Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

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SPORTS STARTS ON PAGE ELEVEN

Handling of pornographic’ 3 tomes,
incident angers parents

Heated meeting
at primary school

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

PARENTS of children
attending a New Providence
Catholic primary school are
outraged over how adminis-
trators handled a “porno-
graphic” related incident that
occurred on campus.

Almost two weeks after the
unspecified “incident” hap-
pened, parents were called to
a special meeting at the school
on Monday night.

images of young children and
teenagers involved in traffic
accidents and in drug and sex
related situations.

The parents became
increasingly puzzled by the
nature of the meeting and
demanded an explanation for
the display of images.

When direct answers were
reportedly not forthcoming
from the school, the meeting
became heated.

Rumours started circulating
among the parents about an
incident that may have

one man dead

Another in custody
after incident in
Cowpen Road area

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



A "DOMESTIC DISPUTE" between two men in
the Cowpen Road area took a tragic turn leaving one
man dead and the other in custody, police said.

Although police would not reveal what sparked the
violent row, reports reaching The Tribune indicate it
may have stemmed from a “love triangle" involving a

woman.

According to a report by Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans, the incident unfolded on Williams Drive
around 9 pm Wednesday. Police said Harold Gardiner,
49, of North Andros and a 36-year-old man were having
a "verbal altercation" that escalated into a violent attack
in a yard on that street.

At some point during the row, Gardiner was stabbed

At the meeting, parents told
The Tribune, they were shown

Christie says PLP abstained
from final vote on Police Bill

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

multiple times about the body, ASP Evans said. EMS
was called and found Gardiner in the yard lifeless, lying
on his back, with multiple stab wounds about the body.

He was pronounced dead at the scene, ASP Evans
said.

SEE page eight

SEE page six



Bahamas Constitution
‘is a British enactment’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



PLP Leader Perry Christie maintains his
party abstained from the final vote on the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Act 2009
because a part of the Bill is unconstitu-
tional.

And despite the Bill being passed in the
House of Assembly Wednesday night, Mr
Christie vowed his party will continue to
protest until the clause that limits the ser-
vice of the Commissioner and Deputy Com-
missioner of Police to two five-year terms is
removed.

Although the PLP supported all but one of the provisions of

SEE page six



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE CONDITION of this sidewalk on Long Wharf is showing signs of serious
deterioration. The road was damaged by waves from rough seas last year.

Kerzner CEO

disappointed

with Tribune
lead story

GEORGE Markantonis,
President and CEO of Kerzner
International Bahamas
expressed extreme disappoint-
ment over the Tribune’s lead
story on Thursday.

Mr Markantonis said that
despite the resort’s very clear
statement that Mr Sol Kerzner
“simply hosted a luncheon to
introduce the Prime Minister
and Cabinet Ministers to new
members of the Kerzner Inter-
national board” and despite the
corroborating statements made
by those attending the lun-
cheon, the last paragraph of the
article implied that there are
pending layoffs at Atlantis tar-

SEE page six



THE Bahamas Constitution is a
“British enactment”, not a docu-
ment enacted by the people of The
Bahamas or its parliament, accord-
ing to Education Minister Carl
Bethel.

Mr Bethel made this observation
during his contribution to the debate
on the second reading of the pro-

SEE page eight



Perry Christie

worth more
UPN MRted IT
is seized

Olam et- 1012)

18-year-old in court on
attempted murder charge

AN 18-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on an attempted murder charge.

Police have charged Shavargo Sturrup, a resident of Union Village
Road off Wullf Road, with the attempted murder of Donovan Sturrup.
According to court dockets, the accused attempted to cause Sturrup’s
death on Saturday, January 31. According to reports, the victim was
shot in the chest while standing outside his home on Cox Way, off East
Street south, after he was approached by a man he knew. The two men
reportedly got into an argument, which escalated into a fight. A gun was
pulled and Donovan Sturrup was shot.

Shavargo Sturrup who was arraigned before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday was not required to enter
a plea to the attempted murder charge. He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and is expected back in court today for a bail hearing.

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MORE than $8 million
worth of cocaine was seized
by local drug enforcement
officers and US officials

Thursday morning in what
is being described as one of
the most significant cocaine
seizures in the Family
Islands.

According to police,
around 9 am Thursday Drug
Enforcement Unit Officer
along with US officials inter-
cepted and searched a 77-
foot Haitian wooden hull
vessel on the island of Great
Inagua. Over 400 kilos of

SEE page eight



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PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Fire badly damages

FLOP eM BtiCelMmOLEnl Onpe re



Firefighters
battle Wulff
Road area blaze
most of morning

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FIRE in the Wulff Road
area could not be contained
before it caused extensive

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To the Love of My Life:



damage to a nearby apartment
building.

Fire fighters spent most of
yesterday morning fighting the
blaze, which it was claimed
was Started when a Rastafari-
an lit a fire to roast peanuts.

The man was issued a warn-
ing by the fire fighters as light-
ing fires in a yard is illegal.

Press liaison officer Walter
Evans said the fire took place
opposite the FYP lumber
yard.

“The report came in around
9am and units arrived five
minutes after the call came in.
There was a two-storey build-
ing nearby and initial reports
were that someone was inside,
however after a search no one
was found.

“There were three apart-
ment units in the back of the
building.

“The rear unit was
destroyed and the other two
units received smoke dam-
age,” Mr Evans said.

He also denied claims that a
baby had to be rescued from
the building and that fire
hydrants in the area were dry,
forcing fire fighters to use
sewage water to contain the
blaze.

“There were four fire trucks
at this scene and if any fire
truck runs out of water, exca-
vator wells are used as there is
one located on nearby Mack-
ey street,” Mr Evans said.

seen anne TE ine off it ree



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

AG: Govt wants freedom of information bill
before parliament within ‘reasonable’ time

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

ATTORNEY General Michael
Barnett said that government is
still working on its proposal for a
freedom of information law, but is
committed to seeing a bill before
parliament within a “reasonable”

As I reflect upon the short time I’ve been privileged to know You,

[ can’t help but marvel at how lucky | must be.
Lucky to actually be around one the likes of You,

And amazed You'd share Your love with someone like me!

So as others prepare their chocolates, flowers and cute teddy bears,
I'll take a slightly different approach to which I hope You will like.

1) And publish these words even amidst my shy fears,

| And tell the whole world why You are the Love of my life...

I know | certainly didn’t deserve all the times You were there for me,

All those many times You would nurture and care for me.

Especially considering instances when | didn’t fully respect You,
Circumstances that led me to turn away and even neglect You!
But never once did You ever get fed up and make Your retreat,
Even after months of my filling Your head up with my unbeliet.
Unbelief in Your uncanny ability to bring order to my lowly existence,
So I thank You for not leaving me even amidst this foolish resistance.
| But instead You stood by me, and in doing so made me ten times stronger,
| You took the fear from inside of me, and now I’m frightened of love no longer.
I thank You so much for being the best thing to ever happen in my life,
And that's why You are and will always be the ultimate Love of my life...

Tenderness, gentleness, warmth, compassion,
Thoughtfulness, benevolence, unmatched affection:
You are the personification of all that is perfection...

| So Happy Valentine's Day to the one and only Love of my life,
Happy Valentine’s Day to my one and only Jesus Christ...

VV9g

(Written by a man after God's own heart)
Bless God Forever !!!



time. “Most democracies have
moved towards a Freedom of
Information Act and I think it
will be a good thing. We have five
years to put it in place so it is still
a part of our commitment,” Mr
Barnett said.

Freedom of Information laws
are intended to give citizens
access to information held by gov-
ernment and to create mecha-
nisms by which this information
can be obtained. In practice, all
such laws outline certain excep-
tions, often justified on the
grounds of national security.

The US passed its Freedom of
Information Act in 1966. Under
the act, all federal agencies are
required to comply with public
































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solicitations for information, and
are subject to penalties if they fail
to do so.

The UKR’s Act, passed in 2000,
gives citizens the right to demand
access to any information held by
a public authority.

Process

Mr Barnett said the process of
formulating such a law and get-
ting it passed by parliament takes
time.

“People make comments and
they revise it and change it and
modify it until they come up with
a product that everyone is happy
with. Then it has to be approved
by the government and then it

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Michael Barnett

has to go through the parliamen-
tary process,” he explained.

Mr Barnett said media organi-
sations will have the opportunity
to see the Bill before it becomes
law.

According to government’s
website, the Freedom of Infor-
mation Act, when enacted, is
expected to grant every person a
right, subject to certain restric-
tions, to access information held
by government departments,
agencies and other designated
bodies in receipt of state funding.
The Act will also reinforce the
fact that individuals may seek
access to their own data held by
such bodies.

A number of countries in the
region have taken steps toward
greater openness in the last
decade. Barbados, Belize,
Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica,
Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint
Vincent and the Grenadines have
all enacted freedom of informa-
tion laws.

Guyana, Saint Kitts and Nevis
and the Cayman Islands have all
started developing legislation to
increase transparency.

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SUIT, SHIRT & TIE



THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief |



Bail for woman
charged in
connection with
seizure of weapon
and ammunition

A 24-YEAR-OLD woman
charged with two men in con-
nection with a weapon and
ammunitions seizure that
stemmed from a high-speed
police chase, was granted bail
1m the sum of $10,000 yester-
day.

Evelyn Ann Pratt, of South
Beach, was granted bail by
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
after Inspector Ercell Dorsette,
the prosecutor, raised no objec-
tion. Pratt is represented by
lawyer Tai Pinder.

Pratt was arraigned on Tues-
day with Levardo Forbes, 24,
and Trevardo Taylor, 22, of
Derby Road, on the charges of
possession of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

It is alleged that on Sunday,
February 8, the accused were
found with a silver and black
InterArm .380 pistol and four
live rounds of .380 ammuni-
tion.

The accused have all plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

It is further alleged that the
three were involved in a high-
speed car chase with Drug
Enforcement Unit officers dur-
ing which a 380 pistol was
thrown from their vehicle.

Forbes and Taylor, who are
represented by attorney Dion
Smith, remain on remand and
are expected back in court
today as the prosecution is
expected to give a further
report in relation to their
antecedents.

The prosecutor told the
court yesterday that Taylor has
an armed robbery and
attempted murder case and a
drug possession case still pend-
ing.

Taylor was granted bail in
Supreme Court on the armed
robbery charge, he said. Taylor
is charged in the October 2007
armed robbery and attempted
murder of Lorraine Francis.

Ms Francis was reportedly
robbed at gunpoint of $22,892
belonging to Holiday Industrial
and then shot in the face.

The prosecutor also told the
court that Forbes has a case
pending in a Nassau Street
Magistrate’s Court. Forbes’
attorney said, however, that
that matter was completed last
November.

MAIN SECTION
Local News

Editorial/Letters. .........

Apprehension
exercise defended
by Immigration
Department

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Immigration Depart-
ment yesterday defended its
recent apprehension exercise at
Eleuthera, which some residents
allege was conducted in an inap-
propriate manner.

Some residents claimed that
Haitian families were forced out
of their homes in bitter cold
weather and made to wait for
transportation to the mainland
in an outdoor containment site.

However, the department

said the exercise was carried out
as a result of complaints by
many persons on the island who
described the immigration sit-
uation as “a vexing problem.”
“The main objective of the
exercise was to identify illegal
migrants of all nationalities
residing and working in the
North and Central Eleuthera
Districts,” a statement from the
department said. “In addition,
the team sought to identify per-
sons working without valid
work permits as well as those
engaged in illegal activities. The
team of over 60 Law Enforce-

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Share
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news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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ment Officers executed its
planned operations following
its initial briefings.”

This resulted in 225 persons
being interviewed and assessed
with a view of determining their
status on the island.

In some instances documents
were presented and checked.
Once officers were satisfied of
the validity and authenticity of
documents, persons were
released.

Thirty persons were released
after producing proper docu-
mentation and another 33 fam-
ilies produced documents or
paid outstanding fees for the
work permits.

The department collected
some $10,000 in outstanding
fees. The remaining 162 per-
sons were sent to New Provi-
dence for further assessment
and processing.

The department said all per-
sons without legal status will be
repatriated within this week.

“Officers were briefed as to
the acceptable standards in such
operations. Persons were given
the opportunity to satisfy offi-
cials by producing proper doc-
uments. All persons deemed to
be of interest to officials were
afforded the opportunity to col-
lect personal effects/items, prior
to being sent to New Provi-
dence.

The department wishes to
categorically deny any sugges-
tions that suspected illegal
migrants were treated inhu-
manly or less than respected.
The department is fully aware
of its obligations and commit-
ments during such apprehen-
sion exercises and will at all
times adhere to the strictest
code of conduct and best prac-
tices,” the department said.

The Mal at MM aration
WOX OFFICE OPENS AT 1iclh AM DAILY

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 6TH, 2009

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HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

13TH OCTOBER - 14TH FEBRUARY 2008.

Well loved educator & community leader
“A man is loved not for how tall he stands
but for how often he bends to help, comfort and teach.”

REST IN PEACE HUGH

Remembered by his wife, Sylvia; son, Gregory;
all family members & friends





PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Government should
ensure news distribution

in the Family Islands
ERM E DS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master






















































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Abaco readers need their ‘fix’

WE THOUGHT that by now Bellevue Busi-
ness Depot in Marsh Harbour and Bahamasair
would have concluded an agreement for the
daily delivery of The Tribune to Marsh Har-
bour.

However, although The Tribune continues
to deliver its newspaper to Bahamasair in Nas-
sau to be flown to Marsh Harbour, an agree-
ment as to how much the airline will charge
Bellevue and how it will demand payment is
still in limbo.

The flag carrier wants the Marsh Harbour
business to pay cash when the newspapers arrive
every morning in Marsh Harbour. Bellevue says
this is impossible as the billing is done by weight
and every day The Tribune has a different
weight depending upon how many sections were
printed that day. Bellevue wants to pay the air-
line either weekly or monthly. The airline’s
accounts office says “no” it must be cash on
delivery. The airline says it has no intention of
opening any new accounts. This detail is yet to
be solved.

On Wednesday morning the Tribunes were
flown to Marsh Harbour, and were picked up as
usual by a Bellevue representative. Nothing
was paid. Bellevue thought this must have been
an oversight by the airline’s Nassau office. It was
assumed that Nassau had failed to tell Marsh
Harbour that the collection rules had been
changed and that the newspapers now had to be
paid for before they could be taken from the air-

ort.
7 Abaconians — especially the “newspaper
junkies” — were jubilant. They were still getting
their newspaper. “I don’t have to go into mourn-
ing anymore!” one reader chuckled.

But yesterday morning the story had
changed.

We were wakened by an early morning tele-
phone call. It was Mr Timothy Sands, Bellevue
manager, at the other end.

“Would you believe it,” he said, “Bahamasair
has not delivered this morning’s papers. They
only had one bundle of newspapers to deliver to
Marsh Harbour and they couldn’t even get that
right!”

The Tribunes for Marsh Harbour had been
flown to Freeport.

Mr Sands said he received a call from Mr
Robert Osborne, Bellevue’s owner, who oper-
ates the Bellevue store in Freeport. He said the
newspapers had been delivered to him. He was
tempted to keep them for his own customers,
who were also clamouring for Tribunes, but on
reading in this column how hard Abaconians
were fighting to keep The Tribunes coming, he
hadn’t the heart to ’tief them for his own busi-
ness.

He promised to send them to Abaco on
Regional Air’s 1pm flight. But once more Aba-
conians were disappointed, the newspapers were

not on the plane. Mr Sands was promised that
they would definitely be on the 5pm flight.
When we last spoke with him yesterday after-
noon he had someone waiting at Marsh Har-
bour airport to receive them.

Mr Sands said this kind of service by
Bahamasair was typical of what Abaconians
have had to put up with over the years. Judging
from the complaints our Circulation Depart-
ment in Nassau receives, Abaco is not unique.
Every island has a complaint from time to time.

It was impossible for us to hold Bahamasair
accountable for its service and so we gave up
long ago. We paid our bill, asked no questions
and ceased complaining.

However, with Abaco now paying its own
delivery charges, Bahamasair will not be paid if
it does not deliver. Maybe someone will then
wake up and understand what accountability
and service means.

Mr Sands said that when his representative
arrived at Marsh Harbour airport to collect
Wednesday morning’s Tribune, Monday’s edi-
tion of the Guardian had just arrived — three
days late. Really there is no excuse for this
because the Guardians and Tribunes are
dropped off every morning at Nassau airport at
the same time, in the same van and by the same
driver. Obviously Bahamasair had a space prob-
lem on the flight on which both newspapers
should have been flown, and the Guardian was
bumped. Yet the Guardian will still have to
pay Bahamasair and the newspaper will proba-
bly have to credit its customer because a news-
paper three days late can no longer be sold.

“The Tribune gives us more trouble and
stress than any other item that we sell in our
store,” laughed Mr Sands. “We always get calls:
‘It arrive yet?’ or ‘Remember save me that
paper, I hear there’s a great story’ or ‘T ain’t get
my paper yet, what happening?’ or ‘When that
blankety-blank plane coming?’”

Yesterday ended with an exasperated cus-
tomer shaking his head and sighing: “Oh, man,
yuh know, I gotta get ahold of Ingraham. Ingra-
ham could fix it!”

Mr Sands says when the papers are late or
not delivered, the calls to his store are constant.
“They’re like a bunch of junkies who need their
fix!” As soon as they have The Tribune in their
hands, they’re content for that day. But, then the
circus starts all over the next day if the Tribune
doesn’t arrive or is late.

“The Tribune means more to most Abaco-
nians than the Bible!” said one Abaconian.
When we repeated this comment to another
and remarked that it was rather blasphemous,
the reply was: “ It might be blasphemy, but it’s
true!”

The Tribune apologises to its “newspaper
junkies”, but promises to work with Bellevue to
have their “fix” delivered daily and on time.

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Lid.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I find the announcement in
Monday’s Tribune advising of the
termination of the paper to the
Family Islands very troubling.

It is common knowledge that
the national airline, Bahamasair,
flies routes to the Out Islands that
are not profitable presumably for
political reasons. The Govern-
ment of the Bahamas clearly
accepts responsibility for provid-
ing the Bahamian people with
uninterrupted access to the Fam-
ily Islands.

It seems reasonable to expect
the Government of the Bahamas
to accept an equal responsibility
to ensure uninterrupted distrib-

letters@tribunemedia net



ution of news. I am not suggesting
that the newspaper be delivered
free of charge.

However, for Bahamasair to
raise shipping rates at this tenu-
ous economic time appears to be
ill advised. The Tribune’s effort to
address this challenge by supply-
ing the paper over the Internet is
to be commended.

Unfortunately, Bahamians
without access to computers will
not benefit.

Supporters and critics of The
Tribune both lose in this unfor-
tunate turn of events.

Further readers are concerned
that The Guardian will succumb
to the same economic challenge
leaving us with few options for
getting news. Is this the begin-
ning of a trend that will deal a
crippling blow to the distribution
of news throughout The
Bahamas? There must be some
way to negotiate a win-win agree-
ment.

A CONCERNED
CITIZEN
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
February 11, 2009



IN this column today we publish a
selection of readers’ comments on
the first three days of The Tribune
online.

As our readers know this is a work
in progress as we build a web site
that will soon be launched. In the
meantime we want our readers to
become comfortable with reading
their newspaper on line. We invite
them to give us their opinions of
what improvements they want.

When the website has been com-
pleted, readers will be able to take out
a subscription to The Tribune on line.
At that time it will contain far more
content than at present.

EDITOR,
The Tribune on Line

Dear madam,

I’m in the construction industry
on the Island of Abaco, and read
your paper daily. I won’t mind
paying an extra .50 to .75 cent to
get your paper here on the island.
I get your paper around 8.30 am
every morning from Bellevue
Business Centre. I do not have a
computer at work and like to read
in the morning and on my lunch
at 12 noon.

Miss (Jessica) Robertson, (Edi-
tor, Tribune Online), PLEASE
consider to continue to send your
paper to Marsh Harbour, thanks
in advance.

Bernard Haynes
construction supervisor
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Dear Editor,
Great job on getting the only

real newspaper in the islands on

line! I know this is a work in

progress but if possible if you

could get a page just with text

with the headlines and the busi-

ness section. This would take up

less bandwidth and be easier to

access for those of us that have

slow internet speeds.

Thanks.

Troy Albury

Great Guana Cay,

Abaco.

(Thanks for the positive feed-
back. As you may be aware, this
is the first phase of our web strat-
egy that's been launched earlier
than the rest of the site to ensure
our readers in the islands to
whom we can no longer deliver
will have access.

(The full site is still under con-

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struction, but I anticipate it will be
launched rather soon. That site
is designed in a manner that
makes it easy for you to access
exactly what you are interested
in. - Ed).

Dear Editor,

Congratulations to the entire
Tribune Team for getting on line.
Now, if only the crossword could
be included it would be complete
for me.

I am a newspaper junkie and
the thought of no Tribune is
anathema to me.

Regards

Ruth Pinder
Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.

(We hope, especially for the sake
of the “newspaper junkies” in
Abaco, that they will soon be
receiving their Tribunes regular-
ly. As usual The Tribune is deliv-
ering the newspapers to Bahama-
sair in Nassau to be flown to
Marsh Harbour. In the meantime
Bellevue in Marsh Harbour is try-
ing to negotiate an agreement
with Bahamasair for regular
delivery for its customers. — Ed).

Dear Editor,

Just congratulating you on the
new Tribune online. Having seen
the announcement some time ago
on Facebook that The Tribune
would soon be online, I eagerly
awaited the day. I am not disap-
pointed at all. The format is so
user friendly and it is great to see
the whole paper. Well done! It is
also nice to see that the paper will
be uploaded at a certain time
each day, better than your two
competitors who are not always
able to update in a timely fashion!

ALISON

(Thank you for your support.
(There is no plan to publish the
paper online earlier than 2pm at
the moment. We expect to soon
be able to make the e-paper and
all content available earlier in the
day for online subscribers. We'll
be sure to keep our readers
appraised of such developments.
(As for past editions, the only
papers available online are those
from February 7 when we unoffi-
cially launched the site. Once our
full site is up and running, more

of the archives will eventually be
made available. — Ed).

Dear Editor,

Great job in bringing The Tri-
bune online. This really helps
your overseas readers. Can you
tell me if you plan to bring the
classified ads online?

Regards,
Peter
Key West, Florida.

Dear Editor,

Good morning,

This is excellent! I have been
hoping that The Tribune would
do something like this. Howev-
er, there is just one thing that I
will like to know.

Will The Tribune have up to date
news as in to day’s news and not
yesterday’s news?

Inderia Strapp
Firstcaribbean Int'l Bank
Support Center Nassau.

(If you saw out-of-date news, you
must have logged on to our test
runs. The Tribune went on line
officially at 2pm Wednesday with
that day’s news. The Tribune will
be posted daily at 2pm with the
news of the day. — Ed).

Dear Editor,

Good Morning.

I have just gone online for the
first time and it is wonderful that
your paper is now online.

I would like to make a small sug-
gestion. Your online paper does
not allow you to print the page
or save a copy of the page. The
system automatically defaults to
the home selection page.

Talso would like to see the pages
sent out as PDF as this will give
you the ability to save, print and
zoom in on the page.

Thanks for again for giving per-
sons the opportunity to view the
paper.

Regards,

Vanessa M. Brice

Dear Editor,

Congrats on the online edition.
Will it include all parts of the
physical edition, specifically the
classifieds? This is very important
since the paper will not be avail-
able in the Family Islands.

Aniska Pennerman

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 5



Developers await go-ahead for Summit Centre

a oneevereecreesesorsonsseenrsrecsseceuesesorssecssseseressseoees

Armed man
robs pharmacy
employee

AN ARMED bandit robbed }
a pharmacy employee of compa- }
ny cash while in the Harbour Bay }
Shopping Centre. :

According to police reports, :
the daylight robbery occurred }
sometime before lpm oni
Wednesday when an employee
from Lowe's Pharmacy was }
accosted at gunpoint by a man
wearing blue jeans and a white ;
shirt flecked with red. i

Assistant Superintendent Wal- }
ter Evans said the employee had }
just left the store carrying a bank }
deposit bag and was headed to ;
the plaza's parking lot when the
theft occurred. i

The gunman, who was about 5 }
ft 6” tall, demanded the compa- :
ny’s deposit bag. The employee }
handed over the bag and the gun- }
man made off with the cash then }
fled on foot towards the back of :
the Adam and Eve clothing store.

Police said he eventually made }
his escape in a black Honda with }
a large sum of cash. :

The matter is under active }
investigation. :

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PHILANTHROPIC develop-
ers of a proposed multi-million
dollar, 30,000 square-foot, edu-
cation and recreation centre say
they are hoping to break ground
later this year if an upcoming
review by Cabinet gives the plans
the go-ahead.

The Summit Centre, where
New Providence’s children will
be able to go for after school
tutoring, have access to comput-
ers and the internet as well as
exhilarating rock-climbing, mar-
tial arts, fitness and music lessons,
is the brainchild of the widow of
late Atlantis Chief Executive,
Butch Kerzner.

Set to be located adjacent to
the Queen Elizabeth Centre, the
centre is being designed to pro-
vide much needed extra-curricu-
lar activities for Bahamian youths.

“The idea was born (when we)
looked at the needs of the com-
munity we thought an after school
centre would be great to get the
kids out of hanging out at the
mall and on the streets and into a
place where they could basically
keep their minds and bodies
active and out of trouble and
steer them in a more positive
direction,” said Nick Sagar, who is

working with Vanessa Kerzner
on the project.

“After school hours parents
fight traffic to get home after five
then back at six, kids get home
at 3, so there’s a lot of downtime
there,” he added.

Vanessa Kerzner setup the
Butch Kerzner Summit Founda-
tion in memory of her 42-year-
old husband after his death in a
helicopter accident in October
2006.

After funding a new swimming
pool at St Anne’s school and set-
ting up a “Sky Climbers” rock-
climbing programme on Paradise
Island for Bahamian children, the
Foundation was keen to spear-
head a more “signature” project.

Designs for the first-of-its-kind
centre, drawn up by respected
Bahamian architect Jackson
Burnside, are now in their final
stages.

Inside the building children will
find a cornucopia of ways to learn
and entertain themselves. It will
also include a yoga/dance studio
and 8,000-square foot high ropes
course.

Additionally, the Foundation
is planning “life advice” classes
for adolescents and adults will
cover topics like how to apply for
a loan or prepare for a job inter-
view.

Mr Sagar said that the Foun-

dation anticipates their plans will
go before Cabinet in the next
month.

Approvals at the highest level
are key to the developers entering
the next stage of their drive to
make the centre a reality — solic-
iting the private sector for spon-
sorship and donations.

The level of support the foun-
dation gets from the community
at large will then in turn impact
something even more crucial —
the cost to those coming to the
centre.

The aim is to keep the price of
using the myriad facilities inside
the Summit Centre at a minimum
with accessibility for children of
all socio-economic backgrounds
a paramount concern.

Mr Sagar said: “We definitely
do not want to be exclusive, we
want to be as inclusive as possible.
We want to benefit as many kids
as possible.”

In a move that should help the
Foundation achieve this goal, the
Government has suggested that
it will “donate” land near the
Queen Elizabeth’s Sports Centre
to the Foundation, once it is sat-
isfied with the proposal.

This will allow the Centre to
be situated in the heart of what
will eventually be Nassau’s sport-
ing mecca — site of a new nation-
al sports stadium, headquarters

Greg and Tanya Cash celebrate ‘ Mee breakthrough’



JUSTICE campaigners Greg
and Tanya Cash were celebrating
last night after scoring what they
termed “a major breakthrough”
in their seven-year legal battle with
the Baptist education authorities.

They have been told that a pack-
age of documents relating to their
case is now Safely in the hands of
the Privy Council in London.

The first package allegedly
“went missing” last year after being
handed over to the local agent
of an international mailing com-
pany.

Now Mr and Mrs Cash hope for
leave to appeal to the Bahamas’
highest court after facing a series of
obstacles in their fight for justice.

Mrs Cash said: “All the relevant
documents are in now in the Privy
Council’s hands. They relate not
only to our problems with the Bap-
tist Convention, but also the Attor-
ney General’s Office.

“We know the result is going to
be positive,” she said, claiming that
“some very shocking disclosures
will be made.”

Mr and Mrs Cash say they are
prepared to travel to London to
present their case, which includes
claims for unfair dismissal and
human rights breaches against the
Baptist education authorities.

Their long fight for justice began
in 2002 when Mr Cash was fired as
coach from Jordan Prince William
High School.

The couple have complained
that their court battle has been
prolonged by obstructive officials
and lost files.

“All we wanted was for that
package to get safely out of this
country,” Mrs Cash told The Tri-
bune.

“We have known for a long time
now that we would never get jus-
tice in the Bahamas.”

Last October, Court of Appeal
president Dame Joan Sawyer
called Mrs Cash “a disgrace to
Bahamian womanhood” and ques-
tioned her level of education dur-
ing a court hearing.

LUCAYA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

She also threatened Mrs Cash
with prison for alleged contempt of
court.

However, at the next hearing, a
different set of judges appeared to
set aside the jail threat, saying it
was “done with”.

Today, Justice Anita Allen is
expected to rule on a claim by the
Attorney General’s Office that Mr
and Mrs Cash are vexatious liti-
gants.

The couple argue that their var-
ious cases before the courts are
the result of their allegedly
being denied justice when their
original complaints were first
heard.

JUSTICE CAMPAIGNERS Greg and Tanya Cash.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MARY
FOSTER, 95

> Boyd Subdivision and

ort) formerly of George

Town, Exuma, will be

held on Saturday,

February 14th, 1lam at

Holy Spirit Anglican

Church, Howard Street,

Chippingham. Officiating

will be Rev. Fr. Harry W. Ward, Rev. Canon Samuel

S.T. Sturrup, Rev. Fr. Dwight Bowe and Rev. Fr.

Theodore Hunt. Interment will follow in St. Mary's
Cemetery, Virginia Street.

Mary Foster is succeeded by her two sons, Anthony
Foster and Fredrick Foster; grandchildren, Michael,
Kim, Andre, Allister, Angelique, Leonard, Candice,
Chelsea, Cameron and Alex Foster, Yanique Pinder
and Ebony Bodley; great grandchildren, Ibrahim,
Yunus, Adam, Yusuf, Andre, Devon, Dannon, Israel
and Latrell Foster, Khary, Kenneth and Kristoff
Davies, Asiya Nelson, Othnell Pinder, Ashley,
Memphis and Markiss Bodley, Leander Bethel;
great great grandchildren, Hamzah, Maryam,
Dawud, Mikayel and Yazmine Foster, Muhammad
Nelson; extended family, Louise Foster, Jeannie
Foster, Corinne Foster, Barbara Carroll, Crystal
Trotman, Edith Foster, Tanya Foster, Ortnell Pinder,
Mary Bodley, Tara Foster, Joyce McKenzie, Charles
McKinney, Anthony McKinney, Eleanor Wilfong,
Vernon Aranah, Adrian Aranah, Jesse Aranah Jr.,
Vienna Clarke, Roslyn Aranah, Veronica Aranah,
Brigitta Moncur, Candis Cargill, Dominique
Hammond, Nicola and Olivia McKinney, Kurt
McKinney, Mariska Tinker, Sammuel Collie,
Roland Tinker, Claudette Lundy, Mispah Glinton,
Larry Glinton, Bradley Glinton, Daphane Glinton
and Dot Butler, Valarie Clarke, Kimberly Davis,
Afeffa Foster, Wayne Lundy, Marcello Lundy,
Fernando Lundy, Victor Clarke Jr., Virgo Clarke,
Valentino Clarke, Valencia Clarke; and friends too
numreous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street, on Friday
from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 10am until service time.



CREDIT SUISSE

THE TRIBUNE



Handling of ‘pornographic’
incident angers parents

FROM page one

involved a nine-year-old girl and a 10-
year-old boy at the school.

However, an official who spoke with
The Tribune on condition of anonymity
said that the meeting was primarily held
to make parents aware of the age-inap-
propriate material children have access to
on television and the internet, and to
advise them to be more vigilant.

The official denied that two minors had
been involved in a sexual situation and
said the incident had been “blown way
out of proportion.”

“It was rather a pornographic down-
load incident,” the official said.

Following the incident that occurred
two weeks before Monday night’s meet-
ing with the parents, school administra-
tors had a special assembly with the stu-
dents to discuss the topic of sex in an
age-appropriate manner.

Some students claimed that the school
had forbidden them to discuss the subject
of the assembly with their parents.

Parents, who were confused by the pur-
pose of the meeting on Monday, report-
edly demanded to be told details about
the assembly and the “mysterious” inci-

dent that had prompted the sex talk.

The official told The Tribune, however,
that due to confidentiality and sensitivity
issues the school did not want to release
any further information to the parents
or the public.

As it concerns the assembly, the official
said it is completely untrue that the stu-
dents were asked not to talk about it with
their parents.

The official also said that the contro-
versial incident from two weeks ago is a
unique occurrence at the school and not
something that happens with any sort of
frequency.

Perry Christie says PLP
abstained from final vote

FROM page one

the Bill, Mr Christie argues
that government goes
against the Constitution by
including clause seven.

He said: “We believe that
provision is unconstitution-
al.

“We attempted in com-
mittee to delete it from the
Bill, but the government
refused to budge.”

The PLP leader maintains
his party will continue to
abstain from voting on the
Bill until the government
changes course.

Mr Christie added: “We
will continue to support the
dedicated men and women
of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force and its mod-
ernisation.

“However, we insist that

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for

JUNIOR COMPLIANCE OFFICER

The Compliance Department is accepting applications for a Junior Compliance

Officer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Requirements:

University degree with a major in Law or Finance

At least 2-3 years experience with an international bank

Extensive knowledge in the fields of Auditing and Internal Controls
Thorough knowledge of private banking in general

Knowledge of Bahamas Banking and Trust Legislation

Knowledge of local regulatory and statutory matters with regards to
“Know Your Client” and the avoidance of Money Laundering

PC Knowledge (MS Word, MS Excel, Access, etc.)

Well versed with Swiss anti-money laundering and due diligence

procedures

: Knowledge of credit issues would be an asset

Duties will include:

: Accept new business and allocate mandate numbers for new accounts
Conduct monthly reviews of financial transactions
Conduct Annual risk reviews for mandates with low risk
Maintain physical and electronic client documentation
Review Legal and Compliance Registers to ensure receipt of

documentation

° Administer and monitor closure of accounts

Personal Qualities:

7 Strong organizational and communication skills

7 Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
7 Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible

hours

° Willing to work in a multicultural environment

Benefits provided include:
: Competitive salary

° Pension Plan
. Health and Life Insurance

any Act of Parliament must
be in conformity with the
Constitution.”

At the final vote on the
Bill in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
argued that the Constitution
does not specify an age lim-
it or any grounds under
which the Commissioner or
Deputy Commissioner of
Police may be removed.

And rather than being
unconstitutional, his gov-
ernment is taking up its
Constitutional right to
decide on the term and
retirement age of the Police
Force’s two most senior offi-
cers.

Mr Ingraham said: “It is
settled and acknowledged
law in all our books that if
you have the power to
appoint, you have the power
to determine how long the
appointment will be for.

“In fact it says a power to
appoint shall include power
to prescribe the period for
which the appointment shall
operate. That is beyond dis-
pute.

“We are not doing any-
thing in this legislation that
will take away from the
Commissioner of Police or
the Deputy Commissioner
of Police any of the rights
which they have under the
Constitution of the
Bahamas. We are not
empowered to do any such
thing.”

Any employee paid by the
Pubic Treasury may be
removed from office, Mr
Ingraham said.

NISSAN PICKUP

Tough Body
Trauble-treae
Easy to Maintain

Kerzner CEO
disappointed with
Tribune lead story

FROM page one

geted for the coming holiday
period.

“T can tell you unequivo-
cally that there are no layoffs
planned around the Easter
holidays as indicated in The
Tribune yesterday. It simply
is not true,” Mr Markantonis
said.

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about the future, we have not
discussed further layoffs,” he
said. “We believe that at times
such as these, we should all
expend our energy on culti-
vating new tourists for our
destination, and taking care
of those who are already here.
Media space is better spent on
promoting the positives of our
country than on perpetuating
baseless and unsettling
rumours.”

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minimum requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be
accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
FEBRUARY 18, 2009



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THE TRIBUNE



A LEADING churchman is calling on
banks to “go easy” on borrowers after
counselling seven potential suicide vic-
tims in three days.

