Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
My ‘The Tribun

?m lovin’ it

WINDY

Volume: 105 No.66



are I

Sources
within ©
the force
describe a
‘culture of
corruption’

@ By TRIBUNE
STAFF WRITERS

THE proliferation of danger-
ous drugs on the streets of New
Providence has landed squarely
at the doorstep of the country’s
main drug-fighting agency —
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force — as sources within the
department insist that some
members of its own unit con-
fiscate and re-sell cocaine to
dealers on the streets.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, sources within the

- RBPF blew the lid off what was
described as a “culture of.cor-

“ruption” within various depart:

ments of the force.
As the main drug fighting

unit, corrupt officers within the .

Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU)
were accused yesterday of being
some of the main offenders in
the steady flow of cocaine and
marijuana on the streets of Nas-
sau.

Stating that often only the
“small fries” were led along the

_SEE page 10



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SUNNY AND ;













DANCERS, in town for the 2009 World Pro-Am Championships at Atlantis, performed yesterday in a special





BAHAMAS EDITION |



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

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HELP WANTED
Mere

RSET 5



show for children at the National Centre for the Performing Arts on Shirley Street.

Suspected arson attack ‘may
not be related to home fire’

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

EARLY investigations into

the suspected ‘arson attack on °
the car of a senior customs

officer suggest. that the inci-
dent is not related to the fire
that destroyed the home of a
special customs task force offi-

cer late last year.

Police reported yesterday
that Gregory Mortimer was
“off island” when his car was

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set on fire outside his Sunset

- Park home at 4am. Monday.

Asst Supt Jeffrey Dele-
veaux, head of Fire Services,
said that police are now await-
ing the return of Mr Mortimer
to assist them in their investi-
gations into the incident.

At the moment, Mr Dele-

veaux said, police have no
leads and are not questioning
anyone in.connection with the
matter.
The fire chief said that while
initial investigations suggest

that this fire does not resem-

ble the one that destroyed the

home of customs officer Rose-.

lyn Ritchie in November of
last year, police are not ruling

out any possibility at this time. .

Last month, Clive Kent
Schroeter, 37, was charged ina
Magistrate's Court in connec-

tion with the fire that’

destroyed Mrs Ritchie’s 10-
room Sea Link Drive home.

Court dockets. allege that
Schroeter, while being con-
cerned with others, intention-
ally caused the home of Philip
and Roslyn Ritchie to be set
on fire.

SEE page 10

Online
electronic
Tribune is

officially
launched

THE Tribune's electron:

ic newspaper was Officially
launched online today. The

e-paper ‘flipbook, which -

makes it easy for readers'to
navigate from page to page,
is available online at
www.tribune242.com .

"We are excited to now :

be able to make our news-
paper available online. We
are still working on the
development of our full mul-
ti-media interactive site, but
are pleased at the positive
reaction to the launch of this
first phase," said Tribune
Publisher Eileen Carron.

The e-paper is an exact
replica of The Tribune and
includes all advertisements
placed in the physical paper,
giving advertisers even
greater exposure than they
had before.

SEE page eight |
















Sia gaits)




Some officers are
allegedly being oad

to to make serious
“cases ‘

aaa all oe fe aticiit
occurrence is crippling
efforts of ee orang staff





m@ By TRIBUNE STAFF WRITERS.




SOME corrupt eice within the prosecutions department
are reportedly being paid up to $5,000 to ensure that files
_ | relating to serious matters such as drugs, rape, and firearm

_ possession either go missing, or are never presented before
the courts, The Tribune has been told.

According to well-placed sources within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, the act of making cases “disappear”
has become an all too frequent occurrence that is crippling |
the efforts of hard-working officers.

“You have some serious cases come forward like firearm
-possession,. AK 47’s even,” one source said, “and if you
notice they would have stated on the docket that the defen-
dant and counsel.are always present. But there is no appear-
ance by the prosecution witnesses.”

In other examples, officers who were “on the take” would
simply insist that the exhibits for a case were not ready,
‘forcing another time consuming adjournment. Another road
block that is reported to be used is the act of not calling the
complainant’s name when their'case actually comes before
the court. ©

This happened recently in the case of a mother whose
young daughter was allegedly raped by her step father.

“This is the norm. This is not just an isolated incident. It’s
with firearms, drugs — you would have files sent, the Mag-
istrate would sign the summons, they are stamped, but cer-
tain prosecutors would hide them away in the office, put
them in files that have already been cenipietee: or just lose

a page 10






















Spate of suspected suicides.
leads to public lecture

lm By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A RECENT spate of sus-

_ pected suicides and a deepen-
ing global economic crisis led -
psychiatrist Timothy Barrett
to address the issue in a public
lecture yesterday.

The consultant psychiatrist
for the Public Hospitals*
Authority and head of the
Community and Counseling
Assessment Centre explored
the statistics, reasons for sui-
cide and ways of preventing
it in his lecture, ‘Suicide: Are
the number’s increasing?’ at
Wesley Methodist Church in
Blue Hill Road yesterday
morning.

Around 80 healthcare work-
ers and concerned members
of the public learned that old- .
er men are most at risk*and”
teenagers are becoming more *
and more vulnerable to

on aS depression’ and the suicidal

DR TIMOTHY BARRETT addressed

the issue of suicide yesterday.

SEE page eight
SUL ASN
ELT LN
LIFE 1NSURARCE
TRE LULL

RULED ELAN)
SE NLL Bt

BARES dalkwens o



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



- Former BEC general manager

Says privatisation a ‘good idea’

Memorial Service at
Clifton National Park

ON SUNDAY, February 15 the Coalition To Save Clifton
will hold a Memorial Service at the Clifton National Park for
those who lived, worked, died, and were buried at the Clifton
Plantation.

The ecumenical service, which begins at 3pm, will be con-
ducted by the Bahamas Christian Council.

A motorcade will leave the juncture of Baillou Hill and
Carmichael Roads at 2pm for the service site at the southern
end of the park.

Rev CB Moss said the public is invited to participate in the
motorcade and service.










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THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s former general
manager said that he views pri-
vatisation of the entity as a
“good idea” but only if there is
significant Bahamian partici-
pation and government regu-
lation.

The government said last
year that it intends to privatise
BEC after it completes the
process of privatising the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC).

According to ex-GM
Bradley Roberts (not the for-
mer MP), who served in that
position at the corporation for
four and a half years, entities
like BEC are “kind of like the
people’s birthright” and if pri-
vatised, should be handled sim-
ilarly.

“We need to think out care-

_ fully the form of privatisation.

I believe it’s always good if ina

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But only ‘if Bahamians
can participate’

major venture like that we try
to ensure that Bahamians can
participate in a meaningful
way. I think it’s good to have
joint venture type relationships
where you can have foreign
expertise but ensure that
Bahamians can be significant
shareholders,” he said.

“Others from the outside
don’t necessarily have the same
mindset. If you look at what
has happened in some other
areas, a big company from the
US or Canada comes and they
buy into an organisation, but
at a given point in time they
can decide, ‘Well from a busi-
ness point of view we need to
get rid of this organisation’. But
Bahamians don’t have any-
where to go and Bahamians
should always be thinking in
the best interest of the
Bahamas,” he said.

Meanwhile, he added that at
present the corporation is man-
dated to provide electricity at a
flat rate throughout the islands
— something that a private com-
pany might not be minded to
do.

Politicians

“TI feel certain that politicians
will not allow that to change,
but whether they do it in a par-
tial way or-a total way I think
they have to take a lot of things
into account,” he said.

As the government moves
towards eventually starting to
privatise the company, it has
indicated that a first step is
clearing up inefficiencies at the
corporation to make. it a more
attractive prospect which’is
more responsive to customer
needs.

Mr Roberts suggested that
one of the ways operational
efficiency could be enhanced
is to ensure that professionals
employed at the corporation
are able to make decisions
without interference from

“political people”.

Tentatively stating that he is is
“not saying that this is what
went on or what goes on now”,
Mr Roberts said that he
believes government organisa-
tions such as BEC could be
“just as efficient as a private

organisation but 'the reality is

that sometimes there can be
interference that is _counter-

- productive.”

“If you look at the terms of
reference of the minister, the
chairman, et cetera, it’s OK,
but it’s in reality sometimes

‘that you do have a problem.

So a lot depends on the people
who are given these positions.
If you have a professional



PROFESSIONAL DANCERS from Italy, in town for the 2009 World

approach where everybody
decides, ‘look we’re going to
always be focused on what’s
best for the public the customer
the organisation’, once that’s
done, the organisation, public
or private, can do well.”

As for whether a transition
to a private company would
mean less blackouts, Mr
Roberts said the public must
realise that some blackouts are
unavoidable. '

“Sometimes it’s BEC’s

fault,” he said, “But sometimes
it’s weather conditions. Or
workmen excavating the roads
and damaging lines, or cars dri-
ving into overhead lines.”

Tim Clarke/Tr



Pro-Am Championships at Atlantis, perform yesterday for children in
Nassau at the National Centre for the Performing Arts of Shirley Street.

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, industry here

Bahama Rock lays off 19 workers

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahama Rock
laid off 19 workers on Monday,
a labour official on Grand
Bahama has confirmed.

Tyrone Gibson, deputy direc-
tor of labour in Freeport, said
the Department of Labour was

' given notice of the lay-offs on

Friday.

“The company notified us
that they were making 19 peo-
ple redundant and our officers
are trying to determine who and
what positions were affected,”
said Mr Gibson.

Walter Reed, general man-
ager at Bahama Rock, said that
all the laid off workers were
Bahamians.

He noted that staff cuts were
necessary because of the signif-
icant decline in the construction
business.

“There has been a significant
downturn in the construction
in the Bahamas
and in the Caribbean.

“We are still running produc-
tion (at the plant in Freeport),
but at a reduced level,” he
explained.

Bahama Rock is operated by
Martin Marietta Materials,
which supplies aggregate prod-
ucts to the Bahamas, as well as
various export markets in the
United States and_ the
Caribbean.

Martin Marietta also oper-
ates 300 quarry plants in the US
and Canada. The Freeport plant
is said to be the most profitable
for the company, and also
pumps $20 million a year into
the Grand Bahama economy.

Mr Reed said that Bahama
Rock is still continuing its major
harbour expansion at the
Freeport Container Port. 9

“We do not foresee any more
lay-offs in the future and we
anticipate that the market will
improve significantly at the end
of the year,” he said.



THE TRIBUNE





Tourists fined $1,000 for eating iguanas and juvenile conch

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TOURISTS who posted photographs
of themselves eating iguanas and juvenile
conch on social networking site Face-
book were fined $1,000 in Exuma Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Alexander David Rust, 24, from Indi-
ana, and Vanessa Star Palm, 23, from
Illinois, both pleaded guilty to the charges
of possessing undeveloped conch con-
trary to the Fisheries Resources Act and
taking a prohibited wild species protect-
ed under the Wild Animal Protection
Act. The pair had undeveloped conch in
their possession while in Allan’s Cay,
Exuma, between January 15 and 25, and





WILDLIFE offence on aera

photographed themselves grilling and
eating a critically endangered iguana.

They told the court they were igno-
rant of Bahamian wildlife protection
laws. Magistrate Ivan Ferguson excused
Palm from the two charges with a warn-
ing and ordered Rust to pay fines for
each charge or serve time in prison.

For possession of undeveloped conch

LOCAL NEWS



PNET USS eae

Rust was ordered to pay $800 or serve a
four month jail term, and for possession
of an iguana he was fined $200 or told he
would spend two months in prison.

The maximum penalty for possession
of undeveloped conch is a $5,000 fine
and one year in prison, and for possession
of an iguana magistrates can enforce a
$300 penalty and six months:in prison. ,

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 3

Executive director of the Bahamas
National Trust (BNT) Eric Carey said:
“We are pleased they got convicted and
we are really pleased the police worked
with us to apprehend these people.

* “But the fact that they didn’t get the
maximum penalty shows we have a lot of
work to do to sensitise magistrates to the
fact that offences against wildlife and
environmental laws need to be taken
seriously. It’s foolishness that these peo-
ple plead ignorance when they come
from-a society where they know most
wildlife is protected. These people ought
to be banned from this country. We
understand tourism is down but we don’t
need hooligans abusing our laws.”

The Facebook photographs of Rust

and Palm also featured two other men;



one who is standing next to Rust as they
cut up undeveloped conch and another
cating iguana meat with Rust. It is under-
stood one of the men is a resident of
Nassau and although police maintain
investigations are continuing, they have
not confirmed the two men pictured are
wanted in connection with the offence.
Mr Carey said: “The names of these
men have been sent to me via e-mail and
they should also be charged and brought
before the courts, but we have had no
assistance from the police in doing this.”
The BNT chief has contacted Depart-
ment of Marine Resources to help pursue
the other two men and has called on Min-
ister for the Environment Earl.Deveaux
to introduce higher penalties for breach-
ing the Wild Animal Protection Act.

In bri



‘Trio ue

over Weapon,

ammunitions
iZure

THREE people.charged in
connection with a weapon and
ammunitions seizure earlier
this week were arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday.

Police have charged Levar- ~
do Forbes, 24; Trevardo Tay-
lor, 24, of Derby Road; and
Evelyn Ann Pratt, 24, of
South Beach with possession
of an unlicensed firearm and
possession of ammunition. _

It-is alleged that on Sunday,
February 8, the accused were
found with’a silver and black
InterArm .380 pistol and four
live rounds of .380 ammuni-
tion.

The accused, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at Court Eight, Bank
Lane, pleaded not guilty and
were remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison.

They‘are expected to réturn
to court on February i2 fora
bail hearing.

Forbes’ and Taylor are rep-
resented by attorney Dion —
Smith and Pratt is being repre-
sented by lawyer Tai Pinder.

It is alleged that the accused
led police’ on a high speed
388 western New
e, during which a
as thrown Ons the

Man remantied
to prison on
armed robbery
allegations

A 29-year-old man of Union
Village has. been remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison on armed
robbery charges.

It is alleged that on Monday,
December 15, Lewis Alex
Williams while armed with a
handgun robbed Jody Morris of
$800 cash, the property of the
Shell Automotive Service Sta-
tion.

It is also alleged that on Sun-
day, December 21, Williams,
being concerned with others,
robbed Fernand Francois of
$900 cash, an assortment of -
phone cards and two packages
of Backwoods cigars valued at
$96, the property of Texaco Ser-
vice Station on Prince Charles
Drive, ,

Williams, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau
Street, was not required to
plead to the charges.

He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. The case was
adjourned to May 25.





The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
VAM OUI RYS
Tropical Exterminators
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STEPHEN’S CLOSE CONTROVERSY

1 | Would- be home owners

threaten legal action in

subdivision furore

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A GROUP of would-be home
owners embroiled in the confu-
sion over failed subdivision,
Stephen's Close, are threatening
legal action against the banks,
developer and lawyers involved.’

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said
although he hopes the continuing
negotiations will lead to an out of
court settlement, a few of his

clients are agitating to sue devel-

oper Denise Burrows, attorneys
Dion Foulkes and Desmond
Edwards, and the banks that
approved the loans for the trou-
bled subdivision if their negotia-
tions with the involved parties are

_ not soon resolved.

Mr Fitzgerald is the lawyer for
six of the clients who purchased
lots in the proposed subdivision.

"IT represent (a few) of the -
‘clients involved in that matter who

unfortunately had paid substan-
tial amounts of money with
deposits and (are) paying bank

loans and so forth for the.gonsne

struction of those hom
when the Ministry of Works
in and ceased construction (it left

a lot of them abandoned and out °

of a lot of. money," Mr Fitzgerald

told The Tribune yesterday.

"Of course the clients have
been somewhat frustrated and
have said to me that if things don't
work out in short order they will
be instructing me to bring action
against the bank and lawyers
involved," he said.

While refusing to divulge the






“Of course
the clients
have been
somewhat
frustrated...”



Jerome Fitzgerald

specifics of the negotiations, Mr -

Fitzgerald said he is hopeful the
process will move swiftly to avoid
lengthy and costly litigation.

"Litigation is expensive and I]
am always one to try and find a
way to settle matters if I see that is
an alternati i is case
that is a very real alternative —
and I'm pursuing it with vigour,"
he said.

Complaints

News of the controversy broke
in 2007-when public complaints
were made against the high-pro-
file attorneys who reportedly
advised the banks involved that
the subdivision had the green light
for development, when it is
claimed, only approval in principle
had been granted in September,
2004.

In Naveniber 2005 the Min-
istty of Works issued a stop-order,
claiming construction had started
without necessary government





IN THE SUPREME COURT

“provisions of the Act.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Common Law ad Equity Division
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER. of ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land comprising an area of Nine thousand and
Sixteen (9,016) square feet being Lot number Seven
(7) of “Bel-Air Estates” Subdivision situate on the
Southern side of Carmichael Road approximately:
8,535 feet west of Blue Hill Road in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SHAMEKA L. MORLEY

NOTICE
_SHAMEKA L. MORLEY, the Petitioner claim to be the: owner in fee
_simple estate in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore described
and free from encumbrances. The Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the

Copies of the file plan may be inspected during normal hours at:-

The Registry of The Supreme Court; and
The Chambers of Ramsey & Associates,
Ramses Building, 23 Plantol Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person or persons having a right
of Dower or an adverse claim not recognized in the Petition shall within
Thirty (30) days after the of the Notice herein filed in the Registry of
the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of such claim | the prescribed
form, verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a Statement of such claim within Thirty (30)
days herein will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 20" day of October, A.D., 2008

RAMSEY & ASSOCIATES
Chambers
Ramses Building
23 Plantol Street
Nassau, The Bahamas _



2008
No. 00332





permits and approvals being
granted. Subsequently, many of
the families were left with incom-
plete homes and thousands of dol-
lars in mortgage payments over
their heads.

In some cases the banks sus-
pended mortgage payments pend-
ing a resolution of the stalled
approvals.

Senator Foulkes, and former
FNM candidate for St Cecilia
Desmond Edwards, represented
the clients who were looking to
secure loans to invest in the pro-
posed subdivision off Cowpen
Road.

’ Throughout the ordeal, Mr
Foulkes maintained his law firm
was "totally blameless" and had
done all that was required of it.

Last September, developer
Denise Burrows said she was
doing her best to achieve a "fair
solution to what has been a diffi-

’ cult situation" for clients bur-

dened with mortgages in the trou-
bled area.

’ During a ruling for a separate
case last September, Justice John
Lyons.ruled that.selling lots in
unapproved subdiyisions is an
offenee-and‘denounced-all lawyers
who facilitate the selling or pur-
chasing of land that lack full gov-
ernment approval.

Santander

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P.O. a wor NaceatE x
email:info @colesofnassau.com



SANTANDER BANK & TRUST LTD .

has an immediate vacancy for a

Private Banking Marketing Officer

Applicants must hold the following:

Master’s Degree in Administration, Fi nance, Economics or related degree
A minimum of 5 years experience in private banking

Applicants should also be capable of the following:

I Totally fluent in English and Spanish

2 Develop and manage a portfolio of private

banking clients by analyzing the banking and

investment needs of corporate and high-net worth individuals and offering financial and
;

’ investment alternatives.

Maintain existing client relationships by monitoring the financial condition of assigned
accounts, executing client instructions, and keeping clients updated as to the changing
conditions of financial markets.

Frequent travel to assigned countries to enhance current client relationships and develop
new business by meeting with representatives and clients.

Supervise a Private Banking Assistant.

Ensure that all private banking activities

are in compliance with internal policies

and procedures and external regulatory requirements.

Applications in writing with details of educaton and experience should be addressed to the Human
Resources Manager, P.O. Box N-1682, Nassau, Bahamas not later than February 24, 2009.





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. |

Publisher/Editor 1972-

“Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
‘Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

How Tribune was pushed onto the web

ON ONE of yesterday morning’s talk shows,
a caller accused The Tribune of stopping deliv-
ery of this newspaper to the Family Islands to

spite Bahamasair. The caller gave no reason’

for The Tribune wanting to spite Bahamasair,
nor can we think of any.

When the New Year opened, although The
Tribune was cutting costs, stopping delivery of
the newspapers to the Family Islands was not
open for discussion.

However, we were pushed into making a
hasty decision when Bahamasair announced it
had increased our rates more than 400 per cent,
and we could find no alternative carrier inter-
ested in filling the gap.

In less than two weeks — because of our con-

cern for our Family Island readers —a website -

was built to try to fill the void. ©

We at The Tribune have always been aware
of our civic duty to try to keep our readers
informed throughout the archipelago.

We have always subsidised the Family

Islands. All Family Island depots bought the ,
newspaper for resale at the same price’ as those |"

in New Providence.

In addition The Tribune paid all transporta-
tion costs to the islands with no extra charge to
our out island customers, although on resale
some of the depots did sell the newspaper at a
higher price than the 75 cents in Nassau.

The Tribune did not benefit from these’ Jocal

markups.

For years The Tribune had been charged a
flat monthly rate by Bahamasair for delivery
of the papers to the islands to which it flew.
Suddenly in early January we received a letter
dated December 31, .2008 from Bahamasair
informing us that on that date — Dec. 31 — the
price of carrying the papers had been increased
by weight. If we had continued with these price
terms, by the end of the year we would have
paid Bahamasair, well over $200,000. We had
always subsidised the out islands, but that cost
now made it prohibitive.

We were already well into January before
we received Bahamasair’s December notice
that we were paying per week what we had
been paying per month.

’ The Tribune tried to open the lines for nego-
tiation with Bahamasair, but got a take- it- -Or-
leave it reply.

Often our telephone calls were not returned.
We started to explore other.carriers, but noth-
ing worked out.

Our readers had become so accustomed to
same-publication-day service that going back
to the days of mail boat delivery was not an
option. Added to which over the years there
was a certain air of indifference at Bahamasair

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about the timely delivery of the newspaper. For
example, a few weeks ago Long Island cus-
tomers called to complain that Bahamasair had
not delivered The Tribunes for two days. Over
the years this has been a common complaint.
Another complaint was that the papers were
delivered too late, and, therefore, could not be
sold. Not only did we pay Bahamasair for all
these deliveries, but we had to write off the late
papers because by then what was once news
had become history.

Not being able to negotiate with Bahamasair,
we decided to introduce an electronic Tribune
for the islands. As soon as Bahamasair man-
agement read The Tribune’s announcement
that yesterday was to be the last day that its
delivery services would be used for the news-
paper, Bahamasair contacted us offering to
reduce the rates. It offered to lower its rates
from 46 cents to 30 cents a pound. It admitted
that even with this reduction the rates were 100
per cent higher than what we were paying.
Because of their lack of proper notice they
offered to bill the month of January at our orig-
inal monthly flat rate, for which we are grateful.

We appreciate that Bahamasair’s costs have
increased, but so have The Tribune’s. The only
difference is that government subsidises
Bahamasair, no one subsidises The Tribune

,, and so we are forced to make very hard business
decisions — this is one of them. We were under-.
writing the Family Islands even with Bahama-

sair’s original rates, however, the new rates
make this financial burden insupportable.
Although there are those who believe they
cannot live without the feel of the real Tribune
in their hands, we have had many other enthu-
siastic reactions.
One of them came yesterday morning from

_ Theo Bergmann in far off Iceland. “This is just

great. Good job!” was his message.

Theo, who married a Bahamian girl, was at
one time on The Tribune’s staff. He is now
back in his Icelandic hometown. Theo, it’s good
to hear from you. Now through your Tribune
you can once again keep in touch with your
islands in the sun.

“The new website has certainly pushed The
Tribune to the forefront of the local online
media and onto.the world wide web with a
bang. The advertisements are large and, colour-
ful and navigation through the pages is very

simple. As usual the content of the articles by .

your writers are second to none in the Bahamas.
Congratulations!” says James Saunders’ e-mail.
Although many are saddened that this day
has come, from-the messages we are now receiv-
ing even more are delighted that at last The
Tribune has arrived on the world wide web.



not expect Baha Mar to be



If the Police
Force ain’t broke
don’t fix it!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Recent reports in the local
press have prompted me to
make these observations for
the benefit of our citizens. Our
Police Force continues to be
the topic of conversation in
the media and among politi-
cians. There are those who
have expressed their lack of
respect and trust in the Acting
Commissioner of Police.

There are those who talk

- about political interference,

notably the leader of the
Police Staff Association, and
now we. have those who are
trying to change the law
regarding the tenure of the
Commissioner of Police and
several of his executive offi-
cers, :

It has been said by some-
one, that if it ain’t broke don’t
fix it. The Police Force is the

_ most éfficient organisation. in

our public service.

There are faults, concerns
and complaints, which the
force has been making mas-
sive strides to correct, eg; dis-
cipline and the need for a mas-
sive effort to eradicate minor
offences. Corruption and
aggressive conduct continues.
When exposed the force deals
with those officers responsi-
ble. The efforts of the Force in
the fight against hardened gun
toting criminals, the drug
entrepreneurs and all those
who are endangering our lives
and putting us in fear have
been magnificent.

Their efforts in protecting
us from these violent demons
exposes them to danger every

’ day and night, but they are

continuously displaying the
courage and determination. to
provide “substantial and visi-
ble police presence on those
streets where the fear of crime
is greatest by implementing a
vigorous stop and search pol-
icy to remove firearms and
drugs from our streets and an
intelligence-led policing poli-

cy, which includes targeting”

and taking out major crimi-

nals, especially the firearms,

drugs and financial dealers.




LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



The population at our pris-

ons, the large backlog of cases -

in our courts and the daily
media reports indicates to me
that we are winning the war
and with the continued help
from those supportive mem-
bers of the public we could

- take control of our streets

again.

However, our politicians
seem determined to fix some-
thing that does not need fix-
ing. Firstly, the big promo-
tions. The number of senior
officers were a lot more than
the legal establishment, in par-
ticular those assistant com-
missioners.

The establishment is for
five assistant commissioners.
I have, always wondered if
Commissioner Paul Far-
quharson, .an established
administrative genius, had
approved this promotion.

I also wonder if the Police
Service Commission appoint-
ed by the government had
anything to say or any objec-
tion to this breach of the
establishment. Could it be that
there was political interfer-
ence?

Then there was the com-
plaint of corruption’in the
Ministry of Housing.

It was made to the Police
and should have been the
responsibility of the assistant
commissioner for crime to
direct the investigation.

It was sent to a uniform
branch officer where it
remained dormant. Is this the
political interference suggest-
ed by the head of the Police
Staff Association in a recent
statement to the press?

We are now debating a bill
to have the commissioner and
his executive officers serve for
a period of five years, which
could be extended to another
five years by the politicians.
John Peel joins the Force at
age 18 years. He educates

himself, works very hard and
moves up in the ranks. At 45
years of age John.Peel pro-
moted to commissioner of

' police. John Peel is married

and has children.

He is in a job that he has
dedicated his life to and his
desire is to continue after five
years.

He has to work to convince
the government of the day
that he deserves another five
years. Will John Peel be able
to perform his duties impar-
tially?

Will John Peel be willing to
deal with politicians in the
government, who may attempt
to interfere in his daily admin-
istration of the force? John
Peel wants to stay for. another
five years he will always think
that he is beholden to the gov-
ernment of the day and must
not do or say anything to
upset those politicians. Major
Sears gave evidence in the
Oakes case.

He was a senior fiche then.
He offended the Bay Street
boys. He did not make com-
missioner. Sir Albert Miller
was just friends of two UBP
politicians, which prevented
him from being commissioner.

l agree that a commissioner
of police should serve for not
more than ten years; but I do
not agree with the responsi-
bility placed on him to please
the government of the day or
leave after five years.

Make it mandatory retire-
ment for the commissioner of
police at age 60, provided that
he is in good health. ;

The commissioner must be

_free to conduct his duties with-

out,fear or any. interference

‘from the politicians.

It is surprising that the
police Staff Association has
not.given this ‘matter the

- extensive consideration it

deserves.

PAUL THOMPSON Sr.
Former Assistant
Commissioner

' of Police,
Nassau,
February 9, 2009.

Why spend hundreds of thousands of
dollars on repaving West Bay Street?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Passing through Goodmans
Bay heading west through
Cable Beach yesterday I saw

significant confirmation that .

Government certainly does

PHONES: LOCATIONS:

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able to find a significant part-

ner to fund the proposed

' development as otherwise why

are they spending possibly a
few hundreds of thousands of
dollars on repaving West Bay
Street?

I recall many years ago.

when then Hon Loftus Roker
was Minister of Public Works
and I believe it was around
the time that Carnival built

' Crystal Palace and there was

then a request to divert West
Bay.

As quick as he’s sharp Min-
ister Roker told all that Gov-
ernment had just completed
the new southern two-lane
carriageway, no road was

- going to be diverted and that

was that, in true, Roker fash-
ion.
Certainly if Baha Mar
before the required cut-off in
March, 2009 are able to find a
suitably funded partner and
then they wish to proceed with

. the detouring of West Bay as

proposed then if this
$270,000.00 plus expense on
resurfacing of West Bay Street
will.be to the cost of Baha
Mar and certainly not the tax-
payers.

H RAHMING
Nassau,
January 30, 2009.

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RIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 5

Mm
—|

TH





LOCAL NEWS



In brief

Pe he Fire cuts cable services

BahamaHealth are



major sponsors
of ‘Celebrate
Heart Month

FAMILY Guardian and
its group health division,
BahamaHealth, are major
sponsors of this year’s
“Celebrate Heart Month,”
which runs through Febru-
ary.

Family Guardian’s vice-
president of the group life
and health division Linda
Jarrett (left) recently pre-
sented the company’s
sponsorship pledge to Nel-
lie Brown of the Bahamas
Heart Association.

In making the presenta-
tion, Mrs Jarrett said: “We
are happy to partner with
the Heart Association in
this important health ini-
tiative which runs concur-
rently with Bahama-
Health’s 100-day chal-
lenge. BahamaHealth’s
focus is to bring awareness
and solutions to the seri-
ous health risks associated
with obesity, including
heart disease, and our
partnership with the Heart
Association is very time-

106 people are
cited for traffic
offences in

police exercise

A FIVE-HOUR “‘spe-
cial joint operation” con-
ducted by police at the ~
Marathon and Robinson
Roads intersection result-
ed in 106 people being cit-
ed for traffic offences.

Officers from Wulff
Road and East Street
South police stations
mounted the operation
between 3pm and 8pm.

During the five-hour
period, officers also arrest-
ed three people for having
an outstanding warrant,
one for disorderly behav-
iour arid another for mak-
ing threats to police offi-
cers.

m CORRECTION

MONDAY’S Tribune
article under the headline
“Rastafarians claim certain
private schools are unconsti-
tutional” inaccurately report-
ed Summit Academy as
being located on Thompson
Boulevard. ;

The Summit Academy is
in fact located on East Bay
Street, near the Montagu.

Wit He
eS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS §

PHONE: 322-2157



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



CABLE services to around 150
homes in eastern New Providence
were wiped out when a power cable
fell on a.fibre optics line, causing it to
catch fire.

The somewhat freak occurrence
took place at around 9.30am on Mon-
day in Tamarind Street, Camperdown,
cutting out cable services for hundreds
of residents of Winton and Camper-

2.30pm.

first thought.

down throughout the day.

Cable Bahamas operations manager
Lester DeGregory explained that the
fibre optics line which the power cable
had fallen on caught fire and was
replaced by a specialist team after
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
repaired their line at around

But engineers later found there had
been more damage to the cable than

Mr DeGregory said: “It had burnt
our cable further down the street so we

that.”

had to replace additional cable as well
and discharge another crew to do

Television

Modem and television services
returned to normal in the area at
around 6.30pm Mr DeGregory said.

He added: “It’s not exactly a freak
incident, as it happens around twice a
year and it is usually right at that same
location, but in this incident it also

to around 150 homes |

burnt the cable further down.”
BEC general manager Kevin Bas-
den said he was not aware of the pow-

er line falling in that location before,

. and said in this instance it was brought
down by a vehicle. |

He said: “A dump truck in the area

snagged one of our lines and
that resulted in the lines coming
together so we had to carry out repairs
‘as well.”

BEC customers in the immediate
area would have been affected by the
accident, Mr Basden said.

The Bahamas ‘needs more all

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net




























JAMAICA defied global
tourism trends by recording a four
per cent increase in tourist stop-
overs in the last year and another
leap in January — evidence that
The Bahamas needs to offer more
“all inclusive” and cheaper vaca-
tions, according to Minister of
Tourism, Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace.

Last year The Bahamas record-
ed a five per cent decrease in
overall tourism figures, a slight
reduction from initial expectations
of an eight per cent fall-off by
year’s end.

But according to figures
released by the Jamaican govern-
ment, Jamaica saw their stop-over
arrivals jump by four per cent

Oe w overall in 2008 compared with

Vincent Vander




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Minister speaks out after
Jamaica defies tourism trends



And despite dismal global con-
ditions, January 2009 saw record
growth of 3.4 per cent over Janu-
ary 2008, providing more visitors
in that month than in any year
ever before, according to
Jamaican tourism minister
Edmund Bartlett.

In a February 4th news article
produced by the Jamaican Gov-

ernment’s information service, Mr,

Bartlett attributed the trend-defy-
ing growth to intense overseas
marketing and promotion efforts,
especially during the start of the
winter tourism season, and to the
staging of the annual Jazz and
Blues festival in January.

According to some Bahamian

industry figures, Jamaica has been
more visible and “aggressive” with
their marketing dollars than The
Bahamas.

“They are all. over the mass-
media. We promote a lot as well,
but Jamaica has really stepped it




CREDIT SUISSE

up,” said one industry-watcher.

Yesterday Bahamian Minister
of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace pointed to other factors
— stating that there is “no ques-
tion whatsoever” that Jamaica’s
boost in arrivals during a globally
tough period was fuelled in large
part by a major growth in lower-
cost room inventory and the intro-
duction of a significant number
of new “all inclusive packages” in
2008.

“Jamaica has added a lot more
products, particularly from Span-
ish (hotel) chains. There’s all
inclusive product at a lower price
than what was there before and
they have become a very compet-
itive destination by way of the
combination of ‘all inclusive’ and
“low cost all inclusive’.”

“Tf you look at the category that
our rooms are in, they are ina
much more expensive category
than many of our competitors and

inclusive and cheaper vacations’

that’s something that we are
addressing right now, to make us
much more competitive,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace, ‘

Frank Comito, executive vice
president of the Bahamas Hotel
Association said that some hotels
in this country which are not all-
inclusive are now seeking to offer
more all-inclusive type products,
with “meal packages” and other
incentives.

He added that the Ministry of
Tourism’s soon-to-be-launched
“Club Grand Bahama” pilot pro--
gramme is part of a Bahamian
effort to feed the growing appetite
among would-be travellers for
more low-cost all inclusive vaca-
tions.

That programme, being formed
at present, will see several Grand
Bahama hotel properties, restau-
rants, tour operators and trans-
portation providers come under
one umbrella as part of a pre-paid
package offered to visitors.

If successful, the Government
hopes to emulate the concept
throughout The Bahamas, in both
New Providence and the Family
Islands.

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for



IPLIANCE OFFIC



The Compliance Department is accepting applications for a Junior Compliance

Officer

The position is.open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Requirements:



. University degree with a major in Law or Finance

. At least 2-3 years experience with an international bank

*, Extensive knowledge in the fields of Auditing and Internal Controls

. Thorough knowledge of private banking in general

° Knowledge of Bahamas Banking and Trust Legislation

: Knowledge of local regulatory and statutory matters with regards to
“Know Your Client” and the avoidance of Money Laundering

° PC Knowledge (MS Word, MS Excel, Access, etc.)

. Well versed with Swiss anti-money laundering and due diligence
procedures

. Knowledge of credit issues would be an asset

Duties will include:

: Accept new business and allocate mandate numbers for new accounts

°. Conduct monthly reviews of financial transactions

. Conduct Annual risk reviews for mandates with low risk

° Maintain physical and electronic client documentation

: Review Legal and Compliance Registers to ensure receipt of
documentation

. Administer.and monitor closure of accounts

. Personal Qualities:

. Strong organizational and communication skills

. Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision

. Staal a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible

ours

° Willing to work in a multicultural environment

Benefits provided include:

. Competitive salary

° Pension Plan

‘ Health and Life Insurance

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be

accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

or via fax 356-8148

. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

FEBRUARY 18, 2009



= aE



PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

ac¢ Film showcase puts the

Caribbean in the frame



Junior Achievement Bahamas donation

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT BAHAMAS recently presented both the Nazareth :
Centre and the Elizabeth Estates Children Home with a cheque for $500 each :
and 10 boxes of non-perishable food items, which where donated by the :
Achievers and Advisors. Pictured from left are vice-president of the Achiev- :
ers Association Mikhail Barry; Leando Thompson; Anna Stuart; Junior ;
Achieverment centre manager Leandra Kelly; Adrianna McDonald of the Eliz- :
abeth Estates Children Home; Junior Achievement programme manager :
Delano Munroe; Nicole Whitfield of the Nazareth Centre; Junior Achievement i

centre manager Jane Roach; Achievers Association president Jade Strachan;
Risnel Elliott and Anthony Hall.

SURGICAL ASSOCIATES BAH. LTD.
is accepting applications for an

ORTHOPEDIC & HAND SURGEON

Contact: (242) 356-5827

| E-mail: omaura@mednetholdings.com
or Postal Address: CB-1145

Nassau, Bahamas



ADMINISTRATOR!
LIBRARIAN |

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the suctessfal candidate will ie
include: ]

© Overseeing the ‘dally peration of the

facility, which includes a library, museum,
i computer laboratory, resource. centre,
| reading room and café.

© Investigating and pursuing viable

sources of funding

© Planning and executing the curriculum
1 of the trade and vocational classes to be

offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

| © Experience in a _ related field or
| certification in library science

| © Excellent organization and administrative
skills

© Very Good computer skills

| © Excellent communication skills
© Exceptional titerpersortal skills
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© Willingness to work flexible hours 3

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to SS ees com

or via fax 242-334-2280.
_ WWW. southeleutheramission.com_



Harbour Ss
is_
SOs orr

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

FILM enthusiasts gathered
for fine wine and thought-pro-
voking entertainment at the
opening of the second Travel-
ling Caribbean Film Showcase
held at Galleria Cinemas JFK
on Monday.

The week-long event screens
films which place special inter-
est on the children and adoles-
cents of the Caribbean.

First launched in the

Bahamas in 2007, the event
aims to recognise the work and

skill of film producers from the
region, and to provide an
avenue for those producers to
expose their work and creativ-

ity to other members of the =

broader Caribbean communi-
ty.

It is a joint effort of the
Cuban Institute of Film Art
and Industry (ICAIC), the
UNESCO Regional Offices for
the Caribbean (Havana,
Kingston and Port-au-Prince)
and UNICEF representatives
in Cuba.

After reviewing 116 films

from producers representing .



Legal Notice

NOTICE

LOTUS CHAMPS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MAPPA: VALLEY CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the |

dissolution of MAPPA VALLEY CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued. and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP.

Notice,is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
‘dissolution of BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate éf Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

store im Ihalt

THE OTHER
HEATFE |ErsS —

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Periwthlhe ae
ec eee ae ee: ES cr ee ec

ay es Boy, Bo eo
Oe {Sere 4 et
EE" ae eo De ee Se



16 countries in the region, the
international selection com-
mittee accepted 52 movies and
short-listed 24.
Movies from the following
countries were chosen for pre-
sentation: Belize, Cuba, Cura-
cao, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Jamaica, Nicaragua, Haiti,

‘ Dominican Republic, Suri-

name, Trinidad and Tobago,

‘and Venezuela.

Owen Bethel, president of
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional, said the international
organising committee felt there
were a lot of issues that affect
young persons globally, but
some in particular which
impact the region’s youth. .

“There were a number of
issues that they felt needed to
be addressed and one of the
ways we know for reaching
that part of the population is
through visual media. Some of
the films range from. anima-
tions that are one minute long
to those which are full feature
films over 60 minutes long,”
Mr Bethel said.

Michael Edwards, education

. officer at the National Art

Gallery, said: “We understand
that it'may be difficult for stu-
dents to come out for evening

screenings, SO We are now try- -
ing to take the showcase into

the schools so that our kids can
be able to see these films and

learn from them.as well.”

Ambassador for Cuba to the
Bahamas Jose Ponce said this
year’s showcase is a great step

forward to reach the necessary ~

cultural integration for the
youth to gain a better. knowl-
edge and respect for the people
in the region.

“They can draw focus to the
films not only from the per-
spective of entertainment, but
also drawing attention to issues
that affect and threaten the
youth of the region such as

family violence, early preg-

nancy, child prostitution, drug

. addiction and.the respect for

different races,” Ambassador

-Ponce said.

The first film, “Casa De
Munecas” by Joaquin Zuniga,
is a film from Nicaragua.

It tells the story of how two
girls from different parts of the
country - urban and rural —
share similar realities when
they become young mothers
and in the process are forced to
abandon their studies and

everything else that affords

them a better future. . -
The second film, “Invisible”

by Elspeth Duncan, hails from
Trinidad and Tobago: It is a
documentary on the life of a
mother who is in a situation
where she and her young
daughter are HIV positive but
her eight-year-old son is not.
This documentary shows a
mother’s struggle of address-
ing the stigma that is associated

‘with the disease, not only for

herself, but also her daughter
in the school environment.
Tomerique Forbes, a student
at the College of the Bahamas,
said she hopes Bahamian
teenagers who see the films will
walk away thinking about how
fortunate they are to live in a
country like the Bahamas.
“They should realise how
fortunate their lives are in gen-
eral. They don’t have to cross
rivers to get home, whether
they have.a baby or not. At
that young age they should
want to enjoy life, so I hope
they look at it very compara-
tively and think that they are
very lucky and maybe they
should keep their lives on the
road to success and not get
sidetracked,” Ms Forbes said.
She said she admired the
way the two films showed

- different aspects of women’s |

lives and the different respon-
sibilities they have to their chil-
dren, their health and them-

‘selves.

“TI think the films were very
good at zoning in on issues that
we may not think about on a
day-to-day basis, like teen
pregnancy and the. struggles
that go along with that, not
necessarily just seeing it and
dismissing it, but really walking
through the process with these
girls,” she said.

Mr Bethel said he hopes
the film showcase can become
an annual event for the
Bahamas.

“It is planned that way by
the international committee.

“The idea is that as it grows,
we hope that it encourages
producers and young persons
here to really look at putting

their stories to film and making

it creative, to have universal
value so that others around the
region and around the world
will want to see it and would
want to know what it is like
in the Bahamas,” Mr Bethel
said.

The First Travelling
Caribbean Film Showcase held
in 2007 featured 21 films from
13 countries including the
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.

(In Voluntary, Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

DREADNOUGHT
VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
DREADNOUGHT VALLEY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





bite

bb eee we oe



The concept of the singul

e are suffering

just now from a
bad attack of economic pes-
simism,” wrote the famous
British economist John May-
nard Keynes in a 1930 essay. "It
is common to hear people say
that....a decline in prosperity is
more likely than an improve-
ment in the decade which lies
ahead of us."

Keynes was one of the most
renowned economists of his day,
and his theories of deficit spend-
ing to stimulate demand were
the global economie orthodoxy
from the time of the Great
Depression of the 1930s until
the 1970s. They are now coming
back into fashion as the world
economy collapses around us.

But in this essay Keynes was
no doomsayer. At the beginning
of the Depression — which was

to last 15 years until the out-

break of the second world war
in 1945 — he wrote a 4,000-
word essay entitled Economic
Possibilities for our Grandchil-
dren, in which he called the
understandable pessimism of his
day mistaken. .

"The prevailing world
depression...blind(s) us to what
is going on under the surface,
to the true interpretation of the
trend of things," he wrote. "We
are suffering, not from the
rheumatics of old age, but from
the growing-pains of over-rapid
changes, from the painfulness
of readjustment between one
economic period and another."

The purpose of his essay was
to consider the long-term future:
"What can we reasonably expect
the level of our economic life to
be a hundred years hence?
What are the economic possi-
bilities for our grandchildren?"

Keynes believed that the slow
rate of human progress over the
past 3,000 years had been
brought to an end by a combi-
nation of capitalism and science.

