Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION







Volume: 105 No.36



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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

Uys
BIGGEST!!!

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$ tourist om lead
on Paradise Istand

Police classify
death of man
found in
marina as
‘suspicious’

i By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN tourist was
found dead in a marina on Par-
adise Island near the Atlantis

Resort a day after he was -

reported missing. by his family,
police said.

The body of Timothy Massa,
28, a physical education teacher
from Waterbury, ‘Connecticut,
was found floating in the mari-
na shortly after Spm Monday.
He was ‘reported missing by a

‘close relative on Sunday, police °

said.

Up to press time, police had
classified Massa's death as "sus-
picious" and it was unknown
whether he drowned in the
marina or died at another loca-
tion. :

Police could not say if alcohol
or drugs played any part in
Massa's death or how he ended
up in the marina.





ASP Evans said there 1 were
no signs of trauma to Massa's
body and foul play was not sus-
pected.

Conflicting US reports that
said Massa's death was being
treated as a possible homicide
by the US Department of State
were denied by the US
Embassy and local police yes-

SEE page six

Aum |
we ea F

i
4 Tel (247) 330-08

THIS IS AN undated family photo of Timothy Massa who was found
dead Monday night. His body was found floating in this marina. (below)

near the Atlantis resort.

RIANA OAD

Courtesy Massa family/AP

Felipe Major/T ribune staff



Commissioner denies claims
that some ‘very serious’
crimes not being investigated

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Commissioner of

Police yesterday denied claims
by a senior police insider that a
number of “very, very serious”
crimes are not properly inves-
tigated because those involved
are related to high-ranking
police officers or politicians.

Reginald Ferguson said he
“wouldn’t agree” with the
informant’s assertion but
admitted that there is “no ques-
tion” that, given the size of
Bahamian society, there are
cases in which investigating offi-
cers are related to accused indi-
viduals. *

However, he stressed that it

is not a “major problem” for

the police force.

“IT am not saying that these
situations will not arise, and for
the very reason I have just
described. I think that’s part of
the challenge of policing the
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. We have a unique
situation here and, of course,
we have to rise to that chal-
lenge, because we are charged
with that mandate,” the Com-
missioner said.

This comes as the senior
police source, speaking on con-

dition of anonymity, claimed |

that the media and public
would be “shocked” to hear of
the extent of the problem.

He said that in the past, when
steps were taken to pursue cer-
tain controversial cases, “reper-
cussions were brought to bear

SEE page six

| Palindale + Paradise island + Oakes F
Bernard foad + 8 Locations (Freeper)







Hotel makes move
in bid to cut losses.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE. planned eight-week. clo-
sure of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casino
this summer is designed to slash
losses normally incurred during
that time in half, while preserving:
existing employment levels.

Baha Mar, which owns the
Cable Beach Resorts, the Shera-
ton Cable Beach Resort and the

ret Travolta (AP)
Travolta family
AWM MLS

FLITE RSH: Ics

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Tra-
voltas left Grand Bahama qui-
etly around midnight with the
ashes of their 16-year-old son,
arriving in Florida early Tues-
day morning.

Keith McSweeney, funeral
director/mortician at Restview
Memorial Mortuary, told The
Tribune that Jett Travolta was
cremated Monday and his ash-
es left the island around mid-
night.

It is believed the Travoltas
flew out on their private plane
to Ocala, Florida, where they
have another vacation home.

Jett Travolta died on Janu-
ary 2 of a seizure at the Tra-
voltas’ private residence in

SEE page six



Wyndham and Crystal Palace,
said in a statement last night that
in 2008 it ended the year with
“combined operating losses and
debt service expenses in excess
of millions of dollars”, and need-
ed to cut costs.

The closure will take place
between August 17-October 5,
2009, which is traditionally the
low point of the Bahamian

tourism season. Baha Mar said it

SEE page six
Alleged victim of
police ‘brutality’
Charged in court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
. Tribune Staff Reporter

A BAIN Town man, who is
alleged to have been the victim
“anprovoked brutality” by a
police officer.last week, was

-arraigned in a Magistrate’s

Court yesterday on charges of
resisting arrest and assaulting ; a
policeman.

Charles Babbs, 36, of Wilkin-
son Street, who appeared
before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane,
was also arraigned on charges of

SEE page six

Kerzner official expects
Atlantis employment

figures to remain stable

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

UNLESS there is an unex-
pected and “major downswing”
in tourism arrivals, Kerzner
Bahamas’ managing director
said yesterday he expects
Atlantis’ employment figures to
remain at a “very similar” level
this year as they are now.

Confirming that room reser-
vation forecasts made by the

SEE page six





PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

In brief

Woman accused
of attempting to
smuggle drugs.
into prison

A WOMAN accused of
attempting to smuggle mari-
juana into Her Majesty’s
Prison was arraigned in Mag-
istrates Court yesterday.

Shantell Gilbert, 30, of Fox
Hill, appeared before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel in
Court Eight, Bank Lane,
charged with two counts of
marijuana possession.

According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that on Mon-
day, January 5, Gilbert was
found in possession of a
quantity of the drug.

It is also alleged that a
total of eight grams of mari-
juana was found under a seat
in Gilbert’s vehicle in a
transparent container along
with “chicken and fries” that
Gilbert intended to give to
her imprisoned boyfriend.

Gilbert pleaded not guilty
to the charges.

Prosecutor Inspector
Ercell Dorsette raised no
objection to bail. Gilbert was
granted bail in the sum of
$7,500. The case was
adjourned to June 26.

e A 32-year-old man was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court 8 yesterday, charged
with possession of marijuana
with intent to supply.

According to court dock-
ets, Roston Rahming of
Inagua Way was found in
possession of a quantity of
marijuana on Sunday, Janu-
ary 4.

e Itis alleged that Rahming
pvas found in possession of
#3 grams of marijuana.

« Rahming, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, pleaded not guilty to’
the charge.

: He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000. The case was
adjourned to July 9.







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Customers can visit any one of our
other New Providence locations to
pay bills, make inquiries or obtain.
services. New Providence locations
include the Mall at Marathon, Bay
Street, the Town Center Mall, Fox Hill
and the Shirley Street Plaza.

nea EN





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



TEN employees of Valentine’s Resort and Mari-
na on Harbour Island are expected to be laid-off by
the énd of the week, a resort official said.

This follows Monday’s announcement that 21
employees are being laid off from the Comfort
Suites property on Paradise island.

Resort general manager Lia Head told The Tri-
bune yesterday that Valentine’s has been forced to
cut staff because of repeated drops in guest arrivals.

She said: “We only have one room checked in
today, and I expect that we will bounce between

LOCAL NEWS

Harbour Island resort employees ‘set to be laid off’

one and two rooms up until March.”

. Like many resorts throughout the country that
have experienced occupancy spikes during the hol-
idays, Ms Head said high operational costs have
also influenced the company’s decision.

“The last electricity bill was’$100,000 for the
month, and even if occupancy is low we still have to

. keep the lights on, and burn air-conditioners in

the rooms,” she said. ;
The company, which employees around 68 peo-
ple, intends to place most of its staff on rotation
while others will be placed on call.
However, Ms Head said the rescheduling of the
staff is only a temporary fix to a growing problem.

THE TRIBUNE

She said if conditions worsen employees could be
laid off. In recent months, hundreds of former
hotel workers have joined the unemployment lines
as many resort operators continue to report
significant declines in occupancy levels. The-biggest
blow was in November when around 800 employ-
ees of Kerzner International were laid-off.

‘Bahamas Hotel Association president Robert
Sands warned that if the first four months of 2009
“do not go according to plan" in terms of industry
performance, "sacrifices" from all stakeholders —
hotel owners and operators, developers, manage-
ment teams and line staff — might be necessary to
keep businesses financially viable.





















BOXING DAY TRAGEDY






- Autopsy: Junkanoo drummer died

when heart fell into abnormal rhythm

Adwin Moss’s family say they were unaware of problem

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

DRUMMER Adwin Moss who col-
lapsed during the Boxing Day
Junkanoo parade, died when his heart
fell into an abnormal rhythm,.an
autopsy has revealed.



















|.death listed on
the 39-year-old’s
death certificate

arrhythmia”,
also known as
cardiac disrhyth-
mia, an abnor-
{ mal rhythm that
‘can cause the
heart to stop.

Mr Moss’s
family of Frog-
man Lane, Nas-
sau, say they
were not aware he had a heart prob-
lem, although they believe he was tak-

ing medication for heartburn.

The youngest of his six siblings,
Michlene Gustav, 23, said they still

‘have unanswered questions.

“I. give the Department of Health

O THE WORLD




Waele
CLOSED TO PUBLIC

BIC wishes to advise its customers that
its JFK headquarters is closed to the
general public until further notice.
The company is moving quickly to
refurbish the facility in the aftermath
of the recent fire incident.



~ wwwibtcbahamas.com | CALL BTC 225-5282

The cause of

‘is “cardiac



“Junkanoo is pretty stressful in terms
of physical exertion and excitement,
so if you have any abnormality with
the heart, all of the excitement and
physical stress could trigger an.

abnormal rhythm.”

~



all credit in certain ways, but I think
they could have probably saved his
life,” she said.

“We have other questions about
how and why it happened, because it
was so sudden. I feel he could have
lived, because he was fine. ”

Cardiologist Dr Conville Brown of
the Bahamas Heart Centre on Collins
Avenue said that although cardiac
arrhythmia is not necessarily fatal, the

_first,instance can cause sudden death.

Although junkanoo would not nec-

essarily lure the heart into a fatal —

rhythm, junkanooers should take care

_ if they have heart conditions and avoid

stimulants, Dr Brown said.»







ee rk

Dr Conville Brown

“Junkanoo is pretty stressful in terms
of physical exertion and excitement,
so if you have any abnormality with
the heart, all of the: excitement and
physical stress could trigger an abnor-
mal rhythm,” he said.

“Various things in energy drinks like
ginseng, taurine and caffeine, as well as
alcohol, are stimulants'that allow you
to function at-a higher’ than normal
level. So if you have a predisposition to
an abnormal rhythm or electrical short-

_ circuit, they can trigger those abnormal

pathways.”

Dr Brown said it may not have been
possible to save Mr Moss, but added
that he was at high risk as medical



treatment was not immediately avail-
able. :

Hundreds of junkanoo enthusiasts
from across the spectrum of A and B
groups are coming to Nassau from as
far as Miami, Washington, DC, and
Atlanta, to join the Saxon Superstars in
a final farewell procession for Mr Moss

after his funeral on Saturday. :

Peter Gilmud, chairman of the Sax-
ons management committee, said: “He
is indeed deserving of the full
junkanoo treat for his contribution to
the Saxons and junkanoo, and we have
people from all over who want to come
and show love.

“This is not just people who know
him; this is a junkanooer who died in
the act of junkanoo: This is one of us,” _
he said. ,

The procession will follow the funer-
al service at Prevalent Church of God
in Christ, Deveaux Street, off East .
Street, at lpm. Rushers will proceed
from the City Market parking lot in
Village Road to Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery in Soldier Road, where

. Moss will be buried. i‘

The Saxons will also hold a ceremo-
ny for Mr Moss at their junkanoo
shack in Marshall Cooper Park,
Masons Addition, at 8.30pm Friday..:



FAMILY Guardian presented its annual scholarship award to the College of the Bahamas (COB), enabling five
students to pursue their educational goals.. At a.reception at the insurance company’s corporate centre on — '
Shirley Street, Family Guardian’s senior vice-president of administration Dr Kerry Higgs presented the schol- .
arship proceeds to COB’s director of Financial Aid and Housing Cheryl Carey. Since its inception in 1988,
Family Guardian’s scholarship programme has provided over $300,000 in financial assistance to more than
80 students at the College. Pictured (left to right) scholarship recipients Roderick Malone, Deandra Saun-
ders and Kristin Johnson; Cheryl Carey of the College of the Bahamas; Dr Kerry Higgs, senior vice-president
of administration, and recipients Charvette Strachan and Rovaine Adderley.

RWW

— NGCK
Or
See.

? oF 7 £9

SFE? £3

GSS
oe

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
@ood cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



THE TRIBUNE



In brief

Man found
dead in
submerged
car died from
heart failure

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN autopsy has revealed ©
that the man found dead ina
submerged Mercedes nearly
a month ago died as a result
of heart failure, Chief Super-
intendent, Glen Miller, offi-
cer in-charge of crime, told
The Tribune yesterday.’

Two weeks ago, police
reported that the man had
been identified as Flint Fer-
guson, 53, of Dunmore
Street. His decomposing
body, sitting inside a heavily-
tinted Mercedes 280-E, was
pulled from Nassau Harbour
on Friday, December 19.

The car, said to have been
in the water for days before
workers in the area notified
authorities, had entered the
Harbour nose first from the
end of Victoria Avenue, on
the north side of Bay Street.

Police were informed that
Mr Ferguson was last seen in
the Bay Street area on the
night of Monday, December
15, 2008.

Mr Miller said yesterday
that police are still making
inquiries into the circum-
stances surrounding Mr Fer-
guson’s death. The results of
the autopsy were released
last week.

“The only development we
have so far is that the autop-
sy is telling us that he died
from heart failure,” Mr
Miller said.

“In terms of our inquiries
as to what actually happened
to him, that has not been
concluded as yet,” Mr Miller
said. s f

Concerne
citizen helps
police find
handgun

e WITH the assistance of a
concerned citizen, police
found and seized a handgun
in the Elizabeth Estates area
on Monday.

_ Acting on at tip, officers
were dispatched to Elizabeth
Estates at 1.30pm. They dis-
covered. a .38 handgun with
five live rounds of ammuni-
tion hidden in some bushes.
Investigations into the mat-
ter are ongoing.

Police quiz
man over
attempted
vehicie theft

¢ POLICE are questioning
a 27-year-old man of Mar-
shall Road in connection
with the attempted theft of a
vehicle on Monday. ;

According to reports, resi-
dents of the area have made
a number of reports about
cars being broken into.

At around 3am on Mon-
day, officers from the
Carmichael Road Police Sta-
tion were on patrol in that
area when residents drew
their attention to aman ina
car.

The individual was
allegedly inside a 2003 LX
Honda Accord attempting to
steal the vehicle.

The 27-year-old is current-
ly in custody and helping the
police with their investiga-
tion into this matter.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

UC Cla Te) Ce
322-2157



MINISTER of State Zhivargo
Laing’s comments about the
validity of the Standard and
Poor’s report on the Bahamas
continues to draw criticism from
the government’s detractors.

Yesterday, political activist and
PLP hopeful for the St Cecilia
constituency Paul Moss called on
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
to fire Mr Laing over his response
to the report, which found that
the government’s decision to stop
and review nearly $80 million
worth of contracts entered into
by the previous government dis-
rupted the economy’s “growth
momentum and negatively affect-
ed investors’ sentiments”.

Following the release of the
report, Mr Laing questioned
where S&P got its figures from,
saying the FNM found nowhere
near $80 million worth of con-
tracts in place.

He denied that the government
was responsible for the economic
downturn.

In his statement, Mr Moss crit-
icised this response, but also chas-
tised his own party for attempting
to politicise the matter.

He said: “I am deeply con-
cerned about the responses to the
report by both the government
and the PLP.

“T find there has not yet been a
sober response to the report by
any public official in this coun-
try.

“It is astounding tome that we
have failed in the face of a public
report by an august institution,
while the world is watching and
listening, in the midst of a down-
turn in which we must take every
opportunity — if we are serious
about bringing prosperity to the

LOCAL NEWS

PLP hopeful calls for Laing
to be sacked over comments

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3

Paul Moss lashes out after Minister of State
questions validity of S&P report on Bahamas





“..Mr Laing sought
to pillory the report,
| because it criticised
the treatment of
investors, in what
we already know to
be a selective and
immature approach
of the government
of which he is a

part.”

‘Paul Moss



Bahamian people — to show the
world that we mean business.

“On the government side, Mr
Laing sought to pillory the report,
because it criticised the treatment
of investors, in what we already
know to be a selective and imma-
ture approach of the government
of which he is a part.”

Mr Moss said he would think
the minister of state for finance
would respond to the report “in a
measured fashion, given that it is
on the basis of this sort of docu-
ment, prepared by these very
people, that he will have to rely
upon for government credit.”

He said Mr Laing should
realise that attempting to defend
the indefensible merely leaves the
Bahamas looking like a “banana
republic”. 3

“What will he say should he
have to go to New York, where
lending and credit is weakening,
and give an account of his
remarks as a condition of the
Bahamas receiving credit?” Mr

-Moss asked. “I submit to you that

this attitude is no different that
Mr Ingraham calling Petro-Caribe
a ‘stupid deal’ in.a national
speech, thereby insulting his

Caribbean colleagues and poten-

Twenty-six Cuban

Joint effort

between US -

Coast Guard
and RBDF

In a joint effort between the

United States. Coast Guard
and the Royal -Bahamas
Défence Force, 26 Cuban
migrants were detained in the

North West Bahamas yester-’

day.

The Defence Force opera-
tions department received
information on Monday from

the US Coast Guard that sus-.

pected migrants had been
spotted on William Island,
west of Andros. 3

RBDF vessel HMBS P-45,
under the command of Petty
Officer Chad Farrington, went
to the area to investigate.

Around 7am yesterday

Clean-up campaigners seek payment

morning, the captain report-
ed finding 14 men and 12
women, who all appeared
hungry, but in good physical
condition...

They were taken aboard the
vessel and brought to Nassau
around 3pm, where they were
turned over to the immigra-
tion officials for further inves-
tigations.

THIRTEEN workers on the Garden Hills clean-up cam-
paign are calling on their MP, Brensil Rolle, to ensure that

they are paid. ‘

They claim money has been owed to them since before

Christmas.

A spokesman for the group, who wished to remain anony-
mous, told The Tribune yesterday that the workers were
promised $100 a day for the four days they helped clean up

the community.

‘“‘We have not been paid and other people in the area have
already-gotten two pay cheques. Last night we went to Mr
Rolle’s home and we will return again until we get our mon-

ey,” the spokesman said.

Repeated calls to Mr Rolle’s office and mobile phone were
not answered and messages left for him were not returned up

to press time last night.







Zhivargo Laing

tially undermining the Bahamas’
options if Petro-Caribe becomes
necessary.”

He added: “I am not offered
any comfort by the remarks of
the PLP either.

“The response was both politi-
cal and irrelevant.

“And in my view what was
political was not relevant and
what was relevant was made too
political. :

“We ought to look at the
report and see what it reveals for
us and how or what initiatives we
should undertake to forestall or
blunt some of its warnings,” he
said.

Look Smart
in a Great
Selection .

&

from

JACK VICTOR!

Man wanted
for questioning
over murder
turns himself in

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
- dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 22-
year-old Haitian man
wanted for questioning in
connection with a murder
turned himself in to Abaco
police officers yesterday
morning.

Chief Superintendent
Basil Rahming said the
man, who lives in the Hait-
ian settlement known as
The Mud, surrendered
around 8.30am at the
Marsh Harbour Police
Station.

The man, who has been
sought by police for more
than two weeks, was
accompanied by his lawyer
Alphonso Morley.

He is now assisting
detectives on Abaco and
Grand Bahama with their :
investigation into the
shooting death of 34-year-
old Vincent Zilma,.a resi-
dent of The Mud.

Jackson Joseph, 19, of
Murphy Town, Abaco,
was charged in connection
with Zilma’s murder on
December 24, 2008, in
Marsh Harbour Magis-
trate’s Court.

He was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox
Hill until April 22 when a
preliminary inquiry will be:
held.



MORLEY

EF

NX

ONAN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
: Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE









































Cas,

















‘07 SU

The Tribune Limited

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Hanging is not the

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E: H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991 |

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES ve
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



PLP indecision will help economy

DESPITE STANDARD & Poors downgrade

of the Bahamas’ real domestic product from _

4.4 per cent in 2006 to 1.1 per cent in.2008 and

. 1 per cent this year, government believes it can

weather the economic turbulence for at least 18
months. ~ ;

“No country, including the Bahamas, is inter-
ested in having the current circumstances last
beyond 18 months,” said Finance Minister
Zhivargo Laing. “That would be very difficult
for any economy and any fiscal regime. We
hope to have a turnaround sooner rather than
later.”

Of course, that turnaround is dependent on
whether the stimulus packets injected into the
US and European economies will pay off and

" stabilise a presently sinking global ship.

Unlike its Caribbean neighbours, Mr Laing
says the Bahamas has “two percentage points of

space” in which to manoeuvre before it gets to
vany dangerous level on the debt-to-GDP ratio.
=, *.He told Tribune Business last week that the
‘| Bahamas’ relative fiscal prudence, by compar-
_sison to its Caribbean rivals such as Barbados
“and Jamaica — the latter having a national debt

of more than three times’ what the IMF regards

.| as safe— had safeguarded this nation’s ability to .
_- borrow at competitive interest rates and “carry

itself through.”

It is in this two ‘percentage points of wiggle —

space that the Bahamas hopes to borrow
enough to turn upgrades of the country’s crum-
bling infrastructure into mtich needed jobs.”
.. However, Standard & Poor blamed the FNM

“government, after winning the election, for
reviewing $80 million worth of contracts agreed
.“in-principle by the outgoing PLP government
- and of cancelling the $23 million public con-

tract for construction of the Straw Market.
What S&P were referring to in the $80 million

worth of contracts is yet to be identified, but it,.

claimed that the FNM’s review “negatively
affected investors’ sentiments and brought sub-
stantial disruption to the contractors’ activity.”
It conceded that the situation has ‘since nor-
malised, “but the important economic growth
momentum has been lost.” :
Although the review might have brought

_ disruption to “contractors’ activity”, the Christie
government’s delay in completing these con--- --

tracts in a timely fashion had already jaundiced

. investors’ opinions of the Bahamas.

After all, it was Mr Sarkis Izmirlian, head of
the Baha Mar venture, who, in a letter written
‘on January 25, 2006 to then prime minister

Christie, questioned “whether investing billions
of dollars in this country is the right decision.”
Mr Izmirlian was upset that Mr Christie had



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- not lived up to his “personal assurance” that

“sovernment would move expeditiously” to

‘have a supplemental contract signed on which

”

there was a deadline.

He made it clear that this delay could jeop-
ardise the $2.4 million Cable Beach project.

However, it was a stroke of good luck that
Mr Christie’s indecision saved the country from
sinking 50 per cent of its capital works budget
for the 2007 fiscal year into just one project —
the Straw Market.

. If this had gone through — with all the con-
struction problems we now know about — it
would have pushed construction costs even
higher and forced a decision to use inferior
materials to cut costs.

If this had happened, $23 million would have
been ill spent and our two per cent wiggle space
on which Mr Laing is now counting to see us
through this recession would have been greatly
jeopardised.

Originally the market was budgeted at $10 to
$13 million. Later the president of the company,
appointed by the Christie government to over-
see the market project, could not explain how
the 77,000 square foot building that his compa-
ny was to oversee was suddenly expanded to
200,000 square feet when it was sent out'to con-

~-tractors-for bid. ~~

The estimated cost had now risen to $29-$37
million. Even to this day there seems to be no
explanation, except that the straw market was
no longer to be just a market, but also an enter-
tainment centre with restaurant/nightclub, open
dining’on the roof and an observation tower.

Earlier in 2005/6 the architect, in excavating
to find the concrete base of the original market
before construction could start, discovered that
the old straw market had been built on conch
shells and if the beams and pilings had not been
sound, the market “would have caved in a long
time ago.” /

The managing director of the consultancy

* firm’s only explanation for the apparent “mud-

dle” surrounding the straw market appears to be
that the PLP government couldn’t decide
whether it wanted a relatively simple, low cost
permanent structure for a straw market or a
grand “monument” that would stand as the
centrepiece of downtown Nassau’s revitalisa-
tion.

For once a PLP “muddle” saved this coun-
try’s precious bacon. Nassau will now have a
market taylor-made to its budget — its con-
struction will create employment and help sta-
bilise the economy until daylight can be seen at
the end of the fiscal tunnel. : \






Se f
= Se £










BY

326-5856 PALMDALE SHOPPING PLAZA 9am-6pm Monday-Saturday

solution to our

country’s growing

crime dilemma

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me an oppor-
tunity to express my views on
what I think is a different,
albeit familiar, consideration
to the issue of hanging in The
Bahamas.

I have listened to the var-
ied opinions on this issue
which are often charged with
emotion and devoid of criti-
cal, open, honest and. frank
analysis.

Our fledgling economy,
overly dependent on tourism,
is now suffering from what is

considered the ill affects of a ©

global recession.

Not to mention our grow-
ing crime dilemma, the solu-
tion to which a large part of
our population erroneously
thinks is hanging! ;

In 2006 the Judicial Com-
mittee of the Privy Counsel
unanimously struck down the
mandatory death sentence
imposed on those convicted
of murder in The Bahamas,
as being in breach of the Con-
stitution.

The decision caused much
debate as proponents of the
death penalty seem to think
that state sponsored execu-
tions is the key to ridding our
society of the scourge of wan-
ton crime.

To an extent I agree that a
form of execution is the key to
solving our crime problem.

I think that few would dis- .

agree that hypocrisy and cor-
ruption has infected and/or
infiltrated the social and moral
fabric of our society and-has
long since executed the con-
science of many.

This month a new crime
report was presented to the
government.

I make no apologies for my

‘cynicism in saying that I seri-

ously doubt whether the pre-
vious reports were even con-
‘sidered let alone implement-
ed.

It is still safe to say “that
our society is more threatened
by a pervasive culture of dis-
honesty, greed and a casual
disregard for social norms and
formal regulation, than it is\by
crime in the narrow sense.”

The form of execution of

which I spoke is a figurative

execution.
So I posit the question, who
will step forward for our first

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIANA. ETIENNE of
NASSAU VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
‘send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of DECEMBER 2008
_ tothe Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



public albeit figurative hang-
ing for the level of hypocrisy
and corruption that exists in
our society?

Michael Craton articulated
the vision, philosophy and ide-
ology of our first Minister of
Education Sir Cecil Wallace
Whitfield for the masses.

It was to guarantee cutting
edge educational facilities and
to ensure that the masses were
afforded the opportunity of a
decent education.

Forty years in the future we .

have yet to establish a univer-
sity and are doing our best to
justify a national grad aver-
age of D.

The present disposition is
far removed from the vision,
philosophy and ideology of Sir
Cecil.

Isay which Minister of Edu-
cation, whether past of pre-
sent, will step forward, accept

.responsibility and be figura-

tively hanged for our current
national educational crisis?
What about our courts?
Our country would have pro-
duced three successive black
Prime Ministers all of whom
preached a solemn message
of commitment for the poor
and marginalized. -
Sir Lynden encouraged us
to step forward to the new
frontier, Mr. Christie articu-

lated that he would.swim in...

his regurgitation for the peo-
ple and Mr. Ingraham ensures

-us that he will guarantee the

safety of the cookie jar. .

I would submit that it was
under the watch of these three
distinguished leaders in their
own right and eminent practi-

tioners at the Bar that the

judicial system saw its greatest
decline.
That august body, respon-

- sible for protecting the funda-

mental rights of the least in
our society thereby guaran-
teeing the rights of the great-
est, has at.times felt it neces-
sary to break with tradition
and lament its displeasure at
the less than adequate facili-
ties necessary to ensure prop-
er service for members of the
public.

Tell me which of our dar-

ling leaders will accept respon-

Sibility and step forward for

this and I emphasise figura-
tive hanging? |
Who among our Clergy-
man will step forward and be
first, for the misuse of the con-
fidence of the poor?
You know what I mean.

‘Just consider the messages of

prosperity, observe some of
their fancy cars and lavish
homes and look at the condi-
tion of many of their mem-
bers.

Not to mention the defin-
ing silence on issues of nation-
al importance. Do we have
any takers?

What about those in our
society who prey on our young
children, the predators, the
ones who hang around our
schools laying in wait for our
young girls and boys?

You can probably find one

~ in every sector of our society.

Do we have any takers?

There has been no scientif-
ic proof provided that hang-
ing is a deterrent to crime.

This I do know, that is
respect for the rights of others,
honesty, charity and strong
family values are strong and
effective deterrents!

The way forward to solv-
ing our crime problem is not
through hysteria and emo-
tionally charged rash deci-
sions, but rather by first
acknowledging and eradicat-
ing the scourge of dishonesty,
indiscipline, hypocrisy, intol-
erance and hate.

Then we can move forward
to considering who'should be
hanged.

However, I suspect that dur-
ing our time of introspection
and self-evaluation in light of
our action or inactions we may
come to the conclusion as did
the Scribes, Sadducees and

“Pharisees and simply walk

away without casting a stone
or in our case hanging!

ELSWORTH N JOHN-
SON ;

Former president of the
Bahamas Human Rights
Association

Nassau,

December, 2008





Dumb and dumber

. EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would like to thank you for publishing this letter in your
newspaper. I look forward to us all making a step in the right

direction.

I am an educated Bahamian with Associate’s, Bachelor’s and

Master’s degrees.

I understand that there are some levels of education that

not everyone is able to achieve.

Therefore, I would not expect every person I meet on the Jit-
ney to be able to calculate their gas mileage, or write an award
winning essay. I do, however, expect competence in basic
spelling, particularly, in large businesses and in public displays.

On Shirley Street there is a business that claims to be an
excellent place:for children to visit with the words “Down too
earth” (should be “to” NOT “too”) in their sign and the word
“generators” misspelled. An established donut shop in Nas-
sau proudly touts their new soups, saying “There back!” (should
‘say “They’re” not “there”) on the large window posters. When
I told the cashier, she humbly informed me that I was not the
first to point it out. A local, website development and comput-
er training, company, in Nassau, proudly displays its student tes-
timonials on its website. The problem is the link is spelled ~
“Testimonials”. Who owns these businesses? Have they no
pride? What of their employees? Are they blind? Or are we all
just so stupid nobody knows these signs are wrong? How can any
of the persons who own, work in or frequent these establish-
ments say with a straight face that they are surprised with our

national grade point average? —

I feel the Ministry of Education should send out a task force
to police any sign mounted in public and remove posters and fly-
ers with flagrant misspellings or poor grammar. If the company
sign is too large or too heavy, have the company remove it or
correct it at their expense. If they do not, fine them. Use the
money generated to support educational programmes to miti-
gate the damage they are causing.

Sadly, I doubt the persons responsible will or are able to

read this entire letter.

For those of you who are, please take up your dictionaries and
make a stand for the children, for The Bahamas and for the
national pride I still have some faith in.

ANCILLENO DAVIS, MSc

Nassau,
December 17, 2008.



IHE |HIBUNGE

Ca a

yp evuyvy tr rink ye



Harbour Island |
resorts hit hy
interruptions to
utility supplies

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS HARBOUR ISLAND
continues to buck the current
tourism trend by still attract-
ing a high volume of visitors,
resorts on that island are
forced to accept significant
financial losses due to con-
stant interruptions in utility
supplies.

While many Family Island
communities have experi-
enced a sharp decline in visi-
tor arrivals in recent months,
resulting in lay-offs, leading
resorts on Harbour Island
say they are faced with a dif-
ferent challenge.

General Manager of the
Pink Sands Resort Jacques
Bronchier told The Tribune
that business for the quaint
luxury resort has been excep-
tional throughout the past
year despite continuous dis-
ruptions in electricity and
water supplies.

“We have power problems,
our water situation is terri-
ble,” he said.

The resort, which employs.
80 employees, continues to
have significant costs because
of unreliable utilities, said Mr

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THIS YEAR, St Joseph’s
Catholic Parish will be cele-

_brating 75 years in the heart

of Bain Town and Chipping-
ham.

The church will commemo-
rate its founding with a series
of activities beginning on Jan-
uary 25 with a special mass
and continuing through the
entire year under the theme
“St Joseph’s: Looking Back,
Moving Forward, as a Family
of Faith”.

LOCAL NEWS

‘St Joseph’s Catholic Parish to
celebrate 75 year milestone

heen of activities
set to begin on
January 25th

St Joseph’s plans to recog-
nise both the members who
were alive when the church’s
cornerstone was laid in 1934
and the youths who will con-
tinue the strong family tradi-
tions of the parish into the
future.

Rev Martin Gomes said the
mission of the parish has not
changed in three quarters of a
century.

“The mission of the church
has been the same. Ministries
that carry out the mission
have changed and must
change. It has to do with com-



Rev Martin Gomes

munity building, proclaiming
the gospel in the community,
and the mission of service,”
Rev Gomes said.

He noted that at one point,

Cent Bx) aTSteNA



ous growth,” she said.
George Robinson, an 85-
year-old parishioner of St
Joseph’s, said he has many
fond memories of growing up

TS (clE eeenn Ntyiiat

all the changes in St Joseph’s
and witnessed all the priests
that came and went in St
Joseph’s. I lived to-witness all

‘the changes,” Mr Robinson

Bronchier.
wehiciniy opetated cade the a. R FS Hl i 0 f) N i M | $s ] 0) \i yy e rn the Bain Towa Commi: es Svea any some of the The ae J eee varie a

same management as the
Pink Sands, has experienced
similar disruptions.

Resort operators said they
are now questioning if the
government is ever going to
address their problems.

Lia Head, general manager
at the Valentines Resort and
Marina, said the company
was forced to spend more
than $100,000 on a generator
and water pump to deal with
the erratic utility supplies.

“Most of the other busi-
‘nesses on the island don’t
have generators, so then
théir light and water can be
interrupted two or three
times a week, and during the
busy season disruptions hap-
pen several times everyday,
she said.

Ms Head said the resort’s
electricity bills for the #12
room propeity are as s high as."
$100,000 a month:

In August 2008, State Min-
ister for Environment Phen-

. ton Neymour said plans were
on the way for the construc-
tion of a power plant in
North Eleuthera intended to
significantly reduce the cost
of electricity. ;

Set to be completed later
this year, Mr Neymour said
the plant will link Harbour
Island to a consistent energy
source through a submarine
cable.

The Tribune was yesterday
unable to reach BEC’s gen-
eral manager Kevin Basden
for comment.

TROPICAL
EUS)

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157





TUGTE



THE COLLEGE of the Bahamas freshmen attend the. FOAM (Fresh
man On A Mission) Spring Orientation '09, at the college's main

~ campus, Moriday.



UNDERSECRETARY AT the Ministry of National Security Peter

Deveaux-lsaacs speaks about the links between his ministry and the

College of the Bahamas.

3rd Party
Insurance

ty.
“This is where the bell rang
to awaken people to go to
work, this is where the bells

‘rang to summon people come

to church. This is where peo-
ple gathered to recreate, to
pray, to enjoy — so St Joseph’s
has always been the focal
point in this. area,” Rev
Gomes said.

Sister Cecilia Albury, direc-

‘tor of Adult Day-Care Cen-

tre, said she is amazed by the
development at the parish
over the years.

“We have all these new
buildings around, which real-
ly shows that St Joseph’s
parish parishioners are con-
tinuing to build the education
of our children, seniors and
juniors, so there is continu-

first alter servers in St
Joseph’s and read the first
mission. I was living the clos-
est to St Joseph’s and many
mornings just me and the
priest kept mass. J watched

initiatives to the community,
including youth ministries, a
Saturday soup kitchen, adult
day care, and home visitation
ministries.

Share your news |

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
yourare raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story, |

CREDIT SUISSE a
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch ©

Private Banking



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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

_ Kerzner official expects Atlantis 7 7
employment figures to remain stable

Wyndham to close for eight weeks
FROM page one

would encourage staff to take their annual vacation and other enti-
tlements during that time.

The Cable Beach Resorts owner said it had spent $75 million to
cover/subsidise operating losses in the three-and-a-half years since
it acquired the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort and Wyndham/Crys-
tal Palace Casino in May 2005.

These losses had been eaten during a period when Baha Mar had
invested some $150 million in upgrading the two properties, on
top of the $200 million purchase price, taking its total spent to
close to $500 million.

The company yesterday said it had to cope with a 35 per cent
increase in utility costs to $15 million in 2008.

* FOR FULL STORY SEE TRIBUNE BUSINESS ON PAGE 1B

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 « Fax: 326-7452

EXTRA, EXTRA,

FROM page one

company in November for the
first quarter of this year remain
largely on target, George
Markantonis said that last year’s
lay-offs remain adequate from a
cost-saving perspective.
Kerzner’s staff levels fell from
9,200 in November when it let
go 800 Atlantis employees and
played a part in a decision to
drop 150 workers from the Har-
bourside resort, citing a dra-
matic downturn in occupancy.
At that time, the hotel was
just 48 per cent full, hit hard by
economic conditions in the Unit-
ed States and Hurricane Ike.
On Monday Comfort Suites
was the next Paradise Island
hotel operator to cut back —
reducing its staff quota by 21
per cent.
Comfort Suite’s move, did not

surprise Prime Minister Hubert '

Ingraham, who told reporters
on. Monday that he expected
that “downsizing in the hotel
‘sector is not complete.”

Mr Markantonis noted that

Atlantis based its November
downsizing on the fifty per cent
slower booking pace seen for
early 2009 compared with a year
earlier, adding that after almost
two months this figure remained
largely unchanged (at 45 per
cent).

For this reason, he said that
the company does not foresee
further staff downsizing.

“What we had predicted ‘is
coming true and January even
saw ‘some slippage, from what
we had predicted, it was very
close,” said Mr Markantonis.

“We like to think we do these
things (lay-offs) at one time. Our
forecast was done with a lot of
deliberation last year for this
year and that’s how we chose

. the number of associates that

we would need to lay off and
right now our forecast still seems
to be holding as we expected.”

“Of course we are looking at
cost saving measures, but we

‘always do that. That doesn’t

always involve laying off more

people. Unless there is a major
downswing we hope to get
through this year without lay-
ing off any more people,” said
the CEO.

According to Mr Markanto-
nis, booking pace — the number
of advanced room reservations
made by “leisure travellers” —
is the preferred “advanced
warning” for hoteliers of how
overall business will be in com-
ing months.

However, although leisure

’ travellers make up sixty per cent

of all Atlantis’ visitors, their
bookings do not translate direct-
ly into “heads in beds” as they
do not account for all potential
visitors, or those customers may
cancel their reservations at a lat-
er date.

