Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
WEATHER

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

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ie

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CLOUDY

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AND WINDY

Volume: 105 No.63





TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

Two men expected in
Court after shootout

aU aad

A third
occupant
of car in
high-speed
chase is
reportedly
injured

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SHOOT-OUT at the end
of a high-speed car chase
through Nassau resulted in the
arrest of two men and the injury
of one person, according to
reports.

Police had been chasing a
white Lexus with heavily tint-
ed windows from Tedder Street,
Palmdale, for over an hour
before the pursuit ended in a
hail of gunfire outside the Roy-
al Nassau Sailing Club and
Montagu ramp just after Spm
on Thursday.

Shots were fired at police by
occupants of the car before offi-
cers returned fire, police say.
People living nearby described
the gun battle as terrifying.

Two men aged 20 and 26
were arrested and taken into
custody. They are expected to
appear in Magistrate’s Court on
Monday.

Reports on ZNS news
claimed last night there was a
third occupant in the vehicle
who was injured in the shooting,
but police press liaison officer
Walter Evans was unable to
confirm this before The Tribune
went to press.

It has also been reported that
a woman in the Lexus fled the
scene.

The Lexus and a police
motorbike were damaged when
more than a dozen gunshots
were fired.

One resident said: “There
was a single shot followed by a
burst of gunfire from weapons
of varied calibre - probably two
dozen rounds in all. The gun-
fight lasted for at least 30 sec-
onds.”

Motorists in East Bay Street
were frightened into diversion
as police cars sped by and a
rapid succession of bullets were
fired in the street only metres
away.

Back-up police patrols con-
verged on the scene from all
directions.

The dramatic shooting

SEE page six

RETIRED CHAUFFEUR Mike Burrows with two of his custom-

UTM Case

The Tribune ®&

ete mee ber car
drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



ed |

The Bahamas

set for ‘world

first’ tourism
concept

Bid to boost visitor
arrivals and revenue

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama is set to be the
launching ground for a “world first”
tourism concept intended to boost
tourism arrivals and revenue, according
to Ministry of Tourism officials.

Talks are underway in the hope of
eventually turning the destination into
an “all inclusive island” - where visi-
tors can have a “Club Med” style holi-
day treating them to unrestricted access puss
to a plethora of hotels, restaurants and Minister of
activities across the island for one pre- Tourism Vincent
paid price. Vanderpool Wallace

The ministry’s aim is to encourage a
broader visitor experience and wider sharing of their cash
throughout the tourism sector - two of the key objectives
identified by Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace, in his speech unveiling the new direction for
Bahamian tourism last year.

If successful the package option, initially incorporating
properties around Lucaya, will be expanded to invite more
hotels, restaurants and tourism dependent businesses across
Grand Bahama, eventually getting rolled out in New Prov-
idence and the Family Islands.

The ministry will start selling the Grand Bahama pack-

SEE page six

Husband fears for



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

NO LONGER confined to the rigours of
a regular job, one man says developing his
lifelong hobby of rebuilding motor-cycles
has made his golden years the best part of his
life.

Retired chauffeur Mike Burrows is the
owner of nearly a dozen high-performance
motor-bikes, one of which he designed and
claims as an original.

Stretching nearly nine feet in length, the
twin-engine Triumph bike is the pride of
his vintage fleet.

The machine, built in less than six months,
includes an altered frame from New Jersey,
double Triumph engines, two transmissions
and oil tanks, and elongated handle bars.

the right conditions it can reach speeds in
excess of 240 mph.

“Everything is English, the frame and the
engines. It’s like a stretch Harley-Davidson,
only better. However, I still have more work
to do on it.”

By installing another fuel tank, Mr Bur-
rows said he hopes to create a smoother
and sleeker bike.

Honing his talent for more than 42 years,
Mr Burrows said he would not be surprised
if in another 42 years he’s doing the same
thing.

Along with his wife Gloria - an author
and world traveller who helped him build his
first bike - Mr Burrows said “retirement is a
wonderful experience once you plan for it.”

Also in his collection are a vintage 1967
650 BSA bike, a 1988 Harley-Davidson 1200,
a 1974 Harley-Davidson 1000, and a 1968

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

his missing wife

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE husband of a woman who
reportedly went missing nearly a
month ago fears that she may be
in serious danger.

Leslie Lindley told The Tribune
yesterday that his wife of 19 years
Brenda Roker, 37, was last seen
on January 9.

Mr Lindley (formerly Roker)
said that he and his son had gone
on an overnight fishing trip only
to return and discover that his
wife was no longer at their Gold-
en Isles Road residence.

Mr Burrows explained that, although he
has never tested his creation’s top speed, in

SEE page six



One man arraigned, more arrests likely over
arson attack on customs officer’s home

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH one man was
arraigned on formal charges for the
arson of the home of a senior cus-
toms officer, investigations into the
incident are still continuing with
more arrests likely, police said yes-
terday.

"We were able to charge one per-
son (and) there are other persons
who we more than likely, once the
inquiry is completed, will put before
the courts again. It (the case) is still

open, there are still persons who
we are looking at,” head of CDU
Chief Supt Glenn Miller said yes-
terday.

CSP Miller said recently three
men, including a well-known busi-
nessman, were arrested by police
for questioning in connection with
the November fire at Roslyn
Ritchie's home but released pending
further inquiries.

Ms Ritchie - a senior customs
officer who was part of a task force
which roots out corruption and pre-
vents tax fraud - lost her 10-room
home in Sea Link Drive, off East

Street South, in a suspicious fire on
November 26.

It was suspected that the arson
attack was related to Mrs Ritchie’s
role in a customs task force charged
with weeding out customs fraud-
sters.

Last month, Clive Kent
Schroeter, 37, of Lady Slipper
Avenue, was charged in Magis-
trate's Court in connection with that
fire. According to court dockets
Schroeter, while being concerned
with others, intentionally caused the
home of Philip and Roslyn Ritchie
to be set on fire.



:
BI NOCORte) GE

Suicides could be sign of
‘even more serious problem’

m By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

SEE page six

THE recent spate of suicides could be a sign of an even more seri-
ous problem, which one psychologist says could lead to unem-
ployed Bahamian men killing their whole families.

Psychologist Dr David Allen said that during the recession in the
late 1980s, major cities in the United States experienced a significant
number of cases of the type of murder-suicide known as “famili-
cide.”

Familicide involves the killing of two or more family members by
another member of that family.

In 2007, the San Francisco Chronicle interviewed Phillip Resnick,
a professor of psychiatry at Case Western Reserve University in
Cleveland, who has studied parents who killed their children.

SEE page six





NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER



PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Dilapidated buildings ‘could be used as criminal hide-outs’

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

RESIDENTS of the south-
western part of New Provi-
dence are concerned that the
dilapidated buildings on the
South Ocean property are
being used as a hide-out by
criminals in the area.

Ronald Lloyd, who has
lived in the area for 19 years,
said he has been a victim of
these criminals and wants the
owners of the property and
the government to do some-
thing about it.

“The new owner of the
buildings closed everything
down, had a meeting with the
neighbourhood telling the
residents that he was going
to take down all the buildings
and put new buildings there.
His people then went and
took out all the windows and
doors and left the buildings,
that are now an eyesore, to
harbour crime.

“People hide in those
buildings, the bush has grown
up and it’s an easy place to
hide things,” he said.

Mr Lloyd claimed there is
no security to patrol the
grounds or the area.

Ode ME

Residents in South
Ocean area concerned

“IT saw a new face just as
late as Sunday behind the
fence of South Ocean’s main
building snooping around.
They stole my nine-year-old’s
bicycle, my $3,000-52” inch
television, desks, my Sunday
watch, DVDs and so many
other things. The police have
not done a proper job in this
area if you ask me. It has
been like this for almost four
years now and the criminals
feel that just because the
buildings are abandoned they
can do all they want,” he
said.

Mr Lloyd said before the
owners discontinued the
upkeep of the property,
South Ocean was a lovely
place.

“TI chose to live way out
here because it was so nice,
quiet and beautiful. Now the
place is a mess and causing
the property value in this
area to go down — some-
thing has to be done,” Mr
Lloyd said.

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Project coordinator for the
New South Ocean Club
Development Company Bur-
ton Rodgers told The Tri-
bune that the burglaries were
not brought to his attention,
but that his company is going
to try and work with the res-
idents to rectify the problem.

“We have security officers
on the compound in the day
and at night. The buildings
are going to come down,
although we have not started
as yet. If the residents see
any suspicious activity they
should give us a call. I will
make sure that security is
increased within the next 48
hours,” Mr Rodgers said.

Police from the Lyford Cay
station said the last house
break-in they can recall for
the South Ocean area hap-
pened about two months ago.

THE faculty members of the
School of Social Sciences at the
College of the Bahamas have
completed a research paper
analysing the part civil society
has played in the crafting of
government policies regarding
development.

In “Challenges of Develop-
ment and Sustainability in the
Bahamas: the Role of Civil
Society”, associate sociology
professor Jessica Minnis and
assistant psychology professor
Yvette Pintard-Newry investi-
gated the case of Clifton Cay,
the proposed gated community
that stirred much controversy
in the late 1990s and early 2000.

They explored how civil soci-
ety impacted the governmen-

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SOUTH OCEAN resident of 19 years PENA EIN FSM Is oneen a victim of crime.

t’s eventual rejection of the
investor’s proposal for the pro-
ject on 554 acres of the histor-
ically and archaeologically rich
land in western New Provi-
dence.

The study, which was start-
ed after a call was made for
papers for the University of
Prince Edward Island‘s Island
Heritage Management Confer-
ence in Canada, took the pair
six months to complete.

The professors started in
April, 2008 and finished in Sep-
tember of that year, just in time
for the conference held in the
following month.

The pair shared their find-
ings at the College of the
Bahamas’ first Research Edge
Forum for the year held in Jan-
uary. Research Edge is a lec-
ture series held once a month
where faculty and students
share presentations on matters
of national and scholarly inter-
est.

According to Ms Pintard-
Newry, who researched the the-
oretical aspect of civil society
while Ms Minnis researched the
specifics of the Clifton Cay
case, the role of civil society is
important because it increases
the empowerment of citizens.

“The World Bank and its
shareholders recognise the crit-
ical role that civil society plays
in helping to reduce poverty
and promote sustainable devel-
opment. And the World Bank’s
projects focus on the capacity of
the civil society for the empow-
erment of citizens living within
the country,” Ms Pintard-
Newry said at the Research
Edge Forum.



“For small states, there is a
unique challenge with regards
to their insularity and size.
Many small island states share a
common colonial heritage and
for these island states, including
the Bahamas, civil society has
been instrumental,” she added.

The college faculty members
specifically examined the
“Coalition to Save Clifton”
made up of civic and social
groups, activists and individuals
who were vehemently opposed
to the development. The
researchers found that this par-
ticular coalition model was
instrumental in its influence on
the eventual outcome.

“Clifton was a unique case
because it involved about 500
plus acres of land at the [west-
ern] end of the island and peo-
ple saw this as the last area that
Bahamians in the community
had in terms of beach access,”
Minnis said in a later interview.

“What we wanted to high-
light is that civil society was
successful, civil society can
bring about change and that
civil society was successful in
the form of the coalition,” she
added.

The researchers found that
the Clifton coalition followed
the Advocacy Coalition Frame-
work which suggests that
“stakeholders are motivated
within a coalition by a core
belief system that holds the
coalition together and it is the
core belief ... that the coalition
wants to see as a policy.”

“In the case of Clifton, you
see a variety of governmental
organisations, private organi-
sations and individuals [lobby-

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ing] to shift government policy
away from the idea of a gated
community for something more
meaningful, lasting and sus-
tainable in the Bahamian con-
text,” Ms Pintard-Newry said.

According to the paper, the
Advocacy Coalition Frame-
work looks at policy oriented
learning which is learning and
teaching within the various
groups in the coalition.

“The idea of [policy] learning
is having the transfer of beliefs
and the transfer of knowledge
from one group to the next to
the point where it is a consis-
tent, sustainable thought [and]
continues over the lifespan of
the group as well as the lifes-
pan of the issue,” Ms Pintard-
Newry said.

The Clifton Cay investors
wanted to create a $400 mil-
lion dollar luxury community
which would have included
marinas and canals.

According to the research,
archaeological excavation exer-
cises at Clifton in 1996 and
1998 undertaken by two
archaeologists led to the dis-
covery of a site that housed
three eras of Bahamian history.

Ms Minnis said the paper has
been resubmitted to the Uni-
versity of Prince Edward Island
for publication and if selected,
will be included in the Island
Heritage Management Con-
ference’s proceedings docu-
ment.

Research will be one of the
primary thrusts of the antici-
pated University of the
Bahamas, the mission of which
will be to help support and dri-
ve national development.

US Embassy Martin Luther
King Essay Competition

ON FEBRUARY 13 the US
Embassy will announce the
2009 Martin Luther King Essay
Competition winners in a recep-
tion to be held at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel.

The event, which will begin
at 4pm, marks the third consec-
utive year the embassy has
offered the competition, open
to students in grades 10 through
12 in both public and private
schools in New Providence and
the Family Islands.

On January 19 the United
States observed a national hol-
iday celebrating the life and

legacy of the Reverend Dr Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. A civil rights
activist, Dr King championed
the principle of human dignity
in his native United States and
around the world.

The essay competition was
launched in honour of Dr
King’s memory, and in an effort
to strengthen public under-
standing of his life’s impact not
only in the United States, but
also in the Bahamas.

Applying their knowledge
and understanding of Dr King’s
teachings and philosophy, stu-
dents were asked to respond to

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Ss Shee

sedeccaeteeecicetcaetaeet nets P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES



the question: Does the swearing
in of Barack Obama as the first
African-American president of
the United States of America
mean that Dr King’s dream has
been realised in the US?

The embassy said it is
“pleased to note that this year,
the response has been over-
whelming. We have received
105 essays from 11 New Provi-
dence schools and seven schools
in the Family Islands.”

This year, two first place win-
ners will be selected — one from
New Providence and one from
the Family Islands.

Each winner will be present-
ed with a laptop computer
which has been donated by the
d’Albenas Agency Limited and
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce.

Bahamasair has also donat-
ed round trip tickets so the
Family Island winner and a par-
ent can attend the reception on
February 13.

The 2nd, 3rd, and 4th placed
winners will be awarded books
and other materials on Dr Mar-
tin Luther King.

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THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

ombrief Three in court 4%

cent conto ON fraud charges





he released

THE Central Bank of the }
Bahamas will be releasing a}
new version of the one cent}
coin that will look identical to }
the existing coin except for its }

size and weight.

Last modified in 2006, the |
new penny will be reduced

from 19.05 millimeters to 17.

Retaining its composition of ;
copper plated zinc, steel, and }
nickel, the new coinage will}
weight about .80 grammes less }

than the present one.

The Central Bank said this }
change is a part of a continua- }
tion of a commitment to the }
Counterfeit Resistant Integrat- }
ed Security Product (CRISP). :

In December, the Central ;
Bank issued a $1 bill with :
enhanced security features, and }
in recent months modified the }

$5, $10, and $50 notes.

On September 3, 2007, a :
newly designed ten cent coin}
was also issued. This coin rep-
resents the second denomina- }
tion in the family of Bahamas }
to be}
redesigned, following the}
release of the updated one cent }

circulation coins

coin in 2006.

As part of its public educa- :
tion initiatives, the Central }
Bank has available and has dis- }
tributed to banks and other }
cash handlers, flyers and
posters which describe the new }
security features of the new}

notes.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Three women — an
Urban Renewal officer, a teacher, and
a teenager — were arraigned in
Freeport Magistrates Court on fraud
charges yesterday.

Urban Renewal assistant co-ordina-
tor Dr Betsy Russell, 50, of Braemer
Drive; Teacher Vhanyti Reckley, 22, of
Braemer Drive; and Katisha Knowles,
19, of Albacore Drive were escorted by
police to the Garnet Levarity Justice

The women were charged with fraud
by false pretenses.

It is alleged that on January 19, the
accused, being concerned together with
intent to defraud, obtained $4,000 cash
from Commonwealth Bank by means
of false pretenses.

Dr Russell and Vhanyti Reckley
were further charged with obtaining
$5,000 cash from Commonwealth
Bank by means of false pretenses.

The women pleaded not guilty to
the charges. They were each granted
$5,000 bail with one surety.

The matter was adjourned to June
16.

mM, Betsy Russell



In other court matters, a 16-year-
old boy was charged with three counts
of causing grievous harm in connec-
tion after a stabbing incident in the
Hawksbill community.

Vhanyti Reckley

Katisha Knowles



accused, a resident of Inagua Place,
was remanded to the Diah Ward for
psychological evaluation.

The case was adjourned to March
12 when he will appear before a Juve-
nile Panel.

Centre for arraignment.

Following his arraignment the

Group of PLPs wants Neil Percentie for Marathon

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

ARGUING that Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald is not their
choice for the Marathon con-
stituency in the next general elec-
tion, a group of PLPs has formed
a committee to persuade the pow-
ers that be in the party to nomi-
nate Neil Percentie to vie for the
post.

The committee, aptly named
the Committee to Elect Neil Per-
centie for Marathon, has report-
edly formalised a 12-point plan
to raise the former Marathon
branch chairman’s profile and
propel him into the political are-
na.

combe, the chairman of the com-
mittee, Mr Percentie is the best
candidate for the area, as he was
“born and raised” in Marathon.

“Neil, has led a number of
community efforts to bring the
community together, advance it
from where it was many years
ago, and to also encourage the
youth of the community to grow
and become good representatives
of the country,” he said.

Mr Duncombe said that in his
estimation, the majority of per-
sons who live in the area are 100
per cent behind the committee’s
efforts.

“With all due respect to Mr
Fitzgerald, he hasn’t put in the
effort or done the amount of

work that Percentie has done.
Percentie was there when Ron
Pinder was the actual candidate
for the area. And Mr Percentie
was integral to Mr Pinder’s
winning his candidacy for
Marathon.

“So we believe that the natural
progression should allow for the
torch to be passed on to Per-
centie. Because, again, with all
due respect to Mr Fitzgerald, we
know he has done a number of
things as well, but he hasn’t
impacted the community in the
way I feel Mr Pinder has done in
the past and now Mr Percentie is
doing,” he said.

When contacted yesterday, Mr
Percentie confirmed that he is

interested in running for the
Marathon seat, stating that per-
sons have been encouraging him
for “some time now” to enter the
political fray.

A young businessman who
owns his own brokerage firm, a
car rental business and a local
bar, Mr Percentie said that he and
the community of Marathon are
on “very familiar” terms, as
he has lived there for the past







Cralleria

32 years.

Mr Fitzgerald has started to
hold branch meetings in the area
already, but Mr Percentie is quite
confident that he retains a “sub-
stantial level” of support.

“The young persons around his
main support area — who have
actually been supporting me —
are only waiting for me to for-
mally announce that I am run-
ning,” he said.

Cinemas

EFFECTIVE FEBRUARY GTH, 2009.

POMK PANTHER? ew | 1:90 [345 | wk | orzo | mao [ros80 |
7






According to Delmaro Dun-

Drugs worth $200,000
confiscated by police

POLICE confiscated drugs with a street value of $200,000 and took
six people into custody during a stop and search exercise yesterday.

This comes just days after police seized $3.75 million worth of
cocaine in Freeport and $100,000 worth of marijuana in Andros.

Drug Enforcement Unit officers stopped a burgundy Honda Accord
occupied by four men and one woman and a silver Nissan Altima
with one male passenger on South Ocean road shortly after midnight
on Friday.

Upon searching the Nissan, officers found nine bails of marijuana,
with a total weight of more than 196 pounds.

Two of the men arrested are Andros residents, and while the others
reside on New Providence.















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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Democrats exploiting economic crisis

WASHINGTON — “Congress is like a
whiskey drinker,” President Lyndon John-
son once observed. “You can put an awful lot
of whiskey into a man if you just let him sip
it,” he said. “But if you try to force the whole
bottle down his throat at one time, he’ll throw
it up.”

The 36th president and former Senate
majority leader was referring to Congress’s
ability to produce legislative outcomes —
too much activity inebriates the system.

Congressional Democrats learned the hard
way this week as the bloated economic stim-
ulus bill stalled in the Senate.

Moderation in all things — including the
speed with which they grow the federal gov-
ernment — is a virtue. The problem is House
Democrats just didn’t have the temperance to
just say no.

That lack of self-restraint is now producing
political headaches.

After eight years of bumping heads with a
Republican president, many liberals in Con-
gress believe voters just gave them the keys to
the spending liquor cabinet. There is so much
pent-up demand for funding new projects,
Democrats run the risk of ignoring President
Johnson’s admonition, creating a fiscal —
and political —mess.

The current economic crisis may demand
speedy action, but it’s not a mandate for irre-
sponsible spending.

The bill the Senate is considering calls for
$65 billion more than the House-passed ver-
sion, at a time when scepticism about the
stimulus plan is growing.

Polling by both Gallup and Rasmussen has
demonstrated a sharp drop in support for
the legislation in the last several days as more
and more stories about its content hit the
light of day.

Democrats may equate a mandate for
change with a license to spend, but in doing so
they could quickly alienate fickle indepen-
dent voters.

House Democrats see the stars aligned for
a generational expansion of the federal gov-
ernment.

Writing in National Journal last week, Ron
Brownstein quotes a Democratic staffer who
tells the unvarnished truth: “This is a once-in-
a-25-year opportunity to ‘implement’ a lot of
our agenda.”

That’s probably correct. But they need to
slow down and look to President Obama to
serve as the designated driver.

Republicans understand the House bill
looks more like a Trojan horse for a liberal
spending agenda than an economic stimulus
bill. They were ebullient following last week’s
vote, when all GOP members voted no. “It

was the most unifying vote in several years,”
one Republican lawmaker told me. “The out-
pouring of support Members received from
their districts after the vote and over the
weekend was gratifying,” a House leader-
ship aide added. Many indicated they heard
from constituents saying the vote restored
their confidence in the Republican Party.

The key to the unity, according to several
members of the House GOP leadership, was
not only the Democrats’ excess, but a positive
Republican alternative.

As Republican leader John Boehner said
on the House floor, “... our proposal will
create 6.2 million jobs over the next two
years, about twice as many as the (Democ-
ratic) bill and at about half the costs.”

Twice the jobs at half the cost! Why in the
world wouldn’t Congress want to pursue that
approach?

That’s what makes people so angry about
Washington. It sounds like the fleecing of
America continues as the House Democrats
use the economic meltdown to inaugurate
New Deal 2.0 with the next generation’s mon-
ey.
But the spending revelry looks like it will
be tamped down in the Senate. How the bill
moves ahead is unclear, but one thing is cer-
tain — the price tag will be reduced.

Maybe this was all part of a grand plan.
The House serves up what looks like a super-
sized liberal Happy Meal and then lets Pres-
ident Obama work with the Senate to drink
the Slim-Fast shake. Perhaps. But it appears
the House won’t go on a diet without a fight.
Finishing the legislation by next Friday —
when Congress is scheduled to begin a week-
long district work period — will prove chal-
lenging.

Over the next 10 days Obama has a chance
to help reshape some of the excesses in the
legislation. He even has a chance to win more
Republican support. But he’ll have to reign in
the appetites of some big-spending House
members to pull that off. Maybe the White
House needs to remind congressional
Democrats they have at least four years —
not four weeks — to expand the size and
scope of government. But outside of Wash-
ington, I get the sense Americans are growing
angry about being taken as suckers again, as
Democrats in Congress use an economic cri-
sis to promote a political agenda. Big gov-
ernment liberals are ready to party, but they
should spend in sips, rather than gulps, lest
voters take away the keys to the liquor cabi-
net.

(This article was written by Gary Andres -
c. 2009 Hearst Newspapers).



Bahamasair
and the people
of Mayaguana

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WILL be grateful if you
would please give me a little
space in your column to voice
the concerns of the residents
of Mayaguana in respect to
Bahamasair in particular; and
thank you for your kind con-
sideration.

The matter in question is the
way that our National Flag
Carrier treats the people of
Mayaguana with utter con-
tempt as though we are not
entitled to the basic courtesies
or consideration given to other
islands or destinations.

I believe everyone will agree
that the island of Mayaguana,
is one of the most remote in
the chain of Bahamas islands;
due mainly to the policies or
lack thereof, of successive gov-
ernments over the years.
Notwithstanding certain eco-
nomic consideration; as a pub-
lic entity, Bahamasair, is
expected to treat all of the
islands with the same regard.
However, person or persons in
New Providence seem to have
adopted the attitude that
Mayaguana, as a destination is
of no significance and treats
its residents accordingly.

Editor, you may find it hard
to believe that Bahamasair has
been leaving considerable
numbers of Mayaguana pas-
sengers, travelling to and from
New Providence, with con-
firmed reservations and ticket
in hand, often without so much
as an apology in order to
accommodate passengers trav-
elling to and from our neigh-
bouring island in the south.
Imagine a 50-seat aircraft ser-
vicing two destinations and 48
to 50 seats are reserved for one
destination? Something has to
be wrong with that picture.

I am told that persons in
Bahamasair claimed that the
problem is that Mayaguanians
don’t make their reservations.
Nothing could be further from
the truth. The truth of the mat-
ter is Mayaguanians mainly
have to rely on making reser-
vations during one of the three
flight days; there is no com-
puter connection with
Bahamasair reservations and
the agent often tries unsuc-
cessfully to make reservations
for people. I am not talking
only of other people’s experi-
ence, I have encountered the
same thing myself.

I was scheduled to travel
from New Providence, just
recently, was checked in and
at the gate the agent advised us
that they could take only two
of seven passengers for
Mayaguana, because the plane
was going to Inagua first then
to Mayaguana; and Inagua had
48 passengers travelling to
New Providence. I was told

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia. net



then that they had hoped to
get persons responsible to have
the plane stop in Mayaguana
first, in order to take all of the
passengers for Mayaguana, but
those responsible, insisted that
they were going to Inagua first;
resulting in the aircraft depart-
ing with a number of empty
seats; leaving five passengers
stranded.

As I write this letter, I have
requested a reservation to trav-
el to New Providence and the
agent advised me that the
reservation could not be made,
because he no longer had the
ability to make a long distance
call on his phone.

So pray tell, how in God’s
name are we to make reserva-
tions in a timely manner? Just
this past week, Bahamasair,
caused a seminar which was
scheduled for Mayaguana and
would have been of tremen-
dous value to the island had to
be cancelled. Why? Because
Bahamasair decided that they
were sending two planes to
Inagua and would not be trans-
porting any passengers to
Mayaguana on Monday
(26/1/09). A last minute deci-
sion by someone who inter-

There have also been instances
when reservations were made
and confirmed for persons
travelling from Mayaguana
and they discovered upon
arrival at the airport, their
names were not on the mani-
fest with confirmed reserva-
tions and often have to return
home.

Mayaguanians have been
suffering under these condi-
tions for a number of years,
but of late it has been getting
worse. To start with we have
been suffering from a most
degrading condition at our air-
port which makes me feel
ashamed when visitors arrive
in Mayaguana, and on top of
that we are treated with dis-
dain by our flag carrier.

I could relate so many other
instances when travellers to
and from as well as the desti-
nation of Mayaguana in gen-
eral, had been treated in like
fashion. However, I believe the
situations stated should be suf-
ficient for those responsible to
note that Mayaguanians are
becoming very frustrated and
would not endure this kind of
treatment any longer.

The only time we are able
to get any significant number
of seats is during the period
when we share a flight with
Exuma.

For God’s sake would the
responsible person or persons

vened, resulted in them bring-
ing some passengers who had
shown up at the airport any-
way. However, a number of
other persons who had already
been advised that they could
not get a seat did not bother to
even go back to the airport. January 28, 2009.

Iam gay, but Iam
a Bahamian, too!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

in Bahamasair please look into
and remedy this situation

HUEL A WILLIAMSON
General Delivery,

Pirates Well,

Mayaguana, Bahamas,

THIS letter is intended as an intellectual and emotional response
against the arrogant, vitriolic drivel spewed forth in the letter enti-
tled “We Must Strongly Oppose Sinister Homosexual Rights Agen-
da” published in The Tribune on Wednesday, February 4, 2009.

I am a 23-year-old lesbian Bahamian “living” in this country.
Although a better description would be to say that I am “lan-
guishing” as I am forced to hide my identity and orientation
because persons such as the author of this letter, Ms Phillippa
Russell, have made the Bahamas inhospitable to its own citizens.

Ms Russell argues that we homosexuals are trying to corrupt
Bahamian life by pursuing a gay rights agenda. Gay people gen-
erally do not have a sinister agenda to corrupt and infiltrate the
Church and the Bahamas. We simply want to not be harassed,
free to love and marry and have a family as straight people do, and
to be accepted and loved by our families. We want understanding,
not license to ruin the country.

