Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Arson attack’ on
CuSLOMS

Incident comes just
three months after
task force member
lost home in fire

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

JUST three months after a
member of a special customs
task force lost her home in a
suspicious fire, another senior
officer with that department is
now the victim of a suspected
arson attack.

At around 4am yesterday, the
car of Gregory Mortimer was
set on fire in front of a Sunset
Park residence. Fire Services
responded immediately to
extinguish the blaze and no one
was injured, police press liaison

officer Asst Supt Walter Evans
said.

As the matter is still under
investigation, police said they
cannot speculate about the
motive or the possibility that
this latest fire might in some
way be linked to the one that
destroyed the Sea Link Drive
home of senior customs officer
Roslyn Ritchie last November.

Mr Evans, however, con-
firmed that police are treating
the matter as suspected arson.
Further details were not avail-
able up to press time last night.

SEE page eight

Alleged molestation case
‘forwarded to AG’s office’

FREEPORT - The alleged molestation case involving two former
male students at Eight Mile Rock High has been forwarded to
the Attorney’s General’s Office for a decision, according to a
senior police official on Grand Bahama.

Chief Superintendent Emerick Seymour said that police have

SEE page eight

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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.




BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

ALORS ae
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Fifth man is

charged in
2007 murder

Man appears in court over
death of Theophilus Dean

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



officer




A FIFTH man charged in the August, 2007, murder of
Theophilus Dean was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Benjamin Ramsey, 20, of
Rupert Dean Lane north, alias
“Ben Boy”, was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez and Magistrate Ancel-
la Williams in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged in Dean’s
murder as well as conspiring
to murder Dean.

It is alleged that Ramsey,
being concerned with others,
intentionally caused Dean’s
death on Thursday, August 2,
2007.

It is also alleged that Ramsey
conspired with others to cause
Dean’s death. Ramsey, who is
represented by attorneys Mur-
rio Ducille and Krista Smith,
was not required to plead to
the charges.

Jason Ferguson, 27, Julian
Woodside, alias “Ninja”, 30,
Elroy Brice, 28, and Sharif
Mackey, 28, have also been
charged and arraigned in con-

SEE page eight


































Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

20-YEAR-OLD Benjamin Ramsey arrives at court yesterday.

Atlantis takes legal action
against man who reportedly lost
$1.4m in one day's gambling

THE Atlantis Resort and Casino has filed suit
against an Australian millionaire who
reportedly lost $1.4 million gambling in a single
day.

According to Australia's Herald Sun, the sum
was lost in November, 2006, when self-described
pathological gambler Harry Kakavas was hon-
eymooning at the luxury resort on Paradise
Island.

The resort has taken action in Australia's
Supreme Court.

According to the daily, the 42-year-old prop-
erty developer made single bets up to $60,000,
but never paid the debt.

The Australian newspaper reported that an
Australian Supreme Court last week heard that
Mr Kakavas defence will hinge on the claim that
the casino was aware of his gambling addiction
and that the debt is not enforceable under
Bahamas and Victorian law.

When contacted yesterday, senior vice-presi-
dent of external affairs at Atlantis Ed Fields said
he would not comment on the matter because it
was before the courts.

A trial date is set for July.

Former MP forced to
intervene as woman
tries to take own life
@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



Don Phillipe

Grand Bahama
man charged

with murder

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER MP had to intervene as the
mother of two young children attempted to
take her own life yesterday.

Sitting on a large boulder on the northern

slope of the hill along Dolphin Drive yes-
terday morning, the mother was sobbing,
hoping that some unwitting driver would
run her over and end the torture she was in.

Refusing money that was offered to her,
the woman said she was not looking for a
hand-out, but a job.

Claiming she had been secking meaning-
ful employment for a number of years, she
was finally coaxed out of the street by a
handful of “good Samaritans” who had
stopped to help her.

SEE page eight

FREEPORT - A 30-year-old
Grand Bahama man was
charged with murder in Eight
Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



all > | : =e
Tourism Minisiry hands out














Lillis Swann

a
Need Help Collecting wav
Past Due Accounts?

special signature awards

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Tourism
handed out special signature
awards to four outstanding
employees and 20 retirees.

The ministry recently bid
farewell to employees who will
soon be entering retirement
after years of service. The new
retirees, who have worked
with the ministry for up to 29
years, were presented with
retirement gifts by Acting
Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation Neko Grant.

“Public Service is about
advancing the interest of
Bahamians,” said Greg Bar-

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Mia Lange of the Bahamas

Tourist Office in Plantation,

Florida was the recipient of

the Director General’s Award,

which recognises the staff
member selected as the most :
innovative in reaching visitors ;

and potential visitors.

The Exuma Tourist Office :
took the Team Award. The :
Exuma Office is known for }
organising successful events }
such as the Bahamian Music }

and Heritage Festival.

Ambrose Fernander, the

ministry’s graphics manager,

received the Permanent Sec- }
retary’s Award for efficiency, :
and Lillis Swann of the Fami-
ly Islands Department walked
away with the All-Star
Employee Award for overall :

performance.

MOTSA is an annual fix-
ture of National Tourism
Week and is designed to }
recognise and help motivate :
employees of the Ministry of }
Tourism and Aviation. Win- }
ners are chosen by an inde- :
pendent panel of judges after }
being nominated by ministry :

colleagues.



Son of the Governor
General behind move to
change political landscape

THE son of Governor General
Arthur Hanna - one of the most
prominent Bahamian political fig-
ures of the last 50 years - is behind
a determined new move to change
the country’s political and legal
landscape.

Arthur Dion Hanna Jr., a Nassau
attorney, is to convene a congress
later this month to create a “united
and cohesive force” to lay a new
foundation for Bahamian society
to ensure progress and develop-
ment over the next 100 years.

Mr Hanna’s congress will be held
at the Musicians’ Union building
in Horseshoe Drive on February
27-28.

Its aim, he says, is to unite like-
minded patriots in bringing “revo-
lutionary and complete change” to
the country’s inadequate political
and legal system.

In a statement issued yesterday,
Mr Hanna said: “Let us bury our
petty differences that have peren-
nially divided us and come to
awareness as a people that irre-
spective of our religious, cultural
and political differences, there is
far more that we share in common
than the differences which have his-
torically divided us.

“In order to solve our current
problems in this age of crisis, we
are obligated to make a stand for
freedom and justice.”

Mr Hanna, whose father was one
of the major figures behind the
PLP’s rise to power in 1967, is high-
ly critical of the nation’s progress
since majority rule, especially in the
fields of education and empower-
ment of the people.

He said the destruction of the
old Government High School and
the failure to create the long-await-
ed University of the Bahamas had
created a “significant gap” in stan-
dards between private and public
schooling.

“The national pass rate or grade
has descended to a ‘D’ and our
school playgrounds are often trans-
formed into battlefields and epi-
centres of gang-related violence,”
he added.

“Tn this context, we do not have
the Government High School of
the calibre that I attended or any
similar institution able to provide
ordinary, everyday Bahamians with
the oppportunity of a first-class edu-
cation on par with that offered by
private schools in the Bahamas.”

Mr Hanna also questioned the
term “majority rule” and asked
whether there had been genuine
empowerment of ordinary, every-
day Bahamians.

“To rule means to control your
destiny and to be masters or mis-
tresses of your own fate. Today we
the people do not control our
nation.

“We have little if any control of
our domestic economy and we are
not the owners of the land, which
has been given to our plantation
owners to set up massive hotels and
casinos.

“Hence, when the plantation
owner makes massive lay-offs of
staff with little or no prior consul-
tation, and many of our people are
thrown into economic chaos, they
are left with nothing to sustain their
existence other than the largesse
of the government which, as we are
finding out every day, has reached
its meagre limits.”

Mr Hanna said land is the basis
of all independence. Yet today,

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many people remain disempow-
ered, disenfranchised and landless,
“ensuring that they remain chained
to the vagaries of the modern plan-
tation system.”

Extensive land grants by succes-
sive governments to “foreign plan-
tation overlords” have ensured the
population’s dependence rather
than independence, he said.

Successive governments had
been in pursuit of “fool’s gold”
leading to perpetual servitude,
bondage and second-class ditizen-
ship.

Petty partisanship, selfishness
and political divisiveness had
ensured an over-centralised and
dictatorial system of governnance,
he said.

Sovereignty

“More critically, it has threat-
ened to disrupt and diminish what
little national sovereignty and inde-
pendence we have been able to
retain in this our Bahamaland.”

He cited the views of the late
Cabinet minister Carlton Francis,
who said Bahamians would have
to return to the fishing village to
lay the foundation for an enduring
and sustainable independence.

It involved sacrifice and was not
paved with gold, but it offered a
paradigm on which people could

fashion economic self-reliance.

Unfortunately, he added, the
politicians and academics saw no
merit in his model for national
development and embarked on a
path to “a precipice of perpetual
dependence.”

In these perilous economic times,
he said, the government and oppo-
sition remained “clueless and
adrift” with personal ambition,
greed and intrigue blocking a con-
sensus-based paradigm of national
development.

Instead of putting their heads
together to devise a strategic plan,
politicians on both sides had dis-
gusted most people by flagrant
abuse of legislative time, childish
antics, finger-pointing and blame-
casting.

There was no semblance of a
national development plan over the
next five, 10, 15 or 20 years, with
politicians relying on ad hoc, knee-
jerk reactions “often going from
pillar to post in the rabble of polit-
ical rhetoric.”

Urging fellow Bahamians to
attend his congress, Mr Hanna said:
“Let us in unity make our collective
dreams a reality and end this night-
mare which now engulfs our
beloved Bahamaland.”

¢ The full text of Mr Hanna’s
statement will appear as a
reader’s letter at a future date.










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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Two men
charged in
$100,000
drug bust

TWO men charged ina
$100,000 drug bust were
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Patrick Roberts, 35, of
Dundas Town, Abaco, and
Jason Evans, 28, of Lowe
Sound, Andros, appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, yesterday charged
with possession of marijuana
with intent to supply.

Court dockets allege that
the accused were found in
possession of the drugs on
Wednesday, February 4,
while at Fresh Creek,
Andros.

According to police, the
drugs weighed approximate-
ly 100 Ibs and have a local
street value of $100,000.

Both men pleaded not
guilty to the charge and were
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison until February 16
when a bail hearing will take
place.

College of
The Bahamas
rejoins
Chamber of
Commerce

THE College of the
Bahamas has forged a formal
connection with the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, the
non-profit organisation that
represents a wide cross section
of private sector businesses in
the country.

Re-establishing formal ties
with the Chamber is an impor-
tant step for the College as it
continues its evolution to the
University of the Bahamas
and seeks to positively impact
national development.

COB president Janyne
Hodder said the move is a cru-
cial one as the institution pur-
sues its primary mission.

“Our mission is to support
and drive national develop-
ment through education,
research and innovation and
service, then certainly being a
part of the Chamber is a part
of that mission. So we are very
happy to be rejoining the
Chamber and we are hoping
to find ways to partner with
the private sector to serve the
country,” she said.

Welcoming the College into
the network, president of the
Chamber Dionisio D’ Aguilar
expressed optimism about
future relations between the
two. “We are delighted that
the College of the Bahamas
has rejoined the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce. I
think it will be an excellent
relationship,” he said.

“One of the goals of the
Chamber of Commerce is to
attempt to assist in the educa-
tion of Bahamians in how to
start a business, how to devel-
op a business, how to grow a
business, and I don’t think
that we can do that wonderful-
ly without this relationship
with the College of the
Bahamas. It’s an important
relationship and we expect it
to grow and develop.”

The College is now one of
more than 500 registered enti-
ties from various industries
that are members of the
Chamber.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Minister seeks action on Haitians living in illegal Abaco settlements

m@ BY MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THOUSANDS of Haitian people living
in squalor in illegal settlements in the cen-
tre of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, must be
dealt with as soon as possible, the immi-
gration minister said.

On a visit to Marsh Harbour to regu-
larise six Haitian Bahamians with director
of Immigration Jack Thompson last week,
Minister Branville McCartney held dis-
cussions on the future of the Mud and
Pigeon Pea - adjacent shanty towns where
Haitian descendants with a right to
Bahamian citizenship live alongside ille-
gal immigrants on government land in front
of the Abaco Immigration Building.

The minister is uncertain how many live
in the clapboard and corrugated iron
shacks, where there is no sanctioned elec-
tricity, water supply or sanitation, but esti-
mates are as high as 5,000.

To discuss a plan of action, Mr McCart-
ney met with local government officials in

LIVING in squalor

Marsh Harbour to discuss the extent of
the problem and explore potential strate-
gies.

Discussion

He said: “We are determining the best
way of going about it and that is an ongo-
ing discussion we intend to continue.

“T have some ideas of my own, but Iam
waiting to get some further ideas from per-
sons on the ground who integrate with the

SHANTY towns
people there on a daily basis.”

Those living in the slum who were born
in the Bahamas and have a right to citi-
zenship are unable to work, start a business
or open a bank account until they are reg-
ularised, causing mounting frustration and
resentment which can lead to criminal
activity, Mr McCartney said.

Another problem of the unauthorised
settlements is their capacity to hide illegal
immigrants as none of the residents are
accounted for.

And the minister said his department is



Lay-ofis expected
at Old Bahama Bay

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Old Bahama
Bay is experiencing “difficult”
times and lay-offs are expect-
ed to take place at the devel-
opment in West End, The Tri-
bune has learned.

A small number of workers
were laid off in January, but it
is not known how many
employees will be affected this
time.

A total of seven workers
were initially let go at the Old
Bahama Bay Resort. About
140 persons are currently on
staff at the property in West
End.

West End and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchcombe said yes-
terday that he was not aware
of any plans for further lay
offs by the developer Ginn.

“T spoke with them last
week and they did not make
me aware of any plans to lay-
off staff,” he said.

“They have said that they
are having difficulties and that
things are a bit testy, but said
nothing about lay offs,” said
Mr Wilchcombe.

Al Jones, senior vice presi-
dent of development, could

Six people appear in court over
$200,000 marijuana seizure

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

SIX people charged in con-
nection with a $200,000 mari-
juana seizure were arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Craig Ivan Williams, 36, of
Marshall Road; Jeffrey
Theophilus Dean, 32, of Man-
grove Cay, Andros; Al Sade-
nia Gaitor, 32; Chevron God-
frey Roberts, 32, of Joan’s
Heights; Areo Tony Major,
36, of Palm Beach Street and
Madeka Alexis Brown, 22, of
Marshall Road appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane
on marijuana possession
charges.

It is alleged that between
Monday, January 19, and Fri-
day, February 6, the accused
conspired to import and pos-
sess marijuana with intent to
supply.

It is further alleged that the

West End development is
experiencing ‘difficult’ times

Obie Wilchcombe

not be reached for comment
up to press time yesterday.



accused imported the drugs
and were found in possession
of the drugs on February 6.
All of the accused pleaded not
guilty.

According to prosecutor
Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the
accused have been charged in
connection with the seizure of
196 pounds of marijuana.

The drugs, estimated to
have a street value of
$200,000, were reportedly
seized from two vehicles dur-
ing a police stop-and-search
exercise last Friday night.

Major was also arraigned
separately on charges of con-
spiracy to possess marijuana
with intent to supply, conspir-
acy to import marijuana with
intent to supply and importa-
tion of dangerous drugs.

She pleaded guilty to the
charges.

Dean and Roberts are rep-
resented by attorney Ian
Cargill. Brown and Williams
are represented by attorney

In January, Ginn
spokesman Ryan Julison said
the lay offs in January were
necessary to cut costs as a
result of the “unfortunate” cir-
cumstances caused by the
global economic downturn.

Despite reports of bank-
ruptcy, the Ginn Company
says that its $4.9 billion resort
development in Grand
Bahama is secure.

The company has filed for
bankruptcy on two of its pro-
jects in the US and has
entered into a restructuring
agreement with Credit Suisse
on its $675 million loan
default.

In November, developer
Bobby Ginn signed a $12 mil-
lion contract to partner with
the Grand Bahama Power
Company for the develop-
ment of power infrastructure
at West End.

The 22-mile, 69KV trans-
mission line is necessary for
the company’s massive Ginn
Sur Mer project.

Geoffrey Farquharson.

The accused have been
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. The case was
adjourned to February 16 for
a bail hearing.

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working to prevent settlements of this
nature from growing as they pop up across
the islands.

Refuge

He said: “Persons coming to the
Bahamas illegally will look at these places
like a refuge and it’s incumbent upon us to
stop others from being established.

“In our Bahamas we cannot take much
more of this problem.

“If we allow certain things to happen
we will become second-class citizens in our
own country.”

However, Mr McCartney is uncertain
when the Immigration Department will
put an end to the misery of the Pea and the
Mud.

He said: “I don’t want to publicly dis-
close anything until we have confirmed
which step we are going to take, but I
would like to see something happen and it
will deal with regularising those who ought
to be regularised, and removing those who
ought to be removed.”



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
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A new day dawns for Police

IN THE House of Assembly last week
National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest
introduced a Bill to repeal the Police Service
Act.

The most important proposal in the Bill was
to put a term limit on the time a Police Com-
missioner and his deputy can serve. The contract
period can be for a term up to five years, renew-
able for a period not to exceed 10 years.

The proposition seems sensible. As Mr Turn-
quest pointed out it is not incompatible with
the Bahamas’ Constitution. There are also
examples of fixed contracts for Commission-
ers of Police in other Commonwealth countries
— Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and
Jamaica. Even the heads of the London Met-
ropolitan Police and New Scotland Yard have
fixed term contracts. If it can work successfully
in those countries, why should it be an abysmal
failure in the Bahamas?

Nor is this system foreign to the Bahamas,
which has also had police commissioners under
contract, even with a Bahamian commissioner
being strung along from year to year for three
years before being replaced by another member
of the Force.

It is a system that can encourage commis-
sioners and their deputies to show leadership,
initiative and produce results within a given
time frame. It is also an encouragement to the
lower ranks to put their best foot forward in the
knowledge that if they do well they can also
make it to the top.

“A well structured, well managed Royal
Bahamas Police Force, as similar organisations,”
said Mr Turnquest, “can only maintain the nec-
essary balance in its workforce through contin-
ued recruitment at the base and continued
retirement at the top level. While the senior
command is pivotal in the management of the
Force, the success of the organisation equally
depends upon a critical mass of officers at all
levels that perform the day-to-day work of the
Force.”

Could such a system be open to corruption
and abuse? Of course, it can. Nothing man-
made is corruption proof, but if a well trained
police force is to be put under the oversight of
untrained civilians — particularly politicians as
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell suggests — it is
doomed before it has a chance to exist.

We have seen the so-called political cover-ups
during the PLP regime, and we have heard the
widespread rumours of political interference in
the force. Now Mr Mitchell alleges that he has
seen the “evidence of widespread leaks out of
the Police Force of a purely political anti-PLP
nature in the last 18 months.” What proof does
Mr Mitchell have for such a wild and scatter-
brained suggestion? If he wants to find political
leaks — yes, even against his own party — we















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suggest he look for the leaky sieves within that
very same party. Don’t blame it on the police
force. This is once Mr Mitchell is hunting the
wrong rabbits.

“The Police Force, the Defence Force and all
of them and each of them from the top to the
bottom have to come, recognize and accept in
their jobs that they are subject to the supervi-
sion, direction and control of civilian authorities,
including Members of Parliament from both
sides, and their role is not to play favourites
with either side, adopting in some cases the ter-
minology of the governing party in its propa-
ganda campaigns,” Mr Mitchell told the House.
“Tt is not the role of the police to use purloined
evidence to try to sully the names of the politi-
cal opponents of a governing party.”

A reporter was so shocked by Mr Mitchell’s
remarks that he forwarded them to us with the
comment: “It seems to me this call of his for
‘civilian oversight’ for the police and defence
force would lead to an extremely unfair sys-
tem.

The idea that a group of politicians would
actually be in charge of ‘policing the police’ is
frightening.

That means that no politician or relative of a
politician in a governing party would ever be
brought up on charges.

If Mitchell had his way I’m sure the over-
sight committee would ensure that no informa-
tion of significance would ever reach the press.
Can you imagine what state the police would be
in if an oversight committee of Mitchell, Peet,
Roberts and (Keod) Smith were in place?”

The very thought gave us a fit of the “hor-
rors.”

Probably Mr Mitchell’s fear — as is that of
many other politicians — is the level of per-
sons this force is now prepared to call in for
questioning and even to bring before the Bar of
the Court. Instead of complaining, they should
all pull up their socks and recognise that at last
a new day has dawned — all Bahamians, regard-
less of social or political rank, are now equal
before the law.

They are probably particularly fearful of the
young men recently returned from special train-
ing with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
and the rumour now making the sip-sip rounds:
“Man, if they think Ferguson tough, wait ’till
they get a taste of Greenslade and Dames!”

It is probably the fear of the unknown and
the scandals of the past few years that make
Mr Mitchell want politicians to have a steadying
hand on any pot that might boil over.

The criminals might now sit up and take
note. Instead of their old cry: “If they can get
away with it, why can’t I?” The new cry might
become: “Boy, if even they can be taken down,
I better watch my skin!”