Mr Markantonis expects Feb-
ruary 2009 to see hotel occu-
pancy levels in the “high 60s”,
compared with last year’s “mid
70s”. Meanwhile, March occu-

pancy is set to stand in the “mid
60s” compared with an above
80 per cent figure last year.

However, the CEO noted
that last year’s high March occu-
pancy was “distorted” by the
fact that the Easter holiday fell
in that month, whereas it does
not in 2009.

This year Easter falls on the
weekend of April 10 (Good Fri-
day) to April 13 (Easter Mon-
day).

“Some of it was to do. with
that (although) a whole 20 per
cent shortfall — I don't think
so,” said the CEO.

He revealed that occupancy
levels for most of December
2008 stood at around 56 per cent
— 10 per cent lower than last
year.

While there was “less than a
week” from Boxing Day
onwards in which all rooms
were taken and some of the
workers laid-off in Novembe1
were brought back for tempo-
rary overtime work, visitor lev-
els have now returned to a pre-
dictably lower position, said the
managing director.

He said Jett loved West End and he loved

EXTRA,

_ Large Shipment
Of
Used Cars

N STOCK

‘COME CHECK
US OUT

7 a New Shipments Arrived

FROM page one

West End, Grand Bahama.
Although there has been much publicity
about their son’s tragic death, the grieving

’ Hollywood couple has stayed out of the media

spotlight while here on the island, avoiding

international and local TV cameras and pho-\

tographers.

Mr McSweeney, who received the consent
by the Travoltas to speak with the news media
on Monday evening, was criticised by the Min-
ister of Health on Tuesday for releasing con-
fidential information.

Mr McSweeney told reporters that the death
certificate released to them had indicated that
Jett Travolta died of a seizure disorder.

A two-hour autopsy was conducted at Rand
Memorial Hospital on Monday morning. The
body was released around 2.30pm to morti-
cians at Restview.

. Jett Travolta has had a history of seizures in

the past, and was diagnosed with Kawasaki
Syndrome, also known as lymph node syn-
drome.

Actor John Travolta, his wife, Kelly Pre-

‘movie star,”

Travolta family leave
Bahamas with son’s ashes

ston, with their eight-year-old daughter Ella,
and son, Jett, arrived in the Bahamas on their
private plane on December 30.

» According to police, Jett was last seen going
into the family bathroom on January 1. He

was discovered unconscious in the bathroom

around 10am on January 2.

West End MP Obie Wilchcombe said the ;

Travoltas were like family. He said West End
was a place where Mr Travolta and his family
could relax like ordinary people.

“They became a part of this community.
We saw him and we didn’t expect him to be a
said Mr Wilchcombe.

“He wasn’t well-dressed and shaven all the

‘time and that was why he liked being in West

End because he was able to exhale in oe
Bahamas.

“We.know the celebrity John and his wife;
and their children were like ordinary folks
walking around the property talking to every-
one and embracing everyone,” said MP Wilch-
combe.

the water.

‘When you'saw John you saw Jett who was
always there whether his father was out boat- .
ing or swimming, and you saw the affection
there,” he said.

Mr Travolta had planned to stay in Grand
Bahama until January 9 to celebrate the New
Year with about 60 family and friends who
had travelled to West End.

John Travolta issued a statement on his offi-
cial website, JohnTravolta.com.

It reads: “We would like to extend our deep-
est and most heartfelt thanks to everyone who
has sent their love and condolences. Jett was
the most wonderful son that two parents could
ever ask for and lit up the lives of everyone he
encountered.

“We are heartbroken that our time with
him was so brief. We will cherish the time we.
had with him for the rest of our lives. We have
received many messages of condolence from
around the world and we want to thank every-
one for their prayers and support. It has meant
so much to us. It is a beautiful reminder of
the inherent goodness in the human spirit that
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Mite Announcement

MRS. JOANN PRITCHARD,
Tas

of Mt. Pleasant
Village, Lyford.Cay
and formerly of St.
Albert Alberta,
Canada will be held
on Thursday, January
| 08th, 2009 at 3:00
pam jat St,
Christopher’s
Anglican Church,
Lyford Cay. Officiating will be Archdeacon
Keith Cartwright.

Left to cherish her memories are her Husband:
Michael Pritchard; One (1) Son: Barry;
“Mother: Leona Bruens; Four (4) Brothers:
.Ben, Darrel, Gary and Martin; Mother-in-
Jaw: Florence Pritchard; Five (5) Sisters-in-
law: Ellen, Kim and Connie Bruens, Rencina
Knowles and Wendy: Wong; Two (2)
Brothers-in-law: Martin McLean and
Christopher Pritchard and a host.of other
relatives and friends including: Her Nieces
and Nephews in Canada and Nassau and
others to numerous to mention.
In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to
Mt. Pleasant Association c/o of Michael
Pritchard, Box-SS-19273 Nassau, Bahamas.

Arrangements are being conducted by
Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium,
Ernest and York Streets.






FROM page one |

on those officers.”

The: fact that investigations
have been stunted for this
reason by the very people
who officers look to for guid-
ance as they strive to reduce
crime has lowered morale
among officers and con-
tributed to an unwillingness
to follow up on matters of this
nature, claimed the well-
placed insider.

“The officers know what is
going on. You will be shocked
-by the extent of it. It’s unfor-
tunate but this isn’t something
new to the country. It’s been

added.

Deepening the seriousness
of the allegations, the insider
claimed that “right now it’s
‘known that some relatives of
(a particular officer) are doing
some things and (the police)
would not investigate those

tigate those matters. And that
goes for some of the politi-
cians’ children, too,” he
added.

However, Gortiisetoner
Ferguson ‘said it is the “pro-
fessionalism of the (RBPF)”
that will “save” the Bahamas
from the nepotistic tenden-
cies that are prevalent in a
small country like this.

“If you deteriorate to the
level where you are taking
sides and that kind of thing
you can see exactly what the
problems are going to be on
the horizon for us,” he added.

Mr Ferguson said he
“couldn’t tell (The Tribune)
about any specific situation”

| where an officer would have

faced any penalty for pursu-

Commissioner denies claims
that some ‘very serious’ crimes
not being investigated

‘senior: person in the police or
ain;public life, as the. police: [<-.

- had a crime committed and

going on for decades,” he |

matters. No-one would inves- '

. this time.

ing a case against an individ-
ual who may be related to a

insider alleged.

“I am not saying that it is
non-existent, but I am not
aware of any particular situa-
tion,” he said.

“As a matter of fact, if we

there was fear of something
of that nature, you manage
your investigations basé¢d on
the information you have in
your hand.

. “Tf something like that was
to occur, I: would not sit idly
by and let that become some
kind of sub-culture that was .
developing. That is corrup-.
tive in influence, you can’t
allow that to happen and so



-certainly this Commissioner

of Police will not tolerate
something like that happen-
ing in the organisation,” he
said.

The police chief said he
“did not know” why a person
with intimate knowledge of
the workings of the force
would make such claims at

“He may have been mak-
ing some broad state-
ments...there may have been
some things that he knew of,
and you will find that perhaps
they were not properly
reported,” said Mr Ferguson: .

He said it is the responsi-
bility of those who may be
aware of cases which are not
being properly investigated
to bring that to the Commis-
sioner’s attention. -

However, the senior insider
expressed reluctance that
such an effort would improve
the situation.








































Alleged victim of police
‘prutality’ charged in court

FROM page one

using obscene language and disorderly behaviour. Babbs’ girl-

friend, Kendria Mackey,, 22;..W
obstruction.

Daman

was, also, arraigned on a charge. of

Court dockets allege that around 8404 pm on Monday, December
29, while at Augusta Street, Babbs used obscene language to the
annoyance of Corporal 2496 Rolle. It is also alleged that Babbs
behaved in a‘disorderly manner, resisted the arrest of officer Rolle
and assaulted him. Babbs pleaded not guilty to the charges. He was
granted $6,000 bail with one surety.

Mackey also allegedly obstructed officer Rolle from executing his
duties. Mackey pleaded not guilty to the charge and was granted
$2,500 bail. The case was adjourned to March 3. The two accused
are being represented by lawyer Ian Cargill. °

A warrant of arrest was issued yesterday for Condell Macintosh,

‘39, of Wilkinson Street. Macintosh has also been charged with

obstruction but failed to appa in court for his arraignment yes-

terday. .

US tourist found dead
on Paradise Island

FROM page one

f

terday.

Assistant Public Affairs Offi-
cer at the US Embassy Kristyna
Rabassa said the investigation
into Massa's death.is led by
local authorities: "I can

absolutely confirm that the

investigation is not being han-
dled by the State Department,"
she told The Tribune. She said

. the embassy considered his

death, and other recent deaths

of Americans in this country,

as "isolated incidents."

. Acting Commissioner Regi-

nald Ferguson said police were
treating the death as suspicious
pending autopsy results to
determine an official cause of
death..

Massa was reportedly a guest
at the Atlantis Resort on a five-
day trip with a brother and
friends to ring in the new year,
according to’a Connecticut dai-
ly, Republican-American. :

The newspaper reported that

the night before Massa disap-
peared he was partying with his
brother and friends at Atlantis
before returning to his room
alone around lam Sunday.
When friends went to the room
a few hours later, they report-
edly found some of Massa's
belongings on a nightstand but
the teacher was nowhere to be
found, according to the Repub-
lican-American.

He also reportedly missed a
Sunday flight home raising the
alarm of his family.

Nancy Vaughn, an official at
Waterbury Arts Magnet School,
where Massa taught for five
years, described him as a "great
guy", loved by students and
teachers alike. She said the.
school community was still in
shock over his death and was
providing counselling sessions.

Messages left for Kerzner.
International senior-vice presi-
dent of public affairs Ed Fields
were not returned up to press
time.

Investigations continue.

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\

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 7





In brief

Former FAU director
is named energy
commission chair

@ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.

A FLORIDA Atlantic Uni-
versity environmental director
will lead a newly created com-
mission responsible for the
state’s energy and climate
change programmes, according
to Associated Press.

Gov. Charlie Crist Tuesday
named James F. Murley as
chair of the Florida Energy &
Climate Commission.

His term will end Nov. 30,
2011 and is subject to Senate
confirmation.

‘ The commission was creat-
ed in the 2008 legislative ses-
sion. It will administer finan-
cial incentive programs and
complete annual assessments
of Florida’s Energy and Cli-
mate Change Action Plan. It
will also provide recommenda-
tions to lawmakers.

Murley is director of FAU’s
Center for Urban and Envi-
ronmental Solutions.

aia)

Defence Force
helping hand to hostel

OFFICERS and marines
from the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force visited the
Children’s Emergency Hostel
to carry out repairs and main-
tenance jobs.

The Commando Squadron
Department of the force
undertook structural repairs,
basic maintenance and land-
scaping work.

The marines also repaired
chairs and tables, trimmed
trees and mowed the lawn.

Later, executive officer of
the Commando Squadron
Lieutenant Ricardo Barry pre-
sented a box of groceries to
the McKinney Drive home.

A massive clean up effort
by the Defence Force Admin-
istration Section was also car-
ried out. The work entailed
tasks such as cleaning window
screens and hauling away
garbage.

Chief Petty Officer Eric
Brown led this team.

“These are just some of the
projects which the officers and
marines of the Defence Force
are involved with; as a small
gesture of lending a helping
hand wherever possible, as

(we) continue to protect the —

territorial sovereignty of the
Bahamas,” said the Defence
Force in a statement.

cutting tree branches

Claim that tourists being swindled

TOURISTS are being swindled in the
Bahamas from the moment they arrive at
Nassau’s international airport, it was
claimed yesterday.

Many taxi-drivers charge exorbitant
fares with no reference to standard rates

— and even hit visitors with “criminal”

fares. of up to $135 from the airport to
Atlantis.

The allegations came from German
investor Harald Fuhrmann, who has
launched a new campaign to highlight
the Bahamas’ shortcomings as a tourist
resort and investment centre.

“This is not a paradise for tourism or
investment,” Mr Fuhrmann said, “It is a
place where foreigners get a bad deal.”

His comments came against the back-
drop of,a massive slump in tourist busi-
ness. But he said falling visitor numbers
could not be attributed entirely to the
global financial crisis.

“Unsuspecting tourists and new
investors don’t know what goes on here,”
he said, “From their very first step
through the airport, they are being swin-
dled.

“As soon as they enter the real
Bahamas, they find out about the crimi-
nals in this country.”



“Unsuspecting

tourists and new
investors don’t know
what goes on here.
From their very first
step through the
airport, they are being
swindled. As soon as
they enter the real
Bahamas, they find out
about the criminals in
this country.” | |



German investor
Harald Fuhrmann

Mr Fuhrmann claimed the $135 per
person charge was common for taxi rides
from the airport to Atlantis. He said many
tourists were staggered by the charge.

“What’s more, drivers will charge a
tourist $60 just to drive from the traffic

island near the Riu hotel on Paradise .

Island to the cruise ships at Nassau water-
front,” he said.

Many taxi-drivers and other freelance
tourism workers set themselves a daily
income target which they try to maintain,
no matter how few tourists there are, he
said.

“This means the fewer tourists there
are, the harder the individual tourist gets
hit,” he added.

But short-term gain for Bahamians
leads to long-term disillusionment for vis-
itors, he said, and a subsequent fall-off
in tourist numbers. wed

“Many people who come here on vaca-
tion vow never to return,” said Mr
Fuhrmann. “Everything is too expensive
- and they get swindled as well. They then
realise that they get a far better deal in
Cuba or the Dominican Republic.”

Mr Fuhrmann said it was no use
Tourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace talking about new flights from
Europe if the product was lacking at this
end. :

“T was one of several passengers in a
taxi from the airport, but I was charged
$15 for a ride to Caves Point, even though
it was listed as $6. ‘

from moment they arrive at airport

“When I raised the matter with the
woman driver, she said: ‘We don’t work
for $6 in the Bahamas.”

Mr Fuhrmann fears that, as the econo-
my tightens, tourists will be cheated even
more as Bahamians try to keep up income
levels.

“No-one should blame tourists if they
don’t come back. Once you have visited
the Bahamas and realise it is not the par-
adise you were led to believe, then you
naturally choose to go elsewhere. |
_ “People who have had a bad experi-
ence say ‘No thanks, Bahamas’ and I’m
afraid the Bahamas has only itself to
blame. ‘Cheat the tourist’ is the aim of so
many here. But the minister has to realise
that honesty is the best policy in the long
run.”

Mr Fuhrmann has campaigned against
what he terms the “corrupt” Bahamas .
legal system for many years.

~He now wants the government to
increase the claims limit from $5,000
to $10,000 in the small claims court “so
that ordinary people can represent them-

selves and avoid the services of corrupt

lawyers.”
“J always feel more comfortable when
Iam representing myself,” he said.

- Mitchell hits out at PM response

SSK

DMINISTRATION TEAM of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force at the Children’s Emergency Hostel.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PLP MP Fred Mitchell has hit
out at the prime minister’s
response to his accusations of the
FNM’s alleged plans to destroy
the opposition this year.

Mr Mitchell is standing by his
statement published in Monday’s
Tribune, claiming the ruling par-
ty will use all and any agencies of
the state, including the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, to bring
down the PLP.

He also said it is time for Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to

step down from his third term in *

office, comparing him to Zim-
babwean dictator Robert
Mugabe.

But Mr Ingraham was quoted
in Tuesday’s Tribune saying he
would not dignify the Fox Hill
MP with a response. *

Mr Mitchell said: “The
remarks made by me with regard
.ta his stepping down from office

ment to smear the PLP were not
ill considered and without evi-
dence.

“Mine was a serious interven-
tion. It is a sure sign when some-
one is losing an argument that
they have to resort to being
insulting.”

Remarks

In an attempt to justify his
remarks, Mr Mitchell said Minis-
ter of National Security Tommy
Turnquest appears to have con-
firmed that there will be investi-
gations into public figures over
the coming year, but Mr Turn-
quest was not available for com-
ment yesterday.

The Fox Hill MP further
alleges public servants perceived
to be PLP have been dismissed
by the FNM government, PLP
advice on appointments to public
offices have been ignored, the

infrastructure in some PLP con-..
stituencies is being neglected, and .

and other professionals associat-
ed with the last PLP administra-
tion have had their contracts
stopped, reviewed and cancelled.

And the FNM dismantled the
PLP’s Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme only to rebuild it as
Neighbourhood Policing, Mr
Mitchell said. —

He added: “While they could
not accept the PLP’s programme
was a good one, the FNM needed
to rebrand the programme to call
it their own.”

Mr Mitchell also called for Mr
Ingraham to stand:down from his
third term in office as he said the
prime minister had criticised Sir

‘Lynden Pindling for staying more

than two terms in office.

He added: “I simply asked him
to adhere to his promise and
leave. All around the world there
are leaders who did not know
when it was time to go: Robert
Mugabe, Hugo Chavez.

“All want to hold on to power.
Mr Ingraham must not shame his
legacy by falling into that cate-










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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009



_ Are you between a
Rock and Hard place

Well... =
THE TRIBUNE

is your soft landing!










| ‘Take advantage of the 21,000 in paid
| circulation of The Bahamas’ \argest newspaper
-and get your share of the scarce dollar.



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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 9





PMT

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, January 7

Miami at Denver (9 pm
EST). The Heat open a sev-
en-game, 13-day, 7,461-mile
road trip in Denver. The
Nuggets may be without star
Carmelo Anthony, who
injured his hand on Monday
night.

STARS

Monday

— Tim Duncan, Spurs,
scored 19 points and
grabbed nine rebounds to
lead Southwest Division-
leading San Antonio over
Miami 91-84.

— Michael Redd, Bucks,
had a season-high 35 points
to help Milwaukee to a 107-
97 win over Toronto.

— Deron Williams, Jazz,
had 25 points and tied his
season high with 15 assists
in Utah's 119-114 victory
over Golden State.

WALKER CHARGED

Former NBA player
Antoine Walker was
charged with suspicion of
drunk driving in Miami
Beach on Monday morning,
further hurting his chances
of playing again this season.

Walker was driving a black '

Mercedes without the lights
-on when he was pulled over
at 5:39 am, according to the
arrest report. Officers
detected a strong odor of
alcohol and wrote in the
report that Walker had a

sleepy look on his face. He.

refused a breathalyzer test.

SUN SPOTS

Suns guard Jason Richard-
son is facing charges of dri-
ving under the influence of
alcohol in an American Indi-
an tribal community in met-
ropolitan Phoenix. A cita-
tion filed in court says the
ex-Michigan State star was
stopped by a Salt River
Pima-Maricopa Indian Com-
munity police officer on
December 21.

SIDELINED

Los Angeles Lakers for:
eward Luke Walton will be
‘sidelined for at least two
weeks by a foot injury. Wal-
ton, who started 11 consecu-
tive games before missing
Sunday's 100-86 win over
Portland, has sesamoiditis in
his right foot and will wear a
protective boot for a week,
the team said Monday.

The condition is an irrita-

tion of the sesamoid bones.
that extend to the big toe .

and generally heals without
surgery. Oklahoma City
rookie forward DJ White
had a second surgery to
remove a benign growth
from his‘jaw, and is expected
to miss at least the next 12
weeks.

Thunder officials said
team doctors performed the
final procedure on Sunday

‘at Integris Baptist Medical —

Center. The initial surgery
was performed October 13.

SENT PACKING a
The Los Angeles Clippers
acquired 7-foot-1 Cheikh
Samb of Senegal from the
Denver Nuggets on Monday

- for a conditional second-
round draft pick. The Clip-
pers also waived forward
Paul Davis and guard Fred
Jones and received cash con-

siderations as part of the

deal.

SUPER SUB.

Paul Millsap posted his
18th consecutive double-
double with 19° points and
14 rebounds as a fill-in for

. Carlos Boozer, who has
missed 23 straight games
with a knee injury. Boozer
will undergo- arthroscopic
surgery on the knee on Fri-
day.

SPEAKING

"That wasn't New J ersey,

it was the Kings. We're our

own worst enemy. Some-'

where along the line we're
going to have to grow up
and grow out of that losing
mentality."

— Sacramento interim
coach Kenny Natt after the
Kings lost their 11th straight
road game, 98-90 to the Nets
on Monday

For the stories
ATT Se

APTI M E96
on Mondays



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



CARMELO ANTHONY holds his right wrist after it was wrapped in.an ice pack after he was hit going
up for a shot against the Indiana Pacers in the third quarter of! the Nuggets’ 135-115 victory in Mon-

day’s game in Denver...

(AP Photo: David Zalubowski)

Anthony has
broken bone in
shooting hand

@ By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — Denver
Nuggets All-Star Carmelo
Anthony will miss at least three
weeks with a broken bone in
his shooting hand — but won't
need surgery.

' The team said Tuesday that
Anthony will be fitted for a
removable splint after breaking
a bone in his right hand in a vic-





FROM page 11

be a recurring theme
throughout the quarter.

He scored 11 of his 17
points of the quarter at the
charity stripe to keep the
Falcons within striking dis-
tance as the Diplomats
threatened to pull away.

Sharp shooter Manaro
Lundy came off the bench
and became the story of the
quarter as his efficiency from
long range gave the Diplo-

. mats their largest lead of the
game.

Lundy, who finished reg-
ulation with 11 points, nailed
three consecutive three
pointers to give the Diplo-
mats a 32-19 advantage mid-
way through the quarter.

Moss continued to attack

and reach the foul line as he |

nearly single-handedly
closed the gap for the Fal-

cons, bringing them within ©

four points, 37-33 with just
over a minute remaining in
~ the half.
‘The Diplomats regained
composure and ended the

quarter on.a 7-0 flurry, to -

_ give them an 11 point advan-
. tage at the half, 44-33.
Facing a.double figure
deficit at the half on the road
against the defending cham-
pions, the Falcons dug deep
in the third quarter to rally
themselves into contention.
Nayman Lightbourne

made a three pointer on the ~

opening possession of the
half and Moss’ consistent
aggression at the basket
forced Gomez and Morley
‘to the bench with foul trou-
ble.

Lightbourne, who finished
with 10 points in regulation,
scored eight in the quarter.

Moss’ three point conver-
sion trimmed the deficit, 46-



ERENT.

aes

41, and a pair of free throws
by Austin Hanna brought
the Falcons within two, 50-

48.”

With the Diplomats ahead
57-53 late in the quarter,
Moss went down with a
cramp and was forced out of
the game with an injury.

Larry Smith scored on the
next possession to give the
Diplomats a 59-53 advan-
tage.

Franson Moss came off
the bench and stepped up to
fill the void left by the Fal-

, cons’ star player, scoring all

of his five points during the
late third quarter stretch.

His lay-up through a
porous Westminster transi-
tion defense gave the. Fal-
cons their first lead of. the
game, 61-59.

A Chistorr Stuart basket
tied the game heading into

_the fourth quarter.

The Diplomats held the
largest lead of the fourth,
when Smith’s lay-up gave
them a 69-64 lead with 3:34
remaining.

_ The Falcons once again
blazed a comeback trail led
by Devardo Williams.

Willams drove the lane
and flushed a dunk in traffic

_and followed with a lay-up

on the ensuing possession to
bring the Falcons within one,
71-70.

Recovered from. his
cramps, Donathen Moss re-
entered the game and gave
the Falcons a 73-71 lead with

‘a successful three point con-

version.

The Diplomats missed a °

myriad of free throws and
lay-ups down the stretch
with an opportunity to tie
and a strategic gamble by
head coach Geno Bullard

Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune Staff



IN a rematch of the 2007 championship
series, the Westminster College Diplo-

A







paid off.

Rather than foul and send
the Falcons to‘the free throw
line, Bullard instructed his
team to step up their defen-
sive intensity and go for a
steal as the Falcons tried to
milk the clock.

Bain eventually came up,

with the steal and basket,
securing overtime for his



FROM page 11

4

mats and Jordan Prince William Fal-
cons played to a 73-73 tie at the end of
regulation at the Diplomats’ campus on
~ Blake Road yesterday.

See photos on this page...

team.
At the end of regulation,

Stuart led the Diplomats -

with 14 points, while Mor-
ley added 13 and Smith
‘ added 10.

tory over the Indiana Pacers the
night before.

Anthony was injured early in
the third quarter when Pacers
center Jeff Foster swatted at the
ball, catching part of Anthony's

_ hand.

Anthony continued to play
despite numbness in the hand,
scoring 21 points before leav-
ing late in the fourth quarter of
a 135-115 win.

A tribute
to Kevin
‘Eyes’
Ford

FROM page 11

gramme started.

Local players showed no fear
when they played against such
great players, which included
Dir Jan Botham.

Kevin ‘Eyes’ Ford was among
the best of that era.

Our cricket historian Gary
Campbell, in his research in the
files of local newspapers and
the archives, produced infor
mation about Ford’s perfor
mances.

He was taken to the UK in
1976 by the Commonwealth
Wanderers Cricket Club. He
was one of three youth players
on the trip. Upon his return to
the Bahamas, the onslaught on
local bowlers began.

He hit hard, high and far. His
favourite targets were above the
willow trees at Haynes Oval and

| across Bay Street to Arawak
Cay. :
' A Canadian team visiting
Nassau exposed their top spin
bowler to Ford in his first over.
Ford hit to six consecutive sixes
that went close to Fort Chany
lotte.

Even today, that bowler hag
not lived down the beating he
got from Ford. Canadians still
remember the catch Ford took

’ on the grounds of the Toronto:
Cricket Club to dismiss their
top batsman.

He had run about fifty yardet
dived full length with his body:
horizontal to the ground to hold

- on to a brilliant catch. The:
crowd was silent for seconds
and then roared with their acco-
lades.

In 1987, he-recorded the
fastest century in cricket history,

- when he scored 100 runs off 6.5°
overs (41 balls). He ended that
innings with his score at 169
runs. He had hit 20 sixes and 8
fours. &

In 1992, he scored a record
aggregate of 796 runs, which.
included five centuries.

Then BCA president Sidney
Deveaux got the association
into the International Cricket
Conference and the opportuni-
ties for international cricket
began.

He was followed by Colin
Deane and Gregory Taylor Sr.
The Bahamas has won interna-
tional acclaim by winning the.
ICC Tournament of Americas
and with excellent perfor-;
mances in the international,
cricket arena. ’

The youth programme is pro-
gressing and even they are get-:
ting international exposure. The:
future looks bright. .

Both teams look to con-—

tinue their undefeated
streaks when the overtime

period is re-scheduled later ~

in the season.

“T could not win,” Rev McPhee stat-



Sydney Forbes elected as commodore of BBOSA

to do as soon as we can as we collabo-



vote.
In making his exit, Rev McPhee said
he has done his best and has no regrets.
“I told them win, lose or draw, I

‘ won’t be interested in sailing as I was.in

the past,” said McPhee, who had vowed
to keep the memory of his father, the
late Rev Dr W G McPhee alive in the

. Sport.

“I wasn’t going to be there for more

than two years, but I ran again because -

I didn’t want people to come on board
who were only going to use it for ‘Polit-
ical reasons.’

Rev McPhee, owner of the Red Hot
Thunderbird, said he made his contri-

bution to sailing, helping to bring the

Regatta Desk to the Ministry of Sports,
securing the $1.5 million contract with
Burns House and helping to raise the
prize money offered at the various
regattas.

“But when people feel that they can
do better, you let them go,” Rev
McPhee insisted. “But I have no regrets.
I did what I had to do, but I think we
made a big mistake by allowing the min-
istry. to step in and conduct the elec-
tions the way they did.”

Rev McPhee noted that it was uncon-
stitutional and that young people who
sail on the boats were not allowed to
vote, which he claimed prevented him
from returning to office.

ed. “I didn’t have the money to fight
those who competed. Money won that
election. But I wished them the best. I
hope that sailing goes on.”

Rev McPhee, who has indicated that
his era in sailing as a boat owner may
also be over, congratulated Forbes as he
passed the torch on.

As the new commodore, Forbes said
it’s their intention to rebuild the
BBOSA.

“We really need to get involved and
bring sailing back to the glory days
when we had sailing just about every
weekend or every month in Montagu
Bay,” Forbes projected.

“That is one of the things we want

rate with all of the other associations.”
With the team of executives he has to;
work with, Forbes said he’s sure that,
they will get the job done because “this;
is not an individual thing.”
“We have a team of officers who are
prepared to work,” he charged. “We
will give other people some responsi-.
bilities because it’s going to be a col-
laborated effort, not an individual one.”
By the end of the month, Forbes said
the first concerted effort should be wit-
nessed when the ministry hold the All-
For-Me Regatta in Montagu Bay.
The regatta should feature all of the
associations competing together in the
first major regatta for the year.



PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Sports Notes

TRACK
ODD DISTANCE
POSTPONED

Due to the homegoing ser-
vice/celebration of sports leg-
end Phil Smith, the Bahamas
Associations of Athletic Asso-
ciation has advised the public
that the Odd Distance Track
Meet, which is scheduled for
Saturday at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, has been rescheduled,
and will now be held on January
17. The meet will officially kick
off the 2009 season.

League public relations offi-
cer Kermit Taylor extended the
condolences of the association
to Smith’s funeral and he
encouraged their members to
attend the funeral service 10am
Saturday at St Francis Catholic
Church.

FOOTBALL
. CAFL POSTPONE
PLAYOFFS

The Commonwealth Ameri-
can Football League. has
announced that due to the

funeral service of the late sports ~

icon Phil Smith, their playoff
game on Saturday between the
second place Orry J Sands Pros
(6-2) and the third place

Stingrays (4-4) will be post- .

poned until 1:30pm January 17
at the DW Davis Gymnasium.

However, the league has also
announced that Sunday’s match
between the pennant winning
Jets (8-0) and the fourth place
Tripoint Kingdom Warriors (1-
7) will be played as scheduled at
1:30 pm at. DW. Davis.

The championship game
between the winners of the two
playoff games is slated for
1:30pm January 31 at the DW
Davis playing field.

The league has extended its
condolences to Smith’s family
and they are encouraging all of
their players to show up for the
funeral service in their uniform

tops at St Francis Catholic .

Church 10 am Saturday.

Even though neither object in the
Secret Sound is medicine, some people
swear they would die without one



essere arrntnrenoneytse “yess SUPE PREG enti tn CPLA COREE eC OT OTC EE eect einem arene nn eh aan nen i Se

of these objects.

Elliott mourning
loss of his wife

@ By BRENT STUSBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FORMER St Augustine’s College and
national triple jump champion Norbert
Elliott is mourning, the loss of his wife,
Gertrudis Palacio Elliott.

Trudy, as she was. affectionately called,
lost her battle with cancer on Saturday at
their home in Knoxville, Tennessee. Her
funeral is scheduled for Thursday at the
All Saints Catholic Church.

Speaking from t* ir home in an inter-
view with The Tribune yesterday, Elliott
said it was a tough loss, especially because
she leaves her children behind.

“I’ve known her “or over 25 years and
we’ve been marrie ‘or 20 years,” Elliott
pointed out. “I’m just trying to hold on
for the kids.”

The Elliotts have five children, inclu-
sive of Danielle, who is currently in col-
lege, and Norbert II, Alexander, Dominic
and Adrian, all of whom are either in pri-
mary or high school.

“We have a lot of support from family
members, neighbours and friends, so that



emanate PAE

helps,” Elliott stated.
“So right now, we’re doing okay.”

Interested persons wishing to send their
condolences to the Elliotts can do so by
logging onto Click Funeral Home,
Knoxville, Tennessee, where they can also
view Trudy’s obituary.

Trudy Elliott, a former biology instruc-
tor at Murray State University, was a reli-
gious education teacher and Mary Kay
director. She is originally from Belize.

Norbert Elliott, who formerly starred
at the Big Red Machines for SAC, is in his
third season as an assistant coach at the
University of Tennessee where he works

directly with the Vol’s sprints, hurdles and
horizontal jumps.

He attended the University of Texas at
E] Paso where he earned a Bachelor’s
Degree in Business Management in 1987
and a Master’s Degree in Exercise Sci-
ence in 1991.

Elliott went on to represent the
Bahamas at the 1987 World Champi-
onships where he placed ninth in the triple
jump; was tenth at the 1988 Olympic
Games and also competed at the 1992
Olympics. .

He began his coaching career as an assis-
tant at Texas El-Paso from 1989-92 before
he became the assistant coach at the Uni-
versity of Georgia from 1992-2001. He
then moved to Murray State where he
served as the head coach from 2002-2004.

In 2005, he joined the staff at the Uni- |

versity of Tennessee.

_ Elliott was an assistant coach on the
Bahamas’ team at the 1991 World Cham-
pionships; head coach of the 1995 Central
‘American and Caribbean Championship
team; assistant coach at the 2000 World
Junior Championships and the head men’s
coach at the 2001 World Championships.

‘Phil was sifted and he had a heart for persons...’

@ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Rev Dt William

. Thompson, on behalf of the

Christian community, joined

. in offering condolences to the
family of the late ZNS sports-~

caster Phil ‘Smoker’ Smith,
calling him a man of integrity.

Rev Thompson, the former
president of the Bahamas
Christian Council and current-
ly serving as the president of
the Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention, said the country
has certainly lost a great
Bahamian sporting icon.

The pastor of the Faith Unit-
ed Missionary Baptist Church
said‘ When he: first met Smith,
he was a young reporter who

-was very skilled in basketball,



Rev William Thompson

softball and baseball.

“We formed a camaraderie
between us that lasted until his
death,” Rev Thompson point-
ed out. “Phil was gifted and he
had a heart for persons: He
had a passion for sports.

“He loved the game and he
believed in the dignity of the

We're looking for a few good
people to join our team.
‘DO YOU HAVE
WHAT IT TAKES? |



Apply for the pusition of

games. We had.so much fond

memories that we shared.”
One of those was when Rev

Thompson had returned home

- from school. Having gone for

about eight years, the Tom
Mac Diggers baseball team had
invited him to manage their
team.

“Phil came to practice when
he heard I was there and he
said ‘Rev, after eight years, you
think you could come back and

play this young man’s game?’ I.

told him just wait and see.” :

Rev Thompson, who held.

his own as a legend in baseball
and softball, said Smith willbe

hard to replace, but his legacy -

will continue to live.on.

“I think the way to keep
‘Phil’s legacy, alive is for thes,

Sports writer



pursuéxt the



jobs with the kind of tenatity A
and dignity that.Phil did his,’ a

he projected.
“T think that part of-his ino

cy will live on. But I think the






(AMENDMENT) ~

country owes him and we need
to do something that will help
us to keep him legacy alive. I
think the country owe that, but
those in sports need to emu-
late him.”

While Smith will be laid to
rest on Saturday, Rev Thomp-
son said he won’t be able to
attend as he has to perform the
eulogy at the funeral service
for religious icon, the Rev Lev-
ania Stuart at the New Mount
Zion Baptist Church.

But Rev Thompson left
those words of comfort for the
family of Smith.

- “To Blossie and the children,
the prayers of the Christian
community is with them, the
prayers of the Baptists is defi-
byayith them and our

:carry’Gn in the dignified way“
that Phil has lived, I truly

‘believe that in their living, .

Phil’s name will stay alive,”

Rev Thompson summed up.:...-... peace

MINIS’ RY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT — fae Ee
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971 me

CHAPTER 339

that if they continue a

A tribute
to Phil
‘Smoker’
Smith
‘A voice that will echo in

the chambers of times’

@ By The Bahamas_
Basketball Federation

THERE is nothing like the
evolution of a man; especially as
such who from humble begin-
nings Phil ‘Smoker’. Smith made
giant imprints on the sporting
world in grand national and
international fashion.

This earth will never be the
same without his excellent
deliverance and spice for life,
upon his demise. His voice will
echo in the chambers of time
for ever.

The Bahamas Basketball
Federation is bemoaned by his
tragic passing. Yes, he was the
voice of sports for many years
and as fortune had it our
beloved sport of basketball was
the beneficiary of some of his
most historic and exciting calls.

‘For that, our organisation and
the nation of basketball are
eternally grateful. We owe
‘Smoker’ a debt of gratitude
and appreciation.

To Blossie, his faithful wife,
and children, the BBF extends
our heartfelt sympathies. Your
husband and father has passed
on. However, he leaves a’ ster-
ling example of life’s triumphs
over obstacles, selflessness and
an extraordinary love for you
and the rest of his family.

We became Phil’s extended
appendages who he treated with
kid gloves, served us, embell-
ished our activities and reported
our achievements. But above
all, he was not afraid to indi- ©
cate our frailties, always remain-
ing faithful to true sports devel-
opment through professional
sports journalism.

The Bahamas Basketball
Federation will sadly miss Phil
Smith. We ensure that genera-
tions will know of ‘his contribu-
tions,to true national sports



i develdpment. His legacy will
live On. The chamber with the

echo of his voice will never go
away. May his soul rest in

GN807

THE PRICE CONTROL (GASOLINE & DIESEL OIL)
REGULATIONS, 2002

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Monday, January 5, 2009, LEAD. FREE. GASOLINE sold by CHEVRON (TEXACO)
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Friday, diane 9, 2009,

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4



CARL J. BRENNEN
ACTG. PERMANENT SECRETARY





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7,



2009



Anthony will
miss at least

three weeks...
See page 9...



Sydney Forbes elected as BBOSA commodore

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER serving for the past six
years as the commodore of the
Bahamas Boat Owners and Sailors
Association (BBOSA), the Rev Dr
Philip McPhee has been voted out of
office.

He was replaced by Sydney Forbes
during the general election of officers
yesterday at the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture. Forbes beat out
Rev McPhee 76-60.

“It’s great because this is something
that we have been fighting for over
the last six months,” said Forbes, who

sailed with the Southern Cross boat ano ara TS
in the A Class, about being the new
























commodore.

“There was some concerns about
what was going on in the association
and so we wrote letters to the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture to

» meet, with us and him and it was

agreed that they will conduct the elec-
tions. So the victory was a sweet one.”

Joining Forbes on the new execu-
tive board are vice commodore Ali
Ferguson, who beat out Autry New-
bold 71-54; secretary Larry Bastian, a
79-51 winner over Patrinella McKenzie
with Stephanie Riley as his assistant
after she won 73-58 over Gleanor Per-
centie.

The treasurer is Stafford Armbrister,
who secured a 82-50 decision over
Kenneth Saunders and his assistant is
Vernice Adderley, an 81-51 victor over

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

layed out as everything it was billed to be, the
BAISS senior boys matchup between the
leagues top teams produced everything a bas-

Valdrie McClain.

