Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Volume: 105 No.53°



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BAHAMAS EDITION






TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

WUT eS
TE
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PIS


















acts e sb



Police have allege

extortion to

‘Critical stage’
in investigation

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
“Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net:

FREEPORT ~
Senior Assistant Com-
missioner of Police’
Marvin Dames
revealed yesterday that
Grand Bahama police
have the document that was
allegedly being used to extort
some $25 million from actor
John Travolta.

Although police ae

reached a “critical stage”
their investigation, Mr Danis
“noted that inquiries are still
continuing. — E
US celebrity John Travolta
complained of attempted
extortion more than a week
ago to Grand Bahama police,
which led to the arrest of Sen-
ator Pleasant Bridgewater,

‘hospital employee Tarino |

Lightbourne and PLP MP
Obie Wilchcombe.

Yesterday, Lightbourne
was formally arraigned in New
Providence on charges of
attempted extortion and con-
spiracy to extort money from
Mr Travolta.



Pleasant
Bridgewater

__At a press confer-
ence held Monday at
‘Police Headquarters,
Mr Dames said evi-
dence in police custody
does not involve any
photographs in con-
nection with the
alleged extortion plot.

“There are certainly
some reports out there
speaking to some pho-
tos. That is incorrect,
we are talking specifically
about a document that the
alleged accused purported to
have in his possession and was
using that document to extort
a substantial sum of monies
from the victim,.Mr Travolta.

_. “This matter is still under -
investigation...and so I don’t

intend to get into specifics of
the case,” he said.”

The new police chief for
Grand Bahama has also indi-
cated that no international law
enforcement agency is
involved in the case here in
the Bahamas.

“This complaint was made
to the Royal.Bahamas Police
Force because it was alleged
to have taken place in the
Bahamas. Any criminal mat-

SEE page eight



PLP expects
to replace

Bridgewater

in Senate
next week

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

. Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Progressive Liberal Par-
ty is expecting to have a

replacement for Pleasant’

Bridgewater in the Senate

‘ sometime next week, former

Prime Minister Perry Christie
said yesterday.

“I am the leader of the PLP.
One of our members has been
charged in the court. That mem-

ber has resigned and I have

accepted that resignation. I will
move to replace that member
at the earliest opportunity with

SEE page eight





TARINO LIGHTBOURNE,
47, makes his way to
court yesterday...



@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A MAN chhied in an

! alleged $25 million extor-

tion plot against, Holly-

wood actor John Travol-

ta was formally arraigned

in.a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Tarino Lightbourne,
a 47-year-old medical
worker, was arraigned
before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in court 8,
Bank Lane yesterday,
charged with conspiracy
to commit extortion and
attempted extortion.

It is alleged that
between January 2 and
20, 2009, Lightbourne
conspired with others to
commit the indictable
offence of extortion. It is
further alleged that
Lightbourne attempted
to extort $25 million



SEE page eight

Get savings built. right into your

mortgage with

~ Tim Clarke/Tribune staff











li By ALISON LOWE

murder victim and “Bain
Town fella”
yesterday remembered him as

Scandal pene
— questions over
future of the”
‘PLP leadership

[But Christie says party |
will survive the storm

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net






































AS.A former PLP Senator is scheduled to ‘
appear in court tomorrow accused of attempt-
ing to-extort $25 million from US actor John
Travolta, political observers are asking
‘whether this latest scandal could finally sink
the current PLP leadership.

Political sources yesterday suggested that,
as the future of West End ‘and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchcombe now lies in the balance, the floodgates remain
open to new contenders for the party’s deputy leader post,
and eventually leadership position.

Former Prifne Minister Perr y Christie-said he fully expects |.
detractors of his leadership within the party to spin this latest ]}:
scandal as a blight on him remaining as head of the PLP. —

“T expect them to take aim at me in this regard, but quite
frankly, the fact that I am the leader of the PLP stands the par-
ty in good stead,” Mr Christie said yesterday.

In the past when politicians, including sitting members of par--
liament, were implicated in incidents of “conflicts of interest”,
Mr Christie said his party, due to overwhelming media interest,
had taken the brunt of these fiascoes.

“There is no Punch or newspaper that can dislodge me. The
PLP, as one arm of the democracy of the Bahamas, needs
steady and firm leadership —.and leadership that you can
question politically in terms of whether or not you think I am the
right person politically, but leadership where you don’t question
it on integrity matters,” he said.

Mr ‘Christie said the PLP would survive this latest storm and
he would move very quickly to ensure that a replacement for Ms
Bridgewater’s Senate seat would be named-next week.

Having lost the government in the 2007 general gection,

SEE page eight

Perry Christie



Hed







nore uN of Onado Newbold, 32, is taken away i
32-year-old man is the
year’s fourth homicide



At his former workplace,
Bahamas Sheet Metal on Hos-
pital Lane, where 32-year-old
Onado grew up and numer-
ous members of his family still
live, a friend and co-worker
suggested his death may have
been “over a woman.”

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FRIENDS and relatives of

Onado Newbold

an “easy, quiet” guy who kept

to himself.

your savings!



SEE page a

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Nassau:
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PIDELITY

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





; * :
m@ BY GLADSTONE
THURSTON

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma —
As part of its “Take back our sou-
venir industry” policy, the goy-
ernment has now trained about
1,000 artisans throughout the
islands.

Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
executive chairman Edison Key
travelled to Exuma on the week-
end for the graduation of 30 Exu-
mians who took part in straw and

coconut craft courses. The grad-:

uates were trained by Eldina
Miller in straw work and Howard
Bevans in coconut craft. .

Mr Key was accompanied by
BAIC general manager Benjamin
Rahming, assistant general man-
ager Donnalee Bowe and a sup-
port team. They were met by
island administrator Ivan Fergu-
son, chief councillor Teddy
Clarke and other local govern-
ment officials.

Mary Deveaux, president of
the Yuma Arts Association of
handicrafters and artists, encour-
aged the graduates to be original.

“Tourists are always asking for
Bahamian-made products

because they are'tired of the Chi-
nese products with Bahamian
labels on them,” she said.












The importation of souvenirs
for sale to tourists annoys many
Extma artisans “no end”, Ms
Deveaux said: “That is especially
so when you know the products
were not made in the Bahamas
and you see the-labels that they
was made in the Bahamas. Some-
times IJ feel like taking them off
the shelves.” ‘

There was a time when



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Bahamian straw, sisal, coconut
and shell products were exported
to as far away as Europe, Mr Key
recalled.

Many prominent Bahamians
received university educations
and now live comfortable
lifestyles as a result of income
from straw and souvenir busi-
nesses, he said. “Things had
apparently become so good for
us that it became easier for us to

import souvenirs for the millions:

of tourists who come here.

“As a result, a once lucrative
industry, Bahamian souvenir pro-
duction, has been allowed to
almost die along the way. Well
folks, the tourist say they do not
want that cheap imported stuff
we have been passing off on
them. They say they want authen-
tic Bahamian-made memorabil-
ia.”

It is estimated that hundreds



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of millions of dollars are spent
each year importing souvenirs for
tourists.

“What a big impact it would.

make if some of those millions of

dollars were to start flowing '

directly into your pockets,” Mr
Key told the graduates. “With
quality as the watchword, we
must support our own, give the
tourists what they want, and earn
a decent living so doing.
“Exuma products, not products
from half way round the world,

, Should be prominently displayed

in our straw market in downtown
Nassau.” :
BAIC is returning to Exuma

shortly to continue courses in sisal.

craft and wood turning.

*Mr Key encouraged the arti-
sans to contact BAIC’s Business
Services Division, which offers
free information on how to start a
business.








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‘Check your



children for
signs of sexual

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport

Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Bahamian
parents are being advised to
“closely monitor” their chil-
dren for any changes in their

' behaviour that could be a sign

of possible sexual molestation.
‘There are monsters out
there and we need to start
noticing when children change
for whatever reasons,” said
Hezekiah Dean, School
Superintendent at the Min-
istry of Education in Freeport.
Mr Dean was very disturbed
to learn of allegations of
molestation involving a school
teacher and two former male
students on Grand Bahama.
Although the teacher denies
the allegations, Mr Dean has

made recommendation for the ©

teacher’s removal after inter-
viewing the alleged victims last
week. “

Photographs

The young men, who are 19
years of age, claim that the
sexual abuse started while
they were in grade seven and
lasted for eight years. They
also alleged that the teacher
took nude photographs of
them. .

“In my opinion, this kind of
thing should never happen. It
should never be a case where
a young man, a student in
school, male or female, is
exploited by an adult, espe-
cially an adult with an acute
responsibility like being a
teacher.”

The teacher, who the boys
have accused, has been placed
on probation and is presently
in New Providence awaiting
an official decision in the mat-
ter by the Ministry of Educa-
tion.

“What still bothers me is
how many other predators are
out there in our schools. In
addition to students at Eight
Mile Rock High, we have the
whole Bahamas to think of,”
Mr Dean said.

“T want to say to the per-
sons out there who engage in
such acts, if you want to be
predators leave the children

alone if that is your lifestyle.”

Mr Dean said that teachers
are held in high esteem and
trusted by students and par-
ents.

“It took a lot of courage for
the young men to come for-
ward and say the things they
said and when their character
is at stake, and for-that rea-
son we are not releasing the

- names of the former students

or their parents,” he said.
“T would like to send a mes-

sage to all-our parents that I °

think we need to have a closer
monitoring of all our young
boys and girls.

“We need to_be monitoring
our kids more closely, talk
with them more often, and
take time to look at them real-
ly carefully and monitor their
actions and notice changes of



molestation’

Bahamian
parents
advised to
monitor
youngsters for
changes in

behaviour _

behaviour,” said Mr Dean.

Mr Dean said that the
young men are very distressed
by the alleged abuse.

Sexual abuse, also referred
to as molestation, is the forc-
ing of undesired sexual acts
by one person upon another.

‘When the victim is younger

than the age of consent it is

‘referred to as child sexual

abuse. .
Suicidal
)

Some physical signs of sex-
ual abuse include: habit dis-
orders such as biting, rocking,
eating disorders, frequent acci-
dents or self-injurious behav-

‘jour, suicidal, constipation,

pain or discomfort on urina-
tion, and bacterial infections.

School psychologist Dr
Pamula Mills said parents
need to understand their chil-
dren’s growth and develop-
ment, personalities, and idio-
syncrasies “so that when chil-
dren are acting outside of the
norm they will know it is a red
flag and that something is
probably amiss.”

Dr Mills said that parents
also need to be aware of their
children's whereabouts.

“That is a major concern for
this Grand Bahama area. You
need to know with whom your
children are hanging out with,
peers.as well as adults. .

“And parents don’t need be
as trusting as they are, being
an adult is not tantamount to
being a good person,” she
said.



“What still
bothers me is
how many other
predators are
out there in our
schools. In
addition to
students at Eight -
Mile Rock High,
we have the |
whole Bahamas.

to think of.” =



Hezekiah Dean

en |

SN

rN
on

a



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3





Magistrate
discharges
four accused
of murdering
alleged hit man

FOUR men accused of the
November 2007 shooting
death of alleged hit-man
Samuel “Mouche” McKen-
zie were discharged yester-
day after a magistrate ruled
that there was no evidence at
all to connect them to the
murder.

Stephen Stubbs, Dashino
Wilson, Marlon Smith and
Adrian Edgecombe had
been charged in the Novem-
ber 22, 2007, murder of
Samuel McKenzie and the
attempted murder of Keith
Woodside. ‘

The four men were also
discharged in relation to the
attempted murder of Wood-
side, who was wounded dur-
ing the shooting. .

McKenzie, 35, was out on
bail on a murder charge at
the time he was killed.

According to reports,
McKenzie was shot seven
times in broad daylight on
Wilson Street off Hay Street.

Stubbs, Wilson, Smith and
Edgecombe appeared yester-
day before Magistrate. Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street.

Stubbs was also discharged
in connection with a causing
harm charge yesterday. He
had been accused of causing
harm to Chief Inspector
Bernard Bonamy on Decem-
ber 4, 2007, while he was
being taken to court for his
arraignment in connection °
with McKenzie’s murder.

Man in custody,
another sought
over firearm
discovery

‘ONE man is'‘in custody
and another is being sought
by police-in connection with
‘the discovery of an illegal «
firearm near St Andrew’s .
Presbyterian Church.

Officers of the Central
Police Station were in the
area of the Central Bank of
the Bahamas on Shirley
Street when they saw two
men on a motorcycle some-
time after 7pm on Sunday.

As the officers approached
the two men, the motorcycle
sped off.

Near the-church yard of St
Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk,
located on Shirley Street, the
officers found a .9mm hand-
gun with seven live rounds of
ammunition. ;

Police believe the two men
on the motorcycle disposed
of the gun and the ammuni-
tion.

The officers called for
‘assistance and moments later
police stopped the motorcy-
cle in the area of Mackey -
‘Street. A 20-year-old man —
was taken into custody and is
being questioned in the mat-
ter.

The second man is still
being sought by police

i The Tribune wants to hear
| from people who are

making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning

| for improvements in the
area orhave wonan |
award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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ALLEGED JOHN TRAVOLTA EXTORTION PLOT

Christie declares his support for



Obie Wilchcombe despite rift talk

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE talk of a rift, for-
mer Prime Minister Perry
Christie yesterday declared his
support for his parliamentary
colleague Obie Wilchcombe,
whose name has been drawn
into the mire surrounding an
alleged attempt to extort mil-
lions of dollars from John Tra-
volta.

record to assure the public of
his total innocence while anoth-
er parliamentarian, former Sen-
ator Pleasant Bridgewater, is
expected to appear before’ the
courts tomorrow to be charged
in connection with the matter.
The minister of tourism in Mr
Christie’s former administra-
tion, Mr Wilchcombe has said
that after being informed that
“someone was doing something
untoward”, he phoned the Tra-
voltas’ lawyers, Michael Ossi

and Michael McDermott, and ~

passed on some information.
Mr Wilchcombe was picked
up by the police on Friday last

Mr Wilchcombe has gone on

BH Some pundits predict controversy could lead to PLP ditching MP

HB Opposition Leader phones ex-Tourism Minister to encourage him





week and questioned about his
role in the matter.

He was released that evening
and has not been charged with
any offence. However the pollit-
ical fall-out has been consider-
able, with some pundits saying
the matter could lead to the par-
ty leader ditching the MP.‘

But yesterday, Mr Christie
said that despite the whispers
emanating from the political

“He remains
my friend —
notwithstanding
public perception.”

Perry Christie (left) on

_ Obie Wilchcombe (right) —

rumour-mill, he is not calling
for Mr Wilchcombe’s resigna-
tion. In fact, he said that he is
supportive of Mr Wilchcombe
and has phoned the MP to
encourage him.

“T have taken what he has
said. At all material times he

has acted responsibly in this ©

matter notwithstanding the talk
on the street and whatever else
people may believe.

INTERVIEW WITH BAR ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT WAYNE MUNROE

Pleasant Bridgewater ‘will not

be disbarred - unless convicted’

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

UNLESS she is convicted of
the charges against her, for-
mer PLP Senator and lawyer
Pleasant Bridgewater will not
face the possibility of disbar-
ment, president of the Bar
Association Wayne Munroe
said yesterday.

Even in the case of a con-
viction, Mr Munroe told The
Tribune, the matter would still
be subject to a review by the
Bahamas Bar Association's
ethics committee. —

It would be up to the com-
mittee to determine if the mat-
ter should be forwarded to a
disciplinary tribunal, which
then would decide if Ms
Bridgewater should be
expelled from the legal com-
munity, he said.

"The record of the proceed- —

ing and the conviction, if it
stood, would no doubt be sent
to the ethics committee, who
would have to make a qualita-
tive decision to send it up or
not to the disciplinary tribunal
for hearing," he said.

Mr Munroe emphasised that
lawyers, just like ordinary cit-
izens, are afforded the pre-
sumption of innocence.

"Lawyers aren't treated any
different than any other mem-

' ber of the public. If you're

charged with something the

Wayne Munroe

person who charged you has
to prove their case, (but)
you're not assumed to be
guilty because you're a
lawyer," he said.

American actor John Tra-
volta made a complaint of
attempted extortion over a
week ago to Grand Bahama
police.

Yesterday, Tarino Light-.
bourne, an employee of the '

Rand Memorial Hospital in
Grand Bahama, was formally
arraigned in New Providence

_ on charges of attempted extor-

tion and:conspiracy to extort
money from Mr Travolta.

Ms Bridgewater is expected
to be arraigned in a New Prov-

Brite tein photographs
‘not taken by BIS employee’

Bahamas Information Services has denied that photographs
showing Obie Wilchcombe outside a Police Station in Grand
Bahama were taken by a BJS employee.

This comes after a US entertainment website TMZ.com
reprinted the photographs with deputy director of BIS Sharon

Turner’s name attached.

“BIS wishes to inform the public that these pictures were not
taken by the officer named; neither were they taken by anyone
authorised by Bahamas Information Services.

“The photographer who took them obviously wished to
remain anonymous because when he sent them out electron- .
ically he accompanied them with instructions clearly stating
that no byline should be attached,” a BIS statement said.



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idence court tomorrow on
charges of abetment to extort
and conspiracy to extort.

Mr Munroe explained the
country's laws regarding extor- -
tion as follows: "It (the law)
says whoever extorts any prop-

erty from any person by means .

of threats is liable to impris-
onment, and (for) aggravated
extortion, that whoever for the -
purpose of extortion accuses
or threatens to accuse a person -

whether living or dead of an -
infamous offence shall be .

liable for imprisonment".

The accused persons could
each be facing a maximum of
five years in prison if convict-
ed.

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“He is my colleague and until
such time as there are matters
that I have to address of any

substance that applies to him, -
he remains my colleague; he’

remains my friend — notwith-
standing public perception,” he
said. fae
Yesterday, a political source
said: “They really went after
him in the wrong way .. . They
can’t produce any tape on Obie





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Wilchcombe on no discussion.
He was never a part of any dis-

_ cussions pertaining to extortion.

There could be no discussion of
Wilchcombe on any tape or
anything like that.”

’ In his first interview since
being released from police cus-
tody, Mr Wilchcombe told Us
Magazine that he is innocent of
any allegation that might be
brought against him, and that

he did a “noble thing”.

When asked if he sought or:
expected any compensation
from the Travoltas, Mr Wilch-
combe was adamant that he
never once asked the family for

‘anything. .

“Never once, expecting any-

-thing!

“This is ridiculous and
absurd.
“The Travoltas are suffering,

‘it’s just outright foolish,” he

said.





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PAGE 4,

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI








Being Bound to Swear to the Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. re DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K. CSG;
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Publisher/Editor 1972-

s

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608



ALMOST 40 years.ago Sir Etienne Dupuch,
then publisher of this newspaper, drove up to
thée'entrance of Nassau International Airport to
let a passenger off. However, the arrivals
entrance was blocked by a car, ‘obviously hasti-
ly parked. Other than stopping to let passengers
off, the area was clearly marked: “No parking.”

As Sir Etienne pulled up,.he saw a young
police officer walk.towards the parked car,.
inspect it, look at the blue licence plate, then rub
his chin and hastily walk away.

Sir Etienne drew alongside the young police-
man, pointed out the car to him, remarked ’on
the government licence plate, and urged the
young man to-do his duty. The. young officer
looked confused.

He told Sir Etienne that he would take off his

uniform jacket.and let Sir Etienne book the car .
and driver for him, but-it:was more, he said,

than he a lowly. police. officer would dare do.
The officer quickly walked. away.”
Sir Etienne waited to see if it was a chauffeur

or the owner of the official car who had parked. «

the vehicle: Eventually a high ranking member

of Sir Lynden Pindling’s cabinet came out of the

airport; got into the car, and drove off.

Of course, Sir Etienne commented on the

incident in this column it in He next edition ‘of The
Tribune.-

In those days. (and even. tata. recent times, Bae

members of the inner circle had ‘special privi-

leges. We believe that:much of the disdain of -

today’s youth for the: law is the result of this
unfair distribution of justice.

In the eighties, we had students who would
dabble in drugs. If caught, they'were left with a
criminal record and could not réturn to'school

abroad. One day.a top politician’s son was

picked up.:The miracle: was. that he went to
court at all; but once in court the plea was that

a conviction would affect his studies abroad..

There was no conviction. :

At the height of the drug.era in the eighties
one of our staff —a cleaner in our press room. -

—was arrested and sent to prison for peddling
drugs. He must have had influential contacts,
because he was sprung fairly quickly from the
cells. At the time, we were out of the country.
On our return;.we sent for this young. man'to
disctiss his problem. No matter what anyone
said about him after hours; as an employee he
was loyal and. kept the press room spotlessly
clean. We did not want to lose him.

However, to remain on our staff it had to be

impressed upon him that he had to give up his-

extra curricular:activities: We had along dis-..:~
the police are only after the little man. Today,

fhe police are after all who transgress the law.

cussion: We must have: had’some influence on

‘him, because our staff often laughed that they
hated to see us s leave the island, | Because 3 it ere ss

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only then that this young man got into trouble.

with the law.
Anyway, during our discussion-he asked a
pertinent question. Why, he wanted to know,

must he go to prison, when there were impor-
‘tant people at the top who could get away with

what he was doing, and never be caught? He
then called off an impressive list of names.
Politicians were well represented on his list.
Why me? he wanted to know. Because, we told
him, you are easy prey, the others think they are
above the law, and they are protected. “There is
no one protecting you so you had better be
good, because for you there is no Santa Claus.”
Life was unfair, he concluded. Some had to
answer for their sins, others did not:
However, in the past few days, the tables

- have been turned. For the first time Bahamians

are seeing that we are all equal before the law.
This is not to say that the politicians now being
questioned in the extortion case that has sullied

* . thé Bahamas’s name around the world, are

guilty of any wrong doing. However, what is

‘important is that regardless of their position

they have been called upon to answer to the

accusations against them before the Bar of Jus- -

tice. It is the same Bar before which our press

“room cleaner was held accountable.

“These are exciting times,” one police officer

-commented yesterday. “This is the first time
that we are being able to do our job without ~

political interference.
“We told you to watch out for these new
boys, they: mean business. When we meet with

, them we-have to be accountable for our sta-

tions, no excuses are accepted. These are real-

‘ly exciting times for us. This is a new day!”

The “new boys” to whom this officer referred
‘with:such enthusiasm are Assistant Commis-
sioner Marvin Dames, in charge of Grand

Bahama, and Assistant Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade, deputy to Acting Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson in New. Providence. Mr
Dames headed the investigation against the two
persons now accused in connection with

\ attempted extortion. These two young police

officers have recently returned from special

training with the Royal Canadian Mounted

Police in Canada, and they intend to do their

_ duty.

The force should be praised for doing its
job. The complaints we now hear are coming
mainly from political quarters. This is not sur-
prising because now, with these men in charge,
politicians ‘are also drawn within the orbit. of
the law. There can no longer be the cry that

ee new cay has dawned in the Bahamas...








































The great
dilemma
facing PLP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kenyatta Gibson's crossing
the floor to join the FNM is a
blow to the Opposition PLP
beyond the fact that they have
lost an elected Member of
Parliament to the other par-
ty. That is always hurtful to.a
political party but not neces-
sarily grievous.

The bigger problem for the
PLP is that Mr. Gibson's
defection represents a con-
stant stream of defections
from that party because of

fundamental problems and |

irreconcilable differences at
the heart of the organization.
Not everybody understood

. this — or wanted to believe it
— when the Dissident Eight

left to form the FNM in the
early 1970s.’ By 1984 when
Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie left, the picture was
becoming clearer. Mr. Ingra-

-ham wisely opted to stay out’
while Mr. Christie took a swim. '
back.

The leadership of the.PLP
became corrupt and arrogant
very soon after the great vic-

* tory in-1967. The full stories

of the Bahamas Airways fias-

. co, the Freeport Benguet deal

and other scandals have yet
to be told.

By the 1980s it should have ©

been clear to all those close

. to Bahamian polities that the




Os Mbel

letters@tribunemedia.net



PLP had been infected with a
combination of destructive
viruses including a personality
cult, a pervasive attitude of
entitlement and exclusivity,
and rampant corruption.

The idea that the leader-
ship could do anything, get
away with anything, soon
spread throughout the orga-
nization and the government,
even to the public service
where some. connected civil
servants felt that the label PLP
protected them from any con-
sequences for their corrupt
ways. ,

This pathology was per-

fectly demonstrated during the,
drug years of the 1980s when

free-wheeling corruption was
the order of the day and the
PLP Government appeared to
be the facilitator of the
Colombian drug dealers’
takeover rather than*protec-
tor of the Bahamian patrimo-
ny. sy
There was a hope that after
10: years in opposition, the
PLP might have purged itself
of these malignancies, but it
soon became apparent that
the old viruses of entitlement,
exclusivity and immunity were

still very much alive and ready
to run riot again at the first
opportunity.

And that is exactly what

‘they did when the PLP took

power again in 2002 with the
sordid Anna Nicole Smith
affair being the most spectac-
ular symptom of the infections
but not necessarily the worst.

No one, no. leader can do
anything about it. Mr.
Christie has been roundly crit-
icized and abused for his
apparent inability or unwill-
ingness to do anything about
it.

But the truth is that he or
any other leader who attempts
to administer the necessary
curatives would be set upon
by a vast entrenched group of
hundreds who control the
councils of the party and who
cannot be disciplined nor
removed.

Mr. Christie is still the best
that the PLP has to offer but
he will remain powerless until
years of attrition can rid the
organization of its pervasive
infections — provided they do
not pass the diseases on to the
next generation. That is the
diagnosis — and the great
dilemma of the PLP.

OLD TIMER
Nassau,
January 25, 2009

‘Traffic engineers need to”
be looking at access. roads.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It seems two Police Officers’

have found: the fountain for

‘traffic fines by positioning

themselves along the access
road that runs and connects
Solomon’s Super Centre, First
Caribbean Bank office, Prime
Bahamas and City Meat.

Although signed at the
Abundant. Life Road end by
the traffic light the actual
entrance to this road is
unsigned, the sign has long
ago been removed... .

May I suggest that the
authorities will simply turn the
traffic flow on this road

-. around permitting traffic to

NY

enter from East-West High-

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‘and not permitting a westerly
flow of traffic from the end
closer to the East-West High-
way-Marathon traffic light.
There should not be the right
to turn left onto East-West
Highway the same access road
driving back towards the
Marathon light.

Further all over the island
the traffic engineers need to

be looking at where access on |

certain roads to cross a road

with a heavy traffic flow

should be stopped — take

Shirley Street as a good exam-
le.

Along Shirley Street -you
have access crossings which
permit traffic to cross the two
westerly lanes of traffic to
enter roads.

The road opposite where
Joe & Berlin used to be is an
obvious example — further
west where traffic can cross
not only from the north but
the south causing traffic to
come to a grinding halt.

All traffic on a one way
street like Shirley should only
permit a left turn with the flow
of traffic. *

The same.goes on West Bay

— the congestion in the morn-
ing and afternoon is simply
caused by traffic trying to
‘cross and access West Bay
against the flow of traffic; of
course this unfortunately will

not go away soon with the

decision to retain the contain-

’ er traffic on Arawak Cay

something all. residents
between Arawak Cay and
Goodman’s Bay were hoping
would go, but of course some,
think this is progress.

We need to add a third
access lane where space is
available.for left .lane traffic
— this would greatly assist
traffic flow for west bound
East-West Highway traffic at
Marathon and at the end of
Harrold Road for example. -

Traffic Lights — as we
arrive at the second year with
them can we have a decision
— yes we will have traffic
lights or we will remove them?
It can’t have taken this long
to set-up a maintenance pro-
gramme or are we so ineffi-
cient?

H HUMES
Nassau,
January 11, 2009.

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THE | HIBUNE







In brief

British govt keen on
helping Carihbean
countries fight crime

THE British government
wants to help build the
Caribbean’s capacity to
tackle crime, according to
Fraser Wheeler, newly-
accredited plenipotentiary
representative of the Unit-
ed Kingdom to CARI-
COM.

In remarks after he pre-
sented his letters of cre-
dence to CASLICOM Secre-
tary General Edwin Car-
rington, Mr Wheeler said
the United Kingdom and
the Caribbean have a “joint
shared interest” in con-
fronting crime and that his
government “remains
keen” on helping to build
the region’s capacity in this
regard.

Mr Wheeler, who is also
United Kingdom High
Commissioner to Guyana,
is the first British envoy to
be accredited to CARI-
COM.

He hailed the partner-
ship between the UK and
CARICOM on security
during the Cricket World
Cup in 2007, as a “great
success” — one that needs
to be solidified in the
future.

Mr Wheeler said he
hopes his government and
CARICOM can work
together to achieve this
goal. ’

Commenting on the
“extraordinary relation-
ship” between the UK and
the Caribbean, he said it is
“characterised by evolution
from dependence to inde-
pendence and partnership.”

The relationship had
matured to one of “mutual
interest, respect and sup-
port; underpinned by
shared values, understand-
ing and real affection,” he
added.

These factors, Mr Wheel-
er said, are “powerful
tools” with which both the
UK and CARICOM can
“confront challenges and
take opportunities together
in this increasingly complex
world.”



LOCAL NEWS Aan

IULOVAI, JVAINUAMT 27, CUUd, 1 mL

Man claims he was wrongfully



arrested and beaten by police

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ANOTHER claim of police
brutality has surfaced with a Gar-
den Hills man alleging that police
wrongfully arrested him, suffo-
cated him and beat him with a
baseball bat during interrogation.

After being arrested on Janu-
ary 20 for questioning in con-
nection with a house break-in,
Demario "Slugz" Rolle claims
he was the victim of a series of
threats and beatings while he

remained cuffed and defenseless .

at the East Street South Police
Station.

A report made to the police
Complaints and Corruption Unit
documents his allegations.

The self-employed barber and
musician claimed he was
marched into an interrogation

Self-employed barber and
musician makes allegations



room, handcuffed and then
pushed to the floor. One of the
four officers in the room said Mr
Rolle almost got him fired and
that an officer "had a beating"
for him, according to the report,
which was filed on January 22.
Mr Rolle told The Tribune
yesterday that while one of the
officers questioned him about
stolen money and phone cards,
he maintained his innocence.

"He started tellin' me, 'Big —

man, we ga' make you talk,’" Mr
Rolle said.

Then, one of the officers
pulled a tam, or woven hat, over
Mr Rolle's face and covered that

"That's when they start beatin'
me," he claimed. "Punchin' me,
beatin' me over and repeatedly.
Now I screaming, right, so what
do they do? They turn on the
radio and turn it up so anyone

downstairs couldn't hear."

Mr Rolle claimed he was
somehow able to manoeuvre his

‘hands, which were cuffed behind

his back, into a position where
he could puncture the plastic bag
with his fingers, which helped
him breathe.

He said that throughout the
30-minute beating, the officers
repeated the tam/plastic bag
combination in an effort to get
him to make a confession. One

officer — in the presence of a
senior officer — reportedly
attacked Mr Rolle with a base-
ball bat, hitting him some "20
times" on the left buttock.

He was left with injuries to the
chest, abdomen and buttocks,
and abrasions on both wrists,
according to a doctor's report
included in his complaint.

Mr Rolle, 28, claimed that
after the beating he was hauled
to a restroom and told to clean
himself up.

He was released from custody
without being charged about two
hours later, he said.

Yesterday officer-in-charge of
the Complaints and Corruption
Unit Macktavius Daniels said his
office had received the report.

If the claims are substantiated
the matter will proceed to police
tribunal, he said.

According to Mr Daniels, the

officers will remain on active
duty until the investigation is
complete.

Mr Rolle was arrested by three
officers attached to the East
Street South police station on
January 19 around 7pm outside
of Hillside Lounge and Bar in
Garden Hills.

He said that he was
approached by an officer who
told him he had to come in for
questioning, pulled him out of
the bar, and with the help of two
plainclothes officers, took him
into custody,

Mr Rolle claims the officers
did not read him his rights or tell
him why he was being arrested.

Supt Stephen Dean, officer-in-
charge of the station, confirmed
that the matter was being inves-
tigated by the police complaints
unit and that whatever the results
it would be acted on.

with a plastic bag, he said.

Laid-off worker wants govt to intervene to protect investment

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunémedia.net

AFTER DEDICATING years to refur-
bishing the house he and his wife bought
nine years ago, a father laid-off from Pio-
neer Shipping last year is calling on the
government to intervene to protect his
life’s investment.

Dennis Gibson, 46, is hitting out at Sco-

tiabank for what he alleges are harsh busi- .

ness practices that do not take account of
the poor state of the economy and his his-
tory as a reliable borrower.

“They are threatening to take the house
if I don’t take their deal, But the deal is not
a deal, it’s threatening to take my wife
and I deeper than we were before. It’s
making us more vulnerable,” claimed Mr
Gibson, a former construction worker.

The 46-year-old has a mortgage with
the bank on his property on Cedar Way,
off Carmichael Road, which originally
required him to make 360 payments of
$1080 per month. “We've been paying this
mortgage for the nine years, ” said Mr Gib-
son.

However, for the last three months he
and his wife — who is still maintaining her

job at a local hotel — have not been able to
pay the full amount, instead offering the
bank $800, he claims.

“Things are kinda rough on her trying to
pay these bills by herself,” he said. “I got
laid off when Pioneer closed: Since then
I’ve only picked up a little side job, and
when you do see a job it’s often a job that
pays you too little to pay your bills with.”

Last week his bank asked the couple to
come in for a talk. “They told us they
wanted to help us,” said Mr Gibson.

‘Payments

He claims the bank asked the couple to
accept a two month “grace period” on
their original loan payments in conjunction
with a separate $4,000 loan — amounting to
an additional $150 per month to be repaid
over the next three years — to pay off the

debt they accumulated during the months:

they fell short of their full payments.

Mr Gibson believes that the deal is no
help at all and will in fact speed up he and
his wife’s financial nosedive.

“In these kinda times, what they are
asking you to do, if you do it you can only
last for what — three or four months? You

know that you won’t be able to meet that
amount the way the economy is. Things
aren’t getting any better.”

“Then they gave us an ultimatum saying
if we fall at any given time after that,
they’ll put the house up for sale.

“To me it ain’t right because there are
other ways they can deal with this,” he
said.

Mr Gibson asked why the bank couldn’t
extend the life of the loan; thereby reduc-
ing the monthly payments.

“They may say age is a factor, that that’s
why they say they can’t push it back. But
you are insured - so even if you die they
still win!” he said.

On October 11th 2008 Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced that the gov-
ernment would implement, by as early as
November that year, a “relief programme”
for mortgagors struggling to meet their
monthly payments due to “unemployment;
underemployment or other unforeseen
circumstances.”

“We would like to ensure that these
persons don’t end up losing their homes
because of what we consider to be this
temporary setback — even though we do
not know how long this temporary situa-

‘tion is likely to exist,” the PM said.

However in late November Mr Ingra-
ham, pressed to clarify what form the assis-
tance might take, said the government did
not intend to “go into the public treasury
and take out the people’s money to pay
other people’s mortgages.”

Banks .

He said that the government had been
encouraging banks to work with their
clients, adding that those with good cred-
it histories “who are unable to make those
arrangements will be able to benefit from
a government programme.”

There has been no word on the assis-
tance plan since that time.

Mr Gibson suggested the government
must at a minimum ensure that banks are
not profiting from people’s hardship.

“The bank ain’t worrying about the peo-
ple. Every single loss — which to these peo-
ple is their entire life’s investment — comes
as gain to the bank; they got your money
and they got your property,” claimed the
ex-shipyard worker.

Messages left seeking comment from
Scotiabank yesterday was not returned up

_to,press time.

ete ae Ts
Bahamas prepare
for Spring Festival








CHINESE people living in
the Bahamas and Bahamians
of Chinese descent are gearing
up to celebrate the Spring Fes-
tival next month.

The festival is the most
important annual celebration
for Chinese people; the cultur-
al equivalent, of Christmas in
western countries.

Although the meaning and
methods of celebrating the
Spring Festival have changed
with time, the importance of
the event is “incomparable”,
according to the Chinese
Embassy in Nassau.

The festival, which celebrates
spring, or the "great, harvest",
has an almost 4,000 year histo-
ry.

According to tradition, the
Spring Festival lasts from the
23rd day of 12th lunar month to
the 15th day of first lunar
month, and the climax falls on
the night before the first-day of
the first lunar month.

People participate in activi-
ties all over China to welcome
the spring. In the countryside,
preparations start at the begin-
ning of 12th lunar month. Fam-

ilies clean their houses and .

wash their clothes and bed
sheets. The idea is that fresh
new clothes and sheets ‘reflect
the fresh new year.

In the city, people celebrate
by attending temple fairs, and
gatherings held-in parks.

There are different customs
in different parts of China, but
the whole family coming
together for a dinner on new
year’s eve is a common prac-
tice everywhere.

In southern China, the
reunion dinner usually includes
more than 10 dishes. Particu-
larly common is bean curd and
fish, because the pronunciation
of these two foods together
means "wealthy" in Chinese!

In northern China, most
meals feature dumplings which
are made and eaten by the
whole family.

ied 7.8
EXTERMINATORS

YR
id i 7a dar IY



Families usually stay up late

and set off fireworks on new -

year's eve. The next day,
women don festival dresses and
begin to visit or welcome fami-
ly, friends and loved ones.

Among the other activities
that commemorate the festival
are opera performances and
movie screenings.

As the standard of living in
China improves in some areas,

the Spring Festival has begun to’

evolve. The newest fashion is
travelling to celebrate the occa-
sion in a different part of the
country.

According to the Chinese
Zodiac, 2009 is a Year of the
Ox which lasts from January
26, 2009 to. February 14, 2010.

The Chinese new year begins
on the date that corresponds
with the second new moon after
the winter equinox, so it varies
from year to year.

The years progress in eels
of 12 and each year is repre-









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sented by an animal. The Year
of the Ox is the second of the
cycle, which repeats five times
to form a larger cycle of 60
years, and in each of the 12-
year cycles, the animals are
ascribed an element (wood,
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Yin or, Yang characteristics,
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coming Chinese Spring Festi-
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~ Thursday, Jan. 15, 2009:

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also gearing up for the event.



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





illegal immigrants
are barred from
Florida programme

@ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.

AN APPELLATE court
has barred illegal immi-
grants from a state rehabili-
tation programme for peo-,
ple who have suffered brain

_or spinal cord injuries,
according to Associated
Press.

The 1st District Court of

Appeal on Monday reversed

-an administrative law
judge’s ruling that had been
appealed by the state.

The decision came in the
case of Miguel Mora
Rodriguez, a’ Mexican citi-
zen now living in Hardee
County. He was injured
when the-vehicle he was rid-

ing in was struck by a drunk-

en driver.

His lawyer, JoNel New-
man, says the appellate rul-
ing was narrowly drawn to
cover only the brain and
spinal cord programme. She
says her client received a.
small settlement and is
ambulatory but could bene-
fit from rehabilitation.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award..s «i. shy5) Sa oe ates
If so, call us.on 322-1986...
and share your story.

‘“



In brief



Pastor condemns use of
churches for opening of Assizes

A LEADING pastor has con-
demned the judiciary’s practice of
using Anglican churches for the open-
ing of Assizes as “wrong and wicked.”

Bishop Simeon Hall told the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama that the prac-
tice “must be condemned” because
judges ought not to favour one denom-
ination over another.

His comments-came after the

Freeport judiciary held its opening cer-
emony at the Anglican.Pro Cathedral.

“For some ‘time I have asked sever-
al leading persons who make up our
judiciary why is it that their annual
Assizes openings are held exclusively
at Christ Church Cathedral.

“TI suspect the colonial tradition of a
state church, but 36 years after inde-
pendence this practice must be dis-





continued as it retards the spirit of

ecumenism which many churches’

enjoy.
“Not only was the annual opening of

Assizes held at Christ.Church Cathe-

dral in Nassau again this year, but I

~ could not help but notice that it was

held at the Pro Cathedral here in
Freeport.

Judiciary

“Today I go on record as stating that
the practice of the judiciary holding
its opening Assizes at Anglican church-

-es is wrong, wicked and must be con-

demned.”
Bishop Hall said there ought to be

no practice, no ceremony and no exer-
































cise that lends weight to the opinion
that sitting judges favour one denom-
ination to the exclusion of all others.

“I further call on all those concerned
to consider the negative message this
practice sends to the remainder of the,

. Christian community throughout the
Bahamas.”

He called for a halt to all colonial- .
style discriminatory practices and said
the judiciary must lead in this effort:

“All forms of discrimination, be they
racial, political, and/or religious must
be removed,” he added.

“J remind you that each of us must
work for the day when the Bahamas
will truly be a place where all are
equal, all are free and all have a fair
chance to embrace some of what this
fair land has to offer.”

A FIRST step toward
lowering the cost of food
has been taken by the hus-
band-wife team of Lynden
and Astrid Tinker. They
have started First Step Gro-
cery Club, which allows
members to save 15 to 30
per cent on grocery and
household items as-well as
meats.

president, reveals that over
1,000 people have already
signed up, and inquiries are
pouring into their offices on
Romer Street, Fox Hill.

Response

Noting that these are
tough times for families and
since food is a necessity,
Mrs Tinker says they.are
not too surprised by the
overwhelming response they
have received so far.

Commandant, Police College; Tim Brown, Deputy Chief of Missions, United States Embassy,
Nassau; Captain Stephen Russell, director, NEMA. -

NEMA hosts disaster _
management workshop

Astrid, who serves'‘as:

_, What we. do is ask our.
members to submit 4 list of
items, and once half of them |
request those items, we then.

Anglican



een Ell

rocery Club to reduce cost of food

do bulk buying in Florida
and bring over containers
every 12 weeks.”
Additionally, feeding the
family can be less of a bur-
den, as low weekly or
monthly payment plans are
available to members.
First Step Grocery Club
is an offshoot of First Step

. Development Company,

which was started by the
Tinkers in 2007.

“With the downturn in
the building industry, we
had to look at other busi-
ness opportunities,” Mrs
Tinker says.

“We are very excited
about this new venture and
happy that. we can make a
big difference in bringing
food to struggling families.”

She added they can offer
the low prices because they
do not have any of the nor-
mal foodstore overheads.

_ Her 18-year-old daughter,
Maradona, who-is, vice-pres-
ident of the club, assists
Astrid, a retired banker in

the business: i

+

Kristaan HA Ingraham II/BIS



4 Conditions apgty. * Taderrark of The Bark of Novo Scots, used unc ence



BSO7AS

ll By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information Services

THE National Emergency Management Agency ~
(NEMA) facilitated a workshop for key personnel in
disaster management to certify them as instructors in
the proper presentation of information on disasters
when they arise.

The workshop, held January 19-23 at the Police
College on Thompson Boulevard, was sponsored
by the United States Agency for International
Development (USAID) and the Office of Foreign
Disaster Assistance. USAID/OFDA also sponsors
similar workshops throughout the Caribbean on

disaster managemient.

‘Director of NEMA Commander Stephen Rus-

sell said the geographical and archipelagic makeup
of the Bahamas demands that NEMA is prepared to
respond to any form of disaster or emergency event
that can disrupt the livelihood of citizens or visi-
tors in any of the islands, districts or communities.

Tim Brown, Deputy Chief of Missions at the Unit-

‘ed States Embassy in Nassau, underscored the

importance of such training exercise. He said plan-
ning is key to effectively respond to natural disasters.

Mr Brown praised NEMA and its partner
USAID/OFDA for ensuring that the country is pre-
pared for any event.

Representatives from the Caribbean. Disaster
Emergency Response Agency (CDERA) in Bar-
bados, St Lucia, Dominica, Grenada and Jamaica
also participated in the workshop.

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7



ie

‘ : A sng
Rana wheowihe dn 7 i

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs = DU CATING & TRAIT IC BAHAMIANS



eS .
anh nde: eadtbosned?



2
os
ee ruin ®™



The School of Education's.
Adult Workforce Education & Training —

Summer Certificate & Diploma Programmes for
Corporate Trainers
Training Managers

NOTICE

The School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions at The College of The Bahamas
wants to implement the following Allied Health programmes:



> Medical Laboratory Technology Vocational Education Teachers and

> Physical Therapy College/University Lectuters

> Nutrition and Dietetics Application Deadline January 30, 2009
> Speech Therapy

> Occupational Therapy

NOTICE

The Office of Admissions of The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise the
public that the undergraduate admission application deadline for Fall 2009 is Friday
6th, February 2009, at 4:00pm.

Interested persons may contact Dr. Zorene Curry at the School of Nursing and Allied
Health Professions at 242-325-5551.