"If capital increases, say, 2
per cent per annum, the capital
equipment of the world will
have increased by:a half in 20
years, and seven and a half times
in a hundred years...At the same
time technical improvements in
manufacture and transport have
been proceeding at a greater
rate in the last 10 years than

ever before in history." cite 8S

“He predicted that we would

be, on average, eight'times bet-”’

ter off by 2030, and our eco-
nomic problems would be
solved. It would be the end of
economic history. But he wor-
ried that this outcome might
produce other difficulties.

"For the first time since his
creation man will be faced with
his real, his permanent problem
_ = how to use his freedom from
pressing economic cares, how
to occupy the leisure time which
science and compound interest
will have won for him, to live
wisely and agreeably and well."

The future, he believed,
would free us from the need to
work, with the love of money



finally recognised as "a some-
what disgusting morbidity".
Instead, we will come to value
those who can teach us how to
"pluck the hour and the day vir-
tuously and well, the delightful
people who are capable of tak-
ing direct enjoyment in things,
the lilies of the field who toil
not, neither do they spin."

It will be the greatest change
that has ever occurred in human
history, and Keynes was con-
vinced — while facing a bleak
prospect in 1930 — that the
transformation had already
begun. The speed of the transi-

_ tion would be governed by our

ability to avoid war and over-
population, by the rate of capital
accumulation, and by the pace
of scientific achievement.

eferences to this

Depression-era prog-
nostication have been cropping
up in newspaper commentaries
everywhere as the recession that
the world currently finds itself in
bites ever deeper into our col-
lective pockets and psyches. But
the event that prompted this
article was the recent opening
of something called the Singu-
larity University in California's
Silicon Valley.

This is an institution spon-
sored by both Google and
NASA whose mission is “to
assemble, educate and inspire a
cadre of leaders who strive to
understand and facilitate the
development of exponentially
advancing technologies; and to
apply, focus and guide these to
the best benefit of humanity and
its environment.”

The idea of accelerating
social and technological change
was explored by futurist Alvin
Toffler in his revolutionary
book, Future Shock, published
in 1970. But the originator of
the singularity concept was an
American mathematics profes-

‘sor and science fiction writer
» -mamed-Vernor Vinge. :
-.- In looking-at the potential of _

computer science he came to
the conclusion that the world

/must eventually run into a tech-

nological singularity — an event
similar to its astrophysical name-
sake, which lies at the centre of
a black hole. This is defined as a
point in space or time at. which
one's existing models of reality
are no longer valid.

Vinge presented his idea at a
NASA symposium in 1993. He
predicted that within 30 years
we will have the technological
means to create superhuman
intelligence, and argued that
"we are on the.edge of change
comparable to the rise of human
life on Earth." And it occurred



to me that this incredible fore-
cast is amazingly close to the
time period envisioned by the
late John Maynard Keynes 78
years ago.

The singularity concept was
popularised by another com-
puter scientist and futurist
named Ray Kurzweil (who
developed the Xerox OCR soft-
ware known as Textbridge) in
a 2005 book called "The Singu-
larity is Near".

Kurzweil developed the “Law
of Accelerating Returns” to
describe technological changes
over the coming decades —
from faster, more powerful com-
puters to radical breakthroughs
in artificial intelligence, biotech-
nology, neuroscience, and nan-
otechnology. :

In fact, Kurzweil's best-selling
book has now been made into a
movie slated for release early
this year. Subtitled "A True Sto-
ry About the Future", the film
presents a view of the remark-
able transformations of the com-
ing age ‘as our species breaks
the shackles of its genetic legacy
and achieves inconceivable
heights of intelligence, material
progress, and longevity."





“The idea of accelerating social
and technological change was |
explored by futurist Alvin Toffler in
his revolutionary book, Future
Shock, published in 1970. But the
originator of the singularity
concept was an American
mathematics professor and science
fiction writer named Vernor Vinge.”



" The movie intertwines a fast-
paced documentary featuring

‘Kurzweil and other thinkers

with a narrative story about a
virtual alter ego, which becomes
increasingly life-like as the film
progresses. ~
The theory is that nonbiolog-
ical intelligence will have access
to its own design and able to
improve itself to the point where
human intelligence will be
unable to follow — and that will
mark the singularity.
Projections are that within
20 years, artificial intelligence
will match the range and sub-
tlety of human intelligence. By
2030, a thousand dollars of com-
putation will be about a thou-
sand times more powerful than
a human brain. And the nonbi-
ological intelligence created in
2045 will be a billion times more

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powerful than all human intelli-
gence today. That will represent
a profound change.

cience fiction, you say?

Then how do you
explain Singularity U? Based at
NASA's Ames Research Facil-
ity in Silicon Valley, the univer-
sity's trustees include Kurzweil
and Peter Diamandis, founder
of the XPrize Foundation for
private space flight. And
Google, the Internet informa-
tion provider, is the chief cor-

- porate sponsor. The university

offers postgraduate courses in
biotechnology, nanotechnology
and artificial intelligence.
"Singularity University
makes no predictions about the
exact effects of these technolo-
gies on humanity; rather, our

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mission is to facilitate the under-
standing, prediction and devel-
opment of these technologics
and how they can best be har-
nessed to address humanity's
grand challenges," the universi-
ty's website says.

As Kurzweil says, “we won't
experience 100 years of progress
in the 21st century — it will be
more like 20,000 years of
progress (at today’s rate)...tech-
nological change so rapid
and profound it represents a
rupture in the fabric of human
history.”

Keynes was certainly right
that we (by the millions) are no
longer working, as our 21st cen-
tury economy collapses. But he
forgot to tell us how to pay the
bills in the meantime. Perhaps
we will all have to indenture
ourselves to some monstrously *
brainy robot.

But the singularity theory
does give us hope that the
intractable issues we face today,
like poverty, energy and climate
change, will all be solved. within
a few short years. As one pundit
put it, "We are on a wild ride
to an interesting destination."
It is a ride that would no doubt
be of great interest to John May-
nard Keynes. Perhaps he is
rolling over in his grave.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www. bahamapundit.com







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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2009

eee eee eee

a ae
Spate of suspected suicides

leads to public lecture

FROM page one

process.

Suicide is the eighth leading
cause of death among adults
in the United States where
there are around 83 suicides
per day and over 30,000
deaths per year, and it is the
second leading cause of death
among 15 to 24 year olds.

US figures also show Cau-
casian men between 45 and
64, who are single or wid-
owed, and have little social
support, are in the highest
risk group.

And men are three times
more likely to commit suicide
than women, although

women more commonly
exhibit suicidal behaviour.
Bahamas statistics show
how suicides dramatically
increased in 2000 when there
were 10 self-inflicted deaths,
compared to six in 1999, and
zero to four in other years
between 1996 and 2006.
Around 90 per cent of peo-
ple who commit suicide suffer
from a major psychiatric, ill-
ness, with half being clinical-

ly depressed, and several

ROCK & ROLL
WILL NEVER

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abusing drugs and alcohol,
and 30 per cent have made
previous attempts.

But overwhelmingly, peo-
ple who commit suicide suffer
from a sense of hopelessness
and helplessness, Dr Barrett
said.

Low levels of CSF. 5-
HIAA, a metabolite of sero-
tonin in the cerebral spinal
fluid which is important in
determining mood and levels
of aggression, is a key factor
in suicide.

And although antidepres-
sants used to boost serotonin
levels can bring a person out
of the physical depression
within weeks, it also increas-
es their risk of committing

suicide as it can give them the
energy to go ahead with the
act, Dr Barrett said.

Dr Barrett highlighted the
signs social workers, care
givers, friends and family
should look for in suicidal
people, such as giving away
prized possessions, finalising
plans, and becoming
depressed, and detailed steps
they can take to help.

If you suspect someone
may be suicidal, Dr Barrett
suggested asking them if they

think life is not worth living, if -

they consider harming them-
selves, or killing themselves,
and how they intend to do it.

He said: “They want some-
one to engage with them in

that conversation:

“Jt’s really important not
to put your judgments and
your mentality and your

framework on somebody

else’s thinking. ~
“If you are going to help

Odessa Sfarden

that person you have to help
them right where ‘they are.

Wherever they are, you have

to help them.”

Drawing up a “no-harm
contract” whereby. the vul-
nerable person will vow to
call -you before harming
themselves is another way to
help the vulnerable.

The psychiatrist warned

_ there is an increasing rate of

suicidal behaviour among
young people as depression
is becoming increasingly com-
mon among teenagers, and
drug and alcohol abuse
occurs more frequently as
they experience academic and
family pressures.

Young people are also
more likely to be inspired to
copy suicide, he said.

Dr Barrett is going to the
international symposium on
suicide in Barcelona next
month and intends to com-
pile an information booklet
upon his return to distribute
to volunteers, pastors,
community leaders and

THE TRIBUNE

the public.

Dr Barrett said he is par-
ticularly concerned about the
risk.of suicide as the eco-
nomic recession deepens, as
statistics show rates nearly
doubled during the Great
Depression in 1920’s America
when suicides shot up to 17
per 100,000.

‘He said: “I think we are
really going to experience a
downturn in the economy in
the next month, and we will
send information out to help
people.

“The clergy is easily the
first step and helping people
understand when they come, °
not to push them, but to help
them.

“Help prevent social isola-
tion by involving people in
things that you do.

“You feel this sense of iso-
lation but you have to
remember that you are still
your brother’s keeper. More
than any other time in our
history we have to remember
that.”

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Online electronic Tribune launched

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Islands affected include Freeport, Eleuthera, Abaco, Exuma,
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Legal Notice

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ESSENTIAL INVESTMENTS LTD. SAFE HAVEN FOUNTAIN INC. TUNHUA NORTH LTD.

a he | Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
TUNHUA NORTH LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

" Noti¢é is hereby given that in accordaitcé with*Seétion 138 ‘| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SAFE HAVEN FOUNTAIN INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ESSENTIAL INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. (Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
‘ (Liquidator)

(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETERNAL BLESSINGS LTD.

‘(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

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NOTICE

CL LIMITED

DASSI POINTE LID. (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DASSI POINTE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FUSEKI HOLDINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of FUSEKI HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 15th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

EAST SOMERSET INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of EAST
SOMERSET INC. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Company is. in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LANCELOT HERO LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
LANCELOT HERO LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

- ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 9



‘Students are

down to earth

at Columbus Primary school

VEGETABLE GARDEN TEACHES VALUABLE SKILLS

YOUNG explorers at
Columbus Primary School are
learning the science of the
earth and valuable life skills
by planting and maintaining
their own vegetable garden.

Pupils at the school on
Collins Avenue started their
“project vegetable garden”
about three years ago, and
this year it is being funded by
the Food and Agricultural
Organisation of the United
Nations.

The young gardeners pre-
pared the ground and planted
crops in deep pots of fertilised
soil following a demonstra-
tion of the ‘pot planting’
method by acting assistant

director of Education Ham- -

blin Newbold in November
last year. fe ©

_ Now they are reaping
beans, beets, black-eyed peas,
cabbages, cantaloupes, okra,
tomatoes, watermelon
‘and pigeon peas from the gar-
den..

Committee
A garden committee, which

includes Columbus Primary
School principal Marcia

Roberts, teachers, adminis- |

trative staff, student “science
explorers” and other stu-
dents, parents, teachers and
local residents, oversees-the
project.
Science coordinator Patri-
cia Greenslade said: “This
project is training our stu-

dents in self-sufficiency and
agricultural techniques, skills
which are very important to
the future survival of
mankind.
“Through this project, stu-
dents are obtaining other
important. life skills — coop-

. eration and working as a

team, planning.and organis-
dng, making decisions, mar-
keting skills, making choices,
career development and
many others.”

She congratulated the
young science explorers and
said she encourages them to
continue their work and strive
for excellence.

Legal Notice

- NOTICE >

ESCALA POINTE INC.

BAS 5

aay

2eyReArms wn

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolition of ESCALA POINTE INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

! NOTICE :
_ RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) .

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EVERPLUS ASSETS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EVERPLUS ASSETS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) :

{
{
}
}





' Legal Notice

: NOTICE ay
BADGE BRIGADE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of January 2009. The Liquidator

‘is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PURE SUCCESS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PURE SUCCESS LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GOROV LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOROV LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



_ STUDENTS FROM COLUMBUS PRIMARY SCHOO! help to

maintain their own vegetable garden.

Legal Notice

THORNYDALE INC. —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies. Act 2000, the dissolution of
THORNYDALE INC. has been completed; a |
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. vo

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) /

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company issn dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

a

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

<



Legal Notice .
~ NOTICE
MAXIMUS ASSET GROUP LTD.

St

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAXIMUS ASSET GROUPLTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ENTERPRISE OVERSEAS LIMITED

‘| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

- (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of ENTERPRISE OVERSEAS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009



FROM page one

them, and then get paid,” he said.

This process could net an officer anywhere
from $1, 000 to up to $5,000 for his or her “ser-
vices,” the source claimed.

Additionally, persons are often given the
wrong court date, to confuse a matter, and
ensure that when it is brought before a “stern
magistrate” that they would have no option but
to throw out the case as the complainant never
seems to appear before the court.



hariliseng Bank Lane walk
to court to answer charges of
drug possession and distribu-
tion, a high level source within
the RBPF explained yesterday
that some individuals who »
have significantly profited
from the drug trade are not
those persons who one would
normally suspect.

Outlining how it is “very
easy” for a drug dealer to get
off-charges of possession or
intention to supply, the source
explained that such narcotics
often go “missing” from the














Soine officers are allegedly being paid
to make serious cases ‘disappear’



“Some guys in warrants really don’t ‘want to
pick up these people either. They have some
40,000 warrants outstanding. Some of them are
business people, but they are paying — almost’
like a salary — so they won’t get picked up. If I
can find them, they can find them. But they
aren’t trying to do their job, because they are out
serving summons for the banks and such. They
are too busy dealing with repossessing people’s

“cars,” he said.

The Tribune will continue in its series of arti-
cles outlining cases of alleged corruption within
the Force in tomorrow’s edition.

FROM page one Claims that some police |
are re-selling cocaine |

Force’s forensic lab, DEU
holding site, or the RBPF” s°
evidence room.

Often, he said, some arrest-,
ing officers would “confiscate”
or “steal” the drugs, without
ever reporting the matter. Ifa — was.
person were “feeling greedy”,
they could even “shake down”
the individual-and demand
payment — under the pretence
that if cash were not offered,
the individual would be arrest-

ed and charged.

And quite naturally, the
source added, the true amount
of narcotics recovered would

. be “a little lighter” than
what the true amount really

Some officers have also, ‘it
is claimed, removed hundreds
of thousands of dollars from
the CDU and would often try
to put the funds back before
they were found to be missing.

GN-822

— GOVERNMENT
- NOTICE



THE TRIBLi



















Bahamas Heart Association
visit the Governor General

MEMBERS OF THE BAHAMAS HEART ASSOCIATION paid a courtesy call on Governor-General Arthur D
Hanna at Government House on Tuesday, February 3, 2009. Pictured from left are Thelma Johnson, —~

Coretta Owen, Sheila Lady Butler, Portia Nottage, Governor-General Arthur Hanna, Bahamas Heart
Association president Nellie Cox, Tina Lightbourne, Barbara Sawyer, and Maria Symonette.

Suspected arson attack ‘ may

not be related to home fire’

nessman, were recently in police sasedy being
questioned in connection with the fire at Mrs

FROM page one |

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE

In the case of November's fire, it is suspected
that the fact that Mrs Ritchie is a member of a
special customs task force to root out corruption
and tax fraud in the department may be related
to the incident.

Three persons, including a well-known busi-

Ritchie’s home, but were released pending fur-
ther inquiries, Chief Supt Glenn Miller, head of.
the Central Detective Unit, said.
However, he said that investigations. are
continuing and more arrests are likely in the

_ future.

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
_ (CHAPTER 326)

Itis hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “ARRROVED PRODUCTS?” for the purpose of that
Act. ot 2

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED

- PRODUCTS
; IN MANUFACTURE

Juice Concentrates,
Juice Powders, Powdered
Spices, Food Colourants,

Fructose Syrup, Granulated
Sugar, Citric Acid, Malic Acid,

Plastic Performs, Caps, Minerals,
Salt, Sea Water.

Water & Juice Beverages

Any. interested person having any objection to such a declaration should
- give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the

Office of the Prime Minister, before the 22nd day of February, 2009, by -

_ letter addressed to:- ne

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
_ OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
‘P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER |
NOTICE

Lue INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

Iti is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the
manufacturer specified in the first. column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER” i in relation to the products
specified in the third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF — PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES é

- Bacardi Road and - Water & Juice
Clifton Pier, New . Beverages
Providence, Bahamas

ER Source Alvar
Limited |

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should
give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the
Office of the Prime Minister, before the 22nd day of Februarys: 2009, by
- letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary








PUBLIC NOTICE 3.

een See
oo fe RELOCATION. OF THE |

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH a SAFETY: DEPARTMENT: ns

Please be advised that the Occupational Health & Safety. |
Department » of the National Insurance Board has moved;
they are now located on the Ground Floor, western wing of
the Clifford Darling Complex (Headquarters Pui Baillou
Hall Road.










The telephone ‘contacts in the Department are 502-1504,
502-1527, 502-1732, or you may call the general switchboard at
502-1500.




VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for position of VICE PRINCIPAL of St. Anne’s School PTEPAAOGY
Department beginning September 2009.

The Applicant must have a degree in Education from a . recognized
University, with at least 5 years accumulative experience. The applicant must also be
computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Assisting with staff supervision and evaluation
- Admissions and student orientation
- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations, invigilations)
- Assisting with discipline
- Assisting with supervision of academic programmes
.- Assisting with Curriculum Development _
Administration of School and External examinations
Oversee Inventory
Oversee Requisitions
Share responsibility for sustaining culture of excellence throughout the school
Share responsibility for providing a climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from the Anglican Diocese office on Sands Road
off East Street. The completed application together with a cover letter, statement
of educational philosophy and recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P.O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is Friday, February 20th, 2009





THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11
GN-824 |

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

)__-- Ministry of National Security :
” Office of The Parliamentary Commissioner |

FORM OF NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS IN A CONTESTED ELECTION























FORM OF NOMINATION PAPER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION FOR
Raa ELECTION FOR DISTRICT COUNCIL/TOWN COMMITTEE

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 3B * :
Kemp’s Bay and Johnson’s Bay
In the Kemp’s Bay Town Area

ELECTION IN mar... Kenags aechiaas Ba. Mi ccichacasacetbusnssseadace DISTRICT /TOWN AREA
Of the South Andros District os

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS We, the undersigned, being registered as voters in the said District/Town Area, do
AND hereby nominate the undermentioned person as a candidate at the said election, and we
NOTICE OF POLL hereby certify that to the best of our knowledge and belief he is qualified to represent the

said District/Town Area on the council /committee. :

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidates named below stand nominated in the

Above mentioned election, and NOTICE is hereby given that the poll will take place on Candidate's Othernames e .
i is :00 a.m. i i 6:00 j Flaceof Occupation
Friday 27" February, 2009, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. in the morning and Gates full Resi

_ p.m. in the afternoon in the following polling place:-

“Oe

Polling Division , Polling Place

Polling Division No. 3B South Andros High School
Signatures.of five subscribers:
Cadidates Other names Occupation Place of
Surname in full : Residence
JOHNSON-HEWITT ——_Jacqueline Plumber Johnson’s Bay
MCKINNEY Veronica Barbara Clerk Johnson’s Bay

Date: 6"" February, 2009



Sign: Franceta Neely

RETURNING OFFICER NOTE: The attention of intending candidates and subscribers of nomination papers is

drawn to the requirements of the Local Government Act, 1996, regarding nomination, and
particularly to the requirements that a declaration of qualification shall be delivered and a
deposit of BS50.00 (fifty dollars) shall be made to the Returning Officer on nomination day.
A nomination paper must be signed by not less than five (5) subscribers. Subscribers and
nominees must be registered in the particular polling division.

oom Hee -9ees28 4 417 ‘

CéAy

FORM OF NOMINATION PAPER





ELECTION FOR DISTRICT COUNCIL / TOWN COMMITTEE




ELECTION IN TEE oP AY AN ISEREE/ TOWN AREA an
Tame 0 6 2009: °~

We, the undersigned, being registered as voters in the said District /Town Area, do
hereby nominate the undermentioned person as a candidate at the said election, and we a
hereby certify that to the best of our knowledge and belief he is qualified to represent the Ppa Se ala ns

~ gaid District /Town:Atéa-on-the council/committee.

FORM OF DECLARATION OF QUALIFICATION _ |

Candidate’s . ‘Other names Place of Occupation

Sumame In full Residence

‘staceue ha Co my son- H eunt
of Don Son Ray |

do solemly declare that! am qualified according to Ikaw to be elected and to serve

as a member of the District Council/Town Committee in the District/Town Area

of i Ss . ma oa




omaee®? Lefio vesis —oes
VC FE SSF. :

, sa t es Ve * cae Signature of Intending Candidate

NOTE: The attention of intending candidates and subsctibers of nomination papers is

drawn to the requirements of the Local Government Act, 1996, regarding nomination, and

particularly to the requirements that a declaration of qualification shall be delivered and a

deposit of B$50.00 (fifty dollars) shall be made to the Returning Officer on nomination day.

A nominate pee must be signed by nat less than five (5) subscribers. Subscribers and
i "7 ————

aaa istered in the particular polling division. ee
no’ 38° . ere i P [opamasTRaTOR’s OFFICR;
fe ceupl C-996327 * Yo)og
- "e "96 ont? | ae

= $5000.
FORM OF SBCL ALTON OF QUALIFICATION
aKemps Bau, South fades

.do solemly declare that [am qualified according to lait to be elected and to serve

Fa
as a member of the District Council /Town Committee in. the District/ Town Area P B I S et
l fone | ; ]
of __. Co
u



Your Balance Sheets

& Legal Notices

VAmer—, | *) |
Signature of Intending €andidate . | | 00
The Tribune

Call us at

Be PRY

Signature of Justice of the Peace”... oa

Declared and signed before me, this__( day of __
we






PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009





Durant, Mayo,

Johnson on
All-Star

H-0-R-§-E

By The Associated Press

Rookie of the Year Kevin
Durant of the Oklahoma City
Thunder and O.J. Mayo, a
favorite for this season's award,
highlight the field for a H-O-
R-S-E competition during All-
Star Saturday night.

Atlanta Hawks guard Joe

Johnson is the other competi-

tor in TNT's special event, the
network announced Tuesday.
Johnson will play in the All-Star
game, while Durant and Mayo
were selected for the rookie
challenge.

The contest will take place
outdoors at the NBA's All-Star
Block Party on Saturday in
Phoenix before TNT televises
the All-Star Saturday night fes-
tivities.

If a player makes a shot in
H-O-R-S-E, the next competi-
tor must make the same shot or
receive a letter. A player gets
an 'H' for his first miss and is
eliminated once he has all five
letters of the word.

Players will have 24 seconds
to execute their shots, and an
NBA referee will rule if they're
done properly. Dunking won't
be allowed.

Cavs recall
rookie after one
game in D-League

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cav-
aliers rookie forward Darnell
Jackson was recalled after play-
ing one game for Erie of the

NBA’s Development League. ©

Jackson, who was assigned to
the BayHawks on Monday,
scored 24 points with six
rebounds in 26 minutes in a
102-89 win over the Utah Flash.
He will be available for Tues-
day night’s game in Indianapo-
lis against the Pacers.

The Cavaliers are short-hand-
ed as swingman Sasha Pavlovic
(sprained ankle), guard Delonte
West (broken wrist) and for-
ward Tarence Kinsey (sprained
ankle) are all out. Jackson, a

second-round pick who played ,

on Kansas’ national champi-
onship team last year, is aver-
aging one point and 1.2
rebounds in 6.7 minutes.

Cavs’ Mo Williams
to replace Bosh
in All-Star game

. NEW YORK (AP) — Mo
Williams is headed to the All-
Star game after all.

Twice snubbed, the Cleve-
land Cavaliers point guard was
chosen Tuesday by NBA com-
missioner David Stern. Williams
will replace Toronto Raptors
forward Chris Bosh, who will

miss the game because of a

sprained right knee.

Williams wasn't chosen by
Eastern Conference head
coaches as a reserve, then was
passed over by Stern in favor
of Boston's Ray Allen when
Orlando's Jameer Nelson had
to be replaced because of injury.





Toyota Camry



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS









IN THIS February 15, 2007 file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James (23) drives the ball Apes Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant

during the first half a game in Los Angeles...

ames named East’s best

CLEVELAND (AP) — The
NBA taketh and giveth to LeBron

James.

James, who had an apparent his-
toric triple-double downgraded by
the league last week, was named the
Eastern Conference's top player for
Feb. 2-8. It marked the 18th time in
his career and fifth time this season
that James has won the award.



@ By MIKE CRANSTON
AP Sports Writer



CHARLOTTE, N.C.
(AP) — Vladimir Rad-

manovic wasn't sure he'd:
even play against the Los

Angeles Clippers 90 min-
utes before making his
Charlotte debut.

The ex-Lakers forward
not only became the Bob-
cats' NBA-high 23rd player
Monday night, his 13 points
and three fourth-quarter 3-
pointers propelled Char-
lotte to a 94-73 win over
the road-weary Clippers.

And as coach Larry
Brown continues to tinker
with his roster, he may
have found an answer to
the team's shaky outside
shooting with Radmanovic,
acquired Saturday from the

Lakers for underachieving

Adam Morrison and
reserve Shannon Brown.

"It was so funny trying
to talk to him through
stuff," Brown said of Rad-
manovic, who had yet to
practice with his new team-
mates. "We invented plays,
but I was really happy that
he struggled early and then
had the confidence to come
back and knock down some
shots.

"It gives us another guy
who has length and athleti-

~ cism."

Emeka Okafor had 19
points and 16 rebounds for
the undermanned Bobcats,
who were missing starters
Gerald Wallace (rib, lung)
and Raja Bell (groin).

So they turned to Rad-
manovic, who had wanted
out of Los Angeles after

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and test drive the new Toyota Camry.

falling out of favor with
coach Phil Jackson, to end
a five-game losing streak. |

Radmanovic fired up an

~ early air ball, but eventu-

ally got comfortable in the
fourth quarter, After Baron
Davis' jumper cut Charlot-

te's lead to 67-63, Rad- -

manovic hit two long
jumpers during a 15-2 run.
He added another 3 to put
Charlotte ahead 88-70 with
4 minutes left.

"It took me a while to get
that second wind, but over-
all I felt pretty good in

‘there," Radmanovic said.

Zach Randolph had 20
points and-10 rebounds and
Eric Gordon scored 17 for
the Clippers, who had won
two straight but fizzled in
the fourth quarter in the
finale of a seven-game road
trip.

"The last game of a trip,
I've been around a long
time, I know how these
games can be tough," cen-
ter Marcus Camby said.
"Especially right before the
All-Star break, you tend to
lose a little focus. Your
mind is elsewhere."

The Clippers were

outscored 27-12 in the
fourth quarter, with several
key players struggling.
’ Al Thornton shot 3-for-
13, Camby was 3-for-8 and
Davis 1-for-7 in his return
to Charlotte, where he
began his NBA career with
the Hornets. -

"We didn't attack and
play at the level we've been
playing at the last two
games," Davis said. "I
thought our offense got
complacent and stagnant."

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In three games last week, he aver-
aged 33.7 points, 9 assists and 8
rebounds per game.

On Feb. 3, James scored 33 points
in a win over Toronto,and became
the youngest player in league histo-’
ry to top 12,000 career points. The |
next night, he posted 52 points, 10
rebounds and 11 assists in a win at
New York but the league ended up











IN THIS January 3, 2009 file
photo, Charlotte Bobcats man-
aging partner Michael Jordan
reacts from the sidelines during
their game against the Milwau-
kee Bucks in Charlotte, N.C.

(AP Photo: Chuck Burton)

Grizzlies 85, Hornets 80

At Memphis, Tenn., O.J.
Mayo had 22 points and a
career-high 16 rebounds for
his first double-double,
while Mike Conley scored
18 and handed out eight
assists to lead the Grizzlies
over the short-handed Hor-
nets.

The Hornets shot 29.5
percent after the Grizzlies
held Toronto to the same
mark Saturday. According
to the Elias Sports Bureau,
it marked the first time in
more than 49 years that a
team has held consecutive
opponents under 30 per-
cent shooting from the

field: The last time was:

Dec. 19-20, 1959, when the
then-St. Louis Hawks held

taking away one of his rebounds
after reviewing game tapes.

Still, James was the first player to
record at least 52 points, nine
rebounds and 11 assists in a game
since Wilt Chamberlain (53 points,
14 assists, 32 rebounds) in 1968.

The Los Angeles Lakers' Pau
Gasol was named the Western Con-
ference player of the week.



(AP Photo: Mark J Terrill)

Bobcats beat Clippers 94-73 .

Philadelphia to 26.9 per-
cent and Detroit to 29.9 the
next night.

Peja Stojakovic scored 23
points to lead the Hornets,
who were without their top
three players in Chris Paul,
Tyson Chandler and David

West. Paul and Chandler -

were out with injuries,
while West was suspended
for the game after his fla-
grant foul against Min-
nesota's Mike Miller on
Sunday.

‘ Bucks 124, Rockets 112.
At Milwaukee, Charlie

Villanueva scored 25.

points, grabbed eight
rebounds and sparked a big
second-half run as the
Bucks snapped an eight-
game losing streak against
the Rockets.

Aaron Brooks scored a
career-high 23 points for
Houston, which had-won
three of the previous four,

but gave up more than 104

points in its fifth straight
road game.

76ers 108, Suns 91

At Philadelphia, Thad--

deus Young scored 25
points and Marreese
Speights had a career-high
24 points to lift the 76ers
to their third straight win.

Andre Iguodala scored
22 points and Samuel
Dalembert grabbed 11
rebounds to help the Six-
ers (26:24) move two
games above .500 for the
first time this season.

Amare . Stoudemire
shrugged off persistent
trade rumors and scored 19
points for the Suns.

When a car becomes more.



BA Today



@ By The Associated Press

‘ SCOREBOARD
Wednesday, February 11
Denver at Orlando (7 pm EST). The North-
west Division-leading Nuggets take on the
Magic, who are on top of the Southeast Divi-
sion and are 2-1 since All-Star point guard
Jameer Nelson suffered a shoulder injury.

STARS

Monday

— O.J. Mayo, Grizzlies, had 22 points and a
career-high 16 rebounds in Memphis’ 85-80
win over New Orleans.

— Marreese Speights, 76ers, had a career-
high 24 points, including 10 straight in a sec-
ond-quarter charge, as Philadelphia won its
third straight, 108-91 over Phoenix.

— Charlie Villanueva and Ramon Sessions,
Bucks. Villanueva scored 25 points and
grabbed eight rebounds, and Sessions had 26
points and seven assists to give Milwaukee a
124-112 victory over Houston.

STREAK STOPPERS

Milwaukee snapped an eight-game losing
streak against Houston with a 124-112 victory
Monday night. The Bucks' last win over the
Rockets was Dec. 28, 2004, when they beat
them 115-87 in Milwaukee.

ABOVE WATER

Philadelphia (26-24) moved two games
above .500 for the first time this season with a
108-91 win over Phoenix on Monday night.
The 76ers have won 13 of 17 and are seven
games over .500 since Tony DiLeo took over
as coach in December.

SUDDEN IMPACT ‘
Vladimir Radmanovic scored 13 points and
hit three fourth-quarter 3-pointers in his Char-

' lotte debut Monday night, helping turn a‘close

game into a rout in the Bobcats' 94-73 win
over the road-weary Los Angeles Clippers.
He became the 23rd player to suit up for Char-
lotte this season — an NBA-high — two days

, after he was acquired from the Los Angeles

Lakers for Adam Morrison and Shannon
Brown.

TENACIOUS D

New Orleans shot 29.5 percent in an 85-80
loss at Memphis after the Grizzlies held
Toronto to the same mark Saturday. Accord-
ing to the Elias Sports Bureau, it marked the
first time in more than 49 years that a team
held consecutive opponents under 30 percent
shooting from the field. The last time was
Dec. 19-20, 1959, when the then-St. Louis
Hawks held Philadelphia to 26.9 percent and
Detroit to 29.9 the next night.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Zach Randolph had 20 points and 10
rebounds in the Los Angeles Clippers' 94-73
loss at Charlotte.on Monday night. Aaron
Brooks scored a career-high 23 points, but
Houston lost 124-122 at Milwaukee. Peja Sto-
jakovic scored 23 points to lead New Orleans
in an 85-80 loss at Memphis.

SHORT-HANDED

New Orleans was without their top three
players in Chris Paul, Tyson Chandler and
David West in an 85-80 loss at Memphis on
Monday night. Paul and Chandler were out
with injuries, while West was suspended for
the game after his flagrant foul against Min-
nesota's Mike Miller on Sunday.

SIDELINED
Minnesota center Al Jefferson will miss s the
rest of the season with a torn ACL in his right
knee. Coach Kevin McHale said Jefferson
will likely have surgery to repair the injury in
the next week to 10 days. The team's leading
‘ scorer and rebounder hurt his knee when he
landed awkwardly late in Sunday's 101-97 loss
to New Orleans. Cleveland starting guard
Sasha Pavlovic could miss up to six weeks
with a sprained right ankle he sustained at
the end of the first quarter Sunday in the Cay-
aliers' 101-91 home loss to the Los Angeles
Lakers. ©

SPEAKING |

"Yes, this was an ugly game. It is always
beautiful when you execute and win these
games."

— Memphis coach Lionel Hollins after the
Grizzlies edged the New Orleans Hornets 85-80
on Monday night despite 19 turnovers and
shooting 3-of-15 from 3-point range

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 13°



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



London 2012
team unveils
post-Games
stadium
vision

l@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

STRATFORD, England
(AP) — The main stadium for
the 2012 London Olympics will
be used after the games to
house a secondary school and
stage annual top athletics
events, organizers said Tuesday.

But an official in charge of
ensuring the 9.3 billion-pound
($13.7 million; 10.5 million)
overall project provides an

enduring legacy for London -

acknowledged that the stadium
can not make money or break
even after the Olympics.

The 80,000-capacity stadium,
which is under contraction and
could cost up to 547 million
($790 million), will be scaled

back to a 25,000-seat venue

after the Olympics.

The post-games facility will
house a secondary school for
about 500 students, the Nation-
al Skills Academy for sports and
leisure industries and the Eng-
lish Institute of Sport.

As far as hosting sports com-
petition, only track and field is
planned so far. Football and
rugby are still possible.

"We know that there will be
the Grand Prix every year and

- almost certainly more than that.
There will be athletics events
of all sizes and scale will take
place there," Olympics Minis-
ter Tessa Jowell told The Asso-
ciated Press. "So this is a stadi-



Beckham set for
England record |






























2008
runner-up
Spain to
face Serbia
in playoffs

LONDON (AP) — Last
year’s Fed Cup runner-up Spain
will face Serbia in the World
Group I playoffs. ‘

Spain lost to the Czech
Republic in the first round last

‘weekend after having reached
the final against Russia in 2008.

In the playoffs to determing
which teams will participate in
the elite eight-nation World
Group I next year, Spain will
host the Serbs, who used Jelena
Jankovic and Ana {vanovic to
beat Japan in World Group II/

In the other best-of-five play-

offs April 25-26, France hosts

Slovakia, Germany hosts. Chil
na and Argentina hosts
Ukraine. In World Group II!
it’s: Belgium vs. Canada; Esto?
nia vs. Israel; Poland vs. Japan;
and Australia vs. Switzerland. -.

‘The United States, which has
won 17 Fed Cup titles, visits the
Czech Republic in the Fed Cup
semifinals while defending
champion Russia takes on Italy’

AC Milan English soccer star
David Beckham eyes the ball dur-
ing Serie A soccer match between
AC Milan and Reggina at the San
Siro stadium in Milan, Italy, on Feb
7, 2009. The match ended 1-1.

um that will have life in it every
day."

London Mayor Boris John-
son said organizers were "pret-
ty lucky" that a deal to lease
the stadium to West Ham foot-
ball club collapsed after the Pre-
mier League side's owner fell
victim to the Icelandic econom-
ic crisis.

"We are still open to the pos-
sibility of doing some deal with
Premiership rugby if that's a
runner," Johnson told. the AP
near-the Olympic site in Strat-:
ford. "We'll see what comes.
There are plenty of deals we
could have done that would
have gone very sour in this time.
I am always hopeful.".

Saracens and Wasps rugby
clubs have been linked with
moving into the stadium.

"If a club tenant comes for-
ward with a sensible and coher-
ent offer which makes sense for
us and other people of course
we will consider it," Johnson
said.

Previous London mayor Ken
Livingstone had said the stadi-
um would cost 10 million
pounds ($14 million) annually
to maintain if a club tenant
could not be found, but Johnson
would not divulge new figures.
- The London Development
Agency said revenue from the
rest of east London's Olympic
Park would subsidize the stadi-
um...

HONDA ISUZ



. BH By PAUL LOGOTHETIS

AP Sports Writer (AP Photo: Antonio Calanni)





SEVILLE, Spain (AP) — David Beckham can set a nation-
al record for appearances Wednesday when England plays
European champion Spain in what will be Fabio Capello’s
toughest test‘during an impressive start as England manager.
> Beckham can equal Bobby Moore’s mark-of.108.appear--
ances for England, the most by a player other than a goal-
keeper. Peter Shilton made 125 appearances in goal.

' “(Beckham’s) a reference for the English team,” said Spain
goalkeeper Iker Casillas, Beckham’s former teammate at
Real Madrid. “He brings:a lot of leadership and character to
the locker room and I think that hasn’t changed to now.”

Capello put Beckham on the team after the Los Angeles
Galaxy midfielder moved to AC Milan to strengthen his

-chances of playing in the 2010 World Cup. Beckham is look-
ing to turn his two-month loan into a permanent move.

Capello is off to the best start by an England coach since
Alf Ramsey, who led England to victory at the 1966 World
Cup, with eight wins in 10 games:and a single defeat: Spain,
the top-ranked country in FIFA’s poll, is on a 28-match
unbeaten run dating to November 2006.

Spain leads Group 5 in World Cup qualifying with 12
points from four games — three more than closest rival
Turkey. England is also perfect through four games to lead
Group 6 by five points over Croatia.

This the first times the teams have played since spectators:
at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium greeted England’s black
players with monkey chants during a 2004 exhibition game.

Spanish players were not allowed to respond to questions
by reporters Tuesday over whether a repeat of those scenes
would play out at the Sanchez Pizjuan stadium.



















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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



ere ae eee
Highlights: BAISS championship finals

m By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net_

THE Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools opened their champi-
onship finals in all divisions
Monday night which featured
one defending champion tak-
ing the opening game, another
on the wrong end of a lopsided
blowout and a pair of close fin-
ishes in the junior division.

Game two in each series
takes place today at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, beginning
at 4pm.

Senior Boys

Westminster Diplomats - 81

Kingsway Saints - 80

The defending champions
and heavily favoured number
one seed squandered a 22 point
third quarter lead, but with the
play of their frontcourt, with-
stood a late surge by a resilient
Saints squad in the game "s wan-
ing moments.

Diplomats center Rashard

Morley gave his team the go .

ahead score with his tip in to
take a 79-77 lead with just under
one minute left to play.
Christorr Stuart’s pair of free
throws on the ensuing posses-
sion, his only two of the quarter,



e Here’s how they stack up:
Pool One

_ & Omega and Bimini.
Pool Iwo

CI Gibson, St. Paul’s, Teleos, RM Bailey, Catholic. High,
_ Charles W. Saunders, South Andros and Eight Mile Rock. X

Pool Three

Tabernacle Baptist, Government High, CC Sweeting, Bishop |
Michael Eldon, Jordan Prince William, Galilee ieademty: Tem- f
ple Christian and Kingsway Academy.

Pool Four

CR Walker, St. George’s, CV Bethel, St. John’s, St. Anne’s, |
Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy, North Eleuthera High and | -

Sunland Lutheran.



Hugh Campbell Pools

‘CR Walker are the defending: champions

gave Westminster an 81-77
advantage with 49 seconds left.

A late three pointer by

Jorann Adderley brought the
Saints within one, but with just
1.5 seconds remaining, the
Diplomats heaved a long
inbound pass to Morley away
from any Saints defenders look-
ing to commit a foul.

Morley scored nine of his 15
points in the fourth quarter,
while Stuart led the Diplomats

_with a team high 20.

The Diplomats ended the
first on an 11-3 run to take an
18-13 after the opening period.

Adderley had an opportunity

to tie the game in the second |

quarter, however he failed to
convert from the line on a three
point play giving the Diplomats
a slight 24-23 advantage with
4:00 left in the half.

After a pair of Westminster
baskets, Adderley, who finished
with 24 points, kept his team
close with another score trim-
ming the deficit 30-27.

Following the score the
Diplomats ended the quarter
on a 11-2 run and powered by a
10 point second quarter from
Stuart, took a 41-29 advantage
into the ‘half.

The third quarter opened just
as the second ended, with the
Diplomats maintaining com-

WITH the 2009 Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic set to |
get underway on Monday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the |
organising committee from the AF Adderley Junior High School |
released the list of teams entered in the four pools in the pres- |
tigious senior boys double elimination basketball tournament. |

4



Jack Hayward, Westminster, Church of God Rondanis Doris |
- Johnson, Queen’s College, Nassau Christian Academy, Alpha |



















plete control, as they raced out
to a 51-29, their largest lead of
the game.

Backed by an eager green-
clad sea of supporters and a
coach that refused to concede in
Randy Cunningham, the Saints
continued to chip away at the
massive deficit.

The guard trio of Adderley,
Anvon Ferguson and do-it-all
floor géneral Shem Moss blazed
a comeback trail for the Saints.

Kingsway outscored the
Diplomats 29-19 in the third
quarter, and trailed by just one
basket at the end of the third,
60-58, which set the stage for
an epic fourth quarter.

The Saints took their first
lead since midway through the
first quarter on a free throw by

_ Ferguson to give them a 69-68

advantage with 5:03 left to play.
Moss, who finished with a
game high 25 points, slashed
through the lane and finished
with an up and under to give
the Saints a 71-68 lead.
Thereon Morley dominated
the boards, scoring seven points
from that point onward.
Diplomats head coach.Geno
Bullard Sr said his team may
have come into the finals over-
looking the third seeded Saints.
“This just proves the game is
not over until the clock strikes
all zeros. When my guys find
out as that when you look on
the schedule you can not under-
estimate anybody,” he said.
“Apvbody with desire and heart
can come through determined
to win once they execute well
and they did: We had to dig
extremely deep to get that win
so I have alot of respect for
them.”

Stuart, whose free throws —

sealed the win, said his team’s
main focus was maintaining
composure down the stretch.
“When they came. back we
knew we had to keep our head
in the game and we just tried 0
stay together as a team and

~ come out with a successful win,”

he said. “In game two we need
to come out even stronger,
dominate the boards even more
and play an overall better game
to get another victory.”

Game Notes: The Diplomats
were usually productive back-
court trio of Larry Smith, Geno
Bullard and Shaquille Bain fin-

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THE Diplomats’ Christorr Stuart is fouled on his way to the basket by the
Saints’ Jorann Adderley. Stuart finished with a feam high 20 points in his
team’s 81-80 win Monday night in game one of the senior boys’ :-cham-

pionship series...

ished with just 14 points
between them, eight of which

came from Smith.

Moss played the entire sec-
ond half. with four fouls but
remained: aggressive on both
ends of the floor scoring 15
points in the half.

With the Diplomats ahead
77-75, Moss took a hard foul on
his way to the basket and was
forced to leave the game.

Reserve guard Johnathan
Bethel came in off the bench
for Moss and' tied the game at
77 making both free throws.

In last year’s BAISS champi-
onship, the Diplomats were on

the opposing side as they faced -

the then defending champions
Jordan Prince William Falcons

and upset the Falcons in three |

games. —

Senior Girls

SAC Big Red Machines - 57

St John's Giants - 35

From the opening tip, the Big
Red Machines came out more
aggressive, dominated on the

boards, and played a complete .

game to route the defending
champions in the opening game
of the series.

The Big Red Machines’ lead
grew to as much as 24 in the
second half and withstood a late
Giants run in the process.

‘Baskets came easy and often
in the first quarter as they
opened a 15-8 margin at the end
ofone.

