

d to $1m investment

* Say shooting outside Bay Street 27-room Bay Street property, and unrelated
nightclub noise, costing them business ‘left, right and centre’

* “Four to five rooms’ check out after shooting

* El Greco running 60-70% occupancies, but struggling to keep it there
as neighbourhood not conducive to tourism

* Incidents last think Bahamian tourism/downtown project needs

E] Greco.

This music, Mr Pikramenos
said, often went on until 4am
in the morning from Thursday-
Sunday every week, depriving
his guests of a good night’s
sleep.

No connection has been
made between the nightclub
and yesterday morning’s shoot-
ing, but Mr Pikramenos told
Tribune Business: “It’s not the
best atmosphere for tourism.

“There was a shooting out in
front of the hotel yesrerday, at
about 2am. Four to five rooms
last night just checked out
because of this shooting.”

A full-fledged gun battle in
what is regarded as a key tourist
area is likely to be the last thing

the Bahamian tourism industry
and economy needs at a time
when it is struggling to attract
every visitor possible.

If the Bahamas is perceived
as unsafed, it could exacerbate
the current downturn even fur-
ther. And the word could
spread very quickly, if those
who checked out of the El Gre-
co yesterday talk about their
experience with friends and
family, and spread the word via
e-mail and Internet postings.

Such shootings also hold the
potential for undermining plans
to revitalise downtown Bay
Street and the City of Nassau,
since few landlords and busi-
nesses will want to invest in
upgrading until the security cli-

Ex-John S George chief back

home after Turks close

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

EX-JOHN S George and
Freeport Concrete chief exec-
utive, Ken Hutton, yesterday
confirmed he had returned to
Nassau after closing his Turks &
Caicos-based wholesale/retail
operation, a move forced by the
‘triple whammy’ of hurricanes
and that nation’s political and
economic implosion.

Mr Hutton told Tribune Busi-
ness that after coming through
three hurricanes in 2008, the
sharp economic downturn -
which he said was much worse

Make ita

° Pension Plans

* Mutual Funds



Hutton closes wholesale/retail venture and selling building, due to
‘triple whammy’ of hurricanes and economic/political meltdown

in the Turks & Caicos than in
the Bahamas - and absence of
any government in that nation
had prompted him to “cut” his
losses and shut his Cost Right
business.

Mr Hutton said of the ven-
ture: “It was a gamble to start
with - a pretty good gamble -
but with the place the way it is,
it was time to cut.”

He added that after Turks &
Caicos was struck by multiple
storms last year, Cost Right

reality.

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

° Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

PU Pk

recovered to a position where it
had “turned the corner”, only
for the business to feel the full
force of the global economic
meltdown.

All construction and invest-
ment projects in Turks & Caicos
had ground to a halt, a devel-
opment most Bahamians are all
too-familiar with. That nation’s
high-end tourism product also
experienced a major reduction

SEE page 4B

mate and atmosphere improves.

“We own the hotel, and are
making improvements, sub-
stantial improvements to it,” Mr
Pikramenos said of the proper-
ty owned by himself and his
brother.

“Right now, we’ve invested
in the hotel in excess of $1 mil-
lion. It’s been going on for a
while, and in a year the pro-
gramme should be completed.
There’s been significant
progress with the rooms. We’ve
done more of a West Indies-
type feel, and are trying to ante
up the product and improve the
hotel. We are trying to turn the
area around, but it’s not going

SEE page 2B

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.



We can get you there!

roonalstudy. spactous Iring roam, separate dining room and screened In porch

Nassau: 242.356.9801
Freeport: 242.351.3010

The hall gore bot offers quiet iounds of nature ofed & private back garden woth pour

owe frelt reas, Mo ptress of veoeticn with Gis lew maintinaece home 40 pest

ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work

bring pour oF chebs. Chualisy finishes and conspienely furnisbed USL ote

George. DamianosaSothebysRealtycom 242.562.4211

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

BARBADOS
St. Michael: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

Damianos |

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Monber a
SKinhamascom tS | Pa od The Gatos MS


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



USI eee
VAT’s the way to go on tax reform

THIS is the second part in a
series on tax reform.

Last week, I presented a case
for tax reform highlighting some
of the challenges presented by
our current system of taxation.
In the next two articles, I will
examine several types of tax
regimes that we can obviously
consider. Today, I will discuss
the Sales Tax and the Value
Added Tax (VAT).

Consumption-based taxes

Both systems are consump-
tion-based taxes, which would
take the collection process out
of the hands of a bureaucratic
and often inefficient agency (the
Customs Department in our
case), and replace it with multi-
ple ‘private sector’ collection
points.

Many persons would argue
that, historically, the Bahamas
has never had a culture of mer-
cantile honesty. As a result,
there is a lot of scepticism about
putting tax collection in the
hands of the merchant class.
However, on the other hand,
there is a perception of wide-
spread dishonesty and corrup-
tion among some officers with-
in the Customs Department,
making it almost impossible to
determine what would be the
lesser of the two evils. Talking
about being between ‘a rock
and a hard place’...what a posi-
tion to be in.









A successful transition to a
tax system with widespread col-
lection points requires that we
have computer systems and net-
works, monitoring regimes,
strict rules and the political and
legal resolve to enforce compli-
ance.

Notwithstanding the above,
there are two aspects of con-
sumption-based taxes that
intrigue me. First is the fact that
it collects taxes from everybody
in the economy — citizens, resi-
dents and foreigners. The lat-
ter point is particularly relevant
to a society like ours, with an
extremely large illegal immi-
grant population who elude our
tax base to a large extent. Sec-
ond,there is the potential to tax
the ‘underground’ cash econo-
my, as consumption triggers
some degree of taxation. For
instance, just imagine the poten-
tial revenue that can be derived
by taxing the ‘numbers’ indus-
try.

Our current national pretence
that the numbers business is ille-
gal is an absolute joke...when,
in truth, it is now one of the
most ‘open’ businesses that
exist.

Numbers can be openly pur-
chased at beauty salons, restau-
rants, barber shops, bars, ‘cor-
ner stores’ and, of course, the
ever present, web café. The only
persons who are seemingly
unaware of this are the police.

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.










The Candidate should have the following requirements:
Have 5-7 years experience with the Caterpillar or
similar Product Line, have worked in a Caterpillar
dealership or a similar Organization;

Have training in Ordering and Receiving Parts









Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count






Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University would be an



asset;

Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the

Parts Department;



Must have experience in process statistical control in
planning, programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.







This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts






Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work







experience to:

M & E Limited,

P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email




me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this












position will be contacted.

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

The Public Is Cordially Invited To Attend
THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON PRESENTATION

Hosted by The Bahamas Society of Engineers

Thursday, February 19, 2009
Topic
“HOW SMALL BUSINESSES
CAN SURVIVE THE
ECONOMIC DOWNTURN”

GUEST SPEAKER:

MR. ANTHONY FERGUSON

PRESIDENT
CIRCLE VISION FINANCIAL PLANNING,

THE NASSAU GUARDIAN GROUP

PLACE:
EAST VILLA RESTAURANT
East Bay Street
Time: 12:00p.m.
Donations: $25.00 per person

If possible please confirm your attendance by e-mail

Gracesharma05@yahoo.com or JEElliott@bahamaselectricty.com
or quentin.knowles@flameless.com

Financial

By Larry Gibson



Sales tax

A Sales Tax is a tax that is
imposed every time a retail (end
user) sale occurs. It is probably
safe to say that most Bahamians
are familiar with a sales tax as a
result of ‘Florida’ shopping
trips.

A Sales Tax is a tax on con-
sumption, levied on goods and
services at the point of pur-
chase. They are typically
detailed as a percentage on the
price of the item in question,
but may simply be a flat fee. So
a sales tax could be 5 per cent of
the purchase price, or a stan-
dard amount such as 10 cents.

A sales tax as a percentage
of the purchase price is far more
common. For example, the cur-
rent Sales Tax rate in Florida
is 6 per cent.

The underlying philosophy of
a Sales Tax is that a person is
taxed on the basis of what he
consumes rather than what he
earns. Such taxes are consid-
ered to be regressive, as it turns
out that the lower your income
is, the greater the proportion of
your income you wind up pay-
ing in sales taxes. This is
because they are not deter-
mined on income, and even the
poor must consume a certain
baseline quantity of goods and
services. This is part of the rea-
son why many foods are fre-
quently exempted from sales
taxes.

While the concept is straight-
forward, this system places a
heavy reliance on the honesty of
merchants, who are responsible
for first, collecting these taxes,
and second, remitting these tax-
es to the national treasury in a
timely and accurate manner.

Value Added Tax (VAT)
Value Added Tax, popularly

known as ‘VAT”, is a special
type of indirect tax in which a
sum of money is levied at a par-
ticular stage in the sale of a
product or service.

VAT came into effect for the
first time on 10 April, 1954.
From its inception, the VAT
system was imposed on all
major sectors of the French
economy — the first country to
use this system. Once instituted,
it was immediately clear that
revenues collected from the
VAT system constituted a sub-
stantial share of the govern-
ment’s revenue in the French
economy.

VAT is similar to a sales tax.
But instead of implementing
one tax on a given percentage at
the time of a retail sale, there is
a smaller tax, added each time
the product is resold or when
‘value has been added toa
product’. For example, a tax is
added when a product is passed
from a manufacturer to whole-
saler, and again from the whole-
saler to the retailer.

Example
This is best demonstrated by
a simple easy to follow example:

Cat Island Fabrics is a manu-
facturer of upholstery fabrics.
It sells fabric to Sleeptime Mat-
tresses, a manufacturer of bed
mattresses. The Furniture
Gallery, a furniture store, buys
its mattresses from Sleeptime,
and in turn sells its mattresses to
Gerald Stubbs.

Under a Sales Tax system,
the only person who pays taxes
would be Gerald Stubbs, the
purchaser of the mattress. How-
ever, under a VAT system, Cat
Island Fabrics would pay tax
when it buys cotton and turns it
into fabric; Sleeptime would pay

Hotel owners threaten

FROM page 1B

to turn around like this.”

Referring to the shooting and
the nightclub issues, Mr Pikra-
menos added: “It obviously puts
investment in jeopardy here,
that’s for sure. We’re kind of
thinking about holding off and
seeing what the Government is
going to do.

“We're just going to consider
whether we take it any further.
We are seriously reconsidering
going any further if there’s not
going to be any progress by the
authorities, there not going to
get more involved.

“We’re just losing a ton of

business. We’re just losing busi-
ness left, right and centre
because of this.”

Mr Pikramenos said the El
Greco Hotel’s occupancies were
currently running at 60-70 per
cent, and the property was “try-
ing to keep it there”. The hotel,
he added, had a strong Bahami-
an client base, and was also
attracting a lot of Europeans -
something the owners hoped
would increase with additional
airlift.

“We’re not going to be able
to hold the business if the
atmosphere causes three to four
rooms to check out,” Mr Pikra-
menos added.

“Ever since this nightclub

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that THOMAS ANTOINIER

EMMANUEL,

of GREGORY TOWN, ELEUTHERA,

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 17 day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Weer: = ier
Price: 55/000.00)
Hull: Piberglaia

Engine: Tein Mercy CML OPTS, 225 HP, 4) Bowes

We: S-1e

a

i. Getrage in greet condities! Suby loaded vith Auip-pint, Pith firder, Chart plotiersGPS,
Shere, Need, Poesvweter, Bow counties, Powered with twin idercery 22 Optimise ara

menart cratt gauges.

Standard Equiprrient

Sd ed ee Ber
fire tached Ug? wok

fon 6 mated ferme det nore
es Brairege

ir eis

Pout dated Frubs becmen, sayfa
ced Packer

Sisk prep area

iochebis pomunls wosege wlokenl door
Lecer pure os races

‘whet jad uel Pooh ri at tora ed ee ea
ee bol ng ple cack

SS operirg wel

2/5 romsgie grak rl

Teint tory

Ploy fener dee

Us| Wee care ar ed mers
ford coming Lawes

Heda © mee win

Optional [quiprreeer

Pict peli eens od BS dehege
Died eftop gen aerriggen
Leaning por wicaler

a ‘eden
darkee
ool ey nb DaRarog e, Pcae p ,
wete-pler, fink fieder, WEF, ees

CONTACT:

Kingsley Ldgecornéa, ir.
Pr d]4-2and
E-mal) beigrarehe @ypeai care

tax when it uses that fabric to
create a mattress; the Furniture
Gallery would pay tax when it
purchases the mattress for
resale; and finally, Gerald
Stubbs would pay tax when he
buys his new mattress. There-
fore, tax is paid at four points of
‘value adding’, instead of once
at the point of final sale.

VAT Philosophy

It is believed that VAT is a
better tax collection system than
a sales tax, and most countries
worldwide have adopted some
variation of the VAT, especial-
ly in Europe and Africa. More
than 120 countries have imple-
mented this system, and it is
estimated that more than 70 per
cent of the world’s population
live under such a system.

The risk of not recovering tax
from all the intermediaries
involved in VAT’s collection is
said to be the biggest risk of
such a system. The counter
argument is that this is actually
reduced because the tax is col-
lected in stages, and the tax bur-
den is not left to the final retail-
er, but spread over the multi-
stage collection system. (I have
my personal views on this...this
is the counter-argument
nonetheless).

Under VAT, every person
trading (or adding value) is
required to register as a trader.
This then begs the question:
What is a trader? A trader
under VAT is everyone who
provides a professional, trade
or business service on an ongo-
ing basis...an extremely wide
definition.

Criticisms

According to Wikipedia,
rvenues from VAT are fre-
quently lower than expected
because they are difficult and
costly to administer and collect.
In many countries, however,
where collection of personal
income taxes and corporate
profit taxes has been historical-
ly weak, VAT collection has
been more successful than oth-
er types of taxation.

VAT has become more
important in many jurisdictions,
as tariff levels have fallen world-
wide due to trade liberalisation.
It has essentially replaced lost
tariff revenues. Whether the

end to S$1m

came on stream, we are losing
business evbery weekend.
Every weekend we’ve got
check-outs due to the noise.
They’re afraid to stay in the
hotel.”

Mr Pikramenos said he had
spoken to the Licensing
Authority to discover what
licence the Mayfield had, and
had also approached the build-
ing’s owner, Keith Aranaj,
without success.

Mr Aranaj yesterday said he
understands the nightclub has
a license to operate until 4am
nightly.

He said: "Since the nightclub
opened people have com-
plained about the noise and I
can't blame them for that, but
they should talk to the woman
who rents the place, and they
should come to some under-
standing.

"If the police say close it
down then fine, close it down. I

costs and distortions of value
added taxes are lower than the
economic inefficiencies and
enforcement issues ( such as
smuggling) from high import
tariffs is debatable, theory sug-
gests value added taxes are far
more efficient.

Similarly, certain industries
(small-scale services, for exam-
ple) tend to have more VAT
avoidance, particularly where
cash transactions predominate,
and VAT may be criticised for
encouraging this. From the per-
spective of government, how-
ever, VAT may be preferable
because it captures at least some
of the value-added.

For example, a carpenter may
offer to provide services for
cash (without a receipt, and
without VAT) to a homeowner,
who usually cannot claim input
VAT back. The homeowner
will hence bear lower costs and
the carpenter may be able to
avoid other taxes (profit or pay-
roll taxes).

The Government, however,
may still receive VAT for vari-
ous other inputs (lumber, paint,
gasoline, tools) sold to the car-
penter, who would be unable
to reclaim the VAT on these
inputs. While the total tax
receipts may be lower com-
pared to full compliance, it may
not be lower than under other
feasible taxation systems. Next
week, we will continue our
exploration of alternative tax
systems with an examination of
income tax.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

investment

can’t do anything until she vio-
lates her lease, so it depends on
what the police do.”

He added: “The shooting
wasn't on my property and I
don’t think the shooting was
connected to the club. From
what I understand, the man was
shot at home. I am worried
about it but I don’t think it is
connected here.”

According to acting director
of hotel licensing, Monique
Hepburn, the Mayfield is no
longer licensed to operate as a
hotel and is listed as under ren-
ovation. The building itself,
however, still houses a coffee
shop, night club and liquor
store.

Ms Hepburn said that though
the former hotel is under reno-
vations, other businesses are
able to rent and operate in
available commercial space
once they hold a valid business
license.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN RONY DORCELY
of WILSON ST. NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 10 day of February, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,
P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

MAKUM L. INVESTMENTS LTD

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of
2000), the Dissolution of MAKUM L. INVESTMENTS

LTD has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 9th

day of February, 2009.

hi-=
“fie
faip 5 Foeer
Fat Gerdierae Lig dors, inc
Lepetlaens


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 3B

Regulator: Just 22% of fiwannaeii
filings meet deadline TV SHOW







m By CHESTER ROBARDS

Business Reporter



THE SECURITIES Commis-
sion, in an effort to boost com-
pliance rates that are as low as
22 per cent when it comes to
Bahamas-registered investment
funds filing their audited year-
end financials within the pre-
scribed time, will roll out new
legislation this year to tighten
regulation.

The Commission’s market sur-
veillance manager, Sally Moss,
revealed in a presentation at the
British Colonial Hilton that in
2007 only 22 per cent of all reg-
istered investment funds turned
in audited financial statements
within the statutory deadline of
four months after year end.

Ms Moss, speaking to Com-
mission registrants, admitted
that this low figure could be
attributed to laxity in enforcing
regulatory obligations.

“You can say: “You haven’t

enforced the rules’, and so this
exists as bad on you as it does us
- and you’re probably right,” she
said.

“We don’t want to have laws
that strangle the industry. We
want to enforce the law, but not
at all costs, and so we are trying
to look at the proportionality of
regulation. It has to make sense
for us and also for you.”

According to Ms Moss, a
financial extension rule was
adopted in 2004, so that compa-
nies who were in danger of not
meeting the Commission’s dead-
line for turning in audited finan-
cial statements would receive a
grace period. However, busi-
nesses failed to take advantage
of the grace period, she said, and
the Commission year after year
failed to enforce its laws regard-
ing financial reporting.

Yesterday’s meeting was the
Commission’s third annual
industry briefing, which focused
on introducing the upcoming

amendments to the Investment
Funds Act 2003. Some of the
changes being pursued are: a
change in definition of invest-
ment funds; change in definition
of professional funds; change in
definition of recognized foreign
funds and the extension of the
audit deadline from four to six
months.

Speaking at the briefing, Com-
misison chairman Philip Stubbs
said that after his appointment it
was made obvious to him that
some “change and reform” was
needed.

“One of the major criticisms
was that the Commission was
not as responsive to the industry
as might be expected,” he said.

Mr Stubbs said theCommis-
sion recently underwent a review
of its operations by an indepen-
dent consultant, who provided
a report to the Ministry of
Finance. Mr Stubbs said an
analysis from the findings of this
report will lead to plans to sup-

plement the Commission’s short
and long-term goals.

The Commission, which regu-
lates the capital markets and
investment funds industry,
released its ‘Statement of Prior-
ities for 2009’ yesterday.

They pledged for 2009 to:

* Conduct a comprehensive
review of the Commission to
identify areas of risk and
required improvements.

* Improve the efficiency of the
Commission.

* Enhance the legislative
framework of the Commission.

* Enhance transparency in the
operations of the Commission.

The Commission is strained
by the environment in which it
operates, as it seeks to ensure
confidence in local capital mar-
Kets that apply to both domestic
and international market partic-
ipants. “We recognise the chal-
lenges,” said Mr Stubbs. “We as
the regulator are committed to
successfully meeting them.”

Businesses urged: Do not end
critical group memberships

Chamber, BECon finding it tough
to collect same level of dues

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A SENIOR Bahamas Cham-
ber of Commerce official has
urged businesses to maintain
their membership in organisa-
tions like his, and not simply let
it lapse in a bid to cut costs. The
Chamber has so far collected
75 per cent of the membership
fees due for the upcoming year.

Philip Simon, the Chamber’s
executive director, told Tribune
Business: “We’re heading into
the renewal period beginning
in March, and we’ve pretty
much collected, from last year
to now, about three-quarters of
the total membership [fees].

“Tt is anticipated there might
be a challenge getting higher
than that this time, because of

BSi

the economic downturn.”

The Chamber has about 500
fully paid-up members, and Mr
Simon added: “We want to
encourage them to renew.
Membership in organisations
that can provide support in dif-
ficult times, be it structural,
financial or technical advice, is
recommended. We have pro-
grammes designed to assist
businesses in these tough
times.”

Mr Simon pointed to the
Chamber’s training pro-
grammes, newly-launched Small
and Medium Sized Business

Unit, its pension plan for mem-
bers, and the proposed group
health plan as examples of prac-
tical initiatives designed to ben-
efit the business community.

“Now is not the time to aban-
don membership in organisa-
tions that can help you through
these tough economic times,”
Mr Simon added.

Brian Nutt, head of the 100-
member Bahamas Employers
Confederation (BECon), con-
firmed that his organisation was
also feeling the effects of the
depressed economy, with some
members either not renewing

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international
private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently accepting

applications for:-

PRIVATE BANKING
RELATIONSHIP MANAGER

Applicants for the position of PB Relationship Manager must have a banking or
financial degree and 7-10 years experience in the offshore banking sector, have
knowledge of international investment instruments & money market, ability to
partner with team members, must be confident regarding customer relations,
investments & portfolio management and have thorough knowledge of local
legislation, regulatory & statutory matters as well as international banking practices.
Fluency in Italian & French is required.

Personal qualities :-

Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision

Strong Team attitude

Financial and analytical background
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary
Must be able to work under pressure

Available to travel

Responsibilities :-

Service & advise customers

Maintain & follow up account relationships
Liaise directly with customers or their investment advisors
Monitor, analyze positions and evaluate reports
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external banking

professionals

Meet deadlines on timely basis
Meet target in terms of Profitability and Acquisition of Net New Money

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum

Vitae to:-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N-7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted

or paying their dues late.

“One of the things that is
happening is that businesses are
examining all their costs, includ-
ing the cost of subventions to
organisations like BECon, the
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce and all the other organi-
sations,” Mr Nutt said. “We
have seen a slowdown in dues
payments.”

Within “the next month or
so”, companies that had not
paid their dues may no longer
be BECon members, Mr Nutt
said, because they would not be

in “good standing”.
ro

ISLANDS BY DESIGN ] REISS ENGINEERING

Master Motivator Spence Finlayson, Bahamian-born, world
renowned motivational speaker and corporate trainer is pictured
during the taping of his highly popular TV show “Dare To Be
Great” at the Hilton Hotel. “Dare To Be Great” airs tonight at

8:30pm on ZNS TV13.

Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spence Finlayson
are his guests, Minister Dwight Armbrister of ZNS, Gaynell Rolle-
Stubbs, Co-Franchise owner, Miss Bahamas Company Lid., and
Mustafa Khalfani, owner of Ashanti Oils and community activist.

2003 38 FT. INTREPID
Three 275 HP Mercury Engines
Generator, Cabin, GPS and Depth Finder

Well maintained - Asking $300,000.00 O.N.O

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL
TANYA ERDEG at

376-4091 or 396-1134

Two Great Firms
Have Now Joined to Become the Largest

Bahamian Owned Engineering Team





Bt

- Same Commitment to Quality and Service -
- New Resources to Serve YOU -

STRONGER Technical Capabilities
LARGER Staff of Experts
WIDER Range of Services

Keith Bishop and Robert Reiss, Ph.D., P.E.

Islands by Design Reiss Engineering

BAHAMIAN OWNED | BAHAMIAN OWNED

Bes

Proudly Serving the Bahamas

CIVIL * RESORTS *« COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL « MARINE CONSULTING
ENVIRONMENTAL = WILDUIFE = UTILITIES

Keith Bishop

e-mail: keithi@islandsbydesign.cam

WATER * OPERATIONS

cir abet es

=o Es) ee)

C. Robert Reiss, Ph.D., P.E.

cle

ia ee

ae


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Grand Bahama Power investor in
new Bahamas renewable tie-up

FROM page 1B

“We are excited to have
Emera as our financial and
development partner, as we
pursue renewable energy pro-
jects in this region,” said
Thomas Schneider, Schneider
Power’s president.

“Their power generation
development experience and
understanding of the Bahamas
will enhance these and future
projects.”

In a previous interview with
Tribune Business, Mr Schnei-
der said the BREC proposal
would require $60 million in
capital financing, of which $15

Ex-John

FROM page 1B

in demand, Mr Hutton added,
and some 1,000 families had left
the islands.

Describing Turks & Caicos
as being in “economic melt-
down”, Mr Hutton said the
problems facing him and other
businessmen there were exac-
erbated by the uncertain invest-

BSi

million would be equity and the
remainder debt financing. He
added that $40 million of that
figure was likely to be spent in
the Bahamas.

“Such a capital infrastructure
spend in the Bahamas can cre-
ate a lot of services as well as
jobs,” Mr Schneider said at the
time. “That’s going to be a key
benefit for the Bahamas, as
we’re going to be putting mon-
ey into the economy.” Some 10-
15 full-time jobs were likely to
be created.

Some 20-30 jobs construction
jobs would be created on each
of the three islands involved in
the BREC project, meaning

S George chief back home

ment climate created by an
absence of government.

The island’s governance has
been paralysed by the ongoing
Commission of Inquiry, which
last week resulted in the resig-
nation of Premier Michael Mis-
sick. The upshot has been that
there have been no policymak-
ers around to take decisions on
business and investment-related

that some 60-90 jobs would be
created in total if it won gov-
ernment/BEC approval.

Meanwhile, Emera has made
no secret of its desire to expand
its foothold in the Bahamas,
which was achieved last Novem-
ber when the company paid $41
million to acquire Lady Henri-
etta St George’s 50 per cent
ICD Utilities stake (translating
into a 25 per cent stake in
Grand Bahama Power).

Chris Huskilson, its chief
executive, indicated that Emera
wanted to explore various forms
of renewable energy in the
Bahamas, and was looking to
erect several towers in Grand

proposals.

“T closed the business,” Mr
Hutton told Tribune Business
yesterday. “I’m in the middle
of selling the property right
now. It’s [Turks & Caicos] a
neat place, I enjoyed it, but it
was time to make a business
decision and get out of it.

“The first year was not bad,
and then we had some trouble .

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau, Bahamas, an established international private
bank in The Bahamas, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland, is presently

accepting applications for:-

HEAD OF OPERATI

RDINATI

STRUCTURED PRODUCTS

Applicants for the position of Head of Operations Coordination / Structured Products
must have relevant financial accreditation or professional qualifications, in-depth
managerial experience in all phases of securities & other assets in the offshore banking
industry, overall processes including front office & operations activities, and be fully
abreast of today’s sophisticated private banking products. Must be knowledgeable of
international markets, financial instruments and of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is

definitely required.

Personal qualities:-

Proven ability to supervise staff & control the daily flow of transactions & direct
and guide staff through knowledge and example
Must have demonstrated practical organization of self and others
Ability to assess, evaluate and make recommendations
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Possess analytical qualities
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude and outlook
Commitment to quality, service excellence and customer satisfaction

Responsibilities:-

Necessary liaison with units Private Banking & Service Provider (Outsourcer)
Verify that processed transactions are correctly settled

Perform control of administrative tasks to be executed locally

Ensure reconciliations of outstanding items and that pending items are resolved

Monitor & manage booking of structured products

Troubleshooting

Guide and train personnel in the unit

This position will report directly to the Head of Private Banking.

Interested persons with such qualifications should submit their resume/curriculum vitae

to :-

Human Resources Manager
BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman Bay Corporate Centre

P. O. Box N - 7130
Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no. (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr @bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

FirstCaribbean

Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity?



AVAILABLE POSITION:
INSURANCE OFFICER

Accountable for acquisition and
promotion of the full range of
insurance products and services.

Bahama to study the island’s
suitability for wind power gen-
eration.

Company

Both itself and Grand
Bahama Power Company are
also looking to experiment with
tidal/hydro energy and waste-
to-energy.

Mr Huskilson said Emera
hoped to bring significantly low-
er electricity costs to Grand
Bahama Power customers
while, like many alternative
energy projects, reducing the
carbon footprint of the
Bahamas.

I got more involved, we had it
going, and then there were
three hurricanes, a global melt-
down, and a political meltdown.

“There’s no one in charge
down there. There’s no govern-
ment, no decisions are being
made, and there’s no invest-
ment. It’s absolutely a train
wreck. When you’re a whole-
sale supplier to the hotels, and
the hotels are running at 12 per
cent occupancies, there’s no
business.”

When asked what he planned
to do now he was back full-time
in the Bahamas, Mr Hutton told
Tribune Business: “I’ve got
some options I’m looking at,
but I’m happy to be home. I’ve
been a way for a year and it’s
been a struggle.”

The Turks & Caicos store Mr
Hutton has closed has endured
a somewhat turbulent time
under different Bahamian own-
ership over the past seven to
eight years. The Cost Right ven-
ture has closed a little less than
two years after Mr Hutton
acquired the business from
BISX-listed Bahamian compa-
ny, Abaco Markets, which in
turn had bought it in 2000 as
TC Trading, a grocery whole-

"The approach that we have
to the electricity business in gen-
eral is that moving the industry
further away from hydrocar-
bons is an important part of
where we are going for the
future, so anything we can do
to bring more renewables - and
to bring lower costs into the
market -that’s a very strong
focus for us, lowering emissions,
lowering costs and making elec-
tricity more stable for cus-
tomers," Mr Huskilson told a
Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce luncheon earlier this
year.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany chief executive, E.O. Fer-

rell, said his company was work-
ing closely with Emera on this
project and others in order to
develop its own technology and
improve services to Grand
Bahamians.

"We have been working
jointly to determine the poten-
tial for wind on the island, and
they are helping us with a cou-
ple of other things,” he said.
"We actually have Emera peo-
ple in Freeport today working
with our folks on a project, so
we're looking for opportunities
where their utilities expertise
can augment our capabilities
and improve service to our cus-
tomers."

after Turks close

saler.

Mr Hutton and fellow
investors paid $2.7 million for
the store, which was also named
Cost Right then, via their com-
pany Entervant Holdings (TCD
Ltd, with $2.5 million paid
upfront and the remaining
$200,000 payable over a three-
year period.

When it was closed, Cost
Right employed some 22 staff,
at one time having employed
32 persons.

“[’m not the only one,” Mr
Hutton said of the Cost Right
closure. “This is happening all
over the world, and I’ve still got
my health, ’ve got my family
and the sun will rise tomorrow.

“It’s a shame, but again, ’m
not the only one. Atlantis
knows what it’s all about, Cable
Beach knows what it’s all about,
and the phone company in the
Turks & Caicos has laid off half
its staff.”

