Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

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LOW

Pim flowin’ it

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PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.69



TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

The Tribune a

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rormer prison officer

charged With murder

Jerome Bethel
appears in court
over stabbing

death of

councilman

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FORMER prison officer
was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison yesterday fol-
lowing his arraignment on a
murder charge.

Police have charged Jerome
Bethel, 36, of Greenway Drive
in the February 11 stabbing
death of Gary Harold Gar-
diner.

Gardiner, 49, a North
Andros local councilman was
reportedly stabbed to death
on Williams Drive off Cow-
pen Road around 9 pm
Wednesday.

According to initial police
reports, the deceased and
another man got into a verbal
altercation that turned violent
in a yard on Williams Drive.

WEST

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At some point during the row,
Gardiner was stabbed multi-
ple times about the body. Gar-
diner died at the scene of the
incident.

His death marked the ninth
homicide this year. Gardiner’s
relatives described him as a
calm and giving person.

The other man involved in
the altercation later drove to
the East Street South Police
Station it was reported.

Bethel, who appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court 1,
Bank Lane yesterday after-
noon was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge.

A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether

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escorted from Court 5. Several police officers had to restrain the men and
separate them from each other in the skirmish.

mr Clarke/Tribune staff

Bank Lane yesterday.

Six arrested
in connection
with seizure
of cocaine

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE arrested six men in
connection with the seizure of
$6 million worth of cocaine
from the second Haitian vessel
intercepted in the area of Great
Inagua earlier this week.

Police, Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officers and US
officials found more than 300
kilos of cocaine on the second
boat. The second seizure came
shortly after police confiscated
400 kilograms of cocaine, worth
about $8 million, from a 77-foot
wooden Haitian vessel off
Inagua around 9 am the same
day.
The second find brings the
total amount of cocaine found
on the two boats to $14 million.

This brings the total number
of arrests for both drug busts
to 12; five men and one woman
were arrested in connection
with the first seizure.

SEE page six



JEROME BETHEL, 36, of Greenway Drive, is escorted to Court One,

Man dies
in pool of
ICU ay

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

A MAN died in his
employer's pool at a home
on Eastern Road yesterday
morning in what police are
investigating as a drowning
incident.

Up until press time last
night the man, who is a gar-
dener believed to be in his
late 40s to early 50s, was
identified by residents on the
scene as “Willy”. The inci-
dent occurred at a home
immediately east of High
Vista Drive.

Eastern Road resident Jay
Albury, who helped pull the
drowned man out of his
neighbour's pool, said
around 10.15 am he heard
his neighbour's pool cleaner
screaming that someone was
floating at the bottom of the

SEE page six



Convicted
thief makes
a dash for
freedom

Man attempts to escape
after being sentenced

A CONVICTED thief’s
dash for freedom ended
quickly on Bank Lane yes-
terday as he was taken
before a magistrate who
added an additional year
to his four-year prison
term for the daring
attempt.

Shortly after Magistrate
Derrence Rolle sentenced
Carlos Holbert to four
years in prison yesterday,
the 21-year-old darted out
of court 5, Bank Lane and,
according to eyewitnesses,
jumped several feet from
the top of the steps to the
pavement in his attempt to
avoid prison.

Police on Bank Lane,
however, quickly captured
Holbert who was subse-
quently escorted back



before Magistrate Rolle.

Holbert, who had been
convicted for stealing from
a vehicle and was sen-
tenced to four years in
prison, was ordered to
serve an additional year in
jail for attempting to
escape.

On the charge of steal-
ing from a vehicle, court
dockets state that Holbert
on July 23, 2008, while at
the Blue Hills sporting
complex stole from a 2000
Ford Escape, a black bag
valued at $50, a $35 girls
watch, two pairs of glasses
valued at $400 and other
personal items belonging
to Rose Ferguson.

Prosecutors say that
Holbert was convicted of a
similar offence last year.

Redundant employees criticise
resort for hiring foreign workers

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REDUNDANT hotel employees criticised
Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort for hiring
foreign workers to do their jobs less than two
months after their positions were terminated.

But the Cable Beach hotel maintains the 12
foreigners are interns from the Surinam
School of Hospitality carrying out a three
month training exercise in various depart-
ments. And Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes

Dion Foulkes



understands the trainees are not being paid for their work.

Nevertheless, the presence of non-Bahamians joining the hotel
staff raised suspicion among the 150 employees who lost their jobs
in December. The former employees shared their views in a press
conference held by the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied
Workers Union (BHMAWU) at the House of Labour, Wulff
Road, Thursday.

BHMAWU president Lynden Taylor said: “They have foreign

SEE page six

Grand Bahama readers
want Tribune to return

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama readers are requesting
the return of The Tribune news-
paper, which has been delivered
for more than 40 years to the
island.

The Tribune office in
Freeport has been inundated
with calls from loyal readers
since last Wednesday when



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER

delivery was officially discon-
tinued to Grand Bahama.

“T miss The Tribune, that’s
all I read, we love The Tri-
bune,” said a woman caller.

Due to the increased cost of
air transport, newspaper deliv-
ery by Bahamasair was discon-
tinued to Grand Bahama, main-
land Eleuthera, Exuma,
Crooked Island and Long
Island.

The Tribune is now available

SEE page six



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Wilchcombe speaks out on new Police Force Act

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IT is the role of the media to “med-
dle and interfere” in order to keep
politicians honest, MP for West End
and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe said.

Criticising the tendency of some
politicians to use their influence to fill
public service jobs with “political
appointments”, Mr Wilchcombe said
it is the media’s job to ensure elected
officials do not “manipulate the process
of good governance.”

The MP and former tourism minister
was contributing to the debate on the
second reading of the Police Force Act
2009 on Wednesday in the House of
Assembly.

“Throughout the country, from the
police force to the civil service and
throughout every ministry of the gov-
ernment political appointments are evi-
dent. We go so far as shelving perma-
nent secretaries if they do not speak
our political language,” said Mr Wilch-
combe.

“T ask this question: How will we
ever be ready to play a role in the ever-
changing global order if we dumb
down the process and turn every posi-
tion that is influenced by government
into a political appointment?

“There is room in government for
political appointments, but we should
steer clear of polluting the entire ser-
vice with political hacks, political pimps
or political misfits. I am diametrically
opposed to such behavior.”

the vote on the Police Force 2009 Act,
citing that provision seven, which seeks
to limit the tenure of the police com-
missioner and deputy commissioner,
is unconstitutional because it removes
their “security of tenure” and allows
undue influence by the executive, the
party said.

The government strongly opposed
this argument, stating that it has “no
sound legal basis” and adding that
appointing commissioners of police on
a shorter contractual basis is a prac-
tice followed in many Commonwealth
countries, including the United King-
dom and Australia.

Speaking out against any politicisa-
tion of the civil service or the police
force, Mr Wilchcombe said that filling
public service roles with people on this

Bahamas’ readiness to join the global
stage in the way that it should.

“The media must keep the politi-
cians honest. The media must meddle.
The media must investigate, the media
must not be afraid to expose those
issues that contemplate the destruc-
tion of the orderly development of
nation and our people.

“Mr Speaker, the media could stop
politicians from interference, from
manipulating the process of good gov-
ernance. The politicians will not in all
cases keep themselves honest. It is the
media — the people’s voice — that
must,” he added.

The MP charged that both political
parties “must carry some guilt of hay-
ing used of having used naked power to
misuse and abuse the power of gov-





















FREEPORT - An 11-month
project came to fruition on
Thursday with the official open-
ing of the new bridge at the
Lucayan National Park in east-
ern Grand Bahama.

The event, attended by gov-
ernment officials and Bahamas
National Trust representatives,
was greatly anticipated as the
bridge is expected to play a vital
role in the tourism product of
Grand Bahama.

In attendance were Colonel
John Blashford-Snell and Cap-
tain John Hinchliffe - both
instrumental in creating the
original nature walk and foot-
bridge at the park.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette said: “The govern-
ment of the Bahamas believes
that our need for economic
development must be kept in
proper balance with the need
to secure protection of the envi-
ronment, including the biologi-
cal diversity of our islands.”

He said there are plans in
place to establish four or five
new protected areas through-
out the Bahamas and that the
opening of the new bridge is
“an excellent example of how
development and conservation

The PLP ultimately abstained from

can and do co-exist in our coun-
try for the benefit of all.”

The new structure replaces
an older bridge that was com-
pleted in 1987 through a joint
effort by local volunteers and
Operation Raleigh
(www.raleigh.org.uk).

Colonel Blashford-Snell was
closely involved in the original
project. He said: “It was a won-
derful friendship between the
people of Grand Bahama. We
worked all over the Bahamas
trying to help the National
Trust. And indeed, we wish
them well because they are pre-
serving the heritage of these
islands that is unique and so
important for the coming gen-
erations.”

Bahamas National Trust pres-
ident Glenn Bannister said the
bridge is a vital component to
the Grand Bahama tourism
product.

“Tt is very important to bring
our visitors out into nature. This
kind of experience will bring
them back, over and over
again,” Mr Bannister said.
“That is why we take particular
interest in this project, and that
is why it is so gratifying to have
this opening in Grand

Bahama.”

Chairperson for the Grand
Bahama region of the Bahamas
National Trust Karin Sanchez
shared the Trust’s plans for the
park.

“The bridge covering the
creek is just one of the first
things,” she said. “We would
like to build a visitor centre here
so that visitors to the park will
fully experience it as a great
place to come and enjoy the
beauty of our island and our
environment.”

The 22-year-old original
bridge was severely damaged
during the hurricanes that
struck Grand Bahama in 2004.
As the condition of the bridge
worsened, it became necessary
to close it for safety reasons.

The new bridge, which spans
Gold Rock Creek, features a
large covered observation deck.

The bridge was constructed
by local contractor Hartley
Lowe of Bahamas Engineering
and Dock Company Limited at
a cost of around $230,000.

It was financed by a $100,000
contribution from _ the
Bahamas National Trust and
donations by corporations and
individuals.

LOVE BUGHE

eS PECIAL

| NS O firm,

oo

basis rather than on merit will stifle the





ernment.” Obie Wilchcombe

WHILE attending the official opening of the new bridge at Lucayan National Park, a group of government and
Bahamas National Trust (BNT) officials toured the caves which are part of the protected area in Grand
Bahama. L-R: Karin Sanchez, Chairperson, Grand Bahama Region, BNT; Robin Symonette, Honourary Secre-
tary of the BNT; Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas: Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Envi-
ronment; Glenn Bannister, President of BNT: Neil McKinney, Deputy President of BNT; Lynn Gape, Deputy
Executive Director of BNT: and, Eric Carey Executive Director BNT.

Erik J. Russell/ Keen i Media Ltd

THE RIBBON cutting at the official opening of the new bridge at Lucayan National Park was conducted by
Colonel John Blashford-Snell of Operation Raleigh and Bahamas National Trust Administrator and Educa-
tional Liaison Cecilia Bodie. Shown, L-R with students of Freeport Primary School are: Glenn Bannister,
President, Bahamas National Trust; the Honourable Neko Grant, Minister of Public Works and Transport;
Colonel Blashford-Snell; (at back) Eric Carey, Deputy Director, Bahamas National Trust; Ms Bodie; Deputy
Prime Minister of the Bahamas the Honourable Brent Symonette; and Minister of Housing the Honourable
Kenneth Russell.

Local churches to provide counselling
during worsening financial crisis

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TEN church leaders are to
co-operate in a bid to counter
growing despair among
Bahamians over the worsen-
ing financial crisis.

Their churches will be
thrown open as counselling
centres as the economy tight-
ens and more people are
thrown out of work.

On Monday, a group of pas-
tors will announce their plans
at a press conference to be
held at New Covenant Bap-

tist Church.

Bishop Simeon Hall, who
said he has had to counsel
nine potential suicides over
the past week, told The Tri-
bune that an “ecumenical”
approach is being taken to the
problem.

“Church leaders of all
denominations will be taking
part,” he said.

“We are going to collabo-
rate on running crisis coun-
selling centres because of the

MAIN SECTION
Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipe. So o,0nhe

ote rrecaer reac reeer reer ias P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGE





4 ee
Bishop Simeon Hall

problems now being faced by
ordinary Bahamian families.”

He said other churchmen
had been counselling poten-
tial suicides in recent days.

“T have had nine, but most
wanted someone to talk to in
an effort to ease their trou-
bles. I think only two actually
needed psychiatric help.”

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eee UE
PHONE: 322-2157





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Staff leave posts
after problem
with office air
conditioning

STAFF at the Post
Office headquarters on
East Hill Street decided
to leave their posts yes-
terday morning after a
problem with the air-
conditioning system
left a bad odour
throughout parts of the
building.

According to Assis-
tant Postmaster Robert
Sumner, staff gathered
outside the building
until around 11.30am
when the problem was
fixed.

He said “water
spilled” from the air-
conditioning system
sometime before people
arrived at work for that
day.

“It did have an odour,
(but it was) cleaned up
in a short period of
time,” he said.



DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION Jack Thompson walks through the
Straw Market yesterday.

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

IMMIGRATION officials
paid an unannounced visit to
the Straw Market yesterday
to remind vendors that they
will continue to search for
illegal immigrants working
in the market.

Director of Immigration
Jack Thompson said his team
also wanted to check up on
what is going on in the Straw
Market.

Strategise

“We will identify certain
locations and certain sites for
ourselves and we will then
know how to strategise and
how to move from there,”
Mr Thompson said.

He said it is important that
his officers not apprehend

Greg and Tanya Cash can file appeal against declaration

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

JUSTICE campaigners Greg and Tanya
Cash are allowed to file an appeal in the
Court of Appeal against a declaration nam-
ing them “vexatious litigants”.

In a short ruling handed down yester-
day morning, Senior Justice Anita Allen
said that the couple did not need leave of
her court to appeal the order.

The couple were declared vexatious liti-
gants by Justice Allen on January 12 and
intend to appeal the order. Justice Allen
had ruled that the couple be barred from
continuing any legal action or having any-
one initiate any proceedings on their behalf.

She said that the couple could initiate
proper proceedings with leave of the court.

The Attorney General's Office had filed
an application in Supreme Court against
the couple, seeking a court ruling that they
be barred from taking any further legal
action because most of their actions are
vexatious and amount to an abuse of the

Greg and Tanya Cash



court’s process.

Justice Allen’s written ruling stated that
“there are no provisions in the Supreme
Court Act which declare such a ruling final,
nor are there provisions in the Court of
Appeal Act, which prohibits the institu-
tion of such an appeal or require the leave
of the Supreme Court to institute such an

To the Love of My Life:

As I reflect upon the short time I’ve been privileged to know You,
I can’t help but marvel at how lucky | must be.

Lucky to actually be around one the likes of You,

And amazed You'd share Your love with someone like me!

So as others prepare their chocolates, flowers and cute teddy bears,
I'll take a slightly different approach to which I hope You will like.

And publish these words even amidst my shy fears,

And tell the whole world why You are the Love of my life...

| know | certainly didn’t deserve all the times You were there for me,

All those many times You would nurture and care for me.

Especially considering instances when I didn't fully respect You,
Circumstances that led me to tum away and even neglect You!
But never once did You ever get fed up and make Your retreat,

Even after months of my filling Your head up with my unbelief.

Unbelief in Your uncanny ability to bring order to my lowly existence,
So I thank You for not leaving me even amidst this foolish resistance.
But instead You stood by me, and in doing so made me ten times stronger,

You took the fear from inside of me, and now [’m frightened of love no longer.

I thank You so much for being the best thing to ever happen in my life,
And that’s why You are and will always be the ultimate Love of my life...

Tenderness, gentleness, warmth, compassion,
Thoughtfulness, benevolence, unmatched affection:
! You are the personification of all that is perfection...

So Happy Valentine's Day to the one and only Love of my life,

Happy Valentine's Day to my one and only Jesus Christ...

VV9

(Written by a man afier God's own heart)

Bless God Forever !!!

appeal.”

Following the ruling Mrs Cash gave
thanks to God for the latest development in
their favour.

The Cashes have waged a six-year legal
battle against the Baptist education author-
ities.

The matter stems from the alleged
wrongful dismissal of Mr Cash from his
job as a physical education teacher at Jor-
dan Prince William High School in October
2002.

Since then, he and his wife have made a
number of allegations, including that their
human and constitutional rights were
breached.

The Cashes made headlines last Octo-
ber when President of the Court of Appeal
Dame Joan Sawyer ordered Mrs Cash to
either publish an apology for scandalising
the court or be jailed for contempt.

Mrs Cash refused to publish an apology.
However, she was not jailed for contempt
as a differently constituted court said that
the issue was “done with.”

someone every time they
enter the market, so as to
avoid creating the impres-
sion that they are “all about
raids”.

“Sometimes you just want
to go and survey, see what is
happening and get a feel for
things.

“You can not operate
immigration from Hawkins
Hill’s fourth floor; sometimes
you have to come on the
ground,” Mr Thompson said.

“We got some complaints
from a few taxi drivers that
there are a number of other
locations to be checked such
as Potter’s Cay dock, further
downtown, and we will sur-
vey the areas,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that as
the efforts to weed out illegal
immigrants progress, he is
hopeful that the public will
continue to support the

Immigration officials
visit the Straw Market

department.

“When the people see that
you are actually trying and
that you want to do things
right, they notice.

“There were a few in there
who didn’t want to raise their
heads and say good morning,
so it is the little things
that these random walka-
bouts point out to us,” he
added.



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HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

ISTH OCTOBER 1930 - 14TH FEBRUARY 2008.

Well loved educator & community leader

“A man is loved not for how tall he stands
but for how often he bends to help, comfort and teach.”

Rest In On ugh

Remembered by his wife, Sylvia; son, Gregory;
all family members & friends





PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Redundant employees criticise
resort for hiring foreign workers

Grand Bahama
readers want
The Tribune

to return

FROM page one

online a t
www.tribune242.com and will
be posted for readers by 2pm
on the day of publication.

There were mixed reactions
from persons about the
changes.

One caller said that older

FROM page one

workers on the property in the same
positions, right now. So a lot of people

have a major problem with this.”

He called on the Immigration Depart-
ment to crack down on employers hiring
foreigners when Bahamians are out of

work.

for one is good for the next one.”

The union leader also criticised
Labour Minister Dion Foulkes for failing
to recognise the BHMAWU as a legal
union, and for not calling a poll to allow
hotel employees to choose membership
in the BHMAWU or the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU), which is recognised by
government and Sandals.

been let go.

But the Minister maintains the
BHMAWU has not had an election of
officers since its registration in 2001 for
employees of the former Holiday Inn
and Resorts International, and has failed
to file annual returns as required under
the Industrial Relations Act.

The Minister said: “I have referred
the matter to the Attorney General to

Mr Foulkes is waiting for a ruling
to be returned by the Court of Appeal
before making a decision about the
poll.

Further criticism of Sandals by the
BHMAWU president includes the sack-
ing of three pregnant women, two of
whom have not been offered their jobs
back, according to Mr Taylor.

But the Minister of Labour said San-

He added: “They are all about the
Haitians and Jamaicans, but don’t want
to follow up these people for a major
company — it’s ridiculous. What’s good

Man dies in pool of employer

persons enjoy reading the actu-
al newspaper.

“What about those elderly
persons and adults who do not
have a computer or know how
to operate a computer.”

However, another caller
believes that the online Tri-
bune would be beneficial to

He further alleges many of the work-
ers made redundant by Sandals were
BHMAWU officers and should not have

get a final determination on the matter
and at that time I will issue a formal
statement to the public.”

dals has assured him that all three preg-
nant women had been offered their jobs
back without any change of status.

Six arrested in connection
with seizure of cocaine

: Detective Corporal Adderley, police found the
stndenis since Most Onn peo FROM Page one victim lying oa next 2 the pool. Police h a 1
pl have ae sto the Ine He said EMS were called, who unsuccess- FROM page one eek ere cman
“Tt is free and it would be pool. fully att wad it ie th ict significant drug seizures in
5 AUR Epis OO Tes sei tate ie: ViCtins New Providence and the Fam-

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said police
believe the two drug busts are
linked. ASP Evans said while
the find was not the biggest in
recent history, it was certainly
one of the largest drug seizures
in the southern Bahamas.

The drugs and the people
involved were expected to
arrive in New Providence yes-
terday morning.

good for the environment
because there would be less
waste and less paper usage,”
said the caller.

Many persons hope that the
newspaper will be able to
return to Grand Bahama.

“The Tribune has not aban-
doned its loyal Grand Bahama
readers and is particularly con-
cerned about those who either
do not have a computer or do
not like to read a newspaper
on line,” said Tribune publish-
er Eileen Carron. “We are still
exploring ways to get the daily
newspaper to Grand Bahama.
However, currently air trans-
port is too expensive.”

Former prison
Officer charged

FROM page one

there is sufficient evidence
against Bethel for him to
stand trial in the Supreme
Court.

His attorney, Tai Pinder,
asked the magistrate to
order that Bethel be housed
in the hospital section of
Her Majesty’s Prison.

She told the court that
Bethel worked as a prison
officer between 1995 and
2001. The prosecutor
Sergeant Sean Thurston
asked that the case be
adjourned to March 3 for
the commencement of a
preliminary inquiry in
Court 1, Bank Lane.

Bethel was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison.

He and the pool cleaner, Hubel Duncombe,
rushed to his neighbour's pool where he saw the
victim floating face down at the bottom of the
pool, his broom next to him.

"T pulled him to the (pool's) surface and the
two of us pulled him out,” he said.

According to Mr Albury, the victim was not
breathing when he was pulled from the pool.

