Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION



Volume: 105 No.59







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

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Wilehcombe calls
for PLP ‘ceasefire’ :

@ By DENISE He said a concerned Pin- .
: MAYCOCK der’s Point resident tele-
Embattled MP Tribune Freeport phoned the. police control
h ks Reporter room and reported hearing |
than suppor ters, dmaycock@ gunshots in the area..

calls for party to
end politically
divisive behaviour

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
-alowe@tribunemedia:net

QUOTING biblical passages
and defiant poetry, embattled
MP for West End and Bimini,
Obie Wilchcombe, last. night
thanked his supporters and
called on PLPs to call “a cease-
fire” on politically divisive and
destructive behaviour.

The PLP MP admonished his
party members to “lay down the
weapons that are causing mass
destruction” and focus on the
economic and social challenges
facing the Bahamas.

“The quest for the ultimate
seat of power in our party has
unfortunately created a mad
dash where brilliant and edu-

SEE page six

= shot bas /

Police hoping residents of Pinder's
Point can provide them with leads |




tribunemedia.net .

FREEPORT - A man
was shot dead at Pinder’s
Point late Sunday evening
and police are hoping that
residents can provide them
with leads into the island’s
second and the country’s
seventh homicide for the
year.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley, press liaison officer,
reported that the victim was
shot-in the head and died at
the scene.

Mr Reckley said police
received reports of a shoot-
ing around 10.45pm on Sun-
day and dispatched officers
to investigate.



’ his back with a wound to the |














When officers arrived at |
the scene, they spoke with |
residents in the area and dis-_|
covered the body of a black
man, who appeared to be in
his early twenties, lying.on
the ground. :

The victim was lying on |

head. The deceased was |
wearing a pair of white ten- |}
nis shoes, long blue jeans
and a black hood.

ASP Reckley said police
are seeking the public’s
assistance in the matter.

He is urging anyone with |
information to contact |
police at911 or the Central
Detective Unit at 352-
9774/5.








Christie expected to announce Pleasant
‘Bridgewater Senate replacement this week

& By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PROGRESSIVE Liberal Party leader Perry
Christie is expected to announce a replacement for
the Senate seat left vacant-by embattled former
senator Pleasant Bridgewater as early as Wednes-
day. -
During a brief interview yesterday, Mr Christie

said he has made his choice on Ms Bridgewater's

replacement but did not want to divulge the name

_ before making an official statement later this week. BRR aaaenanitts

He did confirm, however, that the replacement

will be a Grand Bahama resident, cspelling rumours that businessman
Ricardo Treco was his choice.’

Mr Christie-said he received about six recommendations for the

FROM LEFT: Julian Johnson; Leshawn Bowe and rete ane outside of court

| @ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Motorcycle
fatality report

A REPORT reached The Tri-
bune late last night of a traffic
fatality on Grand Bahama.

Shannon Comarcho,.d resident
of Fox Hill, reportedly lost con-
trol of his motorcycle in Freeport
around 6.30pm.

Mr Comarcho was taken to
hospital but died shortly after. He

men have also been charged with conspiring
to murder Newbold.
: Newbold, 32, was shot multiple times in

THREE men were arraigned in a Magis-.._ the chest in Nassau Village around 9pm on
trate’s Court yesterday'on charges of mur- January 25. He was the country's fourth
der and conspiring:to commit murder. murder victim for 2009.

Police have charged Julian Johnson, 24, of According to court dockets, Bowe, John-
Cooper’s Terrace, off Kemp Road, Leshawn _ son and Sands intentionally caused New-
Bowe, 23, and Kendrick.Sands, 32, both of — bold’s death. It is also alleged that, on the
Matthew Street, Nassau Village, in the Jan-

‘Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



was 33.

uary 25 murder of Onado Newbold. The





SEE page six

Fiscal deficit increases by
almost 57% to $121.4m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s fiscal
deficit increased by almost 57 per
cent to $121.4 million during the
first four months of its 2008-2009
fiscal year, a trend the Central
Bank of the Bahamas said was
likely to increase in the short and
medium term.

Unveiling its repdrt on month-
ly and economic developments
during December 2008, the Cen-
tral Bank said the deficit — which
shows by how much the Govern-

ment’s spending exceeds its rev-
enue — and public sector debt
were expected to increase due to
a combination of decreased rev-
enues and increased spending on
social programmes and infra-
structure, ”

While total government rev-
enues were only down slightly by

0.41 per cent, at $510.7 million .

for the four months from July to
November 2008, import duties
were off by 24.61 per cent when

SEE page six

Senate replacement, whose names he did not reveal. Although he has

SEE page six

Sten OAM
shots despite police doubts

@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Staff Reporter .

ON MONDAY residents
in the Shirley Street and
Sears Road area still insisted
they heard gun shots being
fired during the apprehen-
sion of an ex-police officer

in a stolen vehicle last Sun- -

day morning.
This comes after police



officers doubted that any
gunfire was exchanged in the
chase of the stolen Nissan.
A senior officer suggested
that residents could have
mistaken shots for the loud
crash of the vehicle or the
crackling noise from the
downed power lines.
Residents said as police

SEE page six







PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Three men charged over murder
Will stand trial in Supreme Court

THREE men charged in the 2007 murder of Shawn Evans will
stand trial in the Supreme Court,,a Magistrate has ruled.

Smith Charitable, 33, alias Ishmael; Michael Joseph, 22, alias
Michael France, and Nicole Octelus, 33, are accused of the mur-
der.

Mr Evans, 32, was found in a yard near his Pride Estates :
home with a gunshot wound to his neck on the morning of Sep- ;
tember 16, 2007. v3

A preliminary i inquiry was held to determine whether there was
sufficient evidence against the men for them to stand trial in the
Supreme Court.

Magistrate Carolita Bethel ruled last Friday that there was suf-
ficient evidence for a Supreme Court trial.

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FRIGHTENING trend of
suicide. and depression is
increasing in the Bahamas
through a spreading sense of
hopelessness, despair and iso-
lation, a top psychologist has
said.

Three suicides this week sent
the suicide rate soaring at the
_beginning of the year, coincid-
ing with a deepening economic
crisis affecting families across
the nation.

‘Father-of-two Leslie Camp-
bell, 36, of Ruby Avenue,
Cable Beach, was found hang-
ing in his home on Friday night,
and just 24 hours later Kimber-
ley Miller, 37, was found hang-
ing at her Pastel Gardens
home.

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Deaths

Their deaths followed the
suspected suicide of a 45-year-
old father-of-three found hang-
ing in his Seabreeze Lane
Home on Wednesday.

Police are investigating all
three deaths on the premise the
deceased committed suicide.

Psychologist David Allen
attributes the trend to a break-
down of family life and care in























lm By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

week.

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mreynolds@tribunemedia:net

LONG term Haitian residents of Marsh.
Harbour, Abaco, were granted Bahamian
citizenship when the director and minister
of immigration visited the community last

Minister of Immigration, Branville McCart-
_ney and director Jack Thompson. flew to ,
Marsh: Harbour to legitimise the status of



“Suicide is not necessarily
a choice, it happens because
the pain they experience
internally exceeds their
internal view of the resources |

around them.”



Psychologist David Allen

the community as people are
caught up in their busy lives
and become isolated, but are
too proud to share their inner
turmoil.

He argues suicide is a process
involving a deep sense of hope-
lessness, isolation, sleep depri-
vation, an inability to express
hurt, and a tendency to turn to
alcohol and drugs.

Dr Allen said: “Suicide is not
necessarily a choice, it happens
‘because the pain they experi-
ence internally exceeds their
internal view. of the resources
around them.”

“ Although the circumstances
surrounding the three recent
suicides are still unknown, Dr

Allen said the economic crisis is -

likely to be a factor as men get
self-esteem from their jobs, and

six Haitian-Bahamians. an
Their applications had been approved by

women get self-esteem from
their relationships. :
When men lose their jobs

' they are unable to support their

wives emotionally,.and children
are affected.

Dr Allen said: “The econom-
ic downturn and lack of bond-
ing in our community is rife.

Fatalism

“There’s a kind of fatalism
that is coming in and I don’t
know if that is coming from the
adults or from society.

“It’s almost like death is in
the. air and I would want life
and hope to be in the air.”

Depression is expected to be
the world’s most common ill-
ness:by 2025, Dr Allen said, but
80 per cent of cases are treat-

KOA UN MSC IICION HORS Mer Tu OTM
residents are granted citizenship

the Department of Immigration and the offi-
cials travelled to Marsh Harbour to admin-

ister the oath and citizenship ceremony for

- the applicants.
Mr Thompson said he was not sure
whether the new citizens are residents of the

Mud and Pigeon Pea, illegal slums in the

heart of Marsh Harbour where thousands of
illegal Haitian immigrants and legitimised
migrants live in squalid conditions.

\

Suicide, depression trend ‘increasing
through a sense of a hopelessness’

able with medication and psy-
chotherapy.

Simple tests can diagnose the
disease and Dr Allen would
like to see these tests carried
out in public places to prevent
it from being the silent killer.

Dr Allen said suicide is a
catching trend, as for every
death by suicide there are
almost 100 people struggling
with the process.

Suicide rates reached a
peak in 2000 when ten people
ended their lives, and the rate
dropped to half that number in
2001.

In 2002 the number of sui-

cides more than halved again
with just two suicidal deaths in

, the Bahamas that year, but the

rate doubled again to four in
2003.

There were just two suicides
in 2004, five in 2005 and four in
2006.

There were at least three sui-
cides last year — in Bimini,
Grand Bahama and Nassau, but

_ police were unable to confirm

the final figures before The Tri-
bune went to press.

A lecture on the topic, ‘Sui-
cide: Are the numbers increas-

‘ing?’ will be held by the

Department of Social Services
at Wesley Methodist Church in
Malcolm Road East, Nassau,

. on Tuesday, February 10 from

9pm to 10.30pm. |




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THE TRIBUNE

_ LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 3



In brie

Super Bowl
commercial
put spotlight
on Bahamas

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net



AN Islands of the Bahamas
commercial showcased during
Super Bowl XLII on Sunday
was part of an international
marketing campaign aimed at
injecting new life into the falter-
ing industry.

The championship game,
which drew an estimated 130
million viewers worldwide, is
not only a must-see for football
enthusiasts but also an advertis-
ers’ paradise.

Tourism Min-
ister Vincent
§ Vanderpool-

j Wallace said
yesterday that
| more than $11



international

Vincent advertising by
Vanderpool- the government,
Wallace and will be

divided into sev-
eral specific initiatives aimed at
promoting the Bahamas. “We
advertise in places where there
are large audiences. You can
tell from the telephones ringing,
and from the calls and inquiries
and hits on our websites after-
wards, but generally speaking
we’ve seen a good response to
the Super Bowl ad almost
immediately,” he said.
Although he was unable to
make any predictions because
of the instability of the global
market, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said he is confident that the
ad and future promotions will
bring'visitors to the Bahamas.
Companies that advertised
during the event were said to
have spent at least $3 million for
a 30 second slot. Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said: “We negoti-
ate all of these prices. It’s not
the full price that everybody has
been hearing about, but these
are negotiated as part of an
overall:media buy, and so for
that’ tcrific ad we don’t single
URS a spetific itent



See the ministry ie its
eye on the Academy Awards,
and the NBA playoffs.
“Anything where there is a
‘large gathering of audiences
with the right kind of atmos-
phere, you are going to see our |
advertising. We think that we
are putting together a signature
offer that will become associat-
ed with the Bahamas,” he said.
According'to Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace, the ministry’s efforts to
promote the country in new
markets extend far beyond
American television, and
include deals and promotions
available over the Internet and
a greater presence in high-end
European markets. “It’s.a total:
marketing web that we are
putting together to make certain
that we are delivering our mes-,
sage to the right audiences.” \

Two men charged
with Kidnapping,
armed robbery

TWO men were arraigned ina
Magistrate’s Court yesterday on
kidnapping and armed FODBELY
charges.

Jeffrey Wilson, 52, of Farring-
ton Road, and Roscoe Armbris-
ter, 23, of Rock Crusher Road,
were arraigned on the charges
before Magistrate Susan Sylvester
in Court 11, Nassau Street.

Court dockets allege that the
two men while armed with a
handgun on Monday, January 26,
robbed Sabrina Glinton Eizenga
of a silver 1997 Mercedes Benz
valued at $8,000, a black hand
bag valued at $15 and a $10-cel-
lular telephone case.

It is also alleged that the two
men kidnapped Ms Eizenga on
Monday, January 26. ~ -

The accused were not required
to plead to the charges and were
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. The case was adjourned to
May 28 when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

e A man was’sentenced to 30
months in prison yesterday after
pleading guilty to drug possession
charges.

Dwayne Lockhart, 30, plead-
ed guilty in a Magistrate’s Court
to the possession of 171 lbs of
marijuana. According to court
dockets, Lockhart was found in
possession of the drugs on Fri-
day, January 30. Police reported-
ly discovered the drugs in a bed-
room of a house located near
Electro Jack off Baillou Hill
Road. Lockhart, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita Bethel
in Court 8, Bank Lane, pleaded
guilty to the charge of possession
of marijuana with intent to sup-
ply. Magistrate Bethel sentenced
Lockhart to’30 months in prison.



IFC AND WORLD BANK REPORT: Regulatory reforms

Bahamas rated 55th
most business-friendly
_ place in the world

Mi Country sixth in region among small island states

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

rmissick@tribunemedia.net

A NEW report from IFC and
the World Bank ranks the
Bahamas 55 in the world, and
sixth in the region among small
island states creating more oppor-
tunity for local businesses through
regulatory reforms that help
boost competitiveness.

' The Report “Doing Business
in Small Island Developing States
2009”, the second in a series,
examines the performance of 33
small island states based on the
Doing Business indicators and
compares the regulatory envi-

ronment for business in these -

economies.

The report finds that Singapore
is the easiest place in the world to
do business, while Mauritius, St.
Lucia, and Fiji are leading the
way in Africa, the Caribbean, and

Many ‘street people

the Pacific, respectively.
The Dominican Republic is
this year’s top small-island

reformer as well as a top-10:

reformer globally.
In The Bahamas, the report
recorded no major reform.
Overall the Bahamas was 55th

in the world and sixth in the

region.

Svetlana Bagaudinova, author
of the report, said, “Better busi-
ness regulations give firms more
opportunities to grow and create
jobs, which is critical for small
island states that have to over-
come challenges posed by size

‘and distance. Being small can

even be an advantage because
reform can happen faster and
deliver results sooner.”

Small states with lagging regu--

latory environments can learn
from each other.
He said Mauritius, which ranks

24th on the ease of doing busi-

>]

unwilling to change

lifestyles

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Having undertaken a “huge
drive” to reduce the number of
people living on the sffeets of
New Providence, the government
has found that many are unwilling
to change their lifestyles, the Min-
ister of State for Social Develop-
ment said.

According to Loretta Butler-
Turner, the number of “street
people” is down considerably and

| the large majority of those who

remain do so despite the efforts of
her ministry.

“On a given day, the average
Nassauvian is likely to encounter
several familiar faces begging for
money on the island’s main thor-
oughfares — such as Shirley Street
and East and West Bay Streets.

The minister claims that her
department has found it is not
necessity that always drives these
people to the streets.

“The reality is these people will
tell you quite simply — they like
being on the street hustling a dol-
lar,” said Mrs Butler-Turner,

' adding that a significant number

express an unwillingness to con-
form to. the demands of society
at large. “Many of them come
from families that can take care of
them, this is no secret, but for
whatever reason they seem not

| to comply with their family’s —

wishes, and that is where they end
up,” said the minister.

She highlighted the cases of a
number of people who, she
revealed, have set up make-shift
“homes” under the bridge on Rot,
ter’s Cay.

“Whether it’s under some of
the government buildings there,
or under the fruit and vegetable
stand, we’ve been out there and
interviewed them, we’ve contact-
ed their family members, and
tried to place them in temporary
homes and many of them tell us
they do not want to be there
because they don’t wish to abide
by the rules. They don’t wish to
live under the regulations in their
family homes, they just want to be
themselves.”

“They can hustle $20. and
they’re happy as can be. So it’s
not for not trying (on the part of
government), I can tell you,” she
said. Meanwhile, she revealed
that teams sent out by her min-
istry to investigate certain cases
have found that some individu-
als are being placed on certain
street corners. by other people “to
collect.money.’

And when people are willing
to take advantage of the rehabil-
itation services offered by the
government, they often'do so
only to return to their old habits.

“I can tell you from personal
experience that I have actually
instructed our rehabilitation ser-
vices people to go and check on
certain individuals and they have
reported back to me, they have
made interventions and even
though those people may have
taken advantage of whatever
intervention was offered, before
long they were back out there
again.”

She said that, based on the
findings of her department, many
of those who live on the street
have “mentally induced problems
because of either alcoholism or
drug problems.”

However, she stated that this

WUT



oS UL



in itself does not create the nec-
essary conditions for their indef-
inite incarceration in Sandilands.

“At the end of the day these
are usually adults and they have
the ability on their own to deter-
mine whether they want to be in
such a programme,” she said.

For those who emerge from
programmes and have nowhere
to go, the government currently
runs four “half-way houses” in an
undisclosed location which sup-
port people while they are
preparing to re-enter society.

“The homes we have are
filled,” the minister said.

Damon Bradshaw, programme
co-ordinator at the Salvation
Army’s Mackey Street soup
kitchen said that the numbers of
people seeking sustenance from
that location have remained “sta-
ble” in recent times. .

“Some people go and then new
one’s replace them. Then you
have some of the same old faces,”
said Mr Bradshaw.



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Over the past two years, Mau-
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increase in the annual growth
rate, from 2.2 per cent in 2005 to
5.4 per cent in 2007. Also, unem-
ployment has dropped from 9.6
per cent in 2005 to 8.5 per cent in
2007.

The Doing Business project
ranks economies based on 10
indicators of business regulation
that record the time and.cost to
meet government requirements
in starting and operating a busi-
ness, trading across borders, pay-
ing taxes, and closing a business.

The rankings do not reflect
such areas as macroeconomics
policy, quality of infrastructure,
currency volatility, investor per-
ceptions, or crime rates.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

"LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Balurday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N- 3207, Naskall, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) ' 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242 ) 502-2352
Circulation Department -.(242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
creeper fax: (242) 352- was

An answer to Franklyn Wilson

AT THE end of last week Mr Franklyn Wil-

son expressed amazement at how much ink |

local newspapers are dedicating to PLP “per-
sonalities” while neglecting those of the gov-
erning party.

It reminds us of the days when the com-
plaint was that too many black Bahamians were
filling the prisons, while not even a token num-
ber of whites were joining them behind bars.
They wanted to know why? The answer was as
clear as the nose on their faces, but they didn’t
want to accept the obvious. It was almost ‘as
though they were urging that white Bahami-

ans — guilty of an offence or not — be arrested -

and imprisoned, just to make black Bahamians

feel better. Instead, they should have been try- :

ing to get to the root cause of the problem to
find a remedy to keep all Bahamians, regardless
of colour, on the right side of the law.

We can assure. Mr Wilson that Tribune
reporters do not make it their business to go dig-
ging about in the PLP’s dirty laundry, but when
that Jaundry.j is left on,our doorstep in full pub-

amazing,” he said, “that The Tribune in partic-
ular finds so much interest in making the
Bahamian public'so aware of what is wrong in
the PLP and somehow nothing can ever be
found or adverse comment about the FNM.”
Members of the PLP themselves find so
much amiss in their party that they are now
openly backbiting in public. Today it is the PLP
that is making the news. And, or course, news-
papers and radio stations follow the news.
Even Managing Editor John Marquis, who
- annually hands out a tongue-in-cheek spoof at
Christmas time to the “good, bad, smart, dumb
and crazy”, gave 'the FNM “the dull as ditch-
‘water award,” because they are “a collection of
incredibly lacklustre politicians who give Insight
little or nothing to write about.”
Many FINMs were ‘upset by this dismissal,

not recognising it as a back-handed compli- -

ment. Mr Marquis didn’t need the FNM when
he had so many PLP centre stage, jiving and

clicking their heels in public. By comparison, the

FNM are not headline makers.

Labour law
reform is
overdue ©

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am convinced that it is

long overdue for all our labour
laws, especially those govern-
ing trade unions to be updated
and further to once and for all
establish under law that non-
union employees also have
rights and they will have an
essential place in the labour
scene being heard as they are
the majority. .

There is no question that it

_ is unacceptable that once a.
union is certified that certifi-
cation is ’til death cometh..

Many have given their opinion



Woawbs.xs

letters@tribunemedia.net




before that it should be for as

long as the current collective
agreement stands; usually
three-years. Certification

must require six-months,

before the end of the collec-
tive agreement that the union
will be required to have a vote
of its members to recertify

’ itself.

Take the Bahamas Hotel
Caterers Union, they have lost

probably more than 50 peer
cent of their membership over
the past 15-20 years — I doubt
they could get certified today
at any hotel but they are
embodied and enthroned.

Non-union employees fur-
ther need to be heard — they
are anyway the majority of the
workers in the country and no
one even asks their opinion.

It is time for Labour Law
reform not tokenism, but real
reform.

D SCAVELLA
Nassau,
January 17, 2009.

Still a lot of decent Bahamians

who look after our tourists

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would like to write a letter to the atten-
* tion of The Ministry Of Tourism to say that
there are a lot of decent and honest Bahamians
~-who respect and look after our tourists even’
_ though we think those days are long gone.

-. A visitor from London, England came to
Nassau to visit a resident and friend recently for

a short vacation.

Later that evening he was on his computer
and received an e-mail from a Bahamian lady

tents.

stating that she had stopped at the Montagu
Ramp to purchase fish and found his pouch
which contained his belongings stating the con-

- She gave | her home phone number which he
called the following day to get directions to
her home located in Sunshine Park No. 22.

He visited her home and retrieved his

- belongings and rewarded the Bahamian lady.

During his visit he visited the Montagu Ramp
‘Turning to the current Travolta extortion to take a photograph of the conch shells and °

lic view, our reporters certainly are not going to’ -
scandal, which got full play again on Fox news

The tourist from London, England and his

ignore it.

. Although they do not ignore what has been
given them, neither do they accept it at face
value without question.‘They go to great lengths
to find out if any, and if so how much of it is

true. They contact the owner of the dirty linen *

to try to discover what part of itis his. He is giv-
en every opportunity to tell,his side. of the sto-
ry. Some seize the opportunity to defend the
selves, some plead that it be swept.und
carpet, some are defiant in denial. Our reportés
are trained to handle all attitudes, and brig
the public as much of the story as they can con-
firm or deny.

Much dirty linen belonging to several PLP

members has been unloaded on our doorstep. .

over the years.

Some of it has been put there by members of
the public who are fed up with the lack of moral-
ity in our community and want it exposed. '

The hope is that if there is enough shame
and blame someone will eventually get the mes-
sage and start demanding accountability.

The focus is now on many of our politicians,
who have suddenly discovered that there are no
more hiding places when they transgress.

We now have a police force that when it
comes to breaking the law all men are equal.
The transgressor has neither social nor political
rank — there is only democracy before the law
when all men are treated as equals.

Mr Wilson complains that:if one reads the
editorials of The Tribune and Guardian, it is
the PLP who are in the spotlight, “I just find it

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Sunday night; Mr Wilson did not think that
such bad publicity against the Bahamas would
adversely affect our “economic climate.”
This is where we think he is seriously wrong.
He obviously is not aware of the number of
' desirable investors who backed off from the
Bahamas because of the scandal of the Pindling
ae Bahamians had hoped that these years

. Would: have. been put.to rest'when the FNM:

“came to power in 1992.

ar ‘Tt is true that all went quiet and investors
came. Now the embers are being stoked again
by the present scandal and the Bahamas is once
more in the news as that corrupt little backwa-
ter, where the “natives pick your pockets.” We
know that this present hiccup will affect
investors. We had hoped that it would not affect
visitors until we received an é-mail from a
retired editor inthe US expressing sadness

about the present’ misfortunes of “your coun-

t ” 4 ‘

Despite the headlines this country has made —

from hurricanes and other misfortunes and scan-
dals over the years, this present scandal has so
moved this man that it is the first time in more
‘than 50 years, when we were classmates at
Columbia University, that he has made con-
tact.

We. think that this country has been very

~ badly hurt by the Travolta case, not only in the

US, but around the world — it has even been
broadcast in Japan from where we have’ been
trying t to attract visitors.



should

NOTICE is. hereby given that ANNA G. MICHEL of
SOLDIER ROAD WEST, APT#3, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the. Minister responsible for Nationality and }
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 27" day of January, 2009
‘| to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,

the local set-up of the area, on his return to his
hostess’ home he noticed that his pouclf that
‘was attached to his belt was missing which con-
tained his camera, phone, cash and personal ID.
He returned to:the Montagu Ramp and:
retraced his path looking for his belongings
and questioned the residents:there but no one
claimed to have found his pouch.

«-FOURIST =:

host would like to thank the Bahamian lady
and her family for being so honest and respect-
ful for returning his belongings and to Say that
it is truly better in the Bahamas. -

A VERY THANKFUL
« January 14; 2009

A proposition oar Ingraham and
his government should consider

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“I am sure that you would

agree with me that in the
world today, as it has been for
an extended period of'time,
the English language seems to
be the premier international
language of choice spoken,
written, and read by a variety
of peoples.

I will not delve into the rea-
sons for this global develop-
ment, but the fact remains that
that is now the case (J anuary
21,2009).

P.O. BORN: (Nat, Nassatl ‘Bahamas,

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘OG EYeMUYARIS 4
‘01 HYUNDAI ACCENT
‘(01 HYUNDAI COUPE

DESIGN

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

My question to you, though,
is how can the world (inclu-
sive of The Bahamas) capi-
talise on this evolution.

Can you imagine the speed
of progress this world would
be capable of accomplishing
if everyone at least spoke Eng-
lish? Not to mention read and
write?

Your and my finite ands

- (and others) together. would
not be able to fathom the

plethora of opportunities that
would be available to all glob-
al citizens if such a situation
were to be presented to the
world.

However, for fear of omit-
ting several significant
prospective developments that
probably would take place

‘because of this, I will refrain -

from enlightening you on only

what I am able to think of. ©

The Bahamian people as well
as the people ofthe world
have (I suspect) very healthy
imaginations individually, and
more importantly, collectively,
to visualise whatever creations

_ that could be realised.

And so, it would seem to
me that} considering this pro-
posal, the government of The
Bahamas should take the ini-
tiative.and devise its own com-

- prehensive and sophisticated

plan to cause the world to ral-
ly around and implement this
concept.

It is my personal estimation
that such an ambitious under-
taking by the world (being led

by The Bahamas) would take
no less than 500 years to
accomplish. But, before the
500th year is reached, The
Bahamas would, no doubt, be
showcased to the world from
year one and increasing inter-

. Mittently over the following

years.
I need nat point out to
Bahamians the inordinate

-amount of attendant benefits

that. The Bahamas could
derive from leading the way
in presenting this platform to
the world. I wish, again, that
they would use their collec-
tive imaginations. |

And, finally, it would be my
wish that after the 500 years
would have been completed
that the native languages of
countries other than English-
speaking countries would still
have retained use as signifi-
cantly and prominently as they
are in use today. They (lan-
guages) should remain an inte-
gral part of their respective
cultures. .

Prime Minister the Rt Hon
Hubert A Ingraham and the
remaining members of his
government should give seri-
ous consideration to this
proposition. It can only bene-
fit this world and this country
for the next 500 years. Who
can argue with that?

MARVIN G
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau

January 21, 2009.

‘04 HYUNDAI SANTA FE
‘03 DAIHATSU TERIOS.
‘06 HYUNDAI ELANTRA
‘06 HYUNDAI TERRACAN
‘06 HYUNDAI SONATA
“00 HYUNDAI ACCENT
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‘07 SUZUKI GRAND VITARA 5dr

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Email:ggongora@coralwave.com

Welcome surprise to see phone
books packaged separately

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A year ago I wrote.a letter concerning the yearly publication of
the Bahamas phone directories white and yellow pages books
(which you posted in your local issue). I stated that I thought that
packing the two books together was a waste of money and materials

as a lot of the yellow page books are seldom used and end up in the
garbage.

I went to the post-office January 12th, 2009 and noticed that the
phone books for 2009 were out and much to my surprise they
were packaged separately. I guess someone at BaTelCo read my let-
ter and agreed with me. Again just a thought.

NO NAME
Nassau,
January 14, 2009.

AUTHORIZED

reap! Q MANUFACTURER
or Abace Motor Moll, Don MacKay Blvd, 347- 291 6





[HE TRIBUNE

|} UESVDAY, FEBRUARY 3

3, 200Y, PAGE 5d



Amigo’s Fund, the
Kohn, Pegasus
Foundations
underwrite spay
and neuter clinic

AMIGO’S Fund is part-
nering with the Kohn and
Pegasus Foundations to
underwrite the Humane Soci-
ety of Grand Bahama’s
(HSGB) spay and neuter
field clinic which started yes-
terday and will continue until
Friday at Pinder’s Point,
Grand Bahama.

The spay and neuter cam-
paign began in 1998 with pot-
cake ‘Amigo’ as its poster
dog.

It initiated a massive public
relations effort to raise aware-
ness of the importance of
spaying and neutering in con-
trolling the population of
uncared for and suffering ani-
mals who populate Grand
Bahama.

The campaign included
catchy, award winning posters
featuring potcake star Ami-
go, numerous newspaper arti-
cles, including being chosen
as one of the “Stories of the
Year” by The Tribune,
adverts in tourist magazines
and radio interviews which
were broadcast throughout
the Bahamas.

It spotlighted the impor-
tance of public participation
in the effort to have all owned
animals neutered — which was
then and still is a free service
to all those who cannot afford
it.

The spay and neuter field
clinics project, initiated and
run by HSGB managing
director Tip. Burrows and
Ellen Kohn, HSGB board
member and founder of the
Kohn Foundation, involve
pro-bono work by veterinari-
ans from the United States
under the direction of Dr ;
Robin Brennen of New York. :

This will be the fourth :
major field clinic in this pro-
ject, two to three clinics per
year are the goal. Stes

HSGB honorary chairper- :
son Frances Hayward, who
founded and underwrote the
spay/neuter campaign in 1998,
as well as initiating the chari-
table trust ‘Amigo’s Fund’ in
2008, said it is a “honour and
pleasure (to be) able to take
part in such a noble effort”
and hopes the public will par-
ticipate in increasing num-
bers.

She said she also hopes that
the business community will
take a greater part in the pro-
gramme.

In addition to participating
in spay/neuter initiatives,
Amigo’s Fund contributes to
the rehabilitation of deserving
animals who are found in the
most pitiful physical condi-
tion imaginable, but when
given care and love become
the “beautiful, wonderful
happy ‘creatures’ God
intended them to be,” she
said.









Bahamas tourism outlook
for 2009 is ‘very bleak’

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

IMMEDIATE past-president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA)
Russell Miller said the outlook for the
country’s tourism industry in 2009 is

“very bleak.”

Mr Miller was reflecting on the state
of the industry after receiving the
award for “Hotelier of the Year” at

the 13th Annual Cacique Awards last

Friday.

“We have not faced these types of
challenges and difficulties ever before,
but I do believe that ours is a resilient
industry and we will persevere and we
will come through this situation a.lot
better off than we got into it,” he said at
the awards ceremony held at the Rain-
forest Theatre in the Crystal Palace
Casino.

Mr Miller said he does not expect to
see things to improve until the fourth
quarter or the end of the forth quarter,

and maybe not even until the begin- °

RUSSELL MILLER receives his ‘Hotelier of the Year’ award.

“These are very tough times and this
thing is global. It’s affecting everything,
everybody and everywhere, so it’s a
tough time we are faced with. I think







ning of 2010.



the hotel industry in the Bahamas will .

face difficulties this year before things
get better, but I do believe that they

will get better and we are optimistic

that that will come hopefully by the
end of the year,” he said.

Mr Miller said it is a huge honour
to be named as “Hotelier of the Year”,
as the selection is made by all past win-
ners and is recognition by one’s peers
of outstanding performance and dedi-
cation to the industry.

“The Cacique Awards within the
tourism industry are the pinnacle of
achievement and so to be recognised
like that I feel very fortunate and very
gratified and it’s obviously a reflection

. and recognition of the years I have
. been in the industry and the opportu-

nities that I have been afforded,” he
said.

Mr Miller is an active supporter of
the ‘BHA and a major force in the
organisation’s increased focus’ on small
hotels, improving work force quality
and increasing collaboration with the
government.

He served as president of the 220-
member Association for two years,
with his tenure ending in December,
2008.

Cacique Awards recognise high performers

TOURISM’S high performers
received a show of gratitude on
January 30, when the winners of
the 13th Annual Cacique Awards
were revealed ata ceremony held
at the Rainforest Theatre on Fri-
day.

The nation’s highest tourism
award was equally distributed
between winners from urban cen-
tres and tranquil island settings.

The night’s winners were from
New Providence, Grand: Bahama
and two Family Islands. By the
end of the evening, seven public,
hotel and music category awards
went to Nassau residents. Four
went to Grand Bahama residents,
three to Abaco and two to Exuma.

The Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation and the Bahamas Hotel
Association also acknowledged
international partners for their
contributions to tourism in the
Bahamas. .

Transportation category winner
Glender Archer-Knowles set the
tone for the evening. As she
received the first award for the
evening, she emphasised the ser-
vice theme frequently advanced
by the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation. Ms Archer-Knowles
said that it was her parents who
ingrained healthy ethical and work
values in her and her siblings.

“They instilled service and com-
munity in their children,” she said.

> WINNERS OF THE 13TH ANNUAL

Pe TA VE Ue

Lifetime Achievement — John “Billy Joe” Gilbert, Grand Bahama

° Manager of the Year — Janet Stubbs Rolle, Four Seasons; Exuma”

¢ Employee of the Year — Standley Williams, Pelican Bay; Grand Bahama

¢ Chef of the Year — Carolyn Elaine Bowe, Wyndham Nassau Resort; Nassau
e Supervisor of the Year — Kevin McKenzie, Atlantis; Nassau .

* Sales Executive of the Year — Myron Jones, Sheraton Nassau Beach; Nassau
¢ Hotelier of the Year — Russell Miller, Ritz Carlton; Nassau

¢ Transportation — Glender Archer-Knowles, Abaco

e Human Resources Development — Donald Glass, Grand Bahama

° Sports, Leisure and Events - Ambrose Gouthro, Grand Bahama

° Creative-Arts — Steve Dodge, Abaco
° Handicraft — Eloise Smith, Nassau

¢ Sustainable Tourism — Kingsley Holbert, Exuma

* Minister’s Award for Hospitality - Peggy Thompson, Abaco

¢ People’s Choice Secular Music —Kenneth “KC” Wallace-Whitfield, Nassau
¢ People’s Choice Gospel Music — Minister Charles Drake and CMA Ensemble
e International Travel Writer - Jean-Luc Marty, Geo Magazine; France

¢ International Tour Operator - Steffen Boehnke, TUI; Germany

° Cruise Line of the Year — Norwegian Cruise Line

¢ Airline of the Year — British Airways



Marina at Rum Cay denies

it is closed for business -

_ A MARINA at Rum Cay
has denied claims by locals that
it is closed for business, and
says it is confident that it will
continue to attract foreign
yachtsmen in the coming
months.

Michelle Wells, operations
manager for Sumner Point
Marina, told The Tribune yes-
terday that the facility employs
ten people and meets a $5,000
fortnightly payroll.’

“It-is true that this kind of
business is seasonal and that

2008 was a bad year because.

of the rising fuel prices, but we
are still very much fully oper-
ational,” she added.

“We have had boats visiting
since Thanksgiving and during
the low season we try to keep
people employed as best we
can.’

Last week islanders told The
Tribune that Rum Cay men-
folk were having to collect
sweetwood bark for a living
because of high unemployment
on the island.

They referred to “closure”
of the island marina and the
cessation of work on the new,

aa ae
Bees

HUE
PHONE: 322-2157



Operations manager: ‘we are

‘still very much fully operational’



larger island marina being
developed by Montana Hold-
ings.

But Ms Wells said Sumner
Point had not closed. Though
2008 was a bad year for boat-
ing because of high fuel prices,

the marina was still taking
bookings, she said.

Accepting that Montana
operations on Rum Cay had
faced challenges, she said: “We
are hopeful things will turn
around for us. It has been very
difficult, but we are continu-
ing to press forward.”

Sumner Point was previous-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear .

ly owned by well-known Rum
Cay resident Bobby Little.

Now it is run by Montana,
which is the main company
behind development plans for
Rum Cay.

In The Tribune’s article,
island sources said cascarilla -
or sweetwood - was now the
only real source of employ-
ment for those officially out of
work.

The tree’s bark is used for
making Campari and is,
according to island sources,
bought by agents.for $5 per
pound.













Bank

Financi

ennai:

ng

Available

www. preownedbahamas. com



_ ABOVE: GLENDER
Archer-Knowles

- accepts -the
Cacique Award for
Transportation.

LEFT:

STANDLEY
Williams of :
Pelican Bay”
received the award
for Employee of
the Year.

Derek Smith/BIS

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A a STAT Te at

BENJAMIN
_ WESLEY
ROBERTS, 67

"affectionaly known as
Bunyan"















of Nassau, The Bahamas and
formerly of Man-O-War Cay,
Abaco, The Bahamas, who
died peacefully at Doctors
Hospital, on Sunday, Ist
February, 2009, will be held
at Bible Truth Hall, West
Avenue, Nassau on ‘Brida: 6th February; oe at 3:00p.m.









Brother Alec Pinder, Brother Brad Smith, Brother Aaron
Thompson and Brother Tom Roberts will officiate and
interment will be in Ebenezer Methodist Cemetery, East
| Shirley Street, Nassau.








He is survived by his wife, Frances June; a daughter
Christine April Albury; a son, Paul Wallace Roberts; a son-
in-law, Raymond; a daughter-in-law, Jennie; four
grandchildren, Kristin, Randall and Rachel Albury and
Tyler Roberts; a sister, Hannah Hall; a stepmother, Naomi
_ Roberts; four brothers-in-law, Larry Higgs, Walter Key,
Robert Higgs and Oliver Hall; four sisters-in-law, Arlene
Key, Carol Higgs, Gaylene Higgs and Stephanie Treco; six
nieces, Alana Carroll and her husband Ian, Lori Higgs
. Thompson, Carla Darling and her husband Shorn, Tammy
Thompson and her husband Drexon, Donna Higgs and her
husband Mike, Darcy ‘Albury and her husband Tony, eight
nephews, Daniel Key, Roger Hall and his wife Wendy,
Brian Hall, Randy Hall, Stephen Higgs, Ryan Higgs and
his wife Lisa, Luke Higgs and his wife Valine, Amos Higgs
and numerous other relatives and friends. Special thanks
to Brian, Linda and Cleveland Sawyer, Alec and Ruby.
Pinder, Lucinda Allen and family, Mr. & Mrs. Lyman Pinder
and the management and staff of Pinder's Customs Brokers
Limited and Centreville Pharmacy, Dr. Barrett McCartney,
Dr. Duane Sands, Dr. Theodore Turnquest and Dr. Adrian
Sawyer.

























Wilchcombe calls
for PLP ‘ceasefire’

FROM page one

cated men and women have forgotten that
if you destroy the party then what will be
left to lead?” asked Mr Wilchcombe,
addressing a town meeting held at St Mary
Magdelene church in his West End_-con-
stituency in Grand Bahama.

“If you slay, slander or ridicule the faces
of the party of Pindling, Hanna and Milo
then only the skeletal remains will be left for
burial,” he said.

After last week stating that media cepons
alluding to a connection between himself
and an alleged plot to extort money from
John Travolta, had left him “in pain”, Mr
Wilchcombe told the crowd, attending par-
ty officials and others listening by radio
that he was thankful for their “love, loyalty,
prayers and support.”

“Never have I felt as ‘surrounded by love
as I have felt during these past troubling
days,” he said, also calling on those listening
“to remember our friend and colleague
Pleasant Bridgewater and assure her of our
love.”

‘In advance of his appearance at the meet-
ing, Mr Wilchcombe personally sent an
advanced copy of his wide ranging address

to the media in an e-mail entitled “Obie

Wilchcombe Relaunch Speech”.

This comes after speculation was rife this’
past week among political commentators
about precisely: what impact the Travolta
saga will have on the fortunes of Mr Wilch-
combe as a potential leatier in the PLP,

Fiscal deficit
increases by almost.
57% to $121.4m

FROM page one

and for the PLP at large as a political enti-

ty.

Mr Wilchcombe charged last night that
“segments” of the foreign media have
engaged in “journalistic terrorism” in their
handling of the Travolta issue, which has
seen some American media outlets in par-
ticular making comments that clearly
impugn the character of the MP despite no
charges being brought against him: Mr
Wilchcombe has claimed to bea friend of
the Travoltas.

“Where sensationalism has become the

. grist of the media money mill, Truth has

become its first casualty ... even within

‘some of the most hallowed’ ‘halls of Jour-

nalism,” he said.
Meanwhile, aopariathy hitting back at
those in politics who may have sought to use

the-Travolta issue for their own political: |
_ ends, Mr Wilchcombe described how, when

entering politics in 1993 he “knew that (he)
had entered waters infested by political
sharks.”

“J knew then what I havé now confirmed
that I would be tested and tried; beaten
and wounded,” he said, adding, however,
that he is not “angry (or) bitter.”

“This is the life that I have chosen and so
_ Laccept the ups and the downs, the bitter
" with the sweet and the good times with the
bad times.”

Shifting gear, the MP’s address went on to
elaborate on his vision for the. advance-
ment of Grand Bahama and for “change” in
The Bahamas as a whole.

- and

“Bahamians want change... Change not
simply stolen from the lips of a gifted and
skilled orator, but change that refocuses
our minds, rekindles our desire for greatness
and inspires our spirit to love, respect and
honour.

“As a free and independent nation of
over 35 years, we Bahamians can no

longer blame our failings and shortcom-
‘ings on others,” he said.

The former tourism minister spoke about
the need for improvements in the country’s
education and justice systems, for account-
ability and transparency in the manage-
ment and use of public funds, for better
political representation, deeper democracy
“imaginative economic programmes
‘designed for self-sufficiency.”

.He told “PLPs everywhere” with these’
challenges facing the country, now “is not
the moment to break ranks and engage in a
dance of destruction.

“We know only too well that.a house
divided cannot stand. And’at this moment
in the life of the Bahamas, there is but one
absolute imperative... and that is the imper-
ative of unity...We are in this together and
in the battle days ahead, we will need every
fine warrior in the camp,” he added.

The meeting, which was’ also addressed
by two other party officials, was airéd live
on Love 97FM, the radio station owned by

‘Jones Communications, which Mr’ Wilch-.

combe last week said he would sue over
the publication of an article detailing the
alleged extortion plot.

Residents insist they heard gun
‘shots despite police doubts

In liew of flowers donations may be made for the medical

expense of Mr. Roberts to Frances Roberts, P.O. Box S.S.
_ 5175, Nassau, in memory of Mr. Benjamin (Bunyan) W.
-Roberts.

Friends may pay ‘their respects at Kemp's Bunctal Hone
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, on Thursday, 5th.
February, 2009 from 4: 30p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

- Arrangements by Kemp’ s Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale ae Palmdale, Nassau, The Bahamas.