Also, anyone interested in enrolling in the BSc. Pharmacy Programme —
for September 2009 should apply no later than February 6, 2009.




























































REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR THE DESIGN OF THE
SMALL ISLAND SUSTAINABILITY FACILITY
The College of the Bahamas is seeking the services of an Architect/Architectural Firm (with requisite
sub-consultants) to provide all design services including development of the Brief, Plans, Specifications,
and Construction Drawings and Contract Administration for the construction of the TRG Campbell: COURSE OFFERING: Beginning February 2, 2009
Small Island Sustainability Facility on land situated on Gladstone Road on the island of New: ee
Providence. The Facility is to become the home of the new undergraduate programmes in sustainability CONVERSATIONAL CREOLEL& Il PRICE: $ 250.00 per course
to be offered by the College. : igeheece baa ne Gees a peer ee ae "
ee q is pga We Ne ts age Behe ie eran ' CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I & I | :
e selection process will consist of two, phases. The Pre-qualification Stage (Stage One) is open | mr 7 Spt eee
to all Architects/Architectural Firms licenced to practice in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The: BONNE Gens Sea : 7 eau ue 8s i Ge
Selection Committee will review all expressions of interest to determine the firms’ stability, relevant | ~ 01S YEA TEATT ne aan ACTOSS LLORES M
-experience, familiarity with the College of the Bahamas and its goals, the commitment to and |} ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I
experience with sustainable design and the firms’ approach to project organization. :| CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I DURATION: 10 Weeks
Upon completion of review of the expressions of interést, the Selection Committee will select finalists: i. HS ate
who will receive written notification for their required appointment for an in-person interview. The + TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs
intent of the formal interview process is to provide the Committee with in-depth information from ot -t77-++--r tr tr rrr r rr ttt terre MRRP ge ee pe pa ee eer te or een Ge ee
the selected firms in order to make a final selection for the award of a contract. The Stage Two process} Ye We He HA HII AOA I II HOA II III IIE IIIA III IIIA IAI ASA I AAACA CA CA A IK
involves a two enyelope submission, the first containing the firms’ technical information and the * : * ne ea Riveh a eat oa *
second the fee proposal. After review of the technical submission and upon completion of the interview: ze PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES — SPRING 2009 x
process, the Selection Committee will rank the firms and the highest ranked firm willbe invited to | » ok
enter into contract negotiations based on their submitted fee proposal. ' z Please submit your completed x
The requests for proposal will be available for collection during normal business hours commencing ‘ok ee 2 re oo *
Tuesday 20th, January from: ne *Graduation Evaluation Forms x
Sa ad aha General, Oe to the RECORDS DEPARTMENT on or before January 30", 2009.* 5
1k *
The College of the Bahamas WN lag nr eae arta *
Poincianna & Thompson Blvds, * Graduation forms.should include: \ x
New Providence : 1 .
| Telephone: 302-4317, 302-4335 | ¥ Y ALL SIGNATURES, (i.e. student, advisor & chairperson) x
The expressions of interest are to be returned in the applicable format to the same office by 2:00 pm : x Boas A : ‘ , eS
on Friday 6th, February, 2009. Late submissions will not be accepted. i = ¥ PROOF OF PAYMENT FROM THE BUSINESS x
Mee DS ete ee ton ep eae Pe pe ee te OFFICE. (.e. stamp, receipt) *
CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE, INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT | lk 7 j *
saat PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES ~ SPRING SEMESTER ai : aS SIGNED ADVISEMENT FORM (Course Outline) x
tie. SEC. EBbE BEGINS ENDS DURATION _| DAYS. TIME. FEES RM ine ‘ - : al
bis reais awe mei eps sae ie COOK vi isda teweckectetesicdwaeucocekc G00 edie teagtoue syne cd uma awd eck ae : : Bae os .
i Eahetlas Cote Ba“ Pebs e" Mac 26 a al ee ee ek *Ale others are considered. LATE and will be forwarded to the . ae
Asian Cooking 1 200. Feb.18__Mar.25 | 6weeks' __| Wednesday 8:00pm Jf 988:00%: ue forge e .hext graduation. period (Summer 2009), Graduation forms may bi
me COOK Co a 002 as alee obtained-from the-Records Enquiry Office. a *:
Gourmet Cooking | 1 oex Feb. 16 __Mar. 23 6 weeks | Monday oooh $380.00 MK 12 ok *
Gourinet Cooking _1. 824 Feb. 18_Mar.25 [sweets | Wednesday | 0pm _| 5485.00 mk | 12) RAR I II II II RA A I IIIA III SII IIISSSISIIISISS SII I A
Cooking. 520. 6 weeks 9:00pm _| $205.00 MK CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Cookin: 1 820 Feb.17 Mar. 24

COOK
827







Healthy &
Nutritious Cookin















Personal Development - Spring Semester 012009

Feb.16 Mar. 23 6 weeks $465.00 LK







1























































































































i
'
'
'
1
1
’
'
’
1
z : : : ; : eae aR EI a et he a te pulse
Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 - ' COURSE TIME +
Making | 41 813 Feb. 17 Apr.7 8 weeks Tuesday 9:00pm $300.00 PK | 12 . DESGRIPTION
Cake & Pastry COOK : 6:00 - t a ee:
i Making li 1 814 Feb. 19 Apr. 9 8 weeks : $325.00 PK :
[eae oe '
j COOK ’ 00 - 7
Bread Making 1 810 Feb. 19 April. 9 8 weeks Thursday : not $290.00 LK :
COOK 6:00- ‘
Cake Decorating! 1 817 Feb.16 Apr. 6 8 weeks Monda 9:00pm $325.00 PK A2e fn Oe
COOK 6:00 - '
Cake Decorating 1 1 818 Feb 18 Apr. 8 8 weeks Wednesday | 9:00pm $375.00 PK 12 t
e tt S = ; .
COOK 7 6:00 - :
Holiday Baking 1 830 Feb.17 Apr. 7 8 weeks | Tuesday 9:00pm $390.00 LK 12 ;
* ‘
‘
All fees are included in the price quoted above; new students pay a one-time application fee of $40.00. (NON REFUNDABLE) — :
et 1
. '
Application Deadline: February 6, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. : §:30anncd-SOpm
For further information or to pick up an application please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & Hospitality Management Institute, 323-3804, 323-6804 or ; Ailfed
fax 325-8175. : 6:00pm-9:00pm
the College of the Bahamas reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content. Course Schedule and Course Materials. ' TIME & STRESS MANAGEMENT W/S = am-4:30pm
: a
1
OA rene Nie ee ae ae ee ee A EOS AS SS 2 SSS OSS OS RSS ae VOR See oe Vest See Ose sens CERES eS PSs Se SS ese =
'
: ;
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 1 Mon | 2-Feb
I CAREER INSTITUTE SCHEDULE ' COMPUTER APPLICATIONS (~ wed i ——a-Feb
7 t t
‘ COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 11600 pii= qm | Prt BF 50
.







. SEMESTER: SPRING 2009 4

ALL COURSES MARKED WITH AN ASTERISK (*) INDICATES THE COURSE MUST BE TAKEN AT THE SCHEDULED TIME IN ORDER TO COMPLETE
THE PROGRAMME. THE COST OF BOOKS/RESOURCE MATERIALS ARE INCLUDEDIN THE FEES

Sh ceo leaeetiiennslaabemtn:
Tues i

bt
T - a7i Siar days
omnes sO aed SOpm SThurvet Perna
eb =
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THERAPY PROG. bakes an
Prerequisites: BUC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
& BJC General Science









SCUPLTURE NAILS










9:30am | 12:30pm TRS sd Beb TS |

























MASGo00 Massage Therapy Essentials J* |_M MAKE-UP APPLICATION 600pm-0:00pm |Mon SSkeb) Gwks| Sdo5
MLAB9U0 Massage Therapy Essentials 1” t 9:30am | 12:30pm 6-Feb $200
APHY9O0 JT_| Anatomy & Physiology* : F 6:00pm | 9:00pm. a | 13-Feb $400
MEDI9N0 Medical Terminology* fee Meet Cc W_ | 6:00pm | 9:00pm | 25 | LOwks | 25-Feb | $225
PUTER SYSTEMS TECHNICIAN PROG. Pop orn] BANGIOT Po BALLROOM DANCING TTT SEG pme8:00pm









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BALLROOM DANCING YS 00pm-8:00pm [Wed oa P"Bwks| $275
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‘Prerequisites BJC Math and English OR ic RS SE acs eather al
0 iploma ' : teu zat. LE
PC Support I 6:00pm. | [
CONTINUED 9:00am | 10:30am | 25 ‘ks | 2-Feb{ ee ‘ Bae dela ta ol roast a RN pte a
Keyboarding _ 11:00am A 20, | 5 | :
Web Page Design | oe 9:30am | 20__ INTERTOR DECORATING T “T6:0Gpm-S:00pm Tues | 24-Febl Swks| $225
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MEDICAL SECRETARY’ "SPROG,
Prerequisites: ‘BIC Math, English &
General Science OR High School Diploma
& BJC General Science -
Medical Terminology*

i Hy900 | LCT_| Anatomy & Physiology*





FLORAL DESIGN 1 6:00pm-9:00pm |Mon 16-Feb| Swks| $225
OT TECGRAL DESIGN TH OO pM-SddpmV|Ftes” aaa eke $275






6:00pm Sopa | ld is | -Feb|
6:00pm | 9:00pm | 25
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MEDICAL BILLING AND CODING PROG.





Prerequisites; BIC Math, English &
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i MED TIO
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MANAGEMENT
MGMT900 01 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT |

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“7:30pm | 25

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LANDSCAPING INSTALLATION &










Prerequisites: BJC Math, English &

“ {OT |BASIC GF FREEHAND CUTTING Tl" 16:00}
General Science OR High School Diploma ween enecene nents eee

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Contact the Go-ordinator at Tel: (242) 3:
or.e-mail perdev@cob.edu,bs
All fees are inctuded with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).











714 / (242) 328-0093 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5201











Suitiv does nat include the one time $40 application fee
ENQUIRIES: Contact the Coordinator d Tel Oe 325-5714 / 328-0093 / 328-1926 or email perdensdicob.edu.bs

CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Caurse Schedule and Course Materials.
Revise d Jan 16 2009



| UESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

FAME B,

eyey- Vi se

THE TRIBUNE.



Scandal prompts
fjuestions over
future of the

PLP leadership

FROM page one

Mr Christie has been under



ex

Police have alleged

rtion document

constant political threat ever
since. Many in his party have
begun to campaign through-
out the country for the post he
has yet to vacate.

The PLP is expected to hold
a convention in November
when the deputy leadership is
expected to be contested, as
Mrs Cynthia Pratt has
announced she will not. be
seeking re-election.

Medical
worker
in court

FROM page one

from John Travolta, by
means of threats.

Lightbourne who plead-
ed not guilty to the charges
elected for a summary trial
in the Magistrate’s Court.
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner object-
ed to Lightbourne being
granted bail.

Lightbourne was remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison:
and is expected back in court
on Wednesday. Former Pro-
gressive Liberal Party Sena- .
tor Pleasant Bridgewater is |
also expected to be arraigned
on Wednesday in connection
with the alleged extortion
plot. Ms Bridgewater, who
lost her House of Assembly
seat at the 2007 general elec-
tion, has resigned from the
Senate and vowed to fight
the charges. She has been
granted $40,000 bail pend-
ing Wednesday’s court hear-
ing.

Reports of the alleged
extortion attempt emerged’
days after Jett Travolta, the
16-year-old son of actors
John Travolta, 54, and Kelly
Preston, 46, died of a seizure
at the family’s vacation home
in Freeport, Grand Bahama
on January 2. Jett was the

FROM page one

ter that has allegedly taken place in
the Bahamas is the responsibility of
the RBPF.

“We have the capability and con-

fidence to deal with matters such as
this or any other matter, and so in
this particular matter we had no
external help or assistance —
we needed none,” Mr Dames
said. .

Senator Bridgewater is expected

to be formally charged on Wednes-
day in New Providence. The accused
persons, if found guilty, could be
facing a maximum of five years in
prison, according to legal sources.

Mr Dames said Mr Wilchcombe
remains released pending further
inquiries.

When asked why Senator Bridge-
water was being arraigned in the
capital instead of Grand Bahama,
Mr Dames pointed out that there is
no special reason why she is pehieds

uled to be arraigned in
New Providence.

“Jt is not unusual as
you have had any num-
ber of matters (in the
past) where persons were
arraigned in New Provi-
dence.

“We gave Senator
Bridgewater bail after
she was charged for the
offence and you would
appreciate the fact as
well that she was the first
person in police custody.

“The investigation did



tracted period of time
before she was arraigned

o...the prudent thing to
do is extend bail.

“You will appreciate
the fact that this is an
ongoing investigation and
so there are things that
we needed to do and we
continue to do to move
this investigation for-
ward, so the arraignment
is not critical,” he said.

Mr Dames assured the

special treatment or con-

not stop when she was SENIOR ASSISTANT Commis- sideration given to any

charged and so the inves-
tigation continued.

tant for us to have her

arraigned right there and then, and
we were into the weekend as well,
and we certainly did not want to
keep her in custody for any pro-

sioner of Police Marvin Dames Of the principals involved
said Obie Wilchcombe (above) in the matter.

“Given that fact, we remains released pending fur-
thought it was not impor- ther inquiries.

“The focus of the
police throughout these
inquiries has always been
to inquire into these allegations, and
place persons before the court wher-
ever the evidence led to support the
charges,” he said.

public that there was no.

A ZNS reporter then questioned
Mr Dames about the release of
information to the media, saying

_that it appeared the international

media was being given information
more readily than the local press in
Grand Bahama.

“J don’t know if that is correct
because we continue to update
members of the local press. I have
entertained all calls and met with
any number of press persons from
Grand Bahama and Nassau.

“The police released a prepared
statement on Friday to the press.
That.statement you ought to have
been guided by. Any other com-
ments coming from any other sector
of the press we have no control over,
that.

“We are not dealing with specu-
lation and there is a lot of specula-
tion out there. We can’t control any-
thing else because we have to give

‘you the facts, and the facts are all we

are dealing with,” he said.

—32- ‘year-old | man is the

year’s fourth homicide

FROM page one

“That disappoint me, man. .
That’s my bredren!” said the.
friend, who did not wish to be’

named.
Like the victim’s father, the

pS friend said he had heard about

Onado’s killing in Nassau Vil-
lage — which occurred at
around 9pm Sunday — early

ek yesterday morning.

“All of us here today and
tomorrow. we gone,” he

reflected, “Today I’m aliye but,,

only son of JohnTravolta

and his wife Kelly Preston. tomorrow I could wake up

dead. Right now life is what

. , os
Pinder’s Funeral Home
‘Service Beyoud Measure”
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 * CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

FUNERAL SERVICE

j Inez Louise
Edgecombe,
85

Funeral services for the late Inez Louise Edgecombe age 85 years of
Tuckaway Road, will be held at Calvary Bible Church, Collins Ave. on
Wednesday, January 28th, 2009 at 11:00am. Burial will be in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road. Pastor Allen Lee and other ministers will officiate.

She is survived by her children, Kingsley Sr. and (Deloris) of McKanns
Long Island, Lincoln of Fort Pierce FL., Luther and (Rosetta), Paul
“Wendell” of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Stephen and (Dotlene) of Miami
FL., J. Nathaniel and (Deanthia), Dawn, Linda, Kirkwood and (Gail),
Oral of Ashburn, Virginia, Arlington “Al” and (Dellareese), Obadiah
Edgecombe Jr. and Hilda Miller; her adopted children, Stephanie
and Tillman Bethel, Ann and David Russell Sr; grandchildren and
great grandchildren, Kingsley, Jr. “Bing” and (Cheryl), Kingsley Ill,
Gabrielle, Patricia, Val Edgecombe-Smith and (Kevin), SaSa, Philip,
Tara, Janae, Isaiah, Cassandra: Smith and (Dave), Jodell Roberts
and (Kevin), Vashti, Danielle, Kevin Jr., Stevan, Victoria, Sharon Joy,
Shandera, Stephen Jr., Paul Edgecombe of Ottawa, Canada, Joseph
“Joey”, Anna Maria, Reuben, Leon Edgecombe of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Mia, Francesco Dames, Arlysia of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Travis, Ethan, Francina Brennen and Cora Miller of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Joann Chisholm, Betty Isaccs, Leslie Roosevelt and Ted
Miller, Roy Edgecombe and Hilda Galanos, Franklyn, Kim, Lavern:
and Rhonda Edgecombe; siblings, Sir Albert Miller and (Lady Laurie
Miller), of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Willard Miller Sr., and (Joey) Miller
of Nassau and Scofield and (Rosie) Miller of Long Island; sisters-in-law,
Jewel Miller of Haines City, Fl. and Dorothy Miller of Nassau; nieces and
nephews, Deborah Archer (Donald), Marc Anthony “Tony” of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Russell (Linda) Miller, Patricia Coakley, Reuben, Lenox,
Peter and Mary Miller, Ellis, Anthony and Paula Miller, Willard Jr. and
Ann Marie Miller, Raquel.Minnis, Basil Jr., Valentino, Elga and Deta
Miller, Horace Miller Jr., Gloria Ward, Cynthia Saunders, Nellie Cooper,
Edna Pennerman, Pamela Miller-Ferguson, Karen Mackey-Pinder and
Nita Thompson; Cousins: Rosie Thrower, Thelma Pyfrom, Gladys
and Carl Brice, Alfreda Fernander,. Nettie, Cynthi, Uleyse, Joyce and
Sheva Adderley; other family, neighbors and friends including,
The Brice, Simmons, Maycock, Sweeting, Knowles, Nottage, Bowleg,
Hanna and Russell families of Tuck away, The Miller, Edgecombe, Gray,
Brice, Knowles, Adderley, Bowe, Glinton, Marshall and Fox families of
Long Island; special friends, Farist Stubbs, Scot and Myrtie Lowe,
Rannie and Thelma Pinder, Rex and Iva Pinder, Juanita Roberts, Sally
Colebrooke, Val Wraing, Betty Allen, ‘Shirley Foster, Val Hudson, Faith
Roxbury, Carolyn Hanna, David Farrington, Martha Albury, Pastor and
Sister Cole and.the entire Calvary Bible Church family; her caregivers,
Ms. Verona Thomas, Ms. Dorothy Taylor, Miriam Symonette, Mary Rolle
and Audrey Taylor; her physicians, Dr.’s Agreta Eneas-Carey, Duane
Sands and Ada Thompson, many other relatives.and friends.

Friends mal pay their last respect at Pinders Funeral Home Palmdale
Ave., Palmdale on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 from 5:00pm until.
7:00pm.



you make it.”
Yesterday police said that

they are investigating and .

have yet to determine a
motive for the killing.
No-one has yet been
detained in connection with
the matter, which was record-

ed as the country’s fourth’

homicide.

According to a cousin, who
gave his name as Lorenzo,
Onado had recently moved to
Nassau. Village to live with a
brother.

However, his father Gerard _

Newbold of Hospital Lane
and Dunmore Street said he

. still spent much of his time in

the neighbourhood where he
grew up — in a pink house
opposite his own where anoth-
er brother resided.

' When The Tribune spoke
with the victim’s father yes-
terday afternoon he had only
recently found out about his
death, but had not heard the
details of how his son had
died. .

According to police, Ona-
do died at the scene after
being shot multiple times in
the chest — between nine and
12 times, according to some
witnesses on the scene.

«

‘ Gerard Newbold said. that
despite the fact that he and
his son were not all that close,
he was still “really shocked” to
hear of his death.

“T don’t know why (some-
one would kill’ him), because
he was an easy fella. He was a
quiet person. I can’t say why
someone would do that, I real-
ly can’t,” said Mr Newbold,
sitting outside his home.

Lorenzo, Onado’s cousin,
said that he can only imagine

that his relative was ,“in the

wrong place at the wrong
time.”

“Only sometimes if he had a
drink or something you’d hear
his voice, but ‘Nado didn’t
really get involved with peo-
ple,” he said.

Former boss and distant rel-

ative, Bruce Newbold, agreed,
describing Onado, who
worked at his business for
about two years, as a
“very nice, cordial and quiet”
man.

“T didn’t.expect it, but you
have to expect the unexpect-
ed,” he said.

Police attended the scene in
Nassau Village after residents

reported hearing gunshots in ©

the area.

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resigned her Senate seat on Saturday, January 24.

PLP expects
to replace
Bridgewater in

Senate next week

FROM page one




























someone who is able to make a contribution to this country.

“In the meantime another colleague has had a cloud over him
with respect to this matter, but as I speak my understanding of
the matter is that it is only that - he has not been charged,” he
said.

On January 22, Ms Bridgewater was taken into custody by
police in Grand Bahama and questioned in connection with a
complaint filed by US celebrity John Travolta. Ms Bridgewater
was held overnight and on January 23, at about 10.30am, she was
questioned a second time in the presence of her lawyer. As a
result of these proceedings, Ms Bridgewater was charged by
police with abetment to extort and conspiracy to extort $25
million from the Travoltas.

Ms Bridgewater was subsequently released on $40,000 bail and

According to information reaching The Tribune, special: voice
analysts from the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) are
currently in the Bahamas, assisting Bahamian police with their
investigations into the matter.

Reportedly, the crux of the police’s case relies on “sensi-
tive” telephone conversations recorded between Ms Bridge-
water and the Travoltas’ lawyers, where the parties are alleged
to have “haggled” over the amount of money that would be
exchanged for some “documents”, which it was claimed Ms
Bridgewater had obtained.

Despite her resignation, Ms Bridgewater maintains her inno-
cence.

In a statement released over the weekend, Ms Bridgewater
said that she was merely acting in her capacity as an attorney,
and “within the bounds of my ethical responsibility to my pro-
fession”.

“How these innocent actions can be so misconstrued, so per-
versely twisted to mean something other than it was, is a mys-
tery. I assure the Bahamian people of my complete and total
innocence and I am satisfied that when the full story. comes
out that I shall be fully vindicated. I will then take all appropriate
and lawful actions for redress and to protect my good name,” she
said.







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Open: Mon. - Sats 10 ant - opm

RSTO TMS SMBS) oT RSLS OST) MRT TN



TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 9

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Murray loses to Verdascoa

m@ By JOHN PYE
AP Sports Writer

Bahamas Football
Association Senior
League Standings

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) —
Andy Murray may have to wait awhile
before he's picked again to win a Grand
Slam tournament.

Touted by British bookmakers as a
favourite at the Australian Open, Mur-
ray lost to No. 14 Fernando Verdasco of
Spain in five sets Monday in the fourth



Team Po3W:) BD) LGR =GA* Pts round. He twice blew a one-set lead
Bears FC 8 6 1 1 2 7 19 and missed chances to break serve in
CaledoniaFC 8 5 1 2 23 11 += 16 the pivotal sixth game of the deciding
Cavalier FC PD 2h et ets. 49 0) set. He then dropped serve in the sub-
Sharks FC pe iene oO OR: Lae se ee gaine and was beaten 2-6, 6-1,
Bahan Pe Ca Ogee eee ca All of which was a big letdown for
DynamosFC 9 1 3 5 16 29 6 Murray, who defeated No. 1 Rafael
FC Nassau’ POLO 6ST 24 23 Nadal and No. 2 Roger Federer in‘an
exhibition in Abu Dhabi this month
Upcoming Matches leading to the season's first major.

Sunday , February 1, 2009
lpm FC Nassau vs. Sharks FC

3pm Caledonia FC vs. Baha Juniors FC

Recent Results

Sunday, January 25, 2009
1pm Sharks FC-0 Caledonia FC-1
Goalscorers: Marcus Trail (Caledonia FC) 87th minute

3pm Bears FC-6 Dynamos FC-0
_Goalscorers: Quade Smith (Bears) 4th, Andre Carey
(Bears) 15th, 36th, 40th; Julian Franklyn (Bears) 46th,
Lesley St. Fleur.74th

BSF Men and Women National





RESULTS, from 11

Lowe, Matthew, BSC, 1:06.27;
Morley, Laron, SBSC, 1:14.36;
Azmbrister, Jamarco, SBSC,

1:30.18.

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter But-
terfly - Moss, Armando, SBSC,
1:06.22; Moss, Denez
SBSC, 1:10.85; Thompson,
Joshua, DSC, 1:12.85.
Girls 8 & Under 50 Meter But-
terfly - Campbell, Celia, UN-SB,
47.85; Higgs, Lilly, SWIFT-BA,

° 57.88; Reed, Charlotte, SWIFT-

BA, 59.43.

Girls 9-10 50 Meter Butterfly -
Allen, Tremaine, SBSC, 38.65;

Weech, Andreas, SBSC, 38.84;
Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,

39.85,

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter But-
terfly - Bastian, Izaak, BSC,
55.71; Gibson, Samuel, BSC,
1:00.12; Bevans, Paul; BSC,

1:08.40...

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Butterfly - .
Bowe, Clement, BSC, 37.93; Hep-
burn, Malik, UN-SB, 41.08;
Greene, Gershwin, BSC, 41.53.
Girls 11-12 200 Meter Back-
stroke - Adderley, Khes, BSC,

3:23.17.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



Sweeting

2

3:16.56.

Boys 13-14 200 Meter Back-
stroke - McCarroll, Toby, DSC,

~ Girls 9-10'100 Meter Backstroke
- Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-BA,
1:38.44; Hutcheson, Danielle,
DSC, 2:11.63.

Girls 11-12 100 Meter Back-

stroke - Morley, Laura, SWIFT-
BA, 1:24.34; Hanlan, Sheean,
. SBSC, 1:27.27; Davis, Janae,

' - SBSC, 1:30.30.

1:40.03.

_ Girls 13-14 100 Meter Back-
stroke - Johnson, Deja, SBSC,

1:27.39; Watson, Brittney, SBSC
- 1:33.29; Cox, Xenia, SBSC,

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter
_ Backstroke - Chaplin, Jenna,
‘ SWIFT-BA, 1:16.61; Thompson,

"T don't know if I'll be the favourite

for a Slam in the next year or so after.

today," he said.

Murray went out in the first round
last year, the initial victim of Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga's surprising charge. to the
Australian Open final. The 21-year-old
Scot's biggest aim is to end Britain's
run of 73 years without a winner of a
men's major.

"T'll try and learn from it ... come
back a better player," said Murray, who
finished last season with five titles and
made a run to the U.S. Open final. "I'm
thinking that last year I had a tough
loss..This year obviously is a tough loss,
as well. came back stronger last year."
‘ Nadal had a far easier time, downing
2007 runner-up Fernando Gonzalez of

Chile 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. He has yet to drop a.



ANDY MURRAY reacts after losing a point as he plays Spain's Fernando Verdasco during their
Men's singles match at the Australian Open Tennls Championship in Melbourne, Australia,

set ahead of his quarterfinal against Monday... ‘
a Rer-hael (Work-Out Squad) sixth-séeded Gilles Simon. (AP Photo: Andrew Brownbill)
"Iam playing well, but you never
know if it's going to be enough," said
Marvin Wood ~ Bllino Sineus Vonetta Nairn Nadal, who had 33 winners and just’11__ble after." No. 3- ranked Novak Djokovic, who
Ricardo Rolle Grant Rutherford Latoya Brown unforced errors. Williams, who has won in Australia beat Tsonga in last year's final.
Philip Culmer Julian Pratt. Lesheena Pinder Verdasco will meet fifth-seeded every alternate year since 2003, next Federer will continue his quest: to
Julian Collie Daral Ranger ‘Tara Evans © Tsonga, a Frenchman who defeated No. _ plays Svetlana Kuznetsova, the 2004 equal Pete Sampras record 14 Grand
Anthon Gibson Pedro Marcellas. . Brendalee McPhee 9 James Blake 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (3) inanight U.S. Open champion. Kuznetsova Slam singles titles in a quarterfinal
Godfrey Burnside Jr Mickey Dorsett Jr. Lotoya Johnson match interrupted by a fireworks display... advanced when Zheng Jie retired at 4-1 against No. 8 Juan Martin del Petro, a
Geron Sands. - Michael Thompson Tavonna Romer around the stadium to celebrate Aus- after injuring her left wristin atumble in 20-year-old Argentine. .
Charles Carroll, Raynaldo Russell Bianca Ferguson tralia Day. .. the third game, ending her hopes of.a | In the buildup. to the
Alcott Forbes Byron Ferguson’ Lotoya Thomas. Of the top eight Seeded players, Mur- victory on the Chinese New Year. Australian Open, much of the focus was
Garfield Bethel Derek Christie Christine Hanna ray will be the only one missing from. Williams, who has won nine majors, . on Murray and his three wins over Fed-
Richard Bain Jr Wek Garnette, Curry the quarterfinals at Melbourne Park. . and Kuznetsova are the only Grand erer since the U.S. Open final and two
Raman Johnson Coaches Keisha Pratt .. Never in the Open era have all eight. Slam title winners remaining in the ~- tournament wins in 2009.
eee nee ee A cscid See eee top seeds filled every spot ina Grand women's draw. _ The focus on Verdasco was on his
Teran Wood Darell Weir’ Trekia Bowl Slam quarterfinal lineup. Olympic champion Elena Dementie- love match with 2008 finalist Ana
SSae Atte Sear Pee anaes He wasn't the only casualty Monday va extended her season winning streak —_ Ivanovic. He's been reluctant to discuss
Martin Burrows Jr Perry Seymour Nicole Sands y y y : 8 : : Beas ;
‘Christopher ‘Tyues Nigel Rootes Vanessa Mayne — Melbourne Park nearly hadtoestab- to 14 matches with a 6-2, 6-2 win over _ that, saying he s in Australia to con-
Alec Rolle EN aaon Butlen Susan Clarke lish its own emergency room. Slovakia's Dominika Cibulkova on centrate on tennis. ' ;
Van Johson Michael Dorsett -: Ann Bullard Three matches finished early because Monday to reach the quarterfinals in Even before he arrived in Australia,
Lynden Richardson Alonzo Pratt Donna Bodie of illness or injuries. The opener at Rod - Melbourne for the first time in 11 trips... he worked on his game during the sea-
Greg Gardiner Leroy Thompson Dorothy Jones Laver Arena finished with Simon hold- The fourth-seeded Russian next faces. son break, when he could have been cel-,
Ken Wood Sr) . Lucille Bethel ing a 2-1 set advantage when friend and. Carla Suarez Navarro, who ousted sev- ebrating his final-clinching performance
Stephen Brown BSF Ladies NanGntl” ate Bethel fellow Frenchman Gael Monfils decid-~ en-time Grand Slam winner Venus in Spain*s Davis Cap triumph in:
LeFranc Franks Team (Work-Out Lashanda Bethel’ edhe couldn't continue with an injured - Williams in the sécond round.-Suarez Argentina: yar
Thomas Davis Squad) - Doresha Barr right wrist. Navarro beat No. 21 Anabel Medina "J. think that Davis ‘Cup final ite
Eugene Pratt Lathera Brown Renee Curry Davis In the following match on center. Garrigues 6-3, 6-2 in an all-Spanish | me much stronger mentally," Verdasco
Devaughn Wong;, Cryshan Percentie Zella Symonette court, Serena Williams lost the first set. match. said. "And this preseason, I was work-
Christopher Russell Alexis Moss . Theola Williams 6-3 to 13th-seeded Victoria Azarenka of In women's Guaneitinal: starting ing really hard. So today, I was really
Angelo Dillett Desiree Coakley - Rosemary Green Belarus. Williams, annoyed with her Tuesday, 2007 Wimbledon finalist Mar- believing in myself, that I can win the
Cardinal Gilbert Jeannie Wallace Dawn Forbes erratic first serve, screamed at herself, ion Bartoli will be trying to follow her. match."
Larry Russell Jr Thela Johnson Debbie McClure and drew a warning for an obscenity. | fourth-round upset of No. l-ranked He spent’ time working i in America
‘Romeko Knowles Alex Taylor Dornette Edwards The 19-year-old Azarenka woke up Jelena Jankovic with another win over _ with Gil Reyes in December. He even
aman pee ye Sa sick and was dizzy and in tears when No. 7 Vera Zvonareva of Russia. got some tips from Reyes' top former
aerees Seat Crystal DeAncy. ease she quit after going down a break at 2- No. 3 Dinara Safina meets resurgent student, Andre Agassi, a four-time win-
ndrea Bethell Shonnel Symonette Stephen Beneby Ainth 4 Tl Dokiesbadk ting Atiso= ithe Australian O
William Rutherford Ruthann Simms Paul Demeritte Vr ciara ; CRORE SA ORTOT OBER PE PICSCRUNS :\US ne Bee ett oe
Lester: Walle Milinda Bastian yeep ackhare "The doctors didn't want me tokeep tralia and in her first quarterfinal at Agassi came to say hi to me, and I
Renaldo Nottage Marvel Miller Spurgeon Johnson going, but I wanted to keep trying and Melbourne Park, in the night match. . was speaking with him," Verdasco said.
Darrol Rolle Nerissa Seymour Gary Johnson see how I do," Azarenka said. "But it No. 7 Andy Roddick, the only Amer- I don't want to say what he told me
Pedro Culmer Mary Edgecombe- Craig W Johnson was probably not a very good idea ican man still in the draw, will play the because that's secret. But really helped
Rodwell Knowles _ Lenny Newton because it just gave me even more trou- _ first of the men's quarterfinals against - meso much."



NICHOLAS, Peter, Anthony, Alec and Anibal show off their medals...

Jade, SBSC, 1:16.85; Moss,
Shaunte, SWIFT-BA 54 1:32.45.

- Boys 9-10 100 Meter Backstroke

- Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA,
1:48.33; Gibson, D'Angelo, DSC,
2:00.48; Del Bianco, Anthony,
SWIFT-BA, 2:05.82.

Boys 11-12 100 Meter Back-
stroke - Carey, Dionisio, BSC,
1:17.66; Cash, Dylan, SBSC,
1:23.26; Roberts, Meshach, BSC,

1:25.06.
Boys 13-14 100 Meter Back-

stroke - Lowe, Matthew, BSC,
1:12.17; Morley, Laron, SBSC,
1:14.69; Armbrister, Jamarco,
SBSC, 1:28.26.

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter

‘ Backstroke - Moss, Denez,



SBSC, 1:18.03; Pinder, McGuire,
SBSC, DQ.

Girls 8 & Under 50 Meter Back-

stroke - Campbell, Celia, UN-SB,
49.09; Higgs, Lilly, SWIFT-

' BA, 56.07; Winner, Isabelle,

SWIFT-BA, 58.47.
Girls 9-10 50 Meter Backstroke -

Allen, Tremaine, SBSC, 40.64;

- Weech, Andreas, SBSC, 41.61;

Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA
42.67.

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter Back-
stroke - Morley, Peter, SWIFT-

BA, 52.89; Pinder, Conner,
SWIFT-BA, 1:09.78; Burrows,
Jaivin, BSC, 1:09.88.

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Backstroke -
Bowe, Clement, BSC, 39.53; Hep-

burn, Malik, UN-SB, 43.31;
Greene, Gershwin, BSC, 43.35.

Girls 8 & Under 200 LC Meter
Freestyle - Reed, Charlotte,

SWIFT-BA, 4:02.91.

‘Girls 9-10 200 Meter Freestyle -

Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-BA,
2:56.63; Scanlan, Lily, SWIFT-
BA, 3:20.10; Knowles, Lauren,
SWIFT-BA, 3:30.83.

Girls 11-12 200 Meter Freestyle -
Morley, Laura, SWIFT-BA,
2:32.56; Lowe, Abigail, SWIFT-
BA, 2:32.78; Rahming, Crystal,
SWIFT-BA, 2:37.51.

Girls 13-14 200 Meter Freestyle -
Moss, Berchadette, DSC, 2:37.83;
Glinton, Lauren, DSC, 2:46.87;
Cox, Xenia, SBSC, 2:57.75.

| Girls 15 & Over 200 Meter

Freestyle - Russell, Ronique,
SWIFT-BA, 3:25.83.

Boys 8 & Under 200 Meter
Freestyle - Morley, Peter, SWIFT-
BA, 3:26.83; Thompson, Luke-

‘Kennedy, SWIFT-BA, 4:18.05.

Boys 9-10 200 Meter Freestyle -
Bowe, Clement, BSC, 2:43.68;
Rahming, Nicholas, SWIFT-BA,

3:16.56; Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA,

3:26.11.
Boys 11-12 200 Meter Freestyle -

Moses, Zach, SWIFT-BA,
2:35.50; Roberts, Meshach, BSC,
2:41.96; Redgrave, Paul, SWIFT-
BA , 2:57.06.

- Boys 13-14 200 Meter Freestyle -

McCarroll, Toby, DSC, 2:25.89;
Adderely, Vernal, SBSC, 3:38.57.
Boys 15 & Over 200 Meter
Freestyle - Moss, Armando,
SBSC, 2:20.41; Thompson,
Joshua, DSC, 2:24.05; Dean,

Donovan, DSC, 2:29.85.

Girls 8 & Under 200 Meter IM -
Kemp, Kacey, SWIFT-BA, DQ.
Girls 9-10 200 Meter IM -
Weech, Andreas, SBSC, 3:15.78;
Redgrave, Anna, SWIFT-BA,
4:05.20; Hutcheson, Danielle,
DSC > 4:26.19.

Girls 11-12 200 Meter IM -
Davis, Janae, SBSC, 3:06.17;
Chea, Christina-Marie, BSC,

3: 12.48; Bevans, Jourdan, BSC,

3:16.03.
Girls 13-14 200 Meter IM -

Rolle, Riquel, DSC, 2:52.63;
Johnson, Deja, BSC, 3:07.41;

_ Watson, Brittney, SBSC, 3:13.33.

Girls 15 & Over 200 Meter IM -
Chaplin, Jenna, SWIFT-BA,
2:39.43; Thompson, Jade, SBSC,

2:51.59.
Boys 8 & Under 200 Meter IM -

Morley, Peter, SWIFT-BA,
3:54.06; Bastian, Izaak, BSC,

4:01.97.
Boys 9-10 200 Meter IM - Adder-

ley, Khadr, BSC, 3:50.09; Gib-

son, D'Angelo, DSC, 4:09.58;
Neely, Brandon, DSC, 4:31.23,
Boys 11-12 200 Meter IM -
Munnings; Jaevon, SBSC,
3:04.82; Taylor, Tre, SBSC,
3:05.91; Lloyd, Keith, SBSC,

3:06.04.
Boys 13-14 200 Meter IM - Mor-

ley, Laron, SBSC, 2:39.16; Arm-
brister, Jamarco, SBSC, 3:03.86;
Bethel, Carlon, DSC, 3:22.26.
Boys 15 & Over 200 Meter IM -
Rolle, Cameron, DSC, 2:38.98;

‘Moss, Denez, SBSC, 2:46.95;

Pinder, McGuire, SBSC, 2:58.49.



‘PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



BAHAMIAN U- 23 International
‘Justin Sealey was recently selected to
travel to London, England, this coming
summer to train at the prestigious
Chelsea Football Academy, home of
Chelsea Football Club of the English
Premier League.

Sealey, who captained his club side
Lonestars of Austin, Texas, to a semi-
final appearance in the Disney Soccer
Showcase Tournament during the
Christmas, was named to the All-Tour-
nament Team and invited to travel to
England for a tryout with the Premier
League side.

The Disney Soccer Showcase i is a pre-
mier elite soccer tournament held each
year over the Christmas break and
attracts top soccer clubs from across
the United States.

The Chelsea Youth Academy also
participates in the tournament which
is sponsored by the English club. _

Coaches from the club attend the
games to scout talent and at the con-





JUSTIN SEALEY has been invited to tryout
with the Premier League side...

LOCAL SPORTS.

Justin Sealey selected to train
at Chelsea Football Academy

invited to the club's training facility in
England for tryouts.

Sealey, who last year competed for
the Bahamas at both U-23 and Senior
Men's National Team level is a junior at
St Stephen's Episcopal School in
Austin, Texas, where he is enrolled in
the school’s soccer academy, consid-
ered the US’ premier academic soccer
programme.

He has been attracting the attention

of many NCAA Division I college SOc- *

cer coaches for the 2010 recruiting class
as a result of his stellar play at recent

showcase events, including the Adidas’

College Showcase held in Dallas this
past December.

At that tournament, Sealey and his
Lonestars team won the championship.

This weekend, Sealey will be bringing
his St Stephen's Academy Spartans to
the Bahamas to compete in a series of
games with local club sides and an All-
Star team from the Bahamas Youth
Football League U-16 Division.

The academy traveled to the

_ making it one of the top preparatory

‘also will lend a helping hand to a local



















Bahamas two years ago, at which time,
Sealey along with Lynden Pindling,
were scouted and invited to the school.

Pindling is a baseball player and is
also performing very well for the Spar-
tans baseball team. Coach Bobby Mur-
phy of St Stephen's ‘has been extreme-
ly pleased with his two Bahamian schol-
ar-athletes and is hoping to attract oth-
er local talent to the school, which in
addition to its sports programmes (the
school also has a tennis academy), pur-
sues a rigorous academic curriculum

schools in the United States.

The school will play three matches
against local opposition on Friday at
4:30 pm; Saturday at 3:00 pm and on
Sunday at noon. While here, the school

charity.

Parents and kids interested in infor-
mation about the school are invited to
attend the matches and can speak with -
the school's coach after the conclusion
of each match.



Results of the Swift Swimming
Gunite Pools Swim Meet held'on
Saurday at the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center.

Girls 11-12 400 Meter Freestyle -
Bevans, Jourdan; BSC, 6:19.48;
Reed, Doran, SWIFT-BA, 6:24.94;
Elliot, Ayshah, DSC, 7:19.87.
Girls 13-14 400 Meter Freestyle -
Austin, Fane, BSC, ‘5:59.49;
Bevans, Chelsea, BSC, 6:09.59;
Burrows, Lianna, BSC, 6:10.43.
Girls 15 & Over 400 Meter
Freestyle - Weech, Ariel, BSC,
5:02.05; Weech, Amber, BSC,
5:13.11; Campbell, Shayla, BSC,
5:27.93.

Boys 11-12 400 Meter Freestyle -

Moses, Zach, SWIFT-BA,

Swimmers
closing in
on Carifta
“stan 3 dard
"FROM page it



- e - Matthew Lowe | in the
100 breast, 100 fly and 100
_ back :

-e Shaunte Moss in the -

_ 100 breast and 100 fly
_ © Tremaine Allen in the
50 breast, 50 fly and 50
- back ..
_ ¢ Peter Morley in the 50
free, 50 back, 200 free and
200 IM S
_¢ Albury Higgs in ie
100 breast, 100 fly and 100 .
hace a
__ e Nicholas. Repmine in.
: the1 100 free and 100 breast o







Financing
Available

clusion select an All-Star team which is





5:16.38; Carey, Dionisio, BSC,
5:20.14; Kerr, Kohen, BSC,
5:59.15.

Boys 13-14 400 LC Meter
Freestyle - Hernandez Valdes,

Anibal, SWIFT-BA, 5:42.52;
Chea, Aaron; BSC, 5:45.19;
Bethel, Carlon, DSC, 6:31.06.
Girls 8 & Under 100 Meter
Freestyle - Higgs, Lilly, SWIFT-
BA, 1:31.26; McCarroll, Zoe,
DSC, 1:41.68; Reed, Charlotte,
SWIFT-BA, 1:44.49.

Girls 9-10 100 Meter Freestyle -

Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,
1:12.92; Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-
BA, 1:17.51; Scanlan, Lily,
SWIFT-BA, 1:30.06.

_ Girls 11-12 100 Meter Freestyle -

Morley, Laura, SWIFT-BA,

ohs09.56; Lowe, Abigail, SWIFT-.

BA, 1:12.28; Hanlan, Sheean,
SBSC, 1:13.63.

Girls 13-14 100 LC Meter
Freestyle - Deveaux, Bria, BSC,
1:07.09; Moss, Berchadette, DSC,
1:09.41, Johnson, Deja, SBSC,
1:13.24,

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter
Freestyle - Chaplin, Jenna,
SWIFT-BA, 1:04.50; Moss,
Shaunte, SWIFT-BA, 1:06.71; *

Deveaux, Ravyn, BSC, 1:07.03.

Boys 8 & Under 100 Meter

Freestyle - Bastian, Izaak, BSC,
1:42.86; Thompson, Luke-

~ Kennedy , SWIFT-BA, 1:59.01.

Boys 9-10.100 Meter Freestyle -
Rahming, Nicholas, SWIFT-BA,
1:27.58; Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA,



SIMONE STURRUP takes a rest...

1:31.75; Del Bianco, Anthony, >;
SWIFT-BA, 1:36.64.

Boys.11-12 100 Meter Freestyle -
Munnings, Jaevon, SBSC,
1:13.44; Lloyd, Keith, SBSC ,
1:15.15; Cash, Dylan, SBSC,

1:15.77.
Boys 13-14 100 Meter Freestyle -

Morley, Laron, SBSC, 1:02.52;

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter
Freestyle - McIntosh, Michael,

BSC, 58.52; Moss, Armando,
SBSC, 1:02.83; Knowles,
Devonn, BSC, 1:03.06.

Girls 8 & Under.50 Meter
Freestyle - Campbell, Celia, UN-
SB , 37.94; Higgs, Lilly,
SWIFT-BA, 42.44; Scriven, Taja,
SBSC, 46.96. 5

Girls 9-10 50 Meter Freestyle -

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Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,
32.31; Weech, Andreas, SBSC,
33.01; Allen, Tremaine, SBSC,
34.68. ;

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter
Freestyle - Morley, Peter, SWIFT-
BA, 42.65; Bevans, Paul, BSC,
46.62; Strachan, Trent, BSC,
52.61.

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Freestyle -
Bowe, Clement, BSC 5
32.96; Greene, Gershwin, BSC,
34.11; Hepburn, Malik, UN-SB,
36.95,

Girls 11-12 200 Meter Breast-
stroke - Adderley, Khes; BSC,

3:50.07.
Girls 13-14 200 Meter Breast-

stroke - Glinton, Lauren, DSC,
3:20.20. |

Girls 15 & Over 200 Meter
Breaststroke - Russell, Ronique,
SWIFT-BA, DQ. ,
Boys 11-12 200 Meter Br east-
stroke - Deveaux, Brandon, BSC,

3:36.11; Bastian, Drew, BSC,

3:45.82. ,
Boys 13-14 200 Meter Breast-

stroke - McCarroll, Toby, DSC
; 252182,

Girls 8 & Under 100 Meter
Breaststroke - McCarroll, Zoe,
DSC; 2;05.10.

Girls 9-10 100 Meter Breast-

. stroke - Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-

BA, 1:45.46; Hutcheson, Danielle,
DSC, 2:04.24; Redgrave, Anna,
SWIFT-BA, 2:08.55.

Girls 11-12 100 Meter Breast-
stroke - Chea, Christina-Marie,
BSC, 1:41.96; Davis, Janae,
SBSC, 1:43.52; Thompson,
Celine, SWIFT-BA, 1:51.77.
Girls 13-14 100 Meter Breast-
stroke - Rolle, Riquel, DSC,
1:30.93; Greene, Ana-Philece,
BSC, 1:33.68; Johnson, Deja,
SBSC, 1:36.44.

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter
Breaststroke - Moss, Shaunte,

SWIFT-BA, 1:22.65; Chaplin,
Jenna, SWIFT-BA, 1:33.34; Rus-

‘sell, Ronique, SWIFT-BA,

1:53.13.