When The Tribune arrived around 11 am
yesterday, police were taking statements and
the body was still at the scene.

According to one of the investigating officers,

"At this point in time, we can only assume
that he would have drowned. We will await
autopsy results to determine whether drowning
was the cause or whether he might have been
on some other substance," he said.

He said foul play was not suspected and there
were no signs of injury on the victim. Police sus-
pect the victim may have been in the pool for at
least 20 minutes.

Detective Adderley said the victim would
be taken to hospital to be officially declared
dead.

ily Islands over the past few
weeks.

Six people were arrested
last week and have been
charged in the seizure of some
$200,000 worth of marijuana.
Police also seized $3.75 million
worth of cocaine in Freeport
and $100,000 worth of
marijuana in Andros this
month.



Embattled Turks
and Caicos
premier to resign

@ PROVIDENCIALES,
Turks and Caicos

Scotiabank donates
funds to Mable Walker
Primary School

AS A part of its ongoing commitment to the [eg
advancement of education in the Bahamas, |
Scotiabank is supporting the efforts of grade |
one and two teachers and students at the
Mable Walker Primary School.

The bank gave the school a financial dona-
tion towards a mini-fair which is scheduled
for February 14 on the school grounds.

Shantel Hield, a grade two teacher and
teacher of the year (2008-2010) at the Mable
Walker Primary School, expressed her appre-
ciation to Scotiabank for supporting this event.
Mrs Hield said it is the school’s intent this
year to give students as much exposure as
possible and to encourage learning with a
more hands-on approach. The proceeds from |!
the mini fair will go towards financing a field
trip to Busch Gardens which is a part of this
years science curriculum.

PICTURED IN THE PHOTO (L-R) are Shantel

Hield, grade two teacher and teacher of the year
2008-2010 at Mable Walker Primary School, and
Kevin McKinney, senior manager of Scotiabank’s
main branch.






























PREMIER Michael Misick
said Friday he will step down
as leader of the Turks and
Caicos at the end of March,
citing a lack of support for his
scandal-plagued government,
according to Associated Press.

The surprise announcement
came hours after the
Caribbean nation's deputy
premier and finance minister
resigned, citing differences
with the colorful Misick,
whose jet-set lifestyle has
helped turned the Turks and
Caicos into a celebrity hotspot
but has fueled corruption alle-
gations.

"What the country and our
party needs now more than
ever is stability and certain-
ty,” Misick said during a press
conference in his office. "I
have tried in recent weeks to
create this. It now appears to
me that the divide within the
party is too deep."

Misick said he would step
down as party leader on Feb.
28 and resign as premier on
March 31.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching tiam4& 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:
Sunday Gpm - 2N5 2
Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

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If so, call us on 322-1986
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PasiorH. Mills

“Preaching the Bible as is, bo men 44 they are”

|Pasbor: HL Mills * Phone: 295-0563 + Box N-o622 |
Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

Cc EN TRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL (Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS * Tek 325-2921 The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427

(www.gtwesley.org)
eee en — SUNDAY, FEBRUARY I5TH, 2009

Elder Brentford Isaacs 7:00 a.m. Phillip Stubbs/Bro. Jamiko Forde

Topic The Revelation Series” 11:00 a.m. Bro. Ernest Miller/Youth

tone oe sak Hvasn verge a 7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Members-At-Large (HC)

* Fivierat Prayer Mesting ater: TERI Tnreun it eaclaeria

Come; joinius as we know Jesus Personally
‘by listening and studying the Word of God

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
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SUNDAY aoe
Mi LT Vil :
ibs “Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

» LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

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Geared To The Future

Grace and ert Wesleyan erties
ee eM ee ee eT
Horth dmerica

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WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND FFERD
Worship time: lam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place: i
The Madeira }

Shopping Center

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pm.
Prayer Time: 001 5am,
” Church Sehool during Worship oe

ae at 7:30 p.m.

Meeting

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive

athe MINISTRY
ncdarys cot 8:30 cm, « ZS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

M

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God

er ee Ve eee Ue ee cay Ld
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Rev. Dr. Franklin Knowles

ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
ay hone number 325-5712
AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box S3-3631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587



THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Sky Climbers ‘reaching for new heights’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AFTER proving a hit with
school children across New
Providence, Sky Climbers - a
Paradise Island-based rock
climbing experience - will be
reaching new heights come Feb-
ruary 21.

The programme, funded by
the Butch Kerzner Foundation —
a charitable entity set up by the

Lyndah Wells/Photo

GRAND BAHAMA - The management team at
Pelican Bay at Lucaya joined in the jubilation of
having one of its long-time staff members, Stan-
ley Williams, walk away as Employee of the Year
at the 13th Annual Cacique Awards.

widow of the late son of Atlantis
CEO Sol Kerzner — has been
enjoyed by hundreds of Bahami-
an children since it opened last
September to schools and youth
groups.

Now, the free experience is
extending its opening hours to
include weekends and inviting
all children between the ages of
seven and 18 years and their par-
ents to come and join the
heights-scaling fun.

Sky Climbers operations con-
sultant Nick Sagar told The Tri-

bune that he hopes children who
participated with a group will be
keen to pit themselves against
the walls a second time, while
those young people whose
schools did not take part in the
programme can now also test
their agility.

“We don’t want to stunt those
kids who came before by say-
ing, “You’re going to have to
wait until next year when your
class comes back to do it again’,”
said he said.

Mr Sagar, a accomplished



Giovanni Sands, engineering manager; Marva
Munroe, sales manager; Della Bridgewater, front
office manager; Magnus Alnebeck, general man-
ager; Julie Paice, purchasing manager; Patra
Albury, financial controller, and Sybilene Coop-

rock-climber, taught the
demanding sport to the late
Butch Kerzner, designing per-
sonalised climbing walls which
were installed in the former
Atlantis Chief Executive’s home.
With it having been such a
passion of Mr Kerzner’s, his wid-
ow, Vanessa Kerzner, wanted to
see it become one of the activi-
ties promoted to young people
under the umbrella of the foun-
dation named in his honour.
Mr Sagar said the project has
been an “incredible success” so

far and he anticipates an even
greater response when it opens it
doors to another round of
adventurous young Bahamians.

Starting on February 21, any
children within the specified age
range interested in getting
involved can turn up at the site,
located on the grounds of the
old Club Med resort on Paradise
Island, and be accommodated
on a first-come-first-served basis,
said Mr Sagar.

Those under 14 must be
accompanied by a parent.

Parents are also welcome to
test their agility and strength on
the walls.

In 2008, 670 children partici-
pated in the rock-climbing expe-
rience.

Schools are still being encour-
aged to sign up for a session if
they have not already. “We want
to reach out to more schools,”
said Mr Sagar. “It’s free and they
just need to transport the kids
to us.”

Sky Climbers is open from
9am - Spm.

SHARING IN THE JOY
OF A CACIQUE AWARD

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

INTERNAL AUDITOR

INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Internal Auditor in the Internal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

* Produces audit programs and submit the same for approval of the Chief Internal Auditor
* Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited

Mr Williams is a bell captain and a three-plus
year employee at Pelican Bay.

er, executive housekeeper.
Missing are Melissa Carroll, revenue/reserva-

Della Bridgewater, Pelican Bay's front office
manager, said: "This is a great achievement for
Stanley. We celebrate with him. | look forward
to continued work with him. And with this
achievement under his belt, | know that Stanley
will Serve as an ever bigger Pelican Bay evange-
list amongst guests and employees."

The management team is pictured by the
poolside at Pelican Bay at a press reception
sponsored by the Grand Bahama Island Tourism
Board, Ministry of Tourism and Pelican Bay to
recognise Cacique winners and runners-up.

Mr Williams (fifth from left) is flanked by (I-r)

security.

and golf.

tions manager and Allan Scavella, director of

Mr Williams hails from Abaco and is married.
He and his wife Jane have five sons. He spends
his spare time in church and playing basketball

The Cacique Awards was a prime event during
National Tourism Week. The purpose of the
Cacique Awards is to recognise the roles played
by those individuals and organisations whose
performance or products have consistently
made a positive impact on the quality and the
growth of tourism in the Bahamas.

Vice-Premier of the State Council of

People's Republic of China to visit

@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON



HUI LUANGYJU, Vice-
Premier of the State Council
of the People’s Republic of
China, will make an official
visit to the Bahamas from
Tuesday, February 17 to
Thursday, February 19.

Vice-Premier Hui will be
received by Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
and Ambassador of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China Hu
Dingxian at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport on
Tuesday.

The Vice-Premier will pay
courtesy calls on Governor-
General Arthur Hanna and
Mrs Beryl Hanna at Govern-

ment House and Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at the
Cabinet Office, Churchill
Building.

Mr Symonette and the Vice-
Premier will participate in a
signing ceremony in the Cab-
inet Room of the Cabinet
Office, which will be followed
by an official dinner at
Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island.

On Wednesday, Mr Symon-
ette, Bahamas Government
officials, Vice-Premier Hui
and his delegation will depart
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport for Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

They will be received by
government ministers, parlia-
mentarians and officials and

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHAVAUGHNA McMASTERS

of #48 DRAKE AVE.,
BAHAMAS

Nationality and Citizenship,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for
for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for
for registration/naturalization

of #48 DRAKE AVE.,
BAHAMAS

Nationality and Citizenship,

GODFREY McMASTERS

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

principals of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, and
will attend an official luncheon
at Our Lucaya Resort.

The delegation will be taken
on a tour of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port and the Grand
Bahama Shipyard. An official
dinner will be hosted by the
Vice-Premier in the Churchill
Room of Our Lucaya Resort.

The Vice-Premier and his
delegation are expected to
depart the country on Thurs-
day, February 19.

The government of the
Bahamas and the People’s
Republic of China (PRC)
established diplomatic rela-
tions with the signing of a
Joint Communiqué on May
23, 1997.

* Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with established audit programs.

+ This involves a complete assessment of the systems of internal control, risk exposures and the efficiency,
effectiveness and economic use of resources to achieve management objectives

* Produces audit reports on audit concerns, their causes, effects and the audit recommendations in
accordance with the ITA Standards

* Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate findings and produce investigation reports: exercising
the IA’s ethical standards e.g., confidentiality, etc.

* Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies, manpower efficiency
and new computer applications

+ Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review and release
to management and the Audit Committee

+ Assembles audit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files produced by the Assistant Internal
Auditors and the Audit Clerks

+ Trains, coaches and direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers general supervision and technical
support to the Assistant Internal Auditor(s)

* Conducts corporate research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud investigations. (producing
the associated reports)

* Assist the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and offer direct assistance on
major investigations

* Conduct audits in conjunction with the External Auditors and produce working papers for the External
Auditors year-end audit

* Conducts stock taking observation exercises, Family Island audits and special assignments

Job requirements include:

* Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline

* Professional accounting certification (e.g., CA, CPA,), in addition completing the CIA would be
highly desirable

* Understand and apply Internal Audit Standards and International Accounting Standards

* Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills

* Good problem solving skills

* Knowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs. Also knowledge of audit software and a good

working knowledge of the H.T.E system are required

* Good knowledge of the Corporation’s operating policies, systems and procedures

* Management and supervision skills

* A minimum of 5 years experience

Salary for the position is in Group 3 of the Senior Staff Salary Scales.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager-Human
Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box



N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: February 24, 2009.

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.



‘Golden girl’ matches
world leading time

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

eteran sprinter, ‘Gold-

en girl’ Chandra Stur-

rup is proving why

she’s known for her
quick start.

At the International PSD Bank
Meeting in Duesseldorf, Germany,
yesterday, Sturrup clocked 7.17
seconds to match both the world
leading time and the meet record,
which are held by American
Angela Williams.

The most significant thing is
Williams was in the race. She had
to settle for third in 7.22, just
behind British Virgin Island’s Tah-

ai

BASKETBALL:
NPWBA RESULTS



THE New Providence Wom-
en’s Basketball Association con-
tinued its regular season on
Thursday night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium with two exciting
games.

In the opener, the Electro Tele-
com Cybots Queens defeated the
College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs 65-57.

Natasha Miller shot 14-of-18
from the field and finished with a
game high 31 points to lead the
Queens. Christine Sinclair shot 7-
of-15 from the field for 16 points
for the Lady Caribs.

In the nightcap, the two finalists
from last year’s championship
series hooked up with runners-up
Sunshine Auto Cheetahs came
from a 41-39 halftime to pull off a
100-91 win over the defending
champions Johnson Lady Truck-
ers.

Audrey Martin, who delighted
the crowd with her dazzling
moves and behind the back pass-
es, shot 11-16 from the field for a
game high 33 points in the Chee-
tahs’ win, their second over the
Lady Truckers this season.

For the Lady Truckers, veteran
guard Glenda Gilcud scored 31
points to leads two other players
in double figures. Shantel Rolle
had 25 points and Latoya Rolle
added 19 points.

¢ Here’s a look at Saturday’s
schedule: 7:30 pm Electro Tele-
com Cybots vs Sunshine Auto
Cheetahs.

BASKETBALL:
NPBA SCHEDULE

THE New Providence Basket-
ball Association will play a double
header tonight at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium. At 7 pm, the Enter-
tainers will meet the Foxies' Pros.
At 8 pm, the Johnson's Trucking
Jumpers and the Electro Telecom
Cybots at 8 pm.

TENNIS:
BOURNE-ATKINSON
APPRECIATION
TOURNEY

THE Gym Tennis Club will
host the Dr. Eric Bourne-Ron
Atkinson Appreciation Tennis
Tournament at the Gym Tennis
Club from February 21-March 5.

The tournament is opened to
all local male and female tennis
players and there are several cat-
egories inclusive of the men’s
open, 45’s and 55’s singles, ladies’
open singles, men’s doubles and
mixed pairs.

The entry fee is $15 for each
singles and $10 per person for
each doubles. The draw will be
held at the club at 7 pm on Thurs-
day, February 19. Entry forms
must be submitted to the club.



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14,

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

esia Harrigan, who ran 7.21 for
another second place finish.

“Tt was good,” said a 37-year-
old Sturrup during an exclusive
interview with The Tribune yes-
terday. “I felt good. I thought I
would have ran that time in my
last race, but I was just glad that it
finally came out.”

For Sturrup, the time was grati-
fying because it helped her to get
over the problems she was experi-
encing for the three weeks before
she headed to Europe.





2009

“Tm starting to come back into
my element,” she stressed. “Hay-
ing tied the world leading time was
a great confident booster going
into the outdoor season.”

Although some of the big names
in the athletic world are not com-
peting indoors this year, Sturrup
said she has been pleased with the
progress she has made in each race
she ran.

“Knowing my past in the 60
metres, ’m not surprised,” she
noted. “I know I can run a good 60
metres and the field has been pret-
ty good.

“There’s not a bunch of Ameri-
cans running in the race, but I have
one of my training partners and
so I know the work we’ve been



doing in practice, so it’s coming
along. ’'m enjoying it.”

While her final indoor meet is in
Birmingham on February 21, Stur-
rup is hoping that she can secure a
lane to run in a meet in Stockholm,
Sweden, on February 18.

While she has been holding her
own on the track, Sturrup said
she’s pleased to watch the accom-
plishment of hurdler Shamar
Sands. “I told him after the race
that the Bahamas was representing
tonight,” she noted. “Of course he
(set a personal record) in his last
race and he has been running very
well. Hopefully he can feel very
good about himself because he has
been coming around...So I’m very
happy for him.”

NCAA: Magnum Rolle injured
in 60-52 loss to Utah State

(TOP) - Louisiana Tech center
Magnum Rolle (15), of the
Bahamas, scores against Utah
State forward Gary Wilkinson
(55) during the first half of the
NCAA college game Saturday,
February 7, 2009, in Logan,
Utah. Utah State defeated
Louisiana Tech 60-52...

LOUISIANA TECH CENTER MAGNUM ROLLE (15), of the Bahamas, winces in pain during the second half...
(AP Photos: Douglas € Pizac)





‘Blast From
The Past’

See page 10

GOLDEN GIRL Chandra Sturrup gets ready to compete at the
August ‘08 Beijing Olympic Games in China...

(File photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Shamar’s
win streak
hurdles on

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



ANOTHER
60m hurdles
race, another
victory for 23-
year-old
Olympian
Shamar Sands.

Yesterday at
the Interna-
tional PSD
Bank Meeting
in Duesseldorf,
Germany,
Sands posted
his third
straight victory
in four meets
on the Euro-
pean indoor
circuit. His
time: 7:50 sec-
onds. “Honestly, I can say yea,” said
Sands when asked if he was surprised
at his performance so far in an exclu-
sive interview with The Tribune. “T
always knew I could do it, but seeing it
is totally different. I’m just thankful.”

Coming off his second consecutive
national record-breaking performance,
Sands said he got a quick start and
that propelled him to an easy victory
with Netherlands’ Gregory Sedoc as
his nearest rival, who finished the race
in 7.54.

“T got a better start. I don’t know
why, but I had some problems with
my start in the last two races,” he
reflected. “I felt kind of sluggish com-
ing out of the final. But it was still a
good race. I just wasn’t as clean as I
could have been going over the hur-
dles. But it’s still a fast time. Ican take
it.”

With each race he competes in,
Sands said he has been getting the
challenge to force him to go out and
execute his race.

“The harder the line-up, the faster I
see myself running,” he projected. “All
of these guys over here are good so I
love to compete against them.”

On Sunday, Sands will be back in
action. As a result of his recent suc-
cess, he was invited to compete in
another meet in Germany before he
wraps up his indoor season on Feb-
ruary 21 in Burmingham.

Not only has Sands been successful
so far, but veteran sprinter Chandra
Sturrup has been doing her thing as
well. (See headline story)

Sands had nothing but praise for
the ‘golden girl’, who is now tied with
the world’s fastest time of 7.17 sec-
onds in the women’s 60m. “She has
been in the game for a long time and
at her age, she’s still competing at a
high level, so I want to congratulate
her for her world leading time,” he
said. “She and the other girls set the
block for us, so we just have to con-
tinue to keep it going. But I’m glad to
be here and competing at such a high
level with a person like her.”

ae,
SHAMAR SANDS





PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Champion Dipl

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WATCH out. Here come the
Westminster Diplomats.

They’re celebrating as back-to-
back Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools’ senior
boys basketball champions.

“The preparation for this season
began immediately after the last
championship last year,” said coach
Geno Bullard. “It’s easy to get the
boys focused because instead of
being the underdogs team, we’re the
team that everybody was preparing
to beat.

“So it was easy to get everybody
focused and for us to retain our
title. But we had more pressure on
us because they had us ranked as
the number one team (in the
Bahamas) so everybody was gun-
ning for us. So we had to be on our
A game everytime we came to

play.”
Grade

Give the Diplomats an A grade
for their accomplishment, consider-
ing that they didn’t get to face the
much anticipated rematch with the
Jordan Prince William Falcons.

The Falcons, the previous two-
time champions, didn’t make the
playoffs because the BAISS
penalised them for what they called

COACH GENO BULLARD



using an illegal player.

Matched instead against the sur-
prising Kingsway Academy Saints in
the best-of-three championship
series this week at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium, the Diplomats had to
forge a gallant come-back by their
rivals after they blew a 20-point lead
in game one.

In game two, Westminster played
like true champions and they never

Freedom Farm

Standings

(Week 5)

Here’s the current standings for Freedom Farm going into week five:

T-BALL DIVISION

Sea Grapes
Coco Plums
Jujus
Guineps
Dillies

COACH PITCH

Bees

Boas
Sandflies
Mosquitoes
Wasps

Green Turtles

9-10 DIVISION

Dolphins
Octopus
Barracudas
Red Snappers
Turbots

Eels

11-12 DIVISION

Wild Dogs
Conchs

Divers

Nassau Groupers
Hurricanes
Iguanas

Blue Marlins
Whit Crowns
Green Parrotts

AAR WHRYNR ©

13-15 DIVISION

Silver Jacks
Owlz
Racoons
Stingrays
Potcakes
Sharks

16-18 DIVISION

Arawaks 2 0
‘Tainos 1 1
Caribs 0 2
Lucayans

WINS LOSSES

STREAK

W6
Ll

WINS LOSSES

Here’s a look at the recent results of games played:

T-Ball Won
Friday Jan. 30th

Saturday Jan. 31st
Coach Pitch Won
Friday Feb. 6th

Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th

Turtles
Bees
Boas

9-10 Division Won

Friday Feb. 6th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Sunday Feb. 8th

Octopus
Dolphins
Octopus
Turbots
11-12 Division Won
Wednesday Feb. 4th
Tied score Friday Feb. 6
Saturday Feb. 7
Saturday Feb. 7
Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Sunday Feb. 8th

Sunday Feb. 8th

Tguanas
Marlins
Conchs
Dogs
Conchs
Groupers
Marlins
Tguanas
Groupers



Coco Plums
Sea Grapes

Loss

Dillies
Coco Plums

Loss

Wasps
Boas
Wasps

Loss

Red Snappers
Barracudas
Eels

Red Snappers

Loss

Crowns
Tguanas
Divers

Parrots

Divers
Hurricanes
White Crowns
Parrots

White Crowns

gave Kingsway Academy any glim-
mer of hope of dethroning them.
For Bullard, he noted that when
comparing the two teams, he felt
last year’s squad was a “very good
one,” but the difference this year
was the fact that “we had a year’s

experience.”
Cold

“We came in cold turkey (last
year) and we had to learn a lot from
our mistakes. The loss we suffered
to Prince William at their home
really shook us up,” Bullard lament-
ed.