A Christian
country? We are a
nation of crooks

EDITOR, The Tribune.

T recall about a year ago as I
sat in my car in a parking lot in
the Palmdale area I witnessed a
driver (a prominent pastor)
reversing out of a spot.

In doing so the driver hit
another car leaving quite a dent,
which was highly visible.

The driver got out and as the
saying goes, he looked this way
and that way saw no one and
left the scene.

When the owner of the dam-
aged car came out naturally she
was quite upset.

I went over and told her who
the culprit was for which she
thanked me.

Some time last year while
staying at Eleuthera I overheard
a local complaining of how 40’
containers that were transport-
ed direct from the US were also
being used to bring illegal liquor
to that island.

Upon opening the container
the assigned customs officer
would merely check the front
portion and depart the scene
either deliberately or carelessly.
But, lo and behold, 100 cases
of beer were at the rear of the
container.

A home owner went to make
a loan from a bank in the mid-
1980s and was charged $2,500
by the bank lawyers for
research.

That same home owner went
for another loan in the 1990s
and this time was charged
$3,800 again for the same
research.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Last year 2008 the same
home owner was charged $4,200
yet again in securing a loan in
legal fees, with another set of
lawyers claiming they were not
satisfied with the first two
researches.

During the holidays after
completing a meal at a local
restaurant I asked the waitress
for my check...your bill is
$28.50 was her reply but she did
not present me with an itemised
check.

Later I called the restaurant
owner whom I knew and
informed him and that particu-
lar waitress does not work there
anymore.

Listed here is just some of the
practices which we as Bahami-
ans allow to happen continu-
ously in our Bahamas.

Civil servants taking an extra
two days off every time a holi-
day falls on a Friday or a Mon-
day, brag openly about it and
dare their supervisors to disci-
pline them...gasoline being
transferred to private vehicles
at government expense...gov-
ernment assisted loans to stu-
dents with the funds being used
for something else and inten-
tionally not paid... building con-
tractors removing one home-
owner materials and sending
same to another site...ambu-

lance drivers taking the jew-
ellery from fatal victims...
expensive caskets being
exhumed and resold to the
undertakers...taxicab drivers
overcharging tourists everyday
and getting away with it...even
the tyre repair man if you have
three small holes in your tyre,
will charge you $15, $5 for each
25 cent plug he uses...yet we
seem surprised by the events of
national headlines of the past
week.

But not too long ago in the
1970s we had a member of par-
liament for Grand Bahama who
was referred to as “Mr 10 per
cent”...and we also remember
a certain man now deceased
who collected thousands of dol-
lars from would be investors just
for securing an appointment
with the prime minister!

Yet we seem surprised by
the events of this past week, we
are what we are.

Yes, my fellow Bahamians,
on a daily basis we are being
swindled by unscrupulous pas-
tors, lawyers, real estate deal-
ers, building contractors, mail
boat operators, etc, with civil
servants being among the major
culprits short changing our gov-
ernment and treasury daily.

So to all of you Bible toting
pastors out there, be careful
when you refer to us as being a
Christian nation...as from as I
see we are a nation of crooks.

BRIAN O CLARKE
Nassau,
January, 2009.

Raise permit fees to weed out undesirables!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We read with disgust the behaviour of visiting
“yachtsmen” in the Exuma Cays.

We too have been witness to inexcusable
behaviour in the past by cruising sailors and bear
witness to their complete disrespect of our coun-

try.

They have left trash in the bush right inside
the National Park because of sheer laziness to
take it to a nearby dumping facility and more so
dodging the payment that comes with the ser-

vice!

We have seen the slaughter of baby nurse
sharks and stingrays by French Canadian cruisers
for eating purposes and the same collection shown
in your paper today with countless baby conchs.

We hope and support the confiscation of their
vessels and jail time here in the islands.

Add to this a cancellation of their cruising per-

mits, which are far too cheap anyway, and the
banning of re-entering to our country.

In years past I was doing some minor mainte-

nance while pulled up to a beach in the Exumas

and turned my back for 20 minutes to see a cruis-
ing yacht sail away with my tool box missing!
There needs to be some vigilant watch by both

locals and authorities throughout the islands on

sirables!
PAUL &
“Safari

Seaplanes”
Nassau,

SUZANNE
HARDING

our cruising visitors for their behaviour here is
certainly questionable.
Raise the Permit Fees to weed out the unde-

February, 2009.

We work for the betterment of the country

EDITOR, The Tribune.

You may have read a letter
to John Marquis in the Janu-
ary 26th. Tribune’s edition of
Monday’s Insight where mem-
bers of the Nassau Branch of

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The Royal Society of St
George were criticised for
their non-involvement in the
political situation in the UK.

To quote: “A small number
of us have tried to excite the
RSSG out of their slumber,
only to be met with statements
such as, “‘We don’t involve
ourselves in politics” and
“We don’t involve ourselves
in religion.”

For the benefit of the writer,
who I assume is a member of
our Society, he has only to
read the RSSG website where
he will note that the policies of
the Society are “Unsectarian
and independent of party pol-
itics.”

What I do take exception

to, however, is being taken out
of our “slumber.”

Obviously this person is
unaware of how much we do,
not just in making donations,
but actually getting involved
and working with the various
charitable organisations here
in the Bahamas. We certainly
don’t sit on our laurels and
neither do we “slumber!”

We are the Nassau Branch
of the Royal Society who
work together in harmony for
the betterment of the country
we now call our home.

JUDY GRINDROD
President RSSG,
Nassau,

February 4, 2009.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

0 In brief

Police seek
‘armed and
dangerous’
GB resident

m@ BY MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A Grand Bahama resident,
described as armed and danger-
ous, is wanted
by police for
questioning in
connection
with allega-
tions of death
threats and
the discovery
of an unli-
censed
firearm.

Garin
Lucken Gib-
son, 30, a gardener whose last
known address is Batelco Cor-
ner in Jones Town, Eight Mile
Rock, is considered extremely
dangerous and should be
approached with caution, police
say. The Bahamian man, born in
Blanket Sound, Andros, is 6ft
lins tall, weighs between 150lbs
and 180lbs, has dark brown skin,
eyes and hair, and a small scar
under his right eye.

Anyone with information
about Gibson or his where-
abouts is asked to contact
Grand Bahama police urgently
on 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-
9991, 348-3445, 350-3125 or call
911.

MP presents
musical instruments
to help marching
hand develop

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

enn an

FREEPORT - Pineridge MP
Kwasi Thompson has presented
musical instruments to the
Church of God Fairfield in Her-
itage to assist with the develop-
ment of a new community march-
ing band.

Bishop Rev Leslie Woodside
said the church is in the process of
establishing the Heritage March-
ing Band, which will consist of
young people from the church
and the community of Heritage.

He hopes that parents and
guardians of children in the com-
munity will embrace the oppor-
tunity of allowing their children to
participate in the marching band.

The band is open to children
between ages six through 17 years
old, he said.

“T would like to express our
profound appreciation to MP
Kwasi Thompson for his dona-
tion of these instruments.

“We accept them with grateful
hearts and I am sure that these
instruments will enhance the
morale and moulding of our
young children in the communi-
ty,” said Rev Woodside.

The Heritage subdivision is a
relatively new residential devel-
opment with many young fami-
lies. It is located in the Pineridge
constituency.

Mr Thompson said that in addi-
tion to spiritual development,
churches also play a very impor-
tant role in the development of
communities.

He noted that “Team Piner-
idge” recently assisted the Church
of God Temple on Peachtree
Street with the construction of a
basketball court to assist residents
in that area. The MP believes that
the donation of musical instru-
ments will enrich the lives of not
only the young people of the
Church of God Fairfield, but also
the young people of Heritage.

“The Church of God Fairfield
is committed to partnering with
the Heritage community (in) pro-
viding wholesome positive activ-
ities for young people of their
church and the community,” he
said.

“We will be inviting all the res-
idents of Heritage who are inter-
ested in participating in the
marching band to contact the
church so that they may be
included in the band.”

Mr Thompson thanked Rev
Woodside and the church for
their willingness to partner with
the residents in their efforts to
better the lives of young people.

“We recognise the important
contributions churches make to
the community and I recognise
that as a member of parliament
we must do all possible to partner
with churches to better our com-
munities,” he said.

Mr Thompson announced that
he will be holding a Heritage
town meeting on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 28 at 4pm to discuss com-
munity issues.

He said that on the agenda will
be plans for a park and the for-
mation of a Heritage community
association. Mr Thompson said
they will also discuss the forma-
tion of a community crime watch
due to the recent break-ins in
Heritage.



Remnants of giant
tortoises, 2,000-

UM BRIKIU as

found in Abaco
I Cam It) s

m@ BY DIANE PHILLIPS

Aree hole in Abaco
is gaining internation-

al attention, revealing tightly-held
secrets preserved for up to 4,000
years, evidence of an era when
the Bahamas was home to land-
roaming crocodiles, giant tortois-
es, flightless birds, ancient bats
and owls that roosted 85 feet
below ground.

Known as the Sawmill Sink, the
saltwater-filled blue hole in the
heart of the pinelands on the
island of Great Abaco was the
recipient of National Geograph-
ic’s largest expedition grant for
2008 and is scheduled to be the
subject of a major NG feature
this year. The scientific treasure it
holds, a fossilised collage of life
and culture as it once existed, is
now closely guarded by experts
under the auspices of The Nation-
al Museum in co-operation with
scientists and researchers from
the United States.

The oxygen-free Sawmill Sink
holds such treasure that photog-
rapher Wesley Skiles, who is
shooting on behalf of The Nation-
al Museum for National Geo-
graphic, spent 10 days in Decem-
ber capturing images for the arti-
cle and a possible show. And Dr
Kenneth Broad of the Rosensteil
School of Marine Sciences
describes it as unlike any other
anywhere.

“There is no place like it in the
world for blue holes,” said Dr
Broad.

The hole was first discovered
by Brian Kakuk, a former Navy
diver, now a respected cave and
wreck dive instructor, marine sci-
entist, researcher and owner of
Bahamas Underground.

In 2004, he was leading a dive
in a cave near a blue hole south of
Marsh Harbour when he saw
what appeared to be a giant turtle
shell. Buried about 60 feet down,
the shell turned out to be that of
a tortoise, later carbon-dated to
be about 2,500 years old, and like
other artifacts found since then,
including a 1,040-year old human
bone, it was perfectly preserved.

Though rare, the explanation
for what has kept remains in the
blue hole frozen in time is sim-
ple. Absence of oxygen (it is ‘eat-
en’ by hydrogen sulphide) means
no growth of fungus or bacteria.

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Detritus like leaves, twigs, seeds,
flowers, fruit, bones and shells is
naturally preserved. The integri-
ty of the findings excites scien-
tists across a range of disciplines,
even those who believe it can help
explain everything from evolu-
tion to climate change.

“Most sites we find are pollut-
ed, so they are actually a health
hazard, which in a way is fortu-
nate because it keeps people from
going in.

“Water samples are filled with
e-coli and other bacteria,” said
Nancy Albury, a diver who’s
spent 20 years photographing the
blue holes, caves, flora and fauna
of Abaco and now serves as the
Bahamas National Museum rep-
resentative there.

Her photos have helped docu-
ment the wealth of findings in
what has been estimated at 100
holes, “But none,” she says, “as
pristine as Sawmill Sink, so pris-
tine that we can take DNA sam-
ples and get accurate readings
from animal and plant remains
thousands of years old.”

Only one sink hole, located in
Belize, has ever come close to the
preserved scientific riches of
Sawmill Sink, agree experts, who
are studying those riches to piece
together a portrait of life and land




long ago. They believe winds
blew dust from the Sahara here a
quarter of a million years ago.

Two thousand feet of passages
in the caves of Sawmill Sink are
covered and laden with fossilised
remains of crocodiles that made
their way by what was then land
from Cuba when sea level was
420 feet below today’s level and
land covered much of The
Bahamas.

Owls

Animals could have walked
between Long Island and the
Berry Islands, and 10,000 years
ago, prehistoric owls roosted in
trees now deep underwater. Giant
slow-moving tortoises, long since
extinct, roamed the land, as like-
ly to have been destroyed by
humans as by natural predators.

Discovery has not been limited
to what lived long ago. A species
of shrimp never before discov-
ered in May and a sample was
kept alive for six weeks by
Friends of the Environment in
Abaco, which works closely with
The National Museum.

Today, the remains that will
become the resources for study
and help to guide environmental

Correction




PROCEEDS of the Antique Auto Club of the
Bahamas’ annual car show, which is currently in the
planning stages, will be donated to the Bilney Lane
Home for Children and the Every Child Counts School
in Abaco. The 2009 Antique Car Show is now scheduled
for Saturday, March 14, at the Arawak Cay Heritage








Centre in Nassau.

Entry fee is $35 — not $3 as previously reported —
for those that want their vehicles judged to compete for
trophies in the eight established categories.

The Tribune apologises for the error in the original
article on February 9 and for any inconvenience caused.

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management are in the hands of
The National Museum, which will
become the repository for the
ruins and remains.

According to its director, Dr
Keith Tinker, it is a treasure
unlike any ever expected to be
found, and opens doors for coop-
eration with universities and
researchers around the globe.

“We are particularly pleased
that in addition to our interna-
tional efforts, we will be partner-
ing with The College of The
Bahamas where additional scien-
tific research will be conducted
and where its inclusion in course
material will attract serious
marine sciences students,” Dr
Tinker said.

Already, other institutions,
including the University of Flori-
da, the Florida Museum of Nat-





ural History, Friends of the Envi-
ronment (Abaco) and the New
Mexico Museum of Natural His-
tory are participating in joint
efforts to continue to discover,
uncover, study and preserve the
long-hidden natural treasure.

“Sawmill Sink and the riches it
holds will help us unlock an
important part of history that
could teach us lessons of great
value, helping to guide future
decisions about climate, marine
resources and environmental
management,” said Dr Davidson
Hepburn, Chairman of the Antiq-
uities, Monuments and Museums
Corporation which oversees The
National Museum.

“This is truly a great find anda
tremendous honour for The
Bahamas.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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‘Vaughn O. Jones
| MEMORIAL CENTER

"Honoring the memories of loved omos”
INDEPENDENTLY CMV HED & OPERATES

Funeral Service
for the late

George Kerr, 96

of Delaporte and formerty of
Sandy Point, Abaco wil be
held on Wednesday February
11, 2009 at 17:00 a.m. at little
Jerusalem Apostolic Church,
Delapone, West Bay Street.
Officiating will be Suffragan
Bishop George Duncambe as-
sisted by other Minésters of the
Gospel. Interment wil follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road. Precious memories
will forever linger in the hearts of his family: three sons:
Prince, Rudolph & Dexter Kerr; thirty-four grandchildren:
Dereck, Jeffrey, Gregory, Stephen Ker, Judy Cargill,
Norma Thompson, Harvey, Keilh, Shantalee, Kimberly,
Theodore, Prince, Deborah, Rita, Ann Ker, Marcia, Rudy,
Samantha, Simone, Sebastian, Scott, Audie Kerr, Minister
Linda Moxey, Elizabeth Brown, Minister Esmerakda
O'Brien, Lisa Knowles, Elainé Forbes, James, Derek,
Jerome, Prescola Gardiner, Sandra Edoar, Necola
Ferguson, Dexter Conyers, Braden Kerr: four sisters:
Virginia Paul, Hilda Rawls and Ella Jones of Orlando, Fla.,
Gladys Rolle of Houston Texas; one brother: Marvin Kerr of
Miami, Fla.; one daughter-in-law: Beryl Kerr; five sisters-in-
law: Tesser Smith, Doris Ker, Dolly Cooper, Lenora
Gibson, Beatrice Gibson; five grand daughters-in-law:
Ruby, Tina, Yvette, Bemadette, Christa Ker; eight
grandsons-inlaw: Urban Cargill, Stephen Thompson,
Rickey Moxey, Adrian Brown, Clayton Knowles, Ansel
Obrien, Anthony Forbes & Jimmy Bastian; forty-five great
grandchildren; twenty-five great great grandchildren: fifteen
nieces; twanty nephews; and a host of other relatives and
friands including: Sidney Kerr, Kenwood Kerr, Patricia Hart,
Rowena Ker, Roland Knowles and family, Julia Huyler &
the Delaporte family.

Viewing will be held in the “Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O.
Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Sireet on
Tuesday from 12700 noon to 6:00 p.m. and al the church an
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. to service time,

co

NCH FRITTERS

FOLLOWING several years of preparation,
the government-owned Clifton Heritage Nation-
al Park will officially be opened to the public on
Thursday, February 19, 2009.

The Coalition To Save Clifton said it wants to
congratulate the Clifton Heritage Authority on
this very important achievement.

The Coalition has always maintained that pri-
or to the Park’s opening, when scores of people
will descend upon the site, recognition should be
given to the slaves who lived, worked, died and
were buried on the plantation.

Therefore on Sunday, February 15, 2009, an
ecumenical memorial service under the auspices
of the Bahamas Christian Council will be held at
the Clifton site beginning at 3pm.

ACO OH Cmca (I-r) Carolyn Strachan, chairman Rev C B Moss and Herbert Sears.

Clifton Heritage National Park
to be opened to the public



“This will be a solemn, yet exciting experience
as we honour the memory and legacy of those
who lived and died at a time when, because of
their status, they were deprived of the right and
dignity of being buried in the island’s cemeteries
alongside ‘free people’,” said Rev C B Moss,
chairman of the Coalition.

A motorcade will leave from Carmichael and
Baillou Hill Roads at 2pm, and will proceed to the
memorial site.

Public and private sector organisations and the
general public are invited to attend.

The Coalition said it extends sincerest
thanks to all those who supported the Coalition’s
fight to save the priceless Clifton site from
destruction.

Lu
GAMES

PETES







PLANTS

THE Bahamas Institute of
Financial Services has announced
the appointment of Tanya
McCartney as its president and
Kim Bodie as executive director.

Both women bring a wealth of
experience to the financial ser-

DISCO

r vices sector.

Ms McCartney entered the
financial services sector in 1991
as a legal and compliance officer
for a private bank and has
worked at a number of interna-
tional financial institutions.

She is currently the managing
director of RBC/Finco.

Mrs Bodie started her career
at the Institute in 1980 as secre-
tary to the Registrar, and in 1987

ADMINISTRATOR/
LIBRARIAN

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the successful candidate will
include:

© Overseeing the daily operation of the
facility, which includes a library, museum,
computer laboratory, resource centre,
reading room and café

© Investigating and
sources of funding

pursuing viable

© Planning and executing the curriculum
of the trade and vocational classes to be
offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

© Experience in aé_ related field or
certification in library science

© Excellent organization and administrative
skills

© Very Good computer skills

© Excellent communication skills
© Exceptional Interpersonal skills
© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to cdsands@coralwave.com
or via fax 242-334-2280.
www.southeleutheramission.com



PSCC ETE TE)
Yaa TSR TTT ts





Kim Bodie

was promoted to the position of
administrator, a title she held
until 2007 when she was appoint-
ed executive director of the Insti-
tute.

In an interview with both pro-
fessionals, Ms McCartney
expressed her excitement about
her appointment and said she is
looking forward to working along
with Mrs Bodie who has a vast
amount of experience in the area
of training.

Together, she said, they will
work towards realising the strate-
gic priorities of the Institute.

Ms McCartney further said that
training in the financial services
sector is crucial to the Bahamas
maintaining the competitive edge
and that she is honoured to be
able to contribute to developing



Tanya McCartney

the industry’s workforce through
her service as president of the
Institute.

Mrs Bodie expressed her
enthusiasm in having Ms McCart-
ney on board.

She said that Ms McCartney
brings to the Institute a wealth of
acknowledged experience and
sincere passion for training and
developing people.

She said it would be a pleasure
to have her serve as head of the
Institute.

Ms McCartney is only the third
woman to hold the position of
president in the Institute’s 34
years.

The two other prominent
women who served in this capac-
ity were Suzanne Black and
Pauline Allen Dean.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Raymond Bethel/BIS

Pica ar a z
CABBAGES stand out in Julia Munroe-Neilly’s home garden in Monastery Park.

Ministry’s backyard
gardening project
reaps rewards

“I took up every scrap of grass and put down






Liat | I ~~
ABOVE: A basket from Julia
Munroe-Neilly’s home gar-
den in Monastery Park for
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Larry Cartwright.
Pictured from left are Per-
manent Secretary Cresswell
Sturrup, Mrs Munroe-Neilly,
fellow home gardener
Oraliene Maycock, and Mr
Cartwright.

LEFT: Agriculture and
Marine Resources Minister
Larry Cartwright (right) and
Permanent Secretary Cress-
well Sturrup are treated to
home gardener Julia
Munroe-Nelly’s newest treat
— sweet potato surprise.

broccoli, cabbages and tomatoes instead.”

@ By GLADSTONE
THURSTON

SOMETHING just wasn’t
right — Julia Munroe-Neilly’s
food bill kept going up, but the
amount of groceries she was
bringing home kept going
down. She decided to do some-
thing about it and enrolled in
the Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources’ backyard
gardening project.