Mr Hutton pointed out that
some of the most successful
businessmen in history had to
endure several corporate fail-
ures before they tasted success.

The economic downturn had
also resulted in a crime spike in
the Turks & Caicos Islands, Mr

Hutton added, with several
armed robberies taking place
there in the last few weeks.

“T’ve never seen anything like
that before,” he said. “It’s still a
lot better here in the Bahamas
than it is down there.”

Mr Hutton focused full-time
on his Turks & Caicos venture
after the John S George Hold-
ings private equity group he put
together decided to sell the
Bahamian retailer, following a
boardroom split.

The argument spilt into pub-
lic when one of the group’s
investors, Benchmark
(Bahamas) and its president,
Julian Brown, voiced public crit-
icism of Mr Hutton’s manage-
ment style.

Apart from Benchmark,
which had a 20 per cent stake,
and Mr Hutton and his relatives
with a 40 per cent stake, the
remainder of the company was
held by the Morley and
Pritchard families with 15 per
cent each, and Butterfield Bank
(Bahamas) head Robert Lot-
more with 10 per cent.

John S George was subse-
quently sold to its current own-
er, Bahamian retail entrepre-
neur Andrew Wilson.

Bahamas First
hires ex-Colina
executive for
agency finances

FROM page 1B

happen.

He explained: “We have a 30 per cent equity
interest in GBA. That has not changed. It is no
secret that we have expressed an interest in
acquiring the balance of the shares that we don’t
already own.

“In the process of doing that, we agreed with
the existing shareholders that in order for us to do
proper due diligence as necessary, certain aspects
of recordkeeping and certain elements in the way
the business was being managed and operated
needed to change.

“There’s been an agreement reached where
elements of the day-to-day management are going
to be done by a new slate of directors and man-
agers. That may lead to a change in ownership
down the road.”

If Bahamas First does ultimately acquire BGA,
which has offices on Collins Avenue in Nassau
and Freeport, the general insurance carrier —
which has the largest market share in terms of
annual gross premiums, now standing at more
than $100 million — will own a 100 per cent inter-

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

a 92 BR Of

For further information on this and
other available positions, please visit
our website:

www.firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm

© ay
@s ©

est in five agencies. The others would be Moseley
Burnside, Nassau Underwriters (NUA), Carib
Insurance Agency and Star General in Freeport.

In addition, industry sources said several other
agents — Confidence Insurance Agents & Bro-
kers, Colina General, Bethel-Thompson and one
other — while not owned by Bahamas First, wrote
business 100 per cent exclusively for the carrier.

One insurance sector source told Tribune Busi-
ness that Bahamas First’s expanding agency force
was now close to matching the Bahamian mar-
ket’s largest brokers/agents, J. S. Johnson and
Insurance Management, in terms of size. While
those companies placed the majority of their busi-
ness through tied carriers, Insurance Company of
the Bahamas and Summit, respectively, Bahamas
First had grown through acquiring agents, and
now had a force of ‘tied’ agents.

Several insurance industry sources yesterday
likened 100 per cent-owned or ‘tied’ agents to a
form of ‘direct selling’ of insurance policies to
consumers by a carrier. They suggested that it
raised competition concerns, especially among
the broker and agent segment of the Bahamian
insurance market.

FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.




JUDGE PARKER
l

Ht CONGRATULATIONS, GON. --
YOU'RE OFFICIALLY
JUDGE PARKER!



( HE JUST CAME IN
THIS MORNING

ke

RORY
sesecend

Wy WHAT ARE
THEY FIGHTING



CALVIN & HOBBES

CALVIN, YOU'VE GOT TWO
SECONDS TO UNLOCK THIS
DOOR AND GIVE ME BACK
WY SCIENCE NOTES!








©1989 Universal Press Syndicate

*A LAND OF MILI AN’ HONEY MUST BE FULL

OF COWS AN’ BEES.”

Across
1 Builder of a lodge (5) 2
8 Purchase from bar before 3






time (8)
9 It pours tea to us quietly, 4
by design (5)
10 Get a tube-shaped 5
loaf (8)
11. Consented to give up a 6
vice (5)
12 Was no faster (3) 7

16 Performs a new ascent (6)

17 It may be pronounced with 12
conviction (6)

18 Massaging the middle may 13
prevent it! (3)

23 Brew of beer left to 14
rise (5)

24 Succeeds with a will (8) 15

25 Beautiful girl one may ring, 19
we hear (5) 20

26 One virus possibly picked
up on holiday (8) 21
27 It’s near the
cathedral (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Lion's share, 6 Fair, 10
Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone,
13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19
Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24
Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29
Seal, 30 Celebrated.

Down: 1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam,
4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod
and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars,
16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea
mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager,
26 Heed.



TM TOLD THAT WHEN YOU
3f TUG THAT STRING, HE RECITES
5, WASHINGTON’S FAREWELL SPEECH



YOU KNOW, ROSALYN, I'D
SUGGEST YOU ADOPT A MORE
HUMBLE ATTITUDE, You
NOOLDNT WANT ANYTHING
To HAPPEN YO THESE a



CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down

THERE WILL ONLY
BE ONE JUDGE
PARKER, DAD!

RS

www.Blondie.com

YOU SCUMMY ~
LITTLE TROLLS?
WHEN YOUR
PARENTS GET

Sunday

ANP, YOU'LL NEED A
SEASONED GAVEL..-
WITH MY COMPLIMENTS!



(T LOOKS *
LiKE DiRT










THANKS-_-
IT WILL BE AN
HONOR TO
USE IT!






O LONG,

sainjead Bury fa S03)

peniesal s} 44 pyony “ouy ‘sleapuig s

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to

















Difficulty Level *

Ambitious candidate (8)
Clue mixed with open



abundance (8)

Withdraw in a sort of
trance (6)

Rolled up for the
opening (5)

Italian food father’s taken
without knowing (5)
Plane going up or

down (5)

Some areas short of a
means of transport (3)

It may be consumed from
a cup (3)

Team not assumed to be
of star quality (8)

High church features (8)
Achieve gain? (6)

Oldest tree on the

street (5)

Loudly call out after a plea
for silence (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Colour for putting on (5)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10
Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13
Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19
Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24
Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt,
29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker.

Down: 1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3
Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7
Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14
Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go
berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23
Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star.











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

APT 3-G

I WENT TO A PLAY WITH
JOE KELLY. DON'T TELL ME

I BE, .| ON YOUR

YOU'RE JEALOUS, GARY?/ TOMMIEP| SIDE.

‘i

MARVIN

TM A MEAN,
LEAN FIGHTING
MACHINE!

7 Yow pip
HAGAR GET To











www. kingfaatures.com

uses
words in
the main
body of
Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary
(1999
edition)



SHOULD | NEVER. BESIDES, JOE'S



HE THINKS YOu'RE A GOOD
GUY WHOS

UNDER A LOT

OF PRESSURE

AT WoRK,



©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. Warld rights reserved.

WELL, AT
LEAST I'M
MEAN/

©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc, Workd rights reserved,



PLUS HES Te ONLY ONE WHO OWNS A
HAT WITH HORNS ON IT /




HOW many words of four
letters or more tan vou make
from the letters shown here?
In making a word, each letter
may he used once only. Each
must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
nine-letter word, No plurals,
TODAY'S TARGET

Good 15; very food 22;
excellent 29 (or more). Solution
tomorrow.

SATURDAY'S SOLUTION

adage agar aged agpue arrue
argued auger drag drudge
drug garda gaud gear grade
praded guard guarded
HEADGUARD huge raga
rage raged urge urged













Saturday’s
Sudoku Answer

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Saturday’s
Kakuro Answer























O}N 01/0} Go) PO

OO A/M/—-|o






























Across Down
1 Justice (5) 2 Excessive
8 Count for nothing adoration (8)
(3,2,3) 3 Art of
9 White with clockmaking (8)
age (5) 4 Dome (6)
10 Suffer fall in prestige 2. ele)
6 Extremely
(4.4) important (5)
TM Sortie ts) 7 Debated at length (5)
12. Shrill bark (3) 12 Japanese monetary
16 Czech capital (6) unit (3)
17 Refuge (6) 13 Clawed foot (3)
18 As things are (3) 14 Fortuitously (2,6)
23 Banter (5) 15 Attempt to escape
24 Estrange (8) (3,3,2)
25 Angry growl (5) 19 Right to choose (6)
ini 20 Fortunate (5)
26 Dismiss
contemptuously (4-4) eo
22 Shoot from

27

Small-minded (5)

concealment (5)























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

o B\/oO
o
eON
wt
Nh oO;o

NM] O)® co] oo}c);4+



PO O;WIM/O —/Rigi~N

2/16





North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.



NORTH
@A73
Â¥10865
#Q
&A 10832
WEST EAST
@K8642 #310
Â¥KQ92 VAI743
4105 A98743
KG >
SOUTH
4095
y_
@#KIJ62
&O19754
The bidding:
North East South West
Pass lv 2 & 49
5 & 5 Pass Pass
6 & Pass Pass Dble

Opening lead — king of hearts.

The 160-deal semifinal match
between Brazil and the United States
at the 1985 Bermuda Bowl in Sao
Paulo, Brazil, was one of the most
exciting in world team championship
history. After a nip-and-tuck battle
that the Brazilians led most of the
way, the Americans trailed by only 6
IMPs going into the last two hands.
This was the penultimate deal.

In the Open Room, with a large
partisan audience watching on Vu-
Graph, the Brazilians, seated North-
South, reached six clubs doubled as
shown. The declarer was Marcelo
} Branco, and the cheering throng



















+/O1/ 0) NN] ©] 00)



























3]/9/4/8| i
4\7\6l2| WR7 8(3\9/2Mi1\2
7lsiaii| (eS 4\2/6|1 3 9
stolole| M23, 1 BS 7 M7 [9
MNS 4/817 9 M8 l2
5/8/1/3 6 5/819 RWS 9 /6/1
1|4/5/7| Is cic /2 5\3 aN
1/8/4| Wo 38 WW7\9 BBs (1/9
6/2/5| MNO 3 4 9 7/6/38
3/7/9 | NE 1 8[5\2]7



re AIL Nery ee



Famous Hand

could see that the slam was unbeat-
able, provided Branco guessed how
to play the clubs.

After ruffing the opening heart
Icad, Branco tabled the club qucen,
on which West smoothly followed
low. With the audience — _ far
removed from the playing area —
shrieking “finesse, finesse,” Branco
pondered the situation and finally
called for the ace. Down one for a
loss of 200 points.

At the second table, with a Brazil-
ian pair now holding the East-West
cards, the bidding went as follows:

North East South West
Pass Pass Pass 1@
Pass 29 Pass 49
Pass 5 & Pass s¥

Here, the American North-South
pair didn’t even enter the bidding,
and the Brazilians climbed to five
hearts under their own steam. The
critical bid was West’s leap to four
hearts on minimal values, which
encouraged East to try for slam with
a cuebid of five clubs.

Five hearts might have succeeded
on another day, but on this occasion
declarer found it impossible to over-
come the bad breaks in hearts and
diamonds, and finished down one.

Thus Brazil, with chances to gain
significantly at both tables, instcad
lost 250 points — exactly 6 IMPs —
to throw the match into a dead tie
with one deal remaining. We’ll see
what happened on that deal tomor-
row.

‘Tomorrow: Famous Hand — 2.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 7B



a Ne



The Tribune



ec



oo N D



ith



Carefully consider having a hysterectomy

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Writer

aving a hysterectomy is a

serious decision and one

that should be carefully

considered. A physician
may recommend a hysterectomy for a
variety of reasons, however, in most
cases it is optional and an informed
decision based on one’s medical his-
tory must be made.

In the Bahamas, according to data
collected by the Planning Unit of the
Princess Margaret Hospital, there have
been 1,017 hysterectomies in the past
six years.

Gynecologist/obstetrician, Leon
Dupuch, has been doing hysterec-

tomies for about 15 years and has per-
formed and seen many Bahamian
women who do and do not need this
procedure.

“The most common reason for a
hysterectomy in our country is for the
removal of multiple fibroids. Other
causes include, prolapse, cancer,
endometriosis, pelvic pain, or irregular
bleeding,” Dr Dupuch said.

Dr Dupuch said before a hysterec-
tomy there are a lot of things to con-
sider.

“It depends on their age first of all.
You would not want to do a hysterec-
tomy on someone who has not had
children or who is still quite young.
So if they have completed their fami-
ly, then they can consider the proce-

dure,” Dr Dupuch said.

However, Dr Dupuch stressed that
there are possible alternative thera-
pies which one might wish to try
before choosing to have a hysterecto-
my. Depending on one’s medical con-
dition, drug treatments, D & C, or
pelvic exercises are sometimes helpful.
In the case of pre cancerous cells, cone
biopsy, cryosurgery, or laser therapy
are some of the options available.

“They can try the Mirena coil, which
can help with bleeding, the shot, the
pill and many others. So these things
can be used to help treat the patient.
Another procedure is the endometri-
al ablation, where the lining of the
womb is cut away which avoids having
a hysterectomy in someone who is

within childbearing age,” Dr Dupuch
said.

Many women also fear depression
or other emotional changes following
a hysterectomy. Some women are
afraid they will lose their desire for
sex. Dr Dupuch said this too is untrue
and that their sex life should remain as
pleasurable, if not more pleasurable
once they are free of the cause of the
hysterectomy.

“In parts of Europe, especially in
France, it is quite common to have a
sub total hysterectomy where they
take out just the top part of the womb
and leave the cervix behind because it
is thought that it maintains sexual
function and pleasure but some
women would come in and request

i en '
a F

‘Make a

CO

Miseioetony
to a healthy heart ©

through your feet

FEBRUARY is Heart Month, and you
need to ask yourself what you're doing to
celebrate your own healthy heart? Are you
ensuring that your feet are contributing to a
healthy heart?

You should always be mindful that the
foot, a complex structure composed of
bones, muscles, ligaments, nerves, and blood
vessels must support the entire weight of
the body during walking and standing. Dur-
ing running and jumping, the forces on the
foot can be several times greater than the
weight of the body.

Regular activity goes a long way towards
keeping you and your heart healthy, as well
as lowering your risks for other diseases.

Walking

The easiest exercise out there is walking.
It's simple to do, is low stress on aging knees
and hips, and is incredibly good for you.
The benefits of walking 15 minutes per day
are astounding, and can lead to decreased
chances of heart disease, diabetes and obe-
sity. If you haven't been as active as you
should due to foot pain, seek help. In many
cases you are not wearing proper footwear
for walking and as a result you are doing
more damage to your health than good. I
urge you to get active today, it will save you
money and add years to your life!!!

Specific design

Footwear today is designed for specific
activities, with the support in the area where
pressure may be present, given that partic-
ular activity. For example, if you are walking
for fitness, then you should purchase a 'walk-
er-sneaker' because the pressures on the
foot would be very different than if you
were running. Similarly, many walkers com-
plain of knee pains, which may be because
they are using footwear designed for other
activities.

High tech footwear

If you're looking for something a little
different, consider something revolutionary





like a rocker-soled shoe to enhance your
exercise program and add a little pep to
your step. This type of footwear will defi-
nitely rock your world by directing the body
into a stable and correct walk and reduce the
stress on the joints.

For example, the "MBT" and the ‘Chung
Shi’ line of footwear have been scientifical-
ly designed as dynamic workout tools. Their
unique ‘rocker sole’ design benefits the user

eHelping to reduce cellulite

eToning muscles

eIncreasing circulation

eImproving posture

Reducing lower back pain
Strengthening joints; and
eDiminishing spider and varicose veins

Foot pain

Finally, to avoid foot pain, seek profes-
sional help to assist you with the correct
footwear and support (orthotic) to not only
support your body and foot type but to ade-
quately relieve the pressure presented by
the underlying terrain. Runners who want to
continue running for many more years, need
to ensure that there is enough support
between your foot and the flat and hard
surfaces you run on. Depending on the activ-
ity to which you are doing, you need to seek
the appropriate footwear and support for
that purpose. A professional in the field of
footwear can help you best with your selec-
tion.

¢ Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified
Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solu-
tions, a health and wellness franchise that
focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit,
located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau.

"The views expressed are those of the
author and does not necessarily represent
those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any
of its subsidiary and/or affiliated compa-
nies. Please direct any questions or com-
ments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 327-
FEET (3338).

ANDISAVE!

that,” Dr Dupuch said.

Dr Dupuch said the removal of the
ovaries may cause a decrease in sexu-
al desire because the woman goes into
premature menopause. However, if
the ovaries are not removed during
the procedure, the woman then pro-
duces hormones that continue to stim-
ulate sexual desire

For many women, a hysterectomy
provides an enhanced sense of well-
being and a chance to start a new life,
free of the pain and symptoms which
caused them to choose a hysterectomy.
Whatever method or option she
chooses, it is in the woman’s best inter-
est to explore all the treatment options
available for her particular condition
before choosing a hysterectomy.


















ENERGY SAVING FLOURESCE
COOL & WARM LIGHT BULBS

(Medium & Regular Based Bulbs)

DUTY FREE <=
ITEM!

15 Watt (equal to 75w)....from $4.30
20 Watt (equal to 100w)...from 94, ebeD

23 Watt (equal to 115w)...from $4.55

24 Watt (equal to 120w)...from $8.0 J

AYLOR INDUSTRI

SHIRLEY STREET ° TEL: 322-8941
JPEN: MON - FRI 7:30 am - 4:30 pm ¢ SAT 8:00 am - 12 noo!
Visit our web site at www.taylor-industries.com


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ae

Eating for a healthy heart

‘Loving
Relationships’

@ By MAGGIE BAIN



Intimacy

WHATdoes
being intimate with
someone really
mean? Is it the
sharing and show- |
ing of passion and
desire for some-
one? Is it an emo-
tional connection |â„¢
with someone? One
is sexual intimacy
and the other is an
emotional or psy-
chological intimacy. We see this psy-
chological intimacy in several forms
and it can be either one or two sided.
For example our intimate relation-
ships with our doctors and perhaps
lawyers and accountants can be one
sided as one person is usually the
speaker and the other the listener.
Friends, family and love relationships
are two sided and require both per-
sons to be speakers and listeners. It is
the sharing of our innermost self that
is the basis of the emotional connec-
tion. Not only is each relationship
unique but each person may gain dif-
ferent things from the same relation-
ship. The speaker's pleasure is a sense
of peace or contentment showing
their inner self being listened to with
interest and being understood. The
listener's pleasure is in listening to
the speaker's innermost thoughts.
There is no doubt that we can show
intimacy towards someone in one or
many areas of our lives such as social,
intellectual, spiritual but it is the deep-
ening of this two sided emotional con-
nection that is usually the basis of a
love relationship.

The first step for psychological inti-
macy is for a person to be able to put
their innermost experiences into
thought, and be able to express them
in words. This is often very hard for
people to do particularly if they have
not been brought up in an environ-
ment where they were encouraged to
talk and express their feelings. Sec-
ondly the listener has to be able to
respond in a non critical and accepting
manner to what is being said.
Responding with 'you shouldn't feel
this way’ or ‘couldn't this wait?’ will
not encourage the speaker to open
up and express themselves. A grasp of
what is being said and the importance
of the moment for the speaker is
required. The wonderful effect of this
connection brings great comfort and
security to the relationship. It calms
and sustains individuals because they
feel seen, accepted, and understood.
However for some people the excite-
ment that this new attachment cre-
ates is too difficult to handle and they
run from the relationship. They feel
the emotional closeness but turn away
from it when near the person. They
have difficulty understanding why
they do this and may repeat it in sub-
sequent relationships.

We see the effect of this emotional
attachment in relationship therapy
and the delight and also the distress
that it can cause. The emotional peace
to a person's sense of well being is so
important that if the relationship
comes to an abrupt end a person can
experience depression, anxiety or
stress symptoms.

We can see then that it is essential
early on in a relationship to learn and
develop the skills necessary to emo-
tionally connect to another individ-
ual as this lays the groundwork for
love relationships. It is usually
assumed that women are the ones
who most value the importance of
emotional connection because it is a
way to measure their relationships.
However men also prosper in emo-
tionally rich relationships and do bet-
ter maintaining them when they
develop these skills. Psychological
intimacy is often the trigger for falling
in love and the subsequent sexual inti-
macy allows persons to further know
each other. Understanding the impor-
tance of encouraging this intimacy to
grow allows individuals to shed their
inhibitions during love making and
discover their full sexual potential.

For couples who have not worked
this out, have not been able to con-
nect emotionally, unable to express
themselves, or are overwhelmed with
outside demands, this can become a
difficult problem to overcome. Over
time it becomes increasingly difficult
to behave sexually together when the
emotional connection has become
depleted. A period of dating and get-
ting to know each other prior to intro-
ducing sexual intimacy provides a cou-
ple with an atmosphere of substance
and hopefully longevity to the rela-
tionship. It takes a lot of courage to
realise and also admit to this discon-
nect or loss in the relationship, but it
is this that often brings couples to
relationship therapy.

To rekindle or even fire up for the
first time the desire and intimacy can
bring real energy and passion to the
relationship. With out a doubt it is
worth all the time and effort that it
will require from you. The tantalis-
ing reward will be peace, joy and hap-
piness.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Therapist.
She is a Registered Nurse and a Certi-
fied Clinical Sex Therapist located at
The Centre for Renewing Relation-
ships, Grosvenor's Close West. She
can be contacted by calling 356-7953
or by email at
relatebahamas@yahoo.com

Maggie mn



DID you know that heart disease is
one of the top causes of death in
The Bahamas? The heart is one of
the most important organs in the
body. For it to function well, it is
important that you take care of it.
The food you eat can affect the way
that blood flows through your heart
and blood vessels. If you have a
diet that is high in fat and choles-
terol, it can gradually cause a build
up called plaque in your arteries.
Plaque slows down the blood flow
and blocks small arteries. If the
blockage is in an artery that carries
blood to the heart muscle, then one
suffers a heart attack. If the block-
age is in an artery that carries
blood to the brain, then one suffers
a stroke. The good news is that you
can prevent heart disease or lower
your risk for it. Having a healthy
diet helps to keep your arteries
clear allowing blood to flow freely,
thus reducing your risk for heart
disease.

Here are some tips for a heart-
healthy diet from the American
Academy of Family Physicians:

*Eat less fat (especially butter,
coconut and palm oil, saturated or
hydrogenated vegetable fats such
as Crisco, animal fat in meats and
fats in dairy products.

eUse non-stick vegetable cooking
sprays instead of oils.

eBuy lean cuts of meats and eat
fish, skinless chicken and turkey
instead of beef.

e Try low fat snacks that have been
baked instead of fried, such as pret-
zels.

eTry to limit how many sweets you
eat.

Eat no more than 3 egg yolks per
week (2 if you already have heart
disease), use egg whites or egg sub-
stitutes.

¢Bake, broil, boil or grill foods
instead of frying them.

eHat fewer “fast foods” (burgers,
fried foods) which are high in fat.
Instead, eat more fruits, vegetables
and complex carbohydrates (brown
rice, pasta, whole wheat bread,
grains).

eDrink low calorie beverages, such
as water, unsweetened tea, 100 per
cent fruit juices, and low fat milk.
eMaintain or improve your weight.
Here are some additional heart
healthy tips from the Department
of Health and Human Services,
Food and Drug Administration,
United States of America.

Eat less Fat

eSome fats are more likely to cause
heart disease-saturated fats and
trans fats. These fats are usually
found in foods from animals, such
as meat, milk, cheese, and butter.
They also are found in foods with
palm and coconut oils. Eat less of
these foods. Rather, eat foods con-
taining monounsaturated fats(olive,
canola, peanut, avocado, nuts,

Depression isn’t something you can

ACCORDING to a local physician,
contrary to popular belief, depression is
not something that you can just ‘snap
out’ of. It's more than just a feeling of
being "down in the dumps" or "blue".
More than 14 million Americans, or
more than 6 per cent of adults experi-
ence depression in any given year.
Despite these statistics, depression is
not a normal part of life, regardless of
your age, sex, or health status.

It is thought to be caused by an
imbalance of brain chemicals, and oth-
er factors. When certain chemicals in
the brain (such as serotonin norepi-
nephrine, and dopamine) are out of
balance, depression can occur. Antide-
pressants improve the symptoms of
depression by bringing these chemicals
back into balance.

These are the facts given to an audi-
ence at Doctors Hospital during the
second lecture of their 2009 Distin-
guished Lecture Series schedule. Eager
to gain insight on a topic that has
seemed to affected many Bahamian
families in recent days; the free lecture
was designed to promote awareness
and prevention.

Dr Michael Neville, leading psychia-
trist at Doctors Hospital presented on
the topic of Depression. “The good
news is that depression is very treat-
able. Most patients, even those with
severe depression, show improvement
after they seek treatment. Your doc-
tor will prescribe treatment based on
the pattern of your depression, its sever-
ity, persistence of symptoms, and his-
tory,” said Dr Neville

Depression is a serious medical ill-
ness that involves the brain and the
feelings do not go away. They persist
and interfere with your everyday life.
Symptoms can include:

eSadness

eLoss of interest or pleasure in activ-
ities you used to enjoy

eChange in weight

eDifficulty sleeping or oversleeping

eEnergy loss

eFeelings of worthlessness

eThoughts of death or suicide

The fact is that anyone can get
depression. The first step in fighting
depression is to understand what it is,
how it affects you, and what causes it.
There are also things you can do to

MeL Nie CUM ACCOM wotlte
Camelta Barnes, Shandera Smith
and Lathera Lotmore, Nutritionists
from the Department of Public /
Health Ministry of Health

seeds) and polyunsaturated fats
(Safflower oil, corn oil) found in
plants and seafood.

Eat less Sodium

Eating less sodium can help lower
some people's blood pressure. This
can help reduce the risk of heart
disease.

Sodium is something we need in
our diets, but most of us eat too
much of it. Much of the sodium we
eat comes from salt we add to our
food at the table or that food com-
panies add to their foods. So, avoid
adding salt to foods at the table.

Eat fewer Calories

When we eat more calories than we
need, we gain weight. Being over-
weight can cause heart disease.
When we eat fewer calories than
we need, we lose weight.

Eat more Fiber

Eating fiber from fruits, vegetables,
and grains may help lower your
chances of getting heart disease.

DALE CAN YOU DO SOME

Instead of: Do This:
Whole or 2 percent milk, and
cream- Use 1 per cent or skim
milk

Fried foods- Eat baked,
steamed, boiled, broiled, or
microwaved foods

Lard, butter, palm, and coconut
oils- Cook with unsaturated
vegetable oils, such as corn, olive,
canola, safflower, sesame, soybean,
sunflower, or peanut

Fatty cuts of meat, such as prime
rib- Eat lean cuts of meat or cut off
the fatty parts

One whole egg in recipes- Use two
egg whites

Sour cream and mayonnaise-

Use plain low-fat yogurt, low-fat
cottage cheese, or low-fat or “light”
sour cream

Sauces, butter, and salt- Season
vegetables with herbs and spices

Regular hard and processed
cheeses- Eat low-fat, low-sodium
cheeses

Salted potato chips and other
snacks -Choose low-fat, unsalted

Doctors Hospital lecture

help yourself feel better. Go online
and research the topic. Depression.com
gives these tips to help you understand
depression:

eRecognise early signs. It's impor-
tant to recognise and treat depression as
early as possible, which decreases your
risk of becoming depressed again. If
you pretend the problem isn't there,
it’s probably going to get worse. You
need to watch for the types of events
that contributed to depression in the
past, and be alert for early symptoms.

eSet realistic goals. You may feel
overwhelmed by everything you
"should" be doing at home or at work.
Try not to be hard on yourself. Remem-
ber that depression is an illness and
that you can't force yourself out of it.
Focus on small, realistic goals to ease
yourself back into your work and fam-
ily routine.

eDo what you enjoy. Even if you
don't really feel like it, set aside time to
do things that you like. Get together
with friends. Take a walk. Go to the
movies. Take up a hobby that you set
aside years ago.

eHold off on big decisions. Since
depression can color your outlook on
everything, it’s best to avoid making
any big decisions-quitting a job or mov-
ing, for instance-until you feel better.

eAvoid alcohol. Although you might
think it will help you feel better, alcohol
can make your depression worse.
Depressed people are at special risk of
developing substance abuse problems,
and alcohol interacts with many anti-
depressants.

eExercise. There's more and more
evidence that exercise helps with mild
to moderate depression. When you're
considering an exercise plan, don't be
too ambitious. Find an activity that you
like, start slowly, and work up to exer-
cising three times a week or more for 20
to 30 minutes.

Dr Neville agrees that physical activ-
ity can help people overcome mild to
moderate depression. Any type of exer-
cise seems to help. In addition, he sug-
gested keeping a journal. It may not
always be easy and it can be painful to

tortilla and potato chips and unsalt-
ed pretzels and popcorn

Read the Food Label

The food label can help you eat less
fat and sodium, fewer calories, and
more fiber.

Look for certain words on food
labels. The words can help you spot
foods that may help reduce your
chances of getting heart disease.
The FDA has set rules on how
these words can be used. So, if the
label says “low-fat,” the food must
be low in fat.

Look at the side or back of the
package. Here, you will find
“Nutrition Facts.” Look for these
words:

eTotal fat
eSaturated fat
Cholesterol
eSodium.

Look at the per cent Daily Value
listed next to each term. If it is 5
per cent or less for fat, saturated
fat, cholesterol, and sodium, the
food is low in these nutrients.
That's good. It means the food fits
in with a diet that may help reduce
your chances of getting heart dis-
ease.

Some Other Things You Can Do

eAsk your doctor to check your
cholesterol level. This is done with
a blood test. The test will show the
amount of cholesterol in your
blood with a number. Below 200 is
good. The test will also show the
amount of “good” and “bad” cho-
lesterol. Your doctor can tell you
more about what these numbers
mean.

elf your cholesterol is high, your
doctor may suggest diet changes,
exercise, or drugs to bring it down.
eRegular exercise-such as walking,
swimming, or gardening-can help
you keep your weight and choles-
terol down.

So the conclusion of all this is:
Eat less fat

Eat less sodium

Reduce your calories if you're
overweight

eEat more fibre

eEat a variety of foods

eEat plenty of bread, rice, cereal,
vegetables and fruits

®Reduce or eliminate alcohol con-
sumption

You only have one heart. If you
want to live a long and healthy life,
it is important that you take care of
it by practising healthy eating prin-
ciples, being active and checking
your blood pressure and choles-
terol levels regularly, especially if
you are at risk.