Bictice Blemorial Mar |
Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020: Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 » 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

DEREK LEON |
'Lee'
_ KNOWLES, 38

of San Souci will be held on
Wednesday, February 4, 2009 at 11
:00 A.M. at St. Agnes Anglican
Church Baillou Hill Road.
Officiating will be The Vernerable
I. Ranfurly Brown, L. Th., M.A.
J.P., assisted by the Rev. Canon (
“Warren H::Rolle MA M.ED:, Rev.
Fr. Bernard Been B.A. and Deacon
Neil Nairn. Interment in The Church
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He i is survived: by his PARENTS: Leor & Carmel Kfiowles;
BROTHERS: Larry & Leslie Minns,.Shai & Lamont Knowles;
SISTERS: Lourie Minns, Schell Stubbs, Jill: Ward, Lorraine
Hutchins & Joan Pratt; ADOPTED MOTHER: Cynthia Archer;
ADOPTED SIBLINGS: Debbie & Anton Archer, Sonia, Shawn
. & Shane Pinder and Charles (Chuckie) Albury; AUNTS: Louise:
Bain, Agnes Albury, Joan Archer, Mizpah Archer & Rosie Archer,
Beryl Campbell, Ernestine Rolle, Christine Francis, Cheryl Sands,
Carolyn Bartlett and Hyacinth Saunders-Burnside; UNCLES:
Edwin, Roosevelt, Anthony & John Archer and Hasting Charlow;
GRAND UNCLE: Felix Pinder NIECES: Lexia Cartwright, Tasni_ |)
Minns, Sienne , Shea & Shandi Stubbs, Willette Pratt and Lynsey -
Ward; NEPHEWS: Lars & Lon Minns, Leslie Nigel Minns,
McGregor "Loran" Woodside, Jyles Ward, William Pratt.Sr., Wilton
Charles ‘Hutchins; NUMEROUS GRAND NIECES & NEPHEWS:
SISTERS-IN LAW: Marva & Nasha Minns; BROTHERS-IN-
LAW: Rev. Phillip Stubbs, Patrick Ward and William Pratt Sr.;
GODMOTHER: June Smith, (England) ; COUSINS: ‘Miriam:
Hanna, Paula Campbell-Stone, Audrey Strachan & Shaunna Everett;
Carla Lockhart, Keith, Andrew, Carl & Vaughn Albury, Edwin
Archer Jr., Samantha & Alicia McCartney; Simone Hall; Ravanna
Mason, Henfield, Cliff & Stimson Bullard, Ricardo Knowles,
Roosevelt Archer Jr., Deidre Hepburn, Michelle Miller & Shameka
Archer; Anthony Archer Jr., Antoinette & Amanda Archer; Juanita .
Gaitor, Desiree, John & Jeremy Archer, Anthea & Tavis Archer;
|. Asia & Trei Pinder, Desra Mason, Michael & Ray Saunders, Emma
Cooper & family, Rev, Hilda Allen & family, Hon. Rev. Phillip
Bethel & family, Albert Carey & family, Audley Carey & family,
Herbert Guilluame & family, Lilly Carey & family, Jessie Fox &
family, Kathleen McKenzie & family, Margaret Thompson &
family, Lydia Rahming & family, Celeste Lockhart & family, Ivis
Curtis & family; FAMILY & FRIENDS: Godfrey Eneas & Family,
Myra Albury, Voyna Albury, Leslie Pinder, The McCartney family
(Joan, Mavis, Coramae, Kim, Ann, Timonthy, Willie & Clinton)
Keith and Desire, Katina (Casey) Bowe, Dino Parker, Tamara &
the Hon. Elma Campbell, Dr. Earl Farrington & Melanie Farrington,
Dr. Bernard Rolle & Ernestine Rolle, Da Costa & Rosie Williams
& family, The Johnsons of Ernest St. (Royann, Joanne, John,

Kevin), Florence Rahming & Family, John Rahming & family, ;

Valencia Thompson & family, Derek Cambridge & family, Albert
& Ernest McKenzie & family, Barbara Wallace & family; Marsha
Bain, Esa & Michael Sherman, Isaac Smith & Family, Rev. Mervin |
Johnson & Cora Johnson, Natasha Newbold. Dianne, Carmetta,
Michelle & Brian Maycock, Audrey Carey, The Pedal Pushers and
their families, Audrey Fountain & family, The Carey, Knowles
and Allen’ Families of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, Janice Johnson,
‘Arlene Nicholls, Marvette Henfield, Jerry Fisher, Michael’ JR'
Femander, Claudia Frasier, All families of the National Tennis
Center and friends of the Gym Tennis Club.

‘The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson
Street o1 Tuesday, from 11:00.A.M. until 6:00 P.M.

dniesday from 10:00 A.M. until service |





compared to the same period
in 2007, standing at $162.3 mil- ;

lion. :
Yet recurrent spending,

which goes to cover Govern- }
-.ment’s fixed costs,-such as }

wages and property rents, rose
by 10.45 per cent to $557.4 mil-

lion.

fuel-and.electricity prices.)

Tourist arrivals fell by 6.1 per! :
cent. during the -first.nine! :
months of 2008, with a 15.2 per :
~ cent decline in the third quarter. ::
The Central Bank said: “In :
- particular, the respective 11.6: }
|per cent and 17 per cent third }
quarter fall-off in air and sea }
traffic culminated in reductions :
of 2.8 per cent and 7.8 per cent. }
over first nine months of 2007. :
Port of entry data showed con- }
tinued decline in visitors to New :

Providence, by 9.2 per cent,

incorporating a third quarter :
decrease of 16.7 per cent and }
led by weakness in sea arrivals ;

(15.3 per cent).

“Although Grand Bahama i.
arrivals improved by 3.1 per :-
cent in the third quarter, a year-
to-date decrease of 9.3 per cent }
was recorded, based on reduc- }
tions in both air (13.5 per cent) :

- and sea (7.3 per cent) visitors; °:
while arrivals to the Family }
Islands rose ona year-to-date :
- basis, by 2.3 percent, despite a:
third quarter deterioration of :
20.9 per cent, as increased sea _}
. Visitors (4.6 per-cent) out- ;-
weighed the contraction in air }

traffic (7 per cent).”

‘The Central Bank eaid the }
rate of credit expansion slowed }
by 25 per cent to $468.8 million ;
in 2008, with private sector :
credit growth rates falling to 6.8 :
per cent.and $385.6 million : |
compared to $524.6 million or
10.2 per cent growth the year :
», before. i
», ..Consumer credit growth fell ;

to $113.2 million or a 5.34 per }
*. cent rate, compared to $215.3 :

million or 11.4 per cent in 2007,

while mortgage growth dropped i
to 8.3 per cent or $211 million ;
compared to $300 million or :

13.4 per cent in 2007.

Ph: ere Ri 25 Sr as 8 bd

Elsewhere, the Central Bank :
said inflation increased from 2.5.
per. cent in 2007 to 4.5 per cent }
last year, due largely to higher! :



FROM page one

- cars rushed to the scene, traf-

fic was backed up on Shirley

. Street. past St Matthew’s
Church. After the incident

two police officers on motor-
cycles were left at the scene

until the badly damaged car.

could be removed.
However, a motorist dri-

‘ving down Sweetings Lane
‘shortly after the;crash at Sears:

‘Road, said he saw police cars,
police vans, a SUV, all with
sirens blaring at the scene. He
heard three shots, but did not
know who fired them. A
police ‘car then rushed past
him, turned into Moss Lane,

Three charged

FROM page one

; same day, the three men conspired to

murder Newbold.

The men, who were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane,
were not required to plead to the

charges.

_ Bowe was also arraigned on two
counts of possession of.a firearm with

intent to put another in fear.

_ Itis alleged that on Friday, Decem-
ber 26, Bowe was in possession ofa.
black handgun intending to put Wil-

imide Almonor in fear.

It is also alleged that on Friday,
January 1, Bowe was had a black
handgun intending to put Anastacia
Evans in fear. Bowe, who was not rep-
resented by counsel, pleaded not

» guilty to the charges. \

Lawyer Willie Moss told the court
that:his.client Julian Johnson had
informed him that he was beaten

while in police custody.

Lawyer Algernon Allen Jr also told
‘the court that he received similar
information from his client Leshawn
Bowe. The men were remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday. °
The case was adjourned to February
18 and transferred to Court 11, Nas-

sau Street.

wits Plaza —~ Par

Wax: (242) ere Pes b

www the prichkle patch.com

then’ east on Dowdeswell
Street, pursuing a man who it
is believed had run from the

wrecked car and into an over- °

grown vacant lot, not too far
from St Matthew’s church rec-

tory. The motorist. insisted ©

that the shots came from the
bushy area on Dowdeswell
Street.

Another resident of Sears

road was in his kitchen when

he heard a terrible’ ¢rash. He *
:» looked:out. of the window and:

saw ‘the electrical polesand
wires on Sears Road swaying.

One pole had caught fire. The ,

area was without electricity
until about 6.20 Sunday night
when BEC repaired the dam-
aged pole. Another resident

said that ‘a Aolibedian: told him
that the driver of the car was
arrested and that drugs were
discovered in the vehicle.
“The older folk in the area
ran outside to see what the
commotion was,” said a resi-
dent on hearing the gunshots.
“A lot of them were con-
cerned because this sort of
stuff does not happen in this
area. '
“Many of them sit on their

‘porches in the mornings so

stray bullets are not something

they should have to be think-
ing about first thing Sunday

morning.” .

Up to press, time; police still
could not confirm a Teport on
the incident.

Christie expected to announce
Pleasant Bridgewater Senate

_ replacement this week

' FROM page one

: chaowed down a decision, he said "due diligerice’ in.
respect of background checks has to be completed before

a formal announcement is made.

"Numbers really don't matter but at least half a dozen
recommendations have come in. It (the announcement)

could be any time really, it's a question of whether I do it
after the House of Assembly or not. I'm not sure yet.

"I think in my own mind_a decision is made, but I

want to be absolutely careful about speaking to it until
such time as necessary checks are made on all of the
relevant people who are under consideration.

"People who would have discussed this with me would

know that I have limited my seléction to the island of

Grand Bahama, That's whete Ms Bridgewater is from, it's

a very large island, and we have one member of Parlia-
ment and therefore insofar as the Senate is concerned we

at least. ought to have one member from Grand Bahama,"

he told The Tribune.
_ When asked whether Ms Bridgewater's replacement
will be new to the political fray or a well-known face, Mr

Christie was tight-lipped. "I think it's fair to say that I'm
going to let you knowin a short period of time," he said.

Ms Bridgewater‘resigned from the Senate on Janu-

‘ary 24, a day after being charged by police with abetment

to extort and conspiracy to extort $25 million from.
celebrity John Travolta. She, with ambulance driver

Tarino Lightbourne, were arraigned on these charges

bail.

last week. Ms Bridgewater.was released on $50,000

The Senate meets again on February 12.

SORRY
hed PHONE ORDERS PLEA





THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 3, 2009

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 7

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and ~
his sidekick Derek put sy

some smiles on your

kids faces.

Bring your children to the : i
MctHappy Hour at McDonald's in
_ Oakes Field every Thursday -
from 3:30pm to 4:300m during the
month of February 2009.

\

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

?miovin' it -

0-FLIX, 3

call 3

: ‘Movie Gift Certificates}

[make great gifts!§



THE TRIBUNE





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,

2009








Bynum
will miss
eight to

12 weeks...
See page 10






SPORTS
WG



BASKETBALL
BAISS POSTSEASON

THE Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools will host their sudden
death basketball playoffs on
Wednesday and.Thursday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

e Here’s a look at the
matchups:

Wednesday

Junior girls - Queen’s Col-
lege Comets (No.1) 'vs St.
John’s Giants (No.4).

Junior boys - St..Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
(No.1) vs Jordan “Prince
William Falcons (No.4).

Senior girls - St. John’s
(No.1) vs: Nassau Christian
Academy (No.4).

Senior boys ~ positions unde-
cided,

Thursday

Junior girls - St. Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
(No.2) vs Westminster Diplo-
mats (No:3).

Junior boys -- Westminster
(No.2) vs Kingsway Academy
Saints (No.3). .

Senior girls - St. Augustiné’s
College (No.2) vs Queen’s Col-
lege Comets. (No.3).

Senior boys - undecided.

The winners in all four series
will advance to the best-of-

. three championship that will
be played next Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday, if

- necessary, at Kendal Isaacs.

SOCCER

_BFA’S SENIOR LEAGUE \

UPDATE



THE Bahamas eo hai a
Association continued its reg- -

ular season. on Sunday at the
. National Development Center
with two exciting games on tap:

In the opener, the Sharks
Football Club blanked the FC
Nassau 6-0 as Chedlet Pierre
struck fora goal in the 8th
minute, Duckerno Exlias in the

’ Jith; Nesta Lemard in the 33rd,
Mario Alsind twice in the 50th
and 59th and Yvenel Brown i in
the 83rd.

While the Sharks improved
to 3-2 in third place, FC Nassau -
remained in last place at.1-7.

In the feature contest, Cale-
donia FC knocked off the Baha
Juniors 3-1. For Caledonia, Thi-
ago DaSilva scored twice in.the
6th and 61st minutes and
Damian Neville got one in the
32nd. Kevin Vangehr scored
the Baha Jr’s lone goal in the»

87th.

Caledonia is currently sitting ;
in second place at 6-2 and the
Baha Juniors FC are in fifth
place at 3-4.

e At the end of Sunday’ 'S
double header, here’s a look at
the leading goalscorers for. the
season:

Lesley St. Fleur, Bears FC,
10; Marcus Trail, Caledonia
FC, 7; Andre Carey, Bears. FC,
6; Duckerno Exlias, Sharks FC,
6; Dean Farry, Caledonia FC, 4;
Frank Negri, Caledonia EC, 4;
Jermaine Johnson, Caledonia
FC, 4; Denair Mitchell, Cava-
liers FC, 4; Ordaine McCallum,
Cavalier F C, 4 and Ehren Han-
na, Dynamos FC, 4

BASEBALL >
JBLN’S RESULTS

THE Junior Baseball League .

of Nassau played:a series of ~

games over the weekend at the
St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams
with the following results post-
ed:

Tee-Ball

Knights def. Sands Gnats 18-
15; Sidewinders def. Blew
Claws 19-8 and Grasshoppers
def. Raptors 21-20...

Coach Pitch | —

Athletics def. Astros 13- 3:
Cubs def. Diamondbacks 18-6
and Bluejays def. Angels 15-
10.

- Minor League’
Red Sox def. Rays 18-14 and
Rockies def. Royals'11-1.
MajorLeague ©.
Reds def. Marines 6-5 and
Indians def. Marlins 8-7.
’ Junior League

Dodgers def. Twins 6-5 and __

Yankees def. Cardinals 20-4.
Senior League
. Pirates def. Rangers 6-2 and
Phillies def. Tigers 18-4.



Bahamas gets set for Fed Cun

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

oach Sean Cartwright had
a chance to go through a
series of practices with
Grand Bahamian Larikah
Russell, Nikkita Fountain
and Kerrie Cartwright in Montreal,
Canada, as they prepare for the Fed
Cup this week.
' And based on what he has seen,
Cartwright.is confident that the
Bahamas will perform very well in the
- field of seven teams that will be placed
in two pools - one with four and the
other with three - when the draw takes
place today.

“The team has been working out real-
ly hard and they are ready to go,” said
Cartwright, who noted that the players
have been making the adjustment to
the chilly and snowy conditions they
had to endure coming out of their hotel
to get to the Uniprix Stadium where
they will play.

Cartwright, however, noted that the
players selected by the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association have indicated that
they basically know a lot of the players

on the. teams from Canada, Paraguay,,.

Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia and Puer-
to Rico.





NIKKITA FOUNTAIN thinks the Bahamas has
“a pretty good chance” at the Fed Cup...

In fact, he said that while the teams
have at least one player who is highly
ranked on the Women’s Tennis Tour,
the other members are basically playing
at their level.

“So we feel that looking at the teams
over here, we have a good chance to
make it through to the next round,” he
projected. “We just have to wait to see
who we will get:to play when they have
the draw (today).”

Cartwright said the facilities is one

- KERRIE CARTWRIGHT, the youngest member of the team at age 16...

Sports Reporter %
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net ok:

THE Bahamas Scholastic Association —
began its trio of championship series yester-
day at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with
the Teleos Cherubims reasserting their dom-
inance as pennant winners, winning game
one in two of the three series.

Senior Boys

Teleos Cherubims: 71

Galilee Miracles - 66

’ Teleos scored on the opening tip and led
wire to wire and held off a late charge by
the Miracles to take game one of the series.

The Cherubims ended a high scoring open-
ing quarter with a late three pointer to g0 up

"26-19 at the end of the first.

Galilee opened the second quarter on a
6-1 run to trim the deficit 27-25, however
Rakeem Smith stopped the run with an acro-
batic finish to regain.a two possession lead for
the Cherubims.

‘Smith, who finished with 14. points, con-
trolled the pace of the game at the guard
position and teamed up with Chauncey
Cooper to force several turnovers at the ini-
tial level of the Teleos fullcourt trap.

Teleos maintained a 45-39 lead at the half.

Cooper, who finished with a. game high 19
points, gave the Cherubims their biggest lead
of the game in the third when he converted
on a three point play to give his team a 59-47

‘lead late in the third quarter.

They led 63-52 heading into the fourth,



BSA CHAMPIONSHIPS



and the Miracles never legitimately threat-

ened the remainder of the way as both teams

traded baskets in the final quarter.
Frederick Delancy led the Miracles with 15

points while David Strachan finished with

13.

: Junior Boys
’ Zion Christian Eagles - 65
Teleos Cherubims - 60
The Eagles led by as many as 10 in the
third quarter and staved off a late comeback
to take a crucial game one win in the most

evenly matched of the three championship

series.
The Eagles led 17-11 after the first quarter
however suffered a poor shooting second

. quarter and trailed 30-29 at the half.

The Eagles’ Anthony Oliver opened the
third quarter with a block and took the ball
coast to coast to finish and give his team giv-

ing his team a 31-30 lead which put them

ahead for good.
Oliver finished with a game high 24 and

scored 10 of his team’s 16 points in the quar- »

ter..

The Eagles led 45-41 heading into the
fourth.

The Cherubims interior defense did little to
stop Philip Hanna in the fourth quarter as his
drives to the basket and a stifling trap helped
the Eagles to open their biggest lead of the

of the best that he has seen ail while

’ his daughter, Kerrie, has played there at

least three times before, the other two
players have had a chance to make the
necessary adjustments in. practice.

Kerrie Cartwright, the youngest
member of the team at age 16, said the
Bahamas’ team jis a pretty strong one
and the players are all eager to start
competition. ;

“We know a lot of the players here. I
know I’ve played against some of
them,” said Cartwright, who has trav-
eled extensively on the junior circuit.
“As a team, we have spent a lot of time
here working out, so I think we will be
ready.”

Fountain, perhaps the most consis-
tent member of the team having played
since she was 15, said they have been
running from the hotel to the car to the
tennis facility to avoid the cold, but they
have gotten adjusted to the climate and
are just waiting to start playing.

“IT think.we have a pretty good
chance. We have been talking about it
all day. We’ve been saying ‘we got this,
we got this.’ So it’s definitely nothing |
that we can’t handle,” she insisted. “So
we should do very well.”

Fountain, the eldest member of the
team,at 24, has played a number of ties
with Russell, but this i is the second one
with Cartwright.

Russell, who has spent a lot of time
training in Tampa, Florida, has played
since she was 16. Said The 23-year-old:
“I think we have a pretty good shot.
We had a.chance to see the other teams
and I think we can compete well and we
can get into a pretty good position to get
into the next group,” she projected.

“’m pretty confident in myself and .
my teammates. I had a chance to hit —
with them for a few days and we look
pretty good. I’m looking forward to
playing with them again.’

BLTA president Wesley. Rolle said...

~ the they wanted to send Kalotina Klonaris.._ |
~on the-team as well; ‘but a ‘shoulder ~*~: |

injury forced her to miss:the trip:
“The team is a pretty good team with

. Larikah and Nikkita. Kerrie is also play-

ing pretty good tennis,” Rolle stressed.
“So we feel we have a good chance of
doing very well.”

Rolle said it just depends on who they
get to play in the draw.

Cherubims take game 1 in two series

‘@ By RENALDO DORSETT

game.

A basket by Oliver gave ‘thei a 59-49 lead
with just over two minutes remaining.

The Cherubims blazed a comeback trail
Jed by Henry Rolle, who trimmed the lead to
three, 57-54 with 1:43 left to play and

. Damero Arnett brought the Cherubims with-
in one on the ensuing possession.

Shakiel Hepburn ended the threat with a :

tough basket inside and the Eagles forced a
~ turnover and easy score to make it a two
possession game.

Hanna finished with 19 points while Hep-
burn and Arsenio Woodside both finished
with eight apiece.

Rolle finished with 10 points while Brian
Francis and Arnett finished with 13 and 11
points respectively.

Girls

Teleos Cherubims - 59

Mt Caramel Cavs-9

With Sashana Smith patrolling the interior
for the Cherubims, the pennant winners
cruised to an effortless game one victory and
appear on the brink of a division title.

Smith finished with a game high 21 points
and. five blocks.

The Cherubims center controlled the

offensive glass and sparked easy fastbreak .

opportunities for point guard Angie Bethel.
Bethel finished with 16 points, 14 of which

came in the first half. Tannica Smith also’

added 16 for Teleos.

¢ Game two in all three series will take
place 4pm today at the Kendal Isaacs ore
nasium

‘Righty per cent of competitors will be new lifters’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT has been quite a while since

the Bahamas Powerlifting Fed- -

eration has staged National
Bodybuilding Championships.

- In fact, when the federation
put on this year’s championships
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um on Saturday, March 21, look
for a whole lot of new faces to
step out on center stage to lift
the heavy iron bars in the squats,

‘benchpress and deadilifts.

One ofthe only consistencies
to look forward to is Rex Burn-
side, who is still the president,
and he is eager to see the new
talent that should emerge among
the few veteran competitors. ~

“We have a great number of
new lifters that will be taking
part in this tournament,” Burn-

side pointed out. “I think it’s fair

to say that 80 per cent. of the
competitors will be new lifters:
“And what we are doing right

now. is to rebuild the sport, of:
powerlifting because it has taken

a dive a couple years ago. So we

have been going around the var-'
ious gyms training people to take-

over.’

Unlike in the past, Burnside
said they expect to have much
more female competitors step-
ping out and competing this year
than they have had in the past
in any one year.

“We also still have the out-
standing lifter, Leslie Whyte, so
we are looking forward to

rebuilding the sport in order to
take the Bahamas back to the
international level,” said Burn-
side, who noted that they haven’t
had a national team compete
since 2005.

“We know that the Kevin
Woodsides, the Arlington
Clarkes, John Mills and Falcon
Majors. I think it’s fair to say
that those lifters have made their
exit from the sport as far as com-
petition is concerned. But they
are still around training some of
the youngsters.”

Burnside said they have close
to 70 competitors, the majority of
whom are under the age of 25,
competing. Included in those
numbers are a team from the
College of the Bahamas and
some of the high schools.

At least 10 competitors from

Grand Bahama are also expected
to compete as they tune up for
their National Championships
that will follow.
' “Their competition was sup-
posed to be this month, but a lot
of them are not ready, so they
had to push it back for another
month,” Burnside stated, “They
just got started with their training
in January, but this will be good
for them to get in-some compe-
tition before they concentrate on
their nationals.”

Burnside said he anticipates
that the competition will be
extremely fierce and he invites
the public to mark the date down
on their calendar to come out
and show their Supper to the
competitors.

Davis Cup:
Knowles.
undecided

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK
Knowles: and
Mahesh Bhu-
pathi surged to
number two on
the ATP com-
puter rankings
by virtue of fin-
ishing as the |
men’s doubles |
runners-up at
the Australian eS
Open.

_ But with the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associ-



- ation getting set to send a team

off to Paraguay next month to

try to get out of the American

Zone II, Knowles is still unde-

cided whether or not he will,
travel with the young players.

“I was: pretty focused on my
event here, so now IJ have to
take a step back and decide
what I’m going to, do,” said
Knowles in an interview with
The Tribune on Saturday after
he and Bhupathi lost in three
sets to the American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

“The tie is going to be played
away in Paraguay, which is
going to be a very difficult task.
It’s going to be very tough trav-
eling also. So I just have to see

. how it all fits in and how my

body is feeling as well.”
Taking this week off to recu-

-. perate at home in Dailas, Texas,

Knowles is expected to make
his decision then before he’s

* scheduled to spend next week in |

town with his family.

But BLTA president Wesley
Rolle said that while it would
be good for the team to have
Knowles travel to play doubles,

they can’t wait forever. for his

decision.
“We have to send in the

‘names of the players, so we’re’
- going to do that and whenever

he makes up his mind and if he’
decides that he wants to play
then we will make some adjust-
ments,” Rolle stated.

“But we’re not going to wait
for him to say ‘yes, I’m going
to,’ or ‘no, I’m not going to.’
The team has to be named
because the dates for the tour-
nament is set and .we have to
meet certain obligations as far
as our team is concerned.”

Whether or-not he decides to

-go, Rolle said captain John Far-

rington will have the use of
players Devin Mullings, Timo-
thy Neely, Bjorn Munroe and
Marvin Rolle.

- Mullings and Neely are
expected to play singles based

- on their performances as. the

top two finishers in the BLTA’s
December Invitational at the
National Tennis Center with

, Munroe and Rolle scheduled to |

play doubles.

If Knowles does decide to
travel to play with the team,
Rolle said the players’ partici-
pation in singles and doubles
could change, but it will depend
on what Farrneton decides as
the captain.

“These guys are committed,
but we haven’t heard from
Mark yet,” Rolle stressed.
“Until he does so, we have to go
ahead and name the team.

“But if we have to make an
adjustment, we have the oppor-
tunity to do so.”

Looking ahead to the tie,
Knowles. said it’s obvious that
the team has to win some
matches and he feels the young
guys will have to step up and
play a lot harder.

“We’re making some good
progression, but when you’re
talking about zone one, you’re
talking about some elite com-
pany,” Knowles pointed out.

“It’s a pretty high calibre of
tennis, so our younger guys who
have been playing on the team

for the last couple of years, will

need to step | it up. That’s the
only we we’re going to get
there.”

Depending on their outcome,
the Bahamas will play again
over the weekend of July 10-12
against the winner or loser
between Guatemala and the
Dominican Republic, who will
also play March 6-8.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 9



Star Trackers to pay homage to track and field legends

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the Bahamas’ lead-
ing athletics clubs is preparing
to host one of the more eagerly
anticipated meets of the young
2009 BAAA’s calendar.

The Star Trackers Track and
Field Club will host the Baker
Concrete. and Greyco Limited
“Star Performers Track Classic
2009,” Saturday February 7 at
the Thomas A Robinson Stadi-
um.

The organisation will pay
homage to two of the legends of

Bahamian track and field,
Frank Rutherford and Debbie °

Ferguson McKenzie.
Rutherford captured the
country’s first Olympic medal
with a bronze in the triple jump
at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics,
while Feguson-McKenzie,
arguably one of the most deco-
rated sprinters in Bahamian his-

tory, reached the Olympic podi- -

um individually and as a mem-
ber of the storied Golden Girls
400m relay squad. Meet organ-
iser Laura Charlton said the
meet continues to grow in

stature and the athletes have:

responded with great perfor-
mances year after year. _
“The first year we held the

meet we were more than happy’

to oblige and it has been going



CHRIS “Bay” Brown



strong for five years. The kids
really thrive on the competition

not just from the local athletes *

but athletes from throughout
the region as well. We have
hosted athletes from Jamaica,
the Cayman Islands, Turks and

-Caicos, Curacao and the United

States,” she said. “Each year it
continues to get bigger and bet-
ter, largely in part to our spon-
sors.”

J R Reynolds, a representa-
tive of the event’s chief spon-
sor, said as corporate citizens
his company has become com-
pelled to assist in positive
aspects of the community, par-
ticularly those. involving the
youth suchas the Star Track-
ers Track and Field Club.

“As a company we always
feel like we have.a responsibil-
ity-in the community we work
in. For several years we have
sponsored other groups but we
have never had anything this
large. When coach Ferguson
contacted us, he explained the
programme, and showed us the
kids ‘and how much influence
they have in shaping their lives...

we felt it was a no brainier to’

become involved.

Reynolds, said as sponsors
they will play a vital role in
ensuring the meet becomes one
of the premier events in the
Caribbean.

' “The coaches spend so much

'

DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE

of their time teaching, not just
track, but they are teaching life
skills and we thought it was a no
brainier to put all of our eggs in
one basket and get behind this
organisation. We want this to
be the premier meet in the
Caribbean,” he said. “The
things they learn as a part of
the club in terms of discipline

Tw



and setting goals are things you
can use it whatever career you
choose. We look forward to a
long and profitable relation-
ship.”

This weekend meet will fea-.

ture athletes from the Family
Islands, including Andros, Aba-
co, Exuma, Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Long Island and

throughout the region includ-
ing the Cayman Islands, Turks
and Caicos and Jamaica.

Star Trackers Track and Field
Club officially began in 2001

and features over 40 athletes *

registered for the 2009 season.

Star Trackers head coach
David Charlton, who is assisted
by coaches Rudolph Ferguson
and Trevor Strachan, said with

the progression of the club’s ,

athletes and the meet itself he,
_ expects the Star Performers to
, become a world class meet.

“We are looking good, we
had a number of surprising per-
formances and a number of kids
rose to the occasion who were
not on the radar last year and
made their presence felt, now
they are the ones to beat,” he
said. “We expect to have a great
meet with a number of quali-
fiers from not only our club but
others clubs as well. We are
very excited over our sponsor-
ship, the level of competition,

’ the expected attendance at the

meet so we are well on our way
to accomplishing a world class
meet.”

The meet will feature com-
petition in a myriad of divisions
ranging from under seven to

_Masters. Competition takes

place from 10am to 9pm.
Members of the Star Trackers

Track and Field Club confi-

dently boast high expectations

Es

Winners of the BAAA national eter school Nae

for their organisation’s flagship
event.

Said middle distance runner
Audley Carey, who competes
in the 800m, 1500m and 3000m:
“My season has been going
pretty good and at our meet I
expect first place finishes in all
of my races,” he said. “I want to
get under two minutes for my
800m and under 10 minutes for
my 3000m especially.”

Sprinter-Steve Munroe chose
not to make any predictions on
the outcome of his events, but
said he too expects great finish-
es in the 100m and 200m:

“For our meet I want to come
out and do well,” he said. “I do

‘not want to make any predic-

tions or anything like that yet,
I'd rather that being a surprise.”
Hurdler and quarter miler
Patrick Bodie said while he
expects to do well at the meet,
he continues to have his sights
set on the season’s ultimate
goal. hs
The season has been going

‘ well, so far I set a personal best °

in the 400m hurdles in 56.5s and
Iam hoping to make the Carif- °
ta team and continue to drop
my times,” he said. “At the Star

. performers meet the public can

expect a good show in the 400m
and it will help me towards my
two major goals of the season,
the Carifta and World Youth
Games.”



Brown an _
inductee in.
‘09 Hall
of Fame

@ By BRENT STUBBS '
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

4



WINNERS of the Under 15 4x400m boys relay

AT the beginning of the year,
Chris “Bay” Brown got a con-
firmation letter from the Inter-
national Amateur Athletic Fed-
eration, listing as the number
three ranked male quarter-mil-
er in the world.

On January 27, Brown
received another letter, this
time from the Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference, listing him
as one of the inductees into the
2009 Hall of Fame class.

In the latest letter from the
office of the MEAC’s commis-
sioner, Brown. was congratulat-
ed on his selection for the
induction.

“You are being inducted for

this important honour because
of your outstanding success as
an athlete in the MEAC, and
for your superb professional
achievéments in your commu-
nity and state,” the commis-
sioner wrote. 5
Official |

The official MEAC Hall of
Fame Reception and Induction
Brunch Ceremony will take
place March 12 at the Benton
Convention Center in Winston-
Salem, North Carolina.

The induction is being held
during the week of the MEAC
Men and Women Basketball
Tournament and the Hall of
Fame inductees will be recog-
nised during the games staged
the night of their ceremony.

On May 29, 1981, the Mid-
Eastern Athletic Conference
combined a 10-year anniver-

‘sary banquet with its first Hall
of fame Induction Ceremonies

WINNERS of the Under 17 4x400m girls relay



leader in a significant statistical cate- in the 400 metres indoors and both the
gory in their sport (e.g. free throws, 400 and 4 x 400 relay outdoors.
kills, sacks, shutouts, strikeouts, etc.; Last summer, Brown turned in his

in Greensboro, North Caroli- (and/or), best performance in three ties when he
na. 4) Must be the all time institutional. got fourth in the 400m at the Olympic

Ceremonies have taken place __ leader in a significant statistical cate- | Games in Beijing, China, getting edged
in 1986, 1993, 1995, 1999, 2002, gory; (and), ; out on a dive at the line at the Bird’s

Nest from American David Neville.
He came back and closed out his trip
6) Have to be away from the sport by anchoring the Bahamas men’s 4 x

and must have completed their eligibil- 400 relay team of Andretti Bain,

ity; Michael Mathieu and Andrae Williams,
7) Must be of high moral character: along with alternates Ramon Miller and
8) Must be making significant contri- Avard Moncur, to the silver medal
butions to society. , behind the US.
Brown, 30, was a two-time Division 1 In October last year, Eleuthera native

All-American at Norfolk State Univer- Brown got married to Faith in Athens,

sity where he excelled for the Spartans Georgia, where they now reside.

2005, 2007 and 2008.

In order for athletes to be
selected, they must meet the
following criteria:

1) Must have achieved All-
American status in their respec-
tive sport; (and/or),

2) All-Conference status (1st,
2nd, 3rd team or honourable
mention) in the sport; (and/or),

3) Must have been an annual

5) Must have ended playing career
for. at least five years;





WINNERS of the Under 20 4x400m girls relay



PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009





i By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Tuesday, February 3

Toronto at Cleveland (7 pm
EST). LeBron James and the
Cavaliers are 22-0 at home this
season.

STARS

Sunday

— Kevin Martin, Kings,
scored 37 points on his 26th
birthday and Sacramento beat
Oklahoma City 122-118 in over-
time

— LeBron James, Cavaliers,
scored 33 points in Cleveland's
90-80 win over Detroit.

— Paul Pierce, Celtics, had
36 points, eight rebounds and

six assists to help Boston extend »

its winning streak to 11 games
with a 109-101 victory over Min-
nesota. —

DISAPPEARING ACT

Chris Bosh came in averag-
ing close to 24 points and nine
rebounds in 20 career games
against the Magic, but shot a
disappointing 4-for-11 and was
booed after missing five of his
first six attempts in Toronto's
113-90 loss to Orlando on Sun-
day.

MISFIRING

. Detroit lost to Cleveland 90-
80 on Sunday, giving the Pis-
tons four straight home losses
for the first time in eight years.
They're also coming off their
first losing month since Febru-
ary 2004, the month in which
they acquired Rasheed Wallace
and went on to win the NBA
title.

LISTEN UP Le

Sacramento held a players-
only meeting on Saturday and
then went out and beat Okla-
homa City 122-118 in overtime
on Sunday. "I think it helped,"
Spencer Hawes said.

SPEAKING

"I just try to give the gam
what it needs. Today, I thought
it needed my. scoring. You go
off and say 'Hey, I've still got it.'
Even at 31."

— Paul Pierce after his 36
points, eight rebounds and six
assists helped Boston extend its

winning streak to.11 games with..

a 109-101 victory over the Min-
nesota Timberwolves on. Sun-
day




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NEW YORK (AP) — Los Angeles
Lakers center Andrew Bynum will miss
eight to 12 weeks after tearing the medi-
al collateral ligament in his right knee.

Bynum was hurt in the first quarter
of Saturday night's win at Memphis.
Kobe Bryant drove to the basket, missed
the shot and crashed into Bynum's right
leg. Bynum immediately grabbed his
knee.

Bynum is the Lakers' third-leading

‘scorer and second-leading rebounder,

averaging 14.0 points, 8.2 rebounds and
1.9 blocks.

The 7-0, 285-pound Bynum's injury
brought back bad memories of last sea-
son for the Lakers. He went down in
mid-January and was expected to be
sidelined eight to 12 weeks after bruising
a bone in his knee and briefly dislocating
his kneecap.

Instead, he missed the final 46 games

of the season, as the Lakers lost in the
NBA finals. He underwent arthroscopic
surgery May 21 to remove cartilage

debris and smooth some rough spots on ~

the underside of his kneecap.

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

NBA Today Bynum will miss eight to 12 weeks



ANDREW BYNUM (left) reacts after being hit by Kobe Bryant (right) in the first quarter of Sat-

urday’s game against the Memphis Grizzlies. Bynum left the game...

"This is a team that went to the finals
last year that we put on the floor, so
they're confident in what they can do,"

(AP Photo: Mark Weber)

coach Phil Jackson said at the Lakers'
shootaround Monday afternoon, before
they announced the severity of the



TRIBUNE SPORTS




injury. "We know we're going to miss
his presence, his rebounding ability. But
this is a very capable team."

The injury came as the 21-year-old
seemed to be taking a major step for-
ward in his fourth NBA season. In the
five games before he was hurt, he was
averaging 26.2 paints, 13.8 rebounds and

- 3.2 blocks and shooting 65.3 per cent

from the field. — sy %
"It changes our team, and the rhythm .
that we're playing with,". Bryant said at’
the shootaround. " Obviously we found a
great rhythm there with him in the line-
up, particularly the last week or so. So

‘we're going to have to make some

adjustments." 2yh!

Bryant insisted the-Lakers: could still
win a title without Bynum.

"There are teams that lost.in the finals
that.go back and win the next year," he:
said. = wa
"I think having Andrew in the lineup
makes us a dominant team. With him
out of the lineup, we're still a great team.
You put him in the mix, it takes us to
another level." :





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DETROIT PISTONS’ Allen Iverson (right)
oO OFT Aci B OEM CRAVE (lRsmese CIITA
Pavlovic in the second half of Sunday's
game in Auburn Hills; Michigan: Iverson
led the Pistons with 22 points but the
Cavaliers beat the Pistons 90-80.



(AP Photo: Duane Burleson)

LeBron watches

while Williams,
Gibson lead Cavs

By LARRY LAGE

AP Sports Writer :



AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
(AP) — LeBron James could
get used to being a cheerleader.

Especially when the Cavaliers
can take care of business with
him on the bench.

James scored: 33 points and
got some timely help from Mo
Williams and Daniel Gibson in
Cleveland's 90-80 win over the
Detroit Pistons on Sunday.

Williams, who has become
James' best sidekick on the
perimeter, scored 22 points and

-Gibson scored all seven of his

points in the fourth.
"It's been different this sea-

son because we have guys who .

can control the offense and con-
trol the defense," James said.
"There's not been a time this
season when I felt pressure to
not come off the floor.

"I know these guys can take
care of things."

In Sunday's other NBA
games, it was: Orlando 113,
Toronto 90; Boston 109, Min-
nesota 101; and Sacramento
122, Oklahoma City 118 in

- overtime.

With James resting, Williams
and Gibson outscored Detroit
by themselves during a 15-2 run
that gave the Cavs a 73-68 lead
early in the fourth quarter.

For the stories

Te RGA tie
MN eT
Pens



James shouted, "C'mon Mo!
C'mon Mo!" from the scorer's
table during the final posses-
sion of the winning surge, then
celebrated with Williams after
his jumper led to Detroit calling
a timeout.

The 24-year-old phenom
sealed the victory on a driving
layup, an assist, 3-pointer and
free throw to put the Cavs
ahead by nine with-2? minutes
left. . ,

The Central Division-leading
Cavs have won six of their last
seven, and are 12 games ahead
of Detroit. They had lost four
straight at The Palace in the
regular season.

"Any road win is special, but
the rivalry we have with these
guys adds some fire," James
said.

Allen Iverson scored 22
points for Detroit, which has
lost nine of 12 and is 21-21 since
acquiring him in a trade with
Denver.

"I'm surprised, but I've seen
the.flashes of how good we can
be," Iverson said. "And, I see
the reasons that we lose games."

Magic 113, Raptors 90

At Toronto, Dwight Howard
had 29 points and 14 rebounds,
Jameer Nelson added 18 points
and 10 assists, and Orlando nev-
er trailed.

Mickael Pietrus scored 22
points and Rashard Lewis had
15 for the Magic, who led by as
many as 24 and have won three
straight following back-to-back
losses to Boston and Miami.

Orlando broke it open with
a 20-6 run to start the second
half, keyed by two 3-pointers
each by Lewis and rookie
Courtney Lee.

Toronto trailed 87-65 after
three quarters.

Orlando, the NBA's best 3-

point shooting team, shot 13- .

for-30 from beyond the arc.
Jose Calderon scored 16
points for Toronto.

Celtics 109,

Timberwolves 101

At Boston, Paul Pierce had
36 points, eight rebounds and
six assists, Ray Allen scored 22
and the Celtics won their 11th
straight game.

Al Jefferson, the centerpiece
of the trade that brought Kevin
Garnett to Boston and set the
stage for the franchise's 17th
NBA title, scored 34 points for
the Timberwolves. Jefferson
also had 11 rebounds for his
26th double-double of the sea-
son.

Boston led by as many as 21
in the third quarter, 71-50,
before Minnesota scored 15 of
the next 17 points. The Tim-
berwolves got within five in the
fourth quarter, 94-89, with 5:20
left, but Allen hit a jumper and
Pierce made a pair of free
throws to make it a nine-point
game:

The Timberwolves had lost
three straight since winning 10
of 12.

Garnett missed the game with
a high tever.

Kings 122, Thunder 118, OT

At Sacramento, Calif., Kevin
Martin scored 37 points and the
Kings ended an eight-game los-
ing streak.

Bobby Jackson had six of his
11 points in overtime. The vet-'
eran guard put Sacramento
ahead for good with a floater
in the lane and followed with a
jumper to make it 120-116 with
1:42 left.

Russell Westbrook had a
career-high 34 points and added
eight assists for the Thunder.
Kevin Durant scored 33, Jeff
Green had 28 points and 13
rebounds, and Nick Collison
added 10 points and 14 boards.

Francisco Garcia had 17
points, Jason Thompson scored
15 and Spencer Hawes finished
with 13 for the Kings. Both Gar-
cia and Thompson fouled out
in the fourth quarter.



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 11

We say “Thank You” to all our valued >
Clients & Staff for your support.

