Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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e Tribune







BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 105 No.60

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

PRICE — 75¢



lH By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

‘JUST days before he was due
to return to Jamaica to visit his
wife and two of his four young
‘children, electrician Ricardo
Farrington was shot dead in his
sleep by three masked men in
the early hours of Tuesday

morning, leaving a family in ||

mourning.

Yesterday, at his mother’s
wooden house, his relatives —
including 16 year-old.son, Ricar-
do. junior — watched as she
cleaned up the gruesome rem-
nants of his execution-style
killing.

Father to a 16, 14, six and
one-year-old, Ricardo died in
hospital shortly. after 4am. He
suffered a gunshot wound to the
face by one of the men who



niles UmOLO Mars eat AeLCO)

invaded the Laird Street and

Blue Hill Road home as he

slept on the sofa.

SEE page six

PLP hopeful booted

off radio programme

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AFTER being unceremoniously booted off a radio programme
yesterday, PLP nomination hopeful Omar Archer went on the
offensive, calling for all homosexuals to leave the party.

SEE page six



, i ten ae
O41 To (240) S30-2862 Tel (242) 336-2804



Family in mourning after
execution-style killing



SYLVIA RAMSAY, the mother Ricardo Farrington, speaks to the media

outside her home where he was killed yesterday.

PGA files suit

against Ginn

_ Development
Company

THE Professional Golfer’s
Association Tour has filed suit
against Ginn Development
Company claiming it breached a
multi-year tournament spon-
sorship contract.

The PGA suit, filed last
month in Florida , alleges that
aftér agreeing to serve as tour-
nament organizer and title

_ sponsor, which included pro-

viding the prize money for two
different tournaments through
2011, the real estate resort and
community development com-
pany “has simply announced

SEE page six









Obie Wilchcombe
taking legal action
against US media

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@ ©
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - West
End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe says he has
instructed attorneys in the
United States to pursue
legal action to defend his
reputation against those in

have attacked his charac-
ter.





SEE page six

Palendale + Panadive tskond - Oakes
} 2 Lanes veewent)

RLU PALA RRS OT ITN










the American media who ~



Photos of people eating
iguanas on Internet
- lead to two arrests”

li By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TWO American
tourists have been
arrested after pho-
tographs of people
cooking and eating
endangered iguanas
in the Exuma Cays |
were posted on a
social networking
website.

Friends. of the
those responsible
for. posting the pic-
tures on Facebook |
circulated the pho- ,
tographs in an-e-
mail that worked its

“way to executive

ONE OF the photographs from the social
networking site that led to the arrests.

director of the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) Eric Carey on

Monday afternoon.

Horrified by the gruesome images of the critically endan-
gered: species being. butchered; grilled“and devoured, and a
dinghy filled with undersized juvenille conch which were then cut
up and eaten, Mr Carey alerted-staff.at the BNT Exuma Cays

Land and Sea Park.

-

The park warden. and administrator worked with police in

SEE page two



THE EARL OF WESSEX VISITS NASSAU



HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS Prince Edward, the Earl-Of Wessex, arrives in Nas-

sau at Lynden Pindling International Airport where he was met by Sir Orville
Turnquest, Chairman of the GGYA Board of Trustees. The Earl of Wessex
will take part in a medal‘presentation ceremony at Government House
today. From left: HRH The Earl of Wessex, Sir Orville Turnquest and Mrs
Lelia Green, Permanent Secretary Government House.

Some pet-food products
are being recalled

lm By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

SOME pet-food products are

being recalled by manufactur-

ers who fear peanut based
ingredients may expose pets to
Salmonella infection.

With several dozen food
manufacturers and retailers in
the US already recalling hun-
dreds of products containing
peanut ingredients, dog biscuits
have become the newest food

threatened by the widespread
salmonella warning.

On January 23, the US Food
and Drug Administration
(FDA) placed a Salmonella
recall alert on some pet brands
including: Carolina Prime, Salix,
Happy Tails, and Great Choice.

Humane Society Director

- Frederick Turnquest told The

Tribune on Tuesday, this latest
recall is cause for concern espe-
cially if any of the brands on

SEE page six



ESA



PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Local builder claims
‘loophole’ cheating
contractors out of pay

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



A LOCAL builder claims contractors are being cheated out
bf their pay by means of a “loophole” in the system.

When property owners take out a loan to build a home, he

explained, the contractor they hire essentially “works for
the bank” — as a bank-appointed inspector must check each
stage of construction.
He said there is a growing trend of clients seeking to take
advantage of this situation by firing a contractor for the
slightest problem — real or invented-— in order to avoid pay-
ing for the work.

"If you find a fault with something you are supposed to
bring it to the contractor's attention and let him correct it,"
he pointed out.

Business

The source, who asked to remain anonymous to protect his
more than 20-year-old business, told The Tribune that one of
his clients refused to pay for more than $80,000 worth of
work, alleging that certain specifications were not followed
during the construction of his house.

However, according to the builder, the wotlk was done to
Joesties tions: and was appraised and approved.
| "The appraisal man went in and appraised the whole two
stages.

, “As soon as it came to the roof stage the owner went to the
appraiser talking all kinds of nonsense, He keeps telling the
appraiser that this stage and that stage isn't finished," he

aid.

" "That's the loophole — they know that if they fire the
contractor they don't have to pay the contractor for the
stage and they keep the money and then they get another
contractor. —

_ "This is going on ith plenty contractors now; plenty con-
tractors can't get their stage payments," the source said.

. The source said that throughout his career in the field,

"no client has ever run the money, the bank always runs
the money.”

He said that when he took the issue up with bank employ-
ees, they said there was nothing they could do as it was a mat-
ter between the client and the contractor.

They told him he would have to sue his client'to get the
money.

“Now I have to find money to pay a lawyer to sue the |

owner to get the money for my see and that's a long
process,” the builder said.

‘



New unit ‘will help prison
advance to self-sufficiency’

@ By LLOYD ALLEN .
Tribune Staff Report
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE new health diagnostic
unit at Her Majesty’s Prison will
help the facility advance
towards self-sufficiency, officials
say.

The new unit houses a com-
plete pharmacy, X-ray suite, a
laboratory, and-an electrocar-
diogram and ultrasound centre.

Built in just seven weeks,
Superintendent of Prisons Dr
Elliston Rahming said the deci-
sion on where to. construct the
diagnostic and. pharmaceutical
unit came after a long debate. |

Dr Rahming said he and the
other administrators understood
the, need for a more inclusive
health facility at the prison and

decided that to build the new
unit on top of a more than 50-
year-old-rain water pit was their
best option.

1

Boasting a myriad of
advanced medical equipment
and services, the diagnostic and
pharmaceutical unit is the latest
project in a move toward hous-
ing an all inclusive medical cen-

‘tre at the prison.

Improved

Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis, who spoke at the offi-
cial opening of the diagnostic

and pharmaceutical unit, said _

healthcare facilities at Her
Majesty’s Prison have inmiproved
dramatically since 1953, “when
the medical unit at this site con-
sisted of one small office with a
cubical partition door to dis-
pense all medication.”

Since then, the healthcare
demands of the prison have
increased drastically.

Dr Minnis said that alone in
2008, more than 1,129 inmates.

were referred to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.

On average, the prison health
service tends to 140 inmates a
week and the new unit will now
allow even more prisoners to

_ be treated, Dr Minnis said.

Minister for National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest, who

presented the keynote address ©

at the unit’s opening, said that
the construction of the facility is
in line with the United Nation’s
2005 treaty, which dictates that
it is the government’s duty to
provide adequate physical and
mental healthcare for incarcer-
ated individuals. ,
“This unit will considerably

expand the current health care ~
capacity and services provided '
‘to inmates and prison staff

through a close partnership with
the Ministry of Health and the
prisons’ department,” he said. |

Mr Turnquest said the new
diagnostic unit will allow
/

!
1

inmates who are charged with
serious crimes to receive med-
ical treatment within the prison
rather than being transported.

Community

“Vast majority of prisoners:
leave the prison at some point,
and it is definitely in the interest
of our country to do all that is
practicable to ensure that those
leaving prison and who are
being reintegrated into our
community are in'the best
health.

“We believe that this health

‘diagnostic unit will meet that

objective,” he said.

The new facility employs two
full-time nurses, two registered
nurses, a pharmacist and a com-
munity worker to assist. eight
medically trained prison offi-
cers to cater to inmates’ health-
care needs.

Iguana eating photos on
Internet lead to two arrests

FROM page one

George Town and Black Point, Exuma, to track

down the suspects.

Two people were arrested at around mid-



day yesterday in the vicinity of Black Point or
Staniel Cay in connection with the offence
which breaks Fisheries Regulations and the
Wild Animal Protection Act, prohibiting the
possession of dead or live iguanas.

Iguanas are also protected under the Con-
vention on International Trade in Endangered
Species (CITES) and as the suspects in cus-

- tody are understood to be US citizens, Mr Carey

said they could also be charged under US law
which makes it illegal to commit an offence in a
country that has a relationship with the US.

Two others also feature in the photographs
showing a group of people taunting, cooking
and eating iguanas, and taking juvenille conch.

Police investigations continue.

Mr Carey said: “We have had people poach-
ing iguanas for the pet trade but I have never
seen this sort ‘of barbaric BUNGE for con-
sumption by visitors: !

“This is personally and proféssionally very
disturbing to.me. It’s absolutely disgusting.

“It’s totally disrespectful of our laws and of
the laws of nature.

“To see guys gloating with such disrespect
and putting the pictures on such a public profile
as Facebook clearly shows they have no fear of
prosecution and we need to prove them wrong.

“We. take the responsibility to enforce wildlife .

law very seriously.”

The West Indian iguanas are some of the
‘most endangered lizards in the world and
include the thrée species and seven sub-species
native to the Bahamas,’ ;

Iguanas are threatened by development
vee their habitats and foreign animals that
eat small iguanas or iguana eggs.

Mr Carey said: “We have the greatest diver-
sity of iguanas — some only exist on small iso-
lated islands, and certainly they cannot take
any sort of pressure from humans or they won’t
survive:

“They are really a very important part of our

‘unique biodiversity and they are also an impor-



’ SOME OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS that
' appeared.on the Internet, leading to
two arrests.





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_ NIB to ensure employers pay
amount due for each employee

THE National Insurance Board
is in the process of updating its
contribution records to ensure
that all employers have paid the
amount due for each employee
for each month. |

According to NIB director
Algernon Cargill, the board is also
making sure that contributions
are accurately deposited in the
accounts of the appropriate
employees.

He said: “This exercise is vital-
ly important because each contri-
bution paid goes toward NIB’s
fulfillnient of the promise of
income-replacement. We have an
absolute obligation to ensure that
each contribution, which repre-
sents one week of a worker’s life,
is paid and is properly assigned
because one contribution can
mean the difference between a
sick, invalid or aged worker qual-
ifying for a benefit or being disal-
lowed.”

Mr Cargill admitted that over
the years, the board has not






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always been vigilant and timely
in notifying employers of gaps or
omissions in their payments.

But he said that where gaps are
identified, the board is obligated
by law to find the relevant contri-

butions and/or secure payments |

where full payments have not
been made.

‘Various government agencies
— like the Licensing Authority and
the Department of Immigration
~are now requiring letters of good
standing from NIB, to confirm
that businesses are in compliance
with the National Insurance Acct..

. Mr Cargill said “compliance”
in this context means:

e Being.up-to-date on contri- ,

butions for all employees for each
month.a business was in opera-
tion

e Submission to NIB of
employees’ work records

e Maintenance of proper
employee records

The National Insurance Act.
states that every, employer and.






self-employed person must keep

. payroll and associated records at

their place of business at all times,
to prove the correctness of their

. contributions. Failing to: do so is
_an offence.

In addition, the Buiployment
Act says employers must keep a
record of the names, addresses,
ages, wages, hours worked, annu-
al vacations and other canditions

. of work of every employee.

However, Mr Cargill said NIB
knows some employers may not

-have kept contribution records

dating back to when National

. Insurance started in 1974.

He said this: has presented a
challenge for the board and
employers, particularly when it
comes tothe issuance of letters
of good standing.

“Previously,” said Mr Cargill,
“we were reluctant to issue let-
ters of good standing where there
were gaps, even if the gaps were.
from as far back as 1974. But
we've recently taken a decision

. that where gaps exist for old peri-

ods, we will look at the payment
history of the employer and the
nature of the outstanding items,
and then make a case-by-case
decision.

“For example, in cases where
old records carinot be located but
a series of letters had previously
been issued confirming good
standing, and contributions are
otherwise current, we will work
to ensure that there is no obstruc-
tion of the employer's regulatory
processes by issuing the leyters of
good standing.”



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 3



Tia eee eee
Economic conditions ‘hurting

and helping’ real estate market



In brief

Man fined for
marijuana
possession

A PODOLEO
STREET man has been
fined $2,500 on a mari-
juana possession
charge.

Court dockets allege
that Eleazor Smith,
alias Eleazor Farquhar-
son, was found in pos-
session of a quantity of
marijuana on Friday,
January 23, 2009.

Smith pleaded not
guilty to the possession
of 3.7 ounces of mari-
juana during his
arraignment on January
26.

On Monday, Magis- |
trate Bethel fined Smith
$2,500 on the drug
charge.

Failure to pay the fine -
will result in a one-
year prison sentence.

Speculation that
teen may have

heen killed over
Super Bowl het

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The
man who was shot and
killed at Pinder’s
' Point on Sunday has
been identified as 17-
year-old Dwight
Bartlette.

Police are now
. appealing to anyone
who has information. _
about his murder to ~




comesforward. spe aa
5 Xs 3 aca
Mr Bartiette, a resi-

dent of Pinder’s Point,
was shot in the head
sometime around
10.45pm.

A concerned resident
reported hearing gun-
shots and officers
arrived on the scene,
however the police say
they have no leads at
this time.

It has been speculated
that Mr Bartlette may
have been killed over a
bet; .as.the incident
took place just after the
Super Bowl. :

“This matter remains
under active investiga-
tion and the police still
néeds thé public’s.assis-
tance in bringing clo-
sure to this matter,”
said a police spokesper-
son. :

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE beleaguered economy
is both hurting and helping
those in the real estate market -
with rents nose-diving and prop-
erties selling for well below
their initial price tags, according
to some leading realtors.

‘William Wong, president of
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation (BREA) and owner of
William Wong Realty, said that
now is an ideal time for people
who are looking for a place to
rent to get.a good deal, and for
those already renting to negoti-
ate with their landlords to low-
er their monthly payments.

‘Values

He said he has seen a 20 to 30
per cent drop in rental values
in the last six to eight months, a
reduction he attributes to two
things — the departure of a sig-
nificant number of ex-patriate
workers who were let go by
struggling companies, and the
fact that some former renters
have moved back in with their
parents in response to financial
difficulties.

Mr Wong said that with the
overall demand ’for rentals
down, and vacancies increasing,
landlords have been more will-
ing to ‘soften their rent

_ demands.

“Owners feel it’s better to. get
someone inside the house and
get something for it than to get

BREA president says rents -
nose-diving, properties selling |
well below their initial price tags

nothing at all,” he said.

The BREA president said
“the more desperate owners
become,” the more willing they
will be to further lower their
rents.

When. it comes to properties
for sale, Mr Wong said that in
his view those prices have not
been affected, and he does not
foresee a major change in this
regard unless banks significant-
ly tighten their lending condi-

’ tions.

“T-have not noticed any of the
prices going down. Our market
is different from the US mar-
ket, we have a problem with
inventory (being limited). Our
prices have not changed,” he
said.

However, another realtor
with a prominent high-end
Bahamian real estate company
said that after the global finan-
cial crisis took hold with a

- vengeance in September last

year, he has seen closing price
tags on homes dropping by as
much as 25 per cent from their
initial asking prices.

Calling Mr Wong’s assess-
ment “entirely wrong”, based
on his own experience, the real
estate agent said: “From what
we have seen, it seems we are

about 20 per cent to 25 per cent
down from our asking prices.”

“Nobody’s buying anything
unless they’re getting a deal on

it - even in the high-end mar-

ket,” he said.

Impact

He noted, however, that the ~

extent of the impact of the eco-

_ nomic downturn on sales val-

ues may be “skewed” slightly
by the fact that some asking
prices were set when the market
was in much better shape.
Some local banks have indi-

cated that they are being far

more circumspect in. their lend-

ing practices in light of rising |

numbers of loans falling into
arrears over the past year.

In its most recent report, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
noted that the percentage of
mortgages in arrears rose by 2.8
per cent-overall in 2008 to 13.4
per cent - an increase of $100.5
million.

Meanwhile, the percentage -
_of commercial and consumer

loans in arrears rose by 6.23 per
cent and 2.49 per cent to 15.5
per cent and 10.8 per cent,
respectively.

Stimulus package ‘not what

the tourism market needs’

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
. lallen@tribunemedia.net

MORE than 1,500 Bahamians*} ~~

have been laid-off from the

tourism. sector, but industry offi-

cials say a stimulus package is
not what the market needs.
While several countries in the
region have already introduced
initiatives to bolster tourism, the
Bahamas government has resist-

~ ed going down that path. /

Robert Sands, president of the

‘Bahamas Hotel Association!

(BHA) said on Monday that bet-
ter business practices are the key
to the industry’s survival.

Mr Sands said market confi-
dence is one of the biggest chal-
lenges the industry faces, but
added that. this could be

improved if ticket prices dropped. He said it has
“always been a bone of contention for‘travellers
that the airfare for getting to the Bahamas was

quite high.”

At a time when each dollar counts, such a dis-
incentive to travellers could cripple the industry,

he argued.

The Bahamas is one of the closest tourism des-
tinations to the US, and Mr Sands believes this
should be reflected in travel and vacation pack-

ages.

BRA chairman Frank Comito said that the .

association has taken note of the
several tourism stimulus pack-
ages already introduced in similar
markets,

In Jamaica in December of last

year,,Prime,Minister Bruce.
Golding approvedia $6.4 million -

package tobe used. to stimulate
that country’s struggling tourism
industry.

Belize followed suit in Janu-

ary, injecting around $30 million |

into its tourism sector. The funds

| are to be used to offset the oper-

ational costs of a number of

\y resorts.

But State Minister for Finance

| Zhivargo Laing told The Tribune

that it would not be in the best

~| interest of the Bahamas for the



government to propose such a
package here. .
“In what is the worst econom-

ic scenario since the Great Depression, it is not
practical, nor possible, for the government to
afford to do what private companies cannot afford

to do, which is to keep and maintain people at

work where there is no demand.” 4

He said anyone who suggests otherwise is “liv-.
ing in a fantasy.”

Mr Laing said that the only viable option for
the government in the present economic envi-
ronment is to continue to accelerating capital
infrastructure programmes and offering social
assistance packages to individuals.

INS won't go digital for another three year's

’ Mi By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter



ZNS TV will not go digital
for another three'years, it has
been announced.

A spokesperson for the
Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas said: “We began by
creating a digital work-flow in
radio, which we have completed
and we are in the process now of
upgrading our television tech-
nology to digital through a
phased integration process.

“We expect that we will very
shortly be able to produce a dig-
ital work flow in television that
will provide digital transmission

feed to Cable Bahamas for dis-.

tribution on its cable network.”

As the world turns digital, and
the United States is scrambling
to have every household ready
for the transition in a few weeks,
the spokesperson said ZNS TV
will be affected on two fronts:
“One, on the consumer front,
because America is moving to
' digital television they have
phased out the production of
analog television sets so
Bahamians will be hard-pressed

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to find analog sets in the US
along with finding parts for the
ones they already have.

“How it affects broadcasting
is from a different prospective.
Broadcast manufacturers are no

longer producing analog tech-
. nology and so with the equip-

ment that we and many other

‘developing countries have, it will

be difficult for us to find techni-
cal support for that equipment.”

As of February 17, all nation-
al television stations in the Unit-
ed States will stop broadcasting
in analog and begin broadcast-
ing only in digital.

Digital Television (DTV)
enables broadcasters to offer



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Director of marketing and
pay-per-view at Cable Bahamas,
David Burrows, said the com-
pany has been ready to make
the change to digital for nearly
four years.

“We went through a transi-
tion in 2005 from analog to dig-
ital but we were still using an
analog tuner to a digital tuner.
We completed that transition by
the end of 2006 and it was a very
quick transition as customers
adopted the equipmént very
quickly,” Mr Burrows said.












+ YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)








ZNS said it will continue to

broadcast in analog for those |

customers who do not have
access to cable television.

End Tabl
Cushions

NNO UTS eraoe tty

they have not been paid

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter






STAFF at Solomon’s Mines claim that they have not been paid
for a month and that management has been tight-lipped on when
their cheques will be issued.

Two of the jewellery merchant’s ben atahs contacted The Tri-
bune yesterday to say they are furious and demanding answers.

They said this is not the first time Solomon’s Mines has disre-
garded the needs of its staff.

“The 30th of January has just past and there has been no pay-
ment to staff as yet; no word as to when it is going to be done,”
one said.

“We all have needs and obligations. People have to pay rent
and school fees. The banks are calling, loans have to be paid.
You can not expect people to come to work without being paid. I
do not know the last time they made pay-roll on time,” the
employee said.

The employee said he understands that hard economic times
have hit the country, but said this does not give Solomon’s Mines
the right to neglect its employees.

“Tt’s not like we’re not conscious of the fact we are in an eco-
nomic downturn — no one is disputing that. When you take it to
the point of not addressing the needs of the staff or their con-
cerns, that is pretty bad,” the employee said.

President of Solamon’s Mines, Mark Finlayson, said he could
not comment on whether or not the employees have been paid,
but said he knows far too well about the effect the economy is
having on his business.

“We started making preparations for this in the early part of
2007 and for someone who has been involved in Bay Street since
1989, I have never seen anything like this before. We have gotten
rid of the non-profitable stores and as a result we had to lay off
people, so over time we have been cutting back,” Mr Finlayson
said.

“The point is if payment was late, my thing is — it is always bet-
ter late than never. We have always paid our people and I would
be the last person.to tell you we have never paid a day late.
Times are tough and all of us have to appreciate every penny we
have,” said Mr Finlayson. pe





































JACK VICTOR

Is What You
Wear To A
‘Black Tie
Affair

at

The Heal Ball

OMOLLLIRULLULLLLULLOOEULLUA LU tt

|ostansioencencnnttaad

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
“Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street’
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com







PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited We must strongly

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master . e e.

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M. G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday



Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F- 485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Obama’s food safety pledge is crucial

WITH the peanut butter scare making
news — the latest in a series involving sal-
monella-contaminated foods including toma-
toes, jalapeno peppers and E. coli-contami-
nated spinach — there again rises the public

‘clamour for doing something.

In the not distant past, studies have con-
firmed that the people reasonably enough
are very much concerned about the safety
of the food they eat.

Only government has the expertise and
authority to do something about it. Food pro-
ducers who are by tradition and lack of fed-
eral resources mainly relied upon to monitor
themselves fall short, as the record demon-
strates.

The Food and Drug Administration over-
sees some 80 per cent of America’s food sup-
ply, excluding meat, poultry and processed
egg products. As its name makes plain, it is
also the overseer of the nation’s medical sup-
plies.

As the peanut butter brouhaha was gath-
ering force, the Government Accountability
Office, the investigative arm of Congress,
put medical products on their High-Risk List
on January 22.

‘While Americans ponder whether in the
face of 500 illnesses and eight deaths to con-
tinue to send their children off to school with
the popular peanut butter and jelly sand-
wiches, or if they should go on nibbling on
cookies and other goodies containing peanut
paste, they should be no less wary about the
medicinal pills they are ingesting in ever-
increasing quantities.

Placement on the High-Risk List was
earned because “the American consumer

~ may not be adequately protected from unsafe.

and ineffective medical products” resulting in
part from “the globalization of the medical
products industry.”

In the recent past you might recall when
consumers, allied with state governments that
helped them pay for needed drugs, wanted to
import drugs from Canada and elsewhere at
a much lower cost.

Among the arguments in opposition put
forward by the pharmaceutical industry was
that their products were American-made and,
therefore, safe.

Neglected by Pharma, surely by oversight,
is that for years U.S. drug makers were
importing ingredients for their pills that were
made in America. And, you might well ask,

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where from did those ingredients come? The
answer, of course, is the country that makes
a host of lower-cost products, namely China,
now the world’s dominant supplier of medi-
cinal ingredients.

Yes, folks, that’s the same China that .
recently sentenced two of its citizens to death

for purveying milk and milk products ‘adul-
terated with melamine. Melamine is a.toxic
chemical that can cause cancer and renal fail-
ure, among other dire illnesses. It was insert-
ed into baby formula to disguise the fact that
the milk had been watered and to give it the
appearance of a higher protein value. It
caused at least six deaths and some 208, 000
illnesses in China.

In the U:S. it led to a clampdown by the

FDA that imposed new testing to keep taint-
‘ed products out of our country. Melamine

has also been detected in more than a dozen
countries in eggs, yogurt, chocolates and
frozen desserts.

China is also the exporter of tainted pet
food and toothpaste, among other consumer
items. As a result, that is a country whose
medical products need to come under the
closest scrutiny until and unless they man-
age to get a firmer control of their export
products.

Inspection is costly and daunting. The FDA
estimates that it regulates 65,500 domestic
food firms. If each were inspected one time,
it would cost $524 million.

For years it has been clear that the FDA
did not have sufficient staff or budget to doa
thorough job. During the late and unlament-
ed Bush administration that deficiency was
exacerbated because of ideological opposition
to bolstering the regulatory resources of
responsible federal agencies.

Consequently, the FDA, in the face of
spurring GAO reports, dragged its heels in
seeking more funding during the Bush years.
Although there were some increases, they
were not nearly sufficient.

Rectifying those shortcomings now will
take more than it might otherwise have
required. But it is ufterly essential that the
Obama administration back up. its pledges
to increase the safety of Americans by final-
ly equipping regulatory agencies with effec-
tive means and mandates.

(This article was written by Harry Rosenfeld

-- ¢.2009 Albany Times Union).



rights agenda

_ EDITOR, The Tribune.

The news item titled:

“Bahamas ready for a gay PM,
says ex-MP” written by Brent
Dean, which appeared in The
Nassau Guardian of Saturday,
January 31, 2009 begs a
response.

Does the writer understand

__ the direction he is asking The

Bahamas to take?

It is now abundantly clear
how these psychopathic forces
have been able to corrupt
every facet of Bahamian life,
confusing the Bahamian pub-
lic and the Church with their
own personal agenda, mas-
querading as good public pol-
icy.

In retrospect, the manner in
which religious, judicial and
governmental decisions were
confused by deliberate link-
ages to human rights and gay

. Tights as synonymous issues,
‘resulted in failed public poli-

cy and a general confusion
about governance in the
Bahamas.

This effort has been. aided
by many international groups
emanating from the United
Nations, posing as seemingly
innocent NGO’s (non-gov-
ernmental organisations) pur-
porting to be doing “good”
around the world.

The difficulty arises when
homosexuals attempt to dis-
tinguish between their sexual
orientation and their charac-
ter. No such separation is pos-
sible and this only reinforces
how deep the psychopathy is,
when they attempt to do so.

aa WEe

letters@tribunemedia.net






There are sinister character
and personality disorders that
are generally a part of dys-
functional sexual orientation.
Some of these traits include:-
pathologic lying, loss of emo-
tional affect, grandiosity; a
sense of entitlement; a
propensity to deceive, cheat
and manipulate; a lack of
empathy and remorse; an
inability to develop deep emo-
tional and social connections
with others; and the view that
others are merely resources
to be exploited — callously
and without regret.

Industrial and Organisa-
tional Psychologists Robert D
Hare, Ph D, and Paul Babiak,
Ph D, experts in psychopathic
studies and co-authors of the
book titled: “Snakes in Suits”
have been studying psy-
chopaths and their effects for

years. Hare, the creator of the -

standard tool for diagnosing
psychopathy and author of
“Without Conscience: The
Disturbing World of the Psy-
chopaths Among us” writes
thusly: “Psychopaths invest
energy in creating and main-
taining a facade that facilitates
their careers...they convince
decision-makers. of their
unique talents and abilities —
albeit based on lies and. dis-
tortions.”

These morally and ethical- i.

ly bankrupt individuals are
capable of the most heinous

‘acts, plunging any society

overpowered by their fraud-
ulent manipulations into chaos
and anarchy. .

. Unless The Bahamas wishes
to go the way of all ancient
gay societies, whether biblical
or secular, (which is destruc-
tion) then for the sake of our
children — the future of The
Bahamas and for the remain-
ing normal population, we
need to vigorously oppose this
sinister agenda regarding
homosexual rights, which so
far has been successfully mas-
querading as good public pol-
icy. It is now scientifically con-
firmed that behaviour is con-
tagious.

In response to the writer’s
statement; “There are no
openly gay people currently
involved in Bahamian politics”
We ask the question: What is
the difference, if any, between

openly gay” and “closetted

9

q applaud the Prime Minis-
ter of Jamaica, the Hon Bruce
Golding; who during an inter-
view on the BBC TV show
Hardtalk last year, said that
his Cabinet was not the place
for gays, thus barring the pos-
sibility of their ascent to the
Office of the Prime Minister in
Jamaica. “Sure they can be in
the Cabinet. Not mine. Not
mine,” he said.

It is a pity that we.are
unable to make such an asser-
tion in The Bahamas!

PHILLIPPA RUSSELL
~ Nassau,
February 1, 2009.

Noise pollution incompatible with
Bahamas National Trust principles

EDITOR, TheTribune.

Tread with almost disbelief .

Leonard Smith’s letter, in
which he outlined the rude
response by a Bahamas
National. Trust executive to

his complaint about the latest’

bombardment of noise from
The Retreat.

I, too, have experienced
first hand the ear shattering,
window shaking music. from

_ the Trust until the wee hours.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MADELEINE DELHOMME
of ALLEN DRIVE, CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as.a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28" day of
January, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and enzenshie, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Private Family Island Resort

Operation



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Invites application for the following position:

WATERSPORTS MANAGER

The successful candidate should have the following

Certified scuba diving Instructor

Proficient in Water-sports Medicine

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Fully experienced in basic sea survival procedures
Experience in the Hospitality Industry is an asset
Good communication and motivational skills are

- Individual will be required to live on property.
Salary will be based on qualifications and experience
_ We offer excellent benefits

Applications should be email to
cmajor@grp.sandals.com

Had the wind been from a dif-
ferent direction, my family

also would have spent a sleep- _ |

less Saturday night.

We have complained to
Trust executive director Eric
Carey, the Wulff Road police
and our MP, Loretta Butler,
the latter of who made repre-
sentation to the Trust on our
behalf.

We were assured by the
Trust that a Custodian was
present at all events to make
sure the music was kept at an
acceptable level, and that the
slip in policy would be
addressed forthwith.

The Trust’s refusal to deal
with the problem demon-
strates contempt for the Roy-

al Bahamas Police Force, our . :

Member of Parliament and
the hardworking, law-abiding

citizens of Village Road and
surrounding environs.

It also begs the question;
does the Bahamas National
Trust think it is above the
law?

I have been loathe to write
a letter to the newspaper —
and I am sure many others
have as well — because of the
good work the Bahamas
National Trust has done over
the years.

But enough is enough.

Noise pollution is not com-
patible with the principles of
the Bahamas National Trust
and the utter disdain exhibited
to the police, our MP and the
residents is not acceptable.

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
February 2, 2009.

Why are no Bahamians being
arrested for employing people
without Immigration permits?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Firstly, the Minister of State for Immigration should know that
no immigration permit is to be issued without payment being

made.

It is so simple to correct any infractions without cameras
rolling — simply send a letter to the offending company or
person requiring them to pay within 48 hours or the permit is
automatically cancelled. Immigration go and advise the expat on
the permit and advise him that unless his employer corrects the
matter immediately he will have to leave.

Why are no Bahamians being arrested for employing people

without Immigration permits?

If the Haitians get to know that unless you have a permit sete
is no work, in other words kill the work market, you will never

kill this practice.

I was glad to hear that the Minister of State is finally doing
something, at least investigating possible trafficking, but let’s see
actions on this — people in court and dealt with to the fullest

extent of the law.

Least we forget, the Minister of State for Immigration is
directly responsible to the Minister of Foreign Affairs & Immi-
gration so one presumes he works under instructions although
we must congratulate the Minister for his very public face and
seemingly never ending editorial support of our tabloid.

H JOHNSON
Nassau,
January 17, 2009.





i oa
Ryan trying to whip
up support for his

© In brief
Motorcyclist
killed after
crashing into
utility pole

‘i By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama recorded its second
traffic fatality for the year on
Monday evening when a 33-
year-old motorcyclist died
after crashing into a utility
pole on East Mall Drive.

Asst Supt Clarence Reckley
reported that the victim, Shan-
‘non Comacho, of Buckingham
Lane, Freeport, was riding a
2006 Honda 600, licence plate

number 465, when he lost con- |

trol and collided with a con-
crete pole in the median.

The accident occurred
around 5.51pm near the AID
building. The victim was
severely injured and was taken
to Rand Memorial Hospital, °
where he was pronounced
dead at 6.48pm.

The accident is still under
investigation. Meanwhile,
police are appealing to
motorists to drive with cau-
tion.

Plant sale to
take place on.
Saturday

PLANT lovers from all over
the Bahamas will travel to
Nassau this weekend for the
Horticultural Society of the
Bahamas’ annual plant sale.

The event will take place on
Saturday, February 7, from
10am to 2pm at the Bahamas
National Trust's headquarters,
the Retreat, on Village Road.

The plant sale committee
includes Dory Bowleg, HSB
president; Dale Pearce, HSB .
vice-president; Cindy Wilde
and Sarah Lobosky, sale chair-
persons, and Sara Parker, who
does publicity for HSB.

“There is always something
new to spark a gardener's

imagination at this sale,” said,

Ms Bowleg. ° =

There will be special booths
by Flamingo Nursery for.
orchids and supplies; Marina
Greaves with her water gar-
den features; Beryl Sheasby
with her special Tillandsias;
Dale Pearce with special Ade-
niums or Desert Roses, and
bedding plants and fruit trees
from Errol Strachan’s Garden
of Eden. ©

Popular |

Herbs and hanging baskets,
bromeliads and orchids are
. always popular and in great
supply.

Gardening guru Sara Parker
said, “I recommend the bare
root Bromeliads which you
can move around a new land-
scape until you get it right.
The HSB sale has a large col-
lection to choose from at very
good prices. The BNT garden
gives you great ideas on land-
scaping, too."

“Members show off new
skills and new plant life,” said
Ms Parker, a founding mem-
ber and host of the popular
new home and garden show
“Bahamas Realty Now.”

Plants on sale will range in
price from less than a dollar to
more than $100 depending on
size and rarity. HSB members
grow the plants and label
them for sale with 15 per cent
of the sale price going to the
HSB.

Of special interest each year
are hundreds, possibly thou-
sands, of dramatic.Bromeli-: °
ads, from tiny Tillandsias or
“airplants” to gigantic hybrids
with five foot- long leaves.

’- Members also often-donate
bare root plants to the sale for
landscaping.:

Ms Wilde, plant sale co-
chairman, urges members to
bring plants, labelled with
proper sales tags, between
2pm and 6pm on Friday, and
from 8am to 9am on Saturday.

Plant shoppers are urged to
wear hats and sunscreen, °
arrive early and bring their
own boxes, bags and trucks.
Some help is available for
transporting large plants to
the parking area courtesy of
Queen’s College. There is no
admission charge.

ia He
aU ty

eM hah
PHONE: 322-2157



COB moving forward
on green complex

THE College of the Bahamas is ready to move to
the next phase of assisting the country with small
island sustainability issues, and is inviting architects
to submit proposals for the anticipated GTR Camp-
bell Small Island Sustainability Complex which will
serve as the headquarters for the college’s pro-
gramme in this crucial area. ;

The facility will house classrooms, laboratories,
lecturing facilities, library space, faculty offices and
administration spaces.

There will also be a green house, a farm house and
a chemical storage facility.

College officials are in talks with the government
about the transfer of a plot of land to the institution
at the government-owned Gladstone Road Agri-
cultural complex, where the facility is likely to be
constructed.

The GTR Complex will be named after famous
ship builder George T R Campbell, who is also the
founder of the Freedom Foundation, which donat-
ed $10 million to the college for the development of
the Small Island Sustainability (SIS) programme.

The college has budgeted $8 million of that sum
for the land preparation, construction and furnishing
of the facility. .

Consultant to the college for capital works devel-
opment Melanie Roach said the design of the SIS
facility will be challenging. Interested architectural
firms have until Friday, February 6, to submit pro-
posals to the College. The complex will be a green
facility in design, construction and utilisation.

the design team because we don’t just want a four-
square reinforced concrete building that you can
find anywhere,” said Ms Roach.

_ “We are looking for creative ways in which to
have the facility constructed so that it is in and of
itself sustainable.”

Ms Roach said that she envisions incorporating
clean energy options and technologies in the facili-
ty’s design. “The facility is going to be a living lab-
oratory, so we want to be able to show what can be
done anywhere in a small island state and we want
them to be able to take advantage of the natural
wind with regard to the ventilation and their place-
ment of the building is very.important.

“With regards to the landscaping, that should be
incorporated into the design so that the trees provide
a natural shade. There are all sorts of building tech-
nologies that can be.used,” she said.

The expectation is also that the facility will be
powered by wind, solar or biodiesel energy in line
with the green concept.

Once the proposals for the facility’s design have
been reviewed, firms will be shortlisted and then a

. selection committee will conduct interviews.

That committee will make a recommendation to
the College Council on which firm should be select-
ed. :

Ms Roach said the College expects the architect to
complete the design in time to go out to tender by
the end of 2009 so that construction can begin in Jan-
uary 2010. The projected completion date is June

Gladstone Thurston/BIS Photo

“The facility is really going to tax the ingenuity of



benefit An

@ GLADSTONE THURSTON

NICHOLL’S TOWN -
Lucayan Tropical’s proposed
operation in North Andros will
advance agriculture and benefit

. farmers there.

That was the message deliv-
ered by Bahamas Agricutural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
and Lucayan Tropical auring a
meeting with the North Andros
District Council last weekend.

“You could only benefit from
Lucayan’s presence here,” BAIC
executive chairman Edison Key
said at the meeting. Lucayan’s
sales manager Roger Rolle said:
“There is no need to feel that we
are coming here and put anybody
out of business. We intend to do

exactly the opposite and that,is ,,

to work together so that every-
body at the end of the day gets a
piece of the-pie.”

‘ In pursuit of the government’s
food security policy, the Ministry,
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources and BAIC have been
encouraging Bahamians to tap
into the many millions of dollars

' spent on importing food.

Among those present at the
meeting were Administrator Dr
Huntley Christie, Chief Council-
jor Brian Cleare, BAIC’s domes-
tic investment officer Alphonso
Smith and local government offi-
cials. °

Vision

Mr Key was accompanied by
general manager Benjamin Rah-
ming, secretary to the board of
BAIC Joyce Treco, and assistant
general manager Arnold Dorsett.

“We have a vision, and that is
for farming to improve in this
country,” said Mr Rolle. “We are
farmers just like you and we are
passionate about farming.

“We know that we need to doa
far better job at feeding ourselves
than we are doing right now. We
are far too dependent on
imports.”

‘The Bahamian-owned Lucayan
Tropical; operator of a huge
hydroponics greenhouse farm in
New Providence, grows mainly
tomatoes. This season they have
been able to move, about 1,500
cases each week. An additional
300 cases is coming out of

‘ Andros. That takes care of near-

ly half the Bahamian market.

Lucayan Tropical is interested
in utilising unused land in North
Andros and, in collaboration with
farmers there, increase agricul-
tural production. |

Some farmers were reportedly
concerned about the impact a
large operator like Lucayan Trop-
ical would have on their liveli-
hood. “Do not feel uneasy and
don’t listen to rumours,” said Mr
Rolle. “We are quite open. You
can visit us anytime.

“We are happy to let you know -

our intentions. We want to work
with Andros farmers. Like Mr
Key, we want to:improve farming.
This is just a start and we are hap-
py to be a part of it.”

« ’

‘ment still has to allow tomatoes to

. greatest competitor,” he said.



2011.

Lucayan Tropical to
ros farmers



S SS SS

PUMPKINS galore are flowing into the North Andros packing house.
BAIC executive chairman Edison Key (leit) and domestic investment offi-
cer Alphonso Smith examine them.
‘In a pilot project. already
underway, Lucayan Tropical pro-
vided Andros farmers with about
60,000 sweet pepper seedlings.
Most. of them are on course for
harvesting within two weeks.

Lucayan Tropical takes care of
packaging and shipping. And,
according to Mr Rolle, “the
(North Andros) farmers get more
of the profits than we do.”

The company is also keen on
purchasing other produce out of
Andros and moving them to mar-
ket at their expense.

“We are more than glad to buy
from the local farmers,” said
Lucayan Tropical’s general man-
ager Tim Hauber.

“If we can meet the demand
then there can be some strength

to stand up to the government

and say ‘don’t allow imported i

tomatoes. We have all the toma- badd ae ‘
toes we need.’ LEQ

“But the reality is, that is not \ _

the case, even with us cranking ~
out 1,500 cases a week and a few
hundred more coming from here
and other islands. The govern-



come in to feed our people.”
Administrator Dr ‘Christie
urged farmers to take advantage
of the opportunities that partner-
ing with Lucayan Tropical will
bring. “They should not be
looked at as our enemy or our

“There should be a degree of col-
laboration. Farmers were very
appreciative of the seedlings they
got from Lucayan because seeds
cost a lot of money.”

BAIC executive chairman Mr
Key said farmers “could only ben-
efit from Lucayan’s presence in
North Andros.”

“We are all Bahamians and we
have to work together,” he said.
“We have to look at the big pic-
ture. We are not looking at that
three to four hundred million dol-
lars worth of food that we are
importing.

“We are just looking at some
people saying ‘well, what is this
going to mean with regard to the

‘competition with the local farm-

ers?’

“There are going to be benefits
for the North Andros farmers. I
can assure you.that Lucayan
Tropical is not coming in here to
run you out of business.”

A NEW TOOL shed has
been constructed in
North Andros to com-
plement recently
bought farm tractors.
Pictured from right are
BAIC executive chair-
man Edison Key, gen-
eral manager Benjamin
Rahming, and domes-
tic investment officer
Alphonso Smith.

Gladstone Thurston/BIS Photo






bid for Kennedy |

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



ATTORNEY Derek Ryan, PLP hopeful for the Kennedy
constituency, is attempting to galvanise support for his bid for the
controversial seat.

Although he has not received an official nomination from the
party, Mr Ryan is canvassing the area with branch members and
party generals, and plans to open a community centre in the sub-
division. :

He has also purchased a van to assist immobile seniors from "
the area.."We are gearing up, we have been doing so for some
time in that area. But I have not been given the nod by the
machinery of the party for the nomination, so in the interim all
we are trying to do is meet with people to talk with them," said
Mr Ryan, who is’a ratified PLP National General Council mem-
ber for the constituency. 1

The constituency is considered to be a PLP stronghold,
one that political pundits. believe should be the “reward” fo
a candidate with long-standing party connections.

Mr Ryan said he feels that the seat should.go to a hopeful
who has the constituents’ best interests at heart, someone
who will not switch political allegiance.

Stabilising

"T think that the seat should go to somebody who can best rep-
resent the people. People are concerned because they don't
know whether or not Kennedy will ever have a stabilising force
(because) of what has went on before.

"I'm working along with the branch, and (party) generals to
again put some measures in place so that people feel that they are
going to be secure. So they don't have to worry about another
two years down the road that Mr Ryan (is) crossing the floor, or ”
deciding ‘listen I get into this, I ain' for it anymore’," he said.

The current representative for the area, Kenyatta Gibson,
resigned from the PLP early last year, serving as an Independent
MP in the House of Assembly before officially joining the FNM ~
last month. Kennedy is a highly coveted seat, with would-be can-
didates such as Omar Archer and Craig Butler said to be
competing for the nomination. 4

Former head of police prosecutions Keith Bell has also
emerged as a possible contender.

However, Mr Ryan believes that his support base in the area

’ is solid. "We have a lot of wonderful, talented young people who

are interested in Kennedy and I think Mr Christie at the end of
the day.is going to do what's best for the party and choose the
best candidate for Kennedy - and I support Mr Christie.in that,”
he said. *- :
PLP leader Perry Christie told The Tribune that the party has
not yet begun the formal process of selecting a Kennedy candi-
date. The Kennedy constituency has seen two prominent res-
ignations in the recent past. Mr Gibson resigned in 2008, and -
current leader of Opposition business in the House of Assem-
bly Dr Bernard Nottage resigned from the PLP when he was
the area’s MP in 2000. He later rejoined the party.





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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Some pet-food |
products are

being recalled action

FROM page one

recall are sold locally.

Mr Turnquest said, as far as he was aware, none of the pet food
brands were sold locally. However, where many people may
purchase pet products abroad as they do with other items, it was
important to the ensure pet-food was free of peanut ingredients.

Popular US animal food retailer PetSmart, last week put a vol-
untary recall on at least 12 of its pet snack products.

In a press statement, the company said: “With the recent
FDA announcement of a salmonella investigation involving
peanut butter products distributed through the Peanut Corpo-
ration of America (PCA), we are working closely with all of our
vendors to verify whether there are any implications for our cus-
tomers and their pets through the products sold in our stores.”

Although there are no confirmed cases in the US or locally of
pets falling ill after consuming these products, PetSmart had since
recalled the products as a precaution.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has posted sev-
eral recall notifications for pet snacks possibly containing ingre-
dients from PCA, which may be contaminated with Salmonella
Typhimurium.

Most persons or animals infected with this strain of salmonella:

can easily develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps with-
in 12 to 72 hours of infection.

The illness usually lasts four to seven days, and most recover
without treatment.

