Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Volume: 105 No.64

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Three arrested
after incident in
broad daylight

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

GUNSHOTS were fired from
a car in West Bay Street over
the weekend leading to a police
chase and the arrest of two men
and a woman.

The incident, which hap-
pened in broad daylight,
brought gun terror to the
streets of Nassau for the second
time in three days, following a
dramatic shootout in Montagu
last week which rocked the
community.

At least one gunshot was

fired in West Bay Street at
around 4pm on Saturday and
officers from the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEV) on patrol in
western New Providence traced
it to a gold Honda Accord.

As the occupants of the
Accord tried to flee police by
heading east, a high speed chase
ensued.

An object thrown from the
car was later discovered to be a
.38mm handgun with four live
rounds of ammunition, police
say.

The car was stopped by police

SEE page 14

Major employer on Bimini
‘packs up and leaves’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FIFTY Biminites have been left in the lurch to scramble for a
source of income after one of the island’s main employers packed
up and left without telling them whether he was coming back,

according to locals.

Power at the Big Game Resort and Marina in Alice Town, Bimi-
ni, was switched off by the Bahamas Electricity Corporation in the

=USA TODAY.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009



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SEE PAGE FIFTEEN

13th Bishop
of the Diocese
is inducted

Hundreds of Anglicans
attend the ceremony

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.com

HUNDREDS of devout Anglicans
gathered at Christ Church Cathedral
yesterday when the Rt Rev Laish Zane
Boyd was officially inducted as 13th
Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas.

Local clergymen were joined by var-
ious Bishops and Archbishops from
throughout the region including Turks
and Caicos, Barbados and South Flori- ap DRrAGene
da. The rare enthronement ceremony Yanna-Martin
was last seen in the Bahamas in 1995. welcomed Rt Rev Boyd

Filled with pomp and pageantry, the
inauguration of Rt Rev Boyd was initiated by performances
by the Enthronement Choir, the Anglican Youth Ensemble,
various musical selections, and was attended by state officials
and dignitaries.

Glenys Hanna-Martin, national chairman of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, issued a press statement welcoming
Rt Rev Boyd as the newest Bishop of the Diocese of the
Bahamas.

“The Anglican Church has played an important role in the
spiritual development of our people and in our national
development generally.

“We are convinced that Bishop Boyd will bring his own
vision imbued with the wisdom, passion and love required
to meet the heavy challenges our country today faces. We
pledge our full support to his work and his efforts in this

SEE page 14

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Increased air transport cost ends
Tribune delivery to Family Islands



THE 13TH Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands, Bishop Laish Zane Boyd, is pictured during his
enthronement ceremony. See story top right and more photos on
pages 12 and 13.

middle of last year after the owner allegedly failed to meet his oblig-

SEE page 14

Kellys" 5 Move

Tel: fet 343) aye teee



Concern over alleged treatment of
families in immigration exercise

THE TRIBUNE regrets to
have to announce today that it
will no longer be able to deliver
this newspaper to its Family
Island readers because of the
increased cost of air transport.

However, The Tribune is now
online at www.tribune242.com
and will be posted for readers
by 2pm on the day of publica-
tion. Tuesday morning’s Tri-
bune will be the last delivery by
Bahamasair. Wednesday’s Tri-
bune can be read on line from

2pm that day and for all follow-
ing week days.

This announcement will not
affect the daily delivery of The
Tribunes to Harbour Island on
the Bohengy, nor will it affect
the delivery by Western Air to
Andros.

However, it will affect readers
in Freeport, Eleuthera, Abaco,
Exuma, Crooked Island and
Long Island.

SEE page 14

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITNESSES to the recent
immigrant apprehension exer-
cise on Eleuthera claim Haitian
families were forced out of their
homes in bitter cold weather
and made to await transporta-
tion to the mainland in an out-
door containment site.

One concerned resident told
The Tribune that she witnessed

around 3am Wednesday, result-
ed in the round-up of close to
200 Haitians in various island
settlements, including Gover-
nor’s Harbour, Palmetto Point
and Harbour Island.

However, Immigration Direc-
tor Jack Thompson denied on
Friday that any officers acted in
an inappropriate way.

“To my knowledge, the exer-
cise was carried out in a
humane, sensitive and profes-















Rastafarians claim certain private
schools are ‘unconstitutional’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RASTAFARIAN parents claim certain private schools are
unconstitutional by not allowing children to dress in religious
attire because it does not comply with uniform regulations.
he said.

sional manner,”

Mr Thompson explained that
prior to officers being dis-
patched to the island, they were

SEE page 14

some of those apprehended
being forced to leave their
homes “wearing only panties
and a bra.”

The exercise, carried out

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

NASSAU’S international
airport has been without its
own ambulance for ten years,
it has emerged.

Passengers involved in the
recent crash landing of a flight
from Andros said they had to
wait on the grass for an ambu-
lance to take the injured away
for treatment.

Now airport employees are
expressing concern about
what would happen if a major
crash occurred.

One said that, based on test
times of ambulances coming
from the city, emergency
crews would not make it in
time to save lives.

“From an operational point
of view it is believed that the
ambulances that are stationed
in the city can make the
response time within the
required 15 minutes at the air-
port for a normal emergency,
which we have proven could
happen, but for most of the
time there is massive delay,”
the employee said.

The employee said from
the late 1980s ambulances had
to drive from the city to the
airport to assist.

“The airport is growing.

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ambulance for ten years

Employees express concern about what
would happen if major crash occurred

LYNDEN PINDLI

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

With the airport being an
industrial environment, there
is the need for at least the
minimum for basic medical
services,” the source added.
Medical director for EMS,
Dr Alvry Hanna, said they
have recognised the need for
an ambulance at the airport.

Requests

“It was found at that time
before the ambulance was
removed that the call volume
for requests for the ambulance
was low and they were needed
more in the community areas.

“So that ambulance was
pulled away from the airport.
It usually takes 20 or more
minutes for the ambulance to
arrive from in the city,” Dr
Hanna said.

He said currently there is a
sickbay at the airport with
only two nurses at a time.

“We have two shifts at the
sick bay with one nurse at a
time, between 8am to 3pm
and 3pm to 10pm. Overnight,
the crash and fire persons are
there after the nurse leaves,”
Dr Hanna said.

Chief Fire Officer for crash
and fire rescue at the airport,
Samuel Clarke, said the dis-
tance the ambulance has to

travel from Princess Margaret
Hospital is between 15 and
17 miles.

Mr Clarke said despite not
having an ambulance at this
time, the airport is still in good
standing with International
Civil Aviation Organisation
(ICAO) standards.

“The ICAO recommends
that once we reach a category
eight and above at the airport,
there must be an ambulance
present. We are at a category
seven therefore it is not man-
dated at this time to have one
stationed at the airport.

“However, with all of the
development going on at the
airport, we are not too far
away from reaching category
eight status. They also require
us to have a response time of
no more than 15 minutes

which is still something that is
being worked on,” Mr Clarke
said.

Dr Hanna said one initia-
tive the EMS is working on is
decentralising EMS through-
out the community.

Downtown

“Instead of having all of the
ambulances stationed down-
town, we want to have them
spread out through the com-
munities. We are looking at
attaching our ambulances to
the community clinics and we
think this is the best scenario
to work for us as they would
be able to respond more
quickly to issues in the com-
munity,” he added.

Dr Hanna said they are try-
ing to reinstate the ambulance
at the airport.

“We have to try and take it
in stages by looking at our
resources, logistics and
staffing.

“Our plan is that we can cut
down on response time as we
have realised this is one of the
main issues the community
has.

“We want to be able to
respond more quickly to the
public,” Dr Hanna said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 3



Ex-Pizza Hut staff claim employer

has failed to pay severance money

0 In bail |



Javaughn Delancy

Man charged
with making
death threats

FREEPORT - Javaughn
Delancy was charged in
Freeport Magistrate’s
Court with making death
threats.

It is alleged that on Feb-
ruary 5, the accused
threatened to kill a 21-
year-old female resident of
Pinder’s Point, putting her
in fear of the life.

Delancy pleaded not
guilty to the charge. The
case was adjourned to
March 23.

Because Delancy was
out on an outstanding
bench warrant on another
matter, he was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

Man accused
of Killing in
the course of
dangerous
driving

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

A MAN charged ina
2007 traffic accident which
claimed the life of a 36-
year-old Adelaide Village
resident has been
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court.

Kervens Forrestal, 27, of
Cowpen Road, was
accused of killing in the
course of dangerous dri-
ving.

It is alleged that around
12.45am on Monday, Feb-
ruary 5, 2007, Forrestal
drove a truck east on Ade-
laide Road in a manner
dangerous to the public,
causing the death of
Dominic Redhead.

Redhead was reportedly
travelling west on Ade-
laide Road in a green Toy-
ota Avalon when the acci-
dent occurred.

A Ford F150 truck and a
Ford Ranger, both head-
ing east, were also
involved in the crash. Red-
head died at the scene
while six others were
detained in hospital.

Forrestal, who appeared
before Magistrate Renee
McKay in Court 6, Parlia-
ment Street, was informed
that the matter would pro-
ceed by way of a voluntary
bill of indictment.

He was granted $10,000
bail with one surety. The
case has been adjourned to
April 8, 2009.

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m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes has pledged to inves-
tigate complaints by displaced
Pizza Hut workers who say
they are fuming at their for-
mer employer’s failure to pay
severance money.

The ex-employees, who
worked at the now closed
Cable Beach location, are frus-
trated that nearly three
months after the restaurant
shut its doors without notice
— leaving about 30 jobless — no
redundancy payments have
been made.

They say they are ready to
take legal action after lodging
a complaint with the Depart-
ment of Labour last Novem-
ber.

Yesterday Mr Foulkes said
while he did not know details
of the negotiations, he was
aware that the Department of
Labour was engaged in bring-
ing about a settlement.

"What I will do, now that
it's (the delay) been brought
to my attention, is do an inves-
tigation to see to what extent I
can assist in bringing about an

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MINISTER OF LABOUR Dion
Foulkes has said he will
investigate the complaints.

immediate resolution to this
problem,” the minister said.

Mr Foulkes advised the agi-
tated group to file a trade dis-
pute against Pizza Hut with
the Department of Labour to
avoid a complicated and
lengthy court battle.

"The process is set up at the
Department of Labour so that
it makes it easier for aggrieved
persons to file a dispute with-
out an attorney. It doesn't
adhere to all of the provisions

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of the legal procedure and it's
a very simple process. The
whole idea is that a lot of peo-
ple who are redundant or laid
off, are not in a position to
afford a lawyer so the depart-
ment is set up with that in
mind," he said.

According to one former
employee who worked for the
company since the late 1980s,
on November 8 employees
were assembled for an emer-
gency meeting where they
were told the restaurant would
be closed with immediate
effect.

During this meeting, a man-
ager reportedly told the group
they would receive a final pay-
ment. The worker, who asked
to have her name withheld,
said the workers made a claim
with the Labour Board the
next day.

But despite months of wran-
gling, the employees - some of
whom are still jobless - are
looking for answers and com-
pensation from their former
employers.

“We need our money and
nobody wants to pay us. I have
a car payment and rent due,”
said the employee.

Another employee who









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worked at both the Mackey
Street and Cable Beach loca-
tions for 11 years before the
stores shut their doors perma-
nently said: "It's bad because
you put in your loyal years and
this is how they treat you.
They said the money was

going to be ready for us by
December 15. That has come
and gone."

With no current job and
three children, the single
mother said she has resorted
to asking family and friends
for money.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Obama may learn from slips on stimulus

WASHINGTON (AP) — On his first big test,
Barack Obama made some rookie mistakes and
strategic missteps. But he still appears headed for
a win on the centrepiece of his agenda, a huge eco-
nomic recovery programme, with the fresh strik-
ing of a bipartisan deal in the Senate. Legislative
leaders, including some fellow Democrats who
support him, chalked up his problems to inexpe-
rience and some initial miscalculations over the
lack of Republican support, and they suggest he'll
learn from the rocky start. Americans have
learned, too, a little about how their new president
works.

He's swung from being conciliatory to bad-
gering Congress to act, from courting the opposi-
tion to taking partisan swipes. He's had to fight to
keep from losing control of the message. And all
this is playing out against a background of Cabinet
problems, economic distress and global distrac-
tions.

Some veteran Democrats say Obama could
have made it easier for himself.

"T think it is important that he reached out. But
lesson learned: It would have been better for him
to send up his idea of a bill,” instead of having
House Democratic leaders initiate the process,
said Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Leaders
of both parties agree the slumping U.S. economy
requires strong stimulus, an argument reinforced
by a government report showing soaring new job
losses. Obama will likely get most of what he
wants. On the job under three weeks, he still has
a large reservoir of good will on Capitol Hill.

But things haven't gone quite the way the new
Obama team expected. It's been a rough two
weeks of on-the-job training on the legislative
process from the other end of Pennsylvania
Avenue for the former one-term Illinois senator.
Still, Obama aides claimed they were satisfied
with the results, given the enormity of the chal-
lenge. "In a matter of weeks, we moved through
both houses of Congress a very complex piece of
legislation,” Obama senior adviser David Axelrod
said Saturday in an interview. "I don't know if
there is a parallel in history."

While Obama reached out energetically to
members of both parties, he didn't win a single
Republican vote in the House. In the Senate,
Democrats late Friday reached a deal with a small
band of Republican moderates that set the stage
for expected approval within the next few days.
The recovery package was put together by con-
gressional Democrats in partnership with Oba-
ma, a process begun during Obama's transition.
The administration decided against starting off
the process by submitting its own detailed leg-
islative package. Even though Obama and top
aides stayed close to the process, the result was an
$819 billion package packed with spending pro-
jects, some of which struck even some fiscally
conservative Democrats as not particularly stim-
ulative. In the Senate, an even larger package
was considered, although the deal struck Friday
night pared it back some.

The size and composition of the plan gave
Republicans an opening to assert that Obama
had given too much leeway to House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi and House Banking Committee
Chairman Barney Frank. And they also could
argue that, while Obama had offered to consider
Republican suggestions for the package, none
wound up in the legislation.

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In not sending his own legislation to Congress,
Obama did the exact opposite of what President
Bill Clinton did in 1993 when he tried to get Con-
gress to swallow whole a detailed health care
overhaul plan put together by a task force headed
by his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. That take-it-
or-leave it approach alienated Congress.

Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who has active-
ly championed the stimulus bill, said Obama stum-
bled at first by ceding the debate to Capitol Hill
and not stepping out more forcefully to explain the
bill to the public.

"A small percentage of this bill, the unneces-
sary spending, allowed Republicans — who have
played politics on this from the beginning — to
discredit it so public opinion is against it,” Rendell,
the chairman of the National Governors Associ-
ation, said in an interview Friday. "We need a
massive stimulus bill with spending. Every econ-
omist says that. And yet the American people
are against it now because we let the Republi-
cans spin."

Democratic Congressman James Clyburn said
Republican critics were able to define the legis-
lation as a bloated spending measure being rushed
through Congress. He said he was pleased that
Obama had shifted gears and was "going on the
offensive."

After his original outreach to Republicans,
Obama late last week changed his tone and derid-
ed Republican ideas for putting more tax cuts in
the stimulus package. Such ideas "have been test-
ed and they have failed,” he said in a speech at the
Energy Department. Later, he told a gathering of
congressional Democrats in Williamsburg, Vir-
ginia, that "the scale and scope of this plan is
right.”

He'll continue trying to regain momentum on
economic policy. He plans his first prime-time
news conference today after Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner outlines details for a new finan-
cial-sector rescue plan. Then he'll participate in
town hall-style meetings in towns suffering par-
ticularly hard times. Democratic Sen. Charles
Schumer said Obama's courtship of Republicans
only to be rebuffed by them should serve as "an
early lesson for President Obama and his team.”

But James Thurber, director of the Centre for
Congressional and Presidential Studies at Amer-
ican University, said Obama set a particularly
high bar for himself by "promising to change the
way Washington works."

"He promised to make it a less partisan, post-
partisan place. And so he has to do this. The ques-
tion is whether he can hit the sweet spot on the
stimulus package with enough tax breaks and
enough non-controversial spending to get the
votes. I think he can," Thurber said.

Democrats praise Obama's close work with
them on the stimulus legislation.

"T don't think there's any doubt that the pres-
ident has been active ... he's been making phone
calls, visiting members in the Senate and the
House personally," said Rep. Xavier Becerra, a
Democrat. But Becerra said the jury's still out
on the effectiveness of his approach because the
bill still isn't done. Once the measure passes the
Senate, differences with the House-passed bill
will have to be reconciled. "It's a work in
progress,” said Becerra. "It's still cooking."

(This article was written by Tom Raum of the

Associated Press).



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Marijuana
legalisation not
an answer to
economic woes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN December’s 22, 2008 Tri-
bune publication, a young man
claimed that legalising marijua-
na would be an answer to res-
cue our struggling economy;
“the legalisation of this plant
may seem preposterous to
some, and downright stupid to
most, but such a move would
drastically change our tourism
product.” He also made com-
parisons to Amsterdam: “You
cannot find one single beach in
or near Amsterdam that can
compare to one of our worst
beaches, so there must be some-
thing else that is drawing these
tourism into their country.” He
also went on and talked about
the illegal production of alco-
hol and how it was continued
until it finally became legalised;
then he discussed marijuana
seeds as sources of fuel due to
its hemp oil, etc. His argument
basically is that Amsterdam
attracts millions of tourists
because they have legalised the
use of marijuana throughout the
city.

Amsterdam is the capital of
The Netherlands; this city alone
surpasses the entire population
of the Bahamas with a stagger-
ing number of approximately
750,000 people. Amsterdam
has: subways highlighting his-
toric images; canals that are
used as means of transportation
throughout parts of the city; an
interesting architectural back-
ground; two major universities;
a wide array of museums and
entertainment centres. To be
exact one of the museums in
Amsterdam had over one mil-
lion visitors a few years back;
these museums are filled with
arts, crafts, paintings and rich
historic documents; Amsterdam

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



also has halls specifically
designed for concerts, theatre,
comedy and so forth. Amster-
dam has roughly 100 or more
festivals per annum; this city is
comprised of nearly 400 hotels
with 40 per cent being four or
five star hotels. Oh did I men-
tion that “Amsterdam is the
financial and business capital of
the Netherlands”; it is classified
as one of the best European
cities for international business
next to: London, Paris,
Barcelona and Frankfurt. Ams-
terdam has its own world trade
centre which is a part of the
international world trade cen-
tres association; Amsterdam
also has the oldest stock
exchange in the world. Numer-
ous Dutch banks and corpora-
tions such as: ABM AMRO,
Heineken International, ING
group and Philips have their
headquarters in Amsterdam.
KPMG International’s global
headquarters is even near by.
Seventy-five per cent of Ams-
terdam’s annual visitors are
European, Americans only
account for about 13 to 14 per
cent of the visitor population
each year.

I can run on all day about
other reasons why marijuana is
not the main reason for tourist
migration to Amsterdam such
as the “Red Light District”
which is a tourist attraction sat-
urated with sex shops, peep
shows and a enormous selec-
tion of prostitutes that can be
singly picked through glass win-
dows.

Amsterdam is a tourist and

financial destination whose
tourist attractions stem beyond
mediocre sightseeing tours and
Bahamas paraphernalia that
were probably made in China
or Indonesia.

If marijuana is legalised in
the Bahamas, cocaine would
surge our streets, because the
fellows on the street won’t have
their commodity, crime would
shoot higher than our morality
and the Bahamas would be
compared to South Florida in
the 1980’s. Who would be
responsible for the distribution
of the weed? You think those in
the pharmaceutical market want
to be a part of that? You really
think they want to tarnish their
brands? Those addicted to this
drug would probably target
these pharmaceutical establish-
ments to steal, etc. What would
that do to policing? Worldwide
police use drugs on the streets
to catch drug dealers; in some
cases they let certain drug deal-
ers parade the streets and do as
they like as long as they snitch
off their rivalries.

To sum it up, Mr Dunn, the
legalisation of marijuana would
not be an economic stimulus for
our stagnant economy or a
means to attract tourists.

Personally I have never used
marijuana and personally I
won’t use it, I have never had
dope in my possession and I
never intend to supply, but the
legalisation of marijuana in the
Bahamas is a ridiculous sugges-
tion. Marijuana is not just a
problem between the police and
the drug boys; it is our problem
(The Bahamas). I just think that
legalising it will have some dras-
tic ramifications.

ELKIN SUTHERLAND Jr
Nassau,
February, 2009.

Dangerous intersection needs fixing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

smaller but nonetheless still quite visible, however

BAHAMAS OUT ISLAND
PROMOTION BOARD

POSITION AVAILABLE

Job Description
Executive Director

Successful applicant must possess at least a
Bachelors Degree, with a minimum of 7-10 years
experience relating to Operations, Strategic,
Planning and Marketing. Extensive in Tourism or
Hospitality being preferred. Good verbal, written
and presentation skills with people of all levels,
inside and outside of the Board. A strategic
thinker, with initiative, and follow-through skills.
Possessing positive Management qualities.
Have the ability to manage current and long-
range objectives, while directing organizational
emphasis _ of
guidelines, and maximized returns. The ability
to proactively engage in Advocacy initiatives
affecting the Out Island, while collaborating with
industry, paying special
attention to Membership Development.

Would the Comptroller of Road Traffic, the
officer commanding the traffic division or some-
one else in authority please do something about
the intersection at the entrance to the Nassau
Yacht Club and Fort Montagu.

Today while exiting the Nassau Yacht Club, I
once again narrowly avoided being broadsided by
a vehicle entering the Montagu park exit at high
speed from the west. During the ensuing
exchange, having weathered a barrage of racial
slurs and obscenities, I was able to point out to the
young man that the sign he was looking at was in
facta NO ENTRY sign and that had a collision
occurred he most certainly would have been at
fault.

The large and prominent no entry sign once
displayed there has been replaced by one much

motorists particularly at lunch time and five
o'clock routinely ignore it, entering the Montagu
area through this exit to bypass the usual traffic
congestion.

Needless to say the traffic police are generally
conspicuous by their absence in this vicinity unless
they're blocking the Yacht Club entrance while
holding one of their periodic/idiotic ticket anyone
exceeding 25 mph exercises.

This has become a very dangerous intersection
and it is simply a matter of time before some
innocent exiting the Yacht Club or the Montagu
is seriously injured or killed.

Thanking God for yet another near miss.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
February 4, 2009.

WANTED

A leading wholesaler seeks to hire a highly motivated
individual for the position of:

ADMINISTRATIVE

ASSISTANT

The Administrative Assistant will be responsible for

coordinating office services such as records control,

budgetary

Send Resume to Sammy @boipb.com

follow up, and other administrative activities for a
department/division. The person will compile data
and format reports, graphs, tables, and records as
well as categorizing facts and figures for computation.

Interested persons should possess:
An Associate's degree in business or equivalent
Excellent administrative/clerical skills
At least two years’ experience working in a
business environment
Excellent communication and presentation skills
Proficiency in MS Office Excel and other
computer applications

Please send application letter and résumé

by February 17, 2009 to:

Administrative Assistant
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9g, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



BAIC lecture series aims to help business people

HELPING business people
be better at what they do, and
giving would-be entrepreneurs
the extra know-how they may
need to do it, are among goals
of a new lecture series co-ordi-
nated by Bahamas Agricultur-
al and Industrial Corporation.

The 12-week Business
Empowerment Lecture Series
will provide potential and exist-
ing business owners with an
opportunity for exposure to suc-
cessful business strategies, best
practices, and real life business
experiences, BAIC executive
chairman Edison Key
explained.

Free and open to all who wish
to attend, it begins on Thurs-
day, 7pm, in the Lecture The-
atre of the Culinary and Hospi-
tality Management Institute at
the College of the Bahamas,
Thompson Boulevard campus.

The interactive sessions are
the brainchild of BAIC's Busi-
ness Services Division, headed
by deputy general manager
Don Major.

Edison Key s

Topics to be covered include
customer service and market-
ing; plan development; Customs
duties/concessions and imports;
and e-commerce and account-
ing.

“BAIC is aware of the role
micro, small and medium-sized
enterprises play in the econo-
my of the Bahamas, especially
as it relates to job creation,”
said Mr Key.

“Therefore BAIC remains



committed to assisting in what-
ever way we can to ensure suc-
cess.

“The previous lecture series
were well attended.

“And that heartens us
because now is the time for
Bahamians to prepare them-
selves for other opportunities,
especially in food production.

Inspire

“We have been on a mission
to inspire Bahamians to take on
the lucrative task of feeding our
people and the millions of
tourists who visit us.

“T therefore urge Bahamians,
especially those who have lost
their jobs to visit us. Perhaps
we can assist.”

There will also be round table
discussions on financing a new
business venture; increasing
competitiveness in business; the
anatomy of an entrepreneur;
and linking local business with
the tourism sector.

Opportunity for businesses to
access millions of dollars in funding [Ry

BAHAMIAN businesses are being given
another opportunity to access millions of dol-
lars in funding that can be put towards enhanc-
ing their competitiveness.

The Caribbean Export Development Agency
will launch a second call on February 9, 2009,
for its Direct Assistance Grant Scheme, a Euro-
pean Union funded programme which focuses
on building the competitiveness of firms in the
Caribbean region (CARIFORUM).

Applicants

Caribbean Export’s senior grant adviser Kirk
Brown said that successful applicants will be
able to access funds for projects that may
include, but not be limited to: research, product
and service development, marketing, promo-
tional material, quality and environmental man-
agement systems and information technology
solutions.

Mr Brown stated that the response to
the first call was encouraging, with 33
applicants being awarded grants totalling
BDS$2.3 million.

He said it is hoped the scheme will help
improve competitiveness of firms by “increas-

ing export potential and expanding export mar-
Kets.”

Competitiveness is an issue that has been
highlighted by Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing as one which Bahamian busi-
nesses must focus on if they are to take full
advantage of the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment signed last year between Caricom coun-
tries, including the Bahamas and the Euro-
pean Union.

That agreement will liberalise the trade rela-
tionship between European and African,
Caribbean and Pacific countries, allowing Euro-
pean companies more access to the Bahamian
market, and Bahamian companies more access
to Europe.

Persons wishing to apply for Caribbean
Export Development Agency funds are invited
to submit proposals for the regular procedures
from February 9, 2009, until February 20, 2009,
at 4.30pm.

Those interested in applying may obtain
guidelines, application forms and the list of
eligible activities from Caribbean Export’s
website at www.carib-export.com.

Applications must be submitted to Caribbean
Export’s head office in Barbados or its sub-
regional office in the Dominican Republic.

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at the same venue with a round
table discussion on agribusiness
possibilities.

In six of the sessions, there
will be a segment for testimoni-
als from successful business
owners who will share their
experiences.

The opening night will see

motivational speaker Dr Wayne
Thompson of the Centre for
Renewing Relationships speak
on the topic ‘Prosperity in the
face of Adversity’.

Held in conjunction with the
College of the Bahamas and the
Royal Bank of Canada, the
series is free of charge and open
to all.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 7



es,
Is the Caribbean financial
services sector asleep?

insight |

WORLD VIEW

“So far there has been no
public indication that
Caribbean governments are
ready to jointly engage the
OECD and the US government
in particular on these new
threats to their financial

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

‘i threat to the
financial services sec-
tor of the Caribbean is grow-
ing everyday and is becom-
ing more evident in reports
by media who have swal-
lowed hook, line and sinker
that so-called “tax havens”
are helping US, European
and Japanese nationals, both
persons and companies, to
evade taxation in their home
countries.

There is no hard evidence
to support this allegation
about Caribbean jurisdictions.
Yet it persists from govern-
ments of the Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD).

A recent BBC report
claims that the British gov-
ernment “is broke — a record
£44bn in the red — and yet
one estimate is that the tax-
man loses £18.5bn a year
thanks to tax haven abuse.”

The reports specifically
identifies British protec-
torates which it describes in
derogatory terms “as the
Bounty Bar island tax haven
of the Caymans in the
Caribbean and the fish-and-
chip tax havens closer to
home like Jersey, Guernsey
and the Isle of Man.” It says,
“18 of the world's tax havens
are Crown Dependencies like
Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of
Man or British protectorates
like the Caymans, a fag-end
of the British Empire in the
Caribbean.”

Dramatically, the report
also states that “one man has
targeted tax haven abuse in
the Caymans — and his name
is Barack Obama. So change
for the world's tax havens
seems on the way — whether
the leaders of the micro-states
like it or not.”

W hen the OECD
first raised its so-

called “Harmful Tax Compe-
tition Initiative” (HTCI)
aimed at closing down the
financial services sector of 41
small jurisdictions around the
world which were giving seri-
ous competition to the finan-
cial institutions of the OECD
countries, Caribbean coun-
tries were slow to move on
the issue.

It was not until it was
raised by Antigua and Bar-
buda at the 21st meeting of
the Conference of Heads of
Government of the
Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) at Canouan in
St Vincent and the
Grenadines in July 2000, that
CARICOM countries began
to take the issue seriously.

At that time, a statement
was issued saying that Heads
of Government took note
that the OECD report “‘was
based on incomplete infor-
mation and on standards set
unilaterally by these bodies.
They deplored the fact that
the lists were published with
the objective of tainting juris-
dictions in the eyes of the
investment community and
the international financial
market. They condemned the
actions of the OECD in par-
ticular as contrary to the
tenets of a global market
economy promoted by G7
countries. They reiterated
that the proposed OECD
actions have no basis in inter-
national law and are alien to
the practice of inter-state
relations.”

Later a Committee was
established headed by then
Barbados Prime Minister,
Owen Arthur, and present
Barbados Chief Justice, Sir
David Simmons, of which I
was a part, to engage the
OECD in a serious dialogue
on this issue. Eventually, the
OECD dropped a blacklist of
countries that they had pro-
duced but only after coercing

ie
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157



services sector.”



almost all of the jurisdictions
to adopt many of the rules
that the OECD had set uni-
laterally. A so-called “Global
Tax Forum” was also estab-
lished to set rules for a level
playing field for all jurisdic-
tions. But, a report two years
ago showed that the main cul-
prits ignoring these rules are
the big players in the OECD
countries themselves. Poor
regulation and supervision in
the US and UK which con-
tributed to the present finan-
cial crisis in both countries is
ample evidence of that fact.
President Obama, when he
was the Senator from Illinois,
joined two other Senators in
introducing the “Stop Tax
Havens Abuse Act” in the
US Congress. Fortunately,
the Act never became law.
But, it names 34 jurisdictions
as “secrecy” jurisdictions and
among them are all the
British Overseas Territories
in the Caribbean, all the
members of the Organisation
of Eastern Caribbean States,
the Bahamas and Barbados.
The fact that the Bill did
not become law does not
mean it has been dropped
from the Obama administra-
tion’s agenda. Every indica-
tion is that the legislation will
be enacted this year and
while the blacklist will be
removed, it will be replaced
by broad empowerment of
the US Treasury Secretary to
impose sanctions. The belief
persists that “the total loss to
the (US) Treasury from off-
shore tax evasion alone
approaches $100 billion per
year, including $40 to $70 bil-
lion from individuals and
another $30 billion from cor-
porations engaging in off-
shore tax evasion.”
Caribbean jurisdictions are
regularly examined by the
Caribbean Financial Action
Task Force (CFATF) and the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) to ensure that they are
compliant with the require-
ments set by the OECD.
Many, if not all of them, have
Tax Information Exchange
Agreements with the US.
Banks are required by law,
and on pain of the toughest
penalties, to make suspicious
activity reports and to follow
know your customer proce-
dures. Persons trying cither



to open a second account
with a bank they have dealt
with for years, or transfer
money anywhere, are well
aware of the scrutiny to which
they are subjected, the paper
they have to sign and the
identification they have to
provide.

Ne. some of the
OECD jurisdictions

are luring customers away
from Caribbean countries on
the basis that they will give
them better tax breaks, and,
of course, they are “safe”
jurisdictions. One of the latest
companies to shift is the giant
engineering and construction
company, Foster Wheeler
Ltd, which is moving its place
of incorporation to Switzer-
land from Bermuda for “tax
and other reasons.”

So far there has been no



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

public indication that
Caribbean governments are
ready to jointly engage the
OECD and the US govern-
ment in particular on these
new threats to their financial
services sector. Yet, they are
all at risk, including Guyana,
Jamaica and Trinidad and
Tobago — all of whom have
passed legislation to offer
international financial ser-
vices,

Similarly, the Caribbean
private sector who provide
financial services and are in
the best position to marshal
the arguments and evidence
to refute the charges of
OECD governments are say-
ing nothing.

When the crunch comes,
therefore, those in the private
sector, who seem to be sleep-
ing instead of lobbying their
governments for joint action,
should wake up and start
pressing the issue fast. The
wolf is already at the door.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

ADMINISTRATOR/
LIBRARIAN

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the successful candidate will
include:

© Overseeing the daily operation of the
facility, which includes a library, museum,
computer laboratory, resource centre,

reading room and café

© Investigating and

sources of funding

pursuing viable

© Planning and executing the curriculum
of the trade and vocational classes to be
offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

© Experience in aé_ related field’ or
certification in library science

© Excellent organization and administrative
skills

© Very Good computer skills

© Excellent communication skills
© Exceptional Interpersonal skills
© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to cdsands@coralwave.com
or via fax 242-334-2280.
www.southeleutheramission.com



Summit Academy

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A limited amount of spaces are available in Playgroup through Grade 5.
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tampa dog that scoured 9/11 ruins dies

m@ TAMPA, Fla.

A FLORIDA search-and-rescue dog that scoured the ruins of
the World Trade Center, hurricane-ravaged communities, and
other lower-profile disasters has died, according to Associated
Press.

Marley of Tampa Fire Rescue was 12 when she died Wednes-
day.

Besides sniffing for survivors after the Sept. 11 attacks, Marley
also was active in efforts after Hurricanes Charley and Katrina.

The dog suddenly came down with canine bloat and had to be
euthanized. Captain Mark Bogush, who trained the dog, said
surgery would only have worsened her quality of life.

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Immigration chief pays courtesy
call on Commodore Scavella

DIRECTOR of Immigra-
tion Jack Thompson recently
paid a courtesy call on Com-
mander Defence Force Com-
modore Clifford Scavella at
the Coral Harbour Base. Dur-
ing his visit, the newly
appointed director met with
the Commodore, and was
introduced to his command
team.

Matters of mutual interests
were discussed, and both par-
ties exchanged pleasantries.

PERHAPS you've thought about sell-
ing your present home, but have put off
that decision, thinking ‘that now is not a
good time to sell. Want some advice?
Wait no longer!

Consider what happens during the “bad
times.” Most homeowners want to sell
their homes for the highest possible price
in the shortest possible period of time.
So, during those periods that are per-
ceived as ‘a bad time to sell a home’ or a
‘buyer’s market,’ those homeowners put
off their selling decision until a more
favourable selling climate exists.

Since the so-called ‘bad times’ can last
from a relatively short period to a couple
of years, a backlog of frustrated would-be
sellers builds up.

It is sort of like the force that builds up
in a pressure cooker.

Then, finally, comes the good news:
“Home sales are rising - buyers are buy-

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ABOVE: Director of Immigration Jack Thompson and Commodore
Clifford Scavella engage in a casual conversation at the Coral
Harbour Base.

LEFT: Commodore Clifford Scavella presents Director of Immigra-
tion Jack Thompson with a keepsake from the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force.

RBDF photos/Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen

sey SND

CARMEN MASSONI

sure cooker, the lid blows right off the
top. Sellers by the thousands begin to
flood the market with homes to sell.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9g, 2009, PAGE 9








MR GLENN BANNISTER, BNT president, accepts the cheque from Dr Livingston Marshall,



senior vice-president of Environment and Community Affairs for Baker’s Bay.

Nassau to host Women’s
Business Conference

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT ~— As the
Grand Bahama economy
continues to struggle, the
women of Freeport are
being invited to connect with
other Bahamian and inter-
national businesswomen at
the Second Annual Wom-
en’s Business Conference in
Nassau.

Attorney Melissa Hall,
founder of Kingdom Women
In Business (K WIB), was in
Grand Bahama on Thursday
to announce that this year’s
conference will be held at
the British Colonial Hilton
on February 28.

The conference theme is
“Rise to the Occasion and
Transition from Trial to Tri-
umph.”

Opportunity

Ms Hall said this major
international conference
event gives women from all
walks of life the opportunity
to network and launch their
personal visions for their
lives during these trying
times.

She believes that one of
the main challenges experi-
enced by women in business
is the availability of finan-
cial resources. She noted
that training, skills, and good
advice are important.

“We believe that despite
what is happening in the
economy in Grand Bahama,
if we come together and con-
nect with other women and

LUCAYA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL



“We believe that despite what is
happening in the economy in
Grand Bahama, if we come
together and connect with other
women and share our secrets of
success, women will discover
how to be creative and
recession-proof by repositioning
and redefining themselves.”