“So every time we came to play,
we came with our A game. Last
year, we didn’t have that to gauge
on. Now this year, we had all of last
year’s experience to get us in shape
and prepared mentally for the task
that was ahead of us this past sea-
son.”

Heading into the prestigious
Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic
that will get started on Monday,
Bullard and his Diplomats are still
ranked at No.1 according to the poll
released weekly by Ozzie Simmons
of Grand Bahama.

Does that mean that the Diplo-
mats have a shot at winning the
title? Better still, can you go all the
way and win it?

Tribune Sports asked coach Geno
Bullard. He said:

“We can go as far as we prepare

ourselves mentally to go,” he
quipped. “But we are going to be
mentally prepared for the challenge
because we want to come out there
and compete to the best of our
capability and represent our
school.”

Hard work, determination and
dedication are three key factors that
Bullard feels will make the differ-
ence in their success or failure.

“We just have to take every game
one at a time and don’t get ahead of
ourselves,” he pointed out.

Going into the tournament,
Bullard has some concern for his big
man, Rashad Morley, along with his
son, guard Geno Bullard Jr, who are
nursing slight ankle injuries.

Other than that, Bullard said they
have the reserves — most of those
players have benefited from being a
part of Bullard’s No Bull Summer
Programme — who can fill their

shoes.
Addition

In addition to Morley and Bullard
Jr, No Bull also features Christorr
Strachan, Larry Smith, Adrian Sher-
man, Shaquille Bain, Thomas Mack-
ey and Marako Lundy.

Bullard also boasts the fact that
Sham Moss and Anvon Ferguson,
both of Kingsway Academy, also
play in the programme. So does
Colin Cartwright, of St John’s.

And from the junior division,

omats go two straight!

there’s Weston Saunders and Regi-
nald Ferguson from the champions
and Jabari Wilmott from runners-up
St Augustine’s College.

Westminster, one of the youngest
schools in the BAISS, was hoping to
build on the newest dynasty they
have just established with the
junior boys and the junior girls mak-
ing a run at the championship as
well.

Junior

Unfortunately, the junior boys
didn’t survive in the playoffs and
were ousted, while the girls, who
have only been in operation since
October, fell short when it counted
the most.

But Bullard said the achievement
of the senior boys, who will only be
losing three players, will be the cata-
lyst for the rest of the teams in their
quest to get to the top.

“The junior boys did very well,
but during the playoffs, we had one
bad game and it cost us. But it’s
good for them to learn for the next
season,” he stated.

“With the junior girls, I’m very
proud of them because they only
got started this year, so hopefully
they can learn from their mistakes.”

As they get set for Hugh Camp-
bell, Bullard said he only wants his
players to stay focused and take one
game at a time and they should be
able to go after another title.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

REMEMBER these former outstanding sprinters?
‘Blast From The Past’ takes you back to the
1970s when these youngsters were starting to
make a name for themselves in track and field.

Can you identify any of them?

(The Tribune file photos)













is

THE WEATHER REPORT k 4 = {7

ae Va gC | UV INDEX NY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14th, 2009, PAGE 11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.






















yr | | rs Vv I High = Low W Hign Low W NASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 7a F
— ry _ E <- i. 0| 1 |2 3 |4|5 6|7 8 | gl10 11 FIC OFC F/C F/C Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
en f . _ pa = Acapulco 89/31 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 § FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
— ‘ “*K ORLANDO X Ankara, Turkey 45/7 34/1 5 48/8 32/0. ABACO Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
High:77° F/25°C ae ee Partly sunny. Partly cloudy. Breezy with plenty of Sunshine. Mostly sunny and Partly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens S211 42/5 c 49/9 39/3 F Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
fia g “61°F/16°C Sew sun. pleasant. and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 73/22 57/13 pc 68/20 55/12 c
i OW: OT” @ « High: g2° High: 82° High: 79° High: 75° Bangkok 97/36 77/25 pc 98/36 77/25 s
c 4 OG » 740 - 770 a . B58 pao Barbados 85/29 74/23 pec 85/29 74/23 s
TAMPA oe a eraaseemm | pemotene Low: 70 Low: 69 Low: 62 Low: 64 SS ESS Barcelona 51/10 39/8 s cio 383s) MU Va te
; = fe RCI EI : baling = ONES RR TAOS
High: 76° F/24° C ee 68°-61° F High _Ht(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.) peat eee oe ea
Low: 62° F/16°C ai 7 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:24am. 25 4:15am. -0.3 Belgrade 31/0 26/-3 sn 30/-1 26/-3 c
ey @ s : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:51pm. 2.7 4:28pm. -0.3 Berlin 39/0 23/-5 sf 30/-1 23/-5 pc
} 1:07am. 23 5:04am. -0.1 Bermuda 67/19 58/14 pc 6518 60/15 pc
a FALMANAG |
39pm. 26 5:11pm. -0.1 Bogota 68/20 47/8 t 66/18 47/8 +
3 AAG ? Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 13am. 21 Sodam. OT Brussels 39/3 34/1 sn 41/5 30/-1 pe
i a ~~ ABACO Temperature, wn 557 p.m. 0.0 Budapest 36/2 28/-2 sn 37/2 24/-4 pc
r. , — High: 77° F/25° C PGI sees cceatstes Oceeereetacetaaece acess 82° F/28° C Tanda i23lam 04 640am 02 Buenos Aires 93/33 73/22 s 97/36 77/25 pc : 4 .
. “as oe DOM assierecte 64°F/1g°¢ = Monday 5 pm. 20 648pm. 02 Cairo 75/23 56/13 pc 77/25 56/13 s 43 ' a
; y As zy eae F/18°C Normal high... 7rsG 9 __etepm. 20) 6aepm. 02 ae 88/31 66/18 s 92/33 69/20 s | Fi |
¥ ; os Normal low 64° F/18° C Calgary 15/-9 1/17 c 14/-10 -1/-18 ¢ < ri® s
; a @ WEST PALM BEACH i. Last year's ig Us seaessePeasedtecessteessicsneees 81° F/27° C SUN ay Ty ify Cancun 84/28 72/22 pc 86/30 66/18 s as aaron (L)
ai High: 81° F/27°C : Last year's lOW oes 71° F/22° C Caracas 83/28 68/20 sh 83/28 69/20 pc Mloganceles >" Qos
Low: 64° F/18°C @ = Precipitation _ bene a.m. Lala ed p.m. Casablanca 71/21 499 s 73/22 55/12 ¢ 60/44
As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo. 0.00" unset... .... ‘Vo p.m. Moonset..... ‘Vo a.m. Copenhagen 35/1 25/-3 s 36/2 29/-1 s —— (COLD)
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT alii Year to date Last New First Full Dublin 46/7 39/3 pe 46/7 41/5 sh
TEER @ High: 76° F/24° C Normal year to date... cescesseseeeeeeeeeees 2.48" - a - Frankfurt 37/2 30/-1 sn 36/2 28/-2 pe
ow: 67° F/19° Low: 64° F/18°C Ts om ie Geneva 32/0 29/-1 sn 32/0 22/-5 c
<4 AccuWeather.com ibe me Halifax 32/0 10/-12 ¢ 27/-2 14/-10 c
@ i. Forecasts and graphics provided by ‘aij - = 5 Havana 85/29 62/16 s 85/29 62/16 s Showers gaa
MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb.16 Feb.24 Mar.4 Mar.10 Helsinki 28/-2 21/-6 sf 27/-2 14/-10 pc T-storms ( A 31/66
= 5 High: 81° F/27°C SS High:81°F/27°C Hong Kong 79/26 70/21 pe 77/25 70/21 ¢ Rain beta Fronts
i. Low: 66° F/18° C NA AU 1g - ° ° Islamabad 60/15 44/6 1 7/21 42/5 s 4 Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and 7
High: 83° F/28° C Low: 66° F/19°C Istanbul 49/9 40/4 + 41/5 37/2 sn Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitenfitentie
Low: 71° F/22°C Jerusalem 69/20 48/8 pc 71/21 49/99 s Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary angunfle
a4 ca Johannesburg 71/21 55/12 pe 75/23 57/13 s
KEY WEST = @ 2 CATISLAND Kingston 84/28 74/23 s 84/28 75/23 sh 0s [/03)) 10s 20s (B03!) 40s
Fhe 70 ° i = A 2 Lima 84/28 68/20 c 85/29 67/19 c
ppt cota _ ie ie ‘ London 41/5 34/1 pe 43/6 39/3 pc
j ow: 63° F/17° Madrid S713 30/-1 s 5015 34/1 s
@ = Manila 90/32 74/23 pc 91/32 75/23 pc
ela r tn Mexico City 81/27 46/7 s 80/26 43/6 s A a TO N S a i" yay IN Cc =
Zs —_- Monterrey 88/31 61/16 s 86/30 59/15 s
oa GREAT EXUMA al SAN SALVADOR Montreal 25/-3 9-12 ¢ 27/-2 I-12 pe
High: 83° F/28° C High: 81° F/27°C Moscow 32/0 28/-2 sn 34/1 28/-2 sn
Low: 71° F/22° C 6 7 Munich 25/-3 24/-4 sn 26/-3 17/-8 sn
ANDROS Low: 65°F/18°C Nairobi 88/31 55/12 pc 87/30 55/12 pc

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



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=~ — am ogee we Temomenwithout us!

LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 81/27 72/22

r 80/26 71/21 c
High: 81° F/27°C Riyadh 75/23 52/11 s 79/26 56/13 s i
CA er ret Rome 1915 2012 po AGT BOL 8 jes. to Auto Insurance,
Today Saliniay ioiey saluniay Toty Satuntay a MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 73/22 s 82/27 73/22 s Z art choi +

High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W _- High: 82° F/28° C San Juan 97/36 72/22 pc 99/37 71/21 s 7 the sm CnOlce Is

FIC F/C FIC F/G FIC F/C FIC F/C FC FIC FIC F/C _ Low: 64° F/18°C San Salvador 90/32 68/20 s 90/32 71/21 ¢ st Management.
Albuquerque 50/10 27/-2 s 48/8 25/-3 Indianapolis 4677 31/0 po 41/5 25/3 c Philadelphia 46/7 28/-2 § 41/5 30/-1 pe CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 90/32 57/13 s 91/32 55/12 s .
Anchorage Q7/-2 18/-7 c 27/2 19/-7 pc Jacksonville 72/22 56/13 pc 75/23 5713 t Phoenix 64/17 46/7 s 6015 42/5 pc ye j Santo Domingo 83/28 68/20 s 84/28 68/20 s .
Atlanta 66/18 49/9 po 62/16 44/6 Fr Kansas City 40/4 22/-5 34/1 21/6 po Pittsburgh 40/4 24/-4 po 38/3. -24/-4 sn RAGGEDISLAND High: 84" F/29°C = -_ wor ro C re ser : We ?
Atlantic City 46/7 21/6 s 43/6 21/6 pc _Las Vegas 5812 37/2 po 5442 35/4 pc Portland,OR 478 31/0 sh 47/8 35/1 pc High: 82° F/28°C Low: 67°F/19°C eave 40/4 EEE Sea ONESE . ——
Baltimore 48/8 30/-1 s 42/5 30/-1 pc _Little Rock 60/15 41/5 sh 57/43 37/2 s Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4 s 47/8 344 1 Low:63°F/17°C _—— ean ae eas erereparrnresaes () ,
Boston 37/2 23/-5 s 39/3 26/-3 pc LosAngeles 60/15 44/6 r 60/15 46/7 pc _ St Louis 52/11 35/1 c 38/3 26/3 pe : _ oe SaaS SDT SA DECEaD DOGS —41 | RANCE M ANAGEMENT
Buffalo 32/0 17/-8 sf 30/-1 16/-8 c Louisville 56/13 38/3 po 46/7 33/0 c Salt Lake City 36/2 24/-4 32/0 21/-6 sn GREATINAGUA Charleston, SC 72/22 5110 po 65/18 5140 t Memphis 62/16 47/8 sh 5442 37/2 s San Antonio 78/25 55/12 pc 68/20 52/11 pc High: 84° F/29°C ae 32/0 19/7 pe 31/0 16/-8 c (BATIAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 42/5 24/-4 po 33/0 23/5 sn Miami 81/27 66/18 pc 82/27 6518 s San Diego 60/15 49/9 r 61M6 49/9 po Low. 66°FA9°C Trinidad 98/31 73/22 t 93/98 73/99 t =
Cleveland 36/2 23/-5 pc 34/1 25/-3 sn Minneapolis 30/-1 14/-10 pc 27/-2 13/-10 ¢ San Francisco 53/11 43/6 r 54/12 47/8 4+ . ene 43/6 32/0 c 43/6 32/0 pe ~ Hew Providente Gren Boho Ahern Fauthera Frum
Dallas 69/20 38/3 po 5945 41/5 s Nashville 62416 42/5 po 5542 36/2 c Seattle 45/7 35/1 45/7 33/0 pc Vianga 39/0 25/-3 st 31/0 24/-4 sn 4 ibd) | BELT ASh-00 D4 3opets (Den “BoB CLE Gs
Denver 32/0 15/-9 sn 30/-1 13/-10 c New Orleans 71/21 62/16 t 71/21 5613 t Tallahassee 66/18 54/412 sh 71/21 5241 ¢ : j ! 5 1
Detroit 38/3 27/-2 pc 38/3 25/-3 sn New York 42/5 29/-1 s 43/6 31/0 pc Tampa 76/24 62/16 pce 76/24 60/15 pc ~ asa ae ayer a ve Be : Dl iN a ah = nH ih |
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 s 81/27 70/21 pc OklahomaCity 60/15 28/-2 pc 48/8 31/0 s Tucson 6317 41/5 s 5643 36/2 pc — —_—_——— —

Houston 73/22 53/11 t 68/20 5140 c¢ Orlando 77/25 6116 po 83/28 6015 pc Washington, DC 53/11 320 s 44/6 31/0 + he ee ee





PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS








NASSAU EVENTS

ve

THE picturesque Bahamas Embassy building situated on 2220 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington,
DC, 20008, formerly housed the Venezuelan Embassy. It was purchased by the Bahamas government from
Venezuela in 1974 after the Venezuelan diplomatic corps became too large to be housed in the building.




EMBASSY of the Bahamas, Washington, DC (I-r): Bridget McKay, second secretary and vice-consul; Monique
Vanderpool, second secretary and vice-consul; Bahamas Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipo-
tentiary; Rhoda M Jackson, Minister-Counsellor/Consul; Charice Rolle, second secretary/vice-consul; Chet D Ney-
mour, counsellor (economic and commerce).

(L-R) NESTA Pathirana, secretary to Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipotentiary; Rhoda
M Jackson, Minister-Counsellor/Consul: Cecile Lirag, Ambassador’s Secretary.

CAPTURED

thescene



by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP

ON

CAMERA

THE BAHAMAS STRENGTHENING

THE Bahamas is extensively represented in
the United States with an embassy in Washington
DC and consular offices in New York and Miami,
and a third to open in Atlanta shortly.

AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY

The Mission in Washington DC has a dual role.
As the embassy, it conducts bilateral activities with
the government of the United States and the gov-
ernment of Mexico. As the Permanent Mission to
the Organisation of American States, it addresses
all matters pertaining to political, economic, trade,
consular, development, security, and environmen-
tal affairs as they relate to the Bahamas.

In addition, the embassy provides advice on the
panoply of matters of interest to the Bahamas, in
consultation with the Ministry of National Securi-
ty, and contributes to the ministry's preparation
of country and meeting briefs (Organisation of
American States, CARICOM, Summit of the
Americas, et cetera).

Presently, the Mission is concentrated on such
matters as:

¢ illegal immigration (Cubans in detention, mon-
itoring legislative developments in the US)*

* Copyright issues (Cable Bahamas and the Spe-
cial 301 Review)

e The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
(WHTI)

¢ Multi-dimensional security (security concerns
of small and island states)

¢ Women’s affairs

e Sustainable development

e Technical co-operation

¢ The Summit of the Americas Process

¢ The Conference on the Caribbean (The
Bahamas chairs Showcasing of the Caribbean com-
ponent)

e The ongoing activities to mark the 200th
Anniversary of the Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic
Slave Trade

¢ Other national and regional cultural activities
(school presentations, Bahamas Junkanoo Associ-

WASHINGTON, DC, January 21, 2009 — Pictured (I-r)

ation of Metropolitan-DC, et cetera.

The mission will also be involved in prepara-
tions for the upcoming Fifth EU-LAC Summit in
Peru in 2008, the Fifth Summit of the Americas to
be hosted by Trinidad and Tobago in 2009, and
negotiations for an aviation agreement with the
US.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Some of the noteworthy accomplishments of the
Mission over the last five years include:

¢ Chairing the OAS Committee on Administra-
tive and Budgetary Affairs July 2005 - June 2006)

e As committee chair, overseeing the critical and
contentious issues of increasing the quota contri-
butions of Member States and accounting for cost
of living adjustments (COLA)

¢ Representing CARICOM, along with Trinidad
and Tobago and Barbados, in the negotiations to
make the Inter-American Defence Board an enti-
ty of the OAS

e Full-fledged participation in the OAS Com-
mittee Against Terrorism

e Financial contributions to important OAS
processes (Haiti, terrorism, Peace Process)

e Increased participation in youth leadership
activities

e Taking lead in defending the Bahamas in US
copyright protection complaints

e Granting support to CARICOM candidates
for critical OAS posts such as that of the Assistant
Secretary-General, the Director of the Inter-Amer-
ican Institute for Co-operation in Agriculture
(ICA) and the Chair of the Executive Committee
of the Inter-American Committee on Women’s
Affairs (CIM)

¢ Contributing to the successful participation of
the Bahamian community in the DC Carnivals in
2005 and 2006, taking second and first, respective-
ly

e Chairing the showcase component of the Con-
ference on the Caribbean to be held in Washington,
DC, in June 2007.



at a private dinner at the University Club are Earl Godet

of E Godette and taxi-cab service in Freeport, Grand Bahama: Gloria Godet, international property specialist
with Real Estate Terrance, California; Bahamian Ambassador to the United States of America Cornelius A
Smith, Claire Smith; wife of the Bahamian Ambassador, Veronica Godet-Pierson of the Montgomery County
School Board, director of Union Middle School, Washington, DC.



(L-R) INGA Dean, consular assistant; Colleen Isaacs, accounts officer; Ambassador Cornelius A Smith,
Ambassador and Plenipotentiary; Faith Jasmine Lightbourne, receptionist/information officer; Rodel Vil-
lasenor, maintenance/chauffeur. Missing in photo is Charles Cameron Ferguson, Dharmadasa Hettiarachchi

and Christine Dean.

y=: For further information on THE SCENE Pictures please contact





Full Text


Lae L134

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

HIGH
LOW

Pim flowin’ it

83F
71F

ANY

PARTLY
SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.69



TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

The Tribune a

McDonald's downtown

Pele h Ode tebe al)

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



PRICE —75¢



rormer prison officer

charged With murder

Jerome Bethel
appears in court
over stabbing

death of

councilman

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FORMER prison officer
was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison yesterday fol-
lowing his arraignment on a
murder charge.

Police have charged Jerome
Bethel, 36, of Greenway Drive
in the February 11 stabbing
death of Gary Harold Gar-
diner.

Gardiner, 49, a North
Andros local councilman was
reportedly stabbed to death
on Williams Drive off Cow-
pen Road around 9 pm
Wednesday.

According to initial police
reports, the deceased and
another man got into a verbal
altercation that turned violent
in a yard on Williams Drive.

WEST

a bs

At some point during the row,
Gardiner was stabbed multi-
ple times about the body. Gar-
diner died at the scene of the
incident.

His death marked the ninth
homicide this year. Gardiner’s
relatives described him as a
calm and giving person.

The other man involved in
the altercation later drove to
the East Street South Police
Station it was reported.

Bethel, who appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez in Court 1,
Bank Lane yesterday after-
noon was not required to
enter a plea to the murder
charge.

A preliminary inquiry will
be held to determine whether

SEE page six
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escorted from Court 5. Several police officers had to restrain the men and
separate them from each other in the skirmish.

mr Clarke/Tribune staff

Bank Lane yesterday.

Six arrested
in connection
with seizure
of cocaine

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

POLICE arrested six men in
connection with the seizure of
$6 million worth of cocaine
from the second Haitian vessel
intercepted in the area of Great
Inagua earlier this week.

Police, Royal Bahamas
Defence Force officers and US
officials found more than 300
kilos of cocaine on the second
boat. The second seizure came
shortly after police confiscated
400 kilograms of cocaine, worth
about $8 million, from a 77-foot
wooden Haitian vessel off
Inagua around 9 am the same
day.
The second find brings the
total amount of cocaine found
on the two boats to $14 million.

This brings the total number
of arrests for both drug busts
to 12; five men and one woman
were arrested in connection
with the first seizure.

SEE page six



JEROME BETHEL, 36, of Greenway Drive, is escorted to Court One,

Man dies
in pool of
ICU ay

m@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@
tribunemedia.net

A MAN died in his
employer's pool at a home
on Eastern Road yesterday
morning in what police are
investigating as a drowning
incident.

Up until press time last
night the man, who is a gar-
dener believed to be in his
late 40s to early 50s, was
identified by residents on the
scene as “Willy”. The inci-
dent occurred at a home
immediately east of High
Vista Drive.

Eastern Road resident Jay
Albury, who helped pull the
drowned man out of his
neighbour's pool, said
around 10.15 am he heard
his neighbour's pool cleaner
screaming that someone was
floating at the bottom of the

SEE page six



Convicted
thief makes
a dash for
freedom

Man attempts to escape
after being sentenced

A CONVICTED thief’s
dash for freedom ended
quickly on Bank Lane yes-
terday as he was taken
before a magistrate who
added an additional year
to his four-year prison
term for the daring
attempt.

