Citation
The Tribune - Page 1

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 105 No.35

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- TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



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Twenty-one lose their

jobs at Comfort Suites |

& By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter:
Uhompson@tribunemedia, net

TWENTY-ONE dmployees
- from all departments of the Com-
fort Suites property on Paradise
Island were given walking papers
yesterday in-a continuing series of
lay offs from the hotel sector.
Senior Vice-president and Man-
aging Partner William Naughton
blamed the lay offs on dismal
occupancy rates for the winter sea-
son — about.20 to 35 per cent low-

er than previous. winter months

— fueled by the global recession.
Hotel officials expect this trend to
continue into spring, 2009.
When confronted with the news
on the sidelines of the.seventh
annual Caribbean MBA Confer-
ence yesterday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said he expects
more downsizing in the hotel sec-
tor.
"I'm not aware of that but I
expect the downsizing in the hotel
sector has not been complete, if

SEE page six

| PM hopes job stimulus programmes
Wi ‘cushion’ displaced workers

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN THE wake of another round of lay offs in the hotel sector,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said his administration hopes its
job stimulus programmes will "cushion" displaced workers against

harsh economic realities.

"We are in the business of bailing.out now, that's why we are
creating jobs, we think they are going to be adequate to cushion

SEE page seven

Py

Naya

Enter to WIN 2 ROUNDTRIP TICKETS |
TOA et ISLAND

Cg
oe

+|} [Limited Time Offer. While supplies Iast. *

*/ BAHAMASAIR |



More hotel layoffs
on Paradise Islant



OBIE WILCHCOMBE, MP for West End, talks to reporters in 1 front of the hospital where the autopsy of inn





=)

Travolta's son, Jett, is being performed i in Freeport, Bahamas, Monday, Jan. 5, 2009.

Faction of union
executive members
alleged to have —
changed LON Kore
@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

INFIGHTING in the: Air-

port Airline and Allied Work- .

ers Union escalated over the
holiday season as a faction of
executive members were
alleged to have changed the
locks on union headquarters,
indefinitely barring access to
the president and all other
executive officers and general
members.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes called the New Year’s
eve incident, “very unfortu-
nate.”

SEE page six:





mortgage with

° SEE STORY RIGHT

Decision postponed in the AG’s

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A DECISION in
the Attorney Gener-
al’s case against Greg
and Tanya Cash had
to be postponed yes-
terday because the
presiding judge is
reported to be ill.

Ns
)
hen ff
a
eS 4
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2
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case against Greg and Tanya Cash

them as well as other
legal proceedings.

According to Mr
Cash’s affidavit, his
wife was admitted to
Princess Margaret
Hospital on Decem-
ber 26 for medical
and stress-related
issues and is still
receiving care.

The Attorney
General’s Office has

An affidavit filed GREG CASH ouside of filed an application in

yesterday by Greg court yesterday.

Cash — the second
defendant in the action — stat-
ed that Mrs Cash was also ill
and unable to attend.court.
According to the affidavit,
Mrs Cash — the first defendant
— suffered a “tremendous
amount of stress”, which was
attributed to the Attorney
General’s legal action against

your savings!

Get savings built right into your

the Supreme Court
seeking to have Mr
and Mrs Cash deemed “vexa-
tious litigants.”

The AG’s Office claims the
couple’s various court actions
are vexatious. Senior Justice
Anita Allen was expected to
deliver a decision in the matter

SEE page seven









Marsh Harbour:

a By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net -

- FREEPORT - The official
death certificate issued Monday
by pathologists in the Bahamas
confirms that 16-year-oldJett

. Travolta:died of seizure disorder. +

An autopsy was conducted
Monday morning and the body
was released to morticians at
Restview Mortuary around
2.30pm for cremation.

Head pathologist Dr Caroline
Sands of New Providence, and
Dr Ana Tancawan, the patholo-
gist at Rand Memorial Hospital
performed the autopsy. It began
at about 10am and was completed
around noon.

Keith A McSweeney, funeral

' director/mortician at Restview,

said that the Travoltas have
requested cremation of their son’s
remains.

“We are cremating (the body)
here at this facility right now,” he
told international and local press
that had gathered at the crema-
torium on Coral Road around
6.45pm Monday.

Obie Wilchcombe, MP for

‘ West End, told reporters that the

Travoltas are expected to leave
the island with their son’s ashes
by private plane sometime Tues-
day for Ocala, Florida.

SEE page seven

PM ‘won't dignify’
answering Fred
Mitchell’s FNM

govt concerns

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday he »
would not dignify answering.
Fred: Mitchell, PLP MP for
Fox Hill, who cautioned PLPs
that the FNM government
would be using “all of its agen-
cies” against the party in 2009.

Claiming that party leader,
Perry Christie, had cautioned
his parliamentary group that
the FNM would be staging an
all out “war” against the PLP
this year, Mr Mitchell added
that it was his belief that this
political aggression could
include the partisan use of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force:

However, when asked
about these comments yester-

SEE page seven






356.7764
352.6676/7
367.3135

Nassau:
Freeport:









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THE TRIBUNE



Call for greater
union involvement
when dealing with

school violence

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ A TEACHERS union official is calling for a
policy change allowing greater union involve-
ment when it comes to instances of school vio-
lence. |

After a busy start to the school year in 2008,

with several violent incidents occurring in.numer-
ous schools around the country, union officials
feel more control is needed in dealing with violent
students at the school level.

Belinda Wilson, president of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers (BUT), said government has
taken a reactive approach to school violence, giv-
ing way to limited control by school administra-
tors.

Mrs Wilson explains initial steps have been
taken in the form of a questionnaire issued to
BUT members, identifying four areas of con-
cerns for teachers. According to Mrs Wilson they
include: discipline, violence, the police on cam-
puses, and security.

Mrs Wilson said after a complete review, she
intends to present her findings to the ministry
where a policy change is hoped.

Ultimately, Mrs Wilson feels: “There has to
be the initiative coming from the ministry of edu-
cation, that yes this ‘on campus violence’ is a
serious problem, we cannot put our heads in the
sand, and we must deal with it head on. That is
not happening.”

Mrs Wilson said the BUT and school adminis-

trators are powerless when it comes to imple-
menting school protocol, leaving the final word on
policy change to the minister of education.

“There has to be a political will from the gov-
ernment to recognize that we have a discipline
and violence problem.”

Mrs Wilson said the primary role of the union
is to protect teachers, however by extension that
obligation is passed on to students.

Mrs Wilson said addressing the issue of school
violence is a major task, and cannot be accom-
plished by the BUT alone.

Education Minister Carl Bethel told The Tri-
bune on Monday, the government’s position on
school violence has not changed.

- Mr Bethel said: “We continue with our inter-
ventions, we continue to seek to make schools an
atmosphere conducive to learning, and we will
continue to work with the individual students
and the individual problems.”

Mr Bethel contends the education ministry has
taken a pro-active approach to school violence in
the form of its newest initiative, the Transitional
Alternative Programme (TAP).

Mr Bethel explains the TAP project is a more
clinical, psychological and therapeutic approach
in dealing with troubled students.

“The programme is aimed at finding the men-
tal causes, and finding solutions to help troubled
students, bearing in mind that every child is an
individual with an individualized set of needs,
requiring individualized attention, and sometimes
individualized help.”



FROM LEFT: FAMILY Guardian senior vice- president of administration Kerry Higgs, under whose direction the
2009 calendar was produced; winners Ronald Lightbourn, Anthony Stubbs, and Olga Stokes; Family Guardian
chairman Norbert Boissiere; winners Melissa Maura, Jade Greensword and Anthony Hepburn, and Family
Guardian president and CEO Patricia Hermanns. Unable to attend the winners’ reception and missing from the
photo are contest winners Jeff Mansbach, Bean Rose, Tracy Toogood, Michael Toogocd, Jack Hardy and Robyn

Seymour.

Reception puts budding photographers in the frame

‘BUDDING photographers _ tion at the official launch of this the insurance company’s poli-
and winners of the Family year’s “Celebration of Nature” cy owners, businesses and the

Guardian’s 2009 calendar photo _ calendar.
contest were treated to a recep-

With the turquoise waters of

‘general public each year.
Family Guardian said it is

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Exuma National Park gracing
the cover, the 2009 calendar is
the 23rd issue in the “Celebra-
tion” series.

The 14 winning photographs
showcase the diversity and
beauty of Bahamian nature,
spanning flora and fauna,
seascapes and sunsets.

The reception provided an
opportunity to congratulate this
year’s winners whose pho-
tographs were selected from
over 500 entered in Family
Guardian’s photo contest.

Family Guardian’s president
and CEO Patricia Hermanns
said: “The variety and quality
of entries made the selection of
only 14 a difficult task for the
judges. The winning pho-
tographs are a true celebration
of the natural beauty that sur-
rounds us.”

The calendar is distributed to

particularly. pleased this year
that students and teachers have
requested copies of the calendar
to display in classrooms as it
provides an anthology of
Bahamian nature useful in sci-
ence projects.

While Family Guardian’s
“Celebration of Nature” is in
its 23rd year, the company has
produced a calendar since the
early 1970s.

The photo contest was intro-
duced in 1986 by the then chair-
man the late Roscow Pyfrom,
an avid photographer himself
whose images of -wildflowers
and orchids were the subjects
of four Family Guardian calen-
dars.

The photo contest runs from
March until May each year and
winning photographers receive
a gift certificates for their select-
ed entries.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY.6; 2009, PAGE 3





In brief

Jamaican
women,
Bahamian man
charged over
drug bust

THREE Jamaican women
and a Bahamian man
charged.in connection with a
$400,000 drug bust over the
weekend appeared in a Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Dexter Livingstone Wil-
son, 30, Tricia Tamara Wit-
ter, 32, Paula Morrison, 32,
and Winsome Williams, 28,
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane charged with
possession of marijuana with
intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Satur-
day, December 3, the
accused were found in pos-
session of a quantity of mari-
juana that police believe
they intended to supply to
another.

According to reports,
Drug Enforcement Unit offi-
cers seized eight crocus sacks
containing marijuana in
addition to four taped pack-
ages of marijuana while exe-
cuting a search warrant ona
residence at Turks Close,
Flamingo Gardens.

The drugs, which reported-
ly weighed 361 Ibs, are esti-
mated to have a street value
of $400,000.

Police are reportedly also
in search of a fifth person for
questioning in the matter.

All four of the accused
pleaded not guilty to the
drug charge during their
arraignment yesterday.

They were remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison and are
expected back in court on
Friday for a bail hearing.

Robber locks —

noes Pizza were locked in a
freézerwhenagunman .
robbed the delivery chain’s
Carmichael Road location.

The incident:occurred
around 9am on Sunday,
when the employees opened
the establishment’s back
door to dispose of some
garbage.

A gunman dressed in a
dark green jacket took
advantage of the situation
and entered the building
through the open door.

He robbed the establish-
ment and one of the employ-
ees of cash, police reported.

Before leaving, the robber
locked both employees in a
freezer and left the area
heading in an unknown
direction.

A short time later, other
employees showed up for
work and opened the freez-
er. They found both employ-
ees alive and well.

The matter is under active
investigation, police say.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an/
award. /

If so, callus on 322-1986
and share your story.

Ca a

For the stories
eye aT ae MM) oe
read Insight
on Mondays







TWO employees of Domi- ,



Sandals rapped for taking ‘
long’ to decide on tor nae

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

LABOUR Minister Dion
Foulkes yesterday said San-
dals Royal Bahamian Resort
has taken too long to deliver
its response to government’s
request that it rehire eight
executive officers of the
Bahamas Hotel Maintenance
and Allied Workers Union
who were laid off in Decem-
ber.

He said the matter has been
“outstanding for far too long.”

“T contacted them today
and J am waiting for them to
respond.

“The matter has been out-
standing I think for far too
long and the Sandal’s man-
agement team need to make a
decision.

“T’ve left a message for the
manager to call me today, but
Thaven’t received a call from
him yet,” Mr Foulkes said yes-
terday.

This comes as attorney for
the Bahamas Hotel Mainte-
nance and Allied Workers
Union (BHMAWU) Obie
Ferguson held a press-confer-
ence in which he called on Mr
Foulkes to give an update on
the status of the leuor San-
dals workers.

Mr Ferguson has also com-

mitted to organising a solidar-

ity march to protest the man-
ner in which recent lay-offs,
including those at Sandals and
yesterday at Comfort Suites

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER Bahamasair
pilot who alleges he was
unfairly dismissed after nearly
three decades of flying for the
airline has filed an appeal
claiming he did not receive a
fait hearing.

Anthony Dean, 52, had his
employment terminated in
2003 because he had failed
flight simulator training four
times in 2002, an employment
tribunal ruled on December
3.

However, Captain Dean
claims in the Notice of Appeal
that vital evidence that would
have proved he did not fail
the flight simulator training
four times was prevented from
being heard by Bahamas
Industrial Tribunal president
Harrison Lockhart.

The captain refused to

accept Bahamasair’s settle-

ment of 15 months salary,
accrued monetary benefits
and travel privileges in the
hope of receiving a greater
settlement, and the tribunal
was dismissed.

AOE SITS





VT



on Paradise Island, were con-
ducted.

“We are inviting the Christ-
ian Council, we are inviting
all civic organisations, we are
inviting those who are fair-
minded in the community to
come out and support the
workers,” said Mr Ferguson.

“We feel that the workers
have been marginalised,” he
said, referring in particular to





J contacted
them today and
am waiting for
them to
respond. The
matter has been
outstanding I
think for far too
long and the
Sandals
management
team need to
make a
decision.”

Dion Foulkes

the firing of the entire lead-
ership of the BHMAWU from
Sandals.

The eight executive mem-
bers of the BHMAWU were
among a group of 150 people
laid off in December by the
Sandals resort, which blamed
the tourism downeim for the
move.

At the time of the exercise,
the BHMAWU and the



Captain files ‘an appeal in dispute
over flight simulator training

But Captain Dean has gone
to the Court of Appeal claim-
ing the ruling for his applica-
tion to be dismissed was
wrong in law, went against the
weight of the evidence, and
contradicted what the presi-
dent had said in open court.

In the nine grounds for
appeal, the appellant main-
tains Mr Lockhart acted
beyond the powers of the con-
stitution by making an
ambiguous ruling in the case.

He further alleges the pres-
ident, “Arbitrarily and capri-
ciously decided not to hear
witnesses who the tribunal
ordered to appear and those
subpoenaed by the tribunal to
appear and give evidence at
the hearing.”

And that witnesses were
prevented from being cross-
examined by his attorney,
when it would have “exposed
the real reason why the appel-
lant was unfairly dismissed.”

The real reason he lost his
job, Captain Dean claims “was

due to his continuous docu-
mented effort to have regard

_for public safety and health

on Bahamasair aircraft,”
which would.have required
the airline to carry out expen-
sive repairs.

The notice of appeal filed
on December 30, claims Mr
Lockhart was wrong in law to
refuse Captain Dean’s appli-
cation to order Bahamasair to
pay more than the 12 month
gratuity payment in his
employment contract, and that
he ignored the fact. Captain
Dean was entitled to a greater
award for unfair dismissal
because of his 28 years of
employment.

In the notice, Captain Dean
also alleges he was not afford-
ed a fair hearing within a rea-
sonable time as his case
opened in early 2003 and did
not close until nearly six years
later in December 2008, dur-
ing which time he was unem-
ployed with no income.




Patrick Hanna/BIS Photo

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (right) presents retiring Secretary to tHe Cabinet Wendall Major with a
minted $250 face value gold coin reserved normally as a gift for Heads of Government and foreign digni-
taries. They pose in front of a photo of the House of Parliament that the Prime Minister also presented to Mr.
Major at his farewell retirement party at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace and Casino, Friday,
January 2, 2008. Anita Bernard will be the next Secretary to the Cabinet.

Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Worker’s Union

(BHCAWU) were awaiting a |

decision from the Court of

Appeal about which union
should be allowed to officially.

represent employees at the
property.

Mr Ferguson called. the.

action a “clear case of union

busting”, while Mr Foulkes |.

warned against hotels ani

Former Bahamasair pilot claims he did not |
receive fair hearing in unfair dismissal case.

omtBy MEGAN. REYNOLDS -

Different!

JEANNIE
MCQUEENIE

Great —
Selection of
Embroidered
Tops &

, Caftans! |







: inviting all Civic
|) organisations, —
-we are inviting |

. fair-

Established in 1956 by an old Bahamian fatnily







those. who are

minded in
the community



to.come out and
support the -
2 workers.” ES 3

&





Obie Ferguson

‘terminations to weaken trade

° unions.

“Tt is:a cardinal rule in
industrial ‘relations that the
executives of unions are pro-
tected at all. times,” he’ said.

- A message left with Sandal’s
public relations 1 Manager Steve
Hector. seeking comment on
the issue ‘was not. returned up

to press: sine last. night...

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009





























‘The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E: H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S, B.Ay LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

11 Shirley Street; PO, Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. ase Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

‘Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

ONE of the funniest Eddie Maiioby “Satur-

day Night Live” skits was one called “White -

like Me” in which Murphy, to learn how white
people live, goes undercover as a white person.

“Slowly, I began.to realise,” says Murphy,
“that when white people are alone, they give
things to each other for free.”

In one scene, he goes into a bank and with no
collateral, no credit and no ID asks for a $50,000
loan. ‘The banker tells him, “Just take what you
need.: Pay | us back anytime — or don’t. We
don’t care.””

When that'skit ran more than 20 years ago it

_ was éalled satire. Today it’s called the subprime
. ‘mortgage crisis or bailout, and the money we’re
~ talking about isn’t 50 G’s but about three-quar-

ters of a trillion dollars. And it’s not about race

ut ‘about class and accountability.
“The. Associated Press contacted 21 banks

hat received at least $1 billion of the govern-

ment bailout money and asked them four easy-

O-answer questions.

low much has been spent?

What wasitspent on? .

:-® How much is being held in savings?







































i



*.What’s the ‘plan for the rest of the money?

Now, if you’re one of the big-shot over-shots
| Funning a major bank and you came, crawling
--on your knees, to beg the American people to
- bail you out of the catastrophe you created by
your own mismanagement, greed and arro-
* gance, -you should be eager to answer those

"questions.

-The very name of the programme, created by

the ‘Emergency Economic Stimulus Act of 2008,

hud. be. enough to humble you and remind
tof your sins: The Troubled Assets Relief

- Programme. You’re seeking relief because of
. assets your actions have troubled.

But these cats aren’t like you and me; they go
through life carrying extra layers of arrogance
and a sense of entitlement. |

None of the banks contacted by the AP
would give specific answers, and some were
downright defiant in their responses.

Thomas Kelly, a spokesman for JP Morgan
*~ Chase, which walked away with $25 billion,
said, “We've lent some of it. We’ve not lent
some of it. We're not. giving an accounting of
‘here’s how we’re doing it.” We have not dis-

.. closed that to the public. We’re declining to.”

Barry: Koling, a spokesman for SunTrust
Banks Inc., which got $3.5 billion, said, “We're
not providing dollar-in, dollar-out tracking.”

Wendy Walker; spokeswoman for Comerica

\ Inc, ($2.25' ‘billion), said, “We’re not sharing
* any other detail: We're just not at this time.”
en And ‘Kevin E Heine, s panesman for Bank of .



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New York Mellon ($3 billion) said, “We’re
choosing not to disclose that.”

He had a request for the AP. “I just would
prefer if you wouldn’t say that we’re not going
to discuss those details.”

“We’re not giving an accounting of.”

“We're not providing dollar-in, dollar-out
tracking.”

“We're not sharing any other detail.”

“We’re choosing not to disclose that.”

Don’t these comments reflect the attitudes
that helpéd create this mess?

An early Christmas gift of hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars from taxpayers who are suffer-
ing through their worst Christmas in years, and
these banks don’t feel they need to account for
this money, including any bonuses that CEOs
are taking.

In the spirit of the season, it would be tempt-
ing to make the Santa Claus analogy for Con-
gress and the administration for requiring so
little from the banks.

But Santa has standards. He knows who’s
been bad or good, and he demands good behav-
iour before he delivers any more gifts.

He doesn’t let the richest kids raid the North
Pole, take the other kids’ toys, eat all the cook-
ies, drink all the milk and then burp before

‘announcing they’ll be back for the rest so stack

them up at the door, no questions asked.

Not one of the banks that refused to answer .
the AP’s questions of accountability would help

any good, hard-working person who asked for
money to tide them over in desperate times but
refused to say how they were going to spend
that money. ,

Not one of those banks would allow such an
arrogant and cavalier disregard for account-
ability from any of the very people from whom
they’ve taken taxpayer-funded bailout money
and to whom they now display arrogant and
cavalier disregard for accountability.

Before they allow the rest of the money to be
doled out, lawmakers better attach a few strings

to it and force the banks to answer, specifically, ‘

all questions about what.they have done with
the bailout money so far and what exactly will
they do with the new money they’re begging for.

If their attitude is still, “Just take what you -

need. Pay us back anytime — or don’t.

“We don’t care,” then we need to put Eddie
Murphy in charge of the bailout scheme. At
least he saw this coming, long ago.

(This article was written by Cary Clack of the

San Antonio Express-News - c.2009).





















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‘ =e
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EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me some
space in your editorial column
to comment on one of the eco-
nomic phenomenon that is now
covering The Bahamas.

That is, of course the topic of
layoffs and staff reductions.

This paper is partially based
on a recent article by D
McCann in the business -press
in the USA.

Already, thousands of
Bahamian jobs have disap-
peared in the first 11 months of
2008, and most financial pro-
fessionals expect that more lay-
offs will occur in 2009.

Companies contemplating
layoffs. must, however, consider
a variety of issues, not all of
which fit into a spreadsheet — a
common tool used by.accoun-
tants and business persons to
assess business challenges.

The spreadsheet is usually
depicted. in dollars and cents
and they hardly ever consider
intangible items.

As of the first of the Decem-
ber, unemployment is estimated
to be around 15 per cent (take
the published amounts of 10 per
cent recently, add the new job
cuts, add the persons who don’t
bother to register, add the
underemployed and 15 per cent
looks good).

Do not expect any govern-
ment to admit a high unem-
ployment: rate because it does
not make them look good.
Their goal is to minimise the
perception of how bad the econ-
omy really is and to. maximise
the propaganda on what: they
are doing to make it better’
again.

' One this is ‘certain, unem-
ployment is the highest since
the election of 2007 and maybe

_ even the highest since August

1992.

The reason companies make
these cuts is to trim their bud-
gets in the face of economic
headwinds.

For top management, it’s a
tactic that’s hard to argue: if top
line growth is slowing, expenses
should slow too.

And for most companies,

, people are the largest expense,
or at least, the easiest expense -
. to modify.

But is there a financial case to
be made against Jayoffs?
Certainly, layoffs come with

costs too, both tangible and

intangible.

In addition to potentially
incurring restructuring charges,
the following points are a con-
sequence of layoffs: .

1) Companies lose institu-
tional knowledge;

2) Companies risk being
caught short-staffed when the
economy turns around; and

3) No matter how sensitive
they try to’be, companies often
















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damage the morale and pro- |

ductivity of the surviving
employees.
There is also a non-financial

‘case against layoffs, though it’s

harder to make to the manage-
ment team‘who owes a fiducia-
ry duty to their shareholders.
Employees are key stakeholders
in a company’s fortune.

The notion of viewing not just
shareholders but employees as
key stakeholders in company
fortunes was a hot topic of con-
versation in the early 1990’s
after a spate of leveraged buy-
outs came undone.

Today, a similar question. is
whether mass layoffs — sparked
more by fear than accurate fore-
casting -— could actually deepen
the recession, creating a-vicious
circle.

Technically, that’s still not top
management’s concern: while
fiduciary responsibility does
shift when a company is imper-
iled, it shifts.to creditors, not
employees.

Still, many Bahamian com-
panies and their American
counterparts are more reliant
on the intellectual capital of
their employees than they are
on actual production or the pro-
vision of services.

Companies that lay off
employees are taking a long-
term risk for a short-term sav-
ings.

Indeed, companies “almost
always” overestimate the num-
ber of people who should be

.laid off, according to Crist

Berry, who served as a vice
president or director of human
resources at four different For-
tune 500 companies before

‘retiring in 2005.

In. The Bahamas, we saw ‘his

* phenomenon several years ago

when Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company (BTC) down-
sized for the purported purpose
of privatisation (which is anoth-
er topic for another lecture).
My understanding is that BTC
was forced to rehire additional
persons and to re-engage some
of those persons who were sep-
arated from the company.
Indeed, the same thing hap-
pened several months ago at
Kerzner where the remaining
staff had to work extended
hours and then, some of the
separated staff members were
rehired.

“You've got to figure out

what your competitive edge is.
— what sets you apart from the:

competition? That’s the place
you can’t cut,” says Berry.
- “Tf you don’t understand that,

you're going to have a heck of a:

time ramping back up.”
Steven Hunt, a longtime

‘developer of talent and perfor-

mance management solutions
who is currently director of
business transformation services
for software vendor Success-
Factors, agrees that companies

“tend to jump the.gun” on a
offs.

Often, he said, workers are
more flexible than their employ-
ers realise when it comes to cut?
ting costs.

‘Voluntarily taking pay cuts,
forgoing bonuses, and working
fewer hours may be preferable
to taking a chance on being laid
off.

“That won’t work at every

company, but in some cases it»

canbe an effective way to say

. that ‘employees are our most

valuable assets so we’re going to
think twice about getting rid of
them,’” Hunt says.

In the retail sector, Hunt says
he’s seen some companies take
people out of management roles
and put them on store floors
where they can drive revenue.
“I’m not saying that’s going to
solve the problems of a major
financial crisis, but companies
should start by asking them-
selves if they’re getting as much
money from people’s work as

“they possibly can,” he says.

Such‘tactics may also help a
company hedge against a sud-
den rebound in the market.
Rehiring laid-off workers after a
prolonged downturn is often
much harder than companies
expect.

Perhaps even more poten-
tially damaging than laying off
too many people is letting go
of the wrong people.

Usually, when management
makes this type of decision, they
will employ a matrix estimating
how much a person costs to

THE TRIBUNE

(GER enenr eRe reece eee ese eee
: see SO TO THE EDITOR |

Employee layoffs —
double-edged sword

for companies
LETTERS

employ, their level of perfor-
mance, and what knowledge
they have.

“Companies often have made
mistakes (estimating employee
knowledge), where they have
let someone go that they sud-
denly realised was the only one
who knew how to perform an

_important task,” Hunt says.

In a high-profile example,
Circuit City Stores last year laid
off 3,400 employees whom it
described as “paid well above
the market-based salary range
for their role” and hired lower-
paid replacements.

The impact on employee

‘ morale was severe, and some

observers have partly blamed
the move for last month’s bank-
ruptcy filing and announcement
of 155 store closings.

Then there is the story of
another company that got rid
of a team of five people, only to
discover that another, revenue-
generating department critical-
ly relied on them.

After firing the five employ-
ees and giving them severance,
the company decided its best

‘option was to rehire them into

the other department.

This is equivalent to the in a
hotel environment, firing the
kitchen staff because the man-
agement of the hotel felt that
the waiters were so good.

Only to find out later that the
waiters were only perceived as
good because the food came out
quickly and was always well
cooked.

Of course, it can also be dam-
aging for a company to cut too
few employees, resulting in the
dreaded “downsizing of the
month” scenario: numerous
small layoffs, with everyone
thinking the ax will fall next on
them.

Tronically, some experts’ say

, that can do as much damage to

morale and survivor productiv-
ity as cutting too deeply.

It is alleged that this is occur-
ring presently in a large com-
pany in Freeport where a small
group was let go already, and
rumours persist that the com-
pany’s management is seeking
further and deeper cuts.

Clearly, then, layoffs, like so
many other business decisions,
cannot be based solely on the
coming year’s budget spread-
sheet.

And that’s particularly true
in the current environment,
when normal forecasting is
nearly impossible.

Even companies that are nor-
mally excellent at forecasting
their results may not.be able to
adequately forecast where their
company is headed.

It is argued that unless the
company’s survival is at stake,
it’s tricky to know with any con-
fidence whether layoffs are
actually the right move.

The managerial methods we
currently use to determine if
layoffs are appropriate may be
flawed and not applicable to
today’s economic environment
which is unprecedented. —

Managing today’s complex
organisations is no easy task.
You effectively have the fate of
person’s lives in your hand, yet
you must do the right thing for
the company that employs you.
While management employees
have a responsibility to do what
is right for workers, they also
must do what is right for the
company.

Clearly, if a company’s access
‘to cash is insufficient to fund
operations and other obliga-
tions, layoffs may be unavoid-
able.

That’s true even if it’s just
that the cash cushion is too thin
— if a miss in sales projections
would result in the company
flirting with insolvency.

But some executives make
this type of decision based, not
on the needs of the companies
they head or the fate of the per-
sons they employ.

Some of the layoffs may be
for selfish reasons.

Sometimes, layoffs are made
to reduce cost for the sake of
hitting an artificial number so
the top executives can get a
bonus.

Sadly, in The Bahamas, there
are some executives like that,
who say “to hell with the peo-
ple, I’m going to do. whatever
it takes to get my bonus.”

JOHN S BAIN
Nassau,
December 21, 2008



bho os

eke eee

_ LOCAL NEWS





Man gets jail
sentence for
drug and
weapons
charges

A MAN was sentenced to
serve 24 months in jail after
pleading guilty to drug and
weapons charges in a Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday. '

Ronald Alexander Joha-
son, alias Roz. Johnson, iai-
tially pleaded not guilty to
charges of possession of
marijuana with the intent to
supply, possession of an
unlicensed firearm and pos-
session of ammunition in
October of 2007.

According to the prose-
cution, police executed a
search warrant. on Johnson’s
St James Road residence on
Wednesday, October 17,
2007 and discovered four
pounds of marijuana in a
bedroom. Police also found
a silver Smith and Wesson
.38 revolver along with 21
live rounds of .38 ammuni-
tion hidden tehind a bath
tub in the residence, Inspec-
tor Ercell Dorsette told the
court yesterday.

According to the prose-
cutor, police also found
$625 on Johnson.

Magistrate Bethel sen-
tenced Johnson to serve 24
months in prison on each
count. The sentences are to
run concurrently.

‘Bahamasair
official refutes
reperts of
impending layoffs

TABLOID newspaper
reports claiming Bahamasair
will layoff 300 workers have
been refuted by the airline’s
general manager Henry
Woods.

Mr Woods said a report in

Tae Punch’s'Nassau:

Grapevine yesterday which
claims Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham was planning to lay
off 300 workers next month
was news to him.

“T have no knowledge
whatsoever about that,” he
said, adding if there were big
changes in the pipeline, he
would hope to have been
told.

He also said The Punch

was inaccurate in reporting’:

that the airline has nine

planes and 900 staff, when in

fact it has eight aircraft and
714 employees.

Florida House
speaker to
leave college joh

@ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.

FLORIDA House Speaker
Ray Sansom announced Mon-
day he will give up the
$110,000 Northwest Florida
State College job he took the
day he was sworn in as speak-
er, according to Associated
Press.

_ Critics have questioned
whether the job as the college’s
chief fundraiser was a reward
for putting $25.5 million for
the school into the budget last
year, when Sansom served as
head of the House Budget and
Policy Council. Sansom was
making $25,000 more than his
predecessor and the college
didn’t advertise the job.

But Sansom defended him-
self even as-he stepped down
_ from the college job.

“JT accepted my position.at
the college with pure intentions

and for good reasons. I have ii
long had a passion for educa- ; }
tion, and I have spent decades,

working to expand the oppor-
‘tunities available to the peo-
ple of northwest Florida,” San-
som told House members as a
special session to cut the bud-
get began. t
Sansom graduated from
Northwest Florida State and
told members that he had
hoped to work there longafter
his legislative service ended.
“Unfortunately, some have
disagreed with my decision to
work at the college. While I do
not question their motives, I
strongly object to their conclu-
sions. In all my yearsin public
service, I have sought to act in
a manner worthy ofthe trust
that the people have placed in
me,” Sansom said.
Sansom said, though, that he
didn’t want the job to be a dis-
traction to House business.

| RM BAILEY STUDENTS “FORCED TO LEARN IN STRUCTURALLY UNSOUND FACILITIES’

Claim that government failed to
fulfill school repairs promises



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



HUNDREDS of students at R M
Bailey High School are forced to learn
in structurally unsound facilities
because government failed to fulfill its
promises to carry out repairs ‘on cam-
pus, school officials told The Tribune.
yesterday.

As RM Bailey yesterday opened its
doors to students for the 2009 spring
semester, administrators said they
have grown weary of the government’s
“empty promises” to carry out much
needed repairs to the school’s build-
ings.

R M Bailey principal Julian Ander-
son said several major pre-requested
repairs to the Robinson Road campus
have not been addressed despite
numerous requests made to the Min-
istry of Education.

Mr Anderson said that the gymna-
sium, which serves as the school’s pri-
mary meeting location, has been in a
state of disrepair for more than six
years now.

The gym, Mr Anderson said, has a
gaping hole in its ceiling, exposing stu-
dents and teachers to the elements.

Carl Bethel

ough paint job, which he said has not
been performed in more than three
years.

“I’ve made several recommenda-



The school is also in need of a thor-

tions verbally and in writing, and I
guess it’s based on who you are and
who you know that determines how
things get done,” he said.

Mr Anderson said he has been
forced to “make do” with the limited
resources available, however, he con-
tinues to look to the government for
assistance.

Rebuilt

While he hopes that government will
have the gym demolished and a new
one built, Mr Anderson said that the
entire school, which is more than 40
years old, really needs to be rebuilt
from the ground up.

Education Minister Carl Bethel said
yesterday that repairs to R M Bailey’s
gymnasium will not take place before
this summer due to several “unfore-
seen expenses.” ji

“Repairs to the St Georges Junior
High School in Freeport, Anatole
Rodges School in southern New Prov-
idence, and the T G Glover school
experienced some unforeseen expens-
es that affected our capital budget,”
he said.

At Government High School, prin-
cipal Geoffrey McPhee said repairs
have resumed on five staircases.

Work at the high school had stopped
because of pay disputes between a pri-
vate contractor and the Ministry of
Education, he said.

However, he said that there are still
several other areas which require
major repair work, including numer-
ous walk-ways and bridges on the cam-

us.

Both RM Bailey and Government
High schools are among 11 campuses
set to be completely rebuilt or
refurbished according to Bahamas
Union of Teachers president Belinda
Wilson.

A F Adderley, C H Reeves, Selina
Point All-Age School in Acklins and
Low Sound school in Eleuthera are
also among schools to be rebuilt.

Minister Bethel said yesterday that
government’s intention to rebuild 11
public schools has not changed,.how-
ever, the massive undertaking cannot
go ahead before additional funds are
allocated.

Mr Bethel said he expects this may
not happen before the end of the next
budget peniod:

Search and rescue efforts

for missing man

suspende

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEARCH and rescue efforts
for a man believed to be miss-
ing at sea have been suspend-

.ed by the Bahamas Air and

Sea Rescue Association (BAS-
RA) pending further informa-
tion, an official said yesterday.
However, two vessels from
the Defence Force’s Harbour
Patrol Unit were said to be
continuing their search for 48-
year-old Dion Dawkins, who
reportedly went missing at sea
around 4pm on Friday.

Yesterday, an officer from
the RBDF Harbour Patrol
Unit said two vessels were
scouring an extensive area
where Mr Dawkins is believed
to have gone missing.

While yesterday's weather
conditions proved favourable
for the search, officials said
efforts were hampered by the
fact that it is unclear where
exactly Mr Dawkins went
missing.

According to information
received by The Tribune, Mr
Dawkins was engaged by
Reginald Sands, the husband
of former Senator Gladys
Sands, to assist two of his
employees,who had run out of

gas in one of his vessels off
Lyford Cay.

Mr Dawkins was reportedly
paid $100 and set out from
Arawak Cay in his vessel, the’
23-foot long ‘Big H’, on which
he is also-reported to have
lived.

However, Mr-Dawkins nev-
er arrived at the stranded ves-
sel and has not been heard
from since.

Around 9am on Sunday Mr
Dawkins’ vessel was found
capsized near Love Beach, Mr
Lloyd said.

The vessel was towed to
the Defence Force’s
Harbour Patrol Station on Bay
Street.. ,



KA \ AS
MISSING MAN Dion Dawkins



Boat

BASRA operations manag-
er Christopher Lloyd said his
organisation called off search
and rescue efforts on Sunday,
the same day Mr Dawkins'
boat was found capsized in the
Love Beach area.

He said chances of a rescue
are slim as it appears that Mr
Dawkins was not wearing a
life jacket when he went miss- -
ing.

"We don't know where it
happened, whether it was in
the ocean or on the reef. If he
was wearing (a) life jacket he
would have been ashore
already. That's the direction
that the wind and the waves
would have taken him. So like
I said, it's more of a recovery -
effort (now), but to recover
any bodies you'd have to know
where it happened, "Mr Lloyd
said.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
Md RR
PHONE: 322-2157

Another group of Haitian

migrants apprehended

Branville IN CeLOr TTA?

YET another group of illegal Haitian
immigrants was picked up by the
Defence Force yesterday morning in the
southwestern end of New Providence.

The 132 migrants —.101 men, 23
women and eight children — were appre-
hended just after they made landfall.

After receiving information from res-
idents of Venice Bay that a Haitian

sloop had been seen in nearby waters,
shortly after 6am, members of the |

Defence Force were immediately dis-
patched to the area.

On arrival, the combined efforts of
concerned residents, the Defence Force,
and Immigration and police officials
resulted in the apprehension of the ille-
gal migrants.

A 40-foot white and blue Haitian sail-
boat was also discovered in the vicinity.

The Haitian migrants were turned
over to Immigration officials for further
processing.

With this latest apprehension of Hait-

ian migrants, a total of 363 have been
taken into custody for trying to land ille-
gally in the Bahamas so far for 2009...

Last Friday, the Defence Force cap-

tured a group of 156 illegal Haitians as

they strolled around Ragged Island after Ve

landing onshore.

Less than 24 hours later, on Saturday,

Defence Force officers intercepted :
Haitian sloop off the southern coast: of

OPe

Long Island. On board were 75 Haitians. |

Minister of State for Immigration
Branville McCartney told The Tribune
that the Immigration Department will
continue to repatriate the illegal
migrants as quickly as possible. °

He speculated that the recent mass
exodus of Haitians could be due to indi-

cations of political unrest in that country.
Favourable wind conditions during |
this time of the year may also be.a reax;})

son for the large numbers of Haitians
attempting to emigrate in the past few
weeks, he said.



Alternative Dispute Resolution

negotiation and mediation skills workshop in Nassau, January 27-30, 2009

“Very beneficial, informative and practical. This program is
easy to understand and easily applicable in many situations.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

To learn more:

fA 61113

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SUCCESS

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» learn how to deal with tough bargainers -
* learn how to mediate disputes
* receive individual coaching in mediation. -

contact@adr.ca







PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



BahamaHealth: Slim-Down Challenge

‘Obesity is perhaps the most pervasive medical problem we
face today and causes many serious health complications,
including diabetes, heart disease and even cancer.’



Family Guardian vice president Linda Jarrett

OR the third consec-

utive year, Family

Guardian’s group life

and health division,
BahamaHealth, has lauriched an
effort to increase awareness about
the epidemic of obesity and its
associated health risks.

With its third annual Slim-Down
Challenge, BahamaHealth once
again provided a programme of
education, exercise and support
for clients, associates and the pub-
lic.

This year’s challenge ran 1 from
August through November and
featured a special event the sec-
ond Saturday of each month which
brought participants together for a
morning of health-focused activi-
ties and information.

’ Slim-Down participants had |

their weight and blood pressure
recorded and received advice and
encouragement to help them meet
their health goals.

Family Guardian vice president
Linda Jarrett, said: “Obesity is per-
haps the most pervasive medical
problem we face today and causes
many serious health complications;
including-diabetes, heart disease
and even cancer. We feel that our
. longer programme has a greater
impact than a one-time event in
addressing this -health issue, and
we were very happy to.see the
enthusiasm and commitment of
participants over these past four
months.”

BahamaHealth’ s Sli’ Dowa:

Challenge.drew impressive crowds
to the events, which were themed
this year to attract different age
and interest levels. ““We wanted to
ensure that the whole family
becomes informed about the.ben-

a

efits of healthy lifestyles, and our
four major events were geared to
appeal to all age groups,” said Mrs
Jarrett.

Under the banner “A Family
Affair,” the Slim-Down opening
event in August brought the young
and young-at-heart to the Family
Guardian Financial Centre at the

‘ corner of East Bay and Church

Streets to register, weigh-in, warm-
up, and walk a 30-minute seaside
route.

Among the early morning exer-
cisers was Dr Hubert Minnis, Min-
ister of Health, who gave opening,
remarks and congratulated
BahamaHealth for the initiative.