Bishop Simeon Hall of New Covenant
Baptist Church said many Bahamians
are now “living on the edge of quiet des-
peration and hopelessness” because of
mounting debts.

Bishop Hall said the seven potential
suicides - five men and two women - had
either been referred to him or walked
into his church for help. One left a note
under his door.

Now he is calling on banks and other
lending institutions to offer a 90-day
“reprieve” for those forced to default
on loans because of changed circum-
stances.

Banks that had benefited from

Successful spay and neuter clinic in Grand Bahama

Bahamian workers in the past should
now be lenient and accommodating to
credible defaulters, he said.

“No Bahamian who has established a
credible record as a mortgage payer
should end up losing their house now
that they are unemployed,” he told The
Tribune yesterday.

“T call on all banks and lending insti-
tutions to structure a 90-day reprieve for
all unemployed mortgage holders, and
show themselves as good corporate citi-
zens in this time of economic downturn.”

Bishop Hall’s call came after four
recent suicides. Many Bahamian families
are known to be living under extreme
stress as a result of the economic down-
turn and deepening recession.

“The loss of a dwelling house is the
basis for great psychological and finan-

cial stress that is now pushing those who
need help to the edge,” he said.

“Banks who have benefited from the
Bahamian worker should at this time be
more lenient and accommodating to cred-
ible Bahamian workers.”

Bishop Hall said those who had con-
sulted him in recent days had been “har-
bouring suicidal thoughts.”

Only one, in his opinion, had required
professional help. The rest needed some-
one to talk to.

“Several other pastors have seen a rise
in the number of persons marginalised
and living on the edge,” he added.

“Many persons are living on the edge of
quiet desperation and hopelessness.”

He said Bahamians on the whole need-
ed to take full responsibility for the actions
and decisions they had made “and all of us

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Hall petitions banks to ‘go easy’

need to lend a listening ear or helping
hand where possible.”

He said too many areas of Bahamian
society seemed to be nearing the brink of
total collapse.

“A turnaround and remedy will only
come when each Bahamian takes more
responsibility for his actions and more of
our national leaders stop fiddling while
Rome is burning,” he added.

Bishop Hall said he was concerned
about the suicide talk because Bahami-
ans rarely thought in those terms.

“People love living,” he said, “To kill
yourself really takes a lot, but I think
people are being pushed to the edge.”

He said more and more people were
feeling “marginalised and pressured” by
the banks as unemployment rises in a
tightening economy.



Bishop Simeon Hall

JOB OPPORTUITY

THE Humane Society of
Grand Bahama celebrated great
success with its fourth major field
spay/neuter clinic held from Feb-
ruary 2-6 at the Church of the
Good Shepherd’s Parish Hall in
Pinders Point.

This clinic topped all others
held thus far, with a total of 277
dogs and cats sterilised. This fig-
ure includes 237 dogs and pup-
pies, 39 cats and kittens and one
raccoon.

It does not include the eight
additional surgeries performed
on already sterilised animals,
which included a bladder stone
removal, a leg amputation, sev-
eral eye surgeries and various
wound repairs.

It also does not include minor
treatment of an additional 20
dogs or puppies for various ail-
ments or basic deworming and
vaccinating of puppies too young
or small for surgery.

“Many thanks are owed to
Reverend Ambrose, Anne Penn,
and the kind parishioners of the
Church of the Good Shepherd,
who understand the need for this
important community service,
and turned over their parish hall
to this project for the second time
in 15 months.

“As always, all the dogs and
cats received flea/tick preventa-
tive, vaccines if needed and
deworming, which will lead to a
healthier overall pet population.

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They also had their nails trimmed
and ears cleaned while in recov-
ery. Pet owners received educa-
tional information on how to bet-
ter care for their pets,” the HSGB
said.

Some of the animals sterilised
also required further surgical
attention, such as treatment of
hernias and wound abscesses.

“Some of the animals were in
poor physical condition to begin
with, yet thanks to the dedication
and skill of the volunteer veteri-
nary team, none were lost, and
these animals will no longer have
to go through the trauma of bear-
ing litter after litter of puppies or
kittens,” the HSGB said.

The Humane Society said it
hopes that more pet owners will
provide better overall care for
their pets in the future.

“It is a shame when a three-
year-old dog has the appearance
and health deterioration of a dog
much older due to poor care and
lack of attention.”

At least eight dogs were also
treated for transmissible venere-
al tumours. This is a sexually
transmitted disease, very com-
mon on Grand Bahama, spread
entirely through sexual contact.
It causes painful tumors to form
in and about the genitalia of the
dog; which, untreated, continue
to grow and abscess and will
eventually kill the dog. Dog own-
ers should be aware of the preva-

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lence of this disease, and are
urged to spay and neuter their
pets before they reach sexual
maturity, to prevent the spread
of this deadly and highly conta-
gious disease.

Ten dogs and puppies were sur-
rendered to the HSGB during the
clinic. Eight critical care patients
remain under the care of the
HSGB until they are healthy
enough to return home.

All services provided during
this clinic were provided free of
charge to the public.

The goal is to reduce pet over-
population on Grand Bahama, as
well as achieve a healthier pet

an

population in general, and
encourage and educate pet own-
ers in being more responsible and
better pet care-takers for the
future.

This clinic was funded by The
Pegasus Foundation, the Kohn
Foundation, a private individual
from the United States, and
Amigo’s Fund.

The HSGB is seeking funding
for the next clinic, scheduled ten-
tatively for November, and hopes
that local corporations, govern-
ment, and individuals will sup-
port this project, which thus far
has been funded largely from
abroad.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cocaine worth more Bahamas Constitution

than $8m is seized “4s a British enactment’

five men and a woman were
arrested. The drugs are esti-
mated to have a local street
value of well over $8 million.
Following that discovery, offi-

FROM page one

cocaine was found onboard the
vessel.
As a result of this discovery,

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cials found a second vessel
which also had a large amount
of cocaine onboard.

The total weight and quan-
tity of the drugs was not
released up to press time last
night.

Head of the Drug Enforce-

ment Unit Superintendent
Anthony Ferguson was
unavailable for comment up to
press time yesterday evening
as he was reportedly in a meet-
ing.
Police have made several
significant drug seizures here in
New Providence and the Fam-
ily Islands over the past sever-
al weeks.

Six people were arrested
last week and have been
charged in the seizure of some
$200,000 worth of marijuana.
Police also seized $3.75 million
worth of cocaine in Freeport
and $100,000 worth of mari-

a] juana in Andros this month.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD.



hat an immediate vacaney For a

Private Banking Marketing Officer

Applicants tous held the fallewing:

- Waster's Degree im Administration, Finance, Economics or rebated degree

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Applicunts should alo be capoble of the following:

Tatally fluent in English und Spanish

Develop and manage a portiolio of private banking clients by analyzing the basking and
lavestmcnt needs of corperate aed high-ect worth individuals and offering finamcial and

investmcnt alternatives,

Maintain existing clicnt relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
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Frequent travel te assigned countries to enhance current client relationships aad develop

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i ee |

FROM page one

posed Police Force Act 2009
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday.

He was seeking to support
his argument against the claim
by Opposition members that
provision seven of the Act,
which passed later that
evening in the lower chamber
with the support of Govern-
ment MPs alone, is unconsti-
tutional.

That provision seeks to lim-
it the tenure of a Police Com-
missioner or Deputy Com-
missioner to no more than two
five year terms.

PLP MP for Cat Island,
Rum Cay and San Salvador,
Philip Davis told parliament
in his earlier contribution that
to enforce such a term limit
was unconstitutional as the
power to appoint a Commis-
sioner under the terms of Arti-
cle 119 of the Constitution was
such that upon appointment
that officer could only be
“removed” from office either
by attaining the retirement
age for a police commissioner
or by the extraordinary

TAI

process set forth in Article 120
of the Constitution.

While Government had
claimed, in proposing the pro-
vision, that it could limit the
appointment of a Commis-
sioner in accordance with the
Interpretation and General
Clauses Act, Mr Davis said
this was “silly” because this
Act “only applied to Acts of
Parliament and not the Con-
stitution.”

His legal argument under-
lined the Opposition’s more
emotive charge that by limit-
ing the tenure of the Com-
missioner of Police the provi-
sion would open up his office
to abuse — forcing the Chief
of Police to have to “sing for
his supper”.

But Mr Bethel countered
that the definition of the word
“Act” in the Interpretation
and General Clauses Act
“expressly applies to an Act
of Parliament of the United
Kingdom and any legislative
instrument made thereunder
having effect or having had
effect as part of the law of The
Bahamas.”

Continuing

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Odessa Ga rden

where fife is sill simple and peaple still care
Murphywille, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

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Bahamas constitution “has not
been ‘repatriated’ or ‘patriat-
ed’ to The Bahamas” and
“remains a Schedule attached
to an Act passed by the British
Parliament” he said that for
this reason the Interpretation
and General Clauses Act
which the Government
claimed allowed them to
include the provision “implic-
itly and necessarily applies
directly to our Constitution.”

A ‘domestic
lispute’
leaves one
man deat

FROM page one

The younger man later
drove to the East Street
South Police Station where
he is currently being
detained.

Police did not specify the
nature of the relationship
between the two men yester-
day, however ASP Evans
said they were not relatives.
When asked what sparked
the altercation, ASP Evans
said police knew the motiva-
tion behind the attack but
did not disclose it to avoid
jeopardizing the case.

Family and friends living
in Nassau converged at the
murder scene after getting
the call from police that their
loved one had been mur-
dered.

His sister, Maureen
Prescott, told the media that
Gardiner was a calm person
who always walked away
from disputes.

"Harold was one of my
mother's calmest children
and he always walked away
from a fight and an argu-
ment. Harold shared, what-
ever he had, he shared. He
was not a mean person," Ms
Prescott said.

Ironically, she and her
brother joked about their
mortality and sudden death
the night before he was
stabbed to death, she said.

Gardiner is said to be a
resident of North Andros,
and served as a member of
the Mastic Point Township.

Florence Pratt-Meyer, a
resident of Andros who
works for the Nicholl'’s Town
Administration, told The
Tribune that Gardiner's sud-
den death took residents of
the area by surprise.

According to her, Gar-
diner was a "community
minded" person who did a
lot of work for his area.

Gardiner was in Nassau
doing contractual work ona
client's roof, his sister said.

His death marked the
ninth for the nation.

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THE TRIBUNE

busine





‘One way
or another’

eter melt
get capital



* Bahamian company IP
Solutions International
restructuring $6m private
placement, but says $2m
enough to begin ‘full
deployment’ of multi-play
Internet services

* Tn talks with potential
Bahamian and foreign
partners, latter of whom
has offered to finance $2m
head-end construction

* Hoping to close service
contracts with hotels/gated
communities in ‘14 days
or sooner’, and targeting
service start in ‘month to
six weeks’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian company will
“one way or another” raise the
capital to enable it to start
deploying its ‘multiple play’
bundle of Internet services with-
in the next month to six weeks,
its chief executive saying yes-
terday that a number of “posi-
tive developments” had taken
place since its first private place-
ment offering closed.

Edison
Sumner, presi-
dent and chief
executive of
IP Solutions
International
(IPSI), said
the company
was restruc-
turing a new
private place-
ment offering
following the
end-January
close of its
initial finance-
raising effort.

He acknowledged that the
first private placement had
failed to raise the hoped-for $6
million, but said IP Solutions
International was now talking to
potential new and former
investors, and estimated it only
required $2 million to finance
“full deployment” of its ser-
vices.

SEE page 5B



Edison
Sumner

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

FRIDAY,

FEBRUARY

IS



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Project's huge

WH Schooner Bay subdivision approval likely imminent, with
developers able to begin construction ‘within 14 days’ of final

approval to sell

M 570-acre project could generate employment ‘from zero to

130-plus’ very quickly

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A 570-unit development is
hoping to give the Bahamian
economy and real estate mar-
ket “a huge shot in the arm” as
it anticipates receiving final sub-
division approval from the Gov-
ernment imminently, its project
manager yesterday telling Tri-
bune Business it could “quickly
ramp up” to create 130 jobs.

Keith Bishop, Islands by
Design's principal, who is acting
as project manager for South
Abaco-based Schooner Bay
development, said the project,
which is aiming to set standards
for sustainable, environmental-
ly friendly development in the
Bahamas, would be able to start
construction “within 14 days”



Zhivargo Laing

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The private/public sector
committee advising the Gov-
ernment on financial sector
regulatory consolidation is
expected to meet “in the next
week or two” to consider fur-
ther recommendations for
pushing the process forward,
the minister responsible telling
Tribune Business that the
“platform” for achieving their
ultimate goal was already in
place.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, said the last
of the three regulators to
move into Charlotte House,
the Compliance Commission,
had relocated there last week
from the Cecil Wallace Whit-
field Building at Cable Beach.

By having this regulator,
together with the Securities
Commission of the Bahamas
and the Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office, in the same
premises, Mr Laing said infor-
mation sharing between the
three would be much easier.

The regulators’ ability to
service financial services oper-
ators seeking licences, permits
and approvals from them will
also be enhanced in terms of
efficiency, since their consoli-

SEE page 6B

of receiving final government
approval to sell lots.

Once that happened, Mr
Bishop said there would be a
“huge” impact on employment
in south Abaco, with Schooner
Bay’s workforce going from
“zero to 130-plus persons” in
very little time.

“T hope to be able to get the
final subdivision approval this
week,” Mr Bishop said, “and
given that, we hope very short-
ly to start marketing. The
expressions of interest are very,
very pleasing.

“[’m just waiting for the day
the development gets final
approval for selling, because it
will be a huge shot in the arm
for Abaco and the Bahamas
Real Estate Association. I think
Schooner Bay is going to do

very, very well.” He added that
Phase I of the Schooner Bay
development was “pretty much
all done”, with the relevant gov-
ernment agencies all conduct-
ing a final review of its permit
and licence applications.

“T would say that judging
against previous projects that
I’ve done, this one has gone a
little bit more quickly than we
experienced previously,” Mr
Bishop said.

“The first submission was
done only in August last year,
and here we are in February.
Any day now we’ll see subdivi-
sion approval and subsequently
the selling of lots, and a huge
impact on employment in south
Abaco - from zero to 130-plus

SEE page 4B

Compliance Commission joins Securities
Commission, insurance regulator in
Charlotte House, as minister says ‘good
progress’ being made






















































for a better life

TU La

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Engineering merger’s
‘one-stop shop’ fights

shot i In the arm’ 35-40% business drop

Bahamian firms Islands by Design, Reiss
Engineering in tie-up that aims to enhance
service delivery and cost competitive
solutions that ‘will attract more business’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Two leading Bahamian-owned engineering firms yes-
terday unveiled their merger that is designed to create a
“one-stop shop concept” for these services, and in so
doing enhance efficiency and “get more business” in a
market estimated to have shrunk by 35-40 per cent.

Islands by Design, the environmental, marine and
wildlife engineering and consulting specialist headed by
principal Keith Bishop, is merging with Reiss Engineering,
a US-headquartered engineering firm with office in Orlan-
do and California, but which is headed by Bahamian and
Freeport native Robert Reiss as president.

SEE page 5B



30% crawfish price decline
hits Spanish Wells hard

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

The 30 per cent drop in craw-
fish/lobster prices as a result of
decling global demand has
impacted Spanish Wells’ fish-
ermen, who yesterday pledged
to keep on fishing despite
expected revenue losses and
increasing operating costs.

The price of lobster has fallen

incrementally from around
$22.50 per pound at this time
last year to around $15 per
pound, with a further decrease
possible later this year as restau-
rants and other purchasers
reduce crawfish purchases in
response to falling customer
demand.

This has heavily impacted

SEE page 4B

FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

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4 dlexex-3)) Top-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street

1378



PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45
of 2000), NOTICE is hereby given that TMT
Holdings Limited is in dissolution and the date of
commencement of the dissolution is 6 February 2009.

Margaret Tatem-Gilbert and Lorna Kemp
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas)Ltd.
1 Bay Street
2nd Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O.Box SS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas

FOR RENT
PARADISE ISLAND

LUXURIOUS HARBOUR FRONT PENTHOUSE
RESIDENCE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
OF NASSAU AND ITS HARBOUR:



« 5,000+ sq ft. total area

* 4 Bedrooms with 4.5 baths

« Master bedroom with dressing area, Jacuzzi
tub and large walk-in closet

* Large balconies

* Elegantly furnished throughout with a
separate study

* Formal dining room

* Private elevator

* Heated pool and spa overlooking the harbour

* Private dock for a yacht up to 75 feet

* Dedicated storage and crew areas

* Exercise room

* Indoor Garage

* Private gated entry

* Lush tropical landscaping

Rent: $15,000.00 per month net

NO PETS

For further information and viewing call:
363-2730

ERG
Client Relationship Officer, Vice President

About EFG Tinernational

EPG Intemational 16 a global private hanking group offering private

Tourism chief to tackle
Freeport airfare costs

The Ministry of Tourism’s
director-general will outline
what is necessary to turn Grand
Bahama’s assets to its advan-
tage, and re-shape the island
into a successful tourist desti-
nation, when she addresses the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look Conference on Monday,
February 23.

“We believe that Grand
Bahama, as the closest offshore
destination to the United States,
has the greatest opportunity to
capture the offshore vacation
market for the American con-
sumer,” said Vernice Walkine.

“My remarks will centre
around those things that we
believe have to be done in order
for Grand Bahama to achieve
this potential, and one would
be the issue of the cost of admis-
sion into Grand Bahama, the
cost of airfare.

“Grand Bahama really
should be the least expensive
destination to fly into in this
entire region because of its
proximate position to all of the
major markets in the United
States.

“But in some cases it is three
times as expensive, so we have
to address that.”










Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Lte

banking: anal

asset management services, headquartered in Switzerland. EFG International's group of

private banking businesses currently operate in $4 locations in over
with cwea 2,175 employers,

_ .
OA) counerves,

CONTINUES To expand as ey) idenced by ITS ew Premises

at Lyford Cay EFG lar has over 40 experienced professional

sand offers a full

range of solutions for wealthy chents around the globe, EFG's unique corporate culture
attracts the most entrepreneurial and most experienced professionals in the industry. To

learn more, please visit www.elpinternational cor

We are looking for seasoned financial professionals with at least 10) years of sales and

marketing experience in providing financial solutions to high

net worth clients and

companies. The candidates must possess a solid knowledge of investments, banking and

(rust SEFVICES,

The ability to service and grow your own chent book ts extremely

important. EPG provides a unique and uninhibited global marketing opportunity, an open

architecture platform and multiple hooking centres.

The successful candidates must have a university degree or equivalent and possess or be

enrolled in the Series 7

CSC, or UK equivalent. The individuals

must have the required

qualifications and accreditations to be registered with The Bahamas Securities

Commission.
within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EFG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary,
structure directly related to profitability, Salary will be determined by experience, and
qualifications.

The flexibility to go on frequent business development trips and work

benefits and a bonus

Interested and qualihied professionals should submit applications by 27th February 2009

Tk

EPG Bank & Trust (Bahamas)
Human Resources
Centre of Commerce, 2

| Bay Street

FO. Box $5 6299
Nasiau, The Balarnas
Fax (242) 502-5487

" floor

Lid



AV(cVanltersm Ullal

Ms Walkine added that
Grand Bahama was perfectly
positioned to benefit from a
world class cruise port and a
bigger, faster cruise ferry ser-
vice.

“So with these things being
taken into account...Grand
Bahama really can achieve
exponential growth, and I’m
going to be more specific about
what we are doing in the case of
each of these.

“We then will use all of these
strategies to shape Grand
Bahama into the destination
that we believe it needs to be













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Eregive: Tein berry

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a5. Powered with bain Meecery 25



PICTURED from left to right: Pauline Nairn, Sherrilyn Wallace,
Andronekia Clark, Andrea Knowles, Conray Rolle, and Vernal Smith.

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

wth Aust



“We believe that
Grand Bahama, as
the closest offshore
destination to the
United States, has
the greatest
opportunity to
capture the offshore
vacation market for
the American
consumer.”



and, therefore, we can promote
and market it appropriately,”
Ms Walkine said.

Influential

The highest-ranking woman
in the history of Bahamian
tourism, Ms Walkine was iden-
tified by TRAVEL AGENT
Magazine in 2002 as one of the
100 most influential women in
tourism and travel in the world.

Grand Bahama Business
Outlook is organised by The
Counsellors, and will be held at
Our Lucaya under the theme

















Spiiot, Fish finder, Chart plotter GPS,



Optional (qelpramt



Grand Bahama Renewal: The
Power of Partnerships, The
Power of One.

Ms Walkine joins a high-
powered line up of presenters
including C. A. Smith, Bahamas
Ambassador to the US; Zhivar-
go Laing, minister of state for
finance; Giora Israel, senior
vice-president of ports and des-
tination development, Carnival
Corporation & PLC; Ian Rolle,
chief financial officer, Grand
Bahama Port Authority; Gre-
gory Moss, attorney-at-law and
president, Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce;
Maxwell Sweeting, vice-presi-
dent VOPAK; Eric Carey,
executive director, the Bahamas
National Trust; Peter Turn-
quest, CA; and Stacia Williams,
corporate image and personal
branding consultant and prin-
cipal of Total Image Manage-
ment.

The event is sponsored by the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national, FOCOL, Emera, the
Central Bank of The Bahamas,
British American Financial and
Scotiabank.

For updates and Registration
Online visit www.tclevents.com

Bahamians
Chia

from
manager
course



The last Certified Inter-
national Project Managers
(CIPM) managers class of
2008, who studied with
Lignum Institute of Tech-
nology (LIT) at Harbour
Bay Shopping Plaza, were
issued with their certifica-
tion through the Ameri-
can Academy of Project
Management (AAPM).
The presentation of the
certificates was made at
Lignum’s headquarters in
the Harbour Bay Shop-
ping Plaza on January 22,











The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

a ee eee eee

A position has arisen for a chartered accountant with 20-25 years
experience in the profession, or private sector, at assist in the further
development of branch offices in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and

Freeport, Grand Bahama.

The applicant must have good inter-personal skills and be able to
relate to a wide variety of clients in diverse business environments,
have a history of large scale development projects and experience
of international clients looking to set up business in the family islands.
He/she must be computer literate with a good working knowledge

of Excel and Word.

Applicants should apply in wiritng to:

ECA Application

P.O. Box CB-11651, Nassau, Bahamas





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 5B



‘One way or another’ firm will get capital

FROM page 1B

Mr Sumner said the company
was also in negotiations with
two other Bahamas-based tele-
coms licensees, who he said he
could not name, about using
their technology and products
in its system.

And IP Solutions Internation-
al was also taking to a “foreign
partner” who had offered to
finance construction of its IP
(Internet Protocol) head-end
technology for $2 million.

The company is initially tar-
geting hotels and gated com-
munities with a variety of ser-
vices it will transmit down just
one Internet line, hence the ‘Mul-
tiple Play’ description. The ser-
vices will include Internet, TV via
Internet Protocol, video-on-
demand (VOD) video games and
Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP) phone services.

“The issue did close at the
end of last month,” said Mr
Sumner, referring to the first
private placement issue. “We
didn’t raise all the capital we
wanted to raise, but we allowed

the private placement document
to expire.

“We’ve been given leave by
the Board of Directors to
redraft the private placement
document because of all the
developments that have taken
place since the launch.”

He added: “We are currently
restructuring the private place-
ment, and are looking at other
options which are under active
review. We have Plan B and
Plan C in effect if we don’t raise
sufficient from the private
placement.

“We have determined this
will happen one way or another.
The Board of Directors have
expressed a deep commitment
to this. We think we can get
started and get fully deployed
with $2 million.

“We’re requiring $6 million,
but feel that in this environ-
ment, and based on the negoti-
ations that are ongoing with
partners, that $2 million will be
adequate to get services up and
running in a short period of
time.”

A private placement is tar-
geted at selected institutional

and high net-worth investors,
meaning that it is not a public
offering, so members of the
Bahamian public need not

apply.
Investors

Mr Sumner, who is also IP
Solutions International’s presi-
dent, added that the company
had “identified a new group of
investors who’ve expressed an
interest in looking at our com-
pany”. The firm had also spo-
ken to potential investors it had
pitched previously, but
informed it that the private
placement did not match their
investment/asset allocation
cycles.

“In the interim, we have
entered discussions with two
other local providers in the
industry about using their infra-
structure and products in the
platform,” said Mr Sumner.
“We’re in discussions with the
two licensees about the Multi-
Play technology.

“We have also been in very
good discussions with a foreign

partner as well about financing
our head-end construction. That
is a $2 million proposal we are
currently negotiating. They
have given us a proposal to con-
struct the entire IP head-end,
which reduces the capital we’re
looking to spend in the first
instance.”

Mr Sumner added that IP
Solutions International had also
been “placing draft contracts”
with potential hotel and gated
community customers.

He added: “Those contracts
are under active review. We
hope to close them in 14 days or
sooner.

“We are very encouraged by
the progress we have made over
the last month, month-and-a-
half, and based on the momen-
tum we’ve got we expect to see
a lot more progress over the
next month to six weeks, at
which time we will be in a posi-
tion to deploying services to
hotel properties and gated com-
munities.”

IP Solutions International has
targeted serving “well in excess
of 5,000 hotel rooms within a
year” of its creation, and has

Engineering merger’s ‘one-stop
shop’ fights 35-40% business drop

FROM page 1B

The merger, which will cre-
ate an entity with more than 30
employees, will see Mr Reiss
head up Islands by Design, with
Mr Bishop providing “assis-
tance as needed”. Mr Bishop
said that, ultimately, it would
end up as a 50/50 joint venture.

Estimating that market
demand for Bahamian engi-
neering services had shrunk by
“35 per cent to 40 per cent at
least” as a result of the global
economic downturn, and virtu-
al stoppage of many foreign
development and Bahamian-
generated construction projects,
Mr Bishop said the merger had
been driven by this in concert
with the need to “provide better
service to clients, which might
attract more business”.

By joining forces, Mr Bishop
explained that Islands by
Design’s specialist services on
the environmental, marine and
wildlife side would provide a
perfect complement to Reiss
Engineering’s main focus, which
was on civil and construction
engineering, plus water and
waste water engineering.

This combination, Mr Bish-
op said, would enable the
merged companies to “go for-
ward with a better product. It
makes us a better team. It just
means the clients can go to one
shop if they need to. It just
makes it a lot more efficient”.

Islands by Design, through its
environmental work, was often
called upon by developers to
prepare Environmental Impact
Assessments (EIAs) and the
like prior to projects starting.
Once developments started,
though, the company was often
required to sub-contract civil
engineering work out to other
companies because it was not
specialist in this area.

“Before, what we were doing
was sub-contracting work, and
any time you do that, you pass
on extra costs to the client,” Mr
Bishop explained.

“In today’s competitive
world, we have to improve ser-
vice and cut costs where you
can to remain competitive. By



“In today’s
competitive
world, we have
to improve
service and cut
costs where you
can to remain
competitive.”



Keith Bishop

providing better service to
clients, hopefully we’ll get more
business. In a shrinking market,
you've got to be creative.”
Providing quality service at a
competitive price would be key,
Mr Bishop explained, in efforts
by Bahamian engineers to ward
off competition from primarily
US companies, who were
increasingly seeing the Bahamas
as an attractive market given
the lack of demand back home.

“What we’re seeing is that the
squeeze is biting back in the US,
and we’re seeing Bahamian pro-
fessionals as being almost
preyed upon by US contrac-
tors,” Mr Bishop said. “They’re
desperate to get work and are
coming over here.

“While it’s definitely slowed,
we have a little bit of construc-
tion going on.”

Following the merger, all the
Bahamian operations will com-
bined at Islands by Design’s
Nassau headquarters, with the
US side continuing to be run
out of Reiss Engineering’s
offices there.

Mr Bishop said Reiss Engi-
neering’s expertise in water and
waste water engineering, and
the technology it had access to,
would be especially valuable in
the Bahamas given that this
nation was “a little archaic” in
its approach to recycling waste
water, letting it run into the
ground or septic tanks.

Mr Reiss added: “The real
benefit to the two firms, and
from an opportunity standpoint
when viewed from the client’s
perspective, is that Islands by
Design has a history of very

SUE
a

Well established wholesaler requires a salesman for
the snack food division. Individual must have had
experience is sales with emphasis on large food stores.
Only individuals with a proven record of being able
to work unsupervised and achieve results will be

considered.

Must be able to drive standard shift vehicle and
be in possession of current valid driver’s license.
Individuals not meeting the stated requirements will
not be considered for the post. Company offers good

benefits.

c/o DA 67134
P.O.BOX N3207
Nassau, Bahamas



UT

Commercial Building
Known as Lees Carpet Building - Shirley Street, Nassau

— = _

Gross Floor Area
11,278 sq. ft.

Site Area
18,756 sq. ft.

Located in the
Vicinity of
Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management,

P.O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, The Bahamas
to reach us on or before February 12, 2009
For further information, please contact: 356-1608; 356-1685 or 502-0929



high quality service with EIAs
etc, and my firm has a long his-
tory on civil work. It’s a one-
stop shop concept that res-
onates well with companies that
need that service, and provides
much greater depth in terms of
staff and skill sets.”

Mr Reiss explained that the
two companies were merging
their capabilities, service deliv-
ery and internal organisations, a
process that was already in
train. Name changes was an
issue very much for the distant
future.

“One of the things we as
Bahamians need to make sure
we do to protect the market is
that we present our true skill
sets as Bahamians, scientists or
engineers, and show the value
we can bring in the delivery of
services through adding value,”
Mr Reiss said.

BATAMLA

plans to expand into the
Bahamas residential market and
the wider Caribbean “24
months or sooner” after its
launch.

The launch is timed to coin-
cide with the opportunities that
will result from liberalisa-
tion/deregulation of the

Bahamian telecommunications
industry, plus the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) privatisation and
end to Cable Bahamas’ cable
TV monopoly. Once Cable












Bahamas’ exclusivity on the
provision of cable television ser-
vices expires later this year in
October, IP Solutions Interna-
tional is aiming to break into
the Bahamian residential mar-
ket in Phase II.

It is now trying to set up its
own wireless infrastructure and
a self-sufficient network, some-
thing that would enable it to
avoid ‘digging up’ hotels and
running fibre lines to rooms
when the time came for instal-
lation.

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.







The Candidate should have the following requirements:
* Have 5-7 years experience with the Caterpillar or
similar Product Line, have worked in a Caterpillar
dealership or a similar Organization;
Have training in Ordering and Receiving Parts



Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count

Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University would be an

asset;



Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the




Parts Department;

Must have experience in process statistical control in
planning, programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.









This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts






Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work







experience to:

M & E Limited,

P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email




me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this






position will be contacted.

» ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

CANCY)

INTERNAL AUDITOR
‘ONAL AUDIT DEPARTS

4. Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Intenmal Auditor in the Intemal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position lachide, but are wot limited te the following:

* Produces audit programs and submit the same for aperoval of the Chief Internal Auditor
* Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited
* Conducts financial, opernbonal and [TS aaudat ssslpnments In accordance with established adit Programs.