The Giants usually aggressive
defense faltered in transition
and gave up a a number of easy
scores.

The Big Red Machine
outscored the Giants 15-3 in
the second quarter to take a
seemingly insurmountable 30-
11 lead into the half.

The Giants trimmed the 19
point deficit to as little as 10 in
the second half but failed to
come within single digits.

After a Caryn Moss three
pointer made the score 40-30,

and with the Big Red Machines °

reeling, the Giants called an ill-
advised time-out on their next
possession.

Following the time-out, SAC

outscored the Giants 17-5 in the
remainder of the fourth quar-
ter to seal the win.

Tarae Sweeting led SAC with
14 points and dominated the
boards giving the Big Red
Machine a number of second
chance opportunities.

Christian Albury finished
with 12 while Alica Musgrove

added eight.
Alicia Maycock led the
Giants with 13 while .

Domonique Young and Moss
chipped in with nine and eight
points respectively.

Game Notes: SAC’s interior

‘defense limited the Giants to

just one field goal in the second
quarter. The Giants handily
defeated the Big Red Machines
in the regular season, however
center Brittney Harrison was
injured during the contest and
did not play beyond the first
quarter.

The length of the SAC front-

line limited the effectively of

Giants’ leading scorer and last
year’s championship MVP,
Caryn Moss, one of the few

Photos by Timothy Clarke



SAC’s Alicia Musgrove is fouled

on her way to.the basket...



MIHKAIL ROLLE scores two of his
17 points as the Big Red Machines’
Brandon Whyms (left) and Ken
Wood (right) look on...

times she has been held below
double figures all season. It was
the Giants’ first loss since last
November’s Father Marcian
Peters Tournament.

Junior Boys
Kingsway Saints - 53
SAC Big Red Machines - 51

Mihbkail Rolle was the cata-_

lyst for the Saints’ fourth quar-
ter heroics and Stephen Stra-
chan Jr delivered in the clutch
to give his team an upset win
over the division’s pennant win-
ners in game one of what
promises to be an exciting
series.

The Saints trailed 51-50 with
14.6 seconds left to play when

Strachan took the inbound pass
at the free-throw line extended
and drove towards the rim fin-
ishing a tough lay-up in traffic
along the baseline.

Strachan, who finished with
19 points, converted the three
point play at the line to give his
team a 53-51 lead with just 10
seconds remaining.

The versatile forward suf-
fered a miscue just a possession
earlier when he.took a tough
contested jumper which sailed
out of bounds on an airball with
42 scconds left to play as the
Saints were trying to run out

the clock and preserve the lead.

The Big Red Machines’
Jabari Wilmott missed a runner
as time expired sending the
Saints faithful into a frenzy.

The Saints led 43-41 heading
into the fourth quarter, howev-
er the Big Red Machines scored
the opening four points to take
a 45-43 lead.

Both teams went scoreless
until 2:45 when Rolle tied the
game at 45 with a long jump-
shot from the right wing.

After SAC regained the lead
on a Wilmott lay-up, Rolle, who
finished with 17, put the Saints
ahead with a three pointer,
again from the right wing.

He capped a seven point
fourth quarter with a runner to
give the Saints a 50-47 lead with
under one minute left to play.

Wilmott finished with a game
high 17 points while Ken Wood
chipped in with nine.

Said Saints head coach Randy
Cunningham: “I told my guys
to win.this game they had to
play hard defense and on
offense they had to come out
in attack mode every trip
upcourt and try to score,” he
said. “I just tried to get the mes-
sage across to them that they
had to be tough, dive after
every loose ball, deny their man
on defense and make smart
decisions down the stretch.”

Cunningham said he was
proud of his team’s resilience
in keeping themselves ir the
game mentally, even as they
faced adversity in the waning
moments. __

“The got out of the game a
little bit, they got a few charges
called against them, they got a
little upset and I had to reel
them in a bit,” he said. “But

‘ down the stretch they just

showed how much they want-
ed it and I expect them to come
out with the same or even a bet-
ter effort in game two.”
. Game Notes: In the most
closely contested game of the
evening, neither team lead by
more than two possessions.
SAC got their largest lead of
the game on a basket just
before the half to take a 28-22
lead. The Saints' largest lead
came on Rolle's lay-up to give
them a 50-47 lead in the fourth.
SAC opened their’ six point

advantage late in the first while

the Saints struggled to get into
their offensive flow with point
guard Reginald Ferguson on the
bench, Ferguson had four assists
in the fourth quarter alone.

The Big Red Machines had
a sure opportunity to take a
lead in the game's waning
moments, however the Saints
defense knocked the ball away
forcing SAC to take the ball out
of bounds with 17 seconds left.
Wilmott was limited to just four
points in the final quarter after
an eight point third.

Junior Girls

Queen's College Comets - 27

Westminster Diplomats - 23

With the Diplomats three
leading scorers fouled out of the
game, the Comets capitalized
in the overtime period, outscor-
ing Westminster to take game
one of the series.

Alexandria Marshall, who
went scoreless in the fourth
quarter, scored four of her game
high 17 points in overtime to
lead the Comets in overcoming
a three point deficit in the extra
period.

Tied at 19-at the end of regu-
lation, The Diplomats took a
22-19 lead, early in overtime on
a free throw and subsequent
bucket on the next possession
by Patrel Pickstock.

Pickstock, who relieved much
of the scoring slack for the
Diplomats when Thea Hanna
fouled out of the game in the
fourth quarter, was also forced
to leave the game in when she
picked up her fifth foul.

A short jumper on the base-
line by Marshall tied the game
at 22 and the Comets took their
first lead of overtime two plays
later with 1:13 remaining on a
free throw by Talia Thompson.

The Comets ended the game
on an 8-1 run, capped by anoth-
er Thompson free throw, which
maintained a two possession
lead for the Comets.

Thompson finished with
eight, three of which came from
the line in overtime.

Hanna led Westminster with
12 points while Pickstock fin-
ished with eight.

Game Notes: The Comets led
by as much as 10 in the first half
and took a 13-5 lead heading
into the third quarter.

Beginning with a basket late
in the second quarter and con-
tinuing into the third, Hanna
scored 11 consecutive points to
bring the Diplomats within
striking distance, 17-14 at the
end of three.

The Diplomats trimmed the
lead to one on a Pickstock bas-
ket, 19-18 with 1:54 remaining
when Hanna fouled out.





James
named

best in

the East...

See page 12







lm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHAMAR “Sham” Sands,
improving on his third place fin-
ish in his debut, picked up a sec-
ond big victory yesterday as he
once again lowered his Bahami-
an men’s 60m hurdles national
indoor record.

Against a stacked field that
excluded Cuban world 110m
record holder Dayron Robles,
Sands emerged on top with a
winning time of 7.49 seconds at

the 20th edition of Meeting ,

IAAF du Pas-de-Calais in’
Liévin, France.

Ladji Doucoure of France
was second in 7.52 with Yev-
geniy Borisov of Russia third
m_7.54. Robles pulled up with
what-appeared to be a ham-
string injury midway through
the heats and finished last in
9.94 as Sands won in 7.60.

The meet also saw veteran
sprinter Chandra Sturrup pow-
er through with her second
straight victory as well in:the

women’s 60m in 7.25 seconds, ©

just ahead of Tahesia Harrigan
in 7.26. Mechelle Lewis was
third in 7.33.

Not only did Sands spoil the
season debut of Robles in what
was to have been the highlight
of the meet, but he also shat-
tered his previous national mark
of 7.58 to win in Ghent, Bel-
gium, on Sunday.

breaks record again



DAYRON Robles (left) grimaces:
after. he injured himself during the
race...

“It feels good. I don’t worry

about records, I just go out :

there and compete,” said Sands
when asked about the record
breaking performance in an
exclusive interview with The
Tribune from France.
“When you do break a
record, it’s a great feeling
_ because you know that some-
body else went out there and
did a good job ahead of you to
get it.”
While Robles suffered an
‘injury, Sands climbed from 15th
on the IAAF top performance
list-to number five. The list is
headed by American Terrence
Trammell in 7.45 with his com-

patriot Joel Brown holding onto
the fourth spot at 7.48.

It was a performance that
Sands’ coach Henry Rolle at
Auburn University had pre-
dicted on Monday. The 23-year-
old Sands said he always knew
he had it in him.

Looking back at the perfor-
mance yesterday, Sands said he
has not gotten off to his usually
great start out of the blocks, but
he made up.enough ground
throughout the race to pull

’ through.

“Everybody had about a.step
ahead of me, but I hurdled real
good in this race,” Sands reflect-
ed. “After the first hurdle, I felt
myself getting better and bet-
ter with.each hurdle after that.”

Coming off the first hurdle
and going towards the second,
Sands-said he felt that he was in
control of the race and he just
went on for it, despite the fact
that Robles, the Olympic cham-
pion, was the man to beat.

“Mentally, I was ready,”
Sands pointed out. “He had a
lot of accolades, but I just went
into the race thinking that the
race isn’t finished until it is fin-
ished. I just felt that once I
stepped on the track anything
was possible.”

The St Augustine’s College
graduate said he’s just thankful
to God that he finally got the
opportunity to compete on a
full season on the European cir-
cuit and he’s making the best

Top boxers to square off
at Independence Cup

lf By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Boxing Fed-
eration is expected to send
three of its top senior boxers
to the Independence Cup in
the Dominican Republic next
week.

Andre Seymour will be leav-
ing town on February 18 with
the'team of welterweight Tau-

reano “Reno” Johnson, junior. :

welterweight Carl Hield and
lightweight Valentino. Knowles.

“It will be the first in a series
of national teams that the fed-
eration will be sending off this
year and according to Seymour,
the expectations are very high
forthe trio. —

“This year we have a number
of tournaments for our senior
boxers to compete in,” Sey-
mour said. “So we are expect-
ing them to be very active this
year.”

The tournament, according
to Seymour, is expected to
serve as a warm up for the Pan
American Championships that
will be staged in Puerto Rico
in May.

Additionally, Seymour said
they intend to send the senior
national teams to the Com-
monwealth Championships in
India and the World Champi-
onships in Italy. Both events
are being held over the sum-
mer.

“We have to compete in
these small tournaments in

Taureano Johnson



order for us to go to the Com-
monwealth Championships and
the World Championships,”
Seymour said.

In preparation for the inter-
national trips, both Hield and
Knowles are currently training
in Cuba. Johnson is here at
home working out at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex

under the watchful eyes of.

coach Ray Minus Jr.

Two years ago, Johnson won
the Bahamas’ first bronze
medal at the Independent Cup.
Last Year, Knowles captured
the Bahamas’ second bronze.

_ This year, Seymour said he
expects that the Bahamas will
improve on those two perfor-
mances. But he indicated that

it’s not going to be easy to
achieve.
_ “We don’t know who will be
coming to the tournament,” he
pointed out. “Normally Cuba,
Brazil, Russia and-the United
States use this tournament as a
development tournament.
“But we don’t know if they

will be coming this year and.

what sort of team they will be
bringing down to compete. We
hope to be ready because. our
boxers have been training very
hard.”

While the focus right now is
on the seniors, Seymour said
there are a number of interna-
tional tournaments for the
juniors to compete in as well.

On . Saturday at the
Carmichael Knockout Boxing
Club, Seymour said his club is
scheduled to stage its first
monthly show for the year as
they get a glimpse of the boxers

that will be potential national -

team members.

The show, which is expect-
ed to feature boxers of all ages,
will begin at 3pm and should
have participation from the

Champion Boxing Club, head- .

ed by Ray Minus Jr and the
Bahamas Youth Boxing Club,
headed by Leonard “Boston
Blackie” Miller.

Seymour said they intend to
put on a show at least once a
month and they will interact
with Champion Boxing Club
in their monthly shows at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

(FAR LEFT) - Shamar
Sands on his way to
win the 60m Hurdles...

(LEFT) - Dayron Robles
in pain as he injures
himself during the
race...

(AP Photos: Michel
Spingler)



of it.

Sands, who missed making
the final at the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China, last August,
opened up with a 7.59 in Glas-
glow, Scotland on January 31.

He is expected to compete
again in Germany on February
13 before he takes a break and
closes out his indoor campaign
in Birmingham, Great Britain,
at the Aviva Indoor Grand Prix
on February 21.

Sturrup, along with Olympic
triple jump bronze: medallist
Teevan “Superman” Sands, are
also expected to compete on
February 13 before they finish
up in Europe at the Birming-
ham meet.

Gielen



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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a

nternational and
John Bull make prize
presentation to lucky winner

TAIRO International, a worldwide perfume and
cosmetics vendor, in partnership with John Bull

recently concluded its summer 2008 promotion with

a prize presentation at John Bull’s flagship store-in
downtown Nassau.

The promotion, which ran between June 1 and
June 30 of 2008, invited shoppers spending a mini-
mum of $50 on selected brands to enter to win an all
expenses paid trip including airfare and hotel accom-

modations for a family of four to Orlando, Florida,
and tickets to both the Magic Kingdom and Sea
World. The lucky winner, Candice Williams, was
absolutely thrilled with her prizes.

Pictured heré are Claudine Butler, perfume and
cosmetics buyer for John Bull Ltd; Candice Williams,
winner; Teresa Gonzalez, Bahamas area manager for
TAIRO International, Sandra Ferguson, account
executive (Bahamas) with TAIRO International.

AMBASSADOR OF
JAPAN to the Bahamas
Masahiro Obata paid a
courtesy call on Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham at the Office of
the Prime Minister on
Thursday, February 5.
Pictured from left are
Basil Sands, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
‘ham, Ambassador
Obata and Robert
Sands, Honourary
Consul.

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ee
wo.
—
oa
Qa.

«FULL SERWIGE
Spa & Salon

- East Bay Street, Just East of Luciano’s
Tel: (242) 323-6711 - 323-6715

In. the Photo starting from the front Row left with lady in the cream: Ebony Dorsett (Massage
and Skin Care Specialist), Shekera Forbes (Shampoo Assistant), Mekeisha Fernander (Massage

Therapist), Janet Joseph (Hair Stylist), Kenya Mortimer-McKenzie (Spa Director, Massage Therapist,
Skin Care Specialist). 5

The Row in the back starting from left with lady in black and gold: Stacy Thompson-Demeritte

(Hair Stylist), Gertrude Roberts (Nail Technician), Kedra Bell (Front Desk Manager), Tara Chipman

(Nail Technician), Hermane Thompson (Hair Stylist). Missing from the photo: JeRome
Miller (Master Hairstylist) and Sharon Thompson (Nail Technician).

OPER Moncey 10am >on ° ttas Qaimo Gam © Suivceiy

Email Appointments/Inquiries to:
info@baharetreat.com
Visit our website at: www.baharetreat.com

Nk









BOSS SSS

Bahama Rock lays-off
23% of workforce

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMA Rock, the Grand
Bahama-based supplier of
aggregate material to the con-
struction industry, yesterday
confirmed it had been forced to
cut 23 per cent of its workforce
on Monday due to decreased
demand sparked by the global
economic recession.

Walter Reed; Bahama Rock-
’s vice-president and general
manager, told Tribune Business

‘that the construction market ©

demand had declined by a stag-
gering 30 per cent, due toa US
market flop late in 2008, which
forced the company to lay-off
19 of its 83 workers.

Mr Reed said Bahama Rock
has also reduced its overall pro-

duction in order to “try to ride.

19 redundancies
sparked by 30% decline
in. construction industry
demand for aggregate

this thing out”, as the compa-
ny’s.international exports to the
Caribbean and South America
have declined along with the
region’s construction industry.

Bahama Rock has tradition-
ally supplied aggregate for the
majority of construction pro-
jects throughout the Bahamas,
and also frequently supplies the
Turks and Caicos.

“Most of the construction
projects - if it’s road building,
bridge building - they’ have to
use someone’s product, and we

SEE page 7B

‘Dual currency system’
urged for dollarisation

By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor

DOLLARISATION of the
Bahamian economy is possible if
this nation forms a “dual cur-
rency system” to permit the
smooth adoption of the US dol-
lar over time, a leading profes-
sional said yesterday, and the
Government allows this nation’s
multinational firms to pay their
Bahamian staff in US dollars.

Professional says adoption
of US currency can be
achieved smoothly over time

_ if Bahamians allowed to
repatriate dollar hoardings
abroad, and firms given
permission to pay staff
in US dollars

Dr Jonathan Rodgers, well-known as the Bahamian ‘eye doctor’,
and who addressed the Bahamas Business Outlook Conference on
monetary policy issues, said that through operating the two cur-
rencies - Bahamian dollars and US dollars - in tandem, and also per-
mitting Bahamians.to.hold US dollar accounts and repatriate US

dollar ‘hoardings stashed abroad,

dollarisation-was possible.

SEE page 4B

US regulators seek $2.2m in
FirstCaribbean bank account

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

UNITED States financial reg-
ulators are demanding the
return of $2.2 million held in a
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) account in
Nassau, with the funds alleged
to be part of a supposed inter-
national ‘boiler room’ fraud that
has netted the perpetrators
$44.2 million.

The Securities & Exchange
Commission (SEC), in a Feb-

ruary 3, 2009, lawsuit filed |

against four Chicago-based indi-
viduals and related entities,
alleged that-some of the

scheme’s proceeds, obtained .

from 1,400 unsuspecting
investors worldwide, had been
deposited into a Bahamian



SEC alleges sraceeds from
$44m international boiler
room fraud deposited into
bank’s Nassau-based branch

-bank account in the name of

CTA Worldwide Services.
“CTA Worldwide Services

has received more than $2.2 mil-

lion of investor proceeds in an
account held at FirstCaribbean
International Bank in Nassau,
Bahamas,” the SEC lawsuit

alleged. ©

There is nothing to suggest
that FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas), its
employees or directors have
done anything wrong in rela-
tion to CTA Worldwide Ser-
vices or the account. The bank
is not named as a defendant in
the. legal action.

The SEC alleged that CTA’

Worldwide Services was con-
nected to a fellow ‘relief’ defen-
dant in the case, Stephan Got-
tfried von Hase, a Chicago-

‘based investment adviser who,

it was claimed, acted as the
company’s managing director
from May 1997 until February
2001.

“von Hase and CTA World-
wide have each received a sig-
nificant sum of investor pro-
ceeds through payment made
by the escrow agent defen-
dants,” the SEC alleged.

“The investor proceeds rep-
resent undisclosed sales com-
missions from the boiler room
scheme. Neither von Hase nor
CTA Worldwide has any legiti-
mate claim to the funds that
they have received, nor have
they provided any services to

SEE page 5B



WEDNES SDAY,

FEBRUARY

11;



2009

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

$13m project eyes
November opening

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he $13 million
transformation of
downtown Bay
Street’s former
Moses Plaza is
scheduled to be completed by
November 2009, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, with
the owners having received
indicative commitments to lease
70 per cent of the retail/restau-
rant space in the development.

Charles Klonaris, the Nassau

Tourism and Development
Board’s (NTDB) chairman,

* Elizabeth on Bay receives indicative commitments for 70% of
retail/restaurant space, with 30 workers employed by Cavalier
* Marina tie-in with tour operators designed to attract 300-400

tourists per day to former Moses Plaza on Bay Street

who acquired the site with his
two, brothers and intends to
transform it into the upscale
Elizabeth on Bay development,
acting as a “catalyst” for the
revival of that part of down-
town Nassau, said contractor
Cavalier Construction now had
30 persons working on the for-
mer plaza.

“We're full speed ahead with
the Moses Plaza, and on target
for opening up around Novem-
ber 2009, That’s what we’re

“hoping for, and we’ve had a

meeting of minds between our-
selves and Cavalier right now,’
Mr Klonaris told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I’d say it’s about a $13
million project.”

‘25-30k Bahamians’ suffer Misery Index

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government was yes-
terday urged by a retired
banker to combat the plight of
an estimated “25,0000 to
30,000” Bahamians plunged
into the ‘Misery Index’ by estab-

lishing a ‘Food Bank’, as he -

warned that total commercial
bank loans in default could eas-
ily pass the $1 billion net by
year-end.

Al Jarrett, former Finance
Corporation of the Bahamas
(FINCO) head and ex-Bank of

the Bahamas chairman, told -

Tribune Business that with the
global economic recession like-
ly to last for’ another 18 months
at least, the unemployment rate



* Ex-leading banker calls for creation of Food Bank,
aid says bank loan defaults may surpass $1bn-in 2009
* Suggests unemployment rate could hit 15-20
per cent as recession deepens

in the Bahamas was likely to
reach a peak between 15-20 per
cent.

Adding that he was “dis-
turbed” by minister of labour
and social development, Sena-
tor Dion Foulkes, stating in
Monday’s Tribune Business that
unemployment levels remained
in the single digits, Mr Jarrett
said this was open to serious
doubt, given that “ every sector
of the economy has been lay-

“inig-off”
The former banker expressed

serious concern about the
employment prospects for this
summer’s. annual 5,000-6,000
high school graduates, even if
25 per cent (some 1,250-1,500)
went into college/higher educa-
tion, and argued that the true

number of Bahamians who.

became unemployed or under-

: employed in 2008 was between -

7,000-8;000.° .-*
Mr Jarrett argued that this
figure was spread between some

SEE page 6B

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE




PENSION PLAN

As a part of our commitment to our
valued members, The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce is partnering with Royal
Fidelity to provide Chamber members with
a superior Group and Individual Pension
Plan with more benefits, flexible investment
options and online access.
















































ast

‘

When completed, Elizabeth

-on Bay will feature 14 retail
‘spaces and three restaurants,
-including two eateries situated

in its courtyard.
“It’s hard to say until we’ve
prepared the leases and have

‘the signatures, but from the

SEE page 3B



Investment management and.administration by:

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Money at Work



puunsntey




PHN exe Led a ater: AccuWeather anne




The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ae is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind,

ABACO
High: 80° F/27°C
Low:62°F/17°C





. WEST PALMBEACH
: High: 82° F/28° C





High: 79° F/26°C
Low: 61° F/16°C

KEY WEST
High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are teday's
highs and tonights's lows.





High: 85° F/29°C.
Low: 66°F/19°C



Thursday
W High Low Ww

F/C F/C <
pe 53/11 31/0 pe _—_Indianapoli:
sn. 22/-5 12/-11 s . _ Jacksonville
t 6447 40/44 s-
c 53/11 34/1 pe
pe 52/11 36/2 pe
c 51/10 31/0 pc
~~ 89/38. 5 41/5 25-3 sf
Charleston, SC 74/23 52/11 pe 71/21 44/6. pc

; Thursday
Low W High _- Low Ww





Albuquerque
Anchorage










Chicago = S010 30/-1 =r 42/5 25/-3 “pe.

Cleveland 626 37/2 + 40/4 29/-1

Dallas =——-—s- 70/24 «40/4 s = 70/21. 47/8 vil

Denver 46/7 20/-6 pc 43/6 18/-7 _ New Cee Tleeceee

Detroit = 56/13 36/2 re 42/5 28/-2 New York Tampa | 65

Honolulu 80/26 69/20 pe 81/27 70/21 s Oklahoma City 60/15 34/1 Tucson 63/17 39/3 s
Houston = 74/23 45/7 § = 73/22 54/12 pe Orlando —S 81/27 62/16 pce 80/26 58/14 pc Washington,DC 68/20 45/7 pc





Sunny, windy and Partly cloudy and Atul day of Mostly sunny.
humid. breezy. sunshine.

High: 84° High: 83°

High: 83° Low: 72° “Low: 72° aoe 11°








58/14 36/2



Mostly sunny and Bright sunshine.

pleasant.
High: 85° - High: 82°
Low: 70° Low: 67°



elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels; Ns. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.









“‘Hign:2°Ferc | O” Fg
Low: 64° F/18°C

G:

GREAT INAGUA
High: 86°F/30° C
Low.69°F/21°C

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.









humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and ; Today 8:56 a.m. 29 2:38 a.m. 0, 5
9:19pm. 2.9 3:03p.m. -0.5
Thursday 9:40am. 27 3:27am. -0.4
Y 40:05 p.m. 28 345pm. -04
Statistics; are for Nassau through 1 p. m. yesterday. Fe day 24am. 25 415am. 03
Temperature : 10:51 p.m. 2.7 4:28p.m. -0.3_
High Seen eee eeneaeeneeseenensenesstereessaeaesaeesseees 77° F/25° C * — 11:07 2 3 5:04 -0 1
x at turd :07 a.m. 04a.m. -0.
LOW: -ecssecticassoccetsecborascvtsadsgerseststedseoseess OOSE/IO GO Satur ay 11:39 p.m. 26 5:11 p.m. -0.1
Normal high... TT? F/25° C
Normal low . 64° F/18°.C
Last year's . 82° F/28° C
Last year's low . . 66° F/19°C ;
Precipitation Sunrise....:. 6: 47a.m. Moonrise .... 8:25 p.m.
AS Of 1 p.m. yesterday ...cccccsssseesesseseseee, 0.00". Sunset.......6:02 p.m. Moonset. .... 7:59 a.m.
Veart0 Wate sic secssesilasseansnnssteesssstesiesiienntee 0:68 02 i
Normal year to date ....... ee sratidend ages 2.36" 7 iow First Fal
AccuWeather.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by i! a
‘ AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 - is f y “1
= ELEUTHERA Feb. 16 Feb. 24 Mar. 4 Mar. 10
High: 82° F/28°C
Low: 65° F/18°C
CAT ISLAND
High: 80° F/27°C
Low:61°F/16°C
SAN SALVADOR
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 63° F/A17°C

(MAYAGUANA
High: 84° F/29°C












3) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS








WINDS WAVES _ VISIBILITY










Thursday ” WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
F/C F/C FIC oe Thursday: _ E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 14°F
88/31 1 a/2 FREEPORT Today: Eat 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles



Amsterdam 39/3 34/1 sn

Thursday:
ABACO Today:

E at 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles
E at 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles

Thursday: _E at 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles



64/17 48/8 sh

Showers : ’ ; é = Miami
= 5 82/70
T-storms a

] Rain : : Fronts
Flurries Cd ==

Warr fini.

Stationary ag

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

AUTO INSURANCE

our
tus!

*

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CE BROKERS & AGENTS

~ Fleuthery Exum
Tel: (242) 332-2862 | Tek (242) 336-2204

26/3 ~ 48/-7 sn.

29/-1 14/-10 sn
Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, t- i

rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice; Prop-precipitation;-T-trace~













THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 3B





Starbucks avoids
US parent's woes

™ By CHESTER ROBARDS”
Business Reporter

STARBUCKS (Bahamas)
has yet to feel the economic
pinch being suffered by its par-
ent, a spokesperson for the
local franchise told Tribune

: Business yesterday, as US sister
stores move to trade in their a-
la-carte coffee and cakes for
the more consumer charming,
“bang for your buck”,
meal following a 10 per cent
sales dip.

According to Starbucks
Bahamas’ Inga Bowleg, the
company is continuing to grow
internationally, even though
executives made the decision
to close around 600 stores
across the US last year.

She said Bahamas-based
Starbucks locations worked to
keep their pricing competitive
with the US, and will be rolling
out new promotional cam-

$13m project eyes:
November opening

FROM page 1B

indications and Letters of Intent
that have, been signed, we’re
about 70 per cent committed,”
Mr Klonaris added.
“Cavalier are doing the
groundwork, the foundations
tructuring | ‘of the
/e’re going to;recon-
figure a lot of the structure.
That’s a lot of the work that we
think, in a week or two, will be
completed.” :

Elizabeth on Bay accounts
for the lion’s share, some 62 per
cent or $13 million, of the $21
million worth of projects .-
spread across nine develop-
ments - currently benefiting
from the import/Stamp duty
and real property tax breaks
introduced by the City of Nas-
sau Development Act in Iast
year’s Budget.

The project, and its counter-
parts, show that Bahamian busi-
nessmen and entrepreneurs are
not waiting for the completion
of the overall masterplan for
downtown Nassau and Bay
Street’s revitalisation before
upgrading their businesses and
properties.

_ Mr Klonaris yesterday told
Tribune Business that Elizabeth
on Bay’s design incorporated a




INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

Mondays

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
‘award. :
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

value-.



paigns and food options in the
near future to continue to
entice Bahamian coffee
drinkers.

“So far, it’s steady as she
goes,” said Ms Bowleg. “Cer-
tainly, we’ll be operating like

everybody else in business, and -

month-by-month looking at the
operation and doing what’s best
for the company. But right now
our customers can expect to be

able to take advantage of all

eight stores.”

The new value-meal offering,
scheduled to hit US menus on
March 3, may or may not, how-
ever, come to the eight Bahami-
an stores.

“They will be sharing with
us, and have shared, things that

_ have already been implemented

with us,” said Ms Bowleg.

“To see how we can leverage
what is being done in the Unit-
ed States, you will see us
extending similar offers, but we

small marina on Nassau Har-

- bour, which would be able to
‘accommodate six 100 foot

yachts.
e
Marina

He added that the marina
would be a “critical part” of
Elizabeth on Bay’s develop-
ment plan, given that it would
also act as an embarkation point
for tourists going on water-
based tours and excursions with

Bahamian operators.
That, Mr Klonaris said, would

attract 300-400 tourists per day '

to Elizabeth on Bay, giving its

haven’t yet confirmed what it is
we would be doing because the
value meal is something that
they’re just offering in select
stores in the United States as
somewhat of a pilot pro-
gramme,.so we’re looking at
that as an option.”

According to an
MSNBC.com article, Starbucks
is attempting to refashion itself
as a recession friendly coffee-
house by offering value-meals
that could get you a tall latte
and a slice of reduced-fat cin-
namon swirl cake coffee cake
for only $3.95. “Drip coffee
drinkers can get a tall brewed
coffee with a.breakfast sand-
wich at the same price,” the
article continued.

Though the “combo” offer-
ing may not come to Bahamian
Starbucks locations, Ms Bow-
leg said they have started

revamping their food products,

with new drinks and food to be



restaurants and shops a strong
customer base until the rest of
that part of downtown Nassau
received a similar upgrade.
“What we want to do is tie in
a lot of the local tour operators
with the marina,” he explained,
“as this will, in a way, guarantee

that 300-400 tourists will come::’
- every day to be picked up by

tour operators.

“We felt that was a critical
element to the success of the
Plaza, as we wait for the core

’ of the city to be revitalised.”

Describing Elizabeth on Bay
as a “huge catalyst” for reviving
the area of Bay Street east of







Short Term Apartment
Cheaper than a Hotel

week. weeks. month

BAMASLAS
MOIME SS ay FROM NOME

cai: 393-1540

arsink bahamas. honewayframbome@gmail.cont

NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

INVESTMENT
CORPORATION LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors
of PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL
_ ESTATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION
LIMITED has filed for and has been
granted an extension by the Bahamas

International

Securities

Exchange __ to.

report its September 30, 2008 Audited

Financials.

The extension

has been

granted to February 28, 2009 due to
ancillary outstanding items required for the
completion of the company’s Audit. The
extension was requested as a result of
outstanding details to be provided by the
Board of Directors and Management of the
Company, as well as a delay in receiving
confirmations from the Bankers and the
Attorney of the Company.

Ivylyn Cassar
Secretary



“= needed, Mr Klonaris added.

POSITION
WANTED

Well established wholesaler requires a salesman for
the snack food division. Individual must have had
experience is sales with emphasis on large food stores.
Only eee with a proven record of being able

Supervised and achieve results will be

to work

‘| considered.
Must be able to drive standard shift vehicle and
be in possession of current valid driver’s license.
Individuals not meeting the stated requirements will
not be considered for the post. compen offers good
benefits. 5;

introduced to get the Bahamian
public excited.

“We've proven that we have
a lot of coffee drinkers,” she
said. “Bahamians really have
become accustomed to, that cup
of Joe.

“There is much more excite-
ment planned for the Starbucks
stores here. We plan to bump
up our promotional campaigns,
so you’ll see more promotional
food options coming from us.”

Ms Bowleg said she expects
the company to continue to do
well and possibly expand past
its eight locations in the future.
She said there has been an
overwhelming demand for the
franchise’s products, which are
also distributed in Harbour
Island, Eleuthera.

“We hope to continue to
grow,” she said. “We are not in
any other island, but Starbucks
coffee is available in Harbour
Island. ;

c/o DA 67134
P.O.BOX N3207
Nassau, Bahamas







FAMGUARD
The Board of Directors
of
FamGuard Corporation Limited
is pleased to advise that
the fourth quarterly dividend
. for 2008
of 6 cents per share
has been declared to be paid on
February 23, 2009

to Shareholders of record as at
February 16, 2009

East Street, Mr Klonaris said
he was hoping that the derelict
buildings east of the Betty K
shipping dock would be demol-
ished by the time of the Novem-
ber opening, giving tourists a
nice, scenic walk through the
area.

More street lighting was also

FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED

The parent holding company of

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limited
FG Capital Markets Limited
FG Financial Limited

















La, by () NMelentines Duy

Sun and............Restaurant




Appetizers




Soup of Love $10
Tomato Soup topped with Cream & a Drizzle of Vodka
French Onion Soup $10
Lobster & Grab Salad $20,








Lovers Shrimp
Shrimp. Diced Tomatoes, Onions, Celery & Parsley i in
White Wine served warm
Boston Lettuce, Tomatoes, Avocado topped with Red Onion, & a
. Citrus Vinaigrette Dressing $10







MAIN COURSE




: Surf & Turf for 2 $90
Grilled Chateaubriand & Broiled Lobster with
Béarnaise Sauce & Lobster Butter






Roasted Rack of Lamb for 2 $92
With a Dijon Mustard Crust complimented with
Mint Jelly or Mint Sauce —
Chicken Breast stuffed with Crab Meat served with
Saffron Potatoes & Braised Baby Fennel $38





Bahamian Style Grouper $33
‘Cracked Lobster $44




All main‘courses are serve egetables, rice or potatoes






upid's Heart Cheesecake $10
Bread & Butler, udding s¢ serve ed ‘ona a Light Rum Sauce $8.50
pecialty. ity Coffees are a available $9

Espresso, Cappuccino, Cafe Late $4

Coffee, Tea $3









PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Dual currency system’ urged for dollarisation

FROM page 1B

Emphasising that he was “not
being combative” on the issue,
and that he supported former
finance minister, James Smith,
on his view that ‘dollarisation’
was impossible overnight, Dr
Rodgers, pointed out that every
Bahamian’s ability to borrow
was dependent on the amount
of US dollar foreign. reserves

held by the Central Bank of the
Bahamas. .

“There is a direct relation-
ship between the amount of
credit in the system and the US
dollar, so why not dollarise,”
Dr Rodgers asked. “Everything
depends on it.”

When it came to dealing with
the asset-liability mismatch
identified by Mr Smith, given
that the Bahamas’ $7 billion in



IN THE ESTATE OF SYLVIA
WATKINS late of #7 Sunderland
Road, Stapledon Gardens in the
Western District of the Island.of
New Providence, Bahamas,

deceased.

NOTICE

_ NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand agéinst the said
estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 25" day of February, A.D. 2009,
after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only to the —
claims of which they-shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinabove

mentioned.

"Dated the 10 day of February, A.D. 2009.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor ;
9 Rusty Bethel Drive — - ae
_ Nassau, Bahamas



3 ‘Money « at: Work .

private sector Bahamian dollar
liabilities dwarfed the existing
$600 million in foreign reserves,
Dr Rodgers said US dollar
flows came into this nation via
tourism, banking and foreign
direct investment.

“My proposal would be that

we form.a dual currency system
to allow Bahamians to have US
dollar accounts, and bring back
US dollars from the US [that
are held in bank accounts
owned by Bahamians there],”
Dr Rodgers said.

He pointed out that studies
had shown that some 55 per
cent of all US $100 bills ever
printed were held by foreign-
ers, espegially persons of Afro-
Caribbean descent. When
Jamaica altered its exchange
control regime, Dr Rodgers said
more US dollars came back into
the country than went out,
because Jamaicans repatriated
their holdings from abroad.

Apart from permitting this
repatriation, Dr Rodgers also
suggested that allowing multi-
national firms with a presence in
this nation to pay their staff in
US dollars would further aid
dollarisation.in a measured, pro-
gressive fashion over several
years.

hotels and the foreign investors
to pay Bahamians in US dollars
as opposed to Bahamian dol-
lars,” Dr Rodgers added, those

“Tf you get the banks, the.

companies would also be spared
the currency conversion costs
they are currently confronted
with.

Atlantis, for example,
received the vast majority of
room revenues and other forms
of guest income in US dollars,
but paid its staff in Bahamian
dollars.

Currency

Pointing out that dual cur-

. Tency systems had worked well
‘in. Bermuda, Hong Kong, the

Cayman Islands and Jamaica,
Dr Rodgers illustrated how pay-
ing Bahamian staff in US dol-
lars could smooth the path to
dollarisation.

He said financial data from

one year ago showed that there ©

were some $3 billion in Bahami-
an dollars in circulation in the
economy..Set against this,
according to very conservative
estimates, were then some $450
million in foreign currency

" reserves, Dr Rodgers said, some

$50-$100 million in US dollars
hidden “under mattresses”, and
$100-$200 million in. Bahami-
an-owned US dollars outside
the Bahamas.

External reserves were now
closer to $600 million, and Dr
Rodgers said it was likely that
Bahamian-owned holdings of
US dollar assets abroad was
closer to $500 million.

Legal Notice
NOMIEE:

_INTERASIAN RESOURCES GROUP
- LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000,

the

dissolution of
RESOURCES GROUP LIMITED has

INTERASIAN
been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company: has therefore been struck off the

Register.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator



Legal Notice

_ NOTICE
_BAMFORTH PLAINES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe. 12th day of January 2009. The Liquidator |
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, |

Bahamas.

‘ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EG CAP

TTAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISOBY SERVICES
& =

ee Le oO NEAL

—
— _.
-

— _.

Dollarisation would now be
significantly advanced if 4,700
commercial and offshore bank-
ing workers received their aver-
age $49,000 annual:salary; 4,800
hotel workers obtained ‘their
average $35,000 salaries; and

1,200 workers in the direéct..°
employ of foreign investors |

received an average $25,000 per
annum salary all in US dollars.
“Those combined salaries

would put $450 million US dol-.

lars per annum into the dual
currency system, so over the

course of a five to six year peri- .

od, you’d have close to $3 bil-
lion in US dollars coming into
the system,” Dr Rodgers said.
Describing dollarisation as
“exactly what we need”, he
added that the Bahamian econ-
omy depended almost entirely
on its US counterpart, and
“even credit in the system per-

taining to Bahamian dollars is

dependent on the US dollar.
“If reserves begin to fall-off,
there’s a tightening in credit.
The Central Bank uses moral
suasion to tell the banks not to

lend‘so much, so that we don’t -

import as much. Every dollar

in credit in the system - you’re -
, ability to borrow money is relat-

ed to the reserves in the Central
Bank.” ‘

Dr Rodgers pointed out that
under normal economic behav-
iour, if there were different cur-
rencies in‘an economy, the
dominant one. would take over
in time.

In the case of the. Bahamas

the US dollar, given that it was

a currency that was accepted:

across the world, was used as.a

reserve currency by most cen-_
tral banks, and was flocked to as °
a safety net in hard times. Latin ~
American and Caribbean coun-:
tries were estimated to own’
$129 billion worth of US Trea-

sury securities.

“To all intents and purposes,
we are basically a state of the

_ US, and if people have to

choose between the US dollar
and the Bahamian dollar bill,
they’re going to choose the US
dollar because you have more
utility. If people prefer US.dol-
lars, more and more dollars
would come into the system,”
Dr Rodgers said.

This, in turn, would overcome

‘political issues related to the
‘end of the Bahamian dollar cur-

rency, as voters would prefer
the greater utility provided by
US dollars.

And, with exchange controls
coming down through dollari-
sation, Bahamians would. “for
once have the freedom to do
what they want with their mon-

”

ey”.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

and dollarisation, this would be. | Making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

“| good cause, campaigning |

for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. *

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



tegal Notice’

NOTICE
ATVICKTON INVESTMENTS LTD.

“(in Voluntary Gauldation)

‘Notice is. hereby given that the above-named
' Company is in:dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HAPSBOURNE INVESTMENTS LTD.
alo Voluntary pawn

Notice is hereby given. that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa-Corp. Inc., P. O. Box NEE Nassau,

Bahamas.

SSS
ARVANA
5 Saas : ER PAE ESAS INE BESIING __ SS“
Securit Previous Close. | Today’: : Div $ BIE
Abaco Markets .
Bahamas Property Fund::
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1).
Consolidated VVater BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard :
Finco ©, es
FirstCaribbean. Bank |,
Foco] (S) ~ Sag ee
Focol Class B Preference oe
Freeport Concrete ° 4
ICD Utilities: 5: i
J. S. Johnson
nk remier Real Estate

_ARGOSA CORP. INC.
: eee

Legal Notice

~ NOTICE

MILLCROSS MANOR HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

aes wet

1000.00 _- Fidelity Bank Note’ 17 (Series A) +
1000.00: Fidelity Bank:Note 22.(Serles B)'+
1000.00 Elden: Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

0.300 N/â„¢M
0.480 N/M
O. 256.6

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

‘Bahamas.

29. 00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 0.300 N/M

261.9

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08 ''
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Oct-08

Colina Bond Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund |:

_ Fidelity Bahamas G-& |} Fund:
Fidelity Prime Income Fund ¢
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
EG Financlal Growth Fund

dS / Buying ‘price of Colina.and Fidality,
Ask S "Selling price of Colina and fidelity |
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.



52wk-Low - Lowest’closing ‘pride in fast,62 weeks m8 ear ror

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume

Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV & - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

('S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
41 fees Date 7/11/21



- Trading volume of the prior week

~ ARGOSA CORP. INC,
(Liquidator)

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX'- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100







eRe

be ed





Ine tAIDVUING

WEVINCOVAIL, FEDMUANY 11, 2UU9, FAUL vw



US regulators seek
$2.2m in bank account

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of REGINALD WINFIELD KNOWLES
late and domiciled of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are requested to send their

FROM page 1B names, addresses and particulars of the same certified in

funds, and not déstroy docu- and that the ‘relief’ defendants ments, Benger and Meyers

justify the receipt of such
funds.”

The SEC has already
obtained a temporary restrain-
ing order against CTA World-
wide Services to prevent it from
moving or disposing of the mil-
lions of dollars in the First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) account.

Specifically, CTA Worldwide
Services and von Hase are
required to “provide an

accounting”, freeze their assets, ~
repatriate the Bahamas-based

mentary evidence. The order
applies against all the other
defendants as well.

In its lawsuit, the SEC alleged .

that CTA Worldwide Services
had been “unjustly enriched”
by its receipt of investor funds,
had no legitimate claim to them,
and that the monies were the
product of an “unlawful” boiler
room scheme.

It demanded a court order
requiring the return of funds in
the FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) account,



PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR & GENERAL MANAGER

“disgorge all funds they
received from defendants’ ill-
gotten gains, or by which they
have been unjustly enriched,
including all investor funds
transferred to them or used for
their benefit, including pre-
judgment interest thereon.”

Targeted

The scheme targeted by the
SEC allegedly involved Chica-
go-based residents Stefan

' Benger and Jason Meyers, who

entered into distribution agree-
ments with companies who

- issued ‘Regulation S’ stock.

These stocks were exempt

from SEC regulation because ,

they were only sold to investors
outside the US. In the agree-

allegedly agreed to solicit
investors in exchange for sales
commissions exceeding 60 per
cent.

Overseas boiler room opera-
tors were then allegedly
retained to sell the stocks
through what is known as ‘cold
calling’ tactics. This is a prac-

tice of targeting elderly, unsus- .

pecting investors through unso-
licited phone calls, employing
high pressure sales tactics and
“misrepresentations”.
Essentially, unsophisticated

investors in the UK and Europe-

were induced by the two, and

fellow defendants Philip Pow--

ers and Frank Reinschreiber, to
purchase worthless, illiquid
stocks whose value was artifi-

Truck Sales / Service / Parts facility a must.
Backgraund anc knowledge of truck specification/
Background in Pans and
nent required on a daily basis. Must
ctively admimister all facits of business.
Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Goad
| people skills a must. Must have prior experience in
|| parts order entry and supervising employees. Computer
1 skits r ston daily basis. Must be self motivated
and work with [ite or no supervision.



apolication mandatory.
Service manac
bs able to efe

‘










Extensive background in managing an OEM Heavy

Top wages _-

applivanis, however ony nandidatas to be

We thank all
. imerviawed will be contacted,





no defiver res.snes and references tx

Sahamas Mack Truck Sales Lid,
Oakes Field
P.O, Sox N-dd
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE.