In some cases, the Salmonella infection may become extreme-
ly aggressive, spreading to the blood stream and intestines, and
without proper treatment may lead to death.

‘Over the last four months, nearly 500 people in the US and
Canada have been reported to be infected with Salmonella
infection. At least six have died.

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Wilchcombe taking legal

FROM page one

“T worked all my life to
build my character, all my
life to build my reputation
and I will let no one take
that from me,” Mr Wilch-
combe told his constituents
on Monday evening.

“T have instructed my
attorneys in the United
States to begin the process
for legal action to defend my
reputation against the char-
acter assassination launched
at me. ,

“Tt happened once before

in our country and I can tell ,

you in West End tonight, it
will not happen to me and I
won’t take that lightly.”
West End_ residents
packed the town hall build-
ing in that settlement to
hear from their MP, who
delivered a 30-minute
address, which was also car-
ried live on Love 97 Radio.
The MP was taken in for
questioning on January 23
to. assist police with their
investigations into the
alleged attempted extortion
of US actor John Travolta,
following the death of his
16-year-old son, Jett Tra-

’ volta, at West End, Grand

Bahama on January 2.

Mr Wilchcombe was
released, however, his busi-
ness partner and PLP col-
league, former senator,
lawyer Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter, was charged with extor-
tion, along with ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne.
Both were granted $50,000
bail.

MP Wilchcombe thanked

his family, close friends, and *

those PLP colleagues, who
have supported him and has
vowed to defend his reputa-
tion:

.. The former journalist and





Monee

ZNS broadcaster praised the

‘Bahamian media, those who
represented the high level

of journalism and profes-
sionalism in their reporting
of the facts in relation to the
alleged extortion plot.

Journalists

“As-one who once walked
among them, I looked on

with pride as Bahamian

journalists took the high
road while some of the
biggest media brands in the
world chose to take the low
road. But rest assured that
my personal battles in that
regard will be handled,” he
said.

“This most recent episode
of what can only be
described as journalistic ter-
rorism by segments of the
foreign media was not the
first, and sadly, is unlikely
to be the last.

“Where sensationalism
has become the grist of the

‘media money mill, truth has

FROM page one

become its first
casualty...even within some
of the most hallowed halls
of Journalism,” he said.

This is the second time
that.a Bahamian politician
was caught up in an alleged
scandal involving a US Hol-
lywood celebrity.

Mr Wilchcombe stressed
that the more important bat-
tle is to protect the reputa-
tion and character of the
Bahamas and its people.

“Our country must never
be assailed because some-
one chooses to-do so,
because they believe they
have the power to do so or
because they believe in this
imperialistic approach
where they dominate those
that are small because they

_are large — they don’t have

that right.

“As a people, we are leg-

endary for opening our
hearts and our homes to the
world. From our hospitali-
ty, we have built a tourism
economy of unparalleled
quality. We value our guests
and take pride in treating
them well.

“But no one should mis-
take our willingness to serve
with servitude; nor should
they confuse: our simplicity
with simple-mindedness. We
are nobody’s fool to be
chewed up and spat out.

“Bahamians, like every-

one else, must stand against
every display of disrespect
against them and their insti-
tutions by agents of arro-
gance and ignorance. In the
face of raw power and
brutish behaviour, we must
be willing to stand firm and
to insist on our right to live
our lives the Bahamian
way... which is one of
respect for the law and for
the rights of every person,

against US media

Bahamian or not. +

“We are not playground
operators, just here to col-
lect gate receipts, put on a
costume and smile for the
customers. This is our
home... and this is our life.

Rules

_“We set the rules for all
whom we welcome here. It
is my hope that every per-
son charged with the
responsibility of protecting
the integrity of Bahamian
institutions will convey that
message to anyone who tries
to subvert them, whether
from inside or out,” said Mr
Wilchcombe..

The West End MP has not
revealed the names of those
media houses in the US that
he intends take legal action
against.

Well known West End
resident Artis Neely, a
staunch PLP supporter,
agrees with Mr Wilchcombe.

“As far as J am concerned
he is correct, but in my opin-
ion he was little light in
some of things and he
should) have’ been a
little more direct in some
things.

“T felt he could have
brought more information
to the public as to certain
things that happened, but I
am sure because of good
judgment he made the
decision not to,” Mr Neely
said.

Another resident, who
identified herself as Mar-
garet, said that she will con-
tinue to pray for Mr Wilch-
combe. .“I know that the
reports in the (US) media
were a.lie and I am happy
he has decided to take some
action against them,” she
said.

Ricardo Junior, the electrician’s eldest son,
described how he found out about his 37-year-old
father’s death when he stopped by to see him
later on Tuesday morning.

“They told me Daddy got shot and they weren’t
sure if he was living. I thought they were lying to
me. Then I run to the hospital and they told me he
was dead,” he said quietly as he stared at the
bloodied sofa on which his father was killed.

“My Daddy was just like me. We don’t bother
no one, we keep to ourselves,” he added.

Her clothes and hands stained with the blood of
her son, 51-year-old Sylvia Ramsay said the
tragedy unfolded as her boyfriend, Kermit Hep-
burn, was preparing to go to work.

“Kermit — he work to the dump — he opened’
the front door and he didn’t know nobody was °

there, but there were three fellas outside and
they lick him down right there.

“When they lick him down, they asked for
‘Cardo. One of them held (Kermit) down by his
head with their foot. Then one of them came in
here and he told me to go back in my room. I
went back in my room and then I heard. ‘Pap!’
(bullet fired). They shoot ‘Cardo,” she said,
adding that her infant grandson was also in the
room with her.

According to his friends and family, Ricardo

FROM page one

Claiming that the PLP is

PLP hopeful

Man is shot dead

had been robbed outside by a group of masked
men about a week earlier.

Mr Hepburn said that barely “seconds” passed
between the point at which the men entered the
house and when they killed Ricardo.‘

“They must’ve seen where he was laying, they
just walked straight in and shot him,” he said.

Despite their closeness in age, 42-year-old
Department of Environmental Health Services
employee said he considered the 37-year-old like
a son to him and in turn Cardo called him “Dad.”

““Cardo was a nice, loving young man. He’s
not my son but that’s how I take him, because
anything I ask .him to do...If I’m sick he takes
me to the hospital; if I need medicine, he’ll try .
help me. If we don’t have everything in the house
to cook, he’ll help buy grocery,” he said, teary-
eyed, standing in the family’s front room.

Both Mr Hepburn and the victim’s mother
commended the police for their quick response to
the incident. They were alerted by Mr Hepburn,
who ran to the nearby Quakoo Street station to
report the killing after the masked assailants fled
the scene.

Yesterday, police press liaison officer Walter
Evans said that no arrests have yet been made in
connection with the incident.

homosexuality, then “so be it.”
In a brief interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Mr Bodie

steeped with persons who lead

_ “alternate lifestyles”, Mr Archer

said that he will not allow him-
self to be bullied into accepting
their choices.

Appearing as a guest on the
94.9FM ‘Real Talk’ show, Mr
Archer was asked by host Ort-
land Bodie Jr to leave after he
failed to withdraw allegations
connected with an incident last
year in which he (Mr Archer)
was shot.

A few hours later, Mr Archer
visited The Tribune to say he
had reached a breaking point.

He claimed the party leader-
ship is being “pressured” to get

-rid of him, because-he has

developed a “huge following”
in the Kennedy area.

' Mr Archer threatened to run
as an independent if he is not
given the party’s nomination.
He is confident that he will
either win the seat outright, or
split the vote, allowing FNM
MP Kenyatta Gibson to retain

not gay. But yet we are in a sis-
sy party? That isn’t fair to us,
who want to bring about a pos-
itive change to the party,” he
said.

The Kennedy hopeful said he
feels the issue of homosexuality
needs to be “properly
addressed.”

“It is a sick problem. Being
gay is not right. If God is against
it, so am J. I do not believe in
man and man, or woman and
woman. They can not procre-
ate. I believe in a man and a
woman.,And those who want
to create a society of their own
need to get away from politics.”

Mr Archer added that if he
is kicked out of the PLP for tak-
ing such a strong stance against

said that Mr Archer would not
be allowed back on the show as
long as he remains the host.

He challenged Mr Archer to
name the people in politics who
he refers to as “sissies” and
“crooks.”

A member of the local gay
community criticised Mr
Archer’s comments last night,
saying: “To call for homosexu-
als to be thrown out of the PLP
is like calling for black people to
be thrown out of the PLP.
Homosexuality is a character-
istic that is natural to the human
experience.’

“Mr Archer’s suggestion is
ridiculous and runs counter to.
the principles upon which the
PLP was founded.”

PGA files suit

FROM page one

that it will not be going forward with the additional golf tourna-
ments for which it is obligated.”

In a press release January 28, Ginn President and CEO Robert
Gidel said economic factors led to the.decision to cancel the agree-
ment with the PGA.

“We have worked diligently with many others for several months
to find solutions to our predicament with respect to these profes-
sional golf tournaments,” Gidel said in the release. “We did the best
we could, but the economy got the best of us with respect to the
tournaments.”

The development company is currently eonbinneig the mixed-
use resort Ginn Sur Mer in West End, Grand Bahama.

his seat.
_ On the issue of alleged homo-
sexuality in the PLP, Mr Archer
’ said: “These persons need to
go! They need to ’fess up and be
man about it and say I’m leav-
ing. We need to clean house.
Because I’m sick and tired of
the image of the PLP as being a
sissy party.
; “[’m not gay. Paul Moss is
Tet ee Rae eh os not gay. Jerome Fitzgerald is



Ask your Scotiabank representative for details.





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 7



a EY I Be
Nassau grouper is ‘not long for this world’

OIL' FISH fans beware
— the Nassau grouper

is not long for this world.
According to Dr Yvonne
Sadovy, one of the world's top

grouper experts who is working

with the Departnient of Marine

Resources, data projections show ,
that the Bahamian grouper fish- .

. ery will collapse within a decade
unless it is better managed,

That means we will join the oth-
er 33 countries in the region where
this resource has been overfished
to the point of commercial extinc-
tion. Like cod in the north Atlantic,
the Nassau grouper — once the
most common food fish around
the region reaching a weight of 50
pounds or more — is now on the
endangered list. In fact, 20 of the
world’s 162 species of grouper are
threatened with extinction ‘by over-

_ fishing.

And one of the big-reasons is
their unusual reproductive behav-
iour. Every year at full moon in
December and January, Nassau
groupers migrate long distances
from their home reefs to specific
sites where they form spawning
aggregations.

These swirling columns-of thou-
sands of fish, all intent'on creat-
ing the next generation, are easily
targeted by fishermen. About 50 of
these spawning sites have been
identified around the region, which
means that the entire annual repro-
duction for this species is concen-

trated at a few particular spots for ,

only a few days each year.

"We have no idea what attracts
fish to an aggregation site, nor how
they know where. to go," Dr
Sadovy. told a'public meeting last
week at the Bahamas National
Trust. "We don't know if. it's
instinctual or learned behaviour,
and we don't know if aggregations
can ever be re-established once
they have been destroyed. The
ecosystem implications are
unknown."

Young grouper live in coastal
mangroves for up to five years

before moving to outer reefs where °

they live for decades, migrating to
the same spawning sites every win-
ter. This makes. them highly vul-
nerable to fishing pressure, And
research has shown that even mod-
erate fishing on aggregations can
have a large impact.

"They only spawn in aggrega-
tions and if these are depleted

- there will be'no next generation
of groupers," Dr Sadovy said.
"Catches, have been severely
reduced throughout the Caribbean
and many fish caught today are
juveniles. The Bahamas is the only
country with some healthy stocks
left. Belize and Cayman. have a
few remaining aggregations, but
all others have collapsed."

Dr Sadovy knows whereof she
speaks. She is a former director of
Puerto Rico's Fisheries Research
Laboratory and works with the
US-based Caribbean Fishery Man-
agement Council. She chairs the
IUCN's expert committee'on
groupers, and-in the early 1990s
was among the first to discover
that spawning aggregations were
disappearing throuphed! the
Caribbean.

She is currently on leave from
her post as a professor at the Uni-
versity of Hong Kong and one of
the projects she is working on is
an appraisal of the available data

. on our grouper fishery in order to

_ develop management guidelines

based on lessons that have been
learned the hard way elsewhere.

Her appraisal will include a sur-

vey of Bahamian fishermen. ~

One of Dr Sadovy's research

interests is the future of the world's

coastal fisheries, which provide
food and livelihoods for millions
throughout the tropics. Shallow-
water fisheries are more efficient,
less wasteful of by-catch and more
productive;.per tonne of fish pro-
duced, than industrial-scale fish-
eries. Yet few are managed prop-
erly, and many face serious

declines from reef degradation, '

overfishing and poaching.
Total global fishery yield has

been falling since. the ists 1980s,
despite more and more fishing
effort being applied, and it is clear
that we are progressively ‘fishing
out the larger species. About three
quarters of all marine stocks are
now fully exploited, overexploit-
ed or depleted. Groupers are not

the only fish to spawn in aggrega-.

tions, but most: of those that do
are in decline.

"Many communities around the
world ‘depend on the sea as a last
resort and any collapse in shallow
water fisheries is a potential social
nightmare,
"These communities don't under-

, stand the decline of traditional fish:

eries because it is historically not
part of their experience. They are
under heavy commercial pressure
today, and they need to be man-
aged for a whole range of reasons
— including food security."
Management options for the
Nassau grouper focus on control-
ling the level of fishing effort. This
means closed seasons (to protect
regations), minimum and max-
imum size limits (to protect juve-
niles and.large females with eggs),
gear restrictions, and the preven-

. tion of illegal fishing by poachers.

N

Sets have been seeking
to protect grouper aggre--

gations for well.over.a decade. In
1998 the Bahamas Reef-Environ-
mental Education Foundation
commissioned a detailed manage-

ment action plan by British fish-

ery consultants that noted "a real
danger, of heavy depletion which
would not be detected from the
current data collection and analy-
sis system until too late" unless
controls during spawning agerega-
tions were implemented.

In what was a politically risky
move at the time, the government
banned fishing at spawning sites
near High’Cay Andros for several
days in the winter of 1998-99. That
trial was later extended to other
sites, and a national closed season
was introduced in 2005. The fol-
lowing year new restrictions on
grouper sales were added to the

. closure, which was extended to:
“three months (from Décember to

February). But there is still no
fixed calendar — the dates are
decided annually and the current
season ends on February 28.
"Some have been arrested dur-
ing the closure but we believe most
of our commercial fishermen are

honouring the ban, although we.

remain very concerned about for-
eign poachers," said Marine
Resources Director Michael Bray-
nen. "More management measures
are being considered, including a
fixed season with no sale of Nassau
groupers at all during the closure.

We feel this is best handled in a

black and white fashion."

He said the three-pound mini-
mum size limit is woefully inade-
quate and also called for a maxi-
mum size limit to protect the most
reproductive adults. There is the
possibility of gear restrictions too,
but experts say the best approach is
to leave groupers alone for a cou-
ple of months each year.

"We are not trying to put fish-
ermen out of business,

_ nen said, "so we should all buy and

_ encourage the sale of other species

during the closed season."

The most important manage-
ment option is the creation of a
network of marine reserves
throughout the country to protect
our key fishery resources. This has
become one of the main tools for
conservation management in
coastal waters: —. about -4600

- Marine reserves have been set up
around the world. ~

In an historic move eight years
ago, the previous. Ingraham gov-

"Dr Sadovy said.

"Mr Bray- ©



‘ ernment did agree to set aside 20

per cent of Bahamian waters as a
network of no-take reserves. —
heeding the best advice of marine
scientists worldwide.

The intent was to create five

reserves immediately ~—at Bimini,
the Berry Islands, North Abaco,

South Eleuthera:and Exuma-— but ~

the devil was in the details. For
years the Department of Marine
Resources has been consulting
with local communities and fish-
ermen on the proposed boundaries
— a daunting task since family
islanders regard their fishing

~ grounds as generation property.

The results of this extensive
groundwork were distilled into a
lengthy cabinet paper back in 2006.
And.a week or two ago the gov-
ernment gave the greenlight to set
up six reserves (Exuma was split
into north side and south side
reserves), two of which will be
gazetted by. Easter, according to
Agriculture & Marine Resources
Minister Larry Cartwright. Those
two are the Berry Islands.and Exu-
ma South Side reserves, which are
considered relatively non-contro-
versial.

The boundaries of the North
Bimini reserve — which environ-
mentalists have long clamoured
for as a way to control develop-
ment at the Bimini Bay Resort —
are being’ reconsidered following
discussions with the Bimini Bay

Minister Cartwright. The North
Abaco and Exuma North Side
reserves still face opposition from
local fishermen. And the South
Eleuthera reserve is considered
too big and is being cut back in
size.

All six protected areas will ban

‘any extractive use except in’ North

Bimini, where registered fishing
guides will be able to‘catth and
release bonefish. There should
be no boat anchoring in a reserve
and fishing, dredging, diving or

have also increased outside of the
spawning season, so its a win-win
situation."

But she warns that no single
measure is enough when it comes
to fishery management: Overall
fishing effort and poaching are

major problems that will only get ,

worse as stocks are depleted.
Enforcement is the key to protec-
tion of our national food security,
to which all governments pay lip
service.

' "Ageregations give the illusion




CREDIT SUISSE

of plenty and it is often difficult to
communicate that a fishery needs
protection. Fish concentrate to
spawn even when population levels
are low. Cod in the north Atlantic
exhibited similar schooling behav-
iour even as that fishery collapsed
years ago," Dr Sadovy said.

But the results of fishing
grouper aggregations are pre-
dictable. Of the eight documented
aggregation sites around the Cay-
man Islands, six had been wiped
out by 2003, when the Cayman

government banned fishing on all
known aggregations.

"Fish are not an endless
resource," Dr Sadovy pointed out.
"They are no different from other
animals, and there is only a-tiny
chance that their eggs will survive."

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

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otherwise disturbing marine life. -

and habitats is prohibited.
The big question is,how will
these restrictions be enforced? It

costs a minimum of $350,000 for -

the Bahamas National Trust to
maintain a mobile presence in the

,.Exuma Cays Land,and Sea, Park,

which became a no-take. zone in

-,1986. The Department of Marine

Resources will need a lot more

trained staff and equipment that

government would have to pro-
vide for in its annual budget. And
some new entity would require
even more money to get off the
ground.

Most scientists agree that there
is little point in having “paper
parks” where the destruction of
the coastal environment goes on
as rapidly inside as it, does outside.
But. Minister Cartwright says
enforcement will be handled joint-
ly by his ministry, the BNT, The
Nature Conservancy and the
Defence Force — just as already
happens in the Exuma park. It is

unclear how this. will play out in.

reality, but more, resources will

have to come from somewhere. |. °

But there is-no question that
marine reserves. are the best
approach to fishery conservation.
‘Dr Sadovy points to evidence that
protecting aggregations is a par-
ticularly effective strategy. For
example, the US Virgin Islands
created a marine reserve in 1999 to
protect an important spawning
site for Red Hind. This led to size

increases and a doubling of spawn- .

ing density.

"Fish migrated out of the pro-
tected area and may have :con-
tributed to an overall increase in
the size of Red Hind caught else-

where, thus increasing the value _

of this grouper fishery for local

Key Duties & Responsibilities:
* Co-ordinate and manage the Static Data, ‘Mail Administration and Cash and

Security Reconciliation Teams
- Ensure adherence to the required daily processes by the teams to ensure the ;
“integrity of the data maintained |
* Communicate and resolve any queries from internal and external clients
- Ensure the update of process documentation changes arising due to changes
in procedures or additional responsibilities allocated to the'teams -
* Achieve deliverables against agreed deadlines.and manage the expectations

with clients.

- Serve as an Operations subject matter expert for new requirements impacting
the units under management

- Participate in User Acceptance Testing prior to project or product
implementation for developments impacting data management -

- Contribute to and participate in special project initiatives impacting the Bank

Benefi rovide

include:

- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan

¢ Health and Life Insurance

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING,

) TRIE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS. NEED APPLY.

Applications should be submitted to:
-Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928 —

. Nassau, Bahamas

Or via fax 356-8148

* Ongoing internal and external career developmenttraining program :

fishermen," she said. "Landings |

















Lyford.

Interna it ional S





SC b 1LO¢l






TEACHER ©
RECRUITMENT FAIR

sMinimum 3 years experience preferred
B.A or above required
Positions available in Elementary and Secondary School
Competitive salary and benefits
Excellent Professional Development opportunities for
International Baccalaureate program (PYP, MYP & Diploma)

ae

' Come meet the Principal, Administration and Heads of Schools at the LCIS Campus
on Saturday 7th February, 2009 at 10:00am

For further information, please contact Monalisa Milford

E-mail : mmilford@lIcis.bs ~ Telephone : 362 4774 x239

Wr ee Recruitment Fair - SPT 7th February, 2009 - LCIS eae
www.Icis.bs










rAUE 0, WEUINESUVAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

@ WFOR

@WTV9 |wood (cc)



WEDNESDAY EVENING wt FEBRUARY 4, 2009

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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must infiltrate a fight club. (N) © — fis shot mid-flight. (N) © (CC) bled NYPD officer takes hostages.
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THE TRIBv.

,

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make great gifts!

et Charlie the

Bahamian Puppet and
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some smiles on your

kids faces.
. Bring your children to the |

: McHappy Hour at McDonald's in

~ Oakes Field every Thursday
| from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the

~ month of February 9009,

‘En joy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

Pm lovin’ it





TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



CHRIS PAUL lies on the court after being injured in the second half against the Portland Trail Blazers in Mon-

day’s game in New Orleans.

KOBE Bryant prepares
to dunk the ball
against New York
Knicks’ forward Al
Harrington (7) in the
second quarter of
Monday’s game at
Madison Square Gar-
den in New York.
Bryant had 61 points
in the game... E

(AP Photo: Kathy
Willens)



(AP Photo: Bill Haber).

Bryant lights u
with record 6

@ By The Associated Press



KOBE Bryant had plenty of motivation for his
record-setting performance at Madison Square
Garden.

With a postgame work’ daté’planneéd With Knicks *
fan Spike Lee, who was sitting in the front row, -
Bryant put on a show the-filmmaker couldn't crit- ~

icize, setting a current arena record with 61 points
to lead the Los Angeles Lakers to a 126-117 victo-
ry over New York on: Monday night.

"I'm going to review this documentary I'm doing
with Spike Lee tonight after the game and I didn't
feel like sitting next to him and hearing him talking
trash about the Knicks, so that was added incentive
as well," Bryant said. "Seriously. He's going to get
an earful tonight.", Y

Bryant entertained a sold-out crowd that took
turns booing him and saluting him with "MVP!"
chants during an electrifying performance.

He bested:Michael Jordan's opponent record of
55 points atthe present building, known as "Garden

IV," when he hit three free throws with 3:56-

remaining, then broke Bernard King's overall mark

of 60, set on Christmas Day 1984, with two more’

foul shots with 2:33 to play.
Bryant, who also had the highest-scoring game in
the NBA this season, left to a loud ovation after his
fifth 40-point game at MSG, where the Knicks
played their first game in February. 1968. ;

"It's a blessing to do what you love and to have |

moments like this," Bryant said.



Gu



UZURI DODG

was:

’ land 97, New

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZUKI



Your Fast Lane to
hicle Purchasing \.

In other
NBA games
Monday, it
Dallas |
105, Orlando
95; Memphis
113, Washing-
ton 97; Miami
119, the Los
Angeles Clip-
pers 95; Port-

Orleans 89;
Phoenix 129,
Sacramento ie .
81; Utah 105, MAVERICKS forward Dirk Nowitzki
Charlotte 86;
and San Anto-
nio 110, Gold-
en State 105 in
overtime.

In , New

after defeating the Orlando Magic. 105-
95 in Orlando Monday... -
(AP Photo: John Raoux)

“York, Pau Gasol added‘31 points and 14 rebounds

in the Lakers’ first game since losing center Andrew
Bynum for. eight to 12 weeks with a torn medial col-
lateral ligament in his right knee.

The Lakers didn't miss him with Bryant going 19-

| -of-31 from the field with an array of tough jumpers,

powerful drives and a perfect 20-for-20 from the
free throw line. ’

Bynum was hurt Saturday at Memphis when
Bryant crashed into his leg after driving to the bas-



ee

é

NZNSI BauO



raises his arm as he walks: off the court,

WESTWEGO, La.
(AP) — New. Orleans
Hornets star Chris Paul
has a mild groin strain
and is listed as day to day.
The team said the point -
guard had an MRI on
Tuesday after injuring his

Paul has mild
groin strain

‘right groin the night
before against Portland.

Paul left the game late

in the third quarter with
12 points and 13 assists.

He leads the NBA with

has 31 double-doubles.



Ga



\

ket. The center isn't expected to need surgery and
said he was confident he would return in time for
the playoffs. ;

| Lamar. Odom moved into the starting lineup an
Gasol slid to.‘the center spot to replace Bynum.
Odom had six points'and 14 rebounds.

Al Harrington scored 24 points. and:David:Lee -

had 22 points.and:12:rebounds for the Knicks, who
had won six of seven but didn't have the firepower
to stay with the Western Conference leaders in

the opener of a brutal week. New York plays

Boston and Cleveland, too. :
"We.tried to do the rope-a-dope a little bit where

he (Bryant) might shoot himself out, but he didn't,"
Knicks coach Mike D'Antoni said. "He just kept on |

going."

Trail Blazers.97, Hornets 89

At New Orleans, LaMarcus Aldridge scored 22
points and Portland overcame a 17-point deficit
— after Hornets guard Chris Paul was injured —
for its fifth straight victory. Cis

Paul left the game late in the third quarter with
a strained right groin, the first action he has missed
all season. He had 12 points and 13 assists.

The Hornets led 72-55-when Paul left the game.
Portland then outscored New Orleans 26-7 during
the next.seven minutes, with Jerryd Bayless scoring
13 of his 19 points during the decisive surge.

Mavericks 105, Magic 95

At Orlando, Fla., Ditk Nowitzki had 29 points
and six rebounds. and Jason Terry scored 23 ‘to
lead Dallas to its third straight win.

Dwight Howard had 35 points and 11 rebounds:

as the Magic's three-game winning streak ended.
All-Star point guard Jameer Nelson left the game

in the third quarter with a dislocated right shoulder.

He was scheduled to have an MRI on Tuesday.
Grizzlies 113, Wizards 97

At Washington, rookie O.J. Mayo matched his -
career high with 33 points to help the Grizzlies

end a 12-game skid. ; ;
_Antawn Jamison had 29 points and 13 rebounds

for Washington.

Heat 119, Clippers 95

At Miami, Dwyane Wade had 32 points and nine

assists, Michael Beasley added 18 points and the
Heat snapped a two-game skid.

‘ Shawn Marion — in his first game back after
missing five straight with a strained left groin — fin-
Le with 11 points and seven rebounds for the

eat. : ‘
Zach Randolph, back after missing 19 games

with a sote left knee, scored 21 points for the Clip-

pers.

- Suns 129, Kings 81
At Phoenix, Jason Richardson scored 16 of his 24
points in the first quarter, Amare Stoudemire fin-
ished with 25 points and eight rebounds and the
rejuvenated Suns ended a three-game home losing
skid with their most lopsided victory of the season.
John Salmons led the Kings with 19 points.

Jazz 105, Bobcats 86

At Salt Lake City, Ronnie Brewer scored 14 of
his 21 points in the second half and the injury-rid-
dled Jazz rallied from a sluggish start.

Raymond Felton had 16 points and nine assists to

‘lead the Bobcats.

Spurs 110, Warriors 105, OT

At Oakland, Calif., Tim Duncan and Manu Gino-
bili each had season highs with 32 points apiece and
San Antonio overcame a 12-point deficit in the
fourth quarter to force overtime.

Duncan added 15 rebounds for his 30th double-
double and the Spurs won their fourth straight.

Stephen Jackson scored a season-high 33 points
for the Warriors.

five triple-doubles and.

den



ws;

NBA Today

@ By The Associated Press



SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, February 4

L A Lakers at Toronto (7 pm EST).
Kobe Bryant follows up his 61-point per-
formance against the Knicks with a trip to

‘Toronto, the Atlantic Division's last-

place team.

STARS

Monday “

—~ Kobe Bryant, Lakers, broke the cur-
rent Madison Square Garden record with
61 points to lead Los Angeles to a 126-
117 victory over New York. .

— Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili,
Spurs, each scored 32 points as San Anto-

_ nio beat Golden State 110-105 in over-

time.

— Dirk Nowitzki, Mavericks, had 29
points and Dallas beat Orlando 105-95
for its third straight win.

— Dwyane Wade, Heat, had 32 points
and nine assists as Miami snapped a two-
game losing skid by beating the Los
Angeles Clippers 119-95.

— OJ Mayo, Grizzlies, matched his.
career high with 33 points to lead Mem-
phis to its first:win in nearly a month,
113-97 over Washington.

— Jason Richardson and Amare
Stoudemire, Suns. Richardson scored 16
of his 24 points in the first quarter and
Stoudemire finished with 25 points as
Phoenix ended a three-game home losing
skid with their most lopsided victory of
the season, 129-81 over Sacramento.

— Ronnie Brewer, Jazz, scored 14 of
his 21 points in the second half and Utah
rallied from a sluggish start to beat Char-

lotte 105-86. |

‘ GARDEN PARTY
Kobe Bryant broke the current Madi
son Square Garden record with 61 points
to lead Los Angeles to a 126-117 victory
over New York. Bryant was 19-for-31
from the field; including 3-of-6 from
beyond the arc,-:and hit all 20 of his free
throw attempts to eclipse the previous
visitor record of 55 held by Michael Jor-
dan and the overall record of 60 set by
Bernard King.

HURTS SO MUCH MORE
New Orleans guard Chris Paul left the
Hornets' 97-89 loss to Portland late in

‘the third quarter with a strained right

‘groin, the first action he has missed all
season. He had 12 points and 13 assists.
The Hornets led 72-55 when Paul left
the game.

Portland then outscored New Orleans
26-7 during the next seven minutes. Paul
walked out of the arena with a slight
limp, saying only that he hurt himself
when he "stepped wrong" and plans to

have an MRI on. Tuesday. .

NOT AGAIN

Lakers center Andrew Bynum will
miss eight to 12 weeks after tearing the
medial collateral ligament in his right
knee. The diagnosis Monday was a relief
to Bynum, who initially feared he might
be out for the season. Bynum was hurt in

. the first quarter of Saturday night's win at
.. Memphis. Still, it's hard for the Lakers to
‘forget what happened last season, when

Bynum was also supposed to be out eight
to 12 weeks with a knee injury. Instead of
returning in time for the playoffs, he

- missed the final 46 games of the season,

including the finals against Boston.

TOUGH WEEK

New York started a brutal week with a
126-117 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers.
The Knicks host Cleveland on Wednes-
day and Boston on Friday. It's the first

‘time a team has played three straight

games against. opponents with over .750
winning percentages after Feb. 1 since
the Celtics did it in February 1995,
according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

OUCH’ — be

All-Star point guard Jameer Nelson
left Orlando's 105-92 win over Washing-
ton in the third quarter with a dislocated
right shoulder. He was scheduled to have
an MRI on Tuesday. —

SNAPPED
-, Memphis ended a 12-game losing skid
with a 113-97 victory over Washington. It
was the team's longest since dropping 13
in a row to start the 2002-03 season. The
Grizzlies had not won since beating Dal-
las 102-82 on Jan. 4.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Orlando's Dwight Howard had 35
points and 11 rebounds in a 105-92 loss to
Dallas. Antawn Jamison had 29 points
and 13 rebounds for Washington in a
113-97 loss to Memphis. Stephen Jackson
scored a season-high 33 points for Gold-
en State in a 110-105 overtime loss to
San Antonio.

STATS

The Heat's point total in a 119-95 win
over the Clippers was the most points
Miami scored at home since beating Utah
121-83 on March 14, 2006. Miami's
Jamaal Magloire grabbed his 4,000th
career rebound. The Suns' point total in
a 129-81 win over Sacramento was their
highest of the season and their 48-point
margin of victory was their biggest ever at
home.

SPEAKING 2

"It was very obvious to all of us by the
middle of the first quarter that he wasn't
in a distributing type of mode or in a get-
ting-10-rebounds type of mode, that he
was going to try to score the basketball
tonight."

— Knicks forward David Lee on Lak-
ers guard Kobe Bryant, who broke the
current Madison Square Garden record
with 61 points in a 126-117 victory over

‘New York:



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL SPORTS

a ee a ae,
son to be inducted into Judo Hall of Fame

Christofilis, Thom

RETIRED Saint Augustine’s Col-
lege teacher Paul Christofilis and busi-
nessman Bruce Thompson of Thomp-
son Trading are both to be inducted
into the Bahamas Judo Hall of Fame
at the Bahamas Junior Open on Feb-
ruary 7 at Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road.

The induction will take place at lpm
during the opening ceremonies of the
first international Judo tournament
ever to be held in the Bahamas.

“These men are among the pioneers
of Judo in this country. Their contri-
butions have been significant to the

Fed Cup draw:
Bahamas to play
Puerto Rico in |
the first round

or Puerto Rico on Thursday.
Canada will play the other on
Friday. :

Both Fountain and Russell
said they are eager to get start-
eds 3.

“With Venezuela not being’
here, it’s still a 50/50 chance that
we can still. survive and remain
in zone one,” Fountain said. “I
honestly believe that we have
a pretty good chance of doing,
very well.” i

When asked if she’s feeling
any pressure, Fountain quickly
quipped: “Not at all. I think the
pressure is on the other teams
because they are ranked higher
than we are. %

“We are here, so we just have
to’go out there and prove to
everybody here that we belong
here with them. We just have
to be prepared to play our
best.” ete

Russell, on the other hand,
said “it’s going to be tough, but
we have a pretty good chance.
We just have to go out there
and play our game and not wor-
ty about them.” ;

As for the pressure, Russell
had this to say: “There is no
pressure on us. It’s on every-
body because they are ranked
higher than us. We just need to
get-an early start and be ready
to play.” ? »

development of our
people and until
now have gone
unnoticed," said
federation presi-
dent D'Arcy Rah-
ming. "These men
were trained by the
best people in the
world at the time,
and they gave back
through teaching
and passing on their
knowledge."

Paul Christofilis





sy 0 (as Tee



began his study of
Judo while a
teacher at SAC
under Mr Ober-
heiser, a Cuban
exile who is
thought to be the
founder of Judo in
this country.

He went on to
study at the
Kodokan, the
birthplace of Judo
in Japan.

Mr Christofilis is

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believed to be the first Bahamian to
ever study for an extended period of
time — 15 months — at the Kodokan.

He eventually received the grade of
Black Belt directly from the Kodokan.

Bruce Thompson began his study
with Don Malone, a 3rd-degree Judo
Black Belt, in the early 70s.

MR Thompson practiced at Luden
Limited on Dowdswell Street and

on to teach for many years in a space
rented from Queen's College.

Judo was founded on the principles
of mutual benefit for all and caring
for others as well as maximum effi-
ciency with minimum effort.

"These men personify these princi-
ples having demonstrated them in
Judo as well as their professional lives.
The BJF is honored to follow in their
footsteps," said Mr Rahming.



degree Black Belt.

Paul Christofilis

eventually received the grade of 2nd

Among his many accomplishments
in Judo, he,represented the Bahamas
at international tournaments and went

Tickets for the event are available
from the Bahamas Judo Federation
on Joe Farrington Road or call 364-
6773.

ZION EAGLES: Phillip Hanna in action yesterday...



‘In the final period the Miracles went cold and _

managed only to trade baskets.

. The Cherubims were able to build a 16 point
lead in the fourth with team captains Chauncey
Cooper and Rakeem Smith on-the bench due to
the aggressive bench play of juniors Rolle. and
Brian Francis. ;

A pair of free throws by Francis, who finished
with 11 points, seven in the final quarter, gave
Teleos a 69-53 advantage with just over two min-
utes remaining, and thé Miracles failed to threat-
en again.

Cooper finished with 10 while Smith added 11.

David Strachan led the Miracles with 20, while
Tim Forbes and Frederick Delancey finished with
13 and eight points respectively.

Girls

_Teleos Cherubims - 29 "4

Mt Caramel Cavs - 6

Sashana Smith fouled out just two minutes into -

the second half. However, the Cherubims had
already built an insurmountable 21-1 lead and

‘clinched the championship without their star cen-

ter on the floor.

In the opening half, the Cherubims built a 15
point lead before the Cavaliers reached the score-
board on a free throw by Shantol Hall with 2:05
remaining in the half. :

Smith fouled out with 11 points, three rebounds,
and two blocks but after fouling out early in the
second, her supporting cast was forced to pick up
the scoring slack with her on the sideline.

Tannica Smith answered the call for the Cheru-
bims as she scored six of her team’s eight points in
the second half.

With a lack of ballhandlers on the floor for Mt

| Cherubims win three on day 2

Caramel, the Cherubims took full advantage with
a relentless fullcourt trap that forced turnovers and
preserved the win. :

Smith finished with 10 points while. Angie
Bethel added six. Hall led the Cavaliers with four
points. ’

Junior Boys

Teleos Cherubims - 52

Zion Eagles - 51

The Cherubims extended the series to force a
third and deciding game with a suffocating defen-
sive effort that limited Eagles standout Anthony
Oliver in the second half. ;

After scoring 14 points in the first half, the
Cherubims held Oliver. to just five points in the
second and survived a late rally to hold on for
the one point win.

« The Cherubims came out playing inspired bas-
ketball and led 17-9 after the first quarter.

Oliver scored 12 of his team’s 14 points in the
second as the Eagles came back to trim the deficit
29-24 at the half. ,

The Cherubims’ lead grew to as much as 10 in
the third on a pair of free throws by Henry Rolle,
41-31, with 2:39 remaining in the quarter.

Rolle left the game due to foul trouble on the
very next play and was forced to sit out until 3:14
left in the fourth quarter.

At that point the Cherubims held just a slim 47-
43 lead.

Both teams suffered free throw woes late in
the game, but an assist from Rolle to Darnero
Arnett with under 10 seconds sealed the win for
his team. Rolle finished with 16 points and 8 assists
while Brian Francis added 14. Oliver finished with
19 while Philip Hanna added 11.

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Sailing community mourns Munroe’s death

FROM page 11

in their time of bereavement.
For more than 30 years,
Munroe sailed on the Good
News and the original Coura-
geous as well as the Pieces of
Eight before. he stopped about

10 years ago to get into officiat-,

ing at, the regattas.

Dwayne. Higgins, one of the
organisers of the All-For-One
Regatta, said Munroe will be
sadly missed because of what
he brought to the table as an
administrator.

“He was a very dedicated
man, who devoted a lot of his
time to the organising of regat-
tas,” Higgins pointed out. “He
was also very fair and handled
his chores as a race commodore
with distinction.”

Over the past to weekends,
local boats competed in a series
of events staged in Montagu.

It got started with the C Class
competition over the weekend
of January. Jacob’s Ladder,

skippered by Dwayne Higgins,
won the three-race series over
Lady Ruthnell, skippered by
Marty Bullard, followed by the
Barbarian, skippered by Del-
worth Gibson.

On Monday and Tuesday in
Rawson Square, the Sweet
Island Gal, Irene Good Night
and the Barbarian participated
in an exhibition for the general

public.

Then this past weekend, the
competition closed out with the
A and B Classes, as well as the
high school segment in the C
Class along with the Optimist
Sailing, in Montagu Beach.

_ The activities were all part of
Regatta Week.

Higgins, one of the organis-
ers, said the entire week was a
success, but they are already
looking ahead to building on
next year’s event.

“A lot of the boats were not
available, but for the boats that
did show up, I think we had a
very good event,” Higgins said.

“I think we have a lot yo look
forward to next year.”

Higgins said if there was any-
thing that inspired them the
most it would have been the
fact that there were at least 50
young. people who showed up
on Friday to participate in the
High School Sailing Competi-
tion.

Schools represented were
Government High, C V Bethel,
C R Walker, C C Sweeting Sr,
D W Davis, L W Young, H O
Nash and T A Thompson (for-
merly CC Sweeting Jr).

Higgins thanked the owners
of the Stache, Lady Ruthnell,
Paparazzi, Queen Brigetta,
Jacob’s Ladder and Try Me for
allowing the sailors to use their
boats.

“We didn’t have sufficient
boats to use,” Higgins stated.
“So I think next year we will
try to get some more of the
boats out so that we can have all
of the schools competing against
each other.”



THE TRIBUNE



PAGE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4"



2009



Bryant-lights
up Garden —
with record

61 points...
. See page 9



Sailing community mourns Munroe’s death

a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hile the Ministry

of Youth, Sports

and Culture’s All-

For-One Regatta

in Montagu Beach

turned out to be a success, it was a

bitter sweet weekend for the sailing

community as they mourned the

death of long-time administrator
Richard Munroe.

‘Munroe, the immediate. past com-

modore of the National Sailing Asso-

Sailors Associa-
tion, died 6:05pm
Sunday at Doc-
tors Hospital after
a long illness.

His funeral ser-
vicé is tentatively
set for Sunday,
February 15, at
New Destiny Bap-
tist Church.

According to
James Wallace,
one of. his
nephews, his uncle’s death.came as a
shock, although he had been in the

Richard Munroe



move him into a private room as

opposed to keeping him in the inten-
sive care,”: Wallace pointed out. “So it
was quite'a shock when he died.
“There was some progress. So the
doctors were even quite surprised.”
At age 75, Munroe leaves behind
his wife, Mary, three daughters Lisa
Hall, Shantel and Deborah, three
sons, Richard Jr and Stephen and a
host 'of relatives and friends.
Wallace, who worked with him in
the office of the NSA, said his uncle
was well respected in the sailing com-
munity for being fair and honest.
“He was quiet, fair and dedicated.

- The Rev Dr Philip McPhee, he

Heoneilints past commodore of the

BBOSA, said the sailing community
owes Munroe’s family a debt of grat-
itude.

“He was one that you could always |

count on to administer his duty with
fairness,” Rev McPhee charged. “He
always tried to make, sure that the
regattas went on without any prob-
lems.”

On behalf of the BBOSA, its mem-
bers and the entire sailing communi-
ty, Rev McPhee offered condolences
to the Munroe family and he assured



SHOWN (I-r) are Kerrie Cartwright, Coach
Sean Cartwright, Larikah Russell and Nikkita
Fountain as they brave the cold weather i in

them that their prayers are with them

SEE page 10

Canada...

He loved the sport,” Wallace

hospital for at least a month.
summed up.

“The doctors were preparing to

ciation and a former commodore of
the Bahamas Boat Owners and

Fed Cup draw:
Bahamas to play
Puerto Rico in
the first round

a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
- bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas’ three-member team has
drawn Puerto Rico to play in the first round
of the BNP Paribas Americas Zone Group 1
Fed Cup today in Montreal, Canada. :

Seven teams were originally scheduled to
participate in the four-day tournament on
the indoor courts at the Uniprix Stadium,
but Venezuela didn’t show up.

_ So it’s down to three teams in two pools
with the Bahamas matched“against Puerto
Rico and host Canada in Group A. In Group
B are Colombia, Brazil and Paraguay. °

- Coach Sean Cartwright said the format
calls for each team to play each other in the

. round robin with the two losing teams in the
two groups being relegated to zone II next
year. =

The winners of each group | ea square off
for a chance to take part in the World Group
If qualifying round in April.-

“The draw was set ‘at the coaches’ meeting
yesterday and Cartwright said they: were
pleased that they didn’t get to play Canada in
the first round as they’re the only team in
their pool with players ranked in the Wom-
en’s Tennis Association.

Canada’s top seeded player Aleksandra
Wozniak is ranked-at number 33 in the
WTA; while No. 2 pispiante Dubois is at
125.

“We were hoping that we would have
drawn Puerto Rico in the first round because
they are just like us. They don’t have any
WTA ranked players,” Cartwright said.

“At least we can play Puerto Rico before
we play them. But it’s still going to be a

-tough match for us. So we have to be pre-
pared to really play.”

_ Cartwright has selected Nikkita Fountain
as the Bahamas’ top seeded player with
Grand Bahamian Larikah Russell at No.2,
Fountain will play Jessica Roland, Puerto
Rico’s top seed and Russell will play Monica
Puig. -

Fountain and Russell, who have played
together in the past, are also scheduled to
play in the doubles that will wrap up the first
day of competition. |

. But Cartwright said if any of the players
are not prepared to play, then his daughter
Kerrie Cartwright will be called upon to play
with the other player. :

“Canada has gotten a bye and will draw
today after the tie to play either the Bahamas

SEE page 10



RUNNING back Charles Edwards (with ball) in action...

Boil Fish Bowl competitors
dominate All-Pros list

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter on
“tdorsett@tribunemedianet

WITH the 2008-09 Commonwealth American
Football League season completed, end of year
awards were given out with the Boil Fish Bowl com-
petitors dominating the list of All-Pros.

The BFB Champion Orry Sands and the runners
up John Bull Jets each boasted nine members on the
All-Bahamian first team. (See list of team members
below)

The V8 Fusion Stingrays had five players named
to the squad while the Kingdom Warriors and
Defence Force each had one honouree.

With a running game that paved the way to anoth-
er league championship, the Pros all-stars were led
by running back Charles Edwards and offensive |
linemen Ravello Williamson and Shane Albury.

_ Edwards was also named League MVP and Offen-
sive MVP in the championship game.

The Jets passing attack featured all stars quarter-
back Drameco Clarke and receivers Garvin Newbold
and Eldon Ferguson.

Defensively the Jets’ cornerback duo, Phillip Rah-
ming and Jameko Moore also received "All- Bahami-
an honours.

Stingrays defensive end Anwar Godet was named
the league’s Defensive MVP, sharing the award with"
Rahming.