* This Involves a complete assessment of the systems of internal control, risk exposures and the eticiency,
effectiveness gind economec use of resources lo achieve management obpectives

* Produces audit reports on audit concems, their causes, effects and the audit recommendations in

accomlance with the [LA Starklartis:

* Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate findings and produce investigation reports: exercising

the 1A‘s ethical standards é.g., confidentiality, ete

* Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies, manpower efficiency

and new computer applications

* Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review and release
to management and the Audit Committee
* Assembles aunlit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files produced by the Assistant Internal

Auditors and the Avadit Clerks

* Trains, couches amd direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and otters general supereision and technical
support to the Assistant Internal Auditors)

* Comlucts componite research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud investigations. (producing

the asenciibed reperrts|

* Assist the AGMIChief Intermal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and affer direct assistance on

major mnvestigatians

* Corde andits in conjunction with the Extersal Auditors and produce working papers for the External

Auditors year-end andi

* Conducts stock taking observation ewercises, Fam ily Island audits and special agi gnments

Job requirements inchude:

* Bachelor degree in Accounting of other closely related discipline

* Professional aceountineg cervtication fee. CA. CPA)

highly desirable

: Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills

* Lind problem solving skills

In. addition completing the CLA would be

*Koowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs, Also knowledge of audit software and a goad

working knowledge of tle H-TE system are required

* Good knowledge of the Corporation's operating policies, systema and procedures

+ Management and supervision skills

* A minimum of 3 years experience

Salary for the position is in Group 3 of the Senior Staff Salary Scales

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Fonn io: The Manager-Human
Reseurces & Training Department. Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box

N-7309 Nassau Bahamas on or before: February 24, 2009,





a et

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST











TT ae NG



















iil





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

THE TRIBUNE



MARINE FORECAST



! as Vv
i ! = — pe
i“ r 2 a — _ 7 nl
$ Le = «2 i «2 0]1|2/3/4|5|6|7|s|9]10h1
i — ; — Low | moverare | HicH | VHIGH |
: “xr ORLANDO \
\ High:77° F/25°C re a Partly sunny. Partly cloudy. Breezy with plenty of Sunshine. Mostly sunny and Partly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
a Low61°FAG°C — sun. pleasant. and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
woo hee \ High: 82° High: 82° High: 79° High: 75°
. Rs c High: 83° Low: 71° Low: 70° Low: 69° Low: 62° Low: 64° see ey
_TAMPA fifo eee a A
High: 76° F/24°C a 68°-61° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 62° F/16°C rp f. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:24am. 25 4:15am. -03
a @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:51pm. 2.7 4:28pm. -0.3
: ; ; Saturd 11:07am. 23 5:04am. -0.1
3 AY 7 Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Siillay T153am. 01 554am. 01
j r — ABACO Temperature 557 p.m. 0.0
Z | Le _ 5 High 82° F/28° C ; :
; ' Y High: 77° F/25°C Sunset anenetassdiec estates diuees anecaaiheeee 5 Monday 12:31 am. 94 6:49am. 03
ip " Low:65°F/18°C LOW oeeeeeeeeeeeee 64° F/18° C 12:42pm. 20 6:48pm. 0.2
4 Wik ow: 65° F/ Normal high... TE ge
. eo Normal low 64° F/18° C
joe @ WEST PALM BEACH es Last year's HIGH voccccccccccccsseseesseees 81° F/27°C SUN AND Moon
= High: 81° F/27°C een VOW oeeceeeeecteesesseeseeeeesees 71° F/22° C ca oe a re
Low: 64° FA18°C Precipitation, unrise...... ‘46.a.m. Moonrise ... 10:21 p.m.
" & .. As of 1 p.m. yesterday ou... 0.00" Sunset....... 6:03 p.m. Moonset ..... 9:08 a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT il. Year to date ‘ob ee ee Fal
High: 80° F/27° C @ High: 76° F/24° C Normal year to date ......cccccscccscccsecsecseestesees 2.48" - 7 -
Low: 67° F/A9°C Low: 64° F/18°C ey e Ws
* AccuWeather.com = Gm
= a i. Forecasts and graphics provided by ay - ‘ay
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb.16 Feb.24 Mar.4 Mar. 10
= 5 High: 81° F/27°C ELEUTHERA
2 Low: 66°F/18°C NASSAU SE Era’
High: 83° F/28° C i
zy Low: 71° F/22°C
os en @ on
KEY WEST ill. 2 CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26° C —_ High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 70° F/21°C Low: 63° F/17°C
e =
-_ . i
> GREATEXUMA ae SAN SALVADOR
in. q High: 81° F/27°C
; ANDROS Low: 71° F/22° C few: 65° ie c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's , Oe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 84° F/29° C an
Low:67° F/19°C FP in
a
a
LONGISLAND
Low: 65° F/18°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday —_ MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W = High: 82° F/28° C
F/C FIC FC FC Fic FIC FC FC FC FC Fic FC a Low: 64° F/18° C
Albuquerque 50/10 27/-2 s 48/8 25/-3 ¢ Indianapolis 46/7 31/0 pc 41/5 25/-3 ¢ Philadelphia 46/7 28/-2 s 41/5 30/-1 pe
Anchorage 27/-2 18/-7 27/-2 19/-7 pc Jacksonville 72/22 56/13 pe 75/23 57/13 t Phoenix 6417 46/7 s 60/15 42/5 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 66/18 49/9 pc 62/16 44/6 + Kansas City 40/4 22/5 c = 341 21/6 po Pittsburgh 40/4 24/-4 po 38/8. 24/-4 sn RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:84°F/29°c
Atlantic City 46/77 21/6 s 43/6 21/-6 pc Las Vegas 5512 37/2 po 54/12 35/4 pce Portland,OR 47/8 310 sh 47/8 35/1 pc High: 82° F/28° C Low:67°F/19°C
Baltimore 48/8 30/-1 s 42/5 30/-1_ pc Little Rock 60/15 41/ sh 57/13 37/2 § Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4 s 47/8 344 4 Low:63°F/17°C eae
Boston 37/2 23/-5 s 39/3 26/-3 pc Los Angeles 60/15 44/6 r 60/15 46/7 pc St. Louis 52/11 35/1 ¢ 38/3 26/-3 pc . <=
Buffalo 32/0 17/-8 sf 30/-1 16/-8 c Louisville 56/13 38/3 pc 46/7 33/0 c Salt Lake City 36/2 24/-4 c¢ 32/0 21/-6 sn GREATINAGUA ie
Charleston, SC 72/22 51/10 pce 65/18 51/10 t Memphis 6216 47/8 sh 54/12 37/2 s San Antonio 78/25 55/12 pe 68/20 52/11 pc High: 84° F/29° C
Chicago 42/5 24/-4 pc 33/0 23/-5 sn Miami 81/27 66/18 pc 82/27 65/18 s San Diego 60/15 49/9 r 6116 49/9 pc Low. 66°FAG°C
Cleveland 36/2 23/-5 pc 34/1 25/-3 sn Minneapolis 30/-1 14/-10 pc 27/-2 13/-10 ¢ San Francisco 53/11 43/6 r 5412 47/8 1 .
Dallas 69/20 38/3 pe 59/15 415 s5 Nashville 6216 42/5 pce 55/12 36/2 c Seattle 45/7 35/1 s 45/7 33/0 pe
Denver 32/0 15/-9 sn 30/-1 13/-10 c New Orleans 71/21 62/16 t 71/21 56/13 t Tallahassee 66/18 54/12 sh 71/21 52/11 + oh
Detroit 38/3 27/-2 pc 38/3 25/-3 sn New York 42/5 29/-1 s 43/6 31/0 pc Tampa 76/24 62/16 pce 76/24 60/15 pc
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 s 81/27 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 60/15 28/-2 pc 48/8 31/0 s Tucson 6317 41/5 s 56/13 36/2 pc — Bn
Houston 73/22 53/11 t 68/20 51/10 ¢ Orlando 77/25 6146 pce 83/28 60/15 pc Washington, DC 53/11 32/0 s 44/6 31/0 +

Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
F/C F/C F/C F/C Saturday: Eat 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Acapulco 89/31 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 S FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Amsterdam 37/2 32/0 sn 39/3 34/1 Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Ankara, Turkey 45/7 34/1 1 48/8 32/0 f ABACO Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Athens 52/11 425 ¢ 49/9 398 6 Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
Auckland 73/22 57/13 pc 68/20 55/12 c
Bangkok 97/36 77/25 pc 98/36 77/25 s
Barbados 85/29 74/23 pe 85/29 74/23 s pi
Barcelona 5110 39/3 s 50/10 38/3 s Topay's U.S. FORECAST
Beijing 50/10 32/0 pc 45/7 19/-7 pe
Beirut 70/21 62/16 pc 70/21 60/15 s
Belgrade 31/0 26/-3 sn 30/-1 26/-3 c
Berlin 32/0 23/-5 sf 30/-1 23/-5 pe
Bermuda 67/19 58/14 pc 65/18 60/15 pc
Bogota 68/20 47/8 t 66/18 47/8 +
Brussels 39/3 34/1 sn 41/5 30/-1 pe
Budapest 36/2 28/-2 sn 37/2 24/-4 pc
Buenos Aires 93/33 73/22 s 97/36 77/25 pc : 4
Cairo 75/23 56/13 pc 77/25 56/13 s 3/43 , ee = ic
Calcutta 88/31 66/18 s 92/33 69/20 s oO =
Calgary 15/-9 1/-17 ¢ 14/10 -1/-18 c ee we 4 es
Cancun 84/28 72/22 pc 96/30 66/18 s ee ] ~S@
Caracas 83/28 68/20 sh 83/28 69/20 pc s'os)Angeles T we
Casablanca 71/21 49/9 s 73/22 55/12 ¢ 60/44
Copenhagen 35/1 25/-3 s 36/2 29/-1 s â„¢==<_ (COLD)
Dublin 46/7 39/3 pe 46/7 41/5 sh
Frankfurt 37/2 30/-1 sn 36/2 28/-2 pc
Geneva 32/0 29/-1 sn 32/0 22/-5 ¢
Halifax 32/0 10/-12 ¢ 27/-2 14/-10 c
Havana 35/29 62/16 s 35/29 62/16 s Showers
Helsinki 28/-2 21/6 sf 27/-2 14/-10 pe T-storms # 81/66
Hong Kong 79/26 70/21 pc 77/25 70/21 ¢ Rain Bae Fronts
Islamabad 60/15 44/6 1 7/21 42/5 s 4 Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and re
Istanbul 49/9 40/4 + 41/5 37/2 sn Snow precipitation. TeSEUts bands are bine for the day. Warm fitnfitentita
Jerusalem 69/20 48/8 pc 71/21 49/99 s Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary angunfls
Johannesburg 71/21 55/12 pe 75/23 57/13 s
Kingston 84/28 74/23 s 84/28 75/23 sh = z
Lima 84/28 68/20 c 85/29 67/19 c & os us 20s [3081 als
London 41/5 34/1 pc 43/6 39/3 pc
Madrid 57N3 30/-1 s 59/15 34/1 s
Manila 90/32 74/23 pc 91/32 75/23 pc
Mexico City 81/27 46/7 s 80/26 43/6 s a a TO N S a RA MN ¢ =
Monterrey 88/31 61/16 s 86/30 59/15 s
Montreal 25/-3 9/-12 ¢ 27/-2 9/-12 pc
Moscow 32/0 28/-2 sn 34/1 28/-2 sn
Munich 25/-3 24/-4 sn 26/-3 17/-8 sn
Nairobi 88/31 55/12 pc 87/30 55/12 pc N ;
New Delhi 80/26 54/12 pc 78/25 51/10 pe eC St QO
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St. Thomas 82/27 73/22 s 82/27 73/22 s vf “
San Juan 97/36 72/22 pe 99/37 71/21 s “the smart choice is
San Salvador 90/32 68/20 s 90/32 71/21 c ye
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Sao Paulo 75/23 62/16 c 76/24 63/17 + Is, —— i”
Seoul 49/9 30/-1 37/2 17/-8 wii pe 4 i _
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Vancouver 43/6 32/0 436 320 po ft MewProviseare / Grond Bohoma.! Abana Fleuthere Fyuma
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Warsaw 36/2 34/1 sn 37/2 30/-1 sn b BEAD 20) Tek (2A) 50-3500 Tet (240) 367-4004 Ba (DED) 30-18 Be (14) NEG
Winnipeg 20/-6 -2/-18 c 17/-8 -1/-18 c \ il

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace





TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

(ABOVE) St John’s
Caryn Moss moves the
eee) Ute e) elon

(LEFT) West Minister
Michelle Burrows is
fouled by QC Alexan-
tria Marshall.



BFA congratulated for
milestone achievement

The Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation congratulates President
Anton Sealey and the executive
of The Bahamas Football Asso-
ciation on its achievement in
negotiating with its governing
body, Fédération Internationale
de Football Association (FIFA)
to host its General Assembly in
The Bahamas.

The FIFA General Assembly
will attract thousands of mem-
bers from 208 countries to The
Bahamas, to be accompanied by
hundreds of news reporters.

FIFA’s General Assembly will

be held 29th May - 4th June,
2009 at Atlantis Resorts.

The Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation encourages other sport-
ing Federations and Associations
to make the most of our natural
national resources and bid with
their international bodies to have
their general meeting in The
Bahamas.

It now appears from all indi-
cations that the Government
generally and the Ministries of
Sports & Tourism in particular
are prepared to lend expertise
and assistance in these projects

to Federations bringing in large
groups of sports tourists.

The BOA is proud and happy
that one of our Federations has
now shown the power of sports
tourism at work in attracting this
major group to our shores.

As the official representatives
of the Olympic Movement in
The Bahamas, the BOA further
encourages all Bahamians, espe-
cially those working in front line
tourism positions to do every-
thing possible during the visit of
FIFA and its delegates to show
the best face of our country.

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS











ORGANISERS at the AF }
Adderley Junior High Scholl :
have released the schedule for }
the first three days of compe- }
tition for the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic }
that will get started on Mon- }
day at the Kendal Isaacs }
Gymnasium. ;

SCHEDULE:
3:30 pm Doris Johnson vs}
Nassau Christian Academy. }
4:30 pm Charles W. :
Saunders vs CI Gibson.
5:30 pm CV Bethel vs
St. Anne’s.

B. R. E. A. K.

7 pm CC Sweeting

vs Galilee.

8 pm Kingsway Acadeym
vs Government High.

9 pm St. John’s

vs CR Walker.

SCHEDULE
3:30 pm RM Bailey
vs Teleos.
4:30 pm Church of God
vs Queen’s College.
5:30 pm Winner game 3
vs Winner game 6.

B. R. E. A. K.

7 pm Winner game 4
vs Winner game 5.
8 pm Winner game 1
vs Winner game 8.
9 pm Winner game 2
vs Winner game 7.

SCHEDULE
1 pm South Andros
vs Catholic High.
2pm Alpha/Omega
vs Bimini.
3 pm Temple Christian
Academy vs
Tabernacle Baptist.
4pm Sunland Baptist vs
Mt. Carmel.

B. R. E. A. K.

6 pm Prince William vs
Bishop Michael Eldon.
7 pm North Eleuthera vs
St. George’s.

8 pm Eight Mile Rock
vs St. Paul’s.

9 pm Westminster vs
Jack Hayward.

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Comets clinch third junior
girls championship

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

QUEEN’S COLLEGE COMETS - 40
WESTMINSTER DIPLOMATS - 35

WITH her team trailing 25-
19 heading into the fourth
quarter, Alexandria Marshall
placed the Comets on her back,
willed her team to a game three
victory and clinched the third
BAISS junior girls champi-
onship in school history.

Marshall saved her best
game of the season for the
league finale pouring in 31 of
her teams 40 points, 14 of
which came in the all impor-
tant fourth quarter.

Marshall began the fourth
with a three point play to bring
her team within three points.

The Comets star forward
scored her team’s first eight
points of the period, capping
a run which gave her team a
28-27 lead with 3:56 remain-
ing.

Kerri Bascom scored on the
ensuing possession to give the
Comets a 30-27 advantage.

Marshall’s best play of the

game may have come ona
series where she drew a foul
rather than score.

The foul was the fifth on
Diplomats star Thea Hanna,
who finished with 18 points
and had traded baskets with
Marshall throughout the quar-
ter.

Marshall made one of two
free throws to give the Comets
a 33-31 lead with 2:19 remain-
ing.

With Hanna sidelined, the
Diplomats struggled to score
and the Comets took advan-
tage of the ball handling defi-
ciencies.

Talia Thompson stole a pass
and took the ball coast to coast
finishing with a lay-up to give
the Comets their largest lead of
the game, 38-31 with 1:18 left
to play.

Thompson finished with sev-
en, while Bascom added the
Comets only other score of the
game.

For the Diplomats Petrel
Pickstock finished with 11, sec-
ond on the team to Hanna’s
18.

Marshall said her team made
a determined effort to come



TALKING SOFTBALL: Legacy's Vice President for Softball, Yvonne
Lockhart, right, chats with softball coaches from Indian River Com-
munity College from Florida during an earlier visit to Grand bahama,
and local with college recruiter, Dwayne Jennings.

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out with a concentrated effort
in game three, particularly in
the second half.

“We just wanted to come
out here, play with all our
heart try to put alot of effort in
it, but we had to finish the
offensive plays in the second
because early in the first half
we were not doing so well so
we had to step it up and bring
our best game to the table,”
she said. “It feels very good,
everybody was hoping for us
to win a championship and I
really wanted it because this is
my last year.”

Comets Head Coach, Ter-
rence McSweeney said he was
proud of his team’s effort but
applauded the Diplomats’
improvements they made over
the course of the season

“It is mixed emotions
because the girls from the
Diplomats they practised with
us, they worked with us and
they were able to go and work
on some other things,” he said.
“We give them kudos because
it is an increase to the BAISS
junior and senior girls.”

The Comets took the series
two games to one.

QC Alexantria Marshall drives...



Legacy boys baseball, girls
softball season set to begin

FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama - As the opening of
the Legacy boys baseball and
girls softball seasons approach,
the player registration drive
for both disciplines continue
even as Legacy considers revis-
ing its baseball divisions to bet-
ter prepare the boys for post
season competition.

The baseball season, open
to boys from 4 to 15, is expect-
ed to open February 28 at
10:00 am at the YMCA, and
girls softball season, ages 6-18,
opens the following weekend,
March 7 at 12 noon at GB.
Catholic High Playing Field.

Legacy’s Player Agent,
Eugene Thompson, pointed
out that this year the Associa-
tion is looking at a revision of
the age divisions and may add
a new baseball division to bet-
ter prepare the boys for post
season play.“We are proposing
the addition of a Mustang
Division which will give us five
divisions for our youngsters
and better prepare them as
they progress through our sys-
tem. The league has the Shet-
land (Tee-Ball) Division for
4-6 year olds; the Pinto Divi-
sion (Coach-Pitch) for 7 and
8 year olds; the new Mustang
Division for 9 and 10 year olds;
the Bronco Division for 11 and
12 year olds, and the Pony
Division for our 13-15 year old
boys.

FROM page 11

to reminisce about the good
time at home.”

August Campbell, a native of
Grand Bahama, signed to play
for Duke University.

As he head to Fayetteville,
Justin Campbell said he was
eager to get started as the offen-
sive linesman coach had already
indicated to him that they want-
ed him to come in and get pre-
pared to play centre, possibly
as the starter.

“Tjust have to work out,” said
Campbell, who returned to
Charlotte on Wednesday where
he intended to get back in phys-
ical condition after taking the
past two weeks off.

Although school won’t start
until August, Campbell said he
had a busy summer ahead of
him as he “step my game up.”
Once he graduates from Victo-
ry Center in May, Campbell said
he will have to report to summer
camp at Fayetteville in July.

Campbell, the son of Dwight
and Yvonne Campbell, said he
was delighted to take the short
break to come home after sign-
ing with Fayetteville. He noted
that his family was over-
whelmed that he was finally
going to live out a childhood
dream.

“Workouts and games are
also on-going for Legacy’s 16-
18 year olds to help prepare
them for post season play and
for opportunities to be seen
by scouts and High Schools
abroad,” Thompson said.

Meanwhile, baseball prac-
tice continues for ALL players
and ALL divisions on Satur-
days at 12:30 pm at the
YMCA. Registration also con-
tinues at the concession stand
at the YMCA during the same
time.

SOFTBALL

The softball registration
continues this weekend in the
Bight Mile Rock community
when Yvonne Lockhart and
her coaching team travel west
to conduct workouts and reg-
ister players beginning at 10:00
am at St. Agnes Church Field.
Registration of boys interested
in baseball will also take place
at this session.

“This weekend we’re invit-
ing all interested girls in the
communities of west Grand
Bahama, ages 6-18, to our
workout session at St. Agnes
Church Playing Field, make
themselves known and regis-
ter for the upcoming softball
season. Those persons inter-
ested in coaching are also
asked to make themselves
known so that we can begin
assigning teams,” said Ms.

Lockhart. Next weekend,
February 21, the Legacy team
will be conducting workouts
and registering players and
coaches in East Grand
Bahama beginning at 11:00
am.

Legacy’s Vice President for
Softball also revealed plans
for two upcoming events to
assist players and coaches,
namely the rescheduled Soft-
ball College Showcase with
the Indian River Junior Col-
lege Team from Florida, now
set for April 17-19, and a spe-
cial clinic for pitchers and
coaches with another visiting
college coach and his staff in
May.

“We’re pleased to have
these coaches continue to
express an interest in working
with our girls in The Bahamas
and we look forward to having
many of them interested in a
college opportunity prepare
themselves early; we are also
inviting those interested in
coaching softball to join in
these sessions and improve the
knowledge and skills that they
want to share with their
teams,” said Ms. Lockhart.

Parents interested in regis-
tering their children can con-
tact: BASEBALL - Lillian
Carey, 352-3636; Eugene
Thompson, 646-1665; SOFT-
BALL — Yvonne Lockhart,
533-7989.

heads to Fayetteville

“T always had that dream,
somewhere in the back of my
head that I will play college
football,” he said. “I just knew
that I had to work hard at it.”

His proud father said their
family was quite pleased with
his achievement so far.

“Pm proud of him in terms
of his discipline. That was our
number one concern when he
left here,” Dwight Campbell
pointed out. “ve known of
people who went off to the
States only to return in a couple
of months or not return at all.

“Hopefully what we have
instilled in him as a young boy
will stick with him as he con-
tinues to excel. But I’m very
proud of his accomplishments
so far.”

Now that he’s accomplished
his goal of obtaining a collegiate
scholarship, Justin Campbell
said he ultimately wanted to go
all the way and play in the
National Football League.

“That’s a goal, but I still have
to go and work on my acade-
mics, just in case that doesn’t
work out,” he said. “At least I
will have something to fall back
on. But at least playing in the
NFL is a goal.”

As a fan of the Tampa Buc-
caneers, Campbell said he

would eventually like to suit up
for them, but if the opportunity
doesn’t present itself, he will be
willing to satisfy with whatever
school is willing to pick him up.

“Any team will do,” he
stressed.

For those Bahamian players
who also aspire to follow their
dreams of playing in college and
even far as venturing into the
pro ranks, Campbell used them
to “keep your dream alive and
stick to it.

“Hard work and dedication
is what it takes. You definitely
have to do your school work.
So you have to stay on track
with your school work and you
could achieve your goal.”

For Campbell, he hopes to
achieve his ultimate goal so that
he can “make my family and
the Bahamas very proud.” At
present, he’s on course to
accomplish that.

“T would hope that more of
our Bahamian players would
come over and play in college,”
he said. “There are a couple of
us playing high school now, who
are going off to college.

“So with the talent that we
have here, if some of them are
given the opportunity, I think
they can accomplish their goal
as well.”



THE TRIBUNE



Sports

TRACK
CLUB MONICA
MEET

8 STARTING tonight at
6 pm at the Thomas A. i
Robinson Track and Field :
Stadium, the 9thannual
Club Monica Track and
Field Classic will take
place. The meet will wrap
up on Saturday, starting at :
noon, :
All of the local clubs are :
expected to participate as i
athletes try to surpass the
qualifying marks for the
Carifta Games that will
take place in St. Lucia
over the Easter holiday
weekend.

BASKETBALL
NPBA RESULTS

¢ THE New Providence
ISYIS eel byl ate 1nCeynl
played two games on
Wednesday night at the
Gi Groves Gg urvernsttian)
with the following results
posted:

In the opener, the Fox-
ies Pros improved their
record to 8-7 as they
defeated the South West
Printing Falcons (3-13)
110-103. Denash Hanna
had a game high 28 points
for the Pros, while Jude
Rolle had 26 for the Fal-
ferns

In the feature game, the
Y'Cares Wreckers (8-7)
defeated the Sunshine
Auto Rough Ryders (10-
6) 94-84. Brandon Ingra-
ham scored 18 points in
the win for the Wreckers.
Mario Pickstock had a
game high 19 in the loss
for the Ryders.

The NPBA will be back
in action tonight with a
double header and again
on Saturday before the
league take a break for
the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Clas-
sic that will start on Mon-
day at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.



SOFTBALL
MASTERS GAMES
POSTPONED

¢ THE Masters Softball
League has announced :
that due to the funeral ser- :
vice of one of its mem- i
bers, Dennis Smith, on
Saturday, all games sched-
uled at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Soft-
ball Park at the Southern
Recreation Grounds, has
been postponed.

However, league presi-
dent Anthony ‘Boots’
Weech, is requesting that
its membes show up in
team uniform tops at St.
Agnes Anglican Church
on Baillou Hill Road at 11 :
am. He will be interned in }
Lakeview Memorial Gar-
dens, John F. Kennedy
Drive and Gladstone
Road.

Call to
advertise:
502-2371














op FRIDAY,

PAGE 11



*
fe U

a

> aaa
* ca



FEBRUARY 13,

2009

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ST JOHNS Darinque Young ride sac Ashlee Bethel

Campbell
heads to
Fayetteville

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHEN Justin Campbell left
Jordan Prince William High in
2007, he went to Charlotte,
North Carolina with the inten-
tion of getting an athletic schol-
arship to pursue his dream of
playing collegiate football.

Two years after he made the
move where he starred for Vic-
tory Christian Center School,
Campbell is now on his way to
playing as a Bronco on Fayet-
teville State football team, start-
ing with his freshman year in
August.

“Things are going good, aca-
demically and sports wise,” said
Campbell, who was home this
week for a family funeral. “?’m
just doing my thing.”

The 18-year-old, who started
playing in the Commonwealth
American Football League
under coach Richard Gardiner
after he jokingly admitted that
he “couldn’t defy gravity to play
football,” said the football cli-
mate was totally different in the
states than it was here.

“They are more disciplined
and dedicated,” Campbell
pointed out. “Whatever you do,
you just have to try hard, but I
believe they push you more to
work much harder.”

As an offensive linesman,
playing centre and free tackle,
Campbell has had two stellar
seasons for Victory Christian
that he was selected to play in
the Oasis All-Star Shrine Clas-
sic in November in Charlotte.

The classic featured the top
players in the joint states of



=
Justin Campbell

North and South Carolina, who
were teamed up to play on two
opposing All-Star teams.

“Tt was fun. It was enlighten-
ing to know that I was playing
on the same team with another
Bahamian,” said Campbell of
August Campbell, who played
as an outside linebacker for
Arden Christ School in North
Carolina.

“When I saw the name
Campbell when I first arrived, I
thought that he had to be a
Bahamian. When I finally found
out, I was just happy to know
that there was another Bahami-
an there.”

Unfortunately, the Campbells
combo (who didn’t play at the
same time on the field) wasn’t
enough to power the North
team pass the South as they lost
by more than a field goal.

“We did have a chance to
watch each other play and we
talked with each other about
the way we played,” Justin
Campbell said. “So it was good

SEE page 10





BOYS AND
GIRLS
LEGACY
BASEBALL
RETURNS

SAC takes BAISS
senior girls title

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

SAC BIG RED MACHINE - 41
ST. JOHN’S GIANTS - 30

THERE would be no repeat in the Senior
Girls’ division as the defending champions fell in
the third and deciding game unable to match
the size of the Big Red Machine’s front-line.

SAC’s Brittney Harrison scored a game high
17 points to lead the Big Red Machine to the
title, dominating the interior in the second half.

The Big Red Machine trailed 17-15 at the half,
but Harrison began the third quarter scoring six
consecutive points to put her team ahead for
good.

A free throw by Alicia Musgrove capped a
10-0 run which gave SAC a 25-17 advantage.

Domonique Young gave the Giants their first

score of the half from the line, 2:23 into the quar-
ter and Alexia Maycock scored the team’s first
field goal with 1:49 remaining.

Young brought the Giants within three with a
drive to the basket which trimmed the deficit
25-22,

SAC ended the quarter with a baseline jumper
by Christian Albury and a three point play by
Harrison to take a 30-25 lead into the fourth.

After Young fouled out early in the fourth
quarter, with 11 points, the Giants offence unrav-
elled, struggling to score on the Big Red
Machine’s stout interior defence anchored by
Harrison.

SAC led by as much as 10 points on a three
point play my Musgrove which gave her team a
35-25 lead with 3:30 left to play.

Musgrove finished with 13 points while Albury
added six and Ashlee Bethel four.

The Big Red Machine took the series two
games to one.

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BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

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PRICE — 75¢

SPORTS STARTS ON PAGE ELEVEN

Handling of pornographic’ 3 tomes,
incident angers parents

Heated meeting
at primary school

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

PARENTS of children
attending a New Providence
Catholic primary school are
outraged over how adminis-
trators handled a “porno-
graphic” related incident that
occurred on campus.

Almost two weeks after the
unspecified “incident” hap-
pened, parents were called to
a special meeting at the school
on Monday night.

images of young children and
teenagers involved in traffic
accidents and in drug and sex
related situations.

The parents became
increasingly puzzled by the
nature of the meeting and
demanded an explanation for
the display of images.

When direct answers were
reportedly not forthcoming
from the school, the meeting
became heated.

Rumours started circulating
among the parents about an
incident that may have

one man dead

Another in custody
after incident in
Cowpen Road area

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



A "DOMESTIC DISPUTE" between two men in
the Cowpen Road area took a tragic turn leaving one
man dead and the other in custody, police said.

Although police would not reveal what sparked the
violent row, reports reaching The Tribune indicate it
may have stemmed from a “love triangle" involving a

woman.

According to a report by Assistant Superintendent
Walter Evans, the incident unfolded on Williams Drive
around 9 pm Wednesday. Police said Harold Gardiner,
49, of North Andros and a 36-year-old man were having
a "verbal altercation" that escalated into a violent attack
in a yard on that street.

At some point during the row, Gardiner was stabbed

At the meeting, parents told
The Tribune, they were shown

Christie says PLP abstained
from final vote on Police Bill

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

multiple times about the body, ASP Evans said. EMS
was called and found Gardiner in the yard lifeless, lying
on his back, with multiple stab wounds about the body.

He was pronounced dead at the scene, ASP Evans
said.

SEE page eight

SEE page six



Bahamas Constitution
‘is a British enactment’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



PLP Leader Perry Christie maintains his
party abstained from the final vote on the
Royal Bahamas Police Force Act 2009
because a part of the Bill is unconstitu-
tional.

And despite the Bill being passed in the
House of Assembly Wednesday night, Mr
Christie vowed his party will continue to
protest until the clause that limits the ser-
vice of the Commissioner and Deputy Com-
missioner of Police to two five-year terms is
removed.

Although the PLP supported all but one of the provisions of

SEE page six



Felipé Major/Tribune staff

THE CONDITION of this sidewalk on Long Wharf is showing signs of serious
deterioration. The road was damaged by waves from rough seas last year.

Kerzner CEO

disappointed

with Tribune
lead story

GEORGE Markantonis,
President and CEO of Kerzner
International Bahamas
expressed extreme disappoint-
ment over the Tribune’s lead
story on Thursday.

Mr Markantonis said that
despite the resort’s very clear
statement that Mr Sol Kerzner
“simply hosted a luncheon to
introduce the Prime Minister
and Cabinet Ministers to new
members of the Kerzner Inter-
national board” and despite the
corroborating statements made
by those attending the lun-
cheon, the last paragraph of the
article implied that there are
pending layoffs at Atlantis tar-

SEE page six



THE Bahamas Constitution is a
“British enactment”, not a docu-
ment enacted by the people of The
Bahamas or its parliament, accord-
ing to Education Minister Carl
Bethel.

Mr Bethel made this observation
during his contribution to the debate
on the second reading of the pro-

SEE page eight



Perry Christie

worth more
UPN MRted IT
is seized

Olam et- 1012)

18-year-old in court on
attempted murder charge

AN 18-YEAR-OLD man was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday on an attempted murder charge.

Police have charged Shavargo Sturrup, a resident of Union Village
Road off Wullf Road, with the attempted murder of Donovan Sturrup.
According to court dockets, the accused attempted to cause Sturrup’s
death on Saturday, January 31. According to reports, the victim was
shot in the chest while standing outside his home on Cox Way, off East
Street south, after he was approached by a man he knew. The two men
reportedly got into an argument, which escalated into a fight. A gun was
pulled and Donovan Sturrup was shot.

Shavargo Sturrup who was arraigned before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday was not required to enter
a plea to the attempted murder charge. He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison and is expected back in court today for a bail hearing.

THE BEST ROOF SEALER



MORE than $8 million
worth of cocaine was seized
by local drug enforcement
officers and US officials

Thursday morning in what
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the most significant cocaine
seizures in the Family
Islands.

According to police,
around 9 am Thursday Drug
Enforcement Unit Officer
along with US officials inter-
cepted and searched a 77-
foot Haitian wooden hull
vessel on the island of Great
Inagua. Over 400 kilos of

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAMA ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Fire badly damages

FLOP eM BtiCelMmOLEnl Onpe re



Firefighters
battle Wulff
Road area blaze
most of morning

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FIRE in the Wulff Road
area could not be contained
before it caused extensive

We Can
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damage to a nearby apartment
building.

Fire fighters spent most of
yesterday morning fighting the
blaze, which it was claimed
was Started when a Rastafari-
an lit a fire to roast peanuts.

The man was issued a warn-
ing by the fire fighters as light-
ing fires in a yard is illegal.

Press liaison officer Walter
Evans said the fire took place
opposite the FYP lumber
yard.

“The report came in around
9am and units arrived five
minutes after the call came in.
There was a two-storey build-
ing nearby and initial reports
were that someone was inside,
however after a search no one
was found.

“There were three apart-
ment units in the back of the
building.

“The rear unit was
destroyed and the other two
units received smoke dam-
age,” Mr Evans said.

He also denied claims that a
baby had to be rescued from
the building and that fire
hydrants in the area were dry,
forcing fire fighters to use
sewage water to contain the
blaze.

“There were four fire trucks
at this scene and if any fire
truck runs out of water, exca-
vator wells are used as there is
one located on nearby Mack-
ey street,” Mr Evans said.

seen anne TE ine off it ree



Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

AG: Govt wants freedom of information bill
before parliament within ‘reasonable’ time

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

ATTORNEY General Michael
Barnett said that government is
still working on its proposal for a
freedom of information law, but is
committed to seeing a bill before
parliament within a “reasonable”

As I reflect upon the short time I’ve been privileged to know You,

[ can’t help but marvel at how lucky | must be.
Lucky to actually be around one the likes of You,

And amazed You'd share Your love with someone like me!

So as others prepare their chocolates, flowers and cute teddy bears,
I'll take a slightly different approach to which I hope You will like.

1) And publish these words even amidst my shy fears,

| And tell the whole world why You are the Love of my life...

I know | certainly didn’t deserve all the times You were there for me,

All those many times You would nurture and care for me.

Especially considering instances when | didn’t fully respect You,
Circumstances that led me to turn away and even neglect You!
But never once did You ever get fed up and make Your retreat,
Even after months of my filling Your head up with my unbeliet.
Unbelief in Your uncanny ability to bring order to my lowly existence,
So I thank You for not leaving me even amidst this foolish resistance.
| But instead You stood by me, and in doing so made me ten times stronger,
| You took the fear from inside of me, and now I’m frightened of love no longer.
I thank You so much for being the best thing to ever happen in my life,
And that's why You are and will always be the ultimate Love of my life...

Tenderness, gentleness, warmth, compassion,
Thoughtfulness, benevolence, unmatched affection:
You are the personification of all that is perfection...

| So Happy Valentine's Day to the one and only Love of my life,
Happy Valentine’s Day to my one and only Jesus Christ...

VV9g

(Written by a man after God's own heart)
Bless God Forever !!!



time. “Most democracies have
moved towards a Freedom of
Information Act and I think it
will be a good thing. We have five
years to put it in place so it is still
a part of our commitment,” Mr
Barnett said.

Freedom of Information laws
are intended to give citizens
access to information held by gov-
ernment and to create mecha-
nisms by which this information
can be obtained. In practice, all
such laws outline certain excep-
tions, often justified on the
grounds of national security.

The US passed its Freedom of
Information Act in 1966. Under
the act, all federal agencies are
required to comply with public
































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solicitations for information, and
are subject to penalties if they fail
to do so.

The UKR’s Act, passed in 2000,
gives citizens the right to demand
access to any information held by
a public authority.

Process

Mr Barnett said the process of
formulating such a law and get-
ting it passed by parliament takes
time.

“People make comments and
they revise it and change it and
modify it until they come up with
a product that everyone is happy
with. Then it has to be approved
by the government and then it

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Michael Barnett

has to go through the parliamen-
tary process,” he explained.

Mr Barnett said media organi-
sations will have the opportunity
to see the Bill before it becomes
law.

According to government’s
website, the Freedom of Infor-
mation Act, when enacted, is
expected to grant every person a
right, subject to certain restric-
tions, to access information held
by government departments,
agencies and other designated
bodies in receipt of state funding.
The Act will also reinforce the
fact that individuals may seek
access to their own data held by
such bodies.

A number of countries in the
region have taken steps toward
greater openness in the last
decade. Barbados, Belize,
Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica,
Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint
Vincent and the Grenadines have
all enacted freedom of informa-
tion laws.

Guyana, Saint Kitts and Nevis
and the Cayman Islands have all
started developing legislation to
increase transparency.

a ie

PU

ee ree eM ctr ge

Mace

ee i Med eal) tas |

{aati

SUIT, SHIRT & TIE
THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 3



0 In brief |



Bail for woman
charged in
connection with
seizure of weapon
and ammunition

A 24-YEAR-OLD woman
charged with two men in con-
nection with a weapon and
ammunitions seizure that
stemmed from a high-speed
police chase, was granted bail
1m the sum of $10,000 yester-
day.

Evelyn Ann Pratt, of South
Beach, was granted bail by
Magistrate Carolita Bethel
after Inspector Ercell Dorsette,
the prosecutor, raised no objec-
tion. Pratt is represented by
lawyer Tai Pinder.

Pratt was arraigned on Tues-
day with Levardo Forbes, 24,
and Trevardo Taylor, 22, of
Derby Road, on the charges of
possession of an unlicensed
firearm and possession of
ammunition.

It is alleged that on Sunday,
February 8, the accused were
found with a silver and black
InterArm .380 pistol and four
live rounds of .380 ammuni-
tion.

The accused have all plead-
ed not guilty to the charges.

It is further alleged that the
three were involved in a high-
speed car chase with Drug
Enforcement Unit officers dur-
ing which a 380 pistol was
thrown from their vehicle.

Forbes and Taylor, who are
represented by attorney Dion
Smith, remain on remand and
are expected back in court
today as the prosecution is
expected to give a further
report in relation to their
antecedents.

The prosecutor told the
court yesterday that Taylor has
an armed robbery and
attempted murder case and a
drug possession case still pend-
ing.

Taylor was granted bail in
Supreme Court on the armed
robbery charge, he said. Taylor
is charged in the October 2007
armed robbery and attempted
murder of Lorraine Francis.

Ms Francis was reportedly
robbed at gunpoint of $22,892
belonging to Holiday Industrial
and then shot in the face.

The prosecutor also told the
court that Forbes has a case
pending in a Nassau Street
Magistrate’s Court. Forbes’
attorney said, however, that
that matter was completed last
November.

MAIN SECTION
Local News

Editorial/Letters. .........

Apprehension
exercise defended
by Immigration
Department

m@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

THE Immigration Depart-
ment yesterday defended its
recent apprehension exercise at
Eleuthera, which some residents
allege was conducted in an inap-
propriate manner.

Some residents claimed that
Haitian families were forced out
of their homes in bitter cold
weather and made to wait for
transportation to the mainland
in an outdoor containment site.

However, the department

said the exercise was carried out
as a result of complaints by
many persons on the island who
described the immigration sit-
uation as “a vexing problem.”
“The main objective of the
exercise was to identify illegal
migrants of all nationalities
residing and working in the
North and Central Eleuthera
Districts,” a statement from the
department said. “In addition,
the team sought to identify per-
sons working without valid
work permits as well as those
engaged in illegal activities. The
team of over 60 Law Enforce-

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ment Officers executed its
planned operations following
its initial briefings.”

This resulted in 225 persons
being interviewed and assessed
with a view of determining their
status on the island.

In some instances documents
were presented and checked.
Once officers were satisfied of
the validity and authenticity of
documents, persons were
released.

Thirty persons were released
after producing proper docu-
mentation and another 33 fam-
ilies produced documents or
paid outstanding fees for the
work permits.

The department collected
some $10,000 in outstanding
fees. The remaining 162 per-
sons were sent to New Provi-
dence for further assessment
and processing.

The department said all per-
sons without legal status will be
repatriated within this week.

“Officers were briefed as to
the acceptable standards in such
operations. Persons were given
the opportunity to satisfy offi-
cials by producing proper doc-
uments. All persons deemed to
be of interest to officials were
afforded the opportunity to col-
lect personal effects/items, prior
to being sent to New Provi-
dence.

