Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
The Tribune

| "_. BAHAMAS EDITION

i ?’m lovin’ it |

| HIGH 82F
‘Low 71F|

~ CLOUDY WITH |
“SHOWERS

Volume: 105 No.40
















MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

ine i





PLAY THE (}@Oe%
((SECRET SOUND))

CLUES INSIDE TODAY |



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resin)
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‘timebomb’
STa aU TE

Ken yatta Gilson vee , '

"Senior co

INSIGHT





ty Tommy Turnquest said.

ES f cl ‘ APPOINTMENTS for the

Ps restructured senior command of

\ the Royal Bahamas Police Force .
was announced by-the Cabinet

: office yesterday, four days after

| ‘ : 15 senior officers were asked to

‘ accept early retirement packages.

! i : - The overhaul, carried out

Sa according to a strategic: review,




NGTNELE Gibson



fi By PAUL G:TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

INDEPENDENT Kennedy

_ MP Kenyatta Gibson will publicly
announce his decision to join the
governing Free National Move-
ment within the week, The Tri-'
_bune was told. eae i
In an exclusive interview with

one of the MP’s campaign gener- .

Independent MP set to
‘make announcement
within the week’

als, it has been revealed that Mr
Gibson has been meeting and
, consulting with his team in the
- Kennedy area over the Christmas
holiday. According to the source
who spoke on condition of
anonymity, the MP advised them

on his decision in order ‘to gain.

the relevant feedback before he
makes his official statement.
Having held most of these dis-
cussions privately, the source indi-
cated that Mr Gibson was
adamant that he would not take a
Cabinet post — nor will he enter-
tain a chairmanship “at this time.”

SEE page 10:

Hopes for sexual offenders registry

" MBy ALEX MISSICK
‘Tribune Staff Reporter

SOCIAL Services State Minister Loretta Butler Turner hopes gov- .

ernment will consider implementing a sexual offenders registry to noti-
fy the public of the identity of persons convicted of a sexual offence.

__ This follows allegations made against.a teacher by a former male stu-
derit of the Eight Mile Rock High School in Grand Bahama last week.

SEE page 10











and efficiently carry out its man-

THE WIDOW of the late ZNS sportscaster Phil Smith, Blossie Smith, is supported as she puts arose on his

seeks to streamline the top ranks
to allow the force to effectively



date, Minister of National Securi-



coffin on Saturday. Phil Smith, who died on December 28th, was laid to rest at Lakeview Cemetery.

Archbishop speaks out
against death penalty

¢ SEE PAGE SEVEN

Man is rushed to

The mave reduces the number
of assistant and acting assistant
commissioners to have one com-
missioner, one acting deputy com-*
missioner, one Senior assistant
commissioner, four assistant com-
missioners, seven chief superin-

‘tendents and 28 superintendents.

Promotions have been given to
a number of officers, while 15
senior Officers, all over age 55,
accepted severance packages.

Senior Assistant Commissioner
of Police Ellison Greenslade is
now acting Deputy Commissioner
of Police; Assistant Commission-
er of Police Marvin Dames.
becomes Senior Assistant Com-
missioner of Police;,and Quinn
McCartney, Raymond Gibson,
Shannondor Evans and Hulan
Hanna are appointed Assistant
Commissioners of Police.

SEE page 10

Mitchell hits
out at govt
over removal
of officers

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION spokesman on
public affairs Fred. Mitchell blast-
ed the government’s removal of
15.senior police officers from the
RBPF as “unlawful” and “ungra-
cious” and called on the minister
of national security to apologise
to the officers for the manner of
their dismissals.

He said the officers did not .

‘retire voluntarily but did so with a

proverbial “gun to their heads”
after RBPF leadership said if they.
did not accept the package, they
would be dismissed.

hospital after stabbing

A 27-YEAR-OLD man from Elizabeth Estates,
found suffering from several serious stab wounds to
his body, was rushed to hospital Saturday night.

Police found the man in Cypress Court, Eliza-
beth Estates, shortly before 11pm on January 10,

Press Liaison officer for the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Walter Evans said: “An investiga-
tion is underway to ascertain how this man was
injured and who was responsible for causing such
an act to take place.”

Anyone with any information that could assist
the police investigation.should call 919 or Crime
Stoppers anonymously at 328-8477.

In a separate incident police arrested three men)
who were driving in Buen Retiro off Shirley Street

SEE page 10

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



“They have embarrassed these
individuals, stripped them of their
dignity and condemned them to
holding their heads down as if. ,
they have done something wrong,
when nothing of the kind has
been said,” he said in part.

_ “The PLP stands with these
aggrieved officers as.we do with
any one who has a grievancé
against this administration. We
stand ready to help. I urge the
‘officers to stand tall and encour-
age them and their families to
work with us to help remove the
Free National Movement from
power. That is the ultimate

SEE page 10















CATHOLIC Archbishop Patrick Pinder yes-
terday spoke out against the moral and spiritual
implications of the death penalty and called for col-
lective voices of reason-to publicly oppose capital
punishment. qe

He chronicled various “flaws” the Catholic
Church has observed in relation to the adminis-
tration of the death sentence and questioned the

- validity of the widely held argument that the death
penalty is a deterrent to crime.
; : “Throughout human history, one of the thorni-.
. {| — est has been the question of capital punishment.

; \ , Should we, or should we not, maintain or enforce
341-6593 / 377-6593

SEE page 10
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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

eee

Reginald Ferguson



Ellison Edroy Greenslade

Marvin Dames

Quinn William McCartney



Hulan Anthony Hanna

Raymond Allan Gibson

THE TRIBUNE

Shannondor Harold Evans



Profiles of restructured Senior Command of RBPF

REGINALD FERGUSON
OPM ACTING
COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

REGINALD Ferguson
joined the RBPF on October

13, 1965. He rose steadily —

through the ranks of the

Police Force and has worked:

in many areas.of the force,
including the Central Division,
the Commercial Crime Sec-
tion, the Special Intelligence
Branch, the New Providence
District, the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit, the Airport Divi-
sion and Assistant Commis-
sioner — Crime.

Commissioner Ferguson
has had vast training in police
management and leadership,
both regionally and interna-
tionally.

He is the recipient of the
Queen’s Police Medal, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
medals for Long Service and
Good Conduct and Meritori-











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ous Service.
Mr Ferguson is married and
is the father of four sons.



ELLISON EDROY GREENSLADE
QPAUACTING DEPUTY,
COMANSSIONER OF POLICE

Ellison Greenslade joined
the RBPF on May’ 17, 1979.
He has served in the following
areas: Traffic Division; Secu-
rity and Intelligence Branch;

. Computer Development Cen-
_tre; Research and Planning

Unit; Information Technology
and Statistics Section; North
Eastern Division; Central
Division; Assistant Commis-
sioner — Grand Bahama and
Northern Bahamas District. '

He holds an Associates
Degree in Business Adminis-

‘tration from the. College of the

Bahamas and a Master’s
degree in Business from the
University of Miami. Cur-













rently a doctoral candidate
with the University of
Phoenix, Arizona he also
holds a Post Graduate Cer-

. tificate in Police Management

and Criminal Justice from the
University of Leicester.

In January, 2008 he started
a one year secondment with
the Royal Canadian Mount-
ed Police (RCMP), in Ottawa
Canada. He received several
honours throughout his
career, including: Queen’s
Police Medal; The Prime Min-
ister’s Above and Beyond
Award; The Police Force’s
Medal for Meritorious Ser-
vice; The Police Force’s Medal
for Long Service, and Good
Conduct.

Mr Greenslade is married
to Kimberley Greenslade, nee
Morley, and is the father of
five children.

AAANES



MARVIN DAMES
SENIOR ASSISTANT
COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

Marvin Dames joined the
RBPF on March 1,1988 and
has worked in the following
areas of the RBPF: Crime
Prevention and Community
Relations Section; Carmichael
Division; Operation Sweep,
Eleuthera District - Harbour
Island Complaints and Disci-

pline Unit; Mobile Division;..

Western Division; Drug
Enforcement Unit; Central
Detective Unit; Air and Sea-
port Security; and Assistant
Commissioner — New Provi-
dence District.

Mr Dames holds.a Bache-

lor of Arts degree in Crimi- .

nology from Ohio State Uni-

versity, Ohio and a Post Grad-

uate Certificate in Criminal
Justice from the University of
Leicester, United Kingdom.
He also holds a Post Graduate

HIGGS & JOHNSON WELCOMES
“se = _Sands-Feaste to the Firm. Mrs, Sands-Feaste joins the

‘Practice Groups. She has exterisive legal experience in
. corporate and commercial law and international trust and



NEWEST PARTNER - CHRISTEL SANDS-FEASTE
Higgs & Johnson welcomes its newest Partner, Christel







firm’s Commercial Law, Securities and Private Clietit





company administration and has acted in all aspects of
commercial transactions including mergers and acquisi-
tions, asset financing, private placements of offshore secu-
rities, irivestinent furid structuring arid creation and estate
planning. Christel has represented both domestic and
foreign clients in a variety of businesses. including the fi-
nancial services arid hospitality industries,

Prior to her admission to the Partnership of Higgs & John-
son in 2009, Christel served as Vice President - Legal for a
family office and a leading Bahamian development com-
pany.

Christel was educated in the United Kingdom and holds
ati LLB frori Reading University and an LLM in banking
and finance law from the London School of Economics
and Political Science. She was called to the bars of Eng:
land and Wales and the Commonwealth of The Bahamas |
int 1998, ) 5
Christel is a member of the Bahamas Bar Association. and
the Funds Working Group of The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board, In 2006, Christel was named as a leading
commercial lawyer in The Bahamas in the International
Financial Law Review 1000.





















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Certificate in Police Manage-
ment from the Institute of

Legal Executives...
In January, 2008 he started

a one year secondment at the.

Toronto Police Service in
Toronto, Canada. Mr Dames
has received several honours
throughout his career, includ-
ing: the Police Force’s Medal
for Meritorious Service and
the US Drug Enforcement
Administration Administra-
tor’s Award.

Mr Dames and his wife
Stacey have one son.



QUINN WILLIAM MCCARTNEY
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Quinn McCartney joined
the RBPF on January 1, 1983.
He worked in several areas
during his career: Serious
Crime and Drug Section —
Criminal Investigation
Department, Forensic Science
Section; Government House
as Aide de Camp to the Gov-
ernor General; Police Training

College; Office of the Assis-

tant Commissioner — Man-
agement and Support Ser-
vices.

Mr McCartney is a two-
time.graduate of the College
of The Bahamas where. he
obtained Associate Degrees
in Chemistry with Biology,
and Management. He also
holds a Bachelor of Science

degree in Chemistry from.

McGill University, Montreal,
Canada, and’a Master of Sci-
ence degree in Forensic Sci-
ence from the University of
Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scot-
land. He also holds a Post
Graduate Diploma in Police
Management from the Uni-
versity of Leicester, United
Kingdom, and Level 7 Execu-
tive Diploma in Strategic

Management. from the Char- —
tered Management Institute, .

United Kingdom. :
Mr McCartney is the recip-

lent of the Police Force’s

Medal for Meritorious Ser-
vice, and the Medal for Long
Service and Good Conduct.

’ He.is the father of two. chil-
dren. : esc



HULAN ANTHONY HANNA
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Hulan. Hanna joined the
RBPF on June 8, 1978. His
career has taken him through-
out the Force where he served
in the following areas: Fire
Services (New Providence and
Grand Bahama); Central
Division; Western Division;
Southern Division; Commu-
nity Relations Section; Press

Liaison Office; Southern

Bahamas District; District
Headquarters; Office of the
Assistant Commissioner —

. Management and Support

Services.
Mr Hanna holds a Bachelor

of Arts degree in Business:

Administration with Honours
from Sojourner Douglass Col-
lege, Baltimore. He also has
a Post Graduate Certificate in
Criminal Justice and Police
Management from the Uni-
versity of Leicester, United
Kingdom. He has also. partic-
ipated in courses at the Flori-
da State Fire College. He is
currently pursuing a Master’s

degree in Psychology and’

Counselling.

Mr Hanna is the recipient
of the Police Force’s Medal
for Meritorious Service, and
the Medal for Long Service
and Good Conduct.

He and his wife are the par-
ents of three children.

NN



RAYMOND ALLAN GIBSON
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Raymond Gibson joined the —

RBPF on June 26; 1975 and
has worked in a number of



_

Academy,

areas including: Mobile Divi-
sion; Commercial Crime Sec-
tion; Interpol; Complaints and
Corruption Unit; Serious
Crime Squad; Commission of
Inquiry; Central Detective
Unit; Drug Enforcement Unit;
Office of the Assistant Com-

‘missioner — Crime and Intelli-

gence.
- He holds.a Master’s degree
in International Trust and is
also a Certified Paralegal
Executive, from the Institute
of Legal Executives, London.

A graduate of the FBI
he has also
obtained extensive interna-
tional training in areas of
Crime Management. He is the
recipient of the RBPF’s Medal
for Meritorious Service, and
the Medal for Long Service
and Good Conduct.

He is married and is the

‘father of three children.



SHANNONDOR HAROLD EVANS
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Shannondor Evans joined
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force on February 7, 1974.
He has worked in the follow-
ing areas: Southern Division;
Mobile Division; Criminal,
Investigation Department
(New Providence); Drug
Enforcement Unit (Grand

-Bahama); Eastern Division

(Grand Bahama); Eastern
Division (New Providence);
Central Division (New Provi-

dence); Police Training Col-

lege; Office of the Assistant
Commissioner — New Provi-
dence District.

He has a Post Graduate
Certificate in Criminal Justice
and Police Management from
the University of Leicester,
United Kingdom. He is cur-
rently pursuing a Master’s
degree in Criminology, Crim-
inal Justice, Police Manage-
ment and Public Safety, from

-the University of Leicester,
United Kingdom.

Mr Evans is married to Jus-
tice Estelle Evans and they
have five children.

Authorities search
for heavyset ninja

ll WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

A NINJA is lurking in the shad-
ows of Palm Beach County, but
apparently he’s more like Chris
Farley in “Beverly Hills Ninja”
than Liam Neeson in “Batman
Begins”, according to Associated
Press

The Palm Beach County Sher-
iff’s Office says a heavyset man
with a visible potbelly unsuccess-
fully tried to steal two different
ATMs over the past two weeks.
Security video from the ATMs
showed the unidentified man
dressed in a black ninja outfit with
a hood that showed only his eyes.

Authorities say the first attempt
was made at a bank on Dec. 29,
and another attempt was made at
a Walgreens on Tuesday. Author-
ities did not say how the man tried
to steal the machines.





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 3



Students
celebrate
Majority Rule

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

HIGH SCHOOL stu-
dents celebrated freedom
and honoured the sacrifices
of their forefathers on the
forty-second anniversary of
Majority Rule at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas on Fri-
day.

The School of Social Sci-
ences’ event, under the
theme, “January 10, 1967,
Pivotal Moment in
Bahamian History, Voices
from the 21st Century” -
invited students from
schools across New Provi-
dence to mark the anniver-
sary of a crucial day in
Bahamian history. .

Speakers included three
Bahamian Rhodes scholars
who discussed the connec-
tion between Majority
Rule, education, culture,
athletics and health, and
FNM chairman Senator
Johnley Ferguson, who
spoke on the significance of
Majority Rule and empha-
sised the importance of
education.

He told students:
“Majority Rule has no
colour, it has no political
stance, it has the blood
sweat and tears of the
Bahamian people.”

The senator said educa-
tion had come a long way
since 1967, as he reflected
on when he went to school
for only three and a half
months out of the year.

He said: “Destination
and situation cannot form
your future.

“What is in you will
shape you regardless.

“Make it at your pace,
make it at your level, but at
the end of the day make it
for your nation, your family
and your God.”

Rhodes scholar and pro-
fessor Christian Campbell
said although it has‘been ~
more.than 40 years since.:::
majority rule, Bahamian °

society still fails to value » *:

the creativity of Bahamians
and embrace their ability to
‘generate new ideas.

Dr Campbell said: “The
thing about Majority Rule
is that it allowed for so
many opportunities in
terms of education, but one
of the things I don’t think
the elders paid attention to
was setting up institutions
to reaffirm what it is to be a
practising, creative
Bahamian.”

For fellow Rhodes schol-
ar and professor Desiree’
Cox, freedom is at the heart
of Majority Rule.

She said: “Majority Rule
is ultimately about the free-
dom to choose your life the
way you would have it be,
and to have the tools to be
able to do that.

“The freedom to choose
the path you will live, and
the definition you will have,
for what you choose to do.”

Dr Cox said students
should tap into the free-
doms their parents and
ancestors created for them
to have an education.

“They made it possible
for you to have the tools to
choose your destiny and to
be self aware,” she said.

“You will have to learn
how to honour the old and
fearlessly represent the
new — that is your chal-
lenge.”

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MITCHELL ALSO AGITATES FOR MAJORITY RULE AS A DAY OF OBSERVANCE

MP calls for the government to enact
National Heroes, Honours legislation

AS THE country remembers the day of
Majority Rule, member of Parliament for
Fox Hill Fred Mitchell called on -govern-

: ° ment to enact the proposed National

Heroes Day and National Honours Day
legislation as a method of preserving
Bahamian history.

Mr Mitchell is also agitating government.
to mark Majority Rule as a day of Nation-.

al Observance.

“When in the last Cabinet, we made a
decision to move for the creation of Nation-
al Honours and to set aside the second
Monday in October as National Heroes
Day, we settled that distinction. Today,
both bills are passed in the legislature but
neither has been brought into force. .

Contributions

“The National Heroes Day Bill would
set aside the second Monday in October
to observe the contributions of all Nation-
al heroes to the country this would include
a list as long as the country would like. It
would also make it possible for someone to
be officially declared a national hero. It
would establish local honours, and local
honour societies,” he said.

He said that upon her resignation, former
director of culture Nicolette Bethel
“lamented that the legislation was not
brought into force and that the work of the
cultural commission that looked into all of

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MAJORITY RULE DAY MARKED AT SIR LYNDEN’S MAUSOLEUM: From left Leslie Pindling,
son of Sir Lynden, Rev. Sebastian Campbell, Committee Chair, Fred Mitchell MP and Maxwell

Turner, Committee Members.

these matters seems largely to have been
discarded.”

Said Mr Mitchell: “I have personally
raised these matters on the floor of the
House. The answers from the Prime Min-
ister have as usual been contemptuous. I

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raised the matter with Loretta Butler Turn-
er, who is a member of the National Heroes

Day Committee, about seeking to use the ,

influence of her Cabinet colleagues to bring
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. the policy of the government even though

they voted for it when they were in Oppo-
sition”.

On remembering Majority Rule as a day
of national observance, Mr Mitchell said:
“There are certain ceremonies that the state
should support to mark the day. It should
also mean that the schools should take spe-
cial note of the day and that churches
around the nation should be encouraged
to take special measures to observe the
day.

“This should also mean that the curricu-
lum of subject of history should reflect what
happened on 10th January.

Importance

“Some people simply do not know what
happened and it is important that the story
be told and be known. Just the facts. This is
the way to treat it with the due solemnity
and importance that it deserves”.

On January 10, 1967, the Progressive
Liberal Party led by Sir Lynden Pindling
won 18 seats in the general election while
the United Bahamian Party (UBP) led by
Sir Roland Symonette also obtained 18
seats.

Sir Randol Fawkes, the lone Indepen-
dent Labour MP, voted to sit with the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, enabling them to
form a government and on January 14, 1967
Majority Rule Day became official.















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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ese Se i SUS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES.

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Tax cuts for US teachers

OVER the next couple of years, two very
big countries, America and China, will give
birth to something very important. They’re each
going to give birth to close to $1 trillion worth of

‘economic stimulus — in the form of tax cuts,
infrastructure, highways, mass transit and new
energy systems. But a lot is riding on these two
babies: If China and America each give birth to
a pig — a big, energy-devouring, climate-spoil-
ing stimulus hog — our youth are done for. It
will be the burden of their lifetimes. If they
each give birth to a gazelle — a lean, energy-effi-
cient and innovation-friendly stimulus — it will
be the opportunity of their lifetimes.

So here’s hoping that our new administra-
tion and Congress will be guided in shaping the
stimulus by reading John Maynard Keynes in
one hand — to get as much money injected as
quickly as possible — and by reading “Rising
Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and
Employing America for a Brighter Economic
Future” with the other.

“Gathering Storm” was the outstanding 2005
report produced by our National Academies
on how to keep America competitive by vastly
improving math and science education, invest-
ing in long-term research, recruiting top stu-
dents from abroad and making U.S. laws the
most conducive in the world for innovation.

You see, even before the current financial

crisis, we were already in a deep competitive”
*.. home —.-and offer full:scholarships to needy
~’students who want to go to a public university or

“hole —a long period.in which too many people

were making money from money, or-Hioney ,

from flipping houses or hamburgers, and too
few people were making money by making new
stuff, with hard-earned science, math, biology
and engineering skills.

The financial crisis just made the hole deep-
er, which is why our stimulus needs to be both
big and smart, both financially and educationally
stimulating. It needs tobe able to produce not
only more shovel-ready jobs and shovel-ready
workers, but more Google-ready jobs and Win-
dows-ready and knowledge-ready workers.

If we spend $1 trillion on a stimulus and just
get better highways and bridges — and not a

new Google, Apple, Intel or Microsoft — your

kids will,thank you for making it so much easi-
er for them to commute to the unemployment
office or mediocre jobs.

Barack Obama-gets it, but I’m not sure Con-
gress does. “Yes,” Obama said Thursday, “we'll
put people to work repairing crumbling roads,
bridges and schools by eliminating the backlog
of well-planned, worthy and needed infrastruc-

, ture projects. But we’ll also do more to retrofit
America for a global economy.” Sure that
means more smart grids and broadband high-
ways, he added, but it also “means investing in

. can’t bail out a generation,”

the science, research and technology that will
lead to new medical breakthroughs, new dis-
coveries and entire new industries.”

But clean-tech projects like intelligent grids
and broadband take a long time to implement.
Can we stimulate both our economy and our
people in time? Maybe rather than just giving
everyone a quick $1,500 to hit the mall to buy
flat-screen TVs imported from China, or creat-
ing those all-important green-collar jobs for
low-skilled workers — to put people to work
installing solar panels and insulating homes —
we should also give everyone who is academi-
cally eligible and willing a quick $5,000 to go
back to school. Universities today are the
biggest employers in many congressional dis-
tricts, and they’re all having to downsize.

My wife teaches public school in Montgomery
County, ‘Md., where more and more teachers
can’t afford to buy homes near the schools
where they teach, and now have long, dirty
commutes from distant suburbs. One of the
smartest stimulus moves we could make would
be to eliminate federal income taxes on all pub-
lic schoolteachers so more talented people
would choose these careers. I’d also double the
salaries of all highly qualified math and science
teachers, staple green cards to the diplomas ‘of
foreign students who graduate from any U.S.
university in math or science — instead of sub-
sidizing their educations and then sending them

community college for the next four years.

JFK took us to the moon. Let BHO take
America back to school.

But that will take time. There’s simply no
shortcut for a stimulus that stimulates minds
not just salaries. “You can bail out a bank; you
says the great
American inventor, Dean Kamen, who has
designed everything from the Segway to artifi-
cial limbs. “You can print money, but you can’t
print knowledge. It takes 12 years.”

Sure, we’ll waste some money doing that.
That will happen with bridges, too. But a bridge
is just a bridge. Once it’s up, it stops stimulating.
A student who normally would not be inter-
ested in science but gets stimulated by a better
teacher or more exposure to.a lab, or a scientist
who gets the funding for new research, is poten-
tially “the next Steve Jobs or Bill Gates. They
create good jobs for years. Perhaps more bridges
can bail us out of a depression, but only more
Bills and Steves can bail us into prosperity.

(This article was written by Thomas L. Fried-
man —

c.2009 New ie Times News Service ).



Why Jehovah's
Witnesses should
choose to serve
in government

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It would be the wish of any
government around the world,
including The Bahamas, to have
as its civil servants people who

_ are of high moral character,

inordinately ethical, satisfyingly
competent, and committed to
excellence. Fortunately, it is my
firmly held belief that that cal-
iber of people are sprinkled
throughout the Bahamas public
service and certainly through-
out the private sector.

However, only dotting the
governmental landscape with
these types of people will not
suffice. I look forward to the
day when these examples will
become the norm in our civil
service. Wishful thinking, I
know; reality, maybe never. But
I have been told, and I believe
that if you shoot for the stars,
and don’t reach, maybe you will
land on the moon.

To me, the stars represent a .

government filled to capacity

‘ with Jehovah’s Witnesses. I

know more than a few mem-




wees

letters@tribur




lemedia.net



bers of that organization, and
in my humble opinion the
description of the ideal civil ser-
vant would be that of a Witness.
It is a colossal pity that Jeho-
vah’s Witnesses choose not to
participate in governing the
country at any meaningful level
(because of their religious
beliefs). Nevertheless, they are
not totally averse to working
for the government. You'll
excuse me for saying so, but I
find that to be hypocritical and
irresponsible.

Jehovah’s Witnesses benefit
from the governmental function
just like everyone else. And it is
unfortunate that their religion
does not permit them to reach
for the stars (in any endeavour),
including governing the coun-
try (at any level), so that their
material involvement would be

greatly assisting this country in
forward development.

High moral character, inor-
dinate ethical behaviour, satis-
fying competence and commit-
ment to excellence are not
exclusive to Jehovah’s Witness-
es. Others in government and
in the private sector display
these characteristics as well. But
Jehoyah’s Witnesses have been
relatively successful in ingrain-
ing these traits in their mem-
bers in a well-run, worldwide
organization.

It is my belief that if the pow-
ers that be within the Jehovah’s
Witnesses Organization would
cease and desist from the sup-.
pression of its members’ collec-
tive and individual potential,
then governance in any coun-
try around the world would be.
redefined (including The
Bahamas).

MARVIN G.
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

January 10, 2009 '

The famous Nassau Straw Market
shocker and ‘The Forgotten Man’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A report in The Tribune Busi-’

ness on the Straw market as
described by a professional work-
ing on the plans — is a shocker.

The projected cost of the straw
market rose from eighteen mil-
lion to somewhere between 29
and 36 million. Taking the mid-
point projection of 33 million, the
per capita cost for 300,000
Bahamians is about $110. ‘Con-
sidering the portion of the popu-
lation that are not earning any
income (children and retired) the
amount is higher for income earn-
ers.

Clearly the PLP government
“lost their heads.”

In September 2007 The Nas-
sau Institute researched opera-
tions of the Straw Market. Some
of the findings were:

Licensed vendors pay an annu-
al rent of $100 per year with no
requirement to sell Bahamian
made products or straw goods.
Over 50 per cent sell no straw
and/or Bahamian-made products.

’ Six hundred and five stalls
were licensed, but information as
to whether the rents were current
—was not known or not available.

Subletting is illegal, however
those operating the stalls were
mostly Haitian and Jamaican.
Over 50 per cent of the stalls sell
knock-offs of name brands in vio-
lation of copyright laws.

It is time to ask whether a

straw market on Bay Street is an
asset or an unaffordable liabili-
ty. Rental income. is negligible
relative to the investment. The
result is a government subsidy for
a few individual lessees.

There is a notion that the
country needs a Straw Market as
a shopping experience for
tourists.

Whether true or not is ques-
tionable. However, there is no
question about the degraded
image for Bay Street as a'shop-
ping destination when non-
Bahamians are hawking cheap
knock-offs and imported sou-
venirs.

To build a market for the cost
originally intended ($18,000,000)
is morally wrong because it places

the cost burden on the popula-
tion that derives no material ben-
efit and may even be harmed by
the unsavoury image. The days
are long gone when the market
added “local culture” and the fun
of bargaining for Bahamian-made
straw work.

When grandiose plans for a
government project capture the
minds of politicians the:sky is the

limit and the humble tax-payer is
‘ignored.

William Graham Sumner

-called him “The Forgotten Man”

— “He works, he votes, generally
he prays — but he always pays”.

' The Nassau Institute
Nassau,
J anuary 4, 2009

A public service gem

EDITOR, The ‘Tribune.

Once ina while, you run across a gem in the public service.
This week, I had occasion to visit the National Insurance Office |

in Fox Hill twice in as many days.

T needed an NIB card for my son and, it later transpired, an

updated one for me.

Ms. Sheena Forbes dealt with me with such cheerful efficiency
that I was in and out of NIB within five minutes of filling out the:
required form. In fact, everyone I encountered at NIB in Fox

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
January 8, 2009

| Hill was pleasant and helpful, I found it so refreshing.

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A leading global, research-based
pharmaceutical company seeks a qualified
person for the position of:

MEDICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The medical rep will be responsible for
promoting pharmaceutical brands within the
healthcare community in The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

/ Bachelor's degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

/ Effective communication and ‘presentation skills
Effective time management, planning, and
organizing skills

J Proficiency in a variety of computer applications

Jf Self-motivated team player

/ Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing -
would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor
vehicle, be willing to travel to the family islands,
-to the U.S., and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and resumé by
January 16, 2009 to:

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P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 393-0440

We thank all applicants for their interest: however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.





THE TRIBUNE







nc eencececcereccecenerseenenteseneensnceacnegeececsasenen seers z

Labour Dept
to. conduct —
BIEMSU poll

DION FOULKES, Minister
of Labour and Social Develop-
ment, announced that the
Department of Labour will con-
duct a poll on February 2 to
determine whether the majority
of employees in the bargaining
unit of the Bahamas Industrial
Engineers, Managerial, and
Supervisory Union (BIEMSU)
at the Grand Bahama Power

Company still wish BIEMSU to
‘represent them as Bargaining
Agent. . ;
- Minister Foulkes was peti-
tioned last year by more than 25
“per cent of the members of the
!Bargaining Unit in accordance
- with Section 43 of the Industrial
pRelations Act which provides
yfor the revocation of a union’s
jrecognition as a bargaining
agent.

INS announces
-padio adjustments

- THE Broadcasting Corpora-
etion of The Bahamas today
iannounced significant adjust-
ments to its music format and’
the creation of new radio pro-
grammes intended to further
“enhance and Bahamianise the
content on 1540 A.M. “The
‘National Voice of the
“Bahamas.”

Effective Monday, January
12, 2009, ZNS 1540 A.M. will
adopt an all Bahamian format
showcasing different genres of
Bahamian music inclusive of
Rake ‘N Scrape, Junkanoo,
Goombay, Gospel, “Ole Skool
Music”, Folk songs and Bal-
lads. Local R & B and Hip
‘Hop by Bahamian artists also
will be featured as well as top
-Bahamian hits. A special seg-
ment will be included where
new music of all genres by
-Bahamians will be exposed
-dubbed “Pump it or Dump it”.
y “The Corporation is in pos-
session of one of the largest

- collection of local music, which
sdates back to the early years
cof 1540 A.M.,” said Edwin
Lightbourn, General Manager.
A significant amount of this :
‘music collection has been digi-
tized from its original vinyl for: 71
mat tobe used'in the: néw:i
music format.” PEG

TAaQMiss ete prt Vi











) : LOCAL NEWS |
- ¢. LESLIE MILLER SAYS JOBS NEEDED IN SECTORS OTHER THAN TOURISM AND FINANCE
In brief = : :

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 5



Former minister: economy
needs to be diversified

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Trade and Industry
Minister Leslie Miller urged the
country to seek ways to diversify
the economy in view of the insta-
bility in the tourism market, the
country’s number one industry.

He also said he believes
employers are using the econom-
ic downturn as an excuse to fire
employees.

“We need jobs in other sectors
of our economy other than
,tourism and the financial sector.
Let us diversify our place. It boils
down to the inability to make a
decision for and on behalf of the
welfare of the majority of the
Bahamian people. Therefore they
sit in safe harbour — tourism,
tourism, tourism allowing persons
like Kerzner to become gods in
this country,” Mr Miller said.

Mr Miller said because the
tourism is an “easy sell”, govern-
ment does not have o make tough
decisions regarding diversifying
the economy. However, anything
that takes nerves, guts and
courage governments shy away
from, he said.

“No one wants to expand and
diversify our economic base.
When times are good in the
tourism sector is when we should
have supplemental industries to
get involved in the domestic econ-
omy,” Mr Milller said.

Mr Miller said that if there is
one time Bahamians should now
fully support locally made prod-
ucts, these are the times.

“We can in fact increase our
domestic production to enable

‘those local entities to produce

more products that we use in our :

daily lives and create more jobs
for those Bahamians who are
going to be displaced in. our num-
ber one industry,” Mr Miller said.

Mr Miller referred to the LNG
project as he claims the Bahamas
continues to play games with this
resource.

“Tt is nonsensical to me that
these games are still being played.
It was played by the Cliristie gov-
erniment and it’s being played by
the Ingraham government. Both



Leslie Miller

of these guys are playing with the
welfare of our country and I
don’t appreciate it,” Mr Miller
said.

Mr Miller said LNG has a
potential income stream of some
$1.2 billion over 25 years and the
government continues to this day
not to approve the LNG propos-
al. : ;
“The funds that we can dérive
from LNG can assist in putting
up a new hospital, you can build
schools, fix some of the social ills
we have in this country, but the
government prefers to wait for
the foreigner to put up another
hotel,” Mr Miller said.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



— : WeyeyVM\ =e | ,

Hundreds

i By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynold@tribunemedia.net

P

HUNDREDS of Junkanooers joined
mourners to give Saxons drummer Adwin
Moss a final Junkanoo rush to the grave.

A funeral for the 39-year-old tum-tum
drummer who died suddenly while “rush-
ing” on Bay Street on Boxing Day morn-
ing was attended by hundreds of friends
and relatives at the Church of God in
Deveaux Street, off East Street, on Sat-
urday.

Former Prime Minister Perry Christie,

Minister of Health Hubert Minnis, PLP




PROSPECTUS



BAHAMAS REGISTE









14th June, 2008.

paid on amounts so refunded. -






price are given below :-








Rate of Interest

11/32% Above Prime Rate

INTEREST

Stock is repaid.



The Stock will
Applications wi

Issue of Stock



January, 2009 a





Applications

Application Forms App iGations for th



following banks:





Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, a



1/4% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
9/32% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 -| _15;000,000.00 | © 100.00
5/16% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2030 17,226,000.00 | 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2031.



CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock aretharged Y
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Ba

SUPPLEMENT A

oo
be,vissued

ei

commence at a

hm. On (5th fF

sy, *% :
The Stock will bain units ee
eo ae

plications must be for BS100.00 ora multiple of that sum.



Prospectus and may be obt
Treasury Department (Marlborough ‘Stree

PaO PY ER Se ‘

Finance Corpdfation of Babamas Limited

MP Bernard Nottage, and Chief Super-
intendent Hulan Hanna also paid their
respects to the deceased.

At the end of the four-hour service Mr
Moss’s remains was taken to Soldier Road
in a motorcade flanked by environmental
health-vehicles driven by his colleagues.
Mr Moss was an employee of Environ-
mental Health.

Saxons, Valley Boys, Music Makers,
One Family, Roots and Colours mem-
bers carried the coffin at the front of a
procession in Soldier Road and played
gospel music as they rushed to the Wood-

‘lawn Gardens cemetery where Mr Moss

was laid to rest. :

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
RED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032 AND 2033
ISSUE OF B$107,226, 000.00

nd authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly,

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 8th January, 2009 and
will close at 3:00pm on 14th January, 2009. Allocations will.commence at 9:3
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 19th January, 2009.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$107,226,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be

The date of this Prospectusis ___—_—«. 2009

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$107,226,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2028 and the latest in 2033. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue




Name of Stock






3/8% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2032 20 000,000.00 | 100.00
{3/32% Above Prime Rate: | Bahamas Registered Stock 2033 20,000,000.00 | 100.00
i al ee peace aoe ob O26 OOOO ee

The Stock shall be repaid on 19th January, -in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

The Stock will bear mterest.from. 19th January, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock aethe
percent per annum over, the Prime Rate (ic. the prime commercial interest-rate from time to time fixed*by
". Clearing banks carrying on-business.in the Island. of New. Providence. in. The. Bahamas... jfthere shall be
~ difference between thefh, then'that which is'fixed’ by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half:
yeatly commencing on 19th July, 2009. and thereafter on 19th January and 19th’ July in-eVery yea until the

s

hamas.

&








Y PROVISIONS

(THA Centr

by: the. Renistrar
sno D

fed by The Bank







bi



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\>








af







Scotiabank (Bahatttas) Limited tae :
ahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)

oF
a
3.
4. Commonwealth Bank Li
5. Rayal Bank Of Cans
6.
7. Fidelity Bank (B
Limited)
8. Citibank, NA.

Provisional estimates from the-unaud
Bahamas to be B$3,207,547,000.% “~ 72"

PUBLIC DEBT

ited accounts as at September 30, 2008 show the Public Debt of The Jf

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE



Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Revenue

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding °
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited ‘accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Pub

FY2006/2007p** FY2007/2008p**
. BS BS
Nae Approved Budget
1,338,481,000 1,483,929,000
1,285,692,000 1,385, 369,000
166,225,000

189,731,000

September 30, 2008 totalled B$442,389,000.

0 am. on 15th January, 2009 and

~ Amount

15,000,000.00

BS ‘
,000,000.
:000,000.
226,000.
{VYV,0UU.0t
000,000.
000,000.
5m -

.|... 20,000,000.00 |. 100,00.

\
al Bank
09.
dquary, 2009 anc will ceasdat 3:00p.m. on

envelopes ‘enclosing appneations should ees F

Registered&&Stocks”. 2

ould’ e made to the eGo the f mmattached tothe =
hed froin the Registrarofficesit Nassau and Freeport, The - 9

t & Navy ion Road, Nassau) or any of the
BP os



The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The _

lic Corporations contingent liability which as at

Mr Moss’s mother Catherine Gustav
of Frogman Lane off Deveaux Street said:
“I can’t even describe it, it was so nice.
Everyone talked about how nice he was
and the number of people who turned
out was wonderful.”

Michlene Gustav, 23, Mr Moss’s
youngest sister said: “It was very sad, but.
I liked how everybody turned out, it was
successful, and the rush was good, it
picked up the mood. -

“We appreciate the Saxons and every-
body who contributed in. so-many ways,
and we want to wish a special thanks to
Dr Hubert Minnis who spoke on behalf of
the Ministry. of Health.”



















The Registrar



P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir: ue





















BS
100.00



s

BAN




1. (One Per

.



YX :
* The aos N

:30 am on Sth FAOrdinary §
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‘Names in Full

Address

“FY2008/2009p**
BS
Approved Budget
1,569,329,000
' Bank Name
1,484, 150,000
Bank Branch

188,718,000

We enclose AS

* PAYM

- Ordinary Signatures

Account Number





















THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK. 2028, 2029 , 2030, 2031, 2032 AND 2033

c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

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ay last respects to Saxons drummer Adwin Moss

MEMBERS of the

| Shell Saxons Super
Stars and other
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support Saxons
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| Felipé Major
> /Tribune staff






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ahamas Registered Stock 2033° BS
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at




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AMAS

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FUNERAL FOR SPORTSCASTER
Philip Smit
is laid to rest

Drive It!, Drag It!,
Pull it!, Push it!



3S ate

MINISTER OF STATE for the Environment Phenton
Neymour-and Shane Gibson; Golden’Gates MP, escort
_ the coffin out of St Francis Xavier Cathedral.




EVEN IF IT
WE WILL



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ipé

Fel



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THE TRIBUNE

What the Bahamas
| needs in this new year

PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009





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ly THIS New Year, the
Bahamas is desperately in
need of competent, patriotic
statesmen to legislate and to

tion from the societal and eco-
nomic predicaments we now
face.

Bahamians are quickly losing
out on controlling their own for-
tunes and aspects of their coun-
try’s economic engines as gov-
ernment after government
grants massive investment
incentives and land giveaways
to land speculators, which
appears to be speedily turning
our island chain into an invest-
ment bottom-feeder that’s near-
ly dependent on a fickle tourism
industry with hardly any plausi-
ble attempt to foster economic
diversification. The actions and
lack of foresight of many of
today’s and yesteryear’s politi-
cians has led to investment dis-
asters, directly contributed to
the paucity of genuine entre-

_ preneurs and also contributed
to a lack new forms of devel-
opment/industries while impru-
dently encouraging Bahamians
to put all their eggs in-a perfo-
rated tourism basket. With their
misguided, short-sighted give-
aways, successive administra-
tions have contributed to the
erosion of. our country’s tax
base at a.time when the
Bahamas’ infrastructure needs
major upgrades and strength-
ening.

Moving forward, there must
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ernment with a view to fostering
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el—for potential general elec-
tion candidates to ensure that
only the brightest are elected—
rather than some of the inef-
fective benchwarmers who are
repeatedly pushed on the elec-
torate. In taking a revolutionary
approach to governance, in
addition to electoral reforms,
the mechanisms to hold elect-
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and/or enforced to spare the
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The evolution of a credible,
viable third political party may
provide an option to Bahami-
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almost spell-bound with play-
ing political musical chairs with
only two parties in the running.

Thus. far; the Bahamas is quite .

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other countries that have sev-
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whether beaten by one or thir-
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ical leaders—in both the FNM
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Bahamian public is demanding
that a new slate of potential
leaders be brought to the polit-
ical forefront with many of the
washed-up, has-been politicians
being relegated to the sidelines.
Finally, as we enter 2009, I am
most impressed by forward-
thinking individuals such as

capacity.
Although BTC has intro-
duced the VIBE system, it does

hot appear to have the same

Raynard Rigby, who appears to.

be actively pursuing and pro-
moting a blueprint for our
national development, and
offering ways to effect positive

change while gaining the confi- -

dence of a mistrusting public.