Ferguson and Pros’ receiver Alex Rolle shared
the league’s Offensive MVP award.

NIB enten hem een



TELEOS CHERUBIMS guard Scott Newbold drives to the basket over Zion Eagles’ Arsenio Woodside ‘date:
See more photos on page 10°

Cherubims win
_ three on day 2

Offense

‘Drameco Clarke - Quarterback; Jets
Sheldon Lynes - Fullback; Stingrays
Charles Edwards - Running Back; Pros
Eldon Ferguson - Tight End; Jets _
Garvin Newbold - Wide Reciver; Jets
Alex Rolle - Wider Reciver; Pros
Wilshere Dawkins - Center; Warriors
Shane Albury - Right Guard; Pros
Jamaal Baker - Left Guard; Jets
Ravello Williamson - Right Tackle; Pros
Tyrone Rolle - Left Tackle; Stingrays
Defense

Anwar Godet - Right Defensive End; Stingrays

Kendal Alcide - Left Defensive End; Jets
Julian Saunders - Defensive Tackle; Stingrays
Garaliese Collie - Pros :

-Demetrius - Right Linebacker; Jets
Ricardo Hamilton - Middle Linebacker; Pros
Walter Russell - Left Linebacker; Pros
Phillip Rahming - Right Cornerback; Jets
Jameko Moore - Left Cornerback; Jets
Slade - Free Safety; Destroyers

Keno Nixon - Strong Safety; Pros

Special Teams

Leslie St. Fleur - Stingrays; Kicker
Leslie St. Fleur - Stingrays; Punter
Ishmail Sutherland - Jets; Punt Returner
Ashley Roberts - Pros; Kick Returner
Offensive Rookie of the Year

Xavier Hanna - Warriors; Quarterback
Laish Boyd - Pros; Offensive Line
Defensive Rookie of the Year

Wayde Higgs - Stingrays; Cornerback
Alex Johnson - Warriors, Off/Def Tackle
Offensive MVP

Eldon Ferguson - Jets

Alex Rolle - Pros

Defensive MVP

Anwar Godet - Stingrays

Phillip Rahming - Jets



@ By RENAEO BORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THREE wins by the Teleos Cheru-
bims on day two of the Bahamas
Scholastic Association’s playoff series
produced a pair of championships for
the institution while extending the
hopes of a third team to a deciding
game.

Senior Boys

Teleos Cherubims - 72

Galilee Miracles-63. — -

As if being:a junior playing in the
senior boys final was not enough pres-
sure, Henry Rolle shouldered the scor-
ing load for his team in the champi-
onship clinching game of the series.

Rolle scored a team high 15 points,
13 of which came in the second half to
help the Cherubims withstand a fre-
netic third quarter rally by the Miracles.

Teleos held a 31-18 lead at the half as
the Miracles began to unravel due to
early foul trouble.

In the first half the Cherubims were
able to control the pace of the game,
slowing it to'a more favourable con-
trolled pace. But the Miracles’ defense
changed the game in the third quarter.

Galilee opened the quarter on a 19-8
run to come within one basket midway
through, 39-37.

A pair of free throws by Rolle gave
the Cherubims some breathing room
and stopped the bleeding momentarily.

Teleos point guard Lamont Armaly
was vital in the Cherubims reasserting
control at the end of the quarter, single
handedly breaking the Miracles full
court trap and creating shot opportu-
nities for his teammates in transition.

Armlay finished with six points and a

‘game high nine assists, orchestrating

the Teleos offense.

His assist to Brian Francis gave the
Cherubims a 47-40 advantage and an
offensive rebound led to'a three point
play for Rolle to put his team ahead
50-40 at the end of the third quarter.

SEE page 10





PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS







POWER TEAM! Pictured from left to right is Philip Simon, Executive Director of. The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce; Kevin Basden, General Manager of The Bahamas Electricity Corporation; Chris Huskilson,
President and CEO of Emera, the Canadian based energy services giant company; Dionisio D’Aguilar,
President of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Khaalis Rolle, First Vice President of The Chamber
and Felix Stubbs, Chairman of the Grand Bahama Port Authority at a recent Chamber of Commerce and:
Emera joint luncheon at the British.Colonial Hilton..Huskilson addressed The Chamber’s members on
Emera’s plans for The Grand Bahama Power Company. Emera recently acquired 25 per cent of the

Grand Bahama Power Company.

Emera and the

Bahamas Chamber

of Commerce hold
joint luncheon

CHRIS Huskilson, presi-
dent and CEO of Emera, the
multi-billion dollar energy ser-
vices company which recently
purchased 25 per cent of the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, addressed members of
the Bahamas Chamber of

* Commerce at a joint luncheon
put on by both organisations
on Wednesday, January 21, at
the British Colonial Hilton.

During the luncheon, Mr













Huskilson elaborated on ener-
gy and new development
plans being undertaken by the
company, which provides
electricity to an estimated
600,000 customers in Canada
and St Lucia.

The luncheon was attend-
ed by movers and shakers
from the business community
in New Providence and
Grand Bahama, including

Bahamas Chamber of Com-

merce president Dionisio
D’ Aguilar; Chamber of Com-
merce executive director
Philip Simon; E O Ferrell III,
president and CEO of the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany Limited; Kevin Basden,
general manager of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration, and Felix Stubbs,

chairman of the Grand.

Bahama Port Authority along
with many others.

MIAMI



E.O FERRELL Ill, President & CEO of the Grand Bahama Power Company; Chris Huskilson, President
and CEO of Emera along with Dionisio D’Aguilar, President of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce are.
pictured at The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Emera joint luncheon on Wednesday, January 21,
at the British Colonial Hilton. .



EMERA ADDRESSES CHAMBER MEMBERS - Pictured at centre fourth from left is Chris Huskilson,
president and CEO of Emera, along with Dionisio D’Aguilar, president of the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce. Also pictured from left to right are Ray Robinson, vice-president of Integrated Operations at
Emera; E O Ferrell Ill, president and CEO of the Grand Bahama Power Company; Kevin Basden, general
manager of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation; Mr Huskilson, Mr D’Aguilar, Yvette Sands, Chamber of
Commerce director; Khaalis Rolle, first vice-president of the Chamber, and Philip Simon, executive
director of the Chamber. %



DURING the holiday season Master Tech-
nicians Ltd and Panasonic teamed up to present
lucky winner Anthony Woodside with a 58-
inch high definition TV, home theatre system
and a leather recliner.

“My wife and I have been customers for
years; all of the appliances in our home are
from Master Technicians,” Mr Woodside said.

“We come aba Wesel of the quality of prod-
uct, the customer service and, of course, the
price.”

Master Technicians is the official retailer of
Panasonic products in the Bahamas. The local
Panasonic product line includes of televisions,
home theatre systems, DVD players, Blu-Ray
players and microwaves.

Senator attends IWE:
meeting in Moscow

SENATOR Allyson Maynard-Gibson
was in Moscow, Russia, last week attend-
ing the International Women’s Forum
winter board meeting. She serves as the
vice-president of the IWF.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson and IWF board
members were hosted at City Hall by
Moscow's Mayor Yuri Luzhkov.

Pictured here together with Mrs May-
nard-Gibson are (l-r) Deputy Mayor of

Miami hurricane centre’s
briefings will go online





HURRICANE forecasters at the National
Hurricane Center in Miami will have their
briefings carried live this season on Web sites
when a storm threatens to make landfall in
the US., according to Associated Press

The center announced a partnership Tuesday
with America’s



s Emergency Network, a com-
pany foundéd by former center director Max
Mayfield and former CBS weather expert
Bryan Norcross, to distribute the briefings.
It’s unclear currently how many Web sites
will carry the feed, though it will at least
include The Miami Herald, Norcross said Tues-
day.
Hive season begins June 1.



Moscow Ludmila Shvetsova; Senator Luz
Lajous Vargas, former President of the
Senate Legislative Committee of Mexi-
co, and cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova,
the first woman to fly in space, at the
home and gallery of Zurab Tsereteli,
famous Russian painter, sculptor, architect
and decorator.







THE TRIBUNE

&
s
S



WEDNES DAY,



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

n $85 million lawsuit
over a failed marina
project adjacent to the
British Colonial. Hilton
in downtown Nassau
has been settled, Tribune Business can

reveal, with the former lead developer

likely having recovered its deposit and
development costs.

A January 30, 2009, stipulation filed
in the New York State Supreme Court,
and bearing the signature of attorneys
representing all the parties involved,
confirmed that the action launched by
Island Global Yachting (IGY) against
the Hilton’s holding company, its two
major shareholders and two property
affiliates had come to an end.

* $85m claim over failed
downtown Nassau project
closed, with New York-
based company likely
recovering $200,000
deposit, development costs

‘ obtained by Tribune Business, said:

“Each and every cause of action assert-

ed by plaintiffs IGY Ocean Bay Prop-

erties Island Global Yachting against
defendants Ocean Bay Properties I

and Ocean Bay Properties I, British

Colonial Development Company, PRK
Holdings, Adurion Capital and George
Allen is hereby discontinued with prej-

FEBRUARY 4,



2009



ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



The document was signed on Janu-
ary 30, 2009, by Simon Miller, IGY’s
attorney from Greenberg Traurig; and
defence attorneys Bruce Meyer and
John Morin from the respective firms
of Weil, Gotshal & Manges, and
Wormser, Kiely, Galef & Jacobs.

Although the settlements terms are
understood to be subject to a confi-
dentiality agreement, it is likely that, at
the very least, IGY recovered its
$200,000 deposit from the former
defendants, plus the development costs
it incurred in developing the project.:

The latter costs would likely have
come from obtaining all the necessary
permits and approvals from the
Bahamian government; economic,
engineering and environmental assess-
ments required for the development;

The document, which has been

\

Economy suffering
‘a sort of implosion’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL -
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy is
starting to suffer “a sort of
implosion on all sides” due to
the dramatic increase in. bank-
ing sector loan defaults, a for-
mer government minister said
yesterday, with the deteriora-

- tion beginning to affect indus-
tries yet to experience the
downturn’s full impact.

James Smith, a former Cen-
tral Bank governor and ex-min-
ister of state for finance, told
Tribune Business that the surge

-in banking sector loans that

were either non-performing or:

in arrears “ought to be reason
for a lot of concern, because it

Dramatic rise in defaulted
bank loans impacting
other sectors through

reluctance to lend

goes to the core of the opera-
tion of the economy”.

While the commercial banks
suffered the first direct hit if a
loan lapsed into the non-per-
forming category, meaning it
was 90 days past due, Mr Smith
said Bahamians needed to
remember that banking, essen-
tially, was almost a confidence
trick, since institutions lent

as paee 4B

Vacation rental market
regulation being assessed

i By CHESTER ROBARDS
_Business Reporter

LEVYING taxes and fees on
the vacation home rental mar-
ket has long been a challenge
for the Government, Tribune
Business*has learned, but
tourism policymakers are deter-
mined to find a way to regulate
the industry.

_ Statistics from the Ministry
of Tourism show visitor interest
in home rentals versus hotels is
steadily increasing, and Bahami-
ans are being encouraged more

than ever to build second homes

strictly for this purpose.

The Ministry of Tourism’s
Vernice.

director-general,

Walkine, said the Government
was engaged in talks to deter-





‘mine how to integrate private

vacation home, owners into the
mainstream of the tourism
industry.

Some hoteliers feel the
homes should be taxed a per-
centage like the 6 per cent hotel
room nights are subjected to, in
order to make the market equi-
table. However, there is
presently no way to track the
revenue earned by private vaca-
tion home owners.

“Tt’s not as easily done as you

might think,” said Ms Walkine.

“Tf I am a second home own-
er and J use several weeks out
of the year to allow my friends

to use it, how do you regulate

my. ability to let my friends use
my house? |

“So, the question is, how do
we determine the revenue that
they are potentially earning
from these properties and our
ability to therefore tax them on

‘that revenue. If it was easy we
_ would have already done it.”

Though the Government is
assessing how to impose fees

‘and taxes on individuals who

rent their second homes to vis-
itors, Ms Walkine said it was
equally concerned that the tar-
iffs would serve as a disincen-

tive. She considers the market a:

progressive step for the tourism
economy. —

“We have encouraged peo-
ple to buy homes in the
Bahamas because by doing that,
they spend money in the local
economy through construction,
the hiring of construction work-
ers, and the outfitting of their
homes, so the Government
makes some money,” she said.

SEE page 3B

udice, and without costs to any party.”

mY

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

°

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas was yesterday urged

to harness interest rate cuts in‘

combination with tools such as
lending caps, with private sector
executives arguing that this
would control new credit
growth but provide relief to
existing business and residen-
tial borrowers.

Dr Jonathan Rodgers, the
Bahamian ‘eye. doctor’ and
head of the Omni Financial Ser-
vices money transmission busi-
ness, and Chamber of Com-
merce president Dionisio
D’ Aguilar, both suggested that
using interest rates/monetary
policy as a stimulus tool “does-
n’t cost the Government a





SEE page 7B

* Private sector executives urge iGennal Bink to harness credit srowth
restriction tools in tandem with interest rate cuts to bring relief
* One says 1% base rate cut, if passed on, could save
- borrowers $60m per year/$5m per month ©
* Rate cust ‘don’t cost government a dime’, unlike fiscal stimulus:
* Chamber chief says priority should be. keeping businesses alive,
as sQverninent ‘ends up paying, for failure

dime” if harnessed in tandem
with tools to dampen new bor-
rowing.

“There are about $6 billion
in loans out there right now in
the Bahamas,” Dr. Rodgers said
yesterday. “If you drop the
interest rate by 1 per cent, that
releases around $60 million into

the economy or $5 million a

month.”

Dr Rodgers, whe spoke on -:

the issue at the Bahamas Busi-

_ness Outlook Conference, yes-,



terday said a1 per cent cut.in
borrowing: costs’ ;which is the

interest fate~ ‘woulld: reduce, for

example, a $1,000 mortgage

payment: to around $700: per ~

month, giving Bahamian con-
sumers more disposable income
and spending powek

Wiel OE

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PENSION PLAN

As a part of our commitment to our
valued members, The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce is partnering with Royal
Fidelity to provide Chamber members with
a superior Group and Individual. Pension
Plan with more benefits, flexible investment
options and online access.

Benefits:

“Both he and Mr D’ Aguilar.

- acknowledged Central Bank

governor Wendy Craigg’s con-
cerns that a cut in interest rates
could’ stimulate a. sudden
increase in. consumption and

_credit creation, with more mon-

ey spent on imports, thus lead-
ing to a.drain on the foreign

SEE page 4B

Investment management and administration by:

ROYAL #@ FIDELITY

WV Key ew arch aA Uo gl



















































aoe “A8IT s
2

73/22 64/17 ‘pc





: Today WINDS - ; WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W NASSAU Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles = 75°F
_ FIC Thursday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 15°F
3 FREEPORT Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles i five e
39/3 33/0 pc Thursday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
: . ; ee t ABACO Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet. 5-10 Miles 75° F
Windy with a full day Mainly clear, breezy Breezy with clouds ~ Windy; cloudy, then ‘Partial sunshine. Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Thursday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
of sunshine. “ and cold. and sun. clouds and sun. windy. ! . greater the need for eye and skin protection. 9p 7
_ . High: 69° - High: 72° High: 76° High: 77° 95/85 rae ae ‘
Low: 55° Low: a ? eli OW: lia _LOW: ae Low: 68 Le





73°-65° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, aa sunshine intensity, a precipitation, pressure;and Today 2:14 a.m. 26
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures teflect the high and the low for the day.








8:48 a.m. 02

2:39 pm, 2.0 8:43p.m. -0.1

3:51 pm. 2.1 9:52 p.m. -0.2
Friday 4:34am. 2.8 11:00am. -0.1







32/0. c



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Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday :
Temperature 4:57p.m. 2.2 10:58p.m. -0.4

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6 5 S rt “ Tt. - . e
saenenionend TOSB2I* CSNY es: DA OU Se DIN. 06



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Normal high 77° F/25° C , 3 Z | = ; Y ; 1 uN dSS
Normal low . 64° F/18°C gs Calgay 52/4 29/-1 pe 45/7 31/0 pe os . ee i *ANSIY
hee . Last year's high B2°F28°C | RST ee yin | ea % 54/2 25 2 = = =
High:65°FA8°C _ : LE LE Last year's IOW +........0+ ,. 66° F/19° C : 83/28 69/20 t
Low:39°F/4°C g ; - Precipitation Sunrise......6:51a.m. Moonrise ... 12:44 p.m. 55/12 54/12 7
: a Ze 2 : a: As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.54" Sunset....-.. 5:57 p.m. Moonset .... . 2:02 a.m. 38/3 37/2 pc
: g : Year-to date . 1.17" i g 4
Hight 63°F/17°C A a Normal year to date . 1.95" Full Last Hew 34/1 5

43/6
Low: 45° F/7°C =




AccuWeather.com

Forecasts and graphics provided by at
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 3 Fab: 9 Feb.16 Feb. 24

25-3 si c

“4






28/-2 21-6 ‘pe



= 1 . od Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
{3128 aus : j — precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast eee temperatures are for selected cities.





73/22 49/9 pc



KEY WEST

High: 67° F/19° C
Low:

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721 sh





37/2 3a pc

NSURANCE

~ High: 75° F/24°C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's peer e
highs and tonights's lows.

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Today

High Low

F/G FC

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Thursday

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39/3 20/6 s 50/10 247-4 5
33/0 15/-9 pc 26/-3 20/-6 s
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29/-1 15/-9 sf 23/-5 21/-6 pe Los Angeles
~ 18/-7 12/-11 sf 20/-6 20/6 sf Louisville
Charleston 8 46/7 21/-6 pc 48/8 21/-6 5s Memphis









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52/11 37/2




High: 75° F/24°C
Low:62°F/17°C.





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Chicago = 16/-B 8/-13 po 36/2 26-3 pe Mia 637° -49/9°"s—San 6a/t ake 1 ee rinidad ~ 88/3 t 89/31 75/23. pe A _

Cleveland 16/-8 13/-10 sf 29/-1 21/-6 . pe pas se Vancout - 48/8 3828 ¢ : Fleuthera Bye
a oe ee ee ee , | ‘son nH ae We aes nan Ts (0) 80-2860 To (40) 3862904
Detroit 17/8 9/-12 sf = 27/-2 20/-6. pe NewYork # s Tampa 55/12 34 ‘Winnipeg 14/-10 neAG pe 98/-2° 18/-7, pe ne | | | |
Honolulu 79/26 67/19 pc 80/26 68/20 c Oklahoma stl 50/10 30/-1 s Tucson 77105 45/7 s 78/25 47/8 s Weather (W) S-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers t-thunder-

Houston... 60/15 36/2 s GANT S010 s Orlando <= 5214-282 s S42: 33/0 -s Washington, DC. 35/1. 17/-8 po... 27/-2 25/-3. s i i

~storms, t-rain;sf-snow flurries; sn-snow, |-ice;*Prep-precipitation; Tr-trace~



THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 3B



Passports returned
for those travelling

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Passport Office is
returning old passports to
Bahamians who need to travel
during the six-week period
while they wait for their
machine readable replacements,
a senior Official told Tribune
Business yesterday, thus ensur-
ing business travel and com-
merce were not disrupted.

Roselyn Horton, the Passport
Office’s deputy permanent sec-
retary, said Bahamians - includ-
ing members of the business
community - would have their
old documents handed back to

them if they told the agency

they needed to travel while
waiting for the new machine
‘readable passports.
‘She added that policy had
been in place since last June.
Ms Horton was responding
to the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president, Dioni-
sio D’ Aguilar, who told Tribune

Business that businesses were:

complaining about the Passport
Office’s requirement that
Bahamians hand over their old
passports for six weeks while

they wait for the machine read- |

able replacements. This, he said,
was “completely unacceptable”
to the business community.

But Ms Horton replied:

“That’s not our policy. We do
return the passport for persons
to travel. All persons need to
say is: ‘?’m travelling’, and we
return the passport to them.
That policy has been in place
since last June.”



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



FUTURE Bahamian taxpayers will
end up paying for the persistent fiscal
deficits run up by the Government, a
leading fiscal ‘hawk’ told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday, bemoaning the fact that
“there doesn’t seem to be enough focus
on where there could be cost savings” in
the public sector.

Rick Lowe, an executive with the Nas-

sau Institute think-tank, while acknowl-

my and create some jobs through infra-
structure and capital spending, said there

Government’s recurrent spending on its
fixed costs - wages, rents and the like.

“There doesn’t seem to be enough
focus on where there could be some cost
savings measures by the Government,”
Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. “It
doesn’t appear they are focusing on it at
all.”



edging the need to stimulate the econo-

seemed to be no effort to control the

Deficit raises government savings fear

He was responding to the Central
Bank of the Bahamas report that
revealed the Government's fiscal deficit
increased by almost 57 per cent to $121.4
million during the first four months of.its
2008-2009 fiscal year, a trend likely to
increase in the short and medium term.

Recurrent spending, which goes to
cover Government’s fixed costs, such as

_ wages and property rents, rose by 10.45
per cent to $557.4 million during that
period, leading Mr Lowe to express con-

‘cern that increased government bor-
rowing to fund its deficit could ‘crowd
out’ the private sector.

“It usurps any credit that might be
available for the private sector,” he
added. “It’s difficult enough to get cred-
it for businesses, but if the Governmen-
t’s sucking it all up, there will be nothing
left for us at the end of the day. If the
private sector is not growing, you will
have not economic growth, and you need
the economy growing now more than
ever.’





@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

‘Business Reporter

A BAHAMIAN architect living and
working in Atlanta, Georgia, has been to
invited tojoin the Carter Centre’s Board of
Councillors, an honor once bestowed on
officials such as the Governor of Georgia,
the Mayor of Atlanta and the President of
Emory University.

Fred Perpall was invited to join'the Cen-
tre, founded by former US president Jimmy
Carter in 1982.It focuses on waging peace,
fighting disease, and building hope by “both
engaging with those at the highest levels of
government and working side by side with
poor and often forgotten people”.

“The Centre has observed 69 elections

{Bahamian architect to join Carter Centre

in 27 countries; helped farmers double or

- triple grain production in 15 African coun-

tries; worked to prevent and resolve civil
and international conflicts worldwide; inter-
vened to prevent unnecessary diseases in
Latin America and Africa; and strived to
diminish the stigma against mental illness,”
according to its annual report.

Mr Perpall said in an e-mail to friends
and family, that it was.a joy to have been

- invited to join such a distinguished group.

He told them it will be fun to help to con-
tinue to “chart the course of this wonderful
organisation”.

“Although often ridiculed for his Presi-
dency, there is no question of Jimmy
Carter's far reaching impact as a statesman,



Mr Lowe questioned why the Gov-
ernment could not be frugal at a time
when the private sector and ordinary
Bahamians were being required out of
necessity to identify all possible savings.

He also questioned why the Bahamas
needed a Mortgage Corporation or
Hotel Corporation, and said: “We know
that if the Government keeps on raising
the national debt (now at $3.207 billion)
as they have been doing over the last
20-25 years, it’s unsustainable.

“GDP is shrinking. There are contin-
gent liabilities not shown as part of the
national debt figure. When you add it up,
it’s quite concerning. How long can we
continue to sustain it? It just cannot con-
tinue.”

While total government revenues were
only down slightly by 0.41 per cent, at



$510.7 million for the four months from
July to November 2008, import duties
were off by 24.61 per cent when com-
pared to the same period in 2007, stand- '
ing at $162.3 million.

and a humanitarian. Many of his causes are
direct interests and passions of mine, and
this will be a wonderful experience for the
next three years,” the e-mail continued.
The board on which Mr Perpall now sits
comprises 185 councilors who represent top
leaders of the Atlanta and Georgia busi-
ness community. He is currently a principal
at The Beck Group’s Atlanta office.
Friends and family responded to Mr Per-
pall’s e-mails by. inundating him with con-
gratulations and praise for his appointment.

' One friend said: “Congratulations, my |.

brother! We are all proud of you and excit-

ed about the many ways we may be able to .

leverage your new opportunity. There may
even be direct benefits to. our country.”

Business Outlook conference all set for Grand Bahama

- ORGANISERS of the annual Grand

Vernice Walkine; vice-president of

rent recession.

Bahama Business outlook have adopt-

ed a theme of partnership for this year’s -

event, which will focus on creating a
mindset of private sector investment as
the way forward for the island. .

The 11th annual outlook, under the
theme “Grand Bahama Renewal: Thé
Power of Partnerships; The Power of
One,” is scheduled to take place at Our
Lucaya Resort in February and will fea-
ture nine speakers from a variety of
sectors.

Among those presenting will be
Ambassador to the US C.A. Smith’
Minister, of State for Finance, Zhivargo
Laing; ‘Director- General of Tourism,

et

strategic planning for Carnival Corpo-
ration, Giora Israel; Grand Bahama
Port Authority chief executive, Ian
Rolle; president of the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce Gregory Moss;
chief operating officer of Freeport Con-
tainer Port, Freeport Harbour Compa-
ny and Grand Bahama Airport Com-
pany, Raymond Jones; VOPAK vice-
president Maxwell Sweeting, and
Regional Airlines’ chief financial officer
Peter Turnquest.

Organisers plan to present an _

“unvarnished, but hopeful” view of

Grand Bahama’s economy, as well as’

‘opportunities for weathering the cur-

Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

Ideal applicant will:

banking and investments.

various parts,



- Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic understanding of

A private wealth management company.
is currently seeking a qualified, energetic and confident
indi vidual for tt he position of

TRUST PROFESSIONAL

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«Have the ability fo review sometimes complex legal documents relating to special projects
and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.

e Bea seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project and coordinating its

¢ Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

Investment and financial transactions.

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counsel and advisors.

follows:

either by



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Successful candidate will work directly with Senior Management in the administration of
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private facsimile (242) 702-2040
or by mail as follows:

| __ LYFORD MANOR, WEST BUILDING
~LYFORD CAY + P.O,BOX N7776 (Slot 193) ~ NASSAU, N.P,, THE BAHAMAS
’ Télephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 702-2002



“We’ve gathered a slate of presen-
ters who have undertaken to present
an honest look at the Grand Bahama
economy, both the negatives and the
positives, without sugar coating,” said
president of The Counsellors, Joan
Albury.

“Also, among them are persons who
represent entities with vested interests
in the growth of the Grand Bahamian
economy, and who show that there is
still considerable investor interest in
this well-endowed Bahamian island.

“As our theme demonstrates, we
believe that there is a way forward, but
it can’t be business as usual. It will take

a mindset and action plans that centre
not just on-what government can do,
but on private sector initiative driven by
individuals and partnerships.” __

Several Grand Bahama students will
be sponsored, so that they can attend
the event which will be broadcast, on
television.

The 18th annual Bahamas Business
Outlook, also sponsored by the Coun-
sellors, was held last month at.the Wyn-
dham resort on Cable beach and was a
packed house. Speakers at that outlook
included Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, Minister of Tourism and: Aviation
Vincent Vanderpool- -Wallace and CEO
of Baha Mat Sarkis Izmirlian.



Vacation rental |
market regulation
being assessed

FROM page 1B

According to Bahamas Hotel
Association president Frank Comi-
to, there was a need to create “stan
dard and regularity” within the
vacation rental market.

He said a prime example of thé
burgeoning demand for vacation
home rentals can be seen in Abaco,
where the number of visitors resid: .
ing in apartments or villas increased
by almost 4 per cent from 2006 to
2007, while the number of visitors
staying in hotels declined by almost
3 per cent during the same period:

“As hoteliers we contribute te’

~ the overall product improvement

and marketing of the destination?
and feel there needs to be a moré
equitable playing field in that
regard,” said Mr Comito.

“This year we plan to work with
the’ Ministry of Tourism to look
into ways in which that market can
be better incorporated.” 2

- He said efforts were underway
by the Bahamas Hotel Association
and the Ministry of Tourism.

Mr Comito. said the vacation
home rentals market was simply
another experience that visitors
were willing to try.

Vacation home rental owned
Angela Cleare told Tribune Busis
ness that she considers it a niché
market. Her home, located og
Cable Beach, has received rave
reviews by former guests on the
vacation rental-by-owner websité
vrbo.com. 7

“It behoves all of us, including.
those in the vacation home rental
arena, to figure out how we work
together to ensure greater access
to the destination, more effective
marketing and an improved prod:
uct,” said Mr Comito. .
Though hoteliers, mostly in the
Family Islands, are unsettled
because of the growth of the vaca-
tion home rental market, Ms
Walkine feels their cause for alarm. _
is unwarranted. —

“To the degree that we are able
to kéep those hotels full, they
wouldn’t have time to worry about
these second home owners, so real-
ly my focus is raising the level of
business for everybody, so that
everyone is happy,” she said.

“T think that hotels worry about
the second homes only to the
degree that they see them as
siphoning some of their business,
but I’m not sure that that’s the
same customer.”

PUBLIC NOTICE

From Department of
Civil Aviation



Effective Immediately:

All cheques for services or facilities of
| the Department of Civil Aviation must be

made payable to the Public Treasury.





a money order,
cheque or cash, No personal or company
cheques will be accepted.

All payments must be in the form of
bank draft,

| certified |

Payments are to be sent directly to the }
Accounts Section at Civil Aviation Head.
Office, Seaban House, Crawford Street. |





PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cap can fit interest rate reduction

FROM page 1B

currency reserves that support

this nation’s one:one exchange

rate peg to the US dollar.
Emphasising that they were

not criticising her position, both |

argued in separate interviews
with Tribune Business that the
Central Bank could still cut its
discount rate - the rate at which
it lends to the commercial banks
- without undermining the
Bahamas’ core monetary policy
objectives.

“The bottom line is, if you
reduce interest rates by 1/2 per
cent, given the amount of loans
out there the money that saves
for the population at large is
substantial,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“If you’re worried, as a Cen-
tral Bank governor, as you
should be” about causing an
unwanted credit and import
boom, the Chamber president
said: “You force your popula-
tion-to be more fiscally respon-
sible, and there are many tools,
mechanisms, levers the Central
Bank can employ to dampen
borrowing while helping peo-
ple to repay loans.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said down pay-
ment requirements could be

increased for “big ticket” items —

FROM page 1B

depositors money to borrowers.

Banks stopped earning inter-
est on loans if they were 180
days or more past due, and Mr
Smith said that if borrowers
were unable to meet their mort-
gage and other bank loan oblig-
ations, it was unlikely they could
pay their other bills, too.

This meant the fallout from °
jobs losses and income reduc--

tions spread much wider,
impacting landlords and utility
company receivables, to name
just two.

Given the substantial rise in
loan defaults, Mr Smith said
Bahamas-based commercial

such as cars, while banks could
be required to raise mortgage
down payment requirements to
20-30 per cent of the total pur-
chase price.

In addition, the Central Bank
could also reintroduce the lend-
ing cap it had imposed after the
September 11, 2001, attacks.
This device, while interfering
with the commercial banks’ nor-
mal conduct of business, pre-
vented them from increasing
their loan portfolios beyond the
size they had attained at the cap
date, restricting them to only
re-lending monies repaid by
existing borrowers.

“Tf a cap is put on the lending,
as well as bringing down interest
rates, the status, quo will be
maintained,” Dr Rodgers said.

Mr D’ Aguilar added:.“You
can dampen borrowing while
passing along relief.” With the
current economic crisis “far
more substantial” that the post-
September. 11 fallout, the
Chamber chief urged the Cen-
tral Bank to, if it cut interest
rates, institute a lending cap for
a specific time period such as

six months, after which it would

be reviewed.

Dr Rodgers suggested that .

interest rate cuts‘ were a far

~ banks‘would focus on rebuild-

ing and managing their existing

_ lending portfolios, becoming

very wary about further
advances to business and con-
sumer borrowers - even if they
represented solid credit risks.
In such a fashion, the banking
system - the very wheel that
lubricated the Bahamian econ-
omy through credit lending -
could start grinding to a halt,
impacting the wider economy.

“It could indicate the econo- —

my is imploding,” Mr Smith said
of the latest Central Bank lend-
ing data, “and the thing that
greases the economy is the
banking sector’s ability to lend
money.

“Tn turn, that ability to lend

Ces

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

(No. 45 of 2000)

ye

ivEELINO CONSULTING LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8) ,
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000) .
the Dissolution of AVELLINO CONSULTING LIMITED.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

_issued and the Company ‘has therefore been struck off the
Registér. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 23rd
day of January, 2009.

B. Foster
_ For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator



IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION
ACT, 1992

AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST
COUNSEL AND ATTORNEY :

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
: Complainant :
AND :

RALPH JAN WARD |
neponcen

NOTICE,

TAKE NOTICE that the Dissiplinary Tribunal will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 25th day of February, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Ralph Jan Ward, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within twenty-one (21) days from the date
hereof, an address to which the Decision may be sent by
prepaid Registered Post.

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D., 2009
Bahamas Bar Council

Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas

‘cheaper stimulus for the

Bahamian government than the
current fiscal spending expan-
sion he had embarked on.

Taking the $135 million New
Providence Road Improvement
Project as an. example, he said
the Government not only had
to repay the principal and inter-
est to the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB), but
the main contractor, Argenti-
na-based JCC, would repatri-
ate a large portion of that sum
back to its homeland.

That money would never be
spent in the Bahamas, Dr
Rodgers;added. While Bahami-
an construction companies and
workers were likely to benefit to

a certain degree, thus stimulat-_.

ing spending in the economy to
some extent, JCC was also like-
ly to bring in a large number of
expatriate workers.

Then, given that the road pro-
ject and Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) rede-

velopment were government- .

sponsored infrastructure pro-
jects, all construction materials

would be imported duty-free,

meaning the Government
would not benefit from
increased revenues.

Dr Rodgers suggested that

money depends on deposits
coming into the bank, and they
are going down because people
are not working. You get a sort
of implosion on all sides.

“The banks have to retrench
and improve their bottom lines,
tightening credit and improv-
ing the performance of their
portfolio.”

As Tribune Business revealed
yesterday, the recession’s
impact can clearly be seen on
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FINCO) loan port-
folio for the year to October 31,
2008. The BISX-listed mortgage
lender saw a 76.5 per cent year-
over-year increase in non-accru-

sal loans - loans that were more

than 90 days overdue - to
$28.933 million, compared to
$16.39 million the year before.

The percentage of non-accru-
al loans in its total portfolio rose

. from 2.64 per cent at year-end

2007 to 4.09 per cent at year-

end 2008. Out of that $28 mil-.

lion, almost $22 million was

. more than 180 days past due,

compared to $14 million the
year before.

In its report on monthly eco- '

nomic. developments for
December 2008, the Central
Bank last night said that total

" private sector loans in atrears -
those overdue by more than 31 -

days - rose by $79.7 million :dur-
ing that month to make a 12-
month rise of $235.8 million or
44.5 per cent. Total loans in
arrears stood at $766 million at
2008 year-end.

“This was equivalent to an

‘estimated 12.4 per cent of total .
loans, compared to 9.27 per cent: '

and 7.47 per cent at end-2007

and 2006, respectively,” the -

Central Bank said. .
Non-performing loans grew

with the road improvement pro-
ject loan, $50 million to assist
the LPIA financing, and a fur-
ther $75 million spend on the
construction of court/govern-
ment office complexes coming
to around $250 million, if this
sum was borrowed at a 7 per
cent interest rate, the Govern-
ment would be paying $2.9 mil-

lion a year.
Cut
While he acknowledged that

an interest rate cut would lead ©

to increased consumption, loans
and imports, thus impacting for-
eign reserve levels, Dr Rodgers

‘said each dollar spent on

imports was likely to have
changed hands several times

before leaving the Bahamas.
This would increase the veloci-

ty of income in circulation, a
key tool for stimulating the
economy.

“Tt will not cost the Govern-
ment anything by cutting inter-
est rates,” Dr Rodgers told Tri-
bune Business. “It will transfer

' bank profits or wealth to the

people of the country, the same
people who have made the
banks.

“By lowering interest rates,

by $116 million or 46.1 per cent

in'2008.to ‘end the year at $368 -

million, while loans in arrears -
those between 31-90 days past
due - rose by $119.8 million or
43.1 per cent to $398 million.

Some 48 per.cent of total
loans in default are now non-
performing. Some 5.9 per cent
(almost 6 per cent) of all com-
mercial bank loans in the
Bahamas are now non-per-
forming, meaning the lenders
are not earning interest’ on
them.

' Mx Smith yesterday described
the 2008 increases in non-per-
forming and loans in arrears as
“huge”, adding that the aver-
age for non-performing loans,
as a percentage of the total
banking industry loan portfo-
lio, was usually around 4 per
cént.

‘“While those figures are

". dreadful, it’s not unexpected,” .
“We know ;

Mr Smith added.
what's happening in the US.
Youre seeing the start of a dra-
matic increase in the slow-
down.”

The former minister said he
was concerned that the bank-
ing sector’s asset quality issues

- might “affect the parts of the ~

economy not yet affected by the
slowdown”, ‘

He explained: “To maintain
inventory, a store has to bor-

row, and the banks might not.

be keen to expand credit
because of the problems they’re
having. It could have severe
repercussions : for other parts of
the economy.”

Some 15.5 per cent of all
commercial/business loans in
the Bahamas are now in arrears,

the rate having increased by -
71.4 per cent or $67.1 million in -
2008.

IN THE ESTATE OF RUTH
AGNES GRANGER late of
No. 15 Infant View. Road in the
Southern District of the Island
-of New Providence, Bahamas,

deceased.

NOTICE

N OTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand °
against the said estate are required to
send the same duly certified in. writing
to the undersigned on or before the 17th
day of February, A.D. 2009, after which
date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only
to the claims of which he shall have:

had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are
required to make full settlement on or
before the date hereinabove mentioned.

‘

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas



people import more, so more
government revenue will be
coming in. The cost of govern-
ment borrowing will come down
if interest rates come down, so
the Government’s cash flow will
improve.”

Dr Rodgers suggested the
three Canadian-owned banks -
Royal Bank of Canada, Scotia-
bank and FirstCaribbean -
between them repatriated some
$250-$300 million in profits to
their parent each year.

If.a 1 per cent interest rate
cut reduced banking income by
$60 million or so, he said these
profits would be reduced by
around 20 per. cent.

“Tn exchange for doing that, it
would be a transfer of wealth
the people who are suffering
hell,” Dr Rodgers said, sug-
gesting that Bahamians would
not-invest interest savings in
new borrowings, but meeting
existing obligations such as

' mortgage, rent and school fees.

Criticising the Bahamian
banking system for having inter-
est rates spreads “among the

‘highest in the world”, and a lack

of competition, Dr Rodgers
described the Bahamian Prime

Rate - the rate at which the

banks lend to each other; and is

Economy suffering ‘a sort of implosion’

“Businesses can only pay in

accordance with what they sell,.

especially in an economy like
ours where for the most part
we are retail/distributors,” Mr

‘Smith explained. “If the mar-

ket is soft, and people are not
purchasing from you, business-
es have to build up inventory
facilities from their overdraft.
If they are not selling, you are
going to see a lot of defaults.”
The Central Bank report also
showed the strain Bahamian
households and consumers were
under, with a.134 per cent
increase in loans for debt con-
solidation - $92 million in the

first 11 months of 2008; com-
pared to $39.3 million the year

before.
Mr Smith said he felt this
increase “may also reflect a

strategic response by the bank- »

ing.sector”, where institutions

used as the base for setting all
consumer interest rates as “the
single greatest determinant of
the cost of money and the cost
of living in our country”.
While an-interest rate reduc-
tion might negatively impact
savers, Dr Rodgers said this

“impact was much less.in the

Bahamas due to this nation’s
“negative savings rate. The
reduction in the cost of doing
business will offset the loss

Savers would suffer from the

drop in interest rates”.
Mr D’ Aguilar said yesterday:
“At the end of the day it’s

‘ important for the Government
‘to try and keep businesses sol-

vent-and people employed,
rather than deal with them
when they’re laid-off.

“This is a difficult time,
requiring bold and aggressive
steps to prevent businesses fail-
ing. If businesses fail and go'out
of business, it creates a whole
host of social problems the
Government eventually ends up
paying for. Lowering interest
rates don’t cost the Govern-
mentadollar,adime. —

“I’m convinced you can pro-
tect your foreign reserves while
at the same time reducing: inter-

“est rates.”

were restructuring loans made

. to customers whose ability to

repay had been impacted by job
and income losses.

On a brighter note, Mr Smith
said the US tourism market had
shown signs of responding to
the discounted hotel rates and
tourism packages the Bahamas
was offering. This nation need-
ed to continue its strategic mar-
keting and hope the Obama
administration’s stimulus pack-
age worked.

A renewed focus on the
Canadian market would.also
help to partly compensate for
the loss of ‘some US tourists,
but Mr Smith said: “We just
have to recognise that we’re in
an extraordinary period that we
have not seen before, and have
to keep working on the. solu-
tions, not throwing our hands
in the air and giving up.”

NOTICE is hereby given that MYRTHIL ST. JEAN § of

DAVIS STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-7117, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is ‘applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28 day of
January, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JADE GREENSWORD of |
HIGH VISTA DRIVE, P.O..BOX EE-16486, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4'" day of
February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-ELITTE JEAN
BENEBY of PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX CB-
12401, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 28" day of January, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BU SINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
ACAL CAPITAL ASSOCIATES LIMITED.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ACAL Capital Associates Limited is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on January
27", 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Shareece E. Scott, Deltec

Bank & Trust Limited, Deltec House, Lyford Cay, P.O. Box N-3229,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Shareece E. Scott
Liquidator





hee ee



Most carmakers’ sales plunge while Hyundai, Subaru gain

@ By KIMBERLY S
JOHNSON
and BREE FOWLER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — General
Motors’ US vehicle sales
plunged 49 per cent in January
while Ford's sales dropped 40
per cent, starting 2009 at an
abysmal pace for the whole auto
industry as lower sales to fleet
buyers like rental car compa-
nies weighed down the results.

Toyota's sales dove 32 per
cent for the month, Nissan's
dropped 30 per cent and Hon-
da's fell 28 per cent, putting the

overall industry on track for its ©

fourth straight month in which
US sales plunged 30 per cent or
more.

But Subaru bucked the trend
of declines for a second month
in a row, posting an eight per
cent sales increase, and
Hyundai said its sales jumped
14 per cent.

Hyundai credited its increase
to its offer to cover a new vehi-
cle's depreciation if customers
return a car within 12 months
because they are unable to
make the payments.

"This program gets to the
root cause of today's economic
concerns — fear of job loss,"
Hyundai regional general man-
ager Peter DiPersia said in a
statement.

Chrysler is set to release its -

sales figures later Tuesday. The
company's sales chief, Steven
Landry, told reporters earlier
ata meeting with dealers that
US industry sales could drop as
much as 35 per cent in January.
The annualized sales rate for
the month could drop below 10
million for the first time in more
than 26 years, he said.
According to Ward's AutoIn-
foBank, the last month in which
the seasonally adjusted annual
sales rate dropped below 10 mil-
lion was August 1982, when it
hit 9.9 million as the nation was
mired in a recession.
Domestic and foreign
automakers have been strug-
gling as unemployment risés,
consumer confidence weakens

and many people have a
tougher time getting loans.
General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler LLC have received
$13.4 billion in federal loans to
stay afloat, and they hope to get
more after they submit a viabil-
ity plan to the government by
February 17. Ford Motor Co.
has said it does not plan to use
government aid.

GM said earlier this month it
is planning its turnaround under
the assumption the entire indus-
try will sell 10.5 million new
vehicles in the US this year.
Chrysler has said it's planning
on 11.1 million units, and Ford
last week reduced its forecast
to a range between 11.5 million
and 12.5 million. But few people
were expecting the automakers
to start 2009 at such a pace.

January is typically a slow
sales month, ‘and many
automakers and analysts are
expecting the market to
rebound in the second half of
the year as the economy and

_ access to credit improves.

Detroit-based GM sold
128,198 light vehicles in Janu-
ary, while Ford's sales totaled
93,060. Toyota Motor Corp.
sold 117,287 cars and trucks.

The automakers have rolled
out hefty incentive offers in
recent months in an effort to
boost sales. Edmunds.com esti-
mated the average automaker
incentive at $2,714 per vehicle
sold in January, down 5.2 per
cent from December but up
12.5 per cent from January
2008.

Jesse Toprak, the auto Web
site's executive director of
industry analysis, attributed the
year-over-year increase to a
greater number of lingering
2008 model year vehicles. He
noted that 27 per.cent of all new
vehicles sold this January were
from the 2008 model year, up

- from 12 per.cent a year ago.

Analysts had expected high-
volume fleet sales to be down
sharply in January, as con-
sumers and businesses cut back
on travel in the economic down-
turn and rental car companies
hold onto their current cars

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MARATHONINVESTMENT
‘HOLDINGS LIMITED: ~

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 29th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE ELOITE |
THOMPSON late of #7, Sea
Horse Drive, Sea Breeze Estates
in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the said estate are required to
send the same duly certified in writing
to the undersigned on or before the 17th
day of February, A.D. 2009, after which
date the Administrator will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only
to the claims of which he shall have.

had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are
required to make full settlement on or
' before the date hereinabove mentioned.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas





AGM sign sits in front of a long line of unsold 2009 Escalades at a Cadillac dealership in the southeast Denver -

Toyota's sales of light trucks
fell 35 per cent on about equal
declines in SUV and pickup
truck demand, while its car sales
dropped 29 per cent. Sales of
its Prius hybrid slid 29 per cent.

Honda Motor Co.'s car sales
fell 27 per cent and its truck.
sales dropped 29 per cent, but
the Japanese automaker saw a
Six per cent increase in sales of
its Fit subcompact, and sales of
the updated Acura TSX sports
sedan rose 16 per cent.