The department wishes to
categorically deny any sugges-
tions that suspected illegal
migrants were treated inhu-
manly or less than respected.
The department is fully aware
of its obligations and commit-
ments during such apprehen-
sion exercises and will at all
times adhere to the strictest
code of conduct and best prac-
tices,” the department said.

The Mal at MM aration
WOX OFFICE OPENS AT 1iclh AM DAILY

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY 6TH, 2009

fmepunon new 0 (820 WA an [az [00

arena fr fo

THEREADER ew | 1025 MIA | 4:25 | sts [WA

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eewwmeamed ie | Wk [Wik | NA | Win | es [1 |
Pam euaME wate cop | a:20 |90 | NA | ets [NA | NR]
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PO



HUGH JOHN ARTHUR COTTIS

13TH OCTOBER - 14TH FEBRUARY 2008.

Well loved educator & community leader
“A man is loved not for how tall he stands
but for how often he bends to help, comfort and teach.”

REST IN PEACE HUGH

Remembered by his wife, Sylvia; son, Gregory;
all family members & friends


PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Government should
ensure news distribution

in the Family Islands
ERM E DS

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master






















































































LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A. LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398

Abaco readers need their ‘fix’

WE THOUGHT that by now Bellevue Busi-
ness Depot in Marsh Harbour and Bahamasair
would have concluded an agreement for the
daily delivery of The Tribune to Marsh Har-
bour.

However, although The Tribune continues
to deliver its newspaper to Bahamasair in Nas-
sau to be flown to Marsh Harbour, an agree-
ment as to how much the airline will charge
Bellevue and how it will demand payment is
still in limbo.

The flag carrier wants the Marsh Harbour
business to pay cash when the newspapers arrive
every morning in Marsh Harbour. Bellevue says
this is impossible as the billing is done by weight
and every day The Tribune has a different
weight depending upon how many sections were
printed that day. Bellevue wants to pay the air-
line either weekly or monthly. The airline’s
accounts office says “no” it must be cash on
delivery. The airline says it has no intention of
opening any new accounts. This detail is yet to
be solved.

On Wednesday morning the Tribunes were
flown to Marsh Harbour, and were picked up as
usual by a Bellevue representative. Nothing
was paid. Bellevue thought this must have been
an oversight by the airline’s Nassau office. It was
assumed that Nassau had failed to tell Marsh
Harbour that the collection rules had been
changed and that the newspapers now had to be
paid for before they could be taken from the air-

ort.
7 Abaconians — especially the “newspaper
junkies” — were jubilant. They were still getting
their newspaper. “I don’t have to go into mourn-
ing anymore!” one reader chuckled.

But yesterday morning the story had
changed.

We were wakened by an early morning tele-
phone call. It was Mr Timothy Sands, Bellevue
manager, at the other end.

“Would you believe it,” he said, “Bahamasair
has not delivered this morning’s papers. They
only had one bundle of newspapers to deliver to
Marsh Harbour and they couldn’t even get that
right!”

The Tribunes for Marsh Harbour had been
flown to Freeport.

Mr Sands said he received a call from Mr
Robert Osborne, Bellevue’s owner, who oper-
ates the Bellevue store in Freeport. He said the
newspapers had been delivered to him. He was
tempted to keep them for his own customers,
who were also clamouring for Tribunes, but on
reading in this column how hard Abaconians
were fighting to keep The Tribunes coming, he
hadn’t the heart to ’tief them for his own busi-
ness.

He promised to send them to Abaco on
Regional Air’s 1pm flight. But once more Aba-
conians were disappointed, the newspapers were

not on the plane. Mr Sands was promised that
they would definitely be on the 5pm flight.
When we last spoke with him yesterday after-
noon he had someone waiting at Marsh Har-
bour airport to receive them.

Mr Sands said this kind of service by
Bahamasair was typical of what Abaconians
have had to put up with over the years. Judging
from the complaints our Circulation Depart-
ment in Nassau receives, Abaco is not unique.
Every island has a complaint from time to time.

It was impossible for us to hold Bahamasair
accountable for its service and so we gave up
long ago. We paid our bill, asked no questions
and ceased complaining.

However, with Abaco now paying its own
delivery charges, Bahamasair will not be paid if
it does not deliver. Maybe someone will then
wake up and understand what accountability
and service means.

Mr Sands said that when his representative
arrived at Marsh Harbour airport to collect
Wednesday morning’s Tribune, Monday’s edi-
tion of the Guardian had just arrived — three
days late. Really there is no excuse for this
because the Guardians and Tribunes are
dropped off every morning at Nassau airport at
the same time, in the same van and by the same
driver. Obviously Bahamasair had a space prob-
lem on the flight on which both newspapers
should have been flown, and the Guardian was
bumped. Yet the Guardian will still have to
pay Bahamasair and the newspaper will proba-
bly have to credit its customer because a news-
paper three days late can no longer be sold.

“The Tribune gives us more trouble and
stress than any other item that we sell in our
store,” laughed Mr Sands. “We always get calls:
‘It arrive yet?’ or ‘Remember save me that
paper, I hear there’s a great story’ or ‘T ain’t get
my paper yet, what happening?’ or ‘When that
blankety-blank plane coming?’”

Yesterday ended with an exasperated cus-
tomer shaking his head and sighing: “Oh, man,
yuh know, I gotta get ahold of Ingraham. Ingra-
ham could fix it!”

Mr Sands says when the papers are late or
not delivered, the calls to his store are constant.
“They’re like a bunch of junkies who need their
fix!” As soon as they have The Tribune in their
hands, they’re content for that day. But, then the
circus starts all over the next day if the Tribune
doesn’t arrive or is late.

“The Tribune means more to most Abaco-
nians than the Bible!” said one Abaconian.
When we repeated this comment to another
and remarked that it was rather blasphemous,
the reply was: “ It might be blasphemy, but it’s
true!”

The Tribune apologises to its “newspaper
junkies”, but promises to work with Bellevue to
have their “fix” delivered daily and on time.

DON STAINTON
PROTECTION Lid.

Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

TOP QUALITY TEMPERED
ALUMINUM SECURITY SCREENS

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I find the announcement in
Monday’s Tribune advising of the
termination of the paper to the
Family Islands very troubling.

It is common knowledge that
the national airline, Bahamasair,
flies routes to the Out Islands that
are not profitable presumably for
political reasons. The Govern-
ment of the Bahamas clearly
accepts responsibility for provid-
ing the Bahamian people with
uninterrupted access to the Fam-
ily Islands.

It seems reasonable to expect
the Government of the Bahamas
to accept an equal responsibility
to ensure uninterrupted distrib-

letters@tribunemedia net



ution of news. I am not suggesting
that the newspaper be delivered
free of charge.

However, for Bahamasair to
raise shipping rates at this tenu-
ous economic time appears to be
ill advised. The Tribune’s effort to
address this challenge by supply-
ing the paper over the Internet is
to be commended.

Unfortunately, Bahamians
without access to computers will
not benefit.

Supporters and critics of The
Tribune both lose in this unfor-
tunate turn of events.

Further readers are concerned
that The Guardian will succumb
to the same economic challenge
leaving us with few options for
getting news. Is this the begin-
ning of a trend that will deal a
crippling blow to the distribution
of news throughout The
Bahamas? There must be some
way to negotiate a win-win agree-
ment.

A CONCERNED
CITIZEN
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,
February 11, 2009



IN this column today we publish a
selection of readers’ comments on
the first three days of The Tribune
online.

As our readers know this is a work
in progress as we build a web site
that will soon be launched. In the
meantime we want our readers to
become comfortable with reading
their newspaper on line. We invite
them to give us their opinions of
what improvements they want.

When the website has been com-
pleted, readers will be able to take out
a subscription to The Tribune on line.
At that time it will contain far more
content than at present.

EDITOR,
The Tribune on Line

Dear madam,

I’m in the construction industry
on the Island of Abaco, and read
your paper daily. I won’t mind
paying an extra .50 to .75 cent to
get your paper here on the island.
I get your paper around 8.30 am
every morning from Bellevue
Business Centre. I do not have a
computer at work and like to read
in the morning and on my lunch
at 12 noon.

Miss (Jessica) Robertson, (Edi-
tor, Tribune Online), PLEASE
consider to continue to send your
paper to Marsh Harbour, thanks
in advance.

Bernard Haynes
construction supervisor
Marsh Harbour, Abaco.

Dear Editor,
Great job on getting the only

real newspaper in the islands on

line! I know this is a work in

progress but if possible if you

could get a page just with text

with the headlines and the busi-

ness section. This would take up

less bandwidth and be easier to

access for those of us that have

slow internet speeds.

Thanks.

Troy Albury

Great Guana Cay,

Abaco.

(Thanks for the positive feed-
back. As you may be aware, this
is the first phase of our web strat-
egy that's been launched earlier
than the rest of the site to ensure
our readers in the islands to
whom we can no longer deliver
will have access.

(The full site is still under con-

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struction, but I anticipate it will be
launched rather soon. That site
is designed in a manner that
makes it easy for you to access
exactly what you are interested
in. - Ed).

Dear Editor,

Congratulations to the entire
Tribune Team for getting on line.
Now, if only the crossword could
be included it would be complete
for me.

I am a newspaper junkie and
the thought of no Tribune is
anathema to me.

Regards

Ruth Pinder
Marsh Harbour,
Abaco.

(We hope, especially for the sake
of the “newspaper junkies” in
Abaco, that they will soon be
receiving their Tribunes regular-
ly. As usual The Tribune is deliv-
ering the newspapers to Bahama-
sair in Nassau to be flown to
Marsh Harbour. In the meantime
Bellevue in Marsh Harbour is try-
ing to negotiate an agreement
with Bahamasair for regular
delivery for its customers. — Ed).

Dear Editor,

Just congratulating you on the
new Tribune online. Having seen
the announcement some time ago
on Facebook that The Tribune
would soon be online, I eagerly
awaited the day. I am not disap-
pointed at all. The format is so
user friendly and it is great to see
the whole paper. Well done! It is
also nice to see that the paper will
be uploaded at a certain time
each day, better than your two
competitors who are not always
able to update in a timely fashion!

ALISON

(Thank you for your support.
(There is no plan to publish the
paper online earlier than 2pm at
the moment. We expect to soon
be able to make the e-paper and
all content available earlier in the
day for online subscribers. We'll
be sure to keep our readers
appraised of such developments.
(As for past editions, the only
papers available online are those
from February 7 when we unoffi-
cially launched the site. Once our
full site is up and running, more

of the archives will eventually be
made available. — Ed).

Dear Editor,

Great job in bringing The Tri-
bune online. This really helps
your overseas readers. Can you
tell me if you plan to bring the
classified ads online?

Regards,
Peter
Key West, Florida.

Dear Editor,

Good morning,

This is excellent! I have been
hoping that The Tribune would
do something like this. Howev-
er, there is just one thing that I
will like to know.

Will The Tribune have up to date
news as in to day’s news and not
yesterday’s news?

Inderia Strapp
Firstcaribbean Int'l Bank
Support Center Nassau.

(If you saw out-of-date news, you
must have logged on to our test
runs. The Tribune went on line
officially at 2pm Wednesday with
that day’s news. The Tribune will
be posted daily at 2pm with the
news of the day. — Ed).

Dear Editor,

Good Morning.

I have just gone online for the
first time and it is wonderful that
your paper is now online.

I would like to make a small sug-
gestion. Your online paper does
not allow you to print the page
or save a copy of the page. The
system automatically defaults to
the home selection page.

Talso would like to see the pages
sent out as PDF as this will give
you the ability to save, print and
zoom in on the page.

Thanks for again for giving per-
sons the opportunity to view the
paper.

Regards,

Vanessa M. Brice

Dear Editor,

Congrats on the online edition.
Will it include all parts of the
physical edition, specifically the
classifieds? This is very important
since the paper will not be avail-
able in the Family Islands.

Aniska Pennerman

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 5



Developers await go-ahead for Summit Centre

a oneevereecreesesorsonsseenrsrecsseceuesesorssecssseseressseoees

Armed man
robs pharmacy
employee

AN ARMED bandit robbed }
a pharmacy employee of compa- }
ny cash while in the Harbour Bay }
Shopping Centre. :

According to police reports, :
the daylight robbery occurred }
sometime before lpm oni
Wednesday when an employee
from Lowe's Pharmacy was }
accosted at gunpoint by a man
wearing blue jeans and a white ;
shirt flecked with red. i

Assistant Superintendent Wal- }
ter Evans said the employee had }
just left the store carrying a bank }
deposit bag and was headed to ;
the plaza's parking lot when the
theft occurred. i

The gunman, who was about 5 }
ft 6” tall, demanded the compa- :
ny’s deposit bag. The employee }
handed over the bag and the gun- }
man made off with the cash then }
fled on foot towards the back of :
the Adam and Eve clothing store.

Police said he eventually made }
his escape in a black Honda with }
a large sum of cash. :

The matter is under active }
investigation. :

m By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

PHILANTHROPIC develop-
ers of a proposed multi-million
dollar, 30,000 square-foot, edu-
cation and recreation centre say
they are hoping to break ground
later this year if an upcoming
review by Cabinet gives the plans
the go-ahead.

The Summit Centre, where
New Providence’s children will
be able to go for after school
tutoring, have access to comput-
ers and the internet as well as
exhilarating rock-climbing, mar-
tial arts, fitness and music lessons,
is the brainchild of the widow of
late Atlantis Chief Executive,
Butch Kerzner.

Set to be located adjacent to
the Queen Elizabeth Centre, the
centre is being designed to pro-
vide much needed extra-curricu-
lar activities for Bahamian youths.

“The idea was born (when we)
looked at the needs of the com-
munity we thought an after school
centre would be great to get the
kids out of hanging out at the
mall and on the streets and into a
place where they could basically
keep their minds and bodies
active and out of trouble and
steer them in a more positive
direction,” said Nick Sagar, who is

working with Vanessa Kerzner
on the project.

“After school hours parents
fight traffic to get home after five
then back at six, kids get home
at 3, so there’s a lot of downtime
there,” he added.

Vanessa Kerzner setup the
Butch Kerzner Summit Founda-
tion in memory of her 42-year-
old husband after his death in a
helicopter accident in October
2006.

After funding a new swimming
pool at St Anne’s school and set-
ting up a “Sky Climbers” rock-
climbing programme on Paradise
Island for Bahamian children, the
Foundation was keen to spear-
head a more “signature” project.

Designs for the first-of-its-kind
centre, drawn up by respected
Bahamian architect Jackson
Burnside, are now in their final
stages.

Inside the building children will
find a cornucopia of ways to learn
and entertain themselves. It will
also include a yoga/dance studio
and 8,000-square foot high ropes
course.

Additionally, the Foundation
is planning “life advice” classes
for adolescents and adults will
cover topics like how to apply for
a loan or prepare for a job inter-
view.

Mr Sagar said that the Foun-

dation anticipates their plans will
go before Cabinet in the next
month.

Approvals at the highest level
are key to the developers entering
the next stage of their drive to
make the centre a reality — solic-
iting the private sector for spon-
sorship and donations.

The level of support the foun-
dation gets from the community
at large will then in turn impact
something even more crucial —
the cost to those coming to the
centre.

The aim is to keep the price of
using the myriad facilities inside
the Summit Centre at a minimum
with accessibility for children of
all socio-economic backgrounds
a paramount concern.

Mr Sagar said: “We definitely
do not want to be exclusive, we
want to be as inclusive as possible.
We want to benefit as many kids
as possible.”

In a move that should help the
Foundation achieve this goal, the
Government has suggested that
it will “donate” land near the
Queen Elizabeth’s Sports Centre
to the Foundation, once it is sat-
isfied with the proposal.

This will allow the Centre to
be situated in the heart of what
will eventually be Nassau’s sport-
ing mecca — site of a new nation-
al sports stadium, headquarters

Greg and Tanya Cash celebrate ‘ Mee breakthrough’



JUSTICE campaigners Greg
and Tanya Cash were celebrating
last night after scoring what they
termed “a major breakthrough”
in their seven-year legal battle with
the Baptist education authorities.

They have been told that a pack-
age of documents relating to their
case is now Safely in the hands of
the Privy Council in London.

The first package allegedly
“went missing” last year after being
handed over to the local agent
of an international mailing com-
pany.

Now Mr and Mrs Cash hope for
leave to appeal to the Bahamas’
highest court after facing a series of
obstacles in their fight for justice.

Mrs Cash said: “All the relevant
documents are in now in the Privy
Council’s hands. They relate not
only to our problems with the Bap-
tist Convention, but also the Attor-
ney General’s Office.

“We know the result is going to
be positive,” she said, claiming that
“some very shocking disclosures
will be made.”

Mr and Mrs Cash say they are
prepared to travel to London to
present their case, which includes
claims for unfair dismissal and
human rights breaches against the
Baptist education authorities.

Their long fight for justice began
in 2002 when Mr Cash was fired as
coach from Jordan Prince William
High School.

The couple have complained
that their court battle has been
prolonged by obstructive officials
and lost files.

“All we wanted was for that
package to get safely out of this
country,” Mrs Cash told The Tri-
bune.

“We have known for a long time
now that we would never get jus-
tice in the Bahamas.”

Last October, Court of Appeal
president Dame Joan Sawyer
called Mrs Cash “a disgrace to
Bahamian womanhood” and ques-
tioned her level of education dur-
ing a court hearing.

LUCAYA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL

She also threatened Mrs Cash
with prison for alleged contempt of
court.

However, at the next hearing, a
different set of judges appeared to
set aside the jail threat, saying it
was “done with”.

Today, Justice Anita Allen is
expected to rule on a claim by the
Attorney General’s Office that Mr
and Mrs Cash are vexatious liti-
gants.

The couple argue that their var-
ious cases before the courts are
the result of their allegedly
being denied justice when their
original complaints were first
heard.

JUSTICE CAMPAIGNERS Greg and Tanya Cash.

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PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

Bethel Brothers Morticians

Telephone: 322-4433, 326-7030
Nassau Street, P.O.Box N-1026

FUNERAL SERVICE FOR

MARY
FOSTER, 95

> Boyd Subdivision and

ort) formerly of George

Town, Exuma, will be

held on Saturday,

February 14th, 1lam at

Holy Spirit Anglican

Church, Howard Street,

Chippingham. Officiating

will be Rev. Fr. Harry W. Ward, Rev. Canon Samuel

S.T. Sturrup, Rev. Fr. Dwight Bowe and Rev. Fr.

Theodore Hunt. Interment will follow in St. Mary's
Cemetery, Virginia Street.

Mary Foster is succeeded by her two sons, Anthony
Foster and Fredrick Foster; grandchildren, Michael,
Kim, Andre, Allister, Angelique, Leonard, Candice,
Chelsea, Cameron and Alex Foster, Yanique Pinder
and Ebony Bodley; great grandchildren, Ibrahim,
Yunus, Adam, Yusuf, Andre, Devon, Dannon, Israel
and Latrell Foster, Khary, Kenneth and Kristoff
Davies, Asiya Nelson, Othnell Pinder, Ashley,
Memphis and Markiss Bodley, Leander Bethel;
great great grandchildren, Hamzah, Maryam,
Dawud, Mikayel and Yazmine Foster, Muhammad
Nelson; extended family, Louise Foster, Jeannie
Foster, Corinne Foster, Barbara Carroll, Crystal
Trotman, Edith Foster, Tanya Foster, Ortnell Pinder,
Mary Bodley, Tara Foster, Joyce McKenzie, Charles
McKinney, Anthony McKinney, Eleanor Wilfong,
Vernon Aranah, Adrian Aranah, Jesse Aranah Jr.,
Vienna Clarke, Roslyn Aranah, Veronica Aranah,
Brigitta Moncur, Candis Cargill, Dominique
Hammond, Nicola and Olivia McKinney, Kurt
McKinney, Mariska Tinker, Sammuel Collie,
Roland Tinker, Claudette Lundy, Mispah Glinton,
Larry Glinton, Bradley Glinton, Daphane Glinton
and Dot Butler, Valarie Clarke, Kimberly Davis,
Afeffa Foster, Wayne Lundy, Marcello Lundy,
Fernando Lundy, Victor Clarke Jr., Virgo Clarke,
Valentino Clarke, Valencia Clarke; and friends too
numreous to mention.

Friends may pay their last respects at Bethel
Brothers Morticians, #44 Nassau Street, on Friday
from 10am to 6pm and on Saturday at the church
from 10am until service time.



CREDIT SUISSE

THE TRIBUNE



Handling of ‘pornographic’
incident angers parents

FROM page one

involved a nine-year-old girl and a 10-
year-old boy at the school.

However, an official who spoke with
The Tribune on condition of anonymity
said that the meeting was primarily held
to make parents aware of the age-inap-
propriate material children have access to
on television and the internet, and to
advise them to be more vigilant.

The official denied that two minors had
been involved in a sexual situation and
said the incident had been “blown way
out of proportion.”

“It was rather a pornographic down-
load incident,” the official said.

Following the incident that occurred
two weeks before Monday night’s meet-
ing with the parents, school administra-
tors had a special assembly with the stu-
dents to discuss the topic of sex in an
age-appropriate manner.

Some students claimed that the school
had forbidden them to discuss the subject
of the assembly with their parents.

Parents, who were confused by the pur-
pose of the meeting on Monday, report-
edly demanded to be told details about
the assembly and the “mysterious” inci-

dent that had prompted the sex talk.

The official told The Tribune, however,
that due to confidentiality and sensitivity
issues the school did not want to release
any further information to the parents
or the public.

As it concerns the assembly, the official
said it is completely untrue that the stu-
dents were asked not to talk about it with
their parents.

The official also said that the contro-
versial incident from two weeks ago is a
unique occurrence at the school and not
something that happens with any sort of
frequency.

Perry Christie says PLP
abstained from final vote

FROM page one

the Bill, Mr Christie argues
that government goes
against the Constitution by
including clause seven.

He said: “We believe that
provision is unconstitution-
al.

“We attempted in com-
mittee to delete it from the
Bill, but the government
refused to budge.”

The PLP leader maintains
his party will continue to
abstain from voting on the
Bill until the government
changes course.

Mr Christie added: “We
will continue to support the
dedicated men and women
of the Royal Bahamas
Police Force and its mod-
ernisation.

“However, we insist that

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for

JUNIOR COMPLIANCE OFFICER

The Compliance Department is accepting applications for a Junior Compliance

Officer

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Requirements:

University degree with a major in Law or Finance

At least 2-3 years experience with an international bank

Extensive knowledge in the fields of Auditing and Internal Controls
Thorough knowledge of private banking in general

Knowledge of Bahamas Banking and Trust Legislation

Knowledge of local regulatory and statutory matters with regards to
“Know Your Client” and the avoidance of Money Laundering

PC Knowledge (MS Word, MS Excel, Access, etc.)

Well versed with Swiss anti-money laundering and due diligence

procedures

: Knowledge of credit issues would be an asset

Duties will include:

: Accept new business and allocate mandate numbers for new accounts
Conduct monthly reviews of financial transactions
Conduct Annual risk reviews for mandates with low risk
Maintain physical and electronic client documentation
Review Legal and Compliance Registers to ensure receipt of

documentation

° Administer and monitor closure of accounts

Personal Qualities:

7 Strong organizational and communication skills

7 Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision
7 Enthusiasm, a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible

hours

° Willing to work in a multicultural environment

Benefits provided include:
: Competitive salary

° Pension Plan
. Health and Life Insurance

any Act of Parliament must
be in conformity with the
Constitution.”

At the final vote on the
Bill in the House of Assem-
bly on Wednesday, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
argued that the Constitution
does not specify an age lim-
it or any grounds under
which the Commissioner or
Deputy Commissioner of
Police may be removed.

And rather than being
unconstitutional, his gov-
ernment is taking up its
Constitutional right to
decide on the term and
retirement age of the Police
Force’s two most senior offi-
cers.

Mr Ingraham said: “It is
settled and acknowledged
law in all our books that if
you have the power to
appoint, you have the power
to determine how long the
appointment will be for.

“In fact it says a power to
appoint shall include power
to prescribe the period for
which the appointment shall
operate. That is beyond dis-
pute.

“We are not doing any-
thing in this legislation that
will take away from the
Commissioner of Police or
the Deputy Commissioner
of Police any of the rights
which they have under the
Constitution of the
Bahamas. We are not
empowered to do any such
thing.”

Any employee paid by the
Pubic Treasury may be
removed from office, Mr
Ingraham said.

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FROM page one

geted for the coming holiday
period.

“T can tell you unequivo-
cally that there are no layoffs
planned around the Easter
holidays as indicated in The
Tribune yesterday. It simply
is not true,” Mr Markantonis
said.

“While no one is certain

about the future, we have not
discussed further layoffs,” he
said. “We believe that at times
such as these, we should all
expend our energy on culti-
vating new tourists for our
destination, and taking care
of those who are already here.
Media space is better spent on
promoting the positives of our
country than on perpetuating
baseless and unsettling
rumours.”

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APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be
accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department
P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:
FEBRUARY 18, 2009



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THE TRIBUNE



A LEADING churchman is calling on
banks to “go easy” on borrowers after
counselling seven potential suicide vic-
tims in three days.

Bishop Simeon Hall of New Covenant
Baptist Church said many Bahamians
are now “living on the edge of quiet des-
peration and hopelessness” because of
mounting debts.

Bishop Hall said the seven potential
suicides - five men and two women - had
either been referred to him or walked
into his church for help. One left a note
under his door.

Now he is calling on banks and other
lending institutions to offer a 90-day
“reprieve” for those forced to default
on loans because of changed circum-
stances.

Banks that had benefited from

Successful spay and neuter clinic in Grand Bahama

Bahamian workers in the past should
now be lenient and accommodating to
credible defaulters, he said.

“No Bahamian who has established a
credible record as a mortgage payer
should end up losing their house now
that they are unemployed,” he told The
Tribune yesterday.

“T call on all banks and lending insti-
tutions to structure a 90-day reprieve for
all unemployed mortgage holders, and
show themselves as good corporate citi-
zens in this time of economic downturn.”

Bishop Hall’s call came after four
recent suicides. Many Bahamian families
are known to be living under extreme
stress as a result of the economic down-
turn and deepening recession.

“The loss of a dwelling house is the
basis for great psychological and finan-

cial stress that is now pushing those who
need help to the edge,” he said.

“Banks who have benefited from the
Bahamian worker should at this time be
more lenient and accommodating to cred-
ible Bahamian workers.”

Bishop Hall said those who had con-
sulted him in recent days had been “har-
bouring suicidal thoughts.”

Only one, in his opinion, had required
professional help. The rest needed some-
one to talk to.

“Several other pastors have seen a rise
in the number of persons marginalised
and living on the edge,” he added.

“Many persons are living on the edge of
quiet desperation and hopelessness.”

He said Bahamians on the whole need-
ed to take full responsibility for the actions
and decisions they had made “and all of us

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS

Hall petitions banks to ‘go easy’

need to lend a listening ear or helping
hand where possible.”

He said too many areas of Bahamian
society seemed to be nearing the brink of
total collapse.

“A turnaround and remedy will only
come when each Bahamian takes more
responsibility for his actions and more of
our national leaders stop fiddling while
Rome is burning,” he added.

Bishop Hall said he was concerned
about the suicide talk because Bahami-
ans rarely thought in those terms.

“People love living,” he said, “To kill
yourself really takes a lot, but I think
people are being pushed to the edge.”

He said more and more people were
feeling “marginalised and pressured” by
the banks as unemployment rises in a
tightening economy.



Bishop Simeon Hall

JOB OPPORTUITY

THE Humane Society of
Grand Bahama celebrated great
success with its fourth major field
spay/neuter clinic held from Feb-
ruary 2-6 at the Church of the
Good Shepherd’s Parish Hall in
Pinders Point.

This clinic topped all others
held thus far, with a total of 277
dogs and cats sterilised. This fig-
ure includes 237 dogs and pup-
pies, 39 cats and kittens and one
raccoon.

It does not include the eight
additional surgeries performed
on already sterilised animals,
which included a bladder stone
removal, a leg amputation, sev-
eral eye surgeries and various
wound repairs.

It also does not include minor
treatment of an additional 20
dogs or puppies for various ail-
ments or basic deworming and
vaccinating of puppies too young
or small for surgery.

“Many thanks are owed to
Reverend Ambrose, Anne Penn,
and the kind parishioners of the
Church of the Good Shepherd,
who understand the need for this
important community service,
and turned over their parish hall
to this project for the second time
in 15 months.

“As always, all the dogs and
cats received flea/tick preventa-
tive, vaccines if needed and
deworming, which will lead to a
healthier overall pet population.

cada dali

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Set et eo]

They also had their nails trimmed
and ears cleaned while in recov-
ery. Pet owners received educa-
tional information on how to bet-
ter care for their pets,” the HSGB
said.

Some of the animals sterilised
also required further surgical
attention, such as treatment of
hernias and wound abscesses.

“Some of the animals were in
poor physical condition to begin
with, yet thanks to the dedication
and skill of the volunteer veteri-
nary team, none were lost, and
these animals will no longer have
to go through the trauma of bear-
ing litter after litter of puppies or
kittens,” the HSGB said.

The Humane Society said it
hopes that more pet owners will
provide better overall care for
their pets in the future.

“It is a shame when a three-
year-old dog has the appearance
and health deterioration of a dog
much older due to poor care and
lack of attention.”

At least eight dogs were also
treated for transmissible venere-
al tumours. This is a sexually
transmitted disease, very com-
mon on Grand Bahama, spread
entirely through sexual contact.
It causes painful tumors to form
in and about the genitalia of the
dog; which, untreated, continue
to grow and abscess and will
eventually kill the dog. Dog own-
ers should be aware of the preva-

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lence of this disease, and are
urged to spay and neuter their
pets before they reach sexual
maturity, to prevent the spread
of this deadly and highly conta-
gious disease.

Ten dogs and puppies were sur-
rendered to the HSGB during the
clinic. Eight critical care patients
remain under the care of the
HSGB until they are healthy
enough to return home.

All services provided during
this clinic were provided free of
charge to the public.

The goal is to reduce pet over-
population on Grand Bahama, as
well as achieve a healthier pet

an

population in general, and
encourage and educate pet own-
ers in being more responsible and
better pet care-takers for the
future.

This clinic was funded by The
Pegasus Foundation, the Kohn
Foundation, a private individual
from the United States, and
Amigo’s Fund.

The HSGB is seeking funding
for the next clinic, scheduled ten-
tatively for November, and hopes
that local corporations, govern-
ment, and individuals will sup-
port this project, which thus far
has been funded largely from
abroad.

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cocaine worth more Bahamas Constitution

than $8m is seized “4s a British enactment’

five men and a woman were
arrested. The drugs are esti-
mated to have a local street
value of well over $8 million.
Following that discovery, offi-

FROM page one

cocaine was found onboard the
vessel.
As a result of this discovery,

Bis satel

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341-6744














A Santander



cials found a second vessel
which also had a large amount
of cocaine onboard.

The total weight and quan-
tity of the drugs was not
released up to press time last
night.

Head of the Drug Enforce-

ment Unit Superintendent
Anthony Ferguson was
unavailable for comment up to
press time yesterday evening
as he was reportedly in a meet-
ing.
Police have made several
significant drug seizures here in
New Providence and the Fam-
ily Islands over the past sever-
al weeks.

Six people were arrested
last week and have been
charged in the seizure of some
$200,000 worth of marijuana.
Police also seized $3.75 million
worth of cocaine in Freeport
and $100,000 worth of mari-

a] juana in Andros this month.

SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD.



hat an immediate vacaney For a

Private Banking Marketing Officer

Applicants tous held the fallewing:

- Waster's Degree im Administration, Finance, Economics or rebated degree

= A minimum of 3 years experience im private banking
Applicunts should alo be capoble of the following:

Tatally fluent in English und Spanish

Develop and manage a portiolio of private banking clients by analyzing the basking and
lavestmcnt needs of corperate aed high-ect worth individuals and offering finamcial and

investmcnt alternatives,

Maintain existing clicnt relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
AccoMNnts, execating clicet instructions, and keeping clicnts updated as to the changing

Conditions of Tinanetal Markers.

Frequent travel te assigned countries to enhance current client relationships aad develop

new business by meeting with representatives aad clients,
Supervise a Private Banking Assistant.

Ensure that all private banking activities are im compliance with intermal policies

ond procedures und external regulatery requirements.

Applications im voting with details of edecation amd experience should be ackdressed to the Human
Resources Munager, P.O. Baox N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than Febnaary 24, 004

a






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i ee |

FROM page one

posed Police Force Act 2009
in the House of Assembly on
Wednesday.

He was seeking to support
his argument against the claim
by Opposition members that
provision seven of the Act,
which passed later that
evening in the lower chamber
with the support of Govern-
ment MPs alone, is unconsti-
tutional.

That provision seeks to lim-
it the tenure of a Police Com-
missioner or Deputy Com-
missioner to no more than two
five year terms.

PLP MP for Cat Island,
Rum Cay and San Salvador,
Philip Davis told parliament
in his earlier contribution that
to enforce such a term limit
was unconstitutional as the
power to appoint a Commis-
sioner under the terms of Arti-
cle 119 of the Constitution was
such that upon appointment
that officer could only be
“removed” from office either
by attaining the retirement
age for a police commissioner
or by the extraordinary

TAI

process set forth in Article 120
of the Constitution.

While Government had
claimed, in proposing the pro-
vision, that it could limit the
appointment of a Commis-
sioner in accordance with the
Interpretation and General
Clauses Act, Mr Davis said
this was “silly” because this
Act “only applied to Acts of
Parliament and not the Con-
stitution.”

His legal argument under-
lined the Opposition’s more
emotive charge that by limit-
ing the tenure of the Com-
missioner of Police the provi-
sion would open up his office
to abuse — forcing the Chief
of Police to have to “sing for
his supper”.

But Mr Bethel countered
that the definition of the word
“Act” in the Interpretation
and General Clauses Act
“expressly applies to an Act
of Parliament of the United
Kingdom and any legislative
instrument made thereunder
having effect or having had
effect as part of the law of The
Bahamas.”

Continuing

CHI

that the

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Tuesday, 24th February through Tuesday 31st March 2009
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Time: 7:00 pm to 8:00 pm
Age limit 18 and up.

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For more informaiton or to register, and you nust register if

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Call 394-4171 or email taichibahamas @gmail.com





Odessa Ga rden

where fife is sill simple and peaple still care
Murphywille, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

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Bahamas constitution “has not
been ‘repatriated’ or ‘patriat-
ed’ to The Bahamas” and
“remains a Schedule attached
to an Act passed by the British
Parliament” he said that for
this reason the Interpretation
and General Clauses Act
which the Government
claimed allowed them to
include the provision “implic-
itly and necessarily applies
directly to our Constitution.”

A ‘domestic
lispute’
leaves one
man deat

FROM page one

The younger man later
drove to the East Street
South Police Station where
he is currently being
detained.

Police did not specify the
nature of the relationship
between the two men yester-
day, however ASP Evans
said they were not relatives.
When asked what sparked
the altercation, ASP Evans
said police knew the motiva-
tion behind the attack but
did not disclose it to avoid
jeopardizing the case.

Family and friends living
in Nassau converged at the
murder scene after getting
the call from police that their
loved one had been mur-
dered.

His sister, Maureen
Prescott, told the media that
Gardiner was a calm person
who always walked away
from disputes.

"Harold was one of my
mother's calmest children
and he always walked away
from a fight and an argu-
ment. Harold shared, what-
ever he had, he shared. He
was not a mean person," Ms
Prescott said.

Ironically, she and her
brother joked about their
mortality and sudden death
the night before he was
stabbed to death, she said.

Gardiner is said to be a
resident of North Andros,
and served as a member of
the Mastic Point Township.

Florence Pratt-Meyer, a
resident of Andros who
works for the Nicholl'’s Town
Administration, told The
Tribune that Gardiner's sud-
den death took residents of
the area by surprise.

According to her, Gar-
diner was a "community
minded" person who did a
lot of work for his area.

Gardiner was in Nassau
doing contractual work ona
client's roof, his sister said.

His death marked the
ninth for the nation.

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THE TRIBUNE

busine





‘One way
or another’

eter melt
get capital



* Bahamian company IP
Solutions International
restructuring $6m private
placement, but says $2m
enough to begin ‘full
deployment’ of multi-play
Internet services

* Tn talks with potential
Bahamian and foreign
partners, latter of whom
has offered to finance $2m
head-end construction

* Hoping to close service
contracts with hotels/gated
communities in ‘14 days
or sooner’, and targeting
service start in ‘month to
six weeks’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A Bahamian company will
“one way or another” raise the
capital to enable it to start
deploying its ‘multiple play’
bundle of Internet services with-
in the next month to six weeks,
its chief executive saying yes-
terday that a number of “posi-
tive developments” had taken
place since its first private place-
ment offering closed.