> IRION INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD:
‘(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named -

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Cofp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE ESTATE OF HAROLD
MAJOR late of No. 10 Infant View
Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the said
estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 25th day of February, A.D. 2009,
after which date the Executors will proceed to

distribute the estate having regard only to the’
claims of which they shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full _
settlement on or before the date hereinabove
mentioned.

Dated the 10" day of February, A.D. 2009.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas





cially inflated by the salesmen.

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HIGH REQ FUND LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February
10, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of
2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named
Company are required on or before the 11th day of March,
2009 to send their names and addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, .
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

FEBRUARY 11, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE >
REIGATE VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 19th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

panaines:

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION
ACT, 1992

AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST
COUNSEL AND ATTORNEY

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Complainant
AND

RALPH JAN WARD
~ Respondent

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 25th day of February, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,

Ralph Jan Ward, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within twenty-one (21) days from the date
hereof, an address to which the Decision may be sent by
prepaid Registered Post.

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D., 2009
Bahamas Bar Council

Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas

writing to the undersigned on or before the 11th day of March
A.D. 2009 and if required, to prove such debts or claims or
in default be. excluded from any distribution; after the above
date the assets will be distributed having regard only to the

‘proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons

indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
‘| settlement: on or before the 11th day of March A.D. 2009

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D. 2009

ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
Attorney for the Executor
Chambers
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas

2



Legal Notice

NOTICE |

KNOXVILLE INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

—, NOTICE
~ ETERNAL GLORY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

‘Notice is hereby given that the: above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

«

Bahamas,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



IN THE ESTATE OF RODNEY
THOMPSON late of Adelaide
Village in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the said
estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 27'H day of February, A.D. 2009,
after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only to the
claims of which they shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinabove
mentioned.

Dated the 10" day of February, A.D. 2009.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor.
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee
‘25-30k Bahamians’ suffer Misery Index

26’ BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Year: 2001
Price: $55,000.00
Hull: Fiberglass

Engine: Twin Mercury CXL OPTIMAX, 225 HP, 450 Hours

YW: =55032-1853792

26 Outrage in great condition! Fully loaded with Auto-pilot, Fish finder, Chart plotter/GPS,

Stereo/CD, Head, Freshwater, Bow cushions.
smart craft gauges.

Standard Equipment

Integral bow pulpit w/anchor roller and chafe plate
Bow anchor storage w/hatch

Port & starboard forward deck storage
Seats w/drainage

Integral swim platform

Port & starboard fish boxes w/drains
Rod holders

Bait prep area

Lockabfe console storage w/piexi door
Under gunnel rod racks

Vertical rod holders at forward deck seat
Self baiting fiberglass cockpit

S/S steering wheel

S/S console grab ral

Drink Holders

Fibergfass transom door

Livewellat transom wiwashdowa
Forward coaming bolsters

Hydraulic steering w/titt

eoeeoeneneseseosreseve

Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and

Optional Equipment

Porta potti w/pump out & 0/8 discharge
T-top w/top gun outriggers

Leaning post w/cooler

Windlass

Anchor

Full electronics including radar, chart platter,
auto-pilot, fish finder, VHF, stereo

| CONTACT:

Kingsley Edgecembe, Jr,
Pho 4284959
E-mail: khedgecombe@gmsif.com



FROM page 1B

2,000 redundancies and reduced
work weeks in the hotel sector;
some 2,000 construction indus-
try lay-offs; another 1,500
redundancies and reduced work
weeks in the retail sector; and
another 1,500 ‘indirect’ job loss-
es. If he is correct, that would
effectively amount to an
increase in the unemployment
rate of between 3-4 per cent ina
labour force that is around
170,000 to 190,000 persons.
Extrapolating further, Mr Jar-

rett said that for every Bahami- -

an worker made redundant,
four to five family members
were immediately impacted.
The effect was especially pro-
nounced in single parent fami-
lies if the sole breadwinner was
laid-off.

Given this data, he suggested
some 25,000 to 30,000 Bahami-
ans were now living in what he
termed the ‘Misery Index’,
“You don’t do spin at a time

‘like this when people are suf-

fering and the Misery Index is
25,000 to 30,000 people,” Mr
Jarrett said in response to Mr

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A position has arisen for a chartered accountant with 20-25 years
experience in the profession, or private sector, at assist in the further
development of branch offices in Marsh Harbour, Abaco a

leant Grand Bahama.

The applicant must have good inter-personal skills and be able to ,
relate to a wide variety of clients in diverse business environments,
have a history of large scale development projects and experience
of international clients looking to set up business in the family islands.
He/she must be computer literate with a good working knowledge

of Excel and Word.

eens should apply in wiritng Ot

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Foulkes.

“There is no institution where
employment increased last year,
whether it was in banking,
tourism, construction, retail, the
hotels. None increased employ-
ment, and they all laid off peo-
ple in a net position.

“People have been laid-off in
every sector. Look at the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and see what their reduc-
tion in contribution collections
was last year.”

The last Department of Sta-
tistics survey, carried out before
the global recession established

-a tight grip, indicated the

Bahamas’ unemployment rate
was 7.8 per cent.

Yet with the US unemploy-
ment rate said to currently be

-7.5 per cent, and “headed to 9

per cent by year-end”, Mr Jar-
rett said that given that the
Bahamian unemployment rate
was usually 3.5 per cent above
that of the US, the current fig-
ure in this nation was likely to
be around 12 per cent.

“I believe we’re going to go
through a very difficult period
for the next two years, mini-
mum,” Mr Jarrett said.

“TI believe, at the rate we’re
going, if this thing lasts beyond
2009 and goes into 2010, mid-
2010, we’re looking at a 15-20
per cent unemployment rate.
The Government has to help

out the Misery Index of people
suffering.”

To do that, Mr Jarrett said
“every damn body” -all
Bahamas-based stakeholders,
such as government, private and
public sectors, expatriates and
Bahamians - needed to come
together and set up a ‘Food
Bank’ to provide food and
clothing the growing army of
unemployed and homeless.

With the Department of
Social Services set to become
the ‘most important’ govern-

- ment department over the next

two years, Mr Jarrett said the
Government’s annual budget
allocation of $13-$15 million
could be supplemented by $10
million raised by the Bahami-
an public. He pointed to the
$500,000 he and a group of oth-
ers raised in two weeks for hur-
ricane relief as an indication of
what could be done by those in
a position to help.

Mr Jarrett said the economic
strain was now evident in the
three to four calls he was receiv-
ing.every week from Bahami-
ans pleading for financial assis-
tance.

: He added that he had recent-
ly given a $1,000 loan, from his
pension money, to a man he
had not heard from in 20 years,
but who had contacted him in
distress because his children
were about to be put out of pri-

LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

‘BBM FUND, LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with Section
137 (4) of International Business Companies Act of 2000,
BBM Fund, Ltd. is in Dissolution.”

The date of the commencement of dissolution is the 23rd

day of December, 2008.

Claudio Carvalho de Queiroz Mello
Shirley House, :
50 Shirley Street 2nd floor,
Nassau, Bahamas
P.O. Box N-7507
Liquidator



vate school because he could
not pay the fees.

“T’ve seen people eating out
of the garbage bins on West
Bay Street in the last two
weeks,” Mr Jarrett said. “J went
over the street and gave one
man some ham and a bottle of
soda, and told him not to.do
that.

“T feel for people. If you don’t
care for people when they’re
suffering, you’re going to reap
the whirlwind. Unless we come
together and address this,
you’re going to see an escala-
tion of crime second to none in
this country. People are hurt-
ing. I’m scared to take money
out of my pocket in public now,
as we’re going to get an escala-
tion of crimes against property
and the person.”

As for the economy, Mr Jar-
rett said that if last year’s 44.5
per cent rate of increase in loan
defaults was maintained, some
$1.106 billion of commercial
bank loans would be 31 days or
more overdue at year-end -
compared to $766 million at
2008-end.

By a similar token, if non-per-
forming loans grew at the same
46.1 per cent rate, some
$537.648 million worth of com-
mercial bank loans would be in
this position come year-end.

Mr Jarrett said that with hind-
sight it was a mistake that the
Government did not privatise
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) by agree-
ing a deal with Bluewater Com-
munications Holdings, as this
would have injected $225 mil-
lion in cash into its coffers.

Now, it was being forced to
borrow to cover the fiscal deficit
and its fixed costs, in addition to
capital works, and Mr Jarrett
said it was possible that the
National Debt could increase
to between $3.7 billion and $3.8
billion by year-end.

He added that it was possi-
ble the Government might have
to consider additional asset
sales, and urged it to work with
major developers to see if there
was anything that it could do to
get their stalled projects going.

“Tightening up”, though,
would be the order of the day,
Mr Jarrett describing the cur-
rent $585 million. in external
reserves as “soft”, due to the
lack of foreign direct investment
inflows and the fact that part of

_ it was borrowed money.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

INTERNAL AUDITOR

INTERNAL AUDLT DEPARTMENT

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Internal Auditor in the Internal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

¢,

Auditor

1

“* Produces audit programs and submit the same for approval of the Chief Internal

Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited

Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with
established audit programs. This involves a complete assessment of the systems of
internal control, risk exposures and the efficiency, effectiveness and economic use
of resources to achieve management objectives —

Produces audit reports on audit concerns, their causes, effects and the audit
recommendations in accordance with the ILA Standards

Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate aneoeS and produce investigation
reports: exercising the [A’s ethical standards e. .. confidentiality, etc.

Conducts reviews of ,budgetary systems haclnding variances analysis), policies
manpower efficiency and new computer applications

Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review
and release to management and the Audit Committee

Assembles audit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files udieaa by the
Assistant Internal Auditors and the Audit Clerks

Trains, coaches and direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers schol
supervision and technical support to the Assistant Internal Auditor(s)

Conducts corporate research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud
investigations. (producing the associated reports)

Assist the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and
offer direct assistance on major investigations

Conduct audits in conjunction with the External Auditors and produce working
papers for the External Auditors year-end audit

Conducts stock taking observation exercises, Family Island audits and special
assignments

Job requirements include: -

Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline

Professional accounting certification (e.g, CA, CPA,), in addition completing the
CIA would be highly desirable
Understand and apply Internal Audit Standards and International Accounting
Standards
Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills
Good problem solving skills
Knowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs. Also knowledge of
audit software and a good working knowledge of the H.T.E system are required

“+ Good knowledge of the Corporation’s operating policies, systems and procedures

“¢ Management and supervision skills

4,

“A minimum of 5 years experience



For more information ee
(242) 356-3100
(242) 322- 3740 :
Email: bahamasagribusinesse po@yahoo, com

Salary for the position is in Group 3 of the Senior Staff Salary Scales.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
February 10, 2009.









THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 7B



Bahama Rock lays-
off 23 per cent
of workforce

FOR RENT

‘PARADISE ISLAND

LUXURIOUS HARBOUR FRONT PENTHOUSE
RESIDENCE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
OF NASSAU AND ITS HARBOUR:



¢ 5,000+ sq ft. total area

e 4 Bedrooms with 4.5 baths

e Master bedroom with dressing area, Jacuzzi
tub and large walk-in closet

e Large balconies

e Elegantly furnished throughout with a
separate study

¢ Formal dining room Z

e Private elevator

¢ Heated pool and spa overlooking the harbour

e Private dock for a yacht up to 75 feet

e.Dedicated storage and crew areas

e Exercise room

~ ¢ Indoor Garage
e Private gated entry
e Lush tropical landscaping

Rent: $15,000.00 per month net

NO PETS

For f jurther information and viewing call:
| 863-2730

_ Legal Notice

SUMMERCREST HOLDINGS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice-is. hereby: given, that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

_on the 5th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp: Inc., P O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas. '

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) -

Legal Notice

LOCK DESIGN INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc:, P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

~ARGOSA CORP. INC.
_ (Liquidator)

Legal Notice

INIGO HOLDINGS LTD.

_ Un Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., E O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
| Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) ©

FROM page 1B

supply everything into Nassau,”
said Mr Reed.

Now, he said, the company is
setting itself up to make it
through 2009 in order to realign
in the new year 2010.

“We believe that the market
will improve by the end of the
year,” Mr Reed added.

“Even though it’s very unfor-

‘ tunate, particularly for those
involved, we believe that we’re .

set up to make it through the

‘rest of the year a get back on

an even keel in 2

Minister of ae, Dion
Foulkes, yesterday told Tribune
Business he was not made

|. aware by.Bahama Rock of the

impending lay-offs prior to
them being carried out Mon-
day. He said employers were
mandated by the industrial code

to inform the Ministry of -

Labour before any redundan-
cies were.made.
However,.Mr Reed contends

that his company informed the
Ministry’s Grand Bahama
offices before the move was
made.

Mr Foulkes said his Ministry
will ensure thé 19 workers made
redundant at Bahama Rock

receive the benefits due to |

them.

According to Mr Reed, many
of the workers laid-off were
highly qualified, and he suspects
they will have no trouble finding
emiployment. He added that the
company “would love to rehire
them all if they’re available”
when the market turns around.

Bahama Rock workers were
cut ‘throughout the. company’s
various departments, including

equipment operators, mainte- ,

nance and operations.

When asked if the govern-

ment’s economic stimulus pack-

age, which includes a range of

construction projects, would
assuage some of the company’s
demand shortages, Mr Reed
replied: “Very significantly.”



INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight Mondays

Legal Notice

X-TREME RESOURCES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given. that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of December 2008. The
Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas. ~

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

GILLYASSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,

-| Bahamas.

~ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

KAMDEN OCEAN CORP.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas. °

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LOILOIL CO. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) .

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



ue Notice

‘LE MONT S. A.

(in Voluntary Piauigation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Gorp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. -
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

FULL FORCE INVESTMENTS
HOLDINGS LTD:

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-narned

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas. :

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LOURDES INC.

dn Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice -

SUNFLOWER VALLEY
LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is.in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE'S

THE TRIBUNE



|

N) know How To Ai
THANK YOU!

IN THE FRIDGE---
HELP YOURSELF!

ANP THEN ee

= = UP ASTOOL.--

WE WE HAVE SOME
BUSINESS TO

HOW ABOUT DISsCcuss!

OFFERING ME
A COLD BEER!

V'0 LIKE IT

WOULD YOU
IN $10s

LIKE THAT IN
$10s OR $20s?

IN $50s, 9100s,
AND $500s



©2009 by King Features Syndicate. Inc. World Rights reserved

www.Blondie.com



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IN AND SENDS
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several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 +o
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday :

















COME ON IN, GARY, I WAS X
JUST ABOUT TO TAKE A BREAK.)\ YOU LOOK SO
I'VE BEEN CLEANING ALL DAY.

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WHO DO YOU
THINK YOU ARE...
MY MOTHER?

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uses once only. Each must contain
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words in be at least one nine-letter word.
th ee, No plurals,
Cai topay's TARGET

body of
Chambers
2ist
Century
Dictionary
{1999
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Good 19; very good 29; excellent
38 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION
afore amok arrow awoke faro
farrow foam fore forearm fork
form former FRAMEWORK
from korma mako marrow
meow moke more mower okra
ormer reform remora rework
roam roamer roar rower woke
womera wore work worker
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fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
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level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.















































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_ CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down






Across

1 Sporting fish seen around 1 Become less neat (5)




32009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





athlete? (6,4) .

Noah's ship (7) ‘2 Very hungry creature that
4 Strolling player from : flies round the States (8)
~ Scotland (5) 3 Not too clean, like a
7 Marine feature which may caterpillar’s young? (6)

be permanent (4) 4 The kind of wind that is
8 A train driver (8) generally expected (10)
10 Vegetarian fare for an 5 Look for an equal (4)

6 Variety of red rose seen in








12 US port in a state of church (7) ped ley ay a
inactivity (6) 9 Flags put out in honour of a ed
13 Possibly alerts to a brave man (10)
changes (6) 11 Beginning to be seemly (8) | (ea ae
15 Openly enjoying a stay in 12 ra reflection, a must asa wi Rerses
the country? (7,3) fruit (7) _I Re RECISRE ORO
18 Ugly in an awkward 14 Times of enchantment (6) N paper (7)
way (8) © 16° The main idea of work, a) 4 Funny (5)
. 19 Heap of carpets (4) perhaps (5) oO. 7 Sicilian
20 A trap set outside a sec- - 17 Where to see the Taj ns volcano (4)
ond time (5) ° Mahal in a gracious gq 8 Reject (4,4)
21 Hair style on the beach (7) setting (4) LU {6-Vasting only baetiy
ond ee ae : 5-5
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution’ Yesterday’s Easy Solution ae:
12 To exile (6)
Across: 1 Half-hearted, 9 Net cord, Across: 1 Up against it, 9 Address, Straight 6
10 Vesta, 11 Ears, 12 Lacerate, 14 10 Gliff, 11 Dull, 12 Unsettle, 14 43: Suaight mat (6)
Reckon, 16 Desert, 18 Go astern, 19 Nickel, 16 Cliche, 18 Festival, 19 15 Brawl (4-3-3)
Emit, 22 Taken, 23 Peanuts, 24 Odds, 22 Swift, 23 Lookout, 24 18 Deliberat
Personality. : Unwelcoming. laarheas
Down: 2 Actor, 3 From, 4 Endear, 5 Down: 2 Pedal, 3 Glee, 4 Insane, 5 damage (8)

Reviewed, 6 Enslave, 7 Interrogate, 8
Taken to task, 13 Fortunes, 15
Crackle, 17 Trepan, 20 Mount, 21 Tail.

Secretly, 6 Idiotic, 7 Hard-and-fast, 8 19
Of necessity, 13 Belittle, 15 3

Cushion, 17 Garlic, 20 Drown, 2 20
Boom. . 21

Untamed (4)
Correspond (5)



Love story (7)

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Down

1

ona fF WO ND

11
12

14
16

17

Harass (5)

Locate precisely (8)
Artist's workroom (6)
Social custom (10)
Prevailing attitude (4)
Condemn sternly (7)
Without interruption
(2,1,7)

A calling (8)

Flowers on fruit
trees (7)

Accounts bdok (6)
Deep-bowled

‘spoon (5)
Encourage to do

wrong (4)























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.







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7/6/3/8/2/1(519/4 ee
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2/10 9/7/5|2/416/1/3/8 Z 9178















Good Technique Pays Off

Q of trumps, the A-K of spades and
the king of diamonds. He then ruffed

North dealer. ‘
North-South vulnerable.

ALARA LULL ALEAALLLL ALLAN

NORTH the diamond six, reducing both
@I17 dummy’s hand and his own to two
Â¥QI82 trumps and four clubs.
#K64 Having reached this impervious
AK 53 position by well-planned _ play,
WEST EAST declarer no longer had reason to be
@Q842 #109653 concemed with whether the missing
¥53 ¥74 clubs were divided 3-2, 4-1 or 5-0.
#1098 @QIJ752 Regardless:of how the suit was dis-
HQIS6 #7 tributed, he was now guaranteed to
SOUTH make the slam.
@AK ' After leading a low club to the
VAK 1096 king, he continued with a low club
A3 toward his hand. When East showed
#10942 out, South played the nine, losing to
The bidding: the jack.
North — East South West — West had no answer to this
| & Pass 1v Pass sequence of plays. A club return
24 Pass 6Â¥ * would hand declarer two more club

Opening lead — ten of diamonds.

There are hands that experts play
expertly even in their sleep — and
here is a case in point. Our hero,
South, got to six hearts as shown, and
West led the diamond ten, taken with
the ace.

Declarer saw immediately that
the slam was practically certain to
come home. The only real threat was
the possibility that he’d lose two club
tricks, but as an experienced declarer
he knew that with careful play he
could overcome even this danger.

Accordingly, South cashed the A-

tricks, while a spade return would
allow declarer to ruff in one hand and
discard a club loser from the other.

So South wound up making a
slam that would have gone down one
with inferior play. Furthermore, the
outcome would have been the same
had East held the club length.

The key to finding the winning
play was declarer’s realization at the
outset that the only distribution that
could jeopardize the contract was a
4-1 or 5-0 club division. He therefore
focused all his efforts on that possi-
bility, and took the necessary steps to
assure the slam.

Tomorrow: With a little bit of luck.

©2009 King Peatures Syndicate Ine.





WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 9B

THE TRIBUNE
SP





The Tribune

with light touches as he tinkled the

ved teh rere and appeared as physically
taxing as a basketball game, as sweat
drops illuminated the keys and Mr Nosé
became one with the keys again.

His third and final piece before the inter-

‘mission was Liszt's Mephisto Waltz, that
gave a more contemporary feel to classical
piano. The performance was one that could
only be described as_a beautiful union
between good friends. ©

Following the intérmission, Mr Nosé played
three ‘more pieces: by J Brahms and two Russ-
ian compositions by Prokofiev.

His rendition of Brahms made one smile as he
forcefully stroked the keys with an heightened
awareness that encompassed a wide range of
human emotion.

- By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

Brought to the
Bahamas by the
Nassau Music
Society's Presi-
dent Patrick
Thompson, Mr
Nosé (pro- ©
nounced No-zay)
FMT OME Leer N Ue
plished pianist,
originally from
AVA Vieni
Verona, Italy and
winner of the 2005
Santander award
in Spain.

Le CB roma ALO
the world to share
his magnanimous The last scheduled piece was Seer pianist
talent with the Sergei Prokofiev from the 1940s.
world. After his last official piece, he was asked for an

IT wasn't rake and
scrape, it wasn't
Junkanoo music ‘or
even reggae or rap,
but Alberto Nosé's
piano concerto
proved ecstatically
entertaining to atten-
dees of his concerts
held last Saturday
and Sunday.

After winning many prestigious awards
throughout Europe, he honoured the Bahamas
with two performances of five planned ballads —
plus one after he was encored unanimously by
audiences:

Mr Nosé opened with Beethoven's "Moon-
light" sonata, a delicately touching piece magni-
fied by his facial expression while playing — eyes
closed with a relaxed look as the beauty of his
music sent soothing vibes down one's spine.

As the music turned darker with deep rooted
sounds that powerfully captivated all listeners,
the audience’s eyes were glued to his hands grac-
ing the keys so effortlessly that his key strokes

encore and received a standing ovation that dis-
pelled the.notion that Bahamians do not have a
love for classical music.

"We just love to have a variety of classical
music artists coming to the Bahamas," said Mrs
Linda Thomson, wife of the president and a com-
rv tatete

member in the Nassau Music Society.

"We want to expand our audience and number
of talents we bring into the Bahamas to share our
knowledge of art and music," she said. "Alber-
to's performance was really outstanding, he's
probably the best we've ever had in the
Bahamas. We might have a hard time satisfying

looked almost haphazard — as if the sonnet only future audiences"
came out accidentally. His fingers danced across
the piano in such a natural movement that it
seemed that the two — his hands and the instru-
ment — were always meant to be one.

After the 25 minute melody, Mr Nosé took a
humble bow to the ecstatic audience, only to re-
appear in a matter of seconds for his second
piece Chopin's Ballad number one, op 23.

The strong feel of this ballad was balanced

top pianists in the world.

ing jazz piano, and April 4 and 7 with Polina
Leschenko and Mark Drobinsky on
Oy UWTOMee UAT)



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

_ ASSISTANT INTERNAL AUDITOR
_ INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an- Assistant titer! Auditor in the Antena Audit
Department. : ;

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited. fo, the following:

Works unsupervised, and attends weekly meeting with the AGM/Chief Internal
Auditor ; Soyer
Consults with the Internal Auditor. or AGM/Chief Internal Auditor to ‘resolve
queries or obtain guidance on audit assignments
Develops audit programs for conducting audits, from the planning to TEpOnIne
stages for approval by the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor

Conduct financial, operational and ITS: audits at Head Office and the Family
Islands Operations
Provides feedback on Audit Clerks in the preliminary performance evaluation. for
them
Coaches, supervises, and assists in the training of Audit Clerks
Collects information and updating continuous audit monitors on plants and Family
Island. branches and produce regular reports
Assists, External Auditors i in the prepat ation of work papers for the annual audit
exercise

'

Job Requirements include:
Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline
Completion of a professional certification (ACCA, CA, CPA or the CIA)
Understand Internal Audit Standards and Procedures, and International Accounting
Standards :
Good investigative, interviewing, problem solving y and analytical skills
Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Knowledge of internal controls, operational audit techniques as well as the ability to
identify and assess risks
Good knowledge of the Corporation’s operating policies, systems and procedures
The ability to assess and evaluate the Corporation systems of internal control
The ability to conduct some risk analysis for major areas within the Corporation
The ability to conduct financial, operational and ITS audits and investigations and
exercise strict audit code of ethics (e.g, confidentiality)
Ability to lead, supervise and training ‘audit cler ks
A minimum of 3-5 years experience

+,
fe

>

+

2,
+

+

a

’ Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The

Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

February 10,2009.



She also added that soon he will be among the

eTHE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY has two more planned
performances on March 14 with Steve Koven play-



$5,000 gift
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furniture!









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ae ONE pede Se








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answer the skill question, attach
receipt(s) to your completed eni;\
and drop into the entry box at
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Contest ends March 13, 2009.

Empioyees of The d’Albenas Agency and Media Entegyicos ge!
their Immediate famities, are not eligible to enter

Win a $5,000 Gift Certificate from H_G_|

Name:

Address:



Telephane:





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009 °

THE TRIBUNE



. | SG: | |

The Tribune







MARY WHYLLY of Waterford, Eleuthera, demonstrates plaiting dur-

ing last weekend’s Pineapple Festival in Jensen Beach.
Doing something
different this Valentine

Bi By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features. Writer

TASTE community, togeth-
erness,.and love at Something's
Different — a café opened by
husband and wife team Ian and
Sam Moree at #6 Alexander
Street, Palmdale.

Smell freshly baked French
bread as you wander into the
cozy shop with a warm welcome
from Ian or Sam as they offer
you a taste of Italian biscotti
that delicately crumbles in your
mouth, almond brittle or their
famous guava jammies (short-
bread with intoxicating guava,
jam inside).

The lunch fare consists of
generous servings of either
hickory smoked ham and ched-
dar or the turkey and Swiss
cheese, on either white or whole

wheat French bread baked |

fresh in the kitchen. The sand-
wiches' generous servings of
meat will definitely fill you up
for lunch. :
The unique part of Some-

thing’s Different is their.dedi- . rs A
’ relations at the same time. The

cation to special occasions —
this St Valentine’s day is no
exception as the café is offer-
ing a mouthwatering array of
goodies for your sweetie. -

_ Anything that can fit into a
basket is a possibility. Some-
thing’s Different provides box-
es of their unique creations.
From hand decorated short-
bread cookies that have the
message "I love you" to bite
size spicy chocolate fudge and
almond brittle, as well as
coconut rum filled truffles-
Something’s Different has a
delectable selection.

"We're appealing to the male
market here," said Mrs Moree,
"and helping them show their
woman they do care, but the



‘have ah

~ NOTICE

basket can also be something
they'll enjoy."

"We understand that men
ard timexagound this
time. of 4 r gettitie tei girl-
friends oy wives gifts, so we've
made it éasy. If they taste some-
thing and love it, they'll buy it,"
said Mr Moree.

In their biggest selling bas-
ket, you can get an assortment
of biscotti, guava jammies, a
box of spicy chocolate fudge,
two "Something’s Different"
signature mugs, cupcake shaped
soaps and cider. .

"Basically a customer can
come in and tell us how much
they want to spend on a basket,
and we'll put together the per-
fect gift," said Mrs Moree.

And by the end of the:month,
the husband and wife team plan

- to be doing even more to help

bring everyone closer with bak-
ing classes. "There'll be cake and
cookie decorating classes, bread

baking, and how to make taffy |
~ and candy," Mrs Moree said.

‘It's just another way to share
the knowledge, and to build

cozy café will become home to

no more than eight students ~

under the instruction of the
Morees. They want to encour-
age their students to “celebrate
people and celebrate the rela-

‘tionships you've built with

them.”

Sam and Ian Moree also offer
wedding packages and break-
fast goods like croissants,
muffins, danishes and bagels.

‘. "We've had too many old pas-

tries in our lifetime to put peo-
ple through that, so we will
always guarantee freshness,"
she said.

They offer frozen goods by
the dozen to bake at home and
coffee as well.







NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN BUSSAINT BIEN-AIME,
SOLDIER ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
| naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement. of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas. 4

NOTICE is hereby given that GERMAINE TELUS-
VILCIN of ST..CHARLES VINCENT STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to, the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas,. and that any person who
knows .any reason why. registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts. within twenty-eight days from the 4" day of

February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

























IF YOU are a
chocolate lover
or know one,
make sure you.
visit Chocol—Art
Shoppe.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEPHTHA LAUREL BROWN
of CARMICHAEL RD,#8 HAMILTON SUBDIVISION
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen .of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of, the facts. within twenty-eight
days from the 11" day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Nees

NOTICE is hereby given that SEDLER NOEL of BLUE
HILL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturaiization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not t9 granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 11" day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Bo

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











i By JEFFARAH GIBSON

If you are a
chocolate lover or
know one, put a

CHOCOLATE has always Vio a vour”
been a: pleasing and popu- Valentine to do
lar flavor and the Chocol- lst.

eh . Jenny Pierre
Art Shop els gearing up Smith owner and

for St Valentine’s Day ina _ pastty Chef at the
. : Chocol—Art
big way. by offering a Shoppe spoke

with Tribune Taste
and told us a little
about their cre-
ations.

bs “We opened last
year and 'we have added a few different flavors to the
chocolate, we wanted to try something a little different,”
she said. :

This included pairing chocolate with local flavours-
tamarind, sugar apple, guava, and a popular flavor, Pina
Colada. vs
. “Adding the fruits to the chocolate was an idea that we
just explored with. It came out very good and people
seem to love it a lot,” she said.

They are also considering adding other flavors such as
sour sop, and dilly.

Their orders have definitely increased in preparation
for the Valentine’s day holiday.

“We have a great deal of persons who order with us _
throughout the year, and now we have had an increase in
orders. Simply because people love the creativity we
bring to the chocolates.”

Chocolates have always been a popular Valentine’s
gift, well received, but this year consider a unique shape
or flavor to add a twist to your “ I'love you token,”

At the Chocol-Art Shoppe you can either choose from
the huge variety of chocolates that are already made, or
you can make your own suggestions.

“People can come in and tell us what they want. They
provide the idea and we provide the creativity,” she said.

In the showcase there are chocolates made in the form
of lips- an idea they received from a customer. Other cus-
tom shapes include little pink roses on a stick and teddy
bears

Ladies, consider purchasing a tool box made of choco-
late for the special man in your life.

Some men have been more creative in their proposals.
“Some men take the edible chocolate box and put a wed-
ding ring in it which I think is so creative.

Another guy wanted a box of roses and he wanted
them to be in different colors and I thought that it was
very creative too,” Ms Smith said.

unique twist with their
homemade creations.



THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 11B



ARTS | S

Finding that
special place for
Valentine’s Day

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON

ARE you looking for that special place that would make the
perfect Valentine’s Day date? With little to do on the island it
may be difficult to plan and stray away from the traditional
Valentine’s Day date ‘Dinner and a movie’.

While there is nothing wrong with sticking to tradition, you
can add a little some extra to the dinner date and make it
something extra special.

SHERATON GRAND HOTEL

The 45th annual heart will be held at the Sheraton on Valen-
tine’s night. Dance the night away while contributing to a. very
good cause. The music will be provided by the Defense Force
Band, The S.G Band, and the Ed Rice Orchestra.

SANDALS ROYAL BAHAMIAN RESORT
Thanks to Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort you can have a

one of a kind Valentine’s experience with your partner. Cou-'

ples are invited to spend an entire day at the hotel. The pack-
age includes dinner, and along with that, couples are given a
complimentary rose as well as complimentary bottle of cham-
pagne. In addition, couples will have the privilege to enjoy
entertainment and unlimited drinks.

PROVENCE RESTAURANT
- Taking things back to the tradition, you can have dinner at a
very nice and exclusive restaurant. Provence Restaurant is
offering a Valentine’s Day menu along with their regular
menu. Included on the Valentine ’s Day menu is a five course
meal-appetizer, a salad, entree and dessert. You will also
receive complimentary champagne and full access to the bar.

OTHER GREAT IDEAS FOR THE
BUDGET CONSCIOUS VALENTINE
_ Youcan have a great Valentines date without breaking the
bank. You can check into one of the local spas and set and up
a couple’s massage for you and your mate, which is quite
romantic, relaxing and rejuvenating.

You can have a nice dinner at home by candlelight, fol-

lowed by a rose petal bath for two, or suupEte together and
watch a romantic movie.

Another great gift idea is a coupon book, which your signif-
icant other can.cash in at their convenience for a sexy treat or
escape from housework.



a President Kino Coakley stands in front of some of the groups
wor

GBAA presents its
annual Valentine
Art Exhibition

THE Grand Bahama Artists Association invites the com-
munity to begin their Valentine weekend celebrations at
their annual Valentine Art Exhibition.

Love, Music, Sweets and art will be in the air when local and

international visual, performing and culinary artists present.
themselves at an opening reception on Friday February 1, 2009

at the Glory Banks Art Gallery.

"Flowers and chocolate are great but this Valentine's we are ee
suggesting a date with the Artists of Grand Bahama," says.
newly elected Grand Bahama Art Association (GBAA) Pres: a

ident Kino Coakley.

"Art opens the world in our mind, liberates and evoker:
thought and we believe that our art exhibition provides the

Grand Bahama community that opportunity."
The GBAA membership is excited because their 14th annu-

al Art Exhibition is at a new venue, the Glory Banks Art’
Gallery at the Rand Nature Centre. This great venue allows’
visual artists to be joined with performing and culinary:artist.

to showcase the wide variety of artistry that is available on the
island.

Benefactor Glory Banks, herself an artist, was anxiots to
give her adopted home, a centre for art. The Glory Banks Art j
Gallery was officially opened in February 2008 at the 100-acre .
nature preserve on East Settler's way. It continues as a Cen-

tre for many cultural and educational exhibits.

"The Valentine Art Exhibition is a chance to view works
that are created by talented members of our community,” Mr
Coakley said. It is an excellent opportunity to learn more
about art, view works that embrace all artistic styles and
eee to the artists who can personally give insight into their
wor

Students from Orchestral School of Music, under the direc-
tion of Reynold Robinson will also perform. .

The Valentine Art Exhibition at the Glory Banks Art
Gallery continues until March 13, 2009 and is open Monday
to Friday from 8.30am to 4.30 pm. : Art educators are welco
to contact Miss Cecilia Bodie to set up a Valentine Art Ext
bition gallery visit with their students.













4
:
:
:





- a Haitian love tale -



PICTURED are

paintings of the
Yellow Bird show.
At right is Chantal
Ey Bethel standing
next to her painting
‘Choucoune.



FROM page 12

"This is a Haitian love story," said Mrs
Bethel, "There's:a lot of beautiful creation, in
the forms of music, art, and writing in Haiti, and
I think this is a reaction to the poverty and
‘political unrest there today — it is meant to
soothe the pain."

On the performance side of things, the story
of Yellow Bird or Choucoune was

equally astounding and gave light to the
beauty of the Haitian culture, a __

side that is largely unknown in this country.

Mrs Bethel explained 'that this negative

" stereotype of the Haitian people perhaps exists

because of a lack of understanding of their lan-
guage, as well as the peasant Haitian people
that are common immigrants to the Bahamas.

: There are in fact many literary intellectuals
from § aiti," she told Tribuné Art, "and that's’:
why the cultural exchange found in shows like
this one are so important."

Another onlooker said, "This has been such

- an eye opener."

Creator Julia Ames said her goal was to show

‘the fluidity of culture through such a show, and

to prove that a song commonly thought.to be
Bahamian, in fact originatéd in Haiti.
"This shows that culture is not static," she

- said, "Things have changed, and they continue

to change, ulema bringing cultures closer
together."» .

On hearing Choucoune read i in Creole, one
would think it was the language of lovers, of
romance and hope, Jack Paul read the poem in
its original language, as Alesha Hart read its
English translation:. ~: °,

Next, the verses were moved into song, as.
Francoise Newry beautifully sang to the tunes
of Pat Rahming on guitar.

Moving from the first part of "falling" into
the.second of "loving”, original love poems
were read. by Clinton Minnis and Alesha Hart
with a beautiful chorale led by soloist Jennifer
Bandoo-Wallace along with soprano singer
Francoise Newry, alto singer Julia Ames, and
tenor singers Christopher Thompson and. .
Adam Blake, with bass Bernard Bernard Far-
quharson.

The dances were really the highlight of the
night, with specialists Roderick Johnson and
Issa Saunders, as well as soloist dancer
Franklyn: Donaldson who. moved to the beats of
the song Black Orpheus in the third part of
"leaving", and "Can't Sleep" sung by
Demetrius Smith. ©

"Returning", the. fourth and final act served
as a closure to the night, with more love poems
and another rendition of Choucoune sung by
Naomi Taylor, Joey Edwards and Bobby Pin-

der.

The art pieces were all donated to the Hub in
its attempts to raise money for literacy. This
was organised by Julia Ames, the graphic artist
of Dupuch Publications, herself an artist on dis-
play at the Hub.."In the Bahamas literacy needs
to come first," she said, ‘for the generation now
growing up, we don't want them to end up not
understanding humanity."

“Love and art are the only solution," added
Mrs Bethel.













WEDNESDAY, AEE 11

Saying ‘Il
love you
with

chocolate

See page ten

‘Aclassic



‘The Tribune SECTION B ¢




performance
hy Alberto Nose

See page 9



Art works by well known Bahamian artists such as

3! Livingstone Pratt, Maxwell Taylor and Toby Lunn,
meshed into the momentum of Haitian-Bahamian
artists such as Bernard Petit, Jackson Petit and Chan-
tal EY Bethel. j

Mrs Bethel, wife of previous minister of health Dr.
Marcus Bethel, painted two pieces and constructed a
statue out of royal palm named: "Sankofa",
_ In "Choucoune", an oil on canvas measuring 24 by
24, the artist of Haitian descent used poetry alongside
her magnificent painting, to write in words the pain

By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

- FALLING, loving, leaving
and returning are the
motions of a relationship, as.
well as an act masterfully
performed at the Hub this

have to look to your past in order to know your
future."

Mrs Bethel translated the original Creole by Oswald
Durand, who wrote the poem in 1883 while in prison:

",.Choucoune had very dark skin and long hair
Her eyes were like candle light
Her breasts were firm and beautiful
If she could only be faithful...
..A Frenchman came to town
He found Choucoune beautiful

This painting

_entitled ‘Euphoria’

by Julia Ames was
on display at the
show Yellow Bird
(or Choucoune

past Saturday January 7
-with art that depicts the sto-
ry of Yellow Bird (or
Choucoune in Creole) as the

BacKarey:

li By JEFFARAH GIBSON

SENDING an arrangement —
of pink, red, yellow, and white »
roses or a mixture of carna- :

tions, daisies, and lilies is a per-
fect get well gift, a good way

of letting someone. know that.
they are special, and an even °

better way of saying ‘T love
you’.

Valentine’s Day is almost
here, and many of you want to
show your significant other how

_much you care about them.
Kristina Major at Floral Fan-

tasia says one of the best ways _

to say ‘I love you’ is with a bou-
quet of flowers. ‘Ploral designs
is an art form, it takes much
creativity to create an arrange-
ment of flowers and it is one of

the most common gifts given
and received on Valentine’s
Day,” she told Tribune Arts.

This Valentines Day, at Floral .

Fantasia, its all about the roses.
“For this Valentines Day we are
focusing on roses, the red, yel-

“low, white; and pink. People are

purchasing one dozen, and half
dozen. But even though this
Valentines Day we have been
making a lot of arrangements
consisting of roses, it is whatev-
er the customer wants,” she said.

For many years the act of giv-
ing flowers has been long asso-
ciated with Valentines Day, and
Mother’s Day.

Roses are particularly popu- ,

lar.on Valentine’s Day because
they symbolise love.
“T guess throughout the world

‘from thém.

felt on the canvas.
"In my piece the swan is covering the lady' S body, as
inspired by the story of Choucoune, and the: bitd in the
cage in the background represents the entrapment you
feel when you're in love," the artist explained.
The two birds in the painting represent the two men
that loved Choucoune, and they're both shown as
looking back to the past, because the artist said, "you

Valentine’s in bloom

flowers are associated with
Valentines Day-particulary red
roses. This makes people feel
very special when they are giv-
en these nice little gifts.

Although many of you may
be on a strict budget this year,
you can still remind your true
love how much you appreciate
them with flowers. You don’t
have to purchase red roses or
white roses, less expensive
blooms can still express your
feelings. *

There are flowers that can be
appreciated by the man in your
life, she added, although there
are some guys who shy away
“In a situation like
that, a gift basket that compose
of masculine items would be a
better choice,” she said.

He spoke French : .

Choucoune fell in love with him... in Creole). }
| felt pain

Choucoune left me

If she would only come back to me

It was like my ankles were chained...

SEE page 11



SNA iE RATAN ne wx
r

Gift baskets are an ideal
choice for anyone on your.
Valentine gift list. .

“We have made arrange-
ments with flowers and choco-
lates that is supported by a back
board that we decorate with,
flowers. We have made a vari-
ety of baskets as well as a teddy
bear in a massive balloon. It is a
matter of what the customer
wants,” she said.

How do you ensure that the
blooms stay as fresh as possi-
‘ble: ensure it has significant
water and keep,as much plant
food in it as possible.

“When you change the water
of your roses you want to pour
some of the water out and leave
‘as much plant food in the vase
as possible,” said Mrs Major.



Full Text
My ‘The Tribun

?m lovin’ it

WINDY

Volume: 105 No.66



are I

Sources
within ©
the force
describe a
‘culture of
corruption’

@ By TRIBUNE
STAFF WRITERS

THE proliferation of danger-
ous drugs on the streets of New
Providence has landed squarely
at the doorstep of the country’s
main drug-fighting agency —
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force — as sources within the
department insist that some
members of its own unit con-
fiscate and re-sell cocaine to
dealers on the streets.

In an exclusive interview with
The Tribune, sources within the

- RBPF blew the lid off what was
described as a “culture of.cor-

“ruption” within various depart:

ments of the force.
As the main drug fighting

unit, corrupt officers within the .

Drug Enforcement Unit (DEU)
were accused yesterday of being
some of the main offenders in
the steady flow of cocaine and
marijuana on the streets of Nas-
sau.

Stating that often only the
“small fries” were led along the

_SEE page 10



S3F |
71F

SUNNY AND ;













DANCERS, in town for the 2009 World Pro-Am Championships at Atlantis, performed yesterday in a special





BAHAMAS EDITION |



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

CARS FOR SALE.
HELP WANTED
Mere

RSET 5



show for children at the National Centre for the Performing Arts on Shirley Street.

Suspected arson attack ‘may
not be related to home fire’

By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

EARLY investigations into

the suspected ‘arson attack on °
the car of a senior customs

officer suggest. that the inci-
dent is not related to the fire
that destroyed the home of a
special customs task force offi-

cer late last year.

Police reported yesterday
that Gregory Mortimer was
“off island” when his car was

AUTO INSURANCE

r art : your





| Eleuthera Em
4 Tek: (240) $32-2802 | Tel (247) 336-2304

set on fire outside his Sunset

- Park home at 4am. Monday.

Asst Supt Jeffrey Dele-
veaux, head of Fire Services,
said that police are now await-
ing the return of Mr Mortimer
to assist them in their investi-
gations into the incident.

At the moment, Mr Dele-

veaux said, police have no
leads and are not questioning
anyone in.connection with the
matter.
The fire chief said that while
initial investigations suggest

that this fire does not resem-

ble the one that destroyed the

home of customs officer Rose-.

lyn Ritchie in November of
last year, police are not ruling

out any possibility at this time. .

Last month, Clive Kent
Schroeter, 37, was charged ina
Magistrate's Court in connec-

tion with the fire that’

destroyed Mrs Ritchie’s 10-
room Sea Link Drive home.