And Dora Mae Wright won the
public relations officer post with a total
of 67 votes, compared to 47 won by
Anita Pratt and 16 by Calvin Far-
quharson.

Minister of Sports Desmond Ban-
nister appointed a committee to con-
duct the elections. They comprised of
the Rev Dr William Thompson, Kings-
ley Black and the Rev Elkin Symon-
ette. a

Rev Thompson, president of the
Bahamas National Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention, said
when they met with the association
before the elections, they tried to set
up a process for the elections.

It took the form of nominations and
a new registration was formed where

only those persons who were over the
age of 15 years old and financial would
be allowed to vote.

“The committee hopes to meet with
the new board to put together a prop-
er constitution for the association so
the same problem would not reoccur,”
Rev Thompson stated.

“The whole association agreed that
this was the way it should be done and
I think it was fair. It was done with
dignity. It was done at the level of a
national election.”

Once the constitution is amended,
Rev Thompson said it will eliminate
the problem of persons who are in no
way connected with sailing coming in
and registering just so that they can

SEE page 9

Diplomats tie with Falcons

Teams will WEN

ketball game could — a second half comeback, a

OT at later date |



myriad of ties and lead changes, late game heroics — all but
an ending.

In a rematch of the 2007 championship series, the West-
minster College Diplomats and Jordan Prince William
Falcons played to a 73-73 tie at the end of regulation at the
Diplomats’ campus on Blake Road.

The overtime period was called off due to darkness
and a date for completion of the game will be decided by
BAISS executives and announced at a later date.

A steal by the Diplomats’ Shaquille Bain and his sub-

sequent fastbreak basket tied the game at 73 with 27 sec-
onds remaining.

The Falcons had two chances to respond and regain the
lead. However, a pair of turnovers by Donathen Moss end-
ed the possibility of escaping with a win on the road.

Moss was tagged with a five seconds closely guarded vio-
lation and on the Falcons’ final possession was called for
traveling on his way to the basket.

The defending champions looked to establish the post

game early with Rashard Morley and Ryan Gomez assert-

ing themselves inside early on.

Morley scored eight of the Diplomats’ 14 points in the
quarter as both teams played to a tie at the end of the
opening quarter.

Westminster began the second quarter on an 8-0 run to
take a decisive 22-14.

Moss, who led all scorers in regulation with 35 points,
halted'the run with a pair of free throws, which proved to |

SEE page 9

cB.

A (eto LO



-Felipé Major/Tribune s

ya

JORDAN Prince-William Falcons player goes fora dunk over a Westminster College Diplomats player during
_Tuesday’s rematch of the 2007 championship series at the Diplomats’ campus on Blake Road...

‘See more photos on page 9...



@ By PAUL THOMPSON
Bahamas Cricket
Association

IN. his early teens, he
appeared for the St Bernard’s
Cricket Club, a cricket dynasty
of the fifties, sixties and seven-
ties.

He learned his cricket with
his brothers on Windsor Park,
better known as Dorsey Park.
He was an extraordinary tal-
ented batsman with exceptional
ability, fitness and agility, with
the timing, reflexes, power and
eyes, that terrorised bowlers of
his era.

In addition to his ability as a
batsman, he was an exceptional
fast medium pace bowler and
was magnificent as a fieldsman.
He and others like him did not
have the opportunities that exist
today, which would have pro-
pelled them into becoming
’ world class cricketers.

The Commonwealth Wan-
derers Cricket Club in the late
sixties started making annual
cricket tours abroad - the USA,
Canada, the West Indies,
Bermuda and the 1976 visit to



THE late Kevin ‘Eyes’ Ford...

England.

Those tours gave players of
that era the chance to excel on
the world stage against some of

' the best players in the world, to

the delight of many who had
not heard of the Bahamas being

a cricketing country:

Through the performances of
these great Bahamian players
such as Eddie Ford, Irving Tay-
lor, Patrick Louison, Vianny
Jacques, Irving Armstrong,
Francis Scott, Horace Kingston
and a host of others too numer-
ous to,mention, the Bahamas
emerged as a cricket destina-
tion.

Teams visited regularly from
Bermuda, cities in the United
States of America, Canada, the
West Indies, England and as far
away as Australia and New
Zealand. |

English country teams, name-
ly Somerset and Worcestersire,
spent several days playing crick-
et here. The great MCC visit-
ed, played and coached here.
The latter were very impressed
with our players. They invited
two players, namely Whitcliffe
Atkinson and Garsha Blair, to
visit the MCC at Lord’s in Eng-
land for coaching.

The MCC was also instru-

‘ mental in getting the youth pro-

SEE page 9

DOSTANA el a oi Toe
Ia CaS cha

K4 to Grade 4 am





i

PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Nybkae

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Ue



BO ccrsrenrsesersensnsancrspenenesnne:

WEDNESDAY,






SSSR ASAE

JANUARY 7,



2009





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Commercial: count niche
‘critical’ for Bahamas

* Former attorney-general urges creation of dedicated commercial court with specific
judges, as complex matters such as Port Authority dispute taking ‘too long’ to process

* Says such court would boost financial services industry’s attraction and Bahamas’
competitiveness, potentially making it major centre for resolving global disputes

* Argues that Bahamas could start ball rolling with just $200, 000 investment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

former

attor-

ney-gen-

eral yes-

terday urged the

Bahamas to establish

a dedicated commer-

cial court to ensure

the swift resolution of

major disputes, argu-

ing that with just an

initial $200,000 investment it would

boost the financial services industry’s

attraction and enhance economic com-
petitiveness.

Alfred Sears, who was this nation’s

chief legal officer for four years under

PML elec les



the former PLP administration, told
Tribune Business that a specific com-
mercial court was needed because it
“takes too long” for disputes of this
nature to be resolved, impacting
investor and private sector confidence
in this nation.

Mr Sears, who is now back in pri-
vate practice at his law firm, Sears &

Co, is representing one of the parties
involved in the protracted Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) own-
ership dispute, which has been before
the Bahamian courts for more than
two years'inow.

He told Tribune Busines that the
absence of a dedicated commercial
court, with judges allocated to only

hear disputes of that nature which’

came before it, meant that.cases such

as the GBPA dispute - first filed in’

November 2006 - took much longer to
resolve and make their way through
the court system.

While the Bahamas Supreme Court
had numerous judges well-versed and
experienced in dealing with complex

commercial fecthan such as senior
justices John Lyons and Anita Allen,
plus Justice Neville Adderley, their
case load meant that they were fre-
quently called away to focus on other
disputes and could not dedicate their
time to the GBPA dispute. Various

SEE page 4B

Bahamas urged to lead Wyndham and Crystal Palace

lobbying for Global
anti-laundering forum

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas must lead lob-
bying for the creation of a Glob-

al Forum on anti-money laun-

dering and anti-terror financ-
ing regulations, a former attor-
ney general telling Tribune
Business yesterday this was the
only way to ensure rulés were
developed in a “transparent”
manner that did mot discrimi-
nate against nations such as this
one.

Alfred Sears, attorney gener-
al under the former Christie
administration, said such a
Forum would prevent “high tax
onshore” centres, such as
France and Germany, from
using bodies such as the Finan-



cial Action Task Force (FATF)
to craft rules designed to reduce
the competitiveness of the
Bahamas and other. interna-
tional financial centres under
the guise of international regu-
latory reform.

He also urged the Govern-
ment to start lobbying the
Bahamas’ allies in the US Con-
gress and government agencies
to head off any potential nega-
tive implications from the pro-
posed*Stop Tax Haven Abuse

‘Bill, which was sponsored by
‘president-elect Barack Obama

when he was a Senator.

Mr Sears added that several
Clinton-era officials, stich as for-
mer US Treasury Secretary
Lawrence Summers, who were
“ideologically opposed” to
international financial centres
such as the Bahamas, were set
to be appointed to key Obama
administration positions. This
did not bode well for the
Bahamas, and made the lobby-
ing effort all the more urgent.

Arguing that “you are not
dealing with a level playing
field” when it came to interna-
tional financial services regula-
tion, Mr Sears said his four
years as attorney general - and,
in particular, his tenure as
Caribbean Financial Action
Task Force (CFATF) chair -
had exposed him to the FATF’s
wiles and how its developed
country members manipulated
the body to their own advan-
tage.

He recalled how, when
attending an FATF meeting in
Paris as the CFATF’s chair, he
was asked to leave the room

SEE page 4B



to close for eight weeks

@ By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA MAR last night
unveiled plans to close the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino for eight weeks
this year between August 17-
October 5, telling Tribune Busi-
ness the initiative was designed
to cut in half the financial bleed- .
ing usually sustained during its §j
highest loss-making period with-
out laying-oft staff.

The Cable Beach Resorts
owner said it had spent $75 million to cover/sub-
sidise operating losses in the three-and-a-half
years since it acquired the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort and Wyndham/Crystal Palace Casino in
May 2005.

These losses had been. eaten during a period
when Baha Mar had invested some $150 mil-
lion in upgrading the two properties, on top of the
$200 million purchase price, taking its total spend
to close to $500 million.

The figures, when combined with Baha Mar’s
statement that in 2008 it ended the year with
“combined operating losses and debt service
expenses in excess of millions of dollars”, all add
up to the impression that the Bahamian hotel
industry - the largest private sector employer - is

How do you attract and retain



* August-October 2009 closure
to cut financial bleeding ‘in half

during highest loss-making period

* Cable Beach Resort owner/developer .
spends $75m to cover operating losses
since taking over in May 2005

* 2008 losses ‘in excess of many millions
of dollars’, with 35% utility bill rise

* Scheme designed to reduce losses
while seh ig existing employment,
as 1,000 staff set to be impacted

essentially 4 welfare industry, the losses of many
properties subsidised by the pockets of their own-
ers.

Tribune Business feporied last year that Baha
Mar was already incurring net losses of between
$12-$15 million per year before the 2008 global
economic downturn. The company yesterday said
it had to cope with a 35 per cent increase in util-

‘ ity costs to $15 million in 2008.

Explaining the rationale for the eight-week

SEE page 3B

Atlantis could
attract em

inrevenues

curing 2008

@ By CHESTER ROBARD
_ Business Reporter



THE ATLANTIS reso
could generate revenues ‘of
around $800 million for itself
and related businesses in 2009
despite thé“current economic
recession, Kerzner Internation-
al (Bahamas) president, George
Markantonis, said yesterday

Speaking at the seventh
annual Caribbean MBA Con-
ference’s luncheon, Mr Markan-
tonis revealed certain project-
ed figures for the resort in 2009.

He expected Atlantis to gen-
erate this year around $240 mil-
lion in room revenues, its pri-
mary revenue source. A further
$195 million was projected to
come from food and beverage,

‘SEE page 3B

‘best of class’ employees?

iN eenro le
Lia pk og Oh

ener eae ses ain

An RBC

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company









re



KEY WEST
Low: 70° F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque 50/10 29/-1_ pe

AE 20- Ls 23 s



842 29/-1 ss —
4/-15 -6/-21
- §5/12 33/0 pe

43/6 25/-3



816 3602 - ce





26-3 nd




79/26 67/1 1 9
(2045/7 Ss 275/238) 573 se

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Houston yo







4 Thursday
Low. W

Today
High Low W

FIC Fic




Partly sunny and Partly cloudy with Clouds and sun; Sunny and nice. - | Sunny and pleasant. Sunny and beautiful. The higher the AccuWeather UV indexâ„¢ number, the
breezy. = showers around. | breezy, less humid. : greater the need for eye and skin protection.
_ High: 79° | High: 75° High: 75° High: 76°

AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel
70°-60° F 70°-62° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, oe and Today 3:43am. 2. 7 “10: 15 a.m. 0.

élevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.























4:08 p.m. 2.1 10:07 p.m. -0.3

hursday 4:47am. 2.9 11:17am. -0.1
Three 5:11 p.m. 2.2 11:08 p.m. -0.4

Friday 48am. 3.0 12:13p.m. -0.3





25/-3 15/-







Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday











ABACO Temperature . ; : 6:10 p.m. © 2.3 ent
HIGH. si.csieitlcasvsssmanleatarcasionntnBe” P20" C. : ; 7
High: 83° F/28 C Li ° ° Saturday 6:45 a.m. 3.1 12:08 a.m. -0.6
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Normal OW coccsscscssssrssssnessenraeen 66° F/19° C
WEST PALM BEACH © _ Last year's high .. 79° F/26° C
High:81°F/27°C ae ss Last year's low .. . 66° F/19° G
* Low: 65° F/18°C e : * Precipitation : Sunrise . .
ee 22 AS Of 1 p.m. yeSterday .......cccessecessseeseeseesees {ACE
- FREEPORT Year to date ou... essccsssseressecectsscsecersseeseees O01"
High: 82° F/28°C Normal year to date oo... essseecseesreseseeee 0.84"
Low: 63° F/17°CG
AccuWeather.com 34/1 34/1 sn
Forecasts and graphics provided by ai : / a me gr :
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 é e i a A -7 pc -
= ELEUTHERA Jan 10 Jan.17 Jan. 26 Feb. 2






_ High:84°F/29°C

67/19.
Low: 72° F/22°C



37/2 s
High: 84° F/29°C
Low.71°F/22°C_





CAT ISLAND
High: 82° F/28°C
-67°F/19°C





_ SAN SALVADOR
? High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 71° F/22°C








86/30. “5a/12. | pe

=



High: 87°F/31°C —
Low: 72° F/22°C

MAYAGUANA
& _ High: eS" F/30°C







Indianapolis.










Jacksonville s Ss
Kansas City 32/0 pe. Sf RAG ISLAN
Las Vegas 63/17 40/4 s r ear F/29°C D

Low: 67° F/19°C



GREATINAGUA







2 High: 88° F/31°C
: or Low: 71° F/22°C
Nashvill







New Orleans ' ae -

668 31/2 2






Winnipeg -4/-20 -16/-26 pc O/-17 -10/-23 pc

; ’ a Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Wagbington.,PC 44/6. 34/1 . , 48/7 28/-2 -c. . ot en storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, t-ice, Prep- precipitation, Tr-trace

u



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS»

SS ara JANUARY, 2009
















Marine Forecast
WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles (°F
Thursda' SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles JI2F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Thursday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F

Thursday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. :
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary —s

CE BROKERS & AGENTS

{Eleuthera Exum
(247) 332-2862 Tes (242) 336-2304





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3B



i <â„¢ i Sa eee
FOCOL: $6.3m = British Airways to add sixth direct flight from UK to Nassau

JV set to show
henefits in ‘two
to three periods’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FOCOL Holdings yesterday
said it was hoping the cost sav-
ings from its $6.3 million invest-
ment in a shipping joint ven-
ture, which will ship.its petrole-
um products throughout the
Bahamas, will “begin to show
in another two to three quar-
ters from now”.

Franklyn Wilson, who holds
almost one-third of the BISX-
listed company’s shares, which

are held in either his name or-

those of Sunshine Holdings,
told Tribune Business that the
joint venture with Marine
Tankers. Services AS was
designed to give FOCOL Hold-
ings greater control over its sup-
ply chain, and reduce costs
incurred ‘in the
distribution/transportation of its
fuel-rélated products.

While the company had
“some idea” of the likely sav-
ings the initiative would pro-
duce, Mr Wilson did not want
to reveal figures until it saw how
the venture was operating. |

However, he said of the like-
ly savings: “It was sufficient to
persuade the Board that it was
the right thing to do.”

FOCOL’s $5.3 million invest-
ment gives it a 60 per cent stake
in the joint venture, with
Marine Tanker Services AS
providing management/opera-
tional expertise to the joint ven-

ture. The joint venture will own —

two tanker vessels that will
deliver petroleum products to
all FOCOL’s operations in the
Bahamas and Turks & Caicos,
where it operates under the
Shell brand. .

Mr Wilson described Norwe-
gian-based Marine Tanker Ser-
vices AS as having “an out-
standing track record and very

‘qualified people. One of the
stakeholders traces his roots in
shipping as far back as the

. Vikings.

“They have an outstanding
( ‘oné"blue chip
iatin. g with
anothérblte-chip ‘company.
They are very active in this part
of the region, and specialise in
fuel transportation.”

The joint venture will replace
the previous charter operation
FOCOL used for its fuel ship-
‘ments’ transportation.

Tribune Business reported in
May last year that FOCOL was
planning to use part of the pro-
ceeds from its $15 million pref-
erence share issue to acquire a
tanker vessel, which would
result in cost savings of $3-$4
million by the third year in
operation.

Mr Wilson added that
FOCOL was “working as hard
as hell” to meet its Budget, the
fall in global oil prices having
eliminated the damage this had
done last year to the company’s
liquidity.



INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BRITISH Airways is set to
add a sixth weekly direct flight
from the UK to Nassau this
summer, the Ministry of Touris-
m’s director-general said yes-
terday, as it seeks to reduce air-
line ticket prices on routes com-
ing into the Bahamas.

Vernice Walkine, who was
part of a panel discussion on
the tourism industry at the sev-
enth annual Caribbean MBA
conference, said the Govern-
ment hopes to reduce the taxes,
fees and charges that airlines
incur in the hope they will pass
on the savings in reduced ticket
prices and a lower overall cost
of travel to the Bahamas.

She said these reductions
should come into effect by the
end of January 2009, and when
they do, the the Bahamas will
become very real to travelers.

“If we remove those taxes or
reduce those taxes, charges and
fees that will, in effect, reduce
the costs to the airline to bring
each passenger here. Then they
have the opportunity to man-
age their yields through a pric-
ing policy that allows them to
make enough money on. that
seat, but still reduce the cost to
the customer,” said Ms

Atlantis could
attract $800m
in revenues
-during 2008

FROM page 1B

some $160 million from the
Atlantis casino, and about $39
million through water and
marine activities, which includ-
ed activities such as Dolphin
Cay and Aquaventura.

“Of course, i’ve left out a lot
of smaller businesses,” said Mr
Markantonis. “I’ve left out the
joint ventures, i’ve left out the
golf courses, left out all the
retail concessions.”

Atlantis was recently forced
to let go almost 800 employees,
due to the economic downturn

and low occupancy rates, which’

left it squeezed between
reduced business levels and the
debt service/banking covenants
attached to the $2.75 billion
debt load taken on when Sol
Kerzner and his late son, Butch,
took the parent Kerzner Inter-
national private in 2006.

However, Atlantis was
recently able to bring back a
number of laid-off workers dur-
ing the 2008 Christmas season,
as the resort was at almost 100
per cent occupancy.

Kerzner International recent-
ly opened its newest property,
Atlantis The Palm, Dubai, with
a $20 million dollar extrava-
ganza that included a fireworks
display that rivaled that of the
opening ceremony for 2008’s
Beijing’s Olympic games.

It was feared that this newest
property would eclipse the
Atlantis Paradise Island prop-
erty, enticing visitors to patron-
ise the exploding United Arab

Emirates tourism product.

instead of the Bahamas.

But Mr Markantonis said the
two properties were different
products, as the Dubai proper-
ty lacks a casino due to laws
barring gambling in the UAE.

He again expressed his regret,
during the lunch, at the recent
lay-offs and said he hoped the
resort will soon be able to bring

_ some of the employees back.

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Walkine.
Recently, American Airlines
reduced its flights to Nassau

from Fort Lauderdale, and sev-

eral other airlines have greatly
reduced their number of flights
to the Bahamas.



FROM page 1B

closure, Robert Sands, Baha
Mar’s senior vice-president of
administration and government
affairs, told Tribune Business
that based on projected busi-
ness levels, it could accommo-
date all visitors in the 700-room
Sheraton Cable Beach Resort.

As a result, Baha Mar decid-
ed to consolidate all operations
into one resort, and reduce loss-
es through cost savings on elec-
tricity and all other utility bills,
wages and numerous other dai-
ly expenses, by closing the 550-
room Wyndham and Crystal
Palace Casino.

The closure, which is likely
to impact 1,000 staff, out of a
total Baha Mar workforce of
around 1900, will take place
during what is traditionally. the
slowest part of the Bahamian
tourism season.

“Basically, we’ve done an
analysis of the total projected

Nation to exceed 100,000 visitors from
Canada for first time in 2008

According to Ms Walkine,
the airfare reduction strategy

’ approach adopted by the Min-
istry of Tourism will be différent.

for each carrier, because of their
different cost structures.

“It might not be taxes and
fees to one,” she said. “It might
be customs and immigration
that might be more important to
another carrier than the pas-
senger facility charge, so we’re
looking at a whole range of
expenses that are a part of the
cost of the ticket.”

The managing director of
FirstCaribbean International
_Bank for Barbados, Eastern
“Caribbean and Belize, Oliver
Jordan, said the Caribbean
should not be so dependent on
foreign carriers like American

occupancy during the period,
and found one hotel can absorb
the business during that time,”
Mr Sands said. “We’re basical-
ly consolidating operations to
mitigate against large losses,
and preserving employment as
best we can.

“We don’t see any indications
at this point in time that the
third quarter of 2009 is going
to be any different than it has
been in the past, and this is one
way to mitigate against the type
of losses seen in the past.”

Mr Sands said Baha Mar was
hoping that the “economies of
scale” obtained from closing the
Wyndham/Crystal Palace for
eight weeks would “trickle
down” to the bottom line,
“helping to reduce those loss-
es”.

While the closure would not
totally eliminate the losses
incurred by Baha Mar during
the tourism slow season, it was
designed to “reduce the levels

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Previous Close Today's Close

Airlines.
He suggested the Caribbean
consider implementing one or

two regionall-based airline .

operations throughout the
islands in order to lower travel
costs.

According to Ms Walkine,
the Ministry of Tourism is gear-
ing up for the winter season,
which peaks in February and
March.

She said that along with cost
reductions, direct flights from
France to the Bahamas recent-
ly began, which could possibly
grow into a second flight, and a
sixth British Airways flight to
New Providence could also be

added to the fleet’s itinerary, in .

order to further tap the Euro-
pean market.

Wyndham and Crystal Ta cu eins

experienced in the last two

years”.

The resort owner/developer
was in the process of crunching
numbers to work out the exact
total projected savings, Mr
Sands added, but “we believe
that it will help us cut the level
of losses, in what traditionally
happens to be the highest loss
period of the year - August,
September and October - down
dramatically, in half”.

Baha Mar warned yesterday
that if current economic condi-
tions continued or worsened, its
2009 losses were forecast to
exceed 2008 levels. To preserve
employment, the company was
asking Wyndham/Crystal Palace
staff to take their vacation leave
during this time, and was also
looking at switching one week
of Christmas pay to that period.

In addition, Mr Sands said
Baha Mar was working on an
incentive surrounding sick pay,
“one of the biggest abused



There has also been a signifi-
cant increase in visitors from
Canada.

“Our business from Canada
has been growing very, very
well, so we are looking at sig-
nificant double digit growth
from Canada for 2008, which is
pleasing to us. We will exceed
100,000 visitors from Canada
for the first time in a while,”
said\Ms Walkine.

However, it is not known yet
how the economy will impact
this year’s visitors from Canada.

“We believe that because of
our location, our proximity, we
are better positioned to con-
vince, particularly Americans,
that they can still afford a
Bahamas vacation,” Ms
Walkine said.

at Me cy



areas” by Bahamian workers.
Frequent sick days by staff
caused resorts to call in other
workers to replace them, often
at rates of “premium pay”.

However, for those workers
with no or minimal sick days,
Baha Mar was looking at offer-
ing them an extra week’s vaca-
tion pay.

Mr Sands said many Bahd
Mar staff were already entitled
to five weeks’ vacation pay
under the existing union agree-
ment. Given that many work-

- ers often worked one to two

days per week during the clo-
sure period, the plan designed
by Baha Mar was intended to
keep workers on full incomes -
certainly more money than they
traditionally earned.

However, Mr Sands. warned
that “other things may have to
happen” if business forecasts
worsened and Baha Mar did not
perform as expected, requiring

adjustments to its business plan.

FOR SALE

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA

ALL THAT, the Apartment Number 43 being an
apartment with a unit entitlement of 1.43% on the 4th
Floor of Silver Point Condominium Apartments situate
on ALL THAT piece parcel or part of a tract of land

situate in Freeport/Lucaya in the Island of Grand Bahama
another of the Islands in the said Commonwealth of The
Bahamas containing Three and Sixty Nine Thousands
(3.069) acres referred to in the said Declaration was
subjected to the provisions of The Law of Property and
Conveyancing (Condominium) Act ‘1965

Board of Directors.

For conditions of sale and any
other information contact:

Silver Point Condominium Apartments,
P.O. Box F-40825,
PH (242) 373-1168, Fax: (242) 373-1168





Cc

cFAL*

EG CAP







TTAL MARKET:
ROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES


























a Abaco Markets ' 1.71 1.71 0.00 .
11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 ‘ 11.00 0.00 0.992
19.68 7.64 Bank of Bahamas 7.64 é 7.64 0.00 0.319
10.99 0.66 Benchmark 0.66 r 0.66 0.00 -0.877
3.74 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.95 3.15 0.60 0.105
2.65 1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
14.15 12.05 Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 0.00 1.255
3.15 2.83 Colina Holdings _ 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.118
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.00 * 6.98 -0.02 7,575 0.446
6.59 1.88 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.51 2.54 0.03 O.111
3.00 2.27 Doctor's Hospital 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.240
8.10 6.02 Famguard 7.80 7.80 0.00 0.598
13.01 11.87 Finco 11.87 a 11.87 0.00 0.665
14.66 10.45 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 ‘10.45 0.00 0.682
6.04 5.01 Focol (S) 5.17 5.17 0.00 0.337
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 1,000 0.000
1.00 0.30 Freeport Concrete - 0.30 \ 0.30 0.00 0.035
18.20 5.50 ICD Utilities 6.13 Ss 6.13 0.00 1,200 0.407
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952

-¢ 10.00 0.00 9. 180












Premier, Real





BSS (Bands Was On: ee Pareentage RREING Hassa) ~
Last Sale Interest
? T% 19 October 2017

Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
“5 7% 30 May 2013
ete & AG










1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
Shag te as

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity














Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
BND





0.000
0.300
9.000





4.540
-0.041
9.002 |









.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings











Yield %





Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund















3.3505 2.9401 Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.9401 -2.02 -2.02 31-Dec-08
1.4336 1.3686 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4336 4.25 4.75 26-Dec-08
3.7969 3.4931 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.4931 +~B.00 15.79 30-Nov-08
12.5597 11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.5597 5.25 5.73 30-Nov-08
100.2421 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.2421 0.24 0.24 30-Sep-08
100,9600 96.7492 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7492 73.25 3.25 30-Sep-08
1.0000 1.0000 © CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-07
10.5000 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.0775 -13.55 “13.55
1.0264 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0264 2.64 2.64
1.0289 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0289 2.89 2.89 .

FG Financial Diversified Fund 2 & 2.87




12 month dividends divided by closing price



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00












52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bld & - Buying £ fc and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask & - Seltlng pric and fidelity

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price =.Laut traded over-the-counter price

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume * Weekly Voli. Trading volume of the prior wook

Change - Change In closing price from day to day ‘ EPS §$ - A‘company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today “4 NAV - Net Asset Value

DIV & - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful






FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100

BaP HHEAGO uh SREQNIAE BASSAI SRE CE

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) > S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 24














PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Commercial court niche ‘critical’ for Bahamas

FROM page 1B

aspects of the GBPA case had,
as a result, been heard by dif-
ferent justices.

“If we were to dedicate them
[the three justices] to a proper
commercial facility, if we had a

ela i

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



commercial court, what has tak-
en years could have been
processed much more rapidly,”
Mr Sears told Tribune Business.
“They are handling a very

‘complex commercial matter

that has vital importance for the
entire country, and in this case,

the entire ‘community of Grand |

Bahama.”

Yet in the absence of a com-
mercial court, and when com-
bined with the workload from
the other cases before them, Mr

Sears said the judges handling .

the various aspects of the
GBPA ownership dispute had

~ been forced to deal with it in a

“piecemeal fashion”.

“As a result of that, you have
an entire community on hold,”
Mr Sears added. “When that
happens to any one part of the
Bahamas, people tend to

migrate to other areas where

they can earn a living. These
are the kinds of things you can
do very easily.”

As a solution, Mr Sears said:
“We ought to establish a com-
mercial court in the Bahamas,
as it takes too long for disputes
of a commercial nature to be
resolved in terms of access to
court and a speedy disposition
of disputes.

, “As they have done in Sin-
gapore, in the UK and other
places, we need a commercial
court for several reasons. We
need the judges who have the
expertise in commercial litiga-
tion matters to be dedicated.

“Secondly, the existence of a

quick, efficient dispute resolu- ”

tion adds to the attractiveness of
the destination as a financial
services centre.

“And what. we will have, as

"the jurisdiction develops a rep-

utation in this area, is that peo-
ple outside the Bahamas, when
they structure their contracts,
may put the Bahamas as their
choice of legal jurisdiction [to
settle disputes].

“This is because of the repu-
tation we would have developed

‘as a speedy, efficient, cost-effec-.

tive type of platform to resolve
disputes, and attract people to
come and settle disputes here.”

- Currently, many major inter-

national investors developing '

projects in the Bahamas choose
other jurisdictions, such as New
York, as the primary venue to
settle any disputes that may
arise.

Island Global Yachting’ s
(IGY) action over the failed
marina project adjacent to the
British Colonial Hilton; Baha
Mar’s dispute with Harrah’s;
and RHS Ventures complaint

against the major financing
partner for the South Ocean
project have - or are being - lit-
igated in the New York State
Supreme Court.

Mr Sears said London, and
increasingly New York, had
both set out to develop and
market themselves as centres
for arbitration and the resolu-
tion of major commercial dis-
putes. There was no reason, he
added, why the Bahamas could
not do the same given the exist-
ing talent base i in this jurisdic-
tion. ’

“This is one of the areas, in

' this period. of recession, that the

Bahamas can enhance its com-
petitiveness,” Mr Sears said.
“We have the legal talent, to
some degree.

“We have the accountants on

terms of doing forensic account-
ing, serving as receivers and liq-

uidators, and we have a wide
spread of expertise in the finan-
cial services centre. We have
the hotels.

“This is an area, when we talk
about niche markets, that is crit-
ical when we talk about the
economy at this time. This is
something we can do with a
minimal capital outlay.”

_ Mr Sears suggested that just

an initial $200,000 investment
would be enough to get a com-
mercial court system up and
running, adding that the
Bahamas “just has to dedicate
judges, put in the IT infrastruc-
ture so that there is the com-
puter information retrieval sys-
tem” and set aside suitable
premises for a commercial
court. ,

“The problem with the

‘Bahamas is that we’re always

so late,” Mr Sears said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNRISE RED CLOVES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SUNRISE RED CLOVES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

. Legal Notice

NOTICE

QUALUMINA LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUALUMINA LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) she Sa



Legal Notice
NOTICE
MASTERLUCK INVESTMENTS
OFFSHORE LTD. ©

Notice is hereby given that in décordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MASTERLUCK INVESTMENTS OFF-
SHORE LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dis-
solution has been issued and’ the: Company has i thefefore

been struck off the Regi

ARGOSA CORP. INC. _
(Liquidator) . |

Legal Notice

NOTICE |

KAJSA ROSE VENTURES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of KAJSA ROSE VENTURES INC. has been }-

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

\

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) _

Bahamas urged to lead lobbying for
Global anti-laundering forum

FROM page 1B

when the Bahamas and its continued pres-
ence on an FATF monitoring list came up.
This, Mr Sears said, left the Bahamas with-
out any direct representation to argue its
case, and it was left to rely on CFATF sec-
retary-general Calvin Wilson and Canada.

The PLP MP for Fort Charlotte also

“recalled another FATF meeting in Paris

where, its members having performed a
self-assessment of their anti-money laun-
dering regimes based on the organisation’s

40 recommendations, voted not to release
_the findings to the media or general public

because they had all failed,

“We need to be part of a global lobby
for the convening of a Global Forum on
anti-money laundering and anti-terror
financing,” Mr Sears told Tribune Busi-

ness.

“You are not dealing with a level playing
field, and the high tax onshore financial
centres, rather than become more efficient,

it is easier for them to eliminate the exter-.

nal competition.”

Such a Global Forum, Mr Sears suggest- -

ed, would be able to set rules and guidelines

. for global anti-money laundering and anti-"”

terror financing regulations/laws in a “trans-
parent” fashion, with all United Nations

. members able to participate. .

“We have to make sure we never find
ourselves again in the position we were in

during 2000, where we were in this reac- -

tive mode, aggressively trying to extract
ourselves,” Mr Sears said.

“I think it is important we, in a ‘very
proactive fashion, lobby the Congressional
Black Caucus and all friends of the

Bahamas in the US Senate and Congress, as
well as other agencies in Washington, to
really explain that the focus of the Stop
Tax Haven Abuse Bill is misleading. It
deems the Bahamas asa country engaged in .
unfair tax practices.

“We need to be much more proactive in
explaining ' we are engaged in the legitimate
practice of providing: financial services, and
that our system is transparent and meets
international best practices, even more so
than in the US.

“Many of the people in the Obama
administration-to-be have a certain ideo-

logical perspective, and we need not wait

until we are assaulted again, but should
invest in intellectual capacity, so that we
can analyse and predict, and invest in lob-
bying so that we can develop a strategy to
deal with the OECD initiative and the US.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JINOTEGA INTEGRA CORP.

—go—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

| dissolution of JINOTEGA INTEGRA CORP. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. :
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JANINE RIVERS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of JANINE RIVERS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register,

~ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

GPB LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GPB LIMITED has been completed; a Cer-

‘tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

-ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JADE MOUNT LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JADE MOUNT LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ROCKSPRINGS S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

_ (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of ROCKSPRINGS §.A. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com- |

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RMC GROUP INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RMC GROUP INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 5B




Find out what the experts are predicting for you,
your business and The Bahamas in 2009.

Join us at the most important seminar of 2009!

.



\

Theme: Effective Strategies For
A Strong Economic Rebound

Thurs., January 15th am tet
Wyndham Nassau Resort

Keynote Speaker

Presenters include:



Senator the Hon. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism
Dionisio D' Aguilar, President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
Sarkis Izmirlian, Chairman & CEO, Baha Mar

Dr Keva Bethel, Veteran Educator
“Eric Carey, Executive Director, Bahamas National Trust

Dr Arthur Porter, M.D., Director, The Cancer Centre, Nassau
Lawrence Bascom, Financial Consultant, N.Y.

Stacia Williams, Total Image Management & Communications.
Dr K. Jonathan Rodgers, Ophthamologist-Businessman

Albert H. Binger, Ph.D., Environment & Global Energy Consultant



: | TO REGISTER CONTACT:
SPONsOrs: : : Eileen Fielder The Counsellors Ltd



Telephone: 322-1000
fos eel ce Fax: 325-2482
THE TRIBUNE efielder@thecounsellorsitd.com

ie Bank of The Bahamas

TNTERNATIONAL



ae. SS Sun Oil Limited
; cwatusin OD

FinsTC Area: oe REGISTER ONLINE AT
lane, Scotiabank



www.iclevents.com



TCLGROUP.



PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE





oldman Sachs adviser to

unveil leading concept

AN independent consultant to the
Goldman Sachs Urban Investment
Group avyill address the Bahamas Busi-
ness Outlook on the topic, Revolution-
ary Business Concepts, on January 15.

Lawrence P. Bascom will focus on Six
Sigma and Net Promoter, two business
concepts that are currently sweeping the
globe, during the conference staged at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort.

Mr Bascom said Six Sigma was a man-
agement philosophy originated in the
1980s by Motorola, and subsequently
adopted by General Motors as its pre-
mier management philosophy. It focus-
es on improving the effectiveness and

“Effectiveness is
the degree to which
an organisation
meets and exceeds
the needs and
requirements of its
customers,” he
added.

“Efficiency is the
resources consumed
in achieving effec-
tiveness. Six Sigma
is the equivalent of
no more than 3.4
bad customer experiences for every mil-
lion customer opportunities. In Bahami-
an terms, it is the equivalent of BEC

JES eo) 11)



customers experiencing one hour of
power outage every 34 years. Results
from Six Sigma have not been paral-
leled by any other quality initiative.”

Mr Bascom will also provide an
overview of Net Promoter, an emerg-
ing best practice that provides a scientific
method of measuring and improving a
company’s actively satisfied customers
relative to its detractors.

He graduated from the College of the

Bahamas with an Associate’s Degree in
Business, and began his career at
Deloitte & Touche in 1984. After pass-
ing the CPA exam he completed his BA
degree at the University of Miami, and
his MBA at the Wharton School.

Mr Bascom was a member of Deloit-
te’s Global Financial Services Industries
practice, and was admitted to the prac-
tice as partner in 1997. He served as
client service partner in the firm’s New
York City Office, serving some of
Deloitte & Touche’s largest clients in
either a consulting or audit capacity.

He was a member of the Managing
Partner Advisory Council and worked
closely with the US firm’s managing
partner on strategic and operational
issues. Mr’ Bascom also served as a
member of the Deloitte Foundation
Board of Directors.

In 2004, he joined the 21st Century
Insurance Group as chief financial offi-

cer and was involved in all major man-
agement and strategic decisions, being
‘responsible for managing the compa-
ny’s $1.4 billion investment portfolio,
investor relations, rating agency rela-
tionships, M&A, enterprise risk man-

agement, capital management, planning

and budgeting, financial reporting and
taxes. .

Bahamas Business Outlook is organ-
ised by The Counsellors and sponsored
by the Central Bank of The Bahamas,
FirstCaribbean International Bank, Ans-
bacher Bahamas, Albany, Bacardi, Sco-
tiabank, British American Financial,
Bank of the Bahamas International,
KPMG, BEC and Sun Oil.

efficiency of an organisation.

‘

- Legal Notice

NOTICE

BEYOND PARADISE LIMITED

cease €&>
\\

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BEYOND PARADISE LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

| the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
* (Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ODESSA SLOPES LTD.

| Notice is hereby given that in pocorcance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
| dissolution of ODESSA SLOPES LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE



TURKU VILLAGE INC. .

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
| (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
‘dissolution of TURKU VILLAGE INC. has been com-

| pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

| Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GOLDEN SPARKLE INC.

sie Pigauaal

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
| dissolution of GOLDEN SPARKLE INC. has been com-

| pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

| Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FLORAL GARDEN LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FLORAL GARDEN LTD. has been com-

‘pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

_ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
REGAL PALM HOLDINGS LTD.