Edison
Sumner, presi-
dent and chief
executive of
IP Solutions
International
(IPSI), said
the company
was restruc-
turing a new
private place-
ment offering
following the
end-January
close of its
initial finance-
raising effort.

He acknowledged that the
first private placement had
failed to raise the hoped-for $6
million, but said IP Solutions
International was now talking to
potential new and former
investors, and estimated it only
required $2 million to finance
“full deployment” of its ser-
vices.

SEE page 5B



Edison
Sumner

The information contained is from a third
party and The Tribune can not be held
responsible for errors and/or omission
from the daily report.

FRIDAY,

FEBRUARY

IS



2009

SECTION B « business@tribunemedia.net

Project's huge

WH Schooner Bay subdivision approval likely imminent, with
developers able to begin construction ‘within 14 days’ of final

approval to sell

M 570-acre project could generate employment ‘from zero to

130-plus’ very quickly

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A 570-unit development is
hoping to give the Bahamian
economy and real estate mar-
ket “a huge shot in the arm” as
it anticipates receiving final sub-
division approval from the Gov-
ernment imminently, its project
manager yesterday telling Tri-
bune Business it could “quickly
ramp up” to create 130 jobs.

Keith Bishop, Islands by
Design's principal, who is acting
as project manager for South
Abaco-based Schooner Bay
development, said the project,
which is aiming to set standards
for sustainable, environmental-
ly friendly development in the
Bahamas, would be able to start
construction “within 14 days”



Zhivargo Laing

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The private/public sector
committee advising the Gov-
ernment on financial sector
regulatory consolidation is
expected to meet “in the next
week or two” to consider fur-
ther recommendations for
pushing the process forward,
the minister responsible telling
Tribune Business that the
“platform” for achieving their
ultimate goal was already in
place.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for finance, said the last
of the three regulators to
move into Charlotte House,
the Compliance Commission,
had relocated there last week
from the Cecil Wallace Whit-
field Building at Cable Beach.

By having this regulator,
together with the Securities
Commission of the Bahamas
and the Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office, in the same
premises, Mr Laing said infor-
mation sharing between the
three would be much easier.

The regulators’ ability to
service financial services oper-
ators seeking licences, permits
and approvals from them will
also be enhanced in terms of
efficiency, since their consoli-

SEE page 6B

of receiving final government
approval to sell lots.

Once that happened, Mr
Bishop said there would be a
“huge” impact on employment
in south Abaco, with Schooner
Bay’s workforce going from
“zero to 130-plus persons” in
very little time.

“T hope to be able to get the
final subdivision approval this
week,” Mr Bishop said, “and
given that, we hope very short-
ly to start marketing. The
expressions of interest are very,
very pleasing.

“[’m just waiting for the day
the development gets final
approval for selling, because it
will be a huge shot in the arm
for Abaco and the Bahamas
Real Estate Association. I think
Schooner Bay is going to do

very, very well.” He added that
Phase I of the Schooner Bay
development was “pretty much
all done”, with the relevant gov-
ernment agencies all conduct-
ing a final review of its permit
and licence applications.

“T would say that judging
against previous projects that
I’ve done, this one has gone a
little bit more quickly than we
experienced previously,” Mr
Bishop said.

“The first submission was
done only in August last year,
and here we are in February.
Any day now we’ll see subdivi-
sion approval and subsequently
the selling of lots, and a huge
impact on employment in south
Abaco - from zero to 130-plus

SEE page 4B

Compliance Commission joins Securities
Commission, insurance regulator in
Charlotte House, as minister says ‘good
progress’ being made






















































for a better life

TU La

FAMILY GUARDIAN

INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



Engineering merger’s
‘one-stop shop’ fights

shot i In the arm’ 35-40% business drop

Bahamian firms Islands by Design, Reiss
Engineering in tie-up that aims to enhance
service delivery and cost competitive
solutions that ‘will attract more business’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

Two leading Bahamian-owned engineering firms yes-
terday unveiled their merger that is designed to create a
“one-stop shop concept” for these services, and in so
doing enhance efficiency and “get more business” in a
market estimated to have shrunk by 35-40 per cent.

Islands by Design, the environmental, marine and
wildlife engineering and consulting specialist headed by
principal Keith Bishop, is merging with Reiss Engineering,
a US-headquartered engineering firm with office in Orlan-
do and California, but which is headed by Bahamian and
Freeport native Robert Reiss as president.

SEE page 5B



30% crawfish price decline
hits Spanish Wells hard

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

The 30 per cent drop in craw-
fish/lobster prices as a result of
decling global demand has
impacted Spanish Wells’ fish-
ermen, who yesterday pledged
to keep on fishing despite
expected revenue losses and
increasing operating costs.

The price of lobster has fallen

incrementally from around
$22.50 per pound at this time
last year to around $15 per
pound, with a further decrease
possible later this year as restau-
rants and other purchasers
reduce crawfish purchases in
response to falling customer
demand.

This has heavily impacted

SEE page 4B

FAMILY GUARDIAN
INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED

[1 leave your children financially secure
[1 provide a safety net for your loved ones
[ ensure a bright future for your family

A all of the above

Financial Strength Rating

3 A

A> Excellent a

sCartridge

4 dlexex-3)) Top-of-the-Hill, Mackey Street

1378
PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No.45
of 2000), NOTICE is hereby given that TMT
Holdings Limited is in dissolution and the date of
commencement of the dissolution is 6 February 2009.

Margaret Tatem-Gilbert and Lorna Kemp
LIQUIDATORS
c/o EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas)Ltd.
1 Bay Street
2nd Floor, Centre of Commerce
P.O.Box SS-6289
Nassau, Bahamas

FOR RENT
PARADISE ISLAND

LUXURIOUS HARBOUR FRONT PENTHOUSE
RESIDENCE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
OF NASSAU AND ITS HARBOUR:



« 5,000+ sq ft. total area

* 4 Bedrooms with 4.5 baths

« Master bedroom with dressing area, Jacuzzi
tub and large walk-in closet

* Large balconies

* Elegantly furnished throughout with a
separate study

* Formal dining room

* Private elevator

* Heated pool and spa overlooking the harbour

* Private dock for a yacht up to 75 feet

* Dedicated storage and crew areas

* Exercise room

* Indoor Garage

* Private gated entry

* Lush tropical landscaping

Rent: $15,000.00 per month net

NO PETS

For further information and viewing call:
363-2730

ERG
Client Relationship Officer, Vice President

About EFG Tinernational

EPG Intemational 16 a global private hanking group offering private

Tourism chief to tackle
Freeport airfare costs

The Ministry of Tourism’s
director-general will outline
what is necessary to turn Grand
Bahama’s assets to its advan-
tage, and re-shape the island
into a successful tourist desti-
nation, when she addresses the
Grand Bahama Business Out-
look Conference on Monday,
February 23.

“We believe that Grand
Bahama, as the closest offshore
destination to the United States,
has the greatest opportunity to
capture the offshore vacation
market for the American con-
sumer,” said Vernice Walkine.

“My remarks will centre
around those things that we
believe have to be done in order
for Grand Bahama to achieve
this potential, and one would
be the issue of the cost of admis-
sion into Grand Bahama, the
cost of airfare.

“Grand Bahama really
should be the least expensive
destination to fly into in this
entire region because of its
proximate position to all of the
major markets in the United
States.

“But in some cases it is three
times as expensive, so we have
to address that.”










Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Lte

banking: anal

asset management services, headquartered in Switzerland. EFG International's group of

private banking businesses currently operate in $4 locations in over
with cwea 2,175 employers,

_ .
OA) counerves,

CONTINUES To expand as ey) idenced by ITS ew Premises

at Lyford Cay EFG lar has over 40 experienced professional

sand offers a full

range of solutions for wealthy chents around the globe, EFG's unique corporate culture
attracts the most entrepreneurial and most experienced professionals in the industry. To

learn more, please visit www.elpinternational cor

We are looking for seasoned financial professionals with at least 10) years of sales and

marketing experience in providing financial solutions to high

net worth clients and

companies. The candidates must possess a solid knowledge of investments, banking and

(rust SEFVICES,

The ability to service and grow your own chent book ts extremely

important. EPG provides a unique and uninhibited global marketing opportunity, an open

architecture platform and multiple hooking centres.

The successful candidates must have a university degree or equivalent and possess or be

enrolled in the Series 7

CSC, or UK equivalent. The individuals

must have the required

qualifications and accreditations to be registered with The Bahamas Securities

Commission.
within very tight deadlines is also a necessity.

EFG offers an attractive compensation plan that includes salary,
structure directly related to profitability, Salary will be determined by experience, and
qualifications.

The flexibility to go on frequent business development trips and work

benefits and a bonus

Interested and qualihied professionals should submit applications by 27th February 2009

Tk

EPG Bank & Trust (Bahamas)
Human Resources
Centre of Commerce, 2

| Bay Street

FO. Box $5 6299
Nasiau, The Balarnas
Fax (242) 502-5487

" floor

Lid



AV(cVanltersm Ullal

Ms Walkine added that
Grand Bahama was perfectly
positioned to benefit from a
world class cruise port and a
bigger, faster cruise ferry ser-
vice.

“So with these things being
taken into account...Grand
Bahama really can achieve
exponential growth, and I’m
going to be more specific about
what we are doing in the case of
each of these.

“We then will use all of these
strategies to shape Grand
Bahama into the destination
that we believe it needs to be













s Tear Jl
» Price
« Hul: Fierglain

Eregive: Tein berry

2 WWE: 002-181 ee



00





a5. Powered with bain Meecery 25



PICTURED from left to right: Pauline Nairn, Sherrilyn Wallace,
Andronekia Clark, Andrea Knowles, Conray Rolle, and Vernal Smith.

26° BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

wth Aust



“We believe that
Grand Bahama, as
the closest offshore
destination to the
United States, has
the greatest
opportunity to
capture the offshore
vacation market for
the American
consumer.”



and, therefore, we can promote
and market it appropriately,”
Ms Walkine said.

Influential

The highest-ranking woman
in the history of Bahamian
tourism, Ms Walkine was iden-
tified by TRAVEL AGENT
Magazine in 2002 as one of the
100 most influential women in
tourism and travel in the world.

Grand Bahama Business
Outlook is organised by The
Counsellors, and will be held at
Our Lucaya under the theme

















Spiiot, Fish finder, Chart plotter GPS,



Optional (qelpramt



Grand Bahama Renewal: The
Power of Partnerships, The
Power of One.

Ms Walkine joins a high-
powered line up of presenters
including C. A. Smith, Bahamas
Ambassador to the US; Zhivar-
go Laing, minister of state for
finance; Giora Israel, senior
vice-president of ports and des-
tination development, Carnival
Corporation & PLC; Ian Rolle,
chief financial officer, Grand
Bahama Port Authority; Gre-
gory Moss, attorney-at-law and
president, Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce;
Maxwell Sweeting, vice-presi-
dent VOPAK; Eric Carey,
executive director, the Bahamas
National Trust; Peter Turn-
quest, CA; and Stacia Williams,
corporate image and personal
branding consultant and prin-
cipal of Total Image Manage-
ment.

The event is sponsored by the
Grand Bahama Port Authori-
ty, Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national, FOCOL, Emera, the
Central Bank of The Bahamas,
British American Financial and
Scotiabank.

For updates and Registration
Online visit www.tclevents.com

Bahamians
Chia

from
manager
course



The last Certified Inter-
national Project Managers
(CIPM) managers class of
2008, who studied with
Lignum Institute of Tech-
nology (LIT) at Harbour
Bay Shopping Plaza, were
issued with their certifica-
tion through the Ameri-
can Academy of Project
Management (AAPM).
The presentation of the
certificates was made at
Lignum’s headquarters in
the Harbour Bay Shop-
ping Plaza on January 22,











The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

a ee eee eee

A position has arisen for a chartered accountant with 20-25 years
experience in the profession, or private sector, at assist in the further
development of branch offices in Marsh Harbour, Abaco and

Freeport, Grand Bahama.

The applicant must have good inter-personal skills and be able to
relate to a wide variety of clients in diverse business environments,
have a history of large scale development projects and experience
of international clients looking to set up business in the family islands.
He/she must be computer literate with a good working knowledge

of Excel and Word.

Applicants should apply in wiritng to:

ECA Application

P.O. Box CB-11651, Nassau, Bahamas


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 5B



‘One way or another’ firm will get capital

FROM page 1B

Mr Sumner said the company
was also in negotiations with
two other Bahamas-based tele-
coms licensees, who he said he
could not name, about using
their technology and products
in its system.

And IP Solutions Internation-
al was also taking to a “foreign
partner” who had offered to
finance construction of its IP
(Internet Protocol) head-end
technology for $2 million.

The company is initially tar-
geting hotels and gated com-
munities with a variety of ser-
vices it will transmit down just
one Internet line, hence the ‘Mul-
tiple Play’ description. The ser-
vices will include Internet, TV via
Internet Protocol, video-on-
demand (VOD) video games and
Voice over Internet Protocol
(VoIP) phone services.

“The issue did close at the
end of last month,” said Mr
Sumner, referring to the first
private placement issue. “We
didn’t raise all the capital we
wanted to raise, but we allowed

the private placement document
to expire.

“We’ve been given leave by
the Board of Directors to
redraft the private placement
document because of all the
developments that have taken
place since the launch.”

He added: “We are currently
restructuring the private place-
ment, and are looking at other
options which are under active
review. We have Plan B and
Plan C in effect if we don’t raise
sufficient from the private
placement.

“We have determined this
will happen one way or another.
The Board of Directors have
expressed a deep commitment
to this. We think we can get
started and get fully deployed
with $2 million.

“We’re requiring $6 million,
but feel that in this environ-
ment, and based on the negoti-
ations that are ongoing with
partners, that $2 million will be
adequate to get services up and
running in a short period of
time.”

A private placement is tar-
geted at selected institutional

and high net-worth investors,
meaning that it is not a public
offering, so members of the
Bahamian public need not

apply.
Investors

Mr Sumner, who is also IP
Solutions International’s presi-
dent, added that the company
had “identified a new group of
investors who’ve expressed an
interest in looking at our com-
pany”. The firm had also spo-
ken to potential investors it had
pitched previously, but
informed it that the private
placement did not match their
investment/asset allocation
cycles.

“In the interim, we have
entered discussions with two
other local providers in the
industry about using their infra-
structure and products in the
platform,” said Mr Sumner.
“We’re in discussions with the
two licensees about the Multi-
Play technology.

“We have also been in very
good discussions with a foreign

partner as well about financing
our head-end construction. That
is a $2 million proposal we are
currently negotiating. They
have given us a proposal to con-
struct the entire IP head-end,
which reduces the capital we’re
looking to spend in the first
instance.”

Mr Sumner added that IP
Solutions International had also
been “placing draft contracts”
with potential hotel and gated
community customers.

He added: “Those contracts
are under active review. We
hope to close them in 14 days or
sooner.

“We are very encouraged by
the progress we have made over
the last month, month-and-a-
half, and based on the momen-
tum we’ve got we expect to see
a lot more progress over the
next month to six weeks, at
which time we will be in a posi-
tion to deploying services to
hotel properties and gated com-
munities.”

IP Solutions International has
targeted serving “well in excess
of 5,000 hotel rooms within a
year” of its creation, and has

Engineering merger’s ‘one-stop
shop’ fights 35-40% business drop

FROM page 1B

The merger, which will cre-
ate an entity with more than 30
employees, will see Mr Reiss
head up Islands by Design, with
Mr Bishop providing “assis-
tance as needed”. Mr Bishop
said that, ultimately, it would
end up as a 50/50 joint venture.

Estimating that market
demand for Bahamian engi-
neering services had shrunk by
“35 per cent to 40 per cent at
least” as a result of the global
economic downturn, and virtu-
al stoppage of many foreign
development and Bahamian-
generated construction projects,
Mr Bishop said the merger had
been driven by this in concert
with the need to “provide better
service to clients, which might
attract more business”.

By joining forces, Mr Bishop
explained that Islands by
Design’s specialist services on
the environmental, marine and
wildlife side would provide a
perfect complement to Reiss
Engineering’s main focus, which
was on civil and construction
engineering, plus water and
waste water engineering.

This combination, Mr Bish-
op said, would enable the
merged companies to “go for-
ward with a better product. It
makes us a better team. It just
means the clients can go to one
shop if they need to. It just
makes it a lot more efficient”.

Islands by Design, through its
environmental work, was often
called upon by developers to
prepare Environmental Impact
Assessments (EIAs) and the
like prior to projects starting.
Once developments started,
though, the company was often
required to sub-contract civil
engineering work out to other
companies because it was not
specialist in this area.

“Before, what we were doing
was sub-contracting work, and
any time you do that, you pass
on extra costs to the client,” Mr
Bishop explained.

“In today’s competitive
world, we have to improve ser-
vice and cut costs where you
can to remain competitive. By



“In today’s
competitive
world, we have
to improve
service and cut
costs where you
can to remain
competitive.”



Keith Bishop

providing better service to
clients, hopefully we’ll get more
business. In a shrinking market,
you've got to be creative.”
Providing quality service at a
competitive price would be key,
Mr Bishop explained, in efforts
by Bahamian engineers to ward
off competition from primarily
US companies, who were
increasingly seeing the Bahamas
as an attractive market given
the lack of demand back home.

“What we’re seeing is that the
squeeze is biting back in the US,
and we’re seeing Bahamian pro-
fessionals as being almost
preyed upon by US contrac-
tors,” Mr Bishop said. “They’re
desperate to get work and are
coming over here.

“While it’s definitely slowed,
we have a little bit of construc-
tion going on.”

Following the merger, all the
Bahamian operations will com-
bined at Islands by Design’s
Nassau headquarters, with the
US side continuing to be run
out of Reiss Engineering’s
offices there.

Mr Bishop said Reiss Engi-
neering’s expertise in water and
waste water engineering, and
the technology it had access to,
would be especially valuable in
the Bahamas given that this
nation was “a little archaic” in
its approach to recycling waste
water, letting it run into the
ground or septic tanks.

Mr Reiss added: “The real
benefit to the two firms, and
from an opportunity standpoint
when viewed from the client’s
perspective, is that Islands by
Design has a history of very

SUE
a

Well established wholesaler requires a salesman for
the snack food division. Individual must have had
experience is sales with emphasis on large food stores.
Only individuals with a proven record of being able
to work unsupervised and achieve results will be

considered.

Must be able to drive standard shift vehicle and
be in possession of current valid driver’s license.
Individuals not meeting the stated requirements will
not be considered for the post. Company offers good

benefits.

c/o DA 67134
P.O.BOX N3207
Nassau, Bahamas



UT

Commercial Building
Known as Lees Carpet Building - Shirley Street, Nassau

— = _

Gross Floor Area
11,278 sq. ft.

Site Area
18,756 sq. ft.

Located in the
Vicinity of
Harbour Bay
Shopping Centre

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management,

P.O. Box N-7518,
Nassau, The Bahamas
to reach us on or before February 12, 2009
For further information, please contact: 356-1608; 356-1685 or 502-0929



high quality service with EIAs
etc, and my firm has a long his-
tory on civil work. It’s a one-
stop shop concept that res-
onates well with companies that
need that service, and provides
much greater depth in terms of
staff and skill sets.”

Mr Reiss explained that the
two companies were merging
their capabilities, service deliv-
ery and internal organisations, a
process that was already in
train. Name changes was an
issue very much for the distant
future.

“One of the things we as
Bahamians need to make sure
we do to protect the market is
that we present our true skill
sets as Bahamians, scientists or
engineers, and show the value
we can bring in the delivery of
services through adding value,”
Mr Reiss said.

BATAMLA

plans to expand into the
Bahamas residential market and
the wider Caribbean “24
months or sooner” after its
launch.

The launch is timed to coin-
cide with the opportunities that
will result from liberalisa-
tion/deregulation of the

Bahamian telecommunications
industry, plus the Bahamas
Telecommunications Compa-
ny’s (BTC) privatisation and
end to Cable Bahamas’ cable
TV monopoly. Once Cable












Bahamas’ exclusivity on the
provision of cable television ser-
vices expires later this year in
October, IP Solutions Interna-
tional is aiming to break into
the Bahamian residential mar-
ket in Phase II.

It is now trying to set up its
own wireless infrastructure and
a self-sufficient network, some-
thing that would enable it to
avoid ‘digging up’ hotels and
running fibre lines to rooms
when the time came for instal-
lation.

Machinery & Energy Limited Caterpillar dealer in the
Bahamas are seeking a candidate to work as a

Parts Supervisor, at our Freeport Office - Branch.







The Candidate should have the following requirements:
* Have 5-7 years experience with the Caterpillar or
similar Product Line, have worked in a Caterpillar
dealership or a similar Organization;
Have training in Ordering and Receiving Parts



Importation;

Be able to Audit Parts Inventory; Cyclic Count

Procedure;

Degree from an accredited University would be an

asset;



Must be able to manager and motivate staff in the




Parts Department;

Must have experience in process statistical control in
planning, programming and control of Caterpillar
industrial parts and Warehouse production process; .
Able to manage major components interchange
process; Hoses assembling process.









This candidate is required to be a professional who
thrives on the challenge of Managing Parts Inventory
and all other operational procedures within the Parts






Warehouse.

Send complete resume with education and work







experience to:

M & E Limited,

P. O. Box N-3238,
Nassau Bahamas,

Attention: Office Administrator, or email




me@me-ltd.com.

NOTE: Only persons being interviewed for this






position will be contacted.

» ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

CANCY)

INTERNAL AUDITOR
‘ONAL AUDIT DEPARTS

4. Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Intenmal Auditor in the Intemal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position lachide, but are wot limited te the following:

* Produces audit programs and submit the same for aperoval of the Chief Internal Auditor
* Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited
* Conducts financial, opernbonal and [TS aaudat ssslpnments In accordance with established adit Programs.

* This Involves a complete assessment of the systems of internal control, risk exposures and the eticiency,
effectiveness gind economec use of resources lo achieve management obpectives

* Produces audit reports on audit concems, their causes, effects and the audit recommendations in

accomlance with the [LA Starklartis:

* Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate findings and produce investigation reports: exercising

the 1A‘s ethical standards é.g., confidentiality, ete

* Conducts reviews of budgetary systems (including variances analysis), policies, manpower efficiency

and new computer applications

* Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review and release
to management and the Audit Committee
* Assembles aunlit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files produced by the Assistant Internal

Auditors and the Avadit Clerks

* Trains, couches amd direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and otters general supereision and technical
support to the Assistant Internal Auditors)

* Comlucts componite research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud investigations. (producing

the asenciibed reperrts|

* Assist the AGMIChief Intermal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and affer direct assistance on

major mnvestigatians

* Corde andits in conjunction with the Extersal Auditors and produce working papers for the External

Auditors year-end andi

* Conducts stock taking observation ewercises, Fam ily Island audits and special agi gnments

Job requirements inchude:

* Bachelor degree in Accounting of other closely related discipline

* Professional aceountineg cervtication fee. CA. CPA)

highly desirable

: Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills

* Lind problem solving skills

In. addition completing the CLA would be

*Koowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs, Also knowledge of audit software and a goad

working knowledge of tle H-TE system are required

* Good knowledge of the Corporation's operating policies, systema and procedures

+ Management and supervision skills

* A minimum of 3 years experience

Salary for the position is in Group 3 of the Senior Staff Salary Scales

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Fonn io: The Manager-Human
Reseurces & Training Department. Bahamas Electricity Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P.O. Box

N-7309 Nassau Bahamas on or before: February 24, 2009,


a et

THE WEATHER REPORT

5-Day FORECAST











TT ae NG



















iil





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

THE TRIBUNE



MARINE FORECAST



! as Vv
i ! = — pe
i“ r 2 a — _ 7 nl
$ Le = «2 i «2 0]1|2/3/4|5|6|7|s|9]10h1
i — ; — Low | moverare | HicH | VHIGH |
: “xr ORLANDO \
\ High:77° F/25°C re a Partly sunny. Partly cloudy. Breezy with plenty of Sunshine. Mostly sunny and Partly sunny, breezy The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
a Low61°FAG°C — sun. pleasant. and pleasant. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
woo hee \ High: 82° High: 82° High: 79° High: 75°
. Rs c High: 83° Low: 71° Low: 70° Low: 69° Low: 62° Low: 64° see ey
_TAMPA fifo eee a A
High: 76° F/24°C a 68°-61° F High _Ht.(ft.) Low _Ht.(ft.
Low: 62° F/16°C rp f. The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 10:24am. 25 4:15am. -03
a @ - : elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 10:51pm. 2.7 4:28pm. -0.3
: ; ; Saturd 11:07am. 23 5:04am. -0.1
3 AY 7 Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Siillay T153am. 01 554am. 01
j r — ABACO Temperature 557 p.m. 0.0
Z | Le _ 5 High 82° F/28° C ; :
; ' Y High: 77° F/25°C Sunset anenetassdiec estates diuees anecaaiheeee 5 Monday 12:31 am. 94 6:49am. 03
ip " Low:65°F/18°C LOW oeeeeeeeeeeeee 64° F/18° C 12:42pm. 20 6:48pm. 0.2
4 Wik ow: 65° F/ Normal high... TE ge
. eo Normal low 64° F/18° C
joe @ WEST PALM BEACH es Last year's HIGH voccccccccccccsseseesseees 81° F/27°C SUN AND Moon
= High: 81° F/27°C een VOW oeeceeeeecteesesseeseeeeesees 71° F/22° C ca oe a re
Low: 64° FA18°C Precipitation, unrise...... ‘46.a.m. Moonrise ... 10:21 p.m.
" & .. As of 1 p.m. yesterday ou... 0.00" Sunset....... 6:03 p.m. Moonset ..... 9:08 a.m.
FT. LAUDERDALE FREEPORT il. Year to date ‘ob ee ee Fal
High: 80° F/27° C @ High: 76° F/24° C Normal year to date ......cccccscccscccsecsecseestesees 2.48" - 7 -
Low: 67° F/A9°C Low: 64° F/18°C ey e Ws
* AccuWeather.com = Gm
= a i. Forecasts and graphics provided by ay - ‘ay
MIAMI AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Feb.16 Feb.24 Mar.4 Mar. 10
= 5 High: 81° F/27°C ELEUTHERA
2 Low: 66°F/18°C NASSAU SE Era’
High: 83° F/28° C i
zy Low: 71° F/22°C
os en @ on
KEY WEST ill. 2 CATISLAND
High: 78° F/26° C —_ High: 79° F/26° C
Low: 70° F/21°C Low: 63° F/17°C
e =
-_ . i
> GREATEXUMA ae SAN SALVADOR
in. q High: 81° F/27°C
; ANDROS Low: 71° F/22° C few: 65° ie c
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's , Oe
highs and tonights's lows. High: 84° F/29° C an
Low:67° F/19°C FP in
a
a
LONGISLAND
Low: 65° F/18°C
Today Saturday Today Saturday Today Saturday —_ MAYAGUANA
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W = High: 82° F/28° C
F/C FIC FC FC Fic FIC FC FC FC FC Fic FC a Low: 64° F/18° C
Albuquerque 50/10 27/-2 s 48/8 25/-3 ¢ Indianapolis 46/7 31/0 pc 41/5 25/-3 ¢ Philadelphia 46/7 28/-2 s 41/5 30/-1 pe
Anchorage 27/-2 18/-7 27/-2 19/-7 pc Jacksonville 72/22 56/13 pe 75/23 57/13 t Phoenix 6417 46/7 s 60/15 42/5 pc CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 66/18 49/9 pc 62/16 44/6 + Kansas City 40/4 22/5 c = 341 21/6 po Pittsburgh 40/4 24/-4 po 38/8. 24/-4 sn RAGGEDISLAND — Tigh:84°F/29°c
Atlantic City 46/77 21/6 s 43/6 21/-6 pc Las Vegas 5512 37/2 po 54/12 35/4 pce Portland,OR 47/8 310 sh 47/8 35/1 pc High: 82° F/28° C Low:67°F/19°C
Baltimore 48/8 30/-1 s 42/5 30/-1_ pc Little Rock 60/15 41/ sh 57/13 37/2 § Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4 s 47/8 344 4 Low:63°F/17°C eae
Boston 37/2 23/-5 s 39/3 26/-3 pc Los Angeles 60/15 44/6 r 60/15 46/7 pc St. Louis 52/11 35/1 ¢ 38/3 26/-3 pc . <=
Buffalo 32/0 17/-8 sf 30/-1 16/-8 c Louisville 56/13 38/3 pc 46/7 33/0 c Salt Lake City 36/2 24/-4 c¢ 32/0 21/-6 sn GREATINAGUA ie
Charleston, SC 72/22 51/10 pce 65/18 51/10 t Memphis 6216 47/8 sh 54/12 37/2 s San Antonio 78/25 55/12 pe 68/20 52/11 pc High: 84° F/29° C
Chicago 42/5 24/-4 pc 33/0 23/-5 sn Miami 81/27 66/18 pc 82/27 65/18 s San Diego 60/15 49/9 r 6116 49/9 pc Low. 66°FAG°C
Cleveland 36/2 23/-5 pc 34/1 25/-3 sn Minneapolis 30/-1 14/-10 pc 27/-2 13/-10 ¢ San Francisco 53/11 43/6 r 5412 47/8 1 .
Dallas 69/20 38/3 pe 59/15 415 s5 Nashville 6216 42/5 pce 55/12 36/2 c Seattle 45/7 35/1 s 45/7 33/0 pe
Denver 32/0 15/-9 sn 30/-1 13/-10 c New Orleans 71/21 62/16 t 71/21 56/13 t Tallahassee 66/18 54/12 sh 71/21 52/11 + oh
Detroit 38/3 27/-2 pc 38/3 25/-3 sn New York 42/5 29/-1 s 43/6 31/0 pc Tampa 76/24 62/16 pce 76/24 60/15 pc
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 s 81/27 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 60/15 28/-2 pc 48/8 31/0 s Tucson 6317 41/5 s 56/13 36/2 pc — Bn
Houston 73/22 53/11 t 68/20 51/10 ¢ Orlando 77/25 6146 pce 83/28 60/15 pc Washington, DC 53/11 32/0 s 44/6 31/0 +

Today Saturday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
F/C F/C F/C F/C Saturday: Eat 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Acapulco 89/31 71/21 s 88/31 71/21 S FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Amsterdam 37/2 32/0 sn 39/3 34/1 Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Ankara, Turkey 45/7 34/1 1 48/8 32/0 f ABACO Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
Athens 52/11 425 ¢ 49/9 398 6 Saturday: _E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74°F
Auckland 73/22 57/13 pc 68/20 55/12 c
Bangkok 97/36 77/25 pc 98/36 77/25 s
Barbados 85/29 74/23 pe 85/29 74/23 s pi
Barcelona 5110 39/3 s 50/10 38/3 s Topay's U.S. FORECAST
Beijing 50/10 32/0 pc 45/7 19/-7 pe
Beirut 70/21 62/16 pc 70/21 60/15 s
Belgrade 31/0 26/-3 sn 30/-1 26/-3 c
Berlin 32/0 23/-5 sf 30/-1 23/-5 pe
Bermuda 67/19 58/14 pc 65/18 60/15 pc
Bogota 68/20 47/8 t 66/18 47/8 +
Brussels 39/3 34/1 sn 41/5 30/-1 pe
Budapest 36/2 28/-2 sn 37/2 24/-4 pc
Buenos Aires 93/33 73/22 s 97/36 77/25 pc : 4
Cairo 75/23 56/13 pc 77/25 56/13 s 3/43 , ee = ic
Calcutta 88/31 66/18 s 92/33 69/20 s oO =
Calgary 15/-9 1/-17 ¢ 14/10 -1/-18 c ee we 4 es
Cancun 84/28 72/22 pc 96/30 66/18 s ee ] ~S@
Caracas 83/28 68/20 sh 83/28 69/20 pc s'os)Angeles T we
Casablanca 71/21 49/9 s 73/22 55/12 ¢ 60/44
Copenhagen 35/1 25/-3 s 36/2 29/-1 s â„¢==<_ (COLD)
Dublin 46/7 39/3 pe 46/7 41/5 sh
Frankfurt 37/2 30/-1 sn 36/2 28/-2 pc
Geneva 32/0 29/-1 sn 32/0 22/-5 ¢
Halifax 32/0 10/-12 ¢ 27/-2 14/-10 c
Havana 35/29 62/16 s 35/29 62/16 s Showers
Helsinki 28/-2 21/6 sf 27/-2 14/-10 pe T-storms # 81/66
Hong Kong 79/26 70/21 pc 77/25 70/21 ¢ Rain Bae Fronts
Islamabad 60/15 44/6 1 7/21 42/5 s 4 Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and re
Istanbul 49/9 40/4 + 41/5 37/2 sn Snow precipitation. TeSEUts bands are bine for the day. Warm fitnfitentita
Jerusalem 69/20 48/8 pc 71/21 49/99 s Ice Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary angunfls
Johannesburg 71/21 55/12 pe 75/23 57/13 s
Kingston 84/28 74/23 s 84/28 75/23 sh = z
Lima 84/28 68/20 c 85/29 67/19 c & os us 20s [3081 als
London 41/5 34/1 pc 43/6 39/3 pc
Madrid 57N3 30/-1 s 59/15 34/1 s
Manila 90/32 74/23 pc 91/32 75/23 pc
Mexico City 81/27 46/7 s 80/26 43/6 s a a TO N S a RA MN ¢ =
Monterrey 88/31 61/16 s 86/30 59/15 s
Montreal 25/-3 9/-12 ¢ 27/-2 9/-12 pc
Moscow 32/0 28/-2 sn 34/1 28/-2 sn
Munich 25/-3 24/-4 sn 26/-3 17/-8 sn
Nairobi 88/31 55/12 pc 87/30 55/12 pc N ;
New Delhi 80/26 54/12 pc 78/25 51/10 pe eC St QO
Oslo 23/-5 16/-8 s 19/-7 10/-12 pc Ver ur /
Paris 39/3 32/0 r 41/5 34/1 pe ‘ ) { [
Prague 28/-2 25/-3 sn 28/-2 20/-6 pc C1 Saiive WI - O , us a
Rio de Janeiro 81/27 72/22 + 80/26 71/21 c ‘
Riyadh 75/23 52/11 s 79/26 56/13 s nate om kp
Rome 43/6 28/-2 pc 45/7 30/-1 s reco
St. Thomas 82/27 73/22 s 82/27 73/22 s vf “
San Juan 97/36 72/22 pe 99/37 71/21 s “the smart choice is
San Salvador 90/32 68/20 s 90/32 71/21 c ye
Santiago 90/32 57/13 s 91/32 55/12 s ra ae Management.
Santo Domingo 83/28 68/20 s 84/28 68/20 s / -ople you can trust.
Sao Paulo 75/23 62/16 c 76/24 63/17 + Is, —— i”
Seoul 49/9 30/-1 37/2 17/-8 wii pe 4 i _
Stockholm 30/-1 25/-3 c 30/-1 23/-5 s ' Ty.
Sydney 67/19 63/17 sh 69/20 64/17 + al 1
= reve aa 22% TD/IPTTINSURANCE MANAGEMENT
Tokyo 616 54/12 pc 66/18 50/10 r P e . ie
Toronto 32/0 19/-7 pc 31/0 16/-8 c (RATIANLAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
Trinidad 88/31 73/22 t 83/28 73/22 t = |
Vancouver 43/6 32/0 436 320 po ft MewProviseare / Grond Bohoma.! Abana Fleuthere Fyuma
Vienna 32/0 25/-3 sf 31/0 24/-4 sn
Warsaw 36/2 34/1 sn 37/2 30/-1 sn b BEAD 20) Tek (2A) 50-3500 Tet (240) 367-4004 Ba (DED) 30-18 Be (14) NEG
Winnipeg 20/-6 -2/-18 c 17/-8 -1/-18 c \ il

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace


TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS

(ABOVE) St John’s
Caryn Moss moves the
eee) Ute e) elon

(LEFT) West Minister
Michelle Burrows is
fouled by QC Alexan-
tria Marshall.



BFA congratulated for
milestone achievement

The Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation congratulates President
Anton Sealey and the executive
of The Bahamas Football Asso-
ciation on its achievement in
negotiating with its governing
body, Fédération Internationale
de Football Association (FIFA)
to host its General Assembly in
The Bahamas.