Court dockets. allege that
Schroeter, while being con-
cerned with others, intention-
ally caused the home of Philip
and Roslyn Ritchie to be set
on fire.

SEE page 10

Online
electronic
Tribune is

officially
launched

THE Tribune's electron:

ic newspaper was Officially
launched online today. The

e-paper ‘flipbook, which -

makes it easy for readers'to
navigate from page to page,
is available online at
www.tribune242.com .

"We are excited to now :

be able to make our news-
paper available online. We
are still working on the
development of our full mul-
ti-media interactive site, but
are pleased at the positive
reaction to the launch of this
first phase," said Tribune
Publisher Eileen Carron.

The e-paper is an exact
replica of The Tribune and
includes all advertisements
placed in the physical paper,
giving advertisers even
greater exposure than they
had before.

SEE page eight |
















Sia gaits)




Some officers are
allegedly being oad

to to make serious
“cases ‘

aaa all oe fe aticiit
occurrence is crippling
efforts of ee orang staff





m@ By TRIBUNE STAFF WRITERS.




SOME corrupt eice within the prosecutions department
are reportedly being paid up to $5,000 to ensure that files
_ | relating to serious matters such as drugs, rape, and firearm

_ possession either go missing, or are never presented before
the courts, The Tribune has been told.

According to well-placed sources within the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, the act of making cases “disappear”
has become an all too frequent occurrence that is crippling |
the efforts of hard-working officers.

“You have some serious cases come forward like firearm
-possession,. AK 47’s even,” one source said, “and if you
notice they would have stated on the docket that the defen-
dant and counsel.are always present. But there is no appear-
ance by the prosecution witnesses.”

In other examples, officers who were “on the take” would
simply insist that the exhibits for a case were not ready,
‘forcing another time consuming adjournment. Another road
block that is reported to be used is the act of not calling the
complainant’s name when their'case actually comes before
the court. ©

This happened recently in the case of a mother whose
young daughter was allegedly raped by her step father.

“This is the norm. This is not just an isolated incident. It’s
with firearms, drugs — you would have files sent, the Mag-
istrate would sign the summons, they are stamped, but cer-
tain prosecutors would hide them away in the office, put
them in files that have already been cenipietee: or just lose

a page 10






















Spate of suspected suicides.
leads to public lecture

lm By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A RECENT spate of sus-

_ pected suicides and a deepen-
ing global economic crisis led -
psychiatrist Timothy Barrett
to address the issue in a public
lecture yesterday.

The consultant psychiatrist
for the Public Hospitals*
Authority and head of the
Community and Counseling
Assessment Centre explored
the statistics, reasons for sui-
cide and ways of preventing
it in his lecture, ‘Suicide: Are
the number’s increasing?’ at
Wesley Methodist Church in
Blue Hill Road yesterday
morning.

Around 80 healthcare work-
ers and concerned members
of the public learned that old- .
er men are most at risk*and”
teenagers are becoming more *
and more vulnerable to

on aS depression’ and the suicidal

DR TIMOTHY BARRETT addressed

the issue of suicide yesterday.

SEE page eight
SUL ASN
ELT LN
LIFE 1NSURARCE
TRE LULL

RULED ELAN)
SE NLL Bt

BARES dalkwens o
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



- Former BEC general manager

Says privatisation a ‘good idea’

Memorial Service at
Clifton National Park

ON SUNDAY, February 15 the Coalition To Save Clifton
will hold a Memorial Service at the Clifton National Park for
those who lived, worked, died, and were buried at the Clifton
Plantation.

The ecumenical service, which begins at 3pm, will be con-
ducted by the Bahamas Christian Council.

A motorcade will leave the juncture of Baillou Hill and
Carmichael Roads at 2pm for the service site at the southern
end of the park.

Rev CB Moss said the public is invited to participate in the
motorcade and service.










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THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s former general
manager said that he views pri-
vatisation of the entity as a
“good idea” but only if there is
significant Bahamian partici-
pation and government regu-
lation.

The government said last
year that it intends to privatise
BEC after it completes the
process of privatising the
Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC).

According to ex-GM
Bradley Roberts (not the for-
mer MP), who served in that
position at the corporation for
four and a half years, entities
like BEC are “kind of like the
people’s birthright” and if pri-
vatised, should be handled sim-
ilarly.

“We need to think out care-

_ fully the form of privatisation.

I believe it’s always good if ina

Bernard Rd - Mackey St- Thompson Bivd

HIT a Terre

| sifft SHIRT eT

OUSE

/FLORAL & EVENT DESIGN

3 Blocks North of Wulff Road)

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But only ‘if Bahamians
can participate’

major venture like that we try
to ensure that Bahamians can
participate in a meaningful
way. I think it’s good to have
joint venture type relationships
where you can have foreign
expertise but ensure that
Bahamians can be significant
shareholders,” he said.

“Others from the outside
don’t necessarily have the same
mindset. If you look at what
has happened in some other
areas, a big company from the
US or Canada comes and they
buy into an organisation, but
at a given point in time they
can decide, ‘Well from a busi-
ness point of view we need to
get rid of this organisation’. But
Bahamians don’t have any-
where to go and Bahamians
should always be thinking in
the best interest of the
Bahamas,” he said.

Meanwhile, he added that at
present the corporation is man-
dated to provide electricity at a
flat rate throughout the islands
— something that a private com-
pany might not be minded to
do.

Politicians

“TI feel certain that politicians
will not allow that to change,
but whether they do it in a par-
tial way or-a total way I think
they have to take a lot of things
into account,” he said.

As the government moves
towards eventually starting to
privatise the company, it has
indicated that a first step is
clearing up inefficiencies at the
corporation to make. it a more
attractive prospect which’is
more responsive to customer
needs.

Mr Roberts suggested that
one of the ways operational
efficiency could be enhanced
is to ensure that professionals
employed at the corporation
are able to make decisions
without interference from

“political people”.

Tentatively stating that he is is
“not saying that this is what
went on or what goes on now”,
Mr Roberts said that he
believes government organisa-
tions such as BEC could be
“just as efficient as a private

organisation but 'the reality is

that sometimes there can be
interference that is _counter-

- productive.”

“If you look at the terms of
reference of the minister, the
chairman, et cetera, it’s OK,
but it’s in reality sometimes

‘that you do have a problem.

So a lot depends on the people
who are given these positions.
If you have a professional



PROFESSIONAL DANCERS from Italy, in town for the 2009 World

approach where everybody
decides, ‘look we’re going to
always be focused on what’s
best for the public the customer
the organisation’, once that’s
done, the organisation, public
or private, can do well.”

As for whether a transition
to a private company would
mean less blackouts, Mr
Roberts said the public must
realise that some blackouts are
unavoidable. '

“Sometimes it’s BEC’s

fault,” he said, “But sometimes
it’s weather conditions. Or
workmen excavating the roads
and damaging lines, or cars dri-
ving into overhead lines.”

Tim Clarke/Tr



Pro-Am Championships at Atlantis, perform yesterday for children in
Nassau at the National Centre for the Performing Arts of Shirley Street.

oy A CES
Valentine
Come and See our Silk Floral Arrangements!
You Won't Have to Water them and They Won't Die!

Beau

ul Flowers with grasses flowing down in Pretty

, industry here

Bahama Rock lays off 19 workers

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Bahama Rock
laid off 19 workers on Monday,
a labour official on Grand
Bahama has confirmed.

Tyrone Gibson, deputy direc-
tor of labour in Freeport, said
the Department of Labour was

' given notice of the lay-offs on

Friday.

“The company notified us
that they were making 19 peo-
ple redundant and our officers
are trying to determine who and
what positions were affected,”
said Mr Gibson.

Walter Reed, general man-
ager at Bahama Rock, said that
all the laid off workers were
Bahamians.

He noted that staff cuts were
necessary because of the signif-
icant decline in the construction
business.

“There has been a significant
downturn in the construction
in the Bahamas
and in the Caribbean.

“We are still running produc-
tion (at the plant in Freeport),
but at a reduced level,” he
explained.

Bahama Rock is operated by
Martin Marietta Materials,
which supplies aggregate prod-
ucts to the Bahamas, as well as
various export markets in the
United States and_ the
Caribbean.

Martin Marietta also oper-
ates 300 quarry plants in the US
and Canada. The Freeport plant
is said to be the most profitable
for the company, and also
pumps $20 million a year into
the Grand Bahama economy.

Mr Reed said that Bahama
Rock is still continuing its major
harbour expansion at the
Freeport Container Port. 9

“We do not foresee any more
lay-offs in the future and we
anticipate that the market will
improve significantly at the end
of the year,” he said.
THE TRIBUNE





Tourists fined $1,000 for eating iguanas and juvenile conch

By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TOURISTS who posted photographs
of themselves eating iguanas and juvenile
conch on social networking site Face-
book were fined $1,000 in Exuma Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Alexander David Rust, 24, from Indi-
ana, and Vanessa Star Palm, 23, from
Illinois, both pleaded guilty to the charges
of possessing undeveloped conch con-
trary to the Fisheries Resources Act and
taking a prohibited wild species protect-
ed under the Wild Animal Protection
Act. The pair had undeveloped conch in
their possession while in Allan’s Cay,
Exuma, between January 15 and 25, and





WILDLIFE offence on aera

photographed themselves grilling and
eating a critically endangered iguana.

They told the court they were igno-
rant of Bahamian wildlife protection
laws. Magistrate Ivan Ferguson excused
Palm from the two charges with a warn-
ing and ordered Rust to pay fines for
each charge or serve time in prison.

For possession of undeveloped conch

LOCAL NEWS



PNET USS eae

Rust was ordered to pay $800 or serve a
four month jail term, and for possession
of an iguana he was fined $200 or told he
would spend two months in prison.

The maximum penalty for possession
of undeveloped conch is a $5,000 fine
and one year in prison, and for possession
of an iguana magistrates can enforce a
$300 penalty and six months:in prison. ,

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 3

Executive director of the Bahamas
National Trust (BNT) Eric Carey said:
“We are pleased they got convicted and
we are really pleased the police worked
with us to apprehend these people.

* “But the fact that they didn’t get the
maximum penalty shows we have a lot of
work to do to sensitise magistrates to the
fact that offences against wildlife and
environmental laws need to be taken
seriously. It’s foolishness that these peo-
ple plead ignorance when they come
from-a society where they know most
wildlife is protected. These people ought
to be banned from this country. We
understand tourism is down but we don’t
need hooligans abusing our laws.”

The Facebook photographs of Rust

and Palm also featured two other men;



one who is standing next to Rust as they
cut up undeveloped conch and another
cating iguana meat with Rust. It is under-
stood one of the men is a resident of
Nassau and although police maintain
investigations are continuing, they have
not confirmed the two men pictured are
wanted in connection with the offence.
Mr Carey said: “The names of these
men have been sent to me via e-mail and
they should also be charged and brought
before the courts, but we have had no
assistance from the police in doing this.”
The BNT chief has contacted Depart-
ment of Marine Resources to help pursue
the other two men and has called on Min-
ister for the Environment Earl.Deveaux
to introduce higher penalties for breach-
ing the Wild Animal Protection Act.

In bri



‘Trio ue

over Weapon,

ammunitions
iZure

THREE people.charged in
connection with a weapon and
ammunitions seizure earlier
this week were arraigned in
Magistrate's Court yesterday.

Police have charged Levar- ~
do Forbes, 24; Trevardo Tay-
lor, 24, of Derby Road; and
Evelyn Ann Pratt, 24, of
South Beach with possession
of an unlicensed firearm and
possession of ammunition. _

It-is alleged that on Sunday,
February 8, the accused were
found with’a silver and black
InterArm .380 pistol and four
live rounds of .380 ammuni-
tion.

The accused, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel at Court Eight, Bank
Lane, pleaded not guilty and
were remanded to Her
Majesty's Prison.

They‘are expected to réturn
to court on February i2 fora
bail hearing.

Forbes’ and Taylor are rep-
resented by attorney Dion —
Smith and Pratt is being repre-
sented by lawyer Tai Pinder.

It is alleged that the accused
led police’ on a high speed
388 western New
e, during which a
as thrown Ons the

Man remantied
to prison on
armed robbery
allegations

A 29-year-old man of Union
Village has. been remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison on armed
robbery charges.

It is alleged that on Monday,
December 15, Lewis Alex
Williams while armed with a
handgun robbed Jody Morris of
$800 cash, the property of the
Shell Automotive Service Sta-
tion.

It is also alleged that on Sun-
day, December 21, Williams,
being concerned with others,
robbed Fernand Francois of
$900 cash, an assortment of -
phone cards and two packages
of Backwoods cigars valued at
$96, the property of Texaco Ser-
vice Station on Prince Charles
Drive, ,

Williams, who appeared
before Magistrate Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nassau
Street, was not required to
plead to the charges.

He was remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison. The case was
adjourned to May 25.





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from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
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area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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STEPHEN’S CLOSE CONTROVERSY

1 | Would- be home owners

threaten legal action in

subdivision furore

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

A GROUP of would-be home
owners embroiled in the confu-
sion over failed subdivision,
Stephen's Close, are threatening
legal action against the banks,
developer and lawyers involved.’

Senator Jerome Fitzgerald said
although he hopes the continuing
negotiations will lead to an out of
court settlement, a few of his

clients are agitating to sue devel-

oper Denise Burrows, attorneys
Dion Foulkes and Desmond
Edwards, and the banks that
approved the loans for the trou-
bled subdivision if their negotia-
tions with the involved parties are

_ not soon resolved.

Mr Fitzgerald is the lawyer for
six of the clients who purchased
lots in the proposed subdivision.

"IT represent (a few) of the -
‘clients involved in that matter who

unfortunately had paid substan-
tial amounts of money with
deposits and (are) paying bank

loans and so forth for the.gonsne

struction of those hom
when the Ministry of Works
in and ceased construction (it left

a lot of them abandoned and out °

of a lot of. money," Mr Fitzgerald

told The Tribune yesterday.

"Of course the clients have
been somewhat frustrated and
have said to me that if things don't
work out in short order they will
be instructing me to bring action
against the bank and lawyers
involved," he said.

While refusing to divulge the






“Of course
the clients
have been
somewhat
frustrated...”



Jerome Fitzgerald

specifics of the negotiations, Mr -

Fitzgerald said he is hopeful the
process will move swiftly to avoid
lengthy and costly litigation.

"Litigation is expensive and I]
am always one to try and find a
way to settle matters if I see that is
an alternati i is case
that is a very real alternative —
and I'm pursuing it with vigour,"
he said.

Complaints

News of the controversy broke
in 2007-when public complaints
were made against the high-pro-
file attorneys who reportedly
advised the banks involved that
the subdivision had the green light
for development, when it is
claimed, only approval in principle
had been granted in September,
2004.

In Naveniber 2005 the Min-
istty of Works issued a stop-order,
claiming construction had started
without necessary government





IN THE SUPREME COURT

“provisions of the Act.



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
Common Law ad Equity Division
IN THE MATTER of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER. of ALL THAT piece parcel or lot
of land comprising an area of Nine thousand and
Sixteen (9,016) square feet being Lot number Seven
(7) of “Bel-Air Estates” Subdivision situate on the
Southern side of Carmichael Road approximately:
8,535 feet west of Blue Hill Road in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND
IN THE MATTER of the Petition of SHAMEKA L. MORLEY

NOTICE
_SHAMEKA L. MORLEY, the Petitioner claim to be the: owner in fee
_simple estate in possession of the parcel of land hereinbefore described
and free from encumbrances. The Petitioner has made application to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section
3 of The Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have their title to the said land
investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared
in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the

Copies of the file plan may be inspected during normal hours at:-

The Registry of The Supreme Court; and
The Chambers of Ramsey & Associates,
Ramses Building, 23 Plantol Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person or persons having a right
of Dower or an adverse claim not recognized in the Petition shall within
Thirty (30) days after the of the Notice herein filed in the Registry of
the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau aforesaid and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of such claim | the prescribed
form, verified by an affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such
person to file and serve a Statement of such claim within Thirty (30)
days herein will operate as a bar to such claim.

Dated this 20" day of October, A.D., 2008

RAMSEY & ASSOCIATES
Chambers
Ramses Building
23 Plantol Street
Nassau, The Bahamas _



2008
No. 00332





permits and approvals being
granted. Subsequently, many of
the families were left with incom-
plete homes and thousands of dol-
lars in mortgage payments over
their heads.

In some cases the banks sus-
pended mortgage payments pend-
ing a resolution of the stalled
approvals.

Senator Foulkes, and former
FNM candidate for St Cecilia
Desmond Edwards, represented
the clients who were looking to
secure loans to invest in the pro-
posed subdivision off Cowpen
Road.

’ Throughout the ordeal, Mr
Foulkes maintained his law firm
was "totally blameless" and had
done all that was required of it.

Last September, developer
Denise Burrows said she was
doing her best to achieve a "fair
solution to what has been a diffi-

’ cult situation" for clients bur-

dened with mortgages in the trou-
bled area.

’ During a ruling for a separate
case last September, Justice John
Lyons.ruled that.selling lots in
unapproved subdiyisions is an
offenee-and‘denounced-all lawyers
who facilitate the selling or pur-
chasing of land that lack full gov-
ernment approval.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. |

Publisher/Editor 1972-

“Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
‘Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

How Tribune was pushed onto the web

ON ONE of yesterday morning’s talk shows,
a caller accused The Tribune of stopping deliv-
ery of this newspaper to the Family Islands to

spite Bahamasair. The caller gave no reason’

for The Tribune wanting to spite Bahamasair,
nor can we think of any.

When the New Year opened, although The
Tribune was cutting costs, stopping delivery of
the newspapers to the Family Islands was not
open for discussion.

However, we were pushed into making a
hasty decision when Bahamasair announced it
had increased our rates more than 400 per cent,
and we could find no alternative carrier inter-
ested in filling the gap.

In less than two weeks — because of our con-

cern for our Family Island readers —a website -

was built to try to fill the void. ©

We at The Tribune have always been aware
of our civic duty to try to keep our readers
informed throughout the archipelago.

We have always subsidised the Family

Islands. All Family Island depots bought the ,
newspaper for resale at the same price’ as those |"

in New Providence.

In addition The Tribune paid all transporta-
tion costs to the islands with no extra charge to
our out island customers, although on resale
some of the depots did sell the newspaper at a
higher price than the 75 cents in Nassau.

The Tribune did not benefit from these’ Jocal

markups.

For years The Tribune had been charged a
flat monthly rate by Bahamasair for delivery
of the papers to the islands to which it flew.
Suddenly in early January we received a letter
dated December 31, .2008 from Bahamasair
informing us that on that date — Dec. 31 — the
price of carrying the papers had been increased
by weight. If we had continued with these price
terms, by the end of the year we would have
paid Bahamasair, well over $200,000. We had
always subsidised the out islands, but that cost
now made it prohibitive.

We were already well into January before
we received Bahamasair’s December notice
that we were paying per week what we had
been paying per month.

’ The Tribune tried to open the lines for nego-
tiation with Bahamasair, but got a take- it- -Or-
leave it reply.

Often our telephone calls were not returned.
We started to explore other.carriers, but noth-
ing worked out.

Our readers had become so accustomed to
same-publication-day service that going back
to the days of mail boat delivery was not an
option. Added to which over the years there
was a certain air of indifference at Bahamasair

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about the timely delivery of the newspaper. For
example, a few weeks ago Long Island cus-
tomers called to complain that Bahamasair had
not delivered The Tribunes for two days. Over
the years this has been a common complaint.
Another complaint was that the papers were
delivered too late, and, therefore, could not be
sold. Not only did we pay Bahamasair for all
these deliveries, but we had to write off the late
papers because by then what was once news
had become history.

Not being able to negotiate with Bahamasair,
we decided to introduce an electronic Tribune
for the islands. As soon as Bahamasair man-
agement read The Tribune’s announcement
that yesterday was to be the last day that its
delivery services would be used for the news-
paper, Bahamasair contacted us offering to
reduce the rates. It offered to lower its rates
from 46 cents to 30 cents a pound. It admitted
that even with this reduction the rates were 100
per cent higher than what we were paying.
Because of their lack of proper notice they
offered to bill the month of January at our orig-
inal monthly flat rate, for which we are grateful.

We appreciate that Bahamasair’s costs have
increased, but so have The Tribune’s. The only
difference is that government subsidises
Bahamasair, no one subsidises The Tribune

,, and so we are forced to make very hard business
decisions — this is one of them. We were under-.
writing the Family Islands even with Bahama-

sair’s original rates, however, the new rates
make this financial burden insupportable.
Although there are those who believe they
cannot live without the feel of the real Tribune
in their hands, we have had many other enthu-
siastic reactions.
One of them came yesterday morning from

_ Theo Bergmann in far off Iceland. “This is just

great. Good job!” was his message.

Theo, who married a Bahamian girl, was at
one time on The Tribune’s staff. He is now
back in his Icelandic hometown. Theo, it’s good
to hear from you. Now through your Tribune
you can once again keep in touch with your
islands in the sun.

“The new website has certainly pushed The
Tribune to the forefront of the local online
media and onto.the world wide web with a
bang. The advertisements are large and, colour-
ful and navigation through the pages is very

simple. As usual the content of the articles by .

your writers are second to none in the Bahamas.
Congratulations!” says James Saunders’ e-mail.
Although many are saddened that this day
has come, from-the messages we are now receiv-
ing even more are delighted that at last The
Tribune has arrived on the world wide web.



not expect Baha Mar to be



If the Police
Force ain’t broke
don’t fix it!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Recent reports in the local
press have prompted me to
make these observations for
the benefit of our citizens. Our
Police Force continues to be
the topic of conversation in
the media and among politi-
cians. There are those who
have expressed their lack of
respect and trust in the Acting
Commissioner of Police.

There are those who talk

- about political interference,

notably the leader of the
Police Staff Association, and
now we. have those who are
trying to change the law
regarding the tenure of the
Commissioner of Police and
several of his executive offi-
cers, :

It has been said by some-
one, that if it ain’t broke don’t
fix it. The Police Force is the

_ most éfficient organisation. in

our public service.

There are faults, concerns
and complaints, which the
force has been making mas-
sive strides to correct, eg; dis-
cipline and the need for a mas-
sive effort to eradicate minor
offences. Corruption and
aggressive conduct continues.
When exposed the force deals
with those officers responsi-
ble. The efforts of the Force in
the fight against hardened gun
toting criminals, the drug
entrepreneurs and all those
who are endangering our lives
and putting us in fear have
been magnificent.

Their efforts in protecting
us from these violent demons
exposes them to danger every

’ day and night, but they are

continuously displaying the
courage and determination. to
provide “substantial and visi-
ble police presence on those
streets where the fear of crime
is greatest by implementing a
vigorous stop and search pol-
icy to remove firearms and
drugs from our streets and an
intelligence-led policing poli-

cy, which includes targeting”

and taking out major crimi-

nals, especially the firearms,

drugs and financial dealers.




LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



The population at our pris-

ons, the large backlog of cases -

in our courts and the daily
media reports indicates to me
that we are winning the war
and with the continued help
from those supportive mem-
bers of the public we could

- take control of our streets

again.

However, our politicians
seem determined to fix some-
thing that does not need fix-
ing. Firstly, the big promo-
tions. The number of senior
officers were a lot more than
the legal establishment, in par-
ticular those assistant com-
missioners.

The establishment is for
five assistant commissioners.
I have, always wondered if
Commissioner Paul Far-
quharson, .an established
administrative genius, had
approved this promotion.

I also wonder if the Police
Service Commission appoint-
ed by the government had
anything to say or any objec-
tion to this breach of the
establishment. Could it be that
there was political interfer-
ence?

Then there was the com-
plaint of corruption’in the
Ministry of Housing.

It was made to the Police
and should have been the
responsibility of the assistant
commissioner for crime to
direct the investigation.

It was sent to a uniform
branch officer where it
remained dormant. Is this the
political interference suggest-
ed by the head of the Police
Staff Association in a recent
statement to the press?

We are now debating a bill
to have the commissioner and
his executive officers serve for
a period of five years, which
could be extended to another
five years by the politicians.
John Peel joins the Force at
age 18 years. He educates

himself, works very hard and
moves up in the ranks. At 45
years of age John.Peel pro-
moted to commissioner of

' police. John Peel is married

and has children.

He is in a job that he has
dedicated his life to and his
desire is to continue after five
years.

He has to work to convince
the government of the day
that he deserves another five
years. Will John Peel be able
to perform his duties impar-
tially?

Will John Peel be willing to
deal with politicians in the
government, who may attempt
to interfere in his daily admin-
istration of the force? John
Peel wants to stay for. another
five years he will always think
that he is beholden to the gov-
ernment of the day and must
not do or say anything to
upset those politicians. Major
Sears gave evidence in the
Oakes case.

He was a senior fiche then.
He offended the Bay Street
boys. He did not make com-
missioner. Sir Albert Miller
was just friends of two UBP
politicians, which prevented
him from being commissioner.

l agree that a commissioner
of police should serve for not
more than ten years; but I do
not agree with the responsi-
bility placed on him to please
the government of the day or
leave after five years.

Make it mandatory retire-
ment for the commissioner of
police at age 60, provided that
he is in good health. ;

The commissioner must be

_free to conduct his duties with-

out,fear or any. interference

‘from the politicians.

It is surprising that the
police Staff Association has
not.given this ‘matter the

- extensive consideration it

deserves.

PAUL THOMPSON Sr.
Former Assistant
Commissioner

' of Police,
Nassau,
February 9, 2009.

Why spend hundreds of thousands of
dollars on repaving West Bay Street?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Passing through Goodmans
Bay heading west through
Cable Beach yesterday I saw

significant confirmation that .

Government certainly does

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able to find a significant part-

ner to fund the proposed

' development as otherwise why

are they spending possibly a
few hundreds of thousands of
dollars on repaving West Bay
Street?

I recall many years ago.

when then Hon Loftus Roker
was Minister of Public Works
and I believe it was around
the time that Carnival built

' Crystal Palace and there was

then a request to divert West
Bay.

As quick as he’s sharp Min-
ister Roker told all that Gov-
ernment had just completed
the new southern two-lane
carriageway, no road was

- going to be diverted and that

was that, in true, Roker fash-
ion.
Certainly if Baha Mar
before the required cut-off in
March, 2009 are able to find a
suitably funded partner and
then they wish to proceed with

. the detouring of West Bay as

proposed then if this
$270,000.00 plus expense on
resurfacing of West Bay Street
will.be to the cost of Baha
Mar and certainly not the tax-
payers.

H RAHMING
Nassau,
January 30, 2009.

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LOCAL NEWS



In brief

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its group health division,
BahamaHealth, are major
sponsors of this year’s
“Celebrate Heart Month,”
which runs through Febru-
ary.

Family Guardian’s vice-
president of the group life
and health division Linda
Jarrett (left) recently pre-
sented the company’s
sponsorship pledge to Nel-
lie Brown of the Bahamas
Heart Association.

In making the presenta-
tion, Mrs Jarrett said: “We
are happy to partner with
the Heart Association in
this important health ini-
tiative which runs concur-
rently with Bahama-
Health’s 100-day chal-
lenge. BahamaHealth’s
focus is to bring awareness
and solutions to the seri-
ous health risks associated
with obesity, including
heart disease, and our
partnership with the Heart
Association is very time-

106 people are
cited for traffic
offences in

police exercise

A FIVE-HOUR “‘spe-
cial joint operation” con-
ducted by police at the ~
Marathon and Robinson
Roads intersection result-
ed in 106 people being cit-
ed for traffic offences.

Officers from Wulff
Road and East Street
South police stations
mounted the operation
between 3pm and 8pm.

During the five-hour
period, officers also arrest-
ed three people for having
an outstanding warrant,
one for disorderly behav-
iour arid another for mak-
ing threats to police offi-
cers.

m CORRECTION

MONDAY’S Tribune
article under the headline
“Rastafarians claim certain
private schools are unconsti-
tutional” inaccurately report-
ed Summit Academy as
being located on Thompson
Boulevard. ;

The Summit Academy is
in fact located on East Bay
Street, near the Montagu.

Wit He
eS

FOR PEST PROBLEMS §

PHONE: 322-2157



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net



CABLE services to around 150
homes in eastern New Providence
were wiped out when a power cable
fell on a.fibre optics line, causing it to
catch fire.

The somewhat freak occurrence
took place at around 9.30am on Mon-
day in Tamarind Street, Camperdown,
cutting out cable services for hundreds
of residents of Winton and Camper-

2.30pm.

first thought.

down throughout the day.

Cable Bahamas operations manager
Lester DeGregory explained that the
fibre optics line which the power cable
had fallen on caught fire and was
replaced by a specialist team after
the Bahamas Electricity Corporation
repaired their line at around

But engineers later found there had
been more damage to the cable than

Mr DeGregory said: “It had burnt
our cable further down the street so we

that.”

had to replace additional cable as well
and discharge another crew to do

Television

Modem and television services
returned to normal in the area at
around 6.30pm Mr DeGregory said.

He added: “It’s not exactly a freak
incident, as it happens around twice a
year and it is usually right at that same
location, but in this incident it also

to around 150 homes |

burnt the cable further down.”
BEC general manager Kevin Bas-
den said he was not aware of the pow-

er line falling in that location before,

. and said in this instance it was brought
down by a vehicle. |

He said: “A dump truck in the area

snagged one of our lines and
that resulted in the lines coming
together so we had to carry out repairs
‘as well.”

BEC customers in the immediate
area would have been affected by the
accident, Mr Basden said.

The Bahamas ‘needs more all

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net




























JAMAICA defied global
tourism trends by recording a four
per cent increase in tourist stop-
overs in the last year and another
leap in January — evidence that
The Bahamas needs to offer more
“all inclusive” and cheaper vaca-
tions, according to Minister of
Tourism, Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace.

Last year The Bahamas record-
ed a five per cent decrease in
overall tourism figures, a slight
reduction from initial expectations
of an eight per cent fall-off by
year’s end.

But according to figures
released by the Jamaican govern-
ment, Jamaica saw their stop-over
arrivals jump by four per cent

Oe w overall in 2008 compared with

Vincent Vander




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Minister speaks out after
Jamaica defies tourism trends



And despite dismal global con-
ditions, January 2009 saw record
growth of 3.4 per cent over Janu-
ary 2008, providing more visitors
in that month than in any year
ever before, according to
Jamaican tourism minister
Edmund Bartlett.

In a February 4th news article
produced by the Jamaican Gov-

ernment’s information service, Mr,

Bartlett attributed the trend-defy-
ing growth to intense overseas
marketing and promotion efforts,
especially during the start of the
winter tourism season, and to the
staging of the annual Jazz and
Blues festival in January.

According to some Bahamian

industry figures, Jamaica has been
more visible and “aggressive” with
their marketing dollars than The
Bahamas.

“They are all. over the mass-
media. We promote a lot as well,
but Jamaica has really stepped it




CREDIT SUISSE

up,” said one industry-watcher.

Yesterday Bahamian Minister
of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace pointed to other factors
— stating that there is “no ques-
tion whatsoever” that Jamaica’s
boost in arrivals during a globally
tough period was fuelled in large
part by a major growth in lower-
cost room inventory and the intro-
duction of a significant number
of new “all inclusive packages” in
2008.

“Jamaica has added a lot more
products, particularly from Span-
ish (hotel) chains. There’s all
inclusive product at a lower price
than what was there before and
they have become a very compet-
itive destination by way of the
combination of ‘all inclusive’ and
“low cost all inclusive’.”

“Tf you look at the category that
our rooms are in, they are ina
much more expensive category
than many of our competitors and

inclusive and cheaper vacations’

that’s something that we are
addressing right now, to make us
much more competitive,” said Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace, ‘

Frank Comito, executive vice
president of the Bahamas Hotel
Association said that some hotels
in this country which are not all-
inclusive are now seeking to offer
more all-inclusive type products,
with “meal packages” and other
incentives.

He added that the Ministry of
Tourism’s soon-to-be-launched
“Club Grand Bahama” pilot pro--
gramme is part of a Bahamian
effort to feed the growing appetite
among would-be travellers for
more low-cost all inclusive vaca-
tions.

That programme, being formed
at present, will see several Grand
Bahama hotel properties, restau-
rants, tour operators and trans-
portation providers come under
one umbrella as part of a pre-paid
package offered to visitors.

If successful, the Government
hopes to emulate the concept
throughout The Bahamas, in both
New Providence and the Family
Islands.

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

is presently considering applications for



IPLIANCE OFFIC



The Compliance Department is accepting applications for a Junior Compliance

Officer

The position is.open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Requirements:



. University degree with a major in Law or Finance

. At least 2-3 years experience with an international bank

*, Extensive knowledge in the fields of Auditing and Internal Controls

. Thorough knowledge of private banking in general

° Knowledge of Bahamas Banking and Trust Legislation

: Knowledge of local regulatory and statutory matters with regards to
“Know Your Client” and the avoidance of Money Laundering

° PC Knowledge (MS Word, MS Excel, Access, etc.)

. Well versed with Swiss anti-money laundering and due diligence
procedures

. Knowledge of credit issues would be an asset

Duties will include:

: Accept new business and allocate mandate numbers for new accounts

°. Conduct monthly reviews of financial transactions

. Conduct Annual risk reviews for mandates with low risk

° Maintain physical and electronic client documentation

: Review Legal and Compliance Registers to ensure receipt of
documentation

. Administer.and monitor closure of accounts

. Personal Qualities:

. Strong organizational and communication skills

. Ability to meet deadlines with minimum supervision

. Staal a positive attitude and a willingness to work flexible

ours

° Willing to work in a multicultural environment

Benefits provided include:

. Competitive salary

° Pension Plan

‘ Health and Life Insurance

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the
minimum requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be

accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

or via fax 356-8148

. DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

FEBRUARY 18, 2009



= aE
PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

ac¢ Film showcase puts the

Caribbean in the frame



Junior Achievement Bahamas donation

JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT BAHAMAS recently presented both the Nazareth :
Centre and the Elizabeth Estates Children Home with a cheque for $500 each :
and 10 boxes of non-perishable food items, which where donated by the :
Achievers and Advisors. Pictured from left are vice-president of the Achiev- :
ers Association Mikhail Barry; Leando Thompson; Anna Stuart; Junior ;
Achieverment centre manager Leandra Kelly; Adrianna McDonald of the Eliz- :
abeth Estates Children Home; Junior Achievement programme manager :
Delano Munroe; Nicole Whitfield of the Nazareth Centre; Junior Achievement i

centre manager Jane Roach; Achievers Association president Jade Strachan;
Risnel Elliott and Anthony Hall.

SURGICAL ASSOCIATES BAH. LTD.
is accepting applications for an

ORTHOPEDIC & HAND SURGEON

Contact: (242) 356-5827

| E-mail: omaura@mednetholdings.com
or Postal Address: CB-1145

Nassau, Bahamas



ADMINISTRATOR!
LIBRARIAN |

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the suctessfal candidate will ie
include: ]

© Overseeing the ‘dally peration of the

facility, which includes a library, museum,
i computer laboratory, resource. centre,
| reading room and café.

© Investigating and pursuing viable

sources of funding

© Planning and executing the curriculum
1 of the trade and vocational classes to be

offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

| © Experience in a _ related field or
| certification in library science

| © Excellent organization and administrative
skills

© Very Good computer skills

| © Excellent communication skills
© Exceptional titerpersortal skills
© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours 3

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to SS ees com

or via fax 242-334-2280.
_ WWW. southeleutheramission.com_



Harbour Ss
is_
SOs orr

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

FILM enthusiasts gathered
for fine wine and thought-pro-
voking entertainment at the
opening of the second Travel-
ling Caribbean Film Showcase
held at Galleria Cinemas JFK
on Monday.

The week-long event screens
films which place special inter-
est on the children and adoles-
cents of the Caribbean.

First launched in the

Bahamas in 2007, the event
aims to recognise the work and

skill of film producers from the
region, and to provide an
avenue for those producers to
expose their work and creativ-

ity to other members of the =

broader Caribbean communi-
ty.

It is a joint effort of the
Cuban Institute of Film Art
and Industry (ICAIC), the
UNESCO Regional Offices for
the Caribbean (Havana,
Kingston and Port-au-Prince)
and UNICEF representatives
in Cuba.

After reviewing 116 films

from producers representing .



Legal Notice

NOTICE

LOTUS CHAMPS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 20th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas. .

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MAPPA: VALLEY CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the |

dissolution of MAPPA VALLEY CORP. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued. and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP.

Notice,is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
‘dissolution of BUSHFIRE ALARM CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate éf Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

store im Ihalt

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16 countries in the region, the
international selection com-
mittee accepted 52 movies and
short-listed 24.
Movies from the following
countries were chosen for pre-
sentation: Belize, Cuba, Cura-
cao, Colombia, Costa Rica,
Jamaica, Nicaragua, Haiti,

‘ Dominican Republic, Suri-

name, Trinidad and Tobago,

‘and Venezuela.

Owen Bethel, president of
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional, said the international
organising committee felt there
were a lot of issues that affect
young persons globally, but
some in particular which
impact the region’s youth. .

“There were a number of
issues that they felt needed to
be addressed and one of the
ways we know for reaching
that part of the population is
through visual media. Some of
the films range from. anima-
tions that are one minute long
to those which are full feature
films over 60 minutes long,”
Mr Bethel said.

Michael Edwards, education

. officer at the National Art

Gallery, said: “We understand
that it'may be difficult for stu-
dents to come out for evening

screenings, SO We are now try- -
ing to take the showcase into

the schools so that our kids can
be able to see these films and

learn from them.as well.”

Ambassador for Cuba to the
Bahamas Jose Ponce said this
year’s showcase is a great step

forward to reach the necessary ~

cultural integration for the
youth to gain a better. knowl-
edge and respect for the people
in the region.

“They can draw focus to the
films not only from the per-
spective of entertainment, but
also drawing attention to issues
that affect and threaten the
youth of the region such as

family violence, early preg-

nancy, child prostitution, drug

. addiction and.the respect for

different races,” Ambassador

-Ponce said.

The first film, “Casa De
Munecas” by Joaquin Zuniga,
is a film from Nicaragua.

It tells the story of how two
girls from different parts of the
country - urban and rural —
share similar realities when
they become young mothers
and in the process are forced to
abandon their studies and

everything else that affords

them a better future. . -
The second film, “Invisible”

by Elspeth Duncan, hails from
Trinidad and Tobago: It is a
documentary on the life of a
mother who is in a situation
where she and her young
daughter are HIV positive but
her eight-year-old son is not.
This documentary shows a
mother’s struggle of address-
ing the stigma that is associated

‘with the disease, not only for

herself, but also her daughter
in the school environment.
Tomerique Forbes, a student
at the College of the Bahamas,
said she hopes Bahamian
teenagers who see the films will
walk away thinking about how
fortunate they are to live in a
country like the Bahamas.
“They should realise how
fortunate their lives are in gen-
eral. They don’t have to cross
rivers to get home, whether
they have.a baby or not. At
that young age they should
want to enjoy life, so I hope
they look at it very compara-
tively and think that they are
very lucky and maybe they
should keep their lives on the
road to success and not get
sidetracked,” Ms Forbes said.
She said she admired the
way the two films showed

- different aspects of women’s |

lives and the different respon-
sibilities they have to their chil-
dren, their health and them-

‘selves.

“TI think the films were very
good at zoning in on issues that
we may not think about on a
day-to-day basis, like teen
pregnancy and the. struggles
that go along with that, not
necessarily just seeing it and
dismissing it, but really walking
through the process with these
girls,” she said.

Mr Bethel said he hopes
the film showcase can become
an annual event for the
Bahamas.

“It is planned that way by
the international committee.

“The idea is that as it grows,
we hope that it encourages
producers and young persons
here to really look at putting

their stories to film and making

it creative, to have universal
value so that others around the
region and around the world
will want to see it and would
want to know what it is like
in the Bahamas,” Mr Bethel
said.

The First Travelling
Caribbean Film Showcase held
in 2007 featured 21 films from
13 countries including the
Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.

(In Voluntary, Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

DREADNOUGHT
VALLEY LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
DREADNOUGHT VALLEY LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


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The concept of the singul

e are suffering

just now from a
bad attack of economic pes-
simism,” wrote the famous
British economist John May-
nard Keynes in a 1930 essay. "It
is common to hear people say
that....a decline in prosperity is
more likely than an improve-
ment in the decade which lies
ahead of us."

Keynes was one of the most
renowned economists of his day,
and his theories of deficit spend-
ing to stimulate demand were
the global economie orthodoxy
from the time of the Great
Depression of the 1930s until
the 1970s. They are now coming
back into fashion as the world
economy collapses around us.

But in this essay Keynes was
no doomsayer. At the beginning
of the Depression — which was

to last 15 years until the out-

break of the second world war
in 1945 — he wrote a 4,000-
word essay entitled Economic
Possibilities for our Grandchil-
dren, in which he called the
understandable pessimism of his
day mistaken. .

"The prevailing world
depression...blind(s) us to what
is going on under the surface,
to the true interpretation of the
trend of things," he wrote. "We
are suffering, not from the
rheumatics of old age, but from
the growing-pains of over-rapid
changes, from the painfulness
of readjustment between one
economic period and another."

The purpose of his essay was
to consider the long-term future:
"What can we reasonably expect
the level of our economic life to
be a hundred years hence?
What are the economic possi-
bilities for our grandchildren?"

Keynes believed that the slow
rate of human progress over the
past 3,000 years had been
brought to an end by a combi-
nation of capitalism and science.

"If capital increases, say, 2
per cent per annum, the capital
equipment of the world will
have increased by:a half in 20
years, and seven and a half times
in a hundred years...At the same
time technical improvements in
manufacture and transport have
been proceeding at a greater
rate in the last 10 years than

ever before in history." cite 8S

“He predicted that we would

be, on average, eight'times bet-”’

ter off by 2030, and our eco-
nomic problems would be
solved. It would be the end of
economic history. But he wor-
ried that this outcome might
produce other difficulties.

"For the first time since his
creation man will be faced with
his real, his permanent problem
_ = how to use his freedom from
pressing economic cares, how
to occupy the leisure time which
science and compound interest
will have won for him, to live
wisely and agreeably and well."

The future, he believed,
would free us from the need to
work, with the love of money



finally recognised as "a some-
what disgusting morbidity".
Instead, we will come to value
those who can teach us how to
"pluck the hour and the day vir-
tuously and well, the delightful
people who are capable of tak-
ing direct enjoyment in things,
the lilies of the field who toil
not, neither do they spin."

It will be the greatest change
that has ever occurred in human
history, and Keynes was con-
vinced — while facing a bleak
prospect in 1930 — that the
transformation had already
begun. The speed of the transi-

_ tion would be governed by our

ability to avoid war and over-
population, by the rate of capital
accumulation, and by the pace
of scientific achievement.

eferences to this

Depression-era prog-
nostication have been cropping
up in newspaper commentaries
everywhere as the recession that
the world currently finds itself in
bites ever deeper into our col-
lective pockets and psyches. But
the event that prompted this
article was the recent opening
of something called the Singu-
larity University in California's
Silicon Valley.

This is an institution spon-
sored by both Google and
NASA whose mission is “to
assemble, educate and inspire a
cadre of leaders who strive to
understand and facilitate the
development of exponentially
advancing technologies; and to
apply, focus and guide these to
the best benefit of humanity and
its environment.”

The idea of accelerating
social and technological change
was explored by futurist Alvin
Toffler in his revolutionary
book, Future Shock, published
in 1970. But the originator of
the singularity concept was an
American mathematics profes-

‘sor and science fiction writer
» -mamed-Vernor Vinge. :
-.- In looking-at the potential of _

computer science he came to
the conclusion that the world

/must eventually run into a tech-

nological singularity — an event
similar to its astrophysical name-
sake, which lies at the centre of
a black hole. This is defined as a
point in space or time at. which
one's existing models of reality
are no longer valid.

Vinge presented his idea at a
NASA symposium in 1993. He
predicted that within 30 years
we will have the technological
means to create superhuman
intelligence, and argued that
"we are on the.edge of change
comparable to the rise of human
life on Earth." And it occurred



to me that this incredible fore-
cast is amazingly close to the
time period envisioned by the
late John Maynard Keynes 78
years ago.