= or

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of REGAL PALM HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MEIKLE HOLDINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

. the dissolution of MEIKLE HOLDINGS INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

‘the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

-PANTA VALLEY INC.

&

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138.(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PANTA VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TOURMALINE VENTURES LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the .
dissolution of TOURMALINE VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GRIMMY LECHIEN LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRIMMY LECHIEN LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NEHEMIAH REALTY INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of NEHEMIAH REALTY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE |
LETTE VISIONS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, |
the dissolution of LETTE VISIONS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





tee WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 7B
| WEDNESDAY EVENING } ] JANUARY 7, 2009 oR 7 —

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$0 (2007) (CC) ‘|best friend. © 'PG-13'(CC) . son in a hit-and-run accident. 3 3 O 4 a 4 3 0 d ‘ th
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PAGE 8B ,WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009





JUDGE PARKER

YOU'RE UP
EARLY THIS «
MORNING!














I THE CITY OF
GG SCOTTSPALE DID...
THEY WANT YOU
TO COME BACK!

ACTUALLY, I
HAVEN'T BEEN
TO BED YET...TOO
MUCH- PAPERWORK!

yOu TOOK
CARE OF MY
HOTEL BILL?





WHEN IM MRS. MILLS.
THERE’LLBE SOME +
CHANGES MADE.

G

I LOVE THIS ROOM,BUT
THAT LEATHER COUCH
JUST SCREAMS y
“BAG HELOR”L



SINCE I DON'T
KNOW WHAT I/M
LOOKING FOR,1
MAY AS WELL
START HERE.

YOU'RE NOT GOING Q
TO PUT ANY SUGAR ON
IT, ARE YOU?

1 THINK I'LL GO
DOWN AND MAKE
MYSELF A SIMPLE
FRIED EGG

SANDWICH Ss
4!

YOU'RE NOT
GOING TO PUT],
ANY SALT ON |:

IT, ARE YOU?



JUST BEAT
THE KIBBLES
OUT OF ME!

MAN, WHAT
HAPPENED

©2003 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



WELL, IF THATS

TLL IMIDE
YOUR BEST OFFER,

THESE COOKIES










rise Y aspen Bont YY tna Wine meu Nef
oO [ 16 MIG, iy
THAT FIRST ONE LP “REALTY! BEAN | we
GUY THE LADDER... ng” EXCELLENT i
ce, ew = S| ME TORUT
Sa) ‘

3
SWS fle
Ds) We

‘CRYPTIC PUZZLE a
Ee

Across Down
1 They provide information 1 Have an oral test? (5)
* for workers at the bank (7) 2 .Comedian’s repertoire is

one that’s really
ridiculous (8,5)

3 Greek letter varies in
slope (7)

4 Aclose shave? (6)

5 Stretchers used for
carrying luggage (5)

5 Plunder Winchester for
example (5)

8 To suppress frauds you
need the courts (6,7)

9 The Spanish get round the
English girl (5)

10 Charge for delivering 6 Open acknowledgment
pages to be edited (7) that there’s no entrance

11 Write a sonnet about fee (4,9)
wooden joints (6) 7 Point behind the ship Pd

towards the sunrise (7)
11 Travelling goods will be in
it (7)

12 The pilots remain in
trouble (6)



15 Still a variety of * Rophes oes
13 Show sluggishness; i.e. a
sausage (7) es a (7) : 1, A published
17 Support for the board (5) ee Preview (5-2)

14 Human or not, they
exist (6)
16 Turkish leader elected for
a second time (5)
Beer turns up in royal
style (5)

‘5 Deserve (5)

8. Outmoded (13)

9 Very stupid (5)
40. Brilliant red (7)

11. Excessively

affectionate (6)

: -: 12° Ferocious (6
Across: 1 Face to face, 6 Fair, 10... 5. (6)

Spurn, 11 Ad nauseam, 12 “18 Caller (7)

Chastise, 13 Pitch, 15 Profile, 17 47

Traffic, 19 Outward, 21 Pitfall, 22 RR SLSR ES sh og

Occur, 24 Stricken, 27 Objection, 28: 19 Result in failure

Afoot, 29 Dank, 30 Merrymaker. » (4,2,7)

Down: 1 Fuse, 2 Caught out, 3 ee ( ;

Tunis, 4 Fragile, 5 Content, 7 Alert, * 20 Correspond (5)

8 Ramshackle, 9 Supplant, 14 Up to... 214

no good, 16 In a trice, 18

Framework, 20 Despite, 21 Partner, :

23 Cajun, 25 Claim, 26 Stir:

19 Don't go up to one and be
ruthless? (4,2,7)

20 Asign to know (5)

21 Tool for tightening up a 18

EASY PUZZLE

bridge perhaps (7) _

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution
Across: 1 Illiterate, 6 Thug, 10 Kinds,
11 Existence,»12 After all, 13 Aryan,
15 Sackbut, 17 Trevino, 19 Rashers,
21 Resides, 22 Clout, 24 Acquaint, 27 °
Stevedore, 28 Lasso, 29 Deed, 30
Skateboard.

Down: 1 Inks, 2 Long faces, 3 Taste,
4 Re-enact, 5 Triplet, 7 Honey, 8
Greenhouse, 9 Steamers, 14
Ostracised, 16 Breathes, 18
Indonesia, 20 Sea-cook, 21 Request,
23 Oxeye, 25 Ad-lib, 26 Load.

Arrogant self-
confidence (7)



COMIC PAGE



CALVIN & HOBBES

NEXT TIME WE Go DONN,
I GET TO STEER
THE SLED.

§
Do
&
a
é
a
3

©1989 u:



You 7”



YEAH, WELL, 1'M

OVER AND DIONT WE?!
THROUGH EVERY
ORSTACLE ON A

THE HILL.

Sunday

wus. DAILYINEK. COM

"EVERY OBSTACLE" ?/? WE
You STEER SICK OF GOING | MISSED THE BRIAR PATCH,
LIKE A



THE TRIBUNE







OH, YO MAKE

EVERNTHING

SND SO

TERRIBLE. You
.| SHOULD BE GLAD
¢ WERE ALIVE.



Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to’
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to





© 20097, NarTHAnerica Synd-









Difficulty Level *%* &



©2009 Conceptis Puzzles,.Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and’ the sum
of each vertical block equals the number oniits top. No number |
may be used in the same block more thah once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











co oo |
iN
Pes







O}O)-
©}00
om







eos













| Viktor Korchnoi v Simen ~
Agdestein, Haninge 1988.
Korchnoi, now aged 76 yet suli
an active competitar, has had
the mast incident-packed life of
any modern grandmaster. He

oO }—



©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

@}O;Q|N Bj —+}oo}~









loon

#1. C}09/Po
CIN; RIO) O PIO) |M
#&j OT} PO

NI} |} CO] NO] CO OCT; RID









no/oo
sioln











Choks solution S34h I GS &xdS 24 Civent 3297




survived the siege of Leningrad

: CET SNNG+ wins Backs queesd SRxdSt
in 1991 by collecting ration 4 arate) ae GLOW i =

Escape.grasp of (5)'

and $OxdS 4 NG> vains the queen
books fram the badies of dead : x ace eeatt. aay
relatives, defected from the ; rSscad One possible word ladder solution is: PUFF guil,
USSR when chess bosses * gostf quig Dull bell, BALL.

preferred the young Anatoly
Karpov, then twice qualified to
challenge Xarpav for the warid
title. Ris Hfestyle of caviar,
jogging, yoga and continual
tournaments inspires other
veterans, and in between takin:
an GMs a third of his age he
> won tire world senior (aver-62}
championship at his first
_ attempt fast year Korchaai
_ White, to mave} has fevel
material in today’s puzzle, which
tooks J dose call between his
attack and Slack’s strong d2
knight. Row did White force
victory?



Down
1 Injury (5)
2 Immeasurably
small (13)
3 Oriental (7)
4 Ordained
minister (6)
5 Madness (5)
6 Stirring up
discontent (6-7)
7. Playhouse (7)
11 Pigeonhouse (7)
13 Sluggishness (7)
14 A planet (6)
16 Of poor quality (5)
18 Keen (5)












HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make fram the
letters shovn here? In making a
word, each Jebher niay de used
once cnly. Each must contain
the centre letter and there mush
be at isast one nine-letter word. |
No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET =
Good £2; very paod 26; excellent
34 (or more}. Solution tomorrow,

YESTERDAY’S SGLUTION

serie anti bairn bait- barite
bier bint bite biter brain
brine entire INDBBRIATE. inert
inertia tater Irate nibre rain
yeni rein redein refine rite
tibia tier tine tinea bthaier tire
train trainee tribe trine



' Like Taking Candy From a Baby

East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH

AK 10

Â¥854

#K 1087

bAQI
WEST EAST
@74 96532
VK Q109732 V6
$Q6 443
b95 #108643

SOUTH

4QI8

VAI

#AJ952

&K72
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass | NT 39 6 NT

Opening lead — king of hearts.

The accomplished declarer is like
a fine detective. He does a lot of leg-
work, gathering up all the informa-
tion he can, before he finally gets
around to cracking the case.

Take this deal where declarer is in
six notrump and West leads the king
of hearts. South would have an easy
time making the slam if he knew
exactly where the queen of diamonds
was located. He would either play for
the drop or take a finesse in the right
direction to bring home. 12 tricks.

But South does not know: at the
start of play which defender has the
queen, and his job is to do whatever
he can to determine the location .of | ;
the missing damsel. To this end, by’
far his best shot is to play the jack of

hearts at trick one!

Considerable merit is attached to
this play, and in the actual deal it
works like a charm. West can do ‘no
better than continue with a.heart to
South’s ace, on which East discards a
low spade, confirming that West
started with seven hearts for his pre-
emptive three-heart bid.

This goes a long way toward solv-
ing declarer’s problem. South pur-
sues his quarry by cashing three
rounds of spades, learning that West
started with two spades — neither
more nor less — and also learning
that West started with exactly two
clubs when the A-K-Q of clubs are
next cashed.

The question of how to play the
diamonds is now solved. West is
known to have started with precisely
seven hearts, two spades and two
clubs, and therefore exactly two dia=
monds.

So South cashes. his two high dia-
monds without giving a thought to a
finesse, and the slam comes march-
ing home,

Tomorrow: Sylvia throws a curve.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 9B:





The Tribune





Celebrating

“ eC

dateous ole

lm By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

os

A
7

poriiga



DINE fine in 2009 with tasty hors d'oeuvre ideas com-
pliments of Cacique Food Art. Whether you've resolved to
lose a few pounds or stay in closer contact with friends,
enjoy nibbling to the fullest with low fat Caribbean crab
cakes or low calorie, Euro-inspired gazpacho.

The bites seem to come as only an after thought to many
a party-goer, but,.to the host or hostess, it can be quite the
challenge to find one that's just right. Considering all
guests, their appetites, dietary requirements (Is someone at
your gathering vegetarian? Does anyone have food aller-
gies?) and taste preferences can be a hard job for anyone,
even the kitchen connoisseurs we all know and love.

These scrumptious tidbits will go along wonderfully with
either a simple family meal or a larger gathering of old and
new friends. —

Julia‘Lee, registered dietitian and nutrition consultant for
Doctor's Hospital, has given the nutritional value of each
of the appetizers. Each day she helps people to improve eat-
ing lifestyle for disease prevention and health mainte-

Nance.

In working with specific illnesses, ‘Ms Lee said that diet
is immensely important in preventing: chronic illnesses ~
such as cancer, diabetes, and high blood pressure. The
hors d'oeuvres below:are passable in her mind.

"Gazpacho is all vegetables so it looks excellent, I would




LU

| mBy LISA LAWLOR

Tribune Features Writer —

LUNCH in the work-

: place is always a difficult
: meal to plan for, it's safe
: to say. Convenience of

: fast food and whatever’s
: closest wins over nutri-

: tional value arguments

: every time, as your

: starving stomach tells -

Even financial woes aren't
enough to make you bring
food from home, as getting
up that extra half hour early
just seems too much as you
cling to the bed sheets while
your mind pries you to get up
and out.

The nagging voice in the -

-back of your mind will persist

as your hips gét bigger, your
wallet get smalter, and the
leftovers in the fridge build-
up. Here lies the answer.
"It's a good idea to take
lunch from home," said Doc-

like to try this.recipe," said Ms Lee, "any vegetable based
food is great especially with all the coloured veggies in
this recipe.

The Crab Kofta is high in 1 cholesterol, ” she said,

While some dietitians disagree about seafood cholestrol
levels, Ms Lee said cholesterol from seafood doesn't make
a person's cholesterol go up and the Crab Kofta is accept-
able.

Ms Lee recommended Canola oil for frying the crab
cakes.



YELLOW. TOMATO &
GAZPACHO
Yield: 20-24 Mini Shots

CRAB KOFTA &
Yield:.24-30 Mini Cakes

Ingredients:

1 tin lump crab meat Int redients:

4 Ib spinach (fresh) 1 th yellow tomatoes
V4 Ib potatoes (peeled and diced 2-3 thsp country bread (ground :
small) _ in food processor) i
2 ea garlic cloves (minced) 12 ea red bell pepper (seeded

1 thsp ginger (minced). and diced)

1 tbsp coriander (ground)
1 tbsp chili powder .

1 thsp turmeric

1-2 tsp kosher salt

(chopped)
- 12 cup red onion (chopped)

1-2 ea red chilies (Spanish preferably)
3-4 cups oil Fe tbsp olive oil
Bea -ea garlic clove (minced)
Method: V4 tsp cumin (ground)
1. Blanch spinach in- boiling V4 tsp paprika
water for 1-2 minutes, drain in 1 cup water
colander and squeeze out the
excess water. Method:

2. After spinach has cooled, chop -
finely. Repeat blanching process
with potatoes but do not squeeze
out the water.

3. Mix all ingredients together,
except the oil, and form little balls
with the mixture.

4. Heat oil to 325 degrees
Fahrenheit and fry mini balls for 3-
4 minutes.

5. Serve with any favourite dip-
ping sauce, Chef’s personal
favourite is a spicy curry broth.

smooth.

sistency is achieved.

soup as possible.
allowing flavours to mold.
pepper before serving.

and serve in shot glasses.

- Recipes compliments of Food Art by Cacique.

Legal Notice

NOTICE.

INGLEBERT INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
- (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of INGLEBERT INC. has been completed; ‘a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

_ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



: you “get food now.”

1/4 ea English cucumber

1-2 tbsp sherry wine vinegar

1. Using a food processor, puree
all ingredients, except water, until,

2. Add water until desired con-

3. Strain through’a fine strainer,
pressing solids to extract as much

4. Chill overnight in the fridge
5. Season to taste with salt and

6. Garnish with fresh cilantro



tor's Hospital registered
dietitian and nutrition con-
sultant Julia Lee, "you have
control over all ingredients, oils, and calorie
amounts."

Plus, from Tribune Taste's calculations, you'll be
saving between $25 to $50 a week on lunch, a large
sum when multiplied to the cost of each month -
$100 to $200; and the year - $1200 to $2400.

To keep it nutritionally smart, Ms Lee recom:
mends that each lunch include something staechy.
"This will make it filling and carbohydrates provide
energy which is essential for work," she said. The
Rice Bowl recipe below, with rice, meat and any
type of sauce is one of her favourites.

"If a person does not include a healthy carbohy-

drate, then two hours after eating.d] ey, tend to look “~

for an instant pick me up like aeQK je or candy”
bar," she pointed‘out. “Basically, 1 iyou eliminate
‘the ‘carbohydrate at first, you'll end up eating some-
thing much worse later.”

To nourish yourself with a healthy meal right from
the get go, Ms Lee said everyone needs to include a
healthy carbohydrate option, usually half to one cup
whole grain pasta or brown rice or one to two slices
whole wheat bread.

Meat portions should be small, equivalent to the
size of a deck of cards or smaller and the more veg-
etables the better. "Veggies are really good asa
filler," said the dietitian, "you can be more satisfied
with smaller portions of meat and-rice if you have a
lot of them."

At the same time however, ‘it would be wrong to”
have a meal of only vegetables.

Legal Notice

NOTICE.

FUN CREATION LIMITED

Notice:is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of FUN CREATION LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal. Notice

NOTICE

ANIMA ENTERPRISE INC.

!

Notice is hereby given tHat in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ANIMA ENTERPRISE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



’ out is meal timing. If someone has a light lunch, such

=> Step: 1

Make Rice the Foundation: -
Each Cup Equals 2 Grain Servings

e 15 essentiai nutrients including folic acid, iron

e Low calorie, virtually fat free, cholesterol and
sodium free:

e icup brown vice = 2 of 3 daily ‘whole grain
servings

Step: 2

Pack in Perfect Produce:
Each Cup Equals 2 Produce Servings



e Choose colorful veggies for nutrient puneh
e 15 nutrients, 25 cafories per haif-cup serving
e Low calorie, nutrient-rich fill-yeu-up feads

Step: 3
Add Lean Protein to Balance the Meal:
Each Ounce of Protein Equals a Serving



e Lean choices like poultry, meats, seafood and
beans mect protein geals

Next: Sauce or season as you: like...Asian... Mexican.,.Indian... .
’ Southwest... wherever your creativity takes you!



. Variations to the old lunch standby, a sandwich,
that we all grow tired of, are pita bread, pasta salad

_or a Salad that are each equally Suaple to bring along

to work with you.
Another important element the dietitian pointed

as a Salad with beans, they could have a snack later
on, such as a fruit or a couple crackers.

"Try to plan for the lunch meal to be in the: middie
of your shift if you can, so you're nourished through-
out the day," said Ms Lee, "Or don't go more than
six hours with no food."

Eating a little bit frequently can be a healthy
thing. You really want to avoid getting to that starv-
ing stage.and grabbing a candy bar or something |
unhealthy,” she emphasised.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SAN DIMAS ENTERPRISE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SAN DIMAS ENTERPRISE INC. has
peat completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is- |
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the |

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HOUSE OF UNITY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HOUSE OF UNITY LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the’Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009



SSS



The Tribune









@ By LISA LAWLOR

Tribune Features Writer

BEAUTY of Bahamian

life is more than the
immediate answer
ready on anyone's

tongue - it's more than

the sun, sand and sea
inherent to the country
- it's in the intricacies
of a challenging life,
facing social issues
that are often ignored
or avoided, said film-
maker Maria Govan,
whose narrative film
debut Rain premiered
at the Bahamas Inter-
national Film Festival
(BIFF) last month. |

The film followed her title
character's growth from a
tiny, out island innocent to
someone who faces tough
situations in the big city of
Nassau, showing how one
delicate girl can make it
through anything. Rain is a
resounding symbol of hope
that Ms Govan believes
must-be shown in«all films.

The Bahamian themes
explored in the film were
accepted gratefully by many
viewers, who felt she had
really touched on some con-

troversial topics that need

to be exposed Ms Govan
said. : ,

."I feel so thrilled withthe
reception that Rain had,
people were so moved, so
proud and so grateful — and
that is so humbhing. It just
‘warms my heart that
Bahamians appreciated my
film and saw themselves
reflected in it," said the film-
maker. ,

But she was nervous at
first, because she said, "I

care so much about this:

audience, (the movie is) the
first of its kind and I hope it
will have an international
life, but its really for us — it's
a Bahamian film for our
people." .

Ms Govan said her whole
experience with BIFF was
beyond expectation. "Leslie

Vanderpool has brought |

' BIFF forward by leaps and
bounds," she: said. "There
were such fantastic films this
year and the way Rain was
presented at the opening
night, the way everything
was put together was just A



PUBLIC NOTICE

class."

Rain was shown at the
Toronto International Film
Festival last September,
which. exposed Ms Govan
herself to a number of amaz-
ing directors and films.

Ms Govan thinks that
BIFF has huge potential to
become an internationally
sought festival similar to the
one in Toronto, but like all
things, will take time. She is
a prime example of the fruits
borne from such a festival,
as she was part of the resi-
dency program in 2005.

"The residency program
has really taken off," she

Said, "there are money

prizes now for screen writ-
ing. First place will gain you
$5,000, second place $3,000
and third place $2,000."
But for her, money just
isn't the focus. The mentor-
ship makes the festival such
an invaluable learning expe-
rience for those just starting
out, as well as veteran film-
makers who frequent the
Bahamas from year to year.
"I feel the program really
needs to be highlighted and
celebrated," she said, "it can
do a lot of good helping us
to grow a local film indus-

try" and banking on more -

than the sun, sand and sea
inherent to the country.”
What's more, creating a
widely acclaimed film like
Rain gives her a sense of
economic accomplishment.
"I can feel like I've con-
tributed to the Bahamian
economy in a positive way,

and that feels really good," _

shé said. °
filmmakers who have con-
tributed in a creative way,

’ there is Kareem Mortimer,

Ian Poitier, Travolta Coop-
er, Charlie Smith, Kevin
Taylor and Jackson Petit.
"And we're creating a
whole new. Bahamian

career," said the filmmaker, ~

“when you support a
Bahamian film, you're also
supporting the Bahamian
actors, ‘singérs, songwriters

- and creators that couldn't .

exist without:this venue."
Another experience that
readied her. for the chal-
lenges of filmmaking was
working on movies like Flip-
per, Duplicity, Casino
Royale, and After the Sun-
set each shot here in the
Bahamas.,These Hollywood,
commercial films bank on

the beauty of the Bahamian’

landscape, bringing in big
budgets and big names.
"And it's time we made a



INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TOMMY BELLE MACKEYof
P.O. BOX N-504, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name

to CLORADO TOMMY MACKEY, If there are any objections to

this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas

To name just a few other

More than sun





__ MBy RICHARD COULSON

ind the
Long Fight
for Cuba





_ THIS story of our fascinating, trou-

~â„¢blesome neighbour to the south, com-

bined with an account of our favorite
spirit, makes an irresistible tale for —
Bahamians — particularly since many |
of the Bacardi family settled in Nassau
after Fidel Castro drove them out of
Cuba.

The modern Cuban nation and:
Bacardi rum are linked like a long,
stormy marriage — beginning with love
and leading to estrangement that has
never quite reached total divorce.

When Facundo Bacardi, the Span-
ish-born founder of the Bacardi clan in
Cuba, first distilled rum in the 1860s,
Cuba was still a colony of Spain, ruled

. oppressively by the Royal Governor-
General in Havana. But the Bacardis
lived in Santiago, Cuba’s vibrant sec-
ond city at the distant eastern end of
the island. Facundo’s ambition was to
create a rum that was lighter,
smoother and easier on the palate than
the harsh, dark tipple that was already
made, mainly knocked back by hard-
bitten sailors. He gradually succeeded,
and sales grew throughout Cuba and
abroad. After producing the prize win-
ning Ron Superior Extra Seca in 1873,
Facundo retired and put his 33-year
old son Emilio in charge of the grow-
ing enterprise.

But Emilio was not simply a rum
distiller. He joined Cuba’s indepen-
dence movement, was arrested, and
spent four years in a Spanish prison.
When he returned, hé continued the
difficult juggling act of leading the
Santiago business establishment as
‘chief of Bacardi while writing and agi-
tating for Cuban independence. In
1896 he was again arrested and impris-

SO



oned, while his brothers kept the busi-

ness alive. pe
The hard-fought war of indepen-

dence succeeded in 1898, aided: by

direct intervention of the; U.S..military, |

and Emilio was released, returning to
Santiago to become its mayor and
unquestioned first citizen, later elected
a Cuban senator. During the many
years when Cuba existed\uneasily as
virtually a United States colony, —

_Emilio resisted American domination.

But he and his family did not neglect
their focus.on growing the Bacardi

. enterprise, putting a high-value on its
‘ famous 'tradématk and ré6tganising it
“Yas a Stock company in 1919'with share

ownership limited to ‘family mefnbers,
making Emilio and his three brothers
instant millionaires.,In the 1920s a new
distillery was built in Santiago and a.
gleaming art-deco office tower in
Havana. 3

The venerable Emilio Bacardi died
in 1922, but the new generation proved
equally adept, emphasising interna- -
tional expansion. Sales in the U.S.
were boosted after. prohibition, and

- major investments were made building’

distilleries in Mexico and Puerto Rico.
The book well covers the challenges.
and accomplishments of the Bacardi
family members who carried:the com-
pany forward in the pre-Castro years,
navigating the:continual Cuban politi-
cal intrigues and the competition in
foreign markets, and brings to life the
personalities and peculiarities of the
leaders, particularly José “Pepin”
‘Bosch, a Bacardi son-in-law whose
business ability and self-assurance
moved him up through the ranks to
become managing director in 1944. .

Bosch had to play ball with Fulgen-’
cio Batista, the dominant figure in
Cuba’s politics for over 20 years. But
by 1957 he'and the whole Bacardi fam-
ily had become fed up with the corrup-
tion and civil repression of the Batista
regime, and in the key year 1958 they
actively supported the tiny revolution-
ary force led by Fidel Castro in the

» Sierra Maestre mountains above Santi-

ago.
When Batista fled and Fidel :
announced victory on January 1, 1959,
Santiago and the Bacardi company
rejoiced. But even in the early days,

some had misgivings. Manuel Cutillas, '

film industry here for our peo-
“ple too," said Ms Govan. ,
They taught her the invalu-
able skills of translating a sto-
ry to a wider audience, and
she hopes to grow an indige-

ly important as story tellers to
shed light on things often left
in the dark; issues that are
avoided or ignored (need to
be exposed)," she said.

"In my opinion, there's
always a positive choice, even

moments," she said, "and the

represents that. I'm celebrat-
ing the beauty of our islands
. while exploring social issues,"
she said. .

film are homosexuality, AIDS,
prostitution, and the preva-
lence of outside children.

nous industry here. "It's great- -

physical beauty shown in Rain »

Some topics hinted at in the



cal engineer, was first amazed to see

Fidel accept the former Batista chief ;
of police as his partner-at a victory
lunch, and then horrified four days lat-
er when Fidel ordered-him shot. Now
a resident in Nassau, busily chairing
the Lyford Cay Foundation, Cutillas
vividly remembers those topsy-turvy
early days, when José Espin, a senior
Bacardi executive, held a huge wed-
ding reception, attended by all the
Bacardis, for the marriage of his
daughter Vilma to Fidel’s brother
Raul. The establishment had united
with the revolution, it seemed.

' The honeymoon lasted through =
1959. Bosch had kind words for Fidel’s
sweeping economic and social reforms
and seemed unworried that they would
seriously affect Bacardi — he even pre-

paid the company’s tax bill. By 1960, - :

the climate had changed, as Bacardi
was accused of “counterrevolutionary”
activities, and foreign-owned compa-

aged to.wangle an “exit permit” and
flew off to Miami. On October 14, the
unthinkable happened: a decree
announced that many Cuban-owned

‘private enterprises, including the

largest, Bacardi, had become the prop-
erty of the Government, merely
because it was “capitalist”, contrary to

" the new socialist cuiding ideology.

State functionaries descended on
Bacardi headquarters with documents

“hies, mainly American, were put under.» «
‘pressure. In July, Bosch himself man-~ °

requiring the immediate transfer of all .

the company’s physical assets in Cuba.
But, in their ignorance of business
affairs, they said nothing about intel-
lectual property. Bosch had shrewdly

-sent all the trademark certificates to

America for registration with a New’
York company owned by Bacardi
individuals — a vital step enabling the
continued Bacardi growth even though
cut off from its Cuban roots.
After nationalization, most Bacardi
executives found they could not stom-
ach being public employees and moved
to join Bosch in Miami. Fidel deemed
Cutillas an engineer essential to the
state and refused him an exit permit, so
he had to take the risky step of an “ille-
gal” departure, escaping with just the
clothes on his back, via a six-day

SEE page 11







































in the most despairing -





a Bacardi grandson and young chemi-

TL LUL LULL LOLA LLOLL ALLL OLA LL COLL LLAMA LULL LLLLOLOL LLL OOLLLLL OLLI OLLLELL LALA LALOR LLL SLES OULD

no-later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice, i Sesto





SSSA WD) 6 "U™ "°F ND Ry TG "°° °°°0 i oEB’b Pz.) 3 RH. F516“ = "*"»"F6w”FEF£h.tninn0d_ |) 5 DH

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YYONNE PAUL of WATER
STREET, BIG POUND, NASSAU, BARAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as‘a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why

_ registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of DECEMBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





~ Charm bracelet Lost at the auby nie us
Saturday, 20 December 2008

REWARD OFFERED
——- 424-0783/356-2068
Bracelet has a very personal history
~ and sentimental value to the owner

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OCNEL JEAN-PIERRE of.
CULMERSVILLE, P.O. BOX N-10461, NASSAU,
THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of
Jarluary, 2008 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE JEAN-PIERRE of
CULMERSVILLE, P.O, BOX N-10461, NASSAU,
THE BAHAMAS. |s applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that. any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of
January, 2008 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DEANGELO WHITE
of EGRET STREET, NASSAU EAST NORTH, P.O, BOX

















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STUART TAVARES of OLD
ORT BAY, NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Ainister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6" day of January, 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

The Bahamas.





EE-15556, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
DEANGELO BYER. if there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this notice.









THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 11B

















SHOTS FROM
JUNKANOO.
¢ )



2009 started off
with a bang as tens of
thousands of Bahami-
ans flocked down-

town to view the News

Year’s Day Junkanoo
parade Thursday
morning.

Here are some great
shots of the parade. —
and congratulations
to the Saxons who are
the New Year’s day
winners- only 354
days to go until Box-
ing Day 2009!

Felipé Major/Tribune staff
















Bacardi Fight for Cuba

FROM page 10

starvation voyage to Miami on
a decrepit freighter.

The story of Bacardi in its
post-Cuban years combines
astute legal moves with high-
powered salesmanship and tech-
nical production expertise. New
offshore finance companies were
created, and a sales company for
the U.S. market; to the existing
distilleries in Mexico and Puerto
Rico, plants in Spain, Canada,
Brazil and Nassau (later closed)
were added; and diversification
from rum was achieved by acqui-
sitions of Martini & Rossi ver-
mouth, Dewar’s whiskey, and
gin, vodka, and tequila brands.
These developments were engi-

neered by the brilliant but dicta-
torial Pepin Bosch until 1976,
when a row with his fellow direc-

" tors led to his abrupt resignation

and retirement to Nassau, where
he died in 1994 at age 96.
Bosch’s departure led ‘to the
succession problems that plague
any family-owned company. And
Bacardi was actually five sepa-
rate corporations, each owned
by different family shareholders
with different percentages. The
book displays a family tree show-
ing the bewildering number of
Bacardi male and female suc-
cessors dependent on Bacardi,
either for a job or reliable divi-
dends. Intra-family strife was pre-
dictable. Finally in 1992 a “peace
accord” was reached due to

Cutillas’ meticulous planning that
created a consolidated Bermu-
da holding company named Bac-
ardi Limited. The tradition of
family control continued, with
Cutillas himself in charge, fol-
lowed later by a 38-year-old Bac;
ardi bearing the ancestral name
Facundo. ©

Through all these changes,
antagonism to Fidel never fad-
ed from the Bacardi corporate
objective. In the 1980s the Cuban
government created a rum
known as Havana Club, based
on a small company seized from
its private owner. They first sold
it in the Soviet Union but later
joined up with the mighty Pern-
od Ricard group for full interna-
tional marketing. Bacardi fought

‘bitter legal and commercial bat-
tles to prevent this upstart from
being marketed as the “genuine”
Cuban rum, losing in Europe,
but basically succeeding in the
US, thanks to anti-Castro legis-
lation and controversial high-
pressure political lobbying. °
The traditional Cuban back-
ground of the Bacardi family,
despite their many years of resi-
dence in Florida, Nassau, or
Europe, could never be separat-

ed from corporate ambitions. ,

Young Facundo has valiantly
stated that that “the significance
of my chairmanship is to be the
one to re-establish the Bacardi
company in its homeland ... lead-
ing the family, and the company,
back to its birthplace.” As the

book went to press in early 2008,
and even now, no one can tell
when or whether that dream can
be made reality. But clearly the
iron grip of socialism imposed
by the Castro brothers is slowly
fading as Cuba’s governance and
economy disintegrates, while the
Bacardi company as a billion-
dollat enterprise goes from
strength to strength under uni-
fied control. Perhaps the com-
pany can insist, or even be invit-
ed, to end the long estrangement
and resume the marriage on its
own terms. As described bril-
liantly in this book, Bacardi is an
institution with the energy, the
ambitions, the flexibility, and the
patriotism that could lead to suc-
cess.





artists of
the Bahamas

FROM page 12

: she said.

Another painter, Holly
Parotti, commented that
"there are pockets of women
who are just sitting back. I

: don't know why we're sitting
: back and watching what's

going on with the male artists,
it's like we're making things
happen for ourselves selec-

: tively, but never collective-
: ly," she said in explaining why
: women are not moving for-

ward as one entity. -

In her opinion, men don't
have to move forward as one
like women do, they can

: move in parallel. "Women are
more competitive creatively,

and emotions sometimes get
the better of us," she said,
"sometimes we get in our

; Own way."

Looking at it historically,

for example, it had to be a

group of women who made
the first step towards wom-
en's rights. "It was a lot of

: women who fought for our
: Tight to vote," she said, "it
: wasn't a factor of Mrs Jane

Doe who put herself on the
line for her family."
And she thinks that women

: have every right to be recog-
: nized as equals in the art
atmosphere, both locally and

internationally.
One step in the right direc-
tion, is the number of female

; artists shown in the National
: Art Gallery's fourth exhibi-
: tion. 13 of 32 artists were

females this past year, a high-
er number than seen ever
before.

The film directed by Karen

: Arthur and Thomas Neuwirth
i of Island Films showed the
: talents and rights of Max Tay-

lor, Amos Ferguson, John
Beadle, Kendal Hanna, John
Cox, Brent Malone, Antonius

? Roberts, Eddie Minnis, Dave
? Smith, Stan and Jackson
: Burnside. Their talents and

contributions are not the mat-
ter under. question, because
these are doubtlessly very
accomplished and gifted
artists.., i
“There were no women
painting and sculpting in the

: past like Max, Amos, Kendal,
: and Brent," said Ms Arthur,

"this is a historic document

that looks at who the masters

of art are in the country."
The American team knew

: it would be foolish of them
: to come to another country

and dictate who the masters
and mentors of art were, so
they asked one of the most
prominent art collectors of

: the country — the late Vin-
: cent D'Aguilar who had the
: largest private collection of

art in the Bahamas.
’ "He really knew the artists
and their work, he was a huge

: collector and also gave fund-
: ing to a lot of the artists for
: their work. We went to him

with 132 names, and he chose
the ones featured in the film
that he would call masters or

; seminal artists," said Ms
: Arthur.

And as a woman, she ques-

: tioned it at first. "What about

all the great women painters
and sculptors in the
Bahamas?"

First of all, she explained,

? they were not openly work-
: ing as artists in‘the past as

some of the older masters
were. Newer generation
artists like John Cox and John
Beadle were placed in the

: movie at Mr D'Aguilar's rec-
? ommendation because he did-
i n't feel "the women artists
i had as great a vocabulary of
: craft and their art output was
: not equitable to the works of
i Cox and Beadle," said Ms
: Arthur.

She added that with the

: template provided to the
: Bahamas for such a prolific
: film, it's the perfect opportu-
: nity for someone else to take
: on the documentation of oth-
i er artists who were left out of
: this first film.

"The women who I felt

- } were left out can be docu-
? mented, and even other men
? who missed out, (but) I think
: we have made a fantastic film
: and it's a film that belongs to
i the Bahamas," she said,

"Rather than slam it because

: you're not in it, make your
: own. The world is open."

Call to
advertise:

502-2371





apansouenronsronnen

Celebrating the ‘Great scenes from
‘New Year in Junkanoo 2008
lelicious style mes:page 14

See page nine












SSS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009 | | !

lm By LISA LAWLOR Its title has particularly.
Tribune Features Writer

been questioned by
prominent female artists
who feel they also deserve
the spotlight.
"Sometimes I wonder
what era I was born in,"
said artist Jessica Cole-
brooke, who even after a
month, finds the title and
ensuing film to be quite
offensive and upsetting.
"If it was called 'Male \
artists of the Bahamas' or
‘Some artistsof the
Bahamas' it would be fine,
but to have this title is to
say that female artists
‘don't exist in the
Bahamas, or that we don't
measure up," said the
artist of over ten years.
And the ironic part of it
all, she added, is that most
of the men in the film credited women as their men-
tors to become who they are today. "So while they
have female art teachers,and inspiring mothers who
made them who they are today, there are no female
artists featured in the film," said Mrs Colebrooké.
"They all have made contributions, but so have
we. It's ridiculous to think that in 2008, we as
women have nothing to show. This was privately
funded, the persons who made it must have had
some affiliations, but they should've put another
title."
This is just another example of how success in the
country is always measured by men's accomplishments,

SEE page 11











ARAN
wi





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| 2% PARTIY SUNNY
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BAHAMAS EDITION







Volume: 105 No.36



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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

Uys
BIGGEST!!!

(etal) aye
Tha)












$ tourist om lead
on Paradise Istand

Police classify
death of man
found in
marina as
‘suspicious’

i By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AN AMERICAN tourist was
found dead in a marina on Par-
adise Island near the Atlantis

Resort a day after he was -

reported missing. by his family,
police said.

The body of Timothy Massa,
28, a physical education teacher
from Waterbury, ‘Connecticut,
was found floating in the mari-
na shortly after Spm Monday.
He was ‘reported missing by a

‘close relative on Sunday, police °

said.

Up to press time, police had
classified Massa's death as "sus-
picious" and it was unknown
whether he drowned in the
marina or died at another loca-
tion. :

Police could not say if alcohol
or drugs played any part in
Massa's death or how he ended
up in the marina.





ASP Evans said there 1 were
no signs of trauma to Massa's
body and foul play was not sus-
pected.

Conflicting US reports that
said Massa's death was being
treated as a possible homicide
by the US Department of State
were denied by the US
Embassy and local police yes-

SEE page six

Aum |
we ea F

i
4 Tel (247) 330-08

THIS IS AN undated family photo of Timothy Massa who was found
dead Monday night. His body was found floating in this marina. (below)

near the Atlantis resort.