The letter claims that in our pursuit of this agenda “the difficul-
ty arises when homosexuals attempt to distinguish between their
sexual orientation and their character.” Ms Russell, please allow me
to disabuse you of your benighted ignorance and state that a
cogent distinction does exist. My sexual orientation does not define
my character. My character defines how I exercise my sexual ori-
entation. If a heterosexual male resolves to rape his female neigh-
bour he does so not because his sexual orientation is “dysfunc-
tional”, but because his character is flawed.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JERMAINE PREZILAN
of ROSE BUD ROAD, EDEN STREET, FARRINGTON
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 31% day of January, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BARBARA BIRDIEMAE
McPHEE of Bahamia, Freeport, Grand, Bahama, intend to
change my name to BERTHAMAE BARBARA McPHEE. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of the publication of this notice.

SUL
WANTED

Well established wholesaler requires a salesman for
the snack food division. Individual must have had
experience is sales with emphasis on large food stores.
Only individuals with a proven record of being able
to work unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered.

Must be able to drive standard shift vehicle and
be in possession of current valid driver’s license.
Individuals not meeting the stated requirements will
not be considered for the post. Company offers good
benefits.

Furthermore, the letter states that, “It is now scientifically con-
firmed that behaviour is contagious”. Well in that case, I should
have been straight ten times over, as I did not encounter another
gay person until I was in my late teens. Growing up I was bathed,
fed, hugged, dressed, tucked in, sneezed on, taught by and along
with heterosexual people and yet Iam gay. Therefore, Ms Russell
if not by blood (as my parents are straight), or through air, or by
touch, or even my observational mimicry how else is this “conta-
gion” passed?

The heart of the article focuses on psychopathy. However, psy-
chopathy is a mental disorder; homosexuality is not. The Diagnostic
and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) removed homo-
sexuality as a mental illness in 1973, as it became increasingly
clear that while it was not the norm, it did not cause specifically vio-
lent, hostile or dangerous behaviour in people nor was it equated
with psychosis or any sort of violent pathology. Psychopathy is a
totally separate and distinct mental illness all on its own. Homo-
sexuality is now accepted in major circles as intrinsic, and not as a
mental illness and for Ms Russell to claim otherwise, is ludicrous,
and is nothing more than thinking that is pseudo-psychology at its
best, ranting of an uneducated woman at worst.

Now if the Jamaican PM, as the letter states, so chooses to bar
homosexuals from his cabinet, whether they are qualified or not that
is between him and his constituents. But as for my country I know
that we are not better off because of our homophobia. I am edu-
cated, talented and ambitious, yet I wish to leave my homeland to
go where I can be free to love, without shame and live, without fear,
because I know and feel that here I am hated and vilified for who
Tam.

Ms Russell, your letter disappoints, disheartens and scares me
because you represent the intolerance, small-mindedness, and big-
otry that mars the better nature of my people. When you identify
me with psychopaths, and intimate that I am inferior you strip me
of my humanity. And therefore, leave me naked for others to
harass me, because I am undeserving of dignity, discriminate
against me, because I am undeserving of rights, and hurt me,
because I am undeserving of protection.

So, Ms Russell, if you truly wish to pursue your noble goal of sav-
ing the Bahamas, then save us from you and others like you.

Odessa Ga FAEN

where fife is still sine ip e and people still care
_ Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
= Telephone 322-8493

io Be Different a.
AD GIVE A BOOK for MX
. VALENTINES DAY

SBE. DIFFERENT - GIVE A BOOK FOR VALENTINE'S DAY=.
ff THIS LIFE - BY SIDNEY POITIER - SIGNED 1ST EDITION) ig)
“JUST AST AM BY BILLY GRAHAM qi

* NAPOLEON THE GREAT - VOLS, I, [and I. ff
HENRY W, LONGFELLOW - EARLY POEMS /
EMPEROR ALEXANDER |

BLACK BEAUTY
eo REMEMBERING SINATRA 2
~~ AMERICAN BACK ON TRACK - Sen. Edward M. Keanedy ~

c/o DA 67134
P.O.BOX N3207
Nassau, Bahamas ANONYMOUS
‘ Pa. ee Pa): @ Je , Nassau,
; 7 > : ‘ February 4, 2009.





THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Woman whose grandson was shot
- dead volunteers as a counsellor



WHY YOU

VEX?

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter ;
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net i

"TI vex at the drivers who park i
so recklessly on the curb right :
on Bay Street, Dowdeswell }
Street and Village Road every }
day, blocking the passage of }
traffic and causing me to have to }
strain my neck to see if any cars }
coming when I try to come out a }

corner.

"It especially vexin' when I :
turn onto Deveaux Street off }
Bay Street - people acting like }
they own the road! What I want }
to know is where is all the police :
who could be making some }
good money ticketing these no }
good people! I surprised more :
accidents don't happen because i

of people's foolishness."

— Mad Motorist, Nassau.

"I vex at the spate of crimes :
that seem to be happening every }
day now. I mean broad daylight :
car chases, shootings in Kemp
Road and one in Montague the }
other night. What is happening }
to our culture? Guns more }

accessible than water these days,

it seems and everyone have one. }

"And instead of our lawmak- i
ers and politicians trying to do }
something about it, they getting
caught up in foolishness. Where }
does that leave law-abiding cit- }
izens who afraid to go outside in :
broad daylight or the evening i

for fear of a stray bullet?"

- Concerned about Crime,

Nassau. }

"I vex 'cause every night two }
church buses and two church :
vans with heavy tinted windows }
run through my neighbourhood }
close to Potter's Cay seven }
nights a week to disturb my }

sleep.

church needs to follow."

- Lift up ya head all da time,

Nassau. }

"T vex at how many children I }
see roaming the streets without }
any supervision day in and day
out. Sometimes I see kids in the :
middle of the day just wander- }
ing, and I know school is in ses- }
sion. I always wonder where are }
the parents who brought them
into this world who now disre- }
gard them and let them fend for }
themselves? I am surprised our }
child abduction rates aren't :
higher considering the most
innocent and vulnerable are left i
without a guardian so many }

times.

"It breaks my heart to watch }
these little kids walking in areas }
I wouldn't walk alone in the }
evening and I can only imagine }
what they go home to at night.
Is it any wonder our crime situ- }
ation is at the level it's at now?" }

-M Johnson, Nassau. :

"IT vex because on the social :
network Facebook it seems like }
all types of people I don't know
hit me up wanting to become }
friends and to make matters }
worse, when you add these peo- }
ple, no one I know seems to }
know them and I have no idea }
who they are. I have even heard }
of cases where weirdoes create }
fake profiles just so they can }

access people's pages.

“It's sort of scary knowing all
my personal information is out }
there on cyberspace for so many
strangers to access. Asa guy, it }
also weirds me out when I geta }
friend request from another
man who I don't know. My }
advice to people is to be careful :
who you add to your lists on }

websites like that."

- Man in Carmichael. i

NOTICE

Antonio Sweeting, son
of Mae Sweeting please
contact M. Franks

at 324-3972. This is

in regards to family in

eA MMMUey AMI lALAe)
OM TMl(0lUR



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

A WOMAN whose grandson was
gunned down last year is giving back to
the community by volunteering as a
counsellor in a free service for the vul-
nerable.

Idena Burrows, 71, of East Avenue,
Millar’s Heights, lost the grandson she
raised when he was shot in the back five
times while working under the hood of
his car in Millar’s Heights, off Carmichael
Road.

No one has yet been arrested for the
murder of Reno Burrows, who turned
30 two weeks before he was shot dead in
January 2008, making Mrs Burrows’ grief
all the more painful.

She remembers the boy that she and
her husband Stanley Burrows, 74, raised
from the age of nine as “polite, respectful
and loving.”

The mother of five and grandmother of
16 living grandchildren said: “If it has
never happened to you, you can’t know
how it feels.

Memories

“T still have my memories and I still cry
a lot, because I miss him so much. It’s a
void that will never be filled, but we have
to go on and you have to let go.”

A year after the event, Mrs Burrows
has channelled her grief into something

A piece

positive by devoting her
Wednesday afternoons to
counselling people at The
Haven in Kenilworth Street,
off Montrose Avenue, with
leading psychologist Dr
David Allen.

She is one of around ten
volunteers at the free coun-
selling clinic, which was
established in March last
year, and works mostly with
young men who benefit
from her love and support.

“If you didn’t have pain
in life there is a lot you
wouldn’t know.

“Pain is necessary. It’s
like an alarm.

“So if the Lord allows
pain to come into your life,
it is for a reason and a purpose, and
Reno’s death has given me a new direc-
tion.”

Mrs Burrows said she has seen changes
in the boys she has counselled over the
last year — some have gone from unem-
ployment and homelessness to returning
to their families and working.

“From having problems working and
getting along with others, being disrup-
tive at home and not going to school, I
have seen a complete turnaround.”

Mrs Burrows has worked with young
people at Calvary Bible Church on
Collins Avenue in Centreville for 25
years, and believes by working together
in the community, the problems that lead

of history is
sold on Harbour Island

Idena Burrows



to gun crime, drug dealing
and the downfall of promis-
ing young people can be
eliminated.

“When it comes down to
crunch time we need to get
together as one.

“Because with the crime,
if we don’t get together as
one, we are not going to
face it,” she said.

Mts Burrows said she also
believes that parents must
live up to the responsibility
of caring for their children,
ensuring they go to school,
do their homework, and feel
loved.

“We can’t be afraid to let
kids know that we love
them.

“T think that is so important - to know
that you’re loved, because most people
who commit suicide or are depressed,
would not feel that way if they knew
deep down that somebody loved and
cared for them,” she said.

Mrs Burrows’ contribution to the pro-
gramme has been a benefit to her as well
as the clients, Dr Allen said.

“This is the anniversary of the death of
her grandson, and now she is one of my
leading volunteers. She is taking the pain
from her loss, and using it to help others,
and that’s a beautiful thing.”

Dr Allen said he believes the healing
power of talking and opening up can stop
people on a violent or suicidal path.

"They is mussey da most reli- i
gious group an them other }

COLDWELL Banker Light-
bourn Realty sales associate
Robert Arthur has sold a piece
of Harbour Island history.

Arthur sold The Little Board-
ing House, the island’s first or sec-
ond establishment of its kind, to
Bahamian Tracey Barry Tyler and
her husband, Toby Tyler, owners
of the island's elegant Landing
hotel.

The seller was a non-Bahamian
and long time visitor to the island.

Visitors to Harbour Island are
familiar with the charming yellow
house on the corner of Bay Street
and Murray.

Now a private residence, Little
Boarding House is over 200 years
old.

In the 1940s, Ms Hattie Thomp-
son and Ms Marion Johnson
owned the boarding house.

Ms Johnson was headmistress
of the primary school on Harbour
Island. Ms Thompson managed
the little hotel. Both were instru-
mental in getting the Catholic
Bishop to build a church on Har-
bour Island, somewhere around
1922.

It is said that the first Catholic
mass on the island was celebrated
in their home.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty president Mike Lightbourn
has fond memories of Little
Boarding House.

He and his family spent sum-
mer holidays in their vacation
home two doors away, and ate
breakfast and dinner at Little
Boarding House every day.

The island was a child’s play-
ground with the gorgeous, three
mile Pink Sand Beach and a fish-
ing boat, Pieces of Eight, at their
fingertips.

On the corner to the south of
Little Boarding House, Mr Light-
bourn recalls, Capt. Harry Albury
had the first generator on the
island and supplied electricity to a
large area. The drone of the
engine was a new night sound.

Transport was by foot or bicy-
cle. Unlike today, there were no
golf carts or vehicles. However,
there were lots of simple plea-
sures, such as homemade coconut
ice cream sold at the square at the
top of Murray Street at four
o'clock every afternoon.

The winds of change started to
rustle through Harbour Island
with the introduction of amphibi-
ous craft from Nassau. The popu-
lation grew, and Bahamian and
non-Bahamians discovered the
island as a second home destina-
tion.

Today’s Harbour Island is still
graced with many charming struc-
tures of old, such as Little Board-
ing House, which speak of that
magical era.

For Coldwell Banker’s Robert
Arthur, the sale was particularly
satisfying. Arthur ranks in the top
one per cent of an international
Coldwell Banker sales force of
116,800.

Although not one of his most
significant sales in terms of dollars
and cents — the home sold for
$775,000 with some trade ele-
ments — Arthur was thrilled
when his friends, the Tylers,
bought the property.

“Not only are Tracy, Toby and
I good friends, but I know that

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eee
al a yaar a LY



Little Boarding House will be
maintained to the highest stan-
dard and that this important piece
of history will be preserved,”
Arthur said.

And he's pleased that the seller
will continue to visit Harbour
Island.

The Tylers own the historic
Landing hotel in Harbour Island.
Prince Charles’ goddaughter and
Ralph Lauren Safari model, India
Hicks, until fairly recently had a
minority stake in the traditional
Colonial-style 1800's hotel.

The Landing is a magnet for
the rich and famous.

The Duke and Duchess of
York are among the list of celebri-
ties who’ve stopped in to enjoy
The Landing’s gourmet meals and

sample their fine wines and cigars.

The guest list reads like a
Who's Who.

Prince Pavalos and Princess
Marie Chantal of Greece, Mick
Jaggar, Richard Gere, Elle
McPherson, Diane Von Fursten-
berg, Barry Diller, Christianne
Amannpour, Ed Bradley, Bette
Midler, Collin Farrell, George
Hamilton, Daryll Hall and Jack
Nicholson, along with super mod-
els and many others have enjoyed
the ambiance of The Landing.

The Tylers plan to make Little
Boarding House their family
home, give it a facelift and build a
cottage in the backyard, retaining
the period of the home.

It's this timeless quality that
makes Harbour Island so special.

O Me. bl G arden

) where fife is still simple and people still care
“ Murphyville, 2nd Howse left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Give Her Al

fasting ‘Gift This

Valentine!!!
Come and See our Silk Floral Arrangements!
You Won't Have to Water them and They Won't Diet
, Beautiful Flowers with grasses Mowing down in Pretty Vases!

GIFT ITEMS

for VALENTINE
VALENTINE PILLOWS POR YOUR BED - STANDARD SIZE!
CHARMING CUSHIONS WITH SACHETS - SWEET SMELLING .
LARGE, COLOURFUL WREATHS POR YOUR DCRRIT
VALENTINE ORNAMENTS POR YOUR GIFTS

vic TORIAN STYL E BOSIES -

—s,

ea

DED DRIED FLOWERS Y
, ‘a da

ROYAL = FIDELITY

oney of Work

“The kids who were violent in schools
had lost somebody a few years before,
but had no one to talk to, so the hurt
went down and came out as anger, and
violence, so we have to talk to the kids
when these things happen.

“Sick people don’t talk and healthy
people talk. It’s as simple as it sounds,”
he said.

The three suicides last week are sign of
individuals becoming isolated from soci-
ety in a process which could be stopped
by communication, Dr Allen said.

Contacts

“The suicidal person feels hopeless
and lonely, and all statistics show they
have the same number of contacts as peo-
ple who are not isolated,” he said.

“So loneliness is something that hap-
pens between the ears.

“You project it on society and create a
reality so it becomes a self-fulfilling
prophecy.”

The counselling centre is free and open
to all from 2pm-4pm and Spm-7pm on
Wednesdays. Volunteers who would like
to be counsellors can attend training ses-
sions on Wednesday afternoons from
4pm-5pm.

If you would like to attend the free
clinic or are interested in volunteering,
call The Haven on 327-8719.

Dr Allen also established a free 24-
hour hotline for anyone who wants to
talk at 677-KIDS (5437).

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,























Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

Large Shipment
ol

) COME CHECK
US OUT

New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 6 FEBRUARY 2009

On Premises

Check Our Prices

Before buying

FG CAP

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,690.98 | CHG 0.26 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -21.38 | YTD % -1.25
FINDEX: CLOSE 825.31 | YTD -1.14% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y

1.39 Abaco Markets

1.39

Bahamas Property Fund

7.64
0.63
3.15

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
2.83 Colina Holdings
4.80
1.88
2.27
6.02
11.87

Famguard
Finco

Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

7.64
0.63
3.15

2.83
6.77
2.19
2.40
7.80
11.87

4

Previous Close Today's Close

1.39

7.64
0.63
3.15

2.83
6.77
2.44
2.40
7.80
1.87

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.25
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

10.45
5.01

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

10.45
5.17

10.45
5.17

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

EPS $
0.070

Div $

0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Symbol

Last Sale Change
0.00

0.00

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00 0.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 4.40
2.9230 -2.54
1.4376 4.38
3.3856 -10.83
12.6180 5.74
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.0950 -13.38
1.0264
1.0289 2.89
1.0287 2.87
MARKET TERMS

100.00

13. 38.
2.64 2.64
2.89

2.87

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Interest
7% 19 October 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% 30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Yield %
30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525



PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Suicides could be sign of

FROM page one

ages, details of which are being
discussed now, on May 15.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “We can make sure that
the distribution of income
that’s so important to us hap-
pens before the people even
arrive in the country.

“The intent is to start with
four hotels where somebody
buys an all-inclusive product,
including airfare, hotel room,
food, tours, entertainment —
all in one pre-paid package.
But the whole experience is
not in one property, it is at sev-
eral different locations. We
want to give people a total des-
tination experience, not just a
hotel experience.”

According to Deputy Direc-
tor General of Tourism, David
Johnson, the concept has nev-
er been tried anywhere else in
the world.

“No other island has ever
tried to do this. Hotels have
been doing it and, of course,
cruiselines do it, but we would
be the first place where I see
this being executed and we
hope to do it and claim the
rights to being the first and
only,” said Mr Johnson.

It may be a potential boon
for the Grand Bahama econo-
my at a time when the tradi-
tionally depressed economy is
suffering more than ever.

“They need a big boost and
they are hungrier (for the
opportunity),” said Mr John-
son.

According to the tourism
official, initial research sug-
gests that the offering will be a
popular one.

“We believe it’s sound con-
ceptually and our preliminary



Tourism

research shows that people see
value in it. People have said
to us that if we can get our
price points right (and) if they
can get their meals included
and have a choice of restau-
rants they would pay a bit
more. They see that on a
cruise ship or a hotel they’re
limited to two or three restau-
rants, they don’t really like
that limitation,” he said.

Meanwhile, interest from
Grand Bahama businesses in
getting involved in the scheme
has been “extreme”, accord-
ing to Mr Vanderpool Wal-
lace.

“So far the concept has been
embraced very strongly, espe-
cially by the restaurants and
the vendors, so I feel like we
have some positive momen-
tum,” added Mr Johnson.

The four hotel properties
expected to be part of the first
package are Our Lucaya,
which includes the Westin and
Sheraton hotels, Port Lucaya
and Pelican Bay.

Tourists will be able to
spend less or more money to
buy a “top of the line, middle
of the road or lower end”
package.

Grand Bahama is being
seen as the ideal location to
test out the model, as it has
the most convenient infra-
structure, he said.

“You’ve got about 2,000
rooms right across from about
60 stores and about 40 restau-
rants, and the watersports and
beachsports and the boating
sports are all there with the
marina and the beach, so
everything is very close by,”
he added.

FROM page one

He said the vast majority of
familicides in the US are com-
mitted by the father and usually
in the wake of financial hardship
or job loss.

Although a significant number
of government capital projects
have introduced new jobs in the
Bahamas’ construction field, Dr
Allen fears the rare type of mur-
der familicide may soon occur if
the issue is not addressed.

During the Bahamian reces-
sion of the early 1990s, there was
at least one case of a man who
had shot his wife and attempted
to kill his children by driving his
family vehicle into the sea near
Clifton Pier.

Where many murders that
occur under similar circumstances
are seldom classified as famili-
cides, all confirmed cases have
revealed that a parents’ desire to
prevent their children or family
from suffering had been a major
factor in their deadly decision.

With three suicides already
occurring in the space of a week

this year, and with at least two of
the victims reportedly experienc-
ing financial difficulties, Dr Allen
feels some response is now need-
ed.

“Men get their self-esteem
from their jobs, and when they
lose their jobs, unless they have a
real community connection, deal-
ing with the shame of that can
lead to them becoming psychot-
ic.”

However, he admits that there
has been a long existing attitude
among many local men of not
sharing their thoughts and being
too proud to seek help.

In addition, Dr Allen said that
many have turned away from the
church, and have accepted secu-
larism as their God.

He feels that the combination
of these characteristics of the
Bahamian male with the global
economic downturn could spark
the occurrence of this rare crime.

Dr Allen feels one way of
relieving stress and depression
that could follow unemployment
would be to seek spiritual encour-
agement from a church or neigh-
bour.

Two men expected in
court after shootout

FROM page one

Revving up in retirement

FROM page one

Triumph 750.

A member of the Scurvy Few Bike Club of Abaco, Mr Bur-
rows said his passion for bikes has made his retirement a com-
plete joy.

Mr Burrows said locals always react with amazement when he
rides his various bikes round the island because each is unique.

“T’m really proud to see that my bikes can bring so much joy,
and for Bahamians to see that we can do things like this.”

Outside of his collection, Mr Burrows said he also repairs
Harley bikes, lawn mowers and other motorised gadgets.

CENTRAL GOSPEL CHAPEL

CHRISTIE & DOWDESWELL STREETS ° Tel: 325-2921

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
Elder Brentford Isaacs
Topic “The Revelation Series”

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
¢ Sisters’ Prayer Meeting: 10:00 a.m. (2nd Thursday of each month)




































Come joinus as we know Jesus Personally
by listening and studying the Word of God

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
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SUNDAY SERVICES

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FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.

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occurred just hours after police chased the two occupants of a
Toyota Avalon from the Kemp Road area to Madeira Street,
Palmdale, and apprehended them before dozens of onlookers at
around 10am.

Eyewitnesses claim police gunbutted one of the men seen lying
on the ground near the passenger side of his vehicle. He was bleed-
ing profusely from a head injury. Police maintain the driver hit his
head on the car door while trying to evade arrest.

Two men aged 38 and 35, both residents of Perpall Tract, were
arrested in Palmdale and taken into custody.

The shootings have rocked local residents, who claimed that
Nassau is becoming like the Wild West.

A Montagu resident said: “I find this absolutely terrifying. It is
like living in the Wild West. We are very concerned about the
level of crime.

“We are concerned the police are ill-equipped to do their job
properly and they are not given the support they need, especially
in terms of training.

“Tam not suggesting what happened in Montagu is the police’s
fault, but I am suggesting that we are in crisis.”

The resident noted Minister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest’s announcement on Thursday showing the current murder
rate, 24 per 100,000 people, is four times higher than the five per
100,000 deemed acceptable by international standards.

And the resident, who did not want to be named, pointed out how
the shortage of Supreme Court judges allows those accused of
murder and violent crime to be released on bail, and freed to com-
mit more crimes, as cases stack up.

She added: “We are at a crisis level and the government appears
to be paralysed. We welcome the appointment of new senior police
officers, but what are they doing to deal with crime? Overall, what
is being done?

“The American State Department warnings are saying it is safe
to come here, but when are we going to cross that threshold?”

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Dr. Jewel Dean (B)
7:00 a.m. Bro. Sidney Culmer/Board of General Education

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iam & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2N5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorcH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men 43 they areâ„¢

Grace and ert Wesleyan eres
A Soclety of The Free Methodist Church of
Horth merica

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFPERVONE [8 APFIRWED

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pm.
, Prayer Times Ee! 3am,
Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box $3-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587

‘Cha

However, in recent years, many
Bahamians have discontinued the
traditions of regular church atten-
dance.

Christian Council president,
Rev Patrick Paul, told The Tri-
bune that over the past ten years
there has been a significant drop
in the number of Bahamians
attending church.

Rev Paul said where at
one time there were many attend-
ing church on Sunday and
Wednesday, he has been
informed by several churches
that they have ceased Wednes-
day services because of low
turnouts.

Rev Paul explained that this
shift in behaviour has contributed
to a new breed of people who

‘even more serious problem

lack virtues and morals, and
where the consequences of sui-
cide or familicide may not be con-
sidered.

Rev Paul said this new behav-
iour has even led to many church-
es discontinuing their Sunday
schools, which also have low
attendance, and feels the church-
es’ role in inspiring hope is today
key to the survival of Bahamian
society.

“It’s not a small matter, but it’s
something that we can seize over
a short period of time. If we as a
church can network together and
work to bring some degree of
equilibrium in our society, I will
assure you we will have a lot of
our present problems reduced sig-
nificantly.”

Husband fears for wife

FROM page one

“We went that Thursday, came back that Friday and she wasn’t
there. Her sister said that she dropped her to the airport but does-
n’t know where she went from there,” he said.

Neither he nor his wife’s family have seen or heard from her in
nearly a month. Mr Lindley said that he filed a police report regard-
ing his wife’s disappearance two weeks ago.

Mr Lindley admitted that this is not the first time his wife left

abruptly.

“In 2007 something similar to this happened. It was in October,
2007, her sister allegedly dropped her to the airport and she went
away. When she went that time she called her daughter back in the
first week and she e-mailed her. She did correspond with her sister
as well,” he said. Whether she went back to the same place I’m not

sure but I think she did.

Mr Lindley said he believes his wife could be in Haiti but is not

certain.

“T think she went back to where she was before because I had
looked at her phone records and it was saying that she had been call-
ing Haiti right up to the last day she left.

“Someone did call me and tell me there were reports of her
being seen in Haiti but then again I haven’t gotten any confirmation
from police to say that is where she left to. She was involved with
someone in Haiti before but that was supposed to have been over

with,” he said.

Mr Lindley claimed that he and his wife, who also works with him
in the building maintenance business, were not having marital

problems.

“There wasn’t any problem in the relationship or anything like
that going on so it became a shock to me when she left.

“T don’t think she is in the right state of mind to do what she did
and wherever she is I don’t think she is safe. She never cut her chil-
dren off like this and that is what has me more concerned,” Mr Lind-

ley said.

Mrs Roker is described as about 5 feet 3 inches tall, of solid
build and weighing around 190 pounds. She also has a tattoo of a

panther on her lower right leg.

ADMINISTRATOR/
LIBRARIAN

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the successful candidate will

include:

© Overseeing the daily operation of the
facility, which includes a library, museum,

computer

laboratory,

resource centre,

reading room and café

© Investigating
sources of funding

and pursuing viable

© Planning and executing the curriculum
of the trade and vocational classes to be

offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

© Experience in

a

related field or

certification in library science

© Excellent organization and administrative

skills

© Very Good computer skills

© Excellent communication skills

© Exceptional Interpersonal skills

© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to cdsands@coralwave.com

or via fax 242-334-2280.
www.southeleutheramission.com





THE TRIBUNE



har,
Ce of ee

otte

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sport Reporter

DESPITE losing all of their matches in
Group A of the Fed Cup by BNP Paribas
Americas Zone Group One, the Bahamas’
three-member team still has a chance to
play in a relegation match.

Today at the Uniprix Stadium in Mon-
treal, Canada, the Bahamas will cross over
to play Brazil — the last place finisher in
Group B — to determine which team will be
relegated to Zone II next year.

On Thursday, the Bahamas was beaten
soundly 3-0 by host Canada. But coach
Sean Cartwright said the scores didn’t
reflect the way the team played.

Masters Softball ¢



OF

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7,




ta,

PAGE 9



T



2009



mas faces Brazil

ee
|

te

“The Canadians were just an outstand-

ing team,” Cartwright stressed. “Our girls
hit a heavy ball, but we played well against

them. We had some good games, but just

Group.

League’s All-Star
Classic set for
this weekend

THE Masters Softball
League has released the names
of the following players select-
ed to participate in the All-Star
Classic 2pm Sunday at the
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park at Southern
Recreation Grounds:

¢ Pineapple Pickers, man-
aged by Pat Evans of the
Williams Construction Jets and
coached by Larry Forbes of the
Andeaus Insurance Brokers
and Spurgeon Johnson of the
Johnson Six Pack Abs:

First base - George Turner
(St Anges Lions) and Brad
Smith (Williams’ Jets).

Second base - Dennis Davis
(six Pack Abs); Gary Johnson
(Williams Jets) and Sam Cum-
berbatch (St Anges Lions).

Shortstop - Franklyn Kemp
(Andeaus Brokers) and Jack
Davis (Williams Jets).

Left field - Roger Demeritte
(Williams Jets) and Larry
Thompdon (Six Pack Abs).

Centerfield - Shannon Ban-
nister (Augusta St Bulls) and
Sam Haven (Andeaus Bro-
kers).

Rightfield - Anthony Pearce
(Williams Jets) and Audley
Williams (Alco Raiders).

Catcher - Lee Rahming
(Williams Jets) and John
Woodside (Augusta St Bulls).