Building on its financial strength and rich legacy dane back to 1920, British
American Financial has launched numerous innovative products & services over
the past. two (2) years, transforming the Company into a full financial services. -
firm fulfilling its mission to provide “Financial Solutions for Life” Mr. Basil L. Sands, .
Chairman of the Board remarked: “Having grown with the public for almost 7
ninety (90) years, Our roots are deeply embedded i inthe community and we are
‘delighted that we have grown from strength to strength with the full support of -
our more than 80,000 Bahamian policyholders. . BAF has in place very stringent |
_ corporate governance guidelines and prudent management practices to ensure

. the protection of our clients and pol icyholders. We will be here every step of the

_ way, for our clients through these challenging economic times’







ea
,

UMMM



202-461 -1000 lv www. babfinancial. com By British
‘Freeport 242- 352- 7209 Exuma 242-336- 3035 Abaco 242- 367- 6501 -_. Ameri ican

FINAN ©-T Al

MORTGAGES « + MUTUAL FUNDS « LIFE INSURANCE * HEALTH INSURANCE
ANNUITIES & PENSION PLANS » ¢ FINANCIAL PLANNING & INVESTMENTS





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





s said to us in Chicago, this
never be about you, but is
s be about the changes you.

ade during your short












ue to bless and keep you,
and Malia as always.


















\\
\\ \\\\



WN CAAA A \ A \ yt
\

; WN AN NY \ AY \\ \ A
as AON i A ‘i Ve, \

ANY \







.

revive
economy

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

AN ECONOMIC summit is
needed to “identify ways to pos-
itively impact the Bahamas’ cur-
rent account balance in the
immediate to medium-term,”
according to one of its organiz-
ers who, in collaboration with
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce, plans to address how
Bahamians should take advan-
tage of the current ‘economic
crisis, during the free confer-
ence in March.

According to Lynden Nairn,
an executive on the steering
committee for the March con-
ference; said the economic crisis
had presented Bahamians with
the opportunity to bring the
country together, address sys-
temic economic weaknesses and
to make tough, politically expe-
dient decisions that are in the
national interest.

“Tt would be unwise for us to
waste this crisis,” he said. “We
must exploit it post haste.”

“While the summit is intend-

SEE page 6B

CLICO (Bahamas) put
under ‘negative review’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

_Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) yesterday

saw its creditworthiness placed

“under review with negative

implications” by the leading ©
international insurance rating ©
agency, which pledged to con- |

tinue monitoring the insurer’s
financial health as it waited “to
see how things fall out”.
Joseph McGowan, an A. M.
Best Company analyst who cov-
ers CLICO (Bahamas), told
Tribune Business that the rating
agency would take no further
action until it saw how the situ-
ation surrounding the Bahami-
an insurer, and its CL Financial
parent, played out following the
latter’s bail-out by the Trinida-
dian government last Friday.
-In its previous August 21,
2008, review, A. M. Best placed
-a B (Fair) financial strength rat-
ing on CLICO (Bahamas), and

an issuer credit rating of ‘bb’. |
That in itself represented a-
downgrade from previous B+ =

and ‘bbb-’ ratings.

However, Mr McGowan
agreed that the fact CLICO
(Bahamas) had some 59 per
cent of its total assets tied up
in one investment - a $57 mil-
lion loan to an affiliate, which
had been guaranteed by its
troubled Trinidadian parent -
was an “unusual concentration

of risk” for an insurance com-

(THE TRIBUNE

“change” policy, its gov- ji



TUESDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia, net

“REBRUARY 3,



2009



ROYAL DFIDELITY

Central Bank rules out interest rate cut

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Central aa



Bank of |g
t h e
Bahamas

will not use
interest rate cuts to stim-
ulate the economy
“unless there is a devel-
opment that causes us to

ernor telling Tribune
Business yesterday that
with foreign reserves
standing at $585 million °
this nation had to “protect what it has”.
Wendy Craigg explained that while. the
Bahamas’ foreign currency reserves had
increased by about $22 million during Jan-

Monty Craigg

uary 2009, to a position that was the equiv-’

alent value of 13.4 weeks of imports - a lev-

‘el slightly higher than the 12 weeks (three

months) “rule-of-thumb” employed by the
International Monetary Fund (IMF) -
reduced foreign direct investment and
tourism earnings mandated caution.
Responding to calls for an interest rate

cut from elements in the private sector, Ms _ |

Craigg said the Central Bank did not want
to encourage credit growth that might place
this’ nation’s balance of payments, foreign
exchange reserves and, ultimately, the
one:one peg with the US dollar under pres-
sure.

“We have this balance to maintain,” the
Central Bank governor explained. “On the
one hand, a change in interest rates is sup-
posed to signal an easy monetary policy
phase at the Central Bank, making a cut
to encourage economic growth and spend-

* Governor says nation must ‘protect what it has’, as
foreign reserves increase by $22m to $585m in January
* Bahamas’ 13.4 weeks of import reserves S greater

than IMF ‘rule-of’thumb’

ing.

Sut in this particular environment we
are in a situation where the opportunities
for growing the foreign reserves, through
foreign currency earnings from foreign
direct investment and tourism, are not as
robust as they were several years ago. We
have to be mindful of that, and any action
taken to stimulate the economy in that fash-
ion.

“We. have to watch very closely the
growth opportunities for external reserves

‘in this environment.”

Ms Craigg said the Bahamas’ current for-
eign exchange reserves level was $585-$586
million. “I think that’s about a $22 million
increase over December 31 last year,” she
said. “It’s not very dissimilar from the 2008
level, where-we ended the year at $454 mil-
lion and saw an increase of $18 million in
January 2008.”

While a reduction in the Central Bank
discount rate, the rate at which the mone-
tary policy régulator lent to Bahamian com-
mercial banks, was a policy tool at its dis-
posal that was reviewed on a monthly basis,
Ms Craigg said a rate reduction would only
happen if required by changed economic
circumstances.

“In our environment, there are trade-
offs,” Ms Craigg explained. “If foreign
direct investment is not flowing the way
‘we'd like it, and we’re not getting the

tourism earnings, you have to protect what
you have.”

Economic theory suggests that if the Cen-
tral Bank cut interest rates, the commercial
banks cut the Bahamian Prime Rate, and all
interest rates charged to borrowers were
also cut, the cheaper cost of money would
encourage consumers and businesses to
increase Import spending, thus increasing
foreign currency outflows at a time when
the Bahamas could least afford it.

Ms Craigg said the reduced private sector
credit creation and lower fuel import bill,
caused by the drop in global oil prices,
would also help protect the Bahamas’ for-
eign reserves in 2009.

The Central Bank governor added that
the regulator was “not overly concerned”
about the deterioration in commercial bank
asset quality yet, as borrowers defaulted
due to job losses and.reduced incomes, but

| was watching the situation closely.

The pace of recovery, she indicated,
would depend on the world economy.
Maintaining healthy.capital ratios despite a
decline in loan portfolio quality, and “riding
this out”, were key for the banking sector,
the Governor said, with the Central Bank
focused on domestic and financial system
stability.

“From all indications, and this is based on

SEE page 6B

Passport policy ‘unacceptable’ for businesses

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

/ 3 i Chamber chief says ‘some concern’ also exists over mulled ©
, Tribune Business Editor

change to expatriate permanent residency process



Rating agency admits $57m

_ loan, guaranteed by parent .....

and equal to 59% of assets,
is ‘unusual concentration of
risk’ for insurance firm

pany.

“It’s a big concentration of
risk; and is what we’ve pointed
out in previous ratings,” Mr
McGowan told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“Tt’s unusual, because: we’ré
always pointing it out as a con-
centration of risk. If it was nor-
mal procedure, the chances are
that we would not consider it a
concentration of risk or unusu-
al risk.”

As Tribune Business revealed
on Monday, the key issue that
CLICO (Bahamas) and the
Government/Bahamian finan-
cial services are grappling with

is this $57 million loan to CLI-.

CO Enterprises, which is a
Bahamian-incorporated affili-
ate 100 per cent owned by the
insurance company.

Their ultimate parent, CL
Financial, had guaranteed the
funds advanced to CLICO
Enterprises, which had invested

them in what is likely to be one »

of the world’s worst investment
options (in the current climate),

a Florida-based real estate

SEE page 3B

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SiRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | £242.322.2033 | The Bahamas MLS



REQUIRING Bahamians to

hand. over their old-passports =

for six weeks while they wait
for the machine readable
replacements is “completely
unacceptable” to the business
community, the Chamber of
Commerce’s president told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, as it
can disrupt commerce by pre-
venting key personnel from
travelling.

Dionisio D’Aguilar said the

current process unnecessarily

“takes someone out of circula-
tion”, and called on the Gov-
ernment to resolve the situation
by permitting Bahamians to

keep and travel on their old

passports‘while waiting for the
new ones.

‘Explaining that he had
received several complaints and
concerns over the issue from
business community members,
Mr D’ Aguilar said that once the
Passport Office had taken the
relevant information to process

a Bahamian’s e-passport appli-

cation, the applicant should
keep his old version. Then,
when the new, machine read-
able e-passport was ready, the
Government should require as.a

condition of its issuance that the.

old one be turned over.
“This requirement that you

-* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

* Personal Pension Plan Accounts’ |‘

* Education Investment Accounts °

BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801 »
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
ae Michael:

246.435.1955

ro een com

must hand in your passport for-.-

six weeks in order to get a new

one is completely unacceptable ©

to the business community,” the

‘Chamber president told Tri-

bune Business. “The fact you’re
taking someone out of circula-
tion for six weeks is completely
unacceptable.

“If you need to go to the US
and pick up a part for your busi-
ness, you can’t do it. If you have
to over there to pick up sup-
plies for your business or go to
a conference, you can’t do it.

“Mr Symonette [minister of

-. SEE page 5B

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

‘FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Dissident union
members mar
hotel agreement

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

A NEW industrial agreement
between Bahamian hotel
employers and their union
counterparts, ‘which will pro-
vide union members with a 4.8
per cent salary increase in 2012,
was signed yesterday amid
protests from:a union faction.
who attempted to thwart what
they deemed an “illegal” sign-
ing.

As President of the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union, Roy Cole-'
brooke delivered his address in
a Department of Labour con-
ference room filled with media
and hospitality industry profes-
sionals, former union member,
Raymond Wright, began heav-
ily pounding the door to the
room shouting: “Open this
door! That’s an illegal contract.
Open this door. Ya’ll are sign-
ing an illegal document. .

“Open the door. These are
executive council members.
Open the door. What you’re
doing is illegal. Open the door!
You are compromising the
members --open the door.”

The union’s first. vice-presi-

SEE page 6B



ROYAL @ FIDELITY

- Money at Work









AGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009 — | THE TRIBUNE















: The Tribune

fy) My Vou. My Hews








THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 3B



Expo to open Business
‘Kingdom’ for women

IN a bid to aid women entre-
preneurs in starting their own
companies, Kingdom Women
in Business (KWIB) will be
holding an expo this Saturday,
February 7, at the Mall at
Marathon.

The free exhibition will give
Bahamian women the chance
to meet KWIB members, and
view some of their products up
close. KWIB members who pro-
vide business services will offer
advice in their areas of exper-
tise, including law, manage-
ment, finances, image and pub-
lic relations.

“The expo is a prelude to our
annual conference, and gives
women the chance to see how
ordinary women can transition
themselves into being extraor-
dinary women,” said KWIB
founder Melisa Hall.

“Tn fact, this is our first busi-
ness expo for the year, and we
are thrilled to see what has been
developed by our members. We
will be taking the time to
answer any questions from the
general public, as well as give
persons the chance to sign up
for our conference. So many
times, we want to reach out to



SHOWN ([-r): Kingdom Women in Business founder and attorney, Melisa Hall, with core leaders Deegenera Jones-
Dixon, Charlene Paul and Arthia Nixon, unveiled plans for a KWIB Expo this Saturday at the Mall at Marathon.
The Expo is a prelude to the group’s annual conference, scheduled for February 26-28 at the British Colonial Hilton

Hotel.

a bit busy during the week we
decided to meet them in a high
traffic area and set up in a place
where they won’t have to stray
far away from their normal rou-

tine.

“All in all, it’s another part
of our community outreach and
we are simply blessed to push
women to walk in their pur-



pose.”

For more information, visit
www.kingdomwomeninbusi-
ness.org, the group’s Facebook
page or call 328-6050.

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Must be flexible with hours

Please summit your resume along with a photo to:

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Or call
' 325-2258 for more information
Deadline is February 6, 2009












women, but because people are



FROM page 1B

development.

Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), in its 2007
audit report on CLICO (Bahamas), noted
that it was only a guarantee by CL Finan-
cial, pledging that it would honour CLICO
Enterprises’ obligations to the Bahamian
insurer, that prevented the latter’s man-
agement from impairing the loan.

Given the poor financial condition of CL
Financial, as evidenced by Friday’s action by
the Trinidadian authorities, it appears high-
ly unlikely that the company will be able to

perform its $57 million guarantee.

' And with the Florida real estate market
still in a funk, and prices locked in a down-
ward spiral, the value of CLICO Enter-
prises’ investment is likely to have deterio-
rated further, with all the implications thai
entails for repaying CLIC: hariias).;~
Deloitte & Touche (Ba pms) did’ not











Ideal applicant wills



_ banking and investments.








various parts.





Tradelnvest Asset eat Ltd |
A private wealth management company

is currently seeking a qualified, energetic and confident

“individual for the position of

TRUST PROFESSIONAL

Possess LLB or other law degree.

CLICO Gree put under ‘negative review’

qualify its opinion on CLICO (Bahamas)
2007 financials (the latest ones available),
but still highlighted the fact that almost 59
per cent of the company’s $97.352 million in
total assets were invested in loans to CLI-
CO Enterprises Ltd.

The audit report found that CLICO
Enterprises’ main investment, the Florida-
based real estate project called Wellington
Preserve, suffered a more than 20 per cent

decline in market value, falling from an

appraised $104 million at year-end 2006 to
$80.5 million at year-end 2007, due to the
collapsing Florida real estate market.

“This reduction in value has resulted in
[CLICO Bahamas] management consider-
ing the possibility of impairment of the
loan,” Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas) wrote
in its audit report,:

ecovery Of;
Tia

e Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in the areas of trust,

e Have the ability to review sometimes complex legal documents relating to special projects
and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.

e Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project and coordinating its

e Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures,

¢ Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic understanding of

investment and financial transactions.

e Have a full understanding of corporate structures and the responsibilities of Directors and

corporate formalities:

e Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant supervision.

e Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.

Successful candidate will work directly with Senior Management in the administration of
complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular contact with
overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as well as legal

counsel and advisors.

Applicants should submit a cover letter and.resume no later than Friday, February 13, 2009 as

follows:

The President

Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.
either by private facsimile (242) 702-2040
or by mail as follows:

_ _LYFORD MANOR, WEST BUILDING
~ LYFORD CAY ~ P.0,BOX N7776 (Slot 193) ~ NASSAU, N.P,, THE BAHAMAS

Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~

Facsimile (242) 702-2002





ns “Althou oe the market paca ne sare
da shows toni ,
in,2008, ‘manage ent



tee from C L Financial (CLICO Bahamas
ultimate parent), whereby C L Financial
states that it will honour the obligations of
CLICO Enterprises to the company if the
need arises. As such, no provision has been
made for impairment.”

Needless to say, the anticipated Florida
real estate market recovery has not taken
place, and may not do so for some years to
come.

A. M. Best, in its August 21, 2008, rating,
expressed concern over the “concentration.
risk and high exposure to the depressed
Florida real estate market”.

And, spotting that much of CLICO
(Bahamas) reserves were in fixed-term
annuities, the rating agency expressed fears
that the real estate investments ‘ ‘represent
a mismatch to. CLICO (Bahamas) liabili-

Great” at the Hilton Hotel. “Dare To Be Great”:
8:30pm on ZNS TV13.

Pictured along with the shows creator and
are his guests, Minister Dwight Armbrister:
| Stubbs, Co-Franchise owner, Miss B A
' Mustafa Khalfani, owner of Ash








Colinalmperial.

_ CAREER OPPORTUNITY

"Senior Group & Health Benefits Account Representative





We are looking for a highly motivated and experienced Account Executive to join our Group & Health

must possess the skills and knowledge to successfully manage existing Group accounts and ensure
continued growth and retention of f the Group portfolio.






Penk duties:
. Managing existing Group denne t ensure continued growth and retention,
“+ Attracting new business opportunities through effective presentation of our Group products, —
* Maintaining high level of customer satisfaction by effectively a) issues and explaining
changes or enhancements t 0. Group products.






Qualifications:
«Strong negotiation skills,
* Excellent communication skills (oral and written).
* Excellent presentation skills.
* Ability to work independently.
«Proficiency in Microsoft Office applications
+ Previous industry experience a plus.







The successful candidate will: ;
* Demonstrate a professional attitude and excellent communication skills.
«Have exceptional follow through ability,
* Possess tine management skills to ensure comfortable working relationship with customers to
' meet project requirements and deadlines.
* Be dependable, organized, and detail oriented.








To apply:




Send electronic resumé to careers@collr
Manager, Human Resources

308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas







Applications must be received by February 16, 2009



























Benefits team. Reporting to the Director, Group & Health Benefits Department, the successful candidate





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009
GN-818



SUPREME
COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2008/PRO/NPR/00807

IN THE ESTATE OF JOZEF SPIRA (a.k.a. J OSEF
‘SPIRA), late and domiciled of 59A, Oakwood Court,
W14 England in the United Kingdom), deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by SAMANTHA M. WILLIAMS, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Probate in the above
estate granted to MICHAEL SPIRA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the High Court of Justice,

The Principal Registry of the Family Division on the
18th day of July, 1995.

DESIREE ROBINSON
| (for) REGISTRAR



COMMON Een OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00025

Whereas THOMAS A.A, CLEARE, JR. of Joe
Farrington Road, Eastern District: New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of THOMAS ALLISON AUGUSTUS
CLEARE, late:of Joe Farrington Road, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby. given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

we 5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009 |

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00026

Whereas ALEXANDER EDWARD WOODSIDE, of
Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates, Eastern District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth: ,

of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme

Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of.

the Real and Personal Estate of CAROLINE
WOODSIDE, late of Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court. at the eapucnon of 14 oe from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for Registrar



- THE SUPREME COURT
_ PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/00027

Whereas MARVIN JAMES MACKEY, of Rolle
Avenue, New Providence and BARON. -HUDEN.

MACKEY of Florida both of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JAMES.
MUDEN MACKEY a.k.a. JAMES MACKEY a.k.a.
§SAMES HUDON MACKEY, late of Fox Hill Road,
- South Eastern, District, New Providence, one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof

DESIREE. ROBINSON
.. for) Registrar ..

Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

| 3 2009/PROINPR/00036- :
‘INTHE ESTATE OF CHARLES G. MORETTO, late

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009 |



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/00028

Whereas CHANELL ROKER, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of GLENROY HOWARD, late of Sir
Lynden Pindling Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from

the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

~ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT |

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009

~ 2009/PRO/NPR/00030

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY RITA, late of 3300
N. Milwaukee Avenue, Northbrook in the State of Illinois,
one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MONIQUE V. A. GOMEZ of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the resealed Order Admitting
Will to Probate and Appointing Representative in the
above estate granted to FRANK J. CALLERO and
ROBERT M. CALLERO the Independent Co-Executors
of the Estate, by the Circuit Court of Cook County,
Illinois, County. Department, Probate Division, on the
5th day of January, 2005.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
’ - THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PROIN PR/00031

Whereas OLAMAE T AYLOR of No. 7 Perpall Tract
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme. Court of The

‘Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and

Personal Estate of JAMES ROBERT TAYLOR late of
No.7 Perpall Tract in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the ex ‘ration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY .
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION

and domiciled of Broward County in the State of Florida,
one ofthe States ofthe United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days ITom the date hereof, application will be

made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the

Probate Division by CONSTANCE E. MCDONALD,
of Fortune Village, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for

_ | obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Administration in’
_ | the above‘estate granted to CHRISTINE MACHUGH,

the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the Circuit

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAM is. Court For Broward County, in the state of Florida, Probate

Divigion on. the 16th day of January, 2004.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/N PR/00037

IN THE ESTATE OF WARD STOUTENBURG
EVANS, late and domiciled of Flat No. 11, Jocyn Court,
Rochester Road, Bantry Bay, South Africa, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS

‘and: MIKE ANTHONY KLONARIS, both of the

STH FEBRUARY, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of the Certificate of Appointment of Estate
Trustee with a Will in the above estate granted to MARY
JANE MCKINNON, the Personal Representative of.
the Estate, in the Superior Court of Justice on the 8th
day of July, 2008. — -

DESIREE ROBINSON °
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/N PR/00038

IN THE ESTATE OF SADIE LEE E TAYLOR, late and
domiciled of2554 N. 28th Street in the City of Milwaukee
in the county of Milwaukee in the State of Wisconsin,
one of the States of the United States of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one. of’ the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing Grant of Domiciliary Letters in the above
estate granted to RUTH MCDOWELL, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the State of Wisconsin,
Circuit Court, Milwaukee County on the 18th day of
November, 2008.

_ DESIREE ROBINSON
~~ for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION’
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00039

IN THE ESTATE OF AUDREY VERA HODGSON,
late and domiciled of 38 East Avenue, Riverview Park,
Althorne, Chelmsford Essex in the United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MELISSA L. SELVER-ROLLE,
of the Western: District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of The Grant of Probate in the
above estate granted to FAY GEORGINA MORRIS, -

'|: the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the High
Court of Justice, The District Probate Registry at Ipswich ;

on the 28th day of Apa 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

- No. 2009/PRO/NPR00040

Whereas MICHAEL GEORGE HIGGS II, of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of MICHAEL GEORGE
HIGGS I, late of New Providence, one of the Islands

_ of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given tliat such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00041

Whereas ADAM D.R. CARRERATA, of Poinciana
Drive, in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for CAROLE
ARTERBERY, the Daughter has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANE
C. EDMUNDS, late of 241 State Road in the City of
Eliot in the County of York in the State of Maine, U.S.A,
deceased.

Notice is hac given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from

the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



IHE }HIBUNE

GN-818



SUPREME.
COURT

-COMMON WEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00042

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway off
the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by
Deed of Power of Attorney for Yvon Senecal, the Executor of

the deceased has made application to the Supreme Court of The.

Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of CLAUDE SENECAL a.k.a.
CLAUDE JOSEPH HENRI SENECAL late of the City of

Montreal in the Province of Quebec i in the Dominion of Canada, .

deceased:

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by |

the said Court at eexytanon of 14 days from date hereof.

- DESIREE ROBIN SON
(for) Registrar



"COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
‘THE SUPREME COURT

~ PROBATE DIVISION
, 5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00044
“Whereas DOUGLAS BURROWS, of Golden Gates #2, Western

District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the .

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of VELERIA MINLEY
BURROWS, late of Jackfish Drive, Golden Gates #2, Western
District, News Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such apelications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

- DESIREE ROBINSON
Mon) Heer

_ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT .
PROBATE DIVISION -

ae - 5TH FEBRUARY, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00045

Whereas BERTHA MAE COOPER-ROUSSEAU, of Trinity:
Place off Frederick Street in the City of Nassau, on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth |
of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for .

- the Legal Heirs of the deceased has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of DR. STEFAN JOHANNES

-SANDKUHLER, late of the City ofNeulingen in the Republic ;

of Germany, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof

_ DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



gr ey ey eh

Passport policy
‘unacceptable’
for businesses

FROM page 1B

foreign affairs] and his team at Foreign Affairs
need to think that through again. The Govern-
ment needs to come up with.a solution.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said that allowing Bahamians to

travel on their old passports, once a properly

completed application was submitted, for six
weeks until the new document was issued was
the common sense approach to resolving this.
He added that Bahamians would not hold on to
their old passports, ‘since they would travel on

. the new one, and urged the Government to make

turning in the old document a condition of its
replacement’s issue.

Mr D’ Aguilar also called on the Government to
set-up a “fast track” passport issuing system,
where Bahamians who needed their travel docu-
ments urgently, such as businessmen, could obtain
them in quick time by paying extra for the privi-

' lege.

Otherwise, the Chamber president said the
Passport Office was likely to be confronted by a
major rush for the machine readable document at
the end of 2010, when all Bahamians were sup-
posed to possess one. This was because the cur-
rent system, with its inconvenience, provided no
incentive for Bahamians to apply early.

Meanwhile, Mr D’Aguilar said the business
community was also expressing concern over
indications that the Department of Immigration
was talking about changing the policy when it
came to expatriates on work permits applying
for permanent residency.



Branville McCartney, minister of state for
immigration, could not be reached for comment,
yesterday, but the Chamber president said the
Government was mulling setting a fixed time lim-
it on how many years a person could be in the
Bahamas on a work permit.

The current policy, Mr D’Aguilar said, as it
was under the first Ingraham administration, was
that expatriate workers who had been in the
Bahamas for 10 years on a work permit, and were
performing a valuable economic role, should than
apply for permanent residency. f

“There’s talk of a change in policy, where
they’re going to refuse to renew the work permit
once you get to the ninth permit or the ninth
year, because they don’t want you to be entitled
to apply for permanent residency,” Mr D’Aguilar
said.

This, he suggested, was the wrong approach,
and said it would be better if the Government
increased the time period from 10 years to, say, 15
years. It-appeared as if it was looking to adopt the
Cayman and Bermuda approach, where expatri-
ates were given fixed time limits for their pres:
ence.

“That’s causing some concern out there,” the
Chamber president said of the mulled change.

He explained that it would cause “major dis-
ruption to Bahamian businesses”, especially. those
who were reliant on expatriate middle and senior
managers for the smooth functioning of their
operations, if these staff had to leave after eight or
nine years without a Bahamian replacement avail-
able.



FROM page 3B

Looking at the December 31,
2007, balance sheet date, a full
impairment of that $57 million
loan would leave CLICO
(Bahamas) with just over $40
million in total assets.

That would be insufficient to
meet liabilities worth almost
$85.5 million, especially some
$79.37 million in reserves set
aside to pay future policyholder

benefits.
| Mr McGowan said yesterday

that. A. My Bestiwould:now
assess developments before

~ deciding to take any further

Ghee (Bahamas) put under Beye review’

action in relation to CLICO

(Bahamas) and Colonial Life
Insurance Company (Trinidad).
“At this point, we would real-

ly want to see all the pieces fall :

out and what happens in the
near future,”
said. “I’m sure there’s going to
be a lot of developments in the
coming days.

“We’ve just put it under
review and have got a lot of
eyes looking at this. The ratio-

nale for the previous rating,

which we just stated, still

-remains. But beyond that we'll

wait. to. see how things “fallout

béforé’ making any deff itive 2

statements.” Bhs

Mr McGowan’

CLICO (Bahamas) premium
income increased by 40 per cent
during the 12 months to year-
end December 2007, driven by a
110 per cent increase in its
annuity line to $31.196 million.

What happens to the Bahami-
an insurer in the near future lies
in the hands of the country’s
regulators. Several sources sug-
gested that, given the emphasis
on annuities, CLICO

. (Bahamas) was now a deposit-

taking institution as opposed to
a pure life and health insurer,
and was being. used as, some-

thing akin toa‘ private eqhity
“firm by its Trinidadian ‘patent

with the realestate. investments.

PUBLIC NOTICE
From Department of
Civil Aviation

Effective Immediately:

All cheques for services or facilities of
the Department of Civil Aviation must be

made payable to the Public Treasury.

All payments must be in the form of

a money order,

bank draft, certified

cheque or cash, No personal or company

cheques will be accepted.

Payments are to be sent directly to the
Accounts Section at Civil Aviation Head
Office, Seaban House, Crawford Street:





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Central Bank rules out interest rate cut

FROM page 1B

what is happening in the US
and world economy, it could be
another year to 18 months,” Ms
Craigg said of the downturn’s
likely length. “It seems we’re in
it for some time to come. It’s
nota short-term turnaround.”

The recession’s impact can
clearly be seen on Finance Cor-
poration of the Bahamas (FIN-
CO) loan portfolio for the year
to October 31, 2008. The BISX-
listed mortgage lender saw a
76.5 per cent year-over-year
increase in non-accrual loans -
loans that were more than 90

Dissident union

FROM page 1B.

dent, Kirk Wilson, a Cole-
brooke opponent, could be
heard saying: “The members
never ratified that contract -
council members are objecting
to this contract.”

This came moments after the
Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association’s (BHEA) presi-
dent, J Barrie Farrington, laud-
ed the industrial agreement
negotiations as being the most
amicable ever.

“On this occasion, I’m hap-
py to report that we have been
able to work through the nego-
tiations, so that there was no
confrontation or strife, and we’

ended up with an agreement

days overdue - to $28.933 mil-
lion, compared to $16.39 mil-
lion the year before.

The percentage of non-accru-
al loans in its total portfolio rose
from 2.64 per cent at year-end
2007 to 4.09 per cent at year-
end 2008. Out of that $28 mil-
lion, almost $22 million was
more than 180 days past due,
compared to $14 million the
year before.

In its report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for
December 2008, the Central
Bank last night said that total
private sector loans in arrears -
those overdue by more than 31

that we’re quite willing to sign
both as employers and the
union,” Mr Farrington said.
The melee outside did not
stop Mr Colebrooke touting the
agreement, which was one-year
overdue, as being historic and

- forward thinking.

He said the new industrial
agreement’s historical reso-
nance was due in part to the
absence of industrial action.

The inclusion of gratuity
increases for ‘Front of House’

employee; the addition of gra-.

tuities for departments that did
not receive it before; a retroac-
tive lump sum of $300 that will
benefit previously laid off work-
ers; a second lump sum in 2011
and a 4.8 per cent salary.

_ forming balances,

days - rose by by $79.7 million
during that month to make a

‘ 12-month rise of $235.8 million

or 44.5 per cent. Total loans in
arrears stood at $766 million at
2008 year-end.

“This was equivalent to an
estimated 12.4 per cent of total
loans, compared to 9.27 per cent
and 7.47 per cent at end-2007
and 2006, respectively,” the
Central Bank said.

“With regards to the main
components, loan arrears in the
31-90 day period increased by
$119.8 million (43.1 per cent)
to $398 million; while non-per-
having

arrears Beyond 90 days and on
which interest accrual has
ceased, grew by $116.0 million
(46.1 per cent) to $368 million.

“In terms of the main cate-
gories, the largest increase in
facilities affected by arrears dur-
ing 2008 was noted for mort-

- gages, of $100.5 million (38.1

per cent), raising the corre-
sponding arrears rate by 2.8
percentage points to 13.24 per
cent.

“Similarly, total consumer
and commercial'loans inarrears
grew by $68.2 million (39.6 per
cent) and $67.1 million (71.4 per
cent), with the respective

arrears rate increasing by 2.49
and _ 6.23 percentage points to
10.8 per cent and 15.5 per cent.”

The Central Bank added: “In
tandem with the deteriorating
loan quality, commercial banks
increased provisions for loan
loss expenses by $48.5 million
(40.2 per cent). However, given
the rapid expansion in arrears,
provisions decreased, both in

proportion to total arrears and |

non-performing loans, by 0.68

‘and 1.95 percentage points, to

22.09 per cent and 45.98 per
cent respectively.
“Providing some evidence of

the strain in credit markets, data,

for the January-November 2008
period révealed that net con-
sumer lending was significantly
skewed towards debt consoli-
dation loans, which rose by
$92.0 million vis-a-vis $39.3 mil-
lion in 2007.

“Growth in credit card claims
also firmed marginally to $26.5
million.. However, net lending
for land purchases slowed by
$7.9 million to $16.5 million;
and contractionswere registered
for miscellaneous credit ($5.3
million) and private cars ($6.3
million), following respective
year-earlier gains of $64.0 mil-
lion and $18.5 million.”

members mar hotel agreement

increase in 2012 are included as
a part of the agreement. The
agreement is retroactive to Jan-
uary 2008

Mr Colebrooke said that due
to the economic situation, nego-
tiating the monetary part of the
contract created the most diffi-
culty.

“Areas which have been
oppressed for a very long time,
in my opinion, now will receive
elevation,” said Mr Colebrooke.

“They (hotel workers) have
to pay.the same gas prices, they
have to pay the same light bills,
they have to pay the same mort-
gages which everyone else has
to pay, and so | think the time
has come where everyone is
supposed to benefit from these

_ contracts.”

The contracts continued to
be sealed with the stamp of the
Registrar of Labour, who acts as
a witness, as police officers were
called to stop the locked-out
union members disrupting the
proceedings.

| Labour

Director of Labour and Reg- '

istrar of Trade Unions, Har-
court Brown, said those union
members outside the signing
should seek to contest the
agreement at the Industrial Tri-
bunal.

“If any member objects to the
contract and the validity of the
contract, the contract is regis-

tered at the Industrial Tribunal
and that is where they ought to
lodge their concerns and their
complaints. They are in the

wrong forum for that process,” _
he said.

The hotel union has been

,; split for a number of years and

has been racked with infight-
ing, mistrust, and disorganisa-
tion, which put its membership
in an awkward position with the
downturn in the tourism sector
last year that led to mass lay-
offs.

Mr Wilson claimed that for
almost one year Mr Colebrooke
had failed to call executive
council meetings, which he said
were necessary for the prepa-
ration of the industrial agree-

Summit aims to revive economy |

2007 Nissan Truck

(Standard Shift)

eONLY 1,296 MILES

FOR INQUIRIES:

SIL

Call: 322-2188/9

(Mon-Fri 7:30am-4:30pm & Sat. 8am-1:00pm)



NOTICE ©

-INVERSIONES UNA VIVA LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the

International Business Companies Act 2000 notice

is hereby given that the above-named Company has.
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on thé 19th day of January, 2009.

Christena Pazos
Liquidator

of

INVERSIONES UNA VIVA LTD.

| voras thas (rg
information, contact:

LINDSAY IRELAND

Communications

ear a)

FROM page 1B

ed to address the specific needs
of small business during one ses-
sion, it is our intention to con-
vene a more comprehensive

Summit that focuses exclusively

on small business.”

Among the areas the summit
plans to address are the devel-
opment of agriculture, animal
husbandry, energy, fishing, light
manufacturing, transportation,
Family Island tourism, récycling
and small business.

The summit, opening from:
March 2 to March 8, will be: ”

open to all who are interested in
attending, according to Mr
Nairn, and will include speakers

with professional resumes for
each forum.

“This summit is not only
important for what we might
achieve in the area of econom-
ics,” he said. “It could become a
model that we use to attack vex-
ing national issues in education,
crime, the administration of jus-
tice, immigration, national

development and other areas.”

According to bsiness consul-

tant Mark Turnquest, small and
* medium-sized business owners
«who come to the summit will--

be able learn “how government,

with the assistance of financial”
institutions, can create policies |

that promote small ande medi-
um-sized development in the

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

ANTEX TRADING LTD.

Bahamas International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4). of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), ANTEX
TRADING LTD. is in dissolution. PANAMERICAN MANAGE-
MENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD. is the Liquidator and ean

’ be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Street,
P.O. Box N-10429, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims -
against the above-named company are required to send their names

addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator

before March 2, 2009.

baste kd
- PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2009
6:00 - 9:00 pm
The British Colonial Hotel,

Wedgewood Room, 1 Bay Street, Nassau
(242) 322-3301

' boys/girls/co-ed boarding in attendance:
elementary and secondary grade levels offered

distinguished placement record at Canadian,
American and international universities

challenging academic and athletic programs

scholarships and financial assistance available



Bahamas.
. “I urge business owners to
participate, because now is the

ment. However, Mr Colebrooke
contends that he did indeed
hold meetings, but Mr Wilson
simply did not attend.

“Ask him to show minutes of
an executive council meeting to
discuss the industrial agree-
ment,” said Mr Wilson.

Mr Colebrooke said a meet-
ing was held last Friday, which
Mr Wilson attempted to disrupt
by bringing laid off workers in
protest. He said these kinds of
battles should now be fought at
the negotiation table and not
from the field.

_ “Whatever fighting it must
be, it must be behind closed
doors at the table, in the best
interests of those persons that

' will be affected,” he said.

time to team up and prevent
the negative impact of future
recessions,” he said.

Legal Notice .

NOTICE: .
RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above- named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) \

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.

(In Voluntary pee

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp..Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced .
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
~ (Liquidator)









Low | MODERATE | HicH | V.HIGH








ORLANDO


















High:58°F/14°C Acouple of morning | Partly cloudy, windy Sunny and windy. | Breezy with clouds | © Windywithsome | Partly sunny.', | The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
Low:39°F/4°C. showers. i and colder. and-sun. i sun. i as greater the need for eye and skin protection.
: — High: 66° High: 70° High: 71°.
: Low: 47° Low: 53° Low: 59° + |
= TAMPA | . Ee iE pil | EY Ci ss
High: 58° FA4a°¢ 61°-38° F , 54°-40° F * |. 61°-45° F 5 64°-53° F
Low: 44° F/7°C The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:05am. 2.6 7:36am. 0.2

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold.a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:29p.m. 2.0 7:34p.m. -0.1



2:39p.m. 2.0 8:43p.m. -0.1
. Statistics are for Nassau through‘1 p.m. yesterday

ABACO Temperature 3:51p.m. 2.1 9:52p.m. -0.2













DEE CAT ISLAND
High: 70° F/21°C CAT ISLANE
Low:58°F/I4°C High: 75° F/24°C

_ Low: 64° F/18°C





GREAT EXUMA SS _. SAN SALVADOR
HC High: 78° F/26° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDR OS. 4 a
highs and tonights's lows. Higa EEG
Low: 68° F/20°C






LONG ISLAND









High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 70° F/21°C
Today Wednesday : Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA

High Low W - High Low W High Low W- High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 84° F/29°C

FIC FIC FIC FIC ; Fe FIC FIC FC FIC FC FC. FC 8 Low: 68° F/20°C .
Albuquerque 56/13 31/0 s 60/15 32/0 $s Indianapolis 26/-3 15/-9 sf 26/-3 13/-10 — sf Philadelphia 37/2 20/-6 sn 28/-2 16/-8 pc if Q
Anchorage 10/-12 -1/-18 s 17/-8 8/-13 sf Jacksonville 56/13 30/-1 s 50/10 22/-5 s Phoenix 79/26 51/10 s 78/25 51/10 . CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 44/6 23/-5 c¢ 42/5 23/-5 s Kansas City 28/-2 12/-11 pce . 40/4 23/-5 s Pittsburgh 28/-2 14/-10 sn 20/-6 10/-12 sf RAGGED ISLAND High: 85° F/29°C
Atlantic City 38/3. 21/-6 sn 32/0 15/9 pc LasVegas. 69/20 43/6 s 70/21 46/7 pc Portland,OR 53/11 34/1 po 52/11 37/2 c High:80°Fa7°¢ 4 LOW: 7T°F/22°C
Baltimore 36/2 20/-6 sn 32/0 18/-7 pc Little Rock 42/5 271-2 c . 49/9 28/-2 s Raleigh-Durham 46/7 24/-4 po 40/4 20/-6 pc ie -67°F/19°C A
Boston 34/1 22/-5 sn 22/-5 20/-6 sf Los Angeles 80/26 50/10 s 74/23 52/11 pe St. Louis 26/-3 15/-9 ¢ 34/1 19/-7 $s wi
Buffalo 26/-3 10/-12 sn — 19/-7 12/-11 sf Louisville 28/-2 22/-5 sf — 33/0 17/-8 sf Salt Lake City 47/8 29/-1 s 49/9 30/-1 GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 52/11 26/-3 pc 48/8 23/-5 pe Memphis 38/3 23/-5 c 43/6 26/-3 s San Antonio 70/21 43/6 s 65/18 48/8 s . j 0 ey
Chicago 22/-5 14/-10 sf 17/-8 13/-10 pe Miami 72/22 48/8 pe 66/18 39/3 pe San Diego 70/21 52/11 s 68/20 54/12 pc High: 85° Haat
Cleveland 26/-3 18/-7 sn 21/-6 14/-10 — sf Minneapolis 12/-11. 7/-13 cc. = 21/6 14/-10 pc San Francisco 64/17 47/8 s 63/17 48/8 pc Low: 70° F/21°C
Dallas 63/17 32/0 s 59/15 40/4 s Nashville - 84/1 21/-6 sf — 36/2 20/-6 5s Seattle 53/11 38/3. pe 51/10 38/3 -c.
Denver 58/14 29/-1 s 60/15 27/-2 s New Orleans 61/16 37/2 s 53/11 36/2 s Tallahassee 54/12 23/-5° s 5110 16/-8 s
Detroit 23/-5 14/-10 sf 19/-7 147-10 sf New York 36/2 22/-5 sn 29/-1 20/-6 sf Tampa =~ 58/14 38/3 pe 56/13 32/0 s
Honolulu 77/25 67/19 sh 79/26 67/19 pc Oklahoma City 50/10 22/-5 s 52/11 36/2 s Tucson 75/23 44/6 s 75/23 45/7 pe
Houston 65/18 38/3 s 64/17 42/5 $s Orlando 58/14 341 pe 52/11 28/-2 ¢ Washington, DC 39/3 26/-3. sf 33/0 22/-5 pe

ae
ei





Thursday 3:26am. 27 9:57am. O01



. High .. 79° F/26° C 2 ; 3 -
_ High:73°F/23°C | ; a ‘ Friday 4:34am. 2.8 11:00am. -0.1
- Low:56"F/13°C Normal high ro apogee 87pm. 2.21058 p.m. “0.4
© Normal OW weesceccseeecssseeeseees ssssssseees 84° F/18° C
WEST PALM BEACH Last year's HIGH oc .eesesceseeseeseseeeee 80° F/27° C



High: 70° F/21°C Last year's OW ou... pacer sesesveee.01° F/162 C
Low: 46° F/8°C 4 Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:52 a.m* Moonrise... . 11:50 a.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday ............... secs trace ‘Sunset.......5:56 p.m. Moonset .... 12:56 a.m.
FREEPORT Year to date ou... seatTiavavicet fesaiae otis 0.63" Full New First
High: 71° F/22°C Normal year to date ............ deesestetsesessesveeesees 1.89" “eh ‘
Low:54°F/12°C Z
AccuWeather.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
‘ AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 i i 2 ;
High:72°F/22°C ELEUTHERA ccuWeather, Inc Feb. 9 Feb.16 Feb. 2 Mar. 4
lowesz-Frt°¢ NASSAU ‘Miah 7° Fs
High:72°F/22°¢ = (té“iéiR WA
gf Low: 54° F/12°C

SS

AY
5)
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LN
SSSA

Na

WU AAA
SSS

es SSS
SSS
N





High

FIC,

Acapulco 2 88/31
Amsterdam 38/3
Ankara, Turkey 3 48/8
Athens 65/18
Auckland : 14/23
Bangkok 93/33
Barbados © t 85/29 |
Barcelona 56/13
Beijing — ABIL
Beirut 64/17
Belgrade 54/12
Berlin 39/3
Bermuda 72/22
Bogota 66/18
Brussels. 5 (37/2
Budapest 38/3
Buenos Aires 93/33
Cairo : 73/22
Calcutta ’ ys BBW
Calgary 48/8
Cancun -. 79/26
Caracas 84/28
Casablanca y BING
Copenhagen’ 33/0
Dublin | 39/3 |
Frankfurt 42/5
Geneva 48/8
Halifax 36/2
Havana OA
Helsinki 27/-2
Hong Kong 13/22
Islamabad : 72/22
Istanbul : é 56/13
Jerusalem 60/15
Johannesburg : 75123
Kingston 84/28
Lima 81/27
London 39/3
Madrid z : 47/8
Manila 84/28
Mexico City 68/20 -
Monterrey : 73/22
Montreal . 18/-7
Moscow 19/-7
Munich oo A718
Nairobi : 83/28
New Delhi 75/23
Oslo 23/-5
Paris : 37/2
Prague, 35/1
‘Rio de Janeiro : 86/30
Riyadh 75/23
Rome : : 55/12
St. Thomas 83/28
San Juan 95/35
San Salvador. 88/31
Santiago 86/30.
~ -Santo Domingo ~ 86/30
Sao Paulo : 83/28
Seoul 50/10
‘Stockholm’ 34/1.
Sydney vn 82/27 |
Taipei : 77/25
Tokyo 54/12
Toronto : 22/-5
Trinidad ~ 88/31
Vancouver 46/7
Vienna 39/3
Warsaw © : 34/1
Winnipeg 3/-16

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy,

TOE
‘
os

S

SSS





SSS

Won trts = =



Z
|
LL,
YY
Today Wednesday
Low W High Low W
F/C F/C FIC
72/22 pe 88/31 70/21 s
30/-1 sn 39/3 = 37/2 pc
34/1 ¢ 54/12 34/1 pc
52/11 ¢ 67/19 55/12 pe
66/18 s 74/23. 65/18 pe
75/23 pe 93/33 76/24 pc
76/24 pc 85/29 74/23 pc.
43/6 c 59/15 47/8 s
23/-5 48/8 28/-2 5
57/13 s 70/21 64/17 pc
39/3 1 52/1 43/6 r
34/1 ¢ 41/5 34/1 pc
67/19 + 69/20 52/11 sh
48/8 pc 66/18 46/7 t
28/-2 sn 36/2 34/1 ¢
34/1 sh 45/7 37/2 sh
72/22 ¢’ ~ 88/31 70/21 pc
55/12 s 80/26 59/15 s
67/9 Ss. . 88/31 (65/18 s
30/-1 pc 54/12 27/-2 pe
55/12 pe 80/26 57/13 pc
68/20 pc 83/28 68/20 t
48/8 sh 66/18 53/11 +
32/0 ¢ 37/2 35/1 ¢
32/0 sn 41/5 36/2 pe
30/-1 ¢ 45/7 34/1 pc
44/5 sh 53/11. 35/1 pe
23/-5 sn 27/-2 17/-8
48/8 po 69/20 43/6 s
21/-6 s 27/-2 23/-5 c
64/17 s ~~ 73/22 63/17 s
48/8 c 75/23 = 49/9 s
51/10 sh 66/18 51/10 c
42/5 s 69/20 49/9 pc
61/16 t 79/26 55/2 t
74/23 pc 83/28 71/21. sh
70/21 - pc “83/28 68/20 pc.
32/0 pc 39/3 34/1 ¢
39/3 sh ADT. 39/3
72/22 pc ~ 82/27 73/22 ¢
(41/5 c 68/20 38/3 pc
46/7 s 74/23 54/12 pc
5/-15 Ss” 14/-10 O17 pc
12/-11 pe 21/-6 18/-7 pe.
34/1 ¢ 48/8 36/2 pc
57/13 ¢ 84/28 55/12 r
46/7 s 79/26 50/10 s
17/-8 pc 25/-3 18/-7 sn
28/-2 pc 41/5. 34/1 sh
31/0 c 38/3 33/0 c
74/23 t 87/30: 76/24 pc
52/11 s 77/25 50/10 s-
‘OO + 58/14 48/8 pc
72/22 sh 83/28 73/22 s
70/21 pe 100/37 72/22 t
70/21 s 93/33 73/22 pc
54/12 s 84/28. 52/11 s
68/20 s_ 84/28 67/19 c
67/19 sh 79/26 - 68/20. t
28/-2 ¢ 48/8 30/-1 pc
27/-2.s 30/-1 -28/-2 sn
72/22 t 82/27 70/21 pc
61/16 s 77/25. 65/18 +
41/5 pc 48/8 39/3 ¢c
TI-A3. st 18/-7. 9/-12 sf
73/22 t 88/31 75/23 sh
38/3. pc 49/9. 38/3 c
35/1. sh 45/77, 41/5 r
30/-1 sn- - 39 32/0 ¢
3/-16 pc 18/-7 .14/-10 pc
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- .

storms, -rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



Cron. on

%

Y ya 1, U4 + 4, L yy









URANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





WAVES VISIBILITY. _ WATER TEMPS.