Attorney Melissa Hall, founder of
Kingdom Women In Business

share our secrets of success,
women will discover how to
be creative and recession-
proof by repositioning and
redefining themselves.

“The conference will also
be a time of refreshing and
renewing for women as they
will be provided with practi-
cal advice on how they can
start their own businesses
and improve their mar-
Ketability in the market-
place,” she said.

Some of the conference
speakers are former banker
and financial consultant
Charlene Paul; Patrice Ellis;
Dr Jennifer Deveaux, finan-
cial controller of Ernst and
Young, former senator
Tanya McCartney; Ruby
Ann Darling, and motiva-
tional speaker, life coach,
and businesswoman Dr Sta-
cia Pierce from Lansing,
Michigan.

Ms Hall said Ms Pierce
brings a wealth of knowl-

Freeport - BAHAMAS
VACANCY NOTICE - SCHOOL TEACHERS

LUCAYA

edge and advice that can
help women become suc-
cessful in business.

“She has a fashion line and
make-up line, she is a TV
host, and has written 21
books.

“She is just a phenomenal
woman and just to be able
to connect with someone
like her would be a great
experience for all women.”

Plans

Although KWIB is based
in Nassau, there are plans to
establish a branch in Grand
Bahama during the third
quarter of this year.

The organisation currently
has 65 members and a fol-
lowing of 300 women.

Ms Hall noted that a num-
ber of businesswomen in
Grand Bahama have already
joined the organisation this
year, including Michelle
Thompson, owner of Uni-

Effective: August 2009

Lucaya International $chwal isa non-protic independent organization peaviding high qualiny education to the kaca

and intemational community. The High School academic program prepares students for tertiary education

through the international Baccalaureate Organization (BO) Diploma Program (DP), SAT and a broad range of

subjects at Edeace Intemational General Certthcate of Secondary Education (1GCSE) kewel. The Primary School

follloress the IO Primary Years Programme (PP). There is a strong extra-curricular and fine arts programme

available to all students through the Sched.

The School's Board of Directors are locking to appoint suitably qualified teachers in the following subjects

areas:
Biology
Physics
Mathematics

» Geography
* Ristory
= Mlusic

“English
* French
*Spankh

Head of Primary School with training in 18 PYP preferably with experience in PY PHSE

* Primary Classroom Teacher with 18 PYP training and experience

All cancedates should be qualified with a recognised teaching license, degree or post-graduate qualification

[PGCE of equivalent in their subpect up to 18 Ciploms level and should itate4 second subject area in which they

are qualted and prepared to teach, It should be noted that suitably experienced teachers may be expected to

leach across (he whole secondary ange Additionally, previous international perience preferably with the PYP

IGCSE of 1 Dipioma preegramene is prelerred but ret a requirement,

Salaries and benefits ae paid commnercurate walk candidates qualifications avd experience
For suitably qualified camdidates there may be thee opportunity for Faculty Head appointive nt

All applications should be addressed to the Director of Schaal at

cya
Lucaya International School,
P.O. Bow 44066, Freeport,
Grand Bahama island,
Bahamas.

intermationalschoalcom or posted to

Further information can be attained from the schools web site werw.lecayainternationalschool.com



Developers donate

$100,000 to the BNT

DEVELOPERS of The Baker’s Bay Golf and
Ocean Club at Great Guana Cay, Abaco, con-
tinued their support for Bahamas National Trust
by presenting the organisation with a $100,000
cheque.

The donation by Discovery Land Company is
the second instalment of a $600,000 three-year
commitment to the organisation and the nation-
al parks on Abaco.

Dr Livingston Marshall said when presenting
the cheque: “Although we are all experiencing
tough times in this economic downturn, we at
Baker’s Bay want the BNT to know that we are
committed to the organisation and the environ-
ment.”

The grant from Baker’s Bay is supporting the
establishment of a BNT office on Abaco as well
as a full-time warden.

The grant has also provided the BNT with the

Text an



opportunity to partner with Friends of the Envi-
ronment and schools in North and South Abaco
to establish three Discovery Clubs on Abaco.

Discovery Club is an after school club that
combines environmental education with fun
learning techniques designed to take young peo-
ple out of the classroom and into the different
eco-systems we find in The Bahamas.

“The BNT is truly grateful to corporate sup-
porters like Baker’s Bay, who place a high value
on the environment and the work of the Trust,”
said Glenn Bannister, president of the BNT.

The Bahamas National Trust is the mandated
manager of 25 national parks and protected areas
in The Bahamas. Abaco is home to five national
parks: Abaco National Park, Pelican Cays Land
and Sea Park, Tilloo Cay Reserve, Black
Sound Cay Reserve and Walker’s Cay National
Park.

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versal Security Systems; Pas-
tor Margo Victor, marketing
manager of Acacia Groves;
Raquel Hart, and Pastor
Shirley Stubbs of Universal
Houschold of Faith.

She said that women from
Abaco and other Family
Islands are also expected to
join the organisation and
attend the Nassau confer-
ence.

“It’s not only for
professional or business-
women, you can be a house-
wife.

“This is the kind of organ- 4
isation all women should P’'@
want to be a part of to help
them reach their goals in
life,” she said.

“The main thing we
request of members is to
exercise integrity in their
lives, possess a commitment
to support other women, and
to patronise other women in
business,” said Ms Hall.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

BAKERY GENERAL MANAGER

Bakery Servives Linited, a commervial bakery, wishes ta acquire the services ofa
Genecal Manager, The secoesful candidate vill manage the Bakery aperation and will
be ata senior management kevcl.

Requirements:
Certfication from an sceedited cullearp/ baking intitution
A minimamel 5 years experience af.admilar senion lewel in dood and beverage
managenem
Proves leadenihip, minagement and motivational skills are ecential
Earellerd written aed oa! communication skills area fundamental requirement
A mieng culinary indinnry backgroand induding hatds-on matejerne it
eepenience |: eaemial
Rrvewmietize o cipe Seip ane defences oS are bs recived
Tika ye tool Marna cper Stet cl bes Tarvalin with HACCP Stam ecards, Their
implemestnion and mainicnane
Capability of waking any position within the balbery operation ard havea
knowledge of recpes, methedelegy and equipment eequined foreach prodect

Fresperesibal ities:

. Eraure quality products are baked te antomer ypectication

= Manage peoduct distribution and delivery coun te anaure mlable and direly deltas ry
« Manage beentery wel of raw & fn bhed products and thet rotation to minimise

alge

+ Create an iaqredient and finished peoduct teaceabil ty peeqrar

= (Liaise with the peschating department to ents unintemupted aired ection

+ Effet ieh) ahilie human recat, epelpee nd and material

= Dewelp and maistain & food safety peogran and train stait in safe toed handling and
See alien peactices in accoedande with HACCP itandards

» Dewehp and implement an equipment preventative maintenance progr

= Provide leadership of the balee ry stall thesagh training ard opaching

Acompebitive salary aed beneits package will be offered to the uacceisful candice,
Candidates may apply by e-mail to hamanrescuresérestauran ssn




The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North
end of North Bimini, Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on
over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for
anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the
most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd.
owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

o ws.
> ~

=



ALL SMILES at the opening of the computer laboratory and community centre.

Hope Centre opens



computer laboratory,
community centre

THE Hope Centre, under the leadership of
Pastor Carlos Reid and his team of directors,
opened its computer laboratory and community
centre.

The multi-purpose facility includes an
audio/video studio and game room, and will
allow students to socialise and complete home-
work while utilising the computer lab in a safe
Christian-oriented environment, the founders
of the centre said.

Users of the centre are encouraged to abide
by its core values which seek to foster respect,
trust, honesty, and service.

Attending the opening was Minister of Edu-
cation Carl Bethel, who applauded the direc-
tors of the Hope Centre for providing such a
holistic recreational facility where young peo-
ple can spend time after school.

Minister Bethel said that this was in keeping

with a future goal of the Ministry of Education
to foster the development of a universal system
of homework centres.

“This centre can be a refuge in a time of tur-
bulence, and a safe haven for the poor and
underprivileged,” he said.

Mr Bethel explained that the success that is
being realised by Pastor Reid and his team did
not happen overnight, but came incrementally
through focused determination, as a result of
hard work.

He said that one of the messages that he
would like to impart to students is that suc-
cess does not happen overnight, and cannot
be sustained through “quick fix” solutions.

In closing, Minister Bethel commended the
directors and organisers of the event, and
encouraged them to continue to provide posi-
tive alternatives for the youth.

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire qualified professional
individuals for the following positions:

SECURITY
DIRECTOR OF SECURITY
F&B MANAGER
RESTAURANT MANAGERS
IT MANAGER
ACTIVITIES MANAGER
GUEST SERVICES AGENTS
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL
We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive

compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants
should forward a copy of their resumé to the attention of

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

AND TRAINING
at CRolle@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.



56-year-old becomes first
woman to swim Atlantic

m@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

JENNIFER FIGGE pressed
her toes into the Caribbean
sand, exhilarated and exhaust-
ed as she touched land this week
for the first time in almost a
month, according to Associated
Press.

Reaching a beach in Trinidad,
she became the first woman on
record to swim across the
Atlantic Ocean — a dream she’d
had since the early 1960s, when a
stormy trans-Atlantic flight got
her thinking she could don a life
vest and swim the rest of the way
if needed.

The 56-year-old left the Cape
Verde Islands off Africa’s west-
ern coast on Jan. 12, battling
waves of up to 30 feet (9 meters)
and strong winds.

David Higdon, a friend of
Figge who kept in touch with
her via satellite phone, said she
had originally planned to swim
the Bahamas, but inclement
weather forced her to veer 1,000
miles (1,610 kms) off course to
Trinidad, where she arrived on

Feb. 5.
Figge plans to continue her
odyssey, swimming from

Trinidad to the British Virgin
Islands, where she expects to
arrive in late February. The crew
won’t compute the total distance
Figge swam until after she com-
pletes the journey, Higdon said.

Then it’s home to Aspen, Col-
orado — where she trained for
months in an outdoor pool amid
snowy blizzards — to reunite
with her Alaskan Malamute.

“My dog doesn’t know where
I am,” she told The Associated
Press on Saturday by phone.
“Tt’s time for me to get back
home to Hank.”

The dog swirled in her
thoughts, as did family and
friends, as Figge stroked through
the chilly Atlantic waters escort-
ed by a sailboat. She saw a pod
of pilot whales, several turtles,
dozens of dolphins, plenty of
Portuguese man-of-war — but
no sharks.

“I was never scared,” Figge
said. “Looking back, I wouldn’t
have it any other way. I can

always swim in a pool.”

Her journey comes a decade
after French swimmer Benoit
Lecomte made the first known
solo trans-Atlantic swim, cover-
ing nearly 4,000 miles (6,400
kilometers) from Massachusetts
to France in 73 days. No woman
on record has made the cross-
ing.

Figge woke most days around
7 a.m., eating pasta and baked
potatoes while she and the crew
assessed the weather. Her
longest stint in the water was
about eight hours, and her short-
est was 21 minutes. Crew mem-
bers would throw bottles of
energy drinks as she swam; if the
seas were too rough, divers
would deliver them in person.
At night she ate meat, fish and
peanut butter, replenishing the
estimated 8,000 calories she
burned a day.

Figge wore a red cap and wet
suit, with her only good-luck
charm underneath: an old, red
shirt to guard against chafing,
signed by friends, relatives and
her father, who recently died.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Antique Auto Club
proceeds to be
donated to children’s
home and school

PROCEEDS of this year’s
Antique Auto Club will be
donated to the Bilney Lane
Home for Children and the
Every Child Counts School in
Abaco.

The Antique Auto Club is
primarily a hobby club, but
also conducts some commu-
nity service projects to give
back to needy children in the
Bahamas.

Proceeds of the club’s
annual Antique Car Show,
which is currently in the plan-
ning stages for 2009, are
always donated to a charity
or organisation involving chil-
dren.

The proceeds of the club’s
2008 show were used to repair
and renovate the boys’ and
girls’ washrooms at the Bil-
ney Lane Home for Children.

The club recently elected a
new board of directors for
2009 who visited the Bilney
Home for Children to see the
improvements.

They noted that there is
room for more improvements
at the home.

Peter Armstrong and Mur-
ray Forde were returned as
president and secretary,
respectively, while Richard
Blake was elected vice-presi-
dent, Wayne Aranha was
named treasurer and Don
Aranha, Roland Ferguson
and Jim LaRoda were elected
as directors.

Members

The 2009 Antique Car
Show is now scheduled for
Saturday, March 14, at the
Arawak Cay Heritage Cen-
tre. In addition to its own club
members, the club is looking
for persons who own antique
(local definition is “at least
20 years old”) and special
interest vehicles to participate
in the show.

Entry fee is $3, for those
that want their vehicles
judged to compete for tro-
phies in the eight established

Odessa



categories. This year, some
new events are planned,
including a separate section
for “project vehicles” — vehi-
cles that are in restoration,
but not completed or for
which some restoration work
is being planned.

“Every year we hear peo-
ple say their car is not ready
yet or not good enough to
show,” said club secretary
Murray Forde, “so we decid-
ed to open it up a little, to
include these vehicles to show
what can be done and look
for a difference in next year’s
show. We expect that this will
add to the interest in the hob-
by.”

As in previous years, funds
are raised through corporate
donations that cover the cost
of trophies and through a
steak-out, tickets for which
are available from any club
member for only $10.

The Antique Auto Club of
the Bahamas was formed in
1987 by six men interested in
the hobby. Membership of
men and women is now close
to 50 persons.

) where fife ts still simple and people stiff carey
“ Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

)) Give Her A Lasting 'Gift This Valentine!!! ¢
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Forde, secretary.

work that has
been done to
one of the
bathrooms in
the Bilney
Lane Home for
Children and
points to the
light fixture,
the only thing
left to do (and
since done).

Jim LaRoda

i

Y 7
fen ee Ame

Try your hand for the
Ultimate February 14h
giveaway. as we launch

our 80th anniversary.

His and her Cartier
Trinty rings await you.

Ladies present any
2008 John Bull receipt,
fit the ring and be

entered to win

February 13th & 144th

John Bull

284 Bay St, 302-2800
Mall at Marathon, 393-4406







DON ARANHA, |.

past-president |g ot ali ’ i

of the Antique pi
Auto Club ANTIQUE AUTO CLUB of the Bahamas Board of Directors for 2009. (I-r) Wayne Aranha, treasurer; Richard
shows the Blake; vice-president; Don Aranha; Roland Feguson; Peter Armstrong, president; Jim LaRoda and Murray

MEMBERS OF THE
Antique Auto Club of
The Bahamas discuss
some possible
improvements that
could be made to the
front entrance of the
Bilney Lane Home for
Children.

Part proceeds of the
Club’s Antique Car
Show, scheduled for
March 14, 2009 will be
directed to this home;
l-r; Wayne Aranha,
Richard Blake, Murray
Forde, Peter Armstrong
and Don Aranha.



PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

ENTHRONEMENT OF NEW BISHOP OF ANGLICAN DIOCESE

THE THIRTEENTH Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and
The Turks and Caicos Islands, the Right Rev Laish Zane Boyd Sr.
was enthroned at Christ Church Cathedral yesterday.

Private Dueling Paradite laband
Invites application for the position of:

1. HOUSEHOLD MANAGER
2. HOUSEKEEPER

TO LIVE ON PREMISES

¢ Applicants MUST BE KNOWLEDGABLE IN
Food & Beverage good communications skills,
good supervisory skills

* Must be able to develop menu and prepare meals
for special functions.

¢ Should be fully experienced in domestic household
chores. Husband and wife team preferred. Three
years in a similar position would be an asset.

Applications should be email to:
cmajor@grp.sandals.com

tion Make$ Cent$
Nassau
rim Grouper

Honeymoon..:

EAT .AOAKeyer-re |

LIONFISH!
Season

Oo DAVID YURMAN 2009

December 1, 2008
To
Xclyate Martell)

Ei rN ree rate) DRA LOL
, ) iS) contact BREEF
aa)

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grouper to enjoy in the future!





THE TRIBUNE



ENTHRONEMENT OF NEW BISHOP OF ANGLICAN DIOCESE

LOCAL NEWS





FORMER BISHOP Drexel Gomez kisses the ring of the new Anglican
Bishop Laish Boyd.



THE GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur D Hanna (far right) pictured with the
Primer Minister Hubert Ingraham and his wife Delores Ingraham.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 13



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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

officers and three occupants were detained. A
woman from Marshall Road and two men from
Yellow Elder Gardens, all aged 24, were taken
into custody.

The shooting came just a day after Nassau
residents told The Tribune they are living in
fear of the capital becoming like the Wild West
after a high-speed chase ended in a dramatic
gunfight in Montagu at around 8pm on Thurs-
day.

Police had chased a white Lexus from Palm-
dale to East Bay Street where bullets were
fired at police and officers retaliated with a
round of ammunition in front of Montagu
ramp and the Royal Nassau Sailing Club.

Witnesses claim around two dozen shots
were fired in a 30-second gunfight which result-
ed in the arrest of two men, aged 20 and 26,
who are expected to appear in Magistrates
Court today.

Reports that a third person was injured in
the shooting and a female occupant of the
Lexus fled the scene remain unconfirmed by

CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse,

police.

Chief Supt Glenn Miller, in charge of the
Central Detective Unit, said: “It’s not becom-
ing like the Wild West where criminals are fir-
ing at police every day, almost certainly not.

“However, I would say there are sporadic
incidents where criminals are being confront-
ed by the police from time to time who open
fire. Bahamian criminals have been shooting at
police now for many years.

“There have been incidents where police
officers are fired at, injured and even killed by
criminals in Nassau, Grand Bahama, and even
the Family Islands, but it’s not an everyday
thing.”

When asked if gun crime is on the rise, Mr
Miller said the opposite is true. “Statistics this
year indicate crime has gone down,” he said.

“Homicides are down, armed robbery is
down and serious crimes are down. For the
most part, major crime against persons are
down compared to January last year.”

Nassau Branch

Private Banking

FROM page one

In accordance with Biblical
scripture they all grow dread-
locks and the two girls, Arian-
nah, 8, and Omega, 5, cover
their heads with a haircloth or
‘fawl’ and wear long skirts.

But Empress Wells and
Prophet Bain maintain they are
struggling to find a private
school willing to accept them as
they are.

Kingsway Academy in
Bernard Road, Bahamas Acad-
emy in Wulff Road and Mount
Carmel Preparatory School in
Palmdale Avenue are all Chris-
tian private schools which
accept children of other reli-
gious beliefs but do not allow
alterations of the dress code for
religious reasons.

St Andrew’s International
School in Yamacraw and Sum-
mit Academy in Thompson
Boulevard, which Ariannah cur-
rently attends, allow students
to wear religious dress.

Summit Academy principal
Gillian Wilson said: “We allow
it because it is a part of their

FROM page one

Rastafarians

religion. It is such a close-knit
community it’s really not a big
deal to the kids at all. And we
have had no problems with
those kids who wear religious
dress following the school
rules.”

But as the parents look for a
school for Omega, they say the
school fees are too high to send
her there.

And although government
schools allow religious dress as
the Constitution of the
Bahamas states all children
have a right to an education,
they are reluctant to send
Omega to a state school.

Prophet Bain said: “It is not
equal if one person can go to a
private school, another person
of the same ability should be
able to go.

“T don’t want them to go toa
government school, it’s not that
the education is so different, it’s
the violence in the school. And
there are better opportunities
at private school.”

Prophet Bain and Empress

Wells want the freedom to
choose a school they can afford
without compromising their reli-
gious beliefs, but discrimination
is tolerated in private schools,
which have the right to be selec-
tive, Director of Education
Lionel Sands said.

He added: “No child should
be discriminated against, and
certainly we have authority over
public schools because every
child is entitled to an education,
but we cannot tell private
schools who to take and who
not to take.

“We have some control in
that we offer financial grants to
the schools to help them in their
admissions but not that kind of
control.”

There are 162 public schools
in the Bahamas, and 91 private
schools, more than half of which
are attached to a church.

Empress Wells said: “If peo-
ple don’t see things the way we
see them they should still
respect it. It’s a good and posi-
tive thing. It’s about love and
unity and trying to make the
world what God wanted it to
be.”

is presently considering applications for a

Business Data Manager

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications:
¢ University Degree or equivalent

Experience:

* Sound international banking background with at least 5-7 years experience in
back-office securities operations

* Strong understanding of Private Banking Business and the Financial Sector

* Working knowledge and experience with Globus Application is advantageous

* Working knowledge and experience with MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint and
Bloomberg applications

Personal Qualities:
Confident with strong leadership skills

As of the beginning of this year Bahamasair
has increased its freight fees. For The Tribune
from a flat monthly rate, the rate has been
increased by daily weight, which means that what
The Tribune paid Bahamasair for one month it
now pays for five days, which, if continued, would
bring the yearly freight bill to more than $200,000.

“We regret to have to make this decision after
serving the Family Islands from the days when
they were known as the Out Islands and the mail
boat was the only means of transport,” said Tri-
bune publisher Eileen Carron. “However, know-
ing that our Family Island readers could not pos-
sibly support such a subscription increase to cov-
er transportation, we have moved quickly to the
web to try to service them. They will still get the
news, although it will be a few hours later than
usual.”

Mrs Carron recalled the early days of The Tri-
bune — even before the days when ZNS took the
news to the Out Islands — of how The Tribune
kept the archipelago informed of what was hap-
pening in the capital. Those were the days when
Out Islanders could not even afford to buy The
Tribune, which in the early days was published

Tribune delivery

twice weekly and sold at a penny for a single
copy, two shillings for a three months subscrip-
tion, four shillings for six months and eight
shillings for one year.

To keep the people informed, The Tribune
sent a copy to each island’s central school, or to
the library wherever there was one.

“People from the settlement went to the school
or the library to read the paper,” she said. “For
those who could not read it was read to them. The
late Sir Etienne Dupuch was always astounded
whenever he visited one of the islands — partic-
ularly his House of Assembly constituency of
Inagua and Mayaguana — and residents would
quote him his Tribune editorials verbatim from
public platforms — and without a teleprompter.

“And so, it is with deep regret that The Tri-
bune has had to make this decision today. How-
ever, we shall now try to keep in close touch with
our loyal readers through the electronic media.”

And so at 2pm Wednesday please click onto
www.tribune242.com and keep in touch with your
daily newspaper, which is in fact the voice of
you, the people.

Strong numerical and analytical skills

Excellent organizational skills with attention to details and structured

approach to work
Strong written, oral, and interpersonal

skills

Work within a team environment with the ability to mentor team members
Enthusiastic team spirit with the ability to effectively collaborate across teams

and cultures

Highly motivated and committed to service excellence

Key Duti Ri nsibilities:

* Co-ordinate and manage the Static Data, Mail Administration and Cash and

Security Reconciliation Teams

Ensure adherence to the required daily processes by the teams to ensure the

integrity of the data maintained

Communicate and resolve any queries from internal and external clients

Ensure the update of process documentation changes arising due to changes
in procedures or additional responsibilities allocated to the teams

Achieve deliverables against agreed deadlines and manage the expectations

with clients.

Serve as an Operations subject matter expert for new requirements impacting

the units under management

Participate in User Acceptance Testing prior to project or product
implementation for developments impacting data management
Contribute to and participate in special project initiatives impacting the Bank

Benefits provided include:

* Competitive salary and performance bonus

* Pension Plan
* Health and Life Insurance

* Ongoing internal and external career development/training program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. ONLY PERSONS MEETING
THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

Or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

FEBRUARY 11TH, 2009

Harbour E&
Is cuttin:

SO°2

“the

EBHinatT FF Iss
avn itt



FROM page one

briefed and directed to treat the
believed immigrants with digni-
ty.
Although not on the island at
the time of the exercise, Mr
Thompson said all the believed
migrants would have been given
ample time to produce residen-
cy documents.

A Bahamian resident who
phoned The Tribune yesterday
said many of those taken by the
officers were not even allowed
to put on clothes, and were
escorted to an outdoor contain-
ment site, where temperatures
reached a low of 59 degrees.

Speaking anonymously, the
resident said: “Many of the peo-

Immigration exercise

ple who were taken were
women and children. Officers
took them to an outdoor tennis
court where some of them were
wearing only panties and bra.”
Residing on the island for
most of her life, the caller indi-
cated that people had been “cor-
ralled like cattle” before being
taken to the Sea-Wind vessel
for transport to Nassau.
Claiming that mostly women
and children had been placed
on the boat’s deck, the resident
said officers treated the immi-
grants as if they were less than
human, and indicated that sev-
eral residents had already com-

plained to immigration authori-
ties about the manner in which
the Haitians were handled.

Admitting there were a num-
ber of new immigrants to the
island, the resident said some
Haitian-born residents who
had lived on the island for more
than 20 years were bullied out of
their homes despite their
insistence on having legal stand-
ing.

With around 30 migrants
released shortly after their
apprehension, immigration offi-
cials say there remain more than
100 people still awaiting resi-
dency verification.

13th Bishop of the Diocese

FROM page one

regard.”

During his sermon, Rt Rev Boyd called for
Anglicans in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos and
the world over to rethink their approach and
behaviour to others, and to allow the true spirit of
Christianity to be represented in their daily lives.

Speaking to the existence of prejudices within
the local community, Mr Boyd reminded the con-
gregation to acknowledge God, and not to allow
differences to separate them from others.

“T therefore ask you the question, who do you
think ill of, who do you despise, by whom are

you repulsed?

“We have our groups that we like to talk about,
and you know just how we operate when we say:
these white people, these black people, these
Haitians, these homosexuals, and these church
people, we all have our groups we like to despise.

“This service is a reminder that we need to
present ourselves for service in every area of our
lives, in our two countries. We live in a time when
people find it too easy to despise, to discount,
and even to persecute others.”

Rt Rev Boyd urged the body to fashion them-
selves after Christ, in being kind-hearted and
continuously dedicated to goodwill and Chris-
tianity.

FROM page one

ations as part of a repayment
schedule and it is believed that
he has shut down for good.

In September, 2008, the own-
er is believed to have left the
island, leaving only a “skeleton
crew” of about four workers
employed to secure the prop-

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Bimini
erty and around 50 more with-
out work, according to MP for
West End and Bimini, Obie
Wilchcombe.

Workers were given $100 and
letters stating what they were
owed by the company and told
that this payment would be
forthcoming at a later date.
However, nothing has been
heard since then.

“They have apparently shut
down. The staff were not told
anything. They have not been
paid,” said the MP.

He added that, while still
working at the resort, staff were
reportedly not paid gratuities
owed since the “beginning of
(2008).”

Made aware of their concerns
at a meeting in the constituency
on Friday, Mr Wilchcombe said
that he is doing his bit to try to
get answers for his constituents
and former employees of the
club.

The MP is writing to the
Director of Investments, Joy
Jibrilu, so that she can make a
determination about exactly
what the status of the property
is.

“The question now is, what’s
going to happen next? The
employees are wondering
what’s going to happen to them
and to their future.” he said.

According to Mr Wilch-
combe, Mrs Jibrilu said that the
government was not informed -
as is the law - that there were
lay-offs at the club.

“The hotel owners have an
obligation.

“The government had no rea-
son to think everything was not
continuing as per normal, that
things were progressing,” said
Mr Wilchcombe.

The MP said he hopes to
report back to the constituents
on the matter “before the end
of the week.”

One local who spoke to The
Tribune yesterday said
Biminites have struggled to find
alternative sources of employ-
ment.

Mr Wilchcombe called the
public meeting at the Bimini All
Age School on Friday where he
again addressed some of the
issues he had spoken about at
an earlier town meeting in West
End last week.

His speech at that earlier
meeting touched on the state of
the country, the PLP and saw
him express gratitude for the
support of those who had stood
behind him during his deten-
tion by police for questioning
in connection with the alleged
extortion of Hollywood actor
John Travolta.

Mr Wilchcombe was subse-
quently released without
charge.



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS

Raymond A Bethel/BIS



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February 3, at the Monarch af 4

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9,

Ui
Vd

New Providence
Basketball
Association
continues regular
season action

BASKETBALL
NPBA UPDATE

THE New Providence
Basketball Association con-
tinued its regular season
action with games played on
Friday and Saturday nights.

Results of those games are
as follows:

¢ Saturday night

The Y-Care Wreckers
powered past the Coke
Explorers 111-107. Brandon
Ingraham scored a game
high 32 points for the win-
ners. Lamar Watkins had 25
in a losing effort.

And the Sunshine auto
Ruff Ryders blasted the fox-
ies Pros 116-102. Ernest
Saunders lid up the nets for a
game high 42. Henderson
Curry had 25 in the loss.

¢ Friday night

Police Crimestoppers def.
the Johnson Trucking
Jumpers 82-78. Freddie light-
bourne scored a game high
26 points in the win. Able
Joseph had 24 in the loss.

And the Electro Telecom
Cybots knocked off the
Southwest Printing Falcons
128-102. Delvonne Dun-
combe scored 32 points in
the win. Jude Rolle hada
game high 36 in the loss.

Tonight at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium, another double
header will take place. In the
7 pm opener, the Po.lice
Crimestoppers will take on
the Southwest Printing Fal-
cons. In the 8:30 pm opener,
the Commonwealth Bank
Giants will face the Y-Care’s
Wreckers.

BASKETBALL
BAISS
CHAMPIONSHIPS

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools will open its
best-of-three championship
series today at 4 pm at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

In the junior girls division,
the Westminster Diplomats
will take on Queen’s College
Comets; in the junior boys
division, the Kingsway Acad-
emy Saints will face SAC; in
the senior girls division, SAC
will play St. John’s Giants
and in the senior boys divi-
sion, Kingsway Academy
will meet Westminster.

¢ Game two in all series
will be played on Wednes-
day, starting at 4 pm at
Kendal Isaacs.

SOFTBALL
NATIONAL TEAM
PRACTICE

THE Bahamas Softball
Federation has announced
that its workout sessions for
the national teams will be
held every Monday and
Wednesday at 7 pm for the
men and Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 7 pm and Sat-
urdays at 8 am for the ladies
at the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex.

All selected coaches and
players must attend and be
on time.

National team director
Godfrey ‘Gully’ Burnside is
asking that all players and
coaches make an effort so
that the federation can select
the best team possible.

Family Island coaches are
asked to workout with their
selected Family Island play-
ers at the same time.

2009

INSIDE ¢ Premiership action

WOMEN’S TENNIS: Montreal, Canada

Fed Cup: Bahamas
relegated to Zone Il

Three-woman team loses 3-0 to Colombia
Nation demoted along with Puerto Rico

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HE Bahamas Fed

Cup team of Nikki-

ta Fountain,

Larikah Russell and
Kerrie Cartwright failed in its bid
to remain in Zone One of the Fed
Cup by BNP Paribas.

On Saturday in Montreal,
Canada, the Bahamas lost 3-0 to
Colombia and was joined by
Puerto Rico as the two teams
from the six-team draw that got
relegated to Zone II for 2010.

“Tt wasn’t what we had expect-
ed,” said team captain Sean
Cartwright on his return home
yesterday with Nikkita Fountain.

Cartwright said originally they
were told that the two teams with
the losing records would play
each other. Instead, the Bahamas
and Puerto Rico ended up play-
ing Colombia and Brazil, who
both won a match apiece.

Brazil and Colombia both
pulled off 3-0 victories to remain
in Zone One for next year.

Meanwhile Canada stayed
undefeated by wiping out
Paraguay 3-0 as well to advance
to the playoffs for a shot at the
World Group I playoffs in April.
Paraguay will also remain in zone
One by virtue of their loss.

“Every team we played were
tough,” said Cartwright of the

in her spot against Canada and
Colombia.

matches against Colombia, but



TEAM EFFORT: Pictured, left to right, are: Nikkita Fountain, Kerrie Cartwright and Larikah Russell.

tournaments.

ico and Brazil to play a couple of



NIKKITA Fountain in action.

ing her right shoulder against

Bahamas’ 2-1 loss to Puerto Rico
and 3-0 shutout to Canada in their
round robin play in Group A.
“We didn’t have much of a
chance against them.”

While Russell went out with a
shoulder injury after the first
match against Puerto Rico, Foun-
tain played through her shoulder
injury that she sustained against
Canada.

With Russell on the sideline,
Cartwright stepped in and played

In the relegation playoff against
Colombia, Cartwright lost 6-3, 6-
2 against Viky Nunez-Fuentes
and Fountain dropped a 6-2, 6-1
decision to Mariana Duqiue-
Marino. Russell, did however,
come back and finished up with
fountain in the doubles, but they
lost 2-1 to the team of Nunez-
Fuentes and Yuliana Lizarazo.

Cartwright said they had a
chance to win at least one of the

the toll of not playing sufficient
matches at that calibre played a
factor in the outcome.

Kerrie Cartwright, who actu-
ally had the best chance to pulling
off a win, said she wasn’t quite
prepared to play because she had
expected Russell to be ready to
go. “After she was unable to play,
I got a chance to play,” said
Cartwright from Tampa, Florida
where she went to spend a week
training before she head to Mex-

“T was happy that I got a
chance to play because it was
quite a learning experience. I
think if I had a little more expo-
sure to this level, I would have
been able to pull off the win.”

Despite the loss, Cartwright
said she still felt she played a
good game and she was just glad
that she got a chance to team up
with Fountain in doubles on Fri-
day against Canada. After injury-

Canada, Fountain said she wasn’t
at full strength against Colombia
and it showed in her perfor-
mance.

“T wasn’t able to go out there
and do what I wanted to do,” said
Fountain, who returned home to
do her rehab. “I didn’t play bad-
ly. It’s just that nothing that I
wanted to do worked in my
favour.”

SEE page 18

Striders come away with another victory

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

| HE Striders came away with

another victory as they dominated
the Star Trackers/Baker’s Construction
Track Classic on Saturday.

The one-day meet at the Thomas A.
Robinson saw a number of teams from
New Providence, Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands competed as athletes made
their bid to qualify for the Carifta Games.

While there were no qualifiers, Star
Trackers’ head coach David Charlton said
they were quite impressed with the level of
performance turned in.

“T thought it was very successful. The
competition was very keen and the offici-
ating was on spot,” Charlton stressed. “All
of our volunteers came out in full force
and the combination of all of the above
made the event a success.”

Thanking the Bahamas Association of
Certified Officials (BACO) and the Star
Trackers’ volunteers, including Alpha Kap-
pa, Beta Phi Beta and Alpha Phi Alpha,
Charlton said they were able to complete
the meet two hours ahead of time and
there wasn’t any hitches.

“The competition was very keen and we
saw a lot of new faces, which is very good
for track and field,” he stated. “A lot of our
old faces did as expected, but it’s still ear-
ly in the season.

“But by the end of February going into
March when we have the National High
School Championships and the Carifta tri-
als, I expect that a lot of the athletes will
start peaking.”

Although at the T-Bird Flyers Track
Classic a week ago, coach Stephen Murray
said he doesn’t expect his Striders to start
peaking just yet, they came back with
another great performance over the week-
end. The Striders collected a total of 688
points to out-distance their nearest rivals,
Golden Eagles, who picked up second
place with 461. Host Star Trackers had to
settle for third with 349.50.

(Look at the scoreboard for the com-
plete results).

Even though there were no Carifta qual-
ifiers, there were still a number of out-
standing performances turned in.

Athletes posting the most points in their





PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

GOLDEN EAGLES’ Jasmine Sutherland crosses the line for the win in the 100 metres.

PAGES 16 and 17: Results and more photos

respective divisions were as follows:

¢ Marissa Capron of Striders with 20 in
the girls under-7 after she won the under-
7 girls 50 metres in 9.87 seconds and the
100 in 18.73.

¢ Edwin Riley of the Spirit of Excel-
lence in the under-7 boys, winning the 50 in
10.72 and the 100 in 21.41,

¢ Deante Wright of the Striders in the
girls under-9, winning the 100 in 16.31 and
finishing second in the 200 in 33.89 behind

team-mate Gem Wilson in 32.91.

e Zion Bannister of the Sunblazers with
16 points after he placed second in both the
under-9 100 in 16.24 and the 200 in 34.07
behind Star Trackers’ Juwan Willie (16.15
in 100) and Bahamas Speed Dynamics’
Shaun Miller (34.02) respectively.

¢ Daejah Moss of the Striders in the girls
under-11 with 20 points, winner of both
the 200 in 30.46 and the 400 in 1:13.93.

¢ Christopher Johnson of the Striders

in the under-11 boys with 18 as the winner
of the 100 in 14.52 and runner-up in the 200
in 29.66 behind Road runners’ Branson
Rolle in 29.34.

¢ Jasmine Sutherland of the Golden
Eagles in the under-13 girls with 28 points
after winning the 200 in 27.59 and the 400
in 1:06.79, while finishing second in the
long jump with a leap of 3.86 metres behind
Striders’ Ieisha Taylor (3.88).

