Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2009
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( marcgt )
newspaper ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
ae m Lhe Tribune

Pim lovin’ it

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LOTS OF SUN, |
SHOWER

Volume: 105 No.32

“THE BAHAMAS __

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<<







BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

















p



Residents outraged
over the alleged
actions of officer

‘By. MEGAN.REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

girlfriend.

‘Neighbours who came out
when they heard the commo-
tion, photographed and filmed
the incident.

They. said the officer
announced he was respond-
ing to noise complaints from a
woman living in the same
apartment building.

He pushed a man inside and
shoved his sick grandmother
out of the way, witnesses
claimed.

A woman, who lives across

A COMMUNITY is. out-
raged by the “unprovoked
brutality” of a police officer
witnessed by dozens of peo-
ple in Bain Town.

Residents said they watched
in horror as a police officer,
shouting expletives,
approached four men stand-
ing under a tree in front of
their apartment building.
According to eyewitnesses, he
slapped one of the men across
the face, threatened him with

SEE page nine

Some Customs staff cynical
about ending corruption

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

SOME Bahamas Customs personnel are wondering what
government plans to do to curtail corruption and fraud in the

- department in the new year.
Customs was placed under a microscope late last year as vast
corruption claims, sparked by an arson attack on the house of a
customs officer who was a part of a corruption task force, flood-

SEE page nine





















COMPANIES SWITCHING TO |

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angun,-and. latex arrested, his.

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Dalit [OWN cial

ERE ASE TSR

PEM UNE ATA





is
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PERCY ‘VOLA’ aH leader i ne Saxons Superstars, shakes hands with eat ine Hubert Ingraham.

Armed robberies

mar New Yeat’s eve

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ENJOYMENT of New Year’s eve was
marred for three people in New Providence
who fell victim to crime in two separate.armed
robberies.

The first incident took place at Bertha’s Go
Go Ribs restaurant on Blue Hill Road south at
around 6.30pm.

Two employees were robbed by ‘a man wield-
ing a silver coloured hand gun. The gunman

. was accompanied by another man.

One employee had a small amount of cash

and a cell phone taken from him, while the

other was forced to open the cash register,
allowing the gunman and his accomplice to
flee around the rear of the building with an
undisclosed amount of cash belonging to the
restaurant, according to Assistant Superinten-
dent of Police, Walter Evans. :

At 9.30 that same evening a woman living

SEE page nine

National Energy Policy
components ‘expected
to be achieved this year’

mi By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff
Reporter

MAJOR components
of a National Energy
Policy are expected to be
achieved in 2009, with
the first being the
approval of a renewable
energy supplier, accord-
ing to an environment
official.

State Environment Minister Phenton Ney-
mour said Thursday that several major pro-
jects are expected to be launched this year,
propelling the Bahamas towards greater
energy independence.

“We’ve set out to seek proposals for
renewable energy, hopefully in this year we
will make that a reality in regards to having
energy supplied by a renewable energy

SEE page nine



Phenton Neymour



Felipé Major/Tribune staff








Saxons are
— unofficial
winnet
New
Junkanoo



ear’s |

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter |
THE Shells. Saxon Super-

stars were announced the

unofficial overall winners of
the 2009 New Year’s Day

Junkanoo parade.

-With-a- total of 4,184 points,
the Saxons outshone the Val-
ley Boys by 346 points, putting
them in second place with
3,838 points, and One Family,

‘third with a score of 3,640

points.

Making their first-lap on
Bay Street around 7 o’clock
Thursday morning, the Saxons
arrived with the theme “I
Have a Dream.”

With a massive lead costume
with the images of Barack
Obama, Martin Luther King
Jr, and Nelson Mandela, the
group showed full support for
the advancement of black peo-

SEE page nine

Grand Bahama
International
Airport suffers
runway lights failure

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The failure of
runway lights at Grand Bahama
International Airport caused
delays and cancellation of
flights on Tuesday evening.

The runway lights were out
for several hours beginning
5.30pm, preventing flights in

- and out of Freeport until 10pm.

Airport director Philip Carey
could not be reached for com-
ments up to press time on
Wednesday.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany officials told The Tribune
that the power company had no
disruption in power and was not
at fault for the outage at the air-
port.

On Wednesday evening, a
second outage occurred at the
airport around 9.40pm — 30

SEE page nine





PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



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,

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 3







In brief

‘Mitchell
appeals for
youth to join
PLP in 2009



red Mitchell Q

_ M@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
is seeking to connect with the
youth — appealing to young
people to join the PLP in 2009
to work towards bringing
change to that party and to
The Bahamas, which he said
he would like to see become a
“developed” country by 2020.

The MP has in the last few
weeks made it clear that he
would one day like to lead the
opposition party. However, he
Said, his aspirations are a
“moot point” given that there
is currently “no vacancy” in
the PLP leadership.

Reaching out in his New
Year’s Message addressed °
“To young Bahamians”, he
called on young people to join
the PLP to express their views
about how change can be
brought about in the country
and show that they are “seri-
ous” about such an endeay-

, our. The message is the latest
of a growing series of public
commentaries produced by
the MP and former foreign
affairs minister in recent
months. “You say you want
change. How do you bring it

2:By joining a political



encourage all ue TOU whe say
you-are PLP — before you
leave for school and even if
you:are:away — to formally
join:the PLP. Come join at my
braiich i in Fox Hill. You can
also join at the PLP’s head-
quarters in Farrington Road.
If you have a problem joining,
_getin touch with me,” said Mr
Mitchell.
The MP appeals to Bahami-
ans in 2009 to “commit our-

selves to work together online ,

and in other ways to bring
about change in the PLP and
in The Bahamas.”

He raises the question of
whether use of the internet
can “help make changes” in
the country and encourages
young people to see the inter-
net not only as a tool for social
interaction but for action to
achieve improvements in soci-
ety. Stating that when he left
school he aimed to “further
the ends of racial justice for
oppressed Bahamians and to
help create the new Bahamian
nation state,” the MP said he
now wants to make The
Bahamas “as good as it can
be; a true reflection inclusive
of the new generations that
have been educated since
nationhood. ‘

' “The question to you as
young people is: What is your
mission? Where are you .
going to take The Bahamas
and what role will the PLP
play in it?” asked the MP.

If the Bahamas is to become

a “developed” country by.
2020, said the MP, “clear.
markers” will have to be
obtained, including: “an
increase in national income or
GDP per capita, a more
refined literacy, a lower birth
rate and a lower death rate; a
national health insurance pro-
gramme; unemployment bene-
fits; better dccess to capital ©
through small business loans,
micro loans, improved infra-
structure by land, sea and by
air, an improved tourism
product, national food security
through an investment in agri-
culture and fisheries, the
rebuilding of our capital city
and increased environmental
protection.”

“One major and immediate
goal must be to make the price
of land and housing affordable
for young Bahamians,” he
said. Mr Mitchell encouraged
those interested in joining the
party or expressing their ideas
to’contact him on his Face-
book. profile or by e-mail.



Sixty-eig

ht Haitian migrants found

aboard sloop in the Exuma chain

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE battle between the arrival of an
increasing number of Haitian migrants
and the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force continued Wednesday with the
apprehension of 68 persons found
aboard a sloop in the Exuma chain.

The interception of the migrants, 54
males and 15 females, brings to 441

the total number of Haitians captured
in Bahamian waters since mid-Decem-

ber.

sloops.

Oren melee (toc (0

‘continue with

DSTI Ka ILE LOCOy Oy



lf By Chester Robards
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT, which has
spent almost $1 million this year
to send illegal immigrants back
to their countries, has decided to
continue with swift repatriation,
according to immigration officials.

A group of Haitian immigrants,
picked up before Christmas in
Bimini, spent barely 24 hours on
Bahamian soil before they: were
put on a plane and flown back
home.

“That’s just how fast they have
been coming in and how fast we
have been sending them back,”
said Immigration Director Jack
Thompson.

Senior Deputy Director of
Immigration Roderick Bowe said
that between December 23 and
30 — within a week — 373 illegal
Haitians had been repatriated at
a cost of $100,000.

He said of the number of repa-
triated Haitians, 50 were picked
up in Inagua, 21 in Bimini, 121
on St Andrews’ Beach,
Yamacraw, 67 on Marshall Road,
six at Silver Cay and 108 in Exu-
ma. According to Mr Thompson,

thé total cost’of the repatriations’*'

‘place for persons*who are*h

“fllegally"and*I am‘Serious About
that. We have to ensure that we

might’ not conipate tothe price
tag on, keeping’ a large number of

| illegal persons detained. for along’

period of time.

“This is certainly a good chunk
of money which is being spent for
repatriations, but we have bud-
geted for it and the government






“There will be no
resting place for

persons who are
here illegally...”



Jack Thompson

of the Bahamas would have bud-
geted, so that we do have a quote
in our budget for the purposes of
repatriating,” he said.

“I think though that when you
really measure the cost of repa-
triating persons against if they
were here — with the cost on our

social services, on our health ser- |

vices, to feed these people to
house these people to clothe

‘ these people, I'mean there is no

comparison.”

Yesterday, the Immigration
Department used a Bahamasair
jet to repatriate 198 persons on
two separate flights to Port au
Prince, Haiti, according to Mr
Bowe.

“T think it’s a wise thing to
repatriate them,” said Mr pa ae
son, “Phere will be no resti

send the message that we are not
able to accommodate them and
that we.shall ensure that they
return to their homes.”

He said government does not

National Insurance
fund in ‘no danger’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance fund
is in “no short, medium or long
term danger,” according to
recently appointed Director
Algernon Cargill.

Mr Cargill said his assessment
is based on the fact that “internal
processes are being
tightened...functional changes
implemented” and “a stronger
focus on employer compliance,
‘supported with reliance on our

legal systém when necessary and

the implementation of the Actu-
arial recommendations” are
underway.

His comments came after the
seventh Actuarial report on the
National Insurance Board, com-
pleted in 2001, warned that with-
out changes the funds would be
depleted by 2034 at the latest,
leaving Bahamians without pen-
sions and other benefits, which
they now receive.

Mr Cargill said it is expected
that contribution collections may
decrease in 2009, due to changes
in the Bahamian economy and
lower employment levels. How-
ever, although the amount of
money coming into the fund will
be lower while the demand for
benefits to be paid out will rise,
the National Insurance Board
does not expect to have problems
meeting its obligations.

“Contribution payments along
with cash income generated from
NIB’s $1.5 billion in investments

- will continue to provide sufficient

cash to make all qualified benefit
payments when they are due,” "he
said.

In 2007, National Insurance
collected $155.5 million in con-
tributions and paid out $139.5
million in benefits. In. 2008
National Insurance expected to
collect $158 million in contribu-

tions and sign off on $150 million

in benefits.

Allaying concerns that the eco-
nomic climate might spell prob-
lems for the NIB, Mr Cargill said
that “periods of economic slow-
down as well as periods of eco-
nomic growth are factored into

the fund’s long-term projections.”

“The fund is sound and
through prudent management
together with Government policy,
there is no fear of NIB not hon-
ouring legitimate benefit claims
and/or going broke as has been
reported in.the media,” he said.

Mr Cargill said the Board of
Directors, management and
employees of the NIB are “com-
mitted to improving the perfor-
mance of the fund and the overall
experience of every claimant.”

“The singular most important
message we would like to convey
is that the Fund is sound, benefits
continue to increase and are not
expected to decrease for decades.
The Fund can and will continue
to honour every legitimate bene-
fit claim, even in cases where
employers are not compliant with
their contributions,” Mr Cargill
said.

Renew licences, gun owners atlvised

GUN owners have been advised to renew their licenses or face

a possible $1,000 fine.

In a release issued yesterday, police warned that all licenses in
the Northern Bahamas expired on December 31 and will now

require renewal.

“All license holders are being asked to renew their permits at
the Criminal Records Office in Grand Bahama/NewProvidence.
Failure to renew the licenses will result in all license holders
being taken into police custody and being subject to a fine not
exceeding $1,000,” said Assistant Superintendent Loretta Mack-

ey.

License holders are advised to visit the fire officer, who will be
available at the Criminal Records offices in Grand Bahama/New
Providence from 9 am through 4pm Monday through Fridays. -

Those fleeing their impoverished
homeland have been found throughout
The Bahamas — Bimini, Silver Cay,
Exuma, Inagua and New Providence.

According to Defence Force spokes-
woman, Sub Lieutenant Sonia Miller,
the winter months allow optimum sail-
ing conditions for Haitians aboard

On Tuesday, immigration officials

ney.

SENIOR Deputy Immigration. Offi-
cer Roderick Bowe (left) and
Immigration Director Jack
Thompson addressing a press
conference at the Department

of Immigration, Hawkins Hill on
Tuesday.

intend persons to ‘be housed at
the detention centre for long peri-
ods of time.

. Mr Thompson praised the pub-

’ lic for its assistance in giving infor-
mation to authorities and thanked .

the Defence Force, Police Force
and US Coast Guard for their
assistance.

He said his department:wilhs:~
comtinue to ensure that-allillegal

imihigrants, fot just Haitian

adhere to the Bahamas’ immii-

gration laws.

According to him, a Nigerian,
Filipino woman with her two chil-
dren,'and a Congolese national
were also‘recently repatriated.

Tearful”

- mother |
begs court
for mercy

“A MOTHER of two
broke down in'tears
Wednesday, begging for
mercy from the court
after being arraigned on
weapons charges.

Bonniesha Collie, a
resident of Sunshine
Park, appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court 1, Bank
Lane, charged with three ©
counts of possession of a
firearm with intent to
endanger life, damage
and assault of a police
officer with a dangerous
instrument.

It is alleged that Collie
was in possessionofa
handgun on December 18
with intent to endanger
the lives of Jason Hen-
field Sr, Jason Henfield
Jr and Mamawia Hen-
field. It is further alleged
that-on the day in ques- °
tion, Collie caused $2,335
in damage to a Nissan
Primera. It is also alleged
that Collie assaulted
Police Constable 2422
George Ward with a car.

Collie, who was not
represented by counsel,
pleaded not guilty to the
charges. She told the
court that it was a “bad
situation” and that she
had never held a gun in
her life. Collie asked the
court to have mercy on
her. She said she is a
mother of two children.

Collie was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison.
The case was adjourned
to today.





is . 3 f:
U

noted the quick turn around time for
those recently caught, with 373 sent
back in just a week, between Decem-
ber 23 and 30, at a cost of $100,000.
The group of 68 was expected to
have been repatriated either last night
or today, according to Minister of State
for Immigration, Branville McCart-

Their 40-foot blue and red boat was
discovered on Wednesday at around
10am by RBDF officers flying Defence
Force craft Charlie Six BDF while on

a routine air patrol. HMBS P-49 was
dispatched to investigate and found
the migrants afloat six and a half miles
off Hawksbill Rock. .
Without proper documentation, they
were transferred from their vessel to
the Defence Force craft and taken to
New Providence. Their apprehension.
comes at a time when the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre is in a state
of disrepair, having been damaged last
week in an arson attack for which an
American has been charged.




. Patrick Hanna/BIS Photo



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380-FLIX



PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Let the
law be







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master




LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914





SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.








Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991






EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-




Published Daily Monday to Saturday






Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance PeAnaperent Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama








TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
‘Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

_ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348








Russian sees end of US in 2010

WHILE the world is looking forward to
January 20th and pinning tremendous hope .
on America’s new president, a lonely voice

' echoes across the icy steppes of Russia pre- -
dicting the end of the US in 2010.

No one paid much attention to the
world’s modern-day Nostradamus — he
was probably considered.a bit of a nut case
at the time — but with the US’s deepening ©

- recession many are starting to.take him
seriously.

He is being lionised by the Russian
media, and is now being picked up by the .
Western press.

According to the Wall Street Journal
Russian academic Igor Panarin, 50, believes
that an economic and moral collapse will
trigger a civil war in the United States that
will eventually lead to its: break up.

He first posited his theory about the col-
lapse of the US in 2010 at a conference in
Linz, Austria, in 1998.

The predictions of Mr Panarin, a former
KGB analyst, are of course music to the
ears of the men in the Kremlin, who have.
blamed Washington for all of the world’s

. problems — from the instability in the Mid-

dle East to the world’s financial.collapse.

Russia sees the.end of American influ-

_ence as her opportunity, at last:to fill the ~

void.that will-be left: enabling her: to: move =
onto centre stage.

However, Mr Panarin, who says he is not

anti-American, unlike the Kremlin, does
not see the US collapse as a good omen for

) . Russia.

- Mr Panarin, the dean of the Russian

Foreign Ministry’s academy for future

diplomats, can often be found at Kremlin

receptions, in addition to lecturing stu- ©
dents, publishing books and appearing in

the media as an expert on US-Russian rela-

tions.

"There's a 55-45'per cent chance right
now that disintegration will occur (in
America),” he says. “One could rejoice in
that process. But if. we're. talking reason- be most un-American.
ably, it's not the best scenario — for Rus- © | However, if we all pull together, make
sia." _. sensible decisions, and not fight among

Writing from Moscow. Kadtew Osborn _ourselves, the present storm can be weath-
quotes Mr Panarin as saying that “although ered. In the end we might even have a
Russia would become more powerful on. = more stable world.





*- the global stage, its economy would suffer
because it currently depends heavily on
the dollar and on 'trade with the US.”

Writes Osborn: “Mr Panarin posits, in
brief, that mass immigration, economic
decline, and moral degradation will trig-
gera civil war next fall and the collapse of
the dollar.

“Around the end of June 2010, or early
July, he says, the US. will break into six
pieces — with Alaska reverting to Russian
control.

“In addition to increasing coverage in
state media, which are tightly controlled
by the Kremlin, Mr. Panarin's ideas are
now being widely discussed among local
experts. He presented his theory at a recent
- roundtable discussion at the Foreign Min-

_ istry.
“The country's top international rela-
- tions school has hosted him asa Reyote :
speaker.

“During an appearance on the state TV
channel Rossiya, the station cut between
his comments and TV footage of lines at

“soup kitchens and crowds of homeless peo-

ple in the U.S. The professor has also been

featured on the Kremlin's English- language

“. propaganda channel, Russia Today.” ©
«According to, Vladimir Pozner, a promi- _
nent TV journalist in-Russia;Mr-Panarin’s~-
vision “reflects a very pronounced degree
of anti-Americanism in Russia today. It’s
much stronger than it was in the Soviet ,
Union.”

According to columnist Osborn, Mr
Pozner.and other Russian commentators
and experts on the US dismiss Mr Panarin’s
predictions. ‘Crazy ideas are not usually
discussed by serious people,’ says Serei .
Rogov, director of the government-run
Institute for US and Canadian Studies,
who thinks Mr Panarin’s theories don’t
hold water.”

This can only happen if Americans lose
hope and faith in themselves, which would










































There is no time like the New Year
to make a resolution to enroll in”
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EDITOR, The Tribune.

When persons like me speak
out in support of capital pun-

‘ishment, we often hear the.

opposing chatter of those who
claim to stand for human rights.
They ask the question: “Who
has the right to judge or con-
demn someone who has com-
mitted murder?” My question
in response is: “Does the law
have a face?” Let’s not be mis-
guided and allow the words of
anyone to conjure up thoughts
that would cause us-to give a

. face to the laws of our country.

The law regarding capital pun-
ishment has no face! The law
itself is the Judge and not the
robed man or woman with the
bleached wig.

When we apply a face to the
law of capital punishment we
then begin to associate individ-
uals with a law that pre-exists all
ofus.

By doing so, we'add their
ideals, personalities and associ-
ations. :

I would then have the right
to question this man’s ability to




BOMB Ee

letters@tribunemedia.net



judge another or condemn one
to death.

However let it be known that
no one person is the law. A
judge can only apply the law
according to what is written and
that which is written in regards
to capital punishment was done
so in all wisdom. We need to
respect the origins of law of cap-
ital punishment.

Those who have the power
to remove a law such as this
must respect its origin and the
Originator.

I hear those who say that the
integrity of our legal system is in
such a poor state that we cannot
exercise this law because high
risks of wrongful deaths.

However, they must acknowl-
edge also that one of the main
reasons behind this mess is the
delays in carrying out execu-
tions and punishments for crim-
inals.

the ; udge

' The relaxation and passive-
ness of those who were assigned
to carry out what is written has
damaged the integrity of our
courts.

Some people ‘continue to try
and make capital punishment a
personal issue. It’s not! No mat-
ter if you are for or against it, let
the law be the judge.

Mind you these are the very
same persons who claim to sup-
port equal rights for all. Yet this
mentality is thrown aside when
it comes to capital punishment.
The murderers get the centre
of the cheese and the victims
— the ends. How fair is that?’

Are we equal in this world? If
I am murdered can I ask for
that man to be hanged? This is
my dying. wish that I hope
would be carried out if such was
to be the case of my exit. But as
for those who were not as for-
tunate to make such a wish let’
us be their voices.

DELROY MEADOWS -
BahamasIssues.com
Nassau,

December, 2008.

Press is often our strongest ally!

EDITOR, The Tribune.
I WAS overjoyed to hear that

- the mother who was scarred in

surgery was finally given her
records.

The Power of “The Pen”.......

Or should I say...““The Press!”

I am a registered nurse (non-
practising), and would be the
first to defend the many fine
physicians, nurses and other
health care professions at The
Princess Margaret Hospital. It is
absolutely amazing that they
have been able to serve the
Bahamian people all these
years, with very little resources
and no health tax.

What we get out of it, con-
sidering what we put in, is astro-
nomical!

I have no idea what really
happened in the unfortunate
case of the mother whose body

- was left badly scarred after

surgery, but would advise the
Bahamian public to always find

out both sides of any story that

comes out of PMH.

I do believe; however, that
there needs to be more regula-
tions and accountability in place
for the entire medical profes-
sion. The Bahamas is far behind













2




por 1, Queens Hwy, 352-6122
or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blyd, 367-2916




in many areas. For example:

Are all health care profes-
sionals required to have mal-
practice insurance?

Is continuing education
mandatory in order to.be re-
licensed annually?

Are there regulations ‘con-
cerning the importation and dis-

tribution of pharmaceuticals, or.

do we run an open market that
exposes the Bahamian people
to any and everything from
counterfeit to substandard
drugs? These are just a few
examples.

It is interesting, but not sur-
prising at all, that this patient
was given her records after her

case was made public. A: story
in the 20th edition of The Kil-
larney Voice online,

_ (www.thekillarneyvoice.com),

speaks to the power of the pen
and how we can go.about get-
ting our rights in a civilised way.

lam a strong believer that no
institution or government on
earth is stronger-than the ‘will
of the people whom they serve.
— 41 to 300,000+..:you do, the
math!

The press is often our
strongest ally! —

BARBARA HENDERSON
Nassau,
December, 2008.

Basic understanding of
animal welfare needed

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Will the horse track ever open again? Tribune -15 Dec '08

THE ‘horse track’ should not be permitted to open agair. until we
demonstrate a basic understanding of animal welfare.

KEN W

KNOWLES, MD
Nassau, ;
December 19, 2008.

DON STAINTON
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Tel: 322-8219 322-8160

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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 5





Electrical fault
suspected in
fire at BIC

POLICE suspect that an
electrical fault and not foul
play was responsible for
the damaging fire at
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tion Company’s head
office on John F Kennedy
Drive. ;

“It was confined to
room on the second floor
of the building. There was
damage to computers that
were in that room. It is sus-
pected that it might have
been electrical, based on
everything we see there,”
said Acting Commissioner
of police Reginald Fergu-
son.

It is understood that the
fire started in the area
where a Christmas tree
had been erected.

The blaze occurred on
Tuesday and left the front
of the main building dra-
matically blackened with
smoke. BTC employees
were told not to return to
work until “further
notice.”

A message left for BTC
Vice President Kirk Grif-
fin seeking an update on
the situation was not
returned up to press time
yesterday.

Unconfirmed
reports of
layoffs at
Abaco Cluh,
Winding Bay

THERE were uncon-
firmed reports yesterday
of a number of workers
being laid off from the
Abaco Club in Winding
’ Bay, Marsh Harbour.

Up.to press time the .
club’s human resources: °”
manager, Freddie
Munnings, was out of
office and did not return
an e-mail seeking com-
ment.

However, several
sources suggested that the
exercise had taken place.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said he had not
been informed of any lay-
offs. ‘ A

He noted that all major
employers are mandated
by law to inform the
department of labour
before terminating work-
ers.

The Bahamas
more than
doubles its
rice imports

THE Bahamas more
than doubled its rice
imports in 2008.

The country increased
its rice imports from the
United States by 200 ©
metric tonnes.

Overall the country
imported 300 metric
tonnes of rice in 2008.

The worldwide con-
sumption of rice has -
drastically increased
over the last 25 years, :
but dropped slightly last
year when prices for the }
product skyrocketed.

During the first quar-
ter of 2008, the price of
rice rose greatly due to
a rice shortage.

In April 2008, rice
prices hit 24 cents a
pound, twice the price
that it was seven
months earlier.

S'TRUCKUM

USCUUSRETT TE Sa TITEL SS

PU SMUT SR TH eT LEE

PHONE: 327-6464
a eee



Branville McCartney

\

gateway lines

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

LONG lines could soon be a thing of
the past for returning residents at Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport’s
Immigration gateway, according to
State Minister for Immigration
Branville McCartney.

He said the department has been _
looking into ways to reduce the.

amount of time it takes for immigra-

tion officers to process residents and,

moving forward, even visitors.

‘“We certainly don’t want what has’ .

been happening — these long lines at
the airport for Bahamians coming
home. They should not be waiting on
lines to get, back home,” said Mr
McCartney. —

According to him, the information
officers enter into their databases when
residents are returning may not be
practical information. Now, they are
looking for ways to reduce or remove
parts of the required process.

o inbrief Bid to reduce immigration

at the airport



“We certainly
don’t want what

has been happening
— these long lines
at the airport for
Bahamians coming
home. They should
not be waiting on
lines to get back
home.”



Branville McCartney

tion from locals:they go and they plug
certain things in and some of that is not
necessary,” said Mr McCartney. “I
don’t know where that is in the law to
say that that’s mandatory, but someone
must have put that in practice and now

it is causing a delay.”