PUC/BTC—
Still a telecoms dinosaur!
It was astonishing to read

the Public Utilities Commission -

threat that-vendors and users
of VoIP. products could face a
fine of ‘$10,000 if caught. The
PUC’s statement illustrates the
backward-thinking, protection-
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and the obsolete laws govern-

ing the local telecoms sector in,
a 21st century society with tech- ,

nological advances that seem to
far exceed BTC’s current

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roaming capabilities or the reli-
ability of other VoIP telephone
services. Surely, the PUC
understands that BTC’s exorbi-_.
tant prices has driven many dis-

cerning consumers to’ VoIP

providers who offer better rates

and technology that can be used

with ease.

_ I share businessman
Andrew Wilson’s sentiments
that the PUC— instead of seek-
ing to have the Telecommuni-
cations Act amended—nonsen-
sically appears to be attempt-
ing to regulate the World Wide .
Web. Indeed, Wilson is correct
in comparing the PUC’s out- -
dated, monopolistic approach
to that of outlawing e-mails to
protect the postal service. |

After years of rapacious
prices, Vonage and other VoIP
telephone devices has alleviated
many households (particularly
those with children and family
members studying or living
abroad) and businesses (includ- —
ing law practitioners) of the
excessive monthly charges.

Both the PUC and BTC are
outdated dinosaurs and need to
get with the programmes. Fur-
thermore, while the PUC uses
archaic laws to protect monop-
olistic interests, it is clear that
two parts of a government body
are not working in accord, par-
ticularly since.a law enforce-
ment agency such as the Cus-
toms Department has permit-

‘ted the importation of these so-

called “illegal” VoIP devices.
In speaking of the ways that
the PUC intends to put an end
to the usage of Vonage and the
Magic Jack, Vincent Wallace-
Whitfield, a senior legal counsel
at that Commission, made an
absurd statement. He said:
“We are looking. at different
avenues to tackle this problem.
What we would do is find out
thai the person has purchased
it, obtain a search warrant to

In find out if they have it hooked "'

“up ‘to their computer’ or phone. '
and legal Steps are taken from

there.” This is laughable!

Can you imagine BTC/PUC
using the police to kick down
the doors of almost every house
‘to “find out if (people) hooked
up” a VoIP device to their com-
puter or phone? With serious
crimes skyrocketing, wouldn’t
the\ police have more pressing
matters to attend to? Is this a
dictatorship where the PUC can
take these draconian measures
to ensure their own (BTC’s)
bottom-line?

With the dawn of the 21st
century, the PUC:and its regres-
sive tactics/laws has been rele- :
gated to the telecoms bone
yard, in part because of its fail-
ure to adjust to technological
changes and, beyond VoIP.
devices, the availability of free
programmes—via the internet—
such as Skype, iChat, MSN
Messenger and other pro-
grammes that allow people to
talk and see each other over the
internet. Frankly, Bahamians
have advanced and are no
longer solely dependent on
BTC. So now, is the PUC going
to seek to control and regtate

the internet?

ILLEGITIMATE
‘ CHILDREN!

_ Lately, I saw a newspaper
article/photo of a 26-year-old
pregnant mother of four who
was recently laid off. Accord-
ing to the article, she lived with

. her mother and the fathers of

‘her children were hardly con-
‘tributing to their welfare.

The number of illegitimate
children born at local hospitals
each day amazes me, particu-
larly in.what is supposedly a
Christian nation. Of late, a doc-
tor-friend told me of the num-
ber of young women/girls who
are impregnated—often for a

succession of different men—

and who mindlessly bring one
bastard after another into the
world. When irresponsible men
are casually sowing their wild
oats and “biggin’up” one crazed
woman after another—out of
wedlock~is there any wonder
why crime is escalating and why
there is an growing number of
teenage miscreants who come
from dysfunctional, fatherless
households without any basic
values or morals. Every year,
our society is-saddled with ille-
gitimate children from people
with neither the financial
resources nor the parental
wherewithal to raise them prop-
erly.

At this point, I would like to
express my sincere condolences
to my grandfather, Edward Gib-
son (Long Island) and his sib-
lings on the passing of their
brother David Gibson.

Happy New Year Bahamas!



THE TRIBUNE

BVT utr aula



gas — and people’s lives

lm By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)

2009 started with arctic tem-
peratures in Europe. The cold
grip in many parts of Europe
was worse because of a row
between Russia and the Ukraine
over natural gas.

Russia cut gas supplies to
Ukraine early in January in a
dispute over pricing and an alle-
gation that Ukraine was not
only not paying its bills but
stealing gas as well. The coun-
tries of the European Union
(EU) depend on Russia for
about a quarter of their total
gas supplies, some 80 per cent of
which are pumped via Ukraine.
Tens of thousands of homes
were left without deating.

At the time of writing, Russia ,

says that it will resume gas sup-
plies to the EU countries if
monitors are sent to the
Ukraine, but no date has been
set and, as temperatures plunge
to minus 10 degrees centigrade,
people may die in many coun-
tries in Europe, particularly
those that were once part of the
Soviet Union and who are
almost entirely dependent on
Russian gas for heating.

This issue is not only about
the price of gas. Four years ago,
an anti-Russian regime won
power in Ukraine and Russia
accused it of supplying arms to
Georgia last August when Rus-
sia and Georgia warred over.
South Ossetia. Georgia had
launched a military strike on the
province in an attempt to
reclaim it after 16 years of semi-
independence — a move the Rus-
sians regarded as presumptuous.

Russia pushed Georgian
troops back into Georgia but
vowed at the time to teach the
Ukraine a lesson.

It can’t be discounted that,
in cutting off the gas supply to
EU countries through Ukraine,
the Russian government. is
underscoring EU dependence
on Russian gas, and sending.a

warning against policies of





these would be the expansion
of EU membership to include
former members of the Soviet
Union that share borders with
Russia.

In the same week, Venezue-
la’s President, Hugo Chavez,
seemed unable to make up his
mind whether to continue
donating heating oil to poor
families in the US. First, he cut
off supply, then he reinstated it
after his “godfather” image took
a beating in the international
media.

‘Chavez introduced the pro- .

gramme four years ago when oil

prices were relatively high and .

he was in full flight in his viru-
lent attacks on the US President
George W Bush and the Amer-
ican government.

According to the Associated
Press, Venezuela supplies fuel
to 200,000 households in 23
states and 65 Native American
tribes — last year alone the value
of these supplies was put at $100

million.

Now that the price of oil has
dropped almost 70 per cent
from its high last July, PDVSA,
the state-owned oil company,
which Chavez uses to dispense
largesse in support of his Boli-

-varian Socialist Revolution, can-

not afford these gifts.
Chavez is faced with the pos-
sibility’ of ‘devaluing the
Venezuelan currency — a mea-
sure he seems to be postponing
until a referendum is held in
February, the result of which he
hopes will allow him to extend
the.term of his Presidency.
Also at risk is the Petro-
Caribe programme to which sev-
eral Caribbean countries are sig-
natories. Chavez has reported-
ly cut back,on oil production as
part of a jopreement by the
,Organiy; tid :
Exportirg.Countries (OPEC): to

which it ISAPP FOES: AMON: )| force- “up the price.of oil..But,







rch 0

Under The Theme:

Mere God Bas Brought Us

INTED SINGING BY:
Guest Soloists
itional Crusade Choir

f God National Choir
macle Concert Choir

it oe? fi ts ae




projections indieate that, with
the demand for oil dropping in
several major countries, includ-
ing China and India, in the face
of the international financial cri-
sis, oil prices will not reach their
earlier high levels in a hurry if at
all.

The Caribbean governments |

that signed up to PetroCaribe
and who have predicated some
of their social development pro-
jects on the back. of promises
made by Chavez may find them-
selves scrambling for financing
from elsewhere if they can get it.

Amid all this, an important
book: on the politics of oil and
gas in the Caribbean has been
produced by Wendell Mottley, a
former Finance Minister of
Trinidad and Tobago and now a
New York-based investment
banker. The book, modestly
entitled “Trinidad and Tobago:
Industrial Policy 1959-2008”, is a
masterly account of the role that
oil and gas has played in the
economy of Trinidad and Toba-
go, and the role it has failed to
play in developing the country’s
human resources, healing its
ethnic divisions and ensuring

‘against potential conflict i in the

future.
For instance, Mottiey makes

the point: “In Trinidad, a useful '

reality check is the ratio of the
output of the educational sys-
tem to employment in the ener-
gy sector. Every year, the coun-
try graduates 19,000 students

_from its high schools. Based on

the most optimistic expansion
of the oil, gas, chemicals and
other process industries, only
1,78. of these students will be
absorbed by these industries
every year. The remaining
17,220 students must be placed

elsewhere. ... in the teal Trinidad

é and: Pobago%sa:s “et
And, the. “real Trinidad and

Tobago” is one in which of the











SPEAKER:
Bishop William M. Wilson
Executive Director —
International Centre For
Spiritual Renewal

‘s lives of ordinary people







@ SIR Ronald Sanders

labour force of 625,900 approx-
imately one-quarter or 159,000
persons “may be poorly
equipped to earn a Jiving in
(the) twenty-first century.”

‘Mottley also warns that “the
projected large revenue streams
(from oil and gas) over the next
20 years could be interrupted
by the eruption of destructive
social forces caused by the coun-
try’s dual: development paths”.

He deals too with the petro-
diplomacy between Trinidad
and Tobago and Venezuela as
both countries seek strong influ-
ence over neighbouring states
in the Caribbean. And, he asks
the question: “Is Venezuela,
through PetroCaribe, seeking to
turn, and can it succeed in turn-
ing, the Caribbean into vassal
states, tied to one energy source,
and sinking daily further into
unrepayable debt?”

Mottley’s book, published by
Ian Randle in Jamaica, also
gives a revealing insight into the
maritime dispute between Bar-
bados and Trinidad and Tobago
— allegedly over fishing, but real-
ly over petroleum as he con-
firms.

These events so early in 2009
indicate that the politics of oil
and gas will continue to play an
important part not only in rela-
tions between States but in the










Responses to:

. Fonaldganders29@hotmar com

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 9

ation Make$ Cent$
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will be closed

on Friday, January 16th, 2009
for a Company Retreat.

Our offices will re-open on
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PAGE 10, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNG



i es eee, ee
Archbishop speaks out against death penalty

[Man is rushed to hospital after stabbing

FROM page one

around 8pm Saturday. A handgun and ammunition were found. i
As police approached, the three men in the black Buick jumped out |:
of the car with police following closely behind. i
Officers caught up with the three men on foot and searched them.
They found a .45. handgun with four live rounds of ammunition. i
Two men from Davis Street Fox Hill, aged 25 and 28, and a 31- :
year-old from St Margaret’s Road off Kemp Road, were taken into :
custody. They are expected to appear in court today. i
A 24- year-old woman and 32-year-old man arrested on Friday in :
connection with illegal drugs found in a home in Montell Heights are
also expected to appear in court this week. :
They were arrested on Friday morning after officers from Grove i
Police Station executed a search warrant at a residence in Montell :
Heights and found a clear plastic bag with one pound of marijuana ;
concealed i in the ceiling. :

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FROM page one

the death penalty?

“Judging by recent local
demonstrations and pronounce-
ments on part of those who sup-
port capital punishment and want
to see hangings, I would say that it
is a matter of importance, of .
urgency that calls for voices of
reason to rise up in opposition,”
said the archbishop during the
annual Red Mass ceremony at
which members of the judiciary
celebrated the start of the 2009
legal year.

He told the congregation at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral that
many who support the death
penalty use the Old Testament to
bolster their argument and ignore
teachings of forgiveness and com-
passion — principles of the New
Testament.

Said the archbishop: “Among
those who support the death
penalty, there are many and var-
ied justifications for supporting



MEMBERS of the judiciary gather at St Francis Xavier Cathedral for the annual Red Mass ceremony, as part of tradi-
tional celebrations for the start of the new. legal year. (Pictured in front row from L -R) Rev Glenn Nixon, Appealate Jus-.
tice Emmanuel Osadebay, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Archbishop Patrick Pinder, President of the Court of Appeal
Dame Joan Sawyer, Appealate Justices Hartman Longley and Christopher Blackman. Second row L -.R: President of
Supreme Court Tribunal Nathaniel Dean, Justice Kechine Cunningham, Supreme Court Justice Estelle Gray Evans, for-
mer AG Clare Hepburn, SC Justice Neville Adderley, Justices Chery! Albury, Stephen Issacs, Jon. Issacs and Snr Jus-.

this extreme form of punishment.
There are those who believe in
the law of retaliation, retribution,
an eye for an eye . Many such per-
sons can be found even in the reli-
gious community. There are often
the most vocal and the most
inflexible. They openly prefer
God in. his Old Testament per-
sona or issue summary judgments
according to the letter of the law.
The God who became flesh for
the love of human kind and God
of mercy and redemption simply

‘ does not satisfy their world view.

He noted “flaws” in the appli-
cation of the death penalty out-
lined in a recent speech by Arch-
bishop Wilton Gregory of
Atlanta, Georgia on the Catholic

tice Anita Allen.

church’s view of the death penal-
ty. The “alarming number” of
innocent persons being sentenced
to death who were later exoner-
ated, economic and racial inequal-
ities that plague defendants in
capital offence cases: all “cast seri-
ous doubt on the efficacy of the
death penalty as a means of deter-
ring capital offences,” said the
archbishop.

He also read from a 2008 Pas-
toral Letter to the Antilles Epis-
copal Conference of Roman

’ Catholic Bishops that “strongly

affirmed” the Church’s belief in
the sanctity of life and urged the
Caribbean region to move to com-

pletely abolish the death penalty.

“Capital punishment can only
be defended in cases of absolute
necessity, when it was simply not
possible otherwise to defend soci-
ety. However such cases are very
rare, if not practically non-exis-
tent,” he read.

“The bishops afficmbd that this

‘position in the church’s teaching

does not provide the basis for the
reintroduction or renewed use of
the death penalty, which is
presently under discussion in the

region. The bishops further .
expressed their firm desire that |

the leaders and people of the
Caribbean move toward the total

abolition of the death penalty.
Therefore we should. place
emphasis on the rehabilitation of
the offender rather than his élim-
ination. Non-lethal forms of pun-
ishment are more in keeping with

- the, concrete: conditions | of the

human good and more: in confor-
mity with the dignity of the human
person,” he said.

Although still on the statute
books, capital punishment has not’
been carried out in this country
since 2000. In 2006, the Privy
Council handed down an histori-
cal ruling which abolished the
mandatory death sentence for-
those convicted of murder.

Overhaul of police force senior command
FROM page one .

Mr Dames will assume responsibility of Grand Bahama,
Mr Evans of New Providence, and Mr Hanna of the Fam-
ily Islands.

Mr McCartney will lead management and support ser-
vices, while Mr Gibson will head the crime and intelli-
gence division.

Speaking to hundreds of police officers attending the
RBPF annual church service and parade at the Church of
God of Prophecy in East Street yesterday, Mr Turnquest
expressed his hopes for the future of the force.

He said: “Restructuring, as we know, calls for a funda-
mental reassessment of the organisation, its command
structure, the laws and regulations by which it is governed,
succession within the ranks, its personnel, and its assets.

“What restructuring seeks to do is to Strike the most -
effective balance of all these element’, to ensure the Police
Force continues to effectively and efficiently implement its
mandate.”

Mr Turnquest said he. expects the new senior coined
to provide visionary and progressive leadership to men
and women in the force, to act with transparency and
accountability, and ensure the force is equitable and fair.

The new senior command follows recommendations in
the strategic review report that called attention to the
urgent need for, “a leaner and fitter command chain which
should ensure an appropriate development of responsi-
bilities and provide senior and middle managers with more
clearly defined roles and responsibilities.”

The Cabinet Office advised there are no further plans to
reduce the number in the senior command, and there will
be no new appointments to the ranks of senior assistant

































Mitchell hits out ,

FROM page one

revenge in this matter,” Mr Mitchell,
member of Parliament for Fox Hill,
said in a statement: released yester-
day.

He asked if government is intent on

. fighting crime why were experienced

officers asked to resign. He claimed
that a number of the officers were tar-

.geted either because of suspected. affil-

iation to the PLP or after speaking
out against the commissioner. He
asked why the officers were asked to
abruptly resign after 48 hours notice.

“How does a 63-year-old commis-

sioner and a 61-year-old prime minis-
“ter tell 55-year-old officers that

because of their age they ought to go
home? Will the minister please explain
why the usual courtesies were not
allowed these officers to say farewell
to their colleagues as is the convention
in the Force?

“Instead they were instructed to
turn in all of their uniforms and police
equipment by Friday afternoon, with
no opportunity to participate in the
final police parade. The point here is

’ that what the government has done is

unlawful, unseemly and ungracious,”
he claimed.

“ful.

legal action against government if
what was done was found to be unlaw-

“The officers who were ‘disiniised
should know that it is not too late to
take legal action. If the Government’s
actions are unlawful there is still an
opportunity to seek redress, even if
you accept the money,” Mr Mitchell
said.

Yesterday government announced
the restructuring of the senior com-

‘mand of the RBPF. The news came

four days after a shake-up at the force,
when 15 senior officers were asked to
accept early retirement packages or
face dismissals.

The officers were given two days to
respond and according to reports, all
the officers accepted the packages.

The officers asked to retire were

- Assistant Commissioners ‘of Police:

Christopher McCoy, Juanita Cole-
brook, Kirkland: Hutchison, Eugene
Cartwright, James Carey; Chief Super-
intendents Burkie Wright, Robert Pin-.

-der and Basil Rahming; Superinten-

dents George Mortimer; Frank St
Remy, Alexander Blatch, Christopher
Rahming, Philip Gibson, Matthew
Davis, Sidney: McPhée, Drexel.
Cartwright, and Charles Walkine.

~ Govetnment said the move was in



FROM page one

There are fears that there might be
other victims at that school and
other child predators throughout
the country.

“T feel that it would be an excel-
lent idea. A sexual offences reg-
istry is very important and I think
it would be helpful as we move
forward, but the government has
not yet opened this discussion for-
mally with regard to a sexual
offences registry. It is something I
will have to put forward on behalf
of the people in conjunction with
all of the sexual offences changes
we are making,” Mrs Turner said.

A sex offender registry is a sys-
tem in place in a number of juris-
dictions designed to allow gov-
ernment authorities to keep track

‘of the residence and activities of

sex offenders, including those who
have completed their criminal sen-





commissioner of police or chief superintendent.





e SEE PAGE TWO




Registry

tences.

In some jurisdictions, especial-
ly in the United States, informa-
tion in the registry is made avail-
able to the general public by a
website or other means. In many
jurisdictions registered sex offend-
ers are subject to additional restric-
tions, including housing.

Those on parole or probation
may be subject to restrictions that
do not apply to other parolees or
probationers. Sometimes these
include (or have :been proposed
to.include) restrictions on being
in the presence of minors, living in
proximity to a school or day care

centre, or owning toys or other

items of interest to minors.
The government had presented
a series of amendments to-the Sex-

ual Offences and Domestic Vio- °

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Monday - Saturday - 9: 30 AM - 5: 30 PM

He also advised the dismissed offi-
cers that it was not too late to take



lence.Act to the House of Assem-
bly last year, however, Mrs Turn-
er said a sexual offenders registry
is something she is still advocating.
“It’s one of the things I talked
about in my contribution on the
changes to the Sexual Offences
Act that we did. Obviously these
are going to have to go hand in
hand with each other and J am
hoping the government would
look into that,” Mrs Turner said.
Mrs Turner said she is passion-
ate about the protection of chil-

dren as this is something that is _

long overdue.
“I am very passionate about
these types of things, especially
when it comes to the ruination of
our children. The government has
to have legislation in place to pro-
tect.all citizens, but children need
advocates on their behalf so for
me that is something I am pas-
sionate about,” Mrs Turner said.







|Kenyatta |





keeping with the recommendations of
a Strategic Review of the Force. '
























































‘FROM page one

Asked: how. much ofa role
the current leadership of the |
PLP played in the MP’s deci-
sion to ultimately join the
FNM, the source could not
say. However, he, did point out
that Mr Gibson has outlined
before that he would not be
seeking “any nomination”
under the PLP in any future

_ élections if former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie was still at"
the helm of the party.

“T think it’s fair to Say that,
because he has gone on record -
to that effect before. But what-
ever his reasons, we-support
him,” the source said.

Having served in Mr
Christie’s administration as the
chajrman of the Gaming
Board before the PLP lost the
2007 general election, Mr Gib-
son gained national headlines
by abruptly resigning from the
PLP in January last year.

Catching many of his for-
mer colleagues off guard, Mr
Gibson: became the only. sit-
ting Independent MP. in the
House of Assembly since 2007.

However, with this latest
announcement, and the polit-
ical fall-out that could follow
among the more “die-hard
supporters within the PLP”,
the source said that Mr Gibson
did not seem in the slightest
bit “concerned.”

“Mr Gibson is.content that
he is making the right deci-
sion. If you look at everything,
where he is now, and where
he would like to take the con-
stituency, it was only a matter
of time before he did what was
in the best interest of the peo-
ple. We advised him that he
has done a lot for the area,
and we stuck by him (2007)
and we will stick by him.in
(2009),” he said.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Gibson
said he had no comment on
the matter at this time.



\



THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 11



Are you between a
Rock and Hard place

Well... tae
THE TRIBUNE

is your soft landing!







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Take advantage of the 21,000 in paid
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Call Godfrey Arthur at

- §02-2394

*Certain Restrictions Apply





PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Knowles, Bhupathi

out of Chennai Open




























MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated in the |
second round of the Chennai Open in Chennai, India on Friday. ‘The
Bahamian-Indian duo were playing in their first tournament in
India since they started playing together last year.

As the top seeded
team, they didn’t sur-
vive the second round
as they were ousted by
the unseeded team of
Jean-Claude Scherrer
and Stanislas Wawrin-
ka of Switzerland in set
scores of 3-6, 6-3 and Hema

10-8. Scherrer and MMUAGL NITES TTR Melts esi oii
, Wawrinka, however, |

i; lost in the final 6-3 and 6-4 to the team of Eric Butorac and Rajeev |"

of the United States. Knowles and Bhupathi had won their first |

{ round match 7-6 (3) and 7-6 (8) over the wild card team of Prakash

| Amritraj and Somdev Dewvarman of Indian. |

2}. This week, Knowles and Bhupathi are headed to Australia to play

_}+ in the Medibank International in Sydney where they are the number

; three seeds.
> They are scheduled to play their first round match against the

_{| Bruno Soares of Brazil and Kevin Ullyett of Zimbabwe.

|; Knowles’ former partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad

) Zimonjic were the top seeds. The American identical twin brothers
Bob and Mike Bryan are the number two:seeds.

. Nestor and Zimonjic finished the year as the number one ranked
team in the ATP computer rankings, followed by the Bryans.
Knowles and Bhupathi were number three. ,

Following the Medibank International, Knowles and Bhupathi will
head to Melbourne for the Australian Open, the first Grand Slam
Tournament for the year.

The Australian Open will get started on January 17.



'





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JOB TITLE
Assistant Professor, Journalism

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

adonsahars’ Ga!

BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL

BSC Family Fun Run/Walk Road Race
gets under way on Saturday, January 31

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil will begin its 2009 campaign
on Saturday, January 31 when
they host its annual Family
Fun Run/Walk Road Race.

This year's event will be
held in honour of national
coach Frank 'Pancho' Rah-
ming, who has assisted the
BSC in putting the race
togather from its inception in
2000. Rahming is a member
of the Mt. Carey Union Bap-
tist Church and has served as
the commissioner ‘of softball
for the BSC.

BSC Director Brent
Stubbs said they are pleased to
continue to honour those per-
sons who have made a signifi-
cant contribution to the suc-
cess of the Baptist Sports
Council in the past and it is
hoped that the sporting com-
munity will come out and sup-
port them as they honour
Rahming in the first event for
the year.

The event will once again

Position 1: Assistant Professor responsible for teaching print journalism and serving as full-time

faculty advisor for the monthly student newspaper, The Spectrum.

Position 2: Assistant Professor responsible for teaching broadcast journalism, video production (that

is, pre-production, production and post-production) and

video production software.

The ideal candidates will be able to develop and teach courses leading to a baccalaureate degree in
journalism; will have a strong commitment to teaching undergraduate students; evidence of excellence
in teaching and creative/innovative pedagogies; knowledge of current trends in the field of journalism;

and a commitment to research.

QUALIFICATIONS

Applicants should possess an earned PhD in Journalism or a related field.

» For a detailed job description and application persons should visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested
candidates should submit a detailed resume and a. cover r fetter of interest, giving full particulars of

_ qualifications and expériences, no later than Friday, 23"

January, 2009.

The School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions at The College of The Bahamas wants

to implement the following Allied Health programmes:

> Medical Laboratory Technology
> Physical Therapy

>. Nutrition and Dietetics

> Speech Therapy

> Occupational Therapy

Professions at 242-325-5551.

Interested persons may contact Dr. Zorene Curry at the School of Nursing and Allied Health

“| Also, anyone interested in enrolling in the BSc. Pharmacy Programme for September 2009

should apply no later than February 6, 2009.

ip PIII II IIIA II III IIA IS III AI ISA IIIS ASAI ISSA SI SSSI ASI NS

PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES —

Graduation, forms should include:

OFFICE. (i.e. stamp, receipt)

next graduation period (Summer 2009).

SE bb Db bb bbb bbb tt

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE, INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 012009

SPRING 2009

Please submit your completed

*Graduation Evaluation Forms
to the RECORDS DEPARTMENT on or before January 30, 2009.* |
Â¥ ALL SIGNATURES, (i.e. student, advisor & cel person)

vv PROOF OF PAYMENT FROM THE BUSINESS
SIGNED ADVISEMENT FORM (Course Outline)

*All others are considered LATE and will be forwarded to the
Graduation forms may
be obtained from the Records Enquiry Office.

FIP II III III III AI IIIA AA AIA AAA AAA ASD AAA AS AAA AAAI OK

SEE EE DDE DIE BD Db bt































































































COURSE TUITION &
sinner SECs, CODE BEGINS ENDS | DURATION | DAYS _ (timed FEES RM | Spaces.
} COOK
if 1 806 Feb. 19 Mar. 26 6 weeks $375:00
COOK a
' Asian Cooking 4800 Feb. 18 Mar. 25 6 weeks Wednesday i $385.00
Mise poce. COOK 00 -
Gourmet Cooking! ss 1. 823 __Feb. 16 Mar.23 | 6 weeks Monday _ : $380.00
COOK “00 - ean
i :
\ | Gourmet Cooking | tl 1824 Feb. 18 Mar. 25 6 weeks Wednesda : $465.00
|] | French & italian COOK 1A 00- tr ae
j Cooking 1820 Feb.17 Mar. 24 18 weeks Tuesday F
|| [Healthy —~ COOK : 5:00 - :
1_ 827 ___Feb,16 Mar. 23 6 weeks Monday : $465.00
we EES EES a :
COOK Bi 6:00 -
1813 ___Feb. 17 Apr. 7 8 weeks _| Tuesday 9:00pm. $300.00
i COOK 6:00 -
i 4 814 __ Feb. 19 Apr. 9 8 weeks H $325.00
COOK ;
i 1810 Feb.19 April. 9 8 weeks :
i COOK :
I 1 817 Feb. 16 Apr. 6 8 weeks :
COOK 00 -
1 818 Feb18 Apr. 8 8 weeks Wednesday | 9:00pm $375.00
. ia COOK é 6:00 - ae
Holiday Baking 1__ 830 Feb.17 Apr. 7 8 weeks Tuesday 9:00pm $390.00 LK





All fees are included in the price quoted above; new students pay a one-time application fee of $40.00. (NON REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: February 6, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.

For further iaformation or to pick up asi application please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & ospitatity Management Institute, 323-5804, 323-GR04 or

fay 325-8175,

the College of the Bahamas reserves the right ta change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials,



Event will honour coach Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming

be divided into two parts with

- a three-mile run and a one-

and-a-half walk, both begin-
ning and ending in front of the
Charles W. Saunders High
School on Jean Street.

The run will leave Jean
Street and travel south to
Prince Charles Drive, turn and
travel east to Fox Hill Road,
turn and travel north to
Bernard Road, turn and trav-
el west to. Hillside Estate,
opposite Kingsway Academy

and turn and travel back to -

Jean Street.

The walk will leave Jean
Street and travel north to Hill-
side Estate, turn and travel
west to Bernard Road, turn
‘and travel south to Soldier
Road, turn and travel east to
Prince Charles Drive and turn
and travel north back to Jean
Street.

The categories for entries

r
Ba ‘

odes? ass whos



SECT} COURSE

are male and female 15-and-
under, 19-and-under, 20-29,
30-39, 40-49 and 50-and-over.
There will be a special cate-

gory for Pastors and Minis-
ters, as well as the Church
with the most finishers.

Trophies will be presented
to the first three finishers in
each category. Certificates of
participation will also be pre-
sented to each competitor.

The entry fee is $10.00 per
person.

Entry forms will be avail-
able from the offices of the
Bahamas National Baptist

- Missionary and Educational

Convention, the Bahamas

Olympic Association and the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials as of Wednes-
day.

Pre registration will take
place from 6 am on race day.
The race will get started



Summer Certificate & Diploma Programmes for

Corporate Trainers.
Training Managers.

Vocational Education Teachers and
College/University Lecturers

Application Deadline J anuary 30, 2009

promptly at 7 am.

Immediately following the
race, there will be a meeting
for all Churches interested in
participating in the BSC's
2009 Basketball Classic.

This year's classic will be
held in honour of Joyce
Minus, the immediate past
assistant director of the BSC
and a member of the Golden
Gates Native Baptist Church.

The classic is scheduled to
begin on Saturday, February.
21 at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex. The entry fee is
$100.00 per team. The cate-
gories include 15-and-under,
19-and-under, men and

“women.

For. further information,
interested persons can contact
Brent Stubbs at, 502-2363 or
email bstubbs@tribuneme-
dia.net, bstubbo@yahoo.com
or stubbobs@gmail.com












CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SER VICES
Personal Development - Spring Semester. OF 2009, eae





ACCOUNTING














6:00pm-8:00pm













ACCA.FOR BEGINNERS | MonMWed j 9-Feb 10wks| $250
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Il 6:00pm-8:00pm Sear Feb ee
AGCA FOR BEGINNERS II! 6:00pm-8:00pm |Tue/Thur }10-Feb 10wks| $300







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BUSINESS



é























[eMeug o1

BUSIO00 GREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Tues oe 8wks ($225
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COMPUTERS |













































COMP901 O01 {COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00pm-9:00pm {Mon 12-Feb 12wks| $450
COMP901 02 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 11:00am-2:00pm | Tue | SFeb {Swks| $450
COMP902 (oh) COMPUTER APPLICATIONS II 6:00pm-9:00pm | Thur [S-Fab 12wks| $550
COMP941 01 6:00pm-9:00pm: | Tues 3-Feb _|6 wks |$350
COMP953 . _ {O01 | PC UPGRADE AND REPAIR 6:00pm-7:30pm |Mon/Wed |2-Feb — | 12wks $500]
COMPS30 TOT TWEED PAGE DESIGN WS TB ani-4:SOpm | Thurvrri | T2ASMar}2 days ‘S807





COMP931









2 days|$650| *







COSMETOLOGY




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COSM802 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00pm-9:00pm | Mon 8wks ye
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DANCE — |
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DANC901 BALLROOM DANCING 6:00pm-8:00pm |Wed



















































HEALTH AND FITNESS

DECORATING } |
DECO800 INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Tues \8wks ($225
FFLOR8OO “———"E-OOpm-9-00pm | Mon wks [$225
FLOR802 ORAL DESIGN Til '6:00pm-9:00pm |Tues 1 T7-Feb 8wks [$275
ENGLISH =

ENG900 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00pm-9:00pm Hie 17-Feb | 10wks/$300
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HLTH801










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MASG901 MASSAGE THERAPY ESSENTIALS II 6:00pm-8:00pm_ Mon
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MGMTG00 TOT HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT 1 |6:00pm-9:00pm |Thur ~~






~ + 40wks| $250
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MEDICAL











Revised Dee 292008



Dre emoes meee PLR RTE PARP ER ESM YUN TERT EAT OT EY RN AE NTE ERT TAT SSO TN ETRE MEP HT TAMER TINT STOTT IEE AEN OME YBN SETTER ATR TE NE CHIR SATE TIT NIT EYRE EE ME MERTEN CSTR STENT YEE CRORE | TS?









ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co- ordinator at Tel: (242) 325- 5714 7 (242) 328- 0098 | / / 328- 1936 / / 302- 4300 ext. 6201
or e-mail perdev@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception af the application fee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 13



Saying farewell to



m By BRENT STUBBS |
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

F you had a chance

before he died, what

would have been the last

thing you would have
told Phil ‘Smoker’ Smith?

That was a heart wrenching
question that Rev. Father Mar-
tin Gomes asked the packed audi-
ence at the St. Francis Xavier
Cathedral to consider on Satur-
day.

Then Fr. Gomes invited every-
body, which included government
officials, sports administrators,
coaches, athletes, family and
friends, to take a minute and
shared their answers with some-
body next to them.

Giving the eulogy at the funer-
al service for the late Smith, 51,
who died on Sunday, December
28 due to complications from his
kidney failure, said for the past
week the Smith’s family was inun-
dated with sympathy from the
general public.

But he said that “nobody”
expected Smith to come to his
demise when he did and therefor
“nobody” was able to say any
parting words to him.

“We said what we wanted to
say, now we need to let it go,”

said Gomes as he invited the |

audience to show their apprecia-

els pow

FROM page 15

After the defence forced con-
secutive turnovers, the Jets’ aeri-
al attack once again found its
mark when Clarke connected
with Reggie Knowles.

The Warriors offence failed to
muster little more than a three
out possession or turnover and

the Jets continued the onslaught, ‘

turning the fourth interception of
‘the day into:a score when-.run-
«ning back Jason Davis blew by
the defence for the score.

Fullback Tito Bethel capped
the scoring with a one yard run
early in the fourth quarter.

Jcts* Head Coach Obie Roberts
said it was paramount for his
team to avoid any possible let-
downs against the fourth seeded



owe & Co. =]






" Felipé Major/Tribune staff



SOFTBALL players led the precession on JFK Drive to Lakeview Memorial where the remains of the late Phil
‘Smoker’ Smith was interred on Saturday. From left to right in front row are Jenny Dotson, Thora Sweeting
(BGDSA president holding Smith's photo) and Pandora Greenslade. Behind Greenslade are Mary ‘Cruise’ Edge-
combe and Lynden Gaitor.

tion to Smith for the life he lived.

Gomes, Smith’s priest, said this
wasn’t the way that they had
intended to see Smith because
“he wanted to live.” But he said
that Smith’s death brought every-
body together.

Then he asked another ques-
tion: “How do we benefit from
his death?”

He said everybody has some-
thing to give and Paul, in his writ-

Warriors and take charge from
the opening quarter.

“J think a lot of our players
were overlooking this game and
looking ahead to the champi-
onship,” he said. “So it was very
important that we come out and
execute early to get a good jump
on them and control the score-
board from the outset. Despite
the score There is a lot of room

for growth ,for.the Jets,

“We picked if up as thé ‘game

went along but we have a-lot-ol -

practising to do in terms of
preparing for the championship
game.”

In the three meetings on the
season, the Jets have shutout the
Warriors each time, winning 52-0,
62-0 preceding yesterday’s 54-0
victory. Roberts, a former

member of the Pros organization

on Co.

). 322-8306
ford Cay - 362-4895
Tickets available at he door (subject to seating availability)

ing to Hebrews, said in the time
of mourning for Smith, if every-
body identify one of their gifts
and multiple it by the amount of
people present in the service, they
would be able to “transform our
family, our neighborhood, our
recreational spaces.

“Just think about it. Just one
gift from each of us can turn
around our countty.”

Since Smith’s death, Bahami-

1 to 54-0 victory over

said his team has no preference
regarding whom they will face in
the next round, but that his team’s
preparation will remain the same
irrespective of their opponent,
“The Pros are the defending
champions and we have a tremen-
dous amount of respect for them
the Stingrays are a very well
coached team led by Lawrence
Hepburn so whatever team it is its

.. going to be quite a challenge.
Some of the guys I know they

want-to play the Pros-and the
Stingrays are like the little broth-
ers to the Jets so both games are
somewhat of a rivalry,” he said.
“Whomever we play hopefully
we are going to be prepared on
that day and put forth our best
effort.”

Roberts cited the example of
the New England Patriots in last



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ans from all walks of life reflected
on the life of Smith, who was con-
sidered a national legend, a sport-
ing icon, a mentor and a friend
to the nation.

He was hailed, not just for his
role as the Director of Sports at

‘the Broadcasting Corporation of

the Bahamas where he was con-
sidered the “voice” of the sports-
casts, but for the personal touch
he had with both the athletes and

Warriors

year’s Super Bowl as the moti-
vating factor for his team to finish
a perfect regular season on a pos-

‘itive note.

“Once we execute and play jets
ball we should be successful who-
ever we face in the next round,”
he said. ‘We have come this far
to have a perfect season at this
point it would be a shame for us

to lose in the championship game

after all this hard work and effort

to come up short: The perfect »~
record:-means. nothing: if we do-::.

not win a championship, plain
and simple.”

2WD 4-cylinder
engine has EPA
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. their families and for his commit-

ment and deciation to helping a
number of student-athletes to
receive athletic scholarships
abroad.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham headed the list of dignitaries,
who attended the service. But he
left because of his speaking
engagement at the funeral ser-
vice for the Rev. Dr. Lavania Stu-
art, who went on at the same time
t the New Mt. Zion Baptist
Church.

Also among those in atten-
dance were Minister of Sports
Desmond Bannister; Minister of
State for Environment, Fenton
Neymour; Member of Parliament
for Clifton, Kendal Wright; West
End. MP Obie Wilchcombe;

Golden Gates MP Shane Gibson.

and Senator Pauline Zonicle. ~














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Before he was laid to rest, a
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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS








MASTERS Track and Field Association Srasident Foster
Dorsett (left) and vice president Mike Armbrister (right) con-
gratulate coach Stephen Murray as he was honored Saturday
night by the Striders Track Club at the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort.



MEMBERS of. re wey clan share a moment with
coach Stephen Murray’as he We
right by the etriers Trapk Club at ‘the Sheraton Cable
Heach Resorts: 4





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@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONSIDERED the longest serving

coach in any of the local track and

field clubs, Stephen Murray got his

just reward on Saturday night when
the Striders Track Club showered him with a ban-
quet that was deserving of his 24 years of dedicat-
ed service.

Held at the Sheraton Cable Beach Hotel, Mur-
ray got accolades from both former and present
Ministers of Sports, Neville Wisdom and Desmond
Bannister and from his past and present athletes,
including collegiate standout Bianca Stuart,
Olympic bronze medalist Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
and Pauline Griffith-Bain, as well as parents and
some of his collegiate in the Bahamas Associations
of Athletic Association.

Showered with a number of gifts, including a
cheque from the Ministry of Sports, a Blackberry
cellphone, a round trip ticket and a watch, per-
haps the greatest moment for Murray came when
all of his current athletes walked into the ballroom
holding lid candles and waving flags as they hon-
ored him before he gave his speech.

It was truly a special night for Murray and one
that Leevan Sands said he couldn’t miss for any-

.thing in the world.

“T stayed here just for Stephen Murray. A lot of
you might not know, but he’s still my coach,’ said
the newly wed Sands, who trains now with Henry
Rolle at Auburn University.

Looking at his mentor, who got him started in
track and field at the age of six, Sands said he can’t

believe that Murray “hasn't aged. He’s still looking
young. How old are you, 30?’ he asked. Sands said
it seemed as if he’s getting older and Murray is

a8"HOnored Saturday “setting younger.

Sands, who lowered his national record when he
oO menjs triple jump bronze medal in Beijing,
in August, thanked Murray for getting him

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. Murray and Danielle Burrows-S

: started in his ca a J
“ Leevan Sr., had’stopped Murray one day when he

OLYMPIC men’s triple jump bronze medalist Leevan
‘Superman’ Sands (right), along with his family pose
above with his first track coach Stephen Murray at the
Striders Track Club banquet.on Saturday night. From
left are Leevan Sands Sr (holding Sands’ Jr. son); Bria
Sands (sister); Inspector Elaine Sands (mother);
ands,.Leevan’s wife.





how his father,

was passing through:their cornér and had informed
him that he had two sons he wanted to get involved
in sports. The rest was history and Sands said he will
never forget Murray because he was always a “real
father and inspiration for me and he’s happy that
he’s being honored while he is here. I didn’t know
that I would make it this far, but thanks to you, I
did.”

Tributes

-. While Sands and Griffith-Bain, a former sprint-
er who gave a tribute, were in person, Stuart, the
national long jump champion and Southern IIli-
nois senior standout, remarks were recorded and
replayed over a large monitor along with other
tributes from some of the athletes, parents and well
wishers, including Foster Dorsett, Dexter Bodie
and Mike Armbrister.

In his remarks before he made the cheque pre-
sentation to Murray, Bannister he attended a sad
occasion earlier in the day when he joined hun-
dreds in paying their last respect to the late Phil
‘Smoker’ Smith, the former Sports Director at ZNS,
who was remembered for his invaluable contribu-
tion to the success of sports in the country.

At the banquet, Bannister said he was happy to
see that the Striders Track Club is honoring Murray
for his unselfish, dedicated and devoted service to
the Striders Track Club and the young people of the
country at a time when he can appreciate it.

“Stephen is the longest serving track coach in
any.club in this country. His whole career has been
geared towards helping young people,” Bannister
stressed. “He’s given a wonderful example of what

’ it is to be a coach. He’s organised a club and hé’s

stayed fit, so none of you can tell him about the
workout that he's not experienced himself.”
Bannister, a former distance runner himself,
said during the time that he served as president of
the BAAA, Murray would have been one of those



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RST OTR Rue mee CUR AUC Seer LATE iS]
fo) eT MU CoAT ENYA aC VAL SU a UO OAL

MINISTER of Sports
Desmond Bannister (left),
along with Olympic men’s
triple jump bronze medalist
Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
(second right) and former
Minister of Sports, Neville
Wisdom (right) join together
in presenting coach Stephen
Murray with a cheque from
the Ministry of Sports and a
plaque from the Striders
Track Club at a banquet in
Murray’s honour on Saturday
night at the Sheraton Cable
Beach Resort.