Remember, a healthy heart is a
happy heart and a happy heart is a
healthy heart!



just snap out of’

focuses on depression



write about bad feelings. However, Dr
Neville says writing a journal is one of
the best self-help methods you can use
to learn more about your thoughts and
feelings

Researchers have found that a lot of
people who are depressed feel self-crit-
ical, and may even doubt that their
loved ones really care for them. These
feelings may be symptoms of depres-
sion. Try to push aside these feelings
and talk to the people close to you.
Explain what you're going through.
Ask them for help. Having someone
on your side-someone who encourages
you in your treatment or goes with you
to doctor's appointments-can make a
huge difference in your recovery.

What can you do to help someone
through depression?

eLearn about depression-its causes,
symptoms, and treatments. Knowing
about the condition will help you better
understand what a depressed person is
going through.

¢Do what you can to make sure that
a person with depression gets medical
care. Encourage your friend or loved
one to stick with his or her therapy or
medication. Offer to go with him or
her to appointments as support.

eBe supportive and patient. Listen
to what the depressed person has to
say.

eWithout being pushy, encourage
your friend or loved one to do the
things that he or she used to enjoy. See
friends. Go to the movies. Take a walk.

If someone you know is thinking
about suicide, don't ignore it. Do what-
ever you can to get help for that person.
Get in touch with his or her doctor or
therapist. Depression can run in fami-
lies, and usually starts between the ages
of 15 and 30 and it is much more com-
mon in women. Women can also get
postpartum depression after the birth of
a baby.

There are effective treatments for
depression, including antidepressants
and talk therapy. Talk to your doctors
to find out the best course of treatment
for you.

Small animal
poisonings:
Facts or Fiction

H O W
many times
throughout
his career
does a veteri-
narian hear
the com- lies
plaint “ T is
think my ©
neighbor is
trying or has
poisoned my
pet”- on a
regular basis.

Often the
pertinent
clinical signs are unrelated to any tox-
in, however many times toxicosis is the
source of clinical signs. My colleagues
in the veterinary profession reliably
inform me, that intentional poisonings
inflicted by people are on the rise in
The Bahamas. However, most toxic
exposure in animals are accidental.

Many pets may ingest plants, pesti-
cides, automotive products, and over
the counter prescription drugs avail-
able in or around the home despite the
owner’s best efforts to prevent them
from doing so.

Today because of the age of the
Internet, there are a lot of truths, half
truths, and untruths traversing the
cyber space. There are so many rumors
and misinformation that one must be
careful of the Internet. I will try to give
good information that has been verified
as good about certain poisoning.



1) Ingestion of grapes and raisins may
result in acute renal failure in dogs

This is true- vomiting, lethargy and
polydypsia (drinking a lot of water)
may occur 5 to 6 hours after ingestion
followed by anorexia and diarrhea. The
owner should induce vomiting and
place the animal on fluids.

2) Ingestion of sugarless candy/gum
containing XYLITOL is poisonous to
dogs

‘True- weakness, ataxia and total col-
lapse may occur 30 to 60 minutes fol-
lowing ingestion. Xylitol promotes
insulin release by the pancreases, which
results inprofound hypoglycemia.

3) Ingestion of chocolate can poison
cats and dogs

True- all chocolates contain caffeine
and Theobromine which are toxic. This
causes restlessness, cardiac arrhythmia,
seizures, vomiting and diarrhea.

4) Onions and garlic can be bad for
dogs

True- too much dietary onion and
garlic produce depression rapid heart
and respiratory rates and pale mucus
membranes.

5) Ingestion of poinsettia flowers or
leaves can make cats and dogs sick

True- this plant contains a milky lard
sap that contains diesterpinoid esters.
These are irritants to the animals G.I
systems.

6) Macadamia nuts produce muscle
weakness in dogs

True: weakness, depression, and
vomiting usually occur 6 hours after
ingestion.

7) Centipedes if eaten by pets can
cause harm

True: all centipedes are venomous
and can inflict harm by their bites or
because they have been ingested.

8) Vitamins A and D have toxic
potential for many animals

True: excessive amounts of vitamin
A promotes bone lesions. Excessive
amounts of vitamin D will result in
hypercalcemia and calcium deposits on
soft tissues.

9) Herbal products can harm cats
and dogs

True: when left open and available,
potpourri, garden herbs, cooking pow-
ders, perfumes and any various odor-
ants are similar scent products are
attractive to cats; they are very irritat-
ing to the G.I tract

10) Ingestion of greenie treats is enjoy-
able but not risk free for cats and dogs

True- greenies are hard green, mold-
ed bone shape treats that contain wheat
glutein and other additives. They are
intended to be chewed before inges-
tion to help prevent oral odors, tarter
build up and gingivitis. Unfortunate-
ly, pets occasionally will swallow large
pieces of the hand treats rather than
chew them resulting in gastrointesti-
nal upset.

11) Clorox bleach contains lye and
therefore is potentially dangerous for
dogs

False- this bleach contains Sodium
hypochlorite and not lye. However, this
sodium hypochlorite is still corrosive
and may cause harm for eye and skin
contact. Too often Bahamian owners
wash their floors or kennels on a daily
basis resulting in a lot of skin lesions as
a result of this bleach.

12) Anything and everything can be
potentially toxic for a companion ani-
mal

True- the dose alone makes all the
difference

Every day I am sent an e-mail that
may have some validity, may be clear-
ly erroneous, and sometimes are half-
truths concerning different toxins. I am
called to respond to client concerns
about such electronic posting or rumors
and therefore, I have to use my knowl-
edge, experience and common sense
to provide appropriate, realistic and
professional information. Because there
is on true toxicology labs available to
veterinarians in The Bahamas, many
times we are at a disadvantage and
hence, we do miss some diagnoses.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 9B





Overwhelming stress: What
is your coping capacity?

“The key to managing and coping
with stress is to build the mental agili-
ty and clarity to calmly face your
problems rather than avoiding them.”

If overwhelming stress is taking hold
of you, this article seeks to help.

Stress is really your mental, physical
and behavioural response to anxiety-
producing events. Left unchecked, it
can result in serious physical, psycho-
logical, interpersonal or performance
problems.

Stress is quoted as the number one
cause of many adverse health condi-
tions; reducing efficiency and produc-
tivity at work, causing increased irri-
tability, work pressures and annoy-
ance, all of which directly affects your
overall state of wellness.

Problems stress can cause include:
Heart attacks or strokes

Drug abuse

Ulcers

Physical illness

Hypertension

Migraines

High cholesterol

Insomnia

Depression

Unless you find creative ways to
understand and effectively manage
your stress it will continue to create
much havoc in your personal and pro-
fessional life.

Signs and Symptoms of Stress Over-
load

Often because the word ‘stress’ is
used so loosely, many people do not
appreciate what stress is and how it
can adversely affect their mental and
physical disposition.

In addition, most people pay atten-
tion only to physical aspects of them-
selves; causing stress to go undetected
and inadvertently ignored. In such cas-
es, even neon signs and symptoms
result in no specific change in the way
we manage or deal with stress.

Stress symptoms may include:

Muscle tension

Fatigue

Migraine headaches

Back pain

Problems in relationships

Aggressive behaviour

Weight gain or loss

Fears

Low self-esteem



Anxiety
Inability to concentrate
Spiritual emptiness

The first step to fixing or coping with
any challenge is to acknowledge that
you have a challenge.

It is also important for you to recog-
nise that not all stress is ‘bad’; so you
must understand the full complexity

of stress in order to build your mental
capacity to cope and reduce its adverse
affects on your health.

Here are Ten Ways Reduce Your
Stress:-
1. Work no more than ten hours dai-

ly.

2. Allow at least half an hour for
each meal.

3. Eat slowly and chew well, with-
out too much conversation.

4. Cultivate the habit of listening to
relaxing music.

5. Actively cultivate the habit of
walking, talking and moving at a slow-
er pace.

6. Smile and respond cheerfully
whenever meeting anyone.

7. Consider ways to relax and just
breathe.

8.If emotional and/or sexual rela-
tionships are upsetting you, seek
advice.

9. If you're unhappy at work, take

Peaches & Cream

stock and examine your choices (con-
sider training in a new area etc.). We all
have choices.

10. Concentrate on the present;
avoid the tendency to dwell on past
events and future uncertainties.

Final thoughts...Stress is about atti-
tude. Stress alone does not cause ill-
ness. Stress is neutral until it lands on
us. What we choose to do about it
determines how it will affect us.

Remember- if you continue to use
ineffective methods of dealing with
your challenges, you will continue to
achieve ineffective results.

You can improve your capacity to
cope; but it will only begin when you
decide to make the changes needed.

No matter what you are experienc-
ing, you have the personal power to
make positive change happen.

If you are ready to build your coping
skills and effectively manage your
stress, you are the ideal candidate for
my upcoming No Excuses Goals Pro-
gram. Please send an email to
coach4ward@ Yahoo.com or call

429-6770. Seats Are Limited!

LATE February is a fine time to plant corn
because we can expect dry and sunny weather
through most of April and June, giving ideal
conditions for corn cobs to develop.

The corn we favour these days is far removed
from the flint corn that our grandparents used
to make grits. The accent is on tenderness and
sweetness, but that also means we have to deal
with a myriad of insects that like tenderness
and sweetness. Corn is easy enough to grow
but it is tricky to get perfect full-kernel form
without worms.

Corn needs fertile soil and should be planted
in blocks rather than rows. The size of the block
can vary. If you live in Kansas the block can be
several miles by several miles. Here in The
Bahamas a block is more likely to be about
the size of a dining table.

Plant the seeds as deep as the package tells
you to (usually about 2 inches) and somewhat
closer together than the package suggests.
About 12 inches is fine so long as your soil is
rich and you water regularly.

When your corn approaches maturity you
will notice the male parts (tassels) form on the
top. The ears of corn, usually two to a plant,
develop and then produce ‘silk’, masses of
pearly-white threads that protrude from the
ears. Pollen is produced from the tassels in a
cloud like smoke. Each thread of silk leads to a
position on the cob where a kernel will grow,
once the silk has been pollinated. Wind spreads
the pollen to the silk and the corncob begins to
fatten.

Most corn varieties these days are called ‘sug-
ar enhanced’ (se) and are really sweet. This
sweetness is somewhat ephemeral and the old
advice to have your pot of water boiling before
you pick and shuck your corn (and run back) is
still good.

When is your corn ready for the pot? Peel

back the covering and press a thumbnail against
a kernel. If it spurts milky, it’s mealtime. Any

FROM page 10C

do unto you,” Mrs Stubbs said.
Other winners at the Cacique
awards included:

* Transportation — Glender
Archer-Knowles, Abaco
* Human Resources Devel-
opment — Donald Glass, Grand
Bahama
* Sports, Leisure & Events —
Ambrose Gouthro, Grand
Bahama
* Creative Arts — Steve
Dodge, Abaco
* Handicraft — Eloise Smith,
Nassau
* Sustainable Tourism —
Kingsley Holbert, Exuma
* Minister’s Award for Hos-
pitality - Peggy Thompson, Aba-
co
* Lifetime Achievement —
John “Billy Joe” Gilbert, Grand
Bahama
* Manager of the Year —
Janet Stubbs Rolle, Four Sea-
sons; Exuma
* Employee of the Year —



Standley Williams, Pelican Bay;
Grand Bahama
* Chef of the Year — Car-
olyn Elaine Bowe, Wyndham
Nassau Resort; Nassau
* Supervisor of the Year —
Kevin McKenzie, Atlantis; Nas-
sau
* Sales Executive of the
Year — Myron Jones, Sheraton
Nassau Beach; Nassau
* Hotelier of the Year —
Russell Miller, Ritz Carlton; Nas-
sau
* People’s Choice Secular
Music — Kenneth “KC” Wallace-
Whitfield, Nassau
* People’s Choice Gospel
Music — Minister Charles Drake
and CMA Ensemble
* International Travel
Writer — Jean-Luc Marty, Geo
Magazine; France
* International Tour Oper-
ator — Steffen Boehnke, TUI;
Germany
* Cruise Line of the Year —
Norwegian Cruise Line
* Airline of the Year —
British Airways

LATE February is a fine time to plant corn because we can expect dry and sunny weather through most of
April and June, giving ideal conditions for corn cobs to develop.

days to go.

resistance or a clear juice means a couple more

GARDENER

Let’s get back to those critters. Corn is
attacked by insects more than any other veg-
etable I can think of. Once the silk has formed
the tops of the cobs should be dusted with Sevin
insecticide or an equivalent every two days
without fail. A small and inexpensive dust dis-
penser is handy here. If you shake from the
can you will be wasting a lot of insecticide and
your corn will be horribly costly.

One of the insects that enjoys eating corn is
our old green friend the giant tomato horn-
worm. When it attacks corn, however, it
changes its name to giant corn hornworm.

I was introduced to the se variety Peaches &
Cream in Ontario a few years ago and it is the
variety I recommend for home growing. It is so
called because the kernels are white and yellow.
It has good flavour and is exceptionally sweet.

I personally prefer to boil my ears of corn in
salted and sugared water. The sugar in the
water is not to add sweetness to the corn but to
prevent it losing sweetness. Osmosis and all
that. Once on the plate I use an excess of butter
to help bring out the flavour. An old friend of
mine, a Bajan, likes to boil his ears of corn in
water that has had a few goat peppers and slices
of salt beef added to it.

Definitely different.

There are many other se corn varieties avail-
able besides Peaches & Cream and I would
recommend full season types rather than early
types. We have no fear of frosts here so why not
let our corn develop flavour over a long period.

Plant your blocks of corn every month and
you will have a regular supply of this popular
veggie all through the barbecue season.



Transforming young girls

FROM page 10C

She said there will also be at least one
weekend camp training session to prepare
the new leaders for the upcoming Cari-
Camp in April.

With the training open to all leaders, Mrs
Archer said this will also be a good chance
to prepare camp organizers for the organi-
zations future expansion.

Currently, there are GGA Districts in
Exuma, Eleuthera, Abaco, and Grand
Bahama, however this year the organisa-
tion will work toward establishing addi-
tional districts in Bimini, Long Island,
Andros, and Inaqua.

Past ranger, Chitra Pennerman, said she
hopes to become an active participant of
GGA as a leader, and said her decision to

do so comes from the group being an instru-
mental factor in her success as an adult.

Ms Pennerman said: “When I was
younger it was a must that I go to girl
guides. After school, the routine was for
me to catch the bus from Aquinas every
Friday. Girl guides has instilled morals and
values that I may have lost at home. It has
taught me a lot, and I would like to see
that passed on to girls today.”

Remembers

She remembers her time in the organisa-
tion, where on camping trips she had to
learn how to pitch tents, and learn to cook
an entire meal in one pot.

Rev Higgs who has taken the helm of
the organisation from former President Gail
Saunders, said Girl Guides has always held
a special place in her heart.

Reflecting on her initial days in the organ-
isation as a patrol leader, Rev Higgs said
back then she thought it was the best posi-
tion she could have ever held.

“Tt really gave us a time to get together in
our little groups, and the things that we did
were so wonderful. Throughout guiding
I’ve learnt so much that has helped me in
my career, as a wife, as a mother, it’s just
been wonderful.”

Responding to the importance of the
organisation in any young girl’s life, Rev
Higgs said: “Not only are we aiming to help
and speak up for our girls, but we would
like to allow them to speak out for them-
selves and other girls and young women in
our society.”

Currently, Girl Guides has a member-
ship of 2,303 young leaders in training, with
hope of increased membership in particu-
larly over the next year.

GIVE IN

TO TEMPTATION



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY,

PAGES 7-8 © HEALTH: Body and mind

FEBRUARY



17, 2009

Transforming young girls to women

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen @tribunemedia.net

he Girl Guides Associa-

tion (GGA) of the

Bahamas has for a long

time been known as a

body of change, in its
approach to transforming young girls to
women.

From senators to teachers, this group
has spread its wings and been a factor
for positive change in many Bahamian
women for the past 94 years.

In keeping with that tradition, the
organisation’s newest president Rev
Beryl Higgs, said during her inaugural
press conference last Monday, that
increased recruitment and growth are
among major changes to take place
under the new administration.

GGA Chief Commissioner Julia
Burnside explained that with so many
girls being vulnerable to peer pressure
during their early to mid-teens, the
responsibility falls on the organisation
to inject positive influences as early as
possible.

“In our re-branding, we want to
especially launch a campaign aimed at
attracting girls between the ages of 11
and 16, because we realise that they
present some of the challenges that we
have in society today.

“We’ve found that girls who have
stayed committed to guiding, general-
ly have made some of the better social
and moral choices, and this is some-
thing that we need to use as part of
our re-branding, to attract new mem-
bers,” she said.

The organisation began its annual
guide week last Sunday under the

theme of Stop The Spread of AIDS
and Malaria and Other Disease.

Starting with a division-wide pro-
cession from the RM Bailey field on
Robinson Rd, the group marched to
the Christ the King Anglican Church in
Ridgeland Park for a church service.

On Monday both Brownies and
Sunflowers gathered at their division
headquarters, where they were taught
about the causes and symptoms of
many diseases affecting the world
today.

The youngsters were also given tips
on how they can now influence change
through GGA, and later on in their
adult lives.

The same group along with their
leaders prepared gift baskets for resi-
dents of the AIDS Camp, which was an
important initiative for the organisa-
tion.

GGA executives explained, the exer-
cise was not only planned to show its
commitment to those affected by the
disease, but to also sensitize others on
the importance of prevention and pro-
tection.

On Friday, the older guides and
rangers are scheduled to take part in an
expedition, where they'll hopefully dis-
cover cleverly hidden ribbons in vari-
ous parts of Nassau.

In the end, organisers envision the
girls gaining a more comprehensive
understanding about multiple life-
threatening diseases, and ways to stay
healthy.

The following day, all girls along
with their leaders will go into several
communities, where they will share
their knowledge on the diseases by
becoming prevention ambassadors.

GGA International Commissioner

Karen Lightbourne, said the highlight
of Girl Guide week, will be an organ-
ised tea party for the all local GGA
members.

“Because talking about diseases can
be tough for some of the girls, we will
bring in a guest speaker to talk about
the benefits of living a healthy life.”

In an effort to continue the tradition
of Girl Guides with young women who
have grown past the rangers level,
GGA deputy chief commissioner for
training Nicolette Archer, said she is
looking forward to training “The new
flock of leaders” this March.

“We're going to begin level one and
orientation training on March 2, which
will durate for five consecutive Mon-
days at GGA headquarters from 6pm
to 8.”

SEE page 9

The barber shop, ‘where men are free to be men’

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Features Reporter
lallen @tribunemedia.net

WHEN compared to women, men in many
respects have suffered the negative results of not
being able to discuss, share, and reveal without
bias the issues that truly matter to them with
each other.

From their fears of not measuring up as a “real
man,” to their sexual, emotional, and religious
insecurities, many men have fallen victim to this
social crisis that some argue may have far reach-
ing effects.

In many communities there is however one
haven where men are free to be men, a place
where they can be as candid and as blunt about
issues such as the effects of the feminists move-
ment, their views on God, or even their thoughts
on intimacy and love, where they are not criticised
for the way they feel.

The barber shop is that place, where men can
let their guards down and just speak their minds
on the things that matter to them.

This week, Tribune Features visited New Links
Barber and Beauty Salon located on Bay Street,
where a small group of guys were discussing the
recent spate of suicides, and were trying to under-
stand why men seemed to be the most at risk in
this growing problem.

Proprietor Rodger Lloyd feels, there is a direct
link between the lack of men discussing their



ae es
RODGER LLOYD hard at work in the barber shop...
(Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

feelings, and the growing number of men willing
to take their own lives.

“You don’t really know who you could trust to
talk to, so most men prefer to keep things deep
down inside and try to rationalise it within them-
selves.”

Being a family man, Rodger feels men in his
position are particularly under threat, and should
reach out to their male counterparts for support
and guidance.

He said in a society where the fear of not mak-
ing the grade can result in a man being ostracised,
and where the appearance of having around-the-
clock confidence is considered normal male

AY bi AN $I uN!
Bar er, 0]
behaviour, the realities of feeling bad or showing
emotions are forced into a box.

He explained this forced internal battle, is now
telling the community that men just like women
need to be able to talk about their feelings.

Keith Minus, a 37-year-old church minister,
said there is a spiritual air of depression and sui-
cide, taking hold of many men- who feel cor-
nered by the pressures of a tough economic peri-
od.

“The devil is out for the man, because the Bible
declares that we are made in the image and like-
ness of Christ. If he (Satan) can remove the fam-
ily head with that spirit of suicide, then he will suc-
ceed in weakening the family structure.”

Keith explained that through his understanding
of the Bible, the female is the “weaker vessel” in
any marriage or union, and as good men are
forced to take their own lives, future generations
will become easy targets for Satan.

Entrepreneur Stephen St Clair-Serrette also
shared those sentiments, and said because both
men and women over the years have walked
away from traditional Christian values, it is not
hard to understand the decision of committing sui-

cide by some people.

This issue, is one that hit Stephen close as sui-
cide victim 42-year-old Nikita Brennen was his
close and dear friend.

Despite the common Christian belief that an act
of suicide essentially serves as a one way ticket to
Hell, Stephen said he believes because of the
love his friend had for God, “he is resting in the
Almighty’s arms,”.

He insisted that society get back to the basics.

“Those things that worked in the past will work
again, we have to raise our children in the fear
and the admonition of God, we must follow the
commandments of God.

“We need to go back to the days when we
picked in the neighbours’ clothes from the rain,
where we can share bread and sugar with them,
go back to those things to show that we care.”

Rodger feels the lack of a good social model
for young people to follow, has also played a role
in the disappearance on “the old ways” that has
kept the Bahamian people together in the past.

“On basic cable you have homosexuality, nudi-
ty, profanity, corruption, on public transporta-
tion there are children watching and listening to
explicit materials, we just need to go back to the
values that protect our children and in essence
protect all of us.”

Although these men share diverse views on
the recent cases of suicide and other incidents of
violence in the country, they share a common
desire that through talking, change can come.

13th Cacique Awards: Outstanding women recognised for work in tourism

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Features Writer

AS women continue to make
great strides professionally in the
work world, two outstanding
young women in the tourism
industry have been recognised
for their work in service to the
country’s number one industry
during the 13th annual Cacique
Awards.

Chef Carolyn Elaine Bowe
had always wanted to be a chef
from the age of 12. She never let
go of those dreams and took on
every opportunity she had. Since
then she has been employed as a
chef since 1988 and presently is
the head chef at Seaside Restau-
rant, overseeing 28 staff.

Ms Bowe said being a female
chef in the Bahamas is not a day
at the park as there are a lot of
things that may get in the way.

“T think the fight is so much
greater for women because we
have to show our strength in
many different ways. We have
to prove we can lift things, show
that we are aggressive, and be
able to show that we can lead
and not follow,” Ms Bowe said.

Ms Bowe said she was very

excited to know that she was
recognised for such an award and
to win.

“T have never looked for any-
thing in my life in terms of peo-
ple rewarding me because I do
what I do because I enjoy it,”
Ms Bowe said.

Ms Bowe said as a part time
chef instructor at the University
of the West Indies, she would
encourage students to enjoy their
passion.

“T always encourage students,
especially those coming out of
high school, to enter the young
chef competition because I think
that is a good start for them to
pursue their career. The compe-
tition gives a bit of pressure and
it gives them a feel to see if being
a chef is what they really want to
do and if they can handle that,
they can go further,” Ms Bowe
said.

Chief Concierge at Four Sea-
sons Resort Great Exuma at
Emerald Bay, Janet Rolle
Stubbs, was instrumental in
establishing the Concierge and
Guest Services departments at
the property. Her efforts in the
field have raised service levels
among her employees.

Carolyn Seine Bowe

Mrs Stubbs said her initial
reaction to winning is one she
will soon not forget.

“My initial reaction was shock
and I felt that my heart was
going to burst. My husband
nudged me and said ‘Janet that's
you' I took a deep breath and
started walking up to the podi-
um. While I was walking up I
realised it was real! I am deeply
appreciative and greatly hum-
bled and honored,” Mrs Stubbs
said.

Being able to be recognised
from a Family Island is a great

1,
Janet Rolle Stubbs



accomplishment not only for her
but also for the Four Seasons
Resort in Exuma she added.
“When you live on an out
island it is harder for you to be
recognised, because of the loca-
tion. Working on the island and
especially in the area that I am
in, it is sometimes challenging
because everything is not at your
fingertips like in Nassau or
Freeport. When guest asks for
items that are not on the island,
you have to go above and
beyond to ensure that the guests
requests are honoured and they

are happy,” Mrs Stubbs said.

Mrs Stubbs said the support
from her bosses, coworkers, her
mother and the smiles of satis-
faction on the faces of the guests
as they depart is her inspiration
to continue to in the service
industry.

“When people believe in you
and allow you to make decisions
on your own, it encourages and
inspires you to know that you
have their support. We also have
an awesome training program,
that helps you grow in many
areas in regards to your job and
performance. Four Seasons
gives you so many opportunities
for growth and their main inter-
est is to promote and focus from
within. I am a people person that
Four Seasons took and trained,
supported and encouraged so
that I could enjoy the structure
and be successful in it. Over the
years, in my life's journey, I have
had a lot of people who believed
in me and seen my true potential
before I have realised it. They
brought out the best in me and
believed in me. I am indeed
grateful to every one of them,”
Mrs Stubbs said.

Mrs Stubbs, in offering words

of wisdom to other young
women in tourism, said she
would encourage them to stay
focused and to set achievable
goals.

“Once you work with people
you must be approachable and
be a team player. It is important
to give your best every day at
everything you do. Do not limit
yourself to one area, and try to
learn all you can about different
jobs in your field because knowl-
edge is indeed power. There will
be days you will not get every-
thing right, but you will know
what to do better for next time.
There is nothing wrong with
making mistakes, the good thing
is, you can learn from them.
Once you do your job because
you love it, you will achieve
much more, because it comes
from your heart. Do not get dis-
couraged and listen to what peo-
ple may say about you or do to
try to discourage you. Remem-
ber that people only talk about
people who are making a differ-
ence. Most important, always
remember the golden rule- Do
unto other as you will have them

SEE page 9

Discover the goodness
of Ovaltine.

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8
REPORT xmlns http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance xsi:schemaLocation http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitssReport.xsd
INGEST IEID E6A2R3TFT_5JGEQ8 INGEST_TIME 2011-08-11T19:15:09Z PACKAGE UF00084249_01243
AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT UF PROJECT UFDC
FILES



PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Man is injured in downtown shooting C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.71TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER SUNNY AND BREEZY HIGH 75F LOW 64F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION At the barber shop SEEPAGEELEVEN Hugh Campbell Tournament n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net TOURISTS woke to the sound of gunshots in the streets of downtown Nassau early yesterday when violence erupted across from a hotel on the Western Esplanade. Police cars filled Augusta S treet at around 4am and a 28year-old man who had been shot in the lower back was taken to hospital by ambulance. His condition is not life-threatening. The injured man told police that three men outside his Augusta Street home next to the Envy nightclub on Bay Street, called him. He said shots were fired when he went outside to speak to them. Guests at El Greco Hotel across the street, who had been kept awake until 4am by music blaring from the nearby nightclub, rushed down to reception after hearing the shots to find out what had happened. The following morning 10 of the 24 guests in the 27-room hotel checked out because they did not feel safe. They told staff they had been kept awake nightly by noise from the club which persists until 4am, and some had been solicited by prostitutes on the street. The Mayfair building, opposite the hotel on Augusta Street, was raided by police and immi gration officials last year when it was found that a brothel was being operated from the apart ments. And although activity stopped for some time, hotel guests are again complaining of streetwalkers. Mike Pikramenos, part owner of El Greco, said such activ ity is ruining the area. He said: “They are attracting the wrong elements and it makes it hard for anybody to stay here for a couple of nights. It’s extremely dangerous for anyone. “It’s affecting the Strip adversely, and they are trying to improve it, but it’s difficult when you get elements which should be controlled by the police. “We have people running around with guns and it’s crazy. “With the economy as bad as it is, these people are just making it worse.” Hotel manager Yolanda Stra chan added: “People will stay here for a few days or a week and they come back, but now Guests check out of hotel after hear ing gunshots nearby The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E S P O R T S n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A HAITIAN boat captain was sentenced to four years in prison yesterday after pleading guilty to charges stemming from the seizure of nearly $14 million worth of cocaine in Great Inagua last week. Lucio Blanc, 39, of La Tortue, Haiti, with the aid of a Creole interpreter, pleaded guilty before Magistrate Carolita Bethel yesterday to charges of conspiring to import cocaine, conspiring to possess cocaine with intent to supply, importation of cocaine with intent to supply and possession of cocaine with intent to supply. Blanc's lawyer, Mary Bain, told the Magistrate that Blanc has a wife and seven children in Haiti and submitted that he had not wasted the court's time having pleaded guilty to the charges. Magistrate Bethel took into consideration the fact that he had been forthright and pleaded guilty to the charges. She also noted that there was a significant amount of drugs involved. Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor, told the court that officers from the police Drug Enforcement Unit, Defence Force base in Inagua and US Coast Guard had intercepted the 77-foot blue and white vessel Blanc had captained, just off Great Inagua. He told the court that six men were discovered onboard the vessel. The prosecutor told the court that after removing several planks onboard the vessel, 361 packages of cocaine were found. He said that the drugs weighed 900 pounds and had a 39-y ear-old man pleads guilty to charges n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The trial of a police officer accused of bribery resumed in the Supreme Court on Monday with the accused giving sworn testimony from the witness stand in his defence. Constable 2372 Pierre Martin, 25, is charged with soliciting a bribe. He is also charged with two counts of accepting a bribe. Lawyer Carlson Shurland is representing Martin, who has been interdicted from the Roy al Bahamas Police Force. Justice Vera Watkins is presiding over the trial. Prosecutors Jillian Williams, Simon Rolle and Erica Kemp of the Attorney General’s Office appear on behalf of the Crown. Officer Martin is accused of bribing Garrick Lewis on February 14, 2007. Lewis was arrested on February 5 at West End for using obscene language, resisting arrest, and making threats of death against Officer Martin. It is alleged that Martin approached Lewis after his arraignment in the Eight Mile Four years for Haitian boat captain in connection with drug seizure SEE page eight MAN CHAR GED WITH MURDER n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A 26-YEAR-OLD man of Yellow Elder Gardens was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday on charges of murder, burglary and attempted armed robbery. Police have charged Valdez Bowleg in the March 14, 2008 murder of Edward Clarke. Clarke, 52, the country’s 16th murder victim for 2008, was found shot to death on Old Boat Alley, off Market Street where he lived. Ini tial police reports stated that two armed men attempted to enter a home in the inner city neighbourhood near the time of the murder, but were thwarted when the home owner alerted neighbours of the attempted break-in. Residents of the area reportedly caused a ruckus, which prompted the assailants to flee the area. Gun shots were reportedly heard as the armed men escaped the area and Clarke’s lifeless body was later found in the street with gun shot wounds. Bowleg, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane yesterday, is also VALDEZ BOWLEG outside of court yesterday. SEE page eight Police officer accused of bribery testifies SEE page eight A FLORIDApilot on his way to Bimini crashed his plane after hitting a flock of vultures in Ft Lauderdale. No-one was killed in the crash. The birds cracked the window of the Cessna twin-engine plane and the pilot radioed that he would make an emergency landing. He landed safely at the Fort Lauderdale airport, sustaining minor injuries. Pilot crashes on way to Bimini SEE page eight T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 2

n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE CHAIRMAN of the committee which wants to see gambling legalised in the Bahamas yesterday applauded the Rotary Club of East Nassau for deciding to stage a gaming night as part of its fundraising efforts. The night of “Texas Hold’em, Roulette, Blackjack and a grand raffle” is set to be held on February 28. No cash prizes will be won as a result of the poker/roulette/black jack, according to Rotary club organiser, Joanne Smith, but participants will get a chance to win raffle prizes and test their gamblingt alents for charity. Sidney Strachan, chairman of the Bahamas Gaming Reform committee, said the more Bahamians who show they may be for a change in the country’s “antiquated” gam ing laws, the better. He said he would “love to attend the event” and thinks the club should go fur-t her and play for money. “Definitely I will be there – I can’t wait. I think we need a lot more Bahamians to openly chal lenge the law. Atlantis just held one (a poker tournament see why Bahamians can’t hold one,” he said. The BGR committee maintains that the country’s gaming laws – which prohibit Bahamians from, among other activities, gambling in casinos, playing the lottery or participating in poker games for cash – are discriminatory and outdated. Yesterday Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister and an East Nassau Rotarian, said he would not be attending the Rotary game night. But he confirmed when asked that he is still for a referendum on the question of whether gambling should be legalised in the Bahamas, as he stated in the House of Assembly in 2005. At the time he suggested that the government was “hypocritical” for failing to hold a nationwide vote on the issue. An email advertising the Rotary’s “Mock Casino” event states that admission will be $20 and raffle tickets $100. It adds that first place prize for those playing poker, roulette or blackjack will be per cent of the purse”, while second place will win 12 per cent and third place, seven. But Rotarian Ms Smith maintained in an interview with The Tribune yesterday that no monetary prizes will be awarded and all funds raised and prizes will be through the raffle. “We’ve gotten permission from the Gaming Board (for the raffle),” she added. Secretary of the Gaming Board and former police commissioner Bernard “BK” Bonamy empha sised that to play for cash would be illegal – even if the majority of the proceeds go to charity. Raffle While entities can apply to the Ministry of Tourism, which will seek the advice of the board, fora pproval to hold a raffle, “there is no such thing as a poker permit,” he said. Mr Strachan said the illegality of gambling for Bahamians is a civil rights issue, and reflective of an th century mindset.” He said the country “wants to sit on both sides of the divide” when it c omes to the subject – with gov ernment so far supporting the status quo, while appearing impotent to enforce the law, which is widely known to be broken by citizens from a broad cross-section of society. H oping to push their agenda to another level, the BGR committee i s shortly set to conduct its own sur vey, likely in conjunction with the College of the Bahamas, into the prevalence of gambling and Bahamian attitudes towards it. Mr Strachan said he expects the findings to show that many Bahamians take part in gambling on a regular basis and support a change in the law. “We’ll make another appeal to the government based on those findings. We’ve met with the Gaming Board and we’re kind of confident that they want it (to change he said. “Our intention is to bring it (the debate government can actually act on it,” he added. Conditions under the present government appear to be the most favourable for a shift in policy. In late 2008 Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham told a Meet the Press conference, in response to a question, that he would not be a “proposer or proponent” of changing the law. However, he encouraged those who are pro-change to “step up, make their positions known and tell the public”, adding: “I will not be a vote that stands against you.” He has previously declared that the law against Bahamians gambling is “not an enforceable law and society is doing it everyday.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The man killed in a traffic accident on Sunday has been identified as 26-year-old La’vaughn Fernando Kristain Munroe of Grand Bahama, a former member of the Bahamas’ Davis Cup Team (see Sports ). The death of the tennis player pushed the island’s traffic fatality count to three for the year. The accident occurred around 1.15pm on Sunday on Midshipman Road in the vicinity of Palm Gardens. Mr Munroe, an employee at the Freeport Container Port, was driving a black 1995 Ford Mustang with the licence plate number 45532. Asst Supt Clarence Reckley said Mr Munroe lost control of the vehicle and crashed into a tree. Mr Munroe was taken by ambulance to Rand Memorial Hospital, where doctors officially pronounced him dead. The vehicle, police said, was extensively damaged. M r Reckley said the front section of the car broke off and was thrown some 45 feet on impact. Police are continuing their investigations into the accident. Pro-gambling committee chairman applauds Rotary Club for gaming night decision Crash victim was former Davis Cup Team member THE DW Davis Junior High School received a defibrillator donated by Doctors Hospital and the South Miami Heart Centre. Making the presentation to the school’s principal Abraham Stubbs was Janisse Post, senior manager of project development and research outcomes at the South Miami Heart Centre. She said several defibrillators were purchased for schools in South Miami and the Bahamas through a donation from a caring philanthropist. A defibrillator is an apparatus used to control and regulate the heart beat by application of an electric current to the chest wall. Bringing remarks on behalf of Minister of Education Carl Bethel was Lionel Sands, acting director of education, who said the govern ment aims to ensure that the country’s children are in an environment that is safe, healthy and conducive to learning. He explained that on any given day, our school campuses house thousands of children of varying needs, which may include health issues. For this reason, he said, the Ministry of Education is grateful for the defibrillator, which will be of great assistance in emergencies related to the heart. Mr Sands explained the school began to prepare for the defibrillator in the summer of 2008, when training sessions were held for administrators and teachers in cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR and First Aid procedures. School r eceives donation of a defibrillator THE FORD MUSTANG crashed into a tree on Midshipman Road. THE FRONT section of the vehicle ‘broke off’.

PAGE 3

n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net BAHAMASAIR said there is no cause for alarm following the deadly plane crash in New York which involved an aircraft manu factured by the company which supplies a portion of the national flag carrier's fleet. Preliminary information emerging from US Federal investigations into the crash have linked the disaster to the use of autopilot during severe icy conditions – notany manufacturing flaw. "We don't have any need to be overly concerned and that (infor-mation) doesn't suggest that there was a problem with the aircraft," Bahamasair managing director Henry Woods told The Tribune yesterday. "So we still feel as though the aircraft is most suit able for our services and very reli able. So there is no cause for alarm". Bahamasair operates six 50seater Dash 8 Q300s, a smaller and older model than the Dash 8 Q400 which crashed last week. Both models are made by Cana dia-based firm Bombardier. Since the crash last Thursday, it has emerged the plane's crew were flying on autopilot during severe icy conditions until 26 seconds before it barreled into a home outside Buffalo, New York. Some aviation experts contend that the use of autopilot in icy con ditions can prevent pilots from real ising the severity of icy weather. It was also reported that both the American National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB turer recommend that pilots disengage autopilot during severe icy conditions, but the Federal Aviation Administration has not adopted that recommendation. A complete report on the cause of the crash is not expected for at least a year, the NTSB told the media. In the meantime, Mr Woods stressed that Bahamasair's fleet is subjected to rigorous maintenance checks that trump some international standards. "It's a combination of calendar, landings, daily and hourly (checks prescribed by the manufacturer and the Airways Authority to determine the maintenance pro gramme and the frequency of maintenance to be performed. But it's a very rigid programme, very rigid," he said. "I would say in-house we do check, and we have a preventa tive maintenance programme that goes above and beyond the requirements of the manufacturer and the Airways Authority. We exceed that". Mr Woods urged the public not be afraid to fly in the aftermath of this latest crash, explaining thata person has a better chance of being injured at home than onboard an airplane. "You have to take into consideration the tens of thousands of aircraft in operation and the hundreds of thousands of flights that operate per day. Well, a single incident – “fraction” is not a fitting word of a percentage of people that fly. So I don't think this will be a deterrent," he said. On Thursday, Continental Connection Flight 3407 en route to Buffalo from Newark crashed, killing 49 people including the crew, and one person on the ground. It was the first deadly crash in commercial aviation in two years. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 3 n B y NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter THE retrial of the men accused of the 2006 m urder of local businessman Keith Carey began i n the Supreme Court yesterday. Jamal Glinton, Sean Brown and Dwight Knowles are charged in Carey’s murder and are also standing trial on charges of armed robbery and conspiracy to commit armed robbery. During his opening statement, prosecutor A nthony Delaney told the jurors that the prose cution intends to call Vaughn Carey – the victim’s cousin – as a witness in the case. Vaughn Carey had initially been charged with c onspiring to commit armed robbery. Those charges have however been dropped. Dwight Knowles previously served as a prosecution witness but was later charged in connection with Carey’s murder. T his came after Knowles testified in court that police had coached him to give his statement and t hat the statement he gave to police was false. On February 27, 2006, Carey, 43, a father of three, was gunned down on the steps of The Bank of the Bahamas on the Tonique Williams-Darling Highway before he was able to deposit $40,000 that belonged to the Esso Service Station whichh e operated. A ccording to the prosecution, a young man got out of a white Maxima, robbed Carey, then shot him twice before fleeing the scene in thec ar. Detective Corporal 1212 Lavardo Sherman, a crime scene technician, was the first witness calledt o testify yesterday. Mr Sherman told the court that he photographed the crime scene. He also told the court that he took pictures of the victim at the morgue o f the Princess Margaret Hospital and was present for the post mortem examination by Dr Govinda Raju on Friday March 2, 2006. Detective Constable Garnell Rolle testified that he took photographs of a white Nissan Maxima allegedly used in the crime. Deputy director of Public Prosecutions Cheryl G rant-Bethel is the lead prosecutor in the case. Attorneys Craig Butler and Devard Francis are representing Jamal Glinton, attorney D orsey McPhee is representing Sean Brown and attorney Perry Albury is representing Dwight Knowles. n B y TANEKA THOMPSON T ribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net JOB prospects for students leaving school this year will be worse than in 2008, Labour Min-i ster Dion Foulkes told T he Trib une y esterday. The global economic turmoil has led to a series of lay-offs – around 1,000 last year from the hospitality sector alone and dozens already this year – andt his spells bad news for new e ntrants into the job market. But Minister Foulkes said there may be an increase in white-collar jobs in the construction industry, with opportunities in clerical, architecturaland engineering work due to government's capital works pro-j ects. "We are experiencing a downturn, the (job be as bright as they were last year, but there are still jobs out there to be gotten. The Labour Exchange for example referreds uccessfully last month 60 new persons into (job So there are jobs that are becomi ng available, but the job market isn't as vibrant as it was last year. " The jobs that the government i s focused on creating hopefully w ill also create some opportunities for some of the persons who are graduating," Mr Foulkes said. A bout 500 people are currently employed in several Ministry of Works projects in various infrastructure programmes, Mr Foulkes said in a recent inter view with The Tribune. S ince July 2008, some 1,500 people have been employed in the Ministry of Housing’s buildi ng programme, while another 5 00 are currently working on the Department of Environmental Services’ beautification programme for New Providence. By June 2009, government expects 400 workers to bee mployed in the New Providence Road Improvement Pro ject and other similar road infrastructure works throughout the islands. Another 400 persons are e xpected to be hired for phase o ne of the Lynden Pindling International Airport (LPIA redevelopment, Mr Foulkes said earlier. However, many of these jobs w ill be short-term and have a high turn-over rate. As the uncertainty surrounding job opportunities increases, some officials at the College of the Bahamas (COB ly encouraging students tob ecome more “versatile.” "With the recession, I don't think we're going to have lots of opportunities like we normally would. And a lot of the hotels are laying off people, so I see this year as being a little bit diff icult in terms of finding certain types of jobs,” said an educator at the college who asked not to be named. We don't know if it's going to g et worse, if it's going to get bett er it's a little bit scary.” Students The educator said most stu d ents in her department search for hospitality related jobs. However, due to the downturn in that sector, she is encouraging them to branch out into other fields. "They are going to now have t o start thinking about other fields, not just hospitality. Make themselves more marketablea nd studying things that are going to make them attractiven ot just in one field, but in different fields, more versatile," said the educator. COB career and placement c ounsellor Norma Turnquest told The Tribune that her office has seen a significant decline in requests for student placement over the past few months. "I noticed since December actually, whereas we used toh ave calls just about every day in terms of requests for students, in late December I got maybe two calls. Definitely the employment market is down because we do not get the kind of calls we used to in the past," she said. Job prospects for school leavers ‘worse than 2008’ A FREEPORT man was yesterday arraigned in the Grand Bahama Magistrates Court Three on a rmed robbery and receivi ng charges. It is alleged that on Febr uary 7, Bernard Ferguson, w hile in Freeport, robbed t wo expatriates of cash. He was not required to enter a plea to the armedr obbery charge and the matter was adjourned to June 9. In a separate matter, Ferguson was also arraigned along with Javardo Cooper on robbery c harges in Court One. I t is alleged that on Febr uary 7, Ferguson and Cooper robbed the Sav-AD ollar store in the West Mall Plaza. Cooper was granted $1,000 cash bail and Fer-g uson was remanded to H er Majesty’s Prison in New Providence. The matter was adjourned to July3 0, 2009. Dion Foulkes Man in court on armed robbery, r eceiving charges Retrial of men accused of murder of businessman gets underway THE WRECKAGE of Continental flight 3407 lies amid smoke at the scene after crashing into a suburban Buffalo home and erupting into flames late Thursday Feb. 12, 2009. D a v e S h e r m a n / A P Bahamasair: no cause for alarm after NY plane crash

PAGE 4

EDITOR, The Tribune. T HANKyou for allowing m e to vent my ever increasing frustration with the medi cal and nursing “professionals” of this nation. Recently I had a relative admitted to our illustrious” governmentoperated hospital. They had u ndergone surgery and was then placed on one of the public wards. T o my chagrin each day that I visited said relative I r eceived the most unsettling, blood-boiling reports of frank negligence on both the part oft he nurses and physicians concerned with their care. T he paramount complaint was that no one either physician or nurse had the forth-r ightness to explain/teach: 1) the client’s condition in light of the presenting signsa nd symptoms 2) the planned procedures i e blood tests, radiology or surgical plans 3 ) pre-and post-operative preparatory activities for the patient, including pain man a gement; the withholding of oral sustenance for a period o f time; how and when activi ties of daily living/self-care activities would resume fol-l owing surgery. Hence, I wonder how informed consent was obtained seeing that the nec essary teaching (a standard p art of pre-op preparation) was not provided despite the questioning by the patient of the “professionals” responsible for her care. W ouldn’t it be a case of assault since the patient although lucid and oriented in all spheres signed a consent form without the obligatedi nformation? To add insult to injury my relative remarked that when-e ver she asked either doctor or nurse questions regarding her condition and care she was m ade to feel “crazy” and dismissed with inappropriate comments and feigned igno rance of the case. Funny how a client will be informed by the grapevine that their case is the hottest topic around the water cooler, but they themselves cannot formally receive said inform ation. Secondly, is it customary to t rain physicians and nurses to be cold, uncaring, uncivilised, disrespectful, asinine purvey-o rs and practitioners of the art of medicine and nursing? I think it not too difficult or t oo much to ask or expect that they 1 ) are professional at all times. 2) actually listen to and conv erse with (and not at or over the heads of) their patients, e specially when they are clearly conscious and alert, capable of understanding the infor-m ation/feedback that is required to be given. 3 ) uphold the sanctity of the oath they took when receiving their so long sought after white coat” and upon receipt of licensure with the Nursing Council. 4) treat their patients (which for those who didn’t knowi ncludes the family or care givers) as though it were themselves or a relative, bestf riend with tender loving care, and at least a modicum of r espect and honour. 5) exude passion for serv ing patients going above a nd beyond the call of duty for both the pauper and the k ing, even in the worst cir cumstance or environment. Also, why is it painfully o bvious that too many nurses and doctors at our premiere medical institution cannot be bothered to teach clients about anything related to theirc are or even ensure if taught that it was understood? Is it a practice that is shunned or is it simply too much to add to the workload? I have on numer ous occasions witnessed both grades of “professionals”i gnore or squander opportun ities to provide critical teaching to patients and their relat ives/caregivers alike. I cannot fathom why they wouldn’t work to achieve theb est possible outcome for the client. Perhaps the client will s uccumb to their injury or disease, but the relatives could have received life saving infor-m ation that would change the course of their lives and cons equently that of another generation. I am appalled, even utterly d isgusted at the lackadaisical, “I aim to be negligent and i neffective,” “I’m only working for a pay cheque” rhetoric that is so pervasive within theh ealth care community. I have been a nurse over seven years and cringe at the thought ofb eing grouped together with this lot. I am sickened and m any times driven livid at the thought that, my clients, rela t ives, friends or even strangers could fall victim to the perils of this much dysfunctional,m ismanaged,under regulated, toxic health care s ystem. Remember, although very clich...one rotten apple spoilst he whole bunch! I challenge nurses and physicians, those with enough intestinal fortitude to change the system by first changingt hemselves. At any one time we will all need medical care and it is crucial that the highest level of service, yes excellence be rendered to all and sundry. Think about it. PATIENTLY A WAITING CHANGE! Nassau, January 26, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama Washington: All about trust – or lack of it WASHINGTON (AP sanship that's on life support in Washington. It's basic trust and confidence. T he government this week was all about projecting reasons to believe things will get better: That lawmakers will be able to handle the e conomic rescue quickly and effectively; that President Barack Obama can handle the crisis w ith a competent and steady team; that he can work productively with a Congress controlled by h is own party. Indeed, that Democrats in Congress can w ork with each other. Instead, this week's rollout of Obama's bankr escue update bombed. His treasury secretary was pilloried for a less-than-surefooted debut. His second nominee for commerce secretary s aid, on second thought, no thanks. And on Capitol Hill, the Democratic leader o f the House let her Senate counterpart announce a deal on the history-making eco-n omic stimulus plan and convene negotiators to work out the last differences and then stood h im up. Why? She was following Ronald Reagan's famous dictum: Trust, but verify. " We wanted to see the language" of the bill before endorsing it, House Speaker NancyP elosi told reporters the next day. Pelosi and Reid did finally agree on the pack a ge $787 billion to get consumers spending and companies rehiring. And Congress moved to pass it Friday, meeting the Democrats' selfimposed deadline and allowing lawmakers to leave for official trips around the globe. L ike anything that becomes the law of the land, this legislation was succeeding because itw as in a lot of people's interest. Perhaps, as White House chief of staff Rahm Emanuel sug g ested, its very passage should reassure investors and consumers. But in the process, Washington did not exactly radiate the confidence its leaders are trying to inspire. O bama's presidency and the 111th Congress are only a few weeks old, wrestling with an eco n omic meltdown beyond the experience of any one charting the course to recovery. L awmakers are ill-tempered because their constituents are angry and letting them know about it. Some key relationships are new or rejiggered because of last fall's elections. The jitters are showing everywhere, from t he false starts to not-for-attribution sniping. Obama asked the nation to trust him to slow t he economic slide. But three weeks into his administration, he's still getting his footing. T imothy Geithner, the chief of Obama's economic team, looked nervous and younger than h is years this week when he rolled out a bank bailout plan that lacked the details Wall Street w anted. The stock market tanked. And late Thursday, Obama's second nomin ee for commerce secretary, Republican Sen. Judd Gregg of New Hampshire, abruptly with drew from consideration, citing "irresolvable conflicts" on key policy items. Obama's first choice for commerce, his nominee for health secretary and his pick as a federal efficiency overseer all had withdrawn earlier. Obama joked about the latest problem, wond ering aloud in Springfield, Ill., if Abraham Lincoln had ever thought about the commerce job. White House chief of staff Emanuel acknowledged that some might see the admini stration's hiring problems as amateur hour, but he suggested Bill Clinton's transition, which i ncluded Rahm, was even shakier. But whatever the spin, the situation hardly w as a confidence builder for the nation. Neither was the way Congress was dealing w ith the bank bailout. The first, deeply unpopular $700 billion b ailout bill last year contained no strong requirements for recipients to account for the taxpayer money. That was Congress' doing. B ut members of the House Financial Services Committee took it out this week on eight CEOs o f the nation's biggest banks who had been the first to receive the bailout money. I t almost didn't matter what the banking titans had to say for themselves at a televised h earing. They were the faces behind a housing crisis that escalated into a recession that makes it hard to raise any kind of cash, let alone camp aign contributions. And every member of the House is up for re-election in 2010. H ouse members ripped into the former masters of the universe. O ne suggested they should be thrown in prison. "America doesn't trust you anymore," railed Rep. Michael Capuano, D-Mass. Many Americans feel the same way about Congress. And some members of Congress feel t hat way about each other. Last Wednesday, Senate Majority Leader H arry Reid, his leadership team and moderate Republicans at his side, triumphantly announced o n live television that the House and Senate had agreed on new legislation to bail out trou bled industries and boost homeowners. Pelosi did not respond. Reid then lit the stately parlour named for L yndon Baines Johnson for television and instructed his Senate negotiators to meet there w ith their House counterparts to iron out any remaining issues. T he senators waited. And waited. Pelosi, meanwhile, summoned Reid to her office for a talking-to. Finally, she signed onto the agreement, though that didn't stop the sniping between her aides and Reid's. " One person's understanding of a spoken description might vary from another's," she s aid. "We wanted to see it. We wanted to remove all doubt that the purpose of the mon-e y was reflected in the language that was there." Reagan? Or lawmakers' favourite e uphemism, an "abundance of caution"? "I don't want to come to you later and say, ' We thought it said yes and it said no,'" Pelosi said. "It said what we want it to say, and we're v ery pleased with that outcome." (This article was written by Laurie Kellman who has covered Congress and politics since 1997 for The Associated Press). '(6,*1 (1*,1((5,1* &203(7,7,9(,&,1* )$67%,'',1*,1)250$7,21 5RDGWR&LW\'XPSDIWHUUHPL[ (PDLOJJRQJRUD#FRUDOZDYHFRP Frustration with medical and nursing ‘professionals’ LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. WE, IN THIScontemporary age, concerning The Bahamas, have been, and continuously are provided with irrefutable evi dence that Bahamian Tourism officials are extremely compe tent in their profession of promoting our country. I believe that there would be no dissension amongst Bahami ans, Caribbean peoples and those around the world if I were to adopt the position that these Tourism professionals in The Bahamas and elsewhere can be counted with the choicest of the lot on the globe. And so, being of the opinion myself, it is my sincere belief that the best of the best Bahamian tourism officials, and even the ordinary citizen would be receptive to innovative ideas to catapult Tourism progression even further than it has come today. It is my humble opinion that the government of The Bahamas should take the initiative to approach the Chinese government, the Japanese government, the German government, Spanish speaking governments, French speaking govern ments and the Haitian government, with a view to requesting of them (except Haiti teachers they are able to spare to teach Bahamian children their native languages beginning at age four-five years old and ending the last year in high school – a span of approximately 12 years. Obviously, The Bahamas government would not be able to afford these additional teachers (or would they? Hence my use of the word sponsor (by these foreign govern ments) previously. It is my humble opinion that if it became public knowledge in these respective countries over the years that The Bahamas is replete with individuals speaking their native languages fluent ly, it would make our destination that much more attractive. Additionally, the fact that Bahamians would be able to read, write and speak another language fluently could present them with a plethora of other opportunities; as I am sure you would be able to appreciate. And also, The Bahamas (I believe able reputation within the Caribbean, the wider region, and the world as being one of the few wonders of the world; and a “must see.” It is my sincere hope that the government of The Bahamas initiates the necessary processes to ensure that this vision comes to fruition so that The Bahamas and Bahamians would stand head and shoulders above our counterparts. Thank you for your time. MARVIN G LIGHTBOURN Nassau, February, 2009 Govt should pursue language teaching

PAGE 5

MINISTER of National Security Tommy Turnquest and Attorney General Michael Bar nett will participate in a special United Nations conference on crime this week. The “Ministerial Conference on Security, Drug Trafficking, Transnational Organised Crime and Terrorism as Challenges to Development in the Caribbean” is organised by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNDOC and the government of the Dominican Republic. The conference will take place in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, from Feb ruary 17-20. Speaking on the Bahamas’ decision to participate in the conference, Minister Turnquest said, “In light of current crime trends in the Caribbean region, the issues the ministerial conference will take up are those with which a majority of CARI COM governments, including the Bahamas, are tackling, and have been tackling for several years now.” Minister Turnquest said it is critical for the Bahamas to have an input in the “action plan” the conference is to develop for the region, to ensure that the country’s concerns are taken fully into account. He pointed to the recent significant seizures of cocaine on board two Haitian sloops as an indication of the ongoing illicit drug transit traffic. Mr Turn quest commended the police and the Defence Force for the exemplary work they continue to do in the area of drug control. The overall objective of the conference is to develop a regional strategy that will strengthen the response of Caribbean governments, including the Bahamas, to the many very serious challenges that drug trafficking, transnational organised crime, security and terrorism present to development in the Caribbean region. The conference will be con vened in two parts. In the first part, to take place from February 17-19, senior officials and experts from Caribbean countries will review the agenda of the Ministers’ Meeting. In addition to discussing matters on the conference’s agenda, the officials and experts will also complete drafts of the two documents the ministers will consider and adopt – a “Political Declaration” and an “Action Plan.” In reviewing the threats and challenges posed by illicit drugs, transnational organised crime and related matters, the ministerial part of the conference, to be held from February 19-20, will discuss issues includ ing law enforcement; organised crime; the legal framework; drug demand reduction, and national strategies for counter ing terrorism and transnational organised crime. I NTERNATIONA L recording artist M adonna is set to play the wife of a former Bahamian governor in an upcoming movie. Madonna will take on the role of Wallis Simpson, wife of P rince Edward, Duke of Windsor,who servedastheB ahamas’ governor f rom 1940 until the end of World War II in 1945. In1936,King E dward VIII abdicat ed the British throne to marry Mrs Simpson,a n American who had b een married twice already. Project The Guardian of London reported that the movie is expected to be a true-life romantic drama and is a labour-of-love project for the 50-year-old pop singer. Bahamas Film Commissioner Craig W oods said there has been no word yet on w hether scenes for the movie will be shot o n location in the Bahamas. "No, it hasn't gotten to that stage yet so it's all speculative. Nothing happened yet,s o once they decide to do it, they'll be down here, they'll be scouting the locationeverybody in the country will know. So nothing has happened yet,” he said. According to some historians, the Duke of Windsor did not enjoy his time in the Bahamas and referred to the islands as “a third-class British colony.” However, the Duke was praised for his efforts to combat poverty in the country, although he was said to have been contemptuous of Bahamians. Many historians have suggested that Hitler was prepared to reinstate the Dukea s King in the hope of establishing a fas cist Britain. It is widely believed that the Duke, and especially the Duchess, sympathised withf ascism before and during World War II, a nd had to remain in the Bahamas to min imise their opportunities to act on those feelings. Roles Casting of the other major roles in the m ovie – Edward VIII and Adolf Hitler – h as yet to be announced. T he movie would be the first major theatrical release for the subject matter, although many made-for-television versions have been produced over the years. These television films include “The Woman I Love” (1972 Simpson” (1978, a seven-part mini-series “The Woman He Loved” (1988 and Edward” (2005 C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 5 NASSAU GLASS COMPANYwill be CLOSED Saturday February 21stfor our company’s in order to give our staff a well-deserved break.We will reopen on Monday February 23rdWe apologise for any inconvenience causedMackey Street 393-8165 THE United States’ National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA one of its Hurricane hunter a ircraft to Nassau on March 2 2 for a one-day exhibition o n March 23 at the Lynden Pindling International Airport. FUTURE political leaders o f the country should also be l eaders in the field of educa tion, according to one senat or. PLP Senator Jerome F itzgerald is calling on future p olitical leaders to put thems elves forward to not only be prime minister of the Bahamas, but also to be the n ext Minister of Education. That’s how serious I am about education being at the c entre of any national development plan,” he said. Senator Fitzgerald was giving his contribution to the debate on an Act to establish a National Library and Information Services A uthority last week. H e said if the Bahamas is to sustain its economic growth, education, learning and research must be at the c ore of its efforts. “I believe that while we have made significant steps i n this regard, I am of the view that recently successive g overnments have unfortun ately failed to channel ade quate focus and sufficiently significant resources intoe ducation and research in o ur country,” he said. “There are many books in our libraries written aboutl eadership and while our present prime minister is strong-willed and decisive, t hat alone does not make him a good leader. Where is the vision, where is the plan, where is ability to inspire a p eople so as to give them hope, where is the environ ment of creativity, of thinking big.” Senator Fitzgerald said that he is concerned by the number of Bahamian stu d ents that are leaving the country to attend universities abroad and are not returningh ome because they see no professional opportunities in the Bahamas or simply cannot find a job in their field of study. “The brain drain is truly alarming and we are not addressing it. This issue, too, requires focus and clarity of purpose. I am also con cerned that the female to male ratio at the college istwo to one,” he said. The senator said that there needs to be more focus by way of human and financial capital in early childhood development, with serious consideration given to extending school hours and shortening the long summer breaks, along with a focus on science and technology. COURT staff plagued by mould growing on the walls and ceilings and the lack of air-conditioning have t hreatened to stay home until repairs a re complete. E mployees of the Coroner’s Court in Victoria Gardens maintain the workplace has become unbearable since the air conditioning stopped working upstairs, affecting the Coroner’s Court, magistrates’ offices and clerical offices. A number of inquests are scheduled t his week but the magistrate, staff and l egal representatives are struggling to c arry out their duties in the stifling heat, it was claimed. A member of staff who called The Tribune yesterday said there has been no effort to repair the air conditioning since it broke down and was reported last week. And the lack of air is creating an i nhospitable environment across the whole upper floor of the aging building. He said: “They are becoming very u ncomfortable, very agitated and they a re saying they won’t come into work tomorrow. “The weather is getting warmer and it’s really miserable. “There were several counsel here ( yesterday) and they found it unbearable.” The employee said it’s impossible to get a breeze flowing through the b uilding by opening the windows b ecause an adjacent building blocks all airflow. Black mould growing on the wall behind the magistrate’s bench in the Family Court located downstairs in c ourt three, was reported to the Mini stry of Works last month but staff say i t has still not been remedied. The Ministry of Works ascertained that the mould was nothing out of the ordinary, but employees fear it poses a danger to staff, visitors and particularly children. I know they sent somebody to look a t it,” the staff member said. “But I d on’t know when it is going to be c leaned up. I haven’t seen anybody cleaning it up.” The Ministry of Works failed to return calls before The Tribune went to press. Hurricane hunter aircraftto come to the Bahamas Call for future leaders to push for education In brief Court staff threaten to stay home until repairs are done Employees say workplace has become unbearable Minister and AGto participate in UN crime conference T ommy Turnquest MADONNA (above p lay Wallis Simpson, w ife of Prince Edward, Duke of Windsor (both pictured left). Madonna set to play wife of former Bahamian governor