Boys 9-10 100 Meter Breast-
stroke - Rahming, Nicholas,
SWIFT-BA, 1:48.88; Gibson,
D'Angelo, DSC, 2:07.77; Neely,
Brandon, DSC, 2:18.82. — ,
Boys 11-12 100 Meter Breast-

stroke - Carey, Dionisio, BSC,



1:21.03; Taylor, Tre, SBSC,
1:33.10; Munnings, Jaevon,
SBSC, 1:35.18. ~

Boys 13-14 100 Meter Breast-

- stroke - Lowe, Matthew, BSC,

1:24.13; Morley, Laron, SBSC,
1:33.74; Hernandez Valdes, Ani-
bal, SWIFT-BA, 1:39.77.

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter
Breaststroke - Pinder, McGuire,

SBSC, 1:26.08; Brooks, Troy,
SWIFT-BA 5 1:51.20;
Knowles Sr, Percy, SWIFT-BA,

1:58.23.
Girls 8 & Under 50 Meter
Breaststroke - Campbell, Celia,

UN-SB, 57:90; Higgs, Lilly,
SWIFT-BA, 58.39; Longley, Sian,
BSC, .1:03.42.

Girls 9-10 50 Meter Breaststroke

- Allen, Tremaine, SBSC, 45.90;
Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,
46.04; Scriven, Nia, SBSC, 49.01.

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter
Breaststroke - Thompson, Luke-

Kennedy, SWIFT-BA, 1:05.38;
Carey, Davante, BSC, 1:11.59;
Bevans, Paul, BSC, 1:11.80.

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Breaststroke
- Bowe, Clement, BSC, 44.14;
Adderley, Khadn, BSC, 48.84;

Hepburn, Malik, 50.03.
Girls 9-10 100 Meter Butterfly -

Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-BA,

1:34.95. :
Girls 11-12 100 Meter Butterfly -

Morley, Laura, SWIFT-BA,
1:22.52; Davis, Janae, SBSC,
1:28.10; Bevans, Jourdan, BSC,

1:36.33. |
Girls 13-14 100 Meter Butterfly -

Saunders, Je'Nae, BSC, 1:14.19;
Moss, Berchadette, DSC, 1:18.85;
Watson, Brittney, SBSC, 1:21.63.

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter But-
terfly - Moss, Shaunte, SWIFT-

BA; 1:13.79; Thompson, Jade,
SBSC, 1:20.23; Whitehead, Sofia,
SWIFT-BA, 1:36.36.

Boys 9-10 100 Meter Butterfly -
Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA, 2:07.89;
Gibson, D'Angelo, DSC, 2:17.85.
Boys 11-12 100 Meter Butterfly -
Carey, Dionisio, BSC, 1:14.47;
Lloyd, Keith, SBSC, 1:20.76;
Munnings, Jaevon, SBSC,

1:23.87.
Boys 13-14 100 Meter Butterfly -

SEE page 9





Big Red
Machines
blow out
the Aces

FROM page 11 ~

“We played good defense

“and we played to the best of

our ability. I liked the way we
came out here and win this

-game today,” he insisted. “I

think we’re ready for the play-
offs.”

As the pennant winners,
SAC could end up facing
either defending champions
Jordan Prince. William Falcons |
or the Kingsway Academy
Saints, depending on who wins
the showdown this week
between the Falcons and last
year’s runners-up Westminis-
ter Diplomats, who are in sec-
ond place.

But the way Wood sees it, if
they can play like they did
against Aquinas, he doesn’t
feel like there’s any team out

‘there who'can beat them.

“From school we were
hyped for the game,” he

‘stressed. “We just came out

to play.”

Jabari Wilmott exploded for
a game high 30 points, while .
Bradley Outten had nine, and
Brandon Whymms eight..
Wood, along with Charles
Sealy, Nakita Higgins and
Justin Symonette all con-
(gibuted four.

The Aces, who trailed 17-i
before they scored their first
field goal and eventually fell
behind 22-5 at the end of the
first quarter and 38-13 at the
half, didn’t have thé manpow-
er to contain SAC as coach
Maurice Fawkes had to sit
seven players on the bench
because of academic proba-
tion.
Dropped to 7-5 and out of
the playoff picture, Fawkes |
said he had no other choice
but to bench the players dur-
ing the start of Catholic Week
because of the grades they
turned in on their report cards
on Thursday, fess

~ “We were short-handed. 3
We only had six players and
some of them don’t even get
to play in the game,” he point-
ed out. “We made no excuses,
we still came out and made
the attempt.” - .

“But I think if we had our
full team, we would have
played a much better game.
Our academics comes first and
they knew that if they didn’t
make their grades, they won’t

' be able to play. It cost the

team.”

With the limited players to
rely on, the Aces got a 1-2
punch from Theron Taylor
and Elrod Munnings with 16
and 15 points respectively.

Taylor, who came on strong
in the.second half when SAC
tried to go deep in their bench,
said it was a tough loss to
digest, especially at home.

“We could have done better
if we had the full team, but
we let them intimidate us and
we didn’t play our best,” he
charged. “Because we didn’t
have the full team, that hurt us
a lot.”

SAC’s starters didn’t ease
up at all in the first quarter.
But after starting a fresh five
in the second quarter, Todd
brought the starters right back. -

‘in when Aquinas made a mini

run for a 23-8 deficit.

They continued to apply the
pressure and surged ahead 38-
13 at the half. >

Nothing much changed in
the second half, except that
Munnings finally broke out of
a three-point shooting slump
to hit two consecutive’ treys
for a 54-33 deficit to open the
fourth.

While Wilmott ran the ball
on the open court, drilling’two
big slam dunks, SAC’s big
interior line-up saw Outten
come up with a couple block
shots as they kept the Aces at
bay.

DAT

mits Pe

behind the news,
Ae E9 107
on Mondays










TUESDAY,

ahamas Football



JANUARY 27,

Serena

Williams
beats injured
Azarenka...



2009

See page 9



ssociation standing





BSF names
workout
squads for
national
teams

THE Bahamas Softball Fed-
eration (BSF) is bracing for an
extremely busy year on the
international scene and with a
concentrated effort on national

team building, seeks to return to:

the prominence of yesteryear.
The BSF named both work-
‘out squads (See page 9) for var-
ious upcoming national teams
set to travel to several regional
and global tournaments in 2009.

The BSF has plans to field
four national teams for the year,
beginning with the men’s
national team traveling to San-
to Domingo, Dominican
Republic for the CAC Qualifi-
er, June 7-13.

The women’s national team
will then compete in their CAC
Qualifier shortly thereafter,
June 21-27 in Puerto Rico.

_ A successful showing at the
CAC Qualifiers would mean
the teams would earn a berth to

the CAC Championships, July 1°

to August 1 in Puerto Rico.

Both teams will attempt to
qualify on the Pan Am circuit
when the Men travel to
Guadalajara, Mexico Novem-
ber 19-27 for. the Pan Am Qual-
ifier.

The women’s team will com-
pete in the Pan Am Qualifier
August 2-12 in Guadalajara,
Mexico, ,

With good performances
around the country last season,

the BSF has named workout .

squads made up of players from

‘around the country for these.

tournaments.

The men’s workout squad °

features 51 players while:the
women’s squad features 47.

Bobby “Baylor” Fernander

will head the men’s team while
Stephen “Bishop” Beneby will
head. the women’s side. .There
will be a meeting for players
based on different islands begin-
ning this week.

New Providence based play-
ers are slated to meet 7 pm
Wednesday at the Blue Hills
Sporting Complex.

Players based in Grand
Bahama are scheduled to meet
with Yvonne Lockhart, Exuma
- coach Johnson and Kendal
McPhee, Eleuthera - Andrew.
Butler, Andros - Michael Cole-
brooke, Long Island -Julian
Pratt and Abaco - Nigel Bootle.

Burket Dorsett, first vice
president of the BSF, said the
federation expects great things
from the collaboration of ,ath-
letes.

“It represents a true national
team because we will attempt
to. have as many islands repre-
sented. as possible to find the
best possible team to represent
the country,” he said.

“Having this many players on
the workout squads and getting
them together as soon as-possi-
ble will help the coaches be able

to determine the best combina-.
tion of.players which we expect °

should give us one of our best

national team hopes in quite .

some time.”

Joleen





blow out
the Aces

® By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net’

ST Augustine’s College Big
Red Machines made their 12th
and final regular season bas-

‘ketball game in the Bahamas

Association of Independent
Secondary Schools’ junior boys
division look so easy.

The Big Red Machines ran
circles around a depleted
Aquinas Colleges Aces at
Aquinas College 67-39 to
remain undefeated at 12-0 as
they prepare to regain suprema-
cy after missing out of the
championship game last year.

“Our mercy rule is to Score
as much points as we can,” said

SAC’s coach John Todd in 'try-'

ing to give an indication of why

they went for the offensive
onslaught.

“The season was good, but
we just out-played everybody.
But the scary thing is that I have
eight players returning next
year. So we just want to get
through the playoffs and hope-
fully win the title this year.”

Playing championship calibre
ball, the Big Red Machines
opened the game with a full
court trap defense that resulted
in them posting a quick 11-0
lead and they were'never really
in. any trouble the rest of the

"way.

Point guard Kent Wood said
it was just an indication of how
well the team is playing this
year.

SEE page 10

Swimmers closing in on

Carifta standard times

A NUMBER of local swim
club members are closing in on
race times that are on par with
the standards of the Carifta
Games, it was revealed after
swimmers from the various
clubs met in competition.

According to a press state-
ment, Swift swimming club and
Gunite Pools “worked together
as a team to put on a well run
swim meet” at the Betty Kelly

Kenning swim romples on Sat-

urday.

The Swift, Barracudas, ‘Dol-
phins, and Sea Bees swim clubs
took part in the meet.

“After a week of cold weath-
er, the swimmers showed up to
swim some fast times as more
swimmers close in on Carifta
standards. The meet'was struc-

tured with a mixture of open,

events and age group events
that allowed swimmers to race
against others with similar
times.

“The awards were given by
age group with medals for first,



| FORMER US Président Bill Clinton drives a shot to the green as he takes part in Eighth Annual Michael
Jordan Celebrity Invitational at the One & Only Ocean Club, on Paradise Island, Bahamas, Saturday,
| January 24. Clinton teamed with actor James Caan and RaveH alongside jouatnarnt host Michael -

second, and third place and rib-
bons for fourth through eighth.”

The statement said that the
meet “ran smooth enough and
we were able to present the
awards during the meet.”

A number of the swimmers
won multiple events. They
were:

e Jenna Chaplin, 100m
freestyle, 100 backstroke and
200m individual medley,

Laura Morley in.the 100
free, 100 fly, 100 back and 200
free

® Clement Bowe in the 50
free, 50 breast, 50 fly, 50 back
and 200 free

¢ Celia Campbell in the 50
free, 50 breast, 50 fly and 50
back

e Carey Dionisio in the 100
breast, 100 fly and 100 back

° Simone Sturrup in the 100
free and 50 free

e Laron Morley in the 100
free and 200 IM

, SEE page 10



“(AP Photo: Tim Aylen)





STR ROBERT

GIN

35% OFF WINES

50% OFF

50% OFF

SAE V EL eae OR BME RU RWIS ROA VEO)





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009





Tourism Minister greets

special friend of Bahamas



CLARA Varnum of Nashville, Tennessee recently
added Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace to her list of adopted Bahamian family.

Ms Varnum has been making Bahamian friends for
more than two decades. She first visited Grand Bahama 21
years ago. Then she started to visit Nassau and Paradise
Island. She and daughter Cindie Brown now havea host
of special friends who they regard as their Bahamian fam-
ily. nye
“Once'l get here, it’s hard to leave,” she said.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said the mother and
daughter’s experiences in the Bahamas are the type of
encounters that tourism officials encourage.

“We are building a store of stories of that kind,” Min-
ister Vanderpool-Wallace said. “They are so special. At
the end of the day, that’s what it’s all about — people
building relationships.”

Ms Varnum and Ms Brown said they always feel right at
home in the Bahamas.

The mother and daughter (centre) aré pictured with
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation representatives Marsha
Thompson, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace and Bernadette
Saunders.








BLACKBERRY BOLDS
& Phone. Cards will be

SO JOIN vow’ q

FOUN SOHUEC NOW ID ME MOR




































@ BY ALEX MISSICK:

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE College of the Bahamas

. and the Bahamas National Youth

Council, in conjunction with Min-
istry of National Security, will host
a week of activities during the sec-
ond annual National Youth
Against Crime and. Violence
Week to gather ideas from the
youth of the nation to assist in
crime prevention.

Beginning next Monday under
the theme “Peace is our weapon —
cuz violence ain’t.our swagga”, it
is estimated that over 2,000 young
people will Pair als in this
year’s event.

Last year, the programme was
held in the form of a one-day
youth forum, in which students
from secondary and tertiary insti-
tutions from around the Bahamas
participated.

Minister of National Security

Tommy Turnquest said the
National Assembly on Crime
recognised early on that young
people are often left out of the
dialogue on solutions to the prob-
lem of crime, despite the fact that
they are disproportionately rep-
resented in the crime statistics as
both victims and perpetrators.

“My ministry has adopted this
conference as.an annual event
with the purpose of creating a dia-
logue space for young people to
discuss possible strategies to
address crime and violence. from
their perspective.









ung to
ar against crime

THE TRIBUNE

















= Clarke/Tribune staff



CRIME FIGHTERS: Pictured (from right to left) are: President of the College of the Bahamas Janye Hodder, Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest, Cari-
com Ambassador Sasha Armbrister and International Youth Ambassador Andril Aranha at Cabinet for the second annual National Youth Agaist Crime and Violence

College of the Bahamas, youth
council and Ministry of National
Security plan week of activities



“Fighting
crime is
everybody’s
business.”



Tommy Turnquest

“We. have allocated funds in

our budget to facilitate the imple- :

mentation of this important ini-
tiative, which is young people-
planned, young people-driven and
young people- implemented,” Mr
Turnquest said.

The minister said the recom-
mendations that emerge from the
discussions will be considered

‘alongside those made by the

National Advisory Council of
Crime.

“This initiative is very crucial
to the government’s national anti-

crime strategy and the recom-.

mendations from the forum will
be. studied and: incorporated in

other recouuiitiondatia: from oth-
er stakeholder groups,” Mr Turn-
quest,said.

Sasha Armbrister, a CARI-

. COM Youth Ambassador, said

the event is extremely important
as it encourages young people to
play a more active role in the deci-
sions of their country.

“It really touched our hearts to
see that our ministry and our
country actually want the young
people to help.

“They actually want our ideas
and our opinions,” she said.

As the principle strategy of the
week of activities is to create dia-
logue spaces, Minister Turnquest
is calling on all educational insti-
tutions, tertiary, secondary and
primary, public and private to
dedicate at least one class period
during the NYACVW to discuss
strategies which address crime and
violence in the Bahamas.

“We want to use this opportu-

. nity to challenge Bahamians to

become..engaged in preventing
crime and violence that continues
to eat away at our quality of life.

“Fighting crime is everybody’s

_business,” Mr Turnquest said..



STUDENTS of stade 4Q at Queen's College visited the House of Assembly sah met Prime Minister Hubert
norahen Each Studatt had the opportunity to shake the prime minister's hand after their grand tour.

GIVE _IN

TO TEMPTATION



E TRIBUNE





Set irae oes
‘tf ever there
‘Was a time to
Stop talking anti
act, it is now’
Senior attorney aintns
that Bahamas’ ‘short-
term fate will be

dictated’ by how it’
responds to challenges

facing financial services ~

over next 12-24 months

® By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“If ever there was a time in
our recent history when we
have to stop talking and start
acting it is now,” a prominent
Bahamian attorney told Tribune
Business yesterday.

Brian Moree, senior partner
at the McKinney, Bancroft &

_ Hughes law firm, warned that
“current unprecedented events” .

meant the Bahamas and its
financial services sector faced
s chahenges—that
ensured ‘they could no longer
conduct “business as usual”.

He said that how this nation
responds to the numerous chal-
lenges facing it and the financial
services industry over the next
12 months-24 months “will dic-
tate our short-term fate”.

A proactive, co-ordinated
response was. paramount, Mr
Moree said, with both the Gov-
ernment and private sector

needing to prioritise and allo- ,

cate greater resources to
defending the Bahamas and its
financial services’ interests,
especially in the face of renewed
pressure from the European
Union (EU), its individual
members and the OECD.
“The financial services indus-
try in the Bahamas is obviously
not going to be immune from

the unprecedented events going »

on throughout the world, and I
think that if ever there was a
time in our recent history when
we have to stop talking and start
acting it is now,” Mr Moree told
Tribune Business.

“T think, to some extent, in -

the private and public sector,
there is a risk we become desen-
sitised to the urgency and seri-
ousness of the problems we are

SEE page 6B



TUES SDAY,



SOV

JANUARY

Stet

BT cs

YON O Mw reste Cusislicrtccre nite.

Fort holds construction



2009



ROYAL BFIDELITY

industry woes at ‘Bay’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
‘Tribune Business Editor

ld Fort Bay is
countering
depressed con-
struction activi-
ty via the
employment of 500 tradespeo-
ple and 22 building companies
in finishing homeowner prop-
erties, the head of New Provi-
dence’s largest private landown-

er told Tribune Business, with
plans to create a new retail

‘Town Centre’ for the area
“coming along very nicely”.

T. Rhys Duggan, New Provi-
dence Development Company’s
president and chief executive,
told this newspaper that the
firm was “working diligently”
to bring to fruition the planned
retail development, which
would be located opposite the
entrance to the Charlotteville
development.

He indicated that he might
be able to divulge more details
in 30-40 days once all necessary
planning approvals and permits
came through for the new Town
Centre.

Tribune Business revealed

Exchange

control
regime
‘pays off

~ Commonwealth chair

says average loan size.
_of $12-$14k, and

consumer focus, helps
by diversifying risk

\

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
‘Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas’ exchange
control regime, although
decried by some, and ‘conserv-
ative’ monetary policy “paid
off” in the past year by protect-
ing the banking system and
investment community from the
ravages of the credit

‘crunch/sub-prime mortgage cri-

sis, a former Central Bank gov-
ernor said yesterday.

T. B. Donaldson said that
while it was fashionable in some
quarters to criticise the
exchange control regime for
denying Bahamian investors the .
opportunity to invest abroad’
and diversify with higher
returns, the system had largely
safeguarded them from the loss-
es associated with the global

_ SEE page 3B

* Some 500 tradesmen and 22 companies employed on Old Fort Bay home
construction, with 25 properties underway and another 12 to come on stream
* Developer ‘working diligently’ on planned new Town Centre i western
New Providence, and ‘couldn’t ask for more’
* 500,000 cubic yards of fill levels site for proposed light industrial park





last year that New Providence
Development Company had

- received preliminary planning

approval for the new retail
‘Town. Centre’, which was
intended to address a “short-
age of retail” in western New
Providence.

To accommodate the project,
New Providence Development
Company was also, at the time,
examining whether to move its
existing 50 year-old Lyford Cay
Shopping Centre to the Town
Centre site. Maintenance costs
were only likely to increase at
the former site, which backs on
to the Lyford Cay Marina.

Meanwhile, Mr Duggan told
Tribune Business that New
Providence Development Com-
pany had “sold the vast majori-
ty of inventory” in the Old Fort
Bay community, with just 10

Regulator: No more licences for banks to do insurance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

- NO more insurance bro-
ker/agent licences will be issued
to Bahamian commercial banks,
the industry’s chief regulator
told Tribune Business yester-
day, after sector players recent-
ly raised competition concerns
regarding this issue.

Lennox McCartney, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance, said that
while he could not comment
directly on government policy,
he “understood” that any com-
mercial banks applying for new
insurance broker/agent licences
would be turned down.

He explained: “I can say, at
this point in time, that it’s my
understanding they would not

lots now available for prospec-
tive buyers.

He added that some 500 con-
struction industry tradesmen,
and 22 contractor and sub-con-
tractor companies, were work-

ing on home construction in Old _

Fort Bay currently, helping to
stimulate activity in an indus-
try which, many believe has
been hard hit by the present
economic downturn.

“There are 25 homes under
construction,” Mr Duggan said
of Old Fort Bay, “and about a
dozen are in the pipeline.
They’re getting their planning
and permitting in place.

“It’s really encouraging. We
keep seeing good activity. We
couldn’t ask for more, to tell
you the truth. On the New
Providence Development Com-

pany and Old Fort Bay Club. .

Industry concerns raised over Scotiabank seeking broker/agent licence

be approved, banks seeking to
carry on insurance business -
any new banks, that is.”

Mr McCartney’s comments
came after insurance industry
sources expressed to. Tribune
Business increasing concerns
about the competitive threat
being posed to their sector by
the banks, especially when it
came to competing for home-
owners and life insurance busi-
ness for their mortgage clients.

Tribune Business can reveal .

in part that the concerns have
been prompted by Scotiabank
(Bahamas) desire to obtain an
insurance brokerage/agency
licence, a development relayed
to this newspaper by numerous

‘

level we’ve been doing our bit,
and have managed to get by

- without laying anyone off.”

Old Fort Bay, Mr Duggan
added, had “a lot of full-time
residents”, including expatri-
ates, bankers and:attorneys, giv-

ing it a greater sense of com-
munity. Tennis courts and two-

play areas had now been put in.
As for New Providence

Development Company’s other°
initiatives, Mr Duggan said the

company - which has been mas-
terplanning western New Proy-
idence’s development and

‘ growth carefully, putting in all
necessary infrastructure and .

utility building blocks - was
moving forward with its
planned 75-acre light industrial
park, to be located just south

SEE page 3B

industry sources.

The insurance sector is under-’

stood to-be almost unanimous-

ly opposed to the award _.of such.

a licence, a development that
now seems most unlikely given
Mr McCartney’s comments.
Barry Malcolm, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) managing director,
did not return Tribune Busi-

ness’s call seeking comment on ~

the issue, despite a detailed
message having been left with
his office yesterday.

When questioned on the

issue, Mr McCartney said: “I’ve
not seen any application from
Scotiabank in the cacten.

SEE page 4B.

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valued members, The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce is partnering with Royal
Fidelity to provide Chamber members with
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Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Baha Mar’s
China meeting
‘went well’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA Mar’s meeting last
week with a high-level Chinese
delegation “went well”, Tribune
Business was told yesterday;

, Taising hopes that the $2.6 bil:

lion Cable Beach redevelop;
ment will be revived imminent:
ly. a

Robert Sands, Baha Mar? 's
-senior vice- president of exter:
nal affairs and: government
affairs, confirmed that Baha
Mar was “still in communica-
tion” with the China State Con;
struction and the China Export-
Import Bank following their
meeting last week.

“Tt’s fair to say that the meet-
ing went well,” Mr Sands said.
“We’ll just‘continue to work on
our meetings with them, and to
do the due diligence wé’ve
promised. We’re communicat-
‘ing on a regular basis.” :

He indicated he might be able
_ to say. more later this week once
Baha Mar principals returned
to the Bahamas. |

Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’ 5
chief executive, told this news-
paper at the Business Outlook
Conference that it hoped to

SEE page 4B:



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ry a aes Ug 27TH, 2009

THE WEATHER REPO RT A (P)INSURANCE MANAGEMENT



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST



















Wednesday WINDS WAVES _-_VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 7D" F
Wednesday: E at 15-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles fork
FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet i 75° F



Wednesday: E at 15-20 Knots 2-4 Feet

- ABACO Today: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F

10-20 Miles 78° F











Bright sunshine.











Bright sunshine and Humid with plenty of Partly sunny with a Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Wednesday: E at 15-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
breezy. sunshine. shower late. windy. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 83° High: 82°: High: 75° High: 74°
High: 82° Low: Ta Low: ee Low: a Low: 6a
Meat lbace Eee 7 : TERE RRR Pei
88°-76° F 93°-72° F ~78°-53° F 68°-58° F







The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, preci
5 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and aie low for the day.
WednesdayS06am. 26 27am. -O1

or 910p.m. 24° 3:05p.m. -0.2
3 : : Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. esterday Thursday 9:30am. 25 36am. -O1
ABACO : : Temperature 2 9:47 p.m. 22.5 3:39 p.m.. -0.2

26 1:59 a.m. 04
8:34 p.m. 2.3 2:32pm. -0.2



ion, pressure, and Today 8:22 a.m.
















Lay cnn tnaeg : , Riayl Ube. 2A SEAM. 01.
Normal high nnn spencer tican tod HIDE pees aa Pie
Normal lOW .u..eeseesseessesseesessssereeeseeeree BO" F/18° C 3B. 19/-7 9 c
f A ZZ Last year's NIGH... eseeeseeeereeees 10° F/25° 6 F
- High: 78° F/26°C A Z g ZL Last year's IOW ....esssseessesssseesseesssesssees 62° F/17° C
Low: 65° F/18°C a : Precipitation Sunrise. -....6:54 a.m. Moonrise... . . 7-41 a.m.
2 IAA LLL_ : As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.00" =‘ Sunset....:..5:51 p.m. Moonset... .. 7:14 p.m.
Year to date .. . 0.63"

Full New



F Firs
High:7° F/25° C ae; Et

Low: 59° F/15°C

‘Normal year to date .

AccuWeather.com :

Forecasts and graphics provided by <





Showers 4 a Se Miami
eS T-storms ies






Feb.2 Feb.9 ‘Feb. 16







AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009
ELEUTHERA . ¢ Rain Fronts
C Sh iti f e th te id ee
jown are noon positions of weather systems ani
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for tfie day. Warm ia
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary ge



KEY WEST
High: 76° F/24°G
Low: 67° F/19°C



2/
48/8 37/2



SALVADOR
— High:81°F/27°C
Low: 66° F/19°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today
highs and tonights's lows.

Ss



Tai







Today Wednesday _ MAYAGUANA
. High Low W i Low FieB
FC = FC

oe ts FC OFC FC FIC
Albuquerque. ) ; Ne f
19/- 7 ee 11

1/ Indianapolis”
18/-7 7/-13 sn ane le




















BAA © 36/2 Fr RAGGED ISLAND
42/5 19/-7 Fr i ; Portland, OR ; Hi h: 80° F/27°C
m0 26-8 Little Rock i Raleigh: Durham Lownes*Fie°C
Boston 28/-2 21/-6 s 31/0 22/-5 sn Los Angeles St. Louis 221-5 11 26/- é ;





at 3 ee 6









Buffalo «25/3 18/7 © 272 18-7 sn’ sa nal alsa

Charleston, ad 65/18 54/12 ¢ 72/22 50/10 pe GREAT INAGU A:

Chicago ——SS*17/-8 B13. sn BH 17-8 pe High: 83°F/28°C CE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 25/-3 19/-7 sn = 23/-5 _ 17/-8 sn aoe

Dallas (BN OTR i BT 3201 SSCNashville “Hlouth Fy

Denver 26/-3 16/-8 pc 46/7 18/-7 pc New Orleans a i i pe t eta : nnd
Detroit = 21-6 14/-10 sn 20/5 13/-10 po New York 3 sn Tamp Winnipeg 8-13 246s «18-7. 515 sn \ ; Mid
Honolulu 74/23 59/15 pce 77/25 64/17 sh Oklahoma City 29/-1 15/-9. 45/7 23/-5 pe Tucson Westies 0: s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers tthunden ” Tel (242) 332 Hy Tek (242) 336-2304
Houston «66/18 42/5 pe 47/8. 36/2 Orlando. 78/25 58/14 po 81/27 GO/IS pe Washington, DC 34/1 29/-1. sn.” 40/4. 26-3. r. see enonc tures emeehen aR

“storms; train, sf*snow flurries; sn-snow, fice;



Tcp-precipitation, Tr-trace~



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Exchange control
regime ‘pays off
FROM page 1B

stock market crash.

Referring to the banking sec-
tor, Mr Donaldson said: “We
still run this business, by some
people’s standards, pretty con-
servatively here, which has paid
off.

“Some people might not want
to admit it, but for those people
who railed against exchange
controls, those same controls
may have stopped them from
getting caught up in all this fool-
ishness. Suppose. we’d allowed
pension funds and others to
invest in foreign markets. Peo-
ple have to be careful.”

The exchange control regime,
coupled with the conservative
lending mortgage practices of
Bahamian commercial banks,
prevented the sector from
becoming involved in the sub-
prime lending practices that

devastated their counterparts -

in the US.

In addition, very few Bahami-
an investors have direct expo-
sure to the international mar-
kets. Those that do include
holders of Consolidated Water
Bahamian Depository Receipts
(BDRs), a derivative, of the
Nasdaq-listed stock, plus
investors in RoyalFidelity and
CFAL’s international invest-
ment funds. The National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) has also been
permitted to invest a portion of
its funds overseas.

Meanwhile, Mr Donaldson,
who is Commonwealth Bank’s
chairman, lauded the risk diver-
sification achieved by the BISX-
listed institution’s consumer
lending focus after it posted a 10
per cent rise in net income for
2008 to $49 million, compared

to $48.5 million the year before.
’ The bank published its unau-
dited financials yesterday, and
Mr Donaldson said: “The joy
about Commonwealth Bank is
that the average loan is between
$12,000 to $14,000. It’s spread
over a wide range, and not con-
centrated in just a few compa-
nies or sectors...

“If you spread risk out like
that, you. begin to see the bene-
fits of not having too large a
coonhe BSSEIStin a just Gne sec-
tor.” & ;



monvealth Bank’s 2008: pclae:
mance “came in around where
we thought it would come in”,
and was on budget.

When management saw the
economy begin to slide in the
2008 second half, they “made
general provisions” against the
likelihood of increased. loan
losses and have built this into
the bank’s financial model
already, he added.

Loan loss reserves more than
covered the slight increase in
non-performing loans, from 1.5
per cent of the total portfolio
_ in 2007 to 1.7 per cent at end-
2008, Mr Donaldson attribut-

ing the slight increase to man- .

agement’s “vigilance” and use
of a credit scoring regime to
assess a borrower’s creditwor-
thiness.

The 1.7 per cent non-per- .

forming loan figure, Mr Don-
aldson said, was far better than
the 6.3 per cent industry aver-
age reported by the Central
Bank of the Bahamas at
November 2008.

Meanwhile, Commonwealth
Bank saw its return on equity
remain flat at 35 per cent, while
return on assets dropped from
3.8 per cent in 2007, although
it remained above the indus-
try’s 3.5 per cent average. The
decline was due to a $150: mil-
lion or 12 per cent increase in
total assets to $1.323 billion,
without a matching proportion-
ate rise in net income.

However, Commonwealth
Bank’s overall efficiency ratio
improved during 2008 to 43 per
cent.

“We intend to keep on doing
what we’re doing. We came
through last year, and have no
crystal ball for this year, but will
adjust to whatever circum-
stances we find ourselves in,”
Mr Donaldson told Tribune
Business.

He acknowledged, though,
that 2009 was likely, to “be a
rough year for everybody”, and
expressed fears that rather than

a ‘V-shaped’ recession, where
the downturn and recovery both
took place relatively rapidly, the
‘Bahamas and the world might
be in for an ‘L-shaped’ reces-
sion where the economy con-

tracted and then bounced along

the bottom for a while.
Commonwealth Bank had no
plans to downsize or lay-off

staff, Mr Donaldson added, and

was continuing to expand with

construction of its Prince)

Charles Drive branch expected
to be completed some time in
the 2009 third quarter. Some
new employees were expected
to be hired.

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BEC yesterday released the
list of 13 companies vying to
supply it with renewable energy
yesterday, most of which pro-
posed waste to energy produc-
tion as the country's most fea-
sible power source.

Two of the firms that sub-
mitted bids to the govern-
ment/BEC proposed Solar/Pho-
to Voltaic energy as an alter-
native to fossil fuels; two sug-
gested a combination of wind
and solar resources to generate
energy; one proposed wind

. only; and another proposed an
Ocean Thermal Energy Con-
version (OTEC) operation.

The 13 bidders are:

¢ Bahamas Renewable

Energy Corporation

Wind/Solar

¢ Bahamas Renewable

Energy Resources

Waste to Energy

¢ Cambridge Development,

Inc,

Waste to Energy |

e Enfinity

Solar/PV

- @ Exuma Waste Manage-
ment
‘Waste to Energy

e GA Solar

Solar/PV

¢ GGEC-Globally Green

Energy Consortium

Waste to Energy

e¢ GPEC Global Inc. + Ener-
gy Solutions Bahamas .

Waste to Energy

¢ Norwin America LLC

Wind

© Ocees International Inc

e OTEC 3

Plasco Energy

Waste to Energy

e Protocol Energy









FROM page 1B

of the existing Airport Industrial Park.

“The industrial park is moving along well.
We've filled the site with 500,000 cubic yards of
fill,” Mr Duggan said, explaining that the land had
to be raised because it was a low-lying site. The
park will be called the Rocky Plant Road Indus-

trial Park.

New Providence Development Company was
also “working to get the word out” about Green

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that nee oan of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,

Minister responsible for Nationality and
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day’ of JANUARY
2009 to the .Minister responsible for Nationality and
P.O.Box N-7147,








Citizenship,

BEC unveils 13 renewable bids

International
Wind/Solar

e Smart power
Waste to Energy

These 13 companies will now
be vetted by a private firm cho-
sen by the Government, with
the aim of further reducing the
list of competitors in order to
choose the most viable option
for renewable energy.

BEC’s chairman, Fredfrick
Gottlieb, said it was in the best
interest of small island nations
to develop alternatives sources
of energy to supplement the
need for oil production.

At a renewables conference
in Bonn, Germany, in 2004 it
was suggested that the demand
for oil by large developing
nations in the East like China
and India is rising faster than
it can be produced," he said.
"If this trend continues, it will
result in a conflict between sup-
ply and demand where soaring

prices of oil will be inevitable."
One of the short listed com- ”

panies is proposing a $60 mil-
lion dollar solar/ wind project
across three islands that could

_ create 60 - 90 jobs in the

process.
Bahamas Renewable Ener-
gy Corporation, a joint venture
between Bahamas based WIN-
SO Ltd and Canada-based
Schneider Power, said if it were
to proceed it could generate
around 24 megawatts of elec-
tricity per day on the three
islands of New Providence,
Abaco and Harbour island,
powering 25,000 homes.
OTEC company, Ocees
International Inc, which was
also short listed proposes ther-
mal energy conversion that uses
ocean temperature variations

Fort holds construction industry woes at ‘Bay’

Systems, the waste recycling joint venture pro-
ducing compost, top soil and mulch from green
waste and old pallets.

The operation, run from a facility on New Prov-
idence Development Company land, is a venture
involving it, Bahamas Waste, Waste Not and
Robin Myers of Caribbean Landscaping. “Stuff
that normally would go to the dump is being
turned into something useful,” Mr Duggan said.

He added: “Everything’s going well. We just
have to hope the economy doesn’t stall us. We’re ..
optimistic and see good things happening.”

ae RR ke

lying to the
“eitizenship, for

Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNA G. MICHEL of
SOLDIER ROAD WEST, APT#3, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister: responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization’ should not be granted,

should send a written and signed statement of the facts:
within twenty-eight days from the 27" day of January, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Gllzenete
‘P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

maT Tea

Salesperson to sell outboard engines, boats,
waverunners, trailers and generators. Must
be professional, enthusiastic and motivated.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.



PKF BAHAMAS

QUALIFIED AND TRAINEE ACCOUNTANTS REQUIRED

The Nassau office of PKF, an International Accounting Firm,

seeks to recruit the following:

(1) Professional
accounting qualifications.
membership in The

qualified
They
Bahamas

persons with recognized
must be eligible for
Institute . of | Chartered

Accountants and must have at least two (2) or three (3)
years post qualification experience. Only Bahamians need
apply. Preference will be given to applicants with proven audit
and assurance experience.

(2) Trainess. with an accounting or equivalent degree and
eligible to write a professional examination.

In all cases, salary and benefits subject to negotiation.

Apply in writing to Human Resources Partner,
PKF, P.O.Box N-8335, Nassau Bahamas



- sions per year.

to explore the viability of wind

To ailvertise, just call 502-2371

to drive heat engines to pro-
duce power. However, popular
opinion flags this alternative
energy option as high in capital
expenditure with low overall
efficiency.

Norwin America LLC, which
was the only firm to offer a
wind-only energy proposal, has
completed projects in other
Caribbean countries, such as
the Dominican Republic, where
it constructed a 225 kilowatt
(kW) wind turbine expected to
generate 586,000 kWh of clean
energy and offset 160 metric
tons of carbon dioxide emis-

Salesperson for Car lot
must have experience
in sales.

Rene y Hal @ cr Ey Le

A study is currently being
done through the Grand
Bahama Power company and
Canadian shareholder Emera,

energy for the second capital.

Minister for the Environ-
ment, Phenton Neymour, said
recently that wind energy also
incurred high capital costs,
while its turbines were also in
high demand but short supply.

The Government, though ,
sees the pursuit of clean, renew-
able energy as a worthy. ven-
ture that could in the long run
provide .a "better environ-
ment" and "reduce foreign cur-
rency leaving the country for
oil imports”.

"When all systems are go for
renewable energy in this coun-
try, The Bahamas will not only
have put itself one step closer to
becoming a first world country
from an energy perspective, but
it would also-have put itself in a
position to decrease its oil
imports significantly and add
to the environmental initiatives
that are presently underway,"
said BEC General Manager
Kevin Basden.





VALID: JAN 26 — JAN 31, 2009

Tel: 242-328-0048 |
| Fax: 242-328-0049 _

#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts,
Palmdale
(Next to City Market)
Nassau, Bahamas
~ Email:
sales@dctpc.com



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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Pe ee eee
Baha Mar’s China meeting ‘went well’

FROM page 1B

conclude an agreement with
two Chinese state-owned enti-
ties “over the next six months”,
with a construction contract
“signed over the next few
weeks”.

“I’m very optimistic,” Mr
Izmirlian said. “I think the Chi-
nese are the right partners for
us. They look at the world over
a long period of time. They are
very senior people who would
not fly half-way around the
world if they were not serious.
The negotiations are complex
and will take time, but over the
next six months we hope to
come to a conclusion.

“We'll hopefully be in a posi-
tion to sign a construction con-
tract over the next few weeks,”
Mr Izmirlian told Tribune Busi-



leading print medium in The Bahamas. The Tribune is my newspaper.”











port the news, call our
ips Line at 502-2359.



REGULATOR, from 1B




that I’ve been in office.”
Currently, there are three
banks licensed to conduct busi-
ness s brokers and agents in the
Bahamas. They are Finance
Corporation of the Bahamas
(FINCO), Commonwealth
Bank (through its Laurentide
Insurance and Mortgage Com-
pany), and FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas).
Industry sources told Tribune
Business that further insurance
industry concerns had centred
around FirstCaribbean’s in-
house insurance agency, First-
Co. ‘8
In particular, concerns had
been raised that FirstCo was
expanding its remit beyond pro-

viding services solely to First-

Caribbean mortgage clients, and
was directly marketing policies
such as motor insurance to the
Bahamian public. ©

Industry sources said that, fol-
lowing complaints by sector
players, the Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office had told FirstCo
to stop marketing to non-First-
Caribbean clients.

Mr McCartney declined to
comment on the FirstCo situa-
tion yesterday, telling this news-
paper: “I would not comment
on that. We don’t really com-
ment on any..... sort of thing
dealing with licensees.”

However, he did confirm that

“Credible. As a writer, my goal is-to present news and information that is fair

_and objective. People can trust what J write. I’m proud to be a part of the

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER



ROBERT SANDS, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of external affairs and government affairs

. FirstCo. was licensed as an
agent, and asked any insurance,

industry representatives with
concerns to contact him. The
licence is understood to have
been inherited from Barclays’
BaFinCo subsidiary when it
merged in 2002-2003 with CIBC
to create FirstCaribbean.

Overall, the insurance indus- /
try is concerned that any,

increasing encroachment by the
commercial banks into their
market, apart from taking away
profits and revenues, could be
anti-competitive.

This is because, by acting as
brokers and agents, they could
tie homeowners and life insur-

_ ance products to mortgages and _
funnel business to particular

carriers, squeezing all competi-
tors out. Mortgage consumers,
sources said, would also be
denied choice.

One contact told Tribune

Business that the insurance bro- ~

ker/agent market in the
Bahamas was already “saturat-
ed, beyond saturated, with
about 50 broker and agent com-
panies.

“The banks already make
huge profits from banking. Why
should they be allowed to
intrude into the insurance
industry and take. our profits?
It’s unwanted competition; it’s
unnecessary competition. If
they start doing this, maybe we
should start doing banking. Do
they really want to do every-
thing in financial services?”



THE TRIBUNE



ness, adding that “after that”
the main issue was likely to
involve reaching an agreement
with the China Ex-Im Bank to
provide debt financing to fund
the construction work.

While the bank would act as
the financing partner, Mr Izmir-
lian said that besides acting as
general contractor, China State
Construction would also invest
in the project and become Baha

Mar’s equity partner. Baha Mar —

would manage and operate the
finished resort complex, whose
design has not changed since
Harrah’s Entertainment with-
drew as the equity and casino
partner.

The Baha Mar chief execu-
tive said it was “the right time”
for the Baha Mar project to be
built, given the huge drop in

input costs for the project.

Mr Izmirlian explained that
international shipping
costs/rates had dropped 90 per
cent as a result of the global
economic downturn, thereby
lowering Baha Mar’s costs when
it came to imported construc-
tion materials, equipment and
other supplies, while raw mate-
rials costs had fallen by between
50-75 per cent.

Mr Izmirlian said the $2.6 bil-
lion Cable Beach redevelop-
ment would be fully completed
and open in three-and-a-half
years if construction work
began now, something that
again represented perfect tim-
ing, because it would hopefully
coincide with a period when the
world economy was growing
again.

Missing details delay
BEC Inagua takeover

li By CHESTER ROBARDS.
Business Reporter _

OMISSIONS in the agree-
ment between Morton Salt and
BEC have hampered the lat-
ter’s move to take over power
supply on Inagua, according to
a statement released by BEC's
general manager.

Kevin Basden said BEC held
a meeting with Morton Salt
managing director Glen Ban-
nister in an attempt to resolve
the case of the missing listing
of assets, including a listing of
spares, updated accounts receiv-
ables, a current, balance sheet

and third party contracts from

the agreement. , -

"As reported a number of
times in the press, BEC and
Morton Salt have been engaged
in negotiations for some time

for the transfer of the responsi-

bility for the generation, distri-

bution and management of

Inagua's electricity supply from.

Morton to the Corporation,"
said the statement.

"To this end, an.agreement
for sale of was submitted by
Morton's attorneys to the Cor-
poration for review.

“It was discover that the said
agreement was lacking in

important respects, as a num-
ber of issues were not addressed

. and supporting documents

referred to in the agreement
had not been submitted."

The transfer of the responsi-
bility for generation should
have been completed by the
beginning of 2009, but BEC has
made no further statement as
to when the new deadline might
be. Furthermore, Morton's elec-
trical infrastructure is expected

to undergo major changes.

According to the statement,
the changes will cost BEC "sub-
stantial amounts of money."

Calls made by Tribune Busi-
ness to Mr Basden to find out
just how much BEC would have
to foot for the upgrades were
not returned up to press time

_yesterday.

“The takeover is not being
delayed by BEC," Mr Basden's
statement stressed.

"The Bahamas Electricity
Corporation is committed to
taking over the power system
operations from Morton. Salt
Bahamas, but as servants of the
people, BEC must first ensure
that due diligence takes place
in the best interest of the Cor-
poration.and all of its cus-
tomers."

The Tribune

My Vorce. Mey Viewsoqer!



PAs aw Nib



eae eee ea eee
Look within for the key

to survive tough times





SUZANNE BLACK shares thoughts on surviving inying times at the Rotary Club of Southeast Nassau meeting
_at East Villa on January 21...

BAHAMAS HEART INSTITUTE
| LYFORD CAY HOSPITAL

IMMEDIATE VACANCY FOR A FULL TIME FAMILY
PRACTICE/EMERGENCY ROOM/INTERNAL MEDICINE
PHYSICIAN
BOARD CERTIFICATION AND SPANISH SPEAKER PREFERRED

The successful candidate’ will be required to manage a diverse caseload and to provide ©
on-call and emergency room cover as needed. It will therefore be necessary for the
candidate to reside on the western end of the island. Participation in the treatment and
management of dive emergencies and hyperbaric chamber patients required.

IMMEDIATE VACANCY FOR A FULL TIME REGISTERED
NURSE

Interested applicants should apply in writing befere February 28, 2009 to:
Medial Director

Bahamas Heart Institute’

Lyford Cay Hospital

P.O. Box N-7776

Nassan, Bahamas

Tel: 242-362-4400/4025
Fax: 242-362-4493

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_ TOUGH times call for pow-

erful, though surprising, tools:

for success - service fo others,
renewed respect for inner beau-
ty, a commitment to. balancing
work and play plus a whopping
dose of endurance, said a

Bahamian financial services .

veteran and realtor. And the
biggest surprise — restraint from

* Suzanne Black shared
thoughts on surviving trying
times when she addressed a
larger-than-usual weekly meet-
ing of the Rotary Club of

Southeast Nassau at East Villa

on January 21.

The address came one day _

after Barack Obama was inau-
gurated as the 44th president of

the US and change, she said,

was on everyone’s minds. While
decision-makers focused on
change to ensure national and
financial survival, individuals
had ‘to use times like these to

re-focus on what’s important

personally, she said.

“In this country, for the most -

part, we have had good and
prosperous times. Those who
have been diligent and enter-
prising have done well. But for
many, today’s challenges pre-
sent almost overwhelming
odds,” said Ms Black.

“Many people are frightened
— loss of jobs, scarcity of
investors, fall-off in tourists vis-
iting our shores. All of these
impact how we view our world
and how we view ourselves.
How, then, can we weather
these stormy seas of change,
keeping our courage ahead of
our concerns?”

Her answer was three-fold,
starting with striking a balance
between “work, family and
friends, our spiritual side and
time to ourselves. We need to
take care that we do not take

advantage of ourselves by

becoming all work and no any-
thing else. Over-working is a
form of self-exploitation and it
is when we self-exploit that we
may Self-abandon. When we
self-abandon, we may find our-
selves waking up one day and

asking ourselves who we are.”