That was eight months ago.
Today, her yard in Monastery
Park is a veritable cornucopia
of vegetables and fruit trees.

“The economy was my big
motivator. The price of sweet
peppers and tomatoes in the
food stores was too high,” she
said.

One of the first things she
did was to take up the well-
manicured lawn in her front
yard.

“People have all this grass in
their yard, and you know what,
you can’t eat that,” she said. “I
took up every scrap of grass
and put down broccoli, cab-
bages and tomatoes instead.”

In the back of her yard and
wherever she finds space she
has sweet potatoes, cassavas,
beans, onions, bananas, carrots,
beats, spices, fruit trees and
more.

Julia Munroe-Neilly

A descendent from New
Bight, Cat Island, Mrs Munroe-
Neilly spent some 40 years as
an educator in the Catholic sys-
tem and as head of Sesame
Academy.

“My food is like island food
now — fresh.

“Moreover, I know what I
am eating because I grew it. I
have everything I need to cook
with now,” she said.

Mrs Munroe-Neilly finds gar-
dening to be quite therapeutic.

“It’s something I felt I need-
ed to do and I am enjoying it,”
she said. “I never thought I
would be out here weeding, but
I tell you every scrap of weed in
this yard I pulled up myself.

“Not only is it good exercise,
but it is also good for meditat-
ing.
“Tt’s good thinking time. You
can get away from people
because no one is going to
come into your garden to help
you to weed,” she said.

If it were up to Mrs Munroe-
Neilly, all householders would
have their home garden. She
distributes seeds and seedlings
to all of her neighbours.

“When (Agriculture Minis-
ter) Mr Larry Cartwright said
we should eat what we grow
and grow what we eat, I took
him seriously,” she said.

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Cacique Awards
commits $96,000 in
scholarship funds to the
College of the Bahamas

WAYLON McCardy has become the first recipient of the
Cacique Awards Major Entrance Scholarship.

The Cacique Awards committed $96,000 to establish this
scholarship at the College of the Bahamas. The scholarship is
funded from the ticket sales of the annual tourism industry
awards event, and is awarded to high academic achievers pur-
suing baccalaureate degrees in either tourism management or
hospitality management at COB.

In addition to funding Mr McCardy’s entire four years of
study, the scholarship will fund a student in the next three con-
secutive years for his or her entire baccalaureate programme.
Cacique hopes to use the scholarship as a vehicle to encourage
talented young people to pursue careers in tourism.

Scholarship recipient Waylon McCardy recently had the
opportunity to meet Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace and College president Janyne Hodder.

The meeting brought a lively discussion on tourism, avia-
tion, innovation and national development.

Mr McCardy’s career goal is to excel in the tourism specialty
of aviation management. He said his aviation aspirations include
being a part of a Bahamasair team that reports profitable oper-
ations.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace personally presented the schol-
arship cheque to the College of the Bahamas.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man found dead
at side of the road |

AN UNIDENTIFIED
man was found dead on the
side of a road in the
Peardale Subdivision, Nas-
sau, yesterday afternoon.

The man, believed to have
been in his early sixties,
appears to have been home-
less.

Police responded to calls
from the public at around
3pm yesterday, and are not
treating the death as suspi-
cious.

Chief Superintendent
Hulan Hanna said: “Our ini-
tial investigation found no
visible signs of trauma and

there is indication that he
appeared to be homeless, or
certainly a drifter.

“We are treating it asa
sudden death, and believe
he may have died from some
natural cause.

“We are appealing to the
community who may know
him to give information to
us, because as of now he is
unknown to us.”

Anyone with any
information which could
assist the investigation are
urged to call the Royal
Bahamas Police Force on
322-4444,

Alleged molestation case
‘forwarded to AG’s office’

FROM page one

concluded its investigations into formal complaints filed by the
two male victims who claim they were sexually molested by their

Former MP intervenes as
woman tries to take own life

FROM page one

One of them, former Minister of Trade
and Industry and former MP for Blue Hills
Leslie Miller, said he felt compelled to
help the young woman.

“She was sitting on the hill, saying she
wanted to take her life — she was dis-
traught, and she had been trying to get a
job in this country for the past two years
and no-one would hire her,” Mr Miller
told The Tribune.

His daughter, Leslia, was also at the
scene with a group of other concerned
women.

Mr Miller said he asked his daughter if
she could give the woman a job at Sun-
burst Paints until he could hire her at his
soon-to-be completed bowling alley.

“If someone is in that bad a strait then
obviously we have a duty to assist wherev-
er we can. And that’s all you can do,” Mr
Miller said.




The Tribune confirmed last night that
the woman is now happily employed at
Sunburst Paints on east Shirley Street.

Leading psychologists have expressed
concern over the frightening trend of sui-
cide and depression that is increasing in
the Bahamas through a spreading sense
of “hopelessness, despair and isolation.”

Three suicides last week sent the suicide
rate soaring at the beginning of the year,
coinciding with a deepening economic cri-
sis affecting families across the nation.

Father-of-two Leslie Campbell, 36, of
Ruby Avenue, Cable Beach, was found
hanging in his home on Friday night, and
just 24 hours later Kimberley Miller, 37,
was found hanging at her Pastel Gardens
home.

Their deaths followed the suspected sui-
cide of a 45-year-old father-of-three found
hanging in his Sea Breeze Lane Home on
Wednesday.

Police are investigating all three deaths
on the premise the deceased committed

suicide.

Psychologist Dr David Allen attributes
the trend to a breakdown of family life
and care in the community as people are
caught up in their busy lives and become
isolated, but are too proud to share their
inner turmoil.

He argued that suicide is a process
involving a deep sense of hopelessness,
isolation, sleep deprivation, an inability to
express hurt, and a tendency to turn to
alcohol and drugs.

Dr Allen said: “Suicide is not necessari-
ly a choice, it happens because the pain
they experience internally exceeds their
internal view of the resources around
them.”

m BLOOD DONATIONS

The family of a cancer patient is in desper-
ate need of blood donations to assist in the
care of their loved one as supply at the blood
bank of Doctor's Hospital is very low. Any
person able to make a donation should con-
tact the hospital at 302-4600.

teacher.
Mr Seymour said police had questioned the accused teacher,

who is now in New Providence on administrative leave. C 9 FROM page one Grand Bahama Mall
The teacher was removed from Eight Mile Rock High when Ar S O fh Att a ck

molestation allegations surfaced in January. yesterday.







FROM page one

Don Phillipe, of Pinder’s
Point, appeared before Magis-
trate Gwen Claude.

Grand Bahama.
Phillippe was not required to
enter a plea and was remanded































to Her Majesty’s Prison in Nas-
sau. The matter was adjourned
to June 4.

Police are also searching for a
second man, Bernard Ferguson,
for questioning in connection
with the murder.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZETTE RICHEMOND OF FAITH
AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 83RD day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TINO BRIAN GIBBS of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change my name
to TINO BRIAN GIBBS FERNANDER. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication of this notice.

It is alleged that on February
1, at Pinder’s Point, Phillipe
intentionally caused the death
of 17-year-old Dwight Bartlette,
also of Pinder’s Point.

Bartlette’s death is the sec-
ond homicide for the year on

Fifth man charged in 2007 murder

FROM page one

nection with Dean’s death.

A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether there
is sufficient evidence against the men for them to stand trial in the
Supreme Court.

Mr Dean, 24, who lived in the Freddie Munnings sub-division,
had reportedly just returned home around 11pm on August 2
when he was lured to his backyard by someone calling his name.
Upon going to his yard following the mysterious call, Mr Dean
was reportedly shot multiple times in the upper right side of his
chest.

The father-of-two managed to stagger across the street before
collapsing in the dirt in front of his neighbour’s yard, according
to reports. He was the 50th murder victim for 2007.

Ramsey was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday
and is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, on February 24.

Taos (ios

Nag yn.

orange Hill Beach, West Boy Street

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mrs Ritchie said that
although she was aware of the fire that was set to Mr Mor-
timer’s car, she had not received any information or heard any
speculation about the possible motive behind the alleged arson
attack.

She verified, however, that Mr Mortimer is not a member of
the special task force to which she belongs.

Mrs Ritchie is part of a task force that was appointed to root
out corruption in the department and prevent tax fraud.

It was suspected that the arson attack on Mrs Ritchie’s house
might have been related to her role in weeding out customs
fraudsters.

Last month, Clive Kent Schroeter, 37, was charged in a Mag-
istrate's Court in connection with that fire. According to court
dockets, Schroeter, while being concerned with others, inten-
tionally caused the home of Philip and Roslyn Ritchie to be set
on fire.

Police told The Tribune that this does not signal the end of their
investigation and that more arrests are likely to be made in
future.

Head of the Central Detective Unit, Chief Supt Glenn Miller,
said that three persons, including a well-known businessman,
were recently in police custody being questioned in connection
with the fire at Mrs Ritchie’s home, but were released pending
further inquiries.

Acting Comptroller of Customs Anthony Adderley could not
be reached for comment yesterday.

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 9



First international judo
tourney a huge success

e Foreign visitors
impressed
by local event

¢ Bahamas makes
giant stride
in bid for
international
recognition

m By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

THE organisers of the first ever
international judo tournament to
be held on Bahamian soil knew it
was crucial to impress their visi-
tors — and they pulled it off in
style over the weekend and took
a giant stride towards interna-
tional recognition at the highest
levels.

The Bahamas Judo Federation
(BJF) has ambitious plans: it
intends to make the Bahamas a
serious Olympic contender and
to secure international wins at the
Pan-American level within four
years.

Crucial to that effort is accred-
itation of BJF tournaments by the
International Judo Federation
(IJF), and recognition by the
United States Judo Federation
(USJF).

With USJF affiliate coach Ron
Landry and chief IJF referee for
the Pan-American region Julio
Clemente in attendance on Sat-
urday when the BJF hosted the
first annual Bahamas Junior Judo
Open, it is fair to say that a great
deal was at stake.

And if the opinion of Mr
Landry is anything to go by, the
BJF passed the test with flying
colours.

“We have had a fantastic time,”
he said. “We were really
impressed with the BJA and how
well received we were.”

Mr Landry, head of the Cape
Cod Mat Sports Judo and
Wrestling Club, said he was very
happy about the number of qual-
ity matches his players were able
to compete in.

“There was good refereeing,
good organisation and the friend-
liness was overwhelming,” he
said.

Mr Landry also praised the
quality of the Bahamian players,
pointing out that all the athletes
on the US team were divisional
champions, but faced some stiff



competition nonetheless.

Speaking of the Bahamian ath-
letes, he said: “The competition
was good. We were all impressed
with how game they were, how
enthusiastic — you don’t see that
anymore.”

Mr Landry said he will defi-
nitely return to the Bahamas,
hopefully for next year’s tourna-
ment and with a bigger team.

He also promised to preach the
cause to the BJF to his former
college associates — who, he said,
“run USA Judo” — and encourage
them to take part in the Bahamas
Junior Judo Open in the future.

In the end, the US team won
all its matches, but BJF president
D’Arcy Rahming playfully
assured the crowd that “it won’t
be like that next year”.

Mr Rahming teaches a num-
ber of martial arts at his All-Star
Family Centre on Joe Farrington
Road, including judo, jujutsu,
karate, kickboxing and aikido.

After the tournament, he said:
“T thought it went fabulously on
several levels: one, we got all the
major judo schools out. Two, Mr
Clemente attended to judge the
caliber of our referees and make
individual recommendations for
their improvement — advice which
is invaluable. Three, we were very
successful in terms of raising
funds, which means we can begin
to branch out into the Family
Islands, which is our next goal.”

The federation president has
made no secret of his ambitions

Ey











JUDO enthusiasts take part in the first international judo tournament to be held in Bahamas.

for the sport. He aims to qualify a
team of formidable competitors
for the Olympic Games as soon
as resources and training will
allow.

However, Mr Rahming sees
the role of judo in the Bahamas as
more than just that of a sport.

He says the martial art can be a
“beacon of light” to encourage
excellence and show that “right
from these soils we can develop
world class people with world
class attitudes”.

Mr Rahming, who has consid-
erable experience working with
at risk youths, has emphasised
how the study of judo encourages
discipline, self-esteem and respon-
sibility — attributes that are in
short supply among teens and
young adults today according to
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister.

Mr Bannister, who attended
the Junior Open and presented
trophies to some of the winners,
said: “I am most impressed with
the fact that they are teaching
young people a lot about disci-

pline and self-control. Just before
the tournament, I came from the
funeral of a young man, killed at
the age of 31.”

The minister said that during
the event, he was speaking on the
subject of youth violence
with Monsignor Preston Moss,
Rector at St Anselm's Catholic
Church.

“He said that young people
don’t know themselves, they have
no self-confidence, they don’t
know their strengths,” Mr Ban-
nister recounted.

“What I saw at the tournament
is young people who do know
their strengths; can defend them-
selves but don’t need to show it
off. They know when to use it.”

Mr Bannister said he would
like to see the programme expand
into all the inner city areas of New
Providence.

He also revealed that the gov-
ernment helped with the tourna-
ment and has committed to giving
an annual budget to the BJF -
“because we believe it is so
important”.



HIGHLIGHTS

¢ THE 2009 Bahamas Junior Judo Open was punctuated by
a number of high points, none of them more well-received than
the demonstration by a group of local Special Olympians dur-
ing the opening ceremonies.

The programme is run by David Rahming, the Bahamas
Judo Federation’s (BJF) technical sports director. The students
train with other practitioners every Saturday, but BJF president
D’Arcy Rahming told The Tribune that plans are afoot to put
together a paralympic league.

“They are fantastic, great athletes. We are blessed with their
presence,” Mr Rahming said.

Another highlight of the day was a demonstration of the
Samurai arts of ancient Japan.

e Black belts Melanie Lobosky and Reno Culmer captivated
the crowd with a display of traditional sword-work and a
medieval staff art known as Shinto Muso Ryu.

The pair followed up with a demonstration of Miyama Ryu
Jujutsu, an art adapted from centuries-old Samurai methods but
applied to modern self-defence and law enforcement purposes.
It is employed by a number of police and security forces in the
US, as well as by the Royal Bahamas Police Force.

e The audience was also introduced to the accomplishments
of Paul Christofilis and Bruce Thompson, the two Bahamas
Judo Hall of Fame Inductees announced at the tournament.

Mr Thompson, who was travelling and could not attend the
event, began the study of judo with Don Malone, a 3rd degree
black belt, in the early 1970s.

He practiced at Luden Ltd on Dowdeswell Street and even-
tually received the grade of 2nd degree black belt. Among his
many accomplishments in judo, he represented the Bahamas at
international tournaments.

Mr Thompson went on to teach judo for many years on the
Campus of Queen’s College.

Mr Christofilis began the study of judo while a teacher at St
Augustine’s College under Mr Oberheiser, a Cuban exile who
is thought to be the founder of judo in the Bahamas.

He went on to study at the Kodokan, the birthplace of judo in
Japan, for 15 months. Mr Christofilis received his black belt
directly from the Kodokan.

Mr Christofilis was very impressed with Saturday’s tourna-
ment.

He said: “I’ve been out of judo for many years, and I am sur-
prised to see how far it has come. I had no idea it had progressed
so much.”





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

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‘Arson attack’ on customs officer N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.65TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER SUNSHINE ANDWINDY HIGH 81F LOW 71F F E A T U R E S SEEWOMANSECTION S P O R T S SEEPAGEELEVEN Sands breaks record n By KARIN HERIG Tribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net JUST three months after a m ember of a special customs task force lost her home in as uspicious fire, another senior officer with that department is now the victim of a suspected arson attack. At around 4am yesterday, the car of Gregory Mortimer was set on fire in front of a Sunset Park residence. Fire Services responded immediately to extinguish the blaze and no one was injured, police press liaison officer Asst Supt Walter Evans s aid. As the matter is still under investigation, police said theyc annot speculate about the m otive or the possibility that this latest fire might in some way be linked to the one thatd estroyed the Sea Link Drive home of senior customs officer Roslyn Ritchie last November. M r Evans, however, confirmed that police are treating the matter as suspected arson. Further details were not available up to press time last night. Incident comes just three months after task force member lost home in fire The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY A labour of love BAHAMASBIGGEST CARSFORSALE, HELPWANTED ANDREALESTATE I N S I D E Fifth man is charged in 2007 murder n B y NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter A FIFTH man charged in the August, 2007, murder of T heophilus Dean was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Benjamin Ramsey, 20, of Rupert Dean Lane north, alias Ben Boy”, was arraigned before Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez and Magistrate Ancel l a Williams in Court One, Bank Lane, charged in Dean’s murder as well as conspiring to murder Dean. I t is alleged that Ramsey, b eing concerned with others, intentionally caused Dean’s death on Thursday, August 2,2 007. It is also alleged that Ramsey conspired with others to cause Dean’s death. Ramsey, who is represented by attorneys Murrio Ducille and Krista Smith, was not required to plead to the charges. Jason Ferguson, 27, Julian Woodside, alias “Ninja”, 30, Elroy Brice, 28, and Sharif Mackey, 28, have also been charged and arraigned in conSEE page eight 20-YEAR-OLD Benjamin Ramsey arrives at court yesterday. CHARGEDWITHMURDER T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f Man appears in court over death of Theophilus Dean SEE page eight n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – A 30-year-old Grand Bahama man was charged with murder in Eight Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court THE Atlantis Resort and Casino has filed suit against an Australian millionaire who reportedly lost $1.4 million gambling in a single day. According to Australia's Herald Sun, the sum was lost in November, 2006, when self-described pathological gambler Harry Kakavas was honeymooning at the luxury resort on Paradise Island. The resort has taken action in Australia's Supreme Court. According to the daily, the 42-year-old property developer made single bets up to $60,000, but never paid the debt. The Australian newspaper reported that an Australian Supreme Court last week heard that Mr Kakavas defence will hinge on the claim that the casino was aware of his gambling addiction and that the debt is not enforceable under Bahamas and Victorian law. When contacted yesterday, senior vice-presi dent of external affairs at Atlantis Ed Fields said he would not comment on the matter because it was before the courts. A trial date is set for July. n By PAUL G TURNQUEST Tribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net A FORMER MP had to intervene as the mother of two young children attempted to take her own life yesterday. Sitting on a large boulder on the northern slope of the hill along Dolphin Drive yes terday morning, the mother was sobbing, hoping that some unwitting driver would run her over and end the torture she was in. Refusing money that was offered to her, the woman said she was not looking for a hand-out, but a job. Claiming she had been seeking meaning ful employment for a number of years, she was finally coaxed out of the street by a handful of “good Samaritans” who had stopped to help her. FREEPORT The alleged molestation case involving two former male students at Eight Mile Rock High has been forwarded to the Attorney’s General’s Office for a decision, according to a senior police official on Grand Bahama. Chief Superintendent Emerick Seymour said that police have Alleged molestation case ‘forwarded to AG’ s office’ SEE page eight Atlantis takes legal action against man who reportedly lost $1.4m in one day’ s gambling Former MP forced to intervene as woman tries to take own life SEE page eight Grand Bahama man charged with murder SEE page eight Don Phillipe