WINDS .
NASSAU Today: . NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
FREEPORT Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75°F
ABACO Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F



Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 19° F

f \\N 7} Showers
[<&j T-storms .
[0° 3") Rain

x 4 Flurries

PK] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
v_v! Ice preci n. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



pth

fea

oot) ANAS

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foe |S
Suet bP

.

- INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Abo | ether

Exum

367-4204 Tl (242) 332-2862 Tel (242) 336-2304





PAGE 8B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009



JUDGE PARKER

WHEN SAM COMES POWNSTAIES,
ABBEY ASKS WHAT SOPHIE BAIP!L

A STRATEGY
FOR WHAT

Al,

|

HOW'S SHE

DOING? WHAT
DID SHE SAYZ

SHE'S FINE-.-
AND SHE HAS
A STRATEGY! JN

THOSE GIRLS AT
THEIR OWN GAME!





YOUR HUSBAND WAS
AN ENEMY OF THE
‘CHINESE GOVERNMENT
ant WA6N'T HE?
ARTA
yy)

LETS BE FRANK, NORA, Y

I'VE READ TIM'S
oA
q

















MY HUSBAND 15 DEAD.
I/VE ACCEPTED THAT, AND
ERIC HASN'T.
































CHEER UP! IT'S NOT LIKE YOUR
BOSS |S SITTING AROUND
PLOTTING WAYS TO -&

z- MAKE YOUR 3

LIFE MORE G):

MISERABLE )\



OKAY, MARLENE, HELP ME
BRAINSTORM SOME WAYS TO
MAKE BUMSTEAD'S LIFE MORE
MISERABLE...

MY BOSS HAS BEEN RAMPAGING
AROUND LIKE A WILD JUNGLE
1 OREAD















SHE GIVES ME MONTHLY

MOTHER SPENT WAAAY TOO
PERFORMANCE REVIEWS

MANY YEARS WORKING IN
CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

TIMES, AND
You SPENT
OVER FOUR



I WANTE 10

WELL, You AN? You VAN You
KNOW THE

LENE (TOUT BOMPINTO NEVER

CAN YOu TELL
WHATS THE
TROUBLE WITH
MY BIKE,

TROUBLE
MY BIKE

©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3 CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
Mark closely and upset the
club three-quarters (4,4)
Childhood interest of
archaeologists? (5,3)
One girl having an
argument with another (6)
Avoid committing oneself
about agricultural land,
Ring the Turkish pethaps (3) saan
officials and does as one is PUP Tpesspaclen nae
s course of 24 hours (5)

fold (5) : Prepares to publish new
Changing to a cereal (3) diets (5)

Orange turned into a Scandinavian coin or
weapon (6) ~ note (3)

A boring set-up (3,3) Heavy piece of stone (3)
One form of eternity (3) Punish a child just a little
Peers out for a lively for being careless (8)
frolic (5) East Russian bear.is in the
Like a buccaneer with wild state (8)
pronounced breathing (8) No way to finish port (6)
Custom-made clothing (5) | was put out about noisy
Doing without, because strays (5)

working (8) Supports fights, but not

Country porcelain (5) seriously (5)
Deck or dock (5)

Across
Finger the back of a . 2
book (5)

Serious requirement for
ointment? (4,4)

Wife returns about to be
angry (5)

Cloth worker, one ina
mess (8)

11

12
16

17

18
_ 23 Across

1 Temporary
24 difficulty (5)
25

26 cover (5)

EASY PUZZLE

27 (5,3)

Postpone (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Behindhand, 6 Nave, 10
Foyer, 11 Asserting, 12 Straddle, 13
Clean, 15 Orchard, 17 Grenade, 19
Results, 21 Hostile, 22 Oriel, 24
Chastens, 27 Drop a line, 28 Reeds,
29 Rays, 30 In hot water.

‘Down: 1 Buff, 2 Haystacks, 3 Norma,
4 Hoarded, 5 Nest egg, 7 Alike, 8
Engineered, 9 Crackers, 14 Court
order, 16 All clear, 18 Alignment, 20
Section, 21 Heave to, 23 Irony, 25
Throw, 26 User.

Across: 1 In question, 6 Visa, 10
Awatd, 11 Regretful, 12 Eruption, 13
Earth, 15 On paper, 17 Cropper, 19
Endless, 21 Missing, 22 Aroma, 24
External, 27 Hysterics, 28 Built, 29

- Rate, 30 Ascendancy.
Down: 1 Ivan, 2 Quadruped, 3 End
up, 4 Terrier, 5 Organic, 7 Infer, 8 All
the rage, 9 Generous, 14
Forefather, 16 Prepared, 18
Privation, 20 Species, 21 Matisse,
23 Onset, 25 Rabid, 26 Stay.

country (6)
Loiter (6)

A cover (3)
Traitor (5)
Naturally (2,6)
Cheerful (5)
Alone (2,6)
Sordid (5)

COMIC PAGE —

TROUBLE WITH) WITH ME!)

Go on a spree (4,2,2)
9 Approach under

Utterly exhausted

Prefix for new (3)
Southeast African

THE TRIBUne








CALVIN & HOBBES
WON, YOU'VE






















Y TWe ONES I
REALLY \IATE
ARE SMALL,SO

WHEN THE SUN COMES OUT, | WASN'T
TUL WATCH THEIR FEATURES — | AWARE YOU
SIOWLY MELT DONN THEIR | EVEN KNEW
DRIPPING BODIES UNTIL THEYRE: | THIS MANN
NOTHING BUT NOSES AND PEOPLE.
ENES FLOATING IN POOLS

NEP. THEY'RE EFFIGIES.
EAC ONE REPRESENTS

MADE A Lot
OF SNOWMEN

©1989 Universal Press Syndicate



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“MRS, WILSON D
SHE COOKS BY EAR.”

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


































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Difficulty Level *



HOW many words of four

letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?

In making a word, eachletter =>

uses may be used once only. Each

rd in must contain the centre letter
words and there must be at least one
the main nine-letter word. No plurals.
body of TODAY'S TARGET

Good 20; very good 30;

Chambers — excellent 39 (or more).
21st Solution tomorrow.
Century SATURDAY’s SOLUTION

bench bonce bone bony

boon cone coney cony coon

ebony economy hone honey

HONEYCOMB hymen hymn

money mono moon moony
“omen once

Dictionary

(1999
| edition)

Famous Hand

Here is an example of the type of
play he was capable of making on the

South dealer.
North-South'vulnerable. '

NORTH spur of the moment. Fishbein was

41762 West, defending against four spades,

Â¥VK74 and he began by leading the queen

#K93 and another club to East’s king.

#1063 - When East next played the ace of

WEST EAST clubs, Fishbein had to decide which

@Q4 4103 card to play. He knew that a fourth

¥653 ¥109 club lead by East would promote his

Virtually ass ired #AQI1N64 #8752 queen of spades into the setting trick,
(2,3,3) . &Q5 #AK 972 © but he was afraid East might return a
Blind alley (3-2-3) SOUTH diamond instead. This could prove
Holy (6) @AK985 fatal if South, who had bid two suits
" VAQIS82 and shown up with three clubs, was

State of high o— void of diamonds. If he was, South
excitement (5) #184 could ruff the diamond and cash the
Lower oneself The bidding: A-K of spades to make the contract.
morally (5) South West North East The question, therefore, was how
1¢ 2¢ 24 34 to get East to continue with a fourth

Flood (5) 3% Pass 44 club. Discarding a low heart might

cause East to lead a diamond, while
discarding a low diamond might
induce a trump or heart shift. And so,
Fishbein did something that very few
players would think of — he dis-
carded the ace of diamonds!

It was not difficult for East to
grasp the meaning of this extraordi-
nary discard, since he also knew
declarer might be void of diamonds.
Accordingly, he led the nine of clubs
at trick four, and the contract quickly
went down the drain.

Zero (3)

Aged (3)

From now on (2,6)
In each year (3,5)
Treat with

contempt (6)

Leisure pursuit (5)
Pungent (5)

Overly decorative (5)

Opening lead — queen of clubs.

The late Harry Fishbein, well-
known star and impresario of New
York’s now-defunct Mayfair Bridge
Club, was noted most for his imagi-
native bidding and play.

For Fishbein, there was no such
thing as a sacred rule that could not
be broken if the situation called for it,
and he was always on the lookout for
such situations. No one ever accused
him of being a monolithic player.

Tomorrow: Neutralizing a knave.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.



THE TRIBUNE

’ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 9B











Many persons give little or
no thought to the mattress
they sleep on each and every
night, but Al Frances, the
manager at the Sleep Gallery,
a mattress specialty store for
the last five years on Cable
Beach told Tribune Health it
can make a major difference.

“People the world over have
been brainwashed to think
that firmer is better when it
comes to a bed. But whatever
mattress you can sleep on is
the best for you," he said."
Ninety per cent of people out

_ there are sleeping onafirm -
mattress but they're tossing
and turning all night, and not
getting enough sleep."

Doctors say most people
need at least eight hours of
sleep to refuel their body's
energies after a day of being
awake, whether working,
relaxing or partying on'a
weekend. ;

Sleep Gallery's biggest sell-

@ By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

A GOOD night's
sleep is the best medi-
cine for a healthy life
any doctor would tell
you. It's the cure for a
common cold, recov-
ery from a late night,
or even a recent
surgery. But getting the
ideal eight hours each
night can be next to
impossible for many
and the problem just
may be their mattress.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
, (No.45 of 2000)

OXIAS ASSOCIATES INC.

‘

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, OXIAS ASSOCIATES INC. has been
Dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 29th day of December, 2008.

Mr. Marios Georgiou
(Barrister at Law)
101,3 Kalavriton Street
1070 Nicosia
Cyprus
Liquidator

er is the Seely Posturepedic
mattress that has 600 springs
because Mr Francis explained,
it's the best price for a recog-
nised name in mattresses.

Less expensive versions are
orthopedics (300 springs) and
higher end is Tempur-pedic,
the mattress that conforms to
your body shape: Other fea-
tures of the Tempur-pedic’
include the 20 year warrantee,
and it is made of open-cell
memory foam or Viso-elastic.
So this foam mattress is sup-
portive because it remembers
your body shape.

"This relieves body pres-
sure and most importantly for
people who sleep. with a part-
ner, movements don't carry _
over to the other person. A lot
of times a person can't sleep
because their partner can't
sleep," he explained.

Mr Francis said that many
times, customers come in fed
up with their current mattress

AY

but don't know what to look
for next.

Sleeping habits

The value of information in
sleep knowledge is a precious

‘commodity, Mr Francis said

because night time prepares
you for another good day. ©
Without good sleep habits, a
person will become grumpy
and irritable, impatient and
stressed out the next day.
"Sleep time is when your
body recuperates, and the
next day it allows you to be a

nicer person to your spouse,

children or co-workers. It
makes your days go better,
and not feel as if they're drag-
ging on and on," he said.
Once you have that perfect
mattress, you should rotate
and flip it every three to four
months, recommended Mr
Francis. The reason for this is

- that humans' upper bodies are

Legal Notice
NOTICE

DISESTAR TRADING LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

_ warrantee time he added.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, DISESTAR TRADING LTD. is in dissolu-
tion as of January 29, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated as 35A

Regent Street, RO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



heavier than their lower bod-
ies, and unequal pressure on a
mattress Over time will create
lumps and bumps.

An average mattress should
last.between 10 to 12 years,
depending on its quality and

Other issues to getting a
good night's sleep-are the
sheets and pillow you use. Mr
Francis' number one rule in
finding the perfect pillow is to
find it yourself, because some-
one else will never be able to
guess the kind of angle your
neck will be comfortable at, or
whether you'd like your head
to sink into sleep or rest firmly
on a constant support.

It seems we've moved












Mi)

yy

Yy
Ly

Pisa ney att
beyond the question "feather =a
or regular?" of the good old ~



days. Now there's latex, foam,
and buckwheat to choose
from. As his own preference,
Mr Francis likes his latex pil-
low that he bought eight years
ago. "I love it because it's kind
of bouncy but firm at the same
time. It doesn't elevate my
head too much or not
enough."

Latex pillows are made
from the rubber tree in
Europe. First the rubber is
melted and poured into a
mould with spikes, it's baked,
frozen and the spike impres-
sions pulled off. "The number
of holes allow the pillow to
breathe," he said.

Specialty sleep wares like
this cost more, but also last for
a longer period of time. "It's
better to pay $70 once in eight
years than to buy a cheap pil-
low at $12 that you have to
replace three times a year,"
Mr Francis said.

Sheets are also an important
consideration he said. "A
higher thread count means
better quality," said Mr Fran-
cis, "the regular sheet is 180
thread count, but really you
just need between 300 to 500."

yc
te lif



iy



PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

HEALTH

THE TRIBUNE



By JEFFARAH GIBSON

GOOD HAIR care
is a crucial part of
proper hygiene no
matter what hair type
you have- whether it
be long and straight,
or short and curly.

Speaking with Tri-
bune Health, a stylist
at the Hair Team said
that people need to
take care of their
hair, the same way
they take care of their
skin and body. In par-
ticular, she suggests
cleaning the hair at
least once week.

your hair regularly,
the pores in your
scalp will become
clogged, that is why
it is necessary to
shampoo your hair
once a week. Just as
you bathe your skin,
you must do the
same to your hair,”
she said.

Although men
have less hair than
women they should
take this into consid-
eration as well. She
explained that hair is
often exposed to all
sorts of chemicals
from the air and hair
products which
together with dead
skin cells can create
toxins that become a
breathing ground for
infection.

Hair Care for Women

Hair treatments are equally as important
as getting a shampoo. The Hair Team pro-
fessional stylist says that hair should be
treated every two weeks depending on the
type of hair. “Asian hair is very strong and
Afro ethnic hair is more course and brittle
so the person with Afro ethnic hair type
may have to treat their hair more often,”

she said.

In addition to having the hair treated, it
is also important to ensure that the hair is
cut every time it is relaxed, which should
be every six weeks. Cutting does not mean
removing large amounts of hair, but it
means removing the split ends which can-
not be mended and cause your hair to be ©
damaged. “There is no product that can
repair split ends. There are however prod-
ucts that enhance the texture of the hair
that causes the integrity of the hair to
become stronger,” she said.

“If you don’t clean

hair.

no’ since this often has a negative effect
on the growth and development of the

“When you grease your scalp you are
blocking every pore in the scalp. This is
like telling your hair not to produce its
own oil. What you can do is apply very
small applications to the hair itself, not the
scalp. Or you can stimulate the scalp to
produce its own oil by massaging it light-
ly,” she said.

Adding hair extensions can be very
stressful on the hair if it is not done bya
professional. This is the same for adding
colours. If it is not done professionally,
then it can be detrimental to the hair.

She discouraged relaxing, adding
weaves, and colours to hair without see-
ing a professional stylist:

Hair Care for Guys

Some men might think that they don’t
need hair care, but Alex Davidson, barber
for twenty plus years, and owner of Alex
Factory Cuts Salon provided Tribune
Health with some valuable tips.

“Guys should keep their hair clean

which includes getting a multi purpose
shampoo that treats the hair and also

leaves a sheen,” he said.

To give the hair a little shine he suggests
using the Pro Mad or cream that leaves -
the hair full of luster and shine. “Most
guys try to obtain a look, a wavy look that
is, sO using the Pro Mad grease can assist
with that,” he said.

Men employed in industrial jobs like

construction, or who are often surrounded

by chemicals, should cover their hair with
a cap or durag to eliminate their chances
of picking up a fungus as well as debris,”
Mr Davidson said.

For the bald man maintenance isa lot
simpler. “The scalp is the main part of the
hair and if the hair follicle is damaged, this
causes the growth to be stunted. When a
person’s head is bald, it is exposed and it
is easier to pick up a Virus or infection.
What these men should do is keep the hair
waxed with oil sheen to protect the scalp

After a shampoo, sometimes the hair =~ — and the sheens have agents that kill cer-

appears very brittle or dry and the first
thing you might want to do is “grease”
your scalp. But greasing the scalp is a ‘no

tain bacteria.”
The stylists pointed out that healthy
hair reflects a healthy body.



HAIR is often exposed to all sorts of chemicals from the air and hair products which together with
dead skin cells can create toxins that become a breathing ground for infection. .





RECENTLY we considered
the herbs parsley, sage, rose-
‘mary and _ thyme, along with tar-
ragon. There are many more
delightful culinary herbs that we
can grow in our gardens — or in
pots — to liven up our taste expe-
riences.

Basil is one of the world’s
most popular herbs, beloved
from Italy to Vietnam. The mild,
sweet anise flavour marries per-
fectly with tomatoes and is the
base of pesto, an uncooked
sauce made of pesto, pine nuts,
garlic, parmesan cheese and
olive oil.

Basil grows so well in our cli-

ee



Small mammals (hamsters,
guinea pigs and rabbits), birds

and reptiles (turtles and snakes) '

may offer companionship to
people in situations when dogs,
cats or larger animals are not
- practical or permitted. As with
all pets, the bond between the
human and the animal enhances
the health and well being of

”

mate that it can easily become a
weed. There are many varieties
of the herb but I would recom-
mend the standard large-leafed
green basil for most applica-
tions. There is a small-leafed
variety called lemon basil that
is so fragrant it should find a
place in your herb garden.

Basil grows all year round and
the flowering shoots should be
picked off as they form to allow
the plant to invest its energies in

leaves rather than procreation. .

Another herb that is ubiqui-
tous in the warmer parts of the
world is cilantro, commonly
called Chinese parsley and Mex-



both parties. However, these
smaller creatures require par-
ticular care to prevent illness.

scat



‘ican parsley. It has an ofty,

somewhat bitter taste thatsas
very distinctive. It really has
substitutes. — SBN

Cilantro grows well but tends
to bolt and turn to seed very
quickly. It is a herb that should
be planted every month, if you
like it, and harvested regularly.
The cilantro seeds are called
coriander and form the basis of
most curry powders, making the
plant a producer of both a herb
and a spice.

Go to northern Europe and
you will soon appreciate that dill
is the regional herb of choice,
mainly because of its affinity for
rich fish. Dill is an attractive
plant with large flower sprays
that produce hundreds of aro-
matic seeds. The thin leaves are
called dill weed and have a del-
icate flavour while the seeds are
strongly flavoured and make
an excellent tea to counter



Risks from exposure to exotics
pet species can be reduced or
eliminated by regular hand
washing, clean animal housing,
keeping exotic pets away from
their wild cousins and proper
pet selection.

Salmonella
The most common human ill-








intestinal gas: Dit
ingredient intbaby

Dill is vefy ea
can readily*betonice
you do not” haivest the seeds
properly. \

Oregano and marjoram are
essentially the same herb, mar-
joram being milder in flavour.
Greek cuisine is dominated by
oregano, a strongly- flavoured
herb that comes in many shapes
and sizes. It is mostly used in
soups, stews and sauces and is
just about essential for an
authentic pizza. In the islands
we tend to use a plant called
Cuban oregano that is not a true
oregano but has the same



- flavour. Cuban oregano is a

fleshy plant.that is easily grown

“from cuttings. It is particularly

flavoursome when used to sea-
son Salsas. © |

Mexican thyme has even larg-
er, fleshier leaves and is used as

ness linked to exotic animals.
This is a bacterial infection that
many pet reptiles, especially
aquatic turtles carry on their
skins. Some birds, especially baby
chicks and ducks, are sources of
salmonella exposure. Even some
dogs and cats shed this bacteria
in their feces, especially those
that are fed raw meat. Salmo-
nella typically causes symptoms
resembling severe food poisoning
and its effects can be especially
grave in very young and old peo-
ple. Salmonella causes unpleas-
ant symptoms like abdominal
cramps, nausea, watery or bloody
diarrhea, vomiting and fever. As
mentioned earlier, this bacteria
can be very serious in children,
seniors and people with impaired
immune systems. Most people
are exposed through under
cooked meat or eggs. Most ani-
mals that carry the bacteria do
not show any symptoms of dis-
ease.

To prevent salmonella expo-
sure from pets, be sure to wash
hands with soap and warm water
after handling reptiles, birds or
any.pet feces. Keep pet houses



Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZETTE RICHEMOND OF FAITH
AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 3RD day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,



a substitute for Méditerranean’™

thyme. Both Cuban oregano

and Mexican-thyme should be, _
added to the pot late or used in”

uncooked foods. Ginger is easi-
ly grown from store-bought
hands that have developed
growth nodes. Break or cut the
hand into pieces containing a
growth node and plant about
five inches deep. In time you
will have attractive foliage and
then delightful flowers. When
the plant dies back you can har-
vest your gingers, reserving
some to replant.

Lemongrass is an essential in
Thai and Vietnamese cooking
and has long been known in The
Bahamas as ‘fever grass’, used in
bush medicine. Lemongrass
grows in clumps and can be
grown in flower beds to provide
attractive greenery. The swollen
white lower stem is the part
used.

Diseases of exotic animals that can affect people

clean. Supervise children han-
dling pets and ensure proper
hand washing. Young children
and immuno-compromised peo-
ple should avoid direct contact
with reptiles and birds.

Tularemia

This naturally occurring bac-
terial disease of rabbits and
rodents is considered a poten-
tial bio terrorism agent by the
Center for Disease Control and
Prevention. People infected
with the bacteria may experi-
ence skin rashes, sudden fever,
chills, nausea weakness, joint
pain, dry cough, diarrhea,
headaches, swollen painful
lymph nodes, chest pain and/or
pneumonia. Rabbits and
rodents are infected through
ticks and biting flies. People can
be exposed through inhalation
or ingestion. People are gener-
ally exposed through handling
carcasses of rabbits or rodents.
The bacteria is not spread from
person to person.

Psittacosis
Another potential bio-terror-










Garden mint is usually
spearmint or peppermint. Mint
is usually employed in its raw
form and sprinkled onto foods.
Mint tea is wonderful for diges-
tive disorders and a saucé made
of finely diced mint leaves, sug-
ar and vinegar is a fine accom-
paniment to lamb:

My last herb may come as a
surprise to many — celery. Basi-
cally a cool weather swamp
plant, celery is difficult to grow
in The Bahamas if what you
want are large, thick white stems
to use as a vegetable.

The somewhat smaller, dark
green stems and leaves we can
grow have wonderfully concen-
trated flavour and can be used
to flavour soups and stews and
chicken salads.

Bon appetit!

e j. hardy@coralwave.com





ism agent, Psittacosis’is an
important disease for bird own-,
ers to know about. Although
less than 50 people in the Unit-:
ed States are infected each year;
the illness can be serious. Peo=.
ple may experience heart infec-”
tion, hepatitis, neurologic symp-
toms, severe pneumonia, or
death. Infected birds may show
weakness, poor appetite, fluffed
up feathers, diarrhea, difficulty’
breathing, eye swelling and/or
eye discharge. The bird’s feces”
may remain virulent for months.
All sick birds should see a vet-
erinarian, especially if the ill-

ness includes eye swelling or.

discharge.

Lyrnphocytic Chori-
omeningitis Virus
(LCM)

House mice and other rodents
are natural carriers of the LCM
virus. Pet mice, hamsters and
guinea pigs may become infect-
ed by exposure to wild rodents in
pet stores or breeding facilities.
These pets may not show any
symptoms. Some will lose
weight, reduce activity, have
swollen eyelids, walk in a
hunched posture, stumble or fall,
develop seizures, or die from the
virus. In people, LCM generally
leads to flu-like symptoms one to
two weeks after exposure. Con-
tact with urine or bedding is the
most common route of infection,
although bites can also.transmit
the disease. To reduce the risk of
exposure, clean cages often in a
well ventilated area. Wash hands
after handling pet, rodents and
clean bedding. Do not kiss these
pets.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 11B



Ge

“To Experience Any Sense of
Positive Change, You Must
Start With Yourself.”

As the world ushers in a new era
of change and transformation at
every. possible level, this is possibly
the most amazing time to be alive.
People from across the globe are
hungry for a richer more meaningful
experience of life and are inspired to
explore this new frontier; accepting
that there is more to them than what
meets the eye.

On one hand, while many are
keenly aware of this shift, and wel-
come this ‘change revolution’ will-
ing, ready and able to take their liv-
ing to a. whole new level; on the flip
side there are still so many sitting on
the sidelines as mere spectators of
this beautiful transition. They are
unaware, unwilling and unable to
take ownership of their lives; oblivi-
ous to the incredible personal power
that they possess.





Ifyou find yourself in the latter

‘category; let me quickly point out

that the changes that you desire to

‘- experience do not exist outside of

you. Contrary to popular belief, your
answers do not lie in your parents,
your teachers, your spouse, your

children, the church, the government

or any other individual or-entity.

Believe it or not your answers lie
within you, and it is your responsi-.;
bilty to find ways to discover-and
employ them to create your pre-
ferred life.

For many of you I imagine this is
not a simple statement to accept;

especially in a time where things may
not be going quite right. But the
good news is - you can change your
situation by first changing yourself.

Move Beyond Mediocrity

I believe that one of the greater
challenges for most people is releas-
ing the habit of judging themselves
too harshly; constantly feeling like
they don’t measure up to society’s
small benchmarks of success. As

-such, they never feel good enough

and live their lives always trying to
prove something. This is where the
cycle of mediocrity takes root and if
left unchecked, it becomes the
norm; fueling the low energy of

inadequacy which leads to stress and
- dysfunction.

Change and transformation, must |
therefore be seen as an.elective

course of action; not because of
- what people will say or the things

that you may obtain, but because of
the value it will bring to you, your



Makeup application and ©
style tips for a beautiful you

FROM page 12

clogged pores, but this is not so since there are foundations

that are light on the skin.

Using a wedge sponge can help to blend in foundation

she added.

Concealers are very similar to foundation, and hides
those spots under the eyes. “Concealer is used more under
the eyes and it tends to conceal in the place of foundation.
It also hides those rings that some women may have under
the eye. It pretty much does the same jobs as foundation,”

she said.

Lip. Liners, lip sticks & lip gloss
Finding the color that suits your skin tone can be very dif-
- ficult. This process also involves testing, so you can find the
“color that will unleash your ‘sexy’. “A lot of women use lin-
“ers; and glosses are becoming very popular among the
younger women. The more mature and older women are
and have always been faithful to their lipstick. But before
you-choose a lipstick or gloss it is best to go:to a cosmetic
store and do a little testing | before you say that a certain col-

- or will look good on you.’

Liners, if applied properly have the effect to make the lips
fuller or smaller depending on how it is applied. Before
applying lipstick, gloss or liners, Ms William said it is best

~“““to apply a lip: balm to the lips before, because putting on
dried lips doesn’t give a desirable look.
“Whenever clients enter the store I will never sell them
"lip gloss without letting them purchase lip balm,” she said.
Another key to wearing liner, she said is to apply the lip-
stick or gloss: first and then the liner, as it gives a more

refreshed look.

“Tf you work in an area that is not fully air conditioned
then you don’t want to wear much make- up, since you will
sweat the makeup off especially if you have oily skin. “All

, you should put on is press powder and a little concealer for

the blemishes.”

Makeup Removers










































To ensure and promote healthy skin remove makeup
from the face with a makeup remover system, which exfo-
liates the face and cleans the pores. She says that having the
perfect glow when wearing makeup goes hand in hand
with keeping the face clean and healthy, which means tak-
ing the proper steps to take care es the skin.










family and your community. You
know within yourself that you are
more than what you have become
and there is

more to you than what meets the
eye; you hear it in the whispers of °
heart, you feel it in the gentle breeze
and you are genuinely seeking
avenues to break out of this box and
be free.

Free from the expectations of oth-
ers, free from having something to
prove, free from depending on the
opinion of others, free to be you and
to live a life of authenticity. I assure
you, that this degree of freedom is
available to you; and it begins with
you making the decision to embrace

’ the chance to change — from the

inside out.

Final thoughts...

Every sunrise brings a new
moment of possibility in which you
can choose to take a chance on your-
self and transform your life or you



FROM page 12

No fear of failure - Owners focus
on success, possibilities and adapt-
ability. They are aware of risks but
they are not pessimistic and they avoid
falling into the trap of focusing on
“what ifs”.

Mental toughness and an under- ©

standing of delayed gratification. It

takes mental toughness to take you’
through the tough times your compa- -

ny faces. Mental toughness can also
help you make a decision to delay your
gratification. When deciding to delay
your gratification, make a note of
when you will pursue gratification,
don't let your boss take unfair advan-
tage of your willingness to wait.

Benefits from adopting an owner's
mentality:

Increased Profitability - If more:and
more of your coworkers adopt an own-
er's mentality, increased profits can
follow because of improved produc-
tivity, better customer service and
enhanced employee relations.

. Mutual Respect - Respect will grow,

between managers and employees’
because employees understand the big
picture and managers appreciate and
respect employees for their contribu-
tion.

Unified Vision - Everyone will be _

focused on the same purpose and step-
- ping outside the nine dots to get things
done. There is more initiative.

What do leaders have to do to create
and support an owner's mentality
among employees?

If you want to know if you are part
of an organization with employees who
take ownership; all you have to do is



Success and an owner's mentality

~ apply a simple test.



You are the change that you are for!

can continue to listen to the same old
story or play the same unfulfilling life
game. .

Remember - change begins when
you decide; so why not take a new
look at your reflection in the mirror
and see a brand new, magnificent you
waiting for you to bring it into
expression.

I encourage you to accept that
despite your most difficulty situation, .

. you are living in a remarkable time of

possibility and you are truly the
change that you are looking for. You
need only begin to believe this and
act as if it is so; get up and make it -
happen.

e Are you ready to reinvent yourself?
Are you willing to commit to the process
of change? Congratulations - you are an
ideal candidate for my upcoming No
Excuses Goals Program. Please send an
email to coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call
429-6770. Seats Are Limited!

Ask yourself if
you typically hear employees and man-
agers refer to each other as “they” or
“them”? Or do you typically hear
employees and managers use the
words “we” and “us”? If you hear too
much usage of the words “they” or
“them” you have some work to do.

If you are an owner of a company,
the easiest way to deter employees
from adopting an owner's mentality is
to show your employees that you are
threatened by their idéas.
employees usually work closer to the
customer so learn to listen to them if
you don't already. You may or may
not agree with them, or you may not
have the resources to make a change
but they deserve a listening ear. In
fact, they may even be able to provide
creative solutions if you learn to'use
curiosity.

Transparency is necessary if you
want to create an environment where
employees take ownership.. You cer-
tainly don't have to share all the details
of the business with employees
because you don't want to alarm top
performers if there is a challenge but
you can provide employees with
enough.information so stimulate focus
and higher performance.

Cultivating a culture that promotes
employee ownership can support you
as a business owner and employee
through tough times and in times of
strong profitability. If you are an
employee and you adopt an owner's
mentality you can better ensure your
long term employability potential
because this mentality broadens your
technical skill sets and tESEED YS your
leadership abilities.

So give of yourself as though you
own the company. Find new ways to
make money. Put your heart into your
work .and remember that you can help
to differentiate your business and your-
self because by taking ownership, you
become more.and more valuable as
an employee:

ohnson-Smith named Caribbean Supervisor of the Year



PICTURED from left to.right Vincent Vanderpool Wallace, Minister of Tourism, Holidays Caribbean Hotel
Supervisor of the Year award winner Phyllis Johnson Smith; Caribbean Hotel Tourism Association
’ (CHTA)President Enrique De Marchena Kaluche; and Frank Comito, Executive Vice President of the Bahamas

Hotel & Tourism Association.



Beach Hotel.

the initiative and become a

Your.

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON



PHYLLIS Johnson- Smith,
a manager in the housekeep-
ing department at the Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort, was
recently named the Caribbean
Supervisor of the Year during
the opening ceremony of the
Caribbean Hotel and Tourism
Association's annual Market-
place Conference in St. Lucia.

Ms Johnson- Smith’s career
of hard work, persistence and
determination stood out
amongst tourism employees
all over the region.

Tourism is her life and
working in hotels is all she
knows, since she started in the

- industry in 1978 where she
_ was employed at the Winding

Bay Resort in Eleuthera. And
since 1980 she has been work-
ing as the Sheraton Nassau

She recently sat down with

‘Tribune Woman to discuss her

accomplishment and the

importance of the Tourism’

industry. “I am always
focused, and I believe in
remaining positive regardless
of the situation. I try to
encourage people to not look
at difficulties as obstacles, but
try to find the opportunities
to learn within each mistake,”
she said.

Serving in the tourism
industry is joy for Ms John-
son- Smith since she enjoys
taking part in rebuilding and
maintaining such a lucrative
industry. “Tourism is very
important and it effects every-
one, so at work I try to do my
best to accommodate visitors
to ensure that things are all
right with them. I try to take

proactive employee. I never
wait for someone to ask me
to do something, I take it
upon myself and just do it,”
she said.

She believes'in getting the
work done even if it requires
her to come in early and leave
late. Ms Johnson- Smith can
add this award to an impres-
sive list of accolades she has
already achieved throughout
her career including: the
Cacique award 2007-2008,
supervisor of the year for two
years, employee of the month
and a number of trips and gifts
for her career performance.

She continues to be a hard-
working, dependable, reliable
employee and says she is
always motivated to do her
best. She describes herself as a
person for all seasons.

IVE_IN

TO TEMPTATION











pe ae and desir-
Betts












m@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Woman
os es” Spoke. “with: ‘Tonya
ALL women want a Williams, manager of

: : the Cosmetic Boutique
beautiful glowing face eran tolae vie eae

enhanced by makeup and Woman, “I do believe
using cosmetics can surely _ that makeup application
give you a glow, but if it is is a form art. You must
ot applied to the face

roperly then you, can eration, skin tone, pig-
ave a makeup disaster. mentation, and you also

have an eye for cosmet-
ics, taking into consid-

want to be in touch with

colors. So working on

the face i is like working on a blank canvas, waiting on the
makeup artist’s creativity.”

Ms Williams. noted that there are right and wrong

ways to apply cosmetics. “There is a professional way to

apply makeup, however you can do what you feel is the

better way for you to:apply your makeup. Some people.

would prefer to tse their fingers when it comes to apply-
ing eye shadow or liquid foundation as well as concealers.
This is good because the warmth from the fingers blends

the eye shadow, concealer, and foundation in very good,” »

she said.

Having the perfect. and desirable. coverage can be:

achieved by using the proper tools, preferably Hsing
brushes composed mainly of ee hair.

Foundations and Concealers

Many Bahamian women feel that pressed powder i is
incomplete without foundation. However there are some
women who do not need it. And while many women

_ may have very smooth, clear, complexions they still fall

weak to the completion they think foundation gives.
“Foundation is not necessary. It does however depend
on your skin type. If you have very bad skin, or if you
have a lot of blemishes as well as marks then maybe
you can use foundation, but if you don’t have
much blemishes then it is not necessary to wear
foundation, or if you do you can wear it lightly.”
She also. mentioned that when some women
hear the word foundation, they automatically think
of it being something very heavy or they think of

SEE page 11 |

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,













Success and an
owner’s mentality

Have you ever heard any of these.
statements: “I only work here”, “that's
not my job” or “I am not paid enough
to do that.” While this may all be true,
if you usé these or similar statements
you are really saying that you are okay
with mediocrity because you are unwill-
ing to step outside the parameters of
your job description.

These statements are symptomatic of
what is often referred to as a job men-
tality. You work, you get paid and then
you start the cycle again. There is
rarely any extra effort from you and for
some, there is very little effort.

You may have decided not to make
the extra effort because you feel over-
looked or stuck, so you convince your-
self the extra effort won't help you.
While this may true, there is the risk
that during tough times, or when pro-
motions are being considered, you will
continue to be unnoticed.

One way you'can take charge of your
career is to adopt an owner's mentality.
An owner cares about their company.
They constantly think about how they
can improve their products, customer
servicé, and operations with the inten-
tion of improving profitability. They
take calculated risks and apply creativi-
ty to challenges. Owners take pride in
their surroundings and no matter how
menial the task, they are prepared to _
do what it takes to make their company
successful. i

The author, Daniel Theyagu said,
“You should learn to see yourself as
the owner, no matter where you stand
in your organisation. Achieving this
paradigm shift within will automatically
allow. you to,start to contribute effec-..
tively to your organization.”

So, if you are not the owner of your _
company, start thinking about how you
can adopt a more entrepreneurial, own-
er's mentality. Keep in mind that some ~
aspects of the owner's mentality are not
welcome in every workplace because’
some owners or leaders are intimidated
by strong performers with great ideas
so be sure you understand your envi-
ronment and use wisdom.

The basic traits of employees with an
owner's mentality:

Responsibility - you take responsibil-
ity whether or not you are assigned for-
mal responsibility. Thisisnot about —
taking blame for others, it is about see-
ing trash on the floor and taking
responsibility for keeping your sur-
roundings clean without being asked.
It is about seeing an opportunity to
assist and helping a fellow employee or
it is about suggesting a new way for the

company to make money.

Reliability - You are reliable when
you have integrity. You do what you

Said you will do when you said you

would do it. If you are a reliable
employee you will communicate effec-
tively especially if expectations are not
being met. You don't avoid the issue.

Resourcefulness - You are resource-
ful when you are able to make things
happen even if you don't have the
finances, staff or tools you need. You
are creative and you can find a way to
make things happen despite the per-
ceived lack of resources. You see pos-
sibilities and avoid focusing on lack.

Holding your coworkers accountable
-You not only hold yourself account-
able to high standards, you help your
co-workers to do the same. You recog-
nise the reality that if your company is
not profitable, you won 't have a job.

SEE page 11

r

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and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate,

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394- 1759



Full Text


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BAHAMAS EDITION



Volume: 105 No.59







TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

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oss









Wilehcombe calls
for PLP ‘ceasefire’ :

@ By DENISE He said a concerned Pin- .
: MAYCOCK der’s Point resident tele-
Embattled MP Tribune Freeport phoned the. police control
h ks Reporter room and reported hearing |
than suppor ters, dmaycock@ gunshots in the area..

calls for party to
end politically
divisive behaviour

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
-alowe@tribunemedia:net

QUOTING biblical passages
and defiant poetry, embattled
MP for West End and Bimini,
Obie Wilchcombe, last. night
thanked his supporters and
called on PLPs to call “a cease-
fire” on politically divisive and
destructive behaviour.

The PLP MP admonished his
party members to “lay down the
weapons that are causing mass
destruction” and focus on the
economic and social challenges
facing the Bahamas.

“The quest for the ultimate
seat of power in our party has
unfortunately created a mad
dash where brilliant and edu-

SEE page six

= shot bas /

Police hoping residents of Pinder's
Point can provide them with leads |




tribunemedia.net .

FREEPORT - A man
was shot dead at Pinder’s
Point late Sunday evening
and police are hoping that
residents can provide them
with leads into the island’s
second and the country’s
seventh homicide for the
year.

Asst Supt Clarence Reck-
ley, press liaison officer,
reported that the victim was
shot-in the head and died at
the scene.

Mr Reckley said police
received reports of a shoot-
ing around 10.45pm on Sun-
day and dispatched officers
to investigate.



’ his back with a wound to the |














When officers arrived at |
the scene, they spoke with |
residents in the area and dis-_|
covered the body of a black
man, who appeared to be in
his early twenties, lying.on
the ground. :

The victim was lying on |

head. The deceased was |
wearing a pair of white ten- |}
nis shoes, long blue jeans
and a black hood.