Shortly after Magistrate
Derrence Rolle sentenced
Carlos Holbert to four
years in prison yesterday,
the 21-year-old darted out
of court 5, Bank Lane and,
according to eyewitnesses,
jumped several feet from
the top of the steps to the
pavement in his attempt to
avoid prison.

Police on Bank Lane,
however, quickly captured
Holbert who was subse-
quently escorted back



before Magistrate Rolle.

Holbert, who had been
convicted for stealing from
a vehicle and was sen-
tenced to four years in
prison, was ordered to
serve an additional year in
jail for attempting to
escape.

On the charge of steal-
ing from a vehicle, court
dockets state that Holbert
on July 23, 2008, while at
the Blue Hills sporting
complex stole from a 2000
Ford Escape, a black bag
valued at $50, a $35 girls
watch, two pairs of glasses
valued at $400 and other
personal items belonging
to Rose Ferguson.

Prosecutors say that
Holbert was convicted of a
similar offence last year.

Redundant employees criticise
resort for hiring foreign workers

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

REDUNDANT hotel employees criticised
Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort for hiring
foreign workers to do their jobs less than two
months after their positions were terminated.

But the Cable Beach hotel maintains the 12
foreigners are interns from the Surinam
School of Hospitality carrying out a three
month training exercise in various depart-
ments. And Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes

Dion Foulkes



understands the trainees are not being paid for their work.

Nevertheless, the presence of non-Bahamians joining the hotel
staff raised suspicion among the 150 employees who lost their jobs
in December. The former employees shared their views in a press
conference held by the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied
Workers Union (BHMAWU) at the House of Labour, Wulff
Road, Thursday.

BHMAWU president Lynden Taylor said: “They have foreign

SEE page six

Grand Bahama readers
want Tribune to return

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama readers are requesting
the return of The Tribune news-
paper, which has been delivered
for more than 40 years to the
island.

The Tribune office in
Freeport has been inundated
with calls from loyal readers
since last Wednesday when



NASSAU AND BAHAME

ISLANDS” LEADING NEWSPAPER

delivery was officially discon-
tinued to Grand Bahama.

“T miss The Tribune, that’s
all I read, we love The Tri-
bune,” said a woman caller.

Due to the increased cost of
air transport, newspaper deliv-
ery by Bahamasair was discon-
tinued to Grand Bahama, main-
land Eleuthera, Exuma,
Crooked Island and Long
Island.

The Tribune is now available

SEE page six
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Wilchcombe speaks out on new Police Force Act

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IT is the role of the media to “med-
dle and interfere” in order to keep
politicians honest, MP for West End
and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe said.

Criticising the tendency of some
politicians to use their influence to fill
public service jobs with “political
appointments”, Mr Wilchcombe said
it is the media’s job to ensure elected
officials do not “manipulate the process
of good governance.”

The MP and former tourism minister
was contributing to the debate on the
second reading of the Police Force Act
2009 on Wednesday in the House of
Assembly.

“Throughout the country, from the
police force to the civil service and
throughout every ministry of the gov-
ernment political appointments are evi-
dent. We go so far as shelving perma-
nent secretaries if they do not speak
our political language,” said Mr Wilch-
combe.

“T ask this question: How will we
ever be ready to play a role in the ever-
changing global order if we dumb
down the process and turn every posi-
tion that is influenced by government
into a political appointment?

“There is room in government for
political appointments, but we should
steer clear of polluting the entire ser-
vice with political hacks, political pimps
or political misfits. I am diametrically
opposed to such behavior.”

the vote on the Police Force 2009 Act,
citing that provision seven, which seeks
to limit the tenure of the police com-
missioner and deputy commissioner,
is unconstitutional because it removes
their “security of tenure” and allows
undue influence by the executive, the
party said.

The government strongly opposed
this argument, stating that it has “no
sound legal basis” and adding that
appointing commissioners of police on
a shorter contractual basis is a prac-
tice followed in many Commonwealth
countries, including the United King-
dom and Australia.

Speaking out against any politicisa-
tion of the civil service or the police
force, Mr Wilchcombe said that filling
public service roles with people on this

Bahamas’ readiness to join the global
stage in the way that it should.

“The media must keep the politi-
cians honest. The media must meddle.
The media must investigate, the media
must not be afraid to expose those
issues that contemplate the destruc-
tion of the orderly development of
nation and our people.

“Mr Speaker, the media could stop
politicians from interference, from
manipulating the process of good gov-
ernance. The politicians will not in all
cases keep themselves honest. It is the
media — the people’s voice — that
must,” he added.

The MP charged that both political
parties “must carry some guilt of hay-
ing used of having used naked power to
misuse and abuse the power of gov-





















FREEPORT - An 11-month
project came to fruition on
Thursday with the official open-
ing of the new bridge at the
Lucayan National Park in east-
ern Grand Bahama.

The event, attended by gov-
ernment officials and Bahamas
National Trust representatives,
was greatly anticipated as the
bridge is expected to play a vital
role in the tourism product of
Grand Bahama.

In attendance were Colonel
John Blashford-Snell and Cap-
tain John Hinchliffe - both
instrumental in creating the
original nature walk and foot-
bridge at the park.

Deputy Prime Minister Brent
Symonette said: “The govern-
ment of the Bahamas believes
that our need for economic
development must be kept in
proper balance with the need
to secure protection of the envi-
ronment, including the biologi-
cal diversity of our islands.”

He said there are plans in
place to establish four or five
new protected areas through-
out the Bahamas and that the
opening of the new bridge is
“an excellent example of how
development and conservation

The PLP ultimately abstained from

can and do co-exist in our coun-
try for the benefit of all.”

The new structure replaces
an older bridge that was com-
pleted in 1987 through a joint
effort by local volunteers and
Operation Raleigh
(www.raleigh.org.uk).

Colonel Blashford-Snell was
closely involved in the original
project. He said: “It was a won-
derful friendship between the
people of Grand Bahama. We
worked all over the Bahamas
trying to help the National
Trust. And indeed, we wish
them well because they are pre-
serving the heritage of these
islands that is unique and so
important for the coming gen-
erations.”

Bahamas National Trust pres-
ident Glenn Bannister said the
bridge is a vital component to
the Grand Bahama tourism
product.

“Tt is very important to bring
our visitors out into nature. This
kind of experience will bring
them back, over and over
again,” Mr Bannister said.
“That is why we take particular
interest in this project, and that
is why it is so gratifying to have
this opening in Grand

Bahama.”

Chairperson for the Grand
Bahama region of the Bahamas
National Trust Karin Sanchez
shared the Trust’s plans for the
park.

“The bridge covering the
creek is just one of the first
things,” she said. “We would
like to build a visitor centre here
so that visitors to the park will
fully experience it as a great
place to come and enjoy the
beauty of our island and our
environment.”

The 22-year-old original
bridge was severely damaged
during the hurricanes that
struck Grand Bahama in 2004.
As the condition of the bridge
worsened, it became necessary
to close it for safety reasons.

The new bridge, which spans
Gold Rock Creek, features a
large covered observation deck.

The bridge was constructed
by local contractor Hartley
Lowe of Bahamas Engineering
and Dock Company Limited at
a cost of around $230,000.

It was financed by a $100,000
contribution from _ the
Bahamas National Trust and
donations by corporations and
individuals.

LOVE BUGHE

eS PECIAL

| NS O firm,

oo

basis rather than on merit will stifle the





ernment.” Obie Wilchcombe

WHILE attending the official opening of the new bridge at Lucayan National Park, a group of government and
Bahamas National Trust (BNT) officials toured the caves which are part of the protected area in Grand
Bahama. L-R: Karin Sanchez, Chairperson, Grand Bahama Region, BNT; Robin Symonette, Honourary Secre-
tary of the BNT; Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas: Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Envi-
ronment; Glenn Bannister, President of BNT: Neil McKinney, Deputy President of BNT; Lynn Gape, Deputy
Executive Director of BNT: and, Eric Carey Executive Director BNT.

Erik J. Russell/ Keen i Media Ltd

THE RIBBON cutting at the official opening of the new bridge at Lucayan National Park was conducted by
Colonel John Blashford-Snell of Operation Raleigh and Bahamas National Trust Administrator and Educa-
tional Liaison Cecilia Bodie. Shown, L-R with students of Freeport Primary School are: Glenn Bannister,
President, Bahamas National Trust; the Honourable Neko Grant, Minister of Public Works and Transport;
Colonel Blashford-Snell; (at back) Eric Carey, Deputy Director, Bahamas National Trust; Ms Bodie; Deputy
Prime Minister of the Bahamas the Honourable Brent Symonette; and Minister of Housing the Honourable
Kenneth Russell.

Local churches to provide counselling
during worsening financial crisis

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TEN church leaders are to
co-operate in a bid to counter
growing despair among
Bahamians over the worsen-
ing financial crisis.

Their churches will be
thrown open as counselling
centres as the economy tight-
ens and more people are
thrown out of work.

On Monday, a group of pas-
tors will announce their plans
at a press conference to be
held at New Covenant Bap-

tist Church.

Bishop Simeon Hall, who
said he has had to counsel
nine potential suicides over
the past week, told The Tri-
bune that an “ecumenical”
approach is being taken to the
problem.

“Church leaders of all
denominations will be taking
part,” he said.

“We are going to collabo-
rate on running crisis coun-
selling centres because of the

MAIN SECTION
Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Pipe. So o,0nhe

ote rrecaer reac reeer reer ias P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGE





4 ee
Bishop Simeon Hall

problems now being faced by
ordinary Bahamian families.”

He said other churchmen
had been counselling poten-
tial suicides in recent days.

“T have had nine, but most
wanted someone to talk to in
an effort to ease their trou-
bles. I think only two actually
needed psychiatric help.”

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eee UE
PHONE: 322-2157


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



Staff leave posts
after problem
with office air
conditioning

STAFF at the Post
Office headquarters on
East Hill Street decided
to leave their posts yes-
terday morning after a
problem with the air-
conditioning system
left a bad odour
throughout parts of the
building.

According to Assis-
tant Postmaster Robert
Sumner, staff gathered
outside the building
until around 11.30am
when the problem was
fixed.

He said “water
spilled” from the air-
conditioning system
sometime before people
arrived at work for that
day.

“It did have an odour,
(but it was) cleaned up
in a short period of
time,” he said.



DIRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION Jack Thompson walks through the
Straw Market yesterday.

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

IMMIGRATION officials
paid an unannounced visit to
the Straw Market yesterday
to remind vendors that they
will continue to search for
illegal immigrants working
in the market.

Director of Immigration
Jack Thompson said his team
also wanted to check up on
what is going on in the Straw
Market.

Strategise

“We will identify certain
locations and certain sites for
ourselves and we will then
know how to strategise and
how to move from there,”
Mr Thompson said.

He said it is important that
his officers not apprehend

Greg and Tanya Cash can file appeal against declaration

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

JUSTICE campaigners Greg and Tanya
Cash are allowed to file an appeal in the
Court of Appeal against a declaration nam-
ing them “vexatious litigants”.

In a short ruling handed down yester-
day morning, Senior Justice Anita Allen
said that the couple did not need leave of
her court to appeal the order.

The couple were declared vexatious liti-
gants by Justice Allen on January 12 and
intend to appeal the order. Justice Allen
had ruled that the couple be barred from
continuing any legal action or having any-
one initiate any proceedings on their behalf.

She said that the couple could initiate
proper proceedings with leave of the court.

The Attorney General's Office had filed
an application in Supreme Court against
the couple, seeking a court ruling that they
be barred from taking any further legal
action because most of their actions are
vexatious and amount to an abuse of the

Greg and Tanya Cash



court’s process.

Justice Allen’s written ruling stated that
“there are no provisions in the Supreme
Court Act which declare such a ruling final,
nor are there provisions in the Court of
Appeal Act, which prohibits the institu-
tion of such an appeal or require the leave
of the Supreme Court to institute such an

To the Love of My Life:

As I reflect upon the short time I’ve been privileged to know You,
I can’t help but marvel at how lucky | must be.

Lucky to actually be around one the likes of You,

And amazed You'd share Your love with someone like me!

So as others prepare their chocolates, flowers and cute teddy bears,
I'll take a slightly different approach to which I hope You will like.

And publish these words even amidst my shy fears,

And tell the whole world why You are the Love of my life...

| know | certainly didn’t deserve all the times You were there for me,

All those many times You would nurture and care for me.

Especially considering instances when I didn't fully respect You,
Circumstances that led me to tum away and even neglect You!
But never once did You ever get fed up and make Your retreat,

Even after months of my filling Your head up with my unbelief.

Unbelief in Your uncanny ability to bring order to my lowly existence,
So I thank You for not leaving me even amidst this foolish resistance.
But instead You stood by me, and in doing so made me ten times stronger,

You took the fear from inside of me, and now [’m frightened of love no longer.

I thank You so much for being the best thing to ever happen in my life,
And that’s why You are and will always be the ultimate Love of my life...

Tenderness, gentleness, warmth, compassion,
Thoughtfulness, benevolence, unmatched affection:
! You are the personification of all that is perfection...

So Happy Valentine's Day to the one and only Love of my life,

Happy Valentine's Day to my one and only Jesus Christ...

VV9

(Written by a man afier God's own heart)

Bless God Forever !!!

appeal.”

Following the ruling Mrs Cash gave
thanks to God for the latest development in
their favour.

The Cashes have waged a six-year legal
battle against the Baptist education author-
ities.

The matter stems from the alleged
wrongful dismissal of Mr Cash from his
job as a physical education teacher at Jor-
dan Prince William High School in October
2002.

Since then, he and his wife have made a
number of allegations, including that their
human and constitutional rights were
breached.

The Cashes made headlines last Octo-
ber when President of the Court of Appeal
Dame Joan Sawyer ordered Mrs Cash to
either publish an apology for scandalising
the court or be jailed for contempt.

Mrs Cash refused to publish an apology.
However, she was not jailed for contempt
as a differently constituted court said that
the issue was “done with.”

someone every time they
enter the market, so as to
avoid creating the impres-
sion that they are “all about
raids”.

“Sometimes you just want
to go and survey, see what is
happening and get a feel for
things.

“You can not operate
immigration from Hawkins
Hill’s fourth floor; sometimes
you have to come on the
ground,” Mr Thompson said.

“We got some complaints
from a few taxi drivers that
there are a number of other
locations to be checked such
as Potter’s Cay dock, further
downtown, and we will sur-
vey the areas,” he said.

Mr Thompson said that as
the efforts to weed out illegal
immigrants progress, he is
hopeful that the public will
continue to support the

Immigration officials
visit the Straw Market

department.

“When the people see that
you are actually trying and
that you want to do things
right, they notice.

“There were a few in there
who didn’t want to raise their
heads and say good morning,
so it is the little things
that these random walka-
bouts point out to us,” he
added.



Galleria Cinemas

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HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

ISTH OCTOBER 1930 - 14TH FEBRUARY 2008.

Well loved educator & community leader

“A man is loved not for how tall he stands
but for how often he bends to help, comfort and teach.”

Rest In On ugh

Remembered by his wife, Sylvia; son, Gregory;
all family members & friends


PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Redundant employees criticise
resort for hiring foreign workers

Grand Bahama
readers want
The Tribune

to return

FROM page one

online a t
www.tribune242.com and will
be posted for readers by 2pm
on the day of publication.

There were mixed reactions
from persons about the
changes.

One caller said that older

FROM page one

workers on the property in the same
positions, right now. So a lot of people

have a major problem with this.”

He called on the Immigration Depart-
ment to crack down on employers hiring
foreigners when Bahamians are out of

work.

for one is good for the next one.”

The union leader also criticised
Labour Minister Dion Foulkes for failing
to recognise the BHMAWU as a legal
union, and for not calling a poll to allow
hotel employees to choose membership
in the BHMAWU or the Bahamas Hotel
Catering and Allied Workers Union
(BHCAWU), which is recognised by
government and Sandals.

been let go.

But the Minister maintains the
BHMAWU has not had an election of
officers since its registration in 2001 for
employees of the former Holiday Inn
and Resorts International, and has failed
to file annual returns as required under
the Industrial Relations Act.

The Minister said: “I have referred
the matter to the Attorney General to

Mr Foulkes is waiting for a ruling
to be returned by the Court of Appeal
before making a decision about the
poll.

Further criticism of Sandals by the
BHMAWU president includes the sack-
ing of three pregnant women, two of
whom have not been offered their jobs
back, according to Mr Taylor.

But the Minister of Labour said San-

He added: “They are all about the
Haitians and Jamaicans, but don’t want
to follow up these people for a major
company — it’s ridiculous. What’s good

Man dies in pool of employer

persons enjoy reading the actu-
al newspaper.

“What about those elderly
persons and adults who do not
have a computer or know how
to operate a computer.”

However, another caller
believes that the online Tri-
bune would be beneficial to

He further alleges many of the work-
ers made redundant by Sandals were
BHMAWU officers and should not have

get a final determination on the matter
and at that time I will issue a formal
statement to the public.”

dals has assured him that all three preg-
nant women had been offered their jobs
back without any change of status.

Six arrested in connection
with seizure of cocaine

: Detective Corporal Adderley, police found the
stndenis since Most Onn peo FROM Page one victim lying oa next 2 the pool. Police h a 1
pl have ae sto the Ine He said EMS were called, who unsuccess- FROM page one eek ere cman
“Tt is free and it would be pool. fully att wad it ie th ict significant drug seizures in
5 AUR Epis OO Tes sei tate ie: ViCtins New Providence and the Fam-

Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans said police
believe the two drug busts are
linked. ASP Evans said while
the find was not the biggest in
recent history, it was certainly
one of the largest drug seizures
in the southern Bahamas.

The drugs and the people
involved were expected to
arrive in New Providence yes-
terday morning.

good for the environment
because there would be less
waste and less paper usage,”
said the caller.

Many persons hope that the
newspaper will be able to
return to Grand Bahama.

“The Tribune has not aban-
doned its loyal Grand Bahama
readers and is particularly con-
cerned about those who either
do not have a computer or do
not like to read a newspaper
on line,” said Tribune publish-
er Eileen Carron. “We are still
exploring ways to get the daily
newspaper to Grand Bahama.
However, currently air trans-
port is too expensive.”

Former prison
Officer charged

FROM page one

there is sufficient evidence
against Bethel for him to
stand trial in the Supreme
Court.

His attorney, Tai Pinder,
asked the magistrate to
order that Bethel be housed
in the hospital section of
Her Majesty’s Prison.

She told the court that
Bethel worked as a prison
officer between 1995 and
2001. The prosecutor
Sergeant Sean Thurston
asked that the case be
adjourned to March 3 for
the commencement of a
preliminary inquiry in
Court 1, Bank Lane.

Bethel was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison.

He and the pool cleaner, Hubel Duncombe,
rushed to his neighbour's pool where he saw the
victim floating face down at the bottom of the
pool, his broom next to him.

"T pulled him to the (pool's) surface and the
two of us pulled him out,” he said.

According to Mr Albury, the victim was not
breathing when he was pulled from the pool.

When The Tribune arrived around 11 am
yesterday, police were taking statements and
the body was still at the scene.

According to one of the investigating officers,

"At this point in time, we can only assume
that he would have drowned. We will await
autopsy results to determine whether drowning
was the cause or whether he might have been
on some other substance," he said.

He said foul play was not suspected and there
were no signs of injury on the victim. Police sus-
pect the victim may have been in the pool for at
least 20 minutes.

Detective Adderley said the victim would
be taken to hospital to be officially declared
dead.

ily Islands over the past few
weeks.

Six people were arrested
last week and have been
charged in the seizure of some
$200,000 worth of marijuana.
Police also seized $3.75 million
worth of cocaine in Freeport
and $100,000 worth of
marijuana in Andros this
month.



Embattled Turks
and Caicos
premier to resign

@ PROVIDENCIALES,
Turks and Caicos

Scotiabank donates
funds to Mable Walker
Primary School

AS A part of its ongoing commitment to the [eg
advancement of education in the Bahamas, |
Scotiabank is supporting the efforts of grade |
one and two teachers and students at the
Mable Walker Primary School.

The bank gave the school a financial dona-
tion towards a mini-fair which is scheduled
for February 14 on the school grounds.

Shantel Hield, a grade two teacher and
teacher of the year (2008-2010) at the Mable
Walker Primary School, expressed her appre-
ciation to Scotiabank for supporting this event.
Mrs Hield said it is the school’s intent this
year to give students as much exposure as
possible and to encourage learning with a
more hands-on approach. The proceeds from |!
the mini fair will go towards financing a field
trip to Busch Gardens which is a part of this
years science curriculum.

PICTURED IN THE PHOTO (L-R) are Shantel

Hield, grade two teacher and teacher of the year
2008-2010 at Mable Walker Primary School, and
Kevin McKinney, senior manager of Scotiabank’s
main branch.






























PREMIER Michael Misick
said Friday he will step down
as leader of the Turks and
Caicos at the end of March,
citing a lack of support for his
scandal-plagued government,
according to Associated Press.

The surprise announcement
came hours after the
Caribbean nation's deputy
premier and finance minister
resigned, citing differences
with the colorful Misick,
whose jet-set lifestyle has
helped turned the Turks and
Caicos into a celebrity hotspot
but has fueled corruption alle-
gations.

"What the country and our
party needs now more than
ever is stability and certain-
ty,” Misick said during a press
conference in his office. "I
have tried in recent weeks to
create this. It now appears to
me that the divide within the
party is too deep."