If the approach of not suc-
cumbing to self-imposed slav-
ery to work to survive seems
contrary to the popular vein,
Ms Black says maintaining a

balance helped her fight can- —

cer, not once but twice, and
emerge stronger than ever.

Warned

Although she warned against
work. overkill, she said rough

. seas may mean digging deeper

to do well at what you. do best.

“If we are in retail, it may
mean more time spent listening
to staff concerns. In the hotel
industry, it may mean more
hands-on management. In real
estate, it may mean more calls
to past clients and more efforts
to develop new clients,” said

Ms Black.

“Look to others for positive
examples and guidance. I find
that when I help others, it helps
me to feel better about my life.”
Feel good about. yourself,
admire your inner beauty, she
advised. “Eleanor Roosevelt
once said: ‘No one can make us
feel inferior without our per-
mission.’ No one gets it all right;
hopefully we get it more right
than wrong. But if you ratchet.
up the strengths of what got you
where you are without losing
sight of the need to maintain
balance, you will not only sur-
vive. You will thrive.

“As we journey through life,
remember that we hold the key.
Let us strive to give the best
that we. are and the best -that
we have to as many people as
possible along the way.”

OFFICE SPACE

Medical and Dental

Professional Office Space
Availablein =)
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In

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Contact: Ms. K. Lockhart
P O Box F-40827 —
_ Freeport, Grand Bahama
Telephone (242) 373- 7400 .
3 Email —
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ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

An entrepreneurial spirit, original thinking, snd a passion to succeed.

If you have it, we want you.

. We are growing!

‘Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- ASSISTANT SECURITIES TRADER -

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
January 30*, 2009 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: Assistant Securities Trader

51 Frederick Street

P.O. Box N-4853

‘Nassau

F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PROFILE:

e Series 7 Qualification .

* e Minimum t year administrative experience

° Must have excellent communication skills WierBat and written)

sagt! ee

¢ Proficient at Microsoft Office-Stiite programs.

se

© Ability to work 1 ina » self motivated environment with little supervision

* Ability to manage multiple tasks simultaneously

RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:

¢ Meet-with prospective and existing clients and maintain client

“accounts inclusive of inputting trades and other client transactions
{

° Profotion and distiibuttion of various investment products of

the company

¢ Assist with the solicitation of securities transactions

¢ Conduct research on various, domestic publicly traded companies

and assist in the preparation of commentaries and research reports

e Participate in business development initiatives including public

speaking engagements

e Administrative and other duties as assigned

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.





PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Women’s business summit to
make Bahamas its ‘Kingdom’

WOMEN from the Bahamas,
North America and several
Caribbean nations will convene
at the British Colonial Hilton
hotel next month for the sec-
ond annual Kingdom Women
in Business Conference
(KWIB).

The. conference started off
last year with just over 12
women, including founder
Melisa Hall, patron Dr Ada
Thompson, and others such as
former Senator Tanya McCart-
ney. They organised a major
event, which attracted numer-
ous Bahamian women, and they
officially launched the organi-
sation.

Mrs Hall said: "What started

off as a simple idea for Bahami-.

an businesswomen to come
together has turned into a high-














ly-anticipated international
event that has garnered us a
few sponsors who we never
thought would join. More
importantly, Bahamian women
come and network and launch,
in some cases relaunch their
lives."

She added: “We've had
someone start a magazine.
another lady wrote and pub-
lished the first of several books,
someone else started a televi-
sion show, another lady fulfilled
a life long dream to own her
own company, and a shy
woman has turned into a much
sought-after motivational
speaker," Mrs Hall said.

“This is just part of the rea-
son why it is essential for us
women to come together, share
our talents and expertise and

Master Motivator Spence Finlayson is pictured during the
taping of his hit TV show “Dare To Be Great” at the Hilton
Hotel. “Dare To Be Great” airs tonight at 8: apps on ZNS TV 13.



Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spetice Finlayson
are his guests The Hon, Fredrick Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill,
Rory Higgs, President of Apex Management Services Ltd. and
Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson, former IAAF Council Member.










/

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED
: Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

COMPLIANCE OFFICER
REQUIRED SKILLS:-

Commitment to excellent customer’ service.
- Ability to work independently.and under pressure to meet
' strict deadlines.

- Must be a team player.
- Excellent oral and written communication silts,

- Excellent problem solving and organisational skills.

- Proficiency in a variety of software applications including
Microsoft Office.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-
At least five (5) years related experience in a Private Bank
or Trust Company.
- Professional qualification (LLB, CPA, ACCA, CA) preferred.
- Minimum ofa Master’s Degree in Business Administration,
Finance or Accounting.
- Experience in the. preparation of regulatory and special
information reports.
- In-depth knowledge of The Bank & Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000. —
- In-depth knowledge of Anti-Money Laundering, KYC
(Know Your Customer) and Countering the Finance of
Terrorism policies and procedures.

- Experience in the preparation of regulatory and special
information reports.

ABSOLUTELY NO atnGne
, CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. |
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND

NO LATER THAN FEBRUARY 6, 2009 to:-

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road

Nassau, Bahamas
Offices in

Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore,
Tokyo, Hong Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, Paris, Rome, Turin





KINGDOM WOMEN In Business founder, Melisa Hall, thanks Florida delegates from last year’s conference. This year's conference is set for next month...

help each other out. Can you
imagine the results we'll have
if we all shared, instead of keep-
ing our success a secret?

‘Because we'd be helping each

other, we'd be benefiting from
great rewards."

Since launching the organi-
sation's website, www.king-
domwomeninbusiness.org, and

Facebook page, Mrs Hall said it
had received a lot of questions
from North America and the
Caribbean.

“With technology, our world
has no borders, and‘as a result
women have been wanting to
come to the event as well as
sign up to become members,"
said Mrs Hall.

“Our KWIB members are

now thrust into the spotlight as -

Bahamian ambassadors when
these ladies arrive, and they
have opportunities to then con-
tinue friendships.

“Last year, one member who
was just launching her public
relations firm was able to use
a member she met through

KWIB to get connected to a
national American magazine
and to several others through-
out the Caribbean. So when
you have such opportunities,
take advantage of them."

Early registration for the sec-
ond annual conference is
already in progress. For more
information, call 242-328-6050.

Tat BELTED TL Tl es

FROM page 1B

confronting, and that we can’t
conduct business as usual.”
The issues confronting the

Bahamian economy and, more .

specifically, had been identified





























and discussed for years, Mr
Moree indicated. However, this
nation had been slow to imple-
ment the required solutions,
and the leading attorney yes-
terday urged both the Govern-
ment and private sector to start
moving beyond. the debating
stage/

“I think there is a wide con-
sensus that has developed over
the years as to what needs to
be done,” Mr Moree told Tri-
bune Business. “We don’t need
more debate and discussion.....
We need, above all, to be more
proactive, more dynamic.

“There are a myriad of issues
that require the attention of the
Government and the private
sector with regard to the finan-
cial services industry and its
development. We do need to
sound a wake-up call to action.

- It can’t be some minor event

where people meet and discuss
issues.”

Among the gathering storms
is the “increased aggressive
behaviour”. being shown
towards the Bahamas and other
international financial centres,
following the credit:crunch and
global financial-meltdown, by
the EU member states and the
OECD.

.Many European countries,

looking to shore up their wel-
fare states and weakened
tax/revenue regimes, were
focusing on the easier targets
of international financial cen-

tres as a suitable scapegoat for »

their ills, rather than reforming
their own systems. The’ end
result was likely to be more
pressure on the Bahamas.

In addition, Mr Moree said’

“many high net worth individu-
als have lost significant parts of
their wealth” as a result of the
finanwal crisis and stock mar-
ket collapse, a development
with major implications for the

Bahamian financial industry giv- -

en that this. was its target client
base.
“Bearing in mind that our

core business is private..bank-s...

ing and private wealth manage-

ment, this will represent diffi-:.:

culties in attracting, new:’busi-
ness to the Bahamas,” Mr
Moree added.

On top of that, he said: “We
still don’t allocate enough

resources to the second largest’

industry in the country to keep
up to date with a very dynamic
industry, whether it be with
regard to products, legislation
or the regulatory environment.

“We are significantly behind
many of our competitors. The
product development cycle is
too slow.”

Mr Moree explained that
while the Bahamas had placed
private trust companies, special
purpose trusts and segregated
accounts companies on the
statute books, and amended
other financial services product
legislation, in many cases it had
done so two to four years after
its major international financial
centre competitors.

“We cannot expect to contin-
ue to service a very competitive
industry if it takes us too long to
respond to market forces, and
stifle our ability to service a very
dynamic and competitive indus-
try,” the McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes senior partner told
Tribune Business.

As for the regulatory situa-

‘tion, Mr Moree said the ratio-

nalisation, consolidation and
streamlining that had taken
place among financial services

supervisors to date was “com-_

mendable”.
However, it was “taking too

long” to.produce the final result, :

which the Government had stat-
ed: was the consolidation of all
regulators into either one ‘super

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

IKCON INVESTMENTS LIMITED
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (8) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT 2000

I, Macgregor Robertson, Liquidator of IKCON INVEST-
MENTS LIMITED, hereby certify that the winding up and
dissolution of IKCON INVESTMENTS LIMITED, has been
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution. A
certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of

the dissolution was the 9th day of January 2009.

Macgregor Robertson
Liquidator







regulator’ or a twin pillars mod-
el with two supervisory bodies.
- Achieving this goal would
“not only reduce the timeframe
but also the cost structure of
doing business here”.
-Emphasising that he: did not
want'to:sound alarmist or “sug-
gest our financial services indus-
try is under some imminent

threat”, Mr Moree said there

had to be a greater degree of
specialisation among persons
representing the Bahamas at
international forums/confer-
ences on financial services.

He argued that all too often,
the Bahamas was represented
at major international fora by
the same people, who simply
cannot give their full attention
to every financial services mat-
ter, given the complexity and
volume of the subject matter.

In contrast, other countries
were represented by specialist
teams of eight to 10 persons,
leaving the Bahamas “out-
manned and outresourced”. Mr
Moree said this nation needed
to “get’ serious about it” and
allocate the necessary resources
to ensure it had the best possi-
ble representation at interna-
tional conferences, thus safe-.
guarding its interests. -

With the number of interna-
tional financial services com-
petitors increasing annually,
especially among Caribbean
nations, Mr Moree added: “We

“have to understand we have to

be engaged. We have to do it,
and we have to do it within a
relatively short timeframe if
we’re seriously going to accept
the challenge which, I think
frankly, is going to be there
whether we want it to be or not.

“Difficult times sometimes
present real opportunities, and
that’s how the best respond.
Those countries that respond
thoughtfully and proactively,
and allocate sufficient resources,
have a chance of finding unique
opportunities.

“For those of us who practice
business as usual, we will find
ourselves losing market share
and falling even further behind.
How we respond will dictate
our short-term fate.”

TST

ae UCAS Es

RCA Ca
RL
on Montays



THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS . TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B



TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 27, 2009

10:30
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Seinfeld Jerry's |Family Guy Family Guy Family Guy © |Family Guy “Pe- |The Office ‘The |The Office A new
TBS ina welding Homicidal and |Stewie goes to (CC) ter's Daughter’ |Merger” (CC) Jemployee is an

contest. M (CC) \drunk. © (CC) San Francisco. N (CC) ex-convict.

ah ee Jon & Kate Plus |Jon & Kate Plus'8 “Jon &Kate |17Kidsand 17 Kids and _|Toddlers & Tiaras Mothers and
TLC 8 A day together. |Family Movie Night” The Gosselin Counting 25th |Counting “Dug- daughters compete to win a tile and
(CC) family watches a movie. (CC) anniversary trip. |gars on Safari’ —|$5,000 in Texas. (N) (CC)

3% TRUE LIES (1994, Action) Arnold aware Jamie Lee Curtis, Tom Arnold. A |Leverage The team goes after a
man lives the double life of a spy and a family man. (CC) construction company that fore-
7 Closed on a soldier's home. (N) -

Courage the | Misadv. of Flap- |Misadv. of Flap: Johnny Test 1 |6TEEN King of the Hill |King of the Hill
TOON [ovat ele TS

TRU Cops “Jack- Disorder in the Court 7 Disorder in the Court 8 (N) Most Shocking

sonville” (CC)
Chez Maupassant “Aux champs” Facteur humain |D’Est en Ouest
“Hiérarchie”


















TV5 ~ * , |(00) A commu- |Les Bébés animaux ‘Les Ongulés”
5 niquer
TwWC Abrams-Bettes |Weather: Evening Edition (CC) ° [Epic Conditions |Epic Conditions |Weather: Evening Edition (CC)

:00) Las Tontas {Cuidado con el Angel Marichuy es Fuego en la Sangre Hermanos —|Aqui y Ahora
UNIV i ie al Cielo |una joven criada en un hospicio, |buscan venganza. oe

(:00) NCIS “Fak- |(:01) House “Needle in a Haystack’ [(:01) House “Insensitive” A snow- |(:02) House “Half-Wit” A musical sa-
USA link nica’ it fin (don at






ing I’ A (CC) 1 read re eae as in- Romie tis ER acy vant is admitted to the hospital with oe < ON
ernal bleeding. on Valentine’s Day. a fare movement disorder. e RO CERT .
VH1 a Real Tool Academy:“Fidelity” Hidden [Tool Academy “Humility” Humility /Rock of Love Bus With Bret ~ ale We) Sche les Coys di °
hance of Love |camera fidelity challenge. 0 challenge. Michaels 1 | . — eer OK er"
vs (:00) NHL Hockey Netegon Capitals at Boston Bruins. Fram TD Ban- Hockey Central [Sports Soup [Sports Soup : ~ ~
" knorth Garden in Boston. (Subject to Blackout) (Live) 0. (Live)

(00) Star Trek: |Star Trek: The Next Generation [Star Trek: The Next Generation _|WGN News at Nine (N) 0 (CC)
WGN he Next Gener- /Two starships must pass a crucial Enterprise catapulted more than a

ation © (CC) _|inquisition, (CC) billion light years away. © (CC) :
Family Guy Joe |90210 “The Bubble” Tabitha offers to[Privileged “All About Defining Your- [PIX News at Ten Tong. (N) (CC)
-_WPIX gets a leg trans- |direct West Beverly's school musi- sel” Megan discovers a shocking
plant. (CC) cal. 0 secret. 1 (CC)
Dr. Phil WBZ News (N)















(CC)

0 (CC) That '70s Show |Frasier Sons —_| Frasier Trekkie
ea festiv-|seeking the per- teaches Frasier
ities. © (CC) HHect present. Hebrew. (CC)

wssK {ecu

PREMIUM CHANNELS

:00) % * * MEET THE PARENTS (2000, Comedy) - | %» WELCOME HOME ROSCOE JENKINS (2008, Comedy) Martin
bert De Niro. A man spends a disastrous weekend |Lawrence, James Earl Jones, Margaret Avery. A talk-show star returns to
with his lover's family. © ‘PG-13' (CC) his Southern hometown. ‘PG-13' (CC) 3

ue A) Big Love Bs & & BROKEBACK MOUNTAIN (2005, Romance) Heath Ledger, Jake Gyllenhaal, Flight of the
HBO-P "Empire" 1 (CC)}Linda Cardellini. Two cowboys maintain a secret romance over many years. © ‘R'(CC) — |Conchords
Dave's strategy.

+ & MEET THE PARENTS
ond Comedy) Robert De Niro,






HBO-E





pot ek H -|(:15) 44% BEDAZZLED (2000, Comedy) Brendan Fraser, Elizabeth
HBO-W_ Jaw (1979 Hurley, Frances O'Connor. A lovesick man sells his soul to the devil for
Roy Scheider. [seven wishes, 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) ,

en Stiller. © ‘PG-13' (CC)
HB 0-S (00) x & TOP GUN (1986, Adventure) Tom Cruise. | & &% JUNO (2007, Comedy-Drama) Ellen Page, || Now Pro-
trophysicist. 1 ‘PG’ (CC)

hot-shot Navy jet pilot downs MiGs and loves an as- |Michael Cera. A teen decides to ave up her unborn —|nounce You
child for adoption. ‘PG-13' (CC) Chuck & Larry
cae & RUN-| % % MR. BASEBALL (1992, Comedy) Tom Selleck, Ken Takakura, Aka | * DOOMSDAY ne) Rhona Mi-
M AX-E ING SCARED |Takanashi. Aging New York Yankee gets traded to Japan. 1 ‘PG-13' — |ira. Disease-specialists seek a cure
(2006) ‘R' (CC) |(CC) for a deadly virus. ‘R’ (CC)
isl * % MAXIMUM RISK (1996, Action) Jean- % & FUNNY GAMES (2007, Suspense) Naomi Watts, Tim Roth, Michael

laude Van Damme. A oop assumes the identity of his |Pitt. Premiere. Two young men torture a hostage family. O'R’ (CC)
murdered twin brother. 1 ‘R’ (CC)

:20) %.* PREMONITION (2007, Suspense) Sandra [United States of United States of |The L Word ‘Least Likely’ (iTV) < 7

SHOW tect Nia Long, iTV. Awoman has a precognitive vi- |Tara Perfect Tara Perfect Counseling. M (CC I }

sion of her husband's death. 1 ‘PG-13' (CC) homemaker. homemaker. m8) a e 8 re at § l
-](5:20) % 4. [441 PRIDE (2007, Drama) Terrence Howard, Bernie Mac, Kevin x THE PASSION OF THE Sires aetna AS

TMC SOIC (2007) |Phillifs. A man starts-an all-black swim team in 1970s Philadelphia, ©. |CHRIST (2004, Drama) Jim :

Jake Gyllenhaal. |‘PG’, Caviezel. (Subtitled-English) 0 ‘R’





















MOMAX
















PAGE 8B TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

NGI: SB, LEU PAN OF NO EAPUN 1 9
: 3 | COMIC PAGE ; |

CALVIN & HOBBES

YES, CAN [ HAVE THE
TOOL DEPARTMENT, PLEASE?












JUDGE PARKER
AS SAM

PRESSES FOR





I DON'T BLAME
SOPHIE FOR
SLAPPING

SUE ELLEN!




WHY ON EARTH WOULD
THEY PUT GLUE ON
SOPHIE'S CHAI?






1 19i69 Unnmisal Pras Syraicate



HER MOM
WANTED SOPH TO
BE SUSPENDED
FOR VIOLENCE!





SOME OF.
~ THESE GIRLS
| | \ ARE JUST MEAN...
i ; y THEY LAUGHED!






|
|



1
2)
©x009 by Norn Amenca Syndicala, Inc. World rights reserved



APT 3-G














TOUCH THE SNOW; NORA MILLS APPEARS I et SURE MOU NS WHO /S' THIS
Sie ne SJ | WHAT WITH ALLTHIS SNOW, / FRIENDLY,
- COWN, Mame VS SAFE, MARCO: | 2) BUT LM VERY GLAD_2 CHEERFUL






WOMAN AND WHAT

YOU DID? ,
HAS SHE DONE WITH



HE'S REALLY A LAMB.

2. ty













THE STAIRWELL?!
WHAT'S WRONG
WITH THE
CONFERENCE

OITHERS IS
HOLDING AN
Pp EMERGENCY
MEETING IN THE
STAIRWELL!!





2009 PROJECTED
~_ EARNINGS



















©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved

HELLO? HOW MUCH ARE YOUR
POWER CIRCULAR SANS ? I
SEE. AND YOUR ELECTRIC ORIUS?
UH-HUH., HON BIG OF ABIT WILL
THAT HOLD? REALIN? GREAT.



“J USUALLY CHARGE A QUARTER, BLT
YOU CAN. RIDE FOR FREE.”










{| S THE ASSIGNMENT

w SORRY ABOUT THAT. D0 You
CARRY ACETYLENE TORGHES ?
OK, RING IT AL UP. THIS
WILL BE ON MASTERCARD.

\



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on.a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 -box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





















MAN, IT TAKES A LOT



vexrreme,

OF GUTS TO PLAY SUCH
FOOSBALL

A VIOLENT SPORT.”’











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number: to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.













































Difficulty Level *&














TI HERES A LOT OF
THINGS IMASKING
FOR, SO IM GIVING

HIM A CHANCE
To GET AFENCIL

ANZ. PAPER ..

4

SAY Your
PRNYERS,
PUNKINHEAD.

WHAT ARE YOU
WAITING FOR?











©2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc.

ee |

Across Down
1 Intrigued at a form of 2
non-appreciation (11)
9 Timely measure a couple
of favourites recalled (3-4)

10 Where to see runners, as
on a bed (5)

11. On which many initial
declarations of love: have
been made (4)

Strong man in club

team (8)
Love to point out there’s a '
choice (6)

_ Nicest form of inverte

brate (6)

A dog to'the Spanish, a
bird to us (8)

Turning knocks into a

pole (4)

Steal game to cook (5)
Important match involving
large’animals (3,4) 20 Quietly played at
Bullet that meant goodbye home? (5)

for someone? (7,4) : 21 Gets on in stages (4)

Ring in the nose for a
halter (5)
Rising star?

Nonsense! (4)
Repast, perhaps, comes to

_ a fine end (6)

17
Teaching art in disorder,

gin cocktail needed (8)

6 Refuse to take a drop? (7)
It determines the regularity

of beatings (11)

=

Public-announcements of
secret rites (6,5)

Down

How teams are organised
_ Across
1 Pre-emptive attack 2 Suggest (5)
(5,6)
9 Elucidate (7)

10 North American cattle
farm (5)

11. Variety of
chalcedony (4)
Traveller on foot (8)
Formal discussion (6)
Was inclined (6)
Unexpectedly (8)
Hard persistent
toil (4)

Colloquial
language (5)
Confront boldly (7)
Ready when
needed (11)

to a certain extent (8)
Composition that calls for
assurance of touch (7) 3 Influence (4)
A'French beer brewed by 4 Elaborate ice cream
dish (6)
5 Refined (8) -
6 Related (7)
7 Seek to
predict (6-5)
Ruthless

Jacob’s son (6) -

EASY PUZZLE

’ Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution © Yesterday’s Easy Solution ©

Across: 1 Guffaw, 4 Opponent, 9
Openly, 10 Hallmark, 12 Down, 13-
Clown, 14 Plan, 17 All-important, 20
White feather, 23 Haul, 24 Diary, 25
Swan, 28 Perverse, 29 Bogota, 30
Nowadays, 31 Pained.

Down: 1 Good deal, 2 Free will, 3
Ally, 5 Play with fire, 6 Only, 7 ,
Enable, 8 Taking, 11 Bloodthirsty, 15
Omaha, 16 Sneak, 18 Showdown,
19 Drunkard, 21 Chopin, 22 Burrow,
26 Send, 27 lota.

Across: 1 Tomtit, 4 Scabious, 9
Wanted, 10 Co-driver, 12 Adam, 13
Links, 14 Help, 17 Helping hands, 20
Stretched out, 23 Even, 24 Rides, 25
Idea, 28 Absconds, 29 Sprang, 30
Landlady, 31 Stoker. .
‘Down: 1 Towpaths, 2: Mentally, 3 Ides,
* 5 Clock-watcher, 6 Burn, 7 On view, 8

Scrape, 11 Single-minded, 15 Bitts, 16
Idler, 18 Hold back, 19 Stranger, 21
Detail, 22 Lets in, 26 Toll, 27 Spot.

interrogation (5,6)
Direct (8)

Boastful threats (7)
Larger than life (6)
Get to know (5)

To staunch (4)

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.











2ist
Century
Dictionary
| (1999
edition)

7(6 j
| 415 7|2(8/6 19 fd 1/2
1/8 5!1/14/213 Baw 3/8
rat7iol4 1/8 13/9 Ba 417/819
7/9 BB7/9 Bi (2/3
9/4./817 [2
6/3/4 41811 R719 Bo i2
5|6|3 719(3/1 BR8i9l7 |
11/8/7 217 R918 16/714
41219 1/5 Bas lo (5/811



















HOW many words of four letters _
or more can you make from the’
letters shown here? In making a

uses . word, each letter may be used
words in one onl aaa mit eo
ioant e centre letter and there mus
ne a be at least one nine-letter word.
body of = No plurals. ; ;
Chambers
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 20; very good 30; excellent
40 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

_adagio agar alga argali argot
drag gait gala gaol garda gila
gild gilt gird girl giro girt

glad GLADIATOR gloat goad
goal goat gold grid grit groat
grot largo otalgia raga taiga

toga. trig ‘



Famous Hand

East dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
a7
VI86
#Q 108653
954
WEST EAST
@K5 QI1842
9953 : ¥2
@Al4 #K72
AQ 1062 3873
SOUTH
A 10963
VAKQ1074
9
mK
- The bidding:
East South West North
2% 4% All Pass .

Opening lead — king of spades.

This deal from the 1988 Vander-
bilt Teams features excellent defen-
sive play by Peter Boyd, a Virginian
who has won several national and
international titles over the past three
decades.

Boyd held the West hand and
wound up defending against four
hearts after his partner had opened
with an unorthodox weak two-spade
bid. South won the opening spade
lead with the ace and ran the dia-
mond nine, to East’s king. East
returned a low club, and, after taking
the king with the ace, Boyd stopped

to think things over.

’ He judged that declarer might
well be in position to score 10 tricks
on a.crossruff, trumping three spades
in dummy to add to the ace of spades
and at least six heart tricks in his
hand. Accordingly, Boyd made’ the
first of two key plays by shifting to a
low trump. This was taken by
dummy’s six as East followed with
the deuce and South the four.

Since only nine tricks were now
available on a crossruff, declarer’s
only remaining hope was to establish
dummy’s diamonds. So he ruffed a
diamond with the queen of hearts
and then led the heart seven toward
dummy’s J-8. .

Had Boyd mechanically followed
low, South would have gotten home
safely by finessing dummy’s’ eight,
ruffing another diamond high and
then leading the ten of hearts to the
jack. This would have yielded 10
tricks: six hearts, a spade and three
diamonds. ,

But Boyd had carefully kept track
of all the heart spots played to this
point. When the seven of hearts was
led, he foiled declarer’s plan by play-
ing the nine! This deprived South of
the extra entry needed to set up and
run the diamonds, so he finished
down two, thwarted by the combina+
tion of Boyd’s heart shift at trick four
and his entry-denying play of the
heart nine two tricks later.

Tomorrow: A sensational one-act play.
©2009'King Features Syndicate Inc,



THE TRIBUNE

oD.
Z
=

Oo

daily life.



DOCTORS say itis
very important that
children are given all
the support they can
get as they make such
a huge adjustment to





The power of touch

lm By MARGARET BAIN

Have you ever wondered why
it is that when someone holds
you, the world seems a safer and
more wonderful place?. Why
does touch seem like such a basic
instinct -equal to an essential vit-
amin or mineral? Some of us
know that we can not live with-
out it, but others, who do not
know the importance of touch,
may develop symptoms of
depression, stress, anxiety,
aggression and mid-life crisis. We
take touch for granted. You see it
everywhere; people hugging
acquaintances, friends and fami-
ly. It. seems so easy, but why do

we see so many couples who are .

‘touch deprived'? We know that
babies fail to thrive without touch
and parents are encouraged to
spend time in special care units

touching and holding their babies

while in incubators. The smell
memory formed by the powerful
bond in mothers and newborns is
formed when accompanied by
touch. Early deprivation can irre-

versibly damage a baby's per-. «:
sonality, social skills and ability to:
express affection as adults. We '

also know that older people dete-
riorate faster when no one is
there to touch them and a sense
of peace comes over them when
you just sit and hold their hand.

The reason why touch feels so
good is that it causes us to secrete

endorphins; the natural opiate,

the body produces to protect us
from pain. This is why we can
feel instantly better in someone's
arms and a hug and kiss from a
parent can take away a child's
pain instantly. The substance that
really draws us closer to someone
is oxytocin. Oxytocin is a pep-
tide that is secreted from the pos-
terior lobe of the pituitary gland.
It flows to receptor sites in vari-
ous parts of the brain and
throughout the reproductive tract
of both the male and the female.
For women, the presence of
estrogen is essential for oxytocin
to work. Oxtocyin spikes when
someone touches you and if you
spend time with that person, then
it will surge when you think
about them, when they arrive
and also when they touch you.

The effect of this-is ‘oxytocin “

bonding' or being ‘chemically
committed’. This can explain why
people who are in lukewarm
warm or destructive relationships

become bonded and attached |

against their will and better judg-
ment due to continuous physical
contact with that person. Where
oxytocin affects women more
profoundly than men due to the
estrogen, vasopressin is mainly
a man's chemical. It is also a
bonding agent and also.a sta-
biliser. Oxytocin makes us giddy
and emotional and vasopressin
improves our ability to think
more clearly. Vasopressin is
dependent on testosterone and
when it fails then vasopressin
reduces. It makes sense then that
hormone levels affect touch dis-
orders, parenting problems,
orgasmic dysfunction in both sex-
es, and reduced intimacy as we
become older.

. The problem for men and

women meeting each others’
needs through touch is not only
controlled by hormones but also
by upbringing. Women enjoy

and require a lot of nonsexual:

touch and men often sée it as a

means to a sexual encounter. .

Young girls are used to being
held, rocked and picked up
when they cry, but in teenage

“years this becomes less. This

results in acute oxytocin star-
vation. By the time she starts

‘dating she has developed

tremendous. 'skin hunger’ and
looks for an.'oxytocin fix'. Boys
on the other hand are brought

" up to cry by themselves and are
often not comforted with the





aim to make them stronger and -
‘more 'manly'. Young men are

not accustomed to the pleasant
sensations associated with touch
and oxytocin. The need for non-
sexual touch is then replaced
by the testosterone driven goal
of the sexual act.

In spite of our upbringing or
life experiences, introducing or
reintroducing touch to your life
as an adult can transform you. It
can rekindle-the romance in
your intimate relationship, stim-
ulate the hormones and pro-
duce more loving and tender
thoughts towards your partner.
It is good for your health, heart
and relationships. It is habit
forming. Touch is free, readily

- available and it is a shame that

it is often limited to times of

grief or sexual encounter. It can .

neutralise anger and depression.
Once you see the quick results
in your own life you will come
to understand that the amount
of joy and fulfillment available
in a loving partnership is con-
siderably more than you can

" imagine.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is‘a Registered Nurse

and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-

pist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships,
Grosvenor's Close West..

\

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON. _|:

“HELPING a child
adjust to life as a dia-
betic can be challeng-
ing and daunting for
parents, as they seek
to help their son or
daughter adjust not

only to the physical

challenges of the con-
dition, but the emotion-
al challenges as well.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B

In the immedi-
ate aftermath ofa
diagnosis, doctors
say it is very
important that
children are giv-
en all the support
they can get as
they make such a
huge adjustment
to daily life.

Brent Lowe, a >

medical technol-
ogist at Kelso
Medical
explained that
juvenile diabetes
occurs
infancy up to 30

years. The pancreas produces little
or no insulin and the patient is insulin
dependent,” he said.

While type 1 diabetes is charac-

Lab..

from.

terised by the limited amount or

absence of insulin in the body, type 2
is characterised: by the bodies resis-
tance to insulin. Some of the symp-
toms a child may have include exces-
sive thirst, frequent urination, vision
problems and weight loss.

Mr Lowe says that type 1 diabetes
is heredity in about ten per cent of all
cases. “There is no cause that has
been established, but it is something

’ that just happens,” he said.

Controlling diabetes takes a lot of



discipline and includes cutting out
those snacks that are very unhealthy
to your child’s diet-something they
may not understand.

“Parents play a major role in their
children overcoming diabetes. To
ensure that their child’s condition is
kept under control they can monitor
and watch them very closely. They
must cut down the amount of carbo-
hydrates, fats, and: sugars that their
child consumes,” he said.

' Along with all the physical symp-
toms that accompany diabetes such.as
weight loss and delay in the healing of
wounds,. children also experience -
emotional symptoms.

Mr Lowe. said: that ensuring that
the child is always mentally enriched
is key. They may experience a case of '
mild depression when they realise the
severity of their state, he explained. —

“Diabetes can effect them emo-
tionally. It’s very upsetting when they
see their classmates eating candy and
other snacks they once enjoyed. They
will ask questions like ‘how come I
can’t eat candy anymore,” he said.

_ They are also encouraged to
remain as active as possible.

“Children with diabetes can do |
pretty much everything that a regular
kid can do and while they are active, -
parents should make sure that their
children get as much water as possi-
ble,” he told Tribune Health.

Under Stress? —
Exhausted and Losing —
| concentration? —

HELP IS RIGHT AT HAND AT YOUR
NEAREST PHARMACY! |

Pharmaton: Capsules

Acomplete multi-vita-
min and mineral com-
bination of ginseng
G115 and active
agents which help
restore physical and
mental powers and
counteract wear and

| tear. —

Pharmaton

Capsules

Highly recommended for:
Lethargy, Fatigue and Exhaustion
Growing Teenagers
Sports People
Enhancing Vitality

Available In The Bahamas at Pharmacies and Drug Stores Everywhere!
Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. - 393-4854





PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009 | THE TRIBUNE

@ By LISA LAWLOR Sweating your guts out
Tribune Features Writer for little return (it can take

a few months to see results)

STAYING fit does not just doesn't seem like a fair

trade.

come without sacrifice- But as we all know, itis
: TA. necessary trade. Being 1n
whether it means skip arepe cane VOM INGE A
ping the new House or __ good health for a longer
Bever! Hills 9021 O time, and besides being able
‘ os ae to slip into that new little
episode or missing out black dress or pair of slacks,
1 i j- _ it will lead to a happier you.
ry pe yin your Fam Tribune Health spoke to
y or significant orner. ~~ jocal gyms to find workouts
Sometimes those old fit- that will not only burn off

‘ ape that fat but also be fun to
ness routines - biking, Go.

running, swimming ~ -One that has received a lot

: 1 ° of celebrity hype in the last

just arent appealing : few years is pilates.

when you'd prefer to Pilates is an exercise cre-
< ated by Joseph Pilates from

be cuddling on the Germany in the early 1900s.

couch relaxing instead. He was a sickly child who
: combined the elements of
body-building, yoga and

gymnastics to overcome his physical limitations.
Today at the Pilates Studio on Shirley Street, trainers
give modernised instruction on the old pilates exercise,
combining physical stretches with emotional and men-
tally meditative moves.

In a group or private lesson, one can exercise the
heart's strength along with the mind's determination
and flexibility. Pa

Linda Holowesko, one of the five pilates instructors
there, said that this exercise has the most health bene-
fits — from helping with stress and back pain, to build-
ing strength from the inside out, rebalancing the body
and giving overall stature a better alignment.

Pilates lengthens and strengthens the. muscles, as
opposed to just pumping iron she said, which can
cause strain and feelings of fatigue. :

"Pilates raises physical awareness and I find it

‘addictive because you feel.so good after a session,"
she said.

Pilates is often used for rehabilitation and it.caters
to persons with injuries or special needs.

David Revington a yoga instruction at the Pilates

- Studio, said that yoga offers. a greater range of move-
ments- all practised on the mat. \ ~ .

One of his favourite group of exercises is for the << . KO
arms, "You can do handstands, the crow pose, eight ‘ .
limbed sage pose, the scorpion, the peacock, and
many more," he said, "And for the standing poses —
there's the vinyasa (flowing continuous movement |
from oné posture to another)."

The main difference is the meditation period at the
end of a session — the, pose of Savasana, where you lay
flat on the back in anatomical position for five min- AG

epee s i : . \ Loe
utes. "This is a time for rest, recovery, and relaxation \ : oe ash
before getting off your mat and walking out the ~ aes
door," said Mr Revington, "It's a time when what
your body has learned integrates itself with the intelli-
gence of the mind and students and teachers alike find
this essential." .
For a more intense workout regime, one can visit a
- numberof gyms that have regular fitness classes in'the’ ”
form of step classes, aerobics, hi/lo (which alternates
between high intensity and low intensity moves), or
spinning (which utilises all leg muscles while pedaling
on a Stationary bike). -,

To find new and revolutionary classes, check out
Bally's Soca Sweat to mix traditional Bahamian danc-
ing into your old boring workout, or the Junkanoo
Rush class for challenging exercise.

Bally's assistant manager and personal trainer
Yolanda Barr advised those trying to get fit this year
to set realistic short term goals. "If you work.out just
three times per week for 30 minutes, you'll see
results," she said, "One of the best decisions you can
make is to incorporate exercise into your daily life."

Next, you should vary your workouts. "Try strength
training one day, then swimming the next. Throw in
some fitness classes, but most importantly don't hit a
plateau because it's human nature to get tired of doing
the same thing every day or every week." :

Yolanda teaches reaction cycling or spinning, which
is an excellent way to burn calories. "We have it set up
with different zones so that you can always know your
heart rate and this way you always know exactly how
many calories you're burning. This really takes the

‘guess work out.of exercise."

At Bally's, their motto is "Treat yourself to fitness",
a telling statement in today's world of gadgets that
take the physical strain out of everything we do — from
cars to automatic can openers, to remote control TVs
to fast food delivery. :

"80 per cent of the battle is just coming out to exer-
cise," said Yolanda, "the hardest part is resolving to
make a change to your daily regime, getting out there
and getting active." ; ae ;

Making that decision day after day will lead to

change, so try one of these fun, new exercises the F
next time stepping onto that treadmill seems just too : a ard C S

boring.





-A cataract is cloudiness or opacity of the lens of
the eye. The lens is inside the eye, directly behind: _
the pupil. In a normal eye, the lens is clear and __
normally is transparent. A cataract interferes ~
with normal vision or sight by, partially or com-
pletely blocking clarity of the lens. The cloudiness

can vary from a little spot of white to a totally

opaque structure that affects the entire lens. Ifthe — Often, even blind animals continue to do well in









COOL & WARM LIG a ay completely masked, the result is familiar surroundings by relying on other acute
i ‘ar Base en sey 9 senses, the underlying cause is treated when pos-

(Medium & Regular Based B Dogs suffer from'cataracts more commonly gible, ne I
than any other species. Cataracts can develop at [Tp animals that have trouble navigating dué to

any age,, but'most cases.are found in dogs over 5 vision loss, sight can be restored to near normal by
years of age. While aeeere are extremely COM- surgery. Surgical treatment with lens extraction
ae as pia tats a ae suffer py Bs oe: provides predictable restoration of functional
z+ odes related or “old age” cataracts often toun¢ vision. The general condition of the patient as
a o8s: ee esata to health and behavior should be considered.
es Se ee cat ae on changes. Trau- Cataract surgery should be left to veterinarians
a ae : / ma and/o. resulting inflammation may cause a” ith special interest in ophthalmology and expe-
ge ue” a cataract but usually to only one eye. Cataracts can risnee leds extraction oe
; be caused by poor nutrition, but because of mod- Tae IMs oxpensive procedure danevandse
ern advances to canine and feline diets, such caus- general antiethiecis femoves endeeibtit net the
es are rare. ‘ ; ; : poe nate
. : Chon fr ‘ entire affected lens. The lens itself is contained in
Dogs ae cee ee pom seule orold gee a kind of capsule like eggshell. Most commonly,
Gotaract, Almost aT des OVER years old sults the surgeon removes the front part of the shell

24 Watt equal to 120w home from some degree of cloudiness to the lens. aot : nS sees Shas Ine
(eq ) : 8 0 Cataracts in dogs may also result from diabetes and ane rece eS a eats the pees
when the lens protein is injured by metabolic half of the capsule/shell intact. ‘n some cases,
changes. ; the whole lens is removed sue nen lens is trans-

A cataract may affect only a portion of the Planted to replace the damaged lens.
lens, and consequently some animals may show A procedure called PHACOEMULSIFICA-
no sign of vision loss at all. TION produces high frequency sound waves-
Even the cataract that covers the entire lens ultrasound- to break the lens, which is then
removed by suction or aspiration. Dogs and cats

a:

may still allow some vision. Treatment may not be .



necessary until a high degree of vision is lost and
cataracts become problematic for the dog or cat.

that have this type of surgery usually recover
quite well.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 11B





Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
For once she was a true love of mine.

In days gone by, herbs were supposed to have
the ability to imbue the eater (or wearer) with vir-
tuous qualities, or to represent those qualities. The
refrain “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme” would
clearly have meant to a listener.a few centuries ago
“amelioration, strength, faithfulness and courage.”

Parsley has long been used as a digestif as well as
a food flavourer. It was taken to remove bitterness
and bile from the stomach. In modern times we
appreciate the depth of flavour parsley adds to
stews and soups without the herb itself being too
evident. It is also a : a

_ popular garnish. It is best to use curly-leafed
parsley for garnishing and Italian flat-leafed pars-
ley for culinary purposes. :

Before parsley seeds are sown they must be
soaked and rinsed in several changes of warm
water over a day or two. Parsley seeds contain a
natural growth inhibitor that must be washed away
in order for germination to occur. Like most
Mediterranean herbs, parsley appreciates light,
well-drained soil.

Sage, a symbol of strength, marries well with
onion and the two together with pork. It also

flavours chicken very well. Sage also symbolises a
problem gardeners have with growing herbs from
seeds. A package of sage seeds could produce a
field of large plants while only a plant or two
would suffice a large family. For this reason, look
for seedlings in small pots at your local nursery.

Youngsters sow their wild oats; older people
grow sage.

. Rosemary represents faithfulness and, in Romeo
and Juliet, remembrance. Sprigs of rosemary
adorned bodies on their way to burial, the strong
pine scent overcoming any others. A small sprig of
rosemary will turn in time into a bush and may,
treated well, become a considerable shrub. Rose-
mary is easily propagated by bending a long ~
branch over until it can be pegged into the ground.
A wound at the lowest point allows for root
growth.

Sprigs or branches of rosemary can be placed
underneath meats to be.roasted in the oven, or
even on the barbecue grill. The flavour is strong so
rosemary should be used with circumspection.

Sprigs of rosemary can also be placed in closets
and drawers. They scent the area and are also sup-
posed to keep insects away.

Thyme is the most popular herb in The Bahamas

-and is used in virtually every savoury meal. It is a



perennial that must be gleaned from sparingly dur-
ing the first year but can be harvested with aban-
don thereafter. Thyme seeds are so tiny that ants
can carry away a whole package without you realis-
ing your seeds have gone. To prevent ant preda-

‘tion, sow the seeds in a container that can then be

placed on a support in a bow] filled with water, cre-
ating a moat that keeps the ants out.

I pointed out to a local retailer recently that he
had no thyme in his spice racks. ‘““Nobody buys dried

thyme any more,” he told me. Instead, people buy... ..,..,,;

sprigs of fresh thyme and store them in a paper bag.
The thyme remains green for a few days and when it
dries the leaves collect at the bottom of the bag.
Recently dries leaves are superior in flavour to bot-
tled leaves.

It is virtually impossible to grow French tarragon
in-our climate but Mexican marigold makes an
excellent substitute. It doubles as a flowering
annual and as a herb. Do not ever buy tarragon
seeds. French tarragon is propagated by root divi-
sions and does not produce seeds. What you
would be buying is Russian tarragon, worse than
useless.

‘There are hundreds of herbs and we have dealt

with a mere five. More on herbs soon.



Celebrating
women

FROM page 12

daigphasetacecudepoucasecuesseacecceuceseay

always speak your mind,
Ms Vanderpool said.

"It was a very vibrant
school experience," she’
said, "You had opportuni-
ties to be creative and be in
plays, which I did, but there
was also a great balance
with the academic side."

And to see other peo-
ple's cultures, students and
faculty coming from all
over the world, "It shaped
my life," she commented.

The school also provided
a great social network. with
extracurricular activities,
said Ms Vanderpool, who
herself took part in gym-
nastics, horse riding and
swimming. "The school
taught us to be proud of
ourselves but respectful of
others at the same time, a
sentiment that's been car-
ried on throughout our
lives."

In making each boy and
: girl a well rounded student,
: St Andrew's helped Ms
: Vanderpool to realize her
: dream of. becoming an
: actress from an early age,

: and she said, "St Andrew’s
? School is a trendsetter, and
: was truly the platform for

i my career and life."



z ’ ; ‘
Tribune Woman's most

i recent graduate who also
: attended the reunion was

Jessica Phillips, who grad-

: uated in 2002.

i "St Andrew’s prepared

? me really well," she said,

: evident in the fact that she
: wants to become.a teacher



‘hand return to: the school to

i provide other students with
; the encouragement she _
ireceivedasagirl. _

: "We were encouraged to
? succeed in all of the same

: subjects, the boys had to
take Home Economics and
learn to set a table or bake
a pie just the same as girls
were, and girls were
encouraged to partake in
all the same sports chal-
lenges as the boys," she
said.

At the end of the day, St
Andrew's just wants each
child to find the subject
they're passionate about,
she said.

Lastly she remembered
the fantastic feeling of
growing up with the same
friends from age five to 15..
"You really connect with
your peers and grow up in
this family that's more than
: your one brother or sister.

i It was just an awesome
: place to be," she said.



This poem was written after
the Inauguration of United
States President Barack Oba-
ma.

VICTORIA SARNE

Washington January 20, 2009

Tear chases tear
Across many a face,
In its haste
To write history
For more than one race.
Black next to white
And shades in between;
No-one is hiding,

All can be seen
Standing together
United.in need.
Distant countries
Witness the deed
And fall down to kneel,
To grasp at the dream.
A world-wide appeal,
To be freed from the past,
From each yearning soul -
Answered at last!

A man for all seasons
Gives us our reasons
To be free to weep.

The tears are flowing
All are one colour.








@ By LISA LAWLOR -
Tribune Features Writer

~ WOMEN throughout the ages have gue more and

more political rights and sexual free

om, something

that is very evident when you talk to women of differ-
ent ages as Tribune Woman was able to do recently at
the sixtieth anniversary of St Andrew’s School.

The four successful women all said that
attending the school gave them a strong
foundation to realise their dreams and dis-
cussed their career choices and gender dis-
crimination at the time of graduation as com-
pared to today, ©

Diane Holowesko
Dunkley, a graduate
of 1974, said that St
Andrew’s did not '
differentiate in the
education offered a
male or female stu-
dent.