Pitcher - Danny Stubbs
(Williams Jets), Jow Demeritte
(Six Pack Abs), Bertie Murray
(Williams Jets) and Ken
O’Brien (St Anges).

Utility - Anthony Weech
(Williams Jets), Mike Dillett

(Andeaus Brokers) and Mike
Isaacs (Andeaus Brokers).

¢ Watermelon Splashers,
managed by Dudley Moxey
(Micholette Strokers) and
coached by Anthony Huyler
(Bamboo Shack Bulls) and
Sammy Adderley (Micholette
Strokers).

First base - Cyril Miller (Mic-
holette); Anthony Henfield
(Alco Raiders) and Joe

McPhee (Miller Lite).
Second base - Joe McPhee
(Miller Lite).

Third base - Rodney Albury
(Bamboo Shack) and Hillary
Deveaux (Miller Lite).

Shortstop - Abe Johnson
(Micholette) and Keith Arm-
brister (Micholette).

Leftfield - Victor Bain (Bam-
boo Shack) and Joe Jones

(Miller Lite).

Center field - Brian
Cartwright (Micholette) and
Jeff Cooper (Jets).

Right field - Lawrence Smith
(Miller Lite) and Walter Smith
(Bamboo Shack).

Catcher - Frederick Saunders
(Six Pack Abs) and Anthony
Bowe (Alco Raiders).

Pitcher - Clifton Smith (Mic-
holette), Greg Thompson
(Bamboo Shack), Ray Johnso
(Six Pack Abs) and Harold
Fritzgerald (Miller Lite).

Utility - Leland Levaruty
(Six Pack Abs); Anthony
Brown (Six Pack Abs), Ronald
Seymour (Micholette) and
John Wallace (Alco Raiders).

Note: Starters at each posi-
tion listed first

ROTTS Td O71
a AICTE eC

just call 302-2371 today!



lost the big points.”

Cartwright, however, feels that Canada
doesn’t belong in the American Zone and
should actually be playing in the World

Having earned a bye in the first day of
competition, Canada opened play with
their number two seed Stéphanie Dubois
drubbing Kerrie Cartwright 6-0, 6-0.

e¢ KERRIE CARTWRIGHT, of the Bahamas,
returns a shot from Canada’s Stephanie Dubois
during their Americas Zone Group | Federa-

SEE page 10

a
PLUME LC

Be

STEPHANIE DUBOIS returns a shot from Kerrie Cartwright...

Lakers-Celtics
rematch earns
big ratings
for TNT...

See page 10

Photos: Ryan Remiorz/AP



Choo Choo’ Mackey

has his fists set on
fight with Adamu

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sport Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the one-year suspen-
sion by the Bahamas Boxing
Commission lifted, First Class
Promotions is hoping to bounce
back in the ring with a British
Commonwealth super mid-
dleweight title fight for Jer-
maine “Choo Choo” Mackey.

Pending their ratification
from the commission, First
Class promoter Michelle Minus
said Mackey should have a
mandatory defense against
Charles Adamu of Ghana on
Saturday, May 23 at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

Adamu was the original
fighter that Mackey was set to
face, but after he suffered an
injury, First Class Promotions
brought in Michael Gbenga of
Ghana instead.

On July 19, 2008 at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
Mackey went on to pull off a
unanimous 12-round decision
over Gbenga to win the British
Commonwealth title.

That was the last show pro-
moted by First Class before
they were shelved in Novem-
ber by the commission. On
Wednesday, the commission
hosted a press conference to
announce that the suspension
was lifted.

“We’re willing to move for-
ward to host the Adamu fight,”
Minus said. “If we don’t get
clearance, we will look at who-
ever wants to take the fight
internationally. We just have
to sit and wait.”

As a promotional company,
Minus said First Class really
didn’t feel that much of an



.

JERMAINE “CHOO CHOO” MACKEY

effect with the suspension
because they have been pro-
moting the Bahamian Idol and
they are getting ready to stage
the Kids Musical.

“We’ve been moving. It was
just the athletes who basically
suffered in all of this,” Minus
charged. “They could have
been doing a lot of other things,
but they have decided to stick

with the programme.”

Although they haven’t staged
a show since July, Minus said
Mackey also has to make a
mandatory defense of his Fede-
Caribe-WBA super mid-
dleweight title.

In a letter sent to First Class
from Dr Calvin Inalsingh, the
president of the FedeCaribe-
WBA, it was stated that while

Mackey won the title on June
22, 2007, he should have
defended it within six months
of winning it.

Inalsingh advised First Class
Promotions that Mackey will
be given the opportunity to
defend the title against any of
the FedeCaribe rated boxers
by February 28 or the title may
be declared vacant.

In response, Minus said they
have asked Inalsingh for a
month’s extension as they look
forward to traveling to Trinidad
& Tobago to fight Kirk “The
Technician” Sinnette, whom
Mackey won the title over in a
second round knockout.

Minus, however, said they
have already gotten some reac-
tion from the commission, who
indicated that as the champi-
on, Mackey should have fight
here as opposed to overseas.

But Minus said they were
leaning towards making the trip
as First Class was still under
suspension. But now that the
suspension has been lifted, she
said it’s still not possible to
have the fight staged here next
month.

“There’s just too much work
that we have to do,” she
claimed. “And looking at the
economic situation that we are
faced with, it will be harder to
pull it off in such a short time,
as opposed to going to Trinidad
& Tobago.”

Efforts to contact commis-
sion chairman Pat “The Cen-
treville Assassin” Strachan on
Friday for comments were
unsuccessful.

In the meantime, Minus said
they will also be looking at
Mackey defending his WBC’s
CABOFE and even the
Bahamas super middleweight



PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘BLAST FROM
THE

THESE were two of the outstanding female golfers who played on
the local scene. Can you identify any of them...

REMEMBER these two former junior players? ‘Blast From The Past’
takes you back to the days when these youngsters were starting to
make a name for themselves on the golf course. Can you identify

any of them?



Bahamas faces Brazil
rem ualae recom rIri cele



FROM page 10

tion Cup match Thursday in Montreal...

That was followed by Canada’s top
seed Aleksandra Wozniak knocking
off Bahamas’ No.2 seed Nikkita Foun-
tain 6-0, 6-2.

Then in the doubles, Dubois and
Sharon Fichman wrapped up the tie
with a sweep as they secured a 6-0, 6-0
win over Cartwright and Fountain.

While the rankings played a key fac-
tor, the Bahamians noted that they
both went out and played as hard as
they could under the circumstances,
playing before the Canadian home
crowd.

Wozniak is ranked No.32 in the Sony
Ericcson WTA Tour and Dubois is
No.118. None of the Bahamian players
are ranked on the tour.

Cartwright, ranked No.227 on the
ITF Junior Rankings, filled in for
Larikah Russell, who sat out the tie
with a shoulder injury she sustained in
the first round in the Bahamas’ 2-1 loss
to Puerto Rico.

For 16-year-old Cartwright, getting a
chance to play was “just amazing. I

Lakers-Celtics rematch earns big ratings for TNT

n By The Associated Press —___

THE NBA finals rematch between
Boston and the Los Angeles Lakers drew
the highest rating on TNT since a 1996
game featuring Michael Jordan and Mag-
ic Johnson during the height of the Chica-

go Bulls’ dynasty.

The Lakers’ 110-109 overtime victory
on Thursday night delivered a 2.7 US. rat-
ing and was watched by more than 4.3 mil-
lion viewers. It was the first meeting
between the rivals in Boston since the
Celtics beat the Lakers in Game 6 of last
year's finals for their 17th NBA champi-
onship. It was the most-watched regular-
season game on TNT since Feb. 2, 1996,

when the eventual champion Bulls beat
Johnson's Lakers, 99-84.

The game also drew the most viewers
for a game on cable since Christmas 2004,
when ESPN televised the first game
between Indiana and Detroit since the
brawl between Pacers players and Pistons
fans earlier that season. TNT is up 23 per-
cent in total viewers from the same point

Lakers snap another
Celtics streak with
overtime victory

n By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) — Losing to
the Los Angeles Lakers is bad
enough for Boston. What the
Celtics can't afford is another
tailspin.

Pau Gasol scored 24 points
with 14 rebounds, and Lamar
Odom hit a pair of free throws
with 16 seconds left in over-
time Thursday night to lead the
Lakers to a 110-109 victory
over Boston that ended the
Celtics’ winning streak at 12
games.

Los Angeles also snapped
Boston's 19-game streak on
Christmas Day, a loss that
started the Celtics on a 2-7 skid.

"These games are tough, and
they're emotional games and
then you play the next night,”
said Celtics coach Doc Rivers,
whose team plays the New
York Knicks on Friday night.
"We'll try to muster it up and
see what we have."

In a rematch of an NBA
finals in which the Celtics out-
muscled the Lakers to the title,
Los Angeles held on with phys-
ical defense against Paul Pierce
and Allen that prevented either
All-Star from getting off a
clean shot after Odom's free
throws. The Lakers will take a
five-game winning streak into
Sunday's game against Cleve-
land.

"T wish we would have come
here last year with this kind of
attitude,” Gasol said. "Nobody
backed down. We were as
physical as anybody.”

The Celtics fell to 0-2 against
the Lakers and trail L.A. by
percentage points for the best
overall record in the NBA;
Boston would lose a tiebreaker
for home court advantage in
the finals — if they both make
it back.

"It would be great,” Pierce
said.

Kevin Garnett banged his fist
on the table in agreement, and
then interjected a reminder
that seemed to be intended for
the locker room across the hall:
"We're the champs, man."

In the only other NBA
games Thursday night,
Philadelphia beat Indiana 99-
94, and Utah routed Dallas
115-87.

It was the Lakers’ first visit
to Boston since a 131-92
embarrassment in Game 6 of
the NBA finals that clinched
the Celtics’ unprecedented 17th

ia



KOBE BRYANT (24) points to Celtics guard Rajon Rondo (9) after a foul in the second half of Thursday’s game
in Boston. At right holding Rondo is Celtics guard Ray Allen...

league championship. L.A. got
a small measure of revenge on
Christmas, but even then
Boston played a more physical
game.

"Coming down the streets,
staying at the same hotel, I was
up last night thinking about the
game — wondering how my
teammates would respond. It
all came back," said Kobe
Bryant, who had 26 and 10
rebounds. "Enough is enough.
We were able to match their
physical play.”

Pierce scored 21, and Allen
had 22, but they both missed
off-balance shots in the final
seconds. Allen was knocked to
the court at the buzzer while
Boston fans clamored for a foul
call, but none came.

Rajon Rondo had 16 points
and 12 assists for Boston.

There were two double-tech-
nicals — one of them after
Bryant and Rondo were push-
ing and finger-pointing in the
third — and enough shoving to
pass for a playoff game, but
both teams were tired when it
ended. Garnett, who missed
the previous two games with
the flu, scored 16 points before
fouling out with 4:22 left in the
fourth quarter.

Bryant, who scored 61 and

36 in his previous two games,
hit three 3-pointers in the
fourth quarter, the last with
1:30 left in regulation and
Pierce in his face to make it
101-100 — the Lakers’ first
lead of the half. But after
Pierce made one of two free
throws with 30 seconds left,
Bryant tried to shoot over
Pierce again and banged it off
the rim.

After a timeout with 7.7 sec-
onds left, Pierce dribbled the
clock down before Bryant
poked the ball away. Eddie
House got it and put up a side-
ways, one-handed 3-point
attempt at the buzzer that was-
n't close.

Bryant missed his last five
shots of the game.

Gasol made one of two free
throws to give the Lakers a
108-107 lead with 1:11 left, then
Glen "Big Baby" Davis made a
jumper — his only basket of
the game after six misses. Kobe
missed over Pierce, then Davis
missed again and fouled Odom,
who sank both free throws.

The Celtics got the ball to
Pierce, but his shot was off.
Rondo got the rebound and
drew a foul, but it wasn't a
shooting foul. The inbounds
pass made it to Allen, but he

(AP Photo: Charles Krupa)

was out of position and never
got a good look.

76ers 99, Pacers 94

At Philadelphia, Samuel
Dalembert had 18 points and
20 rebounds, and Andre Miller
and Andre Iguodala also had
double-doubles to lead the
76ers.

The Sixers won only hours
after they learned power for-
ward Elton Brand needed sea-
son-ending surgery on his right
shoulder. Miller had 13 points
and 12 assists, while Iguodala
had 20 points and 11 assists to
help the Sixers snap a two-
game losing streak.

Mike Dunleavy scored 21
points as Indiana dropped its
third straight.

Jazz 115, Mavericks 87

At Salt Lake City, Deron
Williams shook off a deep thigh
bruise and scored 34 points and
handed out 12 assists to lead
Utah . Kyle Korver scored a
season-high 20 points in his first
start of the season to power the
Jazz to their third win in four
games.

Josh Howard had 18 points
for Dallas, which had its four-

think it was a good opportunity. I had
a good time on the court.”

Cartwright admitted that the Cana-
dians were tough to beat, but she said
she gained a lot of valuable experience
that she hopes to put to good use as she
attempts to get to their level.

“They hit the ball very hard,” she
reflected.

As they look ahead to their match
against Brazil, Cartwright said she’s
unaware of how (Brazil) they play,
“but we know that Canada was the
best. They blew us off the court, so we
hope to bounce back and beat Brazil.”

Both teams head into the match win-
less in their two round robin matches
and according to coach Cartwright,
“we have a good chance to win this
match.

“They told us that two teams at the
end of the tournament will be relegat-
ed to zone IT next year, so we’re hoping
that we can win and keep our hopes
alive.”

The tournament will wrap up today
with Canada and Colombia, both unde-
feated at 2-0, playing against each oth-



er to determine who will get achance CANADA’S Aleksandra Wozniak serves to Nikkita Fountain, of the Bahamas, during their Federation match Thursday in Montreal...

to play in the World Group II qualify-

(AP Photo: Ryan Remiarz)



PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





thescene



by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP



NASSAU EVENTS

CAPTURED ON CAMERA





FROM LEFT: Joyann Archer, Leroy Archer, president of Bahamas Commonwealth Brewery and the Burns House Group of Companies and a major
sponsor of the ball; and Kim Sawyer, director general of the Red Cross.



Lah a?

WILLIAM MILLS, senior manager at JS Johnson Insurance Company; Wendy Mills, senior
trust manager, ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited; Mavis Burrows, assistant vice president of

operations, Commonwealth Bank; Everette EK Burrows, retired banker.

EDITH GREEN-
SANDS, risk
and control
manager for the
Bahamas and
Turks and
Caicos at First
Caribbean Inter-
national Bank;
and her hus-
band, Charles
Sands, parts
manager at
Tyreflex Star
Motors.

YVETTE SANDS,
assistant vice
president of
quality and
external affairs
at Bacardi Com-
pany Limited;
and her hus-
band, Charles V
Sands III, coun-
try manager for
Insurance Com-
pany of the
West Indies
(ICWI).

NURSE VAL
RICHARDS who
performs with
the Soulful
Groovers and
her sister,
Patrice Smith,
bookkeeper at
Aquapure Water
Limited.











| " = | - hi u i
RED CROSS BALL Committee members: Kyron
Strachan, executive vice president of Arawak Homes
Limited; Deveral Ferguson, executive financial ser-
vices representative at Colina Imperial; and Nikki
Boeuf, retail unit business manageress at Bahamas
Commonwealth Brewery and the Burns House
Group of Companies.



MARILYN CAM-
BRIDGE, senior
vice president of
administration,
Pictet Bank and
Trust; and hus-
band, Earnest
Cambridge, vice
president of VIP
service at
Atlantis Resort.
Both companies
were major
sponsors of the
ball.

JANETTE
SMITH, director
of member ser-
vices at the
Lyford Cay
Club; Marilyn
Meeres, deputy
registrar of the
Supreme Court
and former
magistrate.

ENJOYING the
music of the
Lou Adams
Orchestra are
accountant Van
Diah and busi-
nesswoman
Mae Morton-
Curry.

An enchanted evening at the

RED BALL

IT WAS indeed “An Enchanted Evening” as guests enjoyed the 37th
Annual Red Cross Ball held at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino on Saturday, January 31, 2009.

Attendees were treated to a delicious dinner, including a salad comprised
of crisp gourmet greens with cucumber, tomatoes, olives and julienne of
carrots, pink grapefruit topped with a spicy pecan nut and passion fruit
vinaigrette; a soup of tomato and wild basil bisque topped with quenelle
of cream; and mango sorbet with fresh mint leaf.

The entrée included a tenderloin of beef forestiere laced with wild
mushroom reduction, roasted Atlantic salmon with a champagne drizzle,
a julienne of vegetables, asparagus, Irish and sweet whipped garlic pota-
toes. For dessert, the guests enjoyed chocolate and mint mousse presented
ona short bread biscuit served with raspberry coulee and fresh berries.

During the cocktail reception, guests were entertained by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Pop Band. The Lou Adams Orchestra performed dur-
ing the dinner.

While dessert was being served, the world-famous American group The
Manhattans provided entertainment. The popular Bahamian band Visage
entertained for the duration of the evening and into the early morning.

The ball was held in a beautifully decorated Crystal Ball Room courtesy
of Florarama, which is owned by Manita Wisdom, wife of former PLP cab-
inet minister Neville Wisdom.

The table favours — all Bahamian organic botanical products — were pro-
duced by Dr Wendy Stuart.

The ladies also spiced up the festive atmosphere with an array of ele-
gant attire.

The top in-house prize was won by Wendy Mills.

The Guest of Honour was Dorothy Hepburn-King, a former deputy
director general of the Red Cross, who retired in June, 2008 after 42 years
of dedicated service.

Also in attendance were Governor General Arthur D Hanna; Dame Mar-
guerite Pindling and Lady Darling.

The new Director General of the Red Cross is Kim Sawyer, a former
social worker who attained the rank of assistant director in the Department
of Social Services before leaving to head the Red Cross.

Lady Finlayson is the chairperson of the 2009 Red Cross Ball Committee
and also head of fundraising for the Bahamas Red Cross Society.

Gerald Sawyer is president of the Red Cross.

The event was held under the patronage of Governor General Arthur D
Hanna .

Platinum Sponsors for the ball were: Pictet Bank and Trust, Bahamas
Commonwealth Brewery, the Burns House Group of Companies, Bahamas
Telecommunications Company, FML Webshop, Scotiabank Bahamas
Limited, Cable Bahamas Limited, La Rose Boutique, Kerzner Internation-
al Bahamas Limited, Commonwealth Bank, Percy’s Web Café and the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas.

American Airlines was the official Airline for the Red cross ball for the
fourth consecutive year.



GERALD SAWYER SR, president of the Bahamas Red Cross Society;
Kim Sawyer, director general of the Bahamas Red Cross Society;
Wendy Mills, winner of the top prize at the 37th annual Red Cross Ball:
and Lady Rowena Finlayson, chairperson of the Red Cross Ball Com-
mittee. The top prize consisted of two airline tickets to Europe donated
by American Airlines, a gift basket donated by the Perfume Bar and a
pair of gold earrings donated by Crown Jewellers.



CRAIG S MORSE, president of Distinctive Escapes, Luxury Travel Con-
sultants; Lady Rowena Finlayson, chairperson of the 2009 Red Cross
Ball Committee and head of fundraising for the Bahamas Red Cross;
Jorge Valls, vice president of luxury travel consultants Distinctive
Escapes.





Full Text
WEATHER

FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

HIGH
LOW

ie

Pim blowin’ it

76F
66F

CLOUDY

ANY

AND WINDY

Volume: 105 No.63





TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE #1



BAHAMAS EDITION

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

Two men expected in
Court after shootout

aU aad

A third
occupant
of car in
high-speed
chase is
reportedly
injured

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A SHOOT-OUT at the end
of a high-speed car chase
through Nassau resulted in the
arrest of two men and the injury
of one person, according to
reports.

Police had been chasing a
white Lexus with heavily tint-
ed windows from Tedder Street,
Palmdale, for over an hour
before the pursuit ended in a
hail of gunfire outside the Roy-
al Nassau Sailing Club and
Montagu ramp just after Spm
on Thursday.

Shots were fired at police by
occupants of the car before offi-
cers returned fire, police say.
People living nearby described
the gun battle as terrifying.

Two men aged 20 and 26
were arrested and taken into
custody. They are expected to
appear in Magistrate’s Court on
Monday.

Reports on ZNS news
claimed last night there was a
third occupant in the vehicle
who was injured in the shooting,
but police press liaison officer
Walter Evans was unable to
confirm this before The Tribune
went to press.

It has also been reported that
a woman in the Lexus fled the
scene.

The Lexus and a police
motorbike were damaged when
more than a dozen gunshots
were fired.

One resident said: “There
was a single shot followed by a
burst of gunfire from weapons
of varied calibre - probably two
dozen rounds in all. The gun-
fight lasted for at least 30 sec-
onds.”

Motorists in East Bay Street
were frightened into diversion
as police cars sped by and a
rapid succession of bullets were
fired in the street only metres
away.

Back-up police patrols con-
verged on the scene from all
directions.

The dramatic shooting

SEE page six

RETIRED CHAUFFEUR Mike Burrows with two of his custom-

UTM Case

The Tribune ®&

ete mee ber car
drive-thru is now open

24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays



ed |

The Bahamas

set for ‘world

first’ tourism
concept

Bid to boost visitor
arrivals and revenue

m@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GRAND Bahama is set to be the
launching ground for a “world first”
tourism concept intended to boost
tourism arrivals and revenue, according
to Ministry of Tourism officials.

Talks are underway in the hope of
eventually turning the destination into
an “all inclusive island” - where visi-
tors can have a “Club Med” style holi-
day treating them to unrestricted access puss
to a plethora of hotels, restaurants and Minister of
activities across the island for one pre- Tourism Vincent
paid price. Vanderpool Wallace

The ministry’s aim is to encourage a
broader visitor experience and wider sharing of their cash
throughout the tourism sector - two of the key objectives
identified by Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace, in his speech unveiling the new direction for
Bahamian tourism last year.

If successful the package option, initially incorporating
properties around Lucaya, will be expanded to invite more
hotels, restaurants and tourism dependent businesses across
Grand Bahama, eventually getting rolled out in New Prov-
idence and the Family Islands.

The ministry will start selling the Grand Bahama pack-

SEE page six

Husband fears for



m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

NO LONGER confined to the rigours of
a regular job, one man says developing his
lifelong hobby of rebuilding motor-cycles
has made his golden years the best part of his
life.

Retired chauffeur Mike Burrows is the
owner of nearly a dozen high-performance
motor-bikes, one of which he designed and
claims as an original.

Stretching nearly nine feet in length, the
twin-engine Triumph bike is the pride of
his vintage fleet.

The machine, built in less than six months,
includes an altered frame from New Jersey,
double Triumph engines, two transmissions
and oil tanks, and elongated handle bars.

the right conditions it can reach speeds in
excess of 240 mph.

“Everything is English, the frame and the
engines. It’s like a stretch Harley-Davidson,
only better. However, I still have more work
to do on it.”

By installing another fuel tank, Mr Bur-
rows said he hopes to create a smoother
and sleeker bike.

Honing his talent for more than 42 years,
Mr Burrows said he would not be surprised
if in another 42 years he’s doing the same
thing.

Along with his wife Gloria - an author
and world traveller who helped him build his
first bike - Mr Burrows said “retirement is a
wonderful experience once you plan for it.”

Also in his collection are a vintage 1967
650 BSA bike, a 1988 Harley-Davidson 1200,
a 1974 Harley-Davidson 1000, and a 1968

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

his missing wife

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE husband of a woman who
reportedly went missing nearly a
month ago fears that she may be
in serious danger.

Leslie Lindley told The Tribune
yesterday that his wife of 19 years
Brenda Roker, 37, was last seen
on January 9.

Mr Lindley (formerly Roker)
said that he and his son had gone
on an overnight fishing trip only
to return and discover that his
wife was no longer at their Gold-
en Isles Road residence.

Mr Burrows explained that, although he
has never tested his creation’s top speed, in

SEE page six



One man arraigned, more arrests likely over
arson attack on customs officer’s home

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ALTHOUGH one man was
arraigned on formal charges for the
arson of the home of a senior cus-
toms officer, investigations into the
incident are still continuing with
more arrests likely, police said yes-
terday.

"We were able to charge one per-
son (and) there are other persons
who we more than likely, once the
inquiry is completed, will put before
the courts again. It (the case) is still

open, there are still persons who
we are looking at,” head of CDU
Chief Supt Glenn Miller said yes-
terday.

CSP Miller said recently three
men, including a well-known busi-
nessman, were arrested by police
for questioning in connection with
the November fire at Roslyn
Ritchie's home but released pending
further inquiries.

Ms Ritchie - a senior customs
officer who was part of a task force
which roots out corruption and pre-
vents tax fraud - lost her 10-room
home in Sea Link Drive, off East

Street South, in a suspicious fire on
November 26.

It was suspected that the arson
attack was related to Mrs Ritchie’s
role in a customs task force charged
with weeding out customs fraud-
sters.

Last month, Clive Kent
Schroeter, 37, of Lady Slipper
Avenue, was charged in Magis-
trate's Court in connection with that
fire. According to court dockets
Schroeter, while being concerned
with others, intentionally caused the
home of Philip and Roslyn Ritchie
to be set on fire.



:
BI NOCORte) GE

Suicides could be sign of
‘even more serious problem’

m By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net

SEE page six

THE recent spate of suicides could be a sign of an even more seri-
ous problem, which one psychologist says could lead to unem-
ployed Bahamian men killing their whole families.

Psychologist Dr David Allen said that during the recession in the
late 1980s, major cities in the United States experienced a significant
number of cases of the type of murder-suicide known as “famili-
cide.”

Familicide involves the killing of two or more family members by
another member of that family.

In 2007, the San Francisco Chronicle interviewed Phillip Resnick,
a professor of psychiatry at Case Western Reserve University in
Cleveland, who has studied parents who killed their children.

SEE page six





NASSAU AND BAHAME:

ISLANDS’ LEADING NEWSPAPER
PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Dilapidated buildings ‘could be used as criminal hide-outs’

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

RESIDENTS of the south-
western part of New Provi-
dence are concerned that the
dilapidated buildings on the
South Ocean property are
being used as a hide-out by
criminals in the area.

Ronald Lloyd, who has
lived in the area for 19 years,
said he has been a victim of
these criminals and wants the
owners of the property and
the government to do some-
thing about it.

“The new owner of the
buildings closed everything
down, had a meeting with the
neighbourhood telling the
residents that he was going
to take down all the buildings
and put new buildings there.
His people then went and
took out all the windows and
doors and left the buildings,
that are now an eyesore, to
harbour crime.

“People hide in those
buildings, the bush has grown
up and it’s an easy place to
hide things,” he said.

Mr Lloyd claimed there is
no security to patrol the
grounds or the area.

Ode ME

Residents in South
Ocean area concerned

“IT saw a new face just as
late as Sunday behind the
fence of South Ocean’s main
building snooping around.
They stole my nine-year-old’s
bicycle, my $3,000-52” inch
television, desks, my Sunday
watch, DVDs and so many
other things. The police have
not done a proper job in this
area if you ask me. It has
been like this for almost four
years now and the criminals
feel that just because the
buildings are abandoned they
can do all they want,” he
said.

Mr Lloyd said before the
owners discontinued the
upkeep of the property,
South Ocean was a lovely
place.

“TI chose to live way out
here because it was so nice,
quiet and beautiful. Now the
place is a mess and causing
the property value in this
area to go down — some-
thing has to be done,” Mr
Lloyd said.

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Project coordinator for the
New South Ocean Club
Development Company Bur-
ton Rodgers told The Tri-
bune that the burglaries were
not brought to his attention,
but that his company is going
to try and work with the res-
idents to rectify the problem.

“We have security officers
on the compound in the day
and at night. The buildings
are going to come down,
although we have not started
as yet. If the residents see
any suspicious activity they
should give us a call. I will
make sure that security is
increased within the next 48
hours,” Mr Rodgers said.

Police from the Lyford Cay
station said the last house
break-in they can recall for
the South Ocean area hap-
pened about two months ago.

THE faculty members of the
School of Social Sciences at the
College of the Bahamas have
completed a research paper
analysing the part civil society
has played in the crafting of
government policies regarding
development.

In “Challenges of Develop-
ment and Sustainability in the
Bahamas: the Role of Civil
Society”, associate sociology
professor Jessica Minnis and
assistant psychology professor
Yvette Pintard-Newry investi-
gated the case of Clifton Cay,
the proposed gated community
that stirred much controversy
in the late 1990s and early 2000.