RIANA OAD

Courtesy Massa family/AP

Felipe Major/T ribune staff



Commissioner denies claims
that some ‘very serious’
crimes not being investigated

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Commissioner of

Police yesterday denied claims
by a senior police insider that a
number of “very, very serious”
crimes are not properly inves-
tigated because those involved
are related to high-ranking
police officers or politicians.

Reginald Ferguson said he
“wouldn’t agree” with the
informant’s assertion but
admitted that there is “no ques-
tion” that, given the size of
Bahamian society, there are
cases in which investigating offi-
cers are related to accused indi-
viduals. *

However, he stressed that it

is not a “major problem” for

the police force.

“IT am not saying that these
situations will not arise, and for
the very reason I have just
described. I think that’s part of
the challenge of policing the
Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. We have a unique
situation here and, of course,
we have to rise to that chal-
lenge, because we are charged
with that mandate,” the Com-
missioner said.

This comes as the senior
police source, speaking on con-

dition of anonymity, claimed |

that the media and public
would be “shocked” to hear of
the extent of the problem.

He said that in the past, when
steps were taken to pursue cer-
tain controversial cases, “reper-
cussions were brought to bear

SEE page six

| Palindale + Paradise island + Oakes F
Bernard foad + 8 Locations (Freeper)







Hotel makes move
in bid to cut losses.

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE. planned eight-week. clo-
sure of the Wyndham Nassau
Resort and Crystal Palace Casino
this summer is designed to slash
losses normally incurred during
that time in half, while preserving:
existing employment levels.

Baha Mar, which owns the
Cable Beach Resorts, the Shera-
ton Cable Beach Resort and the

ret Travolta (AP)
Travolta family
AWM MLS

FLITE RSH: Ics

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Tra-
voltas left Grand Bahama qui-
etly around midnight with the
ashes of their 16-year-old son,
arriving in Florida early Tues-
day morning.

Keith McSweeney, funeral
director/mortician at Restview
Memorial Mortuary, told The
Tribune that Jett Travolta was
cremated Monday and his ash-
es left the island around mid-
night.

It is believed the Travoltas
flew out on their private plane
to Ocala, Florida, where they
have another vacation home.

Jett Travolta died on Janu-
ary 2 of a seizure at the Tra-
voltas’ private residence in

SEE page six



Wyndham and Crystal Palace,
said in a statement last night that
in 2008 it ended the year with
“combined operating losses and
debt service expenses in excess
of millions of dollars”, and need-
ed to cut costs.

The closure will take place
between August 17-October 5,
2009, which is traditionally the
low point of the Bahamian

tourism season. Baha Mar said it

SEE page six
Alleged victim of
police ‘brutality’
Charged in court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE
. Tribune Staff Reporter

A BAIN Town man, who is
alleged to have been the victim
“anprovoked brutality” by a
police officer.last week, was

-arraigned in a Magistrate’s

Court yesterday on charges of
resisting arrest and assaulting ; a
policeman.

Charles Babbs, 36, of Wilkin-
son Street, who appeared
before Magistrate Derrence
Rolle in Court 5, Bank Lane,
was also arraigned on charges of

SEE page six

Kerzner official expects
Atlantis employment

figures to remain stable

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

UNLESS there is an unex-
pected and “major downswing”
in tourism arrivals, Kerzner
Bahamas’ managing director
said yesterday he expects
Atlantis’ employment figures to
remain at a “very similar” level
this year as they are now.

Confirming that room reser-
vation forecasts made by the

SEE page six


PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

In brief

Woman accused
of attempting to
smuggle drugs.
into prison

A WOMAN accused of
attempting to smuggle mari-
juana into Her Majesty’s
Prison was arraigned in Mag-
istrates Court yesterday.

Shantell Gilbert, 30, of Fox
Hill, appeared before Magis-
trate Carolita Bethel in
Court Eight, Bank Lane,
charged with two counts of
marijuana possession.

According to court dock-
ets, it is alleged that on Mon-
day, January 5, Gilbert was
found in possession of a
quantity of the drug.

It is also alleged that a
total of eight grams of mari-
juana was found under a seat
in Gilbert’s vehicle in a
transparent container along
with “chicken and fries” that
Gilbert intended to give to
her imprisoned boyfriend.

Gilbert pleaded not guilty
to the charges.

Prosecutor Inspector
Ercell Dorsette raised no
objection to bail. Gilbert was
granted bail in the sum of
$7,500. The case was
adjourned to June 26.

e A 32-year-old man was
arraigned in Magistrate’s
Court 8 yesterday, charged
with possession of marijuana
with intent to supply.

According to court dock-
ets, Roston Rahming of
Inagua Way was found in
possession of a quantity of
marijuana on Sunday, Janu-
ary 4.

e Itis alleged that Rahming
pvas found in possession of
#3 grams of marijuana.

« Rahming, who appeared
before Magistrate Carolita
Bethel in Court 8, Bank
Lane, pleaded not guilty to’
the charge.

: He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000. The case was
adjourned to July 9.







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pay bills, make inquiries or obtain.
services. New Providence locations
include the Mall at Marathon, Bay
Street, the Town Center Mall, Fox Hill
and the Shirley Street Plaza.

nea EN





@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



TEN employees of Valentine’s Resort and Mari-
na on Harbour Island are expected to be laid-off by
the énd of the week, a resort official said.

This follows Monday’s announcement that 21
employees are being laid off from the Comfort
Suites property on Paradise island.

Resort general manager Lia Head told The Tri-
bune yesterday that Valentine’s has been forced to
cut staff because of repeated drops in guest arrivals.

She said: “We only have one room checked in
today, and I expect that we will bounce between

LOCAL NEWS

Harbour Island resort employees ‘set to be laid off’

one and two rooms up until March.”

. Like many resorts throughout the country that
have experienced occupancy spikes during the hol-
idays, Ms Head said high operational costs have
also influenced the company’s decision.

“The last electricity bill was’$100,000 for the
month, and even if occupancy is low we still have to

. keep the lights on, and burn air-conditioners in

the rooms,” she said. ;
The company, which employees around 68 peo-
ple, intends to place most of its staff on rotation
while others will be placed on call.
However, Ms Head said the rescheduling of the
staff is only a temporary fix to a growing problem.

THE TRIBUNE

She said if conditions worsen employees could be
laid off. In recent months, hundreds of former
hotel workers have joined the unemployment lines
as many resort operators continue to report
significant declines in occupancy levels. The-biggest
blow was in November when around 800 employ-
ees of Kerzner International were laid-off.

‘Bahamas Hotel Association president Robert
Sands warned that if the first four months of 2009
“do not go according to plan" in terms of industry
performance, "sacrifices" from all stakeholders —
hotel owners and operators, developers, manage-
ment teams and line staff — might be necessary to
keep businesses financially viable.





















BOXING DAY TRAGEDY






- Autopsy: Junkanoo drummer died

when heart fell into abnormal rhythm

Adwin Moss’s family say they were unaware of problem

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

DRUMMER Adwin Moss who col-
lapsed during the Boxing Day
Junkanoo parade, died when his heart
fell into an abnormal rhythm,.an
autopsy has revealed.



















|.death listed on
the 39-year-old’s
death certificate

arrhythmia”,
also known as
cardiac disrhyth-
mia, an abnor-
{ mal rhythm that
‘can cause the
heart to stop.

Mr Moss’s
family of Frog-
man Lane, Nas-
sau, say they
were not aware he had a heart prob-
lem, although they believe he was tak-

ing medication for heartburn.

The youngest of his six siblings,
Michlene Gustav, 23, said they still

‘have unanswered questions.

“I. give the Department of Health

O THE WORLD




Waele
CLOSED TO PUBLIC

BIC wishes to advise its customers that
its JFK headquarters is closed to the
general public until further notice.
The company is moving quickly to
refurbish the facility in the aftermath
of the recent fire incident.



~ wwwibtcbahamas.com | CALL BTC 225-5282

The cause of

‘is “cardiac



“Junkanoo is pretty stressful in terms
of physical exertion and excitement,
so if you have any abnormality with
the heart, all of the excitement and
physical stress could trigger an.

abnormal rhythm.”

~



all credit in certain ways, but I think
they could have probably saved his
life,” she said.

“We have other questions about
how and why it happened, because it
was so sudden. I feel he could have
lived, because he was fine. ”

Cardiologist Dr Conville Brown of
the Bahamas Heart Centre on Collins
Avenue said that although cardiac
arrhythmia is not necessarily fatal, the

_first,instance can cause sudden death.

Although junkanoo would not nec-

essarily lure the heart into a fatal —

rhythm, junkanooers should take care

_ if they have heart conditions and avoid

stimulants, Dr Brown said.»







ee rk

Dr Conville Brown

“Junkanoo is pretty stressful in terms
of physical exertion and excitement,
so if you have any abnormality with
the heart, all of the: excitement and
physical stress could trigger an abnor-
mal rhythm,” he said.

“Various things in energy drinks like
ginseng, taurine and caffeine, as well as
alcohol, are stimulants'that allow you
to function at-a higher’ than normal
level. So if you have a predisposition to
an abnormal rhythm or electrical short-

_ circuit, they can trigger those abnormal

pathways.”

Dr Brown said it may not have been
possible to save Mr Moss, but added
that he was at high risk as medical



treatment was not immediately avail-
able. :

Hundreds of junkanoo enthusiasts
from across the spectrum of A and B
groups are coming to Nassau from as
far as Miami, Washington, DC, and
Atlanta, to join the Saxon Superstars in
a final farewell procession for Mr Moss

after his funeral on Saturday. :

Peter Gilmud, chairman of the Sax-
ons management committee, said: “He
is indeed deserving of the full
junkanoo treat for his contribution to
the Saxons and junkanoo, and we have
people from all over who want to come
and show love.

“This is not just people who know
him; this is a junkanooer who died in
the act of junkanoo: This is one of us,” _
he said. ,

The procession will follow the funer-
al service at Prevalent Church of God
in Christ, Deveaux Street, off East .
Street, at lpm. Rushers will proceed
from the City Market parking lot in
Village Road to Woodlawn Gardens
Cemetery in Soldier Road, where

. Moss will be buried. i‘

The Saxons will also hold a ceremo-
ny for Mr Moss at their junkanoo
shack in Marshall Cooper Park,
Masons Addition, at 8.30pm Friday..:



FAMILY Guardian presented its annual scholarship award to the College of the Bahamas (COB), enabling five
students to pursue their educational goals.. At a.reception at the insurance company’s corporate centre on — '
Shirley Street, Family Guardian’s senior vice-president of administration Dr Kerry Higgs presented the schol- .
arship proceeds to COB’s director of Financial Aid and Housing Cheryl Carey. Since its inception in 1988,
Family Guardian’s scholarship programme has provided over $300,000 in financial assistance to more than
80 students at the College. Pictured (left to right) scholarship recipients Roderick Malone, Deandra Saun-
ders and Kristin Johnson; Cheryl Carey of the College of the Bahamas; Dr Kerry Higgs, senior vice-president
of administration, and recipients Charvette Strachan and Rovaine Adderley.

RWW

— NGCK
Or
See.

? oF 7 £9

SFE? £3

GSS
oe

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
@ood cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.
THE TRIBUNE



In brief

Man found
dead in
submerged
car died from
heart failure

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

AN autopsy has revealed ©
that the man found dead ina
submerged Mercedes nearly
a month ago died as a result
of heart failure, Chief Super-
intendent, Glen Miller, offi-
cer in-charge of crime, told
The Tribune yesterday.’

Two weeks ago, police
reported that the man had
been identified as Flint Fer-
guson, 53, of Dunmore
Street. His decomposing
body, sitting inside a heavily-
tinted Mercedes 280-E, was
pulled from Nassau Harbour
on Friday, December 19.

The car, said to have been
in the water for days before
workers in the area notified
authorities, had entered the
Harbour nose first from the
end of Victoria Avenue, on
the north side of Bay Street.

Police were informed that
Mr Ferguson was last seen in
the Bay Street area on the
night of Monday, December
15, 2008.

Mr Miller said yesterday
that police are still making
inquiries into the circum-
stances surrounding Mr Fer-
guson’s death. The results of
the autopsy were released
last week.

“The only development we
have so far is that the autop-
sy is telling us that he died
from heart failure,” Mr
Miller said.

“In terms of our inquiries
as to what actually happened
to him, that has not been
concluded as yet,” Mr Miller
said. s f

Concerne
citizen helps
police find
handgun

e WITH the assistance of a
concerned citizen, police
found and seized a handgun
in the Elizabeth Estates area
on Monday.

_ Acting on at tip, officers
were dispatched to Elizabeth
Estates at 1.30pm. They dis-
covered. a .38 handgun with
five live rounds of ammuni-
tion hidden in some bushes.
Investigations into the mat-
ter are ongoing.

Police quiz
man over
attempted
vehicie theft

¢ POLICE are questioning
a 27-year-old man of Mar-
shall Road in connection
with the attempted theft of a
vehicle on Monday. ;

According to reports, resi-
dents of the area have made
a number of reports about
cars being broken into.

At around 3am on Mon-
day, officers from the
Carmichael Road Police Sta-
tion were on patrol in that
area when residents drew
their attention to aman ina
car.

The individual was
allegedly inside a 2003 LX
Honda Accord attempting to
steal the vehicle.

The 27-year-old is current-
ly in custody and helping the
police with their investiga-
tion into this matter.

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322-2157



MINISTER of State Zhivargo
Laing’s comments about the
validity of the Standard and
Poor’s report on the Bahamas
continues to draw criticism from
the government’s detractors.

Yesterday, political activist and
PLP hopeful for the St Cecilia
constituency Paul Moss called on
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
to fire Mr Laing over his response
to the report, which found that
the government’s decision to stop
and review nearly $80 million
worth of contracts entered into
by the previous government dis-
rupted the economy’s “growth
momentum and negatively affect-
ed investors’ sentiments”.

Following the release of the
report, Mr Laing questioned
where S&P got its figures from,
saying the FNM found nowhere
near $80 million worth of con-
tracts in place.

He denied that the government
was responsible for the economic
downturn.

In his statement, Mr Moss crit-
icised this response, but also chas-
tised his own party for attempting
to politicise the matter.

He said: “I am deeply con-
cerned about the responses to the
report by both the government
and the PLP.

“T find there has not yet been a
sober response to the report by
any public official in this coun-
try.

“It is astounding tome that we
have failed in the face of a public
report by an august institution,
while the world is watching and
listening, in the midst of a down-
turn in which we must take every
opportunity — if we are serious
about bringing prosperity to the

LOCAL NEWS

PLP hopeful calls for Laing
to be sacked over comments

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3

Paul Moss lashes out after Minister of State
questions validity of S&P report on Bahamas





“..Mr Laing sought
to pillory the report,
| because it criticised
the treatment of
investors, in what
we already know to
be a selective and
immature approach
of the government
of which he is a

part.”

‘Paul Moss



Bahamian people — to show the
world that we mean business.

“On the government side, Mr
Laing sought to pillory the report,
because it criticised the treatment
of investors, in what we already
know to be a selective and imma-
ture approach of the government
of which he is a part.”

Mr Moss said he would think
the minister of state for finance
would respond to the report “in a
measured fashion, given that it is
on the basis of this sort of docu-
ment, prepared by these very
people, that he will have to rely
upon for government credit.”

He said Mr Laing should
realise that attempting to defend
the indefensible merely leaves the
Bahamas looking like a “banana
republic”. 3

“What will he say should he
have to go to New York, where
lending and credit is weakening,
and give an account of his
remarks as a condition of the
Bahamas receiving credit?” Mr

-Moss asked. “I submit to you that

this attitude is no different that
Mr Ingraham calling Petro-Caribe
a ‘stupid deal’ in.a national
speech, thereby insulting his

Caribbean colleagues and poten-

Twenty-six Cuban

Joint effort

between US -

Coast Guard
and RBDF

In a joint effort between the

United States. Coast Guard
and the Royal -Bahamas
Défence Force, 26 Cuban
migrants were detained in the

North West Bahamas yester-’

day.

The Defence Force opera-
tions department received
information on Monday from

the US Coast Guard that sus-.

pected migrants had been
spotted on William Island,
west of Andros. 3

RBDF vessel HMBS P-45,
under the command of Petty
Officer Chad Farrington, went
to the area to investigate.

Around 7am yesterday

Clean-up campaigners seek payment

morning, the captain report-
ed finding 14 men and 12
women, who all appeared
hungry, but in good physical
condition...

They were taken aboard the
vessel and brought to Nassau
around 3pm, where they were
turned over to the immigra-
tion officials for further inves-
tigations.

THIRTEEN workers on the Garden Hills clean-up cam-
paign are calling on their MP, Brensil Rolle, to ensure that

they are paid. ‘

They claim money has been owed to them since before

Christmas.

A spokesman for the group, who wished to remain anony-
mous, told The Tribune yesterday that the workers were
promised $100 a day for the four days they helped clean up

the community.

‘“‘We have not been paid and other people in the area have
already-gotten two pay cheques. Last night we went to Mr
Rolle’s home and we will return again until we get our mon-

ey,” the spokesman said.

Repeated calls to Mr Rolle’s office and mobile phone were
not answered and messages left for him were not returned up

to press time last night.







Zhivargo Laing

tially undermining the Bahamas’
options if Petro-Caribe becomes
necessary.”

He added: “I am not offered
any comfort by the remarks of
the PLP either.

“The response was both politi-
cal and irrelevant.

“And in my view what was
political was not relevant and
what was relevant was made too
political. :

“We ought to look at the
report and see what it reveals for
us and how or what initiatives we
should undertake to forestall or
blunt some of its warnings,” he
said.

Look Smart
in a Great
Selection .

&

from

JACK VICTOR!

Man wanted
for questioning
over murder
turns himself in

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
- dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 22-
year-old Haitian man
wanted for questioning in
connection with a murder
turned himself in to Abaco
police officers yesterday
morning.

Chief Superintendent
Basil Rahming said the
man, who lives in the Hait-
ian settlement known as
The Mud, surrendered
around 8.30am at the
Marsh Harbour Police
Station.

The man, who has been
sought by police for more
than two weeks, was
accompanied by his lawyer
Alphonso Morley.

He is now assisting
detectives on Abaco and
Grand Bahama with their :
investigation into the
shooting death of 34-year-
old Vincent Zilma,.a resi-
dent of The Mud.

Jackson Joseph, 19, of
Murphy Town, Abaco,
was charged in connection
with Zilma’s murder on
December 24, 2008, in
Marsh Harbour Magis-
trate’s Court.

He was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison, Fox
Hill until April 22 when a
preliminary inquiry will be:
held.



MORLEY

EF

NX

ONAN

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
: Telephone: (242) 362-6654/6
Bayparl Building, Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-8240 ¢ Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
e-mail: info@colesofnassau.com


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE









































Cas,

















‘07 SU

The Tribune Limited

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Hanging is not the

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E: H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991 |

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES ve
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



PLP indecision will help economy

DESPITE STANDARD & Poors downgrade

of the Bahamas’ real domestic product from _

4.4 per cent in 2006 to 1.1 per cent in.2008 and

. 1 per cent this year, government believes it can

weather the economic turbulence for at least 18
months. ~ ;

“No country, including the Bahamas, is inter-
ested in having the current circumstances last
beyond 18 months,” said Finance Minister
Zhivargo Laing. “That would be very difficult
for any economy and any fiscal regime. We
hope to have a turnaround sooner rather than
later.”

Of course, that turnaround is dependent on
whether the stimulus packets injected into the
US and European economies will pay off and

" stabilise a presently sinking global ship.

Unlike its Caribbean neighbours, Mr Laing
says the Bahamas has “two percentage points of

space” in which to manoeuvre before it gets to
vany dangerous level on the debt-to-GDP ratio.
=, *.He told Tribune Business last week that the
‘| Bahamas’ relative fiscal prudence, by compar-
_sison to its Caribbean rivals such as Barbados
“and Jamaica — the latter having a national debt

of more than three times’ what the IMF regards

.| as safe— had safeguarded this nation’s ability to .
_- borrow at competitive interest rates and “carry

itself through.”

It is in this two ‘percentage points of wiggle —

space that the Bahamas hopes to borrow
enough to turn upgrades of the country’s crum-
bling infrastructure into mtich needed jobs.”
.. However, Standard & Poor blamed the FNM

“government, after winning the election, for
reviewing $80 million worth of contracts agreed
.“in-principle by the outgoing PLP government
- and of cancelling the $23 million public con-

tract for construction of the Straw Market.
What S&P were referring to in the $80 million

worth of contracts is yet to be identified, but it,.

claimed that the FNM’s review “negatively
affected investors’ sentiments and brought sub-
stantial disruption to the contractors’ activity.”
It conceded that the situation has ‘since nor-
malised, “but the important economic growth
momentum has been lost.” :
Although the review might have brought

_ disruption to “contractors’ activity”, the Christie
government’s delay in completing these con--- --

tracts in a timely fashion had already jaundiced

. investors’ opinions of the Bahamas.

After all, it was Mr Sarkis Izmirlian, head of
the Baha Mar venture, who, in a letter written
‘on January 25, 2006 to then prime minister

Christie, questioned “whether investing billions
of dollars in this country is the right decision.”
Mr Izmirlian was upset that Mr Christie had



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- not lived up to his “personal assurance” that

“sovernment would move expeditiously” to

‘have a supplemental contract signed on which

”

there was a deadline.

He made it clear that this delay could jeop-
ardise the $2.4 million Cable Beach project.

However, it was a stroke of good luck that
Mr Christie’s indecision saved the country from
sinking 50 per cent of its capital works budget
for the 2007 fiscal year into just one project —
the Straw Market.

. If this had gone through — with all the con-
struction problems we now know about — it
would have pushed construction costs even
higher and forced a decision to use inferior
materials to cut costs.

If this had happened, $23 million would have
been ill spent and our two per cent wiggle space
on which Mr Laing is now counting to see us
through this recession would have been greatly
jeopardised.

Originally the market was budgeted at $10 to
$13 million. Later the president of the company,
appointed by the Christie government to over-
see the market project, could not explain how
the 77,000 square foot building that his compa-
ny was to oversee was suddenly expanded to
200,000 square feet when it was sent out'to con-

~-tractors-for bid. ~~

The estimated cost had now risen to $29-$37
million. Even to this day there seems to be no
explanation, except that the straw market was
no longer to be just a market, but also an enter-
tainment centre with restaurant/nightclub, open
dining’on the roof and an observation tower.

Earlier in 2005/6 the architect, in excavating
to find the concrete base of the original market
before construction could start, discovered that
the old straw market had been built on conch
shells and if the beams and pilings had not been
sound, the market “would have caved in a long
time ago.” /

The managing director of the consultancy

* firm’s only explanation for the apparent “mud-

dle” surrounding the straw market appears to be
that the PLP government couldn’t decide
whether it wanted a relatively simple, low cost
permanent structure for a straw market or a
grand “monument” that would stand as the
centrepiece of downtown Nassau’s revitalisa-
tion.

For once a PLP “muddle” saved this coun-
try’s precious bacon. Nassau will now have a
market taylor-made to its budget — its con-
struction will create employment and help sta-
bilise the economy until daylight can be seen at
the end of the fiscal tunnel. : \






Se f
= Se £










BY

326-5856 PALMDALE SHOPPING PLAZA 9am-6pm Monday-Saturday

solution to our

country’s growing

crime dilemma

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Please allow me an oppor-
tunity to express my views on
what I think is a different,
albeit familiar, consideration
to the issue of hanging in The
Bahamas.

I have listened to the var-
ied opinions on this issue
which are often charged with
emotion and devoid of criti-
cal, open, honest and. frank
analysis.

Our fledgling economy,
overly dependent on tourism,
is now suffering from what is

considered the ill affects of a ©

global recession.

Not to mention our grow-
ing crime dilemma, the solu-
tion to which a large part of
our population erroneously
thinks is hanging! ;

In 2006 the Judicial Com-
mittee of the Privy Counsel
unanimously struck down the
mandatory death sentence
imposed on those convicted
of murder in The Bahamas,
as being in breach of the Con-
stitution.

The decision caused much
debate as proponents of the
death penalty seem to think
that state sponsored execu-
tions is the key to ridding our
society of the scourge of wan-
ton crime.

To an extent I agree that a
form of execution is the key to
solving our crime problem.

I think that few would dis- .

agree that hypocrisy and cor-
ruption has infected and/or
infiltrated the social and moral
fabric of our society and-has
long since executed the con-
science of many.

This month a new crime
report was presented to the
government.

I make no apologies for my

‘cynicism in saying that I seri-

ously doubt whether the pre-
vious reports were even con-
‘sidered let alone implement-
ed.

It is still safe to say “that
our society is more threatened
by a pervasive culture of dis-
honesty, greed and a casual
disregard for social norms and
formal regulation, than it is\by
crime in the narrow sense.”

The form of execution of

which I spoke is a figurative

execution.
So I posit the question, who
will step forward for our first

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DIANA. ETIENNE of
NASSAU VILLAGE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
‘send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of DECEMBER 2008
_ tothe Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.






LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



public albeit figurative hang-
ing for the level of hypocrisy
and corruption that exists in
our society?

Michael Craton articulated
the vision, philosophy and ide-
ology of our first Minister of
Education Sir Cecil Wallace
Whitfield for the masses.

It was to guarantee cutting
edge educational facilities and
to ensure that the masses were
afforded the opportunity of a
decent education.

Forty years in the future we .

have yet to establish a univer-
sity and are doing our best to
justify a national grad aver-
age of D.

The present disposition is
far removed from the vision,
philosophy and ideology of Sir
Cecil.

Isay which Minister of Edu-
cation, whether past of pre-
sent, will step forward, accept

.responsibility and be figura-

tively hanged for our current
national educational crisis?
What about our courts?
Our country would have pro-
duced three successive black
Prime Ministers all of whom
preached a solemn message
of commitment for the poor
and marginalized. -
Sir Lynden encouraged us
to step forward to the new
frontier, Mr. Christie articu-

lated that he would.swim in...

his regurgitation for the peo-
ple and Mr. Ingraham ensures

-us that he will guarantee the

safety of the cookie jar. .

I would submit that it was
under the watch of these three
distinguished leaders in their
own right and eminent practi-

tioners at the Bar that the

judicial system saw its greatest
decline.
That august body, respon-

- sible for protecting the funda-

mental rights of the least in
our society thereby guaran-
teeing the rights of the great-
est, has at.times felt it neces-
sary to break with tradition
and lament its displeasure at
the less than adequate facili-
ties necessary to ensure prop-
er service for members of the
public.

Tell me which of our dar-

ling leaders will accept respon-

Sibility and step forward for

this and I emphasise figura-
tive hanging? |
Who among our Clergy-
man will step forward and be
first, for the misuse of the con-
fidence of the poor?
You know what I mean.

‘Just consider the messages of

prosperity, observe some of
their fancy cars and lavish
homes and look at the condi-
tion of many of their mem-
bers.

Not to mention the defin-
ing silence on issues of nation-
al importance. Do we have
any takers?

What about those in our
society who prey on our young
children, the predators, the
ones who hang around our
schools laying in wait for our
young girls and boys?

You can probably find one

~ in every sector of our society.

Do we have any takers?

There has been no scientif-
ic proof provided that hang-
ing is a deterrent to crime.

This I do know, that is
respect for the rights of others,
honesty, charity and strong
family values are strong and
effective deterrents!

The way forward to solv-
ing our crime problem is not
through hysteria and emo-
tionally charged rash deci-
sions, but rather by first
acknowledging and eradicat-
ing the scourge of dishonesty,
indiscipline, hypocrisy, intol-
erance and hate.

Then we can move forward
to considering who'should be
hanged.

However, I suspect that dur-
ing our time of introspection
and self-evaluation in light of
our action or inactions we may
come to the conclusion as did
the Scribes, Sadducees and

“Pharisees and simply walk

away without casting a stone
or in our case hanging!

ELSWORTH N JOHN-
SON ;

Former president of the
Bahamas Human Rights
Association

Nassau,

December, 2008





Dumb and dumber

. EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would like to thank you for publishing this letter in your
newspaper. I look forward to us all making a step in the right

direction.

I am an educated Bahamian with Associate’s, Bachelor’s and

Master’s degrees.

I understand that there are some levels of education that

not everyone is able to achieve.

Therefore, I would not expect every person I meet on the Jit-
ney to be able to calculate their gas mileage, or write an award
winning essay. I do, however, expect competence in basic
spelling, particularly, in large businesses and in public displays.

On Shirley Street there is a business that claims to be an
excellent place:for children to visit with the words “Down too
earth” (should be “to” NOT “too”) in their sign and the word
“generators” misspelled. An established donut shop in Nas-
sau proudly touts their new soups, saying “There back!” (should
‘say “They’re” not “there”) on the large window posters. When
I told the cashier, she humbly informed me that I was not the
first to point it out. A local, website development and comput-
er training, company, in Nassau, proudly displays its student tes-
timonials on its website. The problem is the link is spelled ~
“Testimonials”. Who owns these businesses? Have they no
pride? What of their employees? Are they blind? Or are we all
just so stupid nobody knows these signs are wrong? How can any
of the persons who own, work in or frequent these establish-
ments say with a straight face that they are surprised with our

national grade point average? —

I feel the Ministry of Education should send out a task force
to police any sign mounted in public and remove posters and fly-
ers with flagrant misspellings or poor grammar. If the company
sign is too large or too heavy, have the company remove it or
correct it at their expense. If they do not, fine them. Use the
money generated to support educational programmes to miti-
gate the damage they are causing.

Sadly, I doubt the persons responsible will or are able to

read this entire letter.

For those of you who are, please take up your dictionaries and
make a stand for the children, for The Bahamas and for the
national pride I still have some faith in.

ANCILLENO DAVIS, MSc

Nassau,
December 17, 2008.
IHE |HIBUNGE

Ca a

yp evuyvy tr rink ye



Harbour Island |
resorts hit hy
interruptions to
utility supplies

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS HARBOUR ISLAND
continues to buck the current
tourism trend by still attract-
ing a high volume of visitors,
resorts on that island are
forced to accept significant
financial losses due to con-
stant interruptions in utility
supplies.

While many Family Island
communities have experi-
enced a sharp decline in visi-
tor arrivals in recent months,
resulting in lay-offs, leading
resorts on Harbour Island
say they are faced with a dif-
ferent challenge.

General Manager of the
Pink Sands Resort Jacques
Bronchier told The Tribune
that business for the quaint
luxury resort has been excep-
tional throughout the past
year despite continuous dis-
ruptions in electricity and
water supplies.

“We have power problems,
our water situation is terri-
ble,” he said.

The resort, which employs.
80 employees, continues to
have significant costs because
of unreliable utilities, said Mr

@ By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THIS YEAR, St Joseph’s
Catholic Parish will be cele-

_brating 75 years in the heart

of Bain Town and Chipping-
ham.

The church will commemo-
rate its founding with a series
of activities beginning on Jan-
uary 25 with a special mass
and continuing through the
entire year under the theme
“St Joseph’s: Looking Back,
Moving Forward, as a Family
of Faith”.

LOCAL NEWS

‘St Joseph’s Catholic Parish to
celebrate 75 year milestone

heen of activities
set to begin on
January 25th

St Joseph’s plans to recog-
nise both the members who
were alive when the church’s
cornerstone was laid in 1934
and the youths who will con-
tinue the strong family tradi-
tions of the parish into the
future.

Rev Martin Gomes said the
mission of the parish has not
changed in three quarters of a
century.

“The mission of the church
has been the same. Ministries
that carry out the mission
have changed and must
change. It has to do with com-



Rev Martin Gomes

munity building, proclaiming
the gospel in the community,
and the mission of service,”
Rev Gomes said.

He noted that at one point,

Cent Bx) aTSteNA



ous growth,” she said.
George Robinson, an 85-
year-old parishioner of St
Joseph’s, said he has many
fond memories of growing up

TS (clE eeenn Ntyiiat

all the changes in St Joseph’s
and witnessed all the priests
that came and went in St
Joseph’s. I lived to-witness all

‘the changes,” Mr Robinson

Bronchier.
wehiciniy opetated cade the a. R FS Hl i 0 f) N i M | $s ] 0) \i yy e rn the Bain Towa Commi: es Svea any some of the The ae J eee varie a

same management as the
Pink Sands, has experienced
similar disruptions.

Resort operators said they
are now questioning if the
government is ever going to
address their problems.

Lia Head, general manager
at the Valentines Resort and
Marina, said the company
was forced to spend more
than $100,000 on a generator
and water pump to deal with
the erratic utility supplies.

“Most of the other busi-
‘nesses on the island don’t
have generators, so then
théir light and water can be
interrupted two or three
times a week, and during the
busy season disruptions hap-
pen several times everyday,
she said.

Ms Head said the resort’s
electricity bills for the #12
room propeity are as s high as."
$100,000 a month:

In August 2008, State Min-
ister for Environment Phen-

. ton Neymour said plans were
on the way for the construc-
tion of a power plant in
North Eleuthera intended to
significantly reduce the cost
of electricity. ;

Set to be completed later
this year, Mr Neymour said
the plant will link Harbour
Island to a consistent energy
source through a submarine
cable.

The Tribune was yesterday
unable to reach BEC’s gen-
eral manager Kevin Basden
for comment.

TROPICAL
EUS)

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
PHONE: 322-2157





TUGTE



THE COLLEGE of the Bahamas freshmen attend the. FOAM (Fresh
man On A Mission) Spring Orientation '09, at the college's main

~ campus, Moriday.



UNDERSECRETARY AT the Ministry of National Security Peter

Deveaux-lsaacs speaks about the links between his ministry and the

College of the Bahamas.

3rd Party
Insurance

ty.
“This is where the bell rang
to awaken people to go to
work, this is where the bells

‘rang to summon people come

to church. This is where peo-
ple gathered to recreate, to
pray, to enjoy — so St Joseph’s
has always been the focal
point in this. area,” Rev
Gomes said.

Sister Cecilia Albury, direc-

‘tor of Adult Day-Care Cen-

tre, said she is amazed by the
development at the parish
over the years.

“We have all these new
buildings around, which real-
ly shows that St Joseph’s
parish parishioners are con-
tinuing to build the education
of our children, seniors and
juniors, so there is continu-

first alter servers in St
Joseph’s and read the first
mission. I was living the clos-
est to St Joseph’s and many
mornings just me and the
priest kept mass. J watched

initiatives to the community,
including youth ministries, a
Saturday soup kitchen, adult
day care, and home visitation
ministries.

Share your news |

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
yourare raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story, |

CREDIT SUISSE a
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch ©

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE

_ Kerzner official expects Atlantis 7 7
employment figures to remain stable

Wyndham to close for eight weeks
FROM page one

would encourage staff to take their annual vacation and other enti-
tlements during that time.

The Cable Beach Resorts owner said it had spent $75 million to
cover/subsidise operating losses in the three-and-a-half years since
it acquired the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort and Wyndham/Crys-
tal Palace Casino in May 2005.

These losses had been eaten during a period when Baha Mar had
invested some $150 million in upgrading the two properties, on
top of the $200 million purchase price, taking its total spent to
close to $500 million.

The company yesterday said it had to cope with a 35 per cent
increase in utility costs to $15 million in 2008.

* FOR FULL STORY SEE TRIBUNE BUSINESS ON PAGE 1B

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 « Fax: 326-7452

EXTRA, EXTRA,

FROM page one

company in November for the
first quarter of this year remain
largely on target, George
Markantonis said that last year’s
lay-offs remain adequate from a
cost-saving perspective.
Kerzner’s staff levels fell from
9,200 in November when it let
go 800 Atlantis employees and
played a part in a decision to
drop 150 workers from the Har-
bourside resort, citing a dra-
matic downturn in occupancy.
At that time, the hotel was
just 48 per cent full, hit hard by
economic conditions in the Unit-
ed States and Hurricane Ike.
On Monday Comfort Suites
was the next Paradise Island
hotel operator to cut back —
reducing its staff quota by 21
per cent.
Comfort Suite’s move, did not

surprise Prime Minister Hubert '

Ingraham, who told reporters
on. Monday that he expected
that “downsizing in the hotel
‘sector is not complete.”

Mr Markantonis noted that

Atlantis based its November
downsizing on the fifty per cent
slower booking pace seen for
early 2009 compared with a year
earlier, adding that after almost
two months this figure remained
largely unchanged (at 45 per
cent).

For this reason, he said that
the company does not foresee
further staff downsizing.

“What we had predicted ‘is
coming true and January even
saw ‘some slippage, from what
we had predicted, it was very
close,” said Mr Markantonis.

“We like to think we do these
things (lay-offs) at one time. Our
forecast was done with a lot of
deliberation last year for this
year and that’s how we chose

. the number of associates that

we would need to lay off and
right now our forecast still seems
to be holding as we expected.”

“Of course we are looking at
cost saving measures, but we

‘always do that. That doesn’t

always involve laying off more

people. Unless there is a major
downswing we hope to get
through this year without lay-
ing off any more people,” said
the CEO.

According to Mr Markanto-
nis, booking pace — the number
of advanced room reservations
made by “leisure travellers” —
is the preferred “advanced
warning” for hoteliers of how
overall business will be in com-
ing months.

However, although leisure

’ travellers make up sixty per cent

of all Atlantis’ visitors, their
bookings do not translate direct-
ly into “heads in beds” as they
do not account for all potential
visitors, or those customers may
cancel their reservations at a lat-
er date.

Mr Markantonis expects Feb-
ruary 2009 to see hotel occu-
pancy levels in the “high 60s”,
compared with last year’s “mid
70s”. Meanwhile, March occu-

pancy is set to stand in the “mid
60s” compared with an above
80 per cent figure last year.

However, the CEO noted
that last year’s high March occu-
pancy was “distorted” by the
fact that the Easter holiday fell
in that month, whereas it does
not in 2009.

This year Easter falls on the
weekend of April 10 (Good Fri-
day) to April 13 (Easter Mon-
day).

“Some of it was to do. with
that (although) a whole 20 per
cent shortfall — I don't think
so,” said the CEO.

He revealed that occupancy
levels for most of December
2008 stood at around 56 per cent
— 10 per cent lower than last
year.

While there was “less than a
week” from Boxing Day
onwards in which all rooms
were taken and some of the
workers laid-off in Novembe1
were brought back for tempo-
rary overtime work, visitor lev-
els have now returned to a pre-
dictably lower position, said the
managing director.