PAGE 6

A LOCALbusinessman and philanthropist was this year’s winner of the LadyS assoon Golden Heart Award at the Annual Heart Ball on Valentine’s Day held at the Sheraton Nassau Beach Resort. L owell Mortimer, the award recipient, is the son of Ulric Jason Mortimer and Winifred Caroline Mortimer of the famous Mortimer’sC andies. C hairman of the Sir Vict or Sassoon (Bahamas Heart Foundation R E B arnes said that once again many worthy Bahamians were nominated for theG olden Heart Award, but that Mr Mortimer had stood o ut in the crowded field. “The Golden Heart Award goes to a member ofo ur community who gives of themselves selflessly for the b etterment of their fellow man,” said Mr Barnes. “It is the people’s award, a s the nominations come from the public.” Support In response to receiving h is award, Mr Mortimer thanked all who came to support him and asked thesep ersons to stand. His supporters included Dr Keva Bethel, Dr Gail Saunders a nd Minister of State for Health and Social Development Loretta Butler-Turner. Mrs Turner said that it is i mportant to support such a worthy cause which benefits children, particularly those less fortunate suffering with heart problems. S he said she felt Mr Mortimer was an excellent choice for a nominee. T he eighth of ten children, Mr Mortimer said he comes f rom a “sweet tradition”, having grown up around the f amily’s candy business. He attended St John’s C ollege, Bethune Cookman, Temple University and received his law degree inL ondon in 1972. He returned to Nassau to practice law and worked at several local law firms, including Christie, Ingrahama nd Co, Darrell Rolle and Co and Cash, and Fountain and Co, before starting hiso wn firm, Mortimer and Co in 1996. I t was many years after, that Mr Mortimer became interested in helping thosel ess fortunate than himself. A family friend, Gwen M cDeigan, had a mentally challenged child and he wanted to help her out. Thise ncouraged him to join the Bahamas Association for the Mentally Retarded in 1964. He helped in just about e very capacity with the Association, including as president. He is also a founding m ember of Abilities Unlimited and has served there as a director and secretary. He worked closely with former Golden Heart Award win-n er David Smalley in getting this organisation up and going. Mr Mortimer is also active with the Bahamas AIDSF oundation, where he has served as vice-president, director and chairman, anda lso worked in a fundraising capacity. Restoration He actively supports the Beaux Arts Ball and has been chairman of their ball committee for fundraisingt o help with the restoration of the Dundas Centre. He has also been a supporter oft he James Catalyn and Friends Theatrical Group. Additionally, Mr Mor t imer is a founding member of the local chapter of the O mega Psi Phi Fraternity, b etter known as the Pi Xi Chapter of the Omega Psi P hi Fraternity. His father supported the YWCA for years and whenh e died in 1980, Mr Mortimer took up his father’s post with that organisation. He has served as a trustee for the YWCA and providedf ree legal advice for them for years. He serves as Honourary C onsul for the Republic of Turkey and is also chairman o f the Christ Church Cathedral Endowment Trust and a member of the vestry. M r Mortimer said he was truly honoured to receive t his prestigious award and he thanked the Heart Foundation and his many friendsf or their support. The Heart Ball is the major fundraiser for the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas Heart Foundation, whichp rovides support for children. Additionally, the Foundation works in conjunction with the Bahamas HeartA ssociation to educate and inform Bahamians about heart care and healthy heartl ifestyles. The Lady Sassoon Golde n Heart Award is named in honour of the late Lady Evelyn Sassoon, who established the Foundation in memory of her late husband, Sir Victor Sassoon. The deadline for nomina tions is normally the third Monday in January of each year. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina. %LPLQL%D\HVRUWtDULQDVHHNVWRKLUHDTXDOLHGSURIHVVLRQDO individual for the following position:Seeking effective communicator with strong leadership and interpersonal skills. This individual will develop strategy and execution plans to include revenue generation, QDQFLDOSHUIRUPDQFHJURZWKDQGGHYHORSPHQWUHFUXLWPHQWDQGVWDIGHYHORSPHQW 6ROLGEDFNJURXQGLQRSHUDWLRQVVDOHVDQGPDUNHWLQJDQGQDQFLDOPDQDJHPHQWLV required. Job responsibilities include: $VVLVWLQWKHGHYHORSPHQWRIVKRUWDQGORQJUDQJHSODQVIRUSHUIRUPDQFHDQGSURWDELOLW\ RIGHVLJQDWHGVHJPHQW)RFXVWREHSODFHGQRWRQO\RQVFDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\EXWDOVR culture development for seasonal and regular employees. Understands managing the bottom line. 2YHUVHHPDQDJHPHQWRIUHVRUWSURSHUW\LQFOXGLQJDGKHUHQFHWREXGJHWDQG compliance with all operating processes. 5HFUXLWDQGGHYHORSORFDOVWDI :RUNHIIHFWLYHO\ZLWKFRUSRUDWHFDSDELOLWLHVGHYHORSPHQWPDUNHWLQJ+XPDQ Resources, Finance, IT and Legal) working with district to execute on strategies, identify opportunities/issue and ensure goals are achieved. (QVXUHWKDWFRPSDQ\FXOWXUHLVGHYHORSHGDQGJURZQWRVXSSRUWRYHUDOO corporate objectives. 3HUIRUPRWKHUGXWLHVDVDVVLJQHG Requirements: %DFKHORUGHJUHHGLSORPDLQEXVLQHVVRUUHODWHGHOG H\HDUVH[SHULHQFHRIRYHUVHDVUHVRUWPDQDJHPHQW H\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQPDQDJHPHQW 0HJDDULQDDQDJHPHQWNQRZOHGJHUHTXLUHG :RIIHUDQH[FHOOHQWEHQHWVSDFNDJHDQGFRPSHWLWLYHFRPSHQVDWLRQ)RUIXOO consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resum to the attention of atCRolle@biminibayresort.com n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – The Reachout Outreach Ministry aims to make a positive difference in the lives of hundreds of young men on Grand Bahama. Co-founder Dudley Seide said the ministry plans to launch a m entoring programme for young boys and establish a half-way f acility for troubled young men who want to change their lives. M r Seide said the goal is to reach out to those vulnerable young men in society and inspire them to be godly men of principle. He said that many young men are ruining their lives by getting involved in criminal activities and going to prison. “We have a lot of young men who have problems with identity and we want to expose them to positive role models through our mentoring programme,” he said. Last Saturday, Reachout Outreach Ministry kicked off its mentoring programme by hosting a “Boys to Men” conference at Calvary Temple Church for some 600 young men throughout Grand Bahama. Conference The conference was held under the theme “Transforming our youth through Godly Principle.” Mr Seide said many prominent men in the community participated in the conference, including Assistant Commissioner of Police Marvin Dames and MPs Kwasi Thompson and Kenneth Russell, who encouraged the young men to be good citizens. He thanked the business community and religious leaders who also supported the event, including Grand Bahama businessman Havard Cooper. Mr Seide said the ministry is focusing its attention particularly on inner-city children of single-parent families in the Garden Villas and Columbus Drive areas, as well as the Hawksbill community. “We want to provide positive role models for our young men to emulate and it was just overwhelming to see so many of them come out on Saturday,” he said. “We honoured Mr Havard Cooper who is a very successful businessman, but he is also a man of God and man of principle and we want our young men to aspire to that. “We started this ministry one year ago, but the lives we touched in that one year, (it making a difference and changing lives in Grand Bahama,” said Mr Seide. Co-founder Elmor Smith said he made many mistakes as a teenager and missed out on many opportunities. He does not want other young men to follow in his footsteps. “I was dealing drugs at age 14 and I had opportunities to receive athletic scholarships to play football and run track, but I threw it all way and decided to deal drugs and went to prison,” he said. “I have given my life to the Lord and I felt the need to give back and help transform the lives of our young men in a positive way. I don’t want them to go down the same path that I went down,” said Mr Smith. Reachout Outreach Ministry aiming to make a difference Lowell Mortimer wins Lady Sassoon Golden Heart Award LOWELL MORTIMER (LEFT receives his award from Chairman of the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas H eart Foundation R E Barnes. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story.

PAGE 7

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 7 NINE Government High School students made their mark as the first official teenage members of the Kingdom Women In Business organisation. Already having Diamond and Pearl memberships available for women, KWIB has dubbed it’s teen members the “OPALS” (Opening and Preparing Avenues for young Ladies to Succeed). The 10th grade girls got to meet and share their career aspirations with some of the KWIB members, including founder Melisa Hall, teen speaker Cashena Thompson and core leaders Charlene Paul, Deegenera Jones-Dixon and Arthia Nixon at their school. The girls will also be taking part in KWIB’s annual conference to be held this year at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel from February 26 to February 28. During the conference, the students will have a special session featuring pageant director Michelle Malcolm, Mrs Jones-Dixon, Ms Thompson and Yvette Strachan, who will cover a broad range of timely topics for today’s teenage girls. Anja Farquharson, GHS guidance counsellor, expressed her thanks to KWIB for not only inviting the students, but for also garnering corporate and individual sponsors to cover the cost of their membership materials. “We are so thrilled to be launching our teen division,” said Mrs Hall. “We didn’t want them to just come for a pep talk, but have them actually come, network and connect with women who are in the professions they aspire to be in and meet with their peers. “At this age, we want them to be on a great path to success and some of the connections they make at this conference might actually lead to their internships or jobs in the future.” Spearheading the OPALS is Mrs Jones-Dixon, a youth advocate and teen motivational speaker. “As a society we tend to complain a lot about our young people, but we sit back and watch the news and don’t do anything to prevent them from making negative headlines,” she said. “At KWIB we see the urgency for us to actually get physically involved in these young girls’ lives and invest in their futures. Life is too short to waste time being idle and not walking into your purpose. Sure, we are businesswomen, but at the same time we are big sisters trying to help our little sisters avoid being statistics on lists that include AIDS, teen pregnancy, drugs, domestic abuse and the like.” PICTURED FROM LEFT viewing the performances, including song, dance and skits, are Olga Richards, southwestern district superintendent; Lionel Sands, acting director of Education and Elma Garraway, permanent secretary. P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S P a t r i c k H a n n a / B I S P RE-SCHOOL, primary and secondary school students last week displayed their talents at the Department of Education southwestern district's “Talent Splash 2009.” The event was held at the Holy Trinity Activity Centre in Stapledon Gardens. STUDENTS OF C W SAWYER PRIMARY perform a dance entitled "Splash from the Past" which was choreographed by Shaketra Knowles. Students take to the stage in ‘Talent Splash 2009’ KWIB welcomes its first official teenage members

PAGE 8

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE accused of breaking into the home of Theophilus Knowleso n Friday, March 14. It is alleged that while armed with a silver handgun he attempted t o rob Theophilus Knowles. Bowleg, who was representedbyattorney W illie Moss, was not required to enter a plea to the charges. A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether there is sufficient evidence a gainst Bowleg for him to stand trial in the Supreme Court. T he preliminary inquiry is set to open on March 27. Bowleghasbeen remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. Rock Magistrate’s Court on February 14 and asked Lewis to give him $3,000 not to show up in court. Lewis testified that he had given Martin $1,500 on one occasion and $1,000 at another time. Officer Martin told the court that he was arrested for bribery around 9.30am on September 12, 2007, at the Fish Fry in Eight Mile Rock. Before his arrest, Martin said he was at the Fish Fry waiting for the Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court to open when a burgundy coloured vehicle pulled up and the passenger called out to him. As he walked toward the vehicle, he said an object was thrown through the window at him. When he picked up the object, he said two DEU officers arrested him for bribery. Mr Shurland asked Martin whether he knew what the object was. He replied that it was ten $100 notes balled up. Officer Martin was wearing his police uniform at the time of his arrest. He said he was taken to the Eight Mile Rock Police Station and denied his right to speak with a lawyer. Martin said he did not know Lewis, but saw him on occasions in the West End area. He said Lewis was using obscene language at the Coffee on the Bay Sports Bar i n West End on February 5. He called officers for assistance and Lewis was arrested. Martin said Lewis offered him money to not show up in court. He said he rejected Lewis’s offer. He appeared in court on April 30 as required. He also went to court on July 18, but said he was not feeling well and asked the magistrate if he could be excused. The matter was then adjourned to December 12, 2007. Prosecutor Williams asked Martin to tell the court when Lewis offered him money, but he said he could not recall. When asked if he reported to police that Lewis tried to bribe him, officer Martin said he did not report it. T he trial continues Tuesday. MORE than 500 patrons gathered in the Independence Ballroom of the Sheraton Nassau to raise funds for chil-d ren with heart disease at the 45th Annual Heart Ball – the major fundraiser for the Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas Heart Foundation. Heart Ball Committee co-chair Portia Nottage said, “The Foundation is grateful and thankful to all who haveh elped to make this event a success. We look forward to your continued support as we help to repair children’s hearts, one child at a time”. The committee for the Heart Ball promised an evening of fun, elegance, dancing, prizes and surprises. Guests t horoughly enjoyed the 45th Annual Heart Ball, which was held on Valentine’s Day under the theme “Taking care of our future – Fixing little hearts. Music was provided by the Ed Brice Orchestra, the SG B and and the Royal Bahamas Defence Force Dinner Band. T he silent auction featuring more than 20 items, was also a great success. The most coveted auction items for the night were a f our-day stay at Echo Valley in British Columbia; roundtrip tickets to anywhere in Canada; a mahogany pool t able with matching cabinets; signed Chan Pratt prints, and a Tiffany & Co necklace set donated by John Bull. Raffle T he room raffle was a resounding success as well. The top winner was Andy Fowler, who won two round-trip World Traveller Plus tickets donated by British Airways;a diamond necklace and earring set donated by Colombian Emeralds International; a framed print “Ocean Colours” b y John Paul; a free basic home alarm system installation compliments of SSI, and a wellness assessment donated by the Family Medicine Centre. S econd prize winner Kyron Strachan won the handcoloured lithograph “Red Coral” from Bamboo Bamboo, Lyford Cay; an amethyst and citrine bracelet from MF ondas Jewellers, Lyford Cay; a Vietnamese lacquer box donated by an anonymous donor; a Motorola cellular p hone from BTC, and a three-day, two-night stay in Bennett’s Harbour at Sammy T’s Resort, Cat Island. Third prize winner Edison Darville won a 19” Toshiba f lat screen television from SAVECO; a whole body scan, digital mammogram and coronary calcium score donated b y the Centreville Medical Pavilion Dr Conville Brown; a 18 kt yellow gold and blue enamel shell ring from Coin of the Realm, and a Moyna beaded evening bag donated b y Marcie Bond, Lyford Cay. The Ballroom was decorated by Symone’s Baskets of Happiness, Therez McKenzie. Table favours were pro vided by Maria Antoinette Special Events; Pasion Tea; Island Merchant; Island Rose; Bahama Sol; Botani Bath,a nd Bacardi and Co. The Sir Victor Sassoon (Bahamas was established in 1961 to assist persons with heart disease. Today, the Foundation’s main goal is to assist children who suffer from heart disease. D onations are accepted throughout the year to help this cause. Patrons flock to Annual Heart Ball Police officer accused of bribery testifies F ROM page one Man is injured in downtown shooting this happens and they don’t want to come here. They don’t feel safe. “We can’t afford for guests to go home and tell their family and friends they stayed in a hotel and there was a shoot-out. “People won’t want to come to the Bahamas on vacation.” Harry Pikramenos, also a part owner in El Greco, said problems have been emanating from the nearby building for years. However, it was compounded when the nightclub was estab lished about three months ago. “We don’t really object to people doing business, but that’s not doing business,” he said. “It’s attracting riff-raff outside our front door.” Keith Aranaj, owner of the Mayfair building on the corner of Bay and Augusta Streets, said the club has a licence to operate nightly until 4am. He said: “Since the nightclub opened people have complained about the noise and I can't blame them for that, but they should talk to the woman who rents the place, and theys hould come to some under standing. “If the police say close it down then fine, close it down. “I can’t do anything until she violates her lease, so it depends on what the police do.” Mr Aranaj denied any knowledge of prostitutes returning to the building or soliciting in the street in recent months. H e said he understands the women living in the building have work permits and are not prostitutes, but he does not know what work they do. Assistant Commissioner Hulan Hanna said: “We don’t know at this point what connection the shooting would have with any other activity in the area, but we are followings ignificant leads as to who may have carried out the shooting.” FROM page one wholesale street value of $5 million. Blanc was sentenced to four years on each charge. The sentences are to run concurrently. Blanc was also ordered to be deported after he serves his sentence. Ernst Petit-Homme, 32, Jean Marc Pierre, 43 and Dennis Placide, 52, Meckly Mazard, 28, and Simeon Monestine, 39, who were charged with Blanc have been remanded to Her Majesty's Prison and are expected to stand trial on July 15. Alexandre Jean, 50, Landaize Lessage, 45, Olindieu Pierre, 33, Robenson Franois, 39, Rodly Jean, 19, and Marie Slyvida Davilmar, 47, who are alleged to have been on the first vessel on which $8 million worth of cocaine was seized, pleaded not guilty to the drug charges during their arraignment yesterday and were remanded to Her Majesty's Prison. They are expected back in court today at 2 pm. They are represented by lawyer Murrio Ducille. FROM page one Four years for Haitian boat captain in connection with drug seizure Man c harged with murder FROM page one n By JOHN F. BURNS c.2009 New York Times News Service LONDON In a freak accident, two submarines carrying nuclear weapons, one French and the other British, collided while submerged on operational patrols in the Atlantic earlier this month, the British and French defense ministries said Monday. Both vessels returned damaged but otherwise safe to their home ports, with the 250 crew members abroad uninjured and with “no compromise to nuclear safety,” the defense ministries said in terse state ments that appeared to have been agreed between the nations. The reference appeared to cover the nuclear reactors that power the submarines and the 16 ballistic missiles carrying nuclear warheads that the British and French vessels each routinely carry on patrols. But military experts said the episode raised troubling questions about the safety of ballistic-missile submarines patrolling the oceans while hiding their whereabouts even from NATO allies. They said that agreements on “waterspace management,” requiring NATO nations to advise each other of the whereabouts of submerged submarines, did not include vessels carrying ballistic missiles with nuclear warheads. The collision spurred a fresh outcry from groups in Britain and France that have demanded that the nations scrap their nuclear arsenals, with representatives saying that only chance had prevented a more serious impact that could have sunk both vessels, along with their missiles. The collision “could have released vast amounts of radiation and scattered scores of nuclear warheads across the seabeds,” said Kate Hudson, the chairwoman of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, a long-established protest group in Britain. The collision of the vessels on the night of Feb. 3, at a location neither nation disclosed, was described by military experts in London and Paris as a million-toone occurrence, given the expanse of the oceans and the low number of submarines carrying ballistic missiles on patrol at any time from nations with such vessels. Those nations include the United States, Rus sia and China, as well as Britain and France. Just as startling, the experts said, was that the French Defense Ministry appeared not to have known in the immediate aftermath that its submarine, Le Triomphant, had struck the British submarine, HMS Vanguard. On Feb. 6, the ministry released a state ment in Paris saying that the French vessel had “col lided with an immersed object,” which it described as probably a drifting cargo container, and that the submarine’s sonar dome, located in its nose and crucial to its ability to track other vessels, had been seriously damaged. Official confirmation of the collision came only after a report of the episode appeared Monday in The Sun a British tabloid newspaper. French offi cials said Monday they only realized that Le Triom phant had struck the British vessel after sending inquiries to other navies about the deep-sea impact an admission that appeared to underline the extreme secrecy NATO allies impose on the whereabouts of their missile-carrying submarines. The HMS Vanguard, which is 492 feet long, was towed back to its home port at Faslane on the Firth of Clyde, near Glasgow, Scotland, with “very visible dents and scrapes,” according to the BBC. The similarly-sized French submarine took three days after the impact to return to its home port, at L’Ile Longue near Brest, according to reports in the French news media. IN THIS OCT. 25, 1992 file photo, sailors are seen aboard the HMS Vanguard, in Holy Loch, Scotland. Nuclear-armed submarines from Britain and France collided deep under the Atlantic Ocean earlier this month, causing damage to both vessels but releasing no radioactivity, a British official said Monday, Feb. 16, 2009. The HMS Vanguard, Britain's first Trident class nuclear-armed submarine, and the French Le Triom phant submarine, which was also carrying nuclear missiles, both suffered minor damage. PA, Chris Bacon, File /AP French and British subs in collision

PAGE 9

C M Y K C M Y K INTERNATIONAL SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 9 n PEBBLE BEACH, California D ustin Johnson walked out the door and into the rain Monday morning, still expecting to show up on the first tee with a four-shot leadto play the final round at Pebble Beach, reports the AssociatedPress . He won not with a big drive or a clutch putt, rather a phone call. It was Michael Letzig, one of my buddies out here,” Johnson said. I was walking out the door to go have breakfast. He called to congratulate me and I didn’t know what he was talking about.” Some 40 hours after hitting his last shot of the tournament, Johnson won the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am when rain washed outt he final round for the second straight day. Pebble Beach received nearly 1 1/2 inches of rain, enough to create a tiny river in one fairway and produce puddles on most of the greens. It was the first rain-shortened tournament on the PGA Tour in nearl y three years, and the first 54-hole event at Pebble Beach since the late P ayne Stewart also hit the winning shot on Saturday in 1999. And it was historic for at least one reason. “I’ve never won a tournament in tennis shoes,” said Johnson, who came to the course to collect his trophy, thank the rain-soaked volun-t eers and grasp the timing of his great week, even if he only got in three rounds. The victory was the second in his last nine starts, and it puts himin the conversation with a growing cast of rising stars. The 24-year-old Johnson joins Anthony Kim as the only players under 25 with multiple P GA Tour victories. He moved up to No. 45 in the world, putting him into the 64-man field at the Accenture Match Play Championship next week. More importantly at least for a guy who grew up less than an hour away from Augusta National it earned Johnson a trip to the Masters. Heh as had a few offers to play the course, but each time turned it down. “I just really wanted to be in the tournament before I went and played it,” he said. Johnson finished at 15-under 201 and earned $1.098 million. The winning round came at Poppy Hills on Saturday, when Johnson overpowered the five par 5s with birdies on all of them heh ad three eagle attempts and shot a 67. That gave him a four-shot l ead over Mike Weir, who would have been playing in the final group at Pebble for the second time in four years. None of this would have seemed possible to Johnson eight years ago. According to a story published two weeks ago in Golf World maga zine, Johnson was suspended from his high school golf team for skipping classes as he struggled to cope with his parents’ divorce. Then came an incident that nearly cost him much more. Intimidated by Steve Gillian, a menacing older brother of one of his f riends, Johnson was among five kids involved in the break-in of a h ouse, where someone took a gun. Johnson says he stayed in the car during the burglary, but he was there. According to appellate court documents, Johnson then was persuaded, reluctantly, to buy bullets for the gun. Later that month in 2001, Gillian was charged with murder after s hooting the victim multiple times in the head. Because of the loose connection to the crime, Johnson had to pay restitution for the theft and a gree to testify at the murder trail. Gillian is serving life without parole. I always knew I wanted to play on the PGA Tour,” Johnson said. “Eight years ago, however long ago that was, I couldn’t see myself being here. But after I got through all that stuff, I went on to play golf at Coastal Carolina. And coach (Allen The victory at Pebble comes nearly three weeks after the Probation, P ardon and Parole Services Board of South Carolina granted Johnson a full pardon relating to his guilty plea in the second-degree burglary c ase. And with his second tour victory, Johnson is ready to see how far he can go. I t took Johnson only 36 starts to record his second tour victory, compared with 42 tournaments for Kim and 87 for Camilo Villegas. “Obviously, I’ve proved myself to be just as good as they are,” Johnson said. “Anthony is a great player. He’s a good friend of mine, and he’s done great things in the last two years. Just to be mentioned w ith them is an honor. I’m just looking forward to the rest of the year and proving myself a little more.” n By FRANK GRIFFITHS LONDON Eduardo da Silva scored twice in his return to Arsenal after a nearly one-year layoff caused by a broken leg, leading the Gunners over Cardiff 4-0 Monday night and into the fifth round of the FA Cup, reports the Associated Press . Eduardo scored in the 20th minute with a header off a cross from Carlos Vela, then beat goalkeeper Tom Heaton with a penal ty kick in the 60th after he was brought down by Gavin Rae. After the first goal, Eduardo ran toward a corner, fell to his knees and smiled before being teammates enveloped him. Arsenal fans erupted into celebrations and sang Eduardo’s name. “Of course everybody is happy for him but I believe it was a good team performance, dynamic, convincing, mobile, with the kind of game we love to play,” Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger said. “Eduardo played a big part in that and everybody is, of course, pleased for him tonight.” The 25-year-old forward’s left fibula was broken and ankle dislocated during a tackle by Birmingham’s Martin Taylor last Feb. 23. Eduardo played his first official game after that last Wednesday, setting up the go-ahead goal for Croatia in a 2-1 exhibition win over Romania. In the fourth-round replay, Arsenal also got goals from Nicklas Bendtner in the 33rd minute and Robin van Persie in the 88th. Van Persie entered in the 67th for Eduardo, who left with a slightly strained hamstring. The Gunners host Burnley in the fifth round on March 7 or 8, with the winner meeting Sheffield United or Hull in the sixth round. ENGLAND'S BOWLER Steve Harmison, right, celebrates after taking the wicket of West Indies' captain Chris Gayle, left, who was caught by teammate James Anderson for 30 runs, during the second day of the third crick et Test match at the Antigua Recreation Ground in St. John's, Monday, Feb. 16, 2009. England declared their first innings at 566 for nine. ENGLAND'S BATSMAN Paul Collingwood points with his bat to the pavilion while celebrating his century during the second day of the third cricket Test match against the West Indies at the Antigua Recreation Ground in St. John's, Monday, Feb. 16, 2009. CRICKET: ENGLAND VS WEST INDIES, 3RD TEST Collingwood ton helps England to 566 for nine ENGLISH SOCCER: FA CUP Eduar do makes dream return to send Arsenal into 5th round PHOTOS: Andres Leighton / AP Photo WEST INDIES' cricket captain Chris Gayle defends his wicket during the second day of the third cricket Test match against England at the Antigua Recreation Ground in St. John's, Monday, Feb. 16, 2009. England declared their first innings at 566 for nine and West Indies reach 55-1 at close of day two. Johnson wins Pebble without hitting a final shot GOLF