Family Guardian’s president and

- CEO Patricia Hermanns wel-

comed the large crowd. She said:
“The Annual Slim-Down Chal-
lenge is an important undertaking
for our company as we recognise

‘ the ever-increasing impact of obe-

sity and its associated health risks
within our community. As a part-
ner in the healthcare industry, we

, take seriously our role in educating

our clients and the public on issues

that affect their health and well- -

being.”
September’s Slim- Down pro-
gramme was geared for those over

°18 and under 30 years old, who

have grown-up in the ‘age of fast-
food and computer games. Noting
the World Health Organisation’s

. position that the obesity epidemic

is driven by “diets with a higher
proportion of saturated fats and

sugars” and “increasing use of ©

automated transport, technology
in the home, and more passive
leisure pursuits,” BahamaHealth’s
September event featured whole-
some foods, exercises, judo and
dance.

CREDIT SUISSE
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

In October “Tiny Tots” enjoyed
their own special day and were
treated to a hula-hoop contest, a
petting zoo and a junkanoo rush-
out, learning at an early age that
outdoor activities and exercise lead
to good health. A hands-on
junkanoo workshop showed
youngsters the art of cutting and
pasting.

The 2008 Slim-Down Challenge _
. concluded with a grand finale on

November 8 under the theme,
“Age Ain’t Nothin’ But A Num-
ber,” underscoring the fact that it’s
never too late to improve your
health. ;

Special prizes were awarded to
Slim-Down participants in specific
categories, recognising the most
enthusiastic and successful in terms
of their long-term efforts and pos-
itive results. —

“Tt has been very rewarding to
follow thé success of persons who
have lost weight the right way,
through proper diet and increased
physical activity, and have also
improved their blood pressure and
cholesterol levels,” said Mrs Jar-
rett.

While the annual Slim-Down
Challenge is designed to help par-
ticipants achieve optimal health in
a fun environment, the subject of
obesity is a serious one. The World
Health Organisation reports that

‘more than 1 billion adults world-

wide are overweight — and at least
300 million of them clinically
obese. The incidence of childhood
obesity is also increasing, and is
already epidemic in some areas.
An estimated 20 million chil-
dren under age five worldwide are
overweight, giving rise to an
increase in type two diabetes in
young people, which ‘for’ most: of

THE TRIBUNE



MATH RY AIAN roti erel cuechcl



the 20th century was confined to
older adults. The medical commu-
nity has long warned that obesity
poses major health risks. Some
risks, though non-fatal, cause suf-
ficient physical and psychological
issues to affect the quality of life,

for example: chronic pain, poor
mobility, breathing difficulty, and
infertility.

However, obesity can lead to
life-threatening problems, includ-
ing type two. diabetes, cardiovas-
cular disease, hypertension and

stroke, and certain cancers.
While heredity and hormones

-can. influence unhealthy weight

gain, health professiondls point to
the major culprits: too much
unhealthy food and too ittle exer-
cise.

Oswald Ingraham yet to make

decision on 2012 election

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

HAVING been elected to serve his second
consecutive term as the Member of Parliament for
South Eleuthera, former House Speaker Oswald.
Ingraham said he has not made any official deci-

sion as.to whether or not he will run for office’,

again in the 2012 general election.
Despite initial reports that he had informed
his party leader, Perry Christie, that he would

‘ not be. vying for the South Eleuthera ‘seat again,

ends, and before that time I will then make a
determination as to whether I will offer again,” he
said. -
At the PLP Parliamentary dinner, held at Mr
Christie’s-home on Cable Beach, the former
prime minister. reportedly warned those gath-
ered that some of the party’s candidates in the
2007 election would not be renominated for any
constituencies in 2012.

While not going into specifics, there has been
much speculation as to whom Mr Christie’ was,
referring in this general remark, leaving many

‘MPs and:former:MPs questioning the security of

Mr Ingraham. said, he.has: not. made ,atiy suchi-. their stahdisig;in the party,),| bt "At ai be

announcement.

“T never did such a thing,” Mr Ingraham com-

mented. “I don’t know who spread that but I
have not made any such statement and when the
time: arises that I make a statement I will cer-
tainly do so.’

Mr Ingraham said he will serve out his term in
the House of Assembly before deciding his future
in the Bahamian political arena.

“T am the Member of Parliament until the term

Of those rumoured to be in question for renom-
ination are mainly PLP’s who are considered to
have caused the party damage in the last general
election — ultimately hurting the party’s chances
of regaining government in 2007.

To avoid such a repeat, sources close to the
party reveal that an in-depth analysis of former
and future candidates has been undertaken to
ensure that the party avoids any “further embar-
rassment” as 2012 nears.

Private Banking ss
is presently considering applications for

SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER ~ EQROPEN DESK

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Senior
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Requirements:

Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking &
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management, trading, trade reconciliation, custody business ane securities
markets

Marketing experience throughout the Bhrone Must have established international
client base with assets under management in excess S of US$100 Mio and a well
developed network within the market region.

r

Strong communication skills in ‘English and a working knowledge of. French,
German or Italian would be an asset to facilitate marketing and relationship
management with clients and prospects

Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Wilting to travel extensively | throughout the Europe and utilize a network of
existing contacts and associates. ' d

Possess a confident and outgoing sersonalty

Duties: will include: HN
Acquisition and. development of new offshore European based clients.
Marketing. of ; estate. planning, private banking. and portfolio management.

FROM page one

you go back to the speech I gave
to the nation I forecasted that I
expected unemployment to rise to
the lower double digit levels so
that will not be surprising to me,"
said Mr Ingraham.

The lay offs sparked outrage
from trade unionist Obie Ferguson

“who said the Bahamas Hotel Man-

agerial Association (BHMA) —

reportedly the bargaining. agent -

for managerial and supervisory
staff at the property — was not

notified of the action until the:

news broke today.

He said, according to their
Industrial Relation Act, Comfort
Suites was required to notify the
minister of labour and the bar-
gaining agent before initiating any

_ lay offs.

Mr Ferguson, a lawyer and
BHMaA president, chalked up the
latest round of lay offs "with no
consultation", as proof that hote-
liers‘"have no regard for trade
unions or their workers."

Yesterday morning, Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes said he was

not yet officially informed of the

hotel's actions.
Yesterday morning employees

were asked to convene for a gen-

eral staff meeting at the property
where 21 of the 99-strong work-

FROM page one

Hotel layoffs

force, or 21 per cent, were

informed that their services were

no longer needed.

In a press statement jeleased
yesterday, General Manager
Arthurita Butler-said the lay offs
were.a result of a iprolonsed

’ downturn in business,"

"This was an especially difficult
decision for Comfort Suites,
because many of our ‘employees
have been:with the hotel from the
very beginning," Ms Butler said,
adding that this was the first time
in the hotel's history that employ-
ees were laid off.

"We waited until the last pos-
sible moment to make this deci-
sion, hoping for an upturn in busi-
ness, which unfortunately has not
occurred,"

Mr Naughton, who founded
Comfort Suites in 1991, said the
hotel. was experiencing a "excep-

. tionally soft" winter season for the

first time in more than 18 years of

. operation.

"As an example of the severity,
of the downward trend, we now,
anticipate that the key winter sea- '

son months will achieve 20 per

cent to 35 per cent lower occu-

pancies than in previous winter

oY

-seasons, It is truly regrettable that
the. worldwide recession, has
caused such a prolonged and
sévere drop in occupancy, that

. these staff reductions became nec-

essary;" he said.

He said severance packages, giv-
en to each affected employee ful-
ly complies with Bahamian labour
laws.

Comfort Suites is currently

‘ involved in legal wrangling over

a collective agreement, but this
does not preclude the hotel from
notifying the union about lay offs,
Mr Ferguson claimed yesterday.

"They believe the trade union
movement is weak, so they are
taking advantage of it," he
claimed, arguing that the employ-
er should have first put staff on a
rotating work schedule before the
lay off process.

According to an informed
source, employees were expecting
some bad news after they were
told last week of yesterday's
planned meeting. Still some for-
mer workers appeared to be dev-
astated by the news and left the
property in tears, according to the
source.

Comfort Suites is a subsidiary of
Choice Hotels, an international
franchise with more than 5,700

. hotels,in the United States and

over 35 countries world-wide.

‘Union executive members

services’ to prospective clients along with additional services, such as,

the -

set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

opportunities

¢

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from Europe.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.

Parsons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.
Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications once be submitted to:

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

Human Resources Department

\

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: JANUARY 20, 2000

'



Union employees yesterday alleged the secre-
tary-general, Anthony Bain, the treasurer, Susan’

Palmer anda trustee, Fredericka Baker, were behind _

the move, however The ‘Tribunewas unable to con-
firm this allegation up to press time.

The three were ousted from the union in an
August 2007 poll of members, but always claimed
the vote was illegitimate. They were reinstated by
order of the court late last year, prompting union
President Nelerene Harding and other executives to

‘tender their resignations, only.to shortly after rescind

them on the advice of the labour minister.

President of the AAAWU, Nelerene Harding,
yesterday said she would await 'the outcome of a
January 12th court hearing, set to finally determine
the fate of the three executives, before deciding
what further course of action to take.

She pledged to continue conducting union busi-

ness as best she could outside the union’s office,
which is located in the east wing of Worker’s House.
’ The union represents 532 airport workers.

Yesterday several employees were said to have
been disturbed by their inability to gain their usual
access to the union building, where they had gone to
collect Christmas cheques from the union which
they needed to pay bills.

Union member Melanie Bowe.said: “I am telling
them (those responsible for the lock change) that I
am a member of the AAA WU, if they havea prob-
lem with Nelerene, then they need to sort that out.

I have paid my dues ‘and I need my Christmas
cheque. I usually get my money in January when I
need to pay my bills and need my cheque and the
office is locked. The secjetary general (Anthony
Bain) is now telling me I should have picked up my
cheque in December. I can pick up my cheque when
Iso choose to!”

Meanwhile the union’s inter turmoil has also
affected a third party — the local pilot’s union,
which was also temporarily blocked from getting
into its headquarters, sub-let from the AAA WU.

Minister Foulkes said that he will inquire into
the circumstances and see if he\can do anything to
help resolve the situation.

“Just like any other organisation, unions have
their problems from time to time and it is for the
leadership of the union to be mature and to be as
patient as possible in terms of resolving those prob-
lems. They must do whatever they can to work
together; not only for the interests of their mem-
bership, but for the interests of The Bahamas
because if we do not have a stable union at the air-
port it could lead to disruption of services at the
airport,” said Mr Foulkes.

A message left seeking comment from Mr Bain
was not returned up to press time yesterday, while
attempts to reach Ms Baker, who was |dentitied by
Ms Palmer as the person to speak to a put the mat-
ter, were unsuccessful.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 7



FROM page one

There had been reports that
the body of Jett Travolta was tak-
en by hearse around 4pm from
Restview to the airport and hand-
ed over to the Travoltas, who left
by private plane late Monday.

“The body is here where cre-
mation is taking place, and the
Travoltas will make a statement
in another day or so. John is still
on the island in West End and is
expected to leave within the next
24 hours,” said Mr Wilchcombe
yesterday.

He said the ashes will travel
with the Travoltas who plan to
leave on their plane for Ocala
today.

Commissioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson told The Tribune
that police would not be releasing
a statement as there was “nothing

criminal about the situation” sur-"

rounding Jett’s death.

A number of police officers,
including a team of officers from
the SIB, stood guard outside the
hospital on Monday morning to
keep the press at bay.

International reporters and
cameramen from Access Holly-
wood, Entertainment Tonight,
and writers and photographers
from other news organisations,
including the Associated Press,
gathered in the hospital’s eastern
parking lot.

The Travoltas’ family doctor
was permitted to sit in on the
autopsy at the request of Mr and
Mrs Travolta. It is not known
whether the Travoltas were pre-
sent at, the hospital during the

PM, Mitchell
FROM page one

day, Mr Ingraham said he had
read the article in The: Tri-
bune, but had not seen the
quotes attributed directly to
Mr Christie.

“T read the article, but I did

“not see a quote from Mr

Christie. The article did not
quote Mr Christie. The per-
son who was speaking, I
would not dignify him by
responding to him. If Mr
Christie had said it, I would
be happy to respond to it
immediately,” Mr Ingraham
said.” ~

However, the Prime Minis-
ter added that he did not think
that the Opposition Leader
would “say such a thing.”

“If he did, I would be happy



















Travolta

autopsy.

Jett Travolta suffered a seizure
and died at the family’s residence
at Old Bahama Bay Resort. He
was discovered unconscious in the
bathroom around 10am on Fri-
day, January 2.

The. body was taken to the hos-
pital, where doctors officially pro-

‘nounced the teenager dead

around 12.40pm Friday.

The family’s lawyer, Michael
Ossi, said Jett had a history of
seizures. He noted that all
attempts to revive him were
unsuccessful.

Mr Wilchcombe, a close friend
of the family, said the Travoltas
considered their son to be a “spe-
cial child.”

There are conflicting reports

about how long Jett may have
been left alone unsupervised
before he was discovered by a
caretaker.

- According to official police
reports, Jett was last seen going
into the bathroom on January 1,
and was discovered in the bath-

room by a caretaker around 10am ,

on January 2. -

The Travoltas’ attorney has
denied that Jett was left unsuper-
vised for any length of time as
the family had two nannies
attending to their children.

Mr Wilchcombe was bombard-
ed outside the hospital on Mon-
day morning by reporters who
questioned him about his con-
nection to the Travoltas.

He said he first became
acquainted with the Travoltas six

years ago when the couple pur-
chased property at West End. He
was the Minister of Tourism at
the time and had spent time and
spoken with the Hollywood cou-
ple on several occasions.

Mr Wilchcombe described
them as very “nurturing and car-
ing” parents to their children.

“J saw the Travoltas when they
arrived at the resort in West End
and they said that they were hav-
ing a great time,” he recalled.

The Travoltas arrived on
December 30. They had' planned
to stay in the Bahamas until Jan-
uary 9 to celebrate the New Year
with about 60 family and friends
at West End.

_“Mr and Mrs Travolta are
going through a lot of pain and
hurt — you felt it and you saw it.
They were crying a lot and they
spent several hours with their son
separated by a glass in the
morgue, said Mr Wilchcombe.

“They are two human beings
showing their loss and we want
to allow them time (to grieve)
and to reflect in privacy with fam-
ily, to be able to reflect on their
life with Jett and life without Jett,
arid to think about what will hap-
pen next.”

When questioned as to why
two pathologists were required
to condtct the autopsy, Mr

Wilchcombe said it was a matter |

of making certain that no ques-
tions were left unanswered.
“We had an incident here
before that left questions. We had
the Anna Nicole situation con-
cerning Daniel and questions
were raised and so it is best to be
careful than sorry,” he said.

Decision postponed in AG’s case

FROM page one

yesterday but, according to J ustice Jon Isaacs, Justice Allen was tak-

en ill and was not able to deliver her ruling yesterday.
She is expected to deliver her ruling on January 12.

The Cashes have waged a six-year fight with the Baptist education
authorities since Mr Cash alleged that he was wrongfully dismissed

- » from his job as physical education teacher at Jordan Prince William

High School in October, 2002. Since then, Mr and Mrs Cash have
made'a number of allegations, including claims of unfair dismissal
and breach of human and constitutional rights.

Last December the Court of Appeal struck out an appeal by the
couple, ruling that they had failed to file a proper record of appeal
in accordance with the order of the Registrar.

The couple had filed for an appeal ' ifor a retrial in their case
against the Bahamas Baptist Missionaries and Education Conven-
tion.

The Cashes made headlines last October when President of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer ordered Mrs Cash to either
publish an apology for scandalising the court or be jailed for con-
tempt. Mrs Cash refused to publish an apology. However, she was

« u not jailed for contempt:as a differently constituted court said that the *)’

to respond to him,” he added.""}''

issue was “done with.”

-FOCOL
HOLDINGS LTD.

CO

The public is advised that on December 24, 2008 Sun Oil
Turks & Caicos Limited, a subsidiary of Focol Holdings
Limited (BISX:FCL) invested 5.3 million dollars for 60%
ownership in a joint venture with Marine Tankers Services

AS, a private company incorporated in Norway.

Effective January. 1, 2009 BICI Tankers Limited, the joint
venture company will own and operate two marine tanker

vessels which .will be used to transport petroleum

products throughout The Bahamas and Turks & Caicos

Islands.

“Fuelling Growth For People”



FROM page one

us against the harshness of

: realities but it's very impor-
i tant that whatever we do
: responds to what is happen-
: ing at a given point and time
: so there is no long-term, fixed,

: inflexible sort of policy rather

: there will be policies that have

: been considered to respond ©
: to events as things get worse
: or get better," he said, speak-

: ing to reporters on the side-
: lines of the 7th annual
: Caribbean MBA Conference

: on Paradise Island after news ~
: broke of 21 lay offs at the
? nearby Comfort Suites prop-
i erty.

Mr Ingraham told reporters

at the time he was not aware
+ of the most recent lay offs, but
: said it did not surprise him.

"I'm not aware of that, but I

: expect’ the downsizing in the
: hotel sector has not been com-
: plete, if you go back to the
: speech I gave to the nation I
: forecasted that I expected
: unemployment to rise to the
: lower double digit levels so
: that will not be surprising to
" ; me.

The nation's chief added

: that "a number" of laid off
i Atlantis workers were brought
: back to work over the Christ-
: mas holidays when the resort |
; boasted high occupancy rates.

Atlantis let go around 1,000

employees a few months ago
: citing the economic climate
and low occupancy rates.

Yesterday, Labour Minister

: Dion Foulkes, who also said
: he was not informed of the
? Comfort Suites lay offs — said
: things will get worse before
i they get better.

"The prime minister fore-

: shadowed that things would
: get worse before they get bet- '
i ter and that was predicated on
; international economic trends
i which were all pointing down-
: ward. We are doing all we can
: from a government point of
} view to provide as many jobs

Some restrictions are placed
on the use of one of the objects
‘in the Secret Sound.





PM hopes job stimulus
programmes will ‘cushion’
displaced workers

for Bahamians through eco-
nomic stimulus packages, "he
said.

He said government's "mas-
sive" infrastructure pro-
gramme will provide employ-
ment in addition to the “hun-
dreds" of jobs created by
recent environmental cleanup
projects.

"All of those combined will

vhelp to ease the burden of
many of the recently unem-
ployed workers — especially
in the hotel industry," he said.
"There are (employment)
opportunities in the economy.
They may not be the type of
opportunities that persons
want, but in this environment
something is better than noth-
ing.”

He said the proposed unem-
ployment assistance pro-

gramme is currently being for-

‘mulated by the National

Insurance Board.

It will be introduced early
this year.

Government will also soon
launch a programme that will
have a training component

‘and a work component, the

details of which are now being
formulated, he said, -

"The whole concept is to
take a hotel worker who wish-
es to be retrained or get addi-
tional training in (another)
area take advantage of new
job opportunities, that the
government will actually pay a
stipend so that you can work
and train at the same time.
That is a programme that gov-
ernment will be announcing
very shortly in terms of the
details," he said.

FOR SALE

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA

ALL THAT, the Apartment Number 43 being an
apartment with a unit entitlement of 1.43% on.-the 4th
Floor of Silver Point Condominium Apartments situate
on ALL THAT piece parcel or part of a tract of land

. Situate in Freeport/Lucaya in'the Island of Grand Bahama
another of the Islands in the said Commonwealth of The
Bahamas containing Three and Sixty Nine Thousands
(3.069) acres referred to in the said Declaration was
subjected to the provisions of The Law of Property and
Conveyancing (Condominium) Act 1965

Board of Directors.

For conditions of sale and any
_. other information contact:

Silver Point Condominium Apartments,
P.O. Box F-40825,
PH (242) 373-1168, Fax: (242) 373- 1168

O THE WORLD










BIC wishes to advise its customers that
its JFK headquarters is closed to the
general public until further notice.
The company is moving quickly to
refurbish the facility in the aftermath
of the recent fire incident.

Customers.can visit any one of our
other New Providence locations to
pay bills, make inquiries or obtain:

Services.

New Providence locations

include the Mall at Marathon, Bay
Street, the Town Center Mall, Fox Hill
and the Shirley Street Plaza.

www.btcbahamas.com | CALL BIC 225-5282





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PAGE. 8, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 6, 2009

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THE TRIBUNc

Let Charlie the.
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

_kids faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough St. every Thursday
from 3:30pm to. 4:30pm during the

month of January 2009, |

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots ‘of Fon

?m lovin it



\

A

Movie Gift Certificates
emake great gifts!





TRIBUNE SPORTS

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 9







Antoine Walker

Former NBA player charged with NBA
suspicion of drunken driving

MIAMI BEACH, Florida
(AP) — Former NBA player
Antoine Walker has been

charged with suspicion of

drunken driving in Miami
Beach.

Police say Walker was driving
a black Mercedes without the



oe

Lakers beat

lights on when he was pulled
over early Monday morning.
Police say officers smelled alco-
hol and that Walker looked
sleepy.

Police say he refused to take
a Breathalyzer test.

Walker was a three-time All-

Star forward for the Boston
Celtics and helped the Miami
Heat win the NBA champi-
onship in 2006.

Games
Walker struggled in 46. games

with the Minnesota Timber-
wolves last season. His contract
was bought out by the Mem-
phis Grizzlies in December but
he hasn't played this season. ©
Walker was being held on a
$1,000 bond and did not imme-
diately have an attorney.









Blazers for.

15th straight home win

LOS ANGELES (AP) .— Once
again, the Lakers have the best record
in the NBA — thanks to a little help
from the Celtics and Cavaliers.

Kobe Bryant scored 26 points, Pau
Gasol added 19 and Los Angeles beat
the Portland Trail Blazers 100-86 Sun-

day night for its sixth consecutive vic- , [|

tory and 15th straight at home.
The defending Western Conference
champions realize that not having

homecourt advantage against the ©

Celtics in last year's finals probably
cost them the NBA title, and they
want to do something about it this
time around. They are 27-5, one fewer
loss than Boston and Cleveland.

The Cavaliers and Celtics each lost
Sunday to bottom teams in the East.
Boston was beat by the Knicks and
Cleveland fell to Washington.

"It's obviously important to have
homecourt advantage, so we look at it
as a challenge to achieve that goal,"
Bryant said. "Obviously we have a
long way to go. It's a great opportuni-

ty. We have quite a few home games -

here, so we look forward to trying to
stretch this out a little bit. We have
plenty more gears to. go to. Plenty

more. I haven't even played in third -

. gear yet."
LaMarcus Aldridge led Portland
with 22 points and 11 rebounds, as all
five startérs scored in double figures.

But. the Blazers shot only 39 percent

‘overall.

"They are a Rod group, and they
are on a mission," Portland coach Nate
McMitllan'said. "They definitely know
what they need to do to win, and right
now everybody is healthy for them.
Phil (Jackson) can push.a lot of but-
tons and.he has a lot of different com-
binations that he can go with, as far as
playing big or small."

Facing the Trail Blazers for the first .

time since a season-opening, 96-76 win
— Portland's lowest point total ever
against the Lakers — Los Angeles
pulled away with a 15-3 run that
increased its four-point lead to 75-59

’ with 2:12 left in the third quarter.
"They came out with the momen-

‘tum in the third quarter and took over |

the game," Aldridge said. "A lot of
guys had open shots. We just didn't



PORTLAND Trail Blazers forward Nicolas Batum (88) dunks over Lakers forward Pau Gasol
(16) during the first half of Sunday’s game in-Los Angeles...

(AP Photo: Gus Ruelas)

make them. Kobe- kind of took over
and'‘did what he does."

Bryant and Gasol got the Lakers'
pivotal rally going with 16-foot
jumpers, Derek Fisher added a 3-
pointer and Sasha Vujacic capped the
rally with a four-point play — con®

- verting the free throw after Rudy Fer-

nandez fouled him on a 3-pointer.
"I like that play a lot," Vujacic said.

"Sometimes I'm worried. that if the —
‘guy's not very cautious or if he comes

to me at a high speed, I've got to kind
to jump back because I can sprain my

-ankle. So it's not easy. In the first half,

he kind of threw himself into my legs
on my pick-and-roll with Andrew
(Bynum), so I knew he was going to.

foul me on that play and I kind ofiso- .

lated him and just took a shot."
Vujacic, playing despite a case of

- tonsillitis, had.11 points in 26 minutes.
Vladimir Radmanovic had 16 points .
off the bench for the Lakers, 12 of :

them in the fourth quarter. Portland
made only three of 14 shots during
the first 6:06 of the quarter, all of them
3-pointers, and never got closer than

_ 14 points.

"It's always a good sign to be on
top, but you just can't relax," Gasol
said.

"There's too many games and too
much competition to just relax and

get comfortable and be satisfied with ©

the best record."

The Lakers, hoping to get out to.a
fast start against a Portland lineup
missing leading scorer Brandon Roy

~because of:an injured:right: hamstring, =:

didn't take their first lead until Trevor
Ariza's two free throws put them

ahead 51-50 with 52.5 seconds left in |

the first half. Portland led 25-19
through one quarter after forcing nine
turnovers — all of them in a 7:25 span
and one fewer than the Lakers had in
Friday's win over Utah.

"It happens every once in a while,"

- Bryant said. "Sometimes the rhythm

isn't-there, you can't quite get a handle
on the ball and the. team that you're

playing against is playing extremely —

well with a lot of energy. So you just
have to put a stop to it somehow. But
some of those turnovers were self-
inflicted."

| Celtics, Cavs downed by teams at bottom of East

BB The Associated REGS



LeBron James didn' t agree
with the traveling call that
helped prevent his Cleveland
Cavaliers from beating lowly
Washington.

A loss to the struggling New
York Knicks leaves little doubt
Kevin Garnett and the Boston
Celtics are stumbling atop the
Eastern Conference.

James was whistled for tak-
ing an extra step while driving
for a potential tying layup with
2.3 seconds left, and Cleveland
lost 80-77 to the host Wizards
on Sunday despite wiping out
a 16-point deficit in the fourth
quarter. .

"Bad call, " said James, who
had 30 points, 10 assists and six

rebounds. "We all make mis-. :

takes, and'I think I got the

wrong end of the bargain. I:
watched it 10 times after the,
game, and it was clearly a good

play.’

Garnett, who hurt his right
calf when he was kicked late in
the third quarter, had only six
points forthe Celtics in a 100-88
loss in. New York, their fourth

defeat in'six games after a 27-2

start.

"We've just got to come |

together," Paul Pierce said, "We
talked about it after the game
amongst, the players, what we're.
doing right, what we're doing
wrong, and the good thing
about this group, we'reja strong
group. It's just about getting
through this. period and we
know we're a better team that
the way we've been playing."

Boston (29-6) needs to shake -

the slump fast. The conference
leader faces the Central Divi-
sion-leading Cavaliers (27-6) on
Friday night in Cleveland.

In other NBA games Sunday,

it was: Toronto 108, Orlando
102; Detroit 88, L.A. Clippers |

87; Memphis 102, Dallas 82 and
L.A. Lakers 100, Portland 86.
At Washington, James dis-
sected the game's key sequence
in extensive detail —:even
pointing out that he felt he was
fouled as-he released the shot,

which went in and would have

given Cleveland the lead.
His biggest beef, though, was
with what he considered a mis-

' understanding of the way he

moved to the basket.
"You-have your trademark
play, and that's one of my. plays.
It kind of looks like a travel
because it's slow, and it's kind
of a high-step, but it's a one-
two just as fluent as any other
one-two in this league. I got the
wrong end of it, but I think they
need to look at it — and they
need 'to understand that's not a
travel," James said: "It's a per-
fectly legal play, something I've

‘always done."

Washington's Caron Butler
— who scored 19 points and
guarded James most of the
game, including on that closing
play '— remembers that same
move, without an official's call,
from one of the teams' recent
playoff meetings.

"I definitely knew he trav-

-eled, but I didn't know they

were going to call it," Butler
said.

"That was one of them situa-
tions in which a great player
made a move, good officiating,
and they called the call. And I
was like, 'Oh, man, there is a
God."

None of James' teammates
scored more than 13 points, the
Cavaliers shot 39 percent for
the game and they weke held to

_ their lowest point total this sea-

son.



NEW York Knicks forward Wilson Chandler (21) and Celtics guard Rajon
Rondo (9) vie.for control of the ball in the fourth quarter of the Knicks’ 100-
88 victory in Sunday’s game at Madison Square Garden in New York...

Antawn Jamison led’ Wash-
ington with 26 points and 13
rebounds, while Dominic
McGuire had 10 points and 10
rebounds for his first NBA dou-
ble-double.

At New York, the defending
NBA champions lacked their
usual poise, frequently yelling
at each other and the officials.
They allowed 100 points for just
the eighth time in 35 games this
season and managed the low-
est total allowed by the Knicks.

_ "We were frustrated," Boston

(AP Photo: Kathy Willens)

coach Doc Rivers said. ."I think
we were very frustrated in our
play tonight. I thought you
could see it real early in the
game and that's not us, but it
was us tonight."

Paul Pierce scored 31 points
and Ray Allen added 16 for the
Celtics, who lost three of four
on its West Coast road trip over
the holidays

Wilson Chandler scored a
career-high 31 points and New
York snapped an eight-game
losing streak against the Celtics.

~The Kilicks seized control in
the third quarter, never let it
get too close in the fourth.

"Tt was the way they scored.
It was frustrating watching it
happen," Celtics guard Ray
Allen said.

Raptors 108, Magic 102

At Toronto, Anthony Parker
scored a season-high 26 points,
Chris Bosh added 23 points and *
10 rebounds and Toronto over-
came a 39-point performance
by Dwight Howard.

Parker was 13-of-16 from the
field and came within one point

» of his career high.

Pistons 88, Clippers 87

At Los Angeles, Rodney
Stuckey scored 24 points,
Tayshaun Prince added 20 and
Detroit got a critical goaltend-
ing call in the final seconds to
beat the Clippers for their sev-
enth straight victory in a
matchup of injury-depleted
teams.

Allen Iverson had 18 points
and 10 assists for the Pistons,
who have beaten the Clippers

' 12 straight times.

_ Eric Gordon scored a career-

high 31 ‘points, but missed a
potential winner at the buzzer
as the Clippers dropped to 8-
25 with their seventh straight
loss.

Grizzlies 102, Mavericks 82

At Memphis, Tenn., O.J.
Mayo scored 18 of his 21 points
inthe second half, and the Griz-
zlies snapped a 13-game losing
streak to Dallas.

Marc Gasol had 19 points for
Memphis, which ended a four-
game skid overall. ~

Dirk Nowitzki led the Mav-
ericks with 28 points, hitting 11
of 21 shots.





@ By The Associated Press"

SCOREBOARD

Tuesday, January 6

New Orleans at Los Angeles
Lakers (10:30 pm EST). Two of
the top teams in'the Western
Conference meet when Chris
Paul and the Hornets visit Kobe
Bryant and the Lakers.

STARS
Sunday :
— Antawn Jamison, Wizards,

‘scored 26 points, grabbed 13

rebounds and hit a baseline
jumper with 10.5 seconds left
that put Washington ahead in
an 80-77 win over Cleveland.

— Anthony Parker, Raptors,
had a season-high 26 points on
13-of-16 shooting in a 108-102
victory over Orlando.

— Wilson Chandler and Al
Harrington, Knicks. Chandler

' scored a career-high 31 points,

Harrington added 30 and New
York snapped an eight-game
losing streak against the sput-
tering Boston Celtics with a 100-
88 win.

— Kobe Bryant, Lakers, had
26 points as Los Angeles beat
Portland 100-86 for its sixth con-
secutive victory and 15th
straight at home.

CHAIRMAN OF THE
BOARDS :

Marcus Camby had 14 points
and: 20 rebounds for the Los
Angeles Clippers in an 88-87
loss to Detroit. Camby extend-
ed his double-digit rebound
streak to 20 games and is aver-
aging 18.3 over his last eight.

LONG ROAD BACK

Steve Francis and Darius
Miles, both obtained by Mem-
phis last: month, finally joined
the Grizzlies before Sunday's
102-82 victory over Dallas.

Miles played the final 1:46,
but Francis, who didn't arrive
in Memphis until Saturday and

’ only went through a short prac-

tice, was on the inactive list.
Miles, drafted third overall,
out of high school by the Los
Angeles Clippers in. 2000, is
returning from a two-year layoff

‘ because of microfracture knee

surgery. Francis has not played
since December 15, 2007, and
underwent right knee surgery
last February.

Indiana's Mike Dunleavy is
expected back within a week or
So after missing all 33 games so
far this season with soreness in

- his right knee.

STREAKING

Rodney Stuckey scored 24
points. and Detroit edged the
Los Angeles Clippers 88-87 for
its seventh straight.victory.
Allen Iverson had 18 points and
10 assists for the Pistons; who
have beaten the Clippers 12
consecutive times.

SNAPPED

OJ. Mayo scored 18 of his 21
points in the second half and
Memphis ended a 13-game los-
ing streak to Dallas with a 102-
82 victory. The Grizzlies had
lost four straight overall.

STRONG IN DEFEAT |

Dwight Howard scored 39
points but Orlando lost for only '
the fourth time in 21 games,
108-102 to Toronto. LeBron
James had 30 points, 10 assists
and six rebounds in Cleveland's
80-77 loss to Washington.
Nobody else on the Cavaliers
scored more than 13, and they
were held to their lowest point
total this season.

Paul Pierce scored 31 points
for Boston in a 100-88 loss at
New, York, the Celtics’ fourth
defeat in six games following a
27-2 start. Eric Gordon had a
career-high 31 points but missed

‘a potential winner at the buzzer

for the Clippers in their 88-87
loss to Detroit. Los Angeles
dropped to 8-25 with its sev venth
straight loss.

SPEAKING

"It's like that bully in school
that's always coming and beat-
ing you up, and standing up to
him. We were finally able to go
out and get that win against
them."

— Memphis forward Hakim
Warrick, after the Grizzlies

‘snapped a 13-game losing streak

to Dallas with a 102-82 victory

INSIGHT

ee

TEU Vy
ES
on Montlays



PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



TRIBUNE SPORTS





DALLAS Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens (81) is tackled by Baltimore
Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, back, and Baltimore Ravens safety Ed

Reed (20) after picking up 22 yards on a pass play in the second of their

game on December 20, 2008, in Irving, Texas.





(AP Photo: Matt Slocum)

Dr

Roddick and
Monfils through
to 2nd round
of Qatar Open

DOHA, Qatar (AP) —
Fourth-seeded Andy Roddick
moved into the second round
of the Qatar Open with a 6-1, 6-
3 victory over Ivan Navarro of
Spain on Monday.

Fifth-seeded Gael Monfils of
France also advanced with 6-2,
6-2 win over Jan Hernych of the
Czech Republic. "It's a good
start to the year," said Roddick,
who served eight aces. "I am
pretty happy. with my play. I
didn't do anything stupid..I
returned well. I got what I want-
ed from the match. I have been

training hard in the offseason."

Monfils, the 2006 finalist who
broke into the top 20 last year
and was a surprise semifinalist
at the French Open, was
delighted with his performance,
which included seven aces.

"It's good it wasn't a long
match but I practiced hard
before the season began," he
said, "I did everything and it
was a perfect match for me."

_Top-ranked Rafael Nadal
and No. 2 Roger Federer play
Tuesday at the $1.2 million
tournament.

_INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Everyone wants to be last year’s Giants

m@ By DAVE GOLDBERG
AP Football Writer

WITH the second round of
the NFL playoffs upon us, there
are multiple aspirants to
become last season's Giants, the
team from nowhere that swept

through the postseason to an —

improbable Super Bowl title.

Unfortunately for the Giants,
they aren't one of them. They
are the NFC's top-seeded team,
the hunted instead of the
hunter, as they prepare to meet
Philadelphia for the third time
this season.

Actually, it wouldn't -be too

: long a shot to suggest that, the

two sixth-seeded teams could
make it to the Super Bowl in
Tampa. Pittsburgh went that
route in 2006 and won, and the
Giants, the fifth seed (same dif-
ference) did it last year. But
never have two teams seeded
that low gone to the same Super
Bowl.

This season's bottom seeds
are the Ravens in the AFC and
the Eagles in the NFC. They go
up against the top-seeded Titans
and Giants on the road in an
all-rematch weekend. Both are
live underdogs who would sur-

. prise no one if they won.

The Ravens lost 13-10 to the
Titans in Baltimore in October
with the help of a dubious
penalty that extended Ten-
nessee's winning drive. And the
Eagles and Giants split their
two games, each winning on the
road. -

"They're about as dangerous
as all four teams left in the play-
offs," Giants middle linebacker
Antonio Pierce said of the
Eagles — the four referring to
the teams remaining in the
NFC. He might as well have
said that for all eight teams.



ANDY RODDICK serves the ball to [van Navarro of Spain at the ATP Qatar tennis open in Doha, Qatar, Monday...

AFC

Put a blanket over all four
contestants, including San
Diego, which is just 9-8.

Remember that the Chargers
were one of the preseason
favorites to represent the con-
ference in the Super Bowl and
that they've looked strong in
winning five straight. The last
two were especially impressive:
52-21 over Denver in the regu-
lar-season finale that cemented
the AFC West title, and 23-17 in
overtime over Indianapolis that
moved them on.

Yes, San Diego normally
plays well against Peyton Man-
ning and his teammates — the
Chargers now have won four of
the last five with Indy.

But this wasn't LaDainian
Tomlinson and Shawne Merri-
man doing it, it was Darren
Sproles, who had 328 all-pur-
pose yards. And punter Mike
Scifres, who pinned the Colts
inside their 20 on six kicks. Field
position is a. huge part of playoff
football and Scifres' punting
and Sproles' returns could make
a difference in Pittsburgh,
where the temperature figures
to be 30 degrees colder than in
San Diego.

Pittsburgh, who the Chargers
play, has one big question mark
in Ben Roethlisberger, who was
carried off the field with a con-
cussion in the final regular-sea-
son game. He says he'll play,
but the final verdict is up to the
doctors. :

Moreover, the reason Ben
was carried off was a shaky
offensive line that allowed 49
sacks this season and was espe-
cially vulnerable to teams such
as the Eagles and Giants, who
rush the passer well. The Charg-
ers can do that with outside
linebackers Jyles Tucker and

Shaun Phillips and can stuff the
run with Jamal Williams.

The Steelers may have been
four games better in the regular
season, but this is no gimme.

The game between Baltimore
(12-5) and Tennessee (13-3)
takes us back to the pre-realign-
ment turn of the century, when
both teams played in the AFC
Central. In the same round that
season, the Ravens won 24-10 in
Nashville as a wild card against
the Tennessee team that had
won the division.

Baltimore had just 134 yards
of offense and six first downs
in that game, but won because
of two obscure special teamers
and still-very-much around Ray
Lewis, who had just been cho-
sen the league's defensive play-
er of the year. How exactly?
First Keith Washington blocked
a field-goal attempt and Antho-
ny Mitchell returned it 90 yards
for the go-ahead score, then
Lewis returned an interception
50 yards.

Omens?

The Super Bowl that season
was in Tampa, where it is again.
The Ravens got there and faced
the Giants, something that. is
very possible this season. The
Giants quarterback in that
game was Kerry Collins, who is
now Titans QB.

NFC

The Eagles (10-6-1) beat the
Giants 20-14 on Dec. 7 in the
Meadowlands. The Giants (12-
4) won 36-31 in Philly on
November 9. Aggregate score:
Eagles 51, Giants 50.

"Plenty of sun," the positive
section of the long-range fore-
cast reads. "Highs in the low
30s. Lows in the low 20s." No
mention of winds. No need.
They almost always blow at the



Meadowlands, which probably
means the team that runs better
wins this game.

The Giants, who lost three of
their last four games, got the
only one they needed in that
span by beating Carolina in
overtime to secure home-field
advantage. The formula: bang-
ing with Brandon Jacobs to
wear down the defensive front,
then sending Derrick Ward for
215 yards through ever-widen-
ing holes.

In Philly's win at the Mead-

‘owlands, Brian Westbrook

twice exploited Pierce for TDs,
one on the ground, the other
through the air. The Giants
excuse? It was the week after
Plaxico Burress shot himself in
the leg and they were 11-1 with
seven tough wins in a row, just
the time for a letdown. —

So take your pick on that one.
But not on the other game.

Arizona (10-7) is 4-7 outside
the NFC West, was 3-5 on the
road and 3-6 against teams. with
a .500 record: or bétter. That
includes a 27-23 loss to the Pan-
thers (12-4) in Charlotte on Oct.-
26.

Now that the Cardinals have
validated their season by win-
ning a playoff game, it's hard
to see them beating a team that
has improved a lot since that
first meeting.

On the other hand, imagine
Arizona hosting the NFC cham-
pionship game against the
Eagles, who beat them 48-20
Thanksgiving night in Philadel-
phia.