Ford shares rose nine cents,
or 4.8 per cent, to $1.97 in after-
noon trading, while GM shares
fell 7 cents, or 2.4 per cent, to
$2.82. Toyota's U.S. shares rose
$1.64, or 2.5 per cent, to $65.52,
and Honda's shares climbed 77
cents, or 3.4 per cent, to $23.49.

The Associated Press reports

suburb of Lone Tree, Colorado...

longer.

Production cuts that have
idled many US factories for sev-
eral weeks have compounded

the problem. Many fleet cus-

tomers get their deliveries right

. after cars roll off the assembly

line, so when factories suspend
production, those deliveries
come to a halt.

GM said its fleet sales fell 80
per cent to just over 13,000 vehi-
cles in January, marking their
lowest sales level since 1975.
GM's retail sales fell 38 per
cent. :

Dearborn-based Ford said

,

Lincoln and Mercury vehicles
included a 27 per cent drop in
retail sales and a 65 per cent
decline in fleet sales.

Ford's top analyst George
Pipas said he expects industry-
wide fleet sales to be down 65
per cent for the month. Those
declines combined with facto-
ry shutdowns in late December
and most of January may lead
to an annualized US sales rate
below 10 million, he said.

But Ford's retail sales, albeit
lower than January 2008 levels,
held steady over the last three
months.

"What we're fading for is

(AP Photo: David Zalubowski)

stabilization. You have to stop
falling before you can start ris-
ing," said Emily Kolinski Mor-
ris, Ford's top:economist. "Con-
sumers are responding to favor-
able prices and discounts."

USS. sales at Ford's Sweden- ~

based Volvo division fell 64 per
cent to 2,910 vehicles in Janu-
ary. The company is exploring a
possible sale of the unit.

unadjusted auto sales figures,
calculating the percentage
change in the total number of
vehicles sold in one month com-
pared with the same month a
year earlier. Some automakers
report percentages adjusted for
sales days. There were 26 sales
days last month, one more than
in J anuaty 2008.:

° AP Auto Writer Bree
Fowler reported from New York

January's drop in sales of Ford,

NOTICE

NOTICE. is hereby given that GERMAINE TELUS-
VILCIN of ST. CHARLES VINCENT STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4 day of
February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Legal Notice

Osu CeD

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

‘PARK GLADE HOLDINGS LIMITED.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, PARK GLADE HOLDINGS LIMITED. has
been Dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 29th day of December, 2008.

Clifford McClelland
12-14 David Place
St. Helier, Jersey, JE2 4TD
‘Liquidator



Fane

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLE ST. JEAN of

DAVIS STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-7117, NASSAU, »

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

‘Knows any reason why registration/naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28 day of
January, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of REGINALD WINFIELD KNOWLES
late and domiciled of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Noticeis hereby given thatall persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are requested to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the same certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before the 11th day of March.
A.D. 2009 and if required, “to prove such “debts or claims or
in default be excluded from any distribution; after the above
date the assets will be distributed having regard only to the

‘proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall have had notice.

And. Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to. the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the 11th day of March A.D. 2009

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D. 2009 ”

ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
Attorney for the Executor
Chambers
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas



A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services .

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e Acting as project manager for the duration of engagements, acting as key contact for the client, attending -

client meetings, leading particular sections of work and co-ordination of the work of junior staff

e Overseeing the developmént and evaluation of financial models, valuation reports, detailed financial due
diligence reports, term sheets, information memoranda and reports prepared for external consumption

Managing and coaching people
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Undertaking credit and debt capacity analysis of companies and presentation of results

Assisting in new business development including the preparation and presentation of documentation
Negotiating alongside clients on transactions

Ensuring adherence to all compliance and regulatory rules

Reporting to clients and partners on transaction progress

Applicants will also have experience in various sectors including infrastructure (such as airports, ports, roads,
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Applicants must be a finance/economics university graduate and a member of a recognized accountancy body (or
hold a qualification such as the Chartered Financial Analyst designation) in addition to having a minimum of five
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KPMG offers a competitive compensation and benefits package inclusive of medical and pension plans.



Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their degree and professional certifications and a copy of their
transcripts to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or f[alighthourne@kpma.com.bs no later

than Friday, February 13, 2009.

AUDIT «© TAX # ADVISORY

© 2009, KPMG, a Bahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.



!
‘



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

GN-818



SUPREME
COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2008/PRO/NPR/00807

IN THE ESTATE OF JOZEF SPIRA (a.k.a. JOSEF
SPIRA), late and domiciled of 59A, Oakwood Court,
W14 England in the United Kingdom), deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by SAMANTHA M. WILLIAMS, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Probate in the above
estate granted to MICHAEL SPIRA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the High Court of Justice,
The Principal Registry of the Family Division on the
18th day of July, 1995.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00025

Whereas THOMAS A.A, CLEARE, JR., of Joe
Farrington Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of THOMAS ALLISON AUGUSTUS
CLEARE, late of Joe Farrington Road, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the ese of 14 days from
the: date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00026
Whereas ALEXANDER EDWARD WOODSIDE, of

Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates, Eastern District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of CAROLINE
WOODSIDE, late of Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates,
Eastern District, New Providence, .one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for Registrar -

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/00027

Whereas MARVIN JAMES MACKEY, of Rolle
Avenue, New Providence and BARON HUDEN
MACKEY of Florida both of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JAMES
HUDEN MACKEY a.k.a. JAMES MACKEY a.k.a.
JAMES HUDON MACKEY, late of Fox Hill Road,
South Eastern, District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/00028

Whereas CHANELL ROKER, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

has made application to the Supreme Court cf The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of GLENROY HOWARD, late of Sir
Lynden Pindling Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00030

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY RITA, late of 3300 ,

N. Milwaukee Avenue, Northbrook in the State of Illinois,
one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MONIQUE V. A. GOMEZ of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The

Bahamas for obtaining the resealed Order Admitting _

Will to Probate and Appointing Representative in the
above estate granted to FRANK J. CALLERO and
ROBERT M. CALLERO the Independent Co-Executors
of the Estate, by the Circuit Court of Cook County,
Illinois, County Department, Probate Division, on the
5th day of January, 2005.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

- STH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00031

Whereas OLAMAE T AYLOR of No.7 Perpall Tract
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of JAMES ROBERT TAYLOR late of
No.7 Perpall Tract in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION:

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009
2009/PRO/NPR/00036

IN THE ESTATE OF CHARLES G. MORETTO, late
and domiciled of Broward County in the State of Florida,
one ofthe States ofthe United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days ITom the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by CONSTANCE E. MCDONALD,

of Fortune Village, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Administration in
the above estate granted to CHRISTINE MACHUGH,

| the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the Circuit

Court For Broward County, in the state of Florida, Probate
Division on the 16th day of January, 2004.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00037

IN THE ESTATE OF WARD STOUTENBURG
EVANS, late and domiciled of Flat No. 11, Jocyn Court,

‘Rochester Road, Bantry Bay, South Africa, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS
and MIKE ANTHONY KLONARIS, both of the

THE TRIBUNE



«

Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of the Certificate of Appointment of Estate
Trustee with a Will in the above estate granted to MARY
JANE MCKINNON, the Personal Representative of
the Estate, in the Superior Court of Justice on the 8th
day of July, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

~ PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00038 —

IN THE ESTATE OF SADIE LEE TAYLOR, late and
domiciled of 2554 N. 28th Street in the City of Milwaukee
in the county of Milwaukee in the State of Wisconsin,
one of the States of the United States of America,

’ deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of -
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing Grant of Domiciliary Letters in the above
estate granted to RUTH MCDOWELL, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the State of Wisconsin,
Circuit Court, Milwaukee County on the 18th day of
Noveinber, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR —

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00039

IN THE ESTATE OF AUDREY VERA HODGSON,
late and domiciled of 38 East Avenue, Riverview Park,
Althorne, Chelmsford Essex in the United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MELISSA L. SELVER-ROLLE,

of the Western District, New Providence, one of ‘the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney- ,
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for |
obtaining the Reséaling of The Grant of Probate in the ©
above estate granted to FAY GEORGINA MORRIS,
the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the High
Court of Justice, The District Probate Registry at Ipswich
on the 28th day of April, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON |
(for) REGISTRAR -

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR00040

Whereas MICHAEL GEORGE HIGGS II, of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of MICHAEL GEORGE
HIGGS I, late of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given tliat such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the Sxpianan ¢ of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00041

Whereas ADAM D.R. CARRERATA, of Poinciana
Drive, in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for CAROLE
ARTERBERY, the Daughter,has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANE
C. EDMUNDS, late of 241 State Road in the City of
Eliot in the County of York in the State of Maine, U.S.A,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



THE TRIBUNE
GN-818



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00042

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway off
the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by

Deed of Power of Attorney for Yvon Senecal, the Executor of
the deceased has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of CLAUDE SENECAL a.k.a.
CLAUDE JOSEPH HENRI SENECAL late of the City of
Montreal in the Province of Quebec in the Dominion of Canada,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT ~

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00044
Whereas DOUGLAS BURROWS, of Golden Gates #2, Western

District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the

Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration ©

of the Real and Personal Estate of VELERIA MINLEY
BURROWS, late of Jackfish Drive, Golden Gates #2, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby. given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00045

Whereas BERTHA MAE COOPER-ROUSSEAU, of Trinity
Place off Frederick Street in the City of Nassau, on thé Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
the Legal Heirs of the deceased has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of DR. STEFAN JOHANNES
SANDKUHLER, late of the City ofNeulingen in the Republic
of Germany, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 7B





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Gold prices suffer as
risk appetite returns

lm By SARA LEPRO
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Gold
prices fell for a second straight
day Tuesday as investors
plowed back into the equities
markets on better-than-expect-

ed earnings reports and encour-
aging news on the housing sec-
tor.

Oil prices rose, while grain
prices declined.

Demand for gold has been
rising in recent weeks as volatil-

ity on Wall Street has investors -

seeking safety in the metal. But
on Tuesday, some risk appetite
returned to the markets after
the National Association of
Realtors reported an increase
in pending home sales in
December as buyers in the
South and the Midwest snapped
up properties at steep discounts.

Additionally, earnings reports
from big-name companies like
homebuilder D.R. Horton Inc.
and drugmakers Merck & Co.
and Schering Plough came in

ahead of analysts' estimates.

The day's news sent all the
major indexes up more than
one per cent, including the Dow
Jones industrials, which rose 141
points to the 8,078 level.

Gold for April delivery fell
$14.70 to settle at $892.50 an
ounce on the New York: Mer-
cantile Exchange.

Fell

Gold prices fell Tuesday
despite a slide in the US dollar.
Investors often use gold as a
hedge against inflation and a
weak greenback.

Other precious metals prices —
were mixed. March silver fell:

11.5 cents to $12.30 an ounce,
while March copper futures
rose 9.1 cents to $1.5220 a

pound. The yield on the bench- ~

mark 10-year Treasury note,
which moves opposite its price,

, rose to 2.83 per cent from 2.72 -

per cent late Monday.
Oil prices rose slightly on the
Nymex as investors found some

encouragement in production
cuts by OPEC. The Organiza-
tion of the Petroleum Exporting
Countries promised last year to
cut crude production by 4.2 mil-
lion barrels a day in an effort
to offset plunging prices. In the
past, OPEC has cheated on
announced production cuts to
keep oil money flowing, but so
far that doesn't seem to be hap-
pening to the degree that was
expected, analysts say.

Light, sweet crude for March
delivery rose 70 cents to settle at
$40.78 a barrel.

In other Nymex trading, gaso-
line futures dropped about a
penny to $1.1376 a gallon, while
heating oil fell nearly two cents
to-$1.3235 a gallon. Grain prices
fell on the Chicago Board of
Trade.

March wheat futures shed
11.25 cents to $5.5250 a bushel,
while corn for March delivery
fell 8.75 cents to $3.6175 a
bushel. March soybeans
declined 13.5 cents to $9.46-a
bushel.

Hilton marina lawsuit settled

FROM page 1B.

and architectural and other
planning work.
The move to settle the dis-

pute coincided with a January .

21, 2009, interlocutory ruling on
the dispute by Judge Charles
Edward Ramos, who found that
the British Colonial Develop-

_ ment Company, its two prop-

erty affiliates and Mr Allen had
a potential case to answer in
relation to several grounds
alleged by IGY.

It is unclear if the settlement
was prompted by that ruling.
However, Judge Ramos threw

out the charges levied by IGY_

against the resort’s two major
shareholders, PRK Holdings

(the investment vehicle for the
Canadian Commercial Work- j
ers Industry Pension Plan:;,
.(@CWIRP), and Adurion Capi- +»

tal.

The latter is the Swiss and
London-based private equity
boutique/investment house that
acquired a majority interest in
the British Colonial Develop-

ment Company from PRK:

Holdings in late 2006/early 2007.
Judge Ramos removed both
shareholders from the lawsuit,
dismissing the complaint against
them, and also dismissing some
of the complaints against the
hotel’s holding company and
Mr Allen.

Judge Ramos’s judgment was

a relatively strange one, in that
he repeated the allegations
made by IGY in its lawsuit in
such a way as to potentially con-
fuse readers into thinking they
were findings or statements of
fact.

However, the judge made no
findings/rulings on any of IGY’s
allegations, including claims that
Mr Allen had misled it into
approving Adurion’s purchase
of a majority stake in the British
Colonial Development Compa-

ny.
Alleged

IGY had alleged its invest-

ment vehicle, IGY Ocean Bay’

Properties, had signed an agree-
ment to acquire five acres of
undeveloped waterfront land in

..Nassau.on November. 7,/2005,

from the Britigh*Colonial

‘Development Conapany ahd its

affiliates. wi; 1 Wi

The agreement, which was to
ultimately develop a joint ven-
ture marina, was allegedly struc-
tured so that IGY would
acquire the land by paying $8

million in cash and providing a.

$10 million equity interest to
the Hilton companies in the
joint venture.

Still, the lawsuit’s settlement
now allows both parties to move
on, and clears the way for the
British Colonial Development
Company and its shareholders
to focus on the property’s ongo-
ing $15 million upgrade and

future development.

A $40 million loan from Sco-
tiabank has already been re-
finance with FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas),
and the hotel’s owners can also
turn their attention to develop-
ing the property formerly part
of the IGY deal. Besides a mari-
na, the construction of a new
office complex has also been
mulled for the site.

An economic impact study
disclosed previously by Tribune
Business had predicted that the
IGY project would generate
“very substantial employment”,
creating 700 direct full-time jobs
and another 400 indirect per-
manent jobs for Bahamians.
The indirect jobs were to be cre-
ated at suppliers of goods and -
services to the development,
and through services provided
to yachts. ii

‘The study:.also fauceask that
the IGY. development would
create 200-250 full-time jobs
during construction, and have
a total economic impact of
$222.8 million over a 20-year
period.

IGY’s proposed marina on
West Bay Street would have
had 72 slips, catering chiefly to
the larger yachts and vessels,
those of between 100-150 feet to
200 feet and longer.

The development was to fea-
ture a boutique hotel of about
150-200 rooms, several restau-
rants, retail and a parking struc-
ture for over 300 cars.

VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED |

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for position of VICE PRINCIPAL of St. Anne’s School Preparatory
Department beginning September 2009.

The Applicant must have a degree in Education from a_ recognized
University, with atleast 5 years accumulative CRDEMERCE. The applicant must also be

computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Assisting with staff supervision and evaluation
- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations, invigilations)
- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic programmes
- Assisting with Curriculum Development
Administration of School and External examinations

Oversee Inventory
Oversee Requisitions

Share responsibility for sustaining culture of excellence throughout the school
Share responsibility for providing a climate that fully develop the concept of

teamwork.

Application forms are available from the Anglican Diocese office on Sands Road
off East Street. The completed application together with a cover letter, statement
of educational philosophy and recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

P.O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is Friday, February 20th, 2009





PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



JUDGE PARKER

I’M AFRAID TO ote
ASK WHAT SOPHIE'S
STRATEGY IS! 5







TIM WAS COMMITTED TO



1 WAS IN SOME SORT
OF TRANCE
ALL DAY

SCREEN





NANIGHH!









Across
1 Indisposition of one in 1.
_ mental breakdown (7)

5 Dignified way to 2
_ help (5)
8 What | should have. 3

_ done, if | were in your’ °
position (7,6)
9 Tears shed for Flora (5)
A downtrodden machine
worker (7) 5

11. In which all men are
brothers? (6) ©
12 Girl out to procure
bird (6) a lg
15 Fire raisers (7)
17 Salesman the Spanish 1
rebuff (5)
19 It gives current time (8,5) ae
20 They have branches for 14
- shoes (5) ]
21 They may’be responsible 16
‘for reports from the i
: 18

front (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Index, 8 Sore need, 9
Storm, 10 Sergeant, 11 Obeys, 12
Oat, 16 Onager, 17 Oil rig, 18 Eon, 23
Spree, 24 Aspirate, 25 Habit, 26
Forgoing, 27 China.

Down: 2 Nota bene, 3 Early age, 4
Rowena, 5 Hedge, 6 Delay, 7 Edits,
12 Ore, 13 Ton, 14 Slapdash, 15
Siberian, 19 Ostend, 20 Waifs, 21
Spars, 22 Orlop.





IT'S SIMPLE---
SHE'S GOING

IN THE EARLY YEARS,

HELPING TIBETANS ESCAPE THE BROTHERS WERE

ATEAM,BUT ERIC
TIRED OF
THE GAME.



1 SAT AND STARED AT A COMPUTER

OU CHENEDU?P
AY PINOSAORS!




. ) Ww sande AM ;

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down -

CALVIN & HOBBES

I'M WRITING A BOOK
ABOUT MY LIFE.




ITS CALLED, " CALIN:

TWE SHOCKING TRUE STORY

OF THE BON WHOSE EXPLOITS
PANICKED A NATION."

/















ANP WHY
WOULD I
DO THAT?

YOU'RE SERIOUS!
YOU DIDN'T TRY TO
‘TALK HER OUT OF IT?

yw
ERIC BLAMED HIMSELF.
BUT WE ALL KNEW

JUST
ACCEPTED IT,













SPECIFICALLY

WHAT EXPLOITS.
ARE Nou

REFERRING To?





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- several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
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3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



THE RISKS. NORA?

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aL lek |

‘A MAN'S HOME IS HIS CASTLE, AND J’ THINKIN’

SERIOUSLY ABOUT ADDING A MOAT.” Difficulty Level






I SUFFER
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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Best described as.a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more 'than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.













www.kingfeatures.com



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©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate,-Inc. _







Difficulty Level * *




VV
THERE!
Now ITS
JUST

uses

Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary










©2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved,

edition).

Get a new car on
account, but some capital
required (5) bi
Induce to become
religious? (4,2,7)

For example, rising in

the morning with
enthusiasm (7)

Hitherto the aim of boys
wanting to go out with girls
(2,4)

Find answer to love’s

South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

torment (5) NORTH
i a16

Flat out after a mishap? ¥AIS8
‘Not unusual if you’re #KQ1052

this (8-5) £983

Locked up as a final WEST EAST
Bune) @K 1072 #Q854
: : ; ¥743 ¥95 :
lam bent on getting out “Tw Across Down e904 #3873
and moving round (7) as aaa p 4 Uivieldl RAK 64 &Q107
Nigerian perhaps can be N arjous (7) nyletcing 45) SOUTH

5 Flowering bulb (5 2 Zambezi #A93

after fair treatment (7) N owering bulb (5) ambezi cataruct ¥KQ1062
Demanding, like royalty = 8 Asa result (2,11) (8,5) #A6

can be? (6) hI52

i ! 3 ata

Has to make professions > 9 An area’s plant To plunder (7) The bidding:

of loyalty (5) “” life (5) 4 Room to poate we North East
tt of water coming pF 10 Theatrical manoeuvre (6) INT Pass 39 Pass

rom leaks (5) entertainer (7) 5 Jeer at (5) Wat acs

. ; - an a sept ais) Opening lead — king of clubs.
3 ie? ayfu \ ery patient (4-
Yesterday s Easy Solution 42 Behave > Go ahead of (7) Assume you’re declarer with the

South hand at four hearts. The

Across: 1 ‘Hitch, 8 Live it up, 9

: insincerely (6) 11. Gun (7) defenders start by cashing three club
ne 1O\Tired out, Hs eed a h Use : tricks, after which East shifts to a
: a ‘| 6 vote 1 eae . id, 15 Sports official (7). 13. What remains (7) low spade. How do you continue?
udas, course, unny, 47 Perfume (5 14 Starta When the deal occurred, South
26 By itself, 27 Seamy. 6) won the spade with the ace and
Down: 2 In the bag, 3 Cul-de-sac, 4 19 Soon enough journey (3,3) played five rounds of trumps, reduc-
Divine, 5 Fever, 6 Stoop, 7 Spate, : ing everyone to four cards with
12 Nil, 13 Old, 14 In future, 15 Per Naas! tee Slane dummy. retaining the K-Q-10-5. of
annum, 19 Insult, 20 Hobby, 21 20 Smelling stale (5) long-legged (5) diamonds. East grimly hung on to his
id. 2 ; four. diamonds, discarding — his
Acrid, 22 Fussy. 21 Cargo (7) 18 Deal with (5) remaining spade on the last trump

lead. Declarer then tried the A-K-Q
of diamonds, but had to concede a

HOW many words of four letters:
or more can you.make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain

eee

aS oa ct ee iS ye

BSS ee

Neutralizing a Krave










mR tt Sard

. the centre letter and there must
words in be at least one nine-letter word.
‘the main No plurals. :
hee body of TODAY’S TARGET

Good 21; very good 31; excellent
41 {or more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION -

alert alter. ariel auteur earl
extra irate lair later laxer Har
lira litre lure LUXURIATE ‘rail
rale rate ratel real relax retail
rial viel rile rite ritual rule
rutile. tare tear tier tiler tire
trail trial true ultra urea

3

SSS

Lae







WW

NY
cs

diamond to East at the end for down
one.

South’s method of play had about
an even chance-of success. Had the
diamonds been divided 3-3, or had
the jack fallen singleton or double-
ton, he would have made the con-
tract: However, since he overlooked
a safe way to guard against either
opponent holding the J-x-x-x of dia-
monds, the outcome cannot be attrib-
uted solely. to bad luck.

After taking the. ace of spades,
the best line, of play is to cash the
king of trumps and lead a trump to
the ace. When both East and West
follow suit; the A-K of diamonds are
played.

At this | point, the | contract
becomes certain. Declarer trumps a
low diamond with the queen, leads a
low trump to dummy’s jack and dis-
cards his 9-3 of spades on the Q-10
of diamonds: That’s all there is to it.

If the opponents’ trumps were
divided 4-1, declarer would find out
when he cashed the second heart. He
would then have no choice but to
continue drawing trumps and hope:
for a favorable diamond division.

Observe that the recommended
method of play — drawing only two
rounds of trumps if both defenders
follow suit — assures the contract
whenever the opposing diamonds are
divided 3-3 or 4-2 (86 percent),
while drawing all the trumps stakes
the entire outcome on a friendly dia-
mond division.

/ Tomorrow: To cover or not to cover.
‘ : ©2009 King Featires Syndicate Inc,



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 9B

THE TRIBUNE



@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON

LOCATED in the heart
of town is the newest
‘down home classy’
restaurant, The Velvet
Room Restaurant &.
Lounge, where native
and Italian dishes are
sure to entice the diner
as they enjoy their meal
in immaculate surround-
ings. .

Linda Ferguson, the restau-
rant’s owner told Tribune
Taste: “The Vélvet Room is a
very classy restaurant, When
people hear where it is located
(Cordeaux Avenue and Miami
Street) they get the impression
that it is not a nice restaurant,
but I assure you that once you
step.into the restaurant you: .
will forget you are in the ‘ghet-
to,” she said.

Linda and Charles Ferguson,
wanted to bring something new
to the island, something that
would make their diners say ‘I
have been waiting for a place
like this for a long time’, so
with a little Bahamian spice
and ingenuity they formed The

Velvet Room Restaurant & Lounge. “I wanted the style of the
restaurant to be different than the other restaurants that we
have here on the island. Beside serving food we‘also want to
give our diners a good time so we decided to introduce poetry °
night, movie night, game night and karokee night. The restau-
rants over here don’t host a poetry night so we thought that it
would be something very nice to do things different for a
change”, she said.

She said that the game night will allow patrons to come in and
have a little fun. She also said that there will be. tournaments
where people. can compete and even win prizes. The karokee
night will be hosted on Wednesdays. '

The restaurant has been opened since last year November, but
the official opening of was held on Saturday night.

While all of the activities for the restaurant are very exciting
the food is really the main attraction. The restaurant has a num-
ber of dishes that will keep you coming back for more Mrs Fer-
guson said: “We specialise in native dishes as well as Italian dish-
es. The Italian food includes:a variety of fettuchini pastas, like
chicken fettuchini, shrimp fettuchini, and for the native dishes
we serve, stew fish, stew conch, the regular peas.& rice, crack
conch, chicken souse, stem.fish, stem conch and much more,” |
she said. ,

They also serve mouth watering conch salad and soon they
will have a jerk and barbecue pit.

Mrs Ferguson said that the Velvet Room’s conch is the best
on the island.:The conch that we serve here is nice and tender

and it will melt:in you: € two customers who when
_they come'to the'rest only order the crack conch, and I
“would have to say that the is probably the most delicious meal
onthe.menu.” | sfyissis eeteaesy VS D 9
. . There are also a number sweet native pastries available to ease
that sweet tooth. The pastries include cheesecake, banana bread,
coconut cake, benny cake, and pineapple upside down cake.

Their beverages include soft drinks, mixed drinks, daiquiris’,

margaritas, as well as beers. .










SSNS



A fresh approach to salads



= By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

SALADS get a bad rap a lot
of the time for being the same
old boring, tasteless (read:
healthy) lunch or dinner side:

Tribune Taste askéd dietitians”

and chefs to defend:salads and
suggest ways to put them back
on Bahamians' plates as a sub-
stitute to those down home

favourites of:cracked conch,..

macaroni and cheese with a side
of fried plantain.

Chef Harald Sauer said there
are tons of ways to make dif-
ferent salads with specialty
ingredients found at his work-
place, the Gourmet Market in
Caves Village. These will add

some excitement and spice to.

_ the plain old salad, attracting
even youngsters to eat their veg-
gies.

Some twists to the regular let-
tuce salad are the Monterrey
Bay Dungeness Crab Salad with
beets or the Spicy Asian Noodle
Salad, the most popular dish at
all catering-events.

Julia Lee, the registered dietit- ’

ian and nutrition consultant at
Doctor's Hospital also advised
that it is a good idea to take a
salad to work or school for
lunch. "This way you have con-
trol over all ingredients, oils and
calorie amounts," she said.

And while it would be wrong
to have a meal of only vegeta-
bles, you can make a complete
meal with a salad that has ingre-
dients added from the starch or
protein categories.



"Chick peas are a great idea
in completing a salad," said Ms
Lee, who added other options
of corn, black beans, or even
pasta, all of which can give a
more substantial nutritious val-
ue. .

"You could even cube a left-
over piece of meat from last
night's dinner, add some tuna
salad, or substitute beans for,
meat,” she pointed out.

Plus, salads are similar to
soups in that they can take on
any ingredients your imagina-
tion cooks up. From chopped
apples, raisins, craisins, man-
darin orange fruity options, to
sprinklings of almonds, walnuts
or sunflower seeds.

And is it all right to use
canned vegetables? It's been
widely publicised that fresh is
always best, but. Ms Lee said
that frozen or canned options
are also acceptable.

"Fresh is great," she said,
"but there's nothing wrong
with frozen vegetables. These
are often picked at the peak of
freshness." e

Sometimes, Ms Lee said, she
thaws out frozen broccoli to add
to a salad.

But she pointed out that
there are wrongs ways to go
about making a ‘salad particu-
larly with

- large amounts of cheese
' - bacon

- dousing salad with fatty
dressing ;

- big fatty croutons (may be
processed and salty)

- anything large in animal fat

7

MONTERREY BAY DUNGENESS

CRAB SALAD WITH BEETS

(6 servings) ‘

Garden of hearts — more people use Romaine because it is
more nutritious (amount desired)

. 3 Fresh red beets, cooked and peeled.

6 Egg yolks.

2 cups virgin olive oil

1/2 cup champagne vinegar

1 ths. garlic, finely chopped

pinch of salt.and pepper ;

18 oz Dungeness Crab meat (available Gourmet Market) .

~ 3 tbsp lemon juice

3 hard boiled eggs, chopped

1/2 cup parsley, chopped

12 green asparagus tips, crisp and tender

METHOD nea ZY :
Chop up lettuce, put on plate. Cut beets into strips and

put aside. ; ‘
Take half the beets and put in blender with egg yolks;
slowly add olive oil and champagne vinegar simultaneously
into blender, season with salt and pepper and refrigerate —
this is your dressing. ; ‘

Top lettuce with Dungeness crab meat, sprinkle on lemon juice,
and then drizzle beet vinaigrette and top with chopped eggs.
Mix with parsley and garnish plate with remaining beets

and asparagus.

COLI ILTULL LLL LALLA RLLT TOLL OLEATE



SPICY ASIAN NOODLE SALAD

(8 servings)

SGN WPNPHHNHNHHPHHH HNN

Garden Hearts Lettuce (any amount desired)

4 tbsp olive oil
2 thsp dark sesame oil:
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3 cups of Chinese long beans, cooked and cut into 2 inch pieces
1Ib carrots, peeled, cooked and cut into 2 inch pieces (diamond cut)

1 cup green onions
salt and pepper to taste
1lb Chinese egg noodles, cooked and
noodles — these are transparent) -
6.tbsp:soy sauce

1 thsp bean sauce

1/4 tsp freshly grated black pepper

1 inch fresh ginger root, peeled and finely chopped
12:02 firm tofu, cubed and browned in olive oil

1/2 tsp fresh jalapeno peppers, minced or.chopped
1/2 cup fresh cilantro — roughly chopped

3 tbsp toasted sesame seeds

METHOD

Cut up, rinse under water and dry lettuce,

Heat the oils in pan, add garlic and fry for 30 seconds
Quickly add vegetables, pasta, soy sauce, bean sauce, pepper
and ginger — sautee for one minute

Put into big salad bowl.
Let cool for 30 minutes

Add tofu, cilantro, sesame seeds, all other ingredients and toss

Arrange on plate.

_. THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS
‘The Retreat’, Village Road * Saturday, Feb. 7th, 2009 10am - 2pm

Featuring Water Lilies and Plants for Water Features! Flamingo Nursery and The Garden of Eden
Orchids * Fruit Trees * Herbs * Bedding

Plants ¢ Rare Palms * Bromeliads



drained (or Glass






y

MOL LOLLP LAD

The Tribune

Learning
to love
nature

Os ey

ASIII ES

aul Corsbbean Be 2 S

m By LISA LAWLOR
- Tribune Features Writer

PLANTS whether soft or spiky,

bright or pastel, sweet or sour, nation-

al or global, are the life of many an
enthusiast, scientist or student. And

_ they continue to contribute to the vast
array of wild life found in the

Bahamas. rts psn
Author and photographer Linda Huber is one
admirer of nature who says the knowledge of

plants, their identification and uses, must never die

in the Bahamas. It is in fact her form of art to dis-
- cover new species of plants; and to photograph
their resounding beauty as they appear in nature
to be a diamond in the rough, or'a beautiful berry
in the midst of a thorny bush.
She's found that in schools and the general pop-

ulation, the appreciation of nature is just not there.

"In fact many young. people don't know our

PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009,



national flower — the Yellow Elder or national tree
— the Lignum Vitae,” she told Tribune Art.

In her collection of photographs, books and
knowledge of plants, she has compiled a field
guide for the younger generation of Bahamians
"so they can become familiar with the flora of our
islands," she said. , :

"Flowers of the Bahamas is also a small effort to
promote greater awareness of the special beauty in
the country's natural world," she said. "Many of
the 'native' flowers are becoming endangered due
to land development and other adversities. Unless
we become more concerned about preservation,
more and more species will become extinct."

Growing up on a fruit farm in Canada, Ms’
Huber has always loved everything about the out-
side wilderness. Since first coming to the Bahamas
more than 40 years ago, she's only experienced
beauty as a hobby, while she worked in advertising
and marketing at John Bull.

In retirement, she's been getting back to nature.
"T just love the bush, the feeliny of being sur-
rounded by birds in their natural habitat of flora
and fauna."

The first edition of "Flowers of the Bahamas"
came out five years ago, and with the second edi-
tion released in 2008, she has added even more
flowers to her unique collection. Ms Huber also’
lists three pages worth of the practical uses of
plants in the form of bush medicines. .

"Without doctors and limited resources avail-
able on the isolated and widely-scattered islands,
the practice of bush medicine evolved through
practical use over the years," Ms Huber explains in
her guide, "Considerable interest in preventive
medicine and natural healing is being shown today
and new discoveries are:constantly being made."

The writing of a second edition to her original
book becamé necessary as contributors from many

.islands.wrote.to:Ms, Huber with.suggestions.of
-more plants and their uses, as well.as.differing
“names to plants lar

‘better knowht.as Gardner Jack inthe’ Pribune®>
Health section, schools and libraries from across
the nation requested a second edition.

"T felt very humbled in the publication of this
book," she said, "I'm just.a photographer and am
still learning so much from other specialists and
gardeners."

She sadly doesn't have a garden herself because
she lives in a small apartment, but said that the
whole of the Bahamas serves as her garden.

Ms Huber traveled from island to island pho-.
tographing the flora and fauna found in her book,
and says the Bahamas’is her back yard. "The
whole of New Providence is my garden," she said,
"wild flowers, native plants, fruits and native
orchids can be found in the deep of the bush, a
very relaxing and enchanting place to be."

Special mention goes to many who offered Ms
Huber assistance, including Mrs Mildred (Millie)





_ Sands for the assistance with recipes for bush med-

icine and Dr Ethan Freid who is a "total expert on
Bahamian plants." ecg

"Flowers of the Bahamas" can be found in many ,
gift shops and book stores across the Bahamas,

’. including Logo's Bookstore, Chapter One, Cole's

Pharmacy, Ardastra's Gift shop, United Book-
shop, Island Bookshop, and is represented on out
islands such as Abaco, Exuma, Freeport, Bimini
Eleuthera, San Salvador and Long Island.



¢ Do you have a unique hobby or collection you want
to share with Tribune readers, please let us know at
502-2368 or email cbrennen@tribunemedia.net





plants ‘from island to island?Jack Hardy, \_











THE TRIBUNE -



THE biography of Christopher ‘Notorious B.I.G’ Wallace
is a must see movie for 2009. It captures his rise and fall as
a rapper, and depicts the jarring reality of living life in the
‘fast lane’. ~ VG

The biopic-does not focus on-the unsolved murders of
Biggié and his ex buddy rapper Tupac Shakur, but focuses -

‘instead on his rise to stardom in the rap industry.

Angela Basset makes the role of Voletta Wallace ( Big-
gie’s mother) come alive with a tough and no nonsense per-
formance. Throughout Biggie’s life, (Jamal ‘Gravy’ Wood-
ward) she tries to instill in him strong ethics, and the impor-
tance of having a good education by sending him to the
private Queen of All Saints Middle School in Brooklyn, .
New York. ; : tt

However, Biggie dropped out of school, choosing a life on
the streets dealing drugs instead. He was subsequently
arrested and spent nine months in prison. ue

After he got out of prison, Biggie pursued his dream of
being a rap artist and did his best to make a productive
living. A major break came when he: met Sean ‘Puffy’
Combs (Derek Luke) who heard his mixtapes and took a
keen interest in his smooth, lyrical flow.

The movie chronicles Biggie’s rise to the top. His music
became popular not only in the black community but the hip
hop mainstream as well. People admired the way he used
words and the way he told his life story through his music.

What’s fame and fortune without women and many
women gravitated towards him, most notable Kimberly “Lil
Kim’ Jones, (Naturi Naughton formerly of 3LW) who.
became the rapper’s lover. The attraction between Biggie

‘and Lil’ Kim was very prevalent throughout the movie.

And although they had a strong physical attraction, his
heart was with Faith Evans, (Antonique Smith) a singer,
whom he married after dating for three weeks.

Without a doubt, the best performance was by Jamal
‘Gravy’ Woolard. His outward appearance, heavy weight,
hard breathing, and his dark complexion, made this char-
acter believable. I must admit he outshines the veterans.



it

1. Johnny and Pia Farmer cel- .
ebrated at the recent St
Andrew’s School’s 60th reunion
held at Atlantis after their own
graduations 30 years ago.

“St Andrew’s prepared me for
a lifetime of having my cake and
eating it too,” Pia joked, “they
instilled in me the knowledge
that I’d-have to work hard, but
that I'd be able to succeed.”

2. Lefty, Theo, Katherine and
Areti Tsavoussis have a family
reunion among their school
mates from enjoyable school
days at St Andrew’s.. “I have.
‘only the fondest memories of
my years at St A's and really
enjoyed coming back for the 60
year anniversary party,” said
Katherine, who traveled from
Florida for the event.

3.. Mr and Mrs Dorian Roach .
represent a younger variety of St.
A's grads who enjoyed the event.

4. Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette and Mrs
Robin Symonette pose with a
current St Andrew’s student,
symbolising the hope of a suc-
cessful future ahead for another
graduate.









THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 11B








. B By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

FROM traditional
warm and cozy bed
vilts, to amazingly
, detailed wall tapestries,
the Stepping Stone



The show, which was held.
for the first time 20 years ago,
is an annual event at which
members of the Stepping
Stone Quilting group not only
showcase and sell their work,
but also attempt to revive
interest in what has become a
slowly dying craft.

“A lot of young people are
just not interested in quilt-



































































Annual Quilt Show taking anymore. They can-
showcases just how cre- not justify spending all that .

time to create something, so

ative a person can be they don’t want to learn. They
using a few squares of don’t understand the benefit

of creating something beauti-

material: ful and that they can do this .

while they are watching TV
or hanging out with friends.

“You have to juggle it with the rest of your life because no
one has the time to sit and quilt all day. That is how I started
with quilting, I learnt to do it while I was at my children’s
games, or waiting for them or in the evenings after they went
to bed and it gave them a new respect for me because this was
an area that was all mummy’s,” said Maria Chisnall, a mem-
ber of the group.,

Bonnie Phillips, president of the Stepping Stone group,
said one of their goals is to revive the quilting tradition in the
schools’ needlework curriculum.

The women explained that because quilting is so time-con-
suming, it is rarely passed on from mother to daughter these
days, but rather from grandmother to granddaughter or aunt
to niece.,

“The mums are too busy to teach it to their daughters," said
Ms Chisnall.

Another reason quilting may be less popular, is that quilters
have to compete with mass-produced bed linens. These fac-
tory-made materials also affects the pricing of quilts.

“People love quilts, everyone wants a quilt, but they don’t

_ want to pay what they think is a high price for it, but you can-

not pay someone for the amount of time they have invested
in a quilt and the quality of the work,” said Ms Chisnall.

“We have a member who took three years to make a
Hawaiian leaf print quilt - can you pay her for three years of
her life?”

Quilts can cost upwards of $400, the group said.

Ms Phillips said that Stepping Stone Quilters offers a great
forum for the women.

Meeting once a week allows them to discuss techniques,
problems and provides an avenue to bounce ideas back and
forth.

The group, which was founded in 1986, has around 20
members.

The name “Stepping Stone” is taken from a traditional
type of quilt block.

Realising just how comforting a quilt can make a person feel
has prompted the Broup to make a number of charitable con-
tributions.

“We made all of the quilts for the Cancer Caring Centre and

- we have sent quilts to the Red:Cross to give to people affect-
-ed by hurricanes and fires,” said group president Ms Phillips.

They have also received international acclaim, particularly
for a group of panels they made for the Bahamas National
Trust’s 50th Anniversary.

The panels were part of the Scottish National Quilt Chan:
pionships and won first place in the machine appliqué cate-
gory. Other members had the experience of representing the
Bahamas at'the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.

Exposure and opportunities such as these are just an added
bonus to quilting, which is a creative outlet for the women.

The quilts currently on display by the group show off fas-
cinating designs and: colours, as well as intricate detailing
and quality work. -»

Ms Phillips explained that inspiration comes from any and
everywhere and most quilts may be a combination of hand and _
machine stitching. She said people should not be afraid to use
their quilts because all material is prewashed to prevent fur-
ther shrinkage or colour bleeding, so they can be gently













washed.

DESPITE a decline in the
economy and the financial
challenges facing many 7
Bahamians, hundreds
turned out at the 37th annu-
al Red Cross Ball held Sat-
urday night, paying big
bucks to support a very
worthy cause.

Ball patrons danced the
night away to music provid-
ed by the Lou Adams
Orchestra, Visage and the
Manhattans. During cock- «
tails, the Royal Bahamas
Police Pop Band played
before attendees dined on a
supreme meal prepared by
the staff of the Crystal
Palace Resort and Casino.

From the hundreds of red
roses which graced the
tables and ceiling, to the
red, white and gold organza.
tablecloths silver cande-
labras and the sparkling

‘crystals on women’s
evening gowns, it was truly,
“An Enchanted Evening.”

The highlight of the night

was the tribute paid to ball

honouree Dorothy Hep- THE LADY of the
burn- King for her many evening honouree
years of outstanding service Dorothy Hepburn-

King (left) with
Governor General
Arthur Hanna.

to the organisation.

Red Cross president Ger-
ald Sawyer welcomed guests
to the event saying that it
was wonderful to see so
many persons attend partic-
ularly given the state of the
economy and the fact that
people are watching their
expenses. In addition to
being one of the major
social events of the year,
the ball-is one of the major
fundraising events for the _
organisation.

MARINA GLINTON
(right) director
general of the
Bahamas Red
Cross looks on.



When picking a quilt, Ms Philips advised: “Go with your gut
reaction and then examine it for the quality, and remember
quilts are a one-of-a-kind item.”

The Stepping Stone Quilters Annual Quilt Show is being
held at Trinity. Methodist Church Hall on Frederick Street and
runs until February 7, Admission is free and the show is open
from 10am-4pm daily (except on Sunday).

Finding
the art in
nature

FROM page 12

Considering that these trees
make some of the most expen-

. sive furniture here in the

Bahamas, conserving, and
bringing about awareness to
their quality is very important.
“The Maderia is very expensive
tree, and if we don’t preserve
this tree and others, what will
our grandchildren and upcom-
ing generations see and how will
they will experience our cul-
ture,” he said.

Mr Roberts contends that
premeditation is not part of his
creative process. “I respect
nature and in anything that I
do I try to remove myself and
make a public statement. It is
the sculpture that liberates itself -
and allows its beauty to speak
for itself,” he said.

He added that it is very
important for the community
to be part of the work of art,
for it is a celebration of culture.
“It is important to embrace all
and allow them to become apart
of the creative process. It is also
very important to have a sense
of community” he added.

While the year 2008 was quite
fulfilling for Mr Roberts, this
year he intends to do things a
little differently. He also wants
to continue to impact and
enhance the beauty of the island
and the culture. “J want to influ-
ence Bahamian landscapes this
year. I want to speak to the
issue of preservation and to
show people that we must use
the best we can. I want to cause
people to appreciate nature in
every sense of the word,” he
said.



a7th . _Learning to
annual Red -—«—«ove nature

Cross Ball like Linda

See page 10

See page 11



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009







"THE MUNROE"
. COFFEE TABLE



"THE ROBIN"
COFFEE TABLE





"THE VANESSA" HALF
MOON CONSOLE:



"THE CHIPMAN"
CENTRE TABLE



“THE NIKKt"
COFFEE TABLE

“THE RENAE”

LARGE CONSOLE





Full Text
‘rurant Y\\

?m lovin’ it

| HIGH
LOW



72F |
| JOF
| WINDY WITH |
| SUNSHINE



e Tribune







BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 105 No.60

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

PRICE — 75¢



lH By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

‘JUST days before he was due
to return to Jamaica to visit his
wife and two of his four young
‘children, electrician Ricardo
Farrington was shot dead in his
sleep by three masked men in
the early hours of Tuesday

morning, leaving a family in ||

mourning.

Yesterday, at his mother’s
wooden house, his relatives —
including 16 year-old.son, Ricar-
do. junior — watched as she
cleaned up the gruesome rem-
nants of his execution-style
killing.

Father to a 16, 14, six and
one-year-old, Ricardo died in
hospital shortly. after 4am. He
suffered a gunshot wound to the
face by one of the men who



niles UmOLO Mars eat AeLCO)

invaded the Laird Street and

Blue Hill Road home as he

slept on the sofa.

SEE page six

PLP hopeful booted

off radio programme

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

AFTER being unceremoniously booted off a radio programme
yesterday, PLP nomination hopeful Omar Archer went on the
offensive, calling for all homosexuals to leave the party.

SEE page six



, i ten ae
O41 To (240) S30-2862 Tel (242) 336-2804



Family in mourning after
execution-style killing



SYLVIA RAMSAY, the mother Ricardo Farrington, speaks to the media

outside her home where he was killed yesterday.

PGA files suit

against Ginn

_ Development
Company

THE Professional Golfer’s
Association Tour has filed suit
against Ginn Development
Company claiming it breached a
multi-year tournament spon-
sorship contract.

The PGA suit, filed last
month in Florida , alleges that
aftér agreeing to serve as tour-
nament organizer and title

_ sponsor, which included pro-

viding the prize money for two
different tournaments through
2011, the real estate resort and
community development com-
pany “has simply announced

SEE page six









Obie Wilchcombe
taking legal action
against US media

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@ ©
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - West
End and Bimini MP Obie
Wilchcombe says he has
instructed attorneys in the
United States to pursue
legal action to defend his
reputation against those in

have attacked his charac-
ter.





SEE page six

Palendale + Panadive tskond - Oakes
} 2 Lanes veewent)

RLU PALA RRS OT ITN










the American media who ~



Photos of people eating
iguanas on Internet
- lead to two arrests”

li By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

TWO American
tourists have been
arrested after pho-
tographs of people
cooking and eating
endangered iguanas
in the Exuma Cays |
were posted on a
social networking
website.