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net GEORGETTE Rolle, still looking for her break through on the Ladies Professional Golf Tour, will be teeing off today in her first tournament for the year in in the Sun Coast Ladies Series Developmental Golf Tour. Rolle, the only Bahamian entered in the field of 33 players, will be in the first group to tee off at 7:15 am. She is paired with Jackie Gonzalez from Valencia, Venezuela and Susan Choi from Natick, Ma. In an interview as she arrived at the tournament site at Errol Estates in Orlando, Florida, Rolle said she’s eager to get on the greens and make her presence felt. “I came to win. That’s my goal,” said Rolle, who has never played on the course. But she’s confident that if she can get “good ball striking, manage the course and stay focus,” she should be able to achieve her goal at the end of the tournament on Thursday. While the LPGA’s Futures Tour doesn’t start until the end of March, Rolle hopes to play in the Sun Coast Series to stay sharp. The next series tournament is March 3-5, followed by March 9-11 and finally March 17-19. “So I’m just going to play in these tournaments to get ready,” Rolle revealed. B ut she noted that she’s been preparing at s chool at Texas Southern University where s he’s practiced in the afternoons on her game. “I feel pretty confident and very eager to begin,” said the biology undergraduate major. “So once the tournament start, I know that I will be ready.” During the Christmas holiday when she was home on a break, Rolle had indicated that she was looking for a sponsor to help her in her quest to crack the professional barrier. But even though there are some people who have supported her in part, Rolle said she’s still looking forward to a major sponsor to come through as it will take a considerable amount of funds for her to play on the tour. She’s still encouraging the public to support her financially. “I think if I can win a few of these tournaments, or at least place very high, it should help my quest to get some funding,” said Rolle, who has the opportunity to become the first Bahamian female pro golfer. Rolle, 23, is a 2002 St. Augustine’s College graduate who excelled in the Bahamas Golf Federation’s Junior Programme before she received an athletic scholarship to Texas Southern. Georgette Rolle tees off for first tournament of year n GOLF LOOKING FOR A BREAKTHROUGH: Georgette Rolle. s till ranked at number two in the ATP World Tour DoublesT eam Rankings with 1,335 points. The list is headed by A ustralian Open champions Bob and Mike Bryan with 2,295. Knowles’ former partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and his Nemad Zimonjic of Serbia, w on their first title on Sunday at the ABN Amro World Tennis T ournament in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. K nowles said it was gratifying win for them since they didn’t do that well at the Australian Open. But he admitted that he’snot too concerned about Nestor and Zimonjic. “They’re one of the toip t eams in the world, so I expect them to be right there at the endo f the year,” Knowles stated. “But we’re not friends at all, so I ’m really going to talk about him anymore.” With the schedule ahead of him, Knowles has opted not to travel with the national team to P araguay for the first round of the American Zone II DavisC up tie. “The hardest part for me was t he schedule and playing on the red clay in Paraguay,” Knowles stressed. “I have a pretty hectic schedule and I probably would not have arrived in Paraguay u ntil the Wednesday before the doubles is played on Saturday. So the preparation didn’t allow me to be an assess to the team. But I think the guys can pull through and if they do, I will be available for the secondr ound, as long as the guys want me and I can help the team.” T he team, captained by John Farrington, will be made up of D evin Mullings, Timothy Neely, Bjorn Munroe and Marvin Rolle. The team is scheduled to leave on Friday, February 27, but it’s not known if Munroe will travel with them due to the death of his younger brother Lavaughn in a traffic accident on Sunday. Mark Knowles rules out Davis Cup travel T ennis in mour ning F ROM page 11 made the Davis Cup team in 1999 with Mark Knowles and Mark Merklein when the Bahamas hosted Canada at the National Tennis Center in July. Canada won the match 4-1 with Munroe losing in a reverse singles match 6-1, 6-3 to Frederic Niemeyer. In September that same year when the Bahamas traveled to Caracas, Venezuela, Munroe again teamed up with Knowles and Merklein. As the Bahamas won the tie 3-1 to remain in Zone One, Munroe didn’t play. Then in 2002 when the Bahamas traveled to Ecuador the Americas Group One relegation tie, Munroe traveled with his brother BJ, Mullings and Dentry Mortimer. The Bahamas was blanked 50 and were relegated to Zone II in 2003. Munroe played in the second match, losing 6-3, 6-3,6-0 to Luis Morejon. Although he had stopped playing competitively to make another national team, Munroe was working with a number of the young tennis players in Grand Bahama. Munroe’s lessons were conducted at the CA Smith Park, but his dream, according to his mother, was to construct a Tennis Academy and they will be pursuing that goal as they keep his memory alive. May his soul rest in peace. FROM page 11 BASKETBALL: HUGH CAMPBELL TOURNAMENT CRESTWELL PRATT brings the ball upcourt for the C.V. Bethel Stingrays in their 56-26 win over the St. Anne’s Blue Waves yesterday. RASHAD WOODSIDE is fouled by a pair of C.I. Gibson Rattlers on his way to the basket. Woodside finished with a team high 15 points for the C.W. Saunders Cougars in their 66-52 loss yesterday. C.V. BETHEL’S Patieco Leadon scores two of his game high 16 points on a finger roll in the Stingrays’ 56-26 win over the St. Anne’s Blue Waves. DREW ROLLE finishes a fastbreak with a dunk in the Rattlers opening day win of the Hugh Campbell Invitational. PHOTOS: Tim Clarke /Tribune staff that gave his team a 25-5 advantage with 4:42 left in the half. Denis, the lone starter to log significant minutes in the second, fini shed with 19 points to lead all scorers. H e ended the half on a 4-0 run, with consecutive steals and lay-ups to give his team a 35-18 advantage headed into the third quarter. The Rattlers came out just as aggressive in the second half led by Rashad Sturrup who finished in the open court and followed with a steal a nd three point play on the ensuing possession. With his team leading 44-25, Drew Rolle stripped Cougars' point g uard Kendal Simmons at half court and finished with a dunk to put his team ahead by 21. T he basket triggered a 16-3 run, capped by a pair of free throws by Denis just before the end of the third. The Rattlers outscored the Cougars 25-10 in the third quarter to take a 60-28 lead into the fourth. With the reserves going the distance in the final period the Rattlers s cored just six points the rest of the way. Ramano King scored on consecutive tip ins on the offensive glass ear l y in the quarter, but the Cougars outscored the Rattlers 14-2 thereafter. Rolle finished with 11 points, while King, Sturrup and Denirado Mott a dded eight points apiece. Rashad Woodside led the Cougars with 15 points, Stephen Rolle added 12 and Kareem Thompson finished with 10. The Rattlers will advance to tonight's evening session at 9pm when they will face the winners of this afternoon's matchup between R.M. B ailey Pacers and Teleos Cherubims. The Cougars, relegated to the loser’s bracket will face the loser of the P acers/Cherubims matchup, Thursday at 7pm. The defending GSSSA runners up shrugged off a sluggish start and o vercame a half-time deficit in the first game of the tournament. In a low scoring affair, the Crusaders led 6-5 after the opening quar t er and 17-14 at the half. The Mystic Marlins completely turned the game around in the sec o nd half, as the outscored the Crusaders 35-17 in the third and fourth quarters. A 14 point third quarter, led by four points each from Charles Walker and Prince Pinder, in a quarter where they limited the Crusaders to five, gave the Mystic Marlins a 28-22 lead. Walker, who finished with 12 points, scored eight in the final period as the Mystic Marlins opened their first double figure margin of thea fternoon. Pinder finished with 12 while Patrick Brice added six. L eonardo Ferguson led the Crusaders with nine points while Trevor Adderley added seven. The Mystic Marlins will advance to today’s evening session to face the winner of this afternoon’s matchup between the Church of God Academy Flames and the Queen’s College Comets. The Crusaders, relegated to the loser’s bracket will face the loser of the Flames/Comets matchup, Thursday at 6pm. The Stingrays, fresh off the season's biggest win in the GSSSA regular season finale which vaulted them into the playoffs, continued their momentum with a dominating performance to open up the tournament. After a slim 12-9 lead after the first, the Stingrays held the Blue Waves without a field goal for the entire second quarter. The struggling Blue Waves only points came from the free throw line when Gordan Ferguson converted a pair with 2:30 left to play in the quarter. The Stingrays led 30-11 at the half. The third produced much of the same as the Stingrays outscored the Blue Waves 14-8 in the third to take a 44-19 lead into the final period. C.V. Bethel dominated the final period led by Pateico Leadon who scored eight of his team leading 16 points in the fourth quarter. Dustin McKenzie and Travis Dawkins added eight points apiece. Ferguson led Blue Waves with 12 points. The Stingrays advance to face the winners of last night’s St. John’s College/C.R. Walker Knights matchup, today at 5:30pm Government Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominate FROM page 11 DENIRADO MOTT is fouled on his way to the basket against the C.W. Saunders Cougars yesterday. Mott finished with eight points off the bench in the Rat tlers’ 66-52 win DDJ Mystic Marlins 49 NCA Crusaders 34 CV Bethel Stingrays 56 St. Anne's Blue Waves 26

PAGE 11

C M Y K C M Y K TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE England pile up runs against West Indies SPORTS IN BRIEF n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net W ITH a hectic schedule ahead of him, Mark Knowles has announced that he will not travel with the Davis Cup team to Paraguay for the first round of the American Zone II tie. After taking a two-week break from finishing as the run ners-up with Mahesh Bhupathi f rom India in the Australian Open, Knowles will be back in action this week at the Regions Morgan Keegan Championships in Memphis, Tennessee. But instead of teaming up with Bhupathi, who is still in India waiting for next week’s tournament in Dubai, Knowles w ill play with Mardy Fish from the United States. Seeded at number four, the duo will play their first match against the team of Christophe Rochus from Belgium and Florent Serra from France. “The expectations are pretty high,” said Knowles of Fish, w hom he played with in Delray Beach, Florida last year where they made it to the semifinal. “I’m coming off playing well and he’s been playing well, so I think we have the making of a pretty good doubles team. So it’s going to be exciting. He’s a pretty good singles player and doubles player. We get along pretty well, so things should go pretty good for us.” Fish, ranked No.24 in the world and No.3 in the United States behind Andy Roddick and James Blake in singles, is coming off a 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 loss in the final of the SAP Open in San Jose, California on Sunday. “The hardest part for him is that he won’t have much time to prepare, so our first round match should be tricky,” Knowles noted. “But we know each other very well, so that should help us.” From Memphis Knowles will travel to Dubai for the Barclays Dubai Tennis Championships that get started on Monday where he will hook back up with Bhupathi. That will be followed by a pair of ATP World Tour Mas ters 1000, starting on March 12 in Indian Wells, California and in Miami, Florida from March 25. “We’re hoping to build on the momentum that we got started in Australia,” Knowles projected about his partnership with Bhupathi. “These are big weeks for us, which are the biggest tournaments outside of the Grand Slam.” Knowles and Bhupathi are n By BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net L ESS than two weeks before the Bahamas national team head to the A mericas Zone II Davis Cup tie in Paraguay, members are mourning the tragic death of a former three-time member and younger brother of their current team-mate. Lavaughn Munroe, 26, was k illed in a traffic accident in the Lucaya area in Grand Bahama on Sunday. His black Mustang crashed into a large tree on Midshipman Road around 1 pm. Munroe is the brother of Bjorn Munroe, who has been named by the Bahamas Lawn Tennis Association to the fourman team heading to Paraguay on February 27. BJ Munroe, along with Devin Mullings, Timothy Neely and Marvin Rolle are due to travel with captain John Farrington, a week in advance to the tie, scheduled for March 6-8. He leaves behind his parents, Lor na and Patrick Munroe, anoth er brother, Parris, and a number of family members and friends, including a group of students whom he instructed in tennis lessons. “It’s really tragic,” said Munnings, who noted that he received the sad news on Sunday afternoon. “I want to wish BJ and his family all of the best. It was so sudden. “But I know they are a tough family and they will get through this.” While he played with Lavaughn on the Davis Cup team, Mullings said he never got a chance to play against him. But as a Grand Bahamian native, Mullings said he knew he very well. “He was a very fun loving guy who got along very well with everybody,” Mullings reflected. “He had a strong personality with a lot of chris ma.” Mullings said he had a chance to speak to BJ (who was unavailable for comments)a nd he offered him his condol ences. He extended it to the rest of the family. Also sending his condolences was Mark Knowles from Mepmhis, Tennessee where he is preparing to play Mardy Fish at the Regions Morgan Kee-g an Championships this week. “It’s tragic. We had a strong relationship, having played together on the Davis Cup team,” Knowles pointed out. “I also know BJ very well because we played together too. “I know it’s going to be hard f or their family. But I want to l et them know that everything will be alright. I want to give them my condolences. My prayers are with them.” Lavaughn Munroe first Bahamas tennis mourns death of Lavaughn Munroe Shock after traffic accident claims life of 26-year-old BADLY MISSED: Lavaughn Munroe He was a very fun loving guy who got along very well with everybody.” Devin Mullings Knowles rules out travelling with Davis Cup team to Paraguay Mark Knowles Mardy Fish SEE page 10 SEE page 10 Govt Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominate BASKETBALL: HUGHCAMPBELLINVITATIONAL TOURNAMENT, DAYONE DREW ROLLE scores two of his 11 points in the Rattlers 66-52 win in yesterday’s opening ses sion of the Hugh Campbell Basketball Invitational. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net The nation’s most prestigious basketball tournament officially tipped off yesterday at the Kendal G.L. Isaacs Gymnasium, with Government Secondary Schools Sports Association schools dominating each of the three games in the opening session of the tournament. The Rattlers built a two digit margin early and got an opportunity to rest their starters for much of the second half for an opening day win. C.I Gibson began the game on a 10-0 run with a defense that held the Cougars without a field goal for the first 3:17 of the game. With the starters in the game for much of the first, the Rattlers led 18-2 at the end of the first quarter. In the second, the lead reached 20 on a Junior Denis three pointer CI Gibson Rattlers – 66 CW Saunders Cougars – 52 SEE page 10

PAGE 12

ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 45F/7C Low: 45F/7C Low: 55F/13C Low: 59 F/15C Low: 58F/14C Low: 61F/16C Low: 64 F/18C Low: 53F/12C High: 68F/20C High: 70F/21C High: 72 F/22C High: 75F/24C High: 74F/23C High: 72 F/22 High: 75F/24C Low: 55F/13C High: 68 F/20C Low: 61 F/16 High: 72 F/22CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 61F/16C High: 77F/25C Low: 62 F/17C High: 73F/23C Low: 58 F/14C High: 70F/21C Low: 60 F/16C High: 73F/23C Low: 65F/18C High: 79 F/26C Low: 62F/17C High: 74 F/23C Low: 62 F/17C High: 78F/26C Low: 66F/19C High: 80F/27C Low: 61 F/16C High: 76F/24C High: 67F/19CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE / TUESDAY FEBRUARY 17 2009 / PAGE 12THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Mostly sunny, breezy and pleasant. Clear and breezy.Breezy with bright sunshine. Breezy with a full day of sunshine. Sunshine and patchy clouds. High: 75 Low: 64 High: 79 High: 83 High: 75 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Mostly sunny and pleasant. High: 75 Low: 67 Low: 65 Low: 62 AccuWeather RealFeel 74F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 60F 73-65F 87-67F 73-57F 72-63F Low: 63 TODAYTONIGHTWEDNESDAYTHURSDAYFRIDAYSATURDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 84F/29C Low .................................................... 63F/17C Normal high ...................................... 77F/25C Normal low ........................................ 64F/18C Last year's high .................................. 83F/28C Last year's low .................................. 67F/20C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................trace Year to date ..................................................0.68"Normal year to date ......................................2.72" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU New First Full Last Feb. 24 Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Mar . 18 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:43 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:05 p.m. Moonrise . . . . . 1:11 a.m. Moonset . . . . 11:47 a.m. Today W ednesday Thursday Friday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 1:29 a.m.2.37:48 a.m.0.5 1:39 p.m.1.87:45 p.m.0.3 2:32 a.m.2.38:51 a.m.0.5 2:41 p.m.1.88:47 p.m.0.3 3:36 a.m.2.39:51 a.m.0.5 3:44 p.m. 1.99:48 p.m.0.3 4:33 a.m. 2.310:44 a.m.0.4 4:41 p.m. 2.0 10:43 p.m.0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 88/3170/21s88/3173/22s Amsterdam43/636/2r39/334/1c Ankara, Turkey39/325/-3c43/628/-2c Athens50/1040/4pc48/841/5pc Auckland74/2363/17sh74/2366/18sh Bangkok95/3579/26pc95/3579/26c Barbados84/2875/23pc84/2874/23s Barcelona55/1242/5s59/1544/6s Beijing32/023/-5pc36/227/-2sn Beirut63/1754/12sh63/1759/15c Belgrade36/233/0sn34/125/-3sn Berlin30/-121/-6pc28/-219/-7c Bermuda 60/1553/11sh60/1556/13sh Bogota67/1944/6r66/1846/7sh Brussels45/734/1r45/736/2sh Budapest32/025/-3sn30/-119/-7snBuenos Aires 93/3372/22s93/3373/22s Cairo66/1850/10s74/2367/19pc Calcutta 92/3369/20s92/3366/18s Calgar y26/-37/-13pc28/-214/-10pc Cancun81/2766/18s85/2967/19s Caracas84/2868/20sh83/2868/20rCasablanca 64/17 48/8 s 67/1948/8s Copenhagen 32/028/-2pc33/032/0c Dublin52/1139/3pc48/841/5pcFrankfurt 37/2 19/-7c34/125/-3pc Geneva35/131/0sn35/122/-5sf Halifax32/012/-11pc35/120/-6pcHavana 79/26 56/13 s83/2858/14s Helsinki23/-514/-10sf25/-318/-7pc Hong Kong 70/2165/18c72/2266/18c Islamabad77/2548/8pc78/2548/8s Istanbul41/536/2pc49/943/6shJerusalem 51/1038/3sh59/1552/11s Johannesburg 78/25 59/15t78/2559/15t Kingston 84/28 72/22s83/2874/23s Lima86/3066/18pc87/3066/18pc London 50/10 41/5 pc48/839/3pc Madrid57/1330/-1pc59/1530/-1s Manila86/3075/23sh86/3075/23sh Mexico City77/2546/7pc79/2648/8pc Monterrey79/2663/17pc87/3056/13pcMontreal 27/-214/-10s27/-223/-5sn Moscow 32/028/-2sn32/021/-6sn Munich33/012/-11sn19/-712/-11pc Nairobi86/3060/15t86/3059/15t New Delhi75/2347/8pc73/2248/8s Oslo 23/-510/-12sn27/-212/-11pc Paris 49/941/5sh50/1040/4c Prague28/-219/-7sn25/-318/-7c Rio de Janeiro84/2875/23s84/2873/22pc Riyadh88/3161/16c77/2548/8pc Rome50/1037/2pc45/732/0pc St. Thomas 82/27 72/22s81/2771/21r San Juan99/3770/21s103/3973/22s San Salvador88/3164/17s94/3471/21s Santiago90/3255/12s86/3052/11s Santo Domingo81/2765/18s82/2766/18pc Sao Paulo83/2868/20pc82/2766/18sh Seoul 27/-216/-8s37/225/-3s Stockholm28/-219/-7sf27/-223/-5pc Sydney75/2368/20r77/2568/20r T aipei 75/23 66/18r81/2768/20pc Tokyo46/736/2pc48/834/1pc Toronto34/126/-3c36/230/-1sn Trinidad83/2873/22t88/3176/24t Vancouver46/734/1pc47/835/1pcVienna 33/0 21/-6sn29/-120/-6pc Warsaw32/023/-5c30/-121/-6sn Winnipeg10/-12-5/-20c5/-15-13/-25pc HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodayWednesdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:NE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:ENE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:ENE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:NE at 10-20 Knots1-3 Feet10-20 Miles74F Wednesday:ENE at 10-20 Knots2-4 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 54/1231/0sh51/1028/-2pc Anchorage30/-118/-7sf27/-222/-5sf Atlanta 60/15 39/3s59/1542/5t Atlantic City42/522/-5s44/637/2r Baltimore42/528/-2s42/536/2rBoston 34/1 25/-3s38/335/1c Buffalo36/225/-3c38/331/0sn Charleston, SC56/1339/3s61/1649/9t Chicago41/532/0c41/518/-7snCleveland 42/5 28/-2c47/828/-2sn Dallas68/2052/11sh70/2137/2s Denver48/821/-6c40/417/-8c Detroit40/429/-1c42/527/-2sn Honolulu80/2669/20pc80/2668/20pcHouston 68/20 63/17 sh78/2548/8t HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodayWednesday T odayWednesday T odayWednesday Indianapolis 48/839/3pc48/823/-5r Jacksonville62/1644/6s73/2255/12pc Kansas City 50/10 33/0pc39/314/-10c Las Vegas56/1338/3pc60/1537/2s Little Rock52/1148/8pc69/2035/1tLos Angeles 60/15 46/7sh66/1848/8s Louisville54/1245/7s57/1329/-1r Memphis56/1353/11pc66/1834/1r Miami74/2360/15s77/2565/18s Minneapolis 34/1 18/-7c20/-63/-16sn Nashville56/1344/6s63/1735/1r New Orleans65/1858/14pc75/2352/11t New York40/430/-1s42/537/2c Oklahoma City68/2043/6pc58/1427/-2s Orlando 68/20 50/10 s77/2559/15pc Philadelphia42/527/-2s42/537/2r Phoenix63/1745/7sh66/1845/7s Pittsburgh40/429/-1pc46/728/-2sn Portland, OR46/736/2c53/1136/2pc Raleigh-Durham 50/1032/0s50/1043/6r St. Louis50/1043/6pc52/1120/-6rSalt Lake City 38/328/-2sn42/526/-3sn San Antonio 68/20 59/15 c80/2643/6pc San Diego59/1550/10sh65/1849/9s San Francisco57/1347/8sh58/1447/8pcSeattle 46/737/2pc50/1037/2pc T allahassee 66/1844/6pc70/2155/12c Tampa70/2153/11s75/2360/15pc Tucson61/1639/3sh64/1738/3s Washington, DC47/830/-1s46/738/3r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T-storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com

PAGE 13

n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor T h e Bahamian coo wners of a Bay S treet hotel yesterday threatened to end their million-dollar investment programme for the property after a ‘Wild West’ style shoot-out took place outside early yesterday morning, the latest development in what they claim is an unsavoury atmosphere for tourism in the area. Harry Pikramenos, co-owner of the 27-room El Greco Hotel, said that following the shooting “four to five rooms” of guests checked out due to fears for their safety. The episode cost the property 10 of its 24 guests, or almost 40 per cent of business. He added that another factor costing the hotel, located across from the Western Esplanade, business “left, right and centre” was the loud music being played from a nightclub in the Mayfield building, located across Augusta Street from the El Greco. This music, Mr Pikramenos s aid, often went on until 4am i n the morning from ThursdaySunday every week, depriving his guests of a good night’s sleep. No connection has been made between the nightclub and yesterday morning’s shooting, but Mr Pikramenos told Tribune Business: “It’s not the best atmosphere for tourism. “There was a shooting out in front of the hotel yesrerday, at about 2am. Four to five rooms last night just checked outb ecause of this shooting.” A full-fledged gun battle in what is regarded as a key tourist area is likely to be the last thing the Bahamian tourism industry and economy needs at a time w hen it is struggling to attract e very visitor possible. If the Bahamas is perceived as unsafed, it could exacerbate the current downturn even further. And the word could spread very quickly, if those who checked out of the El Greco yesterday talk about their experience with friends and family, and spread the word via e-mail and Internet postings. Such shootings also hold the potential for undermining plans to revitalise downtown BayS treet and the City of Nassau, since few landlords and businesses will want to invest in upgrading until the security climate and atmosphere improves. “We own the hotel, and are m aking improvements, subs tantial improvements to it,” Mr Pikramenos said of the property owned by himself and his brother. “Right now, we’ve invested in the hotel in excess of $1 mil lion. It’s been going on for a while, and in a year the programme should be completed. There’s been significant progress with the rooms. We’ve done more of a West Indiestype feel, and are trying to ante up the product and improve theh otel. We are trying to turn the area around, but it’s not going n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor EMERA, the expansionminded Canadian power giant that last year acquired 25 per cent of Grand Bahama Power Company, yesterday moved to strengthen its presence in the Bahamian energy sector by agreeing a joint venture that aims to pursue renewable ener gy projects in this nation. Emera said in a statement that it had signed a Letter of Intent with Schneider Power Inc, the Canadian renewable energy specialist that has qualified for the second stage of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation’s (BEC gy search, that will see the two link-up for the latter’s wind/solar power proposals. Schneider Power, which is involved in the Bahamas Renewable Energy Corporation (BREC with Bahamian company WINSO Ltd, had submitted a pro posal to BEC for the construction and operation of wind turbines and solar panels on three different islands New Providence, Abaco and Harbour Island. BREC had proposed that the three projects would collectively generate 24 Mega Watts (MW enough to power 25,000 homes. Wayne Crawley, Emera’s vice-president of corporate development, said yesterday: “We look forward to working with Schneider Power and their local partners to support BEC’s renewable energy programme. This is an important economic energy source for the Bahamas”. C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third p arty and The Tribune can not be held r esponsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$4.29 $4.29 $4.29The information contained is from a t hird party and The Tribune can not be held responsible fore rrors and/or o mission from the daily report. $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 Grand Bahama Power investor in new Bahamas renewable tie-up n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor BAHAMAS First, the general insurer, yesterday confirmed it had hired a former leading ColinaImperial Insur ance Company executive to run the finances at an agency it has just taken managerial control of, in a bid to get a better handle on the company’s trading and financial position. Patrick Ward, Bahamas First’s president and chief exec utive, told Tribune Business that the company had hired Michele Fields, wife of well-known Kerzner International and Atlantis spokesman, Ed Fields, on a contract basis to take care of General Brokers & Agents (GBA “Her background is in finance and accounting,” Mr Ward explained. “Since the operation [General Brokers & Agents] had no one in there as a qualified accountant, we felt we needed to put someone in place to look after the agency’s financial affairs on a contract basis. “Her remit is finance, not managing the agency’s overall affairs.” Mr Ward said Bahamas First “needs to know from our case how the company is trading”. He added that GBA’s two for mer principals and owners, husband and wife team Franklyn and Orinthia Nesbitt, were now at home. “You can use the word ‘retirement’,” the Bahamas First chief said. Mr Nesbitt was in the news last year, after he was kidnapped at gun point from his home and taken to GBA, where he was robbed of $2,000 in cash and $6,000 in cheques. Apart from Bahamas First, GBA is also understood to write business for Security & General and Atlantic Medical. Tribune Business recently revealed how Bahamas First had effectively taken management control of GBA, a move that could eventually result in the carrier acquiring the outstanding 70 per cent stake in the latter that it does not yet own. Bahamas First Holdings, the general insurance carrier's parent company, acquired a 30 per cent stake in GBA in 2007 in return for writing-off a $500,000 receivable balance, which represented premium income that the agent/broker owned. Mr Ward had previously acknowledged "it was not secret" that Bahamas First wanted to obtain 100 per cent ownership of GBA, but said the management agreement did not necessarily mean this would Bahamas First hires ex-Colina executive for agency finances n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor EX-JOHN S George and Freeport Concrete chief executive, Ken Hutton, yesterday confirmed he had returned to Nassau after closing his Turks & Caicos-based wholesale/retail operation, a move forced by the ‘triple whammy’ of hurricanes and that nation’s political and economic implosion. Mr Hutton told Tribune Business that after coming through three hurricanes in 2008, the sharp economic downturn which he said was much worse in the Turks & Caicos than in the Bahamas and absence of any government in that nation had prompted him to “cut” his losses and shut his Cost Right business. Mr Hutton said of the venture: “It was a gamble to start with a pretty good gamble but with the place the way it is, it was time to cut.” He added that after Turks & Caicos was struck by multiple storms last year, Cost Right recovered to a position where it had “turned the corner”, only for the business to feel the full force of the global economic meltdown. All construction and investment projects in Turks & Caicos had ground to a halt, a devel opment most Bahamians are all too-familiar with. That nation’s high-end tourism product also experienced a major reduction Ex-John S George chief back home after Turks close Hotel owners threaten end to $1m investment * Say shooting outside Bay Street 27-room Bay Street property, and unrelated nightclub noise, costing them business ‘left, right and centre’ * ‘Four to five rooms’ check out after shooting * El Greco running 60-70% occupancies, but struggling to keep it there as neighbourhood not conducive to tourism * Incidents last think Bahamian tourism/downtown project needs Emera in joint venture link with fellow Canadian power provider that has qualified for BEC renewable energy search SEE page 4B SEE page 2B SEE page 4B SEE page 4B Hutton closes wholesale/retail venture and selling building, due to triple whammy’ of hurricanes and economic/political meltdown

PAGE 14

to turn around like this.” Referring to the shooting and the nightclub issues, Mr Pikra menos added: “It obviously puts investment in jeopardy here, that’s for sure. We’re kind of thinking about holding off and seeing what the Government is going to do. “We’re just going to consider whether we take it any further. We are seriously reconsidering going any further if there’s not going to be any progress by the authorities, there not going to get more involved. “We’re just losing a ton of business. We’re just losing busi ness left, right and centre because of this.” Mr Pikramenos said the El Greco Hotel’s occupancies were currently running at 60-70 per cent, and the property was “try ing to keep it there”. The hotel, he added, had a strong Bahami an client base, and was also attracting a lot of Europeans something the owners hoped would increase with additional airlift. “We’re not going to be able to hold the business if the atmosphere causes three to four rooms to check out,” Mr Pikramenos added. “Ever since this nightclub came on stream, we are losing business evbery weekend. Every weekend we’ve got check-outs due to the noise. They’re afraid to stay in the hotel.” Mr Pikramenos said he had spoken to the Licensing Authority to discover what licence the Mayfield had, and had also approached the building’s owner, Keith Aranaj , without success. Mr Aranaj yesterday said he understands the nightclub has a license to operate until 4am nightly. He said: "Since the nightclub opened people have complained about the noise and I can't blame them for that, but they should talk to the woman who rents the place, and they should come to some understanding. "If the police say close it down then fine, close it down. I can’t do anything until she vio lates her lease, so it depends on what the police do.” He added: “The shooting wasn't on my property and I don’t think the shooting was connected to the club. From what I understand, the man was shot at home. I am worried about it but I don’t think it is connected here.” According to acting director of hotel licensing, Monique Hepburn, the Mayfield is no longer licensed to operate as a hotel and is listed as under ren ovation. The building itself, however, still houses a coffee shop, night club and liquor store. Ms Hepburn said that though the former hotel is under renovations, other businesses are able to rent and operate in available commercial space once they hold a valid business license. THIS is the second part in a series on tax reform. Last week, I presented a case for tax reform highlighting some of the challenges presented byour current system of taxation. In the next two articles, I will examine several types of tax regimes that we can obviously consider. Today, I will discuss the Sales Tax and the Value Added Tax (VAT Consumption-based taxes Both systems are consumption-based taxes, which would take the collection process outof the hands of a bureaucratic and often inefficient agency (the Customs Department in our case), and replace it with multiple ‘private sector’ collection points. Many persons would argue that, historically, the Bahamas has never had a culture of mercantile honesty. As a result, there is a lot of scepticism about putting tax collection in thehands of the merchant class. However, on the other hand, there is a perception of widespread dishonesty and corruption among some officers within the Customs Department, making it almost impossible to determine what would be the lesser of the two evils. Talking about being between ‘a rock and a hard place’what a position to be in. A successful transition to a tax system with widespread collection points requires that we have computer systems and networks, monitoring regimes, strict rules and the political and legal resolve to enforce compliance. Notwithstanding the above, there are two aspects of consumption-based taxes that intrigue me. First is the fact that it collects taxes from everybody in the economy – citizens, residents and foreigners. The latter point is particularly relevant to a society like ours, with an extremely large illegal immigrant population who elude our tax base to a large extent. Second,there is the potential to tax the ‘underground’ cash economy, as consumption triggers some degree of taxation. For instance, just imagine the potential revenue that can be derived by taxing the ‘numbers’ industry. Our current national pretence that the numbers business is illegal is an absolute jokewhen, in truth, it is now one of the most ‘open’ businesses that exist. Numbers can be openly purchased at beauty salons, restaurants, barber shops, bars, ‘corner stores’ and, of course, the ever present, web caf. The only persons who are seemingly unaware of this are the police. Sales tax A Sales Tax is a tax that is imposed every time a retail (end user) sale occurs. It is probably safe to say that most Bahamians are familiar with a sales tax as a result of ‘Florida’ shopping trips. A Sales Tax is a tax on consumption, levied on goods and services at the point of purchase. They are typically detailed as a percentage on the price of the item in question, but may simply be a flat fee. Soa sales tax could be 5 per cent of the purchase price, or a standard amount such as 10 cents. A sales tax as a percentage of the purchase price is far more common. For example, the current Sales Tax rate in Florida is 6 per cent. The underlying philosophy of a Sales Tax is that a person is taxed on the basis of what he consumes rather than what he earns. Such taxes are considered to be regressive, as it turns out that the lower your income is, the greater the proportion of your income you wind up paying in sales taxes. This is because they are not determined on income, and even the poor must consume a certain baseline quantity of goods and services. This is part of the reason why many foods are frequently exempted from sales taxes. While the concept is straightforward, this system places a heavy reliance on the honesty of merchants, who are responsible for first, collecting these taxes, and second, remitting these taxes to the national treasury in a timely and accurate manner. Value Added Tax (VAT Value Added Tax, popularly known as ‘VAT’, is a special type of indirect tax in which a sum of money is levied at a particular stage in the sale of a product or service. VAT came into effect for the first time on 10 April, 1954. From its inception, the VAT system was imposed on all major sectors of the French economy – the first country to use this system. Once instituted, it was immediately clear that revenues collected from the VAT system constituted a substantial share of the government’s revenue in the French economy. VAT is similar to a sales tax. But instead of implementing one tax on a given percentage at the time of a retail sale, there is a smaller tax, added each time the product is resold or when ‘value has been added to a product’. For example, a tax is added when a product is passed from a manufacturer to wholesaler, and again from the wholesaler to the retailer. Example This is best demonstrated by a simple easy to follow example: Cat Island Fabrics is a manufacturer of upholstery fabrics. It sells fabric to Sleeptime Mattresses, a manufacturer of bed mattresses. The Furniture Gallery, a furniture store, buys its mattresses from Sleeptime, and in turn sells its mattresses to Gerald Stubbs. Under a Sales Tax system, the only person who pays taxes would be Gerald Stubbs, the purchaser of the mattress. However, under a VAT system, Cat Island Fabrics would pay tax when it buys cotton and turns it into fabric; Sleeptime would pay tax when it uses that fabric to create a mattress; the Furniture Gallery would pay tax when it purchases the mattress for resale; and finally, Gerald Stubbs would pay tax when he buys his new mattress. Therefore, tax is paid at four points of ‘value adding’, instead of once at the point of final sale. VAT Philosophy It is believed that VAT is a better tax collection system thana sales tax, and most countries worldwide have adopted some variation of the VAT, especially in Europe and Africa. More than 120 countries have implemented this system, and it is estimated that more than 70 per cent of the world’s population live under such a system. The risk of not recovering tax from all the intermediaries involved in VAT’s collection is said to be the biggest risk of such a system. The counter argument is that this is actually reduced because the tax is collected in stages, and the tax burden is not left to the final retailer, but spread over the multistage collection system. (I have my personal views on thisthis is the counter-argument nonetheless). Under VAT, every person trading (or adding value required to register as a trader. This then begs the question: What is a trader? A trader under VAT is everyone who provides a professional, trade or business service on an ongoing basisan extremely wide definition. Criticisms According to Wikipedia, rvenues from VAT are frequently lower than expected because they are difficult and costly to administer and collect. In many countries, however, where collection of personal income taxes and corporate profit taxes has been historical ly weak, VAT collection has been more successful than other types of taxation. VAT has become more important in many jurisdictions, as tariff levels have fallen worldwide due to trade liberalisation. It has essentially replaced lost tariff revenues. Whether the costs and distortions of value added taxes are lower than the economic inefficiencies and enforcement issues ( such as smuggling) from high import tariffs is debatable, theory suggests value added taxes are far more efficient. Similarly, certain industries (small-scale services, for example) tend to have more VAT avoidance, particularly where cash transactions predominate, and VAT may be criticised for encouraging this. From the perspective of government, however, VAT may be preferable because it captures at least some of the value-added. For example, a carpenter may offer to provide services for cash (without a receipt, and without VAT) to a homeowner, who usually cannot claim input VAT back. The homeowner will hence bear lower costs and the carpenter may be able to avoid other taxes (profit or payroll taxes). The Government, however, may still receive VAT for various other inputs (lumber, paint, gasoline, tools) sold to the carpenter, who would be unable to reclaim the VAT on these inputs. While the total tax receipts may be lower compared to full compliance, it may not be lower than under other feasible taxation systems. Next week, we will continue our exploration of alternative tax systems with an examination of income tax. Until next week NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Chartered Financial Analyst, is vicepresident pensions, Colonial Pensions Services (Bahamasa wholly-owned subsidiary of Colonial Group International, which owns Atlantic Medical Insurance and is a major share holder of Security & General Insurance Company in the Bahamas. The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of Colonial Group International or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to rlgibson@atlantic house.com.bs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t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t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
PAGE 15