A lot of strange things have
happened this year, one of the
strangest last Feb. 3 in the Car-
dinals' own stadium when the
Giants beat the unbeaten Patri-
ots in the Super Bowl.

So why not?

CTU

DEFENDING champion Toshiaki Nishioka,
(left), of Japan hits challenge

naro Garcia of

Mexico during their WBC Super Bantamweight
~~ “world title fight in Yokohama, Japan, Saturday,
~ Jan.3; 2009. Nishioka won 12 round TKO.

: 7 Photo: Shizuo Kambayashi)





(AP Photo: Hassan Ammar)



THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY,

JANUARY 6,

2009



Former NBA
player charged
with suspicion of

drunken driving...
See page 9







SHOWN (|-r) Stingrays head coach Lawrence Hepburn, CAFL council member Carl Campbell, Jets head coach Obie Roberts, Jets team captain Phillip
Rahming, CAFL promoter Leslie Moore and Warriors team captain Wilshire “Biggs” Dawkins at yesterday's press conference...

’ Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff

CAFL playofts Kick
off this weekend

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
“Sports ‘Reporter =)"
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ith the NFL

playoffs well

underway,

attention at

home shifts
to local football as the Com-
monwealth American Football
League (CAFL) - down to
their final four teams — is set
to begin the playoffs this week-
end.

In the first game of the post-
season, the top seeded John
Bull Jets are scheduled to face
the Tripoint Kingdom Warriors
2pm January 11 at the D W
Davis field.

The Jets created the most

' talked about storyline of the
2008 season when they defeat-
ed the Orry J Sands Pros for
the first time in over 40 games.

The 14-12 win in week 2 pro-

pelled the Jets to their first -

undefeated season in over a
decade.

Jets head coach Obie
Roberts said the season has
been eventful thus far and they
look for the trend to continue
in the playoffs. -

“It has been a very exciting
season and very interesting
things have happened, The
teams heading into the playoffs
are very confident and we
expect it to be very competi-



@ By ETIENNE ‘FARKIE’
FARQUHARSON II

IT is difficult indeed to find
words to express my regret at
the death of my classmate, life-
long splendid, brother/friend
Phil ‘Gogie/Smoka’ Smith.

‘Smoka,’ Kendal Wright and
myself possess a passion for
sports, particularly baseball.

We created baseball games,
wrote on pieces of paper all the
situations that could happen in
a game, wrote team line-ups,
pick the plays out of a cap and
put the outcome beside the
player's name.

This was Gogie foundation
for broadcasting sports. The
three of us along with Franklyn
‘Pillie’ Thomas are die-hard
Stains Louis Cardinals baseball
fans.

‘Gogie’ encouraged me to
work hard to obtain an athletic
scholarship (baseball) and we
combined our unlimited ener-
gy to ensure that SAC (Big Red



tive over the upcoming week-
-ends,” he said.

Roberts said the playoffs
should see great fan support as
the league’s popularity contin-
ues to grow.

“Over the last two years sup-
port has grown in leaps and
bounds particularly due to the
Pros and Jets rivalry,” he said.
“The Stingrays have also devel-
oped quite a fan base and the
Warriors have done so as well,
they have a young team and
have some dedicated fans.”

Jets team captain Phillip
Rahming said they expect a
hard fought contest against the
Warriors.

“We expect it to be a very
intense, hard hitting game. The
Kingdom Warriors is a, team
that we respect greatly. They
can be dangerous if you take
them lightly, just ask the
Defence Force Destroyers,” he
said. “We expect it to be a good
game and the fans should have
a good time.”

Rahming, said ‘despite their
top seeding, they will not over-
look.the Warriors, looking
ahead to a possible champi-

onship rematch with the Pros.

“It can be a trap game if you
try to look a head and if we
take them for granted we could
be going home,” he said. “We
havea very good mesh of vet-
erans and younger guys. We’re

versatile, we can play smash

IUMChUn Onl Camontt

Machines) remains the domi-
nant sports power we met in
place.

‘Gogie,’ an alcuinite of the
highest order, never dodged a
responsibility that he believed
in. He believed. with heart and
soul, and whatever task he took





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mouth football or be finesse at
times.”

The Warriors made the play-
offs for the first time in their
three-year existence after a nar-
row win over the Defence
Force Destroyers in the final
week of the season.

Warriors team captain
Wilshire “Biggs” Dawkins said
his team has bought into the
concept that the postseason cre-
ates a new opportunity for his
team to make a run. despite
being the fourth seed with just
one win.

’“Our guys are getting the pic-
ture that at the end of the day
the record we do have does not
determine how the champi-
onship will end up. So with that
in mind we only have one thing
to say, we have two games left
to play. That statement lets you
know that Kingdom Warriors
will step on the field very con-
fident. We’re leaving it all on
the field and this is our time
now and we are coming to take
it all,” he said.

The two versus three
matchup, originally scheduled
for this weekend (January 10)
was postponed as a sign of
respect for legendary broad-
caster Phil Smith, whose funer-
al is scheduled for that date.

League executives have stat-
ed that the league and its play-
ers will be attending the funer-
al to pay homage to the devout



in hand, and he brought bound-

less enthusiasm and inspiration. «

Phil was much esteemed in
our country through his profes-
sional attainment in sports jour-
nalism and may he enjoy his
eternal rest and the rewards he
has earned.



sports journalist who has done
much. to facilitate the growth
of the league since its incep-
tion.

-Therefore the game was re-
scheduled for January 17 when
the defending champions Orry
J Sands Pros will face the third
ranked V8 Fusion Stingrays.

Stingrays head coach
Lawrence Hepburn declined to
comment about the game, say-
ing only he would address the
media.

Carl Campbell, CAFL coun-
cil member, said the league
looks to culminate one of its
better seasons on a high note.

“It's been a really exciting
year, we are going to end the
year with great enthusiasm,”
he said. “And we expect it to
extend to the 2009-10 season
with even greater enthusiasm
and hopefully we'll see the fans
as well as the general public
come and give their support.”

‘My education is
more important’
than the NFL

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

PROJECTED to go high
between the first and third
round of the draft, Myron Rolle
has decided to pass up a chance
to play in the National Football
League to pursue the Rhodes
Scholarship.

After helping the Florida.

State Seminoles clinch the
Champs Sports Bowl over Wis-

consin with a 42-13 rout on »

December 27 in Orlando, Flori-
da, Rolle sat down with his fam-
ily and made the decision.
“We were all sitting around in
Orlando about three or four

sion,” said Rolle of heading to
an Oxford University classroom
as opposed to suiting up for an
NFL team.

He. will become Florida
State’s second athlete and the
third student in three years to
earn the two-year scholarship.

Looking at the mind-boggling
decision that he had to make,
Rolle said the opportunity to
play in the NFL will always be
there, but there’s only a “once
in a lifetime” chance that he will

get to travel to England to |

study.

“T thought about it and I real-
ized that in about 10 years when
I would have finished playing
in the NFL, I might have regret-

ted the decision to go to

Oxford,” he insisted.

“So I figure that I can go to.

Oxford now, train in England
and come back and still go. to
the combine in February next
year and put myself out there
again to play in the NFL.”
Considering the lucrative deal
that he could have achieved if
he had decided to go to this
year’s Combine and eventual-

ly get drafted in the NFL, Rolle.
‘said it turned out to be a lengthy.

family discussion.

“T could have gotten my fam-
ily financially secured, I could
have made more money than I
ever would, but I think my edu-
cation is more important right

‘ now,” Rolle stressed. .

The aspiring neurosurgeon,
who completed his Bachelor’s
degree in exercise science in just
two-and-a-half years, said edu-
cation has and will always be
first and foremost in his life.

Speaking from New Jersey in
an interview with The Tribune

yesterday, Rolle said he’s gear-.

Myron Rolle
decides to pursue

| Rhodes Scholarship

ing up to come. tions to speak
at a forum at the College of the

Bahamas on December 9’ along

with Desiree Cox and Christ-
ian Campbell, two other
Rhodes Scholarship winners.
“My family is going to be
there, so I’m going to really
enjoy my time home,” said
Rolle, who will then return to
the US to attend the inaugura-
tion of president-elect Barrack

days ago when I made the deci- . Obama in Washington DC on

January 20.

“T will be talking about the
Rhodes Scholarship and what
it means to me, as well as play-
ing football and my decision not
to pursue the NFL right now.
So it should be a lot of fun.”

Although he graduated last
‘summer, Rolle was taking: fur-

ther classes at Florida State in

order for him to be eligible to
compete for the Seminoles.

It turned out to be a wise
decision for Rolle, who was pur-
suing a Master’s degree in pub-
lic administration. He ended
completing his eligibility by
helping the Seminoles clinch the
Champs Bowl Sports title.

“Tt was fun. It was a good way
to.end my last college football
game,” said Rolle,.who was.
shown on Florida State’s web-
site holding up the team trophy.

At was a very. good wan to go
“out.”

And Rolle had plenty of sup-
port in the stands as many of
his family members from. the
Bahamas showed up to watch
the game.

With all that he has going for
him; Rolle said he. was even
offered the opportunity to write
a book, the title and contents
he’s still not sure about.

But if it all goes according to
plan, Rolle intends to have it
published by 2010.

He has also secured a speak-
ing engagement at the Bill Clin-
ton Library:

“T’m very fortunate and very
blessed. I thank the. Lord all the
time for everything that has
happened in my life so far,” he
quipped. “I’m just enjoying

life. ”

At age 22, Rolle said he’s liv-
ing out a dream,

*Mashed Potatoes Gan Be
Exchanged For Family Fries.
No Other Substitutions.





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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TUESDAY;

| RSTO B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

JANUARY 6G,








2009

‘Diplomatic protest’ call
on US prosecutor actions

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

former attor-
" ney-general



yesterday

urged the
Government to make a
formal. “diplomatic

process” to Washington
over the increasing ten-
dency of US authorities
and prosecutors to bypass
existing treaties and
directly approach
Bahamas-based financial
institutions for information on their clients,

Alfred Sear

a trend that could ultimately scare banks

and business away from this nation.

Alfred Sears, who held the post of the
Bahamas’ chief legal officer for four years
under the Christie administration, said sev-
eral financial sector clients had approached
him over this situation, feeling “menaced”
and intimidated by the aggressive demands
of US federal and state prosecuting author-
ities. ~

“In practice, I’m finding that a number of
financial institutions are being approached



* Former attorney-general warns financial institutions may be scared
away from Bahamas by direct approaches from US authorities
that are ‘menacing and intimidating’

“* US prosecutors bypassing established treaty/co-operation

“network to request client details from Bahamian banks /
* ‘The implication is that financial institutions will feel that,
the environment is not safe in which to operate’ ,

by US prosecutors, who are asking them
to just jump on a plane to Florida or wher-
ever, and come and co-operate,” Mr Sears
told Tribune Business.

“Many of these people [financial execu-

tives] are feeling intimidated because they

have to travel to the US, and fear they
might be arrested.

“The prosecutors are openly telling these :

persons that they prefer not to go through
the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty
(MLAT) because it’s too costly and time-.
consuming. They’re circumventing our laws
as well as they’re laws. . 2S
“A lot of financial institutions are feeling
menaced. There have been instances where

-the prosecutors have actually shown up at

the offices of financial institutions. I think it
is so serious that, in my opinion, that we
need the Government to make a diplomat-
ic protest to the US government.”

‘The MLAT is a treaty which enables the
US regulators and legal authorities to seek
information, via the Attorney General’s

’ Office, relevant to criminal cases they are

investigating via the Bahamian court system

‘and court orders.

Apart from the MLAT, US authorities

can also seek tax-related information on

specific criminal and civil cases via the Tax



Entrepreneurs told: More

oe ‘out of the box’ ideas _

EH By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

. BAHAMIAN entrepreneurs

1

continue to be plagued by a lack

of available capital to finance

their ventures, a panel of financial
industry experts agreed yester-
day, with the Government-spon-

sored venture capital fund’s

administrator calling for more
“out-of-the-box ideas”.

Jerome Gomez, of Baker Tilly
Gomez, who administers the

‘Bahamas Entrepreneurial. Ven-

ture Fund, said the vast majority

-of individuals who-apply for

financing from it are turned

down. He said that out of 300

“business plans that applied for

funding through the fund since

2005, only 45 have.been funded.
“What we find is that every-
body wants a convenience store, a

beauty salon, a restaurant ora

bar. But we’re trying to say that

we really want people to start.

focusing on more out-of-the-box
ideas, and that’s why the invest-
ment rate has been very, very low
today,” said Mr Gomez.

He added, while speaking as a
panelist at the seventh annual

‘Caribbean MBA Conference,

that the Bahamas Entrepreneur- °

‘ial Venture Fund had accessed

$5 million in funding from the
Government, and had so far
made $1.5 million in equity
investments in 10 companies. The

SEE page 4B

Tourism still holds growth potential

' li By CHESTER ROBARDS —

Business Reporter -

CARIBBEAN nations are
teeming with unrecognised busi-
ness opportunities and are espe-
cially open to small business

growth, according to a panel of ,
established Bahamian busi- °

nesspersons.

The panelists at the seventh -

annual Caribbean MBA Confer-
ence agreed that the region of
island nations, in which the

Bahamas is included economical-
_ ly, but not geographically, has

vast untapped potential for

growth and expansion in various

sectors. Oey Vas
Philip Simon , executive direc-

tor of the Bahamas Chamber of. .
Commerce, said tourism was still

one of the fastest-expanding sec-

tors in the world, and many
‘Caribbean-countries had'yet to

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. tial.

He suspected the industry will
continue to grow in the near
future, despite Paradise Island-
based Comfort Suites joining the

_lay-off trend yesterday by making

21 staff redundant. In common
with other resorts, Comfort Suites

said it expected peak winter sea- .

son. bookings to be down by 20-35
percent. —

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra~
ham also admitted the Bahamas
was in recession, telling the same

’ conference: “As might be expect-
ed, our economy contracted last’

year, particularly during the sec-

ond half of 2008 and most.

markedly beginning in the last
quarter - following the height of
the hurricane season and the

SEE page 4B |








Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY



‘October plummet: of stock -



administered by RoyalFideli-



SEE page 4B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce is working on cre-

-ating a group health insurance plan for its members by

the end of the 2009 first quarter, an initiative that will
complement the launch of its pension plan next week.
Philip Simon,-the -Ghamber’s executive -director, told
Tribune Business yesterday that a group health insurance
plan was “something we’re going to work on, and we’ll
send out Requests for Proposal to the various insurance
companies soon. It is a goal”.

Mr.Simon said the. Chamber hoped to have both the’

pension plan and group health insurance scheme in place by
the 2009 first quarter-end, telling this newspaper that there
had been greater demand for the latter, as opposed to the
savings scheme, from the organisation’s members.

However, the Chamber executive pointed out that it
was more. difficult to roll-out a group health insurance
scheme than a pension plan, due to the fact that insurers
demanded all client information up-front to enable them to
assess risk and calculate the correct premium.

The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce pension plan,

which will be managed and :
- SEE page 4B




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* Education Investment Accounts ;

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BEC to undergo |

‘manpower audit’

in ‘O9 first quarter

"By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A MANPOWER audit at the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) is likely to begin in
the 2009 first quarter in a bid
to improve. the energy suppli-
er’s internal efficiencies, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day, with renewable energy
sources set to be a key compo-
nent of the Bahamas’ efforts to
take the lead in addressing glob-
al climate change.

Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for the environment,
told this newspaper that the
BEC manpower assessment was
part of an $875,000 project,
part-financed, by the Inter-:
American Development Bank

“(IDB), to strengthen the

Bahamian energy sector.

He hinted that the Govern-
ment was for the first time mov-
ing to allow large private sec-
tor entities, such as hotels and

‘tesort complexes, to generate

their own power, with the IDB
project being “the-thread” that
bound all its energy-related ini-
tiatives - renewable energy, the
National Energy Policy Com-
mittee and legislative reform -
together. 5

Mr Neymour added that the
IDB initiative, to be financed
by $700,000 from the bank and .
$175,000 from the Government,
would also ‘assess BEC’s inter-
nal operating structure and staff

levels in an effort to get the .
’ Corporation operating at maxi-

_ of this year.”

_ the energy sector, including.

* Renewable energy key part
of Bahamas’ plan to be ©
leader in combating climate,
change, with forecast 5m
sea level rise to ‘leave 100%
of South Beach under water’ .

* Government aiming to .
amend legislation to allow
firms to generate’own
power, in line with:

IDB project

ee make-up,” Mr Neymour told
Tribune Business yesterday.
“Essentially, a manpower audit.
We will review the manpower
structure of BEC. u
“We anticipate we will bepin
to address some of the. man-
power issues in the first quarter

- And-he added: “The IDB
project is critical. It’s a very
important aspect of this review
of the energy sector, and |
bring together a number of ini
tiatives by the Governmentiin

€







| SEE page 4B








mum efficiency, something that ~ - am

was essential to sustaining its
operations and: finances. BEC
is currently understood to
between 900-1,000 employees.

The minister said he had indi-
cated as far back as his 2007-
2008 Budget speech that “it is -
critical to look at the efficiency
of BEC in terms of its opera- -
tions”, an area that had not
received much public attention
but was a critical component in
reducing electricity costs paid
by Bahamian businesses and
residential customers.

“There has to be a review of
the structure of BEC, and there
has to be a review of its employ-

An RBC/ Fidelity Joint Venture Company






















ROYAL @ FIDELITY

Money at Work





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Roe MANNER

Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS. -
High ~ Low W WASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77° F



















































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40/4 Wednesday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
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24/-4 12/-11 sn

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4:08 p.m. 2.1 10:07 p.m.. -0.3







Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday



























































- 4:47am. 29 11:17am. -0.1 4d
Temperature UY tom, 22 11:08pm. -04 26/-3 24/-6 pe
High . . 81° F/27°C Friday o48am. 30 12:13pm. 03 86/30. 68/20
Low . . 72° F/22°C YS 40pm. 23- =
Normal high .. . 78° F/25° C
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Last year's high ............... 76° F/24°G uti
High:81°F/27°C © Last year's lOW ou. .essesesessseceseeeeeee 04° F/18° C — NR Ci ast enti =n es —
( > Precipitation Sunrise......6:56a.m. Moonrise .... 1:08 p.m. GANT
: As Of 1 p.m. yesterday .....ecsssessseecseeseeeee 0.00" Sunset.......5:36 p.m. Moonset .... . 2:02 a.m. 33/0 22/-5 pc
Year to date ........... 0.017 New - First AN. ic
High: 81°F/27°C - Normal year.to date 0.29" 16
Low: 63° F/17°C : 0/-
AccuWeather.com 36/2 25/-3 sn
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Jerusalem 3/6 s 62/16 ‘ Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.
‘dohannesbur :
KEY WEST ‘Kingston
High: 78° F/26°C ‘Lim
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Low: 70" F/21 -23/-5 pe
= 66/18 sh
= 39/8 s-

_ SAN SALVADOR
High: 82° F/28° C
Low:69°F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows. ;
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MAYAGUANA
“High: 84° F/29° C



Wednesday
Low W

Today Wednesday ‘Today Wednesday ~
High Low W High Low WwW High Low W High Low









































FC FIC Fe FIC Fe F/G Fc F/C ; Low: 68° F/20°C
Albuquerque 45/7. 26/-3 pe —50/10- 29/-1 pc Indianapolis. == 36/2. -80/-1.. 33/0. 22/- Philadelphi mr 1¢ 4 ee
Anchorage -5/-20-11/-23 s 3/-16 -9/-22 c¢ Jacksonville 81/27 63/17 pe 73/22 41/5 r Phoenix ee per KLINS
Atlanta «G26 «48/8 c ~~ 5713°-36/2 “pe —“ Kansas City = 42/5 ‘pe Pittsburgh EDISLAND | 7.0.75 ;
Atlantic City 40/4 36/2 i 49/9 31/0 r Las Vegas 58/14 Portland, OR Sear eae Low:69°F/21" ;
Baltimore === 36/2. 32/0 i 44/6 28/-2 + Little Rock == 44/ _ Raleigh-Durham. Low:65°F/18°C : ; i : : iE
Boston 36/2 30/-1 pc 36/2 30/-1 +r Los Angeles 66/18 St. Louis : ‘ Ped ‘ 2
Buffalo = 84-272 pe 37/2 23/-5 ~~ sf Louisville = 40/: Salt Lake 6/: GREAT INAGUA \ eS
Charleston,SC 74/23 60/15 pe 66/18 42/5 fr San Antonio 67/19 ‘ne : = 5 :
Chicago 34/4 21/-6 sn 26/-3° 18/-7 sf San Dieg 63/ ieee c : CB BROKERS & AGENTS —
Cleveland 36/2 31/0 sn 36/2 23/-5 sn San Francisco 55/12 We : :
Dallas = §3/11-- 98/3 pe 66/18 42/5 -s shvill Seattl 7 Fleuthera Fruma
Denver 21/-6 pe 55/12 27/-2 pe New Orleans 64/17 47/8 Tallahassee 78/25 58/14 ¢ 64/17 f 93/-5 14/-10 sn
Detroit - 27/-2-- sn 87/2 -22/-5 sn New York: 44, g Tam 2 8/-13 -11/-23 ¢
Honolulu 68/20 s 81/27 67/19 s Oklahoma City 60/15 35/1 Tucson 58/14 35/1 s 68/20





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Washington, DC 36/2 32/0 i 49/9 Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, Vy,

Houston = 982/448" 44/6 one 68/28: 51/10 esx Orlando : ; , storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

4/23 49/9









Monetary tools have lower stimulus ‘rating’

WHAT a year 2008 turned
out to be. The high point
undoubtedly would have been
the election of Barack Obama
to the White House, and the
low point would clearly be the
global recession.

In Barack Obama we saw a
man who, against tremendous
odds, succeeded not only in win-
ning the US presidential elec-
tion but also capturing the imag-
ination and admiration of the
entire free world in the
process...quite an incredible

achievement. The expectations’

embodied in his victory are still
being understood and analysed
today.

Globally, the world is said to
be in the midst of a synchro-
nised economic meltdown,
spurred on by the painful effects
of a global housing crisis fuelled
by irresponsible lending prac-
tices, and a resulting credit
crunch that’can potentially lead
to economic chaos.

_ Perfect financial storm

Last year will be remembered
as one of the worst-ever for
stock markets around the world.
If you had invested in US stocks
for the entire year, you would
have lost about 38 per cent of
your beginning-of-the-year val-
ue. Likewise, Japanese investors
would have lost about 42 per
cent, investors in other Asian
markets between 45 per cent
and 60 per.cent, and European

investors around 40 per cent. '

Bahamian stocks, as measured
by the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange All-Share

Index, lost about 13 per cent of
their collective value.

The second noteworthy
aspect of the current economic
malaise is the extent to which
major sectors of industry are
applying to their respective gov-
ernments for financial bailouts.
So far, we have seen banks,
insurers and automakers being
provided with massive loans
and capital injections. How
wide these bailouts will even-
tually extend remains to be
seen, but the ‘floodgate’ has
opened and every business
imaginable is lining up ‘cap in
hand?’ to get there share of the
largesse.

fon Ge the hotel, sector, is



offs, with: many: -others ‘placed
on short work weeks. We sim-
ply do not have the capacity to
even contemplate the type of
massive stimulus packages
being implemented by the
‘Group of Twenty’ (G-20)
nations.

Role of monetary policy

Throughout all this, the role
of monetary policy is coming
into focus. The world’s major
economies are using monetary
policy as the major tool to ward
off an economic collapse by
stimulating their economies.

Specifically, central banks are
aggressively reducing interest
rates in an attempt to bolster
their weakening economies. By
reducing interest rates, borrow-
ers are being given some relief,

while savers are being encour-

aged to invest in the economy,
so the theory goes. In the
Bahamas, many persons who
are devout followers of CNN
and other cable news shows are
constantly asking why we are
not taking the same action.

Definition

Monetary policy is the regu-
lation of the money supply and
interest rates by a central bank,
such as the Federal Reserve
Board, in order to control infla-
tion and stabilise the currency.
Monetary policy is one of two
ways the Government can

“impact the economy. By impact-

ing the effective cost of money,
the Federal Reserve can affect
the amount of money that is
spent by consumers and busi-
nesses.

Monetary policy is referred
to as either being an expan-
sionary policy, or a contrac-
tionary policy. An expansion-
ary policy increases the total
supply of money in the econo-
my, and a contractionary policy
decreases the total money sup-
ply.

Expansionary policy is tradi-

tionally used to combat unem- -

ployment in a recession by low-
ering interest rates, while con-
tractionary policy involves rais-
ing interest rates in order to
combat inflation.

Contrast

Monetary policy should be
contrasted with fiscal policy,
which refers to government bor-
rowing, spending and taxation.
Fiscal policy is the use of gov-
ernment taxation and spending
powers to impact economic
behaviour.

In fact, to date, the Govern-
ment has announced a series of
fiscal measures to support the
Bahamian economy in this very
troubling and challenging envi-
ronment. We will be .building
roads, building a brand new air-
port and building new govern-
ment offices. The theory is that
all of this spending will create
new jobs (albeit short-term con-
struction-related jobs mostly),
and the wages paid to these new
workers will increase. the
amount of money in circulation,
thus buoying the economy.
However, future generations
will have to pay for this invest-
ment in infrastructure via high-

_er taxes, as all the money for

these investments is being bor-
rowed.

Why monetary policy is less
effective in the Bahamas

Why do we shun monetary
policy initiatives? The Bahamas’
economy is fundamentally dif-

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

NURIA PROPERTIES LIMITED

IBC No. 141561B
(In Voluntary Eiquidaticn)

NOTICE is hereby given in ieoordatios with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), NURIA
PROPERTIES LIMITED is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the NURIA PROPERTIES
LIMITED is required on or before 13th January, 2009 to send their
name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator
of the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved

Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House, 143 Main Street,.
Gibraltar is the Liquidator of, NURIA PROPERTIES LIMITED.

iz =

(

NOTICE

_INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

SEAFORD INVESTMENTS INC.
IBC NO. 129,890 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with section 138 of the Interna-
tional Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, SEAFORD INVESTMENTS

INC. is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the SEAFORD INVESTMENTS INC.
is required on or béfore the 28th day of February, 2009 to send their name,
address and particulars of the debt or claim to the liquidator of the Company,
or in default thereof they may be excluded from he benefit of any distribution

made before suchclaim is approved.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited) of Suite 205A - Saffrey Square, Bank Lane
& Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, are the Liquidators of SEAFORD

INVESTMENTS INC.

Lebel onsultants Limited
CG



Financial
Focus

By Larry Gibson



ferent from that, say, of the US
or any of the other major
economies that we like to com-
pare ourselves to. It is these dif-
ferences that make our econo-
my less sensitive to changes in
interest rates than traditional
economies. During the past sev-
eral months, I have been a par-
ty to numerous conversations
where the prevailing view was

that a reduction in interest rates ©

will cure our economic woes.
Unfortunately, it is not so sim-
ple, nor do many persons really

understand how our economy ,

is structured.

* Policy Considerations

Sir William Allen, a former
governor of the Central Bank,
finance minister and current
advisor in the Office of the
Prime Minister, in a letter to
The Tribune’s editor on April
17, 2003, did a first-class job
explaining monetary policy in
the Bahamian context.

Sir William correctly. argued
that because of the extreme
openness of the Bahamian
economy, the reality is that
monetary policy is largely con-
fined to ensuring balance of
payments (BOP) stability. Sir
William defines ‘openness’ in a
BOP context, -which is
explained below.

Investopedia defines BOP as:
“A record of all transactions
made between one particular
country and all other countries
during a specified period of
time. BOP compares the dollar

difference of the amount of |

exports and imports, including
all financial exports and
imports. A negative balance of
payments means that more
money is flowing out of the
country than coming in, and
vice versa.”

Balance of payments is used
as an indicator of economic and
political stability. For example,
if a country has a consistently
positive BOP, this could mean is
significant foreign investment
within that country.

Sir William explained that the’

Bahamian economy is, and
always has been, extremely
open, as the value of imports
(both goods and services)
exceeds more than 50 per cent
of national income; while cur-
rent account BOP inflows and
outflows far ‘exceed the value
of national income.

The net result of this open-
ness is that we have very little
influence over price level
changes within the Bahamian
economy, for the most part.
This is not the case in the US,
UK or German economy, for
example, where monetary poli-

‘Bahamians.

cy tools do directly influence
domestic price level changes.
Without making this article
too technical, if our BOP posi-
tion is not properly managed
then we would not be able to
maintain our fixed parity of the
Bahamian dollar versus the US
dollar. This is why the Central
Bank often resorts to credit con-
straints in an attémpt to control
the expansion of domestic cred-
it, otherwise we end up with a
top-heavy credit structure rest-
ing on too small a base of for-
eign reserves. If this is not man-

_aged, we would not be able to

maintain US$/B$ parity.

Interest rate sensitivity

I personally would welcome
any reduction in interest rates,
as I have a mortgage, bank loan
and credit cards, like most
A 1 per cent
decline in mortgage rates will
mean savings of almost $1,200
per year on a $150,000 mort-
gage, while and a 1 per cent
decline in the prime rate will
save the Government over $20
million per annum in interest
charges.

However, the benefit to the
overall economy may not nec-
essarily be as positive as one
might initiallyyperceive...due to
unintended consequences. The
main unintended consequence
that I fear is that any savings
from lower interest rates will
immediately be used for addi-
tional consumer purchases in
Florida. If this happened, the
added burst of ‘Florida-based’
consumerism could actually

bring greater pressure on our -

foreign reserves at a time when
we ought to be conserving
them.

In a macroeconomic sense,
the best use of any savings from
lower interest rates should be
used for domestic investment -
something that we feel (for
some misguided reason) is the
responsibility of the foreign
investor.

Another concern is the fact
that a disproportionate per-
centage of Bahamian total debt
is tied up in consumer loans,
which are generally granted for
small amounts. Many Bahami-
ans, anxious for consumer cred-
it, go into the bank with the
proposition that they can afford
payments of $200 per month —
‘Lend me the maximum that
payment can service, and I don’t
care about the interest rate’.
Until this mentality changes,
there is no reason to expect that
the spread between deposit
rates and lending rates will nar-
row.

Finally, the reality i is that con-
sumer loans tend to be less
responsive to interest rate
reductions than, say, mortgages,
commercial loans or loans to
higher-rated borrowers. The

..,Sayings arising from a reduction
from 14 per cent per annum to

13 per cent per annum on an

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
: (No.46 of 2000)
ASLAN D PRIDE CO. LTD

No. 111336 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby ‘given in accordance with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ISLAND PRIDE

CO. LTD, is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the ISLAND PRIDE CO. LTD is
required on or before 14th June 2009 to send their name, address and par-
ticulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made be-

fore such claim is approved

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 15th day of December 2008.

We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603 Floor, Kinwick
Centre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of

ISLAND PRIDE CO. LTD. °

SIGNED
For & On Behalf Of

Sovereign Managers
Liquidator

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

PHARMA DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING ASIA INC.
_IBC NO. 129,207 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

‘

‘ NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with section 138 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, PHARMA DEVELOP-
MENT AND MARKETING ASIA INC. is in Dissolution.

Aww person having a Claim against the PHARMA DEVELOPMENT AND
MARKETING ASIA INC. is required‘on or before the 28th day of February,
2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the
liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from he
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, of Suite 205A - Saffrey Square, Bank Lane
& Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, are the Liquidators of PHARMA
DEVELPMENT AND MARKETING ASAI INC.

$8,000 consumer loan, amor-
tised over 6 years, works out to
be $5 per month or $60 per
annum. It is highly unrealistic
to expect that such savings
would translate into any mean-
ingful economic stimulus on a
macroeconomic basis.

Conclusion

While I support lower interest
rates, the Bahamian economy
is not as responsive or sensitive
to the lowering of interest rates
as other more diversified
economies. We need to find a
way to get more Bahamians to
understarid the structure of our
economy, and hopefully this, will
lead to meaningful discussions
on how we should fundamen-
tally transform our economy for
long-term, sustainable econom-
ic stability.

For instance, in real econom-
ic terms, the fixed parity of the
Bahamian dollar is really an
artificial construct. Do we con-
tinue with the Bahamian dollar
or do we effectively adopt the
US dollar as our currency? We
seem set on transitioning our

. tax system to a Value-Added

Tax (VAT), but where are the

sustained public education ini-
tiatives on the implications of
such a system? Why is a VAT
better than the other alterna-
tives? How will our signing on
to the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) and its
implications truly change the
way our economy functions?

This is all food for thought as
we embark upon another year
with hope and optimism.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of

’ Colonial Group International

or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rigibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

NOTICE

RAINBOW ACTION FUND LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the International Business Companies
Act 2000 RAINBOW ACTION FEND LTD. is in dissolation.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 17° December 2008. David Thain of Arner Bank
& Trust (Bahamas) Ltd, Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of RAINBOW
ACTION FUND LTD. All persons having claims against the above-named company are required to
send their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 17" January 2009.

David Thain.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MONTELEONE HOLDING INC.

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance. with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, MONTELEONE HOLDING INC., has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 11th day of December, 2008.

Epsilson Management Ltd. .
Suite 13, First Floor
Oliaji Trade Centre
Francis Rachel Street
Victoria, Mahe
Republic of Seychelles
Liquidator

A

Development Company



Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel “Stagé “1 .Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport. The C-220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components:

° Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Stee! Joist; and

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
installations of steel decking.

Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
Brisby for more information.

Tender closing is at 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,

2009.

There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 8th.
Please RSVP Traci Brisby by 1pm January 7th for
briefing location details.







PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009

~ PROTEST, from page 1B

Information Exchange Agreement
(TLEA) with this nation. The Bahamian
Vinancial Intelligence Unit (FIU) also
co-operates and exchanges information
with its foreign counterparts, while there
is regulator-to-regulator co-operation

between the Central Bank of the -

Bahamas and the Securities Commis-
sion and their counterparts, such as the
US Securities and Exchange Commis-
sion (SEC). é

‘Vhis.treaty and co-operation network
was designed to give the process cer-
tainty, and also give a measure of pro-
tection from so-called ‘fishing expedi-
tions’ to Bahamian financial institutions
and their clients. os

Yet Mr Sears warned there could be
dire consequences for the Bahamian

financial services industry if US prose-~

cutors were repeatedly allowed to bypass
the existing legal treaties and co-opera-
tion mechanisms between the two
nations.

~The implication is that financial insti-
tutions will feel that the environinent.is
not safe in which to operate,” Mr Sears
told Tribune Business.

“The rule of law, which is one of the
major attractions for operating in the
Bahamas, will bé eroded if US agencies,

with impunity, can come into this juris-

diction, bypass the treaty arrangements
and just ignore the comity between the
Bahamas and the US, flouting their own

laws as well as the laws of the Bahamas. —

“{t will be a very uncomfortable and
unsafe environment for financial. insti-
iutions to operate in within this juris-
diction. We ought to insist on the rule of
law, and give people operating in our
jurisdiction a measure of comfort that if
they follow the laws of the land, we will
give them protection.

“That is why I recommend that the
Government takea very firm position. I
appreciate that they may not be able to
publicise everything they do because of
the sensitivity, but they ought to make a
very strong diplomatic protest to the US
and demand they cease and desist from
this conduct.”

Allowing it to continue, Mr Sears sug-
gested, would result in the Bahamas
becoming “less competitive” in finan-
cial services, and the whole range of
international services in general, “at a
time when it can least afford to be”.

Given the global economic downturn,
Mr Sears, who is back in private practice
at his law firm, Sears & Co, said there
would be increased competition among
jurisdictions. for a reduced volume of
business, and other jurisdictions were
likely to offer increasingly attractive
incentives to get it.

Mr Sears said a diplomatic protest was
necessary to ensure the US government
knew its officials and prosecutors were
violating the treaty structure between
the Bahamas and the US, and then bring

. them into line.

“It appears to be an extra-territorial

application of US law,” Mr Sears added. \

“We cannot wait for the Bahamas to be
under assault and then raise these com-
plaints. It is important that they be raised
outside of this context.”

Otherwise, the US and others would
be able to exploit the pressure the
Bahamas was under to demand further
concessions from this nation.

If approached directly by US prose-

_cuting authorities, Mr Sears advised

Bahamian financial institutions and their
executives: “Before you jump on any
plane, consult your lawyer and notify
the Attorney General’s Office, so that

they are aware of this kind of activity .

and the extent of it. My recommendation
is not to. respond without advice.”

BUSINESS





IDEAS, from page 1B

other 35 companies have received debt
financing. \
Some of the projects funded include
a construction project management
firm, a maritime training school, a man-
ufacturer of bathtubs and hurricane
shutters, a guided water ferry tour, a
bonefish lodge, a wireless Internet ser-
vice provider, boat engine repair busi-
ness and a security services business.
According to Mr Gomez, the fund
has been trying to encourage the devel-

opment of businesses focused on infor-

mation technology.
TOURISM, from page 1B

exchanges around the globe.”

However, Mr Simon added: “The
areas of tourism that I believe will con-
tinue to grow over the next five years
involve cultural tourism, adventure
tourism, ecotourism, sports tourism and

‘health services.”

Vaughn Roberts, vice-president of
finance at Baha Mar Resorts, said the
opening up of Cuba could present
opportunities for growth in the tourism
sector, if the Bahamas and Caribbean
took a collective approach to marketing
the region as a whole.

“If you approach the Caribbean as a
single marketplace and you look at what
the relaxation of the embargo against
Cuba is going to create, it’s going to
create a new buzz about Cuba, new
buzz.about the Caribbean and new
inyestment into the region, and tons
and tons of business for the region,” he
said.

Founder and chief executive of World
Cooperation Group, Senator Tanya
Wright, said she recognised renewable
energy opportunities as an economic





BEC, from page 1B

”

He suggested that anyone planning to
start a business in the near future should
start small.

“The Caribbean environment is a
very small market, so you have to start
your business small and take the oppor-
tunities to grow, and grow as they come
along,” said Mr Gomez.

'“T'think there are lots of opportuni-
ties for young professionals over the
next two years in spite of all this finan-
cial crisis we are in.”

He said many businesses come to the
fund in serious financial despair, and
most times cannot be bailed out by the
fund. .



stimulant and revenue grower for

Caribbean countries.

She said the natural resources of the

islands were plentiful, and should be

sought after by Bahamian small and

emerging businesses. Mrs Wright sug-

gested fledgling entrepreneurs “dig into
the economic policies” of governments
in order to grasp the opportunities avail-
able.

“When you look at the Caribbean,
opportunities are as diverse as the lan-.
guage, the culture and the food,” said
Mrs Wright.

“We are dealing with different
dynamics whenever we travel from one
island to the next. Some of the advan-
tages relate to proximity, some to the
economy and others are related to nat-
ural resources that certain island nations
possess, but I think that we all can con-
sider ourselves on a level playing field
when it comes to renewable energy
strategies.” . eek

The panel agreed that small busi-
nesses and other entrepreneurial .
endeavours can emerge out of the cur-
rent economic crisis.



renewable energy component.

“It will essentially be the
thread that will tie all these pro-
jects together - renewable ener-

gy, the legislative agenda, and °
': This effectively restricts all

the National Energy Policy.” -
On-renewable energy, Mr
Neymour said the Government

first had to amend the existing:

legislation governing the
Bahamian energy sector so that
it could be “opened up for
greater participation by the pri-
vate sector”.






Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DEMARIO DUNKLEY OF |.
GLADSTONE TERRACE, GRAND BAHAMA, THE BAHAMAS, -
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and |
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
‘a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6TH day of JANUARY, 2009 to the Minister
‘responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Charm bracelet Lost at the Airport

Existing Bahamian law stipu-
lates that in areas where BEC

supplies electricity power, busi- .
“nesses and residences must use
- it, and can only run generators
‘or alternative forms of power

when the BEC supply is cut.

Bahamas-based companies and
residents to taking power from
a monopoly provider, with no
consumer choice or price com-
petitiveness. ;

“We. would like to see more
of the. private sector provide

“energy to BEC,” Mr Neymour



said, “and have the ability to
provide it for themselves if they

_ feel they can do so more cheap-

“It would require amend-

ments to the BEC legislation.

The Government feels it’s time
we changed the existing view.”
Mr Neymour said he was
unable to provide a timetable
on when the legislative changes
would be made, but added that
the IDB project would deter-
mine “how quickly” the changes
would be made. :

On the renewable energy
front, -the minister said BEC
had reduced from 30 to 13 the
number of candidates still in the
running to supply it with power

..under its Request for Proposal ©
"Highway Landfill every year -

(RFP). document.
“Those-.13 have been
required to provide additional
information,” Mr Neymour
said. “We are progressing rapid-
ly with that, so that'we can
make a further shortlist of the
proposals in various sectors.
“There are proposals for
wind power, proposals for
waste-to-energy, and proposals
for solar power. We will break
them down and find which are
the most appropriate, the key
elements being the cost of pro-
viding energy and the efficien-

cy.” Bo

While geothermal had been
largely ruled out as an alterna-
tive energy source for the

Bahamas, Mr Neymotur said -

that “one area we have found
best for the Bahamas is waste-
to-energy, which is a great
opportunity because we gener-
ate waste that-is more suitable
for waste-to-energy conversion
than other countries”.