They explored how civil soci-
ety impacted the governmen-

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SOUTH OCEAN resident of 19 years PENA EIN FSM Is oneen a victim of crime.

t’s eventual rejection of the
investor’s proposal for the pro-
ject on 554 acres of the histor-
ically and archaeologically rich
land in western New Provi-
dence.

The study, which was start-
ed after a call was made for
papers for the University of
Prince Edward Island‘s Island
Heritage Management Confer-
ence in Canada, took the pair
six months to complete.

The professors started in
April, 2008 and finished in Sep-
tember of that year, just in time
for the conference held in the
following month.

The pair shared their find-
ings at the College of the
Bahamas’ first Research Edge
Forum for the year held in Jan-
uary. Research Edge is a lec-
ture series held once a month
where faculty and students
share presentations on matters
of national and scholarly inter-
est.

According to Ms Pintard-
Newry, who researched the the-
oretical aspect of civil society
while Ms Minnis researched the
specifics of the Clifton Cay
case, the role of civil society is
important because it increases
the empowerment of citizens.

“The World Bank and its
shareholders recognise the crit-
ical role that civil society plays
in helping to reduce poverty
and promote sustainable devel-
opment. And the World Bank’s
projects focus on the capacity of
the civil society for the empow-
erment of citizens living within
the country,” Ms Pintard-
Newry said at the Research
Edge Forum.



“For small states, there is a
unique challenge with regards
to their insularity and size.
Many small island states share a
common colonial heritage and
for these island states, including
the Bahamas, civil society has
been instrumental,” she added.

The college faculty members
specifically examined the
“Coalition to Save Clifton”
made up of civic and social
groups, activists and individuals
who were vehemently opposed
to the development. The
researchers found that this par-
ticular coalition model was
instrumental in its influence on
the eventual outcome.

“Clifton was a unique case
because it involved about 500
plus acres of land at the [west-
ern] end of the island and peo-
ple saw this as the last area that
Bahamians in the community
had in terms of beach access,”
Minnis said in a later interview.

“What we wanted to high-
light is that civil society was
successful, civil society can
bring about change and that
civil society was successful in
the form of the coalition,” she
added.

The researchers found that
the Clifton coalition followed
the Advocacy Coalition Frame-
work which suggests that
“stakeholders are motivated
within a coalition by a core
belief system that holds the
coalition together and it is the
core belief ... that the coalition
wants to see as a policy.”

“In the case of Clifton, you
see a variety of governmental
organisations, private organi-
sations and individuals [lobby-

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

ing] to shift government policy
away from the idea of a gated
community for something more
meaningful, lasting and sus-
tainable in the Bahamian con-
text,” Ms Pintard-Newry said.

According to the paper, the
Advocacy Coalition Frame-
work looks at policy oriented
learning which is learning and
teaching within the various
groups in the coalition.

“The idea of [policy] learning
is having the transfer of beliefs
and the transfer of knowledge
from one group to the next to
the point where it is a consis-
tent, sustainable thought [and]
continues over the lifespan of
the group as well as the lifes-
pan of the issue,” Ms Pintard-
Newry said.

The Clifton Cay investors
wanted to create a $400 mil-
lion dollar luxury community
which would have included
marinas and canals.

According to the research,
archaeological excavation exer-
cises at Clifton in 1996 and
1998 undertaken by two
archaeologists led to the dis-
covery of a site that housed
three eras of Bahamian history.

Ms Minnis said the paper has
been resubmitted to the Uni-
versity of Prince Edward Island
for publication and if selected,
will be included in the Island
Heritage Management Con-
ference’s proceedings docu-
ment.

Research will be one of the
primary thrusts of the antici-
pated University of the
Bahamas, the mission of which
will be to help support and dri-
ve national development.

US Embassy Martin Luther
King Essay Competition

ON FEBRUARY 13 the US
Embassy will announce the
2009 Martin Luther King Essay
Competition winners in a recep-
tion to be held at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel.

The event, which will begin
at 4pm, marks the third consec-
utive year the embassy has
offered the competition, open
to students in grades 10 through
12 in both public and private
schools in New Providence and
the Family Islands.

On January 19 the United
States observed a national hol-
iday celebrating the life and

legacy of the Reverend Dr Mar-
tin Luther King Jr. A civil rights
activist, Dr King championed
the principle of human dignity
in his native United States and
around the world.

The essay competition was
launched in honour of Dr
King’s memory, and in an effort
to strengthen public under-
standing of his life’s impact not
only in the United States, but
also in the Bahamas.

Applying their knowledge
and understanding of Dr King’s
teachings and philosophy, stu-
dents were asked to respond to

MAIN/SPORTS SECTION

Local News

Editorial/Letters. ..........

Ss Shee

sedeccaeteeecicetcaetaeet nets P4

CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 PAGES

USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES



the question: Does the swearing
in of Barack Obama as the first
African-American president of
the United States of America
mean that Dr King’s dream has
been realised in the US?

The embassy said it is
“pleased to note that this year,
the response has been over-
whelming. We have received
105 essays from 11 New Provi-
dence schools and seven schools
in the Family Islands.”

This year, two first place win-
ners will be selected — one from
New Providence and one from
the Family Islands.

Each winner will be present-
ed with a laptop computer
which has been donated by the
d’Albenas Agency Limited and
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce.

Bahamasair has also donat-
ed round trip tickets so the
Family Island winner and a par-
ent can attend the reception on
February 13.

The 2nd, 3rd, and 4th placed
winners will be awarded books
and other materials on Dr Mar-
tin Luther King.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
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THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3



LOCAL NEWS

ombrief Three in court 4%

cent conto ON fraud charges





he released

THE Central Bank of the }
Bahamas will be releasing a}
new version of the one cent}
coin that will look identical to }
the existing coin except for its }

size and weight.

Last modified in 2006, the |
new penny will be reduced

from 19.05 millimeters to 17.

Retaining its composition of ;
copper plated zinc, steel, and }
nickel, the new coinage will}
weight about .80 grammes less }

than the present one.

The Central Bank said this }
change is a part of a continua- }
tion of a commitment to the }
Counterfeit Resistant Integrat- }
ed Security Product (CRISP). :

In December, the Central ;
Bank issued a $1 bill with :
enhanced security features, and }
in recent months modified the }

$5, $10, and $50 notes.

On September 3, 2007, a :
newly designed ten cent coin}
was also issued. This coin rep-
resents the second denomina- }
tion in the family of Bahamas }
to be}
redesigned, following the}
release of the updated one cent }

circulation coins

coin in 2006.

As part of its public educa- :
tion initiatives, the Central }
Bank has available and has dis- }
tributed to banks and other }
cash handlers, flyers and
posters which describe the new }
security features of the new}

notes.

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -— Three women — an
Urban Renewal officer, a teacher, and
a teenager — were arraigned in
Freeport Magistrates Court on fraud
charges yesterday.

Urban Renewal assistant co-ordina-
tor Dr Betsy Russell, 50, of Braemer
Drive; Teacher Vhanyti Reckley, 22, of
Braemer Drive; and Katisha Knowles,
19, of Albacore Drive were escorted by
police to the Garnet Levarity Justice

The women were charged with fraud
by false pretenses.

It is alleged that on January 19, the
accused, being concerned together with
intent to defraud, obtained $4,000 cash
from Commonwealth Bank by means
of false pretenses.

Dr Russell and Vhanyti Reckley
were further charged with obtaining
$5,000 cash from Commonwealth
Bank by means of false pretenses.

The women pleaded not guilty to
the charges. They were each granted
$5,000 bail with one surety.

The matter was adjourned to June
16.

mM, Betsy Russell



In other court matters, a 16-year-
old boy was charged with three counts
of causing grievous harm in connec-
tion after a stabbing incident in the
Hawksbill community.

Vhanyti Reckley

Katisha Knowles



accused, a resident of Inagua Place,
was remanded to the Diah Ward for
psychological evaluation.

The case was adjourned to March
12 when he will appear before a Juve-
nile Panel.

Centre for arraignment.

Following his arraignment the

Group of PLPs wants Neil Percentie for Marathon

m By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

ARGUING that Senator
Jerome Fitzgerald is not their
choice for the Marathon con-
stituency in the next general elec-
tion, a group of PLPs has formed
a committee to persuade the pow-
ers that be in the party to nomi-
nate Neil Percentie to vie for the
post.

The committee, aptly named
the Committee to Elect Neil Per-
centie for Marathon, has report-
edly formalised a 12-point plan
to raise the former Marathon
branch chairman’s profile and
propel him into the political are-
na.

combe, the chairman of the com-
mittee, Mr Percentie is the best
candidate for the area, as he was
“born and raised” in Marathon.

“Neil, has led a number of
community efforts to bring the
community together, advance it
from where it was many years
ago, and to also encourage the
youth of the community to grow
and become good representatives
of the country,” he said.

Mr Duncombe said that in his
estimation, the majority of per-
sons who live in the area are 100
per cent behind the committee’s
efforts.

“With all due respect to Mr
Fitzgerald, he hasn’t put in the
effort or done the amount of

work that Percentie has done.
Percentie was there when Ron
Pinder was the actual candidate
for the area. And Mr Percentie
was integral to Mr Pinder’s
winning his candidacy for
Marathon.

“So we believe that the natural
progression should allow for the
torch to be passed on to Per-
centie. Because, again, with all
due respect to Mr Fitzgerald, we
know he has done a number of
things as well, but he hasn’t
impacted the community in the
way I feel Mr Pinder has done in
the past and now Mr Percentie is
doing,” he said.

When contacted yesterday, Mr
Percentie confirmed that he is

interested in running for the
Marathon seat, stating that per-
sons have been encouraging him
for “some time now” to enter the
political fray.

A young businessman who
owns his own brokerage firm, a
car rental business and a local
bar, Mr Percentie said that he and
the community of Marathon are
on “very familiar” terms, as
he has lived there for the past







Cralleria

32 years.

Mr Fitzgerald has started to
hold branch meetings in the area
already, but Mr Percentie is quite
confident that he retains a “sub-
stantial level” of support.

“The young persons around his
main support area — who have
actually been supporting me —
are only waiting for me to for-
mally announce that I am run-
ning,” he said.

Cinemas

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According to Delmaro Dun-

Drugs worth $200,000
confiscated by police

POLICE confiscated drugs with a street value of $200,000 and took
six people into custody during a stop and search exercise yesterday.

This comes just days after police seized $3.75 million worth of
cocaine in Freeport and $100,000 worth of marijuana in Andros.

Drug Enforcement Unit officers stopped a burgundy Honda Accord
occupied by four men and one woman and a silver Nissan Altima
with one male passenger on South Ocean road shortly after midnight
on Friday.

Upon searching the Nissan, officers found nine bails of marijuana,
with a total weight of more than 196 pounds.

Two of the men arrested are Andros residents, and while the others
reside on New Providence.















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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S. B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Democrats exploiting economic crisis

WASHINGTON — “Congress is like a
whiskey drinker,” President Lyndon John-
son once observed. “You can put an awful lot
of whiskey into a man if you just let him sip
it,” he said. “But if you try to force the whole
bottle down his throat at one time, he’ll throw
it up.”

The 36th president and former Senate
majority leader was referring to Congress’s
ability to produce legislative outcomes —
too much activity inebriates the system.

Congressional Democrats learned the hard
way this week as the bloated economic stim-
ulus bill stalled in the Senate.

Moderation in all things — including the
speed with which they grow the federal gov-
ernment — is a virtue. The problem is House
Democrats just didn’t have the temperance to
just say no.

That lack of self-restraint is now producing
political headaches.

After eight years of bumping heads with a
Republican president, many liberals in Con-
gress believe voters just gave them the keys to
the spending liquor cabinet. There is so much
pent-up demand for funding new projects,
Democrats run the risk of ignoring President
Johnson’s admonition, creating a fiscal —
and political —mess.

The current economic crisis may demand
speedy action, but it’s not a mandate for irre-
sponsible spending.

The bill the Senate is considering calls for
$65 billion more than the House-passed ver-
sion, at a time when scepticism about the
stimulus plan is growing.

Polling by both Gallup and Rasmussen has
demonstrated a sharp drop in support for
the legislation in the last several days as more
and more stories about its content hit the
light of day.

Democrats may equate a mandate for
change with a license to spend, but in doing so
they could quickly alienate fickle indepen-
dent voters.

House Democrats see the stars aligned for
a generational expansion of the federal gov-
ernment.

Writing in National Journal last week, Ron
Brownstein quotes a Democratic staffer who
tells the unvarnished truth: “This is a once-in-
a-25-year opportunity to ‘implement’ a lot of
our agenda.”

That’s probably correct. But they need to
slow down and look to President Obama to
serve as the designated driver.

Republicans understand the House bill
looks more like a Trojan horse for a liberal
spending agenda than an economic stimulus
bill. They were ebullient following last week’s
vote, when all GOP members voted no. “It

was the most unifying vote in several years,”
one Republican lawmaker told me. “The out-
pouring of support Members received from
their districts after the vote and over the
weekend was gratifying,” a House leader-
ship aide added. Many indicated they heard
from constituents saying the vote restored
their confidence in the Republican Party.

The key to the unity, according to several
members of the House GOP leadership, was
not only the Democrats’ excess, but a positive
Republican alternative.

As Republican leader John Boehner said
on the House floor, “... our proposal will
create 6.2 million jobs over the next two
years, about twice as many as the (Democ-
ratic) bill and at about half the costs.”

Twice the jobs at half the cost! Why in the
world wouldn’t Congress want to pursue that
approach?

That’s what makes people so angry about
Washington. It sounds like the fleecing of
America continues as the House Democrats
use the economic meltdown to inaugurate
New Deal 2.0 with the next generation’s mon-
ey.
But the spending revelry looks like it will
be tamped down in the Senate. How the bill
moves ahead is unclear, but one thing is cer-
tain — the price tag will be reduced.

Maybe this was all part of a grand plan.
The House serves up what looks like a super-
sized liberal Happy Meal and then lets Pres-
ident Obama work with the Senate to drink
the Slim-Fast shake. Perhaps. But it appears
the House won’t go on a diet without a fight.
Finishing the legislation by next Friday —
when Congress is scheduled to begin a week-
long district work period — will prove chal-
lenging.

Over the next 10 days Obama has a chance
to help reshape some of the excesses in the
legislation. He even has a chance to win more
Republican support. But he’ll have to reign in
the appetites of some big-spending House
members to pull that off. Maybe the White
House needs to remind congressional
Democrats they have at least four years —
not four weeks — to expand the size and
scope of government. But outside of Wash-
ington, I get the sense Americans are growing
angry about being taken as suckers again, as
Democrats in Congress use an economic cri-
sis to promote a political agenda. Big gov-
ernment liberals are ready to party, but they
should spend in sips, rather than gulps, lest
voters take away the keys to the liquor cabi-
net.

(This article was written by Gary Andres -
c. 2009 Hearst Newspapers).



Bahamasair
and the people
of Mayaguana

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I WILL be grateful if you
would please give me a little
space in your column to voice
the concerns of the residents
of Mayaguana in respect to
Bahamasair in particular; and
thank you for your kind con-
sideration.

The matter in question is the
way that our National Flag
Carrier treats the people of
Mayaguana with utter con-
tempt as though we are not
entitled to the basic courtesies
or consideration given to other
islands or destinations.

I believe everyone will agree
that the island of Mayaguana,
is one of the most remote in
the chain of Bahamas islands;
due mainly to the policies or
lack thereof, of successive gov-
ernments over the years.
Notwithstanding certain eco-
nomic consideration; as a pub-
lic entity, Bahamasair, is
expected to treat all of the
islands with the same regard.
However, person or persons in
New Providence seem to have
adopted the attitude that
Mayaguana, as a destination is
of no significance and treats
its residents accordingly.

Editor, you may find it hard
to believe that Bahamasair has
been leaving considerable
numbers of Mayaguana pas-
sengers, travelling to and from
New Providence, with con-
firmed reservations and ticket
in hand, often without so much
as an apology in order to
accommodate passengers trav-
elling to and from our neigh-
bouring island in the south.
Imagine a 50-seat aircraft ser-
vicing two destinations and 48
to 50 seats are reserved for one
destination? Something has to
be wrong with that picture.

I am told that persons in
Bahamasair claimed that the
problem is that Mayaguanians
don’t make their reservations.
Nothing could be further from
the truth. The truth of the mat-
ter is Mayaguanians mainly
have to rely on making reser-
vations during one of the three
flight days; there is no com-
puter connection with
Bahamasair reservations and
the agent often tries unsuc-
cessfully to make reservations
for people. I am not talking
only of other people’s experi-
ence, I have encountered the
same thing myself.

I was scheduled to travel
from New Providence, just
recently, was checked in and
at the gate the agent advised us
that they could take only two
of seven passengers for
Mayaguana, because the plane
was going to Inagua first then
to Mayaguana; and Inagua had
48 passengers travelling to
New Providence. I was told

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia. net



then that they had hoped to
get persons responsible to have
the plane stop in Mayaguana
first, in order to take all of the
passengers for Mayaguana, but
those responsible, insisted that
they were going to Inagua first;
resulting in the aircraft depart-
ing with a number of empty
seats; leaving five passengers
stranded.

As I write this letter, I have
requested a reservation to trav-
el to New Providence and the
agent advised me that the
reservation could not be made,
because he no longer had the
ability to make a long distance
call on his phone.

So pray tell, how in God’s
name are we to make reserva-
tions in a timely manner? Just
this past week, Bahamasair,
caused a seminar which was
scheduled for Mayaguana and
would have been of tremen-
dous value to the island had to
be cancelled. Why? Because
Bahamasair decided that they
were sending two planes to
Inagua and would not be trans-
porting any passengers to
Mayaguana on Monday
(26/1/09). A last minute deci-
sion by someone who inter-

There have also been instances
when reservations were made
and confirmed for persons
travelling from Mayaguana
and they discovered upon
arrival at the airport, their
names were not on the mani-
fest with confirmed reserva-
tions and often have to return
home.

Mayaguanians have been
suffering under these condi-
tions for a number of years,
but of late it has been getting
worse. To start with we have
been suffering from a most
degrading condition at our air-
port which makes me feel
ashamed when visitors arrive
in Mayaguana, and on top of
that we are treated with dis-
dain by our flag carrier.

I could relate so many other
instances when travellers to
and from as well as the desti-
nation of Mayaguana in gen-
eral, had been treated in like
fashion. However, I believe the
situations stated should be suf-
ficient for those responsible to
note that Mayaguanians are
becoming very frustrated and
would not endure this kind of
treatment any longer.

The only time we are able
to get any significant number
of seats is during the period
when we share a flight with
Exuma.

For God’s sake would the
responsible person or persons

vened, resulted in them bring-
ing some passengers who had
shown up at the airport any-
way. However, a number of
other persons who had already
been advised that they could
not get a seat did not bother to
even go back to the airport. January 28, 2009.

Iam gay, but Iam
a Bahamian, too!

EDITOR, The Tribune.

in Bahamasair please look into
and remedy this situation

HUEL A WILLIAMSON
General Delivery,

Pirates Well,

Mayaguana, Bahamas,

THIS letter is intended as an intellectual and emotional response
against the arrogant, vitriolic drivel spewed forth in the letter enti-
tled “We Must Strongly Oppose Sinister Homosexual Rights Agen-
da” published in The Tribune on Wednesday, February 4, 2009.

I am a 23-year-old lesbian Bahamian “living” in this country.
Although a better description would be to say that I am “lan-
guishing” as I am forced to hide my identity and orientation
because persons such as the author of this letter, Ms Phillippa
Russell, have made the Bahamas inhospitable to its own citizens.

Ms Russell argues that we homosexuals are trying to corrupt
Bahamian life by pursuing a gay rights agenda. Gay people gen-
erally do not have a sinister agenda to corrupt and infiltrate the
Church and the Bahamas. We simply want to not be harassed,
free to love and marry and have a family as straight people do, and
to be accepted and loved by our families. We want understanding,
not license to ruin the country.

The letter claims that in our pursuit of this agenda “the difficul-
ty arises when homosexuals attempt to distinguish between their
sexual orientation and their character.” Ms Russell, please allow me
to disabuse you of your benighted ignorance and state that a
cogent distinction does exist. My sexual orientation does not define
my character. My character defines how I exercise my sexual ori-
entation. If a heterosexual male resolves to rape his female neigh-
bour he does so not because his sexual orientation is “dysfunc-
tional”, but because his character is flawed.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JERMAINE PREZILAN
of ROSE BUD ROAD, EDEN STREET, FARRINGTON
ROAD, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 31% day of January, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, BARBARA BIRDIEMAE
McPHEE of Bahamia, Freeport, Grand, Bahama, intend to
change my name to BERTHAMAE BARBARA McPHEE. If there
are any objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty (30)
days after the date of the publication of this notice.

SUL
WANTED

Well established wholesaler requires a salesman for
the snack food division. Individual must have had
experience is sales with emphasis on large food stores.
Only individuals with a proven record of being able
to work unsupervised and achieve results will be
considered.

Must be able to drive standard shift vehicle and
be in possession of current valid driver’s license.
Individuals not meeting the stated requirements will
not be considered for the post. Company offers good
benefits.

Furthermore, the letter states that, “It is now scientifically con-
firmed that behaviour is contagious”. Well in that case, I should
have been straight ten times over, as I did not encounter another
gay person until I was in my late teens. Growing up I was bathed,
fed, hugged, dressed, tucked in, sneezed on, taught by and along
with heterosexual people and yet Iam gay. Therefore, Ms Russell
if not by blood (as my parents are straight), or through air, or by
touch, or even my observational mimicry how else is this “conta-
gion” passed?

The heart of the article focuses on psychopathy. However, psy-
chopathy is a mental disorder; homosexuality is not. The Diagnostic
and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) removed homo-
sexuality as a mental illness in 1973, as it became increasingly
clear that while it was not the norm, it did not cause specifically vio-
lent, hostile or dangerous behaviour in people nor was it equated
with psychosis or any sort of violent pathology. Psychopathy is a
totally separate and distinct mental illness all on its own. Homo-
sexuality is now accepted in major circles as intrinsic, and not as a
mental illness and for Ms Russell to claim otherwise, is ludicrous,
and is nothing more than thinking that is pseudo-psychology at its
best, ranting of an uneducated woman at worst.

Now if the Jamaican PM, as the letter states, so chooses to bar
homosexuals from his cabinet, whether they are qualified or not that
is between him and his constituents. But as for my country I know
that we are not better off because of our homophobia. I am edu-
cated, talented and ambitious, yet I wish to leave my homeland to
go where I can be free to love, without shame and live, without fear,
because I know and feel that here I am hated and vilified for who
Tam.

Ms Russell, your letter disappoints, disheartens and scares me
because you represent the intolerance, small-mindedness, and big-
otry that mars the better nature of my people. When you identify
me with psychopaths, and intimate that I am inferior you strip me
of my humanity. And therefore, leave me naked for others to
harass me, because I am undeserving of dignity, discriminate
against me, because I am undeserving of rights, and hurt me,
because I am undeserving of protection.

So, Ms Russell, if you truly wish to pursue your noble goal of sav-
ing the Bahamas, then save us from you and others like you.

Odessa Ga FAEN

where fife is still sine ip e and people still care
_ Murphyville, 2nd House left from Sears Road.
= Telephone 322-8493

io Be Different a.
AD GIVE A BOOK for MX
. VALENTINES DAY

SBE. DIFFERENT - GIVE A BOOK FOR VALENTINE'S DAY=.
ff THIS LIFE - BY SIDNEY POITIER - SIGNED 1ST EDITION) ig)
“JUST AST AM BY BILLY GRAHAM qi

* NAPOLEON THE GREAT - VOLS, I, [and I. ff
HENRY W, LONGFELLOW - EARLY POEMS /
EMPEROR ALEXANDER |

BLACK BEAUTY
eo REMEMBERING SINATRA 2
~~ AMERICAN BACK ON TRACK - Sen. Edward M. Keanedy ~

c/o DA 67134
P.O.BOX N3207
Nassau, Bahamas ANONYMOUS
‘ Pa. ee Pa): @ Je , Nassau,
; 7 > : ‘ February 4, 2009.


THE TRIBUNE

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 5



LOCAL NEWS

Woman whose grandson was shot
- dead volunteers as a counsellor



WHY YOU

VEX?

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter ;
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net i

"TI vex at the drivers who park i
so recklessly on the curb right :
on Bay Street, Dowdeswell }
Street and Village Road every }
day, blocking the passage of }
traffic and causing me to have to }
strain my neck to see if any cars }
coming when I try to come out a }

corner.

"It especially vexin' when I :
turn onto Deveaux Street off }
Bay Street - people acting like }
they own the road! What I want }
to know is where is all the police :
who could be making some }
good money ticketing these no }
good people! I surprised more :
accidents don't happen because i

of people's foolishness."

— Mad Motorist, Nassau.

"I vex at the spate of crimes :
that seem to be happening every }
day now. I mean broad daylight :
car chases, shootings in Kemp
Road and one in Montague the }
other night. What is happening }
to our culture? Guns more }

accessible than water these days,

it seems and everyone have one. }

"And instead of our lawmak- i
ers and politicians trying to do }
something about it, they getting
caught up in foolishness. Where }
does that leave law-abiding cit- }
izens who afraid to go outside in :
broad daylight or the evening i

for fear of a stray bullet?"

- Concerned about Crime,

Nassau. }

"I vex 'cause every night two }
church buses and two church :
vans with heavy tinted windows }
run through my neighbourhood }
close to Potter's Cay seven }
nights a week to disturb my }

sleep.

church needs to follow."

- Lift up ya head all da time,

Nassau. }

"T vex at how many children I }
see roaming the streets without }
any supervision day in and day
out. Sometimes I see kids in the :
middle of the day just wander- }
ing, and I know school is in ses- }
sion. I always wonder where are }
the parents who brought them
into this world who now disre- }
gard them and let them fend for }
themselves? I am surprised our }
child abduction rates aren't :
higher considering the most
innocent and vulnerable are left i
without a guardian so many }

times.

"It breaks my heart to watch }
these little kids walking in areas }
I wouldn't walk alone in the }
evening and I can only imagine }
what they go home to at night.
Is it any wonder our crime situ- }
ation is at the level it's at now?" }

-M Johnson, Nassau. :

"IT vex because on the social :
network Facebook it seems like }
all types of people I don't know
hit me up wanting to become }
friends and to make matters }
worse, when you add these peo- }
ple, no one I know seems to }
know them and I have no idea }
who they are. I have even heard }
of cases where weirdoes create }
fake profiles just so they can }

access people's pages.

“It's sort of scary knowing all
my personal information is out }
there on cyberspace for so many
strangers to access. Asa guy, it }
also weirds me out when I geta }
friend request from another
man who I don't know. My }
advice to people is to be careful :
who you add to your lists on }

websites like that."

- Man in Carmichael. i

NOTICE

Antonio Sweeting, son
of Mae Sweeting please
contact M. Franks

at 324-3972. This is

in regards to family in

eA MMMUey AMI lALAe)
OM TMl(0lUR



m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia. net

A WOMAN whose grandson was
gunned down last year is giving back to
the community by volunteering as a
counsellor in a free service for the vul-
nerable.

Idena Burrows, 71, of East Avenue,
Millar’s Heights, lost the grandson she
raised when he was shot in the back five
times while working under the hood of
his car in Millar’s Heights, off Carmichael
Road.

No one has yet been arrested for the
murder of Reno Burrows, who turned
30 two weeks before he was shot dead in
January 2008, making Mrs Burrows’ grief
all the more painful.

She remembers the boy that she and
her husband Stanley Burrows, 74, raised
from the age of nine as “polite, respectful
and loving.”

The mother of five and grandmother of
16 living grandchildren said: “If it has
never happened to you, you can’t know
how it feels.

Memories

“T still have my memories and I still cry
a lot, because I miss him so much. It’s a
void that will never be filled, but we have
to go on and you have to let go.”

A year after the event, Mrs Burrows
has channelled her grief into something

A piece

positive by devoting her
Wednesday afternoons to
counselling people at The
Haven in Kenilworth Street,
off Montrose Avenue, with
leading psychologist Dr
David Allen.

She is one of around ten
volunteers at the free coun-
selling clinic, which was
established in March last
year, and works mostly with
young men who benefit
from her love and support.

“If you didn’t have pain
in life there is a lot you
wouldn’t know.

“Pain is necessary. It’s
like an alarm.

“So if the Lord allows
pain to come into your life,
it is for a reason and a purpose, and
Reno’s death has given me a new direc-
tion.”

Mrs Burrows said she has seen changes
in the boys she has counselled over the
last year — some have gone from unem-
ployment and homelessness to returning
to their families and working.

“From having problems working and
getting along with others, being disrup-
tive at home and not going to school, I
have seen a complete turnaround.”