"They provided a
very high standard
of education to all,"
she said,"You —
weren't male or
female, you were
simply a student
who was expected to



study and work hard."
Another strong element of St Andrew’s
was the house system, where each student is
arbitrarily placed in either Arawak (the
green house), Taino (the yellow house),
Carib (the blue house) or Lucayan (the red



ii ln

- house), but families are always in the same
house as each other. The commitment to a
common ground along with a strong school
spirit promoted strength in character, she
said. a
_. Mrs Dunkley herself held leadership roles
as the house captain for Carib and a grade 12
prefect, positions that had to have equal rep-
resentatives of each gender. "There was ney-
er any indication that girls were supposed to
or were expected to do less than boys," she
said. ty

There were also.a lot of women mentors to
the young girls, with a majority of women

_ teachers who taught good life skills as they
juggled families and work. ‘

"In 1974 it was still considered the norm to
be a stay at home mother, which is more
demanding or at least as demanding as work-
ing in an office," she said, "The Bahamas has

been a matriarchal society for decades, with —

women working at home and having multiple
jobs to raise money for their families." __

She said that at her time of graduation,
women held higher positions in banks and in
real estate, "It was so much the norm that
women went on and became professionals,
no different than today," she added.

The real change.Mrs Dunkley said, is seen



Ovaltine’s unique recipe Includes milk

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27,

when looking at her mother's graduation in a
time when women couldn't vote or be mem-
bers of parliament in the 1940s (before the
opening of St. Andrew's School). "I was
afforded a lot more opportunities than my
mother at my age," she said.

Mrs Dunkley went to graduate school to
study law and now has a luxury real estate
company. Sule et

Pia (Ander-
son) Farmer a
graduate of ~
1976, said her
views on wom-
en's rights are
shaped greatly

’ by life in
Argentina
which was
where her fam-
ily is from. "In
Latin America
women were
expected to
marry, have

- children and be a housewife," she said.
She also remembered a key piece of advice —

from her father, "Learn how to type and

~ you'll always have a job" — an indicator of
‘what expectations were for women.

“The only women I knew who worked
were 'spinsters' who had no alternative, and

_they were all secretaries or teachers," she

said.

However, on her move to the Bahamas,
Mrs Farmer saw that women were prominent
in all sorts of careers. Her classmates all
went on to study at universities to become
professionals.

"Remember these were the mid seventies

‘ *

SS



2009



where the whole world was changing, and
many women were knocking at the prover-
bial glass ceiling, pushing their way into posi-
tions of responsibility and power," she said.

‘Mrs Farmer herself was going to train as
an instantaneous translator for the European
Union with four languages under her belt,
"put I fell in love and moved back to the
Bahamas," she said, "where I have been freé
to create and manage various businesses
while still pursuing music and acting interests
and having two fantastic children." -~ f

St Andrew’s prepared her for a lifetime of
having her cake and eating it too, she joked,
recognising the need of hard work and
organisational skills. "With all choices and
possibilities for. careers it can be very scary,"
she said, "but also very rewarding."

Leslie Vanderpool, a graduate of 1989, and
the founder of the Bahamas International
Film Festival also believes that women in the
Bahamas are extremely independent,-not
only in the family structure but in the work- .
force as well. : ey

"St Andrew’s gave me the sense of being,

able to accomplish anything I set my mind

to," she said. "They gave me sucha great
foundation that shows it doesn't necessarily
matter where you come from. There was
such a diversity of young people.

“As a woman in the Bahamas in 2009, we
see young women setting the pace. Women
are shaping our society with a more futuristic
approach in how we need to grow in a for-
ward motion," she said.

The most noteworthy characteristic of
good old ‘St A's’ is in their teaching of rais-
ing your hand to ask any question, and to

SEE page 11.



and cocoa powder, 45 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759



Full Text




Volume: 105 No.53°



aU

?m lovin’ it

82F
72F |

SUNSHINE
AND BREEZY |

















SOUR noney









BAHAMAS EDITION






TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

WUT eS
TE
a

PIS


















acts e sb



Police have allege

extortion to

‘Critical stage’
in investigation

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
“Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@
tribunemedia.net:

FREEPORT ~
Senior Assistant Com-
missioner of Police’
Marvin Dames
revealed yesterday that
Grand Bahama police
have the document that was
allegedly being used to extort
some $25 million from actor
John Travolta.

Although police ae

reached a “critical stage”
their investigation, Mr Danis
“noted that inquiries are still
continuing. — E
US celebrity John Travolta
complained of attempted
extortion more than a week
ago to Grand Bahama police,
which led to the arrest of Sen-
ator Pleasant Bridgewater,

‘hospital employee Tarino |

Lightbourne and PLP MP
Obie Wilchcombe.

Yesterday, Lightbourne
was formally arraigned in New
Providence on charges of
attempted extortion and con-
spiracy to extort money from
Mr Travolta.



Pleasant
Bridgewater

__At a press confer-
ence held Monday at
‘Police Headquarters,
Mr Dames said evi-
dence in police custody
does not involve any
photographs in con-
nection with the
alleged extortion plot.

“There are certainly
some reports out there
speaking to some pho-
tos. That is incorrect,
we are talking specifically
about a document that the
alleged accused purported to
have in his possession and was
using that document to extort
a substantial sum of monies
from the victim,.Mr Travolta.

_. “This matter is still under -
investigation...and so I don’t

intend to get into specifics of
the case,” he said.”

The new police chief for
Grand Bahama has also indi-
cated that no international law
enforcement agency is
involved in the case here in
the Bahamas.

“This complaint was made
to the Royal.Bahamas Police
Force because it was alleged
to have taken place in the
Bahamas. Any criminal mat-

SEE page eight



PLP expects
to replace

Bridgewater

in Senate
next week

By PAUL G TURNQUEST

. Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

THE Progressive Liberal Par-
ty is expecting to have a

replacement for Pleasant’

Bridgewater in the Senate

‘ sometime next week, former

Prime Minister Perry Christie
said yesterday.

“I am the leader of the PLP.
One of our members has been
charged in the court. That mem-

ber has resigned and I have

accepted that resignation. I will
move to replace that member
at the earliest opportunity with

SEE page eight





TARINO LIGHTBOURNE,
47, makes his way to
court yesterday...



@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A MAN chhied in an

! alleged $25 million extor-

tion plot against, Holly-

wood actor John Travol-

ta was formally arraigned

in.a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday.

Tarino Lightbourne,
a 47-year-old medical
worker, was arraigned
before Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel in court 8,
Bank Lane yesterday,
charged with conspiracy
to commit extortion and
attempted extortion.

It is alleged that
between January 2 and
20, 2009, Lightbourne
conspired with others to
commit the indictable
offence of extortion. It is
further alleged that
Lightbourne attempted
to extort $25 million



SEE page eight

Get savings built. right into your

mortgage with

~ Tim Clarke/Tribune staff











li By ALISON LOWE

murder victim and “Bain
Town fella”
yesterday remembered him as

Scandal pene
— questions over
future of the”
‘PLP leadership

[But Christie says party |
will survive the storm

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net






































AS.A former PLP Senator is scheduled to ‘
appear in court tomorrow accused of attempt-
ing to-extort $25 million from US actor John
Travolta, political observers are asking
‘whether this latest scandal could finally sink
the current PLP leadership.

Political sources yesterday suggested that,
as the future of West End ‘and Bimini MP
Obie Wilchcombe now lies in the balance, the floodgates remain
open to new contenders for the party’s deputy leader post,
and eventually leadership position.

Former Prifne Minister Perr y Christie-said he fully expects |.
detractors of his leadership within the party to spin this latest ]}:
scandal as a blight on him remaining as head of the PLP. —

“T expect them to take aim at me in this regard, but quite
frankly, the fact that I am the leader of the PLP stands the par-
ty in good stead,” Mr Christie said yesterday.

In the past when politicians, including sitting members of par--
liament, were implicated in incidents of “conflicts of interest”,
Mr Christie said his party, due to overwhelming media interest,
had taken the brunt of these fiascoes.

“There is no Punch or newspaper that can dislodge me. The
PLP, as one arm of the democracy of the Bahamas, needs
steady and firm leadership —.and leadership that you can
question politically in terms of whether or not you think I am the
right person politically, but leadership where you don’t question
it on integrity matters,” he said.

Mr ‘Christie said the PLP would survive this latest storm and
he would move very quickly to ensure that a replacement for Ms
Bridgewater’s Senate seat would be named-next week.

Having lost the government in the 2007 general gection,

SEE page eight

Perry Christie



Hed







nore uN of Onado Newbold, 32, is taken away i
32-year-old man is the
year’s fourth homicide



At his former workplace,
Bahamas Sheet Metal on Hos-
pital Lane, where 32-year-old
Onado grew up and numer-
ous members of his family still
live, a friend and co-worker
suggested his death may have
been “over a woman.”

Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FRIENDS and relatives of

Onado Newbold

an “easy, quiet” guy who kept

to himself.

your savings!



SEE page a

356.7764
352.6676/7
367.3135

Nassau:
Freeport:
Marsh Harbour:

PIDELITY

30" ANNIVERSARY
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





; * :
m@ BY GLADSTONE
THURSTON

GEORGE TOWN, Exuma —
As part of its “Take back our sou-
venir industry” policy, the goy-
ernment has now trained about
1,000 artisans throughout the
islands.

Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
executive chairman Edison Key
travelled to Exuma on the week-
end for the graduation of 30 Exu-
mians who took part in straw and

coconut craft courses. The grad-:

uates were trained by Eldina
Miller in straw work and Howard
Bevans in coconut craft. .

Mr Key was accompanied by
BAIC general manager Benjamin
Rahming, assistant general man-
ager Donnalee Bowe and a sup-
port team. They were met by
island administrator Ivan Fergu-
son, chief councillor Teddy
Clarke and other local govern-
ment officials.

Mary Deveaux, president of
the Yuma Arts Association of
handicrafters and artists, encour-
aged the graduates to be original.

“Tourists are always asking for
Bahamian-made products

because they are'tired of the Chi-
nese products with Bahamian
labels on them,” she said.












The importation of souvenirs
for sale to tourists annoys many
Extma artisans “no end”, Ms
Deveaux said: “That is especially
so when you know the products
were not made in the Bahamas
and you see the-labels that they
was made in the Bahamas. Some-
times IJ feel like taking them off
the shelves.” ‘

There was a time when



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LOCAL NEWS

Bahamian straw, sisal, coconut
and shell products were exported
to as far away as Europe, Mr Key
recalled.

Many prominent Bahamians
received university educations
and now live comfortable
lifestyles as a result of income
from straw and souvenir busi-
nesses, he said. “Things had
apparently become so good for
us that it became easier for us to

import souvenirs for the millions:

of tourists who come here.

“As a result, a once lucrative
industry, Bahamian souvenir pro-
duction, has been allowed to
almost die along the way. Well
folks, the tourist say they do not
want that cheap imported stuff
we have been passing off on
them. They say they want authen-
tic Bahamian-made memorabil-
ia.”

It is estimated that hundreds



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rices-On The Island”

STORE HOURS: “|
Monday - Saturday
8:30am - 5:30pm

He lindiloM=,4




of millions of dollars are spent
each year importing souvenirs for
tourists.

“What a big impact it would.

make if some of those millions of

dollars were to start flowing '

directly into your pockets,” Mr
Key told the graduates. “With
quality as the watchword, we
must support our own, give the
tourists what they want, and earn
a decent living so doing.
“Exuma products, not products
from half way round the world,

, Should be prominently displayed

in our straw market in downtown
Nassau.” :
BAIC is returning to Exuma

shortly to continue courses in sisal.

craft and wood turning.

*Mr Key encouraged the arti-
sans to contact BAIC’s Business
Services Division, which offers
free information on how to start a
business.








BDO) Tew
Duin VON:

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onald's Furniture
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‘Check your



children for
signs of sexual

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport

Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT —- Bahamian
parents are being advised to
“closely monitor” their chil-
dren for any changes in their

' behaviour that could be a sign

of possible sexual molestation.
‘There are monsters out
there and we need to start
noticing when children change
for whatever reasons,” said
Hezekiah Dean, School
Superintendent at the Min-
istry of Education in Freeport.
Mr Dean was very disturbed
to learn of allegations of
molestation involving a school
teacher and two former male
students on Grand Bahama.
Although the teacher denies
the allegations, Mr Dean has

made recommendation for the ©

teacher’s removal after inter-
viewing the alleged victims last
week. “

Photographs

The young men, who are 19
years of age, claim that the
sexual abuse started while
they were in grade seven and
lasted for eight years. They
also alleged that the teacher
took nude photographs of
them. .

“In my opinion, this kind of
thing should never happen. It
should never be a case where
a young man, a student in
school, male or female, is
exploited by an adult, espe-
cially an adult with an acute
responsibility like being a
teacher.”

The teacher, who the boys
have accused, has been placed
on probation and is presently
in New Providence awaiting
an official decision in the mat-
ter by the Ministry of Educa-
tion.

“What still bothers me is
how many other predators are
out there in our schools. In
addition to students at Eight
Mile Rock High, we have the
whole Bahamas to think of,”
Mr Dean said.

“T want to say to the per-
sons out there who engage in
such acts, if you want to be
predators leave the children

alone if that is your lifestyle.”

Mr Dean said that teachers
are held in high esteem and
trusted by students and par-
ents.

“It took a lot of courage for
the young men to come for-
ward and say the things they
said and when their character
is at stake, and for-that rea-
son we are not releasing the

- names of the former students

or their parents,” he said.
“T would like to send a mes-

sage to all-our parents that I °

think we need to have a closer
monitoring of all our young
boys and girls.

“We need to_be monitoring
our kids more closely, talk
with them more often, and
take time to look at them real-
ly carefully and monitor their
actions and notice changes of



molestation’

Bahamian
parents
advised to
monitor
youngsters for
changes in

behaviour _

behaviour,” said Mr Dean.

Mr Dean said that the
young men are very distressed
by the alleged abuse.

Sexual abuse, also referred
to as molestation, is the forc-
ing of undesired sexual acts
by one person upon another.

‘When the victim is younger

than the age of consent it is

‘referred to as child sexual

abuse. .
Suicidal
)

Some physical signs of sex-
ual abuse include: habit dis-
orders such as biting, rocking,
eating disorders, frequent acci-
dents or self-injurious behav-

‘jour, suicidal, constipation,

pain or discomfort on urina-
tion, and bacterial infections.

School psychologist Dr
Pamula Mills said parents
need to understand their chil-
dren’s growth and develop-
ment, personalities, and idio-
syncrasies “so that when chil-
dren are acting outside of the
norm they will know it is a red
flag and that something is
probably amiss.”

Dr Mills said that parents
also need to be aware of their
children's whereabouts.

“That is a major concern for
this Grand Bahama area. You
need to know with whom your
children are hanging out with,
peers.as well as adults. .

“And parents don’t need be
as trusting as they are, being
an adult is not tantamount to
being a good person,” she
said.



“What still
bothers me is
how many other
predators are
out there in our
schools. In
addition to
students at Eight -
Mile Rock High,
we have the |
whole Bahamas.

to think of.” =



Hezekiah Dean

en |

SN

rN
on

a
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3





Magistrate
discharges
four accused
of murdering
alleged hit man

FOUR men accused of the
November 2007 shooting
death of alleged hit-man
Samuel “Mouche” McKen-
zie were discharged yester-
day after a magistrate ruled
that there was no evidence at
all to connect them to the
murder.

Stephen Stubbs, Dashino
Wilson, Marlon Smith and
Adrian Edgecombe had
been charged in the Novem-
ber 22, 2007, murder of
Samuel McKenzie and the
attempted murder of Keith
Woodside. ‘

The four men were also
discharged in relation to the
attempted murder of Wood-
side, who was wounded dur-
ing the shooting. .

McKenzie, 35, was out on
bail on a murder charge at
the time he was killed.

According to reports,
McKenzie was shot seven
times in broad daylight on
Wilson Street off Hay Street.

Stubbs, Wilson, Smith and
Edgecombe appeared yester-
day before Magistrate. Susan
Sylvester in Court 11, Nas-
sau Street.

Stubbs was also discharged
in connection with a causing
harm charge yesterday. He
had been accused of causing
harm to Chief Inspector
Bernard Bonamy on Decem-
ber 4, 2007, while he was
being taken to court for his
arraignment in connection °
with McKenzie’s murder.

Man in custody,
another sought
over firearm
discovery

‘ONE man is'‘in custody
and another is being sought
by police-in connection with
‘the discovery of an illegal «
firearm near St Andrew’s .
Presbyterian Church.

Officers of the Central
Police Station were in the
area of the Central Bank of
the Bahamas on Shirley
Street when they saw two
men on a motorcycle some-
time after 7pm on Sunday.

As the officers approached
the two men, the motorcycle
sped off.

Near the-church yard of St
Andrew’s Presbyterian Kirk,
located on Shirley Street, the
officers found a .9mm hand-
gun with seven live rounds of
ammunition. ;

Police believe the two men
on the motorcycle disposed
of the gun and the ammuni-
tion.

The officers called for
‘assistance and moments later
police stopped the motorcy-
cle in the area of Mackey -
‘Street. A 20-year-old man —
was taken into custody and is
being questioned in the mat-
ter.

The second man is still
being sought by police

i The Tribune wants to hear
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making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds fora
good cause, campaigning

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area orhave wonan |
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If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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ALLEGED JOHN TRAVOLTA EXTORTION PLOT

Christie declares his support for



Obie Wilchcombe despite rift talk

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE talk of a rift, for-
mer Prime Minister Perry
Christie yesterday declared his
support for his parliamentary
colleague Obie Wilchcombe,
whose name has been drawn
into the mire surrounding an
alleged attempt to extort mil-
lions of dollars from John Tra-
volta.

record to assure the public of
his total innocence while anoth-
er parliamentarian, former Sen-
ator Pleasant Bridgewater, is
expected to appear before’ the
courts tomorrow to be charged
in connection with the matter.
The minister of tourism in Mr
Christie’s former administra-
tion, Mr Wilchcombe has said
that after being informed that
“someone was doing something
untoward”, he phoned the Tra-
voltas’ lawyers, Michael Ossi

and Michael McDermott, and ~

passed on some information.
Mr Wilchcombe was picked
up by the police on Friday last

Mr Wilchcombe has gone on

BH Some pundits predict controversy could lead to PLP ditching MP

HB Opposition Leader phones ex-Tourism Minister to encourage him





week and questioned about his
role in the matter.

He was released that evening
and has not been charged with
any offence. However the pollit-
ical fall-out has been consider-
able, with some pundits saying
the matter could lead to the par-
ty leader ditching the MP.‘

But yesterday, Mr Christie
said that despite the whispers
emanating from the political

“He remains
my friend —
notwithstanding
public perception.”

Perry Christie (left) on

_ Obie Wilchcombe (right) —

rumour-mill, he is not calling
for Mr Wilchcombe’s resigna-
tion. In fact, he said that he is
supportive of Mr Wilchcombe
and has phoned the MP to
encourage him.

“T have taken what he has
said. At all material times he

has acted responsibly in this ©

matter notwithstanding the talk
on the street and whatever else
people may believe.

INTERVIEW WITH BAR ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT WAYNE MUNROE

Pleasant Bridgewater ‘will not

be disbarred - unless convicted’

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

UNLESS she is convicted of
the charges against her, for-
mer PLP Senator and lawyer
Pleasant Bridgewater will not
face the possibility of disbar-
ment, president of the Bar
Association Wayne Munroe
said yesterday.

Even in the case of a con-
viction, Mr Munroe told The
Tribune, the matter would still
be subject to a review by the
Bahamas Bar Association's
ethics committee. —

It would be up to the com-
mittee to determine if the mat-
ter should be forwarded to a
disciplinary tribunal, which
then would decide if Ms
Bridgewater should be
expelled from the legal com-
munity, he said.

"The record of the proceed- —

ing and the conviction, if it
stood, would no doubt be sent
to the ethics committee, who
would have to make a qualita-
tive decision to send it up or
not to the disciplinary tribunal
for hearing," he said.

Mr Munroe emphasised that
lawyers, just like ordinary cit-
izens, are afforded the pre-
sumption of innocence.

"Lawyers aren't treated any
different than any other mem-

' ber of the public. If you're

charged with something the

Wayne Munroe

person who charged you has
to prove their case, (but)
you're not assumed to be
guilty because you're a
lawyer," he said.

American actor John Tra-
volta made a complaint of
attempted extortion over a
week ago to Grand Bahama
police.

Yesterday, Tarino Light-.
bourne, an employee of the '

Rand Memorial Hospital in
Grand Bahama, was formally
arraigned in New Providence

_ on charges of attempted extor-

tion and:conspiracy to extort
money from Mr Travolta.

Ms Bridgewater is expected
to be arraigned in a New Prov-

Brite tein photographs
‘not taken by BIS employee’

Bahamas Information Services has denied that photographs
showing Obie Wilchcombe outside a Police Station in Grand
Bahama were taken by a BJS employee.

This comes after a US entertainment website TMZ.com
reprinted the photographs with deputy director of BIS Sharon

Turner’s name attached.

“BIS wishes to inform the public that these pictures were not
taken by the officer named; neither were they taken by anyone
authorised by Bahamas Information Services.

“The photographer who took them obviously wished to
remain anonymous because when he sent them out electron- .
ically he accompanied them with instructions clearly stating
that no byline should be attached,” a BIS statement said.



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idence court tomorrow on
charges of abetment to extort
and conspiracy to extort.

Mr Munroe explained the
country's laws regarding extor- -
tion as follows: "It (the law)
says whoever extorts any prop-

erty from any person by means .

of threats is liable to impris-
onment, and (for) aggravated
extortion, that whoever for the -
purpose of extortion accuses
or threatens to accuse a person -

whether living or dead of an -
infamous offence shall be .

liable for imprisonment".

The accused persons could
each be facing a maximum of
five years in prison if convict-
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“He is my colleague and until
such time as there are matters
that I have to address of any

substance that applies to him, -
he remains my colleague; he’

remains my friend — notwith-
standing public perception,” he
said. fae
Yesterday, a political source
said: “They really went after
him in the wrong way .. . They
can’t produce any tape on Obie





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Wilchcombe on no discussion.
He was never a part of any dis-

_ cussions pertaining to extortion.

There could be no discussion of
Wilchcombe on any tape or
anything like that.”

’ In his first interview since
being released from police cus-
tody, Mr Wilchcombe told Us
Magazine that he is innocent of
any allegation that might be
brought against him, and that

he did a “noble thing”.

When asked if he sought or:
expected any compensation
from the Travoltas, Mr Wilch-
combe was adamant that he
never once asked the family for

‘anything. .

“Never once, expecting any-

-thing!

“This is ridiculous and
absurd.
“The Travoltas are suffering,

‘it’s just outright foolish,” he

said.





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PAGE 4,

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR



NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI








Being Bound to Swear to the Dogmas of No Master
LEON E. re DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K. CSG;
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-199]

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

Publisher/Editor 1972-

s

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608



ALMOST 40 years.ago Sir Etienne Dupuch,
then publisher of this newspaper, drove up to
thée'entrance of Nassau International Airport to
let a passenger off. However, the arrivals
entrance was blocked by a car, ‘obviously hasti-
ly parked. Other than stopping to let passengers
off, the area was clearly marked: “No parking.”

As Sir Etienne pulled up,.he saw a young
police officer walk.towards the parked car,.
inspect it, look at the blue licence plate, then rub
his chin and hastily walk away.

Sir Etienne drew alongside the young police-
man, pointed out the car to him, remarked ’on
the government licence plate, and urged the
young man to-do his duty. The. young officer
looked confused.

He told Sir Etienne that he would take off his

uniform jacket.and let Sir Etienne book the car .
and driver for him, but-it:was more, he said,

than he a lowly. police. officer would dare do.
The officer quickly walked. away.”
Sir Etienne waited to see if it was a chauffeur

or the owner of the official car who had parked. «

the vehicle: Eventually a high ranking member

of Sir Lynden Pindling’s cabinet came out of the

airport; got into the car, and drove off.

Of course, Sir Etienne commented on the

incident in this column it in He next edition ‘of The
Tribune.-

In those days. (and even. tata. recent times, Bae

members of the inner circle had ‘special privi-

leges. We believe that:much of the disdain of -

today’s youth for the: law is the result of this
unfair distribution of justice.

In the eighties, we had students who would
dabble in drugs. If caught, they'were left with a
criminal record and could not réturn to'school

abroad. One day.a top politician’s son was

picked up.:The miracle: was. that he went to
court at all; but once in court the plea was that

a conviction would affect his studies abroad..

There was no conviction. :

At the height of the drug.era in the eighties
one of our staff —a cleaner in our press room. -

—was arrested and sent to prison for peddling
drugs. He must have had influential contacts,
because he was sprung fairly quickly from the
cells. At the time, we were out of the country.
On our return;.we sent for this young. man'to
disctiss his problem. No matter what anyone
said about him after hours; as an employee he
was loyal and. kept the press room spotlessly
clean. We did not want to lose him.

However, to remain on our staff it had to be

impressed upon him that he had to give up his-

extra curricular:activities: We had along dis-..:~
the police are only after the little man. Today,

fhe police are after all who transgress the law.

cussion: We must have: had’some influence on

‘him, because our staff often laughed that they
hated to see us s leave the island, | Because 3 it ere ss

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only then that this young man got into trouble.

with the law.
Anyway, during our discussion-he asked a
pertinent question. Why, he wanted to know,

must he go to prison, when there were impor-
‘tant people at the top who could get away with

what he was doing, and never be caught? He
then called off an impressive list of names.
Politicians were well represented on his list.
Why me? he wanted to know. Because, we told
him, you are easy prey, the others think they are
above the law, and they are protected. “There is
no one protecting you so you had better be
good, because for you there is no Santa Claus.”
Life was unfair, he concluded. Some had to
answer for their sins, others did not:
However, in the past few days, the tables

- have been turned. For the first time Bahamians

are seeing that we are all equal before the law.
This is not to say that the politicians now being
questioned in the extortion case that has sullied

* . thé Bahamas’s name around the world, are

guilty of any wrong doing. However, what is

‘important is that regardless of their position

they have been called upon to answer to the

accusations against them before the Bar of Jus- -

tice. It is the same Bar before which our press

“room cleaner was held accountable.

“These are exciting times,” one police officer

-commented yesterday. “This is the first time
that we are being able to do our job without ~

political interference.
“We told you to watch out for these new
boys, they: mean business. When we meet with

, them we-have to be accountable for our sta-

tions, no excuses are accepted. These are real-

‘ly exciting times for us. This is a new day!”

The “new boys” to whom this officer referred
‘with:such enthusiasm are Assistant Commis-
sioner Marvin Dames, in charge of Grand

Bahama, and Assistant Commissioner Ellison
Greenslade, deputy to Acting Commissioner
Reginald Ferguson in New. Providence. Mr
Dames headed the investigation against the two
persons now accused in connection with

\ attempted extortion. These two young police

officers have recently returned from special

training with the Royal Canadian Mounted

Police in Canada, and they intend to do their

_ duty.

The force should be praised for doing its
job. The complaints we now hear are coming
mainly from political quarters. This is not sur-
prising because now, with these men in charge,
politicians ‘are also drawn within the orbit. of
the law. There can no longer be the cry that

ee new cay has dawned in the Bahamas...








































The great
dilemma
facing PLP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Kenyatta Gibson's crossing
the floor to join the FNM is a
blow to the Opposition PLP
beyond the fact that they have
lost an elected Member of
Parliament to the other par-
ty. That is always hurtful to.a
political party but not neces-
sarily grievous.

The bigger problem for the
PLP is that Mr. Gibson's
defection represents a con-
stant stream of defections
from that party because of

fundamental problems and |

irreconcilable differences at
the heart of the organization.
Not everybody understood

. this — or wanted to believe it
— when the Dissident Eight

left to form the FNM in the
early 1970s.’ By 1984 when
Hubert Ingraham and Perry
Christie left, the picture was
becoming clearer. Mr. Ingra-

-ham wisely opted to stay out’
while Mr. Christie took a swim. '
back.

The leadership of the.PLP
became corrupt and arrogant
very soon after the great vic-

* tory in-1967. The full stories

of the Bahamas Airways fias-

. co, the Freeport Benguet deal

and other scandals have yet
to be told.

By the 1980s it should have ©

been clear to all those close

. to Bahamian polities that the




Os Mbel

letters@tribunemedia.net



PLP had been infected with a
combination of destructive
viruses including a personality
cult, a pervasive attitude of
entitlement and exclusivity,
and rampant corruption.

The idea that the leader-
ship could do anything, get
away with anything, soon
spread throughout the orga-
nization and the government,
even to the public service
where some. connected civil
servants felt that the label PLP
protected them from any con-
sequences for their corrupt
ways. ,

This pathology was per-

fectly demonstrated during the,
drug years of the 1980s when

free-wheeling corruption was
the order of the day and the
PLP Government appeared to
be the facilitator of the
Colombian drug dealers’
takeover rather than*protec-
tor of the Bahamian patrimo-
ny. sy
There was a hope that after
10: years in opposition, the
PLP might have purged itself
of these malignancies, but it
soon became apparent that
the old viruses of entitlement,
exclusivity and immunity were

still very much alive and ready
to run riot again at the first
opportunity.

And that is exactly what

‘they did when the PLP took

power again in 2002 with the
sordid Anna Nicole Smith
affair being the most spectac-
ular symptom of the infections
but not necessarily the worst.

No one, no. leader can do
anything about it. Mr.
Christie has been roundly crit-
icized and abused for his
apparent inability or unwill-
ingness to do anything about
it.

But the truth is that he or
any other leader who attempts
to administer the necessary
curatives would be set upon
by a vast entrenched group of
hundreds who control the
councils of the party and who
cannot be disciplined nor
removed.

Mr. Christie is still the best
that the PLP has to offer but
he will remain powerless until
years of attrition can rid the
organization of its pervasive
infections — provided they do
not pass the diseases on to the
next generation. That is the
diagnosis — and the great
dilemma of the PLP.

OLD TIMER
Nassau,
January 25, 2009

‘Traffic engineers need to”
be looking at access. roads.

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It seems two Police Officers’

have found: the fountain for

‘traffic fines by positioning

themselves along the access
road that runs and connects
Solomon’s Super Centre, First
Caribbean Bank office, Prime
Bahamas and City Meat.

Although signed at the
Abundant. Life Road end by
the traffic light the actual
entrance to this road is
unsigned, the sign has long
ago been removed... .

May I suggest that the
authorities will simply turn the
traffic flow on this road

-. around permitting traffic to

NY

enter from East-West High-

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‘and not permitting a westerly
flow of traffic from the end
closer to the East-West High-
way-Marathon traffic light.
There should not be the right
to turn left onto East-West
Highway the same access road
driving back towards the
Marathon light.

Further all over the island
the traffic engineers need to

be looking at where access on |

certain roads to cross a road

with a heavy traffic flow

should be stopped — take

Shirley Street as a good exam-
le.

Along Shirley Street -you
have access crossings which
permit traffic to cross the two
westerly lanes of traffic to
enter roads.

The road opposite where
Joe & Berlin used to be is an
obvious example — further
west where traffic can cross
not only from the north but
the south causing traffic to
come to a grinding halt.

All traffic on a one way
street like Shirley should only
permit a left turn with the flow
of traffic. *

The same.goes on West Bay

— the congestion in the morn-
ing and afternoon is simply
caused by traffic trying to
‘cross and access West Bay
against the flow of traffic; of
course this unfortunately will

not go away soon with the

decision to retain the contain-

’ er traffic on Arawak Cay

something all. residents
between Arawak Cay and
Goodman’s Bay were hoping
would go, but of course some,
think this is progress.

We need to add a third
access lane where space is
available.for left .lane traffic
— this would greatly assist
traffic flow for west bound
East-West Highway traffic at
Marathon and at the end of
Harrold Road for example. -

Traffic Lights — as we
arrive at the second year with
them can we have a decision
— yes we will have traffic
lights or we will remove them?
It can’t have taken this long
to set-up a maintenance pro-
gramme or are we so ineffi-
cient?

H HUMES
Nassau,
January 11, 2009.

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In brief

British govt keen on
helping Carihbean
countries fight crime

THE British government
wants to help build the
Caribbean’s capacity to
tackle crime, according to
Fraser Wheeler, newly-
accredited plenipotentiary
representative of the Unit-
ed Kingdom to CARI-
COM.

In remarks after he pre-
sented his letters of cre-
dence to CASLICOM Secre-
tary General Edwin Car-
rington, Mr Wheeler said
the United Kingdom and
the Caribbean have a “joint
shared interest” in con-
fronting crime and that his
government “remains
keen” on helping to build
the region’s capacity in this
regard.

Mr Wheeler, who is also
United Kingdom High
Commissioner to Guyana,
is the first British envoy to
be accredited to CARI-
COM.

He hailed the partner-
ship between the UK and
CARICOM on security
during the Cricket World
Cup in 2007, as a “great
success” — one that needs
to be solidified in the
future.

Mr Wheeler said he
hopes his government and
CARICOM can work
together to achieve this
goal. ’

Commenting on the
“extraordinary relation-
ship” between the UK and
the Caribbean, he said it is
“characterised by evolution
from dependence to inde-
pendence and partnership.”

The relationship had
matured to one of “mutual
interest, respect and sup-
port; underpinned by
shared values, understand-
ing and real affection,” he
added.

These factors, Mr Wheel-
er said, are “powerful
tools” with which both the
UK and CARICOM can
“confront challenges and
take opportunities together
in this increasingly complex
world.”



LOCAL NEWS Aan

IULOVAI, JVAINUAMT 27, CUUd, 1 mL

Man claims he was wrongfully



arrested and beaten by police

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ANOTHER claim of police
brutality has surfaced with a Gar-
den Hills man alleging that police
wrongfully arrested him, suffo-
cated him and beat him with a
baseball bat during interrogation.

After being arrested on Janu-
ary 20 for questioning in con-
nection with a house break-in,
Demario "Slugz" Rolle claims
he was the victim of a series of
threats and beatings while he

remained cuffed and defenseless .

at the East Street South Police
Station.

A report made to the police
Complaints and Corruption Unit
documents his allegations.

The self-employed barber and
musician claimed he was
marched into an interrogation

Self-employed barber and
musician makes allegations



room, handcuffed and then
pushed to the floor. One of the
four officers in the room said Mr
Rolle almost got him fired and
that an officer "had a beating"
for him, according to the report,
which was filed on January 22.
Mr Rolle told The Tribune
yesterday that while one of the
officers questioned him about
stolen money and phone cards,
he maintained his innocence.

"He started tellin' me, 'Big —

man, we ga' make you talk,’" Mr
Rolle said.

Then, one of the officers
pulled a tam, or woven hat, over
Mr Rolle's face and covered that

"That's when they start beatin'
me," he claimed. "Punchin' me,
beatin' me over and repeatedly.
Now I screaming, right, so what
do they do? They turn on the
radio and turn it up so anyone

downstairs couldn't hear."

Mr Rolle claimed he was
somehow able to manoeuvre his

‘hands, which were cuffed behind

his back, into a position where
he could puncture the plastic bag
with his fingers, which helped
him breathe.

He said that throughout the
30-minute beating, the officers
repeated the tam/plastic bag
combination in an effort to get
him to make a confession. One

officer — in the presence of a
senior officer — reportedly
attacked Mr Rolle with a base-
ball bat, hitting him some "20
times" on the left buttock.

He was left with injuries to the
chest, abdomen and buttocks,
and abrasions on both wrists,
according to a doctor's report
included in his complaint.

Mr Rolle, 28, claimed that
after the beating he was hauled
to a restroom and told to clean
himself up.

He was released from custody
without being charged about two
hours later, he said.

Yesterday officer-in-charge of
the Complaints and Corruption
Unit Macktavius Daniels said his
office had received the report.

If the claims are substantiated
the matter will proceed to police
tribunal, he said.

According to Mr Daniels, the

officers will remain on active
duty until the investigation is
complete.

Mr Rolle was arrested by three
officers attached to the East
Street South police station on
January 19 around 7pm outside
of Hillside Lounge and Bar in
Garden Hills.

He said that he was
approached by an officer who
told him he had to come in for
questioning, pulled him out of
the bar, and with the help of two
plainclothes officers, took him
into custody,

Mr Rolle claims the officers
did not read him his rights or tell
him why he was being arrested.

Supt Stephen Dean, officer-in-
charge of the station, confirmed
that the matter was being inves-
tigated by the police complaints
unit and that whatever the results
it would be acted on.

with a plastic bag, he said.

Laid-off worker wants govt to intervene to protect investment

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunémedia.net

AFTER DEDICATING years to refur-
bishing the house he and his wife bought
nine years ago, a father laid-off from Pio-
neer Shipping last year is calling on the
government to intervene to protect his
life’s investment.

Dennis Gibson, 46, is hitting out at Sco-

tiabank for what he alleges are harsh busi- .

ness practices that do not take account of
the poor state of the economy and his his-
tory as a reliable borrower.

“They are threatening to take the house
if I don’t take their deal, But the deal is not
a deal, it’s threatening to take my wife
and I deeper than we were before. It’s
making us more vulnerable,” claimed Mr
Gibson, a former construction worker.

The 46-year-old has a mortgage with
the bank on his property on Cedar Way,
off Carmichael Road, which originally
required him to make 360 payments of
$1080 per month. “We've been paying this
mortgage for the nine years, ” said Mr Gib-
son.

However, for the last three months he
and his wife — who is still maintaining her

job at a local hotel — have not been able to
pay the full amount, instead offering the
bank $800, he claims.

“Things are kinda rough on her trying to
pay these bills by herself,” he said. “I got
laid off when Pioneer closed: Since then
I’ve only picked up a little side job, and
when you do see a job it’s often a job that
pays you too little to pay your bills with.”

Last week his bank asked the couple to
come in for a talk. “They told us they
wanted to help us,” said Mr Gibson.

‘Payments

He claims the bank asked the couple to
accept a two month “grace period” on
their original loan payments in conjunction
with a separate $4,000 loan — amounting to
an additional $150 per month to be repaid
over the next three years — to pay off the

debt they accumulated during the months:

they fell short of their full payments.

Mr Gibson believes that the deal is no
help at all and will in fact speed up he and
his wife’s financial nosedive.

“In these kinda times, what they are
asking you to do, if you do it you can only
last for what — three or four months? You

know that you won’t be able to meet that
amount the way the economy is. Things
aren’t getting any better.”

“Then they gave us an ultimatum saying
if we fall at any given time after that,
they’ll put the house up for sale.

“To me it ain’t right because there are
other ways they can deal with this,” he
said.

Mr Gibson asked why the bank couldn’t
extend the life of the loan; thereby reduc-
ing the monthly payments.

“They may say age is a factor, that that’s
why they say they can’t push it back. But
you are insured - so even if you die they
still win!” he said.

On October 11th 2008 Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced that the gov-
ernment would implement, by as early as
November that year, a “relief programme”
for mortgagors struggling to meet their
monthly payments due to “unemployment;
underemployment or other unforeseen
circumstances.”

“We would like to ensure that these
persons don’t end up losing their homes
because of what we consider to be this
temporary setback — even though we do
not know how long this temporary situa-

‘tion is likely to exist,” the PM said.

However in late November Mr Ingra-
ham, pressed to clarify what form the assis-
tance might take, said the government did
not intend to “go into the public treasury
and take out the people’s money to pay
other people’s mortgages.”

Banks .

He said that the government had been
encouraging banks to work with their
clients, adding that those with good cred-
it histories “who are unable to make those
arrangements will be able to benefit from
a government programme.”

There has been no word on the assis-
tance plan since that time.

Mr Gibson suggested the government
must at a minimum ensure that banks are
not profiting from people’s hardship.

“The bank ain’t worrying about the peo-
ple. Every single loss — which to these peo-
ple is their entire life’s investment — comes
as gain to the bank; they got your money
and they got your property,” claimed the
ex-shipyard worker.

Messages left seeking comment from
Scotiabank yesterday was not returned up

_to,press time.

ete ae Ts
Bahamas prepare
for Spring Festival








CHINESE people living in
the Bahamas and Bahamians
of Chinese descent are gearing
up to celebrate the Spring Fes-
tival next month.

The festival is the most
important annual celebration
for Chinese people; the cultur-
al equivalent, of Christmas in
western countries.

Although the meaning and
methods of celebrating the
Spring Festival have changed
with time, the importance of
the event is “incomparable”,
according to the Chinese
Embassy in Nassau.

The festival, which celebrates
spring, or the "great, harvest",
has an almost 4,000 year histo-
ry.

According to tradition, the
Spring Festival lasts from the
23rd day of 12th lunar month to
the 15th day of first lunar
month, and the climax falls on
the night before the first-day of
the first lunar month.

People participate in activi-
ties all over China to welcome
the spring. In the countryside,
preparations start at the begin-
ning of 12th lunar month. Fam-

ilies clean their houses and .

wash their clothes and bed
sheets. The idea is that fresh
new clothes and sheets ‘reflect
the fresh new year.

In the city, people celebrate
by attending temple fairs, and
gatherings held-in parks.

There are different customs
in different parts of China, but
the whole family coming
together for a dinner on new
year’s eve is a common prac-
tice everywhere.

In southern China, the
reunion dinner usually includes
more than 10 dishes. Particu-
larly common is bean curd and
fish, because the pronunciation
of these two foods together
means "wealthy" in Chinese!

In northern China, most
meals feature dumplings which
are made and eaten by the
whole family.

ied 7.8
EXTERMINATORS

YR
id i 7a dar IY



Families usually stay up late

and set off fireworks on new -

year's eve. The next day,
women don festival dresses and
begin to visit or welcome fami-
ly, friends and loved ones.

Among the other activities
that commemorate the festival
are opera performances and
movie screenings.

As the standard of living in
China improves in some areas,

the Spring Festival has begun to’

evolve. The newest fashion is
travelling to celebrate the occa-
sion in a different part of the
country.

According to the Chinese
Zodiac, 2009 is a Year of the
Ox which lasts from January
26, 2009 to. February 14, 2010.

The Chinese new year begins
on the date that corresponds
with the second new moon after
the winter equinox, so it varies
from year to year.

The years progress in eels
of 12 and each year is repre-









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~ Thursday, Jan. 15, 2009:

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also gearing up for the event.



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





illegal immigrants
are barred from
Florida programme

@ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.

AN APPELLATE court
has barred illegal immi-
grants from a state rehabili-
tation programme for peo-,
ple who have suffered brain

_or spinal cord injuries,
according to Associated
Press.

The 1st District Court of

Appeal on Monday reversed

-an administrative law
judge’s ruling that had been
appealed by the state.

The decision came in the
case of Miguel Mora
Rodriguez, a’ Mexican citi-
zen now living in Hardee
County. He was injured
when the-vehicle he was rid-

ing in was struck by a drunk-

en driver.

His lawyer, JoNel New-
man, says the appellate rul-
ing was narrowly drawn to
cover only the brain and
spinal cord programme. She
says her client received a.
small settlement and is
ambulatory but could bene-
fit from rehabilitation.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award..s «i. shy5) Sa oe ates
If so, call us.on 322-1986...
and share your story.

‘“



In brief



Pastor condemns use of
churches for opening of Assizes

A LEADING pastor has con-
demned the judiciary’s practice of
using Anglican churches for the open-
ing of Assizes as “wrong and wicked.”

Bishop Simeon Hall told the Rotary
Club of Grand Bahama that the prac-
tice “must be condemned” because
judges ought not to favour one denom-
ination over another.

His comments-came after the

Freeport judiciary held its opening cer-
emony at the Anglican.Pro Cathedral.

“For some ‘time I have asked sever-
al leading persons who make up our
judiciary why is it that their annual
Assizes openings are held exclusively
at Christ Church Cathedral.

“TI suspect the colonial tradition of a
state church, but 36 years after inde-
pendence this practice must be dis-





continued as it retards the spirit of

ecumenism which many churches’

enjoy.
“Not only was the annual opening of

Assizes held at Christ.Church Cathe-

dral in Nassau again this year, but I

~ could not help but notice that it was

held at the Pro Cathedral here in
Freeport.

Judiciary

“Today I go on record as stating that
the practice of the judiciary holding
its opening Assizes at Anglican church-

-es is wrong, wicked and must be con-

demned.”
Bishop Hall said there ought to be

no practice, no ceremony and no exer-
































cise that lends weight to the opinion
that sitting judges favour one denom-
ination to the exclusion of all others.

“I further call on all those concerned
to consider the negative message this
practice sends to the remainder of the,

. Christian community throughout the
Bahamas.”

He called for a halt to all colonial- .
style discriminatory practices and said
the judiciary must lead in this effort:

“All forms of discrimination, be they
racial, political, and/or religious must
be removed,” he added.

“J remind you that each of us must
work for the day when the Bahamas
will truly be a place where all are
equal, all are free and all have a fair
chance to embrace some of what this
fair land has to offer.”

A FIRST step toward
lowering the cost of food
has been taken by the hus-
band-wife team of Lynden
and Astrid Tinker. They
have started First Step Gro-
cery Club, which allows
members to save 15 to 30
per cent on grocery and
household items as-well as
meats.

president, reveals that over
1,000 people have already
signed up, and inquiries are
pouring into their offices on
Romer Street, Fox Hill.

Response

Noting that these are
tough times for families and
since food is a necessity,
Mrs Tinker says they.are
not too surprised by the
overwhelming response they
have received so far.

Commandant, Police College; Tim Brown, Deputy Chief of Missions, United States Embassy,
Nassau; Captain Stephen Russell, director, NEMA. -

NEMA hosts disaster _
management workshop

Astrid, who serves'‘as:

_, What we. do is ask our.
members to submit 4 list of
items, and once half of them |
request those items, we then.

Anglican



een Ell

rocery Club to reduce cost of food

do bulk buying in Florida
and bring over containers
every 12 weeks.”
Additionally, feeding the
family can be less of a bur-
den, as low weekly or
monthly payment plans are
available to members.
First Step Grocery Club
is an offshoot of First Step

. Development Company,

which was started by the
Tinkers in 2007.