MINISTER of
Sports, Desmond
Bannister and for-
mer Minister of
Sports Neville Wis-
dom share a
moment with coach
Stephen Murray and
his parents at the

’Striders Track Club
banquet on Satur-
day night to honor
their coach. From
left are George Mur-
ray (father);
Stephen Murray;
Bannister; Thelma
Murray (mother)
and Wisdom.

coaches who didn't mind coaching the develop-
mental national teams, rather than going to the

' more prestigious international events.

He credited a lot of Murray’s success to the
support that he got from his parents, George and
Thelrna Murray, who shared the head table with
him, Bannister and Wisdom.

Wisdom, in his keynote address, said when he
was coaching the Baintown Flyers Track Club, it
was always his goal to see Murray make the nation-
al team. In fact, he had recommended Murray to be
on the team that went to Bermuda and won the first
Carifta Games in 1984, but it didn’t happen.

So when Murray had informed him that he was
going into coaching, Wisdom said he gave him his
blessing.

“Stephen Murray was a special, special person,”
Wisdom said. “I remember when we talked about
the 4.x 4, not the actual running of the relay, but
how we would encourage every athlete on our team
to help four people and if those four people could
help four peaple; COL earn e nar oroMn tenes



im said Wihveay was: an outstanding
Bahamian who did that and should b be commended
for what he has achieved.

Murray, who has passed the IAAF levels 1-4 in
coaching and has represented the Bahamas as a
coach or manager om many national.teams, said
he was quite surprised.on Tuesday when He was
informed about the bahquet.that was i in the making
for at least 4-5 months. "> °°

He offered his condolences to Blossie Smith
and her family on the passing of Smith, whom he
met when he first started coaching.

He also thanked Wisdom for the role he played
as his coach and mentor. :

Considering the fact that he never made a
national team as an athlete, Muiray said he had a”
lot of disappointments along the way, not being
selected to travel as a national coach in the early
stages of his career when he egeehed athletes like
Chandra Sturrup.

“JT was really fed up, but my father pulled me
aside and asked me what I was doing it for and I
said it was for the love of it,” Murray said. “I nev-
er stopped. I continued doing it.”

For his efforts, Murray was awarded the
Caribbean Bank Unsung Hero Award for 2008,
thanks to Jackie Davis, who works with him at
Sheraton Resort. She wrote an essay and he won
the award.

“T don’t know what ’'m aie with vinese kids,
I’m coaching them and rowing them and just trying
to guide them in the right direction,” said Murray,
who thanked his family, especially his parents, his
brother, Ashland, who started the club with him, .
coach Keino Demeritte and his sister, Sherry Fran-
cis, who has returned from retirement to coach-
ing. Murray has vowed that despite his club not
having a sponsor, they will be the prettiest track
club with the girls wearing their pink uniforms and
the boys in gold as they continue to make their
presence felt on the local scene.

The club also honoured coaches Keno
Demeritte, Saron Cox and Sherry Murray.



COACH eoneh Murray is sur-
rounded by his Striders Track
Club athletes as they paid a spe-
cial tribute to him at their ban-
quet held on Saturday night at
the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort.

Systems:








“Stephen is the
longest serving
track coach in any
club in this
country. His whole
career has been
geared towards
helping young
people.”




Pee essa re SON a NT]



Desmond Bannister





THE TRIBUNE

Knowles and
Bhupathi lose in
second round in





MONDAY, JANUARY 12,. 2009

: PLAYOFFS

Jets power to 54-0
win over Warriors

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net .



‘Felipé Major/Tribune staff

JOHN BULL JETS’ wide receiver Garvin Newbold tries to avoid the defence of the Kingdom Warriors yes-. .
fey at the DW Davis Field.

he top seeded team in

the Commonwealth

American Football

League used a stingy
defence, which forced six
turnovers, and a seemingly
unstoppable offence to steamroll
their way into league champi-
onship in the opening game of
the playoffs.

The John Bull Jets advanced
with a dominating 54-0 win over
the Tripoint Kingdom Warriors
yesterday at the D.W: Davis
Field.

With the win the Jets await the ss :
winner of next Saturday's other THE WARRIORS’ running back tries to break the defence of John Bul ti sd

semifinal between the defending —_ Jets yesterday. es | See : - _ Ale \ : cP AT



Major/Tribune staff

ipé



Fel

champions Orry J. Sands Pros
and the V8 Fusion Stingrays.

The Jets scored three times in
the opening quarter, on scores
from Ishmail Sutherland and
Valdez Bodie to go ahead 22-0.

The Jets scored just once in the -
second quarter on when Drame-
co Clarke connected with Garvin
Newbold to give the league lead-
ers a 26-0 advantage.

Clarke, who finished with six’
touchdown passes on the day , hit
Eldon Ferguson for another score
on the opening drive of the third
quarter as the Jets began to put
the game out of reach.

SEE page 13

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MONDAY,

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Ly



2009



Insurance brokers likely to

‘consolidation over next 12 months’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamian insurance bro-
kerage/agent industry is
likely to undergo “some
consolidation over the next
12 months”, sector executives have told
Tribune Business, with stricter legisla-
tive requirements and the economic
downturn combining to produce a rash

of mergers and business failures. _

Timothy Ingraham, the Bahamas
General Insurance Association’s
(BGIA) president, said that with the
Government moving to finally bring
the Domestic Insurance ‘Act into force
more than three years after the legis-
lation was passed, “some of the issues

are going to be some of the smaller

brokers surviving the regulatory
requirements”.

The Act has never been implement-
ed because the accompanying regula-
tions, which give it enforcement teeth,

have yet to be signed off by all stake-.

* New Act and economic conditions could force mergers, business failures

* Minister Zhivargo Laing says regulations completed ‘real, real soon’

* New Act’s passage ‘very critical’, due to need for greater regulatory oversight/enforcement
* Registrar of Insurance Office upgrading seen as ey

holders-and tabled in the House .of

Assembly.

Yet that process, according to min-
ister of state for finance, Zhivargo
Laing, is likely to be completed “real,
real soon”, indicating the Act will come
into force this year. When it does, it

will mandate that Bahamas-based:

insurance brokers and agents have ade-
quate professional indemnity insur-
ance coverage, meet certain minimum
capital requirements, and pay separate
licence fees if they wish to be known as
“brokers and agents”.

Mr Ingraham told Tribune Business

¢

that with the.

enhanced regu-
lations, and
“the prevailing
economic cli-
mate, you will
probably see
some consoli-
dation in the

broking market’

over the next
12. months.
There are so
many small
one-man, two-



‘Zhivargo Laing

man band operations, it’s going to be
difficult for them to generate enough

. Income to pay the professional indem-

nity insurance”
Tribune Business has been told of
past instances where a few Bahamian

brokers/agents have decided not to:

renew their professional indemnity
insurance simply to save money, a
move that potentially could place both
themselves and their clients at risk. .
This newspaper cannot cite names
for legal reasons, but other insurance
industry sources told Tribune Business
that rather than professional indemni-

ty insurance, the main financial chal-
lenge facing brokers/agents as a result
of the new Act would be the increase
in. fees if they kept the moniker ‘bro-
kers and agents’.
If they do, they will pay two separate
fees — one for the ‘broker’ and the oth-
er for the ‘agent’ — rather than the sin-
gle fee they pay now. As.a result, Tri-
bune Business has been told that a _
number of companies are changing
their name to just use the word ‘broker’
as a way to avoid exposure to the extra

SEE page 6

End- January target | Recession-proof

for Planning Acts’
consult readiness

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is ‘aiming
to have draft amendments to
two key planning-related “Acts
ready to be circulated for public
consultation by month’s end,
with the changes seeking to
make legislation less prescrip-
tive for developers and clarity
what ‘approval in principle’
means.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, told Tribune
Business that the revised Town
Planning Act and Private Roads
and Subdivisions Act were



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* Changes designed to
accommodate ‘model
communities’ on eco-

_ friendly, renewable
energy plans

* Moves to clarify ‘approval
in principle’ and-make
process ‘interactive’ and .
balanced

* Transect Code seen as key
aid to local government
decisions

intended to reflect new types of
development, such as ‘green’
communities and the use of
renewable energies, and pro-
vide developers with more flex-
ibility. -

‘The minister added that ihe ae
- amendments were also designed

to forge a “more interactive
process” in Town Planning and
when it came to approving res-
_idential and commercial devel-
opments.

The Town Planning Act
reforms, Dr Deveaux added,

were designed to strike a bal.

ance between giving the Gov-
ernment/Town Planning Com-
mittee the ability to review and
change ‘approvals in principle’,

, and’also ensuring developers

did not incur a tremendous cost
burden-if earlier decisions were
reversed.

SEE page 4 -

The Now Providence
Finanelal Casnter

Bat a SN Vel

PC), Box CR GG/66
Suile 720 :
Nassau, The Bahamas



hopes i in face of
‘very scary year’

M@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

AS ECONOMIES
around the world buckle
under the weight of the cur-

rent financial crisis rippling ©

from the US, some Bahami-
an businesses say they are
still optimistic about the
year ahead, with some
believing they may be
almost recession-proof.
Sharon Farrington, own-
er of La Chica Caliente, a
women’s clothing store on
East Street, told Tribune
Business she is optimistic
about the 2009 business
year. She will be depending
on her regular customers to

SEE page 3



Government sets out Bimini PLP Straw
Bay approval ‘limits’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government will “only
accommodate” applications by
the Bimini Bay Resort for per-
mits/approvals “up to the limit
of Phase 2 (a)”, Tribune Busi-
ness has been told, something

(that does not include the pro-
posed controversial golf course
—a project that will.be subject-
ed to “intense investigation”.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, told this news-
paper that the Government had
informed the resort’s developer,
RAV Bahamas, a subsidiary of
the Miami-based Capo Group,
as to what would be required

from it to obtain future per-

mits/approvals for construction-
related work at the project.
One condition set by the
Government, Dr Deveaux said,
was that all future construction
and development work at Bimi-







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* Will only accommodate
applications up to Phase 2(a),
stance that excludes golf course

* Nine-hole facility to be
subjected to ‘intense
investigation’ before a
go-ahead

* EIA-and EMP to cover all future
resort works before approvals

ni Bay would require an envi-
ronmental impact assessment
(EIA) and environmental man-
agement plan (EMP) in
advance.

“We have written to the
developer with what require-
ments have to be met with
regard to future approvals,” Dr
Deveaux said. “The Govern-

‘ment will only accommodate -

applications up to the limit of

SEE page 5

Market
plans were
a ‘shocker’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor.

A Bahamian economic think-
tank has. accused the former
Christie administration of get-
ting carried away. over their pro-
posed $30 million-plus Bay

_Street Straw Market, its execu-

tives describing the situation as
“a shocker” that would have
given the taxpayer extremely

- poor value for money.

Rick Lowe, a senior execu-
tive with the Nassau Institute,
questioned why the former LP
government had contemplated
funding the Straw Market pro-
ject with a 100 per cent taxpay-
er subsidy, funds that were
unlikely to have been recovered

SEE page Tse








Bi Toor.



PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian
investors traded in six out of
the 25 listed securities, of which
two declined in value, one
advanced and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 53,133 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 35,315 shares or 40
per cent, versus last week's trad-
ing volume of 88,448 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader last week

YOUR CONNEC

with 25,728 shares trading, its

stock ending the week
unchanged at $7,

Focol Holdings Company was
the sole advancer last week, its
share price rising by $0.02 to
$5.19 on a volume of 19, 600
shares.

ICD Utilities (ICD) led the

decline, its stock decreasing by

$0.54 to $5.59 on a volume of

2,300 shares. Cable Bahamas
(CAB) traded 1,500 shares, its
price falling by $0.08 to end the
week at $13.95.

BOND MARKET
Investors traded $5,000 (par

ONTO THE WORLE

value), worth of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Notes, all in Series
C Notes (FBB13) Due 2013.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

Bahamas Waste (BWL)
released unaudited financial
statements for the nine-month
period ended September 30,
2008.

BWL reported net income of
$274,000, a decrease of $608,000
or 68.9 per cent compared to
the same period in 2007. BWL's
gross profit stood at $1.7 mil-
lion versus $2.4 million for the
comparative period in 2007, a

r 2009 Directory at
ni outlets below



a

A

VeyeP7 PZ

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ae

EW Seas

decline of $688,000 or 29.2 per
cent.

Sales revenues of $5.8 million
were down by $210,000, while
$4.2 million in cost of sales was
up by $478,000. Total dperat-
ing expenses fell slightly by
$80,000 to $1.4 million, com-
pared to $1.5 million for the
same nine-month period in
2007.

Earnings per share decreased
by $0.15 to $0.06, versus $0.21 at
the end of the 2007 third quar-
ter.

BWL's.total assets and liabil-
ities stood at $9.9 million and
$1.5 million respectively, com-
pared to $9.2 million and $1 mil-
lion at year-end 2007.

Freeport Concrete Company
(FCC) released its audited
annual results for the year end-
ed August 31, 2008.

FCC reported a net loss of

- $488,000 compared to a small

a

profit of $78,000 in the prior
year, a change of $567,000.
Gross profits declined by $1.3 °
million or 26 per cent, due pri-
marily to lower sales of $13.6
million, compared to $16:2 mil-
lion in the prior year.

While gross profits were low-
er, the company also reported
lower selling, general and
administration expenses, which
declined by $746,000 to total $4
million in the year.

Management indicated that
despite a stagnant economic sit-
uation in Grand Bahama, the
focus in 2009 will be increasing
sales at both the Home Centre
and concrete plant, while con-
tinuing to control operating
expenses and inventory shrink-
age.

Basic and diluted earnings
per share decreased to $0.104
from $0.017 in the previous
year.

Total assets of $6.7 million
fell by $433,000 from the prior
year due to a declining accounts
receivable and inventories bal-
ance. Total liabilities of $5.2 mil-
lion increased slightly by
$55,000 compared to prior year-
end. The company ended the
year with an accumulated deficit
of $5.7 million.

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 833.32



BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML STi ue! Be
BBL $066; ya,
BOB “$7.64 ° $-
BPF $11.00 $.
BSL $9.88 $-
BWL .- $3.15 $-
CAB $13.95 $-0.08
CBL $7.00 $:
CHL $2.83 $:
CIB... $10.45 <
CWCB $2.20 $-0.32
DHS $9.55. ue g.
FAM $7.80 $2
FBB $2.37 aR
FCG. 45. $0.30 (353 $-
FGL ;.» $5.19 $0.02
FCEB <2 .$1.00. 8. $
FIN $11.87 $-
ICD $5.59 $-0.54
JS]. $10.50) 3.0 $+
ee $10.00 $-

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR





Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold









DJIA
S & P 500

NASDAQ
Nikkei



shares will be paying a dividend
rate of prime + 1.75 per cent ,
payable semi-annually.

Dividends/AGM Notes: °

FirstCaribbean Bank Interna-
tional (CIB) has declared a div-
idend of $0.02 per share,
payable on January 9, 2009, to
all shareholders of record date
December 31, 2008.

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of.its.private place-..
ment offering. The preferred

a

AGTARES NB LIATENTLIUA?

0 while supplies ah

ee

J. S.. Johnson (183): } has
declared a dividend of $0.16 per
share, payable on January 21,
2009, to all shareholders of

\
iN
yy

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

International Markets

International Stock Market Indexes:































CHANGE
0 0.00%
0 0.00% :
0 0.00%
0. -6.78%
0 -3.04%
0 0.00%
1,500 -0.57%
25,728 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%

0 -2.22%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0] < 0.00%
19,600 |. -.0.39%
4,000. 0.00%
0 0.00%
2,300 -8.81%
0 -5.41%

Que 0.00%







Weekly % Change
1.1872 -1.99
1.5176 +4.43
1.3454 -3.15

Weekly % Change
$40.76 -11.87
$853.00 -2.81



Weekly

8,599.18 -4.82
890.35 -4.45
“LSST159 -3.71

8,836.80

record date January 14, 2009.

Consolidated Water Company
(CWCB) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.013 per share,
payable on February 7, 2009, to
all shareholders of record date
January 1, 2009.

Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
announced that it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meet-
ing on Thursday, January 29,
2009, at 6 pm at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, No.1
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

nae a

APE
a ee: a a y Yi





THE TRIBUNE

ie eee ee aa
Don’t discount last
minute sales surge

li By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

CHRISTMAS sales were not
as bleak as some retail busi-
nesses had feared, but were still
less than favourable for many
stores with last-minute sales
accounting for most of their hol-
iday revenue.

A representative of the
Sports Centre, the sporting
goods chain with three outlets at
the Mall at Marathon, Harbour
Bay and Sandyport, told Tri-
bune Business that given the

current economic situation and’

growing fears of a‘recession,
they “can’t complain” about
their Christmas sales.

“We weren't up, we weren’t
down. We were about the same
as last year, so we were happy,”
they said.

According to the representa- °

tive, the store offered a 20 per
cent discount two days before

Christmas, something the Sports
Centre never had to do previ-
ously. She said the sale was to
attract buyers to premium items
in the store, but less expensive,
lower margin items, comprised
the majority of sales..““Per per-
son, the actual bills were lower
- people were spending less this
year, she said.

Store

Tessa Dames, store manager

of Silver City in the Mallat: :

Marathon, said sales were not as
good as previous years. She said
customers were spending, but
were very cautious about what
items they purchased, looking

for value for their money.

According to Ms Dames,

cologne and perfume were the ~

best-selling items in the store,
which is known for its silver

jewellery.
She said, though, that chil-

dren’s necklaces and sets for
women were also popular items
last year.

A Mall at Marathon clothing
retailer, who wished to remain
anonymous, said his sales
peaked on Christmas Eve,
much to his relief.

Having only been open for
one year and one month, he
said there was still a noticeable
change in sales from Christmas
2007. As a fairly new retailer at
the Mall, he said he will have
to stick close to his regular cus-
tomers in the New Year and

find new and innovative ways.

to market his business.

“I am cautiously optimistic
about 2009,” he said.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, president
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, said recently that
up to 10 per cent of businesses
could fail this year if the cur-
rent economic downturn is pro-
tracted and deep.

Recession-proof hopes in face of WeFY scary year’

FROM page 1 ©

help her.through what might be a tough eco-

nomic year for small businesses in the retail sec-

tor. :

“If you are good to your customers through
the years, they sure will come back,” said Mrs Far-
rington. “Some people don’t care about their cus-
tomers, but if you have good customers and you
always give them percentages off, they will come
back to you.” OO

She said the uncertain economic climate was
very unnerving,.though. “It’s scary. Yeah, I think
it’s going to be very scary.” -

Mrs Farrington said she also has a business
that might be considered recession-proof. She
said the hair and nails business will always be in
high demand in Nassau, and she has her own
establishment called The Shades.

“People who have hair places will make mon-
ey,” she said. “Let me tell you something; women
will buy hair before they buy food. There is no
recession for hair - it’s going to sell.”

Lajuan Swain, general manager of GNC (Gen-
eral Nutrition Centre), said she believed the vit-
amin and supplement business might, also be
recession-proof.

:-. “They say that we are in a recession right now,
‘but I haven’t seen or, felt-any changes here in



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Nassau as of yet. But I’m sure it will be because of
the occupancy levels in the hotels.” he said. “My
customers are not the American people, but still
my Bahamian people need to make the money
from the Americans in order to come here to
spend.”

Mr Swain said GNC’s Freeport branch was not
doing very well financially, due to the economic
climate on Grand Bahama. But he does see the
need for his company to downsize any time soon,
as they keep their overheads low.

“You just cross your fingers, and you hope and
you pray that you don’t feel it,” said Mr Swain.
“No one in our business will be losing their jobs”

Da Basement, a hip hop clothing store on East
Street, has relocated from Collins Avenue in
order to increase business, and has created a
unique space to attract customer. Now, owner
Keith ‘Vado’ Colebrooke says he might have to
revamp the store in order to stay competitive in
the upcoming year. —

. According Mr Colebrooke, he is optimistic
2009 is going to be a good year for him because he
also leans on his printing business, which he said
people always need. .

“We will just have to diversify and step outside
the box,” he said.

Many Bahamian businesses have said they are
bracing for the worst effects of the economic cri-

sis to,come. through in 2009.













MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 3B

pocictielamceanmni

Tt
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

The Nassau Airport Development.
Company (NAD) is seeking candidates
for the position of Airside Specialist.
Reporting directly to the Manager of Public
Safety, the duties and responsibilities of
the successful applicant will include:

* Daily-airside inspections
¢ Enforcing Airside Traffic Directives
~ + FOD control and airside safety

management

* Runway checks

* Fostering a culture of safety and .
awareness on the airside

* Overseeing General Aviation and FBOs

* Promoting aviation safety by reducing

’ wildlife hazards

* Providing a point of contact for airlines
and ground handling ramp staff -

* Overseeing all airside construction
projects

* Conducting airside accident and incident
investigations

* Primary point of contact for airport
operations after hours = =

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» Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe, coffee maker, hair dryer

+ Pool with swim -up bar
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years operational experience in an airport,

















Potential candidates will possess a
minimum of an Associate's Degree
(Bachelor's Degree preferred) and 3-5

flight operations, air traffic control or airline
environment. Expertise in ICAO Annex 14,
Bahamas Civil Aviation Regulations and
FAA regulations is required along with a
working knowledge of Aerodrome Safety
Regulations and airport zoning regulations
and requirements.

Applicants should be proficient in Microsoft
Office with an aptitude for technical
information. They should have experience’
in negotiation and mediation and possess
strong problem solving and communication
skills with the ability to work within a
diversified group. Knowledge of Safety
Management Systems would be a definite
asset. Shift work will be required.

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Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

UBP employee
gains Series 7



ACT, from page 1B

On the legislative reform
process, he explained: “We
received a preliminary report
from the consultant we had
engaged, with some revisions to
the Acts.and a Concept Paper.
We are reviewing those, and the

ning has been asked to confirm
whether the review addresses
the issues that needed to be
addressed. .
“Once we solve that, we can
take it to the next step, which is
to present it for consideration. I

. have asked the Permanent Sec-

Department of Physical Plan- retary to have these things

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Immediate Vacancies at Kingsway Academy

~ Business Office:

Accounts Officer _ .
Applicants are invited from persons (preferable male)
_ for the junior position of Accounts Office to assist the
Accounts Personnel. Knowledge of Accounts and
various computer skills are necessary.

The successful candidate must:

® Be honest and reliable

4 Be willing to give support to the Accounts
Manager and staff

9 Be able to assist with proper record keeping of

~ all receivables and prepare records of all

_ receivables for Auditors check;

)- Be able to provide factual information from
prepared documents ~

® Bea born again Christian.

~ High School:

Science Teacher
‘The Services of a temporary Science Teacher is
needed for the end of January, 2009 for a three
month. period. The successful applicant. must be
able to teach Biology, Health and General Science.

Applicants should have the following:
e AnAcademic Degree in the area of specialization
A Teaching Certificate
Excellent Communication Skills
A love for children and learning
High standards of morality
e A born again Christian :

Letter of application together with a resume and
recent color photograph (including the. names and
addresses of at least three references, one being the
name of one’s church minister): should be forwarded
to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton

Academy Affairs Manager

Kingsway Academy Business Office
| Bernard Road — ye eagee

Nassau ~ %

Deadline for applications is Friday January 30, 2009

ready by the end of the month
[January 2009].”

Dr Deveaux explained that
“model communities” such as
Schooner Bay, which is being
constructed in Abaco by New
Providence-based developer
Orjan Lindroth, “will in. many
respects challenge some of the
provisions in these Acts”.

Currently, much Bahamian
planning and development-
related legislation is highly pre-
scriptive in nature, mandating
that developers do things in cer-

. tain ways and use the specific

services of government-owned
corporations, such as BTC,
BEC and the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation.

The Town Planning Act and
Private Roads and Subdivision
Act, reforms, he said, were

designed to give developers,

behind communities such as
Schooner Bay more flexibility
in their operations, and account
for the use of renewable ener-
gies and environmeéntally-
friendly designs/materials.

For instance, Dr Deveaux
said the Private Roads and Sub-

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division Act currently stipulated
that the width of roads in tradi-
tional subdivisions should be 40
feet. Yet the question had
arisen over whether this was
necessary in communities devel-
oped only for golf-cart use, and
with sidewalks for pedestrians.

' “Tt does not encourage com-
munities building low-energy
homes with tree coverage, and
wanting to generate their own
power,” the minister explained
of the current legislation. “To
do that, you have to get special
permission from BEC and tie
into their grid.”

The same applied to the likes,

of BEC and the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation, on issues
such as the use of grey water,
collected by communities, for
use in an irrigation system. “We
want to acknowledge in the Act
the commitment to green com-
munities and subdivisions which
are built for energy conserva-
tion, walking,” Dr Deveaux told
Tribune Business.

When it came to ‘approvals

in principle’ issued to develop-
ers by the Town Planning Com-






The Anglican Central Education
Authority
is pleased to announced its Grade 7 Entrance
Examination.

The Entrance Examination will occur on

Satur b

008, 8: - 12:

at each of the following Anglican Schools:

. St. John’s College, Stapledon Gardens, Nassau
2. St. Anne’s School, Fox Hill & Eastern Roads,
Nassau
. Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport Grand
. Bahama
. St. Andrew’s Anglican School, George Town
‘“Exuma ;

Applications can be collected from any Anglican
School ‘between 8:30am - 3:30pm but must be
returned to the school the candidate wishes to attend.

Applications will be accepted until the
registration deadline of 3:00pm
Friday, 30th January 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

A Bahamas-based Union Bancaire
Privee (UBP) employee has passed
the Series 7 examination after
studying with the Nassau-based
Nastac Group. Melissa Bain, a two-
year employee of the bank, is

-shown here with the Nastac
Group’s managing director, Reece
ON Uae



mittee, Dr Deveaux said the
legislative amendments would
look to clarify that this was not
the same as a ‘final approval’.

In the past, ‘approvals in prin-
ciple’ have often been treated as
a final approval by developers,
who have subsequently run into
trouble.

The most recent issue to rear
its head was the proposed
Wendy’s outlet at Cable Beach.
Having received ‘approval in
principle’ from the Department
of Public Works/Town Planning
Committee for an area zoned
for commercial use, the fast
food chain spent a seven-figure

‘sum on purchasing the land,

only for the Committee to later
rescind its approval after a pub-
lic outcry from residents living
near the project.

The end result was the loss
of time, money and opportuni-
ty cost for Wendy’s. Dr
Deveaux said: “Generally, when
a developer applies for plan-
ning permission, they get an

approval in principle, which.

gives them certain rights and
entitlements that usually” con-
tinue with final approval.

He added: “We want to be
certain about that approval in
principles that the Town Plan-
ning Committee issues, so that
they do not deny the Govern-
ment the ability to review or
vary the approval, but not
impose.a cost burden upon the
developer, where he’s done cer-
tain things only for final

‘ approval to be denied. We want

a more interactive process.”
Dr Deveaux said the legisla-

‘tive reforms would also

embrace a Transect Code,
which he described as a vital
tool in helping local government
authorities throughout the
Bahamas to determine which

‘developments were suitable for

specific areas, and the appro-
priate density.

The Code, he explained,
‘would divide land into geo-
graphical codes according to its
description and condition, such

‘as beach zones, ocean front and:

pine forests. From here, the
planning authorities would be
able to determine whether pro-
posed developments — and their
density — were suitable for that
type of land.

“Once you have these

' defined, you can prescribe den-

sity requirements and appro-
priate development for each
area. The geographic features
will pre-determine and prede-
fine the kind of density and use
the land could be put to,” Dr
Deveaux explained. :
“It removes the subjectivity

. from decision-making, because

you’re letting the geography
and the land determine what is
appropriate based on a pre-
determined set of conditions.”
. The minister explained, for
example, how in coastal zones
there could be specific require-
ments for buildings to be set
back a minimum number of feet
from the dunes, and density per
square acre.
The reforms will also deal
with the zoning structures need-
ed to govern developments in
areas such as wetlands."

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2009.

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Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel Stage 1 Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport. The C-220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components:

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Steel Joist; and

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
installations of steel decking.

Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
Brisby for more information.

Tender closing is at 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,
There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 8th.

Please RSVP Traci Brisby by 1pm January 7th for
briefing location details ;













Contact: TRAC! BRISBY.
Contract & Procurement Manager:



Ck ee



FROM page 1B

Phase 2 (a), and that will only
be done with an EIA and EMP
being in place. That is a require-

ment of any approval going for-

ward.”

The minister himself pointed
out that the proposed Bimini
Bay Golf Course, which was the
subject of much scrutiny in an
independent consultant’s report
on the project that was pre-
pared for the Government, lay
in the development’s Phase 2
(b).

The report by consultants
Black & Veatch attempted to
address concerns over whether
an island of Bimini’s limited size
could accommodate develop-
ment beyond Bimini Bay
Resort’s Phase I boundaries,

given that RAV Bahamas and ©

the Government had executed a
Heads of Agreement for a 700-
acre project.

Black & Veatch paid particu-
lar attention to the Phase II golf
course. The first Ingraham
administration had restricted
this to just nine holes, but the
former Christie administration

increased this to 18 holes with .

the revised 2004 Heads of
Agreement. Upon regaining
office, the current government,
via the Bahamas Investment
Authority (BIA), informed the
developers it wanted a return
to the original nine holes, with

the golf course built on “hard
lands”,

Confirming that this was still
the Government’s position, Dr
Deveaux said the administra-
tion had provided RAV
Bahamas with a copy of the
Black & Veatch report and dis-
cussed it with the developer. He
added that Biminites would be
consulted on its contents at an
upcoming Town Meeting, which
would be attended by Back &
Veatch, the aim being to assess
the scope of future work con-
templated by Bimini Bay.

“The ‘Government had

stopped any activity at Bimini

Bay until Black & Veatch did
this report,” Dr Deveaux told
Tribune Business. “Going for-
ward, the developers have to
comply with the findings of the
Black & Veatch report for
Phase 1 (b). The fundamental
requirements are an EJA and
EMP for additional works.
“The Government has since
approved the Marine Protect-
ed Area (MAP) for Bimini.
That is not conditional. What
is conditional is the effect of any
development or approved
development on the MPA.”
As a result, Dr Deveaux said
the proposed golf course would
be “subject to very intensive
investigations”, especially as its
boundaries and location con-
flicted with those of the MAP.
“Anything going forward will

BUSINESS

Government sets out Bimini Bay approval ‘limits’

be based on an EJA and EMP,
including the golf course,” Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.
“RAV Bahamas has indicated
unconditionally that the golf
course will only be built if the
EIA confirms it is appropriate.

“The Government has con-
firmed that any golf course will
be a nine-hole course, only built
on hard land, not reclaimed
hard land, and will be a links
golf course.”

RAV Bahamas had restruc- .

tured its 2006 master land use
plan to scale back Phase II in
terms of density, although mari-
na, commercial, utilities and golf
course uses were still planned.
The development footprint was

reduced, with 153 acres taken .

out of the project.

These are the. 153 acres that
RAV Bahamas in 2006 offered
to. the Government in exchange
for 49.11 acres of reclaimed land
for use in Bimini Bay’s Phase
I, an offer the Christie govern-
ment apparently accepted in
return for the developer paying
$10,000 per acre.

While the layout of lots for
Phase II A had been completed,
RAV Bahamas said its devel-
opment plans beyond that were
still “fluid”.

In its assessment, Black &
. Veatch said some 276.6 acres

of land was available in Phase II
B for a golf course. Taking out
areas such as red mangroves,

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The law firm of

LENNOX PATON

is pleased to welcome

Mr. Lorris Ganpatsingh

Mr. Ganpatsingh is acting as a Consultant to the firm,
and offering his services as an Arbitrator to the public

\

Fort Nassau Centre, Marlborough Street
P.O. Box N-4875, Nassau, Bahamas _
Tel: (242)502-5000 ~ Fax: (242)328-0566

A
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company





Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce.the C-280
Apron Drive Bridges Request For Proposal associated with the expansion of ©
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The scope of work includes but is
not limited to:

©’ Fabrication ‘of five (5), Apron Drive Bridges conforming to the
requirements of the RFP for Stage 1 Construction and five (5) Apron
Drive Bridges for Stage 2 Construction, (2012);

° Transportation and installation of Apron Drive Bridges in accordance
with the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Terminal Expansion Schedule;

¢ — Testing, commissioning and training.

This request for proposal is of interest to Apron Drive Bridge Vendors, however
should also interest local Electrical Trade Contractors.



Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, ans

Requést for Proposal seeing is Wedinesday, February 11th at 3:00pm,

2009.

\

There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 15th. Please RSVP Traci
Brisby by 1pm Wednesday, January 14th for briefing location details.











natural ponds and the flood-
plain area, would remove
between 142.67-164.13 acres
from the land available to a golf
course, leaving just 112.5-133.93
acres left. .

“Whether this provides suf-
ficient space to accommodate
the desired 18-hole golf course
will depend upon the type of
course and design layout to be

developed,” Black & Veatch

said. “Eighteen-hole golf facili-
ties in the US average about
150 to 200 acres of land, accord-
ing to the US Environmental
Protection Agency by reference
to the Golf Course Superinten-
dents Association of America.
A typical urban course is only
110 to 120 acres, while courses
in resort areas may be 170 to
190 acres.”

The Black & Veatch report

said an envirgnmentally sus-
tainable facility will be a ‘tight
fit’. And its report warned that
“significant limitations to avoid
environmental impacts will
make course design a challeng-
ing and sensitive matter”. It

-urged the Government and.

Bimini Bay’s developers to
“compromise” on the scope and
scale of Phase 2.

The project’s 2006 proposed
Master Plan envisions a 410-
room Conrad Hilton Hotel and
10,000 square foot casino, with
an operating partner for the lat-
ter still being sought.

It also includes 559 marina
slips, inclusive of the 140 exist-
ing slips; 50 over-the-water bun-
galows; 125 timeshare or con-
do units (at the developer’s dis-
cretion); 250 timeshare units on
the commercial site; 358 con-
duct units on the island opposite
the hotel; 40 Bay Front bunga-
lows; 100 space site condo units;
91 single family homes; 34
estate beach homes; 100 golf
course condo units.

Some 329 units in the condo
homes are currently completed
or under construction, and
Black & Veatch said in its
report that 59 single family res-
idences had been built. Anoth-
er seven parcels of land had
been sold, while 240-250 boat

slips had been installed.

Currently, the report said
between 210-270 construction
workers were working at Bimi-
ni Bay, while 175-185 Bahami-
ans, out of a staff. pool of 230,
were working in operations. Of
the Bahamian connec nis, 80°
were from Bimini.

Bimini Bay had also com-
pleted construction of a com-
mercial village near the resort
entrance and ferry dock, with
the facility including shops, deli,
a mini-mart, marine shop and

* liquor store.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



AVAGREN SELL

Newly Constructed Two Units Commercial Building
Land and Structure, Step Street & Fox Hill Road

Unit One comprises one office, customer service section, and one bathroom.
Unit Two is a retail store with an open floor plan and one bathroom. . |
Potential Income: Unit One $1,800.00 per month/Unit Two $800.00 per month

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:

' The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, See Bahamas
to reach us on or before January 31st, 2009... :



SPEAKER:

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LECTURE DATE

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Health For Life



PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

ea
Insurance brokers likely to undergo
‘consolidation over next 12 months’

FROM page 1B

fees.

Peter Cole, the Bahamas
Insurance Brokers Association’s
(BIBA) president, told Tribune

Business that consolidation
could “possibly” take place
among the sector as a result of
the new legislation and eco-
nomic environment, although
the issue had not been raised at

BIBA meetings.

He acknowledged, though,
that the number of players
entering the insurance industry
was increasing, with four new
brokers having been established

COURT —
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Vehicles can be viewed from 7:30am to 4:30pm

“in the last few months”. The
increasing number of brokers
could be chasing a market that
is flat or contracting, meaning
there are too many companies
seeking too little business — con-
ditions that are ripe for consol-
idation.

“I wouldn’t be surprised to
see something like that happen
along those lines,” Mr Cole
added. “The smaller brokers are
going to be impacted by the
new legislation. It seems that
whenever consumer legislation
is brought in, there’s a price to
pay. It’s going to be interesting
to see what the new legislation
does.”

That time could soon be here.

' Mr Laing told Tribune Business

last week that the Government,
in the form of the Attorney

_ General’s Office and Ministry

of Finance, were working to
consolidate the Domestic Insur-
ance Act’s regulations after
receiving advice from the pri-
vate sector. Previously, the reg-
ulations had involved several
separate sets of rules, and the
Government was now focused
on “tidying up” the work done.

“I expect fully for us to have
this process completed real, real
soon,” Mr Laing said. “It’s
important for our own regula-
tion of the sector. We’ve been
trying to get this done for a
while.

“The Government has taken
into account the suggestions by
the industry in terms of consol-
idating the regulations, and is
now tidying up the regulations
so that they can be passed.”

Mr Ingraham, who also heads
Summit Insurance, said it was
“very critical” for the Domestic
Insurance Act and its regula-
tions to finally take effect, given
that.the sector was currently

operating under legislation
passed some 40 years ago in
1969. ,

A key concern, he explained,
was that.under.existing legisla-
tion the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office had minimal regulatory
powers, especially when it came
to sanctions and enforcement.
As a result, the regulator had

been somewhat handicapped ©

when it came to disciplining
insurance-related entities and
their executives for wrongdo-
ing and rules breaches, fre-
quently having to refer matters
to the Ministry of Finance.

Tribune Business, for exam-
ple, knows of several instances
where brokers have failed to
pass on, to the insuring carri-
ers, premium income taken on
behalf of their clients. In one
episode, several insurance car-
riers and other brokers/agents
were reportedly left short by
more than a combined $1 mil-
lion.

“A lot of things have
changed, bearing in mind that
the last Act was passed in
1969,” Mr Ingraham told Tri-
bune Business. “The regulator
has not had enough authority
to do a lot of the things it needs
to do, and they have had to be
referred to the Ministry. In sit-
uations where there needed to
be an investigation, these things
drag on and on. They’re not
able to do what they need to
do. :

“We think it’s critical for the
new Act to be brought in place
to address these things. We’ve
been advocating for quite a
while to get it put through,”

Mr Ingraham said the
Bahamian insurance industry

had not suffered any negative.

impact from the failure to
implement the new Act, “other
than the regulator has not been
able to deal with people seem-
ingly acting outside the law”.
In such instances, the BGIA
president said there was the
potential for the actions of a
tiny minority to inflict reputa-
tional damage upon the wider

Bahamian insurance sector, _

THE TRIBUNE

“That’s been the frustrating
thing — to have matters drag on
and on for years, seemingly
because the regulator can’t do
what it needs to do to correct
the issue,” Mr Ingraham said,
adding that when the new Act.
was passed the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office “must be
able to do things a lot quicker”.

One of the reasons cited by
the former PLP administration
for not bringing the Domestic
Insurance Act into effect under
their watch were doubts about
whether the Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office had the expertise,
resources, in-house knowledge
and technical ability to oversee
and administer the new legisla-
tion.

The Domestic Insurance Act

.will transform the Registrar of
_ Insurance’s Office into an Insur-

ance Commission. Among the
other changes it will introduce
are mandating insurance com-
panies to lodge deposits with
the regulator; the maintenance
of adequate solvency margins
and a sufficient level of statuto-
ry reserves to remain solvent;
and greater policyholder edu-
cation.

“They are critical, we feel, to
a current, more modern insur-
ance industry,” Mr Ingraham
said. “We’re looking forward to
the regulations witha certain
amount of interest, because we
want to make sure they’re not
too heavy-handed, but done in

_accordance'with the spirit of the

Act.

“We definitely want to see
the final versicn of the regula-
tions before they’re tabled in
Parliament, because something
may have got lost in transla-
tion.”

For the stories —
behind the news,

ic=Â¥-lo i /hJ[e gg
on Mondays



at Premier Importers, St. Albans Drive.













NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL JEAN OF ESSEX
STREET OFF SHIRLEY STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send |
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight

days from the 5TH day of JANUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Bids must be in writing on or before
January 22nd, 2009.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Contact: 322-8396 @ extn. 232 or
| - cheelaw@gmail
for any additional information.



LEGAL NOTICE

| NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)



RAINFOREST FUNDING CORP. |

The fine line of General Electric appliances Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of RAINFOREST FUNDING CORP. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
The date of completion of the dissolution was the 24th day of

December, 2008.

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1

given that many vendors paid
no or minimal rent.

He told Tribune Business:
“Personally, | think there has
to be a cost-benefit analysis, and
is it really to the country’s ben-
efit to do that on this scale for
peopie who don’t pay rent and
sell non-authentic, non-Bahami-
an goods? Is it fair to every
Bahamian? Is it only fair to the
600 Bahamians in that place?

“I believe that property could
earn the country more rev-
enue..... When the Straw Mar-
ket was originally conceived, it
was a good idea. It has served
its purpose, and now the straw
vendors should be in a position
where they become regular
business owners and take the
step up to the next level.

“If they need help, we should
give them a helping hand, but
the day-to-day running, expense
and upkeep of the Straw Mar-
ket should not become the
responsibility of every Bahami-
an citizen. It’s not the right
approach. Effectively, every cit-
izen is paying for someone to
have a private business, and
that’s not the role of govern-
ment.”

In its missive on the Christie
administration’s plans for the
Bay Street Straw Market, the
Nassau Institute analysed infor-
mation provided to Tribune
Business by Jean-Michael
Clarke, of VERITAS Consul-
tants, which was appointed as
project manager for the mar-
ket’s construction under a now-
cancelled contract handed to
Woslee Dominion.