ASP Reckley said police
are seeking the public’s
assistance in the matter.

He is urging anyone with |
information to contact |
police at911 or the Central
Detective Unit at 352-
9774/5.








Christie expected to announce Pleasant
‘Bridgewater Senate replacement this week

& By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

PROGRESSIVE Liberal Party leader Perry
Christie is expected to announce a replacement for
the Senate seat left vacant-by embattled former
senator Pleasant Bridgewater as early as Wednes-
day. -
During a brief interview yesterday, Mr Christie

said he has made his choice on Ms Bridgewater's

replacement but did not want to divulge the name

_ before making an official statement later this week. BRR aaaenanitts

He did confirm, however, that the replacement

will be a Grand Bahama resident, cspelling rumours that businessman
Ricardo Treco was his choice.’

Mr Christie-said he received about six recommendations for the

FROM LEFT: Julian Johnson; Leshawn Bowe and rete ane outside of court

| @ By NATARIO McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

Motorcycle
fatality report

A REPORT reached The Tri-
bune late last night of a traffic
fatality on Grand Bahama.

Shannon Comarcho,.d resident
of Fox Hill, reportedly lost con-
trol of his motorcycle in Freeport
around 6.30pm.

Mr Comarcho was taken to
hospital but died shortly after. He

men have also been charged with conspiring
to murder Newbold.
: Newbold, 32, was shot multiple times in

THREE men were arraigned in a Magis-.._ the chest in Nassau Village around 9pm on
trate’s Court yesterday'on charges of mur- January 25. He was the country's fourth
der and conspiring:to commit murder. murder victim for 2009.

Police have charged Julian Johnson, 24, of According to court dockets, Bowe, John-
Cooper’s Terrace, off Kemp Road, Leshawn _ son and Sands intentionally caused New-
Bowe, 23, and Kendrick.Sands, 32, both of — bold’s death. It is also alleged that, on the
Matthew Street, Nassau Village, in the Jan-

‘Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



was 33.

uary 25 murder of Onado Newbold. The





SEE page six

Fiscal deficit increases by
almost 57% to $121.4m

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s fiscal
deficit increased by almost 57 per
cent to $121.4 million during the
first four months of its 2008-2009
fiscal year, a trend the Central
Bank of the Bahamas said was
likely to increase in the short and
medium term.

Unveiling its repdrt on month-
ly and economic developments
during December 2008, the Cen-
tral Bank said the deficit — which
shows by how much the Govern-

ment’s spending exceeds its rev-
enue — and public sector debt
were expected to increase due to
a combination of decreased rev-
enues and increased spending on
social programmes and infra-
structure, ”

While total government rev-
enues were only down slightly by

0.41 per cent, at $510.7 million .

for the four months from July to
November 2008, import duties
were off by 24.61 per cent when

SEE page six

Senate replacement, whose names he did not reveal. Although he has

SEE page six

Sten OAM
shots despite police doubts

@ By ALEX MISSICK

Tribune Staff Reporter .

ON MONDAY residents
in the Shirley Street and
Sears Road area still insisted
they heard gun shots being
fired during the apprehen-
sion of an ex-police officer

in a stolen vehicle last Sun- -

day morning.
This comes after police



officers doubted that any
gunfire was exchanged in the
chase of the stolen Nissan.
A senior officer suggested
that residents could have
mistaken shots for the loud
crash of the vehicle or the
crackling noise from the
downed power lines.
Residents said as police

SEE page six




PAGE 2, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Three men charged over murder
Will stand trial in Supreme Court

THREE men charged in the 2007 murder of Shawn Evans will
stand trial in the Supreme Court,,a Magistrate has ruled.

Smith Charitable, 33, alias Ishmael; Michael Joseph, 22, alias
Michael France, and Nicole Octelus, 33, are accused of the mur-
der.

Mr Evans, 32, was found in a yard near his Pride Estates :
home with a gunshot wound to his neck on the morning of Sep- ;
tember 16, 2007. v3

A preliminary i inquiry was held to determine whether there was
sufficient evidence against the men for them to stand trial in the
Supreme Court.

Magistrate Carolita Bethel ruled last Friday that there was suf-
ficient evidence for a Supreme Court trial.

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FRIGHTENING trend of
suicide. and depression is
increasing in the Bahamas
through a spreading sense of
hopelessness, despair and iso-
lation, a top psychologist has
said.

Three suicides this week sent
the suicide rate soaring at the
_beginning of the year, coincid-
ing with a deepening economic
crisis affecting families across
the nation.

‘Father-of-two Leslie Camp-
bell, 36, of Ruby Avenue,
Cable Beach, was found hang-
ing in his home on Friday night,
and just 24 hours later Kimber-
ley Miller, 37, was found hang-
ing at her Pastel Gardens
home.

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Deaths

Their deaths followed the
suspected suicide of a 45-year-
old father-of-three found hang-
ing in his Seabreeze Lane
Home on Wednesday.

Police are investigating all
three deaths on the premise the
deceased committed suicide.

Psychologist David Allen
attributes the trend to a break-
down of family life and care in























lm By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

week.

aor Be ee eee cia Peet to high end

en's Titanium bracelets

Chains, Rings, Cufflinks, Dog Tags a

por

anaes i

mreynolds@tribunemedia:net

LONG term Haitian residents of Marsh.
Harbour, Abaco, were granted Bahamian
citizenship when the director and minister
of immigration visited the community last

Minister of Immigration, Branville McCart-
_ney and director Jack Thompson. flew to ,
Marsh: Harbour to legitimise the status of



“Suicide is not necessarily
a choice, it happens because
the pain they experience
internally exceeds their
internal view of the resources |

around them.”



Psychologist David Allen

the community as people are
caught up in their busy lives
and become isolated, but are
too proud to share their inner
turmoil.

He argues suicide is a process
involving a deep sense of hope-
lessness, isolation, sleep depri-
vation, an inability to express
hurt, and a tendency to turn to
alcohol and drugs.

Dr Allen said: “Suicide is not
necessarily a choice, it happens
‘because the pain they experi-
ence internally exceeds their
internal view. of the resources
around them.”

“ Although the circumstances
surrounding the three recent
suicides are still unknown, Dr

Allen said the economic crisis is -

likely to be a factor as men get
self-esteem from their jobs, and

six Haitian-Bahamians. an
Their applications had been approved by

women get self-esteem from
their relationships. :
When men lose their jobs

' they are unable to support their

wives emotionally,.and children
are affected.

Dr Allen said: “The econom-
ic downturn and lack of bond-
ing in our community is rife.

Fatalism

“There’s a kind of fatalism
that is coming in and I don’t
know if that is coming from the
adults or from society.

“It’s almost like death is in
the. air and I would want life
and hope to be in the air.”

Depression is expected to be
the world’s most common ill-
ness:by 2025, Dr Allen said, but
80 per cent of cases are treat-

KOA UN MSC IICION HORS Mer Tu OTM
residents are granted citizenship

the Department of Immigration and the offi-
cials travelled to Marsh Harbour to admin-

ister the oath and citizenship ceremony for

- the applicants.
Mr Thompson said he was not sure
whether the new citizens are residents of the

Mud and Pigeon Pea, illegal slums in the

heart of Marsh Harbour where thousands of
illegal Haitian immigrants and legitimised
migrants live in squalid conditions.

\

Suicide, depression trend ‘increasing
through a sense of a hopelessness’

able with medication and psy-
chotherapy.

Simple tests can diagnose the
disease and Dr Allen would
like to see these tests carried
out in public places to prevent
it from being the silent killer.

Dr Allen said suicide is a
catching trend, as for every
death by suicide there are
almost 100 people struggling
with the process.

Suicide rates reached a
peak in 2000 when ten people
ended their lives, and the rate
dropped to half that number in
2001.

In 2002 the number of sui-

cides more than halved again
with just two suicidal deaths in

, the Bahamas that year, but the

rate doubled again to four in
2003.

There were just two suicides
in 2004, five in 2005 and four in
2006.

There were at least three sui-
cides last year — in Bimini,
Grand Bahama and Nassau, but

_ police were unable to confirm

the final figures before The Tri-
bune went to press.

A lecture on the topic, ‘Sui-
cide: Are the numbers increas-

‘ing?’ will be held by the

Department of Social Services
at Wesley Methodist Church in
Malcolm Road East, Nassau,

. on Tuesday, February 10 from

9pm to 10.30pm. |




“COME EXPERIENCE THE JOY OF
GIVING TerTERE FOR HUMANITY” ~~

i sponsored | by
Prince Lock and Key Company Limited -

SPACE DONATED BY:
BROWN, MORLEY AND VIGUEE

REALTY


THE TRIBUNE

_ LOCAL NEWS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 3



In brie

Super Bowl
commercial
put spotlight
on Bahamas

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter
lallen@tribunemedia.net



AN Islands of the Bahamas
commercial showcased during
Super Bowl XLII on Sunday
was part of an international
marketing campaign aimed at
injecting new life into the falter-
ing industry.

The championship game,
which drew an estimated 130
million viewers worldwide, is
not only a must-see for football
enthusiasts but also an advertis-
ers’ paradise.

Tourism Min-
ister Vincent
§ Vanderpool-

j Wallace said
yesterday that
| more than $11



international

Vincent advertising by
Vanderpool- the government,
Wallace and will be

divided into sev-
eral specific initiatives aimed at
promoting the Bahamas. “We
advertise in places where there
are large audiences. You can
tell from the telephones ringing,
and from the calls and inquiries
and hits on our websites after-
wards, but generally speaking
we’ve seen a good response to
the Super Bowl ad almost
immediately,” he said.
Although he was unable to
make any predictions because
of the instability of the global
market, Mr Vanderpool-Wal-
lace said he is confident that the
ad and future promotions will
bring'visitors to the Bahamas.
Companies that advertised
during the event were said to
have spent at least $3 million for
a 30 second slot. Mr Vander-
pool-Wallace said: “We negoti-
ate all of these prices. It’s not
the full price that everybody has
been hearing about, but these
are negotiated as part of an
overall:media buy, and so for
that’ tcrific ad we don’t single
URS a spetific itent



See the ministry ie its
eye on the Academy Awards,
and the NBA playoffs.
“Anything where there is a
‘large gathering of audiences
with the right kind of atmos-
phere, you are going to see our |
advertising. We think that we
are putting together a signature
offer that will become associat-
ed with the Bahamas,” he said.
According'to Mr Vanderpool-
Wallace, the ministry’s efforts to
promote the country in new
markets extend far beyond
American television, and
include deals and promotions
available over the Internet and
a greater presence in high-end
European markets. “It’s.a total:
marketing web that we are
putting together to make certain
that we are delivering our mes-,
sage to the right audiences.” \

Two men charged
with Kidnapping,
armed robbery

TWO men were arraigned ina
Magistrate’s Court yesterday on
kidnapping and armed FODBELY
charges.

Jeffrey Wilson, 52, of Farring-
ton Road, and Roscoe Armbris-
ter, 23, of Rock Crusher Road,
were arraigned on the charges
before Magistrate Susan Sylvester
in Court 11, Nassau Street.

Court dockets allege that the
two men while armed with a
handgun on Monday, January 26,
robbed Sabrina Glinton Eizenga
of a silver 1997 Mercedes Benz
valued at $8,000, a black hand
bag valued at $15 and a $10-cel-
lular telephone case.

It is also alleged that the two
men kidnapped Ms Eizenga on
Monday, January 26. ~ -

The accused were not required
to plead to the charges and were
remanded to Her Majesty’s
Prison. The case was adjourned to
May 28 when a preliminary
inquiry will be held.

e A man was’sentenced to 30
months in prison yesterday after
pleading guilty to drug possession
charges.

Dwayne Lockhart, 30, plead-
ed guilty in a Magistrate’s Court
to the possession of 171 lbs of
marijuana. According to court
dockets, Lockhart was found in
possession of the drugs on Fri-
day, January 30. Police reported-
ly discovered the drugs in a bed-
room of a house located near
Electro Jack off Baillou Hill
Road. Lockhart, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita Bethel
in Court 8, Bank Lane, pleaded
guilty to the charge of possession
of marijuana with intent to sup-
ply. Magistrate Bethel sentenced
Lockhart to’30 months in prison.



IFC AND WORLD BANK REPORT: Regulatory reforms

Bahamas rated 55th
most business-friendly
_ place in the world

Mi Country sixth in region among small island states

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
Chief Reporter

rmissick@tribunemedia.net

A NEW report from IFC and
the World Bank ranks the
Bahamas 55 in the world, and
sixth in the region among small
island states creating more oppor-
tunity for local businesses through
regulatory reforms that help
boost competitiveness.

' The Report “Doing Business
in Small Island Developing States
2009”, the second in a series,
examines the performance of 33
small island states based on the
Doing Business indicators and
compares the regulatory envi-

ronment for business in these -

economies.

The report finds that Singapore
is the easiest place in the world to
do business, while Mauritius, St.
Lucia, and Fiji are leading the
way in Africa, the Caribbean, and

Many ‘street people

the Pacific, respectively.
The Dominican Republic is
this year’s top small-island

reformer as well as a top-10:

reformer globally.
In The Bahamas, the report
recorded no major reform.
Overall the Bahamas was 55th

in the world and sixth in the

region.

Svetlana Bagaudinova, author
of the report, said, “Better busi-
ness regulations give firms more
opportunities to grow and create
jobs, which is critical for small
island states that have to over-
come challenges posed by size

‘and distance. Being small can

even be an advantage because
reform can happen faster and
deliver results sooner.”

Small states with lagging regu--

latory environments can learn
from each other.
He said Mauritius, which ranks

24th on the ease of doing busi-

>]

unwilling to change

lifestyles

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Having undertaken a “huge
drive” to reduce the number of
people living on the sffeets of
New Providence, the government
has found that many are unwilling
to change their lifestyles, the Min-
ister of State for Social Develop-
ment said.

According to Loretta Butler-
Turner, the number of “street
people” is down considerably and

| the large majority of those who

remain do so despite the efforts of
her ministry.

“On a given day, the average
Nassauvian is likely to encounter
several familiar faces begging for
money on the island’s main thor-
oughfares — such as Shirley Street
and East and West Bay Streets.

The minister claims that her
department has found it is not
necessity that always drives these
people to the streets.

“The reality is these people will
tell you quite simply — they like
being on the street hustling a dol-
lar,” said Mrs Butler-Turner,

' adding that a significant number

express an unwillingness to con-
form to. the demands of society
at large. “Many of them come
from families that can take care of
them, this is no secret, but for
whatever reason they seem not

| to comply with their family’s —

wishes, and that is where they end
up,” said the minister.

She highlighted the cases of a
number of people who, she
revealed, have set up make-shift
“homes” under the bridge on Rot,
ter’s Cay.

“Whether it’s under some of
the government buildings there,
or under the fruit and vegetable
stand, we’ve been out there and
interviewed them, we’ve contact-
ed their family members, and
tried to place them in temporary
homes and many of them tell us
they do not want to be there
because they don’t wish to abide
by the rules. They don’t wish to
live under the regulations in their
family homes, they just want to be
themselves.”

“They can hustle $20. and
they’re happy as can be. So it’s
not for not trying (on the part of
government), I can tell you,” she
said. Meanwhile, she revealed
that teams sent out by her min-
istry to investigate certain cases
have found that some individu-
als are being placed on certain
street corners. by other people “to
collect.money.’

And when people are willing
to take advantage of the rehabil-
itation services offered by the
government, they often'do so
only to return to their old habits.

“I can tell you from personal
experience that I have actually
instructed our rehabilitation ser-
vices people to go and check on
certain individuals and they have
reported back to me, they have
made interventions and even
though those people may have
taken advantage of whatever
intervention was offered, before
long they were back out there
again.”

She said that, based on the
findings of her department, many
of those who live on the street
have “mentally induced problems
because of either alcoholism or
drug problems.”

However, she stated that this

WUT



oS UL



in itself does not create the nec-
essary conditions for their indef-
inite incarceration in Sandilands.

“At the end of the day these
are usually adults and they have
the ability on their own to deter-
mine whether they want to be in
such a programme,” she said.

For those who emerge from
programmes and have nowhere
to go, the government currently
runs four “half-way houses” in an
undisclosed location which sup-
port people while they are
preparing to re-enter society.

“The homes we have are
filled,” the minister said.

Damon Bradshaw, programme
co-ordinator at the Salvation
Army’s Mackey Street soup
kitchen said that the numbers of
people seeking sustenance from
that location have remained “sta-
ble” in recent times. .

“Some people go and then new
one’s replace them. Then you
have some of the same old faces,”
said Mr Bradshaw.



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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

"LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Balurday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N- 3207, Naskall, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., PO. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) ' 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242 ) 502-2352
Circulation Department -.(242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
creeper fax: (242) 352- was

An answer to Franklyn Wilson

AT THE end of last week Mr Franklyn Wil-

son expressed amazement at how much ink |

local newspapers are dedicating to PLP “per-
sonalities” while neglecting those of the gov-
erning party.

It reminds us of the days when the com-
plaint was that too many black Bahamians were
filling the prisons, while not even a token num-
ber of whites were joining them behind bars.
They wanted to know why? The answer was as
clear as the nose on their faces, but they didn’t
want to accept the obvious. It was almost ‘as
though they were urging that white Bahami-

ans — guilty of an offence or not — be arrested -

and imprisoned, just to make black Bahamians

feel better. Instead, they should have been try- :

ing to get to the root cause of the problem to
find a remedy to keep all Bahamians, regardless
of colour, on the right side of the law.

We can assure. Mr Wilson that Tribune
reporters do not make it their business to go dig-
ging about in the PLP’s dirty laundry, but when
that Jaundry.j is left on,our doorstep in full pub-

amazing,” he said, “that The Tribune in partic-
ular finds so much interest in making the
Bahamian public'so aware of what is wrong in
the PLP and somehow nothing can ever be
found or adverse comment about the FNM.”
Members of the PLP themselves find so
much amiss in their party that they are now
openly backbiting in public. Today it is the PLP
that is making the news. And, or course, news-
papers and radio stations follow the news.
Even Managing Editor John Marquis, who
- annually hands out a tongue-in-cheek spoof at
Christmas time to the “good, bad, smart, dumb
and crazy”, gave 'the FNM “the dull as ditch-
‘water award,” because they are “a collection of
incredibly lacklustre politicians who give Insight
little or nothing to write about.”
Many FINMs were ‘upset by this dismissal,

not recognising it as a back-handed compli- -

ment. Mr Marquis didn’t need the FNM when
he had so many PLP centre stage, jiving and

clicking their heels in public. By comparison, the

FNM are not headline makers.

Labour law
reform is
overdue ©

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I am convinced that it is

long overdue for all our labour
laws, especially those govern-
ing trade unions to be updated
and further to once and for all
establish under law that non-
union employees also have
rights and they will have an
essential place in the labour
scene being heard as they are
the majority. .

There is no question that it

_ is unacceptable that once a.
union is certified that certifi-
cation is ’til death cometh..

Many have given their opinion



Woawbs.xs

letters@tribunemedia.net




before that it should be for as

long as the current collective
agreement stands; usually
three-years. Certification

must require six-months,

before the end of the collec-
tive agreement that the union
will be required to have a vote
of its members to recertify

’ itself.

Take the Bahamas Hotel
Caterers Union, they have lost

probably more than 50 peer
cent of their membership over
the past 15-20 years — I doubt
they could get certified today
at any hotel but they are
embodied and enthroned.

Non-union employees fur-
ther need to be heard — they
are anyway the majority of the
workers in the country and no
one even asks their opinion.

It is time for Labour Law
reform not tokenism, but real
reform.

D SCAVELLA
Nassau,
January 17, 2009.

Still a lot of decent Bahamians

who look after our tourists

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would like to write a letter to the atten-
* tion of The Ministry Of Tourism to say that
there are a lot of decent and honest Bahamians
~-who respect and look after our tourists even’
_ though we think those days are long gone.

-. A visitor from London, England came to
Nassau to visit a resident and friend recently for

a short vacation.

Later that evening he was on his computer
and received an e-mail from a Bahamian lady

tents.

stating that she had stopped at the Montagu
Ramp to purchase fish and found his pouch
which contained his belongings stating the con-

- She gave | her home phone number which he
called the following day to get directions to
her home located in Sunshine Park No. 22.

He visited her home and retrieved his

- belongings and rewarded the Bahamian lady.

During his visit he visited the Montagu Ramp
‘Turning to the current Travolta extortion to take a photograph of the conch shells and °

lic view, our reporters certainly are not going to’ -
scandal, which got full play again on Fox news

The tourist from London, England and his

ignore it.

. Although they do not ignore what has been
given them, neither do they accept it at face
value without question.‘They go to great lengths
to find out if any, and if so how much of it is

true. They contact the owner of the dirty linen *

to try to discover what part of itis his. He is giv-
en every opportunity to tell,his side. of the sto-
ry. Some seize the opportunity to defend the
selves, some plead that it be swept.und
carpet, some are defiant in denial. Our reportés
are trained to handle all attitudes, and brig
the public as much of the story as they can con-
firm or deny.

Much dirty linen belonging to several PLP

members has been unloaded on our doorstep. .

over the years.

Some of it has been put there by members of
the public who are fed up with the lack of moral-
ity in our community and want it exposed. '

The hope is that if there is enough shame
and blame someone will eventually get the mes-
sage and start demanding accountability.

The focus is now on many of our politicians,
who have suddenly discovered that there are no
more hiding places when they transgress.

We now have a police force that when it
comes to breaking the law all men are equal.
The transgressor has neither social nor political
rank — there is only democracy before the law
when all men are treated as equals.

Mr Wilson complains that:if one reads the
editorials of The Tribune and Guardian, it is
the PLP who are in the spotlight, “I just find it

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Sunday night; Mr Wilson did not think that
such bad publicity against the Bahamas would
adversely affect our “economic climate.”
This is where we think he is seriously wrong.
He obviously is not aware of the number of
' desirable investors who backed off from the
Bahamas because of the scandal of the Pindling
ae Bahamians had hoped that these years

. Would: have. been put.to rest'when the FNM:

“came to power in 1992.

ar ‘Tt is true that all went quiet and investors
came. Now the embers are being stoked again
by the present scandal and the Bahamas is once
more in the news as that corrupt little backwa-
ter, where the “natives pick your pockets.” We
know that this present hiccup will affect
investors. We had hoped that it would not affect
visitors until we received an é-mail from a
retired editor inthe US expressing sadness

about the present’ misfortunes of “your coun-

t ” 4 ‘

Despite the headlines this country has made —

from hurricanes and other misfortunes and scan-
dals over the years, this present scandal has so
moved this man that it is the first time in more
‘than 50 years, when we were classmates at
Columbia University, that he has made con-
tact.

We. think that this country has been very

~ badly hurt by the Travolta case, not only in the

US, but around the world — it has even been
broadcast in Japan from where we have’ been
trying t to attract visitors.



should

NOTICE is. hereby given that ANNA G. MICHEL of
SOLDIER ROAD WEST, APT#3, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the. Minister responsible for Nationality and }
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization should not be granted,
send a written and signed statement of the facts
within twenty-eight days from the 27" day of January, 2009
‘| to the Minister responsible for nationality and Citizenship,

the local set-up of the area, on his return to his
hostess’ home he noticed that his pouclf that
‘was attached to his belt was missing which con-
tained his camera, phone, cash and personal ID.
He returned to:the Montagu Ramp and:
retraced his path looking for his belongings
and questioned the residents:there but no one
claimed to have found his pouch.

«-FOURIST =:

host would like to thank the Bahamian lady
and her family for being so honest and respect-
ful for returning his belongings and to Say that
it is truly better in the Bahamas. -

A VERY THANKFUL
« January 14; 2009

A proposition oar Ingraham and
his government should consider

EDITOR, The Tribune.

“I am sure that you would

agree with me that in the
world today, as it has been for
an extended period of'time,
the English language seems to
be the premier international
language of choice spoken,
written, and read by a variety
of peoples.

I will not delve into the rea-
sons for this global develop-
ment, but the fact remains that
that is now the case (J anuary
21,2009).

P.O. BORN: (Nat, Nassatl ‘Bahamas,

‘01 TOYOTA CAMRY

‘OG EYeMUYARIS 4
‘01 HYUNDAI ACCENT
‘(01 HYUNDAI COUPE

DESIGN

WOOD AND COLD-FORMED STEEL
TRUSSES

My question to you, though,
is how can the world (inclu-
sive of The Bahamas) capi-
talise on this evolution.

Can you imagine the speed
of progress this world would
be capable of accomplishing
if everyone at least spoke Eng-
lish? Not to mention read and
write?

Your and my finite ands

- (and others) together. would
not be able to fathom the

plethora of opportunities that
would be available to all glob-
al citizens if such a situation
were to be presented to the
world.

However, for fear of omit-
ting several significant
prospective developments that
probably would take place

‘because of this, I will refrain -

from enlightening you on only

what I am able to think of. ©

The Bahamian people as well
as the people ofthe world
have (I suspect) very healthy
imaginations individually, and
more importantly, collectively,
to visualise whatever creations

_ that could be realised.

And so, it would seem to
me that} considering this pro-
posal, the government of The
Bahamas should take the ini-
tiative.and devise its own com-

- prehensive and sophisticated

plan to cause the world to ral-
ly around and implement this
concept.

It is my personal estimation
that such an ambitious under-
taking by the world (being led

by The Bahamas) would take
no less than 500 years to
accomplish. But, before the
500th year is reached, The
Bahamas would, no doubt, be
showcased to the world from
year one and increasing inter-

. Mittently over the following

years.
I need nat point out to
Bahamians the inordinate

-amount of attendant benefits

that. The Bahamas could
derive from leading the way
in presenting this platform to
the world. I wish, again, that
they would use their collec-
tive imaginations. |

And, finally, it would be my
wish that after the 500 years
would have been completed
that the native languages of
countries other than English-
speaking countries would still
have retained use as signifi-
cantly and prominently as they
are in use today. They (lan-
guages) should remain an inte-
gral part of their respective
cultures. .

Prime Minister the Rt Hon
Hubert A Ingraham and the
remaining members of his
government should give seri-
ous consideration to this
proposition. It can only bene-
fit this world and this country
for the next 500 years. Who
can argue with that?

MARVIN G
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau

January 21, 2009.

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Welcome surprise to see phone
books packaged separately

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A year ago I wrote.a letter concerning the yearly publication of
the Bahamas phone directories white and yellow pages books
(which you posted in your local issue). I stated that I thought that
packing the two books together was a waste of money and materials

as a lot of the yellow page books are seldom used and end up in the
garbage.

I went to the post-office January 12th, 2009 and noticed that the
phone books for 2009 were out and much to my surprise they
were packaged separately. I guess someone at BaTelCo read my let-
ter and agreed with me. Again just a thought.

NO NAME
Nassau,
January 14, 2009.

AUTHORIZED

reap! Q MANUFACTURER
or Abace Motor Moll, Don MacKay Blvd, 347- 291 6


[HE TRIBUNE

|} UESVDAY, FEBRUARY 3

3, 200Y, PAGE 5d



Amigo’s Fund, the
Kohn, Pegasus
Foundations
underwrite spay
and neuter clinic

AMIGO’S Fund is part-
nering with the Kohn and
Pegasus Foundations to
underwrite the Humane Soci-
ety of Grand Bahama’s
(HSGB) spay and neuter
field clinic which started yes-
terday and will continue until
Friday at Pinder’s Point,
Grand Bahama.

The spay and neuter cam-
paign began in 1998 with pot-
cake ‘Amigo’ as its poster
dog.

It initiated a massive public
relations effort to raise aware-
ness of the importance of
spaying and neutering in con-
trolling the population of
uncared for and suffering ani-
mals who populate Grand
Bahama.

The campaign included
catchy, award winning posters
featuring potcake star Ami-
go, numerous newspaper arti-
cles, including being chosen
as one of the “Stories of the
Year” by The Tribune,
adverts in tourist magazines
and radio interviews which
were broadcast throughout
the Bahamas.

It spotlighted the impor-
tance of public participation
in the effort to have all owned
animals neutered — which was
then and still is a free service
to all those who cannot afford
it.

The spay and neuter field
clinics project, initiated and
run by HSGB managing
director Tip. Burrows and
Ellen Kohn, HSGB board
member and founder of the
Kohn Foundation, involve
pro-bono work by veterinari-
ans from the United States
under the direction of Dr ;
Robin Brennen of New York. :

This will be the fourth :
major field clinic in this pro-
ject, two to three clinics per
year are the goal. Stes

HSGB honorary chairper- :
son Frances Hayward, who
founded and underwrote the
spay/neuter campaign in 1998,
as well as initiating the chari-
table trust ‘Amigo’s Fund’ in
2008, said it is a “honour and
pleasure (to be) able to take
part in such a noble effort”
and hopes the public will par-
ticipate in increasing num-
bers.

She said she also hopes that
the business community will
take a greater part in the pro-
gramme.

In addition to participating
in spay/neuter initiatives,
Amigo’s Fund contributes to
the rehabilitation of deserving
animals who are found in the
most pitiful physical condi-
tion imaginable, but when
given care and love become
the “beautiful, wonderful
happy ‘creatures’ God
intended them to be,” she
said.









Bahamas tourism outlook
for 2009 is ‘very bleak’

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

IMMEDIATE past-president of the
Bahamas Hotel Association (BHA)
Russell Miller said the outlook for the
country’s tourism industry in 2009 is

“very bleak.”

Mr Miller was reflecting on the state
of the industry after receiving the
award for “Hotelier of the Year” at

the 13th Annual Cacique Awards last

Friday.

“We have not faced these types of
challenges and difficulties ever before,
but I do believe that ours is a resilient
industry and we will persevere and we
will come through this situation a.lot
better off than we got into it,” he said at
the awards ceremony held at the Rain-
forest Theatre in the Crystal Palace
Casino.

Mr Miller said he does not expect to
see things to improve until the fourth
quarter or the end of the forth quarter,

and maybe not even until the begin- °

RUSSELL MILLER receives his ‘Hotelier of the Year’ award.

“These are very tough times and this
thing is global. It’s affecting everything,
everybody and everywhere, so it’s a
tough time we are faced with. I think







ning of 2010.



the hotel industry in the Bahamas will .

face difficulties this year before things
get better, but I do believe that they

will get better and we are optimistic

that that will come hopefully by the
end of the year,” he said.

Mr Miller said it is a huge honour
to be named as “Hotelier of the Year”,
as the selection is made by all past win-
ners and is recognition by one’s peers
of outstanding performance and dedi-
cation to the industry.

“The Cacique Awards within the
tourism industry are the pinnacle of
achievement and so to be recognised
like that I feel very fortunate and very
gratified and it’s obviously a reflection

. and recognition of the years I have
. been in the industry and the opportu-

nities that I have been afforded,” he
said.

Mr Miller is an active supporter of
the ‘BHA and a major force in the
organisation’s increased focus’ on small
hotels, improving work force quality
and increasing collaboration with the
government.

He served as president of the 220-
member Association for two years,
with his tenure ending in December,
2008.

Cacique Awards recognise high performers

TOURISM’S high performers
received a show of gratitude on
January 30, when the winners of
the 13th Annual Cacique Awards
were revealed ata ceremony held
at the Rainforest Theatre on Fri-
day.

The nation’s highest tourism
award was equally distributed
between winners from urban cen-
tres and tranquil island settings.

The night’s winners were from
New Providence, Grand: Bahama
and two Family Islands. By the
end of the evening, seven public,
hotel and music category awards
went to Nassau residents. Four
went to Grand Bahama residents,
three to Abaco and two to Exuma.

The Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation and the Bahamas Hotel
Association also acknowledged
international partners for their
contributions to tourism in the
Bahamas. .

Transportation category winner
Glender Archer-Knowles set the
tone for the evening. As she
received the first award for the
evening, she emphasised the ser-
vice theme frequently advanced
by the Ministry of Tourism and
Aviation. Ms Archer-Knowles
said that it was her parents who
ingrained healthy ethical and work
values in her and her siblings.

“They instilled service and com-
munity in their children,” she said.

> WINNERS OF THE 13TH ANNUAL

Pe TA VE Ue

Lifetime Achievement — John “Billy Joe” Gilbert, Grand Bahama

° Manager of the Year — Janet Stubbs Rolle, Four Seasons; Exuma”

¢ Employee of the Year — Standley Williams, Pelican Bay; Grand Bahama

¢ Chef of the Year — Carolyn Elaine Bowe, Wyndham Nassau Resort; Nassau
e Supervisor of the Year — Kevin McKenzie, Atlantis; Nassau .

* Sales Executive of the Year — Myron Jones, Sheraton Nassau Beach; Nassau
¢ Hotelier of the Year — Russell Miller, Ritz Carlton; Nassau

¢ Transportation — Glender Archer-Knowles, Abaco

e Human Resources Development — Donald Glass, Grand Bahama

° Sports, Leisure and Events - Ambrose Gouthro, Grand Bahama

° Creative-Arts — Steve Dodge, Abaco
° Handicraft — Eloise Smith, Nassau

¢ Sustainable Tourism — Kingsley Holbert, Exuma

* Minister’s Award for Hospitality - Peggy Thompson, Abaco

¢ People’s Choice Secular Music —Kenneth “KC” Wallace-Whitfield, Nassau
¢ People’s Choice Gospel Music — Minister Charles Drake and CMA Ensemble
e International Travel Writer - Jean-Luc Marty, Geo Magazine; France

¢ International Tour Operator - Steffen Boehnke, TUI; Germany

° Cruise Line of the Year — Norwegian Cruise Line

¢ Airline of the Year — British Airways



Marina at Rum Cay denies

it is closed for business -

_ A MARINA at Rum Cay
has denied claims by locals that
it is closed for business, and
says it is confident that it will
continue to attract foreign
yachtsmen in the coming
months.

Michelle Wells, operations
manager for Sumner Point
Marina, told The Tribune yes-
terday that the facility employs
ten people and meets a $5,000
fortnightly payroll.’

“It-is true that this kind of
business is seasonal and that

2008 was a bad year because.

of the rising fuel prices, but we
are still very much fully oper-
ational,” she added.

“We have had boats visiting
since Thanksgiving and during
the low season we try to keep
people employed as best we
can.’

Last week islanders told The
Tribune that Rum Cay men-
folk were having to collect
sweetwood bark for a living
because of high unemployment
on the island.

They referred to “closure”
of the island marina and the
cessation of work on the new,

aa ae
Bees

HUE
PHONE: 322-2157



Operations manager: ‘we are

‘still very much fully operational’



larger island marina being
developed by Montana Hold-
ings.

But Ms Wells said Sumner
Point had not closed. Though
2008 was a bad year for boat-
ing because of high fuel prices,

the marina was still taking
bookings, she said.

Accepting that Montana
operations on Rum Cay had
faced challenges, she said: “We
are hopeful things will turn
around for us. It has been very
difficult, but we are continu-
ing to press forward.”

Sumner Point was previous-



from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear .

ly owned by well-known Rum
Cay resident Bobby Little.

Now it is run by Montana,
which is the main company
behind development plans for
Rum Cay.

In The Tribune’s article,
island sources said cascarilla -
or sweetwood - was now the
only real source of employ-
ment for those officially out of
work.

The tree’s bark is used for
making Campari and is,
according to island sources,
bought by agents.for $5 per
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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



KEMP'S FUNERAL HOME LIMITED

22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale
Nassau, N.P., The Bahamas

A a STAT Te at

BENJAMIN
_ WESLEY
ROBERTS, 67

"affectionaly known as
Bunyan"















of Nassau, The Bahamas and
formerly of Man-O-War Cay,
Abaco, The Bahamas, who
died peacefully at Doctors
Hospital, on Sunday, Ist
February, 2009, will be held
at Bible Truth Hall, West
Avenue, Nassau on ‘Brida: 6th February; oe at 3:00p.m.









Brother Alec Pinder, Brother Brad Smith, Brother Aaron
Thompson and Brother Tom Roberts will officiate and
interment will be in Ebenezer Methodist Cemetery, East
| Shirley Street, Nassau.








He is survived by his wife, Frances June; a daughter
Christine April Albury; a son, Paul Wallace Roberts; a son-
in-law, Raymond; a daughter-in-law, Jennie; four
grandchildren, Kristin, Randall and Rachel Albury and
Tyler Roberts; a sister, Hannah Hall; a stepmother, Naomi
_ Roberts; four brothers-in-law, Larry Higgs, Walter Key,
Robert Higgs and Oliver Hall; four sisters-in-law, Arlene
Key, Carol Higgs, Gaylene Higgs and Stephanie Treco; six
nieces, Alana Carroll and her husband Ian, Lori Higgs
. Thompson, Carla Darling and her husband Shorn, Tammy
Thompson and her husband Drexon, Donna Higgs and her
husband Mike, Darcy ‘Albury and her husband Tony, eight
nephews, Daniel Key, Roger Hall and his wife Wendy,
Brian Hall, Randy Hall, Stephen Higgs, Ryan Higgs and
his wife Lisa, Luke Higgs and his wife Valine, Amos Higgs
and numerous other relatives and friends. Special thanks
to Brian, Linda and Cleveland Sawyer, Alec and Ruby.
Pinder, Lucinda Allen and family, Mr. & Mrs. Lyman Pinder
and the management and staff of Pinder's Customs Brokers
Limited and Centreville Pharmacy, Dr. Barrett McCartney,
Dr. Duane Sands, Dr. Theodore Turnquest and Dr. Adrian
Sawyer.

























Wilchcombe calls
for PLP ‘ceasefire’

FROM page one

cated men and women have forgotten that
if you destroy the party then what will be
left to lead?” asked Mr Wilchcombe,
addressing a town meeting held at St Mary
Magdelene church in his West End_-con-
stituency in Grand Bahama.

“If you slay, slander or ridicule the faces
of the party of Pindling, Hanna and Milo
then only the skeletal remains will be left for
burial,” he said.

After last week stating that media cepons
alluding to a connection between himself
and an alleged plot to extort money from
John Travolta, had left him “in pain”, Mr
Wilchcombe told the crowd, attending par-
ty officials and others listening by radio
that he was thankful for their “love, loyalty,
prayers and support.”

“Never have I felt as ‘surrounded by love
as I have felt during these past troubling
days,” he said, also calling on those listening
“to remember our friend and colleague
Pleasant Bridgewater and assure her of our
love.”

‘In advance of his appearance at the meet-
ing, Mr Wilchcombe personally sent an
advanced copy of his wide ranging address

to the media in an e-mail entitled “Obie

Wilchcombe Relaunch Speech”.

This comes after speculation was rife this’
past week among political commentators
about precisely: what impact the Travolta
saga will have on the fortunes of Mr Wilch-
combe as a potential leatier in the PLP,

Fiscal deficit
increases by almost.
57% to $121.4m

FROM page one

and for the PLP at large as a political enti-

ty.

Mr Wilchcombe charged last night that
“segments” of the foreign media have
engaged in “journalistic terrorism” in their
handling of the Travolta issue, which has
seen some American media outlets in par-
ticular making comments that clearly
impugn the character of the MP despite no
charges being brought against him: Mr
Wilchcombe has claimed to bea friend of
the Travoltas.

“Where sensationalism has become the

. grist of the media money mill, Truth has

become its first casualty ... even within

‘some of the most hallowed’ ‘halls of Jour-

nalism,” he said.
Meanwhile, aopariathy hitting back at
those in politics who may have sought to use

the-Travolta issue for their own political: |
_ ends, Mr Wilchcombe described how, when

entering politics in 1993 he “knew that (he)
had entered waters infested by political
sharks.”

“J knew then what I havé now confirmed
that I would be tested and tried; beaten
and wounded,” he said, adding, however,
that he is not “angry (or) bitter.”

“This is the life that I have chosen and so
_ Laccept the ups and the downs, the bitter
" with the sweet and the good times with the
bad times.”

Shifting gear, the MP’s address went on to
elaborate on his vision for the. advance-
ment of Grand Bahama and for “change” in
The Bahamas as a whole.

- and

“Bahamians want change... Change not
simply stolen from the lips of a gifted and
skilled orator, but change that refocuses
our minds, rekindles our desire for greatness
and inspires our spirit to love, respect and
honour.

“As a free and independent nation of
over 35 years, we Bahamians can no

longer blame our failings and shortcom-
‘ings on others,” he said.

The former tourism minister spoke about
the need for improvements in the country’s
education and justice systems, for account-
ability and transparency in the manage-
ment and use of public funds, for better
political representation, deeper democracy
“imaginative economic programmes
‘designed for self-sufficiency.”

.He told “PLPs everywhere” with these’
challenges facing the country, now “is not
the moment to break ranks and engage in a
dance of destruction.

“We know only too well that.a house
divided cannot stand. And’at this moment
in the life of the Bahamas, there is but one
absolute imperative... and that is the imper-
ative of unity...We are in this together and
in the battle days ahead, we will need every
fine warrior in the camp,” he added.

The meeting, which was’ also addressed
by two other party officials, was airéd live
on Love 97FM, the radio station owned by

‘Jones Communications, which Mr’ Wilch-.

combe last week said he would sue over
the publication of an article detailing the
alleged extortion plot.

Residents insist they heard gun
‘shots despite police doubts

In liew of flowers donations may be made for the medical

expense of Mr. Roberts to Frances Roberts, P.O. Box S.S.
_ 5175, Nassau, in memory of Mr. Benjamin (Bunyan) W.
-Roberts.

Friends may pay ‘their respects at Kemp's Bunctal Hone
Limited, 22 Palmdale Avenue, Palmdale, on Thursday, 5th.
February, 2009 from 4: 30p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

- Arrangements by Kemp’ s Funeral Home Limited, 22
Palmdale ae Palmdale, Nassau, The Bahamas.





Bictice Blemorial Mar |
Chapel, Ramsey, Exuma - Tel: 345-7020: Robinson Rd & 5th Street
Tel: 325-6621/322-4969 » 24 Hour Paging Service 323-9761

DEREK LEON |
'Lee'
_ KNOWLES, 38

of San Souci will be held on
Wednesday, February 4, 2009 at 11
:00 A.M. at St. Agnes Anglican
Church Baillou Hill Road.
Officiating will be The Vernerable
I. Ranfurly Brown, L. Th., M.A.
J.P., assisted by the Rev. Canon (
“Warren H::Rolle MA M.ED:, Rev.
Fr. Bernard Been B.A. and Deacon
Neil Nairn. Interment in The Church
Cemetery, Nassau Street.