¢ Darius Major of the Sunblazers in the
under-13 boys with 19. He was third in the
200 in 27.99 behind Spirit of Excellence’s
brothers winning combo of Scharann Cash
(26.50) and Shalom Cash (26.70) and sec-
ond in the long jump with 3.79 metres
behind Striders’ Anthony Rolle (4.09).

¢ Danielle Gibson of the Ambassadors
in the under-15 girls with 22 points. She
was second in the 200 in 26.58, won by
Bahamas Speed Dynamics’ Pedrya Sey-
mour (25.97), but Gibson took the high
jump with 1.50.

¢ Delano Davis of the Golden Eagles
in the under-15 boys with 23 points. Davis
sped to victory in the 100 in 11.44, but had
to settle for second in the high jump with
1.58 metres. The winner was Road Run-
ners’ Xavier Coakley with 1.65.

¢ Raquel Williams of the RC Athletics
doubled up in the under-17 girls shot put
(11.73 metres) and discus (34.84) to amass
a total of 20 points.

¢ Stephen Munroe of the Star Trackers
posted a sprint double in the under-17 boys
with his victory in the 100 (10.79) and the
200 (22.14), but he was joined by Star
Trackers’ Patrick Bodie with 20 points
apiece. Bodie took the 100 hurdles (14.00)
and 400 hurdles (56.53).

¢ Katarina Smith of the Golden Eagles
shared the female open division with 20
points after she doubled in the 200 (24.69)
and the 400 (57.42), along with College of
the Bahamas’ Julianna Duncombe, the
winner of the shot put (11.22 metres) and
discus (38.42).

Her team-mate Carlene Johnson
emerged as the century winner in 12.15.

¢ Saron Cox finished with 20 points in
the open men’s shot put (11.52 metres)
and discus (34.68).

The men’s straight away was won by
Ambassador’s Marcus Thompson in 10.64,
while Alfred higgs of the Kenyan Knights
took the 200 in 21.86 and Ambassador’s
Brandon Miller claimed the 400 in 49.87.



PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





SPORTS

RESULTS: STAR TRACKERS /BAKER’S CONSTRUCTION TRACK CLASSIC

THE results of the Star
Trackers/Baker’s Constuction Track
Classic held on Saturday at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track and field
Stadium are posted below:

Girls 50 Meter Dash UNDER 7 Finals
- 1, Capron, Marissa, Striders, 9.78,
w:NWI. 2, Lightbourne, Aisha, Club
Monica, 10.28, w:NWI. 3, Miller,
Shaunece, Bahamas Speed DY,
10.41, w:NWI.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 7 - 1,
Capron, Marissa, Striders, 18.73,
w:2.7. 2, Lightbourne, Aisha, Club
Monica, 20.60, w:1.2. 3, Mortimer,
Madison, Striders, 20.74, w:2.7.
Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Wright, Deante, Striders, 16.31,
w:NWI. 2, Lightbourne, Tyler, Strid-
ers, 16.82, w:2.1. 3, Baptiste,
Karolyn, Striders, 17.57, w:2.1.
Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Wilson, Gem, Striders, 32.91, w:NWI.
2, Wright, Deante, Striders, 33.89,
w:NWI. 3, Lightbourne, Tyler, Strid-
ers, 35.23, w:5.9.

Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 9 -
1, Striders ‘A’ 1:12.20. 2, Striders
'B' 1:18

18.12.
Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Catalyn, Blayre, Sunblazers, 13.78,
w:4.8. 2, Fountain, Britini, Striders,
14.81, w:3.4. 3, Newry, Tanae, Strid-
ers, 14.96, w:4.8.
Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Moss, Daejah, Striders, 30.46, w-6.1.
2, Fountain, Britini, Striders, 30.56,
w:6.1. 3, Newry, Tanae, Striders,
31.24, w:4.9.
Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 11 - 1,
Moss, Daejah, Striders, 1:13.93. 2,
Shaw, Danielle, Club Monica, 1:15.89,
3, Collie, Kristia, Alliance Athleti,
1:19.13.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 11
- 1, Striders ‘A’ 1:01.18. 2, Sunblaz-
ers ‘A’ 1:05.34. 3, Club Monica ‘A’

1:06.49.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Henderson, Janiece, Spirit OF Excell,
13.59, w:3.8. 2, Miller, Destini, Gold-
en Eagles, 13.69, w:4.6. 3, Fergu-
son, Andira, Striders, 13.92, w:3.8.
Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles,
27.59, w:4.6. 2, Henderson, Janiece,
Spirit OF Excell, 27.97, w:4.6. 3, Tay-
lor, leisha, Striders, 28.14, w:5.6.
Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 13 - 1,
Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles,
1:06.79. 2, Ambrose, Jenae, Club
Monica, 1:07.72. 3, Taylor, leisha,
Striders, 1:08.28.

Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Striders 'A' 58.08. 2, Golden
Eagles 'A' 58.81. 3, Striders 'B'
1:00.83

Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Striders ‘A’ 4:39.95.

Girls Long Jump UNDER 13 - 1, Tay-
lor, leisha, Striders, 3.88m, w:NWI. 2,
Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles,
3.86m, w:NWI. 3, Ambrose, Jenae,
Club Monica, 3.66m, w:NWI.

STRIDERS’ Talia Thompson tries to clear the bar.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 15 - 1,
Hield, Khadejah, Golden Eagles,
12.74, w:3.6. 2, White, Makeya, Club
Monica, 12.84, w:3.6. 3, Cox,
Carmiesha, Star Trackers, 12.94,
w:4.0.

Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 15 -
(w: 5.7) 1, Seymour, Pedrya,
Bahamas Speed DY, 25.97. 2, Gib-
son, Danielle, Ambassadors, 26.58. 3,
White, Makeya, Club Monica, 26.60.
Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 1,
Seymour, Pedrya, Bahamas Speed
DY, 1:02.35. 2, Thompson, Talia,
Striders, 1:03.77. 3, Walker, Vanillian,
Striders, 1:04.79.

Girls 800 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 1,
Rolle, Hollie, T Bird Flyers, 2:39.04. 2,
David, Johnique, Striders, 2:41.39.
3, Williams, Spring, T Bird Flyers,
2:41.79

Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 15
- 1, Sunblazers 'A' 53.24. 2, Spirit
OF Excellence ‘A’ 53.78. 3, Club Mon-
ica 'A' 53.93.

Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 15

- 1, Striders ‘A’ 4:33.25. 2, Golden
Eagles 'A' 4:52.47. 3, Road Runners
‘A’ 4:56.35.

Girls High Jump UNDER 15 - 1, Gib-
son, Danielle, Ambassadors, 1.50m.
2, Thompson, Talia, Striders, 1.44m.
3, Strachan, Andriel, Star Trackers,
1.39m.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Miller, Shaunae, Club Monica, 12.16,
w:3.3. 2, Strachan, Anthonique, Silver
Lightning, 12.26, w:3.8. 3, MACK-
EY, Sara, Road Runners, 12.45,
w:3.8.

Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Strachan, Anthonique, Silver Light-
ning, 24.96, w:2.3. 2, Johnson,
Likeira, Golden Eagles, 26.68, w:3.6.
3, Thompson, Courtney, Club Moni-
ca, 27.18, w:3.6.

Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Adderley, Teshon, T Bird Flyers,
1:00.16. 2, Farrington, Bianca, Ney-
mour Athletic, 1:01.37. 3, Johnson,
Likeira, Golden Eagles, 1:03.26.
Girls 800 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,



Cherilus, Angela, Silver Lightning,
2:50.97. 2, Farrington, Bianca, Ney-
mour Athletic, 3:04.42.

Girls 1500 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Heinel, Alice, Striders, 5:37.86. 2,
Hield, Jane, Golden Eagles, 5:40.43.
3, Cherilus, Angela, Silver Lightning,
6:03.79.

Girls 100 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- (w: 3.2) 1, Cartwright, Devinn, Star
Trackers, 15.05.

Girls 300 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- 1, Rolle, Kryshell, Striders, 1:01.47.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 17 -
1, Road Runners 'A’ 51.55. 2, Gold-
en Eagles ‘A’ 52.30. 3, Silver Light-
ning 'A' 53.70.

Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 17
- 1, Road Runners 'A' 4:30.49. 2,
Golden Eagles 'A' 4:45.95.

Girls High Jump UNDER 17 - 1, Fer-
guson, Khadajah, Striders, 1.42m.
Girls Long Jump UNDER 17 - 1,
Barr, Regina, Andros North & C,
5.13m, w:NWI. 2, Ferguson, Khada-
jah, Striders, 4.92m, w:NWI. 3, Moss,

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Girls Shot Put UNDER 17 - 1,
Williams, Raquel, R. C. Athletics,
11.73m. 2, Hamilton, Cymone, Star
Trackers, 7.88m. 3, MACKEY,
Latisha, Zion Christian $, 7.43m.
Girls Discus Throw UNDER 17 - 1,
Williams, Raquel, R. C. Athletics,
34.84m. 2, Hamilton, Cymone, Star
Trackers, 22.41m. 3, Smith, Amanda,
Bahamas Speed DY, 16.12m.
Women 100 Meter Dash OPEN - 1,
Johnson, Carlene, Golden Eagles,
12.15, w:4.6. 2, Morley, Domonique,
Bahamas Speed DY, 12.34, w:4.6.
3, McDonald, Arthurnique, Ambas-
sadors, 12.44, w:4.6.

Women 200 Meter Dash OPEN - 1,
Smith, Katarina, Golden Eagles,
24.69, w:3.2. 2, Robinson, V'Alonee,
Club Monica, 24.74, w:3.7. 3, Sey-
mour, Katrina, Ambassadors, 25.01,
w:3.2.

Women 400 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Smith, Katarina, Golden Eagles,



57.24. 2, Burnside, Deshana,
Bahamas Speed DY, 57.52. 3, Sey-
mour, Katrina, Ambassadors, 58.51.
Women 800 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Burnside, Deshana, Bahamas Speed
DY, 2:27.53. 2, Johnson, Ashley, Star
Trackers, 2:29.03. 3, Sands, Desirae,
Bahamas Speed DY, 2:32.61.
Women 1500 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Rolle, Hughnique, T Bird Flyers,
5:10.78. 2, Sands, Desirae, Bahamas
Speed DY, 5:32.04. 3, Swann, Mikala,
Golden Eagles, 5:41.56.

Women 100 Meter Hurdles OPEN -
(w: NWI) 1, Kemp, lvanique, Club
Monica, 14.84. 2, Charlton, Lauren,
Star Trackers, 16.13. 3, Robinson,
V'Alonee, Club Monica, 17.05.
Women 4x100 Meter Relay OPEN -
1, Club Monica 'A' 49.09. 2, Star
Trackers 'A' 49.83. 3, Golden Eagles
‘A’ 50.58

Women 4x400 Meter Relay OPEN -
1, Bahamas Speed Dynamics 'A'
4:07.66. 2, Star Trackers 'A' 4:16.74.
3, Golden Eagles ‘A’ 4:18.51.
Women High Jump OPEN - 1, Cul-
mer, Kenya, Striders, 1.65m.
Women Shot Put OPEN - 1, Dun-
canson, Julianna, College OF Baham,
11.22m. 2, Dennard, Danielle, Col-
lege OF Baham, 8.26m. 3, Cox,
Sharell, Striders, 8.06m.

Women Discus Throw OPEN - 1,
Duncanson, Julianna, College OF
Baham, 38.42m. 2, Dennard,
Danielle, College OF Baham, 22.47m.
Boys 50 Meter Dash UNDER 7 - (w:
NWI) 1, Riley, Edwin, Spirit OF Excell,
10.72. 2, Wilson, Joshua, Striders,
10.83. 3, Wright, Tevin, Striders,
10.97.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 7 -
(w: 3.2) 1, Riley, Edwin, Spirit OF
Excell, 21.41. 2, Wright, Tevin, Strid-
ers, 21.49. 3, McPhee, Jonathan,
Striders, 22.14.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Willie, Juwan, Star Trackers, 16.15,
w:2.0. 2, Bannister, Zion, Sunblaz-
ers, 16.24, w:3.2. 3, Butler, Jerry
Christopher, Sunblazers, 16.51,
w:2.0.

Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Miller, Shaun, Bahamas Speed DY,
34.02, w:5.4. 2, Bannister, Zion, Sun-
blazers, 34.07, w:4.5. 3, Major, Cruz,
Sunblazers, 34.42, w:5.4.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 9 -
1, Sunblazers 'B' 1:12.45. 2, Sun-
blazers ‘A’ 1:16.19.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Johnson, Christopher, Striders,
14.52, w:3.1. 2, Gardiner, Vincent,
Striders, 14.60, w:4.1. 3, Pratt,
Daniel, N. G. M. Major H, 14.63,

w:3.9.

Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Rolle, Branson, Road Runners, 29.34,
w:6.0. 2, Johnson, Christopher, Strid-
ers, 29.66, w:4.7. 3, Newbold, Zhivar-
go, Striders, 29.94, w:6.0.

SEE page 17

$103.00



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS



RESULTS: STAR TRACKERS /BAKER’S CONSTRUCTION TRACK CLASSIC



FROM page 16

Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 11 - 1,
Newbold, Zhivargo, Striders, 1:11.62.
2, Knowles, Cameron, Ambassadors,
1:13.21. 3, Coakley, Katraz, Road
Runners, 1:14.62.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 11
- 1, Road Runners ‘A’ 1:00.12. 2,
Striders ‘A’ 1:00.31. 3, Striders ‘B’
1:02.68.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Cash, Shalom, Spirit OF Excell, 12.81,
w:4.7. 2, Cash, Scharann, Spirit OF
Excell, 12.88, w:4.5. 3, Nixon,
Recarno, Road Runners, 13.32,

w:i4.5.

Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Cash, Scharann, Spirit OF Excell,
26.50, w:5.6. 2, Cash, Shalom, Spir-
it OF Excell, 26.70, w:3.8. 3, Major,
Darius, Sunblazers, 27.99, w:5.6.
Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 13 - 4,
Sweeting, Kenneth, Club Monica,
1:09.05. 2, Simmons, Kyle, H.O.
Nash, 1:09.49. 3, Wilkinson, Jordan,
Spirit OF Excell, 1:12.65.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 55.03. 2,
Road Runners 'A' 57.95. 3, Striders
‘A’ 58.85.

Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 4:41.81.
2, Road Runners ‘A’ 5:10.18.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 13 - 1,
Rolle, Anthony, Striders, 4.09m,
w:NWI. 2, Major, Darius, Sunblaz-
ers, 3.79m, w:NWI. 3, Bowe, Tyler,
Golden Eagles, 3.77m, w:NWI.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 15 - 1,
Davis, Delano, Golden Eagles, 11.44,
w:5.1. 2, Major, Clarence, Nassau
Christian, 12.11, w:NWI. 3, Martin,
Shanton, Ambassadors, 12.32, w:3.0.
Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 15 - 1,
Rahming, Gerrio, Spirit OF Excell,
24.42, w:4.8. 2, Carey, Tre, Striders,
24.99, w:5.1. 3, King, Shaquille, Sil-
ver Lightning, 25.04, w:4.5.

Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 4,
Riley, Ashley, Spirit OF Excell, 57.73.
2, Charlton, Demetri, Spirit OF Excell,
58.02. 3, Deal, Mario, Golden Eagles,

58.58.

Boys 800 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 4,
Higgins, Nakita, Star Trackers,
2:20.06. 2, Deal, Mario, Golden
Eagles, 2:20.75. 3, Wilson, Thomas,
Striders, 2:34.03.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 15
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 49.55. 2,
Star Trackers ‘A’ 49.70. 3, Zion Chris-
tian School 'A' 51.33.

Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 15
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 3:58.97.
2, Star Trackers ‘A’ 4:13.27. 3, Strid-
ers ‘A’ 4:17.74.

Boys High Jump UNDER 15 - 1,
Caokley, Xavier, Road Runners,
1.65m. 2, Davis, Delano, Golden
Eagles, 1.58m. 3, Anderson, Calvin,
Golden Eagles, 1.52m.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Munroe, Stephen, Star Trackers,
10.79, w:3.5. 2, Carter, Harold, Spir-

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it OF Excell, 10.83, w:3.2. 3, Rolle,
Javon, Road Runners, 11.14, w:5.3.
Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Munroe, Stephen, Star Trackers,
22.14, w:3.4. 2, Carter, Harold, Spir-
it OF Excell, 22.35, w:4.9. 3, Rolle,
Javon, Road Runners, 22.63, w:3.4.
Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Cooper, Julino, Kenyan Knights,
52.81. 2, Lockhart, Michael, Kenyan
Knights, 54.21. 3, Archer, Nicholas,
Star Trackers, 54.31.

Boys 800 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Wallace, Ashton, Golden Eagles,
2:08.10. 2, Hall, Tevin, T Bird Flyers,
2:09.10. 3, Rahming, Earl, Alliance
Athleti, 2:10.11.

Boys 1500 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Cargill, Duane, Star Trackers, 4:42.26.
2, Lafleur, Lopez, T Bird Flyers,
4:44.84. 3, Minns, Marvin, Alliance
Athleti, 4:48.21.

Boys 100 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- (w: 3.2) 1, Bodie, Patrick, Star
Trackers, 14.00. 2, Minns, Lathario,
Jumpers Inc., 14.46. 3, Minns, Lath-
one, Jumpers Inc., 14.81.

Boys 400 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- 1, Bodie, Patrick, Star Trackers,
56.53. 2, Hepburn, Stephan, Club
Monica, 1:02.53.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 17
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 45.39. 2,
Golden Eagles 'A' 46.04. 3, Silver
Lightning 'A' 46.19.

Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 17
- 1, Star Trackers 'A' 3:35.11. 2, Star
Trackers 'B' 3:40.90. 3, Alliance Ath-
letics 'A' 3:44.97.

Boys High Jump UNDER 17 - 1, Hin-
sey, Jaran, R. C. Athletics, 1.85m.
2, Munroe, Julian, Golden Eagles,
1.67m.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 17 - 1,
Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc.,
6.45m, w:NWI. 2, McDonald, Jerome,
Jumpers Inc., 6.23m, w:NWI. 3,
Newbold, Stephen, Star Trackers,
6.05m, w:NWI.

Boys Shot Put UNDER 17 - 1, Not-
tage, Deangelo, R. C. Athletics,
12.88m. 2, Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau
Christian, 10.95m. 3, Rolle, Matthew,
Government High, 10.20m.

Boys Discus Throw UNDER 17 - 1,
Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau Christian,
26.14m. 2, Wilson, Albert, Nassau
Christian, 25.48m. 3, Whyms,
Michael, Nassau Christian, 24.16m.
Boys Javelin Throw UNDER 17 - 1,
Ferguson, Byron, T Bird Flyers,
47.97m. 2, Nottage, Deangelo, R. C.
Athletics, 38.55m. 3, Darling, Sam-
my, Silver Lightning, 30.88m.

Boys Shot Put UNDER 20 - 1, Carey,
Elvardo, R. C. Athletics, 13.25m. 2,
Turnquest, Tobias, N. G. M. Major
H, 11.53m. 3, Rolle, Harrington,
Andros North & C, 11.49m.

Men 100 Meter Dash OPEN - 1,
Thompson, Marcus, Ambassadors,
10.64, w:3.1. 2, MACKEY, Trevor,
Star Trackers, 10.77, w:3.8. 3,
McPhee, Kaadem, Golden Eagles,
10.89, w:3.5.



NCA’S Wilton Johnson wins the under-15 boys’ 400 NSH

Men 200 Meter Dash OPEN - 1, Hig-
gs, Alfred, Kenyan Knights, 21.86,
w:3.2. 2, MACKEY, Trevor, Star
Trackers, 22.00, w:4.1. 3, McPhee,
Kaadem, Golden Eagles, 22.22, w:3.4.
Men 400 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Miller, Brandon, Ambassadors,
49.87. 2, Russell, Alonzo, Golden
Eagles, 50.59. 3, Porter, Eric, Golden
Eagles, 50.89.

Men 800 Meter Run OPEN - 1, New-
bold, Laquardo, T Bird Flyers,
1:57.92. 2, Williams, Jason, Alliance
Athleti, 1:59.66. 3, Wallace-Whitfield,
Kenneth, Star Trackers, 2:01.06.
Men 1500 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Williams, Jason, Alliance Athleti,
4:15.69. 2, Carey, James Audley, Star
Trackers, 4:18.71. 3, Kingsley,
Cajudte, Golden Eagles, 4:34.85.
Men 110 Meter Hurdles OPEN - (w:
4.0) 1, Wilmore, Aaron, Ambas-
sadors, 14.87. 2, Williams, Jason,
Bahamas Speed DY, 14.97. 3, Pala-
cious, Douglas, Jumpers Inc., 15.79.
Men 400 Meter Hurdles OPEN - 1,
Burnside, Nejmi, Star Trackers,
55.38. 2, Cox, Rikeo, Kenyan Knights,
1:13.20

Men 4x100 Meter Relay OPEN - 1,
Golden Eagles 'A' 43.69. 2, Alliance
Athletics 'A' 43.97. 3, Spirit OF Excel-
lence 'A' 44.49.

Men 4x400 Meter Relay OPEN - 1,

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Golden Eagles ‘A’ 3:22.58. 2, Ambas-
sadors ‘A’ 3:24.77. 3, Alliance Ath-
letics 'A' 3:25.74.
Men High Jump OPEN - 1, Bullard,
Troi, Golden Eagles, 2.06m. 2, Mar-
tin, Shanrice, Zion Christian S,
a 3, Wilson, Wheatly, Striders,
7
Men Triple Jump OPEN - 1, Deveaux,
J'Vente, Star Trackers, 15.33m,
w:NWI. 2, Bullard, Troi, Golden
Eagles, 14.25m, w:NWI. 3, Palacious,
Douglas, Jumpers Inc., 13.74m,
w: NWI.
Men Shot Put OPEN - 1, Cox, Saron,
Striders, 11.52m. 2, Rox, Devon, Col-
lege OF Baham, 11.37m. 3, Light-
bourne, Benjamin, College OF Baham,
10.19m.
Men Discus Throw OPEN - 1, Cox,
Saron, Striders, 34.68m. 2, Miller
Sr., Shaun, Bahamas Speed DY,
32.54m. 3, Turnquest, Tobias, N. G.
M. Major H, 30.21m.
Men Javelin Throw OPEN - 1, Rox,
Devon, College OF Baham, 48.60m.
2, Carey, Elvardo, R. C. Athletics,
48.33m. 3, Saunders, Jevaughn, Col-
lege OF Baham, 46.73m.
Team Standings
1, Striders, 688; 2, Golden Eagles,
461; 3. Star Trackers, 349.50; 4. Spir-
it of Excellence, 307; 5. Road Run-
ners, 262.50; 6. Club Monica, 209; 7.

ae {|
ring rd
(Al Meiiay TUS

Sunblazers, 191; 8. Bahamas Speed
Dynamics, 148; 9. Amabassadors,
145; 10. Silver Lightning, 111; 12.
T-Bird, 97; 13. Collge of the
Bahamas, 96; 14. RC Athletics, 66;
15. Nassau Christian Academy, 63;
16. Zion Christian ASchool, 49; 17.
Kenyan Knights, 47; 18. Jumpers
Inc., 46; 19. LN Coakley, 33; 19.
Andros North & Central, 33; 19. Cen-
tral Eleuthera, 33; 22. HO Nash, 28:
23. Neymour Athletics, 21; 24. Gov-
ernment High, 17; 25. NGM Major
High, 15; 26. Abaco Central, 11; 27.
North Long Island High, 8.

Top three finishers in each divi-
sion:

Under-7 combined - Striders, 94;
Spirit of Excellence, 20; Club monica,
19

Under-9 combined - Striders, 92;
Sunblazers, 68; Star Trackers, 14.
Under-11 combined - Striders, 155;
Road Runners, 62; Sunblazers, 53.
Under-13 combined - Striders, 139;
Spirit of Excellence, 116; Golden
Eagles, 70.

Under-15 combined - Striders, 109;
Spirit of Excellence, 99; Golden
Eagles, 91.

Under-17 combined - Golden Eagles,
126; Star Trackers, 126; Silver Light-
ning, 84.

Open division combined - Golden
Eagles - 169; Star Trackers, 125; Col-
lege of the Bahamas, 96.

Female under 7 -Striders, 45; Club
oe 19; Bahamas Speed Dynam-
ic, 10.

Female under-9 - Striders, 91; Club
monica, 7.

Female under-11 - Striders, 83; Sun-
blazers, 35; Club monica, ot.
Female under- 13 - Striders, 105;
Golden Eagles - 60; Spirit of Excel-
lence, 21

Female under-15 - Striders, 68; Sun-
blazers, 37; Golden Eagles, 30.
Female under-17 - Golden Eagles -
72; Road Runners - 58; Silver Light-
ning, 46.

Female open - Golden Eagles, 68;
Bahamas Speed Dynamics, 65; Club
Monica, 53.

Male under-7 - Striders, 49: Spirit of
Excellence, 20.

Male under 9 - Sunblazers, Sun-
blazers, 68; Bahamas Speed Dynam-
ica, 14: Star Trackers, 14.

Male under-11 - Striders, 72; Road
runners, 48; Sunblazers, 18.

Male under-13 - Spirit of Excellence,
95; Road Runners, 59; Striders, 34.
Male under-15 - Spirit of Excellence,
83; Golden Eagles, 61; Star Track-
ers, 48.50.

Male under-17 - Star Trackers, 100;
Golden Eagles, 54; Nassau Christian
Academy, 44.

Male open - Golden Eagles, 101;
Star Trackers, 73: Ambassadors, 59.

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Full Text

PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R Gunshots lead to police chase C M Y K C M Y K V olume: 105 No.64MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER SUNNY AND WINDY HIGH 79F LOW 68F I N S I G H T S EEINSIGHTFRONTPAGE S P O R T S Power game now favours Perry Christie SEEPAGEFIFTEEN Bahamas relegated n By MEGAN REYNOLDS T ribune Staff Reporter m reynolds@tribunemedia.net GUNSHOTS were fired from a car in West Bay Street over the weekend leading to a police chase and the arrest of two mena nd a woman. T he incident, which happened in broad daylight, brought gun terror to thes treets of Nassau for the second time in three days, following a dramatic shootout in Montagul ast week which rocked the community. At least one gunshot was fired in West Bay Street at around 4pm on Saturday ando fficers from the Drug Enforce ment Unit (DEU western New Providence traced it to a gold Honda Accord. A s the occupants of the Accord tried to flee police by heading east, a high speed chasee nsued. An object thrown from the car was later discovered to be a .38mm handgun with four liver ounds of ammunition, police say. The car was stopped by police Three arrested after incident inbr oad da ylight The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 BAHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY T ry our Big Breakfast Sandwich I N S I D E SECTIONINSIDE Real Estate 13th Bishop of the Diocese is inducted n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Staff Reporter l allen@tribunemedia.com HUNDREDS of devout Anglicans g athered at Christ Church Cathedral y esterday when the Rt Rev Laish Zane Boyd was officially inducted as 13th Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas. L ocal clergymen were joined by various Bishops and Archbishops from throughout the region including Turksa nd Caicos, Barbados and South Flori da. The rare enthronement ceremony was last seen in the Bahamas in 1995. Filled with pomp and pageantry, the i nauguration of Rt Rev Boyd was initiated by performances by the Enthronement Choir, the Anglican Youth Ensemble, various musical selections, and was attended by state officials a nd dignitaries. Glenys Hanna-Martin, national chairman of the Progressive Liberal Party, issued a press statement welcomingR t Rev Boyd as the newest Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas. “The Anglican Church has played an important role in the spiritual development of our people and in our national development generally. “We are convinced that Bishop Boyd will bring his own vision imbued with the wisdom, passion and love required to meet the heavy challenges our country today faces. We pledge our full support to his work and his efforts in this SEE page 14 THE 13TH Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands, Bishop Laish Zane Boyd, is pictured during his enthronement ceremony. See story top right and more photos on pages 12 and 13. IN AUGURA TIONOFRTREVLAISHZANEBOYD F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f Hundreds of Anglicans attend the ceremony SEE page 14 n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net RASTAFARIAN parents claim certain private schools are unconstitutional by not allowing children to dress in religious attire because it does not comply with uniform regulations. Ursula Wells, 35, and her husband William James Bain, 45, of Mackey Street, Nassau, have been rastafarian for 16 and 25 years respectively and are raising their three children in the tra dition. Rastafarians claim certain private schools are ‘unconstitutional’ SEE page 14 THE TRIBUNE regrets to have to announce today that it will no longer be able to deliver this newspaper to its Family Island readers because of the increased cost of air transport. However, The Tribune is now online at www.tribune242.com and will be posted for readers by 2pm on the day of publica tion. Tuesday morning’s Tribune will be the last delivery by Bahamasair. Wednesday’s Tribune can be read on line from 2pm that day and for all following week days. This announcement will not affect the daily delivery of The Tribunes to Harbour Island on the Bohengy, nor will it affect the delivery by Western Air to Andros. However, it will affect readers in Freeport, Eleuthera, Abaco, Exuma, Crooked Island and Long Island. Increased air transport cost ends Tribune delivery to Family Islands SEE page 14 n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net WITNESSESto the recent immigrant apprehension exer cise on Eleuthera claim Haitian families were forced out of their homes in bitter cold weather and made to await transportation to the mainland in an outdoor containment site. One concerned resident told The Tribune that she witnessed some of those apprehended being forced to leave their homes “wearing only panties and a bra.” The exercise, carried out around 3am Wednesday, resulted in the round-up of close to 200 Haitians in various island settlements, including Governor’s Harbour, Palmetto Point and Harbour Island. However, Immigration Director Jack Thompson denied on Friday that any officers acted in an inappropriate way. “To my knowledge, the exer cise was carried out in a humane, sensitive and profes sional manner,” he said. Mr Thompson explained that prior to officers being dispatched to the island, they were Concern over alleged treatment of families in immigration exercise SEE page 14 n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net FIFTY Biminites have been left in the lurch to scramble for a source of income after one of the island’s main employers packed up and left without telling them whether he was coming back, according to locals. Power at the Big Game Resort and Marina in Alice Town, Bimini, was switched off by the Bahamas Electricity Corporation in the middle of last year after the owner allegedly failed to meet his oblig Major employer on Bimini ‘packs up and leaves’ SEE page 14 INA press statement, PLP chairman Glenys Hanna-Martin welcomed Rt Rev Boyd

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n By ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter NASSAU’S international a irport has been without its o wn ambulance for ten years, i t has emerged. Passengers involved in the recent crash landing of a flight from Andros said they had to wait on the grass for an ambulance to take the injured away for treatment. N ow airport employees are e xpressing concern about what would happen if a major c rash occurred. O ne said that, based on test t imes of ambulances coming from the city, emergency crews would not make it int ime to save lives. “From an operational point of view it is believed that the ambulances that are stationed in the city can make the response time within the required 15 minutes at the airp ort for a normal emergency, w hich we have proven could h appen, but for most of the time there is massive delay,”t he employee said. T he employee said from the late 1980s ambulances had to drive from the city to the airport to assist. “The airport is growing. With the airport being an i ndustrial environment, there is the need for at least the minimum for basic medical services,” the source added. M edical director for EMS, Dr Alvry Hanna, said they have recognised the need for a n ambulance at the airport. Requests “It was found at that time b efore the ambulance was removed that the call volume for requests for the ambulance w as low and they were needed m ore in the community areas. So that ambulance was pulled away from the airport. It usually takes 20 or morem inutes for the ambulance to arrive from in the city,” Dr Hanna said. H e said currently there is a s ickbay at the airport with only two nurses at a time. “We have two shifts at the sick bay with one nurse at at ime, between 8am to 3pm and 3pm to 10pm. Overnight, the crash and fire persons aret here after the nurse leaves,” Dr Hanna said. Chief Fire Officer for crash and fire rescue at the airport,S amuel Clarke, said the dist ance the ambulance has to travel from Princess Margaret H ospital is between 15 and 17 miles. Mr Clarke said despite not having an ambulance at this t ime, the airport is still in good standing with International Civil Aviation Organisation ( ICAO) standards. The ICAO recommends t hat once we reach a category eight and above at the airport,t here must be an ambulance p resent. We are at a category seven therefore it is not mandated at this time to have one stationed at the airport. “However, with all of the development going on at the airport, we are not too far a way from reaching category e ight status. They also require us to have a response time of n o more than 15 minutes w hich is still something that is being worked on,” Mr Clarke said. Dr Hanna said one initiat ive the EMS is working on is d ecentralising EMS througho ut the community. Downtown Instead of having all of the ambulances stationed downt own, we want to have them s pread out through the comm unities. We are looking at attaching our ambulances to the community clinics and wet hink this is the best scenario to work for us as they would be able to respond more quickly to issues in the comm unity,” he added. Dr Hanna said they are try ing to reinstate the ambulancea t the airport. We have to try and take it i n stages by looking at our resources, logistics ands taffing. Our plan is that we can cut down on response time as we have realised this is one of the main issues the community has. “We want to be able to respond more quickly to the p ublic,” Dr Hanna said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE 326,7,21$9$,/$%/()XOO7LPH(PHUJHQF\,&8XUVH 0XVWKDYHDWOHDVWWKUHH\HDUVH[SHULHQFHSRVW JUDGXDWLRQ +ROGHURIDFXUUHQW%/6t$&/6&HUWLFDWH0 XVWEHLQGHSHQGHQWUHVSRQVLEOHZLWKJRRG FRPPXQLFDWLRQVNLOOV $WWUDFWLYH&RPSHQVDWLRQDFNDJH 6HQG&9WRJLJLDLUDPEXODQFH#FRUDOZDYHFRPE\ ) HEUXDU\W K Airport without its own ambulance for ten years Employees express concern about what would happen if major crash occurred

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n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net M INISTER of Labour Dion Foulkes has pledged to investigate complaints by displaced Pizza Hut workers who say they are fuming at their former employer’s failure to pay severance money. T he ex-employees, who worked at the now closed Cable Beach location, are frustrated that nearly three months after the restaurant shut its doors without notice leaving about 30 jobless – no r edundancy payments have been made. They say they are ready to take legal action after lodginga complaint with the Department of Labour last November. Yesterday Mr Foulkes said while he did not know details o f the negotiations, he was aware that the Department of L abour was engaged in bringi ng about a settlement. "What I will do, now that i t's (the delay to my attention, is do an inves-t igation to see to what extent I c an assist in bringing about an immediate resolution to this p roblem," the minister said. M r Foulkes advised the agit ated group to file a trade dispute against Pizza Hut with t he Department of Labour to avoid a complicated and lengthy court battle. " The process is set up at the D epartment of Labour so that it makes it easier for aggrieved persons to file a dispute witho ut an attorney. It doesn't adhere to all of the provisions of the legal procedure and it's a very simple process. The whole idea is that a lot of people who are redundant or laid off, are not in a position to a fford a lawyer so the departm ent is set up with that in m ind," he said. According to one former employee who worked for the company since the late 1980s, on November 8 employeesw ere assembled for an emerg ency meeting where they were told the restaurant would be closed with immediate effect. During this meeting, a manager reportedly told the groupt hey would receive a final payment. The worker, who asked t o have her name withheld, s aid the workers made a claim w ith the Labour Board the next day. B ut despite months of wran gling, the employees some of whom are still jobless arel ooking for answers and compensation from their former employers. We need our money and nobody wants to pay us. I havea car payment and rent due,” s aid the employee. A nother employee who worked at both the Mackey Street and Cable Beach locations for 11 years before the stores shut their doors permanently said: "It's bad because y ou put in your loyal years and t his is how they treat you. T hey said the money was going to be ready for us by December 15. That has come and gone." With no current job and three children, the single m other said she has resorted t o asking family and friends f or money. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 3 3 pc Queen Post Bed 3 pc Queen Post Bed 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Dresser 1 pc Mirror 1 pc Mirror 2 pc Nightstands 2 pc Nightstands 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest 1 pc 5 Drawer Chest Queen 8 Pc Queen 8 Pc $3,950 $3,950 King 8 Pc Set King 8 Pc Set $4,150 $4,150Solid Wood Solid WoodT T h h e e T T h h e e J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y y J J a a v v a a G G a a l l l l e e r r y yWong’s Plaza Wong’s Plaza Madeira Street Madeira Street (242 (242 2335 2335Financing Available Through Commonwealth Bank I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I I r r i i s s h h C C o o u u n n t t r r y y s s i i d d e e I NDEX MAIN/SPORTS SECTION Local News............................P1,2,3,5,6,7,8,9 L ocal News......................P10,11,12,13,14,19 Editorial/Letters..........................................P4 Sports........................................P15,16,17,18 A dvt .........................................................P20 BUSINESS SECTION Business.............................P1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9 A dvt..........................................................P10 INSIGHT SECTION I nsight . ..................................................P1,2,5 A dvt......................................................P3,4,8 Comics........................................................P6W eather.......................................................P7 CLASSIFIED SECTION 40 PAGES REAL ESTATE GUIDE 24 PAGES U SA TODA Y MAIN SECTION 12 PAGES Ex-Pizza Hut staff claim employer has failed to pay severance money M INISTEROF LABOUR D ion Foulkes has said he will investigate the complaints. F REEPORT Javaughn D elancy was charged in F reeport Magistrate’s Court with making deatht hreats. I t is alleged that on February 5, the accused threatened to kill a 21year-old female resident of Pinder’s Point, putting her in fear of the life. Delancy pleaded not g uilty to the charge. The c ase was adjourned to March 23. B ecause Delancy was o ut on an outstanding b ench warrant on another matter, he was remandedto Her Majesty’s Prison. Man charged with making death threats In brief Javaughn Delancy n By NATARIO M cKENZIE A MANcharged in a 2007 traffic accident whichc laimed the life of a 36y ear-old Adelaide Village resident has been arraigned in a Magistrate’sC ourt. Kervens Forrestal, 27, of Cowpen Road, was a ccused of killing in the c ourse of dangerous driv ing. It is alleged that around 12.45am on Monday, Feb ruary 5, 2007, Forrestal drove a truck east on Adelaide Road in a manner dangerous to the public, causing the death of Dominic Redhead. Redhead was reportedly travelling west on Adelaide Road in a green Toy ota Avalon when the accident occurred. A Ford F150 truck and a Ford Ranger, both heading east, were also involved in the crash. Red head died at the scene while six others were detained in hospital. Forrestal, who appeared before Magistrate Renee McKay in Court 6, Parlia ment Street, was informed that the matter would proceed by way of a voluntary bill of indictment. He was granted $10,000 bail with one surety. The case has been adjourned to April 8, 2009. Man accused of killing in the course of danger ous driving