The FIFA General Assembly
will attract thousands of mem-
bers from 208 countries to The
Bahamas, to be accompanied by
hundreds of news reporters.

FIFA’s General Assembly will

be held 29th May - 4th June,
2009 at Atlantis Resorts.

The Bahamas Olympic Asso-
ciation encourages other sport-
ing Federations and Associations
to make the most of our natural
national resources and bid with
their international bodies to have
their general meeting in The
Bahamas.

It now appears from all indi-
cations that the Government
generally and the Ministries of
Sports & Tourism in particular
are prepared to lend expertise
and assistance in these projects

to Federations bringing in large
groups of sports tourists.

The BOA is proud and happy
that one of our Federations has
now shown the power of sports
tourism at work in attracting this
major group to our shores.

As the official representatives
of the Olympic Movement in
The Bahamas, the BOA further
encourages all Bahamians, espe-
cially those working in front line
tourism positions to do every-
thing possible during the visit of
FIFA and its delegates to show
the best face of our country.

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PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



SPORTS











ORGANISERS at the AF }
Adderley Junior High Scholl :
have released the schedule for }
the first three days of compe- }
tition for the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Classic }
that will get started on Mon- }
day at the Kendal Isaacs }
Gymnasium. ;

SCHEDULE:
3:30 pm Doris Johnson vs}
Nassau Christian Academy. }
4:30 pm Charles W. :
Saunders vs CI Gibson.
5:30 pm CV Bethel vs
St. Anne’s.

B. R. E. A. K.

7 pm CC Sweeting

vs Galilee.

8 pm Kingsway Acadeym
vs Government High.

9 pm St. John’s

vs CR Walker.

SCHEDULE
3:30 pm RM Bailey
vs Teleos.
4:30 pm Church of God
vs Queen’s College.
5:30 pm Winner game 3
vs Winner game 6.

B. R. E. A. K.

7 pm Winner game 4
vs Winner game 5.
8 pm Winner game 1
vs Winner game 8.
9 pm Winner game 2
vs Winner game 7.

SCHEDULE
1 pm South Andros
vs Catholic High.
2pm Alpha/Omega
vs Bimini.
3 pm Temple Christian
Academy vs
Tabernacle Baptist.
4pm Sunland Baptist vs
Mt. Carmel.

B. R. E. A. K.

6 pm Prince William vs
Bishop Michael Eldon.
7 pm North Eleuthera vs
St. George’s.

8 pm Eight Mile Rock
vs St. Paul’s.

9 pm Westminster vs
Jack Hayward.

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Comets clinch third junior
girls championship

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

QUEEN’S COLLEGE COMETS - 40
WESTMINSTER DIPLOMATS - 35

WITH her team trailing 25-
19 heading into the fourth
quarter, Alexandria Marshall
placed the Comets on her back,
willed her team to a game three
victory and clinched the third
BAISS junior girls champi-
onship in school history.

Marshall saved her best
game of the season for the
league finale pouring in 31 of
her teams 40 points, 14 of
which came in the all impor-
tant fourth quarter.

Marshall began the fourth
with a three point play to bring
her team within three points.

The Comets star forward
scored her team’s first eight
points of the period, capping
a run which gave her team a
28-27 lead with 3:56 remain-
ing.

Kerri Bascom scored on the
ensuing possession to give the
Comets a 30-27 advantage.

Marshall’s best play of the

game may have come ona
series where she drew a foul
rather than score.

The foul was the fifth on
Diplomats star Thea Hanna,
who finished with 18 points
and had traded baskets with
Marshall throughout the quar-
ter.

Marshall made one of two
free throws to give the Comets
a 33-31 lead with 2:19 remain-
ing.

With Hanna sidelined, the
Diplomats struggled to score
and the Comets took advan-
tage of the ball handling defi-
ciencies.

Talia Thompson stole a pass
and took the ball coast to coast
finishing with a lay-up to give
the Comets their largest lead of
the game, 38-31 with 1:18 left
to play.

Thompson finished with sev-
en, while Bascom added the
Comets only other score of the
game.

For the Diplomats Petrel
Pickstock finished with 11, sec-
ond on the team to Hanna’s
18.

Marshall said her team made
a determined effort to come



TALKING SOFTBALL: Legacy's Vice President for Softball, Yvonne
Lockhart, right, chats with softball coaches from Indian River Com-
munity College from Florida during an earlier visit to Grand bahama,
and local with college recruiter, Dwayne Jennings.

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out with a concentrated effort
in game three, particularly in
the second half.

“We just wanted to come
out here, play with all our
heart try to put alot of effort in
it, but we had to finish the
offensive plays in the second
because early in the first half
we were not doing so well so
we had to step it up and bring
our best game to the table,”
she said. “It feels very good,
everybody was hoping for us
to win a championship and I
really wanted it because this is
my last year.”

Comets Head Coach, Ter-
rence McSweeney said he was
proud of his team’s effort but
applauded the Diplomats’
improvements they made over
the course of the season

“It is mixed emotions
because the girls from the
Diplomats they practised with
us, they worked with us and
they were able to go and work
on some other things,” he said.
“We give them kudos because
it is an increase to the BAISS
junior and senior girls.”

The Comets took the series
two games to one.

QC Alexantria Marshall drives...



Legacy boys baseball, girls
softball season set to begin

FREEPORT, Grand
Bahama - As the opening of
the Legacy boys baseball and
girls softball seasons approach,
the player registration drive
for both disciplines continue
even as Legacy considers revis-
ing its baseball divisions to bet-
ter prepare the boys for post
season competition.

The baseball season, open
to boys from 4 to 15, is expect-
ed to open February 28 at
10:00 am at the YMCA, and
girls softball season, ages 6-18,
opens the following weekend,
March 7 at 12 noon at GB.
Catholic High Playing Field.

Legacy’s Player Agent,
Eugene Thompson, pointed
out that this year the Associa-
tion is looking at a revision of
the age divisions and may add
a new baseball division to bet-
ter prepare the boys for post
season play.“We are proposing
the addition of a Mustang
Division which will give us five
divisions for our youngsters
and better prepare them as
they progress through our sys-
tem. The league has the Shet-
land (Tee-Ball) Division for
4-6 year olds; the Pinto Divi-
sion (Coach-Pitch) for 7 and
8 year olds; the new Mustang
Division for 9 and 10 year olds;
the Bronco Division for 11 and
12 year olds, and the Pony
Division for our 13-15 year old
boys.

FROM page 11

to reminisce about the good
time at home.”

August Campbell, a native of
Grand Bahama, signed to play
for Duke University.

As he head to Fayetteville,
Justin Campbell said he was
eager to get started as the offen-
sive linesman coach had already
indicated to him that they want-
ed him to come in and get pre-
pared to play centre, possibly
as the starter.

“Tjust have to work out,” said
Campbell, who returned to
Charlotte on Wednesday where
he intended to get back in phys-
ical condition after taking the
past two weeks off.

Although school won’t start
until August, Campbell said he
had a busy summer ahead of
him as he “step my game up.”
Once he graduates from Victo-
ry Center in May, Campbell said
he will have to report to summer
camp at Fayetteville in July.

Campbell, the son of Dwight
and Yvonne Campbell, said he
was delighted to take the short
break to come home after sign-
ing with Fayetteville. He noted
that his family was over-
whelmed that he was finally
going to live out a childhood
dream.

“Workouts and games are
also on-going for Legacy’s 16-
18 year olds to help prepare
them for post season play and
for opportunities to be seen
by scouts and High Schools
abroad,” Thompson said.

Meanwhile, baseball prac-
tice continues for ALL players
and ALL divisions on Satur-
days at 12:30 pm at the
YMCA. Registration also con-
tinues at the concession stand
at the YMCA during the same
time.

SOFTBALL

The softball registration
continues this weekend in the
Bight Mile Rock community
when Yvonne Lockhart and
her coaching team travel west
to conduct workouts and reg-
ister players beginning at 10:00
am at St. Agnes Church Field.
Registration of boys interested
in baseball will also take place
at this session.

“This weekend we’re invit-
ing all interested girls in the
communities of west Grand
Bahama, ages 6-18, to our
workout session at St. Agnes
Church Playing Field, make
themselves known and regis-
ter for the upcoming softball
season. Those persons inter-
ested in coaching are also
asked to make themselves
known so that we can begin
assigning teams,” said Ms.

Lockhart. Next weekend,
February 21, the Legacy team
will be conducting workouts
and registering players and
coaches in East Grand
Bahama beginning at 11:00
am.

Legacy’s Vice President for
Softball also revealed plans
for two upcoming events to
assist players and coaches,
namely the rescheduled Soft-
ball College Showcase with
the Indian River Junior Col-
lege Team from Florida, now
set for April 17-19, and a spe-
cial clinic for pitchers and
coaches with another visiting
college coach and his staff in
May.

“We’re pleased to have
these coaches continue to
express an interest in working
with our girls in The Bahamas
and we look forward to having
many of them interested in a
college opportunity prepare
themselves early; we are also
inviting those interested in
coaching softball to join in
these sessions and improve the
knowledge and skills that they
want to share with their
teams,” said Ms. Lockhart.

Parents interested in regis-
tering their children can con-
tact: BASEBALL - Lillian
Carey, 352-3636; Eugene
Thompson, 646-1665; SOFT-
BALL — Yvonne Lockhart,
533-7989.

heads to Fayetteville

“T always had that dream,
somewhere in the back of my
head that I will play college
football,” he said. “I just knew
that I had to work hard at it.”

His proud father said their
family was quite pleased with
his achievement so far.

“Pm proud of him in terms
of his discipline. That was our
number one concern when he
left here,” Dwight Campbell
pointed out. “ve known of
people who went off to the
States only to return in a couple
of months or not return at all.

“Hopefully what we have
instilled in him as a young boy
will stick with him as he con-
tinues to excel. But I’m very
proud of his accomplishments
so far.”

Now that he’s accomplished
his goal of obtaining a collegiate
scholarship, Justin Campbell
said he ultimately wanted to go
all the way and play in the
National Football League.

“That’s a goal, but I still have
to go and work on my acade-
mics, just in case that doesn’t
work out,” he said. “At least I
will have something to fall back
on. But at least playing in the
NFL is a goal.”

As a fan of the Tampa Buc-
caneers, Campbell said he

would eventually like to suit up
for them, but if the opportunity
doesn’t present itself, he will be
willing to satisfy with whatever
school is willing to pick him up.

“Any team will do,” he
stressed.

For those Bahamian players
who also aspire to follow their
dreams of playing in college and
even far as venturing into the
pro ranks, Campbell used them
to “keep your dream alive and
stick to it.

“Hard work and dedication
is what it takes. You definitely
have to do your school work.
So you have to stay on track
with your school work and you
could achieve your goal.”

For Campbell, he hopes to
achieve his ultimate goal so that
he can “make my family and
the Bahamas very proud.” At
present, he’s on course to
accomplish that.

“T would hope that more of
our Bahamian players would
come over and play in college,”
he said. “There are a couple of
us playing high school now, who
are going off to college.

“So with the talent that we
have here, if some of them are
given the opportunity, I think
they can accomplish their goal
as well.”
THE TRIBUNE



Sports

TRACK
CLUB MONICA
MEET

8 STARTING tonight at
6 pm at the Thomas A. i
Robinson Track and Field :
Stadium, the 9thannual
Club Monica Track and
Field Classic will take
place. The meet will wrap
up on Saturday, starting at :
noon, :
All of the local clubs are :
expected to participate as i
athletes try to surpass the
qualifying marks for the
Carifta Games that will
take place in St. Lucia
over the Easter holiday
weekend.

BASKETBALL
NPBA RESULTS

¢ THE New Providence
ISYIS eel byl ate 1nCeynl
played two games on
Wednesday night at the
Gi Groves Gg urvernsttian)
with the following results
posted:

In the opener, the Fox-
ies Pros improved their
record to 8-7 as they
defeated the South West
Printing Falcons (3-13)
110-103. Denash Hanna
had a game high 28 points
for the Pros, while Jude
Rolle had 26 for the Fal-
ferns

In the feature game, the
Y'Cares Wreckers (8-7)
defeated the Sunshine
Auto Rough Ryders (10-
6) 94-84. Brandon Ingra-
ham scored 18 points in
the win for the Wreckers.
Mario Pickstock had a
game high 19 in the loss
for the Ryders.

The NPBA will be back
in action tonight with a
double header and again
on Saturday before the
league take a break for
the prestigious Hugh
Campbell Basketball Clas-
sic that will start on Mon-
day at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.



SOFTBALL
MASTERS GAMES
POSTPONED

¢ THE Masters Softball
League has announced :
that due to the funeral ser- :
vice of one of its mem- i
bers, Dennis Smith, on
Saturday, all games sched-
uled at the Archdeacon
William Thompson Soft-
ball Park at the Southern
Recreation Grounds, has
been postponed.

However, league presi-
dent Anthony ‘Boots’
Weech, is requesting that
its membes show up in
team uniform tops at St.
Agnes Anglican Church
on Baillou Hill Road at 11 :
am. He will be interned in }
Lakeview Memorial Gar-
dens, John F. Kennedy
Drive and Gladstone
Road.

Call to
advertise:
502-2371














op FRIDAY,

PAGE 11



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fe U

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* ca



FEBRUARY 13,

2009

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

ST JOHNS Darinque Young ride sac Ashlee Bethel

Campbell
heads to
Fayetteville

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WHEN Justin Campbell left
Jordan Prince William High in
2007, he went to Charlotte,
North Carolina with the inten-
tion of getting an athletic schol-
arship to pursue his dream of
playing collegiate football.

Two years after he made the
move where he starred for Vic-
tory Christian Center School,
Campbell is now on his way to
playing as a Bronco on Fayet-
teville State football team, start-
ing with his freshman year in
August.

“Things are going good, aca-
demically and sports wise,” said
Campbell, who was home this
week for a family funeral. “?’m
just doing my thing.”

The 18-year-old, who started
playing in the Commonwealth
American Football League
under coach Richard Gardiner
after he jokingly admitted that
he “couldn’t defy gravity to play
football,” said the football cli-
mate was totally different in the
states than it was here.

“They are more disciplined
and dedicated,” Campbell
pointed out. “Whatever you do,
you just have to try hard, but I
believe they push you more to
work much harder.”

As an offensive linesman,
playing centre and free tackle,
Campbell has had two stellar
seasons for Victory Christian
that he was selected to play in
the Oasis All-Star Shrine Clas-
sic in November in Charlotte.

The classic featured the top
players in the joint states of



=
Justin Campbell

North and South Carolina, who
were teamed up to play on two
opposing All-Star teams.

“Tt was fun. It was enlighten-
ing to know that I was playing
on the same team with another
Bahamian,” said Campbell of
August Campbell, who played
as an outside linebacker for
Arden Christ School in North
Carolina.

“When I saw the name
Campbell when I first arrived, I
thought that he had to be a
Bahamian. When I finally found
out, I was just happy to know
that there was another Bahami-
an there.”

Unfortunately, the Campbells
combo (who didn’t play at the
same time on the field) wasn’t
enough to power the North
team pass the South as they lost
by more than a field goal.

“We did have a chance to
watch each other play and we
talked with each other about
the way we played,” Justin
Campbell said. “So it was good

SEE page 10





BOYS AND
GIRLS
LEGACY
BASEBALL
RETURNS

SAC takes BAISS
senior girls title

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

SAC BIG RED MACHINE - 41
ST. JOHN’S GIANTS - 30

THERE would be no repeat in the Senior
Girls’ division as the defending champions fell in
the third and deciding game unable to match
the size of the Big Red Machine’s front-line.

SAC’s Brittney Harrison scored a game high
17 points to lead the Big Red Machine to the
title, dominating the interior in the second half.

The Big Red Machine trailed 17-15 at the half,
but Harrison began the third quarter scoring six
consecutive points to put her team ahead for
good.

A free throw by Alicia Musgrove capped a
10-0 run which gave SAC a 25-17 advantage.

Domonique Young gave the Giants their first

score of the half from the line, 2:23 into the quar-
ter and Alexia Maycock scored the team’s first
field goal with 1:49 remaining.

Young brought the Giants within three with a
drive to the basket which trimmed the deficit
25-22,

SAC ended the quarter with a baseline jumper
by Christian Albury and a three point play by
Harrison to take a 30-25 lead into the fourth.

After Young fouled out early in the fourth
quarter, with 11 points, the Giants offence unrav-
elled, struggling to score on the Big Red
Machine’s stout interior defence anchored by
Harrison.

SAC led by as much as 10 points on a three
point play my Musgrove which gave her team a
35-25 lead with 3:30 left to play.

Musgrove finished with 13 points while Albury
added six and Ashlee Bethel four.

The Big Red Machine took the series two
games to one.

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PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Handling of ‘pornographic’ incident angers parents C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.68FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER PARTLY SUNNY HIGH 83F LOW 71F B U S I N E S S SEEBUSINESSFRONT S P O R T S Project’s ‘huge shot in the arm’ SPORTSSTARTSONPAGEELEVEN Basketball latest n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter k herig@tribunemedia.net P ARENTS of children attending a New Providence Catholic primary school areo utraged over how adminis trators handled a “pornographic” related incident that occurred on campus. Almost two weeks after the u nspecified “incident” hap pened, parents were called to a special meeting at the school on Monday night. At the meeting, parents told T he Tribune , they were shown images of young children and teenagers involved in traffic accidents and in drug and sexr elated situations. The parents became increasingly puzzled by the nature of the meeting and demanded an explanation fort he display of images. When direct answers were reportedly not forthcomingf rom the school, the meeting became heated. R umours started circulating among the parents about an incident that may have Heated meeting at pr imar y school The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY Try our Big Breakfast Sandwich BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E A ‘domestic dispute’ leaves one man dead n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter t thompson@tribunemedia.net A "DOMESTIC DISPUTE" between two men in the Cowpen Road area took a tragic turn leaving one man dead and the other in custody, police said. A lthough police would not reveal what sparked the violent row, reports reaching The Tribune indicate it may have stemmed from a "love triangle" involving a woman. According to a report by Assistant Superintendent W alter Evans, the incident unfolded on Williams Drive around 9 pm Wednesday. Police said Harold Gardiner, 49, of North Andros and a 36-year-old man were having a "verbal altercation" that escalated into a violent attack in a yard on that street. A t some point during the row, Gardiner was stabbed multiple times about the body, ASP Evans said. EMS was called and found Gardiner in the yard lifeless, lyingo n his back, with multiple stab wounds about the body. He was pronounced dead at the scene, ASP Evans said. AN 18-YEAR-OLDman was arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday on an attempted murder charge. Police have charged Shavargo Sturrup, a resident of Union Village Road off Wullf Road, with the attempted murder of Donovan Sturrup. According to court dockets, the accused attempted to cause Sturrup’s death on Saturday, January 31. According to reports, the victim was shot in the chest while standing outside his home on Cox Way, off East Street south, after he was approached by a man he knew. The two men reportedly got into an argument, which escalated into a fight. A gun was pulled and Donovan Sturrup was shot. Shavargo Sturrup who was arraigned before Magistrate Susan Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau Street yesterday was not required to enter a plea to the attempted murder charge. He was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison and is expected back in court today for a bail hearing. n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net THE Bahamas Constitution is a “British enactment”, not a docu ment enacted by the people of The Bahamas or its parliament, according to Education Minister Carl Bethel. Mr Bethel made this observation during his contribution to the debate on the second reading of the proSIDEW ALKONTHESLIDE THE CONDITION of this sidewalk on Long Wharf is showing signs of serious deterioration. The road was damaged by waves from rough seas last year. F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f 18-year-old in court on attempted murder charge C M Y K C M Y K S E C T I O N B b u s i n e s s @ t r i b u n e m e d i a . n e t F R I D A Y , F E B R U A R Y 1 3 , 2 0 0 9 T H E T R I B U N E $ 3 . 3 4 $ 3 . 3 9 $ 3 . 3 6 f o r a b e t t e r l i f eL I F E I N S U R A N C ES A L E S O F F I C E S : N A S S A U I F R E E P O R T I A B A C O I E L E U T H E R A I E X U M A I C O R P O R A T E C E N T R E : E A S T B A Y S T R E E T I w w w . f a m g u a r d b a h a m a s . c o m c a l l u s t o d a y a t 3 9 6 1 3 5 5 A S U B S I D I A R Y O F s e c u r e f u t u r e l e a v e y o u r c h i l d r e n n a n c i a l l y s e c u r e p r o v i d e a s a f e t y n e t f o r y o u r l o v e d o n e s e n s u r e a b r i g h t f u t u r e f o r y o u r f a m i l ya l l o f t h e a b o v e E n g i n e e r i n g m e r g e r s o n e s t o p s h o p f i g h t s 3 5 4 0 % b u s i n e s s d r o p O n e w a y o r a n o t h e r f i r m w i l l g e t c a p i t a lnB y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T h e p r i v a t e / p u b l i c s e c t o r c o m m i t t e e a d v i s i n g t h e G o v e r n m e n t o n f i n a n c i a l s e c t o r r e g u l a t o r y c o n s o l i d a t i o n i s e x p e c t e d t o m e e t i n t h e n e x t w e e k o r t w o t o c o n s i d e r f u r t h e r r e c o m m e n d a t i o n s f o r p u s h i n g t h e p r o c e s s f o r w a r d , t h e m i n i s t e r r e s p o n s i b l e t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s t h a t t h e p l a t f o r m f o r a c h i e v i n g t h e i r u l t i m a t e g o a l w a s a l r e a d y i n p l a c e . Z h i v a r g o L a i n g , m i n i s t e r o f s t a t e f o r f i n a n c e , s a i d t h e l a s t o f t h e t h r e e r e g u l a t o r s t o m o v e i n t o C h a r l o t t e H o u s e , t h e C o m p l i a n c e C o m m i s s i o n , h a d r e l o c a t e d t h e r e l a s t w e e k f r o m t h e C e c i l W a l l a c e W h i t f i e l d B u i l d i n g a t C a b l e B e a c h . B y h a v i n g t h i s r e g u l a t o r , t o g e t h e r w i t h t h e S e c u r i t i e s C o m m i s s i o n o f t h e B a h a m a s a n d t h e R e g i s t r a r o f I n s u r a n c e s O f f i c e , i n t h e s a m e p r e m i s e s , M r L a i n g s a i d i n f o r m a t i o n s h a r i n g b e t w e e n t h e t h r e e w o u l d b e m u c h e a s i e r . T h e r e g u l a t o r s a b i l i t y t o s e r v i c e f i n a n c i a l s e r v i c e s o p e r a t o r s s e e k i n g l i c e n c e s , p e r m i t s a n d a p p r o v a l s f r o m t h e m w i l l a l s o b e e n h a n c e d i n t e r m s o f e f f i c i e n c y , s i n c e t h e i r c o n s o l i C o m p l i a n c e C o m m i s s i o n j o i n s S e c u r i t i e s C o m m i s s i o n , i n s u r a n c e r e g u l a t o r i n C h a r l o t t e H o u s e , a s m i n i s t e r s a y s g o o d p r o g r e s s b e i n g m a d e Z h i v a r g o L a i n gS E E p a g e 6 B n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A B a h a m i a n c o m p a n y w i l l o n e w a y o r a n o t h e r r a i s e t h e c a p i t a l t o e n a b l e i t t o s t a r t d e p l o y i n g i t s m u l t i p l e p l a y b u n d l e o f I n t e r n e t s e r v i c e s w i t h i n t h e n e x t m o n t h t o s i x w e e k s , i t s c h i e f e x e c u t i v e s a y i n g y e s t e r d a y t h a t a n u m b e r o f p o s i t i v e d e v e l o p m e n t s h a d t a k e n p l a c e s i n c e i t s f i r s t p r i v a t e p l a c e m e n t o f f e r i n g c l o s e d .E d i s o n S u m n e r , p r e s i d e n t a n d c h i e f e x e c u t i v e o f I P S o l u t i o n s I n t e r n a t i o n a l ( I P S I ) ,s a i d t h e c o m p a n y w a s r e s t r u c t u r i n g a n e w p r i v a t e p l a c e m e n t o f f e r i n g f o l l o w i n g t h e e n d J a n u a r y c l o s e o f i t s i n i t i a l f i n a n c e r a i s i n g e f f o r t . H e a c k n o w l e d g e d t h a t t h e f i r s t p r i v a t e p l a c e m e n t h a d f a i l e d t o r a i s e t h e h o p e d f o r $ 6 m i l l i o n , b u t s a i dI P S o l u t i o n s I n t e r n a t i o n a lw a s n o w t a l k i n g t o p o t e n t i a l n e w a n d f o r m e r i n v e s t o r s , a n d e s t i m a t e d i t o n l y r e q u i r e d $ 2 m i l l i o n t o f i n a n c e f u l l d e p l o y m e n t o f i t s s e r v i c e s . * B a h a m i a n c o m p a n y I P S o l u t i o n s I n t e r n a t i o n a l r e s t r u c t u r i n g $ 6 m p r i v a t e p l a c e m e n t , b u t s a y s $ 2 m e n o u g h t o b e g i n f u l l d e p l o y m e n t o f m u l t i p l a y I n t e r n e t s e r v i c e s * I n t a l k s w i t h p o t e n t i a l B a h a m i a n a n d f o r e i g n p a r t n e r s , l a t t e r o f w h o m h a s o f f e r e d t o f i n a n c e $ 2 m h e a d e n d c o n s t r u c t i o n * H o p i n g t o c l o s e s e r v i c e c o n t r a c t s w i t h h o t e l s / g a t e d c o m m u n i t i e s i n 1 4 d a y s o r s o o n e r , a n d t a r g e t i n g s e r v i c e s t a r t i n m o n t h t o s i x w e e k s S E E p a g e 5 B E d i s o n S u m n e r n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r T w o l e a d i n g B a h a m i a n o w n e d e n g i n e e r i n g f i r m s y e s t e r d a y u n v e i l e d t h e i r m e r g e r t h a t i s d e s i g n e d t o c r e a t e a o n e s t o p s h o p c o n c e p t f o r t h e s e s e r v i c e s , a n d i n s o d o i n g e n h a n c e e f f i c i e n c y a n d g e t m o r e b u s i n e s s i n a m a r k e t e s t i m a t e d t o h a v e s h r u n k b y 3 5 4 0 p e r c e n t . I s l a n d s b y D e s i g n , t h e e n v i r o n m e n t a l , m a r i n e a n d w i l d l i f e e n g i n e e r i n g a n d c o n s u l t i n g s p e c i a l i s t h e a d e d b y p r i n c i p a l K e i t h B i s h o p , i s m e r g i n g w i t h R e i s s E n g i n e e r i n g , a U S h e a d q u a r t e r e d e n g i n e e r i n g f i r m w i t h o f f i c e i n O r l a n d o a n d C a l i f o r n i a , b u t w h i c h i s h e a d e d b y B a h a m i a n a n d F r e e p o r t n a t i v e R o b e r t R e i s s a s p r e s i d e n t . S E E p a g e 5 B B a h a m i a n f i r m s I s l a n d s b y D e s i g n , R e i s s E n g i n e e r i n g i n t i e u p t h a t a i m s t o e n h a n c e s e r v i c e d e l i v e r y a n d c o s t c o m p e t i t i v e s o l u t i o n s t h a t w i l l a t t r a c t m o r e b u s i n e s s n B y C H E S T E R R O B A R D S B u s i n e s s R e p o r t e r T h e 3 0 p e r c e n t d r o p i n c r a w f i s h / l o b s t e r p r i c e s a s a r e s u l t o f d e c l i n g g l o b a l d e m a n d h a s i m p a c t e d S p a n i s h W e l l s f i s h e r m e n , w h o y e s t e r d a y p l e d g e d t o k e e p o n f i s h i n g d e s p i t e e x p e c t e d r e v e n u e l o s s e s a n d i n c r e a s i n g o p e r a t i n g c o s t s . T h e p r i c e o f l o b s t e r h a s f a l l e n i n c r e m e n t a l l y f r o m a r o u n d $ 2 2 . 5 0 p e r p o u n d a t t h i s t i m e l a s t y e a r t o a r o u n d $ 1 5 p e r p o u n d , w i t h a f u r t h e r d e c r e a s e p o s s i b l e l a t e r t h i s y e a r a s r e s t a u r a n t s a n d o t h e r p u r c h a s e r s r e d u c e c r a w f i s h p u r c h a s e s i n r e s p o n s e t o f a l l i n g c u s t o m e r d e m a n d . T h i s h a s h e a v i l y i m p a c t e d 3 0 % c r a w f i s h p r i c e d e c l i n e h i t s S p a n i s h W e l l s h a r d S E E p a g e 4 B n B y N E I L H A R T N E L L T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s E d i t o r A 5 7 0 u n i t d e v e l o p m e n t i s h o p i n g t o g i v e t h e B a h a m i a n e c o n o m y a n d r e a l e s t a t e m a r k e t a h u g e s h o t i n t h e a r m a s i t a n t i c i p a t e s r e c e i v i n g f i n a l s u b d i v i s i o n a p p r o v a l f r o m t h e G o v e r n m e n t i m m i n e n t l y , i t s p r o j e c t m a n a g e r y e s t e r d a y t e l l i n g T r i b u n e B u s i n e s s i t c o u l d q u i c k l y r a m p u p t o c r e a t e 1 3 0 j o b s . K e i t h B i s h o p , I s l a n d s b y D e s i g n ' s p r i n c i p a l , w h o i s a c t i n g a s p r o j e c t m a n a g e r f o r S o u t h A b a c o b a s e d S c h o o n e r B a y d e v e l o p m e n t , s a i d t h e p r o j e c t , w h i c h i s a i m i n g t o s e t s t a n d a r d s f o r s u s t a i n a b l e , e n v i r o n m e n t a l l y f r i e n d l y d e v e l o p m e n t i n t h e B a h a m a s , w o u l d b e a b l e t o s t a r t c o n s t r u c t i o n w i t h i n 1 4 d a y s o f r e c e i v i n g f i n a l g o v e r n m e n t a p p r o v a l t o s e l l l o t s . O n c e t h a t h a p p e n e d , M r B i s h o p s a i d t h e r e w o u l d b e a h u g e i m p a c t o n e m p l o y m e n t i n s o u t h A b a c o , w i t h S c h o o n e r B a y s w o r k f o r c e g o i n g f r o m z e r o t o 1 3 0 p l u s p e r s o n s i n v e r y l i t t l e t i m e . I h o p e t o b e a b l e t o g e t t h e f i n a l s u b d i v i s i o n a p p r o v a l t h i s w e e k , M r B i s h o p s a i d , a n d g i v e n t h a t , w e h o p e v e r y s h o r t l y t o s t a r t m a r k e t i n g . T h e e x p r e s s i o n s o f i n t e r e s t a r e v e r y , v e r y p l e a s i n g . I m j u s t w a i t i n g f o r t h e d a y t h e d e v e l o p m e n t g e t s f i n a l a p p r o v a l f o r s e l l i n g , b e c a u s e i t w i l l b e a h u g e s h o t i n t h e a r m f o r A b a c o a n d t h e B a h a m a s R e a l E s t a t e A s s o c i a t i o n . I t h i n k S c h o o n e r B a y i s g o i n g t o d o v e r y , v e r y w e l l . H e a d d e d t h a t P h a s e I o f t h e S c h o o n e r B a y d e v e l o p m e n t w a s p r e t t y m u c h a l l d o n e , w i t h t h e r e l e v a n t g o v e r n m e n t a g e n c i e s a l l c o n d u c t i n g a f i n a l r e v i e w o f i t s p e r m i t a n d l i c e n c e a p p l i c a t i o n s . I w o u l d s a y t h a t j u d g i n g a g a i n s t p r e v i o u s p r o j e c t s t h a t I v e d o n e , t h i s o n e h a s g o n e a l i t t l e b i t m o r e q u i c k l y t h a n w e e x p e r i e n c e d p r e v i o u s l y , M r B i s h o p s a i d . T h e f i r s t s u b m i s s i o n w a s d o n e o n l y i n A u g u s t l a s t y e a r , a n d h e r e w e a r e i n F e b r u a r y . A n y d a y n o w w e l l s e e s u b d i v i s i o n a p p r o v a l a n d s u b s e q u e n t l y t h e s e l l i n g o f l o t s , a n d a h u g e i m p a c t o n e m p l o y m e n t i n s o u t h A b a c o f r o m z e r o t o 1 3 0 p l u s P r o j e c t s h u g e s h o t i n t h e a r m S c h o o n e r B a y s u b d i v i s i o n a p p r o v a l l i k e l y i m m i n e n t , w i t h d e v e l o p e r s a b l e t o b e g i n c o n s t r u c t i o n w i t h i n 1 4 d a y s o f f i n a l a p p r o v a l t o s e l l 5 7 0 a c r e p r o j e c t c o u l d g e n e r a t e e m p l o y m e n t f r o m z e r o t o 1 3 0 p l u s v e r y q u i c k l y S E E p a g e 4 B n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net PLP Leader Perry Christie maintains his party abstained from the final vote on the Royal Bahamas Police Force Act 2009 because a part of the Bill is unconstitutional. And despite the Bill being passed in the House of Assembly Wednesday night, Mr Christie vowed his party will continue to protest until the clause that limits the service of the Commissioner and Deputy Commissioner of Police to two five-year terms is removed. Although the PLP supported all but one of the provisions of Christie says PLP abstained from final vote on Police Bill MORE than $8 million worth of cocaine was seized by local drug enforcement officers and US officials Thursday morning in what is being described as one of the most significant cocaine seizures in the Family Islands. According to police, around 9 am Thursday Drug Enforcement Unit Officer along with US officials intercepted and searched a 77foot Haitian wooden hull vessel on the island of Great Inagua. Over 400 kilos of SEE page six SEE page six Another in custody after incident in Co wpen Road ar ea Perry Christie GEORGE Markantonis, President and CEO of Kerzner InternationalBahamas expressed extreme disappointment over the Tribune’s lead story on Thursday. Mr Markantonis said that despite the resort’s very clear statement that Mr Sol Kerzner “simply hosted a luncheon to introduce the Prime Minister and Cabinet Ministers to new members of the Kerzner International board” and despite the corroborating statements made by those attending the luncheon, the last paragraph of the article implied that there are pending layoffs at Atlantis tarKerzner CEO disappointed with Tribune lead story SEE page six SEE page eight Cocaine worth more than $8m is seized SEE page eight Bahamas Constitution ‘is a Br itish enactment’ SEE page eight Carl Bethel

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter A FIRE in the Wulff Road area could not be contained before it caused extensive damage to a nearby apartment b uilding. Fire fighters spent most of yesterday morning fighting the blaze, which it was claimed was started when a Rastafari-a n lit a fire to roast peanuts. The man was issued a warning by the fire fighters as lighting fires in a yard is illegal. Press liaison officer Walter E vans said the fire took place opposite the FYP lumber yard. “The report came in around 9 am and units arrived five minutes after the call came in. T here was a two-storey buildi ng nearby and initial reports were that someone was inside, h owever after a search no one was found. “There were three apartm ent units in the back of the building. The rear unit was destroyed and the other two units received smoke dam-a ge,” Mr Evans said. He also denied claims that a b aby had to be rescued from the building and that fire hydrants in the area were dry,f orcing fire fighters to use sewage water to contain the blaze. “There were four fire trucks at this scene and if any firet ruck runs out of water, excavator wells are used as there is one located on nearby Mack-e y street,” Mr Evans said. Fire badly damages apartment building n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter ATTORNEY General Michael Barnett said that government is s till working on its proposal for a freedom of information law, but is c ommitted to seeing a bill before parliament within a “reasonable” time. “Most democracies have moved towards a Freedom of Information Act and I think it w ill be a good thing. We have five years to put it in place so it is stilla part of our commitment,” Mr Barnett said. F reedom of Information laws are intended to give citizens access to information held by gov ernment and to create mechanisms by which this information c an be obtained. In practice, all such laws outline certain excep t ions, often justified on the grounds of national security. T he US passed its Freedom of Information Act in 1966. Under the act, all federal agencies are required to comply with public solicitations for information, and are subject to penalties if they fail to do so. T he UK’s Act, passed in 2000, gives citizens the right to demanda ccess to any information held by a public authority. P P r r o o c c e e s s s s Mr Barnett said the process of formulating such a law and getting it passed by parliament takes t ime. “People make comments and t hey revise it and change it and modify it until they come up with a product that everyone is happy with. Then it has to be approved by the government and then it has to go through the parliament ary process,” he explained. Mr Barnett said media organis ations will have the opportunity to see the Bill before it becomes l aw. According to government’s website, the Freedom of Information Act, when enacted, is expected to grant every person a right, subject to certain restric tions, to access information held b y government departments, agencies and other designated bodies in receipt of state funding. The Act will also reinforce the fact that individuals may seek access to their own data held by such bodies. A number of countries in the region have taken steps toward greater openness in the last decade. Barbados, Belize, Trinidad and Tobago, Jamaica, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Vincent and the Grenadines have all enacted freedom of informa tion laws. Guyana, Saint Kitts and Nevis and the Cayman Islands have all started developing legislation to increase transparency. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE AG: Govt wants freedom of information bill before parliament within ‘reasonable’ time F irefighters b attle Wulff R oad area blaze most of morning F IREFIGHTERS c ontain the blaze off Wulff Road. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Michael Barnett