He said an incident recently
occurred when several flights arrived in
succession and there were not suffi-
cient immigration officers to process -
the parade of people quickly. The
result was long lines and a long wait for
visitors and residents alike.

“We’re looking into that to ensure
that that doesn’t happen again and
that we have sufficient people on at
the airport to ensure that-when persons
come that they are dealt with effi-
ciently,” said Mr McCartney.

According to him, there should have
been nine officers working the day of
the incident. However, only four
showed up for work.

He said like the police and Defence
Force, Immigration could always use
more officers in order to help the
department run more efficiently —
especially at the airport.

“It’s not good (long lines) for our
tourist industry and it’s not good for
locals either,” said Mr McCartney. “It’s



“Now they take all of this informa-

Government, fraternity pay tribute

the first impression our visitors get.”

to late broadcaster Phil Smith

@ By ALISON LOWE .
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENTand the
brothers of the Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity have
extended their condolences
to the family of late ZNS
sports broadcaster, Phil
Smith, who died last Sun-
day morning.

Mr Smith served as sports
director for the Broadcast-
ing Corporation of the
Bahamas since 1997.

Youth and Sports Minis-
ter Desmond Bannister said
in a release that Mr Smith,
who was 51, was relied upon
as an “authoritative voice”
who provided an “accurate
description of the state of
sports in the Bahamas.”

“As this country’s pre-
eminent sports journalist
Phil Smith embodied all
that is good about Bahami-
an sports, inspiring in ath-
letes and spectators alike
the notion that they all
shared an equal stake in the

= By CHESTER ROBARDS
. Tribune: Staff Reporter

BISHOP Simeon Hall has launched a sharp
attack on the Bahamas legal system, blaming its
many shortcomings for the rise in crime.

Bishop Hall, who is president at the New
Covenant Baptist Church and serves as Chair-
man of the National Advisory Council on
Crime, has been a stalwart anti-crime fixture in

the community.

He said his sermon entitled “What, when
there are only three berries on your tree” was
to focus. on the economic times, however, his
sermonizing moved into:the problems with the

judicial system.

“The year ended and a new year has begun
and very little has been done to fix the judicial

system,” he said.

“In the crime report we found that one of the
core problems was the inordinate amount of
time (elapsed), from the time the person is
arrested to the time he is brought before the
courts, and we believe that is a major plank in

the fight against crime.”

He said he finds it lamentable that the FNM
government has done nothing to fix this prob-

lem in the judiciary.

Government recently introduced its plan to
complete the Nassau Street court complex;
which it hoped would help curb the backlog of
cases. When the court has been completed it is

growth and development of
the Bahamas as an interna-
tional sports power,” said
Mr Bannister.

“So firmly did Phil Smith
believe in such a proposi-
tion that many were his per-
sonal sacrifices to connect
national federations with
their best international
players so as to ensure that
The Bahamas would field
its strongest national teams
to represent the Common-
weath of Islands he so fer-

vently served,” added the,

minister. beats

Mr Bannister said that
through such efforts Mr
Smith became an “impor-
tant commodity, possessing
a pool of knowledge that
readily made him a Bahami-
an icon, well known
throughout local and inter-
national circles.”

Brothers of the Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity’s local
chapters, Delta Epsilon Sig-
ma and Beta Beta Lambda,
remembered Mr Smith as a
man whose “devotion to his



SNe BUILT A

fraternity was unmatched.”

“Even after his illness
became serious, he still took
the time to mentor younger
brothers and provide sup-
port to the older brothers,”
said the fraternity.

Mr Smith was initiated
into the Beta Epsilon chap-
ter while studying broadcast
journalism at Langston Uni-
versity, USA, in the sum-

Bishop Simeon Hall hits
out at the legal system |

Bishop Simeon Hall



expected to be a more secure complex for pris-

oners, witnesses and court staff.

system.

Bishop Hall suggested to his congregation
that they judge Mr Ingraham on whether he
makes some reasonable advances in fixing the

College of St Benedict and St John's University Brass Choir to perform

ALUMNAE, alumni, par-
ents, students and friends of
the College of Saint Benedict
and Saint John’s University
are invited to a concert and
reception on Sunday January
4, at 6pm. The concert. and
reception will be held at St
Anselm Parish, Fox Hill.
Admission is free. Brian Coop-
er, a junior at the university is
a proud member of the band.

The College of St Bene-
dict/St John’s University Brass
Choir consists of approxi-
mately 16-18 students under
the direction of Dr Dale
White. Membership is made
up of both music and non-
music majors who enjoy a sim-
iar passion for brass ensem-
ble music. The repertoire of
the ensemble includes music
of all historical styles, from

original contemporary works
for brass, to light classics and
hymn tunes, to Renaissance
and Baroque transcriptions.

The CSB/SJU Brass Choir
rehearses once a week and
performs at a variety of events
on and off campus. 5

The 2009 tour to the
Bahamas is the first major tour
outside the state of Minnesota
for the ensemble.

-lege basketball team, his

THE Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity with Phil Smith.



brothers of the Bahamas
and worldwide extend their
heartfelt condolences to the
family of their fallen broth-
er Phill Smith,” they said.

Mr Smith would have
been 52 on May 7th.

mer of 1979.
As a member of the col-

“spectacular performance
on the court earned him his
line name: ‘Thrill’,” recalled .
a release from the group.

“President of the Gradu-° He leaves his .wife,
ate chapter Brother’ Blossie, three children,
DeMario Minus, President Dupree, Karissa, and
of the Beta Beta Lambda Avent, and four grandchil-

Nicholas McDonald, and dren.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds‘for a °
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. A

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.














Bobcat Bahamas Limited _
wishes to advise the public that
we will be closed for business

from the period of

December 23rd, 2008
through

January 3rd, 2009.
RE-OPEN

January 5th, 2009.

On behalf of the
Management & Staff of
Bobcat Bahamas.

We wish you a very
Merry Christmas
and a happy and prosperous
‘New Year

for emergencies contact
Raymond Duncombe at 477-0926





PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 ~ THE TRIBUNE

Highlights
from the action
on Bay Street








-A.2009 NEW YEAR’S DAY MESSAGE



from



"| BARRIE FARRINGTON, CBE PRESIDENT
BAHAMAS HOTEL EMPLOYERS’ ASSOCIATION

hb

On behalf of the Bahamas Hotel Employers’ Association | wish you a Happy
and Healthy New Year.

2008 has been a hard year for our industry as the Bahamas has been clearly

affected by the financial crisis of the United States and the world. We are

once more painfully reminded that we live in an increasingly inter-dependent
" global society. And while we are blessed with incredible natural beauty, a rich

culture; and an abundance of friendly, warm and capable people, for us to

successfully compete in Global Tourism we simply must do better in making
every visitor experience memorable.

: Unfortunately as we look into 2009, there is no indication “of a change for
the better. However, it is the responsibility of all of us to remember our rich
tourism past, and all the positive things it has done for our country.

Regrettably, a number of our colleagues have been affected by the downturn

in tourism activity. We hope that this set back is short-lived and we can
~ get our people back to work. In the meantime, let us prepare ourselves for
- recovery and a better future.

| 7 responsibilty rests with each and every one of us to ensure that it is
‘better in The ages for our, visitors and for one another.



May God Bless you all





Peter, VAINUAL I ey CUU, re 6

es ee
Leena SS SSS SSS Ss SS Ss SS)




“Hl repesenmienaspocsseneasuacesptenpaneat

SSSA SS



ore ER BRR IE RSI



wee

Uva ee
UES
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
aU ey aor al








PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS
PRESENTS THE



SRN
oo Se BS

las ey NY
S

CELEBRITY
XS INVITATIONAL



cw ss
SSR

MICHAEL JORDAN
y rity Inv



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED ©

Kerzner International Bahamas Limited is
recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael
Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament
to be held on January 22 - 25, 2009 at the Ocean
Club Golf Course on Paradise Island.

To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at

mjci@live.com by January 2, 2009.





PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009





RBDF Photos Courtesy of Public Relation Department




plo,

6

FLEET CHIEF EDON GREEN, along-with the marines assigned to the Port Se

SS
N
AXS
\
S

SSH

Mrs. Janet Smith-Butler,,Administrator at Unity House, on East Street South.



‘Merry Christmas &

What a great time to draw
closer to God
and to our loved ones !!!

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SS

ity Section donated two wheelchairs and a monetary gift

5.

KENTUCKY Fried

Chicken officially opened its |

newest store at the Mall at
Marathon in grand festive
style in December. Bahami-
ans from near and far gath-
ered to participate in the
opening ceremonies.

Gabriel Sastre, vice-pres-

ident and general manager
of Restaurants (Bahamas)
Ltd, operators of Kentucky
Fried Chicken Nassau, said,
“We,at KFC are very proud
of having opened our new
restaurant under the latest
KFC image in design and
décor. We believe that the
Mall at Marathon is the per-
fect location.

Comfortable

' “The restaurant, with its
new look, offers comfortable
seating and a spacious dri-

- ve-through. We look for-

ward to attracting the
Bahamian public, and hope
they will come and patronise
our latest addition.”

Mr Sastre said KFC
would like to see families,

THE TRIBUNE



MISS TRACEY-ANN BAXTER receiving gifts from Pastor Prince Bodie,





Chaplain df the Defence Force at the Elizabeth Estates Home for Children.

RBDE makes donations
during holiday season

THE Royal Bahamas Defence Force has made many dona-

dren and the disabled.

‘tions to the less fortunate this holiday season - benefitting chil-

‘This week officers and marines assigned to the'Port Security
Section donated two wheelchairs and a monetary gift to the res-
idents of the Unity House, East Street South.

According to a release from the force, administrator Janet
Smith-Butler, was “visibly moved, as she accepted the gifts,
and thanked the men for their generosity, on behalf of the res-
idents and caretakers of the Home.”

Meanwhile, Pastor Bodie, chaplain of the Defence Force,
helped to “bring cheer” to the children of the Elizabeth Estates ©
Home, presenting numerous gifts to staff member Tracey Ann
Baxter to be given to the children. ie ae

The Children’s Emergency Hostel also benefittd with presents
from HMBS Yellow Elder’s crew. \

“These are just some of the projects which the officers, and
marines of the Defence Force are involved with, as a small
gesture of lending a helping hand wherever possible, as they con-

tinue to protect the territorial sovereignty

the RBDF. \

a

.

yy
Hs

YY

a

iY

i.

\

young adults and “tweeners”
come and enjoy the restau-
rant.

Joining the opening festiv-
ities was “Colonel” John
Baxley, the look-a-like KFC
Colonel and a good friend
of the late Colonel Harland
Sanders.

Since joining the KFC
company in 1994, Mr Baxter
has travelled around the
world.

He said he has found that

people everywhere like Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken.

“They love the consisten-
cy of the product,” he said.
“We do it the same way
worldwide so you know that
if.you are in Bangkok, or

. Nanjing, or in the Philip-

pines, you are going to get
KFC just like you do at
home.

“In the Bahamas, I think
you have some of the best
product I have ever eaten. I
was honoured when they
brought me here for this
opening. These folks do a
fine job,” Mr Baxley said.

Mr Sastre and Miss

of The Bahamas,” said
" th (? i

\



Bahamas Tourism Queen
Tiara Cooper cut the ribbon
at the grand opening cere-.
mony. Assisting them were
Dr Canon Kirkley Sands,
area manager Debra Miller
and lead manager Raynell
Bowe, as well as “Colonel”
Baxley.

Franchise

Shanelle Strachan, Miss
KFC, employed with the
franchise for eight years,
said that the opening was an
“excellent experience.”

“We moved out of the
Mall to accommodate more
Bahamians.

“We have an excellent
atmosphere here and the
employees are smiling and
willing to serve, entertain
and make our customers
happy,” she said.

Dr Canon Sands of Christ
Church Cathedral said a
prayer of blessing and pros-
perity during the opening
event. Adding to the excite-
ment was the appearance by
KFC’s mascot Chicky.



THE TRIBINE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 9



Grand Fahama
International
Airport suffers —
Punway lights
failure

FROM page one

minutes after an American
Eagle flight from Miami
arrived at the airport with
about 48 passengers.

The entire airport termi-
nal was in darkness for a
brief moment before the
emergency lights kicked in,
to the relief of arriving pas-
sengers and persons in the
arrival section.

It is not known whether a
computer or electrical mal-
function might have caused
the airport’s outage.

With today’s technologi-
cal advancement, most air
port runway lights are autr-
matically turned on by con-
puter.

The newly construced
GBIA was built at a cos of
$30 million after the oldair-
port was destroyed by lurri-
cane and storm surge ever-
al years ago.

The 11,000 feet rmway
can accommodate thelargest
planes in service todiy.

The airport is opeated by
the Grand BahamaAirport
Company, which 3 owned
by Hutchison PortHolding.

National Energy
Policy conponents
‘expectedto he
achiever this year"

FROW page one

source,”said Mr Neymour.
With -he former Christie
administration first
annouicing the need for a
NEP n early 2007, when
launched Mr Neymour
said it will impact virtually
every government sector
and will eventually trickle ’'
throughout the remainder
of the economy. /
With the Bahamas rate
the fourth most likely
country to,experience sea
level rise resulting from
climate change, the minis-
ter said initiatives are
being planned in an effort
to combat the impending
threat. Apart from a signif-
icant amount of land loss,
the minister said major
beach erosion is a likely
outcome in the wake of ©
global warming.. |
The minister explained:
“We have to begin the
process of educating
Bahamians, how impor-
tant it is to address climate
change, and to do so is to
reduce our consumption of
petroleum.” |
Mr Neymour said the
extreme shifts in gas and
diesel prices in 2008,. gives .
a clear picture of the,
volatile petroleum indus-
try.
In July the price of a
barrel of oil jumped from
$70 to $147, then dropped
to $38 by December. The
minister says these shifts
should encourage Bahami-
ans to pay close attention
to their consumption of | -
energy. fee
With the completion of
a NEP draft in 2007 under
‘ the Christie administra-
tion, with the assistance of
the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank, an energy
policy committee formed
by the government in early
2008 has since conducted
reviews and has worked on
revising six of the policy
proposals. The committee
is currently preparing an
implementation plan for
an NEP, however a con-.
firmed launch date has yet
to be announced.
Almost 30 applications
have been submitted to
BEC from renewable
energy suppliers, however
in the most recent press
releases, BEC said it is
close to making a final
decision on a supplier.
With the possibility of
more than one company
assisting BEC with energy
supplies to the nation,
some of the applicants
have proposed energy
derived from waste, wind,
solar, and water.

‘Some Customs staff

cynical

about ending corruption

FROM page one

ed the local media.

Several customs officers recently
approached the Tribune, cynical about
tke prospect of ending corruption at

" fae critical government revenue earn-

er,
One customs employee’s sentiments
were that: “Nothing is being done and

. I don’t think it ever will.”

The employee, who left only the tag
“Sick and tired in customs” at the end
of a three page fax, said the media
might just be wasting it’s time exposing
stories about the widespread corrup-
tion in the department.

“There will be victimization and cor-
ruption in customs forever, until some-
one with a stern head takes a stand,”
said the fax.

According to “sick and tired”, cor-

ruption is so deeply ingrained and so ©

widespread that “nothing is ever goin,
to get done no matter how much trut
you guys (media) bring out.”

“Certain customs officers just can’t
be touched,” the fax claimed. “They
say they are invincible, that they know
the right people and that their dollar’s
long.” .

Acting comptroller of Customs
Anthony Adderley recently blamed
importers for officer’s corruption. He
contended that an officer would not

have to take a bribe, were it not
offered to him.

“An officer cannot be party to rev-
enue evasion without the members of
the public.

“The importer would have to agree
to do some things,” he said.

Another Custom’s employee who
wished to remain anonymous said she
would like to see officers promoted
based on their qualifications.

According to her, the promotion of
these officers could be a catalyst of
change.

She said, however, nepotism and
favouritism are commonplace in the
department and it greatly impedes the
progress of personnel who have

worked hard to obtain degrees, but
are not being allowed to utilize their

acquired skills. :

“Changes need to be made from the
top,” she said. “They need to promote
the qualified people, some of whom
have more qualifications than the
comptroller,” she claimed.

After much media attention; Cus-
toms employees began to empty the
department’s closets, exposing numer-
ous allegations of corruption and theft.

Employees are hoping the new year
will prompt government, to shake
things up even more at Customs.

“There are all-kinds of things that

need to be changed,” said a concerned

employee.



Saxons are unofficial winners
— Of New Year’s Junkanoo



219 points.

One Love Junkanoo group,

FROM page one

ple in Africa, America, and
the Bahamas.

The group also showed-off a
nightmare of a damsel being
chased by a myriad of infa-
mous characters being led by

the one and only Freddie’

Kruger.

Winning the crowd over
with a spectacular perfor-
mance, the Saxons also walked
away victorious with best ban-
ner, and best music in the ‘A’

. division, the Shirley Street per-

formance prize with Music
Makers taking second place,
and a one point lead on
Valley Boys, which placed

* third.

In the best dancers category,
the Saxons also won with 269
points, with the Music Mak-
ers trailing in second place
with 267 points, and One Fam-
ily third with 244 points.

Winning,the title of best lead
costume, the Valley Boys
scored.312 points, with the
Music ‘Makers taking second
place at 222, and the Valley
Boys also taking third place at

The Valley Boys placed sec-
ond in the best music category,
just 32 points ahead of the
Music Makers.

» The Valley Boys also placed
second in the best banner cat-
egory, with One Family tak-
ing third.

In the free dancers catego-
ry, Roots took first place with
211 points, Saxons in second
place with 202, and a third
place tie with the Music Mak-
ers and Saxons with 187 points
each.

In the ‘B’ division, the over-
all unofficial winners were The
One Love Junkanoo group

with 3,432 points, in second

place Clico Colours scored
3,099 points, and the Fancy
Dancers in third place with
3,002 points.

For the best music division
‘B’, Clico Colours won with
One Love Junkanoo group
taking second place, and the
Kingdom Warriors taking
third.

best banner category, at 69
points were Clico Colours and

Tied for first place in the

the Fancy Dancers taking sec-
ond place, and in third place
were the Kingdom Warriors
and Redland Soldiers.

For the lead costume, One
Love Junkanoo group won

- first place, with the Redland

Soldier coming in second,
Fancy Dancers in third, and |
Kingdom Warriors in forth
place. :

Thousands of locals flocked
to Bay Street on Thursday
showing full support for the
annual event that attracts hun-
dreds of visitors from all parts
of the world.

There were dozens of local
officials present at the event,
including Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham with his
wife, Delores, National Secu-
rity Minister Tommy Turn-
quest, and former MP Janet
Bostwick.

Opposition leader Perry
Christie ‘not only attended, but
also took part in the parade
rushing with the Valley Boys,
as did Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, who rushed
with the Saxons.

Police ‘brutality’ in Bain Town claim

FROM page one

from the property on the corner of
‘Augusta and Wilkinson Streets in
inner-city Nassau, said: “He was shout-
i *s get from this
* about you all
ghetto people, you all make me sick’.”

She said the officer then slapped
another man across the face.

The man then started walking
towards the nearest police station in
South Street to make a complaint
when the police officer pushed him
over and threatened him at gunpoint,
the woman witness claimed.

She added: “The guy didn’t throw
a blow at the police officer or any-
thing. He pulled out his gun for noth-
ing.

“And all the time he was saying
‘ghetto’, ‘dirty’ this and that, and how
he ‘tired of us’. He talked to us like



dogs.”
As the man’s girlfriend rushed after
him, .the officer pushed her aside,

‘kicked her, and forced her into the
‘police car, saying he was arresting her

for obstruction, witnesses claimed.

Backup arrived in five police cars
bringing an end to the half hour ordeal
that began about 8pm Monday.

Residents said they tried to visit the
arrested girl at South Street Police Sta-
tion, but the same officer would not let
them in.

The woman said: “And we wonder
why there is so much riots and why
people don’t want to call the police.

“Yes we live in the ghetto, but that’s
an insult, and when you carry on like
that in front of little kids, how do you
expect them to grow up respecting the
police?”

Witnesses lodged an official com-
plaint at Police Headquarters in East

Street yesterday.

Bahamas Police Press Liaison officer
Walter Evans was unable to confirm or
deny details of the incident, but said:'

“If they have a legitimate concern or
complaint the complaints department
will carry out a thorough, comprehen-
sive and impartial investigation.”



FROM page one

in Joan’s Heights was approaching
her home on foot when two men
held her up.

A man, described as about five
feet nine inches tall and wearing a
red and white striped shirt demand-
ed her handbag. He had his mouth
covered by a “dark scarf”, according



Armed robberies
mar New Yeat’s eve





to police, and was accompanied by a
man said to be around five feet sev-
en inches tall, wearing a white shirt.

She threw her handbag on the
ground and ran. ,

The men took her bag, which con-
tained numerous personal items.

No one was harmed in either in¢i-
dent. Police have no leads and inves-
tigations are continuing.













PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 “kM THE TRIBUN.

| FRIDAY EVENING “JANUARY 2, 2009 |
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THE TRIBUNE



Ohama set to
return home after
vacation in Hawaii

w KAILUA, Hawaii Hawaii

PRESIDENT-ELECT
Barack Obama on Thurs-

day bid his native Hawaii
“aloha” after a 12-day
vacation, according to
Associated Press.

Obama, wife Michelle
and their two young
daughters were set to fly
to Chicago and expected
to arrive early Friday. He
planned to fly on Sunday
to Washington, where 7-
year-old Sasha and 10-
year-old Malia start
school on Monday.

The Obamas kept a low
profile while vacationing
on the island of Oahu.
Aside from daily trips to.”
the gym and golf courses,
the president-elect seldom
left his vacation retreat, a
rented $9 million. home
near Honolulu. When he
did venture out, it usually
was to grab some shave
ice, a local treat, look at
baby tigers at the zoo or
take some other child-

friendly excursion. ©

Obama joked to
onlookers Thursday
morning at the gym that
he was reluctant to return
to Chicago, where temper-
atures were in the 20s.

“JT wish I could hang out
with you, but I’ve got to
go home,” said Obama,
leaving the Marine Corps
Base Hawaii’s Semper Fit

center in 70-degree weath-
ek: as

While on vacation, Oba-
ma tried to take advan-
tage of his last break
before taking office on
Jan. 20. Other than make
small talk with residents
and pose for pictures with
babies, he has done little
in public. ‘That, aides said,
was the idea.

During the visit, Obama
played golf three times, .
twice at the private Mid-
Pacific Country Club and
orice at Olomana Golf

Links,.a a public.course be. “

knew as‘a youth. On‘Thes
day-he played basketball
at his alma mater, the pri-
vate Punahou School:
Michelle Obama also
remained:largely out of
- sight; other than:the occa-
sional trip to the gym. She
did not join Obama and
the girls when they went
to.an aquatic park or to





the zoo, nor when he visit-.

ed'the nearby Marine base
on Christmas Day.

While on vacation, Oba- .

ma did his best to stay out.
of the discussion over the ;
escalating violence in the’
Middle East, where Israeli
troops launched an offen-
sive against Hamas lead-
ers who had fired rockets
from Gaza. Aides said
there is only one president
‘ata time, but Obama .
received security briefings
and was in touch with Sec-
retary of State Condpleez-
za Rice and his incoming
national security team.
Pro-Palestinian activists.
protested outside Oba-
-ma’s vacation home on

Tuesday and urged anew |

approach to’the Middle

East. Obama did not
acknowledge them.

The only Obama news

- from Oahu came when the
entire island lost electricity
for 11-hours. Obama aides
said the family’s house also
lost power. but did not use
backup generators during
the nighttime incident.

Obama spent his child-
hood in Honolulu, largely -
raised by his grandmother,
who died on Nov. 2, just

two, (days before the elec-
tion’that made Obamia the
nation’s first African-
‘American president.
While on the pre-inaugu-
ration trip he attended a
private memorial service
for Madelyn Payne Dun-
ham — known to friends
as “Toot” — and scattered
her‘ashes into the sea.

Obama was born in
Honolulu in 1961,two
years'after Hawaii became
a state. He lived in
Indonesia for four years
when he moved there with’
his mother and stepfather,
but he spent 14 of his first
18 years as an islander.

He moved to the main-
land to attend college in’
1979 and has only
returned for vacations.





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 11

Israeli airs trike



a top Hamas leader

i GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip

AN ISRAELI warplane
dropped a 2;000-pound bomb
on the home of one of Hamas’
top five decision-makers
Thursday, instantly killing him

and 18 others, while the Israeli.

army said troops massed on
the Gaza border were ready
for any order to invade,
according to Associated Press.

The airstrike on Nizar
Rayan was the first that suc-
ceeded in killing a member of
Hamas’ highest echelon since

Israel began its offensive Sat-

urday. The 49-year-old pro-
fessor of Islamic law was

known for personally partici-,

pating in clashes with Israeli
forces and for sending one of
his sons on’a 2001 suicide mis-
sion that killed two Israelis.
Even as it pursued its bomb-
ing campaign, Israel kept the
way open for intense efforts
by leaders in the Middle East
and Europe to arrange a
cease-fire. Israel said it would

consider a halt to fighting if .
international monitors were

brought in to track compliance
with any truce.

_ Adding to the urgency of
the diplomatic maneuvering,
the Israeli military said its
preparations for a possible
ground assault were complete
and that troops stood ready to
cross the border if the air oper-
ation to stamp out Hamas

. rocket fire needed to be

expanded.

Soldiers massed along the -

Gaza frontier said they were
eager to join the fight, and

some even cheered as they

heard thunderous: airstrikes 1 in
the distance. |

The hit on Rayan’s home
obliterated the four-story

apartment building and peeled

off:the«walls of:others:around



in the northern Gaza Strip.
Mounds of debris thrown up
by'the blast swallowed up cars.

Eighteen other people,
including ‘all four of Rayan’s
wives and nine of his 12 chil-
dren, also were killed, Pales-
tinian health officials said. A
man cradled the burned, limp
body of a child he pulled from
the rubble.

The house was one of five
bombed Thursday, among

more than 20 targets altogeth- |

er. Warplanes shredded the
houses, taking off walls and
roofs ‘and leaving behind éerie,
dollhouse-like views into
rooms that still contained fur-
niture.