Mrs Burrows has worked with young
people at Calvary Bible Church on
Collins Avenue in Centreville for 25
years, and believes by working together
in the community, the problems that lead

of history is
sold on Harbour Island

Idena Burrows



to gun crime, drug dealing
and the downfall of promis-
ing young people can be
eliminated.

“When it comes down to
crunch time we need to get
together as one.

“Because with the crime,
if we don’t get together as
one, we are not going to
face it,” she said.

Mts Burrows said she also
believes that parents must
live up to the responsibility
of caring for their children,
ensuring they go to school,
do their homework, and feel
loved.

“We can’t be afraid to let
kids know that we love
them.

“T think that is so important - to know
that you’re loved, because most people
who commit suicide or are depressed,
would not feel that way if they knew
deep down that somebody loved and
cared for them,” she said.

Mrs Burrows’ contribution to the pro-
gramme has been a benefit to her as well
as the clients, Dr Allen said.

“This is the anniversary of the death of
her grandson, and now she is one of my
leading volunteers. She is taking the pain
from her loss, and using it to help others,
and that’s a beautiful thing.”

Dr Allen said he believes the healing
power of talking and opening up can stop
people on a violent or suicidal path.

"They is mussey da most reli- i
gious group an them other }

COLDWELL Banker Light-
bourn Realty sales associate
Robert Arthur has sold a piece
of Harbour Island history.

Arthur sold The Little Board-
ing House, the island’s first or sec-
ond establishment of its kind, to
Bahamian Tracey Barry Tyler and
her husband, Toby Tyler, owners
of the island's elegant Landing
hotel.

The seller was a non-Bahamian
and long time visitor to the island.

Visitors to Harbour Island are
familiar with the charming yellow
house on the corner of Bay Street
and Murray.

Now a private residence, Little
Boarding House is over 200 years
old.

In the 1940s, Ms Hattie Thomp-
son and Ms Marion Johnson
owned the boarding house.

Ms Johnson was headmistress
of the primary school on Harbour
Island. Ms Thompson managed
the little hotel. Both were instru-
mental in getting the Catholic
Bishop to build a church on Har-
bour Island, somewhere around
1922.

It is said that the first Catholic
mass on the island was celebrated
in their home.

Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty president Mike Lightbourn
has fond memories of Little
Boarding House.

He and his family spent sum-
mer holidays in their vacation
home two doors away, and ate
breakfast and dinner at Little
Boarding House every day.

The island was a child’s play-
ground with the gorgeous, three
mile Pink Sand Beach and a fish-
ing boat, Pieces of Eight, at their
fingertips.

On the corner to the south of
Little Boarding House, Mr Light-
bourn recalls, Capt. Harry Albury
had the first generator on the
island and supplied electricity to a
large area. The drone of the
engine was a new night sound.

Transport was by foot or bicy-
cle. Unlike today, there were no
golf carts or vehicles. However,
there were lots of simple plea-
sures, such as homemade coconut
ice cream sold at the square at the
top of Murray Street at four
o'clock every afternoon.

The winds of change started to
rustle through Harbour Island
with the introduction of amphibi-
ous craft from Nassau. The popu-
lation grew, and Bahamian and
non-Bahamians discovered the
island as a second home destina-
tion.

Today’s Harbour Island is still
graced with many charming struc-
tures of old, such as Little Board-
ing House, which speak of that
magical era.

For Coldwell Banker’s Robert
Arthur, the sale was particularly
satisfying. Arthur ranks in the top
one per cent of an international
Coldwell Banker sales force of
116,800.

Although not one of his most
significant sales in terms of dollars
and cents — the home sold for
$775,000 with some trade ele-
ments — Arthur was thrilled
when his friends, the Tylers,
bought the property.

“Not only are Tracy, Toby and
I good friends, but I know that

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

eee
al a yaar a LY



Little Boarding House will be
maintained to the highest stan-
dard and that this important piece
of history will be preserved,”
Arthur said.

And he's pleased that the seller
will continue to visit Harbour
Island.

The Tylers own the historic
Landing hotel in Harbour Island.
Prince Charles’ goddaughter and
Ralph Lauren Safari model, India
Hicks, until fairly recently had a
minority stake in the traditional
Colonial-style 1800's hotel.

The Landing is a magnet for
the rich and famous.

The Duke and Duchess of
York are among the list of celebri-
ties who’ve stopped in to enjoy
The Landing’s gourmet meals and

sample their fine wines and cigars.

The guest list reads like a
Who's Who.

Prince Pavalos and Princess
Marie Chantal of Greece, Mick
Jaggar, Richard Gere, Elle
McPherson, Diane Von Fursten-
berg, Barry Diller, Christianne
Amannpour, Ed Bradley, Bette
Midler, Collin Farrell, George
Hamilton, Daryll Hall and Jack
Nicholson, along with super mod-
els and many others have enjoyed
the ambiance of The Landing.

The Tylers plan to make Little
Boarding House their family
home, give it a facelift and build a
cottage in the backyard, retaining
the period of the home.

It's this timeless quality that
makes Harbour Island so special.

O Me. bl G arden

) where fife is still simple and people still care
“ Murphyville, 2nd Howse left from Sears Road.
Telephone 322-8493

Give Her Al

fasting ‘Gift This

Valentine!!!
Come and See our Silk Floral Arrangements!
You Won't Have to Water them and They Won't Diet
, Beautiful Flowers with grasses Mowing down in Pretty Vases!

GIFT ITEMS

for VALENTINE
VALENTINE PILLOWS POR YOUR BED - STANDARD SIZE!
CHARMING CUSHIONS WITH SACHETS - SWEET SMELLING .
LARGE, COLOURFUL WREATHS POR YOUR DCRRIT
VALENTINE ORNAMENTS POR YOUR GIFTS

vic TORIAN STYL E BOSIES -

—s,

ea

DED DRIED FLOWERS Y
, ‘a da

ROYAL = FIDELITY

oney of Work

“The kids who were violent in schools
had lost somebody a few years before,
but had no one to talk to, so the hurt
went down and came out as anger, and
violence, so we have to talk to the kids
when these things happen.

“Sick people don’t talk and healthy
people talk. It’s as simple as it sounds,”
he said.

The three suicides last week are sign of
individuals becoming isolated from soci-
ety in a process which could be stopped
by communication, Dr Allen said.

Contacts

“The suicidal person feels hopeless
and lonely, and all statistics show they
have the same number of contacts as peo-
ple who are not isolated,” he said.

“So loneliness is something that hap-
pens between the ears.

“You project it on society and create a
reality so it becomes a self-fulfilling
prophecy.”

The counselling centre is free and open
to all from 2pm-4pm and Spm-7pm on
Wednesdays. Volunteers who would like
to be counsellors can attend training ses-
sions on Wednesday afternoons from
4pm-5pm.

If you would like to attend the free
clinic or are interested in volunteering,
call The Haven on 327-8719.

Dr Allen also established a free 24-
hour hotline for anyone who wants to
talk at 677-KIDS (5437).

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,























Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 * Fax: 326-7452

Large Shipment
ol

) COME CHECK
US OUT

New Shipments Arrived

Hurry, Hurry, Hurry and
Get Your First Choice
For Easy Financing

Bank And Insurance

BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF:
FRIDAY, 6 FEBRUARY 2009

On Premises

Check Our Prices

Before buying

FG CAP

MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,690.98 | CHG 0.26 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -21.38 | YTD % -1.25
FINDEX: CLOSE 825.31 | YTD -1.14% | 2008 -12.31%
WWW .BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATION

Securit y

1.39 Abaco Markets

1.39

Bahamas Property Fund

7.64
0.63
3.15

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
2.83 Colina Holdings
4.80
1.88
2.27
6.02
11.87

Famguard
Finco

Bank of Bahamas

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital

7.64
0.63
3.15

2.83
6.77
2.19
2.40
7.80
11.87

4

Previous Close Today's Close

1.39

7.64
0.63
3.15

2.83
6.77
2.44
2.40
7.80
1.87

Change

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

0.00
0.00
0.25
0.00
0.00
0.00

Daily Vol.

10.45
5.01

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

10.45
5.17

10.45
5.17

0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00
0.00

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

1.00
0.30
5.59
10.50
10.00

EPS $
0.070

Div $

0.992
0.319
-0.877
0.105
0.055
1.255
0.118
0.438
0.111
0.240
0.598
0.542
0.682
0.337
0.000
0.035
0.407
0.952
0.180

BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES - (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases)

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Security
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series D) +
S52wk-Low Symbol
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

1.3781
2.9230
1.3773
3.3856
11.8789
100.0000
96.4070
1.0000
9.0950
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

52wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for daily volume
Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

Symbol

Last Sale Change
0.00

0.00

FBB17
FBB22
FBB13 100.00 0.00
FBB15 100.00 0.00
Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities
Bid $ Ask $ Last Price
7.92 8.42 14.60
6.00 6.25 6.00
0.35 0.40 0.35
Colina Over-The-Counter Securities
31.72 33.26 29.00
11.23 12.04 14.00
0.45 0.55 0.55
BISX Listed Mutual Funds
NA Vv YTD% Last 12 Months
1.4387 4.40
2.9230 -2.54
1.4376 4.38
3.3856 -10.83
12.6180 5.74
100.5606 0.56
96.4070 -3.59
1.0000 0.00
9.0950 -13.38
1.0264
1.0289 2.89
1.0287 2.87
MARKET TERMS

100.00

13. 38.
2.64 2.64
2.89

2.87

Daily Vol.

Weekly Vol.

Div $

Interest
7% 19 October 2017
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% 30 May 2013
Prime + 1.75% 29 May 2015

EPS $
-0.041
0.000
0.001

Div $
0.300
0.480
0.000

P/E

4.540
-0.041
0.002

0.000
0.300
0.000

Yield %
30-Jan-09
31-Jan-09
23-Jan-09
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-08
31-Dec-07
31-Dec-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08

YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price

Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company’s reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100



TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525
PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

Suicides could be sign of

FROM page one

ages, details of which are being
discussed now, on May 15.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said: “We can make sure that
the distribution of income
that’s so important to us hap-
pens before the people even
arrive in the country.

“The intent is to start with
four hotels where somebody
buys an all-inclusive product,
including airfare, hotel room,
food, tours, entertainment —
all in one pre-paid package.
But the whole experience is
not in one property, it is at sev-
eral different locations. We
want to give people a total des-
tination experience, not just a
hotel experience.”

According to Deputy Direc-
tor General of Tourism, David
Johnson, the concept has nev-
er been tried anywhere else in
the world.

“No other island has ever
tried to do this. Hotels have
been doing it and, of course,
cruiselines do it, but we would
be the first place where I see
this being executed and we
hope to do it and claim the
rights to being the first and
only,” said Mr Johnson.

It may be a potential boon
for the Grand Bahama econo-
my at a time when the tradi-
tionally depressed economy is
suffering more than ever.

“They need a big boost and
they are hungrier (for the
opportunity),” said Mr John-
son.

According to the tourism
official, initial research sug-
gests that the offering will be a
popular one.

“We believe it’s sound con-
ceptually and our preliminary



Tourism

research shows that people see
value in it. People have said
to us that if we can get our
price points right (and) if they
can get their meals included
and have a choice of restau-
rants they would pay a bit
more. They see that on a
cruise ship or a hotel they’re
limited to two or three restau-
rants, they don’t really like
that limitation,” he said.

Meanwhile, interest from
Grand Bahama businesses in
getting involved in the scheme
has been “extreme”, accord-
ing to Mr Vanderpool Wal-
lace.

“So far the concept has been
embraced very strongly, espe-
cially by the restaurants and
the vendors, so I feel like we
have some positive momen-
tum,” added Mr Johnson.

The four hotel properties
expected to be part of the first
package are Our Lucaya,
which includes the Westin and
Sheraton hotels, Port Lucaya
and Pelican Bay.

Tourists will be able to
spend less or more money to
buy a “top of the line, middle
of the road or lower end”
package.

Grand Bahama is being
seen as the ideal location to
test out the model, as it has
the most convenient infra-
structure, he said.

“You’ve got about 2,000
rooms right across from about
60 stores and about 40 restau-
rants, and the watersports and
beachsports and the boating
sports are all there with the
marina and the beach, so
everything is very close by,”
he added.

FROM page one

He said the vast majority of
familicides in the US are com-
mitted by the father and usually
in the wake of financial hardship
or job loss.

Although a significant number
of government capital projects
have introduced new jobs in the
Bahamas’ construction field, Dr
Allen fears the rare type of mur-
der familicide may soon occur if
the issue is not addressed.

During the Bahamian reces-
sion of the early 1990s, there was
at least one case of a man who
had shot his wife and attempted
to kill his children by driving his
family vehicle into the sea near
Clifton Pier.

Where many murders that
occur under similar circumstances
are seldom classified as famili-
cides, all confirmed cases have
revealed that a parents’ desire to
prevent their children or family
from suffering had been a major
factor in their deadly decision.

With three suicides already
occurring in the space of a week

this year, and with at least two of
the victims reportedly experienc-
ing financial difficulties, Dr Allen
feels some response is now need-
ed.

“Men get their self-esteem
from their jobs, and when they
lose their jobs, unless they have a
real community connection, deal-
ing with the shame of that can
lead to them becoming psychot-
ic.”

However, he admits that there
has been a long existing attitude
among many local men of not
sharing their thoughts and being
too proud to seek help.

In addition, Dr Allen said that
many have turned away from the
church, and have accepted secu-
larism as their God.

He feels that the combination
of these characteristics of the
Bahamian male with the global
economic downturn could spark
the occurrence of this rare crime.

Dr Allen feels one way of
relieving stress and depression
that could follow unemployment
would be to seek spiritual encour-
agement from a church or neigh-
bour.

Two men expected in
court after shootout

FROM page one

Revving up in retirement

FROM page one

Triumph 750.

A member of the Scurvy Few Bike Club of Abaco, Mr Bur-
rows said his passion for bikes has made his retirement a com-
plete joy.

Mr Burrows said locals always react with amazement when he
rides his various bikes round the island because each is unique.

“T’m really proud to see that my bikes can bring so much joy,
and for Bahamians to see that we can do things like this.”

Outside of his collection, Mr Burrows said he also repairs
Harley bikes, lawn mowers and other motorised gadgets.

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SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH, 2009

11:30 a.m. Speaker:
Elder Brentford Isaacs
Topic “The Revelation Series”

Bible Class: 9:45 a.m. ¢ Breaking of Bread Service: 10:45 a.m.
¢ Community Outreach: 11:30 a.m. ¢ Evening Service: 7:00 p.m.
¢ Midweek Service 7:30 p.m. (Wednesdays)
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occurred just hours after police chased the two occupants of a
Toyota Avalon from the Kemp Road area to Madeira Street,
Palmdale, and apprehended them before dozens of onlookers at
around 10am.

Eyewitnesses claim police gunbutted one of the men seen lying
on the ground near the passenger side of his vehicle. He was bleed-
ing profusely from a head injury. Police maintain the driver hit his
head on the car door while trying to evade arrest.

Two men aged 38 and 35, both residents of Perpall Tract, were
arrested in Palmdale and taken into custody.

The shootings have rocked local residents, who claimed that
Nassau is becoming like the Wild West.

A Montagu resident said: “I find this absolutely terrifying. It is
like living in the Wild West. We are very concerned about the
level of crime.

“We are concerned the police are ill-equipped to do their job
properly and they are not given the support they need, especially
in terms of training.

“Tam not suggesting what happened in Montagu is the police’s
fault, but I am suggesting that we are in crisis.”

The resident noted Minister of National Security Tommy Turn-
quest’s announcement on Thursday showing the current murder
rate, 24 per 100,000 people, is four times higher than the five per
100,000 deemed acceptable by international standards.

And the resident, who did not want to be named, pointed out how
the shortage of Supreme Court judges allows those accused of
murder and violent crime to be released on bail, and freed to com-
mit more crimes, as cases stack up.

She added: “We are at a crisis level and the government appears
to be paralysed. We welcome the appointment of new senior police
officers, but what are they doing to deal with crime? Overall, what
is being done?

“The American State Department warnings are saying it is safe
to come here, but when are we going to cross that threshold?”

Grant’s Town Wesley Methodist

(Baillou Hill Rd & Chapel Street) RO.Box CB-13046

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 8TH, 2009

7:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 a.m. Rev. Carla Culmer/Dr. Jewel Dean (B)
7:00 a.m. Bro. Sidney Culmer/Board of General Education

“Casting our cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)

BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH

SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

‘Sunday School: 10am FUNDAMENTAL |
Preaching iam & 7:30pm EVANGELISTIC
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday Gpm - 2N5 2

Wed, Prayer & Praise 7:20pm

PasiorcH. Mills

"Preaching the Bible as is, to men 43 they areâ„¢

Grace and ert Wesleyan eres
A Soclety of The Free Methodist Church of
Horth merica

WHERE GODS ADORED AND EFPERVONE [8 APFIRWED

Worship Tune: Efacm, & 6pm.
, Prayer Times Ee! 3am,
Charch School during Worship Service

Place: Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
P.O.Box $3-5631

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324.2587

‘Cha

However, in recent years, many
Bahamians have discontinued the
traditions of regular church atten-
dance.

Christian Council president,
Rev Patrick Paul, told The Tri-
bune that over the past ten years
there has been a significant drop
in the number of Bahamians
attending church.

Rev Paul said where at
one time there were many attend-
ing church on Sunday and
Wednesday, he has been
informed by several churches
that they have ceased Wednes-
day services because of low
turnouts.

Rev Paul explained that this
shift in behaviour has contributed
to a new breed of people who

‘even more serious problem

lack virtues and morals, and
where the consequences of sui-
cide or familicide may not be con-
sidered.

Rev Paul said this new behav-
iour has even led to many church-
es discontinuing their Sunday
schools, which also have low
attendance, and feels the church-
es’ role in inspiring hope is today
key to the survival of Bahamian
society.

“It’s not a small matter, but it’s
something that we can seize over
a short period of time. If we as a
church can network together and
work to bring some degree of
equilibrium in our society, I will
assure you we will have a lot of
our present problems reduced sig-
nificantly.”

Husband fears for wife

FROM page one

“We went that Thursday, came back that Friday and she wasn’t
there. Her sister said that she dropped her to the airport but does-
n’t know where she went from there,” he said.

Neither he nor his wife’s family have seen or heard from her in
nearly a month. Mr Lindley said that he filed a police report regard-
ing his wife’s disappearance two weeks ago.

Mr Lindley admitted that this is not the first time his wife left

abruptly.

“In 2007 something similar to this happened. It was in October,
2007, her sister allegedly dropped her to the airport and she went
away. When she went that time she called her daughter back in the
first week and she e-mailed her. She did correspond with her sister
as well,” he said. Whether she went back to the same place I’m not

sure but I think she did.

Mr Lindley said he believes his wife could be in Haiti but is not

certain.

“T think she went back to where she was before because I had
looked at her phone records and it was saying that she had been call-
ing Haiti right up to the last day she left.

“Someone did call me and tell me there were reports of her
being seen in Haiti but then again I haven’t gotten any confirmation
from police to say that is where she left to. She was involved with
someone in Haiti before but that was supposed to have been over

with,” he said.

Mr Lindley claimed that he and his wife, who also works with him
in the building maintenance business, were not having marital

problems.

“There wasn’t any problem in the relationship or anything like
that going on so it became a shock to me when she left.

“T don’t think she is in the right state of mind to do what she did
and wherever she is I don’t think she is safe. She never cut her chil-
dren off like this and that is what has me more concerned,” Mr Lind-

ley said.

Mrs Roker is described as about 5 feet 3 inches tall, of solid
build and weighing around 190 pounds. She also has a tattoo of a

panther on her lower right leg.

ADMINISTRATOR/
LIBRARIAN

The South Eleuthera Mission, Rock Sound, Eleuthera,
anon-profit organization is seeking suitable candidates
for the post of Administrator/Librarian.

The duties of the successful candidate will

include:

© Overseeing the daily operation of the
facility, which includes a library, museum,

computer

laboratory,

resource centre,

reading room and café

© Investigating
sources of funding

and pursuing viable

© Planning and executing the curriculum
of the trade and vocational classes to be

offered at the facility

Applicants must possess:

© Experience in

a

related field or

certification in library science

© Excellent organization and administrative

skills

© Very Good computer skills

© Excellent communication skills

© Exceptional Interpersonal skills

© Innovative thinking

© Willingness to work flexible hours

Should you meet these requirements, please
submit a résumé to cdsands@coralwave.com

or via fax 242-334-2280.
www.southeleutheramission.com


THE TRIBUNE



har,
Ce of ee

otte

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sport Reporter

DESPITE losing all of their matches in
Group A of the Fed Cup by BNP Paribas
Americas Zone Group One, the Bahamas’
three-member team still has a chance to
play in a relegation match.

Today at the Uniprix Stadium in Mon-
treal, Canada, the Bahamas will cross over
to play Brazil — the last place finisher in
Group B — to determine which team will be
relegated to Zone II next year.

On Thursday, the Bahamas was beaten
soundly 3-0 by host Canada. But coach
Sean Cartwright said the scores didn’t
reflect the way the team played.

Masters Softball ¢



OF

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7,




ta,

PAGE 9



T



2009



mas faces Brazil

ee
|

te

“The Canadians were just an outstand-

ing team,” Cartwright stressed. “Our girls
hit a heavy ball, but we played well against

them. We had some good games, but just

Group.

League’s All-Star
Classic set for
this weekend

THE Masters Softball
League has released the names
of the following players select-
ed to participate in the All-Star
Classic 2pm Sunday at the
Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park at Southern
Recreation Grounds:

¢ Pineapple Pickers, man-
aged by Pat Evans of the
Williams Construction Jets and
coached by Larry Forbes of the
Andeaus Insurance Brokers
and Spurgeon Johnson of the
Johnson Six Pack Abs:

First base - George Turner
(St Anges Lions) and Brad
Smith (Williams’ Jets).

Second base - Dennis Davis
(six Pack Abs); Gary Johnson
(Williams Jets) and Sam Cum-
berbatch (St Anges Lions).

Shortstop - Franklyn Kemp
(Andeaus Brokers) and Jack
Davis (Williams Jets).

Left field - Roger Demeritte
(Williams Jets) and Larry
Thompdon (Six Pack Abs).

Centerfield - Shannon Ban-
nister (Augusta St Bulls) and
Sam Haven (Andeaus Bro-
kers).

Rightfield - Anthony Pearce
(Williams Jets) and Audley
Williams (Alco Raiders).

Catcher - Lee Rahming
(Williams Jets) and John
Woodside (Augusta St Bulls).

Pitcher - Danny Stubbs
(Williams Jets), Jow Demeritte
(Six Pack Abs), Bertie Murray
(Williams Jets) and Ken
O’Brien (St Anges).

Utility - Anthony Weech
(Williams Jets), Mike Dillett

(Andeaus Brokers) and Mike
Isaacs (Andeaus Brokers).

¢ Watermelon Splashers,
managed by Dudley Moxey
(Micholette Strokers) and
coached by Anthony Huyler
(Bamboo Shack Bulls) and
Sammy Adderley (Micholette
Strokers).

First base - Cyril Miller (Mic-
holette); Anthony Henfield
(Alco Raiders) and Joe

McPhee (Miller Lite).
Second base - Joe McPhee
(Miller Lite).

Third base - Rodney Albury
(Bamboo Shack) and Hillary
Deveaux (Miller Lite).

Shortstop - Abe Johnson
(Micholette) and Keith Arm-
brister (Micholette).

Leftfield - Victor Bain (Bam-
boo Shack) and Joe Jones

(Miller Lite).

Center field - Brian
Cartwright (Micholette) and
Jeff Cooper (Jets).

Right field - Lawrence Smith
(Miller Lite) and Walter Smith
(Bamboo Shack).

Catcher - Frederick Saunders
(Six Pack Abs) and Anthony
Bowe (Alco Raiders).

Pitcher - Clifton Smith (Mic-
holette), Greg Thompson
(Bamboo Shack), Ray Johnso
(Six Pack Abs) and Harold
Fritzgerald (Miller Lite).

Utility - Leland Levaruty
(Six Pack Abs); Anthony
Brown (Six Pack Abs), Ronald
Seymour (Micholette) and
John Wallace (Alco Raiders).

Note: Starters at each posi-
tion listed first

ROTTS Td O71
a AICTE eC

just call 302-2371 today!



lost the big points.”

Cartwright, however, feels that Canada
doesn’t belong in the American Zone and
should actually be playing in the World

Having earned a bye in the first day of
competition, Canada opened play with
their number two seed Stéphanie Dubois
drubbing Kerrie Cartwright 6-0, 6-0.

e¢ KERRIE CARTWRIGHT, of the Bahamas,
returns a shot from Canada’s Stephanie Dubois
during their Americas Zone Group | Federa-

SEE page 10

a
PLUME LC

Be

STEPHANIE DUBOIS returns a shot from Kerrie Cartwright...

Lakers-Celtics
rematch earns
big ratings
for TNT...

See page 10

Photos: Ryan Remiorz/AP



Choo Choo’ Mackey

has his fists set on
fight with Adamu

n By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sport Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

WITH the one-year suspen-
sion by the Bahamas Boxing
Commission lifted, First Class
Promotions is hoping to bounce
back in the ring with a British
Commonwealth super mid-
dleweight title fight for Jer-
maine “Choo Choo” Mackey.

Pending their ratification
from the commission, First
Class promoter Michelle Minus
said Mackey should have a
mandatory defense against
Charles Adamu of Ghana on
Saturday, May 23 at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium.

Adamu was the original
fighter that Mackey was set to
face, but after he suffered an
injury, First Class Promotions
brought in Michael Gbenga of
Ghana instead.

On July 19, 2008 at the
Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium,
Mackey went on to pull off a
unanimous 12-round decision
over Gbenga to win the British
Commonwealth title.

That was the last show pro-
moted by First Class before
they were shelved in Novem-
ber by the commission. On
Wednesday, the commission
hosted a press conference to
announce that the suspension
was lifted.

“We’re willing to move for-
ward to host the Adamu fight,”
Minus said. “If we don’t get
clearance, we will look at who-
ever wants to take the fight
internationally. We just have
to sit and wait.”

As a promotional company,
Minus said First Class really
didn’t feel that much of an



.

JERMAINE “CHOO CHOO” MACKEY

effect with the suspension
because they have been pro-
moting the Bahamian Idol and
they are getting ready to stage
the Kids Musical.

“We’ve been moving. It was
just the athletes who basically
suffered in all of this,” Minus
charged. “They could have
been doing a lot of other things,
but they have decided to stick

with the programme.”

Although they haven’t staged
a show since July, Minus said
Mackey also has to make a
mandatory defense of his Fede-
Caribe-WBA super mid-
dleweight title.

In a letter sent to First Class
from Dr Calvin Inalsingh, the
president of the FedeCaribe-
WBA, it was stated that while

Mackey won the title on June
22, 2007, he should have
defended it within six months
of winning it.

Inalsingh advised First Class
Promotions that Mackey will
be given the opportunity to
defend the title against any of
the FedeCaribe rated boxers
by February 28 or the title may
be declared vacant.

In response, Minus said they
have asked Inalsingh for a
month’s extension as they look
forward to traveling to Trinidad
& Tobago to fight Kirk “The
Technician” Sinnette, whom
Mackey won the title over in a
second round knockout.

Minus, however, said they
have already gotten some reac-
tion from the commission, who
indicated that as the champi-
on, Mackey should have fight
here as opposed to overseas.

But Minus said they were
leaning towards making the trip
as First Class was still under
suspension. But now that the
suspension has been lifted, she
said it’s still not possible to
have the fight staged here next
month.

“There’s just too much work
that we have to do,” she
claimed. “And looking at the
economic situation that we are
faced with, it will be harder to
pull it off in such a short time,
as opposed to going to Trinidad
& Tobago.”

Efforts to contact commis-
sion chairman Pat “The Cen-
treville Assassin” Strachan on
Friday for comments were
unsuccessful.

In the meantime, Minus said
they will also be looking at
Mackey defending his WBC’s
CABOFE and even the
Bahamas super middleweight
PAGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



‘BLAST FROM
THE

THESE were two of the outstanding female golfers who played on
the local scene. Can you identify any of them...

REMEMBER these two former junior players? ‘Blast From The Past’
takes you back to the days when these youngsters were starting to
make a name for themselves on the golf course. Can you identify

any of them?



Bahamas faces Brazil
rem ualae recom rIri cele



FROM page 10

tion Cup match Thursday in Montreal...

That was followed by Canada’s top
seed Aleksandra Wozniak knocking
off Bahamas’ No.2 seed Nikkita Foun-
tain 6-0, 6-2.

Then in the doubles, Dubois and
Sharon Fichman wrapped up the tie
with a sweep as they secured a 6-0, 6-0
win over Cartwright and Fountain.