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 3 n By RUPERT MISSICK Jr Chief Reporter rmissick@tribunemedia.net T HE Immigration Departm ent yesterday defended its recent apprehension exercise at Eleuthera, which some residents allege was conducted in an inap-p ropriate manner. Some residents claimed that Haitian families were forced out of their homes in bitter cold weather and made to wait for transportation to the mainland in an outdoor containment site. H owever, the department s aid the exercise was carried out as a result of complaints by many persons on the island who described the immigration situation as “a vexing problem.” “The main objective of the e xercise was to identify illegal migrants of all nationalities residing and working in the N orth and Central Eleuthera D istricts,” a statement from the department said. “In addition, t he team sought to identify persons working without valid w ork permits as well as those e ngaged in illegal activities. The team of over 60 Law Enforcem ent Officers executed its planned operations following its initial briefings.” This resulted in 225 persons being interviewed and assessed with a view of determining theirs tatus on the island. In some instances documents were presented and checked. O nce officers were satisfied of t he validity and authenticity of documents, persons were r eleased. Thirty persons were released a fter producing proper docu m entation and another 33 families produced documents or p aid outstanding fees for the work permits. T he department collected some $10,000 in outstanding fees. The remaining 162 per-s ons were sent to New Provid ence for further assessment a nd processing. The department said all persons without legal status will be repatriated within this week. “Officers were briefed as to t he acceptable standards in such operations. Persons were given the opportunity to satisfy officials by producing proper documents. All persons deemed to be of interest to officials were a fforded the opportunity to coll ect personal effects/items, prior to being sent to New Provi dence. T he department wishes to categorically deny any suggestions that suspected illegal m igrants were treated inhumanly or less than respected. The department is fully aware of its obligations and commit m ents during such apprehension exercises and will at all times adhere to the strictest code of conduct and best prac tices,” the department said. A 24-YEAR-OLD woman charged with two men in connection with a weapon and ammunitions seizure that stemmed from a high-speed police chase, was granted baili n the sum of $10,000 yesterday. Evelyn Ann Pratt, of South Beach, was granted bail by Magistrate Carolita Bethel after Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the prosecutor, raised no objection. Pratt is represented by lawyer Tai Pinder. P ratt was arraigned on Tuesday with Levardo Forbes, 24, and Trevardo Taylor, 22, of Derby Road, on the charges of possession of an unlicensed firearm and possession of ammunition. It is alleged that on Sunday, February 8, the accused weref ound with a silver and black InterArm .380 pistol and four live rounds of .380 ammunition. The accused have all pleaded not guilty to the charges. It is further alleged that the three were involved in a highs peed car chase with Drug Enforcement Unit officers during which a .380 pistol was thrown from their vehicle. Forbes and Taylor, who are represented by attorney Dion Smith, remain on remand and are expected back in court today as the prosecution is e xpected to give a further report in relation to their antecedents. The prosecutor told the court yesterday that Taylor hasan armed robbery and attempted murder case and a drug possession case still pend ing. Taylor was granted bail in Supreme Court on the armed robbery charge, he said. Taylor is charged in the October 2007 armed robbery and attempted murder of Lorraine Francis. Ms Francis was reportedly robbed at gunpoint of $22,892 belonging to Holiday Industrial and then shot in the face. The prosecutor also told the court that Forbes has a case pending in a Nassau Street Magistrate’s Court. Forbes’ attorney said, however, that that matter was completed last November. Bail for woman charged in connection with seizure of weapon a nd ammunition In brief Apprehension exercise defended by Immigration Department THIS sail boat had to wait for the tide t o come in after becoming grounded yesterday near Arawak Cay. Felip Major /Tribune staff Shar e your news The T ribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an awar d. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your story. INDEX MAIN SECTION Local News...............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports...............................................P9,10,11 Advt .........................................................P12 BUSINESS SECTION Business ...................................... P1,2,3,4,5,6 Comics........................................................P7 W eather.......................................................P8 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES USA TODAY MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES WAITINGFORTHETIDE

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I find the announcement in M onday’s Tribune advising of the t ermination of the paper to the Family Islands very troubling. It is common knowledge that the national airline, Bahamasair,f lies routes to the Out Islands that are not profitable presumably for political reasons. The Government of the Bahamas clearly a ccepts responsibility for providi ng the Bahamian people with uninterrupted access to the Family Islands. It seems reasonable to expect t he Government of the Bahamas to accept an equal responsibility to ensure uninterrupted distribu tion of news. I am not suggesting t hat the newspaper be delivered free of charge. However, for Bahamasair to raise shipping rates at this tenuo us economic time appears to be ill advised. The Tribune’s effort to address this challenge by supplying the paper over the Internet ist o be commended. Unfortunately, Bahamians without access to computers will not benefit. Supporters and critics of The Tribune both lose in this unfortunate turn of events. F urther readers are concerned t hat The Guardian will succumb to the same economic challenge leaving us with few options for getting news. Is this the begin-n ing of a trend that will deal a crippling blow to the distribution of news throughout The Bahamas? There must be some w ay to negotiate a win-win agreem ent. A CONCERNED CITIZEN F reeport, Grand Bahama, February 11, 2009 C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Abaco readers need their ‘fix’ WE THOUGHT that by now Bellevue Business Depot in Marsh Harbour and Bahamasair would have concluded an agreement for thed aily delivery of The Tribune to Marsh Harb our. However, although The Tribune continues t o deliver its newspaper to Bahamasair in Nassau to be flown to Marsh Harbour, an agreem ent as to how much the airline will charge Bellevue and how it will demand payment is still in limbo. The flag carrier wants the Marsh Harbour b usiness to pay cash when the newspapers arrive e very morning in Marsh Harbour. Bellevue says this is impossible as the billing is done by weight and every day The Tribune has a different weight depending upon how many sections were p rinted that day. Bellevue wants to pay the airline either weekly or monthly. The airline’s accounts office says “no” it must be cash on delivery. The airline says it has no intention of opening any new accounts. This detail is yet to b e solved. On Wednesday morning the Tribunes were f lown to Marsh Harbour, and were picked up as usual by a Bellevue representative. Nothing w as paid. Bellevue thought this must have been an oversight by the airline’s Nassau office. It was assumed that Nassau had failed to tell Marsh Harbour that the collection rules had been changed and that the newspapers now had to be p aid for before they could be taken from the airport. A baconians especially the “newspaper junkies” were jubilant. They were still getting t heir newspaper.“I don’t have to go into mourning anymore!” one reader chuckled. But yesterday morning the story had changed. We were wakened by an early morning tele p hone call. It was Mr Timothy Sands, Bellevue manager, at the other end. Would you believe it,” he said, “Bahamasair has not delivered this morning’s papers. They o nly had one bundle of newspapers to deliver to Marsh Harbour and they couldn’t even get that r ight!” The Tribunes for Marsh Harbour had been flown to Freeport. Mr Sands said he received a call from Mr Robert Osborne, Bellevue’s owner, who oper-a tes the Bellevue store in Freeport. He said the newspapers had been delivered to him. He was t empted to keep them for his own customers, who were also clamouring for Tribunes, but on r eading in this column how hard Abaconians were fighting to keep The Tribunes coming, he hadn’t the heart to ’tief them for his own business. He promised to send them to Abaco on Regional Air’s 1pm flight. But once more Abaconians were disappointed, the newspapers were not on the plane. Mr Sands was promised that they would definitely be on the 5pm flight. When we last spoke with him yesterday after-n oon he had someone waiting at Marsh Harb our airport to receive them. Mr Sands said this kind of service by B ahamasair was typical of what Abaconians have had to put up with over the years. Judging f rom the complaints our Circulation Department in Nassau receives, Abaco is not unique. Every island has a complaint from time to time. It was impossible for us to hold Bahamasair a ccountable for its service and so we gave up l ong ago. We paid our bill, asked no questions and ceased complaining. However, with Abaco now paying its own delivery charges, Bahamasair will not be paid if i t does not deliver. Maybe someone will then wake up and understand what accountability and service means. Mr Sands said that when his representative arrived at Marsh Harbour airport to collect W ednesday morning’s Tribune, Monday’s edition of the Guardian had just arrived three d ays late. Really there is no excuse for this because the Guardians and Tribunes are d ropped off every morning at Nassau airport at the same time, in the same van and by the same driver. Obviously Bahamasair had a space problem on the flight on which both newspapers should have been flown, and the Guardian was b umped. Yet the Guardian will still have to pay Bahamasair and the newspaper will proba b ly have to credit its customer because a newspaper three days late can no longer be sold. The Tribune gives us more trouble and stress than any other item that we sell in our store,” laughed Mr Sands. “We always get calls: ‘It arrive yet?’ or ‘Remember save me that paper, I hear there’s a great story’ or ‘I ain’t get m y paper yet, what happening?’ or ‘When that blankety-blank plane coming?’” Y esterday ended with an exasperated customer shaking his head and sighing: “Oh, man,y uh know, I gotta get ahold of Ingraham. Ingraham could fix it!” M r Sands says when the papers are late or not delivered, the calls to his store are constant. “They’re like a bunch of junkies who need their fix!” As soon as they have The Tribune in their hands, they’re content for that day. But, then thec ircus starts all over the next day if the Tribune doesn’t arrive or is late. The Tribune means more to most Abaconians than the Bible!” said one Abaconian. W hen we repeated this comment to another and remarked that it was rather blasphemous, the reply was: “ It might be blasphemy, but it’s true!” The Tribune apologises to its “newspaper junkies”, but promises to work with Bellevue to have their “fix” delivered daily and on time. Government should ensure news distribution in the Family Islands LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net IN this column today we publish a selection of readers’ comments on the first three days of The Tribune online. As our readers know this is a work i n progress as we build a web site t hat will soon be launched. In the meantime we want our readers to become comfortable with reading t heir newspaper on line. We invite them to give us their opinions of what improvements they want. W hen the website has been comp leted, readers will be able to take out a subscription to The Tribune on line. At that time it will contain far more c ontent than at present. EDITOR, The Tribune on Line Dear madam, I’m in the construction industry on the Island of Abaco, and read y our paper daily. I won’t mind paying an extra .50 to .75 cent to get your paper here on the island.I get your paper around 8.30 am e very morning from Bellevue Business Centre. I do not have a computer at work and like to readi n the morning and on my lunch at 12 noon. Miss (Jessica) Robertson, (Edi tor, Tribune Online), PLEASEc onsider to continue to send your paper to Marsh Harbour, thanks in advance. Bernard Haynes construction supervisor Marsh Harbour, Abaco. D ear Editor , Great job on getting the only real newspaper in the islands on l ine! I know this is a work in p rogress but if possible if you could get a page just with text with the headlines and the busi-n ess section.This would take up less bandwidth and be easier to access for those of us that haves low internet speeds. T hanks. Troy Albury Great Guana Cay, Abaco. (Thanks for the positive feedback. As you may be aware, this is the first phase of our web strat egy that's been launched earlier than the rest of the site to ensure our readers in the islands to w hom we can no longer deliver will have access. (The full site is still under construction, but I anticipate it will be launched rather soon. That site is designed in a manner that makes it easy for you to access exactly what you are interested in. Ed ). Dear Editor, C ongratulations to the entire Tribune Team for getting on line. Now, if only the crossword could b e included it would be complete for me. I am a newspaper junkie and the thought of no Tribune is a nathema to me. R egards Ruth Pinder Marsh Harbour, Abaco. ( We hope, especially for the sake o f the “newspaper junkies” in Abaco, that they will soon be r eceiving their Tribunes regularly. As usual The Tribune is delive ring the newspapers to Bahama sair in Nassau to be flown to Marsh Harbour. In the meantime Bellevue in Marsh Harbour is trying to negotiate an agreement w ith Bahamasair for regular delivery for its customers. Ed). Dear Editor, Just congratulating you on the n ew Tribune online. Having seen the announcement some time ago o n Facebook that The Tribune would soon be online, I eagerly awaited the day. I am not disappointed at all. The format is so user friendly and it is great to see the whole paper. Well done! It is also nice to see that the paper will b e uploaded at a certain time each day, better than your two competitors who are not always able to update in a timely fashion! A LISON ( Thank you for your support. (There is no plan to publish the paper online earlier than 2pm at the moment. We expect to soon be able to make the e-paper and a ll content available earlier in the day for online subscribers. We'll be sure to keep our readers appraised of such developments. (As for past editions, the only p apers available online are those from February 7 when we unofficially launched the site. Once our full site is up and running, more of the archives will eventually be m ade available. – E d ) . Dear Editor, Great job in bringing The Tribune online. This really helps y our overseas readers. Can you tell me if you plan to bring the classified ads online? Regards, P eter Key West, Florida. D ear Editor, Good morning, T his is excellent! I have been h oping that The Tribune would d o something like this. Howeve r, there is just one thing that I w ill like to know. W ill The Tribune have up to date n ews as in to day’s news and not y esterday’s news? Inderia Strapp F irstcaribbean Int'l Bank Support Center Nassau. (If you saw out-of-date news, you must have logged on to our test runs. The Tribune went on line officially at 2pm Wednesday with t hat day’s news. The Tribune will be posted daily at 2pm with the news of the day. – Ed ). Dear Editor, Good Morning. I have just gone online for the first time and it is wonderful that your paper is now online. I would like to make a small suggestion. Your online paper does not allow you to print the page or save a copy of the page. The system automatically defaults to the home selection page. I also would like to see the pages sent out as PDF as this will give you the ability to save, print and zoom in on the page. Thanks for again for giving persons the opportunity to view the p aper. Regards, Vanessa M. Brice D ear Editor , Congrats on the online edition. Will it include all parts of the p hysical edition, specifically the classifieds? This is very important since the paper will not be avail a ble in the Family Islands. Aniska Pennerman READERS RESPONDTOTRIBUNE ONLINE

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JUSTICE campaigners Greg a nd Tanya Cash were celebrating last night after scoring what they termed “a major breakthrough” in their seven-year legal battle witht he Baptist education authorities. T hey have been told that a package of documents relating to their case is now safely in the hands of the Privy Council in London. T he first package allegedly “went missing” last year after being h anded over to the local agent of an international mailing comp any. Now Mr and Mrs Cash hope for leave to appeal to the Bahamas’ highest court after facing a series of obstacles in their fight for justice. M rs Cash said: “All the relevant documents are in now in the Privy C ouncil’s hands. They relate not only to our problems with the Bapt ist Convention, but also the Attorney General’s Office. “We know the result is going to be positive,” she said, claiming that “some very shocking disclosures w ill be made.” Mr and Mrs Cash say they are p repared to travel to London to present their case, which includes c laims for unfair dismissal and human rights breaches against the Baptist education authorities. Their long fight for justice began in 2002 when Mr Cash was fired as c oach from Jordan Prince William High School. T he couple have complained that their court battle has been p rolonged by obstructive officials and lost files. “All we wanted was for that package to get safely out of this country,” Mrs Cash told The Tri-b une. “We have known for a long time n ow that we would never get justice in the Bahamas.” L ast October, Court of Appeal president Dame Joan Sawyer c alled Mrs Cash “a disgrace to Bahamian womanhood” and questioned her level of education during a court hearing. She also threatened Mrs Cash w ith prison for alleged contempt of court. However, at the next hearing, a different set of judges appeared tos et aside the jail threat, saying it w as “done with”. Today, Justice Anita Allen is expected to rule on a claim by the Attorney General’s Office that Mr a nd Mrs Cash are vexatious litigants. T he couple argue that their var ious cases before the courts aret he result of their allegedly being denied justice when their original complaints were first heard. n B y ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net P HILANTHROPICdevelopers of a proposed multi-million dollar, 30,000 square-foot, education and recreation centre say they are hoping to break groundl ater this year if an upcoming review by Cabinet gives the plans the go-ahead. The Summit Centre, where N ew Providence’s children will be able to go for after school tutoring, have access to computers and the internet as well as exhilarating rock-climbing, mar-t ial arts, fitness and music lessons, is the brainchild of the widow of late Atlantis Chief Executive, Butch Kerzner. S et to be located adjacent to the Queen Elizabeth Centre, the centre is being designed to provide much needed extra-curricular activities for Bahamian youths. The idea was born (when we looked at the needs of the community we thought an after school centre would be great to get the k ids out of hanging out at the mall and on the streets and into a place where they could basically keep their minds and bodies active and out of trouble and steer them in a more positive direction,” said Nick Sagar, who is working with Vanessa Kerzner on the project. After school hours parents f ight traffic to get home after five then back at six, kids get home at 3, so there’s a lot of downtime there,” he added. V anessa Kerzner setup the Butch Kerzner Summit Foundation in memory of her 42-yearold husband after his death in a h elicopter accident in October 2006. After funding a new swimming pool at St Anne’s school and sett ing up a “Sky Climbers” rockc limbing programme on Paradise Island for Bahamian children, the Foundation was keen to spearhead a more “signature” project. D esigns for the first-of-its-kind centre, drawn up by respected Bahamian architect Jackson Burnside, are now in their final s tages. Inside the building children will find a cornucopia of ways to learn and entertain themselves. It will also include a yoga/dance studioa nd 8,000-square foot high ropes course. Additionally, the Foundation is planning “life advice” classes f or adolescents and adults will cover topics like how to apply for a loan or prepare for a job interview. M r Sagar said that the Foundation anticipates their plans will go before Cabinet in the next m onth. A pprovals at the highest level are key to the developers entering the next stage of their drive to make the centre a reality solici ting the private sector for sponsorship and donations. The level of support the foundation gets from the community a t large will then in turn impact something even more crucial the cost to those coming to the centre. T he aim is to keep the price of u sing the myriad facilities inside the Summit Centre at a minimum with accessibility for children of all socio-economic backgroundsa paramount concern. Mr Sagar said: “We definitely do not want to be exclusive, we want to be as inclusive as possible. W e want to benefit as many kids as possible.” In a move that should help the Foundation achieve this goal, the Government has suggested thati t will “donate” land near the Queen Elizabeth’s Sports Centre to the Foundation, once it is satisfied with the proposal. T his will allow the Centre to be situated in the heart of what will eventually be Nassau’s sporting mecca site of a new nationa l sports stadium, headquarters for the Bahamas Gymnastic Federationandbaseball s tadium. Once construction begins, completion should take two years, s aid Mr Sagar. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 5 fiesta fridaysHalf price on all Margaritas and Daiquiris $ 3.00 on selected beers $3.00 glass of wine All day long!legendary saturdaysB uyanyofour 10oz.Legendary Burgers a nd receive the 2nd one for half price 2for $8.00 on our Cocktail of the Day F rom 11am 5pmfamily sundaysReceive a FREE Kid’s Meal with every E ntre ordered * Only one kid’s meal per entre will be allowed All day long!*Only for kids 11yrs.and youngerrock & rollwill neverdietnassau,bahamascharlotte street downtown (242 7625 hardrock.com theofficial food of rock. A N ARMEDbandit robbed a pharmacy employee of company cash while in the Harbour Bay Shopping Centre. A ccording to police reports, t he daylight robbery occurred sometime before 1pm on Wednesday when an employee from Lowe's Pharmacy was a ccosted at gunpoint by a man wearing blue jeans and a white shirt flecked with red. Assistant Superintendent Walt er Evans said the employee had j ust left the store carrying a bank deposit bag and was headed to the plaza's parking lot when the theft occurred. T he gunman, who was about 5 ft 6” tall, demanded the company’s deposit bag. The employee handed over the bag and the gunm an made off with the cash then f led on foot towards the back of the Adam and Eve clothing store. Police said he eventually made his escape in a black Honda with a large sum of cash. T he matter is under active investigation. Armed man robs pharmacye mployee In brief Greg and Tanya Cash celebrate ‘major breakthrough’ JUSTICE CAMPAIGNERS Greg and Tanya Cash. Developers await go-ahead for Summit Centre

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the Bill, Mr Christie argues t hat government goes against the Constitution by including clause seven. H e said: “We believe that provision is unconstitutional. We attempted in committee to delete it from the B ill, but the government refused to budge.” The PLP leader maintains h is party will continue to abstain from voting on the Bill until the government changes course. Mr Christie added: “We w ill continue to support the dedicated men and women of the Royal Bahamas Police Force and its modernisation. However, we insist that a ny Act of Parliament must be in conformity with the C onstitution.” At the final vote on the Bill in the House of Assem-b ly on Wednesday, Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham argued that the Constitution does not specify an age limit or any grounds underw hich the Commissioner or Deputy Commissioner of Police may be removed. A nd rather than being unconstitutional, his gove rnment is taking up its Constitutional right to decide on the term andr etirement age of the Police Force’s two most senior offi c ers. Mr Ingraham said: “It is settled and acknowledgedl aw in all our books that if you have the power to appoint, you have the power to determine how long the appointment will be for. In fact it says a power to appoint shall include power to prescribe the period for which the appointment shall operate. That is beyond dis-p ute. “We are not doing any thing in this legislation that will take away from the Commissioner of Police ort he Deputy Commissioner of Police any of the rights which they have under the Constitution of the Bahamas. We are not empowered to do any such thing.” Any employee paid by the Pubic Treasury may be removed from office, Mr Ingraham said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE involved a nine-year-old girl and a 10y ear-old boy at the school. However, an official who spoke with The Tribune on condition of anonymity said that the meeting was primarily held to make parents aware of the age-inap-p ropriate material children have access to on television and the internet, and to a dvise them to be more vigilant. The official denied that two minors had b een involved in a sexual situation and said the incident had been “blown way out of proportion.” “It was rather a pornographic download incident,” the official said. Following the incident that occurred t wo weeks before Monday night’s meeting with the parents, school administrators had a special assembly with the students to discuss the topic of sex in an age-appropriate manner. S ome students claimed that the school had forbidden them to discuss the subject of the assembly with their parents. Parents, who were confused by the purp ose of the meeting on Monday, reportedly demanded to be told details about the assembly and the “mysterious” incident that had prompted the sex talk. The official told The Tribune, however, that due to confidentiality and sensitivityi ssues the school did not want to release any further information to the parents or the public. As it concerns the assembly, the official said it is completely untrue that the stu-d ents were asked not to talk about it with their parents. The official also said that the controversial incident from two weeks ago is au nique occurrence at the school and not something that happens with any sort of frequency. Handling of ‘pornographic’ incident angers parents Perry Christie says PLP abstained from final vote FROM page one geted for the coming holiday period. “I can tell you unequivo cally that there are no layoffs planned around the Easter holidays as indicated in The Tribune yesterday. It simply is not true,” Mr Markantonis said. “While no one is certain about the future, we have not discussed further layoffs,” he said. “We believe that at times such as these, we should all expend our energy on culti vating new tourists for our destination, and taking careo f those who are already here. Media space is better spent on promoting the positives of our country than on perpetuating baseless and unsettling rumours.” FROM page one Kerzner CEO disappointed with Tribune lead story F ROM page one

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T HE Humane Society of Grand Bahama celebrated great success with its fourth major field spay/neuter clinic held from Febr uary 2-6 at the Church of the Good Shepherd’s Parish Hall in Pinders Point. This clinic topped all others h eld thus far, with a total of 277 dogs and cats sterilised. This figu re includes 237 dogs and puppies, 39 cats and kittens and one r accoon. It does not include the eight a dditional surgeries performed on already sterilised animals, w hich included a bladder stone removal, a leg amputation, several eye surgeries and various w ound repairs. It also does not include minor t reatment of an additional 20 dogs or puppies for various ail-m ents or basic deworming and vaccinating of puppies too young o r small for surgery. “Many thanks are owed to Reverend Ambrose, Anne Penn, a nd the kind parishioners of the Church of the Good Shepherd,w ho understand the need for this important community service, a nd turned over their parish hall to this project for the second time in 15 months. “As always, all the dogs and cats received flea/tick preventat ive, vaccines if needed and deworming, which will lead to ah ealthier overall pet population. T hey also had their nails trimmed and ears cleaned while in recovery. Pet owners received educational information on how to bett er care for their pets,” the HSGB said. Some of the animals sterilised also required further surgical a ttention, such as treatment of hernias and wound abscesses. Some of the animals were in poor physical condition to begin w ith, yet thanks to the dedication and skill of the volunteer veteri-n ary team, none were lost, and these animals will no longer have t o go through the trauma of bearing litter after litter of puppies or kittens,” the HSGB said. T he Humane Society said it hopes that more pet owners will p rovide better overall care for their pets in the future. It is a shame when a threeyear-old dog has the appearance a nd health deterioration of a dog much older due to poor care and lack of attention.” A t least eight dogs were also treated for transmissible venere a l tumours. This is a sexually transmitted disease, very com m on on Grand Bahama, spread entirely through sexual contact. It causes painful tumors to form in and about the genitalia of the dog; which, untreated, continue t o grow and abscess and will eventually kill the dog. Dog own e rs should be aware of the preval ence of this disease, and are urged to spay and neuter their pets before they reach sexual maturity, to prevent the spread o f this deadly and highly contagious disease. Ten dogs and puppies were surrendered to the HSGB during the c linic. Eight critical care patients remain under the care of the H SGB until they are healthy enough to return home. A ll services provided during this clinic were provided free ofc harge to the public. The goal is to reduce pet overp opulation on Grand Bahama, as well as achieve a healthier pet p opulation in general, and encourage and educate pet owners in being more responsible and better pet care-takers for the f uture. This clinic was funded by The Pegasus Foundation, the Kohn Foundation, a private individual f rom the United States, and Amigo’s Fund. T he HSGB is seeking funding for the next clinic, scheduled ten t atively for November, and hopes that local corporations, govern-m ent, and individuals will sup port this project, which thus far h as been funded largely from abroad. A LEADING churchman is calling on banks to “go easy” on borrowers after counselling seven potential suicide victims in three days. Bishop Simeon Hall of New Covenant Baptist Church said many Bahamians are now “living on the edge of quiet desperation and hopelessness” because of mounting debts. Bishop Hall said the seven potential suicides five men and two women had either been referred to him or walked into his church for help. One left a note under his door. Now he is calling on banks and other lending institutions to offer a 90-day “reprieve” for those forced to default on loans because of changed circumstances. Banks that had benefited from Bahamian workers in the past should now be lenient and accommodating to credible defaulters, he said. “No Bahamian who has established a credible record as a mortgage payer should end up losing their house now that they are unemployed,” he told The Tribune yesterday. “I call on all banks and lending institutions to structure a 90-day reprieve for all unemployed mortgage holders, and show themselves as good corporate citizens in this time of economic downturn.” Bishop Hall’s call came after four recent suicides. Many Bahamian families are known to be living under extreme stress as a result of the economic downturn and deepening recession. “The loss of a dwelling house is the basis for great psychological and financial stress that is now pushing those who need help to the edge,” he said. “Banks who have benefited from the Bahamian worker should at this time be more lenient and accommodating to credible Bahamian workers.” Bishop Hall said those who had consulted him in recent days had been “harbouring suicidal thoughts.” Only one, in his opinion, had required professional help. The rest needed someone to talk to. “Several other pastors have seen a rise in the number of persons marginalised and living on the edge,” he added. “Many persons are living on the edge of quiet desperation and hopelessness.” He said Bahamians on the whole needed to take full responsibility for the actions and decisions they had made “and all of us need to lend a listening ear or helping hand where possible.” He said too many areas of Bahamian society seemed to be nearing the brink of total collapse. “A turnaround and remedy will only come when each Bahamian takes more responsibility for his actions and more of our national leaders stop fiddling while Rome is burning,” he added. Bishop Hall said he was concerned about the suicide talk because Bahamians rarely thought in those terms. “People love living,” he said, “To kill yourself really takes a lot, but I think people are being pushed to the edge.” He said more and more people were feeling “marginalised and pressured” by the banks as unemployment rises in a tightening economy. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 7 -2%,7<),1$1&,$/&21752//(5 ' ($'/,1( )(%58$5< Hall petitions banks to ‘go easy’ Successful spay and neuter clinic in Grand Bahama B ishop Simeon Hall

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cocaine was found onboard the vessel. As a result of this discovery, five men and a woman were arrested. The drugs are estimated to have a local street value of well over $8 million. Following that discovery, officials found a second vessel which also had a large amount of cocaine onboard. The total weight and quantity of the drugs was not released up to press time last night. Head of the Drug Enforcement Unit Superintendent Anthony Ferguson was unavailable for comment up to press time yesterday evening as he was reportedly in a meeting. Police have made several significant drug seizures here in New Providence and the Family Islands over the past several weeks. Six people were arrested last week and have been charged in the seizure of some $200,000 worth of marijuana. Police also seized $3.75 million worth of cocaine in Freeport and $100,000 worth of marijuana in Andros this month. p osed Police Force Act 2009 i n the House of Assembly on Wednesday. He was seeking to support his argument against the claimb y Opposition members that p rovision seven of the Act, which passed later that evening in the lower chamber with the support of Government MPs alone, is unconsti-t utional. That provision seeks to limit the tenure of a Police Com-m issioner or Deputy Comm issioner to no more than two five year terms. P LP MP for Cat Island, Rum Cay and San Salvador, Philip Davis told parliamenti n his earlier contribution that to enforce such a term limit w as unconstitutional as the power to appoint a Commissioner under the terms of Arti-c le 119 of the Constitution was s uch that upon appointment that officer could only be “removed” from office eitherb y attaining the retirement age for a police commissioner o r by the extraordinary process set forth in Article 120 o f the Constitution. While Government had claimed, in proposing the provision, that it could limit the appointment of a Commis-s ioner in accordance with the Interpretation and General Clauses Act, Mr Davis said this was “silly” because this Act “only applied to Acts ofP arliament and not the Constitution.” His legal argument underlined the Opposition’s more emotive charge that by limiting the tenure of the Commissioner of Police the provi-s ion would open up his office to abuse forcing the Chief o f Police to have to “sing for his supper”. But Mr Bethel countered t hat the definition of the word “Act” in the Interpretation a nd General Clauses Act “expressly applies to an Act of Parliament of the UnitedK ingdom and any legislative instrument made thereunder having effect or having hade ffect as part of the law of The Bahamas.” C ontinuing that the Bahamas constitution “has not b een ‘repatriated’ or ‘patriated’ to The Bahamas” and “remains a Schedule attached to an Act passed by the British Parliament” he said that fort his reason the Interpretation and General Clauses Act which the Government claimed allowed them to include the provision “implic-i tly and necessarily applies directly to our Constitution.” C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE T he younger man later drove to the East Street S outh Police Station where he is currently being detained. P olice did not specify the nature of the relationship b etween the two men yesterday, however ASP Evans said they were not relatives.W hen asked what sparked the altercation, ASP Evans said police knew the motivat ion behind the attack but did not disclose it to avoid jeopardizing the case. Family and friends living in Nassau converged at them urder scene after getting the call from police that their loved one had been mur-d ered. His sister, Maureen P rescott, told the media that Gardiner was a calm person who always walked awayf rom disputes. "Harold was one of my mother's calmest children and he always walked away from a fight and an argu-m ent. Harold shared, whatever he had, he shared. He was not a mean person," Ms Prescott said. Ironically, she and her b rother joked about their mortality and sudden death the night before he was stabbed to death, she said. Gardiner is said to be a r esident of North Andros, a nd served as a member of the Mastic Point Township. Florence Pratt-Meyer, a resident of Andros who works for the Nicholl's Town Administration, told The Tribune that Gardiner's sudden death took residents of the area by surprise. According to her, Gardiner was a "community minded" person who did a lot of work for his area. Gardiner was in Nassau doing contractual work on a client's roof, his sister said. His death marked the ninth for the nation. Bahamas Constitution ‘is a British enactment’ Cocaine worth more than $8m is seized FROM page one FROM page one A ‘domestic dispute’ leaves one man dead F ROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K SECTIONB business@tribunemedia.net FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE $4. 68 $4. 51 $4. 69The information contained is from a third party and The Tribune can not be held responsible for errors and/or omission from the daily report.$ $3.34 $3.39 $3.36 for a better lifeLIFE INSURANCE SALES OFFICES: NASSAU I FREEPORT I ABACO I ELEUTHERA I EXUMA I CORPORATE CENTRE: EAST BAY STREET I www.famguardbahamas.com call us today at 396-1355 A SUBSIDIARY OF A MBESTA-ExcellentFinancialStrengthRating secure future leave your children nancially secure provide a safety net for your loved ones ensure a bright future for your familyall of the above Engineering merger’s ‘one-stop shop’ fights 35-40% business drop ‘One way or another’ firm will get capital n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor The private/public sector committee advising the Gov ernment on financial sector regulatory consolidation is expected to meet “in the next week or two” to consider further recommendations for pushing the process forward, the minister responsible telling Tribune Business that the “platform” for achieving their ultimate goal was already in place. Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance, said the last of the three regulators to move into Charlotte House, the Compliance Commission, had relocated there last week from the Cecil Wallace Whit field Building at Cable Beach. By having this regulator, together with the Securities Commission of the Bahamas and the Registrar of Insur ance’s Office, in the same premises, Mr Laing said information sharing between the three would be much easier. The regulators’ ability to service financial services oper ators seeking licences, permits and approvals from them will also be enhanced in terms of efficiency, since their consoli Compliance Commission joins Securities Commission, insurance regulator in Charlotte House, as minister says ‘good progress’ being made Zhivargo Laing SEE page 6B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A Bahamian company will “one way or another” raise the capital to enable it to start deploying its ‘multiple play’ bundle of Internet services within the next month to six weeks, its chief executive saying yes terday that a number of “posi tive developments” had taken place since its first private place ment offering closed. Edison S umner, president and chief e xecutive of IP Solutions International (IPSI said the company was restructuring a new private place ment offering following the end-January close of its initial financeraising effort. He acknowledged that the first private placement had failed to raise the hoped-for $6 million, but said IP Solutions International was now talking to potential new and former investors, and estimated it only required $2 million to finance “full deployment” of its services. * Bahamian company IP Solutions International restructuring $6m private placement, but says $2m enough to begin ‘full deployment’ of multi-play Internet services * In talks with potential Bahamian and foreign partners, latter of whom has offered to finance $2m head-end construction * Hoping to close service contracts with hotels/gated communities in days or sooner’, and targeting service start in ‘month to six weeks’ SEE page 5B Edison Sumner n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor Two leading Bahamian-owned engineering firms yesterday unveiled their merger that is designed to create a “one-stop shop concept” for these services, and in so doing enhance efficiency and “get more business” in a market estimated to have shrunk by 35-40 per cent. Islands by Design, the environmental, marine and wildlife engineering and consulting specialist headed by principal Keith Bishop, is merging with Reiss Engineering, a US-headquartered engineering firm with office in Orlando and California, but which is headed by Bahamian and Freeport native Robert Reiss as president. SEE page 5B Bahamian firms Islands by Design, Reiss Engineering in tie-up that aims to enhance service delivery and cost competitive solutions that ‘will attract more business’ n By CHESTER ROBARDS Business Reporter The 30 per cent drop in craw fish/lobster prices as a result of decling global demand has impacted Spanish Wells’ fishermen, who yesterday pledged to keep on fishing despite expected revenue losses and increasing operating costs. The price of lobster has fallen incrementally from around $22.50 per pound at this time last year to around $15 perp ound, with a further decrease possible later this year as restaurants and other purchasers reduce crawfish purchases in response to falling customer demand. This has heavily impacted 30% cr a wf ish pr ice dec line hits Spanish W ells hard SEE page 4B n By NEIL HARTNELL Tribune Business Editor A 570-unit development is hoping to give the Bahamian economy and real estate market “a huge shot in the arm” as it anticipates receiving final subdivision approval from the Government imminently, its project manager yesterday telling Tribune Business it could “quickly ramp up” to create 130 jobs. Keith Bishop, Islands by D esign's principal, who is acting a s project manager for South Abaco-based Schooner Bay development, said the project, which is aiming to set standards for sustainable, environmental ly friendly development in the Bahamas, would be able to startc onstruction “within 14 days” of receiving final government a pproval to sell lots. Once that happened, Mr Bishop said there would be a “huge” impact on employment in south Abaco, with Schooner Bay’s workforce going from “zero to 130-plus persons” in very little time. “I hope to be able to get the final subdivision approval this week,” Mr Bishop said, “and given that, we hope very shortly to start marketing. The expressions of interest are very, very pleasing. “I’m just waiting for the day the development gets final approval for selling, because it will be a huge shot in the arm for Abaco and the Bahamas Real Estate Association. I think Schooner Bay is going to do very, very well.” He added that P hase I of the Schooner Bay development was “pretty much all done”, with the relevant government agencies all conducting a final review of its permit and licence applications. “I would say that judging against previous projects that I’ve done, this one has gone a little bit more quickly than we experienced previously,” Mr Bishop said. “The first submission was done only in August last year, and here we are in February. Any day now we’ll see subdivi sion approval and subsequently the selling of lots, and a huge impact on employment in south Abaco from zero to 130-plus Project’s ‘huge shot in the arm’ Schooner Bay subdivision approval likely imminent, with developers able to begin construction ‘within 14 days’ of final approval to sell 570-acre project could generate employment ‘from zero to 130-plus’ very quickly SEE page 4B