“With the downturn in
the building industry, we
had to look at other busi-
ness opportunities,” Mrs
Tinker says.

“We are very excited
about this new venture and
happy that. we can make a
big difference in bringing
food to struggling families.”

She added they can offer
the low prices because they
do not have any of the nor-
mal foodstore overheads.

_ Her 18-year-old daughter,
Maradona, who-is, vice-pres-
ident of the club, assists
Astrid, a retired banker in

the business: i

+

Kristaan HA Ingraham II/BIS



4 Conditions apgty. * Taderrark of The Bark of Novo Scots, used unc ence



BSO7AS

ll By LINDSAY THOMPSON
Bahamas Information Services

THE National Emergency Management Agency ~
(NEMA) facilitated a workshop for key personnel in
disaster management to certify them as instructors in
the proper presentation of information on disasters
when they arise.

The workshop, held January 19-23 at the Police
College on Thompson Boulevard, was sponsored
by the United States Agency for International
Development (USAID) and the Office of Foreign
Disaster Assistance. USAID/OFDA also sponsors
similar workshops throughout the Caribbean on

disaster managemient.

‘Director of NEMA Commander Stephen Rus-

sell said the geographical and archipelagic makeup
of the Bahamas demands that NEMA is prepared to
respond to any form of disaster or emergency event
that can disrupt the livelihood of citizens or visi-
tors in any of the islands, districts or communities.

Tim Brown, Deputy Chief of Missions at the Unit-

‘ed States Embassy in Nassau, underscored the

importance of such training exercise. He said plan-
ning is key to effectively respond to natural disasters.

Mr Brown praised NEMA and its partner
USAID/OFDA for ensuring that the country is pre-
pared for any event.

Representatives from the Caribbean. Disaster
Emergency Response Agency (CDERA) in Bar-
bados, St Lucia, Dominica, Grenada and Jamaica
also participated in the workshop.

DAs

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THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7



ie

‘ : A sng
Rana wheowihe dn 7 i

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs = DU CATING & TRAIT IC BAHAMIANS



eS .
anh nde: eadtbosned?



2
os
ee ruin ®™



The School of Education's.
Adult Workforce Education & Training —

Summer Certificate & Diploma Programmes for
Corporate Trainers
Training Managers

NOTICE

The School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions at The College of The Bahamas
wants to implement the following Allied Health programmes:



> Medical Laboratory Technology Vocational Education Teachers and

> Physical Therapy College/University Lectuters

> Nutrition and Dietetics Application Deadline January 30, 2009
> Speech Therapy

> Occupational Therapy

NOTICE

The Office of Admissions of The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise the
public that the undergraduate admission application deadline for Fall 2009 is Friday
6th, February 2009, at 4:00pm.

Interested persons may contact Dr. Zorene Curry at the School of Nursing and Allied
Health Professions at 242-325-5551.



Also, anyone interested in enrolling in the BSc. Pharmacy Programme —
for September 2009 should apply no later than February 6, 2009.




























































REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR THE DESIGN OF THE
SMALL ISLAND SUSTAINABILITY FACILITY
The College of the Bahamas is seeking the services of an Architect/Architectural Firm (with requisite
sub-consultants) to provide all design services including development of the Brief, Plans, Specifications,
and Construction Drawings and Contract Administration for the construction of the TRG Campbell: COURSE OFFERING: Beginning February 2, 2009
Small Island Sustainability Facility on land situated on Gladstone Road on the island of New: ee
Providence. The Facility is to become the home of the new undergraduate programmes in sustainability CONVERSATIONAL CREOLEL& Il PRICE: $ 250.00 per course
to be offered by the College. : igeheece baa ne Gees a peer ee ae "
ee q is pga We Ne ts age Behe ie eran ' CONVERSATIONAL FRENCH I & I | :
e selection process will consist of two, phases. The Pre-qualification Stage (Stage One) is open | mr 7 Spt eee
to all Architects/Architectural Firms licenced to practice in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas. The: BONNE Gens Sea : 7 eau ue 8s i Ge
Selection Committee will review all expressions of interest to determine the firms’ stability, relevant | ~ 01S YEA TEATT ne aan ACTOSS LLORES M
-experience, familiarity with the College of the Bahamas and its goals, the commitment to and |} ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE I
experience with sustainable design and the firms’ approach to project organization. :| CONVERSATIONAL GERMAN I DURATION: 10 Weeks
Upon completion of review of the expressions of interést, the Selection Committee will select finalists: i. HS ate
who will receive written notification for their required appointment for an in-person interview. The + TELEPHONE: 302-4584 or 302-4587 E-MAIL: ilci@cob.edu.bs
intent of the formal interview process is to provide the Committee with in-depth information from ot -t77-++--r tr tr rrr r rr ttt terre MRRP ge ee pe pa ee eer te or een Ge ee
the selected firms in order to make a final selection for the award of a contract. The Stage Two process} Ye We He HA HII AOA I II HOA II III IIE IIIA III IIIA IAI ASA I AAACA CA CA A IK
involves a two enyelope submission, the first containing the firms’ technical information and the * : * ne ea Riveh a eat oa *
second the fee proposal. After review of the technical submission and upon completion of the interview: ze PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES — SPRING 2009 x
process, the Selection Committee will rank the firms and the highest ranked firm willbe invited to | » ok
enter into contract negotiations based on their submitted fee proposal. ' z Please submit your completed x
The requests for proposal will be available for collection during normal business hours commencing ‘ok ee 2 re oo *
Tuesday 20th, January from: ne *Graduation Evaluation Forms x
Sa ad aha General, Oe to the RECORDS DEPARTMENT on or before January 30", 2009.* 5
1k *
The College of the Bahamas WN lag nr eae arta *
Poincianna & Thompson Blvds, * Graduation forms.should include: \ x
New Providence : 1 .
| Telephone: 302-4317, 302-4335 | ¥ Y ALL SIGNATURES, (i.e. student, advisor & chairperson) x
The expressions of interest are to be returned in the applicable format to the same office by 2:00 pm : x Boas A : ‘ , eS
on Friday 6th, February, 2009. Late submissions will not be accepted. i = ¥ PROOF OF PAYMENT FROM THE BUSINESS x
Mee DS ete ee ton ep eae Pe pe ee te OFFICE. (.e. stamp, receipt) *
CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE, INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT | lk 7 j *
saat PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES ~ SPRING SEMESTER ai : aS SIGNED ADVISEMENT FORM (Course Outline) x
tie. SEC. EBbE BEGINS ENDS DURATION _| DAYS. TIME. FEES RM ine ‘ - : al
bis reais awe mei eps sae ie COOK vi isda teweckectetesicdwaeucocekc G00 edie teagtoue syne cd uma awd eck ae : : Bae os .
i Eahetlas Cote Ba“ Pebs e" Mac 26 a al ee ee ek *Ale others are considered. LATE and will be forwarded to the . ae
Asian Cooking 1 200. Feb.18__Mar.25 | 6weeks' __| Wednesday 8:00pm Jf 988:00%: ue forge e .hext graduation. period (Summer 2009), Graduation forms may bi
me COOK Co a 002 as alee obtained-from the-Records Enquiry Office. a *:
Gourmet Cooking | 1 oex Feb. 16 __Mar. 23 6 weeks | Monday oooh $380.00 MK 12 ok *
Gourinet Cooking _1. 824 Feb. 18_Mar.25 [sweets | Wednesday | 0pm _| 5485.00 mk | 12) RAR I II II II RA A I IIIA III SII IIISSSISIIISISS SII I A
Cooking. 520. 6 weeks 9:00pm _| $205.00 MK CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES

Cookin: 1 820 Feb.17 Mar. 24

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1
z : : : ; : eae aR EI a et he a te pulse
Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 - ' COURSE TIME +
Making | 41 813 Feb. 17 Apr.7 8 weeks Tuesday 9:00pm $300.00 PK | 12 . DESGRIPTION
Cake & Pastry COOK : 6:00 - t a ee:
i Making li 1 814 Feb. 19 Apr. 9 8 weeks : $325.00 PK :
[eae oe '
j COOK ’ 00 - 7
Bread Making 1 810 Feb. 19 April. 9 8 weeks Thursday : not $290.00 LK :
COOK 6:00- ‘
Cake Decorating! 1 817 Feb.16 Apr. 6 8 weeks Monda 9:00pm $325.00 PK A2e fn Oe
COOK 6:00 - '
Cake Decorating 1 1 818 Feb 18 Apr. 8 8 weeks Wednesday | 9:00pm $375.00 PK 12 t
e tt S = ; .
COOK 7 6:00 - :
Holiday Baking 1 830 Feb.17 Apr. 7 8 weeks | Tuesday 9:00pm $390.00 LK 12 ;
* ‘
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All fees are included in the price quoted above; new students pay a one-time application fee of $40.00. (NON REFUNDABLE) — :
et 1
. '
Application Deadline: February 6, 2009 at 4:00 p.m. : §:30anncd-SOpm
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Prerequisites: ‘BIC Math, English &
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CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Caurse Schedule and Course Materials.
Revise d Jan 16 2009
| UESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

FAME B,

eyey- Vi se

THE TRIBUNE.



Scandal prompts
fjuestions over
future of the

PLP leadership

FROM page one

Mr Christie has been under



ex

Police have alleged

rtion document

constant political threat ever
since. Many in his party have
begun to campaign through-
out the country for the post he
has yet to vacate.

The PLP is expected to hold
a convention in November
when the deputy leadership is
expected to be contested, as
Mrs Cynthia Pratt has
announced she will not. be
seeking re-election.

Medical
worker
in court

FROM page one

from John Travolta, by
means of threats.

Lightbourne who plead-
ed not guilty to the charges
elected for a summary trial
in the Magistrate’s Court.
Director of Public Prosecu-
tions Bernard Turner object-
ed to Lightbourne being
granted bail.

Lightbourne was remand-
ed to Her Majesty’s Prison:
and is expected back in court
on Wednesday. Former Pro-
gressive Liberal Party Sena- .
tor Pleasant Bridgewater is |
also expected to be arraigned
on Wednesday in connection
with the alleged extortion
plot. Ms Bridgewater, who
lost her House of Assembly
seat at the 2007 general elec-
tion, has resigned from the
Senate and vowed to fight
the charges. She has been
granted $40,000 bail pend-
ing Wednesday’s court hear-
ing.

Reports of the alleged
extortion attempt emerged’
days after Jett Travolta, the
16-year-old son of actors
John Travolta, 54, and Kelly
Preston, 46, died of a seizure
at the family’s vacation home
in Freeport, Grand Bahama
on January 2. Jett was the

FROM page one

ter that has allegedly taken place in
the Bahamas is the responsibility of
the RBPF.

“We have the capability and con-

fidence to deal with matters such as
this or any other matter, and so in
this particular matter we had no
external help or assistance —
we needed none,” Mr Dames
said. .

Senator Bridgewater is expected

to be formally charged on Wednes-
day in New Providence. The accused
persons, if found guilty, could be
facing a maximum of five years in
prison, according to legal sources.

Mr Dames said Mr Wilchcombe
remains released pending further
inquiries.

When asked why Senator Bridge-
water was being arraigned in the
capital instead of Grand Bahama,
Mr Dames pointed out that there is
no special reason why she is pehieds

uled to be arraigned in
New Providence.

“Jt is not unusual as
you have had any num-
ber of matters (in the
past) where persons were
arraigned in New Provi-
dence.

“We gave Senator
Bridgewater bail after
she was charged for the
offence and you would
appreciate the fact as
well that she was the first
person in police custody.

“The investigation did



tracted period of time
before she was arraigned

o...the prudent thing to
do is extend bail.

“You will appreciate
the fact that this is an
ongoing investigation and
so there are things that
we needed to do and we
continue to do to move
this investigation for-
ward, so the arraignment
is not critical,” he said.

Mr Dames assured the

special treatment or con-

not stop when she was SENIOR ASSISTANT Commis- sideration given to any

charged and so the inves-
tigation continued.

tant for us to have her

arraigned right there and then, and
we were into the weekend as well,
and we certainly did not want to
keep her in custody for any pro-

sioner of Police Marvin Dames Of the principals involved
said Obie Wilchcombe (above) in the matter.

“Given that fact, we remains released pending fur-
thought it was not impor- ther inquiries.

“The focus of the
police throughout these
inquiries has always been
to inquire into these allegations, and
place persons before the court wher-
ever the evidence led to support the
charges,” he said.

public that there was no.

A ZNS reporter then questioned
Mr Dames about the release of
information to the media, saying

_that it appeared the international

media was being given information
more readily than the local press in
Grand Bahama.

“J don’t know if that is correct
because we continue to update
members of the local press. I have
entertained all calls and met with
any number of press persons from
Grand Bahama and Nassau.

“The police released a prepared
statement on Friday to the press.
That.statement you ought to have
been guided by. Any other com-
ments coming from any other sector
of the press we have no control over,
that.

“We are not dealing with specu-
lation and there is a lot of specula-
tion out there. We can’t control any-
thing else because we have to give

‘you the facts, and the facts are all we

are dealing with,” he said.

—32- ‘year-old | man is the

year’s fourth homicide

FROM page one

“That disappoint me, man. .
That’s my bredren!” said the.
friend, who did not wish to be’

named.
Like the victim’s father, the

pS friend said he had heard about

Onado’s killing in Nassau Vil-
lage — which occurred at
around 9pm Sunday — early

ek yesterday morning.

“All of us here today and
tomorrow. we gone,” he

reflected, “Today I’m aliye but,,

only son of JohnTravolta

and his wife Kelly Preston. tomorrow I could wake up

dead. Right now life is what

. , os
Pinder’s Funeral Home
‘Service Beyoud Measure”
PALMDALE AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS
PHONE: 322-4570/ 393-1351 * CELL: 357-3617
RANNIE PINDER President

FUNERAL SERVICE

j Inez Louise
Edgecombe,
85

Funeral services for the late Inez Louise Edgecombe age 85 years of
Tuckaway Road, will be held at Calvary Bible Church, Collins Ave. on
Wednesday, January 28th, 2009 at 11:00am. Burial will be in Woodlawn
Gardens, Soldier Road. Pastor Allen Lee and other ministers will officiate.

She is survived by her children, Kingsley Sr. and (Deloris) of McKanns
Long Island, Lincoln of Fort Pierce FL., Luther and (Rosetta), Paul
“Wendell” of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Stephen and (Dotlene) of Miami
FL., J. Nathaniel and (Deanthia), Dawn, Linda, Kirkwood and (Gail),
Oral of Ashburn, Virginia, Arlington “Al” and (Dellareese), Obadiah
Edgecombe Jr. and Hilda Miller; her adopted children, Stephanie
and Tillman Bethel, Ann and David Russell Sr; grandchildren and
great grandchildren, Kingsley, Jr. “Bing” and (Cheryl), Kingsley Ill,
Gabrielle, Patricia, Val Edgecombe-Smith and (Kevin), SaSa, Philip,
Tara, Janae, Isaiah, Cassandra: Smith and (Dave), Jodell Roberts
and (Kevin), Vashti, Danielle, Kevin Jr., Stevan, Victoria, Sharon Joy,
Shandera, Stephen Jr., Paul Edgecombe of Ottawa, Canada, Joseph
“Joey”, Anna Maria, Reuben, Leon Edgecombe of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Mia, Francesco Dames, Arlysia of Freeport, Grand Bahama,
Travis, Ethan, Francina Brennen and Cora Miller of Freeport, Grand
Bahama, Joann Chisholm, Betty Isaccs, Leslie Roosevelt and Ted
Miller, Roy Edgecombe and Hilda Galanos, Franklyn, Kim, Lavern:
and Rhonda Edgecombe; siblings, Sir Albert Miller and (Lady Laurie
Miller), of Freeport, Grand Bahama, Willard Miller Sr., and (Joey) Miller
of Nassau and Scofield and (Rosie) Miller of Long Island; sisters-in-law,
Jewel Miller of Haines City, Fl. and Dorothy Miller of Nassau; nieces and
nephews, Deborah Archer (Donald), Marc Anthony “Tony” of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, Russell (Linda) Miller, Patricia Coakley, Reuben, Lenox,
Peter and Mary Miller, Ellis, Anthony and Paula Miller, Willard Jr. and
Ann Marie Miller, Raquel.Minnis, Basil Jr., Valentino, Elga and Deta
Miller, Horace Miller Jr., Gloria Ward, Cynthia Saunders, Nellie Cooper,
Edna Pennerman, Pamela Miller-Ferguson, Karen Mackey-Pinder and
Nita Thompson; Cousins: Rosie Thrower, Thelma Pyfrom, Gladys
and Carl Brice, Alfreda Fernander,. Nettie, Cynthi, Uleyse, Joyce and
Sheva Adderley; other family, neighbors and friends including,
The Brice, Simmons, Maycock, Sweeting, Knowles, Nottage, Bowleg,
Hanna and Russell families of Tuck away, The Miller, Edgecombe, Gray,
Brice, Knowles, Adderley, Bowe, Glinton, Marshall and Fox families of
Long Island; special friends, Farist Stubbs, Scot and Myrtie Lowe,
Rannie and Thelma Pinder, Rex and Iva Pinder, Juanita Roberts, Sally
Colebrooke, Val Wraing, Betty Allen, ‘Shirley Foster, Val Hudson, Faith
Roxbury, Carolyn Hanna, David Farrington, Martha Albury, Pastor and
Sister Cole and.the entire Calvary Bible Church family; her caregivers,
Ms. Verona Thomas, Ms. Dorothy Taylor, Miriam Symonette, Mary Rolle
and Audrey Taylor; her physicians, Dr.’s Agreta Eneas-Carey, Duane
Sands and Ada Thompson, many other relatives.and friends.

Friends mal pay their last respect at Pinders Funeral Home Palmdale
Ave., Palmdale on Tuesday, January 27, 2009 from 5:00pm until.
7:00pm.



you make it.”
Yesterday police said that

they are investigating and .

have yet to determine a
motive for the killing.
No-one has yet been
detained in connection with
the matter, which was record-

ed as the country’s fourth’

homicide.

According to a cousin, who
gave his name as Lorenzo,
Onado had recently moved to
Nassau. Village to live with a
brother.

However, his father Gerard _

Newbold of Hospital Lane
and Dunmore Street said he

. still spent much of his time in

the neighbourhood where he
grew up — in a pink house
opposite his own where anoth-
er brother resided.

' When The Tribune spoke
with the victim’s father yes-
terday afternoon he had only
recently found out about his
death, but had not heard the
details of how his son had
died. .

According to police, Ona-
do died at the scene after
being shot multiple times in
the chest — between nine and
12 times, according to some
witnesses on the scene.

«

‘ Gerard Newbold said. that
despite the fact that he and
his son were not all that close,
he was still “really shocked” to
hear of his death.

“T don’t know why (some-
one would kill’ him), because
he was an easy fella. He was a
quiet person. I can’t say why
someone would do that, I real-
ly can’t,” said Mr Newbold,
sitting outside his home.

Lorenzo, Onado’s cousin,
said that he can only imagine

that his relative was ,“in the

wrong place at the wrong
time.”

“Only sometimes if he had a
drink or something you’d hear
his voice, but ‘Nado didn’t
really get involved with peo-
ple,” he said.

Former boss and distant rel-

ative, Bruce Newbold, agreed,
describing Onado, who
worked at his business for
about two years, as a
“very nice, cordial and quiet”
man.

“T didn’t.expect it, but you
have to expect the unexpect-
ed,” he said.

Police attended the scene in
Nassau Village after residents

reported hearing gunshots in ©

the area.

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resigned her Senate seat on Saturday, January 24.

PLP expects
to replace
Bridgewater in

Senate next week

FROM page one




























someone who is able to make a contribution to this country.

“In the meantime another colleague has had a cloud over him
with respect to this matter, but as I speak my understanding of
the matter is that it is only that - he has not been charged,” he
said.

On January 22, Ms Bridgewater was taken into custody by
police in Grand Bahama and questioned in connection with a
complaint filed by US celebrity John Travolta. Ms Bridgewater
was held overnight and on January 23, at about 10.30am, she was
questioned a second time in the presence of her lawyer. As a
result of these proceedings, Ms Bridgewater was charged by
police with abetment to extort and conspiracy to extort $25
million from the Travoltas.

Ms Bridgewater was subsequently released on $40,000 bail and

According to information reaching The Tribune, special: voice
analysts from the Federal Bureau of Investigations (FBI) are
currently in the Bahamas, assisting Bahamian police with their
investigations into the matter.

Reportedly, the crux of the police’s case relies on “sensi-
tive” telephone conversations recorded between Ms Bridge-
water and the Travoltas’ lawyers, where the parties are alleged
to have “haggled” over the amount of money that would be
exchanged for some “documents”, which it was claimed Ms
Bridgewater had obtained.

Despite her resignation, Ms Bridgewater maintains her inno-
cence.

In a statement released over the weekend, Ms Bridgewater
said that she was merely acting in her capacity as an attorney,
and “within the bounds of my ethical responsibility to my pro-
fession”.

“How these innocent actions can be so misconstrued, so per-
versely twisted to mean something other than it was, is a mys-
tery. I assure the Bahamian people of my complete and total
innocence and I am satisfied that when the full story. comes
out that I shall be fully vindicated. I will then take all appropriate
and lawful actions for redress and to protect my good name,” she
said.







. Women’s Full Figured Fashions

Final

Clearance Sate
50% Off

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Excluding Accessories
ALL SALES FINAL
Maderia Shopping Plaza
P.O. Box SS-5166
Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 326-1879
Rax; (242) 324-5706
E-mail: stzgs@coralwave.com

Open: Mon. - Sats 10 ant - opm

RSTO TMS SMBS) oT RSLS OST) MRT TN
TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 9

TRIBUNE SPORTS



LOCAL/INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Murray loses to Verdascoa

m@ By JOHN PYE
AP Sports Writer

Bahamas Football
Association Senior
League Standings

MELBOURNE, Australia (AP) —
Andy Murray may have to wait awhile
before he's picked again to win a Grand
Slam tournament.

Touted by British bookmakers as a
favourite at the Australian Open, Mur-
ray lost to No. 14 Fernando Verdasco of
Spain in five sets Monday in the fourth



Team Po3W:) BD) LGR =GA* Pts round. He twice blew a one-set lead
Bears FC 8 6 1 1 2 7 19 and missed chances to break serve in
CaledoniaFC 8 5 1 2 23 11 += 16 the pivotal sixth game of the deciding
Cavalier FC PD 2h et ets. 49 0) set. He then dropped serve in the sub-
Sharks FC pe iene oO OR: Lae se ee gaine and was beaten 2-6, 6-1,
Bahan Pe Ca Ogee eee ca All of which was a big letdown for
DynamosFC 9 1 3 5 16 29 6 Murray, who defeated No. 1 Rafael
FC Nassau’ POLO 6ST 24 23 Nadal and No. 2 Roger Federer in‘an
exhibition in Abu Dhabi this month
Upcoming Matches leading to the season's first major.

Sunday , February 1, 2009
lpm FC Nassau vs. Sharks FC

3pm Caledonia FC vs. Baha Juniors FC

Recent Results

Sunday, January 25, 2009
1pm Sharks FC-0 Caledonia FC-1
Goalscorers: Marcus Trail (Caledonia FC) 87th minute

3pm Bears FC-6 Dynamos FC-0
_Goalscorers: Quade Smith (Bears) 4th, Andre Carey
(Bears) 15th, 36th, 40th; Julian Franklyn (Bears) 46th,
Lesley St. Fleur.74th

BSF Men and Women National





RESULTS, from 11

Lowe, Matthew, BSC, 1:06.27;
Morley, Laron, SBSC, 1:14.36;
Azmbrister, Jamarco, SBSC,

1:30.18.

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter But-
terfly - Moss, Armando, SBSC,
1:06.22; Moss, Denez
SBSC, 1:10.85; Thompson,
Joshua, DSC, 1:12.85.
Girls 8 & Under 50 Meter But-
terfly - Campbell, Celia, UN-SB,
47.85; Higgs, Lilly, SWIFT-BA,

° 57.88; Reed, Charlotte, SWIFT-

BA, 59.43.

Girls 9-10 50 Meter Butterfly -
Allen, Tremaine, SBSC, 38.65;

Weech, Andreas, SBSC, 38.84;
Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,

39.85,

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter But-
terfly - Bastian, Izaak, BSC,
55.71; Gibson, Samuel, BSC,
1:00.12; Bevans, Paul; BSC,

1:08.40...

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Butterfly - .
Bowe, Clement, BSC, 37.93; Hep-
burn, Malik, UN-SB, 41.08;
Greene, Gershwin, BSC, 41.53.
Girls 11-12 200 Meter Back-
stroke - Adderley, Khes, BSC,

3:23.17.

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



Sweeting

2

3:16.56.

Boys 13-14 200 Meter Back-
stroke - McCarroll, Toby, DSC,

~ Girls 9-10'100 Meter Backstroke
- Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-BA,
1:38.44; Hutcheson, Danielle,
DSC, 2:11.63.

Girls 11-12 100 Meter Back-

stroke - Morley, Laura, SWIFT-
BA, 1:24.34; Hanlan, Sheean,
. SBSC, 1:27.27; Davis, Janae,

' - SBSC, 1:30.30.

1:40.03.

_ Girls 13-14 100 Meter Back-
stroke - Johnson, Deja, SBSC,

1:27.39; Watson, Brittney, SBSC
- 1:33.29; Cox, Xenia, SBSC,

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter
_ Backstroke - Chaplin, Jenna,
‘ SWIFT-BA, 1:16.61; Thompson,

"T don't know if I'll be the favourite

for a Slam in the next year or so after.

today," he said.

Murray went out in the first round
last year, the initial victim of Jo-Wil-
fried Tsonga's surprising charge. to the
Australian Open final. The 21-year-old
Scot's biggest aim is to end Britain's
run of 73 years without a winner of a
men's major.

"T'll try and learn from it ... come
back a better player," said Murray, who
finished last season with five titles and
made a run to the U.S. Open final. "I'm
thinking that last year I had a tough
loss..This year obviously is a tough loss,
as well. came back stronger last year."
‘ Nadal had a far easier time, downing
2007 runner-up Fernando Gonzalez of

Chile 6-3, 6-2, 6-4. He has yet to drop a.



ANDY MURRAY reacts after losing a point as he plays Spain's Fernando Verdasco during their
Men's singles match at the Australian Open Tennls Championship in Melbourne, Australia,

set ahead of his quarterfinal against Monday... ‘
a Rer-hael (Work-Out Squad) sixth-séeded Gilles Simon. (AP Photo: Andrew Brownbill)
"Iam playing well, but you never
know if it's going to be enough," said
Marvin Wood ~ Bllino Sineus Vonetta Nairn Nadal, who had 33 winners and just’11__ble after." No. 3- ranked Novak Djokovic, who
Ricardo Rolle Grant Rutherford Latoya Brown unforced errors. Williams, who has won in Australia beat Tsonga in last year's final.
Philip Culmer Julian Pratt. Lesheena Pinder Verdasco will meet fifth-seeded every alternate year since 2003, next Federer will continue his quest: to
Julian Collie Daral Ranger ‘Tara Evans © Tsonga, a Frenchman who defeated No. _ plays Svetlana Kuznetsova, the 2004 equal Pete Sampras record 14 Grand
Anthon Gibson Pedro Marcellas. . Brendalee McPhee 9 James Blake 6-4, 6-4, 7-6 (3) inanight U.S. Open champion. Kuznetsova Slam singles titles in a quarterfinal
Godfrey Burnside Jr Mickey Dorsett Jr. Lotoya Johnson match interrupted by a fireworks display... advanced when Zheng Jie retired at 4-1 against No. 8 Juan Martin del Petro, a
Geron Sands. - Michael Thompson Tavonna Romer around the stadium to celebrate Aus- after injuring her left wristin atumble in 20-year-old Argentine. .
Charles Carroll, Raynaldo Russell Bianca Ferguson tralia Day. .. the third game, ending her hopes of.a | In the buildup. to the
Alcott Forbes Byron Ferguson’ Lotoya Thomas. Of the top eight Seeded players, Mur- victory on the Chinese New Year. Australian Open, much of the focus was
Garfield Bethel Derek Christie Christine Hanna ray will be the only one missing from. Williams, who has won nine majors, . on Murray and his three wins over Fed-
Richard Bain Jr Wek Garnette, Curry the quarterfinals at Melbourne Park. . and Kuznetsova are the only Grand erer since the U.S. Open final and two
Raman Johnson Coaches Keisha Pratt .. Never in the Open era have all eight. Slam title winners remaining in the ~- tournament wins in 2009.
eee nee ee A cscid See eee top seeds filled every spot ina Grand women's draw. _ The focus on Verdasco was on his
Teran Wood Darell Weir’ Trekia Bowl Slam quarterfinal lineup. Olympic champion Elena Dementie- love match with 2008 finalist Ana
SSae Atte Sear Pee anaes He wasn't the only casualty Monday va extended her season winning streak —_ Ivanovic. He's been reluctant to discuss
Martin Burrows Jr Perry Seymour Nicole Sands y y y : 8 : : Beas ;
‘Christopher ‘Tyues Nigel Rootes Vanessa Mayne — Melbourne Park nearly hadtoestab- to 14 matches with a 6-2, 6-2 win over _ that, saying he s in Australia to con-
Alec Rolle EN aaon Butlen Susan Clarke lish its own emergency room. Slovakia's Dominika Cibulkova on centrate on tennis. ' ;
Van Johson Michael Dorsett -: Ann Bullard Three matches finished early because Monday to reach the quarterfinals in Even before he arrived in Australia,
Lynden Richardson Alonzo Pratt Donna Bodie of illness or injuries. The opener at Rod - Melbourne for the first time in 11 trips... he worked on his game during the sea-
Greg Gardiner Leroy Thompson Dorothy Jones Laver Arena finished with Simon hold- The fourth-seeded Russian next faces. son break, when he could have been cel-,
Ken Wood Sr) . Lucille Bethel ing a 2-1 set advantage when friend and. Carla Suarez Navarro, who ousted sev- ebrating his final-clinching performance
Stephen Brown BSF Ladies NanGntl” ate Bethel fellow Frenchman Gael Monfils decid-~ en-time Grand Slam winner Venus in Spain*s Davis Cap triumph in:
LeFranc Franks Team (Work-Out Lashanda Bethel’ edhe couldn't continue with an injured - Williams in the sécond round.-Suarez Argentina: yar
Thomas Davis Squad) - Doresha Barr right wrist. Navarro beat No. 21 Anabel Medina "J. think that Davis ‘Cup final ite
Eugene Pratt Lathera Brown Renee Curry Davis In the following match on center. Garrigues 6-3, 6-2 in an all-Spanish | me much stronger mentally," Verdasco
Devaughn Wong;, Cryshan Percentie Zella Symonette court, Serena Williams lost the first set. match. said. "And this preseason, I was work-
Christopher Russell Alexis Moss . Theola Williams 6-3 to 13th-seeded Victoria Azarenka of In women's Guaneitinal: starting ing really hard. So today, I was really
Angelo Dillett Desiree Coakley - Rosemary Green Belarus. Williams, annoyed with her Tuesday, 2007 Wimbledon finalist Mar- believing in myself, that I can win the
Cardinal Gilbert Jeannie Wallace Dawn Forbes erratic first serve, screamed at herself, ion Bartoli will be trying to follow her. match."
Larry Russell Jr Thela Johnson Debbie McClure and drew a warning for an obscenity. | fourth-round upset of No. l-ranked He spent’ time working i in America
‘Romeko Knowles Alex Taylor Dornette Edwards The 19-year-old Azarenka woke up Jelena Jankovic with another win over _ with Gil Reyes in December. He even
aman pee ye Sa sick and was dizzy and in tears when No. 7 Vera Zvonareva of Russia. got some tips from Reyes' top former
aerees Seat Crystal DeAncy. ease she quit after going down a break at 2- No. 3 Dinara Safina meets resurgent student, Andre Agassi, a four-time win-
ndrea Bethell Shonnel Symonette Stephen Beneby Ainth 4 Tl Dokiesbadk ting Atiso= ithe Australian O
William Rutherford Ruthann Simms Paul Demeritte Vr ciara ; CRORE SA ORTOT OBER PE PICSCRUNS :\US ne Bee ett oe
Lester: Walle Milinda Bastian yeep ackhare "The doctors didn't want me tokeep tralia and in her first quarterfinal at Agassi came to say hi to me, and I
Renaldo Nottage Marvel Miller Spurgeon Johnson going, but I wanted to keep trying and Melbourne Park, in the night match. . was speaking with him," Verdasco said.
Darrol Rolle Nerissa Seymour Gary Johnson see how I do," Azarenka said. "But it No. 7 Andy Roddick, the only Amer- I don't want to say what he told me
Pedro Culmer Mary Edgecombe- Craig W Johnson was probably not a very good idea ican man still in the draw, will play the because that's secret. But really helped
Rodwell Knowles _ Lenny Newton because it just gave me even more trou- _ first of the men's quarterfinals against - meso much."



NICHOLAS, Peter, Anthony, Alec and Anibal show off their medals...

Jade, SBSC, 1:16.85; Moss,
Shaunte, SWIFT-BA 54 1:32.45.

- Boys 9-10 100 Meter Backstroke

- Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA,
1:48.33; Gibson, D'Angelo, DSC,
2:00.48; Del Bianco, Anthony,
SWIFT-BA, 2:05.82.

Boys 11-12 100 Meter Back-
stroke - Carey, Dionisio, BSC,
1:17.66; Cash, Dylan, SBSC,
1:23.26; Roberts, Meshach, BSC,

1:25.06.
Boys 13-14 100 Meter Back-

stroke - Lowe, Matthew, BSC,
1:12.17; Morley, Laron, SBSC,
1:14.69; Armbrister, Jamarco,
SBSC, 1:28.26.

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter

‘ Backstroke - Moss, Denez,



SBSC, 1:18.03; Pinder, McGuire,
SBSC, DQ.

Girls 8 & Under 50 Meter Back-

stroke - Campbell, Celia, UN-SB,
49.09; Higgs, Lilly, SWIFT-

' BA, 56.07; Winner, Isabelle,

SWIFT-BA, 58.47.
Girls 9-10 50 Meter Backstroke -

Allen, Tremaine, SBSC, 40.64;

- Weech, Andreas, SBSC, 41.61;

Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA
42.67.

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter Back-
stroke - Morley, Peter, SWIFT-

BA, 52.89; Pinder, Conner,
SWIFT-BA, 1:09.78; Burrows,
Jaivin, BSC, 1:09.88.

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Backstroke -
Bowe, Clement, BSC, 39.53; Hep-

burn, Malik, UN-SB, 43.31;
Greene, Gershwin, BSC, 43.35.

Girls 8 & Under 200 LC Meter
Freestyle - Reed, Charlotte,

SWIFT-BA, 4:02.91.

‘Girls 9-10 200 Meter Freestyle -

Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-BA,
2:56.63; Scanlan, Lily, SWIFT-
BA, 3:20.10; Knowles, Lauren,
SWIFT-BA, 3:30.83.

Girls 11-12 200 Meter Freestyle -
Morley, Laura, SWIFT-BA,
2:32.56; Lowe, Abigail, SWIFT-
BA, 2:32.78; Rahming, Crystal,
SWIFT-BA, 2:37.51.

Girls 13-14 200 Meter Freestyle -
Moss, Berchadette, DSC, 2:37.83;
Glinton, Lauren, DSC, 2:46.87;
Cox, Xenia, SBSC, 2:57.75.

| Girls 15 & Over 200 Meter

Freestyle - Russell, Ronique,
SWIFT-BA, 3:25.83.

Boys 8 & Under 200 Meter
Freestyle - Morley, Peter, SWIFT-
BA, 3:26.83; Thompson, Luke-

‘Kennedy, SWIFT-BA, 4:18.05.

Boys 9-10 200 Meter Freestyle -
Bowe, Clement, BSC, 2:43.68;
Rahming, Nicholas, SWIFT-BA,

3:16.56; Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA,

3:26.11.
Boys 11-12 200 Meter Freestyle -

Moses, Zach, SWIFT-BA,
2:35.50; Roberts, Meshach, BSC,
2:41.96; Redgrave, Paul, SWIFT-
BA , 2:57.06.

- Boys 13-14 200 Meter Freestyle -

McCarroll, Toby, DSC, 2:25.89;
Adderely, Vernal, SBSC, 3:38.57.
Boys 15 & Over 200 Meter
Freestyle - Moss, Armando,
SBSC, 2:20.41; Thompson,
Joshua, DSC, 2:24.05; Dean,

Donovan, DSC, 2:29.85.

Girls 8 & Under 200 Meter IM -
Kemp, Kacey, SWIFT-BA, DQ.
Girls 9-10 200 Meter IM -
Weech, Andreas, SBSC, 3:15.78;
Redgrave, Anna, SWIFT-BA,
4:05.20; Hutcheson, Danielle,
DSC > 4:26.19.

Girls 11-12 200 Meter IM -
Davis, Janae, SBSC, 3:06.17;
Chea, Christina-Marie, BSC,

3: 12.48; Bevans, Jourdan, BSC,

3:16.03.
Girls 13-14 200 Meter IM -

Rolle, Riquel, DSC, 2:52.63;
Johnson, Deja, BSC, 3:07.41;

_ Watson, Brittney, SBSC, 3:13.33.

Girls 15 & Over 200 Meter IM -
Chaplin, Jenna, SWIFT-BA,
2:39.43; Thompson, Jade, SBSC,

2:51.59.
Boys 8 & Under 200 Meter IM -

Morley, Peter, SWIFT-BA,
3:54.06; Bastian, Izaak, BSC,

4:01.97.
Boys 9-10 200 Meter IM - Adder-

ley, Khadr, BSC, 3:50.09; Gib-

son, D'Angelo, DSC, 4:09.58;
Neely, Brandon, DSC, 4:31.23,
Boys 11-12 200 Meter IM -
Munnings; Jaevon, SBSC,
3:04.82; Taylor, Tre, SBSC,
3:05.91; Lloyd, Keith, SBSC,

3:06.04.
Boys 13-14 200 Meter IM - Mor-

ley, Laron, SBSC, 2:39.16; Arm-
brister, Jamarco, SBSC, 3:03.86;
Bethel, Carlon, DSC, 3:22.26.
Boys 15 & Over 200 Meter IM -
Rolle, Cameron, DSC, 2:38.98;

‘Moss, Denez, SBSC, 2:46.95;

Pinder, McGuire, SBSC, 2:58.49.
‘PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS



BAHAMIAN U- 23 International
‘Justin Sealey was recently selected to
travel to London, England, this coming
summer to train at the prestigious
Chelsea Football Academy, home of
Chelsea Football Club of the English
Premier League.

Sealey, who captained his club side
Lonestars of Austin, Texas, to a semi-
final appearance in the Disney Soccer
Showcase Tournament during the
Christmas, was named to the All-Tour-
nament Team and invited to travel to
England for a tryout with the Premier
League side.

The Disney Soccer Showcase i is a pre-
mier elite soccer tournament held each
year over the Christmas break and
attracts top soccer clubs from across
the United States.

The Chelsea Youth Academy also
participates in the tournament which
is sponsored by the English club. _

Coaches from the club attend the
games to scout talent and at the con-





JUSTIN SEALEY has been invited to tryout
with the Premier League side...

LOCAL SPORTS.

Justin Sealey selected to train
at Chelsea Football Academy

invited to the club's training facility in
England for tryouts.

Sealey, who last year competed for
the Bahamas at both U-23 and Senior
Men's National Team level is a junior at
St Stephen's Episcopal School in
Austin, Texas, where he is enrolled in
the school’s soccer academy, consid-
ered the US’ premier academic soccer
programme.

He has been attracting the attention

of many NCAA Division I college SOc- *

cer coaches for the 2010 recruiting class
as a result of his stellar play at recent

showcase events, including the Adidas’

College Showcase held in Dallas this
past December.

At that tournament, Sealey and his
Lonestars team won the championship.

This weekend, Sealey will be bringing
his St Stephen's Academy Spartans to
the Bahamas to compete in a series of
games with local club sides and an All-
Star team from the Bahamas Youth
Football League U-16 Division.

The academy traveled to the

_ making it one of the top preparatory

‘also will lend a helping hand to a local



















Bahamas two years ago, at which time,
Sealey along with Lynden Pindling,
were scouted and invited to the school.

Pindling is a baseball player and is
also performing very well for the Spar-
tans baseball team. Coach Bobby Mur-
phy of St Stephen's ‘has been extreme-
ly pleased with his two Bahamian schol-
ar-athletes and is hoping to attract oth-
er local talent to the school, which in
addition to its sports programmes (the
school also has a tennis academy), pur-
sues a rigorous academic curriculum

schools in the United States.

The school will play three matches
against local opposition on Friday at
4:30 pm; Saturday at 3:00 pm and on
Sunday at noon. While here, the school

charity.

Parents and kids interested in infor-
mation about the school are invited to
attend the matches and can speak with -
the school's coach after the conclusion
of each match.



Results of the Swift Swimming
Gunite Pools Swim Meet held'on
Saurday at the Betty Kelly Ken-
ning Aquatic Center.

Girls 11-12 400 Meter Freestyle -
Bevans, Jourdan; BSC, 6:19.48;
Reed, Doran, SWIFT-BA, 6:24.94;
Elliot, Ayshah, DSC, 7:19.87.
Girls 13-14 400 Meter Freestyle -
Austin, Fane, BSC, ‘5:59.49;
Bevans, Chelsea, BSC, 6:09.59;
Burrows, Lianna, BSC, 6:10.43.
Girls 15 & Over 400 Meter
Freestyle - Weech, Ariel, BSC,
5:02.05; Weech, Amber, BSC,
5:13.11; Campbell, Shayla, BSC,
5:27.93.

Boys 11-12 400 Meter Freestyle -

Moses, Zach, SWIFT-BA,

Swimmers
closing in
on Carifta
“stan 3 dard
"FROM page it



- e - Matthew Lowe | in the
100 breast, 100 fly and 100
_ back :

-e Shaunte Moss in the -

_ 100 breast and 100 fly
_ © Tremaine Allen in the
50 breast, 50 fly and 50
- back ..
_ ¢ Peter Morley in the 50
free, 50 back, 200 free and
200 IM S
_¢ Albury Higgs in ie
100 breast, 100 fly and 100 .
hace a
__ e Nicholas. Repmine in.
: the1 100 free and 100 breast o







Financing
Available

clusion select an All-Star team which is





5:16.38; Carey, Dionisio, BSC,
5:20.14; Kerr, Kohen, BSC,
5:59.15.

Boys 13-14 400 LC Meter
Freestyle - Hernandez Valdes,

Anibal, SWIFT-BA, 5:42.52;
Chea, Aaron; BSC, 5:45.19;
Bethel, Carlon, DSC, 6:31.06.
Girls 8 & Under 100 Meter
Freestyle - Higgs, Lilly, SWIFT-
BA, 1:31.26; McCarroll, Zoe,
DSC, 1:41.68; Reed, Charlotte,
SWIFT-BA, 1:44.49.

Girls 9-10 100 Meter Freestyle -

Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,
1:12.92; Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-
BA, 1:17.51; Scanlan, Lily,
SWIFT-BA, 1:30.06.

_ Girls 11-12 100 Meter Freestyle -

Morley, Laura, SWIFT-BA,

ohs09.56; Lowe, Abigail, SWIFT-.

BA, 1:12.28; Hanlan, Sheean,
SBSC, 1:13.63.

Girls 13-14 100 LC Meter
Freestyle - Deveaux, Bria, BSC,
1:07.09; Moss, Berchadette, DSC,
1:09.41, Johnson, Deja, SBSC,
1:13.24,

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter
Freestyle - Chaplin, Jenna,
SWIFT-BA, 1:04.50; Moss,
Shaunte, SWIFT-BA, 1:06.71; *

Deveaux, Ravyn, BSC, 1:07.03.

Boys 8 & Under 100 Meter

Freestyle - Bastian, Izaak, BSC,
1:42.86; Thompson, Luke-

~ Kennedy , SWIFT-BA, 1:59.01.

Boys 9-10.100 Meter Freestyle -
Rahming, Nicholas, SWIFT-BA,
1:27.58; Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA,



SIMONE STURRUP takes a rest...

1:31.75; Del Bianco, Anthony, >;
SWIFT-BA, 1:36.64.

Boys.11-12 100 Meter Freestyle -
Munnings, Jaevon, SBSC,
1:13.44; Lloyd, Keith, SBSC ,
1:15.15; Cash, Dylan, SBSC,

1:15.77.
Boys 13-14 100 Meter Freestyle -

Morley, Laron, SBSC, 1:02.52;

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter
Freestyle - McIntosh, Michael,

BSC, 58.52; Moss, Armando,
SBSC, 1:02.83; Knowles,
Devonn, BSC, 1:03.06.

Girls 8 & Under.50 Meter
Freestyle - Campbell, Celia, UN-
SB , 37.94; Higgs, Lilly,
SWIFT-BA, 42.44; Scriven, Taja,
SBSC, 46.96. 5

Girls 9-10 50 Meter Freestyle -

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Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,
32.31; Weech, Andreas, SBSC,
33.01; Allen, Tremaine, SBSC,
34.68. ;

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter
Freestyle - Morley, Peter, SWIFT-
BA, 42.65; Bevans, Paul, BSC,
46.62; Strachan, Trent, BSC,
52.61.

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Freestyle -
Bowe, Clement, BSC 5
32.96; Greene, Gershwin, BSC,
34.11; Hepburn, Malik, UN-SB,
36.95,

Girls 11-12 200 Meter Breast-
stroke - Adderley, Khes; BSC,

3:50.07.
Girls 13-14 200 Meter Breast-

stroke - Glinton, Lauren, DSC,
3:20.20. |

Girls 15 & Over 200 Meter
Breaststroke - Russell, Ronique,
SWIFT-BA, DQ. ,
Boys 11-12 200 Meter Br east-
stroke - Deveaux, Brandon, BSC,

3:36.11; Bastian, Drew, BSC,

3:45.82. ,
Boys 13-14 200 Meter Breast-

stroke - McCarroll, Toby, DSC
; 252182,

Girls 8 & Under 100 Meter
Breaststroke - McCarroll, Zoe,
DSC; 2;05.10.