While the rankings played a key fac-
tor, the Bahamians noted that they
both went out and played as hard as
they could under the circumstances,
playing before the Canadian home
crowd.

Wozniak is ranked No.32 in the Sony
Ericcson WTA Tour and Dubois is
No.118. None of the Bahamian players
are ranked on the tour.

Cartwright, ranked No.227 on the
ITF Junior Rankings, filled in for
Larikah Russell, who sat out the tie
with a shoulder injury she sustained in
the first round in the Bahamas’ 2-1 loss
to Puerto Rico.

For 16-year-old Cartwright, getting a
chance to play was “just amazing. I

Lakers-Celtics rematch earns big ratings for TNT

n By The Associated Press —___

THE NBA finals rematch between
Boston and the Los Angeles Lakers drew
the highest rating on TNT since a 1996
game featuring Michael Jordan and Mag-
ic Johnson during the height of the Chica-

go Bulls’ dynasty.

The Lakers’ 110-109 overtime victory
on Thursday night delivered a 2.7 US. rat-
ing and was watched by more than 4.3 mil-
lion viewers. It was the first meeting
between the rivals in Boston since the
Celtics beat the Lakers in Game 6 of last
year's finals for their 17th NBA champi-
onship. It was the most-watched regular-
season game on TNT since Feb. 2, 1996,

when the eventual champion Bulls beat
Johnson's Lakers, 99-84.

The game also drew the most viewers
for a game on cable since Christmas 2004,
when ESPN televised the first game
between Indiana and Detroit since the
brawl between Pacers players and Pistons
fans earlier that season. TNT is up 23 per-
cent in total viewers from the same point

Lakers snap another
Celtics streak with
overtime victory

n By JIMMY GOLEN

BOSTON (AP) — Losing to
the Los Angeles Lakers is bad
enough for Boston. What the
Celtics can't afford is another
tailspin.

Pau Gasol scored 24 points
with 14 rebounds, and Lamar
Odom hit a pair of free throws
with 16 seconds left in over-
time Thursday night to lead the
Lakers to a 110-109 victory
over Boston that ended the
Celtics’ winning streak at 12
games.

Los Angeles also snapped
Boston's 19-game streak on
Christmas Day, a loss that
started the Celtics on a 2-7 skid.

"These games are tough, and
they're emotional games and
then you play the next night,”
said Celtics coach Doc Rivers,
whose team plays the New
York Knicks on Friday night.
"We'll try to muster it up and
see what we have."

In a rematch of an NBA
finals in which the Celtics out-
muscled the Lakers to the title,
Los Angeles held on with phys-
ical defense against Paul Pierce
and Allen that prevented either
All-Star from getting off a
clean shot after Odom's free
throws. The Lakers will take a
five-game winning streak into
Sunday's game against Cleve-
land.

"T wish we would have come
here last year with this kind of
attitude,” Gasol said. "Nobody
backed down. We were as
physical as anybody.”

The Celtics fell to 0-2 against
the Lakers and trail L.A. by
percentage points for the best
overall record in the NBA;
Boston would lose a tiebreaker
for home court advantage in
the finals — if they both make
it back.

"It would be great,” Pierce
said.

Kevin Garnett banged his fist
on the table in agreement, and
then interjected a reminder
that seemed to be intended for
the locker room across the hall:
"We're the champs, man."

In the only other NBA
games Thursday night,
Philadelphia beat Indiana 99-
94, and Utah routed Dallas
115-87.

It was the Lakers’ first visit
to Boston since a 131-92
embarrassment in Game 6 of
the NBA finals that clinched
the Celtics’ unprecedented 17th

ia



KOBE BRYANT (24) points to Celtics guard Rajon Rondo (9) after a foul in the second half of Thursday’s game
in Boston. At right holding Rondo is Celtics guard Ray Allen...

league championship. L.A. got
a small measure of revenge on
Christmas, but even then
Boston played a more physical
game.

"Coming down the streets,
staying at the same hotel, I was
up last night thinking about the
game — wondering how my
teammates would respond. It
all came back," said Kobe
Bryant, who had 26 and 10
rebounds. "Enough is enough.
We were able to match their
physical play.”

Pierce scored 21, and Allen
had 22, but they both missed
off-balance shots in the final
seconds. Allen was knocked to
the court at the buzzer while
Boston fans clamored for a foul
call, but none came.

Rajon Rondo had 16 points
and 12 assists for Boston.

There were two double-tech-
nicals — one of them after
Bryant and Rondo were push-
ing and finger-pointing in the
third — and enough shoving to
pass for a playoff game, but
both teams were tired when it
ended. Garnett, who missed
the previous two games with
the flu, scored 16 points before
fouling out with 4:22 left in the
fourth quarter.

Bryant, who scored 61 and

36 in his previous two games,
hit three 3-pointers in the
fourth quarter, the last with
1:30 left in regulation and
Pierce in his face to make it
101-100 — the Lakers’ first
lead of the half. But after
Pierce made one of two free
throws with 30 seconds left,
Bryant tried to shoot over
Pierce again and banged it off
the rim.

After a timeout with 7.7 sec-
onds left, Pierce dribbled the
clock down before Bryant
poked the ball away. Eddie
House got it and put up a side-
ways, one-handed 3-point
attempt at the buzzer that was-
n't close.

Bryant missed his last five
shots of the game.

Gasol made one of two free
throws to give the Lakers a
108-107 lead with 1:11 left, then
Glen "Big Baby" Davis made a
jumper — his only basket of
the game after six misses. Kobe
missed over Pierce, then Davis
missed again and fouled Odom,
who sank both free throws.

The Celtics got the ball to
Pierce, but his shot was off.
Rondo got the rebound and
drew a foul, but it wasn't a
shooting foul. The inbounds
pass made it to Allen, but he

(AP Photo: Charles Krupa)

was out of position and never
got a good look.

76ers 99, Pacers 94

At Philadelphia, Samuel
Dalembert had 18 points and
20 rebounds, and Andre Miller
and Andre Iguodala also had
double-doubles to lead the
76ers.

The Sixers won only hours
after they learned power for-
ward Elton Brand needed sea-
son-ending surgery on his right
shoulder. Miller had 13 points
and 12 assists, while Iguodala
had 20 points and 11 assists to
help the Sixers snap a two-
game losing streak.

Mike Dunleavy scored 21
points as Indiana dropped its
third straight.

Jazz 115, Mavericks 87

At Salt Lake City, Deron
Williams shook off a deep thigh
bruise and scored 34 points and
handed out 12 assists to lead
Utah . Kyle Korver scored a
season-high 20 points in his first
start of the season to power the
Jazz to their third win in four
games.

Josh Howard had 18 points
for Dallas, which had its four-

think it was a good opportunity. I had
a good time on the court.”

Cartwright admitted that the Cana-
dians were tough to beat, but she said
she gained a lot of valuable experience
that she hopes to put to good use as she
attempts to get to their level.

“They hit the ball very hard,” she
reflected.

As they look ahead to their match
against Brazil, Cartwright said she’s
unaware of how (Brazil) they play,
“but we know that Canada was the
best. They blew us off the court, so we
hope to bounce back and beat Brazil.”

Both teams head into the match win-
less in their two round robin matches
and according to coach Cartwright,
“we have a good chance to win this
match.

“They told us that two teams at the
end of the tournament will be relegat-
ed to zone IT next year, so we’re hoping
that we can win and keep our hopes
alive.”

The tournament will wrap up today
with Canada and Colombia, both unde-
feated at 2-0, playing against each oth-



er to determine who will get achance CANADA’S Aleksandra Wozniak serves to Nikkita Fountain, of the Bahamas, during their Federation match Thursday in Montreal...

to play in the World Group II qualify-

(AP Photo: Ryan Remiarz)
PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





thescene



by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP



NASSAU EVENTS

CAPTURED ON CAMERA





FROM LEFT: Joyann Archer, Leroy Archer, president of Bahamas Commonwealth Brewery and the Burns House Group of Companies and a major
sponsor of the ball; and Kim Sawyer, director general of the Red Cross.



Lah a?

WILLIAM MILLS, senior manager at JS Johnson Insurance Company; Wendy Mills, senior
trust manager, ATC Trustees (Bahamas) Limited; Mavis Burrows, assistant vice president of

operations, Commonwealth Bank; Everette EK Burrows, retired banker.

EDITH GREEN-
SANDS, risk
and control
manager for the
Bahamas and
Turks and
Caicos at First
Caribbean Inter-
national Bank;
and her hus-
band, Charles
Sands, parts
manager at
Tyreflex Star
Motors.

YVETTE SANDS,
assistant vice
president of
quality and
external affairs
at Bacardi Com-
pany Limited;
and her hus-
band, Charles V
Sands III, coun-
try manager for
Insurance Com-
pany of the
West Indies
(ICWI).

NURSE VAL
RICHARDS who
performs with
the Soulful
Groovers and
her sister,
Patrice Smith,
bookkeeper at
Aquapure Water
Limited.











| " = | - hi u i
RED CROSS BALL Committee members: Kyron
Strachan, executive vice president of Arawak Homes
Limited; Deveral Ferguson, executive financial ser-
vices representative at Colina Imperial; and Nikki
Boeuf, retail unit business manageress at Bahamas
Commonwealth Brewery and the Burns House
Group of Companies.



MARILYN CAM-
BRIDGE, senior
vice president of
administration,
Pictet Bank and
Trust; and hus-
band, Earnest
Cambridge, vice
president of VIP
service at
Atlantis Resort.
Both companies
were major
sponsors of the
ball.

JANETTE
SMITH, director
of member ser-
vices at the
Lyford Cay
Club; Marilyn
Meeres, deputy
registrar of the
Supreme Court
and former
magistrate.

ENJOYING the
music of the
Lou Adams
Orchestra are
accountant Van
Diah and busi-
nesswoman
Mae Morton-
Curry.

An enchanted evening at the

RED BALL

IT WAS indeed “An Enchanted Evening” as guests enjoyed the 37th
Annual Red Cross Ball held at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino on Saturday, January 31, 2009.

Attendees were treated to a delicious dinner, including a salad comprised
of crisp gourmet greens with cucumber, tomatoes, olives and julienne of
carrots, pink grapefruit topped with a spicy pecan nut and passion fruit
vinaigrette; a soup of tomato and wild basil bisque topped with quenelle
of cream; and mango sorbet with fresh mint leaf.

The entrée included a tenderloin of beef forestiere laced with wild
mushroom reduction, roasted Atlantic salmon with a champagne drizzle,
a julienne of vegetables, asparagus, Irish and sweet whipped garlic pota-
toes. For dessert, the guests enjoyed chocolate and mint mousse presented
ona short bread biscuit served with raspberry coulee and fresh berries.

During the cocktail reception, guests were entertained by the Royal
Bahamas Police Force Pop Band. The Lou Adams Orchestra performed dur-
ing the dinner.

While dessert was being served, the world-famous American group The
Manhattans provided entertainment. The popular Bahamian band Visage
entertained for the duration of the evening and into the early morning.

The ball was held in a beautifully decorated Crystal Ball Room courtesy
of Florarama, which is owned by Manita Wisdom, wife of former PLP cab-
inet minister Neville Wisdom.

The table favours — all Bahamian organic botanical products — were pro-
duced by Dr Wendy Stuart.

The ladies also spiced up the festive atmosphere with an array of ele-
gant attire.

The top in-house prize was won by Wendy Mills.

The Guest of Honour was Dorothy Hepburn-King, a former deputy
director general of the Red Cross, who retired in June, 2008 after 42 years
of dedicated service.

Also in attendance were Governor General Arthur D Hanna; Dame Mar-
guerite Pindling and Lady Darling.

The new Director General of the Red Cross is Kim Sawyer, a former
social worker who attained the rank of assistant director in the Department
of Social Services before leaving to head the Red Cross.

Lady Finlayson is the chairperson of the 2009 Red Cross Ball Committee
and also head of fundraising for the Bahamas Red Cross Society.

Gerald Sawyer is president of the Red Cross.

The event was held under the patronage of Governor General Arthur D
Hanna .

Platinum Sponsors for the ball were: Pictet Bank and Trust, Bahamas
Commonwealth Brewery, the Burns House Group of Companies, Bahamas
Telecommunications Company, FML Webshop, Scotiabank Bahamas
Limited, Cable Bahamas Limited, La Rose Boutique, Kerzner Internation-
al Bahamas Limited, Commonwealth Bank, Percy’s Web Café and the Cen-
tral Bank of the Bahamas.

American Airlines was the official Airline for the Red cross ball for the
fourth consecutive year.



GERALD SAWYER SR, president of the Bahamas Red Cross Society;
Kim Sawyer, director general of the Bahamas Red Cross Society;
Wendy Mills, winner of the top prize at the 37th annual Red Cross Ball:
and Lady Rowena Finlayson, chairperson of the Red Cross Ball Com-
mittee. The top prize consisted of two airline tickets to Europe donated
by American Airlines, a gift basket donated by the Perfume Bar and a
pair of gold earrings donated by Crown Jewellers.



CRAIG S MORSE, president of Distinctive Escapes, Luxury Travel Con-
sultants; Lady Rowena Finlayson, chairperson of the 2009 Red Cross
Ball Committee and head of fundraising for the Bahamas Red Cross;
Jorge Valls, vice president of luxury travel consultants Distinctive
Escapes.








PAGE 1

N N A A S S S S A A U U A A N N D D B B A A H H A A M M A A I I S S L L A A N N D D S S L L E E A A D D I I N N G G N N E E W W S S P P A A P P E E R R C M Y K C M Y K Volume: 105 No.63SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009PRICE – 75 WEATHER CLOUDY ANDWINDY HIGH 76F LOW 66F n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A SHOOT-OUT at the end of a high-speed car chase through Nassau resulted in the arrest of two men and the injury of one person, according to reports. Police had been chasing a white Lexus with heavily tinted windows from Tedder Street, Palmdale, for over an hour before the pursuit ended in a hail of gunfire outside the Royal Nassau Sailing Club and Montagu ramp just after 8pm on Thursday. Shots were fired at police by occupants of the car before officers returned fire, police say. People living nearby described the gun battle as terrifying. Two men aged 20 and 26 were arrested and taken into custody. They are expected to appear in Magistrate’s Court onMonday. Reports on ZNS news claimed last night there was a third occupant in the vehicle who was injured in the shooting, but police press liaison officer Walter Evans was unable to confirm this before The Tribune went to press. It has also been reported that a woman in the Lexus fled the scene. The Lexus and a police motorbike were damaged when more than a dozen gunshots were fired. One resident said: “There was a single shot followed by a burst of gunfire from weapons of varied calibre probably two dozen rounds in all. The gunfight lasted for at least 30 sec onds.” Motorists in East Bay Street were frightened into diversion as police cars sped by and a rapid succession of bullets were fired in the street only metres away. Back-up police patrols converged on the scene from all directions. The dramatic shooting The Tribune ANYTIME ... ANYPLACE , WE RE #1 B AHAMASEDITION FRUIT & NUT McFLURRY Two men expected in court after shootout The Bahamas set for ‘world first’ tourism concept n By ALISON LOWE Tribune Staff Reporter alowe@tribunemedia.net GRAND Bahama is set to be the launching ground for a “world first” tourism concept intended to boost tourism arrivals and revenue, according to Ministry of Tourism officials. Talks are underway in the hope of eventually turning the destination into an “all inclusive island” where visitors can have a “Club Med” style holiday treating them to unrestricted access to a plethora of hotels, restaurants and activities across the island for one prepaid price. The ministry’s aim is to encourage a broader visitor experience and wider sharing of their cash throughout the tourism sector two of the key objectives identified by Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace, in his speech unveiling the new direction for Bahamian tourism last year. If successful the package option, initially incorporating properties around Lucaya, will be expanded to invite more hotels, restaurants and tourism dependent businesses across Grand Bahama, eventually getting rolled out in New Providence and the Family Islands. The ministry will start selling the Grand Bahama packBid to boost visitor arrivals and revenue Minister of Tourism Vincent Vanderpool Wallace SEE page six REVVING UP IN RETIREMENT n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net NO LONGERconfined to the rigours of a regular job, one man says developing his lifelong hobby of rebuilding motor-cycles has made his golden years the best part of his life. Retired chauffeur Mike Burrows is the owner of nearly a dozen high-performance motor-bikes, one of which he designed and claims as an original. Stretching nearly nine feet in length, the twin-engine Triumph bike is the pride of his vintage fleet. The machine, built in less than six months, includes an altered frame from New Jersey, double Triumph engines, two transmissions and oil tanks, and elongated handle bars. Mr Burrows explained that, although he has never tested his creation’s top speed, in the right conditions it can reach speeds in excess of 240 mph. “Everything is English, the frame and the engines. It’s like a stretch Harley-Davidson, only better. However, I still have more work to do on it.” By installing another fuel tank, Mr Bur rows said he hopes to create a smoother and sleeker bike. Honing his talent for more than 42 years, Mr Burrows said he would not be surprised if in another 42 years he’s doing the same thing. Along with his wife Gloria an author and world traveller who helped him build his first bike Mr Burrows said “retirement is a wonderful experience once you plan for it.” Also in his collection are a vintage 1967 650 BSA bike, a 1988 Harley-Davidson 1200, a 1974 Harley-Davidson 1000, and a 1968 RETIRED CHAUFFEUR Mike Burrows with two of his custom-built bikes. T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f SEE page six n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter tthompson@tribunemedia.net ALTHOUGH one man was arraigned on formal charges for the arson of the home of a senior customs officer, investigations into the incident are still continuing with more arrests likely, police said yesterday. "We were able to charge one person (and who we more than likely, once the inquiry is completed, will put before the courts again. It (the case open, there are still persons who we are looking at," head of CDU Chief Supt Glenn Miller said yes terday. CSP Miller said recently three men, including a well-known businessman, were arrested by police for questioning in connection with the November fire at Roslyn Ritchie's home but released pending further inquiries. Ms Ritchie a senior customs officer who was part of a task force which roots out corruption and prevents tax fraud lost her 10-room home in Sea Link Drive, off East Street South, in a suspicious fire on November 26. It was suspected that the arson attack was related to Mrs Ritchie’s role in a customs task force charged with weeding out customs fraudsters. Last month, Clive Kent Schroeter, 37, of Lady Slipper Avenue, was charged in Magistrate's Court in connection with that fire. According to court dockets Schroeter, while being concerned with others, intentionally caused the home of Philip and Roslyn Ritchie to be set on fire. One man ar r aigned, more arrests likely over arson attack on customs officer’s home n By LLOYD ALLEN Tribune Staff Reporter lallen@tribunemedia.net THE recent spate of suicides could be a sign of an even more serious problem, which one psychologist says could lead to unem ployed Bahamian men killing their whole families. Psychologist Dr David Allen said that during the recession in the late 1980s, major cities in the United States experienced a significant number of cases of the type of murder-suicide known as “famili cide.” Familicide involves the killing of two or more family members by another member of that family. In 2007, the San Francisco Chronicle interviewed Phillip Resnick, a professor of psychiatry at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, who has studied parents who killed their children. Suicides could be sign of ‘even more serious problem’ n By NATARIO McKENZIE Tribune Staff Reporter THE husband of a woman who reportedly went missing nearly a month ago fears that she may be in serious danger. Leslie Lindley told The Tribune yesterday that his wife of 19 years Brenda Roker, 37, was last seen on January 9. Mr Lindley (formerly Roker said that he and his son had gone on an overnight fishing trip only to return and discover that his wife was no longer at their Golden Isles Road residence. SEE page six Husband fears for his missing wife SEE page six Brenda Roker SEE page six A thir d occupant of car in high-speedc hase is r epor tedl y injur ed

PAGE 2

n B y ALEX MISSICK Tribune Staff Reporter RESIDENTS of the southw estern part of New Provid ence are concerned that the dilapidated buildings on the South Ocean property are being used as a hide-out by criminals in the area. R onald Lloyd, who has lived in the area for 19 years, said he has been a victim of these criminals and wants the owners of the property andt he government to do something about it. “The new owner of the buildings closed everythingd own, had a meeting with the neighbourhood telling the r esidents that he was going to take down all the buildings and put new buildings there.H is people then went and took out all the windows and d oors and left the buildings, that are now an eyesore, to harbour crime. People hide in those buildings, the bush has grown u p and it’s an easy place to hide things,” he said. Mr Lloyd claimed there is n o security to patrol the grounds or the area. “I saw a new face just as l ate as Sunday behind the fence of South Ocean’s main building snooping around. They stole my nine-year-old’s bicycle, my $3,000-52” incht elevision, desks, my Sunday watch, DVDs and so many other things. The police have not done a proper job in this area if you ask me. It hasb een like this for almost four years now and the criminals feel that just because the buildings are abandoned theyc an do all they want,” he said. Mr Lloyd said before the o wners discontinued the upkeep of the property, S outh Ocean was a lovely place. “I chose to live way out h ere because it was so nice, quiet and beautiful. Now the p lace is a mess and causing the property value in this area to go down some-t hing has to be done,” Mr Lloyd said. Project coordinator for the N ew South Ocean Club Development Company Burton Rodgers told The Tribune thatthe burglaries were not brought to his attention,b ut that his company is going to try and work with the residents to rectify the problem. “We have security officers on the compound in the daya nd at night. The buildings are going to come down, although we have not started as yet. If the residents seea ny suspicious activity they should give us a call. I will make sure that security isi ncreased within the next 48 hours,” Mr Rodgers said. P olice from the Lyford Cay station said the last house break-in they can recall fort he South Ocean area happened about two months ago. THE faculty members of the School of Social Sciences at the College of the Bahamas have completed a research paper analysing the part civil society has played in the crafting of government policies regarding development. In “Challenges of Development and Sustainability in the Bahamas: the Role of Civil Society”, associate sociology professor Jessica Minnis and assistant psychology professor Yvette Pintard-Newry investigated the case of Clifton Cay, the proposed gated community that stirred much controversy in the late 1990s and early 2000. They explored how civil soci ety impacted the governmen t’s eventual rejection of the investor’s proposal for the project on 554 acres of the historically and archaeologically rich land in western New Providence. The study, which was started after a call was made for papers for the University of Prince Edward Island‘s Island Heritage Management Confer ence in Canada, took the pair six months to complete. The professors started in April, 2008 and finished in September of that year, just in time for the conference held in the following month. The pair shared their findings at the College of the Bahamas’ first Research EdgeF orum for the year held in Janu ary. Research Edge is a lec ture series held once a month where faculty and students share presentations on matters of national and scholarly interest. According to Ms PintardN ewry, who researched the the oretical aspect of civil society while Ms Minnis researched the specifics of the Clifton Cay case, the role of civil society is important because it increases the empowerment of citizens. “The World Bank and its shareholders recognise the critical role that civil society plays in helping to reduce poverty and promote sustainable development. And the World Bank’s projects focus on the capacity of the civil society for the empow erment of citizens living within the country,” Ms PintardNewry said at the Research Edge Forum. “For small states, there is a unique challenge with regards to their insularity and size. Many small island states share a common colonial heritage and for these island states, including the Bahamas, civil society has been instrumental,” she added. The college faculty members specifically examined the “Coalition to Save Clifton” made up of civic and social groups, activists and individuals who were vehemently opposed to the development. The researchers found that this particular coalition model was instrumental in its influence on the eventual outcome. “Clifton was a unique case because it involved about 500p lus acres of land at the [weste rn] end of the island and peo ple saw this as the last area that Bahamians in the community had in terms of beach access,” Minnis said in a later interview. “What we wanted to highlight is that civil society wass uccessful, civil society can bring about change and that civil society was successful in the form of the coalition,” she added. The researchers found that the Clifton coalition followed the Advocacy Coalition Frame work which suggests that “stakeholders are motivated within a coalition by a core belief system that holds the coalition together and it is the core belief that the coalition wants to see as a policy.” “In the case of Clifton, you see a variety of governmental organisations, private organisations and individuals [lobbying] to shift government policy away from the idea of a gated community for something more meaningful, lasting and sustainable in the Bahamian context,” Ms Pintard-Newry said. According to the paper, the Advocacy Coalition Frame work looks at policy oriented learning which is learning and teaching within the various groups in the coalition. “The idea of [policy] learning is having the transfer of beliefs and the transfer of knowledge from one group to the next to the point where it is a consis tent, sustainable thought [and] continues over the lifespan of the group as well as the lifes pan of the issue,” Ms PintardN ewry said. T he Clifton Cay investors wanted to create a $400 million dollar luxury community which would have included marinas and canals. According to the research, archaeological excavation exer c ises at Clifton in 1996 and 1998 undertaken by two archaeologists led to the discovery of a site that housed three eras of Bahamian history. Ms Minnis said the paper has been resubmitted to the University of Prince Edward Island for publication and if selected, will be included in the Island Heritage Management Conference’s proceedings document. Research will be one of the primary thrusts of the antici pated University of the Bahamas, the mission of which will be to help support and drive national development. ON FEBRUARY13 the US Embassy will announce the 2009 Martin Luther King Essay Competition winners in a reception to be held at the British Colonial Hilton Hotel. The event, which will begin at 4pm, marks the third consecutive year the embassy has offered the competition, open to students in grades 10 through 12 in both public and private schools in New Providence and the Family Islands. On January 19 the United States observed a national hol iday celebrating the life and legacy of the Reverend Dr Martin Luther King Jr. A civil rights activist, Dr King championed the principle of human dignity in his native United States and around the world. The essay competition was launched in honour of Dr King’s memory, and in an effort to strengthen public understanding of his life’s impact not only in the United States, but also in the Bahamas. Applying their knowledge and understanding of Dr King’s teachings and philosophy, stu dents were asked to respond to the question: Does the swearing in of Barack Obama as the first African-American president of the United States of America mean that Dr King’s dream has been realised in the US? The embassy said it is “pleased to note that this year, the response has been overwhelming. We have received 105 essays from 11 New Provi dence schools and seven schools in the Family Islands.” This year, two first place win ners will be selected – one from New Providence and one from the Family Islands. Each winner will be presented with a laptop computer which has been donated by the d’Albenas Agency Limited and the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce. Bahamasair has also donated round trip tickets so the Family Island winner and a parent can attend the reception on February 13. The 2nd, 3rd, and 4th placed winners will be awarded books and other materials on Dr Martin Luther King. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 2, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE INDEX MAIN/SPOR TS SECTION Local News................................P1,2,3,5,6,12 Editorial/Letters. .........................................P4 Advt ........................................................... P7 Comics........................................................P8 Sports ....................................................P9,10 W ether ...................................................... P11 CLASSIFIED SECTION 16 P AGES USA TODAY WEEKENDER 8 PAGES US Embassy Martin Luther King Essay Competition College researchers explore the role of civil society Dilapidated buildings ‘could be used as criminal hide-outs’ Residents in South Ocean area concerned T i m C l a r k e / T r i b u n e s t a f f S OUTH OCEAN r esident of 19 years Ronald Lloyd says he has been a victim of crime.