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EDITOR, The Tribune. IN December’s 22, 2008 Tribune publication, a young man claimed that legalising marijuana would be an answer to rescue our struggling economy; “the legalisation of this plant may seem preposterous to some, and downright stupid to most, but such a move would drastically change our tourism product.” He also made comparisons to Amsterdam: “You c annot find one single beach in or near Amsterdam that can compare to one of our worst beaches, so there must be something else that is drawing these tourism into their country.” He also went on and talked about the illegal production of alcohol and how it was continued until it finally became legalised; then he discussed marijuana seeds as sources of fuel due to its hemp oil, etc. His argument basically is that Amsterdam attracts millions of tourists because they have legalised the use of marijuana throughout the city. Amsterdam is the capital of The Netherlands; this city alone surpasses the entire population of the Bahamas with a stagger ing number of approximately 750,000 people. Amsterdam has: subways highlighting his toric images; canals that are used as means of transportation throughout parts of the city; an interesting architectural background; two major universities;a wide array of museums and entertainment centres. To be exact one of the museums in Amsterdam had over one mil lion visitors a few years back; these museums are filled with arts, crafts, paintings and rich historic documents; Amsterdam also has halls specifically designed for concerts, theatre, comedy and so forth. Amsterdam has roughly 100 or more f estivals per annum; this city is comprised of nearly 400 hotels with 40 per cent being four or five star hotels. Oh did I mention that “Amsterdam is thef inancial and business capital of the Netherlands”; it is classified as one of the best European cities for international business next to: London, Paris, Barcelona and Frankfurt. Amsterdam has its own world trade centre which is a part of the international world trade cen tres association; Amsterdam also has the oldest stock exchange in the world. Numerous Dutch banks and corporat ions such as: ABM AMRO, Heineken International, ING group and Philips have their headquarters in Amsterdam. KPMG International’s global headquarters is even near by. Seventy-five per cent of Ams terdam’s annual visitors are European, Americans only account for about 13 to 14 per cent of the visitor population each year. I can run on all day about other reasons why marijuana isn ot the main reason for tourist migration to Amsterdam such as the “Red Light District” which is a tourist attraction saturated with sex shops, peep shows and a enormous selection of prostitutes that can be singly picked through glass windows. Amsterdam is a tourist and financial destination whose tourist attractions stem beyond mediocre sightseeing tours andB ahamas paraphernalia that were probably made in China or Indonesia. If marijuana is legalised in the Bahamas, cocaine would surge our streets, because the fellows on the street won’t have their commodity, crime would shoot higher than our morality and the Bahamas would be compared to South Florida in the 1980’s. Who would be responsible for the distribution of the weed? You think those in t he pharmaceutical market want to be a part of that? You really think they want to tarnish their brands? Those addicted to this drug would probably target these pharmaceutical establishments to steal, etc. What would that do to policing? Worldwide police use drugs on the streets to catch drug dealers; in some cases they let certain drug deale rs parade the streets and do as they like as long as they snitch off their rivalries. To sum it up, Mr Dunn, the legalisation of marijuana would not be an economic stimulus for our stagnant economy or a means to attract tourists. P ersonally I have never used marijuana and personally I won’t use it, I have never had dope in my possession and I never intend to supply, but the legalisation of marijuana in the Bahamas is a ridiculous suggestion. Marijuana is not just a problem between the police and the drug boys; it is our problem (The Bahamas legalising it will have some dras tic ramifications. ELKIN SUTHERLAND Jr Nassau, February, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama Obama may learn from slips on stimulus WASHINGTON (AP Barack Obama made some rookie mistakes and s trategic missteps. But he still appears headed for a win on the centrepiece of his agenda, a huge economic recovery programme, with the fresh striking of a bipartisan deal in the Senate. Legislative leaders, including some fellow Democrats whos upport him, chalked up his problems to inexperience and some initial miscalculations over the lack of Republican support, and they suggest he'll l earn from the rocky start. Americans have learned, too, a little about how their new president w orks. He's swung from being conciliatory to bad g ering Congress to act, from courting the opposition to taking partisan swipes. He's had to fight tok eep from losing control of the message. And all this is playing out against a background of Cabinet p roblems, economic distress and global distractions. Some veteran Democrats say Obama could have made it easier for himself. "I think it is important that he reached out. But l esson learned: It would have been better for him to send up his idea of a bill," instead of havingH ouse Democratic leaders initiate the process, said Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Leaders of both parties agree the slumping U.S. economy requires strong stimulus, an argument reinforced by a government report showing soaring new job l osses. Obama will likely get most of what he wants. On the job under three weeks, he still hasa large reservoir of good will on Capitol Hill. But things haven't gone quite the way the new O bama team expected. It's been a rough two weeks of on-the-job training on the legislative process from the other end of Pennsylvania Avenue for the former one-term Illinois senator. Still, Obama aides claimed they were satisfied w ith the results, given the enormity of the challenge. "In a matter of weeks, we moved throughb oth houses of Congress a very complex piece of legislation," Obama senior adviser David Axelrod s aid Saturday in an interview. "I don't know if there is a parallel in history." While Obama reached out energetically to members of both parties, he didn't win a single Republican vote in the House. In the Senate, D emocrats late Friday reached a deal with a small band of Republican moderates that set the stage f or expected approval within the next few days. The recovery package was put together by con g ressional Democrats in partnership with Obama, a process begun during Obama's transition. The administration decided against starting off the process by submitting its own detailed legislative package. Even though Obama and top a ides stayed close to the process, the result was an $819 billion package packed with spending pro j ects, some of which struck even some fiscally conservative Democrats as not particularly stimu lative. In the Senate, an even larger package was considered, although the deal struck Friday n ight pared it back some. T he size and composition of the plan gave Republicans an opening to assert that Obama h ad given too much leeway to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and House Banking Committee C hairman Barney Frank. And they also could argue that, while Obama had offered to consider Republican suggestions for the package, none wound up in the legislation. In not sending his own legislation to Congress, Obama did the exact opposite of what President B ill Clinton did in 1993 when he tried to get Congress to swallow whole a detailed health care overhaul plan put together by a task force headed by his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. That take-itor-leave it approach alienated Congress. P ennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who has actively championed the stimulus bill, said Obama stumbled at first by ceding the debate to Capitol Hill a nd not stepping out more forcefully to explain the bill to the public. " A small percentage of this bill, the unnecessary spending, allowed Republicans who have p layed politics on this from the beginning to discredit it so public opinion is against it," Rendell,t he chairman of the National Governors Associ ation, said in an interview Friday. "We need a m assive stimulus bill with spending. Every economist says that. And yet the American people are against it now because we let the Republicans spin." Democratic Congressman James Clyburn said R epublican critics were able to define the legislation as a bloated spending measure being rushedt hrough Congress. He said he was pleased that Obama had shifted gears and was "going on the offensive." After his original outreach to Republicans, Obama late last week changed his tone and deride d Republican ideas for putting more tax cuts in the stimulus package. Such ideas "have been test e d and they have failed," he said in a speech at the Energy Department. Later, he told a gathering of c ongressional Democrats in Williamsburg, Vir ginia, that "the scale and scope of this plan is right." He'll continue trying to regain momentum on economic policy. He plans his first prime-time n ews conference today after Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner outlines details for a new finan c ial-sector rescue plan. Then he'll participate in town hall-style meetings in towns suffering par t icularly hard times. Democratic Sen. Charles Schumer said Obama's courtship of Republicans only to be rebuffed by them should serve as "an early lesson for President Obama and his team." But James Thurber, director of the Centre for C ongressional and Presidential Studies at American University, said Obama set a particularly h igh bar for himself by "promising to change the way Washington works." " He promised to make it a less partisan, postpartisan place. And so he has to do this. The ques tion is whether he can hit the sweet spot on the stimulus package with enough tax breaks and enough non-controversial spending to get the v otes. I think he can," Thurber said. Democrats praise Obama's close work with t hem on the stimulus legislation. "I don't think there's any doubt that the presi dent has been active ... he's been making phone calls, visiting members in the Senate and the H ouse personally," said Rep. Xavier Becerra, a D emocrat. But Becerra said the jury's still out on the effectiveness of his approach because the b ill still isn't done. Once the measure passes the Senate, differences with the House-passed bill w ill have to be reconciled. "It's a work in progress," said Becerra. "It's still cooking." (This article was written by Tom Raum of the Associated Press). Marijuana legalisation not an answer to economic woes LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net EDITOR, The Tribune. Would the Comptroller of Road Traffic, the officer commanding the traffic division or someone else in authority please do something about the intersection at the entrance to the Nassau Yacht Club and Fort Montagu. Today while exiting the Nassau Yacht Club, I once again narrowly avoided being broadsided by a vehicle entering the Montagu park exit at high speed from the west. During the ensuing exchange, having weathered a barrage of racial slurs and obscenities, I was able to point out to the young man that the sign he was looking at was in fact a NO ENTRY sign and that had a collision occurred he most certainly would have been at fault. The large and prominent no entry sign once displayed there has been replaced by one much smaller but nonetheless still quite visible, however motorists particularly at lunch time and five o'clock routinely ignore it, entering the Montagu area through this exit to bypass the usual traffic congestion. Needless to say the traffic police are generally conspicuous by their absence in this vicinity unless they're blocking the Yacht Club entrance while holding one of their periodic/idiotic ticket anyone exceeding 25 mph exercises. This has become a very dangerous intersection and it is simply a matter of time before some innocent exiting the Yacht Club or the Montagu is seriously injured or killed. Thanking God for yet another near miss. IAN MABON Nassau, February 4, 2009. Dang er ous inter section needs fixing

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H ELPINGbusiness people b e better at what they do, and g iving would-be entrepreneurs the extra know-how they may need to do it, are among goalsof a new lecture series co-ordinated by Bahamas Agricultur-a l and Industrial Corporation. T he 12-week Business Empowerment Lecture Series will provide potential and existing business owners with an opportunity for exposure to successful business strategies, bestp ractices, and real life business e xperiences, BAIC executive chairman Edison Key explained. Free and open to all who wish to attend, it begins on Thursday, 7pm, in the Lecture The-a tre of the Culinary and Hospit ality Management Institute at the College of the Bahamas, Thompson Boulevard campus. The interactive sessions are the brainchild of BAIC's Busin ess Services Division, headed by deputy general manager Don Major. T opics to be covered include c ustomer service and marketing; plan development; Customs duties/concessions and imports; and e-commerce and accounting. “BAIC is aware of the role m icro, small and medium-sized e nterprises play in the economy of the Bahamas, especially as it relates to job creation,” said Mr Key. Therefore BAIC remains c ommitted to assisting in whate ver way we can to ensure succ ess. “The previous lecture series were well attended. “And that heartens us because now is the time forB ahamians to prepare thems elves for other opportunities, especially in food production. Inspire We have been on a mission to inspire Bahamians to take on the lucrative task of feeding our people and the millions of tourists who visit us. I therefore urge Bahamians, e specially those who have lost t heir jobs to visit us. Perhaps we can assist.” There will also be round table discussions on financing a new business venture; increasingc ompetitiveness in business; the anatomy of an entrepreneur; a nd linking local business with t he tourism sector. I t continues on February 19 a t the same venue with a round t able discussion on agribusiness possibilities. In six of the sessions, there will be a segment for testimonials from successful businesso wners who will share their e xperiences. The opening night will see m otivational speaker Dr Wayne T hompson of the Centre for R enewing Relationships speak on the topic ‘Prosperity in the face of Adversity’. Held in conjunction with the College of the Bahamas and theR oyal Bank of Canada, the s eries is free of charge and open to all. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 5 RATS, ANTS, TERMITES, ROACHES, FLIES, MOSQUITOES, TICKS & FLEAS PHONE: 327-6464WE SEND ‘EM PACKIN’!STRUCKUM(DF55 BAHAMIANbusinesses are being given another opportunity to access millions of doll ars in funding that can be put towards enhanci ng their competitiveness. T he Caribbean Export Development Agency will launch a second call on February 9, 2009,f or its Direct Assistance Grant Scheme, a Europ ean Union funded programme which focuses on building the competitiveness of firms in the Caribbean region (CARIFORUM Applicants Caribbean Export’s senior grant adviser Kirk Brown said that successful applicants will be a ble to access funds for projects that may include, but not be limited to: research, product and service development, marketing, promo tional material, quality and environmental mana gement systems and information technology s olutions. Mr Brown stated that the response to the first call was encouraging, with 33 a pplicants being awarded grants totalling BDS$2.3 million. He said it is hoped the scheme will help improve competitiveness of firms by “increasing export potential and expanding export markets.” C ompetitiveness is an issue that has been h ighlighted by Minister of State for Finance Z hivargo Laing as one which Bahamian businesses must focus on if they are to take fulla dvantage of the Economic Partnership Agreem ent signed last year between Caricom countries, including the Bahamas and the European Union. That agreement will liberalise the trade relationship between European and African, Caribbean and Pacific countries, allowing European companies more access to the Bahamian m arket, and Bahamian companies more access to Europe. Persons wishing to apply for Caribbean Export Development Agency funds are invited to submit proposals for the regular proceduresf rom February 9, 2009, until February 20, 2009, at 4.30pm. Those interested in applying may obtain g uidelines, application forms and the list of eligible activities from Caribbean Export’s website at www.carib-export.com. Applications must be submitted to Caribbean E xport’s head office in Barbados or its subr egional office in the Dominican Republic. BAIC lecture series aims to help business people E dison Key Opportunity for businesses to access millions of dollars in funding

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n By SIR RONALD SANDERS (The writer is a business consultant and former Caribbean diplomat) T H E threat to the f inancial services sector of the Caribbean is growing everyday and is becoming more evident in reports b y media who have swall owed hook, line and sinker t hat so-called “tax havens” are helping US, Europeana nd Japanese nationals, both p ersons and companies, to evade taxation in their home countries. There is no hard evidence t o support this allegation about Caribbean jurisdictions. Yet it persists from governm ents of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and D evelopment (OECD A recent BBC report claims that the British gove rnment “is broke a record bn in the red and yet o ne estimate is that the taxman loses .5bn a year thanks to tax haven abuse.” T he reports specifically identifies British protect orates which it describes in derogatory terms “as the Bounty Bar island tax haveno f the Caymans in the Caribbean and the fish-andc hip tax havens closer to home like Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man.” It says, 18 of the world's tax havens a re Crown Dependencies like Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of Man or British protectorates like the Caymans, a fag-endo f the British Empire in the Caribbean.” Dramatically, the report also states that “one man has targeted tax haven abuse in the Caymans and his nameis Barack Obama. So change f or the world's tax havens s eems on the way whether the leaders of the micro-states like it or not.” W hen the OECD first raised its soc alled “Harmful Tax Compe tition Initiative” (HTCI aimed at closing down the f inancial services sector of 41 s mall jurisdictions around the world which were giving serious competition to the financial institutions of the OECDc ountries, Caribbean countries were slow to move on the issue. It was not until it was raised by Antigua and Barbuda at the 21st meeting of the Conference of Heads of Government of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM St Vincent and the Grenadines in July 2000, that CARICOM countries began to take the issue seriously. At that time, a statement was issued saying that Heads of Government took note that the OECD report “‘was based on incomplete information and on standards set unilaterally by these bodies. They deplored the fact that the lists were published with the objective of tainting jurisdictions in the eyes of the investment community and the international financial market. They condemned the actions of the OECD in particular as contrary to the tenets of a global market economy promoted by G7 countries. They reiterated that the proposed OECD actions have no basis in inter national law and are alien to the practice of inter-state relations.” Later a Committee was established headed by then Barbados Prime Minister, Owen Arthur, and present Barbados Chief Justice, Sir David Simmons, of which I was a part, to engage the OECD in a serious dialogue on this issue. Eventually, the OECD dropped a blacklist of countries that they had produced but only after coercing a lmost all of the jurisdictions to adopt many of the rules that the OECD had set uni-l aterally. A so-called “Global Tax Forum” was also established to set rules for a level playing field for all jurisdict ions. But, a report two years ago showed that the main culprits ignoring these rules are t he big players in the OECD c ountries themselves. Poor r egulation and supervision in the US and UK which con-t ributed to the present financ ial crisis in both countries is ample evidence of that fact. President Obama, when he was the Senator from Illinois, joined two other Senators in introducing the “Stop Tax Havens Abuse Act” in theU S Congress. Fortunately, t he Act never became law. But, it names 34 jurisdictions as “secrecy” jurisdictions and among them are all theB ritish Overseas Territories in the Caribbean, all the members of the Organisation of Eastern Caribbean States,t he Bahamas and Barbados. The fact that the Bill did not become law does notm ean it has been dropped f rom the Obama administra tion’s agenda. Every indica tion is that the legislation will be enacted this year andw hile the blacklist will be removed, it will be replaced by broad empowerment of t he US Treasury Secretary to i mpose sanctions. The belief persists that “the total loss to the (US shore tax evasion alone approaches $100 billion per year, including $40 to $70 bil lion from individuals and another $30 billion from corporations engaging in off shore tax evasion.” Caribbean jurisdictions are regularly examined by the Caribbean Financial Action Task Force (CFATF International Monetary Fund (IMF compliant with the requirements set by the OECD. Many, if not all of them, have Tax Information Exchange Agreements with the US. Banks are required by law, and on pain of the toughest penalties, to make suspicious activity reports and to follow know your customer proce dures. Persons trying either t o open a second account with a bank they have dealt with for years, or transferm oney anywhere, are well aware of the scrutiny to which they are subjected, the paper they have to sign and the i dentification they have to provide. N o w, some of the O ECD jurisdictions are luring customers awayf rom Caribbean countries on t he basis that they will give them better tax breaks, and, of course, they are “safe” jurisdictions. One of the latest companies to shift is the giant engineering and construction company, Foster WheelerL td, which is moving its place o f incorporation to Switzer land from Bermuda for “tax and other reasons.” So far there has been no p ublic indication that Caribbean governments are ready to jointly engage the OECD and the US governm ent in particular on these new threats to their financial services sector. Yet, they are a ll at risk, including Guyana, J amaica and Trinidad and T obago – all of whom have passed legislation to offeri nternational financial serv ices. Similarly, the Caribbean private sector who provide financial services and are in the best position to marshal the arguments and evidence to refute the charges of O ECD governments are sayi ng nothing. When the crunch comes, t herefore, those in the private s ector, who seem to be sleep i ng instead of lobbying their governments for joint action, should wake up and startp ressing the issue fast. The wolf is already at the door. Responses to: ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com C M Y K C M Y K T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 7 $'0,1,675$725 /,%5$5,$1 7 KH6RXWK(OHXWKHUD0LVVLRQ5RFN6RXQG(OHXWKHUD D QRQSURWRUJDQL]DWLRQLVVHHNLQJVXLWDEOHFDQGLGDWHV I RUWKHSRVWRI$GPLQLVWUDWRU/LEUDULDQ 7 KHGXWLHVRIWKHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO L QFOXGH ~ ~ ~ $ SSOLFDQWVPXVWSRVVHVV ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6KRXOG\RXPHHWWKHVHUHTXLUHPHQWVSOHDVH VXEPLWDUpVXPpWRFGVDQGV#FRUDOZDYHFRP R U ZZZVRXWKHOHXWKHUDPLVVLRQFRP Is the Caribbean financial services sector asleep? n SIRRonald Sanders WORLDVIEW S S o o f f a a r r t t h h e e r r e e h h a a s s b b e e e e n n n n o o p p u u b b l l i i c c i i n n d d i i c c a a t t i i o o n n t t h h a a t t C C a a r r i i b b b b e e a a n n g g o o v v e e r r n n m m e e n n t t s s a a r r e e r r e e a a d d y y t t o o j j o o i i n n t t l l y y e e n n g g a a g g e e t t h h e e O O E E C C D D a a n n d d t t h h e e U U S S g g o o v v e e r r n n m m e e n n t t i i n n p p a a r r t t i i c c u u l l a a r r o o n n t t h h e e s s e e n n e e w w t t h h r r e e a a t t s s t t o o t t h h e e i i r r f f i i n n a a n n c c i i a a l l s s e e r r v v i i c c e e s s s s e e c c t t o o r r . .

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE PERHAPSyou’ve thought about selli ng your present home, but have put off t hat decision, thinking that now is not a g ood time to sell. Want some advice? Wait no longer! C onsider what happens during the “bad t imes.” Most homeowners want to sell their homes for the highest possible price in the shortest possible period of time. So, during those periods that are perceived as ‘a bad time to sell a home’ or a ‘buyer’s market,’ those homeowners put off their selling decision until a more favourable selling climate exists. S ince the so-called ‘bad times’ can last from a relatively short period to a couple of years, a backlog of frustrated would-bes ellers builds up. I t is sort of like the force that builds up in a pressure cooker. Then, finally, comes the good news: “Home sales are rising buyers are buy i ng!” Guess what happens? Like the pres sure cooker, the lid blows right off the t op. Sellers by the thousands begin to f lood the market with homes to sell. The competition is incredibly fierce and prices must be competitive to generate a sale. T he best time to sell a home is when you are ready to sell. Make sure your home is in top condi t ion, price it fairly, and employ the best BREA realty professional available. Through careful planning, your house will sell successfully in any market! REAL EST ATE CARMENMASSONI THE TIME IS ALWAYS RIGHT! DIRECTOR of Immigration Jack Thompson recently paid a courtesy call on Commander Defence Force Comm odore Clifford Scavella at t he Coral Harbour Base. Duri ng his visit, the newly appointed director met with the Commodore, and was introduced to his command team. Matters of mutual interests w ere discussed, and both parties exchanged pleasantries. Immigration chief pays courtesy call on Commodore Scavella A BOVE: D irector of Immigration Jack Thompson and Commodore C lifford Scavella engage in a casual conversation at the Coral H arbour Base. LEFT: Commodore Clifford Scavella presents Director of Immigration Jack Thompson with a keepsake from the Royal Bahamas Defence Force. RBDF photos/ Marine Seaman Drissen Brennen n TAMPA, Fla. A FLORIDA search-and-rescue dog that scoured the ruins of t he World Trade Center, hurricane-ravaged communities, and o ther lower-profile disasters has died, a ccording to Associated P ress. Marley of Tampa Fire Rescue was 12 when she died Wednesday. Besides sniffing for survivors after the Sept. 11 attacks, Marley also was active in efforts after Hurricanes Charley and Katrina. T he dog suddenly came down with canine bloat and had to be e uthanized. Captain Mark Bogush, who trained the dog, said surgery would only have worsened her quality of life. Tampa dog that scoured 9/11 ruins dies

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n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport R eporter d maycock@ t ribunemedia.net F REEPORT – As the G rand Bahama economy continues to struggle, the women of Freeport are being invited to connect with other Bahamian and international businesswomen at the Second Annual Wome n’s Business Conference in Nassau. Attorney Melissa Hall, founder of Kingdom WomenI n Business (KWIB Grand Bahama on Thursday to announce that this year’s conference will be held att he British Colonial Hilton on February 28. The conference theme is Rise to the Occasion and T ransition from Trial to Tri umph.” Opportunity Ms Hall said this major international conference event gives women from all walks of life the opportunity to network and launch their personal visions for their l ives during these trying t imes. She believes that one of the main challenges experienced by women in businessi s the availability of financial resources. She noted that training, skills, and good advice are important. “We believe that despite what is happening in the economy in Grand Bahama, if we come together and connect with other women and share our secrets of success, women will discover how tob e creative and recessionp roof by repositioning and redefining themselves. “The conference will also be a time of refreshing and renewing for women as they will be provided with practical advice on how they cans tart their own businesses and improve their mar ketability in the market place,” she said. Some of the conference speakers are former banker and financial consultant Charlene Paul; Patrice Ellis; Dr Jennifer Deveaux, financial controller of Ernst and Young, former senator Tanya McCartney; Ruby Ann Darling, and motivational speaker, life coach, and businesswoman Dr Stacia Pierce from Lansing, Michigan. Ms Hall said Ms Pierce brings a wealth of knowledge and advice that can help women become suc c essful in business. She has a fashion line and make-up line, she is a TV host, and has written 21 books. “She is just a phenomenal woman and just to be able to connect with someonel ike her would be a great experience for all women.” Plans Although KWIB is based in Nassau, there are plans to establish a branch in Grand B ahama during the third q uarter of this year. The organisation currently has 65 members and a fol lowing of 300 women. Ms Hall noted that a number of businesswomen in Grand Bahama have already joined the organisation this year, including Michelle Thompson, owner of Uni v ersal Security Systems; Pastor Margo Victor, marketing manager of Acacia Groves; Raquel Hart, and Pastor Shirley Stubbs of Universal Household of Faith. She said that women from A baco and other Family Islands are also expected to join the organisation and a ttend the Nassau confere nce. It’snotonlyfor professional or businesswomen, you can be a house-w ife. “This is the kind of organ isation all women should w ant to be a part of to help t hem reach their goals in life,” she said. “The main thing we request of members is toe xercise integrity in their lives, possess a commitment to support other women, andt o patronise other women in business,” said Ms Hall. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 9 :,1 &OXH :,1 The New C-ClassYour most enjoyable drive ever.The new C-Class is a pleasure to behold offering a new interpretation of driving pleasure. Its taut lines lend it an air of effortless superiority while the wide radiator grille and distinctive rear section announce a vehicle with a real presence and dynamic personality. Few cars can compete with its ability to adjust so many facets of its character from the interior to the drive technology so quickly and precisely in response toexternal conditions and your own particular needs. The key to this flexible response is the standard-fit Agility Control Package which includes selective damping. The interior offers noticeably more space and a more distinctive atmosphere tosuit your taste. As you will see, the new C-Class is the perfect embodiment of the Mercedes-Benz philosophy.Tyreflex Star MotorsWulff Road, P. O. Box N 9123, Nassau, The Bahamas, Tel 242.325.4961 Fax 242.323.4667OUR PARTS DEPARTMENT IS FULLY STOCKED WITH EVERY COMPONENT NECESSARY TO ENSURE THAT YOUR MERCEDES RUNS TROUBLE FREE. TRAINED TECHNICIANS ON DUTY.M DEVELOPERSof The Baker’s Bay Golf and Ocean Club at Great Guana Cay, Abaco, continued their support for Bahamas National Trust by presenting the organisation with a $100,000 cheque. The donation by Discovery Land Company is t he second instalment of a $600,000 three-year commitment to the organisation and the national parks on Abaco. Dr Livingston Marshall said when presenting the cheque: “Although we are all experiencingt ough times in this economic downturn, we at Baker’s Bay want the BNT to know that we arec ommitted to the organisation and the environment.” The grant from Baker’s Bay is supporting the establishment of a BNT office on Abaco as well as a full-time warden. T he grant has also provided the BNT with the opportunity to partner with Friends of the Environment and schools in North and South Abaco to establish three Discovery Clubs on Abaco. Discovery Club is an after school club that combines environmental education with fun learning techniques designed to take young peop le out of the classroom and into the different eco-systems we find in The Bahamas. “The BNT is truly grateful to corporate supporters like Baker’s Bay, who place a high value on the environment and the work of the Trust,”s aid Glenn Bannister, president of the BNT. The Bahamas National Trust is the mandated m anager of 25 national parks and protected areas in The Bahamas. Abaco is home to five national parks: Abaco National Park, Pelican Cays Land and Sea Park, Tilloo Cay Reserve, Black Sound Cay Reserve and Walker’s Cay NationalP ark. W W e e b b e e l l i i e e v v e e t t h h a a t t d d e e s s p p i i t t e e w w h h a a t t i i s s h h a a p p p p e e n n i i n n g g i i n n t t h h e e e e c c o o n n o o m m y y i i n n G G r r a a n n d d B B a a h h a a m m a a , , i i f f w w e e c c o o m m e e t t o o g g e e t t h h e e r r a a n n d d c c o o n n n n e e c c t t w w i i t t h h o o t t h h e e r r w w o o m m e e n n a a n n d d s s h h a a r r e e o o u u r r s s e e c c r r e e t t s s o o f f s s u u c c c c e e s s s s , , w w o o m m e e n n w w i i l l l l d d i i s s c c o o v v e e r r h h o o w w t t o o b b e e c c r r e e a a t t i i v v e e a a n n d d r r e e c c e e s s s s i i o o n n p p r r o o o o f f b b y y r r e e p p o o s s i i t t i i o o n n i i n n g g a a n n d d r r e e d d e e f f i i n n i i n n g g t t h h e e m m s s e e l l v v e e s s . . Nassau to host Women’s Business Conference Attorney Melissa Hall, founder of Kingdom Women In Business MR GLENN BANNISTER , BNT president, accepts the cheque from Dr Livingston Marshall, senior vice-president of Environment and Community Affairs for Baker’s Bay. Developers donate $100,000 to the BNT

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE What does the future have in store for you? Not sure? A career gives you the best chance possible. And we can help. Were CompuCollege. Learn practical skills in an environment thats focused on you, the student. We offer: Monthly Starts so you can begin learning when you want Modular Classes let you study one subject at a time Exciting Diploma Programs in the areas of health care, business, graphic design, public relations, information technology, interior decorating, criminology, child and youth care, office administration, travel and tourism, health and wellness, massage therapy, makeup artistry, acupuncture and more. Come see us and find out more!OPEN HOUSE|Thursday, February 12, 2009British Colonial Hilton |3:30 7:00 pm PICTURE YOURSELF STUDYING IN CANADA Contact Arlene O’Donnell Halifax: (902 aodonnell@compucollege.caH a l i f a x , N o v a S c o t i a www.compucollege.ca Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North end of North Bimini, Bahamas Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd. owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.%LPLQL%D\5HVRUW0DULQDVHHNVWRKLUTXDOLHGSURIHVVLRQDO i ndividuals for the following positions: :HRIIHUDQH[FHOOHQWEHQHWVSDFNDJHDQGFRPSHWLWLYH compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants should forward a copy of their resum to the attention of at CRolle@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242 THE Hope Centre, under the leadership of P astor Carlos Reid and his team of directors, o pened its computer laboratory and community centre. T he multi-purpose facility includes an a udio/video studio and game room, and will a llow students to socialise and complete homework while utilising the computer lab in a safe Christian-oriented environment, the founderso f the centre said. Users of the centre are encouraged to abide by its core values which seek to foster respect, trust, honesty, and service. Attending the opening was Minister of Education Carl Bethel, who applauded the directors of the Hope Centre for providing such ah olistic recreational facility where young peop le can spend time after school. Minister Bethel said that this was in keeping with a future goal of the Ministry of Education t o foster the development of a universal system o f homework centres. “This centre can be a refuge in a time of turb ulence, and a safe haven for the poor and u nderprivileged,” he said. M r Bethel explained that the success that is being realised by Pastor Reid and his team did not happen overnight, but came incrementallyt hrough focused determination, as a result of hard work. He said that one of the messages that he would like to impart to students is that success does not happen overnight, and cannot be sustained through “quick fix” solutions. In closing, Minister Bethel commended the d irectors and organisers of the event, and e ncouraged them to continue to provide posi tive alternatives for the youth. Share your news The Tribune wants to hear f rom people who are m aking news in their neighbourhoods. Perhaps y ou are raising funds for a good cause, campaigning f or improvements in the a rea or have won an award. If so, call us on 322-1986 a nd share your story. Hope Centre opens computer laboratory, community centre ALLSMILES at the opening of the computer laboratory and community centre. n SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico JENNIFER FIGGE pressed her toes into the Caribbean sand, exhilarated and exhausted as she touched land this week for the first time in almost a month, according to Associated Press. Reaching a beach in Trinidad, she became the first woman on record to swim across the Atlantic Ocean a dream she’d had since the early 1960s, when a stormy trans-Atlantic flight got her thinking she could don a life vest and swim the rest of the way if needed. The 56-year-old left the Cape Verde Islands off Africa’s western coast on Jan. 12, battling waves of up to 30 feet (9 meters and strong winds. David Higdon, a friend of Figge who kept in touch with her via satellite phone, said she had originally planned to swim the Bahamas, but inclement weather forced her to veer 1,000 miles (1,610 kms Trinidad, where she arrived on Feb. 5. Figge plans to continue her odyssey, swimming from Trinidad to the British Virgin Islands, where she expects to arrive in late February. The crew won’t compute the total distance Figge swam until after she completes the journey, Higdon said. Then it’s home to Aspen, Colorado where she trained for months in an outdoor pool amid snowy blizzards to reunite with her Alaskan Malamute. “My dog doesn’t know where I am,” she told The Associated Press on Saturday by phone. “It’s time for me to get back home to Hank.” The dog swirled in her thoughts, as did family and friends, as Figge stroked through the chilly Atlantic waters escorted by a sailboat. She saw a pod of pilot whales, several turtles, dozens of dolphins, plenty of Portuguese man-of-war but no sharks. “I was never scared,” Figge said. “Looking back, I wouldn’t have it any other way. I can always swim in a pool.” Her journey comes a decade after French swimmer Benoit Lecomte made the first known solo trans-Atlantic swim, covering nearly 4,000 miles (6,400 kilometers) from Massachusetts to France in 73 days. No woman on record has made the crossing. Figge woke most days around 7 a.m., eating pasta and baked potatoes while she and the crew assessed the weather. Her longest stint in the water was about eight hours, and her short est was 21 minutes. Crew members would throw bottles of energy drinks as she swam; if the seas were too rough, divers would deliver them in person. At night she ate meat, fish and peanut butter, replenishing the estimated 8,000 calories she burned a day. Figge wore a red cap and wet suit, with her only good-luck charm underneath: an old, red shirt to guard against chafing, signed by friends, relatives and her father, who recently died. 56-y ear-old becomes f ir st w oman to swim Atlantic

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PROCEEDS of this year’s Antique Auto Club will be donated to the Bilney LaneH ome for Children and the E very Child Counts School in Abaco. The Antique Auto Club is primarily a hobby club, but also conducts some community service projects to give b ack to needy children in the Bahamas. P roceeds of the club’s annual Antique Car Show,w hich is currently in the plann ing stages for 2009, are a lways donated to a charity or organisation involving children. T he proceeds of the club’s 2008 show were used to repair and renovate the boys’ and g irls’ washrooms at the Biln ey Lane Home for Children. The club recently elected a new board of directors for 2009 who visited the Bilney H ome for Children to see the improvements. T hey noted that there is room for more improvements at the home. Peter Armstrong and Murray Forde were returned as p resident and secretary, r espectively, while Richard B lake was elected vice-president, Wayne Aranha was named treasurer and DonA ranha, Roland Ferguson and Jim LaRoda were electedas directors. Members The 2009 Antique Car S how is now scheduled for Saturday, March 14, at the Arawak Cay Heritage Cen tre. In addition to its own club members, the club is looking for persons who own antique( local definition is “at least 2 0 years old”) and special interest vehicles to participate in the show. E ntry fee is $3, for those t hat want their vehicles judged to compete for trophies in the eight established c ategories. This year, some new events are planned, i ncluding a separate section f or “project vehicles” – vehicles that are in restoration, but not completed or for which some restoration work i s being planned. “Every year we hear peo ple say their car is not ready y et or not good enough to show,” said club secretary Murray Forde, “so we decid e d to open it up a little, to include these vehicles to show what can be done and lookf or a difference in next year’s s how. We expect that this will add to the interest in the hob by.” A s in previous years, funds are raised through corporate donations that cover the costo f trophies and through a steak-out, tickets for which are available from any club member for only $10. T he Antique Auto Club of the Bahamas was formed in 1987 by six men interested in t he hobby. Membership of men and women is now close to 50 persons. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 11 Fly High on the Wings of Love toS O U T HA N D R O S First10couplestobookwillreceive3rdnightfree.Call Emerald Palms at 225-1487 or 242-369-2713www.emerald–palms.com Special $99/person rates on Western Air. Western Air reservations 242-377-2222Hotel reservation conrmation required at time of booking.A romantic Valentine’s getaway February 13-15 enjoy:for only $399 per coupley y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y y Luxury accommodations y Daily continental breakfast y Andros style grill out y Intimate dinner under the stars y Live entertainment ANTIQUE AUTO CLUB of the Bahamas Board of Directors for 2009. (l-r B lake; vice-president; Don Aranha; Roland Feguson; Peter Armstrong, president; Jim LaRoda and Murray Forde, secretary. MEMBERS OF THE Antique Auto Club of The Bahamas discuss some possible improvements thatc ould be made to the front entrance of the Bilney Lane Home for C hildren. P art proceeds of the C lub’s Antique Car Show, scheduled for M arch 14, 2009 will be directed to this home; l-r; Wayne Aranha,R ichard Blake, Murray F orde, Peter Armstrong a nd Don Aranha. J i m L a R o d a Antique Auto Club proceeds to be donated to children’s home and school DON ARANHA , past-president of the Antique A uto Club s hows the w ork that has been done to one of theb athrooms in the Bilney Lane Home for Children and p oints to the light fixture, the only thing l eft to do (and s ince done). J i m L a R o d a