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n By KARIN HERIG T ribune Staff Reporter kherig@tribunemedia.net THE Ministry of Tourism handed out special signaturea wards to four outstanding employees and 20 retirees. The ministry recently bid farewell to employees who will soon be entering retirementa fter years of service. The new retirees, who have worked with the ministry for up to 29 years, were presented withr etirement gifts by Acting Minister of Tourism and Aviation Neko Grant. Public Service is about advancing the interest of B ahamians,” said Greg Barr ett, who was one of the recipients of the retired veterans. Mia Lange of the Bahamas Tourist Office in Plantation, Florida was the recipient oft he Director General’s Award, which recognises the staff member selected as the most innovative in reaching visitors and potential visitors. T he Exuma Tourist Office took the Team Award. The Exuma Office is known for organising successful events such as the Bahamian Music and Heritage Festival. A mbrose Fernander, the ministry’s graphics manager, received the Permanent Sec-r etary’s Award for efficiency, and Lillis Swann of the Famil y Islands Department walked away with the All-Star Employee Award for overallp erformance. MOTSA is an annual fixture of National TourismW eek and is designed to recognise and help motivate e mployees of the Ministry of Tourism and Aviation. Winners are chosen by an inde-p endent panel of judges after being nominated by ministry c olleagues. THE son of Governor General A rthur Hanna one of the most prominent Bahamian political figures of the last 50 years is behind a determined new move to change the country’s political and legall andscape. Arthur Dion Hanna Jr., a Nassau attorney, is to convene a congress later this month to create a “united a nd cohesive force” to lay a new foundation for Bahamian society to ensure progress and development over the next 100 years. Mr Hanna’s congress will be held a t the Musicians’ Union building in Horseshoe Drive on February 27-28. Its aim, he says, is to unite likem inded patriots in bringing “revolutionary and complete change” to the country’s inadequate political and legal system. In a statement issued yesterday, M r Hanna said: “Let us bury our petty differences that have perennially divided us and come to awareness as a people that irres pective of our religious, cultural a nd political differences, there is f ar more that we share in common t han the differences which have hist orically divided us. “In order to solve our current p roblems in this age of crisis, we are obligated to make a stand for f reedom and justice.” Mr Hanna, whose father was one o f the major figures behind the PLP’s rise to power in 1967, is highl y critical of the nation’s progress since majority rule, especially in the fields of education and empowerment of the people. He said the destruction of the o ld Government High School and the failure to create the long-await-e d University of the Bahamas had created a “significant gap” in standards between private and public schooling. “The national pass rate or grade h as descended to a ‘D’ and our school playgrounds are often trans f ormed into battlefields and epicentres of gang-related violence,” h e added. “In this context, we do not have the Government High School of the calibre that I attended or any similar institution able to provide o rdinary, everyday Bahamians with the oppportunity of a first-class edu c ation on par with that offered by private schools in the Bahamas.” M r Hanna also questioned the term “majority rule” and asked whether there had been genuine empowerment of ordinary, everyday Bahamians. To rule means to control your destiny and to be masters or mis t resses of your own fate. Today we the people do not control our n ation. “We have little if any control of our domestic economy and we are not the owners of the land, which has been given to our plantation o wners to set up massive hotels and casinos. Hence, when the plantation owner makes massive lay-offs of s taff with little or no prior consultation, and many of our people are t hrown into economic chaos, they are left with nothing to sustain their e xistence other than the largesse of the government which, as we are f inding out every day, has reached its meagre limits.” Mr Hanna said land is the basis of all independence. Yet today, many people remain disempowe red, disenfranchised and landless, “ensuring that they remain chained to the vagaries of the modern plantation system.” Extensive land grants by success ive governments to “foreign plantation overlords” have ensured the population’s dependence rather than independence, he said. S uccessive governments had been in pursuit of “fool’s gold” leading to perpetual servitude, bondage and second-class ditizenship. P etty partisanship, selfishness and political divisiveness had ensured an over-centralised and dictatorial system of governnance, h e said. Sovereignty More critically, it has threate ned to disrupt and diminish what little national sovereignty and independence we have been able to retain in this our Bahamaland.” He cited the views of the late C abinet minister Carlton Francis, who said Bahamians would have to return to the fishing village to lay the foundation for an enduring and sustainable independence. I t involved sacrifice and was not paved with gold, but it offered ap aradigm on which people could fashion economic self-reliance. U nfortunately, he added, the politicians and academics saw no merit in his model for national development and embarked on a path to “a precipice of perpetuald ependence.” In these perilous economic times, he said, the government and opposition remained “clueless and a drift” with personal ambition, greed and intrigue blocking a consensus-based paradigm of national development. Instead of putting their heads t ogether to devise a strategic plan, politicians on both sides had disgusted most people by flagrant abuse of legislative time, childish a ntics, finger-pointing and blamecasting. There was no semblance of a national development plan over the next five, 10, 15 or 20 years, withp oliticians relying on ad hoc, kneejerk reactions “often going from pillar to post in the rabble of political rhetoric.” U rging fellow Bahamians to a ttend his congress, Mr Hanna said: Let us in unity make our collective d reams a reality and end this nightm are which now engulfs our beloved Bahamaland.” The full text of Mr Hanna’s s tatement will appear as a reader’s letter at a future date. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE Tourism Ministry hands out special signature awards Lillis Swann Son of the Governor General behind move to change political landscape

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n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter SIX people charged in connection with a $200,000 marijuana seizure were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Craig Ivan Williams, 36, of Marshall Road; Jeffrey Theophilus Dean, 32, of Mangrove Cay, Andros; Al Sadenia Gaitor, 32; Chevron Godfrey Roberts, 32, of Joan’s Heights; Areo Tony Major, 36, of Palm Beach Street and Madeka Alexis Brown, 22, of Marshall Road appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane on marijuana possession charges. It is alleged that between Monday, January 19, and Friday, February 6, the accused conspired to import and possess marijuana with intent to supply. It is further alleged that the accused imported the drugs and were found in possession of the drugs on February 6. All of the accused pleaded not guilty. According to prosecutor Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the accused have been charged in connection with the seizure of 196 pounds of marijuana. The drugs, estimated to have a street value of $200,000, were reportedly seized from two vehicles during a police stop-and-search exercise last Friday night. Major was also arraigned separately on charges of conspiracy to possess marijuana with intent to supply, conspiracy to import marijuana with intent to supply and importation of dangerous drugs. She pleaded guilty to the charges. Dean and Roberts are represented by attorney Ian Cargill. Brown and Williams are represented by attorney Geoffrey Farquharson . The accused have been remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison. The case was adjourned to February 16 for a bail hearing. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 3 INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News .......................... P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,12 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports ...............................................P9,10,11 BUSINESS/WOMAN SECTION Business .........................................P1,2,3,4,5 Comics ........................................................ P6 Woman........................................P7,8,9,10,12 W eather.....................................................P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 36 PAGES USA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 P AGES Two men charged in $100,000 drug bust College of The Bahamas rejoins Chamber of Commerce In brief TWO men charged in a $ 100,000 drug bust were arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court yesterday. Patrick Roberts, 35, of Dundas Town, Abaco, andJ ason Evans, 28, of Lowe Sound, Andros, appeared before Magistrate Carolita Bethel in Court 8, BankL ane, yesterday charged with possession of marijuana w ith intent to supply. Court dockets allege that the accused were found inp ossession of the drugs on Wednesday, February 4, w hile at Fresh Creek, Andros. According to police, the d rugs weighed approximately 100 lbs and have a local s treet value of $100,000. Both men pleaded not guilty to the charge and werer emanded to Her Majesty’s Prison until February 16 when a bail hearing will take place. n B y DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT Old Bahama Bay is experiencing “difficult” times and lay-offs are expected to take place at the development in West End, The Tribune has learned. A small number of workers were laid off in January, but it i s not known how many employees will be affected this t ime. A total of seven workers were initially let go at the Old B ahama Bay Resort. About 140 persons are currently on s taff at the property in West E nd. West End and Bimini MP Obie Wilchcombe said yesterday that he was not aware of any plans for further lay offs by the developer Ginn. “I spoke with them last week and they did not make m e aware of any plans to layoff staff,” he said. They have said that they are having difficulties and that things are a bit testy, but said nothing about lay offs,” said Mr Wilchcombe. A l Jones, senior vice presi dent of development, could n ot be reached for comment u p to press time yesterday. I n January, Ginn spokesman Ryan Julison said the lay offs in January were necessary to cut costs as a result of the “unfortunate” cir cumstances caused by the global economic downturn. Despite reports of bankruptcy, the Ginn Company says that its $4.9 billion resortd evelopment in Grand Bahama is secure. The company has filed for bankruptcy on two of its projects in the US and has entered into a restructuring agreement with Credit Suisse on its $675 million loan default. I n November, developer B obby Ginn signed a $12 mil lion contract to partner with t he Grand Bahama Power Company for the development of power infrastructure at West End. The 22-mile, 69KV transm ission line is necessary for the company’s massive GinnS ur Mer project. THE College of the Bahamas has forged a formal connection with the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce, the non-profit organisation that represents a wide cross section of private sector businesses in the country. Re-establishing formal ties with the Chamber is an important step for the College as it continues its evolution to the University of the Bahamas and seeks to positively impact national development. COB president Janyne Hodder said the move is a cru c ial one as the institution pur sues its primary mission. “Our mission is to support and drive national development through education, research and innovation and service, then certainly being a part of the Chamber is a parto f that mission. So we are very happy to be rejoining the Chamber and we are hoping to find ways to partner with the private sector to serve the country,” she said. Welcoming the College into the network, president of the Chamber Dionisio D’Aguilar expressed optimism about future relations between the two. “We are delighted that the College of the Bahamas has rejoined the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. I think it will be an excellent relationship,” he said. “One of the goals of the Chamber of Commerce is to attempt to assist in the educa tion of Bahamians in how to start a business, how to develop a business, how to grow a business, and I don’t think that we can do that wonderful-ly without this relationship with the College of the Bahamas. It’s an important relationship and we expect it to grow and develop.” The College is now one of more than 500 registered enti ties from various industries that are members of the Chamber. n BY MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net THOUSANDS of Haitian people living i n squalor in illegal settlements in the centre of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, must be dealt with as soon as possible, the immigration minister said. On a visit to Marsh Harbour to regul arise six Haitian Bahamians with director of Immigration Jack Thompson last week, Minister Branville McCartney held discussions on the future of the Mud and P igeon Pea adjacent shanty towns where Haitian descendants with a right to Bahamian citizenship live alongside illegal immigrants on government land in front of the Abaco Immigration Building. The minister is uncertain how many live in the clapboard and corrugated iron shacks, where there is no sanctioned electricity, water supply or sanitation, but estim ates are as high as 5,000. To discuss a plan of action, Mr McCartney met with local government officials in Marsh Harbour to discuss the extent of the problem and explore potential strategies. D D i i s s c c u u s s s s i i o o n n He said: “We are determining the best way of going about it and that is an ongoing discussion we intend to continue. I have some ideas of my own, but I am waiting to get some further ideas from persons on the ground who integrate with the people there on a daily basis.” Those living in the slum who were born i n the Bahamas and have a right to citizenship are unable to work, start a business or open a bank account until they are regularised, causing mounting frustration and r esentment which can lead to criminal activity, Mr McCartney said. Another problem of the unauthorised settlements is their capacity to hide illegal immigrants as none of the residents area ccounted for. And the minister said his department is working to prevent settlements of this nature from growing as they pop up across the islands. R R e e f f u u g g e e He said: “Persons coming to the Bahamas illegally will look at these places l ike a refuge and it’s incumbent upon us to stop others from being established. “In our Bahamas we cannot take much more of this problem. “If we allow certain things to happen w e will become second-class citizens in our own country.” However, Mr McCartney is uncertain when the Immigration Department will p ut an end to the misery of the Pea and the Mud. He said: “I don’t want to publicly disclose anything until we have confirmed which step we are going to take, but Iw ould like to see something happen and it will deal with regularising those who ought to be regularised, and removing those who ought to be removed.” Lay-offs expected at Old Bahama Bay West End development is experiencing ‘difficult’ times Six people appear in court over $200,000 marijuana seizure Minister seeks action on Haitians living in illegal Abaco settlements Obie Wilchcombe Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . L IVING i n squalor SHANTY towns

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EDITOR, The Tribune. You may have read a letter to John Marquis in the January 26th. Tribune’s edition of Monday’s Insight where members of the Nassau Branch of The Royal Society of St George were criticised for their non-involvement in the political situation in the UK. To quote: “A small number of us have tried to excite the RSSG out of their slumber, only to be met with statements such as, “‘We don’t involve ourselves in politics” and “‘We don’t involve ourselves in religion.”’ For the benefit of the writer, who I assume is a member of our Society, he has only to read the RSSG website where he will note that the policies of the Society are “Unsectarian and independent of party politics.” What I do take exception to, however, is being taken out of our “slumber.” Obviously this person is unaware of how much we do, not just in making donations, but actually getting involved and working with the various charitable organisations here in the Bahamas. We certainly don’t sit on our laurels and neither do we “slumber!” We are the Nassau Branch of the Royal Society who work together in harmony for the betterment of the country we now call our home. JUDY GRINDROD President RSSG, Nassau, February 4, 2009. EDITOR, The Tribune. I recall about a year ago as I sat in my car in a parking lot in the Palmdale area I witnessed a driver (a prominent pastor reversing out of a spot. In doing so the driver hit another car leaving quite a dent, which was highly visible. The driver got out and as the s aying goes, he looked this way and that way saw no one and left the scene. When the owner of the damaged car came out naturally she was quite upset. I went over and told her who the culprit was for which she thanked me. Some time last year while staying at Eleuthera I overheard a local complaining of how 40’ containers that were transported direct from the US were also being used to bring illegal liquor to that island. Upon opening the container the assigned customs officer would merely check the front portion and depart the scene either deliberately or carelessly. But, lo and behold, 100 cases of beer were at the rear of the container. A home owner went to make a loan from a bank in the mid1980s and was charged $2,500 by the bank lawyers for research. That same home owner went for another loan in the 1990s and this time was charged $3,800 again for the same research. Last year 2008 the same home owner was charged $4,200 yet again in securing a loan in legal fees, with another set of lawyers claiming they were not satisfied with the first two researches. During the holidays after completing a meal at a local restaurant I asked the waitress for my checkyour bill is $28.50 was her reply but she did not present me with an itemised check. Later I called the restaurant owner whom I knew and informed him and that particular waitress does not work there anymore. Listed here is just some of the practices which we as Bahamians allow to happen continuously in our Bahamas. Civil servants taking an extra two days off every time a holiday falls on a Friday or a Monday, brag openly about it and dare their supervisors to discipline themgasoline being transferred to private vehicles at government expensegovernment assisted loans to students with the funds being used for something else and inten tionally not paidbuilding contractors removing one homeowner materials and sending same to another siteambu lance drivers taking the jewellery from fatal victims expensive caskets being exhumed and resold to the undertakerstaxicab drivers overcharging tourists everyday and getting away with iteven the tyre repair man if you have three small holes in your tyre, will charge you $15, $5 for each 25 cent plug he usesyet we s eem surprised by the events of national headlines of the past week. But not too long ago in the 1970s we had a member of parliament for Grand Bahama who was referred to as “Mr 10 per cent”...and we also remembera certain man now deceased who collected thousands of dollars from would be investors just for securing an appointment with the prime minister! Yet we seem surprised by the events of this past week, we are what we are. Yes, my fellow Bahamians, on a daily basis we are being swindled by unscrupulous pastors, lawyers, real estate dealers, building contractors, mail boat operators, etc, with civil servants being among the major culprits short changing our government and treasury daily. So to all of you Bible toting pastors out there, be careful when you refer to us as being a Christian nationas from as I see we are a nation of crooks. BRIAN O CLARKE Nassau, January, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 A new day dawns for Police I N THE House of Assembly last week N ational Security Minister Tommy Turnquest introduced a Bill to repeal the Police Service Act. The most important proposal in the Bill was to put a term limit on the time a Police Commissioner and his deputy can serve. The contract p eriod can be for a term up to five years, renewa ble for a period not to exceed 10 years. The proposition seems sensible. As Mr Turnquest pointed out it is not incompatible with the Bahamas’ Constitution. There are also examples of fixed contracts for Commission-e rs of Police in other Commonwealth countries Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and Jamaica. Even the heads of the London Metropolitan Police and New Scotland Yard have f ixed term contracts. If it can work successfully in those countries, why should it be an abysmal failure in the Bahamas? Nor is this system foreign to the Bahamas, w hich has also had police commissioners under contract, even with a Bahamian commissioner being strung along from year to year for three years before being replaced by another member o f the Force. I t is a system that can encourage commissioners and their deputies to show leadership, initiative and produce results within a givent ime frame. It is also an encouragement to the l ower ranks to put their best foot forward in the knowledge that if they do well they can also make it to the top. A well structured, well managed Royal B ahamas Police Force, as similar organisations,” said Mr Turnquest, “can only maintain the nec essary balance in its workforce through contin ued recruitment at the base and continued r etirement at the top level. While the senior c ommand is pivotal in the management of the Force, the success of the organisation equally depends upon a critical mass of officers at all levels that perform the day-to-day work of the Force.” Could such a system be open to corruption and abuse? Of course, it can. Nothing manm ade is corruption proof, but if a well trained police force is to be put under the oversight of untrained civilians particularly politicians as Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell suggests it is doomed before it has a chance to exist. W e have seen the so-called political cover-ups during the PLP regime, and we have heard the widespread rumours of political interference in the force. Now Mr Mitchell alleges that he has seen the “evidence of widespread leaks out of the Police Force of a purely political anti-PLP nature in the last 18 months.” What proof does Mr Mitchell have for such a wild and scatterbrained suggestion? If he wants to find political leaks yes, even against his own party we s uggest he look for the leaky sieves within that v ery same party. Don’t blame it on the police force. This is once Mr Mitchell is hunting the wrong rabbits. “The Police Force, the Defence Force and all of them and each of them from the top to the bottom have to come, recognize and accept in t heir jobs that they are subject to the supervis ion, direction and control of civilian authorities, including Members of Parliament from both sides, and their role is not to play favourites with either side, adopting in some cases the terminology of the governing party in its propa-g anda campaigns,” Mr Mitchell told the House. “It is not the role of the police to use purloined evidence to try to sully the names of the political opponents of a governing party.” A reporter was so shocked by Mr Mitchell’s remarks that he forwarded them to us with the comment: “It seems to me this call of his for ‘civilian oversight’ for the police and defence f orce would lead to an extremely unfair sys tem. The idea that a group of politicians would actually be in charge of ‘policing the police’ is f rightening. T hat means that no politician or relative of a politician in a governing party would ever be brought up on charges. I f Mitchell had his way I’m sure the overs ight committee would ensure that no information of significance would ever reach the press. Can you imagine what state the police would bei n if an oversight committee of Mitchell, Peet, R oberts and (Keod The very thought gave us a fit of the “hor rors.” Probably Mr Mitchell’s fear as is that of m any other politicians is the level of pers ons this force is now prepared to call in for questioning and even to bring before the Bar of the Court. Instead of complaining, they should all pull up their socks and recognise that at lasta new day has dawned all Bahamians, regardless of social or political rank, are now equal before the law. T hey are probably particularly fearful of the young men recently returned from special train ing with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the rumour now making the sip-sip rounds: “Man, if they think Ferguson tough, wait ’tillt hey get a taste of Greenslade and Dames!” It is probably the fear of the unknown and the scandals of the past few years that make Mr Mitchell want politicians to have a steadying hand on any pot that might boil over. The criminals might now sit up and take note. Instead of their old cry: “If they can get away with it, why can’t I?” The new cry might become: “Boy, if even they can be taken down, I better watch my skin!” A Christian country? We are a nation of crooks LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. We read with disgust the behaviour of visiting “yachtsmen” in the Exuma Cays. We too have been witness to inexcusable b ehaviour in the past by cruising sailors and bear w itness to their complete disrespect of our coun try. They have left trash in the bush right inside the National Park because of sheer laziness to take it to a nearby dumping facility and more so dodging the payment that comes with the service! W e have seen the slaughter of baby nurse sharks and stingrays by French Canadian cruisers for eating purposes and the same collection shown in your paper today with countless baby conchs. We hope and support the confiscation of their vessels and jail time here in the islands. Add to this a cancellation of their cruising per mits, which are far too cheap anyway, and the banning of re-entering to our country. In years past I was doing some minor maintenance while pulled up to a beach in the Exumas and turned my back for 20 minutes to see a cruis i ng yacht sail away with my tool box missing! T here needs to be some vigilant watch by both locals and authorities throughout the islands on our cruising visitors for their behaviour here is certainly questionable. Raise the Permit Fees to weed out the undesirables! P AUL & SUZANNE HARDING “Safari Seaplanes” Nassau, February, 2009. Raise permit fees to weed out undesirables! We work for the betterment of the country