PAGE 3

n B y PAUL G TURNQUEST T ribune Staff Reporter pturnquest@tribunemedia.net ARGUING that Senator J erome Fitzgerald is not their choice for the Marathon constituency in the next general elect ion, a group of PLPs has formed a committee to persuade the powers that be in the party to nominate Neil Percentie to vie for the post. T he committee, aptly named the Committee to Elect Neil Per-c entie for Marathon, has reportedly formalised a 12-point plan t o raise the former Marathon branch chairman’s profile and propel him into the political arena. According to Delmaro Duncombe, the chairman of the committee, Mr Percentie is the best candidate for the area, as he was born and raised” in Marathon. “Neil, has led a number of community efforts to bring thec ommunity together, advance it from where it was many yearsa go, and to also encourage the y outh of the community to grow a nd become good representatives o f the country,” he said. Mr Duncombe said that in his e stimation, the majority of persons who live in the area are 100 p er cent behind the committee’s efforts. With all due respect to Mr Fitzgerald, he hasn’t put in the e ffort or done the amount of work that Percentie has done. Percentie was there when Ron Pinder was the actual candidatef or the area. And Mr Percentie was integral to Mr Pinder’s winning his candidacy forM arathon. “So we believe that the natural p rogression should allow for the t orch to be passed on to Perc entie. Because, again, with all d ue respect to Mr Fitzgerald, we know he has done a number of t hings as well, but he hasn’t impacted the community in the w ay I feel Mr Pinder has done in the past and now Mr Percentie isd oing,” he said. When contacted yesterday, Mr P ercentie confirmed that he is interested in running for the Marathon seat, stating that persons have been encouraging himf or “some time now” to enter the political fray. A young businessman who o wns his own brokerage firm, a car rental business and a localb ar, Mr Percentie said that he and t he community of Marathon are o n “very familiar” terms, as h e has lived there for the past 32 years. Mr Fitzgerald has started to hold branch meetings in the areaa lready, but Mr Percentie is quite confident that he retains a “substantial level” of support. The young persons around his main support area who havea ctually been supporting me a re only waiting for me to form ally announce that I am runn ing,” he said. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3 THE Central Bank of the Bahamas will be releasing a new version of the one cent coin that will look identical to the existing coin except for its size and weight. Last modified in 2006, the new penny will be reduced from 19.05 millimeters to 17. Retaining its composition of copper plated zinc, steel, and nickel, the new coinage will weight about .80 grammes less than the present one. The Central Bank said this change is a part of a continuation of a commitment to the Counterfeit Resistant Integrat-ed Security Product (CRISP In December, the Central Bank issued a $1 bill with enhanced security features, and in recent months modified the $5, $10, and $50 notes. On September 3, 2007, a newly designed ten cent coin was also issued. This coin rep resents the second denomination in the family of Bahamas circulation coins to be redesigned, following the release of the updated one cent coin in 2006. As part of its public education initiatives, the Central Bank has available and has dis tributed to banks and other cash handlers, flyers and posters which describe the new security features of the new notes. P OLICE confiscated drugs with a street value of $200,000 and took six people into custody during a stop and search exercise yesterday. T his comes just days after police seized $3.75 million worth of cocaine in Freeport and $100,000 worth of marijuana in Andros. D rug Enforcement Unit officers stopped a burgundy Honda Accord occupied by four men and one woman and a silver Nissan Altima with one male passenger on South Ocean road shortly after midnighton Friday. Upon searching the Nissan, officers found nine bails of marijuana, w ith a total weight of more than 196 pounds. Two of the men arrested are Andros residents, and while the others r eside on New Providence. n By DENISE MAYCOCK Tribune Freeport Reporter dmaycock@tribunemedia.net FREEPORT – Three women – an Urban Renewal officer, a teacher, anda teenager – were arraigned in Freeport Magistrates Court on fraudc harges yesterday. Urban Renewal assistant co-ordinator Dr Betsy Russell, 50, of Braemer Drive; Teacher Vhanyti Reckley, 22, of Braemer Drive; and Katisha Knowles,1 9, of Albacore Drive were escorted by police to the Garnet Levarity Justice C entre for arraignment. The women were charged with fraud by false pretenses. I t is alleged that on January 19, the accused, being concerned together with intent to defraud, obtained $4,000 cash from Commonwealth Bank by means of false pretenses. D r Russell and Vhanyti Reckley were further charged with obtaining $5,000 cash from Commonwealth Bank by means of false pretenses. The women pleaded not guilty to the charges. They were each granted $ 5,000 bail with one surety. The matter was adjourned to June 1 6. New one cent coin to be released In brief Drugs worth $200,000 confiscated by police Group of PLPs wants Neil Percentie for Marathon Three in court on fraud charges Dr Betsy Russell Vhanyti Reckley Katisha Knowles In other court matters, a 16-yearold boy was charged with three countso f causing grievous harm in connection after a stabbing incident in the Hawksbill community. Following his arraignment the accused, a resident of Inagua Place, was remanded to the Diah Ward forp sychological evaluation. The case was adjourned to March 12 when he will appear before a Juvenile Panel.

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EDITOR, The Tribune. I WILLbe grateful if you would please give me a little space in your column to voice the concerns of the residents of Mayaguana in respect to Bahamasair in particular; and thank you for your kind consideration. The matter in question is the way that our National Flag Carrier treats the people of Mayaguana with utter contempt as though we are not entitled to the basic courtesies or consideration given to other islands or destinations. I believe everyone will agree that the island of Mayaguana, is one of the most remote in the chain of Bahamas islands; due mainly to the policies or lack thereof, of successive governments over the years. Notwithstanding certain economic consideration; as a public entity, Bahamasair, is expected to treat all of the islands with the same regard. However, person or persons in New Providence seem to have adopted the attitude that Mayaguana, as a destination is of no significance and treats its residents accordingly. Editor, you may find it hard to believe that Bahamasair has been leaving considerable numbers of Mayaguana passengers, travelling to and from New Providence, with confirmed reservations and ticket in hand, often without so much as an apology in order to accommodate passengers trav elling to and from our neighbouring island in the south. Imagine a 50-seat aircraft servicing two destinations and 48 to 50 seats are reserved for one destination? Something has to be wrong with that picture. I am told that persons in Bahamasair claimed that the problem is that Mayaguanians don’t make their reservations. Nothing could be further from the truth. The truth of the matter is Mayaguanians mainlyh ave to rely on making reservations during one of the three flight days; there is no com puter connection with Bahamasair reservations and the agent often tries unsuccessfully to make reservations for people. I am not talking only of other people’s experience, I have encountered the same thing myself. I was scheduled to travel from New Providence, just recently, was checked in and at the gate the agent advised us that they could take only two of seven passengers for Mayaguana, because the plane was going to Inagua first then to Mayaguana; and Inagua had 48 passengers travelling to New Providence. I was told then that they had hoped to get persons responsible to have the plane stop in Mayaguana first, in order to take all of the passengers for Mayaguana, but those responsible, insisted that they were going to Inagua first; resulting in the aircraft departing with a number of empty seats; leaving five passengers stranded. As I write this letter, I have requested a reservation to travel to New Providence and the agent advised me that the reservation could not be made, because he no longer had the ability to make a long distance call on his phone. So pray tell, how in God’s name are we to make reserva tions in a timely manner? Just this past week, Bahamasair, caused a seminar which wass cheduled for Mayaguana and would have been of tremendous value to the island had to be cancelled. Why? Because Bahamasair decided that they were sending two planes toI nagua and would not be transp orting any passengers to Mayaguana on Monday (26/1/09 sion by someone who inter vened, resulted in them bringing some passengers who had shown up at the airport any w ay. However, a number of other persons who had already been advised that they could not get a seat did not bother to even go back to the airport. There have also been instances when reservations were made and confirmed for persons travelling from Mayaguana and they discovered upon arrival at the airport, their names were not on the manifest with confirmed reservations and often have to return home. Mayaguanians have been suffering under these conditions for a number of years, but of late it has been getting worse. To start with we have been suffering from a most degrading condition at our airport which makes me feel ashamed when visitors arrive in Mayaguana, and on top of that we are treated with disdain by our flag carrier. I could relate so many other instances when travellers to and from as well as the destination of Mayaguana in general, had been treated in like fashion. However, I believe the situations stated should be sufficient for those responsible to note that Mayaguanians are becoming very frustrated and would not endure this kind of treatment any longer. The only time we are able to get any significant number of seats is during the period when we share a flight with Exuma. For God’s sake would the responsible person or persons in Bahamasair please look into and remedy this situation HUEL A WILLIAMSON General Delivery, Pirates Well, Mayaguana, Bahamas, January 28, 2009. C M Y K C M Y K EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR PAGE 4, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE The Tribune Limited NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master L EON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914 S IR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G., (Hon. P ublisher/Editor 1919-1972 Contributing Editor 1972-1991 EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B. P ublisher/Editor 1972Published Daily Monday to Saturday S hirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama T ELEPHONES Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising Advertising Manager (242 C irculation Department (242 N assau Fax: (242 Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242 F reeport fax: (242 Democrats exploiting economic crisis WASHINGTON “Congress is like a whiskey drinker,” President Lyndon Johnson once observed. “You can put an awful lot of whiskey into a man if you just let him sip it,” he said. “But if you try to force the whole bottle down his throat at one time, he’ll throw it up.” The 36th president and former Senate majority leader was referring to Congress’s ability to produce legislative outcomes too much activity inebriates the system. Congressional Democrats learned the hard way this week as the bloated economic stimulus bill stalled in the Senate. Moderation in all things including the speed with which they grow the federal government is a virtue. The problem is House Democrats just didn’t have the temperance toj ust say no. T hat lack of self-restraint is now producing political headaches. After eight years of bumping heads with a Republican president, many liberals in Con gress believe voters just gave them the keys to the spending liquor cabinet. There is so much pent-up demand for funding new projects,D emocrats run the risk of ignoring President Johnson’s admonition, creating a fiscal and political mess. The current economic crisis may demand speedy action, but it’s not a mandate for irresponsible spending. The bill the Senate is considering calls for $65 billion more than the House-passed version, at a time when scepticism about the stimulus plan is growing. Polling by both Gallup and Rasmussen has demonstrated a sharp drop in support for the legislation in the last several days as more and more stories about its content hit the light of day. Democrats may equate a mandate for change with a license to spend, but in doing so they could quickly alienate fickle independent voters. House Democrats see the stars aligned for a generational expansion of the federal government. Writing in National Journal last week, Ron Brownstein quotes a Democratic staffer who tells the unvarnished truth: “This is a once-ina-25-year opportunity to ‘implement’ a lot of our agenda.” That’s probably correct. But they need to slow down and look to President Obama to serve as the designated driver. Republicans understand the House bill looks more like a Trojan horse for a liberal spending agenda than an economic stimulus bill. They were ebullient following last week’s vote, when all GOP members voted no. “It was the most unifying vote in several years,” one Republican lawmaker told me. “The outpouring of support Members received from their districts after the vote and over the weekend was gratifying,” a House leadership aide added. Many indicated they heard from constituents saying the vote restored their confidence in the Republican Party. The key to the unity, according to several members of the House GOP leadership, was not only the Democrats’ excess, but a positive Republican alternative. As Republican leader John Boehner said on the House floor, “ our proposal will create 6.2 million jobs over the next two years, about twice as many as the (Democratic) bill and at about half the costs.” Twice the jobs at half the cost! Why in the w orld wouldn’t Congress want to pursue that a pproach? That’s what makes people so angry about Washington. It sounds like the fleecing of America continues as the House Democrats use the economic meltdown to inaugurate New Deal 2.0 with the next generation’s money. B ut the spending revelry looks like it will be tamped down in the Senate. How the bill moves ahead is unclear, but one thing is cer tain the price tag will be reduced. Maybe this was all part of a grand plan. The House serves up what looks like a supersized liberal Happy Meal and then lets Pres ident Obama work with the Senate to drink the Slim-Fast shake. Perhaps. But it appears the House won’t go on a diet without a fight. Finishing the legislation by next Friday when Congress is scheduled to begin a weeklong district work period will prove challenging. Over the next 10 days Obama has a chance to help reshape some of the excesses in the legislation. He even has a chance to win more Republican support. But he’ll have to reign in the appetites of some big-spending House members to pull that off. Maybe the White House needs to remind congressional Democrats they have at least four years not four weeks to expand the size and scope of government. But outside of Washington, I get the sense Americans are growing angry about being taken as suckers again, as Democrats in Congress use an economic crisis to promote a political agenda. Big gov ernment liberals are ready to party, but they should spend in sips, rather than gulps, lest voters take away the keys to the liquor cabi net. (This article was written by Gary Andres c. 2009 Hearst Newspapers). Bahamasair and the people of Mayaguana LETTERS letters@tribunemedia.net 127,&(LVKHUHE\JLYHQWKDW -(50$,1(35(=,/$1 RI526(%8'52$'('(1675((7)$55,1*721 52$'1$66$8%$+$0$6 LVDSSO\LQJWRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRU1DWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLSIRUUHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQDVFLWL]HQRI7KH%DKDPDVDQGWKDW DQ\SHUVRQZKRNQRZVDQ\UHDVRQZK\UHJLVWUDWLRQ QDWXUDOL]DWLRQVKRXOGQRWEHJUDQWHGVKRXOGVHQGZULWWHQ DQGVLJQHGVWDWHPHQWRIWKHIDFWVZLWKLQWZHQW\HLJKW GD\VIURPWKH VW GD\RI-DQXDU\ WRWKH0LQLVWHU UHVSRQVLEOHIRUQDWLRQDOLW\DQG&LWL]HQVKLS3%R[ 127,&( ,7,21 :$17(' EDITOR, The Tribune. THIS letter is intended as an intellectual and emotional response against the arrogant, vitriolic drivel spewed forth in the letter enti tled “We Must Strongly Oppose Sinister Homosexual Rights Agen da” published in The Tribune on Wednesday, February 4, 2009. I am a 23-year-old lesbian Bahamian “living” in this country. A lthough a better description would be to say that I am “languishing” as I am forced to hide my identity and orientation because persons such as the author of this letter, Ms Phillippa Russell, have made the Bahamas inhospitable to its own citizens. Ms Russell argues that we homosexuals are trying to corrupt Bahamian life by pursuing a gay rights agenda. Gay people gen erally do not have a sinister agenda to corrupt and infiltrate the Church and the Bahamas. We simply want to not be harassed, free to love and marry and have a family as straight people do, and to be accepted and loved by our families. We want understanding, not license to ruin the country. The letter claims that in our pursuit of this agenda “the difficulty arises when homosexuals attempt to distinguish between their sexual orientation and their character.” Ms Russell, please allow me to disabuse you of your benighted ignorance and state that a cogent distinction does exist. My sexual orientation does not define my character. My character defines how I exercise my sexual ori entation. If a heterosexual male resolves to rape his female neigh bour he does so not because his sexual orientation is “dysfunctional”, but because his character is flawed. Furthermore, the letter states that, “It is now scientifically confirmed that behaviour is contagious”. Well in that case, I should have been straight ten times over, as I did not encounter another gay person until I was in my late teens. Growing up I was bathed, fed, hugged, dressed, tucked in, sneezed on, taught by and along with heterosexual people and yet I am gay. Therefore, Ms Russell if not by blood (as my parents are straight touch, or even my observational mimicry how else is this “contagion” passed? The heart of the article focuses on psychopathy. However, psychopathy is a mental disorder; homosexuality is not. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM sexuality as a mental illness in 1973, as it became increasingly clear that while it was not the norm, it did not cause specifically violent, hostile or dangerous behaviour in people nor was it equated with psychosis or any sort of violent pathology. Psychopathy is a totally separate and distinct mental illness all on its own. Homosexuality is now accepted in major circles as intrinsic, and not as a mental illness and for Ms Russell to claim otherwise, is ludicrous, and is nothing more than thinking that is pseudo-psychology at its best, ranting of an uneducated woman at worst. Now if the Jamaican PM, as the letter states, so chooses to bar homosexuals from his cabinet, whether they are qualified or not that is between him and his constituents. But as for my country I know that we are not better off because of our homophobia. I am educated, talented and ambitious, yet I wish to leave my homeland to go where I can be free to love, without shame and live, without fear, because I know and feel that here I am hated and vilified for who I am. Ms Russell, your letter disappoints, disheartens and scares me because you represent the intolerance, small-mindedness, and big otry that mars the better nature of my people. When you identify me with psychopaths, and intimate that I am inferior you strip me of my humanity. And therefore, leave me naked for others to harass me, because I am undeserving of dignity, discriminate against me, because I am undeserving of rights, and hurt me, because I am undeserving of protection. So, Ms Russell, if you truly wish to pursue your noble goal of saving the Bahamas, then save us from you and others like you. ANONYMOUS Nassau, February 4, 2009. I am ga y , but I am a Bahamian, too!

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COLDWELL Banker Lightbourn Realty sales associate Robert Arthur has sold a piece o f Harbour Island history. Arthur sold The Little Board i ng House, the island’s first or second establishment of its kind, to B ahamian Tracey Barry Tyler and her husband, Toby Tyler, owners of the island's elegant Landing hotel. The seller was a non-Bahamian and long time visitor to the island. Visitors to Harbour Island are f amiliar with the charming yellow house on the corner of Bay Streeta nd Murray. Now a private residence, Little B oarding House is over 200 years old. In the 1940s, Ms Hattie Thomp son and Ms Marion Johnson owned the boarding house. M s Johnson was headmistress of the primary school on HarbourI sland. Ms Thompson managed the little hotel. Both were instru m ental in getting the Catholic Bishop to build a church on Har bour Island, somewhere around 1922. It is said that the first Catholic m ass on the island was celebrated in their home. C oldwell Banker Lightbourn Realty president Mike Lightbourn h as fond memories of Little Boarding House. H e and his family spent sum mer holidays in their vacation home two doors away, and ate breakfast and dinner at Little Boarding House every day. The island was a child’s playground with the gorgeous, three mile Pink Sand Beach and a fish ing boat, Pieces of Eight, at their fingertips. On the corner to the south of Little Boarding House, Mr Lightbourn recalls, Capt. Harry Albury had the first generator on the island and supplied electricity to a large area. The drone of the engine was a new night sound. Transport was by foot or bicycle. Unlike today, there were no golf carts or vehicles. However, there were lots of simple pleasures, such as homemade coconut ice cream sold at the square at the top of Murray Street at four o'clock every afternoon. The winds of change started to rustle through Harbour Island with the introduction of amphibi ous craft from Nassau. The population grew, and Bahamian and non-Bahamians discovered the island as a second home destination. Today’s Harbour Island is still graced with many charming struc tures of old, such as Little Boarding House, which speak of that magical era. For Coldwell Banker’s Robert Arthur, the sale was particularly satisfying. Arthur ranks in the top one per cent of an international Coldwell Banker sales force of 116,800. Although not one of his most significant sales in terms of dollars and cents the home sold for $775,000 with some trade elements Arthur was thrilled when his friends, the Tylers, bought the property. “Not only are Tracy, Toby and I good friends, but I know that Little Boarding House will be maintained to the highest standard and that this important piece o f history will be preserved,” Arthur said. A nd he's pleased that the seller will continue to visit Harbour I sland. The Tylers own the historic Landing hotel in Harbour Island. Prince Charles’ goddaughter and Ralph Lauren Safari model, India Hicks, until fairly recently had a minority stake in the traditional C olonial-style 1800’s hotel. The Landing is a magnet for t he rich and famous. The Duke and Duchess of Y ork are among the list of celebri ties who’ve stopped in to enjoy The Landing’s gourmet meals and sample their fine wines and cigars. The guest list reads like a Who's Who. P rince Pavalos and Princess Marie Chantal of Greece, Mick J aggar, Richard Gere, Elle McPherson, Diane Von Fursten b erg, Barry Diller, Christianne Amannpour, Ed Bradley, Bette Midler, Collin Farrell, George Hamilton, Daryll Hall and Jack Nicholson, along with super mod els and many others have enjoyed the ambiance of The Landing. T he Tylers plan to make Little Boarding House their familyh ome, give it a facelift and build a cottage in the backyard, retaining t he period of the home. It's this timeless quality that makes Harbour Island so special. C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 5 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecurit y Previous CloseToday's CloseChangeDaily Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 1.951.39Abaco Markets1.391.390.000.0700.00019.90.00% 11.8011.00Bahamas Property Fund11.0011.000.000.9920.20011.11.82% 9.687.64Bank of Bahamas7.647.640.000.3190.26023.93.40% 0.990.63Benchmark0.630.630.00-0.8770.000N/M0.00% 3.743.15Bahamas Waste3.153.150.000.1050.09030.02.86% 2.601.95Fidelity Bank2.372.370.000.0550.04043.11.69% 1 4.1512.61Cable Bahamas13.9513.950.001.2550.24011.11.72% 3.142.83Colina Holdings2.832.830.000.1180.04024.01.41% 7.904.80Commonwealth Bank (S16.776.770.006000.4380.31015.54.58% 5.001.88Consolidated Water BDRs2.192.440.250.1110.05222.02.13% 3.002.27Doctor's Hospital2.402.400.000.2400.04010.01.67% 8.106.02Famguard7.807.800.000.5980.28013.03.59% 13.0111.87Finco11.8711.870.000.5420.52021.94.38% 14.6610.45FirstCaribbean Bank10.4510.450.000.6820.40015.33.83% 6.045.01Focol (S5.175.170.000.3370.15015.32.90% 1.001.00Focol Class B Preference1.001.000.000.0000.000N/M0.00% 1 .000.30Freeport Concrete0.300.300.000.0350.0008.60.00% 8.205.50ICD Utilities5.595.590.000.4070.50013.78.94% 12.508.60J. S. Johnson10.5010.500.000.9520.64011.06.10% 10.0010.00Premier Real Estate10.0010.000.000.1800.00055.60.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSecuritySymbolLast SaleChangeDaily Vol. 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series AFBB170.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series BFBB22100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series CFBB13100.000.00 1000.001000.00Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Series DFBB15100.000.00 52wk-Hi52wk-LowSymbolBid $ A sk $Last PriceWeekly Vol.EPS $Div $P/EYield 14.6014.25Bahamas Supermarkets7.928.4214.60-0.0410.300N/M2.05% 8.006.00Caribbean Crossings (Pref6.006.256.000.0000.480N/M7.80% 0.540.20RND Holdings0.350.400.350.0010.000256.60.00% 41.0029.00ABDAB31.7233.2629.004.5400.0009.00.00% 14.0014.00Bahamas Supermarkets11.2312.0414.00-0.0410.300N/M2.67% 0.550.40RND Holdings0.450.550.550.0020.000261.90.00% 52wk-Hi52wk-LowFund NameNA V YTD%Last 12 MonthsDiv $Yield % 1.43871.3781Colina Bond Fund1.43870.354.40 3.03512.9230Colina MSI Preferred Fund2.9230-0.58-2.54 1.43761.3773Colina Money Market Fund1.43760.284.38 3.79693.3856Fidelity Bahamas G & I Fund3.3856-10.83-10.83 12.618011.8789Fidelity Prime Income Fund12.61805.745.74 100.5606100.0000CFAL Global Bond Fund100.56060.560.56 100.000096.4070CFAL Global Equity Fund96.4070-3.59-3.59 1.00001.0000CFAL High Grade Bond Fund1.00000.000.00 10.50009.0950Fidelity International Investment Fund9.0950-13.38-13.38 1.02641.0000FG Financial Preferred Income Fund1.02642.642.64 1.02891.0000FG Financial Growth Fund1.02892.892.89 1.02871.0000FG Financial Diversified Fund1.02872.872.87 BISX ALL SHARE INDEX 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00YIELD last 12 month dividends divided by closing price 52wk-Hi Highest closing price in last 52 weeksBid $ Buying price of Colina and Fidelity 52wk-Low Lowest closing price in last 52 weeksAsk $ Selling price of Colina and fidelity Previous Close Previous day's weighted price for daily volumeLast Price Last traded over-the-counter price Today's Close Current day's weighted price for daily volumeWeekly Vol. Trading volume of the prior week Change Change in closing price from day to dayEPS $ A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths Daily Vol. Number of total shares traded todayNAV Net Asset Value DIV $ Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthsN/M Not Meaningful P/E Closing price divided by the last 12 month earningsFINDEX The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100 (S (S131-Oct-08 31-Oct-08WWW.BISXBAHAMAS.COM or 242-394-2503 FOR MORE DATA & INFORMATIONNAV Date 31-Jan-09 23-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-08 31-Oct-08 30-Jan-09 31-Dec-08 31-Dec-07 31-Dec-08 Prime + 1.75% Maturity 19 October 2017 19 October 2022 30 May 2013 29 May 2015 Interest 7% Prime + 1.75% 7%TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-502-7010 | FIDELITY 242-356-7764 | FG CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-502-7525F INDEX: CLOSE 825.31 | YTD -1.14% | 2008 -12.31%BISX LISTED & TRADED SECURITIES AS OF: Fidelity Over-The-Counter Securities Colina Over-The-Counter Securities BISX Listed Mutual Funds MARKET TERMSFRIDAY, 6 FEBRUARY 2009BISX ALL SHARE INDEX: CLOSE 1,690.98 | CHG 0.26 | %CHG 0.02 | YTD -21.38 | YTD % -1.25BISX LISTED DEBT SECURITIES (Bonds trade on a Percentage Pricing bases n By MEGAN REYNOLDS Tribune Staff Reporter mreynolds@tribunemedia.net A WOMANwhose grandson was gunned down last year is giving back to the community by volunteering as a c ounsellor in a free service for the vuln erable. Idena Burrows, 71, of East Avenue, Millar’s Heights, lost the grandson she raised when he was shot in the back five t imes while working under the hood of his car in Millar’s Heights, off Carmichael Road. No one has yet been arrested for the m urder of Reno Burrows, who turned 3 0 two weeks before he was shot dead in January 2008, making Mrs Burrows’ grief all the more painful. She remembers the boy that she and h er husband Stanley Burrows, 74, raised from the age of nine as “polite, respectful and loving.” The mother of five and grandmother of 1 6 living grandchildren said: “If it has n ever happened to you, you can’t know how it feels. Memories I still have my memories and I still cry a lot, because I miss him so much. It’s a v oid that will never be filled, but we have to go on and you have to let go.” A year after the event, Mrs Burrows has channelled her grief into something positive by devoting her W ednesday afternoons to counselling people at The Haven in Kenilworth Street, off Montrose Avenue, with l eading psychologist Dr David Allen. She is one of around ten volunteers at the free counselling clinic, which wase stablished in March last year, and works mostly with young men who benefit from her love and support. If you didn’t have pain in life there is a lot you wouldn’t know. “Pain is necessary. It’s like an alarm. So if the Lord allows pain to come into your life, it is for a reason and a purpose, and Reno’s death has given me a new direct ion.” Mrs Burrows said she has seen changes in the boys she has counselled over the last year – some have gone from unemployment and homelessness to returningt o their families and working. From having problems working and getting along with others, being disrupt ive at home and not going to school, I have seen a complete turnaround.” M rs Burrows has worked with young p eople at Calvary Bible Church on C ollins Avenue in Centreville for 25 y ears, and believes by working together in the community, the problems that lead to gun crime, drug dealing a nd the downfall of promising young people can be eliminated. “When it comes down to c runch time we need to get together as one. “Because with the crime, if we don’t get together as one, we are not going tof ace it,” she said. Mrs Burrows said she also believes that parents must live up to the responsibility o f caring for their children, ensuring they go to school, do their homework, and feel loved. “We can’t be afraid to let k ids know that we love them. “I think that is so important to know that you’re loved, because most people w ho commit suicide or are depressed, would not feel that way if they knew deep down that somebody loved and cared for them,” she said. Mrs Burrows’ contribution to the prog ramme has been a benefit to her as well a s the clients, Dr Allen said. “This is the anniversary of the death of h er grandson, and now she is one of my leading volunteers. She is taking the painf rom her loss, and using it to help others, a nd that’s a beautiful thing.” D r Allen said he believes the healing p ower of talking and opening up can stop people on a violent or suicidal path. “The kids who were violent in schools h ad lost somebody a few years before, but had no one to talk to, so the hurt went down and came out as anger, and violence, so we have to talk to the kids w hen these things happen. “Sick people don’t talk and healthy people talk. It’s as simple as it sounds,” he said. The three suicides last week are sign of i ndividuals becoming isolated from society in a process which could be stopped by communication, Dr Allen said. C ontacts “The suicidal person feels hopeless and lonely, and all statistics show they h ave the same number of contacts as peop le who are not isolated,” he said. “So loneliness is something that happens between the ears. “You project it on society and create a r eality so it becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.” The counselling centre is free and open to all from 2pm-4pm and 5pm-7pm on W ednesdays. Volunteers who would like t o be counsellors can attend training sess ions on Wednesday afternoons from 4pm-5pm. If you would like to attend the free clinic or are interested in volunteering, c all The Haven on 327-8719. Dr Allen also established a free 24hour hotline for anyone who wants to talk at 677-KIDS (5437 n By TANEKA THOMPSON Tribune Staff Reporter w hyyouvex@tribunemedia.net "I vex at the drivers who park so recklessly on the curb righton Bay Street, Dowdeswell Street and Village Road every day, blocking the passage of traffic and causing me to have to s train my neck to see if any cars coming when I try to come out a c orner. "It especially vexin' when I t urn onto Deveaux Street off B ay Street people acting like t hey own the road! What I want t o know is where is all the police who could be making some g ood money ticketing these no good people! I surprised more a ccidents don't happen because of people's foolishness." Mad Motorist, Nassau. "I vex at the spate of crimes that seem to be happening every d ay now. I mean broad daylight car chases, shootings in Kemp R oad and one in Montague the other night. What is happening t o our culture? Guns more accessible than water these days, it seems and everyone have one. "And instead of our lawmakers and politicians trying to do something about it, they getting caught up in foolishness. Where d oes that leave law-abiding cit izens who afraid to go outside inb road daylight or the evening for fear of a stray bullet?" Concerned about Crime, Nassau. "I vex 'cause every night two c hurch buses and two church vans with heavy tinted windowsr un through my neighbourhood close to Potter's Cay seven n ights a week to disturb my sleep. "They is mussey da most reli gious group an them other church needs to follow." Lift up ya head all da time, N assau. " I vex at how many children I see roaming the streets without any supervision day in and day out. Sometimes I see kids in the middle of the day just wandering, and I know school is in ses sion. I always wonder where are t he parents who brought them into this world who now disre gard them and let them fend for themselves? I am surprised our child abduction rates aren't higher considering the most innocent and vulnerable are left without a guardian so many times. "It breaks my heart to watch these little kids walking in areas I wouldn't walk alone in the evening and I can only imagine what they go home to at night. Is it any wonder our crime situ ation is at the level it's at now?" M Johnson, Nassau. "I vex because on the social network Facebook it seems like all types of people I don't know hit me up wanting to become friends and to make matters worse, when you add these people, no one I know seems to know them and I have no ideawho they are. I have even heard of cases where weirdoes create fake profiles just so they can access people's pages. “It's sort of scary knowing all my personal information is out there on cyberspace for so many strangers to access. As a guy, it also weirds me out when I get a friend request from another man who I don't know. My advice to people is to be careful who you add to your lists on websites like that." Man in Carmichael. WHYYOU VEX? Woman whose grandson was shot dead volunteers as a counsellor Idena Burrows A piece of history is sold on Harbour Island