Noting how the Bay Street
Straw Market’s projected costs
leapt from $18 million to
between $29-$37 million, the
Nassau Institute took the mid-
point of the latter range to show
that the per capita cost of the
plan was $110 per Bahamian
citizen.

This would have meant that
every Bahamian would have

been contributing $110 in the
taxes they paid towards the
Straw Market’s costs. And giv-
en the percentage of persons
not contributing taxes, such as
the elderly, children and unem-
ployed, the Nassau Institute said
the effective burden on working
Bahamians would have been
much higher.

While the 605 vendors at the
Bay Street Straw Market paid
an annual rent of $100, Mr
Lowe suggested that the Gov-

‘ ernment did not know whether

all were paying or were up to
date. Research conducted by
the Nassau Institute in Septem-
ber 2007 found that there was
no requirement for vendors to
sell Bahamian-made products
or straw goods, and only 50 per
cent of vendors surveyed did
so. And 50 per cent of vendors
violated copyright laws by sell-
ing knock-off items.

“It is time to ask whether a
straw market on Bay Street is
an asset or an unaffordable lia-
bility. Rental income is negligi-
ble relative to the investment.
The result is a government sub-
sidy for a few individual
lessees,” the Nassau Institute
said.

“There is a notion that the
country needs a Straw Market
as'a shopping experience for
tourists. Whether true or not is
questionable. However, there
is no question about the degrad-
ed image for Bay Street as a
shopping destination when non-
Bahamians are hawking cheap
knock-offs and imported sou-

_venirs.

“To build a market for the
cost originally intended ($18
million) is morally wrong
because it places the cost bur-

den on the population that.

derives no material benefit and
may even be harmed by the
unsavoury image. The days are
long gone when the market
added ‘local culture’ and the
fun of bargaining for Bahamian-
made straw work.

HEAVY TRUCKS, 20FT & 40FT

CHASSIS, FLATBEDS, TRAILERS,

FORKLIFTS & MISC. VEHICLES
FOR SALE —

52 trucks, vans and trailers including heavy
duty Mack trucks, enclosed box delivery trucks
and trailers, various forklifts and 150 container

chassis priced for immediate sale.

In Nassau call 377: 0165 and ask for John
In Freeport call 352-9315 and ask for Fred

An established bakery is
TR ALO LLM
ing for the following persons:

2 Cashiers
Qualities
You must be-young and energetic and vivid
personality. you should be an ordered and

disciplined person accustomed to following a
routine. You should appreciate clean and neat

surroundings.

Excellence, not average, should

be your measure. Your enthusiasm should be
contagious. Your ethics should be impeccable, and
you should possess an obsession for doing what
is tight. You must be responsible. You must: be

self-assured. Your

attitude

should ‘not be

malodorous. Above all you must be able to resist

the urge to steal.

4 Bakers

Qualities

You must be experienced. You should not be
lazy. You must be a détailed-oriented person ever
vigilant and not bored with an established routine.
You must love to learn. You must be willing to adapt
to. new ways of achieving a task. You should not be
lazy, but willing to work. You must work well within
a team and you should love your work. Above all
you must be able to resist the urge to Steal.

1

Only person fitting these description need apply.
Person pretending to fitthese qualities only toget
the job will be promptly fired upon the exposure
of their true colors. Please call 436-9203, and be
prepared to email your resume to:

theislandbake



hotmail.com

“When grardiose plans for a
government project capture the
minds of politicians, the sky is
the limit and the humble tax-
payer is ignored.”

Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness he was unable to see any
value for money for the tax-
payer in the former administra-
tion’s Straw Market plans. He
suggested that the rather than
build a new facility for them,
the straw vendors should be giv-
en a piece of land by the Gov-
ernment — and not necessarily
on Bay Street — then either
lease or buy the property, and
then finance the Straw Market’s

‘ construction themselves — all

underwritten by rental income
paid for stalls and licence fees.

Otherwise, Mr Lowe said, the
Government would become
responsible for almost every-
thing, taking away accountabil-
ity and personal responsibility
from Bahamian citizens.

Mr Clarke, the former pro-

ject manager, himself recom-

mended that whatever hap-
pened with the Straw Market
moving forward, the vendors
themselves needed to have a
sense of ownership, for other-
wise “the chances of maintain-
ing the Straw Market in good
condition dwindle”.

“T do not believe that we
should give a $23 million gift
without condition to the Straw
Vendors,” Mr Clarke said. “I
believe the costs should be
shared. If the Government has
allocated $10 million for the
Straw Market, rent from the
500-700 vendors and artisans
who are expected to occupy the
building, as well as revenues
from the rental of the commer-
cial space on thé roof level, and
the observation tower.”

The former project manager
said-in a paper sent to Tribune
Business that. the proposed
building “somehow” expanded

PLP Straw Market plans were a ‘shocker’

from an initial 77,000 square
feet “at preliminary design” to
“close to” 200,000 square feet at
the time the project was sent
out to contractors for bid.

The proposed Straw Market
scope presented to his company
and rivals when they responded
to the project manager Request
for Proposal (RFP) issued by
the Ministry of Works in 2005
showed a building 70,000 square
feet in size and costing $10 mil-
lion.

Yet, when appointed, VERI-
TAS Consulting was confronted
with preliminary design docu-
ments showing a 200,000 square



,

foot structure. The initial bud-
get based on this had risen by 80
per cent, from $10 million to
$18 million, “plus or minus 25
per cent” because the design
had not reached a stage where
costs could be determined.
“When we received our terms
of reference for this project

‘from the Ministry of Works, it

said that the building would be
77,000 square feet and cost $10
million,” Mr Clarke wrote. ,
“Throughout our tenure as
project officers, we have never
seen a building of this scope
named the New Straw Market.

- As early as January 2006, the -

INVESTMENT OPPORTUN ee

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
Peardale Subdivision, off Wulff Road

Lot | & 2, zoned for Mixed Use comprising of 6,266 sq. ff. on which is situated a
« p Q =
single storey commercial building 2,300 sq, ft.

For conditions of sale and other information, please contact:
Phone: 356-1685, 502-1929 or 356-1608.
Interested persons should submit offer in-writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than February 02, 2009.

size of the building was already
known to have exceeded 77,000
square feet and the cost of the
building was known to be more
than $10 million. Our earliest
documents always had the
structure at over 180,000 square
feet.”

The increase in size inevitably
meant an increase in costs. The
77,000 square foot Straw Mar-
ket was priced at $129 per
square foot, but at 200,000
square feet the project would
cost between $29-$37 million.
That, Mr Clarke said, translated
into'a price of between $107-
$185 per square foot.








CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of aaeteading finan
services in Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital
Markets and Treasury. We are the largest regionally listed bank in the English-speaking
_.. Caribbean with over 3,500 staff, 100 branches and banking centres, and offices in 17
regional markets, saying 800, Q00 active accounts. We are looking to fill the following

1

4 heed

DIRECTOR, OPERATIONS CEN’

- Email applications: to Deangelia Deleveaux, HR Business —
(Emall address: coos Bea ane ean corny

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Develop, revi

ea “



, revise and enact the overall long-ter m strategy of the Operations Centre of xc lence io ithe Bank in the region.

-# Embed best practices and develop a strong team af of Sperations personnel that is ‘Be momedsete, experienced and efficient i in processing of

bank's business.

* Lead the global transition of the Operation’ from the present structure to the Centreaf Excellence:

vs



Pe Lead, develop and motivate a team of Operations Headls of the specialised businesses, such as Card Operations, Treasury Operations and
‘ Intemational Business Operations, in order to achieve the overall objectives-and goals of the business, .
regional specialised Operations functions af the Operations Department, including ‘but not limited to Centralised Securities,”

| Banking, Treasury Operations, Card Operations, Wealth verceres Sores Asset ee Operations, Capital
8, Custodial Setvices, ee

reas. responsible for the execution of al ‘ banking transactions, maintaining a fully controlled environment.
perational as activities in ne Bahamas, Soya: Te BV, ae and Gers.

Track record of ducaing consistent and cornolant Lperatsril objec tive eS,

to manage, lead and motivate large teams.

Previous experience ina large, regional, multi-ccountry Operations environment within the financial services industry.
s » Experience | in preparing and presenting business plans to executive teams.

An understanding of the full range of products and services provided by FirstCarlbhean across all segments.

oe Knowledge of the policies and strategies of the functional lines.
* Extensive knowledge of service delivery within the Retail, Corporate and Offshore Banking markets.
_« Comprehensive and detailed knowledge of the Bank’s bookkeeping and office procedures.

* Thorough knowledge of internal and’ external audit requirements.

* Sound understanding of Operational Risk, Compliance and Information Technalogy controls.
¢ The ability to analyze financial information to aid decision making pracesses,

Please complete Ae ROM matching hoolcan are requested to submit their resume
iy

your SA ICM Laces
a 9

i
qualifications or aula

cM ee rnits
sian)

ha wover letter by January 16th, 2009,

Only applicants who are shart-listed will be contacted,



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.



THE TRIBU. ..

PAGE 8B ,MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009



COMIC PAGE

CALVIN & HOBBES

THERES SOMETHING MAGICAL] THE CRACKLES AND SNAPS,
ABOUT HANING A FIRE. THE WARM, FLICKERING LIGHT.
EVERYTHING ALWAYS SEEMS



Tribune Comics




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AND IF YOU'E Got A
vedi \E AGAINST... MELL?

SAFE AND COZN \F YOU'RE. fff i
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TELL ME
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HOME!



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



AS MARGO FEELS HER

WAY IN THE DARKENED
ROOM: * [WHATS THAT

LINKING RED

FLASH?

ANSWERING ill
MACHINE 2.

{
AND ERIC HAS

OH RATS.’ THE LIGHTS
ARE ON A TIMER.
T CAN'T SEE A 4m

3| SHE FLIPS:ON THE LIGHT
CUTAN -S TE ANF



















THE ANSWER TO
THAT QUESTION |S
ON PAGE 376!

THANKS, BUT I'M
NOT LOOKING FOR
RENCE
BOOK






WE'VE ADDED
SEVERAL NEW
REFERENCE

IS CHOCK FULL
OF FASCINATING
H INFORMATION













©2009 Conceptis Puzzles. Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“YOU MUST BE AN AWESOME SWIMMER! MY Dap
SAID YOU WERE VERY LONG-WINDED/"



' Difficulty Level * *& & *& ; 110



©2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved
rn di—H

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers '1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







YOU TWO



LOOK, JUNIOR, 1S THIS WHERE
\F YOU QUIT COULD LIVE WE'RE,
FIGHTING WITH TOGETHER IN SUPPOSED
BITSY AND HARMONN / TO HUG

EACH OTHER
AND SING
“KUM BAYA’?

JUST LEARN
TO SHARE









©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

wert kingteatures.com















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





















Difficulty Level * *& *& %& 1/10

BEFORE I KNOW IT?
GEE, I ALWAYS MISS
. OUTON THINGS!

ITS COLV NOowW—
BUT BEFORE YOU
KNOW (T, SPRING

WiLL 6E HERE ;










White to play and win. This -

endgame by Viasiav Holst seems Chess solution 9343: 1 QhS+ Qf6 {if KaG 20hG+ wins

a headed for a draw, as both the queen) 2068+ Od6 (if Kd4 3 Qb2+ wins the Q)3 :
> queens are free to roam the 2+ Qd4 4 Qh2+ f4/NOAKIG 5 OhS+ arid 6 Qxd4,
i board checking the opponent's Mensa quiz: Stare and starve. 6
3 king. An additional hazard for One possible word ladder solution is: LAZY, lacy, .
: White is that the obvious lack, luck, buck, busk, BASK.

2 .

capture 1 Qxh1 loses the queen
after Black's reply Qa8+, Qb7+
or Qc6+. Problem and endgame
composers aim for artistic
solutions where White makes at
least one quiet, non-checking
move, but that's not possible



HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

OM « Ak. / « here due to the danger from
p T ARGUE ! Tle WiLL -- Black’s queen. A different visual
< idea is to defy the axiom that

BE THE FIRST CHANCE MOTHER
HAS HAP TO SEE WHAT

pieces are strongest on central
squares and instead operate

rqund the edges and comers of ‘ The HOW many words of four

the board. That's what occurs. pete or oy JoHLInAle 2
nice hecki om the letters shown here?”

ee ee Target making a word, each letter may

sequence has his queen make a



©2008 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.



; be used onee only. Each must
Cook's tour of the chessboard, USES contai.t aoe tad
é ontaii.the centre letter and
With these clues, can you spot the words in there must be at least one
win? the main nine-letter ward. No plurals. -
hody of TODAY'S TARGET .
Good 23; very. good 24; excellent
i T Chambers 45 (or more). :
Ist Solution tomorrow.
Cen WEDNESDAY'S SOLUTION
: : tury ahead blah dahl dhal haar ~
CRYPTIC PUZZLE Dictionary | | halberd hale hand handle
nee (1999 HANDLEBAR: handler hard
adtion, | | hea! hear heard hed herald
Across Down ion), eal hear he eld her:
1 Plays for time in the 4 Not in one’s own herb herbal herd rehab rhea

interest (8)
2 Arrests about a thousand
supporters (8)

theatre(6)
4 Influenced in an unnatural

wae) tg 3. It’s bound to mean a
9 Mother hits out on August change of plea (4)
ist (6) 5 It's the done thing in
10 Lose track of account in . France (4,8) © :







South took the club lead with the

simple form (8) 6 See a letter goes to the Fe |
12. Neil turned right (4) : a cl ee a 2 pay Sian eae] ea
13 Cooked meats id istressing twitch about to
O eats provide itrtate (6) | Pe - i LG
energy (5) 8 Motor sled thatis South dealer: i ace and, with all the aces and kings in
14 In December I’m expecting constructed (6) North-South vulnerable. plain ‘view, concluded that West’s
frost (4) 14:Vatirs walcomete dating a NORTH double had to be based on his trump
| , : tae : @K85 holding. He therefore led a low
Eee 17 Still twenty required to get gratifying experience WK7 trump ‘toward dummy at trick two.
MV” even (6,1,5) (3,1,8) : @AKI9 and West played the ten to protect his
oe 20 Conduct a consuming 15 Cover for person with a #KQ64 two trump tricks. When East’s nine
< interest? (6.7) “3 cageer (2) ; Morice Pes appented, Seu felt confident that
oy ot just any type o S West had all the missing trumps.
. | me ae - es ae * injury (5) ¥j54 ¥10832 Since the slam could now be sal-
ND oftpaper: (4) 18 Kept quiet (8) ws | Across Down 864° #10752 vagéd only by a trump endplay,
ew 24 Check out of Kabul (5) 19. Two fools in murderous _I 1 Wheedle (6) 1 State a grievance (8) &J 107 5 9532 declarer temporarily ‘abandoned fur-
25 Girl getting rave review (4) combination (8) N 4. Unanimously (2,3,3) 2 Danger (8) sou TH ther trump leads. Instead, he cashed
oS 28 Discovers it’s fun to do 21 Aprofessional apt to N j Y Nea 9: Beasts’ @AT7 : 32 the K-A of hearts and ruffed the nine:
oO : benefit (6) > 9 Shortsightedness (6) east’s den (4) ¥AQ9G6 in dummy.
he wrong (5,3) : : : 5 Unsophisticated (6-6) #Q3 Next came the Q-K-A of dia-
oe 29 Verdi’ sei 22 One who deserves what 0. 10 Trading centre (8) e : Aes
N. erdi’s composition he gets (6) 6 Gas used in #AS8 monds, South ruffing the ace to
bee. transmits power (6) 36 C g Pi 4 > 12 Shakespearean ee The bidding: reduce his trump length. Declarer
-E | 30 This is dropped by plants ustoms epplcatons.2) wn”) king (4) lighting (4) South West North Kast then played the K-Q of clubs, dis-
e a 27 The charge is about right, 7 For the most part (6) 1¢ Pass 34 Pass carding the queen of hearts, to pro-
: : for birds (8) but don’t h t { 13 Oppress cruelly (5) - = v4 Coe ng ear tee >
: ut you dont have to Ww 8 Sum total (6) 39 Pass 34 Pass duce this position:
31 A number put on tissue (6) pay (4) 14 To fly (4) oh 1 64 Dble North
Cc : ; 17 Warm spell in late i ae Gesely Opening lead — jack of clubs. e
| Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution
R y YP aay 7 aug (6.6) 15 Jeer at (5) Silence is golden. ‘There is no area &6
O Across: 1 Still, 4 Drifter, 8 Ski, 9 By Across: 1 Demur, 4 Cutback, 8 All, 20 Public 16 Gem (5) of bridge where this maxim is more West East —
- no means, 10 Armband, 11 Repay, 13 9 Bucharest, 10 Indulge, 11 Unity, declaration (12) 18 System of fitness pertinent than in the ae he #Q16 aeeh Immaterial
S | Nutmeg, 15 Editor, 18 Backs, 19 13 Gratis, 15 Felled, 18 Glass, 19 23 Part played (4) axercisee.(Bi aan Seabee: s Sally Ie < ue
_ : : . aine: a — usue
S i fee ae 23 Rex, 24 paces > See 23 Nun, 24 24 Narrow street (5) 19 Precisely (8) 100 points —- that it should be Dummy’s trump eight was next
Le umbels, 25 Rises ’ : NGtHUG) 25 oday. 25 East Asian desert (4) reserved only for hands where the — led and ducked. West took ‘his jack
‘¢n, | Down: 1 Sustain, 2 Idiomatic, 3 Libra, | Down: 1 Drawing, 2 Melodrama, 3 21 Merchant (6) arta; “defeat is virtually 100 but Kad to retuira & spade from the,O:
W ; 28 Po ; 8 certainty of defeat is virtually had to return a spade )
| 4 Denude, 5 Immured, 6 Tea, 7 Risky, Rebel, 4 Cachet, 5 Traduce, 6 Age, or comic verse (8) 22 Unfortunate percent, or in special cuses where the. 6. to South’s A-7. So declarer made
oO -| 12 Pot-pourri, 14 Essence, 16 7 Kitty, 12 Ill-omened, 14 Insipid, 16 29 Leave off (6) situation (6) doubler is requesting a specific open- the slam and scored 1,860 points
| Relaxed, 17 Strays, 18 Baron, 20 Decency, 17 Cerise, 18 Gusto, 20 30 Cruel (8) 26 Fir or pine wood (4) ing lead from partner. . ..__ instead of going minus 100.
R “1 Rates, 22 Dam. Digit, 22 Rue. 3 31 Lively (6 27 Tolerate (4 West’s one-word speech in this That West could have defeated
: : ively Ae) olerate (4) deal allowed declarer to make aslam the contract by playing the six of
S Dd that surely would have failed had — trumps at trick two is irrelevant. He
ee West remained silent throughout. just should have kept his big mouth

tightly shut,

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.

.



PAGE 9B MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009





“MONDAY EVENING _
|

JANUARY 12, 2009



The Best of the

8:00 8:30

NETWORK CHANNELS

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addam (CC)

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(:00) *.% 27 DRESSES (2008) Katherine Heigl,

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f NY
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Superstars of Dance The dance competition continues. (N) “ (CC)

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7 x x % MUSIC AND LYRICS (2007, Romance: Comedy) Hugh
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9:00 9:30 - ste 10:30

The Stary of India “The Spice
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Two and a Half |(:31) Worst CS Miami The team uses radical
Men Sexual ten- |Week Private technology to Uinlock the secrets of
sion. (N) (CC) thoughts. (N) © Ja man’s mind. (N) © (CC)
Momma's Boys Some mathers dis-
agree with their sons’ romantic
choices. (N) “ (CC)

7: 11:00AM - 12:00PM’ Jack Bauer |News (N) (CC)
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The story of India “Ages of Gold”
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premature exit. (N) (CC) True Beauty Contestants one

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CNN femitoa ate bate Brown: No Bias, No Larry King Live (CC) Anderson Cooper 360 (CC)

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7: 11:00AM-- 12:00PM” Jack Bauer |News (N) {News
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One Tree Hill “A Hand to Take Hold |PIX News at Ten Tong. (N) (CC)
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ussell Crowe. A fugitive ta becomes a gladiator
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ee 115) ae EM |(:05) % & & ROCKY BALBOA 006 Drama) Sylvester Sialone, Burt |x &% ZODIAC (2007, Crime Dra-
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y

—-

_ THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS |

ina challenge that tests their chari- |.

Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put



let Charlie the



some smiles on your

kids faces

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough St. every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the

month of January 2009.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

(T\

i'm lovin’ it





PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Co
Readers have their say on Soro rope’

Re: It’s time to order
’ the hanging rope

Dear Mr Marquis,

I am not always in agreement with
you. However, you hit it out of the park
on this one! Finally someone in the
media put the only commonsense solu-
tion forward. There is one thing you
might have forgotten...executing a
criminal eliminates the criminal, which
would end the havoc caused by that
particular criminal, therefore the deter-
rent argument to me is irrelevant.
Whether or not it deters crime, if you
start eliminating them one by one there
will eventually be little to no criminals
left. You do, however, have to make it
consistent and not hang one and then
take a 20-year vacation before another
execution takes place. When the gov-
ernment steps forward and takes the
issue seriously, then believe me shortly
thereafter the criminal will be elimi-
nated. It is a win/win for society.

As government is so’concerned about
this issue and the expense of the whole
lengthy process, I am willing to pledge
$1,000 to the government for every mur-
derer executed with the condition that I
drop the platform with the murderer
in the noose. This will eliminate the
government’s need to find or pay some-
one in the prison system who might also
have second thoughts about ridding a
murderer (in other words a bleeding
heart liberal). These funds could help
the government feed a few "tiefs" in
Fox Hill at my expense!

So there's the offer, Mr Ingraham
and everyone else in the FNM...I pull
the plank five times, $5,000 to the trea-
sury, 72 times (which is a ridiculous
number of murderers for this tiny coun-
try), $72,000 for the public treasury. I'm
willing to clean this country up, are
you?! |

Once again, excellent article Mr Mar-
quis. I'm sure you will be crucified by
your liberal colleagues and friends.
They are all for tolerance and diversity
until you show a different point of view.

— Christopher Armaly

I LIKE your honesty.in acknowledg-
ing at the beginning that you don’t fit
into the mould of those who usually
support the death penalty. But I support
you 100 per cent.

As you say, there is no scientifically
perfect way to determine whether the
death penalty deters others from com-
mitting murder.

But my generation became the sane
and sensible people they were because
they were, told: “If you don’t change

your ways, you are going to hang on_



the gallovés:?* =

it back. W
‘behind for misbehaving.
— Nassau pastor

FROM page 12
into

the Bahamas is not going to have a
dramatic impact on this. society is
naiveté of the most dangerous kind.
It pre-supposes that every Haitian
scrambling ashore from an upturned
sloop is going to undergo a radical per-





MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2009 Tee





THIS was the most constructive and
compelling argument J have ever heard
in favour of the death penalty. You cov-
ered all the bases, and had the consid-

-erable advantage of having right on

your side. Thank you.
— Dena B

Dear Mr Marquis,

Your column on hanging is one dear
to my heart. As a slightly to the right of
centre individual, I am a strong propo-
nent of hanging.

I see hanging (or other forms of cap-
ital punishment) as the punishment for
someone taking a human life without
benefit of judge or jury. I rarely enter-

tain the “deterrent” argument, though”

certainly it deters:thé individual who
was hanged from ever killing anyone

~ again. I am not concerned if it “deters”

others from committing murder, which
to my mind is highly unlikely. I am only
concerned with justice for the victim
and their family.

~ ONE of a number of Haitian ;
-sloops that are found:
washed ashore in

sonality change the moment he hits -:|\"*

Yamacraw beach. .

Sorry, it will not and cannot happen.
Anarchy is bred into the Haitian psy-
che. Democracy is a word they barely
understand.

At some point in the not-too-distant
future, the mass influx of Haitians will
have reached a critical point at which
an alien culture will begin to subjugate
the hosts. °

Enoch Powell, a much-reviled polit-
ical figure of the 1960s who predicted
that Britain’s streets would become

“rivers of blood” if immigration con-
tinued unabated, is now viewed by the
wise as the man who got it right.

It’s unfortunate that the metaphor he
chose to describe his heartfelt fears
was so over-the-top, but the underlying
thesis of his remarks is now beyond
serious doubt.

It’s true there have not literally been
“rivers of blood” in Britain’s streets
— though quite a lot of it has been
spilled nonetheless — but no-one can
now pretend that mass, uncentrolled
immigration has been a good thing for
Britain.

Over the last ten years of cata-
strophic New Labour government, the
entire nature of British society has
changed. In fact, it could be argued
that Powell’s prescience did not go far
enough.

Who, for instance, would have
thought 40 years ago — when Powell

was ostracised by the Conservative.

Party for telling the truth — that Mus-
lims would be on the streets of London
calling for Britain to become an Islam-
ic state?

Who would have thought an admit-
tedly unintelligent white Englishman
would be converted by Muslim extrem-
ists into a shoe-bomber intent on'blow-
ing up an airliner in flight?

Who would have thought a mad
mullah would be allowed to set up a
mosque in which he openly and
brazenly called for his followers to
undermine English society?

Who would have thought that resi-
dent Muslims would be allowed to
declare a fatwa — a death plot —
against a leading British writer because
he said something in a novel that they
didn’t like?

And who would have predicted the
events of last week, when violent pro-
testers turned out in London wearing
the colours and waving the flags of

Hamas and Hezbollah in protest
against the Israeli assault on Gaza?

Actually, Powell’s fears for Britain
have been more than realised as a
nation which was once arguably the
greatest on earth now struggles to
come to terms with its own identity.

All this has happened in a nation of
60 million souls, a transformation
which has turned suburbs of many
major towns and cities into immigrant
ghettoes.

Walk down any street in South Lon-
don on a Saturday morning and you
could be forgiven for thinking you were
in Mumbai or Karachi. A woman who
took a 40-minute stroll into Northamp-
ton town centre passed not one English
person on the way. The corners were
clogged with unemployed Slavs, all
talking in Eastern European tongues,
while the women were clad in yash-
maks and burkahs. “Were it not for
the old Victorian streets, I would not
have known I was in my own coun-
try,” she said.

Powell, a maniacal presence with a

formidable intellect; told the British
in the 1960s: “You must be stark star-
ing mad.” Few question his wisdom
nowadays.

The Bahamas, remember, has
300,000 people — that’s roughly the
population of Leicester, an unremark-

able English Midlands city. Just 60°

miles off this country’s southernpost
point lies the failed state of Haiti, with
more than seven million people who
would rather be somewhere else. To
ignore the dynamics of this worrying
situation is nothing short of gross irre-
sponsibility.

Last week, a 39-year-old woman



There is no sound
Peres tiinton tierce
the death penalty

A REPORT that



Cvcnn|

Getting a 20-year sentence for first
degree murder and with time off for
good behaviour waltzing around town
after S-7 years, is not to my mind justice.
The victim, after all, got a “death sen-
tence.”

I do differentiate between first-degree
murder and manslaughter. One is pre-
meditated and the other is not. Hanging,
in my mind, should deal with premedi-
tated murder, and a prison sentence
should deal with manslaughter. I total-
ly agree with you that society is dimin-
ished by murderers walking free. If we
value life so little that the victim
becomes unimportant and only the
criminal becomes important, then we
as‘a people are the lesser for it. Tam
originally from Canad#*I have watched

. from afar as the murder rates increased

there after the abolition of capital pun-
ishment. Many of the murders have
been committed by those released from
prison after incarceration for a prior
murder. Some are still on probation or





attorney — a Bahamian mother of two
young children — called The Tribune
to implore me to raise the Haitian
question once again.

She expressed deep concern that her

children’s generation will be forced to”

live in a Bahamas vastly different from
the one we know today, and totally
unrecognisable from the ordered soci-
ety it was 50 years ago.

“The only thing we have in common’

is skin colour,” she said of the Haitian
invaders, “It is a disaster waiting to
happen. They fly the Haitian flag
everywhere, even on their cars. They
carry Zopound stickers on their back
bumpers. They spray Zopound slogans
in the ghettoes.

“Someone needs to stand up and say
that Bahamians need to be protected
against their own lackadaisical, lazy
and corrupt ways.

“These people (immigrant criminals)
are endangering the tourism industry.
Everyone who flies'a Haitian flag is
someone who does not have an alle-
giance to the Bahamas. These are not
docile people. They are dangerous and
will destroy the nation if we don’t take
a stand.”

Her prognosis for the Bahamas on its
present course is not encouraging. “I
don’t think we have ten years. I think
we are at the point where it is getting
out of control. Unfortunately, you have
to make Bahamians hurt before they

- will rise to stop it. They have to feel it

in their pockets.”

It is important here to stress, as I
have before, that Haitians are not all
bad. On the contrary, they have many

e



FEEDBACK -

(horror of horrors) day passes, that for
some reason Canada loves to give to
criminals. Let us value human life to
the extent that society must be protect-
ed from predators. Spending our hard-
earned tax dollars to keep these people
in prison is a scandal. The Privy Coun-
citcannot possibly understand our situ-
ation here and Amnesty International
would be better served working in coun-
tries where a woman is stoned to death
for “allowing” herself to be raped by

- 11 men, while they walk free.

— Lois Major

In today’s Insight, you reported that
families of murdered victims marched in
support of capital punishment, on two
occasions last year. Kindly note that
families of murdered victims marched

‘on Labour Day and Independence Day,

2008, and-on Saturday, November 22,
2008. ;

_ Families and friends of murdered
victims "rushed" during the Junkanoo
celebrations on Boxing Day, 2008, and
New Year’s Day, 2009, with the Bush
Warriors in support of capital punish-
ment. Nevertheless, you have thrown a
powerful and noble blow for the com-
mencement of capital punishment as
the murderers have no fear for the law
because of our worthless politicians.

— Rodney Moncur

You can count me in among the
droves that are going to miss your well-
written, thought-provoking pieces when
you depart. Few articles fit that descrip-
tion more than your latest piece on cap-
ital punishment. I agree with the major-
ity of your points and I'm also on board
with ridding society of the proven wan-
ton killers.

Where my view differentiates from
your view is that I would require a stan-
dard of "no possible doubt" achieved by
the courts as opposed to the prevailing
"beyond reasonable doubt" in order

for a judge to have the option of pro- —

nouncing a death sentence.
In your article, at one point you say
"The argument is irrelevant...because

we have to assume the courts get things -

right." This would be wonderful, if it
were true, but you and I both know
that, not occasionally, but many, many
times the courts get things totally
wrong. In fact, in a parallel paragragh in
the same article, and to prove my
point, you say "..,the local courts areso
susceptible to corruption... ", Further-
more, you have also written on many
occasions, and Hagtéé wholehearted-

‘ly, on how inefficient and inept the legal

system and its practitioners are in this
country (and, indeed, the
world). Although you glossed

smartest of them are very smart, and
the most cultured of them very cul-
tured indeed. Haitian art is universally
admired. They are a people of sub-
stance. And the most pleasant of them
are as. pleasant as you will find any
where.

But they have never majored in gov-
ernance. Nor are they noted for mea-
sured responses to the routiné irrita-
tions of life. It’s their drive, their inner
strength, probably their impetuosity
and volatility, that prompts them to
risk their lives on treacherous seas to
make a future for themselves.

Ever since Dr Francois ‘Papa Doc’
Duvalier ruled Haiti from 1957 to 1971,
refugees from poverty and political
violence have been fleeing their home-
land for a better life in the Bahamas
and the United States. There is no
doubt that their plight is real and their
desire to escape wholly understand-
able.

Since the Duvalier family yielded
power in 1986, things have got worse,
not better. Jean-Claude Duvalier, Papa
Doc’s podgy son, is on record as saying
that his country has gone downhill
since his day — a claim which, ludi-
crous as it sounds, is actually true.

Brutal as they were (it is claimed

that Baby Doc was having political

opponents tortured and killed in the
basement of the National Palace on

. the day he flew into exile) the Duva-

liers brought a crude form of stability
to a fundamentally unstable nation.
Though whole families were whisked
from their homes at night, never to be
seen again, those who kept their heads
down and noses clean knew that, in
spite of everything, a perverse system
of law and order prevailed.
Subsequent governments have failed
to provide any kind of security to com-
pare with the Duvaliers’ odd mix of

- extreme oppression and paternalistic

merits, including a formidable work °

ethic and strong family values. The

patronage.

By the time Aristide — the left-wing
priest who proved to be as corrupt as
his predecessors — was catapulted
from office a second time in 2004, Haiti
was drifting out of control, with gangs
running wild in the city slums and
politicians at a loss.

Today, under President René Preval,
Haiti remains — officially — one of
the most dangerous places on earth,
where kidnappings have become com-
monplace and armed enforcers rule
the ghettoes.

So long as Haiti remains in a state of

chaos, and people go hungry as a result

‘of its ravaged crops and denuded farm-

land, the, desire {o escape will be as
compelling as it’s always been.

In the past, the Bahamas has
absorbed tens of thousands of Haitians

over this argument lightly with your
"Boeing engineers" analogy, if the riv-
eters screwed up their job as often as
the courts screw up theirs, you and I
would never consider flying again!
One has to remember that after a
man is executed there is no recourse
once it has been discovered a mistake
has been made. However, with the
growing advent of video, either by sur-
veillance cameras or the teenager's
ever-present camera phones, the night-
ly news programmes show us that there
is now an abundance of wanton killing
and destruction captured on cam-
era. This video "culture" is such a fast-
growing phenomenon, and our court
system so shamefully and hopelessly
clogged, that by the time any of the new
crop of killers get their day in court,
there will no doubt be indisputable
video evidence of enough of their atroc-
ities in order to assure everyone that
no innocents have been sentenced to

_ death.

Alternatively, if 30 people watch and
identify some maniac who walks in to a

‘yestaurant in Mumbai and starts indis-

criminately mowing down patrons with
a machine gun, then, by all means, take
him out and fry his ass! My only point is,
I think we should be ABSOLUTE-
LY...no, make that... DEAD SURE!:
— Perry Attfield
NP.

I APPRECIATED your article on
capital punishment. The book of all
books lays it out very clearly. There is
no getting away from it: if there contin-
ues to be slackness like we have, there
are bound to be consequences. -

— Male Caller «

YOU hold a mirror up to Bahamian
society. Your writing is so incisive, it’s
scary.

— Insight fan

I CANNOT help but congratulate
you on your article on hanging. I have
been a consistent supporter of capital
punishment all my life.

I fully support all of your points.

I could not help but note your omis-
sion (perhaps deliberate) of one of the
biggest benefits of capital punishment
and that is all of the government fund-
ing required to keep these beasts fed
and sheltered for all of their remaining
lives without any benefit when we could
be using those funds to educate chil-
dren not to become one of those beasts!
Or, we could feed and shelter the fam-

- ilies of the victims of these beasts with

those same funds.

In addition, since these beasts do not
have anything to lose, the longer they ©
are in prison, ‘the better chante “of them
trying td:escape and puttifig the prison
guards and the general public in har-
m's way. Bring on hanging!

Peter



into the lower end of the national econ-

omy, giving. them the yard jobs
Bahamians no longer wanted, and rely- -
ing on them to provide the work ethic
that was often lacking among home-
grown labour.

In the good times, the absorption
was not only possible, but in some com-
munities — Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
for instance — positively welcomed
because local labour was in such short
supply.

Now, of course, things are different:
The Bahamian economy is shrinking
fast, unemployment figures are rising,
disgruntlement is setting in, and there
is no guarantee that the good times
will roll anymore.

It requires no great leap of imagi-
nation to predict what might happen if
things get -worse, with Bahamians being
denied jobs made available to the
incomers.

“This is a time for real leadership,”
said my attorney informant, “I think
the government’s piecemeal approach
to immigration has failed. Those who
employ immigrants must be made to
realise that they will pay the price. .

“Zopound is very influential and
dangerous. They have links with gangs
on the American east coast. Their
markings are already visible in over-
the-hill areas. It’s time for something to
be done.”

As with most things in the Bahamas,
illegal immigration is worsened by cor-
ruption. It is known that some immi-
gration officers take bribes for turn-
ing their heads away from incoming
boats.

Some police officers accept! ‘protec-
tion money” from desperate Haitians
in the bush, allowing them to escape
capture for weekly pay-olts.

Bahamian boat captains are actively
engaged in human trafficking, helping
Haitians into the Bahamas en route to
Florida. There are even “safe houses”
here which are transit points for
refugees waiting for their false immi-
gration papers to arrive to facilitate
easy access to the United States.

The Bahamas faces crises on several
fronts, but none poses quite the same
level of risk as mass illegal immigration.

To counter the dangers, Bahamians
need to display the will required to
force firm action.

Economic necessity might just be
the spur. The alternative is too painful
to contemplate.

e What do you think? Fax 328-2398
or e-mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net

¢ JOHN MAROUIS is the author of
Papa Doc: Portrait of a Haitian Tyrant,
published by LMH Books.





E MANAGEMENT

) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS _



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NE at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
SSW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
NE at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet. 5-10 Miles 15° F























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Seen > : fe i. 2 ‘ : : i Pos E ; : NE at5-10 Knots. - 2-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 76° F
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MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

across the’
year...

Major/Tribune staff :

ite

iné

»
| Fel



_ Adeeply disturbing Tribune headline - ‘Haitian-Bahamian crime timebomb’ - has highlighted
again what INSIGHT has warned of repeatedly. Unless the Bahamas confronts its illegal immigration
problem, this country faces an enormous social and Selnaees crisis over the next 10 to 15 years...












th i fluential friends’ on the Eastern Road’are
I political and. domestic differences.

twe years after the Haitian Revo-

me Sot itresponsit c aalan and taking The eC Pies of Port- au-Prince oe

Tribuns to a low point in its history. © i 1
He said there was no e idence to back up my ‘send atithori € repo! ack to the State’ |; fed h ¢
fears and no suggestion at all that Haitians were Depar tgs, “f eee W nwateed ie m et the | same to Presi-
1gs of two introducing a violent strain into Bahamian er yhe wh studied Haitian hi ‘fo nt Jéar pra Ani tide on American
vidence that the denied Zopound ety. He refused to accept my contention that if
nt is now gaining ‘a firm footholdin you introduce’ pitbulls into a potcake pack, the
e clear evidence of what I pitbull strain will quickly become evident. An
pre _ he suggested that I owed an apol By to he Hait-
Unless the Bahamas overnment bee a grip - jan people,
—and.c ynfronts the single. biggest threat to this I told him at the time —'and do so again now’
“society — the uncontrolled influx of Haitian — that his protestations were hopelessly an
refugees — — there is a real chance that the glori-. recklessly adrift from reality, and that he ought
Ous” archipelago Bahamians call home will’ to have'’been more’ aware, ‘as a-senior cae
become a creolised extension of that unruly tue
‘nation to the south in under two decades.
The last time I foreshadowed this country’s




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The Tribune

| "_. BAHAMAS EDITION

i ?’m lovin’ it |

| HIGH 82F
‘Low 71F|

~ CLOUDY WITH |
“SHOWERS

Volume: 105 No.40
















MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

ine i





PLAY THE (}@Oe%
((SECRET SOUND))

CLUES INSIDE TODAY |



wl

resin)
Cree

‘timebomb’
STa aU TE

Ken yatta Gilson vee , '

"Senior co

INSIGHT





ty Tommy Turnquest said.

ES f cl ‘ APPOINTMENTS for the

Ps restructured senior command of

\ the Royal Bahamas Police Force .
was announced by-the Cabinet

: office yesterday, four days after

| ‘ : 15 senior officers were asked to

‘ accept early retirement packages.

! i : - The overhaul, carried out

Sa according to a strategic: review,




NGTNELE Gibson



fi By PAUL G:TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

INDEPENDENT Kennedy

_ MP Kenyatta Gibson will publicly
announce his decision to join the
governing Free National Move-
ment within the week, The Tri-'
_bune was told. eae i
In an exclusive interview with

one of the MP’s campaign gener- .

Independent MP set to
‘make announcement
within the week’

als, it has been revealed that Mr
Gibson has been meeting and
, consulting with his team in the
- Kennedy area over the Christmas
holiday. According to the source
who spoke on condition of
anonymity, the MP advised them

on his decision in order ‘to gain.

the relevant feedback before he
makes his official statement.
Having held most of these dis-
cussions privately, the source indi-
cated that Mr Gibson was
adamant that he would not take a
Cabinet post — nor will he enter-
tain a chairmanship “at this time.”

SEE page 10:

Hopes for sexual offenders registry

" MBy ALEX MISSICK
‘Tribune Staff Reporter

SOCIAL Services State Minister Loretta Butler Turner hopes gov- .

ernment will consider implementing a sexual offenders registry to noti-
fy the public of the identity of persons convicted of a sexual offence.

__ This follows allegations made against.a teacher by a former male stu-
derit of the Eight Mile Rock High School in Grand Bahama last week.

SEE page 10











and efficiently carry out its man-

THE WIDOW of the late ZNS sportscaster Phil Smith, Blossie Smith, is supported as she puts arose on his

seeks to streamline the top ranks
to allow the force to effectively



date, Minister of National Securi-



coffin on Saturday. Phil Smith, who died on December 28th, was laid to rest at Lakeview Cemetery.

Archbishop speaks out
against death penalty

¢ SEE PAGE SEVEN

Man is rushed to

The mave reduces the number
of assistant and acting assistant
commissioners to have one com-
missioner, one acting deputy com-*
missioner, one Senior assistant
commissioner, four assistant com-
missioners, seven chief superin-

‘tendents and 28 superintendents.

Promotions have been given to
a number of officers, while 15
senior Officers, all over age 55,
accepted severance packages.

Senior Assistant Commissioner
of Police Ellison Greenslade is
now acting Deputy Commissioner
of Police; Assistant Commission-
er of Police Marvin Dames.
becomes Senior Assistant Com-
missioner of Police;,and Quinn
McCartney, Raymond Gibson,
Shannondor Evans and Hulan
Hanna are appointed Assistant
Commissioners of Police.