_ Israel’s military, which has

said the homes of Hamas lead-
‘ers are being used to.store mis-

siles and other. weapons, said
the attack on Rayan’s house

triggered secondary explosions

it, creating a field of rubble in ~
‘the crowded town of Jebaliya



IN THIS AUG. 5, 2005 file photo Hamas leader Nizar Rayan marches
during a protest in the Jebaliya refugee camp in the northern Gaza
Strip. Israel assassinated Rayan Thursday Jan. 1, 2009 by dropping a
one-ton bomb on his house, also killing two of his wives and four of
his children. This first assault on the top leadership of Gaza's ruling
group escalated a crushing aerial offensive even as cee declared itself

ready to launch a ground invasion.
from the arms stockpiled:

there.
Seven other Palestinians

-were killed in.airstrikes ‘Thurs-:
day and one died of earlier,

injuries.

Israel has targeted Hamas
leaders many times in the past,
and the current leadership
went into hiding at the start of
the offensive. Rayan, however,
was known for openly defying
Israel and in the past had led
crowds to the homes of want-
ed Hamas figures — as if dar-
ing Israel to strike and risk the
lives of civilians. -

Residents said he openly
went to.a nearby mosque

Thx. sday morning to pray.

In his last interview, record-
ed with Hamas TV on
Wednesday, Rayan was as
defiant as ever about-con-
fronting the Israeli military.

“Oh fighters, know that you
will be victorious,” he said.
“God promises us either -vic-
tory or martyrdom. God is
greater than they are, God is
greater than their planes, God
is greater than their rockets.”

The military said it had
information that there was a
tunnel beneath Rayan’s home

. for use.asian escape route.

Israel seemed determined to
press ahead with airstrikes on
Hamas houses.

It also has: been targeting
buildings used by the territo-
ry’s Hamas government —
emptied days ago by evacua-
tions — as well’as rocket-
launching sites and smuggling
tunnels along the border with
Egypt.

“We are trying to hit every-
body who is a leader of the
organization, and today we hit
one of their leaders,” Israeli
Vice Premier Haim Ramon
said in a television interview.

More than 400 Gazans had
been killed and some 1,700
wounded © since © Israel
embarked on its aerial cam-
paign, Gaza health officials
said. The United Nations has

said the death toll includes |

more than 60. civilians, 34 of
them children. .

One of them, 11-year-old
Ismail Hamdan, was buried

Thursday after dying of
wounds suffered from»an

airstrike Tuesday that killed

two of his sisters, Haya, 4, and
Lama, 12. His body was

wrapped in a Palestinian flag

and his battered face was still

bandaged as he was carried

above a crowd of mourners.
Since Saturday, three Israeli

civilians and one soldier have.

also died in rocket attacks that
have reached deeper into
Israel than ever before, bring-
ing more than.a tenth of
Israel’s population of 7 million
within rocket range.

The bombing campaign has
worsened an already hard life
for Gaza’s mostly poor popu-
lation of 1.5 million: On Thurs-

day, hundreds of people stood |

in long, snaking lines across
the territory waiting to buy
bread.

‘Israel launched the offen-
sive Saturday after more than
a week of intense Palestinian
rocket fire’ that followed the
expiration of a six-month
truce, which Hamas refused to
extend because Israel kept up
its blockade of Gaza.

So far, the campaign has
been conducted largely from
the air. But a military spokes-
woman, Maj. Avital Leibovich,
said preparations for a ground

operation were complete.
“The infantry, the artillery

and other forces are ready.
They’re around the Gaza
Strip, waiting for any calls to
go inside,” Leibovich said.
Thousands of soldiers wait-

ed along the border, resting.

among tanks, armored per-
sonnel carriers and howitzers.
The ‘troops watched warplanes
and attack helicopters flying
into Gaza, cheering each time
they heard the explosion of an
airstrike.

One soldier, who-can be-

identified under military rules
only as Sgt. Yaniv, said he was
eager to go in. “I am going
crazy here watching all this. I
want to do my part as well,” he
said.

Hamas promised to put up a
fight if Israeli land forces
invaded.

“We are waiting for you to
enter Gaza to kill you or make
you into Schalits,” the group
said, referring to Israeli Sgt.
Gilad Schalit, who was cap-
tured in a cross-border raid by
Hamas-affiliated militants 2
1/2 years ago and remains in
captivity in Gaza.

Israel’s bruising campaign —

has not deterred Hamas from
assaulting Israel. According to
the military, militants fired
more than 30 rockets into
southern Israel during the day.

No injuries were reported,
but an eight-story apartment
building in Ashdod, 23 miles

‘from Gaza, was hit. Panicked

residents ran through a debris-
strewn street.
Earlier this week, Israeli
Prime Minister Ehud Olmert
rebuffed a French proposal for
a two-day suspension of hos-
tilities to allow for the delivery
of. humanitarian supplies.
Israel has been allowing.
trucked relief supplies to enter’
Gaza. Ninety aid trucks

crossed the border Thursday. |

Still, Olmert seemed to be
looking for a diplomatic way
out, telling Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice and other’
world leaders that Israel would
accept a truce only if interna-
tional monitors took respon-.
sibility for enforcing it, gov-
ernment officials said. They
spoke on condition of
anonymity because the talks
were confidential.

A Turkish truce proposal
included a call for such moni-
tors.

Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni,
speaking to reporters during
a visit to Paris for meetings
with . French © officials,

expressed skepticism about the
benefits of a cease-fire. She

said Hamas used the lull dur-
ing the six-month truce that
expired last month to build up
its arsenal of weapons.

“Our experience from the

‘past is that even when we

accept something in order to
have a peaceful period of time,
they abuse it in order to get
stronger and to attack Israel
later on,” Livni said.

Egypt’s foreign minister said
Hamas must ensure that rock-
et fire stops in any truce deal,
and he criticized the Palestin-
an militants for giving Israel

n “opportunity on a golden
platter” to launch the offen-
sive.

Gaza has eon under Hamas

‘rule since the group’s fighters

overran it in June 2007.

The West Bank has
remained under the control of
moderate Palestinian Presi-
dent Mahmoud Abbas, who

‘has been negotiating peace

with Israel for more than a
year but has no influence over
Hamas.

Bringing in truce monitors:
would require cooperation:
between the fiercely antago-
nistic Palestinian factions. °

An Abbas confidant said the |
Palestinian president support-
ed the notion of international.
involvement. “We are asking:
for a cease-fire and an inter-
national presence to monitor
Israel’s commitment to it,”
Nabil Abu Rdeneh said. —

World leaders have not been
deterred by the initial rejec-
tions by Israel and Hamas of
truce efforts, and next week
French President Nicolas
Sarkozy plans'a whirlwind trip
around the region.



PALESTINIAN FIREFIGHTERS work at the scene of an israeli air strike on the hore of s senior Sdanas leader Nizar Paani in nthe Jabealiva refugee camp in the northern ee Strip, Thurs
ay, Jan. 1, 3



PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009



SPORTS |





New faces
abound
as NFL ©
playoffs
start

Hi By DAVE GOLDBERG
AP Football Writer
NEW YORK

Parity. Roger Goodell and
the NFL love it.

That will be evident when the
playoffs start with the wild-card
round this weekend. Five of the
eight participants will be teams
that missed the postseason a
year ago, and one of them, AFC
East champion Miami, actually
finished 1-15.

In the NFC, there is only one
repeater from 2007 among the
six entries: the defending cham-
pion New York Giants, who are
the top-seeded team in the con-

ference and will have the week

off.

Other than New York, which
finished 12-4, the rest of last
year's NFC playoff teams were
a combined 36-44, including
Seattle, which finished 4-12 this
season, and Green Bay, which
was 6-10.

That “left out" group also
includes preseason favorite Dal-
las, whose players consistently
dubbed themselves "the most
talented team in the league,"
but were sent home with an
embarrassing 44-6 drubbing in
Philadelphia last week. |

The games start at 4:30 p.m.
EST Saturday with Atlanta at
Arizona, followed by Indi-
anapolis at San Diego at 8 p.m.
On Sunday, Baltimore is at
Miami at 1 p.m., and Philadel-
phia at Minnesota at 4:30.

In order of appearance:

Atlanta, (11-5) at
Arizona (9-7)

Two teams few people
expected to be here.

The Cardinals, who finished
by losing four of their last six

and allowing an average of |

more than 40 points in those
games, benefited from playing
in the weak NFC West, where
they were 6-0. So they get the
first playoff home game for the
franchise since 1947, when they
won the NFL title as the Ghica-
go Cardinals.

The one advantage Arizona
has is experience at quarter-



back, where 37-year-old Kurt
Warner is a two-time MVP who
has played in two Super Bowls,
winning in 2000 with St. Louis
and losing two years later. -

‘His counterpart is Matt Ryan,
who despite being voted AP
Offensive Rookie of the Year
could have playoff jitters —
although he showed few jitters
of any kind during the regular
season.

The Falcons, 4-12.a year ago,
have some injury concerns.
John Abraham, who had 16?
sacks yet wasn't voted to the
Pro Bowl, sat out the second
half of last week's win over St.
Louis with shoulder, neck and
calf problems that have both-
ered him all season.

But the Falcons already had
clinched a playoff spot and
Abraham says he could have
played.

"We've got a big playoff run
coming up, so I just had to
make sure I was as rested as
possible," he says.

Indianapolis (12-4) at San
Diego (8-8)

Not as one-sided a matchup

‘as it might seem from the
. records.

The Colts won nine straight
after starting 3-4, primarily
because Peyton Manning recov-
ered from the preseason knee
problems that hindered him
well into the regular season.

But San Diego, 4-8 at one
point, won its last four to catch
Denver in the AFC West and is
playing now the way it was
expected to when it began the
season as one of the favorites
in the conference.

The Colts have traditionally
had trouble with the Chargers,
who last season knocked them
out of the playoffs with a 28-24

-win in Indy.

‘The Colts won this year in
San Diego 23-20 on a last-play,
51-yard field goal by Adam
Vinatieri — and that was before
the Chargers were playing well.

"You talk about a team that
people don't want to play, this
has to be one of those teams

_ because they've been playing

great football," San Diego's
LaDainian Tomlinson says o

* Indy. iy A








SAN DIEGO CHARGERS quarterback Philip Rivers (17) talks with teammates as they stretch out during football practice at the Chargers’ facility Thurs-





day, Jan. 1, 2009, in San Diego. The Chargers face the Indianapolis Colts on,Saturday, Jan. 3 in an AFC wild-card playoff football game in San Diego.



S SSS

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS quarterback Philip Rivers looks to pass dur-
ing football practice at the Chargers’ facility Thursday, Jan. 1, 2009,



Denis Poroy/AP Photo

in San Diego. The Chargers will face the Indianapolis Colts in San
Diego on Saturday, January 3 in an AFCIl wild-card playoff football

game.

The problem for the Colts is

that they could say the ‘same
thing about the Chargers.

Baltimore (11-5)
at Miami (11-5)

These are the two AFC teams
that aren't playoff repeaters;
they were a combined 6-26 last
season. In fact, Miami's one win
in 2007 was in overtime over
the Ravens after the usually
reliable Matt Stover missed .a
44-yard field goal attempt that
could have won it for Baltimore
— and possibly sent the Dol-
phins to an 0-16 season.

But Bill Parcells took over
the Dolphins, hired Tony Spara-
no as the coach and was lucky
to get Chad Pennington to play
QB when the Jets released him
after trading for Brett Favre.
Miami also benefited from New

RAK
ron

1S x AIC

England's problems after Tom
Brady's injury and from some
imagination (the "Wildcat"
offense) to win the AFC East.

The Ravens, as usual, are
staunch on defense. They also
got stout performances from
rookie QB Joe Flacco and sec-
ond-year running back Le'Ron
McClain.

That made them an offensive
threat for one of the first times
since they moved to Baltimore
in 1995, and they finished by
winning nine of their last 11.

Like the other visitors, the
Ravens are favored, perhaps
because the Dolphins seem to
be one of those "just glad to be
here" teams. Baltimore.won 27-
13 in Miami in the regular sea-
son and, like Indy, is a wild-card
team that could be a threat to
win it all.

S





S

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS running back Darren Sproles runs with the



- Denis Poroy/AP Photo

ball during football practice at the Chargers’ facility Thursday, Jan. 1,
2009, in San Diego. The Chargers face the Indianapolis Colts on Sat-
urday, Jan. 3 in an AFC wild-card playoff football game in San

Diego.

Philadelphia (9-6-1)
at Minnesota (10-6)

The Eagles, a very up-and-
down team, got in last week by
routing Dallas 44-6 after Tampa
Bay and Chicago lost to give
them a shot. This is a team that
seemed out of it after being tied
by lowly Cincinnati, then get-
ting routed in Baltimore in a

‘game in which Andy Reid

pulled Donovan McNabb at
halftime.

McNabb came back the next
week and the Eagles seemed
rejuvenated. They beat two
division winners, the Giants and
Cardinals, and blew out Dallas,
although they threw in a clunk-
er in the next-to-last week by
losing 10-3 in Washington.

"For people to just put us out
for dead, road kill, for that door

to just open up just one more
time for us, you never want to
give a team another opportuni-
ty," McNabb says, "because
when that team gets in, it could

be that team that you talk about’

that you don't want to play. The
way that we're feeling in this
locker room, we can be that:
team."

The Vikings hope they can
get back Pat Williams, the run-
stopping defensive tackle who
has missed the last two games
with a broken shoulder. Min-
nesota was unimpressive in its
finale, a game it went in know-
ing it needed to win, then bare-
ly getting by a Giants team play-
ing backups. One advantage for
Minnesota: Brad Childress, its
coach, is a former offensive
coordinator for the Eagles, so
he knows Philly well. |

Davydenko and Murray advance in Abu Dhabi

@ ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates
Andy Murray defeated James Blake 6-2, 6-2 Thursday

to set up a semifinal meeting with Roger Federer at the
inaugural Capitala World Tennis Championship, accord-
ing to the Associated Press. ,

In the other first-round match, Nikolay Davydenko
ousted Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-4 and will face Rafael Nadal
in Friday's other semifinal. Nadal and Federer received'
first-round byes in the exhibition event, which is not
part of the ATP Tour but features six of the world's top
10 players and offers a winner-take-all prize of $250,000.

Murray broke Blake in the third game and then took a
5-2 lead after using two forehand winners for another
break. The struggling Blake was then broken twice in a
row in the second set as Murray raced out to.a 4-0 lead to
take control of the match.

‘ Roddick started by hitting three aces in his opening ser-
vice game but was broken in the next after missing a
forehand, which was enough to give Davydenko the set.
Roddick then made two unforced errors in the fourth
game of the second set to give Davydenko another break,
and the Russian held his serve the rest of the way.

Capitala is the first major tennis tournament to be
played at the Zayed Sports City in Abu Dhabi, and: Rod-
dick said he was bothered by the shade covering half
the court for the mid-afternoon match. =

"It was tough playing out of the shadows and made it
difficult to spot the ball," he said. "It was always going to
be difficult coming from six weeks over the break. But






i A

RUSSIA’S Nikolay Davydenko returris the ball to
Andy Roddick from U.S. during the first day of
Capitala World Tennis Championship.





\ JAMES
BLAKE
from the
United
States
returns the

i/AP Photo



regardless of this match, I have worked hard in the off- ball t

season and I am happy." And Ml :
The top-ranked Nadal and No. 2 Federer will both ; i 7.

begin their 2009 ATP season by playing in the Qatar tain.

Open in Doha starting Monday. Murray, the defending
champion, and Roddick are also playing in the tourna-
ment. "




ANDY MURRAY from Britain returns the ball to James Blake from U.S. during the first day of Capitala World
Tennis Championship in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2009.

Say

MHA ‘

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 13







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CI Gibson Rattlers edge out defending
champs Westminster College Diplomats

na possible Hugh Campbell finals preview, the host team, backed
by a thrilling fourth quarter rally, retained their title in the New
Providence Senior Boys Basketball Classic setting the stage for what
is promising to be an entertaining finish to the remainder of the season.

The C.I Gibson Rattlers narrowly edged out the defending BAISS
Champions, Westminster College Diplomats, 87-86 in the tournament
finals Tuesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

The Diplomats took a 64-53 lead into the fourth quarter and the lead
grew to as much as 10 midway though the final period before the
Rattlers staged a comeback effort led by the duo of floor general
Junior Denis and leading Drew Rolle.

Denis began the rally with a deep three pointer from the top of the
key and another jumper from distance a few plays later trimmed the
Diplomats lead to just three points. with 2:03 remaining.

After forcing a turnover.on the defensive end, Denis dished an
assist with a long baseball pass to Drew Rolle who finished with a
reverse lay-up to bring the Rattlers within one.

Rolle took a charge on the ensuing possession to forcer the turnover
and giving the Rattlers their first opportunity at a lead since early in the
second quarter.

Fouled on his way to the basket, Rolle made the second of a pair of
free throws to tie the game at 84. :

The Rattlers stifling defense forced their third turnover in as many
possessions and David St. Ville scored on the other end of the floor to
give C.J. Gibson the lead for good.

Rattlers Head Coach Kevin Johnson lauded his team’s perseverance
despite the fourth quarter deficit. ;

“We just kept fighting and we won the game,” he said.

Contrastingly, Diplomats Head Coach Geno Bullard said his team
faltered in the final period due to poor execution.

“It came down to the stretch,” he said, “but bad decision making cost
us this game.” ~ ,



Cl GIBSON RATTLERS’ Drew Rolle stuffs the ball as Westminister Diplo-
mat’s Geno Bullard attempted a lay-up in the final of the New Provi-
dence Basketball Tournament on Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium. oy

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Lie Ly

WESTMINISTER Diplomat’s Christoper Stuart dribbles past the defense of
Cl Gibson’s Junior Denis in the New Providence Basketball Tournamen-
t’s final on Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.



WESTMINISTER Diplomat’s Christopher Stuart drives through lane for a
lay-up over the Cl Gibson Rattlers on Wednesday night in the New Prov-
idence Basketball Tournament's final.

WESTMINISTER
Diplomat’s Rashad
Morley goes above
his C! Gibson Rat-
tlers’ defender Drew
Rolle in the final of
, the New Providence
Basketball
Tourna,ment on
‘Wednesday night at
the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

—

Ml bliss,









WESTMINISTER Diplomat’s Rashad Morley soars over a Cl Gibson Rat-
tlers player for an attempted dunk during the final of the New Provi-
dence Basketball Classic on Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Nation-
al Gymnasium. ( :





PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009.

TRIBUNE SPORTS







2 SSS Shs : : : o 5 |
HONOREE Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier (centre) shares a moment with low net
winners Scott MacKenzie (left) and Crystal Trudeau (right) at the Nocturne
Third Annual New Year’s Golf Challenge yesterday at the Cable Beach Golf
Course.

GLE cael

RACHELLE Gibson, one of the rising young stars, poses above with hon-
oree Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier at the Nocturne Third Annua;l New Year’s Golf
Challenge yesterday at the Cable Beach Golf Course after she dominated
the individual women’s segment.



zs See nares

THE HUSBAND/WIFE TEAM of James and Paula Cooper (left) are presented with their awards for the second net at








@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT’S not everything that a player gets to
be honored by his peers for his contribution
to the sport that they all enjoy.

Yesterday, Poitier found himself in that
elusive category when he was honored at
the Norturne’s Third Annual New Year’s
Day Golf Challenge at the Cable Beach
Golf Club.

Poitier, who has devoted more than four
decades to the sport of amateur golf, said he
was quite thrilled for the gesture..

“Tt was kind fun because everybody know
everybody in golf and so I was happy to
see that many of my friends showed up to
participate,” he stated. “It was nice.”

Having started back in the 1960s, the

- modest 72-year-old Poitier said it’s some-

thing that he enjoyed doing and would not
have traded it in for anything else in the
world: eshat

From the 1970s, Poitier has represented
the Bahamas on the national team, many of
them with his long-time friend Prince ‘Zor-
ro’ Stubbs.

Poitier’s fondest memory came in
Jamaica when the Bahamas won the
Caribbean Amateur Golf Championship
(CAGC). During the championships, he

’ sunk a 100-foot putt to beat out the entire

field of golfers.

“During the ceremonies, the first word
said was ‘where was the gentleman that
sunk the 100 putt. Could you get up and
raise your hand,’” Poitier recalled. °

As he stood up, Poitier said all of the

. golfers and spectators applauded. him, a

feat that he intend to cherish for the rest of
his life.

Locally, Poitier said if there was any tour-
nament that stood out, it would have been
the Pro-Am in Grand Bahama where he
teamed up with pro Jimmy Delancy.

“We won the Pro-Am and I won a whole
lot of trophies and a lot of crystals,” he
recalled. “I said we are going to need anoth-
er plane to carry all these back to Nassau.
So it was fun.”









HONOREE Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier shares the first piece of cake with tournament director Shawn

Thomas yesterday at the Nocturne Third Annual New Year’s Golf Challenge at the Cable Beach Golf

_ Course. j

fo

While Delancy would haye been his best
pro partner, Poitier said he and Stubbs were
undoubtedly the best amateur connection
ever, having won many international tour-
naments together.

“We controlled the Caribbean,” said
Poitier of the days back then when they
played more as partners than they do today
as individuals. “Everybody was afraid of
us, all of the Caribbean countries.”

Puerto Rico, according to Poitier, was by
far the toughest country that he and Stubbs
would have faced. But like everybody else,
Poitier said they found a way to prevail. .

As he look ahead to the future, Poitier
said he’s definitely looking forward to
“sharpen my game because | want to rep-
resent the Bahamas again.”

In the absence of Stubbs, who didn’t play
in the tournament, Poitier teamed up-with’
another veteran George Turnquest. They ;
shot a 65 gross, but finished-with a 60.45

average and a 77 gross. The gross winners
were Eustan Forbes and Richard Gibson Jr.

Bahamas Golf Federation president
Glenn Archer said Norturne could not have
selected a better person to honour.

“Coins is an ordinary, local fellow among
us, who is well respected,” he stated.
“Everybody know him to be a man who
speaks from his-heart, a‘man of integrity.
We're glad to be associated with him.

“I had the good fortune of playing in the
group with him this morning (yesterday)
and we play together whenever we can
every week. - Mk “i

“But he’s a good example of what golf
can do for you in this country.” A

Having worked at just about: all of the
golf properties in the country, Archer said
Poitier has left a legacy behind and although
he’s retired, everybody still hold him upin -
high esteem. E ;

Archer said the federation just hope that

the Nocturne Third Annu

average for the fourth net position.
The first net finishers were Scott
MacKenzie and Crystal Trudeau with a 57.8



wo

al New

Year’s Golf Challenge at the Cable Beach Golf Course from tournament director Shawn Thomas and honoree Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier.



RICHARD
Gibson Jr. (left)
receives one of
his prizes from
tournament |
director Shawn
Thomas and
honoree Har-
court ‘Coins’
Poitier yesterday
at the Norturne
Third Annual
New Year's Golf
Challenge at the
Cable Beach Golf
Course.

they can see more Bahamians making their
contributions as golfing professionals at the
various sites that exist today.

: = eld = fl i
FROM page 15

ing their return to local competition, were awarded a pair of chip-
ping nets for their performances. They shot a 66 gross.

The third net winners were the veteran team of George Turn-
quest and Poitier, who Shot a 59.35 average with a 65 gross.

Rounding out the net scores were Anthony Hinzey and George
Swann with 60.5 and a 64 gross for fourth; Glenn Archer and Rory
Higgs with 60.5 as well to go along with their 71 gross for fifth and
Rodwell Knowles and the Rev. Ian Brathwaite in sixth place.

' Winning the gross category was the combo of Eustan Forbes and
Richard Gibson Jr. They combined for a 62, shooting an impressive
28 on the back nine .

Gibson Jr., 16, said they played exceptionally well. .

“We started off with two birdies before they fell apart on the front
nine,” said Gibson Jr. of their 34. “But in the back nine, we hit four
birdies in a row, then par and three more birdies in a row.”

Playing together for the first time as well, Gibson Jr. said his part-
ner was very consistent with his driver and that enabled him to go
after the greens. Forbes took it a bit further, noting that “we were
firing on all cylinders today and it worked out very well for us. It was
a pretty good combination. We
are winners.”

But Forbes said they really
wanted to win the tournament
because it was being held on hon-
or of Poitier, whom he consider:
to be a very good friend. ,





«_..the feeling of
the tournament
and sincerity and

enthusiasm “We were very honored to mn
this tournament today,” he stated.

demonstrated _ Brother and sister Richard Jr
today was really and Rachelle Gibson dominated
3 _ the individual categories as they
amazing. carted home the longest drives. :

While George Turnquest took the
men’s shortest to the pin, Gibson
won the women’s title.

And in a putting contest, she
beat out Michael Hall for the title as well. It came down to a
shoot-out as Gibson sunk her first shot to seal the deal.

“J just went up there and putt the ball and try to make it,” said
Gibson, a 16-year-old 11th grader at Jordan Prince William. “I
knew that if I didn’t win it:on that shot, I had five more shots to do
it.”

Tournament organizer Shawn Thomas said everything went
very well. “I learn to really work with feeling and the feeling of the
tournament and the sincerity and enthusiasm demonstrated today
was really amazing,” she said.

“I came here shortly after 7 o’clock and I made golfers out here
already. We had fresh boiled fish, fresh grouper and stew fish for
breakfast, but there was a lot of love being expressed by the
juniors, the seniors, the men and the women.”

Thomas said she couldn’t ask for a better way to start the new
year off and she expressed her thanks to sponsors Continental
Connection, Castle Pines, Port St. Lucie, PGA Village, John Bull,
Executive Motors, FML Group of Companies, JS Johnson, First
Choice Property Maintenance & Management, KFC, Deliotte,
Express It, Bahamas Fast Ferries, Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion, Civil Society Bahamas, R&E Imports and the Wyndham
Nassau Resort. Tournament director Chris Lewis said the tour-
nament was a success, considering all that was going on.

“For the numbers that we had today, it was still pretty good,” he
said. “The tournament was based for a pretty good charity for '
those sticken with iads, so it was good to start the year off showing
a lot of love and care for the needy.”