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 6, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE $'0,1,675$725 /,%5$5,$1 7KH6RXWK(OHXWKHUD0LVVLRQ5RFN6RXQG(OHXWKHUD D QRQSURWRUJDQL]DWLRQLVVHHNLQJVXLWDEOHFDQGLGDWHV IRUWKHSRVWRI$GPLQLVWUDWRU/LEUDULDQ 7KHGXWLHVRIWKHVXFFHVVIXOFDQGLGDWHZLOO LQFOXGH ~ ~ ~ $SSOLFDQWVPXVWSRVVHVV ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 6KRXOG\RXPHHWWKHVHUHTXLUHPHQWVSOHDVH VXEPLWDUpVXPpWRFGVDQGV#FRUDOZDYHFRP RU ZZZVRXWKHOHXWKHUDPLVVLRQFRP ages, details of which are being discussed now, on May 15. Mr Vanderpool-Wallace said: “We can make sure that the distribution of income that’s so important to us happens before the people even arrive in the country. “The intent is to start with four hotels where somebody buys an all-inclusive product, including airfare, hotel room, food, tours, entertainment all in one pre-paid package. But the whole experience is not in one property, it is at several different locations. We want to give people a total destination experience, not just a hotel experience.” According to Deputy Director General of Tourism, David Johnson, the concept has never been tried anywhere else in the world. “No other island has ever tried to do this. Hotels have been doing it and, of course, cruiselines do it, but we would be the first place where I see this being executed and we hope to do it and claim the r ights to being the first and o nly,” said Mr Johnson. I t may be a potential boon for the Grand Bahama econo-my at a time when the traditionally depressed economy is suffering more than ever. “They need a big boost and they are hungrier (for the opportunity),” said Mr Johnson. According to the tourism official, initial research suggests that the offering will be a popular one. We believe it’s sound conc eptually and our preliminary research shows that people see value in it. People have said to us that if we can get our price points right (and can get their meals included and have a choice of restaurants they would pay a bit more. They see that on a cruise ship or a hotel they’re limited to two or three restaurants, they don’t really like that limitation,” he said. Meanwhile, interest from Grand Bahama businesses in getting involved in the scheme has been “extreme”, according to Mr Vanderpool Wallace. “So far the concept has been embraced very strongly, espec ially by the restaurants and t he vendors, so I feel like we h ave some positive momentum,” added Mr Johnson. The four hotel properties expected to be part of the first package are Our Lucaya, which includes the Westin and Sheraton hotels, Port Lucaya and Pelican Bay. Tourists will be able to spend less or more money to buy a “top of the line, middle of the road or lower end” package. Grand Bahama is being seen as the ideal location to test out the model, as it has the most convenient infrastructure, he said. “You’ve got about 2,000 rooms right across from about 60 stores and about 40 restaurants, and the watersports and beachsports and the boating sports are all there with the marina and the beach, so everything is very close by,” he added. He said the vast majority of familicides in the US are committed by the father and usually in the wake of financial hardship or job loss. Although a significant number of government capital projects h ave introduced new jobs in the Bahamas’ construction field, Dr Allen fears the rare type of murder familicide may soon occur if the issue is not addressed. During the Bahamian recession of the early 1990s, there was at least one case of a man who had shot his wife and attempted t o kill his children by driving his family vehicle into the sea near Clifton Pier. Where many murders that occur under similar circumstances are seldom classified as familic ides, all confirmed cases have revealed that a parents’ desire to p revent their children or family from suffering had been a major f actor in their deadly decision. With three suicides already o ccurring in the space of a week this year, and with at least two of t he victims reportedly experiencing financial difficulties, Dr Allen feels some response is now needed. Men get their self-esteem f rom their jobs, and when they lose their jobs, unless they have a real community connection, dealing with the shame of that canl ead to them becoming psychotic.” However, he admits that there has been a long existing attitude a mong many local men of not s haring their thoughts and being too proud to seek help. In addition, Dr Allen said that many have turned away from thec hurch, and have accepted secularism as their God. He feels that the combination of these characteristics of the B ahamian male with the global economic downturn could spark t he occurrence of this rare crime. Dr Allen feels one way of r elieving stress and depression that could follow unemployment w ould be to seek spiritual encouragement from a church or neighbour. However, in recent years, many B ahamians have discontinued the traditions of regular church attendance. Christian Council president, R ev Patrick Paul, told T he Trib une t hat over the past ten years there has been a significant drop in the number of Bahamians attending church. R ev Paul said where at one time there were many attending church on Sunday and Wednesday, he has been i nformed by several churches t hat they have ceased Wednesday services because of low turnouts. Rev Paul explained that this s hift in behaviour has contributed to a new breed of people who lack virtues and morals, and w here the consequences of suicide or familicide may not be considered. Rev Paul said this new behavi our has even led to many churche s discontinuing their Sunday schools, which also have low attendance, and feels the churches’ role in inspiring hope is todayk ey to the survival of Bahamian society. “It’s not a small matter, but it’s something that we can seize over a short period of time. If we as a c hurch can network together and work to bring some degree of equilibrium in our society, I will assure you we will have a lot ofo ur present problems reduced significantly.” occurred just hours after police chased the two occupants of a Toyota Avalon from the Kemp Road area to Madeira Street, Palmdale, and apprehended them before dozens of onlookers at around 10am. Eyewitnesses claim police gunbutted one of the men seen lying on the ground near the passenger side of his vehicle. He was bleeding profusely from a head injury. Police maintain the driver hit his head on the car door while trying to evade arrest. Two men aged 38 and 35, both residents of Perpall Tract, were arrested in Palmdale and taken into custody. The shootings have rocked local residents, who claimed that Nassau is becoming like the Wild West. A Montagu resident said: “I find this absolutely terrifying. It is like living in the Wild West. We are very concerned about the level of crime. “We are concerned the police are ill-equipped to do their job properly and they are not given the support they need, especially in terms of training. “I am not suggesting what happened in Montagu is the police’s fault, but I am suggesting that we are in crisis.” The resident noted Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest’s announcement on Thursday showing the current murder rate, 24 per 100,000 people, is four times higher than the five per 100,000 deemed acceptable by international standards. And the resident, who did not want to be named, pointed out how the shortage of Supreme Court judges allows those accused of murder and violent crime to be released on bail, and freed to com mit more crimes, as cases stack up. She added: “We are at a crisis level and the government appears to be paralysed. We welcome the appointment of new senior police officers, but what are they doing to deal with crime? Overall, what is being done? “The American State Department warnings are saying it is safe to come here, but when are we going to cross that threshold?” Suicides could be sign of ‘even more serious problem’ We went that Thursday, came back that Friday and she wasn’t there. Her sister said that she dropped her to the airport but doesn ’t know where she went from there,” he said. Neither he nor his wife’s family have seen or heard from her in nearly a month. Mr Lindley said that he filed a police report regarding his wife’s disappearance two weeks ago. Mr Lindley admitted that this is not the first time his wife left a bruptly. “In 2007 something similar to this happened. It was in October, 2 007, her sister allegedly dropped her to the airport and she went away. When she went that time she called her daughter back in the f irst week and she e-mailed her. She did correspond with her sister as well,” he said. Whether she went back to the same place I’m not sure but I think she did. Mr Lindley said he believes his wife could be in Haiti but is not certain. “I think she went back to where she was before because I had looked at her phone records and it was saying that she had been calli ng Haiti right up to the last day she left. “Someone did call me and tell me there were reports of her b eing seen in Haiti but then again I haven’t gotten any confirmation from police to say that is where she left to. She was involved with s omeone in Haiti before but that was supposed to have been over with,” he said. M r Lindley claimed that he and his wife, who also works with him in the building maintenance business, were not having marital problems. “There wasn’t any problem in the relationship or anything like that going on so it became a shock to me when she left. I don’t think she is in the right state of mind to do what she did and wherever she is I don’t think she is safe. She never cut her chil d ren off like this and that is what has me more concerned,” Mr Lindley said. M rs Roker is described as about 5 feet 3 inches tall, of solid build and weighing around 190 pounds. She also has a tattoo of a panther on her lower right leg. Triumph 750. A member of the Scurvy Few Bike Club of Abaco, Mr Burrows said his passion for bikes has made his retirement a complete joy. Mr Burrows said locals always react with amazement when he rides his various bikes round the island because each is unique. “I’m really proud to see that my bikes can bring so much joy, and for Bahamians to see that we can do things like this.” Outside of his collection, Mr Burrows said he also repairs Harley bikes, lawn mowers and other motorised gadgets. Revving up in retirement FROM page one F ROM page one Tourism FROM page one Two men expected in court after shootout F ROM page one Husband fears for wife FROM page one

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C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL NEWS PAGE 12, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE the scene N ASSAU E VENTS C APTURED O N C AMERA by Franklyn G Ferguson, JP An enchanted evening at the RED CROSS BALL IT WASindeed “An Enchanted Evening” as guests enjoyed the 37th Annual Red Cross Ball held at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace Casino on Saturday, January 31, 2009. Attendees were treated to a delicious dinner, including a salad comprised of crisp gourmet greens with cucumber, tomatoes, olives and julienne of carrots, pink grapefruit topped with a spicy pecan nut and passion fruit vinaigrette; a soup of tomato and wild basil bisque topped with quenelle of cream; and mango sorbet with fresh mint leaf. The entre included a tenderloin of beef forestiere laced with wild mushroom reduction, roasted Atlantic salmon with a champagne drizzle, a julienne of vegetables, asparagus, Irish and sweet whipped garlic potatoes. For dessert, the guests enjoyed chocolate and mint mousse presented on a short bread biscuit served with raspberry coulee and fresh berries. During the cocktail reception, guests were entertained by the Royal Bahamas Police Force Pop Band. The Lou Adams Orchestra performed during the dinner. While dessert was being served, the world-famous American group The Manhattans provided entertainment. The popular Bahamian band Visage entertained for the duration of the evening and into the early morning. The ball was held in a beautifully decorated Crystal Ball Room courtesy of Florarama, which is owned by Manita Wisdom, wife of former PLP cabinet minister Neville Wisdom. The table favours – all Bahamian organic botanical products – were produced by Dr Wendy Stuart. The ladies also spiced up the festive atmosphere with an array of elegant attire. T he top in-house prize was won by Wendy Mills. T he Guest of Honour was Dorothy Hepburn-King, a former deputy d irector general of the Red Cross, who retired in June, 2008 after 42 years of dedicated service. Also in attendance were Governor General Arthur D Hanna; Dame Marguerite Pindling and Lady Darling. The new Director General of the Red Cross is Kim Sawyer, a former social worker who attained the rank of assistant director in the Department of Social Services before leaving to head the Red Cross. L ady Finlayson is the chairperson of the 2009 Red Cross Ball Committee and also head of fundraising for the Bahamas Red Cross Society. Gerald Sawyer is president of the Red Cross. The event was held under the patronage of Governor General Arthur D Hanna . Platinum Sponsors for the ball were: Pictet Bank and Trust, Bahamas Commonwealth Brewery, the Burns House Group of Companies, Bahamas Telecommunications Company, FML Webshop, Scotiabank Bahamas Limited, Cable Bahamas Limited, La Rose Boutique, Kerzner International Bahamas Limited, Commonwealth Bank, Percy’s Web Caf and the Central Bank of the Bahamas. American Airlines was the official Airline for the Red cross ball for the fourth consecutive year. FROM LEFT: Joyann Archer, Leroy Archer, president of Bahamas Commonwealth Brewery and the Burns House Group of Companies and a major sponsor of the ball; and Kim Sawyer, director general of the Red Cross. GERALD SAWYER SR , president of the Bahamas Red Cross Society; Kim Sawyer, director general of the Bahamas Red Cross Society; Wendy Mills, winner of the top prize at the 37th annual Red Cross Ball; and Lady Rowena Finlayson, chairperson of the Red Cross Ball Com mittee. The top prize consisted of two airline tickets to Europe donated by American Airlines, a gift basket donated by the Perfume Bar and a pair of gold earrings donated by Crown Jewellers. CRAIG S MORSE, president of Distinctive Escapes, Luxury Travel Con sultants; Lady Rowena Finlayson, chairperson of the 2009 Red Cross Ball Committee and head of fundraising for the Bahamas Red Cross; Jorge Valls, vice president of luxury travel consultants Distinctive Escapes. WILLIAM MILLS, senior manager at JS Johnson Insurance Company; Wendy Mills, senior trust manager, ATC Trustees (Bahamas operations, Commonwealth Bank; Everette EK Burrows, retired banker. RED CROSS BALL Committee members: Kyron Strachan, executive vice president of Arawak Homes Limited; Deveral Ferguson, executive financial services representative at Colina Imperial; and Nikki Boeuf, retail unit business manageress at Bahamas Commonwealth Brewery and the Burns House Group of Companies. EDITH GREENSANDS , risk and control manager for the Bahamas and Turks and Caicos at First Caribbean Inter national Bank; and her husband, Charles Sands, parts manager at Tyreflex Star Motors. MARILYN CAM BRIDGE, senior vice president of administration, Pictet Bank and Trust; and husband, Earnest Cambridge, vice president of VIP service at Atlantis Resort. Both companies were major sponsors of the ball. YVETTE SANDS, assistant vice president of quality and external affairs at Bacardi Company Limited; and her hus band, Charles V Sands III, country manager for Insurance Company of the West Indies (ICWI NURSE VAL RICHARDS who performs with the Soulful Groovers and her sister, Patrice Smith, bookkeeper at Aquapure Water Limited. JANETTE SMITH, director of member services at the Lyford Cay Club; Marilyn Meeres, deputy registrar of the Supreme Court and former magistrate. ENJOYING the music of the Lou Adams Orchestra are accountant Van Diah and businesswoman Mae MortonCurry.

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C M Y K C M Y K SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009 THETRIBUNE PAGE 9 PAGE 10 ‘Blast From The Past’... n B y BRENT STUBBS Senior Sport Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net DESPITE losing all of their matches in Group A of the Fed Cup by BNP Paribas A mericas Zone Group One, the Bahamas’ three-member team still has a chance to play in a relegation match. Today at the Uniprix Stadium in Mon t real, Canada, the Bahamas will cross over to play Brazil – the last place finisher in Group B – to determine which team will be relegated to Zone II next year. On Thursday, the Bahamas was beaten soundly 3-0 by host Canada. But coachS ean Cartwright said the scores didn’t r eflect the way the team played. The Canadians were just an outstandi ng team,” Cartwright stressed. “Our girls hit a heavy ball, but we played well against t hem. We had some good games, but just lost the big points.” C artwright, however, feels that Canada doesn’t belong in the American Zone and should actually be playing in the World Group. H aving earned a bye in the first day of competition, Canada opened play with their number two seed Stphanie Dubois drubbing Kerrie Cartwright 6-0, 6-0. KERRIE CARTWRIGHT , of the Bahamas, r eturns a shot from Canada’s Stephanie Dubois during their Americas Zone Group I Federa Bahamas faces Brazil in relegation match P h o t o s : R y a n R e m i o r z / A P SEE page 10 STEPHANIE DUBOIS returns a shot from Kerrie Cartwright... THE Masters Softball League has released the names of the following players selected to participate in the All-Star Classic 2pm Sunday at the Archdeacon William Thomp son Softball Park at Southern Recreation Grounds: Pineapple Pickers, managed by Pat Evans of the Williams Construction Jets and coached by Larry Forbes of the Andeaus Insurance Brokers and Spurgeon Johnson of the Johnson Six Pack Abs: First base George Turner (St Anges Lions Smith (Williams’ Jets Second base Dennis Davis (six Pack Abs (Williams Jets berbatch (St Anges Lions Shortstop Franklyn Kemp (Andeaus Brokers Davis (Williams Jets Left field Roger Demeritte (Williams Jets Thompdon (Six Pack Abs Centerfield Shannon Ban nister (Augusta St Bulls Sam Haven (Andeaus Brokers). Rightfield Anthony Pearce (Williams Jets Williams (Alco Raiders Catcher Lee Rahming (Williams Jets Woodside (Augusta St Bulls Pitcher Danny Stubbs (Williams Jets (Six Pack Abs (Williams Jets O’Brien (St Anges Utility Anthony Weech (Williams Jets (Andeaus Brokers Isaacs (Andeaus Brokers Watermelon Splashers , managed by Dudley Moxey (Micholette Strokers coached by Anthony Huyler (Bamboo Shack Bulls Sammy Adderley (Micholette Strokers). First base Cyril Miller (Micholette); Anthony Henfield (Alco Raiders McPhee (Miller Lite Second base Joe McPhee (Miller Lite Third base Rodney Albury (Bamboo Shack Deveaux (Miller Lite Shortstop Abe Johnson (Micholette brister (Micholette Leftfield Victor Bain (Bamboo Shack) and Joe Jones (Miller Lite Center field Brian Cartwright (Micholette Jeff Cooper (Jets Right field Lawrence Smith (Miller Lite (Bamboo Shack Catcher Frederick Saunders (Six Pack Abs Bowe (Alco Raiders Pitcher Clifton Smith (Mic holette), Greg Thompson (Bamboo Shack (Six Pack Abs Fritzgerald (Miller Lite Utility Leland Levaruty (Six Pack Abs Brown (Six Pack Abs Seymour (Micholette John Wallace (Alco Raiders Note: Starters at each posi tion listed first Masters Softball League’s All-Star Classic set for this weekend To advertise in The Tribune the #1 newspaper in circulation, just call 502-2371 today! n By BRENT STUBBS Senior Sport Reporter bstubbs@tribunemedia.net WITH the one-year suspen sion by the Bahamas Boxing Commission lifted, First Class Promotions is hoping to bounce back in the ring with a British Commonwealth super middleweight title fight for Jermaine “Choo Choo” Mackey. Pending their ratification from the commission, First Class promoter Michelle Minus said Mackey should have a mandatory defense against Charles Adamu of Ghana on Saturday, May 23 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium. Adamu was the original fighter that Mackey was set to face, but after he suffered an injury, First Class Promotions brought in Michael Gbenga of Ghana instead. On July 19, 2008 at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium, Mackey went on to pull off a unanimous 12-round decision over Gbenga to win the British Commonwealth title. That was the last show pro moted by First Class before they were shelved in November by the commission. On Wednesday, the commission hosted a press conference to announce that the suspension was lifted. “We’re willing to move for ward to host the Adamu fight,” Minus said. “If we don’t get clearance, we will look at who ever wants to take the fight internationally. We just have to sit and wait.” As a promotional company, Minus said First Class really didn’t feel that much of an effect with the suspension because they have been promoting the Bahamian Idol and they are getting ready to stage the Kids Musical. “We’ve been moving. It was just the athletes who basically suffered in all of this,” Minus charged. “They could have been doing a lot of other things, but they have decided to stick with the programme.” Although they haven’t staged a show since July, Minus said Mackey also has to make a mandatory defense of his Fede Caribe-WBA super mid dleweight title. In a letter sent to First Class from Dr Calvin Inalsingh, the president of the FedeCaribeWBA, it was stated that while Mackey won the title on June 22, 2007, he should have defended it within six months of winning it. Inalsingh advised First Class Promotions that Mackey will be given the opportunity to defend the title against any of the FedeCaribe rated boxers by February 28 or the title may be declared vacant. In response, Minus said they have asked Inalsingh for a month’s extension as they look forward to traveling to Trinidad & Tobago to fight Kirk “The Technician” Sinnette, whom Mackey won the title over in a second round knockout. Minus, however, said they have already gotten some reaction from the commission, who indicated that as the champion, Mackey should have fight here as opposed to overseas. But Minus said they were leaning towards making the trip as First Class was still under suspension. But now that the suspension has been lifted, she said it’s still not possible to have the fight staged here next month. “There’s just too much work that we have to do,” she claimed. “And looking at the economic situation that we are faced with, it will be harder to pull it off in such a short time, as opposed to going to Trinidad & Tobago.” Efforts to contact commis sion chairman Pat “The Cen treville Assassin” Strachan on Friday for comments were unsuccessful. In the meantime, Minus said they will also be looking at Mackey defending his WBC’s CABOFE and even the Bahamas super middleweight ‘Choo Choo’ Mackey has his fists set on fight with Adamu JERMAINE “CHOO CHOO” MACKEY Lakers-Celtics rematch earns big ratings for TNT... See page 10

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‘BLAST FROM THE PAST’ C M Y K C M Y K LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS P AGE 10, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 2009 TRIBUNE SPORTS tion Cup match Thursday in Montreal... That was followed by Canada’s top seed Aleksandra Wozniak knocking off Bahamas’ No.2 seed Nikkita Fountain 6-0, 6-2. Then in the doubles, Dubois and Sharon Fichman wrapped up the tie with a sweep as they secured a 6-0, 6-0win over Cartwright and Fountain. While the rankings played a key factor, the Bahamians noted that they both went out and played as hard as they could under the circumstances, playing before the Canadian home crowd. Wozniak is ranked No.32 in the Sony Ericcson WTA Tour and Dubois is No.118. None of the Bahamian players are ranked on the tour. Cartwright, ranked No.227 on the ITF Junior Rankings, filled in for Larikah Russell, who sat out the tie with a shoulder injury she sustained in the first round in the Bahamas’ 2-1 lossto Puerto Rico. For 16-year-old Cartwright, getting a chance to play was “just amazing. I think it was a good opportunity. I had a good time on the court.” Cartwright admitted that the Cana dians were tough to beat, but she said she gained a lot of valuable experience that she hopes to put to good use as she attempts to get to their level. “They hit the ball very hard,” she reflected. As they look ahead to their match against Brazil, Cartwright said she’s unaware of how (Brazil “but we know that Canada was the best. They blew us off the court, so we hope to bounce back and beat Brazil.” Both teams head into the match win less in their two round robin matches and according to coach Cartwright, “we have a good chance to win this match. “They told us that two teams at the end of the tournament will be relegat ed to zone II next year, so we’re hoping that we can win and keep our hopes alive.” The tournament will wrap up today with Canada and Colombia, both unde feated at 2-0, playing against each other to determine who will get a chance to play in the World Group II qualify Bahamas faces Brazil in r elegation match THESE were two of the outstanding female golfers who played on the local scene. Can you identify any of them... REMEMBER these two former junior players? ‘Blast From The Past’ takes you back to the days when these youngsters were starting to make a name for themselves on the golf course. Can you identify any of them? FROM page 10 CANADA’S Aleksandra Wozniak serves to Nikkita Fountain, of the Bahamas, during their Federation match Thursday in Montreal... (AP Photo: Ryan Remiorz n By The Associated Press THE NBA finals rematch between Boston and the Los Angeles Lakers drewt he highest rating on TNT since a 1996 g ame featuring Michael Jordan and Magi c Johnson during the height of the Chicago Bulls' dynasty. The Lakers' 110-109 overtime victory o n Thursday night delivered a 2.7 U.S. rati ng and was watched by more than 4.3 million viewers. It was the first meeting between the rivals in Boston since the Celtics beat the Lakers in Game 6 of last year's finals for their 17th NBA champi-o nship. It was the most-watched regularseason game on TNT since Feb. 2, 1996, when the eventual champion Bulls beat J ohnson's Lakers, 99-84. T he game also drew the most viewers for a game on cable since Christmas 2004, when ESPN televised the first game between Indiana and Detroit since the brawl between Pacers players and Pistonsf ans earlier that season. TNT is up 23 percent in total viewers from the same point Lakers-Celtics rematch earns big ratings for TNT n By JIMMY GOLEN A P Sports Writer BOSTON (AP t he Los Angeles Lakers is bad e nough for Boston. What the C eltics can't afford is another tailspin. P au Gasol scored 24 points with 14 rebounds, and Lamar Odom hit a pair of free throwsw ith 16 seconds left in overtime Thursday night to lead the Lakers to a 110-109 victory over Boston that ended the Celtics' winning streak at 12 games. Los Angeles also snapped B oston's 19-game streak on Christmas Day, a loss that started the Celtics on a 2-7 skid. "These games are tough, and they're emotional games and then you play the next night," s aid Celtics coach Doc Rivers, whose team plays the New York Knicks on Friday night. "We'll try to muster it up ands ee what we have." In a rematch of an NBA finals in which the Celtics out muscled the Lakers to the title, Los Angeles held on with phys ical defense against Paul Pierce a nd Allen that prevented either A ll-Star from getting off a clean shot after Odom's free throws. The Lakers will take af ive-game winning streak into S unday's game against Cleve land. "I wish we would have come here last year with this kind of attitude," Gasol said. "Nobody backed down. We were asp hysical as anybody." The Celtics fell to 0-2 against the Lakers and trail L.A. byp ercentage points for the best overall record in the NBA; Boston would lose a tiebreaker for home court advantage int he finals if they both make it back. "It would be great," Pierce s aid. Kevin Garnett banged his fist on the table in agreement, and then interjected a reminder that seemed to be intended for the locker room across the hall: "We're the champs, man." In the only other NBA games Thursday night, Philadelphia beat Indiana 9994, and Utah routed Dallas 115-87. It was the Lakers' first visit to Boston since a 131-92 embarrassment in Game 6 of the NBA finals that clinched the Celtics' unprecedented 17th league championship. L.A. got a small measure of revenge on Christmas, but even then Boston played a more physical game. " Coming down the streets, staying at the same hotel, I was up last night thinking about the g ame wondering how my teammates would respond. It all came back," said Kobe Bryant, who had 26 and 10r ebounds. "Enough is enough. We were able to match their physical play." P ierce scored 21, and Allen had 22, but they both missed off-balance shots in the finals econds. Allen was knocked to the court at the buzzer while Boston fans clamored for a foul call, but none came. Rajon Rondo had 16 points and 12 assists for Boston. There were two double-tech nicals one of them after Bryant and Rondo were pushing and finger-pointing in the third and enough shoving to pass for a playoff game, but both teams were tired when it ended. Garnett, who missed the previous two games with the flu, scored 16 points before fouling out with 4:22 left in the fourth quarter. Bryant, who scored 61 and 36 in his previous two games, hit three 3-pointers in the fourth quarter, the last with 1:30 left in regulation and Pierce in his face to make it1 01-100 the Lakers' first lead of the half. But after Pierce made one of two free t hrows with 30 seconds left, Bryant tried to shoot over Pierce again and banged it off the rim. A fter a timeout with 7.7 sec onds left, Pierce dribbled the clock down before Bryantp oked the ball away. Eddie House got it and put up a sideways, one-handed 3-pointa ttempt at the buzzer that wasn't close. Bryant missed his last five shots of the game. Gasol made one of two free throws to give the Lakers a 108-107 lead with 1:11 left, then Glen "Big Baby" Davis made a jumper his only basket of the game after six misses. Kobe missed over Pierce, then Davis missed again and fouled Odom, who sank both free throws. The Celtics got the ball to Pierce, but his shot was off. Rondo got the rebound and drew a foul, but it wasn't a shooting foul. The inbounds pass made it to Allen, but he was out of position and never got a good look. 76ers 99, Pacers 94 A t Philadelphia, Samuel Dalembert had 18 points and 20 rebounds, and Andre Miller a nd Andre Iguodala also had double-doubles to lead the 76ers. The Sixers won only hours a fter they learned power for ward Elton Brand needed season-ending surgery on his rights houlder. Miller had 13 points and 12 assists, while Iguodala had 20 points and 11 assists toh elp the Sixers snap a twogame losing streak. Mike Dunleavy scored 21 points as Indiana dropped its third straight. Jazz 115, Mavericks 87 At Salt Lake City, Deron Williams shook off a deep thigh bruise and scored 34 points and handed out 12 assists to lead Utah . Kyle Korver scored a season-high 20 points in his first start of the season to power the Jazz to their third win in four games. Josh Howard had 18 points for Dallas, which had its fourLakers snap another Celtics streak with overtime victory KOBE BRYANT (249 in Boston. At right holding Rondo is Celtics guard Ray Allen... (AP Photo: Charles Krupa


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