Friends. of the
those responsible
for. posting the pic-
tures on Facebook |
circulated the pho- ,
tographs in an-e-
mail that worked its

“way to executive

ONE OF the photographs from the social
networking site that led to the arrests.

director of the Bahamas National Trust (BNT) Eric Carey on

Monday afternoon.

Horrified by the gruesome images of the critically endan-
gered: species being. butchered; grilled“and devoured, and a
dinghy filled with undersized juvenille conch which were then cut
up and eaten, Mr Carey alerted-staff.at the BNT Exuma Cays

Land and Sea Park.

-

The park warden. and administrator worked with police in

SEE page two



THE EARL OF WESSEX VISITS NASSAU



HIS ROYAL HIGHNESS Prince Edward, the Earl-Of Wessex, arrives in Nas-

sau at Lynden Pindling International Airport where he was met by Sir Orville
Turnquest, Chairman of the GGYA Board of Trustees. The Earl of Wessex
will take part in a medal‘presentation ceremony at Government House
today. From left: HRH The Earl of Wessex, Sir Orville Turnquest and Mrs
Lelia Green, Permanent Secretary Government House.

Some pet-food products
are being recalled

lm By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

lallen@tribunemedia.net

SOME pet-food products are

being recalled by manufactur-

ers who fear peanut based
ingredients may expose pets to
Salmonella infection.

With several dozen food
manufacturers and retailers in
the US already recalling hun-
dreds of products containing
peanut ingredients, dog biscuits
have become the newest food

threatened by the widespread
salmonella warning.

On January 23, the US Food
and Drug Administration
(FDA) placed a Salmonella
recall alert on some pet brands
including: Carolina Prime, Salix,
Happy Tails, and Great Choice.

Humane Society Director

- Frederick Turnquest told The

Tribune on Tuesday, this latest
recall is cause for concern espe-
cially if any of the brands on

SEE page six



ESA
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Local builder claims
‘loophole’ cheating
contractors out of pay

By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter



A LOCAL builder claims contractors are being cheated out
bf their pay by means of a “loophole” in the system.

When property owners take out a loan to build a home, he

explained, the contractor they hire essentially “works for
the bank” — as a bank-appointed inspector must check each
stage of construction.
He said there is a growing trend of clients seeking to take
advantage of this situation by firing a contractor for the
slightest problem — real or invented-— in order to avoid pay-
ing for the work.

"If you find a fault with something you are supposed to
bring it to the contractor's attention and let him correct it,"
he pointed out.

Business

The source, who asked to remain anonymous to protect his
more than 20-year-old business, told The Tribune that one of
his clients refused to pay for more than $80,000 worth of
work, alleging that certain specifications were not followed
during the construction of his house.

However, according to the builder, the wotlk was done to
Joesties tions: and was appraised and approved.
| "The appraisal man went in and appraised the whole two
stages.

, “As soon as it came to the roof stage the owner went to the
appraiser talking all kinds of nonsense, He keeps telling the
appraiser that this stage and that stage isn't finished," he

aid.

" "That's the loophole — they know that if they fire the
contractor they don't have to pay the contractor for the
stage and they keep the money and then they get another
contractor. —

_ "This is going on ith plenty contractors now; plenty con-
tractors can't get their stage payments," the source said.

. The source said that throughout his career in the field,

"no client has ever run the money, the bank always runs
the money.”

He said that when he took the issue up with bank employ-
ees, they said there was nothing they could do as it was a mat-
ter between the client and the contractor.

They told him he would have to sue his client'to get the
money.

“Now I have to find money to pay a lawyer to sue the |

owner to get the money for my see and that's a long
process,” the builder said.

‘



New unit ‘will help prison
advance to self-sufficiency’

@ By LLOYD ALLEN .
Tribune Staff Report
lallen@tribunemedia.net

THE new health diagnostic
unit at Her Majesty’s Prison will
help the facility advance
towards self-sufficiency, officials
say.

The new unit houses a com-
plete pharmacy, X-ray suite, a
laboratory, and-an electrocar-
diogram and ultrasound centre.

Built in just seven weeks,
Superintendent of Prisons Dr
Elliston Rahming said the deci-
sion on where to. construct the
diagnostic and. pharmaceutical
unit came after a long debate. |

Dr Rahming said he and the
other administrators understood
the, need for a more inclusive
health facility at the prison and

decided that to build the new
unit on top of a more than 50-
year-old-rain water pit was their
best option.

1

Boasting a myriad of
advanced medical equipment
and services, the diagnostic and
pharmaceutical unit is the latest
project in a move toward hous-
ing an all inclusive medical cen-

‘tre at the prison.

Improved

Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis, who spoke at the offi-
cial opening of the diagnostic

and pharmaceutical unit, said _

healthcare facilities at Her
Majesty’s Prison have inmiproved
dramatically since 1953, “when
the medical unit at this site con-
sisted of one small office with a
cubical partition door to dis-
pense all medication.”

Since then, the healthcare
demands of the prison have
increased drastically.

Dr Minnis said that alone in
2008, more than 1,129 inmates.

were referred to Princess Mar-
garet Hospital.

On average, the prison health
service tends to 140 inmates a
week and the new unit will now
allow even more prisoners to

_ be treated, Dr Minnis said.

Minister for National Secu-
rity Tommy Turnquest, who

presented the keynote address ©

at the unit’s opening, said that
the construction of the facility is
in line with the United Nation’s
2005 treaty, which dictates that
it is the government’s duty to
provide adequate physical and
mental healthcare for incarcer-
ated individuals. ,
“This unit will considerably

expand the current health care ~
capacity and services provided '
‘to inmates and prison staff

through a close partnership with
the Ministry of Health and the
prisons’ department,” he said. |

Mr Turnquest said the new
diagnostic unit will allow
/

!
1

inmates who are charged with
serious crimes to receive med-
ical treatment within the prison
rather than being transported.

Community

“Vast majority of prisoners:
leave the prison at some point,
and it is definitely in the interest
of our country to do all that is
practicable to ensure that those
leaving prison and who are
being reintegrated into our
community are in'the best
health.

“We believe that this health

‘diagnostic unit will meet that

objective,” he said.

The new facility employs two
full-time nurses, two registered
nurses, a pharmacist and a com-
munity worker to assist. eight
medically trained prison offi-
cers to cater to inmates’ health-
care needs.

Iguana eating photos on
Internet lead to two arrests

FROM page one

George Town and Black Point, Exuma, to track

down the suspects.

Two people were arrested at around mid-



day yesterday in the vicinity of Black Point or
Staniel Cay in connection with the offence
which breaks Fisheries Regulations and the
Wild Animal Protection Act, prohibiting the
possession of dead or live iguanas.

Iguanas are also protected under the Con-
vention on International Trade in Endangered
Species (CITES) and as the suspects in cus-

- tody are understood to be US citizens, Mr Carey

said they could also be charged under US law
which makes it illegal to commit an offence in a
country that has a relationship with the US.

Two others also feature in the photographs
showing a group of people taunting, cooking
and eating iguanas, and taking juvenille conch.

Police investigations continue.

Mr Carey said: “We have had people poach-
ing iguanas for the pet trade but I have never
seen this sort ‘of barbaric BUNGE for con-
sumption by visitors: !

“This is personally and proféssionally very
disturbing to.me. It’s absolutely disgusting.

“It’s totally disrespectful of our laws and of
the laws of nature.

“To see guys gloating with such disrespect
and putting the pictures on such a public profile
as Facebook clearly shows they have no fear of
prosecution and we need to prove them wrong.

“We. take the responsibility to enforce wildlife .

law very seriously.”

The West Indian iguanas are some of the
‘most endangered lizards in the world and
include the thrée species and seven sub-species
native to the Bahamas,’ ;

Iguanas are threatened by development
vee their habitats and foreign animals that
eat small iguanas or iguana eggs.

Mr Carey said: “We have the greatest diver-
sity of iguanas — some only exist on small iso-
lated islands, and certainly they cannot take
any sort of pressure from humans or they won’t
survive:

“They are really a very important part of our

‘unique biodiversity and they are also an impor-



’ SOME OF THE PHOTOGRAPHS that
' appeared.on the Internet, leading to
two arrests.





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_ NIB to ensure employers pay
amount due for each employee

THE National Insurance Board
is in the process of updating its
contribution records to ensure
that all employers have paid the
amount due for each employee
for each month. |

According to NIB director
Algernon Cargill, the board is also
making sure that contributions
are accurately deposited in the
accounts of the appropriate
employees.

He said: “This exercise is vital-
ly important because each contri-
bution paid goes toward NIB’s
fulfillnient of the promise of
income-replacement. We have an
absolute obligation to ensure that
each contribution, which repre-
sents one week of a worker’s life,
is paid and is properly assigned
because one contribution can
mean the difference between a
sick, invalid or aged worker qual-
ifying for a benefit or being disal-
lowed.”

Mr Cargill admitted that over
the years, the board has not






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always been vigilant and timely
in notifying employers of gaps or
omissions in their payments.

But he said that where gaps are
identified, the board is obligated
by law to find the relevant contri-

butions and/or secure payments |

where full payments have not
been made.

‘Various government agencies
— like the Licensing Authority and
the Department of Immigration
~are now requiring letters of good
standing from NIB, to confirm
that businesses are in compliance
with the National Insurance Acct..

. Mr Cargill said “compliance”
in this context means:

e Being.up-to-date on contri- ,

butions for all employees for each
month.a business was in opera-
tion

e Submission to NIB of
employees’ work records

e Maintenance of proper
employee records

The National Insurance Act.
states that every, employer and.






self-employed person must keep

. payroll and associated records at

their place of business at all times,
to prove the correctness of their

. contributions. Failing to: do so is
_an offence.

In addition, the Buiployment
Act says employers must keep a
record of the names, addresses,
ages, wages, hours worked, annu-
al vacations and other canditions

. of work of every employee.

However, Mr Cargill said NIB
knows some employers may not

-have kept contribution records

dating back to when National

. Insurance started in 1974.

He said this: has presented a
challenge for the board and
employers, particularly when it
comes tothe issuance of letters
of good standing.

“Previously,” said Mr Cargill,
“we were reluctant to issue let-
ters of good standing where there
were gaps, even if the gaps were.
from as far back as 1974. But
we've recently taken a decision

. that where gaps exist for old peri-

ods, we will look at the payment
history of the employer and the
nature of the outstanding items,
and then make a case-by-case
decision.

“For example, in cases where
old records carinot be located but
a series of letters had previously
been issued confirming good
standing, and contributions are
otherwise current, we will work
to ensure that there is no obstruc-
tion of the employer's regulatory
processes by issuing the leyters of
good standing.”
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 3



Tia eee eee
Economic conditions ‘hurting

and helping’ real estate market



In brief

Man fined for
marijuana
possession

A PODOLEO
STREET man has been
fined $2,500 on a mari-
juana possession
charge.

Court dockets allege
that Eleazor Smith,
alias Eleazor Farquhar-
son, was found in pos-
session of a quantity of
marijuana on Friday,
January 23, 2009.

Smith pleaded not
guilty to the possession
of 3.7 ounces of mari-
juana during his
arraignment on January
26.

On Monday, Magis- |
trate Bethel fined Smith
$2,500 on the drug
charge.

Failure to pay the fine -
will result in a one-
year prison sentence.

Speculation that
teen may have

heen killed over
Super Bowl het

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The
man who was shot and
killed at Pinder’s
' Point on Sunday has
been identified as 17-
year-old Dwight
Bartlette.

Police are now
. appealing to anyone
who has information. _
about his murder to ~




comesforward. spe aa
5 Xs 3 aca
Mr Bartiette, a resi-

dent of Pinder’s Point,
was shot in the head
sometime around
10.45pm.

A concerned resident
reported hearing gun-
shots and officers
arrived on the scene,
however the police say
they have no leads at
this time.

It has been speculated
that Mr Bartlette may
have been killed over a
bet; .as.the incident
took place just after the
Super Bowl. :

“This matter remains
under active investiga-
tion and the police still
néeds thé public’s.assis-
tance in bringing clo-
sure to this matter,”
said a police spokesper-
son. :

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE beleaguered economy
is both hurting and helping
those in the real estate market -
with rents nose-diving and prop-
erties selling for well below
their initial price tags, according
to some leading realtors.

‘William Wong, president of
the Bahamas Real Estate Asso-
ciation (BREA) and owner of
William Wong Realty, said that
now is an ideal time for people
who are looking for a place to
rent to get.a good deal, and for
those already renting to negoti-
ate with their landlords to low-
er their monthly payments.

‘Values

He said he has seen a 20 to 30
per cent drop in rental values
in the last six to eight months, a
reduction he attributes to two
things — the departure of a sig-
nificant number of ex-patriate
workers who were let go by
struggling companies, and the
fact that some former renters
have moved back in with their
parents in response to financial
difficulties.

Mr Wong said that with the
overall demand ’for rentals
down, and vacancies increasing,
landlords have been more will-
ing to ‘soften their rent

_ demands.

“Owners feel it’s better to. get
someone inside the house and
get something for it than to get

BREA president says rents -
nose-diving, properties selling |
well below their initial price tags

nothing at all,” he said.

The BREA president said
“the more desperate owners
become,” the more willing they
will be to further lower their
rents.

When. it comes to properties
for sale, Mr Wong said that in
his view those prices have not
been affected, and he does not
foresee a major change in this
regard unless banks significant-
ly tighten their lending condi-

’ tions.

“T-have not noticed any of the
prices going down. Our market
is different from the US mar-
ket, we have a problem with
inventory (being limited). Our
prices have not changed,” he
said.

However, another realtor
with a prominent high-end
Bahamian real estate company
said that after the global finan-
cial crisis took hold with a

- vengeance in September last

year, he has seen closing price
tags on homes dropping by as
much as 25 per cent from their
initial asking prices.

Calling Mr Wong’s assess-
ment “entirely wrong”, based
on his own experience, the real
estate agent said: “From what
we have seen, it seems we are

about 20 per cent to 25 per cent
down from our asking prices.”

“Nobody’s buying anything
unless they’re getting a deal on

it - even in the high-end mar-

ket,” he said.

Impact

He noted, however, that the ~

extent of the impact of the eco-

_ nomic downturn on sales val-

ues may be “skewed” slightly
by the fact that some asking
prices were set when the market
was in much better shape.
Some local banks have indi-

cated that they are being far

more circumspect in. their lend-

ing practices in light of rising |

numbers of loans falling into
arrears over the past year.

In its most recent report, the
Central Bank of the Bahamas
noted that the percentage of
mortgages in arrears rose by 2.8
per cent-overall in 2008 to 13.4
per cent - an increase of $100.5
million.

Meanwhile, the percentage -
_of commercial and consumer

loans in arrears rose by 6.23 per
cent and 2.49 per cent to 15.5
per cent and 10.8 per cent,
respectively.

Stimulus package ‘not what

the tourism market needs’

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
. lallen@tribunemedia.net

MORE than 1,500 Bahamians*} ~~

have been laid-off from the

tourism. sector, but industry offi-

cials say a stimulus package is
not what the market needs.
While several countries in the
region have already introduced
initiatives to bolster tourism, the
Bahamas government has resist-

~ ed going down that path. /

Robert Sands, president of the

‘Bahamas Hotel Association!

(BHA) said on Monday that bet-
ter business practices are the key
to the industry’s survival.

Mr Sands said market confi-
dence is one of the biggest chal-
lenges the industry faces, but
added that. this could be

improved if ticket prices dropped. He said it has
“always been a bone of contention for‘travellers
that the airfare for getting to the Bahamas was

quite high.”

At a time when each dollar counts, such a dis-
incentive to travellers could cripple the industry,

he argued.

The Bahamas is one of the closest tourism des-
tinations to the US, and Mr Sands believes this
should be reflected in travel and vacation pack-

ages.

BRA chairman Frank Comito said that the .

association has taken note of the
several tourism stimulus pack-
ages already introduced in similar
markets,

In Jamaica in December of last

year,,Prime,Minister Bruce.
Golding approvedia $6.4 million -

package tobe used. to stimulate
that country’s struggling tourism
industry.

Belize followed suit in Janu-

ary, injecting around $30 million |

into its tourism sector. The funds

| are to be used to offset the oper-

ational costs of a number of

\y resorts.

But State Minister for Finance

| Zhivargo Laing told The Tribune

that it would not be in the best

~| interest of the Bahamas for the



government to propose such a
package here. .
“In what is the worst econom-

ic scenario since the Great Depression, it is not
practical, nor possible, for the government to
afford to do what private companies cannot afford

to do, which is to keep and maintain people at

work where there is no demand.” 4

He said anyone who suggests otherwise is “liv-.
ing in a fantasy.”

Mr Laing said that the only viable option for
the government in the present economic envi-
ronment is to continue to accelerating capital
infrastructure programmes and offering social
assistance packages to individuals.

INS won't go digital for another three year's

’ Mi By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter



ZNS TV will not go digital
for another three'years, it has
been announced.

A spokesperson for the
Broadcasting Corporation of the
Bahamas said: “We began by
creating a digital work-flow in
radio, which we have completed
and we are in the process now of
upgrading our television tech-
nology to digital through a
phased integration process.

“We expect that we will very
shortly be able to produce a dig-
ital work flow in television that
will provide digital transmission

feed to Cable Bahamas for dis-.

tribution on its cable network.”

As the world turns digital, and
the United States is scrambling
to have every household ready
for the transition in a few weeks,
the spokesperson said ZNS TV
will be affected on two fronts:
“One, on the consumer front,
because America is moving to
' digital television they have
phased out the production of
analog television sets so
Bahamians will be hard-pressed

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to find analog sets in the US
along with finding parts for the
ones they already have.

“How it affects broadcasting
is from a different prospective.
Broadcast manufacturers are no

longer producing analog tech-
. nology and so with the equip-

ment that we and many other

‘developing countries have, it will

be difficult for us to find techni-
cal support for that equipment.”

As of February 17, all nation-
al television stations in the Unit-
ed States will stop broadcasting
in analog and begin broadcast-
ing only in digital.

Digital Television (DTV)
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Director of marketing and
pay-per-view at Cable Bahamas,
David Burrows, said the com-
pany has been ready to make
the change to digital for nearly
four years.

“We went through a transi-
tion in 2005 from analog to dig-
ital but we were still using an
analog tuner to a digital tuner.
We completed that transition by
the end of 2006 and it was a very
quick transition as customers
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ZNS said it will continue to

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customers who do not have
access to cable television.

End Tabl
Cushions

NNO UTS eraoe tty

they have not been paid

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter






STAFF at Solomon’s Mines claim that they have not been paid
for a month and that management has been tight-lipped on when
their cheques will be issued.

Two of the jewellery merchant’s ben atahs contacted The Tri-
bune yesterday to say they are furious and demanding answers.

They said this is not the first time Solomon’s Mines has disre-
garded the needs of its staff.

“The 30th of January has just past and there has been no pay-
ment to staff as yet; no word as to when it is going to be done,”
one said.

“We all have needs and obligations. People have to pay rent
and school fees. The banks are calling, loans have to be paid.
You can not expect people to come to work without being paid. I
do not know the last time they made pay-roll on time,” the
employee said.

The employee said he understands that hard economic times
have hit the country, but said this does not give Solomon’s Mines
the right to neglect its employees.

“Tt’s not like we’re not conscious of the fact we are in an eco-
nomic downturn — no one is disputing that. When you take it to
the point of not addressing the needs of the staff or their con-
cerns, that is pretty bad,” the employee said.

President of Solamon’s Mines, Mark Finlayson, said he could
not comment on whether or not the employees have been paid,
but said he knows far too well about the effect the economy is
having on his business.

“We started making preparations for this in the early part of
2007 and for someone who has been involved in Bay Street since
1989, I have never seen anything like this before. We have gotten
rid of the non-profitable stores and as a result we had to lay off
people, so over time we have been cutting back,” Mr Finlayson
said.

“The point is if payment was late, my thing is — it is always bet-
ter late than never. We have always paid our people and I would
be the last person.to tell you we have never paid a day late.
Times are tough and all of us have to appreciate every penny we
have,” said Mr Finlayson. pe





































JACK VICTOR

Is What You
Wear To A
‘Black Tie
Affair

at

The Heal Ball

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“Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street’
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com




PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune Limited We must strongly

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master . e e.

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M. G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday



Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F- 485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
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Obama’s food safety pledge is crucial

WITH the peanut butter scare making
news — the latest in a series involving sal-
monella-contaminated foods including toma-
toes, jalapeno peppers and E. coli-contami-
nated spinach — there again rises the public

‘clamour for doing something.

In the not distant past, studies have con-
firmed that the people reasonably enough
are very much concerned about the safety
of the food they eat.

Only government has the expertise and
authority to do something about it. Food pro-
ducers who are by tradition and lack of fed-
eral resources mainly relied upon to monitor
themselves fall short, as the record demon-
strates.

The Food and Drug Administration over-
sees some 80 per cent of America’s food sup-
ply, excluding meat, poultry and processed
egg products. As its name makes plain, it is
also the overseer of the nation’s medical sup-
plies.

As the peanut butter brouhaha was gath-
ering force, the Government Accountability
Office, the investigative arm of Congress,
put medical products on their High-Risk List
on January 22.

‘While Americans ponder whether in the
face of 500 illnesses and eight deaths to con-
tinue to send their children off to school with
the popular peanut butter and jelly sand-
wiches, or if they should go on nibbling on
cookies and other goodies containing peanut
paste, they should be no less wary about the
medicinal pills they are ingesting in ever-
increasing quantities.

Placement on the High-Risk List was
earned because “the American consumer

~ may not be adequately protected from unsafe.

and ineffective medical products” resulting in
part from “the globalization of the medical
products industry.”

In the recent past you might recall when
consumers, allied with state governments that
helped them pay for needed drugs, wanted to
import drugs from Canada and elsewhere at
a much lower cost.

Among the arguments in opposition put
forward by the pharmaceutical industry was
that their products were American-made and,
therefore, safe.

Neglected by Pharma, surely by oversight,
is that for years U.S. drug makers were
importing ingredients for their pills that were
made in America. And, you might well ask,

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where from did those ingredients come? The
answer, of course, is the country that makes
a host of lower-cost products, namely China,
now the world’s dominant supplier of medi-
cinal ingredients.

Yes, folks, that’s the same China that .
recently sentenced two of its citizens to death

for purveying milk and milk products ‘adul-
terated with melamine. Melamine is a.toxic
chemical that can cause cancer and renal fail-
ure, among other dire illnesses. It was insert-
ed into baby formula to disguise the fact that
the milk had been watered and to give it the
appearance of a higher protein value. It
caused at least six deaths and some 208, 000
illnesses in China.

In the U:S. it led to a clampdown by the

FDA that imposed new testing to keep taint-
‘ed products out of our country. Melamine

has also been detected in more than a dozen
countries in eggs, yogurt, chocolates and
frozen desserts.

China is also the exporter of tainted pet
food and toothpaste, among other consumer
items. As a result, that is a country whose
medical products need to come under the
closest scrutiny until and unless they man-
age to get a firmer control of their export
products.

Inspection is costly and daunting. The FDA
estimates that it regulates 65,500 domestic
food firms. If each were inspected one time,
it would cost $524 million.

For years it has been clear that the FDA
did not have sufficient staff or budget to doa
thorough job. During the late and unlament-
ed Bush administration that deficiency was
exacerbated because of ideological opposition
to bolstering the regulatory resources of
responsible federal agencies.

Consequently, the FDA, in the face of
spurring GAO reports, dragged its heels in
seeking more funding during the Bush years.
Although there were some increases, they
were not nearly sufficient.

Rectifying those shortcomings now will
take more than it might otherwise have
required. But it is ufterly essential that the
Obama administration back up. its pledges
to increase the safety of Americans by final-
ly equipping regulatory agencies with effec-
tive means and mandates.

(This article was written by Harry Rosenfeld

-- ¢.2009 Albany Times Union).



rights agenda

_ EDITOR, The Tribune.

The news item titled:

“Bahamas ready for a gay PM,
says ex-MP” written by Brent
Dean, which appeared in The
Nassau Guardian of Saturday,
January 31, 2009 begs a
response.

Does the writer understand

__ the direction he is asking The

Bahamas to take?

It is now abundantly clear
how these psychopathic forces
have been able to corrupt
every facet of Bahamian life,
confusing the Bahamian pub-
lic and the Church with their
own personal agenda, mas-
querading as good public pol-
icy.

In retrospect, the manner in
which religious, judicial and
governmental decisions were
confused by deliberate link-
ages to human rights and gay

. Tights as synonymous issues,
‘resulted in failed public poli-

cy and a general confusion
about governance in the
Bahamas.

This effort has been. aided
by many international groups
emanating from the United
Nations, posing as seemingly
innocent NGO’s (non-gov-
ernmental organisations) pur-
porting to be doing “good”
around the world.

The difficulty arises when
homosexuals attempt to dis-
tinguish between their sexual
orientation and their charac-
ter. No such separation is pos-
sible and this only reinforces
how deep the psychopathy is,
when they attempt to do so.

aa WEe

letters@tribunemedia.net






There are sinister character
and personality disorders that
are generally a part of dys-
functional sexual orientation.
Some of these traits include:-
pathologic lying, loss of emo-
tional affect, grandiosity; a
sense of entitlement; a
propensity to deceive, cheat
and manipulate; a lack of
empathy and remorse; an
inability to develop deep emo-
tional and social connections
with others; and the view that
others are merely resources
to be exploited — callously
and without regret.

Industrial and Organisa-
tional Psychologists Robert D
Hare, Ph D, and Paul Babiak,
Ph D, experts in psychopathic
studies and co-authors of the
book titled: “Snakes in Suits”
have been studying psy-
chopaths and their effects for

years. Hare, the creator of the -

standard tool for diagnosing
psychopathy and author of
“Without Conscience: The
Disturbing World of the Psy-
chopaths Among us” writes
thusly: “Psychopaths invest
energy in creating and main-
taining a facade that facilitates
their careers...they convince
decision-makers. of their
unique talents and abilities —
albeit based on lies and. dis-
tortions.”

These morally and ethical- i.

ly bankrupt individuals are
capable of the most heinous

‘acts, plunging any society

overpowered by their fraud-
ulent manipulations into chaos
and anarchy. .

. Unless The Bahamas wishes
to go the way of all ancient
gay societies, whether biblical
or secular, (which is destruc-
tion) then for the sake of our
children — the future of The
Bahamas and for the remain-
ing normal population, we
need to vigorously oppose this
sinister agenda regarding
homosexual rights, which so
far has been successfully mas-
querading as good public pol-
icy. It is now scientifically con-
firmed that behaviour is con-
tagious.

In response to the writer’s
statement; “There are no
openly gay people currently
involved in Bahamian politics”
We ask the question: What is
the difference, if any, between

openly gay” and “closetted

9

q applaud the Prime Minis-
ter of Jamaica, the Hon Bruce
Golding; who during an inter-
view on the BBC TV show
Hardtalk last year, said that
his Cabinet was not the place
for gays, thus barring the pos-
sibility of their ascent to the
Office of the Prime Minister in
Jamaica. “Sure they can be in
the Cabinet. Not mine. Not
mine,” he said.

It is a pity that we.are
unable to make such an asser-
tion in The Bahamas!

PHILLIPPA RUSSELL
~ Nassau,
February 1, 2009.

Noise pollution incompatible with
Bahamas National Trust principles

EDITOR, TheTribune.

Tread with almost disbelief .

Leonard Smith’s letter, in
which he outlined the rude
response by a Bahamas
National. Trust executive to

his complaint about the latest’

bombardment of noise from
The Retreat.

I, too, have experienced
first hand the ear shattering,
window shaking music. from

_ the Trust until the wee hours.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MADELEINE DELHOMME
of ALLEN DRIVE, CARMICHEAL ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as.a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28" day of
January, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and enzenshie, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Private Family Island Resort

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WATERSPORTS MANAGER

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Experience in the Hospitality Industry is an asset
Good communication and motivational skills are

- Individual will be required to live on property.
Salary will be based on qualifications and experience
_ We offer excellent benefits

Applications should be email to
cmajor@grp.sandals.com

Had the wind been from a dif-
ferent direction, my family

also would have spent a sleep- _ |

less Saturday night.

We have complained to
Trust executive director Eric
Carey, the Wulff Road police
and our MP, Loretta Butler,
the latter of who made repre-
sentation to the Trust on our
behalf.

We were assured by the
Trust that a Custodian was
present at all events to make
sure the music was kept at an
acceptable level, and that the
slip in policy would be
addressed forthwith.

The Trust’s refusal to deal
with the problem demon-
strates contempt for the Roy-

al Bahamas Police Force, our . :

Member of Parliament and
the hardworking, law-abiding

citizens of Village Road and
surrounding environs.

It also begs the question;
does the Bahamas National
Trust think it is above the
law?

I have been loathe to write
a letter to the newspaper —
and I am sure many others
have as well — because of the
good work the Bahamas
National Trust has done over
the years.

But enough is enough.

Noise pollution is not com-
patible with the principles of
the Bahamas National Trust
and the utter disdain exhibited
to the police, our MP and the
residents is not acceptable.

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
February 2, 2009.

Why are no Bahamians being
arrested for employing people
without Immigration permits?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Firstly, the Minister of State for Immigration should know that
no immigration permit is to be issued without payment being

made.

It is so simple to correct any infractions without cameras
rolling — simply send a letter to the offending company or
person requiring them to pay within 48 hours or the permit is
automatically cancelled. Immigration go and advise the expat on
the permit and advise him that unless his employer corrects the
matter immediately he will have to leave.

Why are no Bahamians being arrested for employing people

without Immigration permits?

If the Haitians get to know that unless you have a permit sete
is no work, in other words kill the work market, you will never

kill this practice.

I was glad to hear that the Minister of State is finally doing
something, at least investigating possible trafficking, but let’s see
actions on this — people in court and dealt with to the fullest

extent of the law.

Least we forget, the Minister of State for Immigration is
directly responsible to the Minister of Foreign Affairs & Immi-
gration so one presumes he works under instructions although
we must congratulate the Minister for his very public face and
seemingly never ending editorial support of our tabloid.

H JOHNSON
Nassau,
January 17, 2009.


i oa
Ryan trying to whip
up support for his

© In brief
Motorcyclist
killed after
crashing into
utility pole

‘i By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Grand
Bahama recorded its second
traffic fatality for the year on
Monday evening when a 33-
year-old motorcyclist died
after crashing into a utility
pole on East Mall Drive.

Asst Supt Clarence Reckley
reported that the victim, Shan-
‘non Comacho, of Buckingham
Lane, Freeport, was riding a
2006 Honda 600, licence plate

number 465, when he lost con- |

trol and collided with a con-
crete pole in the median.

The accident occurred
around 5.51pm near the AID
building. The victim was
severely injured and was taken
to Rand Memorial Hospital, °
where he was pronounced
dead at 6.48pm.

The accident is still under
investigation. Meanwhile,
police are appealing to
motorists to drive with cau-
tion.

Plant sale to
take place on.
Saturday

PLANT lovers from all over
the Bahamas will travel to
Nassau this weekend for the
Horticultural Society of the
Bahamas’ annual plant sale.

The event will take place on
Saturday, February 7, from
10am to 2pm at the Bahamas
National Trust's headquarters,
the Retreat, on Village Road.

The plant sale committee
includes Dory Bowleg, HSB
president; Dale Pearce, HSB .
vice-president; Cindy Wilde
and Sarah Lobosky, sale chair-
persons, and Sara Parker, who
does publicity for HSB.

“There is always something
new to spark a gardener's

imagination at this sale,” said,

Ms Bowleg. ° =

There will be special booths
by Flamingo Nursery for.
orchids and supplies; Marina
Greaves with her water gar-
den features; Beryl Sheasby
with her special Tillandsias;
Dale Pearce with special Ade-
niums or Desert Roses, and
bedding plants and fruit trees
from Errol Strachan’s Garden
of Eden. ©

Popular |

Herbs and hanging baskets,
bromeliads and orchids are
. always popular and in great
supply.

Gardening guru Sara Parker
said, “I recommend the bare
root Bromeliads which you
can move around a new land-
scape until you get it right.
The HSB sale has a large col-
lection to choose from at very
good prices. The BNT garden
gives you great ideas on land-
scaping, too."

“Members show off new
skills and new plant life,” said
Ms Parker, a founding mem-
ber and host of the popular
new home and garden show
“Bahamas Realty Now.”

Plants on sale will range in
price from less than a dollar to
more than $100 depending on
size and rarity. HSB members
grow the plants and label
them for sale with 15 per cent
of the sale price going to the
HSB.

Of special interest each year
are hundreds, possibly thou-
sands, of dramatic.Bromeli-: °
ads, from tiny Tillandsias or
“airplants” to gigantic hybrids
with five foot- long leaves.

’- Members also often-donate
bare root plants to the sale for
landscaping.:

Ms Wilde, plant sale co-
chairman, urges members to
bring plants, labelled with
proper sales tags, between
2pm and 6pm on Friday, and
from 8am to 9am on Saturday.

Plant shoppers are urged to
wear hats and sunscreen, °
arrive early and bring their
own boxes, bags and trucks.
Some help is available for
transporting large plants to
the parking area courtesy of
Queen’s College. There is no
admission charge.

ia He
aU ty

eM hah
PHONE: 322-2157



COB moving forward
on green complex

THE College of the Bahamas is ready to move to
the next phase of assisting the country with small
island sustainability issues, and is inviting architects
to submit proposals for the anticipated GTR Camp-
bell Small Island Sustainability Complex which will
serve as the headquarters for the college’s pro-
gramme in this crucial area. ;

The facility will house classrooms, laboratories,
lecturing facilities, library space, faculty offices and
administration spaces.

There will also be a green house, a farm house and
a chemical storage facility.

College officials are in talks with the government
about the transfer of a plot of land to the institution
at the government-owned Gladstone Road Agri-
cultural complex, where the facility is likely to be
constructed.

The GTR Complex will be named after famous
ship builder George T R Campbell, who is also the
founder of the Freedom Foundation, which donat-
ed $10 million to the college for the development of
the Small Island Sustainability (SIS) programme.

The college has budgeted $8 million of that sum
for the land preparation, construction and furnishing
of the facility. .

Consultant to the college for capital works devel-
opment Melanie Roach said the design of the SIS
facility will be challenging. Interested architectural
firms have until Friday, February 6, to submit pro-
posals to the College. The complex will be a green
facility in design, construction and utilisation.

the design team because we don’t just want a four-
square reinforced concrete building that you can
find anywhere,” said Ms Roach.

_ “We are looking for creative ways in which to
have the facility constructed so that it is in and of
itself sustainable.”

Ms Roach said that she envisions incorporating
clean energy options and technologies in the facili-
ty’s design. “The facility is going to be a living lab-
oratory, so we want to be able to show what can be
done anywhere in a small island state and we want
them to be able to take advantage of the natural
wind with regard to the ventilation and their place-
ment of the building is very.important.

“With regards to the landscaping, that should be
incorporated into the design so that the trees provide
a natural shade. There are all sorts of building tech-
nologies that can be.used,” she said.

The expectation is also that the facility will be
powered by wind, solar or biodiesel energy in line
with the green concept.

Once the proposals for the facility’s design have
been reviewed, firms will be shortlisted and then a

. selection committee will conduct interviews.

That committee will make a recommendation to
the College Council on which firm should be select-
ed. :

Ms Roach said the College expects the architect to
complete the design in time to go out to tender by
the end of 2009 so that construction can begin in Jan-
uary 2010. The projected completion date is June

Gladstone Thurston/BIS Photo

“The facility is really going to tax the ingenuity of



benefit An

@ GLADSTONE THURSTON

NICHOLL’S TOWN -
Lucayan Tropical’s proposed
operation in North Andros will
advance agriculture and benefit

. farmers there.

That was the message deliv-
ered by Bahamas Agricutural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
and Lucayan Tropical auring a
meeting with the North Andros
District Council last weekend.

“You could only benefit from
Lucayan’s presence here,” BAIC
executive chairman Edison Key
said at the meeting. Lucayan’s
sales manager Roger Rolle said:
“There is no need to feel that we
are coming here and put anybody
out of business. We intend to do

exactly the opposite and that,is ,,

to work together so that every-
body at the end of the day gets a
piece of the-pie.”

‘ In pursuit of the government’s
food security policy, the Ministry,
of Agriculture and Marine
Resources and BAIC have been
encouraging Bahamians to tap
into the many millions of dollars

' spent on importing food.

Among those present at the
meeting were Administrator Dr
Huntley Christie, Chief Council-
jor Brian Cleare, BAIC’s domes-
tic investment officer Alphonso
Smith and local government offi-
cials. °

Vision

Mr Key was accompanied by
general manager Benjamin Rah-
ming, secretary to the board of
BAIC Joyce Treco, and assistant
general manager Arnold Dorsett.

“We have a vision, and that is
for farming to improve in this
country,” said Mr Rolle. “We are
farmers just like you and we are
passionate about farming.

“We know that we need to doa
far better job at feeding ourselves
than we are doing right now. We
are far too dependent on
imports.”

‘The Bahamian-owned Lucayan
Tropical; operator of a huge
hydroponics greenhouse farm in
New Providence, grows mainly
tomatoes. This season they have
been able to move, about 1,500
cases each week. An additional
300 cases is coming out of

‘ Andros. That takes care of near-

ly half the Bahamian market.

Lucayan Tropical is interested
in utilising unused land in North
Andros and, in collaboration with
farmers there, increase agricul-
tural production. |

Some farmers were reportedly
concerned about the impact a
large operator like Lucayan Trop-
ical would have on their liveli-
hood. “Do not feel uneasy and
don’t listen to rumours,” said Mr
Rolle. “We are quite open. You
can visit us anytime.

“We are happy to let you know -

our intentions. We want to work
with Andros farmers. Like Mr
Key, we want to:improve farming.
This is just a start and we are hap-
py to be a part of it.”

« ’

‘ment still has to allow tomatoes to

. greatest competitor,” he said.



2011.

Lucayan Tropical to
ros farmers



S SS SS

PUMPKINS galore are flowing into the North Andros packing house.
BAIC executive chairman Edison Key (leit) and domestic investment offi-
cer Alphonso Smith examine them.
‘In a pilot project. already
underway, Lucayan Tropical pro-
vided Andros farmers with about
60,000 sweet pepper seedlings.
Most. of them are on course for
harvesting within two weeks.

Lucayan Tropical takes care of
packaging and shipping. And,
according to Mr Rolle, “the
(North Andros) farmers get more
of the profits than we do.”

The company is also keen on
purchasing other produce out of
Andros and moving them to mar-
ket at their expense.

“We are more than glad to buy
from the local farmers,” said
Lucayan Tropical’s general man-
ager Tim Hauber.

“If we can meet the demand
then there can be some strength

to stand up to the government

and say ‘don’t allow imported i

tomatoes. We have all the toma- badd ae ‘
toes we need.’ LEQ

“But the reality is, that is not \ _

the case, even with us cranking ~
out 1,500 cases a week and a few
hundred more coming from here
and other islands. The govern-



come in to feed our people.”
Administrator Dr ‘Christie
urged farmers to take advantage
of the opportunities that partner-
ing with Lucayan Tropical will
bring. “They should not be
looked at as our enemy or our

“There should be a degree of col-
laboration. Farmers were very
appreciative of the seedlings they
got from Lucayan because seeds
cost a lot of money.”

BAIC executive chairman Mr
Key said farmers “could only ben-
efit from Lucayan’s presence in
North Andros.”

“We are all Bahamians and we
have to work together,” he said.
“We have to look at the big pic-
ture. We are not looking at that
three to four hundred million dol-
lars worth of food that we are
importing.

“We are just looking at some
people saying ‘well, what is this
going to mean with regard to the

‘competition with the local farm-

ers?’

“There are going to be benefits
for the North Andros farmers. I
can assure you.that Lucayan
Tropical is not coming in here to
run you out of business.”

A NEW TOOL shed has
been constructed in
North Andros to com-
plement recently
bought farm tractors.
Pictured from right are
BAIC executive chair-
man Edison Key, gen-
eral manager Benjamin
Rahming, and domes-
tic investment officer
Alphonso Smith.

Gladstone Thurston/BIS Photo






bid for Kennedy |

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



ATTORNEY Derek Ryan, PLP hopeful for the Kennedy
constituency, is attempting to galvanise support for his bid for the
controversial seat.

Although he has not received an official nomination from the
party, Mr Ryan is canvassing the area with branch members and
party generals, and plans to open a community centre in the sub-
division. :

He has also purchased a van to assist immobile seniors from "
the area.."We are gearing up, we have been doing so for some
time in that area. But I have not been given the nod by the
machinery of the party for the nomination, so in the interim all
we are trying to do is meet with people to talk with them," said
Mr Ryan, who is’a ratified PLP National General Council mem-
ber for the constituency. 1

The constituency is considered to be a PLP stronghold,
one that political pundits. believe should be the “reward” fo
a candidate with long-standing party connections.

Mr Ryan said he feels that the seat should.go to a hopeful
who has the constituents’ best interests at heart, someone
who will not switch political allegiance.

Stabilising

"T think that the seat should go to somebody who can best rep-
resent the people. People are concerned because they don't
know whether or not Kennedy will ever have a stabilising force
(because) of what has went on before.

"I'm working along with the branch, and (party) generals to
again put some measures in place so that people feel that they are
going to be secure. So they don't have to worry about another
two years down the road that Mr Ryan (is) crossing the floor, or ”
deciding ‘listen I get into this, I ain' for it anymore’," he said.

The current representative for the area, Kenyatta Gibson,
resigned from the PLP early last year, serving as an Independent
MP in the House of Assembly before officially joining the FNM ~
last month. Kennedy is a highly coveted seat, with would-be can-
didates such as Omar Archer and Craig Butler said to be
competing for the nomination. 4

Former head of police prosecutions Keith Bell has also
emerged as a possible contender.

However, Mr Ryan believes that his support base in the area

’ is solid. "We have a lot of wonderful, talented young people who

are interested in Kennedy and I think Mr Christie at the end of
the day.is going to do what's best for the party and choose the
best candidate for Kennedy - and I support Mr Christie.in that,”
he said. *- :
PLP leader Perry Christie told The Tribune that the party has
not yet begun the formal process of selecting a Kennedy candi-
date. The Kennedy constituency has seen two prominent res-
ignations in the recent past. Mr Gibson resigned in 2008, and -
current leader of Opposition business in the House of Assem-
bly Dr Bernard Nottage resigned from the PLP when he was
the area’s MP in 2000. He later rejoined the party.





\\
X Ny x S
rt

4 Door Soft

top
__ Also available in 2 Door Soft Top and Hard Top

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co. Ltd.

Montrose Ave.
- Phone: 322-1722/Fax: 326-7452








PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Some pet-food |
products are

being recalled action

FROM page one

recall are sold locally.

Mr Turnquest said, as far as he was aware, none of the pet food
brands were sold locally. However, where many people may
purchase pet products abroad as they do with other items, it was
important to the ensure pet-food was free of peanut ingredients.

Popular US animal food retailer PetSmart, last week put a vol-
untary recall on at least 12 of its pet snack products.

In a press statement, the company said: “With the recent
FDA announcement of a salmonella investigation involving
peanut butter products distributed through the Peanut Corpo-
ration of America (PCA), we are working closely with all of our
vendors to verify whether there are any implications for our cus-
tomers and their pets through the products sold in our stores.”

Although there are no confirmed cases in the US or locally of
pets falling ill after consuming these products, PetSmart had since
recalled the products as a precaution.

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has posted sev-
eral recall notifications for pet snacks possibly containing ingre-
dients from PCA, which may be contaminated with Salmonella
Typhimurium.

Most persons or animals infected with this strain of salmonella:

can easily develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps with-
in 12 to 72 hours of infection.

The illness usually lasts four to seven days, and most recover
without treatment.

In some cases, the Salmonella infection may become extreme-
ly aggressive, spreading to the blood stream and intestines, and
without proper treatment may lead to death.

‘Over the last four months, nearly 500 people in the US and
Canada have been reported to be infected with Salmonella
infection. At least six have died.

Private Dueling Paradite laband

Invites application for the position of:.







1. HOUSEHOLD MANAGER
2. HOUSEKEEPER





TO LIVE ON PREMISES

° Applicants MUST BE KNOWLEDGABLE IN
Food & Beverage good communications skills,
good supervisory skills —

° Must be able to develop menu and prepare meals
for special functions.

° Should be fully experienced in domestic household

chores. Husband and wife team preferred. Three

years in a similar position would be an asset.









Applications should be email to:
cmajor@grp.sandals.com fa



ie Rent hy SN

Wilchcombe taking legal

FROM page one

“T worked all my life to
build my character, all my
life to build my reputation
and I will let no one take
that from me,” Mr Wilch-
combe told his constituents
on Monday evening.

“T have instructed my
attorneys in the United
States to begin the process
for legal action to defend my
reputation against the char-
acter assassination launched
at me. ,

“Tt happened once before

in our country and I can tell ,

you in West End tonight, it
will not happen to me and I
won’t take that lightly.”
West End_ residents
packed the town hall build-
ing in that settlement to
hear from their MP, who
delivered a 30-minute
address, which was also car-
ried live on Love 97 Radio.
The MP was taken in for
questioning on January 23
to. assist police with their
investigations into the
alleged attempted extortion
of US actor John Travolta,
following the death of his
16-year-old son, Jett Tra-

’ volta, at West End, Grand

Bahama on January 2.

Mr Wilchcombe was
released, however, his busi-
ness partner and PLP col-
league, former senator,
lawyer Pleasant Bridgewa-
ter, was charged with extor-
tion, along with ambulance
driver Tarino Lightbourne.
Both were granted $50,000
bail.