Misick said he would step
down as party leader on Feb.
28 and resign as premier on
March 31.

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL
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Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
ay hone number 325-5712
AIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Minister: Rev. Henley Perry

P.O.Box S3-3631
Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587
THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009, PAGE 7



LOCAL NEWS



Sky Climbers ‘reaching for new heights’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

AFTER proving a hit with
school children across New
Providence, Sky Climbers - a
Paradise Island-based rock
climbing experience - will be
reaching new heights come Feb-
ruary 21.

The programme, funded by
the Butch Kerzner Foundation —
a charitable entity set up by the

Lyndah Wells/Photo

GRAND BAHAMA - The management team at
Pelican Bay at Lucaya joined in the jubilation of
having one of its long-time staff members, Stan-
ley Williams, walk away as Employee of the Year
at the 13th Annual Cacique Awards.

widow of the late son of Atlantis
CEO Sol Kerzner — has been
enjoyed by hundreds of Bahami-
an children since it opened last
September to schools and youth
groups.

Now, the free experience is
extending its opening hours to
include weekends and inviting
all children between the ages of
seven and 18 years and their par-
ents to come and join the
heights-scaling fun.

Sky Climbers operations con-
sultant Nick Sagar told The Tri-

bune that he hopes children who
participated with a group will be
keen to pit themselves against
the walls a second time, while
those young people whose
schools did not take part in the
programme can now also test
their agility.

“We don’t want to stunt those
kids who came before by say-
ing, “You’re going to have to
wait until next year when your
class comes back to do it again’,”
said he said.

Mr Sagar, a accomplished



Giovanni Sands, engineering manager; Marva
Munroe, sales manager; Della Bridgewater, front
office manager; Magnus Alnebeck, general man-
ager; Julie Paice, purchasing manager; Patra
Albury, financial controller, and Sybilene Coop-

rock-climber, taught the
demanding sport to the late
Butch Kerzner, designing per-
sonalised climbing walls which
were installed in the former
Atlantis Chief Executive’s home.
With it having been such a
passion of Mr Kerzner’s, his wid-
ow, Vanessa Kerzner, wanted to
see it become one of the activi-
ties promoted to young people
under the umbrella of the foun-
dation named in his honour.
Mr Sagar said the project has
been an “incredible success” so

far and he anticipates an even
greater response when it opens it
doors to another round of
adventurous young Bahamians.

Starting on February 21, any
children within the specified age
range interested in getting
involved can turn up at the site,
located on the grounds of the
old Club Med resort on Paradise
Island, and be accommodated
on a first-come-first-served basis,
said Mr Sagar.

Those under 14 must be
accompanied by a parent.

Parents are also welcome to
test their agility and strength on
the walls.

In 2008, 670 children partici-
pated in the rock-climbing expe-
rience.

Schools are still being encour-
aged to sign up for a session if
they have not already. “We want
to reach out to more schools,”
said Mr Sagar. “It’s free and they
just need to transport the kids
to us.”

Sky Climbers is open from
9am - Spm.

SHARING IN THE JOY
OF A CACIQUE AWARD

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

INTERNAL AUDITOR

INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Internal Auditor in the Internal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

* Produces audit programs and submit the same for approval of the Chief Internal Auditor
* Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited

Mr Williams is a bell captain and a three-plus
year employee at Pelican Bay.

er, executive housekeeper.
Missing are Melissa Carroll, revenue/reserva-

Della Bridgewater, Pelican Bay's front office
manager, said: "This is a great achievement for
Stanley. We celebrate with him. | look forward
to continued work with him. And with this
achievement under his belt, | know that Stanley
will Serve as an ever bigger Pelican Bay evange-
list amongst guests and employees."

The management team is pictured by the
poolside at Pelican Bay at a press reception
sponsored by the Grand Bahama Island Tourism
Board, Ministry of Tourism and Pelican Bay to
recognise Cacique winners and runners-up.

Mr Williams (fifth from left) is flanked by (I-r)

security.

and golf.

tions manager and Allan Scavella, director of

Mr Williams hails from Abaco and is married.
He and his wife Jane have five sons. He spends
his spare time in church and playing basketball

The Cacique Awards was a prime event during
National Tourism Week. The purpose of the
Cacique Awards is to recognise the roles played
by those individuals and organisations whose
performance or products have consistently
made a positive impact on the quality and the
growth of tourism in the Bahamas.

Vice-Premier of the State Council of

People's Republic of China to visit

@ By LINDSAY THOMPSON



HUI LUANGYJU, Vice-
Premier of the State Council
of the People’s Republic of
China, will make an official
visit to the Bahamas from
Tuesday, February 17 to
Thursday, February 19.

Vice-Premier Hui will be
received by Deputy Prime
Minister and Minister of For-
eign Affairs Brent Symonette
and Ambassador of the Peo-
ple’s Republic of China Hu
Dingxian at the Lynden Pin-
dling International Airport on
Tuesday.

The Vice-Premier will pay
courtesy calls on Governor-
General Arthur Hanna and
Mrs Beryl Hanna at Govern-

ment House and Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham at the
Cabinet Office, Churchill
Building.

Mr Symonette and the Vice-
Premier will participate in a
signing ceremony in the Cab-
inet Room of the Cabinet
Office, which will be followed
by an official dinner at
Atlantis Resort on Paradise
Island.

On Wednesday, Mr Symon-
ette, Bahamas Government
officials, Vice-Premier Hui
and his delegation will depart
the Lynden Pindling Interna-
tional Airport for Freeport,
Grand Bahama.

They will be received by
government ministers, parlia-
mentarians and officials and

INSIGHT

For the stories behind
the news, read Insight
on Mondays

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that CHAVAUGHNA McMASTERS

of #48 DRAKE AVE.,
BAHAMAS

Nationality and Citizenship,

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for
for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that
FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA,
is applying to the Minister responsible for
for registration/naturalization

of #48 DRAKE AVE.,
BAHAMAS

Nationality and Citizenship,

GODFREY McMASTERS

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 14th day of
FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister responsible for Nationality

and Citizenship,

P.O.Box N-7147, Freeport, Bahamas.

principals of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority, and
will attend an official luncheon
at Our Lucaya Resort.

The delegation will be taken
on a tour of the Freeport Con-
tainer Port and the Grand
Bahama Shipyard. An official
dinner will be hosted by the
Vice-Premier in the Churchill
Room of Our Lucaya Resort.

The Vice-Premier and his
delegation are expected to
depart the country on Thurs-
day, February 19.

The government of the
Bahamas and the People’s
Republic of China (PRC)
established diplomatic rela-
tions with the signing of a
Joint Communiqué on May
23, 1997.

* Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with established audit programs.

+ This involves a complete assessment of the systems of internal control, risk exposures and the efficiency,
effectiveness and economic use of resources to achieve management objectives

* Produces audit reports on audit concerns, their causes, effects and the audit recommendations in
accordance with the ITA Standards

* Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate findings and produce investigation reports: exercising
the IA’s ethical standards e.g., confidentiality, etc.

* Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies, manpower efficiency
and new computer applications

+ Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review and release
to management and the Audit Committee

+ Assembles audit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files produced by the Assistant Internal
Auditors and the Audit Clerks

+ Trains, coaches and direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers general supervision and technical
support to the Assistant Internal Auditor(s)

* Conducts corporate research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud investigations. (producing
the associated reports)

* Assist the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and offer direct assistance on
major investigations

* Conduct audits in conjunction with the External Auditors and produce working papers for the External
Auditors year-end audit

* Conducts stock taking observation exercises, Family Island audits and special assignments

Job requirements include:

* Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline

* Professional accounting certification (e.g., CA, CPA,), in addition completing the CIA would be
highly desirable

* Understand and apply Internal Audit Standards and International Accounting Standards

* Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills

* Good problem solving skills

* Knowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs. Also knowledge of audit software and a good

working knowledge of the H.T.E system are required

* Good knowledge of the Corporation’s operating policies, systems and procedures

* Management and supervision skills

* A minimum of 5 years experience

Salary for the position is in Group 3 of the Senior Staff Salary Scales.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The Manager-Human
Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box



N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before: February 24, 2009.

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.



‘Golden girl’ matches
world leading time

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

eteran sprinter, ‘Gold-

en girl’ Chandra Stur-

rup is proving why

she’s known for her
quick start.

At the International PSD Bank
Meeting in Duesseldorf, Germany,
yesterday, Sturrup clocked 7.17
seconds to match both the world
leading time and the meet record,
which are held by American
Angela Williams.

The most significant thing is
Williams was in the race. She had
to settle for third in 7.22, just
behind British Virgin Island’s Tah-

ai

BASKETBALL:
NPWBA RESULTS



THE New Providence Wom-
en’s Basketball Association con-
tinued its regular season on
Thursday night at the DW Davis
Gymnasium with two exciting
games.

In the opener, the Electro Tele-
com Cybots Queens defeated the
College of the Bahamas Lady
Caribs 65-57.

Natasha Miller shot 14-of-18
from the field and finished with a
game high 31 points to lead the
Queens. Christine Sinclair shot 7-
of-15 from the field for 16 points
for the Lady Caribs.

In the nightcap, the two finalists
from last year’s championship
series hooked up with runners-up
Sunshine Auto Cheetahs came
from a 41-39 halftime to pull off a
100-91 win over the defending
champions Johnson Lady Truck-
ers.

Audrey Martin, who delighted
the crowd with her dazzling
moves and behind the back pass-
es, shot 11-16 from the field for a
game high 33 points in the Chee-
tahs’ win, their second over the
Lady Truckers this season.

For the Lady Truckers, veteran
guard Glenda Gilcud scored 31
points to leads two other players
in double figures. Shantel Rolle
had 25 points and Latoya Rolle
added 19 points.

¢ Here’s a look at Saturday’s
schedule: 7:30 pm Electro Tele-
com Cybots vs Sunshine Auto
Cheetahs.

BASKETBALL:
NPBA SCHEDULE

THE New Providence Basket-
ball Association will play a double
header tonight at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium. At 7 pm, the Enter-
tainers will meet the Foxies' Pros.
At 8 pm, the Johnson's Trucking
Jumpers and the Electro Telecom
Cybots at 8 pm.

TENNIS:
BOURNE-ATKINSON
APPRECIATION
TOURNEY

THE Gym Tennis Club will
host the Dr. Eric Bourne-Ron
Atkinson Appreciation Tennis
Tournament at the Gym Tennis
Club from February 21-March 5.

The tournament is opened to
all local male and female tennis
players and there are several cat-
egories inclusive of the men’s
open, 45’s and 55’s singles, ladies’
open singles, men’s doubles and
mixed pairs.

The entry fee is $15 for each
singles and $10 per person for
each doubles. The draw will be
held at the club at 7 pm on Thurs-
day, February 19. Entry forms
must be submitted to the club.



SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14,

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

esia Harrigan, who ran 7.21 for
another second place finish.

“Tt was good,” said a 37-year-
old Sturrup during an exclusive
interview with The Tribune yes-
terday. “I felt good. I thought I
would have ran that time in my
last race, but I was just glad that it
finally came out.”

For Sturrup, the time was grati-
fying because it helped her to get
over the problems she was experi-
encing for the three weeks before
she headed to Europe.





2009

“Tm starting to come back into
my element,” she stressed. “Hay-
ing tied the world leading time was
a great confident booster going
into the outdoor season.”

Although some of the big names
in the athletic world are not com-
peting indoors this year, Sturrup
said she has been pleased with the
progress she has made in each race
she ran.

“Knowing my past in the 60
metres, ’m not surprised,” she
noted. “I know I can run a good 60
metres and the field has been pret-
ty good.

“There’s not a bunch of Ameri-
cans running in the race, but I have
one of my training partners and
so I know the work we’ve been



doing in practice, so it’s coming
along. ’'m enjoying it.”

While her final indoor meet is in
Birmingham on February 21, Stur-
rup is hoping that she can secure a
lane to run in a meet in Stockholm,
Sweden, on February 18.

While she has been holding her
own on the track, Sturrup said
she’s pleased to watch the accom-
plishment of hurdler Shamar
Sands. “I told him after the race
that the Bahamas was representing
tonight,” she noted. “Of course he
(set a personal record) in his last
race and he has been running very
well. Hopefully he can feel very
good about himself because he has
been coming around...So I’m very
happy for him.”

NCAA: Magnum Rolle injured
in 60-52 loss to Utah State

(TOP) - Louisiana Tech center
Magnum Rolle (15), of the
Bahamas, scores against Utah
State forward Gary Wilkinson
(55) during the first half of the
NCAA college game Saturday,
February 7, 2009, in Logan,
Utah. Utah State defeated
Louisiana Tech 60-52...

LOUISIANA TECH CENTER MAGNUM ROLLE (15), of the Bahamas, winces in pain during the second half...
(AP Photos: Douglas € Pizac)





‘Blast From
The Past’

See page 10

GOLDEN GIRL Chandra Sturrup gets ready to compete at the
August ‘08 Beijing Olympic Games in China...

(File photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff)

Shamar’s
win streak
hurdles on

TRIBUNE

EXCLUSIVE

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net



ANOTHER
60m hurdles
race, another
victory for 23-
year-old
Olympian
Shamar Sands.

Yesterday at
the Interna-
tional PSD
Bank Meeting
in Duesseldorf,
Germany,
Sands posted
his third
straight victory
in four meets
on the Euro-
pean indoor
circuit. His
time: 7:50 sec-
onds. “Honestly, I can say yea,” said
Sands when asked if he was surprised
at his performance so far in an exclu-
sive interview with The Tribune. “T
always knew I could do it, but seeing it
is totally different. I’m just thankful.”

Coming off his second consecutive
national record-breaking performance,
Sands said he got a quick start and
that propelled him to an easy victory
with Netherlands’ Gregory Sedoc as
his nearest rival, who finished the race
in 7.54.

“T got a better start. I don’t know
why, but I had some problems with
my start in the last two races,” he
reflected. “I felt kind of sluggish com-
ing out of the final. But it was still a
good race. I just wasn’t as clean as I
could have been going over the hur-
dles. But it’s still a fast time. Ican take
it.”

With each race he competes in,
Sands said he has been getting the
challenge to force him to go out and
execute his race.

“The harder the line-up, the faster I
see myself running,” he projected. “All
of these guys over here are good so I
love to compete against them.”

On Sunday, Sands will be back in
action. As a result of his recent suc-
cess, he was invited to compete in
another meet in Germany before he
wraps up his indoor season on Feb-
ruary 21 in Burmingham.

Not only has Sands been successful
so far, but veteran sprinter Chandra
Sturrup has been doing her thing as
well. (See headline story)

Sands had nothing but praise for
the ‘golden girl’, who is now tied with
the world’s fastest time of 7.17 sec-
onds in the women’s 60m. “She has
been in the game for a long time and
at her age, she’s still competing at a
high level, so I want to congratulate
her for her world leading time,” he
said. “She and the other girls set the
block for us, so we just have to con-
tinue to keep it going. But I’m glad to
be here and competing at such a high
level with a person like her.”

ae,
SHAMAR SANDS


PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS



Champion Dipl

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WATCH out. Here come the
Westminster Diplomats.

They’re celebrating as back-to-
back Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools’ senior
boys basketball champions.

“The preparation for this season
began immediately after the last
championship last year,” said coach
Geno Bullard. “It’s easy to get the
boys focused because instead of
being the underdogs team, we’re the
team that everybody was preparing
to beat.

“So it was easy to get everybody
focused and for us to retain our
title. But we had more pressure on
us because they had us ranked as
the number one team (in the
Bahamas) so everybody was gun-
ning for us. So we had to be on our
A game everytime we came to

play.”
Grade

Give the Diplomats an A grade
for their accomplishment, consider-
ing that they didn’t get to face the
much anticipated rematch with the
Jordan Prince William Falcons.

The Falcons, the previous two-
time champions, didn’t make the
playoffs because the BAISS
penalised them for what they called

COACH GENO BULLARD



using an illegal player.

Matched instead against the sur-
prising Kingsway Academy Saints in
the best-of-three championship
series this week at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium, the Diplomats had to
forge a gallant come-back by their
rivals after they blew a 20-point lead
in game one.

In game two, Westminster played
like true champions and they never

Freedom Farm

Standings

(Week 5)

Here’s the current standings for Freedom Farm going into week five:

T-BALL DIVISION

Sea Grapes
Coco Plums
Jujus
Guineps
Dillies

COACH PITCH

Bees

Boas
Sandflies
Mosquitoes
Wasps

Green Turtles

9-10 DIVISION

Dolphins
Octopus
Barracudas
Red Snappers
Turbots

Eels

11-12 DIVISION

Wild Dogs
Conchs

Divers

Nassau Groupers
Hurricanes
Iguanas

Blue Marlins
Whit Crowns
Green Parrotts

AAR WHRYNR ©

13-15 DIVISION

Silver Jacks
Owlz
Racoons
Stingrays
Potcakes
Sharks

16-18 DIVISION

Arawaks 2 0
‘Tainos 1 1
Caribs 0 2
Lucayans

WINS LOSSES

STREAK

W6
Ll

WINS LOSSES

Here’s a look at the recent results of games played:

T-Ball Won
Friday Jan. 30th

Saturday Jan. 31st
Coach Pitch Won
Friday Feb. 6th

Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th

Turtles
Bees
Boas

9-10 Division Won

Friday Feb. 6th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Sunday Feb. 8th

Octopus
Dolphins
Octopus
Turbots
11-12 Division Won
Wednesday Feb. 4th
Tied score Friday Feb. 6
Saturday Feb. 7
Saturday Feb. 7
Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Saturday Feb. 7th
Sunday Feb. 8th

Sunday Feb. 8th

Tguanas
Marlins
Conchs
Dogs
Conchs
Groupers
Marlins
Tguanas
Groupers



Coco Plums
Sea Grapes

Loss

Dillies
Coco Plums

Loss

Wasps
Boas
Wasps

Loss

Red Snappers
Barracudas
Eels

Red Snappers

Loss

Crowns
Tguanas
Divers

Parrots

Divers
Hurricanes
White Crowns
Parrots

White Crowns

gave Kingsway Academy any glim-
mer of hope of dethroning them.
For Bullard, he noted that when
comparing the two teams, he felt
last year’s squad was a “very good
one,” but the difference this year
was the fact that “we had a year’s

experience.”
Cold

“We came in cold turkey (last
year) and we had to learn a lot from
our mistakes. The loss we suffered
to Prince William at their home
really shook us up,” Bullard lament-
ed.

“So every time we came to play,
we came with our A game. Last
year, we didn’t have that to gauge
on. Now this year, we had all of last
year’s experience to get us in shape
and prepared mentally for the task
that was ahead of us this past sea-
son.”

Heading into the prestigious
Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic
that will get started on Monday,
Bullard and his Diplomats are still
ranked at No.1 according to the poll
released weekly by Ozzie Simmons
of Grand Bahama.

Does that mean that the Diplo-
mats have a shot at winning the
title? Better still, can you go all the
way and win it?

Tribune Sports asked coach Geno
Bullard. He said:

“We can go as far as we prepare

ourselves mentally to go,” he
quipped. “But we are going to be
mentally prepared for the challenge
because we want to come out there
and compete to the best of our
capability and represent our
school.”

Hard work, determination and
dedication are three key factors that
Bullard feels will make the differ-
ence in their success or failure.

“We just have to take every game
one at a time and don’t get ahead of
ourselves,” he pointed out.

Going into the tournament,
Bullard has some concern for his big
man, Rashad Morley, along with his
son, guard Geno Bullard Jr, who are
nursing slight ankle injuries.

Other than that, Bullard said they
have the reserves — most of those
players have benefited from being a
part of Bullard’s No Bull Summer
Programme — who can fill their

shoes.
Addition

In addition to Morley and Bullard
Jr, No Bull also features Christorr
Strachan, Larry Smith, Adrian Sher-
man, Shaquille Bain, Thomas Mack-
ey and Marako Lundy.

Bullard also boasts the fact that
Sham Moss and Anvon Ferguson,
both of Kingsway Academy, also
play in the programme. So does
Colin Cartwright, of St John’s.

And from the junior division,

omats go two straight!

there’s Weston Saunders and Regi-
nald Ferguson from the champions
and Jabari Wilmott from runners-up
St Augustine’s College.

Westminster, one of the youngest
schools in the BAISS, was hoping to
build on the newest dynasty they
have just established with the
junior boys and the junior girls mak-
ing a run at the championship as
well.

Junior

Unfortunately, the junior boys
didn’t survive in the playoffs and
were ousted, while the girls, who
have only been in operation since
October, fell short when it counted
the most.

But Bullard said the achievement
of the senior boys, who will only be
losing three players, will be the cata-
lyst for the rest of the teams in their
quest to get to the top.

“The junior boys did very well,
but during the playoffs, we had one
bad game and it cost us. But it’s
good for them to learn for the next
season,” he stated.

“With the junior girls, I’m very
proud of them because they only
got started this year, so hopefully
they can learn from their mistakes.”

As they get set for Hugh Camp-
bell, Bullard said he only wants his
players to stay focused and take one
game at a time and they should be
able to go after another title.

BLAST FROM THE PAST

REMEMBER these former outstanding sprinters?
‘Blast From The Past’ takes you back to the
1970s when these youngsters were starting to
make a name for themselves in track and field.

Can you identify any of them?

(The Tribune file photos)










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THE WEATHER REPORT k 4 = {7

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SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14th, 2009, PAGE 11

INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

MARINE FORECAST
Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.






