SEE page 10

Mitchell hits
out at govt
over removal
of officers

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

OPPOSITION spokesman on
public affairs Fred. Mitchell blast-
ed the government’s removal of
15.senior police officers from the
RBPF as “unlawful” and “ungra-
cious” and called on the minister
of national security to apologise
to the officers for the manner of
their dismissals.

He said the officers did not .

‘retire voluntarily but did so with a

proverbial “gun to their heads”
after RBPF leadership said if they.
did not accept the package, they
would be dismissed.

hospital after stabbing

A 27-YEAR-OLD man from Elizabeth Estates,
found suffering from several serious stab wounds to
his body, was rushed to hospital Saturday night.

Police found the man in Cypress Court, Eliza-
beth Estates, shortly before 11pm on January 10,

Press Liaison officer for the Royal Bahamas
Police Force Walter Evans said: “An investiga-
tion is underway to ascertain how this man was
injured and who was responsible for causing such
an act to take place.”

Anyone with any information that could assist
the police investigation.should call 919 or Crime
Stoppers anonymously at 328-8477.

In a separate incident police arrested three men)
who were driving in Buen Retiro off Shirley Street

SEE page 10

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net



“They have embarrassed these
individuals, stripped them of their
dignity and condemned them to
holding their heads down as if. ,
they have done something wrong,
when nothing of the kind has
been said,” he said in part.

_ “The PLP stands with these
aggrieved officers as.we do with
any one who has a grievancé
against this administration. We
stand ready to help. I urge the
‘officers to stand tall and encour-
age them and their families to
work with us to help remove the
Free National Movement from
power. That is the ultimate

SEE page 10















CATHOLIC Archbishop Patrick Pinder yes-
terday spoke out against the moral and spiritual
implications of the death penalty and called for col-
lective voices of reason-to publicly oppose capital
punishment. qe

He chronicled various “flaws” the Catholic
Church has observed in relation to the adminis-
tration of the death sentence and questioned the

- validity of the widely held argument that the death
penalty is a deterrent to crime.
; : “Throughout human history, one of the thorni-.
. {| — est has been the question of capital punishment.

; \ , Should we, or should we not, maintain or enforce
341-6593 / 377-6593

SEE page 10
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PAGE 2, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

eee

Reginald Ferguson



Ellison Edroy Greenslade

Marvin Dames

Quinn William McCartney



Hulan Anthony Hanna

Raymond Allan Gibson

THE TRIBUNE

Shannondor Harold Evans



Profiles of restructured Senior Command of RBPF

REGINALD FERGUSON
OPM ACTING
COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

REGINALD Ferguson
joined the RBPF on October

13, 1965. He rose steadily —

through the ranks of the

Police Force and has worked:

in many areas.of the force,
including the Central Division,
the Commercial Crime Sec-
tion, the Special Intelligence
Branch, the New Providence
District, the Drug Enforce-
ment Unit, the Airport Divi-
sion and Assistant Commis-
sioner — Crime.

Commissioner Ferguson
has had vast training in police
management and leadership,
both regionally and interna-
tionally.

He is the recipient of the
Queen’s Police Medal, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
medals for Long Service and
Good Conduct and Meritori-











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Mr Ferguson is married and
is the father of four sons.



ELLISON EDROY GREENSLADE
QPAUACTING DEPUTY,
COMANSSIONER OF POLICE

Ellison Greenslade joined
the RBPF on May’ 17, 1979.
He has served in the following
areas: Traffic Division; Secu-
rity and Intelligence Branch;

. Computer Development Cen-
_tre; Research and Planning

Unit; Information Technology
and Statistics Section; North
Eastern Division; Central
Division; Assistant Commis-
sioner — Grand Bahama and
Northern Bahamas District. '

He holds an Associates
Degree in Business Adminis-

‘tration from the. College of the

Bahamas and a Master’s
degree in Business from the
University of Miami. Cur-













rently a doctoral candidate
with the University of
Phoenix, Arizona he also
holds a Post Graduate Cer-

. tificate in Police Management

and Criminal Justice from the
University of Leicester.

In January, 2008 he started
a one year secondment with
the Royal Canadian Mount-
ed Police (RCMP), in Ottawa
Canada. He received several
honours throughout his
career, including: Queen’s
Police Medal; The Prime Min-
ister’s Above and Beyond
Award; The Police Force’s
Medal for Meritorious Ser-
vice; The Police Force’s Medal
for Long Service, and Good
Conduct.

Mr Greenslade is married
to Kimberley Greenslade, nee
Morley, and is the father of
five children.

AAANES



MARVIN DAMES
SENIOR ASSISTANT
COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

Marvin Dames joined the
RBPF on March 1,1988 and
has worked in the following
areas of the RBPF: Crime
Prevention and Community
Relations Section; Carmichael
Division; Operation Sweep,
Eleuthera District - Harbour
Island Complaints and Disci-

pline Unit; Mobile Division;..

Western Division; Drug
Enforcement Unit; Central
Detective Unit; Air and Sea-
port Security; and Assistant
Commissioner — New Provi-
dence District.

Mr Dames holds.a Bache-

lor of Arts degree in Crimi- .

nology from Ohio State Uni-

versity, Ohio and a Post Grad-

uate Certificate in Criminal
Justice from the University of
Leicester, United Kingdom.
He also holds a Post Graduate

HIGGS & JOHNSON WELCOMES
“se = _Sands-Feaste to the Firm. Mrs, Sands-Feaste joins the

‘Practice Groups. She has exterisive legal experience in
. corporate and commercial law and international trust and



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company administration and has acted in all aspects of
commercial transactions including mergers and acquisi-
tions, asset financing, private placements of offshore secu-
rities, irivestinent furid structuring arid creation and estate
planning. Christel has represented both domestic and
foreign clients in a variety of businesses. including the fi-
nancial services arid hospitality industries,

Prior to her admission to the Partnership of Higgs & John-
son in 2009, Christel served as Vice President - Legal for a
family office and a leading Bahamian development com-
pany.

Christel was educated in the United Kingdom and holds
ati LLB frori Reading University and an LLM in banking
and finance law from the London School of Economics
and Political Science. She was called to the bars of Eng:
land and Wales and the Commonwealth of The Bahamas |
int 1998, ) 5
Christel is a member of the Bahamas Bar Association. and
the Funds Working Group of The Bahamas Financial Ser-
vices Board, In 2006, Christel was named as a leading
commercial lawyer in The Bahamas in the International
Financial Law Review 1000.





















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Certificate in Police Manage-
ment from the Institute of

Legal Executives...
In January, 2008 he started

a one year secondment at the.

Toronto Police Service in
Toronto, Canada. Mr Dames
has received several honours
throughout his career, includ-
ing: the Police Force’s Medal
for Meritorious Service and
the US Drug Enforcement
Administration Administra-
tor’s Award.

Mr Dames and his wife
Stacey have one son.



QUINN WILLIAM MCCARTNEY
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Quinn McCartney joined
the RBPF on January 1, 1983.
He worked in several areas
during his career: Serious
Crime and Drug Section —
Criminal Investigation
Department, Forensic Science
Section; Government House
as Aide de Camp to the Gov-
ernor General; Police Training

College; Office of the Assis-

tant Commissioner — Man-
agement and Support Ser-
vices.

Mr McCartney is a two-
time.graduate of the College
of The Bahamas where. he
obtained Associate Degrees
in Chemistry with Biology,
and Management. He also
holds a Bachelor of Science

degree in Chemistry from.

McGill University, Montreal,
Canada, and’a Master of Sci-
ence degree in Forensic Sci-
ence from the University of
Strathclyde, Glasgow, Scot-
land. He also holds a Post
Graduate Diploma in Police
Management from the Uni-
versity of Leicester, United
Kingdom, and Level 7 Execu-
tive Diploma in Strategic

Management. from the Char- —
tered Management Institute, .

United Kingdom. :
Mr McCartney is the recip-

lent of the Police Force’s

Medal for Meritorious Ser-
vice, and the Medal for Long
Service and Good Conduct.

’ He.is the father of two. chil-
dren. : esc



HULAN ANTHONY HANNA
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Hulan. Hanna joined the
RBPF on June 8, 1978. His
career has taken him through-
out the Force where he served
in the following areas: Fire
Services (New Providence and
Grand Bahama); Central
Division; Western Division;
Southern Division; Commu-
nity Relations Section; Press

Liaison Office; Southern

Bahamas District; District
Headquarters; Office of the
Assistant Commissioner —

. Management and Support

Services.
Mr Hanna holds a Bachelor

of Arts degree in Business:

Administration with Honours
from Sojourner Douglass Col-
lege, Baltimore. He also has
a Post Graduate Certificate in
Criminal Justice and Police
Management from the Uni-
versity of Leicester, United
Kingdom. He has also. partic-
ipated in courses at the Flori-
da State Fire College. He is
currently pursuing a Master’s

degree in Psychology and’

Counselling.

Mr Hanna is the recipient
of the Police Force’s Medal
for Meritorious Service, and
the Medal for Long Service
and Good Conduct.

He and his wife are the par-
ents of three children.

NN



RAYMOND ALLAN GIBSON
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Raymond Gibson joined the —

RBPF on June 26; 1975 and
has worked in a number of



_

Academy,

areas including: Mobile Divi-
sion; Commercial Crime Sec-
tion; Interpol; Complaints and
Corruption Unit; Serious
Crime Squad; Commission of
Inquiry; Central Detective
Unit; Drug Enforcement Unit;
Office of the Assistant Com-

‘missioner — Crime and Intelli-

gence.
- He holds.a Master’s degree
in International Trust and is
also a Certified Paralegal
Executive, from the Institute
of Legal Executives, London.

A graduate of the FBI
he has also
obtained extensive interna-
tional training in areas of
Crime Management. He is the
recipient of the RBPF’s Medal
for Meritorious Service, and
the Medal for Long Service
and Good Conduct.

He is married and is the

‘father of three children.



SHANNONDOR HAROLD EVANS
ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER
OF POLICE

Shannondor Evans joined
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force on February 7, 1974.
He has worked in the follow-
ing areas: Southern Division;
Mobile Division; Criminal,
Investigation Department
(New Providence); Drug
Enforcement Unit (Grand

-Bahama); Eastern Division

(Grand Bahama); Eastern
Division (New Providence);
Central Division (New Provi-

dence); Police Training Col-

lege; Office of the Assistant
Commissioner — New Provi-
dence District.

He has a Post Graduate
Certificate in Criminal Justice
and Police Management from
the University of Leicester,
United Kingdom. He is cur-
rently pursuing a Master’s
degree in Criminology, Crim-
inal Justice, Police Manage-
ment and Public Safety, from

-the University of Leicester,
United Kingdom.

Mr Evans is married to Jus-
tice Estelle Evans and they
have five children.

Authorities search
for heavyset ninja

ll WEST PALM BEACH, Fla.

A NINJA is lurking in the shad-
ows of Palm Beach County, but
apparently he’s more like Chris
Farley in “Beverly Hills Ninja”
than Liam Neeson in “Batman
Begins”, according to Associated
Press

The Palm Beach County Sher-
iff’s Office says a heavyset man
with a visible potbelly unsuccess-
fully tried to steal two different
ATMs over the past two weeks.
Security video from the ATMs
showed the unidentified man
dressed in a black ninja outfit with
a hood that showed only his eyes.

Authorities say the first attempt
was made at a bank on Dec. 29,
and another attempt was made at
a Walgreens on Tuesday. Author-
ities did not say how the man tried
to steal the machines.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 3



Students
celebrate
Majority Rule

m@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

HIGH SCHOOL stu-
dents celebrated freedom
and honoured the sacrifices
of their forefathers on the
forty-second anniversary of
Majority Rule at the Col-
lege of the Bahamas on Fri-
day.

The School of Social Sci-
ences’ event, under the
theme, “January 10, 1967,
Pivotal Moment in
Bahamian History, Voices
from the 21st Century” -
invited students from
schools across New Provi-
dence to mark the anniver-
sary of a crucial day in
Bahamian history. .

Speakers included three
Bahamian Rhodes scholars
who discussed the connec-
tion between Majority
Rule, education, culture,
athletics and health, and
FNM chairman Senator
Johnley Ferguson, who
spoke on the significance of
Majority Rule and empha-
sised the importance of
education.

He told students:
“Majority Rule has no
colour, it has no political
stance, it has the blood
sweat and tears of the
Bahamian people.”

The senator said educa-
tion had come a long way
since 1967, as he reflected
on when he went to school
for only three and a half
months out of the year.

He said: “Destination
and situation cannot form
your future.

“What is in you will
shape you regardless.

“Make it at your pace,
make it at your level, but at
the end of the day make it
for your nation, your family
and your God.”

Rhodes scholar and pro-
fessor Christian Campbell
said although it has‘been ~
more.than 40 years since.:::
majority rule, Bahamian °

society still fails to value » *:

the creativity of Bahamians
and embrace their ability to
‘generate new ideas.

Dr Campbell said: “The
thing about Majority Rule
is that it allowed for so
many opportunities in
terms of education, but one
of the things I don’t think
the elders paid attention to
was setting up institutions
to reaffirm what it is to be a
practising, creative
Bahamian.”

For fellow Rhodes schol-
ar and professor Desiree’
Cox, freedom is at the heart
of Majority Rule.

She said: “Majority Rule
is ultimately about the free-
dom to choose your life the
way you would have it be,
and to have the tools to be
able to do that.

“The freedom to choose
the path you will live, and
the definition you will have,
for what you choose to do.”

Dr Cox said students
should tap into the free-
doms their parents and
ancestors created for them
to have an education.

“They made it possible
for you to have the tools to
choose your destiny and to
be self aware,” she said.

“You will have to learn
how to honour the old and
fearlessly represent the
new — that is your chal-
lenge.”

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MITCHELL ALSO AGITATES FOR MAJORITY RULE AS A DAY OF OBSERVANCE

MP calls for the government to enact
National Heroes, Honours legislation

AS THE country remembers the day of
Majority Rule, member of Parliament for
Fox Hill Fred Mitchell called on -govern-

: ° ment to enact the proposed National

Heroes Day and National Honours Day
legislation as a method of preserving
Bahamian history.

Mr Mitchell is also agitating government.
to mark Majority Rule as a day of Nation-.

al Observance.

“When in the last Cabinet, we made a
decision to move for the creation of Nation-
al Honours and to set aside the second
Monday in October as National Heroes
Day, we settled that distinction. Today,
both bills are passed in the legislature but
neither has been brought into force. .

Contributions

“The National Heroes Day Bill would
set aside the second Monday in October
to observe the contributions of all Nation-
al heroes to the country this would include
a list as long as the country would like. It
would also make it possible for someone to
be officially declared a national hero. It
would establish local honours, and local
honour societies,” he said.

He said that upon her resignation, former
director of culture Nicolette Bethel
“lamented that the legislation was not
brought into force and that the work of the
cultural commission that looked into all of

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Turner, Committee Members.

these matters seems largely to have been
discarded.”

Said Mr Mitchell: “I have personally
raised these matters on the floor of the
House. The answers from the Prime Min-
ister have as usual been contemptuous. I

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. the policy of the government even though

they voted for it when they were in Oppo-
sition”.

On remembering Majority Rule as a day
of national observance, Mr Mitchell said:
“There are certain ceremonies that the state
should support to mark the day. It should
also mean that the schools should take spe-
cial note of the day and that churches
around the nation should be encouraged
to take special measures to observe the
day.

“This should also mean that the curricu-
lum of subject of history should reflect what
happened on 10th January.

Importance

“Some people simply do not know what
happened and it is important that the story
be told and be known. Just the facts. This is
the way to treat it with the due solemnity
and importance that it deserves”.

On January 10, 1967, the Progressive
Liberal Party led by Sir Lynden Pindling
won 18 seats in the general election while
the United Bahamian Party (UBP) led by
Sir Roland Symonette also obtained 18
seats.

Sir Randol Fawkes, the lone Indepen-
dent Labour MP, voted to sit with the Pro-
gressive Liberal Party, enabling them to
form a government and on January 14, 1967
Majority Rule Day became official.















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PAGE 4, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



ese Se i SUS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES.

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986.
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Tax cuts for US teachers

OVER the next couple of years, two very
big countries, America and China, will give
birth to something very important. They’re each
going to give birth to close to $1 trillion worth of

‘economic stimulus — in the form of tax cuts,
infrastructure, highways, mass transit and new
energy systems. But a lot is riding on these two
babies: If China and America each give birth to
a pig — a big, energy-devouring, climate-spoil-
ing stimulus hog — our youth are done for. It
will be the burden of their lifetimes. If they
each give birth to a gazelle — a lean, energy-effi-
cient and innovation-friendly stimulus — it will
be the opportunity of their lifetimes.

So here’s hoping that our new administra-
tion and Congress will be guided in shaping the
stimulus by reading John Maynard Keynes in
one hand — to get as much money injected as
quickly as possible — and by reading “Rising
Above the Gathering Storm: Energizing and
Employing America for a Brighter Economic
Future” with the other.

“Gathering Storm” was the outstanding 2005
report produced by our National Academies
on how to keep America competitive by vastly
improving math and science education, invest-
ing in long-term research, recruiting top stu-
dents from abroad and making U.S. laws the
most conducive in the world for innovation.

You see, even before the current financial

crisis, we were already in a deep competitive”
*.. home —.-and offer full:scholarships to needy
~’students who want to go to a public university or

“hole —a long period.in which too many people

were making money from money, or-Hioney ,

from flipping houses or hamburgers, and too
few people were making money by making new
stuff, with hard-earned science, math, biology
and engineering skills.

The financial crisis just made the hole deep-
er, which is why our stimulus needs to be both
big and smart, both financially and educationally
stimulating. It needs tobe able to produce not
only more shovel-ready jobs and shovel-ready
workers, but more Google-ready jobs and Win-
dows-ready and knowledge-ready workers.

If we spend $1 trillion on a stimulus and just
get better highways and bridges — and not a

new Google, Apple, Intel or Microsoft — your

kids will,thank you for making it so much easi-
er for them to commute to the unemployment
office or mediocre jobs.

Barack Obama-gets it, but I’m not sure Con-
gress does. “Yes,” Obama said Thursday, “we'll
put people to work repairing crumbling roads,
bridges and schools by eliminating the backlog
of well-planned, worthy and needed infrastruc-

, ture projects. But we’ll also do more to retrofit
America for a global economy.” Sure that
means more smart grids and broadband high-
ways, he added, but it also “means investing in

. can’t bail out a generation,”

the science, research and technology that will
lead to new medical breakthroughs, new dis-
coveries and entire new industries.”

But clean-tech projects like intelligent grids
and broadband take a long time to implement.
Can we stimulate both our economy and our
people in time? Maybe rather than just giving
everyone a quick $1,500 to hit the mall to buy
flat-screen TVs imported from China, or creat-
ing those all-important green-collar jobs for
low-skilled workers — to put people to work
installing solar panels and insulating homes —
we should also give everyone who is academi-
cally eligible and willing a quick $5,000 to go
back to school. Universities today are the
biggest employers in many congressional dis-
tricts, and they’re all having to downsize.

My wife teaches public school in Montgomery
County, ‘Md., where more and more teachers
can’t afford to buy homes near the schools
where they teach, and now have long, dirty
commutes from distant suburbs. One of the
smartest stimulus moves we could make would
be to eliminate federal income taxes on all pub-
lic schoolteachers so more talented people
would choose these careers. I’d also double the
salaries of all highly qualified math and science
teachers, staple green cards to the diplomas ‘of
foreign students who graduate from any U.S.
university in math or science — instead of sub-
sidizing their educations and then sending them

community college for the next four years.

JFK took us to the moon. Let BHO take
America back to school.

But that will take time. There’s simply no
shortcut for a stimulus that stimulates minds
not just salaries. “You can bail out a bank; you
says the great
American inventor, Dean Kamen, who has
designed everything from the Segway to artifi-
cial limbs. “You can print money, but you can’t
print knowledge. It takes 12 years.”

Sure, we’ll waste some money doing that.
That will happen with bridges, too. But a bridge
is just a bridge. Once it’s up, it stops stimulating.
A student who normally would not be inter-
ested in science but gets stimulated by a better
teacher or more exposure to.a lab, or a scientist
who gets the funding for new research, is poten-
tially “the next Steve Jobs or Bill Gates. They
create good jobs for years. Perhaps more bridges
can bail us out of a depression, but only more
Bills and Steves can bail us into prosperity.

(This article was written by Thomas L. Fried-
man —

c.2009 New ie Times News Service ).



Why Jehovah's
Witnesses should
choose to serve
in government

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It would be the wish of any
government around the world,
including The Bahamas, to have
as its civil servants people who

_ are of high moral character,

inordinately ethical, satisfyingly
competent, and committed to
excellence. Fortunately, it is my
firmly held belief that that cal-
iber of people are sprinkled
throughout the Bahamas public
service and certainly through-
out the private sector.

However, only dotting the
governmental landscape with
these types of people will not
suffice. I look forward to the
day when these examples will
become the norm in our civil
service. Wishful thinking, I
know; reality, maybe never. But
I have been told, and I believe
that if you shoot for the stars,
and don’t reach, maybe you will
land on the moon.

To me, the stars represent a .

government filled to capacity

‘ with Jehovah’s Witnesses. I

know more than a few mem-




wees

letters@tribur




lemedia.net



bers of that organization, and
in my humble opinion the
description of the ideal civil ser-
vant would be that of a Witness.
It is a colossal pity that Jeho-
vah’s Witnesses choose not to
participate in governing the
country at any meaningful level
(because of their religious
beliefs). Nevertheless, they are
not totally averse to working
for the government. You'll
excuse me for saying so, but I
find that to be hypocritical and
irresponsible.

Jehovah’s Witnesses benefit
from the governmental function
just like everyone else. And it is
unfortunate that their religion
does not permit them to reach
for the stars (in any endeavour),
including governing the coun-
try (at any level), so that their
material involvement would be

greatly assisting this country in
forward development.

High moral character, inor-
dinate ethical behaviour, satis-
fying competence and commit-
ment to excellence are not
exclusive to Jehovah’s Witness-
es. Others in government and
in the private sector display
these characteristics as well. But
Jehoyah’s Witnesses have been
relatively successful in ingrain-
ing these traits in their mem-
bers in a well-run, worldwide
organization.

It is my belief that if the pow-
ers that be within the Jehovah’s
Witnesses Organization would
cease and desist from the sup-.
pression of its members’ collec-
tive and individual potential,
then governance in any coun-
try around the world would be.
redefined (including The
Bahamas).

MARVIN G.
LIGHTBOURN
Nassau,

January 10, 2009 '

The famous Nassau Straw Market
shocker and ‘The Forgotten Man’

EDITOR, The Tribune.

A report in The Tribune Busi-’

ness on the Straw market as
described by a professional work-
ing on the plans — is a shocker.

The projected cost of the straw
market rose from eighteen mil-
lion to somewhere between 29
and 36 million. Taking the mid-
point projection of 33 million, the
per capita cost for 300,000
Bahamians is about $110. ‘Con-
sidering the portion of the popu-
lation that are not earning any
income (children and retired) the
amount is higher for income earn-
ers.

Clearly the PLP government
“lost their heads.”

In September 2007 The Nas-
sau Institute researched opera-
tions of the Straw Market. Some
of the findings were:

Licensed vendors pay an annu-
al rent of $100 per year with no
requirement to sell Bahamian
made products or straw goods.
Over 50 per cent sell no straw
and/or Bahamian-made products.

’ Six hundred and five stalls
were licensed, but information as
to whether the rents were current
—was not known or not available.

Subletting is illegal, however
those operating the stalls were
mostly Haitian and Jamaican.
Over 50 per cent of the stalls sell
knock-offs of name brands in vio-
lation of copyright laws.

It is time to ask whether a

straw market on Bay Street is an
asset or an unaffordable liabili-
ty. Rental income. is negligible
relative to the investment. The
result is a government subsidy for
a few individual lessees.

There is a notion that the
country needs a Straw Market as
a shopping experience for
tourists.

Whether true or not is ques-
tionable. However, there is no
question about the degraded
image for Bay Street as a'shop-
ping destination when non-
Bahamians are hawking cheap
knock-offs and imported sou-
venirs.

To build a market for the cost
originally intended ($18,000,000)
is morally wrong because it places

the cost burden on the popula-
tion that derives no material ben-
efit and may even be harmed by
the unsavoury image. The days
are long gone when the market
added “local culture” and the fun
of bargaining for Bahamian-made
straw work.

When grandiose plans for a
government project capture the
minds of politicians the:sky is the

limit and the humble tax-payer is
‘ignored.

William Graham Sumner

-called him “The Forgotten Man”

— “He works, he votes, generally
he prays — but he always pays”.

' The Nassau Institute
Nassau,
J anuary 4, 2009

A public service gem

EDITOR, The ‘Tribune.

Once ina while, you run across a gem in the public service.
This week, I had occasion to visit the National Insurance Office |

in Fox Hill twice in as many days.

T needed an NIB card for my son and, it later transpired, an

updated one for me.

Ms. Sheena Forbes dealt with me with such cheerful efficiency
that I was in and out of NIB within five minutes of filling out the:
required form. In fact, everyone I encountered at NIB in Fox

ATHENA DAMIANOS
Nassau,
January 8, 2009

| Hill was pleasant and helpful, I found it so refreshing.

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PEARMACEUTICA

A leading global, research-based
pharmaceutical company seeks a qualified
person for the position of:

MEDICAL SALES REPRESENTATIVE

The medical rep will be responsible for
promoting pharmaceutical brands within the
healthcare community in The Bahamas.

Skills & Educational Requirements

/ Bachelor's degree in medical sciences, allied
health, or business administration

/ Effective communication and ‘presentation skills
Effective time management, planning, and
organizing skills

J Proficiency in a variety of computer applications

Jf Self-motivated team player

/ Previous experience in pharmaceutical detailing -
would be an asset

Candidates should possess a reliable motor
vehicle, be willing to travel to the family islands,
-to the U.S., and other foreign countries.

Please send application letter and resumé by
January 16, 2009 to:

MEDICAL REP
P.O. Box N-7504
Nassau, Bahamas
or Fax: 393-0440

We thank all applicants for their interest: however,
only short-listed candidates will be contacted.


THE TRIBUNE







nc eencececcereccecenerseenenteseneensnceacnegeececsasenen seers z

Labour Dept
to. conduct —
BIEMSU poll

DION FOULKES, Minister
of Labour and Social Develop-
ment, announced that the
Department of Labour will con-
duct a poll on February 2 to
determine whether the majority
of employees in the bargaining
unit of the Bahamas Industrial
Engineers, Managerial, and
Supervisory Union (BIEMSU)
at the Grand Bahama Power

Company still wish BIEMSU to
‘represent them as Bargaining
Agent. . ;
- Minister Foulkes was peti-
tioned last year by more than 25
“per cent of the members of the
!Bargaining Unit in accordance
- with Section 43 of the Industrial
pRelations Act which provides
yfor the revocation of a union’s
jrecognition as a bargaining
agent.

INS announces
-padio adjustments

- THE Broadcasting Corpora-
etion of The Bahamas today
iannounced significant adjust-
ments to its music format and’
the creation of new radio pro-
grammes intended to further
“enhance and Bahamianise the
content on 1540 A.M. “The
‘National Voice of the
“Bahamas.”

Effective Monday, January
12, 2009, ZNS 1540 A.M. will
adopt an all Bahamian format
showcasing different genres of
Bahamian music inclusive of
Rake ‘N Scrape, Junkanoo,
Goombay, Gospel, “Ole Skool
Music”, Folk songs and Bal-
lads. Local R & B and Hip
‘Hop by Bahamian artists also
will be featured as well as top
-Bahamian hits. A special seg-
ment will be included where
new music of all genres by
-Bahamians will be exposed
-dubbed “Pump it or Dump it”.
y “The Corporation is in pos-
session of one of the largest

- collection of local music, which
sdates back to the early years
cof 1540 A.M.,” said Edwin
Lightbourn, General Manager.
A significant amount of this :
‘music collection has been digi-
tized from its original vinyl for: 71
mat tobe used'in the: néw:i
music format.” PEG

TAaQMiss ete prt Vi











) : LOCAL NEWS |
- ¢. LESLIE MILLER SAYS JOBS NEEDED IN SECTORS OTHER THAN TOURISM AND FINANCE
In brief = : :

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 5



Former minister: economy
needs to be diversified

By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

FORMER Trade and Industry
Minister Leslie Miller urged the
country to seek ways to diversify
the economy in view of the insta-
bility in the tourism market, the
country’s number one industry.

He also said he believes
employers are using the econom-
ic downturn as an excuse to fire
employees.

“We need jobs in other sectors
of our economy other than
,tourism and the financial sector.
Let us diversify our place. It boils
down to the inability to make a
decision for and on behalf of the
welfare of the majority of the
Bahamian people. Therefore they
sit in safe harbour — tourism,
tourism, tourism allowing persons
like Kerzner to become gods in
this country,” Mr Miller said.

Mr Miller said because the
tourism is an “easy sell”, govern-
ment does not have o make tough
decisions regarding diversifying
the economy. However, anything
that takes nerves, guts and
courage governments shy away
from, he said.

“No one wants to expand and
diversify our economic base.
When times are good in the
tourism sector is when we should
have supplemental industries to
get involved in the domestic econ-
omy,” Mr Milller said.

Mr Miller said that if there is
one time Bahamians should now
fully support locally made prod-
ucts, these are the times.

“We can in fact increase our
domestic production to enable

‘those local entities to produce

more products that we use in our :

daily lives and create more jobs
for those Bahamians who are
going to be displaced in. our num-
ber one industry,” Mr Miller said.

Mr Miller referred to the LNG
project as he claims the Bahamas
continues to play games with this
resource.

“Tt is nonsensical to me that
these games are still being played.
It was played by the Cliristie gov-
erniment and it’s being played by
the Ingraham government. Both



Leslie Miller

of these guys are playing with the
welfare of our country and I
don’t appreciate it,” Mr Miller
said.

Mr Miller said LNG has a
potential income stream of some
$1.2 billion over 25 years and the
government continues to this day
not to approve the LNG propos-
al. : ;
“The funds that we can dérive
from LNG can assist in putting
up a new hospital, you can build
schools, fix some of the social ills
we have in this country, but the
government prefers to wait for
the foreigner to put up another
hotel,” Mr Miller said.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



— : WeyeyVM\ =e | ,

Hundreds

i By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynold@tribunemedia.net

P

HUNDREDS of Junkanooers joined
mourners to give Saxons drummer Adwin
Moss a final Junkanoo rush to the grave.

A funeral for the 39-year-old tum-tum
drummer who died suddenly while “rush-
ing” on Bay Street on Boxing Day morn-
ing was attended by hundreds of friends
and relatives at the Church of God in
Deveaux Street, off East Street, on Sat-
urday.

Former Prime Minister Perry Christie,

Minister of Health Hubert Minnis, PLP




PROSPECTUS



BAHAMAS REGISTE









14th June, 2008.

paid on amounts so refunded. -






price are given below :-








Rate of Interest

11/32% Above Prime Rate

INTEREST

Stock is repaid.



The Stock will
Applications wi

Issue of Stock



January, 2009 a





Applications

Application Forms App iGations for th



following banks:





Issued under The Bahamas Registered Stock Act, a



1/4% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2028
9/32% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 -| _15;000,000.00 | © 100.00
5/16% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2030 17,226,000.00 | 100.00

Bahamas Registered Stock 2031.



CHARGE UPON CONSOLIDATED FUND

The principal monies and interest represented by the Stock aretharged Y
Consolidated Fund and assets of The Commonwealth of The Ba

SUPPLEMENT A

oo
be,vissued

ei

commence at a

hm. On (5th fF

sy, *% :
The Stock will bain units ee
eo ae

plications must be for BS100.00 ora multiple of that sum.



Prospectus and may be obt
Treasury Department (Marlborough ‘Stree

PaO PY ER Se ‘

Finance Corpdfation of Babamas Limited

MP Bernard Nottage, and Chief Super-
intendent Hulan Hanna also paid their
respects to the deceased.

At the end of the four-hour service Mr
Moss’s remains was taken to Soldier Road
in a motorcade flanked by environmental
health-vehicles driven by his colleagues.
Mr Moss was an employee of Environ-
mental Health.

Saxons, Valley Boys, Music Makers,
One Family, Roots and Colours mem-
bers carried the coffin at the front of a
procession in Soldier Road and played
gospel music as they rushed to the Wood-

‘lawn Gardens cemetery where Mr Moss

was laid to rest. :

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
RED STOCK 2028, 2029, 2030, 2031, 2032 AND 2033
ISSUE OF B$107,226, 000.00

nd authorized by Resolutions of the House of Assembly,

Applications will be received by The Banking Department beginning at 9:30 am on 8th January, 2009 and
will close at 3:00pm on 14th January, 2009. Allocations will.commence at 9:3
will cease at 3:00p.m. on 19th January, 2009.

If the total subscriptions exceed the sum of B$107,226,000.00 (Nominal) partial allotment will be made to
subscribers, and a proportionate refund will be made as soon as possible after allotment. No interest will be

The date of this Prospectusis ___—_—«. 2009

The Government of The Commonwealth of The Bahamas invites applications for Bahamas Registered
Stock totalling B$107,226,000.00. The Stock will be available in a range of maturity dates; the earliest being
repayable in 2028 and the latest in 2033. The total amount of Stock offered, the rate of interest and the issue




Name of Stock






3/8% Above Prime Rate | Bahamas Registered Stock 2032 20 000,000.00 | 100.00
{3/32% Above Prime Rate: | Bahamas Registered Stock 2033 20,000,000.00 | 100.00
i al ee peace aoe ob O26 OOOO ee

The Stock shall be repaid on 19th January, -in the year appearing in the name of the Stock.

The Stock will bear mterest.from. 19th January, 2009, at the rate shown against the name of the Stock aethe
percent per annum over, the Prime Rate (ic. the prime commercial interest-rate from time to time fixed*by
". Clearing banks carrying on-business.in the Island. of New. Providence. in. The. Bahamas... jfthere shall be
~ difference between thefh, then'that which is'fixed’ by Royal Bank of Canada). Interest shall be payable half:
yeatly commencing on 19th July, 2009. and thereafter on 19th January and 19th’ July in-eVery yea until the

s

hamas.

&








Y PROVISIONS

(THA Centr

by: the. Renistrar
sno D

fed by The Bank







bi



iN
\>








af







Scotiabank (Bahatttas) Limited tae :
ahamas) Limited (formally British American Bank(1993)

oF
a
3.
4. Commonwealth Bank Li
5. Rayal Bank Of Cans
6.
7. Fidelity Bank (B
Limited)
8. Citibank, NA.

Provisional estimates from the-unaud
Bahamas to be B$3,207,547,000.% “~ 72"

PUBLIC DEBT

ited accounts as at September 30, 2008 show the Public Debt of The Jf

GOVERNMENT REVENUE AND EXPENDITURE



Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

Revenue

Recurrent Expenditure (excluding °
Repayment of Public Debt)

Capital Development
Expenditure (excluding loans
contributions and advances
to public corporations)

** Provisional estimates from the unaudited ‘accounts.
* — The Public Debt amount is inclusive of The Pub

FY2006/2007p** FY2007/2008p**
. BS BS
Nae Approved Budget
1,338,481,000 1,483,929,000
1,285,692,000 1,385, 369,000
166,225,000

189,731,000

September 30, 2008 totalled B$442,389,000.

0 am. on 15th January, 2009 and

~ Amount

15,000,000.00

BS ‘
,000,000.
:000,000.
226,000.
{VYV,0UU.0t
000,000.
000,000.
5m -

.|... 20,000,000.00 |. 100,00.

\
al Bank
09.
dquary, 2009 anc will ceasdat 3:00p.m. on

envelopes ‘enclosing appneations should ees F

Registered&&Stocks”. 2

ould’ e made to the eGo the f mmattached tothe =
hed froin the Registrarofficesit Nassau and Freeport, The - 9

t & Navy ion Road, Nassau) or any of the
BP os



The following information is extracted from the unaudited accounts of the Government of The _

lic Corporations contingent liability which as at

Mr Moss’s mother Catherine Gustav
of Frogman Lane off Deveaux Street said:
“I can’t even describe it, it was so nice.
Everyone talked about how nice he was
and the number of people who turned
out was wonderful.”

Michlene Gustav, 23, Mr Moss’s
youngest sister said: “It was very sad, but.
I liked how everybody turned out, it was
successful, and the rush was good, it
picked up the mood. -

“We appreciate the Saxons and every-
body who contributed in. so-many ways,
and we want to wish a special thanks to
Dr Hubert Minnis who spoke on behalf of
the Ministry. of Health.”



















The Registrar



P. O. Box N-4868
Nassau, Bahamas

Sir: ue





















BS
100.00



s

BAN




1. (One Per

.



YX :
* The aos N

:30 am on Sth FAOrdinary §
j ¥ - . S s

cations will WX: os"
dannary,

x



g





Baha
AQ












‘Names in Full

Address

“FY2008/2009p**
BS
Approved Budget
1,569,329,000
' Bank Name
1,484, 150,000
Bank Branch

188,718,000

We enclose AS

* PAYM

- Ordinary Signatures

Account Number





















THE GOVERNMENT OF THE COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
BAHAMAS REGISTERED STOCK. 2028, 2029 , 2030, 2031, 2032 AND 2033

c/o The Central Bank of The Bahamas
I/We hereby apply for the following amount of Bahamas Registered Stock:

1/4% ~ Above Prime Rate
a 9/32% Above Prime Rate
5/16% . Above Prime Rate
11/32% Above Prime Rate
3/8% Above Prime Rate
13/32% . Above Prime Rate...

and undertake to accept any | s amount which nay be allotted to me/us.





Address (Corporations etc. should give Registered Addresses )

: P.O. Box. 2



Telephone Nos..(H) (W) :

2 (Where two or more persons apply as joint subscribers, the,additional names and addresses should
be given below.) . ’ yest

Telephone Nos.(H) (W)

I/We hereby request semi annual interest to be paid to:










\ Sey ‘ = . y J a A
ull amount of Stock(s) applied for abave is/are not allottedt6 yy

SS SETYLEMENT SYSTEM (RTGS) THROUGH ALL COMMERCIAL
KS EXCEPT FINCO.\, a 6



ay last respects to Saxons drummer Adwin Moss

MEMBERS of the

| Shell Saxons Super
Stars and other
Junkanoo groups
support Saxons
. | drummer Adwin
Moss. |

| Felipé Major
> /Tribune staff






FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY
APPLICATION No wn
ALLOTMENT No.




Insert below the amount applied for

in Units of B$100

oo















Bahamas Registered Stock 2028 BS



Bahamas Registered Stock 2029 BS
Bahamas Registefed Stock 2030 BS
BahamgsRevistered Stack 2031 - BS
Baltimas Registered Stk 2032 BS





ahamas Registered Stock 2033° BS
KOA





at




& re
in payment for the Stock appliéd for.
\ AQ “A









"ESS OF B$50,00000 MUSTSBE MADE VIA REALTIME

(00,00.










R LESS CANBE MADE VIA REAL TIME

M OR-BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE
AMAS

OF B$5,000.00 OR LESS CAN BE MADE VIA REAL TIME
.EMENT SYSTEM, BY BANK DRAFT PAYABLE TO THE

IK OF THE BAHAMAS OR BY CASH.








































FUNERAL FOR SPORTSCASTER
Philip Smit
is laid to rest

Drive It!, Drag It!,
Pull it!, Push it!



3S ate

MINISTER OF STATE for the Environment Phenton
Neymour-and Shane Gibson; Golden’Gates MP, escort
_ the coffin out of St Francis Xavier Cathedral.




EVEN IF IT
WE WILL



Major/Tribune staff

ipé

Fel



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THE TRIBUNE

What the Bahamas
| needs in this new year

PAGE 8, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009





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ly THIS New Year, the
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need of competent, patriotic
statesmen to legislate and to

tion from the societal and eco-
nomic predicaments we now
face.

Bahamians are quickly losing
out on controlling their own for-
tunes and aspects of their coun-
try’s economic engines as gov-
ernment after government
grants massive investment
incentives and land giveaways
to land speculators, which
appears to be speedily turning
our island chain into an invest-
ment bottom-feeder that’s near-
ly dependent on a fickle tourism
industry with hardly any plausi-
ble attempt to foster economic
diversification. The actions and
lack of foresight of many of
today’s and yesteryear’s politi-
cians has led to investment dis-
asters, directly contributed to
the paucity of genuine entre-

_ preneurs and also contributed
to a lack new forms of devel-
opment/industries while impru-
dently encouraging Bahamians
to put all their eggs in-a perfo-
rated tourism basket. With their
misguided, short-sighted give-
aways, successive administra-
tions have contributed to the
erosion of. our country’s tax
base at a.time when the
Bahamas’ infrastructure needs
major upgrades and strength-
ening.

Moving forward, there must
be a decentralization of gov-
ernment with a view to fostering
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only the brightest are elected—
rather than some of the inef-
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torate. In taking a revolutionary
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that a new slate of potential
leaders be brought to the polit-
ical forefront with many of the
washed-up, has-been politicians
being relegated to the sidelines.
Finally, as we enter 2009, I am
most impressed by forward-
thinking individuals such as

capacity.
Although BTC has intro-
duced the VIBE system, it does

hot appear to have the same

Raynard Rigby, who appears to.

be actively pursuing and pro-
moting a blueprint for our
national development, and
offering ways to effect positive

change while gaining the confi- -

dence of a mistrusting public.

PUC/BTC—
Still a telecoms dinosaur!
It was astonishing to read

the Public Utilities Commission -

threat that-vendors and users
of VoIP. products could face a
fine of ‘$10,000 if caught. The
PUC’s statement illustrates the
backward-thinking, protection-
ist outlook of this Commission
and the obsolete laws govern-

ing the local telecoms sector in,
a 21st century society with tech- ,

nological advances that seem to
far exceed BTC’s current

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roaming capabilities or the reli-
ability of other VoIP telephone
services. Surely, the PUC
understands that BTC’s exorbi-_.
tant prices has driven many dis-

cerning consumers to’ VoIP

providers who offer better rates

and technology that can be used

with ease.