Shawn Thomas



JANUARY 2, 2009






WB Pair post the
lowest net score
of 57.8 average
at the Cable
Beach Golf Club

’ g By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net -

COTT MacKenzie

and Crystal Trudeau

played together for

the first. time, but
they were as solid as their court-:
ing relationship yesterday at the
Nocturne’s third annual New
Year’s Golf Challenge.

The duo surprised themselves
when they emerged as the over-
all champions, posting the low-
est net score of 57.8 average at
the Cable Beach Golf Club.

The tournament, held in hon-
our of veteran national team
player Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poiti-
-er, raised funds to assist the
Samaritan Ministries.

By virtue of edging out the
husband/wife team of James
and Paula Cooper, who shot a





PHOTO: Felipé Major/T ribune staff

Cl GIBSON School’s player Drew Rolle lays the ball up over Westminster’ s
Rashad Be at the Kendal Isaac Gym on Wednesday.
, SEE STORY AND: MORE PICTURES ON PAGE 8

INSIDE ¢ Andy Murray advances

ee

WINNERS of inks net category in the hocking ain Annual New Year’s Gol
Challenge — Scott MacKenzie and Crystal Trudeau — accept their awards
from tournament director Shawn Thomas and honoree Harcourt ‘Coins’

Poitier.

59.35, MacKenzie and Trudeau
were presented with a package

.for-a three days/two nights stay

at the Castle Pines PGA Vil-
lage in Port St. Lucie via round
trip tickets on Continental Air-
lines.

For MacKenzie, a-construc-
tion worker who has played in a

number of ‘charity events with.

the Poop Deck, said he and

Trudeau have a wonderful rela-

tionship off the green, so they
wanted to see how well they
would do off the tee.

“We wanted to shoot a lot of

‘pars, but I had no idea that this

was going to happen,” MacKen-
zie stated. “We played against.a
lot of better teams out there.”
They only shot.a-77 gross,
which was a clear indication of
their handicaps. ~
But Trudeau admitted that

‘plying in her first tournament

ever, they “played well” and
she’s definitely going to become :
an ardent golfer.

MacKenzie said it was like

putting “ham and egg” together +



NOCTURNE’S THIRD ANNUAL NEW YEAR’S GOLF CHALLENGE

Mackenzie, Trudeau
— 4 Winning duo!



HONOREE Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier
putts at the Nocturne Third Annual
New Year's Golf Challenge yester-
day.
so expect to see them back on
the course in the future.

As the second net winners,
the Coopers, who are also mak-

SEE page 14

Clue #8

One of the objects in the
Secret Sound has been blamed
for numerous deaths.




A True Sports Champion is Gone, but his work to develop
Sports in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas lives on.

ondolences are extended

to the Family of the
Late Phil “Smoker” Smith

ZNS Sports Director

From the Management
and Staff of the
Broadcasting Corporation

of the Bahamas

a Se rie ea
4 ri
Gi ne

Dane





PAGE 16, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



é : - INTERNATIONAL NEWS |

Cuba celebrates the 50th
anniversary of revolution

@ HAVANA

FIFTY YEARS after tri-
umphant armed rebels descend-
ed from the eastern mountains,
communist Cuba celebrated the
revolution’s anniversary Thurs-
day with toned-down festivities
after a trio of devastating hurri-

canes and under the enduring
public absence of an ailing Fidel
Castro, according to Associated
Press.

The austere celebrations,
including dances and concerts
across the island, belied the start
of a year infused with possibili-
ties for increased cash and visi-

tors, and other changes that
might ease Cubans’ daily hard-
ships. Many here hope for
improved relations with the

- United States when President-

elect Barack Obama takes office
Jan. 20 following declarations
he would talk directly with Raul
Castro .and lift. severe restric-

Mashed Potatoes Can Be

changed For Family Fries.

_ No Other Substitutions.



tions on family travel and remit-
tances to the island.

“T hope he gets rid of the
blockade,” 42-year-old Ana
Luisa Mas said as she bought a
pork leg for her family’s. New

Year’s Eve celebration, refer- .

ring to decades-old U.S. trade
sanctions.

“We are.very hopeful that
with Obama our relatives will

“be able to visit us more, and

send us more money,” she said,
maneuvering through hundreds
of shoppers packed inside the
enclosed Cuatro Caminos farm-
ers market, rushing to buy black
beans and rice, salad greens and

other New Year’s Eve dinner

standbys.

“We also hope that Fidel will
stay with us a little bit tone, -
Mas added.

President Raul Castro, who
succeeded ‘his older brother in
February, planned to speak
Thursday night from the same
balcony where Fidel declared
victory over dictator Fulgencio
Batista’s government on Jan. 1,
1959.

No foreign leaders, were

expected at the evening speech -

on a small, leafy plaza, with little
fanfare beyond invitations to
3,000 Communist Party faithful.
Outside the seaside U’S. Inter-
ests Section in Havana, the pop-
ular group Los Van Van were
performing.

Fidel Castro’s health is a state
secret and he remains out of
sight after undergoing major
intestinal surgery almost 2 1/2
years ago. But the 82-year-old
continues to write occasional
essays that suggest he still has
some say in government affairs.

Shortly before midnight
Wednesday, a brief statement
by Castro was read on state tele-
vision, congratulating “our hero-
ic people” on the eve of the
anniversary. .

The 77-year-old Raul Castro
appears to be in firm control of
the government, but has yet to
introduce any major reforms
and few expect transcendent
change while his brother is alive.

Officials initially planned a

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A WOMAN walks down a street with graffitis written on it that read in Span-
ish "Long live Raul" and "Long live Fidel” in reference to Cuba's President
Raul Castro and Fidel Castro in Havana, Monday, Dec. 29, 2008.

more grandiose anniversary cel-
ebration but scaled back after
three hurricanes this year caused
$10 billion in damages and

wiped out nearly a third of -

Cuba’s crops. Raul Castro last
week called for more cost-cut-
ting-measures as the island post-
ed an annual economic growth
of 4.3 percent for the year, bare-
ly half the original government
forecast.

Over a half-century, the tri-
umphant rebels erased illiteracy,
crafted a universal health care
system, and built thousands of
new schools. But after Fidel
Castro embraced communism
in 1961, labor unions lost the
right to strike, the Catholic
Church was harassed, and oppo-
nents of the new povernment
were jailed.

Prisoners

The Havana-based non-gov-
ernmental Cuban Commission
for Human Rights and Recon-
ciliation last counted 219 politi-
cal prisoners on the island, down
from as many as 15,000 in 1964.

Cuba’s revolution was never-
theless long admired through-
out the Third World as Castro
stood up defiantly to the “Yan-
kee imperialists,” and infant
mortality rates began rivaling

-those of developing countries.

Cuban writer Roberto Fer-
nandez Retamar said the revo-
lutionary movement remains
relevant as several regional gov-
ernments embrace milder ver-
sions of the socialist principles
long promoted by the island’s
government. Venezuela, Bolivia

and Ecuador are especially.

strong leftist allies.
“T think that the hopeful

_ moment we have been seeing in

Latin America in recent years

_ has something to do with the

Cuban revolution’s existence,”
said Retamar.

Across the decades, Cuba’s
communist system has hung on,
even after the Iron Curtain col-
lapsed and communist China
‘and Vietnam embraced free
markets while still maintaining
their political systems.

When President George W.
Bush leaves office later this
month, the revolution will have
outlasted 10 American presi:
dents who maintained strict U.S:
sanctions aimed at overthrow-
ing the Cuban leadership.

Outgoing Commerce Secre-
tary Carlos Gutierrez, a Cuban-
American who used his Bush
administration post to promote
hard line‘ policies against the
Castro government, this week
argued against any easing of
sanctions.

“To suggest unconditional
dialogue with the Castro broth-
ers would only signal that the
conditions in Cuba are accept-
able,” Gutierrez wrote in The
Washington Times. “If the Unit-
ed States does. not continue to
stand for the ideals of freedom
and human rights and against
the many guises of tyranny and
oppression, who will?”

But many others think it is
time for a major change in U.S.
policies toward the island, and
that rapprochement could
help force.an opening on the
island.

-: “Confrontation plays up
Havana’ s strong suit,” Marifeli

_ Perez-Stable of the Inter-Amer-

ican.Dialogue, a Washington
think tank, wrote in December.
“Engagement may show how
weak (Cuba’s) hand really is.
Which one is the real hard
line?”

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ceed ee
FRIDAY,

JANUARY 2,



2009

seek Homes forecasting

25% home construction drop

Expects to build 75% of the homes in 2009 that it did in 2008 |

[Bf Adjusts business model from 'build it and they will come' to ‘build it
after deposit is paid’ |

Former Coke warehouse's iparacie to RoyalStar head office is placed

on ‘hold

| By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Arawak Homes is forecast-
ing that it will construct 25 per
cent fewer homes in 2009 than it
did last year, and is adjusting
its business model to cope with
the sluggish construction and
mortgage markets.

Franklyn Wilson,
Bahamian home construc-
tion/developer’s chairman, told
Tribune Business: “The fact of
the matter is we would be lucky

‘ to build, in 2009, 75 per cent of
the homes we built in 2008.”

While declining to reveal how
many homes Arawak Homes
typically constructs in a normal
year, and how many it built in
2008, Mr Wilson’s comments
further underline the fragile

the.



construction and mortgage mar-
ket, not to mention the overall
Bahamian economy.

He also told Tribune Busi-
ness that Arawak Homes had
adapted its business model from
one of ‘build it and they will
come’ to one of ‘we will build

State of the Bahamian home

Govt: eee fiscal ratios
Ww



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government does not
expect its key fiscal ratios will
reach “any dangerous level” as
a result of the global economic
downturn, a senior minister has
told Tribune Business, thanks
largely to the room offered by a
36 per cent debt-to-GDP ratio.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
‘state for finance, said that while
the Government wanted to
keep this ratio and the various
fiscal deficit measurements “at
sustainable levels”, it expected
them to “creep up” > due toa

SEE page 2B

Zhivargo Laing

edna

Government urged
to implement 6.5-
15% flat import tax

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government has been urged to introduce a flat rate import
tax of between 6.5-15 per cent as a way:to simplify the existing duty
system and eliminate the rampant tax evasion that costs the
Bahamian government millions of dollars in revenue per year.

A businessman, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of
anonymity, said alternative tax systems — such as Value-Added Tax
_ (VAT) or a sales tax — that had been touted as ‘fixes’ for the exist-

ing import duties system were “doomed to failure”. What was
required instead, he argued, was enhanced management of the
existing tax structure.

The same businessman, who previously disclosed to Tribune
Business how a huge tax evasion industry had grown up around the
practice of submitting invoices from foreign suppliers that grossly
undervalued imported shipments coming into the Bahamas,
enabling local firms to avoid paying substantial stamp and import
duties to the Public Treasury, said: “Perhaps one of the big stum-
bling blocks to the duty system has been the vast, complicated
variety of duty levees.

“This enables people to cheat the system also- rearranging

‘invoices or descriptions so that lower duties are charged. The
Bahamas does not have any significant natural resources other
than our beaches and water, so why the immense variety of duties?
One consideration should be the introduction of a flat import tax
of 6.5% -15 per cent.
- “Furthermore, a complex, prehistoric system of import duties jus-
tifies a larger government. The larger the government, the more jobs
are controlled by that government and the more the people depend
on the government. This will be unsustainable: when government
outgrows the private sector in size and scope; taxes will not sustain
those hundreds of government jobs.”

The businessman added: “Simplicity is the best policy. A smarter
. government is not a larger government. A larger government
requires greater taxes. This would be the case with a sales tax or
‘VAT system. This only benefits the larger companies (VAT) as well
as the government. Which department or ministry will be respon-
sible for ensuring that all businesses are paying their sales taxes ful-

ly, correctly, and on time? This will require further expenditure both —

in government and the private sector, as well as requiring the

SEE page3B is

only once clients have paid us:

the necessary deposit’.

“We are being far less aggres- —

sive in building homes on.a
‘spec’ basis,” Mr Wilson said.
“We build on the basis of peo-
ple coming in and paying a
deposit.” In other words,
Arawak Homes is no longer
starting*home construction on
the assumption a buyer will turn
up once the property is 50-75
per cent complete, but instead
seeking pre-construction com-
mitments from purchasers in
the form of deposits.

The change has everything to
do with the depressed global
and Bahamian economy, and
its impact on potential home
‘buyers. Arawak Homes typi-

cally targets the middle and low-:

er income market, and these are
the segments that have been hit



@ By NEIL HARTNELL -

cause businesses to fail.

Tribune Business Editor

A former Grand Bahama Chamber of.
Commerce president has described as “total
garbage” proposals to create a ‘redundancy
fund’ to compensate laid-off workers, telling
Tribune Business it invited employees to

Chris Lowe, manager at Kelly’s (Freeport),
in response to the suggestion. by Trades
Union Congress (TUC) president Obie Fer-
guson, said it appeared the union leader was
confusing the issue of severance pay —
already covered in the Employment Act —
with the need to mandate that foreign
investors lodge performance bonds.

“It’s absolute garbage for so many rea-
sons,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Business.
“There are so many valid reasons not to

hardest to date.

Bahamian home buyers have
been hit from two sides.
Demand for new homes — and
homes in general — plus mort-
gages has been heavily damp-
ened by rising unemployment

levels, reduced salaries and

wages, and increased job secu-
rity fears.

That uncertainty has led.
many Bahamians to defer or

cancel plans for property pur-
chases, while obtaining mort-
gage financing has also become
more difficult due to the tighter

credit requirements stipulated. :

by commercial banks. Buyers,
especially those in the hotel and
tourism industries, who once
easily qualified for a mortgage

SEE page 2B

S
ce “

‘Mi ByNEILHARTNELL’

Tribune Business Editor

Work by Bahamian profes-
sionals costing “millions in fees”

‘has been “thrown away” by the
protracted wrangling over the |
Bay Street Straw Market, with

no explanation yet forthcoming
as to why under the former PLP

administration the project

expanded three-fold in size and
costs.

Jean-Michael Clarke, presi-
dent and managing director of
VERITAS Consultants, the

’ project managers/quantity sur-’

veyors appointed by. the
Christie government to oversee
the Straw Market project, said

in a paper sent to Tribune Busi-"
ness that the proposed building °

“somehow” expanded from an’.
‘initial 77,000 tyare oe “at.

preliminary design” to “close

to” 200,000 square feet at the.

time the project was sent out to
contractors for bid.

SEE page 5B







-* Bay Street market

project expanded in
size and cost three-.
fold under former
sovernment

-* Building went

from 77,000 to

200,000sq ft, and

costs from $10m to
$31m

* Former project
manager says Straw.
Vendors should be -
involved financially



Oyama)

have previously urged that the Government
mandate that foreign investors lodge’ per-
formance bonds which, in the event that they
suddenly depart this nation, can be used to
meet unpaid bills to creditors and pay
employees what they are owed. | :
Mr Ferguson, in his comments before
Christmas, urged that all Bahamas-based

SEE page 3B



have one [a redundancy
fund]; but I can agreed
that a performance bond
for foreign investors-is
required, especially given
the calibre of some’
investors our government
seems to attract.”
Bahamian business
executives. and unionists





















FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED |





PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



To EE eee
Arawak Homes forecasting

25% home construction drop

FROM page 1B

may no longer be able to do so,
especially if their incomes have
reduced.

Describing the overall eco-
nomic climate as “brutal”, Mr
Wilson told Tribune Business
on the prospects for 2009: “I
wish I could be positive. It’s a
question of picking a word that
says ‘bad’. This is not a very
good environment for the hous-
ing business, period. I just can’t
find any good news. Every-
where you look it’s bad news.”

Arawak Homes is part of the
Sunshine Holdings group, which
includes Sunshine Finance, its
mortgage lending and financial
arm; Sunshine Insurance, its
insurance agency and. broker-
age; Sun Shipping, a shipping
firm; and a position as the
largest institutional investor in
BISX-listed Freeport Oil Hold-
ings (FOCOL), with a 22.6 per
cent stake.

A sister company, Sunenine
Partners, holds a substantial
stake in insurance company
RoyalStar Assurance, and is.the
largest investor in Eleuthera
Properties, the holding compa-
ny for the Cotton Bay resort
development.

Yet, in common with many
foreign and Bahamian-related
investment projects, Sunshine
Holdings and its affiliates have
been forced by the economic
downturn and its attendant
uncertainty to place planned
developments on hold.

Such a fate has befallen the
upgrade. of the former
Caribbean Bottling Company
warehouse on JFK Drive, which
Sunshine Holdings purchased
from BISX-listed Premier Real

Estate Investment Corporation. .

The plan had been to invest $5
million in the property’s acqui-
sition and upgrade, but Mr Wil-
son confirmed the latter part of
that strategy was on hold.

He told Tribune Business:

“We're sitting on it for a while.

That’s on hold until we see
where we’re going. The plan
remains the same; it’s a ques-
tion of when we implement it.”

The former JFK Drive ware-
house had been used by the
Bahamian Coca-Cola franchise
until it was acquired by new
owners, who terminated the
lease on the property. Sunshine
Holdings had planned to trans-
form it into RoyalStar Assur-
ance’s new corporate head-
quarters, and also a branch
office for the Sunshine Insur-

Do you want your child to have
NIM slash ests
K4 to Grade 4 8am-3pm

Sires

ance and Arawak Homes opet-
ations now located at Blue Hill
Road.

Meanwhile, Mr Wilson said
a major issue facing all Bahami-
an companies, not just his own,
was the ability, of clients and
consumers to pay the monies
they owed on a timely basis.
Many clients were in a position
where they could not pay, or
did not want to.

“Every business today has
seen a huge rise in collectables
[accounts receivables],” Mr Wil-
son explained.

“The auditors in this town

must be having nightmares,

because of all the provisions for
bad debts.

“That will determine how the
profits are.

“We cannot immune our-
selves from the environment in
which we find ourselves, and
the fact of the matter is that
people are increasingly — and
unfortunately — unable to meet
their obligations in a timely
manner.” |

Going forward, Mr Wilson
urged Bahamians to develop
“sreater national consensus” on
how development should take
place in this nation, and also
equip themselves with greater
“discipline” — not just when it

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came to managing their mon-
ey. Advocating that countries
and their citizens needed to
“prepare for bad” when the
economic times were good, Mr
Wilson argued that economic

‘development in the Bahamas

had been impeded by the 2007
general election campaign, and
the subsequent fallout from the
FNM-led debate over whether
the country was “ giving away
too much land” to outside
developers.

“When this thing turns
around, it’s in our country’s best
interests to develop greater
national consensus on what we
regard as development,” Mr
Wilson said. “This is not new.

“We are not selling land at a

rate where Bahamians are dis-
enfranchised from their land. It
would be helpful for the country
to create greater consensus on
what constitutes development.”

The current economic uncer-
tainty, Mr Wilson added, was
“raising a very major question
for us. A major issue for us is
the matter of discipline”.

He added that “for years and
years and years, different finan-
cial advisers have been making
statements about saving more.
Where’s the evidence ‘anyone
listened?”

With 90.4 per ‘cent of
Bahamian bank accounts hold-
ing $10,000 or less, and account-
ing for just 7.3 per cent of total
deposits, the evidence suggests
that ‘far too few Bahamians
have established a savings safe-
ty net to enable them to ride
out times like these.

“Beyond developing a greater
consensus on what constitutes
development, this other issue is
greater and wider discipline,”
Mr Wilson said.

“Financially is just one of the
ways this lack of discipline man-
ifests itself.”

Govt: Key fiscal

ratios will miss
‘danger levels’

FROM page 1B |

combination of reduced rev-
enues and increased spending
on social assistance pro-
grammes.

However, given that 'the
Bahamas’ nation debt-GDP
ratio stood at 36 per cent at the
time the 2008-2009 Budget was
unveiled, Mr Laing said the
Government “had a gap” it
could exploit to minimize the
downturn’s impact before the
likes of international credit rat-
ing agencies and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
started to express concern.

The 38-40 per cent debt-to-
GDP ratio bracket was largely
regarded as a approaching a lev-
el where warning signs were
required. “We are right now
using that gap,” Mr Laing told
Tribune Business.

“When you have fiscal space,
you can use that space in times
like this and not get pounced
into trouble.

“We have some room to
manovere, and we are seeking
where. necessary to use that
room.

“T think, in the circumstances,
that there will be some creep
up in the GDP-to-debt ratios
and the fiscal deficit.

“We have anticipated any
number of scenarios, from the
best case to the worst case, and
one does not know entirely

_ where circumstances will take

us, but right now we don’t
expect to get to any dangerous
level on the debt-to-GDP
ratio.”

The Bahamas’ rolative fiscal
prudence, in comparison to
Caribbean rivals:such. as Bar-
bados and Jamaica, the latter
having more than three times’
the national debt regarded as
safe by the IMF, had safe-

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guarded this nation’s ability to
borrow at competitive interest
rates and “carry itself through”.

While the Bahamas, with a
36 per cent debt-to-GDP ratio,
had “two percentage points of
space”, Mr Laing pointed to the
problems of its Caribbean

. peers, who had no ability to

increase spending on social pro-
grammes or readily borrow as
needed.

Although declining to specify
how long the Bahamian public
finances could withstand the
current economic turbulence,
and run higher-than-ideal fiscal
deficits and a rising national
debt, Mr Laing implied that
heavy reliance was being placed
on the stimulus packages intro-
duced by the US and other
developed countries to turn
matters around.

4
Tumaround

“No country, including the
Bahamas, is interested in having
the current circumstances last
beyond 18 months,” Mr Laing
said. “That would be very diffi-
cult for any ecomomy and any
fiscal regime. We hope to have
a turnaround sooner rather than
later.

“From our point of view, we
are hoping for a turnaround
sooner rather than later because .
no. economy would want to
endure this for the medium-
term.”

In its latest report on the
Bahamas’ sovereign credit rat-
ing, Standard & Poor’s (S&P),
the Wall Street credit rating
agency, backed up Bahamians
who had argued that the Gov-
ernment was relying on
increased GDP levels and ris-
ing revenues to keep the key
fiscal ratios in check.

For 2007, Bahamian GDP is
estimated to have risen to about
$6.7 billion, and critics of the
Government’s fiscal stance,
such as the Nassau Institute’s
Rick Lowe, have argued that
successive administration have
failed’ to‘reduce the size of gov- -
ernment — which is getting ever-
bigger — and rein in public
spending.

However, responding to
claims that government was get-
ting ever-bigger in the
Bahamas, Mr Laing told Tri-
bune Business: “Quite frankly,
that’s an illusion that’s pointed
out. When you look at the size
of government to GDP, that’s
not changed over the years.
That’s what’s important........

“T don’t regard that as an
issue. Our greatest need, in so. :
far as government is concerned,
is to improve the efficiency and
effectiveness of government,
causing the services rendered
to people to be done in a man-
ner where the people receiving
those services are satisfied, and
significantly satisfied.

“That is the important inten-
tion. ’m talking about taking
that investment in public ser-
vice salaries and emoluments
into the kind of experience that
both domestic and internation-
al clients regard as top notch.
We are working on that.”

Mr Laing said there were no
plans to reduce public spend-
ing in this Budget year unless
extreme circumstances war-
ranted it, given that this was the
Government’s most important
“counter-cyclical tool”. The
only instructions given to gov-
ernment ministries and agen-
cies, and their accountants, was
to crack down on fraud and
wastage.

‘The minister added that while
the Government’s efforts to
enhance revenue collection had
already borne fruit, the effects
were unlikely to be seen this fis-
cal year due to the likely drop in
overall collections caused by the
economic downturn.





Ph thle

oP wwe Ny se ewe

a



Redundancy fund
idea 'total garbage’

FROM < page 1B

employers be required to pay an undefined amount into this
redundancy fund, arguing that it would provide much-needed
relief for employees of companies that had suddenly ceased
operations or departed from this nation — the likes of Pioneer
Shipping, Driftwood and Gladstone Farms.

However, Mr Lowe immediately questioned who would con-
tribute to such a ‘redundancy fund’, the amount they would con-
tribute and the frequency of contributions, and how much
employees who were made redundant would receive.

“First off, on what basis will contributions to the fund be
made, and what will be the yield per employee should the busi-
ness fail?” Mr Lowe asked. “I could almost guarantee a lot of
businesses will become redundant and fold-up.

“It’s amassing a pot of money, and no one can touch it unless
the business goes under, which will encourage some people to
ensure their employer does go under. It would be an incredible
incentive for employees to cause a business to fail for a short-
term windfall.”

The former Grand Bahama Chamber president added: “Who
would manage it? Under what criteria would it be dispersed? Is
this something our great government would manage benevo-
lently? That’s go the way NIB is managed.

“There’s nothing right about it. It’s appropriation of other peo-
ple’s property. It’s another form of taxation.”

Given that Bahamian companies were already mandated to
make statutory severance payments to laid-off employees, Mr
Lowe said a ‘redundancy fund’ would add another “phenome-
nal cost” to the costs of doing business.

“Would the unions be required to have one if they go bust?”
Mr Lowe asked. “I think it’s a wonderful idea for the unions to
have one for their members if they go bust, but not the private
sector. It would be detrimental.”

Giner coca mca ts Airport
Saturday, 20 December 2008

REWARD OFFERED

424-0783/356-2068
Bracelet has a very personal history
and sentimental value to the owner

NOTICE |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000



In Voluntary Liquidat
ie

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
JAFRA INVESTMENTS LIMITED, is in dissolution. Conti-
nental Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before 30th day of January,
2009.

Vor: Contusatai Liqulatoss, Ine. ;
Liquidator









‘wt Harvard Business School
/ Caribbean Business Club .
ay’ Member of Student Clubs of HBS, Inc.







Harvard Business School and

Hotels may have been

'too hasty' on lay-offs

@ By. CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter
Many laid-off hotel industry

workers were called back to
work by their former employers

‘over the New Year period to

meet the demand from high
occupancies, with a leading
union official suggesting some

properties may have laid-off:

staff too soon.

Leo Douglas, the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union secretary-gen-
eral, told Tribune Business that
Atlantis had called in at least
30 laid-off employees to accom-
modate guests.