He said Jett loved West End and he loved

EXTRA,

_ Large Shipment
Of
Used Cars

N STOCK

‘COME CHECK
US OUT

7 a New Shipments Arrived

FROM page one

West End, Grand Bahama.
Although there has been much publicity
about their son’s tragic death, the grieving

’ Hollywood couple has stayed out of the media

spotlight while here on the island, avoiding

international and local TV cameras and pho-\

tographers.

Mr McSweeney, who received the consent
by the Travoltas to speak with the news media
on Monday evening, was criticised by the Min-
ister of Health on Tuesday for releasing con-
fidential information.

Mr McSweeney told reporters that the death
certificate released to them had indicated that
Jett Travolta died of a seizure disorder.

A two-hour autopsy was conducted at Rand
Memorial Hospital on Monday morning. The
body was released around 2.30pm to morti-
cians at Restview.

. Jett Travolta has had a history of seizures in

the past, and was diagnosed with Kawasaki
Syndrome, also known as lymph node syn-
drome.

Actor John Travolta, his wife, Kelly Pre-

‘movie star,”

Travolta family leave
Bahamas with son’s ashes

ston, with their eight-year-old daughter Ella,
and son, Jett, arrived in the Bahamas on their
private plane on December 30.

» According to police, Jett was last seen going
into the family bathroom on January 1. He

was discovered unconscious in the bathroom

around 10am on January 2.

West End MP Obie Wilchcombe said the ;

Travoltas were like family. He said West End
was a place where Mr Travolta and his family
could relax like ordinary people.

“They became a part of this community.
We saw him and we didn’t expect him to be a
said Mr Wilchcombe.

“He wasn’t well-dressed and shaven all the

‘time and that was why he liked being in West

End because he was able to exhale in oe
Bahamas.

“We.know the celebrity John and his wife;
and their children were like ordinary folks
walking around the property talking to every-
one and embracing everyone,” said MP Wilch-
combe.

the water.

‘When you'saw John you saw Jett who was
always there whether his father was out boat- .
ing or swimming, and you saw the affection
there,” he said.

Mr Travolta had planned to stay in Grand
Bahama until January 9 to celebrate the New
Year with about 60 family and friends who
had travelled to West End.

John Travolta issued a statement on his offi-
cial website, JohnTravolta.com.

It reads: “We would like to extend our deep-
est and most heartfelt thanks to everyone who
has sent their love and condolences. Jett was
the most wonderful son that two parents could
ever ask for and lit up the lives of everyone he
encountered.

“We are heartbroken that our time with
him was so brief. We will cherish the time we.
had with him for the rest of our lives. We have
received many messages of condolence from
around the world and we want to thank every-
one for their prayers and support. It has meant
so much to us. It is a beautiful reminder of
the inherent goodness in the human spirit that
gives us hope for a brighter future.”

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Mite Announcement

MRS. JOANN PRITCHARD,
Tas

of Mt. Pleasant
Village, Lyford.Cay
and formerly of St.
Albert Alberta,
Canada will be held
on Thursday, January
| 08th, 2009 at 3:00
pam jat St,
Christopher’s
Anglican Church,
Lyford Cay. Officiating will be Archdeacon
Keith Cartwright.

Left to cherish her memories are her Husband:
Michael Pritchard; One (1) Son: Barry;
“Mother: Leona Bruens; Four (4) Brothers:
.Ben, Darrel, Gary and Martin; Mother-in-
Jaw: Florence Pritchard; Five (5) Sisters-in-
law: Ellen, Kim and Connie Bruens, Rencina
Knowles and Wendy: Wong; Two (2)
Brothers-in-law: Martin McLean and
Christopher Pritchard and a host.of other
relatives and friends including: Her Nieces
and Nephews in Canada and Nassau and
others to numerous to mention.
In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to
Mt. Pleasant Association c/o of Michael
Pritchard, Box-SS-19273 Nassau, Bahamas.

Arrangements are being conducted by
Butlers’ Funeral Homes and Crematorium,
Ernest and York Streets.






FROM page one |

on those officers.”

The: fact that investigations
have been stunted for this
reason by the very people
who officers look to for guid-
ance as they strive to reduce
crime has lowered morale
among officers and con-
tributed to an unwillingness
to follow up on matters of this
nature, claimed the well-
placed insider.

“The officers know what is
going on. You will be shocked
-by the extent of it. It’s unfor-
tunate but this isn’t something
new to the country. It’s been

added.

Deepening the seriousness
of the allegations, the insider
claimed that “right now it’s
‘known that some relatives of
(a particular officer) are doing
some things and (the police)
would not investigate those

tigate those matters. And that
goes for some of the politi-
cians’ children, too,” he
added.

However, Gortiisetoner
Ferguson ‘said it is the “pro-
fessionalism of the (RBPF)”
that will “save” the Bahamas
from the nepotistic tenden-
cies that are prevalent in a
small country like this.

“If you deteriorate to the
level where you are taking
sides and that kind of thing
you can see exactly what the
problems are going to be on
the horizon for us,” he added.

Mr Ferguson said he
“couldn’t tell (The Tribune)
about any specific situation”

| where an officer would have

faced any penalty for pursu-

Commissioner denies claims
that some ‘very serious’ crimes
not being investigated

‘senior: person in the police or
ain;public life, as the. police: [<-.

- had a crime committed and

going on for decades,” he |

matters. No-one would inves- '

. this time.

ing a case against an individ-
ual who may be related to a

insider alleged.

“I am not saying that it is
non-existent, but I am not
aware of any particular situa-
tion,” he said.

“As a matter of fact, if we

there was fear of something
of that nature, you manage
your investigations basé¢d on
the information you have in
your hand.

. “Tf something like that was
to occur, I: would not sit idly
by and let that become some
kind of sub-culture that was .
developing. That is corrup-.
tive in influence, you can’t
allow that to happen and so



-certainly this Commissioner

of Police will not tolerate
something like that happen-
ing in the organisation,” he
said.

The police chief said he
“did not know” why a person
with intimate knowledge of
the workings of the force
would make such claims at

“He may have been mak-
ing some broad state-
ments...there may have been
some things that he knew of,
and you will find that perhaps
they were not properly
reported,” said Mr Ferguson: .

He said it is the responsi-
bility of those who may be
aware of cases which are not
being properly investigated
to bring that to the Commis-
sioner’s attention. -

However, the senior insider
expressed reluctance that
such an effort would improve
the situation.








































Alleged victim of police
‘prutality’ charged in court

FROM page one

using obscene language and disorderly behaviour. Babbs’ girl-

friend, Kendria Mackey,, 22;..W
obstruction.

Daman

was, also, arraigned on a charge. of

Court dockets allege that around 8404 pm on Monday, December
29, while at Augusta Street, Babbs used obscene language to the
annoyance of Corporal 2496 Rolle. It is also alleged that Babbs
behaved in a‘disorderly manner, resisted the arrest of officer Rolle
and assaulted him. Babbs pleaded not guilty to the charges. He was
granted $6,000 bail with one surety.

Mackey also allegedly obstructed officer Rolle from executing his
duties. Mackey pleaded not guilty to the charge and was granted
$2,500 bail. The case was adjourned to March 3. The two accused
are being represented by lawyer Ian Cargill. °

A warrant of arrest was issued yesterday for Condell Macintosh,

‘39, of Wilkinson Street. Macintosh has also been charged with

obstruction but failed to appa in court for his arraignment yes-

terday. .

US tourist found dead
on Paradise Island

FROM page one

f

terday.

Assistant Public Affairs Offi-
cer at the US Embassy Kristyna
Rabassa said the investigation
into Massa's death.is led by
local authorities: "I can

absolutely confirm that the

investigation is not being han-
dled by the State Department,"
she told The Tribune. She said

. the embassy considered his

death, and other recent deaths

of Americans in this country,

as "isolated incidents."

. Acting Commissioner Regi-

nald Ferguson said police were
treating the death as suspicious
pending autopsy results to
determine an official cause of
death..

Massa was reportedly a guest
at the Atlantis Resort on a five-
day trip with a brother and
friends to ring in the new year,
according to’a Connecticut dai-
ly, Republican-American. :

The newspaper reported that

the night before Massa disap-
peared he was partying with his
brother and friends at Atlantis
before returning to his room
alone around lam Sunday.
When friends went to the room
a few hours later, they report-
edly found some of Massa's
belongings on a nightstand but
the teacher was nowhere to be
found, according to the Repub-
lican-American.

He also reportedly missed a
Sunday flight home raising the
alarm of his family.

Nancy Vaughn, an official at
Waterbury Arts Magnet School,
where Massa taught for five
years, described him as a "great
guy", loved by students and
teachers alike. She said the.
school community was still in
shock over his death and was
providing counselling sessions.

Messages left for Kerzner.
International senior-vice presi-
dent of public affairs Ed Fields
were not returned up to press
time.

Investigations continue.

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negotiation and mediation skills workshop in Nassau, January 27-30, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 7





In brief

Former FAU director
is named energy
commission chair

@ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.

A FLORIDA Atlantic Uni-
versity environmental director
will lead a newly created com-
mission responsible for the
state’s energy and climate
change programmes, according
to Associated Press.

Gov. Charlie Crist Tuesday
named James F. Murley as
chair of the Florida Energy &
Climate Commission.

His term will end Nov. 30,
2011 and is subject to Senate
confirmation.

‘ The commission was creat-
ed in the 2008 legislative ses-
sion. It will administer finan-
cial incentive programs and
complete annual assessments
of Florida’s Energy and Cli-
mate Change Action Plan. It
will also provide recommenda-
tions to lawmakers.

Murley is director of FAU’s
Center for Urban and Envi-
ronmental Solutions.

aia)

Defence Force
helping hand to hostel

OFFICERS and marines
from the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force visited the
Children’s Emergency Hostel
to carry out repairs and main-
tenance jobs.

The Commando Squadron
Department of the force
undertook structural repairs,
basic maintenance and land-
scaping work.

The marines also repaired
chairs and tables, trimmed
trees and mowed the lawn.

Later, executive officer of
the Commando Squadron
Lieutenant Ricardo Barry pre-
sented a box of groceries to
the McKinney Drive home.

A massive clean up effort
by the Defence Force Admin-
istration Section was also car-
ried out. The work entailed
tasks such as cleaning window
screens and hauling away
garbage.

Chief Petty Officer Eric
Brown led this team.

“These are just some of the
projects which the officers and
marines of the Defence Force
are involved with; as a small
gesture of lending a helping
hand wherever possible, as

(we) continue to protect the —

territorial sovereignty of the
Bahamas,” said the Defence
Force in a statement.

cutting tree branches

Claim that tourists being swindled

TOURISTS are being swindled in the
Bahamas from the moment they arrive at
Nassau’s international airport, it was
claimed yesterday.

Many taxi-drivers charge exorbitant
fares with no reference to standard rates

— and even hit visitors with “criminal”

fares. of up to $135 from the airport to
Atlantis.

The allegations came from German
investor Harald Fuhrmann, who has
launched a new campaign to highlight
the Bahamas’ shortcomings as a tourist
resort and investment centre.

“This is not a paradise for tourism or
investment,” Mr Fuhrmann said, “It is a
place where foreigners get a bad deal.”

His comments came against the back-
drop of,a massive slump in tourist busi-
ness. But he said falling visitor numbers
could not be attributed entirely to the
global financial crisis.

“Unsuspecting tourists and new
investors don’t know what goes on here,”
he said, “From their very first step
through the airport, they are being swin-
dled.

“As soon as they enter the real
Bahamas, they find out about the crimi-
nals in this country.”



“Unsuspecting

tourists and new
investors don’t know
what goes on here.
From their very first
step through the
airport, they are being
swindled. As soon as
they enter the real
Bahamas, they find out
about the criminals in
this country.” | |



German investor
Harald Fuhrmann

Mr Fuhrmann claimed the $135 per
person charge was common for taxi rides
from the airport to Atlantis. He said many
tourists were staggered by the charge.

“What’s more, drivers will charge a
tourist $60 just to drive from the traffic

island near the Riu hotel on Paradise .

Island to the cruise ships at Nassau water-
front,” he said.

Many taxi-drivers and other freelance
tourism workers set themselves a daily
income target which they try to maintain,
no matter how few tourists there are, he
said.

“This means the fewer tourists there
are, the harder the individual tourist gets
hit,” he added.

But short-term gain for Bahamians
leads to long-term disillusionment for vis-
itors, he said, and a subsequent fall-off
in tourist numbers. wed

“Many people who come here on vaca-
tion vow never to return,” said Mr
Fuhrmann. “Everything is too expensive
- and they get swindled as well. They then
realise that they get a far better deal in
Cuba or the Dominican Republic.”

Mr Fuhrmann said it was no use
Tourism Minister Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace talking about new flights from
Europe if the product was lacking at this
end. :

“T was one of several passengers in a
taxi from the airport, but I was charged
$15 for a ride to Caves Point, even though
it was listed as $6. ‘

from moment they arrive at airport

“When I raised the matter with the
woman driver, she said: ‘We don’t work
for $6 in the Bahamas.”

Mr Fuhrmann fears that, as the econo-
my tightens, tourists will be cheated even
more as Bahamians try to keep up income
levels.

“No-one should blame tourists if they
don’t come back. Once you have visited
the Bahamas and realise it is not the par-
adise you were led to believe, then you
naturally choose to go elsewhere. |
_ “People who have had a bad experi-
ence say ‘No thanks, Bahamas’ and I’m
afraid the Bahamas has only itself to
blame. ‘Cheat the tourist’ is the aim of so
many here. But the minister has to realise
that honesty is the best policy in the long
run.”

Mr Fuhrmann has campaigned against
what he terms the “corrupt” Bahamas .
legal system for many years.

~He now wants the government to
increase the claims limit from $5,000
to $10,000 in the small claims court “so
that ordinary people can represent them-

selves and avoid the services of corrupt

lawyers.”
“J always feel more comfortable when
Iam representing myself,” he said.

- Mitchell hits out at PM response

SSK

DMINISTRATION TEAM of the Royal Bahamas Defence Force at the Children’s Emergency Hostel.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

PLP MP Fred Mitchell has hit
out at the prime minister’s
response to his accusations of the
FNM’s alleged plans to destroy
the opposition this year.

Mr Mitchell is standing by his
statement published in Monday’s
Tribune, claiming the ruling par-
ty will use all and any agencies of
the state, including the Royal
Bahamas Police Force, to bring
down the PLP.

He also said it is time for Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham to

step down from his third term in *

office, comparing him to Zim-
babwean dictator Robert
Mugabe.

But Mr Ingraham was quoted
in Tuesday’s Tribune saying he
would not dignify the Fox Hill
MP with a response. *

Mr Mitchell said: “The
remarks made by me with regard
.ta his stepping down from office

ment to smear the PLP were not
ill considered and without evi-
dence.

“Mine was a serious interven-
tion. It is a sure sign when some-
one is losing an argument that
they have to resort to being
insulting.”

Remarks

In an attempt to justify his
remarks, Mr Mitchell said Minis-
ter of National Security Tommy
Turnquest appears to have con-
firmed that there will be investi-
gations into public figures over
the coming year, but Mr Turn-
quest was not available for com-
ment yesterday.

The Fox Hill MP further
alleges public servants perceived
to be PLP have been dismissed
by the FNM government, PLP
advice on appointments to public
offices have been ignored, the

infrastructure in some PLP con-..
stituencies is being neglected, and .

and other professionals associat-
ed with the last PLP administra-
tion have had their contracts
stopped, reviewed and cancelled.

And the FNM dismantled the
PLP’s Urban Renewal Pro-
gramme only to rebuild it as
Neighbourhood Policing, Mr
Mitchell said. —

He added: “While they could
not accept the PLP’s programme
was a good one, the FNM needed
to rebrand the programme to call
it their own.”

Mr Mitchell also called for Mr
Ingraham to stand:down from his
third term in office as he said the
prime minister had criticised Sir

‘Lynden Pindling for staying more

than two terms in office.

He added: “I simply asked him
to adhere to his promise and
leave. All around the world there
are leaders who did not know
when it was time to go: Robert
Mugabe, Hugo Chavez.

“All want to hold on to power.
Mr Ingraham must not shame his
legacy by falling into that cate-










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THE TRIBUNE

PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009



_ Are you between a
Rock and Hard place

Well... =
THE TRIBUNE

is your soft landing!










| ‘Take advantage of the 21,000 in paid
| circulation of The Bahamas’ \argest newspaper
-and get your share of the scarce dollar.



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*Certain Restrictions Apply
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.


TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 9





PMT

@ By The Associated
Press

SCOREBOARD

Wednesday, January 7

Miami at Denver (9 pm
EST). The Heat open a sev-
en-game, 13-day, 7,461-mile
road trip in Denver. The
Nuggets may be without star
Carmelo Anthony, who
injured his hand on Monday
night.

STARS

Monday

— Tim Duncan, Spurs,
scored 19 points and
grabbed nine rebounds to
lead Southwest Division-
leading San Antonio over
Miami 91-84.

— Michael Redd, Bucks,
had a season-high 35 points
to help Milwaukee to a 107-
97 win over Toronto.

— Deron Williams, Jazz,
had 25 points and tied his
season high with 15 assists
in Utah's 119-114 victory
over Golden State.

WALKER CHARGED

Former NBA player
Antoine Walker was
charged with suspicion of
drunk driving in Miami
Beach on Monday morning,
further hurting his chances
of playing again this season.

Walker was driving a black '

Mercedes without the lights
-on when he was pulled over
at 5:39 am, according to the
arrest report. Officers
detected a strong odor of
alcohol and wrote in the
report that Walker had a

sleepy look on his face. He.

refused a breathalyzer test.

SUN SPOTS

Suns guard Jason Richard-
son is facing charges of dri-
ving under the influence of
alcohol in an American Indi-
an tribal community in met-
ropolitan Phoenix. A cita-
tion filed in court says the
ex-Michigan State star was
stopped by a Salt River
Pima-Maricopa Indian Com-
munity police officer on
December 21.

SIDELINED

Los Angeles Lakers for:
eward Luke Walton will be
‘sidelined for at least two
weeks by a foot injury. Wal-
ton, who started 11 consecu-
tive games before missing
Sunday's 100-86 win over
Portland, has sesamoiditis in
his right foot and will wear a
protective boot for a week,
the team said Monday.

The condition is an irrita-

tion of the sesamoid bones.
that extend to the big toe .

and generally heals without
surgery. Oklahoma City
rookie forward DJ White
had a second surgery to
remove a benign growth
from his‘jaw, and is expected
to miss at least the next 12
weeks.

Thunder officials said
team doctors performed the
final procedure on Sunday

‘at Integris Baptist Medical —

Center. The initial surgery
was performed October 13.

SENT PACKING a
The Los Angeles Clippers
acquired 7-foot-1 Cheikh
Samb of Senegal from the
Denver Nuggets on Monday

- for a conditional second-
round draft pick. The Clip-
pers also waived forward
Paul Davis and guard Fred
Jones and received cash con-

siderations as part of the

deal.

SUPER SUB.

Paul Millsap posted his
18th consecutive double-
double with 19° points and
14 rebounds as a fill-in for

. Carlos Boozer, who has
missed 23 straight games
with a knee injury. Boozer
will undergo- arthroscopic
surgery on the knee on Fri-
day.

SPEAKING

"That wasn't New J ersey,

it was the Kings. We're our

own worst enemy. Some-'

where along the line we're
going to have to grow up
and grow out of that losing
mentality."

— Sacramento interim
coach Kenny Natt after the
Kings lost their 11th straight
road game, 98-90 to the Nets
on Monday

For the stories
ATT Se

APTI M E96
on Mondays



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



CARMELO ANTHONY holds his right wrist after it was wrapped in.an ice pack after he was hit going
up for a shot against the Indiana Pacers in the third quarter of! the Nuggets’ 135-115 victory in Mon-

day’s game in Denver...

(AP Photo: David Zalubowski)

Anthony has
broken bone in
shooting hand

@ By PAT GRAHAM
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — Denver
Nuggets All-Star Carmelo
Anthony will miss at least three
weeks with a broken bone in
his shooting hand — but won't
need surgery.

' The team said Tuesday that
Anthony will be fitted for a
removable splint after breaking
a bone in his right hand in a vic-





FROM page 11

be a recurring theme
throughout the quarter.

He scored 11 of his 17
points of the quarter at the
charity stripe to keep the
Falcons within striking dis-
tance as the Diplomats
threatened to pull away.

Sharp shooter Manaro
Lundy came off the bench
and became the story of the
quarter as his efficiency from
long range gave the Diplo-

. mats their largest lead of the
game.

Lundy, who finished reg-
ulation with 11 points, nailed
three consecutive three
pointers to give the Diplo-
mats a 32-19 advantage mid-
way through the quarter.

Moss continued to attack

and reach the foul line as he |

nearly single-handedly
closed the gap for the Fal-

cons, bringing them within ©

four points, 37-33 with just
over a minute remaining in
~ the half.
‘The Diplomats regained
composure and ended the

quarter on.a 7-0 flurry, to -

_ give them an 11 point advan-
. tage at the half, 44-33.
Facing a.double figure
deficit at the half on the road
against the defending cham-
pions, the Falcons dug deep
in the third quarter to rally
themselves into contention.
Nayman Lightbourne

made a three pointer on the ~

opening possession of the
half and Moss’ consistent
aggression at the basket
forced Gomez and Morley
‘to the bench with foul trou-
ble.

Lightbourne, who finished
with 10 points in regulation,
scored eight in the quarter.

Moss’ three point conver-
sion trimmed the deficit, 46-



ERENT.

aes

41, and a pair of free throws
by Austin Hanna brought
the Falcons within two, 50-

48.”

With the Diplomats ahead
57-53 late in the quarter,
Moss went down with a
cramp and was forced out of
the game with an injury.

Larry Smith scored on the
next possession to give the
Diplomats a 59-53 advan-
tage.

Franson Moss came off
the bench and stepped up to
fill the void left by the Fal-

, cons’ star player, scoring all

of his five points during the
late third quarter stretch.

His lay-up through a
porous Westminster transi-
tion defense gave the. Fal-
cons their first lead of. the
game, 61-59.

A Chistorr Stuart basket
tied the game heading into

_the fourth quarter.

The Diplomats held the
largest lead of the fourth,
when Smith’s lay-up gave
them a 69-64 lead with 3:34
remaining.

_ The Falcons once again
blazed a comeback trail led
by Devardo Williams.

Willams drove the lane
and flushed a dunk in traffic

_and followed with a lay-up

on the ensuing possession to
bring the Falcons within one,
71-70.

Recovered from. his
cramps, Donathen Moss re-
entered the game and gave
the Falcons a 73-71 lead with

‘a successful three point con-

version.

The Diplomats missed a °

myriad of free throws and
lay-ups down the stretch
with an opportunity to tie
and a strategic gamble by
head coach Geno Bullard

Photos by Felipé Major/Tribune Staff



IN a rematch of the 2007 championship
series, the Westminster College Diplo-

A







paid off.

Rather than foul and send
the Falcons to‘the free throw
line, Bullard instructed his
team to step up their defen-
sive intensity and go for a
steal as the Falcons tried to
milk the clock.

Bain eventually came up,

with the steal and basket,
securing overtime for his



FROM page 11

4

mats and Jordan Prince William Fal-
cons played to a 73-73 tie at the end of
regulation at the Diplomats’ campus on
~ Blake Road yesterday.

See photos on this page...

team.
At the end of regulation,

Stuart led the Diplomats -

with 14 points, while Mor-
ley added 13 and Smith
‘ added 10.

tory over the Indiana Pacers the
night before.

Anthony was injured early in
the third quarter when Pacers
center Jeff Foster swatted at the
ball, catching part of Anthony's

_ hand.

Anthony continued to play
despite numbness in the hand,
scoring 21 points before leav-
ing late in the fourth quarter of
a 135-115 win.

A tribute
to Kevin
‘Eyes’
Ford

FROM page 11

gramme started.

Local players showed no fear
when they played against such
great players, which included
Dir Jan Botham.

Kevin ‘Eyes’ Ford was among
the best of that era.

Our cricket historian Gary
Campbell, in his research in the
files of local newspapers and
the archives, produced infor
mation about Ford’s perfor
mances.

He was taken to the UK in
1976 by the Commonwealth
Wanderers Cricket Club. He
was one of three youth players
on the trip. Upon his return to
the Bahamas, the onslaught on
local bowlers began.

He hit hard, high and far. His
favourite targets were above the
willow trees at Haynes Oval and

| across Bay Street to Arawak
Cay. :
' A Canadian team visiting
Nassau exposed their top spin
bowler to Ford in his first over.
Ford hit to six consecutive sixes
that went close to Fort Chany
lotte.

Even today, that bowler hag
not lived down the beating he
got from Ford. Canadians still
remember the catch Ford took

’ on the grounds of the Toronto:
Cricket Club to dismiss their
top batsman.

He had run about fifty yardet
dived full length with his body:
horizontal to the ground to hold

- on to a brilliant catch. The:
crowd was silent for seconds
and then roared with their acco-
lades.

In 1987, he-recorded the
fastest century in cricket history,

- when he scored 100 runs off 6.5°
overs (41 balls). He ended that
innings with his score at 169
runs. He had hit 20 sixes and 8
fours. &

In 1992, he scored a record
aggregate of 796 runs, which.
included five centuries.

Then BCA president Sidney
Deveaux got the association
into the International Cricket
Conference and the opportuni-
ties for international cricket
began.

He was followed by Colin
Deane and Gregory Taylor Sr.
The Bahamas has won interna-
tional acclaim by winning the.
ICC Tournament of Americas
and with excellent perfor-;
mances in the international,
cricket arena. ’

The youth programme is pro-
gressing and even they are get-:
ting international exposure. The:
future looks bright. .

Both teams look to con-—

tinue their undefeated
streaks when the overtime

period is re-scheduled later ~

in the season.

“T could not win,” Rev McPhee stat-



Sydney Forbes elected as commodore of BBOSA

to do as soon as we can as we collabo-



vote.
In making his exit, Rev McPhee said
he has done his best and has no regrets.
“I told them win, lose or draw, I

‘ won’t be interested in sailing as I was.in

the past,” said McPhee, who had vowed
to keep the memory of his father, the
late Rev Dr W G McPhee alive in the

. Sport.

“I wasn’t going to be there for more

than two years, but I ran again because -

I didn’t want people to come on board
who were only going to use it for ‘Polit-
ical reasons.’

Rev McPhee, owner of the Red Hot
Thunderbird, said he made his contri-

bution to sailing, helping to bring the

Regatta Desk to the Ministry of Sports,
securing the $1.5 million contract with
Burns House and helping to raise the
prize money offered at the various
regattas.

“But when people feel that they can
do better, you let them go,” Rev
McPhee insisted. “But I have no regrets.
I did what I had to do, but I think we
made a big mistake by allowing the min-
istry. to step in and conduct the elec-
tions the way they did.”

Rev McPhee noted that it was uncon-
stitutional and that young people who
sail on the boats were not allowed to
vote, which he claimed prevented him
from returning to office.

ed. “I didn’t have the money to fight
those who competed. Money won that
election. But I wished them the best. I
hope that sailing goes on.”

Rev McPhee, who has indicated that
his era in sailing as a boat owner may
also be over, congratulated Forbes as he
passed the torch on.

As the new commodore, Forbes said
it’s their intention to rebuild the
BBOSA.

“We really need to get involved and
bring sailing back to the glory days
when we had sailing just about every
weekend or every month in Montagu
Bay,” Forbes projected.

“That is one of the things we want

rate with all of the other associations.”
With the team of executives he has to;
work with, Forbes said he’s sure that,
they will get the job done because “this;
is not an individual thing.”
“We have a team of officers who are
prepared to work,” he charged. “We
will give other people some responsi-.
bilities because it’s going to be a col-
laborated effort, not an individual one.”
By the end of the month, Forbes said
the first concerted effort should be wit-
nessed when the ministry hold the All-
For-Me Regatta in Montagu Bay.
The regatta should feature all of the
associations competing together in the
first major regatta for the year.
PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

TRIBUNE SPORTS





Sports Notes

TRACK
ODD DISTANCE
POSTPONED

Due to the homegoing ser-
vice/celebration of sports leg-
end Phil Smith, the Bahamas
Associations of Athletic Asso-
ciation has advised the public
that the Odd Distance Track
Meet, which is scheduled for
Saturday at the Thomas A
Robinson Track and Field Sta-
dium, has been rescheduled,
and will now be held on January
17. The meet will officially kick
off the 2009 season.

League public relations offi-
cer Kermit Taylor extended the
condolences of the association
to Smith’s funeral and he
encouraged their members to
attend the funeral service 10am
Saturday at St Francis Catholic
Church.

FOOTBALL
. CAFL POSTPONE
PLAYOFFS

The Commonwealth Ameri-
can Football League. has
announced that due to the

funeral service of the late sports ~

icon Phil Smith, their playoff
game on Saturday between the
second place Orry J Sands Pros
(6-2) and the third place

Stingrays (4-4) will be post- .

poned until 1:30pm January 17
at the DW Davis Gymnasium.

However, the league has also
announced that Sunday’s match
between the pennant winning
Jets (8-0) and the fourth place
Tripoint Kingdom Warriors (1-
7) will be played as scheduled at
1:30 pm at. DW. Davis.

The championship game
between the winners of the two
playoff games is slated for
1:30pm January 31 at the DW
Davis playing field.

The league has extended its
condolences to Smith’s family
and they are encouraging all of
their players to show up for the
funeral service in their uniform

tops at St Francis Catholic .

Church 10 am Saturday.

Even though neither object in the
Secret Sound is medicine, some people
swear they would die without one



essere arrntnrenoneytse “yess SUPE PREG enti tn CPLA COREE eC OT OTC EE eect einem arene nn eh aan nen i Se

of these objects.

Elliott mourning
loss of his wife

@ By BRENT STUSBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

FORMER St Augustine’s College and
national triple jump champion Norbert
Elliott is mourning, the loss of his wife,
Gertrudis Palacio Elliott.

Trudy, as she was. affectionately called,
lost her battle with cancer on Saturday at
their home in Knoxville, Tennessee. Her
funeral is scheduled for Thursday at the
All Saints Catholic Church.

Speaking from t* ir home in an inter-
view with The Tribune yesterday, Elliott
said it was a tough loss, especially because
she leaves her children behind.

“I’ve known her “or over 25 years and
we’ve been marrie ‘or 20 years,” Elliott
pointed out. “I’m just trying to hold on
for the kids.”

The Elliotts have five children, inclu-
sive of Danielle, who is currently in col-
lege, and Norbert II, Alexander, Dominic
and Adrian, all of whom are either in pri-
mary or high school.

“We have a lot of support from family
members, neighbours and friends, so that



emanate PAE

helps,” Elliott stated.
“So right now, we’re doing okay.”

Interested persons wishing to send their
condolences to the Elliotts can do so by
logging onto Click Funeral Home,
Knoxville, Tennessee, where they can also
view Trudy’s obituary.

Trudy Elliott, a former biology instruc-
tor at Murray State University, was a reli-
gious education teacher and Mary Kay
director. She is originally from Belize.

Norbert Elliott, who formerly starred
at the Big Red Machines for SAC, is in his
third season as an assistant coach at the
University of Tennessee where he works

directly with the Vol’s sprints, hurdles and
horizontal jumps.

He attended the University of Texas at
E] Paso where he earned a Bachelor’s
Degree in Business Management in 1987
and a Master’s Degree in Exercise Sci-
ence in 1991.

Elliott went on to represent the
Bahamas at the 1987 World Champi-
onships where he placed ninth in the triple
jump; was tenth at the 1988 Olympic
Games and also competed at the 1992
Olympics. .

He began his coaching career as an assis-
tant at Texas El-Paso from 1989-92 before
he became the assistant coach at the Uni-
versity of Georgia from 1992-2001. He
then moved to Murray State where he
served as the head coach from 2002-2004.

In 2005, he joined the staff at the Uni- |

versity of Tennessee.

_ Elliott was an assistant coach on the
Bahamas’ team at the 1991 World Cham-
pionships; head coach of the 1995 Central
‘American and Caribbean Championship
team; assistant coach at the 2000 World
Junior Championships and the head men’s
coach at the 2001 World Championships.

‘Phil was sifted and he had a heart for persons...’

@ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

THE Rev Dt William

. Thompson, on behalf of the

Christian community, joined

. in offering condolences to the
family of the late ZNS sports-~

caster Phil ‘Smoker’ Smith,
calling him a man of integrity.

Rev Thompson, the former
president of the Bahamas
Christian Council and current-
ly serving as the president of
the Bahamas National Baptist
Missionary and Educational
Convention, said the country
has certainly lost a great
Bahamian sporting icon.

The pastor of the Faith Unit-
ed Missionary Baptist Church
said‘ When he: first met Smith,
he was a young reporter who

-was very skilled in basketball,



Rev William Thompson

softball and baseball.

“We formed a camaraderie
between us that lasted until his
death,” Rev Thompson point-
ed out. “Phil was gifted and he
had a heart for persons: He
had a passion for sports.

“He loved the game and he
believed in the dignity of the

We're looking for a few good
people to join our team.
‘DO YOU HAVE
WHAT IT TAKES? |



Apply for the pusition of

games. We had.so much fond

memories that we shared.”
One of those was when Rev

Thompson had returned home

- from school. Having gone for

about eight years, the Tom
Mac Diggers baseball team had
invited him to manage their
team.

“Phil came to practice when
he heard I was there and he
said ‘Rev, after eight years, you
think you could come back and

play this young man’s game?’ I.

told him just wait and see.” :

Rev Thompson, who held.

his own as a legend in baseball
and softball, said Smith willbe

hard to replace, but his legacy -

will continue to live.on.

“I think the way to keep
‘Phil’s legacy, alive is for thes,

Sports writer



pursuéxt the



jobs with the kind of tenatity A
and dignity that.Phil did his,’ a

he projected.
“T think that part of-his ino

cy will live on. But I think the






(AMENDMENT) ~

country owes him and we need
to do something that will help
us to keep him legacy alive. I
think the country owe that, but
those in sports need to emu-
late him.”

While Smith will be laid to
rest on Saturday, Rev Thomp-
son said he won’t be able to
attend as he has to perform the
eulogy at the funeral service
for religious icon, the Rev Lev-
ania Stuart at the New Mount
Zion Baptist Church.

But Rev Thompson left
those words of comfort for the
family of Smith.

- “To Blossie and the children,
the prayers of the Christian
community is with them, the
prayers of the Baptists is defi-
byayith them and our

:carry’Gn in the dignified way“
that Phil has lived, I truly

‘believe that in their living, .

Phil’s name will stay alive,”

Rev Thompson summed up.:...-... peace

MINIS’ RY OF LABOUR & SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT — fae Ee
THE PRICE CONTROL ACT, 1971 me

CHAPTER 339

that if they continue a

A tribute
to Phil
‘Smoker’
Smith
‘A voice that will echo in

the chambers of times’

@ By The Bahamas_
Basketball Federation

THERE is nothing like the
evolution of a man; especially as
such who from humble begin-
nings Phil ‘Smoker’. Smith made
giant imprints on the sporting
world in grand national and
international fashion.

This earth will never be the
same without his excellent
deliverance and spice for life,
upon his demise. His voice will
echo in the chambers of time
for ever.

The Bahamas Basketball
Federation is bemoaned by his
tragic passing. Yes, he was the
voice of sports for many years
and as fortune had it our
beloved sport of basketball was
the beneficiary of some of his
most historic and exciting calls.

‘For that, our organisation and
the nation of basketball are
eternally grateful. We owe
‘Smoker’ a debt of gratitude
and appreciation.

To Blossie, his faithful wife,
and children, the BBF extends
our heartfelt sympathies. Your
husband and father has passed
on. However, he leaves a’ ster-
ling example of life’s triumphs
over obstacles, selflessness and
an extraordinary love for you
and the rest of his family.

We became Phil’s extended
appendages who he treated with
kid gloves, served us, embell-
ished our activities and reported
our achievements. But above
all, he was not afraid to indi- ©
cate our frailties, always remain-
ing faithful to true sports devel-
opment through professional
sports journalism.

The Bahamas Basketball
Federation will sadly miss Phil
Smith. We ensure that genera-
tions will know of ‘his contribu-
tions,to true national sports



i develdpment. His legacy will
live On. The chamber with the

echo of his voice will never go
away. May his soul rest in

GN807

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REGULATIONS, 2002

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Friday, diane 9, 2009,

5 is EDULE








































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PLACE SELLING PRICE |
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4



CARL J. BRENNEN
ACTG. PERMANENT SECRETARY


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7,



2009



Anthony will
miss at least

three weeks...
See page 9...



Sydney Forbes elected as BBOSA commodore

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER serving for the past six
years as the commodore of the
Bahamas Boat Owners and Sailors
Association (BBOSA), the Rev Dr
Philip McPhee has been voted out of
office.

He was replaced by Sydney Forbes
during the general election of officers
yesterday at the Ministry of Youth,
Sports and Culture. Forbes beat out
Rev McPhee 76-60.

“It’s great because this is something
that we have been fighting for over
the last six months,” said Forbes, who

sailed with the Southern Cross boat ano ara TS
in the A Class, about being the new
























commodore.

“There was some concerns about
what was going on in the association
and so we wrote letters to the Min-
istry of Youth, Sports and Culture to

» meet, with us and him and it was

agreed that they will conduct the elec-
tions. So the victory was a sweet one.”

Joining Forbes on the new execu-
tive board are vice commodore Ali
Ferguson, who beat out Autry New-
bold 71-54; secretary Larry Bastian, a
79-51 winner over Patrinella McKenzie
with Stephanie Riley as his assistant
after she won 73-58 over Gleanor Per-
centie.

The treasurer is Stafford Armbrister,
who secured a 82-50 decision over
Kenneth Saunders and his assistant is
Vernice Adderley, an 81-51 victor over

lm By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

layed out as everything it was billed to be, the
BAISS senior boys matchup between the
leagues top teams produced everything a bas-

Valdrie McClain.

And Dora Mae Wright won the
public relations officer post with a total
of 67 votes, compared to 47 won by
Anita Pratt and 16 by Calvin Far-
quharson.