Proposals

Waste-to-energy proposals
submitted to BEC in response
to its RFP estimated that some
200,000 tonnes of municipal sol-
id waste deposited at the
Tonique Williams-Darling

some 600 tonnes per day - could
be converted into renewable
energy.

Among ‘the proposals
received were those from Cana-
dian-based Plasco. Energy
Group; a consortium featuring
Bahamas Waste and Cambridge
Project Development Inc; and
another group headed by. Waste
Not.

Renewable energy also held

- out the prospect of energy secu-
rity and an improved environ- »

ment for the Bahamas, not to

mention reduced foreign cur-
rency outflows on oil imports,
which negatively impacted
Bahamian foreign currency
reserves year after year.

Mr Neymour said: BEC’s oil
imports alone were projected
to have increased in value by
almost 57 per cent in 2008, ris- +
ing to $350 million from $223
million in 2007.

Meanwhile, Mr Neymour
said renewable energy was a
key corhponent of the Bahamas’
plans to become a leading voice s.
in addressing climate change,
since the projected five-metre .
increase in global sea levels over
the next several decades would,
for example, leave his.entire ...

- South.Beach constituency-under ~

water. . :

“Jt is critical for us to begin to
address the consequences of cli-
mate. change,” Mr Neymour
added. “The Bahamas has to be
one of those countries that are
outspoken in addressing the
need for their to be action on
climate change.

“We must be leaders among
small island states and lesser

THE TRIBUNE







Chamber
targets
eroup

~ health,

pension

schemes

FROM page1B

ty, is open to all Chamber mem-
bers and their employees. Roy-
alFidelity will charge no admin-
istration fee during the plan’s
first year.

In an e-mail sent to Cham-
ber members yesterday, the.
organisation said: “Additional-

‘ly, members of The Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce will also
be able to access additional ben-
efits and concessions through
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(FBB) and the Royal Bank of
Canada (RBC).”
Mr Simon added: “We hope
to provide real, tangible benefits
to members of the Chamber of
Commerce as well as encour-
age savings for the future. Giv-
en the dynamics of the eco-
nomic environment, you should
certainly have thought what
your financial future looks like.
You have the option to do that
through the Chamber.”

developed countries to inform
the world, and the Bahamian
people themselves, of. the
importance of climate change.
Renewable energy will be a key
part of that.”

_’ Mr Neymour said that when

he addressed the United:
Nations (UN) Conference on
Climate Change last year in
Poznan, Poland, he “made it
clear” that the global sea level
was expected to rise by five
metres. Some 1,5 metres on that
rise was due to thermal .warm-
ing, with the remainder result-
ing from the polar ice caps’
melting.

“Tf and when that takes place
it wiltmean 100 per cent of »
constitueney; South Beach, wix
be under water; that’s how crit-
ical itis for the Bahamas,” the
minister é€xplained.

~The National Energy Policy

Committee had already pre-
sented its first report to the
Government, Mr Neymour said,
and once the administration had
reviewed it, it was likely to be
released for public consump-
tion in the 2009 first quarter.

_ Saturday, 20 December 2008

REWARD OFFERED
—_ 424-0783/356-2068

Teeter Caml eens a very personal history
and sentimental value to the owner



3 The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.

NOTICE

lan Antonio is no loner
employed by The ¢’Albenas
- Agency Ltd. Therefore he is
no longer authorized to
conduct business on behalf

of The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

” Signed Management.



Brereton ene mie |



. NOTICE is hereby ove that THOMAS VERNACE

of NO..30 MARKET STREET, P.O. BOX F-41454,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason. why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of DECEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that LASCELLES FRANCIS,
RIVERLAND DR., 1219 NW FT, LAUDERDALE, FLA., USA, |
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 30TH day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
‘N;7147, Nassau, Bahamas.























Our ee fg Koya el

last a lifetime.
Pe BE
Call (242) 429-5927

www.asksuzettescott.com

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PINCHINO FRANCOIS OF P.O.
BOX GT-2208, HAY ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30TH day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.









‘1 year old Pekingese:
- Black, Gray & White
Last Seen 27th December, 2008
Yamacraw. Shores
Contacts: 364-4422, 455-6666,436-7555

REWARD OFFERED



Accounts Clerk urgently needed with}
minimum of 3 years experience, proficient
in Microsoft applications, preferably 30

years and older-
Fax resume to 394-3885

Accountant urgently needed with minimum
of 5 years experience, preferably 35 years
and older -

Fax resume to 394-3885

Cleaning/Messenger needed, preferably
35 years or older must have valid drivers
license.

Fax 394-3885





TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B

THE TRIBUNE



CALVIN & HOBBES











DISGUSTING DENIZEN OF
THE DEEP, THE GIANT

OCTOPUS GLIDES ACROSS
WE OCEAN FLOOR.

AT THE SIGHT OF AN ENEMY,
HE RELEASES A CLOUD OF
INK AND MAKES HIS GETAWAY!

/





JUDGE PARKER

LIE OVER,
DIXIE---DON’T
MARE ME KILL




DEAD A
LONG TIME
!

‘©1968 Universal Press Syndicate





att
©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc.
Workd rights resorvod

ALONE IN THE CAFETERIA, GARY | AND I NEVER MEANT
VP T HANDLED =

THAT BADLY. Fl

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku ‘increases from Monday to
Sunday

— oa A ie
7M en NP
reall oe

tA Com ‘ll

L KNOW ITS BEST 7/6
5 WAY.
BEST FOR



€2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







YES, DEAR, THE FOOTBALL
PLAYOFFS, TOO
2








IT KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN!
PARTIES, LIGHTS, GET-
S WITH OUR

THEY ARE MAGICAL,
AREN'T THEY?

pm : : il





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



BITSY, YOU 2 Ree
YOUR LITTLE GOING TO BE I TELL YOU

“COUSIN”




‘www kingfealures.com

MOST OF THE

GREAT PALS!



TO DO
AND IL
MIGHT

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reservod.

SOMEBOPY
SHOULVP CALL

















Difficulty Level 1 oe

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is'to ~
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





















Difficulty Level &*&*& *&







©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





1/03









EARTHS SURFACE






i
IS, COVERED A PLUMBER :
: i¥5} : materist in taday’s purzie, whics
: Viktor ai rchnai v Syneth foxks a clase call between his
{) Agdestein, Haninge 1988. attack and Slack’s strong a3
3] Korchroi, now aged 76 yet still knight. Row did White force
2] an active competitor, has had victory?
{| the most incident-packed life of ei a
§| any modern grandmaster. He Chess solution RAE tS! Bick 20348 Lfvest 3 Qegl
. : : mated gO AN GHT 3 SiGe vans Block's quacent 3 RudSt
survived the siege of Leningrad eo sauce winsthemieen
in 1944 by collecting ration Nensa muir: Knight.
books from the bodies of dead One possiisle vated ladder soluting is SUPE auf
j posses
relatives, defected from the gat gulf, bul bell BALL
USSR when chess bosses

Ha si ape
CRACKERS /

preferred the young Anatoly
Karpov, then twice qualified to
challenge Karpov for the world
title. His festyle of caviar,
jogging, yoga and continual




HOW many words of four
tatters er orore can you make
from: the letters shown here?





—. CRYPTIC PUZZLE



drop? (4,5)

tournaments inspires ather





veterans, and in between taking
on GMs a third of his age he
won the world senior {aver-60)
championship at his first
attempt last year. Korchnoi
(White, fo move) has fevel



7




















In making a wand, each lefiier
may be used once only. Hach
traish contain the centre leiter
wd there must be at least one
rine-tetter word. Ne phurals.

FORAY'S TARGET

Guod LT; very gan 26;
exceRent 24 (or more},
Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
gernsr door dorm dour drown
dram moar mom WOOL

el
| at. rondo food. rovar round
ROUNDWORM unmoor word
Ober as | will keep on Tac thel may be well held (4) a Ba Peer EL eee Reet
saying (10) 2 Seen when chins aia Pa A
Ee

6 Hitman, nothing less than
tough maybe (4)
In these classes children

Discrimination a cannibal



appreciates in people (5)








+ _ take a point to heart (5) 4 Arecent reform put = ie
11 Being in the wrong scene through again (2-5) S| ales eres ONES ets
- with the wrong exit (9) 5 One of three allowed to a he a
12 Nevertheless last (5,3) me a journey (7) _ °
13 Astrange yam abouta | 7 The. aveetest American ee MPEP Td | When to Break a General Rule
ee amy, | # foarte moa ne q ee
: ‘0 the serious South dealer. singleton?
: never neies ”) “gardener (10) i Est ea alle ea Both sides vulnerable. Mathematically, there is no doubt
A, see Gan Eh apouticn 9 Guides about a thousand a Re a es) Pe Ri a NORTH that you should finesse. The odds are
i; ships (8) oF AQ10 almost 2-to-1 in favor of the finesse
19 More than one slice of the A ee s : aes
a ee Se Tes Ee
y 2 SREEINY) “Sh sacred (10) 852 and you can gain many points by put-
21 Lives in a dress that is 16 Gets inspiration from the eee hdl Pee bealeedc ko Petia a * WEST EAST ting this knowledge to use, but a
slovenly (7) braes (8) : : 8653. @K972 word of caution is in order. Occa-
22 Apatch put on a cuff, 18 The country encircling : ' VQ) ¥98 sionally, you may encounter a set of
perhaps (5) one’s country? (9) lw Across Down 863. #742 conditions where it is right to play
24 Bill is cut short, strange to 20 Long John Silver’s | 1 In confrontation 1 To blend (4) _ - &I1097 #Q 643 for the drop instead of the finesse.
tell (8) j line (3-4) N (4,2,4) 2 Shown to be in SOUTH Here is a case in point. West leads
27 He stows away atthe | 21 Petition from Queer N 6 Trade exhibition (4) error (6,3) @s4 a club against your four-heart con-
docks (9) Street (7) | = 10 Reject with 3 North African ¥K 10752 tract. You win and lead a heart to the
28 Girl with love for a.c 23 Neat looker, that’s Qa contempt (5) capital (5) AK 105 ace, on which West plays the jack.
_ owboy (5) _ Daisy! (5) ; > Sea: BENS 4 Easily broken (7) Lie RAK You return a heart, and East follows
29 Act either way (4) 25 Actor’s instructions to play an 1 To a sickening 5 Calll in question (7) The bidding: i " low. Ordinarily, you would finesse
30 Unusual task a,bored ‘As You Like It’? (2-3) youngster may busy 26 Charge the boy nothing to i 12 Punish severely (8) a fbigds - aA : s Pass 3 Y Pass pood reason, you should play the
himself with (10) go in (4) 13 Degree of slope (5) wn EN COS ing.
sic : : i i 15 Brief biography (7) i acid jes: ph Sapa gehen oer ae ecu tai eae an
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 17: Trade (7) (2,2,2,4) tion, that you as declarer have the K- _ is that you can assure the contract by
ATTENTION! Across: 1 Prosaic, 5 Mecca, 8 pobre 16 Instantly (2,1,5) LG or a sence an eS een ee ane ae sr yes 8
Albatross, 9 Leo, 10 Heal, 12 Been cage) 18 Basic structure (9) See tea :
’ 1 ’ 22 To be found (5) , : five tricks in that suit. Suppose West shows out, placing
Autocrat, 14 Answer, 15 Needle, 17 ffl 20 Notwithstanding (7) Of course, this may not be possi- East with the Q-9-8 originally. In that
THIS FEATURE IS NOT AVAILABLE Cockeyed, 18 Deep, 21 Era, 22 ans noted (8) 21 Business ble if the opponents’ cards are unfa- __ case, you cash your other club, cross
Amorphous, 24 Treat, 25 Mariner. 27 Expression of associate (7) vorably divided, but suppose, when to dummy with a diamond and ruff
Down: 1 Poach, 2 Orb, 3 Anti, 4 disapproval (9) 23 Spicy style of you lead low to the ace, your left- | dummy’s last club.
Crocus, 5 Misnomer, 6 Coleridge, 7 28 Under way (5) cooking (5) hand opponent plays the queen (or You then run your diamonds. If
Apostle, 11 Associate, 13 Relevant, 29 Unpleasantly 25 Demandasa jack), and when you lead the suit East doesn’t ruff, you put him on
14 Ancient, 16 Reform, 19 Poser, 20 moist (4) tight (5) back, your right-hand opponent fol- lead with a trump, forcing him to
; lows low. return a spade into dummy’s A-Q or
Spur, 23 Own. 26 C t 4 P: ‘ y
30 Reveller (10) ommotion (4) Should you now play the king, give you a ruff-and-discard.





hoping to catch the missing honor, or
should you finesse in the hope that
your left-hand opponent was dealt a

Going up with the king of hearts
is a safety play that virtually guaran-
tees the contract. ¢

©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009 . THE TRIBU. .





oD Y



B

e Tribune

JNDERSTANDING

f& By JEFFARAH GIBSON Dr Cherilyn P. Dr Hanna explains: “To detect: diabetes
———~ _Hanna,an American _ there are a few signs that people can look
DLABETES is a [fe Board Certified for. The common signs of diabetes are, fre-

Ee ; = i Internist & Pediatri- quent urination, blurred vision, unusual

hOng disease that, if cian says, “Diabetes _ weight loss, excessive thirst, increased fatigue,

30% detected, treated is an abnormality of | extreme hunger, and irritability,”she said.

peel arene 5, sugar level in the While no one sign can indicate diabetes,

and controlled oes Blood. There is either all of the Siacione together can be a red

cause many NeGanve too much insulin _ flag. “Now, if you have one of the symptoms

hronic complications (hyperinsulinism) — it does not mean that you have diabetes, but
te the “tet being produced in _ if you notice that you are experiencing all of
re the body. it a the body, or the body the symptoms you should seek a doctor’s
often characterized does not produce advice immediately. If you do experience one

»y either an under sufficient insulin, as of the symptoms, it is definitely an eye open-

well as the insulin is | er and you might just want to pay close atten-

a ES not being properly _ tion to that”.

which is the hormone — used.” If the tell tale signs applies to you and you

reasoonsible for allow- __ Diabetes is classi- think that you have diabetes it might be

. a Ladv ealiste tal fied into three cate- important for you to know that although

mS BOGy ae $ FO take gories: type 1 dia- there is no cure for diabetes yet, there is med-

alucose from the betes, type 2 dia- ication that treats the malady and keeps it



we










ay fhe blood www.diabetes.org,
igtaly Type 1 diabetes is
HGAY, usually diagnosed in
children and young
adults, and was previously known as juvenile
diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not
produce insulin: Insulin is a hormone that is
needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches
and.other food into energy needed for daily
life.

While type 1 diabetes is characterised by an
insufficient production of insulin, the web-
site goes on to explain the characteristics of
type 2 diabetes.

“ Type 2 diabetes is the most common form
of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, either the
body does not produce enough insulin or the
cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary for
the body to be able to use glucose for energy:
When you eat food, the body breaks down all
of the sugars and starches into glucose, which
is the basic fuel for the cells in the! body.
Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the
cells”.

Gestational pregnancy often occurs in preg-
nant women. “Pregnant women who have
never had diabetes before, but who have high
blood sugar (glucose) levels during pregnan-
cy are said to have gestational diabetes,” the
website stated.

It is very important for people to observe
their bodies- any sudden changes, or any
unusual aches or pains, can increase a per-
son’s chances of detecting diabetes. What
persons might want to pay attention to is

Wy

pod, ar when the betes, and gestation- under control.
afi He Had iilican. al diabetes. “There are quite a number of medications
ay GOSS NOT UNNSe According to used to treat and control the illness. This

includes the oral medication that stimulates
the cells (beta islet cells) in the pancreas, to
produce insulin. There is medication that
works on the liver to help it use sugar from
the blood as well as there is an insulin injec-
tion. A person must inject themselves with

‘insulin and it is present in the blood,” she

said.

Dr Hanna added, “if diabetes goes unde-
tected, untreated or uncontrolled it can cause
dire complications to the body. It is important
that diabetes is detected in its early stages. It
can cause serious damage to the retina in the
eye, it can cause cataracts, increase pressure
in the eye, damage to the cells in the kid-
neys, damage to nerves, loss of sensation,
damage to blood vessels in the legs, and loss
of blood flow” she said.

She also noted that diabetes can cause
amputation. “Untreated diabetes can lead to
the loss of the legs. For example if a nail is

stuck in. the bottom of the foot, a person.

won’t feel it because they have lost all sensa-
tion. This can then lead to a serious infec-
tion in the open wound which leads to the leg
being amputated” she told Tribune Health.
Along with medication, there are other
things that people can do to control diabetes

such as lifestyle modification- seeking a nutri-

tionist to reduce as well as maintain weight,
being physically active, having regular check-
ups, and staying stress free.

The best thing to do is prevent the disease
by being physically active, getting annual
check ups, eating healthy, and by mental
enrichment.

some of the tell tale signs of the disease.





January

THE season so far in the veg-
etable garden has been a good
one without being spectacular.
Tomatoes and peppers produced
early but cabbages, broccoli and
cauliflower were reluctant
starters. My first set of garden
peas was a disaster, but the.sec-
ond sowing looks magnificent.

Last year a late tropical storm
set the early vegetable produc-
tion back considerably. This year
we seemed to go from summer
to winter without any autumn,
which was good for most veg-
gies. The cool weather lovers
such as spinach, chard and car-
rots took advantage of the con-
ditions to make good progress. I
planted fennel for the first time in
years and it is doing well.

I look upon January as the
halfway stage in the vegetable
growing season, even though
many of the 120-day crops are
still short of maturity. We must
remind ourselves to keep the
tomatoes coming by starting new
ones from seed once the previous
crop has set flowers. Once snap
beans are harvestable a new row
or two should be planted. It is,
frustrating to have a glut of veg-
gies one month and none the
next.

Mango trees should be bud-
ding now and also sending out
new leaf growth. A copper sul-
phate spray at the budding stage
and another at the flowering
stage, plus another at the small
fruit stage will help counteract
anthracnose, the disease that
months later causes black rot-
ting spots on mature fruit. Most
avocado pear trees have com-
pleted their fruiting season but
carambola will continue to bear
fruit into February.

Some flowering shrubs and
trees put on their best display at

this time of year. The African
tulip tree is in full glory and will
continue flowering into early
summer. Bauhinias are begin-
ning to pick up the pace and will
soon be loaded with orchid-like
flowers.. Yellow elder is one of
the more noticeable of the flow-
ering shrubs. because its yellow

bells are almost luminous in win-

ter sunshine.
Hibiscus, oleander, frangipani,

bougainvillea and other flower- °

ing shrubs are all at their best
right now. Sometimes it seems
these shrubs do well without any
care from their owners. Do not

take them for granted, however.:

Fertilize them once.every season
to keep them healthy. A healthy
plant resists disease and insect
predation.

The Christmas season is over
and your festive poinsettia is now
an anomaly indoors. Take your
poinsettia pots outdoors and
gradually harden them by giving

them a little more sun each day

until they can take full sun. Plant
them where they not only receive
sun all day but are away from
streetlights and other sources of
nighttime illumination. Prune
them once the bracts have com-
pleted their display and then
prune them for bushiness one or
two more times before the end of
August. Your reward will be
signs of the season that can be
enjoyed by neighbours and
passers-by.

Virtually any flowering annu-
al grows well in a Bahamian win-
ter garden. We must select our
summer flowers with care, but
at this time of the year we can
even grow temperate climate
favourites. It is the time to look
through the flower seed pack-
ages in your local nursery and
experiment with something new.

I have noticed some of my
strawberry plants putting out
flowers, promise of delicious
rewards in the near future. The

‘taste of home grown, freshly-

picked strawberries is sublime
compared to the virtually taste-
less imports from the supermar-
ket. One strawberry plant will
turn into a‘dozen in the space of
a year so a small investment now
will set you up for the future.

Strawberries are so called
because in Europe straw was
placed over and around the
plants to protect them from late
frosts. The straw was then used
to keep the emerging fruits off
the ground and away from crawl-
ing insects. Here in the Bahamas
we can keep the fruits off the
ground using crumpled newspa-
per. If birds become a problem
you will have to use netting, a
plastic owl perched nearby, or a
rubber snake lurking in the near-
est foliage.

It’s a beautiful time of year in
the Bahamian garden. Best wish-
es for a fruitful New Year.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com





THE TRIBUNE

The right





ool

(Last in a 2 part series on Small Schools)

@ By NICOLE FAIR BHATTI

So you've decided that a small school environment would be
best for your little darling whether because you've heard by
word of mouth that some friends’ or family's children have
thrived at a particular school or whether you are concerned
with class size because you have read the latest research or

perhaps because you have a child who you suspect m

be

advanced in some areas and therefore is deserving of the extra
attention only a small school can provide. It is a given, that in
every family there will be a whole host of reasons why parents
choose a particular school for their child(ren), however once
you have become convinced of the advantages of a small
school you have to set about finding which one is best suited

for your son or daughter.

School philosophy is one area
-in which educational establish-
_ ments differ and on such a small

island, diversification is essen-
tial in order for schools to sur-
vive and flourish. In the past ten
years many new small schools
have cropped up in New Provi-
dence. Lisa McCartney, Admin-
istrative Director of The Merid-
ian School at Unicorn Village,
and Gillian McWeeney- Wilson,
principal of Summit Academy,
whose schools have succeeded
as a result of following a small
school approach, shared their
philosophies with me.
_ “Lisa McCartney has been a
wonderful mentor for me,”
reflected Mrs Wilson, “Our
philosophies are different; she
is very artsy and wants to devel-
op the creative sides in her stu-
dents as do we but our emphasis
is certainly more on the acade-
. Inic side of things. We started
_ off things at Summit in the
reverse order. We began with
purely.an academic focus and
although that remains our num-

ber one priority, I think those -

who are a part of the Summit
Academy family will agree that
they have seen an improvement
and increase in our creative
expression. _

Mrs McCartney responded,
“While we place significant

emphasis on music and drama, it .
does not exceed the emphasis ©

we place on academic develop-
ment, Our curriculum encom-
passes only one hour of formal
music training per week, how-

ever, the hour is spent systemat-

ically developing critical areas
of performance and performing
arts, including instruments and

_ said.
Summit's students also get a .

vocal training.”

Similarly, in addition to the

three Rs, Summit has developed
a curriculum integrated music
programme led by teacher
Shantelle Pratt whose particu-
lar strength is brass instruments.
Students are able to play the
clarinet, saxophone, flute, trum-
pet and keyboard under Ms
Pratt's tutelage. As the
math/music brain connection
has been well demonstrated, this

emphasis on music both deepens

and expands upon the students'
knowledge base.

Now in its sixth year of oper-
ation, Summit has also expand-
ed its offering of subjects within
the Cultural Arts. The entire

month of November, for exam-

ple, has been designated as
“Culturama!” — an inquiry into
Bahamian culture. Students
have embarked on an amazing
journey, discovering along the
way what makes The Bahamas
so incredibly special.

The Meridian School, on the

other hand, has built a reputa-

tion for excellence in singing and
performing arts. “Semi-annu-
ally the school puts on shows at
The Rainforest Theater. The
self-confidence that children
experience when performing for
a live audience is priceless,” she

chance to show their creative
flair at the fabulous Spring
Extfavaganza! which last year
was held at the Wyndham Ball-
room to an audience of 400.
“Parents are amazed at how
well their children perform;
ordinarily shy kids are singing
and dancing and students who

Panty power

FROM page 8

ble D cup,'as well as a 44 size
with F cups." Lorenes caters to
cups up to G and H.

At the Fit Event in Decem-
ber 2007, Vanity Fair found-that
a lot of women had straps that
cut into their shoulders, cups that
were not supportive enough, or
often times'too small a back size
causing bulging under the arms.
Another Fit) Event is planned
for the near future for Lorenes,
Ms Aranhaisaid.

Moving onto an equally prob-
lematic area. for many women,.

‘the butt and hips can cause more
stress and contemplation than
any other body part. To compli-
ment what God gave you
though, Lorenes carries many
support and shaping lines: that
will simply smooth out any inse-
curities a woman may. have.
“We want everyone to look
nice, and’feel good about them-
‘selvés in whatever they're wear-
ing. A lot of underwear today is
made to enhance that," she
explained. "When you look nice,
you feel good about yourself."
In underwear, Lorenes caters

to the customer with their line

Flexees, brought in as an answer
to many women's request for the

popular line Spanx. Flexees

workin the same way, coming in

‘a variation of control factors

(from light to firm control): as
well as an array of shapes to fit

- under different garments. The

most popular seller is the Capri
style, which can fit under all
knee length skirts or pants.

- Waist Nippers is like a mod-
ern corset, with formed material

going from below the bra to the |

panty, pulling in the stomach and
smoothing out the bulge.

The newest addition of. the
Lorenes Intimates store came
about as an.answer to the con-

- Stant request of customers, said

Ms Aranha. There are some
lines carried in the lingerie. spe-
cialty store that are not carried in
the main Lorenes such as Fash-
ion Forms and Braza. "There's a
need for women to have bot-
toms and hips and boobs, and
it's a matter of necessity for
many, not just luxury."

The lingerie specialty shop
also carries a larger range of
sleepwear with novelty nighties,
joke gifts such as the crotchless
panty, as well as matching feath-

er‘boas from the Shirley of Hol-
~ lywood line. st
Lorenes carries sizes from:

small to 5x, covering, price ranges
from as little as $3.99 for a pair
of panties to $50 for a Goddes
bra. ‘

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are usually very outgoing get a
chance to really show off their
talent. In our school every child
gets a part and they love it,” said
Mrs Wilson.

Speaking to the benefits of a
small school for a naturally shy
child, Mrs Wilson said, “We are
definitely able to provide our

students with a strong founda- _

tion. They certainly. come out
of here more confident in who
they are and in their academic
abilities and then they can soar
at the secondary school level.
Summit. Academy is proud to
have had one of their. students,

Sierra Aitken, place fifth in the

Bahamas Primary School Stu-

_ dent of The Year competition- a

highly selective process.

- She added, “Our curriculum
is extremely challenging and we
are able to move at a somewhat
fast pace because of our small
class sizes. Therefore we must
insist that students entering the
school be able to meet our aca-
demically challenging require-
ments. At the moment, out of
just over 120 students only three
have been diagnosed with mild
learning differences. We are
pleased to have implemented
monthly computerized stan-
dardized testing for the
2008/2009 academic year.

- “As instructional leader, I am
able to see where each child in

Kindergarten through Grade 6 .

is academically and we can

“make adjustments to the pro-

gram if needed. For example, in
the first grade class, the lowest
student was performing at the

To find an equally sexy and
empowering look, check out
True Confessions, a lingerie
store that specializes in more
than just the panty, but the nov-
el, the game and the toys that
make a woman feel sexy too.

‘Owner for three years, Mr
Orville Walcott said he fully
believes strippercise mogul Car-

men Electra's mantra, "if you've.

got it, flaunt it" and he wants to
help the women of the Bahamas
feel their sexiest in any way he
can. aa

"What motivates me is the
mere fact that we as a people
are not very open to sex. Par-
ents and grandparents don't dis-
cuss that type of thing with their
children, so it's never explained
or uncovered," said Mr Walcott.

The secret to great sex, he
revealed, is the clothing. "It must
enhance what a woman's already
got," he said, "making it even
more appealing and sexy than it
already was." |

With the influx of diet regimes
‘and weekly exercise plans, he
pointed out that many women
‘do these things because they

ant to look good naked. "So
why not make it even better?
Why not wear some sexy lin-
gerie?" he asks.

Available at True Confessions
are oodles of options. For those
who want to create those curves,
he recommends a shaper from
his Teddy's line. These create
the hips that some are just not
born with, but all want to have

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SCIENCE PROJECTS - in a big way! At Summit Academy's annual science fair, students are called
upon to present their project to a panel of judges. Public speak
_marks of a Summit Academy education.

mid-grade two range in Read-
ing- that's one and a half year

ahead'of where they ought to |

be. Consequently, the Admin-
istrative team along with the
classroom teacher sat down to
revise the class's curriculum to
ensure that appropriate enrich-
ment was being implemented to
challenge our students. . In oth-
er words, with the implementa-
tion of the recent testing, we can
keep each child's progress under
a microscope.” ;

Mrs Wilson continued, “One
of the issues that small primary
schools face is that we must feed
our children out:to larger
schools for high school which is
always a very competitive
process..I am sure that Mrs
McCartney will agree that this
remains one of our largest chal-
lenges as small school operators.

This means that our students ©

must have the competitive edge
to secure a seat within the more
selective schools. The majority
of graduating students from
Summit and Le Meridian
matriculate to St. Andrew's
School, Lyford Cay School,
Queen's College and boarding
schools.”
Both schools have most
notably .cultivated a-sense of
community and the friendly
atmosphere which is a hallmark
of small schools through their
choice of high caliber teachers
who combine the strength of
personality and high level teach-
ing techniques to create the kind
of healthy learning environment
so important to the nurturing of

tf

ing and leadership are two of the hall-

1;
young minds.

our students with an education
for globalisation. As the instruc-

to ask myself, what do we need

disappearing borders?”

Wilson says that the school feels

compelled to expose the stu-,
dents at Summit to as much as : inks Bochérself?
possible academically and to : P yy ;
spend the appropriate amount : .
: : : ? in a safe country, as far as our
of me murtueing sudents ea : children are concerned, but that
need help in. This is not some- : is far from the truth - and do
thing that a teacher candoina } We ae a . take a chance
class of more than twelve to fif- SLE OUT OUSPHNE
teen students (Summit's maxi- :
mum class size) she claimed.
More importantly being able

to cultivate well rounded stu- i She had obviously been to see a

30 children in a class. “Even the : ee qe a Hom epee
most well-trained teacher, ifshe : Pee re tate
has thirty, in a-class will find it :
almost impossible to pinpoint :
the strengths and weaknesses of :
each child. At Summit our :
report cards are five to six pages :
long, including a list of strengths :
‘and weaknesses, and objectives :
the student should have covered :
and will need to cover in the :
future. In larger classes it is :
almost certain that one or more : .
children will fall through the :
cracks and this is definitely :
something worth considering :

ents and enriching areas they

dents is well nigh impossible with

whenchoosing a school.



THE MOST popular sellers at Lorenes all have Rago’s Invisinet
- Shaper Panel over the tummy.

the illusion at least underneath
their dress.

Mr Walcott said that empow-
ering women is at the top of his
to do list, supplying the Bahami-
‘an woman with hits like’ "The
Bitch in the Bedroom" by Eliz-
abeth Hilts. "This is one‘book
that I think will make women
feel better about themselves, and
allow them to strut their stuff,"

he said. Then there's the Wom-

an's Gourmet Sex Book, sup-

plying the reader with 365 sen- »
sual experiences with an activity °
or sexual position for every day °

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HAPPY(I
yy

of.the year.

women."

"T like women, our population k ; ;
3 ? know what you think about this
isf/> Der Seah women each ok : Situation and parenting in general

and feel special," he said, "I feel ~ send us an email ahd sab Your
everything should be geared : response published in a future
toward them. they're the back. ; Section. Send emails to cbren-

» they. : nen@tribunemedia.net or mail to

: Box N-3207.

whom always want to look nice

bone of the country."

Nunya wi a
Dae

N
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TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 7B

| PARENTING 101

FROM page 8

come ‘out. They [my children]
did not make a scene either, but
the youngest one‘would have

: been about seven years old.
: The, oldest one would have
? been about 15 years old.

‘When you have trained your

: children well and see that they
: show signs of maturity; you may
: also consider this when going
? to the movies. This however
: should not always the practice.
: Going to the movies together
: helps the whole family to enjoy
i a great time together.

‘On the verge of child abuse
Lam not a parent, I only have
two adorable nieces whom I

: love tremendously and would
+ do whatever is in my power to
| : protect them. When I saw these
: children waiting for their moth-
| : er, I was upset. I don't care how
: well behaved, independent
: these kids are, there is no way
: that a seven year old should be
: left alone for an extended peri-
: od of time in public, and espe-
: cially not with the responsibili-

ey «qq. i ty of his two younger siblings.
As Mrs Wilson says, “I do ; That's not fair to itl and it's
strongly believe that we are cul- : Soha EO his Siete
tivating leaders at Summit. My. : Mose sre

goalifor Summitits 10 Provide them, thankfully, what if some-

: thing did - who's to say that they

set ; ? would have made noise or cried
tional leader of this school I have out if someone had simply

~~ ? picked them up and taken them
to teach our students to give : ei P : :

; e : outside? One of the little girls
them an edge in a world that has had to go to the bathroom - why

x E ee :? should she have to go by her-
In'line with: her vision,: Mrs : self, plus the toilets and. stalls
: at the movies are so nasty, why

: should she have to navigate that

While nothing happened to

‘We love to think that we live

I watched the kids as they

: were standing there, and they
: were alone for at least ten min
: utes before-their mother came.

“We love to think
that we live ina
’.. safe country, as
far.as our children
are concerned, but
that is far from
the truth - and do -
we really want te
take a chance with
our offspring?”

: theirs did. It's incredible to think
: that this woman would do this.

1. You should go to the same

? movie as your children

2. If you want a night out, —

then find.a responsible baby-
: sitter and if you can't find one,
; then you shouldn't be going out.

While I didn't see if she was

? with anyone, I got the impres-
? sion that she had been to the
? movie with a friend because
'? once she came out and saw her
: children, they did not immedi-
: ately leave the theatre, but were
? waiting around. I thought to
: myself that if she went to the
? movies with a guy, that was
? even more terrible - I am tired
: af women
? boyfriends - who.is not their

putting their

"baby daddy" in front of their °

} children - but of course I'm only
: speculating.

Having said all of this - I must

:.admit that there have been
? times when I have taken my
? nieces to the movies in the past

"Sometimes men complain ; - and the younger one wanted
that my store doesn't carry any- } to use the bathroom in the mid-
thing for them," he said, "but i dle of the movie - and I have
the tauthieth att a pair of b peers i taken her and left her older sib-
and cologne, the man is good to : ling’ untilswe came back ~ does

e ? that make me a bad aunt?
go. I carry lotions, powders, sexy :

panties, books and games for -:

¢ Tribune Woman wants to





in all shapes and sizes
‘we've been told again
and again, but what
about the garments to
fit those sexy bits?



With four in five
Bahamian women
wearing the wrong
size bra, according
to a study done by
the Vanity Fair
line in December
2007, and mass
media images
bombarding us
with ridiculous pic-
tures of what
women should
look like, it's about time we stop and
think, why don't we give our under-
wear and ourselves, the chance to be
the sexiest they can be.

At Lorenes, a popular lingerie
store, buyer Nicole Aranha said
there is a wide range of undergar-
ments just waiting to give any
woman the body of their dreams.

Lorenes carries a range of prod-
ucts, from control lines like Flexees
and Rago that tuck that tummy in
and smooth that 'peas n rice bungie'
down, to Fashion Forms and God-:
dess that carry specialty bras that
cater to different styles of dress, such
as the low back or plunging V néck.

“These are extremely popular
around New Years because every
woman has that perfect dress, but

Y can come

_ double sided tape).

-ha said, need a personal fit-

THE TRIBUNE

needs to have the perfect undergar-
ment to compliment it," said Ms
Aranha.

‘For the small chested, there are
also options in breast petals (a stick
on adhesive that means you don't
need a bra, but can still have some
support and coverage) or for that
frilly, no neck line garment, Braza (a

And for the punk star in all
of us, Strap Bling will
bring out that edgier,
confident side with.
rhinestones and
glittery designs
that are meant to
be peeking out
from behind your
top.

Bras can pose
quite the dilemma
for many Bahamian %*
women, who, Ms Aran- .

ting. "There are just so many size
variations here that the US doesn't
cater to (the US is where the majority
of undergarments come from). In the
same day you can.see a smaller woman
with a 32 or 34 size bra but with a dou-

SEE page 7

TUESDAY.

JANUARY 6G,












2009

ee ca er

Ce UBEVLEE Ru eh

Soro ey triers

Boe neue
yes






















so they too had to wait on me to |







PARENTING. 101

ON a recent weekend’ I
joined one of my girlfriends ‘for
a trip to the movies. Arriving
at Galleria's JFK theatres early,
one of the employees was nice
enough to allow us into a show-
ing of Soul Men early, but ‘it
ended as soon as we sat down
so we headed back to the lobby
to wait for the start of our
movie,

Upon leaving Soul Men! I
noticed a little boy and his sister
waiting in front of the door. I



‘didn't give it much thought; I

just figured they had gotten sep--
arated from their mother, father
or guardian upon leaving the
theatre and were waiting for
them to come out.

While in the lobby waiting for
our movie, which would start in
another 15 minutes, I noticed
the little boy again, this time
waiting in the lobby. He could
not have been more than seven,
and his sister looked as if “
were anywhere. from three tf
five, it was then that I noticedia
third sibling, a little girl, oldér
than her sister, but youngér
than her brother. The three
were in the lobby waiting ir
someone. Just standing by the
front door. I couldn't believe'#

I drew my friend's attention fo
the matter and this is how we
each saw it. j

Parents should be praised for
disciplined, well behaved chil-
dren (my friend) é

My view as a single mothe
when seeing the three kids unat-
tended at the movie is one of
being impressed at their behay-
jour. {
_I found that these kids weke
very well behaved. They waited
quietly not making a scene, the
oldest looked to be about seven
to eight years old and seemed to
naturally take charge of his
younger sisters. I even noticed
that when one of the girls went
to the restroom, he monitored
how long she took and went to
check on her. ;

When a seat became avail-
able; they all sat quietly and
continued to wait. I was happy
to see that even at such an ear-
ly age, these kids were able to
display what they were taught
by their parents/guardians. This
is rare, but commendable
indeed.

I considered my own children
and wondered what could have
been the difference between
what I taught them and the
teachings these children
received. I thought maybe it
could be the mannerisms of
their parents/guardian: A calm-
spirited parent may possibly
raise children who are more
easily trained to be patient and
kind to one another. I was gen-
erally driven to think and really
ponder about what it was that
caused these kids to be so well
behaved.

I believe also that these chi
dren are a product of their envi-
ronment. They are probably
exposed to | caring
parents/guardians who are lov-
ing, and kind while being stead-:"
fast on behaviour and family. I
was truly impressed! Certainly
living in the Bahamas, where
child abductions are rare, these
parents/guardians did not think’
the kids would be in any danger:

I too, have gone to see a
movie in one theater while my
children were in another. Chil--
dren's movies normally are over '
before the more mature films, '




‘i

SEE page 7

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential vitamins
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains
half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate. |

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway e 394-1759





Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 105 No.35

PLAY THE



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SEE Ten SECTION





- TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



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sta se
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Twenty-one lose their

jobs at Comfort Suites |

& By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter:
Uhompson@tribunemedia, net

TWENTY-ONE dmployees
- from all departments of the Com-
fort Suites property on Paradise
Island were given walking papers
yesterday in-a continuing series of
lay offs from the hotel sector.
Senior Vice-president and Man-
aging Partner William Naughton
blamed the lay offs on dismal
occupancy rates for the winter sea-
son — about.20 to 35 per cent low-

er than previous. winter months

— fueled by the global recession.
Hotel officials expect this trend to
continue into spring, 2009.
When confronted with the news
on the sidelines of the.seventh
annual Caribbean MBA Confer-
ence yesterday, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said he expects
more downsizing in the hotel sec-
tor.
"I'm not aware of that but I
expect the downsizing in the hotel
sector has not been complete, if

SEE page six

| PM hopes job stimulus programmes
Wi ‘cushion’ displaced workers

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN THE wake of another round of lay offs in the hotel sector,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham said his administration hopes its
job stimulus programmes will "cushion" displaced workers against

harsh economic realities.

"We are in the business of bailing.out now, that's why we are
creating jobs, we think they are going to be adequate to cushion

SEE page seven

Py

Naya

Enter to WIN 2 ROUNDTRIP TICKETS |
TOA et ISLAND

Cg
oe

+|} [Limited Time Offer. While supplies Iast. *

*/ BAHAMASAIR |



More hotel layoffs
on Paradise Islant



OBIE WILCHCOMBE, MP for West End, talks to reporters in 1 front of the hospital where the autopsy of inn





=)

Travolta's son, Jett, is being performed i in Freeport, Bahamas, Monday, Jan. 5, 2009.

Faction of union
executive members
alleged to have —
changed LON Kore
@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

INFIGHTING in the: Air-

port Airline and Allied Work- .

ers Union escalated over the
holiday season as a faction of
executive members were
alleged to have changed the
locks on union headquarters,
indefinitely barring access to
the president and all other
executive officers and general
members.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes called the New Year’s
eve incident, “very unfortu-
nate.”