Girls 9-10 100 Meter Breast-

. stroke - Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-

BA, 1:45.46; Hutcheson, Danielle,
DSC, 2:04.24; Redgrave, Anna,
SWIFT-BA, 2:08.55.

Girls 11-12 100 Meter Breast-
stroke - Chea, Christina-Marie,
BSC, 1:41.96; Davis, Janae,
SBSC, 1:43.52; Thompson,
Celine, SWIFT-BA, 1:51.77.
Girls 13-14 100 Meter Breast-
stroke - Rolle, Riquel, DSC,
1:30.93; Greene, Ana-Philece,
BSC, 1:33.68; Johnson, Deja,
SBSC, 1:36.44.

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter
Breaststroke - Moss, Shaunte,

SWIFT-BA, 1:22.65; Chaplin,
Jenna, SWIFT-BA, 1:33.34; Rus-

‘sell, Ronique, SWIFT-BA,

1:53.13.

Boys 9-10 100 Meter Breast-
stroke - Rahming, Nicholas,
SWIFT-BA, 1:48.88; Gibson,
D'Angelo, DSC, 2:07.77; Neely,
Brandon, DSC, 2:18.82. — ,
Boys 11-12 100 Meter Breast-

stroke - Carey, Dionisio, BSC,



1:21.03; Taylor, Tre, SBSC,
1:33.10; Munnings, Jaevon,
SBSC, 1:35.18. ~

Boys 13-14 100 Meter Breast-

- stroke - Lowe, Matthew, BSC,

1:24.13; Morley, Laron, SBSC,
1:33.74; Hernandez Valdes, Ani-
bal, SWIFT-BA, 1:39.77.

Boys 15 & Over 100 Meter
Breaststroke - Pinder, McGuire,

SBSC, 1:26.08; Brooks, Troy,
SWIFT-BA 5 1:51.20;
Knowles Sr, Percy, SWIFT-BA,

1:58.23.
Girls 8 & Under 50 Meter
Breaststroke - Campbell, Celia,

UN-SB, 57:90; Higgs, Lilly,
SWIFT-BA, 58.39; Longley, Sian,
BSC, .1:03.42.

Girls 9-10 50 Meter Breaststroke

- Allen, Tremaine, SBSC, 45.90;
Sturrup, Simone, SWIFT-BA,
46.04; Scriven, Nia, SBSC, 49.01.

Boys 8 & Under 50 Meter
Breaststroke - Thompson, Luke-

Kennedy, SWIFT-BA, 1:05.38;
Carey, Davante, BSC, 1:11.59;
Bevans, Paul, BSC, 1:11.80.

Boys 9-10 50 Meter Breaststroke
- Bowe, Clement, BSC, 44.14;
Adderley, Khadn, BSC, 48.84;

Hepburn, Malik, 50.03.
Girls 9-10 100 Meter Butterfly -

Higgs, Albury, SWIFT-BA,

1:34.95. :
Girls 11-12 100 Meter Butterfly -

Morley, Laura, SWIFT-BA,
1:22.52; Davis, Janae, SBSC,
1:28.10; Bevans, Jourdan, BSC,

1:36.33. |
Girls 13-14 100 Meter Butterfly -

Saunders, Je'Nae, BSC, 1:14.19;
Moss, Berchadette, DSC, 1:18.85;
Watson, Brittney, SBSC, 1:21.63.

Girls 15 & Over 100 Meter But-
terfly - Moss, Shaunte, SWIFT-

BA; 1:13.79; Thompson, Jade,
SBSC, 1:20.23; Whitehead, Sofia,
SWIFT-BA, 1:36.36.

Boys 9-10 100 Meter Butterfly -
Sands, Alec, SWIFT-BA, 2:07.89;
Gibson, D'Angelo, DSC, 2:17.85.
Boys 11-12 100 Meter Butterfly -
Carey, Dionisio, BSC, 1:14.47;
Lloyd, Keith, SBSC, 1:20.76;
Munnings, Jaevon, SBSC,

1:23.87.
Boys 13-14 100 Meter Butterfly -

SEE page 9





Big Red
Machines
blow out
the Aces

FROM page 11 ~

“We played good defense

“and we played to the best of

our ability. I liked the way we
came out here and win this

-game today,” he insisted. “I

think we’re ready for the play-
offs.”

As the pennant winners,
SAC could end up facing
either defending champions
Jordan Prince. William Falcons |
or the Kingsway Academy
Saints, depending on who wins
the showdown this week
between the Falcons and last
year’s runners-up Westminis-
ter Diplomats, who are in sec-
ond place.

But the way Wood sees it, if
they can play like they did
against Aquinas, he doesn’t
feel like there’s any team out

‘there who'can beat them.

“From school we were
hyped for the game,” he

‘stressed. “We just came out

to play.”

Jabari Wilmott exploded for
a game high 30 points, while .
Bradley Outten had nine, and
Brandon Whymms eight..
Wood, along with Charles
Sealy, Nakita Higgins and
Justin Symonette all con-
(gibuted four.

The Aces, who trailed 17-i
before they scored their first
field goal and eventually fell
behind 22-5 at the end of the
first quarter and 38-13 at the
half, didn’t have thé manpow-
er to contain SAC as coach
Maurice Fawkes had to sit
seven players on the bench
because of academic proba-
tion.
Dropped to 7-5 and out of
the playoff picture, Fawkes |
said he had no other choice
but to bench the players dur-
ing the start of Catholic Week
because of the grades they
turned in on their report cards
on Thursday, fess

~ “We were short-handed. 3
We only had six players and
some of them don’t even get
to play in the game,” he point-
ed out. “We made no excuses,
we still came out and made
the attempt.” - .

“But I think if we had our
full team, we would have
played a much better game.
Our academics comes first and
they knew that if they didn’t
make their grades, they won’t

' be able to play. It cost the

team.”

With the limited players to
rely on, the Aces got a 1-2
punch from Theron Taylor
and Elrod Munnings with 16
and 15 points respectively.

Taylor, who came on strong
in the.second half when SAC
tried to go deep in their bench,
said it was a tough loss to
digest, especially at home.

“We could have done better
if we had the full team, but
we let them intimidate us and
we didn’t play our best,” he
charged. “Because we didn’t
have the full team, that hurt us
a lot.”

SAC’s starters didn’t ease
up at all in the first quarter.
But after starting a fresh five
in the second quarter, Todd
brought the starters right back. -

‘in when Aquinas made a mini

run for a 23-8 deficit.

They continued to apply the
pressure and surged ahead 38-
13 at the half. >

Nothing much changed in
the second half, except that
Munnings finally broke out of
a three-point shooting slump
to hit two consecutive’ treys
for a 54-33 deficit to open the
fourth.

While Wilmott ran the ball
on the open court, drilling’two
big slam dunks, SAC’s big
interior line-up saw Outten
come up with a couple block
shots as they kept the Aces at
bay.

DAT

mits Pe

behind the news,
Ae E9 107
on Mondays







TUESDAY,

ahamas Football



JANUARY 27,

Serena

Williams
beats injured
Azarenka...



2009

See page 9



ssociation standing





BSF names
workout
squads for
national
teams

THE Bahamas Softball Fed-
eration (BSF) is bracing for an
extremely busy year on the
international scene and with a
concentrated effort on national

team building, seeks to return to:

the prominence of yesteryear.
The BSF named both work-
‘out squads (See page 9) for var-
ious upcoming national teams
set to travel to several regional
and global tournaments in 2009.

The BSF has plans to field
four national teams for the year,
beginning with the men’s
national team traveling to San-
to Domingo, Dominican
Republic for the CAC Qualifi-
er, June 7-13.

The women’s national team
will then compete in their CAC
Qualifier shortly thereafter,
June 21-27 in Puerto Rico.

_ A successful showing at the
CAC Qualifiers would mean
the teams would earn a berth to

the CAC Championships, July 1°

to August 1 in Puerto Rico.

Both teams will attempt to
qualify on the Pan Am circuit
when the Men travel to
Guadalajara, Mexico Novem-
ber 19-27 for. the Pan Am Qual-
ifier.

The women’s team will com-
pete in the Pan Am Qualifier
August 2-12 in Guadalajara,
Mexico, ,

With good performances
around the country last season,

the BSF has named workout .

squads made up of players from

‘around the country for these.

tournaments.

The men’s workout squad °

features 51 players while:the
women’s squad features 47.

Bobby “Baylor” Fernander

will head the men’s team while
Stephen “Bishop” Beneby will
head. the women’s side. .There
will be a meeting for players
based on different islands begin-
ning this week.

New Providence based play-
ers are slated to meet 7 pm
Wednesday at the Blue Hills
Sporting Complex.

Players based in Grand
Bahama are scheduled to meet
with Yvonne Lockhart, Exuma
- coach Johnson and Kendal
McPhee, Eleuthera - Andrew.
Butler, Andros - Michael Cole-
brooke, Long Island -Julian
Pratt and Abaco - Nigel Bootle.

Burket Dorsett, first vice
president of the BSF, said the
federation expects great things
from the collaboration of ,ath-
letes.

“It represents a true national
team because we will attempt
to. have as many islands repre-
sented. as possible to find the
best possible team to represent
the country,” he said.

“Having this many players on
the workout squads and getting
them together as soon as-possi-
ble will help the coaches be able

to determine the best combina-.
tion of.players which we expect °

should give us one of our best

national team hopes in quite .

some time.”

Joleen





blow out
the Aces

® By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net’

ST Augustine’s College Big
Red Machines made their 12th
and final regular season bas-

‘ketball game in the Bahamas

Association of Independent
Secondary Schools’ junior boys
division look so easy.

The Big Red Machines ran
circles around a depleted
Aquinas Colleges Aces at
Aquinas College 67-39 to
remain undefeated at 12-0 as
they prepare to regain suprema-
cy after missing out of the
championship game last year.

“Our mercy rule is to Score
as much points as we can,” said

SAC’s coach John Todd in 'try-'

ing to give an indication of why

they went for the offensive
onslaught.

“The season was good, but
we just out-played everybody.
But the scary thing is that I have
eight players returning next
year. So we just want to get
through the playoffs and hope-
fully win the title this year.”

Playing championship calibre
ball, the Big Red Machines
opened the game with a full
court trap defense that resulted
in them posting a quick 11-0
lead and they were'never really
in. any trouble the rest of the

"way.

Point guard Kent Wood said
it was just an indication of how
well the team is playing this
year.

SEE page 10

Swimmers closing in on

Carifta standard times

A NUMBER of local swim
club members are closing in on
race times that are on par with
the standards of the Carifta
Games, it was revealed after
swimmers from the various
clubs met in competition.

According to a press state-
ment, Swift swimming club and
Gunite Pools “worked together
as a team to put on a well run
swim meet” at the Betty Kelly

Kenning swim romples on Sat-

urday.

The Swift, Barracudas, ‘Dol-
phins, and Sea Bees swim clubs
took part in the meet.

“After a week of cold weath-
er, the swimmers showed up to
swim some fast times as more
swimmers close in on Carifta
standards. The meet'was struc-

tured with a mixture of open,

events and age group events
that allowed swimmers to race
against others with similar
times.

“The awards were given by
age group with medals for first,



| FORMER US Président Bill Clinton drives a shot to the green as he takes part in Eighth Annual Michael
Jordan Celebrity Invitational at the One & Only Ocean Club, on Paradise Island, Bahamas, Saturday,
| January 24. Clinton teamed with actor James Caan and RaveH alongside jouatnarnt host Michael -

second, and third place and rib-
bons for fourth through eighth.”

The statement said that the
meet “ran smooth enough and
we were able to present the
awards during the meet.”

A number of the swimmers
won multiple events. They
were:

e Jenna Chaplin, 100m
freestyle, 100 backstroke and
200m individual medley,

Laura Morley in.the 100
free, 100 fly, 100 back and 200
free

® Clement Bowe in the 50
free, 50 breast, 50 fly, 50 back
and 200 free

¢ Celia Campbell in the 50
free, 50 breast, 50 fly and 50
back

e Carey Dionisio in the 100
breast, 100 fly and 100 back

° Simone Sturrup in the 100
free and 50 free

e Laron Morley in the 100
free and 200 IM

, SEE page 10



“(AP Photo: Tim Aylen)





STR ROBERT

GIN

35% OFF WINES

50% OFF

50% OFF

SAE V EL eae OR BME RU RWIS ROA VEO)


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009





Tourism Minister greets

special friend of Bahamas



CLARA Varnum of Nashville, Tennessee recently
added Minister of Tourism and Aviation Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace to her list of adopted Bahamian family.

Ms Varnum has been making Bahamian friends for
more than two decades. She first visited Grand Bahama 21
years ago. Then she started to visit Nassau and Paradise
Island. She and daughter Cindie Brown now havea host
of special friends who they regard as their Bahamian fam-
ily. nye
“Once'l get here, it’s hard to leave,” she said.

Minister Vanderpool-Wallace said the mother and
daughter’s experiences in the Bahamas are the type of
encounters that tourism officials encourage.

“We are building a store of stories of that kind,” Min-
ister Vanderpool-Wallace said. “They are so special. At
the end of the day, that’s what it’s all about — people
building relationships.”

Ms Varnum and Ms Brown said they always feel right at
home in the Bahamas.

The mother and daughter (centre) aré pictured with
Ministry of Tourism and Aviation representatives Marsha
Thompson, Minister Vanderpool-Wallace and Bernadette
Saunders.








BLACKBERRY BOLDS
& Phone. Cards will be

SO JOIN vow’ q

FOUN SOHUEC NOW ID ME MOR




































@ BY ALEX MISSICK:

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE College of the Bahamas

. and the Bahamas National Youth

Council, in conjunction with Min-
istry of National Security, will host
a week of activities during the sec-
ond annual National Youth
Against Crime and. Violence
Week to gather ideas from the
youth of the nation to assist in
crime prevention.

Beginning next Monday under
the theme “Peace is our weapon —
cuz violence ain’t.our swagga”, it
is estimated that over 2,000 young
people will Pair als in this
year’s event.

Last year, the programme was
held in the form of a one-day
youth forum, in which students
from secondary and tertiary insti-
tutions from around the Bahamas
participated.

Minister of National Security

Tommy Turnquest said the
National Assembly on Crime
recognised early on that young
people are often left out of the
dialogue on solutions to the prob-
lem of crime, despite the fact that
they are disproportionately rep-
resented in the crime statistics as
both victims and perpetrators.

“My ministry has adopted this
conference as.an annual event
with the purpose of creating a dia-
logue space for young people to
discuss possible strategies to
address crime and violence. from
their perspective.









ung to
ar against crime

THE TRIBUNE

















= Clarke/Tribune staff



CRIME FIGHTERS: Pictured (from right to left) are: President of the College of the Bahamas Janye Hodder, Minister of National Security Tommy Turnquest, Cari-
com Ambassador Sasha Armbrister and International Youth Ambassador Andril Aranha at Cabinet for the second annual National Youth Agaist Crime and Violence

College of the Bahamas, youth
council and Ministry of National
Security plan week of activities



“Fighting
crime is
everybody’s
business.”



Tommy Turnquest

“We. have allocated funds in

our budget to facilitate the imple- :

mentation of this important ini-
tiative, which is young people-
planned, young people-driven and
young people- implemented,” Mr
Turnquest said.

The minister said the recom-
mendations that emerge from the
discussions will be considered

‘alongside those made by the

National Advisory Council of
Crime.

“This initiative is very crucial
to the government’s national anti-

crime strategy and the recom-.

mendations from the forum will
be. studied and: incorporated in

other recouuiitiondatia: from oth-
er stakeholder groups,” Mr Turn-
quest,said.

Sasha Armbrister, a CARI-

. COM Youth Ambassador, said

the event is extremely important
as it encourages young people to
play a more active role in the deci-
sions of their country.

“It really touched our hearts to
see that our ministry and our
country actually want the young
people to help.

“They actually want our ideas
and our opinions,” she said.

As the principle strategy of the
week of activities is to create dia-
logue spaces, Minister Turnquest
is calling on all educational insti-
tutions, tertiary, secondary and
primary, public and private to
dedicate at least one class period
during the NYACVW to discuss
strategies which address crime and
violence in the Bahamas.

“We want to use this opportu-

. nity to challenge Bahamians to

become..engaged in preventing
crime and violence that continues
to eat away at our quality of life.

“Fighting crime is everybody’s

_business,” Mr Turnquest said..



STUDENTS of stade 4Q at Queen's College visited the House of Assembly sah met Prime Minister Hubert
norahen Each Studatt had the opportunity to shake the prime minister's hand after their grand tour.

GIVE _IN

TO TEMPTATION
E TRIBUNE





Set irae oes
‘tf ever there
‘Was a time to
Stop talking anti
act, it is now’
Senior attorney aintns
that Bahamas’ ‘short-
term fate will be

dictated’ by how it’
responds to challenges

facing financial services ~

over next 12-24 months

® By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

“If ever there was a time in
our recent history when we
have to stop talking and start
acting it is now,” a prominent
Bahamian attorney told Tribune
Business yesterday.

Brian Moree, senior partner
at the McKinney, Bancroft &

_ Hughes law firm, warned that
“current unprecedented events” .

meant the Bahamas and its
financial services sector faced
s chahenges—that
ensured ‘they could no longer
conduct “business as usual”.

He said that how this nation
responds to the numerous chal-
lenges facing it and the financial
services industry over the next
12 months-24 months “will dic-
tate our short-term fate”.

A proactive, co-ordinated
response was. paramount, Mr
Moree said, with both the Gov-
ernment and private sector

needing to prioritise and allo- ,

cate greater resources to
defending the Bahamas and its
financial services’ interests,
especially in the face of renewed
pressure from the European
Union (EU), its individual
members and the OECD.
“The financial services indus-
try in the Bahamas is obviously
not going to be immune from

the unprecedented events going »

on throughout the world, and I
think that if ever there was a
time in our recent history when
we have to stop talking and start
acting it is now,” Mr Moree told
Tribune Business.

“T think, to some extent, in -

the private and public sector,
there is a risk we become desen-
sitised to the urgency and seri-
ousness of the problems we are

SEE page 6B



TUES SDAY,



SOV

JANUARY

Stet

BT cs

YON O Mw reste Cusislicrtccre nite.

Fort holds construction



2009



ROYAL BFIDELITY

industry woes at ‘Bay’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
‘Tribune Business Editor

ld Fort Bay is
countering
depressed con-
struction activi-
ty via the
employment of 500 tradespeo-
ple and 22 building companies
in finishing homeowner prop-
erties, the head of New Provi-
dence’s largest private landown-

er told Tribune Business, with
plans to create a new retail

‘Town Centre’ for the area
“coming along very nicely”.

T. Rhys Duggan, New Provi-
dence Development Company’s
president and chief executive,
told this newspaper that the
firm was “working diligently”
to bring to fruition the planned
retail development, which
would be located opposite the
entrance to the Charlotteville
development.

He indicated that he might
be able to divulge more details
in 30-40 days once all necessary
planning approvals and permits
came through for the new Town
Centre.

Tribune Business revealed

Exchange

control
regime
‘pays off

~ Commonwealth chair

says average loan size.
_of $12-$14k, and

consumer focus, helps
by diversifying risk

\

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
‘Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas’ exchange
control regime, although
decried by some, and ‘conserv-
ative’ monetary policy “paid
off” in the past year by protect-
ing the banking system and
investment community from the
ravages of the credit

‘crunch/sub-prime mortgage cri-

sis, a former Central Bank gov-
ernor said yesterday.

T. B. Donaldson said that
while it was fashionable in some
quarters to criticise the
exchange control regime for
denying Bahamian investors the .
opportunity to invest abroad’
and diversify with higher
returns, the system had largely
safeguarded them from the loss-
es associated with the global

_ SEE page 3B

* Some 500 tradesmen and 22 companies employed on Old Fort Bay home
construction, with 25 properties underway and another 12 to come on stream
* Developer ‘working diligently’ on planned new Town Centre i western
New Providence, and ‘couldn’t ask for more’
* 500,000 cubic yards of fill levels site for proposed light industrial park





last year that New Providence
Development Company had

- received preliminary planning

approval for the new retail
‘Town. Centre’, which was
intended to address a “short-
age of retail” in western New
Providence.

To accommodate the project,
New Providence Development
Company was also, at the time,
examining whether to move its
existing 50 year-old Lyford Cay
Shopping Centre to the Town
Centre site. Maintenance costs
were only likely to increase at
the former site, which backs on
to the Lyford Cay Marina.

Meanwhile, Mr Duggan told
Tribune Business that New
Providence Development Com-
pany had “sold the vast majori-
ty of inventory” in the Old Fort
Bay community, with just 10

Regulator: No more licences for banks to do insurance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

- NO more insurance bro-
ker/agent licences will be issued
to Bahamian commercial banks,
the industry’s chief regulator
told Tribune Business yester-
day, after sector players recent-
ly raised competition concerns
regarding this issue.

Lennox McCartney, the Reg-
istrar of Insurance, said that
while he could not comment
directly on government policy,
he “understood” that any com-
mercial banks applying for new
insurance broker/agent licences
would be turned down.

He explained: “I can say, at
this point in time, that it’s my
understanding they would not

lots now available for prospec-
tive buyers.

He added that some 500 con-
struction industry tradesmen,
and 22 contractor and sub-con-
tractor companies, were work-

ing on home construction in Old _

Fort Bay currently, helping to
stimulate activity in an indus-
try which, many believe has
been hard hit by the present
economic downturn.

“There are 25 homes under
construction,” Mr Duggan said
of Old Fort Bay, “and about a
dozen are in the pipeline.
They’re getting their planning
and permitting in place.

“It’s really encouraging. We
keep seeing good activity. We
couldn’t ask for more, to tell
you the truth. On the New
Providence Development Com-

pany and Old Fort Bay Club. .

Industry concerns raised over Scotiabank seeking broker/agent licence

be approved, banks seeking to
carry on insurance business -
any new banks, that is.”

Mr McCartney’s comments
came after insurance industry
sources expressed to. Tribune
Business increasing concerns
about the competitive threat
being posed to their sector by
the banks, especially when it
came to competing for home-
owners and life insurance busi-
ness for their mortgage clients.

Tribune Business can reveal .

in part that the concerns have
been prompted by Scotiabank
(Bahamas) desire to obtain an
insurance brokerage/agency
licence, a development relayed
to this newspaper by numerous

‘

level we’ve been doing our bit,
and have managed to get by

- without laying anyone off.”

Old Fort Bay, Mr Duggan
added, had “a lot of full-time
residents”, including expatri-
ates, bankers and:attorneys, giv-

ing it a greater sense of com-
munity. Tennis courts and two-

play areas had now been put in.
As for New Providence

Development Company’s other°
initiatives, Mr Duggan said the

company - which has been mas-
terplanning western New Proy-
idence’s development and

‘ growth carefully, putting in all
necessary infrastructure and .

utility building blocks - was
moving forward with its
planned 75-acre light industrial
park, to be located just south

SEE page 3B

industry sources.

The insurance sector is under-’

stood to-be almost unanimous-

ly opposed to the award _.of such.

a licence, a development that
now seems most unlikely given
Mr McCartney’s comments.
Barry Malcolm, Scotiabank
(Bahamas) managing director,
did not return Tribune Busi-

ness’s call seeking comment on ~

the issue, despite a detailed
message having been left with
his office yesterday.

When questioned on the

issue, Mr McCartney said: “I’ve
not seen any application from
Scotiabank in the cacten.

SEE page 4B.

sRols BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

PENSION PLAN

As a part of our commitment to our
valued members, The Bahamas Chamber
of Commerce is partnering with Royal
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options and online access.

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(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

Baha Mar’s
China meeting
‘went well’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA Mar’s meeting last
week with a high-level Chinese
delegation “went well”, Tribune
Business was told yesterday;

, Taising hopes that the $2.6 bil:

lion Cable Beach redevelop;
ment will be revived imminent:
ly. a

Robert Sands, Baha Mar? 's
-senior vice- president of exter:
nal affairs and: government
affairs, confirmed that Baha
Mar was “still in communica-
tion” with the China State Con;
struction and the China Export-
Import Bank following their
meeting last week.

“Tt’s fair to say that the meet-
ing went well,” Mr Sands said.
“We’ll just‘continue to work on
our meetings with them, and to
do the due diligence wé’ve
promised. We’re communicat-
‘ing on a regular basis.” :

He indicated he might be able
_ to say. more later this week once
Baha Mar principals returned
to the Bahamas. |

Sarkis Izmirlian, Baha Mar’ 5
chief executive, told this news-
paper at the Business Outlook
Conference that it hoped to

SEE page 4B:



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ry a aes Ug 27TH, 2009

THE WEATHER REPO RT A (P)INSURANCE MANAGEMENT



(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS
MARINE FORECAST



















Wednesday WINDS WAVES _-_VISIBILITY _ WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 7D" F
Wednesday: E at 15-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles fork
FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet i 75° F



Wednesday: E at 15-20 Knots 2-4 Feet

- ABACO Today: NE at 10-15 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F

10-20 Miles 78° F











Bright sunshine.











Bright sunshine and Humid with plenty of Partly sunny with a Partly sunny and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Wednesday: E at 15-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
breezy. sunshine. shower late. windy. greater the need for eye and skin protection.
High: 83° High: 82°: High: 75° High: 74°
High: 82° Low: Ta Low: ee Low: a Low: 6a
Meat lbace Eee 7 : TERE RRR Pei
88°-76° F 93°-72° F ~78°-53° F 68°-58° F







The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, preci
5 elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and aie low for the day.
WednesdayS06am. 26 27am. -O1

or 910p.m. 24° 3:05p.m. -0.2
3 : : Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. esterday Thursday 9:30am. 25 36am. -O1
ABACO : : Temperature 2 9:47 p.m. 22.5 3:39 p.m.. -0.2

26 1:59 a.m. 04
8:34 p.m. 2.3 2:32pm. -0.2



ion, pressure, and Today 8:22 a.m.
















Lay cnn tnaeg : , Riayl Ube. 2A SEAM. 01.
Normal high nnn spencer tican tod HIDE pees aa Pie
Normal lOW .u..eeseesseessesseesessssereeeseeeree BO" F/18° C 3B. 19/-7 9 c
f A ZZ Last year's NIGH... eseeeseeeereeees 10° F/25° 6 F
- High: 78° F/26°C A Z g ZL Last year's IOW ....esssseessesssseesseesssesssees 62° F/17° C
Low: 65° F/18°C a : Precipitation Sunrise. -....6:54 a.m. Moonrise... . . 7-41 a.m.
2 IAA LLL_ : As of 1 p.m. yesterday 0.00" =‘ Sunset....:..5:51 p.m. Moonset... .. 7:14 p.m.
Year to date .. . 0.63"

Full New



F Firs
High:7° F/25° C ae; Et

Low: 59° F/15°C

‘Normal year to date .

AccuWeather.com :

Forecasts and graphics provided by <





Showers 4 a Se Miami
eS T-storms ies






Feb.2 Feb.9 ‘Feb. 16







AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009
ELEUTHERA . ¢ Rain Fronts
C Sh iti f e th te id ee
jown are noon positions of weather systems ani
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for tfie day. Warm ia
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary ge



KEY WEST
High: 76° F/24°G
Low: 67° F/19°C



2/
48/8 37/2



SALVADOR
— High:81°F/27°C
Low: 66° F/19°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today
highs and tonights's lows.

Ss



Tai







Today Wednesday _ MAYAGUANA
. High Low W i Low FieB
FC = FC

oe ts FC OFC FC FIC
Albuquerque. ) ; Ne f
19/- 7 ee 11

1/ Indianapolis”
18/-7 7/-13 sn ane le




















BAA © 36/2 Fr RAGGED ISLAND
42/5 19/-7 Fr i ; Portland, OR ; Hi h: 80° F/27°C
m0 26-8 Little Rock i Raleigh: Durham Lownes*Fie°C
Boston 28/-2 21/-6 s 31/0 22/-5 sn Los Angeles St. Louis 221-5 11 26/- é ;





at 3 ee 6









Buffalo «25/3 18/7 © 272 18-7 sn’ sa nal alsa

Charleston, ad 65/18 54/12 ¢ 72/22 50/10 pe GREAT INAGU A:

Chicago ——SS*17/-8 B13. sn BH 17-8 pe High: 83°F/28°C CE BROKERS & AGENTS
Cleveland 25/-3 19/-7 sn = 23/-5 _ 17/-8 sn aoe

Dallas (BN OTR i BT 3201 SSCNashville “Hlouth Fy

Denver 26/-3 16/-8 pc 46/7 18/-7 pc New Orleans a i i pe t eta : nnd
Detroit = 21-6 14/-10 sn 20/5 13/-10 po New York 3 sn Tamp Winnipeg 8-13 246s «18-7. 515 sn \ ; Mid
Honolulu 74/23 59/15 pce 77/25 64/17 sh Oklahoma City 29/-1 15/-9. 45/7 23/-5 pe Tucson Westies 0: s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers tthunden ” Tel (242) 332 Hy Tek (242) 336-2304
Houston «66/18 42/5 pe 47/8. 36/2 Orlando. 78/25 58/14 po 81/27 GO/IS pe Washington, DC 34/1 29/-1. sn.” 40/4. 26-3. r. see enonc tures emeehen aR

“storms; train, sf*snow flurries; sn-snow, fice;



Tcp-precipitation, Tr-trace~
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 3B



Exchange control
regime ‘pays off
FROM page 1B

stock market crash.

Referring to the banking sec-
tor, Mr Donaldson said: “We
still run this business, by some
people’s standards, pretty con-
servatively here, which has paid
off.

“Some people might not want
to admit it, but for those people
who railed against exchange
controls, those same controls
may have stopped them from
getting caught up in all this fool-
ishness. Suppose. we’d allowed
pension funds and others to
invest in foreign markets. Peo-
ple have to be careful.”

The exchange control regime,
coupled with the conservative
lending mortgage practices of
Bahamian commercial banks,
prevented the sector from
becoming involved in the sub-
prime lending practices that

devastated their counterparts -

in the US.

In addition, very few Bahami-
an investors have direct expo-
sure to the international mar-
kets. Those that do include
holders of Consolidated Water
Bahamian Depository Receipts
(BDRs), a derivative, of the
Nasdaq-listed stock, plus
investors in RoyalFidelity and
CFAL’s international invest-
ment funds. The National Insur-
ance Board (NIB) has also been
permitted to invest a portion of
its funds overseas.

Meanwhile, Mr Donaldson,
who is Commonwealth Bank’s
chairman, lauded the risk diver-
sification achieved by the BISX-
listed institution’s consumer
lending focus after it posted a 10
per cent rise in net income for
2008 to $49 million, compared

to $48.5 million the year before.
’ The bank published its unau-
dited financials yesterday, and
Mr Donaldson said: “The joy
about Commonwealth Bank is
that the average loan is between
$12,000 to $14,000. It’s spread
over a wide range, and not con-
centrated in just a few compa-
nies or sectors...

“If you spread risk out like
that, you. begin to see the bene-
fits of not having too large a
coonhe BSSEIStin a just Gne sec-
tor.” & ;



monvealth Bank’s 2008: pclae:
mance “came in around where
we thought it would come in”,
and was on budget.

When management saw the
economy begin to slide in the
2008 second half, they “made
general provisions” against the
likelihood of increased. loan
losses and have built this into
the bank’s financial model
already, he added.

Loan loss reserves more than
covered the slight increase in
non-performing loans, from 1.5
per cent of the total portfolio
_ in 2007 to 1.7 per cent at end-
2008, Mr Donaldson attribut-

ing the slight increase to man- .

agement’s “vigilance” and use
of a credit scoring regime to
assess a borrower’s creditwor-
thiness.

The 1.7 per cent non-per- .

forming loan figure, Mr Don-
aldson said, was far better than
the 6.3 per cent industry aver-
age reported by the Central
Bank of the Bahamas at
November 2008.

Meanwhile, Commonwealth
Bank saw its return on equity
remain flat at 35 per cent, while
return on assets dropped from
3.8 per cent in 2007, although
it remained above the indus-
try’s 3.5 per cent average. The
decline was due to a $150: mil-
lion or 12 per cent increase in
total assets to $1.323 billion,
without a matching proportion-
ate rise in net income.

However, Commonwealth
Bank’s overall efficiency ratio
improved during 2008 to 43 per
cent.

“We intend to keep on doing
what we’re doing. We came
through last year, and have no
crystal ball for this year, but will
adjust to whatever circum-
stances we find ourselves in,”
Mr Donaldson told Tribune
Business.

He acknowledged, though,
that 2009 was likely, to “be a
rough year for everybody”, and
expressed fears that rather than

a ‘V-shaped’ recession, where
the downturn and recovery both
took place relatively rapidly, the
‘Bahamas and the world might
be in for an ‘L-shaped’ reces-
sion where the economy con-

tracted and then bounced along

the bottom for a while.
Commonwealth Bank had no
plans to downsize or lay-off

staff, Mr Donaldson added, and

was continuing to expand with

construction of its Prince)

Charles Drive branch expected
to be completed some time in
the 2009 third quarter. Some
new employees were expected
to be hired.

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BEC yesterday released the
list of 13 companies vying to
supply it with renewable energy
yesterday, most of which pro-
posed waste to energy produc-
tion as the country's most fea-
sible power source.

Two of the firms that sub-
mitted bids to the govern-
ment/BEC proposed Solar/Pho-
to Voltaic energy as an alter-
native to fossil fuels; two sug-
gested a combination of wind
and solar resources to generate
energy; one proposed wind

. only; and another proposed an
Ocean Thermal Energy Con-
version (OTEC) operation.

The 13 bidders are:

¢ Bahamas Renewable

Energy Corporation

Wind/Solar

¢ Bahamas Renewable

Energy Resources

Waste to Energy

¢ Cambridge Development,

Inc,

Waste to Energy |

e Enfinity

Solar/PV

- @ Exuma Waste Manage-
ment
‘Waste to Energy

e GA Solar

Solar/PV

¢ GGEC-Globally Green

Energy Consortium

Waste to Energy

e¢ GPEC Global Inc. + Ener-
gy Solutions Bahamas .

Waste to Energy

¢ Norwin America LLC

Wind

© Ocees International Inc

e OTEC 3

Plasco Energy

Waste to Energy

e Protocol Energy









FROM page 1B

of the existing Airport Industrial Park.

“The industrial park is moving along well.
We've filled the site with 500,000 cubic yards of
fill,” Mr Duggan said, explaining that the land had
to be raised because it was a low-lying site. The
park will be called the Rocky Plant Road Indus-

trial Park.

New Providence Development Company was
also “working to get the word out” about Green

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that nee oan of MARSH
HARBOUR, ABACO, BAHAMAS,

Minister responsible for Nationality and
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 20th day’ of JANUARY
2009 to the .Minister responsible for Nationality and
P.O.Box N-7147,








Citizenship,

BEC unveils 13 renewable bids

International
Wind/Solar

e Smart power
Waste to Energy

These 13 companies will now
be vetted by a private firm cho-
sen by the Government, with
the aim of further reducing the
list of competitors in order to
choose the most viable option
for renewable energy.

BEC’s chairman, Fredfrick
Gottlieb, said it was in the best
interest of small island nations
to develop alternatives sources
of energy to supplement the
need for oil production.

At a renewables conference
in Bonn, Germany, in 2004 it
was suggested that the demand
for oil by large developing
nations in the East like China
and India is rising faster than
it can be produced," he said.
"If this trend continues, it will
result in a conflict between sup-
ply and demand where soaring

prices of oil will be inevitable."
One of the short listed com- ”

panies is proposing a $60 mil-
lion dollar solar/ wind project
across three islands that could

_ create 60 - 90 jobs in the

process.
Bahamas Renewable Ener-
gy Corporation, a joint venture
between Bahamas based WIN-
SO Ltd and Canada-based
Schneider Power, said if it were
to proceed it could generate
around 24 megawatts of elec-
tricity per day on the three
islands of New Providence,
Abaco and Harbour island,
powering 25,000 homes.
OTEC company, Ocees
International Inc, which was
also short listed proposes ther-
mal energy conversion that uses
ocean temperature variations

Fort holds construction industry woes at ‘Bay’

Systems, the waste recycling joint venture pro-
ducing compost, top soil and mulch from green
waste and old pallets.

The operation, run from a facility on New Prov-
idence Development Company land, is a venture
involving it, Bahamas Waste, Waste Not and
Robin Myers of Caribbean Landscaping. “Stuff
that normally would go to the dump is being
turned into something useful,” Mr Duggan said.

He added: “Everything’s going well. We just
have to hope the economy doesn’t stall us. We’re ..
optimistic and see good things happening.”

ae RR ke

lying to the
“eitizenship, for

Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that ANNA G. MICHEL of
SOLDIER ROAD WEST, APT#3, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister: responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of
The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason
why registration/naturalization’ should not be granted,

should send a written and signed statement of the facts:
within twenty-eight days from the 27" day of January, 2009
to the Minister responsible for nationality and Gllzenete
‘P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

maT Tea

Salesperson to sell outboard engines, boats,
waverunners, trailers and generators. Must
be professional, enthusiastic and motivated.

Please fax resume to 394-3885.



PKF BAHAMAS

QUALIFIED AND TRAINEE ACCOUNTANTS REQUIRED

The Nassau office of PKF, an International Accounting Firm,

seeks to recruit the following:

(1) Professional
accounting qualifications.
membership in The

qualified
They
Bahamas

persons with recognized
must be eligible for
Institute . of | Chartered

Accountants and must have at least two (2) or three (3)
years post qualification experience. Only Bahamians need
apply. Preference will be given to applicants with proven audit
and assurance experience.

(2) Trainess. with an accounting or equivalent degree and
eligible to write a professional examination.

In all cases, salary and benefits subject to negotiation.

Apply in writing to Human Resources Partner,
PKF, P.O.Box N-8335, Nassau Bahamas



- sions per year.

to explore the viability of wind

To ailvertise, just call 502-2371

to drive heat engines to pro-
duce power. However, popular
opinion flags this alternative
energy option as high in capital
expenditure with low overall
efficiency.

Norwin America LLC, which
was the only firm to offer a
wind-only energy proposal, has
completed projects in other
Caribbean countries, such as
the Dominican Republic, where
it constructed a 225 kilowatt
(kW) wind turbine expected to
generate 586,000 kWh of clean
energy and offset 160 metric
tons of carbon dioxide emis-

Salesperson for Car lot
must have experience
in sales.

Rene y Hal @ cr Ey Le

A study is currently being
done through the Grand
Bahama Power company and
Canadian shareholder Emera,

energy for the second capital.

Minister for the Environ-
ment, Phenton Neymour, said
recently that wind energy also
incurred high capital costs,
while its turbines were also in
high demand but short supply.

The Government, though ,
sees the pursuit of clean, renew-
able energy as a worthy. ven-
ture that could in the long run
provide .a "better environ-
ment" and "reduce foreign cur-
rency leaving the country for
oil imports”.

"When all systems are go for
renewable energy in this coun-
try, The Bahamas will not only
have put itself one step closer to
becoming a first world country
from an energy perspective, but
it would also-have put itself in a
position to decrease its oil
imports significantly and add
to the environmental initiatives
that are presently underway,"
said BEC General Manager
Kevin Basden.





VALID: JAN 26 — JAN 31, 2009

Tel: 242-328-0048 |
| Fax: 242-328-0049 _

#4 Patton & Rosetta Sts,
Palmdale
(Next to City Market)
Nassau, Bahamas
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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Pe ee eee
Baha Mar’s China meeting ‘went well’

FROM page 1B

conclude an agreement with
two Chinese state-owned enti-
ties “over the next six months”,
with a construction contract
“signed over the next few
weeks”.

“I’m very optimistic,” Mr
Izmirlian said. “I think the Chi-
nese are the right partners for
us. They look at the world over
a long period of time. They are
very senior people who would
not fly half-way around the
world if they were not serious.
The negotiations are complex
and will take time, but over the
next six months we hope to
come to a conclusion.

“We'll hopefully be in a posi-
tion to sign a construction con-
tract over the next few weeks,”
Mr Izmirlian told Tribune Busi-



leading print medium in The Bahamas. The Tribune is my newspaper.”











port the news, call our
ips Line at 502-2359.



REGULATOR, from 1B




that I’ve been in office.”
Currently, there are three
banks licensed to conduct busi-
ness s brokers and agents in the
Bahamas. They are Finance
Corporation of the Bahamas
(FINCO), Commonwealth
Bank (through its Laurentide
Insurance and Mortgage Com-
pany), and FirstCaribbean
International Bank (Bahamas).
Industry sources told Tribune
Business that further insurance
industry concerns had centred
around FirstCaribbean’s in-
house insurance agency, First-
Co. ‘8
In particular, concerns had
been raised that FirstCo was
expanding its remit beyond pro-

viding services solely to First-

Caribbean mortgage clients, and
was directly marketing policies
such as motor insurance to the
Bahamian public. ©

Industry sources said that, fol-
lowing complaints by sector
players, the Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office had told FirstCo
to stop marketing to non-First-
Caribbean clients.

Mr McCartney declined to
comment on the FirstCo situa-
tion yesterday, telling this news-
paper: “I would not comment
on that. We don’t really com-
ment on any..... sort of thing
dealing with licensees.”

However, he did confirm that

“Credible. As a writer, my goal is-to present news and information that is fair

_and objective. People can trust what J write. I’m proud to be a part of the

RUPERT MISSICK, JR.
CHIEF REPORTER



ROBERT SANDS, Baha Mar’s senior vice-president of external affairs and government affairs

. FirstCo. was licensed as an
agent, and asked any insurance,

industry representatives with
concerns to contact him. The
licence is understood to have
been inherited from Barclays’
BaFinCo subsidiary when it
merged in 2002-2003 with CIBC
to create FirstCaribbean.

Overall, the insurance indus- /
try is concerned that any,

increasing encroachment by the
commercial banks into their
market, apart from taking away
profits and revenues, could be
anti-competitive.

This is because, by acting as
brokers and agents, they could
tie homeowners and life insur-

_ ance products to mortgages and _
funnel business to particular

carriers, squeezing all competi-
tors out. Mortgage consumers,
sources said, would also be
denied choice.

One contact told Tribune

Business that the insurance bro- ~

ker/agent market in the
Bahamas was already “saturat-
ed, beyond saturated, with
about 50 broker and agent com-
panies.

“The banks already make
huge profits from banking. Why
should they be allowed to
intrude into the insurance
industry and take. our profits?
It’s unwanted competition; it’s
unnecessary competition. If
they start doing this, maybe we
should start doing banking. Do
they really want to do every-
thing in financial services?”



THE TRIBUNE



ness, adding that “after that”
the main issue was likely to
involve reaching an agreement
with the China Ex-Im Bank to
provide debt financing to fund
the construction work.

While the bank would act as
the financing partner, Mr Izmir-
lian said that besides acting as
general contractor, China State
Construction would also invest
in the project and become Baha

Mar’s equity partner. Baha Mar —

would manage and operate the
finished resort complex, whose
design has not changed since
Harrah’s Entertainment with-
drew as the equity and casino
partner.

The Baha Mar chief execu-
tive said it was “the right time”
for the Baha Mar project to be
built, given the huge drop in

input costs for the project.

Mr Izmirlian explained that
international shipping
costs/rates had dropped 90 per
cent as a result of the global
economic downturn, thereby
lowering Baha Mar’s costs when
it came to imported construc-
tion materials, equipment and
other supplies, while raw mate-
rials costs had fallen by between
50-75 per cent.

Mr Izmirlian said the $2.6 bil-
lion Cable Beach redevelop-
ment would be fully completed
and open in three-and-a-half
years if construction work
began now, something that
again represented perfect tim-
ing, because it would hopefully
coincide with a period when the
world economy was growing
again.

Missing details delay
BEC Inagua takeover

li By CHESTER ROBARDS.
Business Reporter _

OMISSIONS in the agree-
ment between Morton Salt and
BEC have hampered the lat-
ter’s move to take over power
supply on Inagua, according to
a statement released by BEC's
general manager.

Kevin Basden said BEC held
a meeting with Morton Salt
managing director Glen Ban-
nister in an attempt to resolve
the case of the missing listing
of assets, including a listing of
spares, updated accounts receiv-
ables, a current, balance sheet

and third party contracts from

the agreement. , -

"As reported a number of
times in the press, BEC and
Morton Salt have been engaged
in negotiations for some time

for the transfer of the responsi-

bility for the generation, distri-

bution and management of

Inagua's electricity supply from.

Morton to the Corporation,"
said the statement.

"To this end, an.agreement
for sale of was submitted by
Morton's attorneys to the Cor-
poration for review.

“It was discover that the said
agreement was lacking in

important respects, as a num-
ber of issues were not addressed

. and supporting documents

referred to in the agreement
had not been submitted."

The transfer of the responsi-
bility for generation should
have been completed by the
beginning of 2009, but BEC has
made no further statement as
to when the new deadline might
be. Furthermore, Morton's elec-
trical infrastructure is expected

to undergo major changes.

According to the statement,
the changes will cost BEC "sub-
stantial amounts of money."

Calls made by Tribune Busi-
ness to Mr Basden to find out
just how much BEC would have
to foot for the upgrades were
not returned up to press time

_yesterday.

“The takeover is not being
delayed by BEC," Mr Basden's
statement stressed.

"The Bahamas Electricity
Corporation is committed to
taking over the power system
operations from Morton. Salt
Bahamas, but as servants of the
people, BEC must first ensure
that due diligence takes place
in the best interest of the Cor-
poration.and all of its cus-
tomers."

The Tribune

My Vorce. Mey Viewsoqer!
PAs aw Nib



eae eee ea eee
Look within for the key

to survive tough times





SUZANNE BLACK shares thoughts on surviving inying times at the Rotary Club of Southeast Nassau meeting
_at East Villa on January 21...