He i is survived: by his PARENTS: Leor & Carmel Kfiowles;
BROTHERS: Larry & Leslie Minns,.Shai & Lamont Knowles;
SISTERS: Lourie Minns, Schell Stubbs, Jill: Ward, Lorraine
Hutchins & Joan Pratt; ADOPTED MOTHER: Cynthia Archer;
ADOPTED SIBLINGS: Debbie & Anton Archer, Sonia, Shawn
. & Shane Pinder and Charles (Chuckie) Albury; AUNTS: Louise:
Bain, Agnes Albury, Joan Archer, Mizpah Archer & Rosie Archer,
Beryl Campbell, Ernestine Rolle, Christine Francis, Cheryl Sands,
Carolyn Bartlett and Hyacinth Saunders-Burnside; UNCLES:
Edwin, Roosevelt, Anthony & John Archer and Hasting Charlow;
GRAND UNCLE: Felix Pinder NIECES: Lexia Cartwright, Tasni_ |)
Minns, Sienne , Shea & Shandi Stubbs, Willette Pratt and Lynsey -
Ward; NEPHEWS: Lars & Lon Minns, Leslie Nigel Minns,
McGregor "Loran" Woodside, Jyles Ward, William Pratt.Sr., Wilton
Charles ‘Hutchins; NUMEROUS GRAND NIECES & NEPHEWS:
SISTERS-IN LAW: Marva & Nasha Minns; BROTHERS-IN-
LAW: Rev. Phillip Stubbs, Patrick Ward and William Pratt Sr.;
GODMOTHER: June Smith, (England) ; COUSINS: ‘Miriam:
Hanna, Paula Campbell-Stone, Audrey Strachan & Shaunna Everett;
Carla Lockhart, Keith, Andrew, Carl & Vaughn Albury, Edwin
Archer Jr., Samantha & Alicia McCartney; Simone Hall; Ravanna
Mason, Henfield, Cliff & Stimson Bullard, Ricardo Knowles,
Roosevelt Archer Jr., Deidre Hepburn, Michelle Miller & Shameka
Archer; Anthony Archer Jr., Antoinette & Amanda Archer; Juanita .
Gaitor, Desiree, John & Jeremy Archer, Anthea & Tavis Archer;
|. Asia & Trei Pinder, Desra Mason, Michael & Ray Saunders, Emma
Cooper & family, Rev, Hilda Allen & family, Hon. Rev. Phillip
Bethel & family, Albert Carey & family, Audley Carey & family,
Herbert Guilluame & family, Lilly Carey & family, Jessie Fox &
family, Kathleen McKenzie & family, Margaret Thompson &
family, Lydia Rahming & family, Celeste Lockhart & family, Ivis
Curtis & family; FAMILY & FRIENDS: Godfrey Eneas & Family,
Myra Albury, Voyna Albury, Leslie Pinder, The McCartney family
(Joan, Mavis, Coramae, Kim, Ann, Timonthy, Willie & Clinton)
Keith and Desire, Katina (Casey) Bowe, Dino Parker, Tamara &
the Hon. Elma Campbell, Dr. Earl Farrington & Melanie Farrington,
Dr. Bernard Rolle & Ernestine Rolle, Da Costa & Rosie Williams
& family, The Johnsons of Ernest St. (Royann, Joanne, John,

Kevin), Florence Rahming & Family, John Rahming & family, ;

Valencia Thompson & family, Derek Cambridge & family, Albert
& Ernest McKenzie & family, Barbara Wallace & family; Marsha
Bain, Esa & Michael Sherman, Isaac Smith & Family, Rev. Mervin |
Johnson & Cora Johnson, Natasha Newbold. Dianne, Carmetta,
Michelle & Brian Maycock, Audrey Carey, The Pedal Pushers and
their families, Audrey Fountain & family, The Carey, Knowles
and Allen’ Families of Tarpum Bay, Eleuthera, Janice Johnson,
‘Arlene Nicholls, Marvette Henfield, Jerry Fisher, Michael’ JR'
Femander, Claudia Frasier, All families of the National Tennis
Center and friends of the Gym Tennis Club.

‘The body will repose at Kurtiss Memorial Mortuary, Robinson
Street o1 Tuesday, from 11:00.A.M. until 6:00 P.M.

dniesday from 10:00 A.M. until service |





compared to the same period
in 2007, standing at $162.3 mil- ;

lion. :
Yet recurrent spending,

which goes to cover Govern- }
-.ment’s fixed costs,-such as }

wages and property rents, rose
by 10.45 per cent to $557.4 mil-

lion.

fuel-and.electricity prices.)

Tourist arrivals fell by 6.1 per! :
cent. during the -first.nine! :
months of 2008, with a 15.2 per :
~ cent decline in the third quarter. ::
The Central Bank said: “In :
- particular, the respective 11.6: }
|per cent and 17 per cent third }
quarter fall-off in air and sea }
traffic culminated in reductions :
of 2.8 per cent and 7.8 per cent. }
over first nine months of 2007. :
Port of entry data showed con- }
tinued decline in visitors to New :

Providence, by 9.2 per cent,

incorporating a third quarter :
decrease of 16.7 per cent and }
led by weakness in sea arrivals ;

(15.3 per cent).

“Although Grand Bahama i.
arrivals improved by 3.1 per :-
cent in the third quarter, a year-
to-date decrease of 9.3 per cent }
was recorded, based on reduc- }
tions in both air (13.5 per cent) :

- and sea (7.3 per cent) visitors; °:
while arrivals to the Family }
Islands rose ona year-to-date :
- basis, by 2.3 percent, despite a:
third quarter deterioration of :
20.9 per cent, as increased sea _}
. Visitors (4.6 per-cent) out- ;-
weighed the contraction in air }

traffic (7 per cent).”

‘The Central Bank eaid the }
rate of credit expansion slowed }
by 25 per cent to $468.8 million ;
in 2008, with private sector :
credit growth rates falling to 6.8 :
per cent.and $385.6 million : |
compared to $524.6 million or
10.2 per cent growth the year :
», before. i
», ..Consumer credit growth fell ;

to $113.2 million or a 5.34 per }
*. cent rate, compared to $215.3 :

million or 11.4 per cent in 2007,

while mortgage growth dropped i
to 8.3 per cent or $211 million ;
compared to $300 million or :

13.4 per cent in 2007.

Ph: ere Ri 25 Sr as 8 bd

Elsewhere, the Central Bank :
said inflation increased from 2.5.
per. cent in 2007 to 4.5 per cent }
last year, due largely to higher! :



FROM page one

- cars rushed to the scene, traf-

fic was backed up on Shirley

. Street. past St Matthew’s
Church. After the incident

two police officers on motor-
cycles were left at the scene

until the badly damaged car.

could be removed.
However, a motorist dri-

‘ving down Sweetings Lane
‘shortly after the;crash at Sears:

‘Road, said he saw police cars,
police vans, a SUV, all with
sirens blaring at the scene. He
heard three shots, but did not
know who fired them. A
police ‘car then rushed past
him, turned into Moss Lane,

Three charged

FROM page one

; same day, the three men conspired to

murder Newbold.

The men, who were arraigned
before Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court One, Bank Lane,
were not required to plead to the

charges.

_ Bowe was also arraigned on two
counts of possession of.a firearm with

intent to put another in fear.

_ Itis alleged that on Friday, Decem-
ber 26, Bowe was in possession ofa.
black handgun intending to put Wil-

imide Almonor in fear.

It is also alleged that on Friday,
January 1, Bowe was had a black
handgun intending to put Anastacia
Evans in fear. Bowe, who was not rep-
resented by counsel, pleaded not

» guilty to the charges. \

Lawyer Willie Moss told the court
that:his.client Julian Johnson had
informed him that he was beaten

while in police custody.

Lawyer Algernon Allen Jr also told
‘the court that he received similar
information from his client Leshawn
Bowe. The men were remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison yesterday. °
The case was adjourned to February
18 and transferred to Court 11, Nas-

sau Street.

wits Plaza —~ Par

Wax: (242) ere Pes b

www the prichkle patch.com

then’ east on Dowdeswell
Street, pursuing a man who it
is believed had run from the

wrecked car and into an over- °

grown vacant lot, not too far
from St Matthew’s church rec-

tory. The motorist. insisted ©

that the shots came from the
bushy area on Dowdeswell
Street.

Another resident of Sears

road was in his kitchen when

he heard a terrible’ ¢rash. He *
:» looked:out. of the window and:

saw ‘the electrical polesand
wires on Sears Road swaying.

One pole had caught fire. The ,

area was without electricity
until about 6.20 Sunday night
when BEC repaired the dam-
aged pole. Another resident

said that ‘a Aolibedian: told him
that the driver of the car was
arrested and that drugs were
discovered in the vehicle.
“The older folk in the area
ran outside to see what the
commotion was,” said a resi-
dent on hearing the gunshots.
“A lot of them were con-
cerned because this sort of
stuff does not happen in this
area. '
“Many of them sit on their

‘porches in the mornings so

stray bullets are not something

they should have to be think-
ing about first thing Sunday

morning.” .

Up to press, time; police still
could not confirm a Teport on
the incident.

Christie expected to announce
Pleasant Bridgewater Senate

_ replacement this week

' FROM page one

: chaowed down a decision, he said "due diligerice’ in.
respect of background checks has to be completed before

a formal announcement is made.

"Numbers really don't matter but at least half a dozen
recommendations have come in. It (the announcement)

could be any time really, it's a question of whether I do it
after the House of Assembly or not. I'm not sure yet.

"I think in my own mind_a decision is made, but I

want to be absolutely careful about speaking to it until
such time as necessary checks are made on all of the
relevant people who are under consideration.

"People who would have discussed this with me would

know that I have limited my seléction to the island of

Grand Bahama, That's whete Ms Bridgewater is from, it's

a very large island, and we have one member of Parlia-
ment and therefore insofar as the Senate is concerned we

at least. ought to have one member from Grand Bahama,"

he told The Tribune.
_ When asked whether Ms Bridgewater's replacement
will be new to the political fray or a well-known face, Mr

Christie was tight-lipped. "I think it's fair to say that I'm
going to let you knowin a short period of time," he said.

Ms Bridgewater‘resigned from the Senate on Janu-

‘ary 24, a day after being charged by police with abetment

to extort and conspiracy to extort $25 million from.
celebrity John Travolta. She, with ambulance driver

Tarino Lightbourne, were arraigned on these charges

bail.

last week. Ms Bridgewater.was released on $50,000

The Senate meets again on February 12.

SORRY
hed PHONE ORDERS PLEA


THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY EVENING FEBRUARY 3, 2009

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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Leverage ‘The’ 12 Step Job” The

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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 7

Let Charlie the
Bahamian Puppet and ~
his sidekick Derek put sy

some smiles on your

kids faces.

Bring your children to the : i
MctHappy Hour at McDonald's in
_ Oakes Field every Thursday -
from 3:30pm to 4:300m during the
month of February 2009.

\

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun

?miovin' it -

0-FLIX, 3

call 3

: ‘Movie Gift Certificates}

[make great gifts!§
THE TRIBUNE





TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,

2009








Bynum
will miss
eight to

12 weeks...
See page 10






SPORTS
WG



BASKETBALL
BAISS POSTSEASON

THE Bahamas Association
of Independent Secondary
Schools will host their sudden
death basketball playoffs on
Wednesday and.Thursday at
the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

e Here’s a look at the
matchups:

Wednesday

Junior girls - Queen’s Col-
lege Comets (No.1) 'vs St.
John’s Giants (No.4).

Junior boys - St..Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
(No.1) vs Jordan “Prince
William Falcons (No.4).

Senior girls - St. John’s
(No.1) vs: Nassau Christian
Academy (No.4).

Senior boys ~ positions unde-
cided,

Thursday

Junior girls - St. Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
(No.2) vs Westminster Diplo-
mats (No:3).

Junior boys -- Westminster
(No.2) vs Kingsway Academy
Saints (No.3). .

Senior girls - St. Augustiné’s
College (No.2) vs Queen’s Col-
lege Comets. (No.3).

Senior boys - undecided.

The winners in all four series
will advance to the best-of-

. three championship that will
be played next Monday,
Wednesday and Thursday, if

- necessary, at Kendal Isaacs.

SOCCER

_BFA’S SENIOR LEAGUE \

UPDATE



THE Bahamas eo hai a
Association continued its reg- -

ular season. on Sunday at the
. National Development Center
with two exciting games on tap:

In the opener, the Sharks
Football Club blanked the FC
Nassau 6-0 as Chedlet Pierre
struck fora goal in the 8th
minute, Duckerno Exlias in the

’ Jith; Nesta Lemard in the 33rd,
Mario Alsind twice in the 50th
and 59th and Yvenel Brown i in
the 83rd.

While the Sharks improved
to 3-2 in third place, FC Nassau -
remained in last place at.1-7.

In the feature contest, Cale-
donia FC knocked off the Baha
Juniors 3-1. For Caledonia, Thi-
ago DaSilva scored twice in.the
6th and 61st minutes and
Damian Neville got one in the
32nd. Kevin Vangehr scored
the Baha Jr’s lone goal in the»

87th.

Caledonia is currently sitting ;
in second place at 6-2 and the
Baha Juniors FC are in fifth
place at 3-4.

e At the end of Sunday’ 'S
double header, here’s a look at
the leading goalscorers for. the
season:

Lesley St. Fleur, Bears FC,
10; Marcus Trail, Caledonia
FC, 7; Andre Carey, Bears. FC,
6; Duckerno Exlias, Sharks FC,
6; Dean Farry, Caledonia FC, 4;
Frank Negri, Caledonia EC, 4;
Jermaine Johnson, Caledonia
FC, 4; Denair Mitchell, Cava-
liers FC, 4; Ordaine McCallum,
Cavalier F C, 4 and Ehren Han-
na, Dynamos FC, 4

BASEBALL >
JBLN’S RESULTS

THE Junior Baseball League .

of Nassau played:a series of ~

games over the weekend at the
St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams
with the following results post-
ed:

Tee-Ball

Knights def. Sands Gnats 18-
15; Sidewinders def. Blew
Claws 19-8 and Grasshoppers
def. Raptors 21-20...

Coach Pitch | —

Athletics def. Astros 13- 3:
Cubs def. Diamondbacks 18-6
and Bluejays def. Angels 15-
10.

- Minor League’
Red Sox def. Rays 18-14 and
Rockies def. Royals'11-1.
MajorLeague ©.
Reds def. Marines 6-5 and
Indians def. Marlins 8-7.
’ Junior League

Dodgers def. Twins 6-5 and __

Yankees def. Cardinals 20-4.
Senior League
. Pirates def. Rangers 6-2 and
Phillies def. Tigers 18-4.



Bahamas gets set for Fed Cun

m@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

oach Sean Cartwright had
a chance to go through a
series of practices with
Grand Bahamian Larikah
Russell, Nikkita Fountain
and Kerrie Cartwright in Montreal,
Canada, as they prepare for the Fed
Cup this week.
' And based on what he has seen,
Cartwright.is confident that the
Bahamas will perform very well in the
- field of seven teams that will be placed
in two pools - one with four and the
other with three - when the draw takes
place today.

“The team has been working out real-
ly hard and they are ready to go,” said
Cartwright, who noted that the players
have been making the adjustment to
the chilly and snowy conditions they
had to endure coming out of their hotel
to get to the Uniprix Stadium where
they will play.

Cartwright, however, noted that the
players selected by the Bahamas Lawn
Tennis Association have indicated that
they basically know a lot of the players

on the. teams from Canada, Paraguay,,.

Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia and Puer-
to Rico.





NIKKITA FOUNTAIN thinks the Bahamas has
“a pretty good chance” at the Fed Cup...

In fact, he said that while the teams
have at least one player who is highly
ranked on the Women’s Tennis Tour,
the other members are basically playing
at their level.

“So we feel that looking at the teams
over here, we have a good chance to
make it through to the next round,” he
projected. “We just have to wait to see
who we will get:to play when they have
the draw (today).”

Cartwright said the facilities is one

- KERRIE CARTWRIGHT, the youngest member of the team at age 16...

Sports Reporter %
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net ok:

THE Bahamas Scholastic Association —
began its trio of championship series yester-
day at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium with
the Teleos Cherubims reasserting their dom-
inance as pennant winners, winning game
one in two of the three series.

Senior Boys

Teleos Cherubims: 71

Galilee Miracles - 66

’ Teleos scored on the opening tip and led
wire to wire and held off a late charge by
the Miracles to take game one of the series.

The Cherubims ended a high scoring open-
ing quarter with a late three pointer to g0 up

"26-19 at the end of the first.

Galilee opened the second quarter on a
6-1 run to trim the deficit 27-25, however
Rakeem Smith stopped the run with an acro-
batic finish to regain.a two possession lead for
the Cherubims.

‘Smith, who finished with 14. points, con-
trolled the pace of the game at the guard
position and teamed up with Chauncey
Cooper to force several turnovers at the ini-
tial level of the Teleos fullcourt trap.

Teleos maintained a 45-39 lead at the half.

Cooper, who finished with a. game high 19
points, gave the Cherubims their biggest lead
of the game in the third when he converted
on a three point play to give his team a 59-47

‘lead late in the third quarter.

They led 63-52 heading into the fourth,



BSA CHAMPIONSHIPS



and the Miracles never legitimately threat-

ened the remainder of the way as both teams

traded baskets in the final quarter.
Frederick Delancy led the Miracles with 15

points while David Strachan finished with

13.

: Junior Boys
’ Zion Christian Eagles - 65
Teleos Cherubims - 60
The Eagles led by as many as 10 in the
third quarter and staved off a late comeback
to take a crucial game one win in the most

evenly matched of the three championship

series.
The Eagles led 17-11 after the first quarter
however suffered a poor shooting second

. quarter and trailed 30-29 at the half.

The Eagles’ Anthony Oliver opened the
third quarter with a block and took the ball
coast to coast to finish and give his team giv-

ing his team a 31-30 lead which put them

ahead for good.
Oliver finished with a game high 24 and

scored 10 of his team’s 16 points in the quar- »

ter..

The Eagles led 45-41 heading into the
fourth.

The Cherubims interior defense did little to
stop Philip Hanna in the fourth quarter as his
drives to the basket and a stifling trap helped
the Eagles to open their biggest lead of the

of the best that he has seen ail while

’ his daughter, Kerrie, has played there at

least three times before, the other two
players have had a chance to make the
necessary adjustments in. practice.

Kerrie Cartwright, the youngest
member of the team at age 16, said the
Bahamas’ team jis a pretty strong one
and the players are all eager to start
competition. ;

“We know a lot of the players here. I
know I’ve played against some of
them,” said Cartwright, who has trav-
eled extensively on the junior circuit.
“As a team, we have spent a lot of time
here working out, so I think we will be
ready.”

Fountain, perhaps the most consis-
tent member of the team having played
since she was 15, said they have been
running from the hotel to the car to the
tennis facility to avoid the cold, but they
have gotten adjusted to the climate and
are just waiting to start playing.

“IT think.we have a pretty good
chance. We have been talking about it
all day. We’ve been saying ‘we got this,
we got this.’ So it’s definitely nothing |
that we can’t handle,” she insisted. “So
we should do very well.”

Fountain, the eldest member of the
team,at 24, has played a number of ties
with Russell, but this i is the second one
with Cartwright.

Russell, who has spent a lot of time
training in Tampa, Florida, has played
since she was 16. Said The 23-year-old:
“I think we have a pretty good shot.
We had a.chance to see the other teams
and I think we can compete well and we
can get into a pretty good position to get
into the next group,” she projected.

“’m pretty confident in myself and .
my teammates. I had a chance to hit —
with them for a few days and we look
pretty good. I’m looking forward to
playing with them again.’

BLTA president Wesley. Rolle said...

~ the they wanted to send Kalotina Klonaris.._ |
~on the-team as well; ‘but a ‘shoulder ~*~: |

injury forced her to miss:the trip:
“The team is a pretty good team with

. Larikah and Nikkita. Kerrie is also play-

ing pretty good tennis,” Rolle stressed.
“So we feel we have a good chance of
doing very well.”

Rolle said it just depends on who they
get to play in the draw.

Cherubims take game 1 in two series

‘@ By RENALDO DORSETT

game.

A basket by Oliver gave ‘thei a 59-49 lead
with just over two minutes remaining.

The Cherubims blazed a comeback trail
Jed by Henry Rolle, who trimmed the lead to
three, 57-54 with 1:43 left to play and

. Damero Arnett brought the Cherubims with-
in one on the ensuing possession.

Shakiel Hepburn ended the threat with a :

tough basket inside and the Eagles forced a
~ turnover and easy score to make it a two
possession game.

Hanna finished with 19 points while Hep-
burn and Arsenio Woodside both finished
with eight apiece.

Rolle finished with 10 points while Brian
Francis and Arnett finished with 13 and 11
points respectively.

Girls

Teleos Cherubims - 59

Mt Caramel Cavs-9

With Sashana Smith patrolling the interior
for the Cherubims, the pennant winners
cruised to an effortless game one victory and
appear on the brink of a division title.

Smith finished with a game high 21 points
and. five blocks.

The Cherubims center controlled the

offensive glass and sparked easy fastbreak .

opportunities for point guard Angie Bethel.
Bethel finished with 16 points, 14 of which

came in the first half. Tannica Smith also’

added 16 for Teleos.

¢ Game two in all three series will take
place 4pm today at the Kendal Isaacs ore
nasium

‘Righty per cent of competitors will be new lifters’

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter

bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT has been quite a while since

the Bahamas Powerlifting Fed- -

eration has staged National
Bodybuilding Championships.

- In fact, when the federation
put on this year’s championships
at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasi-
um on Saturday, March 21, look
for a whole lot of new faces to
step out on center stage to lift
the heavy iron bars in the squats,

‘benchpress and deadilifts.

One ofthe only consistencies
to look forward to is Rex Burn-
side, who is still the president,
and he is eager to see the new
talent that should emerge among
the few veteran competitors. ~

“We have a great number of
new lifters that will be taking
part in this tournament,” Burn-

side pointed out. “I think it’s fair

to say that 80 per cent. of the
competitors will be new lifters:
“And what we are doing right

now. is to rebuild the sport, of:
powerlifting because it has taken

a dive a couple years ago. So we

have been going around the var-'
ious gyms training people to take-

over.’

Unlike in the past, Burnside
said they expect to have much
more female competitors step-
ping out and competing this year
than they have had in the past
in any one year.

“We also still have the out-
standing lifter, Leslie Whyte, so
we are looking forward to

rebuilding the sport in order to
take the Bahamas back to the
international level,” said Burn-
side, who noted that they haven’t
had a national team compete
since 2005.

“We know that the Kevin
Woodsides, the Arlington
Clarkes, John Mills and Falcon
Majors. I think it’s fair to say
that those lifters have made their
exit from the sport as far as com-
petition is concerned. But they
are still around training some of
the youngsters.”

Burnside said they have close
to 70 competitors, the majority of
whom are under the age of 25,
competing. Included in those
numbers are a team from the
College of the Bahamas and
some of the high schools.

At least 10 competitors from

Grand Bahama are also expected
to compete as they tune up for
their National Championships
that will follow.
' “Their competition was sup-
posed to be this month, but a lot
of them are not ready, so they
had to push it back for another
month,” Burnside stated, “They
just got started with their training
in January, but this will be good
for them to get in-some compe-
tition before they concentrate on
their nationals.”

Burnside said he anticipates
that the competition will be
extremely fierce and he invites
the public to mark the date down
on their calendar to come out
and show their Supper to the
competitors.

Davis Cup:
Knowles.
undecided

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

MARK
Knowles: and
Mahesh Bhu-
pathi surged to
number two on
the ATP com-
puter rankings
by virtue of fin-
ishing as the |
men’s doubles |
runners-up at
the Australian eS
Open.

_ But with the
Bahamas Lawn Tennis Associ-



- ation getting set to send a team

off to Paraguay next month to

try to get out of the American

Zone II, Knowles is still unde-

cided whether or not he will,
travel with the young players.

“I was: pretty focused on my
event here, so now IJ have to
take a step back and decide
what I’m going to, do,” said
Knowles in an interview with
The Tribune on Saturday after
he and Bhupathi lost in three
sets to the American identical
twin brothers Bob and Mike
Bryan.

“The tie is going to be played
away in Paraguay, which is
going to be a very difficult task.
It’s going to be very tough trav-
eling also. So I just have to see

. how it all fits in and how my

body is feeling as well.”
Taking this week off to recu-

-. perate at home in Dailas, Texas,

Knowles is expected to make
his decision then before he’s

* scheduled to spend next week in |

town with his family.

But BLTA president Wesley
Rolle said that while it would
be good for the team to have
Knowles travel to play doubles,

they can’t wait forever. for his

decision.
“We have to send in the

‘names of the players, so we’re’
- going to do that and whenever

he makes up his mind and if he’
decides that he wants to play
then we will make some adjust-
ments,” Rolle stated.

“But we’re not going to wait
for him to say ‘yes, I’m going
to,’ or ‘no, I’m not going to.’
The team has to be named
because the dates for the tour-
nament is set and .we have to
meet certain obligations as far
as our team is concerned.”

Whether or-not he decides to

-go, Rolle said captain John Far-

rington will have the use of
players Devin Mullings, Timo-
thy Neely, Bjorn Munroe and
Marvin Rolle.

- Mullings and Neely are
expected to play singles based

- on their performances as. the

top two finishers in the BLTA’s
December Invitational at the
National Tennis Center with

, Munroe and Rolle scheduled to |

play doubles.

If Knowles does decide to
travel to play with the team,
Rolle said the players’ partici-
pation in singles and doubles
could change, but it will depend
on what Farrneton decides as
the captain.

“These guys are committed,
but we haven’t heard from
Mark yet,” Rolle stressed.
“Until he does so, we have to go
ahead and name the team.

“But if we have to make an
adjustment, we have the oppor-
tunity to do so.”

Looking ahead to the tie,
Knowles. said it’s obvious that
the team has to win some
matches and he feels the young
guys will have to step up and
play a lot harder.

“We’re making some good
progression, but when you’re
talking about zone one, you’re
talking about some elite com-
pany,” Knowles pointed out.

“It’s a pretty high calibre of
tennis, so our younger guys who
have been playing on the team

for the last couple of years, will

need to step | it up. That’s the
only we we’re going to get
there.”

Depending on their outcome,
the Bahamas will play again
over the weekend of July 10-12
against the winner or loser
between Guatemala and the
Dominican Republic, who will
also play March 6-8.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 9



Star Trackers to pay homage to track and field legends

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ONE of the Bahamas’ lead-
ing athletics clubs is preparing
to host one of the more eagerly
anticipated meets of the young
2009 BAAA’s calendar.

The Star Trackers Track and
Field Club will host the Baker
Concrete. and Greyco Limited
“Star Performers Track Classic
2009,” Saturday February 7 at
the Thomas A Robinson Stadi-
um.

The organisation will pay
homage to two of the legends of

Bahamian track and field,
Frank Rutherford and Debbie °

Ferguson McKenzie.
Rutherford captured the
country’s first Olympic medal
with a bronze in the triple jump
at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics,
while Feguson-McKenzie,
arguably one of the most deco-
rated sprinters in Bahamian his-

tory, reached the Olympic podi- -

um individually and as a mem-
ber of the storied Golden Girls
400m relay squad. Meet organ-
iser Laura Charlton said the
meet continues to grow in

stature and the athletes have:

responded with great perfor-
mances year after year. _
“The first year we held the

meet we were more than happy’

to oblige and it has been going



CHRIS “Bay” Brown



strong for five years. The kids
really thrive on the competition

not just from the local athletes *

but athletes from throughout
the region as well. We have
hosted athletes from Jamaica,
the Cayman Islands, Turks and

-Caicos, Curacao and the United

States,” she said. “Each year it
continues to get bigger and bet-
ter, largely in part to our spon-
sors.”

J R Reynolds, a representa-
tive of the event’s chief spon-
sor, said as corporate citizens
his company has become com-
pelled to assist in positive
aspects of the community, par-
ticularly those. involving the
youth suchas the Star Track-
ers Track and Field Club.

“As a company we always
feel like we have.a responsibil-
ity-in the community we work
in. For several years we have
sponsored other groups but we
have never had anything this
large. When coach Ferguson
contacted us, he explained the
programme, and showed us the
kids ‘and how much influence
they have in shaping their lives...

we felt it was a no brainier to’

become involved.

Reynolds, said as sponsors
they will play a vital role in
ensuring the meet becomes one
of the premier events in the
Caribbean.

' “The coaches spend so much

'

DEBBIE FERGUSON-McKENZIE

of their time teaching, not just
track, but they are teaching life
skills and we thought it was a no
brainier to put all of our eggs in
one basket and get behind this
organisation. We want this to
be the premier meet in the
Caribbean,” he said. “The
things they learn as a part of
the club in terms of discipline

Tw



and setting goals are things you
can use it whatever career you
choose. We look forward to a
long and profitable relation-
ship.”

This weekend meet will fea-.

ture athletes from the Family
Islands, including Andros, Aba-
co, Exuma, Eleuthera, Grand
Bahama, Long Island and

throughout the region includ-
ing the Cayman Islands, Turks
and Caicos and Jamaica.

Star Trackers Track and Field
Club officially began in 2001

and features over 40 athletes *

registered for the 2009 season.

Star Trackers head coach
David Charlton, who is assisted
by coaches Rudolph Ferguson
and Trevor Strachan, said with

the progression of the club’s ,

athletes and the meet itself he,
_ expects the Star Performers to
, become a world class meet.

“We are looking good, we
had a number of surprising per-
formances and a number of kids
rose to the occasion who were
not on the radar last year and
made their presence felt, now
they are the ones to beat,” he
said. “We expect to have a great
meet with a number of quali-
fiers from not only our club but
others clubs as well. We are
very excited over our sponsor-
ship, the level of competition,

’ the expected attendance at the

meet so we are well on our way
to accomplishing a world class
meet.”

The meet will feature com-
petition in a myriad of divisions
ranging from under seven to

_Masters. Competition takes

place from 10am to 9pm.
Members of the Star Trackers

Track and Field Club confi-

dently boast high expectations

Es

Winners of the BAAA national eter school Nae

for their organisation’s flagship
event.

Said middle distance runner
Audley Carey, who competes
in the 800m, 1500m and 3000m:
“My season has been going
pretty good and at our meet I
expect first place finishes in all
of my races,” he said. “I want to
get under two minutes for my
800m and under 10 minutes for
my 3000m especially.”

Sprinter-Steve Munroe chose
not to make any predictions on
the outcome of his events, but
said he too expects great finish-
es in the 100m and 200m:

“For our meet I want to come
out and do well,” he said. “I do

‘not want to make any predic-

tions or anything like that yet,
I'd rather that being a surprise.”
Hurdler and quarter miler
Patrick Bodie said while he
expects to do well at the meet,
he continues to have his sights
set on the season’s ultimate
goal. hs
The season has been going

‘ well, so far I set a personal best °

in the 400m hurdles in 56.5s and
Iam hoping to make the Carif- °
ta team and continue to drop
my times,” he said. “At the Star

. performers meet the public can

expect a good show in the 400m
and it will help me towards my
two major goals of the season,
the Carifta and World Youth
Games.”



Brown an _
inductee in.
‘09 Hall
of Fame

@ By BRENT STUBBS '
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

4



WINNERS of the Under 15 4x400m boys relay

AT the beginning of the year,
Chris “Bay” Brown got a con-
firmation letter from the Inter-
national Amateur Athletic Fed-
eration, listing as the number
three ranked male quarter-mil-
er in the world.

On January 27, Brown
received another letter, this
time from the Mid-Eastern
Athletic Conference, listing him
as one of the inductees into the
2009 Hall of Fame class.

In the latest letter from the
office of the MEAC’s commis-
sioner, Brown. was congratulat-
ed on his selection for the
induction.

“You are being inducted for

this important honour because
of your outstanding success as
an athlete in the MEAC, and
for your superb professional
achievéments in your commu-
nity and state,” the commis-
sioner wrote. 5
Official |

The official MEAC Hall of
Fame Reception and Induction
Brunch Ceremony will take
place March 12 at the Benton
Convention Center in Winston-
Salem, North Carolina.

The induction is being held
during the week of the MEAC
Men and Women Basketball
Tournament and the Hall of
Fame inductees will be recog-
nised during the games staged
the night of their ceremony.

On May 29, 1981, the Mid-
Eastern Athletic Conference
combined a 10-year anniver-

‘sary banquet with its first Hall
of fame Induction Ceremonies

WINNERS of the Under 17 4x400m girls relay



leader in a significant statistical cate- in the 400 metres indoors and both the
gory in their sport (e.g. free throws, 400 and 4 x 400 relay outdoors.
kills, sacks, shutouts, strikeouts, etc.; Last summer, Brown turned in his

in Greensboro, North Caroli- (and/or), best performance in three ties when he
na. 4) Must be the all time institutional. got fourth in the 400m at the Olympic

Ceremonies have taken place __ leader in a significant statistical cate- | Games in Beijing, China, getting edged
in 1986, 1993, 1995, 1999, 2002, gory; (and), ; out on a dive at the line at the Bird’s

Nest from American David Neville.
He came back and closed out his trip
6) Have to be away from the sport by anchoring the Bahamas men’s 4 x

and must have completed their eligibil- 400 relay team of Andretti Bain,

ity; Michael Mathieu and Andrae Williams,
7) Must be of high moral character: along with alternates Ramon Miller and
8) Must be making significant contri- Avard Moncur, to the silver medal
butions to society. , behind the US.
Brown, 30, was a two-time Division 1 In October last year, Eleuthera native

All-American at Norfolk State Univer- Brown got married to Faith in Athens,

sity where he excelled for the Spartans Georgia, where they now reside.

2005, 2007 and 2008.

In order for athletes to be
selected, they must meet the
following criteria:

1) Must have achieved All-
American status in their respec-
tive sport; (and/or),

2) All-Conference status (1st,
2nd, 3rd team or honourable
mention) in the sport; (and/or),

3) Must have been an annual

5) Must have ended playing career
for. at least five years;





WINNERS of the Under 20 4x400m girls relay
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009





i By The Associated Press

SCOREBOARD

Tuesday, February 3

Toronto at Cleveland (7 pm
EST). LeBron James and the
Cavaliers are 22-0 at home this
season.

STARS

Sunday

— Kevin Martin, Kings,
scored 37 points on his 26th
birthday and Sacramento beat
Oklahoma City 122-118 in over-
time

— LeBron James, Cavaliers,
scored 33 points in Cleveland's
90-80 win over Detroit.

— Paul Pierce, Celtics, had
36 points, eight rebounds and

six assists to help Boston extend »

its winning streak to 11 games
with a 109-101 victory over Min-
nesota. —

DISAPPEARING ACT

Chris Bosh came in averag-
ing close to 24 points and nine
rebounds in 20 career games
against the Magic, but shot a
disappointing 4-for-11 and was
booed after missing five of his
first six attempts in Toronto's
113-90 loss to Orlando on Sun-
day.

MISFIRING

. Detroit lost to Cleveland 90-
80 on Sunday, giving the Pis-
tons four straight home losses
for the first time in eight years.
They're also coming off their
first losing month since Febru-
ary 2004, the month in which
they acquired Rasheed Wallace
and went on to win the NBA
title.

LISTEN UP Le

Sacramento held a players-
only meeting on Saturday and
then went out and beat Okla-
homa City 122-118 in overtime
on Sunday. "I think it helped,"
Spencer Hawes said.

SPEAKING

"I just try to give the gam
what it needs. Today, I thought
it needed my. scoring. You go
off and say 'Hey, I've still got it.'
Even at 31."

— Paul Pierce after his 36
points, eight rebounds and six
assists helped Boston extend its

winning streak to.11 games with..

a 109-101 victory over the Min-
nesota Timberwolves on. Sun-
day




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NEW YORK (AP) — Los Angeles
Lakers center Andrew Bynum will miss
eight to 12 weeks after tearing the medi-
al collateral ligament in his right knee.

Bynum was hurt in the first quarter
of Saturday night's win at Memphis.
Kobe Bryant drove to the basket, missed
the shot and crashed into Bynum's right
leg. Bynum immediately grabbed his
knee.

Bynum is the Lakers' third-leading

‘scorer and second-leading rebounder,

averaging 14.0 points, 8.2 rebounds and
1.9 blocks.

The 7-0, 285-pound Bynum's injury
brought back bad memories of last sea-
son for the Lakers. He went down in
mid-January and was expected to be
sidelined eight to 12 weeks after bruising
a bone in his knee and briefly dislocating
his kneecap.

Instead, he missed the final 46 games

of the season, as the Lakers lost in the
NBA finals. He underwent arthroscopic
surgery May 21 to remove cartilage

debris and smooth some rough spots on ~

the underside of his kneecap.

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

NBA Today Bynum will miss eight to 12 weeks



ANDREW BYNUM (left) reacts after being hit by Kobe Bryant (right) in the first quarter of Sat-

urday’s game against the Memphis Grizzlies. Bynum left the game...

"This is a team that went to the finals
last year that we put on the floor, so
they're confident in what they can do,"

(AP Photo: Mark Weber)

coach Phil Jackson said at the Lakers'
shootaround Monday afternoon, before
they announced the severity of the



TRIBUNE SPORTS




injury. "We know we're going to miss
his presence, his rebounding ability. But
this is a very capable team."

The injury came as the 21-year-old
seemed to be taking a major step for-
ward in his fourth NBA season. In the
five games before he was hurt, he was
averaging 26.2 paints, 13.8 rebounds and

- 3.2 blocks and shooting 65.3 per cent

from the field. — sy %
"It changes our team, and the rhythm .
that we're playing with,". Bryant said at’
the shootaround. " Obviously we found a
great rhythm there with him in the line-
up, particularly the last week or so. So

‘we're going to have to make some

adjustments." 2yh!

Bryant insisted the-Lakers: could still
win a title without Bynum.

"There are teams that lost.in the finals
that.go back and win the next year," he:
said. = wa
"I think having Andrew in the lineup
makes us a dominant team. With him
out of the lineup, we're still a great team.
You put him in the mix, it takes us to
another level." :





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DETROIT PISTONS’ Allen Iverson (right)
oO OFT Aci B OEM CRAVE (lRsmese CIITA
Pavlovic in the second half of Sunday's
game in Auburn Hills; Michigan: Iverson
led the Pistons with 22 points but the
Cavaliers beat the Pistons 90-80.



(AP Photo: Duane Burleson)

LeBron watches

while Williams,
Gibson lead Cavs

By LARRY LAGE

AP Sports Writer :



AUBURN HILLS, Mich.
(AP) — LeBron James could
get used to being a cheerleader.

Especially when the Cavaliers
can take care of business with
him on the bench.

James scored: 33 points and
got some timely help from Mo
Williams and Daniel Gibson in
Cleveland's 90-80 win over the
Detroit Pistons on Sunday.

Williams, who has become
James' best sidekick on the
perimeter, scored 22 points and

-Gibson scored all seven of his

points in the fourth.
"It's been different this sea-

son because we have guys who .

can control the offense and con-
trol the defense," James said.
"There's not been a time this
season when I felt pressure to
not come off the floor.

"I know these guys can take
care of things."

In Sunday's other NBA
games, it was: Orlando 113,
Toronto 90; Boston 109, Min-
nesota 101; and Sacramento
122, Oklahoma City 118 in

- overtime.

With James resting, Williams
and Gibson outscored Detroit
by themselves during a 15-2 run
that gave the Cavs a 73-68 lead
early in the fourth quarter.

For the stories

Te RGA tie
MN eT
Pens



James shouted, "C'mon Mo!
C'mon Mo!" from the scorer's
table during the final posses-
sion of the winning surge, then
celebrated with Williams after
his jumper led to Detroit calling
a timeout.

The 24-year-old phenom
sealed the victory on a driving
layup, an assist, 3-pointer and
free throw to put the Cavs
ahead by nine with-2? minutes
left. . ,

The Central Division-leading
Cavs have won six of their last
seven, and are 12 games ahead
of Detroit. They had lost four
straight at The Palace in the
regular season.

"Any road win is special, but
the rivalry we have with these
guys adds some fire," James
said.

Allen Iverson scored 22
points for Detroit, which has
lost nine of 12 and is 21-21 since
acquiring him in a trade with
Denver.

"I'm surprised, but I've seen
the.flashes of how good we can
be," Iverson said. "And, I see
the reasons that we lose games."

Magic 113, Raptors 90

At Toronto, Dwight Howard
had 29 points and 14 rebounds,
Jameer Nelson added 18 points
and 10 assists, and Orlando nev-
er trailed.

Mickael Pietrus scored 22
points and Rashard Lewis had
15 for the Magic, who led by as
many as 24 and have won three
straight following back-to-back
losses to Boston and Miami.

Orlando broke it open with
a 20-6 run to start the second
half, keyed by two 3-pointers
each by Lewis and rookie
Courtney Lee.

Toronto trailed 87-65 after
three quarters.

Orlando, the NBA's best 3-

point shooting team, shot 13- .

for-30 from beyond the arc.
Jose Calderon scored 16
points for Toronto.

Celtics 109,

Timberwolves 101

At Boston, Paul Pierce had
36 points, eight rebounds and
six assists, Ray Allen scored 22
and the Celtics won their 11th
straight game.

Al Jefferson, the centerpiece
of the trade that brought Kevin
Garnett to Boston and set the
stage for the franchise's 17th
NBA title, scored 34 points for
the Timberwolves. Jefferson
also had 11 rebounds for his
26th double-double of the sea-
son.

Boston led by as many as 21
in the third quarter, 71-50,
before Minnesota scored 15 of
the next 17 points. The Tim-
berwolves got within five in the
fourth quarter, 94-89, with 5:20
left, but Allen hit a jumper and
Pierce made a pair of free
throws to make it a nine-point
game:

The Timberwolves had lost
three straight since winning 10
of 12.

Garnett missed the game with
a high tever.

Kings 122, Thunder 118, OT

At Sacramento, Calif., Kevin
Martin scored 37 points and the
Kings ended an eight-game los-
ing streak.

Bobby Jackson had six of his
11 points in overtime. The vet-'
eran guard put Sacramento
ahead for good with a floater
in the lane and followed with a
jumper to make it 120-116 with
1:42 left.

Russell Westbrook had a
career-high 34 points and added
eight assists for the Thunder.
Kevin Durant scored 33, Jeff
Green had 28 points and 13
rebounds, and Nick Collison
added 10 points and 14 boards.

Francisco Garcia had 17
points, Jason Thompson scored
15 and Spencer Hawes finished
with 13 for the Kings. Both Gar-
cia and Thompson fouled out
in the fourth quarter.
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 11

We say “Thank You” to all our valued >
Clients & Staff for your support.

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our more than 80,000 Bahamian policyholders. . BAF has in place very stringent |
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009 THE TRIBUNE





s said to us in Chicago, this
never be about you, but is
s be about the changes you.

ade during your short












ue to bless and keep you,
and Malia as always.


















\\
\\ \\\\



WN CAAA A \ A \ yt
\

; WN AN NY \ AY \\ \ A
as AON i A ‘i Ve, \

ANY \




.

revive
economy

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

AN ECONOMIC summit is
needed to “identify ways to pos-
itively impact the Bahamas’ cur-
rent account balance in the
immediate to medium-term,”
according to one of its organiz-
ers who, in collaboration with
the Bahamas Chamber of Com-
merce, plans to address how
Bahamians should take advan-
tage of the current ‘economic
crisis, during the free confer-
ence in March.

According to Lynden Nairn,
an executive on the steering
committee for the March con-
ference; said the economic crisis
had presented Bahamians with
the opportunity to bring the
country together, address sys-
temic economic weaknesses and
to make tough, politically expe-
dient decisions that are in the
national interest.

“Tt would be unwise for us to
waste this crisis,” he said. “We
must exploit it post haste.”