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High:77° F/25°C ae ee Partly sunny. Partly cloudy. Breezy with plenty of Sunshine. Mostly sunny and Partly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Athens S211 42/5 c 49/9 39/3 F Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
fia g “61°F/16°C Sew sun. pleasant. and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection. Auckland 73/22 57/13 pc 68/20 55/12 c
i OW: OT” @ « High: g2° High: 82° High: 79° High: 75° Bangkok 97/36 77/25 pc 98/36 77/25 s
c 4 OG » 740 - 770 a . B58 pao Barbados 85/29 74/23 pec 85/29 74/23 s
TAMPA oe a eraaseemm | pemotene Low: 70 Low: 69 Low: 62 Low: 64 SS ESS Barcelona 51/10 39/8 s cio 383s) MU Va te
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High: 76° F/24° C ee 68°-61° F High _Ht(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.) peat eee oe ea
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ey @ s : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:51pm. 2.7 4:28pm. -0.3 Berlin 39/0 23/-5 sf 30/-1 23/-5 pc
} 1:07am. 23 5:04am. -0.1 Bermuda 67/19 58/14 pc 6518 60/15 pc
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3 AAG ? Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Sunday 13am. 21 Sodam. OT Brussels 39/3 34/1 sn 41/5 30/-1 pe
i a ~~ ABACO Temperature, wn 557 p.m. 0.0 Budapest 36/2 28/-2 sn 37/2 24/-4 pc
r. , — High: 77° F/25° C PGI sees cceatstes Oceeereetacetaaece acess 82° F/28° C Tanda i23lam 04 640am 02 Buenos Aires 93/33 73/22 s 97/36 77/25 pc : 4 .
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Low: 64° F/18°C @ = Precipitation _ bene a.m. Lala ed p.m. Casablanca 71/21 499 s 73/22 55/12 ¢ 60/44
As of 1 p.m. yesterday oo. 0.00" unset... .... ‘Vo p.m. Moonset..... ‘Vo a.m. Copenhagen 35/1 25/-3 s 36/2 29/-1 s —— (COLD)
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT alii Year to date Last New First Full Dublin 46/7 39/3 pe 46/7 41/5 sh
TEER @ High: 76° F/24° C Normal year to date... cescesseseeeeeeeeeees 2.48" - a - Frankfurt 37/2 30/-1 sn 36/2 28/-2 pe
ow: 67° F/19° Low: 64° F/18°C Ts om ie Geneva 32/0 29/-1 sn 32/0 22/-5 c
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@ i. Forecasts and graphics provided by ‘aij - = 5 Havana 85/29 62/16 s 85/29 62/16 s Showers gaa
MIAMI ELEUTHERA AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb.16 Feb.24 Mar.4 Mar.10 Helsinki 28/-2 21/-6 sf 27/-2 14/-10 pc T-storms ( A 31/66
= 5 High: 81° F/27°C SS High:81°F/27°C Hong Kong 79/26 70/21 pe 77/25 70/21 ¢ Rain beta Fronts
i. Low: 66° F/18° C NA AU 1g - ° ° Islamabad 60/15 44/6 1 7/21 42/5 s 4 Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and 7
High: 83° F/28° C Low: 66° F/19°C Istanbul 49/9 40/4 + 41/5 37/2 sn Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fitenfitentie
Low: 71° F/22°C Jerusalem 69/20 48/8 pc 71/21 49/99 s Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary angunfle
a4 ca Johannesburg 71/21 55/12 pe 75/23 57/13 s
KEY WEST = @ 2 CATISLAND Kingston 84/28 74/23 s 84/28 75/23 sh 0s [/03)) 10s 20s (B03!) 40s
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ppt cota _ ie ie ‘ London 41/5 34/1 pe 43/6 39/3 pc
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@ = Manila 90/32 74/23 pc 91/32 75/23 pc
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High: 83° F/28° C High: 81° F/27°C Moscow 32/0 28/-2 sn 34/1 28/-2 sn
Low: 71° F/22° C 6 7 Munich 25/-3 24/-4 sn 26/-3 17/-8 sn
ANDROS Low: 65°F/18°C Nairobi 88/31 55/12 pc 87/30 55/12 pc

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



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LONG ISLAND Rio de Janeiro 81/27 72/22

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High: 81° F/27°C Riyadh 75/23 52/11 s 79/26 56/13 s i
CA er ret Rome 1915 2012 po AGT BOL 8 jes. to Auto Insurance,
Today Saliniay ioiey saluniay Toty Satuntay a MAYAGUANA St. Thomas 82/27 73/22 s 82/27 73/22 s Z art choi +

High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W _- High: 82° F/28° C San Juan 97/36 72/22 pc 99/37 71/21 s 7 the sm CnOlce Is

FIC F/C FIC F/G FIC F/C FIC F/C FC FIC FIC F/C _ Low: 64° F/18°C San Salvador 90/32 68/20 s 90/32 71/21 ¢ st Management.
Albuquerque 50/10 27/-2 s 48/8 25/-3 Indianapolis 4677 31/0 po 41/5 25/3 c Philadelphia 46/7 28/-2 § 41/5 30/-1 pe CROOKED ISLAND /ACKLINS Santiago 90/32 57/13 s 91/32 55/12 s .
Anchorage Q7/-2 18/-7 c 27/2 19/-7 pc Jacksonville 72/22 56/13 pc 75/23 5713 t Phoenix 64/17 46/7 s 6015 42/5 pc ye j Santo Domingo 83/28 68/20 s 84/28 68/20 s .
Atlanta 66/18 49/9 po 62/16 44/6 Fr Kansas City 40/4 22/-5 34/1 21/6 po Pittsburgh 40/4 24/-4 po 38/3. -24/-4 sn RAGGEDISLAND High: 84" F/29°C = -_ wor ro C re ser : We ?
Atlantic City 46/7 21/6 s 43/6 21/6 pc _Las Vegas 5812 37/2 po 5442 35/4 pc Portland,OR 478 31/0 sh 47/8 35/1 pc High: 82° F/28°C Low: 67°F/19°C eave 40/4 EEE Sea ONESE . ——
Baltimore 48/8 30/-1 s 42/5 30/-1 pc _Little Rock 60/15 41/5 sh 57/43 37/2 s Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4 s 47/8 344 1 Low:63°F/17°C _—— ean ae eas erereparrnresaes () ,
Boston 37/2 23/-5 s 39/3 26/-3 pc LosAngeles 60/15 44/6 r 60/15 46/7 pc _ St Louis 52/11 35/1 c 38/3 26/3 pe : _ oe SaaS SDT SA DECEaD DOGS —41 | RANCE M ANAGEMENT
Buffalo 32/0 17/-8 sf 30/-1 16/-8 c Louisville 56/13 38/3 po 46/7 33/0 c Salt Lake City 36/2 24/-4 32/0 21/-6 sn GREATINAGUA Charleston, SC 72/22 5110 po 65/18 5140 t Memphis 62/16 47/8 sh 5442 37/2 s San Antonio 78/25 55/12 pc 68/20 52/11 pc High: 84° F/29°C ae 32/0 19/7 pe 31/0 16/-8 c (BATIAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Chicago 42/5 24/-4 po 33/0 23/5 sn Miami 81/27 66/18 pc 82/27 6518 s San Diego 60/15 49/9 r 61M6 49/9 po Low. 66°FA9°C Trinidad 98/31 73/22 t 93/98 73/99 t =
Cleveland 36/2 23/-5 pc 34/1 25/-3 sn Minneapolis 30/-1 14/-10 pc 27/-2 13/-10 ¢ San Francisco 53/11 43/6 r 54/12 47/8 4+ . ene 43/6 32/0 c 43/6 32/0 pe ~ Hew Providente Gren Boho Ahern Fauthera Frum
Dallas 69/20 38/3 po 5945 41/5 s Nashville 62416 42/5 po 5542 36/2 c Seattle 45/7 35/1 45/7 33/0 pc Vianga 39/0 25/-3 st 31/0 24/-4 sn 4 ibd) | BELT ASh-00 D4 3opets (Den “BoB CLE Gs
Denver 32/0 15/-9 sn 30/-1 13/-10 c New Orleans 71/21 62/16 t 71/21 5613 t Tallahassee 66/18 54/412 sh 71/21 5241 ¢ : j ! 5 1
Detroit 38/3 27/-2 pc 38/3 25/-3 sn New York 42/5 29/-1 s 43/6 31/0 pc Tampa 76/24 62/16 pce 76/24 60/15 pc ~ asa ae ayer a ve Be : Dl iN a ah = nH ih |
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 s 81/27 70/21 pc OklahomaCity 60/15 28/-2 pc 48/8 31/0 s Tucson 6317 41/5 s 5643 36/2 pc — —_—_——— —

Houston 73/22 53/11 t 68/20 5140 c¢ Orlando 77/25 6116 po 83/28 6015 pc Washington, DC 53/11 320 s 44/6 31/0 + he ee ee


PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS








NASSAU EVENTS

ve

THE picturesque Bahamas Embassy building situated on 2220 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington,
DC, 20008, formerly housed the Venezuelan Embassy. It was purchased by the Bahamas government from
Venezuela in 1974 after the Venezuelan diplomatic corps became too large to be housed in the building.




EMBASSY of the Bahamas, Washington, DC (I-r): Bridget McKay, second secretary and vice-consul; Monique
Vanderpool, second secretary and vice-consul; Bahamas Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipo-
tentiary; Rhoda M Jackson, Minister-Counsellor/Consul; Charice Rolle, second secretary/vice-consul; Chet D Ney-
mour, counsellor (economic and commerce).

(L-R) NESTA Pathirana, secretary to Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipotentiary; Rhoda
M Jackson, Minister-Counsellor/Consul: Cecile Lirag, Ambassador’s Secretary.

CAPTURED

thescene



by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP

ON

CAMERA

THE BAHAMAS STRENGTHENING

THE Bahamas is extensively represented in
the United States with an embassy in Washington
DC and consular offices in New York and Miami,
and a third to open in Atlanta shortly.

AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY

The Mission in Washington DC has a dual role.
As the embassy, it conducts bilateral activities with
the government of the United States and the gov-
ernment of Mexico. As the Permanent Mission to
the Organisation of American States, it addresses
all matters pertaining to political, economic, trade,
consular, development, security, and environmen-
tal affairs as they relate to the Bahamas.

In addition, the embassy provides advice on the
panoply of matters of interest to the Bahamas, in
consultation with the Ministry of National Securi-
ty, and contributes to the ministry's preparation
of country and meeting briefs (Organisation of
American States, CARICOM, Summit of the
Americas, et cetera).

Presently, the Mission is concentrated on such
matters as:

¢ illegal immigration (Cubans in detention, mon-
itoring legislative developments in the US)*

* Copyright issues (Cable Bahamas and the Spe-
cial 301 Review)

e The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative
(WHTI)

¢ Multi-dimensional security (security concerns
of small and island states)

¢ Women’s affairs

e Sustainable development

e Technical co-operation

¢ The Summit of the Americas Process

¢ The Conference on the Caribbean (The
Bahamas chairs Showcasing of the Caribbean com-
ponent)

e The ongoing activities to mark the 200th
Anniversary of the Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic
Slave Trade

¢ Other national and regional cultural activities
(school presentations, Bahamas Junkanoo Associ-

WASHINGTON, DC, January 21, 2009 — Pictured (I-r)

ation of Metropolitan-DC, et cetera.

The mission will also be involved in prepara-
tions for the upcoming Fifth EU-LAC Summit in
Peru in 2008, the Fifth Summit of the Americas to
be hosted by Trinidad and Tobago in 2009, and
negotiations for an aviation agreement with the
US.

ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Some of the noteworthy accomplishments of the
Mission over the last five years include:

¢ Chairing the OAS Committee on Administra-
tive and Budgetary Affairs July 2005 - June 2006)

e As committee chair, overseeing the critical and
contentious issues of increasing the quota contri-
butions of Member States and accounting for cost
of living adjustments (COLA)

¢ Representing CARICOM, along with Trinidad
and Tobago and Barbados, in the negotiations to
make the Inter-American Defence Board an enti-
ty of the OAS

e Full-fledged participation in the OAS Com-
mittee Against Terrorism

e Financial contributions to important OAS
processes (Haiti, terrorism, Peace Process)

e Increased participation in youth leadership
activities

e Taking lead in defending the Bahamas in US
copyright protection complaints

e Granting support to CARICOM candidates
for critical OAS posts such as that of the Assistant
Secretary-General, the Director of the Inter-Amer-
ican Institute for Co-operation in Agriculture
(ICA) and the Chair of the Executive Committee
of the Inter-American Committee on Women’s
Affairs (CIM)

¢ Contributing to the successful participation of
the Bahamian community in the DC Carnivals in
2005 and 2006, taking second and first, respective-
ly

e Chairing the showcase component of the Con-
ference on the Caribbean to be held in Washington,
DC, in June 2007.



at a private dinner at the University Club are Earl Godet

of E Godette and taxi-cab service in Freeport, Grand Bahama: Gloria Godet, international property specialist
with Real Estate Terrance, California; Bahamian Ambassador to the United States of America Cornelius A
Smith, Claire Smith; wife of the Bahamian Ambassador, Veronica Godet-Pierson of the Montgomery County
School Board, director of Union Middle School, Washington, DC.



(L-R) INGA Dean, consular assistant; Colleen Isaacs, accounts officer; Ambassador Cornelius A Smith,
Ambassador and Plenipotentiary; Faith Jasmine Lightbourne, receptionist/information officer; Rodel Vil-
lasenor, maintenance/chauffeur. Missing in photo is Charles Cameron Ferguson, Dharmadasa Hettiarachchi

and Christine Dean.

y=: For further information on THE SCENE Pictures please contact






PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.69SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 83F LOW 71F n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A FORMER prison officer was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday fol l owing his arraignment on a murder charge. Police have charged Jerome Bethel, 36, of Greenway Drive in the February 11 stabbing death of Gary Harold Gar diner. Gardiner, 49, a North Andros local councilman was reportedly stabbed to death on Williams Drive off Cowpen Road around 9 pm Wednesday. According to initial police reports, the deceased and another man got into a verbal altercation that turned violent in a yard on Williams Drive. A t some point during the row, Gardiner was stabbed multi ple times about the body. Gar diner died at the scene of the incident. His death marked the ninth homicide this year. Gardiner’s relatives described him as a calm and giving person. The other man involved in the altercation later drove to the East Street South Police Station it was reported. Bethel, who appeared before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez in Court 1, Bank Lane yesterday afternoon was not required to enter a plea to the murder charge. A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether J er ome Bethel appears in courto v er stabbing death of councilman The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY Former prison officer charged with murder Convicted thief makes a dash for freedom A CONVICTED thief’s dash for freedom endedq uickly on Bank Lane yesterday as he was taken before a magistrate whoa dded an additional year to his four-year prison term for the daring attempt. S hortly after Magistrate D errence Rolle sentenced Carlos Holbert to four years in prison yesterday, t he 21-year-old darted out of court 5, Bank Lane and, according to eyewitnesses, j umped several feet from t he top of the steps to the p avement in his attempt to avoid prison. Police on Bank Lane, however, quickly captured Holbert who was subsequently escorted back before Magistrate Rolle. Holbert, who had been c onvicted for stealing from a vehicle and was sen tenced to four years inp rison, was ordered to serve an additional year in jail for attempting to escape. O n the charge of steal i ng from a vehicle, court dockets state that Holbert on July 23, 2008, while at t he Blue Hills sporting complex stole from a 2000 Ford Escape, a black bag v alued at $50, a $35 girls w atch, two pairs of glasses v alued at $400 and other personal items belonging to Rose Ferguson. Prosecutors say that Holbert was convicted of a similar offence last year. JEROME BETHEL, 36, of Greenway Drive, is escorted to Court One, Bank Lane yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page six Man attempts to escape after being sentenced n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net REDUNDANT hotel employees criticised Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort for hiring foreign workers to do their jobs less than two months after their positions were terminated. But the Cable Beach hotel maintains the 12 foreigners are interns from the Surinam School of Hospitality carrying out a three month training exercise in various departments. And Minister of Labour Dion Foulkes understands the trainees are not being paid for their work. Nevertheless, the presence of non-Bahamians joining the hotel staff raised suspicion among the 150 employees who lost their jobs in December. The former employees shared their views in a press conference held by the Bahamas Hotel Maintenance and Allied Workers Union (BHMAWU Road, Thursday. BHMAWU president Lynden Taylor said: “They have foreign POLICE RES TRAINHANDCUFFEDMEN T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net POLICE arrested six men in connection with the seizure of $6 million worth of cocaine from the second Haitian vessel intercepted in the area of Great Inagua earlier this week. Police, Royal Bahamas Defence Force officers and US officials found more than 300 kilos of cocaine on the second boat. The second seizure came shortly after police confiscated 400 kilograms of cocaine, worth about $8 million, from a 77-foot wooden Haitian vessel off Inagua around 9 am the same day. The second find brings the total amount of cocaine found on the two boats to $14 million. This brings the total number of arrests for both drug busts to 12; five men and one woman were arrested in connection with the first seizure. n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@ tribunemedia.net A MAN died in his employer's pool at a home on Eastern Road yesterday morning in what police are investigating as a drowning incident. Up until press time last night the man, who is a gar dener believed to be in his late 40s to early 50s, was identified by residents on the scene as “Willy”. The inci dent occurred at a home immediately east of High Vista Drive. Eastern Road resident Jay Albury, who helped pull the drowned man out of his neighbour's pool, said around 10.15 am he heard his neighbour's pool cleaner screaming that someone was floating at the bottom of the Redundant employees criticise resort for hiring foreign workers TWO MEN who were handcuffed together got into a fist fight while being escorted from Court 5. Several police officers had to restrain the men and separate them from each other in the skirmish. Dion Foulkes SEE page six n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT Grand Bahama readers are requesting the return of The Tribune newspaper, which has been delivered for more than 40 years to the island. The Tribune office in Freeport has been inundated with calls from loyal readers since last Wednesday when delivery was officially discon tinued to Grand Bahama. “I miss The Tribune, that’s all I read, we love The Tribune,” said a woman caller. Due to the increased cost of air transport, newspaper delivery by Bahamasair was discon tinued to Grand Bahama, main land Eleuthera, Exuma, Crooked Island and Long Island. The Tribune is now available Grand Bahama readers want Tribune to return SEE page six Six arrested in connection with seizure of cocaine SEE page six Man dies in pool of employer SEE page six

PAGE 2

TEN church leaders are to co-operate in a bid to counter growing despair among Bahamians over the worsening financial crisis. Their churches will be thrown open as counselling centres as the economy tight ens and more people are thrown out of work. On Monday, a group of pas tors will announce their plans at a press conference to be held at New Covenant Bap tist Church. Bishop Simeon Hall, who said he has had to counsel nine potential suicides over the past week, told The Tri bune that an “ecumenical” approach is being taken to the problem. “Church leaders of all denominations will be taking part,” he said. “We are going to collabo rate on running crisis counselling centres because of the problems now being faced by ordinary Bahamian families.” He said other churchmen had been counselling poten tial suicides in recent days. “I have had nine, but most wanted someone to talk to in an effort to ease their trou bles. I think only two actually needed psychiatric help.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN SECTION Local News.............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Comics........................................................P8 Sports....................................................P9,10 Weather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGE n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net IT is the role of the media to “meddle and interfere” in order to keep politicians honest, MP for West End and Bimini Obie Wilchcombe said. Criticising the tendency of some politicians to use their influence to fill public service jobs with “political appointments”, Mr Wilchcombe said it is the media’s job to ensure elected officials do not “manipulate the process of good governance.” The MP and former tourism minister was contributing to the debate on the second reading of the Police Force Act 2009 on Wednesday in the House of Assembly. “Throughout the country, from the police force to the civil service and throughout every ministry of the government political appointments are evident. We go so far as shelving permanent secretaries if they do not speak our political language,” said Mr Wilchcombe. “I ask this question: How will we ever be ready to play a role in the everchanging global order if we dumb down the process and turn every position that is influenced by government into a political appointment? “There is room in government for political appointments, but we should steer clear of polluting the entire service with political hacks, political pimps or political misfits. I am diametrically opposed to such behavior.” The PLP ultimately abstained from the vote on the Police Force 2009 Act, citing that provision seven, which seeks to limit the tenure of the police commissioner and deputy commissioner, is unconstitutional because it removes their “security of tenure” and allows undue influence by the executive, the party said. The government strongly opposed this argument, stating that it has “no sound legal basis” and adding that appointing commissioners of police on a shorter contractual basis is a practice followed in many Commonwealth countries, including the United Kingdom and Australia. Speaking out against any politicisation of the civil service or the police force, Mr Wilchcombe said that filling public service roles with people on this basis rather than on merit will stifle the Bahamas’ readiness to join the global stage in the way that it should. “The media must keep the politicians honest. The media must meddle. The media must investigate, the media must not be afraid to expose those issues that contemplate the destruction of the orderly development of nation and our people. “Mr Speaker, the media could stop politicians from interference, from manipulating the process of good governance. The politicians will not in all cases keep themselves honest. It is the media – the people’s voice – that must,” he added. The MP charged that both political parties “must carry some guilt of having used of having used naked power to misuse and abuse the power of government.” Wilchcombe speaks out on new Police Force Act Obie Wilchcombe FREEPORT – An 11-month project came to fruition on Thursday with the official opening of the new bridge at the Lucayan National Park in eastern Grand Bahama. The event, attended by government officials and Bahamas National Trust representatives, was greatly anticipated as the bridge is expected to play a vital role in the tourism product of Grand Bahama. In attendance were Colonel John Blashford-Snell and Captain John Hinchliffe – both instrumental in creating the original nature walk and foot bridge at the park. Deputy Prime Minister Brent Symonette said: “The government of the Bahamas believes that our need for economic development must be kept in proper balance with the need to secure protection of the environment, including the biologi cal diversity of our islands.” He said there are plans in place to establish four or five new protected areas throughout the Bahamas and that the opening of the new bridge is “an excellent example of how development and conservation can and do co-exist in our country for the benefit of all.” The new structure replaces an older bridge that was completed in 1987 through a joint effort by local volunteers and Operation Raleigh (www.raleigh.org.uk Colonel Blashford-Snell was closely involved in the original project. He said: “It was a wonderful friendship between the people of Grand Bahama. We worked all over the Bahamas trying to help the National Trust. And indeed, we wish them well because they are preserving the heritage of these islands that is unique and so important for the coming generations.” Bahamas National Trust president Glenn Bannister said the bridge is a vital component to the Grand Bahama tourism product. “It is very important to bring our visitors out into nature. This kind of experience will bring them back, over and over again,” Mr Bannister said. “That is why we take particular interest in this project, and that is why it is so gratifying to have this opening in Grand Bahama.” Chairperson for the Grand Bahama region of the Bahamas National Trust Karin Sanchez shared the Trust’s plans for the park. “The bridge covering the creek is just one of the first things,” she said. “We would like to build a visitor centre here so that visitors to the park will fully experience it as a great place to come and enjoy the beauty of our island and our environment.” The 22-year-old original bridge was severely damaged during the hurricanes that struck Grand Bahama in 2004. As the condition of the bridge worsened, it became necessary to close it for safety reasons. The new bridge, which spans Gold Rock Creek, features a large covered observation deck. The bridge was constructed by local contractor Hartley Lowe of Bahamas Engineering and Dock Company Limited at a cost of around $230,000. It was financed by a $100,000 contribution from the Bahamas National Trust and donations by corporations and individuals. New bridge opened at Lucayan National Park Local churches to provide counselling during worsening financial crisis E r i k J . R u s s e l l / K e e n i M e d i a L t d Bishop Simeon Hall WHILE attending the official opening of the new bridge at Lucayan National Park, a group of government and Bahamas National Trust (BNT Bahama. L-R: Karin Sanchez, Chairperson, Grand Bahama Region, BNT; Robin Symonette, Honourary Secre tary of the BNT; Brent Symonette, Deputy Prime Minister of the Bahamas; Earl Deveaux, Minister of the Envi ronment; Glenn Bannister, President of BNT; Neil McKinney, Deputy President of BNT; Lynn Gape, Deputy Executive Director of BNT; and, Eric Carey Executive Director BNT. THE RIBBON cutting at the official opening of the new bridge at Lucayan National Park was conducted by Colonel John Blashford-Snell of Operation Raleigh and Bahamas National Trust Administrator and Educational Liaison Cecilia Bodie. Shown, L-R with students of Freeport Primary School are: Glenn Bannister, President, Bahamas National Trust; the Honourable Neko Grant, Minister of Public Works and Transport; Colonel Blashford-Snell; (at back Prime Minister of the Bahamas the Honourable Brent Symonette; and Minister of Housing the Honourable Kenneth Russell.