Minister of Sports Desmond Ban-
nister appointed a committee to con-
duct the elections. They comprised of
the Rev Dr William Thompson, Kings-
ley Black and the Rev Elkin Symon-
ette. a

Rev Thompson, president of the
Bahamas National Baptist Missionary
and Educational Convention, said
when they met with the association
before the elections, they tried to set
up a process for the elections.

It took the form of nominations and
a new registration was formed where

only those persons who were over the
age of 15 years old and financial would
be allowed to vote.

“The committee hopes to meet with
the new board to put together a prop-
er constitution for the association so
the same problem would not reoccur,”
Rev Thompson stated.

“The whole association agreed that
this was the way it should be done and
I think it was fair. It was done with
dignity. It was done at the level of a
national election.”

Once the constitution is amended,
Rev Thompson said it will eliminate
the problem of persons who are in no
way connected with sailing coming in
and registering just so that they can

SEE page 9

Diplomats tie with Falcons

Teams will WEN

ketball game could — a second half comeback, a

OT at later date |



myriad of ties and lead changes, late game heroics — all but
an ending.

In a rematch of the 2007 championship series, the West-
minster College Diplomats and Jordan Prince William
Falcons played to a 73-73 tie at the end of regulation at the
Diplomats’ campus on Blake Road.

The overtime period was called off due to darkness
and a date for completion of the game will be decided by
BAISS executives and announced at a later date.

A steal by the Diplomats’ Shaquille Bain and his sub-

sequent fastbreak basket tied the game at 73 with 27 sec-
onds remaining.

The Falcons had two chances to respond and regain the
lead. However, a pair of turnovers by Donathen Moss end-
ed the possibility of escaping with a win on the road.

Moss was tagged with a five seconds closely guarded vio-
lation and on the Falcons’ final possession was called for
traveling on his way to the basket.

The defending champions looked to establish the post

game early with Rashard Morley and Ryan Gomez assert-

ing themselves inside early on.

Morley scored eight of the Diplomats’ 14 points in the
quarter as both teams played to a tie at the end of the
opening quarter.

Westminster began the second quarter on an 8-0 run to
take a decisive 22-14.

Moss, who led all scorers in regulation with 35 points,
halted'the run with a pair of free throws, which proved to |

SEE page 9

cB.

A (eto LO



-Felipé Major/Tribune s

ya

JORDAN Prince-William Falcons player goes fora dunk over a Westminster College Diplomats player during
_Tuesday’s rematch of the 2007 championship series at the Diplomats’ campus on Blake Road...

‘See more photos on page 9...



@ By PAUL THOMPSON
Bahamas Cricket
Association

IN. his early teens, he
appeared for the St Bernard’s
Cricket Club, a cricket dynasty
of the fifties, sixties and seven-
ties.

He learned his cricket with
his brothers on Windsor Park,
better known as Dorsey Park.
He was an extraordinary tal-
ented batsman with exceptional
ability, fitness and agility, with
the timing, reflexes, power and
eyes, that terrorised bowlers of
his era.

In addition to his ability as a
batsman, he was an exceptional
fast medium pace bowler and
was magnificent as a fieldsman.
He and others like him did not
have the opportunities that exist
today, which would have pro-
pelled them into becoming
’ world class cricketers.

The Commonwealth Wan-
derers Cricket Club in the late
sixties started making annual
cricket tours abroad - the USA,
Canada, the West Indies,
Bermuda and the 1976 visit to



THE late Kevin ‘Eyes’ Ford...

England.

Those tours gave players of
that era the chance to excel on
the world stage against some of

' the best players in the world, to

the delight of many who had
not heard of the Bahamas being

a cricketing country:

Through the performances of
these great Bahamian players
such as Eddie Ford, Irving Tay-
lor, Patrick Louison, Vianny
Jacques, Irving Armstrong,
Francis Scott, Horace Kingston
and a host of others too numer-
ous to,mention, the Bahamas
emerged as a cricket destina-
tion.

Teams visited regularly from
Bermuda, cities in the United
States of America, Canada, the
West Indies, England and as far
away as Australia and New
Zealand. |

English country teams, name-
ly Somerset and Worcestersire,
spent several days playing crick-
et here. The great MCC visit-
ed, played and coached here.
The latter were very impressed
with our players. They invited
two players, namely Whitcliffe
Atkinson and Garsha Blair, to
visit the MCC at Lord’s in Eng-
land for coaching.

The MCC was also instru-

‘ mental in getting the youth pro-

SEE page 9

DOSTANA el a oi Toe
Ia CaS cha

K4 to Grade 4 am


i

PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



Nybkae

‘if

TA

Yo



- fs available

Coming soon to english speaking caribbean countries.
le : * Premium Roaming Rates Apply
ue : $1.29 per minute (incoming and outgoing calls) and .33¢ per text.

: For more information: www.btcbahamas.com | CALL BTC 225-5282 YOUR CONNECTION TO THE WORLD




THE TRIBUNE



Ue



BO ccrsrenrsesersensnsancrspenenesnne:

WEDNESDAY,






SSSR ASAE

JANUARY 7,



2009





ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Commercial: count niche
‘critical’ for Bahamas

* Former attorney-general urges creation of dedicated commercial court with specific
judges, as complex matters such as Port Authority dispute taking ‘too long’ to process

* Says such court would boost financial services industry’s attraction and Bahamas’
competitiveness, potentially making it major centre for resolving global disputes

* Argues that Bahamas could start ball rolling with just $200, 000 investment

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

former

attor-

ney-gen-

eral yes-

terday urged the

Bahamas to establish

a dedicated commer-

cial court to ensure

the swift resolution of

major disputes, argu-

ing that with just an

initial $200,000 investment it would

boost the financial services industry’s

attraction and enhance economic com-
petitiveness.

Alfred Sears, who was this nation’s

chief legal officer for four years under

PML elec les



the former PLP administration, told
Tribune Business that a specific com-
mercial court was needed because it
“takes too long” for disputes of this
nature to be resolved, impacting
investor and private sector confidence
in this nation.

Mr Sears, who is now back in pri-
vate practice at his law firm, Sears &

Co, is representing one of the parties
involved in the protracted Grand
Bahama Port Authority (GBPA) own-
ership dispute, which has been before
the Bahamian courts for more than
two years'inow.

He told Tribune Busines that the
absence of a dedicated commercial
court, with judges allocated to only

hear disputes of that nature which’

came before it, meant that.cases such

as the GBPA dispute - first filed in’

November 2006 - took much longer to
resolve and make their way through
the court system.

While the Bahamas Supreme Court
had numerous judges well-versed and
experienced in dealing with complex

commercial fecthan such as senior
justices John Lyons and Anita Allen,
plus Justice Neville Adderley, their
case load meant that they were fre-
quently called away to focus on other
disputes and could not dedicate their
time to the GBPA dispute. Various

SEE page 4B

Bahamas urged to lead Wyndham and Crystal Palace

lobbying for Global
anti-laundering forum

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas must lead lob-
bying for the creation of a Glob-

al Forum on anti-money laun-

dering and anti-terror financ-
ing regulations, a former attor-
ney general telling Tribune
Business yesterday this was the
only way to ensure rulés were
developed in a “transparent”
manner that did mot discrimi-
nate against nations such as this
one.

Alfred Sears, attorney gener-
al under the former Christie
administration, said such a
Forum would prevent “high tax
onshore” centres, such as
France and Germany, from
using bodies such as the Finan-



cial Action Task Force (FATF)
to craft rules designed to reduce
the competitiveness of the
Bahamas and other. interna-
tional financial centres under
the guise of international regu-
latory reform.

He also urged the Govern-
ment to start lobbying the
Bahamas’ allies in the US Con-
gress and government agencies
to head off any potential nega-
tive implications from the pro-
posed*Stop Tax Haven Abuse

‘Bill, which was sponsored by
‘president-elect Barack Obama

when he was a Senator.

Mr Sears added that several
Clinton-era officials, stich as for-
mer US Treasury Secretary
Lawrence Summers, who were
“ideologically opposed” to
international financial centres
such as the Bahamas, were set
to be appointed to key Obama
administration positions. This
did not bode well for the
Bahamas, and made the lobby-
ing effort all the more urgent.

Arguing that “you are not
dealing with a level playing
field” when it came to interna-
tional financial services regula-
tion, Mr Sears said his four
years as attorney general - and,
in particular, his tenure as
Caribbean Financial Action
Task Force (CFATF) chair -
had exposed him to the FATF’s
wiles and how its developed
country members manipulated
the body to their own advan-
tage.

He recalled how, when
attending an FATF meeting in
Paris as the CFATF’s chair, he
was asked to leave the room

SEE page 4B



to close for eight weeks

@ By NEIL HARTNELL |
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA MAR last night
unveiled plans to close the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort and Crystal
Palace Casino for eight weeks
this year between August 17-
October 5, telling Tribune Busi-
ness the initiative was designed
to cut in half the financial bleed- .
ing usually sustained during its §j
highest loss-making period with-
out laying-oft staff.

The Cable Beach Resorts
owner said it had spent $75 million to cover/sub-
sidise operating losses in the three-and-a-half
years since it acquired the Sheraton Cable Beach
Resort and Wyndham/Crystal Palace Casino in
May 2005.

These losses had been. eaten during a period
when Baha Mar had invested some $150 mil-
lion in upgrading the two properties, on top of the
$200 million purchase price, taking its total spend
to close to $500 million.

The figures, when combined with Baha Mar’s
statement that in 2008 it ended the year with
“combined operating losses and debt service
expenses in excess of millions of dollars”, all add
up to the impression that the Bahamian hotel
industry - the largest private sector employer - is

How do you attract and retain



* August-October 2009 closure
to cut financial bleeding ‘in half

during highest loss-making period

* Cable Beach Resort owner/developer .
spends $75m to cover operating losses
since taking over in May 2005

* 2008 losses ‘in excess of many millions
of dollars’, with 35% utility bill rise

* Scheme designed to reduce losses
while seh ig existing employment,
as 1,000 staff set to be impacted

essentially 4 welfare industry, the losses of many
properties subsidised by the pockets of their own-
ers.

Tribune Business feporied last year that Baha
Mar was already incurring net losses of between
$12-$15 million per year before the 2008 global
economic downturn. The company yesterday said
it had to cope with a 35 per cent increase in util-

‘ ity costs to $15 million in 2008.

Explaining the rationale for the eight-week

SEE page 3B

Atlantis could
attract em

inrevenues

curing 2008

@ By CHESTER ROBARD
_ Business Reporter



THE ATLANTIS reso
could generate revenues ‘of
around $800 million for itself
and related businesses in 2009
despite thé“current economic
recession, Kerzner Internation-
al (Bahamas) president, George
Markantonis, said yesterday

Speaking at the seventh
annual Caribbean MBA Con-
ference’s luncheon, Mr Markan-
tonis revealed certain project-
ed figures for the resort in 2009.

He expected Atlantis to gen-
erate this year around $240 mil-
lion in room revenues, its pri-
mary revenue source. A further
$195 million was projected to
come from food and beverage,

‘SEE page 3B

‘best of class’ employees?

iN eenro le
Lia pk og Oh

ener eae ses ain

An RBC

ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work

/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company






re



KEY WEST
Low: 70° F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

Albuquerque 50/10 29/-1_ pe

AE 20- Ls 23 s



842 29/-1 ss —
4/-15 -6/-21
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43/6 25/-3



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26-3 nd




79/26 67/1 1 9
(2045/7 Ss 275/238) 573 se

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4 Thursday
Low. W

Today
High Low W

FIC Fic




Partly sunny and Partly cloudy with Clouds and sun; Sunny and nice. - | Sunny and pleasant. Sunny and beautiful. The higher the AccuWeather UV indexâ„¢ number, the
breezy. = showers around. | breezy, less humid. : greater the need for eye and skin protection.
_ High: 79° | High: 75° High: 75° High: 76°

AccuWeather RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel
70°-60° F 70°-62° F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature? is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, oe and Today 3:43am. 2. 7 “10: 15 a.m. 0.

élevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.























4:08 p.m. 2.1 10:07 p.m. -0.3

hursday 4:47am. 2.9 11:17am. -0.1
Three 5:11 p.m. 2.2 11:08 p.m. -0.4

Friday 48am. 3.0 12:13p.m. -0.3





25/-3 15/-







Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday











ABACO Temperature . ; : 6:10 p.m. © 2.3 ent
HIGH. si.csieitlcasvsssmanleatarcasionntnBe” P20" C. : ; 7
High: 83° F/28 C Li ° ° Saturday 6:45 a.m. 3.1 12:08 a.m. -0.6
: OW sccccticotauthasdtiae sh eectenactessnsuens OO IDK. O 7:06 25 1:06p.m. -0.4
cee eC | Normal high. s-s00c.sso0-oe, 78° F/25° C ae Ba























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WEST PALM BEACH © _ Last year's high .. 79° F/26° C
High:81°F/27°C ae ss Last year's low .. . 66° F/19° G
* Low: 65° F/18°C e : * Precipitation : Sunrise . .
ee 22 AS Of 1 p.m. yeSterday .......cccessecessseeseeseesees {ACE
- FREEPORT Year to date ou... essccsssseressecectsscsecersseeseees O01"
High: 82° F/28°C Normal year to date oo... essseecseesreseseeee 0.84"
Low: 63° F/17°CG
AccuWeather.com 34/1 34/1 sn
Forecasts and graphics provided by ai : / a me gr :
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 é e i a A -7 pc -
= ELEUTHERA Jan 10 Jan.17 Jan. 26 Feb. 2






_ High:84°F/29°C

67/19.
Low: 72° F/22°C



37/2 s
High: 84° F/29°C
Low.71°F/22°C_





CAT ISLAND
High: 82° F/28°C
-67°F/19°C





_ SAN SALVADOR
? High: 85° F/29° C
Low: 71° F/22°C








86/30. “5a/12. | pe

=



High: 87°F/31°C —
Low: 72° F/22°C

MAYAGUANA
& _ High: eS" F/30°C







Indianapolis.










Jacksonville s Ss
Kansas City 32/0 pe. Sf RAG ISLAN
Las Vegas 63/17 40/4 s r ear F/29°C D

Low: 67° F/19°C



GREATINAGUA







2 High: 88° F/31°C
: or Low: 71° F/22°C
Nashvill







New Orleans ' ae -

668 31/2 2






Winnipeg -4/-20 -16/-26 pc O/-17 -10/-23 pc

; ’ a Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, ¢-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Wagbington.,PC 44/6. 34/1 . , 48/7 28/-2 -c. . ot en storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, t-ice, Prep- precipitation, Tr-trace

u



INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS»

SS ara JANUARY, 2009
















Marine Forecast
WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
NASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles (°F
Thursda' SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles JI2F
FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
Thursday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
ABACO Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F

Thursday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. :
Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary —s

CE BROKERS & AGENTS

{Eleuthera Exum
(247) 332-2862 Tes (242) 336-2304


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 3B



i <â„¢ i Sa eee
FOCOL: $6.3m = British Airways to add sixth direct flight from UK to Nassau

JV set to show
henefits in ‘two
to three periods’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

FOCOL Holdings yesterday
said it was hoping the cost sav-
ings from its $6.3 million invest-
ment in a shipping joint ven-
ture, which will ship.its petrole-
um products throughout the
Bahamas, will “begin to show
in another two to three quar-
ters from now”.

Franklyn Wilson, who holds
almost one-third of the BISX-
listed company’s shares, which

are held in either his name or-

those of Sunshine Holdings,
told Tribune Business that the
joint venture with Marine
Tankers. Services AS was
designed to give FOCOL Hold-
ings greater control over its sup-
ply chain, and reduce costs
incurred ‘in the
distribution/transportation of its
fuel-rélated products.

While the company had
“some idea” of the likely sav-
ings the initiative would pro-
duce, Mr Wilson did not want
to reveal figures until it saw how
the venture was operating. |

However, he said of the like-
ly savings: “It was sufficient to
persuade the Board that it was
the right thing to do.”

FOCOL’s $5.3 million invest-
ment gives it a 60 per cent stake
in the joint venture, with
Marine Tanker Services AS
providing management/opera-
tional expertise to the joint ven-

ture. The joint venture will own —

two tanker vessels that will
deliver petroleum products to
all FOCOL’s operations in the
Bahamas and Turks & Caicos,
where it operates under the
Shell brand. .

Mr Wilson described Norwe-
gian-based Marine Tanker Ser-
vices AS as having “an out-
standing track record and very

‘qualified people. One of the
stakeholders traces his roots in
shipping as far back as the

. Vikings.

“They have an outstanding
( ‘oné"blue chip
iatin. g with
anothérblte-chip ‘company.
They are very active in this part
of the region, and specialise in
fuel transportation.”

The joint venture will replace
the previous charter operation
FOCOL used for its fuel ship-
‘ments’ transportation.

Tribune Business reported in
May last year that FOCOL was
planning to use part of the pro-
ceeds from its $15 million pref-
erence share issue to acquire a
tanker vessel, which would
result in cost savings of $3-$4
million by the third year in
operation.

Mr Wilson added that
FOCOL was “working as hard
as hell” to meet its Budget, the
fall in global oil prices having
eliminated the damage this had
done last year to the company’s
liquidity.



INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

BRITISH Airways is set to
add a sixth weekly direct flight
from the UK to Nassau this
summer, the Ministry of Touris-
m’s director-general said yes-
terday, as it seeks to reduce air-
line ticket prices on routes com-
ing into the Bahamas.

Vernice Walkine, who was
part of a panel discussion on
the tourism industry at the sev-
enth annual Caribbean MBA
conference, said the Govern-
ment hopes to reduce the taxes,
fees and charges that airlines
incur in the hope they will pass
on the savings in reduced ticket
prices and a lower overall cost
of travel to the Bahamas.

She said these reductions
should come into effect by the
end of January 2009, and when
they do, the the Bahamas will
become very real to travelers.

“If we remove those taxes or
reduce those taxes, charges and
fees that will, in effect, reduce
the costs to the airline to bring
each passenger here. Then they
have the opportunity to man-
age their yields through a pric-
ing policy that allows them to
make enough money on. that
seat, but still reduce the cost to
the customer,” said Ms

Atlantis could
attract $800m
in revenues
-during 2008

FROM page 1B

some $160 million from the
Atlantis casino, and about $39
million through water and
marine activities, which includ-
ed activities such as Dolphin
Cay and Aquaventura.

“Of course, i’ve left out a lot
of smaller businesses,” said Mr
Markantonis. “I’ve left out the
joint ventures, i’ve left out the
golf courses, left out all the
retail concessions.”

Atlantis was recently forced
to let go almost 800 employees,
due to the economic downturn

and low occupancy rates, which’

left it squeezed between
reduced business levels and the
debt service/banking covenants
attached to the $2.75 billion
debt load taken on when Sol
Kerzner and his late son, Butch,
took the parent Kerzner Inter-
national private in 2006.

However, Atlantis was
recently able to bring back a
number of laid-off workers dur-
ing the 2008 Christmas season,
as the resort was at almost 100
per cent occupancy.

Kerzner International recent-
ly opened its newest property,
Atlantis The Palm, Dubai, with
a $20 million dollar extrava-
ganza that included a fireworks
display that rivaled that of the
opening ceremony for 2008’s
Beijing’s Olympic games.

It was feared that this newest
property would eclipse the
Atlantis Paradise Island prop-
erty, enticing visitors to patron-
ise the exploding United Arab

Emirates tourism product.

instead of the Bahamas.

But Mr Markantonis said the
two properties were different
products, as the Dubai proper-
ty lacks a casino due to laws
barring gambling in the UAE.

He again expressed his regret,
during the lunch, at the recent
lay-offs and said he hoped the
resort will soon be able to bring

_ some of the employees back.

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Walkine.
Recently, American Airlines
reduced its flights to Nassau

from Fort Lauderdale, and sev-

eral other airlines have greatly
reduced their number of flights
to the Bahamas.



FROM page 1B

closure, Robert Sands, Baha
Mar’s senior vice-president of
administration and government
affairs, told Tribune Business
that based on projected busi-
ness levels, it could accommo-
date all visitors in the 700-room
Sheraton Cable Beach Resort.

As a result, Baha Mar decid-
ed to consolidate all operations
into one resort, and reduce loss-
es through cost savings on elec-
tricity and all other utility bills,
wages and numerous other dai-
ly expenses, by closing the 550-
room Wyndham and Crystal
Palace Casino.

The closure, which is likely
to impact 1,000 staff, out of a
total Baha Mar workforce of
around 1900, will take place
during what is traditionally. the
slowest part of the Bahamian
tourism season.

“Basically, we’ve done an
analysis of the total projected

Nation to exceed 100,000 visitors from
Canada for first time in 2008

According to Ms Walkine,
the airfare reduction strategy

’ approach adopted by the Min-
istry of Tourism will be différent.

for each carrier, because of their
different cost structures.

“It might not be taxes and
fees to one,” she said. “It might
be customs and immigration
that might be more important to
another carrier than the pas-
senger facility charge, so we’re
looking at a whole range of
expenses that are a part of the
cost of the ticket.”

The managing director of
FirstCaribbean International
_Bank for Barbados, Eastern
“Caribbean and Belize, Oliver
Jordan, said the Caribbean
should not be so dependent on
foreign carriers like American

occupancy during the period,
and found one hotel can absorb
the business during that time,”
Mr Sands said. “We’re basical-
ly consolidating operations to
mitigate against large losses,
and preserving employment as
best we can.

“We don’t see any indications
at this point in time that the
third quarter of 2009 is going
to be any different than it has
been in the past, and this is one
way to mitigate against the type
of losses seen in the past.”

Mr Sands said Baha Mar was
hoping that the “economies of
scale” obtained from closing the
Wyndham/Crystal Palace for
eight weeks would “trickle
down” to the bottom line,
“helping to reduce those loss-
es”.

While the closure would not
totally eliminate the losses
incurred by Baha Mar during
the tourism slow season, it was
designed to “reduce the levels

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Airlines.
He suggested the Caribbean
consider implementing one or

two regionall-based airline .

operations throughout the
islands in order to lower travel
costs.

According to Ms Walkine,
the Ministry of Tourism is gear-
ing up for the winter season,
which peaks in February and
March.

She said that along with cost
reductions, direct flights from
France to the Bahamas recent-
ly began, which could possibly
grow into a second flight, and a
sixth British Airways flight to
New Providence could also be

added to the fleet’s itinerary, in .

order to further tap the Euro-
pean market.

Wyndham and Crystal Ta cu eins

experienced in the last two

years”.

The resort owner/developer
was in the process of crunching
numbers to work out the exact
total projected savings, Mr
Sands added, but “we believe
that it will help us cut the level
of losses, in what traditionally
happens to be the highest loss
period of the year - August,
September and October - down
dramatically, in half”.

Baha Mar warned yesterday
that if current economic condi-
tions continued or worsened, its
2009 losses were forecast to
exceed 2008 levels. To preserve
employment, the company was
asking Wyndham/Crystal Palace
staff to take their vacation leave
during this time, and was also
looking at switching one week
of Christmas pay to that period.

In addition, Mr Sands said
Baha Mar was working on an
incentive surrounding sick pay,
“one of the biggest abused



There has also been a signifi-
cant increase in visitors from
Canada.

“Our business from Canada
has been growing very, very
well, so we are looking at sig-
nificant double digit growth
from Canada for 2008, which is
pleasing to us. We will exceed
100,000 visitors from Canada
for the first time in a while,”
said\Ms Walkine.

However, it is not known yet
how the economy will impact
this year’s visitors from Canada.

“We believe that because of
our location, our proximity, we
are better positioned to con-
vince, particularly Americans,
that they can still afford a
Bahamas vacation,” Ms
Walkine said.

at Me cy



areas” by Bahamian workers.
Frequent sick days by staff
caused resorts to call in other
workers to replace them, often
at rates of “premium pay”.

However, for those workers
with no or minimal sick days,
Baha Mar was looking at offer-
ing them an extra week’s vaca-
tion pay.

Mr Sands said many Bahd
Mar staff were already entitled
to five weeks’ vacation pay
under the existing union agree-
ment. Given that many work-

- ers often worked one to two

days per week during the clo-
sure period, the plan designed
by Baha Mar was intended to
keep workers on full incomes -
certainly more money than they
traditionally earned.

However, Mr Sands. warned
that “other things may have to
happen” if business forecasts
worsened and Baha Mar did not
perform as expected, requiring

adjustments to its business plan.

FOR SALE

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA

ALL THAT, the Apartment Number 43 being an
apartment with a unit entitlement of 1.43% on the 4th
Floor of Silver Point Condominium Apartments situate
on ALL THAT piece parcel or part of a tract of land

situate in Freeport/Lucaya in the Island of Grand Bahama
another of the Islands in the said Commonwealth of The
Bahamas containing Three and Sixty Nine Thousands
(3.069) acres referred to in the said Declaration was
subjected to the provisions of The Law of Property and
Conveyancing (Condominium) Act ‘1965

Board of Directors.

For conditions of sale and any
other information contact:

Silver Point Condominium Apartments,
P.O. Box F-40825,
PH (242) 373-1168, Fax: (242) 373-1168





Cc

cFAL*

EG CAP







TTAL MARKET:
ROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES


























a Abaco Markets ' 1.71 1.71 0.00 .
11.80 11.00 Bahamas Property Fund 11.00 ‘ 11.00 0.00 0.992
19.68 7.64 Bank of Bahamas 7.64 é 7.64 0.00 0.319
10.99 0.66 Benchmark 0.66 r 0.66 0.00 -0.877
3.74 3.15 Bahamas Waste 3.95 3.15 0.60 0.105
2.65 1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 0.055
14.15 12.05 Cable Bahamas 13.95 13.95 0.00 1.255
3.15 2.83 Colina Holdings _ 2.83 2.83 0.00 0.118
8.50 4.80 Commonwealth Bank (S1) 7.00 * 6.98 -0.02 7,575 0.446
6.59 1.88 Consolidated Water BDRs 2.51 2.54 0.03 O.111
3.00 2.27 Doctor's Hospital 2.55 2.55 0.00 0.240
8.10 6.02 Famguard 7.80 7.80 0.00 0.598
13.01 11.87 Finco 11.87 a 11.87 0.00 0.665
14.66 10.45 FirstCaribbean Bank 10.45 ‘10.45 0.00 0.682
6.04 5.01 Focol (S) 5.17 5.17 0.00 0.337
1.00 1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00 1,000 0.000
1.00 0.30 Freeport Concrete - 0.30 \ 0.30 0.00 0.035
18.20 5.50 ICD Utilities 6.13 Ss 6.13 0.00 1,200 0.407
12.50 8.60 J. S. Johnson 10.50 10.50 0.00 0.952

-¢ 10.00 0.00 9. 180












Premier, Real





BSS (Bands Was On: ee Pareentage RREING Hassa) ~
Last Sale Interest
? T% 19 October 2017

Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
“5 7% 30 May 2013
ete & AG










1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
Shag te as

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +
Fidelity














Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
BND





0.000
0.300
9.000





4.540
-0.041
9.002 |









.00 ABDAB
14.00 Bahamas Supermarkets
RND Holdings











Yield %





Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund















3.3505 2.9401 Colina MS! Preferred Fund 2.9401 -2.02 -2.02 31-Dec-08
1.4336 1.3686 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4336 4.25 4.75 26-Dec-08
3.7969 3.4931 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.4931 +~B.00 15.79 30-Nov-08
12.5597 11.8789 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.5597 5.25 5.73 30-Nov-08
100.2421 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.2421 0.24 0.24 30-Sep-08
100,9600 96.7492 CFAL Global Equity Fund 96.7492 73.25 3.25 30-Sep-08
1.0000 1.0000 © CFAL High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000 0.00 0.00 31-Dec-07
10.5000 9.0775 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.0775 -13.55 “13.55
1.0264 1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0264 2.64 2.64
1.0289 1.0000 FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0289 2.89 2.89 .

FG Financial Diversified Fund 2 & 2.87




12 month dividends divided by closing price



BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00












52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks Bld & - Buying £ fc and Fidelity
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks Ask & - Seltlng pric and fidelity

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume Last Price =.Laut traded over-the-counter price

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for dally volume * Weekly Voli. Trading volume of the prior wook

Change - Change In closing price from day to day ‘ EPS §$ - A‘company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mthe
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today “4 NAV - Net Asset Value

DIV & - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months N/M - Not Meaningful






FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index, January 1, 1994 = 100

BaP HHEAGO uh SREQNIAE BASSAI SRE CE

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings
(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007
(S41) > S-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 24











PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Commercial court niche ‘critical’ for Bahamas

FROM page 1B

aspects of the GBPA case had,
as a result, been heard by dif-
ferent justices.

“If we were to dedicate them
[the three justices] to a proper
commercial facility, if we had a

ela i

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



commercial court, what has tak-
en years could have been
processed much more rapidly,”
Mr Sears told Tribune Business.
“They are handling a very

‘complex commercial matter

that has vital importance for the
entire country, and in this case,

the entire ‘community of Grand |

Bahama.”

Yet in the absence of a com-
mercial court, and when com-
bined with the workload from
the other cases before them, Mr

Sears said the judges handling .

the various aspects of the
GBPA ownership dispute had

~ been forced to deal with it in a

“piecemeal fashion”.

“As a result of that, you have
an entire community on hold,”
Mr Sears added. “When that
happens to any one part of the
Bahamas, people tend to

migrate to other areas where

they can earn a living. These
are the kinds of things you can
do very easily.”

As a solution, Mr Sears said:
“We ought to establish a com-
mercial court in the Bahamas,
as it takes too long for disputes
of a commercial nature to be
resolved in terms of access to
court and a speedy disposition
of disputes.

, “As they have done in Sin-
gapore, in the UK and other
places, we need a commercial
court for several reasons. We
need the judges who have the
expertise in commercial litiga-
tion matters to be dedicated.

“Secondly, the existence of a

quick, efficient dispute resolu- ”

tion adds to the attractiveness of
the destination as a financial
services centre.

“And what. we will have, as

"the jurisdiction develops a rep-

utation in this area, is that peo-
ple outside the Bahamas, when
they structure their contracts,
may put the Bahamas as their
choice of legal jurisdiction [to
settle disputes].

“This is because of the repu-
tation we would have developed

‘as a speedy, efficient, cost-effec-.

tive type of platform to resolve
disputes, and attract people to
come and settle disputes here.”

- Currently, many major inter-

national investors developing '

projects in the Bahamas choose
other jurisdictions, such as New
York, as the primary venue to
settle any disputes that may
arise.

Island Global Yachting’ s
(IGY) action over the failed
marina project adjacent to the
British Colonial Hilton; Baha
Mar’s dispute with Harrah’s;
and RHS Ventures complaint

against the major financing
partner for the South Ocean
project have - or are being - lit-
igated in the New York State
Supreme Court.

Mr Sears said London, and
increasingly New York, had
both set out to develop and
market themselves as centres
for arbitration and the resolu-
tion of major commercial dis-
putes. There was no reason, he
added, why the Bahamas could
not do the same given the exist-
ing talent base i in this jurisdic-
tion. ’

“This is one of the areas, in

' this period. of recession, that the

Bahamas can enhance its com-
petitiveness,” Mr Sears said.
“We have the legal talent, to
some degree.

“We have the accountants on

terms of doing forensic account-
ing, serving as receivers and liq-

uidators, and we have a wide
spread of expertise in the finan-
cial services centre. We have
the hotels.

“This is an area, when we talk
about niche markets, that is crit-
ical when we talk about the
economy at this time. This is
something we can do with a
minimal capital outlay.”

_ Mr Sears suggested that just

an initial $200,000 investment
would be enough to get a com-
mercial court system up and
running, adding that the
Bahamas “just has to dedicate
judges, put in the IT infrastruc-
ture so that there is the com-
puter information retrieval sys-
tem” and set aside suitable
premises for a commercial
court. ,

“The problem with the

‘Bahamas is that we’re always

so late,” Mr Sears said.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
SUNRISE RED CLOVES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SUNRISE RED CLOVES INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.
ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

. Legal Notice

NOTICE

QUALUMINA LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of QUALUMINA LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) she Sa



Legal Notice
NOTICE
MASTERLUCK INVESTMENTS
OFFSHORE LTD. ©

Notice is hereby given that in décordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MASTERLUCK INVESTMENTS OFF-
SHORE LTD. has been completed; a Certificate of Dis-
solution has been issued and’ the: Company has i thefefore

been struck off the Regi

ARGOSA CORP. INC. _
(Liquidator) . |

Legal Notice

NOTICE |

KAJSA ROSE VENTURES INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of KAJSA ROSE VENTURES INC. has been }-

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

\

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) _

Bahamas urged to lead lobbying for
Global anti-laundering forum

FROM page 1B

when the Bahamas and its continued pres-
ence on an FATF monitoring list came up.
This, Mr Sears said, left the Bahamas with-
out any direct representation to argue its
case, and it was left to rely on CFATF sec-
retary-general Calvin Wilson and Canada.

The PLP MP for Fort Charlotte also

“recalled another FATF meeting in Paris

where, its members having performed a
self-assessment of their anti-money laun-
dering regimes based on the organisation’s

40 recommendations, voted not to release
_the findings to the media or general public

because they had all failed,

“We need to be part of a global lobby
for the convening of a Global Forum on
anti-money laundering and anti-terror
financing,” Mr Sears told Tribune Busi-

ness.

“You are not dealing with a level playing
field, and the high tax onshore financial
centres, rather than become more efficient,

it is easier for them to eliminate the exter-.

nal competition.”

Such a Global Forum, Mr Sears suggest- -

ed, would be able to set rules and guidelines

. for global anti-money laundering and anti-"”

terror financing regulations/laws in a “trans-
parent” fashion, with all United Nations

. members able to participate. .

“We have to make sure we never find
ourselves again in the position we were in

during 2000, where we were in this reac- -

tive mode, aggressively trying to extract
ourselves,” Mr Sears said.

“I think it is important we, in a ‘very
proactive fashion, lobby the Congressional
Black Caucus and all friends of the

Bahamas in the US Senate and Congress, as
well as other agencies in Washington, to
really explain that the focus of the Stop
Tax Haven Abuse Bill is misleading. It
deems the Bahamas asa country engaged in .
unfair tax practices.

“We need to be much more proactive in
explaining ' we are engaged in the legitimate
practice of providing: financial services, and
that our system is transparent and meets
international best practices, even more so
than in the US.

“Many of the people in the Obama
administration-to-be have a certain ideo-

logical perspective, and we need not wait

until we are assaulted again, but should
invest in intellectual capacity, so that we
can analyse and predict, and invest in lob-
bying so that we can develop a strategy to
deal with the OECD initiative and the US.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JINOTEGA INTEGRA CORP.

—go—

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

| dissolution of JINOTEGA INTEGRA CORP. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC. :
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JANINE RIVERS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of JANINE RIVERS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register,

~ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

GPB LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GPB LIMITED has been completed; a Cer-

‘tificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company

has therefore been struck off the Register.

-ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

JADE MOUNT LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of JADE MOUNT LTD. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice
NOTICE

ROCKSPRINGS S.A.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

_ (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the

dissolution of ROCKSPRINGS §.A. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com- |

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

RMC GROUP INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of RMC GROUP INC. has been completed;
a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE | WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 5B




Find out what the experts are predicting for you,
your business and The Bahamas in 2009.

Join us at the most important seminar of 2009!

.



\

Theme: Effective Strategies For
A Strong Economic Rebound

Thurs., January 15th am tet
Wyndham Nassau Resort

Keynote Speaker

Presenters include:



Senator the Hon. Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism
Dionisio D' Aguilar, President, Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
Sarkis Izmirlian, Chairman & CEO, Baha Mar

Dr Keva Bethel, Veteran Educator
“Eric Carey, Executive Director, Bahamas National Trust

Dr Arthur Porter, M.D., Director, The Cancer Centre, Nassau
Lawrence Bascom, Financial Consultant, N.Y.

Stacia Williams, Total Image Management & Communications.
Dr K. Jonathan Rodgers, Ophthamologist-Businessman

Albert H. Binger, Ph.D., Environment & Global Energy Consultant



: | TO REGISTER CONTACT:
SPONsOrs: : : Eileen Fielder The Counsellors Ltd



Telephone: 322-1000
fos eel ce Fax: 325-2482
THE TRIBUNE efielder@thecounsellorsitd.com

ie Bank of The Bahamas

TNTERNATIONAL



ae. SS Sun Oil Limited
; cwatusin OD

FinsTC Area: oe REGISTER ONLINE AT
lane, Scotiabank



www.iclevents.com



TCLGROUP.
PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUNE





oldman Sachs adviser to

unveil leading concept

AN independent consultant to the
Goldman Sachs Urban Investment
Group avyill address the Bahamas Busi-
ness Outlook on the topic, Revolution-
ary Business Concepts, on January 15.

Lawrence P. Bascom will focus on Six
Sigma and Net Promoter, two business
concepts that are currently sweeping the
globe, during the conference staged at
the Wyndham Nassau Resort.

Mr Bascom said Six Sigma was a man-
agement philosophy originated in the
1980s by Motorola, and subsequently
adopted by General Motors as its pre-
mier management philosophy. It focus-
es on improving the effectiveness and

“Effectiveness is
the degree to which
an organisation
meets and exceeds
the needs and
requirements of its
customers,” he
added.

“Efficiency is the
resources consumed
in achieving effec-
tiveness. Six Sigma
is the equivalent of
no more than 3.4
bad customer experiences for every mil-
lion customer opportunities. In Bahami-
an terms, it is the equivalent of BEC

JES eo) 11)



customers experiencing one hour of
power outage every 34 years. Results
from Six Sigma have not been paral-
leled by any other quality initiative.”

Mr Bascom will also provide an
overview of Net Promoter, an emerg-
ing best practice that provides a scientific
method of measuring and improving a
company’s actively satisfied customers
relative to its detractors.

He graduated from the College of the

Bahamas with an Associate’s Degree in
Business, and began his career at
Deloitte & Touche in 1984. After pass-
ing the CPA exam he completed his BA
degree at the University of Miami, and
his MBA at the Wharton School.

Mr Bascom was a member of Deloit-
te’s Global Financial Services Industries
practice, and was admitted to the prac-
tice as partner in 1997. He served as
client service partner in the firm’s New
York City Office, serving some of
Deloitte & Touche’s largest clients in
either a consulting or audit capacity.