_ I share businessman
Andrew Wilson’s sentiments
that the PUC— instead of seek-
ing to have the Telecommuni-
cations Act amended—nonsen-
sically appears to be attempt-
ing to regulate the World Wide .
Web. Indeed, Wilson is correct
in comparing the PUC’s out- -
dated, monopolistic approach
to that of outlawing e-mails to
protect the postal service. |

After years of rapacious
prices, Vonage and other VoIP
telephone devices has alleviated
many households (particularly
those with children and family
members studying or living
abroad) and businesses (includ- —
ing law practitioners) of the
excessive monthly charges.

Both the PUC and BTC are
outdated dinosaurs and need to
get with the programmes. Fur-
thermore, while the PUC uses
archaic laws to protect monop-
olistic interests, it is clear that
two parts of a government body
are not working in accord, par-
ticularly since.a law enforce-
ment agency such as the Cus-
toms Department has permit-

‘ted the importation of these so-

called “illegal” VoIP devices.
In speaking of the ways that
the PUC intends to put an end
to the usage of Vonage and the
Magic Jack, Vincent Wallace-
Whitfield, a senior legal counsel
at that Commission, made an
absurd statement. He said:
“We are looking. at different
avenues to tackle this problem.
What we would do is find out
thai the person has purchased
it, obtain a search warrant to

In find out if they have it hooked "'

“up ‘to their computer’ or phone. '
and legal Steps are taken from

there.” This is laughable!

Can you imagine BTC/PUC
using the police to kick down
the doors of almost every house
‘to “find out if (people) hooked
up” a VoIP device to their com-
puter or phone? With serious
crimes skyrocketing, wouldn’t
the\ police have more pressing
matters to attend to? Is this a
dictatorship where the PUC can
take these draconian measures
to ensure their own (BTC’s)
bottom-line?

With the dawn of the 21st
century, the PUC:and its regres-
sive tactics/laws has been rele- :
gated to the telecoms bone
yard, in part because of its fail-
ure to adjust to technological
changes and, beyond VoIP.
devices, the availability of free
programmes—via the internet—
such as Skype, iChat, MSN
Messenger and other pro-
grammes that allow people to
talk and see each other over the
internet. Frankly, Bahamians
have advanced and are no
longer solely dependent on
BTC. So now, is the PUC going
to seek to control and regtate

the internet?

ILLEGITIMATE
‘ CHILDREN!

_ Lately, I saw a newspaper
article/photo of a 26-year-old
pregnant mother of four who
was recently laid off. Accord-
ing to the article, she lived with

. her mother and the fathers of

‘her children were hardly con-
‘tributing to their welfare.

The number of illegitimate
children born at local hospitals
each day amazes me, particu-
larly in.what is supposedly a
Christian nation. Of late, a doc-
tor-friend told me of the num-
ber of young women/girls who
are impregnated—often for a

succession of different men—

and who mindlessly bring one
bastard after another into the
world. When irresponsible men
are casually sowing their wild
oats and “biggin’up” one crazed
woman after another—out of
wedlock~is there any wonder
why crime is escalating and why
there is an growing number of
teenage miscreants who come
from dysfunctional, fatherless
households without any basic
values or morals. Every year,
our society is-saddled with ille-
gitimate children from people
with neither the financial
resources nor the parental
wherewithal to raise them prop-
erly.

At this point, I would like to
express my sincere condolences
to my grandfather, Edward Gib-
son (Long Island) and his sib-
lings on the passing of their
brother David Gibson.

Happy New Year Bahamas!
THE TRIBUNE

BVT utr aula



gas — and people’s lives

lm By SIR RONALD
SANDERS

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat)

2009 started with arctic tem-
peratures in Europe. The cold
grip in many parts of Europe
was worse because of a row
between Russia and the Ukraine
over natural gas.

Russia cut gas supplies to
Ukraine early in January in a
dispute over pricing and an alle-
gation that Ukraine was not
only not paying its bills but
stealing gas as well. The coun-
tries of the European Union
(EU) depend on Russia for
about a quarter of their total
gas supplies, some 80 per cent of
which are pumped via Ukraine.
Tens of thousands of homes
were left without deating.

At the time of writing, Russia ,

says that it will resume gas sup-
plies to the EU countries if
monitors are sent to the
Ukraine, but no date has been
set and, as temperatures plunge
to minus 10 degrees centigrade,
people may die in many coun-
tries in Europe, particularly
those that were once part of the
Soviet Union and who are
almost entirely dependent on
Russian gas for heating.

This issue is not only about
the price of gas. Four years ago,
an anti-Russian regime won
power in Ukraine and Russia
accused it of supplying arms to
Georgia last August when Rus-
sia and Georgia warred over.
South Ossetia. Georgia had
launched a military strike on the
province in an attempt to
reclaim it after 16 years of semi-
independence — a move the Rus-
sians regarded as presumptuous.

Russia pushed Georgian
troops back into Georgia but
vowed at the time to teach the
Ukraine a lesson.

It can’t be discounted that,
in cutting off the gas supply to
EU countries through Ukraine,
the Russian government. is
underscoring EU dependence
on Russian gas, and sending.a

warning against policies of





these would be the expansion
of EU membership to include
former members of the Soviet
Union that share borders with
Russia.

In the same week, Venezue-
la’s President, Hugo Chavez,
seemed unable to make up his
mind whether to continue
donating heating oil to poor
families in the US. First, he cut
off supply, then he reinstated it
after his “godfather” image took
a beating in the international
media.

‘Chavez introduced the pro- .

gramme four years ago when oil

prices were relatively high and .

he was in full flight in his viru-
lent attacks on the US President
George W Bush and the Amer-
ican government.

According to the Associated
Press, Venezuela supplies fuel
to 200,000 households in 23
states and 65 Native American
tribes — last year alone the value
of these supplies was put at $100

million.

Now that the price of oil has
dropped almost 70 per cent
from its high last July, PDVSA,
the state-owned oil company,
which Chavez uses to dispense
largesse in support of his Boli-

-varian Socialist Revolution, can-

not afford these gifts.
Chavez is faced with the pos-
sibility’ of ‘devaluing the
Venezuelan currency — a mea-
sure he seems to be postponing
until a referendum is held in
February, the result of which he
hopes will allow him to extend
the.term of his Presidency.
Also at risk is the Petro-
Caribe programme to which sev-
eral Caribbean countries are sig-
natories. Chavez has reported-
ly cut back,on oil production as
part of a jopreement by the
,Organiy; tid :
Exportirg.Countries (OPEC): to

which it ISAPP FOES: AMON: )| force- “up the price.of oil..But,







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projections indieate that, with
the demand for oil dropping in
several major countries, includ-
ing China and India, in the face
of the international financial cri-
sis, oil prices will not reach their
earlier high levels in a hurry if at
all.

The Caribbean governments |

that signed up to PetroCaribe
and who have predicated some
of their social development pro-
jects on the back. of promises
made by Chavez may find them-
selves scrambling for financing
from elsewhere if they can get it.

Amid all this, an important
book: on the politics of oil and
gas in the Caribbean has been
produced by Wendell Mottley, a
former Finance Minister of
Trinidad and Tobago and now a
New York-based investment
banker. The book, modestly
entitled “Trinidad and Tobago:
Industrial Policy 1959-2008”, is a
masterly account of the role that
oil and gas has played in the
economy of Trinidad and Toba-
go, and the role it has failed to
play in developing the country’s
human resources, healing its
ethnic divisions and ensuring

‘against potential conflict i in the

future.
For instance, Mottiey makes

the point: “In Trinidad, a useful '

reality check is the ratio of the
output of the educational sys-
tem to employment in the ener-
gy sector. Every year, the coun-
try graduates 19,000 students

_from its high schools. Based on

the most optimistic expansion
of the oil, gas, chemicals and
other process industries, only
1,78. of these students will be
absorbed by these industries
every year. The remaining
17,220 students must be placed

elsewhere. ... in the teal Trinidad

é and: Pobago%sa:s “et
And, the. “real Trinidad and

Tobago” is one in which of the











SPEAKER:
Bishop William M. Wilson
Executive Director —
International Centre For
Spiritual Renewal

‘s lives of ordinary people







@ SIR Ronald Sanders

labour force of 625,900 approx-
imately one-quarter or 159,000
persons “may be poorly
equipped to earn a Jiving in
(the) twenty-first century.”

‘Mottley also warns that “the
projected large revenue streams
(from oil and gas) over the next
20 years could be interrupted
by the eruption of destructive
social forces caused by the coun-
try’s dual: development paths”.

He deals too with the petro-
diplomacy between Trinidad
and Tobago and Venezuela as
both countries seek strong influ-
ence over neighbouring states
in the Caribbean. And, he asks
the question: “Is Venezuela,
through PetroCaribe, seeking to
turn, and can it succeed in turn-
ing, the Caribbean into vassal
states, tied to one energy source,
and sinking daily further into
unrepayable debt?”

Mottley’s book, published by
Ian Randle in Jamaica, also
gives a revealing insight into the
maritime dispute between Bar-
bados and Trinidad and Tobago
— allegedly over fishing, but real-
ly over petroleum as he con-
firms.

These events so early in 2009
indicate that the politics of oil
and gas will continue to play an
important part not only in rela-
tions between States but in the










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MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 9

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THE TRIBUNG



i es eee, ee
Archbishop speaks out against death penalty

[Man is rushed to hospital after stabbing

FROM page one

around 8pm Saturday. A handgun and ammunition were found. i
As police approached, the three men in the black Buick jumped out |:
of the car with police following closely behind. i
Officers caught up with the three men on foot and searched them.
They found a .45. handgun with four live rounds of ammunition. i
Two men from Davis Street Fox Hill, aged 25 and 28, and a 31- :
year-old from St Margaret’s Road off Kemp Road, were taken into :
custody. They are expected to appear in court today. i
A 24- year-old woman and 32-year-old man arrested on Friday in :
connection with illegal drugs found in a home in Montell Heights are
also expected to appear in court this week. :
They were arrested on Friday morning after officers from Grove i
Police Station executed a search warrant at a residence in Montell :
Heights and found a clear plastic bag with one pound of marijuana ;
concealed i in the ceiling. :

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the death penalty?

“Judging by recent local
demonstrations and pronounce-
ments on part of those who sup-
port capital punishment and want
to see hangings, I would say that it
is a matter of importance, of .
urgency that calls for voices of
reason to rise up in opposition,”
said the archbishop during the
annual Red Mass ceremony at
which members of the judiciary
celebrated the start of the 2009
legal year.

He told the congregation at St
Francis Xavier Cathedral that
many who support the death
penalty use the Old Testament to
bolster their argument and ignore
teachings of forgiveness and com-
passion — principles of the New
Testament.

Said the archbishop: “Among
those who support the death
penalty, there are many and var-
ied justifications for supporting



MEMBERS of the judiciary gather at St Francis Xavier Cathedral for the annual Red Mass ceremony, as part of tradi-
tional celebrations for the start of the new. legal year. (Pictured in front row from L -R) Rev Glenn Nixon, Appealate Jus-.
tice Emmanuel Osadebay, Chief Justice Sir Burton Hall, Archbishop Patrick Pinder, President of the Court of Appeal
Dame Joan Sawyer, Appealate Justices Hartman Longley and Christopher Blackman. Second row L -.R: President of
Supreme Court Tribunal Nathaniel Dean, Justice Kechine Cunningham, Supreme Court Justice Estelle Gray Evans, for-
mer AG Clare Hepburn, SC Justice Neville Adderley, Justices Chery! Albury, Stephen Issacs, Jon. Issacs and Snr Jus-.

this extreme form of punishment.
There are those who believe in
the law of retaliation, retribution,
an eye for an eye . Many such per-
sons can be found even in the reli-
gious community. There are often
the most vocal and the most
inflexible. They openly prefer
God in. his Old Testament per-
sona or issue summary judgments
according to the letter of the law.
The God who became flesh for
the love of human kind and God
of mercy and redemption simply

‘ does not satisfy their world view.

He noted “flaws” in the appli-
cation of the death penalty out-
lined in a recent speech by Arch-
bishop Wilton Gregory of
Atlanta, Georgia on the Catholic

tice Anita Allen.

church’s view of the death penal-
ty. The “alarming number” of
innocent persons being sentenced
to death who were later exoner-
ated, economic and racial inequal-
ities that plague defendants in
capital offence cases: all “cast seri-
ous doubt on the efficacy of the
death penalty as a means of deter-
ring capital offences,” said the
archbishop.

He also read from a 2008 Pas-
toral Letter to the Antilles Epis-
copal Conference of Roman

’ Catholic Bishops that “strongly

affirmed” the Church’s belief in
the sanctity of life and urged the
Caribbean region to move to com-

pletely abolish the death penalty.

“Capital punishment can only
be defended in cases of absolute
necessity, when it was simply not
possible otherwise to defend soci-
ety. However such cases are very
rare, if not practically non-exis-
tent,” he read.

“The bishops afficmbd that this

‘position in the church’s teaching

does not provide the basis for the
reintroduction or renewed use of
the death penalty, which is
presently under discussion in the

region. The bishops further .
expressed their firm desire that |

the leaders and people of the
Caribbean move toward the total

abolition of the death penalty.
Therefore we should. place
emphasis on the rehabilitation of
the offender rather than his élim-
ination. Non-lethal forms of pun-
ishment are more in keeping with

- the, concrete: conditions | of the

human good and more: in confor-
mity with the dignity of the human
person,” he said.

Although still on the statute
books, capital punishment has not’
been carried out in this country
since 2000. In 2006, the Privy
Council handed down an histori-
cal ruling which abolished the
mandatory death sentence for-
those convicted of murder.

Overhaul of police force senior command
FROM page one .

Mr Dames will assume responsibility of Grand Bahama,
Mr Evans of New Providence, and Mr Hanna of the Fam-
ily Islands.

Mr McCartney will lead management and support ser-
vices, while Mr Gibson will head the crime and intelli-
gence division.

Speaking to hundreds of police officers attending the
RBPF annual church service and parade at the Church of
God of Prophecy in East Street yesterday, Mr Turnquest
expressed his hopes for the future of the force.

He said: “Restructuring, as we know, calls for a funda-
mental reassessment of the organisation, its command
structure, the laws and regulations by which it is governed,
succession within the ranks, its personnel, and its assets.

“What restructuring seeks to do is to Strike the most -
effective balance of all these element’, to ensure the Police
Force continues to effectively and efficiently implement its
mandate.”

Mr Turnquest said he. expects the new senior coined
to provide visionary and progressive leadership to men
and women in the force, to act with transparency and
accountability, and ensure the force is equitable and fair.

The new senior command follows recommendations in
the strategic review report that called attention to the
urgent need for, “a leaner and fitter command chain which
should ensure an appropriate development of responsi-
bilities and provide senior and middle managers with more
clearly defined roles and responsibilities.”

The Cabinet Office advised there are no further plans to
reduce the number in the senior command, and there will
be no new appointments to the ranks of senior assistant

































Mitchell hits out ,

FROM page one

revenge in this matter,” Mr Mitchell,
member of Parliament for Fox Hill,
said in a statement: released yester-
day.

He asked if government is intent on

. fighting crime why were experienced

officers asked to resign. He claimed
that a number of the officers were tar-

.geted either because of suspected. affil-

iation to the PLP or after speaking
out against the commissioner. He
asked why the officers were asked to
abruptly resign after 48 hours notice.

“How does a 63-year-old commis-

sioner and a 61-year-old prime minis-
“ter tell 55-year-old officers that

because of their age they ought to go
home? Will the minister please explain
why the usual courtesies were not
allowed these officers to say farewell
to their colleagues as is the convention
in the Force?

“Instead they were instructed to
turn in all of their uniforms and police
equipment by Friday afternoon, with
no opportunity to participate in the
final police parade. The point here is

’ that what the government has done is

unlawful, unseemly and ungracious,”
he claimed.

“ful.

legal action against government if
what was done was found to be unlaw-

“The officers who were ‘disiniised
should know that it is not too late to
take legal action. If the Government’s
actions are unlawful there is still an
opportunity to seek redress, even if
you accept the money,” Mr Mitchell
said.

Yesterday government announced
the restructuring of the senior com-

‘mand of the RBPF. The news came

four days after a shake-up at the force,
when 15 senior officers were asked to
accept early retirement packages or
face dismissals.

The officers were given two days to
respond and according to reports, all
the officers accepted the packages.

The officers asked to retire were

- Assistant Commissioners ‘of Police:

Christopher McCoy, Juanita Cole-
brook, Kirkland: Hutchison, Eugene
Cartwright, James Carey; Chief Super-
intendents Burkie Wright, Robert Pin-.

-der and Basil Rahming; Superinten-

dents George Mortimer; Frank St
Remy, Alexander Blatch, Christopher
Rahming, Philip Gibson, Matthew
Davis, Sidney: McPhée, Drexel.
Cartwright, and Charles Walkine.

~ Govetnment said the move was in



FROM page one

There are fears that there might be
other victims at that school and
other child predators throughout
the country.

“T feel that it would be an excel-
lent idea. A sexual offences reg-
istry is very important and I think
it would be helpful as we move
forward, but the government has
not yet opened this discussion for-
mally with regard to a sexual
offences registry. It is something I
will have to put forward on behalf
of the people in conjunction with
all of the sexual offences changes
we are making,” Mrs Turner said.

A sex offender registry is a sys-
tem in place in a number of juris-
dictions designed to allow gov-
ernment authorities to keep track

‘of the residence and activities of

sex offenders, including those who
have completed their criminal sen-





commissioner of police or chief superintendent.





e SEE PAGE TWO




Registry

tences.

In some jurisdictions, especial-
ly in the United States, informa-
tion in the registry is made avail-
able to the general public by a
website or other means. In many
jurisdictions registered sex offend-
ers are subject to additional restric-
tions, including housing.

Those on parole or probation
may be subject to restrictions that
do not apply to other parolees or
probationers. Sometimes these
include (or have :been proposed
to.include) restrictions on being
in the presence of minors, living in
proximity to a school or day care

centre, or owning toys or other

items of interest to minors.
The government had presented
a series of amendments to-the Sex-

ual Offences and Domestic Vio- °

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Monday - Saturday - 9: 30 AM - 5: 30 PM

He also advised the dismissed offi-
cers that it was not too late to take



lence.Act to the House of Assem-
bly last year, however, Mrs Turn-
er said a sexual offenders registry
is something she is still advocating.
“It’s one of the things I talked
about in my contribution on the
changes to the Sexual Offences
Act that we did. Obviously these
are going to have to go hand in
hand with each other and J am
hoping the government would
look into that,” Mrs Turner said.
Mrs Turner said she is passion-
ate about the protection of chil-

dren as this is something that is _

long overdue.
“I am very passionate about
these types of things, especially
when it comes to the ruination of
our children. The government has
to have legislation in place to pro-
tect.all citizens, but children need
advocates on their behalf so for
me that is something I am pas-
sionate about,” Mrs Turner said.







|Kenyatta |





keeping with the recommendations of
a Strategic Review of the Force. '
























































‘FROM page one

Asked: how. much ofa role
the current leadership of the |
PLP played in the MP’s deci-
sion to ultimately join the
FNM, the source could not
say. However, he, did point out
that Mr Gibson has outlined
before that he would not be
seeking “any nomination”
under the PLP in any future

_ élections if former Prime Min-
ister Perry Christie was still at"
the helm of the party.

“T think it’s fair to Say that,
because he has gone on record -
to that effect before. But what-
ever his reasons, we-support
him,” the source said.

Having served in Mr
Christie’s administration as the
chajrman of the Gaming
Board before the PLP lost the
2007 general election, Mr Gib-
son gained national headlines
by abruptly resigning from the
PLP in January last year.

Catching many of his for-
mer colleagues off guard, Mr
Gibson: became the only. sit-
ting Independent MP. in the
House of Assembly since 2007.

However, with this latest
announcement, and the polit-
ical fall-out that could follow
among the more “die-hard
supporters within the PLP”,
the source said that Mr Gibson
did not seem in the slightest
bit “concerned.”

“Mr Gibson is.content that
he is making the right deci-
sion. If you look at everything,
where he is now, and where
he would like to take the con-
stituency, it was only a matter
of time before he did what was
in the best interest of the peo-
ple. We advised him that he
has done a lot for the area,
and we stuck by him (2007)
and we will stick by him.in
(2009),” he said.

When contacted by The Tri-
bune yesterday, Mr Gibson
said he had no comment on
the matter at this time.



\
THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 11



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Rock and Hard place

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THE TRIBUNE

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Knowles, Bhupathi

out of Chennai Open




























MARK Knowles and Mahesh Bhupathi got eliminated in the |
second round of the Chennai Open in Chennai, India on Friday. ‘The
Bahamian-Indian duo were playing in their first tournament in
India since they started playing together last year.

As the top seeded
team, they didn’t sur-
vive the second round
as they were ousted by
the unseeded team of
Jean-Claude Scherrer
and Stanislas Wawrin-
ka of Switzerland in set
scores of 3-6, 6-3 and Hema

10-8. Scherrer and MMUAGL NITES TTR Melts esi oii
, Wawrinka, however, |

i; lost in the final 6-3 and 6-4 to the team of Eric Butorac and Rajeev |"

of the United States. Knowles and Bhupathi had won their first |

{ round match 7-6 (3) and 7-6 (8) over the wild card team of Prakash

| Amritraj and Somdev Dewvarman of Indian. |

2}. This week, Knowles and Bhupathi are headed to Australia to play

_}+ in the Medibank International in Sydney where they are the number

; three seeds.
> They are scheduled to play their first round match against the

_{| Bruno Soares of Brazil and Kevin Ullyett of Zimbabwe.

|; Knowles’ former partner Daniel Nestor of Canada and Nenad

) Zimonjic were the top seeds. The American identical twin brothers
Bob and Mike Bryan are the number two:seeds.

. Nestor and Zimonjic finished the year as the number one ranked
team in the ATP computer rankings, followed by the Bryans.
Knowles and Bhupathi were number three. ,

Following the Medibank International, Knowles and Bhupathi will
head to Melbourne for the Australian Open, the first Grand Slam
Tournament for the year.

The Australian Open will get started on January 17.



'





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JOB TITLE
Assistant Professor, Journalism

DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES

adonsahars’ Ga!

BAPTIST SPORTS COUNCIL

BSC Family Fun Run/Walk Road Race
gets under way on Saturday, January 31

THE Baptist Sports Coun-
cil will begin its 2009 campaign
on Saturday, January 31 when
they host its annual Family
Fun Run/Walk Road Race.

This year's event will be
held in honour of national
coach Frank 'Pancho' Rah-
ming, who has assisted the
BSC in putting the race
togather from its inception in
2000. Rahming is a member
of the Mt. Carey Union Bap-
tist Church and has served as
the commissioner ‘of softball
for the BSC.

BSC Director Brent
Stubbs said they are pleased to
continue to honour those per-
sons who have made a signifi-
cant contribution to the suc-
cess of the Baptist Sports
Council in the past and it is
hoped that the sporting com-
munity will come out and sup-
port them as they honour
Rahming in the first event for
the year.

The event will once again

Position 1: Assistant Professor responsible for teaching print journalism and serving as full-time

faculty advisor for the monthly student newspaper, The Spectrum.

Position 2: Assistant Professor responsible for teaching broadcast journalism, video production (that

is, pre-production, production and post-production) and

video production software.

The ideal candidates will be able to develop and teach courses leading to a baccalaureate degree in
journalism; will have a strong commitment to teaching undergraduate students; evidence of excellence
in teaching and creative/innovative pedagogies; knowledge of current trends in the field of journalism;

and a commitment to research.

QUALIFICATIONS

Applicants should possess an earned PhD in Journalism or a related field.

» For a detailed job description and application persons should visit www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply. Interested
candidates should submit a detailed resume and a. cover r fetter of interest, giving full particulars of

_ qualifications and expériences, no later than Friday, 23"

January, 2009.

The School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions at The College of The Bahamas wants

to implement the following Allied Health programmes:

> Medical Laboratory Technology
> Physical Therapy

>. Nutrition and Dietetics

> Speech Therapy

> Occupational Therapy

Professions at 242-325-5551.

Interested persons may contact Dr. Zorene Curry at the School of Nursing and Allied Health

“| Also, anyone interested in enrolling in the BSc. Pharmacy Programme for September 2009

should apply no later than February 6, 2009.

ip PIII II IIIA II III IIA IS III AI ISA IIIS ASAI ISSA SI SSSI ASI NS

PROSPECTIVE GRADUATES —

Graduation, forms should include:

OFFICE. (i.e. stamp, receipt)

next graduation period (Summer 2009).

SE bb Db bb bbb bbb tt

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE, INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES — SPRING SEMESTER 012009

SPRING 2009

Please submit your completed

*Graduation Evaluation Forms
to the RECORDS DEPARTMENT on or before January 30, 2009.* |
Â¥ ALL SIGNATURES, (i.e. student, advisor & cel person)

vv PROOF OF PAYMENT FROM THE BUSINESS
SIGNED ADVISEMENT FORM (Course Outline)

*All others are considered LATE and will be forwarded to the
Graduation forms may
be obtained from the Records Enquiry Office.

FIP II III III III AI IIIA AA AIA AAA AAA ASD AAA AS AAA AAAI OK

SEE EE DDE DIE BD Db bt































































































COURSE TUITION &
sinner SECs, CODE BEGINS ENDS | DURATION | DAYS _ (timed FEES RM | Spaces.
} COOK
if 1 806 Feb. 19 Mar. 26 6 weeks $375:00
COOK a
' Asian Cooking 4800 Feb. 18 Mar. 25 6 weeks Wednesday i $385.00
Mise poce. COOK 00 -
Gourmet Cooking! ss 1. 823 __Feb. 16 Mar.23 | 6 weeks Monday _ : $380.00
COOK “00 - ean
i :
\ | Gourmet Cooking | tl 1824 Feb. 18 Mar. 25 6 weeks Wednesda : $465.00
|] | French & italian COOK 1A 00- tr ae
j Cooking 1820 Feb.17 Mar. 24 18 weeks Tuesday F
|| [Healthy —~ COOK : 5:00 - :
1_ 827 ___Feb,16 Mar. 23 6 weeks Monday : $465.00
we EES EES a :
COOK Bi 6:00 -
1813 ___Feb. 17 Apr. 7 8 weeks _| Tuesday 9:00pm. $300.00
i COOK 6:00 -
i 4 814 __ Feb. 19 Apr. 9 8 weeks H $325.00
COOK ;
i 1810 Feb.19 April. 9 8 weeks :
i COOK :
I 1 817 Feb. 16 Apr. 6 8 weeks :
COOK 00 -
1 818 Feb18 Apr. 8 8 weeks Wednesday | 9:00pm $375.00
. ia COOK é 6:00 - ae
Holiday Baking 1__ 830 Feb.17 Apr. 7 8 weeks Tuesday 9:00pm $390.00 LK





All fees are included in the price quoted above; new students pay a one-time application fee of $40.00. (NON REFUNDABLE)

Application Deadline: February 6, 2009 at 4:00 p.m.

For further iaformation or to pick up asi application please contact the Industry Training Department of the Culinary & ospitatity Management Institute, 323-5804, 323-GR04 or

fay 325-8175,

the College of the Bahamas reserves the right ta change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials,



Event will honour coach Frank ‘Pancho’ Rahming

be divided into two parts with

- a three-mile run and a one-

and-a-half walk, both begin-
ning and ending in front of the
Charles W. Saunders High
School on Jean Street.

The run will leave Jean
Street and travel south to
Prince Charles Drive, turn and
travel east to Fox Hill Road,
turn and travel north to
Bernard Road, turn and trav-
el west to. Hillside Estate,
opposite Kingsway Academy

and turn and travel back to -

Jean Street.

The walk will leave Jean
Street and travel north to Hill-
side Estate, turn and travel
west to Bernard Road, turn
‘and travel south to Soldier
Road, turn and travel east to
Prince Charles Drive and turn
and travel north back to Jean
Street.

The categories for entries

r
Ba ‘

odes? ass whos



SECT} COURSE

are male and female 15-and-
under, 19-and-under, 20-29,
30-39, 40-49 and 50-and-over.
There will be a special cate-

gory for Pastors and Minis-
ters, as well as the Church
with the most finishers.

Trophies will be presented
to the first three finishers in
each category. Certificates of
participation will also be pre-
sented to each competitor.

The entry fee is $10.00 per
person.

Entry forms will be avail-
able from the offices of the
Bahamas National Baptist

- Missionary and Educational

Convention, the Bahamas

Olympic Association and the
Bahamas Association of Cer-
tified Officials as of Wednes-
day.

Pre registration will take
place from 6 am on race day.
The race will get started



Summer Certificate & Diploma Programmes for

Corporate Trainers.
Training Managers.

Vocational Education Teachers and
College/University Lecturers

Application Deadline J anuary 30, 2009

promptly at 7 am.

Immediately following the
race, there will be a meeting
for all Churches interested in
participating in the BSC's
2009 Basketball Classic.

This year's classic will be
held in honour of Joyce
Minus, the immediate past
assistant director of the BSC
and a member of the Golden
Gates Native Baptist Church.

The classic is scheduled to
begin on Saturday, February.
21 at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex. The entry fee is
$100.00 per team. The cate-
gories include 15-and-under,
19-and-under, men and

“women.

For. further information,
interested persons can contact
Brent Stubbs at, 502-2363 or
email bstubbs@tribuneme-
dia.net, bstubbo@yahoo.com
or stubbobs@gmail.com












CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SER VICES
Personal Development - Spring Semester. OF 2009, eae





ACCOUNTING














6:00pm-8:00pm













ACCA.FOR BEGINNERS | MonMWed j 9-Feb 10wks| $250
ACCA FOR BEGINNERS Il 6:00pm-8:00pm Sear Feb ee
AGCA FOR BEGINNERS II! 6:00pm-8:00pm |Tue/Thur }10-Feb 10wks| $300







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BUSINESS



é























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BUSIO00 GREDIT & COLLECTIONS | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Tues oe 8wks ($225
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COMP901 O01 {COMPUTER APPLICATIONS | 6:00pm-9:00pm {Mon 12-Feb 12wks| $450
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COMP941 01 6:00pm-9:00pm: | Tues 3-Feb _|6 wks |$350
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COMP931









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COSMETOLOGY




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COSM802 MAKE-UP APPLICATION 6:00pm-9:00pm | Mon 8wks ye
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HEALTH AND FITNESS

DECORATING } |
DECO800 INTERIOR DECORATING | 6:00pm-9:00pm | Tues \8wks ($225
FFLOR8OO “———"E-OOpm-9-00pm | Mon wks [$225
FLOR802 ORAL DESIGN Til '6:00pm-9:00pm |Tues 1 T7-Feb 8wks [$275
ENGLISH =

ENG900 EFFECTIVE WRITING SKILLS 6:00pm-9:00pm Hie 17-Feb | 10wks/$300
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Revised Dee 292008



Dre emoes meee PLR RTE PARP ER ESM YUN TERT EAT OT EY RN AE NTE ERT TAT SSO TN ETRE MEP HT TAMER TINT STOTT IEE AEN OME YBN SETTER ATR TE NE CHIR SATE TIT NIT EYRE EE ME MERTEN CSTR STENT YEE CRORE | TS?









ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co- ordinator at Tel: (242) 325- 5714 7 (242) 328- 0098 | / / 328- 1936 / / 302- 4300 ext. 6201
or e-mail perdev@cob.edu.bs
All fees are included with the exception af the application fee of $40.00 (one time).

CEES reserves the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Schedule and Course Materials.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 13



Saying farewell to



m By BRENT STUBBS |
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

F you had a chance

before he died, what

would have been the last

thing you would have
told Phil ‘Smoker’ Smith?

That was a heart wrenching
question that Rev. Father Mar-
tin Gomes asked the packed audi-
ence at the St. Francis Xavier
Cathedral to consider on Satur-
day.

Then Fr. Gomes invited every-
body, which included government
officials, sports administrators,
coaches, athletes, family and
friends, to take a minute and
shared their answers with some-
body next to them.

Giving the eulogy at the funer-
al service for the late Smith, 51,
who died on Sunday, December
28 due to complications from his
kidney failure, said for the past
week the Smith’s family was inun-
dated with sympathy from the
general public.

But he said that “nobody”
expected Smith to come to his
demise when he did and therefor
“nobody” was able to say any
parting words to him.

“We said what we wanted to
say, now we need to let it go,”

said Gomes as he invited the |

audience to show their apprecia-

els pow

FROM page 15

After the defence forced con-
secutive turnovers, the Jets’ aeri-
al attack once again found its
mark when Clarke connected
with Reggie Knowles.

The Warriors offence failed to
muster little more than a three
out possession or turnover and

the Jets continued the onslaught, ‘

turning the fourth interception of
‘the day into:a score when-.run-
«ning back Jason Davis blew by
the defence for the score.

Fullback Tito Bethel capped
the scoring with a one yard run
early in the fourth quarter.

Jcts* Head Coach Obie Roberts
said it was paramount for his
team to avoid any possible let-
downs against the fourth seeded



owe & Co. =]






" Felipé Major/Tribune staff



SOFTBALL players led the precession on JFK Drive to Lakeview Memorial where the remains of the late Phil
‘Smoker’ Smith was interred on Saturday. From left to right in front row are Jenny Dotson, Thora Sweeting
(BGDSA president holding Smith's photo) and Pandora Greenslade. Behind Greenslade are Mary ‘Cruise’ Edge-
combe and Lynden Gaitor.

tion to Smith for the life he lived.

Gomes, Smith’s priest, said this
wasn’t the way that they had
intended to see Smith because
“he wanted to live.” But he said
that Smith’s death brought every-
body together.

Then he asked another ques-
tion: “How do we benefit from
his death?”

He said everybody has some-
thing to give and Paul, in his writ-

Warriors and take charge from
the opening quarter.

“J think a lot of our players
were overlooking this game and
looking ahead to the champi-
onship,” he said. “So it was very
important that we come out and
execute early to get a good jump
on them and control the score-
board from the outset. Despite
the score There is a lot of room

for growth ,for.the Jets,

“We picked if up as thé ‘game

went along but we have a-lot-ol -

practising to do in terms of
preparing for the championship
game.”

In the three meetings on the
season, the Jets have shutout the
Warriors each time, winning 52-0,
62-0 preceding yesterday’s 54-0
victory. Roberts, a former

member of the Pros organization

on Co.

). 322-8306
ford Cay - 362-4895
Tickets available at he door (subject to seating availability)

ing to Hebrews, said in the time
of mourning for Smith, if every-
body identify one of their gifts
and multiple it by the amount of
people present in the service, they
would be able to “transform our
family, our neighborhood, our
recreational spaces.

“Just think about it. Just one
gift from each of us can turn
around our countty.”

Since Smith’s death, Bahami-

1 to 54-0 victory over

said his team has no preference
regarding whom they will face in
the next round, but that his team’s
preparation will remain the same
irrespective of their opponent,
“The Pros are the defending
champions and we have a tremen-
dous amount of respect for them
the Stingrays are a very well
coached team led by Lawrence
Hepburn so whatever team it is its

.. going to be quite a challenge.
Some of the guys I know they

want-to play the Pros-and the
Stingrays are like the little broth-
ers to the Jets so both games are
somewhat of a rivalry,” he said.
“Whomever we play hopefully
we are going to be prepared on
that day and put forth our best
effort.”

Roberts cited the example of
the New England Patriots in last



-RoyalStar
Assurance






ans from all walks of life reflected
on the life of Smith, who was con-
sidered a national legend, a sport-
ing icon, a mentor and a friend
to the nation.

He was hailed, not just for his
role as the Director of Sports at

‘the Broadcasting Corporation of

the Bahamas where he was con-
sidered the “voice” of the sports-
casts, but for the personal touch
he had with both the athletes and

Warriors

year’s Super Bowl as the moti-
vating factor for his team to finish
a perfect regular season on a pos-

‘itive note.

“Once we execute and play jets
ball we should be successful who-
ever we face in the next round,”
he said. ‘We have come this far
to have a perfect season at this
point it would be a shame for us

to lose in the championship game

after all this hard work and effort

to come up short: The perfect »~
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not win a championship, plain
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. their families and for his commit-

ment and deciation to helping a
number of student-athletes to
receive athletic scholarships
abroad.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham headed the list of dignitaries,
who attended the service. But he
left because of his speaking
engagement at the funeral ser-
vice for the Rev. Dr. Lavania Stu-
art, who went on at the same time
t the New Mt. Zion Baptist
Church.

Also among those in atten-
dance were Minister of Sports
Desmond Bannister; Minister of
State for Environment, Fenton
Neymour; Member of Parliament
for Clifton, Kendal Wright; West
End. MP Obie Wilchcombe;

Golden Gates MP Shane Gibson.

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PAGE 14, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS








MASTERS Track and Field Association Srasident Foster
Dorsett (left) and vice president Mike Armbrister (right) con-
gratulate coach Stephen Murray as he was honored Saturday
night by the Striders Track Club at the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort.



MEMBERS of. re wey clan share a moment with
coach Stephen Murray’as he We
right by the etriers Trapk Club at ‘the Sheraton Cable
Heach Resorts: 4





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@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ONSIDERED the longest serving

coach in any of the local track and

field clubs, Stephen Murray got his

just reward on Saturday night when
the Striders Track Club showered him with a ban-
quet that was deserving of his 24 years of dedicat-
ed service.

Held at the Sheraton Cable Beach Hotel, Mur-
ray got accolades from both former and present
Ministers of Sports, Neville Wisdom and Desmond
Bannister and from his past and present athletes,
including collegiate standout Bianca Stuart,
Olympic bronze medalist Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
and Pauline Griffith-Bain, as well as parents and
some of his collegiate in the Bahamas Associations
of Athletic Association.

Showered with a number of gifts, including a
cheque from the Ministry of Sports, a Blackberry
cellphone, a round trip ticket and a watch, per-
haps the greatest moment for Murray came when
all of his current athletes walked into the ballroom
holding lid candles and waving flags as they hon-
ored him before he gave his speech.

It was truly a special night for Murray and one
that Leevan Sands said he couldn’t miss for any-

.thing in the world.

“T stayed here just for Stephen Murray. A lot of
you might not know, but he’s still my coach,’ said
the newly wed Sands, who trains now with Henry
Rolle at Auburn University.

Looking at his mentor, who got him started in
track and field at the age of six, Sands said he can’t

believe that Murray “hasn't aged. He’s still looking
young. How old are you, 30?’ he asked. Sands said
it seemed as if he’s getting older and Murray is

a8"HOnored Saturday “setting younger.

Sands, who lowered his national record when he
oO menjs triple jump bronze medal in Beijing,
in August, thanked Murray for getting him

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. Murray and Danielle Burrows-S

: started in his ca a J
“ Leevan Sr., had’stopped Murray one day when he

OLYMPIC men’s triple jump bronze medalist Leevan
‘Superman’ Sands (right), along with his family pose
above with his first track coach Stephen Murray at the
Striders Track Club banquet.on Saturday night. From
left are Leevan Sands Sr (holding Sands’ Jr. son); Bria
Sands (sister); Inspector Elaine Sands (mother);
ands,.Leevan’s wife.





how his father,

was passing through:their cornér and had informed
him that he had two sons he wanted to get involved
in sports. The rest was history and Sands said he will
never forget Murray because he was always a “real
father and inspiration for me and he’s happy that
he’s being honored while he is here. I didn’t know
that I would make it this far, but thanks to you, I
did.”

Tributes

-. While Sands and Griffith-Bain, a former sprint-
er who gave a tribute, were in person, Stuart, the
national long jump champion and Southern IIli-
nois senior standout, remarks were recorded and
replayed over a large monitor along with other
tributes from some of the athletes, parents and well
wishers, including Foster Dorsett, Dexter Bodie
and Mike Armbrister.

In his remarks before he made the cheque pre-
sentation to Murray, Bannister he attended a sad
occasion earlier in the day when he joined hun-
dreds in paying their last respect to the late Phil
‘Smoker’ Smith, the former Sports Director at ZNS,
who was remembered for his invaluable contribu-
tion to the success of sports in the country.

At the banquet, Bannister said he was happy to
see that the Striders Track Club is honoring Murray
for his unselfish, dedicated and devoted service to
the Striders Track Club and the young people of the
country at a time when he can appreciate it.

“Stephen is the longest serving track coach in
any.club in this country. His whole career has been
geared towards helping young people,” Bannister
stressed. “He’s given a wonderful example of what

’ it is to be a coach. He’s organised a club and hé’s

stayed fit, so none of you can tell him about the
workout that he's not experienced himself.”
Bannister, a former distance runner himself,
said during the time that he served as president of
the BAAA, Murray would have been one of those



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RST OTR Rue mee CUR AUC Seer LATE iS]
fo) eT MU CoAT ENYA aC VAL SU a UO OAL

MINISTER of Sports
Desmond Bannister (left),
along with Olympic men’s
triple jump bronze medalist
Leevan ‘Superman’ Sands
(second right) and former
Minister of Sports, Neville
Wisdom (right) join together
in presenting coach Stephen
Murray with a cheque from
the Ministry of Sports and a
plaque from the Striders
Track Club at a banquet in
Murray’s honour on Saturday
night at the Sheraton Cable
Beach Resort.



MINISTER of
Sports, Desmond
Bannister and for-
mer Minister of
Sports Neville Wis-
dom share a
moment with coach
Stephen Murray and
his parents at the

’Striders Track Club
banquet on Satur-
day night to honor
their coach. From
left are George Mur-
ray (father);
Stephen Murray;
Bannister; Thelma
Murray (mother)
and Wisdom.

coaches who didn't mind coaching the develop-
mental national teams, rather than going to the

' more prestigious international events.