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n BY DIANE PHILLIPS A BLUE hole in Abaco is gaining internationa l attention, revealing tightly-held secrets preserved for up to 4,000 years, evidence of an era when the Bahamas was home to landroaming crocodiles, giant tortoise s, flightless birds, ancient bats and owls that roosted 85 feet b elow ground. Known as the Sawmill Sink, the saltwater-filled blue hole in the h eart of the pinelands on the island of Great Abaco was the r ecipient of National Geographic’s largest expedition grant for 2 008 and is scheduled to be the subject of a major NG feature this year. The scientific treasure ith olds, a fossilised collage of life and culture as it once existed, is now closely guarded by experts under the auspices of The National Museum in co-operation with scientists and researchers from t he United States. T he oxygen-free Sawmill Sink h olds such treasure that photographer Wesley Skiles, who is shooting on behalf of The Nation al Museum for National Geographic, spent 10 days in Decem b er capturing images for the article and a possible show. And Dr K enneth Broad of the Rosensteil School of Marine Sciences describes it as unlike any other anywhere. “There is no place like it in the world for blue holes,” said Dr B road. The hole was first discovered by Brian Kakuk, a former Navy diver, now a respected cave and wreck dive instructor, marine sci e ntist, researcher and owner of Bahamas Underground. I n 2004, he was leading a dive in a cave near a blue hole south of Marsh Harbour when he saw what appeared to be a giant turtle shell. Buried about 60 feet down, the shell turned out to be that of a tortoise, later carbon-dated to be about 2,500 years old, and like o ther artifacts found since then, including a 1,040-year old human bone, it was perfectly preserved. Though rare, the explanation for what has kept remains in the blue hole frozen in time is simple. Absence of oxygen (it is ‘eaten’ by hydrogen sulphide) means no growth of fungus or bacteria. Detritus like leaves, twigs, seeds, f lowers, fruit, bones and shells is naturally preserved. The integrity of the findings excites scient ists across a range of disciplines, even those who believe it can help explain everything from evolution to climate change. Most sites we find are polluted, so they are actually a health hazard, which in a way is fortu nate because it keeps people from g oing in. “Water samples are filled with e-coli and other bacteria,” said Nancy Albury, a diver who’s spent 20 years photographing the blue holes, caves, flora and fauna of Abaco and now serves as the Bahamas National Museum rep resentative there. Her photos have helped docum ent the wealth of findings in what has been estimated at 100 holes, “But none,” she says, “as p ristine as Sawmill Sink, so pristine that we can take DNA samples and get accurate readings f rom animal and plant remains t housands of years old.” Only one sink hole, located in Belize, has ever come close to the preserved scientific riches of S awmill Sink, agree experts, who are studying those riches to piece together a portrait of life and land long ago. They believe winds b lew dust from the Sahara here a quarter of a million years ago. Two thousand feet of passages i n the caves of Sawmill Sink are covered and laden with fossilised r emains of crocodiles that made t heir way by what was then land f rom Cuba when sea level was 4 20 feet below today’s level and l and covered much of The Bahamas. O O w w l l s s Animals could have walked between Long Island and the Berry Islands, and 10,000 years a go, prehistoric owls roosted in trees now deep underwater. Giant slow-moving tortoises, long since extinct, roamed the land, as likely to have been destroyed by humans as by natural predators. Discovery has not been limited to what lived long ago. A species of shrimp never before discovered in May and a sample was kept alive for six weeks byF riends of the Environment in A baco, which works closely with The National Museum. T oday, the remains that will b ecome the resources for study and help to guide environmental management are in the hands of T he National Museum, which will become the repository for ther uins and remains. A ccording to its director, Dr Keith Tinker, it is a treasure unlike any ever expected to be f ound, and opens doors for coope ration with universities and researchers around the globe. “We are particularly pleased t hat in addition to our interna tional efforts, we will be partner ing with The College of The B ahamas where additional scientific research will be conducted and where its inclusion in course material will attract serious marine sciences students,” Dr Tinker said. Already, other institutions, i ncluding the University of Florida, the Florida Museum of Natural History, Friends of the Envir onment (Abaco Mexico Museum of Natural Hist ory are participating in joint efforts to continue to discover, uncover, study and preserve the long-hidden natural treasure. “Sawmill Sink and the riches it holds will help us unlock an important part of history that could teach us lessons of great value, helping to guide future decisions about climate, marine resources and environmental management,” said Dr Davidson Hepburn, Chairman of the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation which oversees The National Museum. “This is truly a great find and a tremendous honour for The Bahamas.” Remnants of giant tortoises, 2,000year-old crocodiles found in Abaco blue hole C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 5 :,1 &OXH :,1 Police seek ‘armed and dangerous’ GB resident MP presents musical instruments to help marching band develop In brief n BY MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net A Grand Bahama resident, described as armed and dangerous, is wantedb y police for questioning in connection with allegat ions of death threats and the discovery of an unlicensedf irearm. Garin Lucken Gibson, 30, a gardener whose last k nown address is Batelco Corner in Jones Town, Eight Mile Rock, is considered extremely dangerous and should be approached with caution, police say. The Bahamian man, born in Blanket Sound, Andros, is 6ft 1ins tall, weighs between 150lbsa nd 180lbs, has dark brown skin, eyes and hair, and a small scaru nder his right eye. Anyone with information a bout Gibson or his whereabouts is asked to contact Grand Bahama police urgently on 352-1919, 351-9111, 3519991, 348-3445, 350-3125 or call9 11. Correction n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter d maycock@tribunemedia.net F REEPORT – Pineridge MP Kwasi Thompson has presentedm usical instruments to the Church of God Fairfield in Heri tage to assist with the develop ment of a new community marching band. Bishop Rev Leslie Woodside said the church is in the process of e stablishing the Heritage March ing Band, which will consist ofy oung people from the church and the community of Heritage. H e hopes that parents and guardians of children in the community will embrace the oppor tunity of allowing their children to participate in the marching band. T he band is open to children between ages six through 17 yearso ld, he said. “I would like to express our p rofound appreciation to MP Kwasi Thompson for his donation of these instruments. We accept them with grateful hearts and I am sure that these i nstruments will enhance the morale and moulding of our y oung children in the communi ty,” said Rev Woodside. The Heritage subdivision is a relatively new residential devel opment with many young families. It is located in the Pineridge constituency. Mr Thompson said that in addi tion to spiritual development, churches also play a very impor tant role in the development of communities. He noted that “Team Piner idge” recently assisted the Church of God Temple on Peachtree Street with the construction of a basketball court to assist residents in that area. The MP believes that the donation of musical instruments will enrich the lives of not only the young people of the Church of God Fairfield, but also the young people of Heritage. “The Church of God Fairfield is committed to partnering with the Heritage community (in viding wholesome positive activities for young people of their church and the community,” he said. “We will be inviting all the res idents of Heritage who are interested in participating in the marching band to contact the church so that they may be included in the band.” Mr Thompson thanked Rev Woodside and the church for their willingness to partner with the residents in their efforts to better the lives of young people. “We recognise the important contributions churches make to the community and I recognise that as a member of parliament we must do all possible to partner with churches to better our communities,” he said. Mr Thompson announced that he will be holding a Heritage town meeting on Saturday, February 28 at 4pm to discuss com munity issues. He said that on the agenda will be plans for a park and the formation of a Heritage community association. Mr Thompson said they will also discuss the forma tion of a community crime watch due to the recent break-ins in Heritage. NATIONALGEOGRAPHIC’SLARGEST EXPEDITIONGRANT FOR 2009 685*,&$/$662&,$7(6%$+/7' (PDLORPDXUD#PHGQHWKROGLQJVFRP RURVWDO$GGUHVV&% 1DVVDX%DKDPDV PROCEEDS of the Antique Auto Club of the Bahamas’ annual car show, which is currently in the planning stages, will be donated to the Bilney Lane Home for Children and the Every Child Counts School in Abaco. The 2009 Antique Car Show is now scheduled for Saturday, March 14, at the Arawak Cay Heritage Centre in Nassau. Entry fee is $35 – not $3 as previously reported – for those that want their vehicles judged to compete for trophies in the eight established categories. The Tribune apologises for the error in the original article on February 9 and for any inconvenience caused. G arin Gibson

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THEBahamas Institute of F inancial Services has announced the appointment of Tanya McCartney as its president and Kim Bodie as executive director. Both women bring a wealth of e xperience to the financial ser vices sector. M s McCartney entered the financial services sector in 1991 a s a legal and compliance officer for a private bank and has worked at a number of international financial institutions. She is currently the managing director of RBC/Finco. Mrs Bodie started her career a t the Institute in 1980 as secretary to the Registrar, and in 1987 was promoted to the position of a dministrator, a title she held until 2007 when she was appoint e d executive director of the Institute. In an interview with both professionals, Ms McCartney expressed her excitement about h er appointment and said she is looking forward to working along w ith Mrs Bodie who has a vast amount of experience in the area o f training. Together, she said, they will work towards realising the strategic priorities of the Institute. Ms McCartney further said that training in the financial services sector is crucial to the Bahamasm aintaining the competitive edge and that she is honoured to be able to contribute to developing the industry’s workforce through h er service as president of the Institute. M rs Bodie expressed her enthusiasm in having Ms McCart ney on board. She said that Ms McCartney brings to the Institute a wealth of a cknowledged experience and sincere passion for training and d eveloping people. She said it would be a pleasure t o have her serve as head of the Institute. Ms McCartney is only the third woman to hold the position of president in the Institute’s 34 years. The two other prominent w omen who served in this capac ity were Suzanne Black and Pauline Allen Dean. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE $'0,1,675$725 /,%5$5,$1 7KH6RXWK(OHXWKHUD0LVVLRQ5RFN6RXQG(OHXWKHUD D QRQSURWRUJDQL]DWLRQLVVHHNLQJVXLWDEOHFDQGLGDWHV IRUWKHSRVWRI$GPLQLVWUDWRU/LEUDULDQ 7KHGXWLHVRIWKHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO LQFOXGH ~ ~ ~ $SSOLFDQWVPXVWSRVVHVV ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6KRXOG\RXPHHWWKHVHUHTXLUHPHQWVSOHDVH VXEPLWDUpVXPpWRFGVDQGV#FRUDOZDYHFRP RU ZZZVRXWKHOHXWKHUDPLVVLRQFRP THE Coalition To Save Clifton committee members (l-r Clifton Heritage National Park to be opened to the public FOLLOWING several years of preparation, the government-owned Clifton Heritage National Park will officially be opened to the public on Thursday, February 19, 2009. The Coalition To Save Clifton said it wants to congratulate the Clifton Heritage Authority on this very important achievement. The Coalition has always maintained that pri or to the Park’s opening, when scores of people will descend upon the site, recognition should be given to the slaves who lived, worked, died and were buried on the plantation. Therefore on Sunday, February 15, 2009, an ecumenical memorial service under the auspices of the Bahamas Christian Council will be held at the Clifton site beginning at 3pm. “This will be a solemn, yet exciting experience as we honour the memory and legacy of those who lived and died at a time when, because of their status, they were deprived of the right and dignity of being buried in the island’s cemeteries alongside ‘free people’,” said Rev C B Moss, chairman of the Coalition. A motorcade will leave from Carmichael and Baillou Hill Roads at 2pm, and will proceed to the memorial site. Public and private sector organisations and the general public are invited to attend. The Coalition said it extends sincerest thanks to all those who supported the Coalition’s fight to save the priceless Clifton site from destruction. Kim Bodie Tanya McCartney The Bahamas Institute of Financial Services announces appointments

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n By GLADSTONE T HURSTON S OMETHING just wasn’t right – Julia Munroe-Neilly’s food bill kept going up, but the amount of groceries she was bringing home kept goingd own. She decided to do something about it and enrolled in the Ministry of Agriculture andM arine Resources’ backyard gardening project. T hat was eight months ago. Today, her yard in Monastery Park is a veritable cornucopiao f vegetables and fruit trees. “The economy was my big motivator. The price of sweet peppers and tomatoes in the food stores was too high,” shes aid. One of the first things she did was to take up the wellmanicured lawn in her front yard. People have all this grass in their yard, and you know what, you can’t eat that,” she said. “I took up every scrap of grass and put down broccoli, cab-b ages and tomatoes instead.” I n the back of her yard and wherever she finds space she has sweet potatoes, cassavas, beans, onions, bananas, carrots, beats, spices, fruit trees and more. A descendent from New Bight, Cat Island, Mrs MunroeNeilly spent some 40 years as a n educator in the Catholic system and as head of Sesame Academy. My food is like island food now – fresh. Moreover, I know what I am eating because I grew it. I have everything I need to cookw ith now,” she said. Mrs Munroe-Neilly finds gard ening to be quite therapeutic. “It’s something I felt I needed to do and I am enjoying it,”s he said. “I never thought I would be out here weeding, but I tell you every scrap of weed in this yard I pulled up myself. “Not only is it good exercise, b ut it is also good for meditating. “It’s good thinking time. You c an get away from people because no one is going to come into your garden to helpy ou to weed,” she said. If it were up to Mrs MunroeNeilly, all householders would have their home garden. She distributes seeds and seedlingst o all of her neighbours. “When (Agriculture Minister) Mr Larry Cartwright said we should eat what we grow and grow what we eat, I took him seriously,” she said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 7 Celebrating lifes most memorable moments. 1-800-6-NO-DUTY ColombianEmeralds.comExclusive seller of Signi cant Savings • Certi ed Appraisals • International Guarantee of Authenticity Free 90-Day Replacement Plan • Jewellery Rewards • Instant Credit NASSAU: Rawson Square, Bay Street 240 Bay Street Atlantis, Beach Tower Atlantis, Royal Towers Marina Village atAtlantis chocolates melt... roses fade.. .Fine Jewellery Lasts Forever lt S tainless Steel & Gold ID BraceletS tainless Steel & 18K Yellow Gold R egular Price $140$6999Gents Rubber ID BraceletS tainless Steel & 18K Yellow Gold R egular Price $100$499 9Stainless Steel & Gold Cuf”inksS tainless Steel & 18K Yellow Gold R egular Price $80$3999Stainless Steel & 18K Yellow Gold BraceletStainless Steel & 18K Yellow Gold R egular Price $160$799 9 WAYLON McCardy has become the first recipient of the Cacique Awards Major Entrance Scholarship. The Cacique Awards committed $96,000 to establish this scholarship at the College of the Bahamas. The scholarship is funded from the ticket sales of the annual tourism industry awards event, and is awarded to high academic achievers pur suing baccalaureate degrees in either tourism management or hospitality management at COB. In addition to funding Mr McCardy’s entire four years of study, the scholarship will fund a student in the next three consecutive years for his or her entire baccalaureate programme. Cacique hopes to use the scholarship as a vehicle to encourage talented young people to pursue careers in tourism. Scholarship recipient Waylon McCardy recently had the opportunity to meet Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace and College president Janyne Hodder. The meeting brought a lively discussion on tourism, aviation, innovation and national development. Mr McCardy’s career goal is to excel in the tourism specialty of aviation management. He said his aviation aspirations include being a part of a Bahamasair team that reports profitable oper ations. Minister Vanderpool-Wallace personally presented the scholarship cheque to the College of the Bahamas. Cacique Awards commits $96,000 in scholarship funds to the College of the Bahamas Ministry’s backyard gardening project reaps rewards CABBAGES stand out in Julia Munroe-Neilly’s home garden in Monastery Park. ABOVE: A basket from Julia Munroe-Neilly’s home garden in Monastery Park for Agriculture and Marine Resources Larry Cartwright. Pictured from left are Permanent Secretary Cresswell Sturrup, Mrs Munroe-Neilly, fellow home gardener Oraliene Maycock, and Mr Cartwright. LEFT: Agriculture and Marine Resources Minister Larry Cartwright (right Permanent Secretary Cresswell Sturrup are treated to home gardener Julia Munroe-Nelly’s newest treat – sweet potato surprise. Shar e your news The Tribune wants to hear fr om people who ar e making news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps you are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning for improvements in the ar ea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 and shar e your stor y . R a y m o n d B e t h e l / B I S I took up every scrap of grass and put down broccoli, cabbages and tomatoes instead.” Julia Munroe-Neilly

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE RECREATIONAL PARK INCLUDES:7HQQLV&RXUWVUQDPHQWDORQG-RJJLQJUDLOV 3OD\JURXQG%DVNHWEDOO&RXUW*D]HERV*ULOOVCOMPLETED INFRASTRUCTURE INCLUDES:3DYHGRDGV:DWHUtHZHUDJH KRQH&DEOH(OHFWULFLW\WUHHW/LJKWVOpen HouseFEBRUARY 21, 2009 10AM TO 5PMFORMORE INFORMATION CALL:6DQFWXDU\,QYHVWPHQWV/WG&KXUFKWUHHWOD]DKLUOH\t&KXUFKWV325-6456 325-6447/9Rapidly developing communityONLY 23 LOTS LEFT Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mrs Ritchie said that although she was aware of the fire that was set to Mr Mort imer’s car, she had not received any information or heard any s peculation about the possible motive behind the alleged arson attack. S he verified, however, that Mr Mortimer is not a member of the special task force to which she belongs. Mrs Ritchie is part of a task force that was appointed to root out corruption in the department and prevent tax fraud. It was suspected that the arson attack on Mrs Ritchie’s house m ight have been related to her role in weeding out customs fraudsters. L ast month, Clive Kent Schroeter, 37, was charged in a Magistrate's Court in connection with that fire. According to court dockets, Schroeter, while being concerned with others, inten-t ionally caused the home of Philip and Roslyn Ritchie to be set o n fire. Police told The Tribune that this does not signal the end of their investigation and that more arrests are likely to be made inf uture. H ead of the Central Detective Unit, Chief Supt Glenn Miller, said that three persons, including a well-known businessman, w ere recently in police custody being questioned in connection with the fire at Mrs Ritchie’s home, but were released pending further inquiries. Acting Comptroller of Customs Anthony Adderley could not b e reached for comment yesterday. c oncluded its investigations into formal complaints filed by the two male victims who claim they were sexually molested by their teacher. M r Seymour said police had questioned the accused teacher, w ho is now in New Providence on administrative leave. The teacher was removed from Eight Mile Rock High when molestation allegations surfaced in January. One of them, former Minister of Trade and Industry and former MP for Blue Hills Leslie Miller, said he felt compelled to help the young woman. “She was sitting on the hill, saying she w anted to take her life she was dist raught, and she had been trying to get a j ob in this country for the past two years and no-one would hire her,” Mr Miller told The Tribune . His daughter, Leslia, was also at the s cene with a group of other concerned w omen. M r Miller said he asked his daughter if she could give the woman a job at Sun-b urst Paints until he could hire her at his s oon-to-be completed bowling alley. “If someone is in that bad a strait then obviously we have a duty to assist wherever we can. And that’s all you can do,” Mr Miller said. The Tribune confirmed last night that the woman is now happily employed at Sunburst Paints on east Shirley Street. Leading psychologists have expressed concern over the frightening trend of suicide and depression that is increasing in the Bahamas through a spreading sense o f “hopelessness, despair and isolation.” Three suicides last week sent the suicide rate soaring at the beginning of the year, coinciding with a deepening economic crisis affecting families across the nation. Father-of-two Leslie Campbell, 36, of R uby Avenue, Cable Beach, was found hanging in his home on Friday night, and just 24 hours later Kimberley Miller, 37, w as found hanging at her Pastel Gardens h ome. T heir deaths followed the suspected suic ide of a 45-year-old father-of-three found h anging in his Sea Breeze Lane Home on W ednesday. Police are investigating all three deaths on the premise the deceased committed suicide. Psychologist Dr David Allen attributes the trend to a breakdown of family life and care in the community as people are caught up in their busy lives and become isolated, but are too proud to share their inner turmoil. H e argued that suicide is a process involving a deep sense of hopelessness, isolation, sleep deprivation, an inability to express hurt, and a tendency to turn to alcohol and drugs. Dr Allen said: “Suicide is not necessaril y a choice, it happens because the pain they experience internally exceeds their internal view of the resources around t hem.” nection with Dean’s death. A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether there is sufficient evidence against the men for them to stand trial in theS upreme Court. M r Dean, 24, who lived in the Freddie Munnings sub-division, had reportedly just returned home around 11pm on August 2 when he was lured to his backyard by someone calling his name.U pon going to his yard following the mysterious call, Mr Dean was reportedly shot multiple times in the upper right side of his chest. The father-of-two managed to stagger across the street before c ollapsing in the dirt in front of his neighbour’s yard, according to reports. He was the 50th murder victim for 2007. Ramsey was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday and is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, on February 24. y esterday. D on Phillipe, of Pinder’s P oint, appeared before Magistrate Gwen Claude. It is alleged that on February 1, at Pinder’s Point, Phillipe i ntentionally caused the death o f 17-year-old Dwight Bartlette, also of Pinder’s Point. B artlette’s death is the second homicide for the year on Grand Bahama. Phillippe was not required to e nter a plea and was remanded t o Her Majesty’s Prison in Nassau. The matter was adjourned t o June 4. P olice are also searching for a second man, Bernard Ferguson, for questioning in connection with the murder. AN UNIDENTIFIED man was found dead on the side of a road in the Peardale Subdivision, Nassau, yesterday afternoon. The man, believed to have b een in his early sixties, a ppears to have been homel ess. Police responded to calls from the public at around 3pm yesterday, and are not treating the death as suspicious. Chief Superintendent Hulan Hanna said: “Our initial investigation found no visible signs of trauma and there is indication that he appeared to be homeless, or certainly a drifter. “We are treating it as a sudden death, and believe he may have died from some n atural cause. We are appealing to the c ommunity who may know him to give information to us, because as of now he is unknown to us.” Anyone with any information which could assist the investigation are urged to call the Royal Bahamas Police Force on 322-4444 . Man found dead at side of the road Alleged molestation case ‘forwarded to AG’s office’ FROM page one Former MP intervenes as woman tries to take own life F ROM page one FROM page one Fifth man charged in 2007 murder FROM page one Grand Bahama man Arson attac F ROM page one n BLOODDONATIONS The family of a cancer patient is in desperate need of blood donations to assist in the care of their loved one as supply at the blood bank of Doctor's Hospital is very low. Any person able to make a donation should contact the hospital at 302-4600.