n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter THE SECURITIES Commission, in an effort to boost compliance rates that are as low as22 per cent when it comes to Bahamas-registered investment funds filing their audited yearend financials within the pres cribed time, will roll out new legislation this year to tighten regulation. The Commission’s market surv eillance manager, Sally Moss, revealed in a presentation at the British Colonial Hilton that in 2007 only 22 per cent of all reg-i stered investment funds turned in audited financial statements within the statutory deadline of four months after year end. Ms Moss, speaking to Commission registrants, admitted that this low figure could be attributed to laxity in enforcing r egulatory obligations. “You can say: ‘You haven’t enforced the rules’, and so this exists as bad on you as it does usand you’re probably right,” she said. “We don’t want to have laws that strangle the industry. We want to enforce the law, but not at all costs, and so we are trying to look at the proportionality of regulation. It has to make sense for us and also for you.” According to Ms Moss, a financial extension rule was adopted in 2004, so that companies who were in danger of not meeting the Commission’s deadline for turning in audited financial statements would receive a grace period. However, businesses failed to take advantage of the grace period, she said, and the Commission year after year failed to enforce its laws regardi ng financial reporting. Yesterday’s meeting was the Commission’s third annual industry briefing, which focused o n introducing the upcoming amendments to the Investment Funds Act 2003. Some of the changes being pursued are: a change in definition of investment funds; change in definition of professional funds; change in definition of recognized foreign funds and the extension of the audit deadline from four to six months. Speaking at the briefing, Commisison chairman Philip Stubbs said that after his appointment it was made obvious to him that some “change and reform” was needed. “One of the major criticisms was that the Commission was not as responsive to the industry as might be expected,” he said. Mr Stubbs said theCommission recently underwent a review of its operations by an independ ent consultant, who provided a report to the Ministry of Finance. Mr Stubbs said an analysis from the findings of this r eport will lead to plans to supplement the Commission’s short and long-term goals. The Commission, which regulates the capital markets and investment funds industry, released its ‘Statement of Priorities for 2009’ yesterday. They pledged for 2009 to:* Conduct a comprehensive review of the Commission to identify areas of risk and required improvements. * Improve the efficiency of the Commission. * Enhance the legislative framework of the Commission. * Enhance transparency in the operations of the Commission. The Commission is strained by the environment in which it operates, as it seeks to ensure confidence in local capital markets that apply to both domestic a nd international market participants. “We recognise the challenges,” said Mr Stubbs. “We as the regulator are committed to s uccessfully meeting them.” C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 3B n B y NEIL HARTNELL T ribune Business Editor A SENIOR Bahamas Chamb er of Commerce official has u rged businesses to maintain their membership in organisa tions like his, and not simply let i t lapse in a bid to cut costs. The Chamber has so far collected75 per cent of the membership fees due for the upcoming year. Philip Simon, the Chamber’s executive director, told Tribune Business: “We’re heading into the renewal period beginning in March, and we’ve pretty much collected, from last year to now, about three-quarters of the total membership [fees]. “It is anticipated there might be a challenge getting higher than that this time, because of t he economic downturn.” T he Chamber has about 500 fully paid-up members, and Mr Simon added: “We want toe ncourage them to renew. Membership in organisations that can provide support in difficult times, be it structural, financial or technical advice, is recommended. We have pro grammes designed to assist businesses in these tough times.” Mr Simon pointed to the Chamber’s training programmes, newly-launched Small and Medium Sized Business U nit, its pension plan for mem b ers, and the proposed group health plan as examples of prac tical initiatives designed to bene fit the business community. “Now is not the time to abandon membership in organisations that can help you through these tough economic times,” Mr Simon added. Brian Nutt, head of the 100member Bahamas Employers Confederation (BECon firmed that his organisation was also feeling the effects of the depressed economy, with some members either not renewing o r paying their dues late. One of the things that is happening is that businesses are examining all their costs, includ-i ng the cost of subventions to organisations like BECon, the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and all the other organisations,” Mr Nutt said. “We have seen a slowdown in dues payments.” Within “the next month or so”, companies that had not paid their dues may no longer be BECon members, Mr Nutt said, because they would not be in “good standing”. Businesses urged: Do not end critical group memberships Regulator: Just 22% of filings meet deadline Chamber, BECon finding it tough to collect same level of dues

PAGE 16

in demand, Mr Hutton added, and some 1,000 families had left the islands. Describing Turks & Caicos as being in “economic meltdown”, Mr Hutton said the problems facing him and other b usinessmen there were exacerbated by the uncertain investment climate created by an absence of government. The island’s governance has been paralysed by the ongoing Commission of Inquiry, which last week resulted in the resignation of Premier Michael Missick. The upshot has been that there have been no policymakers around to take decisions on business and investment-related proposals. “I closed the business,” Mr Hutton told Tribune Business yesterday. “I’m in the middle of selling the property right now. It’s [Turks & Caicos] a neat place, I enjoyed it, but it was time to make a business decision and get out of it. “The first year was not bad, and then we had some trouble . I got more involved, we had it going, and then there were three hurricanes, a global meltdown, and a political meltdown. “There’s no one in charge down there. There’s no government, no decisions are being made, and there’s no investment. It’s absolutely a train wreck. When you’re a wholesale supplier to the hotels, and the hotels are running at 12 per cent occupancies, there’s no business.” When asked what he planned to do now he was back full-time in the Bahamas, Mr Hutton told Tribune Business: “I’ve got some options I’m looking at, but I’m happy to be home. I’ve been a way for a year and it’s been a struggle.” The Turks & Caicos store Mr Hutton has closed has endureda somewhat turbulent time under different Bahamian ownership over the past seven to eight years. The Cost Right ven ture has closed a little less than two years after Mr Hutton acquired the business fromB ISX-listed Bahamian compan y, Abaco Markets, which in turn had bought it in 2000 asTC Trading, a grocery wholesaler. Mr Hutton and fellow investors paid $2.7 million for the store, which was also named Cost Right then, via their company Entervant Holdings (TCI Ltd, with $2.5 million paid upfront and the remaining $200,000 payable over a threeyear period. When it was closed, Cost Right employed some 22 staff, at one time having employed 32 persons. “I’m not the only one,” Mr Hutton said of the Cost Right closure. “This is happening all over the world, and I’ve still got my health, I’ve got my family and the sun will rise tomorrow. “It’s a shame, but again, I’m not the only one. Atlantis knows what it’s all about, Cable Beach knows what it’s all about,a nd the phone company in the Turks & Caicos has laid off half its staff.” Mr Hutton pointed out that some of the most successful businessmen in history had to endure several corporate fail-u res before they tasted success. T he economic downturn had also resulted in a crime spike in the Turks & Caicos Islands, Mr Hutton added, with several armed robberies taking place there in the last few weeks. “I’ve never seen anything like that before,” he said. “It’s still a lot better here in the Bahamas than it is down there.” Mr Hutton focused full-time on his Turks & Caicos venture after the John S George Holdings private equity group he put together decided to sell the Bahamian retailer, following a boardroom split. The argument spilt into public when one of the group’s investors, Benchmark (Bahamas Julian Brown, voiced public crit icism of Mr Hutton’s management style. Apart from Benchmark, which had a 20 per cent stake, and Mr Hutton and his relativesw ith a 40 per cent stake, the remainder of the company was held by the Morley and Pritchard families with 15 per cent each, and Butterfield Bank (Bahamas more with 10 per cent. J ohn S George was subseq uently sold to its current own er, Bahamian retail entrepreneur Andrew Wilson. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Are you seeking an exciting career opportunity?www.firstcaribbeanbank.com/careers.htm FirstCaribbean For further information on this and other available positions, please visit our website:Accountable for acquisition and promotion of the full range of insurance products and services. AVAILABLE POSITION:INSURANCE OFFICER CAREER OPPORTUNITIES happen. He explained: “We have a 30 per cent equity interest in GBA. That has not changed. It is no secret that we have expressed an interest in acquiring the balance of the shares that we don’t already own. “In the process of doing that, we agreed with the existing shareholders that in order for us to do proper due diligence as necessary, certain aspects of recordkeeping and certain elements in the way the business was being managed and operated needed to change. “There’s been an agreement reached where elements of the day-to-day management are going to be done by a new slate of directors and man agers. That may lead to a change in ownership down the road.” If Bahamas First does ultimately acquire BGA, which has offices on Collins Avenue in Nassau and Freeport, the general insurance carrier which has the largest market share in terms of annual gross premiums, now standing at more than $100 million will own a 100 per cent inter est in five agencies. The others would be Moseley Burnside, Nassau Underwriters (NUA Insurance Agency and Star General in Freeport. In addition, industry sources said several other agents Confidence Insurance Agents & Bro kers, Colina General, Bethel-Thompson and one other while not owned by Bahamas First, wrote business 100 per cent exclusively for the carrier. One insurance sector source told Tribune Business that Bahamas First’s expanding agency force was now close to matching the Bahamian mar ket’s largest brokers/agents, J. S. Johnson and Insurance Management, in terms of size. While those companies placed the majority of their busi ness through tied carriers, Insurance Company of the Bahamas and Summit, respectively, Bahamas First had grown through acquiring agents, and now had a force of ‘tied’ agents. Several insurance industry sources yesterday likened 100 per cent-owned or ‘tied’ agents to a form of ‘direct selling’ of insurance policies to consumers by a carrier. They suggested that it raised competition concerns, especially among the broker and agent segment of the Bahamian insurance market. Ex-John S George chief back home after Turks close Grand Bahama Power investor in new Bahamas renewable tie-up “We are excited to have Emera as our financial and development partner, as we pursue renewable energy projects in this region,” said Thomas Schneider, Schneider Power’s president. “Their power generation development experience and understanding of the Bahamas will enhance these and future projects.” In a previous interview with Tribune Business, Mr Schneider said the BREC proposal would require $60 million in capital financing, of which $15 million would be equity and the remainder debt financing. He added that $40 million of that figure was likely to be spent in the Bahamas. “Such a capital infrastructure spend in the Bahamas can create a lot of services as well as jobs,” Mr Schneider said at the time. “That’s going to be a key benefit for the Bahamas, as we’re going to be putting money into the economy.” Some 1015 full-time jobs were likely to be created. Some 20-30 jobs construction jobs would be created on each of the three islands involved in the BREC project, meaning that some 60-90 jobs would be created in total if it won government/BEC approval. Meanwhile, Emera has made no secret of its desire to expand its foothold in the Bahamas, which was achieved last November when the company paid $41 million to acquire Lady Henrietta St George’s 50 per cent ICD Utilities stake (translating into a 25 per cent stake in Grand Bahama Power). Chris Huskilson, its chief executive, indicated that Emera wanted to explore various forms of renewable energy in the Bahamas, and was looking to erect several towers in Grand Bahama to study the island’s suitability for wind power generation. Company Both itself and Grand Bahama Power Company are also looking to experiment with tidal/hydro energy and wasteto-energy. Mr Huskilson said Emera hoped to bring significantly lower electricity costs to Grand Bahama Power customers while, like many alternative energy projects, reducing the carbon footprint of the Bahamas. "The approach that we have to the electricity business in general is that moving the industry further away from hydrocarbons is an important part of where we are going for the future, so anything we can do to bring more renewables and to bring lower costs into the market -that’s a very strong focus for us, lowering emissions, lowering costs and making electricity more stable for customers," Mr Huskilson told a Bahamas Chamber of Commerce luncheon earlier this year. Grand Bahama Power Company chief executive, E.O. Ferrell, said his company was working closely with Emera on this project and others in order to develop its own technology and improve services to Grand Bahamians. "We have been working jointly to determine the potential for wind on the island, and they are helping us with a couple of other things," he said. "We actually have Emera people in Freeport today working with our folks on a project, so we're looking for opportunities where their utilities expertise can augment our capabilities and improve service to our customers." FROM page 1B FROM page 1B FROM page 1B Bahamas First hir es ex-Colina executive for agency finances

PAGE 17

APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN Purchase from bar before t ime (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 1 0 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 D own 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open a bundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 2 0212223 2 4 2 5 2 6 2 7 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 2 0212223 2 4 2 5 2 6 2 7Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday B est described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. S aturday’s K akuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, b y design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped l oaf (8 11 Consented to give up a v ice (5 1 2 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with c onviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may p revent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 2 5 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of t rance (6 5 Rolled up for the o pening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken w ithout knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 1 2 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 1 3 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 10 11 1 2131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 2 6 2 7 1 234567 8 9 10 11 1 2131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 2 6 2 7T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s S udoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige ( 4,4) 11 Sortie (5 1 2 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 1 8 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of c lockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr J UDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE C RYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD A cross 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before t ime (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 1 0 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 1 1 Consented to give up a v ice (5 12 Was no faster (3 1 6 Performs a new ascent (6 1 7 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 1 8 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 2 3 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 2 5 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 D own 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open a bundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken w ithout knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 C anoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 R epasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 S eal, 30 Celebrated. D own:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod a nd line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 L emon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 D resden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 2 9 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. D own:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 O unce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 A libi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 1 0 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 1 0 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics S udoku PuzzleS aturday s S udoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum o f each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s K akuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 T ribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty l evel of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES D ENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER A PT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with s everal given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. Saturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G BLONDIE MARVIN TIGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku Puzzle S aturday s Sudoku Answer Kakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to Sunday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to f ill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of e ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. k a k u r o c r r o d o s s w 2 1 in p z z l e u t a r g e t S aturday’s Kakuro AnswerAcross 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr J UDGE PARKER A PT3-G B LONDIE M ARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE C ALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLEE A S Y P U Z Z L ET R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic SolutionAcross:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution1 234567 8 9 10 11 1 2131415 1 617 1 819 2 0212223 2 4 25 26 27 1 234567 8 9 10 11 1 2131415 1 617 1 819 2 0212223 2 4 25 26 27Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleSaturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3 x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number m ay be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. s u d o u k c O N C t B R D G E I t a B Y STEVE BECKER m C C o i P G a e THE TRIBUNE’S S aturday’s K akuro Answer Across 1 Justice (5 8 Count for nothing (3,2,3 9 White with age (5 10 Suffer fall in prestige (4,4 11 Sortie (5 12 Shrill bark (3 16 Czech capital (6 17 Refuge (6 18 As things are (3 23 Banter (5 24 Estrange (8 25 Angry growl (5 26 Dismiss contemptuously (4-4 27 Small-minded (5 Down 2 Excessive adoration (8 3 Art of clockmaking (8 4 Dome (6 5 Deduce (5 6 Extremely important (5 7 Debated at length (5 12 Japanese monetary unit (3 13 Clawed foot (3 14 Fortuitously (2,6 15 Attempt to escape (3,3,2 19 Right to choose (6 20 Fortunate (5 21 Lesser (5 22 Shoot from concealment (5 frbr JUDGE PARKER APT3-G B LONDIE MARVIN T IGER HAGAR THE HORRIBLE CALVIN &HOBBES DENNIS THE MENACE CRYPTIC PUZZLE E A S Y P U Z Z L E T R I BUN E T W O I N O N E C R O SS W O RD Across 1 Builder of a lodge (5 8 Purchase from bar before time (8 9 It pours tea to us quietly, by design (5 10 Get a tube-shaped loaf (8 11 Consented to give up a vice (5 12 Was no faster (3 16 Performs a new ascent (6 17 It may be pronounced with conviction (6 18 Massaging the middle may prevent it! (3 23 Brew of beer left to rise (5 24 Succeeds with a will (8 25 Beautiful girl one may ring, we hear (5 26 One virus possibly picked up on holiday (8 27 It’s near the cathedral (5 Down 2 Ambitious candidate (8 3 Clue mixed with open abundance (8 4 Withdraw in a sort of trance (6 5 Rolled up for the opening (5 6 Italian food fathers taken without knowing (5 7 Plane going up or down (5 12 Some areas short of a means of transport (3 13 It may be consumed from a cup (3 14 Team not assumed to be of star quality (8 15 High church features (8 19 Achieve gain? (6 20 Oldest tree on the street (5 21 Loudly call out after a plea for silence (5 22 Colour for putting on (5 Across:1 Lion’s share, 6 Fair, 10 Canoe, 11 Did no good, 12 Trombone, 13 Melon, 15 Adheres, 17 Satchel, 19 Repasts, 21 Foreign, 22 Franc, 24 Annalist, 27 Accordion, 28 Guide, 29 Seal, 30 Celebrated. Down:1 Loco, 2 Ownership, 3 Steam, 4 Hideous, 5 Reddens, 7 Atoll, 8 Rod and line, 9 Commuter, 14 Pair of oars, 16 Rest cure, 18 Hairshirt, 20 Sea mile, 21 Finance, 23 Accra, 25 Lager, 26 Heed. Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Across:1 Carbon copy, 6 Camp, 10 Lemon, 11 Vestigial, 12 Underlie, 13 Tails, 15 Ecstasy, 17 Stopgap, 19 Dresden, 21 Crowbar, 22 Angle, 24 Thuggery, 27 Trenchant, 28 Overt, 29 Ruse, 30 Merrymaker. Down:1 Cold, 2 Reminisce, 3 Ounce, 4 Cavalry, 5 Possess, 7 Alibi, 8 Poles apart, 9 Virtuoso, 14 Head waiter, 16 Audience, 18 Go berserk, 20 Nitrate, 21 Clutter, 23 Guess, 25 Gloom, 26 Star. Yesterday’s Easy Solution 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 1234567 8 9 10 11 12131415 1617 1819 20212223 24 25 26 27 Tribune Comics Sudoku PuzzleS aturday s Sudoku AnswerKakuro Puzzle Contract Bridge by Steve Becker Chess Target S udoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to 9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each 3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to S unday Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum ofe ach horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number may be used in the same block more than once. The difficultyl evel of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday. P AGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 18

C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 7B health B ODYANDMIND T h e T r i b u n e n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Writer H aving a hysterectomy is a s erious decision and one that should be carefully c onsidered. A physician may recommend a hysterectomy for a variety of reasons, however, in most cases it is optional and an informed d ecision based on one’s medical history must be made. In the Bahamas, according to data collected by the Planning Unit of the Princess Margaret Hospital, there have been 1,017 hysterectomies in the past six years. Gynecologist/obstetrician, Leon D upuch, has been doing hysterectomies for about 15 years and has performed and seen many Bahamian w omen who do and do not need this procedure. “The most common reason for a hysterectomy in our country is for the removal of multiple fibroids. Other causes include, prolapse, cancer, e ndometriosis, pelvic pain, or irregular bleeding,” Dr Dupuch said. Dr Dupuch said before a hysterectomy there are a lot of things to con-s ider. It depends on their age first of all. You would not want to do a hysterect omy on someone who has not had c hildren or who is still quite young. S o if they have completed their fami ly, then they can consider the procedure,” Dr Dupuch said. However, Dr Dupuch stressed that t here are possible alternative therapies which one might wish to try before choosing to have a hysterectomy. Depending on one’s medical condition, drug treatments, D & C, or pelvic exercises are sometimes helpful. I n the case of pre cancerous cells, cone biopsy, cryosurgery, or laser therapy are some of the options available. “They can try the Mirena coil, which c an help with bleeding, the shot, the p ill and many others. So these things can be used to help treat the patient. A nother procedure is the endometria l ablation, where the lining of the w omb is cut away which avoids having a hysterectomy in someone who is within childbearing age,” Dr Dupuch said. M any women also fear depression or other emotional changes following a hysterectomy. Some women are afraid they will lose their desire for sex. Dr Dupuch said this too is untrue and that their sex life should remain as p leasurable, if not more pleasurable once they are free of the cause of the hysterectomy. “In parts of Europe, especially in F rance, it is quite common to have a s ub total hysterectomy where they take out just the top part of the womb a nd leave the cervix behind because it i s thought that it maintains sexual f unction and pleasure but some women would come in and request that,” Dr Dupuch said. Dr Dupuch said the removal of the o varies may cause a decrease in sexual desire because the woman goes into premature menopause. However, if the ovaries are not removed during the procedure, the woman then produces hormones that continue to stimu late sexual desire For many women, a hysterectomy provides an enhanced sense of wellbeing and a chance to start a new life,f ree of the pain and symptoms which c aused them to choose a hysterectomy. Whatever method or option she c hooses, it is in the woman’s best intere st to explore all the treatment options a vailable for her particular condition before choosing a hysterectomy. Carefully consider having a hysterectomy FEBRUARY is Heart Month, and you need to ask yourself what you're doing to celebrate your own healthy heart? Are you ensuring that your feet are contributing to a healthy heart? You should always be mindful that the foot, a complex structure composed of bones, muscles, ligaments, nerves, and blood vessels must support the entire weight of the body during walking and standing. During running and jumping, the forces on the foot can be several times greater than the weight of the body. Regular activity goes a long way towards keeping you and your heart healthy, as well as lowering your risks for other diseases. Walking The easiest exercise out there is walking. It's simple to do, is low stress on aging knees and hips, and is incredibly good for you. The benefits of walking 15 minutes per day are astounding, and can lead to decreased chances of heart disease, diabetes and obesity. If you haven't been as active as you should due to foot pain, seek help. In many cases you are not wearing proper footwear for walking and as a result you are doing more damage to your health than good. I urge you to get active today, it will save you money and add years to your life!!! Specific design Footwear today is designed for specific activities, with the support in the area where pressure may be present, given that particular activity. For example, if you are walking for fitness, then you should purchase a 'walker-sneaker' because the pressures on the foot would be very different than if you were running. Similarly, many walkers complain of knee pains, which may be because they are using footwear designed for other activities. High tech footwear If you're looking for something a little different, consider something revolutionary like a rocker-soled shoe to enhance your exercise program and add a little pep to your step. This type of footwear will defi nitely rock your world by directing the body into a stable and correct walk and reduce the stress on the joints. For example, the 'MBT' and the 'Chung Shi' line of footwear have been scientifical ly designed as dynamic workout tools. Their unique 'rocker sole' design benefits the user by: Helping to reduce cellulite Toning muscles Increasing circulation Improving posture Reducing lower back pain Strengthening joints; and Diminishing spider and varicose veins Foot pain Finally, to avoid foot pain, seek professional help to assist you with the correct footwear and support (orthotic support your body and foot type but to adequately relieve the pressure presented by the underlying terrain. Runners who want to continue running for many more years, need to ensure that there is enough support between your foot and the flat and hard surfaces you run on. Depending on the activity to which you are doing, you need to seek the appropriate footwear and support for that purpose. A professional in the field of footwear can help you best with your selec tion. Bernadette D. Gibson, a Board Certified Pedorthist, is the proprietor of Foot Solutions, a health and wellness franchise that focuses on foot care and proper shoe fit, located in the Sandyport Plaza, Nassau. "The views expressed are those of the author and does not necessarily represent those of Foot Solutions Incorporated or any of its subsidiary and/or affiliated companies. Please direct any questions or comments to nassau@footsolutions.com or 327FEET (3338 F F F F o o o o o o o o t t t t S S S S o o o o l l l l u u u u t t t t i i i i o o o o n n n n s s s s Make a contribution to a healthy heart through your feet