“While the summit is intend-

SEE page 6B

CLICO (Bahamas) put
under ‘negative review’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

_Tribune Business Editor

CLICO (Bahamas) yesterday

saw its creditworthiness placed

“under review with negative

implications” by the leading ©
international insurance rating ©
agency, which pledged to con- |

tinue monitoring the insurer’s
financial health as it waited “to
see how things fall out”.
Joseph McGowan, an A. M.
Best Company analyst who cov-
ers CLICO (Bahamas), told
Tribune Business that the rating
agency would take no further
action until it saw how the situ-
ation surrounding the Bahami-
an insurer, and its CL Financial
parent, played out following the
latter’s bail-out by the Trinida-
dian government last Friday.
-In its previous August 21,
2008, review, A. M. Best placed
-a B (Fair) financial strength rat-
ing on CLICO (Bahamas), and

an issuer credit rating of ‘bb’. |
That in itself represented a-
downgrade from previous B+ =

and ‘bbb-’ ratings.

However, Mr McGowan
agreed that the fact CLICO
(Bahamas) had some 59 per
cent of its total assets tied up
in one investment - a $57 mil-
lion loan to an affiliate, which
had been guaranteed by its
troubled Trinidadian parent -
was an “unusual concentration

of risk” for an insurance com-

(THE TRIBUNE

“change” policy, its gov- ji



TUESDAY,

SECTION B ¢ business @tribunemedia, net

“REBRUARY 3,



2009



ROYAL DFIDELITY

Central Bank rules out interest rate cut

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Central aa



Bank of |g
t h e
Bahamas

will not use
interest rate cuts to stim-
ulate the economy
“unless there is a devel-
opment that causes us to

ernor telling Tribune
Business yesterday that
with foreign reserves
standing at $585 million °
this nation had to “protect what it has”.
Wendy Craigg explained that while. the
Bahamas’ foreign currency reserves had
increased by about $22 million during Jan-

Monty Craigg

uary 2009, to a position that was the equiv-’

alent value of 13.4 weeks of imports - a lev-

‘el slightly higher than the 12 weeks (three

months) “rule-of-thumb” employed by the
International Monetary Fund (IMF) -
reduced foreign direct investment and
tourism earnings mandated caution.
Responding to calls for an interest rate

cut from elements in the private sector, Ms _ |

Craigg said the Central Bank did not want
to encourage credit growth that might place
this’ nation’s balance of payments, foreign
exchange reserves and, ultimately, the
one:one peg with the US dollar under pres-
sure.

“We have this balance to maintain,” the
Central Bank governor explained. “On the
one hand, a change in interest rates is sup-
posed to signal an easy monetary policy
phase at the Central Bank, making a cut
to encourage economic growth and spend-

* Governor says nation must ‘protect what it has’, as
foreign reserves increase by $22m to $585m in January
* Bahamas’ 13.4 weeks of import reserves S greater

than IMF ‘rule-of’thumb’

ing.

Sut in this particular environment we
are in a situation where the opportunities
for growing the foreign reserves, through
foreign currency earnings from foreign
direct investment and tourism, are not as
robust as they were several years ago. We
have to be mindful of that, and any action
taken to stimulate the economy in that fash-
ion.

“We. have to watch very closely the
growth opportunities for external reserves

‘in this environment.”

Ms Craigg said the Bahamas’ current for-
eign exchange reserves level was $585-$586
million. “I think that’s about a $22 million
increase over December 31 last year,” she
said. “It’s not very dissimilar from the 2008
level, where-we ended the year at $454 mil-
lion and saw an increase of $18 million in
January 2008.”

While a reduction in the Central Bank
discount rate, the rate at which the mone-
tary policy régulator lent to Bahamian com-
mercial banks, was a policy tool at its dis-
posal that was reviewed on a monthly basis,
Ms Craigg said a rate reduction would only
happen if required by changed economic
circumstances.

“In our environment, there are trade-
offs,” Ms Craigg explained. “If foreign
direct investment is not flowing the way
‘we'd like it, and we’re not getting the

tourism earnings, you have to protect what
you have.”

Economic theory suggests that if the Cen-
tral Bank cut interest rates, the commercial
banks cut the Bahamian Prime Rate, and all
interest rates charged to borrowers were
also cut, the cheaper cost of money would
encourage consumers and businesses to
increase Import spending, thus increasing
foreign currency outflows at a time when
the Bahamas could least afford it.

Ms Craigg said the reduced private sector
credit creation and lower fuel import bill,
caused by the drop in global oil prices,
would also help protect the Bahamas’ for-
eign reserves in 2009.

The Central Bank governor added that
the regulator was “not overly concerned”
about the deterioration in commercial bank
asset quality yet, as borrowers defaulted
due to job losses and.reduced incomes, but

| was watching the situation closely.

The pace of recovery, she indicated,
would depend on the world economy.
Maintaining healthy.capital ratios despite a
decline in loan portfolio quality, and “riding
this out”, were key for the banking sector,
the Governor said, with the Central Bank
focused on domestic and financial system
stability.

“From all indications, and this is based on

SEE page 6B

Passport policy ‘unacceptable’ for businesses

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

/ 3 i Chamber chief says ‘some concern’ also exists over mulled ©
, Tribune Business Editor

change to expatriate permanent residency process



Rating agency admits $57m

_ loan, guaranteed by parent .....

and equal to 59% of assets,
is ‘unusual concentration of
risk’ for insurance firm

pany.

“It’s a big concentration of
risk; and is what we’ve pointed
out in previous ratings,” Mr
McGowan told Tribune Busi-
ness.

“Tt’s unusual, because: we’ré
always pointing it out as a con-
centration of risk. If it was nor-
mal procedure, the chances are
that we would not consider it a
concentration of risk or unusu-
al risk.”

As Tribune Business revealed
on Monday, the key issue that
CLICO (Bahamas) and the
Government/Bahamian finan-
cial services are grappling with

is this $57 million loan to CLI-.

CO Enterprises, which is a
Bahamian-incorporated affili-
ate 100 per cent owned by the
insurance company.

Their ultimate parent, CL
Financial, had guaranteed the
funds advanced to CLICO
Enterprises, which had invested

them in what is likely to be one »

of the world’s worst investment
options (in the current climate),

a Florida-based real estate

SEE page 3B

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REQUIRING Bahamians to

hand. over their old-passports =

for six weeks while they wait
for the machine readable
replacements is “completely
unacceptable” to the business
community, the Chamber of
Commerce’s president told Tri-
bune Business yesterday, as it
can disrupt commerce by pre-
venting key personnel from
travelling.

Dionisio D’Aguilar said the

current process unnecessarily

“takes someone out of circula-
tion”, and called on the Gov-
ernment to resolve the situation
by permitting Bahamians to

keep and travel on their old

passports‘while waiting for the
new ones.

‘Explaining that he had
received several complaints and
concerns over the issue from
business community members,
Mr D’ Aguilar said that once the
Passport Office had taken the
relevant information to process

a Bahamian’s e-passport appli-

cation, the applicant should
keep his old version. Then,
when the new, machine read-
able e-passport was ready, the
Government should require as.a

condition of its issuance that the.

old one be turned over.
“This requirement that you

-* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

* Personal Pension Plan Accounts’ |‘

* Education Investment Accounts °

BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801 »
Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS
ae Michael:

246.435.1955

ro een com

must hand in your passport for-.-

six weeks in order to get a new

one is completely unacceptable ©

to the business community,” the

‘Chamber president told Tri-

bune Business. “The fact you’re
taking someone out of circula-
tion for six weeks is completely
unacceptable.

“If you need to go to the US
and pick up a part for your busi-
ness, you can’t do it. If you have
to over there to pick up sup-
plies for your business or go to
a conference, you can’t do it.

“Mr Symonette [minister of

-. SEE page 5B

An RBC / Fidelity Joint Venture Company

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

‘FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Dissident union
members mar
hotel agreement

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

A NEW industrial agreement
between Bahamian hotel
employers and their union
counterparts, ‘which will pro-
vide union members with a 4.8
per cent salary increase in 2012,
was signed yesterday amid
protests from:a union faction.
who attempted to thwart what
they deemed an “illegal” sign-
ing.

As President of the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union, Roy Cole-'
brooke delivered his address in
a Department of Labour con-
ference room filled with media
and hospitality industry profes-
sionals, former union member,
Raymond Wright, began heav-
ily pounding the door to the
room shouting: “Open this
door! That’s an illegal contract.
Open this door. Ya’ll are sign-
ing an illegal document. .

“Open the door. These are
executive council members.
Open the door. What you’re
doing is illegal. Open the door!
You are compromising the
members --open the door.”

The union’s first. vice-presi-

SEE page 6B



ROYAL @ FIDELITY

- Money at Work






AGE 2B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009 — | THE TRIBUNE















: The Tribune

fy) My Vou. My Hews





THE TRIBUNE

BUSINESS

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 3B



Expo to open Business
‘Kingdom’ for women

IN a bid to aid women entre-
preneurs in starting their own
companies, Kingdom Women
in Business (KWIB) will be
holding an expo this Saturday,
February 7, at the Mall at
Marathon.

The free exhibition will give
Bahamian women the chance
to meet KWIB members, and
view some of their products up
close. KWIB members who pro-
vide business services will offer
advice in their areas of exper-
tise, including law, manage-
ment, finances, image and pub-
lic relations.

“The expo is a prelude to our
annual conference, and gives
women the chance to see how
ordinary women can transition
themselves into being extraor-
dinary women,” said KWIB
founder Melisa Hall.

“Tn fact, this is our first busi-
ness expo for the year, and we
are thrilled to see what has been
developed by our members. We
will be taking the time to
answer any questions from the
general public, as well as give
persons the chance to sign up
for our conference. So many
times, we want to reach out to



SHOWN ([-r): Kingdom Women in Business founder and attorney, Melisa Hall, with core leaders Deegenera Jones-
Dixon, Charlene Paul and Arthia Nixon, unveiled plans for a KWIB Expo this Saturday at the Mall at Marathon.
The Expo is a prelude to the group’s annual conference, scheduled for February 26-28 at the British Colonial Hilton

Hotel.

a bit busy during the week we
decided to meet them in a high
traffic area and set up in a place
where they won’t have to stray
far away from their normal rou-

tine.

“All in all, it’s another part
of our community outreach and
we are simply blessed to push
women to walk in their pur-



pose.”

For more information, visit
www.kingdomwomeninbusi-
ness.org, the group’s Facebook
page or call 328-6050.

Career Opportunity

Receptionist/Accounts Payable Clerk

Responsibilities

Prepare billing

Manage accounts payable/receivables
Process employee time cards

Create documents

Qualifications

High school education or college i

3-5 years experience

Professional, well spoken

Must be willing to work with others

Computer literate with experience in excel

Ability to take directions and wee task within a
timeline

Clean police record within the ink six months

Must be flexible with hours

Please summit your resume along with a photo to:

Unique Security Co
East Street & Balfour Ave
Or call
' 325-2258 for more information
Deadline is February 6, 2009












women, but because people are



FROM page 1B

development.

Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas), in its 2007
audit report on CLICO (Bahamas), noted
that it was only a guarantee by CL Finan-
cial, pledging that it would honour CLICO
Enterprises’ obligations to the Bahamian
insurer, that prevented the latter’s man-
agement from impairing the loan.

Given the poor financial condition of CL
Financial, as evidenced by Friday’s action by
the Trinidadian authorities, it appears high-
ly unlikely that the company will be able to

perform its $57 million guarantee.

' And with the Florida real estate market
still in a funk, and prices locked in a down-
ward spiral, the value of CLICO Enter-
prises’ investment is likely to have deterio-
rated further, with all the implications thai
entails for repaying CLIC: hariias).;~
Deloitte & Touche (Ba pms) did’ not











Ideal applicant wills



_ banking and investments.








various parts.





Tradelnvest Asset eat Ltd |
A private wealth management company

is currently seeking a qualified, energetic and confident

“individual for the position of

TRUST PROFESSIONAL

Possess LLB or other law degree.

CLICO Gree put under ‘negative review’

qualify its opinion on CLICO (Bahamas)
2007 financials (the latest ones available),
but still highlighted the fact that almost 59
per cent of the company’s $97.352 million in
total assets were invested in loans to CLI-
CO Enterprises Ltd.

The audit report found that CLICO
Enterprises’ main investment, the Florida-
based real estate project called Wellington
Preserve, suffered a more than 20 per cent

decline in market value, falling from an

appraised $104 million at year-end 2006 to
$80.5 million at year-end 2007, due to the
collapsing Florida real estate market.

“This reduction in value has resulted in
[CLICO Bahamas] management consider-
ing the possibility of impairment of the
loan,” Deloitte & Touche (Bahamas) wrote
in its audit report,:

ecovery Of;
Tia

e Have approximately 3-5 years experience in financial services in the areas of trust,

e Have the ability to review sometimes complex legal documents relating to special projects
and to confidently communicate with overseas legal and tax advisors on the same.

e Be a seasoned professional who is capable of leading a project and coordinating its

e Be capable of understanding and administering complex fiduciary structures,

¢ Be comfortable in reviewing financial statements, and have a basic understanding of

investment and financial transactions.

e Have a full understanding of corporate structures and the responsibilities of Directors and

corporate formalities:

e Have the ability to work under pressure and without constant supervision.

e Have uncompromising personal and business ethics.

Successful candidate will work directly with Senior Management in the administration of
complex private fiduciary arrangements. Responsibilities include regular contact with
overseas affiliates, associated trust, banking and investment professionals, as well as legal

counsel and advisors.

Applicants should submit a cover letter and.resume no later than Friday, February 13, 2009 as

follows:

The President

Tradelnvest Asset Management Ltd.
either by private facsimile (242) 702-2040
or by mail as follows:

_ _LYFORD MANOR, WEST BUILDING
~ LYFORD CAY ~ P.0,BOX N7776 (Slot 193) ~ NASSAU, N.P,, THE BAHAMAS

Telephone (242) 702-2000 ~

Facsimile (242) 702-2002





ns “Althou oe the market paca ne sare
da shows toni ,
in,2008, ‘manage ent



tee from C L Financial (CLICO Bahamas
ultimate parent), whereby C L Financial
states that it will honour the obligations of
CLICO Enterprises to the company if the
need arises. As such, no provision has been
made for impairment.”

Needless to say, the anticipated Florida
real estate market recovery has not taken
place, and may not do so for some years to
come.

A. M. Best, in its August 21, 2008, rating,
expressed concern over the “concentration.
risk and high exposure to the depressed
Florida real estate market”.

And, spotting that much of CLICO
(Bahamas) reserves were in fixed-term
annuities, the rating agency expressed fears
that the real estate investments ‘ ‘represent
a mismatch to. CLICO (Bahamas) liabili-

Great” at the Hilton Hotel. “Dare To Be Great”:
8:30pm on ZNS TV13.

Pictured along with the shows creator and
are his guests, Minister Dwight Armbrister:
| Stubbs, Co-Franchise owner, Miss B A
' Mustafa Khalfani, owner of Ash








Colinalmperial.

_ CAREER OPPORTUNITY

"Senior Group & Health Benefits Account Representative





We are looking for a highly motivated and experienced Account Executive to join our Group & Health

must possess the skills and knowledge to successfully manage existing Group accounts and ensure
continued growth and retention of f the Group portfolio.






Penk duties:
. Managing existing Group denne t ensure continued growth and retention,
“+ Attracting new business opportunities through effective presentation of our Group products, —
* Maintaining high level of customer satisfaction by effectively a) issues and explaining
changes or enhancements t 0. Group products.






Qualifications:
«Strong negotiation skills,
* Excellent communication skills (oral and written).
* Excellent presentation skills.
* Ability to work independently.
«Proficiency in Microsoft Office applications
+ Previous industry experience a plus.







The successful candidate will: ;
* Demonstrate a professional attitude and excellent communication skills.
«Have exceptional follow through ability,
* Possess tine management skills to ensure comfortable working relationship with customers to
' meet project requirements and deadlines.
* Be dependable, organized, and detail oriented.








To apply:




Send electronic resumé to careers@collr
Manager, Human Resources

308 East Bay Street

P.O. Box N-4728

Nassau, Bahamas







Applications must be received by February 16, 2009



























Benefits team. Reporting to the Director, Group & Health Benefits Department, the successful candidate


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009
GN-818



SUPREME
COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2008/PRO/NPR/00807

IN THE ESTATE OF JOZEF SPIRA (a.k.a. J OSEF
‘SPIRA), late and domiciled of 59A, Oakwood Court,
W14 England in the United Kingdom), deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by SAMANTHA M. WILLIAMS, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Probate in the above
estate granted to MICHAEL SPIRA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the High Court of Justice,

The Principal Registry of the Family Division on the
18th day of July, 1995.

DESIREE ROBINSON
| (for) REGISTRAR



COMMON Een OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00025

Whereas THOMAS A.A, CLEARE, JR. of Joe
Farrington Road, Eastern District: New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of THOMAS ALLISON AUGUSTUS
CLEARE, late:of Joe Farrington Road, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The Bahamas, deceased

Notice is hereby. given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

we 5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009 |

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00026

Whereas ALEXANDER EDWARD WOODSIDE, of
Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates, Eastern District,

New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth: ,

of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme

Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of.

the Real and Personal Estate of CAROLINE
WOODSIDE, late of Trinidad Avenue, Elizabeth Estates,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court. at the eapucnon of 14 oe from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for Registrar



- THE SUPREME COURT
_ PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2009/PRO/00027

Whereas MARVIN JAMES MACKEY, of Rolle
Avenue, New Providence and BARON. -HUDEN.

MACKEY of Florida both of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JAMES.
MUDEN MACKEY a.k.a. JAMES MACKEY a.k.a.
§SAMES HUDON MACKEY, late of Fox Hill Road,
- South Eastern, District, New Providence, one of the
islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof

DESIREE. ROBINSON
.. for) Registrar ..

Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

| 3 2009/PROINPR/00036- :
‘INTHE ESTATE OF CHARLES G. MORETTO, late

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009 |



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/00028

Whereas CHANELL ROKER, of Sir Lynden Pindling
Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of GLENROY HOWARD, late of Sir
Lynden Pindling Estates, Nassau Village, Eastern District,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from

the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

~ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT |

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH, FEBRUARY, 2009

~ 2009/PRO/NPR/00030

IN THE ESTATE OF DOROTHY RITA, late of 3300
N. Milwaukee Avenue, Northbrook in the State of Illinois,
one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MONIQUE V. A. GOMEZ of the
Western District of the Island of New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the resealed Order Admitting
Will to Probate and Appointing Representative in the
above estate granted to FRANK J. CALLERO and
ROBERT M. CALLERO the Independent Co-Executors
of the Estate, by the Circuit Court of Cook County,
Illinois, County. Department, Probate Division, on the
5th day of January, 2005.

NICOYA NEILLY
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
’ - THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PROIN PR/00031

Whereas OLAMAE T AYLOR of No. 7 Perpall Tract
in the Western District of the Island of New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme. Court of The

‘Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and

Personal Estate of JAMES ROBERT TAYLOR late of
No.7 Perpall Tract in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the ex ‘ration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

NICOYA NEILLY .
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION

and domiciled of Broward County in the State of Florida,
one ofthe States ofthe United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days ITom the date hereof, application will be

made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the

Probate Division by CONSTANCE E. MCDONALD,
of Fortune Village, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for

_ | obtaining the Resealing of Grant of Administration in’
_ | the above‘estate granted to CHRISTINE MACHUGH,

the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the Circuit

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAM is. Court For Broward County, in the state of Florida, Probate

Divigion on. the 16th day of January, 2004.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/N PR/00037

IN THE ESTATE OF WARD STOUTENBURG
EVANS, late and domiciled of Flat No. 11, Jocyn Court,
Rochester Road, Bantry Bay, South Africa, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by PAMELA LAVERN KLONARIS

‘and: MIKE ANTHONY KLONARIS, both of the

STH FEBRUARY, 2009



THE TRIBUNE

Western District, New Providence, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of the Certificate of Appointment of Estate
Trustee with a Will in the above estate granted to MARY
JANE MCKINNON, the Personal Representative of.
the Estate, in the Superior Court of Justice on the 8th
day of July, 2008. — -

DESIREE ROBINSON °
(for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/N PR/00038

IN THE ESTATE OF SADIE LEE E TAYLOR, late and
domiciled of2554 N. 28th Street in the City of Milwaukee
in the county of Milwaukee in the State of Wisconsin,
one of the States of the United States of America,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one. of’ the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealing Grant of Domiciliary Letters in the above
estate granted to RUTH MCDOWELL, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, in the State of Wisconsin,
Circuit Court, Milwaukee County on the 18th day of
November, 2008.

_ DESIREE ROBINSON
~~ for) REGISTRAR

PROBATE DIVISION’
5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

2009/PRO/NPR/00039

IN THE ESTATE OF AUDREY VERA HODGSON,
late and domiciled of 38 East Avenue, Riverview Park,
Althorne, Chelmsford Essex in the United Kingdom,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will be
made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the
Probate Division by MELISSA L. SELVER-ROLLE,
of the Western: District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of The Grant of Probate in the
above estate granted to FAY GEORGINA MORRIS, -

'|: the Personal Representative of the Estate, in the High
Court of Justice, The District Probate Registry at Ipswich ;

on the 28th day of Apa 2008.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) REGISTRAR

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

- No. 2009/PRO/NPR00040

Whereas MICHAEL GEORGE HIGGS II, of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration of
the Real and Personal Estate of MICHAEL GEORGE
HIGGS I, late of New Providence, one of the Islands

_ of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased. :

Notice is hereby given tliat such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from
the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00041

Whereas ADAM D.R. CARRERATA, of Poinciana
Drive, in the City of Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for CAROLE
ARTERBERY, the Daughter has made application to
the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of
Administration of the Real and Personal Estate of JANE
C. EDMUNDS, late of 241 State Road in the City of
Eliot in the County of York in the State of Maine, U.S.A,
deceased.

Notice is hac given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from

the date hereof.

DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar
IHE }HIBUNE

GN-818



SUPREME.
COURT

-COMMON WEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION

5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00042

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway off
the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by
Deed of Power of Attorney for Yvon Senecal, the Executor of

the deceased has made application to the Supreme Court of The.

Bahamas, for Letters of Administration with the Will annexed
of the Real and Personal Estate of CLAUDE SENECAL a.k.a.
CLAUDE JOSEPH HENRI SENECAL late of the City of

Montreal in the Province of Quebec i in the Dominion of Canada, .

deceased:

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by |

the said Court at eexytanon of 14 days from date hereof.

- DESIREE ROBIN SON
(for) Registrar



"COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
‘THE SUPREME COURT

~ PROBATE DIVISION
, 5TH FEBRUARY, 2009

No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00044
“Whereas DOUGLAS BURROWS, of Golden Gates #2, Western

District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the .

Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of VELERIA MINLEY
BURROWS, late of Jackfish Drive, Golden Gates #2, Western
District, News Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such apelications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof.

- DESIREE ROBINSON
Mon) Heer

_ COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

THE SUPREME COURT .
PROBATE DIVISION -

ae - 5TH FEBRUARY, 2009
No. 2009/PRO/NPR/00045

Whereas BERTHA MAE COOPER-ROUSSEAU, of Trinity:
Place off Frederick Street in the City of Nassau, on the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth |
of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for .

- the Legal Heirs of the deceased has made application to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for Letters of Administration
of the Real and Personal Estate of DR. STEFAN JOHANNES

-SANDKUHLER, late of the City ofNeulingen in the Republic ;

of Germany, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard by
the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the date hereof

_ DESIREE ROBINSON
(for) Registrar



gr ey ey eh

Passport policy
‘unacceptable’
for businesses

FROM page 1B

foreign affairs] and his team at Foreign Affairs
need to think that through again. The Govern-
ment needs to come up with.a solution.”

Mr D’ Aguilar said that allowing Bahamians to

travel on their old passports, once a properly

completed application was submitted, for six
weeks until the new document was issued was
the common sense approach to resolving this.
He added that Bahamians would not hold on to
their old passports, ‘since they would travel on

. the new one, and urged the Government to make

turning in the old document a condition of its
replacement’s issue.

Mr D’ Aguilar also called on the Government to
set-up a “fast track” passport issuing system,
where Bahamians who needed their travel docu-
ments urgently, such as businessmen, could obtain
them in quick time by paying extra for the privi-

' lege.

Otherwise, the Chamber president said the
Passport Office was likely to be confronted by a
major rush for the machine readable document at
the end of 2010, when all Bahamians were sup-
posed to possess one. This was because the cur-
rent system, with its inconvenience, provided no
incentive for Bahamians to apply early.

Meanwhile, Mr D’Aguilar said the business
community was also expressing concern over
indications that the Department of Immigration
was talking about changing the policy when it
came to expatriates on work permits applying
for permanent residency.



Branville McCartney, minister of state for
immigration, could not be reached for comment,
yesterday, but the Chamber president said the
Government was mulling setting a fixed time lim-
it on how many years a person could be in the
Bahamas on a work permit.

The current policy, Mr D’Aguilar said, as it
was under the first Ingraham administration, was
that expatriate workers who had been in the
Bahamas for 10 years on a work permit, and were
performing a valuable economic role, should than
apply for permanent residency. f

“There’s talk of a change in policy, where
they’re going to refuse to renew the work permit
once you get to the ninth permit or the ninth
year, because they don’t want you to be entitled
to apply for permanent residency,” Mr D’Aguilar
said.

This, he suggested, was the wrong approach,
and said it would be better if the Government
increased the time period from 10 years to, say, 15
years. It-appeared as if it was looking to adopt the
Cayman and Bermuda approach, where expatri-
ates were given fixed time limits for their pres:
ence.

“That’s causing some concern out there,” the
Chamber president said of the mulled change.

He explained that it would cause “major dis-
ruption to Bahamian businesses”, especially. those
who were reliant on expatriate middle and senior
managers for the smooth functioning of their
operations, if these staff had to leave after eight or
nine years without a Bahamian replacement avail-
able.



FROM page 3B

Looking at the December 31,
2007, balance sheet date, a full
impairment of that $57 million
loan would leave CLICO
(Bahamas) with just over $40
million in total assets.

That would be insufficient to
meet liabilities worth almost
$85.5 million, especially some
$79.37 million in reserves set
aside to pay future policyholder

benefits.
| Mr McGowan said yesterday

that. A. My Bestiwould:now
assess developments before

~ deciding to take any further

Ghee (Bahamas) put under Beye review’

action in relation to CLICO

(Bahamas) and Colonial Life
Insurance Company (Trinidad).
“At this point, we would real-

ly want to see all the pieces fall :

out and what happens in the
near future,”
said. “I’m sure there’s going to
be a lot of developments in the
coming days.

“We’ve just put it under
review and have got a lot of
eyes looking at this. The ratio-

nale for the previous rating,

which we just stated, still

-remains. But beyond that we'll

wait. to. see how things “fallout

béforé’ making any deff itive 2

statements.” Bhs

Mr McGowan’

CLICO (Bahamas) premium
income increased by 40 per cent
during the 12 months to year-
end December 2007, driven by a
110 per cent increase in its
annuity line to $31.196 million.

What happens to the Bahami-
an insurer in the near future lies
in the hands of the country’s
regulators. Several sources sug-
gested that, given the emphasis
on annuities, CLICO

. (Bahamas) was now a deposit-

taking institution as opposed to
a pure life and health insurer,
and was being. used as, some-

thing akin toa‘ private eqhity
“firm by its Trinidadian ‘patent

with the realestate. investments.

PUBLIC NOTICE
From Department of
Civil Aviation

Effective Immediately:

All cheques for services or facilities of
the Department of Civil Aviation must be

made payable to the Public Treasury.

All payments must be in the form of

a money order,

bank draft, certified

cheque or cash, No personal or company

cheques will be accepted.

Payments are to be sent directly to the
Accounts Section at Civil Aviation Head
Office, Seaban House, Crawford Street:


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE



Central Bank rules out interest rate cut

FROM page 1B

what is happening in the US
and world economy, it could be
another year to 18 months,” Ms
Craigg said of the downturn’s
likely length. “It seems we’re in
it for some time to come. It’s
nota short-term turnaround.”

The recession’s impact can
clearly be seen on Finance Cor-
poration of the Bahamas (FIN-
CO) loan portfolio for the year
to October 31, 2008. The BISX-
listed mortgage lender saw a
76.5 per cent year-over-year
increase in non-accrual loans -
loans that were more than 90

Dissident union

FROM page 1B.

dent, Kirk Wilson, a Cole-
brooke opponent, could be
heard saying: “The members
never ratified that contract -
council members are objecting
to this contract.”

This came moments after the
Bahamas Hotel Employers
Association’s (BHEA) presi-
dent, J Barrie Farrington, laud-
ed the industrial agreement
negotiations as being the most
amicable ever.

“On this occasion, I’m hap-
py to report that we have been
able to work through the nego-
tiations, so that there was no
confrontation or strife, and we’

ended up with an agreement

days overdue - to $28.933 mil-
lion, compared to $16.39 mil-
lion the year before.

The percentage of non-accru-
al loans in its total portfolio rose
from 2.64 per cent at year-end
2007 to 4.09 per cent at year-
end 2008. Out of that $28 mil-
lion, almost $22 million was
more than 180 days past due,
compared to $14 million the
year before.

In its report on monthly eco-
nomic developments for
December 2008, the Central
Bank last night said that total
private sector loans in arrears -
those overdue by more than 31

that we’re quite willing to sign
both as employers and the
union,” Mr Farrington said.
The melee outside did not
stop Mr Colebrooke touting the
agreement, which was one-year
overdue, as being historic and

- forward thinking.

He said the new industrial
agreement’s historical reso-
nance was due in part to the
absence of industrial action.

The inclusion of gratuity
increases for ‘Front of House’

employee; the addition of gra-.

tuities for departments that did
not receive it before; a retroac-
tive lump sum of $300 that will
benefit previously laid off work-
ers; a second lump sum in 2011
and a 4.8 per cent salary.

_ forming balances,

days - rose by by $79.7 million
during that month to make a

‘ 12-month rise of $235.8 million

or 44.5 per cent. Total loans in
arrears stood at $766 million at
2008 year-end.

“This was equivalent to an
estimated 12.4 per cent of total
loans, compared to 9.27 per cent
and 7.47 per cent at end-2007
and 2006, respectively,” the
Central Bank said.

“With regards to the main
components, loan arrears in the
31-90 day period increased by
$119.8 million (43.1 per cent)
to $398 million; while non-per-
having

arrears Beyond 90 days and on
which interest accrual has
ceased, grew by $116.0 million
(46.1 per cent) to $368 million.

“In terms of the main cate-
gories, the largest increase in
facilities affected by arrears dur-
ing 2008 was noted for mort-

- gages, of $100.5 million (38.1

per cent), raising the corre-
sponding arrears rate by 2.8
percentage points to 13.24 per
cent.

“Similarly, total consumer
and commercial'loans inarrears
grew by $68.2 million (39.6 per
cent) and $67.1 million (71.4 per
cent), with the respective

arrears rate increasing by 2.49
and _ 6.23 percentage points to
10.8 per cent and 15.5 per cent.”

The Central Bank added: “In
tandem with the deteriorating
loan quality, commercial banks
increased provisions for loan
loss expenses by $48.5 million
(40.2 per cent). However, given
the rapid expansion in arrears,
provisions decreased, both in

proportion to total arrears and |

non-performing loans, by 0.68

‘and 1.95 percentage points, to

22.09 per cent and 45.98 per
cent respectively.
“Providing some evidence of

the strain in credit markets, data,

for the January-November 2008
period révealed that net con-
sumer lending was significantly
skewed towards debt consoli-
dation loans, which rose by
$92.0 million vis-a-vis $39.3 mil-
lion in 2007.

“Growth in credit card claims
also firmed marginally to $26.5
million.. However, net lending
for land purchases slowed by
$7.9 million to $16.5 million;
and contractionswere registered
for miscellaneous credit ($5.3
million) and private cars ($6.3
million), following respective
year-earlier gains of $64.0 mil-
lion and $18.5 million.”

members mar hotel agreement

increase in 2012 are included as
a part of the agreement. The
agreement is retroactive to Jan-
uary 2008

Mr Colebrooke said that due
to the economic situation, nego-
tiating the monetary part of the
contract created the most diffi-
culty.

“Areas which have been
oppressed for a very long time,
in my opinion, now will receive
elevation,” said Mr Colebrooke.

“They (hotel workers) have
to pay.the same gas prices, they
have to pay the same light bills,
they have to pay the same mort-
gages which everyone else has
to pay, and so | think the time
has come where everyone is
supposed to benefit from these

_ contracts.”

The contracts continued to
be sealed with the stamp of the
Registrar of Labour, who acts as
a witness, as police officers were
called to stop the locked-out
union members disrupting the
proceedings.

| Labour

Director of Labour and Reg- '

istrar of Trade Unions, Har-
court Brown, said those union
members outside the signing
should seek to contest the
agreement at the Industrial Tri-
bunal.

“If any member objects to the
contract and the validity of the
contract, the contract is regis-

tered at the Industrial Tribunal
and that is where they ought to
lodge their concerns and their
complaints. They are in the

wrong forum for that process,” _
he said.

The hotel union has been

,; split for a number of years and

has been racked with infight-
ing, mistrust, and disorganisa-
tion, which put its membership
in an awkward position with the
downturn in the tourism sector
last year that led to mass lay-
offs.

Mr Wilson claimed that for
almost one year Mr Colebrooke
had failed to call executive
council meetings, which he said
were necessary for the prepa-
ration of the industrial agree-

Summit aims to revive economy |

2007 Nissan Truck

(Standard Shift)

eONLY 1,296 MILES

FOR INQUIRIES:

SIL

Call: 322-2188/9

(Mon-Fri 7:30am-4:30pm & Sat. 8am-1:00pm)



NOTICE ©

-INVERSIONES UNA VIVA LTD.

Pursuant to the Provisions of Section 138 (8) of the

International Business Companies Act 2000 notice

is hereby given that the above-named Company has.
been dissolved and struck off the Register pursuant
to a Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on thé 19th day of January, 2009.

Christena Pazos
Liquidator

of

INVERSIONES UNA VIVA LTD.

| voras thas (rg
information, contact:

LINDSAY IRELAND

Communications

ear a)

FROM page 1B

ed to address the specific needs
of small business during one ses-
sion, it is our intention to con-
vene a more comprehensive

Summit that focuses exclusively

on small business.”

Among the areas the summit
plans to address are the devel-
opment of agriculture, animal
husbandry, energy, fishing, light
manufacturing, transportation,
Family Island tourism, récycling
and small business.

The summit, opening from:
March 2 to March 8, will be: ”

open to all who are interested in
attending, according to Mr
Nairn, and will include speakers

with professional resumes for
each forum.

“This summit is not only
important for what we might
achieve in the area of econom-
ics,” he said. “It could become a
model that we use to attack vex-
ing national issues in education,
crime, the administration of jus-
tice, immigration, national

development and other areas.”

According to bsiness consul-

tant Mark Turnquest, small and
* medium-sized business owners
«who come to the summit will--

be able learn “how government,

with the assistance of financial”
institutions, can create policies |

that promote small ande medi-
um-sized development in the

LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

ANTEX TRADING LTD.

Bahamas International Business Companies Act
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138 (4). of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000), ANTEX
TRADING LTD. is in dissolution. PANAMERICAN MANAGE-
MENT SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD. is the Liquidator and ean

’ be contacted at Winterbotham Place, Marlborough & Queen Street,
P.O. Box N-10429, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims -
against the above-named company are required to send their names

addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator

before March 2, 2009.

baste kd
- PANAMERICAN MANAGEMENT
SERVICES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
Liquidator

CANADIAN ASSOCIATION OF INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 2009
6:00 - 9:00 pm
The British Colonial Hotel,

Wedgewood Room, 1 Bay Street, Nassau
(242) 322-3301

' boys/girls/co-ed boarding in attendance:
elementary and secondary grade levels offered

distinguished placement record at Canadian,
American and international universities

challenging academic and athletic programs

scholarships and financial assistance available



Bahamas.
. “I urge business owners to
participate, because now is the

ment. However, Mr Colebrooke
contends that he did indeed
hold meetings, but Mr Wilson
simply did not attend.

“Ask him to show minutes of
an executive council meeting to
discuss the industrial agree-
ment,” said Mr Wilson.

Mr Colebrooke said a meet-
ing was held last Friday, which
Mr Wilson attempted to disrupt
by bringing laid off workers in
protest. He said these kinds of
battles should now be fought at
the negotiation table and not
from the field.

_ “Whatever fighting it must
be, it must be behind closed
doors at the table, in the best
interests of those persons that

' will be affected,” he said.

time to team up and prevent
the negative impact of future
recessions,” he said.

Legal Notice .

NOTICE: .
RUSSIAN CAMEROON INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above- named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) \

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UNITED BILTMORE FOREST LTD.

(In Voluntary pee

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp..Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
UPTOWN HEIGHTS INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced .
on the 26th day of January 2009. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P.O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
~ (Liquidator)






Low | MODERATE | HicH | V.HIGH








ORLANDO


















High:58°F/14°C Acouple of morning | Partly cloudy, windy Sunny and windy. | Breezy with clouds | © Windywithsome | Partly sunny.', | The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the
Low:39°F/4°C. showers. i and colder. and-sun. i sun. i as greater the need for eye and skin protection.
: — High: 66° High: 70° High: 71°.
: Low: 47° Low: 53° Low: 59° + |
= TAMPA | . Ee iE pil | EY Ci ss
High: 58° FA4a°¢ 61°-38° F , 54°-40° F * |. 61°-45° F 5 64°-53° F
Low: 44° F/7°C The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 1:05am. 2.6 7:36am. 0.2

elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold.a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 1:29p.m. 2.0 7:34p.m. -0.1



2:39p.m. 2.0 8:43p.m. -0.1
. Statistics are for Nassau through‘1 p.m. yesterday

ABACO Temperature 3:51p.m. 2.1 9:52p.m. -0.2













DEE CAT ISLAND
High: 70° F/21°C CAT ISLANE
Low:58°F/I4°C High: 75° F/24°C

_ Low: 64° F/18°C





GREAT EXUMA SS _. SAN SALVADOR
HC High: 78° F/26° C
Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's _ANDR OS. 4 a
highs and tonights's lows. Higa EEG
Low: 68° F/20°C






LONG ISLAND









High: 81° F/27°C
Low: 70° F/21°C
Today Wednesday : Today Wednesday Today Wednesday MAYAGUANA

High Low W - High Low W High Low W- High Low W High Low W High Low W High: 84° F/29°C

FIC FIC FIC FIC ; Fe FIC FIC FC FIC FC FC. FC 8 Low: 68° F/20°C .
Albuquerque 56/13 31/0 s 60/15 32/0 $s Indianapolis 26/-3 15/-9 sf 26/-3 13/-10 — sf Philadelphia 37/2 20/-6 sn 28/-2 16/-8 pc if Q
Anchorage 10/-12 -1/-18 s 17/-8 8/-13 sf Jacksonville 56/13 30/-1 s 50/10 22/-5 s Phoenix 79/26 51/10 s 78/25 51/10 . CROOKED ISLAND / ACKLINS
Atlanta 44/6 23/-5 c¢ 42/5 23/-5 s Kansas City 28/-2 12/-11 pce . 40/4 23/-5 s Pittsburgh 28/-2 14/-10 sn 20/-6 10/-12 sf RAGGED ISLAND High: 85° F/29°C
Atlantic City 38/3. 21/-6 sn 32/0 15/9 pc LasVegas. 69/20 43/6 s 70/21 46/7 pc Portland,OR 53/11 34/1 po 52/11 37/2 c High:80°Fa7°¢ 4 LOW: 7T°F/22°C
Baltimore 36/2 20/-6 sn 32/0 18/-7 pc Little Rock 42/5 271-2 c . 49/9 28/-2 s Raleigh-Durham 46/7 24/-4 po 40/4 20/-6 pc ie -67°F/19°C A
Boston 34/1 22/-5 sn 22/-5 20/-6 sf Los Angeles 80/26 50/10 s 74/23 52/11 pe St. Louis 26/-3 15/-9 ¢ 34/1 19/-7 $s wi
Buffalo 26/-3 10/-12 sn — 19/-7 12/-11 sf Louisville 28/-2 22/-5 sf — 33/0 17/-8 sf Salt Lake City 47/8 29/-1 s 49/9 30/-1 GREAT INAGUA
Charleston, SC 52/11 26/-3 pc 48/8 23/-5 pe Memphis 38/3 23/-5 c 43/6 26/-3 s San Antonio 70/21 43/6 s 65/18 48/8 s . j 0 ey
Chicago 22/-5 14/-10 sf 17/-8 13/-10 pe Miami 72/22 48/8 pe 66/18 39/3 pe San Diego 70/21 52/11 s 68/20 54/12 pc High: 85° Haat
Cleveland 26/-3 18/-7 sn 21/-6 14/-10 — sf Minneapolis 12/-11. 7/-13 cc. = 21/6 14/-10 pc San Francisco 64/17 47/8 s 63/17 48/8 pc Low: 70° F/21°C
Dallas 63/17 32/0 s 59/15 40/4 s Nashville - 84/1 21/-6 sf — 36/2 20/-6 5s Seattle 53/11 38/3. pe 51/10 38/3 -c.
Denver 58/14 29/-1 s 60/15 27/-2 s New Orleans 61/16 37/2 s 53/11 36/2 s Tallahassee 54/12 23/-5° s 5110 16/-8 s
Detroit 23/-5 14/-10 sf 19/-7 147-10 sf New York 36/2 22/-5 sn 29/-1 20/-6 sf Tampa =~ 58/14 38/3 pe 56/13 32/0 s
Honolulu 77/25 67/19 sh 79/26 67/19 pc Oklahoma City 50/10 22/-5 s 52/11 36/2 s Tucson 75/23 44/6 s 75/23 45/7 pe
Houston 65/18 38/3 s 64/17 42/5 $s Orlando 58/14 341 pe 52/11 28/-2 ¢ Washington, DC 39/3 26/-3. sf 33/0 22/-5 pe

ae
ei





Thursday 3:26am. 27 9:57am. O01



. High .. 79° F/26° C 2 ; 3 -
_ High:73°F/23°C | ; a ‘ Friday 4:34am. 2.8 11:00am. -0.1
- Low:56"F/13°C Normal high ro apogee 87pm. 2.21058 p.m. “0.4
© Normal OW weesceccseeecssseeeseees ssssssseees 84° F/18° C
WEST PALM BEACH Last year's HIGH oc .eesesceseeseeseseeeee 80° F/27° C



High: 70° F/21°C Last year's OW ou... pacer sesesveee.01° F/162 C
Low: 46° F/8°C 4 Precipitation Sunrise...... 6:52 a.m* Moonrise... . 11:50 a.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday ............... secs trace ‘Sunset.......5:56 p.m. Moonset .... 12:56 a.m.
FREEPORT Year to date ou... seatTiavavicet fesaiae otis 0.63" Full New First
High: 71° F/22°C Normal year to date ............ deesestetsesessesveeesees 1.89" “eh ‘
Low:54°F/12°C Z
AccuWeather.com
Forecasts and graphics provided by
‘ AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 i i 2 ;
High:72°F/22°C ELEUTHERA ccuWeather, Inc Feb. 9 Feb.16 Feb. 2 Mar. 4
lowesz-Frt°¢ NASSAU ‘Miah 7° Fs
High:72°F/22°¢ = (té“iéiR WA
gf Low: 54° F/12°C

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High

FIC,

Acapulco 2 88/31
Amsterdam 38/3
Ankara, Turkey 3 48/8
Athens 65/18
Auckland : 14/23
Bangkok 93/33
Barbados © t 85/29 |
Barcelona 56/13
Beijing — ABIL
Beirut 64/17
Belgrade 54/12
Berlin 39/3
Bermuda 72/22
Bogota 66/18
Brussels. 5 (37/2
Budapest 38/3
Buenos Aires 93/33
Cairo : 73/22
Calcutta ’ ys BBW
Calgary 48/8
Cancun -. 79/26
Caracas 84/28
Casablanca y BING
Copenhagen’ 33/0
Dublin | 39/3 |
Frankfurt 42/5
Geneva 48/8
Halifax 36/2
Havana OA
Helsinki 27/-2
Hong Kong 13/22
Islamabad : 72/22
Istanbul : é 56/13
Jerusalem 60/15
Johannesburg : 75123
Kingston 84/28
Lima 81/27
London 39/3
Madrid z : 47/8
Manila 84/28
Mexico City 68/20 -
Monterrey : 73/22
Montreal . 18/-7
Moscow 19/-7
Munich oo A718
Nairobi : 83/28
New Delhi 75/23
Oslo 23/-5
Paris : 37/2
Prague, 35/1
‘Rio de Janeiro : 86/30
Riyadh 75/23
Rome : : 55/12
St. Thomas 83/28
San Juan 95/35
San Salvador. 88/31
Santiago 86/30.
~ -Santo Domingo ~ 86/30
Sao Paulo : 83/28
Seoul 50/10
‘Stockholm’ 34/1.
Sydney vn 82/27 |
Taipei : 77/25
Tokyo 54/12
Toronto : 22/-5
Trinidad ~ 88/31
Vancouver 46/7
Vienna 39/3
Warsaw © : 34/1
Winnipeg 3/-16

Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy,

TOE
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S

SSS





SSS

Won trts = =



Z
|
LL,
YY
Today Wednesday
Low W High Low W
F/C F/C FIC
72/22 pe 88/31 70/21 s
30/-1 sn 39/3 = 37/2 pc
34/1 ¢ 54/12 34/1 pc
52/11 ¢ 67/19 55/12 pe
66/18 s 74/23. 65/18 pe
75/23 pe 93/33 76/24 pc
76/24 pc 85/29 74/23 pc.
43/6 c 59/15 47/8 s
23/-5 48/8 28/-2 5
57/13 s 70/21 64/17 pc
39/3 1 52/1 43/6 r
34/1 ¢ 41/5 34/1 pc
67/19 + 69/20 52/11 sh
48/8 pc 66/18 46/7 t
28/-2 sn 36/2 34/1 ¢
34/1 sh 45/7 37/2 sh
72/22 ¢’ ~ 88/31 70/21 pc
55/12 s 80/26 59/15 s
67/9 Ss. . 88/31 (65/18 s
30/-1 pc 54/12 27/-2 pe
55/12 pe 80/26 57/13 pc
68/20 pc 83/28 68/20 t
48/8 sh 66/18 53/11 +
32/0 ¢ 37/2 35/1 ¢
32/0 sn 41/5 36/2 pe
30/-1 ¢ 45/7 34/1 pc
44/5 sh 53/11. 35/1 pe
23/-5 sn 27/-2 17/-8
48/8 po 69/20 43/6 s
21/-6 s 27/-2 23/-5 c
64/17 s ~~ 73/22 63/17 s
48/8 c 75/23 = 49/9 s
51/10 sh 66/18 51/10 c
42/5 s 69/20 49/9 pc
61/16 t 79/26 55/2 t
74/23 pc 83/28 71/21. sh
70/21 - pc “83/28 68/20 pc.
32/0 pc 39/3 34/1 ¢
39/3 sh ADT. 39/3
72/22 pc ~ 82/27 73/22 ¢
(41/5 c 68/20 38/3 pc
46/7 s 74/23 54/12 pc
5/-15 Ss” 14/-10 O17 pc
12/-11 pe 21/-6 18/-7 pe.
34/1 ¢ 48/8 36/2 pc
57/13 ¢ 84/28 55/12 r
46/7 s 79/26 50/10 s
17/-8 pc 25/-3 18/-7 sn
28/-2 pc 41/5. 34/1 sh
31/0 c 38/3 33/0 c
74/23 t 87/30: 76/24 pc
52/11 s 77/25 50/10 s-
‘OO + 58/14 48/8 pc
72/22 sh 83/28 73/22 s
70/21 pe 100/37 72/22 t
70/21 s 93/33 73/22 pc
54/12 s 84/28. 52/11 s
68/20 s_ 84/28 67/19 c
67/19 sh 79/26 - 68/20. t
28/-2 ¢ 48/8 30/-1 pc
27/-2.s 30/-1 -28/-2 sn
72/22 t 82/27 70/21 pc
61/16 s 77/25. 65/18 +
41/5 pc 48/8 39/3 ¢c
TI-A3. st 18/-7. 9/-12 sf
73/22 t 88/31 75/23 sh
38/3. pc 49/9. 38/3 c
35/1. sh 45/77, 41/5 r
30/-1 sn- - 39 32/0 ¢
3/-16 pc 18/-7 .14/-10 pc
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder- .

storms, -rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prep-precipitation, Tr-trace



Cron. on

%

Y ya 1, U4 + 4, L yy









URANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





WAVES VISIBILITY. _ WATER TEMPS.