The singularity concept was
popularised by another com-
puter scientist and futurist
named Ray Kurzweil (who
developed the Xerox OCR soft-
ware known as Textbridge) in
a 2005 book called "The Singu-
larity is Near".

Kurzweil developed the “Law
of Accelerating Returns” to
describe technological changes
over the coming decades —
from faster, more powerful com-
puters to radical breakthroughs
in artificial intelligence, biotech-
nology, neuroscience, and nan-
otechnology. :

In fact, Kurzweil's best-selling
book has now been made into a
movie slated for release early
this year. Subtitled "A True Sto-
ry About the Future", the film
presents a view of the remark-
able transformations of the com-
ing age ‘as our species breaks
the shackles of its genetic legacy
and achieves inconceivable
heights of intelligence, material
progress, and longevity."





“The idea of accelerating social
and technological change was |
explored by futurist Alvin Toffler in
his revolutionary book, Future
Shock, published in 1970. But the
originator of the singularity
concept was an American
mathematics professor and science
fiction writer named Vernor Vinge.”



" The movie intertwines a fast-
paced documentary featuring

‘Kurzweil and other thinkers

with a narrative story about a
virtual alter ego, which becomes
increasingly life-like as the film
progresses. ~
The theory is that nonbiolog-
ical intelligence will have access
to its own design and able to
improve itself to the point where
human intelligence will be
unable to follow — and that will
mark the singularity.
Projections are that within
20 years, artificial intelligence
will match the range and sub-
tlety of human intelligence. By
2030, a thousand dollars of com-
putation will be about a thou-
sand times more powerful than
a human brain. And the nonbi-
ological intelligence created in
2045 will be a billion times more

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powerful than all human intelli-
gence today. That will represent
a profound change.

cience fiction, you say?

Then how do you
explain Singularity U? Based at
NASA's Ames Research Facil-
ity in Silicon Valley, the univer-
sity's trustees include Kurzweil
and Peter Diamandis, founder
of the XPrize Foundation for
private space flight. And
Google, the Internet informa-
tion provider, is the chief cor-

- porate sponsor. The university

offers postgraduate courses in
biotechnology, nanotechnology
and artificial intelligence.
"Singularity University
makes no predictions about the
exact effects of these technolo-
gies on humanity; rather, our

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mission is to facilitate the under-
standing, prediction and devel-
opment of these technologics
and how they can best be har-
nessed to address humanity's
grand challenges," the universi-
ty's website says.

As Kurzweil says, “we won't
experience 100 years of progress
in the 21st century — it will be
more like 20,000 years of
progress (at today’s rate)...tech-
nological change so rapid
and profound it represents a
rupture in the fabric of human
history.”

Keynes was certainly right
that we (by the millions) are no
longer working, as our 21st cen-
tury economy collapses. But he
forgot to tell us how to pay the
bills in the meantime. Perhaps
we will all have to indenture
ourselves to some monstrously *
brainy robot.

But the singularity theory
does give us hope that the
intractable issues we face today,
like poverty, energy and climate
change, will all be solved. within
a few short years. As one pundit
put it, "We are on a wild ride
to an interesting destination."
It is a ride that would no doubt
be of great interest to John May-
nard Keynes. Perhaps he is
rolling over in his grave.

What do you think?

Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www. bahamapundit.com







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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 2009

eee eee eee

a ae
Spate of suspected suicides

leads to public lecture

FROM page one

process.

Suicide is the eighth leading
cause of death among adults
in the United States where
there are around 83 suicides
per day and over 30,000
deaths per year, and it is the
second leading cause of death
among 15 to 24 year olds.

US figures also show Cau-
casian men between 45 and
64, who are single or wid-
owed, and have little social
support, are in the highest
risk group.

And men are three times
more likely to commit suicide
than women, although

women more commonly
exhibit suicidal behaviour.
Bahamas statistics show
how suicides dramatically
increased in 2000 when there
were 10 self-inflicted deaths,
compared to six in 1999, and
zero to four in other years
between 1996 and 2006.
Around 90 per cent of peo-
ple who commit suicide suffer
from a major psychiatric, ill-
ness, with half being clinical-

ly depressed, and several

ROCK & ROLL
WILL NEVER

FIESTA FRIDAYS
Half price on all Margaritas and Daiquiris

abusing drugs and alcohol,
and 30 per cent have made
previous attempts.

But overwhelmingly, peo-
ple who commit suicide suffer
from a sense of hopelessness
and helplessness, Dr Barrett
said.

Low levels of CSF. 5-
HIAA, a metabolite of sero-
tonin in the cerebral spinal
fluid which is important in
determining mood and levels
of aggression, is a key factor
in suicide.

And although antidepres-
sants used to boost serotonin
levels can bring a person out
of the physical depression
within weeks, it also increas-
es their risk of committing

suicide as it can give them the
energy to go ahead with the
act, Dr Barrett said.

Dr Barrett highlighted the
signs social workers, care
givers, friends and family
should look for in suicidal
people, such as giving away
prized possessions, finalising
plans, and becoming
depressed, and detailed steps
they can take to help.

If you suspect someone
may be suicidal, Dr Barrett
suggested asking them if they

think life is not worth living, if -

they consider harming them-
selves, or killing themselves,
and how they intend to do it.

He said: “They want some-
one to engage with them in

that conversation:

“Jt’s really important not
to put your judgments and
your mentality and your

framework on somebody

else’s thinking. ~
“If you are going to help

Odessa Sfarden

that person you have to help
them right where ‘they are.

Wherever they are, you have

to help them.”

Drawing up a “no-harm
contract” whereby. the vul-
nerable person will vow to
call -you before harming
themselves is another way to
help the vulnerable.

The psychiatrist warned

_ there is an increasing rate of

suicidal behaviour among
young people as depression
is becoming increasingly com-
mon among teenagers, and
drug and alcohol abuse
occurs more frequently as
they experience academic and
family pressures.

Young people are also
more likely to be inspired to
copy suicide, he said.

Dr Barrett is going to the
international symposium on
suicide in Barcelona next
month and intends to com-
pile an information booklet
upon his return to distribute
to volunteers, pastors,
community leaders and

THE TRIBUNE

the public.

Dr Barrett said he is par-
ticularly concerned about the
risk.of suicide as the eco-
nomic recession deepens, as
statistics show rates nearly
doubled during the Great
Depression in 1920’s America
when suicides shot up to 17
per 100,000.

‘He said: “I think we are
really going to experience a
downturn in the economy in
the next month, and we will
send information out to help
people.

“The clergy is easily the
first step and helping people
understand when they come, °
not to push them, but to help
them.

“Help prevent social isola-
tion by involving people in
things that you do.

“You feel this sense of iso-
lation but you have to
remember that you are still
your brother’s keeper. More
than any other time in our
history we have to remember
that.”

$3.00 on selected beers
$3.00 glass of wine
All day long!

Online electronic Tribune launched

FROM page one

where life is still simple and people still care
Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road
. Telephone 322-8493.

— Be Diff
GIVE A BOOR for @
VALENTING'S DAY

LIFE - BY SIDNE Y POITIER - SIGNED iST EDIT
JUST AS [AM BY BILLY GRAHAM
NAPOLEON THE GREAT - VOLS. I, I and II.
. HENRY W. LONGFELLOW - EARLY POEMS ..
EMPEROR ALEXANDER
BLACK BEAUTY
REMEMBERING PERS



LEGENDARY SATURDAYS
Buy any of our 10 oz. Legendary Burgers
and receive the 2nd one for half price
2 for $8.00 on our Cocktail of the Day
From 11am - 5pm

On Monday, Mrs Carron announced that due to rising costs of
airfreight, The Tribune regrettably had to cease delivery of the dai-
ly paper to most of the Family Islands.

Islands affected include Freeport, Eleuthera, Abaco, Exuma,
Crooked Island and Long Island.

However, Bellevue Business Depot, on Don Mackay Boulevard,
Marsh Harbour, Abaco, hopes to continue servicing its Tribune cus-
tomers as usual. It is trying to enter into its own agreement with
Bahamasair.

After reviewing all the possible ways of ensuring Family Island
readers still had access to the Tribune's news, it was determined that
publishing on the internet was both cost effective and in keeping
with a strategy already being developed.

Each day's paper is uploaded at 2pm, and readers are also able
to review e-paper editions published starting February 7, 2009.
Once the full site has been launched, The Tribune intends to add
to the archives available for viewing.

Any questions regarding www. tribune242.com should be direct-
ed to online editor Jessica Robertson (jrobertson@tribuneme-:

dia.net).



PV UU aes Bp Dye gy
Yee Dt OCW CEI Rake ag
Entrée ordered
*Only one kid’s meal per entrée will be allowed
PUNK Coy at -4)

* Only for kids s1yrs. and younger

NASSAU, BAHAMAS



Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

ESSENTIAL INVESTMENTS LTD. SAFE HAVEN FOUNTAIN INC. TUNHUA NORTH LTD.

a he | Notice is hereby given that in accordance with

Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
TUNHUA NORTH LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

" Noti¢é is hereby given that in accordaitcé with*Seétion 138 ‘| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SAFE HAVEN FOUNTAIN INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ESSENTIAL INVESTMENTS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued

and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. (Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
‘ (Liquidator)

(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
ETERNAL BLESSINGS LTD.

‘(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CL LIMITED

DASSI POINTE LID. (In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of DASSI POINTE LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FUSEKI HOLDINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of FUSEKI HOLDINGS LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 15th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

EAST SOMERSET INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of EAST
SOMERSET INC. has been completed; a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Company is. in dissolution, which commenced
on the 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LANCELOT HERO LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies Act 2000, the dissolution of
LANCELOT HERO LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register.

- ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 9



‘Students are

down to earth

at Columbus Primary school

VEGETABLE GARDEN TEACHES VALUABLE SKILLS

YOUNG explorers at
Columbus Primary School are
learning the science of the
earth and valuable life skills
by planting and maintaining
their own vegetable garden.

Pupils at the school on
Collins Avenue started their
“project vegetable garden”
about three years ago, and
this year it is being funded by
the Food and Agricultural
Organisation of the United
Nations.

The young gardeners pre-
pared the ground and planted
crops in deep pots of fertilised
soil following a demonstra-
tion of the ‘pot planting’
method by acting assistant

director of Education Ham- -

blin Newbold in November
last year. fe ©

_ Now they are reaping
beans, beets, black-eyed peas,
cabbages, cantaloupes, okra,
tomatoes, watermelon
‘and pigeon peas from the gar-
den..

Committee
A garden committee, which

includes Columbus Primary
School principal Marcia

Roberts, teachers, adminis- |

trative staff, student “science
explorers” and other stu-
dents, parents, teachers and
local residents, oversees-the
project.
Science coordinator Patri-
cia Greenslade said: “This
project is training our stu-

dents in self-sufficiency and
agricultural techniques, skills
which are very important to
the future survival of
mankind.
“Through this project, stu-
dents are obtaining other
important. life skills — coop-

. eration and working as a

team, planning.and organis-
dng, making decisions, mar-
keting skills, making choices,
career development and
many others.”

She congratulated the
young science explorers and
said she encourages them to
continue their work and strive
for excellence.

Legal Notice

- NOTICE >

ESCALA POINTE INC.

BAS 5

aay

2eyReArms wn

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolition of ESCALA POINTE INC. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

! NOTICE :
_ RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) .

Notice is hereby given that the above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

EVERPLUS ASSETS LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of EVERPLUS ASSETS LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) :

{
{
}
}





' Legal Notice

: NOTICE ay
BADGE BRIGADE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 14th day of January 2009. The Liquidator

‘is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

PURE SUCCESS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PURE SUCCESS LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GOROV LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of GOROV LIMITED has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



_ STUDENTS FROM COLUMBUS PRIMARY SCHOO! help to

maintain their own vegetable garden.

Legal Notice

THORNYDALE INC. —

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with
Section 138 (8) of the International Business
Companies. Act 2000, the dissolution of
THORNYDALE INC. has been completed; a |
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and
the Company has therefore been struck off the
Register. vo

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) /

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company issn dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

a

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

<



Legal Notice .
~ NOTICE
MAXIMUS ASSET GROUP LTD.

St

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAXIMUS ASSET GROUPLTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ENTERPRISE OVERSEAS LIMITED

‘| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

- (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of ENTERPRISE OVERSEAS LIMITED
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)




PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009



FROM page one

them, and then get paid,” he said.

This process could net an officer anywhere
from $1, 000 to up to $5,000 for his or her “ser-
vices,” the source claimed.

Additionally, persons are often given the
wrong court date, to confuse a matter, and
ensure that when it is brought before a “stern
magistrate” that they would have no option but
to throw out the case as the complainant never
seems to appear before the court.



hariliseng Bank Lane walk
to court to answer charges of
drug possession and distribu-
tion, a high level source within
the RBPF explained yesterday
that some individuals who »
have significantly profited
from the drug trade are not
those persons who one would
normally suspect.

Outlining how it is “very
easy” for a drug dealer to get
off-charges of possession or
intention to supply, the source
explained that such narcotics
often go “missing” from the














Soine officers are allegedly being paid
to make serious cases ‘disappear’



“Some guys in warrants really don’t ‘want to
pick up these people either. They have some
40,000 warrants outstanding. Some of them are
business people, but they are paying — almost’
like a salary — so they won’t get picked up. If I
can find them, they can find them. But they
aren’t trying to do their job, because they are out
serving summons for the banks and such. They
are too busy dealing with repossessing people’s

“cars,” he said.

The Tribune will continue in its series of arti-
cles outlining cases of alleged corruption within
the Force in tomorrow’s edition.

FROM page one Claims that some police |
are re-selling cocaine |

Force’s forensic lab, DEU
holding site, or the RBPF” s°
evidence room.

Often, he said, some arrest-,
ing officers would “confiscate”
or “steal” the drugs, without
ever reporting the matter. Ifa — was.
person were “feeling greedy”,
they could even “shake down”
the individual-and demand
payment — under the pretence
that if cash were not offered,
the individual would be arrest-

ed and charged.

And quite naturally, the
source added, the true amount
of narcotics recovered would

. be “a little lighter” than
what the true amount really

Some officers have also, ‘it
is claimed, removed hundreds
of thousands of dollars from
the CDU and would often try
to put the funds back before
they were found to be missing.

GN-822

— GOVERNMENT
- NOTICE



THE TRIBLi



















Bahamas Heart Association
visit the Governor General

MEMBERS OF THE BAHAMAS HEART ASSOCIATION paid a courtesy call on Governor-General Arthur D
Hanna at Government House on Tuesday, February 3, 2009. Pictured from left are Thelma Johnson, —~

Coretta Owen, Sheila Lady Butler, Portia Nottage, Governor-General Arthur Hanna, Bahamas Heart
Association president Nellie Cox, Tina Lightbourne, Barbara Sawyer, and Maria Symonette.

Suspected arson attack ‘ may

not be related to home fire’

nessman, were recently in police sasedy being
questioned in connection with the fire at Mrs

FROM page one |

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
NOTICE

In the case of November's fire, it is suspected
that the fact that Mrs Ritchie is a member of a
special customs task force to root out corruption
and tax fraud in the department may be related
to the incident.

Three persons, including a well-known busi-

Ritchie’s home, but were released pending fur-
ther inquiries, Chief Supt Glenn Miller, head of.
the Central Detective Unit, said.
However, he said that investigations. are
continuing and more arrests are likely in the

_ future.

THE INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
_ (CHAPTER 326)

Itis hereby notified pursuant to Section 7 of the Industries Encouragement
Act that the Minister is about to consider whether the following products
should be declared “ARRROVED PRODUCTS?” for the purpose of that
Act. ot 2

RAW MATERIALS TO BE USED

- PRODUCTS
; IN MANUFACTURE

Juice Concentrates,
Juice Powders, Powdered
Spices, Food Colourants,

Fructose Syrup, Granulated
Sugar, Citric Acid, Malic Acid,

Plastic Performs, Caps, Minerals,
Salt, Sea Water.

Water & Juice Beverages

Any. interested person having any objection to such a declaration should
- give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the

Office of the Prime Minister, before the 22nd day of February, 2009, by -

_ letter addressed to:- ne

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
_ OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
‘P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary

OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER |
NOTICE

Lue INDUSTRIES ENCOURAGEMENT ACT
(CHAPTER 326)

Iti is hereby notified pursuant to Section 5 of the Industries Encouragement
Act, Chapter 301, that the Minister is about to consider whether the
manufacturer specified in the first. column of the table below should be
declared an “APPROVED MANUFACTURER” i in relation to the products
specified in the third column.

MANUFACTURER LOCATION OF — PRODUCTS
FACTORY PREMISES é

- Bacardi Road and - Water & Juice
Clifton Pier, New . Beverages
Providence, Bahamas

ER Source Alvar
Limited |

Any interested person having any objection to such a declaration should
give notice in writing of his objection and of the grounds thereof to the
Office of the Prime Minister, before the 22nd day of Februarys: 2009, by
- letter addressed to:-

THE PERMANENT SECRETARY
OFFICE OF THE PRIME MINISTER
P.O. Box CB-10980
NASSAU, N.P.,
THE BAHAMAS

DAVID R. DAVIS
Permanent Secretary








PUBLIC NOTICE 3.

een See
oo fe RELOCATION. OF THE |

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH a SAFETY: DEPARTMENT: ns

Please be advised that the Occupational Health & Safety. |
Department » of the National Insurance Board has moved;
they are now located on the Ground Floor, western wing of
the Clifford Darling Complex (Headquarters Pui Baillou
Hall Road.










The telephone ‘contacts in the Department are 502-1504,
502-1527, 502-1732, or you may call the general switchboard at
502-1500.




VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for position of VICE PRINCIPAL of St. Anne’s School PTEPAAOGY
Department beginning September 2009.

The Applicant must have a degree in Education from a . recognized
University, with at least 5 years accumulative experience. The applicant must also be
computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Assisting with staff supervision and evaluation
- Admissions and student orientation
- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations, invigilations)
- Assisting with discipline
- Assisting with supervision of academic programmes
.- Assisting with Curriculum Development _
Administration of School and External examinations
Oversee Inventory
Oversee Requisitions
Share responsibility for sustaining culture of excellence throughout the school
Share responsibility for providing a climate that fully develop the concept of
teamwork.

Application forms are available from the Anglican Diocese office on Sands Road
off East Street. The completed application together with a cover letter, statement
of educational philosophy and recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY
P.O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is Friday, February 20th, 2009


THE TRIBUNE PAGE 11
GN-824 |

GOVERNMENT
NOTICE

)__-- Ministry of National Security :
” Office of The Parliamentary Commissioner |

FORM OF NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS IN A CONTESTED ELECTION























FORM OF NOMINATION PAPER

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ELECTION FOR
Raa ELECTION FOR DISTRICT COUNCIL/TOWN COMMITTEE

South Andros Constituency Polling Division 3B * :
Kemp’s Bay and Johnson’s Bay
In the Kemp’s Bay Town Area

ELECTION IN mar... Kenags aechiaas Ba. Mi ccichacasacetbusnssseadace DISTRICT /TOWN AREA
Of the South Andros District os

NOTICE OF NOMINATIONS We, the undersigned, being registered as voters in the said District/Town Area, do
AND hereby nominate the undermentioned person as a candidate at the said election, and we
NOTICE OF POLL hereby certify that to the best of our knowledge and belief he is qualified to represent the

said District/Town Area on the council /committee. :

NOTICE is hereby given that the candidates named below stand nominated in the

Above mentioned election, and NOTICE is hereby given that the poll will take place on Candidate's Othernames e .
i is :00 a.m. i i 6:00 j Flaceof Occupation
Friday 27" February, 2009, between the hours of 8:00 a.m. in the morning and Gates full Resi

_ p.m. in the afternoon in the following polling place:-

“Oe

Polling Division , Polling Place

Polling Division No. 3B South Andros High School
Signatures.of five subscribers:
Cadidates Other names Occupation Place of
Surname in full : Residence
JOHNSON-HEWITT ——_Jacqueline Plumber Johnson’s Bay
MCKINNEY Veronica Barbara Clerk Johnson’s Bay

Date: 6"" February, 2009



Sign: Franceta Neely

RETURNING OFFICER NOTE: The attention of intending candidates and subscribers of nomination papers is

drawn to the requirements of the Local Government Act, 1996, regarding nomination, and
particularly to the requirements that a declaration of qualification shall be delivered and a
deposit of BS50.00 (fifty dollars) shall be made to the Returning Officer on nomination day.
A nomination paper must be signed by not less than five (5) subscribers. Subscribers and
nominees must be registered in the particular polling division.

oom Hee -9ees28 4 417 ‘

CéAy

FORM OF NOMINATION PAPER





ELECTION FOR DISTRICT COUNCIL / TOWN COMMITTEE




ELECTION IN TEE oP AY AN ISEREE/ TOWN AREA an
Tame 0 6 2009: °~

We, the undersigned, being registered as voters in the said District /Town Area, do
hereby nominate the undermentioned person as a candidate at the said election, and we a
hereby certify that to the best of our knowledge and belief he is qualified to represent the Ppa Se ala ns

~ gaid District /Town:Atéa-on-the council/committee.

FORM OF DECLARATION OF QUALIFICATION _ |

Candidate’s . ‘Other names Place of Occupation

Sumame In full Residence

‘staceue ha Co my son- H eunt
of Don Son Ray |

do solemly declare that! am qualified according to Ikaw to be elected and to serve

as a member of the District Council/Town Committee in the District/Town Area

of i Ss . ma oa




omaee®? Lefio vesis —oes
VC FE SSF. :

, sa t es Ve * cae Signature of Intending Candidate

NOTE: The attention of intending candidates and subsctibers of nomination papers is

drawn to the requirements of the Local Government Act, 1996, regarding nomination, and

particularly to the requirements that a declaration of qualification shall be delivered and a

deposit of B$50.00 (fifty dollars) shall be made to the Returning Officer on nomination day.

A nominate pee must be signed by nat less than five (5) subscribers. Subscribers and
i "7 ————

aaa istered in the particular polling division. ee
no’ 38° . ere i P [opamasTRaTOR’s OFFICR;
fe ceupl C-996327 * Yo)og
- "e "96 ont? | ae

= $5000.
FORM OF SBCL ALTON OF QUALIFICATION
aKemps Bau, South fades

.do solemly declare that [am qualified according to lait to be elected and to serve

Fa
as a member of the District Council /Town Committee in. the District/ Town Area P B I S et
l fone | ; ]
of __. Co
u



Your Balance Sheets

& Legal Notices

VAmer—, | *) |
Signature of Intending €andidate . | | 00
The Tribune

Call us at

Be PRY

Signature of Justice of the Peace”... oa

Declared and signed before me, this__( day of __
we



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009





Durant, Mayo,

Johnson on
All-Star

H-0-R-§-E

By The Associated Press

Rookie of the Year Kevin
Durant of the Oklahoma City
Thunder and O.J. Mayo, a
favorite for this season's award,
highlight the field for a H-O-
R-S-E competition during All-
Star Saturday night.

Atlanta Hawks guard Joe

Johnson is the other competi-

tor in TNT's special event, the
network announced Tuesday.
Johnson will play in the All-Star
game, while Durant and Mayo
were selected for the rookie
challenge.

The contest will take place
outdoors at the NBA's All-Star
Block Party on Saturday in
Phoenix before TNT televises
the All-Star Saturday night fes-
tivities.

If a player makes a shot in
H-O-R-S-E, the next competi-
tor must make the same shot or
receive a letter. A player gets
an 'H' for his first miss and is
eliminated once he has all five
letters of the word.

Players will have 24 seconds
to execute their shots, and an
NBA referee will rule if they're
done properly. Dunking won't
be allowed.

Cavs recall
rookie after one
game in D-League

CLEVELAND (AP) — Cav-
aliers rookie forward Darnell
Jackson was recalled after play-
ing one game for Erie of the

NBA’s Development League. ©

Jackson, who was assigned to
the BayHawks on Monday,
scored 24 points with six
rebounds in 26 minutes in a
102-89 win over the Utah Flash.
He will be available for Tues-
day night’s game in Indianapo-
lis against the Pacers.

The Cavaliers are short-hand-
ed as swingman Sasha Pavlovic
(sprained ankle), guard Delonte
West (broken wrist) and for-
ward Tarence Kinsey (sprained
ankle) are all out. Jackson, a

second-round pick who played ,

on Kansas’ national champi-
onship team last year, is aver-
aging one point and 1.2
rebounds in 6.7 minutes.

Cavs’ Mo Williams
to replace Bosh
in All-Star game

. NEW YORK (AP) — Mo
Williams is headed to the All-
Star game after all.

Twice snubbed, the Cleve-
land Cavaliers point guard was
chosen Tuesday by NBA com-
missioner David Stern. Williams
will replace Toronto Raptors
forward Chris Bosh, who will

miss the game because of a

sprained right knee.

Williams wasn't chosen by
Eastern Conference head
coaches as a reserve, then was
passed over by Stern in favor
of Boston's Ray Allen when
Orlando's Jameer Nelson had
to be replaced because of injury.





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INTERNATIONAL SPORTS









IN THIS February 15, 2007 file photo, Cleveland Cavaliers’ LeBron James (23) drives the ball Apes Los Angeles Lakers’ Kobe Bryant

during the first half a game in Los Angeles...

ames named East’s best

CLEVELAND (AP) — The
NBA taketh and giveth to LeBron

James.

James, who had an apparent his-
toric triple-double downgraded by
the league last week, was named the
Eastern Conference's top player for
Feb. 2-8. It marked the 18th time in
his career and fifth time this season
that James has won the award.



@ By MIKE CRANSTON
AP Sports Writer



CHARLOTTE, N.C.
(AP) — Vladimir Rad-

manovic wasn't sure he'd:
even play against the Los

Angeles Clippers 90 min-
utes before making his
Charlotte debut.

The ex-Lakers forward
not only became the Bob-
cats' NBA-high 23rd player
Monday night, his 13 points
and three fourth-quarter 3-
pointers propelled Char-
lotte to a 94-73 win over
the road-weary Clippers.

And as coach Larry
Brown continues to tinker
with his roster, he may
have found an answer to
the team's shaky outside
shooting with Radmanovic,
acquired Saturday from the

Lakers for underachieving

Adam Morrison and
reserve Shannon Brown.

"It was so funny trying
to talk to him through
stuff," Brown said of Rad-
manovic, who had yet to
practice with his new team-
mates. "We invented plays,
but I was really happy that
he struggled early and then
had the confidence to come
back and knock down some
shots.

"It gives us another guy
who has length and athleti-

~ cism."

Emeka Okafor had 19
points and 16 rebounds for
the undermanned Bobcats,
who were missing starters
Gerald Wallace (rib, lung)
and Raja Bell (groin).

So they turned to Rad-
manovic, who had wanted
out of Los Angeles after

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falling out of favor with
coach Phil Jackson, to end
a five-game losing streak. |

Radmanovic fired up an

~ early air ball, but eventu-

ally got comfortable in the
fourth quarter, After Baron
Davis' jumper cut Charlot-

te's lead to 67-63, Rad- -

manovic hit two long
jumpers during a 15-2 run.
He added another 3 to put
Charlotte ahead 88-70 with
4 minutes left.

"It took me a while to get
that second wind, but over-
all I felt pretty good in

‘there," Radmanovic said.

Zach Randolph had 20
points and-10 rebounds and
Eric Gordon scored 17 for
the Clippers, who had won
two straight but fizzled in
the fourth quarter in the
finale of a seven-game road
trip.

"The last game of a trip,
I've been around a long
time, I know how these
games can be tough," cen-
ter Marcus Camby said.
"Especially right before the
All-Star break, you tend to
lose a little focus. Your
mind is elsewhere."

The Clippers were

outscored 27-12 in the
fourth quarter, with several
key players struggling.
’ Al Thornton shot 3-for-
13, Camby was 3-for-8 and
Davis 1-for-7 in his return
to Charlotte, where he
began his NBA career with
the Hornets. -

"We didn't attack and
play at the level we've been
playing at the last two
games," Davis said. "I
thought our offense got
complacent and stagnant."

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In three games last week, he aver-
aged 33.7 points, 9 assists and 8
rebounds per game.

On Feb. 3, James scored 33 points
in a win over Toronto,and became
the youngest player in league histo-’
ry to top 12,000 career points. The |
next night, he posted 52 points, 10
rebounds and 11 assists in a win at
New York but the league ended up











IN THIS January 3, 2009 file
photo, Charlotte Bobcats man-
aging partner Michael Jordan
reacts from the sidelines during
their game against the Milwau-
kee Bucks in Charlotte, N.C.

(AP Photo: Chuck Burton)

Grizzlies 85, Hornets 80

At Memphis, Tenn., O.J.
Mayo had 22 points and a
career-high 16 rebounds for
his first double-double,
while Mike Conley scored
18 and handed out eight
assists to lead the Grizzlies
over the short-handed Hor-
nets.

The Hornets shot 29.5
percent after the Grizzlies
held Toronto to the same
mark Saturday. According
to the Elias Sports Bureau,
it marked the first time in
more than 49 years that a
team has held consecutive
opponents under 30 per-
cent shooting from the

field: The last time was:

Dec. 19-20, 1959, when the
then-St. Louis Hawks held

taking away one of his rebounds
after reviewing game tapes.

Still, James was the first player to
record at least 52 points, nine
rebounds and 11 assists in a game
since Wilt Chamberlain (53 points,
14 assists, 32 rebounds) in 1968.

The Los Angeles Lakers' Pau
Gasol was named the Western Con-
ference player of the week.



(AP Photo: Mark J Terrill)

Bobcats beat Clippers 94-73 .

Philadelphia to 26.9 per-
cent and Detroit to 29.9 the
next night.

Peja Stojakovic scored 23
points to lead the Hornets,
who were without their top
three players in Chris Paul,
Tyson Chandler and David

West. Paul and Chandler -

were out with injuries,
while West was suspended
for the game after his fla-
grant foul against Min-
nesota's Mike Miller on
Sunday.

‘ Bucks 124, Rockets 112.
At Milwaukee, Charlie

Villanueva scored 25.

points, grabbed eight
rebounds and sparked a big
second-half run as the
Bucks snapped an eight-
game losing streak against
the Rockets.

Aaron Brooks scored a
career-high 23 points for
Houston, which had-won
three of the previous four,

but gave up more than 104

points in its fifth straight
road game.

76ers 108, Suns 91

At Philadelphia, Thad--

deus Young scored 25
points and Marreese
Speights had a career-high
24 points to lift the 76ers
to their third straight win.

Andre Iguodala scored
22 points and Samuel
Dalembert grabbed 11
rebounds to help the Six-
ers (26:24) move two
games above .500 for the
first time this season.

Amare . Stoudemire
shrugged off persistent
trade rumors and scored 19
points for the Suns.

When a car becomes more.



BA Today



@ By The Associated Press

‘ SCOREBOARD
Wednesday, February 11
Denver at Orlando (7 pm EST). The North-
west Division-leading Nuggets take on the
Magic, who are on top of the Southeast Divi-
sion and are 2-1 since All-Star point guard
Jameer Nelson suffered a shoulder injury.

STARS

Monday

— O.J. Mayo, Grizzlies, had 22 points and a
career-high 16 rebounds in Memphis’ 85-80
win over New Orleans.

— Marreese Speights, 76ers, had a career-
high 24 points, including 10 straight in a sec-
ond-quarter charge, as Philadelphia won its
third straight, 108-91 over Phoenix.

— Charlie Villanueva and Ramon Sessions,
Bucks. Villanueva scored 25 points and
grabbed eight rebounds, and Sessions had 26
points and seven assists to give Milwaukee a
124-112 victory over Houston.

STREAK STOPPERS

Milwaukee snapped an eight-game losing
streak against Houston with a 124-112 victory
Monday night. The Bucks' last win over the
Rockets was Dec. 28, 2004, when they beat
them 115-87 in Milwaukee.

ABOVE WATER

Philadelphia (26-24) moved two games
above .500 for the first time this season with a
108-91 win over Phoenix on Monday night.
The 76ers have won 13 of 17 and are seven
games over .500 since Tony DiLeo took over
as coach in December.

SUDDEN IMPACT ‘
Vladimir Radmanovic scored 13 points and
hit three fourth-quarter 3-pointers in his Char-

' lotte debut Monday night, helping turn a‘close

game into a rout in the Bobcats' 94-73 win
over the road-weary Los Angeles Clippers.
He became the 23rd player to suit up for Char-
lotte this season — an NBA-high — two days

, after he was acquired from the Los Angeles

Lakers for Adam Morrison and Shannon
Brown.

TENACIOUS D

New Orleans shot 29.5 percent in an 85-80
loss at Memphis after the Grizzlies held
Toronto to the same mark Saturday. Accord-
ing to the Elias Sports Bureau, it marked the
first time in more than 49 years that a team
held consecutive opponents under 30 percent
shooting from the field. The last time was
Dec. 19-20, 1959, when the then-St. Louis
Hawks held Philadelphia to 26.9 percent and
Detroit to 29.9 the next night.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Zach Randolph had 20 points and 10
rebounds in the Los Angeles Clippers' 94-73
loss at Charlotte.on Monday night. Aaron
Brooks scored a career-high 23 points, but
Houston lost 124-122 at Milwaukee. Peja Sto-
jakovic scored 23 points to lead New Orleans
in an 85-80 loss at Memphis.

SHORT-HANDED

New Orleans was without their top three
players in Chris Paul, Tyson Chandler and
David West in an 85-80 loss at Memphis on
Monday night. Paul and Chandler were out
with injuries, while West was suspended for
the game after his flagrant foul against Min-
nesota's Mike Miller on Sunday.

SIDELINED
Minnesota center Al Jefferson will miss s the
rest of the season with a torn ACL in his right
knee. Coach Kevin McHale said Jefferson
will likely have surgery to repair the injury in
the next week to 10 days. The team's leading
‘ scorer and rebounder hurt his knee when he
landed awkwardly late in Sunday's 101-97 loss
to New Orleans. Cleveland starting guard
Sasha Pavlovic could miss up to six weeks
with a sprained right ankle he sustained at
the end of the first quarter Sunday in the Cay-
aliers' 101-91 home loss to the Los Angeles
Lakers. ©

SPEAKING |

"Yes, this was an ugly game. It is always
beautiful when you execute and win these
games."

— Memphis coach Lionel Hollins after the
Grizzlies edged the New Orleans Hornets 85-80
on Monday night despite 19 turnovers and
shooting 3-of-15 from 3-point range

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 13°



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



London 2012
team unveils
post-Games
stadium
vision

l@ By ROB HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

STRATFORD, England
(AP) — The main stadium for
the 2012 London Olympics will
be used after the games to
house a secondary school and
stage annual top athletics
events, organizers said Tuesday.

But an official in charge of
ensuring the 9.3 billion-pound
($13.7 million; 10.5 million)
overall project provides an

enduring legacy for London -

acknowledged that the stadium
can not make money or break
even after the Olympics.

The 80,000-capacity stadium,
which is under contraction and
could cost up to 547 million
($790 million), will be scaled

back to a 25,000-seat venue

after the Olympics.

The post-games facility will
house a secondary school for
about 500 students, the Nation-
al Skills Academy for sports and
leisure industries and the Eng-
lish Institute of Sport.

As far as hosting sports com-
petition, only track and field is
planned so far. Football and
rugby are still possible.

"We know that there will be
the Grand Prix every year and

- almost certainly more than that.
There will be athletics events
of all sizes and scale will take
place there," Olympics Minis-
ter Tessa Jowell told The Asso-
ciated Press. "So this is a stadi-



Beckham set for
England record |






























2008
runner-up
Spain to
face Serbia
in playoffs

LONDON (AP) — Last
year’s Fed Cup runner-up Spain
will face Serbia in the World
Group I playoffs. ‘

Spain lost to the Czech
Republic in the first round last

‘weekend after having reached
the final against Russia in 2008.

In the playoffs to determing
which teams will participate in
the elite eight-nation World
Group I next year, Spain will
host the Serbs, who used Jelena
Jankovic and Ana {vanovic to
beat Japan in World Group II/

In the other best-of-five play-

offs April 25-26, France hosts

Slovakia, Germany hosts. Chil
na and Argentina hosts
Ukraine. In World Group II!
it’s: Belgium vs. Canada; Esto?
nia vs. Israel; Poland vs. Japan;
and Australia vs. Switzerland. -.

‘The United States, which has
won 17 Fed Cup titles, visits the
Czech Republic in the Fed Cup
semifinals while defending
champion Russia takes on Italy’

AC Milan English soccer star
David Beckham eyes the ball dur-
ing Serie A soccer match between
AC Milan and Reggina at the San
Siro stadium in Milan, Italy, on Feb
7, 2009. The match ended 1-1.

um that will have life in it every
day."

London Mayor Boris John-
son said organizers were "pret-
ty lucky" that a deal to lease
the stadium to West Ham foot-
ball club collapsed after the Pre-
mier League side's owner fell
victim to the Icelandic econom-
ic crisis.

"We are still open to the pos-
sibility of doing some deal with
Premiership rugby if that's a
runner," Johnson told. the AP
near-the Olympic site in Strat-:
ford. "We'll see what comes.
There are plenty of deals we
could have done that would
have gone very sour in this time.
I am always hopeful.".

Saracens and Wasps rugby
clubs have been linked with
moving into the stadium.

"If a club tenant comes for-
ward with a sensible and coher-
ent offer which makes sense for
us and other people of course
we will consider it," Johnson
said.

Previous London mayor Ken
Livingstone had said the stadi-
um would cost 10 million
pounds ($14 million) annually
to maintain if a club tenant
could not be found, but Johnson
would not divulge new figures.
- The London Development
Agency said revenue from the
rest of east London's Olympic
Park would subsidize the stadi-
um...

HONDA ISUZ



. BH By PAUL LOGOTHETIS

AP Sports Writer (AP Photo: Antonio Calanni)





SEVILLE, Spain (AP) — David Beckham can set a nation-
al record for appearances Wednesday when England plays
European champion Spain in what will be Fabio Capello’s
toughest test‘during an impressive start as England manager.
> Beckham can equal Bobby Moore’s mark-of.108.appear--
ances for England, the most by a player other than a goal-
keeper. Peter Shilton made 125 appearances in goal.

' “(Beckham’s) a reference for the English team,” said Spain
goalkeeper Iker Casillas, Beckham’s former teammate at
Real Madrid. “He brings:a lot of leadership and character to
the locker room and I think that hasn’t changed to now.”

Capello put Beckham on the team after the Los Angeles
Galaxy midfielder moved to AC Milan to strengthen his

-chances of playing in the 2010 World Cup. Beckham is look-
ing to turn his two-month loan into a permanent move.

Capello is off to the best start by an England coach since
Alf Ramsey, who led England to victory at the 1966 World
Cup, with eight wins in 10 games:and a single defeat: Spain,
the top-ranked country in FIFA’s poll, is on a 28-match
unbeaten run dating to November 2006.

Spain leads Group 5 in World Cup qualifying with 12
points from four games — three more than closest rival
Turkey. England is also perfect through four games to lead
Group 6 by five points over Croatia.

This the first times the teams have played since spectators:
at the Santiago Bernabeu Stadium greeted England’s black
players with monkey chants during a 2004 exhibition game.

Spanish players were not allowed to respond to questions
by reporters Tuesday over whether a repeat of those scenes
would play out at the Sanchez Pizjuan stadium.



















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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



ere ae eee
Highlights: BAISS championship finals

m By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

rdorsett@tribunemedia.net_

THE Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools opened their champi-
onship finals in all divisions
Monday night which featured
one defending champion tak-
ing the opening game, another
on the wrong end of a lopsided
blowout and a pair of close fin-
ishes in the junior division.

Game two in each series
takes place today at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, beginning
at 4pm.

Senior Boys

Westminster Diplomats - 81

Kingsway Saints - 80

The defending champions
and heavily favoured number
one seed squandered a 22 point
third quarter lead, but with the
play of their frontcourt, with-
stood a late surge by a resilient
Saints squad in the game "s wan-
ing moments.

Diplomats center Rashard

Morley gave his team the go .

ahead score with his tip in to
take a 79-77 lead with just under
one minute left to play.
Christorr Stuart’s pair of free
throws on the ensuing posses-
sion, his only two of the quarter,



e Here’s how they stack up:
Pool One

_ & Omega and Bimini.
Pool Iwo

CI Gibson, St. Paul’s, Teleos, RM Bailey, Catholic. High,
_ Charles W. Saunders, South Andros and Eight Mile Rock. X

Pool Three

Tabernacle Baptist, Government High, CC Sweeting, Bishop |
Michael Eldon, Jordan Prince William, Galilee ieademty: Tem- f
ple Christian and Kingsway Academy.

Pool Four

CR Walker, St. George’s, CV Bethel, St. John’s, St. Anne’s, |
Mt. Carmel Preparatory Academy, North Eleuthera High and | -

Sunland Lutheran.



Hugh Campbell Pools

‘CR Walker are the defending: champions

gave Westminster an 81-77
advantage with 49 seconds left.

A late three pointer by

Jorann Adderley brought the
Saints within one, but with just
1.5 seconds remaining, the
Diplomats heaved a long
inbound pass to Morley away
from any Saints defenders look-
ing to commit a foul.

Morley scored nine of his 15
points in the fourth quarter,
while Stuart led the Diplomats

_with a team high 20.

The Diplomats ended the
first on an 11-3 run to take an
18-13 after the opening period.

Adderley had an opportunity

to tie the game in the second |

quarter, however he failed to
convert from the line on a three
point play giving the Diplomats
a slight 24-23 advantage with
4:00 left in the half.

After a pair of Westminster
baskets, Adderley, who finished
with 24 points, kept his team
close with another score trim-
ming the deficit 30-27.

Following the score the
Diplomats ended the quarter
on a 11-2 run and powered by a
10 point second quarter from
Stuart, took a 41-29 advantage
into the ‘half.

The third quarter opened just
as the second ended, with the
Diplomats maintaining com-

WITH the 2009 Hugh Campbell Basketball Classic set to |
get underway on Monday at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, the |
organising committee from the AF Adderley Junior High School |
released the list of teams entered in the four pools in the pres- |
tigious senior boys double elimination basketball tournament. |

4



Jack Hayward, Westminster, Church of God Rondanis Doris |
- Johnson, Queen’s College, Nassau Christian Academy, Alpha |



















plete control, as they raced out
to a 51-29, their largest lead of
the game.

Backed by an eager green-
clad sea of supporters and a
coach that refused to concede in
Randy Cunningham, the Saints
continued to chip away at the
massive deficit.

The guard trio of Adderley,
Anvon Ferguson and do-it-all
floor géneral Shem Moss blazed
a comeback trail for the Saints.

Kingsway outscored the
Diplomats 29-19 in the third
quarter, and trailed by just one
basket at the end of the third,
60-58, which set the stage for
an epic fourth quarter.

The Saints took their first
lead since midway through the
first quarter on a free throw by

_ Ferguson to give them a 69-68

advantage with 5:03 left to play.
Moss, who finished with a
game high 25 points, slashed
through the lane and finished
with an up and under to give
the Saints a 71-68 lead.
Thereon Morley dominated
the boards, scoring seven points
from that point onward.
Diplomats head coach.Geno
Bullard Sr said his team may
have come into the finals over-
looking the third seeded Saints.
“This just proves the game is
not over until the clock strikes
all zeros. When my guys find
out as that when you look on
the schedule you can not under-
estimate anybody,” he said.
“Apvbody with desire and heart
can come through determined
to win once they execute well
and they did: We had to dig
extremely deep to get that win
so I have alot of respect for
them.”

Stuart, whose free throws —

sealed the win, said his team’s
main focus was maintaining
composure down the stretch.
“When they came. back we
knew we had to keep our head
in the game and we just tried 0
stay together as a team and

~ come out with a successful win,”

he said. “In game two we need
to come out even stronger,
dominate the boards even more
and play an overall better game
to get another victory.”

Game Notes: The Diplomats
were usually productive back-
court trio of Larry Smith, Geno
Bullard and Shaquille Bain fin-

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THE Diplomats’ Christorr Stuart is fouled on his way to the basket by the
Saints’ Jorann Adderley. Stuart finished with a feam high 20 points in his
team’s 81-80 win Monday night in game one of the senior boys’ :-cham-

pionship series...

ished with just 14 points
between them, eight of which

came from Smith.