He was a member of the Managing
Partner Advisory Council and worked
closely with the US firm’s managing
partner on strategic and operational
issues. Mr’ Bascom also served as a
member of the Deloitte Foundation
Board of Directors.

In 2004, he joined the 21st Century
Insurance Group as chief financial offi-

cer and was involved in all major man-
agement and strategic decisions, being
‘responsible for managing the compa-
ny’s $1.4 billion investment portfolio,
investor relations, rating agency rela-
tionships, M&A, enterprise risk man-

agement, capital management, planning

and budgeting, financial reporting and
taxes. .

Bahamas Business Outlook is organ-
ised by The Counsellors and sponsored
by the Central Bank of The Bahamas,
FirstCaribbean International Bank, Ans-
bacher Bahamas, Albany, Bacardi, Sco-
tiabank, British American Financial,
Bank of the Bahamas International,
KPMG, BEC and Sun Oil.

efficiency of an organisation.

‘

- Legal Notice

NOTICE

BEYOND PARADISE LIMITED

cease €&>
\\

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BEYOND PARADISE LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

| the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
* (Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

ODESSA SLOPES LTD.

| Notice is hereby given that in pocorcance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
| dissolution of ODESSA SLOPES LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE



TURKU VILLAGE INC. .

| Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
| (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
‘dissolution of TURKU VILLAGE INC. has been com-

| pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

| Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GOLDEN SPARKLE INC.

sie Pigauaal

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
| dissolution of GOLDEN SPARKLE INC. has been com-

| pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

| Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FLORAL GARDEN LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of FLORAL GARDEN LTD. has been com-

‘pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

_ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE
REGAL PALM HOLDINGS LTD.

= or

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of REGAL PALM HOLDINGS LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

MEIKLE HOLDINGS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,

. the dissolution of MEIKLE HOLDINGS INC. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

‘the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

-PANTA VALLEY INC.

&

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138.(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of PANTA VALLEY INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TOURMALINE VENTURES LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the .
dissolution of TOURMALINE VENTURES LTD. has
been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

GRIMMY LECHIEN LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of GRIMMY LECHIEN LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NEHEMIAH REALTY INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of NEHEMIAH REALTY INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE |
LETTE VISIONS INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, |
the dissolution of LETTE VISIONS INC. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


tee WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 7B
| WEDNESDAY EVENING } ] JANUARY 7, 2009 oR 7 —

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00
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his sidekick Derek put

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PAGE 8B ,WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009





JUDGE PARKER

YOU'RE UP
EARLY THIS «
MORNING!














I THE CITY OF
GG SCOTTSPALE DID...
THEY WANT YOU
TO COME BACK!

ACTUALLY, I
HAVEN'T BEEN
TO BED YET...TOO
MUCH- PAPERWORK!

yOu TOOK
CARE OF MY
HOTEL BILL?





WHEN IM MRS. MILLS.
THERE’LLBE SOME +
CHANGES MADE.

G

I LOVE THIS ROOM,BUT
THAT LEATHER COUCH
JUST SCREAMS y
“BAG HELOR”L



SINCE I DON'T
KNOW WHAT I/M
LOOKING FOR,1
MAY AS WELL
START HERE.

YOU'RE NOT GOING Q
TO PUT ANY SUGAR ON
IT, ARE YOU?

1 THINK I'LL GO
DOWN AND MAKE
MYSELF A SIMPLE
FRIED EGG

SANDWICH Ss
4!

YOU'RE NOT
GOING TO PUT],
ANY SALT ON |:

IT, ARE YOU?



JUST BEAT
THE KIBBLES
OUT OF ME!

MAN, WHAT
HAPPENED

©2003 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.



WELL, IF THATS

TLL IMIDE
YOUR BEST OFFER,

THESE COOKIES










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Across Down
1 They provide information 1 Have an oral test? (5)
* for workers at the bank (7) 2 .Comedian’s repertoire is

one that’s really
ridiculous (8,5)

3 Greek letter varies in
slope (7)

4 Aclose shave? (6)

5 Stretchers used for
carrying luggage (5)

5 Plunder Winchester for
example (5)

8 To suppress frauds you
need the courts (6,7)

9 The Spanish get round the
English girl (5)

10 Charge for delivering 6 Open acknowledgment
pages to be edited (7) that there’s no entrance

11 Write a sonnet about fee (4,9)
wooden joints (6) 7 Point behind the ship Pd

towards the sunrise (7)
11 Travelling goods will be in
it (7)

12 The pilots remain in
trouble (6)



15 Still a variety of * Rophes oes
13 Show sluggishness; i.e. a
sausage (7) es a (7) : 1, A published
17 Support for the board (5) ee Preview (5-2)

14 Human or not, they
exist (6)
16 Turkish leader elected for
a second time (5)
Beer turns up in royal
style (5)

‘5 Deserve (5)

8. Outmoded (13)

9 Very stupid (5)
40. Brilliant red (7)

11. Excessively

affectionate (6)

: -: 12° Ferocious (6
Across: 1 Face to face, 6 Fair, 10... 5. (6)

Spurn, 11 Ad nauseam, 12 “18 Caller (7)

Chastise, 13 Pitch, 15 Profile, 17 47

Traffic, 19 Outward, 21 Pitfall, 22 RR SLSR ES sh og

Occur, 24 Stricken, 27 Objection, 28: 19 Result in failure

Afoot, 29 Dank, 30 Merrymaker. » (4,2,7)

Down: 1 Fuse, 2 Caught out, 3 ee ( ;

Tunis, 4 Fragile, 5 Content, 7 Alert, * 20 Correspond (5)

8 Ramshackle, 9 Supplant, 14 Up to... 214

no good, 16 In a trice, 18

Framework, 20 Despite, 21 Partner, :

23 Cajun, 25 Claim, 26 Stir:

19 Don't go up to one and be
ruthless? (4,2,7)

20 Asign to know (5)

21 Tool for tightening up a 18

EASY PUZZLE

bridge perhaps (7) _

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution
Across: 1 Illiterate, 6 Thug, 10 Kinds,
11 Existence,»12 After all, 13 Aryan,
15 Sackbut, 17 Trevino, 19 Rashers,
21 Resides, 22 Clout, 24 Acquaint, 27 °
Stevedore, 28 Lasso, 29 Deed, 30
Skateboard.

Down: 1 Inks, 2 Long faces, 3 Taste,
4 Re-enact, 5 Triplet, 7 Honey, 8
Greenhouse, 9 Steamers, 14
Ostracised, 16 Breathes, 18
Indonesia, 20 Sea-cook, 21 Request,
23 Oxeye, 25 Ad-lib, 26 Load.

Arrogant self-
confidence (7)



COMIC PAGE



CALVIN & HOBBES

NEXT TIME WE Go DONN,
I GET TO STEER
THE SLED.

§
Do
&
a
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a
3

©1989 u:



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THROUGH EVERY
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THE HILL.

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"EVERY OBSTACLE" ?/? WE
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LIKE A



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¢ WERE ALIVE.



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several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to’
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Difficulty Level *%* &



©2009 Conceptis Puzzles,.Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and’ the sum
of each vertical block equals the number oniits top. No number |
may be used in the same block more thah once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.











co oo |
iN
Pes







O}O)-
©}00
om







eos













| Viktor Korchnoi v Simen ~
Agdestein, Haninge 1988.
Korchnoi, now aged 76 yet suli
an active competitar, has had
the mast incident-packed life of
any modern grandmaster. He

oO }—



©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

@}O;Q|N Bj —+}oo}~









loon

#1. C}09/Po
CIN; RIO) O PIO) |M
#&j OT} PO

NI} |} CO] NO] CO OCT; RID









no/oo
sioln











Choks solution S34h I GS &xdS 24 Civent 3297




survived the siege of Leningrad

: CET SNNG+ wins Backs queesd SRxdSt
in 1991 by collecting ration 4 arate) ae GLOW i =

Escape.grasp of (5)'

and $OxdS 4 NG> vains the queen
books fram the badies of dead : x ace eeatt. aay
relatives, defected from the ; rSscad One possible word ladder solution is: PUFF guil,
USSR when chess bosses * gostf quig Dull bell, BALL.

preferred the young Anatoly
Karpov, then twice qualified to
challenge Xarpav for the warid
title. Ris Hfestyle of caviar,
jogging, yoga and continual
tournaments inspires other
veterans, and in between takin:
an GMs a third of his age he
> won tire world senior (aver-62}
championship at his first
_ attempt fast year Korchaai
_ White, to mave} has fevel
material in today’s puzzle, which
tooks J dose call between his
attack and Slack’s strong d2
knight. Row did White force
victory?



Down
1 Injury (5)
2 Immeasurably
small (13)
3 Oriental (7)
4 Ordained
minister (6)
5 Madness (5)
6 Stirring up
discontent (6-7)
7. Playhouse (7)
11 Pigeonhouse (7)
13 Sluggishness (7)
14 A planet (6)
16 Of poor quality (5)
18 Keen (5)












HOW many words of four letters
or more can you make fram the
letters shovn here? In making a
word, each Jebher niay de used
once cnly. Each must contain
the centre letter and there mush
be at isast one nine-letter word. |
No plurals.

TODAY'S TARGET =
Good £2; very paod 26; excellent
34 (or more}. Solution tomorrow,

YESTERDAY’S SGLUTION

serie anti bairn bait- barite
bier bint bite biter brain
brine entire INDBBRIATE. inert
inertia tater Irate nibre rain
yeni rein redein refine rite
tibia tier tine tinea bthaier tire
train trainee tribe trine



' Like Taking Candy From a Baby

East dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH

AK 10

Â¥854

#K 1087

bAQI
WEST EAST
@74 96532
VK Q109732 V6
$Q6 443
b95 #108643

SOUTH

4QI8

VAI

#AJ952

&K72
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass | NT 39 6 NT

Opening lead — king of hearts.

The accomplished declarer is like
a fine detective. He does a lot of leg-
work, gathering up all the informa-
tion he can, before he finally gets
around to cracking the case.

Take this deal where declarer is in
six notrump and West leads the king
of hearts. South would have an easy
time making the slam if he knew
exactly where the queen of diamonds
was located. He would either play for
the drop or take a finesse in the right
direction to bring home. 12 tricks.

But South does not know: at the
start of play which defender has the
queen, and his job is to do whatever
he can to determine the location .of | ;
the missing damsel. To this end, by’
far his best shot is to play the jack of

hearts at trick one!

Considerable merit is attached to
this play, and in the actual deal it
works like a charm. West can do ‘no
better than continue with a.heart to
South’s ace, on which East discards a
low spade, confirming that West
started with seven hearts for his pre-
emptive three-heart bid.

This goes a long way toward solv-
ing declarer’s problem. South pur-
sues his quarry by cashing three
rounds of spades, learning that West
started with two spades — neither
more nor less — and also learning
that West started with exactly two
clubs when the A-K-Q of clubs are
next cashed.

The question of how to play the
diamonds is now solved. West is
known to have started with precisely
seven hearts, two spades and two
clubs, and therefore exactly two dia=
monds.

So South cashes. his two high dia-
monds without giving a thought to a
finesse, and the slam comes march-
ing home,

Tomorrow: Sylvia throws a curve.

©2009 King Features Syndicate Inc,
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 9B:





The Tribune





Celebrating

“ eC

dateous ole

lm By LISA LAWLOR
Tribune Features Writer

os

A
7

poriiga



DINE fine in 2009 with tasty hors d'oeuvre ideas com-
pliments of Cacique Food Art. Whether you've resolved to
lose a few pounds or stay in closer contact with friends,
enjoy nibbling to the fullest with low fat Caribbean crab
cakes or low calorie, Euro-inspired gazpacho.

The bites seem to come as only an after thought to many
a party-goer, but,.to the host or hostess, it can be quite the
challenge to find one that's just right. Considering all
guests, their appetites, dietary requirements (Is someone at
your gathering vegetarian? Does anyone have food aller-
gies?) and taste preferences can be a hard job for anyone,
even the kitchen connoisseurs we all know and love.

These scrumptious tidbits will go along wonderfully with
either a simple family meal or a larger gathering of old and
new friends. —

Julia‘Lee, registered dietitian and nutrition consultant for
Doctor's Hospital, has given the nutritional value of each
of the appetizers. Each day she helps people to improve eat-
ing lifestyle for disease prevention and health mainte-

Nance.

In working with specific illnesses, ‘Ms Lee said that diet
is immensely important in preventing: chronic illnesses ~
such as cancer, diabetes, and high blood pressure. The
hors d'oeuvres below:are passable in her mind.

"Gazpacho is all vegetables so it looks excellent, I would




LU

| mBy LISA LAWLOR

Tribune Features Writer —

LUNCH in the work-

: place is always a difficult
: meal to plan for, it's safe
: to say. Convenience of

: fast food and whatever’s
: closest wins over nutri-

: tional value arguments

: every time, as your

: starving stomach tells -

Even financial woes aren't
enough to make you bring
food from home, as getting
up that extra half hour early
just seems too much as you
cling to the bed sheets while
your mind pries you to get up
and out.

The nagging voice in the -

-back of your mind will persist

as your hips gét bigger, your
wallet get smalter, and the
leftovers in the fridge build-
up. Here lies the answer.
"It's a good idea to take
lunch from home," said Doc-

like to try this.recipe," said Ms Lee, "any vegetable based
food is great especially with all the coloured veggies in
this recipe.

The Crab Kofta is high in 1 cholesterol, ” she said,

While some dietitians disagree about seafood cholestrol
levels, Ms Lee said cholesterol from seafood doesn't make
a person's cholesterol go up and the Crab Kofta is accept-
able.

Ms Lee recommended Canola oil for frying the crab
cakes.



YELLOW. TOMATO &
GAZPACHO
Yield: 20-24 Mini Shots

CRAB KOFTA &
Yield:.24-30 Mini Cakes

Ingredients:

1 tin lump crab meat Int redients:

4 Ib spinach (fresh) 1 th yellow tomatoes
V4 Ib potatoes (peeled and diced 2-3 thsp country bread (ground :
small) _ in food processor) i
2 ea garlic cloves (minced) 12 ea red bell pepper (seeded

1 thsp ginger (minced). and diced)

1 tbsp coriander (ground)
1 tbsp chili powder .

1 thsp turmeric

1-2 tsp kosher salt

(chopped)
- 12 cup red onion (chopped)

1-2 ea red chilies (Spanish preferably)
3-4 cups oil Fe tbsp olive oil
Bea -ea garlic clove (minced)
Method: V4 tsp cumin (ground)
1. Blanch spinach in- boiling V4 tsp paprika
water for 1-2 minutes, drain in 1 cup water
colander and squeeze out the
excess water. Method:

2. After spinach has cooled, chop -
finely. Repeat blanching process
with potatoes but do not squeeze
out the water.

3. Mix all ingredients together,
except the oil, and form little balls
with the mixture.

4. Heat oil to 325 degrees
Fahrenheit and fry mini balls for 3-
4 minutes.

5. Serve with any favourite dip-
ping sauce, Chef’s personal
favourite is a spicy curry broth.

smooth.

sistency is achieved.

soup as possible.
allowing flavours to mold.
pepper before serving.

and serve in shot glasses.

- Recipes compliments of Food Art by Cacique.

Legal Notice

NOTICE.

INGLEBERT INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
- (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of INGLEBERT INC. has been completed; ‘a

Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

_ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



: you “get food now.”

1/4 ea English cucumber

1-2 tbsp sherry wine vinegar

1. Using a food processor, puree
all ingredients, except water, until,

2. Add water until desired con-

3. Strain through’a fine strainer,
pressing solids to extract as much

4. Chill overnight in the fridge
5. Season to taste with salt and

6. Garnish with fresh cilantro



tor's Hospital registered
dietitian and nutrition con-
sultant Julia Lee, "you have
control over all ingredients, oils, and calorie
amounts."

Plus, from Tribune Taste's calculations, you'll be
saving between $25 to $50 a week on lunch, a large
sum when multiplied to the cost of each month -
$100 to $200; and the year - $1200 to $2400.

To keep it nutritionally smart, Ms Lee recom:
mends that each lunch include something staechy.
"This will make it filling and carbohydrates provide
energy which is essential for work," she said. The
Rice Bowl recipe below, with rice, meat and any
type of sauce is one of her favourites.

"If a person does not include a healthy carbohy-

drate, then two hours after eating.d] ey, tend to look “~

for an instant pick me up like aeQK je or candy”
bar," she pointed‘out. “Basically, 1 iyou eliminate
‘the ‘carbohydrate at first, you'll end up eating some-
thing much worse later.”

To nourish yourself with a healthy meal right from
the get go, Ms Lee said everyone needs to include a
healthy carbohydrate option, usually half to one cup
whole grain pasta or brown rice or one to two slices
whole wheat bread.

Meat portions should be small, equivalent to the
size of a deck of cards or smaller and the more veg-
etables the better. "Veggies are really good asa
filler," said the dietitian, "you can be more satisfied
with smaller portions of meat and-rice if you have a
lot of them."

At the same time however, ‘it would be wrong to”
have a meal of only vegetables.

Legal Notice

NOTICE.

FUN CREATION LIMITED

Notice:is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of FUN CREATION LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal. Notice

NOTICE

ANIMA ENTERPRISE INC.

!

Notice is hereby given tHat in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ANIMA ENTERPRISE INC. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



’ out is meal timing. If someone has a light lunch, such

=> Step: 1

Make Rice the Foundation: -
Each Cup Equals 2 Grain Servings

e 15 essentiai nutrients including folic acid, iron

e Low calorie, virtually fat free, cholesterol and
sodium free:

e icup brown vice = 2 of 3 daily ‘whole grain
servings

Step: 2

Pack in Perfect Produce:
Each Cup Equals 2 Produce Servings



e Choose colorful veggies for nutrient puneh
e 15 nutrients, 25 cafories per haif-cup serving
e Low calorie, nutrient-rich fill-yeu-up feads

Step: 3
Add Lean Protein to Balance the Meal:
Each Ounce of Protein Equals a Serving



e Lean choices like poultry, meats, seafood and
beans mect protein geals

Next: Sauce or season as you: like...Asian... Mexican.,.Indian... .
’ Southwest... wherever your creativity takes you!



. Variations to the old lunch standby, a sandwich,
that we all grow tired of, are pita bread, pasta salad

_or a Salad that are each equally Suaple to bring along

to work with you.
Another important element the dietitian pointed

as a Salad with beans, they could have a snack later
on, such as a fruit or a couple crackers.

"Try to plan for the lunch meal to be in the: middie
of your shift if you can, so you're nourished through-
out the day," said Ms Lee, "Or don't go more than
six hours with no food."

Eating a little bit frequently can be a healthy
thing. You really want to avoid getting to that starv-
ing stage.and grabbing a candy bar or something |
unhealthy,” she emphasised.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

SAN DIMAS ENTERPRISE INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of SAN DIMAS ENTERPRISE INC. has
peat completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is- |
sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the |

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HOUSE OF UNITY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of HOUSE OF UNITY LIMITED has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the’Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009



SSS



The Tribune









@ By LISA LAWLOR

Tribune Features Writer

BEAUTY of Bahamian

life is more than the
immediate answer
ready on anyone's

tongue - it's more than

the sun, sand and sea
inherent to the country
- it's in the intricacies
of a challenging life,
facing social issues
that are often ignored
or avoided, said film-
maker Maria Govan,
whose narrative film
debut Rain premiered
at the Bahamas Inter-
national Film Festival
(BIFF) last month. |

The film followed her title
character's growth from a
tiny, out island innocent to
someone who faces tough
situations in the big city of
Nassau, showing how one
delicate girl can make it
through anything. Rain is a
resounding symbol of hope
that Ms Govan believes
must-be shown in«all films.

The Bahamian themes
explored in the film were
accepted gratefully by many
viewers, who felt she had
really touched on some con-

troversial topics that need

to be exposed Ms Govan
said. : ,

."I feel so thrilled withthe
reception that Rain had,
people were so moved, so
proud and so grateful — and
that is so humbhing. It just
‘warms my heart that
Bahamians appreciated my
film and saw themselves
reflected in it," said the film-
maker. ,

But she was nervous at
first, because she said, "I

care so much about this:

audience, (the movie is) the
first of its kind and I hope it
will have an international
life, but its really for us — it's
a Bahamian film for our
people." .

Ms Govan said her whole
experience with BIFF was
beyond expectation. "Leslie

Vanderpool has brought |

' BIFF forward by leaps and
bounds," she: said. "There
were such fantastic films this
year and the way Rain was
presented at the opening
night, the way everything
was put together was just A



PUBLIC NOTICE

class."

Rain was shown at the
Toronto International Film
Festival last September,
which. exposed Ms Govan
herself to a number of amaz-
ing directors and films.

Ms Govan thinks that
BIFF has huge potential to
become an internationally
sought festival similar to the
one in Toronto, but like all
things, will take time. She is
a prime example of the fruits
borne from such a festival,
as she was part of the resi-
dency program in 2005.

"The residency program
has really taken off," she

Said, "there are money

prizes now for screen writ-
ing. First place will gain you
$5,000, second place $3,000
and third place $2,000."
But for her, money just
isn't the focus. The mentor-
ship makes the festival such
an invaluable learning expe-
rience for those just starting
out, as well as veteran film-
makers who frequent the
Bahamas from year to year.
"I feel the program really
needs to be highlighted and
celebrated," she said, "it can
do a lot of good helping us
to grow a local film indus-

try" and banking on more -

than the sun, sand and sea
inherent to the country.”
What's more, creating a
widely acclaimed film like
Rain gives her a sense of
economic accomplishment.
"I can feel like I've con-
tributed to the Bahamian
economy in a positive way,

and that feels really good," _

shé said. °
filmmakers who have con-
tributed in a creative way,

’ there is Kareem Mortimer,

Ian Poitier, Travolta Coop-
er, Charlie Smith, Kevin
Taylor and Jackson Petit.
"And we're creating a
whole new. Bahamian

career," said the filmmaker, ~

“when you support a
Bahamian film, you're also
supporting the Bahamian
actors, ‘singérs, songwriters

- and creators that couldn't .

exist without:this venue."
Another experience that
readied her. for the chal-
lenges of filmmaking was
working on movies like Flip-
per, Duplicity, Casino
Royale, and After the Sun-
set each shot here in the
Bahamas.,These Hollywood,
commercial films bank on

the beauty of the Bahamian’

landscape, bringing in big
budgets and big names.
"And it's time we made a



INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, TOMMY BELLE MACKEYof
P.O. BOX N-504, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name

to CLORADO TOMMY MACKEY, If there are any objections to

this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections
to the Chief Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas

To name just a few other

More than sun





__ MBy RICHARD COULSON

ind the
Long Fight
for Cuba





_ THIS story of our fascinating, trou-

~â„¢blesome neighbour to the south, com-

bined with an account of our favorite
spirit, makes an irresistible tale for —
Bahamians — particularly since many |
of the Bacardi family settled in Nassau
after Fidel Castro drove them out of
Cuba.

The modern Cuban nation and:
Bacardi rum are linked like a long,
stormy marriage — beginning with love
and leading to estrangement that has
never quite reached total divorce.

When Facundo Bacardi, the Span-
ish-born founder of the Bacardi clan in
Cuba, first distilled rum in the 1860s,
Cuba was still a colony of Spain, ruled

. oppressively by the Royal Governor-
General in Havana. But the Bacardis
lived in Santiago, Cuba’s vibrant sec-
ond city at the distant eastern end of
the island. Facundo’s ambition was to
create a rum that was lighter,
smoother and easier on the palate than
the harsh, dark tipple that was already
made, mainly knocked back by hard-
bitten sailors. He gradually succeeded,
and sales grew throughout Cuba and
abroad. After producing the prize win-
ning Ron Superior Extra Seca in 1873,
Facundo retired and put his 33-year
old son Emilio in charge of the grow-
ing enterprise.

But Emilio was not simply a rum
distiller. He joined Cuba’s indepen-
dence movement, was arrested, and
spent four years in a Spanish prison.
When he returned, hé continued the
difficult juggling act of leading the
Santiago business establishment as
‘chief of Bacardi while writing and agi-
tating for Cuban independence. In
1896 he was again arrested and impris-

SO



oned, while his brothers kept the busi-

ness alive. pe
The hard-fought war of indepen-

dence succeeded in 1898, aided: by

direct intervention of the; U.S..military, |

and Emilio was released, returning to
Santiago to become its mayor and
unquestioned first citizen, later elected
a Cuban senator. During the many
years when Cuba existed\uneasily as
virtually a United States colony, —

_Emilio resisted American domination.

But he and his family did not neglect
their focus.on growing the Bacardi

. enterprise, putting a high-value on its
‘ famous 'tradématk and ré6tganising it
“Yas a Stock company in 1919'with share

ownership limited to ‘family mefnbers,
making Emilio and his three brothers
instant millionaires.,In the 1920s a new
distillery was built in Santiago and a.
gleaming art-deco office tower in
Havana. 3

The venerable Emilio Bacardi died
in 1922, but the new generation proved
equally adept, emphasising interna- -
tional expansion. Sales in the U.S.
were boosted after. prohibition, and

- major investments were made building’

distilleries in Mexico and Puerto Rico.
The book well covers the challenges.
and accomplishments of the Bacardi
family members who carried:the com-
pany forward in the pre-Castro years,
navigating the:continual Cuban politi-
cal intrigues and the competition in
foreign markets, and brings to life the
personalities and peculiarities of the
leaders, particularly José “Pepin”
‘Bosch, a Bacardi son-in-law whose
business ability and self-assurance
moved him up through the ranks to
become managing director in 1944. .

Bosch had to play ball with Fulgen-’
cio Batista, the dominant figure in
Cuba’s politics for over 20 years. But
by 1957 he'and the whole Bacardi fam-
ily had become fed up with the corrup-
tion and civil repression of the Batista
regime, and in the key year 1958 they
actively supported the tiny revolution-
ary force led by Fidel Castro in the

» Sierra Maestre mountains above Santi-

ago.
When Batista fled and Fidel :
announced victory on January 1, 1959,
Santiago and the Bacardi company
rejoiced. But even in the early days,

some had misgivings. Manuel Cutillas, '

film industry here for our peo-
“ple too," said Ms Govan. ,
They taught her the invalu-
able skills of translating a sto-
ry to a wider audience, and
she hopes to grow an indige-

ly important as story tellers to
shed light on things often left
in the dark; issues that are
avoided or ignored (need to
be exposed)," she said.

"In my opinion, there's
always a positive choice, even

moments," she said, "and the

represents that. I'm celebrat-
ing the beauty of our islands
. while exploring social issues,"
she said. .

film are homosexuality, AIDS,
prostitution, and the preva-
lence of outside children.

nous industry here. "It's great- -

physical beauty shown in Rain »

Some topics hinted at in the



cal engineer, was first amazed to see

Fidel accept the former Batista chief ;
of police as his partner-at a victory
lunch, and then horrified four days lat-
er when Fidel ordered-him shot. Now
a resident in Nassau, busily chairing
the Lyford Cay Foundation, Cutillas
vividly remembers those topsy-turvy
early days, when José Espin, a senior
Bacardi executive, held a huge wed-
ding reception, attended by all the
Bacardis, for the marriage of his
daughter Vilma to Fidel’s brother
Raul. The establishment had united
with the revolution, it seemed.

' The honeymoon lasted through =
1959. Bosch had kind words for Fidel’s
sweeping economic and social reforms
and seemed unworried that they would
seriously affect Bacardi — he even pre-

paid the company’s tax bill. By 1960, - :

the climate had changed, as Bacardi
was accused of “counterrevolutionary”
activities, and foreign-owned compa-

aged to.wangle an “exit permit” and
flew off to Miami. On October 14, the
unthinkable happened: a decree
announced that many Cuban-owned

‘private enterprises, including the

largest, Bacardi, had become the prop-
erty of the Government, merely
because it was “capitalist”, contrary to

" the new socialist cuiding ideology.

State functionaries descended on
Bacardi headquarters with documents

“hies, mainly American, were put under.» «
‘pressure. In July, Bosch himself man-~ °

requiring the immediate transfer of all .

the company’s physical assets in Cuba.
But, in their ignorance of business
affairs, they said nothing about intel-
lectual property. Bosch had shrewdly

-sent all the trademark certificates to

America for registration with a New’
York company owned by Bacardi
individuals — a vital step enabling the
continued Bacardi growth even though
cut off from its Cuban roots.
After nationalization, most Bacardi
executives found they could not stom-
ach being public employees and moved
to join Bosch in Miami. Fidel deemed
Cutillas an engineer essential to the
state and refused him an exit permit, so
he had to take the risky step of an “ille-
gal” departure, escaping with just the
clothes on his back, via a six-day

SEE page 11







































in the most despairing -





a Bacardi grandson and young chemi-

TL LUL LULL LOLA LLOLL ALLL OLA LL COLL LLAMA LULL LLLLOLOL LLL OOLLLLL OLLI OLLLELL LALA LALOR LLL SLES OULD

no-later than thirty (30) days after the date of publication of this
notice, i Sesto





SSSA WD) 6 "U™ "°F ND Ry TG "°° °°°0 i oEB’b Pz.) 3 RH. F516“ = "*"»"F6w”FEF£h.tninn0d_ |) 5 DH

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that YYONNE PAUL of WATER
STREET, BIG POUND, NASSAU, BARAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as‘a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why

_ registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 31st day of DECEMBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





~ Charm bracelet Lost at the auby nie us
Saturday, 20 December 2008

REWARD OFFERED
——- 424-0783/356-2068
Bracelet has a very personal history
~ and sentimental value to the owner

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that OCNEL JEAN-PIERRE of.
CULMERSVILLE, P.O. BOX N-10461, NASSAU,
THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of
Jarluary, 2008 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




NOTICE is hereby given that MARIE JEAN-PIERRE of
CULMERSVILLE, P.O, BOX N-10461, NASSAU,
THE BAHAMAS. |s applying to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that. any person who
knows any reason why registration/naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 7" day of
January, 2008 to the Minister responsible for nationality
and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, DEANGELO WHITE
of EGRET STREET, NASSAU EAST NORTH, P.O, BOX

















NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that STUART TAVARES of OLD
ORT BAY, NASSAU, THE BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Ainister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for

registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and

that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 6" day of January, 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O. Box N-7147, Nassau,

The Bahamas.





EE-15556, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name to
DEANGELO BYER. if there are any objections to this change
of name by Deed Poll, you may write such objections to the Chief
Passport Officer, P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later
than thirty (80) days after the date of publication of this notice.






THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009, PAGE 11B

















SHOTS FROM
JUNKANOO.
¢ )



2009 started off
with a bang as tens of
thousands of Bahami-
ans flocked down-

town to view the News

Year’s Day Junkanoo
parade Thursday
morning.

Here are some great
shots of the parade. —
and congratulations
to the Saxons who are
the New Year’s day
winners- only 354
days to go until Box-
ing Day 2009!

Felipé Major/Tribune staff
















Bacardi Fight for Cuba

FROM page 10

starvation voyage to Miami on
a decrepit freighter.

The story of Bacardi in its
post-Cuban years combines
astute legal moves with high-
powered salesmanship and tech-
nical production expertise. New
offshore finance companies were
created, and a sales company for
the U.S. market; to the existing
distilleries in Mexico and Puerto
Rico, plants in Spain, Canada,
Brazil and Nassau (later closed)
were added; and diversification
from rum was achieved by acqui-
sitions of Martini & Rossi ver-
mouth, Dewar’s whiskey, and
gin, vodka, and tequila brands.
These developments were engi-

neered by the brilliant but dicta-
torial Pepin Bosch until 1976,
when a row with his fellow direc-

" tors led to his abrupt resignation

and retirement to Nassau, where
he died in 1994 at age 96.
Bosch’s departure led ‘to the
succession problems that plague
any family-owned company. And
Bacardi was actually five sepa-
rate corporations, each owned
by different family shareholders
with different percentages. The
book displays a family tree show-
ing the bewildering number of
Bacardi male and female suc-
cessors dependent on Bacardi,
either for a job or reliable divi-
dends. Intra-family strife was pre-
dictable. Finally in 1992 a “peace
accord” was reached due to

Cutillas’ meticulous planning that
created a consolidated Bermu-
da holding company named Bac-
ardi Limited. The tradition of
family control continued, with
Cutillas himself in charge, fol-
lowed later by a 38-year-old Bac;
ardi bearing the ancestral name
Facundo. ©

Through all these changes,
antagonism to Fidel never fad-
ed from the Bacardi corporate
objective. In the 1980s the Cuban
government created a rum
known as Havana Club, based
on a small company seized from
its private owner. They first sold
it in the Soviet Union but later
joined up with the mighty Pern-
od Ricard group for full interna-
tional marketing. Bacardi fought

‘bitter legal and commercial bat-
tles to prevent this upstart from
being marketed as the “genuine”
Cuban rum, losing in Europe,
but basically succeeding in the
US, thanks to anti-Castro legis-
lation and controversial high-
pressure political lobbying. °
The traditional Cuban back-
ground of the Bacardi family,
despite their many years of resi-
dence in Florida, Nassau, or
Europe, could never be separat-

ed from corporate ambitions. ,

Young Facundo has valiantly
stated that that “the significance
of my chairmanship is to be the
one to re-establish the Bacardi
company in its homeland ... lead-
ing the family, and the company,
back to its birthplace.” As the

book went to press in early 2008,
and even now, no one can tell
when or whether that dream can
be made reality. But clearly the
iron grip of socialism imposed
by the Castro brothers is slowly
fading as Cuba’s governance and
economy disintegrates, while the
Bacardi company as a billion-
dollat enterprise goes from
strength to strength under uni-
fied control. Perhaps the com-
pany can insist, or even be invit-
ed, to end the long estrangement
and resume the marriage on its
own terms. As described bril-
liantly in this book, Bacardi is an
institution with the energy, the
ambitions, the flexibility, and the
patriotism that could lead to suc-
cess.





artists of
the Bahamas

FROM page 12

: she said.

Another painter, Holly
Parotti, commented that
"there are pockets of women
who are just sitting back. I

: don't know why we're sitting
: back and watching what's

going on with the male artists,
it's like we're making things
happen for ourselves selec-

: tively, but never collective-
: ly," she said in explaining why
: women are not moving for-

ward as one entity. -

In her opinion, men don't
have to move forward as one
like women do, they can

: move in parallel. "Women are
more competitive creatively,

and emotions sometimes get
the better of us," she said,
"sometimes we get in our

; Own way."

Looking at it historically,

for example, it had to be a

group of women who made
the first step towards wom-
en's rights. "It was a lot of

: women who fought for our
: Tight to vote," she said, "it
: wasn't a factor of Mrs Jane

Doe who put herself on the
line for her family."
And she thinks that women

: have every right to be recog-
: nized as equals in the art
atmosphere, both locally and

internationally.
One step in the right direc-
tion, is the number of female

; artists shown in the National
: Art Gallery's fourth exhibi-
: tion. 13 of 32 artists were

females this past year, a high-
er number than seen ever
before.

The film directed by Karen

: Arthur and Thomas Neuwirth
i of Island Films showed the
: talents and rights of Max Tay-

lor, Amos Ferguson, John
Beadle, Kendal Hanna, John
Cox, Brent Malone, Antonius

? Roberts, Eddie Minnis, Dave
? Smith, Stan and Jackson
: Burnside. Their talents and

contributions are not the mat-
ter under. question, because
these are doubtlessly very
accomplished and gifted
artists.., i
“There were no women
painting and sculpting in the

: past like Max, Amos, Kendal,
: and Brent," said Ms Arthur,

"this is a historic document

that looks at who the masters

of art are in the country."
The American team knew

: it would be foolish of them
: to come to another country

and dictate who the masters
and mentors of art were, so
they asked one of the most
prominent art collectors of

: the country — the late Vin-
: cent D'Aguilar who had the
: largest private collection of

art in the Bahamas.
’ "He really knew the artists
and their work, he was a huge

: collector and also gave fund-
: ing to a lot of the artists for
: their work. We went to him

with 132 names, and he chose
the ones featured in the film
that he would call masters or

; seminal artists," said Ms
: Arthur.

And as a woman, she ques-

: tioned it at first. "What about

all the great women painters
and sculptors in the
Bahamas?"

First of all, she explained,

? they were not openly work-
: ing as artists in‘the past as

some of the older masters
were. Newer generation
artists like John Cox and John
Beadle were placed in the

: movie at Mr D'Aguilar's rec-
? ommendation because he did-
i n't feel "the women artists
i had as great a vocabulary of
: craft and their art output was
: not equitable to the works of
i Cox and Beadle," said Ms
: Arthur.

She added that with the

: template provided to the
: Bahamas for such a prolific
: film, it's the perfect opportu-
: nity for someone else to take
: on the documentation of oth-
i er artists who were left out of
: this first film.

"The women who I felt

- } were left out can be docu-
? mented, and even other men
? who missed out, (but) I think
: we have made a fantastic film
: and it's a film that belongs to
i the Bahamas," she said,

"Rather than slam it because

: you're not in it, make your
: own. The world is open."

Call to
advertise:

502-2371


apansouenronsronnen

Celebrating the ‘Great scenes from
‘New Year in Junkanoo 2008
lelicious style mes:page 14

See page nine












SSS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 2009 | | !

lm By LISA LAWLOR Its title has particularly.
Tribune Features Writer

been questioned by
prominent female artists
who feel they also deserve
the spotlight.
"Sometimes I wonder
what era I was born in,"
said artist Jessica Cole-
brooke, who even after a
month, finds the title and
ensuing film to be quite
offensive and upsetting.
"If it was called 'Male \
artists of the Bahamas' or
‘Some artistsof the
Bahamas' it would be fine,
but to have this title is to
say that female artists
‘don't exist in the
Bahamas, or that we don't
measure up," said the
artist of over ten years.
And the ironic part of it
all, she added, is that most
of the men in the film credited women as their men-
tors to become who they are today. "So while they
have female art teachers,and inspiring mothers who
made them who they are today, there are no female
artists featured in the film," said Mrs Colebrooké.
"They all have made contributions, but so have
we. It's ridiculous to think that in 2008, we as
women have nothing to show. This was privately
funded, the persons who made it must have had
some affiliations, but they should've put another
title."
This is just another example of how success in the
country is always measured by men's accomplishments,

SEE page 11











ARAN
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