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE N N a a s s s s a a u u G G r r o o u u p p e e r r C C l l o o s s e e d d S S e e a a s s o o n nD D e e c c e e m m b b e e r r 1 1 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 8 8 T T o o F F e e b b r r u u a a r r y y 2 2 8 8 , , 2 2 0 0 0 0 9 9For more information contact BREEF 327-9000 or www.breef.org I’m on my Honeymoon EAT LIONFISH! D O N O T D I S T U R B !N a s s a u G r o u p e r S p a w n i n g N o v e m b e r t o M a r c h T T h h e e c c l l o o s s e e d d s s e e a a s s o o n n a a l l l l o o w w s s t t h h e e f f i i s s h h t t o o b b r r e e e e d d s s u u c c c c e e s s s s f f u u l l l l y y . . L L e e t t s s e e n n s s u u r r e e t t h h a a t t w w e e h h a a v v e e N N a a s s s s a a u u g g r r o o u u p p e e r r t t o o e e n n j j o o y y i i n n t t h h e e f f u u t t u u r r e e ! ! C Co o n n $ $ e e r r v v a a t t i i o o n nM Ma a k k e e $ $C Ce e n n t t $ $ THE THIRTEENTH Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and The Turks and Caicos Islands, the Right Rev Laish Zane Boyd Sr. was enthroned at Christ Church Cathedral yesterday. THE VENERABLE James Palacious kisses the ring of the new Anglican Bishop. PHOTOS: Felip Major /Tribune staff E NTHRONEMENTOFNEWBISHOPOF ANGLICANDIOCESE

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 13 FORMER BISHOP Drexel Gomez kisses the ring of the new Anglican Bishop Laish Boyd. THE GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur D Hanna (far right Primer Minister Hubert Ingraham and his wife Delores Ingraham. BISHOP LAISH BOYD kneels and prays. CHORISTERS sing during the enthronement ceremony. E NTHRONEMENTOFNEWBISHOPOFANGLICANDIOCESE

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ations as part of a repayment schedule and it is believed that he has shut down for good. In September, 2008, the owner is believed to have left the island, leaving only a “skeleton crew” of about four workers employed to secure the prop erty and around 50 more with out work, according to MP for West End and Bimini, Obie Wilchcombe. Workers were given $100 and letters stating what they were owed by the company and told that this payment would be forthcoming at a later date. However, nothing has been heard since then. “They have apparently shut down. The staff were not told anything. They have not been paid,” said the MP. He added that, while still working at the resort, staff were reportedly not paid gratuities owed since the “beginning of (2008 Made aware of their concerns at a meeting in the constituency on Friday, Mr Wilchcombe said that he is doing his bit to try to get answers for his constituents and former employees of the club. The MP is writing to the Director of Investments, Joy Jibrilu, so that she can make a determination about exactly what the status of the property is. “The question now is, what’s going to happen next? The employees are wondering what’s going to happen to them and to their future.” he said. According to Mr Wilchcombe, Mrs Jibrilu said that the government was not informed as is the law that there were lay-offs at the club. “The hotel owners have an obligation. “The government had no rea son to think everything was not continuing as per normal, that things were progressing,” said Mr Wilchcombe. The MP said he hopes to report back to the constituents on the matter “before the end of the week.” One local who spoke to The Tribune yesterday said Biminites have struggled to find alternative sources of employment. Mr Wilchcombe called the public meeting at the Bimini All Age School on Friday where he again addressed some of the issues he had spoken about at an earlier town meeting in West End last week. His speech at that earlier meeting touched on the state of the country, the PLP and saw him express gratitude for the support of those who had stood behind him during his deten tion by police for questioning in connection with the alleged extortion of Hollywood actor John Travolta. Mr Wilchcombe was subse quently released without charge. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE $SSOLFDWLRQVVKRXOGEHVXEPLWWHGWR +XPDQHVRXUFHV'HSDUWPHQW 3 1DVVDX%DKDPDV 2U YLD officers and three occupants were detained. A woman from Marshall Road and two men from Yellow Elder Gardens, all aged 24, were taken into custody. The shooting came just a day after Nassau residents told The Tribune they are living in f ear of the capital becoming like the Wild West a fter a high-speed chase ended in a dramatic gunfight in Montagu at around 8pm on Thursday. Police had chased a white Lexus from Palmdale to East Bay Street where bullets were fired at police and officers retaliated with ar ound of ammunition in front of Montagu r amp and the Royal Nassau Sailing Club. Witnesses claim around two dozen shots were fired in a 30-second gunfight which resulted in the arrest of two men, aged 20 and 26, who are expected to appear in MagistratesC ourt today. R eports that a third person was injured in t he shooting and a female occupant of the Lexus fled the scene remain unconfirmed by police. Chief Supt Glenn Miller, in charge of the Central Detective Unit, said: “It’s not becoming like the Wild West where criminals are fir-i ng at police every day, almost certainly not. However, I would say there are sporadic incidents where criminals are being confronted by the police from time to time who open fire. Bahamian criminals have been shooting at police now for many years. “There have been incidents where police officers are fired at, injured and even killed byc riminals in Nassau, Grand Bahama, and even the Family Islands, but it’s not an everyday thing.” When asked if gun crime is on the rise, Mr Miller said the opposite is true. “Statistics this year indicate crime has gone down,” he said. Homicides are down, armed robbery is d own and serious crimes are down. For the most part, major crime against persons are down compared to January last year.” briefed and directed to treat the believed immigrants with digni t y. Although not on the island at the time of the exercise, Mr Thompson said all the believedm igrants would have been given ample time to produce residen cy documents. A Bahamian resident who phoned The Tribune yesterday said many of those taken by theo fficers were not even allowed t o put on clothes, and were escorted to an outdoor containment site, where temperaturesr eached a low of 59 degrees. Speaking anonymously, the resident said: “Many of the peop le who were taken were women and children. Officers took them to an outdoor tennis court where some of them were w earing only panties and bra.” Residing on the island for most of her life, the caller indi cated that people had been “cor ralled like cattle” before being taken to the Sea-Wind vesself or transport to Nassau. Claiming that mostly women and children had been placed o n the boat’s deck, the resident said officers treated the immigrants as if they were less than human, and indicated that several residents had already comp lained to immigration authori ties about the manner in which the Haitians were handled. Admitting there were a num b er of new immigrants to the island, the resident said some Haitian-born residents who had lived on the island for more than 20 years were bullied out of their homes despite their i nsistence on having legal stand ing. With around 30 migrants r eleased shortly after their apprehension, immigration officials say there remain more than 100 people still awaiting residency verification. regard.” During his sermon, Rt Rev Boyd called for Anglicans in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos and the world over to rethink their approach and behaviour to others, and to allow the true spirit of Christianity to be represented in their daily lives. Speaking to the existence of prejudices within the local community, Mr Boyd reminded the congregation to acknowledge God, and not to allow differences to separate them from others. “I therefore ask you the question, who do you think ill of, who do you despise, by whom are you repulsed? “We have our groups that we like to talk about, and you know just how we operate when we say: these white people, these black people, these Haitians, these homosexuals, and these church people, we all have our groups we like to despise. “This service is a reminder that we need to present ourselves for service in every area of our lives, in our two countries. We live in a time when people find it too easy to despise, to discount, and even to persecute others.” Rt Rev Boyd urged the body to fashion themselves after Christ, in being kind-hearted and continuously dedicated to goodwill and Christianity. As of the beginning of this year Bahamasair h as increased its freight fees. For The Tribune f rom a flat monthly rate, the rate has been increased by daily weight, which means that what The Tribune paid Bahamasair for one month itn ow pays for five days, which, if continued, would bring the yearly freight bill to more than $200,000. “We regret to have to make this decision after s erving the Family Islands from the days when t hey were known as the Out Islands and the mail b oat was the only means of transport,” said Tribune publisher Eileen Carron. “However, knowi ng that our Family Island readers could not pos sibly support such a subscription increase to cover transportation, we have moved quickly to the w eb to try to service them. They will still get the n ews, although it will be a few hours later than usual.” Mrs Carron recalled the early days of The Tribune even before the days when ZNS took the news to the Out Islands of how The Tribune kept the archipelago informed of what was hap p ening in the capital. Those were the days when Out Islanders could not even afford to buy The Tribune, which in the early days was published twice weekly and sold at a penny for a single copy, two shillings for a three months subscrip-t ion, four shillings for six months and eight shillings for one year. To keep the people informed, The Tribune sent a copy to each island’s central school, or to the library wherever there was one. “People from the settlement went to the school or the library to read the paper,” she said. “Fort hose who could not read it was read to them. The late Sir Etienne Dupuch was always astounded whenever he visited one of the islands particularly his House of Assembly constituency of Inagua and Mayaguana and residents would q uote him his Tribune editorials verbatim from p ublic platforms and without a teleprompter. And so, it is with deep regret that The Tribune has had to make this decision today. How ever, we shall now try to keep in close touch with o ur loyal readers through the electronic media.” And so at 2pm Wednesday please click onto w ww.tribune242.com and keep in touch with your daily newspaper, which is in fact the voice of y ou, the people. In accordance with Biblical scripture they all grow dreadlocks and the two girls, Ariannah, 8, and Omega, 5, cover their heads with a haircloth or ‘fawl’ and wear long skirts. B ut Empress Wells and P rophet Bain maintain they are struggling to find a private school willing to accept them as they are. Kingsway Academy in Bernard Road, Bahamas Acad-e my in Wulff Road and Mount C armel Preparatory School in Palmdale Avenue are all Christian private schools which accept children of other religious beliefs but do not allowa lterations of the dress code for r eligious reasons. S t Andrew’s International School in Yamacraw and Summit Academy in Thompson Boulevard, which Ariannah currently attends, allow studentst o wear religious dress. Summit Academy principal Gillian Wilson said: “We allow it because it is a part of their r eligion. It is such a close-knit c ommunity it’s really not a big deal to the kids at all. And we have had no problems with those kids who wear religious dress following the school rules.” B ut as the parents look for a s chool for Omega, they say the school fees are too high to send her there. And although government schools allow religious dress as t he Constitution of the B ahamas states all children h ave a right to an education, they are reluctant to send Omega to a state school. Prophet Bain said: “It is not equal if one person can go to ap rivate school, another person of the same ability should be able to go. “I don’t want them to go to a government school, it’s not that the education is so different, it’s the violence in the school.Andt here are better opportunities a t private school.” P rophet Bain and Empress Wells want the freedom to choose a school they can afford without compromising their reli-g ious beliefs, but discrimination i s tolerated in private schools, w hich have the right to be selective, Director of Education Lionel Sands said. He added: “No child should be discriminated against, andc ertainly we have authority over p ublic schools because every child is entitled to an education, but we cannot tell private schools who to take and who not to take. “We have some control in that we offer financial grants tot he schools to help them in their admissions but not that kind of control.” There are 162 public schools in the Bahamas, and 91 private schools, more than half of which are attached to a church. E mpress Wells said: “If people don’t see things the way we see them they should still respect it. It’s a good and positive thing. It’s about love and unity and trying to make the w orld what God wanted it to be.” FROM page one Gunshots lead to police chase FROM page one Rastafarians FROM page one Tribune delivery FROM page one Immigration exercise FROM page one Bimini 13th Bishop of the Diocese FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS T HE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 19 REPRESENTATIVES from the United Nations,I nformation Centre for the Caribbean Area (UNIC a courtesy call on the Director General of Bahamas Information Services (BIS A rthur Foulkes on Tuesday, February 3, at the Monarch B uilding, East Bay Street. From left are Deputy Director of BIS Anthony Forbes; UNIC library assistant Wayde Ramnarine; Sir Arthur; UNICd irector Angellca Hunt, and executive director of BIS Edward Ellis. UNICofficials pay courtesy call on the BIS Director General R aymond A Bethel / BIS

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C M Y K C M Y K MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 15 I NSIDE Premiership action SPORTS NOTES n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T HE Striders came away with another victory as they dominated the Star Trackers/Baker’s Construction Track Classic on Saturday. The one-day meet at the Thomas A. Robinson saw a number of teams from New Providence, Grand Bahama and the Family Islands competed as athletes made their bid to qualify for the Carifta Games. While there were no qualifiers, Star Trackers’ head coach David Charlton said they were quite impressed with the level of performance turned in. “I thought it was very successful. The competition was very keen and the offici ating was on spot,” Charlton stressed. “All of our volunteers came out in full force and the combination of all of the above made the event a success.” Thanking the Bahamas Association of Certified Officials (BACO Trackers’ volunteers, including Alpha Kappa, Beta Phi Beta and Alpha Phi Alpha, Charlton said they were able to complete the meet two hours ahead of time and there wasn’t any hitches. “The competition was very keen and we saw a lot of new faces, which is very good for track and field,” he stated. “A lot of our old faces did as expected, but it’s still early in the season. “But by the end of February going into March when we have the National High School Championships and the Carifta trials, I expect that a lot of the athletes will start peaking.” Although at the T-Bird Flyers Track Classic a week ago, coach Stephen Murray said he doesn’t expect his Striders to start peaking just yet, they came back with another great performance over the week end. The Striders collected a total of 688 points to out-distance their nearest rivals, Golden Eagles, who picked up second place with 461. Host Star Trackers had to settle for third with 349.50. (Look at the scoreboard for the com plete results). Even though there were no Carifta qualifiers, there were still a number of out standing performances turned in. Athletes posting the most points in their respective divisions were as follows: Marissa Capron of Striders with 20 in the girls under-7 after she won the under7 girls 50 metres in 9.87 seconds and the 100 in 18.73. Edwin Riley of the Spirit of Excel lence in the under-7 boys, winning the 50 in 10.72 and the 100 in 21.41, Deante Wright of the Striders in the girls under-9, winning the 100 in 16.31 and finishing second in the 200 in 33.89 behind team-mate Gem Wilson in 32.91. Zion Bannister of the Sunblazers with 16 points after he placed second in both the under-9 100 in 16.24 and the 200 in 34.07 behind Star Trackers’ Juwan Willie (16.15 in 100) and Bahamas Speed Dynamics’ Shaun Miller (34.02 Daejah Moss of the Striders in the girls under-11 with 20 points, winner of both the 200 in 30.46 and the 400 in 1:13.93. Christopher Johnson of the Striders i n the under-11 boys with 18 as the winner of the 100 in 14.52 and runner-up in the 200 in 29.66 behind Road runners’ Branson Rolle in 29.34. Jasmine Sutherland of the Golden Eagles in the under-13 girls with 28 points after winning the 200 in 27.59 and the 400 in 1:06.79, while finishing second in the long jump with a leap of 3.86 metres behind Striders’ Ieisha Taylor (3.88 Darius Major of the Sunblazers in the under-13 boys with 19. He was third in the 200 in 27.99 behind Spirit of Excellence’s brothers winning combo of Scharann Cash (26.5026.70 ond in the long jump with 3.79 metres behind Striders’ Anthony Rolle (4.09 Danielle Gibson of the Ambassadors in the under-15 girls with 22 points. She was second in the 200 in 26.58, won by Bahamas Speed Dynamics’ Pedrya Seymour (25.97 jump with 1.50. Delano Davis of the Golden Eagles in the under-15 boys with 23 points. Davis sped to victory in the 100 in 11.44, but had to settle for second in the high jump with 1.58 metres. The winner was Road Runners’ Xavier Coakley with 1.65. Raquel Williams of the RC Athletics doubled up in the under-17 girls shot put (11.73 metres34.84 a total of 20 points. Stephen Munroe of the Star Trackers posted a sprint double in the under-17 boys with his victory in the 100 (10.79 200 (22.14 Trackers’ Patrick Bodie with 20 points apiece. Bodie took the 100 hurdles (14.00 and 400 hurdles (56.53 Katarina Smith of the Golden Eagles shared the female open division with 20 points after she doubled in the 200 (24.69 and the 400 (57.42 the Bahamas’ Julianna Duncombe, the winner of the shot put (11.22 metres discus (38.42 Her team-mate Carlene Johnson emerged as the century winner in 12.15. Saron Cox finished with 20 points in the open men’s shot put (11.52 metres and discus (34.68 The men’s straight away was won by Ambassador’s Marcus Thompson in 10.64, while Alfred higgs of the Kenyan Knights took the 200 in 21.86 and Ambassador’s Brandon Miller claimed the 400 in 49.87. n B y BRENT STUBBS S enior Sports Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net T HE Bahamas Fed C up team of Nikkita Fountain, L arikah Russell and Kerrie Cartwright failed in its bid t o remain in Zone One of the Fed Cup by BNP Paribas. O n Saturday in Montreal, C anada, the Bahamas lost 3-0 to Colombia and was joined byP uerto Rico as the two teams from the six-team draw that got r elegated to Zone II for 2010. “It wasn’t what we had expect e d,” said team captain Sean Cartwright on his return home y esterday with Nikkita Fountain. Cartwright said originally they were told that the two teams with the losing records would play each other. Instead, the Bahamas a nd Puerto Rico ended up playing Colombia and Brazil, who b oth won a match apiece. Brazil and Colombia both p ulled off 3-0 victories to remain in Zone One for next year. Meanwhile Canada stayed undefeated by wiping out Paraguay 3-0 as well to advance t o the playoffs for a shot at the World Group II playoffs in April. P araguay will also remain in zone One by virtue of their loss. Every team we played were tough,” said Cartwright of the Bahamas’ 2-1 loss to Puerto Rico and 3-0 shutout to Canada in their round robin play in Group A. We didn’t have much of a chance against them.” W hile Russell went out with a shoulder injury after the first m atch against Puerto Rico, Foun tain played through her shoulder injury that she sustained against Canada. With Russell on the sideline, Cartwright stepped in and played in her spot against Canada and Colombia. In the relegation playoff against C olombia, Cartwright lost 6-3, 62 against Viky Nunez-Fuentes a nd Fountain dropped a 6-2, 6-1 decision to Mariana DuqiueM arino. Russell, did however, come back and finished up with fountain in the doubles, but they lost 2-1 to the team of NunezFuentes and Yuliana Lizarazo. Cartwright said they had a chance to win at least one of the matches against Colombia, but the toll of not playing sufficient matches at that calibre played a f actor in the outcome. Kerrie Cartwright, who actu a lly had the best chance to pulling off a win, said she wasn’t quite p repared to play because she had expected Russell to be ready to go. “After she was unable to play,I got a chance to play,” said Cartwright from Tampa, Florida where she went to spend a week training before she head to Mex ico and Brazil to play a couple of tournaments. “I was happy that I got a c hance to play because it was quite a learning experience. It hink if I had a little more expo sure to this level, I would have b een able to pull off the win.” Despite the loss, Cartwright said she still felt she played a good game and she was just glad that she got a chance to team up with Fountain in doubles on Friday against Canada. After injury ing her right shoulder against C anada, Fountain said she wasn’t at full strength against Colombia and it showed in her perfor mance. “I wasn’t able to go out there a nd do what I wanted to do,” said Fountain, who returned home to d o her rehab. “I didn’t play bad ly. It’s just that nothing that I w anted to do worked in my favour.” Fed Cup: Bahamas relegated to Zone II Three-woman team loses 3-0 to Colombia Nation demoted along with Puerto Rico WOMEN’S TENNIS: Montreal, Canada Striders come away with another victory BASKETBALL NPBA UPDATE THE New Providence Basketball Association continued its regular season action with games played on Friday and Saturday nights. R esults of those games are a s follows: Saturday night T he Y-Care Wreckers p owered past the Coke E xplorers 111-107. Brandon I ngraham scored a game h igh 32 points for the winn ers. Lamar Watkins had 25 in a losing effort. And the Sunshine auto Ruff Ryders blasted the foxies Pros 116-102. ErnestS aunders lid up the nets for a game high 42. HendersonC urry had 25 in the loss. Friday night P olice Crimestoppers def. the Johnson Trucking Jumpers 82-78. Freddie lightbourne scored a game high 26 points in the win. Able Joseph had 24 in the loss. And the Electro Telecom Cybots knocked off the S outhwest Printing Falcons 128-102. Delvonne Duncombe scored 32 points in t he win. Jude Rolle had a g ame high 36 in the loss. Tonight at the CI Gibson Gymnasium, another double header will take place. In the 7 pm opener, the Po.lice Crimestoppers will take on t he Southwest Printing Falc ons. In the 8:30 pm opener, t he Commonwealth Bank G iants will face the Y-Care’s W reckers. BASKETBALL BAISS CHAMPIONSHIPS THE Bahamas Association of Independent Secondary Schools will open its best-of-three championship series today at 4 pm at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. In the junior girls division, the Westminster Diplomats will take on Queen’s College Comets; in the junior boys division, the Kingsway Academy Saints will face SAC; in the senior girls division, SAC will play St. John’s Giants and in the senior boys division, Kingsway Academy will meet Westminster. Game two in all series will be played on Wednesday, starting at 4 pm at Kendal Isaacs. SOFTBALL NATIONAL TEAM PRACTICE THE Bahamas Softball Federation has announced that its workout sessions for the national teams will be held every Monday and Wednesday at 7 pm for the men and Tuesdays and Thursdays at 7 pm and Saturdays at 8 am for the ladies at the Baillou Hills Sporting Complex. All selected coaches and players must attend and be on time. National team director Godfrey ‘Gully’ Burnside is asking that all players and coaches make an effort so that the federation can select the best team possible. Family Island coaches are asked to workout with their selected Family Island players at the same time. New Providence Basketball Association continues regular season action TEAMEFFORT: Pictured, left to right, are: Nikkita Fountain, Kerrie Cartwright and Larikah Russell. NIKKITA Fountain in action. AMBASSADORS’ Danielle Gibson wins the under-15 girls high jump. GOLDEN EAGLES’ Jasmine Sutherland crosses the line for the win in the 100 metres. PAGES 16 and 17: Results and more photos P H O T O S : F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page 18

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C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS THE results of the Star Trackers/Baker’s Constuction TrackC lassic held on Saturday at the Thomas A. Robinson Track and field Stadium are posted below: G irls 50 Meter Dash UNDER 7 Finals 1, Capron, Marissa, Striders, 9.78, w:NWI. 2, Lightbourne, Aisha, Club Monica, 10.28, w:NWI. 3, Miller, Shaunece, Bahamas Speed DY,1 0.41, w:NWI. Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 7 1, Capron, Marissa, Striders, 18.73, w:2.7. 2, Lightbourne, Aisha, Club M onica, 20.60, w:1.2. 3, Mortimer, Madison, Striders, 20.74, w:2.7. Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 9 1, Wright, Deante, Striders, 16.31, w:NWI. 2, Lightbourne, Tyler, Strid-e rs, 16.82, w:2.1. 3, Baptiste, Karolyn, Striders, 17.57, w:2.1. Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 9 1, Wilson, Gem, Striders, 32.91, w:NWI. 2 , Wright, Deante, Striders, 33.89, w:NWI. 3, Lightbourne, Tyler, Striders, 35.23, w:5.9. Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 9 1, Striders 'A' 1:12.20. 2, Striders ' B' 1:18.12. Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 11 1, Catalyn, Blayre, Sunblazers, 13.78, w:4.8. 2, Fountain, Britini, Striders, 1 4.81, w:3.4. 3, Newry, Tanae, Striders, 14.96, w:4.8. Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 11 1, Moss, Daejah, Striders, 30.46, w:6.1. 2, Fountain, Britini, Striders, 30.56, w:6.1. 3, Newry, Tanae, Striders, 3 1.24, w:4.9. Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 11 1, M oss, Daejah, Striders, 1:13.93. 2, Shaw, Danielle, Club Monica, 1:15.89,3, Collie, Kristia, Alliance Athleti, 1 :19.13. Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 11 1, Striders 'A' 1:01.18. 2, Sunblazers 'A' 1:05.34. 3, Club Monica 'A' 1 :06.49. Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 13 1, H enderson, Janiece, Spirit OF Excell, 13.59, w:3.8. 2, Miller, Destini, Gold-en Eagles, 13.69, w:4.6. 3, Fergus on, Andira, Striders, 13.92, w:3.8. Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 13 1, S utherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles, 27.59, w:4.6. 2, Henderson, Janiece, S pirit OF Excell, 27.97, w:4.6. 3, Taylor, Ieisha, Striders, 28.14, w:5.6. G irls 400 Meter Run UNDER 13 1, Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles, 1:06.79. 2, Ambrose, Jenae, Club Monica, 1:07.72. 3, Taylor, Ieisha, Striders, 1:08.28. Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 13 1, Striders 'A' 58.08. 2, Golden Eagles 'A' 58.81. 3, Striders 'B' 1:00.83. G irls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 13 1, Striders 'A' 4:39.95. Girls Long Jump UNDER 13 1, Taylor, Ieisha, Striders, 3.88m, w:NWI. 2, Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles, 3.86m, w:NWI. 3, Ambrose, Jenae, Club Monica, 3.66m, w:NWI. G irls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 15 1, Hield, Khadejah, Golden Eagles, 1 2.74, w:3.6. 2, White, Makeya, Club Monica, 12.84, w:3.6. 3, Cox, Carmiesha, Star Trackers, 12.94, w:4.0. Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 15 (w: 5.7 Bahamas Speed DY, 25.97. 2, Gibs on, Danielle, Ambassadors, 26.58. 3, White, Makeya, Club Monica, 26.60. G irls 400 Meter Run UNDER 15 1, Seymour, Pedrya, Bahamas Speed D Y, 1:02.35. 2, Thompson, Talia, Striders, 1:03.77. 3, Walker, Vanillian, Striders, 1:04.79. Girls 800 Meter Run UNDER 15 1, Rolle, Hollie, T Bird Flyers, 2:39.04. 2, David, Johnique, Striders, 2:41.39. 3, Williams, Spring, T Bird Flyers, 2 :41.79. Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 15 1, Sunblazers 'A' 53.24. 2, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 53.78. 3, Club Mon i ca 'A' 53.93. Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 15 1, Striders 'A' 4:33.25. 2, Golden Eagles 'A' 4:52.47. 3, Road Runners ' A' 4:56.35. Girls High Jump UNDER 15 1, Gibson, Danielle, Ambassadors, 1.50m. 2, Thompson, Talia, Striders, 1.44m. 3, Strachan, Andriel, Star Trackers, 1.39m. Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 17 1, M iller, Shaunae, Club Monica, 12.16, w:3.3. 2, Strachan, Anthonique, Silver L ightning, 12.26, w:3.8. 3, MACKEY, Sara, Road Runners, 12.45, w :3.8. Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 17 1, Strachan, Anthonique, Silver Lightning, 24.96, w:2.3. 2, Johnson, Likeira, Golden Eagles, 26.68, w:3.6. 3, Thompson, Courtney, Club Moni ca, 27.18, w:3.6. G irls 400 Meter Run UNDER 17 1, Adderley, Teshon, T Bird Flyers,1 :00.16. 2, Farrington, Bianca, Neymour Athletic, 1:01.37. 3, Johnson, L ikeira, Golden Eagles, 1:03.26. Girls 800 Meter Run UNDER 17 1, C herilus, Angela, Silver Lightning, 2:50.97. 2, Farrington, Bianca, Neym our Athletic, 3:04.42. Girls 1500 Meter Run UNDER 17 1, Heinel, Alice, Striders, 5:37.86. 2, Hield, Jane, Golden Eagles, 5:40.43. 3, Cherilus, Angela, Silver Lightning, 6:03.79. Girls 100 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17 (w: 3.2 Trackers, 15.05. G irls 300 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17 1, Rolle, Kryshell, Striders, 1:01.47. G irls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 17 1, Road Runners 'A' 51.55. 2, Gold en Eagles 'A' 52.30. 3, Silver Lightning 'A' 53.70. Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 17 1, Road Runners 'A' 4:30.49. 2, Golden Eagles 'A' 4:45.95. G irls High Jump UNDER 17 1, Ferguson, Khadajah, Striders, 1.42m. G irls Long Jump UNDER 17 1, Barr, Regina, Andros North & C, 5 .13m, w:NWI. 2, Ferguson, Khada jah, Striders, 4.92m, w:NWI. 3, Moss, L akera, Andros North & C, 4.63m, w:NWI. G irls Shot Put UNDER 17 1, Williams, Raquel, R. C. Athletics, 11.73m. 2, Hamilton, Cymone, Star Trackers, 7.88m. 3, MACKEY, Latisha, Zion Christian S, 7.43m. Girls Discus Throw UNDER 17 1, Williams, Raquel, R. C. Athletics, 3 4.84m. 2, Hamilton, Cymone, Star Trackers, 22.41m. 3, Smith, Amanda, B ahamas Speed DY, 16.12m. Women 100 Meter Dash OPEN 1, J ohnson, Carlene, Golden Eagles, 12.15, w:4.6. 2, Morley, Domonique, Bahamas Speed DY, 12.34, w:4.6. 3, McDonald, Arthurnique, Ambas sadors, 12.44, w:4.6. Women 200 Meter Dash OPEN 1, Smith, Katarina, Golden Eagles, 2 4.69, w:3.2. 2, Robinson, V'Alonee, Club Monica, 24.74, w:3.7. 3, Sey m our, Katrina, Ambassadors, 25.01, w:3.2. W omen 400 Meter Run OPEN 1, Smith, Katarina, Golden Eagles, 57.24. 2, Burnside, Deshana, Bahamas Speed DY, 57.52. 3, Sey-m our, Katrina, Ambassadors, 58.51. Women 800 Meter Run OPEN 1, Burnside, Deshana, Bahamas Speed DY, 2:27.53. 2, Johnson, Ashley, Star T rackers, 2:29.03. 3, Sands, Desirae, B ahamas Speed DY, 2:32.61. Women 1500 Meter Run OPEN 1, Rolle, Hughnique, T Bird Flyers, 5:10.78. 2, Sands, Desirae, BahamasS peed DY, 5:32.04. 3, Swann, Mikala, Golden Eagles, 5:41.56. Women 100 Meter Hurdles OPEN (w: NWI M onica, 14.84. 2, Charlton, Lauren, Star Trackers, 16.13. 3, Robinson, V'Alonee, Club Monica, 17.05. Women 4x100 Meter Relay OPEN 1, Club Monica 'A' 49.09. 2, StarT rackers 'A' 49.83. 3, Golden Eagles 'A' 50.58. Women 4x400 Meter Relay OPEN 1, Bahamas Speed Dynamics 'A' 4 :07.66. 2, Star Trackers 'A' 4:16.74. 3, Golden Eagles 'A' 4:18.51. Women High Jump OPEN 1, Culmer, Kenya, Striders, 1.65m. Women Shot Put OPEN 1, Dunc anson, Julianna, College OF Baham, 11.22m. 2, Dennard, Danielle, College OF Baham, 8.26m. 3, Cox, Sharell, Striders, 8.06m. W omen Discus Throw OPEN 1, Duncanson, Julianna, College OF Baham, 38.42m. 2, Dennard, Danielle, College OF Baham, 22.47m. Boys 50 Meter Dash UNDER 7 (w: NWI) 1, Riley, Edwin, Spirit OF Excell, 1 0.72. 2, Wilson, Joshua, Striders, 10.83. 3, Wright, Tevin, Striders, 1 0.97. Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 7 (w: 3.2E xcell, 21.41. 2, Wright, Tevin, Striders, 21.49. 3, McPhee, Jonathan,S triders, 22.14. Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 9 1, W illie, Juwan, Star Trackers, 16.15, w:2.0. 2, Bannister, Zion, Sunblaze rs, 16.24, w:3.2. 3, Butler, Jerry Christopher, Sunblazers, 16.51, w:2.0. B oys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 9 1, Miller, Shaun, Bahamas Speed DY,3 4.02, w:5.4. 2, Bannister, Zion, Sunblazers, 34.07, w:4.5. 3, Major, Cruz, S unblazers, 34.42, w:5.4. Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 9 1 , Sunblazers 'B' 1:12.45. 2, Sunblazers 'A' 1:16.19. Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 11 1, Johnson, Christopher, Striders, 14.52, w:3.1. 2, Gardiner, Vincent, Striders, 14.60, w:4.1. 3, Pratt, Daniel, N. G. M. Major H, 14.63, w:3.9. Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 11 1, R olle, Branson, Road Runners, 29.34, w:6.0. 2, Johnson, Christopher, Strid ers, 29.66, w:4.7. 3, Newbold, Zhivargo, Striders, 29.94, w:6.0. RESULTS: STARTRACKERS/BAKER’S CONSTRUCTION TRACK CLASSIC STRIDERS’ Talia Thompson tries to clear the bar. SEE page 17 F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f