In some cases, Mr Douglas
said existing staff in certain
departments had _ been
swamped, with several staff
members having to work over-
time or double shifts.

“So they had to call in per-
sons, which is a good thing,” he
said.

Some persons who visited the
Atlantis resort over the Christ-
mas weekend said that the
property was so crowded that
it was difficult to get dinner
reservations, a far cry from a
few weeks before when the
property. was virtually empty,
with occupancies well below 50
per cent.

Mr Douglas said he felt that,
in some cases, the hotels may
have acted too quickly in let-
ting some people go, rather than
waiting until the holiday season
- always a busy time -had
passed. “ft 2

“T think it was like when the
gas prices were so high and peo-
ple reacted. I think that the

‘hotels may have acted too
quickly, and what they are find-’
_ing is that some departments

need more staff. Now that

things are busy, they do not,

have the numbers that they
need,” he explained.

Mr Douglas added that he
would like to see a system in

Govt urged to implement
6.5-15% flat import tax

FROM page 1B

establishment of yet more gov-
ernment jobs, probably to
become yet another inefficient
department.

“The potential revenue is
there for the Government in the

form of import duties. A sim-.

ple database management
scheme would enable the Gov-
ernment to harness the poten-
tial, reap what is rightfully theirs
and direct investment where it
should Be - in public services,

healthcare, education - rather

than in back-office administra-
tion jobs where papers are
passed from one desk to anoth-
er to be repeatedly stamped by
government personnel.”
ion



The businessman, though,

questioned whether the Gov- .

ernment had the political will
to make meaningful tax reforms
and clamp down on the amount
of evasion currently taking
place through the submission
of falsified, undervalued invoic-
es.
“The entire system we have
built over the last 30 years
depends on the very illegal

scams I have outlined here,” the ,

businessman told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I see only a shrug of the
shoulders and a passing “That’s

Wharton
+ Caribbean Business Initiative Club
Member of Whartan Graduate Assoc.

The Wharton School of University of Pennsylvania _





how you do business in the .

Bahamas, so stop whining’.

“Tourism is directly related.

to this issue in that the Bahamas
is one of the most expensive per
day vacations in the Caribbean.
It all comes back to the high
taxation through our system,
which causes the hotel opera-
tions. to be much more costly
than their other Caribbean
counterparts. It is not just the
plane and hotel fare that a visi-
tor factors into their travel
plans. ..

“With the global economic -

situation getting worse by the
day, we had better come up
with a way to compete with the

likes of Mexico, Las Vegas and’
soon to be an open Cuba, that
2 AgiG : te :

= toxth t
- Bahamas vacati



gladly vist d

Nassau Airport

Development Company: (oS 8 SF oe Fey

place where the first persons
fired can be rehired in events
like these.

Looking onward to 2009, Mr
Douglas said he is confident
that this year will bring good
news to the hotel industry.

“I am an optimistic person,




















Nassau Airport

Development Company

2009.

‘

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce
the C-260 Elevators and Escalators Request For Proposals
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling International
Airport, The scope of work includes but is not limited to:

* Design and fabrication of the Elevators and Escalators

conforming to the requirements of the RFP;

* Supply and installation of elevators and escalators,

* Control'and monitoring systems; and
Interface with building systems for security, fire, and various
agency requirements.

This request for proposal is of interest to Elevators and Escalators
Vendors, however should also interest local Electrical and
Mechanical Trade Contactors.

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up after
4:00 pm, on Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Request for Proposal closing is at 3:00 p.m., Thursday, February
5th, 2009.

There will be a Tender Briefing, Tuesday January 13th. Please
RSVP Traci Brisby by pm Monday, January 12th for briefing
location details.

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel Stage 1 Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden’ Pindling
International Airport. The C-220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components:

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Steel Joist; and °

“Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
installations of steel decking. Hs
Tender Packages’ ‘can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on

Thursday, December. 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
Brisby for more informati

‘Tender closing igat 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,
There willbe a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 8th.

Please RSVP Traci Brisby by 1pm January 7th for
briefing location details.

and I believe that things will get
better, especially once the pres-
ident-elect Barack Obama is
sworn in and things begin to
improve in the United States.
Then the Bahamas will begin
to see things improve and visitor
levels come back up,” he said.






















































PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Wall Street hits bankers in wallet

Wall Street is hitting its
bankers where it hurts — in the
wallet, according to the New York
Times News Service.

Citigroup's chief executive and
chairman said on Wednesday that
they would forgo their bonuses
for 2008 and slash the amounts
paid to other senior bankers, join-
ing a growing list of financial
executives who are passing up
some pay.

In a memo to bank employees,
Vikram S. Pandit, Citigroup's
chief executive, said that he and
Winfried F.W. Bischoff, the
bank's chairman, would not take
year-end rewards.

''The harsh realities of 2008,
primarily our earnings results,
mean that our bonus pool is dra-
matically lower than last year,"
Pandit wrote about a year in
which the bank announced tens
of billions of losses.

“The argument is always made
about this excessive compensation,
that it’s necessary to keep these peo-
ple. That will now be tested, and ’'m
not sure if there’s anywhere for

them to go.”



"The most senior leaders
should be affected the most."

But Pandit's remarks may
strike some as several weeks late,
if not a few million dollars short.
Citigroup, one of the biggest
recipients of taxpayer money, has
taken in $45 billion in fresh capi-
tal from the government's bailout

funds.

Nearly every chief executive

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CRYSTAL KEY INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced an
the 31st day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Richard Cellini

on Wall Street has indicated that
he will decline a 2008 bonus, with
Kenneth D. Lewis of Bank of
America and John Stumpf of
Wells Fargo the hold-outs so far.

. Other banks have clamped
down on pay even more than Cit-

_ igroup under pressure from Con-

gress, regulators and investors.

’ Wachovia, for example, said it is

slashing compensation not just in
the executive suite, but all the
way down through its ranks as its
merger with Wells Fargo neared
completion Wednesday night.

"What's different about this
year versus last year is. that the
USS. taxpayer is part of the equa-
tion so how things appear is
important," said Rakesh Khu-
rana, a professor at Harvard Busi-
ness School.

Compensation

On Wall Street, compensation
is always.a hot button. But now
the tension is heightened: pay too
much and risk a political back-
lash, pay too little and risk losing
talented employees. The prospect
of losing workers to hedge funds
and private equity firms has
helped drive up pay in the indus-
try in past years.

"The argument is always made

about this excessive compensa- -

tion, that it's necessary to keep
these people," said Richard Celli-
ni, a senior vice president at
Integrity Interactive, a. consult-
ing firm in Waltham, Mass. "That

will now be tested, and I'm not
sure if there's anywhere for them
to go."

The government provided very
few guidelines about Wall Street
compensation when it injected

‘billions of dollars of capital into

banks late last year, and only
described limits on pay to the
highest-ranking executives. That
gave the banks great discretion
over the size and form of bonuses
for traders, midlevel executives
and others.

Many banks, like Citigroup, are
making the biggest pay reductions
on their senior executives. Bonus-
es at the top of Citigroup will be
down at least 40 percent for 10
members of its senior leadership
team, according to a corporate
filing released on Wednesday.

Robert E. Rubin, an. influential °

Citigroup. board member and
senior adviser to its leadership
team, also turned down his 2008
bonus.

But. other banks have taken

more aggressive actions. Credit

Suisse, Morgan Stanley and UBS
have extended so-called clawback
agreements to cover all employ-
ees, allowing the banks to recoy-
er a portion of bonuses ‘if they
are later shown to have been
based on flawed bets. Citigroup's
new clawback policy applies euly
to its executives. j

Pandit said that cidercup
would continue to pay the bulk of
its employees well as long as they

-performed. .

''Meritocracy requires differ-
entiation in pay," Pandit said.

That is in stark contrast to the
2008 pay plan at Wachovia, where
bonuses were drastically slashed
for the rank-and-file. Many df
Wachovia's senior executives,
though, could still reap riches
from its shot-gun merger with
Wells Fargo.

On a conference call on Dec.
19, Tim Sloan, a Wells Fargo
executive who will head the glob-
al markets and'investment bank-

bankers that they would not
receive big bonuses. Instead, their
allocated bonus money will be

returned to shareholders. He also —

said there would be no retention
packages, according to a
Wachovia employee who listened

to the call. A Wells Fargo spokes- |

woman declined to comment.

"T know that's very painful to
hear, but that's the reality," Sloan
told the employees, as recount-
ed by the participant. "It just
would have been irresponsible to

the company's shareholders to do’
-anything else."

But some employees com-
plained that the rules were being
changed late in the game. One
employee who identified himself
as a third-year vice president said
the bank's decision was putting
its employees in "financial
extremis" and, in some cases, at
risk of not making their mortgage

payments.

Wachovia's senfor executives
— including Robert:K. Steel, who
served as chief executive for just a
few months — will not take home
a discretionary bonus for 2008.
Of course, that is not to say that
all of them will wind up empty-
handed.

According to corporate filings,
10 of Wachovia's senior. execu-
tives are eligible to receive up to
$98.2 million in severance pay-
outs upon the completion of its
merger with Wells Fargo.

Christy Phillips-Brown, a

‘ Wachovia spokeswoman, said
‘that the payouts were. "contrac-

tual obligations" and could turn
out to be less if four Wachovia
executives who accepted positions
remain at Wells Fargo. Steel, who
already annaunced his departure,
will not receive any severance

pay.

' Legal Notice

NOTICE

RED EAGLE VENTURES LIMITED _

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act'2000, the
dissolution of RED EAGLE VENTURES LIMITED has

_been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
“| sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
’ Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



ing unit, told a group of Wachovia

' ” Legal Notice

NOTICE

- Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TIBALD VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) MCH INTERNATIONAL LTD.

ADNIL MANAGEMENT LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named.
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 30th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section-138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MCH INTERNATIONAL LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ADNIL MANAGEMENT LTD. has been |
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.’

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

- NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legil Notice ste
NOTICE
WHITE VALLEY LILLIES LTD.

“ACES HIGH CORP. A & B PARTNERS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business ‘Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of WHITE VALLEY LILLIES LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has’ been is-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of A & B PARTNERS LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ACES HIGH CORP. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been. issued and the on

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC,
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice |

NOTICE

MAX WEALTH LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAX WEALTH LIMITED has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the -

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) -

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KINETIC TRADING LIMITED

Notice is hereby. given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KINETIC TRADING LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

‘Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE OCEAN SPRINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BLUE OCEAN SPRINGS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 5B



Millions ‘thrown away'
in Straw Market work

FROM page 1B

As project managers, Mr
Clarke said VERITAS Consul-
tants did “not know all the pro-
gressions” that led to the
increase in the proposed Straw
Market’s size, a question that
was better answered by’ the for-
mer government and the archi-
tect.

He indicated, though, that as
a result of discussions between
the Government, the architect
and stakeholders such as the
straw vendors themselves, it
appeared that all concerned had
agreed that the new Straw Mar-
ket building should be almost
200,000 square feet.

This size contrasted sharply,
according to Mr Clarke, with
the proposed Straw Market
scope presented to his company
and rivals when they responded
- to the project manager Request
for Proposal (RFP) issued by
the Ministry of Works in 2005.
That showed a building 70,000
square feet in size, and costing
$10 million.

Yet, when appointed, VERI-
TAS Consulting was confronted
with preliminary design docu-
ments showing a 200,000 square
foot structure. The initial bud-

get based on this had risen by 80

per cent, from $10 million to
$18 million, “plus or minus 25

«per cent” because the design
had not reached a stage where
costs could be determined.

‘When we received our terms
of reference for this project
from the Ministry of Works, it
said that the building would be
77,000 square feet and cost $10
million,” Mr Clarke wrote.

“Throughout our tenure as
project officers, we have never
seen a building of this scope
named the New Straw Market.
As early as January 2006, the
size of the building was already
known to have exceeded 77,000

. square feet and the cost-of the.

* building was known to be more
than $10 million. Our earliest
documents always had the
structure at over 180,000 square
feet.”

The increase in size inevitably
meant an increase in costs. The
77,000 square foot Straw Mar-
ket was priced at $129 per
square foot, but at 200,000
square feet the project would
cost between $29-$37 million.
That, Mr Clarke said, translated
into a price of between $107-
$185 per square foot.

“Why the discrepancy? Much
of it had to do with the con-
tractor’s cost of doing the work
or general conditions as it is
called in the industry. We found
the general conditions of one
contractor to be twice as high as

other contractors,” Mr.Clarke -

said.

Perhaps the best explanation
for the apparent ‘muddle’ sur-
rounding the Straw Market’s
rebuilding during the five years

of the Christie. administration

was that the then-government

could not decide on what they:

wanted the project to be, and

then make their case by clearly *

communicating the objectives
to the Bahamian people.
Based on what Mr Clarke’s
paper details, it appears the for-
. mer PLP government could not
make up its mind on whetHer it
. wanted a relatively simple, low-
cost permanent structure to
house Bay Street’s straw ven-
dors, or whether it desired a
- grand ‘monument’ that would
stand as the centerpiece of
downtown Nassau’s revitaliza-
tion.
The final version included a
restaurant/nightclub, with open-
air dining on the roof; an obser-
vation tower that would have
been the highest point on’ Bay
Street; six elevators; and a base-
ment with a vendors’ lounge
and storage for their goods. The
structure was open, so that all
vendors could be seen, regard-
less of where they were located.
The Christie government
seemingly settled on this option
towards the end of its,time in
office but, as Mr Clarke noted,
the project as structured would
have represented an enormous
transfer of taxpayer. monies
from the general Bahamian

population to the Straw Ven- ;

dors — a subsidy, gift, call it what
you will.

VERITAS Consultants
developed a $31.399 million
baseline budget for the project,
Mr Clarke said, and three of the
four contractors who made the
final bid selection round came
within 10 per cent of this bid
average. Five out of nine con-
tractors invited to bid under the

“Throughout
our tenure as
project officers,
we have never
seen a building of
this scope named
the New Straw
Market.”





Jean-Michael Clarke

PLP government did so. -
There then seemed to be a

recognition that the project’s

costs might be too high. As a

result, Mr Clarke said $5.586-

million was saved by eliminating
the basement entirely. Else-
where, work on the commercial
area of the roof was scaled
back; a decision was taken to
switch from using A-grade

materials (designed to resist salt.

air and ship smoke) to cheaper
B-grade materials; and the pos-
sibility of importing materials
duty-free was also assessed.
However, because the base-
ment elimination was not decid-
ed upon until January 2007, the
Straw Market project start date

had to be pushed back to late _

March-April 2007 — just before
the general election.

Mr Clarke recommended that
whatever happened with the
Straw Market moving forward,
the vendors themselves needed
to have a sense of ownership,
for otherwise “the chances of
maintaining the Straw Market
in good condition dwindle”.

“I do not believe that we
should give a $23 million gift
without condition to the Straw
Vendors,” Mr Clarke said. “I
believe the costs should be
shared. If the Government has
allocated $10 million for the
Straw Market, rent from the
500-700 vendors and artisans
who are expected to occupy the

Nassau Airport

Development Company

building, as well as revenues
from the rental of the commer-
cial space on the roof level, and
the observation tower.”
Currently, it appears the
Ingraham administration has
reverted back to the original
$10 million Straw Market plan,
dropping the six-floor plan in
favour of a single storey struc-
ture, and eliminating the
‘grandiose’ observation tower,
nightclub/restaurant and base-
ment plans. As previously
revealed by Tribune Business,
the Government cancelled the
Straw Market contract with
contractors Woslee Dominion,

-on the grounds that it did not

want to commit more than half
its 2007-2008 Budget for capital
works to one project.

Mr Clarke urged that a “‘non-
partisan” solution was needed
to resolve the more than sev-
en-year wait for the Straw Mar-
ket’s rebirth, following its
destruction in the September

2001 fire. He added: “There are
Bahamian professionals who
have worked hard trying to
bring this project to fruition;

their accounts have not been |

settled. There are Straw Ven-
dors housed in what cannot be
classed as a first-rate facility,
befitting world famous sta-
tus....... There is the focal of
Bahamian experience, the heart
of downtown in urgent need of
revitalization, and we continue
to creep toward a solution.

“What is disheartening about
the proposed Straw Market is
that the efforts made by the
Bahamian professionals work-
ing on this project will be
thrown away. I cannot say
whether these individuals have
been asked to work on any
alternate solutions, but it seems
wasteful to spend million — yes,
millions of dollars — on fees and
preparation to totally scrap the
plan and start again from
scratch.”

Legal Notice .

NOTICE

WENDOVER WILLOW LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WENDOVER WILLOW LIMITED has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce the C-280
Apron Drive Bridges Request For Proposal associated with the expansion of
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The scope of work includes but is
not limited to:

Fabrication of five (5), Apron Drive Bridges conforming to the
requirements of the RFP, for Stage 1 Construction and five (5) Apron
» Drive Bridges for Stage 2 Construction, (2012);

Transportation and installation of Apron Drive Bridges in accordance
with the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Terminal Expansion Schedule;

Testing, commissioning and training.

This request for proposal.is of interest to Apron Drive Bridge Vendors, however
should also interest local Electrical Trade Contractors. |

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008.

Request for Proposal closing is Wednesday, February 11th at 3:00pm,

2009.

There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 15th. Please RSVP Traci
Brisby by 1pm Wednesday, January 14th for briefing location details.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
VICTORIA INVESTMENTS
GROUP LTD.

he

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the |.
dissolution of VICTORIA INVESTMENTS GROUP |

LID. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off |

‘

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

VESTINA CLAUDETTE CORP.

Oy



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the |
dissolution of VESTINA CLAUDETTE CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

y

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

PALAGNEDRA CO. LTD.

.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 |
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PALAGNEDRA CO. LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

x

\

ARGOSA CORP. INC,
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

THE PICCHELINA CORPORATION

Oy

_ Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE PICCHELINA CORPORATION
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TOP STAR INC.

=o

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, |

| the dissolution of TOP STAR INC. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY. 2, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRibuwe







1 wants fuel taxes

hiked to fund highways

By JOAN LOWY

WASHINGTON

A SO percent increase in gaso-
line and diesel fuel taxes is
being urged by a federal com-
mission to finance highway con-
struction and repair until the
government devises another
way for motorists to pay for
using public roads, according to
the Associated Press.

The National Commission on
Surface Transportation Infra-
structure Financing, a 15-mem-
ber panel created by Congress,
1s the second group ina year to

call for higher fuel taxes.

With motorists driving less
and buying less fuel, the cur-
rent 18.4 cents a gallon gas tax
and 24.4 cents a gallon diesel
tax fail to raise enough to keep
pace with the cost of road,
bridge and transit programs.

In a report expected in late
January, members of the infra-
structure financing commission
say they will urge Congress to
raise the gas tax by 10 cents a
gallon and the diesel fuel tax by
12 to 15 cents a gallon. At the
same time, the commission will
recommend tying the fuel tax
rates to inflation.

‘The commission will also rec-
ommend that states raise their
fuel taxes and make greater use
of toll roads and fees for rush-
hour driving.

A tax increase on this order
would be politically treacher-
ous for Democratic leaders in
Congress — a gas tax hike was
one of the reasons they lost con-
trol of the House and Senate in
the 1994 elections. President-
elect Barack Obama has.
expressed concern about rais-
ing gas taxes in the current eco-
nomic climate. But commission
members said the government
must find the money some-
where. *

"I'm not excited about a gas
tax increase, but the reality is
our current gas tax doesn't pay

| HEL
WANTED

Accounts Clerk urgently needed with
minimum of 3 years experience, proficient
in Microsoft applications, preferably 30
years and older-

Fax resume to 394-3885

for upkeep of the system we
have now," said Adrian Moore,
vice president of the Reason
Foundation, a libertarian think
tank in Los Angeles, and a
member of the highway revenue
commission. "We can either let
the roads go to hell or we can
pay more."

The dilemma for Congress is
that highway and transit pro-
-grams are dependent for rev-
enue on fuel taxes that are not
sustainable. Many Americans
are driving less and switching
to more fuel-efficient cars and
trucks, and a shift to new fuels
and technologies like plug-in
hybrid electric cars will further
erode gasoline sales.

According to a draft of the
financing commission's recom-
mendations, the nation needs
to move to a new system that
taxes motorists according to
how much they use roads.

"Most if not all of the com-
missioners have a strong belief
and commitment that we need a
fundamental transformation of
the current system," said com-



Accountant urgently needed with minimum
of 5 years experience, preferably 35 years
and older -

Fax resume to 394-3885



Cleaning/Messenger needed, preferably
35 years or older must have valid drivers
license.

Fax 394-3885





mission chairman Robert
Atkinson, president of the
Information Technology and
Innovation Foundation, a tech-
nology policy think tank in
Washington.

A study by the Transporta-
tion Research Board of the
National Academies estimated
that the annual gap between
revenues and the investment
needed to improve highway and
transit systems was about $105
billion in 2007, and will increase
to $134 billion in 2017 under
current trends.

Projected shortfalls in rev-°

enue led the National Surface
Transportation Policy and Rev-
enue Study Commission, in a
report issued in January 2008, to
call for an increase of as much
as 40 cents a gallon in the gas
tax, phased in over five years.
Charles Whittington, chair-
man of the American Trucking
Associations, which supports a
fuel tax increase as long as the
money goes to highway pro-
jects, said Congress may decide
to disguise a fuel tax hike as a
surcharge to combat climate
change. Transportation is
responsible for about a third of
all U.S. carbon emissions cre-
ated by burning fossil fuels.
Traffic congestion wastes an
estimated 2.9 billion gallons of





Retail Store Manager

Small Retail Store specializing in
girls accessories is seeking a dynamic,
energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager (30-40 years) with
prior retail managerial experience

to handle all aspects of store operations.

Please send resumes by e-mail to

bahamas.com @ gmail.com



IN THIS NOV. 21, 2007 file photo, Shell Oil Company's Deer Park refinery and petrochemical facility is shown
in the background as vehicles travel along Highway 225 in Deer Park, Texas. A 50 percent increase in gasoline
and diesel fuel taxes is being urged by a federal commissiion to finance highway construction and repair until
a government devises another way for motorists to pay for using public roads.

fuel a year. Less congestion
would reduce greenhouse gases
and dependence on foreign oil.

"Instead of calling it a gas tax,
call it a carbon tax," Whitting-
ton said. "As long as we label it
as something else we may have
the momentum and acceptance
to move forward."

Bottlenecks around the.
nation cost the trucking industry
about 243 million lost truck
hours and about $7.8 billion per
year, according to the commis-
sion. The financing commission
thinks the long-term solution is
a mileage-based revenue sys-
tem. While details have not
been worked out, such 4 system
would mean equipping every
car and truck with a device that
uses global positioning satellites
and transponders to record how
many miles the vehicle has been
driven, the type of roads and
time of day. Creation and instal-
lation of such a system would
take about 10 years.

Moore said commission
members were initially con-
cerned that using technology to
track driving might violate dri-
vers' privacy, but they've been
assured that such a system could=
be designed to prevent vehicles
from being "tracked in some
big brotherish way."









EG CAPITAL

= ) FIDELITY

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S) ‘
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

11.87
10.45
5.01
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

_..1900,00

| S2wk-Hi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidélity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

#1000.00
41000.00
1000.00

P52wk-Hi
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
20 RND Hold



11.87
10.45
5.17
1.00
0.30
6.13
11.10
10.00

999999999999999990
OOCOCODOONDOCAOCOOOD
ceoo0o0o0co0cooucaooco0o00nd

F290
200
3:00

YO YBSnds Hades die PSsentage PU
Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. __

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

1.4336
3.7969
412.5597
§100.24214
100.9600
1.0000
10.5000
41.0264

100.0000

96.7492
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL

SHARE INDEX - 16
520i tl 3

~ Higher

ing price from day to day

> Number of tot



shares traded today



Date 8/8/2007



pr share paid in the last 12 months
fivided by the last 12 month earnings

‘@ Date 7/11/2007

“33.39
11.83
0.45.
gs BIS Listed
NA_Vv
1.3455
2.9522
1.4336
3.4931
12.5597
100.2421
96.7492
1.0000
9.0775
1.0264
1.0289

floc Fund | 1,0287

Bid $
Ask S

Last Price
Weekly Vol

35.01 29.00
12.68 14.00
OOS csinileaibuken 5
Miuitvial ands:
YTD% Las
4.90
-1.27
4.75
-15.79
5.73
0.24
-3.25
0.00 0.00
-13.55 -13.55
2.64 2.64
2.89 2.89
2.87 2.87

-1.62
4.25
-8.00
5.25
0.24
-3.25

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
- Buying price of Colina and Fidetity

- Selling price of Colina and fidelity
- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

SAARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29M

30-Nov-08
30-Nov-08
26-Dec-08
30-Nov-08
30-Nov-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
31-Dec-07
30-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08

EPSS-A sorpany's reported earnings por share for the last 12 mths

NAY -

Net As

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 =



100

Crit) ear MUTE I eam

Waitaity TST ee



lm By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER
COLUMBIA, Mo.

A federal conservation program originally designed to help
small farmers is now disproportionately benefiting industrial live-
stock operations, according to a new report by a family farm advo-
cacy group, according to the Associated Press.

The Campaign for Family Farms and the Environment examined
five years worth of payments through the federal Environmental
Quality Incentives Program, known as EQIP.

Nationally, industrial hog operations accounted for 37 percent of
all EQIP payments, the group determined, even though such busi-
nesses account for less than 11 percent of that industry. Industrial
dairies received 54 percent of all EQIP dairy contracts. Such busi-
nesses represent only 3.9 percent of all dairy operations.

The study found similar disparities on the state level in lowa, Min-
nesota and Missouri. ;

"This report demonstrates what family farmers have known for
years: This corporate-controlled, industrial model of livestock pro-
duction can't survive without taxpayer support," said Rhonda Per-
ry, a Howard County livestock farmer and program director of the
Missouri Rural Crisis Center.

But Don Nikodim, executive vice president of the Missouri Pork

| Association, said the program is working as Congress intended.

Even with the family farm group's estimate that industrial opera-
tions are receiving $35 million annually, that still leaves plenty of the:
$6.1 billion set aside six years. ago for other producers.