PAGE 19

C M Y K C M Y K HEALTH PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Eating for a healthy heart ACCORDING to a local physician, contrary to popular belief, depression is not something that you can just 'snap out' of. It's more than just a feeling of being "down in the dumps" or "blue". More than 14 million Americans, or more than 6 per cent of adults experi ence depression in any given year. Despite these statistics, depression is not a normal part of life, regardless of your age, sex, or health status. It is thought to be caused by an imbalance of brain chemicals, and oth er factors. When certain chemicals in the brain (such as serotonin norepi nephrine, and dopamine) are out of balance, depression can occur. Antidepressants improve the symptoms of depression by bringing these chemicals back into balance. These are the facts given to an audience at Doctors Hospital during the second lecture of their 2009 Distin guished Lecture Series schedule. Eager to gain insight on a topic that has seemed to affected many Bahamian families in recent days; the free lecture was designed to promote awareness and prevention. Dr Michael Neville, leading psychia trist at Doctors Hospital presented on the topic of Depression. “The good news is that depression is very treat able. Most patients, even those with severe depression, show improvement after they seek treatment. Your doctor will prescribe treatment based on the pattern of your depression, its sever ity, persistence of symptoms, and his tory,” said Dr Neville Depression is a serious medical illness that involves the brain and the feelings do not go away. They persist and interfere with your everyday life. Symptoms can include: Sadness Loss of interest or pleasure in activities you used to enjoy Change in weight Difficulty sleeping or oversleeping Energy loss Feelings of worthlessness Thoughts of death or suicide The fact is that anyone can get depression. The first step in fighting depression is to understand what it is, how it affects you, and what causes it. There are also things you can do to help yourself feel better. Go online and research the topic. Depression.com gives these tips to help you understand depression: Recognise early signs. It's important to recognise and treat depression as early as possible, which decreases your risk of becoming depressed again. If you pretend the problem isn't there, it's probably going to get worse. You need to watch for the types of events that contributed to depression in the past, and be alert for early symptoms. Set realistic goals. You may feel overwhelmed by everything you "should" be doing at home or at work. Try not to be hard on yourself. Remember that depression is an illness and that you can't force yourself out of it. Focus on small, realistic goals to ease yourself back into your work and family routine. Do what you enjoy. Even if you don't really feel like it, set aside time to do things that you like. Get together with friends. Take a walk. Go to the movies. Take up a hobby that you set aside years ago. Hold off on big decisions. Since depression can color your outlook on everything, it's best to avoid making any big decisions-quitting a job or moving, for instance-until you feel better. Avoid alcohol. Although you might think it will help you feel better, alcohol can make your depression worse. Depressed people are at special risk of developing substance abuse problems, and alcohol interacts with many anti depressants. Exercise. There's more and more evidence that exercise helps with mild to moderate depression. When you're considering an exercise plan, don't be too ambitious. Find an activity that you like, start slowly, and work up to exercising three times a week or more for 20 to 30 minutes. Dr Neville agrees that physical activ ity can help people overcome mild to moderate depression. Any type of exercise seems to help. In addition, he suggested keeping a journal. It may not always be easy and it can be painful to write about bad feelings. However, Dr Neville says writing a journal is one of the best self-help methods you can use to learn more about your thoughts and feelings Researchers have found that a lot of people who are depressed feel self-crit ical, and may even doubt that their loved ones really care for them. These feelings may be symptoms of depression. Try to push aside these feelings and talk to the people close to you. Explain what you're going through. Ask them for help. Having someone on your side-someone who encourages you in your treatment or goes with you to doctor's appointments-can make a huge difference in your recovery. What can you do to help someone through depression? Learn about depression-its causes, symptoms, and treatments. Knowing about the condition will help you better understand what a depressed person is going through. Do what you can to make sure that a person with depression gets medical care. Encourage your friend or loved one to stick with his or her therapy or medication. Offer to go with him or her to appointments as support. Be supportive and patient. Listen to what the depressed person has to say. Without being pushy, encourage your friend or loved one to do the things that he or she used to enjoy. See friends. Go to the movies. Take a walk. If someone you know is thinking about suicide, don't ignore it. Do whatever you can to get help for that person. Get in touch with his or her doctor or therapist. Depression can run in fami lies, and usually starts between the ages of 15 and 30 and it is much more common in women. Women can also get postpartum depression after the birth of a baby. There are effective treatments for depression, including antidepressants and talk therapy. Talk to your doctors to find out the best course of treatment for you. Depression isn’t something you can ‘just snap out of n By MAGGIE BAIN Intimacy WHATdoes being intimate with someone really mean? Is it thes haring and showing of passion and desire for someone? Is it an emotional connection with someone? Onei s sexual intimacy and the other is an emotional or psychological intimacy. We see this psychological intimacy in several forms and it can be either one or two sided.F or example our intimate relationships with our doctors and perhaps lawyers and accountants can be one sided as one person is usually the speaker and the other the listener. F riends, family and love relationships a re two sided and require both persons to be speakers and listeners. It is the sharing of our innermost self that is the basis of the emotional connect ion. Not only is each relationship unique but each person may gain different things from the same relations hip. The speaker's pleasure is a sense o f peace or contentment showing their inner self being listened to with interest and being understood. The l istener's pleasure is in listening to the speaker's innermost thoughts. There is no doubt that we can show i ntimacy towards someone in one or many areas of our lives such as social, intellectual, spiritual but it is the deepe ning of this two sided emotional connection that is usually the basis of a love relationship. T he first step for psychological intimacy is for a person to be able to put their innermost experiences into thought, and be able to express them in words. This is often very hard for people to do particularly if they have not been brought up in an environment where they were encouraged to talk and express their feelings. Secondly the listener has to be able tor espond in a non critical and accepting manner to what is being said. Responding with 'you shouldn't feelt his way' or 'couldn't this wait?' will not encourage the speaker to open up and express themselves. A grasp ofw hat is being said and the importance of the moment for the speaker is required. The wonderful effect of thisc onnection brings great comfort and security to the relationship. It calms and sustains individuals because theyf eel seen, accepted, and understood. However for some people the excitement that this new attachment cre-a tes is too difficult to handle and they run from the relationship. They feel the emotional closeness but turn awayf rom it when near the person. They have difficulty understanding why they do this and may repeat it in sub s equent relationships. We see the effect of this emotional attachment in relationship therapy and the delight and also the distress that it can cause. The emotional peace t o a person's sense of well being is so important that if the relationship comes to an abrupt end a person can e xperience depression, anxiety or stress symptoms. We can see then that it is essential early on in a relationship to learn and develop the skills necessary to emo tionally connect to another individual as this lays the groundwork for love relationships. It is usually assumed that women are the ones who most value the importance of emotional connection because it is a way to measure their relationships. However men also prosper in emotionally rich relationships and do bet ter maintaining them when they develop these skills. Psychological intimacy is often the trigger for falling in love and the subsequent sexual intimacy allows persons to further know each other. Understanding the importance of encouraging this intimacy to grow allows individuals to shed their inhibitions during love making and discover their full sexual potential. For couples who have not worked this out, have not been able to connect emotionally, unable to express themselves, or are overwhelmed with outside demands, this can become a difficult problem to overcome. Over time it becomes increasingly difficult to behave sexually together when the emotional connection has become depleted. A period of dating and get ting to know each other prior to introducing sexual intimacy provides a couple with an atmosphere of substance and hopefully longevity to the rela tionship. It takes a lot of courage to realise and also admit to this disconnect or loss in the relationship, but it is this that often brings couples to relationship therapy. To rekindle or even fire up for the first time the desire and intimacy can bring real energy and passion to the relationship. With out a doubt it is worth all the time and effort that it will require from you. The tantalising reward will be peace, joy and hap piness. Margaret Bain is an Individual and Couples Relationship Therapist. She is a Registered Nurse and a Certified Clinical Sex Therapist located at The Centre for Renewing Relation ships, Grosvenor's Close West. She can be contacted by calling 356-7983 or by email at relatebahamas@yahoo.com L L o o v v i i n n g g R R e e l l a a t t i i o o n n s s h h i i p p s s DID you know that heart disease is one of the top causes of death in The Bahamas? The heart is one of the most important organs in the body. For it to function well, it is important that you take care of it. The food you eat can affect the way that blood flows through your heart and blood vessels. If you have a diet that is high in fat and cholesterol, it can gradually cause a build up called plaque in your arteries. Plaque slows down the blood flow and blocks small arteries. If the blockage is in an artery that carries blood to the heart muscle, then one suffers a heart attack. If the blockage is in an artery that carries blood to the brain, then one suffers a stroke. The good news is that you can prevent heart disease or lower your risk for it. Having a healthy diet helps to keep your arteries clear allowing blood to flow freely, thus reducing your risk for heart disease. Here are some tips for a hearthealthy diet from the American Academy of Family Physicians: Eat less fat (especially butter, coconut and palm oil, saturated orh ydrogenated vegetable fats such as Crisco, animal fat in meats and fats in dairy products. Use non-stick vegetable cooking sprays instead of oils. Buy lean cuts of meats and eat fish, skinless chicken and turkey instead of beef. Try low fat snacks that have been baked instead of fried, such as pretzels. Try to limit how many sweets you eat. E at no more than 3 e gg yolks per w eek ( 2 if you already have heart d isease) , use egg whites or egg substitutes. Bake, broil, boil or grill foods instead of frying them. Eat fewer “fast foods” (burgers, fried foods) which are high in fat. Instead, eat more fruits, vegetables and complex carbohydrates ( brown rice, pasta, whole wheat bread, grains). Drink low calorie beverages, such as water , unsweetened tea, 100 per cent fruit juices, and low fat milk. Maintain or improve your weight. Here are some additional heart healthy tips from the Department of Health and Human Services, Food and Drug Administration, United States of America. Eat less Fat Some fats are more likely to cause heart disease-saturated fats and trans fats. These fats are usually found in foods from animals, such as meat, milk, cheese, and butter. They also are found in foods with palm and coconut oils. Eat less of these foods. Rather, eat foods containing monounsaturated fats(olive, canola, peanut, avocado, nuts, seeds) and polyunsaturated fats (Safflower oil, corn oil plants and seafood. Eat less Sodium Eating less sodium can help lower some people's blood pressure. This can help reduce the risk of heart disease. Sodium is something we need in our diets, but most of us eat too much of it. Much of the sodium we eat comes from salt we add to our food at the table or that food companies add to their foods. So, avoid adding salt to foods at the table. Eat fewer Calories When we eat more calories than we need, we gain weight. Being overweight can cause heart disease. When we eat fewer calories than we need, we lose weight. Eat more Fiber Eating fiber from fruits, vegetables, and grains may help lower your chances of getting heart disease. DALE CAN YOU DO SOME KIND OF CHART !!!!!!!!!! Instead of:Do This: Whole or 2 percent milk, and cream-Use 1 per cent or skim milk Fried foods-Eat baked, steamed, boiled, broiled, or microwaved foods Lard, butter, palm, and coconut oils-Cook with unsaturated vegetable oils, such as corn, olive, canola, safflower, sesame, soybean, sunflower, or peanut Fatty cuts of meat, such as prime ribEat lean cuts of meat or cut off the fatty parts One whole egg in recipes-Use two egg whites Sour cream and mayonnaiseUse plain low-fat yogurt, low-fat cottage cheese, or low-fat or “light” sour cream Sauces, butter, and saltSeason vegetables with herbs and spices Regular hard and processed c heeses-Eat low-fat, low-sodium cheeses Salted potato chips and other snacks -Choose low-fat, unsalted tortilla and potato chips and unsalted pretzels and popcorn Read the Food Label The food label can help you eat less fat and sodium, fewer calories, and more fiber. Look for certain words on food labels. The words can help you spot foods that may help reduce your chances of getting heart disease. The FDA has set rules on how these words can be used. So, if the label says “low-fat,” the food must be low in fat. Look at the side or back of the package. Here, you will find “Nutrition Facts.” Look for these words: Total fat Saturated fat Cholesterol Sodium. Look at the per cent Daily Value listed next to each term. If it is 5 per cent or less for fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sodium, the food is low in these nutrients. That's good. It means the food fitsi n with a diet that may help reduce your chances of getting heart disease. Some Other Things You Can Do Ask your doctor to check your cholesterol level. This is done with a blood test. The test will show the amount of cholesterol in your blood with a number. Below 200 is good. The test will also show the amount of “good” and “bad” chol esterol. Your doctor can tell you m ore about what these numbers m ean. If your cholesterol is high, your doctor may suggest diet changes, exercise, or drugs to bring it down. Regular exercise-such as walking, swimming, or gardening-can help you keep your weight and choles terol down. So the conclusion of all this is: Eat less fat Eat less sodium Reduce your calories if you're overweight Eat more fibre Eat a variety of foods Eat plenty of bread, rice, cereal, vegetables and fruits Reduce or eliminate alcohol consumption You only have one heart. If you want to live a long and healthy life, it is important that you take care of it by practising healthy eating principles, being active and checking your blood pressure and choles terol levels regularly, especially if you are at risk. Remember, a healthy heart is a happy heart and a happy heart is a healthy heart! n By BASIL SANDS HOW many times throughout his career does a veterinarian hear the complaint “ I think my neighbor is trying or has poisoned my pet”on a regular basis. Often the pertinent clinical signs are unrelated to any toxin, however many times toxicosis is the source of clinical signs. My colleagues in the veterinary profession reliably inform me, that intentional poisonings inflicted by people are on the rise in The Bahamas. However, most toxic exposure in animals are accidental. M any pets may ingest plants, pesticides, automotive products, and over the counter prescription drugs available in or around the home despite the owner’s best efforts to prevent them from doing so. Today because of the age of the Internet, there are a lot of truths, half truths, and untruths traversing the cyber space. There are so many rumors and misinformation that one must be careful of the Internet. I will try to give good information that has been verified a s good about certain poisoning. 1 ) Ingestion of grapes and raisins may result in acute renal failure in dogs This is truevomiting, lethargy and polydypsia (drinking a lot of water may occur 5 to 6 hours after ingestion followed by anorexia and diarrhea. The owner should induce vomiting and place the animal on fluids. 2) Ingestion of sugarless candy/gum containing XYLITOL is poisonous to dogs Trueweakness, ataxia and total collapse may occur 30 to 60 minutes following ingestion. Xylitol promotes insulin release by the pancreases, which results inprofound hypoglycemia. 3) Ingestion of chocolate can poison cats and dogs Trueall chocolates contain caffeine and Theobromine which are toxic. This causes restlessness, cardiac arrhythmia, seizures, vomiting and diarrhea. 4) Onions and garlic can be bad for dogs Truetoo much dietary onion and garlic produce depression rapid heart and respiratory rates and pale mucus membranes. 5) Ingestion of poinsettia flowers or leaves can make cats and dogs sick Truethis plant contains a milky lard sap that contains diesterpinoid esters. These are irritants to the animals G.I systems. 6) Macadamia nuts produce muscle weakness in dogs True: weakness, depression, and vomiting usually occur 6 hours after ingestion. 7) Centipedes if eaten by pets can cause harm True: all centipedes are venomous and can inflict harm by their bites or because they have been ingested. 8) Vitamins A and D have toxic potential for many animals True: excessive amounts of vitamin A promotes bone lesions. Excessive amounts of vitamin D will result in hypercalcemia and calcium deposits on soft tissues. 9) Herbal products can harm cats and dogs True: when left open and available, potpourri, garden herbs, cooking powders, perfumes and any various odorants are similar scent products are attractive to cats; they are very irritating to the G.I tract 10) Ingestion of greenie treats is enjoyable but not risk free for cats and dogs Truegreenies are hard green, mold ed bone shape treats that contain wheat glutein and other additives. They are intended to be chewed before ingestion to help prevent oral odors, tarter build up and gingivitis. Unfortunately, pets occasionally will swallow large pieces of the hand treats rather than chew them resulting in gastrointesti nal upset. 11) Clorox bleach contains lye and therefore is potentially dangerous for dogs Falsethis bleach contains Sodium hypochlorite and not lye. However, this sodium hypochlorite is still corrosive and may cause harm for eye and skin contact. Too often Bahamian owners wash their floors or kennels on a daily basis resulting in a lot of skin lesions as a result of this bleach. 12) Anything and everything can be potentially toxic for a companion animal Truethe dose alone makes all the difference Every day I am sent an e-mail that may have some validity, may be clearly erroneous, and sometimes are halftruths concerning different toxins. I am called to respond to client concerns about such electronic posting or rumors and therefore, I have to use my knowledge, experience and common sense to provide appropriate, realistic and professional information. Because there is on true toxicology labs available to veterinarians in The Bahamas, many times we are at a disadvantage and hence, we do miss some diagnoses. S mall animal p oisonings: Facts or Fiction By DR BASIL SANDS Doctors Hospital lecture focuses on depression Provided by Adelma Penn, Camelta Barnes, Shandera Smith and Lathera Lotmore, Nutritionists from the Department of Public / Health Ministry of Health Maggie Bain

PAGE 20

“The key to managing and coping with stress is to build the mental agility and clarity to calmly face your problems rather than avoiding them.” If overwhelming stress is taking hold of you, this article seeks to help. Stress is really your mental, physical and behavioural response to anxietyproducing events. Left unchecked, it can result in serious physical, psychological, interpersonal or performance problems. Stress is quoted as the number one cause of many adverse health conditions; reducing efficiency and productivity at work, causing increased irritability, work pressures and annoyance, all of which directly affects your overall state of wellness. Problems stress can cause include: Heart attacks or strokes Drug abuse Ulcers Physical illness Hypertension Migraines High cholesterol Insomnia Depression Unless you find creative ways to understand and effectively manage your stress it will continue to create much havoc in your personal and professional life. Signs and Symptoms of Stress Overload Often because the word ‘stress’ is used so loosely, many people do not appreciate what stress is and how it can adversely affect their mental and physical disposition. In addition, most people pay attention only to physical aspects of themselves; causing stress to go undetected and inadvertently ignored. In such cases, even neon signs and symptoms result in no specific change in the way we manage or deal with stress. Stress symptoms may include: Muscle tension Fatigue Migraine headaches Back pain Problems in relationships Aggressive behaviour Weight gain or loss Fears Low self-esteem Anxiety Inability to concentrate Spiritual emptiness The first step to fixing or coping with any challenge is to acknowledge that you have a challenge. It is also important for you to recognise that not all stress is ‘bad’; so you must understand the full complexity of stress in order to build your mental capacity to cope and reduce its adverse affects on your health. Here are Ten Ways Reduce Your Stress:1. Work no more than ten hours daily. 2. Allow at least half an hour for each meal. 3. Eat slowly and chew well, without too much conversation. 4. Cultivate the habit of listening to relaxing music. 5. Actively cultivate the habit of walking, talking and moving at a slower pace. 6. Smile and respond cheerfully whenever meeting anyone. 7. Consider ways to relax and just breathe. 8.If emotional and/or sexual relationships are upsetting you, seek advice. 9. If you're unhappy at work, take stock and examine your choices (consider training in a new area etc.). We all have choices. 10. Concentrate on the present; avoid the tendency to dwell on past events and future uncertainties. Final thoughtsStress is about attitude. Stress alone does not cause illness. Stress is neutral until it lands on us. What we choose to do about it determines how it will affect us. Remember– if you continue to use ineffective methods of dealing with your challenges, you will continue to achieve ineffective results. You can improve your capacity to cope; but it will only begin when you decide to make the changes needed. No matter what you are experiencing, you have the personal power to make positive change happen. If you are ready to build your coping skills and effectively manage your stress, you are the ideal candidate for my upcoming No Excuses Goals Program. Please send an email to coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call 429-6770. Seats Are Limited! C M Y K C M Y K WOMAN THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009, PAGE 9B Peaches & Cream Overwhelming stress: What is your coping capacity? By Michelle M Miller, CC LATE February is a fine time to plant corn because we can expect dry and sunny weather through most of April and June, giving idealc onditions for corn cobs to develop. The corn we favour these days is far removed from the flint corn that our grandparents used to make grits. The accent is on tenderness and sweetness, but that also means we have to deal with a myriad of insects that like tenderness and sweetness. Corn is easy enough to growb ut it is tricky to get perfect full-kernel form without worms. Corn needs fertile soil and should be planted in blocks rather than rows. The size of the block can vary. If you live in Kansas the block can be several miles by several miles. Here in The Bahamas a block is more likely to be about the size of a dining table. Plant the seeds as deep as the package tells you to (usually about 2 inches closer together than the package suggests. About 12 inches is fine so long as your soil is rich and you water regularly. When your corn approaches maturity you will notice the male parts (tassels top. The ears of corn, usually two to a plant, develop and then produce ‘silk’, masses of pearly-white threads that protrude from the ears. Pollen is produced from the tassels in a cloud like smoke. Each thread of silk leads to a position on the cob where a kernel will grow, once the silk has been pollinated. Wind spreads the pollen to the silk and the corncob begins to fatten. Most corn varieties these days are called ‘sug ar enhanced’ (se sweetness is somewhat ephemeral and the old advice to have your pot of water boiling before you pick and shuck your corn (and run back still good. When is your corn ready for the pot? Peel back the covering and press a thumbnail against a kernel. If it spurts milky, it’s mealtime. Any resistance or a clear juice means a couple more days to go. Let’s get back to those critters. Corn is attacked by insects more than any other vegetable I can think of. Once the silk has formed the tops of the cobs should be dusted with Sevin insecticide or an equivalent every two days without fail. A small and inexpensive dust dispenser is handy here. If you shake from the can you will be wasting a lot of insecticide and your corn will be horribly costly. O ne of the insects that enjoys eating corn is our old green friend the giant tomato hornworm. When it attacks corn, however, it changes its name to giant corn hornworm. I was introduced to the se variety Peaches & Cream in Ontario a few years ago and it is the variety I recommend for home growing. It is soc alled because the kernels are white and yellow. It has good flavour and is exceptionally sweet. I personally prefer to boil my ears of corn in salted and sugared water. The sugar in the water is not to add sweetness to the corn but to prevent it losing sweetness. Osmosis and all that. Once on the plate I use an excess of buttert o help bring out the flavour. An old friend of mine, a Bajan, likes to boil his ears of corn in water that has had a few goat peppers and slices of salt beef added to it. Definitely different. There are many other se corn varieties avail able besides Peaches & Cream and I would recommend full season types rather than early types. We have no fear of frosts here so why not let our corn develop flavour over a long period. Plant your blocks of corn every month and you will have a regular supply of this popular veggie all through the barbecue season. GARDENER JACK LATE February is a fine time to plant corn because we can expect dry and sunny weather through most of April and June, giving ideal conditions for corn cobs to develop. do unto you,” Mrs Stubbs said. Other winners at the Cacique awards included: * Transportation – Glender Archer-Knowles, Abaco * Human Resources Development – Donald Glass, Grand Bahama * Sports, Leisure & Events – Ambrose Gouthro, Grand Bahama * Creative Arts – Steve Dodge, Abaco * Handicraft – Eloise Smith, Nassau * Sustainable Tourism – Kingsley Holbert, Exuma * Minister’s Award for Hos pitality – Peggy Thompson, Aba co * Lifetime Achievement – John “Billy Joe” Gilbert, Grand Bahama * Manager of the Year – Janet Stubbs Rolle, Four Seasons; Exuma * Employee of the Year – Standley Williams, Pelican Bay; Grand Bahama * Chef of the Year – Car olyn Elaine Bowe, Wyndham Nassau Resort; Nassau * Supervisor of the Year – Kevin McKenzie, Atlantis; Nassau * Sales Executive of the Year – Myron Jones, Sheraton Nassau Beach; Nassau * Hotelier of the Year – Russell Miller, Ritz Carlton; Nas sau * People’s Choice Secular Music – Kenneth “KC” WallaceWhitfield, Nassau * People’s Choice Gospel Music – Minister Charles Drake and CMA Ensemble * International Travel Writer – Jean-Luc Marty, Geo Magazine; France * International Tour Oper ator – Steffen Boehnke, TUI; Germany * Cruise Line of the Year – Norwegian Cruise Line * Airline of the Year – British Airways FROM page 10C She said there will also be at least one weekend camp training session to prepare the new leaders for the upcoming CariCamp in April. With the training open to all leaders, Mrs Archer said this will also be a good chance to prepare camp organizers for the organizations future expansion. Currently, there are GGA Districts in Exuma, Eleuthera, Abaco, and Grand Bahama, however this year the organisation will work toward establishing addi tional districts in Bimini, Long Island, Andros, and Inaqua. Past ranger, Chitra Pennerman, said she hopes to become an active participant of GGA as a leader, and said her decision to do so comes from the group being an instrumental factor in her success as an adult. Ms Pennerman said: “When I was younger it was a must that I go to girl guides. After school, the routine was for me to catch the bus from Aquinas every Friday. Girl guides has instilled morals and values that I may have lost at home. It has taught me a lot, and I would like to see that passed on to girls today.” Remembers She remembers her time in the organisation, where on camping trips she had to learn how to pitch tents, and learn to cook an entire meal in one pot. Rev Higgs who has taken the helm of the organisation from former President Gail Saunders, said Girl Guides has always held a special place in her heart. Reflecting on her initial days in the organisation as a patrol leader, Rev Higgs said back then she thought it was the best position she could have ever held. “It really gave us a time to get together in our little groups, and the things that we did were so wonderful. Throughout guiding I’ve learnt so much that has helped me in my career, as a wife, as a mother, it’s just been wonderful.” Responding to the importance of the organisation in any young girl’s life, Rev Higgs said: “Not only are we aiming to help and speak up for our girls, but we would like to allow them to speak out for themselves and other girls and young women in our society.” Currently, Girl Guides has a membership of 2,303 young leaders in training, with hope of increased membership in particu larly over the next year. Transforming young girls FROM page 10C

PAGE 21

n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net WHEN compared to women, men in many respects have suffered the negative results of not being able to discuss, share, and reveal without bias the issues that truly matter to them with each other. From their fears of not measuring up as a “real man,” to their sexual, emotional, and religious insecurities, many men have fallen victim to this social crisis that some argue may have far reaching effects. In many communities there is however one haven where men are free to be men, a place where they can be as candid and as blunt about issues such as the effects of the feminists movement, their views on God, or even their thoughtson intimacy and love, where they are not criticised for the way they feel. The barber shop is that place, where men can let their guards down and just speak their mindson the things that matter to them. T his week, Tribune Features visited New Links B arber and Beauty Salon located on Bay Street, where a small group of guys were discussing the recent spate of suicides, and were trying to under stand why men seemed to be the most at risk in this growing problem. Proprietor Rodger Lloyd feels, there is a direct l ink between the lack of men discussing their feelings, and the growing number of men willing to take their own lives. “You don’t really know who you could trust to talk to, so most men prefer to keep things deep down inside and try to rationalise it within themselves.” Being a family man, Rodger feels men in his position are particularly under threat, and should reach out to their male counterparts for support and guidance. He said in a society where the fear of not mak ing the grade can result in a man being ostracised, and where the appearance of having around-theclock confidence is considered normal male behaviour, the realities of feeling bad or showing emotions are forced into a box. He explained this forced internal battle, is now telling the community that men just like women need to be able to talk about their feelings. Keith Minus, a 37-year-old church minister, said there is a spiritual air of depression and sui cide, taking hold of many menwho feel cornered by the pressures of a tough economic period. “The devil is out for the man, because the Bible declares that we are made in the image and likeness of Christ. If he (Satan ily head with that spirit of suicide, then he will succeed in weakening the family structure.” Keith explained that through his understanding of the Bible, the female is the “weaker vessel” in any marriage or union, and as good men are forced to take their own lives, future generations will become easy targets for Satan. Entrepreneur Stephen St Clair-Serrette also shared those sentiments, and said because both men and women over the years have walked away from traditional Christian values, it is not hard to understand the decision of committing suicide by some people. This issue, is one that hit Stephen close as sui cide victim 42-year-old Nikita Brennen was his c lose and dear friend. D espite the common Christian belief that an act of suicide essentially serves as a one way ticket to Hell, Stephen said he believes because of the love his friend had for God, “he is resting in the Almighty’s arms,”. He insisted that society get back to the basics. “Those things that worked in the past will work a gain, we have to raise our children in the fear and the admonition of God, we must follow the commandments of God. “We need to go back to the days when we picked in the neighbours’ clothes from the rain, where we can share bread and sugar with them, go back to those things to show that we care.” Rodger feels the lack of a good social model for young people to follow, has also played a role in the disappearance on “the old ways” that has kept the Bahamian people together in the past. “On basic cable you have homosexuality, nudity, profanity, corruption, on public transportation there are children watching and listening to explicit materials, we just need to go back to the values that protect our children and in essence protect all of us.” Although these men share diverse views on the recent cases of suicide and other incidents of violence in the country, they share a common desire that through talking, change can come. n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Features Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net T he Girl Guides Association (GGA Bahamas has for a long time been known as a body of change, in its approach to transforming young girls to women. From senators to teachers, this group has spread its wings and been a factor for positive change in many Bahamian women for the past 94 years. In keeping with that tradition, the organisation’s newest president Rev Beryl Higgs, said during her inaugural press conference last Monday, that increased recruitment and growth are among major changes to take place under the new administration. GGA Chief Commissioner Julia Burnside explained that with so many girls being vulnerable to peer pressure during their early to mid-teens, the responsibility falls on the organisation to inject positive influences as early as possible. “In our re-branding, we want to especially launch a campaign aimed at attracting girls between the ages of 11 and 16, because we realise that they present some of the challenges that we have in society today. “We’ve found that girls who have stayed committed to guiding, generally have made some of the better social and moral choices, and this is something that we need to use as part of our re-branding, to attract new members,” she said. The organisation began its annual guide week last Sunday under the theme of Stop The Spread of AIDS and Malaria and Other Disease. Starting with a division-wide procession from the RM Bailey field on Robinson Rd, the group marched to the Christ the King Anglican Church in Ridgeland Park for a church service. On Monday both Brownies and Sunflowers gathered at their division headquarters, where they were taught about the causes and symptoms of many diseases affecting the world today. The youngsters were also given tips on how they can now influence change through GGA, and later on in their adult lives. The same group along with their leaders prepared gift baskets for residents of the AIDS Camp, which was an important initiative for the organisation. GGA executives explained, the exercise was not only planned to show its commitment to those affected by the disease, but to also sensitize others on the importance of prevention and protection. On Friday, the older guides and rangers are scheduled to take part in an expedition, where they’ll hopefully discover cleverly hidden ribbons in various parts of Nassau. In the end, organisers envision the girls gaining a more comprehensive understanding about multiple lifethreatening diseases, and ways to stay healthy. The following day, all girls along with their leaders will go into several communities, where they will share their knowledge on the diseases by becoming prevention ambassadors. GGA International Commissioner Karen Lightbourne, said the highlight of Girl Guide week, will be an organised tea party for the all local GGA members. “Because talking about diseases can be tough for some of the girls, we will bring in a guest speaker to talk about the benefits of living a healthy life.” In an effort to continue the tradition of Girl Guides with young women who have grown past the rangers level, GGA deputy chief commissioner for training Nicolette Archer, said she is looking forward to training “The new flock of leaders” this March. “We’re going to begin level one and orientation training on March 2, which will durate for five consecutive Mondays at GGA headquarters from 6pm to 8.” C M Y K C M Y K THETRIBUNE PAGES 7-8 HEALTH: Body and mind T UESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 2009 n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Features Writer AS women continue to make great strides professionally in the work world, two outstanding young women in the tourism industry have been recognised for their work in service to the country’s number one industry during the 13th annual Cacique Awards. Chef Carolyn Elaine Bowe had always wanted to be a chef from the age of 12. She never let go of those dreams and took on every opportunity she had. Since then she has been employed as a chef since 1988 and presently is the head chef at Seaside Restaurant, overseeing 28 staff. Ms Bowe said being a female chef in the Bahamas is not a day at the park as there are a lot of things that may get in the way. “I think the fight is so much greater for women because we have to show our strength in many different ways. We have to prove we can lift things, show that we are aggressive, and be able to show that we can lead and not follow,” Ms Bowe said. Ms Bowe said she was very e xcited to know that she was recognised for such an award and to win. “I have never looked for any thing in my life in terms of peo ple rewarding me because I do what I do because I enjoy it,” Ms Bowe said. Ms Bowe said as a part time chef instructor at the University of the West Indies, she would encourage students to enjoy their passion. “I always encourage students, especially those coming out of high school, to enter the young chef competition because I think that is a good start for them to pursue their career. The competition gives a bit of pressure and it gives them a feel to see if being a chef is what they really want to do and if they can handle that, they can go further,” Ms Bowe said. Chief Concierge at Four Seasons Resort Great Exuma at Emerald Bay, Janet Rolle Stubbs, was instrumental in establishing the Concierge and Guest Services departments at the property. Her efforts in the field have raised service levels among her employees. Mrs Stubbs said her initial reaction to winning is one she will soon not forget. “My initial reaction was shock and I felt that my heart was going to burst. My husband nudged me and said 'Janet that's you' I took a deep breath and started walking up to the podi um. While I was walking up I realised it was real! I am deeply appreciative and greatly humbled and honored,” Mrs Stubbs said. Being able to be recognised from a Family Island is a great accomplishment not only for her but also for the Four Seasons Resort in Exuma she added. “When you live on an out island it is harder for you to be recognised, because of the loca tion. Working on the island and especially in the area that I am in, it is sometimes challenging because everything is not at your fingertips like in Nassau or Freeport. When guest asks for items that are not on the island, you have to go above and beyond to ensure that the guests requests are honoured and they a re happy,” Mrs Stubbs said. Mrs Stubbs said the support from her bosses, coworkers, her mother and the smiles of satis faction on the faces of the guests as they depart is her inspiration to continue to in the service industry. “When people believe in you and allow you to make decisions on your own, it encourages and inspires you to know that you have their support. We also have an awesome training program, that helps you grow in many areas in regards to your job and performance. Four Seasons gives you so many opportunities for growth and their main interest is to promote and focus from within. I am a people person that Four Seasons took and trained, supported and encouraged so that I could enjoy the structure and be successful in it. Over the years, in my life's journey, I have had a lot of people who believed in me and seen my true potential before I have realised it. They brought out the best in me and believed in me. I am indeed grateful to every one of them,” Mrs Stubbs said. Mrs Stubbs, in offering words o f wisdom to other young women in tourism, said she would encourage them to stay focused and to set achievable goals. “Once you work with people you must be approachable and be a team player. It is important to give your best every day at everything you do. Do not limit yourself to one area, and try to learn all you can about different jobs in your field because knowledge is indeed power. There will be days you will not get every thing right, but you will know what to do better for next time. There is nothing wrong with making mistakes, the good thing is, you can learn from them. Once you do your job because you love it, you will achieve much more, because it comes from your heart. Do not get discouraged and listen to what people may say about you or do to try to discourage you. Remember that people only talk about people who are making a differ ence. Most important, always remember the golden ruleDo unto other as you will have them 13th Cacique A wards: Outstanding women recognised for work in tourism Transforming young girls to women The barber shop, ‘where men are free to be men’ RODGER LLOYD hard at work in the barber shop... (Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff Carolyn Elaine Bowe Janet Rolle Stubbs SEE page 9 SEE page 9