PAGE 17

Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 11 1, Newbold, Zhivargo, Striders, 1:11.62. 2, Knowles, Cameron, Ambassadors, 1 :13.21. 3, Coakley, Katraz, Road Runners, 1:14.62. Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 11 1, Road Runners 'A' 1:00.12. 2, S triders 'A' 1:00.31. 3, Striders 'B' 1:02.68. Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 13 1, Cash, Shalom, Spirit OF Excell, 12.81, w:4.7. 2, Cash, Scharann, Spirit OF E xcell, 12.88, w:4.5. 3, Nixon, Recarno, Road Runners, 13.32, w:4.5. Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 13 1, C ash, Scharann, Spirit OF Excell, 2 6.50, w:5.6. 2, Cash, Shalom, Spirit OF Excell, 26.70, w:3.8. 3, Major, Darius, Sunblazers, 27.99, w:5.6. Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 13 1, S weeting, Kenneth, Club Monica, 1:09.05. 2, Simmons, Kyle, H.O. Nash, 1:09.49. 3, Wilkinson, Jordan, Spirit OF Excell, 1:12.65. B oys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 13 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 55.03. 2, Road Runners 'A' 57.95. 3, Striders 'A' 58.85. Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 13 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 4:41.81. 2, Road Runners 'A' 5:10.18. Boys Long Jump UNDER 13 1, Rolle, Anthony, Striders, 4.09m,w :NWI. 2, Major, Darius, Sunblazers, 3.79m, w:NWI. 3, Bowe, Tyler, Golden Eagles, 3.77m, w:NWI. B oys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 15 1, Davis, Delano, Golden Eagles, 11.44, w:5.1. 2, Major, Clarence, Nassau Christian, 12.11, w:NWI. 3, Martin, Shanton, Ambassadors, 12.32, w:3.0. B oys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 15 1, Rahming, Gerrio, Spirit OF Excell,2 4.42, w:4.8. 2, Carey, Tre, Striders, 24.99, w:5.1. 3, King, Shaquille, Silv er Lightning, 25.04, w:4.5. Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 15 1, Riley, Ashley, Spirit OF Excell, 57.73. 2, Charlton, Demetri, Spirit OF Excell, 58.02. 3, Deal, Mario, Golden Eagles,5 8.58. Boys 800 Meter Run UNDER 15 1, H iggins, Nakita, Star Trackers, 2:20.06. 2, Deal, Mario, Golden Eagles, 2:20.75. 3, Wilson, Thomas, Striders, 2:34.03. Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 15 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 49.55. 2, Star Trackers 'A' 49.70. 3, Zion Chris t ian School 'A' 51.33. Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 15 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 3:58.97. 2, Star Trackers 'A' 4:13.27. 3, Strid ers 'A' 4:17.74. Boys High Jump UNDER 15 1, Caokley, Xavier, Road Runners, 1.65m. 2, Davis, Delano, Golden Eagles, 1.58m. 3, Anderson, Calvin, Golden Eagles, 1.52m. Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 17 1, M unroe, Stephen, Star Trackers, 10.79, w:3.5. 2, Carter, Harold, Spir it OF Excell, 10.83, w:3.2. 3, Rolle, Javon, Road Runners, 11.14, w:5.3. B oys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 17 1, Munroe, Stephen, Star Trackers, 22.14, w:3.4. 2, Carter, Harold, Spirit OF Excell, 22.35, w:4.9. 3, Rolle, Javon, Road Runners, 22.63, w:3.4. B oys 400 Meter Run UNDER 17 1, Cooper, Julino, Kenyan Knights, 52.81. 2, Lockhart, Michael, Kenyan Knights, 54.21. 3, Archer, Nicholas, S tar Trackers, 54.31. Boys 800 Meter Run UNDER 17 1, Wallace, Ashton, Golden Eagles, 2:08.10. 2, Hall, Tevin, T Bird Flyers, 2:09.10. 3, Rahming, Earl, Alliance A thleti, 2:10.11. Boys 1500 Meter Run UNDER 17 1, Cargill, Duane, Star Trackers, 4:42.26. 2, Lafleur, Lopez, T Bird Flyers, 4:44.84. 3, Minns, Marvin, Alliance Athleti, 4:48.21. Boys 100 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17 (w: 3.2 Trackers, 14.00. 2, Minns, Lathario, J umpers Inc., 14.46. 3, Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc., 14.81. Boys 400 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17 1, Bodie, Patrick, Star Trackers, 5 6.53. 2, Hepburn, Stephan, Club Monica, 1:02.53. Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 17 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 45.39. 2, Golden Eagles 'A' 46.04. 3, SilverL ightning 'A' 46.19. Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 17 1, Star Trackers 'A' 3:35.11. 2, Star Trackers 'B' 3:40.90. 3, Alliance Athletics 'A' 3:44.97. B oys High Jump UNDER 17 1, Hinsey, Jaran, R. C. Athletics, 1.85m.2 , Munroe, Julian, Golden Eagles, 1.67m. B oys Long Jump UNDER 17 1, Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc., 6.45m, w:NWI. 2, McDonald, Jerome, Jumpers Inc., 6.23m, w:NWI. 3, Newbold, Stephen, Star Trackers,6 .05m, w:NWI. Boys Shot Put UNDER 17 1, Nott age, Deangelo, R. C. Athletics, 12.88m. 2, Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau C hristian, 10.95m. 3, Rolle, Matthew, Government High, 10.20m. Boys Discus Throw UNDER 17 1, Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau Christian, 26.14m. 2, Wilson, Albert, Nassau C hristian, 25.48m. 3, Whyms, Michael, Nassau Christian, 24.16m. B oys Javelin Throw UNDER 17 1, Ferguson, Byron, T Bird Flyers, 47.97m. 2, Nottage, Deangelo, R. C. Athletics, 38.55m. 3, Darling, Sammy, Silver Lightning, 30.88m. B oys Shot Put UNDER 20 1, Carey, Elvardo, R. C. Athletics, 13.25m. 2, T urnquest, Tobias, N. G. M. Major H, 11.53m. 3, Rolle, Harrington, A ndros North & C, 11.49m. Men 100 Meter Dash OPEN 1, Thompson, Marcus, Ambassadors, 10.64, w:3.1. 2, MACKEY, Trevor, Star Trackers, 10.77, w:3.8. 3, M cPhee, Kaadem, Golden Eagles, 10.89, w:3.5. M en 200 Meter Dash OPEN 1, Higgs, Alfred, Kenyan Knights, 21.86, w :3.2. 2, MACKEY, Trevor, Star Trackers, 22.00, w:4.1. 3, McPhee,K aadem, Golden Eagles, 22.22, w:3.4. Men 400 Meter Run OPEN 1, M iller, Brandon, Ambassadors, 4 9.87. 2, Russell, Alonzo, Golden Eagles, 50.59. 3, Porter, Eric, Golden E agles, 50.89. Men 800 Meter Run OPEN 1, Newb old, Laquardo, T Bird Flyers, 1:57.92. 2, Williams, Jason, AllianceA thleti, 1:59.66. 3, Wallace-Whitfield, Kenneth, Star Trackers, 2:01.06. Men 1500 Meter Run OPEN 1, Williams, Jason, Alliance Athleti, 4:15.69. 2, Carey, James Audley, Star T rackers, 4:18.71. 3, Kingsley, Cajudte, Golden Eagles, 4:34.85. M en 110 Meter Hurdles OPEN (w: 4.0) 1, Wilmore, Aaron, Ambass adors, 14.87. 2, Williams, Jason, Bahamas Speed DY, 14.97. 3, Pala c ious, Douglas, Jumpers Inc., 15.79. Men 400 Meter Hurdles OPEN 1, Burnside, Nejmi, Star Trackers, 55.38. 2, Cox, Rikeo, Kenyan Knights, 1:13.20. M en 4x100 Meter Relay OPEN 1, Golden Eagles 'A' 43.69. 2, AllianceA thletics 'A' 43.97. 3, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 44.49. M en 4x400 Meter Relay OPEN 1, G olden Eagles 'A' 3:22.58. 2, Ambassadors 'A' 3:24.77. 3, Alliance Ath l etics 'A' 3:25.74. Men High Jump OPEN 1, Bullard, T roi, Golden Eagles, 2.06m. 2, Martin, Shanrice, Zion Christian S, 1 .80m. 3, Wilson, Wheatly, Striders, 1 .74m. Men Triple Jump OPEN 1, Deveaux, J 'Vente, Star Trackers, 15.33m, w:NWI. 2, Bullard, Troi, Golden E agles, 14.25m, w:NWI. 3, Palacious, Douglas, Jumpers Inc., 13.74m,w :NWI. Men Shot Put OPEN 1, Cox, Saron, Striders, 11.52m. 2, Rox, Devon, College OF Baham, 11.37m. 3, Lightbourne, Benjamin, College OF Baham, 1 0.19m. Men Discus Throw OPEN 1, Cox, S aron, Striders, 34.68m. 2, Miller Sr., Shaun, Bahamas Speed DY, 3 2.54m. 3, Turnquest, Tobias, N. G. M. Major H, 30.21m. M en Javelin Throw OPEN 1, Rox, Devon, College OF Baham, 48.60m. 2, Carey, Elvardo, R. C. Athletics, 48.33m. 3, Saunders, Jevaughn, College OF Baham, 46.73m. T eam Standings 1, Striders, 688; 2, Golden Eagles, 4 61; 3. Star Trackers, 349.50; 4. Spirit of Excellence, 307; 5. Road Run n ers, 262.50; 6. Club Monica, 209; 7. Sunblazers, 191; 8. Bahamas Speed Dynamics, 148; 9. Amabassadors, 1 45; 10. Silver Lightning, 111; 12. T-Bird, 97; 13. Collge of the Bahamas, 96; 14. RC Athletics, 66; 15. Nassau Christian Academy, 63; 16. Zion Christian ASchool, 49; 17.K enyan Knights, 47; 18. Jumpers Inc., 46; 19. LN Coakley, 33; 19. Andros North & Central, 33; 19. Central Eleuthera, 33; 22. HO Nash, 28; 2 3. Neymour Athletics, 21; 24. Government High, 17; 25. NGM Major High, 15; 26. Abaco Central, 11; 27. North Long Island High, 8. Top three finishers in each divis ion: Under-7 combined Striders, 94; Spirit of Excellence, 20; Club monica, 19. Under-9 combined Striders, 92; Sunblazers, 68; Star Trackers, 14. Under-11 combined Striders, 155; Road Runners, 62; Sunblazers, 53. Under-13 combined Striders, 139; S pirit of Excellence, 116; Golden Eagles, 70. Under-15 combined Striders, 109; Spirit of Excellence, 99; Golden E agles, 91. Under-17 combined Golden Eagles, 126; Star Trackers, 126; Silver Lightning, 84. Open division combined Golden E agles 169; Star Trackers, 125; College of the Bahamas, 96. Female under 7 -Striders, 45; Club Monica, 19; Bahamas Speed Dynami c, 10. Female under-9 Striders, 91; Club monica, 7. Female under-11 Striders, 83; Sunblazers, 35; Club monica, 21. F emale under-13 Striders, 105; Golden Eagles 60; Spirit of Excellence, 21. Female under-15 Striders, 68; Sunb lazers, 37; Golden Eagles, 30. Female under-17 Golden Eagles 72; Road Runners 58; Silver Lightning, 46. Female open Golden Eagles, 68; B ahamas Speed Dynamics, 65; Club Monica, 53. Male under-7 Striders, 49; Spirit of Excellence, 20. Male under 9 Sunblazers, Sunblazers, 68; Bahamas Speed Dynamica, 14; Star Trackers, 14. Male under-11 Striders, 72; Road runners, 48; Sunblazers, 18. M ale under-13 Spirit of Excellence, 95; Road Runners, 59; Striders, 34. Male under-15 Spirit of Excellence, 83; Golden Eagles, 61; Star Tracke rs, 48.50. Male under-17 Star Trackers, 100; Golden Eagles, 54; Nassau Christian Academy, 44. Male open Golden Eagles, 101; S tar Trackers, 73; Ambassadors, 59. C M Y K C M Y K SPORTS TRIBUNE SPORTS MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 17 Smart ChoiceDRIVESales M M a ar r c ch h 7 7t th h , , 2 20 00 09 9SPACE DONATED BY: BROWN, MORLEYAND SMITH REALTY RESULTS: STARTRACKERS/BAKER’S CONSTRUCTION TRACK CLASSIC F e l i p M a j o r / T r i b u n e s t a f f NCA’S Wilton Johnson wins the under-15 boys’ 400 metres. F ROM page 16




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Volume: 105 No.64

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Three arrested
after incident in
broad daylight

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

GUNSHOTS were fired from
a car in West Bay Street over
the weekend leading to a police
chase and the arrest of two men
and a woman.

The incident, which hap-
pened in broad daylight,
brought gun terror to the
streets of Nassau for the second
time in three days, following a
dramatic shootout in Montagu
last week which rocked the
community.

At least one gunshot was

fired in West Bay Street at
around 4pm on Saturday and
officers from the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit (DEV) on patrol in
western New Providence traced
it to a gold Honda Accord.

As the occupants of the
Accord tried to flee police by
heading east, a high speed chase
ensued.

An object thrown from the
car was later discovered to be a
.38mm handgun with four live
rounds of ammunition, police
say.

The car was stopped by police

SEE page 14

Major employer on Bimini
‘packs up and leaves’

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FIFTY Biminites have been left in the lurch to scramble for a
source of income after one of the island’s main employers packed
up and left without telling them whether he was coming back,

according to locals.

Power at the Big Game Resort and Marina in Alice Town, Bimi-
ni, was switched off by the Bahamas Electricity Corporation in the

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BAHAMAS EDITION

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009



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SEE PAGE FIFTEEN

13th Bishop
of the Diocese
is inducted

Hundreds of Anglicans
attend the ceremony

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.com

HUNDREDS of devout Anglicans
gathered at Christ Church Cathedral
yesterday when the Rt Rev Laish Zane
Boyd was officially inducted as 13th
Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas.

Local clergymen were joined by var-
ious Bishops and Archbishops from
throughout the region including Turks
and Caicos, Barbados and South Flori- ap DRrAGene
da. The rare enthronement ceremony Yanna-Martin
was last seen in the Bahamas in 1995. welcomed Rt Rev Boyd

Filled with pomp and pageantry, the
inauguration of Rt Rev Boyd was initiated by performances
by the Enthronement Choir, the Anglican Youth Ensemble,
various musical selections, and was attended by state officials
and dignitaries.

Glenys Hanna-Martin, national chairman of the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, issued a press statement welcoming
Rt Rev Boyd as the newest Bishop of the Diocese of the
Bahamas.

“The Anglican Church has played an important role in the
spiritual development of our people and in our national
development generally.

“We are convinced that Bishop Boyd will bring his own
vision imbued with the wisdom, passion and love required
to meet the heavy challenges our country today faces. We
pledge our full support to his work and his efforts in this

SEE page 14

Felipé Major/Tribune staff



Increased air transport cost ends
Tribune delivery to Family Islands



THE 13TH Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and the Turks and
Caicos Islands, Bishop Laish Zane Boyd, is pictured during his
enthronement ceremony. See story top right and more photos on
pages 12 and 13.

middle of last year after the owner allegedly failed to meet his oblig-

SEE page 14

Kellys" 5 Move

Tel: fet 343) aye teee



Concern over alleged treatment of
families in immigration exercise

THE TRIBUNE regrets to
have to announce today that it
will no longer be able to deliver
this newspaper to its Family
Island readers because of the
increased cost of air transport.

However, The Tribune is now
online at www.tribune242.com
and will be posted for readers
by 2pm on the day of publica-
tion. Tuesday morning’s Tri-
bune will be the last delivery by
Bahamasair. Wednesday’s Tri-
bune can be read on line from

2pm that day and for all follow-
ing week days.

This announcement will not
affect the daily delivery of The
Tribunes to Harbour Island on
the Bohengy, nor will it affect
the delivery by Western Air to
Andros.

However, it will affect readers
in Freeport, Eleuthera, Abaco,
Exuma, Crooked Island and
Long Island.

SEE page 14

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

WITNESSES to the recent
immigrant apprehension exer-
cise on Eleuthera claim Haitian
families were forced out of their
homes in bitter cold weather
and made to await transporta-
tion to the mainland in an out-
door containment site.

One concerned resident told
The Tribune that she witnessed

around 3am Wednesday, result-
ed in the round-up of close to
200 Haitians in various island
settlements, including Gover-
nor’s Harbour, Palmetto Point
and Harbour Island.

However, Immigration Direc-
tor Jack Thompson denied on
Friday that any officers acted in
an inappropriate way.

“To my knowledge, the exer-
cise was carried out in a
humane, sensitive and profes-















Rastafarians claim certain private
schools are ‘unconstitutional’

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

RASTAFARIAN parents claim certain private schools are
unconstitutional by not allowing children to dress in religious
attire because it does not comply with uniform regulations.
he said.

sional manner,”

Mr Thompson explained that
prior to officers being dis-
patched to the island, they were

SEE page 14

some of those apprehended
being forced to leave their
homes “wearing only panties
and a bra.”

The exercise, carried out

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

NASSAU’S international
airport has been without its
own ambulance for ten years,
it has emerged.

Passengers involved in the
recent crash landing of a flight
from Andros said they had to
wait on the grass for an ambu-
lance to take the injured away
for treatment.

Now airport employees are
expressing concern about
what would happen if a major
crash occurred.

One said that, based on test
times of ambulances coming
from the city, emergency
crews would not make it in
time to save lives.

“From an operational point
of view it is believed that the
ambulances that are stationed
in the city can make the
response time within the
required 15 minutes at the air-
port for a normal emergency,
which we have proven could
happen, but for most of the
time there is massive delay,”
the employee said.

The employee said from
the late 1980s ambulances had
to drive from the city to the
airport to assist.

“The airport is growing.

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Employees express concern about what
would happen if major crash occurred

LYNDEN PINDLI

INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

With the airport being an
industrial environment, there
is the need for at least the
minimum for basic medical
services,” the source added.
Medical director for EMS,
Dr Alvry Hanna, said they
have recognised the need for
an ambulance at the airport.

Requests

“It was found at that time
before the ambulance was
removed that the call volume
for requests for the ambulance
was low and they were needed
more in the community areas.

“So that ambulance was
pulled away from the airport.
It usually takes 20 or more
minutes for the ambulance to
arrive from in the city,” Dr
Hanna said.

He said currently there is a
sickbay at the airport with
only two nurses at a time.

“We have two shifts at the
sick bay with one nurse at a
time, between 8am to 3pm
and 3pm to 10pm. Overnight,
the crash and fire persons are
there after the nurse leaves,”
Dr Hanna said.

Chief Fire Officer for crash
and fire rescue at the airport,
Samuel Clarke, said the dis-
tance the ambulance has to

travel from Princess Margaret
Hospital is between 15 and
17 miles.

Mr Clarke said despite not
having an ambulance at this
time, the airport is still in good
standing with International
Civil Aviation Organisation
(ICAO) standards.

“The ICAO recommends
that once we reach a category
eight and above at the airport,
there must be an ambulance
present. We are at a category
seven therefore it is not man-
dated at this time to have one
stationed at the airport.

“However, with all of the
development going on at the
airport, we are not too far
away from reaching category
eight status. They also require
us to have a response time of
no more than 15 minutes

which is still something that is
being worked on,” Mr Clarke
said.

Dr Hanna said one initia-
tive the EMS is working on is
decentralising EMS through-
out the community.

Downtown

“Instead of having all of the
ambulances stationed down-
town, we want to have them
spread out through the com-
munities. We are looking at
attaching our ambulances to
the community clinics and we
think this is the best scenario
to work for us as they would
be able to respond more
quickly to issues in the com-
munity,” he added.

Dr Hanna said they are try-
ing to reinstate the ambulance
at the airport.

“We have to try and take it
in stages by looking at our
resources, logistics and
staffing.

“Our plan is that we can cut
down on response time as we
have realised this is one of the
main issues the community
has.

“We want to be able to
respond more quickly to the
public,” Dr Hanna said.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 3



Ex-Pizza Hut staff claim employer

has failed to pay severance money

0 In bail |



Javaughn Delancy

Man charged
with making
death threats

FREEPORT - Javaughn
Delancy was charged in
Freeport Magistrate’s
Court with making death
threats.

It is alleged that on Feb-
ruary 5, the accused
threatened to kill a 21-
year-old female resident of
Pinder’s Point, putting her
in fear of the life.

Delancy pleaded not
guilty to the charge. The
case was adjourned to
March 23.

Because Delancy was
out on an outstanding
bench warrant on another
matter, he was remanded
to Her Majesty’s Prison.

Man accused
of Killing in
the course of
dangerous
driving

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE

A MAN charged ina
2007 traffic accident which
claimed the life of a 36-
year-old Adelaide Village
resident has been
arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court.

Kervens Forrestal, 27, of
Cowpen Road, was
accused of killing in the
course of dangerous dri-
ving.

It is alleged that around
12.45am on Monday, Feb-
ruary 5, 2007, Forrestal
drove a truck east on Ade-
laide Road in a manner
dangerous to the public,
causing the death of
Dominic Redhead.

Redhead was reportedly
travelling west on Ade-
laide Road in a green Toy-
ota Avalon when the acci-
dent occurred.

A Ford F150 truck and a
Ford Ranger, both head-
ing east, were also
involved in the crash. Red-
head died at the scene
while six others were
detained in hospital.

Forrestal, who appeared
before Magistrate Renee
McKay in Court 6, Parlia-
ment Street, was informed
that the matter would pro-
ceed by way of a voluntary
bill of indictment.

He was granted $10,000
bail with one surety. The
case has been adjourned to
April 8, 2009.

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m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MINISTER of Labour Dion
Foulkes has pledged to inves-
tigate complaints by displaced
Pizza Hut workers who say
they are fuming at their for-
mer employer’s failure to pay
severance money.

The ex-employees, who
worked at the now closed
Cable Beach location, are frus-
trated that nearly three
months after the restaurant
shut its doors without notice
— leaving about 30 jobless — no
redundancy payments have
been made.

They say they are ready to
take legal action after lodging
a complaint with the Depart-
ment of Labour last Novem-
ber.

Yesterday Mr Foulkes said
while he did not know details
of the negotiations, he was
aware that the Department of
Labour was engaged in bring-
ing about a settlement.

"What I will do, now that
it's (the delay) been brought
to my attention, is do an inves-
tigation to see to what extent I
can assist in bringing about an

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MINISTER OF LABOUR Dion
Foulkes has said he will
investigate the complaints.

immediate resolution to this
problem,” the minister said.

Mr Foulkes advised the agi-
tated group to file a trade dis-
pute against Pizza Hut with
the Department of Labour to
avoid a complicated and
lengthy court battle.

"The process is set up at the
Department of Labour so that
it makes it easier for aggrieved
persons to file a dispute with-
out an attorney. It doesn't
adhere to all of the provisions

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of the legal procedure and it's
a very simple process. The
whole idea is that a lot of peo-
ple who are redundant or laid
off, are not in a position to
afford a lawyer so the depart-
ment is set up with that in
mind," he said.

According to one former
employee who worked for the
company since the late 1980s,
on November 8 employees
were assembled for an emer-
gency meeting where they
were told the restaurant would
be closed with immediate
effect.

During this meeting, a man-
ager reportedly told the group
they would receive a final pay-
ment. The worker, who asked
to have her name withheld,
said the workers made a claim
with the Labour Board the
next day.

But despite months of wran-
gling, the employees - some of
whom are still jobless - are
looking for answers and com-
pensation from their former
employers.

“We need our money and
nobody wants to pay us. I have
a car payment and rent due,”
said the employee.

Another employee who









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worked at both the Mackey
Street and Cable Beach loca-
tions for 11 years before the
stores shut their doors perma-
nently said: "It's bad because
you put in your loyal years and
this is how they treat you.
They said the money was

going to be ready for us by
December 15. That has come
and gone."

With no current job and
three children, the single
mother said she has resorted
to asking family and friends
for money.

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.CS.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Obama may learn from slips on stimulus

WASHINGTON (AP) — On his first big test,
Barack Obama made some rookie mistakes and
strategic missteps. But he still appears headed for
a win on the centrepiece of his agenda, a huge eco-
nomic recovery programme, with the fresh strik-
ing of a bipartisan deal in the Senate. Legislative
leaders, including some fellow Democrats who
support him, chalked up his problems to inexpe-
rience and some initial miscalculations over the
lack of Republican support, and they suggest he'll
learn from the rocky start. Americans have
learned, too, a little about how their new president
works.

He's swung from being conciliatory to bad-
gering Congress to act, from courting the opposi-
tion to taking partisan swipes. He's had to fight to
keep from losing control of the message. And all
this is playing out against a background of Cabinet
problems, economic distress and global distrac-
tions.

Some veteran Democrats say Obama could
have made it easier for himself.

"T think it is important that he reached out. But
lesson learned: It would have been better for him
to send up his idea of a bill,” instead of having
House Democratic leaders initiate the process,
said Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein. Leaders
of both parties agree the slumping U.S. economy
requires strong stimulus, an argument reinforced
by a government report showing soaring new job
losses. Obama will likely get most of what he
wants. On the job under three weeks, he still has
a large reservoir of good will on Capitol Hill.

But things haven't gone quite the way the new
Obama team expected. It's been a rough two
weeks of on-the-job training on the legislative
process from the other end of Pennsylvania
Avenue for the former one-term Illinois senator.
Still, Obama aides claimed they were satisfied
with the results, given the enormity of the chal-
lenge. "In a matter of weeks, we moved through
both houses of Congress a very complex piece of
legislation,” Obama senior adviser David Axelrod
said Saturday in an interview. "I don't know if
there is a parallel in history."

While Obama reached out energetically to
members of both parties, he didn't win a single
Republican vote in the House. In the Senate,
Democrats late Friday reached a deal with a small
band of Republican moderates that set the stage
for expected approval within the next few days.
The recovery package was put together by con-
gressional Democrats in partnership with Oba-
ma, a process begun during Obama's transition.
The administration decided against starting off
the process by submitting its own detailed leg-
islative package. Even though Obama and top
aides stayed close to the process, the result was an
$819 billion package packed with spending pro-
jects, some of which struck even some fiscally
conservative Democrats as not particularly stim-
ulative. In the Senate, an even larger package
was considered, although the deal struck Friday
night pared it back some.

The size and composition of the plan gave
Republicans an opening to assert that Obama
had given too much leeway to House Speaker
Nancy Pelosi and House Banking Committee
Chairman Barney Frank. And they also could
argue that, while Obama had offered to consider
Republican suggestions for the package, none
wound up in the legislation.

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In not sending his own legislation to Congress,
Obama did the exact opposite of what President
Bill Clinton did in 1993 when he tried to get Con-
gress to swallow whole a detailed health care
overhaul plan put together by a task force headed
by his wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton. That take-it-
or-leave it approach alienated Congress.

Pennsylvania Gov. Ed Rendell, who has active-
ly championed the stimulus bill, said Obama stum-
bled at first by ceding the debate to Capitol Hill
and not stepping out more forcefully to explain the
bill to the public.

"A small percentage of this bill, the unneces-
sary spending, allowed Republicans — who have
played politics on this from the beginning — to
discredit it so public opinion is against it,” Rendell,
the chairman of the National Governors Associ-
ation, said in an interview Friday. "We need a
massive stimulus bill with spending. Every econ-
omist says that. And yet the American people
are against it now because we let the Republi-
cans spin."

Democratic Congressman James Clyburn said
Republican critics were able to define the legis-
lation as a bloated spending measure being rushed
through Congress. He said he was pleased that
Obama had shifted gears and was "going on the
offensive."

After his original outreach to Republicans,
Obama late last week changed his tone and derid-
ed Republican ideas for putting more tax cuts in
the stimulus package. Such ideas "have been test-
ed and they have failed,” he said in a speech at the
Energy Department. Later, he told a gathering of
congressional Democrats in Williamsburg, Vir-
ginia, that "the scale and scope of this plan is
right.”

He'll continue trying to regain momentum on
economic policy. He plans his first prime-time
news conference today after Treasury Secretary
Timothy Geithner outlines details for a new finan-
cial-sector rescue plan. Then he'll participate in
town hall-style meetings in towns suffering par-
ticularly hard times. Democratic Sen. Charles
Schumer said Obama's courtship of Republicans
only to be rebuffed by them should serve as "an
early lesson for President Obama and his team.”

But James Thurber, director of the Centre for
Congressional and Presidential Studies at Amer-
ican University, said Obama set a particularly
high bar for himself by "promising to change the
way Washington works."

"He promised to make it a less partisan, post-
partisan place. And so he has to do this. The ques-
tion is whether he can hit the sweet spot on the
stimulus package with enough tax breaks and
enough non-controversial spending to get the
votes. I think he can," Thurber said.

Democrats praise Obama's close work with
them on the stimulus legislation.

"T don't think there's any doubt that the pres-
ident has been active ... he's been making phone
calls, visiting members in the Senate and the
House personally," said Rep. Xavier Becerra, a
Democrat. But Becerra said the jury's still out
on the effectiveness of his approach because the
bill still isn't done. Once the measure passes the
Senate, differences with the House-passed bill
will have to be reconciled. "It's a work in
progress,” said Becerra. "It's still cooking."

(This article was written by Tom Raum of the

Associated Press).



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Marijuana
legalisation not
an answer to
economic woes

EDITOR, The Tribune.

IN December’s 22, 2008 Tri-
bune publication, a young man
claimed that legalising marijua-
na would be an answer to res-
cue our struggling economy;
“the legalisation of this plant
may seem preposterous to
some, and downright stupid to
most, but such a move would
drastically change our tourism
product.” He also made com-
parisons to Amsterdam: “You
cannot find one single beach in
or near Amsterdam that can
compare to one of our worst
beaches, so there must be some-
thing else that is drawing these
tourism into their country.” He
also went on and talked about
the illegal production of alco-
hol and how it was continued
until it finally became legalised;
then he discussed marijuana
seeds as sources of fuel due to
its hemp oil, etc. His argument
basically is that Amsterdam
attracts millions of tourists
because they have legalised the
use of marijuana throughout the
city.

Amsterdam is the capital of
The Netherlands; this city alone
surpasses the entire population
of the Bahamas with a stagger-
ing number of approximately
750,000 people. Amsterdam
has: subways highlighting his-
toric images; canals that are
used as means of transportation
throughout parts of the city; an
interesting architectural back-
ground; two major universities;
a wide array of museums and
entertainment centres. To be
exact one of the museums in
Amsterdam had over one mil-
lion visitors a few years back;
these museums are filled with
arts, crafts, paintings and rich
historic documents; Amsterdam

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia net



also has halls specifically
designed for concerts, theatre,
comedy and so forth. Amster-
dam has roughly 100 or more
festivals per annum; this city is
comprised of nearly 400 hotels
with 40 per cent being four or
five star hotels. Oh did I men-
tion that “Amsterdam is the
financial and business capital of
the Netherlands”; it is classified
as one of the best European
cities for international business
next to: London, Paris,
Barcelona and Frankfurt. Ams-
terdam has its own world trade
centre which is a part of the
international world trade cen-
tres association; Amsterdam
also has the oldest stock
exchange in the world. Numer-
ous Dutch banks and corpora-
tions such as: ABM AMRO,
Heineken International, ING
group and Philips have their
headquarters in Amsterdam.
KPMG International’s global
headquarters is even near by.
Seventy-five per cent of Ams-
terdam’s annual visitors are
European, Americans only
account for about 13 to 14 per
cent of the visitor population
each year.

I can run on all day about
other reasons why marijuana is
not the main reason for tourist
migration to Amsterdam such
as the “Red Light District”
which is a tourist attraction sat-
urated with sex shops, peep
shows and a enormous selec-
tion of prostitutes that can be
singly picked through glass win-
dows.

Amsterdam is a tourist and

financial destination whose
tourist attractions stem beyond
mediocre sightseeing tours and
Bahamas paraphernalia that
were probably made in China
or Indonesia.

If marijuana is legalised in
the Bahamas, cocaine would
surge our streets, because the
fellows on the street won’t have
their commodity, crime would
shoot higher than our morality
and the Bahamas would be
compared to South Florida in
the 1980’s. Who would be
responsible for the distribution
of the weed? You think those in
the pharmaceutical market want
to be a part of that? You really
think they want to tarnish their
brands? Those addicted to this
drug would probably target
these pharmaceutical establish-
ments to steal, etc. What would
that do to policing? Worldwide
police use drugs on the streets
to catch drug dealers; in some
cases they let certain drug deal-
ers parade the streets and do as
they like as long as they snitch
off their rivalries.

To sum it up, Mr Dunn, the
legalisation of marijuana would
not be an economic stimulus for
our stagnant economy or a
means to attract tourists.

Personally I have never used
marijuana and personally I
won’t use it, I have never had
dope in my possession and I
never intend to supply, but the
legalisation of marijuana in the
Bahamas is a ridiculous sugges-
tion. Marijuana is not just a
problem between the police and
the drug boys; it is our problem
(The Bahamas). I just think that
legalising it will have some dras-
tic ramifications.

ELKIN SUTHERLAND Jr
Nassau,
February, 2009.

Dangerous intersection needs fixing

EDITOR, The Tribune.

smaller but nonetheless still quite visible, however

BAHAMAS OUT ISLAND
PROMOTION BOARD

POSITION AVAILABLE

Job Description
Executive Director

Successful applicant must possess at least a
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and presentation skills with people of all levels,
inside and outside of the Board. A strategic
thinker, with initiative, and follow-through skills.
Possessing positive Management qualities.
Have the ability to manage current and long-
range objectives, while directing organizational
emphasis _ of
guidelines, and maximized returns. The ability
to proactively engage in Advocacy initiatives
affecting the Out Island, while collaborating with
industry, paying special
attention to Membership Development.

Would the Comptroller of Road Traffic, the
officer commanding the traffic division or some-
one else in authority please do something about
the intersection at the entrance to the Nassau
Yacht Club and Fort Montagu.

Today while exiting the Nassau Yacht Club, I
once again narrowly avoided being broadsided by
a vehicle entering the Montagu park exit at high
speed from the west. During the ensuing
exchange, having weathered a barrage of racial
slurs and obscenities, I was able to point out to the
young man that the sign he was looking at was in
facta NO ENTRY sign and that had a collision
occurred he most certainly would have been at
fault.

The large and prominent no entry sign once
displayed there has been replaced by one much

motorists particularly at lunch time and five
o'clock routinely ignore it, entering the Montagu
area through this exit to bypass the usual traffic
congestion.

Needless to say the traffic police are generally
conspicuous by their absence in this vicinity unless
they're blocking the Yacht Club entrance while
holding one of their periodic/idiotic ticket anyone
exceeding 25 mph exercises.

This has become a very dangerous intersection
and it is simply a matter of time before some
innocent exiting the Yacht Club or the Montagu
is seriously injured or killed.

Thanking God for yet another near miss.

IAN MABON
Nassau,
February 4, 2009.

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follow up, and other administrative activities for a
department/division. The person will compile data
and format reports, graphs, tables, and records as
well as categorizing facts and figures for computation.

Interested persons should possess:
An Associate's degree in business or equivalent
Excellent administrative/clerical skills
At least two years’ experience working in a
business environment
Excellent communication and presentation skills
Proficiency in MS Office Excel and other
computer applications

Please send application letter and résumé

by February 17, 2009 to:

Administrative Assistant
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax 393.0440

We thank all applicants for their interest; however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9g, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS



BAIC lecture series aims to help business people

HELPING business people
be better at what they do, and
giving would-be entrepreneurs
the extra know-how they may
need to do it, are among goals
of a new lecture series co-ordi-
nated by Bahamas Agricultur-
al and Industrial Corporation.

The 12-week Business
Empowerment Lecture Series
will provide potential and exist-
ing business owners with an
opportunity for exposure to suc-
cessful business strategies, best
practices, and real life business
experiences, BAIC executive
chairman Edison Key
explained.

Free and open to all who wish
to attend, it begins on Thurs-
day, 7pm, in the Lecture The-
atre of the Culinary and Hospi-
tality Management Institute at
the College of the Bahamas,
Thompson Boulevard campus.

The interactive sessions are
the brainchild of BAIC's Busi-
ness Services Division, headed
by deputy general manager
Don Major.

Edison Key s

Topics to be covered include
customer service and market-
ing; plan development; Customs
duties/concessions and imports;
and e-commerce and account-
ing.

“BAIC is aware of the role
micro, small and medium-sized
enterprises play in the econo-
my of the Bahamas, especially
as it relates to job creation,”
said Mr Key.

“Therefore BAIC remains



committed to assisting in what-
ever way we can to ensure suc-
cess.

“The previous lecture series
were well attended.

“And that heartens us
because now is the time for
Bahamians to prepare them-
selves for other opportunities,
especially in food production.

Inspire

“We have been on a mission
to inspire Bahamians to take on
the lucrative task of feeding our
people and the millions of
tourists who visit us.

“T therefore urge Bahamians,
especially those who have lost
their jobs to visit us. Perhaps
we can assist.”

There will also be round table
discussions on financing a new
business venture; increasing
competitiveness in business; the
anatomy of an entrepreneur;
and linking local business with
the tourism sector.

Opportunity for businesses to
access millions of dollars in funding [Ry

BAHAMIAN businesses are being given
another opportunity to access millions of dol-
lars in funding that can be put towards enhanc-
ing their competitiveness.

The Caribbean Export Development Agency
will launch a second call on February 9, 2009,
for its Direct Assistance Grant Scheme, a Euro-
pean Union funded programme which focuses
on building the competitiveness of firms in the
Caribbean region (CARIFORUM).

Applicants

Caribbean Export’s senior grant adviser Kirk
Brown said that successful applicants will be
able to access funds for projects that may
include, but not be limited to: research, product
and service development, marketing, promo-
tional material, quality and environmental man-
agement systems and information technology
solutions.

Mr Brown stated that the response to
the first call was encouraging, with 33
applicants being awarded grants totalling
BDS$2.3 million.

He said it is hoped the scheme will help
improve competitiveness of firms by “increas-

ing export potential and expanding export mar-
Kets.”

Competitiveness is an issue that has been
highlighted by Minister of State for Finance
Zhivargo Laing as one which Bahamian busi-
nesses must focus on if they are to take full
advantage of the Economic Partnership Agree-
ment signed last year between Caricom coun-
tries, including the Bahamas and the Euro-
pean Union.

That agreement will liberalise the trade rela-
tionship between European and African,
Caribbean and Pacific countries, allowing Euro-
pean companies more access to the Bahamian
market, and Bahamian companies more access
to Europe.

Persons wishing to apply for Caribbean
Export Development Agency funds are invited
to submit proposals for the regular procedures
from February 9, 2009, until February 20, 2009,
at 4.30pm.

Those interested in applying may obtain
guidelines, application forms and the list of
eligible activities from Caribbean Export’s
website at www.carib-export.com.

Applications must be submitted to Caribbean
Export’s head office in Barbados or its sub-
regional office in the Dominican Republic.

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at the same venue with a round
table discussion on agribusiness
possibilities.

In six of the sessions, there
will be a segment for testimoni-
als from successful business
owners who will share their
experiences.

The opening night will see

motivational speaker Dr Wayne
Thompson of the Centre for
Renewing Relationships speak
on the topic ‘Prosperity in the
face of Adversity’.

Held in conjunction with the
College of the Bahamas and the
Royal Bank of Canada, the
series is free of charge and open
to all.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 7



es,
Is the Caribbean financial
services sector asleep?

insight |

WORLD VIEW

“So far there has been no
public indication that
Caribbean governments are
ready to jointly engage the
OECD and the US government
in particular on these new
threats to their financial

m@ By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat)

‘i threat to the
financial services sec-
tor of the Caribbean is grow-
ing everyday and is becom-
ing more evident in reports
by media who have swal-
lowed hook, line and sinker
that so-called “tax havens”
are helping US, European
and Japanese nationals, both
persons and companies, to
evade taxation in their home
countries.