WINDS .
NASSAU Today: . NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
FREEPORT Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75°F
ABACO Today: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F



Wednesday: NW at 15-30 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-10 Miles 19° F

f \\N 7} Showers
[<&j T-storms .
[0° 3") Rain

x 4 Flurries

PK] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
v_v! Ice preci n. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.



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Suet bP

.

- INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS

Abo | ether

Exum

367-4204 Tl (242) 332-2862 Tel (242) 336-2304


PAGE 8B TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009



JUDGE PARKER

WHEN SAM COMES POWNSTAIES,
ABBEY ASKS WHAT SOPHIE BAIP!L

A STRATEGY
FOR WHAT

Al,

|

HOW'S SHE

DOING? WHAT
DID SHE SAYZ

SHE'S FINE-.-
AND SHE HAS
A STRATEGY! JN

THOSE GIRLS AT
THEIR OWN GAME!





YOUR HUSBAND WAS
AN ENEMY OF THE
‘CHINESE GOVERNMENT
ant WA6N'T HE?
ARTA
yy)

LETS BE FRANK, NORA, Y

I'VE READ TIM'S
oA
q

















MY HUSBAND 15 DEAD.
I/VE ACCEPTED THAT, AND
ERIC HASN'T.
































CHEER UP! IT'S NOT LIKE YOUR
BOSS |S SITTING AROUND
PLOTTING WAYS TO -&

z- MAKE YOUR 3

LIFE MORE G):

MISERABLE )\



OKAY, MARLENE, HELP ME
BRAINSTORM SOME WAYS TO
MAKE BUMSTEAD'S LIFE MORE
MISERABLE...

MY BOSS HAS BEEN RAMPAGING
AROUND LIKE A WILD JUNGLE
1 OREAD















SHE GIVES ME MONTHLY

MOTHER SPENT WAAAY TOO
PERFORMANCE REVIEWS

MANY YEARS WORKING IN
CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

TIMES, AND
You SPENT
OVER FOUR



I WANTE 10

WELL, You AN? You VAN You
KNOW THE

LENE (TOUT BOMPINTO NEVER

CAN YOu TELL
WHATS THE
TROUBLE WITH
MY BIKE,

TROUBLE
MY BIKE

©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

3 CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
Mark closely and upset the
club three-quarters (4,4)
Childhood interest of
archaeologists? (5,3)
One girl having an
argument with another (6)
Avoid committing oneself
about agricultural land,
Ring the Turkish pethaps (3) saan
officials and does as one is PUP Tpesspaclen nae
s course of 24 hours (5)

fold (5) : Prepares to publish new
Changing to a cereal (3) diets (5)

Orange turned into a Scandinavian coin or
weapon (6) ~ note (3)

A boring set-up (3,3) Heavy piece of stone (3)
One form of eternity (3) Punish a child just a little
Peers out for a lively for being careless (8)
frolic (5) East Russian bear.is in the
Like a buccaneer with wild state (8)
pronounced breathing (8) No way to finish port (6)
Custom-made clothing (5) | was put out about noisy
Doing without, because strays (5)

working (8) Supports fights, but not

Country porcelain (5) seriously (5)
Deck or dock (5)

Across
Finger the back of a . 2
book (5)

Serious requirement for
ointment? (4,4)

Wife returns about to be
angry (5)

Cloth worker, one ina
mess (8)

11

12
16

17

18
_ 23 Across

1 Temporary
24 difficulty (5)
25

26 cover (5)

EASY PUZZLE

27 (5,3)

Postpone (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Behindhand, 6 Nave, 10
Foyer, 11 Asserting, 12 Straddle, 13
Clean, 15 Orchard, 17 Grenade, 19
Results, 21 Hostile, 22 Oriel, 24
Chastens, 27 Drop a line, 28 Reeds,
29 Rays, 30 In hot water.

‘Down: 1 Buff, 2 Haystacks, 3 Norma,
4 Hoarded, 5 Nest egg, 7 Alike, 8
Engineered, 9 Crackers, 14 Court
order, 16 All clear, 18 Alignment, 20
Section, 21 Heave to, 23 Irony, 25
Throw, 26 User.

Across: 1 In question, 6 Visa, 10
Awatd, 11 Regretful, 12 Eruption, 13
Earth, 15 On paper, 17 Cropper, 19
Endless, 21 Missing, 22 Aroma, 24
External, 27 Hysterics, 28 Built, 29

- Rate, 30 Ascendancy.
Down: 1 Ivan, 2 Quadruped, 3 End
up, 4 Terrier, 5 Organic, 7 Infer, 8 All
the rage, 9 Generous, 14
Forefather, 16 Prepared, 18
Privation, 20 Species, 21 Matisse,
23 Onset, 25 Rabid, 26 Stay.

country (6)
Loiter (6)

A cover (3)
Traitor (5)
Naturally (2,6)
Cheerful (5)
Alone (2,6)
Sordid (5)

COMIC PAGE —

TROUBLE WITH) WITH ME!)

Go on a spree (4,2,2)
9 Approach under

Utterly exhausted

Prefix for new (3)
Southeast African

THE TRIBUne








CALVIN & HOBBES
WON, YOU'VE






















Y TWe ONES I
REALLY \IATE
ARE SMALL,SO

WHEN THE SUN COMES OUT, | WASN'T
TUL WATCH THEIR FEATURES — | AWARE YOU
SIOWLY MELT DONN THEIR | EVEN KNEW
DRIPPING BODIES UNTIL THEYRE: | THIS MANN
NOTHING BUT NOSES AND PEOPLE.
ENES FLOATING IN POOLS

NEP. THEY'RE EFFIGIES.
EAC ONE REPRESENTS

MADE A Lot
OF SNOWMEN

©1989 Universal Press Syndicate



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“MRS, WILSON D
SHE COOKS BY EAR.”

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.


































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Difficulty Level *



HOW many words of four

letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here?

In making a word, eachletter =>

uses may be used once only. Each

rd in must contain the centre letter
words and there must be at least one
the main nine-letter word. No plurals.
body of TODAY'S TARGET

Good 20; very good 30;

Chambers — excellent 39 (or more).
21st Solution tomorrow.
Century SATURDAY’s SOLUTION

bench bonce bone bony

boon cone coney cony coon

ebony economy hone honey

HONEYCOMB hymen hymn

money mono moon moony
“omen once

Dictionary

(1999
| edition)

Famous Hand

Here is an example of the type of
play he was capable of making on the

South dealer.
North-South'vulnerable. '

NORTH spur of the moment. Fishbein was

41762 West, defending against four spades,

Â¥VK74 and he began by leading the queen

#K93 and another club to East’s king.

#1063 - When East next played the ace of

WEST EAST clubs, Fishbein had to decide which

@Q4 4103 card to play. He knew that a fourth

¥653 ¥109 club lead by East would promote his

Virtually ass ired #AQI1N64 #8752 queen of spades into the setting trick,
(2,3,3) . &Q5 #AK 972 © but he was afraid East might return a
Blind alley (3-2-3) SOUTH diamond instead. This could prove
Holy (6) @AK985 fatal if South, who had bid two suits
" VAQIS82 and shown up with three clubs, was

State of high o— void of diamonds. If he was, South
excitement (5) #184 could ruff the diamond and cash the
Lower oneself The bidding: A-K of spades to make the contract.
morally (5) South West North East The question, therefore, was how
1¢ 2¢ 24 34 to get East to continue with a fourth

Flood (5) 3% Pass 44 club. Discarding a low heart might

cause East to lead a diamond, while
discarding a low diamond might
induce a trump or heart shift. And so,
Fishbein did something that very few
players would think of — he dis-
carded the ace of diamonds!

It was not difficult for East to
grasp the meaning of this extraordi-
nary discard, since he also knew
declarer might be void of diamonds.
Accordingly, he led the nine of clubs
at trick four, and the contract quickly
went down the drain.

Zero (3)

Aged (3)

From now on (2,6)
In each year (3,5)
Treat with

contempt (6)

Leisure pursuit (5)
Pungent (5)

Overly decorative (5)

Opening lead — queen of clubs.

The late Harry Fishbein, well-
known star and impresario of New
York’s now-defunct Mayfair Bridge
Club, was noted most for his imagi-
native bidding and play.

For Fishbein, there was no such
thing as a sacred rule that could not
be broken if the situation called for it,
and he was always on the lookout for
such situations. No one ever accused
him of being a monolithic player.

Tomorrow: Neutralizing a knave.
©2009 King Features Syndicate Ine.
THE TRIBUNE

’ TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 9B











Many persons give little or
no thought to the mattress
they sleep on each and every
night, but Al Frances, the
manager at the Sleep Gallery,
a mattress specialty store for
the last five years on Cable
Beach told Tribune Health it
can make a major difference.

“People the world over have
been brainwashed to think
that firmer is better when it
comes to a bed. But whatever
mattress you can sleep on is
the best for you," he said."
Ninety per cent of people out

_ there are sleeping onafirm -
mattress but they're tossing
and turning all night, and not
getting enough sleep."

Doctors say most people
need at least eight hours of
sleep to refuel their body's
energies after a day of being
awake, whether working,
relaxing or partying on'a
weekend. ;

Sleep Gallery's biggest sell-

@ By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

A GOOD night's
sleep is the best medi-
cine for a healthy life
any doctor would tell
you. It's the cure for a
common cold, recov-
ery from a late night,
or even a recent
surgery. But getting the
ideal eight hours each
night can be next to
impossible for many
and the problem just
may be their mattress.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
, (No.45 of 2000)

OXIAS ASSOCIATES INC.

‘

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
137 (4) of the International Business Companies Act
No. 45 of 2000, OXIAS ASSOCIATES INC. has been
Dissolved and struck off the Register according to
the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 29th day of December, 2008.

Mr. Marios Georgiou
(Barrister at Law)
101,3 Kalavriton Street
1070 Nicosia
Cyprus
Liquidator

er is the Seely Posturepedic
mattress that has 600 springs
because Mr Francis explained,
it's the best price for a recog-
nised name in mattresses.

Less expensive versions are
orthopedics (300 springs) and
higher end is Tempur-pedic,
the mattress that conforms to
your body shape: Other fea-
tures of the Tempur-pedic’
include the 20 year warrantee,
and it is made of open-cell
memory foam or Viso-elastic.
So this foam mattress is sup-
portive because it remembers
your body shape.

"This relieves body pres-
sure and most importantly for
people who sleep. with a part-
ner, movements don't carry _
over to the other person. A lot
of times a person can't sleep
because their partner can't
sleep," he explained.

Mr Francis said that many
times, customers come in fed
up with their current mattress

AY

but don't know what to look
for next.

Sleeping habits

The value of information in
sleep knowledge is a precious

‘commodity, Mr Francis said

because night time prepares
you for another good day. ©
Without good sleep habits, a
person will become grumpy
and irritable, impatient and
stressed out the next day.
"Sleep time is when your
body recuperates, and the
next day it allows you to be a

nicer person to your spouse,

children or co-workers. It
makes your days go better,
and not feel as if they're drag-
ging on and on," he said.
Once you have that perfect
mattress, you should rotate
and flip it every three to four
months, recommended Mr
Francis. The reason for this is

- that humans' upper bodies are

Legal Notice
NOTICE

DISESTAR TRADING LTD.
In Voluntary Liquidation

_ warrantee time he added.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (4) of the International Business Companies Act,
2000, DISESTAR TRADING LTD. is in dissolu-
tion as of January 29, 2009.

International Liquidator Services Inc. situated as 35A

Regent Street, RO. Box 1777, Belize City, Belize is the
Liquidator.

LIQUIDATOR



heavier than their lower bod-
ies, and unequal pressure on a
mattress Over time will create
lumps and bumps.

An average mattress should
last.between 10 to 12 years,
depending on its quality and

Other issues to getting a
good night's sleep-are the
sheets and pillow you use. Mr
Francis' number one rule in
finding the perfect pillow is to
find it yourself, because some-
one else will never be able to
guess the kind of angle your
neck will be comfortable at, or
whether you'd like your head
to sink into sleep or rest firmly
on a constant support.

It seems we've moved












Mi)

yy

Yy
Ly

Pisa ney att
beyond the question "feather =a
or regular?" of the good old ~



days. Now there's latex, foam,
and buckwheat to choose
from. As his own preference,
Mr Francis likes his latex pil-
low that he bought eight years
ago. "I love it because it's kind
of bouncy but firm at the same
time. It doesn't elevate my
head too much or not
enough."

Latex pillows are made
from the rubber tree in
Europe. First the rubber is
melted and poured into a
mould with spikes, it's baked,
frozen and the spike impres-
sions pulled off. "The number
of holes allow the pillow to
breathe," he said.

Specialty sleep wares like
this cost more, but also last for
a longer period of time. "It's
better to pay $70 once in eight
years than to buy a cheap pil-
low at $12 that you have to
replace three times a year,"
Mr Francis said.

Sheets are also an important
consideration he said. "A
higher thread count means
better quality," said Mr Fran-
cis, "the regular sheet is 180
thread count, but really you
just need between 300 to 500."

yc
te lif



iy
PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009

HEALTH

THE TRIBUNE



By JEFFARAH GIBSON

GOOD HAIR care
is a crucial part of
proper hygiene no
matter what hair type
you have- whether it
be long and straight,
or short and curly.

Speaking with Tri-
bune Health, a stylist
at the Hair Team said
that people need to
take care of their
hair, the same way
they take care of their
skin and body. In par-
ticular, she suggests
cleaning the hair at
least once week.

your hair regularly,
the pores in your
scalp will become
clogged, that is why
it is necessary to
shampoo your hair
once a week. Just as
you bathe your skin,
you must do the
same to your hair,”
she said.

Although men
have less hair than
women they should
take this into consid-
eration as well. She
explained that hair is
often exposed to all
sorts of chemicals
from the air and hair
products which
together with dead
skin cells can create
toxins that become a
breathing ground for
infection.

Hair Care for Women

Hair treatments are equally as important
as getting a shampoo. The Hair Team pro-
fessional stylist says that hair should be
treated every two weeks depending on the
type of hair. “Asian hair is very strong and
Afro ethnic hair is more course and brittle
so the person with Afro ethnic hair type
may have to treat their hair more often,”

she said.

In addition to having the hair treated, it
is also important to ensure that the hair is
cut every time it is relaxed, which should
be every six weeks. Cutting does not mean
removing large amounts of hair, but it
means removing the split ends which can-
not be mended and cause your hair to be ©
damaged. “There is no product that can
repair split ends. There are however prod-
ucts that enhance the texture of the hair
that causes the integrity of the hair to
become stronger,” she said.

“If you don’t clean

hair.

no’ since this often has a negative effect
on the growth and development of the

“When you grease your scalp you are
blocking every pore in the scalp. This is
like telling your hair not to produce its
own oil. What you can do is apply very
small applications to the hair itself, not the
scalp. Or you can stimulate the scalp to
produce its own oil by massaging it light-
ly,” she said.

Adding hair extensions can be very
stressful on the hair if it is not done bya
professional. This is the same for adding
colours. If it is not done professionally,
then it can be detrimental to the hair.

She discouraged relaxing, adding
weaves, and colours to hair without see-
ing a professional stylist:

Hair Care for Guys

Some men might think that they don’t
need hair care, but Alex Davidson, barber
for twenty plus years, and owner of Alex
Factory Cuts Salon provided Tribune
Health with some valuable tips.

“Guys should keep their hair clean

which includes getting a multi purpose
shampoo that treats the hair and also

leaves a sheen,” he said.

To give the hair a little shine he suggests
using the Pro Mad or cream that leaves -
the hair full of luster and shine. “Most
guys try to obtain a look, a wavy look that
is, sO using the Pro Mad grease can assist
with that,” he said.

Men employed in industrial jobs like

construction, or who are often surrounded

by chemicals, should cover their hair with
a cap or durag to eliminate their chances
of picking up a fungus as well as debris,”
Mr Davidson said.

For the bald man maintenance isa lot
simpler. “The scalp is the main part of the
hair and if the hair follicle is damaged, this
causes the growth to be stunted. When a
person’s head is bald, it is exposed and it
is easier to pick up a Virus or infection.
What these men should do is keep the hair
waxed with oil sheen to protect the scalp

After a shampoo, sometimes the hair =~ — and the sheens have agents that kill cer-

appears very brittle or dry and the first
thing you might want to do is “grease”
your scalp. But greasing the scalp is a ‘no

tain bacteria.”
The stylists pointed out that healthy
hair reflects a healthy body.



HAIR is often exposed to all sorts of chemicals from the air and hair products which together with
dead skin cells can create toxins that become a breathing ground for infection. .





RECENTLY we considered
the herbs parsley, sage, rose-
‘mary and _ thyme, along with tar-
ragon. There are many more
delightful culinary herbs that we
can grow in our gardens — or in
pots — to liven up our taste expe-
riences.

Basil is one of the world’s
most popular herbs, beloved
from Italy to Vietnam. The mild,
sweet anise flavour marries per-
fectly with tomatoes and is the
base of pesto, an uncooked
sauce made of pesto, pine nuts,
garlic, parmesan cheese and
olive oil.

Basil grows so well in our cli-

ee



Small mammals (hamsters,
guinea pigs and rabbits), birds

and reptiles (turtles and snakes) '

may offer companionship to
people in situations when dogs,
cats or larger animals are not
- practical or permitted. As with
all pets, the bond between the
human and the animal enhances
the health and well being of

”

mate that it can easily become a
weed. There are many varieties
of the herb but I would recom-
mend the standard large-leafed
green basil for most applica-
tions. There is a small-leafed
variety called lemon basil that
is so fragrant it should find a
place in your herb garden.

Basil grows all year round and
the flowering shoots should be
picked off as they form to allow
the plant to invest its energies in

leaves rather than procreation. .

Another herb that is ubiqui-
tous in the warmer parts of the
world is cilantro, commonly
called Chinese parsley and Mex-



both parties. However, these
smaller creatures require par-
ticular care to prevent illness.

scat



‘ican parsley. It has an ofty,

somewhat bitter taste thatsas
very distinctive. It really has
substitutes. — SBN

Cilantro grows well but tends
to bolt and turn to seed very
quickly. It is a herb that should
be planted every month, if you
like it, and harvested regularly.
The cilantro seeds are called
coriander and form the basis of
most curry powders, making the
plant a producer of both a herb
and a spice.

Go to northern Europe and
you will soon appreciate that dill
is the regional herb of choice,
mainly because of its affinity for
rich fish. Dill is an attractive
plant with large flower sprays
that produce hundreds of aro-
matic seeds. The thin leaves are
called dill weed and have a del-
icate flavour while the seeds are
strongly flavoured and make
an excellent tea to counter



Risks from exposure to exotics
pet species can be reduced or
eliminated by regular hand
washing, clean animal housing,
keeping exotic pets away from
their wild cousins and proper
pet selection.

Salmonella
The most common human ill-








intestinal gas: Dit
ingredient intbaby

Dill is vefy ea
can readily*betonice
you do not” haivest the seeds
properly. \

Oregano and marjoram are
essentially the same herb, mar-
joram being milder in flavour.
Greek cuisine is dominated by
oregano, a strongly- flavoured
herb that comes in many shapes
and sizes. It is mostly used in
soups, stews and sauces and is
just about essential for an
authentic pizza. In the islands
we tend to use a plant called
Cuban oregano that is not a true
oregano but has the same



- flavour. Cuban oregano is a

fleshy plant.that is easily grown

“from cuttings. It is particularly

flavoursome when used to sea-
son Salsas. © |

Mexican thyme has even larg-
er, fleshier leaves and is used as

ness linked to exotic animals.
This is a bacterial infection that
many pet reptiles, especially
aquatic turtles carry on their
skins. Some birds, especially baby
chicks and ducks, are sources of
salmonella exposure. Even some
dogs and cats shed this bacteria
in their feces, especially those
that are fed raw meat. Salmo-
nella typically causes symptoms
resembling severe food poisoning
and its effects can be especially
grave in very young and old peo-
ple. Salmonella causes unpleas-
ant symptoms like abdominal
cramps, nausea, watery or bloody
diarrhea, vomiting and fever. As
mentioned earlier, this bacteria
can be very serious in children,
seniors and people with impaired
immune systems. Most people
are exposed through under
cooked meat or eggs. Most ani-
mals that carry the bacteria do
not show any symptoms of dis-
ease.

To prevent salmonella expo-
sure from pets, be sure to wash
hands with soap and warm water
after handling reptiles, birds or
any.pet feces. Keep pet houses



Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that SUZETTE RICHEMOND OF FAITH
AVENUE OFF CARMICHAEL ROAD, NASSAU, THE
BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 3RD day of FEBRUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,



a substitute for Méditerranean’™

thyme. Both Cuban oregano

and Mexican-thyme should be, _
added to the pot late or used in”

uncooked foods. Ginger is easi-
ly grown from store-bought
hands that have developed
growth nodes. Break or cut the
hand into pieces containing a
growth node and plant about
five inches deep. In time you
will have attractive foliage and
then delightful flowers. When
the plant dies back you can har-
vest your gingers, reserving
some to replant.

Lemongrass is an essential in
Thai and Vietnamese cooking
and has long been known in The
Bahamas as ‘fever grass’, used in
bush medicine. Lemongrass
grows in clumps and can be
grown in flower beds to provide
attractive greenery. The swollen
white lower stem is the part
used.

Diseases of exotic animals that can affect people

clean. Supervise children han-
dling pets and ensure proper
hand washing. Young children
and immuno-compromised peo-
ple should avoid direct contact
with reptiles and birds.

Tularemia

This naturally occurring bac-
terial disease of rabbits and
rodents is considered a poten-
tial bio terrorism agent by the
Center for Disease Control and
Prevention. People infected
with the bacteria may experi-
ence skin rashes, sudden fever,
chills, nausea weakness, joint
pain, dry cough, diarrhea,
headaches, swollen painful
lymph nodes, chest pain and/or
pneumonia. Rabbits and
rodents are infected through
ticks and biting flies. People can
be exposed through inhalation
or ingestion. People are gener-
ally exposed through handling
carcasses of rabbits or rodents.
The bacteria is not spread from
person to person.

Psittacosis
Another potential bio-terror-










Garden mint is usually
spearmint or peppermint. Mint
is usually employed in its raw
form and sprinkled onto foods.
Mint tea is wonderful for diges-
tive disorders and a saucé made
of finely diced mint leaves, sug-
ar and vinegar is a fine accom-
paniment to lamb:

My last herb may come as a
surprise to many — celery. Basi-
cally a cool weather swamp
plant, celery is difficult to grow
in The Bahamas if what you
want are large, thick white stems
to use as a vegetable.

The somewhat smaller, dark
green stems and leaves we can
grow have wonderfully concen-
trated flavour and can be used
to flavour soups and stews and
chicken salads.

Bon appetit!

e j. hardy@coralwave.com





ism agent, Psittacosis’is an
important disease for bird own-,
ers to know about. Although
less than 50 people in the Unit-:
ed States are infected each year;
the illness can be serious. Peo=.
ple may experience heart infec-”
tion, hepatitis, neurologic symp-
toms, severe pneumonia, or
death. Infected birds may show
weakness, poor appetite, fluffed
up feathers, diarrhea, difficulty’
breathing, eye swelling and/or
eye discharge. The bird’s feces”
may remain virulent for months.
All sick birds should see a vet-
erinarian, especially if the ill-

ness includes eye swelling or.

discharge.

Lyrnphocytic Chori-
omeningitis Virus
(LCM)

House mice and other rodents
are natural carriers of the LCM
virus. Pet mice, hamsters and
guinea pigs may become infect-
ed by exposure to wild rodents in
pet stores or breeding facilities.
These pets may not show any
symptoms. Some will lose
weight, reduce activity, have
swollen eyelids, walk in a
hunched posture, stumble or fall,
develop seizures, or die from the
virus. In people, LCM generally
leads to flu-like symptoms one to
two weeks after exposure. Con-
tact with urine or bedding is the
most common route of infection,
although bites can also.transmit
the disease. To reduce the risk of
exposure, clean cages often in a
well ventilated area. Wash hands
after handling pet, rodents and
clean bedding. Do not kiss these
pets.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3, 2009, PAGE 11B



Ge

“To Experience Any Sense of
Positive Change, You Must
Start With Yourself.”

As the world ushers in a new era
of change and transformation at
every. possible level, this is possibly
the most amazing time to be alive.
People from across the globe are
hungry for a richer more meaningful
experience of life and are inspired to
explore this new frontier; accepting
that there is more to them than what
meets the eye.

On one hand, while many are
keenly aware of this shift, and wel-
come this ‘change revolution’ will-
ing, ready and able to take their liv-
ing to a. whole new level; on the flip
side there are still so many sitting on
the sidelines as mere spectators of
this beautiful transition. They are
unaware, unwilling and unable to
take ownership of their lives; oblivi-
ous to the incredible personal power
that they possess.





Ifyou find yourself in the latter

‘category; let me quickly point out

that the changes that you desire to

‘- experience do not exist outside of

you. Contrary to popular belief, your
answers do not lie in your parents,
your teachers, your spouse, your

children, the church, the government

or any other individual or-entity.

Believe it or not your answers lie
within you, and it is your responsi-.;
bilty to find ways to discover-and
employ them to create your pre-
ferred life.

For many of you I imagine this is
not a simple statement to accept;

especially in a time where things may
not be going quite right. But the
good news is - you can change your
situation by first changing yourself.

Move Beyond Mediocrity

I believe that one of the greater
challenges for most people is releas-
ing the habit of judging themselves
too harshly; constantly feeling like
they don’t measure up to society’s
small benchmarks of success. As

-such, they never feel good enough

and live their lives always trying to
prove something. This is where the
cycle of mediocrity takes root and if
left unchecked, it becomes the
norm; fueling the low energy of

inadequacy which leads to stress and
- dysfunction.

Change and transformation, must |
therefore be seen as an.elective

course of action; not because of
- what people will say or the things

that you may obtain, but because of
the value it will bring to you, your



Makeup application and ©
style tips for a beautiful you

FROM page 12

clogged pores, but this is not so since there are foundations

that are light on the skin.

Using a wedge sponge can help to blend in foundation

she added.

Concealers are very similar to foundation, and hides
those spots under the eyes. “Concealer is used more under
the eyes and it tends to conceal in the place of foundation.
It also hides those rings that some women may have under
the eye. It pretty much does the same jobs as foundation,”

she said.

Lip. Liners, lip sticks & lip gloss
Finding the color that suits your skin tone can be very dif-
- ficult. This process also involves testing, so you can find the
“color that will unleash your ‘sexy’. “A lot of women use lin-
“ers; and glosses are becoming very popular among the
younger women. The more mature and older women are
and have always been faithful to their lipstick. But before
you-choose a lipstick or gloss it is best to go:to a cosmetic
store and do a little testing | before you say that a certain col-

- or will look good on you.’

Liners, if applied properly have the effect to make the lips
fuller or smaller depending on how it is applied. Before
applying lipstick, gloss or liners, Ms William said it is best

~“““to apply a lip: balm to the lips before, because putting on
dried lips doesn’t give a desirable look.
“Whenever clients enter the store I will never sell them
"lip gloss without letting them purchase lip balm,” she said.
Another key to wearing liner, she said is to apply the lip-
stick or gloss: first and then the liner, as it gives a more

refreshed look.

“Tf you work in an area that is not fully air conditioned
then you don’t want to wear much make- up, since you will
sweat the makeup off especially if you have oily skin. “All

, you should put on is press powder and a little concealer for

the blemishes.”

Makeup Removers










































To ensure and promote healthy skin remove makeup
from the face with a makeup remover system, which exfo-
liates the face and cleans the pores. She says that having the
perfect glow when wearing makeup goes hand in hand
with keeping the face clean and healthy, which means tak-
ing the proper steps to take care es the skin.










family and your community. You
know within yourself that you are
more than what you have become
and there is

more to you than what meets the
eye; you hear it in the whispers of °
heart, you feel it in the gentle breeze
and you are genuinely seeking
avenues to break out of this box and
be free.

Free from the expectations of oth-
ers, free from having something to
prove, free from depending on the
opinion of others, free to be you and
to live a life of authenticity. I assure
you, that this degree of freedom is
available to you; and it begins with
you making the decision to embrace

’ the chance to change — from the

inside out.

Final thoughts...

Every sunrise brings a new
moment of possibility in which you
can choose to take a chance on your-
self and transform your life or you



FROM page 12

No fear of failure - Owners focus
on success, possibilities and adapt-
ability. They are aware of risks but
they are not pessimistic and they avoid
falling into the trap of focusing on
“what ifs”.

Mental toughness and an under- ©

standing of delayed gratification. It

takes mental toughness to take you’
through the tough times your compa- -

ny faces. Mental toughness can also
help you make a decision to delay your
gratification. When deciding to delay
your gratification, make a note of
when you will pursue gratification,
don't let your boss take unfair advan-
tage of your willingness to wait.

Benefits from adopting an owner's
mentality:

Increased Profitability - If more:and
more of your coworkers adopt an own-
er's mentality, increased profits can
follow because of improved produc-
tivity, better customer service and
enhanced employee relations.

. Mutual Respect - Respect will grow,

between managers and employees’
because employees understand the big
picture and managers appreciate and
respect employees for their contribu-
tion.

Unified Vision - Everyone will be _

focused on the same purpose and step-
- ping outside the nine dots to get things
done. There is more initiative.

What do leaders have to do to create
and support an owner's mentality
among employees?

If you want to know if you are part
of an organization with employees who
take ownership; all you have to do is



Success and an owner's mentality

~ apply a simple test.



You are the change that you are for!

can continue to listen to the same old
story or play the same unfulfilling life
game. .

Remember - change begins when
you decide; so why not take a new
look at your reflection in the mirror
and see a brand new, magnificent you
waiting for you to bring it into
expression.

I encourage you to accept that
despite your most difficulty situation, .

. you are living in a remarkable time of

possibility and you are truly the
change that you are looking for. You
need only begin to believe this and
act as if it is so; get up and make it -
happen.

e Are you ready to reinvent yourself?
Are you willing to commit to the process
of change? Congratulations - you are an
ideal candidate for my upcoming No
Excuses Goals Program. Please send an
email to coach4ward@Yahoo.com or call
429-6770. Seats Are Limited!

Ask yourself if
you typically hear employees and man-
agers refer to each other as “they” or
“them”? Or do you typically hear
employees and managers use the
words “we” and “us”? If you hear too
much usage of the words “they” or
“them” you have some work to do.

If you are an owner of a company,
the easiest way to deter employees
from adopting an owner's mentality is
to show your employees that you are
threatened by their idéas.
employees usually work closer to the
customer so learn to listen to them if
you don't already. You may or may
not agree with them, or you may not
have the resources to make a change
but they deserve a listening ear. In
fact, they may even be able to provide
creative solutions if you learn to'use
curiosity.

Transparency is necessary if you
want to create an environment where
employees take ownership.. You cer-
tainly don't have to share all the details
of the business with employees
because you don't want to alarm top
performers if there is a challenge but
you can provide employees with
enough.information so stimulate focus
and higher performance.

Cultivating a culture that promotes
employee ownership can support you
as a business owner and employee
through tough times and in times of
strong profitability. If you are an
employee and you adopt an owner's
mentality you can better ensure your
long term employability potential
because this mentality broadens your
technical skill sets and tESEED YS your
leadership abilities.

So give of yourself as though you
own the company. Find new ways to
make money. Put your heart into your
work .and remember that you can help
to differentiate your business and your-
self because by taking ownership, you
become more.and more valuable as
an employee:

ohnson-Smith named Caribbean Supervisor of the Year



PICTURED from left to.right Vincent Vanderpool Wallace, Minister of Tourism, Holidays Caribbean Hotel
Supervisor of the Year award winner Phyllis Johnson Smith; Caribbean Hotel Tourism Association
’ (CHTA)President Enrique De Marchena Kaluche; and Frank Comito, Executive Vice President of the Bahamas

Hotel & Tourism Association.



Beach Hotel.

the initiative and become a

Your.

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON



PHYLLIS Johnson- Smith,
a manager in the housekeep-
ing department at the Shera-
ton Nassau Beach Resort, was
recently named the Caribbean
Supervisor of the Year during
the opening ceremony of the
Caribbean Hotel and Tourism
Association's annual Market-
place Conference in St. Lucia.

Ms Johnson- Smith’s career
of hard work, persistence and
determination stood out
amongst tourism employees
all over the region.

Tourism is her life and
working in hotels is all she
knows, since she started in the

- industry in 1978 where she
_ was employed at the Winding

Bay Resort in Eleuthera. And
since 1980 she has been work-
ing as the Sheraton Nassau

She recently sat down with

‘Tribune Woman to discuss her

accomplishment and the

importance of the Tourism’

industry. “I am always
focused, and I believe in
remaining positive regardless
of the situation. I try to
encourage people to not look
at difficulties as obstacles, but
try to find the opportunities
to learn within each mistake,”
she said.

Serving in the tourism
industry is joy for Ms John-
son- Smith since she enjoys
taking part in rebuilding and
maintaining such a lucrative
industry. “Tourism is very
important and it effects every-
one, so at work I try to do my
best to accommodate visitors
to ensure that things are all
right with them. I try to take

proactive employee. I never
wait for someone to ask me
to do something, I take it
upon myself and just do it,”
she said.

She believes'in getting the
work done even if it requires
her to come in early and leave
late. Ms Johnson- Smith can
add this award to an impres-
sive list of accolades she has
already achieved throughout
her career including: the
Cacique award 2007-2008,
supervisor of the year for two
years, employee of the month
and a number of trips and gifts
for her career performance.

She continues to be a hard-
working, dependable, reliable
employee and says she is
always motivated to do her
best. She describes herself as a
person for all seasons.

IVE_IN

TO TEMPTATION








pe ae and desir-
Betts












m@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON Tribune Woman
os es” Spoke. “with: ‘Tonya
ALL women want a Williams, manager of

: : the Cosmetic Boutique
beautiful glowing face eran tolae vie eae

enhanced by makeup and Woman, “I do believe
using cosmetics can surely _ that makeup application
give you a glow, but if it is is a form art. You must
ot applied to the face

roperly then you, can eration, skin tone, pig-
ave a makeup disaster. mentation, and you also

have an eye for cosmet-
ics, taking into consid-

want to be in touch with

colors. So working on

the face i is like working on a blank canvas, waiting on the
makeup artist’s creativity.”

Ms Williams. noted that there are right and wrong

ways to apply cosmetics. “There is a professional way to

apply makeup, however you can do what you feel is the

better way for you to:apply your makeup. Some people.

would prefer to tse their fingers when it comes to apply-
ing eye shadow or liquid foundation as well as concealers.
This is good because the warmth from the fingers blends

the eye shadow, concealer, and foundation in very good,” »

she said.

Having the perfect. and desirable. coverage can be:

achieved by using the proper tools, preferably Hsing
brushes composed mainly of ee hair.

Foundations and Concealers

Many Bahamian women feel that pressed powder i is
incomplete without foundation. However there are some
women who do not need it. And while many women

_ may have very smooth, clear, complexions they still fall

weak to the completion they think foundation gives.
“Foundation is not necessary. It does however depend
on your skin type. If you have very bad skin, or if you
have a lot of blemishes as well as marks then maybe
you can use foundation, but if you don’t have
much blemishes then it is not necessary to wear
foundation, or if you do you can wear it lightly.”
She also. mentioned that when some women
hear the word foundation, they automatically think
of it being something very heavy or they think of

SEE page 11 |

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 3,













Success and an
owner’s mentality

Have you ever heard any of these.
statements: “I only work here”, “that's
not my job” or “I am not paid enough
to do that.” While this may all be true,
if you usé these or similar statements
you are really saying that you are okay
with mediocrity because you are unwill-
ing to step outside the parameters of
your job description.

These statements are symptomatic of
what is often referred to as a job men-
tality. You work, you get paid and then
you start the cycle again. There is
rarely any extra effort from you and for
some, there is very little effort.

You may have decided not to make
the extra effort because you feel over-
looked or stuck, so you convince your-
self the extra effort won't help you.
While this may true, there is the risk
that during tough times, or when pro-
motions are being considered, you will
continue to be unnoticed.

One way you'can take charge of your
career is to adopt an owner's mentality.
An owner cares about their company.
They constantly think about how they
can improve their products, customer
servicé, and operations with the inten-
tion of improving profitability. They
take calculated risks and apply creativi-
ty to challenges. Owners take pride in
their surroundings and no matter how
menial the task, they are prepared to _
do what it takes to make their company
successful. i

The author, Daniel Theyagu said,
“You should learn to see yourself as
the owner, no matter where you stand
in your organisation. Achieving this
paradigm shift within will automatically
allow. you to,start to contribute effec-..
tively to your organization.”

So, if you are not the owner of your _
company, start thinking about how you
can adopt a more entrepreneurial, own-
er's mentality. Keep in mind that some ~
aspects of the owner's mentality are not
welcome in every workplace because’
some owners or leaders are intimidated
by strong performers with great ideas
so be sure you understand your envi-
ronment and use wisdom.

The basic traits of employees with an
owner's mentality:

Responsibility - you take responsibil-
ity whether or not you are assigned for-
mal responsibility. Thisisnot about —
taking blame for others, it is about see-
ing trash on the floor and taking
responsibility for keeping your sur-
roundings clean without being asked.
It is about seeing an opportunity to
assist and helping a fellow employee or
it is about suggesting a new way for the

company to make money.

Reliability - You are reliable when
you have integrity. You do what you

Said you will do when you said you

would do it. If you are a reliable
employee you will communicate effec-
tively especially if expectations are not
being met. You don't avoid the issue.

Resourcefulness - You are resource-
ful when you are able to make things
happen even if you don't have the
finances, staff or tools you need. You
are creative and you can find a way to
make things happen despite the per-
ceived lack of resources. You see pos-
sibilities and avoid focusing on lack.

Holding your coworkers accountable
-You not only hold yourself account-
able to high standards, you help your
co-workers to do the same. You recog-
nise the reality that if your company is
not profitable, you won 't have a job.

SEE page 11

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