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Bahamians graduate fr om manager course C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 127,&( The Ministry of Tourism’s director-general will outline what is necessary to turn Grand B ahama’s assets to its advantage, and re-shape the island into a successful tourist destination, when she addresses the Grand Bahama Business Outlook Conference on Monday, February 23. “We believe that Grand Bahama, as the closest offshore destination to the United States, has the greatest opportunity to capture the offshore vacation market for the American consumer,” said Vernice Walkine. “My remarks will centre around those things that we believe have to be done in order for Grand Bahama to achieve this potential, and one would be the issue of the cost of admission into Grand Bahama, the c ost of airfare. “Grand Bahama really should be the least expensive destination to fly into in this entire region because of its proximate position to all of the major markets in the United States. “But in some cases it is three times as expensive, so we have to address that.” M s Walkine added that Grand Bahama was perfectly positioned to benefit from aw orld class cruise port and a bigger, faster cruise ferry service. “So with these things being taken into account...Grand Bahama really can achieve exponential growth, and I’m going to be more specific about what we are doing in the case of each of these. “We then will use all of these strategies to shape Grand Bahama into the destination that we believe it needs to be and, therefore, we can promote and market it appropriately,” Ms Walkine said. I I n n f f l l u u e e n n t t i i a a l l The highest-ranking woman in the history of Bahamian tourism, Ms Walkine was identified by TRAVEL AGENT Magazine in 2002 as one of the 100 most influential women in tourism and travel in the world. Grand Bahama Business Outlook is organised by The Counsellors, and will be held at Our Lucaya under the theme Grand Bahama Renewal: The Power of Partnerships, The Power of One . M s Walkine joins a highpowered line up of presenters including C. A. Smith, Bahamas Ambassador to the US; Zhivargo Laing, minister of state for finance; Giora Israel, senior vice-president of ports and destination development, Carnival Corporation & PLC; Ian Rolle, chief financial officer, Grand Bahama Port Authority; Gregory Moss, attorney-at-law and president, Grand Bahama Chamber of Commerce; Maxwell Sweeting, vice-president VOPAK; Eric Carey, executive director, the Bahamas National Trust; Peter Turnquest, CA; and Stacia Williams, corporate image and personal branding consultant and princ ipal of Total Image Management. The event is sponsored by the Grand Bahama Port Authority, Bank of the Bahamas Inter national, FOCOL, Emera, the Central Bank of The Bahamas, British American Financial and Scotiabank. For updates and Registration Online visit www.tclevents.com Tourism chief to tackle Freeport airfare costs Vernice Walkine The last Certified Inter national Project Managers (CIPM 2008, who studied with Lignum Institute of Technology (LIT Bay Shopping Plaza, were issued with their certifica tion through the American Academy of Project Management (AAPM The presentation of the certificates was made at Lignum’s headquarters in the Harbour Bay Shopping Plaza on January 22, 2009. PICTURED from left to right: Pauline Nairn, Sherrilyn Wallace, Andronekia Clark, Andrea Knowles, Conray Rolle, and Vernal Smith. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear from people who are making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you ar e raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for impr ovements in the area or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and share your story. We believe that Grand Bahama, ast he closest offshore d estination to the U nited States, has t he greatest opportunity to capture the offshore v acation market for t he American c onsumer

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The merger, which will create an entity with more than 30 employees, will see Mr Reiss head up Islands by Design, with Mr Bishop providing “assistance as needed”. Mr Bishop said that, ultimately, it would end up as a 50/50 joint venture. Estimating that market demand for Bahamian engi neering services had shrunk by per cent to 40 per cent at least” as a result of the global economic downturn, and virtu-al stoppage of many foreign development and Bahamiangenerated construction projects,Mr Bishop said the merger had been driven by this in concertwith the need to “provide better service to clients, which might attract more business”. By joining forces, Mr Bishop explained that Islands by Design’s specialist services on the environmental, marine and wildlife side would provide a perfect complement to ReissE ngineering’s main focus, which was on civil and construction engineering, plus water and waste water engineering. This combination, Mr Bish op said, would enable the merged companies to “go forward with a better product. It makes us a better team. It just means the clients can go to oneshop if they need to. It just makes it a lot more efficient”. Islands by Design, through its environmental work, was often called upon by developers to prepare Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs like prior to projects starting. Once developments started, though, the company was often required to sub-contract civil engineering work out to other companies because it was not specialist in this area. “Before, what we were doing was sub-contracting work, and any time you do that, you pass on extra costs to the client,” Mr Bishop explained. “In today’s competitive world, we have to improve ser vice and cut costs where you can to remain competitive. By providing better service to clients, hopefully we’ll get more business. In a shrinking market, you’ve got to be creative.” Providing quality service at a competitive price would be key, Mr Bishop explained, in efforts by Bahamian engineers to ward off competition from primarilyUS companies, who were increasingly seeing the Bahamas as an attractive market given the lack of demand back home. “What we’re seeing is that the squeeze is biting back in the US, and we’re seeing Bahamian professionals as being almost preyed upon by US contractors,” Mr Bishop said. “They’re desperate to get work and are coming over here. “While it’s definitely slowed, we have a little bit of construc tion going on.” Following the merger, all the Bahamian operations will com bined at Islands by Design’s Nassau headquarters, with the US side continuing to be run out of Reiss Engineering’s offices there. Mr Bishop said Reiss Engineering’s expertise in water and waste water engineering, and the technology it had access to, would be especially valuable in the Bahamas given that this nation was “a little archaic” in its approach to recycling waste water, letting it run into the ground or septic tanks. Mr Reiss added: “The real benefit to the two firms, and from an opportunity standpoint when viewed from the client’s perspective, is that Islands by Design has a history of very high quality service with EIAs etc, and my firm has a long history on civil work. It’s a onestop shop concept that resonates well with companies that need that service, and provides much greater depth in terms of staff and skill sets.” Mr Reiss explained that the two companies were merging their capabilities, service delivery and internal organisations, a process that was already in train. Name changes was an issue very much for the distant future. “One of the things we as Bahamians need to make sure we do to protect the market is that we present our true skill sets as Bahamians, scientists or engineers, and show the value we can bring in the delivery of services through adding value,” Mr Reiss said. Mr Sumner said the company was also in negotiations with two other Bahamas-based telecoms licensees, who he said he could not name, about using their technology and products in its system. And I P Solutions Internationa l was also taking to a “foreign partner” who had offered to finance construction of its IP (Internet Protocol technology for $2 million. The company is initially targeting hotels and gated communities with a variety of serv ices it will transmit down just o ne Internet line, hence the ‘Multiple Play’ description. The services will include Internet, TV via Internet Protocol, video-ond emand (VOD Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP “The issue did close at the end of last month,” said Mr Sumner, referring to the first private placement issue. “We didn’t raise all the capital we wanted to raise, but we allowed the private placement document to expire. “We’ve been given leave by the Board of Directors to redraft the private placement document because of all the developments that have taken place since the launch.” He added: “We are currently restructuring the private placement, and are looking at other options which are under active review. We have Plan B and Plan C in effect if we don’t raise sufficient from the private placement. “We have determined this will happen one way or another. The Board of Directors have expressed a deep commitment to this. We think we can get started and get fully deployed with $2 million. “We’re requiring $6 million, but feel that in this environment, and based on the negotiations that are ongoing withp artners, that $2 million will be adequate to get services up and running in a short period oft ime.” A private placement is targeted at selected institutional and high net-worth investors, meaning that it is not a public offering, so members of the Bahamian public need not apply. I I n n v v e e s s t t o o r r s s Mr Sumner, who is also IP Solutions International ’s presid ent, added that the company had “identified a new group of investors who’ve expressed an i nterest in looking at our company”. The firm had also spoken to potential investors it had p itched previously, but informed it that the private placement did not match their investment/asset allocation cycles. “In the interim, we have entered discussions with two other local providers in the industry about using their infrastructure and products in the platform,” said Mr Sumner. “We’re in discussions with the two licensees about the MultiPlay technology. “We have also been in very good discussions with a foreign partner as well about financing our head-end construction. That is a $2 million proposal we are currently negotiating. They have given us a proposal to construct the entire IP head-end, which reduces the capital we’re looking to spend in the first instance.” Mr Sumner added that IP Solutions International had also been “placing draft contracts” with potential hotel and gated community customers. He added: “Those contracts are under active review. We hope to close them in 14 days or sooner. “We are very encouraged by the progress we have made over the last month, month-and-ahalf, and based on the momentum we’ve got we expect to see a lot more progress over the next month to six weeks, at which time we will be in a position to deploying services toh otel properties and gated communities.” IP Solutions International has targeted serving “well in excess of 5,000 hotel rooms within a year” of its creation, and has plans to expand into the Bahamas residential market and the wider Caribbean months or sooner” after its launch. The launch is timed to coincide with the opportunities that will result from liberalisation/deregulation of the Bahamian telecommunications industry, plus the Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s (BTC end to Cable Bahamas’ cable TV monopoly. Once Cable Bahamas’ exclusivity on the provision of cable television services expires later this year in October, IP Solutions International is aiming to break into the Bahamian residential market in Phase II. It is now trying to set up its own wireless infrastructure and a self-sufficient network, something that would enable it to avoid ‘digging up’ hotels and running fibre lines to rooms when the time came for installation. C M Y K C M Y K BUSINESS THE TRIBUNE FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 5B ,7,21 :$17(' 0 DFKLQHU\t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‘One way or another’ firm will get capital F ROM page 1B Engineering merger’ s ‘one-stop shop’ fights 35-40% business drop F ROM page 1B “In today’s competitive world, we have to improve service and cut costs where you can to r emain competitive K eith Bishop

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ANDROS CAT ISLAND ELEUTHERA MAYAGUANA SAN SALVADOR GREAT INAGUA GREAT EXUMA CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS LONG ISLAND ABACO Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's highs and tonights's lows. KEY WEST WEST PALM BEACH FT. LAUDERDALE TAMPA ORLANDOLow: 61F/16C Low: 62F/16C Low: 64 F/18C Low: 67 F/19 Low: 66 F/18C Low: 70 F/21C Low: 71F/22C Low: 64 F/18 High: 77F/25C High: 76F/24C High: 81F/27C High: 80F/27C High: 81F/27C High: 78F/26C High: 83F/28C Low: 65F/18C High: 77F/25C Low: 66 F/19C High: 81F/27CRAGGED ISLANDLow: 63 F/17C High: 82F/28C Low: 71F/22C High: 83 F/28C Low: 63F/17C High: 79F/26C Low: 65 F/18 High: 81F/27C Low: 67 F/19C High: 84F/29C Low: 65 F/18C High: 81 F/27C Low: 64F/18C High: 82F/28C Low: 66 F/19 High: 84F/29C Low: 67F/19C High: 84 F/29C High: 76 F/24 CFREEPORT NASSAU MIAMI PAGE 8B, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13TH, 2009 THE TRIBUNETHE WEATHER REPORT 5-DAYFORECAST Partly sunny. Partly cloudy .Breezy with plenty of sun. Sunshine. Mostly sunny and pleasant. High: 83 Low: 71 High: 82 High: 82 High: 79 AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel AccuW eather RealFeel Partly sunny, breezy and pleasant. High: 75 Low: 70 Low: 69 Low: 62 AccuWeather RealFeel 89 The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperatureis an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and elevation on the human bodyeverything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 70F 83-77F 97-71F 79-58F 68 F Low: 64 TODAYTONIGHTSATURDAYSUNDAYMONDAYTUESDAY ALMANAC High ..................................................82F/28C Low ....................................................64F/18C Normal high ......................................77F/25C Normal low ........................................64F/18C Last year's high ..................................81F/27C Last year's low ..................................71F/22C As of 1 p.m. yesterday ..................................0.00" Year to date ..................................................0.68" Normal year to date ......................................2.48" Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday Temperature Precipitation SUNANDMOON TIDESFORNASSAU Last New First Full Feb. 16 Feb. 24Mar. 4Mar. 10 Sunrise . . . . . . 6:46 a.m. Sunset . . . . . . . 6:03 p.m. Moonrise . . . 10:21 p.m. Moonset . . . . . 9:08 a.m. Today Saturday Sunday Monday HighHt.(ft.LowHt.(ft. 10:24 a.m.2.54:15 a.m.-0.3 10:51 p.m.2.74:28 p.m.-0.3 11:07 a.m. 2.35:04 a.m.-0.1 11:39 p.m. 2.65:11 p.m.-0.1 11:53 a.m.2.15:54 a.m.0.1 -----5:57 p.m.0.0 12:31 a.m.2.46:49 a.m.0.3 12:42 p.m.2.06:48 p.m.0.2 WORLDCITIES Acapulco89/3171/21s88/3171/21s Amsterdam37/232/0sn39/334/1rAnkara, T urkey45/734/1r48/832/0r Athens52/1142/5c49/939/3r Auckland73/2257/13pc68/2055/12c Bangkok97/3677/25pc98/3677/25sBarbados 85/2974/23pc85/2974/23s Barcelona51/1039/3s50/1038/3s Beijing50/1032/0pc45/719/-7pc Beirut70/2162/16pc70/2160/15sBelgrade 31/0 26/-3sn30/-126/-3c Berlin 32/0 23/-5sf30/-123/-5pc Bermuda67/1958/14pc65/1860/15pc Bogota68/2047/8t66/1847/8r Brussels39/334/1sn41/530/-1pcBudapest 36/228/-2sn37/224/-4pc Buenos Aires93/3373/22s97/3677/25pc Cairo75/2356/13pc77/2556/13s Calcutta88/3166/18s92/3369/20s Calgary15/-91/-17c14/-10-1/-18c Cancun84/2872/22pc86/3066/18s Caracas83/2868/20sh83/2869/20pc Casablanca71/2149/9s73/2255/12c Copenhagen 35/125/-3s36/229/-1s Dublin46/739/3pc46/741/5sh Frankfurt 37/2 30/-1 sn36/228/-2pc Geneva 32/0 29/-1 sn32/022/-5c Halifax32/010/-12c27/-214/-10c Havana85/2962/16s85/2962/16s Helsinki28/-221/-6sf27/-214/-10pcHong Kong 79/2670/21pc77/2570/21c Islamabad60/1544/6r71/2142/5s Istanbul49/940/4r41/537/2snJerusalem 69/20 48/8pc71/2149/9s Johannesburg71/2155/12pc75/2357/13s Kingston84/2874/23s84/2875/23sh Lima84/2868/20c85/2967/19c London41/534/1pc43/639/3pc Madrid57/1330/-1s59/1534/1s Manila 90/32 74/23 pc91/3275/23pc Mexico City 81/27 46/7s80/2643/6s Monterrey 88/3161/16s86/3059/15s Montreal25/-39/-12c27/-29/-12pc Moscow32/028/-2sn34/128/-2sn Munich 25/-3 24/-4 sn26/-317/-8sn Nairobi 88/31 55/12pc87/3055/12pc New Delhi80/2654/12pc78/2551/10pc Oslo23/-516/-8s19/-710/-12pc Paris 39/332/0r41/534/1pc Prague28/-225/-3sn28/-220/-6pc Rio de Janeiro 81/2772/22r80/2671/21c Riyadh75/2352/11s79/2656/13s Rome 43/6 28/-2 pc45/730/-1s St. Thomas82/2773/22s82/2773/22s San Juan97/3672/22pc99/3771/21s San Salvador90/3268/20s90/3271/21c Santiago90/3257/13s91/3255/12s Santo Domingo 83/28 68/20 s84/2868/20s Sao Paulo 75/2362/16c76/2463/17r Seoul49/930/-1r37/217/-8c Stockholm30/-125/-3c30/-123/-5s Sydney67/1963/17sh69/2064/17rT aipei 87/30 71/21s84/2872/22pc T okyo61/1654/12pc66/1850/10r Toronto32/019/-7pc31/016/-8c T rinidad 88/3173/22t83/2873/22t Vancouver43/632/0c43/632/0pc Vienna32/025/-3sf31/024/-4sn Warsaw36/234/1sn37/230/-1snWinnipeg 20/-6 -2/-18 c17/-8-1/-18c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/CF/CF/C T odaySaturdayW eather (W s -sunny , pc -partly cloudy , c -cloudy , sh -showers, t -thunder storms, r -rain, sf -snow flurries, sn -snow , i -ice, Pr cp-precipitation, T r -trace TODAY'SU.S. FORECAST MARINEFORECAST WINDSWAVESVISIBILITYWATER TEMPS. NASSAU FREEPORT ABACO T oday:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday: E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Today:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F Saturday:E at 15-20 Knots3-6 Feet10-20 Miles74F U.S. CITIES Albuquerque 50/10 27/-2s48/825/-3c Anchorage27/-218/-7c27/-219/-7pc Atlanta 66/1849/9pc62/1644/6r Atlantic City46/721/-6s43/621/-6pc Baltimore 48/8 30/-1 s 42/530/-1pc Boston 37/223/-5s39/326/-3pc Buffalo32/017/-8sf30/-116/-8c Charleston, SC72/2251/10pc65/1851/10t Chicago42/524/-4pc33/023/-5sn Cleveland36/223/-5pc34/125/-3snDallas 69/20 38/3 pc59/1541/5s Denver32/015/-9sn30/-113/-10cDetroit 38/327/-2pc38/325/-3sn Honolulu81/2770/21s81/2770/21pc Houston73/2253/11t68/2051/10c HighLowWHighLowW F/C F/C F/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C High LowWHighLowW F/CF/CF/CF/C TodaySaturday T odaySaturday T odaySaturday Indianapolis 46/7 31/0pc41/525/-3c Jacksonville72/2256/13pc75/2357/13t Kansas City 40/422/-5c34/121/-6pc Las Vegas55/1237/2pc54/1235/1pc Little Rock 60/15 41/5 sh 57/1337/2s Los Angeles 60/1544/6r60/1546/7pc Louisville56/1338/3pc46/733/0c Memphis62/1647/8sh54/1237/2s Miami81/2766/18pc82/2765/18s Minneapolis30/-114/-10pc27/-213/-10cNashville 62/16 42/5 pc55/1236/2c New Orleans71/2162/16t71/2156/13t New Y ork42/529/-1s43/631/0pc Oklahoma City60/1528/-2pc48/831/0s Orlando77/2561/16pc83/2860/15pc Philadelphia46/728/-2s41/530/-1pc Phoenix64/1746/7s60/1542/5pc Pittsburgh40/424/-4pc38/324/-4sn Portland, OR 47/831/0sh47/835/1pc Raleigh-Durham 66/18 40/4s47/834/1r St. Louis52/1135/1c38/326/-3pc Salt Lake City 36/2 24/-4 c 32/0 21/-6 sn San Antonio78/2555/12pc68/2052/11pc San Diego 60/15 49/9r61/1649/9pc San Francisco 53/11 43/6 r 54/1247/8r Seattle 45/735/1s45/733/0pc Tallahassee66/1854/12sh71/2152/11r Tampa76/2462/16pc76/2460/15pcT ucson63/1741/5s56/1336/2pc W ashington, DC 53/11 32/0s44/631/0r UV INDEXTODAY The higher the AccuWeather UV IndexTM number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection.Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuW eather , Inc. Cold W arm Stationary FrontsShown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. -10s-0s0s10s20s30s40s50s60s70s80s90s100s110s Showers T -storms Rain FlurriesSnow Ice AccuW eather.com

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009, PAGE 9 The Bahamas Olympic Association congratulates President Anton Sealey and the executiveof The Bahamas Football Association on its achievement in negotiating with its governing body, Fdration Internationale de Football Association (FIFA to host its General Assembly in The Bahamas. The FIFA General Assembly will attract thousands of mem bers from 208 countries to The Bahamas, to be accompanied by hundreds of news reporters. FIFA’s General Assembly will be held 29th May 4th June, 2009 at Atlantis Resorts. The Bahamas Olympic Association encourages other sporting Federations and Associations to make the most of our natural national resources and bid with their international bodies to have their general meeting in The Bahamas. It now appears from all indications that the Government generally and the Ministries of Sports & Tourism in particular are prepared to lend expertise and assistance in these projects to Federations bringing in large groups of sports tourists. The BOA is proud and happy that one of our Federations has now shown the power of sports tourism at work in attracting this major group to our shores. As the official representatives of the Olympic Movement in The Bahamas, the BOA further encourages all Bahamians, especially those working in front line tourism positions to do everything possible during the visit of FIFA and its delegates to show the best face of our country. BFA congratulated for milestone achievement (ABOVE St John’s Caryn Moss moves the ball on the brake. MORE BAISS GIRLS ACTION (LEFT West Minister Michelle Burrows is fouled by QC Alexan tria Marshall.

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FREEPORT, Grand Bahama As the opening of the Legacy boys baseball andg irls softball seasons approach, the player registration drive for both disciplines continuee ven as Legacy considers revis ing its baseball divisions to bett er prepare the boys for post season competition. The baseball season, open t o boys from 4 to 15, is expected to open February 28 at 10:00 am at the YMCA, and girls softball season, ages 6-18, opens the following weekend,M arch 7 at 12 noon at G.B. Catholic High Playing Field. Legacy’s Player Agent, Eugene Thompson, pointed out that this year the Associa-t ion is looking at a revision of the age divisions and may add a new baseball division to better prepare the boys for post season play.“We are proposingt he addition of a Mustang Division which will give us five divisions for our youngsters and better prepare them as they progress through our system. The league has the Shet land (Tee-Ball 4-6 year olds; the Pinto Division (Coach-Pitch8 year olds; the new Mustang Division for 9 and 10 year olds; the Bronco Division for 11 and 12 year olds, and the Pony Division for our 13-15 year old boys. “Workouts and games are also on-going for Legacy’s 1618 year olds to help preparet hem for post season play and for opportunities to be seen by scouts and High Schoolsa broad,” Thompson said. Meanwhile, baseball pract ice continues for ALL players and ALL divisions on Satur days at 12:30 pm at the Y MCA. Registration also continues at the concession stand at the YMCA during the same time. S OFTBALL The softball registration c ontinues this weekend in the Eight Mile Rock community when Yvonne Lockhart and her coaching team travel west to conduct workouts and reg i ster players beginning at 10:00 a m at St. Agnes Church Field. Registration of boys interested in baseball will also take place at this session. “This weekend we’re inviting all interested girls in the communities of west Grand Bahama, ages 6-18, to our workout session at St. Agnes Church Playing Field, make themselves known and register for the upcoming softball season. Those persons inter ested in coaching are also asked to make themselves known so that we can begin assigning teams,” said Ms. Lockhart. Next weekend, February 21, the Legacy team will be conducting workoutsa nd registering players and coaches in East Grand Bahama beginning at 11:00a m. Legacy’s Vice President for S oftball also revealed plans for two upcoming events to assist players and coaches,n amely the rescheduled Softball College Showcase with the Indian River Junior College Team from Florida, now set for April 17-19, and a spe c ial clinic for pitchers and coaches with another visiting college coach and his staff in May. “We’re pleased to have t hese coaches continue to express an interest in working with our girls in The Bahamas and we look forward to having many of them interested in ac ollege opportunity prepare themselves early; we are also inviting those interested in coaching softball to join in these sessions and improve the knowledge and skills that they want to share with their teams,” said Ms. Lockhart. Parents interested in regis tering their children can contact: BASEBALL – Lillian Carey, 352-3636; Eugene Thompson, 646-1665; SOFTBALL – Yvonne Lockhart, 533-7989. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 10, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS Smart ChoiceDRIVESales to reminisce about the good time at home.” August Campbell, a native of Grand Bahama, signed to play for Duke University. As he head to Fayetteville, Justin Campbell said he was eager to get started as the offensive linesman coach had already indicated to him that they wanted him to come in and get prepared to play centre, possibly as the starter. “I just have to work out,” said Campbell, who returned to Charlotte on Wednesday where he intended to get back in physical condition after taking the past two weeks off. Although school won’t start until August, Campbell said he had a busy summer ahead of him as he “step my game up.” Once he graduates from Victory Center in May, Campbell said he will have to report to summer camp at Fayetteville in July. Campbell, the son of Dwight and Yvonne Campbell, said he was delighted to take the short break to come home after sign ing with Fayetteville. He noted that his family was overwhelmed that he was finally going to live out a childhood dream. “I always had that dream, somewhere in the back of my head that I will play college football,” he said. “I just knew that I had to work hard at it.” His proud father said their family was quite pleased with his achievement so far. “I’m proud of him in terms of his discipline. That was our number one concern when he left here,” Dwight Campbell pointed out. “I’ve known of people who went off to the States only to return in a couple of months or not return at all. “Hopefully what we have instilled in him as a young boy will stick with him as he continues to excel. But I’m very proud of his accomplishments so far.” Now that he’s accomplished his goal of obtaining a collegiate scholarship, Justin Campbell said he ultimately wanted to go all the way and play in the National Football League. “That’s a goal, but I still have to go and work on my academics, just in case that doesn’t work out,” he said. “At least I will have something to fall back on. But at least playing in the NFL is a goal.” As a fan of the Tampa Buccaneers, Campbell said he would eventually like to suit up for them, but if the opportunity doesn’t present itself, he will be willing to satisfy with whatever school is willing to pick him up. “Any team will do,” he stressed. For those Bahamian players who also aspire to follow their dreams of playing in college and even far as venturing into the pro ranks, Campbell used them to “keep your dream alive and stick to it. “Hard work and dedication is what it takes. You definitely have to do your school work. So you have to stay on track with your school work and you could achieve your goal.” For Campbell, he hopes to achieve his ultimate goal so that he can “make my family and the Bahamas very proud.” At present, he’s on course to accomplish that. “I would hope that more of our Bahamian players would come over and play in college,” he said. “There are a couple of us playing high school now, who are going off to college. “So with the talent that we have here, if some of them are given the opportunity, I think they can accomplish their goal as well.” FROM page 11 Campbell heads to Fayetteville ORGANISERS at the AF Adderley Junior High Scholl have released the schedule for the first three days of competition for the prestigious Hugh C ampbell Basketball Classic t hat will get started on Mond ay at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. MONDAY’S SCHEDULE: 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m Doris Johnson vs Nassau Christian Academy. 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m Charles W. Saunders vs CI Gibson. 5 5 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m CV Bethel vs St. Anne’s. B. R. E. A. K. 7 7 p p m m CC Sweeting vs Galilee. 8 8 p p m m Kingsway Acadeym vs Government High. 9 9 p p m m St. John’s vs CR Walker. TUESDAY’S SCHEDULE 3 3 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m RM Bailey vs Teleos. 4 4 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m Church of God vs Queen’s College. 5 5 : : 3 3 0 0 p p m m Winner game 3 vs Winner game 6. B. R. E. A. K. 7 7 p p m m W inner game 4 vs Winner game 5. 8 8 p p m m Winner game 1 vs Winner game 8. 9 9 p p m m Winner game 2 vs Winner game 7. WEDNESDAY’S SCHEDULE 1 1 p p m m South Andros vs Catholic High. 2 2 p p m m Alpha/Omega vs Bimini. 3 3 p p m m Temple Christian Academy vs Tabernacle Baptist. 4 4 p p m m Sunland Baptist vs Mt. Carmel. B. R. E. A. K. 6 6 p p m m Prince William vs Bishop Michael Eldon. 7 7 p p m m North Eleuthera vs St. George’s. 8 8 p p m m Eight Mile Rock vs St. Paul’s. 9 9 p p m m Westminster vs Jack Hayward. Hugh Campbell SCHEDULE Legacy boys baseball, girls softball season set to begin TALKING SOFTBALL: Legacy's Vice President for Softball, Yvonne L ockhart, right, chats with softball coaches from Indian River Com munity College from Florida during an earlier visit to Grand bahama, and local with college recruiter, Dwayne Jennings. QC Alexantria Marshall drives... n By RENALDO DORSETT Sports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net QUEEN’S COLLEGE COMETS 40 WESTMINSTER DIPLOMATS– 35 W ITH her team trailing 251 9 heading into the fourth quarter, Alexandria Marshall placed the Comets on her back,w illed her team to a game three victory and clinched the thirdB AISS junior girls champio nship in school history. M arshall saved her best g ame of the season for the l eague finale pouring in 31 of h er teams 40 points, 14 of w hich came in the all import ant fourth quarter. Marshall began the fourth w ith a three point play to bring h er team within three points. The Comets star forward s cored her team’s first eight p oints of the period, capping a run which gave her team a2 8-27 lead with 3:56 remain i ng. Kerri Bascom scored on the e nsuing possession to give the C omets a 30-27 advantage. Marshall’s best play of the game may have come on a series where she drew a foul r ather than score. The foul was the fifth on Diplomats star Thea Hanna, who finished with 18 points and had traded baskets with Marshall throughout the quarter. Marshall made one of two free throws to give the Comets a 33-31 lead with 2:19 remaining. W ith Hanna sidelined, the Diplomats struggled to score and the Comets took advan-t age of the ball handling deficiencies. Talia Thompson stole a pass a nd took the ball coast to coast finishing with a lay-up to give the Comets their largest lead oft he game, 38-31 with 1:18 left to play. T hompson finished with seven, while Bascom added the Comets only other score of the game. F or the Diplomats Petrel P ickstock finished with 11, seco nd on the team to Hanna’s 18. M arshall said her team made a determined effort to come out with a concentrated effort in game three, particularly in t he second half. “We just wanted to come out here, play with all our heart try to put alot of effort in it, but we had to finish the offensive plays in the second because early in the first half we were not doing so well so we had to step it up and bring o ur best game to the table,” she said. “It feels very good, e verybody was hoping for us to win a championship and I really wanted it because this ism y last year.” Comets Head Coach, Terrence McSweeney said he wasp roud of his team’s effort but applauded the Diplomats’ improvements they made overt he course of the season “It is mixed emotions b ecause the girls from the Diplomats they practised with us, they worked with us and they were able to go and work o n some other things,” he said. We give them kudos because i t is an increase to the BAISS junior and senior girls.” T he Comets took the series t wo games to one. Comets clinch third junior girls championship F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

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C M Y K C M Y K FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 11 I NSIDE Local sports news n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter b stubbs@tribunemedia.net WHEN Justin Campbell left J ordan Prince William High in 2007, he went to Charlotte, North Carolina with the inten tion of getting an athletic scholarship to pursue his dream of playing collegiate football. Two years after he made the move where he starred for Victory Christian Center School, Campbell is now on his way to playing as a Bronco on Fayet teville State football team, starting with his freshman year in August. “Things are going good, aca demically and sports wise,” said Campbell, who was home this week for a family funeral. “I’m just doing my thing.” The 18-year-old, who started playing in the Commonwealth American Football League under coach Richard Gardiner after he jokingly admitted that he “couldn’t defy gravity to play football,” said the football climate was totally different in the states than it was here. “They are more disciplined and dedicated,” Campbell pointed out. “Whatever you do, you just have to try hard, but I believe they push you more to work much harder.” As an offensive linesman, playing centre and free tackle, Campbell has had two stellar seasons for Victory Christian that he was selected to play in the Oasis All-Star Shrine Clas sic in November in Charlotte. The classic featured the top players in the joint states of North and South Carolina, who were teamed up to play on two opposing All-Star teams. “It was fun. It was enlightening to know that I was playing on the same team with another Bahamian,” said Campbell of August Campbell, who played as an outside linebacker for Arden Christ School in North Carolina. “When I saw the name Campbell when I first arrived, I thought that he had to be a Bahamian. When I finally found out, I was just happy to know that there was another Bahamian there.” Unfortunately, the Campbells combo (who didn’t play at the same time on the field) wasn’t enough to power the North team pass the South as they lost by more than a field goal. “We did have a chance to watch each other play and we talked with each other about the way we played,” Justin Campbell said. “So it was good Campbell heads to Fayetteville sports NOTES Justin Campbell SEE page 10 TRACK CLUB MONICA MEET 8 STARTING tonight at 6 pm at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and FieldS tadium, the 9th annual Club Monica Track and F ield Classic will take place. The meet will wrap up on Saturday, starting atn oon. All of the local clubs are e xpected to participate as athletes try to surpass the qualifying marks for theC arifta Games that will take place in St. Lucia o ver the Easter holiday weekend. BASKETBALL NPBA RESULTS THE New Providence Basketball Association played two games onW ednesday night at the CI Gibson Gymnasium w ith the following results posted: In the opener, the Fox i es Pros improved their record to 8-7 as they defeated the South WestP rinting Falcons (3-13 110-103. Denash Hanna had a game high 28 points for the Pros, while Jude Rolle had 26 for the Fal-c ons. In the feature game, the Y'Cares Wreckers (8-7d efeated the Sunshine Auto Rough Ryders (106 ) 94-84. Brandon Ingraham scored 18 points in the win for the Wreckers.M ario Pickstock had a game high 19 in the loss for the Ryders. The NPBA will be back in action tonight with ad ouble header and again on Saturday before the league take a break for the prestigious Hugh Campbell Basketball Clas s ic that will start on Monday at the Kendal IsaacsG ymnasium. SOFTBALL MASTERS GAMES POSTPONED THE Masters Softball League has announced that due to the funeral service of one of its mem bers, Dennis Smith, on Saturday, all games scheduled at the Archdeacon William Thompson Softball Park at the Southern Recreation Grounds, has been postponed. However, league president Anthony ‘Boots’ Weech, is requesting that its membes show up in team uniform tops at St. Agnes Anglican Church on Baillou Hill Road at 11 am. He will be interned in Lakeview Memorial Gardens, John F. Kennedy Drive and Gladstone Road. C C a a l l l l t t o o a a d d v v e e r r t t i i s s e e : : 5 5 0 0 2 2 2 2 3 3 7 7 1 1 ST JOHNS Darinque Young fouls sac Ashlee Bethel SAC takes BAISS senior girls title F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f B OYS AND GIRLS LEGACY B ASEBALL RETURNS n By RENALDO DORSETT S ports Reporter rdorsett@tribunemedia.net SAC BIG RED MACHINE – 41 ST. JOHN’S GIANTS – 30 THERE would be no repeat in the Senior G irls’ division as the defending champions fell in the third and deciding game unable to match t he size of the Big Red Machine’s front-line. SAC’s Brittney Harrison scored a game high 17 points to lead the Big Red Machine to thet itle, dominating the interior in the second half. The Big Red Machine trailed 17-15 at the half, b ut Harrison began the third quarter scoring six consecutive points to put her team ahead for good. A free throw by Alicia Musgrove capped a 10-0 run which gave SAC a 25-17 advantage. D omonique Young gave the Giants their first s core of the half from the line, 2:23 into the quarter and Alexia Maycock scored the team’s first f ield goal with 1:49 remaining. Young brought the Giants within three with a drive to the basket which trimmed the deficit2 5-22. SAC ended the quarter with a baseline jumper b y Christian Albury and a three point play by Harrison to take a 30-25 lead into the fourth. After Young fouled out early in the fourth q uarter, with 11 points, the Giants offence unravelled, struggling to score on the Big Red M achine’s stout interior defence anchored by Harrison. SAC led by as much as 10 points on a three p oint play my Musgrove which gave her team a 35-25 lead with 3:30 left to play. M usgrove finished with 13 points while Albury added six and Ashlee Bethel four. The Big Red Machine took the series two g ames to one.