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n B y PACO NUNEZ T ribune News Editor T HE organisers of the first ever international judo tournament to be held on Bahamian soil knew it w as crucial to impress their visitors – and they pulled it off in style over the weekend and tooka giant stride towards interna tional recognition at the highest levels. The Bahamas Judo Federation ( BJF) has ambitious plans: it intends to make the Bahamas as erious Olympic contender and to secure international wins at the Pan-American level within foury ears. C rucial to that effort is accred itation of BJF tournaments by the International Judo Federation (IJF United States Judo Federation (USJF With USJF affiliate coach Ron Landry and chief IJF referee for the Pan-American region JulioC lemente in attendance on Sat urday when the BJF hosted the first annual Bahamas Junior JudoO pen, it is fair to say that a great deal was at stake. And if the opinion of Mr Landry is anything to go by, the BJF passed the test with flying colours. “We have had a fantastic time,” he said. “We were really impressed with the BJA and how well received we were.” M r Landry, head of the Cape Cod Mat Sports Judo and Wrestling Club, said he was very happy about the number of quality matches his players were able to compete in. “There was good refereeing, good organisation and the friend liness was overwhelming,” he said. Mr Landry also praised the quality of the Bahamian players, pointing out that all the athletes on the US team were divisional champions, but faced some stiff competition nonetheless. Speaking of the Bahamian ath letes, he said: “The competition was good. We were all impressed with how game they were, howe nthusiastic – you don’t see that a nymore.” M r Landry said he will defi n itely return to the Bahamas, hopefully for next year’s tourna ment and with a bigger team. He also promised to preach the cause to the BJF to his former college associates – who, he said, “run USA Judo” – and encourage t hem to take part in the Bahamas Junior Judo Open in the future. In the end, the US team won a ll its matches, but BJF president D’Arcy Rahming playfullya ssured the crowd that “it won’t be like that next year”. Mr Rahming teaches a number of martial arts at his All-Star Family Centre on Joe Farrington Road, including judo, jujutsu, karate, kickboxing and aikido. After the tournament, he said: “I thought it went fabulously on several levels: one, we got all the major judo schools out. Two, Mr Clemente attended to judge the caliber of our referees and make individual recommendations for their improvement – advice which is invaluable. Three, we were very successful in terms of raising funds, which means we can begin to branch out into the Family Islands, which is our next goal.” The federation president has made no secret of his ambitions for the sport. He aims to qualify a team of formidable competitors for the Olympic Games as soon as resources and training will allow. However, Mr Rahming sees the role of judo in the Bahamas as more than just that of a sport. He says the martial art can be a beacon of light” to encourage excellence and show that “rightf rom these soils we can develop world class people with world class attitudes”. Mr Rahming, who has considerable experience working with at risk youths, has emphasised how the study of judo encourages discipline, self-esteem and respon sibility – attributes that are in short supply among teens and young adults today according to Minister of Youth, Sports and Culture Desmond Bannister. Mr Bannister, who attended the Junior Open and presented trophies to some of the winners, said: “I am most impressed with the fact that they are teaching young people a lot about discipline and self-control. Just before the tournament, I came from the funeral of a young man, killed at the age of 31.” The minister said that during the event, he was speaking on the subject of youth violence with Monsignor Preston Moss, Rector at St Anselm's CatholicC hurch. “He said that young people d on’t know themselves, they have no self-confidence, they don’t know their strengths,” Mr Ban nister recounted. “What I saw at the tournament is young people who do know their strengths; can defend themselves but don’t need to show it off. They know when to use it.” Mr Bannister said he would like to see the programme expand into all the inner city areas of New Providence. He also revealed that the gov ernment helped with the tournament and has committed to giving an annual budget to the BJF – “because we believe it is so important”. THE 2009 Bahamas Junior Judo Open was punctuated by a number of high points, none of them more well-received than the demonstration by a group of local Special Olympians during the opening ceremonies. The programme is run by David Rahming, the Bahamas Judo Federation’s (BJF train with other practitioners every Saturday, but BJF president D’Arcy Rahming told The Tribune that plans are afoot to put together a paralympic league. “They are fantastic, great athletes. We are blessed with their presence,” Mr Rahming said. Another highlight of the day was a demonstration of the Samurai arts of ancient Japan. Black belts Melanie Lobosky and Reno Culmer captivated the crowd with a display of traditional sword-work and a medieval staff art known as Shinto Muso Ryu. The pair followed up with a demonstration of Miyama Ryu Jujutsu, an art adapted from centuries-old Samurai methods but applied to modern self-defence and law enforcement purposes. It is employed by a number of police and security forces in the US, as well as by the Royal Bahamas Police Force. The audience was also introduced to the accomplishments of Paul Christofilis and Bruce Thompson, the two Bahamas Judo Hall of Fame Inductees announced at the tournament. Mr Thompson, who was travelling and could not attend the event, began the study of judo with Don Malone, a 3rd degree black belt, in the early 1970s. He practiced at Luden Ltd on Dowdeswell Street and eventually received the grade of 2nd degree black belt. Among his many accomplishments in judo, he represented the Bahamas at international tournaments. Mr Thompson went on to teach judo for many years on the Campus of Queen’s College. Mr Christofilis began the study of judo while a teacher at St Augustine’s College under Mr Oberheiser, a Cuban exile who is thought to be the founder of judo in the Bahamas. He went on to study at the Kodokan, the birthplace of judo in Japan, for 15 months. Mr Christofilis received his black belt directly from the Kodokan. Mr Christofilis was very impressed with Saturday’s tourna ment. He said: “I’ve been out of judo for many years, and I am sur prised to see how far it has come. I had no idea it had progressed so much.” C M Y K C M Y K S PORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 9 First international judo tourney a huge success Foreign visitors impressed by local event Bahamas makes giant stride in bid for international recognition J UDO e nthusiasts take part in the first international judo tournament to be held in Bahamas. YOUNG winners with their trophies. HIGHLIGHTS

PAGE 10

C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009 THE TRIBUNE TWO YOUNG dancesport performers wow the audience at the Atlantis Resort, on February 8 , 2009, during a demonstration at the 2009 World Pro-Am Championships. They will also be a part of the World Dance Council's benefit performance for children of Nassau, on Tuesday Feb. 10 at the National Centre for the Performing Arts, Shirley Street – performances will be at 9:30a nd 11:30 a.m. Young dancers step to it at Atlantis E r i c R o s e


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Arson attack’ on
CuSLOMS

Incident comes just
three months after
task force member
lost home in fire

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

JUST three months after a
member of a special customs
task force lost her home in a
suspicious fire, another senior
officer with that department is
now the victim of a suspected
arson attack.

At around 4am yesterday, the
car of Gregory Mortimer was
set on fire in front of a Sunset
Park residence. Fire Services
responded immediately to
extinguish the blaze and no one
was injured, police press liaison

officer Asst Supt Walter Evans
said.

As the matter is still under
investigation, police said they
cannot speculate about the
motive or the possibility that
this latest fire might in some
way be linked to the one that
destroyed the Sea Link Drive
home of senior customs officer
Roslyn Ritchie last November.

Mr Evans, however, con-
firmed that police are treating
the matter as suspected arson.
Further details were not avail-
able up to press time last night.

SEE page eight

Alleged molestation case
‘forwarded to AG’s office’

FREEPORT - The alleged molestation case involving two former
male students at Eight Mile Rock High has been forwarded to
the Attorney’s General’s Office for a decision, according to a
senior police official on Grand Bahama.

Chief Superintendent Emerick Seymour said that police have

SEE page eight

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on
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The Tribune

=USA TODAY.




BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

ALORS ae
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Fifth man is

charged in
2007 murder

Man appears in court over
death of Theophilus Dean

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



officer




A FIFTH man charged in the August, 2007, murder of
Theophilus Dean was arraigned in Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Benjamin Ramsey, 20, of
Rupert Dean Lane north, alias
“Ben Boy”, was arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez and Magistrate Ancel-
la Williams in Court One,
Bank Lane, charged in Dean’s
murder as well as conspiring
to murder Dean.

It is alleged that Ramsey,
being concerned with others,
intentionally caused Dean’s
death on Thursday, August 2,
2007.

It is also alleged that Ramsey
conspired with others to cause
Dean’s death. Ramsey, who is
represented by attorneys Mur-
rio Ducille and Krista Smith,
was not required to plead to
the charges.

Jason Ferguson, 27, Julian
Woodside, alias “Ninja”, 30,
Elroy Brice, 28, and Sharif
Mackey, 28, have also been
charged and arraigned in con-

SEE page eight


































Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

20-YEAR-OLD Benjamin Ramsey arrives at court yesterday.

Atlantis takes legal action
against man who reportedly lost
$1.4m in one day's gambling

THE Atlantis Resort and Casino has filed suit
against an Australian millionaire who
reportedly lost $1.4 million gambling in a single
day.

According to Australia's Herald Sun, the sum
was lost in November, 2006, when self-described
pathological gambler Harry Kakavas was hon-
eymooning at the luxury resort on Paradise
Island.

The resort has taken action in Australia's
Supreme Court.

According to the daily, the 42-year-old prop-
erty developer made single bets up to $60,000,
but never paid the debt.

The Australian newspaper reported that an
Australian Supreme Court last week heard that
Mr Kakavas defence will hinge on the claim that
the casino was aware of his gambling addiction
and that the debt is not enforceable under
Bahamas and Victorian law.

When contacted yesterday, senior vice-presi-
dent of external affairs at Atlantis Ed Fields said
he would not comment on the matter because it
was before the courts.

A trial date is set for July.

Former MP forced to
intervene as woman
tries to take own life
@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST

Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net



Don Phillipe

Grand Bahama
man charged

with murder

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER MP had to intervene as the
mother of two young children attempted to
take her own life yesterday.

Sitting on a large boulder on the northern

slope of the hill along Dolphin Drive yes-
terday morning, the mother was sobbing,
hoping that some unwitting driver would
run her over and end the torture she was in.

Refusing money that was offered to her,
the woman said she was not looking for a
hand-out, but a job.

Claiming she had been secking meaning-
ful employment for a number of years, she
was finally coaxed out of the street by a
handful of “good Samaritans” who had
stopped to help her.

SEE page eight

FREEPORT - A 30-year-old
Grand Bahama man was
charged with murder in Eight
Mile Rock Magistrate’s Court

SEE page eight



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NASSAU AND BAHAMA

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



all > | : =e
Tourism Minisiry hands out














Lillis Swann

a
Need Help Collecting wav
Past Due Accounts?

special signature awards

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Tourism
handed out special signature
awards to four outstanding
employees and 20 retirees.

The ministry recently bid
farewell to employees who will
soon be entering retirement
after years of service. The new
retirees, who have worked
with the ministry for up to 29
years, were presented with
retirement gifts by Acting
Minister of Tourism and Avi-
ation Neko Grant.

“Public Service is about
advancing the interest of
Bahamians,” said Greg Bar-

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Mia Lange of the Bahamas

Tourist Office in Plantation,

Florida was the recipient of

the Director General’s Award,

which recognises the staff
member selected as the most :
innovative in reaching visitors ;

and potential visitors.

The Exuma Tourist Office :
took the Team Award. The :
Exuma Office is known for }
organising successful events }
such as the Bahamian Music }

and Heritage Festival.

Ambrose Fernander, the

ministry’s graphics manager,

received the Permanent Sec- }
retary’s Award for efficiency, :
and Lillis Swann of the Fami-
ly Islands Department walked
away with the All-Star
Employee Award for overall :

performance.

MOTSA is an annual fix-
ture of National Tourism
Week and is designed to }
recognise and help motivate :
employees of the Ministry of }
Tourism and Aviation. Win- }
ners are chosen by an inde- :
pendent panel of judges after }
being nominated by ministry :

colleagues.



Son of the Governor
General behind move to
change political landscape

THE son of Governor General
Arthur Hanna - one of the most
prominent Bahamian political fig-
ures of the last 50 years - is behind
a determined new move to change
the country’s political and legal
landscape.

Arthur Dion Hanna Jr., a Nassau
attorney, is to convene a congress
later this month to create a “united
and cohesive force” to lay a new
foundation for Bahamian society
to ensure progress and develop-
ment over the next 100 years.

Mr Hanna’s congress will be held
at the Musicians’ Union building
in Horseshoe Drive on February
27-28.

Its aim, he says, is to unite like-
minded patriots in bringing “revo-
lutionary and complete change” to
the country’s inadequate political
and legal system.

In a statement issued yesterday,
Mr Hanna said: “Let us bury our
petty differences that have peren-
nially divided us and come to
awareness as a people that irre-
spective of our religious, cultural
and political differences, there is
far more that we share in common
than the differences which have his-
torically divided us.

“In order to solve our current
problems in this age of crisis, we
are obligated to make a stand for
freedom and justice.”

Mr Hanna, whose father was one
of the major figures behind the
PLP’s rise to power in 1967, is high-
ly critical of the nation’s progress
since majority rule, especially in the
fields of education and empower-
ment of the people.

He said the destruction of the
old Government High School and
the failure to create the long-await-
ed University of the Bahamas had
created a “significant gap” in stan-
dards between private and public
schooling.

“The national pass rate or grade
has descended to a ‘D’ and our
school playgrounds are often trans-
formed into battlefields and epi-
centres of gang-related violence,”
he added.

“Tn this context, we do not have
the Government High School of
the calibre that I attended or any
similar institution able to provide
ordinary, everyday Bahamians with
the oppportunity of a first-class edu-
cation on par with that offered by
private schools in the Bahamas.”

Mr Hanna also questioned the
term “majority rule” and asked
whether there had been genuine
empowerment of ordinary, every-
day Bahamians.

“To rule means to control your
destiny and to be masters or mis-
tresses of your own fate. Today we
the people do not control our
nation.

“We have little if any control of
our domestic economy and we are
not the owners of the land, which
has been given to our plantation
owners to set up massive hotels and
casinos.

“Hence, when the plantation
owner makes massive lay-offs of
staff with little or no prior consul-
tation, and many of our people are
thrown into economic chaos, they
are left with nothing to sustain their
existence other than the largesse
of the government which, as we are
finding out every day, has reached
its meagre limits.”

Mr Hanna said land is the basis
of all independence. Yet today,

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many people remain disempow-
ered, disenfranchised and landless,
“ensuring that they remain chained
to the vagaries of the modern plan-
tation system.”

Extensive land grants by succes-
sive governments to “foreign plan-
tation overlords” have ensured the
population’s dependence rather
than independence, he said.

Successive governments had
been in pursuit of “fool’s gold”
leading to perpetual servitude,
bondage and second-class ditizen-
ship.

Petty partisanship, selfishness
and political divisiveness had
ensured an over-centralised and
dictatorial system of governnance,
he said.

Sovereignty

“More critically, it has threat-
ened to disrupt and diminish what
little national sovereignty and inde-
pendence we have been able to
retain in this our Bahamaland.”

He cited the views of the late
Cabinet minister Carlton Francis,
who said Bahamians would have
to return to the fishing village to
lay the foundation for an enduring
and sustainable independence.

It involved sacrifice and was not
paved with gold, but it offered a
paradigm on which people could

fashion economic self-reliance.

Unfortunately, he added, the
politicians and academics saw no
merit in his model for national
development and embarked on a
path to “a precipice of perpetual
dependence.”

In these perilous economic times,
he said, the government and oppo-
sition remained “clueless and
adrift” with personal ambition,
greed and intrigue blocking a con-
sensus-based paradigm of national
development.

Instead of putting their heads
together to devise a strategic plan,
politicians on both sides had dis-
gusted most people by flagrant
abuse of legislative time, childish
antics, finger-pointing and blame-
casting.

There was no semblance of a
national development plan over the
next five, 10, 15 or 20 years, with
politicians relying on ad hoc, knee-
jerk reactions “often going from
pillar to post in the rabble of polit-
ical rhetoric.”

Urging fellow Bahamians to
attend his congress, Mr Hanna said:
“Let us in unity make our collective
dreams a reality and end this night-
mare which now engulfs our
beloved Bahamaland.”

¢ The full text of Mr Hanna’s
statement will appear as a
reader’s letter at a future date.










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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS



0 In brief

Two men
charged in
$100,000
drug bust

TWO men charged ina
$100,000 drug bust were
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Patrick Roberts, 35, of
Dundas Town, Abaco, and
Jason Evans, 28, of Lowe
Sound, Andros, appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, yesterday charged
with possession of marijuana
with intent to supply.

Court dockets allege that
the accused were found in
possession of the drugs on
Wednesday, February 4,
while at Fresh Creek,
Andros.

According to police, the
drugs weighed approximate-
ly 100 Ibs and have a local
street value of $100,000.

Both men pleaded not
guilty to the charge and were
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison until February 16
when a bail hearing will take
place.

College of
The Bahamas
rejoins
Chamber of
Commerce

THE College of the
Bahamas has forged a formal
connection with the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce, the
non-profit organisation that
represents a wide cross section
of private sector businesses in
the country.

Re-establishing formal ties
with the Chamber is an impor-
tant step for the College as it
continues its evolution to the
University of the Bahamas
and seeks to positively impact
national development.

COB president Janyne
Hodder said the move is a cru-
cial one as the institution pur-
sues its primary mission.

“Our mission is to support
and drive national develop-
ment through education,
research and innovation and
service, then certainly being a
part of the Chamber is a part
of that mission. So we are very
happy to be rejoining the
Chamber and we are hoping
to find ways to partner with
the private sector to serve the
country,” she said.

Welcoming the College into
the network, president of the
Chamber Dionisio D’ Aguilar
expressed optimism about
future relations between the
two. “We are delighted that
the College of the Bahamas
has rejoined the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce. I
think it will be an excellent
relationship,” he said.

“One of the goals of the
Chamber of Commerce is to
attempt to assist in the educa-
tion of Bahamians in how to
start a business, how to devel-
op a business, how to grow a
business, and I don’t think
that we can do that wonderful-
ly without this relationship
with the College of the
Bahamas. It’s an important
relationship and we expect it
to grow and develop.”

The College is now one of
more than 500 registered enti-
ties from various industries
that are members of the
Chamber.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Minister seeks action on Haitians living in illegal Abaco settlements

m@ BY MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

THOUSANDS of Haitian people living
in squalor in illegal settlements in the cen-
tre of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, must be
dealt with as soon as possible, the immi-
gration minister said.

On a visit to Marsh Harbour to regu-
larise six Haitian Bahamians with director
of Immigration Jack Thompson last week,
Minister Branville McCartney held dis-
cussions on the future of the Mud and
Pigeon Pea - adjacent shanty towns where
Haitian descendants with a right to
Bahamian citizenship live alongside ille-
gal immigrants on government land in front
of the Abaco Immigration Building.

The minister is uncertain how many live
in the clapboard and corrugated iron
shacks, where there is no sanctioned elec-
tricity, water supply or sanitation, but esti-
mates are as high as 5,000.

To discuss a plan of action, Mr McCart-
ney met with local government officials in

LIVING in squalor

Marsh Harbour to discuss the extent of
the problem and explore potential strate-
gies.

Discussion

He said: “We are determining the best
way of going about it and that is an ongo-
ing discussion we intend to continue.

“T have some ideas of my own, but Iam
waiting to get some further ideas from per-
sons on the ground who integrate with the

SHANTY towns
people there on a daily basis.”

Those living in the slum who were born
in the Bahamas and have a right to citi-
zenship are unable to work, start a business
or open a bank account until they are reg-
ularised, causing mounting frustration and
resentment which can lead to criminal
activity, Mr McCartney said.

Another problem of the unauthorised
settlements is their capacity to hide illegal
immigrants as none of the residents are
accounted for.

And the minister said his department is



Lay-ofis expected
at Old Bahama Bay

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Old Bahama
Bay is experiencing “difficult”
times and lay-offs are expect-
ed to take place at the devel-
opment in West End, The Tri-
bune has learned.

A small number of workers
were laid off in January, but it
is not known how many
employees will be affected this
time.

A total of seven workers
were initially let go at the Old
Bahama Bay Resort. About
140 persons are currently on
staff at the property in West
End.

West End and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchcombe said yes-
terday that he was not aware
of any plans for further lay
offs by the developer Ginn.

“T spoke with them last
week and they did not make
me aware of any plans to lay-
off staff,” he said.

“They have said that they
are having difficulties and that
things are a bit testy, but said
nothing about lay offs,” said
Mr Wilchcombe.

Al Jones, senior vice presi-
dent of development, could

Six people appear in court over
$200,000 marijuana seizure

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

SIX people charged in con-
nection with a $200,000 mari-
juana seizure were arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court yes-
terday.

Craig Ivan Williams, 36, of
Marshall Road; Jeffrey
Theophilus Dean, 32, of Man-
grove Cay, Andros; Al Sade-
nia Gaitor, 32; Chevron God-
frey Roberts, 32, of Joan’s
Heights; Areo Tony Major,
36, of Palm Beach Street and
Madeka Alexis Brown, 22, of
Marshall Road appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank Lane
on marijuana possession
charges.

It is alleged that between
Monday, January 19, and Fri-
day, February 6, the accused
conspired to import and pos-
sess marijuana with intent to
supply.

It is further alleged that the

West End development is
experiencing ‘difficult’ times

Obie Wilchcombe

not be reached for comment
up to press time yesterday.



accused imported the drugs
and were found in possession
of the drugs on February 6.
All of the accused pleaded not
guilty.

According to prosecutor
Inspector Ercell Dorsette, the
accused have been charged in
connection with the seizure of
196 pounds of marijuana.

The drugs, estimated to
have a street value of
$200,000, were reportedly
seized from two vehicles dur-
ing a police stop-and-search
exercise last Friday night.

Major was also arraigned
separately on charges of con-
spiracy to possess marijuana
with intent to supply, conspir-
acy to import marijuana with
intent to supply and importa-
tion of dangerous drugs.

She pleaded guilty to the
charges.

Dean and Roberts are rep-
resented by attorney Ian
Cargill. Brown and Williams
are represented by attorney

In January, Ginn
spokesman Ryan Julison said
the lay offs in January were
necessary to cut costs as a
result of the “unfortunate” cir-
cumstances caused by the
global economic downturn.