Moss played the entire sec-
ond half. with four fouls but
remained: aggressive on both
ends of the floor scoring 15
points in the half.

With the Diplomats ahead
77-75, Moss took a hard foul on
his way to the basket and was
forced to leave the game.

Reserve guard Johnathan
Bethel came in off the bench
for Moss and' tied the game at
77 making both free throws.

In last year’s BAISS champi-
onship, the Diplomats were on

the opposing side as they faced -

the then defending champions
Jordan Prince William Falcons

and upset the Falcons in three |

games. —

Senior Girls

SAC Big Red Machines - 57

St John's Giants - 35

From the opening tip, the Big
Red Machines came out more
aggressive, dominated on the

boards, and played a complete .

game to route the defending
champions in the opening game
of the series.

The Big Red Machines’ lead
grew to as much as 24 in the
second half and withstood a late
Giants run in the process.

‘Baskets came easy and often
in the first quarter as they
opened a 15-8 margin at the end
ofone.

The Giants usually aggressive
defense faltered in transition
and gave up a a number of easy
scores.

The Big Red Machine
outscored the Giants 15-3 in
the second quarter to take a
seemingly insurmountable 30-
11 lead into the half.

The Giants trimmed the 19
point deficit to as little as 10 in
the second half but failed to
come within single digits.

After a Caryn Moss three
pointer made the score 40-30,

and with the Big Red Machines °

reeling, the Giants called an ill-
advised time-out on their next
possession.

Following the time-out, SAC

outscored the Giants 17-5 in the
remainder of the fourth quar-
ter to seal the win.

Tarae Sweeting led SAC with
14 points and dominated the
boards giving the Big Red
Machine a number of second
chance opportunities.

Christian Albury finished
with 12 while Alica Musgrove

added eight.
Alicia Maycock led the
Giants with 13 while .

Domonique Young and Moss
chipped in with nine and eight
points respectively.

Game Notes: SAC’s interior

‘defense limited the Giants to

just one field goal in the second
quarter. The Giants handily
defeated the Big Red Machines
in the regular season, however
center Brittney Harrison was
injured during the contest and
did not play beyond the first
quarter.

The length of the SAC front-

line limited the effectively of

Giants’ leading scorer and last
year’s championship MVP,
Caryn Moss, one of the few

Photos by Timothy Clarke



SAC’s Alicia Musgrove is fouled

on her way to.the basket...



MIHKAIL ROLLE scores two of his
17 points as the Big Red Machines’
Brandon Whyms (left) and Ken
Wood (right) look on...

times she has been held below
double figures all season. It was
the Giants’ first loss since last
November’s Father Marcian
Peters Tournament.

Junior Boys
Kingsway Saints - 53
SAC Big Red Machines - 51

Mihbkail Rolle was the cata-_

lyst for the Saints’ fourth quar-
ter heroics and Stephen Stra-
chan Jr delivered in the clutch
to give his team an upset win
over the division’s pennant win-
ners in game one of what
promises to be an exciting
series.

The Saints trailed 51-50 with
14.6 seconds left to play when

Strachan took the inbound pass
at the free-throw line extended
and drove towards the rim fin-
ishing a tough lay-up in traffic
along the baseline.

Strachan, who finished with
19 points, converted the three
point play at the line to give his
team a 53-51 lead with just 10
seconds remaining.

The versatile forward suf-
fered a miscue just a possession
earlier when he.took a tough
contested jumper which sailed
out of bounds on an airball with
42 scconds left to play as the
Saints were trying to run out

the clock and preserve the lead.

The Big Red Machines’
Jabari Wilmott missed a runner
as time expired sending the
Saints faithful into a frenzy.

The Saints led 43-41 heading
into the fourth quarter, howev-
er the Big Red Machines scored
the opening four points to take
a 45-43 lead.

Both teams went scoreless
until 2:45 when Rolle tied the
game at 45 with a long jump-
shot from the right wing.

After SAC regained the lead
on a Wilmott lay-up, Rolle, who
finished with 17, put the Saints
ahead with a three pointer,
again from the right wing.

He capped a seven point
fourth quarter with a runner to
give the Saints a 50-47 lead with
under one minute left to play.

Wilmott finished with a game
high 17 points while Ken Wood
chipped in with nine.

Said Saints head coach Randy
Cunningham: “I told my guys
to win.this game they had to
play hard defense and on
offense they had to come out
in attack mode every trip
upcourt and try to score,” he
said. “I just tried to get the mes-
sage across to them that they
had to be tough, dive after
every loose ball, deny their man
on defense and make smart
decisions down the stretch.”

Cunningham said he was
proud of his team’s resilience
in keeping themselves ir the
game mentally, even as they
faced adversity in the waning
moments. __

“The got out of the game a
little bit, they got a few charges
called against them, they got a
little upset and I had to reel
them in a bit,” he said. “But

‘ down the stretch they just

showed how much they want-
ed it and I expect them to come
out with the same or even a bet-
ter effort in game two.”
. Game Notes: In the most
closely contested game of the
evening, neither team lead by
more than two possessions.
SAC got their largest lead of
the game on a basket just
before the half to take a 28-22
lead. The Saints' largest lead
came on Rolle's lay-up to give
them a 50-47 lead in the fourth.
SAC opened their’ six point

advantage late in the first while

the Saints struggled to get into
their offensive flow with point
guard Reginald Ferguson on the
bench, Ferguson had four assists
in the fourth quarter alone.

The Big Red Machines had
a sure opportunity to take a
lead in the game's waning
moments, however the Saints
defense knocked the ball away
forcing SAC to take the ball out
of bounds with 17 seconds left.
Wilmott was limited to just four
points in the final quarter after
an eight point third.

Junior Girls

Queen's College Comets - 27

Westminster Diplomats - 23

With the Diplomats three
leading scorers fouled out of the
game, the Comets capitalized
in the overtime period, outscor-
ing Westminster to take game
one of the series.

Alexandria Marshall, who
went scoreless in the fourth
quarter, scored four of her game
high 17 points in overtime to
lead the Comets in overcoming
a three point deficit in the extra
period.

Tied at 19-at the end of regu-
lation, The Diplomats took a
22-19 lead, early in overtime on
a free throw and subsequent
bucket on the next possession
by Patrel Pickstock.

Pickstock, who relieved much
of the scoring slack for the
Diplomats when Thea Hanna
fouled out of the game in the
fourth quarter, was also forced
to leave the game in when she
picked up her fifth foul.

A short jumper on the base-
line by Marshall tied the game
at 22 and the Comets took their
first lead of overtime two plays
later with 1:13 remaining on a
free throw by Talia Thompson.

The Comets ended the game
on an 8-1 run, capped by anoth-
er Thompson free throw, which
maintained a two possession
lead for the Comets.

Thompson finished with
eight, three of which came from
the line in overtime.

Hanna led Westminster with
12 points while Pickstock fin-
ished with eight.

Game Notes: The Comets led
by as much as 10 in the first half
and took a 13-5 lead heading
into the third quarter.

Beginning with a basket late
in the second quarter and con-
tinuing into the third, Hanna
scored 11 consecutive points to
bring the Diplomats within
striking distance, 17-14 at the
end of three.

The Diplomats trimmed the
lead to one on a Pickstock bas-
ket, 19-18 with 1:54 remaining
when Hanna fouled out.


James
named

best in

the East...

See page 12







lm By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

SHAMAR “Sham” Sands,
improving on his third place fin-
ish in his debut, picked up a sec-
ond big victory yesterday as he
once again lowered his Bahami-
an men’s 60m hurdles national
indoor record.

Against a stacked field that
excluded Cuban world 110m
record holder Dayron Robles,
Sands emerged on top with a
winning time of 7.49 seconds at

the 20th edition of Meeting ,

IAAF du Pas-de-Calais in’
Liévin, France.

Ladji Doucoure of France
was second in 7.52 with Yev-
geniy Borisov of Russia third
m_7.54. Robles pulled up with
what-appeared to be a ham-
string injury midway through
the heats and finished last in
9.94 as Sands won in 7.60.

The meet also saw veteran
sprinter Chandra Sturrup pow-
er through with her second
straight victory as well in:the

women’s 60m in 7.25 seconds, ©

just ahead of Tahesia Harrigan
in 7.26. Mechelle Lewis was
third in 7.33.

Not only did Sands spoil the
season debut of Robles in what
was to have been the highlight
of the meet, but he also shat-
tered his previous national mark
of 7.58 to win in Ghent, Bel-
gium, on Sunday.

breaks record again



DAYRON Robles (left) grimaces:
after. he injured himself during the
race...

“It feels good. I don’t worry

about records, I just go out :

there and compete,” said Sands
when asked about the record
breaking performance in an
exclusive interview with The
Tribune from France.
“When you do break a
record, it’s a great feeling
_ because you know that some-
body else went out there and
did a good job ahead of you to
get it.”
While Robles suffered an
‘injury, Sands climbed from 15th
on the IAAF top performance
list-to number five. The list is
headed by American Terrence
Trammell in 7.45 with his com-

patriot Joel Brown holding onto
the fourth spot at 7.48.

It was a performance that
Sands’ coach Henry Rolle at
Auburn University had pre-
dicted on Monday. The 23-year-
old Sands said he always knew
he had it in him.

Looking back at the perfor-
mance yesterday, Sands said he
has not gotten off to his usually
great start out of the blocks, but
he made up.enough ground
throughout the race to pull

’ through.

“Everybody had about a.step
ahead of me, but I hurdled real
good in this race,” Sands reflect-
ed. “After the first hurdle, I felt
myself getting better and bet-
ter with.each hurdle after that.”

Coming off the first hurdle
and going towards the second,
Sands-said he felt that he was in
control of the race and he just
went on for it, despite the fact
that Robles, the Olympic cham-
pion, was the man to beat.

“Mentally, I was ready,”
Sands pointed out. “He had a
lot of accolades, but I just went
into the race thinking that the
race isn’t finished until it is fin-
ished. I just felt that once I
stepped on the track anything
was possible.”

The St Augustine’s College
graduate said he’s just thankful
to God that he finally got the
opportunity to compete on a
full season on the European cir-
cuit and he’s making the best

Top boxers to square off
at Independence Cup

lf By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Boxing Fed-
eration is expected to send
three of its top senior boxers
to the Independence Cup in
the Dominican Republic next
week.

Andre Seymour will be leav-
ing town on February 18 with
the'team of welterweight Tau-

reano “Reno” Johnson, junior. :

welterweight Carl Hield and
lightweight Valentino. Knowles.

“It will be the first in a series
of national teams that the fed-
eration will be sending off this
year and according to Seymour,
the expectations are very high
forthe trio. —

“This year we have a number
of tournaments for our senior
boxers to compete in,” Sey-
mour said. “So we are expect-
ing them to be very active this
year.”

The tournament, according
to Seymour, is expected to
serve as a warm up for the Pan
American Championships that
will be staged in Puerto Rico
in May.

Additionally, Seymour said
they intend to send the senior
national teams to the Com-
monwealth Championships in
India and the World Champi-
onships in Italy. Both events
are being held over the sum-
mer.

“We have to compete in
these small tournaments in

Taureano Johnson



order for us to go to the Com-
monwealth Championships and
the World Championships,”
Seymour said.

In preparation for the inter-
national trips, both Hield and
Knowles are currently training
in Cuba. Johnson is here at
home working out at the Bail-
lou Hills Sporting Complex

under the watchful eyes of.

coach Ray Minus Jr.

Two years ago, Johnson won
the Bahamas’ first bronze
medal at the Independent Cup.
Last Year, Knowles captured
the Bahamas’ second bronze.

_ This year, Seymour said he
expects that the Bahamas will
improve on those two perfor-
mances. But he indicated that

it’s not going to be easy to
achieve.
_ “We don’t know who will be
coming to the tournament,” he
pointed out. “Normally Cuba,
Brazil, Russia and-the United
States use this tournament as a
development tournament.
“But we don’t know if they

will be coming this year and.

what sort of team they will be
bringing down to compete. We
hope to be ready because. our
boxers have been training very
hard.”

While the focus right now is
on the seniors, Seymour said
there are a number of interna-
tional tournaments for the
juniors to compete in as well.

On . Saturday at the
Carmichael Knockout Boxing
Club, Seymour said his club is
scheduled to stage its first
monthly show for the year as
they get a glimpse of the boxers

that will be potential national -

team members.

The show, which is expect-
ed to feature boxers of all ages,
will begin at 3pm and should
have participation from the

Champion Boxing Club, head- .

ed by Ray Minus Jr and the
Bahamas Youth Boxing Club,
headed by Leonard “Boston
Blackie” Miller.

Seymour said they intend to
put on a show at least once a
month and they will interact
with Champion Boxing Club
in their monthly shows at the
Baillou Hills Sporting Com-
plex.

(FAR LEFT) - Shamar
Sands on his way to
win the 60m Hurdles...

(LEFT) - Dayron Robles
in pain as he injures
himself during the
race...

(AP Photos: Michel
Spingler)



of it.

Sands, who missed making
the final at the Olympic Games
in Beijing, China, last August,
opened up with a 7.59 in Glas-
glow, Scotland on January 31.

He is expected to compete
again in Germany on February
13 before he takes a break and
closes out his indoor campaign
in Birmingham, Great Britain,
at the Aviva Indoor Grand Prix
on February 21.

Sturrup, along with Olympic
triple jump bronze: medallist
Teevan “Superman” Sands, are
also expected to compete on
February 13 before they finish
up in Europe at the Birming-
ham meet.

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PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



a

nternational and
John Bull make prize
presentation to lucky winner

TAIRO International, a worldwide perfume and
cosmetics vendor, in partnership with John Bull

recently concluded its summer 2008 promotion with

a prize presentation at John Bull’s flagship store-in
downtown Nassau.

The promotion, which ran between June 1 and
June 30 of 2008, invited shoppers spending a mini-
mum of $50 on selected brands to enter to win an all
expenses paid trip including airfare and hotel accom-

modations for a family of four to Orlando, Florida,
and tickets to both the Magic Kingdom and Sea
World. The lucky winner, Candice Williams, was
absolutely thrilled with her prizes.

Pictured heré are Claudine Butler, perfume and
cosmetics buyer for John Bull Ltd; Candice Williams,
winner; Teresa Gonzalez, Bahamas area manager for
TAIRO International, Sandra Ferguson, account
executive (Bahamas) with TAIRO International.

AMBASSADOR OF
JAPAN to the Bahamas
Masahiro Obata paid a
courtesy call on Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham at the Office of
the Prime Minister on
Thursday, February 5.
Pictured from left are
Basil Sands, Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
‘ham, Ambassador
Obata and Robert
Sands, Honourary
Consul.

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Bahama Rock lays-off
23% of workforce

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BAHAMA Rock, the Grand
Bahama-based supplier of
aggregate material to the con-
struction industry, yesterday
confirmed it had been forced to
cut 23 per cent of its workforce
on Monday due to decreased
demand sparked by the global
economic recession.

Walter Reed; Bahama Rock-
’s vice-president and general
manager, told Tribune Business

‘that the construction market ©

demand had declined by a stag-
gering 30 per cent, due toa US
market flop late in 2008, which
forced the company to lay-off
19 of its 83 workers.

Mr Reed said Bahama Rock
has also reduced its overall pro-

duction in order to “try to ride.

19 redundancies
sparked by 30% decline
in. construction industry
demand for aggregate

this thing out”, as the compa-
ny’s.international exports to the
Caribbean and South America
have declined along with the
region’s construction industry.

Bahama Rock has tradition-
ally supplied aggregate for the
majority of construction pro-
jects throughout the Bahamas,
and also frequently supplies the
Turks and Caicos.

“Most of the construction
projects - if it’s road building,
bridge building - they’ have to
use someone’s product, and we

SEE page 7B

‘Dual currency system’
urged for dollarisation

By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor

DOLLARISATION of the
Bahamian economy is possible if
this nation forms a “dual cur-
rency system” to permit the
smooth adoption of the US dol-
lar over time, a leading profes-
sional said yesterday, and the
Government allows this nation’s
multinational firms to pay their
Bahamian staff in US dollars.

Professional says adoption
of US currency can be
achieved smoothly over time

_ if Bahamians allowed to
repatriate dollar hoardings
abroad, and firms given
permission to pay staff
in US dollars

Dr Jonathan Rodgers, well-known as the Bahamian ‘eye doctor’,
and who addressed the Bahamas Business Outlook Conference on
monetary policy issues, said that through operating the two cur-
rencies - Bahamian dollars and US dollars - in tandem, and also per-
mitting Bahamians.to.hold US dollar accounts and repatriate US

dollar ‘hoardings stashed abroad,

dollarisation-was possible.

SEE page 4B

US regulators seek $2.2m in
FirstCaribbean bank account

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

UNITED States financial reg-
ulators are demanding the
return of $2.2 million held in a
FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) account in
Nassau, with the funds alleged
to be part of a supposed inter-
national ‘boiler room’ fraud that
has netted the perpetrators
$44.2 million.

The Securities & Exchange
Commission (SEC), in a Feb-

ruary 3, 2009, lawsuit filed |

against four Chicago-based indi-
viduals and related entities,
alleged that-some of the

scheme’s proceeds, obtained .

from 1,400 unsuspecting
investors worldwide, had been
deposited into a Bahamian



SEC alleges sraceeds from
$44m international boiler
room fraud deposited into
bank’s Nassau-based branch

-bank account in the name of

CTA Worldwide Services.
“CTA Worldwide Services

has received more than $2.2 mil-

lion of investor proceeds in an
account held at FirstCaribbean
International Bank in Nassau,
Bahamas,” the SEC lawsuit

alleged. ©

There is nothing to suggest
that FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas), its
employees or directors have
done anything wrong in rela-
tion to CTA Worldwide Ser-
vices or the account. The bank
is not named as a defendant in
the. legal action.

The SEC alleged that CTA’

Worldwide Services was con-
nected to a fellow ‘relief’ defen-
dant in the case, Stephan Got-
tfried von Hase, a Chicago-

‘based investment adviser who,

it was claimed, acted as the
company’s managing director
from May 1997 until February
2001.

“von Hase and CTA World-
wide have each received a sig-
nificant sum of investor pro-
ceeds through payment made
by the escrow agent defen-
dants,” the SEC alleged.

“The investor proceeds rep-
resent undisclosed sales com-
missions from the boiler room
scheme. Neither von Hase nor
CTA Worldwide has any legiti-
mate claim to the funds that
they have received, nor have
they provided any services to

SEE page 5B



WEDNES SDAY,

FEBRUARY

11;



2009

ROYAL FIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

$13m project eyes
November opening

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he $13 million
transformation of
downtown Bay
Street’s former
Moses Plaza is
scheduled to be completed by
November 2009, Tribune Busi-
ness was told yesterday, with
the owners having received
indicative commitments to lease
70 per cent of the retail/restau-
rant space in the development.

Charles Klonaris, the Nassau

Tourism and Development
Board’s (NTDB) chairman,

* Elizabeth on Bay receives indicative commitments for 70% of
retail/restaurant space, with 30 workers employed by Cavalier
* Marina tie-in with tour operators designed to attract 300-400

tourists per day to former Moses Plaza on Bay Street

who acquired the site with his
two, brothers and intends to
transform it into the upscale
Elizabeth on Bay development,
acting as a “catalyst” for the
revival of that part of down-
town Nassau, said contractor
Cavalier Construction now had
30 persons working on the for-
mer plaza.

“We're full speed ahead with
the Moses Plaza, and on target
for opening up around Novem-
ber 2009, That’s what we’re

“hoping for, and we’ve had a

meeting of minds between our-
selves and Cavalier right now,’
Mr Klonaris told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I’d say it’s about a $13
million project.”

‘25-30k Bahamians’ suffer Misery Index

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government was yes-
terday urged by a retired
banker to combat the plight of
an estimated “25,0000 to
30,000” Bahamians plunged
into the ‘Misery Index’ by estab-

lishing a ‘Food Bank’, as he -

warned that total commercial
bank loans in default could eas-
ily pass the $1 billion net by
year-end.

Al Jarrett, former Finance
Corporation of the Bahamas
(FINCO) head and ex-Bank of

the Bahamas chairman, told -

Tribune Business that with the
global economic recession like-
ly to last for’ another 18 months
at least, the unemployment rate



* Ex-leading banker calls for creation of Food Bank,
aid says bank loan defaults may surpass $1bn-in 2009
* Suggests unemployment rate could hit 15-20
per cent as recession deepens

in the Bahamas was likely to
reach a peak between 15-20 per
cent.

Adding that he was “dis-
turbed” by minister of labour
and social development, Sena-
tor Dion Foulkes, stating in
Monday’s Tribune Business that
unemployment levels remained
in the single digits, Mr Jarrett
said this was open to serious
doubt, given that “ every sector
of the economy has been lay-

“inig-off”
The former banker expressed

serious concern about the
employment prospects for this
summer’s. annual 5,000-6,000
high school graduates, even if
25 per cent (some 1,250-1,500)
went into college/higher educa-
tion, and argued that the true

number of Bahamians who.

became unemployed or under-

: employed in 2008 was between -

7,000-8;000.° .-*
Mr Jarrett argued that this
figure was spread between some

SEE page 6B

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE




PENSION PLAN

As a part of our commitment to our
valued members, The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce is partnering with Royal
Fidelity to provide Chamber members with
a superior Group and Individual Pension
Plan with more benefits, flexible investment
options and online access.
















































ast

‘

When completed, Elizabeth

-on Bay will feature 14 retail
‘spaces and three restaurants,
-including two eateries situated

in its courtyard.
“It’s hard to say until we’ve
prepared the leases and have

‘the signatures, but from the

SEE page 3B



Investment management and.administration by:

ROYAL B FIDELITY

Money at Work
puunsntey




PHN exe Led a ater: AccuWeather anne




The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel ae is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind,

ABACO
High: 80° F/27°C
Low:62°F/17°C





. WEST PALMBEACH
: High: 82° F/28° C





High: 79° F/26°C
Low: 61° F/16°C

KEY WEST
High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 70° F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are teday's
highs and tonights's lows.





High: 85° F/29°C.
Low: 66°F/19°C



Thursday
W High Low Ww

F/C F/C <
pe 53/11 31/0 pe _—_Indianapoli:
sn. 22/-5 12/-11 s . _ Jacksonville
t 6447 40/44 s-
c 53/11 34/1 pe
pe 52/11 36/2 pe
c 51/10 31/0 pc
~~ 89/38. 5 41/5 25-3 sf
Charleston, SC 74/23 52/11 pe 71/21 44/6. pc

; Thursday
Low W High _- Low Ww





Albuquerque
Anchorage










Chicago = S010 30/-1 =r 42/5 25/-3 “pe.

Cleveland 626 37/2 + 40/4 29/-1

Dallas =——-—s- 70/24 «40/4 s = 70/21. 47/8 vil

Denver 46/7 20/-6 pc 43/6 18/-7 _ New Cee Tleeceee

Detroit = 56/13 36/2 re 42/5 28/-2 New York Tampa | 65

Honolulu 80/26 69/20 pe 81/27 70/21 s Oklahoma City 60/15 34/1 Tucson 63/17 39/3 s
Houston = 74/23 45/7 § = 73/22 54/12 pe Orlando —S 81/27 62/16 pce 80/26 58/14 pc Washington,DC 68/20 45/7 pc





Sunny, windy and Partly cloudy and Atul day of Mostly sunny.
humid. breezy. sunshine.

High: 84° High: 83°

High: 83° Low: 72° “Low: 72° aoe 11°








58/14 36/2



Mostly sunny and Bright sunshine.

pleasant.
High: 85° - High: 82°
Low: 70° Low: 67°



elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels; Ns. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.









“‘Hign:2°Ferc | O” Fg
Low: 64° F/18°C

G:

GREAT INAGUA
High: 86°F/30° C
Low.69°F/21°C

The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the
greater the need for eye and skin protection.









humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and ; Today 8:56 a.m. 29 2:38 a.m. 0, 5
9:19pm. 2.9 3:03p.m. -0.5
Thursday 9:40am. 27 3:27am. -0.4
Y 40:05 p.m. 28 345pm. -04
Statistics; are for Nassau through 1 p. m. yesterday. Fe day 24am. 25 415am. 03
Temperature : 10:51 p.m. 2.7 4:28p.m. -0.3_
High Seen eee eeneaeeneeseenensenesstereessaeaesaeesseees 77° F/25° C * — 11:07 2 3 5:04 -0 1
x at turd :07 a.m. 04a.m. -0.
LOW: -ecssecticassoccetsecborascvtsadsgerseststedseoseess OOSE/IO GO Satur ay 11:39 p.m. 26 5:11 p.m. -0.1
Normal high... TT? F/25° C
Normal low . 64° F/18°.C
Last year's . 82° F/28° C
Last year's low . . 66° F/19°C ;
Precipitation Sunrise....:. 6: 47a.m. Moonrise .... 8:25 p.m.
AS Of 1 p.m. yesterday ...cccccsssseesesseseseee, 0.00". Sunset.......6:02 p.m. Moonset. .... 7:59 a.m.
Veart0 Wate sic secssesilasseansnnssteesssstesiesiienntee 0:68 02 i
Normal year to date ....... ee sratidend ages 2.36" 7 iow First Fal
AccuWeather.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by i! a
‘ AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 - is f y “1
= ELEUTHERA Feb. 16 Feb. 24 Mar. 4 Mar. 10
High: 82° F/28°C
Low: 65° F/18°C
CAT ISLAND
High: 80° F/27°C
Low:61°F/16°C
SAN SALVADOR
High: 83° F/28° C
Low: 63° F/A17°C

(MAYAGUANA
High: 84° F/29°C












3) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS








WINDS WAVES _ VISIBILITY










Thursday ” WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 74° F
F/C F/C FIC oe Thursday: _ E at 15-20 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles 14°F
88/31 1 a/2 FREEPORT Today: Eat 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles



Amsterdam 39/3 34/1 sn

Thursday:
ABACO Today:

E at 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles
E at 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles

Thursday: _E at 15-20 Knots 10-20 Miles



64/17 48/8 sh

Showers : ’ ; é = Miami
= 5 82/70
T-storms a

] Rain : : Fronts
Flurries Cd ==

Warr fini.

Stationary ag

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.

AUTO INSURANCE

our
tus!

*

E MANAGEMENT

CE BROKERS & AGENTS

~ Fleuthery Exum
Tel: (242) 332-2862 | Tek (242) 336-2204

26/3 ~ 48/-7 sn.

29/-1 14/-10 sn
Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
storms, t- i

rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice; Prop-precipitation;-T-trace~










THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 3B





Starbucks avoids
US parent's woes

™ By CHESTER ROBARDS”
Business Reporter

STARBUCKS (Bahamas)
has yet to feel the economic
pinch being suffered by its par-
ent, a spokesperson for the
local franchise told Tribune

: Business yesterday, as US sister
stores move to trade in their a-
la-carte coffee and cakes for
the more consumer charming,
“bang for your buck”,
meal following a 10 per cent
sales dip.

According to Starbucks
Bahamas’ Inga Bowleg, the
company is continuing to grow
internationally, even though
executives made the decision
to close around 600 stores
across the US last year.

She said Bahamas-based
Starbucks locations worked to
keep their pricing competitive
with the US, and will be rolling
out new promotional cam-

$13m project eyes:
November opening

FROM page 1B

indications and Letters of Intent
that have, been signed, we’re
about 70 per cent committed,”
Mr Klonaris added.
“Cavalier are doing the
groundwork, the foundations
tructuring | ‘of the
/e’re going to;recon-
figure a lot of the structure.
That’s a lot of the work that we
think, in a week or two, will be
completed.” :

Elizabeth on Bay accounts
for the lion’s share, some 62 per
cent or $13 million, of the $21
million worth of projects .-
spread across nine develop-
ments - currently benefiting
from the import/Stamp duty
and real property tax breaks
introduced by the City of Nas-
sau Development Act in Iast
year’s Budget.

The project, and its counter-
parts, show that Bahamian busi-
nessmen and entrepreneurs are
not waiting for the completion
of the overall masterplan for
downtown Nassau and Bay
Street’s revitalisation before
upgrading their businesses and
properties.

_ Mr Klonaris yesterday told
Tribune Business that Elizabeth
on Bay’s design incorporated a




INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the
news, read
Insight on

Mondays

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
‘award. :
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

value-.



paigns and food options in the
near future to continue to
entice Bahamian coffee
drinkers.

“So far, it’s steady as she
goes,” said Ms Bowleg. “Cer-
tainly, we’ll be operating like

everybody else in business, and -

month-by-month looking at the
operation and doing what’s best
for the company. But right now
our customers can expect to be

able to take advantage of all

eight stores.”

The new value-meal offering,
scheduled to hit US menus on
March 3, may or may not, how-
ever, come to the eight Bahami-
an stores.

“They will be sharing with
us, and have shared, things that

_ have already been implemented

with us,” said Ms Bowleg.

“To see how we can leverage
what is being done in the Unit-
ed States, you will see us
extending similar offers, but we

small marina on Nassau Har-

- bour, which would be able to
‘accommodate six 100 foot

yachts.
e
Marina

He added that the marina
would be a “critical part” of
Elizabeth on Bay’s develop-
ment plan, given that it would
also act as an embarkation point
for tourists going on water-
based tours and excursions with

Bahamian operators.
That, Mr Klonaris said, would

attract 300-400 tourists per day '

to Elizabeth on Bay, giving its

haven’t yet confirmed what it is
we would be doing because the
value meal is something that
they’re just offering in select
stores in the United States as
somewhat of a pilot pro-
gramme,.so we’re looking at
that as an option.”

According to an
MSNBC.com article, Starbucks
is attempting to refashion itself
as a recession friendly coffee-
house by offering value-meals
that could get you a tall latte
and a slice of reduced-fat cin-
namon swirl cake coffee cake
for only $3.95. “Drip coffee
drinkers can get a tall brewed
coffee with a.breakfast sand-
wich at the same price,” the
article continued.

Though the “combo” offer-
ing may not come to Bahamian
Starbucks locations, Ms Bow-
leg said they have started

revamping their food products,

with new drinks and food to be



restaurants and shops a strong
customer base until the rest of
that part of downtown Nassau
received a similar upgrade.
“What we want to do is tie in
a lot of the local tour operators
with the marina,” he explained,
“as this will, in a way, guarantee

that 300-400 tourists will come::’
- every day to be picked up by

tour operators.

“We felt that was a critical
element to the success of the
Plaza, as we wait for the core

’ of the city to be revitalised.”

Describing Elizabeth on Bay
as a “huge catalyst” for reviving
the area of Bay Street east of







Short Term Apartment
Cheaper than a Hotel

week. weeks. month

BAMASLAS
MOIME SS ay FROM NOME

cai: 393-1540

arsink bahamas. honewayframbome@gmail.cont

NOTICE

PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

INVESTMENT
CORPORATION LIMITED

TAKE NOTICE that the Board of Directors
of PREMIER COMMERCIAL REAL
_ ESTATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION
LIMITED has filed for and has been
granted an extension by the Bahamas

International

Securities

Exchange __ to.

report its September 30, 2008 Audited

Financials.

The extension

has been

granted to February 28, 2009 due to
ancillary outstanding items required for the
completion of the company’s Audit. The
extension was requested as a result of
outstanding details to be provided by the
Board of Directors and Management of the
Company, as well as a delay in receiving
confirmations from the Bankers and the
Attorney of the Company.

Ivylyn Cassar
Secretary



“= needed, Mr Klonaris added.

POSITION
WANTED

Well established wholesaler requires a salesman for
the snack food division. Individual must have had
experience is sales with emphasis on large food stores.
Only eee with a proven record of being able

Supervised and achieve results will be

to work

‘| considered.
Must be able to drive standard shift vehicle and
be in possession of current valid driver’s license.
Individuals not meeting the stated requirements will
not be considered for the post. compen offers good
benefits. 5;

introduced to get the Bahamian
public excited.

“We've proven that we have
a lot of coffee drinkers,” she
said. “Bahamians really have
become accustomed to, that cup
of Joe.

“There is much more excite-
ment planned for the Starbucks
stores here. We plan to bump
up our promotional campaigns,
so you’ll see more promotional
food options coming from us.”

Ms Bowleg said she expects
the company to continue to do
well and possibly expand past
its eight locations in the future.
She said there has been an
overwhelming demand for the
franchise’s products, which are
also distributed in Harbour
Island, Eleuthera.

“We hope to continue to
grow,” she said. “We are not in
any other island, but Starbucks
coffee is available in Harbour
Island. ;

c/o DA 67134
P.O.BOX N3207
Nassau, Bahamas







FAMGUARD
The Board of Directors
of
FamGuard Corporation Limited
is pleased to advise that
the fourth quarterly dividend
. for 2008
of 6 cents per share
has been declared to be paid on
February 23, 2009

to Shareholders of record as at
February 16, 2009

East Street, Mr Klonaris said
he was hoping that the derelict
buildings east of the Betty K
shipping dock would be demol-
ished by the time of the Novem-
ber opening, giving tourists a
nice, scenic walk through the
area.

More street lighting was also

FAMGUARD CORPORATION LIMITED

The parent holding company of

Family Guardian Insurance Company Limited
BahamaHealth Insurance Brokers & Benefit Consultants Limited
FG General Insurance Agency Limited
FG Capital Markets Limited
FG Financial Limited

















La, by () NMelentines Duy

Sun and............Restaurant




Appetizers




Soup of Love $10
Tomato Soup topped with Cream & a Drizzle of Vodka
French Onion Soup $10
Lobster & Grab Salad $20,








Lovers Shrimp
Shrimp. Diced Tomatoes, Onions, Celery & Parsley i in
White Wine served warm
Boston Lettuce, Tomatoes, Avocado topped with Red Onion, & a
. Citrus Vinaigrette Dressing $10







MAIN COURSE




: Surf & Turf for 2 $90
Grilled Chateaubriand & Broiled Lobster with
Béarnaise Sauce & Lobster Butter






Roasted Rack of Lamb for 2 $92
With a Dijon Mustard Crust complimented with
Mint Jelly or Mint Sauce —
Chicken Breast stuffed with Crab Meat served with
Saffron Potatoes & Braised Baby Fennel $38





Bahamian Style Grouper $33
‘Cracked Lobster $44




All main‘courses are serve egetables, rice or potatoes






upid's Heart Cheesecake $10
Bread & Butler, udding s¢ serve ed ‘ona a Light Rum Sauce $8.50
pecialty. ity Coffees are a available $9

Espresso, Cappuccino, Cafe Late $4

Coffee, Tea $3






PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



‘Dual currency system’ urged for dollarisation

FROM page 1B

Emphasising that he was “not
being combative” on the issue,
and that he supported former
finance minister, James Smith,
on his view that ‘dollarisation’
was impossible overnight, Dr
Rodgers, pointed out that every
Bahamian’s ability to borrow
was dependent on the amount
of US dollar foreign. reserves

held by the Central Bank of the
Bahamas. .

“There is a direct relation-
ship between the amount of
credit in the system and the US
dollar, so why not dollarise,”
Dr Rodgers asked. “Everything
depends on it.”

When it came to dealing with
the asset-liability mismatch
identified by Mr Smith, given
that the Bahamas’ $7 billion in



IN THE ESTATE OF SYLVIA
WATKINS late of #7 Sunderland
Road, Stapledon Gardens in the
Western District of the Island.of
New Providence, Bahamas,

deceased.

NOTICE

_ NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand agéinst the said
estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 25" day of February, A.D. 2009,
after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only to the —
claims of which they-shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinabove

mentioned.

"Dated the 10 day of February, A.D. 2009.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor ;
9 Rusty Bethel Drive — - ae
_ Nassau, Bahamas



3 ‘Money « at: Work .

private sector Bahamian dollar
liabilities dwarfed the existing
$600 million in foreign reserves,
Dr Rodgers said US dollar
flows came into this nation via
tourism, banking and foreign
direct investment.

“My proposal would be that

we form.a dual currency system
to allow Bahamians to have US
dollar accounts, and bring back
US dollars from the US [that
are held in bank accounts
owned by Bahamians there],”
Dr Rodgers said.

He pointed out that studies
had shown that some 55 per
cent of all US $100 bills ever
printed were held by foreign-
ers, espegially persons of Afro-
Caribbean descent. When
Jamaica altered its exchange
control regime, Dr Rodgers said
more US dollars came back into
the country than went out,
because Jamaicans repatriated
their holdings from abroad.

Apart from permitting this
repatriation, Dr Rodgers also
suggested that allowing multi-
national firms with a presence in
this nation to pay their staff in
US dollars would further aid
dollarisation.in a measured, pro-
gressive fashion over several
years.

hotels and the foreign investors
to pay Bahamians in US dollars
as opposed to Bahamian dol-
lars,” Dr Rodgers added, those

“Tf you get the banks, the.

companies would also be spared
the currency conversion costs
they are currently confronted
with.

Atlantis, for example,
received the vast majority of
room revenues and other forms
of guest income in US dollars,
but paid its staff in Bahamian
dollars.

Currency

Pointing out that dual cur-

. Tency systems had worked well
‘in. Bermuda, Hong Kong, the

Cayman Islands and Jamaica,
Dr Rodgers illustrated how pay-
ing Bahamian staff in US dol-
lars could smooth the path to
dollarisation.

He said financial data from

one year ago showed that there ©

were some $3 billion in Bahami-
an dollars in circulation in the
economy..Set against this,
according to very conservative
estimates, were then some $450
million in foreign currency

" reserves, Dr Rodgers said, some

$50-$100 million in US dollars
hidden “under mattresses”, and
$100-$200 million in. Bahami-
an-owned US dollars outside
the Bahamas.

External reserves were now
closer to $600 million, and Dr
Rodgers said it was likely that
Bahamian-owned holdings of
US dollar assets abroad was
closer to $500 million.

Legal Notice
NOMIEE:

_INTERASIAN RESOURCES GROUP
- LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000,

the

dissolution of
RESOURCES GROUP LIMITED has

INTERASIAN
been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company: has therefore been struck off the

Register.

GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER
Liquidator



Legal Notice

_ NOTICE
_BAMFORTH PLAINES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe. 12th day of January 2009. The Liquidator |
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau, |

Bahamas.

‘ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

EG CAP

TTAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISOBY SERVICES
& =

ee Le oO NEAL

—
— _.
-

— _.

Dollarisation would now be
significantly advanced if 4,700
commercial and offshore bank-
ing workers received their aver-
age $49,000 annual:salary; 4,800
hotel workers obtained ‘their
average $35,000 salaries; and

1,200 workers in the direéct..°
employ of foreign investors |

received an average $25,000 per
annum salary all in US dollars.
“Those combined salaries

would put $450 million US dol-.

lars per annum into the dual
currency system, so over the

course of a five to six year peri- .

od, you’d have close to $3 bil-
lion in US dollars coming into
the system,” Dr Rodgers said.
Describing dollarisation as
“exactly what we need”, he
added that the Bahamian econ-
omy depended almost entirely
on its US counterpart, and
“even credit in the system per-

taining to Bahamian dollars is

dependent on the US dollar.
“If reserves begin to fall-off,
there’s a tightening in credit.
The Central Bank uses moral
suasion to tell the banks not to

lend‘so much, so that we don’t -

import as much. Every dollar

in credit in the system - you’re -
, ability to borrow money is relat-

ed to the reserves in the Central
Bank.” ‘

Dr Rodgers pointed out that
under normal economic behav-
iour, if there were different cur-
rencies in‘an economy, the
dominant one. would take over
in time.

In the case of the. Bahamas

the US dollar, given that it was

a currency that was accepted:

across the world, was used as.a

reserve currency by most cen-_
tral banks, and was flocked to as °
a safety net in hard times. Latin ~
American and Caribbean coun-:
tries were estimated to own’
$129 billion worth of US Trea-

sury securities.

“To all intents and purposes,
we are basically a state of the

_ US, and if people have to

choose between the US dollar
and the Bahamian dollar bill,
they’re going to choose the US
dollar because you have more
utility. If people prefer US.dol-
lars, more and more dollars
would come into the system,”
Dr Rodgers said.

This, in turn, would overcome

‘political issues related to the
‘end of the Bahamian dollar cur-

rency, as voters would prefer
the greater utility provided by
US dollars.

And, with exchange controls
coming down through dollari-
sation, Bahamians would. “for
once have the freedom to do
what they want with their mon-

”

ey”.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are

and dollarisation, this would be. | Making news in their

neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a

“| good cause, campaigning |

for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. *

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



tegal Notice’

NOTICE
ATVICKTON INVESTMENTS LTD.

“(in Voluntary Gauldation)

‘Notice is. hereby given that the above-named
' Company is in:dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HAPSBOURNE INVESTMENTS LTD.
alo Voluntary pawn

Notice is hereby given. that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 29th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa-Corp. Inc., P. O. Box NEE Nassau,

Bahamas.

SSS
ARVANA
5 Saas : ER PAE ESAS INE BESIING __ SS“
Securit Previous Close. | Today’: : Div $ BIE
Abaco Markets .
Bahamas Property Fund::
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1).
Consolidated VVater BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard :
Finco ©, es
FirstCaribbean. Bank |,
Foco] (S) ~ Sag ee
Focol Class B Preference oe
Freeport Concrete ° 4
ICD Utilities: 5: i
J. S. Johnson
nk remier Real Estate

_ARGOSA CORP. INC.
: eee

Legal Notice

~ NOTICE

MILLCROSS MANOR HOLDINGS LTD.
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

aes wet

1000.00 _- Fidelity Bank Note’ 17 (Series A) +
1000.00: Fidelity Bank:Note 22.(Serles B)'+
1000.00 Elden: Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

0.300 N/â„¢M
0.480 N/M
O. 256.6

14.25 Bahamas Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

‘Bahamas.

29. 00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets 0.300 N/M

261.9

30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08 ''
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Oct-08

Colina Bond Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund |:

_ Fidelity Bahamas G-& |} Fund:
Fidelity Prime Income Fund ¢
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
EG Financlal Growth Fund

dS / Buying ‘price of Colina.and Fidality,
Ask S "Selling price of Colina and fidelity |
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol.



52wk-Low - Lowest’closing ‘pride in fast,62 weeks m8 ear ror

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume

Change - Change In closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV & - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

('S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
41 fees Date 7/11/21



- Trading volume of the prior week

~ ARGOSA CORP. INC,
(Liquidator)

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX'- The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100







eRe

be ed


Ine tAIDVUING

WEVINCOVAIL, FEDMUANY 11, 2UU9, FAUL vw



US regulators seek
$2.2m in bank account

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of REGINALD WINFIELD KNOWLES
late and domiciled of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are requested to send their

FROM page 1B names, addresses and particulars of the same certified in

funds, and not déstroy docu- and that the ‘relief’ defendants ments, Benger and Meyers

justify the receipt of such
funds.”

The SEC has already
obtained a temporary restrain-
ing order against CTA World-
wide Services to prevent it from
moving or disposing of the mil-
lions of dollars in the First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) account.

Specifically, CTA Worldwide
Services and von Hase are
required to “provide an

accounting”, freeze their assets, ~
repatriate the Bahamas-based

mentary evidence. The order
applies against all the other
defendants as well.

In its lawsuit, the SEC alleged .

that CTA Worldwide Services
had been “unjustly enriched”
by its receipt of investor funds,
had no legitimate claim to them,
and that the monies were the
product of an “unlawful” boiler
room scheme.

It demanded a court order
requiring the return of funds in
the FirstCaribbean Interna-
tional Bank (Bahamas) account,



PROGRESSIVE SERVICE ORIENTED COMPANY
LOOKING FOR & GENERAL MANAGER

“disgorge all funds they
received from defendants’ ill-
gotten gains, or by which they
have been unjustly enriched,
including all investor funds
transferred to them or used for
their benefit, including pre-
judgment interest thereon.”

Targeted

The scheme targeted by the
SEC allegedly involved Chica-
go-based residents Stefan

' Benger and Jason Meyers, who

entered into distribution agree-
ments with companies who

- issued ‘Regulation S’ stock.

These stocks were exempt

from SEC regulation because ,

they were only sold to investors
outside the US. In the agree-

allegedly agreed to solicit
investors in exchange for sales
commissions exceeding 60 per
cent.