"It's available to all sizes of producers," Nikodim said. "Small
farms can use it just like large farms."

Because of their larger size, industrial operations often own
more land and so need more money, he said.

When Congress created the conservation program in the 1996
Farm Bill, grants were limited to $50,000 over five years and waste
storage facilities were excluded from eligibility. Participants are
, required to match the federal payments.

Six years later, lawmakers expanded EQIP to include industrial
farms. The maximum payment level was increased to $450,000, with
60 percent of allocations set aside for livestock farmers.

The head ofthe federal agency that administers EQIP noted that
Congress intended the program to be "size neutral."

Contracts issued this year averaged $31,235, with more than 82

' percent of payments since 2002 falling under $25,000, said Arlen

Lancaster, chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural
Resources Conservation Service.

" Although a handful of large livestock operations have received
EQIP funds, they are certainly not the majority," he said.

The 2008 Farm Bill, which awaits congressional approval, pro-
poses reducing the cap on maximum payments to $300,000 overall.
But the Agriculture Department can waive the limit for projects
with "special environmental significance."

That revision isn't good enough for the report's authors, a group
that includes lowa Citizens for Community Improvement and the
Land Stewardship: Project in Minnesota.

Among the changes sought: lowering the cap to $150,000; requir-
ing the Agriculture Department to give priority to contracts based
on cost-efficiency, not amount of pollution generated; and restor-
ing the prohibition on using EQIP for waste storage.

According to the report, an unidentified producer in Becker
County, Minn., received $285,000 in 2003 to build a manure lagoon
nearly 1 million cubic feet in size.

And in Missouri, the federal agency Hug approved a total of
nearly $5 million since 2003 to move manure off farms that produce
too much waste to apply to their own cropland. ~

"The money for years has helped support the factory farms'
industry under the guise of environmental stewardship," said Lisa
Whalen, rural project director for the Iowa citizens' group.

Lancaster, though, noted that fewer than 0.5 percent of the
EQIP contracts awarded in Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri since
2002 topped $250,000.

The study defines industrial farms as those with at least 2,000 hogs
or more than 500 dairy cows. Those levels are slightly lower than the
definition of confined animal feeding operations outlined in the Pe
eral Clean Water Act.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, EDWARD
SAINTIL of SEA BREEZE LANE, P.O. Box SS-
6582, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to EDWARD ISRAEL SAINTIL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.












ea
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

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Provision and Maintenance of Plants —



Nassau Airport Development Company Lid. invites tenders for
provision and maintenance of plants at Lynden Pindling
International Airport



In keeping with NAD’s objective to develop and maintain a
world-class gateway to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
proponents:

+ Must be 100% Bahamian owned & operated

* Mustbe holders of a current business license

* Must demonstrate the ability to fulfill the requirements set out
in NAD’s official Request for Proposal

* Must show a track record of commitment to service with
excellence

* Request for Proposals may be collected from NAD’s
corporate office in Terminal — 1 at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport between the hours of 1 0:00am — 4:00pm
commencing January 2 - 6, 2009.



Deadline for submissions of Proposals
is January 9, 2009 at 3:00pm. ~



Telephone (242) 702-1000/1022





THE TRIBUNE



www, kingfeatures.com

COMIC PAGE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 PAGE 7B





CALVIN & HOBBES







NOTHING EVER CHANGES.
IT'S JUST SCHOOL,

EVERY DAY L
HAVE TO GET
UP AND GO TO



by North Amenca Syndicace, ine. ————

J exo

WE PIp-.-














SHE'S HIT, BUT SAM,
DISAPPEARED | ALL UNITS.-- CONVERGE STAY HERE AND
WHO FIRED IN THE DUST NORTHEAST CORNER KEEP DOWN..- :
THAT SHOT? \. CLOUD! | OF THE PARKING LOT--- I'LL BE BACK! Sudoku is a numbe
APT 3-G





THERE WAS NO

















I THINK You
SHOULD ASK
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r-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with

several given numbers. The/object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday





MY BOYFRIEND \ OH, GOSH, TOMMIE, I
JUST DUMPED ME,} HOPE MY INVITATION | QUARREL. GARY
DR. KELLY.’ DIDN'T CAUSE A CLAIMS HE'S TOO |
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2



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fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number

same block more than once. The difficulty
is Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





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©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

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THEN WHY



ARE You So
MEAN TO IT7 :
: jose Capablanca v Max Wallson, army homed in oat. his white king
i simultaneous display, Brooklyn gt the edge of the hoard, and after _
& TA15. Capa was world champion — piack's next tuen he resigned,
3] for only six years, butthe Cuban, commenting gracefully but
g] whodoubled asa parttime antruthsuly “Very fine®, Black's
5 diplomat, conveyed such an gir saetic is rather banal you
8] af effortless superiority that it” paveth ate} ee ig ea
was 3 mini-seasation when he encboicts by Qxb8, What
fost event an exhibition game. fanned? ves
On that evesitg in Brooklyn he MSPPEREA:

_ LEONARD BARDEN” |
agreed ta take on 65 opponents :
rather than his usuai 36, and

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE











Fox ‘N ame of New York's best speed
OKAY, MEN— THE PLAN 16. To. ‘/ WY MUFFLER some ERS geet
BSCE TIE SKM “2 eich Hone Seocceeceare)

ZILENTLY. Ee IN My CLOSET. _ pas usual OGpercent

standards, his concessian of six








shone dofaats was something af 3
YEAH,! HAVE TOLD. disaster, and in tuday’s position
MINE WAS US SOONER, aa unknown college student
- ACHRIBTMA HAGAR / recovered from a poor position
PRESENT / to launch a decisive attack, Capa




could only watch as the black

“ ©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

cues BROWNE

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

\

Down .

2 Over one ounce of
oxygen (5)
Having a down on? (6)

4 The birthright of their crazy
generation (8)
Bring about a result (6)
Dread going round the
globe and therefore

‘Across
1 Light nonsense is still
produced (9).
Father has to confess and
make headlines (5)
Children’s playthings? (7)
No corner stone? (6)

Leave for the Sahara

perhaps (6) don’t (7) South dealer.
Withdraw a summary (8) Apparently outstanding, Both sides va
Everything is plain; the but hardly fine (9) aK94
alert is over (3,5) A classic dream once ED ‘3
: ‘ shattered (9) a
Attacked the copper with _ $8752
id (6) Gave a shriek and scared WEST EAST
aci 2
‘There's hostility when | oe Across #00 10 86 v4 3 :
One on a diet may turn out) =| LJ 4105 #8763
cast my net around (6) so (7) x 1 US political 2 To change (5) A 93 #K 4
Stop and go after amber The French take shelter to N scandal (9) 3 Scope (6) ’ SOUT H
5 @A73
changes (7) be hidden (6) Oo. Open to suspicion (5) 4 Exceed accepted ¥K72
Fights for food left over (6) iclati ini ¢A4
A once rough sea (5) 9g > 9 Legislative act (7) limits (2,3,3) QI 106
They keep shops eer 2 Obvious (6) 5 Treat as identical (6) Ae a North East
smartened perhaps (9) a Ww US wild horse (6) 6 Do good to (7) l& Pass 1¢ Pass
arms (5) , 1 NT Pass 3 NT

Restlessly excited (8) Former (9) Opening lead — queen of hearts.

Yesterday’s Easy Solution Profanity (9)
Blood feud (8)

Done without

Air force unit (8)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

One of the first rules of defensive
play learned by the aspiring new
player is “second-hand low.” Some-
time later he discovers that the rule
has its exceptions, as all such rules
do.

The trouble is that the proper time
to abandon this stricture is not sub-
ject to precise definition. About all
that can be said is that a defender
should depart from the usual practice
whenever there appears to be a good
reason for doing so.

Consider this case where West

Across: 1 Reflect, 4 Beset, 7 Gate,
8 Oratorio, 10 Dilly-dally, 12 Antics,
13 Unique, 15 Stagecoach, 18

_ Overhead, 19 Bias, 20 Tenor, 21
Amnesty.
Down: 1 Rigid, 2 Futility, 3 Thread,
4 Bottleneck, 5 Spry, 6 Trouble, 9
Eye-catcher, 11 Aquarius, 12
Affront, 14 Iguana, 16 Hasty, 17
Lean.

ATTENTION! F Display enticingly (6)
Expression of

THIS FEATURE IS NOT AVAILABLE respect (6) formality (7)
Pertinacious (6)
Under

consideration (2,4)

Furtive procedure (7)
A signalling code (5)
Requiring great

effort (9) Reveal a secret (3,2)



| 02} ] 01 Nin] O} 1/00
Colon] ©: }o}AIN
|N)@O]o @: A} M|O] a





0/0)
AiD/O ho

N

o
re





: Chexe soisien BBR Rat aad yehea resigned
P prcuumn nd EBea2 Gade FADE RATS
** He} Qezmaie.



+ HOW many wards of four letters
or more can you nuke from the
fetters shown here? Ta making 2
word, eavh letter may be used ored
ony. Raoh must contain the centre
letter and there must be atleast
ane rine-bether word, Ne pharals.

FODAY'S TARGET
Good 18; very good 27; excellent 36
far more}. Sohatien famorraw,

SATURDAY'S SQLUTTON
ADVENTURE aunt avenue daunt
denature denture duet dune
Suvet endxe endure enure
enured ebade nature meuter
mude revae rude xrued rnpe mat
tenure temired ime trued funa
tondra fame fiprect tuner bree
turn tumed under unrated
unread urea vanot yvaunied
vaunter venture venbured venue



Second-Hand High -

leads the queen of hearts, ducked all
around. A second heart puts the lead
in dummy, and a club is. led. What
should East do?

First, let's see what happens if
East plays low. South plays the
queen, and West is faced with a no-
win situation. Ifhe takes the trick, he
loses the entry to his heart suit, and
declarer ends up with 10 tricks after
driving out the king of clubs at his
next opportunity. And if West refuses
to take the queen with the ace, South
has nine tricks.

Now let’s see what happens if
East puts up the king when the first
club is led. After the king holds, East
retums a heart, and the contract goes
down one as soon as West gains the
lead with the club ace.

The question, then, is how can
East know that this is the time not to
play second-hand low? The answer
lies in the fact that most notrump
contracts fail because the defense
establishes a long suit and then is
able to run it. This objective is
defeated if the suit cannot be cashed
after it becomes established.

In the present case, East cannot
tell what side entry his partner may
have, but he should reason that play-
ing the club king cannot cost if South
has the A-Q. If West has the ace,
however, the king play performs the
vital function of preserving his entry
until the hearts are established.

Tomorrow: A hard look into the future.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.





INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS









Saturday WAVES _ VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
Low W WASSAU Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles 78° F

FIC NE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles 78° F
VAR at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles WF
NE at 7-14 Knots
NE at 7-14 Knots . 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles qi FE





High













Lots of sun with a Mainly clear witha =| Plenty of sun. Sunshine and patchy





Bright sunshine. Sunny to partly The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the NE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet
. shower; breezy. shower in spots. | "clouds. i | cloudy and breezy, | greater the need for eye and skin protection. ;
High: 79° ~ High: 80° High: 81° =| ~~ High: 85°







‘Low: 68°

uWeather RealFeel

Low: 71°

Low: 70°

AccuWeather R

Low: 69° _- Low: 70°

PHA rs) RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel ; HATA matte
76°-68° F 78°-74° F 86°-69° F if 95°-72°F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 14:13am. 2.3 5:02 4m. 04
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2 14:41 p.m. 2.3 5:27 p.m. 0.0

Sunday 12:33am. 24 6:54am. 0.2







cE te ©





iseegienctiay














Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday












: ABACO TR act 12:55 p.m. 2.1 7:04pm. -0.1
High: 72° F/22°C ee sisaes sebeseeencsecas aadbatacesaveeshedessanree ee : ica : Monday 1:33 a.m. 05 8:00 a.m. 0.2
- S a pasissctaane nes dasastyesee seusauseteadet pri iets -56 p.m. : : _m. -0.
—— Low:53°F/12°C Normal high ................ vee, 78° F/26° C ee ae Ne
Normal lOW ......c.sesesseseseeeeeees wedaasbeaeee 66° F/19° C
. WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High ...ssccsssesssssssseeseseenee 83° F/28° C
High:76°F/24°C Last year's IOW ......sscscseecceeeceee Lacals F236 = : ene
Low: 62° F/A7°C Precipitation Sunrise... .... 6:55 a.m. Moonrise. ... 10:41 a.m.

0.29" Sunset....... 5:33 p.m. Moonset. ... 11:05 p.m.

0.00"
"0.06" Full Last New

As of 1 p.m. yesterday
Year to date
Normal year to date





High: 71° F/22°C
Low: 53° F/12°C























AccuWeather.com Showers Bs
Forecasts and graphics provided by r = T-storms oo
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jan. 4 Jan. 10 Jan.17 Jan. 26 [o%0"4 Rain a
-7R° ° ELEUTHERA Fronts
igh: 76° F/24°C - High:77° F/25°C L*, 4 Flurries Cold ==-=0
w: 63° F/17°C eae ‘. : PEK] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and SN isc ia
Low: 62°F/17°C i [x ~1 Ice precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. j

2 Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary gen












KEY WEST CATISLAND 84/28 atte
High: 76° F/24°C High: 74° F/23°C
Low: 66° F/19°C Low: 59° F/15°C
es

AUTO INSURANCE



aoe _ SAN SALVADOR ©
PC > High: 76°F/24°C
Low: 63°F/17°C



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



High: 79° F/26°C
Low: 65° F/18°C





Our
out us!



High: 78° F/26"









Today Saturday . Today Saturday a Today " Saturday MAYAGUANA e a SESS yess
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W- High Low W ‘High Low W High: 78° F/26° C ! 4/1. 67/9 po
FIC FIC FIC FIC . 94/34 721s
Albuquerque 57/13 320 s 52/41 31/0 c Philadelphia ace
Anchorage —-1/-18-12/-24 pe -1/-18-11/-23 pce _ Jacksonville Phosnie CROOKEDIS /ACKLINS 3 t t
Atlanta 50/10 37/2 c 64/17 500 pc Kansas City OU Can trust.



Atlantic City 46/7 27/-2 c¢ 42/5 20/-6 pc Las Vegas RAGGED ISLAND Low:66°F/19°C


















Baltimore — 40/4 26/3 c 41/5 26/-3 pc Little Rock eae cae

Boston 35/1 26/-3 sf 30/-1 22/-5 pe Los Angeles . Dae ‘

Buffalo «34/1 19/-7 sf 29-1 16-8 sf Louisville —46/7.-33/0 aes

Charleston,SC 62/16 43/6 c° 63/17 52/11 pc Memphis 58/14 51/10 pe GREAT INAGU A ue ir

Chicago (28/-2 18-7 © = 38/8. «31/0 cc «= Miami == 76/24 63/17 High: 84°F/29°C

Cleveland 36/2 21/-6 st 32/0 26/-3 pc Minneapolis 16/-8 13/-10 c Low: 65° F/18°G =

Dallas «74/23 GO/IS pc 71/21 41/5 pc Nashville 5241 39/ ; : he 7

Denver 58/14 24/-4 ¢ 38/3 5/-15 sn New Orleans 73/22 62/16 c t Tallahassee Thi :
Detroit «32/0. 18/-7 sf 34/1 24/-4 c NewYork —«- 37/2 30/-1. 5/-3 pc. Tampa a ikreery 29-sn (er eh (2 (2 f)) 332-2862 | Tel (242) 336-2304 E
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 c 80/26 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 62/16 46/7 s pe Tucson 70/21 44/6 ; ‘ eal 3 rs e 2 < . a
Houston 76/24 64/17 pc 73/22 58/14 t Orlando + ==» 74/23 52/11 c «77/25 56/13 pc Washington, DC 44/6 28/-2 Sea ce Fide aearad Fon Crp arannn fae _ eg



Full Text


ae m Lhe Tribune

Pim lovin’ it

HIGH 82F



70F

LOTS OF SUN, |
SHOWER

Volume: 105 No.32

“THE BAHAMAS __

BIGGEST!!!
eG yt
Sse
BL
STS

LOW

AWG

‘BAO oO SSG
<<







BAHAMAS EDITION

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

















p



Residents outraged
over the alleged
actions of officer

‘By. MEGAN.REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter
mreynolds@tribunemedia.net

girlfriend.

‘Neighbours who came out
when they heard the commo-
tion, photographed and filmed
the incident.

They. said the officer
announced he was respond-
ing to noise complaints from a
woman living in the same
apartment building.

He pushed a man inside and
shoved his sick grandmother
out of the way, witnesses
claimed.

A woman, who lives across

A COMMUNITY is. out-
raged by the “unprovoked
brutality” of a police officer
witnessed by dozens of peo-
ple in Bain Town.

Residents said they watched
in horror as a police officer,
shouting expletives,
approached four men stand-
ing under a tree in front of
their apartment building.
According to eyewitnesses, he
slapped one of the men across
the face, threatened him with

SEE page nine

Some Customs staff cynical
about ending corruption

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

SOME Bahamas Customs personnel are wondering what
government plans to do to curtail corruption and fraud in the

- department in the new year.
Customs was placed under a microscope late last year as vast
corruption claims, sparked by an arson attack on the house of a
customs officer who was a part of a corruption task force, flood-

SEE page nine





















COMPANIES SWITCHING TO |

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PERCY ‘VOLA’ aH leader i ne Saxons Superstars, shakes hands with eat ine Hubert Ingraham.

Armed robberies

mar New Yeat’s eve

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

ENJOYMENT of New Year’s eve was
marred for three people in New Providence
who fell victim to crime in two separate.armed
robberies.

The first incident took place at Bertha’s Go
Go Ribs restaurant on Blue Hill Road south at
around 6.30pm.

Two employees were robbed by ‘a man wield-
ing a silver coloured hand gun. The gunman

. was accompanied by another man.

One employee had a small amount of cash

and a cell phone taken from him, while the

other was forced to open the cash register,
allowing the gunman and his accomplice to
flee around the rear of the building with an
undisclosed amount of cash belonging to the
restaurant, according to Assistant Superinten-
dent of Police, Walter Evans. :

At 9.30 that same evening a woman living

SEE page nine

National Energy Policy
components ‘expected
to be achieved this year’

mi By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff
Reporter

MAJOR components
of a National Energy
Policy are expected to be
achieved in 2009, with
the first being the
approval of a renewable
energy supplier, accord-
ing to an environment
official.

State Environment Minister Phenton Ney-
mour said Thursday that several major pro-
jects are expected to be launched this year,
propelling the Bahamas towards greater
energy independence.

“We’ve set out to seek proposals for
renewable energy, hopefully in this year we
will make that a reality in regards to having
energy supplied by a renewable energy

SEE page nine



Phenton Neymour



Felipé Major/Tribune staff








Saxons are
— unofficial
winnet
New
Junkanoo



ear’s |

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter |
THE Shells. Saxon Super-

stars were announced the

unofficial overall winners of
the 2009 New Year’s Day

Junkanoo parade.

-With-a- total of 4,184 points,
the Saxons outshone the Val-
ley Boys by 346 points, putting
them in second place with
3,838 points, and One Family,

‘third with a score of 3,640

points.

Making their first-lap on
Bay Street around 7 o’clock
Thursday morning, the Saxons
arrived with the theme “I
Have a Dream.”

With a massive lead costume
with the images of Barack
Obama, Martin Luther King
Jr, and Nelson Mandela, the
group showed full support for
the advancement of black peo-

SEE page nine

Grand Bahama
International
Airport suffers
runway lights failure

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The failure of
runway lights at Grand Bahama
International Airport caused
delays and cancellation of
flights on Tuesday evening.

The runway lights were out
for several hours beginning
5.30pm, preventing flights in

- and out of Freeport until 10pm.

Airport director Philip Carey
could not be reached for com-
ments up to press time on
Wednesday.

Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany officials told The Tribune
that the power company had no
disruption in power and was not
at fault for the outage at the air-
port.

On Wednesday evening, a
second outage occurred at the
airport around 9.40pm — 30

SEE page nine


PAGE 2, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 THE TRIBUNE



SAXONS TAKE HONOURS ON BAY STREET

Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune staff e See more pictures on pages six and seven

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/TRIBUNE

,

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 3







In brief

‘Mitchell
appeals for
youth to join
PLP in 2009



red Mitchell Q

_ M@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FOX Hill MP Fred Mitchell
is seeking to connect with the
youth — appealing to young
people to join the PLP in 2009
to work towards bringing
change to that party and to
The Bahamas, which he said
he would like to see become a
“developed” country by 2020.

The MP has in the last few
weeks made it clear that he
would one day like to lead the
opposition party. However, he
Said, his aspirations are a
“moot point” given that there
is currently “no vacancy” in
the PLP leadership.

Reaching out in his New
Year’s Message addressed °
“To young Bahamians”, he
called on young people to join
the PLP to express their views
about how change can be
brought about in the country
and show that they are “seri-
ous” about such an endeay-

, our. The message is the latest
of a growing series of public
commentaries produced by
the MP and former foreign
affairs minister in recent
months. “You say you want
change. How do you bring it

2:By joining a political



encourage all ue TOU whe say
you-are PLP — before you
leave for school and even if
you:are:away — to formally
join:the PLP. Come join at my
braiich i in Fox Hill. You can
also join at the PLP’s head-
quarters in Farrington Road.
If you have a problem joining,
_getin touch with me,” said Mr
Mitchell.
The MP appeals to Bahami-
ans in 2009 to “commit our-

selves to work together online ,

and in other ways to bring
about change in the PLP and
in The Bahamas.”

He raises the question of
whether use of the internet
can “help make changes” in
the country and encourages
young people to see the inter-
net not only as a tool for social
interaction but for action to
achieve improvements in soci-
ety. Stating that when he left
school he aimed to “further
the ends of racial justice for
oppressed Bahamians and to
help create the new Bahamian
nation state,” the MP said he
now wants to make The
Bahamas “as good as it can
be; a true reflection inclusive
of the new generations that
have been educated since
nationhood. ‘

' “The question to you as
young people is: What is your
mission? Where are you .
going to take The Bahamas
and what role will the PLP
play in it?” asked the MP.

If the Bahamas is to become

a “developed” country by.
2020, said the MP, “clear.
markers” will have to be
obtained, including: “an
increase in national income or
GDP per capita, a more
refined literacy, a lower birth
rate and a lower death rate; a
national health insurance pro-
gramme; unemployment bene-
fits; better dccess to capital ©
through small business loans,
micro loans, improved infra-
structure by land, sea and by
air, an improved tourism
product, national food security
through an investment in agri-
culture and fisheries, the
rebuilding of our capital city
and increased environmental
protection.”

“One major and immediate
goal must be to make the price
of land and housing affordable
for young Bahamians,” he
said. Mr Mitchell encouraged
those interested in joining the
party or expressing their ideas
to’contact him on his Face-
book. profile or by e-mail.



Sixty-eig

ht Haitian migrants found

aboard sloop in the Exuma chain

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE battle between the arrival of an
increasing number of Haitian migrants
and the Royal Bahamas Defence
Force continued Wednesday with the
apprehension of 68 persons found
aboard a sloop in the Exuma chain.

The interception of the migrants, 54
males and 15 females, brings to 441

the total number of Haitians captured
in Bahamian waters since mid-Decem-

ber.

sloops.

Oren melee (toc (0

‘continue with

DSTI Ka ILE LOCOy Oy



lf By Chester Robards
Tribune Staff Reporter

GOVERNMENT, which has
spent almost $1 million this year
to send illegal immigrants back
to their countries, has decided to
continue with swift repatriation,
according to immigration officials.

A group of Haitian immigrants,
picked up before Christmas in
Bimini, spent barely 24 hours on
Bahamian soil before they: were
put on a plane and flown back
home.

“That’s just how fast they have
been coming in and how fast we
have been sending them back,”
said Immigration Director Jack
Thompson.

Senior Deputy Director of
Immigration Roderick Bowe said
that between December 23 and
30 — within a week — 373 illegal
Haitians had been repatriated at
a cost of $100,000.

He said of the number of repa-
triated Haitians, 50 were picked
up in Inagua, 21 in Bimini, 121
on St Andrews’ Beach,
Yamacraw, 67 on Marshall Road,
six at Silver Cay and 108 in Exu-
ma. According to Mr Thompson,

thé total cost’of the repatriations’*'

‘place for persons*who are*h

“fllegally"and*I am‘Serious About
that. We have to ensure that we

might’ not conipate tothe price
tag on, keeping’ a large number of

| illegal persons detained. for along’

period of time.

“This is certainly a good chunk
of money which is being spent for
repatriations, but we have bud-
geted for it and the government






“There will be no
resting place for

persons who are
here illegally...”



Jack Thompson

of the Bahamas would have bud-
geted, so that we do have a quote
in our budget for the purposes of
repatriating,” he said.

“I think though that when you
really measure the cost of repa-
triating persons against if they
were here — with the cost on our

social services, on our health ser- |

vices, to feed these people to
house these people to clothe

‘ these people, I'mean there is no

comparison.”

Yesterday, the Immigration
Department used a Bahamasair
jet to repatriate 198 persons on
two separate flights to Port au
Prince, Haiti, according to Mr
Bowe.

“T think it’s a wise thing to
repatriate them,” said Mr pa ae
son, “Phere will be no resti

send the message that we are not
able to accommodate them and
that we.shall ensure that they
return to their homes.”

He said government does not

National Insurance
fund in ‘no danger’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE National Insurance fund
is in “no short, medium or long
term danger,” according to
recently appointed Director
Algernon Cargill.

Mr Cargill said his assessment
is based on the fact that “internal
processes are being
tightened...functional changes
implemented” and “a stronger
focus on employer compliance,
‘supported with reliance on our

legal systém when necessary and

the implementation of the Actu-
arial recommendations” are
underway.

His comments came after the
seventh Actuarial report on the
National Insurance Board, com-
pleted in 2001, warned that with-
out changes the funds would be
depleted by 2034 at the latest,
leaving Bahamians without pen-
sions and other benefits, which
they now receive.