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter IMMIGRATION officials paid an unannounced visit to the Straw Market yesterday to remind vendors that they w ill continue to search for i llegal immigrants working i n the market. Director of Immigration J ack Thompson said his team also wanted to check up on w hat is going on in the Straw M arket. Strategise “We will identify certain l ocations and certain sites for ourselves and we will then know how to strategise and h ow to move from there,” Mr Thompson said. He said it is important that h is officers not apprehend someone every time they e nter the market, so as to a void creating the impress ion that they are “all about raids”. “Sometimes you just want to go and survey, see what is happening and get a feel for things. “You can not operate immigration from Hawkins H ill’s fourth floor; sometimes y ou have to come on the ground,” Mr Thompson said. “We got some complaints f rom a few taxi drivers that there are a number of other locations to be checked such as Potter’s Cay dock, further d owntown, and we will survey the areas,” he said. Mr Thompson said that as t he efforts to weed out illegal i mmigrants progress, he is h opeful that the public will continue to support the department. When the people see that y ou are actually trying and t hat you want to do things right, they notice. “There were a few in there who didn’t want to raise their heads and say good morning, so it is the little things that these random walkabouts point out to us,” he a dded. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009, PAGE 3 STAFF at the Post Office headquarters on East Hill Street decided t o leave their posts yest erday morning after a p roblem with the airconditioning system left a bad odour throughout parts of the building. According to Assist ant Postmaster Robert S umner, staff gathered o utside the building u ntil around 11.30am when the problem was fixed. H e said “water spilled” from the airconditioning system sometime before people a rrived at work for that day. “It did have an odour, ( but it was) cleaned up i n a short period of t ime,” he said. n B y NATARIO McKENZIE T ribune Staff Reporter JUSTICE campaigners Greg and Tanya C ash are allowed to file an appeal in the Court of Appeal against a declaration nam-i ng them “vexatious litigants”. I n a short ruling handed down yesterd ay morning, Senior Justice Anita Allen said that the couple did not need leave of her court to appeal the order. T he couple were declared vexatious liti gants by Justice Allen on January 12 and intend to appeal the order. Justice Allenh ad ruled that the couple be barred from c ontinuing any legal action or having any one initiate any proceedings on their behalf. She said that the couple could initiate p roper proceedings with leave of the court. The Attorney General's Office had filed an application in Supreme Court against t he couple, seeking a court ruling that they be barred from taking any further legal action because most of their actions are vexatious and amount to an abuse of the court’s process. Justice Allen’s written ruling stated that “there are no provisions in the Supreme Court Act which declare such a ruling final, nor are there provisions in the Court ofA ppeal Act, which prohibits the institu tion of such an appeal or require the leave of the Supreme Court to institute such an a ppeal.” F ollowing the ruling Mrs Cash gave t hanks to God for the latest development in their favour. The Cashes have waged a six-year legal b attle against the Baptist education author ities. The matter stems from the alleged w rongful dismissal of Mr Cash from his job as a physical education teacher at Jordan Prince William High School in October 2002. Since then, he and his wife have made a n umber of allegations, including that their human and constitutional rights were b reached. The Cashes made headlines last October when President of the Court of Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer ordered Mrs Cash toe ither publish an apology for scandalising the court or be jailed for contempt. Mrs Cash refused to publish an apology. However, she was not jailed for contempt as a differently constituted court said that the issue was “done with.” Immigration officials visit the Straw Market Staff leave posts after problem with office air conditioning In brief Greg and Tanya Cash can file appeal against declaration Greg and Tanya Cash D IRECTOR OF IMMIGRATION J ack Thompson walks through the Straw Market yesterday. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Assistant Superintendent Walter Evans said police believe the two drug busts are linked. ASP Evans said while t he find was not the biggest in r ecent history, it was certainly o ne of the largest drug seizures i n the southern Bahamas. The drugs and the people i nvolved were expected to arrive in New Providence yes-t erday morning. P olice have made several significant drug seizures in N ew Providence and the Family Islands over the past few weeks. S ix people were arrested l ast week and have been charged in the seizure of some $200,000 worth of marijuana. P olice also seized $3.75 million w orth of cocaine in Freeport and $100,000 worth of m arijuana in Andros this month. pool. He and the pool cleaner, Hubel Duncombe, r ushed to his neighbour's pool where he saw the v ictim floating face down at the bottom of the p ool, his broom next to him. "I pulled him to the (pool's t wo of us pulled him out," he said. According to Mr Albury, the victim was not breathing when he was pulled from the pool. W hen T he Tribune a rrived around 11 am y esterday, police were taking statements and t he body was still at the scene. According to one of the investigating officers, Detective Corporal Adderley, police found the v ictim lying facedown next to the pool. He said EMS were called, who unsuccessf ully attempted to resuscitate the victim. "At this point in time, we can only assume t hat he would have drowned. We will await a utopsy results to determine whether drowning w as the cause or whether he might have been o n some other substance," he said. He said foul play was not suspected and there w ere no signs of injury on the victim. Police suspect the victim may have been in the pool for atl east 20 minutes. D etective Adderley said the victim would be taken to hospital to be officially declared dead. workers on the property in the same positions, right now. So a lot of people have a major problem with this.” H e called on the Immigration Department to crack down on employers hiring foreigners when Bahamians are out of work. He added: “They are all about the Haitians and Jamaicans, but don’t want to follow up these people for a majorc ompany it’s ridiculous. What’s good f or one is good for the next one.” T he union leader also criticised Labour Minister Dion Foulkes for failing to recognise the BHMAWU as a legal union, and for not calling a poll to allow hotel employees to choose membership in the BHMAWU or the Bahamas Hotel Catering and Allied Workers Union( BHCAWU), which is recognised by government and Sandals. He further alleges many of the workers made redundant by Sandals were BHMAWU officers and should not have b een let go. B ut the Minister maintains the BHMAWU has not had an election of officers since its registration in 2001 for employees of the former Holiday Inn and Resorts International, and has failed to file annual returns as required under the Industrial Relations Act. T he Minister said: “I have referred the matter to the Attorney General to get a final determination on the matter and at that time I will issue a formal statement to the public.” M r Foulkes is waiting for a ruling t o be returned by the Court of Appeal before making a decision about the poll. Further criticism of Sandals by the BHMAWU president includes the sacking of three pregnant women, two of whom have not been offered their jobsb ack, according to Mr Taylor. But the Minister of Labour said Sandals has assured him that all three pregnant women had been offered their jobs back without any change of status. o nlineat www.tribune242.com and will be posted for readers by 2pm on the day of publication. There were mixed reactions from persons about the c hanges. O ne caller said that older persons enjoy reading the actual newspaper. “What about those elderly persons and adults who do not have a computer or know how t o operate a computer.” H owever, another caller believes that the online Tribune would be beneficial to students since most young peo-p le have access to the Internet. “It is free and it would be good for the environment because there would be less waste and less paper usage,” said the caller. Many persons hope that the n ewspaper will be able to return to Grand Bahama. “The Tribune has not aband oned its loyal Grand Bahama readers and is particularly concerned about those who eitherd o not have a computer or do n ot like to read a newspaper on line,” said Tribune publisher Eileen Carron. “We are still e xploring ways to get the daily newspaper to Grand Bahama. However, currently air trans-p ort is too expensive.” Redundant employees criticise resort for hiring foreign workers FROM page one t here is sufficient evidence a gainst Bethel for him to stand trial in the Supreme Court. His attorney, Tai Pinder, a sked the magistrate to order that Bethel be housed in the hospital section of Her Majesty’s Prison. She told the court that Bethel worked as a prison officer between 1995 and2 001. The prosecutor S ergeant Sean Thurston asked that the case be adjourned to March 3 for the commencement of a preliminary inquiry in Court 1, Bank Lane. Bethel was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. Grand Bahama readers want The Tribune to return FROM page one F ROM page one Former prison officer charged AS A part of its ongoing commitment to the a dvancement of education in the Bahamas, Scotiabank is supporting the efforts of gradeo ne and two teachers and students at the M able Walker Primary School. The bank gave the school a financial dona tion towards a mini-fair which is scheduled for February 14 on the school grounds. S hantel Hield, a grade two teacher and teacher of the year (2008-2010 Walker Primary School, expressed her appre-c iation to Scotiabank for supporting this event. Mrs Hield said it is the school’s intent this year to give students as much exposure as possible and to encourage learning with am ore hands-on approach. The proceeds from t he mini fair will go towards financing a field trip to Busch Gardens which is a part of this years science curriculum. PICTURED IN THE PHOTO (L-R are Shantel Hield, grade two teacher and teacher of the year 2 008-2010 at Mable Walker Primary School, and K evin McKinney, senior manager of Scotiabank’s m ain branch. Scotiabank donates funds to Mable Walker Primary School Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. Man dies in pool of employer FROM page one Six arrested in connection with seizure of cocaine FROM page one n PROVIDENCIALES, Turks and Caicos PREMIERMichael Misick said Friday he will step down as leader of the Turks and Caicos at the end of March, citing a lack of support for his scandal-plagued government, according to Associated Press. The surprise announcement came hours after the Caribbean nation's deputy premier and finance minister resigned, citing differences with the colorful Misick, whose jet-set lifestyle has helped turned the Turks and Caicos into a celebrity hotspot but has fueled corruption alle gations. "What the country and our party needs now more than ever is stability and certainty," Misick said during a press conference in his office. "I have tried in recent weeks to create this. It now appears to me that the divide within the party is too deep." Misick said he would step down as party leader on Feb. 28 and resign as premier on March 31. Embattled Turks and Caicos premier to resign

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n By LINDSAY THOMPSON HUI LUANGYU, ViceP remier of the State Council of the People’s Republic of C hina, will make an official visit to the Bahamas from Tuesday, February 17 to Thursday, February 19. Vice-Premier Hui will be received by Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of For eign Affairs Brent Symonette and Ambassador of the People’s Republic of China Hu Dingxian at the Lynden Pin dling International Airport on Tuesday. The Vice-Premier will pay courtesy calls on GovernorGeneral Arthur Hanna and Mrs Beryl Hanna at Govern m ent House and Prime Min ister Hubert Ingraham at the Cabinet Office, Churchill Building. Mr Symonette and the VicePremier will participate in a signing ceremony in the Cabinet Room of the Cabinet Office, which will be followed by an official dinner at Atlantis Resort on Paradise Island. On Wednesday, Mr Symonette, Bahamas Government officials, Vice-Premier Hui and his delegation will depart the Lynden Pindling International Airport for Freeport, Grand Bahama. They will be received by government ministers, parliamentarians and officials and p rincipals of the Grand Bahama Port Authority, and will attend an official luncheon at Our Lucaya Resort. The delegation will be taken on a tour of the Freeport Container Port and the Grand Bahama Shipyard. An official dinner will be hosted by the Vice-Premier in the Churchill Room of Our Lucaya Resort. The Vice-Premier and his delegation are expected to depart the country on Thursday, February 19. The government of the Bahamas and the People’s Republic of China (PRC established diplomatic relations with the signing of a Joint Communiqu on May 23, 1997. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net AFTER proving a hit with school children across New Providence, Sky Climbers a Paradise Island-based rock climbing experience will be reaching new heights come February 21. The programme, funded by the Butch Kerzner Foundation – a charitable entity set up by the widow of the late son of Atlantis CEO Sol Kerzner – has been enjoyed by hundreds of Bahamian children since it opened last September to schools and youth groups. Now, the free experience is extending its opening hours to include weekends and inviting all children between the ages of seven and 18 years and their parents to come and join the heights-scaling fun. Sky Climbers operations consultant Nick Sagar told The Tribune that he hopes children who participated with a group will be keen to pit themselves against the walls a second time, while those young people whose schools did not take part in the programme can now also test their agility. “We don’t want to stunt those kids who came before by saying, ‘You’re going to have to wait until next year when your class comes back to do it again’,” said he said. Mr Sagar, a accomplished rock-climber, taught the demanding sport to the late Butch Kerzner, designing personalised climbing walls which were installed in the former Atlantis Chief Executive’s home. With it having been such a passion of Mr Kerzner’s, his widow, Vanessa Kerzner, wanted to see it become one of the activities promoted to young people under the umbrella of the foundation named in his honour. Mr Sagar said the project has been an “incredible success” so far and he anticipates an even greater response when it opens it doors to another round of adventurous young Bahamians. Starting on February 21, any children within the specified age range interested in getting involved can turn up at the site, located on the grounds of the old Club Med resort on Paradise Island, and be accommodated on a first-come-first-served basis, said Mr Sagar. Those under 14 must be accompanied by a parent. Parents are also welcome to test their agility and strength on the walls. In 2008, 670 children participated in the rock-climbing experience. Schools are still being encouraged to sign up for a session if they have not already. “We want to reach out to more schools,” said Mr Sagar. “It’s free and they just need to transport the kids to us.” Sky Climbers is open from 9am 5pm. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009, PAGE 7 Sky Climbers ‘reaching for new heights’ G RAND BAHAMA T he management team at Pelican Bay at Lucaya joined in the jubilation of having one of its long-time staff members, Stan-l ey Williams, walk away as Employee of the Year at the 13th Annual Cacique Awards. M r Williams is a bell captain and a three-plus year employee at Pelican Bay. Della Bridgewater, Pelican Bay's front office m anager, said: "This is a great achievement for Stanley. We celebrate with him. I look forward t o continued work with him. And with this achievement under his belt, I know that Stanley will serve as an ever bigger Pelican Bay evange l ist amongst guests and employees." The management team is pictured by the poolside at Pelican Bay at a press reception sponsored by the Grand Bahama Island Tourism Board, Ministry of Tourism and Pelican Bay to recognise Cacique winners and runners-up. Mr Williams (fifth from leftl-r G iovanni Sands, engineering manager; Marva Munroe, sales manager; Della Bridgewater, front office manager; Magnus Alnebeck, general man-a ger; Julie Paice, purchasing manager; Patra Albury, financial controller, and Sybilene Coope r, executive housekeeper. Missing are Melissa Carroll, revenue/reserva tions manager and Allan Scavella, director of s ecurity. Mr Williams hails from Abaco and is married. H e and his wife Jane have five sons. He spends his spare time in church and playing basketball and golf. T he Cacique Awards was a prime event during National Tourism Week. The purpose of the Cacique Awards is to recognise the roles played by those individuals and organisations whose performance or products have consistently made a positive impact on the quality and the growth of tourism in the Bahamas. SHARING IN THE JOY OF A CACIQUE AWARD L y n d a h W e l l s / P h o t o V ice-Pr emier of the State Council of People’ s Republic of China to visit INSIGHT For the stories behind the news, read Insight on Mondays

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TRIBUNE E XCLUSIV E Shamar’s win streak hurdles on n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net V eteran sprinter, ‘Gold en girl’ Chandra Sturrup is proving why she’s known for her quick start. At the International PSD Bank Meeting in Duesseldorf, Germany, yesterday, Sturrup clocked 7.17 seconds to match both the world leading time and the meet record, which are held by American Angela Williams. The most significant thing is Williams was in the race. She had to settle for third in 7.22, just behind British Virgin Island’s Tahesia Harrigan, who ran 7.21 for another second place finish. It was good,” said a 37-yearo ld Sturrup during an exclusive interview with The Tribune yesterday. “I felt good. I thought I would have ran that time in my last race, but I was just glad that it finally came out.” For Sturrup, the time was gratifying because it helped her to get over the problems she was experiencing for the three weeks before she headed to Europe. “I’m starting to come back into my element,” she stressed. “Having tied the world leading time was a great confident booster going into the outdoor season.” Although some of the big names in the athletic world are not competing indoors this year, Sturrup said she has been pleased with the progress she has made in each race she ran. Knowing my past in the 60 m etres, I’m not surprised,” she n oted. “I know I can run a good 60 metres and the field has been pretty good. “There’s not a bunch of Americans running in the race, but I have one of my training partners and so I know the work we’ve been doing in practice, so it’s coming along. I’m enjoying it.” While her final indoor meet is in Birmingham on February 21, Stur rup is hoping that she can secure a lane to run in a meet in Stockholm, Sweden, on February 18. While she has been holding her own on the track, Sturrup said she’s pleased to watch the accomplishment of hurdler Shamar S ands. “I told him after the race t hat the Bahamas was representing t onight,” she noted. “Of course he (set a personal record race and he has been running very well. Hopefully he can feel very good about himself because he has been coming around...So I’m very happy for him.” C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 P AGE 10 Champion Diplomats go two straight! LOUISIANA TECH CENTER MAGNUM ROLLE (15 (AP Photos: Douglas C Pizac NCAA: Ma gn um Rolle injured in 60-52 loss to Utah State (TOP Louisiana Tech center Magnum Rolle (15 Bahamas, scores against Utah State forward Gary Wilkinson (55 N CAA college game Saturday, February 7, 2009, in Logan, Utah. Utah State defeated Louisiana Tech 60-52... B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L : : N N P P W W B B A A R R E E S S U U L L T T S S THE New Providence Wom en’s Basketball Association continued its regular season on Thursday night at the DW Davis Gymnasium with two exciting games. In the opener, the Electro Telecom Cybots Queens defeated theC ollege of the Bahamas Lady Caribs 65-57. Natasha Miller shot 14-of-18 from the field and finished with a game high 31 points to lead the Queens. Christine Sinclair shot 7of-15 from the field for 16 points for the Lady Caribs. In the nightcap, the two finalists from last year’s championship series hooked up with runners-up Sunshine Auto Cheetahs came from a 41-39 halftime to pull off a 100-91 win over the defending champions Johnson Lady Truckers. Audrey Martin, who delighted the crowd with her dazzling moves and behind the back pass es, shot 11-16 from the field for a game high 33 points in the Cheetahs’ win, their second over the Lady Truckers this season. For the Lady Truckers, veteran guard Glenda Gilcud scored 31 points to leads two other players in double figures. Shantel Rolle had 25 points and Latoya Rolle added 19 points. Here’s a look at Saturday’s schedule: 7:30 pm Electro Telecom Cybots vs Sunshine Auto Cheetahs. B B A A S S K K E E T T B B A A L L L L : : N N P P B B A A S S C C H H E E D D U U L L E E THE New Providence Basket ball Association will play a double header tonight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium. At 7 pm, the Entertainers will meet the Foxies' Pros. At 8 pm, the Johnson's Trucking Jumpers and the Electro Telecom Cybots at 8 pm. T T E E N N N N I I S S : : B B O O U U R R N N E E A A T T K K I I N N S S O O N N A A P P P P R R E E C C I I A A T T I I O O N N T T O O U U R R N N E E Y Y THE Gym Tennis Club will host the Dr. Eric Bourne-Ron Atkinson Appreciation Tennis Tournament at the Gym Tennis Club from February 21-March 5. The tournament is opened to all local male and female tennis players and there are several categories inclusive of the men’s open, 45’s and 55’s singles, ladies’ open singles, men’s doubles and mixed pairs. The entry fee is $15 for each singles and $10 per person for each doubles. The draw will be held at the club at 7 pm on Thursday, February 19. Entry forms must be submitted to the club. SPORTS IN BRIEF GOLDEN GIRL Chandra Sturrup gets ready to compete at the August Beijing Olympic Games in China... (File photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune staff ‘Blast From The Past’ See page 10 n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net ANOTHER 60m hurdles race, another victory for 23year-old Olympian Shamar Sands. Yesterday at the Interna tional PSD Bank Meeting in Duesseldorf, Germany, Sands posted his third straight victory in four meets on the European indoor circuit. His time: 7:50 seconds. “Honestly, I can say yea,” said Sands when asked if he was surprised at his performance so far in an exclu sive interview with The Tribune. always knew I could do it, but seeing it is totally different. I’m just thankful.” Coming off his second consecutive national record-breaking performance, Sands said he got a quick start and that propelled him to an easy victory with Netherlands’ Gregory Sedoc as his nearest rival, who finished the race in 7.54. “I got a better start. I don’t know why, but I had some problems with my start in the last two races,” he reflected. “I felt kind of sluggish coming out of the final. But it was still a good race. I just wasn’t as clean as I could have been going over the hurdles. But it’s still a fast time. I can take it.” With each race he competes in, Sands said he has been getting the challenge to force him to go out and execute his race. “The harder the line-up, the faster I see myself running,” he projected. “All of these guys over here are good so I love to compete against them.” On Sunday, Sands will be back in action. As a result of his recent success, he was invited to compete in another meet in Germany before he wraps up his indoor season on February 21 in Burmingham. Not only has Sands been successful so far, but veteran sprinter Chandra Sturrup has been doing her thing as well. (See headline story Sands had nothing but praise for the ‘golden girl’, who is now tied with the world’s fastest time of 7.17 seconds in the women’s 60m. “She has been in the game for a long time and at her age, she’s still competing at a high level, so I want to congratulate her for her world leading time,” he said. “She and the other girls set the block for us, so we just have to con tinue to keep it going. But I’m glad to be here and competing at such a high level with a person like her.” ‘Golden girl’ matches world leading time SHAMAR SANDS TRIBUNE E XCLUSIV E