SEE page six:





mortgage with

° SEE STORY RIGHT

Decision postponed in the AG’s

@ By NATARIO
McKENZIE
Tribune Staff
Reporter

A DECISION in
the Attorney Gener-
al’s case against Greg
and Tanya Cash had
to be postponed yes-
terday because the
presiding judge is
reported to be ill.

Ns
)
hen ff
a
eS 4
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2
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a
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case against Greg and Tanya Cash

them as well as other
legal proceedings.

According to Mr
Cash’s affidavit, his
wife was admitted to
Princess Margaret
Hospital on Decem-
ber 26 for medical
and stress-related
issues and is still
receiving care.

The Attorney
General’s Office has

An affidavit filed GREG CASH ouside of filed an application in

yesterday by Greg court yesterday.

Cash — the second
defendant in the action — stat-
ed that Mrs Cash was also ill
and unable to attend.court.
According to the affidavit,
Mrs Cash — the first defendant
— suffered a “tremendous
amount of stress”, which was
attributed to the Attorney
General’s legal action against

your savings!

Get savings built right into your

the Supreme Court
seeking to have Mr
and Mrs Cash deemed “vexa-
tious litigants.”

The AG’s Office claims the
couple’s various court actions
are vexatious. Senior Justice
Anita Allen was expected to
deliver a decision in the matter

SEE page seven









Marsh Harbour:

a By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net -

- FREEPORT - The official
death certificate issued Monday
by pathologists in the Bahamas
confirms that 16-year-oldJett

. Travolta:died of seizure disorder. +

An autopsy was conducted
Monday morning and the body
was released to morticians at
Restview Mortuary around
2.30pm for cremation.

Head pathologist Dr Caroline
Sands of New Providence, and
Dr Ana Tancawan, the patholo-
gist at Rand Memorial Hospital
performed the autopsy. It began
at about 10am and was completed
around noon.

Keith A McSweeney, funeral

' director/mortician at Restview,

said that the Travoltas have
requested cremation of their son’s
remains.

“We are cremating (the body)
here at this facility right now,” he
told international and local press
that had gathered at the crema-
torium on Coral Road around
6.45pm Monday.

Obie Wilchcombe, MP for

‘ West End, told reporters that the

Travoltas are expected to leave
the island with their son’s ashes
by private plane sometime Tues-
day for Ocala, Florida.

SEE page seven

PM ‘won't dignify’
answering Fred
Mitchell’s FNM

govt concerns

PRIME Minister Hubert
Ingraham said yesterday he »
would not dignify answering.
Fred: Mitchell, PLP MP for
Fox Hill, who cautioned PLPs
that the FNM government
would be using “all of its agen-
cies” against the party in 2009.

Claiming that party leader,
Perry Christie, had cautioned
his parliamentary group that
the FNM would be staging an
all out “war” against the PLP
this year, Mr Mitchell added
that it was his belief that this
political aggression could
include the partisan use of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force:

However, when asked
about these comments yester-

SEE page seven






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352.6676/7
367.3135

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PAGE 2, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009

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THE TRIBUNE



Call for greater
union involvement
when dealing with

school violence

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ A TEACHERS union official is calling for a
policy change allowing greater union involve-
ment when it comes to instances of school vio-
lence. |

After a busy start to the school year in 2008,

with several violent incidents occurring in.numer-
ous schools around the country, union officials
feel more control is needed in dealing with violent
students at the school level.

Belinda Wilson, president of the Bahamas
Union of Teachers (BUT), said government has
taken a reactive approach to school violence, giv-
ing way to limited control by school administra-
tors.

Mrs Wilson explains initial steps have been
taken in the form of a questionnaire issued to
BUT members, identifying four areas of con-
cerns for teachers. According to Mrs Wilson they
include: discipline, violence, the police on cam-
puses, and security.

Mrs Wilson said after a complete review, she
intends to present her findings to the ministry
where a policy change is hoped.

Ultimately, Mrs Wilson feels: “There has to
be the initiative coming from the ministry of edu-
cation, that yes this ‘on campus violence’ is a
serious problem, we cannot put our heads in the
sand, and we must deal with it head on. That is
not happening.”

Mrs Wilson said the BUT and school adminis-

trators are powerless when it comes to imple-
menting school protocol, leaving the final word on
policy change to the minister of education.

“There has to be a political will from the gov-
ernment to recognize that we have a discipline
and violence problem.”

Mrs Wilson said the primary role of the union
is to protect teachers, however by extension that
obligation is passed on to students.

Mrs Wilson said addressing the issue of school
violence is a major task, and cannot be accom-
plished by the BUT alone.

Education Minister Carl Bethel told The Tri-
bune on Monday, the government’s position on
school violence has not changed.

- Mr Bethel said: “We continue with our inter-
ventions, we continue to seek to make schools an
atmosphere conducive to learning, and we will
continue to work with the individual students
and the individual problems.”

Mr Bethel contends the education ministry has
taken a pro-active approach to school violence in
the form of its newest initiative, the Transitional
Alternative Programme (TAP).

Mr Bethel explains the TAP project is a more
clinical, psychological and therapeutic approach
in dealing with troubled students.

“The programme is aimed at finding the men-
tal causes, and finding solutions to help troubled
students, bearing in mind that every child is an
individual with an individualized set of needs,
requiring individualized attention, and sometimes
individualized help.”



FROM LEFT: FAMILY Guardian senior vice- president of administration Kerry Higgs, under whose direction the
2009 calendar was produced; winners Ronald Lightbourn, Anthony Stubbs, and Olga Stokes; Family Guardian
chairman Norbert Boissiere; winners Melissa Maura, Jade Greensword and Anthony Hepburn, and Family
Guardian president and CEO Patricia Hermanns. Unable to attend the winners’ reception and missing from the
photo are contest winners Jeff Mansbach, Bean Rose, Tracy Toogood, Michael Toogocd, Jack Hardy and Robyn

Seymour.

Reception puts budding photographers in the frame

‘BUDDING photographers _ tion at the official launch of this the insurance company’s poli-
and winners of the Family year’s “Celebration of Nature” cy owners, businesses and the

Guardian’s 2009 calendar photo _ calendar.
contest were treated to a recep-

With the turquoise waters of

‘general public each year.
Family Guardian said it is

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Monday - ‘Saturday
8:30am - 5: 30pm

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Exuma National Park gracing
the cover, the 2009 calendar is
the 23rd issue in the “Celebra-
tion” series.

The 14 winning photographs
showcase the diversity and
beauty of Bahamian nature,
spanning flora and fauna,
seascapes and sunsets.

The reception provided an
opportunity to congratulate this
year’s winners whose pho-
tographs were selected from
over 500 entered in Family
Guardian’s photo contest.

Family Guardian’s president
and CEO Patricia Hermanns
said: “The variety and quality
of entries made the selection of
only 14 a difficult task for the
judges. The winning pho-
tographs are a true celebration
of the natural beauty that sur-
rounds us.”

The calendar is distributed to

particularly. pleased this year
that students and teachers have
requested copies of the calendar
to display in classrooms as it
provides an anthology of
Bahamian nature useful in sci-
ence projects.

While Family Guardian’s
“Celebration of Nature” is in
its 23rd year, the company has
produced a calendar since the
early 1970s.

The photo contest was intro-
duced in 1986 by the then chair-
man the late Roscow Pyfrom,
an avid photographer himself
whose images of -wildflowers
and orchids were the subjects
of four Family Guardian calen-
dars.

The photo contest runs from
March until May each year and
winning photographers receive
a gift certificates for their select-
ed entries.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY.6; 2009, PAGE 3





In brief

Jamaican
women,
Bahamian man
charged over
drug bust

THREE Jamaican women
and a Bahamian man
charged.in connection with a
$400,000 drug bust over the
weekend appeared in a Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday.

Dexter Livingstone Wil-
son, 30, Tricia Tamara Wit-
ter, 32, Paula Morrison, 32,
and Winsome Williams, 28,
appeared before Magistrate
Carolita Bethel in Court 8,
Bank Lane charged with
possession of marijuana with
intent to supply.

It is alleged that on Satur-
day, December 3, the
accused were found in pos-
session of a quantity of mari-
juana that police believe
they intended to supply to
another.

According to reports,
Drug Enforcement Unit offi-
cers seized eight crocus sacks
containing marijuana in
addition to four taped pack-
ages of marijuana while exe-
cuting a search warrant ona
residence at Turks Close,
Flamingo Gardens.

The drugs, which reported-
ly weighed 361 Ibs, are esti-
mated to have a street value
of $400,000.

Police are reportedly also
in search of a fifth person for
questioning in the matter.

All four of the accused
pleaded not guilty to the
drug charge during their
arraignment yesterday.

They were remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison and are
expected back in court on
Friday for a bail hearing.

Robber locks —

noes Pizza were locked in a
freézerwhenagunman .
robbed the delivery chain’s
Carmichael Road location.

The incident:occurred
around 9am on Sunday,
when the employees opened
the establishment’s back
door to dispose of some
garbage.

A gunman dressed in a
dark green jacket took
advantage of the situation
and entered the building
through the open door.

He robbed the establish-
ment and one of the employ-
ees of cash, police reported.

Before leaving, the robber
locked both employees in a
freezer and left the area
heading in an unknown
direction.

A short time later, other
employees showed up for
work and opened the freez-
er. They found both employ-
ees alive and well.

The matter is under active
investigation, police say.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an/
award. /

If so, callus on 322-1986
and share your story.

Ca a

For the stories
eye aT ae MM) oe
read Insight
on Mondays







TWO employees of Domi- ,



Sandals rapped for taking ‘
long’ to decide on tor nae

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

LABOUR Minister Dion
Foulkes yesterday said San-
dals Royal Bahamian Resort
has taken too long to deliver
its response to government’s
request that it rehire eight
executive officers of the
Bahamas Hotel Maintenance
and Allied Workers Union
who were laid off in Decem-
ber.

He said the matter has been
“outstanding for far too long.”

“T contacted them today
and J am waiting for them to
respond.

“The matter has been out-
standing I think for far too
long and the Sandal’s man-
agement team need to make a
decision.

“T’ve left a message for the
manager to call me today, but
Thaven’t received a call from
him yet,” Mr Foulkes said yes-
terday.

This comes as attorney for
the Bahamas Hotel Mainte-
nance and Allied Workers
Union (BHMAWU) Obie
Ferguson held a press-confer-
ence in which he called on Mr
Foulkes to give an update on
the status of the leuor San-
dals workers.

Mr Ferguson has also com-

mitted to organising a solidar-

ity march to protest the man-
ner in which recent lay-offs,
including those at Sandals and
yesterday at Comfort Suites

Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

A FORMER Bahamasair
pilot who alleges he was
unfairly dismissed after nearly
three decades of flying for the
airline has filed an appeal
claiming he did not receive a
fait hearing.

Anthony Dean, 52, had his
employment terminated in
2003 because he had failed
flight simulator training four
times in 2002, an employment
tribunal ruled on December
3.

However, Captain Dean
claims in the Notice of Appeal
that vital evidence that would
have proved he did not fail
the flight simulator training
four times was prevented from
being heard by Bahamas
Industrial Tribunal president
Harrison Lockhart.

The captain refused to

accept Bahamasair’s settle-

ment of 15 months salary,
accrued monetary benefits
and travel privileges in the
hope of receiving a greater
settlement, and the tribunal
was dismissed.

AOE SITS





VT



on Paradise Island, were con-
ducted.

“We are inviting the Christ-
ian Council, we are inviting
all civic organisations, we are
inviting those who are fair-
minded in the community to
come out and support the
workers,” said Mr Ferguson.

“We feel that the workers
have been marginalised,” he
said, referring in particular to





J contacted
them today and
am waiting for
them to
respond. The
matter has been
outstanding I
think for far too
long and the
Sandals
management
team need to
make a
decision.”

Dion Foulkes

the firing of the entire lead-
ership of the BHMAWU from
Sandals.

The eight executive mem-
bers of the BHMAWU were
among a group of 150 people
laid off in December by the
Sandals resort, which blamed
the tourism downeim for the
move.

At the time of the exercise,
the BHMAWU and the



Captain files ‘an appeal in dispute
over flight simulator training

But Captain Dean has gone
to the Court of Appeal claim-
ing the ruling for his applica-
tion to be dismissed was
wrong in law, went against the
weight of the evidence, and
contradicted what the presi-
dent had said in open court.

In the nine grounds for
appeal, the appellant main-
tains Mr Lockhart acted
beyond the powers of the con-
stitution by making an
ambiguous ruling in the case.

He further alleges the pres-
ident, “Arbitrarily and capri-
ciously decided not to hear
witnesses who the tribunal
ordered to appear and those
subpoenaed by the tribunal to
appear and give evidence at
the hearing.”

And that witnesses were
prevented from being cross-
examined by his attorney,
when it would have “exposed
the real reason why the appel-
lant was unfairly dismissed.”

The real reason he lost his
job, Captain Dean claims “was

due to his continuous docu-
mented effort to have regard

_for public safety and health

on Bahamasair aircraft,”
which would.have required
the airline to carry out expen-
sive repairs.

The notice of appeal filed
on December 30, claims Mr
Lockhart was wrong in law to
refuse Captain Dean’s appli-
cation to order Bahamasair to
pay more than the 12 month
gratuity payment in his
employment contract, and that
he ignored the fact. Captain
Dean was entitled to a greater
award for unfair dismissal
because of his 28 years of
employment.

In the notice, Captain Dean
also alleges he was not afford-
ed a fair hearing within a rea-
sonable time as his case
opened in early 2003 and did
not close until nearly six years
later in December 2008, dur-
ing which time he was unem-
ployed with no income.




Patrick Hanna/BIS Photo

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (right) presents retiring Secretary to tHe Cabinet Wendall Major with a
minted $250 face value gold coin reserved normally as a gift for Heads of Government and foreign digni-
taries. They pose in front of a photo of the House of Parliament that the Prime Minister also presented to Mr.
Major at his farewell retirement party at the Wyndham Nassau Resort and Crystal Palace and Casino, Friday,
January 2, 2008. Anita Bernard will be the next Secretary to the Cabinet.

Bahamas Hotel Catering and
Allied Worker’s Union

(BHCAWU) were awaiting a |

decision from the Court of

Appeal about which union
should be allowed to officially.

represent employees at the
property.

Mr Ferguson called. the.

action a “clear case of union

busting”, while Mr Foulkes |.

warned against hotels ani

Former Bahamasair pilot claims he did not |
receive fair hearing in unfair dismissal case.

omtBy MEGAN. REYNOLDS -

Different!

JEANNIE
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: inviting all Civic
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to.come out and
support the -
2 workers.” ES 3

&





Obie Ferguson

‘terminations to weaken trade

° unions.

“Tt is:a cardinal rule in
industrial ‘relations that the
executives of unions are pro-
tected at all. times,” he’ said.

- A message left with Sandal’s
public relations 1 Manager Steve
Hector. seeking comment on
the issue ‘was not. returned up

to press: sine last. night...

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009





























‘The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master
LEON E: H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M,, K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S, B.Ay LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

11 Shirley Street; PO, Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. ase Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

‘Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

ONE of the funniest Eddie Maiioby “Satur-

day Night Live” skits was one called “White -

like Me” in which Murphy, to learn how white
people live, goes undercover as a white person.

“Slowly, I began.to realise,” says Murphy,
“that when white people are alone, they give
things to each other for free.”

In one scene, he goes into a bank and with no
collateral, no credit and no ID asks for a $50,000
loan. ‘The banker tells him, “Just take what you
need.: Pay | us back anytime — or don’t. We
don’t care.””

When that'skit ran more than 20 years ago it

_ was éalled satire. Today it’s called the subprime
. ‘mortgage crisis or bailout, and the money we’re
~ talking about isn’t 50 G’s but about three-quar-

ters of a trillion dollars. And it’s not about race

ut ‘about class and accountability.
“The. Associated Press contacted 21 banks

hat received at least $1 billion of the govern-

ment bailout money and asked them four easy-

O-answer questions.

low much has been spent?

What wasitspent on? .

:-® How much is being held in savings?







































i



*.What’s the ‘plan for the rest of the money?

Now, if you’re one of the big-shot over-shots
| Funning a major bank and you came, crawling
--on your knees, to beg the American people to
- bail you out of the catastrophe you created by
your own mismanagement, greed and arro-
* gance, -you should be eager to answer those

"questions.

-The very name of the programme, created by

the ‘Emergency Economic Stimulus Act of 2008,

hud. be. enough to humble you and remind
tof your sins: The Troubled Assets Relief

- Programme. You’re seeking relief because of
. assets your actions have troubled.

But these cats aren’t like you and me; they go
through life carrying extra layers of arrogance
and a sense of entitlement. |

None of the banks contacted by the AP
would give specific answers, and some were
downright defiant in their responses.

Thomas Kelly, a spokesman for JP Morgan
*~ Chase, which walked away with $25 billion,
said, “We've lent some of it. We’ve not lent
some of it. We're not. giving an accounting of
‘here’s how we’re doing it.” We have not dis-

.. closed that to the public. We’re declining to.”

Barry: Koling, a spokesman for SunTrust
Banks Inc., which got $3.5 billion, said, “We're
not providing dollar-in, dollar-out tracking.”

Wendy Walker; spokeswoman for Comerica

\ Inc, ($2.25' ‘billion), said, “We’re not sharing
* any other detail: We're just not at this time.”
en And ‘Kevin E Heine, s panesman for Bank of .



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New York Mellon ($3 billion) said, “We’re
choosing not to disclose that.”

He had a request for the AP. “I just would
prefer if you wouldn’t say that we’re not going
to discuss those details.”

“We’re not giving an accounting of.”

“We're not providing dollar-in, dollar-out
tracking.”

“We're not sharing any other detail.”

“We’re choosing not to disclose that.”

Don’t these comments reflect the attitudes
that helpéd create this mess?

An early Christmas gift of hundreds of bil-
lions of dollars from taxpayers who are suffer-
ing through their worst Christmas in years, and
these banks don’t feel they need to account for
this money, including any bonuses that CEOs
are taking.

In the spirit of the season, it would be tempt-
ing to make the Santa Claus analogy for Con-
gress and the administration for requiring so
little from the banks.

But Santa has standards. He knows who’s
been bad or good, and he demands good behav-
iour before he delivers any more gifts.

He doesn’t let the richest kids raid the North
Pole, take the other kids’ toys, eat all the cook-
ies, drink all the milk and then burp before

‘announcing they’ll be back for the rest so stack

them up at the door, no questions asked.

Not one of the banks that refused to answer .
the AP’s questions of accountability would help

any good, hard-working person who asked for
money to tide them over in desperate times but
refused to say how they were going to spend
that money. ,

Not one of those banks would allow such an
arrogant and cavalier disregard for account-
ability from any of the very people from whom
they’ve taken taxpayer-funded bailout money
and to whom they now display arrogant and
cavalier disregard for accountability.

Before they allow the rest of the money to be
doled out, lawmakers better attach a few strings

to it and force the banks to answer, specifically, ‘

all questions about what.they have done with
the bailout money so far and what exactly will
they do with the new money they’re begging for.

If their attitude is still, “Just take what you -

need. Pay us back anytime — or don’t.

“We don’t care,” then we need to put Eddie
Murphy in charge of the bailout scheme. At
least he saw this coming, long ago.

(This article was written by Cary Clack of the

San Antonio Express-News - c.2009).





















J cause, campaigning for

‘ =e
« DESIGN






























Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear from
people who are making news in
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a good

improvements in the area or have 3

won an award. If so, call us on
322-1986 and share your story.

ENGINEERING
COMPETITIVE PRICING



EDITOR, The Tribune.

PLEASE allow me some
space in your editorial column
to comment on one of the eco-
nomic phenomenon that is now
covering The Bahamas.

That is, of course the topic of
layoffs and staff reductions.

This paper is partially based
on a recent article by D
McCann in the business -press
in the USA.

Already, thousands of
Bahamian jobs have disap-
peared in the first 11 months of
2008, and most financial pro-
fessionals expect that more lay-
offs will occur in 2009.

Companies contemplating
layoffs. must, however, consider
a variety of issues, not all of
which fit into a spreadsheet — a
common tool used by.accoun-
tants and business persons to
assess business challenges.

The spreadsheet is usually
depicted. in dollars and cents
and they hardly ever consider
intangible items.

As of the first of the Decem-
ber, unemployment is estimated
to be around 15 per cent (take
the published amounts of 10 per
cent recently, add the new job
cuts, add the persons who don’t
bother to register, add the
underemployed and 15 per cent
looks good).

Do not expect any govern-
ment to admit a high unem-
ployment: rate because it does
not make them look good.
Their goal is to minimise the
perception of how bad the econ-
omy really is and to. maximise
the propaganda on what: they
are doing to make it better’
again.

' One this is ‘certain, unem-
ployment is the highest since
the election of 2007 and maybe

_ even the highest since August

1992.

The reason companies make
these cuts is to trim their bud-
gets in the face of economic
headwinds.

For top management, it’s a
tactic that’s hard to argue: if top
line growth is slowing, expenses
should slow too.

And for most companies,

, people are the largest expense,
or at least, the easiest expense -
. to modify.

But is there a financial case to
be made against Jayoffs?
Certainly, layoffs come with

costs too, both tangible and

intangible.

In addition to potentially
incurring restructuring charges,
the following points are a con-
sequence of layoffs: .

1) Companies lose institu-
tional knowledge;

2) Companies risk being
caught short-staffed when the
economy turns around; and

3) No matter how sensitive
they try to’be, companies often
















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damage the morale and pro- |

ductivity of the surviving
employees.
There is also a non-financial

‘case against layoffs, though it’s

harder to make to the manage-
ment team‘who owes a fiducia-
ry duty to their shareholders.
Employees are key stakeholders
in a company’s fortune.

The notion of viewing not just
shareholders but employees as
key stakeholders in company
fortunes was a hot topic of con-
versation in the early 1990’s
after a spate of leveraged buy-
outs came undone.

Today, a similar question. is
whether mass layoffs — sparked
more by fear than accurate fore-
casting -— could actually deepen
the recession, creating a-vicious
circle.

Technically, that’s still not top
management’s concern: while
fiduciary responsibility does
shift when a company is imper-
iled, it shifts.to creditors, not
employees.

Still, many Bahamian com-
panies and their American
counterparts are more reliant
on the intellectual capital of
their employees than they are
on actual production or the pro-
vision of services.

Companies that lay off
employees are taking a long-
term risk for a short-term sav-
ings.

Indeed, companies “almost
always” overestimate the num-
ber of people who should be

.laid off, according to Crist

Berry, who served as a vice
president or director of human
resources at four different For-
tune 500 companies before

‘retiring in 2005.

In. The Bahamas, we saw ‘his

* phenomenon several years ago

when Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company (BTC) down-
sized for the purported purpose
of privatisation (which is anoth-
er topic for another lecture).
My understanding is that BTC
was forced to rehire additional
persons and to re-engage some
of those persons who were sep-
arated from the company.
Indeed, the same thing hap-
pened several months ago at
Kerzner where the remaining
staff had to work extended
hours and then, some of the
separated staff members were
rehired.

“You've got to figure out

what your competitive edge is.
— what sets you apart from the:

competition? That’s the place
you can’t cut,” says Berry.
- “Tf you don’t understand that,

you're going to have a heck of a:

time ramping back up.”
Steven Hunt, a longtime

‘developer of talent and perfor-

mance management solutions
who is currently director of
business transformation services
for software vendor Success-
Factors, agrees that companies

“tend to jump the.gun” on a
offs.

Often, he said, workers are
more flexible than their employ-
ers realise when it comes to cut?
ting costs.

‘Voluntarily taking pay cuts,
forgoing bonuses, and working
fewer hours may be preferable
to taking a chance on being laid
off.

“That won’t work at every

company, but in some cases it»

canbe an effective way to say

. that ‘employees are our most

valuable assets so we’re going to
think twice about getting rid of
them,’” Hunt says.

In the retail sector, Hunt says
he’s seen some companies take
people out of management roles
and put them on store floors
where they can drive revenue.
“I’m not saying that’s going to
solve the problems of a major
financial crisis, but companies
should start by asking them-
selves if they’re getting as much
money from people’s work as

“they possibly can,” he says.

Such‘tactics may also help a
company hedge against a sud-
den rebound in the market.
Rehiring laid-off workers after a
prolonged downturn is often
much harder than companies
expect.

Perhaps even more poten-
tially damaging than laying off
too many people is letting go
of the wrong people.

Usually, when management
makes this type of decision, they
will employ a matrix estimating
how much a person costs to

THE TRIBUNE

(GER enenr eRe reece eee ese eee
: see SO TO THE EDITOR |

Employee layoffs —
double-edged sword

for companies
LETTERS

employ, their level of perfor-
mance, and what knowledge
they have.

“Companies often have made
mistakes (estimating employee
knowledge), where they have
let someone go that they sud-
denly realised was the only one
who knew how to perform an

_important task,” Hunt says.

In a high-profile example,
Circuit City Stores last year laid
off 3,400 employees whom it
described as “paid well above
the market-based salary range
for their role” and hired lower-
paid replacements.

The impact on employee

‘ morale was severe, and some

observers have partly blamed
the move for last month’s bank-
ruptcy filing and announcement
of 155 store closings.

Then there is the story of
another company that got rid
of a team of five people, only to
discover that another, revenue-
generating department critical-
ly relied on them.

After firing the five employ-
ees and giving them severance,
the company decided its best

‘option was to rehire them into

the other department.

This is equivalent to the in a
hotel environment, firing the
kitchen staff because the man-
agement of the hotel felt that
the waiters were so good.

Only to find out later that the
waiters were only perceived as
good because the food came out
quickly and was always well
cooked.

Of course, it can also be dam-
aging for a company to cut too
few employees, resulting in the
dreaded “downsizing of the
month” scenario: numerous
small layoffs, with everyone
thinking the ax will fall next on
them.

Tronically, some experts’ say

, that can do as much damage to

morale and survivor productiv-
ity as cutting too deeply.

It is alleged that this is occur-
ring presently in a large com-
pany in Freeport where a small
group was let go already, and
rumours persist that the com-
pany’s management is seeking
further and deeper cuts.

Clearly, then, layoffs, like so
many other business decisions,
cannot be based solely on the
coming year’s budget spread-
sheet.

And that’s particularly true
in the current environment,
when normal forecasting is
nearly impossible.

Even companies that are nor-
mally excellent at forecasting
their results may not.be able to
adequately forecast where their
company is headed.

It is argued that unless the
company’s survival is at stake,
it’s tricky to know with any con-
fidence whether layoffs are
actually the right move.

The managerial methods we
currently use to determine if
layoffs are appropriate may be
flawed and not applicable to
today’s economic environment
which is unprecedented. —

Managing today’s complex
organisations is no easy task.
You effectively have the fate of
person’s lives in your hand, yet
you must do the right thing for
the company that employs you.
While management employees
have a responsibility to do what
is right for workers, they also
must do what is right for the
company.

Clearly, if a company’s access
‘to cash is insufficient to fund
operations and other obliga-
tions, layoffs may be unavoid-
able.

That’s true even if it’s just
that the cash cushion is too thin
— if a miss in sales projections
would result in the company
flirting with insolvency.

But some executives make
this type of decision based, not
on the needs of the companies
they head or the fate of the per-
sons they employ.

Some of the layoffs may be
for selfish reasons.

Sometimes, layoffs are made
to reduce cost for the sake of
hitting an artificial number so
the top executives can get a
bonus.

Sadly, in The Bahamas, there
are some executives like that,
who say “to hell with the peo-
ple, I’m going to do. whatever
it takes to get my bonus.”

JOHN S BAIN
Nassau,
December 21, 2008
bho os

eke eee

_ LOCAL NEWS





Man gets jail
sentence for
drug and
weapons
charges

A MAN was sentenced to
serve 24 months in jail after
pleading guilty to drug and
weapons charges in a Mag-
istrate’s Court yesterday. '

Ronald Alexander Joha-
son, alias Roz. Johnson, iai-
tially pleaded not guilty to
charges of possession of
marijuana with the intent to
supply, possession of an
unlicensed firearm and pos-
session of ammunition in
October of 2007.

According to the prose-
cution, police executed a
search warrant. on Johnson’s
St James Road residence on
Wednesday, October 17,
2007 and discovered four
pounds of marijuana in a
bedroom. Police also found
a silver Smith and Wesson
.38 revolver along with 21
live rounds of .38 ammuni-
tion hidden tehind a bath
tub in the residence, Inspec-
tor Ercell Dorsette told the
court yesterday.

According to the prose-
cutor, police also found
$625 on Johnson.

Magistrate Bethel sen-
tenced Johnson to serve 24
months in prison on each
count. The sentences are to
run concurrently.

‘Bahamasair
official refutes
reperts of
impending layoffs

TABLOID newspaper
reports claiming Bahamasair
will layoff 300 workers have
been refuted by the airline’s
general manager Henry
Woods.

Mr Woods said a report in

Tae Punch’s'Nassau:

Grapevine yesterday which
claims Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham was planning to lay
off 300 workers next month
was news to him.

“T have no knowledge
whatsoever about that,” he
said, adding if there were big
changes in the pipeline, he
would hope to have been
told.

He also said The Punch

was inaccurate in reporting’:

that the airline has nine

planes and 900 staff, when in

fact it has eight aircraft and
714 employees.

Florida House
speaker to
leave college joh

@ TALLAHASSEE, Fla.

FLORIDA House Speaker
Ray Sansom announced Mon-
day he will give up the
$110,000 Northwest Florida
State College job he took the
day he was sworn in as speak-
er, according to Associated
Press.

_ Critics have questioned
whether the job as the college’s
chief fundraiser was a reward
for putting $25.5 million for
the school into the budget last
year, when Sansom served as
head of the House Budget and
Policy Council. Sansom was
making $25,000 more than his
predecessor and the college
didn’t advertise the job.

But Sansom defended him-
self even as-he stepped down
_ from the college job.

“JT accepted my position.at
the college with pure intentions

and for good reasons. I have ii
long had a passion for educa- ; }
tion, and I have spent decades,

working to expand the oppor-
‘tunities available to the peo-
ple of northwest Florida,” San-
som told House members as a
special session to cut the bud-
get began. t
Sansom graduated from
Northwest Florida State and
told members that he had
hoped to work there longafter
his legislative service ended.
“Unfortunately, some have
disagreed with my decision to
work at the college. While I do
not question their motives, I
strongly object to their conclu-
sions. In all my yearsin public
service, I have sought to act in
a manner worthy ofthe trust
that the people have placed in
me,” Sansom said.
Sansom said, though, that he
didn’t want the job to be a dis-
traction to House business.

| RM BAILEY STUDENTS “FORCED TO LEARN IN STRUCTURALLY UNSOUND FACILITIES’

Claim that government failed to
fulfill school repairs promises



@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



HUNDREDS of students at R M
Bailey High School are forced to learn
in structurally unsound facilities
because government failed to fulfill its
promises to carry out repairs ‘on cam-
pus, school officials told The Tribune.
yesterday.

As RM Bailey yesterday opened its
doors to students for the 2009 spring
semester, administrators said they
have grown weary of the government’s
“empty promises” to carry out much
needed repairs to the school’s build-
ings.

R M Bailey principal Julian Ander-
son said several major pre-requested
repairs to the Robinson Road campus
have not been addressed despite
numerous requests made to the Min-
istry of Education.

Mr Anderson said that the gymna-
sium, which serves as the school’s pri-
mary meeting location, has been in a
state of disrepair for more than six
years now.

The gym, Mr Anderson said, has a
gaping hole in its ceiling, exposing stu-
dents and teachers to the elements.

Carl Bethel

ough paint job, which he said has not
been performed in more than three
years.

“I’ve made several recommenda-



The school is also in need of a thor-

tions verbally and in writing, and I
guess it’s based on who you are and
who you know that determines how
things get done,” he said.

Mr Anderson said he has been
forced to “make do” with the limited
resources available, however, he con-
tinues to look to the government for
assistance.

Rebuilt

While he hopes that government will
have the gym demolished and a new
one built, Mr Anderson said that the
entire school, which is more than 40
years old, really needs to be rebuilt
from the ground up.

Education Minister Carl Bethel said
yesterday that repairs to R M Bailey’s
gymnasium will not take place before
this summer due to several “unfore-
seen expenses.” ji

“Repairs to the St Georges Junior
High School in Freeport, Anatole
Rodges School in southern New Prov-
idence, and the T G Glover school
experienced some unforeseen expens-
es that affected our capital budget,”
he said.

At Government High School, prin-
cipal Geoffrey McPhee said repairs
have resumed on five staircases.

Work at the high school had stopped
because of pay disputes between a pri-
vate contractor and the Ministry of
Education, he said.

However, he said that there are still
several other areas which require
major repair work, including numer-
ous walk-ways and bridges on the cam-

us.

Both RM Bailey and Government
High schools are among 11 campuses
set to be completely rebuilt or
refurbished according to Bahamas
Union of Teachers president Belinda
Wilson.

A F Adderley, C H Reeves, Selina
Point All-Age School in Acklins and
Low Sound school in Eleuthera are
also among schools to be rebuilt.

Minister Bethel said yesterday that
government’s intention to rebuild 11
public schools has not changed,.how-
ever, the massive undertaking cannot
go ahead before additional funds are
allocated.

Mr Bethel said he expects this may
not happen before the end of the next
budget peniod:

Search and rescue efforts

for missing man

suspende

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

SEARCH and rescue efforts
for a man believed to be miss-
ing at sea have been suspend-

.ed by the Bahamas Air and

Sea Rescue Association (BAS-
RA) pending further informa-
tion, an official said yesterday.
However, two vessels from
the Defence Force’s Harbour
Patrol Unit were said to be
continuing their search for 48-
year-old Dion Dawkins, who
reportedly went missing at sea
around 4pm on Friday.

Yesterday, an officer from
the RBDF Harbour Patrol
Unit said two vessels were
scouring an extensive area
where Mr Dawkins is believed
to have gone missing.

While yesterday's weather
conditions proved favourable
for the search, officials said
efforts were hampered by the
fact that it is unclear where
exactly Mr Dawkins went
missing.

According to information
received by The Tribune, Mr
Dawkins was engaged by
Reginald Sands, the husband
of former Senator Gladys
Sands, to assist two of his
employees,who had run out of

gas in one of his vessels off
Lyford Cay.

Mr Dawkins was reportedly
paid $100 and set out from
Arawak Cay in his vessel, the’
23-foot long ‘Big H’, on which
he is also-reported to have
lived.

However, Mr-Dawkins nev-
er arrived at the stranded ves-
sel and has not been heard
from since.

Around 9am on Sunday Mr
Dawkins’ vessel was found
capsized near Love Beach, Mr
Lloyd said.

The vessel was towed to
the Defence Force’s
Harbour Patrol Station on Bay
Street.. ,



KA \ AS
MISSING MAN Dion Dawkins



Boat

BASRA operations manag-
er Christopher Lloyd said his
organisation called off search
and rescue efforts on Sunday,
the same day Mr Dawkins'
boat was found capsized in the
Love Beach area.

He said chances of a rescue
are slim as it appears that Mr
Dawkins was not wearing a
life jacket when he went miss- -
ing.

"We don't know where it
happened, whether it was in
the ocean or on the reef. If he
was wearing (a) life jacket he
would have been ashore
already. That's the direction
that the wind and the waves
would have taken him. So like
I said, it's more of a recovery -
effort (now), but to recover
any bodies you'd have to know
where it happened, "Mr Lloyd
said.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS
Md RR
PHONE: 322-2157

Another group of Haitian

migrants apprehended

Branville IN CeLOr TTA?

YET another group of illegal Haitian
immigrants was picked up by the
Defence Force yesterday morning in the
southwestern end of New Providence.

The 132 migrants —.101 men, 23
women and eight children — were appre-
hended just after they made landfall.

After receiving information from res-
idents of Venice Bay that a Haitian

sloop had been seen in nearby waters,
shortly after 6am, members of the |

Defence Force were immediately dis-
patched to the area.

On arrival, the combined efforts of
concerned residents, the Defence Force,
and Immigration and police officials
resulted in the apprehension of the ille-
gal migrants.

A 40-foot white and blue Haitian sail-
boat was also discovered in the vicinity.

The Haitian migrants were turned
over to Immigration officials for further
processing.

With this latest apprehension of Hait-

ian migrants, a total of 363 have been
taken into custody for trying to land ille-
gally in the Bahamas so far for 2009...

Last Friday, the Defence Force cap-

tured a group of 156 illegal Haitians as

they strolled around Ragged Island after Ve

landing onshore.

Less than 24 hours later, on Saturday,

Defence Force officers intercepted :
Haitian sloop off the southern coast: of

OPe

Long Island. On board were 75 Haitians. |

Minister of State for Immigration
Branville McCartney told The Tribune
that the Immigration Department will
continue to repatriate the illegal
migrants as quickly as possible. °

He speculated that the recent mass
exodus of Haitians could be due to indi-

cations of political unrest in that country.
Favourable wind conditions during |
this time of the year may also be.a reax;})

son for the large numbers of Haitians
attempting to emigrate in the past few
weeks, he said.



Alternative Dispute Resolution

negotiation and mediation skills workshop in Nassau, January 27-30, 2009

“Very beneficial, informative and practical. This program is
easy to understand and easily applicable in many situations.”

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

To learn more:

fA 61113

EXPECT

SUCCESS

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» learn how to deal with tough bargainers -
* learn how to mediate disputes
* receive individual coaching in mediation. -

contact@adr.ca




PAGE 6, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



BahamaHealth: Slim-Down Challenge

‘Obesity is perhaps the most pervasive medical problem we
face today and causes many serious health complications,
including diabetes, heart disease and even cancer.’



Family Guardian vice president Linda Jarrett

OR the third consec-

utive year, Family

Guardian’s group life

and health division,
BahamaHealth, has lauriched an
effort to increase awareness about
the epidemic of obesity and its
associated health risks.

With its third annual Slim-Down
Challenge, BahamaHealth once
again provided a programme of
education, exercise and support
for clients, associates and the pub-
lic.

This year’s challenge ran 1 from
August through November and
featured a special event the sec-
ond Saturday of each month which
brought participants together for a
morning of health-focused activi-
ties and information.

’ Slim-Down participants had |

their weight and blood pressure
recorded and received advice and
encouragement to help them meet
their health goals.

Family Guardian vice president
Linda Jarrett, said: “Obesity is per-
haps the most pervasive medical
problem we face today and causes
many serious health complications;
including-diabetes, heart disease
and even cancer. We feel that our
. longer programme has a greater
impact than a one-time event in
addressing this -health issue, and
we were very happy to.see the
enthusiasm and commitment of
participants over these past four
months.”

BahamaHealth’ s Sli’ Dowa:

Challenge.drew impressive crowds
to the events, which were themed
this year to attract different age
and interest levels. ““We wanted to
ensure that the whole family
becomes informed about the.ben-

a

efits of healthy lifestyles, and our
four major events were geared to
appeal to all age groups,” said Mrs
Jarrett.

Under the banner “A Family
Affair,” the Slim-Down opening
event in August brought the young
and young-at-heart to the Family
Guardian Financial Centre at the

‘ corner of East Bay and Church

Streets to register, weigh-in, warm-
up, and walk a 30-minute seaside
route.

Among the early morning exer-
cisers was Dr Hubert Minnis, Min-
ister of Health, who gave opening,
remarks and congratulated
BahamaHealth for the initiative.

Family Guardian’s president and

- CEO Patricia Hermanns wel-

comed the large crowd. She said:
“The Annual Slim-Down Chal-
lenge is an important undertaking
for our company as we recognise

‘ the ever-increasing impact of obe-

sity and its associated health risks
within our community. As a part-
ner in the healthcare industry, we

, take seriously our role in educating

our clients and the public on issues

that affect their health and well- -

being.”
September’s Slim- Down pro-
gramme was geared for those over

°18 and under 30 years old, who

have grown-up in the ‘age of fast-
food and computer games. Noting
the World Health Organisation’s

. position that the obesity epidemic

is driven by “diets with a higher
proportion of saturated fats and

sugars” and “increasing use of ©

automated transport, technology
in the home, and more passive
leisure pursuits,” BahamaHealth’s
September event featured whole-
some foods, exercises, judo and
dance.

CREDIT SUISSE
Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

In October “Tiny Tots” enjoyed
their own special day and were
treated to a hula-hoop contest, a
petting zoo and a junkanoo rush-
out, learning at an early age that
outdoor activities and exercise lead
to good health. A hands-on
junkanoo workshop showed
youngsters the art of cutting and
pasting.