Mr Cargill said it is expected
that contribution collections may
decrease in 2009, due to changes
in the Bahamian economy and
lower employment levels. How-
ever, although the amount of
money coming into the fund will
be lower while the demand for
benefits to be paid out will rise,
the National Insurance Board
does not expect to have problems
meeting its obligations.

“Contribution payments along
with cash income generated from
NIB’s $1.5 billion in investments

- will continue to provide sufficient

cash to make all qualified benefit
payments when they are due,” "he
said.

In 2007, National Insurance
collected $155.5 million in con-
tributions and paid out $139.5
million in benefits. In. 2008
National Insurance expected to
collect $158 million in contribu-

tions and sign off on $150 million

in benefits.

Allaying concerns that the eco-
nomic climate might spell prob-
lems for the NIB, Mr Cargill said
that “periods of economic slow-
down as well as periods of eco-
nomic growth are factored into

the fund’s long-term projections.”

“The fund is sound and
through prudent management
together with Government policy,
there is no fear of NIB not hon-
ouring legitimate benefit claims
and/or going broke as has been
reported in.the media,” he said.

Mr Cargill said the Board of
Directors, management and
employees of the NIB are “com-
mitted to improving the perfor-
mance of the fund and the overall
experience of every claimant.”

“The singular most important
message we would like to convey
is that the Fund is sound, benefits
continue to increase and are not
expected to decrease for decades.
The Fund can and will continue
to honour every legitimate bene-
fit claim, even in cases where
employers are not compliant with
their contributions,” Mr Cargill
said.

Renew licences, gun owners atlvised

GUN owners have been advised to renew their licenses or face

a possible $1,000 fine.

In a release issued yesterday, police warned that all licenses in
the Northern Bahamas expired on December 31 and will now

require renewal.

“All license holders are being asked to renew their permits at
the Criminal Records Office in Grand Bahama/NewProvidence.
Failure to renew the licenses will result in all license holders
being taken into police custody and being subject to a fine not
exceeding $1,000,” said Assistant Superintendent Loretta Mack-

ey.

License holders are advised to visit the fire officer, who will be
available at the Criminal Records offices in Grand Bahama/New
Providence from 9 am through 4pm Monday through Fridays. -

Those fleeing their impoverished
homeland have been found throughout
The Bahamas — Bimini, Silver Cay,
Exuma, Inagua and New Providence.

According to Defence Force spokes-
woman, Sub Lieutenant Sonia Miller,
the winter months allow optimum sail-
ing conditions for Haitians aboard

On Tuesday, immigration officials

ney.

SENIOR Deputy Immigration. Offi-
cer Roderick Bowe (left) and
Immigration Director Jack
Thompson addressing a press
conference at the Department

of Immigration, Hawkins Hill on
Tuesday.

intend persons to ‘be housed at
the detention centre for long peri-
ods of time.

. Mr Thompson praised the pub-

’ lic for its assistance in giving infor-
mation to authorities and thanked .

the Defence Force, Police Force
and US Coast Guard for their
assistance.

He said his department:wilhs:~
comtinue to ensure that-allillegal

imihigrants, fot just Haitian

adhere to the Bahamas’ immii-

gration laws.

According to him, a Nigerian,
Filipino woman with her two chil-
dren,'and a Congolese national
were also‘recently repatriated.

Tearful”

- mother |
begs court
for mercy

“A MOTHER of two
broke down in'tears
Wednesday, begging for
mercy from the court
after being arraigned on
weapons charges.

Bonniesha Collie, a
resident of Sunshine
Park, appeared before
Chief Magistrate Roger
Gomez in Court 1, Bank
Lane, charged with three ©
counts of possession of a
firearm with intent to
endanger life, damage
and assault of a police
officer with a dangerous
instrument.

It is alleged that Collie
was in possessionofa
handgun on December 18
with intent to endanger
the lives of Jason Hen-
field Sr, Jason Henfield
Jr and Mamawia Hen-
field. It is further alleged
that-on the day in ques- °
tion, Collie caused $2,335
in damage to a Nissan
Primera. It is also alleged
that Collie assaulted
Police Constable 2422
George Ward with a car.

Collie, who was not
represented by counsel,
pleaded not guilty to the
charges. She told the
court that it was a “bad
situation” and that she
had never held a gun in
her life. Collie asked the
court to have mercy on
her. She said she is a
mother of two children.

Collie was remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison.
The case was adjourned
to today.





is . 3 f:
U

noted the quick turn around time for
those recently caught, with 373 sent
back in just a week, between Decem-
ber 23 and 30, at a cost of $100,000.
The group of 68 was expected to
have been repatriated either last night
or today, according to Minister of State
for Immigration, Branville McCart-

Their 40-foot blue and red boat was
discovered on Wednesday at around
10am by RBDF officers flying Defence
Force craft Charlie Six BDF while on

a routine air patrol. HMBS P-49 was
dispatched to investigate and found
the migrants afloat six and a half miles
off Hawksbill Rock. .
Without proper documentation, they
were transferred from their vessel to
the Defence Force craft and taken to
New Providence. Their apprehension.
comes at a time when the Carmichael
Road Detention Centre is in a state
of disrepair, having been damaged last
week in an arson attack for which an
American has been charged.




. Patrick Hanna/BIS Photo



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380-FLIX
PAGE 4, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE





EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Let the
law be







The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master




LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914





SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.








Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991






EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.
Publisher/Editor 1972-




Published Daily Monday to Saturday






Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance PeAnaperent Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama








TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
‘Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

_ Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348








Russian sees end of US in 2010

WHILE the world is looking forward to
January 20th and pinning tremendous hope .
on America’s new president, a lonely voice

' echoes across the icy steppes of Russia pre- -
dicting the end of the US in 2010.

No one paid much attention to the
world’s modern-day Nostradamus — he
was probably considered.a bit of a nut case
at the time — but with the US’s deepening ©

- recession many are starting to.take him
seriously.

He is being lionised by the Russian
media, and is now being picked up by the .
Western press.

According to the Wall Street Journal
Russian academic Igor Panarin, 50, believes
that an economic and moral collapse will
trigger a civil war in the United States that
will eventually lead to its: break up.

He first posited his theory about the col-
lapse of the US in 2010 at a conference in
Linz, Austria, in 1998.

The predictions of Mr Panarin, a former
KGB analyst, are of course music to the
ears of the men in the Kremlin, who have.
blamed Washington for all of the world’s

. problems — from the instability in the Mid-

dle East to the world’s financial.collapse.

Russia sees the.end of American influ-

_ence as her opportunity, at last:to fill the ~

void.that will-be left: enabling her: to: move =
onto centre stage.

However, Mr Panarin, who says he is not

anti-American, unlike the Kremlin, does
not see the US collapse as a good omen for

) . Russia.

- Mr Panarin, the dean of the Russian

Foreign Ministry’s academy for future

diplomats, can often be found at Kremlin

receptions, in addition to lecturing stu- ©
dents, publishing books and appearing in

the media as an expert on US-Russian rela-

tions.

"There's a 55-45'per cent chance right
now that disintegration will occur (in
America),” he says. “One could rejoice in
that process. But if. we're. talking reason- be most un-American.
ably, it's not the best scenario — for Rus- © | However, if we all pull together, make
sia." _. sensible decisions, and not fight among

Writing from Moscow. Kadtew Osborn _ourselves, the present storm can be weath-
quotes Mr Panarin as saying that “although ered. In the end we might even have a
Russia would become more powerful on. = more stable world.





*- the global stage, its economy would suffer
because it currently depends heavily on
the dollar and on 'trade with the US.”

Writes Osborn: “Mr Panarin posits, in
brief, that mass immigration, economic
decline, and moral degradation will trig-
gera civil war next fall and the collapse of
the dollar.

“Around the end of June 2010, or early
July, he says, the US. will break into six
pieces — with Alaska reverting to Russian
control.

“In addition to increasing coverage in
state media, which are tightly controlled
by the Kremlin, Mr. Panarin's ideas are
now being widely discussed among local
experts. He presented his theory at a recent
- roundtable discussion at the Foreign Min-

_ istry.
“The country's top international rela-
- tions school has hosted him asa Reyote :
speaker.

“During an appearance on the state TV
channel Rossiya, the station cut between
his comments and TV footage of lines at

“soup kitchens and crowds of homeless peo-

ple in the U.S. The professor has also been

featured on the Kremlin's English- language

“. propaganda channel, Russia Today.” ©
«According to, Vladimir Pozner, a promi- _
nent TV journalist in-Russia;Mr-Panarin’s~-
vision “reflects a very pronounced degree
of anti-Americanism in Russia today. It’s
much stronger than it was in the Soviet ,
Union.”

According to columnist Osborn, Mr
Pozner.and other Russian commentators
and experts on the US dismiss Mr Panarin’s
predictions. ‘Crazy ideas are not usually
discussed by serious people,’ says Serei .
Rogov, director of the government-run
Institute for US and Canadian Studies,
who thinks Mr Panarin’s theories don’t
hold water.”

This can only happen if Americans lose
hope and faith in themselves, which would










































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EDITOR, The Tribune.

When persons like me speak
out in support of capital pun-

‘ishment, we often hear the.

opposing chatter of those who
claim to stand for human rights.
They ask the question: “Who
has the right to judge or con-
demn someone who has com-
mitted murder?” My question
in response is: “Does the law
have a face?” Let’s not be mis-
guided and allow the words of
anyone to conjure up thoughts
that would cause us-to give a

. face to the laws of our country.

The law regarding capital pun-
ishment has no face! The law
itself is the Judge and not the
robed man or woman with the
bleached wig.

When we apply a face to the
law of capital punishment we
then begin to associate individ-
uals with a law that pre-exists all
ofus.

By doing so, we'add their
ideals, personalities and associ-
ations. :

I would then have the right
to question this man’s ability to




BOMB Ee

letters@tribunemedia.net



judge another or condemn one
to death.

However let it be known that
no one person is the law. A
judge can only apply the law
according to what is written and
that which is written in regards
to capital punishment was done
so in all wisdom. We need to
respect the origins of law of cap-
ital punishment.

Those who have the power
to remove a law such as this
must respect its origin and the
Originator.

I hear those who say that the
integrity of our legal system is in
such a poor state that we cannot
exercise this law because high
risks of wrongful deaths.

However, they must acknowl-
edge also that one of the main
reasons behind this mess is the
delays in carrying out execu-
tions and punishments for crim-
inals.

the ; udge

' The relaxation and passive-
ness of those who were assigned
to carry out what is written has
damaged the integrity of our
courts.

Some people ‘continue to try
and make capital punishment a
personal issue. It’s not! No mat-
ter if you are for or against it, let
the law be the judge.

Mind you these are the very
same persons who claim to sup-
port equal rights for all. Yet this
mentality is thrown aside when
it comes to capital punishment.
The murderers get the centre
of the cheese and the victims
— the ends. How fair is that?’

Are we equal in this world? If
I am murdered can I ask for
that man to be hanged? This is
my dying. wish that I hope
would be carried out if such was
to be the case of my exit. But as
for those who were not as for-
tunate to make such a wish let’
us be their voices.

DELROY MEADOWS -
BahamasIssues.com
Nassau,

December, 2008.

Press is often our strongest ally!

EDITOR, The Tribune.
I WAS overjoyed to hear that

- the mother who was scarred in

surgery was finally given her
records.

The Power of “The Pen”.......

Or should I say...““The Press!”

I am a registered nurse (non-
practising), and would be the
first to defend the many fine
physicians, nurses and other
health care professions at The
Princess Margaret Hospital. It is
absolutely amazing that they
have been able to serve the
Bahamian people all these
years, with very little resources
and no health tax.

What we get out of it, con-
sidering what we put in, is astro-
nomical!

I have no idea what really
happened in the unfortunate
case of the mother whose body

- was left badly scarred after

surgery, but would advise the
Bahamian public to always find

out both sides of any story that

comes out of PMH.

I do believe; however, that
there needs to be more regula-
tions and accountability in place
for the entire medical profes-
sion. The Bahamas is far behind













2




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or Abaco Motor Mall, Don MacKay Blyd, 367-2916




in many areas. For example:

Are all health care profes-
sionals required to have mal-
practice insurance?

Is continuing education
mandatory in order to.be re-
licensed annually?

Are there regulations ‘con-
cerning the importation and dis-

tribution of pharmaceuticals, or.

do we run an open market that
exposes the Bahamian people
to any and everything from
counterfeit to substandard
drugs? These are just a few
examples.

It is interesting, but not sur-
prising at all, that this patient
was given her records after her

case was made public. A: story
in the 20th edition of The Kil-
larney Voice online,

_ (www.thekillarneyvoice.com),

speaks to the power of the pen
and how we can go.about get-
ting our rights in a civilised way.

lam a strong believer that no
institution or government on
earth is stronger-than the ‘will
of the people whom they serve.
— 41 to 300,000+..:you do, the
math!

The press is often our
strongest ally! —

BARBARA HENDERSON
Nassau,
December, 2008.

Basic understanding of
animal welfare needed

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Re: Will the horse track ever open again? Tribune -15 Dec '08

THE ‘horse track’ should not be permitted to open agair. until we
demonstrate a basic understanding of animal welfare.

KEN W

KNOWLES, MD
Nassau, ;
December 19, 2008.

DON STAINTON
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THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 5





Electrical fault
suspected in
fire at BIC

POLICE suspect that an
electrical fault and not foul
play was responsible for
the damaging fire at
Bahamas Telecommunica-
tion Company’s head
office on John F Kennedy
Drive. ;

“It was confined to
room on the second floor
of the building. There was
damage to computers that
were in that room. It is sus-
pected that it might have
been electrical, based on
everything we see there,”
said Acting Commissioner
of police Reginald Fergu-
son.

It is understood that the
fire started in the area
where a Christmas tree
had been erected.

The blaze occurred on
Tuesday and left the front
of the main building dra-
matically blackened with
smoke. BTC employees
were told not to return to
work until “further
notice.”

A message left for BTC
Vice President Kirk Grif-
fin seeking an update on
the situation was not
returned up to press time
yesterday.

Unconfirmed
reports of
layoffs at
Abaco Cluh,
Winding Bay

THERE were uncon-
firmed reports yesterday
of a number of workers
being laid off from the
Abaco Club in Winding
’ Bay, Marsh Harbour.

Up.to press time the .
club’s human resources: °”
manager, Freddie
Munnings, was out of
office and did not return
an e-mail seeking com-
ment.

However, several
sources suggested that the
exercise had taken place.

Labour Minister Dion
Foulkes said he had not
been informed of any lay-
offs. ‘ A

He noted that all major
employers are mandated
by law to inform the
department of labour
before terminating work-
ers.

The Bahamas
more than
doubles its
rice imports

THE Bahamas more
than doubled its rice
imports in 2008.

The country increased
its rice imports from the
United States by 200 ©
metric tonnes.

Overall the country
imported 300 metric
tonnes of rice in 2008.

The worldwide con-
sumption of rice has -
drastically increased
over the last 25 years, :
but dropped slightly last
year when prices for the }
product skyrocketed.

During the first quar-
ter of 2008, the price of
rice rose greatly due to
a rice shortage.

In April 2008, rice
prices hit 24 cents a
pound, twice the price
that it was seven
months earlier.

S'TRUCKUM

USCUUSRETT TE Sa TITEL SS

PU SMUT SR TH eT LEE

PHONE: 327-6464
a eee



Branville McCartney

\

gateway lines

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

LONG lines could soon be a thing of
the past for returning residents at Lyn-
den Pindling International Airport’s
Immigration gateway, according to
State Minister for Immigration
Branville McCartney.

He said the department has been _
looking into ways to reduce the.

amount of time it takes for immigra-

tion officers to process residents and,

moving forward, even visitors.

‘“We certainly don’t want what has’ .

been happening — these long lines at
the airport for Bahamians coming
home. They should not be waiting on
lines to get, back home,” said Mr
McCartney. —

According to him, the information
officers enter into their databases when
residents are returning may not be
practical information. Now, they are
looking for ways to reduce or remove
parts of the required process.

o inbrief Bid to reduce immigration

at the airport



“We certainly
don’t want what

has been happening
— these long lines
at the airport for
Bahamians coming
home. They should
not be waiting on
lines to get back
home.”



Branville McCartney

tion from locals:they go and they plug
certain things in and some of that is not
necessary,” said Mr McCartney. “I
don’t know where that is in the law to
say that that’s mandatory, but someone
must have put that in practice and now

it is causing a delay.”

He said an incident recently
occurred when several flights arrived in
succession and there were not suffi-
cient immigration officers to process -
the parade of people quickly. The
result was long lines and a long wait for
visitors and residents alike.

“We’re looking into that to ensure
that that doesn’t happen again and
that we have sufficient people on at
the airport to ensure that-when persons
come that they are dealt with effi-
ciently,” said Mr McCartney.

According to him, there should have
been nine officers working the day of
the incident. However, only four
showed up for work.

He said like the police and Defence
Force, Immigration could always use
more officers in order to help the
department run more efficiently —
especially at the airport.

“It’s not good (long lines) for our
tourist industry and it’s not good for
locals either,” said Mr McCartney. “It’s



“Now they take all of this informa-

Government, fraternity pay tribute

the first impression our visitors get.”

to late broadcaster Phil Smith

@ By ALISON LOWE .
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

GOVERNMENTand the
brothers of the Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity have
extended their condolences
to the family of late ZNS
sports broadcaster, Phil
Smith, who died last Sun-
day morning.

Mr Smith served as sports
director for the Broadcast-
ing Corporation of the
Bahamas since 1997.

Youth and Sports Minis-
ter Desmond Bannister said
in a release that Mr Smith,
who was 51, was relied upon
as an “authoritative voice”
who provided an “accurate
description of the state of
sports in the Bahamas.”

“As this country’s pre-
eminent sports journalist
Phil Smith embodied all
that is good about Bahami-
an sports, inspiring in ath-
letes and spectators alike
the notion that they all
shared an equal stake in the

= By CHESTER ROBARDS
. Tribune: Staff Reporter

BISHOP Simeon Hall has launched a sharp
attack on the Bahamas legal system, blaming its
many shortcomings for the rise in crime.

Bishop Hall, who is president at the New
Covenant Baptist Church and serves as Chair-
man of the National Advisory Council on
Crime, has been a stalwart anti-crime fixture in

the community.

He said his sermon entitled “What, when
there are only three berries on your tree” was
to focus. on the economic times, however, his
sermonizing moved into:the problems with the

judicial system.

“The year ended and a new year has begun
and very little has been done to fix the judicial

system,” he said.

“In the crime report we found that one of the
core problems was the inordinate amount of
time (elapsed), from the time the person is
arrested to the time he is brought before the
courts, and we believe that is a major plank in

the fight against crime.”

He said he finds it lamentable that the FNM
government has done nothing to fix this prob-

lem in the judiciary.

Government recently introduced its plan to
complete the Nassau Street court complex;
which it hoped would help curb the backlog of
cases. When the court has been completed it is

growth and development of
the Bahamas as an interna-
tional sports power,” said
Mr Bannister.

“So firmly did Phil Smith
believe in such a proposi-
tion that many were his per-
sonal sacrifices to connect
national federations with
their best international
players so as to ensure that
The Bahamas would field
its strongest national teams
to represent the Common-
weath of Islands he so fer-

vently served,” added the,

minister. beats

Mr Bannister said that
through such efforts Mr
Smith became an “impor-
tant commodity, possessing
a pool of knowledge that
readily made him a Bahami-
an icon, well known
throughout local and inter-
national circles.”

Brothers of the Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity’s local
chapters, Delta Epsilon Sig-
ma and Beta Beta Lambda,
remembered Mr Smith as a
man whose “devotion to his



SNe BUILT A

fraternity was unmatched.”

“Even after his illness
became serious, he still took
the time to mentor younger
brothers and provide sup-
port to the older brothers,”
said the fraternity.

Mr Smith was initiated
into the Beta Epsilon chap-
ter while studying broadcast
journalism at Langston Uni-
versity, USA, in the sum-

Bishop Simeon Hall hits
out at the legal system |

Bishop Simeon Hall



expected to be a more secure complex for pris-

oners, witnesses and court staff.

system.

Bishop Hall suggested to his congregation
that they judge Mr Ingraham on whether he
makes some reasonable advances in fixing the

College of St Benedict and St John's University Brass Choir to perform

ALUMNAE, alumni, par-
ents, students and friends of
the College of Saint Benedict
and Saint John’s University
are invited to a concert and
reception on Sunday January
4, at 6pm. The concert. and
reception will be held at St
Anselm Parish, Fox Hill.
Admission is free. Brian Coop-
er, a junior at the university is
a proud member of the band.

The College of St Bene-
dict/St John’s University Brass
Choir consists of approxi-
mately 16-18 students under
the direction of Dr Dale
White. Membership is made
up of both music and non-
music majors who enjoy a sim-
iar passion for brass ensem-
ble music. The repertoire of
the ensemble includes music
of all historical styles, from

original contemporary works
for brass, to light classics and
hymn tunes, to Renaissance
and Baroque transcriptions.

The CSB/SJU Brass Choir
rehearses once a week and
performs at a variety of events
on and off campus. 5

The 2009 tour to the
Bahamas is the first major tour
outside the state of Minnesota
for the ensemble.

-lege basketball team, his

THE Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity with Phil Smith.



brothers of the Bahamas
and worldwide extend their
heartfelt condolences to the
family of their fallen broth-
er Phill Smith,” they said.

Mr Smith would have
been 52 on May 7th.

mer of 1979.
As a member of the col-

“spectacular performance
on the court earned him his
line name: ‘Thrill’,” recalled .
a release from the group.

“President of the Gradu-° He leaves his .wife,
ate chapter Brother’ Blossie, three children,
DeMario Minus, President Dupree, Karissa, and
of the Beta Beta Lambda Avent, and four grandchil-

Nicholas McDonald, and dren.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds‘for a °
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award. A

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.














Bobcat Bahamas Limited _
wishes to advise the public that
we will be closed for business

from the period of

December 23rd, 2008
through

January 3rd, 2009.
RE-OPEN

January 5th, 2009.

On behalf of the
Management & Staff of
Bobcat Bahamas.

We wish you a very
Merry Christmas
and a happy and prosperous
‘New Year

for emergencies contact
Raymond Duncombe at 477-0926


PAGE 6, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 ~ THE TRIBUNE

Highlights
from the action
on Bay Street








-A.2009 NEW YEAR’S DAY MESSAGE



from



"| BARRIE FARRINGTON, CBE PRESIDENT
BAHAMAS HOTEL EMPLOYERS’ ASSOCIATION

hb

On behalf of the Bahamas Hotel Employers’ Association | wish you a Happy
and Healthy New Year.

2008 has been a hard year for our industry as the Bahamas has been clearly

affected by the financial crisis of the United States and the world. We are

once more painfully reminded that we live in an increasingly inter-dependent
" global society. And while we are blessed with incredible natural beauty, a rich

culture; and an abundance of friendly, warm and capable people, for us to

successfully compete in Global Tourism we simply must do better in making
every visitor experience memorable.

: Unfortunately as we look into 2009, there is no indication “of a change for
the better. However, it is the responsibility of all of us to remember our rich
tourism past, and all the positive things it has done for our country.

Regrettably, a number of our colleagues have been affected by the downturn

in tourism activity. We hope that this set back is short-lived and we can
~ get our people back to work. In the meantime, let us prepare ourselves for
- recovery and a better future.

| 7 responsibilty rests with each and every one of us to ensure that it is
‘better in The ages for our, visitors and for one another.



May God Bless you all


Peter, VAINUAL I ey CUU, re 6

es ee
Leena SS SSS SSS Ss SS Ss SS)




“Hl repesenmienaspocsseneasuacesptenpaneat

SSSA SS



ore ER BRR IE RSI



wee

Uva ee
UES
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
aU ey aor al








PARADISE ISLAND, BAHAMAS
PRESENTS THE



SRN
oo Se BS

las ey NY
S

CELEBRITY
XS INVITATIONAL



cw ss
SSR

MICHAEL JORDAN
y rity Inv



VOLUNTEERS NEEDED ©

Kerzner International Bahamas Limited is
recruiting volunteers to assist with the Michael
Jordan Celebrity Invitational Golf Tournament
to be held on January 22 - 25, 2009 at the Ocean
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To volunteer contact Victoria Bethell by email at

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PAGE 8, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009





RBDF Photos Courtesy of Public Relation Department




plo,

6

FLEET CHIEF EDON GREEN, along-with the marines assigned to the Port Se

SS
N
AXS
\
S

SSH

Mrs. Janet Smith-Butler,,Administrator at Unity House, on East Street South.



‘Merry Christmas &

What a great time to draw
closer to God
and to our loved ones !!!

o

FAMILY MEDICINE & SKIN CARE CLINIC FOR THE WHOLE
Faniy , Adults & Children, Men & Women, All health concerns, Annual

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SS

ity Section donated two wheelchairs and a monetary gift

5.

KENTUCKY Fried

Chicken officially opened its |

newest store at the Mall at
Marathon in grand festive
style in December. Bahami-
ans from near and far gath-
ered to participate in the
opening ceremonies.

Gabriel Sastre, vice-pres-

ident and general manager
of Restaurants (Bahamas)
Ltd, operators of Kentucky
Fried Chicken Nassau, said,
“We,at KFC are very proud
of having opened our new
restaurant under the latest
KFC image in design and
décor. We believe that the
Mall at Marathon is the per-
fect location.

Comfortable

' “The restaurant, with its
new look, offers comfortable
seating and a spacious dri-

- ve-through. We look for-

ward to attracting the
Bahamian public, and hope
they will come and patronise
our latest addition.”

Mr Sastre said KFC
would like to see families,

THE TRIBUNE



MISS TRACEY-ANN BAXTER receiving gifts from Pastor Prince Bodie,





Chaplain df the Defence Force at the Elizabeth Estates Home for Children.

RBDE makes donations
during holiday season

THE Royal Bahamas Defence Force has made many dona-

dren and the disabled.

‘tions to the less fortunate this holiday season - benefitting chil-

‘This week officers and marines assigned to the'Port Security
Section donated two wheelchairs and a monetary gift to the res-
idents of the Unity House, East Street South.