MP Wilchcombe thanked

his family, close friends, and *

those PLP colleagues, who
have supported him and has
vowed to defend his reputa-
tion:

.. The former journalist and





Monee

ZNS broadcaster praised the

‘Bahamian media, those who
represented the high level

of journalism and profes-
sionalism in their reporting
of the facts in relation to the
alleged extortion plot.

Journalists

“As-one who once walked
among them, I looked on

with pride as Bahamian

journalists took the high
road while some of the
biggest media brands in the
world chose to take the low
road. But rest assured that
my personal battles in that
regard will be handled,” he
said.

“This most recent episode
of what can only be
described as journalistic ter-
rorism by segments of the
foreign media was not the
first, and sadly, is unlikely
to be the last.

“Where sensationalism
has become the grist of the

‘media money mill, truth has

FROM page one

become its first
casualty...even within some
of the most hallowed halls
of Journalism,” he said.

This is the second time
that.a Bahamian politician
was caught up in an alleged
scandal involving a US Hol-
lywood celebrity.

Mr Wilchcombe stressed
that the more important bat-
tle is to protect the reputa-
tion and character of the
Bahamas and its people.

“Our country must never
be assailed because some-
one chooses to-do so,
because they believe they
have the power to do so or
because they believe in this
imperialistic approach
where they dominate those
that are small because they

_are large — they don’t have

that right.

“As a people, we are leg-

endary for opening our
hearts and our homes to the
world. From our hospitali-
ty, we have built a tourism
economy of unparalleled
quality. We value our guests
and take pride in treating
them well.

“But no one should mis-
take our willingness to serve
with servitude; nor should
they confuse: our simplicity
with simple-mindedness. We
are nobody’s fool to be
chewed up and spat out.

“Bahamians, like every-

one else, must stand against
every display of disrespect
against them and their insti-
tutions by agents of arro-
gance and ignorance. In the
face of raw power and
brutish behaviour, we must
be willing to stand firm and
to insist on our right to live
our lives the Bahamian
way... which is one of
respect for the law and for
the rights of every person,

against US media

Bahamian or not. +

“We are not playground
operators, just here to col-
lect gate receipts, put on a
costume and smile for the
customers. This is our
home... and this is our life.

Rules

_“We set the rules for all
whom we welcome here. It
is my hope that every per-
son charged with the
responsibility of protecting
the integrity of Bahamian
institutions will convey that
message to anyone who tries
to subvert them, whether
from inside or out,” said Mr
Wilchcombe..

The West End MP has not
revealed the names of those
media houses in the US that
he intends take legal action
against.

Well known West End
resident Artis Neely, a
staunch PLP supporter,
agrees with Mr Wilchcombe.

“As far as J am concerned
he is correct, but in my opin-
ion he was little light in
some of things and he
should) have’ been a
little more direct in some
things.

“T felt he could have
brought more information
to the public as to certain
things that happened, but I
am sure because of good
judgment he made the
decision not to,” Mr Neely
said.

Another resident, who
identified herself as Mar-
garet, said that she will con-
tinue to pray for Mr Wilch-
combe. .“I know that the
reports in the (US) media
were a.lie and I am happy
he has decided to take some
action against them,” she
said.

Ricardo Junior, the electrician’s eldest son,
described how he found out about his 37-year-old
father’s death when he stopped by to see him
later on Tuesday morning.

“They told me Daddy got shot and they weren’t
sure if he was living. I thought they were lying to
me. Then I run to the hospital and they told me he
was dead,” he said quietly as he stared at the
bloodied sofa on which his father was killed.

“My Daddy was just like me. We don’t bother
no one, we keep to ourselves,” he added.

Her clothes and hands stained with the blood of
her son, 51-year-old Sylvia Ramsay said the
tragedy unfolded as her boyfriend, Kermit Hep-
burn, was preparing to go to work.

“Kermit — he work to the dump — he opened’
the front door and he didn’t know nobody was °

there, but there were three fellas outside and
they lick him down right there.

“When they lick him down, they asked for
‘Cardo. One of them held (Kermit) down by his
head with their foot. Then one of them came in
here and he told me to go back in my room. I
went back in my room and then I heard. ‘Pap!’
(bullet fired). They shoot ‘Cardo,” she said,
adding that her infant grandson was also in the
room with her.

According to his friends and family, Ricardo

FROM page one

Claiming that the PLP is

PLP hopeful

Man is shot dead

had been robbed outside by a group of masked
men about a week earlier.

Mr Hepburn said that barely “seconds” passed
between the point at which the men entered the
house and when they killed Ricardo.‘

“They must’ve seen where he was laying, they
just walked straight in and shot him,” he said.

Despite their closeness in age, 42-year-old
Department of Environmental Health Services
employee said he considered the 37-year-old like
a son to him and in turn Cardo called him “Dad.”

““Cardo was a nice, loving young man. He’s
not my son but that’s how I take him, because
anything I ask .him to do...If I’m sick he takes
me to the hospital; if I need medicine, he’ll try .
help me. If we don’t have everything in the house
to cook, he’ll help buy grocery,” he said, teary-
eyed, standing in the family’s front room.

Both Mr Hepburn and the victim’s mother
commended the police for their quick response to
the incident. They were alerted by Mr Hepburn,
who ran to the nearby Quakoo Street station to
report the killing after the masked assailants fled
the scene.

Yesterday, police press liaison officer Walter
Evans said that no arrests have yet been made in
connection with the incident.

homosexuality, then “so be it.”
In a brief interview with The
Tribune yesterday, Mr Bodie

steeped with persons who lead

_ “alternate lifestyles”, Mr Archer

said that he will not allow him-
self to be bullied into accepting
their choices.

Appearing as a guest on the
94.9FM ‘Real Talk’ show, Mr
Archer was asked by host Ort-
land Bodie Jr to leave after he
failed to withdraw allegations
connected with an incident last
year in which he (Mr Archer)
was shot.

A few hours later, Mr Archer
visited The Tribune to say he
had reached a breaking point.

He claimed the party leader-
ship is being “pressured” to get

-rid of him, because-he has

developed a “huge following”
in the Kennedy area.

' Mr Archer threatened to run
as an independent if he is not
given the party’s nomination.
He is confident that he will
either win the seat outright, or
split the vote, allowing FNM
MP Kenyatta Gibson to retain

not gay. But yet we are in a sis-
sy party? That isn’t fair to us,
who want to bring about a pos-
itive change to the party,” he
said.

The Kennedy hopeful said he
feels the issue of homosexuality
needs to be “properly
addressed.”

“It is a sick problem. Being
gay is not right. If God is against
it, so am J. I do not believe in
man and man, or woman and
woman. They can not procre-
ate. I believe in a man and a
woman.,And those who want
to create a society of their own
need to get away from politics.”

Mr Archer added that if he
is kicked out of the PLP for tak-
ing such a strong stance against

said that Mr Archer would not
be allowed back on the show as
long as he remains the host.

He challenged Mr Archer to
name the people in politics who
he refers to as “sissies” and
“crooks.”

A member of the local gay
community criticised Mr
Archer’s comments last night,
saying: “To call for homosexu-
als to be thrown out of the PLP
is like calling for black people to
be thrown out of the PLP.
Homosexuality is a character-
istic that is natural to the human
experience.’

“Mr Archer’s suggestion is
ridiculous and runs counter to.
the principles upon which the
PLP was founded.”

PGA files suit

FROM page one

that it will not be going forward with the additional golf tourna-
ments for which it is obligated.”

In a press release January 28, Ginn President and CEO Robert
Gidel said economic factors led to the.decision to cancel the agree-
ment with the PGA.

“We have worked diligently with many others for several months
to find solutions to our predicament with respect to these profes-
sional golf tournaments,” Gidel said in the release. “We did the best
we could, but the economy got the best of us with respect to the
tournaments.”

The development company is currently eonbinneig the mixed-
use resort Ginn Sur Mer in West End, Grand Bahama.

his seat.
_ On the issue of alleged homo-
sexuality in the PLP, Mr Archer
’ said: “These persons need to
go! They need to ’fess up and be
man about it and say I’m leav-
ing. We need to clean house.
Because I’m sick and tired of
the image of the PLP as being a
sissy party.
; “[’m not gay. Paul Moss is
Tet ee Rae eh os not gay. Jerome Fitzgerald is



Ask your Scotiabank representative for details.


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 7



a EY I Be
Nassau grouper is ‘not long for this world’

OIL' FISH fans beware
— the Nassau grouper

is not long for this world.
According to Dr Yvonne
Sadovy, one of the world's top

grouper experts who is working

with the Departnient of Marine

Resources, data projections show ,
that the Bahamian grouper fish- .

. ery will collapse within a decade
unless it is better managed,

That means we will join the oth-
er 33 countries in the region where
this resource has been overfished
to the point of commercial extinc-
tion. Like cod in the north Atlantic,
the Nassau grouper — once the
most common food fish around
the region reaching a weight of 50
pounds or more — is now on the
endangered list. In fact, 20 of the
world’s 162 species of grouper are
threatened with extinction ‘by over-

_ fishing.

And one of the big-reasons is
their unusual reproductive behav-
iour. Every year at full moon in
December and January, Nassau
groupers migrate long distances
from their home reefs to specific
sites where they form spawning
aggregations.

These swirling columns-of thou-
sands of fish, all intent'on creat-
ing the next generation, are easily
targeted by fishermen. About 50 of
these spawning sites have been
identified around the region, which
means that the entire annual repro-
duction for this species is concen-

trated at a few particular spots for ,

only a few days each year.

"We have no idea what attracts
fish to an aggregation site, nor how
they know where. to go," Dr
Sadovy. told a'public meeting last
week at the Bahamas National
Trust. "We don't know if. it's
instinctual or learned behaviour,
and we don't know if aggregations
can ever be re-established once
they have been destroyed. The
ecosystem implications are
unknown."

Young grouper live in coastal
mangroves for up to five years

before moving to outer reefs where °

they live for decades, migrating to
the same spawning sites every win-
ter. This makes. them highly vul-
nerable to fishing pressure, And
research has shown that even mod-
erate fishing on aggregations can
have a large impact.

"They only spawn in aggrega-
tions and if these are depleted

- there will be'no next generation
of groupers," Dr Sadovy said.
"Catches, have been severely
reduced throughout the Caribbean
and many fish caught today are
juveniles. The Bahamas is the only
country with some healthy stocks
left. Belize and Cayman. have a
few remaining aggregations, but
all others have collapsed."

Dr Sadovy knows whereof she
speaks. She is a former director of
Puerto Rico's Fisheries Research
Laboratory and works with the
US-based Caribbean Fishery Man-
agement Council. She chairs the
IUCN's expert committee'on
groupers, and-in the early 1990s
was among the first to discover
that spawning aggregations were
disappearing throuphed! the
Caribbean.

She is currently on leave from
her post as a professor at the Uni-
versity of Hong Kong and one of
the projects she is working on is
an appraisal of the available data

. on our grouper fishery in order to

_ develop management guidelines

based on lessons that have been
learned the hard way elsewhere.

Her appraisal will include a sur-

vey of Bahamian fishermen. ~

One of Dr Sadovy's research

interests is the future of the world's

coastal fisheries, which provide
food and livelihoods for millions
throughout the tropics. Shallow-
water fisheries are more efficient,
less wasteful of by-catch and more
productive;.per tonne of fish pro-
duced, than industrial-scale fish-
eries. Yet few are managed prop-
erly, and many face serious

declines from reef degradation, '

overfishing and poaching.
Total global fishery yield has

been falling since. the ists 1980s,
despite more and more fishing
effort being applied, and it is clear
that we are progressively ‘fishing
out the larger species. About three
quarters of all marine stocks are
now fully exploited, overexploit-
ed or depleted. Groupers are not

the only fish to spawn in aggrega-.

tions, but most: of those that do
are in decline.

"Many communities around the
world ‘depend on the sea as a last
resort and any collapse in shallow
water fisheries is a potential social
nightmare,
"These communities don't under-

, stand the decline of traditional fish:

eries because it is historically not
part of their experience. They are
under heavy commercial pressure
today, and they need to be man-
aged for a whole range of reasons
— including food security."
Management options for the
Nassau grouper focus on control-
ling the level of fishing effort. This
means closed seasons (to protect
regations), minimum and max-
imum size limits (to protect juve-
niles and.large females with eggs),
gear restrictions, and the preven-

. tion of illegal fishing by poachers.

N

Sets have been seeking
to protect grouper aggre--

gations for well.over.a decade. In
1998 the Bahamas Reef-Environ-
mental Education Foundation
commissioned a detailed manage-

ment action plan by British fish-

ery consultants that noted "a real
danger, of heavy depletion which
would not be detected from the
current data collection and analy-
sis system until too late" unless
controls during spawning agerega-
tions were implemented.

In what was a politically risky
move at the time, the government
banned fishing at spawning sites
near High’Cay Andros for several
days in the winter of 1998-99. That
trial was later extended to other
sites, and a national closed season
was introduced in 2005. The fol-
lowing year new restrictions on
grouper sales were added to the

. closure, which was extended to:
“three months (from Décember to

February). But there is still no
fixed calendar — the dates are
decided annually and the current
season ends on February 28.
"Some have been arrested dur-
ing the closure but we believe most
of our commercial fishermen are

honouring the ban, although we.

remain very concerned about for-
eign poachers," said Marine
Resources Director Michael Bray-
nen. "More management measures
are being considered, including a
fixed season with no sale of Nassau
groupers at all during the closure.

We feel this is best handled in a

black and white fashion."

He said the three-pound mini-
mum size limit is woefully inade-
quate and also called for a maxi-
mum size limit to protect the most
reproductive adults. There is the
possibility of gear restrictions too,
but experts say the best approach is
to leave groupers alone for a cou-
ple of months each year.

"We are not trying to put fish-
ermen out of business,

_ nen said, "so we should all buy and

_ encourage the sale of other species

during the closed season."

The most important manage-
ment option is the creation of a
network of marine reserves
throughout the country to protect
our key fishery resources. This has
become one of the main tools for
conservation management in
coastal waters: —. about -4600

- Marine reserves have been set up
around the world. ~

In an historic move eight years
ago, the previous. Ingraham gov-

"Dr Sadovy said.

"Mr Bray- ©



‘ ernment did agree to set aside 20

per cent of Bahamian waters as a
network of no-take reserves. —
heeding the best advice of marine
scientists worldwide.

The intent was to create five

reserves immediately ~—at Bimini,
the Berry Islands, North Abaco,

South Eleuthera:and Exuma-— but ~

the devil was in the details. For
years the Department of Marine
Resources has been consulting
with local communities and fish-
ermen on the proposed boundaries
— a daunting task since family
islanders regard their fishing

~ grounds as generation property.

The results of this extensive
groundwork were distilled into a
lengthy cabinet paper back in 2006.
And.a week or two ago the gov-
ernment gave the greenlight to set
up six reserves (Exuma was split
into north side and south side
reserves), two of which will be
gazetted by. Easter, according to
Agriculture & Marine Resources
Minister Larry Cartwright. Those
two are the Berry Islands.and Exu-
ma South Side reserves, which are
considered relatively non-contro-
versial.

The boundaries of the North
Bimini reserve — which environ-
mentalists have long clamoured
for as a way to control develop-
ment at the Bimini Bay Resort —
are being’ reconsidered following
discussions with the Bimini Bay

Minister Cartwright. The North
Abaco and Exuma North Side
reserves still face opposition from
local fishermen. And the South
Eleuthera reserve is considered
too big and is being cut back in
size.

All six protected areas will ban

‘any extractive use except in’ North

Bimini, where registered fishing
guides will be able to‘catth and
release bonefish. There should
be no boat anchoring in a reserve
and fishing, dredging, diving or

have also increased outside of the
spawning season, so its a win-win
situation."

But she warns that no single
measure is enough when it comes
to fishery management: Overall
fishing effort and poaching are

major problems that will only get ,

worse as stocks are depleted.
Enforcement is the key to protec-
tion of our national food security,
to which all governments pay lip
service.

' "Ageregations give the illusion




CREDIT SUISSE

of plenty and it is often difficult to
communicate that a fishery needs
protection. Fish concentrate to
spawn even when population levels
are low. Cod in the north Atlantic
exhibited similar schooling behav-
iour even as that fishery collapsed
years ago," Dr Sadovy said.

But the results of fishing
grouper aggregations are pre-
dictable. Of the eight documented
aggregation sites around the Cay-
man Islands, six had been wiped
out by 2003, when the Cayman

government banned fishing on all
known aggregations.

"Fish are not an endless
resource," Dr Sadovy pointed out.
"They are no different from other
animals, and there is only a-tiny
chance that their eggs will survive."

What do you think?
Send comments to
larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit www.bahamapundit.com

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch |

Private Banking

is presently considering applications fora



The position is open to candidates with the following minimum requirements:

Qualifications:

. University, Degree or equivalent

Experience:

- Sound international banking background with at least 5-7 years experience in
back-office securities operations

, Strong understanding of Private Banking Business and the Financial Sector

~

- Working knowledge and experience with Globus Application is advantageous
- Working knowledge and experience with MS Word, ence PowerPoint and
Bloomberg applications —

- owner Gerado Capo, according to _

Personal Qualities:

* Confident with strong leadership skills
- Strong numerical and analytical skills
- Excellent organizational skills with attention to details and structured

approach to work

* Strong written, oral, and interpersonal skills .
* Work within a team environment with the ability to mentor team members
- Enthusiastic team spirit with the. ability to effectively collaborate across teams

and cultures

> Highly motivated and committed to service excellence

otherwise disturbing marine life. -

and habitats is prohibited.
The big question is,how will
these restrictions be enforced? It

costs a minimum of $350,000 for -

the Bahamas National Trust to
maintain a mobile presence in the

,.Exuma Cays Land,and Sea, Park,

which became a no-take. zone in

-,1986. The Department of Marine

Resources will need a lot more

trained staff and equipment that

government would have to pro-
vide for in its annual budget. And
some new entity would require
even more money to get off the
ground.

Most scientists agree that there
is little point in having “paper
parks” where the destruction of
the coastal environment goes on
as rapidly inside as it, does outside.
But. Minister Cartwright says
enforcement will be handled joint-
ly by his ministry, the BNT, The
Nature Conservancy and the
Defence Force — just as already
happens in the Exuma park. It is

unclear how this. will play out in.

reality, but more, resources will

have to come from somewhere. |. °

But there is-no question that
marine reserves. are the best
approach to fishery conservation.
‘Dr Sadovy points to evidence that
protecting aggregations is a par-
ticularly effective strategy. For
example, the US Virgin Islands
created a marine reserve in 1999 to
protect an important spawning
site for Red Hind. This led to size

increases and a doubling of spawn- .

ing density.

"Fish migrated out of the pro-
tected area and may have :con-
tributed to an overall increase in
the size of Red Hind caught else-

where, thus increasing the value _

of this grouper fishery for local

Key Duties & Responsibilities:
* Co-ordinate and manage the Static Data, ‘Mail Administration and Cash and

Security Reconciliation Teams
- Ensure adherence to the required daily processes by the teams to ensure the ;
“integrity of the data maintained |
* Communicate and resolve any queries from internal and external clients
- Ensure the update of process documentation changes arising due to changes
in procedures or additional responsibilities allocated to the'teams -
* Achieve deliverables against agreed deadlines.and manage the expectations

with clients.

- Serve as an Operations subject matter expert for new requirements impacting
the units under management

- Participate in User Acceptance Testing prior to project or product
implementation for developments impacting data management -

- Contribute to and participate in special project initiatives impacting the Bank

Benefi rovide

include:

- Competitive salary and performance bonus

- Pension Plan

¢ Health and Life Insurance

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING,

) TRIE ABOVE REQUIREMENTS. NEED APPLY.

Applications should be submitted to:
-Human Resources Department

P.O. Box N-4928 —

. Nassau, Bahamas

Or via fax 356-8148

* Ongoing internal and external career developmenttraining program :

fishermen," she said. "Landings |

















Lyford.

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WEDNESDAY EVENING wt FEBRUARY 4, 2009

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Pm lovin’ it


TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 9



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



CHRIS PAUL lies on the court after being injured in the second half against the Portland Trail Blazers in Mon-

day’s game in New Orleans.

KOBE Bryant prepares
to dunk the ball
against New York
Knicks’ forward Al
Harrington (7) in the
second quarter of
Monday’s game at
Madison Square Gar-
den in New York.
Bryant had 61 points
in the game... E

(AP Photo: Kathy
Willens)



(AP Photo: Bill Haber).

Bryant lights u
with record 6

@ By The Associated Press



KOBE Bryant had plenty of motivation for his
record-setting performance at Madison Square
Garden.

With a postgame work’ daté’planneéd With Knicks *
fan Spike Lee, who was sitting in the front row, -
Bryant put on a show the-filmmaker couldn't crit- ~

icize, setting a current arena record with 61 points
to lead the Los Angeles Lakers to a 126-117 victo-
ry over New York on: Monday night.

"I'm going to review this documentary I'm doing
with Spike Lee tonight after the game and I didn't
feel like sitting next to him and hearing him talking
trash about the Knicks, so that was added incentive
as well," Bryant said. "Seriously. He's going to get
an earful tonight.", Y

Bryant entertained a sold-out crowd that took
turns booing him and saluting him with "MVP!"
chants during an electrifying performance.

He bested:Michael Jordan's opponent record of
55 points atthe present building, known as "Garden

IV," when he hit three free throws with 3:56-

remaining, then broke Bernard King's overall mark

of 60, set on Christmas Day 1984, with two more’

foul shots with 2:33 to play.
Bryant, who also had the highest-scoring game in
the NBA this season, left to a loud ovation after his
fifth 40-point game at MSG, where the Knicks
played their first game in February. 1968. ;

"It's a blessing to do what you love and to have |

moments like this," Bryant said.



Gu



UZURI DODG

was:

’ land 97, New

HONDA ISUZU TOYOTA NISSAN KIA SUZUKI



Your Fast Lane to
hicle Purchasing \.

In other
NBA games
Monday, it
Dallas |
105, Orlando
95; Memphis
113, Washing-
ton 97; Miami
119, the Los
Angeles Clip-
pers 95; Port-

Orleans 89;
Phoenix 129,
Sacramento ie .
81; Utah 105, MAVERICKS forward Dirk Nowitzki
Charlotte 86;
and San Anto-
nio 110, Gold-
en State 105 in
overtime.

In , New

after defeating the Orlando Magic. 105-
95 in Orlando Monday... -
(AP Photo: John Raoux)

“York, Pau Gasol added‘31 points and 14 rebounds

in the Lakers’ first game since losing center Andrew
Bynum for. eight to 12 weeks with a torn medial col-
lateral ligament in his right knee.

The Lakers didn't miss him with Bryant going 19-

| -of-31 from the field with an array of tough jumpers,

powerful drives and a perfect 20-for-20 from the
free throw line. ’

Bynum was hurt Saturday at Memphis when
Bryant crashed into his leg after driving to the bas-



ee

é

NZNSI BauO



raises his arm as he walks: off the court,

WESTWEGO, La.
(AP) — New. Orleans
Hornets star Chris Paul
has a mild groin strain
and is listed as day to day.
The team said the point -
guard had an MRI on
Tuesday after injuring his

Paul has mild
groin strain

‘right groin the night
before against Portland.

Paul left the game late

in the third quarter with
12 points and 13 assists.

He leads the NBA with

has 31 double-doubles.



Ga



\

ket. The center isn't expected to need surgery and
said he was confident he would return in time for
the playoffs. ;

| Lamar. Odom moved into the starting lineup an
Gasol slid to.‘the center spot to replace Bynum.
Odom had six points'and 14 rebounds.

Al Harrington scored 24 points. and:David:Lee -

had 22 points.and:12:rebounds for the Knicks, who
had won six of seven but didn't have the firepower
to stay with the Western Conference leaders in

the opener of a brutal week. New York plays

Boston and Cleveland, too. :
"We.tried to do the rope-a-dope a little bit where

he (Bryant) might shoot himself out, but he didn't,"
Knicks coach Mike D'Antoni said. "He just kept on |

going."

Trail Blazers.97, Hornets 89

At New Orleans, LaMarcus Aldridge scored 22
points and Portland overcame a 17-point deficit
— after Hornets guard Chris Paul was injured —
for its fifth straight victory. Cis

Paul left the game late in the third quarter with
a strained right groin, the first action he has missed
all season. He had 12 points and 13 assists.

The Hornets led 72-55-when Paul left the game.
Portland then outscored New Orleans 26-7 during
the next.seven minutes, with Jerryd Bayless scoring
13 of his 19 points during the decisive surge.

Mavericks 105, Magic 95

At Orlando, Fla., Ditk Nowitzki had 29 points
and six rebounds. and Jason Terry scored 23 ‘to
lead Dallas to its third straight win.

Dwight Howard had 35 points and 11 rebounds:

as the Magic's three-game winning streak ended.
All-Star point guard Jameer Nelson left the game

in the third quarter with a dislocated right shoulder.

He was scheduled to have an MRI on Tuesday.
Grizzlies 113, Wizards 97

At Washington, rookie O.J. Mayo matched his -
career high with 33 points to help the Grizzlies

end a 12-game skid. ; ;
_Antawn Jamison had 29 points and 13 rebounds

for Washington.

Heat 119, Clippers 95

At Miami, Dwyane Wade had 32 points and nine

assists, Michael Beasley added 18 points and the
Heat snapped a two-game skid.

‘ Shawn Marion — in his first game back after
missing five straight with a strained left groin — fin-
Le with 11 points and seven rebounds for the

eat. : ‘
Zach Randolph, back after missing 19 games

with a sote left knee, scored 21 points for the Clip-

pers.

- Suns 129, Kings 81
At Phoenix, Jason Richardson scored 16 of his 24
points in the first quarter, Amare Stoudemire fin-
ished with 25 points and eight rebounds and the
rejuvenated Suns ended a three-game home losing
skid with their most lopsided victory of the season.
John Salmons led the Kings with 19 points.

Jazz 105, Bobcats 86

At Salt Lake City, Ronnie Brewer scored 14 of
his 21 points in the second half and the injury-rid-
dled Jazz rallied from a sluggish start.

Raymond Felton had 16 points and nine assists to

‘lead the Bobcats.

Spurs 110, Warriors 105, OT

At Oakland, Calif., Tim Duncan and Manu Gino-
bili each had season highs with 32 points apiece and
San Antonio overcame a 12-point deficit in the
fourth quarter to force overtime.

Duncan added 15 rebounds for his 30th double-
double and the Spurs won their fourth straight.

Stephen Jackson scored a season-high 33 points
for the Warriors.

five triple-doubles and.

den



ws;

NBA Today

@ By The Associated Press



SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, February 4

L A Lakers at Toronto (7 pm EST).
Kobe Bryant follows up his 61-point per-
formance against the Knicks with a trip to

‘Toronto, the Atlantic Division's last-

place team.

STARS

Monday “

—~ Kobe Bryant, Lakers, broke the cur-
rent Madison Square Garden record with
61 points to lead Los Angeles to a 126-
117 victory over New York. .

— Tim Duncan and Manu Ginobili,
Spurs, each scored 32 points as San Anto-

_ nio beat Golden State 110-105 in over-

time.

— Dirk Nowitzki, Mavericks, had 29
points and Dallas beat Orlando 105-95
for its third straight win.

— Dwyane Wade, Heat, had 32 points
and nine assists as Miami snapped a two-
game losing skid by beating the Los
Angeles Clippers 119-95.

— OJ Mayo, Grizzlies, matched his.
career high with 33 points to lead Mem-
phis to its first:win in nearly a month,
113-97 over Washington.

— Jason Richardson and Amare
Stoudemire, Suns. Richardson scored 16
of his 24 points in the first quarter and
Stoudemire finished with 25 points as
Phoenix ended a three-game home losing
skid with their most lopsided victory of
the season, 129-81 over Sacramento.

— Ronnie Brewer, Jazz, scored 14 of
his 21 points in the second half and Utah
rallied from a sluggish start to beat Char-

lotte 105-86. |

‘ GARDEN PARTY
Kobe Bryant broke the current Madi
son Square Garden record with 61 points
to lead Los Angeles to a 126-117 victory
over New York. Bryant was 19-for-31
from the field; including 3-of-6 from
beyond the arc,-:and hit all 20 of his free
throw attempts to eclipse the previous
visitor record of 55 held by Michael Jor-
dan and the overall record of 60 set by
Bernard King.

HURTS SO MUCH MORE
New Orleans guard Chris Paul left the
Hornets' 97-89 loss to Portland late in

‘the third quarter with a strained right

‘groin, the first action he has missed all
season. He had 12 points and 13 assists.
The Hornets led 72-55 when Paul left
the game.

Portland then outscored New Orleans
26-7 during the next seven minutes. Paul
walked out of the arena with a slight
limp, saying only that he hurt himself
when he "stepped wrong" and plans to

have an MRI on. Tuesday. .

NOT AGAIN

Lakers center Andrew Bynum will
miss eight to 12 weeks after tearing the
medial collateral ligament in his right
knee. The diagnosis Monday was a relief
to Bynum, who initially feared he might
be out for the season. Bynum was hurt in

. the first quarter of Saturday night's win at
.. Memphis. Still, it's hard for the Lakers to
‘forget what happened last season, when

Bynum was also supposed to be out eight
to 12 weeks with a knee injury. Instead of
returning in time for the playoffs, he

- missed the final 46 games of the season,

including the finals against Boston.

TOUGH WEEK

New York started a brutal week with a
126-117 loss to the Los Angeles Lakers.
The Knicks host Cleveland on Wednes-
day and Boston on Friday. It's the first

‘time a team has played three straight

games against. opponents with over .750
winning percentages after Feb. 1 since
the Celtics did it in February 1995,
according to the Elias Sports Bureau.

OUCH’ — be

All-Star point guard Jameer Nelson
left Orlando's 105-92 win over Washing-
ton in the third quarter with a dislocated
right shoulder. He was scheduled to have
an MRI on Tuesday. —

SNAPPED
-, Memphis ended a 12-game losing skid
with a 113-97 victory over Washington. It
was the team's longest since dropping 13
in a row to start the 2002-03 season. The
Grizzlies had not won since beating Dal-
las 102-82 on Jan. 4.

STRONG IN DEFEAT

Orlando's Dwight Howard had 35
points and 11 rebounds in a 105-92 loss to
Dallas. Antawn Jamison had 29 points
and 13 rebounds for Washington in a
113-97 loss to Memphis. Stephen Jackson
scored a season-high 33 points for Gold-
en State in a 110-105 overtime loss to
San Antonio.

STATS

The Heat's point total in a 119-95 win
over the Clippers was the most points
Miami scored at home since beating Utah
121-83 on March 14, 2006. Miami's
Jamaal Magloire grabbed his 4,000th
career rebound. The Suns' point total in
a 129-81 win over Sacramento was their
highest of the season and their 48-point
margin of victory was their biggest ever at
home.

SPEAKING 2

"It was very obvious to all of us by the
middle of the first quarter that he wasn't
in a distributing type of mode or in a get-
ting-10-rebounds type of mode, that he
was going to try to score the basketball
tonight."

— Knicks forward David Lee on Lak-
ers guard Kobe Bryant, who broke the
current Madison Square Garden record
with 61 points in a 126-117 victory over

‘New York:
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL SPORTS

a ee a ae,
son to be inducted into Judo Hall of Fame

Christofilis, Thom

RETIRED Saint Augustine’s Col-
lege teacher Paul Christofilis and busi-
nessman Bruce Thompson of Thomp-
son Trading are both to be inducted
into the Bahamas Judo Hall of Fame
at the Bahamas Junior Open on Feb-
ruary 7 at Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road.

The induction will take place at lpm
during the opening ceremonies of the
first international Judo tournament
ever to be held in the Bahamas.

“These men are among the pioneers
of Judo in this country. Their contri-
butions have been significant to the

Fed Cup draw:
Bahamas to play
Puerto Rico in |
the first round

or Puerto Rico on Thursday.
Canada will play the other on
Friday. :

Both Fountain and Russell
said they are eager to get start-
eds 3.

“With Venezuela not being’
here, it’s still a 50/50 chance that
we can still. survive and remain
in zone one,” Fountain said. “I
honestly believe that we have
a pretty good chance of doing,
very well.” i

When asked if she’s feeling
any pressure, Fountain quickly
quipped: “Not at all. I think the
pressure is on the other teams
because they are ranked higher
than we are. %

“We are here, so we just have
to’go out there and prove to
everybody here that we belong
here with them. We just have
to be prepared to play our
best.” ete

Russell, on the other hand,
said “it’s going to be tough, but
we have a pretty good chance.
We just have to go out there
and play our game and not wor-
ty about them.” ;

As for the pressure, Russell
had this to say: “There is no
pressure on us. It’s on every-
body because they are ranked
higher than us. We just need to
get-an early start and be ready
to play.” ? »

development of our
people and until
now have gone
unnoticed," said
federation presi-
dent D'Arcy Rah-
ming. "These men
were trained by the
best people in the
world at the time,
and they gave back
through teaching
and passing on their
knowledge."

Paul Christofilis





sy 0 (as Tee



began his study of
Judo while a
teacher at SAC
under Mr Ober-
heiser, a Cuban
exile who is
thought to be the
founder of Judo in
this country.

He went on to
study at the
Kodokan, the
birthplace of Judo
in Japan.

Mr Christofilis is

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believed to be the first Bahamian to
ever study for an extended period of
time — 15 months — at the Kodokan.

He eventually received the grade of
Black Belt directly from the Kodokan.

Bruce Thompson began his study
with Don Malone, a 3rd-degree Judo
Black Belt, in the early 70s.

MR Thompson practiced at Luden
Limited on Dowdswell Street and

on to teach for many years in a space
rented from Queen's College.

Judo was founded on the principles
of mutual benefit for all and caring
for others as well as maximum effi-
ciency with minimum effort.

"These men personify these princi-
ples having demonstrated them in
Judo as well as their professional lives.
The BJF is honored to follow in their
footsteps," said Mr Rahming.



degree Black Belt.

Paul Christofilis

eventually received the grade of 2nd

Among his many accomplishments
in Judo, he,represented the Bahamas
at international tournaments and went

Tickets for the event are available
from the Bahamas Judo Federation
on Joe Farrington Road or call 364-
6773.

ZION EAGLES: Phillip Hanna in action yesterday...



‘In the final period the Miracles went cold and _

managed only to trade baskets.

. The Cherubims were able to build a 16 point
lead in the fourth with team captains Chauncey
Cooper and Rakeem Smith on-the bench due to
the aggressive bench play of juniors Rolle. and
Brian Francis. ;

A pair of free throws by Francis, who finished
with 11 points, seven in the final quarter, gave
Teleos a 69-53 advantage with just over two min-
utes remaining, and thé Miracles failed to threat-
en again.

Cooper finished with 10 while Smith added 11.

David Strachan led the Miracles with 20, while
Tim Forbes and Frederick Delancey finished with
13 and eight points respectively.

Girls

_Teleos Cherubims - 29 "4

Mt Caramel Cavs - 6

Sashana Smith fouled out just two minutes into -

the second half. However, the Cherubims had
already built an insurmountable 21-1 lead and

‘clinched the championship without their star cen-

ter on the floor.

In the opening half, the Cherubims built a 15
point lead before the Cavaliers reached the score-
board on a free throw by Shantol Hall with 2:05
remaining in the half. :

Smith fouled out with 11 points, three rebounds,
and two blocks but after fouling out early in the
second, her supporting cast was forced to pick up
the scoring slack with her on the sideline.

Tannica Smith answered the call for the Cheru-
bims as she scored six of her team’s eight points in
the second half.

With a lack of ballhandlers on the floor for Mt

| Cherubims win three on day 2

Caramel, the Cherubims took full advantage with
a relentless fullcourt trap that forced turnovers and
preserved the win. :

Smith finished with 10 points while. Angie
Bethel added six. Hall led the Cavaliers with four
points. ’

Junior Boys

Teleos Cherubims - 52

Zion Eagles - 51

The Cherubims extended the series to force a
third and deciding game with a suffocating defen-
sive effort that limited Eagles standout Anthony
Oliver in the second half. ;

After scoring 14 points in the first half, the
Cherubims held Oliver. to just five points in the
second and survived a late rally to hold on for
the one point win.

« The Cherubims came out playing inspired bas-
ketball and led 17-9 after the first quarter.

Oliver scored 12 of his team’s 14 points in the
second as the Eagles came back to trim the deficit
29-24 at the half. ,

The Cherubims’ lead grew to as much as 10 in
the third on a pair of free throws by Henry Rolle,
41-31, with 2:39 remaining in the quarter.

Rolle left the game due to foul trouble on the
very next play and was forced to sit out until 3:14
left in the fourth quarter.

At that point the Cherubims held just a slim 47-
43 lead.

Both teams suffered free throw woes late in
the game, but an assist from Rolle to Darnero
Arnett with under 10 seconds sealed the win for
his team. Rolle finished with 16 points and 8 assists
while Brian Francis added 14. Oliver finished with
19 while Philip Hanna added 11.

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Sailing community mourns Munroe’s death

FROM page 11

in their time of bereavement.
For more than 30 years,
Munroe sailed on the Good
News and the original Coura-
geous as well as the Pieces of
Eight before. he stopped about

10 years ago to get into officiat-,

ing at, the regattas.

Dwayne. Higgins, one of the
organisers of the All-For-One
Regatta, said Munroe will be
sadly missed because of what
he brought to the table as an
administrator.

“He was a very dedicated
man, who devoted a lot of his
time to the organising of regat-
tas,” Higgins pointed out. “He
was also very fair and handled
his chores as a race commodore
with distinction.”

Over the past to weekends,
local boats competed in a series
of events staged in Montagu.

It got started with the C Class
competition over the weekend
of January. Jacob’s Ladder,

skippered by Dwayne Higgins,
won the three-race series over
Lady Ruthnell, skippered by
Marty Bullard, followed by the
Barbarian, skippered by Del-
worth Gibson.

On Monday and Tuesday in
Rawson Square, the Sweet
Island Gal, Irene Good Night
and the Barbarian participated
in an exhibition for the general

public.

Then this past weekend, the
competition closed out with the
A and B Classes, as well as the
high school segment in the C
Class along with the Optimist
Sailing, in Montagu Beach.

_ The activities were all part of
Regatta Week.

Higgins, one of the organis-
ers, said the entire week was a
success, but they are already
looking ahead to building on
next year’s event.

“A lot of the boats were not
available, but for the boats that
did show up, I think we had a
very good event,” Higgins said.

“I think we have a lot yo look
forward to next year.”

Higgins said if there was any-
thing that inspired them the
most it would have been the
fact that there were at least 50
young. people who showed up
on Friday to participate in the
High School Sailing Competi-
tion.

Schools represented were
Government High, C V Bethel,
C R Walker, C C Sweeting Sr,
D W Davis, L W Young, H O
Nash and T A Thompson (for-
merly CC Sweeting Jr).

Higgins thanked the owners
of the Stache, Lady Ruthnell,
Paparazzi, Queen Brigetta,
Jacob’s Ladder and Try Me for
allowing the sailors to use their
boats.

“We didn’t have sufficient
boats to use,” Higgins stated.
“So I think next year we will
try to get some more of the
boats out so that we can have all
of the schools competing against
each other.”
THE TRIBUNE



PAGE

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4"



2009



Bryant-lights
up Garden —
with record

61 points...
. See page 9



Sailing community mourns Munroe’s death

a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hile the Ministry

of Youth, Sports

and Culture’s All-

For-One Regatta

in Montagu Beach

turned out to be a success, it was a

bitter sweet weekend for the sailing

community as they mourned the

death of long-time administrator
Richard Munroe.

‘Munroe, the immediate. past com-

modore of the National Sailing Asso-

Sailors Associa-
tion, died 6:05pm
Sunday at Doc-
tors Hospital after
a long illness.

His funeral ser-
vicé is tentatively
set for Sunday,
February 15, at
New Destiny Bap-
tist Church.

According to
James Wallace,
one of. his
nephews, his uncle’s death.came as a
shock, although he had been in the

Richard Munroe



move him into a private room as

opposed to keeping him in the inten-
sive care,”: Wallace pointed out. “So it
was quite'a shock when he died.
“There was some progress. So the
doctors were even quite surprised.”
At age 75, Munroe leaves behind
his wife, Mary, three daughters Lisa
Hall, Shantel and Deborah, three
sons, Richard Jr and Stephen and a
host 'of relatives and friends.
Wallace, who worked with him in
the office of the NSA, said his uncle
was well respected in the sailing com-
munity for being fair and honest.
“He was quiet, fair and dedicated.

- The Rev Dr Philip McPhee, he

Heoneilints past commodore of the

BBOSA, said the sailing community
owes Munroe’s family a debt of grat-
itude.

“He was one that you could always |

count on to administer his duty with
fairness,” Rev McPhee charged. “He
always tried to make, sure that the
regattas went on without any prob-
lems.”

On behalf of the BBOSA, its mem-
bers and the entire sailing communi-
ty, Rev McPhee offered condolences
to the Munroe family and he assured



SHOWN (I-r) are Kerrie Cartwright, Coach
Sean Cartwright, Larikah Russell and Nikkita
Fountain as they brave the cold weather i in

them that their prayers are with them

SEE page 10

Canada...

He loved the sport,” Wallace

hospital for at least a month.
summed up.

“The doctors were preparing to

ciation and a former commodore of
the Bahamas Boat Owners and

Fed Cup draw:
Bahamas to play
Puerto Rico in
the first round

a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
- bstubbs@tribunemedia. net

THE Bahamas’ three-member team has
drawn Puerto Rico to play in the first round
of the BNP Paribas Americas Zone Group 1
Fed Cup today in Montreal, Canada. :

Seven teams were originally scheduled to
participate in the four-day tournament on
the indoor courts at the Uniprix Stadium,
but Venezuela didn’t show up.

_ So it’s down to three teams in two pools
with the Bahamas matched“against Puerto
Rico and host Canada in Group A. In Group
B are Colombia, Brazil and Paraguay. °

- Coach Sean Cartwright said the format
calls for each team to play each other in the

. round robin with the two losing teams in the
two groups being relegated to zone II next
year. =

The winners of each group | ea square off
for a chance to take part in the World Group
If qualifying round in April.-

“The draw was set ‘at the coaches’ meeting
yesterday and Cartwright said they: were
pleased that they didn’t get to play Canada in
the first round as they’re the only team in
their pool with players ranked in the Wom-
en’s Tennis Association.

Canada’s top seeded player Aleksandra
Wozniak is ranked-at number 33 in the
WTA; while No. 2 pispiante Dubois is at
125.

“We were hoping that we would have
drawn Puerto Rico in the first round because
they are just like us. They don’t have any
WTA ranked players,” Cartwright said.

“At least we can play Puerto Rico before
we play them. But it’s still going to be a

-tough match for us. So we have to be pre-
pared to really play.”

_ Cartwright has selected Nikkita Fountain
as the Bahamas’ top seeded player with
Grand Bahamian Larikah Russell at No.2,
Fountain will play Jessica Roland, Puerto
Rico’s top seed and Russell will play Monica
Puig. -

Fountain and Russell, who have played
together in the past, are also scheduled to
play in the doubles that will wrap up the first
day of competition. |

. But Cartwright said if any of the players
are not prepared to play, then his daughter
Kerrie Cartwright will be called upon to play
with the other player. :

“Canada has gotten a bye and will draw
today after the tie to play either the Bahamas

SEE page 10



RUNNING back Charles Edwards (with ball) in action...

Boil Fish Bowl competitors
dominate All-Pros list

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter on
“tdorsett@tribunemedianet

WITH the 2008-09 Commonwealth American
Football League season completed, end of year
awards were given out with the Boil Fish Bowl com-
petitors dominating the list of All-Pros.

The BFB Champion Orry Sands and the runners
up John Bull Jets each boasted nine members on the
All-Bahamian first team. (See list of team members
below)

The V8 Fusion Stingrays had five players named
to the squad while the Kingdom Warriors and
Defence Force each had one honouree.

With a running game that paved the way to anoth-
er league championship, the Pros all-stars were led
by running back Charles Edwards and offensive |
linemen Ravello Williamson and Shane Albury.

_ Edwards was also named League MVP and Offen-
sive MVP in the championship game.

The Jets passing attack featured all stars quarter-
back Drameco Clarke and receivers Garvin Newbold
and Eldon Ferguson.

Defensively the Jets’ cornerback duo, Phillip Rah-
ming and Jameko Moore also received "All- Bahami-
an honours.

Stingrays defensive end Anwar Godet was named
the league’s Defensive MVP, sharing the award with"
Rahming.

Ferguson and Pros’ receiver Alex Rolle shared
the league’s Offensive MVP award.

NIB enten hem een



TELEOS CHERUBIMS guard Scott Newbold drives to the basket over Zion Eagles’ Arsenio Woodside ‘date:
See more photos on page 10°

Cherubims win
_ three on day 2

Offense

‘Drameco Clarke - Quarterback; Jets
Sheldon Lynes - Fullback; Stingrays
Charles Edwards - Running Back; Pros
Eldon Ferguson - Tight End; Jets _
Garvin Newbold - Wide Reciver; Jets
Alex Rolle - Wider Reciver; Pros
Wilshere Dawkins - Center; Warriors
Shane Albury - Right Guard; Pros
Jamaal Baker - Left Guard; Jets
Ravello Williamson - Right Tackle; Pros
Tyrone Rolle - Left Tackle; Stingrays
Defense

Anwar Godet - Right Defensive End; Stingrays

Kendal Alcide - Left Defensive End; Jets
Julian Saunders - Defensive Tackle; Stingrays
Garaliese Collie - Pros :

-Demetrius - Right Linebacker; Jets
Ricardo Hamilton - Middle Linebacker; Pros
Walter Russell - Left Linebacker; Pros
Phillip Rahming - Right Cornerback; Jets
Jameko Moore - Left Cornerback; Jets
Slade - Free Safety; Destroyers

Keno Nixon - Strong Safety; Pros

Special Teams

Leslie St. Fleur - Stingrays; Kicker
Leslie St. Fleur - Stingrays; Punter
Ishmail Sutherland - Jets; Punt Returner
Ashley Roberts - Pros; Kick Returner
Offensive Rookie of the Year

Xavier Hanna - Warriors; Quarterback
Laish Boyd - Pros; Offensive Line
Defensive Rookie of the Year

Wayde Higgs - Stingrays; Cornerback
Alex Johnson - Warriors, Off/Def Tackle
Offensive MVP

Eldon Ferguson - Jets

Alex Rolle - Pros

Defensive MVP

Anwar Godet - Stingrays

Phillip Rahming - Jets



@ By RENAEO BORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

THREE wins by the Teleos Cheru-
bims on day two of the Bahamas
Scholastic Association’s playoff series
produced a pair of championships for
the institution while extending the
hopes of a third team to a deciding
game.