BAHAMAS HEART INSTITUTE
| LYFORD CAY HOSPITAL

IMMEDIATE VACANCY FOR A FULL TIME FAMILY
PRACTICE/EMERGENCY ROOM/INTERNAL MEDICINE
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IMMEDIATE VACANCY FOR A FULL TIME REGISTERED
NURSE

Interested applicants should apply in writing befere February 28, 2009 to:
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Nassan, Bahamas

Tel: 242-362-4400/4025
Fax: 242-362-4493

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_ TOUGH times call for pow-

erful, though surprising, tools:

for success - service fo others,
renewed respect for inner beau-
ty, a commitment to. balancing
work and play plus a whopping
dose of endurance, said a

Bahamian financial services .

veteran and realtor. And the
biggest surprise — restraint from

* Suzanne Black shared
thoughts on surviving trying
times when she addressed a
larger-than-usual weekly meet-
ing of the Rotary Club of

Southeast Nassau at East Villa

on January 21.

The address came one day _

after Barack Obama was inau-
gurated as the 44th president of

the US and change, she said,

was on everyone’s minds. While
decision-makers focused on
change to ensure national and
financial survival, individuals
had ‘to use times like these to

re-focus on what’s important

personally, she said.

“In this country, for the most -

part, we have had good and
prosperous times. Those who
have been diligent and enter-
prising have done well. But for
many, today’s challenges pre-
sent almost overwhelming
odds,” said Ms Black.

“Many people are frightened
— loss of jobs, scarcity of
investors, fall-off in tourists vis-
iting our shores. All of these
impact how we view our world
and how we view ourselves.
How, then, can we weather
these stormy seas of change,
keeping our courage ahead of
our concerns?”

Her answer was three-fold,
starting with striking a balance
between “work, family and
friends, our spiritual side and
time to ourselves. We need to
take care that we do not take

advantage of ourselves by

becoming all work and no any-
thing else. Over-working is a
form of self-exploitation and it
is when we self-exploit that we
may Self-abandon. When we
self-abandon, we may find our-
selves waking up one day and

asking ourselves who we are.”

If the approach of not suc-
cumbing to self-imposed slav-
ery to work to survive seems
contrary to the popular vein,
Ms Black says maintaining a

balance helped her fight can- —

cer, not once but twice, and
emerge stronger than ever.

Warned

Although she warned against
work. overkill, she said rough

. seas may mean digging deeper

to do well at what you. do best.

“If we are in retail, it may
mean more time spent listening
to staff concerns. In the hotel
industry, it may mean more
hands-on management. In real
estate, it may mean more calls
to past clients and more efforts
to develop new clients,” said

Ms Black.

“Look to others for positive
examples and guidance. I find
that when I help others, it helps
me to feel better about my life.”
Feel good about. yourself,
admire your inner beauty, she
advised. “Eleanor Roosevelt
once said: ‘No one can make us
feel inferior without our per-
mission.’ No one gets it all right;
hopefully we get it more right
than wrong. But if you ratchet.
up the strengths of what got you
where you are without losing
sight of the need to maintain
balance, you will not only sur-
vive. You will thrive.

“As we journey through life,
remember that we hold the key.
Let us strive to give the best
that we. are and the best -that
we have to as many people as
possible along the way.”

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ROYAL FIDELITY

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If you have it, we want you.

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‘Royal Fidelity invites applications for the position of:

- ASSISTANT SECURITIES TRADER -

PLEASE SUBMIT BEFORE
January 30*, 2009 to:

HUMAN RESOURCES

Re: Assistant Securities Trader

51 Frederick Street

P.O. Box N-4853

‘Nassau

F: 328.1108
careers@fidelitybahamas.com

ABSOLUTELY NO
PHONE CALLS

PROFILE:

e Series 7 Qualification .

* e Minimum t year administrative experience

° Must have excellent communication skills WierBat and written)

sagt! ee

¢ Proficient at Microsoft Office-Stiite programs.

se

© Ability to work 1 ina » self motivated environment with little supervision

* Ability to manage multiple tasks simultaneously

RESPONSIBILITIES WILL INCLUDE:

¢ Meet-with prospective and existing clients and maintain client

“accounts inclusive of inputting trades and other client transactions
{

° Profotion and distiibuttion of various investment products of

the company

¢ Assist with the solicitation of securities transactions

¢ Conduct research on various, domestic publicly traded companies

and assist in the preparation of commentaries and research reports

e Participate in business development initiatives including public

speaking engagements

e Administrative and other duties as assigned

A competitive compensation package (including base salary and commissions)
will be commensurate with relevant experience and qualification.


PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





Women’s business summit to
make Bahamas its ‘Kingdom’

WOMEN from the Bahamas,
North America and several
Caribbean nations will convene
at the British Colonial Hilton
hotel next month for the sec-
ond annual Kingdom Women
in Business Conference
(KWIB).

The. conference started off
last year with just over 12
women, including founder
Melisa Hall, patron Dr Ada
Thompson, and others such as
former Senator Tanya McCart-
ney. They organised a major
event, which attracted numer-
ous Bahamian women, and they
officially launched the organi-
sation.

Mrs Hall said: "What started

off as a simple idea for Bahami-.

an businesswomen to come
together has turned into a high-














ly-anticipated international
event that has garnered us a
few sponsors who we never
thought would join. More
importantly, Bahamian women
come and network and launch,
in some cases relaunch their
lives."

She added: “We've had
someone start a magazine.
another lady wrote and pub-
lished the first of several books,
someone else started a televi-
sion show, another lady fulfilled
a life long dream to own her
own company, and a shy
woman has turned into a much
sought-after motivational
speaker," Mrs Hall said.

“This is just part of the rea-
son why it is essential for us
women to come together, share
our talents and expertise and

Master Motivator Spence Finlayson is pictured during the
taping of his hit TV show “Dare To Be Great” at the Hilton
Hotel. “Dare To Be Great” airs tonight at 8: apps on ZNS TV 13.



Pictured along with the shows creator and host Spetice Finlayson
are his guests The Hon, Fredrick Mitchell, MP for Fox Hill,
Rory Higgs, President of Apex Management Services Ltd. and
Alpheus “Hawk” Finlayson, former IAAF Council Member.










/

PICTET BANK & TRUST LIMITED
: Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

COMPLIANCE OFFICER
REQUIRED SKILLS:-

Commitment to excellent customer’ service.
- Ability to work independently.and under pressure to meet
' strict deadlines.

- Must be a team player.
- Excellent oral and written communication silts,

- Excellent problem solving and organisational skills.

- Proficiency in a variety of software applications including
Microsoft Office.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-
At least five (5) years related experience in a Private Bank
or Trust Company.
- Professional qualification (LLB, CPA, ACCA, CA) preferred.
- Minimum ofa Master’s Degree in Business Administration,
Finance or Accounting.
- Experience in the. preparation of regulatory and special
information reports.
- In-depth knowledge of The Bank & Trust Companies
Regulation Act, 2000. —
- In-depth knowledge of Anti-Money Laundering, KYC
(Know Your Customer) and Countering the Finance of
Terrorism policies and procedures.

- Experience in the preparation of regulatory and special
information reports.

ABSOLUTELY NO atnGne
, CALLS WILL BE ACCEPTED. |
Please deliver Resume and two (2) references BY HAND

NO LATER THAN FEBRUARY 6, 2009 to:-

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
West Bay Street and Blake Road

Nassau, Bahamas
Offices in

Lausanne, Geneva, Zurich, Luxembourg, London, Montreal, Nassau, Singapore,
Tokyo, Hong Kong, Frankfurt, Florence, Milan, Madrid, Paris, Rome, Turin





KINGDOM WOMEN In Business founder, Melisa Hall, thanks Florida delegates from last year’s conference. This year's conference is set for next month...

help each other out. Can you
imagine the results we'll have
if we all shared, instead of keep-
ing our success a secret?

‘Because we'd be helping each

other, we'd be benefiting from
great rewards."

Since launching the organi-
sation's website, www.king-
domwomeninbusiness.org, and

Facebook page, Mrs Hall said it
had received a lot of questions
from North America and the
Caribbean.

“With technology, our world
has no borders, and‘as a result
women have been wanting to
come to the event as well as
sign up to become members,"
said Mrs Hall.

“Our KWIB members are

now thrust into the spotlight as -

Bahamian ambassadors when
these ladies arrive, and they
have opportunities to then con-
tinue friendships.

“Last year, one member who
was just launching her public
relations firm was able to use
a member she met through

KWIB to get connected to a
national American magazine
and to several others through-
out the Caribbean. So when
you have such opportunities,
take advantage of them."

Early registration for the sec-
ond annual conference is
already in progress. For more
information, call 242-328-6050.

Tat BELTED TL Tl es

FROM page 1B

confronting, and that we can’t
conduct business as usual.”
The issues confronting the

Bahamian economy and, more .

specifically, had been identified





























and discussed for years, Mr
Moree indicated. However, this
nation had been slow to imple-
ment the required solutions,
and the leading attorney yes-
terday urged both the Govern-
ment and private sector to start
moving beyond. the debating
stage/

“I think there is a wide con-
sensus that has developed over
the years as to what needs to
be done,” Mr Moree told Tri-
bune Business. “We don’t need
more debate and discussion.....
We need, above all, to be more
proactive, more dynamic.

“There are a myriad of issues
that require the attention of the
Government and the private
sector with regard to the finan-
cial services industry and its
development. We do need to
sound a wake-up call to action.

- It can’t be some minor event

where people meet and discuss
issues.”

Among the gathering storms
is the “increased aggressive
behaviour”. being shown
towards the Bahamas and other
international financial centres,
following the credit:crunch and
global financial-meltdown, by
the EU member states and the
OECD.

.Many European countries,

looking to shore up their wel-
fare states and weakened
tax/revenue regimes, were
focusing on the easier targets
of international financial cen-

tres as a suitable scapegoat for »

their ills, rather than reforming
their own systems. The’ end
result was likely to be more
pressure on the Bahamas.

In addition, Mr Moree said’

“many high net worth individu-
als have lost significant parts of
their wealth” as a result of the
finanwal crisis and stock mar-
ket collapse, a development
with major implications for the

Bahamian financial industry giv- -

en that this. was its target client
base.
“Bearing in mind that our

core business is private..bank-s...

ing and private wealth manage-

ment, this will represent diffi-:.:

culties in attracting, new:’busi-
ness to the Bahamas,” Mr
Moree added.

On top of that, he said: “We
still don’t allocate enough

resources to the second largest’

industry in the country to keep
up to date with a very dynamic
industry, whether it be with
regard to products, legislation
or the regulatory environment.

“We are significantly behind
many of our competitors. The
product development cycle is
too slow.”

Mr Moree explained that
while the Bahamas had placed
private trust companies, special
purpose trusts and segregated
accounts companies on the
statute books, and amended
other financial services product
legislation, in many cases it had
done so two to four years after
its major international financial
centre competitors.

“We cannot expect to contin-
ue to service a very competitive
industry if it takes us too long to
respond to market forces, and
stifle our ability to service a very
dynamic and competitive indus-
try,” the McKinney, Bancroft
& Hughes senior partner told
Tribune Business.

As for the regulatory situa-

‘tion, Mr Moree said the ratio-

nalisation, consolidation and
streamlining that had taken
place among financial services

supervisors to date was “com-_

mendable”.
However, it was “taking too

long” to.produce the final result, :

which the Government had stat-
ed: was the consolidation of all
regulators into either one ‘super

Legal Notice

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No. 45 of 2000)

IKCON INVESTMENTS LIMITED
PURSUANT TO SECTION 137 (8) OF
THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT 2000

I, Macgregor Robertson, Liquidator of IKCON INVEST-
MENTS LIMITED, hereby certify that the winding up and
dissolution of IKCON INVESTMENTS LIMITED, has been
completed in accordance with the Articles of Dissolution. A
certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of

the dissolution was the 9th day of January 2009.

Macgregor Robertson
Liquidator







regulator’ or a twin pillars mod-
el with two supervisory bodies.
- Achieving this goal would
“not only reduce the timeframe
but also the cost structure of
doing business here”.
-Emphasising that he: did not
want'to:sound alarmist or “sug-
gest our financial services indus-
try is under some imminent

threat”, Mr Moree said there

had to be a greater degree of
specialisation among persons
representing the Bahamas at
international forums/confer-
ences on financial services.

He argued that all too often,
the Bahamas was represented
at major international fora by
the same people, who simply
cannot give their full attention
to every financial services mat-
ter, given the complexity and
volume of the subject matter.

In contrast, other countries
were represented by specialist
teams of eight to 10 persons,
leaving the Bahamas “out-
manned and outresourced”. Mr
Moree said this nation needed
to “get’ serious about it” and
allocate the necessary resources
to ensure it had the best possi-
ble representation at interna-
tional conferences, thus safe-.
guarding its interests. -

With the number of interna-
tional financial services com-
petitors increasing annually,
especially among Caribbean
nations, Mr Moree added: “We

“have to understand we have to

be engaged. We have to do it,
and we have to do it within a
relatively short timeframe if
we’re seriously going to accept
the challenge which, I think
frankly, is going to be there
whether we want it to be or not.

“Difficult times sometimes
present real opportunities, and
that’s how the best respond.
Those countries that respond
thoughtfully and proactively,
and allocate sufficient resources,
have a chance of finding unique
opportunities.

“For those of us who practice
business as usual, we will find
ourselves losing market share
and falling even further behind.
How we respond will dictate
our short-term fate.”

TST

ae UCAS Es

RCA Ca
RL
on Montays
THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS . TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 7B



TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 27, 2009

10:30
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Jake Gyllenhaal. |‘PG’, Caviezel. (Subtitled-English) 0 ‘R’





















MOMAX













PAGE 8B TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

NGI: SB, LEU PAN OF NO EAPUN 1 9
: 3 | COMIC PAGE ; |

CALVIN & HOBBES

YES, CAN [ HAVE THE
TOOL DEPARTMENT, PLEASE?












JUDGE PARKER
AS SAM

PRESSES FOR





I DON'T BLAME
SOPHIE FOR
SLAPPING

SUE ELLEN!




WHY ON EARTH WOULD
THEY PUT GLUE ON
SOPHIE'S CHAI?






1 19i69 Unnmisal Pras Syraicate



HER MOM
WANTED SOPH TO
BE SUSPENDED
FOR VIOLENCE!





SOME OF.
~ THESE GIRLS
| | \ ARE JUST MEAN...
i ; y THEY LAUGHED!






|
|



1
2)
©x009 by Norn Amenca Syndicala, Inc. World rights reserved



APT 3-G














TOUCH THE SNOW; NORA MILLS APPEARS I et SURE MOU NS WHO /S' THIS
Sie ne SJ | WHAT WITH ALLTHIS SNOW, / FRIENDLY,
- COWN, Mame VS SAFE, MARCO: | 2) BUT LM VERY GLAD_2 CHEERFUL






WOMAN AND WHAT

YOU DID? ,
HAS SHE DONE WITH



HE'S REALLY A LAMB.

2. ty













THE STAIRWELL?!
WHAT'S WRONG
WITH THE
CONFERENCE

OITHERS IS
HOLDING AN
Pp EMERGENCY
MEETING IN THE
STAIRWELL!!





2009 PROJECTED
~_ EARNINGS



















©2009 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved

HELLO? HOW MUCH ARE YOUR
POWER CIRCULAR SANS ? I
SEE. AND YOUR ELECTRIC ORIUS?
UH-HUH., HON BIG OF ABIT WILL
THAT HOLD? REALIN? GREAT.



“J USUALLY CHARGE A QUARTER, BLT
YOU CAN. RIDE FOR FREE.”










{| S THE ASSIGNMENT

w SORRY ABOUT THAT. D0 You
CARRY ACETYLENE TORGHES ?
OK, RING IT AL UP. THIS
WILL BE ON MASTERCARD.

\



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on.a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 -box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





















MAN, IT TAKES A LOT



vexrreme,

OF GUTS TO PLAY SUCH
FOOSBALL

A VIOLENT SPORT.”’











©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number: to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.













































Difficulty Level *&














TI HERES A LOT OF
THINGS IMASKING
FOR, SO IM GIVING

HIM A CHANCE
To GET AFENCIL

ANZ. PAPER ..

4

SAY Your
PRNYERS,
PUNKINHEAD.

WHAT ARE YOU
WAITING FOR?











©2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc.

ee |

Across Down
1 Intrigued at a form of 2
non-appreciation (11)
9 Timely measure a couple
of favourites recalled (3-4)

10 Where to see runners, as
on a bed (5)

11. On which many initial
declarations of love: have
been made (4)

Strong man in club

team (8)
Love to point out there’s a '
choice (6)

_ Nicest form of inverte

brate (6)

A dog to'the Spanish, a
bird to us (8)

Turning knocks into a

pole (4)

Steal game to cook (5)
Important match involving
large’animals (3,4) 20 Quietly played at
Bullet that meant goodbye home? (5)

for someone? (7,4) : 21 Gets on in stages (4)

Ring in the nose for a
halter (5)
Rising star?

Nonsense! (4)
Repast, perhaps, comes to

_ a fine end (6)

17
Teaching art in disorder,

gin cocktail needed (8)

6 Refuse to take a drop? (7)
It determines the regularity

of beatings (11)

=

Public-announcements of
secret rites (6,5)

Down

How teams are organised
_ Across
1 Pre-emptive attack 2 Suggest (5)
(5,6)
9 Elucidate (7)

10 North American cattle
farm (5)

11. Variety of
chalcedony (4)
Traveller on foot (8)
Formal discussion (6)
Was inclined (6)
Unexpectedly (8)
Hard persistent
toil (4)

Colloquial
language (5)
Confront boldly (7)
Ready when
needed (11)

to a certain extent (8)
Composition that calls for
assurance of touch (7) 3 Influence (4)
A'French beer brewed by 4 Elaborate ice cream
dish (6)
5 Refined (8) -
6 Related (7)
7 Seek to
predict (6-5)
Ruthless

Jacob’s son (6) -

EASY PUZZLE

’ Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution © Yesterday’s Easy Solution ©

Across: 1 Guffaw, 4 Opponent, 9
Openly, 10 Hallmark, 12 Down, 13-
Clown, 14 Plan, 17 All-important, 20
White feather, 23 Haul, 24 Diary, 25
Swan, 28 Perverse, 29 Bogota, 30
Nowadays, 31 Pained.

Down: 1 Good deal, 2 Free will, 3
Ally, 5 Play with fire, 6 Only, 7 ,
Enable, 8 Taking, 11 Bloodthirsty, 15
Omaha, 16 Sneak, 18 Showdown,
19 Drunkard, 21 Chopin, 22 Burrow,
26 Send, 27 lota.

Across: 1 Tomtit, 4 Scabious, 9
Wanted, 10 Co-driver, 12 Adam, 13
Links, 14 Help, 17 Helping hands, 20
Stretched out, 23 Even, 24 Rides, 25
Idea, 28 Absconds, 29 Sprang, 30
Landlady, 31 Stoker. .
‘Down: 1 Towpaths, 2: Mentally, 3 Ides,
* 5 Clock-watcher, 6 Burn, 7 On view, 8

Scrape, 11 Single-minded, 15 Bitts, 16
Idler, 18 Hold back, 19 Stranger, 21
Detail, 22 Lets in, 26 Toll, 27 Spot.

interrogation (5,6)
Direct (8)

Boastful threats (7)
Larger than life (6)
Get to know (5)

To staunch (4)

























©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.











2ist
Century
Dictionary
| (1999
edition)

7(6 j
| 415 7|2(8/6 19 fd 1/2
1/8 5!1/14/213 Baw 3/8
rat7iol4 1/8 13/9 Ba 417/819
7/9 BB7/9 Bi (2/3
9/4./817 [2
6/3/4 41811 R719 Bo i2
5|6|3 719(3/1 BR8i9l7 |
11/8/7 217 R918 16/714
41219 1/5 Bas lo (5/811



















HOW many words of four letters _
or more can you make from the’
letters shown here? In making a

uses . word, each letter may be used
words in one onl aaa mit eo
ioant e centre letter and there mus
ne a be at least one nine-letter word.
body of = No plurals. ; ;
Chambers
TODAY’S TARGET

Good 20; very good 30; excellent
40 (or more). Solution tomorrow.

SATURDAY’S SOLUTION

_adagio agar alga argali argot
drag gait gala gaol garda gila
gild gilt gird girl giro girt

glad GLADIATOR gloat goad
goal goat gold grid grit groat
grot largo otalgia raga taiga

toga. trig ‘



Famous Hand

East dealer.
Neither side vulnerable.

NORTH
a7
VI86
#Q 108653
954
WEST EAST
@K5 QI1842
9953 : ¥2
@Al4 #K72
AQ 1062 3873
SOUTH
A 10963
VAKQ1074
9
mK
- The bidding:
East South West North
2% 4% All Pass .

Opening lead — king of spades.

This deal from the 1988 Vander-
bilt Teams features excellent defen-
sive play by Peter Boyd, a Virginian
who has won several national and
international titles over the past three
decades.

Boyd held the West hand and
wound up defending against four
hearts after his partner had opened
with an unorthodox weak two-spade
bid. South won the opening spade
lead with the ace and ran the dia-
mond nine, to East’s king. East
returned a low club, and, after taking
the king with the ace, Boyd stopped

to think things over.

’ He judged that declarer might
well be in position to score 10 tricks
on a.crossruff, trumping three spades
in dummy to add to the ace of spades
and at least six heart tricks in his
hand. Accordingly, Boyd made’ the
first of two key plays by shifting to a
low trump. This was taken by
dummy’s six as East followed with
the deuce and South the four.

Since only nine tricks were now
available on a crossruff, declarer’s
only remaining hope was to establish
dummy’s diamonds. So he ruffed a
diamond with the queen of hearts
and then led the heart seven toward
dummy’s J-8. .

Had Boyd mechanically followed
low, South would have gotten home
safely by finessing dummy’s’ eight,
ruffing another diamond high and
then leading the ten of hearts to the
jack. This would have yielded 10
tricks: six hearts, a spade and three
diamonds. ,

But Boyd had carefully kept track
of all the heart spots played to this
point. When the seven of hearts was
led, he foiled declarer’s plan by play-
ing the nine! This deprived South of
the extra entry needed to set up and
run the diamonds, so he finished
down two, thwarted by the combina+
tion of Boyd’s heart shift at trick four
and his entry-denying play of the
heart nine two tricks later.

Tomorrow: A sensational one-act play.
©2009'King Features Syndicate Inc,
THE TRIBUNE

oD.
Z
=

Oo

daily life.



DOCTORS say itis
very important that
children are given all
the support they can
get as they make such
a huge adjustment to





The power of touch

lm By MARGARET BAIN

Have you ever wondered why
it is that when someone holds
you, the world seems a safer and
more wonderful place?. Why
does touch seem like such a basic
instinct -equal to an essential vit-
amin or mineral? Some of us
know that we can not live with-
out it, but others, who do not
know the importance of touch,
may develop symptoms of
depression, stress, anxiety,
aggression and mid-life crisis. We
take touch for granted. You see it
everywhere; people hugging
acquaintances, friends and fami-
ly. It. seems so easy, but why do

we see so many couples who are .

‘touch deprived'? We know that
babies fail to thrive without touch
and parents are encouraged to
spend time in special care units

touching and holding their babies

while in incubators. The smell
memory formed by the powerful
bond in mothers and newborns is
formed when accompanied by
touch. Early deprivation can irre-

versibly damage a baby's per-. «:
sonality, social skills and ability to:
express affection as adults. We '

also know that older people dete-
riorate faster when no one is
there to touch them and a sense
of peace comes over them when
you just sit and hold their hand.

The reason why touch feels so
good is that it causes us to secrete

endorphins; the natural opiate,

the body produces to protect us
from pain. This is why we can
feel instantly better in someone's
arms and a hug and kiss from a
parent can take away a child's
pain instantly. The substance that
really draws us closer to someone
is oxytocin. Oxytocin is a pep-
tide that is secreted from the pos-
terior lobe of the pituitary gland.
It flows to receptor sites in vari-
ous parts of the brain and
throughout the reproductive tract
of both the male and the female.
For women, the presence of
estrogen is essential for oxytocin
to work. Oxtocyin spikes when
someone touches you and if you
spend time with that person, then
it will surge when you think
about them, when they arrive
and also when they touch you.

The effect of this-is ‘oxytocin “

bonding' or being ‘chemically
committed’. This can explain why
people who are in lukewarm
warm or destructive relationships

become bonded and attached |

against their will and better judg-
ment due to continuous physical
contact with that person. Where
oxytocin affects women more
profoundly than men due to the
estrogen, vasopressin is mainly
a man's chemical. It is also a
bonding agent and also.a sta-
biliser. Oxytocin makes us giddy
and emotional and vasopressin
improves our ability to think
more clearly. Vasopressin is
dependent on testosterone and
when it fails then vasopressin
reduces. It makes sense then that
hormone levels affect touch dis-
orders, parenting problems,
orgasmic dysfunction in both sex-
es, and reduced intimacy as we
become older.

. The problem for men and

women meeting each others’
needs through touch is not only
controlled by hormones but also
by upbringing. Women enjoy

and require a lot of nonsexual:

touch and men often sée it as a

means to a sexual encounter. .

Young girls are used to being
held, rocked and picked up
when they cry, but in teenage

“years this becomes less. This

results in acute oxytocin star-
vation. By the time she starts

‘dating she has developed

tremendous. 'skin hunger’ and
looks for an.'oxytocin fix'. Boys
on the other hand are brought

" up to cry by themselves and are
often not comforted with the





aim to make them stronger and -
‘more 'manly'. Young men are

not accustomed to the pleasant
sensations associated with touch
and oxytocin. The need for non-
sexual touch is then replaced
by the testosterone driven goal
of the sexual act.

In spite of our upbringing or
life experiences, introducing or
reintroducing touch to your life
as an adult can transform you. It
can rekindle-the romance in
your intimate relationship, stim-
ulate the hormones and pro-
duce more loving and tender
thoughts towards your partner.
It is good for your health, heart
and relationships. It is habit
forming. Touch is free, readily

- available and it is a shame that

it is often limited to times of

grief or sexual encounter. It can .

neutralise anger and depression.
Once you see the quick results
in your own life you will come
to understand that the amount
of joy and fulfillment available
in a loving partnership is con-
siderably more than you can

" imagine.

¢ Margaret Bain is an Individual
and Couples Relationship Thera-
pist. She is‘a Registered Nurse

and a Certified Clinical Sex Thera-

pist located at The Centre for
Renewing Relationships,
Grosvenor's Close West..

\

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON. _|:

“HELPING a child
adjust to life as a dia-
betic can be challeng-
ing and daunting for
parents, as they seek
to help their son or
daughter adjust not

only to the physical

challenges of the con-
dition, but the emotion-
al challenges as well.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 9B

In the immedi-
ate aftermath ofa
diagnosis, doctors
say it is very
important that
children are giv-
en all the support
they can get as
they make such a
huge adjustment
to daily life.

Brent Lowe, a >

medical technol-
ogist at Kelso
Medical
explained that
juvenile diabetes
occurs
infancy up to 30

years. The pancreas produces little
or no insulin and the patient is insulin
dependent,” he said.

While type 1 diabetes is charac-

Lab..

from.

terised by the limited amount or

absence of insulin in the body, type 2
is characterised: by the bodies resis-
tance to insulin. Some of the symp-
toms a child may have include exces-
sive thirst, frequent urination, vision
problems and weight loss.

Mr Lowe says that type 1 diabetes
is heredity in about ten per cent of all
cases. “There is no cause that has
been established, but it is something

’ that just happens,” he said.

Controlling diabetes takes a lot of



discipline and includes cutting out
those snacks that are very unhealthy
to your child’s diet-something they
may not understand.

“Parents play a major role in their
children overcoming diabetes. To
ensure that their child’s condition is
kept under control they can monitor
and watch them very closely. They
must cut down the amount of carbo-
hydrates, fats, and: sugars that their
child consumes,” he said.

' Along with all the physical symp-
toms that accompany diabetes such.as
weight loss and delay in the healing of
wounds,. children also experience -
emotional symptoms.

Mr Lowe. said: that ensuring that
the child is always mentally enriched
is key. They may experience a case of '
mild depression when they realise the
severity of their state, he explained. —

“Diabetes can effect them emo-
tionally. It’s very upsetting when they
see their classmates eating candy and
other snacks they once enjoyed. They
will ask questions like ‘how come I
can’t eat candy anymore,” he said.

_ They are also encouraged to
remain as active as possible.

“Children with diabetes can do |
pretty much everything that a regular
kid can do and while they are active, -
parents should make sure that their
children get as much water as possi-
ble,” he told Tribune Health.

Under Stress? —
Exhausted and Losing —
| concentration? —

HELP IS RIGHT AT HAND AT YOUR
NEAREST PHARMACY! |

Pharmaton: Capsules

Acomplete multi-vita-
min and mineral com-
bination of ginseng
G115 and active
agents which help
restore physical and
mental powers and
counteract wear and

| tear. —

Pharmaton

Capsules

Highly recommended for:
Lethargy, Fatigue and Exhaustion
Growing Teenagers
Sports People
Enhancing Vitality

Available In The Bahamas at Pharmacies and Drug Stores Everywhere!
Distributed by Nassau Agencies Ltd. - 393-4854


PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009 | THE TRIBUNE

@ By LISA LAWLOR Sweating your guts out
Tribune Features Writer for little return (it can take

a few months to see results)

STAYING fit does not just doesn't seem like a fair

trade.

come without sacrifice- But as we all know, itis
: TA. necessary trade. Being 1n
whether it means skip arepe cane VOM INGE A
ping the new House or __ good health for a longer
Bever! Hills 9021 O time, and besides being able
‘ os ae to slip into that new little
episode or missing out black dress or pair of slacks,
1 i j- _ it will lead to a happier you.
ry pe yin your Fam Tribune Health spoke to
y or significant orner. ~~ jocal gyms to find workouts
Sometimes those old fit- that will not only burn off

‘ ape that fat but also be fun to
ness routines - biking, Go.

running, swimming ~ -One that has received a lot

: 1 ° of celebrity hype in the last

just arent appealing : few years is pilates.

when you'd prefer to Pilates is an exercise cre-
< ated by Joseph Pilates from

be cuddling on the Germany in the early 1900s.

couch relaxing instead. He was a sickly child who
: combined the elements of
body-building, yoga and

gymnastics to overcome his physical limitations.
Today at the Pilates Studio on Shirley Street, trainers
give modernised instruction on the old pilates exercise,
combining physical stretches with emotional and men-
tally meditative moves.

In a group or private lesson, one can exercise the
heart's strength along with the mind's determination
and flexibility. Pa

Linda Holowesko, one of the five pilates instructors
there, said that this exercise has the most health bene-
fits — from helping with stress and back pain, to build-
ing strength from the inside out, rebalancing the body
and giving overall stature a better alignment.

Pilates lengthens and strengthens the. muscles, as
opposed to just pumping iron she said, which can
cause strain and feelings of fatigue. :

"Pilates raises physical awareness and I find it

‘addictive because you feel.so good after a session,"
she said.

Pilates is often used for rehabilitation and it.caters
to persons with injuries or special needs.

David Revington a yoga instruction at the Pilates

- Studio, said that yoga offers. a greater range of move-
ments- all practised on the mat. \ ~ .

One of his favourite group of exercises is for the << . KO
arms, "You can do handstands, the crow pose, eight ‘ .
limbed sage pose, the scorpion, the peacock, and
many more," he said, "And for the standing poses —
there's the vinyasa (flowing continuous movement |
from oné posture to another)."

The main difference is the meditation period at the
end of a session — the, pose of Savasana, where you lay
flat on the back in anatomical position for five min- AG

epee s i : . \ Loe
utes. "This is a time for rest, recovery, and relaxation \ : oe ash
before getting off your mat and walking out the ~ aes
door," said Mr Revington, "It's a time when what
your body has learned integrates itself with the intelli-
gence of the mind and students and teachers alike find
this essential." .
For a more intense workout regime, one can visit a
- numberof gyms that have regular fitness classes in'the’ ”
form of step classes, aerobics, hi/lo (which alternates
between high intensity and low intensity moves), or
spinning (which utilises all leg muscles while pedaling
on a Stationary bike). -,

To find new and revolutionary classes, check out
Bally's Soca Sweat to mix traditional Bahamian danc-
ing into your old boring workout, or the Junkanoo
Rush class for challenging exercise.

Bally's assistant manager and personal trainer
Yolanda Barr advised those trying to get fit this year
to set realistic short term goals. "If you work.out just
three times per week for 30 minutes, you'll see
results," she said, "One of the best decisions you can
make is to incorporate exercise into your daily life."

Next, you should vary your workouts. "Try strength
training one day, then swimming the next. Throw in
some fitness classes, but most importantly don't hit a
plateau because it's human nature to get tired of doing
the same thing every day or every week." :

Yolanda teaches reaction cycling or spinning, which
is an excellent way to burn calories. "We have it set up
with different zones so that you can always know your
heart rate and this way you always know exactly how
many calories you're burning. This really takes the

‘guess work out.of exercise."

At Bally's, their motto is "Treat yourself to fitness",
a telling statement in today's world of gadgets that
take the physical strain out of everything we do — from
cars to automatic can openers, to remote control TVs
to fast food delivery. :

"80 per cent of the battle is just coming out to exer-
cise," said Yolanda, "the hardest part is resolving to
make a change to your daily regime, getting out there
and getting active." ; ae ;

Making that decision day after day will lead to

change, so try one of these fun, new exercises the F
next time stepping onto that treadmill seems just too : a ard C S

boring.





-A cataract is cloudiness or opacity of the lens of
the eye. The lens is inside the eye, directly behind: _
the pupil. In a normal eye, the lens is clear and __
normally is transparent. A cataract interferes ~
with normal vision or sight by, partially or com-
pletely blocking clarity of the lens. The cloudiness

can vary from a little spot of white to a totally

opaque structure that affects the entire lens. Ifthe — Often, even blind animals continue to do well in









COOL & WARM LIG a ay completely masked, the result is familiar surroundings by relying on other acute
i ‘ar Base en sey 9 senses, the underlying cause is treated when pos-

(Medium & Regular Based B Dogs suffer from'cataracts more commonly gible, ne I
than any other species. Cataracts can develop at [Tp animals that have trouble navigating dué to

any age,, but'most cases.are found in dogs over 5 vision loss, sight can be restored to near normal by
years of age. While aeeere are extremely COM- surgery. Surgical treatment with lens extraction
ae as pia tats a ae suffer py Bs oe: provides predictable restoration of functional
z+ odes related or “old age” cataracts often toun¢ vision. The general condition of the patient as
a o8s: ee esata to health and behavior should be considered.
es Se ee cat ae on changes. Trau- Cataract surgery should be left to veterinarians
a ae : / ma and/o. resulting inflammation may cause a” ith special interest in ophthalmology and expe-
ge ue” a cataract but usually to only one eye. Cataracts can risnee leds extraction oe
; be caused by poor nutrition, but because of mod- Tae IMs oxpensive procedure danevandse
ern advances to canine and feline diets, such caus- general antiethiecis femoves endeeibtit net the
es are rare. ‘ ; ; : poe nate
. : Chon fr ‘ entire affected lens. The lens itself is contained in
Dogs ae cee ee pom seule orold gee a kind of capsule like eggshell. Most commonly,
Gotaract, Almost aT des OVER years old sults the surgeon removes the front part of the shell

24 Watt equal to 120w home from some degree of cloudiness to the lens. aot : nS sees Shas Ine
(eq ) : 8 0 Cataracts in dogs may also result from diabetes and ane rece eS a eats the pees
when the lens protein is injured by metabolic half of the capsule/shell intact. ‘n some cases,
changes. ; the whole lens is removed sue nen lens is trans-

A cataract may affect only a portion of the Planted to replace the damaged lens.
lens, and consequently some animals may show A procedure called PHACOEMULSIFICA-
no sign of vision loss at all. TION produces high frequency sound waves-
Even the cataract that covers the entire lens ultrasound- to break the lens, which is then
removed by suction or aspiration. Dogs and cats

a:

may still allow some vision. Treatment may not be .



necessary until a high degree of vision is lost and
cataracts become problematic for the dog or cat.

that have this type of surgery usually recover
quite well.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27, 2009, PAGE 11B





Are you going to Scarborough Fair?
Parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme
Remember me to one who lives there
For once she was a true love of mine.

In days gone by, herbs were supposed to have
the ability to imbue the eater (or wearer) with vir-
tuous qualities, or to represent those qualities. The
refrain “parsley, sage, rosemary and thyme” would
clearly have meant to a listener.a few centuries ago
“amelioration, strength, faithfulness and courage.”

Parsley has long been used as a digestif as well as
a food flavourer. It was taken to remove bitterness
and bile from the stomach. In modern times we
appreciate the depth of flavour parsley adds to
stews and soups without the herb itself being too
evident. It is also a : a

_ popular garnish. It is best to use curly-leafed
parsley for garnishing and Italian flat-leafed pars-
ley for culinary purposes. :

Before parsley seeds are sown they must be
soaked and rinsed in several changes of warm
water over a day or two. Parsley seeds contain a
natural growth inhibitor that must be washed away
in order for germination to occur. Like most
Mediterranean herbs, parsley appreciates light,
well-drained soil.

Sage, a symbol of strength, marries well with
onion and the two together with pork. It also

flavours chicken very well. Sage also symbolises a
problem gardeners have with growing herbs from
seeds. A package of sage seeds could produce a
field of large plants while only a plant or two
would suffice a large family. For this reason, look
for seedlings in small pots at your local nursery.

Youngsters sow their wild oats; older people
grow sage.

. Rosemary represents faithfulness and, in Romeo
and Juliet, remembrance. Sprigs of rosemary
adorned bodies on their way to burial, the strong
pine scent overcoming any others. A small sprig of
rosemary will turn in time into a bush and may,
treated well, become a considerable shrub. Rose-
mary is easily propagated by bending a long ~
branch over until it can be pegged into the ground.
A wound at the lowest point allows for root
growth.

Sprigs or branches of rosemary can be placed
underneath meats to be.roasted in the oven, or
even on the barbecue grill. The flavour is strong so
rosemary should be used with circumspection.

Sprigs of rosemary can also be placed in closets
and drawers. They scent the area and are also sup-
posed to keep insects away.

Thyme is the most popular herb in The Bahamas

-and is used in virtually every savoury meal. It is a



perennial that must be gleaned from sparingly dur-
ing the first year but can be harvested with aban-
don thereafter. Thyme seeds are so tiny that ants
can carry away a whole package without you realis-
ing your seeds have gone. To prevent ant preda-

‘tion, sow the seeds in a container that can then be

placed on a support in a bow] filled with water, cre-
ating a moat that keeps the ants out.

I pointed out to a local retailer recently that he
had no thyme in his spice racks. ‘““Nobody buys dried

thyme any more,” he told me. Instead, people buy... ..,..,,;

sprigs of fresh thyme and store them in a paper bag.
The thyme remains green for a few days and when it
dries the leaves collect at the bottom of the bag.
Recently dries leaves are superior in flavour to bot-
tled leaves.

It is virtually impossible to grow French tarragon
in-our climate but Mexican marigold makes an
excellent substitute. It doubles as a flowering
annual and as a herb. Do not ever buy tarragon
seeds. French tarragon is propagated by root divi-
sions and does not produce seeds. What you
would be buying is Russian tarragon, worse than
useless.

‘There are hundreds of herbs and we have dealt

with a mere five. More on herbs soon.



Celebrating
women

FROM page 12

daigphasetacecudepoucasecuesseacecceuceseay

always speak your mind,
Ms Vanderpool said.

"It was a very vibrant
school experience," she’
said, "You had opportuni-
ties to be creative and be in
plays, which I did, but there
was also a great balance
with the academic side."

And to see other peo-
ple's cultures, students and
faculty coming from all
over the world, "It shaped
my life," she commented.

The school also provided
a great social network. with
extracurricular activities,
said Ms Vanderpool, who
herself took part in gym-
nastics, horse riding and
swimming. "The school
taught us to be proud of
ourselves but respectful of
others at the same time, a
sentiment that's been car-
ried on throughout our
lives."

In making each boy and
: girl a well rounded student,
: St Andrew's helped Ms
: Vanderpool to realize her
: dream of. becoming an
: actress from an early age,

: and she said, "St Andrew’s
? School is a trendsetter, and
: was truly the platform for

i my career and life."



z ’ ; ‘
Tribune Woman's most

i recent graduate who also
: attended the reunion was

Jessica Phillips, who grad-

: uated in 2002.

i "St Andrew’s prepared

? me really well," she said,

: evident in the fact that she
: wants to become.a teacher



‘hand return to: the school to

i provide other students with
; the encouragement she _
ireceivedasagirl. _

: "We were encouraged to
? succeed in all of the same

: subjects, the boys had to
take Home Economics and
learn to set a table or bake
a pie just the same as girls
were, and girls were
encouraged to partake in
all the same sports chal-
lenges as the boys," she
said.

At the end of the day, St
Andrew's just wants each
child to find the subject
they're passionate about,
she said.

Lastly she remembered
the fantastic feeling of
growing up with the same
friends from age five to 15..
"You really connect with
your peers and grow up in
this family that's more than
: your one brother or sister.

i It was just an awesome
: place to be," she said.



This poem was written after
the Inauguration of United
States President Barack Oba-
ma.

VICTORIA SARNE

Washington January 20, 2009

Tear chases tear
Across many a face,
In its haste
To write history
For more than one race.
Black next to white
And shades in between;
No-one is hiding,

All can be seen
Standing together
United.in need.
Distant countries
Witness the deed
And fall down to kneel,
To grasp at the dream.
A world-wide appeal,
To be freed from the past,
From each yearning soul -
Answered at last!

A man for all seasons
Gives us our reasons
To be free to weep.

The tears are flowing
All are one colour.





@ By LISA LAWLOR -
Tribune Features Writer

~ WOMEN throughout the ages have gue more and

more political rights and sexual free

om, something

that is very evident when you talk to women of differ-
ent ages as Tribune Woman was able to do recently at
the sixtieth anniversary of St Andrew’s School.

The four successful women all said that
attending the school gave them a strong
foundation to realise their dreams and dis-
cussed their career choices and gender dis-
crimination at the time of graduation as com-
pared to today, ©

Diane Holowesko
Dunkley, a graduate
of 1974, said that St
Andrew’s did not '
differentiate in the
education offered a
male or female stu-
dent.

"They provided a
very high standard
of education to all,"
she said,"You —
weren't male or
female, you were
simply a student
who was expected to



study and work hard."
Another strong element of St Andrew’s
was the house system, where each student is
arbitrarily placed in either Arawak (the
green house), Taino (the yellow house),
Carib (the blue house) or Lucayan (the red



ii ln

- house), but families are always in the same
house as each other. The commitment to a
common ground along with a strong school
spirit promoted strength in character, she
said. a
_. Mrs Dunkley herself held leadership roles
as the house captain for Carib and a grade 12
prefect, positions that had to have equal rep-
resentatives of each gender. "There was ney-
er any indication that girls were supposed to
or were expected to do less than boys," she
said. ty

There were also.a lot of women mentors to
the young girls, with a majority of women

_ teachers who taught good life skills as they
juggled families and work. ‘

"In 1974 it was still considered the norm to
be a stay at home mother, which is more
demanding or at least as demanding as work-
ing in an office," she said, "The Bahamas has

been a matriarchal society for decades, with —

women working at home and having multiple
jobs to raise money for their families." __

She said that at her time of graduation,
women held higher positions in banks and in
real estate, "It was so much the norm that
women went on and became professionals,
no different than today," she added.

The real change.Mrs Dunkley said, is seen



Ovaltine’s unique recipe Includes milk

TUESDAY, JANUARY 27,

when looking at her mother's graduation in a
time when women couldn't vote or be mem-
bers of parliament in the 1940s (before the
opening of St. Andrew's School). "I was
afforded a lot more opportunities than my
mother at my age," she said.

Mrs Dunkley went to graduate school to
study law and now has a luxury real estate
company. Sule et

Pia (Ander-
son) Farmer a
graduate of ~
1976, said her
views on wom-
en's rights are
shaped greatly

’ by life in
Argentina
which was
where her fam-
ily is from. "In
Latin America
women were
expected to
marry, have

- children and be a housewife," she said.
She also remembered a key piece of advice —

from her father, "Learn how to type and

~ you'll always have a job" — an indicator of
‘what expectations were for women.

“The only women I knew who worked
were 'spinsters' who had no alternative, and

_they were all secretaries or teachers," she

said.

However, on her move to the Bahamas,
Mrs Farmer saw that women were prominent
in all sorts of careers. Her classmates all
went on to study at universities to become
professionals.

"Remember these were the mid seventies

‘ *

SS



2009



where the whole world was changing, and
many women were knocking at the prover-
bial glass ceiling, pushing their way into posi-
tions of responsibility and power," she said.

‘Mrs Farmer herself was going to train as
an instantaneous translator for the European
Union with four languages under her belt,
"put I fell in love and moved back to the
Bahamas," she said, "where I have been freé
to create and manage various businesses
while still pursuing music and acting interests
and having two fantastic children." -~ f

St Andrew’s prepared her for a lifetime of
having her cake and eating it too, she joked,
recognising the need of hard work and
organisational skills. "With all choices and
possibilities for. careers it can be very scary,"
she said, "but also very rewarding."

Leslie Vanderpool, a graduate of 1989, and
the founder of the Bahamas International
Film Festival also believes that women in the
Bahamas are extremely independent,-not
only in the family structure but in the work- .
force as well. : ey

"St Andrew’s gave me the sense of being,

able to accomplish anything I set my mind

to," she said. "They gave me sucha great
foundation that shows it doesn't necessarily
matter where you come from. There was
such a diversity of young people.

“As a woman in the Bahamas in 2009, we
see young women setting the pace. Women
are shaping our society with a more futuristic
approach in how we need to grow in a for-
ward motion," she said.

The most noteworthy characteristic of
good old ‘St A's’ is in their teaching of rais-
ing your hand to ask any question, and to

SEE page 11.



and cocoa powder, 45 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759



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