There is no hard evidence
to support this allegation
about Caribbean jurisdictions.
Yet it persists from govern-
ments of the Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and
Development (OECD).

A recent BBC report
claims that the British gov-
ernment “is broke — a record
£44bn in the red — and yet
one estimate is that the tax-
man loses £18.5bn a year
thanks to tax haven abuse.”

The reports specifically
identifies British protec-
torates which it describes in
derogatory terms “as the
Bounty Bar island tax haven
of the Caymans in the
Caribbean and the fish-and-
chip tax havens closer to
home like Jersey, Guernsey
and the Isle of Man.” It says,
“18 of the world's tax havens
are Crown Dependencies like
Jersey, Guernsey, the Isle of
Man or British protectorates
like the Caymans, a fag-end
of the British Empire in the
Caribbean.”

Dramatically, the report
also states that “one man has
targeted tax haven abuse in
the Caymans — and his name
is Barack Obama. So change
for the world's tax havens
seems on the way — whether
the leaders of the micro-states
like it or not.”

W hen the OECD
first raised its so-

called “Harmful Tax Compe-
tition Initiative” (HTCI)
aimed at closing down the
financial services sector of 41
small jurisdictions around the
world which were giving seri-
ous competition to the finan-
cial institutions of the OECD
countries, Caribbean coun-
tries were slow to move on
the issue.

It was not until it was
raised by Antigua and Bar-
buda at the 21st meeting of
the Conference of Heads of
Government of the
Caribbean Community
(CARICOM) at Canouan in
St Vincent and the
Grenadines in July 2000, that
CARICOM countries began
to take the issue seriously.

At that time, a statement
was issued saying that Heads
of Government took note
that the OECD report “‘was
based on incomplete infor-
mation and on standards set
unilaterally by these bodies.
They deplored the fact that
the lists were published with
the objective of tainting juris-
dictions in the eyes of the
investment community and
the international financial
market. They condemned the
actions of the OECD in par-
ticular as contrary to the
tenets of a global market
economy promoted by G7
countries. They reiterated
that the proposed OECD
actions have no basis in inter-
national law and are alien to
the practice of inter-state
relations.”

Later a Committee was
established headed by then
Barbados Prime Minister,
Owen Arthur, and present
Barbados Chief Justice, Sir
David Simmons, of which I
was a part, to engage the
OECD in a serious dialogue
on this issue. Eventually, the
OECD dropped a blacklist of
countries that they had pro-
duced but only after coercing

ie
US)

Ute ta
PHONE: 322-2157



services sector.”



almost all of the jurisdictions
to adopt many of the rules
that the OECD had set uni-
laterally. A so-called “Global
Tax Forum” was also estab-
lished to set rules for a level
playing field for all jurisdic-
tions. But, a report two years
ago showed that the main cul-
prits ignoring these rules are
the big players in the OECD
countries themselves. Poor
regulation and supervision in
the US and UK which con-
tributed to the present finan-
cial crisis in both countries is
ample evidence of that fact.
President Obama, when he
was the Senator from Illinois,
joined two other Senators in
introducing the “Stop Tax
Havens Abuse Act” in the
US Congress. Fortunately,
the Act never became law.
But, it names 34 jurisdictions
as “secrecy” jurisdictions and
among them are all the
British Overseas Territories
in the Caribbean, all the
members of the Organisation
of Eastern Caribbean States,
the Bahamas and Barbados.
The fact that the Bill did
not become law does not
mean it has been dropped
from the Obama administra-
tion’s agenda. Every indica-
tion is that the legislation will
be enacted this year and
while the blacklist will be
removed, it will be replaced
by broad empowerment of
the US Treasury Secretary to
impose sanctions. The belief
persists that “the total loss to
the (US) Treasury from off-
shore tax evasion alone
approaches $100 billion per
year, including $40 to $70 bil-
lion from individuals and
another $30 billion from cor-
porations engaging in off-
shore tax evasion.”
Caribbean jurisdictions are
regularly examined by the
Caribbean Financial Action
Task Force (CFATF) and the
International Monetary Fund
(IMF) to ensure that they are
compliant with the require-
ments set by the OECD.
Many, if not all of them, have
Tax Information Exchange
Agreements with the US.
Banks are required by law,
and on pain of the toughest
penalties, to make suspicious
activity reports and to follow
know your customer proce-
dures. Persons trying cither



to open a second account
with a bank they have dealt
with for years, or transfer
money anywhere, are well
aware of the scrutiny to which
they are subjected, the paper
they have to sign and the
identification they have to
provide.

Ne. some of the
OECD jurisdictions

are luring customers away
from Caribbean countries on
the basis that they will give
them better tax breaks, and,
of course, they are “safe”
jurisdictions. One of the latest
companies to shift is the giant
engineering and construction
company, Foster Wheeler
Ltd, which is moving its place
of incorporation to Switzer-
land from Bermuda for “tax
and other reasons.”

So far there has been no



@ SIR Ronald Sanders

public indication that
Caribbean governments are
ready to jointly engage the
OECD and the US govern-
ment in particular on these
new threats to their financial
services sector. Yet, they are
all at risk, including Guyana,
Jamaica and Trinidad and
Tobago — all of whom have
passed legislation to offer
international financial ser-
vices,

Similarly, the Caribbean
private sector who provide
financial services and are in
the best position to marshal
the arguments and evidence
to refute the charges of
OECD governments are say-
ing nothing.

When the crunch comes,
therefore, those in the private
sector, who seem to be sleep-
ing instead of lobbying their
governments for joint action,
should wake up and start
pressing the issue fast. The
wolf is already at the door.

Responses to:
ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

ADMINISTRATOR/
LIBRARIAN

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the successful candidate will
include:

© Overseeing the daily operation of the
facility, which includes a library, museum,
computer laboratory, resource centre,

reading room and café

© Investigating and

sources of funding

pursuing viable

© Planning and executing the curriculum
of the trade and vocational classes to be
offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

© Experience in aé_ related field’ or
certification in library science

© Excellent organization and administrative
skills

© Very Good computer skills

© Excellent communication skills
© Exceptional Interpersonal skills
© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to cdsands@coralwave.com
or via fax 242-334-2280.
www.southeleutheramission.com



Summit Academy

is registering for the 2009/2010 academic year.

A limited amount of spaces are available in Playgroup through Grade 5.
(Wait list option is available for filled classes)
We are also pleased to announce the additional expansion of our
early- childhood program.

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PAGE 8, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



Tampa dog that scoured 9/11 ruins dies

m@ TAMPA, Fla.

A FLORIDA search-and-rescue dog that scoured the ruins of
the World Trade Center, hurricane-ravaged communities, and
other lower-profile disasters has died, according to Associated
Press.

Marley of Tampa Fire Rescue was 12 when she died Wednes-
day.

Besides sniffing for survivors after the Sept. 11 attacks, Marley
also was active in efforts after Hurricanes Charley and Katrina.

The dog suddenly came down with canine bloat and had to be
euthanized. Captain Mark Bogush, who trained the dog, said
surgery would only have worsened her quality of life.

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Immigration chief pays courtesy
call on Commodore Scavella

DIRECTOR of Immigra-
tion Jack Thompson recently
paid a courtesy call on Com-
mander Defence Force Com-
modore Clifford Scavella at
the Coral Harbour Base. Dur-
ing his visit, the newly
appointed director met with
the Commodore, and was
introduced to his command
team.

Matters of mutual interests
were discussed, and both par-
ties exchanged pleasantries.

PERHAPS you've thought about sell-
ing your present home, but have put off
that decision, thinking ‘that now is not a
good time to sell. Want some advice?
Wait no longer!

Consider what happens during the “bad
times.” Most homeowners want to sell
their homes for the highest possible price
in the shortest possible period of time.
So, during those periods that are per-
ceived as ‘a bad time to sell a home’ or a
‘buyer’s market,’ those homeowners put
off their selling decision until a more
favourable selling climate exists.

Since the so-called ‘bad times’ can last
from a relatively short period to a couple
of years, a backlog of frustrated would-be
sellers builds up.

It is sort of like the force that builds up
in a pressure cooker.

Then, finally, comes the good news:
“Home sales are rising - buyers are buy-

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9g, 2009, PAGE 9








MR GLENN BANNISTER, BNT president, accepts the cheque from Dr Livingston Marshall,



senior vice-president of Environment and Community Affairs for Baker’s Bay.

Nassau to host Women’s
Business Conference

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT ~— As the
Grand Bahama economy
continues to struggle, the
women of Freeport are
being invited to connect with
other Bahamian and inter-
national businesswomen at
the Second Annual Wom-
en’s Business Conference in
Nassau.

Attorney Melissa Hall,
founder of Kingdom Women
In Business (K WIB), was in
Grand Bahama on Thursday
to announce that this year’s
conference will be held at
the British Colonial Hilton
on February 28.

The conference theme is
“Rise to the Occasion and
Transition from Trial to Tri-
umph.”

Opportunity

Ms Hall said this major
international conference
event gives women from all
walks of life the opportunity
to network and launch their
personal visions for their
lives during these trying
times.

She believes that one of
the main challenges experi-
enced by women in business
is the availability of finan-
cial resources. She noted
that training, skills, and good
advice are important.

“We believe that despite
what is happening in the
economy in Grand Bahama,
if we come together and con-
nect with other women and

LUCAYA INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL



“We believe that despite what is
happening in the economy in
Grand Bahama, if we come
together and connect with other
women and share our secrets of
success, women will discover
how to be creative and
recession-proof by repositioning
and redefining themselves.”



Attorney Melissa Hall, founder of
Kingdom Women In Business

share our secrets of success,
women will discover how to
be creative and recession-
proof by repositioning and
redefining themselves.

“The conference will also
be a time of refreshing and
renewing for women as they
will be provided with practi-
cal advice on how they can
start their own businesses
and improve their mar-
Ketability in the market-
place,” she said.

Some of the conference
speakers are former banker
and financial consultant
Charlene Paul; Patrice Ellis;
Dr Jennifer Deveaux, finan-
cial controller of Ernst and
Young, former senator
Tanya McCartney; Ruby
Ann Darling, and motiva-
tional speaker, life coach,
and businesswoman Dr Sta-
cia Pierce from Lansing,
Michigan.

Ms Hall said Ms Pierce
brings a wealth of knowl-

Freeport - BAHAMAS
VACANCY NOTICE - SCHOOL TEACHERS

LUCAYA

edge and advice that can
help women become suc-
cessful in business.

“She has a fashion line and
make-up line, she is a TV
host, and has written 21
books.

“She is just a phenomenal
woman and just to be able
to connect with someone
like her would be a great
experience for all women.”

Plans

Although KWIB is based
in Nassau, there are plans to
establish a branch in Grand
Bahama during the third
quarter of this year.

The organisation currently
has 65 members and a fol-
lowing of 300 women.

Ms Hall noted that a num-
ber of businesswomen in
Grand Bahama have already
joined the organisation this
year, including Michelle
Thompson, owner of Uni-

Effective: August 2009

Lucaya International $chwal isa non-protic independent organization peaviding high qualiny education to the kaca

and intemational community. The High School academic program prepares students for tertiary education

through the international Baccalaureate Organization (BO) Diploma Program (DP), SAT and a broad range of

subjects at Edeace Intemational General Certthcate of Secondary Education (1GCSE) kewel. The Primary School

follloress the IO Primary Years Programme (PP). There is a strong extra-curricular and fine arts programme

available to all students through the Sched.

The School's Board of Directors are locking to appoint suitably qualified teachers in the following subjects

areas:
Biology
Physics
Mathematics

» Geography
* Ristory
= Mlusic

“English
* French
*Spankh

Head of Primary School with training in 18 PYP preferably with experience in PY PHSE

* Primary Classroom Teacher with 18 PYP training and experience

All cancedates should be qualified with a recognised teaching license, degree or post-graduate qualification

[PGCE of equivalent in their subpect up to 18 Ciploms level and should itate4 second subject area in which they

are qualted and prepared to teach, It should be noted that suitably experienced teachers may be expected to

leach across (he whole secondary ange Additionally, previous international perience preferably with the PYP

IGCSE of 1 Dipioma preegramene is prelerred but ret a requirement,

Salaries and benefits ae paid commnercurate walk candidates qualifications avd experience
For suitably qualified camdidates there may be thee opportunity for Faculty Head appointive nt

All applications should be addressed to the Director of Schaal at

cya
Lucaya International School,
P.O. Bow 44066, Freeport,
Grand Bahama island,
Bahamas.

intermationalschoalcom or posted to

Further information can be attained from the schools web site werw.lecayainternationalschool.com



Developers donate

$100,000 to the BNT

DEVELOPERS of The Baker’s Bay Golf and
Ocean Club at Great Guana Cay, Abaco, con-
tinued their support for Bahamas National Trust
by presenting the organisation with a $100,000
cheque.

The donation by Discovery Land Company is
the second instalment of a $600,000 three-year
commitment to the organisation and the nation-
al parks on Abaco.

Dr Livingston Marshall said when presenting
the cheque: “Although we are all experiencing
tough times in this economic downturn, we at
Baker’s Bay want the BNT to know that we are
committed to the organisation and the environ-
ment.”

The grant from Baker’s Bay is supporting the
establishment of a BNT office on Abaco as well
as a full-time warden.

The grant has also provided the BNT with the

Text an



opportunity to partner with Friends of the Envi-
ronment and schools in North and South Abaco
to establish three Discovery Clubs on Abaco.

Discovery Club is an after school club that
combines environmental education with fun
learning techniques designed to take young peo-
ple out of the classroom and into the different
eco-systems we find in The Bahamas.

“The BNT is truly grateful to corporate sup-
porters like Baker’s Bay, who place a high value
on the environment and the work of the Trust,”
said Glenn Bannister, president of the BNT.

The Bahamas National Trust is the mandated
manager of 25 national parks and protected areas
in The Bahamas. Abaco is home to five national
parks: Abaco National Park, Pelican Cays Land
and Sea Park, Tilloo Cay Reserve, Black
Sound Cay Reserve and Walker’s Cay National
Park.

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versal Security Systems; Pas-
tor Margo Victor, marketing
manager of Acacia Groves;
Raquel Hart, and Pastor
Shirley Stubbs of Universal
Houschold of Faith.

She said that women from
Abaco and other Family
Islands are also expected to
join the organisation and
attend the Nassau confer-
ence.

“It’s not only for
professional or business-
women, you can be a house-
wife.

“This is the kind of organ- 4
isation all women should P’'@
want to be a part of to help
them reach their goals in
life,” she said.

“The main thing we
request of members is to
exercise integrity in their
lives, possess a commitment
to support other women, and
to patronise other women in
business,” said Ms Hall.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

BAKERY GENERAL MANAGER

Bakery Servives Linited, a commervial bakery, wishes ta acquire the services ofa
Genecal Manager, The secoesful candidate vill manage the Bakery aperation and will
be ata senior management kevcl.

Requirements:
Certfication from an sceedited cullearp/ baking intitution
A minimamel 5 years experience af.admilar senion lewel in dood and beverage
managenem
Proves leadenihip, minagement and motivational skills are ecential
Earellerd written aed oa! communication skills area fundamental requirement
A mieng culinary indinnry backgroand induding hatds-on matejerne it
eepenience |: eaemial
Rrvewmietize o cipe Seip ane defences oS are bs recived
Tika ye tool Marna cper Stet cl bes Tarvalin with HACCP Stam ecards, Their
implemestnion and mainicnane
Capability of waking any position within the balbery operation ard havea
knowledge of recpes, methedelegy and equipment eequined foreach prodect

Fresperesibal ities:

. Eraure quality products are baked te antomer ypectication

= Manage peoduct distribution and delivery coun te anaure mlable and direly deltas ry
« Manage beentery wel of raw & fn bhed products and thet rotation to minimise

alge

+ Create an iaqredient and finished peoduct teaceabil ty peeqrar

= (Liaise with the peschating department to ents unintemupted aired ection

+ Effet ieh) ahilie human recat, epelpee nd and material

= Dewelp and maistain & food safety peogran and train stait in safe toed handling and
See alien peactices in accoedande with HACCP itandards

» Dewehp and implement an equipment preventative maintenance progr

= Provide leadership of the balee ry stall thesagh training ard opaching

Acompebitive salary aed beneits package will be offered to the uacceisful candice,
Candidates may apply by e-mail to hamanrescuresérestauran ssn




The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

BIMINI BAY

RESORT AND MARINA

Only forty-eight nautical miles east of Miami, Florida, situated on the North
end of North Bimini, Bahamas - Bimini Bay Resort & Marina complex rests on
over 740 acres of pristine Bahamian beaches. Long known as a paradise for
anglers and divers alike, Bimini Bay Resort offers a plethora of options for the
most discriminating traveller. Bimini Bay Management Ltd.
owns and operates Bimini Bay Resort & Marina.

o ws.
> ~

=



ALL SMILES at the opening of the computer laboratory and community centre.

Hope Centre opens



computer laboratory,
community centre

THE Hope Centre, under the leadership of
Pastor Carlos Reid and his team of directors,
opened its computer laboratory and community
centre.

The multi-purpose facility includes an
audio/video studio and game room, and will
allow students to socialise and complete home-
work while utilising the computer lab in a safe
Christian-oriented environment, the founders
of the centre said.

Users of the centre are encouraged to abide
by its core values which seek to foster respect,
trust, honesty, and service.

Attending the opening was Minister of Edu-
cation Carl Bethel, who applauded the direc-
tors of the Hope Centre for providing such a
holistic recreational facility where young peo-
ple can spend time after school.

Minister Bethel said that this was in keeping

with a future goal of the Ministry of Education
to foster the development of a universal system
of homework centres.

“This centre can be a refuge in a time of tur-
bulence, and a safe haven for the poor and
underprivileged,” he said.

Mr Bethel explained that the success that is
being realised by Pastor Reid and his team did
not happen overnight, but came incrementally
through focused determination, as a result of
hard work.

He said that one of the messages that he
would like to impart to students is that suc-
cess does not happen overnight, and cannot
be sustained through “quick fix” solutions.

In closing, Minister Bethel commended the
directors and organisers of the event, and
encouraged them to continue to provide posi-
tive alternatives for the youth.

Bimini Bay Resort & Marina seeks to hire qualified professional
individuals for the following positions:

SECURITY
DIRECTOR OF SECURITY
F&B MANAGER
RESTAURANT MANAGERS
IT MANAGER
ACTIVITIES MANAGER
GUEST SERVICES AGENTS
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL
We offer an excellent benefits package and competitive

compensation. For full consideration, all interested applicants
should forward a copy of their resumé to the attention of

DIRECTOR OF HUMAN RESOURCES

AND TRAINING
at CRolle@biminibayresort.com or fax to (242) 347.2312.



56-year-old becomes first
woman to swim Atlantic

m@ SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

JENNIFER FIGGE pressed
her toes into the Caribbean
sand, exhilarated and exhaust-
ed as she touched land this week
for the first time in almost a
month, according to Associated
Press.

Reaching a beach in Trinidad,
she became the first woman on
record to swim across the
Atlantic Ocean — a dream she’d
had since the early 1960s, when a
stormy trans-Atlantic flight got
her thinking she could don a life
vest and swim the rest of the way
if needed.

The 56-year-old left the Cape
Verde Islands off Africa’s west-
ern coast on Jan. 12, battling
waves of up to 30 feet (9 meters)
and strong winds.

David Higdon, a friend of
Figge who kept in touch with
her via satellite phone, said she
had originally planned to swim
the Bahamas, but inclement
weather forced her to veer 1,000
miles (1,610 kms) off course to
Trinidad, where she arrived on

Feb. 5.
Figge plans to continue her
odyssey, swimming from

Trinidad to the British Virgin
Islands, where she expects to
arrive in late February. The crew
won’t compute the total distance
Figge swam until after she com-
pletes the journey, Higdon said.

Then it’s home to Aspen, Col-
orado — where she trained for
months in an outdoor pool amid
snowy blizzards — to reunite
with her Alaskan Malamute.

“My dog doesn’t know where
I am,” she told The Associated
Press on Saturday by phone.
“Tt’s time for me to get back
home to Hank.”

The dog swirled in her
thoughts, as did family and
friends, as Figge stroked through
the chilly Atlantic waters escort-
ed by a sailboat. She saw a pod
of pilot whales, several turtles,
dozens of dolphins, plenty of
Portuguese man-of-war — but
no sharks.

“I was never scared,” Figge
said. “Looking back, I wouldn’t
have it any other way. I can

always swim in a pool.”

Her journey comes a decade
after French swimmer Benoit
Lecomte made the first known
solo trans-Atlantic swim, cover-
ing nearly 4,000 miles (6,400
kilometers) from Massachusetts
to France in 73 days. No woman
on record has made the cross-
ing.

Figge woke most days around
7 a.m., eating pasta and baked
potatoes while she and the crew
assessed the weather. Her
longest stint in the water was
about eight hours, and her short-
est was 21 minutes. Crew mem-
bers would throw bottles of
energy drinks as she swam; if the
seas were too rough, divers
would deliver them in person.
At night she ate meat, fish and
peanut butter, replenishing the
estimated 8,000 calories she
burned a day.

Figge wore a red cap and wet
suit, with her only good-luck
charm underneath: an old, red
shirt to guard against chafing,
signed by friends, relatives and
her father, who recently died.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Antique Auto Club
proceeds to be
donated to children’s
home and school

PROCEEDS of this year’s
Antique Auto Club will be
donated to the Bilney Lane
Home for Children and the
Every Child Counts School in
Abaco.

The Antique Auto Club is
primarily a hobby club, but
also conducts some commu-
nity service projects to give
back to needy children in the
Bahamas.

Proceeds of the club’s
annual Antique Car Show,
which is currently in the plan-
ning stages for 2009, are
always donated to a charity
or organisation involving chil-
dren.

The proceeds of the club’s
2008 show were used to repair
and renovate the boys’ and
girls’ washrooms at the Bil-
ney Lane Home for Children.

The club recently elected a
new board of directors for
2009 who visited the Bilney
Home for Children to see the
improvements.

They noted that there is
room for more improvements
at the home.

Peter Armstrong and Mur-
ray Forde were returned as
president and secretary,
respectively, while Richard
Blake was elected vice-presi-
dent, Wayne Aranha was
named treasurer and Don
Aranha, Roland Ferguson
and Jim LaRoda were elected
as directors.

Members

The 2009 Antique Car
Show is now scheduled for
Saturday, March 14, at the
Arawak Cay Heritage Cen-
tre. In addition to its own club
members, the club is looking
for persons who own antique
(local definition is “at least
20 years old”) and special
interest vehicles to participate
in the show.

Entry fee is $3, for those
that want their vehicles
judged to compete for tro-
phies in the eight established

Odessa



categories. This year, some
new events are planned,
including a separate section
for “project vehicles” — vehi-
cles that are in restoration,
but not completed or for
which some restoration work
is being planned.

“Every year we hear peo-
ple say their car is not ready
yet or not good enough to
show,” said club secretary
Murray Forde, “so we decid-
ed to open it up a little, to
include these vehicles to show
what can be done and look
for a difference in next year’s
show. We expect that this will
add to the interest in the hob-
by.”

As in previous years, funds
are raised through corporate
donations that cover the cost
of trophies and through a
steak-out, tickets for which
are available from any club
member for only $10.

The Antique Auto Club of
the Bahamas was formed in
1987 by six men interested in
the hobby. Membership of
men and women is now close
to 50 persons.

) where fife ts still simple and people stiff carey
“ Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

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Forde, secretary.

work that has
been done to
one of the
bathrooms in
the Bilney
Lane Home for
Children and
points to the
light fixture,
the only thing
left to do (and
since done).

Jim LaRoda

i

Y 7
fen ee Ame

Try your hand for the
Ultimate February 14h
giveaway. as we launch

our 80th anniversary.

His and her Cartier
Trinty rings await you.

Ladies present any
2008 John Bull receipt,
fit the ring and be

entered to win

February 13th & 144th

John Bull

284 Bay St, 302-2800
Mall at Marathon, 393-4406







DON ARANHA, |.

past-president |g ot ali ’ i

of the Antique pi
Auto Club ANTIQUE AUTO CLUB of the Bahamas Board of Directors for 2009. (I-r) Wayne Aranha, treasurer; Richard
shows the Blake; vice-president; Don Aranha; Roland Feguson; Peter Armstrong, president; Jim LaRoda and Murray

MEMBERS OF THE
Antique Auto Club of
The Bahamas discuss
some possible
improvements that
could be made to the
front entrance of the
Bilney Lane Home for
Children.

Part proceeds of the
Club’s Antique Car
Show, scheduled for
March 14, 2009 will be
directed to this home;
l-r; Wayne Aranha,
Richard Blake, Murray
Forde, Peter Armstrong
and Don Aranha.
PAGE 12, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

ENTHRONEMENT OF NEW BISHOP OF ANGLICAN DIOCESE

THE THIRTEENTH Bishop of the Diocese of the Bahamas and
The Turks and Caicos Islands, the Right Rev Laish Zane Boyd Sr.
was enthroned at Christ Church Cathedral yesterday.

Private Dueling Paradite laband
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2. HOUSEKEEPER

TO LIVE ON PREMISES

¢ Applicants MUST BE KNOWLEDGABLE IN
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good supervisory skills

* Must be able to develop menu and prepare meals
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¢ Should be fully experienced in domestic household
chores. Husband and wife team preferred. Three
years in a similar position would be an asset.

Applications should be email to:
cmajor@grp.sandals.com

tion Make$ Cent$
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THE TRIBUNE



ENTHRONEMENT OF NEW BISHOP OF ANGLICAN DIOCESE

LOCAL NEWS





FORMER BISHOP Drexel Gomez kisses the ring of the new Anglican
Bishop Laish Boyd.



THE GOVERNOR GENERAL Arthur D Hanna (far right) pictured with the
Primer Minister Hubert Ingraham and his wife Delores Ingraham.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 13



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PAGE 14, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

FROM page one

officers and three occupants were detained. A
woman from Marshall Road and two men from
Yellow Elder Gardens, all aged 24, were taken
into custody.

The shooting came just a day after Nassau
residents told The Tribune they are living in
fear of the capital becoming like the Wild West
after a high-speed chase ended in a dramatic
gunfight in Montagu at around 8pm on Thurs-
day.

Police had chased a white Lexus from Palm-
dale to East Bay Street where bullets were
fired at police and officers retaliated with a
round of ammunition in front of Montagu
ramp and the Royal Nassau Sailing Club.

Witnesses claim around two dozen shots
were fired in a 30-second gunfight which result-
ed in the arrest of two men, aged 20 and 26,
who are expected to appear in Magistrates
Court today.

Reports that a third person was injured in
the shooting and a female occupant of the
Lexus fled the scene remain unconfirmed by

CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse,

police.

Chief Supt Glenn Miller, in charge of the
Central Detective Unit, said: “It’s not becom-
ing like the Wild West where criminals are fir-
ing at police every day, almost certainly not.

“However, I would say there are sporadic
incidents where criminals are being confront-
ed by the police from time to time who open
fire. Bahamian criminals have been shooting at
police now for many years.

“There have been incidents where police
officers are fired at, injured and even killed by
criminals in Nassau, Grand Bahama, and even
the Family Islands, but it’s not an everyday
thing.”

When asked if gun crime is on the rise, Mr
Miller said the opposite is true. “Statistics this
year indicate crime has gone down,” he said.

“Homicides are down, armed robbery is
down and serious crimes are down. For the
most part, major crime against persons are
down compared to January last year.”

Nassau Branch

Private Banking

FROM page one

In accordance with Biblical
scripture they all grow dread-
locks and the two girls, Arian-
nah, 8, and Omega, 5, cover
their heads with a haircloth or
‘fawl’ and wear long skirts.

But Empress Wells and
Prophet Bain maintain they are
struggling to find a private
school willing to accept them as
they are.

Kingsway Academy in
Bernard Road, Bahamas Acad-
emy in Wulff Road and Mount
Carmel Preparatory School in
Palmdale Avenue are all Chris-
tian private schools which
accept children of other reli-
gious beliefs but do not allow
alterations of the dress code for
religious reasons.

St Andrew’s International
School in Yamacraw and Sum-
mit Academy in Thompson
Boulevard, which Ariannah cur-
rently attends, allow students
to wear religious dress.

Summit Academy principal
Gillian Wilson said: “We allow
it because it is a part of their

FROM page one

Rastafarians

religion. It is such a close-knit
community it’s really not a big
deal to the kids at all. And we
have had no problems with
those kids who wear religious
dress following the school
rules.”

But as the parents look for a
school for Omega, they say the
school fees are too high to send
her there.

And although government
schools allow religious dress as
the Constitution of the
Bahamas states all children
have a right to an education,
they are reluctant to send
Omega to a state school.

Prophet Bain said: “It is not
equal if one person can go to a
private school, another person
of the same ability should be
able to go.

“T don’t want them to go toa
government school, it’s not that
the education is so different, it’s
the violence in the school. And
there are better opportunities
at private school.”

Prophet Bain and Empress

Wells want the freedom to
choose a school they can afford
without compromising their reli-
gious beliefs, but discrimination
is tolerated in private schools,
which have the right to be selec-
tive, Director of Education
Lionel Sands said.

He added: “No child should
be discriminated against, and
certainly we have authority over
public schools because every
child is entitled to an education,
but we cannot tell private
schools who to take and who
not to take.

“We have some control in
that we offer financial grants to
the schools to help them in their
admissions but not that kind of
control.”

There are 162 public schools
in the Bahamas, and 91 private
schools, more than half of which
are attached to a church.

Empress Wells said: “If peo-
ple don’t see things the way we
see them they should still
respect it. It’s a good and posi-
tive thing. It’s about love and
unity and trying to make the
world what God wanted it to
be.”

is presently considering applications for a

Business Data Manager

The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications:
¢ University Degree or equivalent

Experience:

* Sound international banking background with at least 5-7 years experience in
back-office securities operations

* Strong understanding of Private Banking Business and the Financial Sector

* Working knowledge and experience with Globus Application is advantageous

* Working knowledge and experience with MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint and
Bloomberg applications

Personal Qualities:
Confident with strong leadership skills

As of the beginning of this year Bahamasair
has increased its freight fees. For The Tribune
from a flat monthly rate, the rate has been
increased by daily weight, which means that what
The Tribune paid Bahamasair for one month it
now pays for five days, which, if continued, would
bring the yearly freight bill to more than $200,000.

“We regret to have to make this decision after
serving the Family Islands from the days when
they were known as the Out Islands and the mail
boat was the only means of transport,” said Tri-
bune publisher Eileen Carron. “However, know-
ing that our Family Island readers could not pos-
sibly support such a subscription increase to cov-
er transportation, we have moved quickly to the
web to try to service them. They will still get the
news, although it will be a few hours later than
usual.”

Mrs Carron recalled the early days of The Tri-
bune — even before the days when ZNS took the
news to the Out Islands — of how The Tribune
kept the archipelago informed of what was hap-
pening in the capital. Those were the days when
Out Islanders could not even afford to buy The
Tribune, which in the early days was published

Tribune delivery

twice weekly and sold at a penny for a single
copy, two shillings for a three months subscrip-
tion, four shillings for six months and eight
shillings for one year.

To keep the people informed, The Tribune
sent a copy to each island’s central school, or to
the library wherever there was one.

“People from the settlement went to the school
or the library to read the paper,” she said. “For
those who could not read it was read to them. The
late Sir Etienne Dupuch was always astounded
whenever he visited one of the islands — partic-
ularly his House of Assembly constituency of
Inagua and Mayaguana — and residents would
quote him his Tribune editorials verbatim from
public platforms — and without a teleprompter.

“And so, it is with deep regret that The Tri-
bune has had to make this decision today. How-
ever, we shall now try to keep in close touch with
our loyal readers through the electronic media.”

And so at 2pm Wednesday please click onto
www.tribune242.com and keep in touch with your
daily newspaper, which is in fact the voice of
you, the people.

Strong numerical and analytical skills

Excellent organizational skills with attention to details and structured

approach to work
Strong written, oral, and interpersonal

skills

Work within a team environment with the ability to mentor team members
Enthusiastic team spirit with the ability to effectively collaborate across teams

and cultures

Highly motivated and committed to service excellence

Key Duti Ri nsibilities:

* Co-ordinate and manage the Static Data, Mail Administration and Cash and

Security Reconciliation Teams

Ensure adherence to the required daily processes by the teams to ensure the

integrity of the data maintained

Communicate and resolve any queries from internal and external clients

Ensure the update of process documentation changes arising due to changes
in procedures or additional responsibilities allocated to the teams

Achieve deliverables against agreed deadlines and manage the expectations

with clients.

Serve as an Operations subject matter expert for new requirements impacting

the units under management

Participate in User Acceptance Testing prior to project or product
implementation for developments impacting data management
Contribute to and participate in special project initiatives impacting the Bank

Benefits provided include:

* Competitive salary and performance bonus

* Pension Plan
* Health and Life Insurance

* Ongoing internal and external career development/training program

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. ONLY PERSONS MEETING
THE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS NEED APPLY

Applications should be submitted to:
Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas

Or via fax 356-8148

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS:

FEBRUARY 11TH, 2009

Harbour E&
Is cuttin:

SO°2

“the

EBHinatT FF Iss
avn itt



FROM page one

briefed and directed to treat the
believed immigrants with digni-
ty.
Although not on the island at
the time of the exercise, Mr
Thompson said all the believed
migrants would have been given
ample time to produce residen-
cy documents.

A Bahamian resident who
phoned The Tribune yesterday
said many of those taken by the
officers were not even allowed
to put on clothes, and were
escorted to an outdoor contain-
ment site, where temperatures
reached a low of 59 degrees.

Speaking anonymously, the
resident said: “Many of the peo-

Immigration exercise

ple who were taken were
women and children. Officers
took them to an outdoor tennis
court where some of them were
wearing only panties and bra.”
Residing on the island for
most of her life, the caller indi-
cated that people had been “cor-
ralled like cattle” before being
taken to the Sea-Wind vessel
for transport to Nassau.
Claiming that mostly women
and children had been placed
on the boat’s deck, the resident
said officers treated the immi-
grants as if they were less than
human, and indicated that sev-
eral residents had already com-

plained to immigration authori-
ties about the manner in which
the Haitians were handled.

Admitting there were a num-
ber of new immigrants to the
island, the resident said some
Haitian-born residents who
had lived on the island for more
than 20 years were bullied out of
their homes despite their
insistence on having legal stand-
ing.

With around 30 migrants
released shortly after their
apprehension, immigration offi-
cials say there remain more than
100 people still awaiting resi-
dency verification.

13th Bishop of the Diocese

FROM page one

regard.”

During his sermon, Rt Rev Boyd called for
Anglicans in the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos and
the world over to rethink their approach and
behaviour to others, and to allow the true spirit of
Christianity to be represented in their daily lives.

Speaking to the existence of prejudices within
the local community, Mr Boyd reminded the con-
gregation to acknowledge God, and not to allow
differences to separate them from others.

“T therefore ask you the question, who do you
think ill of, who do you despise, by whom are

you repulsed?

“We have our groups that we like to talk about,
and you know just how we operate when we say:
these white people, these black people, these
Haitians, these homosexuals, and these church
people, we all have our groups we like to despise.

“This service is a reminder that we need to
present ourselves for service in every area of our
lives, in our two countries. We live in a time when
people find it too easy to despise, to discount,
and even to persecute others.”

Rt Rev Boyd urged the body to fashion them-
selves after Christ, in being kind-hearted and
continuously dedicated to goodwill and Chris-
tianity.

FROM page one

ations as part of a repayment
schedule and it is believed that
he has shut down for good.

In September, 2008, the own-
er is believed to have left the
island, leaving only a “skeleton
crew” of about four workers
employed to secure the prop-

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Bimini
erty and around 50 more with-
out work, according to MP for
West End and Bimini, Obie
Wilchcombe.

Workers were given $100 and
letters stating what they were
owed by the company and told
that this payment would be
forthcoming at a later date.
However, nothing has been
heard since then.

“They have apparently shut
down. The staff were not told
anything. They have not been
paid,” said the MP.

He added that, while still
working at the resort, staff were
reportedly not paid gratuities
owed since the “beginning of
(2008).”

Made aware of their concerns
at a meeting in the constituency
on Friday, Mr Wilchcombe said
that he is doing his bit to try to
get answers for his constituents
and former employees of the
club.

The MP is writing to the
Director of Investments, Joy
Jibrilu, so that she can make a
determination about exactly
what the status of the property
is.

“The question now is, what’s
going to happen next? The
employees are wondering
what’s going to happen to them
and to their future.” he said.

According to Mr Wilch-
combe, Mrs Jibrilu said that the
government was not informed -
as is the law - that there were
lay-offs at the club.

“The hotel owners have an
obligation.

“The government had no rea-
son to think everything was not
continuing as per normal, that
things were progressing,” said
Mr Wilchcombe.

The MP said he hopes to
report back to the constituents
on the matter “before the end
of the week.”