He credited a lot of Murray’s success to the
support that he got from his parents, George and
Thelrna Murray, who shared the head table with
him, Bannister and Wisdom.

Wisdom, in his keynote address, said when he
was coaching the Baintown Flyers Track Club, it
was always his goal to see Murray make the nation-
al team. In fact, he had recommended Murray to be
on the team that went to Bermuda and won the first
Carifta Games in 1984, but it didn’t happen.

So when Murray had informed him that he was
going into coaching, Wisdom said he gave him his
blessing.

“Stephen Murray was a special, special person,”
Wisdom said. “I remember when we talked about
the 4.x 4, not the actual running of the relay, but
how we would encourage every athlete on our team
to help four people and if those four people could
help four peaple; COL earn e nar oroMn tenes



im said Wihveay was: an outstanding
Bahamian who did that and should b be commended
for what he has achieved.

Murray, who has passed the IAAF levels 1-4 in
coaching and has represented the Bahamas as a
coach or manager om many national.teams, said
he was quite surprised.on Tuesday when He was
informed about the bahquet.that was i in the making
for at least 4-5 months. "> °°

He offered his condolences to Blossie Smith
and her family on the passing of Smith, whom he
met when he first started coaching.

He also thanked Wisdom for the role he played
as his coach and mentor. :

Considering the fact that he never made a
national team as an athlete, Muiray said he had a”
lot of disappointments along the way, not being
selected to travel as a national coach in the early
stages of his career when he egeehed athletes like
Chandra Sturrup.

“JT was really fed up, but my father pulled me
aside and asked me what I was doing it for and I
said it was for the love of it,” Murray said. “I nev-
er stopped. I continued doing it.”

For his efforts, Murray was awarded the
Caribbean Bank Unsung Hero Award for 2008,
thanks to Jackie Davis, who works with him at
Sheraton Resort. She wrote an essay and he won
the award.

“T don’t know what ’'m aie with vinese kids,
I’m coaching them and rowing them and just trying
to guide them in the right direction,” said Murray,
who thanked his family, especially his parents, his
brother, Ashland, who started the club with him, .
coach Keino Demeritte and his sister, Sherry Fran-
cis, who has returned from retirement to coach-
ing. Murray has vowed that despite his club not
having a sponsor, they will be the prettiest track
club with the girls wearing their pink uniforms and
the boys in gold as they continue to make their
presence felt on the local scene.

The club also honoured coaches Keno
Demeritte, Saron Cox and Sherry Murray.



COACH eoneh Murray is sur-
rounded by his Striders Track
Club athletes as they paid a spe-
cial tribute to him at their ban-
quet held on Saturday night at
the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort.

Systems:








“Stephen is the
longest serving
track coach in any
club in this
country. His whole
career has been
geared towards
helping young
people.”




Pee essa re SON a NT]



Desmond Bannister


THE TRIBUNE

Knowles and
Bhupathi lose in
second round in





MONDAY, JANUARY 12,. 2009

: PLAYOFFS

Jets power to 54-0
win over Warriors

m@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net .



‘Felipé Major/Tribune staff

JOHN BULL JETS’ wide receiver Garvin Newbold tries to avoid the defence of the Kingdom Warriors yes-. .
fey at the DW Davis Field.

he top seeded team in

the Commonwealth

American Football

League used a stingy
defence, which forced six
turnovers, and a seemingly
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their way into league champi-
onship in the opening game of
the playoffs.

The John Bull Jets advanced
with a dominating 54-0 win over
the Tripoint Kingdom Warriors
yesterday at the D.W: Davis
Field.

With the win the Jets await the ss :
winner of next Saturday's other THE WARRIORS’ running back tries to break the defence of John Bul ti sd

semifinal between the defending —_ Jets yesterday. es | See : - _ Ale \ : cP AT



Major/Tribune staff

ipé



Fel

champions Orry J. Sands Pros
and the V8 Fusion Stingrays.

The Jets scored three times in
the opening quarter, on scores
from Ishmail Sutherland and
Valdez Bodie to go ahead 22-0.

The Jets scored just once in the -
second quarter on when Drame-
co Clarke connected with Garvin
Newbold to give the league lead-
ers a 26-0 advantage.

Clarke, who finished with six’
touchdown passes on the day , hit
Eldon Ferguson for another score
on the opening drive of the third
quarter as the Jets began to put
the game out of reach.

SEE page 13

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MONDAY,

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Ly



2009



Insurance brokers likely to

‘consolidation over next 12 months’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamian insurance bro-
kerage/agent industry is
likely to undergo “some
consolidation over the next
12 months”, sector executives have told
Tribune Business, with stricter legisla-
tive requirements and the economic
downturn combining to produce a rash

of mergers and business failures. _

Timothy Ingraham, the Bahamas
General Insurance Association’s
(BGIA) president, said that with the
Government moving to finally bring
the Domestic Insurance ‘Act into force
more than three years after the legis-
lation was passed, “some of the issues

are going to be some of the smaller

brokers surviving the regulatory
requirements”.

The Act has never been implement-
ed because the accompanying regula-
tions, which give it enforcement teeth,

have yet to be signed off by all stake-.

* New Act and economic conditions could force mergers, business failures

* Minister Zhivargo Laing says regulations completed ‘real, real soon’

* New Act’s passage ‘very critical’, due to need for greater regulatory oversight/enforcement
* Registrar of Insurance Office upgrading seen as ey

holders-and tabled in the House .of

Assembly.

Yet that process, according to min-
ister of state for finance, Zhivargo
Laing, is likely to be completed “real,
real soon”, indicating the Act will come
into force this year. When it does, it

will mandate that Bahamas-based:

insurance brokers and agents have ade-
quate professional indemnity insur-
ance coverage, meet certain minimum
capital requirements, and pay separate
licence fees if they wish to be known as
“brokers and agents”.

Mr Ingraham told Tribune Business

¢

that with the.

enhanced regu-
lations, and
“the prevailing
economic cli-
mate, you will
probably see
some consoli-
dation in the

broking market’

over the next
12. months.
There are so
many small
one-man, two-



‘Zhivargo Laing

man band operations, it’s going to be
difficult for them to generate enough

. Income to pay the professional indem-

nity insurance”
Tribune Business has been told of
past instances where a few Bahamian

brokers/agents have decided not to:

renew their professional indemnity
insurance simply to save money, a
move that potentially could place both
themselves and their clients at risk. .
This newspaper cannot cite names
for legal reasons, but other insurance
industry sources told Tribune Business
that rather than professional indemni-

ty insurance, the main financial chal-
lenge facing brokers/agents as a result
of the new Act would be the increase
in. fees if they kept the moniker ‘bro-
kers and agents’.
If they do, they will pay two separate
fees — one for the ‘broker’ and the oth-
er for the ‘agent’ — rather than the sin-
gle fee they pay now. As.a result, Tri-
bune Business has been told that a _
number of companies are changing
their name to just use the word ‘broker’
as a way to avoid exposure to the extra

SEE page 6

End- January target | Recession-proof

for Planning Acts’
consult readiness

B@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government is ‘aiming
to have draft amendments to
two key planning-related “Acts
ready to be circulated for public
consultation by month’s end,
with the changes seeking to
make legislation less prescrip-
tive for developers and clarity
what ‘approval in principle’
means.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, told Tribune
Business that the revised Town
Planning Act and Private Roads
and Subdivisions Act were



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* Changes designed to
accommodate ‘model
communities’ on eco-

_ friendly, renewable
energy plans

* Moves to clarify ‘approval
in principle’ and-make
process ‘interactive’ and .
balanced

* Transect Code seen as key
aid to local government
decisions

intended to reflect new types of
development, such as ‘green’
communities and the use of
renewable energies, and pro-
vide developers with more flex-
ibility. -

‘The minister added that ihe ae
- amendments were also designed

to forge a “more interactive
process” in Town Planning and
when it came to approving res-
_idential and commercial devel-
opments.

The Town Planning Act
reforms, Dr Deveaux added,

were designed to strike a bal.

ance between giving the Gov-
ernment/Town Planning Com-
mittee the ability to review and
change ‘approvals in principle’,

, and’also ensuring developers

did not incur a tremendous cost
burden-if earlier decisions were
reversed.

SEE page 4 -

The Now Providence
Finanelal Casnter

Bat a SN Vel

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Suile 720 :
Nassau, The Bahamas



hopes i in face of
‘very scary year’

M@ By CHESTER
ROBARDS
Business Reporter

AS ECONOMIES
around the world buckle
under the weight of the cur-

rent financial crisis rippling ©

from the US, some Bahami-
an businesses say they are
still optimistic about the
year ahead, with some
believing they may be
almost recession-proof.
Sharon Farrington, own-
er of La Chica Caliente, a
women’s clothing store on
East Street, told Tribune
Business she is optimistic
about the 2009 business
year. She will be depending
on her regular customers to

SEE page 3



Government sets out Bimini PLP Straw
Bay approval ‘limits’

By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government will “only
accommodate” applications by
the Bimini Bay Resort for per-
mits/approvals “up to the limit
of Phase 2 (a)”, Tribune Busi-
ness has been told, something

(that does not include the pro-
posed controversial golf course
—a project that will.be subject-
ed to “intense investigation”.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of
the environment, told this news-
paper that the Government had
informed the resort’s developer,
RAV Bahamas, a subsidiary of
the Miami-based Capo Group,
as to what would be required

from it to obtain future per-

mits/approvals for construction-
related work at the project.
One condition set by the
Government, Dr Deveaux said,
was that all future construction
and development work at Bimi-







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* Will only accommodate
applications up to Phase 2(a),
stance that excludes golf course

* Nine-hole facility to be
subjected to ‘intense
investigation’ before a
go-ahead

* EIA-and EMP to cover all future
resort works before approvals

ni Bay would require an envi-
ronmental impact assessment
(EIA) and environmental man-
agement plan (EMP) in
advance.

“We have written to the
developer with what require-
ments have to be met with
regard to future approvals,” Dr
Deveaux said. “The Govern-

‘ment will only accommodate -

applications up to the limit of

SEE page 5

Market
plans were
a ‘shocker’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor.

A Bahamian economic think-
tank has. accused the former
Christie administration of get-
ting carried away. over their pro-
posed $30 million-plus Bay

_Street Straw Market, its execu-

tives describing the situation as
“a shocker” that would have
given the taxpayer extremely

- poor value for money.

Rick Lowe, a senior execu-
tive with the Nassau Institute,
questioned why the former LP
government had contemplated
funding the Straw Market pro-
ject with a 100 per cent taxpay-
er subsidy, funds that were
unlikely to have been recovered

SEE page Tse








Bi Toor.
PAGE 2B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

LAST week, Bahamian
investors traded in six out of
the 25 listed securities, of which
two declined in value, one
advanced and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 53,133 shares
changed hands, representing a
decrease of 35,315 shares or 40
per cent, versus last week's trad-
ing volume of 88,448 shares.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader last week

YOUR CONNEC

with 25,728 shares trading, its

stock ending the week
unchanged at $7,

Focol Holdings Company was
the sole advancer last week, its
share price rising by $0.02 to
$5.19 on a volume of 19, 600
shares.

ICD Utilities (ICD) led the

decline, its stock decreasing by

$0.54 to $5.59 on a volume of

2,300 shares. Cable Bahamas
(CAB) traded 1,500 shares, its
price falling by $0.08 to end the
week at $13.95.

BOND MARKET
Investors traded $5,000 (par

ONTO THE WORLE

value), worth of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Notes, all in Series
C Notes (FBB13) Due 2013.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

Bahamas Waste (BWL)
released unaudited financial
statements for the nine-month
period ended September 30,
2008.

BWL reported net income of
$274,000, a decrease of $608,000
or 68.9 per cent compared to
the same period in 2007. BWL's
gross profit stood at $1.7 mil-
lion versus $2.4 million for the
comparative period in 2007, a

r 2009 Directory at
ni outlets below



a

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VeyeP7 PZ

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decline of $688,000 or 29.2 per
cent.

Sales revenues of $5.8 million
were down by $210,000, while
$4.2 million in cost of sales was
up by $478,000. Total dperat-
ing expenses fell slightly by
$80,000 to $1.4 million, com-
pared to $1.5 million for the
same nine-month period in
2007.

Earnings per share decreased
by $0.15 to $0.06, versus $0.21 at
the end of the 2007 third quar-
ter.

BWL's.total assets and liabil-
ities stood at $9.9 million and
$1.5 million respectively, com-
pared to $9.2 million and $1 mil-
lion at year-end 2007.

Freeport Concrete Company
(FCC) released its audited
annual results for the year end-
ed August 31, 2008.

FCC reported a net loss of

- $488,000 compared to a small

a

profit of $78,000 in the prior
year, a change of $567,000.
Gross profits declined by $1.3 °
million or 26 per cent, due pri-
marily to lower sales of $13.6
million, compared to $16:2 mil-
lion in the prior year.

While gross profits were low-
er, the company also reported
lower selling, general and
administration expenses, which
declined by $746,000 to total $4
million in the year.

Management indicated that
despite a stagnant economic sit-
uation in Grand Bahama, the
focus in 2009 will be increasing
sales at both the Home Centre
and concrete plant, while con-
tinuing to control operating
expenses and inventory shrink-
age.

Basic and diluted earnings
per share decreased to $0.104
from $0.017 in the previous
year.

Total assets of $6.7 million
fell by $433,000 from the prior
year due to a declining accounts
receivable and inventories bal-
ance. Total liabilities of $5.2 mil-
lion increased slightly by
$55,000 compared to prior year-
end. The company ended the
year with an accumulated deficit
of $5.7 million.

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 833.32



BISX

SYMBOL PRICE

AML STi ue! Be
BBL $066; ya,
BOB “$7.64 ° $-
BPF $11.00 $.
BSL $9.88 $-
BWL .- $3.15 $-
CAB $13.95 $-0.08
CBL $7.00 $:
CHL $2.83 $:
CIB... $10.45 <
CWCB $2.20 $-0.32
DHS $9.55. ue g.
FAM $7.80 $2
FBB $2.37 aR
FCG. 45. $0.30 (353 $-
FGL ;.» $5.19 $0.02
FCEB <2 .$1.00. 8. $
FIN $11.87 $-
ICD $5.59 $-0.54
JS]. $10.50) 3.0 $+
ee $10.00 $-

FOREX Rates

CAD$
GBP
EUR





Commodities

Crude Oil
Gold









DJIA
S & P 500

NASDAQ
Nikkei



shares will be paying a dividend
rate of prime + 1.75 per cent ,
payable semi-annually.

Dividends/AGM Notes: °

FirstCaribbean Bank Interna-
tional (CIB) has declared a div-
idend of $0.02 per share,
payable on January 9, 2009, to
all shareholders of record date
December 31, 2008.

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of.its.private place-..
ment offering. The preferred

a

AGTARES NB LIATENTLIUA?

0 while supplies ah

ee

J. S.. Johnson (183): } has
declared a dividend of $0.16 per
share, payable on January 21,
2009, to all shareholders of

\
iN
yy

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

International Markets

International Stock Market Indexes:































CHANGE
0 0.00%
0 0.00% :
0 0.00%
0. -6.78%
0 -3.04%
0 0.00%
1,500 -0.57%
25,728 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%

0 -2.22%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0 0.00%
0] < 0.00%
19,600 |. -.0.39%
4,000. 0.00%
0 0.00%
2,300 -8.81%
0 -5.41%

Que 0.00%







Weekly % Change
1.1872 -1.99
1.5176 +4.43
1.3454 -3.15

Weekly % Change
$40.76 -11.87
$853.00 -2.81



Weekly

8,599.18 -4.82
890.35 -4.45
“LSST159 -3.71

8,836.80

record date January 14, 2009.

Consolidated Water Company
(CWCB) has declared a divi-
dend of $0.013 per share,
payable on February 7, 2009, to
all shareholders of record date
January 1, 2009.

Bank of the Bahamas (BOB)
announced that it will be hold-
ing its Annual General Meet-
ing on Thursday, January 29,
2009, at 6 pm at the British
Colonial Hilton Hotel, No.1
Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas.

nae a

APE
a ee: a a y Yi


THE TRIBUNE

ie eee ee aa
Don’t discount last
minute sales surge

li By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

CHRISTMAS sales were not
as bleak as some retail busi-
nesses had feared, but were still
less than favourable for many
stores with last-minute sales
accounting for most of their hol-
iday revenue.

A representative of the
Sports Centre, the sporting
goods chain with three outlets at
the Mall at Marathon, Harbour
Bay and Sandyport, told Tri-
bune Business that given the

current economic situation and’

growing fears of a‘recession,
they “can’t complain” about
their Christmas sales.

“We weren't up, we weren’t
down. We were about the same
as last year, so we were happy,”
they said.

According to the representa- °

tive, the store offered a 20 per
cent discount two days before

Christmas, something the Sports
Centre never had to do previ-
ously. She said the sale was to
attract buyers to premium items
in the store, but less expensive,
lower margin items, comprised
the majority of sales..““Per per-
son, the actual bills were lower
- people were spending less this
year, she said.

Store

Tessa Dames, store manager

of Silver City in the Mallat: :

Marathon, said sales were not as
good as previous years. She said
customers were spending, but
were very cautious about what
items they purchased, looking

for value for their money.

According to Ms Dames,

cologne and perfume were the ~

best-selling items in the store,
which is known for its silver

jewellery.
She said, though, that chil-

dren’s necklaces and sets for
women were also popular items
last year.

A Mall at Marathon clothing
retailer, who wished to remain
anonymous, said his sales
peaked on Christmas Eve,
much to his relief.

Having only been open for
one year and one month, he
said there was still a noticeable
change in sales from Christmas
2007. As a fairly new retailer at
the Mall, he said he will have
to stick close to his regular cus-
tomers in the New Year and

find new and innovative ways.

to market his business.

“I am cautiously optimistic
about 2009,” he said.

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, president
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, said recently that
up to 10 per cent of businesses
could fail this year if the cur-
rent economic downturn is pro-
tracted and deep.

Recession-proof hopes in face of WeFY scary year’

FROM page 1 ©

help her.through what might be a tough eco-

nomic year for small businesses in the retail sec-

tor. :

“If you are good to your customers through
the years, they sure will come back,” said Mrs Far-
rington. “Some people don’t care about their cus-
tomers, but if you have good customers and you
always give them percentages off, they will come
back to you.” OO

She said the uncertain economic climate was
very unnerving,.though. “It’s scary. Yeah, I think
it’s going to be very scary.” -

Mrs Farrington said she also has a business
that might be considered recession-proof. She
said the hair and nails business will always be in
high demand in Nassau, and she has her own
establishment called The Shades.

“People who have hair places will make mon-
ey,” she said. “Let me tell you something; women
will buy hair before they buy food. There is no
recession for hair - it’s going to sell.”

Lajuan Swain, general manager of GNC (Gen-
eral Nutrition Centre), said she believed the vit-
amin and supplement business might, also be
recession-proof.

:-. “They say that we are in a recession right now,
‘but I haven’t seen or, felt-any changes here in



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Nassau as of yet. But I’m sure it will be because of
the occupancy levels in the hotels.” he said. “My
customers are not the American people, but still
my Bahamian people need to make the money
from the Americans in order to come here to
spend.”

Mr Swain said GNC’s Freeport branch was not
doing very well financially, due to the economic
climate on Grand Bahama. But he does see the
need for his company to downsize any time soon,
as they keep their overheads low.

“You just cross your fingers, and you hope and
you pray that you don’t feel it,” said Mr Swain.
“No one in our business will be losing their jobs”

Da Basement, a hip hop clothing store on East
Street, has relocated from Collins Avenue in
order to increase business, and has created a
unique space to attract customer. Now, owner
Keith ‘Vado’ Colebrooke says he might have to
revamp the store in order to stay competitive in
the upcoming year. —

. According Mr Colebrooke, he is optimistic
2009 is going to be a good year for him because he
also leans on his printing business, which he said
people always need. .

“We will just have to diversify and step outside
the box,” he said.

Many Bahamian businesses have said they are
bracing for the worst effects of the economic cri-

sis to,come. through in 2009.













MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 3B

pocictielamceanmni

Tt
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

The Nassau Airport Development.
Company (NAD) is seeking candidates
for the position of Airside Specialist.
Reporting directly to the Manager of Public
Safety, the duties and responsibilities of
the successful applicant will include:

* Daily-airside inspections
¢ Enforcing Airside Traffic Directives
~ + FOD control and airside safety

management

* Runway checks

* Fostering a culture of safety and .
awareness on the airside

* Overseeing General Aviation and FBOs

* Promoting aviation safety by reducing

’ wildlife hazards

* Providing a point of contact for airlines
and ground handling ramp staff -

* Overseeing all airside construction
projects

* Conducting airside accident and incident
investigations

* Primary point of contact for airport
operations after hours = =

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+ Spacious sitting area with sofa bed
» Cable TV, refrigerator, in-room safe, coffee maker, hair dryer

+ Pool with swim -up bar
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years operational experience in an airport,

















Potential candidates will possess a
minimum of an Associate's Degree
(Bachelor's Degree preferred) and 3-5

flight operations, air traffic control or airline
environment. Expertise in ICAO Annex 14,
Bahamas Civil Aviation Regulations and
FAA regulations is required along with a
working knowledge of Aerodrome Safety
Regulations and airport zoning regulations
and requirements.

Applicants should be proficient in Microsoft
Office with an aptitude for technical
information. They should have experience’
in negotiation and mediation and possess
strong problem solving and communication
skills with the ability to work within a
diversified group. Knowledge of Safety
Management Systems would be a definite
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Additional fees apply for mandatory taxes, mandatory housekeeping gratuities and utility service fees.



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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

UBP employee
gains Series 7



ACT, from page 1B

On the legislative reform
process, he explained: “We
received a preliminary report
from the consultant we had
engaged, with some revisions to
the Acts.and a Concept Paper.
We are reviewing those, and the

ning has been asked to confirm
whether the review addresses
the issues that needed to be
addressed. .
“Once we solve that, we can
take it to the next step, which is
to present it for consideration. I

. have asked the Permanent Sec-

Department of Physical Plan- retary to have these things

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Immediate Vacancies at Kingsway Academy

~ Business Office:

Accounts Officer _ .
Applicants are invited from persons (preferable male)
_ for the junior position of Accounts Office to assist the
Accounts Personnel. Knowledge of Accounts and
various computer skills are necessary.

The successful candidate must:

® Be honest and reliable

4 Be willing to give support to the Accounts
Manager and staff

9 Be able to assist with proper record keeping of

~ all receivables and prepare records of all

_ receivables for Auditors check;

)- Be able to provide factual information from
prepared documents ~

® Bea born again Christian.

~ High School:

Science Teacher
‘The Services of a temporary Science Teacher is
needed for the end of January, 2009 for a three
month. period. The successful applicant. must be
able to teach Biology, Health and General Science.

Applicants should have the following:
e AnAcademic Degree in the area of specialization
A Teaching Certificate
Excellent Communication Skills
A love for children and learning
High standards of morality
e A born again Christian :

Letter of application together with a resume and
recent color photograph (including the. names and
addresses of at least three references, one being the
name of one’s church minister): should be forwarded
to:

Ms. Kelcine Hamilton

Academy Affairs Manager

Kingsway Academy Business Office
| Bernard Road — ye eagee

Nassau ~ %

Deadline for applications is Friday January 30, 2009

ready by the end of the month
[January 2009].”

Dr Deveaux explained that
“model communities” such as
Schooner Bay, which is being
constructed in Abaco by New
Providence-based developer
Orjan Lindroth, “will in. many
respects challenge some of the
provisions in these Acts”.

Currently, much Bahamian
planning and development-
related legislation is highly pre-
scriptive in nature, mandating
that developers do things in cer-

. tain ways and use the specific

services of government-owned
corporations, such as BTC,
BEC and the Water & Sewer-
age Corporation.

The Town Planning Act and
Private Roads and Subdivision
Act, reforms, he said, were

designed to give developers,

behind communities such as
Schooner Bay more flexibility
in their operations, and account
for the use of renewable ener-
gies and environmeéntally-
friendly designs/materials.

For instance, Dr Deveaux
said the Private Roads and Sub-

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division Act currently stipulated
that the width of roads in tradi-
tional subdivisions should be 40
feet. Yet the question had
arisen over whether this was
necessary in communities devel-
oped only for golf-cart use, and
with sidewalks for pedestrians.

' “Tt does not encourage com-
munities building low-energy
homes with tree coverage, and
wanting to generate their own
power,” the minister explained
of the current legislation. “To
do that, you have to get special
permission from BEC and tie
into their grid.”

The same applied to the likes,

of BEC and the Water & Sew-
erage Corporation, on issues
such as the use of grey water,
collected by communities, for
use in an irrigation system. “We
want to acknowledge in the Act
the commitment to green com-
munities and subdivisions which
are built for energy conserva-
tion, walking,” Dr Deveaux told
Tribune Business.

When it came to ‘approvals

in principle’ issued to develop-
ers by the Town Planning Com-






The Anglican Central Education
Authority
is pleased to announced its Grade 7 Entrance
Examination.

The Entrance Examination will occur on

Satur b

008, 8: - 12:

at each of the following Anglican Schools:

. St. John’s College, Stapledon Gardens, Nassau
2. St. Anne’s School, Fox Hill & Eastern Roads,
Nassau
. Bishop Michael Eldon School, Freeport Grand
. Bahama
. St. Andrew’s Anglican School, George Town
‘“Exuma ;

Applications can be collected from any Anglican
School ‘between 8:30am - 3:30pm but must be
returned to the school the candidate wishes to attend.

Applications will be accepted until the
registration deadline of 3:00pm
Friday, 30th January 2009.



THE TRIBUNE

A Bahamas-based Union Bancaire
Privee (UBP) employee has passed
the Series 7 examination after
studying with the Nassau-based
Nastac Group. Melissa Bain, a two-
year employee of the bank, is

-shown here with the Nastac
Group’s managing director, Reece
ON Uae



mittee, Dr Deveaux said the
legislative amendments would
look to clarify that this was not
the same as a ‘final approval’.

In the past, ‘approvals in prin-
ciple’ have often been treated as
a final approval by developers,
who have subsequently run into
trouble.

The most recent issue to rear
its head was the proposed
Wendy’s outlet at Cable Beach.
Having received ‘approval in
principle’ from the Department
of Public Works/Town Planning
Committee for an area zoned
for commercial use, the fast
food chain spent a seven-figure

‘sum on purchasing the land,

only for the Committee to later
rescind its approval after a pub-
lic outcry from residents living
near the project.

The end result was the loss
of time, money and opportuni-
ty cost for Wendy’s. Dr
Deveaux said: “Generally, when
a developer applies for plan-
ning permission, they get an

approval in principle, which.

gives them certain rights and
entitlements that usually” con-
tinue with final approval.

He added: “We want to be
certain about that approval in
principles that the Town Plan-
ning Committee issues, so that
they do not deny the Govern-
ment the ability to review or
vary the approval, but not
impose.a cost burden upon the
developer, where he’s done cer-
tain things only for final

‘ approval to be denied. We want

a more interactive process.”
Dr Deveaux said the legisla-

‘tive reforms would also

embrace a Transect Code,
which he described as a vital
tool in helping local government
authorities throughout the
Bahamas to determine which

‘developments were suitable for

specific areas, and the appro-
priate density.

The Code, he explained,
‘would divide land into geo-
graphical codes according to its
description and condition, such

‘as beach zones, ocean front and:

pine forests. From here, the
planning authorities would be
able to determine whether pro-
posed developments — and their
density — were suitable for that
type of land.

“Once you have these

' defined, you can prescribe den-

sity requirements and appro-
priate development for each
area. The geographic features
will pre-determine and prede-
fine the kind of density and use
the land could be put to,” Dr
Deveaux explained. :
“It removes the subjectivity

. from decision-making, because

you’re letting the geography
and the land determine what is
appropriate based on a pre-
determined set of conditions.”
. The minister explained, for
example, how in coastal zones
there could be specific require-
ments for buildings to be set
back a minimum number of feet
from the dunes, and density per
square acre.
The reforms will also deal
with the zoning structures need-
ed to govern developments in
areas such as wetlands."

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2009.

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Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel Stage 1 Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport. The C-220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components:

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Steel Joist; and

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
installations of steel decking.

Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
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Tender closing is at 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,
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Contact: TRAC! BRISBY.
Contract & Procurement Manager:
Ck ee



FROM page 1B

Phase 2 (a), and that will only
be done with an EIA and EMP
being in place. That is a require-

ment of any approval going for-

ward.”

The minister himself pointed
out that the proposed Bimini
Bay Golf Course, which was the
subject of much scrutiny in an
independent consultant’s report
on the project that was pre-
pared for the Government, lay
in the development’s Phase 2
(b).

The report by consultants
Black & Veatch attempted to
address concerns over whether
an island of Bimini’s limited size
could accommodate develop-
ment beyond Bimini Bay
Resort’s Phase I boundaries,

given that RAV Bahamas and ©

the Government had executed a
Heads of Agreement for a 700-
acre project.

Black & Veatch paid particu-
lar attention to the Phase II golf
course. The first Ingraham
administration had restricted
this to just nine holes, but the
former Christie administration

increased this to 18 holes with .

the revised 2004 Heads of
Agreement. Upon regaining
office, the current government,
via the Bahamas Investment
Authority (BIA), informed the
developers it wanted a return
to the original nine holes, with

the golf course built on “hard
lands”,

Confirming that this was still
the Government’s position, Dr
Deveaux said the administra-
tion had provided RAV
Bahamas with a copy of the
Black & Veatch report and dis-
cussed it with the developer. He
added that Biminites would be
consulted on its contents at an
upcoming Town Meeting, which
would be attended by Back &
Veatch, the aim being to assess
the scope of future work con-
templated by Bimini Bay.

“The ‘Government had

stopped any activity at Bimini

Bay until Black & Veatch did
this report,” Dr Deveaux told
Tribune Business. “Going for-
ward, the developers have to
comply with the findings of the
Black & Veatch report for
Phase 1 (b). The fundamental
requirements are an EJA and
EMP for additional works.
“The Government has since
approved the Marine Protect-
ed Area (MAP) for Bimini.
That is not conditional. What
is conditional is the effect of any
development or approved
development on the MPA.”
As a result, Dr Deveaux said
the proposed golf course would
be “subject to very intensive
investigations”, especially as its
boundaries and location con-
flicted with those of the MAP.
“Anything going forward will

BUSINESS

Government sets out Bimini Bay approval ‘limits’

be based on an EJA and EMP,
including the golf course,” Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.
“RAV Bahamas has indicated
unconditionally that the golf
course will only be built if the
EIA confirms it is appropriate.

“The Government has con-
firmed that any golf course will
be a nine-hole course, only built
on hard land, not reclaimed
hard land, and will be a links
golf course.”

RAV Bahamas had restruc- .

tured its 2006 master land use
plan to scale back Phase II in
terms of density, although mari-
na, commercial, utilities and golf
course uses were still planned.
The development footprint was

reduced, with 153 acres taken .

out of the project.

These are the. 153 acres that
RAV Bahamas in 2006 offered
to. the Government in exchange
for 49.11 acres of reclaimed land
for use in Bimini Bay’s Phase
I, an offer the Christie govern-
ment apparently accepted in
return for the developer paying
$10,000 per acre.

While the layout of lots for
Phase II A had been completed,
RAV Bahamas said its devel-
opment plans beyond that were
still “fluid”.

In its assessment, Black &
. Veatch said some 276.6 acres

of land was available in Phase II
B for a golf course. Taking out
areas such as red mangroves,

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Mr. Ganpatsingh is acting as a Consultant to the firm,
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\

Fort Nassau Centre, Marlborough Street
P.O. Box N-4875, Nassau, Bahamas _
Tel: (242)502-5000 ~ Fax: (242)328-0566

A
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company





Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce.the C-280
Apron Drive Bridges Request For Proposal associated with the expansion of ©
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The scope of work includes but is
not limited to:

©’ Fabrication ‘of five (5), Apron Drive Bridges conforming to the
requirements of the RFP for Stage 1 Construction and five (5) Apron
Drive Bridges for Stage 2 Construction, (2012);

° Transportation and installation of Apron Drive Bridges in accordance
with the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Terminal Expansion Schedule;

¢ — Testing, commissioning and training.

This request for proposal is of interest to Apron Drive Bridge Vendors, however
should also interest local Electrical Trade Contractors.



Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, ans

Requést for Proposal seeing is Wedinesday, February 11th at 3:00pm,

2009.

\

There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 15th. Please RSVP Traci
Brisby by 1pm Wednesday, January 14th for briefing location details.











natural ponds and the flood-
plain area, would remove
between 142.67-164.13 acres
from the land available to a golf
course, leaving just 112.5-133.93
acres left. .

“Whether this provides suf-
ficient space to accommodate
the desired 18-hole golf course
will depend upon the type of
course and design layout to be

developed,” Black & Veatch

said. “Eighteen-hole golf facili-
ties in the US average about
150 to 200 acres of land, accord-
ing to the US Environmental
Protection Agency by reference
to the Golf Course Superinten-
dents Association of America.
A typical urban course is only
110 to 120 acres, while courses
in resort areas may be 170 to
190 acres.”

The Black & Veatch report

said an envirgnmentally sus-
tainable facility will be a ‘tight
fit’. And its report warned that
“significant limitations to avoid
environmental impacts will
make course design a challeng-
ing and sensitive matter”. It

-urged the Government and.

Bimini Bay’s developers to
“compromise” on the scope and
scale of Phase 2.

The project’s 2006 proposed
Master Plan envisions a 410-
room Conrad Hilton Hotel and
10,000 square foot casino, with
an operating partner for the lat-
ter still being sought.

It also includes 559 marina
slips, inclusive of the 140 exist-
ing slips; 50 over-the-water bun-
galows; 125 timeshare or con-
do units (at the developer’s dis-
cretion); 250 timeshare units on
the commercial site; 358 con-
duct units on the island opposite
the hotel; 40 Bay Front bunga-
lows; 100 space site condo units;
91 single family homes; 34
estate beach homes; 100 golf
course condo units.

Some 329 units in the condo
homes are currently completed
or under construction, and
Black & Veatch said in its
report that 59 single family res-
idences had been built. Anoth-
er seven parcels of land had
been sold, while 240-250 boat

slips had been installed.

Currently, the report said
between 210-270 construction
workers were working at Bimi-
ni Bay, while 175-185 Bahami-
ans, out of a staff. pool of 230,
were working in operations. Of
the Bahamian connec nis, 80°
were from Bimini.

Bimini Bay had also com-
pleted construction of a com-
mercial village near the resort
entrance and ferry dock, with
the facility including shops, deli,
a mini-mart, marine shop and

* liquor store.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



AVAGREN SELL

Newly Constructed Two Units Commercial Building
Land and Structure, Step Street & Fox Hill Road

Unit One comprises one office, customer service section, and one bathroom.
Unit Two is a retail store with an open floor plan and one bathroom. . |
Potential Income: Unit One $1,800.00 per month/Unit Two $800.00 per month

For conditions of sale and any other information, please contact:
The Commercial Credit Collection Unit
@ 502-0929 or 356-1608, Nassau, Bahamas

Interested persons should submit offer in writing addressed to:

' The Commercial Credit Collection Unit, P.O. Box N-7518, See Bahamas
to reach us on or before January 31st, 2009... :



SPEAKER:

Dr. Michelle Major

Autism Specialist

ioe ne “



LECTURE DATE

Thursday, January 15th "09 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP ¢ Seating is Limited ¢ 302-4603

Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the month for this scintillating

series of the most relevant health issues

affecting society today.

Ronnell ‘ Saney “Sends:



a?) DOCTORS HOSPITAL

Health For Life
PAGE 6B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

ea
Insurance brokers likely to undergo
‘consolidation over next 12 months’

FROM page 1B

fees.

Peter Cole, the Bahamas
Insurance Brokers Association’s
(BIBA) president, told Tribune

Business that consolidation
could “possibly” take place
among the sector as a result of
the new legislation and eco-
nomic environment, although
the issue had not been raised at

BIBA meetings.

He acknowledged, though,
that the number of players
entering the insurance industry
was increasing, with four new
brokers having been established

COURT —
Wey)

Action#: 2007/CLE/gen.0043 1
Judgment Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgment Debtor: Mark Sturrup |
1995 Isuzu Big Horn license#156452

Action#: 2007/CLE/gen/00583 _
Judgment Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgment Debtor: Selina Cartwright

.,2002 Chevy Avalanche license#T20944

Action#: 2008/CLE/gen/00101
Judgment Creditor: Premier Importers Limited
Judgment Debtor: Jeremiah Storr
1999 Ford Escort license#186529

Vehicles can be viewed from 7:30am to 4:30pm

“in the last few months”. The
increasing number of brokers
could be chasing a market that
is flat or contracting, meaning
there are too many companies
seeking too little business — con-
ditions that are ripe for consol-
idation.

“I wouldn’t be surprised to
see something like that happen
along those lines,” Mr Cole
added. “The smaller brokers are
going to be impacted by the
new legislation. It seems that
whenever consumer legislation
is brought in, there’s a price to
pay. It’s going to be interesting
to see what the new legislation
does.”

That time could soon be here.

' Mr Laing told Tribune Business

last week that the Government,
in the form of the Attorney

_ General’s Office and Ministry

of Finance, were working to
consolidate the Domestic Insur-
ance Act’s regulations after
receiving advice from the pri-
vate sector. Previously, the reg-
ulations had involved several
separate sets of rules, and the
Government was now focused
on “tidying up” the work done.

“I expect fully for us to have
this process completed real, real
soon,” Mr Laing said. “It’s
important for our own regula-
tion of the sector. We’ve been
trying to get this done for a
while.

“The Government has taken
into account the suggestions by
the industry in terms of consol-
idating the regulations, and is
now tidying up the regulations
so that they can be passed.”

Mr Ingraham, who also heads
Summit Insurance, said it was
“very critical” for the Domestic
Insurance Act and its regula-
tions to finally take effect, given
that.the sector was currently

operating under legislation
passed some 40 years ago in
1969. ,

A key concern, he explained,
was that.under.existing legisla-
tion the Registrar of Insurance’s
Office had minimal regulatory
powers, especially when it came
to sanctions and enforcement.
As a result, the regulator had

been somewhat handicapped ©

when it came to disciplining
insurance-related entities and
their executives for wrongdo-
ing and rules breaches, fre-
quently having to refer matters
to the Ministry of Finance.

Tribune Business, for exam-
ple, knows of several instances
where brokers have failed to
pass on, to the insuring carri-
ers, premium income taken on
behalf of their clients. In one
episode, several insurance car-
riers and other brokers/agents
were reportedly left short by
more than a combined $1 mil-
lion.

“A lot of things have
changed, bearing in mind that
the last Act was passed in
1969,” Mr Ingraham told Tri-
bune Business. “The regulator
has not had enough authority
to do a lot of the things it needs
to do, and they have had to be
referred to the Ministry. In sit-
uations where there needed to
be an investigation, these things
drag on and on. They’re not
able to do what they need to
do. :

“We think it’s critical for the
new Act to be brought in place
to address these things. We’ve
been advocating for quite a
while to get it put through,”

Mr Ingraham said the
Bahamian insurance industry

had not suffered any negative.

impact from the failure to
implement the new Act, “other
than the regulator has not been
able to deal with people seem-
ingly acting outside the law”.
In such instances, the BGIA
president said there was the
potential for the actions of a
tiny minority to inflict reputa-
tional damage upon the wider

Bahamian insurance sector, _

THE TRIBUNE

“That’s been the frustrating
thing — to have matters drag on
and on for years, seemingly
because the regulator can’t do
what it needs to do to correct
the issue,” Mr Ingraham said,
adding that when the new Act.
was passed the Registrar of
Insurance’s Office “must be
able to do things a lot quicker”.

One of the reasons cited by
the former PLP administration
for not bringing the Domestic
Insurance Act into effect under
their watch were doubts about
whether the Registrar of Insur-
ance’s Office had the expertise,
resources, in-house knowledge
and technical ability to oversee
and administer the new legisla-
tion.

The Domestic Insurance Act

.will transform the Registrar of
_ Insurance’s Office into an Insur-

ance Commission. Among the
other changes it will introduce
are mandating insurance com-
panies to lodge deposits with
the regulator; the maintenance
of adequate solvency margins
and a sufficient level of statuto-
ry reserves to remain solvent;
and greater policyholder edu-
cation.

“They are critical, we feel, to
a current, more modern insur-
ance industry,” Mr Ingraham
said. “We’re looking forward to
the regulations witha certain
amount of interest, because we
want to make sure they’re not
too heavy-handed, but done in

_accordance'with the spirit of the

Act.

“We definitely want to see
the final versicn of the regula-
tions before they’re tabled in
Parliament, because something
may have got lost in transla-
tion.”

For the stories —
behind the news,

ic=Â¥-lo i /hJ[e gg
on Mondays



at Premier Importers, St. Albans Drive.













NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that EMMANUEL JEAN OF ESSEX
STREET OFF SHIRLEY STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send |
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight

days from the 5TH day of JANUARY, 2009 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.

Bids must be in writing on or before
January 22nd, 2009.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Contact: 322-8396 @ extn. 232 or
| - cheelaw@gmail
for any additional information.



LEGAL NOTICE

| NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)



RAINFOREST FUNDING CORP. |

The fine line of General Electric appliances Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8)
of the International Business Companies Act, No.45 of 2000,
the Dissolution of RAINFOREST FUNDING CORP. has
been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued
and the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
The date of completion of the dissolution was the 24th day of

December, 2008.

found: at Geoffrey Jones cater to today’s -
busy households and fit every lifestyle. Our
wide variety of GE appliances are designed
to suit your needs, providing the ultimate
in convenience, performance and style.
With the best that technology has to offer,
competitive pricing and a full service
department, Geoffrey Jones is your ultimate

appliance centre.