Overseas boiler room opera-
tors were then allegedly
retained to sell the stocks
through what is known as ‘cold
calling’ tactics. This is a prac-

tice of targeting elderly, unsus- .

pecting investors through unso-
licited phone calls, employing
high pressure sales tactics and
“misrepresentations”.
Essentially, unsophisticated

investors in the UK and Europe-

were induced by the two, and

fellow defendants Philip Pow--

ers and Frank Reinschreiber, to
purchase worthless, illiquid
stocks whose value was artifi-

Truck Sales / Service / Parts facility a must.
Backgraund anc knowledge of truck specification/
Background in Pans and
nent required on a daily basis. Must
ctively admimister all facits of business.
Minimum of 10 years experience preferred. Goad
| people skills a must. Must have prior experience in
|| parts order entry and supervising employees. Computer
1 skits r ston daily basis. Must be self motivated
and work with [ite or no supervision.



apolication mandatory.
Service manac
bs able to efe

‘










Extensive background in managing an OEM Heavy

Top wages _-

applivanis, however ony nandidatas to be

We thank all
. imerviawed will be contacted,





no defiver res.snes and references tx

Sahamas Mack Truck Sales Lid,
Oakes Field
P.O, Sox N-dd
Nassau, Bahamas.

Legal Notice

NOTICE.

> IRION INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD:
‘(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named -

Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 22nd day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Cofp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE ESTATE OF HAROLD
MAJOR late of No. 10 Infant View
Road in the Southern District of the
Island of New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE
NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the said
estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 25th day of February, A.D. 2009,
after which date the Executors will proceed to

distribute the estate having regard only to the’
claims of which they shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full _
settlement on or before the date hereinabove
mentioned.

Dated the 10" day of February, A.D. 2009.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas





cially inflated by the salesmen.

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) HIGH REQ FUND LIMITED is in dissolution under the
provisions of the International Business Companies Act
2000.

The Dissolution of said Company commenced on February
10, 2009 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of
2nd Terrace West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

All persons having Claims against the above-named
Company are required on or before the 11th day of March,
2009 to send their names and addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator of the company or, .
in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

FEBRUARY 11, 2009

LAKEISHA COLLIE
LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

Legal Notice

NOTICE >
REIGATE VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 19th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

panaines:

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION
ACT, 1992

AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST
COUNSEL AND ATTORNEY

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
Complainant
AND

RALPH JAN WARD
~ Respondent

NOTICE

TAKE NOTICE that the Disciplinary Tribunal will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 25th day of February, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.
AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,

Ralph Jan Ward, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within twenty-one (21) days from the date
hereof, an address to which the Decision may be sent by
prepaid Registered Post.

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D., 2009
Bahamas Bar Council

Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas

writing to the undersigned on or before the 11th day of March
A.D. 2009 and if required, to prove such debts or claims or
in default be. excluded from any distribution; after the above
date the assets will be distributed having regard only to the

‘proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall have had notice.

And Notice is hereby given that all persons

indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
‘| settlement: on or before the 11th day of March A.D. 2009

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D. 2009

ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
Attorney for the Executor
Chambers
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas

2



Legal Notice

NOTICE |

KNOXVILLE INVESTMENTS PTE. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 21st day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

—, NOTICE
~ ETERNAL GLORY LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

‘Notice is hereby given that the: above-named

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
onthe 13th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

«

Bahamas,

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



IN THE ESTATE OF RODNEY
THOMPSON late of Adelaide
Village in the Western District of
the Island of New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons
having any claim or demand against the said
estate are required to send the same duly
certified in writing to the undersigned on or
before the 27'H day of February, A.D. 2009,
after which date the Executors will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only to the
claims of which they shall have had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to the estate are required to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinabove
mentioned.

Dated the 10" day of February, A.D. 2009.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor.
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, Bahamas


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ee
‘25-30k Bahamians’ suffer Misery Index

26’ BOSTON WHALER OUTRAGE
WITH BRAND NEW TRAILER

Year: 2001
Price: $55,000.00
Hull: Fiberglass

Engine: Twin Mercury CXL OPTIMAX, 225 HP, 450 Hours

YW: =55032-1853792

26 Outrage in great condition! Fully loaded with Auto-pilot, Fish finder, Chart plotter/GPS,

Stereo/CD, Head, Freshwater, Bow cushions.
smart craft gauges.

Standard Equipment

Integral bow pulpit w/anchor roller and chafe plate
Bow anchor storage w/hatch

Port & starboard forward deck storage
Seats w/drainage

Integral swim platform

Port & starboard fish boxes w/drains
Rod holders

Bait prep area

Lockabfe console storage w/piexi door
Under gunnel rod racks

Vertical rod holders at forward deck seat
Self baiting fiberglass cockpit

S/S steering wheel

S/S console grab ral

Drink Holders

Fibergfass transom door

Livewellat transom wiwashdowa
Forward coaming bolsters

Hydraulic steering w/titt

eoeeoeneneseseosreseve

Powered with twin Mercury 225 Optimax and

Optional Equipment

Porta potti w/pump out & 0/8 discharge
T-top w/top gun outriggers

Leaning post w/cooler

Windlass

Anchor

Full electronics including radar, chart platter,
auto-pilot, fish finder, VHF, stereo

| CONTACT:

Kingsley Edgecembe, Jr,
Pho 4284959
E-mail: khedgecombe@gmsif.com



FROM page 1B

2,000 redundancies and reduced
work weeks in the hotel sector;
some 2,000 construction indus-
try lay-offs; another 1,500
redundancies and reduced work
weeks in the retail sector; and
another 1,500 ‘indirect’ job loss-
es. If he is correct, that would
effectively amount to an
increase in the unemployment
rate of between 3-4 per cent ina
labour force that is around
170,000 to 190,000 persons.
Extrapolating further, Mr Jar-

rett said that for every Bahami- -

an worker made redundant,
four to five family members
were immediately impacted.
The effect was especially pro-
nounced in single parent fami-
lies if the sole breadwinner was
laid-off.

Given this data, he suggested
some 25,000 to 30,000 Bahami-
ans were now living in what he
termed the ‘Misery Index’,
“You don’t do spin at a time

‘like this when people are suf-

fering and the Misery Index is
25,000 to 30,000 people,” Mr
Jarrett said in response to Mr

EXPERIENCED CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT

A position has arisen for a chartered accountant with 20-25 years
experience in the profession, or private sector, at assist in the further
development of branch offices in Marsh Harbour, Abaco a

leant Grand Bahama.

The applicant must have good inter-personal skills and be able to ,
relate to a wide variety of clients in diverse business environments,
have a history of large scale development projects and experience
of international clients looking to set up business in the family islands.
He/she must be computer literate with a good working knowledge

of Excel and Word.

eens should apply in wiritng Ot

ECA Application

P.O. Box CB-11651, Nassau, Bahamas






amas



Foulkes.

“There is no institution where
employment increased last year,
whether it was in banking,
tourism, construction, retail, the
hotels. None increased employ-
ment, and they all laid off peo-
ple in a net position.

“People have been laid-off in
every sector. Look at the
National Insurance Board
(NIB) and see what their reduc-
tion in contribution collections
was last year.”

The last Department of Sta-
tistics survey, carried out before
the global recession established

-a tight grip, indicated the

Bahamas’ unemployment rate
was 7.8 per cent.

Yet with the US unemploy-
ment rate said to currently be

-7.5 per cent, and “headed to 9

per cent by year-end”, Mr Jar-
rett said that given that the
Bahamian unemployment rate
was usually 3.5 per cent above
that of the US, the current fig-
ure in this nation was likely to
be around 12 per cent.

“I believe we’re going to go
through a very difficult period
for the next two years, mini-
mum,” Mr Jarrett said.

“TI believe, at the rate we’re
going, if this thing lasts beyond
2009 and goes into 2010, mid-
2010, we’re looking at a 15-20
per cent unemployment rate.
The Government has to help

out the Misery Index of people
suffering.”

To do that, Mr Jarrett said
“every damn body” -all
Bahamas-based stakeholders,
such as government, private and
public sectors, expatriates and
Bahamians - needed to come
together and set up a ‘Food
Bank’ to provide food and
clothing the growing army of
unemployed and homeless.

With the Department of
Social Services set to become
the ‘most important’ govern-

- ment department over the next

two years, Mr Jarrett said the
Government’s annual budget
allocation of $13-$15 million
could be supplemented by $10
million raised by the Bahami-
an public. He pointed to the
$500,000 he and a group of oth-
ers raised in two weeks for hur-
ricane relief as an indication of
what could be done by those in
a position to help.

Mr Jarrett said the economic
strain was now evident in the
three to four calls he was receiv-
ing.every week from Bahami-
ans pleading for financial assis-
tance.

: He added that he had recent-
ly given a $1,000 loan, from his
pension money, to a man he
had not heard from in 20 years,
but who had contacted him in
distress because his children
were about to be put out of pri-

LEGAL NOTICE

International Business Companies Act, 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

‘BBM FUND, LTD.

In Voluntary Liquidation

“Notice is hereby given that, in accordance with Section
137 (4) of International Business Companies Act of 2000,
BBM Fund, Ltd. is in Dissolution.”

The date of the commencement of dissolution is the 23rd

day of December, 2008.

Claudio Carvalho de Queiroz Mello
Shirley House, :
50 Shirley Street 2nd floor,
Nassau, Bahamas
P.O. Box N-7507
Liquidator



vate school because he could
not pay the fees.

“T’ve seen people eating out
of the garbage bins on West
Bay Street in the last two
weeks,” Mr Jarrett said. “J went
over the street and gave one
man some ham and a bottle of
soda, and told him not to.do
that.

“T feel for people. If you don’t
care for people when they’re
suffering, you’re going to reap
the whirlwind. Unless we come
together and address this,
you’re going to see an escala-
tion of crime second to none in
this country. People are hurt-
ing. I’m scared to take money
out of my pocket in public now,
as we’re going to get an escala-
tion of crimes against property
and the person.”

As for the economy, Mr Jar-
rett said that if last year’s 44.5
per cent rate of increase in loan
defaults was maintained, some
$1.106 billion of commercial
bank loans would be 31 days or
more overdue at year-end -
compared to $766 million at
2008-end.

By a similar token, if non-per-
forming loans grew at the same
46.1 per cent rate, some
$537.648 million worth of com-
mercial bank loans would be in
this position come year-end.

Mr Jarrett said that with hind-
sight it was a mistake that the
Government did not privatise
the Bahamas Telecommunica-
tions Company (BTC) by agree-
ing a deal with Bluewater Com-
munications Holdings, as this
would have injected $225 mil-
lion in cash into its coffers.

Now, it was being forced to
borrow to cover the fiscal deficit
and its fixed costs, in addition to
capital works, and Mr Jarrett
said it was possible that the
National Debt could increase
to between $3.7 billion and $3.8
billion by year-end.

He added that it was possi-
ble the Government might have
to consider additional asset
sales, and urged it to work with
major developers to see if there
was anything that it could do to
get their stalled projects going.

“Tightening up”, though,
would be the order of the day,
Mr Jarrett describing the cur-
rent $585 million. in external
reserves as “soft”, due to the
lack of foreign direct investment
inflows and the fact that part of

_ it was borrowed money.

BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION

VACANCY NOTICE

INTERNAL AUDITOR

INTERNAL AUDLT DEPARTMENT

A Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an Internal Auditor in the Internal Audit Department.

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited to the following:

¢,

Auditor

1

“* Produces audit programs and submit the same for approval of the Chief Internal

Conducts complete risk assessment for areas being audited

Conducts financial, operational and ITS audit assignments in accordance with
established audit programs. This involves a complete assessment of the systems of
internal control, risk exposures and the efficiency, effectiveness and economic use
of resources to achieve management objectives —

Produces audit reports on audit concerns, their causes, effects and the audit
recommendations in accordance with the ILA Standards

Conducts some audit investigations, evaluate aneoeS and produce investigation
reports: exercising the [A’s ethical standards e. .. confidentiality, etc.

Conducts reviews of ,budgetary systems haclnding variances analysis), policies
manpower efficiency and new computer applications

Produces audit reports and submit the same to the Chief Internal Auditor for review
and release to management and the Audit Committee

Assembles audit files and conducts cursory reviews of audit files udieaa by the
Assistant Internal Auditors and the Audit Clerks

Trains, coaches and direct the activities of the Audit Clerks, and offers schol
supervision and technical support to the Assistant Internal Auditor(s)

Conducts corporate research, and investigations on vendors and conducts fraud
investigations. (producing the associated reports)

Assist the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor in the annual audit planning exercise and
offer direct assistance on major investigations

Conduct audits in conjunction with the External Auditors and produce working
papers for the External Auditors year-end audit

Conducts stock taking observation exercises, Family Island audits and special
assignments

Job requirements include: -

Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline

Professional accounting certification (e.g, CA, CPA,), in addition completing the
CIA would be highly desirable
Understand and apply Internal Audit Standards and International Accounting
Standards
Good investigative, interviewing and analytical skills
Good problem solving skills
Knowledge of Microsoft Word & Excel computer programs. Also knowledge of
audit software and a good working knowledge of the H.T.E system are required

“+ Good knowledge of the Corporation’s operating policies, systems and procedures

“¢ Management and supervision skills

4,

“A minimum of 5 years experience



For more information ee
(242) 356-3100
(242) 322- 3740 :
Email: bahamasagribusinesse po@yahoo, com

Salary for the position is in Group 3 of the Senior Staff Salary Scales.

Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The
Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:
February 10, 2009.






THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 7B



Bahama Rock lays-
off 23 per cent
of workforce

FOR RENT

‘PARADISE ISLAND

LUXURIOUS HARBOUR FRONT PENTHOUSE
RESIDENCE WITH SPECTACULAR VIEWS
OF NASSAU AND ITS HARBOUR:



¢ 5,000+ sq ft. total area

e 4 Bedrooms with 4.5 baths

e Master bedroom with dressing area, Jacuzzi
tub and large walk-in closet

e Large balconies

e Elegantly furnished throughout with a
separate study

¢ Formal dining room Z

e Private elevator

¢ Heated pool and spa overlooking the harbour

e Private dock for a yacht up to 75 feet

e.Dedicated storage and crew areas

e Exercise room

~ ¢ Indoor Garage
e Private gated entry
e Lush tropical landscaping

Rent: $15,000.00 per month net

NO PETS

For f jurther information and viewing call:
| 863-2730

_ Legal Notice

SUMMERCREST HOLDINGS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice-is. hereby: given, that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

_on the 5th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp: Inc., P O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas. '

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) -

Legal Notice

LOCK DESIGN INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 8th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc:, P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

~ARGOSA CORP. INC.
_ (Liquidator)

Legal Notice

INIGO HOLDINGS LTD.

_ Un Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., E O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
| Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) ©

FROM page 1B

supply everything into Nassau,”
said Mr Reed.

Now, he said, the company is
setting itself up to make it
through 2009 in order to realign
in the new year 2010.

“We believe that the market
will improve by the end of the
year,” Mr Reed added.

“Even though it’s very unfor-

‘ tunate, particularly for those
involved, we believe that we’re .

set up to make it through the

‘rest of the year a get back on

an even keel in 2

Minister of ae, Dion
Foulkes, yesterday told Tribune
Business he was not made

|. aware by.Bahama Rock of the

impending lay-offs prior to
them being carried out Mon-
day. He said employers were
mandated by the industrial code

to inform the Ministry of -

Labour before any redundan-
cies were.made.
However,.Mr Reed contends

that his company informed the
Ministry’s Grand Bahama
offices before the move was
made.

Mr Foulkes said his Ministry
will ensure thé 19 workers made
redundant at Bahama Rock

receive the benefits due to |

them.

According to Mr Reed, many
of the workers laid-off were
highly qualified, and he suspects
they will have no trouble finding
emiployment. He added that the
company “would love to rehire
them all if they’re available”
when the market turns around.

Bahama Rock workers were
cut ‘throughout the. company’s
various departments, including

equipment operators, mainte- ,

nance and operations.

When asked if the govern-

ment’s economic stimulus pack-

age, which includes a range of

construction projects, would
assuage some of the company’s
demand shortages, Mr Reed
replied: “Very significantly.”



INSIGHT

For the stories behind the
news, read Insight Mondays

Legal Notice

X-TREME RESOURCES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given. that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 23rd day of December 2008. The
Liquidator is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-
7757, Nassau, Bahamas. ~

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

GILLYASSE INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 5th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,

-| Bahamas.

~ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

KAMDEN OCEAN CORP.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas. °

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LOILOIL CO. LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) .

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



ue Notice

‘LE MONT S. A.

(in Voluntary Piauigation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Gorp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. -
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

FULL FORCE INVESTMENTS
HOLDINGS LTD:

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-narned

Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas. :

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

LOURDES INC.

dn Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice -

SUNFLOWER VALLEY
LIMITED

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is.in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of February 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757, Nassau,
Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009

THE TRIBUNE'S

THE TRIBUNE



|

N) know How To Ai
THANK YOU!

IN THE FRIDGE---
HELP YOURSELF!

ANP THEN ee

= = UP ASTOOL.--

WE WE HAVE SOME
BUSINESS TO

HOW ABOUT DISsCcuss!

OFFERING ME
A COLD BEER!

V'0 LIKE IT

WOULD YOU
IN $10s

LIKE THAT IN
$10s OR $20s?

IN $50s, 9100s,
AND $500s



©2009 by King Features Syndicate. Inc. World Rights reserved

www.Blondie.com



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several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 +o
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
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©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved

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body of
Chambers
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{1999
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Good 19; very good 29; excellent
38 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION
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farrow foam fore forearm fork
form former FRAMEWORK
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meow moke more mower okra
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roam roamer roar rower woke
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32009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





athlete? (6,4) .

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4 Strolling player from : flies round the States (8)
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7 Marine feature which may caterpillar’s young? (6)

be permanent (4) 4 The kind of wind that is
8 A train driver (8) generally expected (10)
10 Vegetarian fare for an 5 Look for an equal (4)

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12 US port in a state of church (7) ped ley ay a
inactivity (6) 9 Flags put out in honour of a ed
13 Possibly alerts to a brave man (10)
changes (6) 11 Beginning to be seemly (8) | (ea ae
15 Openly enjoying a stay in 12 ra reflection, a must asa wi Rerses
the country? (7,3) fruit (7) _I Re RECISRE ORO
18 Ugly in an awkward 14 Times of enchantment (6) N paper (7)
way (8) © 16° The main idea of work, a) 4 Funny (5)
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20 A trap set outside a sec- - 17 Where to see the Taj ns volcano (4)
ond time (5) ° Mahal in a gracious gq 8 Reject (4,4)
21 Hair style on the beach (7) setting (4) LU {6-Vasting only baetiy
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12 To exile (6)
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10 Vesta, 11 Ears, 12 Lacerate, 14 10 Gliff, 11 Dull, 12 Unsettle, 14 43: Suaight mat (6)
Reckon, 16 Desert, 18 Go astern, 19 Nickel, 16 Cliche, 18 Festival, 19 15 Brawl (4-3-3)
Emit, 22 Taken, 23 Peanuts, 24 Odds, 22 Swift, 23 Lookout, 24 18 Deliberat
Personality. : Unwelcoming. laarheas
Down: 2 Actor, 3 From, 4 Endear, 5 Down: 2 Pedal, 3 Glee, 4 Insane, 5 damage (8)

Reviewed, 6 Enslave, 7 Interrogate, 8
Taken to task, 13 Fortunes, 15
Crackle, 17 Trepan, 20 Mount, 21 Tail.

Secretly, 6 Idiotic, 7 Hard-and-fast, 8 19
Of necessity, 13 Belittle, 15 3

Cushion, 17 Garlic, 20 Drown, 2 20
Boom. . 21

Untamed (4)
Correspond (5)



Love story (7)

rT ee
eau Eee cea ed
Eh E&s
rE ee
Pees See se eels
LT ee





















Down

1

ona fF WO ND

11
12

14
16

17

Harass (5)

Locate precisely (8)
Artist's workroom (6)
Social custom (10)
Prevailing attitude (4)
Condemn sternly (7)
Without interruption
(2,1,7)

A calling (8)

Flowers on fruit
trees (7)

Accounts bdok (6)
Deep-bowled

‘spoon (5)
Encourage to do

wrong (4)























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.







5/1/8]7/9/4]6]2/3
7/6/3/8/2/1(519/4 ee
'8\5\7|1/6/2[3/4/9 918 BY 113
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2/10 9/7/5|2/416/1/3/8 Z 9178















Good Technique Pays Off

Q of trumps, the A-K of spades and
the king of diamonds. He then ruffed

North dealer. ‘
North-South vulnerable.

ALARA LULL ALEAALLLL ALLAN

NORTH the diamond six, reducing both
@I17 dummy’s hand and his own to two
Â¥QI82 trumps and four clubs.
#K64 Having reached this impervious
AK 53 position by well-planned _ play,
WEST EAST declarer no longer had reason to be
@Q842 #109653 concemed with whether the missing
¥53 ¥74 clubs were divided 3-2, 4-1 or 5-0.
#1098 @QIJ752 Regardless:of how the suit was dis-
HQIS6 #7 tributed, he was now guaranteed to
SOUTH make the slam.
@AK ' After leading a low club to the
VAK 1096 king, he continued with a low club
A3 toward his hand. When East showed
#10942 out, South played the nine, losing to
The bidding: the jack.
North — East South West — West had no answer to this
| & Pass 1v Pass sequence of plays. A club return
24 Pass 6Â¥ * would hand declarer two more club

Opening lead — ten of diamonds.

There are hands that experts play
expertly even in their sleep — and
here is a case in point. Our hero,
South, got to six hearts as shown, and
West led the diamond ten, taken with
the ace.

Declarer saw immediately that
the slam was practically certain to
come home. The only real threat was
the possibility that he’d lose two club
tricks, but as an experienced declarer
he knew that with careful play he
could overcome even this danger.

Accordingly, South cashed the A-

tricks, while a spade return would
allow declarer to ruff in one hand and
discard a club loser from the other.

So South wound up making a
slam that would have gone down one
with inferior play. Furthermore, the
outcome would have been the same
had East held the club length.

The key to finding the winning
play was declarer’s realization at the
outset that the only distribution that
could jeopardize the contract was a
4-1 or 5-0 club division. He therefore
focused all his efforts on that possi-
bility, and took the necessary steps to
assure the slam.

Tomorrow: With a little bit of luck.

©2009 King Peatures Syndicate Ine.


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 9B

THE TRIBUNE
SP





The Tribune

with light touches as he tinkled the

ved teh rere and appeared as physically
taxing as a basketball game, as sweat
drops illuminated the keys and Mr Nosé
became one with the keys again.

His third and final piece before the inter-

‘mission was Liszt's Mephisto Waltz, that
gave a more contemporary feel to classical
piano. The performance was one that could
only be described as_a beautiful union
between good friends. ©

Following the intérmission, Mr Nosé played
three ‘more pieces: by J Brahms and two Russ-
ian compositions by Prokofiev.

His rendition of Brahms made one smile as he
forcefully stroked the keys with an heightened
awareness that encompassed a wide range of
human emotion.

- By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

Brought to the
Bahamas by the
Nassau Music
Society's Presi-
dent Patrick
Thompson, Mr
Nosé (pro- ©
nounced No-zay)
FMT OME Leer N Ue
plished pianist,
originally from
AVA Vieni
Verona, Italy and
winner of the 2005
Santander award
in Spain.

Le CB roma ALO
the world to share
his magnanimous The last scheduled piece was Seer pianist
talent with the Sergei Prokofiev from the 1940s.
world. After his last official piece, he was asked for an

IT wasn't rake and
scrape, it wasn't
Junkanoo music ‘or
even reggae or rap,
but Alberto Nosé's
piano concerto
proved ecstatically
entertaining to atten-
dees of his concerts
held last Saturday
and Sunday.

After winning many prestigious awards
throughout Europe, he honoured the Bahamas
with two performances of five planned ballads —
plus one after he was encored unanimously by
audiences:

Mr Nosé opened with Beethoven's "Moon-
light" sonata, a delicately touching piece magni-
fied by his facial expression while playing — eyes
closed with a relaxed look as the beauty of his
music sent soothing vibes down one's spine.

As the music turned darker with deep rooted
sounds that powerfully captivated all listeners,
the audience’s eyes were glued to his hands grac-
ing the keys so effortlessly that his key strokes

encore and received a standing ovation that dis-
pelled the.notion that Bahamians do not have a
love for classical music.

"We just love to have a variety of classical
music artists coming to the Bahamas," said Mrs
Linda Thomson, wife of the president and a com-
rv tatete

member in the Nassau Music Society.

"We want to expand our audience and number
of talents we bring into the Bahamas to share our
knowledge of art and music," she said. "Alber-
to's performance was really outstanding, he's
probably the best we've ever had in the
Bahamas. We might have a hard time satisfying

looked almost haphazard — as if the sonnet only future audiences"
came out accidentally. His fingers danced across
the piano in such a natural movement that it
seemed that the two — his hands and the instru-
ment — were always meant to be one.

After the 25 minute melody, Mr Nosé took a
humble bow to the ecstatic audience, only to re-
appear in a matter of seconds for his second
piece Chopin's Ballad number one, op 23.

The strong feel of this ballad was balanced

top pianists in the world.

ing jazz piano, and April 4 and 7 with Polina
Leschenko and Mark Drobinsky on
Oy UWTOMee UAT)



BAHAMAS ELECTRICITY CORPORATION
VACANCY NOTICE

_ ASSISTANT INTERNAL AUDITOR
_ INTERNAL AUDIT DEPARTMENT

Vacancy exists in the Corporation for an- Assistant titer! Auditor in the Antena Audit
Department. : ;

Responsibilities of the position include, but are not limited. fo, the following:

Works unsupervised, and attends weekly meeting with the AGM/Chief Internal
Auditor ; Soyer
Consults with the Internal Auditor. or AGM/Chief Internal Auditor to ‘resolve
queries or obtain guidance on audit assignments
Develops audit programs for conducting audits, from the planning to TEpOnIne
stages for approval by the AGM/Chief Internal Auditor

Conduct financial, operational and ITS: audits at Head Office and the Family
Islands Operations
Provides feedback on Audit Clerks in the preliminary performance evaluation. for
them
Coaches, supervises, and assists in the training of Audit Clerks
Collects information and updating continuous audit monitors on plants and Family
Island. branches and produce regular reports
Assists, External Auditors i in the prepat ation of work papers for the annual audit
exercise

'

Job Requirements include:
Bachelor degree in Accounting or other closely related discipline
Completion of a professional certification (ACCA, CA, CPA or the CIA)
Understand Internal Audit Standards and Procedures, and International Accounting
Standards :
Good investigative, interviewing, problem solving y and analytical skills
Excellent written and verbal communication skills
Knowledge of internal controls, operational audit techniques as well as the ability to
identify and assess risks
Good knowledge of the Corporation’s operating policies, systems and procedures
The ability to assess and evaluate the Corporation systems of internal control
The ability to conduct some risk analysis for major areas within the Corporation
The ability to conduct financial, operational and ITS audits and investigations and
exercise strict audit code of ethics (e.g, confidentiality)
Ability to lead, supervise and training ‘audit cler ks
A minimum of 3-5 years experience

+,
fe

>

+

2,
+

+

a

’ Interested persons should apply by completing and returning an Application Form to: The

Manager-Human Resources & Training Department, Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, Blue Hill & Tucker, P. O. Box N-7509 Nassau Bahamas on or before:

February 10,2009.



She also added that soon he will be among the

eTHE NASSAU MUSIC SOCIETY has two more planned
performances on March 14 with Steve Koven play-



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answer the skill question, attach
receipt(s) to your completed eni;\
and drop into the entry box at
participating stores or at The
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Empioyees of The d’Albenas Agency and Media Entegyicos ge!
their Immediate famities, are not eligible to enter

Win a $5,000 Gift Certificate from H_G_|

Name:

Address:



Telephane:


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009 °

THE TRIBUNE



. | SG: | |

The Tribune







MARY WHYLLY of Waterford, Eleuthera, demonstrates plaiting dur-

ing last weekend’s Pineapple Festival in Jensen Beach.
Doing something
different this Valentine

Bi By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features. Writer

TASTE community, togeth-
erness,.and love at Something's
Different — a café opened by
husband and wife team Ian and
Sam Moree at #6 Alexander
Street, Palmdale.

Smell freshly baked French
bread as you wander into the
cozy shop with a warm welcome
from Ian or Sam as they offer
you a taste of Italian biscotti
that delicately crumbles in your
mouth, almond brittle or their
famous guava jammies (short-
bread with intoxicating guava,
jam inside).

The lunch fare consists of
generous servings of either
hickory smoked ham and ched-
dar or the turkey and Swiss
cheese, on either white or whole

wheat French bread baked |

fresh in the kitchen. The sand-
wiches' generous servings of
meat will definitely fill you up
for lunch. :
The unique part of Some-

thing’s Different is their.dedi- . rs A
’ relations at the same time. The

cation to special occasions —
this St Valentine’s day is no
exception as the café is offer-
ing a mouthwatering array of
goodies for your sweetie. -

_ Anything that can fit into a
basket is a possibility. Some-
thing’s Different provides box-
es of their unique creations.
From hand decorated short-
bread cookies that have the
message "I love you" to bite
size spicy chocolate fudge and
almond brittle, as well as
coconut rum filled truffles-
Something’s Different has a
delectable selection.

"We're appealing to the male
market here," said Mrs Moree,
"and helping them show their
woman they do care, but the



‘have ah

~ NOTICE

basket can also be something
they'll enjoy."

"We understand that men
ard timexagound this
time. of 4 r gettitie tei girl-
friends oy wives gifts, so we've
made it éasy. If they taste some-
thing and love it, they'll buy it,"
said Mr Moree.

In their biggest selling bas-
ket, you can get an assortment
of biscotti, guava jammies, a
box of spicy chocolate fudge,
two "Something’s Different"
signature mugs, cupcake shaped
soaps and cider. .

"Basically a customer can
come in and tell us how much
they want to spend on a basket,
and we'll put together the per-
fect gift," said Mrs Moree.

And by the end of the:month,
the husband and wife team plan

- to be doing even more to help

bring everyone closer with bak-
ing classes. "There'll be cake and
cookie decorating classes, bread

baking, and how to make taffy |
~ and candy," Mrs Moree said.

‘It's just another way to share
the knowledge, and to build

cozy café will become home to

no more than eight students ~

under the instruction of the
Morees. They want to encour-
age their students to “celebrate
people and celebrate the rela-

‘tionships you've built with

them.”

Sam and Ian Moree also offer
wedding packages and break-
fast goods like croissants,
muffins, danishes and bagels.

‘. "We've had too many old pas-

tries in our lifetime to put peo-
ple through that, so we will
always guarantee freshness,"
she said.

They offer frozen goods by
the dozen to bake at home and
coffee as well.







NOTICE is hereby given that JEAN BUSSAINT BIEN-AIME,
SOLDIER ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
| naturalization should not be granted, should send a written

and signed statement. of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 11TH day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas. 4

NOTICE is hereby given that GERMAINE TELUS-
VILCIN of ST..CHARLES VINCENT STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to, the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas,. and that any person who
knows .any reason why. registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts. within twenty-eight days from the 4" day of

February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

























IF YOU are a
chocolate lover
or know one,
make sure you.
visit Chocol—Art
Shoppe.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JEPHTHA LAUREL BROWN
of CARMICHAEL RD,#8 HAMILTON SUBDIVISION
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen .of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of, the facts. within twenty-eight
days from the 11" day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

Nees

NOTICE is hereby given that SEDLER NOEL of BLUE
HILL ROAD SOUTH, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturaiization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not t9 granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 11" day of February, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Bo

N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











i By JEFFARAH GIBSON

If you are a
chocolate lover or
know one, put a

CHOCOLATE has always Vio a vour”
been a: pleasing and popu- Valentine to do
lar flavor and the Chocol- lst.

eh . Jenny Pierre
Art Shop els gearing up Smith owner and

for St Valentine’s Day ina _ pastty Chef at the
. : Chocol—Art
big way. by offering a Shoppe spoke

with Tribune Taste
and told us a little
about their cre-
ations.

bs “We opened last
year and 'we have added a few different flavors to the
chocolate, we wanted to try something a little different,”
she said. :

This included pairing chocolate with local flavours-
tamarind, sugar apple, guava, and a popular flavor, Pina
Colada. vs
. “Adding the fruits to the chocolate was an idea that we
just explored with. It came out very good and people
seem to love it a lot,” she said.

They are also considering adding other flavors such as
sour sop, and dilly.

Their orders have definitely increased in preparation
for the Valentine’s day holiday.

“We have a great deal of persons who order with us _
throughout the year, and now we have had an increase in
orders. Simply because people love the creativity we
bring to the chocolates.”

Chocolates have always been a popular Valentine’s
gift, well received, but this year consider a unique shape
or flavor to add a twist to your “ I'love you token,”

At the Chocol-Art Shoppe you can either choose from
the huge variety of chocolates that are already made, or
you can make your own suggestions.

“People can come in and tell us what they want. They
provide the idea and we provide the creativity,” she said.

In the showcase there are chocolates made in the form
of lips- an idea they received from a customer. Other cus-
tom shapes include little pink roses on a stick and teddy
bears

Ladies, consider purchasing a tool box made of choco-
late for the special man in your life.

Some men have been more creative in their proposals.
“Some men take the edible chocolate box and put a wed-
ding ring in it which I think is so creative.

Another guy wanted a box of roses and he wanted
them to be in different colors and I thought that it was
very creative too,” Ms Smith said.

unique twist with their
homemade creations.
THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2009, PAGE 11B



ARTS | S

Finding that
special place for
Valentine’s Day

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON

ARE you looking for that special place that would make the
perfect Valentine’s Day date? With little to do on the island it
may be difficult to plan and stray away from the traditional
Valentine’s Day date ‘Dinner and a movie’.

While there is nothing wrong with sticking to tradition, you
can add a little some extra to the dinner date and make it
something extra special.

SHERATON GRAND HOTEL

The 45th annual heart will be held at the Sheraton on Valen-
tine’s night. Dance the night away while contributing to a. very
good cause. The music will be provided by the Defense Force
Band, The S.G Band, and the Ed Rice Orchestra.

SANDALS ROYAL BAHAMIAN RESORT
Thanks to Sandals Royal Bahamian Resort you can have a

one of a kind Valentine’s experience with your partner. Cou-'

ples are invited to spend an entire day at the hotel. The pack-
age includes dinner, and along with that, couples are given a
complimentary rose as well as complimentary bottle of cham-
pagne. In addition, couples will have the privilege to enjoy
entertainment and unlimited drinks.

PROVENCE RESTAURANT
- Taking things back to the tradition, you can have dinner at a
very nice and exclusive restaurant. Provence Restaurant is
offering a Valentine’s Day menu along with their regular
menu. Included on the Valentine ’s Day menu is a five course
meal-appetizer, a salad, entree and dessert. You will also
receive complimentary champagne and full access to the bar.

OTHER GREAT IDEAS FOR THE
BUDGET CONSCIOUS VALENTINE
_ Youcan have a great Valentines date without breaking the
bank. You can check into one of the local spas and set and up
a couple’s massage for you and your mate, which is quite
romantic, relaxing and rejuvenating.

You can have a nice dinner at home by candlelight, fol-

lowed by a rose petal bath for two, or suupEte together and
watch a romantic movie.

Another great gift idea is a coupon book, which your signif-
icant other can.cash in at their convenience for a sexy treat or
escape from housework.



a President Kino Coakley stands in front of some of the groups
wor

GBAA presents its
annual Valentine
Art Exhibition

THE Grand Bahama Artists Association invites the com-
munity to begin their Valentine weekend celebrations at
their annual Valentine Art Exhibition.

Love, Music, Sweets and art will be in the air when local and

international visual, performing and culinary artists present.
themselves at an opening reception on Friday February 1, 2009

at the Glory Banks Art Gallery.

"Flowers and chocolate are great but this Valentine's we are ee
suggesting a date with the Artists of Grand Bahama," says.
newly elected Grand Bahama Art Association (GBAA) Pres: a

ident Kino Coakley.

"Art opens the world in our mind, liberates and evoker:
thought and we believe that our art exhibition provides the

Grand Bahama community that opportunity."
The GBAA membership is excited because their 14th annu-

al Art Exhibition is at a new venue, the Glory Banks Art’
Gallery at the Rand Nature Centre. This great venue allows’
visual artists to be joined with performing and culinary:artist.

to showcase the wide variety of artistry that is available on the
island.

Benefactor Glory Banks, herself an artist, was anxiots to
give her adopted home, a centre for art. The Glory Banks Art j
Gallery was officially opened in February 2008 at the 100-acre .
nature preserve on East Settler's way. It continues as a Cen-

tre for many cultural and educational exhibits.

"The Valentine Art Exhibition is a chance to view works
that are created by talented members of our community,” Mr
Coakley said. It is an excellent opportunity to learn more
about art, view works that embrace all artistic styles and
eee to the artists who can personally give insight into their
wor

Students from Orchestral School of Music, under the direc-
tion of Reynold Robinson will also perform. .

The Valentine Art Exhibition at the Glory Banks Art
Gallery continues until March 13, 2009 and is open Monday
to Friday from 8.30am to 4.30 pm. : Art educators are welco
to contact Miss Cecilia Bodie to set up a Valentine Art Ext
bition gallery visit with their students.













4
:
:
:





- a Haitian love tale -



PICTURED are

paintings of the
Yellow Bird show.
At right is Chantal
Ey Bethel standing
next to her painting
‘Choucoune.



FROM page 12

"This is a Haitian love story," said Mrs
Bethel, "There's:a lot of beautiful creation, in
the forms of music, art, and writing in Haiti, and
I think this is a reaction to the poverty and
‘political unrest there today — it is meant to
soothe the pain."

On the performance side of things, the story
of Yellow Bird or Choucoune was

equally astounding and gave light to the
beauty of the Haitian culture, a __

side that is largely unknown in this country.

Mrs Bethel explained 'that this negative

" stereotype of the Haitian people perhaps exists

because of a lack of understanding of their lan-
guage, as well as the peasant Haitian people
that are common immigrants to the Bahamas.

: There are in fact many literary intellectuals
from § aiti," she told Tribuné Art, "and that's’:
why the cultural exchange found in shows like
this one are so important."

Another onlooker said, "This has been such

- an eye opener."

Creator Julia Ames said her goal was to show

‘the fluidity of culture through such a show, and

to prove that a song commonly thought.to be
Bahamian, in fact originatéd in Haiti.
"This shows that culture is not static," she

- said, "Things have changed, and they continue

to change, ulema bringing cultures closer
together."» .

On hearing Choucoune read i in Creole, one
would think it was the language of lovers, of
romance and hope, Jack Paul read the poem in
its original language, as Alesha Hart read its
English translation:. ~: °,

Next, the verses were moved into song, as.
Francoise Newry beautifully sang to the tunes
of Pat Rahming on guitar.

Moving from the first part of "falling" into
the.second of "loving”, original love poems
were read. by Clinton Minnis and Alesha Hart
with a beautiful chorale led by soloist Jennifer
Bandoo-Wallace along with soprano singer
Francoise Newry, alto singer Julia Ames, and
tenor singers Christopher Thompson and. .
Adam Blake, with bass Bernard Bernard Far-
quharson.

The dances were really the highlight of the
night, with specialists Roderick Johnson and
Issa Saunders, as well as soloist dancer
Franklyn: Donaldson who. moved to the beats of
the song Black Orpheus in the third part of
"leaving", and "Can't Sleep" sung by
Demetrius Smith. ©

"Returning", the. fourth and final act served
as a closure to the night, with more love poems
and another rendition of Choucoune sung by
Naomi Taylor, Joey Edwards and Bobby Pin-

der.

The art pieces were all donated to the Hub in
its attempts to raise money for literacy. This
was organised by Julia Ames, the graphic artist
of Dupuch Publications, herself an artist on dis-
play at the Hub.."In the Bahamas literacy needs
to come first," she said, ‘for the generation now
growing up, we don't want them to end up not
understanding humanity."

“Love and art are the only solution," added
Mrs Bethel.










WEDNESDAY, AEE 11

Saying ‘Il
love you
with

chocolate

See page ten

‘Aclassic



‘The Tribune SECTION B ¢




performance
hy Alberto Nose

See page 9



Art works by well known Bahamian artists such as

3! Livingstone Pratt, Maxwell Taylor and Toby Lunn,
meshed into the momentum of Haitian-Bahamian
artists such as Bernard Petit, Jackson Petit and Chan-
tal EY Bethel. j

Mrs Bethel, wife of previous minister of health Dr.
Marcus Bethel, painted two pieces and constructed a
statue out of royal palm named: "Sankofa",
_ In "Choucoune", an oil on canvas measuring 24 by
24, the artist of Haitian descent used poetry alongside
her magnificent painting, to write in words the pain

By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

- FALLING, loving, leaving
and returning are the
motions of a relationship, as.
well as an act masterfully
performed at the Hub this

have to look to your past in order to know your
future."

Mrs Bethel translated the original Creole by Oswald
Durand, who wrote the poem in 1883 while in prison:

",.Choucoune had very dark skin and long hair
Her eyes were like candle light
Her breasts were firm and beautiful
If she could only be faithful...
..A Frenchman came to town
He found Choucoune beautiful

This painting

_entitled ‘Euphoria’

by Julia Ames was
on display at the
show Yellow Bird
(or Choucoune

past Saturday January 7
-with art that depicts the sto-
ry of Yellow Bird (or
Choucoune in Creole) as the

BacKarey:

li By JEFFARAH GIBSON

SENDING an arrangement —
of pink, red, yellow, and white »
roses or a mixture of carna- :

tions, daisies, and lilies is a per-
fect get well gift, a good way

of letting someone. know that.
they are special, and an even °

better way of saying ‘T love
you’.

Valentine’s Day is almost
here, and many of you want to
show your significant other how

_much you care about them.
Kristina Major at Floral Fan-

tasia says one of the best ways _

to say ‘I love you’ is with a bou-
quet of flowers. ‘Ploral designs
is an art form, it takes much
creativity to create an arrange-
ment of flowers and it is one of

the most common gifts given
and received on Valentine’s
Day,” she told Tribune Arts.

This Valentines Day, at Floral .

Fantasia, its all about the roses.
“For this Valentines Day we are
focusing on roses, the red, yel-

“low, white; and pink. People are

purchasing one dozen, and half
dozen. But even though this
Valentines Day we have been
making a lot of arrangements
consisting of roses, it is whatev-
er the customer wants,” she said.

For many years the act of giv-
ing flowers has been long asso-
ciated with Valentines Day, and
Mother’s Day.

Roses are particularly popu- ,

lar.on Valentine’s Day because
they symbolise love.
“T guess throughout the world

‘from thém.

felt on the canvas.
"In my piece the swan is covering the lady' S body, as
inspired by the story of Choucoune, and the: bitd in the
cage in the background represents the entrapment you
feel when you're in love," the artist explained.
The two birds in the painting represent the two men
that loved Choucoune, and they're both shown as
looking back to the past, because the artist said, "you

Valentine’s in bloom

flowers are associated with
Valentines Day-particulary red
roses. This makes people feel
very special when they are giv-
en these nice little gifts.

Although many of you may
be on a strict budget this year,
you can still remind your true
love how much you appreciate
them with flowers. You don’t
have to purchase red roses or
white roses, less expensive
blooms can still express your
feelings. *

There are flowers that can be
appreciated by the man in your
life, she added, although there
are some guys who shy away
“In a situation like
that, a gift basket that compose
of masculine items would be a
better choice,” she said.

He spoke French : .

Choucoune fell in love with him... in Creole). }
| felt pain

Choucoune left me

If she would only come back to me

It was like my ankles were chained...

SEE page 11



SNA iE RATAN ne wx
r

Gift baskets are an ideal
choice for anyone on your.
Valentine gift list. .

“We have made arrange-
ments with flowers and choco-
lates that is supported by a back
board that we decorate with,
flowers. We have made a vari-
ety of baskets as well as a teddy
bear in a massive balloon. It is a
matter of what the customer
wants,” she said.

How do you ensure that the
blooms stay as fresh as possi-
‘ble: ensure it has significant
water and keep,as much plant
food in it as possible.

“When you change the water
of your roses you want to pour
some of the water out and leave
‘as much plant food in the vase
as possible,” said Mrs Major.





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