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n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WATCH out. Here come the Westminster Diplomats. They’re celebrating as back-toback Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools’ senior boys basketball champions. “The preparation for this season b egan immediately after the last championship last year,” said coach Geno Bullard. “It’s easy to get the b oys focused because instead of being the underdogs team, we’re the team that everybody was preparingt o beat. “So it was easy to get everybody focused and for us to retain our t itle. But we had more pressure on u s because they had us ranked as t he number one team (in the Bahamas) so everybody was gun-n ing for us. So we had to be on our A game everytime we came to p lay.” Grade G ive the Diplomats an A grade for their accomplishment, consideri ng that they didn’t get to face the m uch anticipated rematch with the Jordan Prince William Falcons. T he Falcons, the previous twot ime champions, didn’t make the p layoffs because the BAISS p enalised them for what they called u sing an illegal player. Matched instead against the surprising Kingsway Academy Saints in t he best-of-three championship series this week at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the Diplomats had to f orge a gallant come-back by their r ivals after they blew a 20-point lead in game one. I n game two, Westminster played like true champions and they never gave Kingsway Academy any glimmer of hope of dethroning them. F or Bullard, he noted that when comparing the two teams, he felt last year’s squad was a “very good o ne,” but the difference this year was the fact that “we had a year’s experience.” Cold We came in cold turkey (last year) and we had to learn a lot from our mistakes. The loss we sufferedt o Prince William at their home really shook us up,” Bullard lamented. So every time we came to play, we came with our A game. Last year, we didn’t have that to gauge o n. Now this year, we had all of last year’s experience to get us in shape a nd prepared mentally for the task that was ahead of us this past season.” H eading into the prestigious Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic that will get started on Monday, Bullard and his Diplomats are still ranked at No.1 according to the pollr eleased weekly by Ozzie Simmons of Grand Bahama. D oes that mean that the Diplom ats have a shot at winning the title? Better still, can you go all the w ay and win it? Tribune Sports asked coach Geno Bullard. He said: We can go as far as we prepare ourselves mentally to go,” he quipped. “But we are going to be m entally prepared for the challenge because we want to come out there and compete to the best of our c apability and represent our school.” Hard work, determination and d edication are three key factors that Bullard feels will make the difference in their success or failure. We just have to take every game one at a time and don’t get ahead of ourselves,” he pointed out. G oing into the tournament, Bullard has some concern for his big man, Rashad Morley, along with his s on, guard Geno Bullard Jr, who are nursing slight ankle injuries. Other than that, Bullard said they h ave the reserves –most of those players have benefited from being a p art of Bullard’s No Bull Summer Programme – who can fill their shoes. A ddition In addition to Morley and Bullard Jr, No Bull also features ChristorrS trachan, Larry Smith, Adrian Sherman, Shaquille Bain, Thomas Macke y and Marako Lundy. B ullard also boasts the fact that Sham Moss and Anvon Ferguson, b oth of Kingsway Academy, also play in the programme. So does Colin Cartwright, of St John’s. A nd from the junior division, there’s Weston Saunders and Reginald Ferguson from the champions a nd Jabari Wilmott from runners-up St Augustine’s College. Westminster, one of the youngest s chools in the BAISS, was hoping to build on the newest dynasty they have just established with the j unior boys and the junior girls making a run at the championship as well. Junior U nfortunately, the junior boys didn’t survive in the playoffs and were ousted, while the girls, who h ave only been in operation since October, fell short when it counted the most. B ut Bullard said the achievement of the senior boys, who will only be l osing three players, will be the catalyst for the rest of the teams in their quest to get to the top. The junior boys did very well, but during the playoffs, we had one bad game and it cost us. But it’s good for them to learn for the next season,” he stated. With the junior girls, I’m very proud of them because they only g ot started this year, so hopefully t hey can learn from their mistakes.” As they get set for Hugh Campb ell, Bullard said he only wants his players to stay focused and take one game at a time and they should be a ble to go after another title. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Here’s the current standings for Freedom Farm going into week five: T T B B A A L L L L D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K Sea Grapes60_W6 Coco Plums42_L1 Jujus12_W1 Guineps13_L1 Dillies05_L5 C C O O A A C C H H P P I I T T C C H H W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K Bees50_W5 Boas 4 1 _ W1 Sandflies22_L1 Mosquitoes13_W1 Wasps14_L4 Green Turtles14_W1 9 9 1 1 0 0 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K Dolphins 5 1 _ W5 Octopus 51_W2 Barracudas 4 2_L1 Red Snappers 2 4_L2 Turbots24_W1 Eels 0 6 _ L6 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K Wild Dogs70_W7 Conchs71_W7 Divers65_L4 Nassau Groupers54_W3 Hurricanes43_L1 Iguanas 3 4 1 W1 Blue Marlins34_W2 Whit Crowns061L6 Green Parrotts 0 8_L8 1 1 3 3 1 1 5 5 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K Silver Jacks51_W2 Owlz321L1 Racoons 3 2 2 W2 Stingrays232L1 Potcakes 2 4 1L2 Sharks 0 32L1 1 1 6 6 1 1 8 8 D D I I V V I I S S I I O O N N W W I I N N S S L L O O S S S S E E S S T T I I E E S S S S T T R R E E A A K K Arawaks20_W2 Tainos 1 1 _ W1 Caribs02_L2 Lucayans Here’s a look at the recent results of games played: T T B B a a l l l l W W o o n n L L o o s s s s S S c c o o r r e e Friday Jan. 30thCoco PlumsDillies17-9 Saturday Jan. 31st Sea Grapes Coco Plums 14-11 C C o o a a c c h h P P i i t t c c h h W W o o n n L L o o s s s s S S c c o o r r e e Friday Feb. 6th TurtlesWasps11-10 Saturday Feb. 7thBeesBoas7-1 Saturday Feb. 7thBoasWasps10-0 9 9 1 1 0 0 D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n W W o o n n L L o o s s s s S S c c o o r r e e Friday Feb. 6thOctopusRed Snappers15-0 Saturday Feb. 7th Dolphins Barracudas8-4 Saturday Feb. 7thOctopusEels20-5 Sunday Feb. 8thTurbotsRed Snappers10-4 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 D D i i v v i i s s i i o o n n W W o o n n L L o o s s s s S S c c o o r r e e Wednesday Feb. 4thIguanasCrowns15-15 Tied score Friday Feb. 6 Marlins Iguanas 7-6 Saturday Feb. 7ConchsDivers15-0 Saturday Feb. 7 DogsParrots14-1 Saturday Feb. 7thConchsDivers12-0 Saturday Feb. 7thGroupersHurricanes18-3 Saturday Feb. 7thMarlinsWhite Crowns24-3 Sunday Feb. 8thIguanasParrots5-4 Sunday Feb. 8thGroupersWhite Crowns10-0 Freedom Farm Standings (Week 5) BLAST FROM THE PAST REMEMBER these former outstanding sprinters? ‘Blast From The Past’ takes you back to the 1970s when these youngsters were starting to make a name for themselves in track and field. Can you identify any of them? (The Tribune file photos Champion Diplomats go two straight! COACH GENO BULLARD

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MA Y AGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 61F/16C Low: 62F/16C Low: 64F/18C Low: 67 F/19C Low: 66F/18C Low: 70F/21C Low: 71 F/22C Low: 64F/18C High: 77F/25C High: 76F/24C High: 81 F/27C High: 80F/27C High: 81F/27C High: 78 F/26 High: 83F/28C Low: 65F/18C High: 77 F/25C Low: 66 F/19 High: 81 F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 63F/17C High: 82F/28C Low: 71 F/22C High: 83F/28C Low: 63 F/17C High: 79F/26C Low: 65 F/18C High: 81F/27C Low: 67F/19C High: 84 F/29C Low: 65F/18C High: 81 F/27C Low: 64 F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 66F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 67 F/19C High: 84F/29C High: 76F/24CFREEPOR T NASSAU MIAMI THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14TH, 2009, PAGE 11 THE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny. Partly cloudy.Breezy with plenty of sun. Sunshine. Mostly sunny and pleasant. High: 83 Low: 71 High: 82 High: 82 High: 79 AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel Partly sunny, breezy and pleasant. High: 75 Low: 70 Low: 69 Low: 62 AccuWeather RealFeel 89F The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 70F 83-77F 97-71F 79-58F 68-61F Low: 64 TODAYTONIGHTSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAYWEDNESDAY ALMANAC High .................................................. 82F/28C Low .................................................... 64F/18C Normal high ...................................... 77F/25C Normal low ........................................ 64F/18C Last year's high .................................. 81F/27C Last year's low .................................. 71F/22C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.68"Normal year to date ......................................2.48" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Feb. 16 Feb. 24Mar . 4 Mar . 10 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:46 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:21 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:08 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:24 a.m.2.54:15 a.m.-0.3 10:51 p.m.2.74:28 p.m.-0.3 11:07 a.m.2.35:04 a.m.-0.1 11:39 p.m.2.65:11 p.m.-0.1 11:53 a.m.2.15:54 a.m.0.1 ----5:57 p.m.0.0 12:31 a.m. 2.46:49 a.m.0.3 12:42 p.m. 2.0 6:48 p.m.0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco 89/3171/21s88/3171/21s Amsterdam37/232/0sn39/334/1r Ankara, Turkey45/734/1r48/832/0r Athens52/1142/5c49/939/3r Auckland73/2257/13pc68/2055/12c Bangkok97/3677/25pc98/3677/25s Barbados85/2974/23pc85/2974/23s Barcelona51/1039/3s50/1038/3s Beijing50/1032/0pc45/719/-7pc Beirut70/2162/16pc70/2160/15s Belgrade31/026/-3sn30/-126/-3c Berlin32/023/-5sf30/-123/-5pc Bermuda 67/1958/14pc65/1860/15pc Bogota68/2047/8t66/1847/8r Brussels39/334/1sn41/530/-1pc Budapest36/228/-2sn37/224/-4pcBuenos Aires 93/3373/22s97/3677/25pc Cairo75/2356/13pc77/2556/13s Calcutta 88/3166/18s92/3369/20s Calgar y15/-91/-17c14/-10-1/-18c Cancun84/2872/22pc86/3066/18s Caracas83/2868/20sh83/2869/20pcCasablanca 71/21 49/9 s 73/2255/12c Copenhagen 35/125/-3s36/229/-1s Dublin46/739/3pc46/741/5shFrankfurt 37/2 30/-1sn36/228/-2pc Geneva32/029/-1sn32/022/-5c Halifax32/010/-12c27/-214/-10cHavana 85/29 62/16 s85/2962/16s Helsinki28/-221/-6sf27/-214/-10pc Hong Kong 79/2670/21pc77/2570/21c Islamabad60/1544/6r71/2142/5s Istanbul49/940/4r41/537/2snJerusalem 69/2048/8pc71/2149/9s Johannesburg 71/21 55/12pc75/2357/13s Kingston 84/28 74/23s84/2875/23sh Lima84/2868/20c85/2967/19c London 41/5 34/1 pc43/639/3pc Madrid57/1330/-1s59/1534/1s Manila90/3274/23pc91/3275/23pc Mexico City81/2746/7s80/2643/6s Monterrey88/3161/16s86/3059/15sMontreal 25/-39/-12c27/-29/-12pc Moscow 32/028/-2sn34/128/-2sn Munich25/-324/-4sn26/-317/-8sn Nairobi88/3155/12pc87/3055/12pc New Delhi80/2654/12pc78/2551/10pc Oslo 23/-516/-8s19/-710/-12pc Paris 39/332/0r41/534/1pc Prague28/-225/-3sn28/-220/-6pc Rio de Janeiro81/2772/22r80/2671/21c Riyadh75/2352/11s79/2656/13s Rome43/628/-2pc45/730/-1s St. Thomas 82/27 73/22s82/2773/22s San Juan97/3672/22pc99/3771/21s San Salvador90/3268/20s90/3271/21c Santiago90/3257/13s91/3255/12s Santo Domingo83/2868/20s84/2868/20s Sao Paulo75/2362/16c76/2463/17r Seoul 49/930/-1r37/217/-8c Stockholm30/-125/-3c30/-123/-5s Sydney67/1963/17sh69/2064/17r T aipei 87/30 71/21s84/2872/22pc Tokyo61/1654/12pc66/1850/10r Toronto32/019/-7pc31/016/-8c Trinidad88/3173/22t83/2873/22t Vancouver43/632/0c43/632/0pcVienna 32/0 25/-3sf31/024/-4sn Warsaw36/234/1sn37/230/-1sn Winnipeg20/-6-2/-18c17/-8-1/-18c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C TodaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow, i -ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 50/1027/-2s48/825/-3c Anchorage27/-218/-7c27/-219/-7pc Atlanta 66/18 49/9pc62/1644/6r Atlantic City46/721/-6s43/621/-6pc Baltimore48/830/-1s42/530/-1pcBoston 37/2 23/-5s39/326/-3pc Buffalo32/017/-8sf30/-116/-8c Charleston, SC72/2251/10pc65/1851/10t Chicago42/524/-4pc33/023/-5snCleveland 36/2 23/-5pc34/125/-3sn Dallas69/2038/3pc59/1541/5s Denver32/015/-9sn30/-113/-10c Detroit38/327/-2pc38/325/-3sn Honolulu81/2770/21s81/2770/21pcHouston 73/22 53/11 t68/2051/10c HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C HighLowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 46/731/0pc41/525/-3c Jacksonville72/2256/13pc75/2357/13t Kansas City 40/4 22/-5c34/121/-6pc Las Vegas55/1237/2pc54/1235/1pc Little Rock60/1541/5sh57/1337/2sLos Angeles 60/15 44/6r60/1546/7pc Louisville56/1338/3pc46/733/0c Memphis62/1647/8sh54/1237/2s Miami81/2766/18pc82/2765/18s Minneapolis 30/-1 14/-10pc27/-213/-10c Nashville62/1642/5pc55/1236/2c New Orleans71/2162/16t71/2156/13t New York42/529/-1s43/631/0pc Oklahoma City60/1528/-2pc48/831/0s Orlando 77/25 61/16 pc83/2860/15pc Philadelphia46/728/-2s41/530/-1pc Phoenix64/1746/7s60/1542/5pc Pittsburgh40/424/-4pc38/324/-4sn Portland, OR47/831/0sh47/835/1pc Raleigh-Durham 66/1840/4s47/834/1r St. Louis52/1135/1c38/326/-3pcSalt Lake City 36/224/-4c32/021/-6sn San Antonio 78/25 55/12 pc68/2052/11pc San Diego60/1549/9r61/1649/9pc San Francisco53/1143/6r54/1247/8rSeattle 45/735/1s45/733/0pc T allahassee 66/1854/12sh71/2152/11r Tampa76/2462/16pc76/2460/15pc Tucson63/1741/5s56/1336/2pc Washington, DC53/1132/0s44/631/0r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold Warm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuWeather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP THE picturesque Bahamas Embassy building situated on 2220 Massachusetts Avenue, NW, Washington, DC, 20008, formerly housed the Venezuelan Embassy. It was purchased by the Bahamas government from Venezuela in 1974 after the Venezuelan diplomatic corps became too large to be housed in the building. THE Bahamas is extensively represented in the United States with an embassy in Washington DC and consular offices in New York and Miami, and a third to open in Atlanta shortly. A REAS OF RESPONSIBILITY The Mission in Washington DC has a dual role. As the embassy, it conducts bilateral activities with the government of the United States and the government of Mexico. As the Permanent Mission to the Organisation of American States, it addresses all matters pertaining to political, economic, trade, consular, development, security, and environmental affairs as they relate to the Bahamas. In addition, the embassy provides advice on the panoply of matters of interest to the Bahamas, in consultation with the Ministry of National Security, and contributes to the ministry's preparation of country and meeting briefs (Organisation of American States, CARICOM, Summit of the Americas, et cetera). Presently, the Mission is concentrated on such matters as: illegal immigration (Cubans in detention, monitoring legislative developments in the US) Copyright issues (Cable Bahamas and the Special 301 Review) The Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative (WHTI Multi-dimensional security (security concerns of small and island states) Women’s affairs Sustainable development Technical co-operation The Summit of the Americas Process The Conference on the Caribbean (The Bahamas chairs Showcasing of the Caribbean component) The ongoing activities to mark the 200th Anniversary of the Abolition of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Other national and regional cultural activities (school presentations, Bahamas Junkanoo Association of Metropolitan-DC, et cetera. The mission will also be involved in preparations for the upcoming Fifth EU-LAC Summit in Peru in 2008, the Fifth Summit of the Americas to be hosted by Trinidad and Tobago in 2009, and negotiations for an aviation agreement with the US. A CCOMPLISHMENTS Some of the noteworthy accomplishments of the Mission over the last five years include: Chairing the OAS Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Affairs (July 2005 June 2006 As committee chair, overseeing the critical and contentious issues of increasing the quota contributions of Member States and accounting for cost of living adjustments (COLA Representing CARICOM, along with Trinidad and Tobago and Barbados, in the negotiations to make the Inter-American Defence Board an entity of the OAS Full-fledged participation in the OAS Committee Against Terrorism Financial contributions to important OAS processes (Haiti, terrorism, Peace Process Increased participation in youth leadership activities Taking lead in defending the Bahamas in US copyright protection complaints Granting support to CARICOM candidates for critical OAS posts such as that of the Assistant Secretary-General, the Director of the Inter-American Institute for Co-operation in Agriculture (IICA of the Inter-American Committee on Women’s Affairs (CIM Contributing to the successful participation of the Bahamian community in the DC Carnivals in 2005 and 2006, taking second and first, respectively Chairing the showcase component of the Conference on the Caribbean to be held in Washington, DC, in June 2007. THE BAHAMAS STRENGTHENING BONDS IN THE UNITED STATES (L-R Pathirana, secretary to Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipotentiary; Rhoda M Jackson, Minister-Counsellor/Consul; Cecile Lirag, Ambassador’s Secretary. WASHINGTON, DC, January 21, 2009 – Pictured (l-r of E Godette and taxi-cab service in Freeport, Grand Bahama; Gloria Godet, international property specialist with Real Estate Terrance, California; Bahamian Ambassador to the United States of America Cornelius A Smith, Claire Smith; wife of the Bahamian Ambassador, Veronica Godet-Pierson of the Montgomery County School Board, director of Union Middle School, Washington, DC. (L-R Dean, consular assistant; Colleen Isaacs, accounts officer; Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipotentiary; Faith Jasmine Lightbourne, receptionist/information officer; Rodel Vil lasenor, maintenance/chauffeur. Missing in photo is Charles Cameron Ferguson, Dharmadasa Hettiarachchi and Christine Dean. EMBASSY of the Bahamas, Washington, DC (l-r Vanderpool, second secretary and vice-consul; Bahamas Ambassador Cornelius A Smith, Ambassador and Plenipo tentiary; Rhoda M Jackson, Minister-Counsellor/Consul; Charice Rolle, second secretary/vice-consul; Chet D Neymour, counsellor (economic and commerce


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