Pharmacy Technician

Course |
Evening 5:30 pm - 8:30pm

American Certification Exams
Only once weekly class
By
Florida Board Pharmacist

- GEOFFREY |

©2009 CreativeRelations.net

JONES & CO

Sales & Full Service Department
Rosetta & Montgomery Streets

Register Today for January session.
322-2188/9

Just call Hepson.

356-4860

You'll wonder how you ever got along without it.


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009, PAGE 7B



FROM page 1

given that many vendors paid
no or minimal rent.

He told Tribune Business:
“Personally, | think there has
to be a cost-benefit analysis, and
is it really to the country’s ben-
efit to do that on this scale for
peopie who don’t pay rent and
sell non-authentic, non-Bahami-
an goods? Is it fair to every
Bahamian? Is it only fair to the
600 Bahamians in that place?

“I believe that property could
earn the country more rev-
enue..... When the Straw Mar-
ket was originally conceived, it
was a good idea. It has served
its purpose, and now the straw
vendors should be in a position
where they become regular
business owners and take the
step up to the next level.

“If they need help, we should
give them a helping hand, but
the day-to-day running, expense
and upkeep of the Straw Mar-
ket should not become the
responsibility of every Bahami-
an citizen. It’s not the right
approach. Effectively, every cit-
izen is paying for someone to
have a private business, and
that’s not the role of govern-
ment.”

In its missive on the Christie
administration’s plans for the
Bay Street Straw Market, the
Nassau Institute analysed infor-
mation provided to Tribune
Business by Jean-Michael
Clarke, of VERITAS Consul-
tants, which was appointed as
project manager for the mar-
ket’s construction under a now-
cancelled contract handed to
Woslee Dominion.

Noting how the Bay Street
Straw Market’s projected costs
leapt from $18 million to
between $29-$37 million, the
Nassau Institute took the mid-
point of the latter range to show
that the per capita cost of the
plan was $110 per Bahamian
citizen.

This would have meant that
every Bahamian would have

been contributing $110 in the
taxes they paid towards the
Straw Market’s costs. And giv-
en the percentage of persons
not contributing taxes, such as
the elderly, children and unem-
ployed, the Nassau Institute said
the effective burden on working
Bahamians would have been
much higher.

While the 605 vendors at the
Bay Street Straw Market paid
an annual rent of $100, Mr
Lowe suggested that the Gov-

‘ ernment did not know whether

all were paying or were up to
date. Research conducted by
the Nassau Institute in Septem-
ber 2007 found that there was
no requirement for vendors to
sell Bahamian-made products
or straw goods, and only 50 per
cent of vendors surveyed did
so. And 50 per cent of vendors
violated copyright laws by sell-
ing knock-off items.

“It is time to ask whether a
straw market on Bay Street is
an asset or an unaffordable lia-
bility. Rental income is negligi-
ble relative to the investment.
The result is a government sub-
sidy for a few individual
lessees,” the Nassau Institute
said.

“There is a notion that the
country needs a Straw Market
as'a shopping experience for
tourists. Whether true or not is
questionable. However, there
is no question about the degrad-
ed image for Bay Street as a
shopping destination when non-
Bahamians are hawking cheap
knock-offs and imported sou-

_venirs.

“To build a market for the
cost originally intended ($18
million) is morally wrong
because it places the cost bur-

den on the population that.

derives no material benefit and
may even be harmed by the
unsavoury image. The days are
long gone when the market
added ‘local culture’ and the
fun of bargaining for Bahamian-
made straw work.

HEAVY TRUCKS, 20FT & 40FT

CHASSIS, FLATBEDS, TRAILERS,

FORKLIFTS & MISC. VEHICLES
FOR SALE —

52 trucks, vans and trailers including heavy
duty Mack trucks, enclosed box delivery trucks
and trailers, various forklifts and 150 container

chassis priced for immediate sale.

In Nassau call 377: 0165 and ask for John
In Freeport call 352-9315 and ask for Fred

An established bakery is
TR ALO LLM
ing for the following persons:

2 Cashiers
Qualities
You must be-young and energetic and vivid
personality. you should be an ordered and

disciplined person accustomed to following a
routine. You should appreciate clean and neat

surroundings.

Excellence, not average, should

be your measure. Your enthusiasm should be
contagious. Your ethics should be impeccable, and
you should possess an obsession for doing what
is tight. You must be responsible. You must: be

self-assured. Your

attitude

should ‘not be

malodorous. Above all you must be able to resist

the urge to steal.

4 Bakers

Qualities

You must be experienced. You should not be
lazy. You must be a détailed-oriented person ever
vigilant and not bored with an established routine.
You must love to learn. You must be willing to adapt
to. new ways of achieving a task. You should not be
lazy, but willing to work. You must work well within
a team and you should love your work. Above all
you must be able to resist the urge to Steal.

1

Only person fitting these description need apply.
Person pretending to fitthese qualities only toget
the job will be promptly fired upon the exposure
of their true colors. Please call 436-9203, and be
prepared to email your resume to:

theislandbake



hotmail.com

“When grardiose plans for a
government project capture the
minds of politicians, the sky is
the limit and the humble tax-
payer is ignored.”

Mr Lowe told Tribune Busi-
ness he was unable to see any
value for money for the tax-
payer in the former administra-
tion’s Straw Market plans. He
suggested that the rather than
build a new facility for them,
the straw vendors should be giv-
en a piece of land by the Gov-
ernment — and not necessarily
on Bay Street — then either
lease or buy the property, and
then finance the Straw Market’s

‘ construction themselves — all

underwritten by rental income
paid for stalls and licence fees.

Otherwise, Mr Lowe said, the
Government would become
responsible for almost every-
thing, taking away accountabil-
ity and personal responsibility
from Bahamian citizens.

Mr Clarke, the former pro-

ject manager, himself recom-

mended that whatever hap-
pened with the Straw Market
moving forward, the vendors
themselves needed to have a
sense of ownership, for other-
wise “the chances of maintain-
ing the Straw Market in good
condition dwindle”.

“T do not believe that we
should give a $23 million gift
without condition to the Straw
Vendors,” Mr Clarke said. “I
believe the costs should be
shared. If the Government has
allocated $10 million for the
Straw Market, rent from the
500-700 vendors and artisans
who are expected to occupy the
building, as well as revenues
from the rental of the commer-
cial space on thé roof level, and
the observation tower.”

The former project manager
said-in a paper sent to Tribune
Business that. the proposed
building “somehow” expanded

PLP Straw Market plans were a ‘shocker’

from an initial 77,000 square
feet “at preliminary design” to
“close to” 200,000 square feet at
the time the project was sent
out to contractors for bid.

The proposed Straw Market
scope presented to his company
and rivals when they responded
to the project manager Request
for Proposal (RFP) issued by
the Ministry of Works in 2005
showed a building 70,000 square
feet in size and costing $10 mil-
lion.

Yet, when appointed, VERI-
TAS Consulting was confronted
with preliminary design docu-
ments showing a 200,000 square



,

foot structure. The initial bud-
get based on this had risen by 80
per cent, from $10 million to
$18 million, “plus or minus 25
per cent” because the design
had not reached a stage where
costs could be determined.
“When we received our terms
of reference for this project

‘from the Ministry of Works, it

said that the building would be
77,000 square feet and cost $10
million,” Mr Clarke wrote. ,
“Throughout our tenure as
project officers, we have never
seen a building of this scope
named the New Straw Market.

- As early as January 2006, the -

INVESTMENT OPPORTUN ee

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY
Peardale Subdivision, off Wulff Road

Lot | & 2, zoned for Mixed Use comprising of 6,266 sq. ff. on which is situated a
« p Q =
single storey commercial building 2,300 sq, ft.

For conditions of sale and other information, please contact:
Phone: 356-1685, 502-1929 or 356-1608.
Interested persons should submit offer in-writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us by no later than February 02, 2009.

size of the building was already
known to have exceeded 77,000
square feet and the cost of the
building was known to be more
than $10 million. Our earliest
documents always had the
structure at over 180,000 square
feet.”

The increase in size inevitably
meant an increase in costs. The
77,000 square foot Straw Mar-
ket was priced at $129 per
square foot, but at 200,000
square feet the project would
cost between $29-$37 million.
That, Mr Clarke said, translated
into'a price of between $107-
$185 per square foot.








CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

FirstCaribbean is a major Caribbean Bank offering a full range of aaeteading finan
services in Corporate Banking, Retail Banking, Credit Cards, Wealth Management, Capital
Markets and Treasury. We are the largest regionally listed bank in the English-speaking
_.. Caribbean with over 3,500 staff, 100 branches and banking centres, and offices in 17
regional markets, saying 800, Q00 active accounts. We are looking to fill the following

1

4 heed

DIRECTOR, OPERATIONS CEN’

- Email applications: to Deangelia Deleveaux, HR Business —
(Emall address: coos Bea ane ean corny

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

* Develop, revi

ea “



, revise and enact the overall long-ter m strategy of the Operations Centre of xc lence io ithe Bank in the region.

-# Embed best practices and develop a strong team af of Sperations personnel that is ‘Be momedsete, experienced and efficient i in processing of

bank's business.

* Lead the global transition of the Operation’ from the present structure to the Centreaf Excellence:

vs



Pe Lead, develop and motivate a team of Operations Headls of the specialised businesses, such as Card Operations, Treasury Operations and
‘ Intemational Business Operations, in order to achieve the overall objectives-and goals of the business, .
regional specialised Operations functions af the Operations Department, including ‘but not limited to Centralised Securities,”

| Banking, Treasury Operations, Card Operations, Wealth verceres Sores Asset ee Operations, Capital
8, Custodial Setvices, ee

reas. responsible for the execution of al ‘ banking transactions, maintaining a fully controlled environment.
perational as activities in ne Bahamas, Soya: Te BV, ae and Gers.

Track record of ducaing consistent and cornolant Lperatsril objec tive eS,

to manage, lead and motivate large teams.

Previous experience ina large, regional, multi-ccountry Operations environment within the financial services industry.
s » Experience | in preparing and presenting business plans to executive teams.

An understanding of the full range of products and services provided by FirstCarlbhean across all segments.

oe Knowledge of the policies and strategies of the functional lines.
* Extensive knowledge of service delivery within the Retail, Corporate and Offshore Banking markets.
_« Comprehensive and detailed knowledge of the Bank’s bookkeeping and office procedures.

* Thorough knowledge of internal and’ external audit requirements.

* Sound understanding of Operational Risk, Compliance and Information Technalogy controls.
¢ The ability to analyze financial information to aid decision making pracesses,

Please complete Ae ROM matching hoolcan are requested to submit their resume
iy

your SA ICM Laces
a 9

i
qualifications or aula

cM ee rnits
sian)

ha wover letter by January 16th, 2009,

Only applicants who are shart-listed will be contacted,



FIRSTCARIBBEAN

INTERNATIONAL BANK

GET THERE. TOGETHER.
THE TRIBU. ..

PAGE 8B ,MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009



COMIC PAGE

CALVIN & HOBBES

THERES SOMETHING MAGICAL] THE CRACKLES AND SNAPS,
ABOUT HANING A FIRE. THE WARM, FLICKERING LIGHT.
EVERYTHING ALWAYS SEEMS



Tribune Comics




HOT TIGER TUMMY TO '

AND IF YOU'E Got A
vedi \E AGAINST... MELL?

SAFE AND COZN \F YOU'RE. fff i
Hh

JUDGE PARKER

| HERE YOU GO, MR.
| DRIVER..-YOUR GATE

SITTING {N FRONT OF A FIRE.

IWAS OUST foe : ES
GOING TO SS —,
il f 2 ('
7 TAN
\ RON snl
LM Ss
ERS
eS \

: ai

TAM
OL



TELL ME
YOU'RE ON
YOUR WAY

HOME!



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



AS MARGO FEELS HER

WAY IN THE DARKENED
ROOM: * [WHATS THAT

LINKING RED

FLASH?

ANSWERING ill
MACHINE 2.

{
AND ERIC HAS

OH RATS.’ THE LIGHTS
ARE ON A TIMER.
T CAN'T SEE A 4m

3| SHE FLIPS:ON THE LIGHT
CUTAN -S TE ANF



















THE ANSWER TO
THAT QUESTION |S
ON PAGE 376!

THANKS, BUT I'M
NOT LOOKING FOR
RENCE
BOOK






WE'VE ADDED
SEVERAL NEW
REFERENCE

IS CHOCK FULL
OF FASCINATING
H INFORMATION













©2009 Conceptis Puzzles. Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“YOU MUST BE AN AWESOME SWIMMER! MY Dap
SAID YOU WERE VERY LONG-WINDED/"



' Difficulty Level * *& & *& ; 110



©2009 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved
rn di—H

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers '1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.







YOU TWO



LOOK, JUNIOR, 1S THIS WHERE
\F YOU QUIT COULD LIVE WE'RE,
FIGHTING WITH TOGETHER IN SUPPOSED
BITSY AND HARMONN / TO HUG

EACH OTHER
AND SING
“KUM BAYA’?

JUST LEARN
TO SHARE









©2009 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

wert kingteatures.com















©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





















Difficulty Level * *& *& %& 1/10

BEFORE I KNOW IT?
GEE, I ALWAYS MISS
. OUTON THINGS!

ITS COLV NOowW—
BUT BEFORE YOU
KNOW (T, SPRING

WiLL 6E HERE ;










White to play and win. This -

endgame by Viasiav Holst seems Chess solution 9343: 1 QhS+ Qf6 {if KaG 20hG+ wins

a headed for a draw, as both the queen) 2068+ Od6 (if Kd4 3 Qb2+ wins the Q)3 :
> queens are free to roam the 2+ Qd4 4 Qh2+ f4/NOAKIG 5 OhS+ arid 6 Qxd4,
i board checking the opponent's Mensa quiz: Stare and starve. 6
3 king. An additional hazard for One possible word ladder solution is: LAZY, lacy, .
: White is that the obvious lack, luck, buck, busk, BASK.

2 .

capture 1 Qxh1 loses the queen
after Black's reply Qa8+, Qb7+
or Qc6+. Problem and endgame
composers aim for artistic
solutions where White makes at
least one quiet, non-checking
move, but that's not possible



HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

OM « Ak. / « here due to the danger from
p T ARGUE ! Tle WiLL -- Black’s queen. A different visual
< idea is to defy the axiom that

BE THE FIRST CHANCE MOTHER
HAS HAP TO SEE WHAT

pieces are strongest on central
squares and instead operate

rqund the edges and comers of ‘ The HOW many words of four

the board. That's what occurs. pete or oy JoHLInAle 2
nice hecki om the letters shown here?”

ee ee Target making a word, each letter may

sequence has his queen make a



©2008 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.



; be used onee only. Each must
Cook's tour of the chessboard, USES contai.t aoe tad
é ontaii.the centre letter and
With these clues, can you spot the words in there must be at least one
win? the main nine-letter ward. No plurals. -
hody of TODAY'S TARGET .
Good 23; very. good 24; excellent
i T Chambers 45 (or more). :
Ist Solution tomorrow.
Cen WEDNESDAY'S SOLUTION
: : tury ahead blah dahl dhal haar ~
CRYPTIC PUZZLE Dictionary | | halberd hale hand handle
nee (1999 HANDLEBAR: handler hard
adtion, | | hea! hear heard hed herald
Across Down ion), eal hear he eld her:
1 Plays for time in the 4 Not in one’s own herb herbal herd rehab rhea

interest (8)
2 Arrests about a thousand
supporters (8)

theatre(6)
4 Influenced in an unnatural

wae) tg 3. It’s bound to mean a
9 Mother hits out on August change of plea (4)
ist (6) 5 It's the done thing in
10 Lose track of account in . France (4,8) © :







South took the club lead with the

simple form (8) 6 See a letter goes to the Fe |
12. Neil turned right (4) : a cl ee a 2 pay Sian eae] ea
13 Cooked meats id istressing twitch about to
O eats provide itrtate (6) | Pe - i LG
energy (5) 8 Motor sled thatis South dealer: i ace and, with all the aces and kings in
14 In December I’m expecting constructed (6) North-South vulnerable. plain ‘view, concluded that West’s
frost (4) 14:Vatirs walcomete dating a NORTH double had to be based on his trump
| , : tae : @K85 holding. He therefore led a low
Eee 17 Still twenty required to get gratifying experience WK7 trump ‘toward dummy at trick two.
MV” even (6,1,5) (3,1,8) : @AKI9 and West played the ten to protect his
oe 20 Conduct a consuming 15 Cover for person with a #KQ64 two trump tricks. When East’s nine
< interest? (6.7) “3 cageer (2) ; Morice Pes appented, Seu felt confident that
oy ot just any type o S West had all the missing trumps.
. | me ae - es ae * injury (5) ¥j54 ¥10832 Since the slam could now be sal-
ND oftpaper: (4) 18 Kept quiet (8) ws | Across Down 864° #10752 vagéd only by a trump endplay,
ew 24 Check out of Kabul (5) 19. Two fools in murderous _I 1 Wheedle (6) 1 State a grievance (8) &J 107 5 9532 declarer temporarily ‘abandoned fur-
25 Girl getting rave review (4) combination (8) N 4. Unanimously (2,3,3) 2 Danger (8) sou TH ther trump leads. Instead, he cashed
oS 28 Discovers it’s fun to do 21 Aprofessional apt to N j Y Nea 9: Beasts’ @AT7 : 32 the K-A of hearts and ruffed the nine:
oO : benefit (6) > 9 Shortsightedness (6) east’s den (4) ¥AQ9G6 in dummy.
he wrong (5,3) : : : 5 Unsophisticated (6-6) #Q3 Next came the Q-K-A of dia-
oe 29 Verdi’ sei 22 One who deserves what 0. 10 Trading centre (8) e : Aes
N. erdi’s composition he gets (6) 6 Gas used in #AS8 monds, South ruffing the ace to
bee. transmits power (6) 36 C g Pi 4 > 12 Shakespearean ee The bidding: reduce his trump length. Declarer
-E | 30 This is dropped by plants ustoms epplcatons.2) wn”) king (4) lighting (4) South West North Kast then played the K-Q of clubs, dis-
e a 27 The charge is about right, 7 For the most part (6) 1¢ Pass 34 Pass carding the queen of hearts, to pro-
: : for birds (8) but don’t h t { 13 Oppress cruelly (5) - = v4 Coe ng ear tee >
: ut you dont have to Ww 8 Sum total (6) 39 Pass 34 Pass duce this position:
31 A number put on tissue (6) pay (4) 14 To fly (4) oh 1 64 Dble North
Cc : ; 17 Warm spell in late i ae Gesely Opening lead — jack of clubs. e
| Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution
R y YP aay 7 aug (6.6) 15 Jeer at (5) Silence is golden. ‘There is no area &6
O Across: 1 Still, 4 Drifter, 8 Ski, 9 By Across: 1 Demur, 4 Cutback, 8 All, 20 Public 16 Gem (5) of bridge where this maxim is more West East —
- no means, 10 Armband, 11 Repay, 13 9 Bucharest, 10 Indulge, 11 Unity, declaration (12) 18 System of fitness pertinent than in the ae he #Q16 aeeh Immaterial
S | Nutmeg, 15 Editor, 18 Backs, 19 13 Gratis, 15 Felled, 18 Glass, 19 23 Part played (4) axercisee.(Bi aan Seabee: s Sally Ie < ue
_ : : . aine: a — usue
S i fee ae 23 Rex, 24 paces > See 23 Nun, 24 24 Narrow street (5) 19 Precisely (8) 100 points —- that it should be Dummy’s trump eight was next
Le umbels, 25 Rises ’ : NGtHUG) 25 oday. 25 East Asian desert (4) reserved only for hands where the — led and ducked. West took ‘his jack
‘¢n, | Down: 1 Sustain, 2 Idiomatic, 3 Libra, | Down: 1 Drawing, 2 Melodrama, 3 21 Merchant (6) arta; “defeat is virtually 100 but Kad to retuira & spade from the,O:
W ; 28 Po ; 8 certainty of defeat is virtually had to return a spade )
| 4 Denude, 5 Immured, 6 Tea, 7 Risky, Rebel, 4 Cachet, 5 Traduce, 6 Age, or comic verse (8) 22 Unfortunate percent, or in special cuses where the. 6. to South’s A-7. So declarer made
oO -| 12 Pot-pourri, 14 Essence, 16 7 Kitty, 12 Ill-omened, 14 Insipid, 16 29 Leave off (6) situation (6) doubler is requesting a specific open- the slam and scored 1,860 points
| Relaxed, 17 Strays, 18 Baron, 20 Decency, 17 Cerise, 18 Gusto, 20 30 Cruel (8) 26 Fir or pine wood (4) ing lead from partner. . ..__ instead of going minus 100.
R “1 Rates, 22 Dam. Digit, 22 Rue. 3 31 Lively (6 27 Tolerate (4 West’s one-word speech in this That West could have defeated
: : ively Ae) olerate (4) deal allowed declarer to make aslam the contract by playing the six of
S Dd that surely would have failed had — trumps at trick two is irrelevant. He
ee West remained silent throughout. just should have kept his big mouth

tightly shut,

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc.

.
PAGE 9B MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009





“MONDAY EVENING _
|

JANUARY 12, 2009



The Best of the

8:00 8:30

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y

—-

_ THE TRIBUNE BUSINESS |

ina challenge that tests their chari- |.

Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put



let Charlie the



some smiles on your

kids faces

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough St. every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the

month of January 2009.

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

(T\

i'm lovin’ it


PAGE 10B, MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Co
Readers have their say on Soro rope’

Re: It’s time to order
’ the hanging rope

Dear Mr Marquis,

I am not always in agreement with
you. However, you hit it out of the park
on this one! Finally someone in the
media put the only commonsense solu-
tion forward. There is one thing you
might have forgotten...executing a
criminal eliminates the criminal, which
would end the havoc caused by that
particular criminal, therefore the deter-
rent argument to me is irrelevant.
Whether or not it deters crime, if you
start eliminating them one by one there
will eventually be little to no criminals
left. You do, however, have to make it
consistent and not hang one and then
take a 20-year vacation before another
execution takes place. When the gov-
ernment steps forward and takes the
issue seriously, then believe me shortly
thereafter the criminal will be elimi-
nated. It is a win/win for society.

As government is so’concerned about
this issue and the expense of the whole
lengthy process, I am willing to pledge
$1,000 to the government for every mur-
derer executed with the condition that I
drop the platform with the murderer
in the noose. This will eliminate the
government’s need to find or pay some-
one in the prison system who might also
have second thoughts about ridding a
murderer (in other words a bleeding
heart liberal). These funds could help
the government feed a few "tiefs" in
Fox Hill at my expense!

So there's the offer, Mr Ingraham
and everyone else in the FNM...I pull
the plank five times, $5,000 to the trea-
sury, 72 times (which is a ridiculous
number of murderers for this tiny coun-
try), $72,000 for the public treasury. I'm
willing to clean this country up, are
you?! |

Once again, excellent article Mr Mar-
quis. I'm sure you will be crucified by
your liberal colleagues and friends.
They are all for tolerance and diversity
until you show a different point of view.

— Christopher Armaly

I LIKE your honesty.in acknowledg-
ing at the beginning that you don’t fit
into the mould of those who usually
support the death penalty. But I support
you 100 per cent.

As you say, there is no scientifically
perfect way to determine whether the
death penalty deters others from com-
mitting murder.

But my generation became the sane
and sensible people they were because
they were, told: “If you don’t change

your ways, you are going to hang on_



the gallovés:?* =

it back. W
‘behind for misbehaving.
— Nassau pastor

FROM page 12
into

the Bahamas is not going to have a
dramatic impact on this. society is
naiveté of the most dangerous kind.
It pre-supposes that every Haitian
scrambling ashore from an upturned
sloop is going to undergo a radical per-





MONDAY, JANUARY 5, 2009 Tee





THIS was the most constructive and
compelling argument J have ever heard
in favour of the death penalty. You cov-
ered all the bases, and had the consid-

-erable advantage of having right on

your side. Thank you.
— Dena B

Dear Mr Marquis,

Your column on hanging is one dear
to my heart. As a slightly to the right of
centre individual, I am a strong propo-
nent of hanging.

I see hanging (or other forms of cap-
ital punishment) as the punishment for
someone taking a human life without
benefit of judge or jury. I rarely enter-

tain the “deterrent” argument, though”

certainly it deters:thé individual who
was hanged from ever killing anyone

~ again. I am not concerned if it “deters”

others from committing murder, which
to my mind is highly unlikely. I am only
concerned with justice for the victim
and their family.

~ ONE of a number of Haitian ;
-sloops that are found:
washed ashore in

sonality change the moment he hits -:|\"*

Yamacraw beach. .

Sorry, it will not and cannot happen.
Anarchy is bred into the Haitian psy-
che. Democracy is a word they barely
understand.

At some point in the not-too-distant
future, the mass influx of Haitians will
have reached a critical point at which
an alien culture will begin to subjugate
the hosts. °

Enoch Powell, a much-reviled polit-
ical figure of the 1960s who predicted
that Britain’s streets would become

“rivers of blood” if immigration con-
tinued unabated, is now viewed by the
wise as the man who got it right.

It’s unfortunate that the metaphor he
chose to describe his heartfelt fears
was so over-the-top, but the underlying
thesis of his remarks is now beyond
serious doubt.

It’s true there have not literally been
“rivers of blood” in Britain’s streets
— though quite a lot of it has been
spilled nonetheless — but no-one can
now pretend that mass, uncentrolled
immigration has been a good thing for
Britain.

Over the last ten years of cata-
strophic New Labour government, the
entire nature of British society has
changed. In fact, it could be argued
that Powell’s prescience did not go far
enough.

Who, for instance, would have
thought 40 years ago — when Powell

was ostracised by the Conservative.

Party for telling the truth — that Mus-
lims would be on the streets of London
calling for Britain to become an Islam-
ic state?

Who would have thought an admit-
tedly unintelligent white Englishman
would be converted by Muslim extrem-
ists into a shoe-bomber intent on'blow-
ing up an airliner in flight?

Who would have thought a mad
mullah would be allowed to set up a
mosque in which he openly and
brazenly called for his followers to
undermine English society?

Who would have thought that resi-
dent Muslims would be allowed to
declare a fatwa — a death plot —
against a leading British writer because
he said something in a novel that they
didn’t like?

And who would have predicted the
events of last week, when violent pro-
testers turned out in London wearing
the colours and waving the flags of

Hamas and Hezbollah in protest
against the Israeli assault on Gaza?

Actually, Powell’s fears for Britain
have been more than realised as a
nation which was once arguably the
greatest on earth now struggles to
come to terms with its own identity.

All this has happened in a nation of
60 million souls, a transformation
which has turned suburbs of many
major towns and cities into immigrant
ghettoes.

Walk down any street in South Lon-
don on a Saturday morning and you
could be forgiven for thinking you were
in Mumbai or Karachi. A woman who
took a 40-minute stroll into Northamp-
ton town centre passed not one English
person on the way. The corners were
clogged with unemployed Slavs, all
talking in Eastern European tongues,
while the women were clad in yash-
maks and burkahs. “Were it not for
the old Victorian streets, I would not
have known I was in my own coun-
try,” she said.

Powell, a maniacal presence with a

formidable intellect; told the British
in the 1960s: “You must be stark star-
ing mad.” Few question his wisdom
nowadays.

The Bahamas, remember, has
300,000 people — that’s roughly the
population of Leicester, an unremark-

able English Midlands city. Just 60°

miles off this country’s southernpost
point lies the failed state of Haiti, with
more than seven million people who
would rather be somewhere else. To
ignore the dynamics of this worrying
situation is nothing short of gross irre-
sponsibility.

Last week, a 39-year-old woman



There is no sound
Peres tiinton tierce
the death penalty

A REPORT that



Cvcnn|

Getting a 20-year sentence for first
degree murder and with time off for
good behaviour waltzing around town
after S-7 years, is not to my mind justice.
The victim, after all, got a “death sen-
tence.”

I do differentiate between first-degree
murder and manslaughter. One is pre-
meditated and the other is not. Hanging,
in my mind, should deal with premedi-
tated murder, and a prison sentence
should deal with manslaughter. I total-
ly agree with you that society is dimin-
ished by murderers walking free. If we
value life so little that the victim
becomes unimportant and only the
criminal becomes important, then we
as‘a people are the lesser for it. Tam
originally from Canad#*I have watched

. from afar as the murder rates increased

there after the abolition of capital pun-
ishment. Many of the murders have
been committed by those released from
prison after incarceration for a prior
murder. Some are still on probation or





attorney — a Bahamian mother of two
young children — called The Tribune
to implore me to raise the Haitian
question once again.

She expressed deep concern that her

children’s generation will be forced to”

live in a Bahamas vastly different from
the one we know today, and totally
unrecognisable from the ordered soci-
ety it was 50 years ago.

“The only thing we have in common’

is skin colour,” she said of the Haitian
invaders, “It is a disaster waiting to
happen. They fly the Haitian flag
everywhere, even on their cars. They
carry Zopound stickers on their back
bumpers. They spray Zopound slogans
in the ghettoes.

“Someone needs to stand up and say
that Bahamians need to be protected
against their own lackadaisical, lazy
and corrupt ways.

“These people (immigrant criminals)
are endangering the tourism industry.
Everyone who flies'a Haitian flag is
someone who does not have an alle-
giance to the Bahamas. These are not
docile people. They are dangerous and
will destroy the nation if we don’t take
a stand.”

Her prognosis for the Bahamas on its
present course is not encouraging. “I
don’t think we have ten years. I think
we are at the point where it is getting
out of control. Unfortunately, you have
to make Bahamians hurt before they

- will rise to stop it. They have to feel it

in their pockets.”

It is important here to stress, as I
have before, that Haitians are not all
bad. On the contrary, they have many

e



FEEDBACK -

(horror of horrors) day passes, that for
some reason Canada loves to give to
criminals. Let us value human life to
the extent that society must be protect-
ed from predators. Spending our hard-
earned tax dollars to keep these people
in prison is a scandal. The Privy Coun-
citcannot possibly understand our situ-
ation here and Amnesty International
would be better served working in coun-
tries where a woman is stoned to death
for “allowing” herself to be raped by

- 11 men, while they walk free.

— Lois Major

In today’s Insight, you reported that
families of murdered victims marched in
support of capital punishment, on two
occasions last year. Kindly note that
families of murdered victims marched

‘on Labour Day and Independence Day,

2008, and-on Saturday, November 22,
2008. ;

_ Families and friends of murdered
victims "rushed" during the Junkanoo
celebrations on Boxing Day, 2008, and
New Year’s Day, 2009, with the Bush
Warriors in support of capital punish-
ment. Nevertheless, you have thrown a
powerful and noble blow for the com-
mencement of capital punishment as
the murderers have no fear for the law
because of our worthless politicians.

— Rodney Moncur

You can count me in among the
droves that are going to miss your well-
written, thought-provoking pieces when
you depart. Few articles fit that descrip-
tion more than your latest piece on cap-
ital punishment. I agree with the major-
ity of your points and I'm also on board
with ridding society of the proven wan-
ton killers.

Where my view differentiates from
your view is that I would require a stan-
dard of "no possible doubt" achieved by
the courts as opposed to the prevailing
"beyond reasonable doubt" in order

for a judge to have the option of pro- —

nouncing a death sentence.
In your article, at one point you say
"The argument is irrelevant...because

we have to assume the courts get things -

right." This would be wonderful, if it
were true, but you and I both know
that, not occasionally, but many, many
times the courts get things totally
wrong. In fact, in a parallel paragragh in
the same article, and to prove my
point, you say "..,the local courts areso
susceptible to corruption... ", Further-
more, you have also written on many
occasions, and Hagtéé wholehearted-

‘ly, on how inefficient and inept the legal

system and its practitioners are in this
country (and, indeed, the
world). Although you glossed

smartest of them are very smart, and
the most cultured of them very cul-
tured indeed. Haitian art is universally
admired. They are a people of sub-
stance. And the most pleasant of them
are as. pleasant as you will find any
where.

But they have never majored in gov-
ernance. Nor are they noted for mea-
sured responses to the routiné irrita-
tions of life. It’s their drive, their inner
strength, probably their impetuosity
and volatility, that prompts them to
risk their lives on treacherous seas to
make a future for themselves.

Ever since Dr Francois ‘Papa Doc’
Duvalier ruled Haiti from 1957 to 1971,
refugees from poverty and political
violence have been fleeing their home-
land for a better life in the Bahamas
and the United States. There is no
doubt that their plight is real and their
desire to escape wholly understand-
able.

Since the Duvalier family yielded
power in 1986, things have got worse,
not better. Jean-Claude Duvalier, Papa
Doc’s podgy son, is on record as saying
that his country has gone downhill
since his day — a claim which, ludi-
crous as it sounds, is actually true.

Brutal as they were (it is claimed

that Baby Doc was having political

opponents tortured and killed in the
basement of the National Palace on

. the day he flew into exile) the Duva-

liers brought a crude form of stability
to a fundamentally unstable nation.
Though whole families were whisked
from their homes at night, never to be
seen again, those who kept their heads
down and noses clean knew that, in
spite of everything, a perverse system
of law and order prevailed.
Subsequent governments have failed
to provide any kind of security to com-
pare with the Duvaliers’ odd mix of

- extreme oppression and paternalistic

merits, including a formidable work °

ethic and strong family values. The

patronage.

By the time Aristide — the left-wing
priest who proved to be as corrupt as
his predecessors — was catapulted
from office a second time in 2004, Haiti
was drifting out of control, with gangs
running wild in the city slums and
politicians at a loss.

Today, under President René Preval,
Haiti remains — officially — one of
the most dangerous places on earth,
where kidnappings have become com-
monplace and armed enforcers rule
the ghettoes.

So long as Haiti remains in a state of

chaos, and people go hungry as a result

‘of its ravaged crops and denuded farm-

land, the, desire {o escape will be as
compelling as it’s always been.

In the past, the Bahamas has
absorbed tens of thousands of Haitians

over this argument lightly with your
"Boeing engineers" analogy, if the riv-
eters screwed up their job as often as
the courts screw up theirs, you and I
would never consider flying again!
One has to remember that after a
man is executed there is no recourse
once it has been discovered a mistake
has been made. However, with the
growing advent of video, either by sur-
veillance cameras or the teenager's
ever-present camera phones, the night-
ly news programmes show us that there
is now an abundance of wanton killing
and destruction captured on cam-
era. This video "culture" is such a fast-
growing phenomenon, and our court
system so shamefully and hopelessly
clogged, that by the time any of the new
crop of killers get their day in court,
there will no doubt be indisputable
video evidence of enough of their atroc-
ities in order to assure everyone that
no innocents have been sentenced to

_ death.

Alternatively, if 30 people watch and
identify some maniac who walks in to a

‘yestaurant in Mumbai and starts indis-

criminately mowing down patrons with
a machine gun, then, by all means, take
him out and fry his ass! My only point is,
I think we should be ABSOLUTE-
LY...no, make that... DEAD SURE!:
— Perry Attfield
NP.

I APPRECIATED your article on
capital punishment. The book of all
books lays it out very clearly. There is
no getting away from it: if there contin-
ues to be slackness like we have, there
are bound to be consequences. -

— Male Caller «

YOU hold a mirror up to Bahamian
society. Your writing is so incisive, it’s
scary.

— Insight fan

I CANNOT help but congratulate
you on your article on hanging. I have
been a consistent supporter of capital
punishment all my life.

I fully support all of your points.

I could not help but note your omis-
sion (perhaps deliberate) of one of the
biggest benefits of capital punishment
and that is all of the government fund-
ing required to keep these beasts fed
and sheltered for all of their remaining
lives without any benefit when we could
be using those funds to educate chil-
dren not to become one of those beasts!
Or, we could feed and shelter the fam-

- ilies of the victims of these beasts with

those same funds.

In addition, since these beasts do not
have anything to lose, the longer they ©
are in prison, ‘the better chante “of them
trying td:escape and puttifig the prison
guards and the general public in har-
m's way. Bring on hanging!

Peter



into the lower end of the national econ-

omy, giving. them the yard jobs
Bahamians no longer wanted, and rely- -
ing on them to provide the work ethic
that was often lacking among home-
grown labour.

In the good times, the absorption
was not only possible, but in some com-
munities — Marsh Harbour, Abaco,
for instance — positively welcomed
because local labour was in such short
supply.

Now, of course, things are different:
The Bahamian economy is shrinking
fast, unemployment figures are rising,
disgruntlement is setting in, and there
is no guarantee that the good times
will roll anymore.

It requires no great leap of imagi-
nation to predict what might happen if
things get -worse, with Bahamians being
denied jobs made available to the
incomers.

“This is a time for real leadership,”
said my attorney informant, “I think
the government’s piecemeal approach
to immigration has failed. Those who
employ immigrants must be made to
realise that they will pay the price. .

“Zopound is very influential and
dangerous. They have links with gangs
on the American east coast. Their
markings are already visible in over-
the-hill areas. It’s time for something to
be done.”

As with most things in the Bahamas,
illegal immigration is worsened by cor-
ruption. It is known that some immi-
gration officers take bribes for turn-
ing their heads away from incoming
boats.

Some police officers accept! ‘protec-
tion money” from desperate Haitians
in the bush, allowing them to escape
capture for weekly pay-olts.

Bahamian boat captains are actively
engaged in human trafficking, helping
Haitians into the Bahamas en route to
Florida. There are even “safe houses”
here which are transit points for
refugees waiting for their false immi-
gration papers to arrive to facilitate
easy access to the United States.

The Bahamas faces crises on several
fronts, but none poses quite the same
level of risk as mass illegal immigration.

To counter the dangers, Bahamians
need to display the will required to
force firm action.

Economic necessity might just be
the spur. The alternative is too painful
to contemplate.

e What do you think? Fax 328-2398
or e-mail jmarquis@tribunemedia.net

¢ JOHN MAROUIS is the author of
Papa Doc: Portrait of a Haitian Tyrant,
published by LMH Books.


E MANAGEMENT

) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS _



WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY — WATER TEMPS. .
NE at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 75° F
SSW at 10-20 Knots 2-4 Feet 10-20 Miles 75° F
NE at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet. 5-10 Miles 15° F























| - SSW at 10-20 Knots 10-20 Miles
Seen > : fe i. 2 ‘ : : i Pos E ; : NE at5-10 Knots. - 2-3 Feet 5-10 Miles 76° F
Mostly cloudy and Turning cloudy. Partly sunny, breezy Partly sunny with a Partly sunny with a The higher the AccuWeather UV indexâ„¢ number, the SSW at 10-20 Knots 10-20 Miles
“humid. oe | and less humid. * shower possible. shower possible. greater the need for eye and skin protection.” :
High: 83° High: 78° -High: 77° High: 72°





bow: ie Low: 65° Low: 67° Low: 63° Low: 67°

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87/2 -A0I-A2 s~

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elevation on the human_body—everything that effects how warm or cold'a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high ard the low for the day.

= ALMANAC






Todi 8:29 a.m. Me 2:00 a.m. 07
may 52pm. 27 245pm. -06

~ Tues 9:18am. 3.0 2:54am... -0.6
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: : ABACO Temperature 10:34 p.m. 2.7 4:18 p.m. -0.5 841 24/-4 5
ee ee ; High . . 82° F/28° C : ; si 91/32 68/20 s
es Mere tase Low eer ri7e¢ Tatay TTT oe cusam Dd 7a22 53/1 pe.
c Normal high .. 17° F/25° C i :
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: "76° F/24°C ASt YOAr'S IOW ....ecsesessecseerseeseereseseeee OO” Pe 7 ° 84/28 69/20 po
Perce = Precipitation Sunrise......6:57 a.m. Moonrise ... . 7:38'p.m.
As of 1 p.m. yesterday . 0,00" - Sunset.......5:40 p.m. Moonset ..... 8:11 a.m. ye
Year to date .. 0.01" New First ‘Full boas
High: 77° F/25°C Normal year to Males escahataieocannnelne , EES Ne SS
Low: 61° F/16°C BS SSS SESS
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KEY WEST
High: 78° F/26° C
Low: 67° F/19°C

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Charleston, SC 5814 36/2 po 58/14 31/0 Sener ‘CE BROKERS & AGENTS
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MONDAY, JANUARY 12, 2009

across the’
year...

Major/Tribune staff :

ite

iné

»
| Fel



_ Adeeply disturbing Tribune headline - ‘Haitian-Bahamian crime timebomb’ - has highlighted
again what INSIGHT has warned of repeatedly. Unless the Bahamas confronts its illegal immigration
problem, this country faces an enormous social and Selnaees crisis over the next 10 to 15 years...












th i fluential friends’ on the Eastern Road’are
I political and. domestic differences.

twe years after the Haitian Revo-

me Sot itresponsit c aalan and taking The eC Pies of Port- au-Prince oe

Tribuns to a low point in its history. © i 1
He said there was no e idence to back up my ‘send atithori € repo! ack to the State’ |; fed h ¢
fears and no suggestion at all that Haitians were Depar tgs, “f eee W nwateed ie m et the | same to Presi-
1gs of two introducing a violent strain into Bahamian er yhe wh studied Haitian hi ‘fo nt Jéar pra Ani tide on American
vidence that the denied Zopound ety. He refused to accept my contention that if
nt is now gaining ‘a firm footholdin you introduce’ pitbulls into a potcake pack, the
e clear evidence of what I pitbull strain will quickly become evident. An
pre _ he suggested that I owed an apol By to he Hait-
Unless the Bahamas overnment bee a grip - jan people,
—and.c ynfronts the single. biggest threat to this I told him at the time —'and do so again now’
“society — the uncontrolled influx of Haitian — that his protestations were hopelessly an
refugees — — there is a real chance that the glori-. recklessly adrift from reality, and that he ought
Ous” archipelago Bahamians call home will’ to have'’been more’ aware, ‘as a-senior cae
become a creolised extension of that unruly tue
‘nation to the south in under two decades.
The last time I foreshadowed this country’s




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