Senior Boys

Teleos Cherubims - 72

Galilee Miracles-63. — -

As if being:a junior playing in the
senior boys final was not enough pres-
sure, Henry Rolle shouldered the scor-
ing load for his team in the champi-
onship clinching game of the series.

Rolle scored a team high 15 points,
13 of which came in the second half to
help the Cherubims withstand a fre-
netic third quarter rally by the Miracles.

Teleos held a 31-18 lead at the half as
the Miracles began to unravel due to
early foul trouble.

In the first half the Cherubims were
able to control the pace of the game,
slowing it to'a more favourable con-
trolled pace. But the Miracles’ defense
changed the game in the third quarter.

Galilee opened the quarter on a 19-8
run to come within one basket midway
through, 39-37.

A pair of free throws by Rolle gave
the Cherubims some breathing room
and stopped the bleeding momentarily.

Teleos point guard Lamont Armaly
was vital in the Cherubims reasserting
control at the end of the quarter, single
handedly breaking the Miracles full
court trap and creating shot opportu-
nities for his teammates in transition.

Armlay finished with six points and a

‘game high nine assists, orchestrating

the Teleos offense.

His assist to Brian Francis gave the
Cherubims a 47-40 advantage and an
offensive rebound led to'a three point
play for Rolle to put his team ahead
50-40 at the end of the third quarter.

SEE page 10


PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS







POWER TEAM! Pictured from left to right is Philip Simon, Executive Director of. The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce; Kevin Basden, General Manager of The Bahamas Electricity Corporation; Chris Huskilson,
President and CEO of Emera, the Canadian based energy services giant company; Dionisio D’Aguilar,
President of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce; Khaalis Rolle, First Vice President of The Chamber
and Felix Stubbs, Chairman of the Grand Bahama Port Authority at a recent Chamber of Commerce and:
Emera joint luncheon at the British.Colonial Hilton..Huskilson addressed The Chamber’s members on
Emera’s plans for The Grand Bahama Power Company. Emera recently acquired 25 per cent of the

Grand Bahama Power Company.

Emera and the

Bahamas Chamber

of Commerce hold
joint luncheon

CHRIS Huskilson, presi-
dent and CEO of Emera, the
multi-billion dollar energy ser-
vices company which recently
purchased 25 per cent of the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, addressed members of
the Bahamas Chamber of

* Commerce at a joint luncheon
put on by both organisations
on Wednesday, January 21, at
the British Colonial Hilton.

During the luncheon, Mr













Huskilson elaborated on ener-
gy and new development
plans being undertaken by the
company, which provides
electricity to an estimated
600,000 customers in Canada
and St Lucia.

The luncheon was attend-
ed by movers and shakers
from the business community
in New Providence and
Grand Bahama, including

Bahamas Chamber of Com-

merce president Dionisio
D’ Aguilar; Chamber of Com-
merce executive director
Philip Simon; E O Ferrell III,
president and CEO of the
Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany Limited; Kevin Basden,
general manager of the
Bahamas Electricity Corpo-
ration, and Felix Stubbs,

chairman of the Grand.

Bahama Port Authority along
with many others.

MIAMI



E.O FERRELL Ill, President & CEO of the Grand Bahama Power Company; Chris Huskilson, President
and CEO of Emera along with Dionisio D’Aguilar, President of The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce are.
pictured at The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce and Emera joint luncheon on Wednesday, January 21,
at the British Colonial Hilton. .



EMERA ADDRESSES CHAMBER MEMBERS - Pictured at centre fourth from left is Chris Huskilson,
president and CEO of Emera, along with Dionisio D’Aguilar, president of the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce. Also pictured from left to right are Ray Robinson, vice-president of Integrated Operations at
Emera; E O Ferrell Ill, president and CEO of the Grand Bahama Power Company; Kevin Basden, general
manager of the Bahamas Electricity Corporation; Mr Huskilson, Mr D’Aguilar, Yvette Sands, Chamber of
Commerce director; Khaalis Rolle, first vice-president of the Chamber, and Philip Simon, executive
director of the Chamber. %



DURING the holiday season Master Tech-
nicians Ltd and Panasonic teamed up to present
lucky winner Anthony Woodside with a 58-
inch high definition TV, home theatre system
and a leather recliner.

“My wife and I have been customers for
years; all of the appliances in our home are
from Master Technicians,” Mr Woodside said.

“We come aba Wesel of the quality of prod-
uct, the customer service and, of course, the
price.”

Master Technicians is the official retailer of
Panasonic products in the Bahamas. The local
Panasonic product line includes of televisions,
home theatre systems, DVD players, Blu-Ray
players and microwaves.

Senator attends IWE:
meeting in Moscow

SENATOR Allyson Maynard-Gibson
was in Moscow, Russia, last week attend-
ing the International Women’s Forum
winter board meeting. She serves as the
vice-president of the IWF.

Mrs Maynard-Gibson and IWF board
members were hosted at City Hall by
Moscow's Mayor Yuri Luzhkov.

Pictured here together with Mrs May-
nard-Gibson are (l-r) Deputy Mayor of

Miami hurricane centre’s
briefings will go online





HURRICANE forecasters at the National
Hurricane Center in Miami will have their
briefings carried live this season on Web sites
when a storm threatens to make landfall in
the US., according to Associated Press

The center announced a partnership Tuesday
with America’s



s Emergency Network, a com-
pany foundéd by former center director Max
Mayfield and former CBS weather expert
Bryan Norcross, to distribute the briefings.
It’s unclear currently how many Web sites
will carry the feed, though it will at least
include The Miami Herald, Norcross said Tues-
day.
Hive season begins June 1.



Moscow Ludmila Shvetsova; Senator Luz
Lajous Vargas, former President of the
Senate Legislative Committee of Mexi-
co, and cosmonaut Valentina Tereshkova,
the first woman to fly in space, at the
home and gallery of Zurab Tsereteli,
famous Russian painter, sculptor, architect
and decorator.




THE TRIBUNE

&
s
S



WEDNES DAY,



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

n $85 million lawsuit
over a failed marina
project adjacent to the
British Colonial. Hilton
in downtown Nassau
has been settled, Tribune Business can

reveal, with the former lead developer

likely having recovered its deposit and
development costs.

A January 30, 2009, stipulation filed
in the New York State Supreme Court,
and bearing the signature of attorneys
representing all the parties involved,
confirmed that the action launched by
Island Global Yachting (IGY) against
the Hilton’s holding company, its two
major shareholders and two property
affiliates had come to an end.

* $85m claim over failed
downtown Nassau project
closed, with New York-
based company likely
recovering $200,000
deposit, development costs

‘ obtained by Tribune Business, said:

“Each and every cause of action assert-

ed by plaintiffs IGY Ocean Bay Prop-

erties Island Global Yachting against
defendants Ocean Bay Properties I

and Ocean Bay Properties I, British

Colonial Development Company, PRK
Holdings, Adurion Capital and George
Allen is hereby discontinued with prej-

FEBRUARY 4,



2009



ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



The document was signed on Janu-
ary 30, 2009, by Simon Miller, IGY’s
attorney from Greenberg Traurig; and
defence attorneys Bruce Meyer and
John Morin from the respective firms
of Weil, Gotshal & Manges, and
Wormser, Kiely, Galef & Jacobs.

Although the settlements terms are
understood to be subject to a confi-
dentiality agreement, it is likely that, at
the very least, IGY recovered its
$200,000 deposit from the former
defendants, plus the development costs
it incurred in developing the project.:

The latter costs would likely have
come from obtaining all the necessary
permits and approvals from the
Bahamian government; economic,
engineering and environmental assess-
ments required for the development;

The document, which has been

\

Economy suffering
‘a sort of implosion’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL -
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian economy is
starting to suffer “a sort of
implosion on all sides” due to
the dramatic increase in. bank-
ing sector loan defaults, a for-
mer government minister said
yesterday, with the deteriora-

- tion beginning to affect indus-
tries yet to experience the
downturn’s full impact.

James Smith, a former Cen-
tral Bank governor and ex-min-
ister of state for finance, told
Tribune Business that the surge

-in banking sector loans that

were either non-performing or:

in arrears “ought to be reason
for a lot of concern, because it

Dramatic rise in defaulted
bank loans impacting
other sectors through

reluctance to lend

goes to the core of the opera-
tion of the economy”.

While the commercial banks
suffered the first direct hit if a
loan lapsed into the non-per-
forming category, meaning it
was 90 days past due, Mr Smith
said Bahamians needed to
remember that banking, essen-
tially, was almost a confidence
trick, since institutions lent

as paee 4B

Vacation rental market
regulation being assessed

i By CHESTER ROBARDS
_Business Reporter

LEVYING taxes and fees on
the vacation home rental mar-
ket has long been a challenge
for the Government, Tribune
Business*has learned, but
tourism policymakers are deter-
mined to find a way to regulate
the industry.

_ Statistics from the Ministry
of Tourism show visitor interest
in home rentals versus hotels is
steadily increasing, and Bahami-
ans are being encouraged more

than ever to build second homes

strictly for this purpose.

The Ministry of Tourism’s
Vernice.

director-general,

Walkine, said the Government
was engaged in talks to deter-





‘mine how to integrate private

vacation home, owners into the
mainstream of the tourism
industry.

Some hoteliers feel the
homes should be taxed a per-
centage like the 6 per cent hotel
room nights are subjected to, in
order to make the market equi-
table. However, there is
presently no way to track the
revenue earned by private vaca-
tion home owners.

“Tt’s not as easily done as you

might think,” said Ms Walkine.

“Tf I am a second home own-
er and J use several weeks out
of the year to allow my friends

to use it, how do you regulate

my. ability to let my friends use
my house? |

“So, the question is, how do
we determine the revenue that
they are potentially earning
from these properties and our
ability to therefore tax them on

‘that revenue. If it was easy we
_ would have already done it.”

Though the Government is
assessing how to impose fees

‘and taxes on individuals who

rent their second homes to vis-
itors, Ms Walkine said it was
equally concerned that the tar-
iffs would serve as a disincen-

tive. She considers the market a:

progressive step for the tourism
economy. —

“We have encouraged peo-
ple to buy homes in the
Bahamas because by doing that,
they spend money in the local
economy through construction,
the hiring of construction work-
ers, and the outfitting of their
homes, so the Government
makes some money,” she said.

SEE page 3B

udice, and without costs to any party.”

mY

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

°

THE Central Bank of the
Bahamas was yesterday urged

to harness interest rate cuts in‘

combination with tools such as
lending caps, with private sector
executives arguing that this
would control new credit
growth but provide relief to
existing business and residen-
tial borrowers.

Dr Jonathan Rodgers, the
Bahamian ‘eye. doctor’ and
head of the Omni Financial Ser-
vices money transmission busi-
ness, and Chamber of Com-
merce president Dionisio
D’ Aguilar, both suggested that
using interest rates/monetary
policy as a stimulus tool “does-
n’t cost the Government a





SEE page 7B

* Private sector executives urge iGennal Bink to harness credit srowth
restriction tools in tandem with interest rate cuts to bring relief
* One says 1% base rate cut, if passed on, could save
- borrowers $60m per year/$5m per month ©
* Rate cust ‘don’t cost government a dime’, unlike fiscal stimulus:
* Chamber chief says priority should be. keeping businesses alive,
as sQverninent ‘ends up paying, for failure

dime” if harnessed in tandem
with tools to dampen new bor-
rowing.

“There are about $6 billion
in loans out there right now in
the Bahamas,” Dr. Rodgers said
yesterday. “If you drop the
interest rate by 1 per cent, that
releases around $60 million into

the economy or $5 million a

month.”

Dr Rodgers, whe spoke on -:

the issue at the Bahamas Busi-

_ness Outlook Conference, yes-,



terday said a1 per cent cut.in
borrowing: costs’ ;which is the

interest fate~ ‘woulld: reduce, for

example, a $1,000 mortgage

payment: to around $700: per ~

month, giving Bahamian con-
sumers more disposable income
and spending powek

Wiel OE

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PENSION PLAN

As a part of our commitment to our
valued members, The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce is partnering with Royal
Fidelity to provide Chamber members with
a superior Group and Individual. Pension
Plan with more benefits, flexible investment
options and online access.

Benefits:

“Both he and Mr D’ Aguilar.

- acknowledged Central Bank

governor Wendy Craigg’s con-
cerns that a cut in interest rates
could’ stimulate a. sudden
increase in. consumption and

_credit creation, with more mon-

ey spent on imports, thus lead-
ing to a.drain on the foreign

SEE page 4B

Investment management and administration by:

ROYAL #@ FIDELITY

WV Key ew arch aA Uo gl
















































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2

73/22 64/17 ‘pc





: Today WINDS - ; WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W NASSAU Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles = 75°F
_ FIC Thursday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 15°F
3 FREEPORT Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles i five e
39/3 33/0 pc Thursday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
: . ; ee t ABACO Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet. 5-10 Miles 75° F
Windy with a full day Mainly clear, breezy Breezy with clouds ~ Windy; cloudy, then ‘Partial sunshine. Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Thursday: _ NW at 12-25 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
of sunshine. “ and cold. and sun. clouds and sun. windy. ! . greater the need for eye and skin protection. 9p 7
_ . High: 69° - High: 72° High: 76° High: 77° 95/85 rae ae ‘
Low: 55° Low: a ? eli OW: lia _LOW: ae Low: 68 Le





73°-65° F
The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, aa sunshine intensity, a precipitation, pressure;and Today 2:14 a.m. 26
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures teflect the high and the low for the day.








8:48 a.m. 02

2:39 pm, 2.0 8:43p.m. -0.1

3:51 pm. 2.1 9:52 p.m. -0.2
Friday 4:34am. 2.8 11:00am. -0.1







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Temperature 4:57p.m. 2.2 10:58p.m. -0.4

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High:65°FA8°C _ : LE LE Last year's IOW +........0+ ,. 66° F/19° C : 83/28 69/20 t
Low:39°F/4°C g ; - Precipitation Sunrise......6:51a.m. Moonrise ... 12:44 p.m. 55/12 54/12 7
: a Ze 2 : a: As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.54" Sunset....-.. 5:57 p.m. Moonset .... . 2:02 a.m. 38/3 37/2 pc
: g : Year-to date . 1.17" i g 4
Hight 63°F/17°C A a Normal year to date . 1.95" Full Last Hew 34/1 5

43/6
Low: 45° F/7°C =




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AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 3 Fab: 9 Feb.16 Feb. 24

25-3 si c

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{3128 aus : j — precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Forecast eee temperatures are for selected cities.





73/22 49/9 pc



KEY WEST

High: 67° F/19° C
Low:

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37/2 3a pc

NSURANCE

~ High: 75° F/24°C
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33/0 15/-9 pc 26/-3 20/-6 s
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29/-1 15/-9 sf 23/-5 21/-6 pe Los Angeles
~ 18/-7 12/-11 sf 20/-6 20/6 sf Louisville
Charleston 8 46/7 21/-6 pc 48/8 21/-6 5s Memphis









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52/11 37/2




High: 75° F/24°C
Low:62°F/17°C.





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Chicago = 16/-B 8/-13 po 36/2 26-3 pe Mia 637° -49/9°"s—San 6a/t ake 1 ee rinidad ~ 88/3 t 89/31 75/23. pe A _

Cleveland 16/-8 13/-10 sf 29/-1 21/-6 . pe pas se Vancout - 48/8 3828 ¢ : Fleuthera Bye
a oe ee ee ee , | ‘son nH ae We aes nan Ts (0) 80-2860 To (40) 3862904
Detroit 17/8 9/-12 sf = 27/-2 20/-6. pe NewYork # s Tampa 55/12 34 ‘Winnipeg 14/-10 neAG pe 98/-2° 18/-7, pe ne | | | |
Honolulu 79/26 67/19 pc 80/26 68/20 c Oklahoma stl 50/10 30/-1 s Tucson 77105 45/7 s 78/25 47/8 s Weather (W) S-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers t-thunder-

Houston... 60/15 36/2 s GANT S010 s Orlando <= 5214-282 s S42: 33/0 -s Washington, DC. 35/1. 17/-8 po... 27/-2 25/-3. s i i

~storms, t-rain;sf-snow flurries; sn-snow, |-ice;*Prep-precipitation; Tr-trace~
THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 3B



Passports returned
for those travelling

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Passport Office is
returning old passports to
Bahamians who need to travel
during the six-week period
while they wait for their
machine readable replacements,
a senior Official told Tribune
Business yesterday, thus ensur-
ing business travel and com-
merce were not disrupted.

Roselyn Horton, the Passport
Office’s deputy permanent sec-
retary, said Bahamians - includ-
ing members of the business
community - would have their
old documents handed back to

them if they told the agency

they needed to travel while
waiting for the new machine
‘readable passports.
‘She added that policy had
been in place since last June.
Ms Horton was responding
to the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president, Dioni-
sio D’ Aguilar, who told Tribune

Business that businesses were:

complaining about the Passport
Office’s requirement that
Bahamians hand over their old
passports for six weeks while

they wait for the machine read- |

able replacements. This, he said,
was “completely unacceptable”
to the business community.

But Ms Horton replied:

“That’s not our policy. We do
return the passport for persons
to travel. All persons need to
say is: ‘?’m travelling’, and we
return the passport to them.
That policy has been in place
since last June.”



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



FUTURE Bahamian taxpayers will
end up paying for the persistent fiscal
deficits run up by the Government, a
leading fiscal ‘hawk’ told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday, bemoaning the fact that
“there doesn’t seem to be enough focus
on where there could be cost savings” in
the public sector.

Rick Lowe, an executive with the Nas-

sau Institute think-tank, while acknowl-

my and create some jobs through infra-
structure and capital spending, said there

Government’s recurrent spending on its
fixed costs - wages, rents and the like.

“There doesn’t seem to be enough
focus on where there could be some cost
savings measures by the Government,”
Mr Lowe told Tribune Business. “It
doesn’t appear they are focusing on it at
all.”



edging the need to stimulate the econo-

seemed to be no effort to control the

Deficit raises government savings fear

He was responding to the Central
Bank of the Bahamas report that
revealed the Government's fiscal deficit
increased by almost 57 per cent to $121.4
million during the first four months of.its
2008-2009 fiscal year, a trend likely to
increase in the short and medium term.

Recurrent spending, which goes to
cover Government’s fixed costs, such as

_ wages and property rents, rose by 10.45
per cent to $557.4 million during that
period, leading Mr Lowe to express con-

‘cern that increased government bor-
rowing to fund its deficit could ‘crowd
out’ the private sector.

“It usurps any credit that might be
available for the private sector,” he
added. “It’s difficult enough to get cred-
it for businesses, but if the Governmen-
t’s sucking it all up, there will be nothing
left for us at the end of the day. If the
private sector is not growing, you will
have not economic growth, and you need
the economy growing now more than
ever.’





@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

‘Business Reporter

A BAHAMIAN architect living and
working in Atlanta, Georgia, has been to
invited tojoin the Carter Centre’s Board of
Councillors, an honor once bestowed on
officials such as the Governor of Georgia,
the Mayor of Atlanta and the President of
Emory University.

Fred Perpall was invited to join'the Cen-
tre, founded by former US president Jimmy
Carter in 1982.It focuses on waging peace,
fighting disease, and building hope by “both
engaging with those at the highest levels of
government and working side by side with
poor and often forgotten people”.

“The Centre has observed 69 elections

{Bahamian architect to join Carter Centre

in 27 countries; helped farmers double or

- triple grain production in 15 African coun-

tries; worked to prevent and resolve civil
and international conflicts worldwide; inter-
vened to prevent unnecessary diseases in
Latin America and Africa; and strived to
diminish the stigma against mental illness,”
according to its annual report.

Mr Perpall said in an e-mail to friends
and family, that it was.a joy to have been

- invited to join such a distinguished group.

He told them it will be fun to help to con-
tinue to “chart the course of this wonderful
organisation”.

“Although often ridiculed for his Presi-
dency, there is no question of Jimmy
Carter's far reaching impact as a statesman,



Mr Lowe questioned why the Gov-
ernment could not be frugal at a time
when the private sector and ordinary
Bahamians were being required out of
necessity to identify all possible savings.

He also questioned why the Bahamas
needed a Mortgage Corporation or
Hotel Corporation, and said: “We know
that if the Government keeps on raising
the national debt (now at $3.207 billion)
as they have been doing over the last
20-25 years, it’s unsustainable.

“GDP is shrinking. There are contin-
gent liabilities not shown as part of the
national debt figure. When you add it up,
it’s quite concerning. How long can we
continue to sustain it? It just cannot con-
tinue.”

While total government revenues were
only down slightly by 0.41 per cent, at



$510.7 million for the four months from
July to November 2008, import duties
were off by 24.61 per cent when com-
pared to the same period in 2007, stand- '
ing at $162.3 million.

and a humanitarian. Many of his causes are
direct interests and passions of mine, and
this will be a wonderful experience for the
next three years,” the e-mail continued.
The board on which Mr Perpall now sits
comprises 185 councilors who represent top
leaders of the Atlanta and Georgia busi-
ness community. He is currently a principal
at The Beck Group’s Atlanta office.
Friends and family responded to Mr Per-
pall’s e-mails by. inundating him with con-
gratulations and praise for his appointment.

' One friend said: “Congratulations, my |.

brother! We are all proud of you and excit-

ed about the many ways we may be able to .

leverage your new opportunity. There may
even be direct benefits to. our country.”

Business Outlook conference all set for Grand Bahama

- ORGANISERS of the annual Grand

Vernice Walkine; vice-president of

rent recession.

Bahama Business outlook have adopt-

ed a theme of partnership for this year’s -

event, which will focus on creating a
mindset of private sector investment as
the way forward for the island. .

The 11th annual outlook, under the
theme “Grand Bahama Renewal: Thé
Power of Partnerships; The Power of
One,” is scheduled to take place at Our
Lucaya Resort in February and will fea-
ture nine speakers from a variety of
sectors.

Among those presenting will be
Ambassador to the US C.A. Smith’
Minister, of State for Finance, Zhivargo
Laing; ‘Director- General of Tourism,

et

strategic planning for Carnival Corpo-
ration, Giora Israel; Grand Bahama
Port Authority chief executive, Ian
Rolle; president of the Grand Bahama
Chamber of Commerce Gregory Moss;
chief operating officer of Freeport Con-
tainer Port, Freeport Harbour Compa-
ny and Grand Bahama Airport Com-
pany, Raymond Jones; VOPAK vice-
president Maxwell Sweeting, and
Regional Airlines’ chief financial officer
Peter Turnquest.

Organisers plan to present an _

“unvarnished, but hopeful” view of

Grand Bahama’s economy, as well as’

‘opportunities for weathering the cur-

Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

Ideal applicant will:

banking and investments.

various parts,



- Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic understanding of

A private wealth management company.
is currently seeking a qualified, energetic and confident
indi vidual for tt he position of

TRUST PROFESSIONAL

“Possess LLB or other law degree.

«Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in the areas of trust’
«Have the ability fo review sometimes complex legal documents relating to special projects
and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.

e Bea seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project and coordinating its

¢ Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures.

Investment and financial transactions.

corporate formalities.

counsel and advisors.

follows:

either by



¢ Have a full understanding of corporate structures and the responsibilties of Directors and

¢ Have the ability to work under pressure ad without constant supervision.

e Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.

Successful candidate will work directly with Senior Management in the administration of
complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular contact with.
overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as well as legal

Applicants should submit a cover letter and resume no later than Friday, February 13, 2009 as

The President

Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.

private facsimile (242) 702-2040
or by mail as follows:

| __ LYFORD MANOR, WEST BUILDING
~LYFORD CAY + P.O,BOX N7776 (Slot 193) ~ NASSAU, N.P,, THE BAHAMAS
’ Télephone (242) 702-2000 ~ Facsimile (242) 702-2002



“We’ve gathered a slate of presen-
ters who have undertaken to present
an honest look at the Grand Bahama
economy, both the negatives and the
positives, without sugar coating,” said
president of The Counsellors, Joan
Albury.

“Also, among them are persons who
represent entities with vested interests
in the growth of the Grand Bahamian
economy, and who show that there is
still considerable investor interest in
this well-endowed Bahamian island.

“As our theme demonstrates, we
believe that there is a way forward, but
it can’t be business as usual. It will take

a mindset and action plans that centre
not just on-what government can do,
but on private sector initiative driven by
individuals and partnerships.” __

Several Grand Bahama students will
be sponsored, so that they can attend
the event which will be broadcast, on
television.

The 18th annual Bahamas Business
Outlook, also sponsored by the Coun-
sellors, was held last month at.the Wyn-
dham resort on Cable beach and was a
packed house. Speakers at that outlook
included Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, Minister of Tourism and: Aviation
Vincent Vanderpool- -Wallace and CEO
of Baha Mat Sarkis Izmirlian.



Vacation rental |
market regulation
being assessed

FROM page 1B

According to Bahamas Hotel
Association president Frank Comi-
to, there was a need to create “stan
dard and regularity” within the
vacation rental market.

He said a prime example of thé
burgeoning demand for vacation
home rentals can be seen in Abaco,
where the number of visitors resid: .
ing in apartments or villas increased
by almost 4 per cent from 2006 to
2007, while the number of visitors
staying in hotels declined by almost
3 per cent during the same period:

“As hoteliers we contribute te’

~ the overall product improvement

and marketing of the destination?
and feel there needs to be a moré
equitable playing field in that
regard,” said Mr Comito.

“This year we plan to work with
the’ Ministry of Tourism to look
into ways in which that market can
be better incorporated.” 2

- He said efforts were underway
by the Bahamas Hotel Association
and the Ministry of Tourism.

Mr Comito. said the vacation
home rentals market was simply
another experience that visitors
were willing to try.

Vacation home rental owned
Angela Cleare told Tribune Busis
ness that she considers it a niché
market. Her home, located og
Cable Beach, has received rave
reviews by former guests on the
vacation rental-by-owner websité
vrbo.com. 7

“It behoves all of us, including.
those in the vacation home rental
arena, to figure out how we work
together to ensure greater access
to the destination, more effective
marketing and an improved prod:
uct,” said Mr Comito. .
Though hoteliers, mostly in the
Family Islands, are unsettled
because of the growth of the vaca-
tion home rental market, Ms
Walkine feels their cause for alarm. _
is unwarranted. —

“To the degree that we are able
to kéep those hotels full, they
wouldn’t have time to worry about
these second home owners, so real-
ly my focus is raising the level of
business for everybody, so that
everyone is happy,” she said.

“T think that hotels worry about
the second homes only to the
degree that they see them as
siphoning some of their business,
but I’m not sure that that’s the
same customer.”

PUBLIC NOTICE

From Department of
Civil Aviation



Effective Immediately:

All cheques for services or facilities of
| the Department of Civil Aviation must be

made payable to the Public Treasury.





a money order,
cheque or cash, No personal or company
cheques will be accepted.

All payments must be in the form of
bank draft,

| certified |

Payments are to be sent directly to the }
Accounts Section at Civil Aviation Head.
Office, Seaban House, Crawford Street. |


PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Cap can fit interest rate reduction

FROM page 1B

currency reserves that support

this nation’s one:one exchange

rate peg to the US dollar.
Emphasising that they were

not criticising her position, both |

argued in separate interviews
with Tribune Business that the
Central Bank could still cut its
discount rate - the rate at which
it lends to the commercial banks
- without undermining the
Bahamas’ core monetary policy
objectives.

“The bottom line is, if you
reduce interest rates by 1/2 per
cent, given the amount of loans
out there the money that saves
for the population at large is
substantial,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

“If you’re worried, as a Cen-
tral Bank governor, as you
should be” about causing an
unwanted credit and import
boom, the Chamber president
said: “You force your popula-
tion-to be more fiscally respon-
sible, and there are many tools,
mechanisms, levers the Central
Bank can employ to dampen
borrowing while helping peo-
ple to repay loans.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said down pay-
ment requirements could be

increased for “big ticket” items —

FROM page 1B

depositors money to borrowers.

Banks stopped earning inter-
est on loans if they were 180
days or more past due, and Mr
Smith said that if borrowers
were unable to meet their mort-
gage and other bank loan oblig-
ations, it was unlikely they could
pay their other bills, too.

This meant the fallout from °
jobs losses and income reduc--

tions spread much wider,
impacting landlords and utility
company receivables, to name
just two.

Given the substantial rise in
loan defaults, Mr Smith said
Bahamas-based commercial

such as cars, while banks could
be required to raise mortgage
down payment requirements to
20-30 per cent of the total pur-
chase price.

In addition, the Central Bank
could also reintroduce the lend-
ing cap it had imposed after the
September 11, 2001, attacks.
This device, while interfering
with the commercial banks’ nor-
mal conduct of business, pre-
vented them from increasing
their loan portfolios beyond the
size they had attained at the cap
date, restricting them to only
re-lending monies repaid by
existing borrowers.

“Tf a cap is put on the lending,
as well as bringing down interest
rates, the status, quo will be
maintained,” Dr Rodgers said.

Mr D’ Aguilar added:.“You
can dampen borrowing while
passing along relief.” With the
current economic crisis “far
more substantial” that the post-
September. 11 fallout, the
Chamber chief urged the Cen-
tral Bank to, if it cut interest
rates, institute a lending cap for
a specific time period such as

six months, after which it would

be reviewed.

Dr Rodgers suggested that .

interest rate cuts‘ were a far

~ banks‘would focus on rebuild-

ing and managing their existing

_ lending portfolios, becoming

very wary about further
advances to business and con-
sumer borrowers - even if they
represented solid credit risks.
In such a fashion, the banking
system - the very wheel that
lubricated the Bahamian econ-
omy through credit lending -
could start grinding to a halt,
impacting the wider economy.

“It could indicate the econo- —

my is imploding,” Mr Smith said
of the latest Central Bank lend-
ing data, “and the thing that
greases the economy is the
banking sector’s ability to lend
money.

“Tn turn, that ability to lend

Ces

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT, 2000

(No. 45 of 2000)

ye

ivEELINO CONSULTING LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (8) ,
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000) .
the Dissolution of AVELLINO CONSULTING LIMITED.
has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been

_issued and the Company ‘has therefore been struck off the
Registér. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 23rd
day of January, 2009.

B. Foster
_ For: Continental Liquidators, Inc.
Liquidator



IN THE MATTER OF THE LEGAL PROFESSION
ACT, 1992

AND

IN THE MATTER OF A COMPLAINT AGAINST
COUNSEL AND ATTORNEY :

BETWEEN
SCOTIABANK (BAHAMAS) LIMITED
: Complainant :
AND :

RALPH JAN WARD |
neponcen

NOTICE,

TAKE NOTICE that the Dissiplinary Tribunal will
render its Decision in the subject matter on Wednesday
the 25th day of February, A.D., 2009 at 3:00 o’clock in the
afternoon at 3rd floor British American House, George
Street, Nassau, The Bahamas.

AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the Respondent,
Ralph Jan Ward, is required to produce to the Bahamas
Bar Council within twenty-one (21) days from the date
hereof, an address to which the Decision may be sent by
prepaid Registered Post.

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D., 2009
Bahamas Bar Council

Elizabeth Avenue
Nassau, The Bahamas

‘cheaper stimulus for the

Bahamian government than the
current fiscal spending expan-
sion he had embarked on.

Taking the $135 million New
Providence Road Improvement
Project as an. example, he said
the Government not only had
to repay the principal and inter-
est to the Inter-American
Development Bank (IDB), but
the main contractor, Argenti-
na-based JCC, would repatri-
ate a large portion of that sum
back to its homeland.

That money would never be
spent in the Bahamas, Dr
Rodgers;added. While Bahami-
an construction companies and
workers were likely to benefit to

a certain degree, thus stimulat-_.

ing spending in the economy to
some extent, JCC was also like-
ly to bring in a large number of
expatriate workers.

Then, given that the road pro-
ject and Lynden Pindling Inter-
national Airport (LPIA) rede-

velopment were government- .

sponsored infrastructure pro-
jects, all construction materials

would be imported duty-free,

meaning the Government
would not benefit from
increased revenues.

Dr Rodgers suggested that

money depends on deposits
coming into the bank, and they
are going down because people
are not working. You get a sort
of implosion on all sides.

“The banks have to retrench
and improve their bottom lines,
tightening credit and improv-
ing the performance of their
portfolio.”

As Tribune Business revealed
yesterday, the recession’s
impact can clearly be seen on
Finance Corporation of the
Bahamas (FINCO) loan port-
folio for the year to October 31,
2008. The BISX-listed mortgage
lender saw a 76.5 per cent year-
over-year increase in non-accru-

sal loans - loans that were more

than 90 days overdue - to
$28.933 million, compared to
$16.39 million the year before.

The percentage of non-accru-
al loans in its total portfolio rose

. from 2.64 per cent at year-end

2007 to 4.09 per cent at year-

end 2008. Out of that $28 mil-.

lion, almost $22 million was

. more than 180 days past due,

compared to $14 million the
year before.

In its report on monthly eco- '

nomic. developments for
December 2008, the Central
Bank last night said that total

" private sector loans in atrears -
those overdue by more than 31 -

days - rose by $79.7 million :dur-
ing that month to make a 12-
month rise of $235.8 million or
44.5 per cent. Total loans in
arrears stood at $766 million at
2008 year-end.

“This was equivalent to an

‘estimated 12.4 per cent of total .
loans, compared to 9.27 per cent: '

and 7.47 per cent at end-2007

and 2006, respectively,” the -

Central Bank said. .
Non-performing loans grew

with the road improvement pro-
ject loan, $50 million to assist
the LPIA financing, and a fur-
ther $75 million spend on the
construction of court/govern-
ment office complexes coming
to around $250 million, if this
sum was borrowed at a 7 per
cent interest rate, the Govern-
ment would be paying $2.9 mil-

lion a year.
Cut
While he acknowledged that

an interest rate cut would lead ©

to increased consumption, loans
and imports, thus impacting for-
eign reserve levels, Dr Rodgers

‘said each dollar spent on

imports was likely to have
changed hands several times

before leaving the Bahamas.
This would increase the veloci-

ty of income in circulation, a
key tool for stimulating the
economy.

“Tt will not cost the Govern-
ment anything by cutting inter-
est rates,” Dr Rodgers told Tri-
bune Business. “It will transfer

' bank profits or wealth to the

people of the country, the same
people who have made the
banks.

“By lowering interest rates,

by $116 million or 46.1 per cent

in'2008.to ‘end the year at $368 -

million, while loans in arrears -
those between 31-90 days past
due - rose by $119.8 million or
43.1 per cent to $398 million.

Some 48 per.cent of total
loans in default are now non-
performing. Some 5.9 per cent
(almost 6 per cent) of all com-
mercial bank loans in the
Bahamas are now non-per-
forming, meaning the lenders
are not earning interest’ on
them.

' Mx Smith yesterday described
the 2008 increases in non-per-
forming and loans in arrears as
“huge”, adding that the aver-
age for non-performing loans,
as a percentage of the total
banking industry loan portfo-
lio, was usually around 4 per
cént.

‘“While those figures are

". dreadful, it’s not unexpected,” .
“We know ;

Mr Smith added.
what's happening in the US.
Youre seeing the start of a dra-
matic increase in the slow-
down.”

The former minister said he
was concerned that the bank-
ing sector’s asset quality issues

- might “affect the parts of the ~

economy not yet affected by the
slowdown”, ‘

He explained: “To maintain
inventory, a store has to bor-

row, and the banks might not.

be keen to expand credit
because of the problems they’re
having. It could have severe
repercussions : for other parts of
the economy.”

Some 15.5 per cent of all
commercial/business loans in
the Bahamas are now in arrears,

the rate having increased by -
71.4 per cent or $67.1 million in -
2008.

IN THE ESTATE OF RUTH
AGNES GRANGER late of
No. 15 Infant View. Road in the
Southern District of the Island
-of New Providence, Bahamas,

deceased.

NOTICE

N OTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand °
against the said estate are required to
send the same duly certified in. writing
to the undersigned on or before the 17th
day of February, A.D. 2009, after which
date the Executor will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only
to the claims of which he shall have:

had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are
required to make full settlement on or
before the date hereinabove mentioned.

‘

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas



people import more, so more
government revenue will be
coming in. The cost of govern-
ment borrowing will come down
if interest rates come down, so
the Government’s cash flow will
improve.”

Dr Rodgers suggested the
three Canadian-owned banks -
Royal Bank of Canada, Scotia-
bank and FirstCaribbean -
between them repatriated some
$250-$300 million in profits to
their parent each year.

If.a 1 per cent interest rate
cut reduced banking income by
$60 million or so, he said these
profits would be reduced by
around 20 per. cent.

“Tn exchange for doing that, it
would be a transfer of wealth
the people who are suffering
hell,” Dr Rodgers said, sug-
gesting that Bahamians would
not-invest interest savings in
new borrowings, but meeting
existing obligations such as

' mortgage, rent and school fees.

Criticising the Bahamian
banking system for having inter-
est rates spreads “among the

‘highest in the world”, and a lack

of competition, Dr Rodgers
described the Bahamian Prime

Rate - the rate at which the

banks lend to each other; and is

Economy suffering ‘a sort of implosion’

“Businesses can only pay in

accordance with what they sell,.

especially in an economy like
ours where for the most part
we are retail/distributors,” Mr

‘Smith explained. “If the mar-

ket is soft, and people are not
purchasing from you, business-
es have to build up inventory
facilities from their overdraft.
If they are not selling, you are
going to see a lot of defaults.”
The Central Bank report also
showed the strain Bahamian
households and consumers were
under, with a.134 per cent
increase in loans for debt con-
solidation - $92 million in the

first 11 months of 2008; com-
pared to $39.3 million the year

before.
Mr Smith said he felt this
increase “may also reflect a

strategic response by the bank- »

ing.sector”, where institutions

used as the base for setting all
consumer interest rates as “the
single greatest determinant of
the cost of money and the cost
of living in our country”.
While an-interest rate reduc-
tion might negatively impact
savers, Dr Rodgers said this

“impact was much less.in the

Bahamas due to this nation’s
“negative savings rate. The
reduction in the cost of doing
business will offset the loss

Savers would suffer from the

drop in interest rates”.
Mr D’ Aguilar said yesterday:
“At the end of the day it’s

‘ important for the Government
‘to try and keep businesses sol-

vent-and people employed,
rather than deal with them
when they’re laid-off.

“This is a difficult time,
requiring bold and aggressive
steps to prevent businesses fail-
ing. If businesses fail and go'out
of business, it creates a whole
host of social problems the
Government eventually ends up
paying for. Lowering interest
rates don’t cost the Govern-
mentadollar,adime. —

“I’m convinced you can pro-
tect your foreign reserves while
at the same time reducing: inter-

“est rates.”

were restructuring loans made

. to customers whose ability to

repay had been impacted by job
and income losses.

On a brighter note, Mr Smith
said the US tourism market had
shown signs of responding to
the discounted hotel rates and
tourism packages the Bahamas
was offering. This nation need-
ed to continue its strategic mar-
keting and hope the Obama
administration’s stimulus pack-
age worked.

A renewed focus on the
Canadian market would.also
help to partly compensate for
the loss of ‘some US tourists,
but Mr Smith said: “We just
have to recognise that we’re in
an extraordinary period that we
have not seen before, and have
to keep working on the. solu-
tions, not throwing our hands
in the air and giving up.”

NOTICE is hereby given that MYRTHIL ST. JEAN § of

DAVIS STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-7117, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is ‘applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28 day of
January, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that JADE GREENSWORD of |
HIGH VISTA DRIVE, P.O..BOX EE-16486, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for

Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4'" day of
February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE-ELITTE JEAN
BENEBY of PALM BEACH STREET, P.O. BOX CB-
12401, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 28" day of January, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-
7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BU SINESS COMPANIES ACT 2000
ACAL CAPITAL ASSOCIATES LIMITED.

(in Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ACAL Capital Associates Limited is in voluntary dissolution under
the provisions of Section 137 (4) of the International Business
Companies Act, 2000.

The dissolution of the said company commenced on January
27", 2009 when the Articles of Dissolution were submitted to
and registered by the Registrar General.

The Liquidator of the said company is Shareece E. Scott, Deltec

Bank & Trust Limited, Deltec House, Lyford Cay, P.O. Box N-3229,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Shareece E. Scott
Liquidator


hee ee



Most carmakers’ sales plunge while Hyundai, Subaru gain

@ By KIMBERLY S
JOHNSON
and BREE FOWLER
AP Auto Writers

DETROIT (AP) — General
Motors’ US vehicle sales
plunged 49 per cent in January
while Ford's sales dropped 40
per cent, starting 2009 at an
abysmal pace for the whole auto
industry as lower sales to fleet
buyers like rental car compa-
nies weighed down the results.

Toyota's sales dove 32 per
cent for the month, Nissan's
dropped 30 per cent and Hon-
da's fell 28 per cent, putting the

overall industry on track for its ©

fourth straight month in which
US sales plunged 30 per cent or
more.

But Subaru bucked the trend
of declines for a second month
in a row, posting an eight per
cent sales increase, and
Hyundai said its sales jumped
14 per cent.

Hyundai credited its increase
to its offer to cover a new vehi-
cle's depreciation if customers
return a car within 12 months
because they are unable to
make the payments.

"This program gets to the
root cause of today's economic
concerns — fear of job loss,"
Hyundai regional general man-
ager Peter DiPersia said in a
statement.

Chrysler is set to release its -

sales figures later Tuesday. The
company's sales chief, Steven
Landry, told reporters earlier
ata meeting with dealers that
US industry sales could drop as
much as 35 per cent in January.
The annualized sales rate for
the month could drop below 10
million for the first time in more
than 26 years, he said.
According to Ward's AutoIn-
foBank, the last month in which
the seasonally adjusted annual
sales rate dropped below 10 mil-
lion was August 1982, when it
hit 9.9 million as the nation was
mired in a recession.
Domestic and foreign
automakers have been strug-
gling as unemployment risés,
consumer confidence weakens

and many people have a
tougher time getting loans.
General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler LLC have received
$13.4 billion in federal loans to
stay afloat, and they hope to get
more after they submit a viabil-
ity plan to the government by
February 17. Ford Motor Co.
has said it does not plan to use
government aid.

GM said earlier this month it
is planning its turnaround under
the assumption the entire indus-
try will sell 10.5 million new
vehicles in the US this year.
Chrysler has said it's planning
on 11.1 million units, and Ford
last week reduced its forecast
to a range between 11.5 million
and 12.5 million. But few people
were expecting the automakers
to start 2009 at such a pace.

January is typically a slow
sales month, ‘and many
automakers and analysts are
expecting the market to
rebound in the second half of
the year as the economy and

_ access to credit improves.

Detroit-based GM sold
128,198 light vehicles in Janu-
ary, while Ford's sales totaled
93,060. Toyota Motor Corp.
sold 117,287 cars and trucks.

The automakers have rolled
out hefty incentive offers in
recent months in an effort to
boost sales. Edmunds.com esti-
mated the average automaker
incentive at $2,714 per vehicle
sold in January, down 5.2 per
cent from December but up
12.5 per cent from January
2008.

Jesse Toprak, the auto Web
site's executive director of
industry analysis, attributed the
year-over-year increase to a
greater number of lingering
2008 model year vehicles. He
noted that 27 per.cent of all new
vehicles sold this January were
from the 2008 model year, up

- from 12 per.cent a year ago.

Analysts had expected high-
volume fleet sales to be down
sharply in January, as con-
sumers and businesses cut back
on travel in the economic down-
turn and rental car companies
hold onto their current cars

Legal Notice

NOTICE
MARATHONINVESTMENT
‘HOLDINGS LIMITED: ~

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 29th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

IN THE ESTATE OF
CHARLOTTE ELOITE |
THOMPSON late of #7, Sea
Horse Drive, Sea Breeze Estates
in the Eastern District of the
Island of New Providence,
Bahamas, deceased.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that all
persons having any claim or demand
against the said estate are required to
send the same duly certified in writing
to the undersigned on or before the 17th
day of February, A.D. 2009, after which
date the Administrator will proceed to
distribute the estate having regard only
to the claims of which he shall have.

had notice.

AND notice is hereby given that all
persons indebted to the estate are
required to make full settlement on or
' before the date hereinabove mentioned.

CEDRIC L. PARKER & CO.
Attorneys for the Executor
9 Rusty Bethel Drive
Nassau, The Bahamas





AGM sign sits in front of a long line of unsold 2009 Escalades at a Cadillac dealership in the southeast Denver -

Toyota's sales of light trucks
fell 35 per cent on about equal
declines in SUV and pickup
truck demand, while its car sales
dropped 29 per cent. Sales of
its Prius hybrid slid 29 per cent.

Honda Motor Co.'s car sales
fell 27 per cent and its truck.
sales dropped 29 per cent, but
the Japanese automaker saw a
Six per cent increase in sales of
its Fit subcompact, and sales of
the updated Acura TSX sports
sedan rose 16 per cent.