The 2008 Slim-Down Challenge _
. concluded with a grand finale on

November 8 under the theme,
“Age Ain’t Nothin’ But A Num-
ber,” underscoring the fact that it’s
never too late to improve your
health. ;

Special prizes were awarded to
Slim-Down participants in specific
categories, recognising the most
enthusiastic and successful in terms
of their long-term efforts and pos-
itive results. —

“Tt has been very rewarding to
follow thé success of persons who
have lost weight the right way,
through proper diet and increased
physical activity, and have also
improved their blood pressure and
cholesterol levels,” said Mrs Jar-
rett.

While the annual Slim-Down
Challenge is designed to help par-
ticipants achieve optimal health in
a fun environment, the subject of
obesity is a serious one. The World
Health Organisation reports that

‘more than 1 billion adults world-

wide are overweight — and at least
300 million of them clinically
obese. The incidence of childhood
obesity is also increasing, and is
already epidemic in some areas.
An estimated 20 million chil-
dren under age five worldwide are
overweight, giving rise to an
increase in type two diabetes in
young people, which ‘for’ most: of

THE TRIBUNE



MATH RY AIAN roti erel cuechcl



the 20th century was confined to
older adults. The medical commu-
nity has long warned that obesity
poses major health risks. Some
risks, though non-fatal, cause suf-
ficient physical and psychological
issues to affect the quality of life,

for example: chronic pain, poor
mobility, breathing difficulty, and
infertility.

However, obesity can lead to
life-threatening problems, includ-
ing type two. diabetes, cardiovas-
cular disease, hypertension and

stroke, and certain cancers.
While heredity and hormones

-can. influence unhealthy weight

gain, health professiondls point to
the major culprits: too much
unhealthy food and too ittle exer-
cise.

Oswald Ingraham yet to make

decision on 2012 election

@ By PAUL G TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

HAVING been elected to serve his second
consecutive term as the Member of Parliament for
South Eleuthera, former House Speaker Oswald.
Ingraham said he has not made any official deci-

sion as.to whether or not he will run for office’,

again in the 2012 general election.
Despite initial reports that he had informed
his party leader, Perry Christie, that he would

‘ not be. vying for the South Eleuthera ‘seat again,

ends, and before that time I will then make a
determination as to whether I will offer again,” he
said. -
At the PLP Parliamentary dinner, held at Mr
Christie’s-home on Cable Beach, the former
prime minister. reportedly warned those gath-
ered that some of the party’s candidates in the
2007 election would not be renominated for any
constituencies in 2012.

While not going into specifics, there has been
much speculation as to whom Mr Christie’ was,
referring in this general remark, leaving many

‘MPs and:former:MPs questioning the security of

Mr Ingraham. said, he.has: not. made ,atiy suchi-. their stahdisig;in the party,),| bt "At ai be

announcement.

“T never did such a thing,” Mr Ingraham com-

mented. “I don’t know who spread that but I
have not made any such statement and when the
time: arises that I make a statement I will cer-
tainly do so.’

Mr Ingraham said he will serve out his term in
the House of Assembly before deciding his future
in the Bahamian political arena.

“T am the Member of Parliament until the term

Of those rumoured to be in question for renom-
ination are mainly PLP’s who are considered to
have caused the party damage in the last general
election — ultimately hurting the party’s chances
of regaining government in 2007.

To avoid such a repeat, sources close to the
party reveal that an in-depth analysis of former
and future candidates has been undertaken to
ensure that the party avoids any “further embar-
rassment” as 2012 nears.

Private Banking ss
is presently considering applications for

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Duties: will include: HN
Acquisition and. development of new offshore European based clients.
Marketing. of ; estate. planning, private banking. and portfolio management.

FROM page one

you go back to the speech I gave
to the nation I forecasted that I
expected unemployment to rise to
the lower double digit levels so
that will not be surprising to me,"
said Mr Ingraham.

The lay offs sparked outrage
from trade unionist Obie Ferguson

“who said the Bahamas Hotel Man-

agerial Association (BHMA) —

reportedly the bargaining. agent -

for managerial and supervisory
staff at the property — was not

notified of the action until the:

news broke today.

He said, according to their
Industrial Relation Act, Comfort
Suites was required to notify the
minister of labour and the bar-
gaining agent before initiating any

_ lay offs.

Mr Ferguson, a lawyer and
BHMaA president, chalked up the
latest round of lay offs "with no
consultation", as proof that hote-
liers‘"have no regard for trade
unions or their workers."

Yesterday morning, Labour
Minister Dion Foulkes said he was

not yet officially informed of the

hotel's actions.
Yesterday morning employees

were asked to convene for a gen-

eral staff meeting at the property
where 21 of the 99-strong work-

FROM page one

Hotel layoffs

force, or 21 per cent, were

informed that their services were

no longer needed.

In a press statement jeleased
yesterday, General Manager
Arthurita Butler-said the lay offs
were.a result of a iprolonsed

’ downturn in business,"

"This was an especially difficult
decision for Comfort Suites,
because many of our ‘employees
have been:with the hotel from the
very beginning," Ms Butler said,
adding that this was the first time
in the hotel's history that employ-
ees were laid off.

"We waited until the last pos-
sible moment to make this deci-
sion, hoping for an upturn in busi-
ness, which unfortunately has not
occurred,"

Mr Naughton, who founded
Comfort Suites in 1991, said the
hotel. was experiencing a "excep-

. tionally soft" winter season for the

first time in more than 18 years of

. operation.

"As an example of the severity,
of the downward trend, we now,
anticipate that the key winter sea- '

son months will achieve 20 per

cent to 35 per cent lower occu-

pancies than in previous winter

oY

-seasons, It is truly regrettable that
the. worldwide recession, has
caused such a prolonged and
sévere drop in occupancy, that

. these staff reductions became nec-

essary;" he said.

He said severance packages, giv-
en to each affected employee ful-
ly complies with Bahamian labour
laws.

Comfort Suites is currently

‘ involved in legal wrangling over

a collective agreement, but this
does not preclude the hotel from
notifying the union about lay offs,
Mr Ferguson claimed yesterday.

"They believe the trade union
movement is weak, so they are
taking advantage of it," he
claimed, arguing that the employ-
er should have first put staff on a
rotating work schedule before the
lay off process.

According to an informed
source, employees were expecting
some bad news after they were
told last week of yesterday's
planned meeting. Still some for-
mer workers appeared to be dev-
astated by the news and left the
property in tears, according to the
source.

Comfort Suites is a subsidiary of
Choice Hotels, an international
franchise with more than 5,700

. hotels,in the United States and

over 35 countries world-wide.

‘Union executive members

services’ to prospective clients along with additional services, such as,

the -

set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures
Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

opportunities

¢

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from Europe.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING.

Parsons not meeting the minimum requirements need not apply.
Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications once be submitted to:

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

Human Resources Department

\

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: JANUARY 20, 2000

'



Union employees yesterday alleged the secre-
tary-general, Anthony Bain, the treasurer, Susan’

Palmer anda trustee, Fredericka Baker, were behind _

the move, however The ‘Tribunewas unable to con-
firm this allegation up to press time.

The three were ousted from the union in an
August 2007 poll of members, but always claimed
the vote was illegitimate. They were reinstated by
order of the court late last year, prompting union
President Nelerene Harding and other executives to

‘tender their resignations, only.to shortly after rescind

them on the advice of the labour minister.

President of the AAAWU, Nelerene Harding,
yesterday said she would await 'the outcome of a
January 12th court hearing, set to finally determine
the fate of the three executives, before deciding
what further course of action to take.

She pledged to continue conducting union busi-

ness as best she could outside the union’s office,
which is located in the east wing of Worker’s House.
’ The union represents 532 airport workers.

Yesterday several employees were said to have
been disturbed by their inability to gain their usual
access to the union building, where they had gone to
collect Christmas cheques from the union which
they needed to pay bills.

Union member Melanie Bowe.said: “I am telling
them (those responsible for the lock change) that I
am a member of the AAA WU, if they havea prob-
lem with Nelerene, then they need to sort that out.

I have paid my dues ‘and I need my Christmas
cheque. I usually get my money in January when I
need to pay my bills and need my cheque and the
office is locked. The secjetary general (Anthony
Bain) is now telling me I should have picked up my
cheque in December. I can pick up my cheque when
Iso choose to!”

Meanwhile the union’s inter turmoil has also
affected a third party — the local pilot’s union,
which was also temporarily blocked from getting
into its headquarters, sub-let from the AAA WU.

Minister Foulkes said that he will inquire into
the circumstances and see if he\can do anything to
help resolve the situation.

“Just like any other organisation, unions have
their problems from time to time and it is for the
leadership of the union to be mature and to be as
patient as possible in terms of resolving those prob-
lems. They must do whatever they can to work
together; not only for the interests of their mem-
bership, but for the interests of The Bahamas
because if we do not have a stable union at the air-
port it could lead to disruption of services at the
airport,” said Mr Foulkes.

A message left seeking comment from Mr Bain
was not returned up to press time yesterday, while
attempts to reach Ms Baker, who was |dentitied by
Ms Palmer as the person to speak to a put the mat-
ter, were unsuccessful.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 7



FROM page one

There had been reports that
the body of Jett Travolta was tak-
en by hearse around 4pm from
Restview to the airport and hand-
ed over to the Travoltas, who left
by private plane late Monday.

“The body is here where cre-
mation is taking place, and the
Travoltas will make a statement
in another day or so. John is still
on the island in West End and is
expected to leave within the next
24 hours,” said Mr Wilchcombe
yesterday.

He said the ashes will travel
with the Travoltas who plan to
leave on their plane for Ocala
today.

Commissioner of Police Regi-
nald Ferguson told The Tribune
that police would not be releasing
a statement as there was “nothing

criminal about the situation” sur-"

rounding Jett’s death.

A number of police officers,
including a team of officers from
the SIB, stood guard outside the
hospital on Monday morning to
keep the press at bay.

International reporters and
cameramen from Access Holly-
wood, Entertainment Tonight,
and writers and photographers
from other news organisations,
including the Associated Press,
gathered in the hospital’s eastern
parking lot.

The Travoltas’ family doctor
was permitted to sit in on the
autopsy at the request of Mr and
Mrs Travolta. It is not known
whether the Travoltas were pre-
sent at, the hospital during the

PM, Mitchell
FROM page one

day, Mr Ingraham said he had
read the article in The: Tri-
bune, but had not seen the
quotes attributed directly to
Mr Christie.

“T read the article, but I did

“not see a quote from Mr

Christie. The article did not
quote Mr Christie. The per-
son who was speaking, I
would not dignify him by
responding to him. If Mr
Christie had said it, I would
be happy to respond to it
immediately,” Mr Ingraham
said.” ~

However, the Prime Minis-
ter added that he did not think
that the Opposition Leader
would “say such a thing.”

“If he did, I would be happy



















Travolta

autopsy.

Jett Travolta suffered a seizure
and died at the family’s residence
at Old Bahama Bay Resort. He
was discovered unconscious in the
bathroom around 10am on Fri-
day, January 2.

The. body was taken to the hos-
pital, where doctors officially pro-

‘nounced the teenager dead

around 12.40pm Friday.

The family’s lawyer, Michael
Ossi, said Jett had a history of
seizures. He noted that all
attempts to revive him were
unsuccessful.

Mr Wilchcombe, a close friend
of the family, said the Travoltas
considered their son to be a “spe-
cial child.”

There are conflicting reports

about how long Jett may have
been left alone unsupervised
before he was discovered by a
caretaker.

- According to official police
reports, Jett was last seen going
into the bathroom on January 1,
and was discovered in the bath-

room by a caretaker around 10am ,

on January 2. -

The Travoltas’ attorney has
denied that Jett was left unsuper-
vised for any length of time as
the family had two nannies
attending to their children.

Mr Wilchcombe was bombard-
ed outside the hospital on Mon-
day morning by reporters who
questioned him about his con-
nection to the Travoltas.

He said he first became
acquainted with the Travoltas six

years ago when the couple pur-
chased property at West End. He
was the Minister of Tourism at
the time and had spent time and
spoken with the Hollywood cou-
ple on several occasions.

Mr Wilchcombe described
them as very “nurturing and car-
ing” parents to their children.

“J saw the Travoltas when they
arrived at the resort in West End
and they said that they were hav-
ing a great time,” he recalled.

The Travoltas arrived on
December 30. They had' planned
to stay in the Bahamas until Jan-
uary 9 to celebrate the New Year
with about 60 family and friends
at West End.

_“Mr and Mrs Travolta are
going through a lot of pain and
hurt — you felt it and you saw it.
They were crying a lot and they
spent several hours with their son
separated by a glass in the
morgue, said Mr Wilchcombe.

“They are two human beings
showing their loss and we want
to allow them time (to grieve)
and to reflect in privacy with fam-
ily, to be able to reflect on their
life with Jett and life without Jett,
arid to think about what will hap-
pen next.”

When questioned as to why
two pathologists were required
to condtct the autopsy, Mr

Wilchcombe said it was a matter |

of making certain that no ques-
tions were left unanswered.
“We had an incident here
before that left questions. We had
the Anna Nicole situation con-
cerning Daniel and questions
were raised and so it is best to be
careful than sorry,” he said.

Decision postponed in AG’s case

FROM page one

yesterday but, according to J ustice Jon Isaacs, Justice Allen was tak-

en ill and was not able to deliver her ruling yesterday.
She is expected to deliver her ruling on January 12.

The Cashes have waged a six-year fight with the Baptist education
authorities since Mr Cash alleged that he was wrongfully dismissed

- » from his job as physical education teacher at Jordan Prince William

High School in October, 2002. Since then, Mr and Mrs Cash have
made'a number of allegations, including claims of unfair dismissal
and breach of human and constitutional rights.

Last December the Court of Appeal struck out an appeal by the
couple, ruling that they had failed to file a proper record of appeal
in accordance with the order of the Registrar.

The couple had filed for an appeal ' ifor a retrial in their case
against the Bahamas Baptist Missionaries and Education Conven-
tion.

The Cashes made headlines last October when President of the
Court of Appeal Dame Joan Sawyer ordered Mrs Cash to either
publish an apology for scandalising the court or be jailed for con-
tempt. Mrs Cash refused to publish an apology. However, she was

« u not jailed for contempt:as a differently constituted court said that the *)’

to respond to him,” he added.""}''

issue was “done with.”

-FOCOL
HOLDINGS LTD.

CO

The public is advised that on December 24, 2008 Sun Oil
Turks & Caicos Limited, a subsidiary of Focol Holdings
Limited (BISX:FCL) invested 5.3 million dollars for 60%
ownership in a joint venture with Marine Tankers Services

AS, a private company incorporated in Norway.

Effective January. 1, 2009 BICI Tankers Limited, the joint
venture company will own and operate two marine tanker

vessels which .will be used to transport petroleum

products throughout The Bahamas and Turks & Caicos

Islands.

“Fuelling Growth For People”



FROM page one

us against the harshness of

: realities but it's very impor-
i tant that whatever we do
: responds to what is happen-
: ing at a given point and time
: so there is no long-term, fixed,

: inflexible sort of policy rather

: there will be policies that have

: been considered to respond ©
: to events as things get worse
: or get better," he said, speak-

: ing to reporters on the side-
: lines of the 7th annual
: Caribbean MBA Conference

: on Paradise Island after news ~
: broke of 21 lay offs at the
? nearby Comfort Suites prop-
i erty.

Mr Ingraham told reporters

at the time he was not aware
+ of the most recent lay offs, but
: said it did not surprise him.

"I'm not aware of that, but I

: expect’ the downsizing in the
: hotel sector has not been com-
: plete, if you go back to the
: speech I gave to the nation I
: forecasted that I expected
: unemployment to rise to the
: lower double digit levels so
: that will not be surprising to
" ; me.

The nation's chief added

: that "a number" of laid off
i Atlantis workers were brought
: back to work over the Christ-
: mas holidays when the resort |
; boasted high occupancy rates.

Atlantis let go around 1,000

employees a few months ago
: citing the economic climate
and low occupancy rates.

Yesterday, Labour Minister

: Dion Foulkes, who also said
: he was not informed of the
? Comfort Suites lay offs — said
: things will get worse before
i they get better.

"The prime minister fore-

: shadowed that things would
: get worse before they get bet- '
i ter and that was predicated on
; international economic trends
i which were all pointing down-
: ward. We are doing all we can
: from a government point of
} view to provide as many jobs

Some restrictions are placed
on the use of one of the objects
‘in the Secret Sound.





PM hopes job stimulus
programmes will ‘cushion’
displaced workers

for Bahamians through eco-
nomic stimulus packages, "he
said.

He said government's "mas-
sive" infrastructure pro-
gramme will provide employ-
ment in addition to the “hun-
dreds" of jobs created by
recent environmental cleanup
projects.

"All of those combined will

vhelp to ease the burden of
many of the recently unem-
ployed workers — especially
in the hotel industry," he said.
"There are (employment)
opportunities in the economy.
They may not be the type of
opportunities that persons
want, but in this environment
something is better than noth-
ing.”

He said the proposed unem-
ployment assistance pro-

gramme is currently being for-

‘mulated by the National

Insurance Board.

It will be introduced early
this year.

Government will also soon
launch a programme that will
have a training component

‘and a work component, the

details of which are now being
formulated, he said, -

"The whole concept is to
take a hotel worker who wish-
es to be retrained or get addi-
tional training in (another)
area take advantage of new
job opportunities, that the
government will actually pay a
stipend so that you can work
and train at the same time.
That is a programme that gov-
ernment will be announcing
very shortly in terms of the
details," he said.

FOR SALE

FREEPORT, GRAND BAHAMA

ALL THAT, the Apartment Number 43 being an
apartment with a unit entitlement of 1.43% on.-the 4th
Floor of Silver Point Condominium Apartments situate
on ALL THAT piece parcel or part of a tract of land

. Situate in Freeport/Lucaya in'the Island of Grand Bahama
another of the Islands in the said Commonwealth of The
Bahamas containing Three and Sixty Nine Thousands
(3.069) acres referred to in the said Declaration was
subjected to the provisions of The Law of Property and
Conveyancing (Condominium) Act 1965

Board of Directors.

For conditions of sale and any
_. other information contact:

Silver Point Condominium Apartments,
P.O. Box F-40825,
PH (242) 373-1168, Fax: (242) 373- 1168

O THE WORLD










BIC wishes to advise its customers that
its JFK headquarters is closed to the
general public until further notice.
The company is moving quickly to
refurbish the facility in the aftermath
of the recent fire incident.

Customers.can visit any one of our
other New Providence locations to
pay bills, make inquiries or obtain:

Services.

New Providence locations

include the Mall at Marathon, Bay
Street, the Town Center Mall, Fox Hill
and the Shirley Street Plaza.

www.btcbahamas.com | CALL BIC 225-5282


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PAGE. 8, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



TUESDAY EVENING JANUARY 6, 2009

| 7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30
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THE TRIBUNc

Let Charlie the.
Bahamian Puppet and
his sidekick Derek put

some smiles on your

_kids faces.

Bring your children to the
McHappy Hour at McDonald's in
Marlborough St. every Thursday
from 3:30pm to. 4:30pm during the

month of January 2009, |

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots ‘of Fon

?m lovin it



\

A

Movie Gift Certificates
emake great gifts!


TRIBUNE SPORTS

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 9







Antoine Walker

Former NBA player charged with NBA
suspicion of drunken driving

MIAMI BEACH, Florida
(AP) — Former NBA player
Antoine Walker has been

charged with suspicion of

drunken driving in Miami
Beach.

Police say Walker was driving
a black Mercedes without the



oe

Lakers beat

lights on when he was pulled
over early Monday morning.
Police say officers smelled alco-
hol and that Walker looked
sleepy.

Police say he refused to take
a Breathalyzer test.

Walker was a three-time All-

Star forward for the Boston
Celtics and helped the Miami
Heat win the NBA champi-
onship in 2006.

Games
Walker struggled in 46. games

with the Minnesota Timber-
wolves last season. His contract
was bought out by the Mem-
phis Grizzlies in December but
he hasn't played this season. ©
Walker was being held on a
$1,000 bond and did not imme-
diately have an attorney.









Blazers for.

15th straight home win

LOS ANGELES (AP) .— Once
again, the Lakers have the best record
in the NBA — thanks to a little help
from the Celtics and Cavaliers.

Kobe Bryant scored 26 points, Pau
Gasol added 19 and Los Angeles beat
the Portland Trail Blazers 100-86 Sun-

day night for its sixth consecutive vic- , [|

tory and 15th straight at home.
The defending Western Conference
champions realize that not having

homecourt advantage against the ©

Celtics in last year's finals probably
cost them the NBA title, and they
want to do something about it this
time around. They are 27-5, one fewer
loss than Boston and Cleveland.

The Cavaliers and Celtics each lost
Sunday to bottom teams in the East.
Boston was beat by the Knicks and
Cleveland fell to Washington.

"It's obviously important to have
homecourt advantage, so we look at it
as a challenge to achieve that goal,"
Bryant said. "Obviously we have a
long way to go. It's a great opportuni-

ty. We have quite a few home games -

here, so we look forward to trying to
stretch this out a little bit. We have
plenty more gears to. go to. Plenty

more. I haven't even played in third -

. gear yet."
LaMarcus Aldridge led Portland
with 22 points and 11 rebounds, as all
five startérs scored in double figures.

But. the Blazers shot only 39 percent

‘overall.

"They are a Rod group, and they
are on a mission," Portland coach Nate
McMitllan'said. "They definitely know
what they need to do to win, and right
now everybody is healthy for them.
Phil (Jackson) can push.a lot of but-
tons and.he has a lot of different com-
binations that he can go with, as far as
playing big or small."

Facing the Trail Blazers for the first .

time since a season-opening, 96-76 win
— Portland's lowest point total ever
against the Lakers — Los Angeles
pulled away with a 15-3 run that
increased its four-point lead to 75-59

’ with 2:12 left in the third quarter.
"They came out with the momen-

‘tum in the third quarter and took over |

the game," Aldridge said. "A lot of
guys had open shots. We just didn't



PORTLAND Trail Blazers forward Nicolas Batum (88) dunks over Lakers forward Pau Gasol
(16) during the first half of Sunday’s game in-Los Angeles...

(AP Photo: Gus Ruelas)

make them. Kobe- kind of took over
and'‘did what he does."

Bryant and Gasol got the Lakers'
pivotal rally going with 16-foot
jumpers, Derek Fisher added a 3-
pointer and Sasha Vujacic capped the
rally with a four-point play — con®

- verting the free throw after Rudy Fer-

nandez fouled him on a 3-pointer.
"I like that play a lot," Vujacic said.

"Sometimes I'm worried. that if the —
‘guy's not very cautious or if he comes

to me at a high speed, I've got to kind
to jump back because I can sprain my

-ankle. So it's not easy. In the first half,

he kind of threw himself into my legs
on my pick-and-roll with Andrew
(Bynum), so I knew he was going to.

foul me on that play and I kind ofiso- .

lated him and just took a shot."
Vujacic, playing despite a case of

- tonsillitis, had.11 points in 26 minutes.
Vladimir Radmanovic had 16 points .
off the bench for the Lakers, 12 of :

them in the fourth quarter. Portland
made only three of 14 shots during
the first 6:06 of the quarter, all of them
3-pointers, and never got closer than

_ 14 points.

"It's always a good sign to be on
top, but you just can't relax," Gasol
said.

"There's too many games and too
much competition to just relax and

get comfortable and be satisfied with ©

the best record."

The Lakers, hoping to get out to.a
fast start against a Portland lineup
missing leading scorer Brandon Roy

~because of:an injured:right: hamstring, =:

didn't take their first lead until Trevor
Ariza's two free throws put them

ahead 51-50 with 52.5 seconds left in |

the first half. Portland led 25-19
through one quarter after forcing nine
turnovers — all of them in a 7:25 span
and one fewer than the Lakers had in
Friday's win over Utah.

"It happens every once in a while,"

- Bryant said. "Sometimes the rhythm

isn't-there, you can't quite get a handle
on the ball and the. team that you're

playing against is playing extremely —

well with a lot of energy. So you just
have to put a stop to it somehow. But
some of those turnovers were self-
inflicted."

| Celtics, Cavs downed by teams at bottom of East

BB The Associated REGS



LeBron James didn' t agree
with the traveling call that
helped prevent his Cleveland
Cavaliers from beating lowly
Washington.

A loss to the struggling New
York Knicks leaves little doubt
Kevin Garnett and the Boston
Celtics are stumbling atop the
Eastern Conference.

James was whistled for tak-
ing an extra step while driving
for a potential tying layup with
2.3 seconds left, and Cleveland
lost 80-77 to the host Wizards
on Sunday despite wiping out
a 16-point deficit in the fourth
quarter. .

"Bad call, " said James, who
had 30 points, 10 assists and six

rebounds. "We all make mis-. :

takes, and'I think I got the

wrong end of the bargain. I:
watched it 10 times after the,
game, and it was clearly a good

play.’

Garnett, who hurt his right
calf when he was kicked late in
the third quarter, had only six
points forthe Celtics in a 100-88
loss in. New York, their fourth

defeat in'six games after a 27-2

start.

"We've just got to come |

together," Paul Pierce said, "We
talked about it after the game
amongst, the players, what we're.
doing right, what we're doing
wrong, and the good thing
about this group, we'reja strong
group. It's just about getting
through this. period and we
know we're a better team that
the way we've been playing."

Boston (29-6) needs to shake -

the slump fast. The conference
leader faces the Central Divi-
sion-leading Cavaliers (27-6) on
Friday night in Cleveland.

In other NBA games Sunday,

it was: Toronto 108, Orlando
102; Detroit 88, L.A. Clippers |

87; Memphis 102, Dallas 82 and
L.A. Lakers 100, Portland 86.
At Washington, James dis-
sected the game's key sequence
in extensive detail —:even
pointing out that he felt he was
fouled as-he released the shot,

which went in and would have

given Cleveland the lead.
His biggest beef, though, was
with what he considered a mis-

' understanding of the way he

moved to the basket.
"You-have your trademark
play, and that's one of my. plays.
It kind of looks like a travel
because it's slow, and it's kind
of a high-step, but it's a one-
two just as fluent as any other
one-two in this league. I got the
wrong end of it, but I think they
need to look at it — and they
need 'to understand that's not a
travel," James said: "It's a per-
fectly legal play, something I've

‘always done."

Washington's Caron Butler
— who scored 19 points and
guarded James most of the
game, including on that closing
play '— remembers that same
move, without an official's call,
from one of the teams' recent
playoff meetings.

"I definitely knew he trav-

-eled, but I didn't know they

were going to call it," Butler
said.

"That was one of them situa-
tions in which a great player
made a move, good officiating,
and they called the call. And I
was like, 'Oh, man, there is a
God."

None of James' teammates
scored more than 13 points, the
Cavaliers shot 39 percent for
the game and they weke held to

_ their lowest point total this sea-

son.



NEW York Knicks forward Wilson Chandler (21) and Celtics guard Rajon
Rondo (9) vie.for control of the ball in the fourth quarter of the Knicks’ 100-
88 victory in Sunday’s game at Madison Square Garden in New York...

Antawn Jamison led’ Wash-
ington with 26 points and 13
rebounds, while Dominic
McGuire had 10 points and 10
rebounds for his first NBA dou-
ble-double.

At New York, the defending
NBA champions lacked their
usual poise, frequently yelling
at each other and the officials.
They allowed 100 points for just
the eighth time in 35 games this
season and managed the low-
est total allowed by the Knicks.

_ "We were frustrated," Boston

(AP Photo: Kathy Willens)

coach Doc Rivers said. ."I think
we were very frustrated in our
play tonight. I thought you
could see it real early in the
game and that's not us, but it
was us tonight."

Paul Pierce scored 31 points
and Ray Allen added 16 for the
Celtics, who lost three of four
on its West Coast road trip over
the holidays

Wilson Chandler scored a
career-high 31 points and New
York snapped an eight-game
losing streak against the Celtics.

~The Kilicks seized control in
the third quarter, never let it
get too close in the fourth.

"Tt was the way they scored.
It was frustrating watching it
happen," Celtics guard Ray
Allen said.

Raptors 108, Magic 102

At Toronto, Anthony Parker
scored a season-high 26 points,
Chris Bosh added 23 points and *
10 rebounds and Toronto over-
came a 39-point performance
by Dwight Howard.

Parker was 13-of-16 from the
field and came within one point

» of his career high.

Pistons 88, Clippers 87

At Los Angeles, Rodney
Stuckey scored 24 points,
Tayshaun Prince added 20 and
Detroit got a critical goaltend-
ing call in the final seconds to
beat the Clippers for their sev-
enth straight victory in a
matchup of injury-depleted
teams.

Allen Iverson had 18 points
and 10 assists for the Pistons,
who have beaten the Clippers

' 12 straight times.

_ Eric Gordon scored a career-

high 31 ‘points, but missed a
potential winner at the buzzer
as the Clippers dropped to 8-
25 with their seventh straight
loss.

Grizzlies 102, Mavericks 82

At Memphis, Tenn., O.J.
Mayo scored 18 of his 21 points
inthe second half, and the Griz-
zlies snapped a 13-game losing
streak to Dallas.

Marc Gasol had 19 points for
Memphis, which ended a four-
game skid overall. ~

Dirk Nowitzki led the Mav-
ericks with 28 points, hitting 11
of 21 shots.





@ By The Associated Press"

SCOREBOARD

Tuesday, January 6

New Orleans at Los Angeles
Lakers (10:30 pm EST). Two of
the top teams in'the Western
Conference meet when Chris
Paul and the Hornets visit Kobe
Bryant and the Lakers.

STARS
Sunday :
— Antawn Jamison, Wizards,

‘scored 26 points, grabbed 13

rebounds and hit a baseline
jumper with 10.5 seconds left
that put Washington ahead in
an 80-77 win over Cleveland.

— Anthony Parker, Raptors,
had a season-high 26 points on
13-of-16 shooting in a 108-102
victory over Orlando.

— Wilson Chandler and Al
Harrington, Knicks. Chandler

' scored a career-high 31 points,

Harrington added 30 and New
York snapped an eight-game
losing streak against the sput-
tering Boston Celtics with a 100-
88 win.

— Kobe Bryant, Lakers, had
26 points as Los Angeles beat
Portland 100-86 for its sixth con-
secutive victory and 15th
straight at home.

CHAIRMAN OF THE
BOARDS :

Marcus Camby had 14 points
and: 20 rebounds for the Los
Angeles Clippers in an 88-87
loss to Detroit. Camby extend-
ed his double-digit rebound
streak to 20 games and is aver-
aging 18.3 over his last eight.

LONG ROAD BACK

Steve Francis and Darius
Miles, both obtained by Mem-
phis last: month, finally joined
the Grizzlies before Sunday's
102-82 victory over Dallas.

Miles played the final 1:46,
but Francis, who didn't arrive
in Memphis until Saturday and

’ only went through a short prac-

tice, was on the inactive list.
Miles, drafted third overall,
out of high school by the Los
Angeles Clippers in. 2000, is
returning from a two-year layoff

‘ because of microfracture knee

surgery. Francis has not played
since December 15, 2007, and
underwent right knee surgery
last February.

Indiana's Mike Dunleavy is
expected back within a week or
So after missing all 33 games so
far this season with soreness in

- his right knee.

STREAKING

Rodney Stuckey scored 24
points. and Detroit edged the
Los Angeles Clippers 88-87 for
its seventh straight.victory.
Allen Iverson had 18 points and
10 assists for the Pistons; who
have beaten the Clippers 12
consecutive times.

SNAPPED

OJ. Mayo scored 18 of his 21
points in the second half and
Memphis ended a 13-game los-
ing streak to Dallas with a 102-
82 victory. The Grizzlies had
lost four straight overall.

STRONG IN DEFEAT |

Dwight Howard scored 39
points but Orlando lost for only '
the fourth time in 21 games,
108-102 to Toronto. LeBron
James had 30 points, 10 assists
and six rebounds in Cleveland's
80-77 loss to Washington.
Nobody else on the Cavaliers
scored more than 13, and they
were held to their lowest point
total this season.

Paul Pierce scored 31 points
for Boston in a 100-88 loss at
New, York, the Celtics’ fourth
defeat in six games following a
27-2 start. Eric Gordon had a
career-high 31 points but missed

‘a potential winner at the buzzer

for the Clippers in their 88-87
loss to Detroit. Los Angeles
dropped to 8-25 with its sev venth
straight loss.

SPEAKING

"It's like that bully in school
that's always coming and beat-
ing you up, and standing up to
him. We were finally able to go
out and get that win against
them."

— Memphis forward Hakim
Warrick, after the Grizzlies

‘snapped a 13-game losing streak

to Dallas with a 102-82 victory

INSIGHT

ee

TEU Vy
ES
on Montlays
PAGE 10, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009



TRIBUNE SPORTS





DALLAS Cowboys wide receiver Terrell Owens (81) is tackled by Baltimore
Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, back, and Baltimore Ravens safety Ed

Reed (20) after picking up 22 yards on a pass play in the second of their

game on December 20, 2008, in Irving, Texas.





(AP Photo: Matt Slocum)

Dr

Roddick and
Monfils through
to 2nd round
of Qatar Open

DOHA, Qatar (AP) —
Fourth-seeded Andy Roddick
moved into the second round
of the Qatar Open with a 6-1, 6-
3 victory over Ivan Navarro of
Spain on Monday.

Fifth-seeded Gael Monfils of
France also advanced with 6-2,
6-2 win over Jan Hernych of the
Czech Republic. "It's a good
start to the year," said Roddick,
who served eight aces. "I am
pretty happy. with my play. I
didn't do anything stupid..I
returned well. I got what I want-
ed from the match. I have been

training hard in the offseason."

Monfils, the 2006 finalist who
broke into the top 20 last year
and was a surprise semifinalist
at the French Open, was
delighted with his performance,
which included seven aces.

"It's good it wasn't a long
match but I practiced hard
before the season began," he
said, "I did everything and it
was a perfect match for me."

_Top-ranked Rafael Nadal
and No. 2 Roger Federer play
Tuesday at the $1.2 million
tournament.

_INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Everyone wants to be last year’s Giants

m@ By DAVE GOLDBERG
AP Football Writer

WITH the second round of
the NFL playoffs upon us, there
are multiple aspirants to
become last season's Giants, the
team from nowhere that swept

through the postseason to an —

improbable Super Bowl title.

Unfortunately for the Giants,
they aren't one of them. They
are the NFC's top-seeded team,
the hunted instead of the
hunter, as they prepare to meet
Philadelphia for the third time
this season.

Actually, it wouldn't -be too

: long a shot to suggest that, the

two sixth-seeded teams could
make it to the Super Bowl in
Tampa. Pittsburgh went that
route in 2006 and won, and the
Giants, the fifth seed (same dif-
ference) did it last year. But
never have two teams seeded
that low gone to the same Super
Bowl.

This season's bottom seeds
are the Ravens in the AFC and
the Eagles in the NFC. They go
up against the top-seeded Titans
and Giants on the road in an
all-rematch weekend. Both are
live underdogs who would sur-

. prise no one if they won.

The Ravens lost 13-10 to the
Titans in Baltimore in October
with the help of a dubious
penalty that extended Ten-
nessee's winning drive. And the
Eagles and Giants split their
two games, each winning on the
road. -

"They're about as dangerous
as all four teams left in the play-
offs," Giants middle linebacker
Antonio Pierce said of the
Eagles — the four referring to
the teams remaining in the
NFC. He might as well have
said that for all eight teams.



ANDY RODDICK serves the ball to [van Navarro of Spain at the ATP Qatar tennis open in Doha, Qatar, Monday...

AFC

Put a blanket over all four
contestants, including San
Diego, which is just 9-8.

Remember that the Chargers
were one of the preseason
favorites to represent the con-
ference in the Super Bowl and
that they've looked strong in
winning five straight. The last
two were especially impressive:
52-21 over Denver in the regu-
lar-season finale that cemented
the AFC West title, and 23-17 in
overtime over Indianapolis that
moved them on.

Yes, San Diego normally
plays well against Peyton Man-
ning and his teammates — the
Chargers now have won four of
the last five with Indy.

But this wasn't LaDainian
Tomlinson and Shawne Merri-
man doing it, it was Darren
Sproles, who had 328 all-pur-
pose yards. And punter Mike
Scifres, who pinned the Colts
inside their 20 on six kicks. Field
position is a. huge part of playoff
football and Scifres' punting
and Sproles' returns could make
a difference in Pittsburgh,
where the temperature figures
to be 30 degrees colder than in
San Diego.

Pittsburgh, who the Chargers
play, has one big question mark
in Ben Roethlisberger, who was
carried off the field with a con-
cussion in the final regular-sea-
son game. He says he'll play,
but the final verdict is up to the
doctors. :

Moreover, the reason Ben
was carried off was a shaky
offensive line that allowed 49
sacks this season and was espe-
cially vulnerable to teams such
as the Eagles and Giants, who
rush the passer well. The Charg-
ers can do that with outside
linebackers Jyles Tucker and

Shaun Phillips and can stuff the
run with Jamal Williams.

The Steelers may have been
four games better in the regular
season, but this is no gimme.

The game between Baltimore
(12-5) and Tennessee (13-3)
takes us back to the pre-realign-
ment turn of the century, when
both teams played in the AFC
Central. In the same round that
season, the Ravens won 24-10 in
Nashville as a wild card against
the Tennessee team that had
won the division.

Baltimore had just 134 yards
of offense and six first downs
in that game, but won because
of two obscure special teamers
and still-very-much around Ray
Lewis, who had just been cho-
sen the league's defensive play-
er of the year. How exactly?
First Keith Washington blocked
a field-goal attempt and Antho-
ny Mitchell returned it 90 yards
for the go-ahead score, then
Lewis returned an interception
50 yards.

Omens?

The Super Bowl that season
was in Tampa, where it is again.
The Ravens got there and faced
the Giants, something that. is
very possible this season. The
Giants quarterback in that
game was Kerry Collins, who is
now Titans QB.

NFC

The Eagles (10-6-1) beat the
Giants 20-14 on Dec. 7 in the
Meadowlands. The Giants (12-
4) won 36-31 in Philly on
November 9. Aggregate score:
Eagles 51, Giants 50.

"Plenty of sun," the positive
section of the long-range fore-
cast reads. "Highs in the low
30s. Lows in the low 20s." No
mention of winds. No need.
They almost always blow at the



Meadowlands, which probably
means the team that runs better
wins this game.

The Giants, who lost three of
their last four games, got the
only one they needed in that
span by beating Carolina in
overtime to secure home-field
advantage. The formula: bang-
ing with Brandon Jacobs to
wear down the defensive front,
then sending Derrick Ward for
215 yards through ever-widen-
ing holes.

In Philly's win at the Mead-

‘owlands, Brian Westbrook

twice exploited Pierce for TDs,
one on the ground, the other
through the air. The Giants
excuse? It was the week after
Plaxico Burress shot himself in
the leg and they were 11-1 with
seven tough wins in a row, just
the time for a letdown. —

So take your pick on that one.
But not on the other game.

Arizona (10-7) is 4-7 outside
the NFC West, was 3-5 on the
road and 3-6 against teams. with
a .500 record: or bétter. That
includes a 27-23 loss to the Pan-
thers (12-4) in Charlotte on Oct.-
26.

Now that the Cardinals have
validated their season by win-
ning a playoff game, it's hard
to see them beating a team that
has improved a lot since that
first meeting.

On the other hand, imagine
Arizona hosting the NFC cham-
pionship game against the
Eagles, who beat them 48-20
Thanksgiving night in Philadel-
phia.

A lot of strange things have
happened this year, one of the
strangest last Feb. 3 in the Car-
dinals' own stadium when the
Giants beat the unbeaten Patri-
ots in the Super Bowl.

So why not?

CTU

DEFENDING champion Toshiaki Nishioka,
(left), of Japan hits challenge

naro Garcia of

Mexico during their WBC Super Bantamweight
~~ “world title fight in Yokohama, Japan, Saturday,
~ Jan.3; 2009. Nishioka won 12 round TKO.

: 7 Photo: Shizuo Kambayashi)





(AP Photo: Hassan Ammar)
THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY,

JANUARY 6,

2009



Former NBA
player charged
with suspicion of

drunken driving...
See page 9







SHOWN (|-r) Stingrays head coach Lawrence Hepburn, CAFL council member Carl Campbell, Jets head coach Obie Roberts, Jets team captain Phillip
Rahming, CAFL promoter Leslie Moore and Warriors team captain Wilshire “Biggs” Dawkins at yesterday's press conference...

’ Photo: Tim Clarke/Tribune Staff

CAFL playofts Kick
off this weekend

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
“Sports ‘Reporter =)"
rdorsett@tribunemedia.net

ith the NFL

playoffs well

underway,

attention at

home shifts
to local football as the Com-
monwealth American Football
League (CAFL) - down to
their final four teams — is set
to begin the playoffs this week-
end.

In the first game of the post-
season, the top seeded John
Bull Jets are scheduled to face
the Tripoint Kingdom Warriors
2pm January 11 at the D W
Davis field.