Despite reports of bank-
ruptcy, the Ginn Company
says that its $4.9 billion resort
development in Grand
Bahama is secure.

The company has filed for
bankruptcy on two of its pro-
jects in the US and has
entered into a restructuring
agreement with Credit Suisse
on its $675 million loan
default.

In November, developer
Bobby Ginn signed a $12 mil-
lion contract to partner with
the Grand Bahama Power
Company for the develop-
ment of power infrastructure
at West End.

The 22-mile, 69KV trans-
mission line is necessary for
the company’s massive Ginn
Sur Mer project.

Geoffrey Farquharson.

The accused have been
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. The case was
adjourned to February 16 for
a bail hearing.

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working to prevent settlements of this
nature from growing as they pop up across
the islands.

Refuge

He said: “Persons coming to the
Bahamas illegally will look at these places
like a refuge and it’s incumbent upon us to
stop others from being established.

“In our Bahamas we cannot take much
more of this problem.

“If we allow certain things to happen
we will become second-class citizens in our
own country.”

However, Mr McCartney is uncertain
when the Immigration Department will
put an end to the misery of the Pea and the
Mud.

He said: “I don’t want to publicly dis-
close anything until we have confirmed
which step we are going to take, but I
would like to see something happen and it
will deal with regularising those who ought
to be regularised, and removing those who
ought to be removed.”



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Madeira St. [242] 325-8233 * Robinson Rd.[242] 322-3080 * Fax:{242] 322-5251
PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

A new day dawns for Police

IN THE House of Assembly last week
National Security Minister Tommy Turnquest
introduced a Bill to repeal the Police Service
Act.

The most important proposal in the Bill was
to put a term limit on the time a Police Com-
missioner and his deputy can serve. The contract
period can be for a term up to five years, renew-
able for a period not to exceed 10 years.

The proposition seems sensible. As Mr Turn-
quest pointed out it is not incompatible with
the Bahamas’ Constitution. There are also
examples of fixed contracts for Commission-
ers of Police in other Commonwealth countries
— Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and
Jamaica. Even the heads of the London Met-
ropolitan Police and New Scotland Yard have
fixed term contracts. If it can work successfully
in those countries, why should it be an abysmal
failure in the Bahamas?

Nor is this system foreign to the Bahamas,
which has also had police commissioners under
contract, even with a Bahamian commissioner
being strung along from year to year for three
years before being replaced by another member
of the Force.

It is a system that can encourage commis-
sioners and their deputies to show leadership,
initiative and produce results within a given
time frame. It is also an encouragement to the
lower ranks to put their best foot forward in the
knowledge that if they do well they can also
make it to the top.

“A well structured, well managed Royal
Bahamas Police Force, as similar organisations,”
said Mr Turnquest, “can only maintain the nec-
essary balance in its workforce through contin-
ued recruitment at the base and continued
retirement at the top level. While the senior
command is pivotal in the management of the
Force, the success of the organisation equally
depends upon a critical mass of officers at all
levels that perform the day-to-day work of the
Force.”

Could such a system be open to corruption
and abuse? Of course, it can. Nothing man-
made is corruption proof, but if a well trained
police force is to be put under the oversight of
untrained civilians — particularly politicians as
Fox Hill MP Fred Mitchell suggests — it is
doomed before it has a chance to exist.

We have seen the so-called political cover-ups
during the PLP regime, and we have heard the
widespread rumours of political interference in
the force. Now Mr Mitchell alleges that he has
seen the “evidence of widespread leaks out of
the Police Force of a purely political anti-PLP
nature in the last 18 months.” What proof does
Mr Mitchell have for such a wild and scatter-
brained suggestion? If he wants to find political
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suggest he look for the leaky sieves within that
very same party. Don’t blame it on the police
force. This is once Mr Mitchell is hunting the
wrong rabbits.

“The Police Force, the Defence Force and all
of them and each of them from the top to the
bottom have to come, recognize and accept in
their jobs that they are subject to the supervi-
sion, direction and control of civilian authorities,
including Members of Parliament from both
sides, and their role is not to play favourites
with either side, adopting in some cases the ter-
minology of the governing party in its propa-
ganda campaigns,” Mr Mitchell told the House.
“Tt is not the role of the police to use purloined
evidence to try to sully the names of the politi-
cal opponents of a governing party.”

A reporter was so shocked by Mr Mitchell’s
remarks that he forwarded them to us with the
comment: “It seems to me this call of his for
‘civilian oversight’ for the police and defence
force would lead to an extremely unfair sys-
tem.

The idea that a group of politicians would
actually be in charge of ‘policing the police’ is
frightening.

That means that no politician or relative of a
politician in a governing party would ever be
brought up on charges.

If Mitchell had his way I’m sure the over-
sight committee would ensure that no informa-
tion of significance would ever reach the press.
Can you imagine what state the police would be
in if an oversight committee of Mitchell, Peet,
Roberts and (Keod) Smith were in place?”

The very thought gave us a fit of the “hor-
rors.”

Probably Mr Mitchell’s fear — as is that of
many other politicians — is the level of per-
sons this force is now prepared to call in for
questioning and even to bring before the Bar of
the Court. Instead of complaining, they should
all pull up their socks and recognise that at last
a new day has dawned — all Bahamians, regard-
less of social or political rank, are now equal
before the law.

They are probably particularly fearful of the
young men recently returned from special train-
ing with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police
and the rumour now making the sip-sip rounds:
“Man, if they think Ferguson tough, wait ’till
they get a taste of Greenslade and Dames!”

It is probably the fear of the unknown and
the scandals of the past few years that make
Mr Mitchell want politicians to have a steadying
hand on any pot that might boil over.

The criminals might now sit up and take
note. Instead of their old cry: “If they can get
away with it, why can’t I?” The new cry might
become: “Boy, if even they can be taken down,
I better watch my skin!”



A Christian
country? We are a
nation of crooks

EDITOR, The Tribune.

T recall about a year ago as I
sat in my car in a parking lot in
the Palmdale area I witnessed a
driver (a prominent pastor)
reversing out of a spot.

In doing so the driver hit
another car leaving quite a dent,
which was highly visible.

The driver got out and as the
saying goes, he looked this way
and that way saw no one and
left the scene.

When the owner of the dam-
aged car came out naturally she
was quite upset.

I went over and told her who
the culprit was for which she
thanked me.

Some time last year while
staying at Eleuthera I overheard
a local complaining of how 40’
containers that were transport-
ed direct from the US were also
being used to bring illegal liquor
to that island.

Upon opening the container
the assigned customs officer
would merely check the front
portion and depart the scene
either deliberately or carelessly.
But, lo and behold, 100 cases
of beer were at the rear of the
container.

A home owner went to make
a loan from a bank in the mid-
1980s and was charged $2,500
by the bank lawyers for
research.

That same home owner went
for another loan in the 1990s
and this time was charged
$3,800 again for the same
research.

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



Last year 2008 the same
home owner was charged $4,200
yet again in securing a loan in
legal fees, with another set of
lawyers claiming they were not
satisfied with the first two
researches.

During the holidays after
completing a meal at a local
restaurant I asked the waitress
for my check...your bill is
$28.50 was her reply but she did
not present me with an itemised
check.

Later I called the restaurant
owner whom I knew and
informed him and that particu-
lar waitress does not work there
anymore.

Listed here is just some of the
practices which we as Bahami-
ans allow to happen continu-
ously in our Bahamas.

Civil servants taking an extra
two days off every time a holi-
day falls on a Friday or a Mon-
day, brag openly about it and
dare their supervisors to disci-
pline them...gasoline being
transferred to private vehicles
at government expense...gov-
ernment assisted loans to stu-
dents with the funds being used
for something else and inten-
tionally not paid... building con-
tractors removing one home-
owner materials and sending
same to another site...ambu-

lance drivers taking the jew-
ellery from fatal victims...
expensive caskets being
exhumed and resold to the
undertakers...taxicab drivers
overcharging tourists everyday
and getting away with it...even
the tyre repair man if you have
three small holes in your tyre,
will charge you $15, $5 for each
25 cent plug he uses...yet we
seem surprised by the events of
national headlines of the past
week.

But not too long ago in the
1970s we had a member of par-
liament for Grand Bahama who
was referred to as “Mr 10 per
cent”...and we also remember
a certain man now deceased
who collected thousands of dol-
lars from would be investors just
for securing an appointment
with the prime minister!

Yet we seem surprised by
the events of this past week, we
are what we are.

Yes, my fellow Bahamians,
on a daily basis we are being
swindled by unscrupulous pas-
tors, lawyers, real estate deal-
ers, building contractors, mail
boat operators, etc, with civil
servants being among the major
culprits short changing our gov-
ernment and treasury daily.

So to all of you Bible toting
pastors out there, be careful
when you refer to us as being a
Christian nation...as from as I
see we are a nation of crooks.

BRIAN O CLARKE
Nassau,
January, 2009.

Raise permit fees to weed out undesirables!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We read with disgust the behaviour of visiting
“yachtsmen” in the Exuma Cays.

We too have been witness to inexcusable
behaviour in the past by cruising sailors and bear
witness to their complete disrespect of our coun-

try.

They have left trash in the bush right inside
the National Park because of sheer laziness to
take it to a nearby dumping facility and more so
dodging the payment that comes with the ser-

vice!

We have seen the slaughter of baby nurse
sharks and stingrays by French Canadian cruisers
for eating purposes and the same collection shown
in your paper today with countless baby conchs.

We hope and support the confiscation of their
vessels and jail time here in the islands.

Add to this a cancellation of their cruising per-

mits, which are far too cheap anyway, and the
banning of re-entering to our country.

In years past I was doing some minor mainte-

nance while pulled up to a beach in the Exumas

and turned my back for 20 minutes to see a cruis-
ing yacht sail away with my tool box missing!
There needs to be some vigilant watch by both

locals and authorities throughout the islands on

sirables!
PAUL &
“Safari

Seaplanes”
Nassau,

SUZANNE
HARDING

our cruising visitors for their behaviour here is
certainly questionable.
Raise the Permit Fees to weed out the unde-

February, 2009.

We work for the betterment of the country

EDITOR, The Tribune.

You may have read a letter
to John Marquis in the Janu-
ary 26th. Tribune’s edition of
Monday’s Insight where mem-
bers of the Nassau Branch of

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The Royal Society of St
George were criticised for
their non-involvement in the
political situation in the UK.

To quote: “A small number
of us have tried to excite the
RSSG out of their slumber,
only to be met with statements
such as, “‘We don’t involve
ourselves in politics” and
“We don’t involve ourselves
in religion.”

For the benefit of the writer,
who I assume is a member of
our Society, he has only to
read the RSSG website where
he will note that the policies of
the Society are “Unsectarian
and independent of party pol-
itics.”

What I do take exception

to, however, is being taken out
of our “slumber.”

Obviously this person is
unaware of how much we do,
not just in making donations,
but actually getting involved
and working with the various
charitable organisations here
in the Bahamas. We certainly
don’t sit on our laurels and
neither do we “slumber!”

We are the Nassau Branch
of the Royal Society who
work together in harmony for
the betterment of the country
we now call our home.

JUDY GRINDROD
President RSSG,
Nassau,

February 4, 2009.

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

0 In brief

Police seek
‘armed and
dangerous’
GB resident

m@ BY MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A Grand Bahama resident,
described as armed and danger-
ous, is wanted
by police for
questioning in
connection
with allega-
tions of death
threats and
the discovery
of an unli-
censed
firearm.

Garin
Lucken Gib-
son, 30, a gardener whose last
known address is Batelco Cor-
ner in Jones Town, Eight Mile
Rock, is considered extremely
dangerous and should be
approached with caution, police
say. The Bahamian man, born in
Blanket Sound, Andros, is 6ft
lins tall, weighs between 150lbs
and 180lbs, has dark brown skin,
eyes and hair, and a small scar
under his right eye.

Anyone with information
about Gibson or his where-
abouts is asked to contact
Grand Bahama police urgently
on 352-1919, 351-9111, 351-
9991, 348-3445, 350-3125 or call
911.

MP presents
musical instruments
to help marching
hand develop

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

enn an

FREEPORT - Pineridge MP
Kwasi Thompson has presented
musical instruments to the
Church of God Fairfield in Her-
itage to assist with the develop-
ment of a new community march-
ing band.

Bishop Rev Leslie Woodside
said the church is in the process of
establishing the Heritage March-
ing Band, which will consist of
young people from the church
and the community of Heritage.

He hopes that parents and
guardians of children in the com-
munity will embrace the oppor-
tunity of allowing their children to
participate in the marching band.

The band is open to children
between ages six through 17 years
old, he said.

“T would like to express our
profound appreciation to MP
Kwasi Thompson for his dona-
tion of these instruments.

“We accept them with grateful
hearts and I am sure that these
instruments will enhance the
morale and moulding of our
young children in the communi-
ty,” said Rev Woodside.

The Heritage subdivision is a
relatively new residential devel-
opment with many young fami-
lies. It is located in the Pineridge
constituency.

Mr Thompson said that in addi-
tion to spiritual development,
churches also play a very impor-
tant role in the development of
communities.

He noted that “Team Piner-
idge” recently assisted the Church
of God Temple on Peachtree
Street with the construction of a
basketball court to assist residents
in that area. The MP believes that
the donation of musical instru-
ments will enrich the lives of not
only the young people of the
Church of God Fairfield, but also
the young people of Heritage.

“The Church of God Fairfield
is committed to partnering with
the Heritage community (in) pro-
viding wholesome positive activ-
ities for young people of their
church and the community,” he
said.

“We will be inviting all the res-
idents of Heritage who are inter-
ested in participating in the
marching band to contact the
church so that they may be
included in the band.”

Mr Thompson thanked Rev
Woodside and the church for
their willingness to partner with
the residents in their efforts to
better the lives of young people.

“We recognise the important
contributions churches make to
the community and I recognise
that as a member of parliament
we must do all possible to partner
with churches to better our com-
munities,” he said.

Mr Thompson announced that
he will be holding a Heritage
town meeting on Saturday, Feb-
ruary 28 at 4pm to discuss com-
munity issues.

He said that on the agenda will
be plans for a park and the for-
mation of a Heritage community
association. Mr Thompson said
they will also discuss the forma-
tion of a community crime watch
due to the recent break-ins in
Heritage.



Remnants of giant
tortoises, 2,000-

UM BRIKIU as

found in Abaco
I Cam It) s

m@ BY DIANE PHILLIPS

Aree hole in Abaco
is gaining internation-

al attention, revealing tightly-held
secrets preserved for up to 4,000
years, evidence of an era when
the Bahamas was home to land-
roaming crocodiles, giant tortois-
es, flightless birds, ancient bats
and owls that roosted 85 feet
below ground.

Known as the Sawmill Sink, the
saltwater-filled blue hole in the
heart of the pinelands on the
island of Great Abaco was the
recipient of National Geograph-
ic’s largest expedition grant for
2008 and is scheduled to be the
subject of a major NG feature
this year. The scientific treasure it
holds, a fossilised collage of life
and culture as it once existed, is
now closely guarded by experts
under the auspices of The Nation-
al Museum in co-operation with
scientists and researchers from
the United States.

The oxygen-free Sawmill Sink
holds such treasure that photog-
rapher Wesley Skiles, who is
shooting on behalf of The Nation-
al Museum for National Geo-
graphic, spent 10 days in Decem-
ber capturing images for the arti-
cle and a possible show. And Dr
Kenneth Broad of the Rosensteil
School of Marine Sciences
describes it as unlike any other
anywhere.

“There is no place like it in the
world for blue holes,” said Dr
Broad.

The hole was first discovered
by Brian Kakuk, a former Navy
diver, now a respected cave and
wreck dive instructor, marine sci-
entist, researcher and owner of
Bahamas Underground.

In 2004, he was leading a dive
in a cave near a blue hole south of
Marsh Harbour when he saw
what appeared to be a giant turtle
shell. Buried about 60 feet down,
the shell turned out to be that of
a tortoise, later carbon-dated to
be about 2,500 years old, and like
other artifacts found since then,
including a 1,040-year old human
bone, it was perfectly preserved.

Though rare, the explanation
for what has kept remains in the
blue hole frozen in time is sim-
ple. Absence of oxygen (it is ‘eat-
en’ by hydrogen sulphide) means
no growth of fungus or bacteria.

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Detritus like leaves, twigs, seeds,
flowers, fruit, bones and shells is
naturally preserved. The integri-
ty of the findings excites scien-
tists across a range of disciplines,
even those who believe it can help
explain everything from evolu-
tion to climate change.

“Most sites we find are pollut-
ed, so they are actually a health
hazard, which in a way is fortu-
nate because it keeps people from
going in.

“Water samples are filled with
e-coli and other bacteria,” said
Nancy Albury, a diver who’s
spent 20 years photographing the
blue holes, caves, flora and fauna
of Abaco and now serves as the
Bahamas National Museum rep-
resentative there.

Her photos have helped docu-
ment the wealth of findings in
what has been estimated at 100
holes, “But none,” she says, “as
pristine as Sawmill Sink, so pris-
tine that we can take DNA sam-
ples and get accurate readings
from animal and plant remains
thousands of years old.”

Only one sink hole, located in
Belize, has ever come close to the
preserved scientific riches of
Sawmill Sink, agree experts, who
are studying those riches to piece
together a portrait of life and land




long ago. They believe winds
blew dust from the Sahara here a
quarter of a million years ago.

Two thousand feet of passages
in the caves of Sawmill Sink are
covered and laden with fossilised
remains of crocodiles that made
their way by what was then land
from Cuba when sea level was
420 feet below today’s level and
land covered much of The
Bahamas.

Owls

Animals could have walked
between Long Island and the
Berry Islands, and 10,000 years
ago, prehistoric owls roosted in
trees now deep underwater. Giant
slow-moving tortoises, long since
extinct, roamed the land, as like-
ly to have been destroyed by
humans as by natural predators.

Discovery has not been limited
to what lived long ago. A species
of shrimp never before discov-
ered in May and a sample was
kept alive for six weeks by
Friends of the Environment in
Abaco, which works closely with
The National Museum.

Today, the remains that will
become the resources for study
and help to guide environmental

Correction




PROCEEDS of the Antique Auto Club of the
Bahamas’ annual car show, which is currently in the
planning stages, will be donated to the Bilney Lane
Home for Children and the Every Child Counts School
in Abaco. The 2009 Antique Car Show is now scheduled
for Saturday, March 14, at the Arawak Cay Heritage








Centre in Nassau.

Entry fee is $35 — not $3 as previously reported —
for those that want their vehicles judged to compete for
trophies in the eight established categories.

The Tribune apologises for the error in the original
article on February 9 and for any inconvenience caused.

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management are in the hands of
The National Museum, which will
become the repository for the
ruins and remains.

According to its director, Dr
Keith Tinker, it is a treasure
unlike any ever expected to be
found, and opens doors for coop-
eration with universities and
researchers around the globe.

“We are particularly pleased
that in addition to our interna-
tional efforts, we will be partner-
ing with The College of The
Bahamas where additional scien-
tific research will be conducted
and where its inclusion in course
material will attract serious
marine sciences students,” Dr
Tinker said.

Already, other institutions,
including the University of Flori-
da, the Florida Museum of Nat-





ural History, Friends of the Envi-
ronment (Abaco) and the New
Mexico Museum of Natural His-
tory are participating in joint
efforts to continue to discover,
uncover, study and preserve the
long-hidden natural treasure.

“Sawmill Sink and the riches it
holds will help us unlock an
important part of history that
could teach us lessons of great
value, helping to guide future
decisions about climate, marine
resources and environmental
management,” said Dr Davidson
Hepburn, Chairman of the Antiq-
uities, Monuments and Museums
Corporation which oversees The
National Museum.

“This is truly a great find anda
tremendous honour for The
Bahamas.”

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE





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Officiating will be Suffragan
Bishop George Duncambe as-
sisted by other Minésters of the
Gospel. Interment wil follow in
Woodlawn Gardens, Soldier
Road. Precious memories
will forever linger in the hearts of his family: three sons:
Prince, Rudolph & Dexter Kerr; thirty-four grandchildren:
Dereck, Jeffrey, Gregory, Stephen Ker, Judy Cargill,
Norma Thompson, Harvey, Keilh, Shantalee, Kimberly,
Theodore, Prince, Deborah, Rita, Ann Ker, Marcia, Rudy,
Samantha, Simone, Sebastian, Scott, Audie Kerr, Minister
Linda Moxey, Elizabeth Brown, Minister Esmerakda
O'Brien, Lisa Knowles, Elainé Forbes, James, Derek,
Jerome, Prescola Gardiner, Sandra Edoar, Necola
Ferguson, Dexter Conyers, Braden Kerr: four sisters:
Virginia Paul, Hilda Rawls and Ella Jones of Orlando, Fla.,
Gladys Rolle of Houston Texas; one brother: Marvin Kerr of
Miami, Fla.; one daughter-in-law: Beryl Kerr; five sisters-in-
law: Tesser Smith, Doris Ker, Dolly Cooper, Lenora
Gibson, Beatrice Gibson; five grand daughters-in-law:
Ruby, Tina, Yvette, Bemadette, Christa Ker; eight
grandsons-inlaw: Urban Cargill, Stephen Thompson,
Rickey Moxey, Adrian Brown, Clayton Knowles, Ansel
Obrien, Anthony Forbes & Jimmy Bastian; forty-five great
grandchildren; twenty-five great great grandchildren: fifteen
nieces; twanty nephews; and a host of other relatives and
friands including: Sidney Kerr, Kenwood Kerr, Patricia Hart,
Rowena Ker, Roland Knowles and family, Julia Huyler &
the Delaporte family.