Ford shares rose nine cents,
or 4.8 per cent, to $1.97 in after-
noon trading, while GM shares
fell 7 cents, or 2.4 per cent, to
$2.82. Toyota's U.S. shares rose
$1.64, or 2.5 per cent, to $65.52,
and Honda's shares climbed 77
cents, or 3.4 per cent, to $23.49.

The Associated Press reports

suburb of Lone Tree, Colorado...

longer.

Production cuts that have
idled many US factories for sev-
eral weeks have compounded

the problem. Many fleet cus-

tomers get their deliveries right

. after cars roll off the assembly

line, so when factories suspend
production, those deliveries
come to a halt.

GM said its fleet sales fell 80
per cent to just over 13,000 vehi-
cles in January, marking their
lowest sales level since 1975.
GM's retail sales fell 38 per
cent. :

Dearborn-based Ford said

,

Lincoln and Mercury vehicles
included a 27 per cent drop in
retail sales and a 65 per cent
decline in fleet sales.

Ford's top analyst George
Pipas said he expects industry-
wide fleet sales to be down 65
per cent for the month. Those
declines combined with facto-
ry shutdowns in late December
and most of January may lead
to an annualized US sales rate
below 10 million, he said.

But Ford's retail sales, albeit
lower than January 2008 levels,
held steady over the last three
months.

"What we're fading for is

(AP Photo: David Zalubowski)

stabilization. You have to stop
falling before you can start ris-
ing," said Emily Kolinski Mor-
ris, Ford's top:economist. "Con-
sumers are responding to favor-
able prices and discounts."

USS. sales at Ford's Sweden- ~

based Volvo division fell 64 per
cent to 2,910 vehicles in Janu-
ary. The company is exploring a
possible sale of the unit.

unadjusted auto sales figures,
calculating the percentage
change in the total number of
vehicles sold in one month com-
pared with the same month a
year earlier. Some automakers
report percentages adjusted for
sales days. There were 26 sales
days last month, one more than
in J anuaty 2008.:

° AP Auto Writer Bree
Fowler reported from New York

January's drop in sales of Ford,

NOTICE

NOTICE. is hereby given that GERMAINE TELUS-
VILCIN of ST. CHARLES VINCENT STREET, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 4 day of
February, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



Legal Notice

Osu CeD

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

‘PARK GLADE HOLDINGS LIMITED.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, PARK GLADE HOLDINGS LIMITED. has
been Dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 29th day of December, 2008.

Clifford McClelland
12-14 David Place
St. Helier, Jersey, JE2 4TD
‘Liquidator



Fane

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that MARCELLE ST. JEAN of

DAVIS STREET, FOX HILL, P.O. BOX N-7117, NASSAU, »

BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who

‘Knows any reason why registration/naturalization should

not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 28 day of
January, 2009 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE of REGINALD WINFIELD KNOWLES
late and domiciled of the Eastern District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of The Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Noticeis hereby given thatall persons having any claim or
demand against the above Estate are requested to send their
names, addresses and particulars of the same certified in
writing to the undersigned on or before the 11th day of March.
A.D. 2009 and if required, “to prove such “debts or claims or
in default be excluded from any distribution; after the above
date the assets will be distributed having regard only to the

‘proved debts or claims of which the Executor shall have had notice.

And. Notice is hereby given that all persons
indebted to. the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the 11th day of March A.D. 2009

Dated the 4th day of February, A.D. 2009 ”

ROBERTS, ISAACS & WARD
Attorney for the Executor
Chambers
Bay Street & Victoria Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas



A global leader in audit, tax and advisory services .

Assistant Manager, Corporate Finance and Transaction Services

KPMG is looking for a highly motivated and dynamic Assistant Manager who will report to the Directors of KPMG

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transaction services advisory clients.

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e Acting as project manager for the duration of engagements, acting as key contact for the client, attending -

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e Overseeing the developmént and evaluation of financial models, valuation reports, detailed financial due
diligence reports, term sheets, information memoranda and reports prepared for external consumption

Managing and coaching people
Speaking in public forums

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Undertaking credit and debt capacity analysis of companies and presentation of results

Assisting in new business development including the preparation and presentation of documentation
Negotiating alongside clients on transactions

Ensuring adherence to all compliance and regulatory rules

Reporting to clients and partners on transaction progress

Applicants will also have experience in various sectors including infrastructure (such as airports, ports, roads,
healthcare, energy, renewable energy, telecoms, water), hospitality and real estate and financial services.
Applicants must be a finance/economics university graduate and a member of a recognized accountancy body (or
hold a qualification such as the Chartered Financial Analyst designation) in addition to having a minimum of five
years-work experience. This position requires attention to detail, strong financial and writing skills, strong people
skills, the ability to work at one’s own initiative, the willingness to travel at relatively short notice, and the ability to
meet tight deadlines. Applicants must be fully competent in the Microsoft office suite of products, and electronic

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KPMG offers a competitive compensation and benefits package inclusive of medical and pension plans.



Applicants should submit a cover letter, resume, a copy of their degree and professional certifications and a copy of their
transcripts to: KPMG, Human Resources Manager, P.O. Box N123, Nassau, Bahamas or f[alighthourne@kpma.com.bs no later

than Friday, February 13, 2009.

AUDIT «© TAX # ADVISORY

© 2009, KPMG, a Bahamas partnership, and a member firm of the KPMG network of independent member firms affiliated with KPMG International, a

Swiss cooperative. All rights reserved.



!
‘
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

GN-818



SUPREME
COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2008/PRO/NPR/00807

IN THE ESTATE OF JOZEF SPIRA (a.k.a. JOSEF
SPIRA), late and domiciled of 59A, Oakwood Court,
W14 England in the United Kingdom), deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by SAMANTHA M. WILLIAMS, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Probate in the above
estate granted to MICHAEL SPIRA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the High Court of Justice,
The Principal Registry of the Family Division on the
18th day of July, 1995.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00025

Whereas THOMAS A.A, CLEARE, JR., of Joe
Farrington Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of THOMAS ALLISON AUGUSTUS
CLEARE, late of Joe Farrington Road, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the ese of 14 days from
the: date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00026
Whereas ALEXANDER EDWARD WOODSIDE, of

Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates, Eastern District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of CAROLINE
WOODSIDE, late of Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates,
Eastern District, New Providence, .one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for Registrar -

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/00027

Whereas MARVIN JAMES MACKEY, of Rolle
Avenue, New Providence and BARON HUDEN
MACKEY of Florida both of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JAMES
HUDEN MACKEY a.k.a. JAMES MACKEY a.k.a.
JAMES HUDON MACKEY, late of Fox Hill Road,
South Eastern, District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/00028

Whereas CHANELL ROKER, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

has made application to the Supreme Court cf The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of GLENROY HOWARD, late of Sir
Lynden Pindling Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00030

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY RITA, late of 3300 ,

N. Milwaukee Avenue, Northbrook in the State of Illinois,
one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MONIQUE V. A. GOMEZ of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The

Bahamas for obtaining the resealed Order Admitting _

Will to Probate and Appointing Representative in the
above estate granted to FRANK J. CALLERO and
ROBERT M. CALLERO the Independent Co-Executors
of the Estate, by the Circuit Court of Cook County,
Illinois, County Department, Probate Division, on the
5th day of January, 2005.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

- STH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00031

Whereas OLAMAE T AYLOR of No.7 Perpall Tract
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of JAMES ROBERT TAYLOR late of
No.7 Perpall Tract in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION:

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009
2009/PRO/NPR/00036

IN THE ESTATE OF CHARLES G. MORETTO, late
and domiciled of Broward County in the State of Florida,
one ofthe States ofthe United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days ITom the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by CONSTANCE E. MCDONALD,

of Fortune Village, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Administration in
the above estate granted to CHRISTINE MACHUGH,

| the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the Circuit

Court For Broward County, in the state of Florida, Probate
Division on the 16th day of January, 2004.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00037

IN THE ESTATE OF WARD STOUTENBURG
EVANS, late and domiciled of Flat No. 11, Jocyn Court,

‘Rochester Road, Bantry Bay, South Africa, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS
and MIKE ANTHONY KLONARIS, both of the

THE TRIBUNE



«

Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of the Certificate of Appointment of Estate
Trustee with a Will in the above estate granted to MARY
JANE MCKINNON, the Personal Representative of
the Estate, in the Superior Court of Justice on the 8th
day of July, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

~ PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00038 —

IN THE ESTATE OF SADIE LEE TAYLOR, late and
domiciled of 2554 N. 28th Street in the City of Milwaukee
in the county of Milwaukee in the State of Wisconsin,
one of the States of the United States of America,

’ deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of -
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing Grant of Domiciliary Letters in the above
estate granted to RUTH MCDOWELL, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the State of Wisconsin,
Circuit Court, Milwaukee County on the 18th day of
Noveinber, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR —

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00039

IN THE ESTATE OF AUDREY VERA HODGSON,
late and domiciled of 38 East Avenue, Riverview Park,
Althorne, Chelmsford Essex in the United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MELISSA L. SELVER-ROLLE,

of the Western District, New Providence, one of ‘the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney- ,
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for |
obtaining the Reséaling of The Grant of Probate in the ©
above estate granted to FAY GEORGINA MORRIS,
the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the High
Court of Justice, The District Probate Registry at Ipswich
on the 28th day of April, 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON |
(for) REGISTRAR -

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR00040

Whereas MICHAEL GEORGE HIGGS II, of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of MICHAEL GEORGE
HIGGS I, late of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given tliat such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the Sxpianan ¢ of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00041

Whereas ADAM D.R. CARRERATA, of Poinciana
Drive, in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for CAROLE
ARTERBERY, the Daughter,has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANE
C. EDMUNDS, late of 241 State Road in the City of
Eliot in the County of York in the State of Maine, U.S.A,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar
THE TRIBUNE
GN-818



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00042

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway off
the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by

Deed of Power of Attorney for Yvon Senecal, the Executor of
the deceased has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of CLAUDE SENECAL a.k.a.
CLAUDE JOSEPH HENRI SENECAL late of the City of
Montreal in the Province of Quebec in the Dominion of Canada,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT ~

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00044
Whereas DOUGLAS BURROWS, of Golden Gates #2, Western

District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the

Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration ©

of the Real and Personal Estate of VELERIA MINLEY
BURROWS, late of Jackfish Drive, Golden Gates #2, Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby. given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00045

Whereas BERTHA MAE COOPER-ROUSSEAU, of Trinity
Place off Frederick Street in the City of Nassau, on thé Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
the Legal Heirs of the deceased has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of DR. STEFAN JOHANNES
SANDKUHLER, late of the City ofNeulingen in the Republic
of Germany, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 7B





INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

Gold prices suffer as
risk appetite returns

lm By SARA LEPRO
AP Business Writer

NEW YORK (AP) — Gold
prices fell for a second straight
day Tuesday as investors
plowed back into the equities
markets on better-than-expect-

ed earnings reports and encour-
aging news on the housing sec-
tor.

Oil prices rose, while grain
prices declined.

Demand for gold has been
rising in recent weeks as volatil-

ity on Wall Street has investors -

seeking safety in the metal. But
on Tuesday, some risk appetite
returned to the markets after
the National Association of
Realtors reported an increase
in pending home sales in
December as buyers in the
South and the Midwest snapped
up properties at steep discounts.

Additionally, earnings reports
from big-name companies like
homebuilder D.R. Horton Inc.
and drugmakers Merck & Co.
and Schering Plough came in

ahead of analysts' estimates.

The day's news sent all the
major indexes up more than
one per cent, including the Dow
Jones industrials, which rose 141
points to the 8,078 level.

Gold for April delivery fell
$14.70 to settle at $892.50 an
ounce on the New York: Mer-
cantile Exchange.

Fell

Gold prices fell Tuesday
despite a slide in the US dollar.
Investors often use gold as a
hedge against inflation and a
weak greenback.

Other precious metals prices —
were mixed. March silver fell:

11.5 cents to $12.30 an ounce,
while March copper futures
rose 9.1 cents to $1.5220 a

pound. The yield on the bench- ~

mark 10-year Treasury note,
which moves opposite its price,

, rose to 2.83 per cent from 2.72 -

per cent late Monday.
Oil prices rose slightly on the
Nymex as investors found some

encouragement in production
cuts by OPEC. The Organiza-
tion of the Petroleum Exporting
Countries promised last year to
cut crude production by 4.2 mil-
lion barrels a day in an effort
to offset plunging prices. In the
past, OPEC has cheated on
announced production cuts to
keep oil money flowing, but so
far that doesn't seem to be hap-
pening to the degree that was
expected, analysts say.

Light, sweet crude for March
delivery rose 70 cents to settle at
$40.78 a barrel.

In other Nymex trading, gaso-
line futures dropped about a
penny to $1.1376 a gallon, while
heating oil fell nearly two cents
to-$1.3235 a gallon. Grain prices
fell on the Chicago Board of
Trade.

March wheat futures shed
11.25 cents to $5.5250 a bushel,
while corn for March delivery
fell 8.75 cents to $3.6175 a
bushel. March soybeans
declined 13.5 cents to $9.46-a
bushel.

Hilton marina lawsuit settled

FROM page 1B.

and architectural and other
planning work.
The move to settle the dis-

pute coincided with a January .

21, 2009, interlocutory ruling on
the dispute by Judge Charles
Edward Ramos, who found that
the British Colonial Develop-

_ ment Company, its two prop-

erty affiliates and Mr Allen had
a potential case to answer in
relation to several grounds
alleged by IGY.

It is unclear if the settlement
was prompted by that ruling.
However, Judge Ramos threw

out the charges levied by IGY_

against the resort’s two major
shareholders, PRK Holdings

(the investment vehicle for the
Canadian Commercial Work- j
ers Industry Pension Plan:;,
.(@CWIRP), and Adurion Capi- +»

tal.

The latter is the Swiss and
London-based private equity
boutique/investment house that
acquired a majority interest in
the British Colonial Develop-

ment Company from PRK:

Holdings in late 2006/early 2007.
Judge Ramos removed both
shareholders from the lawsuit,
dismissing the complaint against
them, and also dismissing some
of the complaints against the
hotel’s holding company and
Mr Allen.

Judge Ramos’s judgment was

a relatively strange one, in that
he repeated the allegations
made by IGY in its lawsuit in
such a way as to potentially con-
fuse readers into thinking they
were findings or statements of
fact.

However, the judge made no
findings/rulings on any of IGY’s
allegations, including claims that
Mr Allen had misled it into
approving Adurion’s purchase
of a majority stake in the British
Colonial Development Compa-

ny.
Alleged

IGY had alleged its invest-

ment vehicle, IGY Ocean Bay’

Properties, had signed an agree-
ment to acquire five acres of
undeveloped waterfront land in

..Nassau.on November. 7,/2005,

from the Britigh*Colonial

‘Development Conapany ahd its

affiliates. wi; 1 Wi

The agreement, which was to
ultimately develop a joint ven-
ture marina, was allegedly struc-
tured so that IGY would
acquire the land by paying $8

million in cash and providing a.

$10 million equity interest to
the Hilton companies in the
joint venture.

Still, the lawsuit’s settlement
now allows both parties to move
on, and clears the way for the
British Colonial Development
Company and its shareholders
to focus on the property’s ongo-
ing $15 million upgrade and

future development.

A $40 million loan from Sco-
tiabank has already been re-
finance with FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas),
and the hotel’s owners can also
turn their attention to develop-
ing the property formerly part
of the IGY deal. Besides a mari-
na, the construction of a new
office complex has also been
mulled for the site.

An economic impact study
disclosed previously by Tribune
Business had predicted that the
IGY project would generate
“very substantial employment”,
creating 700 direct full-time jobs
and another 400 indirect per-
manent jobs for Bahamians.
The indirect jobs were to be cre-
ated at suppliers of goods and -
services to the development,
and through services provided
to yachts. ii

‘The study:.also fauceask that
the IGY. development would
create 200-250 full-time jobs
during construction, and have
a total economic impact of
$222.8 million over a 20-year
period.

IGY’s proposed marina on
West Bay Street would have
had 72 slips, catering chiefly to
the larger yachts and vessels,
those of between 100-150 feet to
200 feet and longer.

The development was to fea-
ture a boutique hotel of about
150-200 rooms, several restau-
rants, retail and a parking struc-
ture for over 300 cars.

VICE PRINCIPAL NEEDED |

The Anglican Central Education Authority invites applications from qualified
Bahamians for position of VICE PRINCIPAL of St. Anne’s School Preparatory
Department beginning September 2009.

The Applicant must have a degree in Education from a_ recognized
University, with atleast 5 years accumulative CRDEMERCE. The applicant must also be

computer literate.

Key job functions and responsibilities include:

- Assisting with staff supervision and evaluation
- Admissions and student orientation

- Scheduling (Timetables; examinations, invigilations)
- Assisting with discipline

- Assisting with supervision of academic programmes
- Assisting with Curriculum Development
Administration of School and External examinations

Oversee Inventory
Oversee Requisitions

Share responsibility for sustaining culture of excellence throughout the school
Share responsibility for providing a climate that fully develop the concept of

teamwork.

Application forms are available from the Anglican Diocese office on Sands Road
off East Street. The completed application together with a cover letter, statement
of educational philosophy and recent photograph must be sent to:

THE DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
ANGLICAN CENTRAL EDUCATION AUTHORITY

P.O. BOX N-656
NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The Deadline for Applications is Friday, February 20th, 2009


PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



JUDGE PARKER

I’M AFRAID TO ote
ASK WHAT SOPHIE'S
STRATEGY IS! 5







TIM WAS COMMITTED TO



1 WAS IN SOME SORT
OF TRANCE
ALL DAY

SCREEN





NANIGHH!









Across
1 Indisposition of one in 1.
_ mental breakdown (7)

5 Dignified way to 2
_ help (5)
8 What | should have. 3

_ done, if | were in your’ °
position (7,6)
9 Tears shed for Flora (5)
A downtrodden machine
worker (7) 5

11. In which all men are
brothers? (6) ©
12 Girl out to procure
bird (6) a lg
15 Fire raisers (7)
17 Salesman the Spanish 1
rebuff (5)
19 It gives current time (8,5) ae
20 They have branches for 14
- shoes (5) ]
21 They may’be responsible 16
‘for reports from the i
: 18

front (7)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Index, 8 Sore need, 9
Storm, 10 Sergeant, 11 Obeys, 12
Oat, 16 Onager, 17 Oil rig, 18 Eon, 23
Spree, 24 Aspirate, 25 Habit, 26
Forgoing, 27 China.

Down: 2 Nota bene, 3 Early age, 4
Rowena, 5 Hedge, 6 Delay, 7 Edits,
12 Ore, 13 Ton, 14 Slapdash, 15
Siberian, 19 Ostend, 20 Waifs, 21
Spars, 22 Orlop.





IT'S SIMPLE---
SHE'S GOING

IN THE EARLY YEARS,

HELPING TIBETANS ESCAPE THE BROTHERS WERE

ATEAM,BUT ERIC
TIRED OF
THE GAME.



1 SAT AND STARED AT A COMPUTER

OU CHENEDU?P
AY PINOSAORS!




. ) Ww sande AM ;

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down -

CALVIN & HOBBES

I'M WRITING A BOOK
ABOUT MY LIFE.




ITS CALLED, " CALIN:

TWE SHOCKING TRUE STORY

OF THE BON WHOSE EXPLOITS
PANICKED A NATION."

/















ANP WHY
WOULD I
DO THAT?

YOU'RE SERIOUS!
YOU DIDN'T TRY TO
‘TALK HER OUT OF IT?

yw
ERIC BLAMED HIMSELF.
BUT WE ALL KNEW

JUST
ACCEPTED IT,













SPECIFICALLY

WHAT EXPLOITS.
ARE Nou

REFERRING To?





Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
- several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



THE RISKS. NORA?

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PX OAW

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RX

PERRO RET

BP RSRKR AIK
+

RK lane
ROK) Wn AAL a
SSRN = 7 I I
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1 WAS IN
THE WRONG

FOR HOURS... THEN IT
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aL lek |

‘A MAN'S HOME IS HIS CASTLE, AND J’ THINKIN’

SERIOUSLY ABOUT ADDING A MOAT.” Difficulty Level






I SUFFER
FROM “PLASTIC
DEFICIENCY
DISORDER ”-













et Lele





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Best described as.a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more 'than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.













www.kingfeatures.com



_. ©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.






























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate,-Inc. _







Difficulty Level * *




VV
THERE!
Now ITS
JUST

uses

Chambers
21st
Century
Dictionary










©2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved,

edition).

Get a new car on
account, but some capital
required (5) bi
Induce to become
religious? (4,2,7)

For example, rising in

the morning with
enthusiasm (7)

Hitherto the aim of boys
wanting to go out with girls
(2,4)

Find answer to love’s

South dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

torment (5) NORTH
i a16

Flat out after a mishap? ¥AIS8
‘Not unusual if you’re #KQ1052

this (8-5) £983

Locked up as a final WEST EAST
Bune) @K 1072 #Q854
: : ; ¥743 ¥95 :
lam bent on getting out “Tw Across Down e904 #3873
and moving round (7) as aaa p 4 Uivieldl RAK 64 &Q107
Nigerian perhaps can be N arjous (7) nyletcing 45) SOUTH

5 Flowering bulb (5 2 Zambezi #A93

after fair treatment (7) N owering bulb (5) ambezi cataruct ¥KQ1062
Demanding, like royalty = 8 Asa result (2,11) (8,5) #A6

can be? (6) hI52

i ! 3 ata

Has to make professions > 9 An area’s plant To plunder (7) The bidding:

of loyalty (5) “” life (5) 4 Room to poate we North East
tt of water coming pF 10 Theatrical manoeuvre (6) INT Pass 39 Pass

rom leaks (5) entertainer (7) 5 Jeer at (5) Wat acs

. ; - an a sept ais) Opening lead — king of clubs.
3 ie? ayfu \ ery patient (4-
Yesterday s Easy Solution 42 Behave > Go ahead of (7) Assume you’re declarer with the

South hand at four hearts. The

Across: 1 ‘Hitch, 8 Live it up, 9

: insincerely (6) 11. Gun (7) defenders start by cashing three club
ne 1O\Tired out, Hs eed a h Use : tricks, after which East shifts to a
: a ‘| 6 vote 1 eae . id, 15 Sports official (7). 13. What remains (7) low spade. How do you continue?
udas, course, unny, 47 Perfume (5 14 Starta When the deal occurred, South
26 By itself, 27 Seamy. 6) won the spade with the ace and
Down: 2 In the bag, 3 Cul-de-sac, 4 19 Soon enough journey (3,3) played five rounds of trumps, reduc-
Divine, 5 Fever, 6 Stoop, 7 Spate, : ing everyone to four cards with
12 Nil, 13 Old, 14 In future, 15 Per Naas! tee Slane dummy. retaining the K-Q-10-5. of
annum, 19 Insult, 20 Hobby, 21 20 Smelling stale (5) long-legged (5) diamonds. East grimly hung on to his
id. 2 ; four. diamonds, discarding — his
Acrid, 22 Fussy. 21 Cargo (7) 18 Deal with (5) remaining spade on the last trump

lead. Declarer then tried the A-K-Q
of diamonds, but had to concede a

HOW many words of four letters:
or more can you.make from the
letters shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used
once only. Each must contain

eee

aS oa ct ee iS ye

BSS ee

Neutralizing a Krave










mR tt Sard

. the centre letter and there must
words in be at least one nine-letter word.
‘the main No plurals. :
hee body of TODAY’S TARGET

Good 21; very good 31; excellent
41 {or more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY’S SOLUTION -

alert alter. ariel auteur earl
extra irate lair later laxer Har
lira litre lure LUXURIATE ‘rail
rale rate ratel real relax retail
rial viel rile rite ritual rule
rutile. tare tear tier tiler tire
trail trial true ultra urea

3

SSS

Lae







WW

NY
cs

diamond to East at the end for down
one.

South’s method of play had about
an even chance-of success. Had the
diamonds been divided 3-3, or had
the jack fallen singleton or double-
ton, he would have made the con-
tract: However, since he overlooked
a safe way to guard against either
opponent holding the J-x-x-x of dia-
monds, the outcome cannot be attrib-
uted solely. to bad luck.

After taking the. ace of spades,
the best line, of play is to cash the
king of trumps and lead a trump to
the ace. When both East and West
follow suit; the A-K of diamonds are
played.

At this | point, the | contract
becomes certain. Declarer trumps a
low diamond with the queen, leads a
low trump to dummy’s jack and dis-
cards his 9-3 of spades on the Q-10
of diamonds: That’s all there is to it.

If the opponents’ trumps were
divided 4-1, declarer would find out
when he cashed the second heart. He
would then have no choice but to
continue drawing trumps and hope:
for a favorable diamond division.

Observe that the recommended
method of play — drawing only two
rounds of trumps if both defenders
follow suit — assures the contract
whenever the opposing diamonds are
divided 3-3 or 4-2 (86 percent),
while drawing all the trumps stakes
the entire outcome on a friendly dia-
mond division.

/ Tomorrow: To cover or not to cover.
‘ : ©2009 King Featires Syndicate Inc,
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 9B

THE TRIBUNE



@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON

LOCATED in the heart
of town is the newest
‘down home classy’
restaurant, The Velvet
Room Restaurant &.
Lounge, where native
and Italian dishes are
sure to entice the diner
as they enjoy their meal
in immaculate surround-
ings. .

Linda Ferguson, the restau-
rant’s owner told Tribune
Taste: “The Vélvet Room is a
very classy restaurant, When
people hear where it is located
(Cordeaux Avenue and Miami
Street) they get the impression
that it is not a nice restaurant,
but I assure you that once you
step.into the restaurant you: .
will forget you are in the ‘ghet-
to,” she said.

Linda and Charles Ferguson,
wanted to bring something new
to the island, something that
would make their diners say ‘I
have been waiting for a place
like this for a long time’, so
with a little Bahamian spice
and ingenuity they formed The

Velvet Room Restaurant & Lounge. “I wanted the style of the
restaurant to be different than the other restaurants that we
have here on the island. Beside serving food we‘also want to
give our diners a good time so we decided to introduce poetry °
night, movie night, game night and karokee night. The restau-
rants over here don’t host a poetry night so we thought that it
would be something very nice to do things different for a
change”, she said.

She said that the game night will allow patrons to come in and
have a little fun. She also said that there will be. tournaments
where people. can compete and even win prizes. The karokee
night will be hosted on Wednesdays. '

The restaurant has been opened since last year November, but
the official opening of was held on Saturday night.

While all of the activities for the restaurant are very exciting
the food is really the main attraction. The restaurant has a num-
ber of dishes that will keep you coming back for more Mrs Fer-
guson said: “We specialise in native dishes as well as Italian dish-
es. The Italian food includes:a variety of fettuchini pastas, like
chicken fettuchini, shrimp fettuchini, and for the native dishes
we serve, stew fish, stew conch, the regular peas.& rice, crack
conch, chicken souse, stem.fish, stem conch and much more,” |
she said. ,

They also serve mouth watering conch salad and soon they
will have a jerk and barbecue pit.

Mrs Ferguson said that the Velvet Room’s conch is the best
on the island.:The conch that we serve here is nice and tender

and it will melt:in you: € two customers who when
_they come'to the'rest only order the crack conch, and I
“would have to say that the is probably the most delicious meal
onthe.menu.” | sfyissis eeteaesy VS D 9
. . There are also a number sweet native pastries available to ease
that sweet tooth. The pastries include cheesecake, banana bread,
coconut cake, benny cake, and pineapple upside down cake.

Their beverages include soft drinks, mixed drinks, daiquiris’,

margaritas, as well as beers. .










SSNS



A fresh approach to salads



= By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

SALADS get a bad rap a lot
of the time for being the same
old boring, tasteless (read:
healthy) lunch or dinner side:

Tribune Taste askéd dietitians”

and chefs to defend:salads and
suggest ways to put them back
on Bahamians' plates as a sub-
stitute to those down home

favourites of:cracked conch,..

macaroni and cheese with a side
of fried plantain.

Chef Harald Sauer said there
are tons of ways to make dif-
ferent salads with specialty
ingredients found at his work-
place, the Gourmet Market in
Caves Village. These will add

some excitement and spice to.

_ the plain old salad, attracting
even youngsters to eat their veg-
gies.

Some twists to the regular let-
tuce salad are the Monterrey
Bay Dungeness Crab Salad with
beets or the Spicy Asian Noodle
Salad, the most popular dish at
all catering-events.

Julia Lee, the registered dietit- ’

ian and nutrition consultant at
Doctor's Hospital also advised
that it is a good idea to take a
salad to work or school for
lunch. "This way you have con-
trol over all ingredients, oils and
calorie amounts," she said.

And while it would be wrong
to have a meal of only vegeta-
bles, you can make a complete
meal with a salad that has ingre-
dients added from the starch or
protein categories.



"Chick peas are a great idea
in completing a salad," said Ms
Lee, who added other options
of corn, black beans, or even
pasta, all of which can give a
more substantial nutritious val-
ue. .

"You could even cube a left-
over piece of meat from last
night's dinner, add some tuna
salad, or substitute beans for,
meat,” she pointed out.

Plus, salads are similar to
soups in that they can take on
any ingredients your imagina-
tion cooks up. From chopped
apples, raisins, craisins, man-
darin orange fruity options, to
sprinklings of almonds, walnuts
or sunflower seeds.

And is it all right to use
canned vegetables? It's been
widely publicised that fresh is
always best, but. Ms Lee said
that frozen or canned options
are also acceptable.

"Fresh is great," she said,
"but there's nothing wrong
with frozen vegetables. These
are often picked at the peak of
freshness." e

Sometimes, Ms Lee said, she
thaws out frozen broccoli to add
to a salad.

But she pointed out that
there are wrongs ways to go
about making a ‘salad particu-
larly with

- large amounts of cheese
' - bacon

- dousing salad with fatty
dressing ;

- big fatty croutons (may be
processed and salty)

- anything large in animal fat

7

MONTERREY BAY DUNGENESS

CRAB SALAD WITH BEETS

(6 servings) ‘

Garden of hearts — more people use Romaine because it is
more nutritious (amount desired)

. 3 Fresh red beets, cooked and peeled.

6 Egg yolks.

2 cups virgin olive oil

1/2 cup champagne vinegar

1 ths. garlic, finely chopped

pinch of salt.and pepper ;

18 oz Dungeness Crab meat (available Gourmet Market) .

~ 3 tbsp lemon juice

3 hard boiled eggs, chopped

1/2 cup parsley, chopped

12 green asparagus tips, crisp and tender

METHOD nea ZY :
Chop up lettuce, put on plate. Cut beets into strips and

put aside. ; ‘
Take half the beets and put in blender with egg yolks;
slowly add olive oil and champagne vinegar simultaneously
into blender, season with salt and pepper and refrigerate —
this is your dressing. ; ‘

Top lettuce with Dungeness crab meat, sprinkle on lemon juice,
and then drizzle beet vinaigrette and top with chopped eggs.
Mix with parsley and garnish plate with remaining beets

and asparagus.

COLI ILTULL LLL LALLA RLLT TOLL OLEATE



SPICY ASIAN NOODLE SALAD

(8 servings)

SGN WPNPHHNHNHHPHHH HNN

Garden Hearts Lettuce (any amount desired)

4 tbsp olive oil
2 thsp dark sesame oil:
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped

3 cups of Chinese long beans, cooked and cut into 2 inch pieces
1Ib carrots, peeled, cooked and cut into 2 inch pieces (diamond cut)

1 cup green onions
salt and pepper to taste
1lb Chinese egg noodles, cooked and
noodles — these are transparent) -
6.tbsp:soy sauce

1 thsp bean sauce

1/4 tsp freshly grated black pepper

1 inch fresh ginger root, peeled and finely chopped
12:02 firm tofu, cubed and browned in olive oil

1/2 tsp fresh jalapeno peppers, minced or.chopped
1/2 cup fresh cilantro — roughly chopped

3 tbsp toasted sesame seeds

METHOD

Cut up, rinse under water and dry lettuce,

Heat the oils in pan, add garlic and fry for 30 seconds
Quickly add vegetables, pasta, soy sauce, bean sauce, pepper
and ginger — sautee for one minute

Put into big salad bowl.
Let cool for 30 minutes

Add tofu, cilantro, sesame seeds, all other ingredients and toss

Arrange on plate.

_. THE HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY OF THE BAHAMAS
‘The Retreat’, Village Road * Saturday, Feb. 7th, 2009 10am - 2pm

Featuring Water Lilies and Plants for Water Features! Flamingo Nursery and The Garden of Eden
Orchids * Fruit Trees * Herbs * Bedding

Plants ¢ Rare Palms * Bromeliads



drained (or Glass



y

MOL LOLLP LAD

The Tribune

Learning
to love
nature

Os ey

ASIII ES

aul Corsbbean Be 2 S

m By LISA LAWLOR
- Tribune Features Writer

PLANTS whether soft or spiky,

bright or pastel, sweet or sour, nation-

al or global, are the life of many an
enthusiast, scientist or student. And

_ they continue to contribute to the vast
array of wild life found in the

Bahamas. rts psn
Author and photographer Linda Huber is one
admirer of nature who says the knowledge of

plants, their identification and uses, must never die

in the Bahamas. It is in fact her form of art to dis-
- cover new species of plants; and to photograph
their resounding beauty as they appear in nature
to be a diamond in the rough, or'a beautiful berry
in the midst of a thorny bush.
She's found that in schools and the general pop-

ulation, the appreciation of nature is just not there.

"In fact many young. people don't know our

PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009,



national flower — the Yellow Elder or national tree
— the Lignum Vitae,” she told Tribune Art.

In her collection of photographs, books and
knowledge of plants, she has compiled a field
guide for the younger generation of Bahamians
"so they can become familiar with the flora of our
islands," she said. , :

"Flowers of the Bahamas is also a small effort to
promote greater awareness of the special beauty in
the country's natural world," she said. "Many of
the 'native' flowers are becoming endangered due
to land development and other adversities. Unless
we become more concerned about preservation,
more and more species will become extinct."

Growing up on a fruit farm in Canada, Ms’
Huber has always loved everything about the out-
side wilderness. Since first coming to the Bahamas
more than 40 years ago, she's only experienced
beauty as a hobby, while she worked in advertising
and marketing at John Bull.

In retirement, she's been getting back to nature.
"T just love the bush, the feeliny of being sur-
rounded by birds in their natural habitat of flora
and fauna."

The first edition of "Flowers of the Bahamas"
came out five years ago, and with the second edi-
tion released in 2008, she has added even more
flowers to her unique collection. Ms Huber also’
lists three pages worth of the practical uses of
plants in the form of bush medicines. .

"Without doctors and limited resources avail-
able on the isolated and widely-scattered islands,
the practice of bush medicine evolved through
practical use over the years," Ms Huber explains in
her guide, "Considerable interest in preventive
medicine and natural healing is being shown today
and new discoveries are:constantly being made."

The writing of a second edition to her original
book becamé necessary as contributors from many

.islands.wrote.to:Ms, Huber with.suggestions.of
-more plants and their uses, as well.as.differing
“names to plants lar

‘better knowht.as Gardner Jack inthe’ Pribune®>
Health section, schools and libraries from across
the nation requested a second edition.

"T felt very humbled in the publication of this
book," she said, "I'm just.a photographer and am
still learning so much from other specialists and
gardeners."

She sadly doesn't have a garden herself because
she lives in a small apartment, but said that the
whole of the Bahamas serves as her garden.

Ms Huber traveled from island to island pho-.
tographing the flora and fauna found in her book,
and says the Bahamas’is her back yard. "The
whole of New Providence is my garden," she said,
"wild flowers, native plants, fruits and native
orchids can be found in the deep of the bush, a
very relaxing and enchanting place to be."

Special mention goes to many who offered Ms
Huber assistance, including Mrs Mildred (Millie)





_ Sands for the assistance with recipes for bush med-

icine and Dr Ethan Freid who is a "total expert on
Bahamian plants." ecg

"Flowers of the Bahamas" can be found in many ,
gift shops and book stores across the Bahamas,

’. including Logo's Bookstore, Chapter One, Cole's

Pharmacy, Ardastra's Gift shop, United Book-
shop, Island Bookshop, and is represented on out
islands such as Abaco, Exuma, Freeport, Bimini
Eleuthera, San Salvador and Long Island.



¢ Do you have a unique hobby or collection you want
to share with Tribune readers, please let us know at
502-2368 or email cbrennen@tribunemedia.net





plants ‘from island to island?Jack Hardy, \_











THE TRIBUNE -



THE biography of Christopher ‘Notorious B.I.G’ Wallace
is a must see movie for 2009. It captures his rise and fall as
a rapper, and depicts the jarring reality of living life in the
‘fast lane’. ~ VG

The biopic-does not focus on-the unsolved murders of
Biggié and his ex buddy rapper Tupac Shakur, but focuses -

‘instead on his rise to stardom in the rap industry.

Angela Basset makes the role of Voletta Wallace ( Big-
gie’s mother) come alive with a tough and no nonsense per-
formance. Throughout Biggie’s life, (Jamal ‘Gravy’ Wood-
ward) she tries to instill in him strong ethics, and the impor-
tance of having a good education by sending him to the
private Queen of All Saints Middle School in Brooklyn, .
New York. ; : tt

However, Biggie dropped out of school, choosing a life on
the streets dealing drugs instead. He was subsequently
arrested and spent nine months in prison. ue

After he got out of prison, Biggie pursued his dream of
being a rap artist and did his best to make a productive
living. A major break came when he: met Sean ‘Puffy’
Combs (Derek Luke) who heard his mixtapes and took a
keen interest in his smooth, lyrical flow.

The movie chronicles Biggie’s rise to the top. His music
became popular not only in the black community but the hip
hop mainstream as well. People admired the way he used
words and the way he told his life story through his music.

What’s fame and fortune without women and many
women gravitated towards him, most notable Kimberly “Lil
Kim’ Jones, (Naturi Naughton formerly of 3LW) who.
became the rapper’s lover. The attraction between Biggie

‘and Lil’ Kim was very prevalent throughout the movie.

And although they had a strong physical attraction, his
heart was with Faith Evans, (Antonique Smith) a singer,
whom he married after dating for three weeks.

Without a doubt, the best performance was by Jamal
‘Gravy’ Woolard. His outward appearance, heavy weight,
hard breathing, and his dark complexion, made this char-
acter believable. I must admit he outshines the veterans.



it

1. Johnny and Pia Farmer cel- .
ebrated at the recent St
Andrew’s School’s 60th reunion
held at Atlantis after their own
graduations 30 years ago.

“St Andrew’s prepared me for
a lifetime of having my cake and
eating it too,” Pia joked, “they
instilled in me the knowledge
that I’d-have to work hard, but
that I'd be able to succeed.”

2. Lefty, Theo, Katherine and
Areti Tsavoussis have a family
reunion among their school
mates from enjoyable school
days at St Andrew’s.. “I have.
‘only the fondest memories of
my years at St A's and really
enjoyed coming back for the 60
year anniversary party,” said
Katherine, who traveled from
Florida for the event.

3.. Mr and Mrs Dorian Roach .
represent a younger variety of St.
A's grads who enjoyed the event.

4. Deputy Prime Minister
Brent Symonette and Mrs
Robin Symonette pose with a
current St Andrew’s student,
symbolising the hope of a suc-
cessful future ahead for another
graduate.






THE TRIBUNE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009, PAGE 11B








. B By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Features Editor

FROM traditional
warm and cozy bed
vilts, to amazingly
, detailed wall tapestries,
the Stepping Stone



The show, which was held.
for the first time 20 years ago,
is an annual event at which
members of the Stepping
Stone Quilting group not only
showcase and sell their work,
but also attempt to revive
interest in what has become a
slowly dying craft.

“A lot of young people are
just not interested in quilt-



































































Annual Quilt Show taking anymore. They can-
showcases just how cre- not justify spending all that .

time to create something, so

ative a person can be they don’t want to learn. They
using a few squares of don’t understand the benefit

of creating something beauti-

material: ful and that they can do this .

while they are watching TV
or hanging out with friends.

“You have to juggle it with the rest of your life because no
one has the time to sit and quilt all day. That is how I started
with quilting, I learnt to do it while I was at my children’s
games, or waiting for them or in the evenings after they went
to bed and it gave them a new respect for me because this was
an area that was all mummy’s,” said Maria Chisnall, a mem-
ber of the group.,

Bonnie Phillips, president of the Stepping Stone group,
said one of their goals is to revive the quilting tradition in the
schools’ needlework curriculum.

The women explained that because quilting is so time-con-
suming, it is rarely passed on from mother to daughter these
days, but rather from grandmother to granddaughter or aunt
to niece.,

“The mums are too busy to teach it to their daughters," said
Ms Chisnall.

Another reason quilting may be less popular, is that quilters
have to compete with mass-produced bed linens. These fac-
tory-made materials also affects the pricing of quilts.

“People love quilts, everyone wants a quilt, but they don’t

_ want to pay what they think is a high price for it, but you can-

not pay someone for the amount of time they have invested
in a quilt and the quality of the work,” said Ms Chisnall.

“We have a member who took three years to make a
Hawaiian leaf print quilt - can you pay her for three years of
her life?”

Quilts can cost upwards of $400, the group said.

Ms Phillips said that Stepping Stone Quilters offers a great
forum for the women.

Meeting once a week allows them to discuss techniques,
problems and provides an avenue to bounce ideas back and
forth.

The group, which was founded in 1986, has around 20
members.

The name “Stepping Stone” is taken from a traditional
type of quilt block.

Realising just how comforting a quilt can make a person feel
has prompted the Broup to make a number of charitable con-
tributions.

“We made all of the quilts for the Cancer Caring Centre and

- we have sent quilts to the Red:Cross to give to people affect-
-ed by hurricanes and fires,” said group president Ms Phillips.

They have also received international acclaim, particularly
for a group of panels they made for the Bahamas National
Trust’s 50th Anniversary.

The panels were part of the Scottish National Quilt Chan:
pionships and won first place in the machine appliqué cate-
gory. Other members had the experience of representing the
Bahamas at'the Smithsonian in Washington, DC.

Exposure and opportunities such as these are just an added
bonus to quilting, which is a creative outlet for the women.

The quilts currently on display by the group show off fas-
cinating designs and: colours, as well as intricate detailing
and quality work. -»

Ms Phillips explained that inspiration comes from any and
everywhere and most quilts may be a combination of hand and _
machine stitching. She said people should not be afraid to use
their quilts because all material is prewashed to prevent fur-
ther shrinkage or colour bleeding, so they can be gently













washed.

DESPITE a decline in the
economy and the financial
challenges facing many 7
Bahamians, hundreds
turned out at the 37th annu-
al Red Cross Ball held Sat-
urday night, paying big
bucks to support a very
worthy cause.

Ball patrons danced the
night away to music provid-
ed by the Lou Adams
Orchestra, Visage and the
Manhattans. During cock- «
tails, the Royal Bahamas
Police Pop Band played
before attendees dined on a
supreme meal prepared by
the staff of the Crystal
Palace Resort and Casino.

From the hundreds of red
roses which graced the
tables and ceiling, to the
red, white and gold organza.
tablecloths silver cande-
labras and the sparkling

‘crystals on women’s
evening gowns, it was truly,
“An Enchanted Evening.”

The highlight of the night

was the tribute paid to ball

honouree Dorothy Hep- THE LADY of the
burn- King for her many evening honouree
years of outstanding service Dorothy Hepburn-

King (left) with
Governor General
Arthur Hanna.

to the organisation.

Red Cross president Ger-
ald Sawyer welcomed guests
to the event saying that it
was wonderful to see so
many persons attend partic-
ularly given the state of the
economy and the fact that
people are watching their
expenses. In addition to
being one of the major
social events of the year,
the ball-is one of the major
fundraising events for the _
organisation.

MARINA GLINTON
(right) director
general of the
Bahamas Red
Cross looks on.



When picking a quilt, Ms Philips advised: “Go with your gut
reaction and then examine it for the quality, and remember
quilts are a one-of-a-kind item.”

The Stepping Stone Quilters Annual Quilt Show is being
held at Trinity. Methodist Church Hall on Frederick Street and
runs until February 7, Admission is free and the show is open
from 10am-4pm daily (except on Sunday).

Finding
the art in
nature

FROM page 12

Considering that these trees
make some of the most expen-

. sive furniture here in the

Bahamas, conserving, and
bringing about awareness to
their quality is very important.
“The Maderia is very expensive
tree, and if we don’t preserve
this tree and others, what will
our grandchildren and upcom-
ing generations see and how will
they will experience our cul-
ture,” he said.

Mr Roberts contends that
premeditation is not part of his
creative process. “I respect
nature and in anything that I
do I try to remove myself and
make a public statement. It is
the sculpture that liberates itself -
and allows its beauty to speak
for itself,” he said.

He added that it is very
important for the community
to be part of the work of art,
for it is a celebration of culture.
“It is important to embrace all
and allow them to become apart
of the creative process. It is also
very important to have a sense
of community” he added.

While the year 2008 was quite
fulfilling for Mr Roberts, this
year he intends to do things a
little differently. He also wants
to continue to impact and
enhance the beauty of the island
and the culture. “J want to influ-
ence Bahamian landscapes this
year. I want to speak to the
issue of preservation and to
show people that we must use
the best we can. I want to cause
people to appreciate nature in
every sense of the word,” he
said.
a7th . _Learning to
annual Red -—«—«ove nature

Cross Ball like Linda

See page 10

See page 11



WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 2009







"THE MUNROE"
. COFFEE TABLE



"THE ROBIN"
COFFEE TABLE





"THE VANESSA" HALF
MOON CONSOLE:



"THE CHIPMAN"
CENTRE TABLE



“THE NIKKt"
COFFEE TABLE

“THE RENAE”

LARGE CONSOLE







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