The Jets created the most

' talked about storyline of the
2008 season when they defeat-
ed the Orry J Sands Pros for
the first time in over 40 games.

The 14-12 win in week 2 pro-

pelled the Jets to their first -

undefeated season in over a
decade.

Jets head coach Obie
Roberts said the season has
been eventful thus far and they
look for the trend to continue
in the playoffs. -

“It has been a very exciting
season and very interesting
things have happened, The
teams heading into the playoffs
are very confident and we
expect it to be very competi-



@ By ETIENNE ‘FARKIE’
FARQUHARSON II

IT is difficult indeed to find
words to express my regret at
the death of my classmate, life-
long splendid, brother/friend
Phil ‘Gogie/Smoka’ Smith.

‘Smoka,’ Kendal Wright and
myself possess a passion for
sports, particularly baseball.

We created baseball games,
wrote on pieces of paper all the
situations that could happen in
a game, wrote team line-ups,
pick the plays out of a cap and
put the outcome beside the
player's name.

This was Gogie foundation
for broadcasting sports. The
three of us along with Franklyn
‘Pillie’ Thomas are die-hard
Stains Louis Cardinals baseball
fans.

‘Gogie’ encouraged me to
work hard to obtain an athletic
scholarship (baseball) and we
combined our unlimited ener-
gy to ensure that SAC (Big Red



tive over the upcoming week-
-ends,” he said.

Roberts said the playoffs
should see great fan support as
the league’s popularity contin-
ues to grow.

“Over the last two years sup-
port has grown in leaps and
bounds particularly due to the
Pros and Jets rivalry,” he said.
“The Stingrays have also devel-
oped quite a fan base and the
Warriors have done so as well,
they have a young team and
have some dedicated fans.”

Jets team captain Phillip
Rahming said they expect a
hard fought contest against the
Warriors.

“We expect it to be a very
intense, hard hitting game. The
Kingdom Warriors is a, team
that we respect greatly. They
can be dangerous if you take
them lightly, just ask the
Defence Force Destroyers,” he
said. “We expect it to be a good
game and the fans should have
a good time.”

Rahming, said ‘despite their
top seeding, they will not over-
look.the Warriors, looking
ahead to a possible champi-

onship rematch with the Pros.

“It can be a trap game if you
try to look a head and if we
take them for granted we could
be going home,” he said. “We
havea very good mesh of vet-
erans and younger guys. We’re

versatile, we can play smash

IUMChUn Onl Camontt

Machines) remains the domi-
nant sports power we met in
place.

‘Gogie,’ an alcuinite of the
highest order, never dodged a
responsibility that he believed
in. He believed. with heart and
soul, and whatever task he took





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mouth football or be finesse at
times.”

The Warriors made the play-
offs for the first time in their
three-year existence after a nar-
row win over the Defence
Force Destroyers in the final
week of the season.

Warriors team captain
Wilshire “Biggs” Dawkins said
his team has bought into the
concept that the postseason cre-
ates a new opportunity for his
team to make a run. despite
being the fourth seed with just
one win.

’“Our guys are getting the pic-
ture that at the end of the day
the record we do have does not
determine how the champi-
onship will end up. So with that
in mind we only have one thing
to say, we have two games left
to play. That statement lets you
know that Kingdom Warriors
will step on the field very con-
fident. We’re leaving it all on
the field and this is our time
now and we are coming to take
it all,” he said.

The two versus three
matchup, originally scheduled
for this weekend (January 10)
was postponed as a sign of
respect for legendary broad-
caster Phil Smith, whose funer-
al is scheduled for that date.

League executives have stat-
ed that the league and its play-
ers will be attending the funer-
al to pay homage to the devout



in hand, and he brought bound-

less enthusiasm and inspiration. «

Phil was much esteemed in
our country through his profes-
sional attainment in sports jour-
nalism and may he enjoy his
eternal rest and the rewards he
has earned.



sports journalist who has done
much. to facilitate the growth
of the league since its incep-
tion.

-Therefore the game was re-
scheduled for January 17 when
the defending champions Orry
J Sands Pros will face the third
ranked V8 Fusion Stingrays.

Stingrays head coach
Lawrence Hepburn declined to
comment about the game, say-
ing only he would address the
media.

Carl Campbell, CAFL coun-
cil member, said the league
looks to culminate one of its
better seasons on a high note.

“It's been a really exciting
year, we are going to end the
year with great enthusiasm,”
he said. “And we expect it to
extend to the 2009-10 season
with even greater enthusiasm
and hopefully we'll see the fans
as well as the general public
come and give their support.”

‘My education is
more important’
than the NFL

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

PROJECTED to go high
between the first and third
round of the draft, Myron Rolle
has decided to pass up a chance
to play in the National Football
League to pursue the Rhodes
Scholarship.

After helping the Florida.

State Seminoles clinch the
Champs Sports Bowl over Wis-

consin with a 42-13 rout on »

December 27 in Orlando, Flori-
da, Rolle sat down with his fam-
ily and made the decision.
“We were all sitting around in
Orlando about three or four

sion,” said Rolle of heading to
an Oxford University classroom
as opposed to suiting up for an
NFL team.

He. will become Florida
State’s second athlete and the
third student in three years to
earn the two-year scholarship.

Looking at the mind-boggling
decision that he had to make,
Rolle said the opportunity to
play in the NFL will always be
there, but there’s only a “once
in a lifetime” chance that he will

get to travel to England to |

study.

“T thought about it and I real-
ized that in about 10 years when
I would have finished playing
in the NFL, I might have regret-

ted the decision to go to

Oxford,” he insisted.

“So I figure that I can go to.

Oxford now, train in England
and come back and still go. to
the combine in February next
year and put myself out there
again to play in the NFL.”
Considering the lucrative deal
that he could have achieved if
he had decided to go to this
year’s Combine and eventual-

ly get drafted in the NFL, Rolle.
‘said it turned out to be a lengthy.

family discussion.

“T could have gotten my fam-
ily financially secured, I could
have made more money than I
ever would, but I think my edu-
cation is more important right

‘ now,” Rolle stressed. .

The aspiring neurosurgeon,
who completed his Bachelor’s
degree in exercise science in just
two-and-a-half years, said edu-
cation has and will always be
first and foremost in his life.

Speaking from New Jersey in
an interview with The Tribune

yesterday, Rolle said he’s gear-.

Myron Rolle
decides to pursue

| Rhodes Scholarship

ing up to come. tions to speak
at a forum at the College of the

Bahamas on December 9’ along

with Desiree Cox and Christ-
ian Campbell, two other
Rhodes Scholarship winners.
“My family is going to be
there, so I’m going to really
enjoy my time home,” said
Rolle, who will then return to
the US to attend the inaugura-
tion of president-elect Barrack

days ago when I made the deci- . Obama in Washington DC on

January 20.

“T will be talking about the
Rhodes Scholarship and what
it means to me, as well as play-
ing football and my decision not
to pursue the NFL right now.
So it should be a lot of fun.”

Although he graduated last
‘summer, Rolle was taking: fur-

ther classes at Florida State in

order for him to be eligible to
compete for the Seminoles.

It turned out to be a wise
decision for Rolle, who was pur-
suing a Master’s degree in pub-
lic administration. He ended
completing his eligibility by
helping the Seminoles clinch the
Champs Bowl Sports title.

“Tt was fun. It was a good way
to.end my last college football
game,” said Rolle,.who was.
shown on Florida State’s web-
site holding up the team trophy.

At was a very. good wan to go
“out.”

And Rolle had plenty of sup-
port in the stands as many of
his family members from. the
Bahamas showed up to watch
the game.

With all that he has going for
him; Rolle said he. was even
offered the opportunity to write
a book, the title and contents
he’s still not sure about.

But if it all goes according to
plan, Rolle intends to have it
published by 2010.

He has also secured a speak-
ing engagement at the Bill Clin-
ton Library:

“T’m very fortunate and very
blessed. I thank the. Lord all the
time for everything that has
happened in my life so far,” he
quipped. “I’m just enjoying

life. ”

At age 22, Rolle said he’s liv-
ing out a dream,

*Mashed Potatoes Gan Be
Exchanged For Family Fries.
No Other Substitutions.


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009 THE TRIBUNE

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TUESDAY;

| RSTO B ¢ business@tribunemedia.net

JANUARY 6G,








2009

‘Diplomatic protest’ call
on US prosecutor actions

By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

former attor-
" ney-general



yesterday

urged the
Government to make a
formal. “diplomatic

process” to Washington
over the increasing ten-
dency of US authorities
and prosecutors to bypass
existing treaties and
directly approach
Bahamas-based financial
institutions for information on their clients,

Alfred Sear

a trend that could ultimately scare banks

and business away from this nation.

Alfred Sears, who held the post of the
Bahamas’ chief legal officer for four years
under the Christie administration, said sev-
eral financial sector clients had approached
him over this situation, feeling “menaced”
and intimidated by the aggressive demands
of US federal and state prosecuting author-
ities. ~

“In practice, I’m finding that a number of
financial institutions are being approached



* Former attorney-general warns financial institutions may be scared
away from Bahamas by direct approaches from US authorities
that are ‘menacing and intimidating’

“* US prosecutors bypassing established treaty/co-operation

“network to request client details from Bahamian banks /
* ‘The implication is that financial institutions will feel that,
the environment is not safe in which to operate’ ,

by US prosecutors, who are asking them
to just jump on a plane to Florida or wher-
ever, and come and co-operate,” Mr Sears
told Tribune Business.

“Many of these people [financial execu-

tives] are feeling intimidated because they

have to travel to the US, and fear they
might be arrested.

“The prosecutors are openly telling these :

persons that they prefer not to go through
the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty
(MLAT) because it’s too costly and time-.
consuming. They’re circumventing our laws
as well as they’re laws. . 2S
“A lot of financial institutions are feeling
menaced. There have been instances where

-the prosecutors have actually shown up at

the offices of financial institutions. I think it
is so serious that, in my opinion, that we
need the Government to make a diplomat-
ic protest to the US government.”

‘The MLAT is a treaty which enables the
US regulators and legal authorities to seek
information, via the Attorney General’s

’ Office, relevant to criminal cases they are

investigating via the Bahamian court system

‘and court orders.

Apart from the MLAT, US authorities

can also seek tax-related information on

specific criminal and civil cases via the Tax



Entrepreneurs told: More

oe ‘out of the box’ ideas _

EH By CHESTER ROBARDS
Business Reporter

. BAHAMIAN entrepreneurs

1

continue to be plagued by a lack

of available capital to finance

their ventures, a panel of financial
industry experts agreed yester-
day, with the Government-spon-

sored venture capital fund’s

administrator calling for more
“out-of-the-box ideas”.

Jerome Gomez, of Baker Tilly
Gomez, who administers the

‘Bahamas Entrepreneurial. Ven-

ture Fund, said the vast majority

-of individuals who-apply for

financing from it are turned

down. He said that out of 300

“business plans that applied for

funding through the fund since

2005, only 45 have.been funded.
“What we find is that every-
body wants a convenience store, a

beauty salon, a restaurant ora

bar. But we’re trying to say that

we really want people to start.

focusing on more out-of-the-box
ideas, and that’s why the invest-
ment rate has been very, very low
today,” said Mr Gomez.

He added, while speaking as a
panelist at the seventh annual

‘Caribbean MBA Conference,

that the Bahamas Entrepreneur- °

‘ial Venture Fund had accessed

$5 million in funding from the
Government, and had so far
made $1.5 million in equity
investments in 10 companies. The

SEE page 4B

Tourism still holds growth potential

' li By CHESTER ROBARDS —

Business Reporter -

CARIBBEAN nations are
teeming with unrecognised busi-
ness opportunities and are espe-
cially open to small business

growth, according to a panel of ,
established Bahamian busi- °

nesspersons.

The panelists at the seventh -

annual Caribbean MBA Confer-
ence agreed that the region of
island nations, in which the

Bahamas is included economical-
_ ly, but not geographically, has

vast untapped potential for

growth and expansion in various

sectors. Oey Vas
Philip Simon , executive direc-

tor of the Bahamas Chamber of. .
Commerce, said tourism was still

one of the fastest-expanding sec-

tors in the world, and many
‘Caribbean-countries had'yet to

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- exploit the industry’s full poten-
. tial.

He suspected the industry will
continue to grow in the near
future, despite Paradise Island-
based Comfort Suites joining the

_lay-off trend yesterday by making

21 staff redundant. In common
with other resorts, Comfort Suites

said it expected peak winter sea- .

son. bookings to be down by 20-35
percent. —

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra~
ham also admitted the Bahamas
was in recession, telling the same

’ conference: “As might be expect-
ed, our economy contracted last’

year, particularly during the sec-

ond half of 2008 and most.

markedly beginning in the last
quarter - following the height of
the hurricane season and the

SEE page 4B |








Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY



‘October plummet: of stock -



administered by RoyalFideli-



SEE page 4B

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamas Chamber of Commerce is working on cre-

-ating a group health insurance plan for its members by

the end of the 2009 first quarter, an initiative that will
complement the launch of its pension plan next week.
Philip Simon,-the -Ghamber’s executive -director, told
Tribune Business yesterday that a group health insurance
plan was “something we’re going to work on, and we’ll
send out Requests for Proposal to the various insurance
companies soon. It is a goal”.

Mr.Simon said the. Chamber hoped to have both the’

pension plan and group health insurance scheme in place by
the 2009 first quarter-end, telling this newspaper that there
had been greater demand for the latter, as opposed to the
savings scheme, from the organisation’s members.

However, the Chamber executive pointed out that it
was more. difficult to roll-out a group health insurance
scheme than a pension plan, due to the fact that insurers
demanded all client information up-front to enable them to
assess risk and calculate the correct premium.

The Bahamas Chamber of Commerce pension plan,

which will be managed and :
- SEE page 4B




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a Investment Management
* Trusts & Estate Planning

2 Personal Pension Plan Accouiats

* Education Investment Accounts ;

BAHAMAS
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BEC to undergo |

‘manpower audit’

in ‘O9 first quarter

"By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

A MANPOWER audit at the
Bahamas Electricity Corpora-
tion (BEC) is likely to begin in
the 2009 first quarter in a bid
to improve. the energy suppli-
er’s internal efficiencies, Tri-
bune Business was told yester-
day, with renewable energy
sources set to be a key compo-
nent of the Bahamas’ efforts to
take the lead in addressing glob-
al climate change.

Phenton Neymour, minister
of state for the environment,
told this newspaper that the
BEC manpower assessment was
part of an $875,000 project,
part-financed, by the Inter-:
American Development Bank

“(IDB), to strengthen the

Bahamian energy sector.

He hinted that the Govern-
ment was for the first time mov-
ing to allow large private sec-
tor entities, such as hotels and

‘tesort complexes, to generate

their own power, with the IDB
project being “the-thread” that
bound all its energy-related ini-
tiatives - renewable energy, the
National Energy Policy Com-
mittee and legislative reform -
together. 5

Mr Neymour added that the
IDB initiative, to be financed
by $700,000 from the bank and .
$175,000 from the Government,
would also ‘assess BEC’s inter-
nal operating structure and staff

levels in an effort to get the .
’ Corporation operating at maxi-

_ of this year.”

_ the energy sector, including.

* Renewable energy key part
of Bahamas’ plan to be ©
leader in combating climate,
change, with forecast 5m
sea level rise to ‘leave 100%
of South Beach under water’ .

* Government aiming to .
amend legislation to allow
firms to generate’own
power, in line with:

IDB project

ee make-up,” Mr Neymour told
Tribune Business yesterday.
“Essentially, a manpower audit.
We will review the manpower
structure of BEC. u
“We anticipate we will bepin
to address some of the. man-
power issues in the first quarter

- And-he added: “The IDB
project is critical. It’s a very
important aspect of this review
of the energy sector, and |
bring together a number of ini
tiatives by the Governmentiin

€







| SEE page 4B








mum efficiency, something that ~ - am

was essential to sustaining its
operations and: finances. BEC
is currently understood to
between 900-1,000 employees.

The minister said he had indi-
cated as far back as his 2007-
2008 Budget speech that “it is -
critical to look at the efficiency
of BEC in terms of its opera- -
tions”, an area that had not
received much public attention
but was a critical component in
reducing electricity costs paid
by Bahamian businesses and
residential customers.

“There has to be a review of
the structure of BEC, and there
has to be a review of its employ-

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Wednesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS. -
High ~ Low W WASSAU Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 77° F



















































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9/31 68/20. FREEPORT Today: E at 5-10 Knots : 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
40/4 Wednesday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
: : | ‘ 32/0 -ABACO ‘Today: E at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 10-20 Miles 76° F
; : Clear, breezy and _ Partlysunnyand . ; Clearing, breezyand | Sunny and nice. : Mostly sunny. | The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Wednesday: SE at 5-10 Knots 0-2 Feet 40-20 Miles 76° F
: humid. E i breezy. + less humid. . : greater the need for eye and skin protection. =
High:84° | ~~ High:79° == ~~ High:79° ~~ ~~ High: 80° & sa cman a
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elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. - 3:02p.m. 2.0 9:04pm. -0.2 mee







24/-4 12/-11 sn

Wednesday?:43 am. 2.7 10:15am. 0.0

4:08 p.m. 2.1 10:07 p.m.. -0.3







Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday



























































- 4:47am. 29 11:17am. -0.1 4d
Temperature UY tom, 22 11:08pm. -04 26/-3 24/-6 pe
High . . 81° F/27°C Friday o48am. 30 12:13pm. 03 86/30. 68/20
Low . . 72° F/22°C YS 40pm. 23- =
Normal high .. . 78° F/25° C
2 Normal OW .u......esessessessessssssssssseeeeeee OB F/19° 6 :
Last year's high ............... 76° F/24°G uti
High:81°F/27°C © Last year's lOW ou. .essesesessseceseeeeeee 04° F/18° C — NR Ci ast enti =n es —
( > Precipitation Sunrise......6:56a.m. Moonrise .... 1:08 p.m. GANT
: As Of 1 p.m. yesterday .....ecsssessseecseeseeeee 0.00" Sunset.......5:36 p.m. Moonset .... . 2:02 a.m. 33/0 22/-5 pc
Year to date ........... 0.017 New - First AN. ic
High: 81°F/27°C - Normal year.to date 0.29" 16
Low: 63° F/17°C : 0/-
AccuWeather.com 36/2 25/-3 sn
: Forecasts and graphics provided by 60/15 sh:
- LE : = ELEUTHE AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009
Si°F/27°C £2 ee ez. RA : : Cold ===
67° FA9°C é : ZZ 's Flurries Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
: Astanbul 44/6 48/8 PK] Snow precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. Warm fii
Jerusalem 3/6 s 62/16 ‘ Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities.
‘dohannesbur :
KEY WEST ‘Kingston
High: 78° F/26°C ‘Lim
°
Low: 70" F/21 -23/-5 pe
= 66/18 sh
= 39/8 s-

_ SAN SALVADOR
High: 82° F/28° C
Low:69°F/21°C

Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows. ;
13/-10. sn









‘Rom
t. Thomas





MAYAGUANA
“High: 84° F/29° C



Wednesday
Low W

Today Wednesday ‘Today Wednesday ~
High Low W High Low WwW High Low W High Low









































FC FIC Fe FIC Fe F/G Fc F/C ; Low: 68° F/20°C
Albuquerque 45/7. 26/-3 pe —50/10- 29/-1 pc Indianapolis. == 36/2. -80/-1.. 33/0. 22/- Philadelphi mr 1¢ 4 ee
Anchorage -5/-20-11/-23 s 3/-16 -9/-22 c¢ Jacksonville 81/27 63/17 pe 73/22 41/5 r Phoenix ee per KLINS
Atlanta «G26 «48/8 c ~~ 5713°-36/2 “pe —“ Kansas City = 42/5 ‘pe Pittsburgh EDISLAND | 7.0.75 ;
Atlantic City 40/4 36/2 i 49/9 31/0 r Las Vegas 58/14 Portland, OR Sear eae Low:69°F/21" ;
Baltimore === 36/2. 32/0 i 44/6 28/-2 + Little Rock == 44/ _ Raleigh-Durham. Low:65°F/18°C : ; i : : iE
Boston 36/2 30/-1 pc 36/2 30/-1 +r Los Angeles 66/18 St. Louis : ‘ Ped ‘ 2
Buffalo = 84-272 pe 37/2 23/-5 ~~ sf Louisville = 40/: Salt Lake 6/: GREAT INAGUA \ eS
Charleston,SC 74/23 60/15 pe 66/18 42/5 fr San Antonio 67/19 ‘ne : = 5 :
Chicago 34/4 21/-6 sn 26/-3° 18/-7 sf San Dieg 63/ ieee c : CB BROKERS & AGENTS —
Cleveland 36/2 31/0 sn 36/2 23/-5 sn San Francisco 55/12 We : :
Dallas = §3/11-- 98/3 pe 66/18 42/5 -s shvill Seattl 7 Fleuthera Fruma
Denver 21/-6 pe 55/12 27/-2 pe New Orleans 64/17 47/8 Tallahassee 78/25 58/14 ¢ 64/17 f 93/-5 14/-10 sn
Detroit - 27/-2-- sn 87/2 -22/-5 sn New York: 44, g Tam 2 8/-13 -11/-23 ¢
Honolulu 68/20 s 81/27 67/19 s Oklahoma City 60/15 35/1 Tucson 58/14 35/1 s 68/20





J

1S" , pC- dy, e-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-
Washington, DC 36/2 32/0 i 49/9 Weather (W): s-sunny, pe-partly cloudy, Vy,

Houston = 982/448" 44/6 one 68/28: 51/10 esx Orlando : ; , storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace

4/23 49/9






Monetary tools have lower stimulus ‘rating’

WHAT a year 2008 turned
out to be. The high point
undoubtedly would have been
the election of Barack Obama
to the White House, and the
low point would clearly be the
global recession.

In Barack Obama we saw a
man who, against tremendous
odds, succeeded not only in win-
ning the US presidential elec-
tion but also capturing the imag-
ination and admiration of the
entire free world in the
process...quite an incredible

achievement. The expectations’

embodied in his victory are still
being understood and analysed
today.

Globally, the world is said to
be in the midst of a synchro-
nised economic meltdown,
spurred on by the painful effects
of a global housing crisis fuelled
by irresponsible lending prac-
tices, and a resulting credit
crunch that’can potentially lead
to economic chaos.

_ Perfect financial storm

Last year will be remembered
as one of the worst-ever for
stock markets around the world.
If you had invested in US stocks
for the entire year, you would
have lost about 38 per cent of
your beginning-of-the-year val-
ue. Likewise, Japanese investors
would have lost about 42 per
cent, investors in other Asian
markets between 45 per cent
and 60 per.cent, and European

investors around 40 per cent. '

Bahamian stocks, as measured
by the Bahamas International
Securities Exchange All-Share

Index, lost about 13 per cent of
their collective value.

The second noteworthy
aspect of the current economic
malaise is the extent to which
major sectors of industry are
applying to their respective gov-
ernments for financial bailouts.
So far, we have seen banks,
insurers and automakers being
provided with massive loans
and capital injections. How
wide these bailouts will even-
tually extend remains to be
seen, but the ‘floodgate’ has
opened and every business
imaginable is lining up ‘cap in
hand?’ to get there share of the
largesse.

fon Ge the hotel, sector, is



offs, with: many: -others ‘placed
on short work weeks. We sim-
ply do not have the capacity to
even contemplate the type of
massive stimulus packages
being implemented by the
‘Group of Twenty’ (G-20)
nations.

Role of monetary policy

Throughout all this, the role
of monetary policy is coming
into focus. The world’s major
economies are using monetary
policy as the major tool to ward
off an economic collapse by
stimulating their economies.

Specifically, central banks are
aggressively reducing interest
rates in an attempt to bolster
their weakening economies. By
reducing interest rates, borrow-
ers are being given some relief,

while savers are being encour-

aged to invest in the economy,
so the theory goes. In the
Bahamas, many persons who
are devout followers of CNN
and other cable news shows are
constantly asking why we are
not taking the same action.

Definition

Monetary policy is the regu-
lation of the money supply and
interest rates by a central bank,
such as the Federal Reserve
Board, in order to control infla-
tion and stabilise the currency.
Monetary policy is one of two
ways the Government can

“impact the economy. By impact-

ing the effective cost of money,
the Federal Reserve can affect
the amount of money that is
spent by consumers and busi-
nesses.

Monetary policy is referred
to as either being an expan-
sionary policy, or a contrac-
tionary policy. An expansion-
ary policy increases the total
supply of money in the econo-
my, and a contractionary policy
decreases the total money sup-
ply.

Expansionary policy is tradi-

tionally used to combat unem- -

ployment in a recession by low-
ering interest rates, while con-
tractionary policy involves rais-
ing interest rates in order to
combat inflation.

Contrast

Monetary policy should be
contrasted with fiscal policy,
which refers to government bor-
rowing, spending and taxation.
Fiscal policy is the use of gov-
ernment taxation and spending
powers to impact economic
behaviour.

In fact, to date, the Govern-
ment has announced a series of
fiscal measures to support the
Bahamian economy in this very
troubling and challenging envi-
ronment. We will be .building
roads, building a brand new air-
port and building new govern-
ment offices. The theory is that
all of this spending will create
new jobs (albeit short-term con-
struction-related jobs mostly),
and the wages paid to these new
workers will increase. the
amount of money in circulation,
thus buoying the economy.
However, future generations
will have to pay for this invest-
ment in infrastructure via high-

_er taxes, as all the money for

these investments is being bor-
rowed.

Why monetary policy is less
effective in the Bahamas

Why do we shun monetary
policy initiatives? The Bahamas’
economy is fundamentally dif-

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.46 of 2000)

NURIA PROPERTIES LIMITED

IBC No. 141561B
(In Voluntary Eiquidaticn)

NOTICE is hereby given in ieoordatios with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), NURIA
PROPERTIES LIMITED is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the NURIA PROPERTIES
LIMITED is required on or before 13th January, 2009 to send their
name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator
of the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from the
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved

Nathan Santos of Suite 2B Mansion House, 143 Main Street,.
Gibraltar is the Liquidator of, NURIA PROPERTIES LIMITED.

iz =

(

NOTICE

_INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

SEAFORD INVESTMENTS INC.
IBC NO. 129,890 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with section 138 of the Interna-
tional Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, SEAFORD INVESTMENTS

INC. is in Dissolution.

Any person having a Claim against the SEAFORD INVESTMENTS INC.
is required on or béfore the 28th day of February, 2009 to send their name,
address and particulars of the debt or claim to the liquidator of the Company,
or in default thereof they may be excluded from he benefit of any distribution

made before suchclaim is approved.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited) of Suite 205A - Saffrey Square, Bank Lane
& Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, are the Liquidators of SEAFORD

INVESTMENTS INC.

Lebel onsultants Limited
CG



Financial
Focus

By Larry Gibson



ferent from that, say, of the US
or any of the other major
economies that we like to com-
pare ourselves to. It is these dif-
ferences that make our econo-
my less sensitive to changes in
interest rates than traditional
economies. During the past sev-
eral months, I have been a par-
ty to numerous conversations
where the prevailing view was

that a reduction in interest rates ©

will cure our economic woes.
Unfortunately, it is not so sim-
ple, nor do many persons really

understand how our economy ,

is structured.

* Policy Considerations

Sir William Allen, a former
governor of the Central Bank,
finance minister and current
advisor in the Office of the
Prime Minister, in a letter to
The Tribune’s editor on April
17, 2003, did a first-class job
explaining monetary policy in
the Bahamian context.

Sir William correctly. argued
that because of the extreme
openness of the Bahamian
economy, the reality is that
monetary policy is largely con-
fined to ensuring balance of
payments (BOP) stability. Sir
William defines ‘openness’ in a
BOP context, -which is
explained below.

Investopedia defines BOP as:
“A record of all transactions
made between one particular
country and all other countries
during a specified period of
time. BOP compares the dollar

difference of the amount of |

exports and imports, including
all financial exports and
imports. A negative balance of
payments means that more
money is flowing out of the
country than coming in, and
vice versa.”

Balance of payments is used
as an indicator of economic and
political stability. For example,
if a country has a consistently
positive BOP, this could mean is
significant foreign investment
within that country.

Sir William explained that the’

Bahamian economy is, and
always has been, extremely
open, as the value of imports
(both goods and services)
exceeds more than 50 per cent
of national income; while cur-
rent account BOP inflows and
outflows far ‘exceed the value
of national income.

The net result of this open-
ness is that we have very little
influence over price level
changes within the Bahamian
economy, for the most part.
This is not the case in the US,
UK or German economy, for
example, where monetary poli-

‘Bahamians.

cy tools do directly influence
domestic price level changes.
Without making this article
too technical, if our BOP posi-
tion is not properly managed
then we would not be able to
maintain our fixed parity of the
Bahamian dollar versus the US
dollar. This is why the Central
Bank often resorts to credit con-
straints in an attémpt to control
the expansion of domestic cred-
it, otherwise we end up with a
top-heavy credit structure rest-
ing on too small a base of for-
eign reserves. If this is not man-

_aged, we would not be able to

maintain US$/B$ parity.

Interest rate sensitivity

I personally would welcome
any reduction in interest rates,
as I have a mortgage, bank loan
and credit cards, like most
A 1 per cent
decline in mortgage rates will
mean savings of almost $1,200
per year on a $150,000 mort-
gage, while and a 1 per cent
decline in the prime rate will
save the Government over $20
million per annum in interest
charges.

However, the benefit to the
overall economy may not nec-
essarily be as positive as one
might initiallyyperceive...due to
unintended consequences. The
main unintended consequence
that I fear is that any savings
from lower interest rates will
immediately be used for addi-
tional consumer purchases in
Florida. If this happened, the
added burst of ‘Florida-based’
consumerism could actually

bring greater pressure on our -

foreign reserves at a time when
we ought to be conserving
them.

In a macroeconomic sense,
the best use of any savings from
lower interest rates should be
used for domestic investment -
something that we feel (for
some misguided reason) is the
responsibility of the foreign
investor.

Another concern is the fact
that a disproportionate per-
centage of Bahamian total debt
is tied up in consumer loans,
which are generally granted for
small amounts. Many Bahami-
ans, anxious for consumer cred-
it, go into the bank with the
proposition that they can afford
payments of $200 per month —
‘Lend me the maximum that
payment can service, and I don’t
care about the interest rate’.
Until this mentality changes,
there is no reason to expect that
the spread between deposit
rates and lending rates will nar-
row.

Finally, the reality i is that con-
sumer loans tend to be less
responsive to interest rate
reductions than, say, mortgages,
commercial loans or loans to
higher-rated borrowers. The

..,Sayings arising from a reduction
from 14 per cent per annum to

13 per cent per annum on an

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
: (No.46 of 2000)
ASLAN D PRIDE CO. LTD

No. 111336 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

NOTICE is hereby ‘given in accordance with Section 138 of the
International Business Companies Act, (No. 46 of 2000), ISLAND PRIDE

CO. LTD, is in Dissolution

Any person having a Claim against the ISLAND PRIDE CO. LTD is
required on or before 14th June 2009 to send their name, address and par-
ticulars of the debt or claim to the Liquidator of the Company, or in default
thereof they may be excluded from the benefit of any distribution made be-

fore such claim is approved

The date of Commencement of dissolution was 15th day of December 2008.

We, Sovereign Managers Limited c/o Suites 1601-1603 Floor, Kinwick
Centre, 32 Hollywood Road, Central, Hong Kong is the Liquidator of

ISLAND PRIDE CO. LTD. °

SIGNED
For & On Behalf Of

Sovereign Managers
Liquidator

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No 46 of 2000)

PHARMA DEVELOPMENT AND MARKETING ASIA INC.
_IBC NO. 129,207 B
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

‘

‘ NOTICE is hereby given that in accordance with section 138 of the Inter-
national Business Companies Act No. 46 of 2000, PHARMA DEVELOP-
MENT AND MARKETING ASIA INC. is in Dissolution.

Aww person having a Claim against the PHARMA DEVELOPMENT AND
MARKETING ASIA INC. is required‘on or before the 28th day of February,
2009 to send their name, address and particulars of the debt or claim to the
liquidator of the Company, or in default thereof they may be excluded from he
benefit of any distribution made before such claim is approved.

We, Redcorn Consultants Limited, of Suite 205A - Saffrey Square, Bank Lane
& Bay Street, Nassau, Bahamas, are the Liquidators of PHARMA
DEVELPMENT AND MARKETING ASAI INC.

$8,000 consumer loan, amor-
tised over 6 years, works out to
be $5 per month or $60 per
annum. It is highly unrealistic
to expect that such savings
would translate into any mean-
ingful economic stimulus on a
macroeconomic basis.

Conclusion

While I support lower interest
rates, the Bahamian economy
is not as responsive or sensitive
to the lowering of interest rates
as other more diversified
economies. We need to find a
way to get more Bahamians to
understarid the structure of our
economy, and hopefully this, will
lead to meaningful discussions
on how we should fundamen-
tally transform our economy for
long-term, sustainable econom-
ic stability.

For instance, in real econom-
ic terms, the fixed parity of the
Bahamian dollar is really an
artificial construct. Do we con-
tinue with the Bahamian dollar
or do we effectively adopt the
US dollar as our currency? We
seem set on transitioning our

. tax system to a Value-Added

Tax (VAT), but where are the

sustained public education ini-
tiatives on the implications of
such a system? Why is a VAT
better than the other alterna-
tives? How will our signing on
to the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) and its
implications truly change the
way our economy functions?

This is all food for thought as
we embark upon another year
with hope and optimism.

Until next week...

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas.

The views expressed are
those of the author and do not
necessarily represent those of

’ Colonial Group International

or any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies. Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rigibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs

NOTICE

RAINBOW ACTION FUND LTD.

IN VOLUNTARY LIQUIDATION

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 of the International Business Companies
Act 2000 RAINBOW ACTION FEND LTD. is in dissolation.

The Date of the Commencement of dissolution was 17° December 2008. David Thain of Arner Bank
& Trust (Bahamas) Ltd, Building 2 Caves Village, P.O. Box N 3917 is the Liquidator of RAINBOW
ACTION FUND LTD. All persons having claims against the above-named company are required to
send their address and particulars of their debts to the Liquidator before the 17" January 2009.

David Thain.
Liquidator

Legal Notice

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

MONTELEONE HOLDING INC.

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance. with Section
138 of the International Business Companies Act No.
45 of 2000, MONTELEONE HOLDING INC., has
been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar

General on the 11th day of December, 2008.

Epsilson Management Ltd. .
Suite 13, First Floor
Oliaji Trade Centre
Francis Rachel Street
Victoria, Mahe
Republic of Seychelles
Liquidator

A

Development Company



Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel “Stagé “1 .Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport. The C-220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components:

° Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Stee! Joist; and

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
installations of steel decking.

Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
Brisby for more information.

Tender closing is at 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,

2009.

There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 8th.
Please RSVP Traci Brisby by 1pm January 7th for
briefing location details.




PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009

~ PROTEST, from page 1B

Information Exchange Agreement
(TLEA) with this nation. The Bahamian
Vinancial Intelligence Unit (FIU) also
co-operates and exchanges information
with its foreign counterparts, while there
is regulator-to-regulator co-operation

between the Central Bank of the -

Bahamas and the Securities Commis-
sion and their counterparts, such as the
US Securities and Exchange Commis-
sion (SEC). é

‘Vhis.treaty and co-operation network
was designed to give the process cer-
tainty, and also give a measure of pro-
tection from so-called ‘fishing expedi-
tions’ to Bahamian financial institutions
and their clients. os

Yet Mr Sears warned there could be
dire consequences for the Bahamian

financial services industry if US prose-~

cutors were repeatedly allowed to bypass
the existing legal treaties and co-opera-
tion mechanisms between the two
nations.

~The implication is that financial insti-
tutions will feel that the environinent.is
not safe in which to operate,” Mr Sears
told Tribune Business.

“The rule of law, which is one of the
major attractions for operating in the
Bahamas, will bé eroded if US agencies,

with impunity, can come into this juris-

diction, bypass the treaty arrangements
and just ignore the comity between the
Bahamas and the US, flouting their own

laws as well as the laws of the Bahamas. —

“{t will be a very uncomfortable and
unsafe environment for financial. insti-
iutions to operate in within this juris-
diction. We ought to insist on the rule of
law, and give people operating in our
jurisdiction a measure of comfort that if
they follow the laws of the land, we will
give them protection.

“That is why I recommend that the
Government takea very firm position. I
appreciate that they may not be able to
publicise everything they do because of
the sensitivity, but they ought to make a
very strong diplomatic protest to the US
and demand they cease and desist from
this conduct.”

Allowing it to continue, Mr Sears sug-
gested, would result in the Bahamas
becoming “less competitive” in finan-
cial services, and the whole range of
international services in general, “at a
time when it can least afford to be”.

Given the global economic downturn,
Mr Sears, who is back in private practice
at his law firm, Sears & Co, said there
would be increased competition among
jurisdictions. for a reduced volume of
business, and other jurisdictions were
likely to offer increasingly attractive
incentives to get it.

Mr Sears said a diplomatic protest was
necessary to ensure the US government
knew its officials and prosecutors were
violating the treaty structure between
the Bahamas and the US, and then bring

. them into line.

“It appears to be an extra-territorial

application of US law,” Mr Sears added. \

“We cannot wait for the Bahamas to be
under assault and then raise these com-
plaints. It is important that they be raised
outside of this context.”

Otherwise, the US and others would
be able to exploit the pressure the
Bahamas was under to demand further
concessions from this nation.

If approached directly by US prose-

_cuting authorities, Mr Sears advised

Bahamian financial institutions and their
executives: “Before you jump on any
plane, consult your lawyer and notify
the Attorney General’s Office, so that

they are aware of this kind of activity .

and the extent of it. My recommendation
is not to. respond without advice.”

BUSINESS





IDEAS, from page 1B

other 35 companies have received debt
financing. \
Some of the projects funded include
a construction project management
firm, a maritime training school, a man-
ufacturer of bathtubs and hurricane
shutters, a guided water ferry tour, a
bonefish lodge, a wireless Internet ser-
vice provider, boat engine repair busi-
ness and a security services business.
According to Mr Gomez, the fund
has been trying to encourage the devel-

opment of businesses focused on infor-

mation technology.
TOURISM, from page 1B

exchanges around the globe.”

However, Mr Simon added: “The
areas of tourism that I believe will con-
tinue to grow over the next five years
involve cultural tourism, adventure
tourism, ecotourism, sports tourism and

‘health services.”

Vaughn Roberts, vice-president of
finance at Baha Mar Resorts, said the
opening up of Cuba could present
opportunities for growth in the tourism
sector, if the Bahamas and Caribbean
took a collective approach to marketing
the region as a whole.

“If you approach the Caribbean as a
single marketplace and you look at what
the relaxation of the embargo against
Cuba is going to create, it’s going to
create a new buzz about Cuba, new
buzz.about the Caribbean and new
inyestment into the region, and tons
and tons of business for the region,” he
said.

Founder and chief executive of World
Cooperation Group, Senator Tanya
Wright, said she recognised renewable
energy opportunities as an economic





BEC, from page 1B

”

He suggested that anyone planning to
start a business in the near future should
start small.

“The Caribbean environment is a
very small market, so you have to start
your business small and take the oppor-
tunities to grow, and grow as they come
along,” said Mr Gomez.

'“T'think there are lots of opportuni-
ties for young professionals over the
next two years in spite of all this finan-
cial crisis we are in.”

He said many businesses come to the
fund in serious financial despair, and
most times cannot be bailed out by the
fund. .



stimulant and revenue grower for

Caribbean countries.

She said the natural resources of the

islands were plentiful, and should be

sought after by Bahamian small and

emerging businesses. Mrs Wright sug-

gested fledgling entrepreneurs “dig into
the economic policies” of governments
in order to grasp the opportunities avail-
able.

“When you look at the Caribbean,
opportunities are as diverse as the lan-.
guage, the culture and the food,” said
Mrs Wright.

“We are dealing with different
dynamics whenever we travel from one
island to the next. Some of the advan-
tages relate to proximity, some to the
economy and others are related to nat-
ural resources that certain island nations
possess, but I think that we all can con-
sider ourselves on a level playing field
when it comes to renewable energy
strategies.” . eek

The panel agreed that small busi-
nesses and other entrepreneurial .
endeavours can emerge out of the cur-
rent economic crisis.



renewable energy component.

“It will essentially be the
thread that will tie all these pro-
jects together - renewable ener-

gy, the legislative agenda, and °
': This effectively restricts all

the National Energy Policy.” -
On-renewable energy, Mr
Neymour said the Government

first had to amend the existing:

legislation governing the
Bahamian energy sector so that
it could be “opened up for
greater participation by the pri-
vate sector”.






Nassau, Bahamas.





NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that DEMARIO DUNKLEY OF |.
GLADSTONE TERRACE, GRAND BAHAMA, THE BAHAMAS, -
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and |
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
‘a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6TH day of JANUARY, 2009 to the Minister
‘responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N-7147,

Charm bracelet Lost at the Airport

Existing Bahamian law stipu-
lates that in areas where BEC

supplies electricity power, busi- .
“nesses and residences must use
- it, and can only run generators
‘or alternative forms of power

when the BEC supply is cut.

Bahamas-based companies and
residents to taking power from
a monopoly provider, with no
consumer choice or price com-
petitiveness. ;

“We. would like to see more
of the. private sector provide

“energy to BEC,” Mr Neymour



said, “and have the ability to
provide it for themselves if they

_ feel they can do so more cheap-

“It would require amend-

ments to the BEC legislation.

The Government feels it’s time
we changed the existing view.”
Mr Neymour said he was
unable to provide a timetable
on when the legislative changes
would be made, but added that
the IDB project would deter-
mine “how quickly” the changes
would be made. :

On the renewable energy
front, -the minister said BEC
had reduced from 30 to 13 the
number of candidates still in the
running to supply it with power

..under its Request for Proposal ©
"Highway Landfill every year -

(RFP). document.
“Those-.13 have been
required to provide additional
information,” Mr Neymour
said. “We are progressing rapid-
ly with that, so that'we can
make a further shortlist of the
proposals in various sectors.
“There are proposals for
wind power, proposals for
waste-to-energy, and proposals
for solar power. We will break
them down and find which are
the most appropriate, the key
elements being the cost of pro-
viding energy and the efficien-

cy.” Bo

While geothermal had been
largely ruled out as an alterna-
tive energy source for the

Bahamas, Mr Neymotur said -

that “one area we have found
best for the Bahamas is waste-
to-energy, which is a great
opportunity because we gener-
ate waste that-is more suitable
for waste-to-energy conversion
than other countries”.

Proposals

Waste-to-energy proposals
submitted to BEC in response
to its RFP estimated that some
200,000 tonnes of municipal sol-
id waste deposited at the
Tonique Williams-Darling

some 600 tonnes per day - could
be converted into renewable
energy.

Among ‘the proposals
received were those from Cana-
dian-based Plasco. Energy
Group; a consortium featuring
Bahamas Waste and Cambridge
Project Development Inc; and
another group headed by. Waste
Not.

Renewable energy also held

- out the prospect of energy secu-
rity and an improved environ- »

ment for the Bahamas, not to

mention reduced foreign cur-
rency outflows on oil imports,
which negatively impacted
Bahamian foreign currency
reserves year after year.

Mr Neymour said: BEC’s oil
imports alone were projected
to have increased in value by
almost 57 per cent in 2008, ris- +
ing to $350 million from $223
million in 2007.

Meanwhile, Mr Neymour
said renewable energy was a
key corhponent of the Bahamas’
plans to become a leading voice s.
in addressing climate change,
since the projected five-metre .
increase in global sea levels over
the next several decades would,
for example, leave his.entire ...

- South.Beach constituency-under ~

water. . :

“Jt is critical for us to begin to
address the consequences of cli-
mate. change,” Mr Neymour
added. “The Bahamas has to be
one of those countries that are
outspoken in addressing the
need for their to be action on
climate change.

“We must be leaders among
small island states and lesser

THE TRIBUNE







Chamber
targets
eroup

~ health,

pension

schemes

FROM page1B

ty, is open to all Chamber mem-
bers and their employees. Roy-
alFidelity will charge no admin-
istration fee during the plan’s
first year.

In an e-mail sent to Cham-
ber members yesterday, the.
organisation said: “Additional-

‘ly, members of The Bahamas

Chamber of Commerce will also
be able to access additional ben-
efits and concessions through
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas)
(FBB) and the Royal Bank of
Canada (RBC).”
Mr Simon added: “We hope
to provide real, tangible benefits
to members of the Chamber of
Commerce as well as encour-
age savings for the future. Giv-
en the dynamics of the eco-
nomic environment, you should
certainly have thought what
your financial future looks like.
You have the option to do that
through the Chamber.”

developed countries to inform
the world, and the Bahamian
people themselves, of. the
importance of climate change.
Renewable energy will be a key
part of that.”

_’ Mr Neymour said that when

he addressed the United:
Nations (UN) Conference on
Climate Change last year in
Poznan, Poland, he “made it
clear” that the global sea level
was expected to rise by five
metres. Some 1,5 metres on that
rise was due to thermal .warm-
ing, with the remainder result-
ing from the polar ice caps’
melting.

“Tf and when that takes place
it wiltmean 100 per cent of »
constitueney; South Beach, wix
be under water; that’s how crit-
ical itis for the Bahamas,” the
minister é€xplained.

~The National Energy Policy

Committee had already pre-
sented its first report to the
Government, Mr Neymour said,
and once the administration had
reviewed it, it was likely to be
released for public consump-
tion in the 2009 first quarter.

_ Saturday, 20 December 2008

REWARD OFFERED
—_ 424-0783/356-2068

Teeter Caml eens a very personal history
and sentimental value to the owner



3 The dAlbenas Agency Ltd.

NOTICE

lan Antonio is no loner
employed by The ¢’Albenas
- Agency Ltd. Therefore he is
no longer authorized to
conduct business on behalf

of The d’Albenas Agency Ltd.

” Signed Management.



Brereton ene mie |



. NOTICE is hereby ove that THOMAS VERNACE

of NO..30 MARKET STREET, P.O. BOX F-41454,
NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason. why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 30TH day of DECEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE is hereby given that LASCELLES FRANCIS,
RIVERLAND DR., 1219 NW FT, LAUDERDALE, FLA., USA, |
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The
Bahamas, and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should send
a written and signed statement of the facts within twenty-
eight days from the 30TH day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box
‘N;7147, Nassau, Bahamas.























Our ee fg Koya el

last a lifetime.
Pe BE
Call (242) 429-5927

www.asksuzettescott.com

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that PINCHINO FRANCOIS OF P.O.
BOX GT-2208, HAY ST., NASSAU, BAHAMAS, is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and
that any person who knows any reason why registration/
naturalization should not be granted, should send a written
and signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight days
from the 30TH day of DECEMBER, 2008 to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, RO.Box N-7147,
Nassau, Bahamas.









‘1 year old Pekingese:
- Black, Gray & White
Last Seen 27th December, 2008
Yamacraw. Shores
Contacts: 364-4422, 455-6666,436-7555

REWARD OFFERED



Accounts Clerk urgently needed with}
minimum of 3 years experience, proficient
in Microsoft applications, preferably 30

years and older-
Fax resume to 394-3885

Accountant urgently needed with minimum
of 5 years experience, preferably 35 years
and older -

Fax resume to 394-3885

Cleaning/Messenger needed, preferably
35 years or older must have valid drivers
license.

Fax 394-3885


TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 5B

THE TRIBUNE



CALVIN & HOBBES











DISGUSTING DENIZEN OF
THE DEEP, THE GIANT

OCTOPUS GLIDES ACROSS
WE OCEAN FLOOR.

AT THE SIGHT OF AN ENEMY,
HE RELEASES A CLOUD OF
INK AND MAKES HIS GETAWAY!

/





JUDGE PARKER

LIE OVER,
DIXIE---DON’T
MARE ME KILL




DEAD A
LONG TIME
!

‘©1968 Universal Press Syndicate





att
©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc.
Workd rights resorvod

ALONE IN THE CAFETERIA, GARY | AND I NEVER MEANT
VP T HANDLED =

THAT BADLY. Fl

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku ‘increases from Monday to
Sunday

— oa A ie
7M en NP
reall oe

tA Com ‘ll

L KNOW ITS BEST 7/6
5 WAY.
BEST FOR



€2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.







YES, DEAR, THE FOOTBALL
PLAYOFFS, TOO
2








IT KNOW WHAT YOU MEAN!
PARTIES, LIGHTS, GET-
S WITH OUR

THEY ARE MAGICAL,
AREN'T THEY?

pm : : il





©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



BITSY, YOU 2 Ree
YOUR LITTLE GOING TO BE I TELL YOU

“COUSIN”




‘www kingfealures.com

MOST OF THE

GREAT PALS!



TO DO
AND IL
MIGHT

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reservod.

SOMEBOPY
SHOULVP CALL

















Difficulty Level 1 oe

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is'to ~
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





















Difficulty Level &*&*& *&







©2009 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.





1/03









EARTHS SURFACE






i
IS, COVERED A PLUMBER :
: i¥5} : materist in taday’s purzie, whics
: Viktor ai rchnai v Syneth foxks a clase call between his
{) Agdestein, Haninge 1988. attack and Slack’s strong a3
3] Korchroi, now aged 76 yet still knight. Row did White force
2] an active competitor, has had victory?
{| the most incident-packed life of ei a
§| any modern grandmaster. He Chess solution RAE tS! Bick 20348 Lfvest 3 Qegl
. : : mated gO AN GHT 3 SiGe vans Block's quacent 3 RudSt
survived the siege of Leningrad eo sauce winsthemieen
in 1944 by collecting ration Nensa muir: Knight.
books from the bodies of dead One possiisle vated ladder soluting is SUPE auf
j posses
relatives, defected from the gat gulf, bul bell BALL
USSR when chess bosses

Ha si ape
CRACKERS /

preferred the young Anatoly
Karpov, then twice qualified to
challenge Karpov for the world
title. His festyle of caviar,
jogging, yoga and continual




HOW many words of four
tatters er orore can you make
from: the letters shown here?





—. CRYPTIC PUZZLE



drop? (4,5)

tournaments inspires ather





veterans, and in between taking
on GMs a third of his age he
won the world senior {aver-60)
championship at his first
attempt last year. Korchnoi
(White, fo move) has fevel



7




















In making a wand, each lefiier
may be used once only. Hach
traish contain the centre leiter
wd there must be at least one
rine-tetter word. Ne phurals.

FORAY'S TARGET

Guod LT; very gan 26;
exceRent 24 (or more},
Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
gernsr door dorm dour drown
dram moar mom WOOL

el
| at. rondo food. rovar round
ROUNDWORM unmoor word
Ober as | will keep on Tac thel may be well held (4) a Ba Peer EL eee Reet
saying (10) 2 Seen when chins aia Pa A
Ee

6 Hitman, nothing less than
tough maybe (4)
In these classes children

Discrimination a cannibal



appreciates in people (5)








+ _ take a point to heart (5) 4 Arecent reform put = ie
11 Being in the wrong scene through again (2-5) S| ales eres ONES ets
- with the wrong exit (9) 5 One of three allowed to a he a
12 Nevertheless last (5,3) me a journey (7) _ °
13 Astrange yam abouta | 7 The. aveetest American ee MPEP Td | When to Break a General Rule
ee amy, | # foarte moa ne q ee
: ‘0 the serious South dealer. singleton?
: never neies ”) “gardener (10) i Est ea alle ea Both sides vulnerable. Mathematically, there is no doubt
A, see Gan Eh apouticn 9 Guides about a thousand a Re a es) Pe Ri a NORTH that you should finesse. The odds are
i; ships (8) oF AQ10 almost 2-to-1 in favor of the finesse
19 More than one slice of the A ee s : aes
a ee Se Tes Ee
y 2 SREEINY) “Sh sacred (10) 852 and you can gain many points by put-
21 Lives in a dress that is 16 Gets inspiration from the eee hdl Pee bealeedc ko Petia a * WEST EAST ting this knowledge to use, but a
slovenly (7) braes (8) : : 8653. @K972 word of caution is in order. Occa-
22 Apatch put on a cuff, 18 The country encircling : ' VQ) ¥98 sionally, you may encounter a set of
perhaps (5) one’s country? (9) lw Across Down 863. #742 conditions where it is right to play
24 Bill is cut short, strange to 20 Long John Silver’s | 1 In confrontation 1 To blend (4) _ - &I1097 #Q 643 for the drop instead of the finesse.
tell (8) j line (3-4) N (4,2,4) 2 Shown to be in SOUTH Here is a case in point. West leads
27 He stows away atthe | 21 Petition from Queer N 6 Trade exhibition (4) error (6,3) @s4 a club against your four-heart con-
docks (9) Street (7) | = 10 Reject with 3 North African ¥K 10752 tract. You win and lead a heart to the
28 Girl with love for a.c 23 Neat looker, that’s Qa contempt (5) capital (5) AK 105 ace, on which West plays the jack.
_ owboy (5) _ Daisy! (5) ; > Sea: BENS 4 Easily broken (7) Lie RAK You return a heart, and East follows
29 Act either way (4) 25 Actor’s instructions to play an 1 To a sickening 5 Calll in question (7) The bidding: i " low. Ordinarily, you would finesse
30 Unusual task a,bored ‘As You Like It’? (2-3) youngster may busy 26 Charge the boy nothing to i 12 Punish severely (8) a fbigds - aA : s Pass 3 Y Pass pood reason, you should play the
himself with (10) go in (4) 13 Degree of slope (5) wn EN COS ing.
sic : : i i 15 Brief biography (7) i acid jes: ph Sapa gehen oer ae ecu tai eae an
Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution 17: Trade (7) (2,2,2,4) tion, that you as declarer have the K- _ is that you can assure the contract by
ATTENTION! Across: 1 Prosaic, 5 Mecca, 8 pobre 16 Instantly (2,1,5) LG or a sence an eS een ee ane ae sr yes 8
Albatross, 9 Leo, 10 Heal, 12 Been cage) 18 Basic structure (9) See tea :
’ 1 ’ 22 To be found (5) , : five tricks in that suit. Suppose West shows out, placing
Autocrat, 14 Answer, 15 Needle, 17 ffl 20 Notwithstanding (7) Of course, this may not be possi- East with the Q-9-8 originally. In that
THIS FEATURE IS NOT AVAILABLE Cockeyed, 18 Deep, 21 Era, 22 ans noted (8) 21 Business ble if the opponents’ cards are unfa- __ case, you cash your other club, cross
Amorphous, 24 Treat, 25 Mariner. 27 Expression of associate (7) vorably divided, but suppose, when to dummy with a diamond and ruff
Down: 1 Poach, 2 Orb, 3 Anti, 4 disapproval (9) 23 Spicy style of you lead low to the ace, your left- | dummy’s last club.
Crocus, 5 Misnomer, 6 Coleridge, 7 28 Under way (5) cooking (5) hand opponent plays the queen (or You then run your diamonds. If
Apostle, 11 Associate, 13 Relevant, 29 Unpleasantly 25 Demandasa jack), and when you lead the suit East doesn’t ruff, you put him on
14 Ancient, 16 Reform, 19 Poser, 20 moist (4) tight (5) back, your right-hand opponent fol- lead with a trump, forcing him to
; lows low. return a spade into dummy’s A-Q or
Spur, 23 Own. 26 C t 4 P: ‘ y
30 Reveller (10) ommotion (4) Should you now play the king, give you a ruff-and-discard.





hoping to catch the missing honor, or
should you finesse in the hope that
your left-hand opponent was dealt a

Going up with the king of hearts
is a safety play that virtually guaran-
tees the contract. ¢

©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009 . THE TRIBU. .





oD Y



B

e Tribune

JNDERSTANDING

f& By JEFFARAH GIBSON Dr Cherilyn P. Dr Hanna explains: “To detect: diabetes
———~ _Hanna,an American _ there are a few signs that people can look
DLABETES is a [fe Board Certified for. The common signs of diabetes are, fre-

Ee ; = i Internist & Pediatri- quent urination, blurred vision, unusual

hOng disease that, if cian says, “Diabetes _ weight loss, excessive thirst, increased fatigue,

30% detected, treated is an abnormality of | extreme hunger, and irritability,”she said.

peel arene 5, sugar level in the While no one sign can indicate diabetes,

and controlled oes Blood. There is either all of the Siacione together can be a red

cause many NeGanve too much insulin _ flag. “Now, if you have one of the symptoms

hronic complications (hyperinsulinism) — it does not mean that you have diabetes, but
te the “tet being produced in _ if you notice that you are experiencing all of
re the body. it a the body, or the body the symptoms you should seek a doctor’s
often characterized does not produce advice immediately. If you do experience one

»y either an under sufficient insulin, as of the symptoms, it is definitely an eye open-

well as the insulin is | er and you might just want to pay close atten-

a ES not being properly _ tion to that”.

which is the hormone — used.” If the tell tale signs applies to you and you

reasoonsible for allow- __ Diabetes is classi- think that you have diabetes it might be

. a Ladv ealiste tal fied into three cate- important for you to know that although

mS BOGy ae $ FO take gories: type 1 dia- there is no cure for diabetes yet, there is med-

alucose from the betes, type 2 dia- ication that treats the malady and keeps it



we










ay fhe blood www.diabetes.org,
igtaly Type 1 diabetes is
HGAY, usually diagnosed in
children and young
adults, and was previously known as juvenile
diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body does not
produce insulin: Insulin is a hormone that is
needed to convert sugar (glucose), starches
and.other food into energy needed for daily
life.

While type 1 diabetes is characterised by an
insufficient production of insulin, the web-
site goes on to explain the characteristics of
type 2 diabetes.

“ Type 2 diabetes is the most common form
of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, either the
body does not produce enough insulin or the
cells ignore the insulin. Insulin is necessary for
the body to be able to use glucose for energy:
When you eat food, the body breaks down all
of the sugars and starches into glucose, which
is the basic fuel for the cells in the! body.
Insulin takes the sugar from the blood into the
cells”.

Gestational pregnancy often occurs in preg-
nant women. “Pregnant women who have
never had diabetes before, but who have high
blood sugar (glucose) levels during pregnan-
cy are said to have gestational diabetes,” the
website stated.

It is very important for people to observe
their bodies- any sudden changes, or any
unusual aches or pains, can increase a per-
son’s chances of detecting diabetes. What
persons might want to pay attention to is

Wy

pod, ar when the betes, and gestation- under control.
afi He Had iilican. al diabetes. “There are quite a number of medications
ay GOSS NOT UNNSe According to used to treat and control the illness. This

includes the oral medication that stimulates
the cells (beta islet cells) in the pancreas, to
produce insulin. There is medication that
works on the liver to help it use sugar from
the blood as well as there is an insulin injec-
tion. A person must inject themselves with

‘insulin and it is present in the blood,” she

said.

Dr Hanna added, “if diabetes goes unde-
tected, untreated or uncontrolled it can cause
dire complications to the body. It is important
that diabetes is detected in its early stages. It
can cause serious damage to the retina in the
eye, it can cause cataracts, increase pressure
in the eye, damage to the cells in the kid-
neys, damage to nerves, loss of sensation,
damage to blood vessels in the legs, and loss
of blood flow” she said.

She also noted that diabetes can cause
amputation. “Untreated diabetes can lead to
the loss of the legs. For example if a nail is

stuck in. the bottom of the foot, a person.

won’t feel it because they have lost all sensa-
tion. This can then lead to a serious infec-
tion in the open wound which leads to the leg
being amputated” she told Tribune Health.
Along with medication, there are other
things that people can do to control diabetes

such as lifestyle modification- seeking a nutri-

tionist to reduce as well as maintain weight,
being physically active, having regular check-
ups, and staying stress free.

The best thing to do is prevent the disease
by being physically active, getting annual
check ups, eating healthy, and by mental
enrichment.

some of the tell tale signs of the disease.





January

THE season so far in the veg-
etable garden has been a good
one without being spectacular.
Tomatoes and peppers produced
early but cabbages, broccoli and
cauliflower were reluctant
starters. My first set of garden
peas was a disaster, but the.sec-
ond sowing looks magnificent.

Last year a late tropical storm
set the early vegetable produc-
tion back considerably. This year
we seemed to go from summer
to winter without any autumn,
which was good for most veg-
gies. The cool weather lovers
such as spinach, chard and car-
rots took advantage of the con-
ditions to make good progress. I
planted fennel for the first time in
years and it is doing well.

I look upon January as the
halfway stage in the vegetable
growing season, even though
many of the 120-day crops are
still short of maturity. We must
remind ourselves to keep the
tomatoes coming by starting new
ones from seed once the previous
crop has set flowers. Once snap
beans are harvestable a new row
or two should be planted. It is,
frustrating to have a glut of veg-
gies one month and none the
next.

Mango trees should be bud-
ding now and also sending out
new leaf growth. A copper sul-
phate spray at the budding stage
and another at the flowering
stage, plus another at the small
fruit stage will help counteract
anthracnose, the disease that
months later causes black rot-
ting spots on mature fruit. Most
avocado pear trees have com-
pleted their fruiting season but
carambola will continue to bear
fruit into February.

Some flowering shrubs and
trees put on their best display at

this time of year. The African
tulip tree is in full glory and will
continue flowering into early
summer. Bauhinias are begin-
ning to pick up the pace and will
soon be loaded with orchid-like
flowers.. Yellow elder is one of
the more noticeable of the flow-
ering shrubs. because its yellow

bells are almost luminous in win-

ter sunshine.
Hibiscus, oleander, frangipani,

bougainvillea and other flower- °

ing shrubs are all at their best
right now. Sometimes it seems
these shrubs do well without any
care from their owners. Do not

take them for granted, however.:

Fertilize them once.every season
to keep them healthy. A healthy
plant resists disease and insect
predation.

The Christmas season is over
and your festive poinsettia is now
an anomaly indoors. Take your
poinsettia pots outdoors and
gradually harden them by giving

them a little more sun each day

until they can take full sun. Plant
them where they not only receive
sun all day but are away from
streetlights and other sources of
nighttime illumination. Prune
them once the bracts have com-
pleted their display and then
prune them for bushiness one or
two more times before the end of
August. Your reward will be
signs of the season that can be
enjoyed by neighbours and
passers-by.

Virtually any flowering annu-
al grows well in a Bahamian win-
ter garden. We must select our
summer flowers with care, but
at this time of the year we can
even grow temperate climate
favourites. It is the time to look
through the flower seed pack-
ages in your local nursery and
experiment with something new.

I have noticed some of my
strawberry plants putting out
flowers, promise of delicious
rewards in the near future. The

‘taste of home grown, freshly-

picked strawberries is sublime
compared to the virtually taste-
less imports from the supermar-
ket. One strawberry plant will
turn into a‘dozen in the space of
a year so a small investment now
will set you up for the future.

Strawberries are so called
because in Europe straw was
placed over and around the
plants to protect them from late
frosts. The straw was then used
to keep the emerging fruits off
the ground and away from crawl-
ing insects. Here in the Bahamas
we can keep the fruits off the
ground using crumpled newspa-
per. If birds become a problem
you will have to use netting, a
plastic owl perched nearby, or a
rubber snake lurking in the near-
est foliage.

It’s a beautiful time of year in
the Bahamian garden. Best wish-
es for a fruitful New Year.

e j.hardy@coralwave.com


THE TRIBUNE

The right





ool

(Last in a 2 part series on Small Schools)

@ By NICOLE FAIR BHATTI

So you've decided that a small school environment would be
best for your little darling whether because you've heard by
word of mouth that some friends’ or family's children have
thrived at a particular school or whether you are concerned
with class size because you have read the latest research or

perhaps because you have a child who you suspect m

be

advanced in some areas and therefore is deserving of the extra
attention only a small school can provide. It is a given, that in
every family there will be a whole host of reasons why parents
choose a particular school for their child(ren), however once
you have become convinced of the advantages of a small
school you have to set about finding which one is best suited

for your son or daughter.

School philosophy is one area
-in which educational establish-
_ ments differ and on such a small

island, diversification is essen-
tial in order for schools to sur-
vive and flourish. In the past ten
years many new small schools
have cropped up in New Provi-
dence. Lisa McCartney, Admin-
istrative Director of The Merid-
ian School at Unicorn Village,
and Gillian McWeeney- Wilson,
principal of Summit Academy,
whose schools have succeeded
as a result of following a small
school approach, shared their
philosophies with me.
_ “Lisa McCartney has been a
wonderful mentor for me,”
reflected Mrs Wilson, “Our
philosophies are different; she
is very artsy and wants to devel-
op the creative sides in her stu-
dents as do we but our emphasis
is certainly more on the acade-
. Inic side of things. We started
_ off things at Summit in the
reverse order. We began with
purely.an academic focus and
although that remains our num-

ber one priority, I think those -

who are a part of the Summit
Academy family will agree that
they have seen an improvement
and increase in our creative
expression. _

Mrs McCartney responded,
“While we place significant

emphasis on music and drama, it .
does not exceed the emphasis ©

we place on academic develop-
ment, Our curriculum encom-
passes only one hour of formal
music training per week, how-

ever, the hour is spent systemat-

ically developing critical areas
of performance and performing
arts, including instruments and

_ said.
Summit's students also get a .

vocal training.”

Similarly, in addition to the

three Rs, Summit has developed
a curriculum integrated music
programme led by teacher
Shantelle Pratt whose particu-
lar strength is brass instruments.
Students are able to play the
clarinet, saxophone, flute, trum-
pet and keyboard under Ms
Pratt's tutelage. As the
math/music brain connection
has been well demonstrated, this

emphasis on music both deepens

and expands upon the students'
knowledge base.

Now in its sixth year of oper-
ation, Summit has also expand-
ed its offering of subjects within
the Cultural Arts. The entire

month of November, for exam-

ple, has been designated as
“Culturama!” — an inquiry into
Bahamian culture. Students
have embarked on an amazing
journey, discovering along the
way what makes The Bahamas
so incredibly special.

The Meridian School, on the

other hand, has built a reputa-

tion for excellence in singing and
performing arts. “Semi-annu-
ally the school puts on shows at
The Rainforest Theater. The
self-confidence that children
experience when performing for
a live audience is priceless,” she

chance to show their creative
flair at the fabulous Spring
Extfavaganza! which last year
was held at the Wyndham Ball-
room to an audience of 400.
“Parents are amazed at how
well their children perform;
ordinarily shy kids are singing
and dancing and students who

Panty power

FROM page 8

ble D cup,'as well as a 44 size
with F cups." Lorenes caters to
cups up to G and H.

At the Fit Event in Decem-
ber 2007, Vanity Fair found-that
a lot of women had straps that
cut into their shoulders, cups that
were not supportive enough, or
often times'too small a back size
causing bulging under the arms.
Another Fit) Event is planned
for the near future for Lorenes,
Ms Aranhaisaid.

Moving onto an equally prob-
lematic area. for many women,.

‘the butt and hips can cause more
stress and contemplation than
any other body part. To compli-
ment what God gave you
though, Lorenes carries many
support and shaping lines: that
will simply smooth out any inse-
curities a woman may. have.
“We want everyone to look
nice, and’feel good about them-
‘selvés in whatever they're wear-
ing. A lot of underwear today is
made to enhance that," she
explained. "When you look nice,
you feel good about yourself."
In underwear, Lorenes caters

to the customer with their line

Flexees, brought in as an answer
to many women's request for the

popular line Spanx. Flexees

workin the same way, coming in

‘a variation of control factors

(from light to firm control): as
well as an array of shapes to fit

- under different garments. The

most popular seller is the Capri
style, which can fit under all
knee length skirts or pants.

- Waist Nippers is like a mod-
ern corset, with formed material

going from below the bra to the |

panty, pulling in the stomach and
smoothing out the bulge.

The newest addition of. the
Lorenes Intimates store came
about as an.answer to the con-

- Stant request of customers, said

Ms Aranha. There are some
lines carried in the lingerie. spe-
cialty store that are not carried in
the main Lorenes such as Fash-
ion Forms and Braza. "There's a
need for women to have bot-
toms and hips and boobs, and
it's a matter of necessity for
many, not just luxury."

The lingerie specialty shop
also carries a larger range of
sleepwear with novelty nighties,
joke gifts such as the crotchless
panty, as well as matching feath-

er‘boas from the Shirley of Hol-
~ lywood line. st
Lorenes carries sizes from:

small to 5x, covering, price ranges
from as little as $3.99 for a pair
of panties to $50 for a Goddes
bra. ‘

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are usually very outgoing get a
chance to really show off their
talent. In our school every child
gets a part and they love it,” said
Mrs Wilson.

Speaking to the benefits of a
small school for a naturally shy
child, Mrs Wilson said, “We are
definitely able to provide our

students with a strong founda- _

tion. They certainly. come out
of here more confident in who
they are and in their academic
abilities and then they can soar
at the secondary school level.
Summit. Academy is proud to
have had one of their. students,

Sierra Aitken, place fifth in the

Bahamas Primary School Stu-

_ dent of The Year competition- a

highly selective process.

- She added, “Our curriculum
is extremely challenging and we
are able to move at a somewhat
fast pace because of our small
class sizes. Therefore we must
insist that students entering the
school be able to meet our aca-
demically challenging require-
ments. At the moment, out of
just over 120 students only three
have been diagnosed with mild
learning differences. We are
pleased to have implemented
monthly computerized stan-
dardized testing for the
2008/2009 academic year.

- “As instructional leader, I am
able to see where each child in

Kindergarten through Grade 6 .

is academically and we can

“make adjustments to the pro-

gram if needed. For example, in
the first grade class, the lowest
student was performing at the

To find an equally sexy and
empowering look, check out
True Confessions, a lingerie
store that specializes in more
than just the panty, but the nov-
el, the game and the toys that
make a woman feel sexy too.

‘Owner for three years, Mr
Orville Walcott said he fully
believes strippercise mogul Car-

men Electra's mantra, "if you've.

got it, flaunt it" and he wants to
help the women of the Bahamas
feel their sexiest in any way he
can. aa

"What motivates me is the
mere fact that we as a people
are not very open to sex. Par-
ents and grandparents don't dis-
cuss that type of thing with their
children, so it's never explained
or uncovered," said Mr Walcott.

The secret to great sex, he
revealed, is the clothing. "It must
enhance what a woman's already
got," he said, "making it even
more appealing and sexy than it
already was." |

With the influx of diet regimes
‘and weekly exercise plans, he
pointed out that many women
‘do these things because they

ant to look good naked. "So
why not make it even better?
Why not wear some sexy lin-
gerie?" he asks.

Available at True Confessions
are oodles of options. For those
who want to create those curves,
he recommends a shaper from
his Teddy's line. These create
the hips that some are just not
born with, but all want to have

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SCIENCE PROJECTS - in a big way! At Summit Academy's annual science fair, students are called
upon to present their project to a panel of judges. Public speak
_marks of a Summit Academy education.

mid-grade two range in Read-
ing- that's one and a half year

ahead'of where they ought to |

be. Consequently, the Admin-
istrative team along with the
classroom teacher sat down to
revise the class's curriculum to
ensure that appropriate enrich-
ment was being implemented to
challenge our students. . In oth-
er words, with the implementa-
tion of the recent testing, we can
keep each child's progress under
a microscope.” ;

Mrs Wilson continued, “One
of the issues that small primary
schools face is that we must feed
our children out:to larger
schools for high school which is
always a very competitive
process..I am sure that Mrs
McCartney will agree that this
remains one of our largest chal-
lenges as small school operators.

This means that our students ©

must have the competitive edge
to secure a seat within the more
selective schools. The majority
of graduating students from
Summit and Le Meridian
matriculate to St. Andrew's
School, Lyford Cay School,
Queen's College and boarding
schools.”
Both schools have most
notably .cultivated a-sense of
community and the friendly
atmosphere which is a hallmark
of small schools through their
choice of high caliber teachers
who combine the strength of
personality and high level teach-
ing techniques to create the kind
of healthy learning environment
so important to the nurturing of

tf

ing and leadership are two of the hall-

1;
young minds.

our students with an education
for globalisation. As the instruc-

to ask myself, what do we need

disappearing borders?”

Wilson says that the school feels

compelled to expose the stu-,
dents at Summit to as much as : inks Bochérself?
possible academically and to : P yy ;
spend the appropriate amount : .
: : : ? in a safe country, as far as our
of me murtueing sudents ea : children are concerned, but that
need help in. This is not some- : is far from the truth - and do
thing that a teacher candoina } We ae a . take a chance
class of more than twelve to fif- SLE OUT OUSPHNE
teen students (Summit's maxi- :
mum class size) she claimed.
More importantly being able

to cultivate well rounded stu- i She had obviously been to see a

30 children in a class. “Even the : ee qe a Hom epee
most well-trained teacher, ifshe : Pee re tate
has thirty, in a-class will find it :
almost impossible to pinpoint :
the strengths and weaknesses of :
each child. At Summit our :
report cards are five to six pages :
long, including a list of strengths :
‘and weaknesses, and objectives :
the student should have covered :
and will need to cover in the :
future. In larger classes it is :
almost certain that one or more : .
children will fall through the :
cracks and this is definitely :
something worth considering :

ents and enriching areas they

dents is well nigh impossible with

whenchoosing a school.



THE MOST popular sellers at Lorenes all have Rago’s Invisinet
- Shaper Panel over the tummy.

the illusion at least underneath
their dress.

Mr Walcott said that empow-
ering women is at the top of his
to do list, supplying the Bahami-
‘an woman with hits like’ "The
Bitch in the Bedroom" by Eliz-
abeth Hilts. "This is one‘book
that I think will make women
feel better about themselves, and
allow them to strut their stuff,"

he said. Then there's the Wom-

an's Gourmet Sex Book, sup-

plying the reader with 365 sen- »
sual experiences with an activity °
or sexual position for every day °

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of.the year.

women."

"T like women, our population k ; ;
3 ? know what you think about this
isf/> Der Seah women each ok : Situation and parenting in general

and feel special," he said, "I feel ~ send us an email ahd sab Your
everything should be geared : response published in a future
toward them. they're the back. ; Section. Send emails to cbren-

» they. : nen@tribunemedia.net or mail to

: Box N-3207.

whom always want to look nice

bone of the country."

Nunya wi a
Dae

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TUESDAY, JANUARY 6, 2009, PAGE 7B

| PARENTING 101

FROM page 8

come ‘out. They [my children]
did not make a scene either, but
the youngest one‘would have

: been about seven years old.
: The, oldest one would have
? been about 15 years old.

‘When you have trained your

: children well and see that they
: show signs of maturity; you may
: also consider this when going
? to the movies. This however
: should not always the practice.
: Going to the movies together
: helps the whole family to enjoy
i a great time together.

‘On the verge of child abuse
Lam not a parent, I only have
two adorable nieces whom I

: love tremendously and would
+ do whatever is in my power to
| : protect them. When I saw these
: children waiting for their moth-
| : er, I was upset. I don't care how
: well behaved, independent
: these kids are, there is no way
: that a seven year old should be
: left alone for an extended peri-
: od of time in public, and espe-
: cially not with the responsibili-

ey «qq. i ty of his two younger siblings.
As Mrs Wilson says, “I do ; That's not fair to itl and it's
strongly believe that we are cul- : Soha EO his Siete
tivating leaders at Summit. My. : Mose sre

goalifor Summitits 10 Provide them, thankfully, what if some-

: thing did - who's to say that they

set ; ? would have made noise or cried
tional leader of this school I have out if someone had simply

~~ ? picked them up and taken them
to teach our students to give : ei P : :

; e : outside? One of the little girls
them an edge in a world that has had to go to the bathroom - why

x E ee :? should she have to go by her-
In'line with: her vision,: Mrs : self, plus the toilets and. stalls
: at the movies are so nasty, why

: should she have to navigate that

While nothing happened to

‘We love to think that we live

I watched the kids as they

: were standing there, and they
: were alone for at least ten min
: utes before-their mother came.

“We love to think
that we live ina
’.. safe country, as
far.as our children
are concerned, but
that is far from
the truth - and do -
we really want te
take a chance with
our offspring?”

: theirs did. It's incredible to think
: that this woman would do this.

1. You should go to the same

? movie as your children

2. If you want a night out, —

then find.a responsible baby-
: sitter and if you can't find one,
; then you shouldn't be going out.

While I didn't see if she was

? with anyone, I got the impres-
? sion that she had been to the
? movie with a friend because
'? once she came out and saw her
: children, they did not immedi-
: ately leave the theatre, but were
? waiting around. I thought to
: myself that if she went to the
? movies with a guy, that was
? even more terrible - I am tired
: af women
? boyfriends - who.is not their

putting their

"baby daddy" in front of their °

} children - but of course I'm only
: speculating.

Having said all of this - I must

:.admit that there have been
? times when I have taken my
? nieces to the movies in the past

"Sometimes men complain ; - and the younger one wanted
that my store doesn't carry any- } to use the bathroom in the mid-
thing for them," he said, "but i dle of the movie - and I have
the tauthieth att a pair of b peers i taken her and left her older sib-
and cologne, the man is good to : ling’ untilswe came back ~ does

e ? that make me a bad aunt?
go. I carry lotions, powders, sexy :

panties, books and games for -:

¢ Tribune Woman wants to


in all shapes and sizes
‘we've been told again
and again, but what
about the garments to
fit those sexy bits?



With four in five
Bahamian women
wearing the wrong
size bra, according
to a study done by
the Vanity Fair
line in December
2007, and mass
media images
bombarding us
with ridiculous pic-
tures of what
women should
look like, it's about time we stop and
think, why don't we give our under-
wear and ourselves, the chance to be
the sexiest they can be.

At Lorenes, a popular lingerie
store, buyer Nicole Aranha said
there is a wide range of undergar-
ments just waiting to give any
woman the body of their dreams.

Lorenes carries a range of prod-
ucts, from control lines like Flexees
and Rago that tuck that tummy in
and smooth that 'peas n rice bungie'
down, to Fashion Forms and God-:
dess that carry specialty bras that
cater to different styles of dress, such
as the low back or plunging V néck.

“These are extremely popular
around New Years because every
woman has that perfect dress, but

Y can come

_ double sided tape).

-ha said, need a personal fit-

THE TRIBUNE

needs to have the perfect undergar-
ment to compliment it," said Ms
Aranha.

‘For the small chested, there are
also options in breast petals (a stick
on adhesive that means you don't
need a bra, but can still have some
support and coverage) or for that
frilly, no neck line garment, Braza (a

And for the punk star in all
of us, Strap Bling will
bring out that edgier,
confident side with.
rhinestones and
glittery designs
that are meant to
be peeking out
from behind your
top.

Bras can pose
quite the dilemma
for many Bahamian %*
women, who, Ms Aran- .

ting. "There are just so many size
variations here that the US doesn't
cater to (the US is where the majority
of undergarments come from). In the
same day you can.see a smaller woman
with a 32 or 34 size bra but with a dou-

SEE page 7

TUESDAY.

JANUARY 6G,












2009

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Ce UBEVLEE Ru eh

Soro ey triers

Boe neue
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so they too had to wait on me to |







PARENTING. 101

ON a recent weekend’ I
joined one of my girlfriends ‘for
a trip to the movies. Arriving
at Galleria's JFK theatres early,
one of the employees was nice
enough to allow us into a show-
ing of Soul Men early, but ‘it
ended as soon as we sat down
so we headed back to the lobby
to wait for the start of our
movie,

Upon leaving Soul Men! I
noticed a little boy and his sister
waiting in front of the door. I



‘didn't give it much thought; I

just figured they had gotten sep--
arated from their mother, father
or guardian upon leaving the
theatre and were waiting for
them to come out.

While in the lobby waiting for
our movie, which would start in
another 15 minutes, I noticed
the little boy again, this time
waiting in the lobby. He could
not have been more than seven,
and his sister looked as if “
were anywhere. from three tf
five, it was then that I noticedia
third sibling, a little girl, oldér
than her sister, but youngér
than her brother. The three
were in the lobby waiting ir
someone. Just standing by the
front door. I couldn't believe'#

I drew my friend's attention fo
the matter and this is how we
each saw it. j

Parents should be praised for
disciplined, well behaved chil-
dren (my friend) é

My view as a single mothe
when seeing the three kids unat-
tended at the movie is one of
being impressed at their behay-
jour. {
_I found that these kids weke
very well behaved. They waited
quietly not making a scene, the
oldest looked to be about seven
to eight years old and seemed to
naturally take charge of his
younger sisters. I even noticed
that when one of the girls went
to the restroom, he monitored
how long she took and went to
check on her. ;

When a seat became avail-
able; they all sat quietly and
continued to wait. I was happy
to see that even at such an ear-
ly age, these kids were able to
display what they were taught
by their parents/guardians. This
is rare, but commendable
indeed.

I considered my own children
and wondered what could have
been the difference between
what I taught them and the
teachings these children
received. I thought maybe it
could be the mannerisms of
their parents/guardian: A calm-
spirited parent may possibly
raise children who are more
easily trained to be patient and
kind to one another. I was gen-
erally driven to think and really
ponder about what it was that
caused these kids to be so well
behaved.

I believe also that these chi
dren are a product of their envi-
ronment. They are probably
exposed to | caring
parents/guardians who are lov-
ing, and kind while being stead-:"
fast on behaviour and family. I
was truly impressed! Certainly
living in the Bahamas, where
child abductions are rare, these
parents/guardians did not think’
the kids would be in any danger:

I too, have gone to see a
movie in one theater while my
children were in another. Chil--
dren's movies normally are over '
before the more mature films, '




‘i

SEE page 7

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