One local who spoke to The
Tribune yesterday said
Biminites have struggled to find
alternative sources of employ-
ment.

Mr Wilchcombe called the
public meeting at the Bimini All
Age School on Friday where he
again addressed some of the
issues he had spoken about at
an earlier town meeting in West
End last week.

His speech at that earlier
meeting touched on the state of
the country, the PLP and saw
him express gratitude for the
support of those who had stood
behind him during his deten-
tion by police for questioning
in connection with the alleged
extortion of Hollywood actor
John Travolta.

Mr Wilchcombe was subse-
quently released without
charge.
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 19

LOCAL NEWS

Raymond A Bethel/BIS



pay courtesy} \UY\UNC DIA).
th he Ae k |
Call on the BIS ‘A Bahamian Ramil Seafogd Tradition”

Director General Valentine se Mii sane Fakes” Gh

REPRESENTATIVES m ; | | |
from the United Nations,
Information Centre for the s ‘ | /
Caribbean Area (UNIC) paid Crew par Filet
a courtesy call on the Director ea, - ere
General of Bahamas Infor- ie ae

mation Services (BIS) Sir

Arthur Foulkes on Tuesday, es

February 3, at the Monarch af 4

Building, East Bay Street. ia Fa d :
From left are Deputy Direc- . . EAB VY ' ‘ For mY Wen vi i)

tor of BIS Anthony Forbes; ip ee: taal f

UNIC library assistant Wayde ;

Ramnarine; Sir Arthur; UNIC = E wa ‘a 7 Tee 1 ri r :
director Angellca Hunt, and a a ne . AS an WIC
executive director of BIS 4 | i i ! !

Edward Ellis.

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MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9,

Ui
Vd

New Providence
Basketball
Association
continues regular
season action

BASKETBALL
NPBA UPDATE

THE New Providence
Basketball Association con-
tinued its regular season
action with games played on
Friday and Saturday nights.

Results of those games are
as follows:

¢ Saturday night

The Y-Care Wreckers
powered past the Coke
Explorers 111-107. Brandon
Ingraham scored a game
high 32 points for the win-
ners. Lamar Watkins had 25
in a losing effort.

And the Sunshine auto
Ruff Ryders blasted the fox-
ies Pros 116-102. Ernest
Saunders lid up the nets for a
game high 42. Henderson
Curry had 25 in the loss.

¢ Friday night

Police Crimestoppers def.
the Johnson Trucking
Jumpers 82-78. Freddie light-
bourne scored a game high
26 points in the win. Able
Joseph had 24 in the loss.

And the Electro Telecom
Cybots knocked off the
Southwest Printing Falcons
128-102. Delvonne Dun-
combe scored 32 points in
the win. Jude Rolle hada
game high 36 in the loss.

Tonight at the CI Gibson
Gymnasium, another double
header will take place. In the
7 pm opener, the Po.lice
Crimestoppers will take on
the Southwest Printing Fal-
cons. In the 8:30 pm opener,
the Commonwealth Bank
Giants will face the Y-Care’s
Wreckers.

BASKETBALL
BAISS
CHAMPIONSHIPS

THE Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools will open its
best-of-three championship
series today at 4 pm at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

In the junior girls division,
the Westminster Diplomats
will take on Queen’s College
Comets; in the junior boys
division, the Kingsway Acad-
emy Saints will face SAC; in
the senior girls division, SAC
will play St. John’s Giants
and in the senior boys divi-
sion, Kingsway Academy
will meet Westminster.

¢ Game two in all series
will be played on Wednes-
day, starting at 4 pm at
Kendal Isaacs.

SOFTBALL
NATIONAL TEAM
PRACTICE

THE Bahamas Softball
Federation has announced
that its workout sessions for
the national teams will be
held every Monday and
Wednesday at 7 pm for the
men and Tuesdays and
Thursdays at 7 pm and Sat-
urdays at 8 am for the ladies
at the Baillou Hills Sporting
Complex.

All selected coaches and
players must attend and be
on time.

National team director
Godfrey ‘Gully’ Burnside is
asking that all players and
coaches make an effort so
that the federation can select
the best team possible.

Family Island coaches are
asked to workout with their
selected Family Island play-
ers at the same time.

2009

INSIDE ¢ Premiership action

WOMEN’S TENNIS: Montreal, Canada

Fed Cup: Bahamas
relegated to Zone Il

Three-woman team loses 3-0 to Colombia
Nation demoted along with Puerto Rico

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

HE Bahamas Fed

Cup team of Nikki-

ta Fountain,

Larikah Russell and
Kerrie Cartwright failed in its bid
to remain in Zone One of the Fed
Cup by BNP Paribas.

On Saturday in Montreal,
Canada, the Bahamas lost 3-0 to
Colombia and was joined by
Puerto Rico as the two teams
from the six-team draw that got
relegated to Zone II for 2010.

“Tt wasn’t what we had expect-
ed,” said team captain Sean
Cartwright on his return home
yesterday with Nikkita Fountain.

Cartwright said originally they
were told that the two teams with
the losing records would play
each other. Instead, the Bahamas
and Puerto Rico ended up play-
ing Colombia and Brazil, who
both won a match apiece.

Brazil and Colombia both
pulled off 3-0 victories to remain
in Zone One for next year.

Meanwhile Canada stayed
undefeated by wiping out
Paraguay 3-0 as well to advance
to the playoffs for a shot at the
World Group I playoffs in April.
Paraguay will also remain in zone
One by virtue of their loss.

“Every team we played were
tough,” said Cartwright of the

in her spot against Canada and
Colombia.

matches against Colombia, but



TEAM EFFORT: Pictured, left to right, are: Nikkita Fountain, Kerrie Cartwright and Larikah Russell.

tournaments.

ico and Brazil to play a couple of



NIKKITA Fountain in action.

ing her right shoulder against

Bahamas’ 2-1 loss to Puerto Rico
and 3-0 shutout to Canada in their
round robin play in Group A.
“We didn’t have much of a
chance against them.”

While Russell went out with a
shoulder injury after the first
match against Puerto Rico, Foun-
tain played through her shoulder
injury that she sustained against
Canada.

With Russell on the sideline,
Cartwright stepped in and played

In the relegation playoff against
Colombia, Cartwright lost 6-3, 6-
2 against Viky Nunez-Fuentes
and Fountain dropped a 6-2, 6-1
decision to Mariana Duqiue-
Marino. Russell, did however,
come back and finished up with
fountain in the doubles, but they
lost 2-1 to the team of Nunez-
Fuentes and Yuliana Lizarazo.

Cartwright said they had a
chance to win at least one of the

the toll of not playing sufficient
matches at that calibre played a
factor in the outcome.

Kerrie Cartwright, who actu-
ally had the best chance to pulling
off a win, said she wasn’t quite
prepared to play because she had
expected Russell to be ready to
go. “After she was unable to play,
I got a chance to play,” said
Cartwright from Tampa, Florida
where she went to spend a week
training before she head to Mex-

“T was happy that I got a
chance to play because it was
quite a learning experience. I
think if I had a little more expo-
sure to this level, I would have
been able to pull off the win.”

Despite the loss, Cartwright
said she still felt she played a
good game and she was just glad
that she got a chance to team up
with Fountain in doubles on Fri-
day against Canada. After injury-

Canada, Fountain said she wasn’t
at full strength against Colombia
and it showed in her perfor-
mance.

“T wasn’t able to go out there
and do what I wanted to do,” said
Fountain, who returned home to
do her rehab. “I didn’t play bad-
ly. It’s just that nothing that I
wanted to do worked in my
favour.”

SEE page 18

Striders come away with another victory

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

| HE Striders came away with

another victory as they dominated
the Star Trackers/Baker’s Construction
Track Classic on Saturday.

The one-day meet at the Thomas A.
Robinson saw a number of teams from
New Providence, Grand Bahama and the
Family Islands competed as athletes made
their bid to qualify for the Carifta Games.

While there were no qualifiers, Star
Trackers’ head coach David Charlton said
they were quite impressed with the level of
performance turned in.

“T thought it was very successful. The
competition was very keen and the offici-
ating was on spot,” Charlton stressed. “All
of our volunteers came out in full force
and the combination of all of the above
made the event a success.”

Thanking the Bahamas Association of
Certified Officials (BACO) and the Star
Trackers’ volunteers, including Alpha Kap-
pa, Beta Phi Beta and Alpha Phi Alpha,
Charlton said they were able to complete
the meet two hours ahead of time and
there wasn’t any hitches.

“The competition was very keen and we
saw a lot of new faces, which is very good
for track and field,” he stated. “A lot of our
old faces did as expected, but it’s still ear-
ly in the season.

“But by the end of February going into
March when we have the National High
School Championships and the Carifta tri-
als, I expect that a lot of the athletes will
start peaking.”

Although at the T-Bird Flyers Track
Classic a week ago, coach Stephen Murray
said he doesn’t expect his Striders to start
peaking just yet, they came back with
another great performance over the week-
end. The Striders collected a total of 688
points to out-distance their nearest rivals,
Golden Eagles, who picked up second
place with 461. Host Star Trackers had to
settle for third with 349.50.

(Look at the scoreboard for the com-
plete results).

Even though there were no Carifta qual-
ifiers, there were still a number of out-
standing performances turned in.

Athletes posting the most points in their





PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

GOLDEN EAGLES’ Jasmine Sutherland crosses the line for the win in the 100 metres.

PAGES 16 and 17: Results and more photos

respective divisions were as follows:

¢ Marissa Capron of Striders with 20 in
the girls under-7 after she won the under-
7 girls 50 metres in 9.87 seconds and the
100 in 18.73.

¢ Edwin Riley of the Spirit of Excel-
lence in the under-7 boys, winning the 50 in
10.72 and the 100 in 21.41,

¢ Deante Wright of the Striders in the
girls under-9, winning the 100 in 16.31 and
finishing second in the 200 in 33.89 behind

team-mate Gem Wilson in 32.91.

e Zion Bannister of the Sunblazers with
16 points after he placed second in both the
under-9 100 in 16.24 and the 200 in 34.07
behind Star Trackers’ Juwan Willie (16.15
in 100) and Bahamas Speed Dynamics’
Shaun Miller (34.02) respectively.

¢ Daejah Moss of the Striders in the girls
under-11 with 20 points, winner of both
the 200 in 30.46 and the 400 in 1:13.93.

¢ Christopher Johnson of the Striders

in the under-11 boys with 18 as the winner
of the 100 in 14.52 and runner-up in the 200
in 29.66 behind Road runners’ Branson
Rolle in 29.34.

¢ Jasmine Sutherland of the Golden
Eagles in the under-13 girls with 28 points
after winning the 200 in 27.59 and the 400
in 1:06.79, while finishing second in the
long jump with a leap of 3.86 metres behind
Striders’ Ieisha Taylor (3.88).

¢ Darius Major of the Sunblazers in the
under-13 boys with 19. He was third in the
200 in 27.99 behind Spirit of Excellence’s
brothers winning combo of Scharann Cash
(26.50) and Shalom Cash (26.70) and sec-
ond in the long jump with 3.79 metres
behind Striders’ Anthony Rolle (4.09).

¢ Danielle Gibson of the Ambassadors
in the under-15 girls with 22 points. She
was second in the 200 in 26.58, won by
Bahamas Speed Dynamics’ Pedrya Sey-
mour (25.97), but Gibson took the high
jump with 1.50.

¢ Delano Davis of the Golden Eagles
in the under-15 boys with 23 points. Davis
sped to victory in the 100 in 11.44, but had
to settle for second in the high jump with
1.58 metres. The winner was Road Run-
ners’ Xavier Coakley with 1.65.

¢ Raquel Williams of the RC Athletics
doubled up in the under-17 girls shot put
(11.73 metres) and discus (34.84) to amass
a total of 20 points.

¢ Stephen Munroe of the Star Trackers
posted a sprint double in the under-17 boys
with his victory in the 100 (10.79) and the
200 (22.14), but he was joined by Star
Trackers’ Patrick Bodie with 20 points
apiece. Bodie took the 100 hurdles (14.00)
and 400 hurdles (56.53).

¢ Katarina Smith of the Golden Eagles
shared the female open division with 20
points after she doubled in the 200 (24.69)
and the 400 (57.42), along with College of
the Bahamas’ Julianna Duncombe, the
winner of the shot put (11.22 metres) and
discus (38.42).

Her team-mate Carlene Johnson
emerged as the century winner in 12.15.

¢ Saron Cox finished with 20 points in
the open men’s shot put (11.52 metres)
and discus (34.68).

The men’s straight away was won by
Ambassador’s Marcus Thompson in 10.64,
while Alfred higgs of the Kenyan Knights
took the 200 in 21.86 and Ambassador’s
Brandon Miller claimed the 400 in 49.87.
PAGE 16, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





SPORTS

RESULTS: STAR TRACKERS /BAKER’S CONSTRUCTION TRACK CLASSIC

THE results of the Star
Trackers/Baker’s Constuction Track
Classic held on Saturday at the
Thomas A. Robinson Track and field
Stadium are posted below:

Girls 50 Meter Dash UNDER 7 Finals
- 1, Capron, Marissa, Striders, 9.78,
w:NWI. 2, Lightbourne, Aisha, Club
Monica, 10.28, w:NWI. 3, Miller,
Shaunece, Bahamas Speed DY,
10.41, w:NWI.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 7 - 1,
Capron, Marissa, Striders, 18.73,
w:2.7. 2, Lightbourne, Aisha, Club
Monica, 20.60, w:1.2. 3, Mortimer,
Madison, Striders, 20.74, w:2.7.
Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Wright, Deante, Striders, 16.31,
w:NWI. 2, Lightbourne, Tyler, Strid-
ers, 16.82, w:2.1. 3, Baptiste,
Karolyn, Striders, 17.57, w:2.1.
Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Wilson, Gem, Striders, 32.91, w:NWI.
2, Wright, Deante, Striders, 33.89,
w:NWI. 3, Lightbourne, Tyler, Strid-
ers, 35.23, w:5.9.

Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 9 -
1, Striders ‘A’ 1:12.20. 2, Striders
'B' 1:18

18.12.
Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Catalyn, Blayre, Sunblazers, 13.78,
w:4.8. 2, Fountain, Britini, Striders,
14.81, w:3.4. 3, Newry, Tanae, Strid-
ers, 14.96, w:4.8.
Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Moss, Daejah, Striders, 30.46, w-6.1.
2, Fountain, Britini, Striders, 30.56,
w:6.1. 3, Newry, Tanae, Striders,
31.24, w:4.9.
Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 11 - 1,
Moss, Daejah, Striders, 1:13.93. 2,
Shaw, Danielle, Club Monica, 1:15.89,
3, Collie, Kristia, Alliance Athleti,
1:19.13.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 11
- 1, Striders ‘A’ 1:01.18. 2, Sunblaz-
ers ‘A’ 1:05.34. 3, Club Monica ‘A’

1:06.49.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Henderson, Janiece, Spirit OF Excell,
13.59, w:3.8. 2, Miller, Destini, Gold-
en Eagles, 13.69, w:4.6. 3, Fergu-
son, Andira, Striders, 13.92, w:3.8.
Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles,
27.59, w:4.6. 2, Henderson, Janiece,
Spirit OF Excell, 27.97, w:4.6. 3, Tay-
lor, leisha, Striders, 28.14, w:5.6.
Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 13 - 1,
Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles,
1:06.79. 2, Ambrose, Jenae, Club
Monica, 1:07.72. 3, Taylor, leisha,
Striders, 1:08.28.

Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Striders 'A' 58.08. 2, Golden
Eagles 'A' 58.81. 3, Striders 'B'
1:00.83

Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Striders ‘A’ 4:39.95.

Girls Long Jump UNDER 13 - 1, Tay-
lor, leisha, Striders, 3.88m, w:NWI. 2,
Sutherland, Jasmine, Golden Eagles,
3.86m, w:NWI. 3, Ambrose, Jenae,
Club Monica, 3.66m, w:NWI.

STRIDERS’ Talia Thompson tries to clear the bar.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 15 - 1,
Hield, Khadejah, Golden Eagles,
12.74, w:3.6. 2, White, Makeya, Club
Monica, 12.84, w:3.6. 3, Cox,
Carmiesha, Star Trackers, 12.94,
w:4.0.

Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 15 -
(w: 5.7) 1, Seymour, Pedrya,
Bahamas Speed DY, 25.97. 2, Gib-
son, Danielle, Ambassadors, 26.58. 3,
White, Makeya, Club Monica, 26.60.
Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 1,
Seymour, Pedrya, Bahamas Speed
DY, 1:02.35. 2, Thompson, Talia,
Striders, 1:03.77. 3, Walker, Vanillian,
Striders, 1:04.79.

Girls 800 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 1,
Rolle, Hollie, T Bird Flyers, 2:39.04. 2,
David, Johnique, Striders, 2:41.39.
3, Williams, Spring, T Bird Flyers,
2:41.79

Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 15
- 1, Sunblazers 'A' 53.24. 2, Spirit
OF Excellence ‘A’ 53.78. 3, Club Mon-
ica 'A' 53.93.

Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 15

- 1, Striders ‘A’ 4:33.25. 2, Golden
Eagles 'A' 4:52.47. 3, Road Runners
‘A’ 4:56.35.

Girls High Jump UNDER 15 - 1, Gib-
son, Danielle, Ambassadors, 1.50m.
2, Thompson, Talia, Striders, 1.44m.
3, Strachan, Andriel, Star Trackers,
1.39m.

Girls 100 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Miller, Shaunae, Club Monica, 12.16,
w:3.3. 2, Strachan, Anthonique, Silver
Lightning, 12.26, w:3.8. 3, MACK-
EY, Sara, Road Runners, 12.45,
w:3.8.

Girls 200 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Strachan, Anthonique, Silver Light-
ning, 24.96, w:2.3. 2, Johnson,
Likeira, Golden Eagles, 26.68, w:3.6.
3, Thompson, Courtney, Club Moni-
ca, 27.18, w:3.6.

Girls 400 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Adderley, Teshon, T Bird Flyers,
1:00.16. 2, Farrington, Bianca, Ney-
mour Athletic, 1:01.37. 3, Johnson,
Likeira, Golden Eagles, 1:03.26.
Girls 800 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,



Cherilus, Angela, Silver Lightning,
2:50.97. 2, Farrington, Bianca, Ney-
mour Athletic, 3:04.42.

Girls 1500 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Heinel, Alice, Striders, 5:37.86. 2,
Hield, Jane, Golden Eagles, 5:40.43.
3, Cherilus, Angela, Silver Lightning,
6:03.79.

Girls 100 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- (w: 3.2) 1, Cartwright, Devinn, Star
Trackers, 15.05.

Girls 300 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- 1, Rolle, Kryshell, Striders, 1:01.47.
Girls 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 17 -
1, Road Runners 'A’ 51.55. 2, Gold-
en Eagles ‘A’ 52.30. 3, Silver Light-
ning 'A' 53.70.

Girls 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 17
- 1, Road Runners 'A' 4:30.49. 2,
Golden Eagles 'A' 4:45.95.

Girls High Jump UNDER 17 - 1, Fer-
guson, Khadajah, Striders, 1.42m.
Girls Long Jump UNDER 17 - 1,
Barr, Regina, Andros North & C,
5.13m, w:NWI. 2, Ferguson, Khada-
jah, Striders, 4.92m, w:NWI. 3, Moss,

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Lakera, Andros North & C, 4.63m,
‘NWI

w:NWI.
Girls Shot Put UNDER 17 - 1,
Williams, Raquel, R. C. Athletics,
11.73m. 2, Hamilton, Cymone, Star
Trackers, 7.88m. 3, MACKEY,
Latisha, Zion Christian $, 7.43m.
Girls Discus Throw UNDER 17 - 1,
Williams, Raquel, R. C. Athletics,
34.84m. 2, Hamilton, Cymone, Star
Trackers, 22.41m. 3, Smith, Amanda,
Bahamas Speed DY, 16.12m.
Women 100 Meter Dash OPEN - 1,
Johnson, Carlene, Golden Eagles,
12.15, w:4.6. 2, Morley, Domonique,
Bahamas Speed DY, 12.34, w:4.6.
3, McDonald, Arthurnique, Ambas-
sadors, 12.44, w:4.6.

Women 200 Meter Dash OPEN - 1,
Smith, Katarina, Golden Eagles,
24.69, w:3.2. 2, Robinson, V'Alonee,
Club Monica, 24.74, w:3.7. 3, Sey-
mour, Katrina, Ambassadors, 25.01,
w:3.2.

Women 400 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Smith, Katarina, Golden Eagles,



57.24. 2, Burnside, Deshana,
Bahamas Speed DY, 57.52. 3, Sey-
mour, Katrina, Ambassadors, 58.51.
Women 800 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Burnside, Deshana, Bahamas Speed
DY, 2:27.53. 2, Johnson, Ashley, Star
Trackers, 2:29.03. 3, Sands, Desirae,
Bahamas Speed DY, 2:32.61.
Women 1500 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Rolle, Hughnique, T Bird Flyers,
5:10.78. 2, Sands, Desirae, Bahamas
Speed DY, 5:32.04. 3, Swann, Mikala,
Golden Eagles, 5:41.56.

Women 100 Meter Hurdles OPEN -
(w: NWI) 1, Kemp, lvanique, Club
Monica, 14.84. 2, Charlton, Lauren,
Star Trackers, 16.13. 3, Robinson,
V'Alonee, Club Monica, 17.05.
Women 4x100 Meter Relay OPEN -
1, Club Monica 'A' 49.09. 2, Star
Trackers 'A' 49.83. 3, Golden Eagles
‘A’ 50.58

Women 4x400 Meter Relay OPEN -
1, Bahamas Speed Dynamics 'A'
4:07.66. 2, Star Trackers 'A' 4:16.74.
3, Golden Eagles ‘A’ 4:18.51.
Women High Jump OPEN - 1, Cul-
mer, Kenya, Striders, 1.65m.
Women Shot Put OPEN - 1, Dun-
canson, Julianna, College OF Baham,
11.22m. 2, Dennard, Danielle, Col-
lege OF Baham, 8.26m. 3, Cox,
Sharell, Striders, 8.06m.

Women Discus Throw OPEN - 1,
Duncanson, Julianna, College OF
Baham, 38.42m. 2, Dennard,
Danielle, College OF Baham, 22.47m.
Boys 50 Meter Dash UNDER 7 - (w:
NWI) 1, Riley, Edwin, Spirit OF Excell,
10.72. 2, Wilson, Joshua, Striders,
10.83. 3, Wright, Tevin, Striders,
10.97.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 7 -
(w: 3.2) 1, Riley, Edwin, Spirit OF
Excell, 21.41. 2, Wright, Tevin, Strid-
ers, 21.49. 3, McPhee, Jonathan,
Striders, 22.14.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Willie, Juwan, Star Trackers, 16.15,
w:2.0. 2, Bannister, Zion, Sunblaz-
ers, 16.24, w:3.2. 3, Butler, Jerry
Christopher, Sunblazers, 16.51,
w:2.0.

Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 9 - 1,
Miller, Shaun, Bahamas Speed DY,
34.02, w:5.4. 2, Bannister, Zion, Sun-
blazers, 34.07, w:4.5. 3, Major, Cruz,
Sunblazers, 34.42, w:5.4.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 9 -
1, Sunblazers 'B' 1:12.45. 2, Sun-
blazers ‘A’ 1:16.19.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Johnson, Christopher, Striders,
14.52, w:3.1. 2, Gardiner, Vincent,
Striders, 14.60, w:4.1. 3, Pratt,
Daniel, N. G. M. Major H, 14.63,

w:3.9.

Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 11 - 1,
Rolle, Branson, Road Runners, 29.34,
w:6.0. 2, Johnson, Christopher, Strid-
ers, 29.66, w:4.7. 3, Newbold, Zhivar-
go, Striders, 29.94, w:6.0.

SEE page 17

$103.00
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2009, PAGE 17



SPORTS



RESULTS: STAR TRACKERS /BAKER’S CONSTRUCTION TRACK CLASSIC



FROM page 16

Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 11 - 1,
Newbold, Zhivargo, Striders, 1:11.62.
2, Knowles, Cameron, Ambassadors,
1:13.21. 3, Coakley, Katraz, Road
Runners, 1:14.62.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 11
- 1, Road Runners ‘A’ 1:00.12. 2,
Striders ‘A’ 1:00.31. 3, Striders ‘B’
1:02.68.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Cash, Shalom, Spirit OF Excell, 12.81,
w:4.7. 2, Cash, Scharann, Spirit OF
Excell, 12.88, w:4.5. 3, Nixon,
Recarno, Road Runners, 13.32,

w:i4.5.

Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 13 - 1,
Cash, Scharann, Spirit OF Excell,
26.50, w:5.6. 2, Cash, Shalom, Spir-
it OF Excell, 26.70, w:3.8. 3, Major,
Darius, Sunblazers, 27.99, w:5.6.
Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 13 - 4,
Sweeting, Kenneth, Club Monica,
1:09.05. 2, Simmons, Kyle, H.O.
Nash, 1:09.49. 3, Wilkinson, Jordan,
Spirit OF Excell, 1:12.65.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 55.03. 2,
Road Runners 'A' 57.95. 3, Striders
‘A’ 58.85.

Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 13
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 4:41.81.
2, Road Runners ‘A’ 5:10.18.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 13 - 1,
Rolle, Anthony, Striders, 4.09m,
w:NWI. 2, Major, Darius, Sunblaz-
ers, 3.79m, w:NWI. 3, Bowe, Tyler,
Golden Eagles, 3.77m, w:NWI.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 15 - 1,
Davis, Delano, Golden Eagles, 11.44,
w:5.1. 2, Major, Clarence, Nassau
Christian, 12.11, w:NWI. 3, Martin,
Shanton, Ambassadors, 12.32, w:3.0.
Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 15 - 1,
Rahming, Gerrio, Spirit OF Excell,
24.42, w:4.8. 2, Carey, Tre, Striders,
24.99, w:5.1. 3, King, Shaquille, Sil-
ver Lightning, 25.04, w:4.5.

Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 4,
Riley, Ashley, Spirit OF Excell, 57.73.
2, Charlton, Demetri, Spirit OF Excell,
58.02. 3, Deal, Mario, Golden Eagles,

58.58.

Boys 800 Meter Run UNDER 15 - 4,
Higgins, Nakita, Star Trackers,
2:20.06. 2, Deal, Mario, Golden
Eagles, 2:20.75. 3, Wilson, Thomas,
Striders, 2:34.03.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 15
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 49.55. 2,
Star Trackers ‘A’ 49.70. 3, Zion Chris-
tian School 'A' 51.33.

Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 15
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 3:58.97.
2, Star Trackers ‘A’ 4:13.27. 3, Strid-
ers ‘A’ 4:17.74.

Boys High Jump UNDER 15 - 1,
Caokley, Xavier, Road Runners,
1.65m. 2, Davis, Delano, Golden
Eagles, 1.58m. 3, Anderson, Calvin,
Golden Eagles, 1.52m.

Boys 100 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Munroe, Stephen, Star Trackers,
10.79, w:3.5. 2, Carter, Harold, Spir-

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it OF Excell, 10.83, w:3.2. 3, Rolle,
Javon, Road Runners, 11.14, w:5.3.
Boys 200 Meter Dash UNDER 17 - 1,
Munroe, Stephen, Star Trackers,
22.14, w:3.4. 2, Carter, Harold, Spir-
it OF Excell, 22.35, w:4.9. 3, Rolle,
Javon, Road Runners, 22.63, w:3.4.
Boys 400 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Cooper, Julino, Kenyan Knights,
52.81. 2, Lockhart, Michael, Kenyan
Knights, 54.21. 3, Archer, Nicholas,
Star Trackers, 54.31.

Boys 800 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Wallace, Ashton, Golden Eagles,
2:08.10. 2, Hall, Tevin, T Bird Flyers,
2:09.10. 3, Rahming, Earl, Alliance
Athleti, 2:10.11.

Boys 1500 Meter Run UNDER 17 - 1,
Cargill, Duane, Star Trackers, 4:42.26.
2, Lafleur, Lopez, T Bird Flyers,
4:44.84. 3, Minns, Marvin, Alliance
Athleti, 4:48.21.

Boys 100 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- (w: 3.2) 1, Bodie, Patrick, Star
Trackers, 14.00. 2, Minns, Lathario,
Jumpers Inc., 14.46. 3, Minns, Lath-
one, Jumpers Inc., 14.81.

Boys 400 Meter Hurdles UNDER 17
- 1, Bodie, Patrick, Star Trackers,
56.53. 2, Hepburn, Stephan, Club
Monica, 1:02.53.

Boys 4x100 Meter Relay UNDER 17
- 1, Spirit OF Excellence 'A' 45.39. 2,
Golden Eagles 'A' 46.04. 3, Silver
Lightning 'A' 46.19.

Boys 4x400 Meter Relay UNDER 17
- 1, Star Trackers 'A' 3:35.11. 2, Star
Trackers 'B' 3:40.90. 3, Alliance Ath-
letics 'A' 3:44.97.

Boys High Jump UNDER 17 - 1, Hin-
sey, Jaran, R. C. Athletics, 1.85m.
2, Munroe, Julian, Golden Eagles,
1.67m.

Boys Long Jump UNDER 17 - 1,
Minns, Lathone, Jumpers Inc.,
6.45m, w:NWI. 2, McDonald, Jerome,
Jumpers Inc., 6.23m, w:NWI. 3,
Newbold, Stephen, Star Trackers,
6.05m, w:NWI.

Boys Shot Put UNDER 17 - 1, Not-
tage, Deangelo, R. C. Athletics,
12.88m. 2, Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau
Christian, 10.95m. 3, Rolle, Matthew,
Government High, 10.20m.

Boys Discus Throw UNDER 17 - 1,
Sturrup, Carlos, Nassau Christian,
26.14m. 2, Wilson, Albert, Nassau
Christian, 25.48m. 3, Whyms,
Michael, Nassau Christian, 24.16m.
Boys Javelin Throw UNDER 17 - 1,
Ferguson, Byron, T Bird Flyers,
47.97m. 2, Nottage, Deangelo, R. C.
Athletics, 38.55m. 3, Darling, Sam-
my, Silver Lightning, 30.88m.

Boys Shot Put UNDER 20 - 1, Carey,
Elvardo, R. C. Athletics, 13.25m. 2,
Turnquest, Tobias, N. G. M. Major
H, 11.53m. 3, Rolle, Harrington,
Andros North & C, 11.49m.

Men 100 Meter Dash OPEN - 1,
Thompson, Marcus, Ambassadors,
10.64, w:3.1. 2, MACKEY, Trevor,
Star Trackers, 10.77, w:3.8. 3,
McPhee, Kaadem, Golden Eagles,
10.89, w:3.5.



NCA’S Wilton Johnson wins the under-15 boys’ 400 NSH

Men 200 Meter Dash OPEN - 1, Hig-
gs, Alfred, Kenyan Knights, 21.86,
w:3.2. 2, MACKEY, Trevor, Star
Trackers, 22.00, w:4.1. 3, McPhee,
Kaadem, Golden Eagles, 22.22, w:3.4.
Men 400 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Miller, Brandon, Ambassadors,
49.87. 2, Russell, Alonzo, Golden
Eagles, 50.59. 3, Porter, Eric, Golden
Eagles, 50.89.

Men 800 Meter Run OPEN - 1, New-
bold, Laquardo, T Bird Flyers,
1:57.92. 2, Williams, Jason, Alliance
Athleti, 1:59.66. 3, Wallace-Whitfield,
Kenneth, Star Trackers, 2:01.06.
Men 1500 Meter Run OPEN - 1,
Williams, Jason, Alliance Athleti,
4:15.69. 2, Carey, James Audley, Star
Trackers, 4:18.71. 3, Kingsley,
Cajudte, Golden Eagles, 4:34.85.
Men 110 Meter Hurdles OPEN - (w:
4.0) 1, Wilmore, Aaron, Ambas-
sadors, 14.87. 2, Williams, Jason,
Bahamas Speed DY, 14.97. 3, Pala-
cious, Douglas, Jumpers Inc., 15.79.
Men 400 Meter Hurdles OPEN - 1,
Burnside, Nejmi, Star Trackers,
55.38. 2, Cox, Rikeo, Kenyan Knights,
1:13.20

Men 4x100 Meter Relay OPEN - 1,
Golden Eagles 'A' 43.69. 2, Alliance
Athletics 'A' 43.97. 3, Spirit OF Excel-
lence 'A' 44.49.

Men 4x400 Meter Relay OPEN - 1,

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

Golden Eagles ‘A’ 3:22.58. 2, Ambas-
sadors ‘A’ 3:24.77. 3, Alliance Ath-
letics 'A' 3:25.74.
Men High Jump OPEN - 1, Bullard,
Troi, Golden Eagles, 2.06m. 2, Mar-
tin, Shanrice, Zion Christian S,
a 3, Wilson, Wheatly, Striders,
7
Men Triple Jump OPEN - 1, Deveaux,
J'Vente, Star Trackers, 15.33m,
w:NWI. 2, Bullard, Troi, Golden
Eagles, 14.25m, w:NWI. 3, Palacious,
Douglas, Jumpers Inc., 13.74m,
w: NWI.
Men Shot Put OPEN - 1, Cox, Saron,
Striders, 11.52m. 2, Rox, Devon, Col-
lege OF Baham, 11.37m. 3, Light-
bourne, Benjamin, College OF Baham,
10.19m.
Men Discus Throw OPEN - 1, Cox,
Saron, Striders, 34.68m. 2, Miller
Sr., Shaun, Bahamas Speed DY,
32.54m. 3, Turnquest, Tobias, N. G.
M. Major H, 30.21m.
Men Javelin Throw OPEN - 1, Rox,
Devon, College OF Baham, 48.60m.
2, Carey, Elvardo, R. C. Athletics,
48.33m. 3, Saunders, Jevaughn, Col-
lege OF Baham, 46.73m.
Team Standings
1, Striders, 688; 2, Golden Eagles,
461; 3. Star Trackers, 349.50; 4. Spir-
it of Excellence, 307; 5. Road Run-
ners, 262.50; 6. Club Monica, 209; 7.

ae {|
ring rd
(Al Meiiay TUS

Sunblazers, 191; 8. Bahamas Speed
Dynamics, 148; 9. Amabassadors,
145; 10. Silver Lightning, 111; 12.
T-Bird, 97; 13. Collge of the
Bahamas, 96; 14. RC Athletics, 66;
15. Nassau Christian Academy, 63;
16. Zion Christian ASchool, 49; 17.
Kenyan Knights, 47; 18. Jumpers
Inc., 46; 19. LN Coakley, 33; 19.
Andros North & Central, 33; 19. Cen-
tral Eleuthera, 33; 22. HO Nash, 28:
23. Neymour Athletics, 21; 24. Gov-
ernment High, 17; 25. NGM Major
High, 15; 26. Abaco Central, 11; 27.
North Long Island High, 8.

Top three finishers in each divi-
sion:

Under-7 combined - Striders, 94;
Spirit of Excellence, 20; Club monica,
19

Under-9 combined - Striders, 92;
Sunblazers, 68; Star Trackers, 14.
Under-11 combined - Striders, 155;
Road Runners, 62; Sunblazers, 53.
Under-13 combined - Striders, 139;
Spirit of Excellence, 116; Golden
Eagles, 70.

Under-15 combined - Striders, 109;
Spirit of Excellence, 99; Golden
Eagles, 91.

Under-17 combined - Golden Eagles,
126; Star Trackers, 126; Silver Light-
ning, 84.

Open division combined - Golden
Eagles - 169; Star Trackers, 125; Col-
lege of the Bahamas, 96.

Female under 7 -Striders, 45; Club
oe 19; Bahamas Speed Dynam-
ic, 10.

Female under-9 - Striders, 91; Club
monica, 7.

Female under-11 - Striders, 83; Sun-
blazers, 35; Club monica, ot.
Female under- 13 - Striders, 105;
Golden Eagles - 60; Spirit of Excel-
lence, 21

Female under-15 - Striders, 68; Sun-
blazers, 37; Golden Eagles, 30.
Female under-17 - Golden Eagles -
72; Road Runners - 58; Silver Light-
ning, 46.

Female open - Golden Eagles, 68;
Bahamas Speed Dynamics, 65; Club
Monica, 53.

Male under-7 - Striders, 49: Spirit of
Excellence, 20.

Male under 9 - Sunblazers, Sun-
blazers, 68; Bahamas Speed Dynam-
ica, 14: Star Trackers, 14.

Male under-11 - Striders, 72; Road
runners, 48; Sunblazers, 18.

Male under-13 - Spirit of Excellence,
95; Road Runners, 59; Striders, 34.
Male under-15 - Spirit of Excellence,
83; Golden Eagles, 61; Star Track-
ers, 48.50.

Male under-17 - Star Trackers, 100;
Golden Eagles, 54; Nassau Christian
Academy, 44.

Male open - Golden Eagles, 101;
Star Trackers, 73: Ambassadors, 59.

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