Viewing will be held in the “Legacy Suite" of Vaughn O.
Jones Memorial Center, Wulff Road and Primrose Sireet on
Tuesday from 12700 noon to 6:00 p.m. and al the church an
Wednesday from 10:00 a.m. to service time,

co

NCH FRITTERS

FOLLOWING several years of preparation,
the government-owned Clifton Heritage Nation-
al Park will officially be opened to the public on
Thursday, February 19, 2009.

The Coalition To Save Clifton said it wants to
congratulate the Clifton Heritage Authority on
this very important achievement.

The Coalition has always maintained that pri-
or to the Park’s opening, when scores of people
will descend upon the site, recognition should be
given to the slaves who lived, worked, died and
were buried on the plantation.

Therefore on Sunday, February 15, 2009, an
ecumenical memorial service under the auspices
of the Bahamas Christian Council will be held at
the Clifton site beginning at 3pm.

ACO OH Cmca (I-r) Carolyn Strachan, chairman Rev C B Moss and Herbert Sears.

Clifton Heritage National Park
to be opened to the public



“This will be a solemn, yet exciting experience
as we honour the memory and legacy of those
who lived and died at a time when, because of
their status, they were deprived of the right and
dignity of being buried in the island’s cemeteries
alongside ‘free people’,” said Rev C B Moss,
chairman of the Coalition.

A motorcade will leave from Carmichael and
Baillou Hill Roads at 2pm, and will proceed to the
memorial site.

Public and private sector organisations and the
general public are invited to attend.

The Coalition said it extends sincerest
thanks to all those who supported the Coalition’s
fight to save the priceless Clifton site from
destruction.

Lu
GAMES

PETES







PLANTS

THE Bahamas Institute of
Financial Services has announced
the appointment of Tanya
McCartney as its president and
Kim Bodie as executive director.

Both women bring a wealth of
experience to the financial ser-

DISCO

r vices sector.

Ms McCartney entered the
financial services sector in 1991
as a legal and compliance officer
for a private bank and has
worked at a number of interna-
tional financial institutions.

She is currently the managing
director of RBC/Finco.

Mrs Bodie started her career
at the Institute in 1980 as secre-
tary to the Registrar, and in 1987

ADMINISTRATOR/
LIBRARIAN

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the successful candidate will
include:

© Overseeing the daily operation of the
facility, which includes a library, museum,
computer laboratory, resource centre,
reading room and café

© Investigating and
sources of funding

pursuing viable

© Planning and executing the curriculum
of the trade and vocational classes to be
offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

© Experience in aé_ related field or
certification in library science

© Excellent organization and administrative
skills

© Very Good computer skills

© Excellent communication skills
© Exceptional Interpersonal skills
© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to cdsands@coralwave.com
or via fax 242-334-2280.
www.southeleutheramission.com



PSCC ETE TE)
Yaa TSR TTT ts





Kim Bodie

was promoted to the position of
administrator, a title she held
until 2007 when she was appoint-
ed executive director of the Insti-
tute.

In an interview with both pro-
fessionals, Ms McCartney
expressed her excitement about
her appointment and said she is
looking forward to working along
with Mrs Bodie who has a vast
amount of experience in the area
of training.

Together, she said, they will
work towards realising the strate-
gic priorities of the Institute.

Ms McCartney further said that
training in the financial services
sector is crucial to the Bahamas
maintaining the competitive edge
and that she is honoured to be
able to contribute to developing



Tanya McCartney

the industry’s workforce through
her service as president of the
Institute.

Mrs Bodie expressed her
enthusiasm in having Ms McCart-
ney on board.

She said that Ms McCartney
brings to the Institute a wealth of
acknowledged experience and
sincere passion for training and
developing people.

She said it would be a pleasure
to have her serve as head of the
Institute.

Ms McCartney is only the third
woman to hold the position of
president in the Institute’s 34
years.

The two other prominent
women who served in this capac-
ity were Suzanne Black and
Pauline Allen Dean.

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Also available:

Balloons ~ Baskets ~ Chocolate

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SORA (WO PRONE ORDERS PLEASE]


THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 7

LOCAL NEWS



Raymond Bethel/BIS

Pica ar a z
CABBAGES stand out in Julia Munroe-Neilly’s home garden in Monastery Park.

Ministry’s backyard
gardening project
reaps rewards

“I took up every scrap of grass and put down






Liat | I ~~
ABOVE: A basket from Julia
Munroe-Neilly’s home gar-
den in Monastery Park for
Agriculture and Marine
Resources Larry Cartwright.
Pictured from left are Per-
manent Secretary Cresswell
Sturrup, Mrs Munroe-Neilly,
fellow home gardener
Oraliene Maycock, and Mr
Cartwright.

LEFT: Agriculture and
Marine Resources Minister
Larry Cartwright (right) and
Permanent Secretary Cress-
well Sturrup are treated to
home gardener Julia
Munroe-Nelly’s newest treat
— sweet potato surprise.

broccoli, cabbages and tomatoes instead.”

@ By GLADSTONE
THURSTON

SOMETHING just wasn’t
right — Julia Munroe-Neilly’s
food bill kept going up, but the
amount of groceries she was
bringing home kept going
down. She decided to do some-
thing about it and enrolled in
the Ministry of Agriculture and
Marine Resources’ backyard
gardening project.

That was eight months ago.
Today, her yard in Monastery
Park is a veritable cornucopia
of vegetables and fruit trees.

“The economy was my big
motivator. The price of sweet
peppers and tomatoes in the
food stores was too high,” she
said.

One of the first things she
did was to take up the well-
manicured lawn in her front
yard.

“People have all this grass in
their yard, and you know what,
you can’t eat that,” she said. “I
took up every scrap of grass
and put down broccoli, cab-
bages and tomatoes instead.”

In the back of her yard and
wherever she finds space she
has sweet potatoes, cassavas,
beans, onions, bananas, carrots,
beats, spices, fruit trees and
more.

Julia Munroe-Neilly

A descendent from New
Bight, Cat Island, Mrs Munroe-
Neilly spent some 40 years as
an educator in the Catholic sys-
tem and as head of Sesame
Academy.

“My food is like island food
now — fresh.

“Moreover, I know what I
am eating because I grew it. I
have everything I need to cook
with now,” she said.

Mrs Munroe-Neilly finds gar-
dening to be quite therapeutic.

“It’s something I felt I need-
ed to do and I am enjoying it,”
she said. “I never thought I
would be out here weeding, but
I tell you every scrap of weed in
this yard I pulled up myself.

“Not only is it good exercise,
but it is also good for meditat-
ing.
“Tt’s good thinking time. You
can get away from people
because no one is going to
come into your garden to help
you to weed,” she said.

If it were up to Mrs Munroe-
Neilly, all householders would
have their home garden. She
distributes seeds and seedlings
to all of her neighbours.

“When (Agriculture Minis-
ter) Mr Larry Cartwright said
we should eat what we grow
and grow what we eat, I took
him seriously,” she said.

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Cacique Awards
commits $96,000 in
scholarship funds to the
College of the Bahamas

WAYLON McCardy has become the first recipient of the
Cacique Awards Major Entrance Scholarship.

The Cacique Awards committed $96,000 to establish this
scholarship at the College of the Bahamas. The scholarship is
funded from the ticket sales of the annual tourism industry
awards event, and is awarded to high academic achievers pur-
suing baccalaureate degrees in either tourism management or
hospitality management at COB.

In addition to funding Mr McCardy’s entire four years of
study, the scholarship will fund a student in the next three con-
secutive years for his or her entire baccalaureate programme.
Cacique hopes to use the scholarship as a vehicle to encourage
talented young people to pursue careers in tourism.

Scholarship recipient Waylon McCardy recently had the
opportunity to meet Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace and College president Janyne Hodder.

The meeting brought a lively discussion on tourism, avia-
tion, innovation and national development.

Mr McCardy’s career goal is to excel in the tourism specialty
of aviation management. He said his aviation aspirations include
being a part of a Bahamasair team that reports profitable oper-
ations.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace personally presented the schol-
arship cheque to the College of the Bahamas.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Man found dead
at side of the road |

AN UNIDENTIFIED
man was found dead on the
side of a road in the
Peardale Subdivision, Nas-
sau, yesterday afternoon.

The man, believed to have
been in his early sixties,
appears to have been home-
less.

Police responded to calls
from the public at around
3pm yesterday, and are not
treating the death as suspi-
cious.

Chief Superintendent
Hulan Hanna said: “Our ini-
tial investigation found no
visible signs of trauma and

there is indication that he
appeared to be homeless, or
certainly a drifter.

“We are treating it asa
sudden death, and believe
he may have died from some
natural cause.

“We are appealing to the
community who may know
him to give information to
us, because as of now he is
unknown to us.”

Anyone with any
information which could
assist the investigation are
urged to call the Royal
Bahamas Police Force on
322-4444,

Alleged molestation case
‘forwarded to AG’s office’

FROM page one

concluded its investigations into formal complaints filed by the
two male victims who claim they were sexually molested by their

Former MP intervenes as
woman tries to take own life

FROM page one

One of them, former Minister of Trade
and Industry and former MP for Blue Hills
Leslie Miller, said he felt compelled to
help the young woman.

“She was sitting on the hill, saying she
wanted to take her life — she was dis-
traught, and she had been trying to get a
job in this country for the past two years
and no-one would hire her,” Mr Miller
told The Tribune.

His daughter, Leslia, was also at the
scene with a group of other concerned
women.

Mr Miller said he asked his daughter if
she could give the woman a job at Sun-
burst Paints until he could hire her at his
soon-to-be completed bowling alley.

“If someone is in that bad a strait then
obviously we have a duty to assist wherev-
er we can. And that’s all you can do,” Mr
Miller said.




The Tribune confirmed last night that
the woman is now happily employed at
Sunburst Paints on east Shirley Street.

Leading psychologists have expressed
concern over the frightening trend of sui-
cide and depression that is increasing in
the Bahamas through a spreading sense
of “hopelessness, despair and isolation.”

Three suicides last week sent the suicide
rate soaring at the beginning of the year,
coinciding with a deepening economic cri-
sis affecting families across the nation.

Father-of-two Leslie Campbell, 36, of
Ruby Avenue, Cable Beach, was found
hanging in his home on Friday night, and
just 24 hours later Kimberley Miller, 37,
was found hanging at her Pastel Gardens
home.

Their deaths followed the suspected sui-
cide of a 45-year-old father-of-three found
hanging in his Sea Breeze Lane Home on
Wednesday.

Police are investigating all three deaths
on the premise the deceased committed

suicide.

Psychologist Dr David Allen attributes
the trend to a breakdown of family life
and care in the community as people are
caught up in their busy lives and become
isolated, but are too proud to share their
inner turmoil.

He argued that suicide is a process
involving a deep sense of hopelessness,
isolation, sleep deprivation, an inability to
express hurt, and a tendency to turn to
alcohol and drugs.

Dr Allen said: “Suicide is not necessari-
ly a choice, it happens because the pain
they experience internally exceeds their
internal view of the resources around
them.”

m BLOOD DONATIONS

The family of a cancer patient is in desper-
ate need of blood donations to assist in the
care of their loved one as supply at the blood
bank of Doctor's Hospital is very low. Any
person able to make a donation should con-
tact the hospital at 302-4600.

teacher.
Mr Seymour said police had questioned the accused teacher,

who is now in New Providence on administrative leave. C 9 FROM page one Grand Bahama Mall
The teacher was removed from Eight Mile Rock High when Ar S O fh Att a ck

molestation allegations surfaced in January. yesterday.







FROM page one

Don Phillipe, of Pinder’s
Point, appeared before Magis-
trate Gwen Claude.

Grand Bahama.
Phillippe was not required to
enter a plea and was remanded































to Her Majesty’s Prison in Nas-
sau. The matter was adjourned
to June 4.

Police are also searching for a
second man, Bernard Ferguson,
for questioning in connection
with the murder.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZETTE RICHEMOND OF FAITH
AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 83RD day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TINO BRIAN GIBBS of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, intend to change my name
to TINO BRIAN GIBBS FERNANDER. If there are any objections to this
change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the
Chief Passport Officer, RO.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication of this notice.

It is alleged that on February
1, at Pinder’s Point, Phillipe
intentionally caused the death
of 17-year-old Dwight Bartlette,
also of Pinder’s Point.

Bartlette’s death is the sec-
ond homicide for the year on

Fifth man charged in 2007 murder

FROM page one

nection with Dean’s death.

A preliminary inquiry will be held to determine whether there
is sufficient evidence against the men for them to stand trial in the
Supreme Court.

Mr Dean, 24, who lived in the Freddie Munnings sub-division,
had reportedly just returned home around 11pm on August 2
when he was lured to his backyard by someone calling his name.
Upon going to his yard following the mysterious call, Mr Dean
was reportedly shot multiple times in the upper right side of his
chest.

The father-of-two managed to stagger across the street before
collapsing in the dirt in front of his neighbour’s yard, according
to reports. He was the 50th murder victim for 2007.

Ramsey was remanded to Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday
and is expected to appear in Court 5, Bank Lane, on February 24.

Taos (ios

Nag yn.

orange Hill Beach, West Boy Street

Speaking with The Tribune yesterday, Mrs Ritchie said that
although she was aware of the fire that was set to Mr Mor-
timer’s car, she had not received any information or heard any
speculation about the possible motive behind the alleged arson
attack.

She verified, however, that Mr Mortimer is not a member of
the special task force to which she belongs.

Mrs Ritchie is part of a task force that was appointed to root
out corruption in the department and prevent tax fraud.

It was suspected that the arson attack on Mrs Ritchie’s house
might have been related to her role in weeding out customs
fraudsters.

Last month, Clive Kent Schroeter, 37, was charged in a Mag-
istrate's Court in connection with that fire. According to court
dockets, Schroeter, while being concerned with others, inten-
tionally caused the home of Philip and Roslyn Ritchie to be set
on fire.

Police told The Tribune that this does not signal the end of their
investigation and that more arrests are likely to be made in
future.

Head of the Central Detective Unit, Chief Supt Glenn Miller,
said that three persons, including a well-known businessman,
were recently in police custody being questioned in connection
with the fire at Mrs Ritchie’s home, but were released pending
further inquiries.

Acting Comptroller of Customs Anthony Adderley could not
be reached for comment yesterday.

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009, PAGE 9



First international judo
tourney a huge success

e Foreign visitors
impressed
by local event

¢ Bahamas makes
giant stride
in bid for
international
recognition

m By PACO NUNEZ
Tribune News Editor

THE organisers of the first ever
international judo tournament to
be held on Bahamian soil knew it
was crucial to impress their visi-
tors — and they pulled it off in
style over the weekend and took
a giant stride towards interna-
tional recognition at the highest
levels.

The Bahamas Judo Federation
(BJF) has ambitious plans: it
intends to make the Bahamas a
serious Olympic contender and
to secure international wins at the
Pan-American level within four
years.

Crucial to that effort is accred-
itation of BJF tournaments by the
International Judo Federation
(IJF), and recognition by the
United States Judo Federation
(USJF).

With USJF affiliate coach Ron
Landry and chief IJF referee for
the Pan-American region Julio
Clemente in attendance on Sat-
urday when the BJF hosted the
first annual Bahamas Junior Judo
Open, it is fair to say that a great
deal was at stake.

And if the opinion of Mr
Landry is anything to go by, the
BJF passed the test with flying
colours.

“We have had a fantastic time,”
he said. “We were really
impressed with the BJA and how
well received we were.”

Mr Landry, head of the Cape
Cod Mat Sports Judo and
Wrestling Club, said he was very
happy about the number of qual-
ity matches his players were able
to compete in.

“There was good refereeing,
good organisation and the friend-
liness was overwhelming,” he
said.

Mr Landry also praised the
quality of the Bahamian players,
pointing out that all the athletes
on the US team were divisional
champions, but faced some stiff



competition nonetheless.

Speaking of the Bahamian ath-
letes, he said: “The competition
was good. We were all impressed
with how game they were, how
enthusiastic — you don’t see that
anymore.”

Mr Landry said he will defi-
nitely return to the Bahamas,
hopefully for next year’s tourna-
ment and with a bigger team.

He also promised to preach the
cause to the BJF to his former
college associates — who, he said,
“run USA Judo” — and encourage
them to take part in the Bahamas
Junior Judo Open in the future.

In the end, the US team won
all its matches, but BJF president
D’Arcy Rahming playfully
assured the crowd that “it won’t
be like that next year”.

Mr Rahming teaches a num-
ber of martial arts at his All-Star
Family Centre on Joe Farrington
Road, including judo, jujutsu,
karate, kickboxing and aikido.

After the tournament, he said:
“T thought it went fabulously on
several levels: one, we got all the
major judo schools out. Two, Mr
Clemente attended to judge the
caliber of our referees and make
individual recommendations for
their improvement — advice which
is invaluable. Three, we were very
successful in terms of raising
funds, which means we can begin
to branch out into the Family
Islands, which is our next goal.”

The federation president has
made no secret of his ambitions

Ey











JUDO enthusiasts take part in the first international judo tournament to be held in Bahamas.

for the sport. He aims to qualify a
team of formidable competitors
for the Olympic Games as soon
as resources and training will
allow.

However, Mr Rahming sees
the role of judo in the Bahamas as
more than just that of a sport.

He says the martial art can be a
“beacon of light” to encourage
excellence and show that “right
from these soils we can develop
world class people with world
class attitudes”.

Mr Rahming, who has consid-
erable experience working with
at risk youths, has emphasised
how the study of judo encourages
discipline, self-esteem and respon-
sibility — attributes that are in
short supply among teens and
young adults today according to
Minister of Youth, Sports and
Culture Desmond Bannister.

Mr Bannister, who attended
the Junior Open and presented
trophies to some of the winners,
said: “I am most impressed with
the fact that they are teaching
young people a lot about disci-

pline and self-control. Just before
the tournament, I came from the
funeral of a young man, killed at
the age of 31.”

The minister said that during
the event, he was speaking on the
subject of youth violence
with Monsignor Preston Moss,
Rector at St Anselm's Catholic
Church.

“He said that young people
don’t know themselves, they have
no self-confidence, they don’t
know their strengths,” Mr Ban-
nister recounted.

“What I saw at the tournament
is young people who do know
their strengths; can defend them-
selves but don’t need to show it
off. They know when to use it.”

Mr Bannister said he would
like to see the programme expand
into all the inner city areas of New
Providence.

He also revealed that the gov-
ernment helped with the tourna-
ment and has committed to giving
an annual budget to the BJF -
“because we believe it is so
important”.



HIGHLIGHTS

¢ THE 2009 Bahamas Junior Judo Open was punctuated by
a number of high points, none of them more well-received than
the demonstration by a group of local Special Olympians dur-
ing the opening ceremonies.

The programme is run by David Rahming, the Bahamas
Judo Federation’s (BJF) technical sports director. The students
train with other practitioners every Saturday, but BJF president
D’Arcy Rahming told The Tribune that plans are afoot to put
together a paralympic league.

“They are fantastic, great athletes. We are blessed with their
presence,” Mr Rahming said.

Another highlight of the day was a demonstration of the
Samurai arts of ancient Japan.

e Black belts Melanie Lobosky and Reno Culmer captivated
the crowd with a display of traditional sword-work and a
medieval staff art known as Shinto Muso Ryu.

The pair followed up with a demonstration of Miyama Ryu
Jujutsu, an art adapted from centuries-old Samurai methods but
applied to modern self-defence and law enforcement purposes.
It is employed by a number of police and security forces in the
US, as well as by the Royal Bahamas Police Force.

e The audience was also introduced to the accomplishments
of Paul Christofilis and Bruce Thompson, the two Bahamas
Judo Hall of Fame Inductees announced at the tournament.

Mr Thompson, who was travelling and could not attend the
event, began the study of judo with Don Malone, a 3rd degree
black belt, in the early 1970s.

He practiced at Luden Ltd on Dowdeswell Street and even-
tually received the grade of 2nd degree black belt. Among his
many accomplishments in judo, he represented the Bahamas at
international tournaments.

Mr Thompson went on to teach judo for many years on the
Campus of Queen’s College.

Mr Christofilis began the study of judo while a teacher at St
Augustine’s College under Mr Oberheiser, a Cuban exile who
is thought to be the founder of judo in the Bahamas.

He went on to study at the Kodokan, the birthplace of judo in
Japan, for 15 months. Mr Christofilis received his black belt
directly from the Kodokan.

Mr Christofilis was very impressed with Saturday’s tourna-
ment.

He said: “I’ve been out of judo for many years, and I am sur-
prised to see how far it has come. I had no idea it had progressed
so much.”


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 2009

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