According to a release from the force, administrator Janet
Smith-Butler, was “visibly moved, as she accepted the gifts,
and thanked the men for their generosity, on behalf of the res-
idents and caretakers of the Home.”

Meanwhile, Pastor Bodie, chaplain of the Defence Force,
helped to “bring cheer” to the children of the Elizabeth Estates ©
Home, presenting numerous gifts to staff member Tracey Ann
Baxter to be given to the children. ie ae

The Children’s Emergency Hostel also benefittd with presents
from HMBS Yellow Elder’s crew. \

“These are just some of the projects which the officers, and
marines of the Defence Force are involved with, as a small
gesture of lending a helping hand wherever possible, as they con-

tinue to protect the territorial sovereignty

the RBDF. \

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young adults and “tweeners”
come and enjoy the restau-
rant.

Joining the opening festiv-
ities was “Colonel” John
Baxley, the look-a-like KFC
Colonel and a good friend
of the late Colonel Harland
Sanders.

Since joining the KFC
company in 1994, Mr Baxter
has travelled around the
world.

He said he has found that

people everywhere like Ken-
tucky Fried Chicken.

“They love the consisten-
cy of the product,” he said.
“We do it the same way
worldwide so you know that
if.you are in Bangkok, or

. Nanjing, or in the Philip-

pines, you are going to get
KFC just like you do at
home.

“In the Bahamas, I think
you have some of the best
product I have ever eaten. I
was honoured when they
brought me here for this
opening. These folks do a
fine job,” Mr Baxley said.

Mr Sastre and Miss

of The Bahamas,” said
" th (? i

\



Bahamas Tourism Queen
Tiara Cooper cut the ribbon
at the grand opening cere-.
mony. Assisting them were
Dr Canon Kirkley Sands,
area manager Debra Miller
and lead manager Raynell
Bowe, as well as “Colonel”
Baxley.

Franchise

Shanelle Strachan, Miss
KFC, employed with the
franchise for eight years,
said that the opening was an
“excellent experience.”

“We moved out of the
Mall to accommodate more
Bahamians.

“We have an excellent
atmosphere here and the
employees are smiling and
willing to serve, entertain
and make our customers
happy,” she said.

Dr Canon Sands of Christ
Church Cathedral said a
prayer of blessing and pros-
perity during the opening
event. Adding to the excite-
ment was the appearance by
KFC’s mascot Chicky.
THE TRIBINE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 9



Grand Fahama
International
Airport suffers —
Punway lights
failure

FROM page one

minutes after an American
Eagle flight from Miami
arrived at the airport with
about 48 passengers.

The entire airport termi-
nal was in darkness for a
brief moment before the
emergency lights kicked in,
to the relief of arriving pas-
sengers and persons in the
arrival section.

It is not known whether a
computer or electrical mal-
function might have caused
the airport’s outage.

With today’s technologi-
cal advancement, most air
port runway lights are autr-
matically turned on by con-
puter.

The newly construced
GBIA was built at a cos of
$30 million after the oldair-
port was destroyed by lurri-
cane and storm surge ever-
al years ago.

The 11,000 feet rmway
can accommodate thelargest
planes in service todiy.

The airport is opeated by
the Grand BahamaAirport
Company, which 3 owned
by Hutchison PortHolding.

National Energy
Policy conponents
‘expectedto he
achiever this year"

FROW page one

source,”said Mr Neymour.
With -he former Christie
administration first
annouicing the need for a
NEP n early 2007, when
launched Mr Neymour
said it will impact virtually
every government sector
and will eventually trickle ’'
throughout the remainder
of the economy. /
With the Bahamas rate
the fourth most likely
country to,experience sea
level rise resulting from
climate change, the minis-
ter said initiatives are
being planned in an effort
to combat the impending
threat. Apart from a signif-
icant amount of land loss,
the minister said major
beach erosion is a likely
outcome in the wake of ©
global warming.. |
The minister explained:
“We have to begin the
process of educating
Bahamians, how impor-
tant it is to address climate
change, and to do so is to
reduce our consumption of
petroleum.” |
Mr Neymour said the
extreme shifts in gas and
diesel prices in 2008,. gives .
a clear picture of the,
volatile petroleum indus-
try.
In July the price of a
barrel of oil jumped from
$70 to $147, then dropped
to $38 by December. The
minister says these shifts
should encourage Bahami-
ans to pay close attention
to their consumption of | -
energy. fee
With the completion of
a NEP draft in 2007 under
‘ the Christie administra-
tion, with the assistance of
the Inter-American Devel-
opment Bank, an energy
policy committee formed
by the government in early
2008 has since conducted
reviews and has worked on
revising six of the policy
proposals. The committee
is currently preparing an
implementation plan for
an NEP, however a con-.
firmed launch date has yet
to be announced.
Almost 30 applications
have been submitted to
BEC from renewable
energy suppliers, however
in the most recent press
releases, BEC said it is
close to making a final
decision on a supplier.
With the possibility of
more than one company
assisting BEC with energy
supplies to the nation,
some of the applicants
have proposed energy
derived from waste, wind,
solar, and water.

‘Some Customs staff

cynical

about ending corruption

FROM page one

ed the local media.

Several customs officers recently
approached the Tribune, cynical about
tke prospect of ending corruption at

" fae critical government revenue earn-

er,
One customs employee’s sentiments
were that: “Nothing is being done and

. I don’t think it ever will.”

The employee, who left only the tag
“Sick and tired in customs” at the end
of a three page fax, said the media
might just be wasting it’s time exposing
stories about the widespread corrup-
tion in the department.

“There will be victimization and cor-
ruption in customs forever, until some-
one with a stern head takes a stand,”
said the fax.

According to “sick and tired”, cor-

ruption is so deeply ingrained and so ©

widespread that “nothing is ever goin,
to get done no matter how much trut
you guys (media) bring out.”

“Certain customs officers just can’t
be touched,” the fax claimed. “They
say they are invincible, that they know
the right people and that their dollar’s
long.” .

Acting comptroller of Customs
Anthony Adderley recently blamed
importers for officer’s corruption. He
contended that an officer would not

have to take a bribe, were it not
offered to him.

“An officer cannot be party to rev-
enue evasion without the members of
the public.

“The importer would have to agree
to do some things,” he said.

Another Custom’s employee who
wished to remain anonymous said she
would like to see officers promoted
based on their qualifications.

According to her, the promotion of
these officers could be a catalyst of
change.

She said, however, nepotism and
favouritism are commonplace in the
department and it greatly impedes the
progress of personnel who have

worked hard to obtain degrees, but
are not being allowed to utilize their

acquired skills. :

“Changes need to be made from the
top,” she said. “They need to promote
the qualified people, some of whom
have more qualifications than the
comptroller,” she claimed.

After much media attention; Cus-
toms employees began to empty the
department’s closets, exposing numer-
ous allegations of corruption and theft.

Employees are hoping the new year
will prompt government, to shake
things up even more at Customs.

“There are all-kinds of things that

need to be changed,” said a concerned

employee.



Saxons are unofficial winners
— Of New Year’s Junkanoo



219 points.

One Love Junkanoo group,

FROM page one

ple in Africa, America, and
the Bahamas.

The group also showed-off a
nightmare of a damsel being
chased by a myriad of infa-
mous characters being led by

the one and only Freddie’

Kruger.

Winning the crowd over
with a spectacular perfor-
mance, the Saxons also walked
away victorious with best ban-
ner, and best music in the ‘A’

. division, the Shirley Street per-

formance prize with Music
Makers taking second place,
and a one point lead on
Valley Boys, which placed

* third.

In the best dancers category,
the Saxons also won with 269
points, with the Music Mak-
ers trailing in second place
with 267 points, and One Fam-
ily third with 244 points.

Winning,the title of best lead
costume, the Valley Boys
scored.312 points, with the
Music ‘Makers taking second
place at 222, and the Valley
Boys also taking third place at

The Valley Boys placed sec-
ond in the best music category,
just 32 points ahead of the
Music Makers.

» The Valley Boys also placed
second in the best banner cat-
egory, with One Family tak-
ing third.

In the free dancers catego-
ry, Roots took first place with
211 points, Saxons in second
place with 202, and a third
place tie with the Music Mak-
ers and Saxons with 187 points
each.

In the ‘B’ division, the over-
all unofficial winners were The
One Love Junkanoo group

with 3,432 points, in second

place Clico Colours scored
3,099 points, and the Fancy
Dancers in third place with
3,002 points.

For the best music division
‘B’, Clico Colours won with
One Love Junkanoo group
taking second place, and the
Kingdom Warriors taking
third.

best banner category, at 69
points were Clico Colours and

Tied for first place in the

the Fancy Dancers taking sec-
ond place, and in third place
were the Kingdom Warriors
and Redland Soldiers.

For the lead costume, One
Love Junkanoo group won

- first place, with the Redland

Soldier coming in second,
Fancy Dancers in third, and |
Kingdom Warriors in forth
place. :

Thousands of locals flocked
to Bay Street on Thursday
showing full support for the
annual event that attracts hun-
dreds of visitors from all parts
of the world.

There were dozens of local
officials present at the event,
including Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham with his
wife, Delores, National Secu-
rity Minister Tommy Turn-
quest, and former MP Janet
Bostwick.

Opposition leader Perry
Christie ‘not only attended, but
also took part in the parade
rushing with the Valley Boys,
as did Health Minister Dr
Hubert Minnis, who rushed
with the Saxons.

Police ‘brutality’ in Bain Town claim

FROM page one

from the property on the corner of
‘Augusta and Wilkinson Streets in
inner-city Nassau, said: “He was shout-
i *s get from this
* about you all
ghetto people, you all make me sick’.”

She said the officer then slapped
another man across the face.

The man then started walking
towards the nearest police station in
South Street to make a complaint
when the police officer pushed him
over and threatened him at gunpoint,
the woman witness claimed.

She added: “The guy didn’t throw
a blow at the police officer or any-
thing. He pulled out his gun for noth-
ing.

“And all the time he was saying
‘ghetto’, ‘dirty’ this and that, and how
he ‘tired of us’. He talked to us like



dogs.”
As the man’s girlfriend rushed after
him, .the officer pushed her aside,

‘kicked her, and forced her into the
‘police car, saying he was arresting her

for obstruction, witnesses claimed.

Backup arrived in five police cars
bringing an end to the half hour ordeal
that began about 8pm Monday.

Residents said they tried to visit the
arrested girl at South Street Police Sta-
tion, but the same officer would not let
them in.

The woman said: “And we wonder
why there is so much riots and why
people don’t want to call the police.

“Yes we live in the ghetto, but that’s
an insult, and when you carry on like
that in front of little kids, how do you
expect them to grow up respecting the
police?”

Witnesses lodged an official com-
plaint at Police Headquarters in East

Street yesterday.

Bahamas Police Press Liaison officer
Walter Evans was unable to confirm or
deny details of the incident, but said:'

“If they have a legitimate concern or
complaint the complaints department
will carry out a thorough, comprehen-
sive and impartial investigation.”



FROM page one

in Joan’s Heights was approaching
her home on foot when two men
held her up.

A man, described as about five
feet nine inches tall and wearing a
red and white striped shirt demand-
ed her handbag. He had his mouth
covered by a “dark scarf”, according



Armed robberies
mar New Yeat’s eve





to police, and was accompanied by a
man said to be around five feet sev-
en inches tall, wearing a white shirt.

She threw her handbag on the
ground and ran. ,

The men took her bag, which con-
tained numerous personal items.

No one was harmed in either in¢i-
dent. Police have no leads and inves-
tigations are continuing.










PAGE 10, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 “kM THE TRIBUN.

| FRIDAY EVENING “JANUARY 2, 2009 |
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THE TRIBUNE



Ohama set to
return home after
vacation in Hawaii

w KAILUA, Hawaii Hawaii

PRESIDENT-ELECT
Barack Obama on Thurs-

day bid his native Hawaii
“aloha” after a 12-day
vacation, according to
Associated Press.

Obama, wife Michelle
and their two young
daughters were set to fly
to Chicago and expected
to arrive early Friday. He
planned to fly on Sunday
to Washington, where 7-
year-old Sasha and 10-
year-old Malia start
school on Monday.

The Obamas kept a low
profile while vacationing
on the island of Oahu.
Aside from daily trips to.”
the gym and golf courses,
the president-elect seldom
left his vacation retreat, a
rented $9 million. home
near Honolulu. When he
did venture out, it usually
was to grab some shave
ice, a local treat, look at
baby tigers at the zoo or
take some other child-

friendly excursion. ©

Obama joked to
onlookers Thursday
morning at the gym that
he was reluctant to return
to Chicago, where temper-
atures were in the 20s.

“JT wish I could hang out
with you, but I’ve got to
go home,” said Obama,
leaving the Marine Corps
Base Hawaii’s Semper Fit

center in 70-degree weath-
ek: as

While on vacation, Oba-
ma tried to take advan-
tage of his last break
before taking office on
Jan. 20. Other than make
small talk with residents
and pose for pictures with
babies, he has done little
in public. ‘That, aides said,
was the idea.

During the visit, Obama
played golf three times, .
twice at the private Mid-
Pacific Country Club and
orice at Olomana Golf

Links,.a a public.course be. “

knew as‘a youth. On‘Thes
day-he played basketball
at his alma mater, the pri-
vate Punahou School:
Michelle Obama also
remained:largely out of
- sight; other than:the occa-
sional trip to the gym. She
did not join Obama and
the girls when they went
to.an aquatic park or to





the zoo, nor when he visit-.

ed'the nearby Marine base
on Christmas Day.

While on vacation, Oba- .

ma did his best to stay out.
of the discussion over the ;
escalating violence in the’
Middle East, where Israeli
troops launched an offen-
sive against Hamas lead-
ers who had fired rockets
from Gaza. Aides said
there is only one president
‘ata time, but Obama .
received security briefings
and was in touch with Sec-
retary of State Condpleez-
za Rice and his incoming
national security team.
Pro-Palestinian activists.
protested outside Oba-
-ma’s vacation home on

Tuesday and urged anew |

approach to’the Middle

East. Obama did not
acknowledge them.

The only Obama news

- from Oahu came when the
entire island lost electricity
for 11-hours. Obama aides
said the family’s house also
lost power. but did not use
backup generators during
the nighttime incident.

Obama spent his child-
hood in Honolulu, largely -
raised by his grandmother,
who died on Nov. 2, just

two, (days before the elec-
tion’that made Obamia the
nation’s first African-
‘American president.
While on the pre-inaugu-
ration trip he attended a
private memorial service
for Madelyn Payne Dun-
ham — known to friends
as “Toot” — and scattered
her‘ashes into the sea.

Obama was born in
Honolulu in 1961,two
years'after Hawaii became
a state. He lived in
Indonesia for four years
when he moved there with’
his mother and stepfather,
but he spent 14 of his first
18 years as an islander.

He moved to the main-
land to attend college in’
1979 and has only
returned for vacations.





INTERNATIONAL NEWS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 11

Israeli airs trike



a top Hamas leader

i GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip

AN ISRAELI warplane
dropped a 2;000-pound bomb
on the home of one of Hamas’
top five decision-makers
Thursday, instantly killing him

and 18 others, while the Israeli.

army said troops massed on
the Gaza border were ready
for any order to invade,
according to Associated Press.

The airstrike on Nizar
Rayan was the first that suc-
ceeded in killing a member of
Hamas’ highest echelon since

Israel began its offensive Sat-

urday. The 49-year-old pro-
fessor of Islamic law was

known for personally partici-,

pating in clashes with Israeli
forces and for sending one of
his sons on’a 2001 suicide mis-
sion that killed two Israelis.
Even as it pursued its bomb-
ing campaign, Israel kept the
way open for intense efforts
by leaders in the Middle East
and Europe to arrange a
cease-fire. Israel said it would

consider a halt to fighting if .
international monitors were

brought in to track compliance
with any truce.

_ Adding to the urgency of
the diplomatic maneuvering,
the Israeli military said its
preparations for a possible
ground assault were complete
and that troops stood ready to
cross the border if the air oper-
ation to stamp out Hamas

. rocket fire needed to be

expanded.

Soldiers massed along the -

Gaza frontier said they were
eager to join the fight, and

some even cheered as they

heard thunderous: airstrikes 1 in
the distance. |

The hit on Rayan’s home
obliterated the four-story

apartment building and peeled

off:the«walls of:others:around



in the northern Gaza Strip.
Mounds of debris thrown up
by'the blast swallowed up cars.

Eighteen other people,
including ‘all four of Rayan’s
wives and nine of his 12 chil-
dren, also were killed, Pales-
tinian health officials said. A
man cradled the burned, limp
body of a child he pulled from
the rubble.

The house was one of five
bombed Thursday, among

more than 20 targets altogeth- |

er. Warplanes shredded the
houses, taking off walls and
roofs ‘and leaving behind éerie,
dollhouse-like views into
rooms that still contained fur-
niture.

_ Israel’s military, which has

said the homes of Hamas lead-
‘ers are being used to.store mis-

siles and other. weapons, said
the attack on Rayan’s house

triggered secondary explosions

it, creating a field of rubble in ~
‘the crowded town of Jebaliya



IN THIS AUG. 5, 2005 file photo Hamas leader Nizar Rayan marches
during a protest in the Jebaliya refugee camp in the northern Gaza
Strip. Israel assassinated Rayan Thursday Jan. 1, 2009 by dropping a
one-ton bomb on his house, also killing two of his wives and four of
his children. This first assault on the top leadership of Gaza's ruling
group escalated a crushing aerial offensive even as cee declared itself

ready to launch a ground invasion.
from the arms stockpiled:

there.
Seven other Palestinians

-were killed in.airstrikes ‘Thurs-:
day and one died of earlier,

injuries.

Israel has targeted Hamas
leaders many times in the past,
and the current leadership
went into hiding at the start of
the offensive. Rayan, however,
was known for openly defying
Israel and in the past had led
crowds to the homes of want-
ed Hamas figures — as if dar-
ing Israel to strike and risk the
lives of civilians. -

Residents said he openly
went to.a nearby mosque

Thx. sday morning to pray.

In his last interview, record-
ed with Hamas TV on
Wednesday, Rayan was as
defiant as ever about-con-
fronting the Israeli military.

“Oh fighters, know that you
will be victorious,” he said.
“God promises us either -vic-
tory or martyrdom. God is
greater than they are, God is
greater than their planes, God
is greater than their rockets.”

The military said it had
information that there was a
tunnel beneath Rayan’s home

. for use.asian escape route.

Israel seemed determined to
press ahead with airstrikes on
Hamas houses.

It also has: been targeting
buildings used by the territo-
ry’s Hamas government —
emptied days ago by evacua-
tions — as well’as rocket-
launching sites and smuggling
tunnels along the border with
Egypt.

“We are trying to hit every-
body who is a leader of the
organization, and today we hit
one of their leaders,” Israeli
Vice Premier Haim Ramon
said in a television interview.

More than 400 Gazans had
been killed and some 1,700
wounded © since © Israel
embarked on its aerial cam-
paign, Gaza health officials
said. The United Nations has

said the death toll includes |

more than 60. civilians, 34 of
them children. .

One of them, 11-year-old
Ismail Hamdan, was buried

Thursday after dying of
wounds suffered from»an

airstrike Tuesday that killed

two of his sisters, Haya, 4, and
Lama, 12. His body was

wrapped in a Palestinian flag

and his battered face was still

bandaged as he was carried

above a crowd of mourners.
Since Saturday, three Israeli

civilians and one soldier have.

also died in rocket attacks that
have reached deeper into
Israel than ever before, bring-
ing more than.a tenth of
Israel’s population of 7 million
within rocket range.

The bombing campaign has
worsened an already hard life
for Gaza’s mostly poor popu-
lation of 1.5 million: On Thurs-

day, hundreds of people stood |

in long, snaking lines across
the territory waiting to buy
bread.

‘Israel launched the offen-
sive Saturday after more than
a week of intense Palestinian
rocket fire’ that followed the
expiration of a six-month
truce, which Hamas refused to
extend because Israel kept up
its blockade of Gaza.

So far, the campaign has
been conducted largely from
the air. But a military spokes-
woman, Maj. Avital Leibovich,
said preparations for a ground

operation were complete.
“The infantry, the artillery

and other forces are ready.
They’re around the Gaza
Strip, waiting for any calls to
go inside,” Leibovich said.
Thousands of soldiers wait-

ed along the border, resting.

among tanks, armored per-
sonnel carriers and howitzers.
The ‘troops watched warplanes
and attack helicopters flying
into Gaza, cheering each time
they heard the explosion of an
airstrike.

One soldier, who-can be-

identified under military rules
only as Sgt. Yaniv, said he was
eager to go in. “I am going
crazy here watching all this. I
want to do my part as well,” he
said.

Hamas promised to put up a
fight if Israeli land forces
invaded.

“We are waiting for you to
enter Gaza to kill you or make
you into Schalits,” the group
said, referring to Israeli Sgt.
Gilad Schalit, who was cap-
tured in a cross-border raid by
Hamas-affiliated militants 2
1/2 years ago and remains in
captivity in Gaza.

Israel’s bruising campaign —

has not deterred Hamas from
assaulting Israel. According to
the military, militants fired
more than 30 rockets into
southern Israel during the day.

No injuries were reported,
but an eight-story apartment
building in Ashdod, 23 miles

‘from Gaza, was hit. Panicked

residents ran through a debris-
strewn street.
Earlier this week, Israeli
Prime Minister Ehud Olmert
rebuffed a French proposal for
a two-day suspension of hos-
tilities to allow for the delivery
of. humanitarian supplies.
Israel has been allowing.
trucked relief supplies to enter’
Gaza. Ninety aid trucks

crossed the border Thursday. |

Still, Olmert seemed to be
looking for a diplomatic way
out, telling Secretary of State
Condoleezza Rice and other’
world leaders that Israel would
accept a truce only if interna-
tional monitors took respon-.
sibility for enforcing it, gov-
ernment officials said. They
spoke on condition of
anonymity because the talks
were confidential.

A Turkish truce proposal
included a call for such moni-
tors.

Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni,
speaking to reporters during
a visit to Paris for meetings
with . French © officials,

expressed skepticism about the
benefits of a cease-fire. She

said Hamas used the lull dur-
ing the six-month truce that
expired last month to build up
its arsenal of weapons.

“Our experience from the

‘past is that even when we

accept something in order to
have a peaceful period of time,
they abuse it in order to get
stronger and to attack Israel
later on,” Livni said.

Egypt’s foreign minister said
Hamas must ensure that rock-
et fire stops in any truce deal,
and he criticized the Palestin-
an militants for giving Israel

n “opportunity on a golden
platter” to launch the offen-
sive.

Gaza has eon under Hamas

‘rule since the group’s fighters

overran it in June 2007.

The West Bank has
remained under the control of
moderate Palestinian Presi-
dent Mahmoud Abbas, who

‘has been negotiating peace

with Israel for more than a
year but has no influence over
Hamas.

Bringing in truce monitors:
would require cooperation:
between the fiercely antago-
nistic Palestinian factions. °

An Abbas confidant said the |
Palestinian president support-
ed the notion of international.
involvement. “We are asking:
for a cease-fire and an inter-
national presence to monitor
Israel’s commitment to it,”
Nabil Abu Rdeneh said. —

World leaders have not been
deterred by the initial rejec-
tions by Israel and Hamas of
truce efforts, and next week
French President Nicolas
Sarkozy plans'a whirlwind trip
around the region.



PALESTINIAN FIREFIGHTERS work at the scene of an israeli air strike on the hore of s senior Sdanas leader Nizar Paani in nthe Jabealiva refugee camp in the northern ee Strip, Thurs
ay, Jan. 1, 3
PAGE 12, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009



SPORTS |





New faces
abound
as NFL ©
playoffs
start

Hi By DAVE GOLDBERG
AP Football Writer
NEW YORK

Parity. Roger Goodell and
the NFL love it.

That will be evident when the
playoffs start with the wild-card
round this weekend. Five of the
eight participants will be teams
that missed the postseason a
year ago, and one of them, AFC
East champion Miami, actually
finished 1-15.

In the NFC, there is only one
repeater from 2007 among the
six entries: the defending cham-
pion New York Giants, who are
the top-seeded team in the con-

ference and will have the week

off.

Other than New York, which
finished 12-4, the rest of last
year's NFC playoff teams were
a combined 36-44, including
Seattle, which finished 4-12 this
season, and Green Bay, which
was 6-10.

That “left out" group also
includes preseason favorite Dal-
las, whose players consistently
dubbed themselves "the most
talented team in the league,"
but were sent home with an
embarrassing 44-6 drubbing in
Philadelphia last week. |

The games start at 4:30 p.m.
EST Saturday with Atlanta at
Arizona, followed by Indi-
anapolis at San Diego at 8 p.m.
On Sunday, Baltimore is at
Miami at 1 p.m., and Philadel-
phia at Minnesota at 4:30.

In order of appearance:

Atlanta, (11-5) at
Arizona (9-7)

Two teams few people
expected to be here.

The Cardinals, who finished
by losing four of their last six

and allowing an average of |

more than 40 points in those
games, benefited from playing
in the weak NFC West, where
they were 6-0. So they get the
first playoff home game for the
franchise since 1947, when they
won the NFL title as the Ghica-
go Cardinals.

The one advantage Arizona
has is experience at quarter-



back, where 37-year-old Kurt
Warner is a two-time MVP who
has played in two Super Bowls,
winning in 2000 with St. Louis
and losing two years later. -

‘His counterpart is Matt Ryan,
who despite being voted AP
Offensive Rookie of the Year
could have playoff jitters —
although he showed few jitters
of any kind during the regular
season.

The Falcons, 4-12.a year ago,
have some injury concerns.
John Abraham, who had 16?
sacks yet wasn't voted to the
Pro Bowl, sat out the second
half of last week's win over St.
Louis with shoulder, neck and
calf problems that have both-
ered him all season.

But the Falcons already had
clinched a playoff spot and
Abraham says he could have
played.

"We've got a big playoff run
coming up, so I just had to
make sure I was as rested as
possible," he says.

Indianapolis (12-4) at San
Diego (8-8)

Not as one-sided a matchup

‘as it might seem from the
. records.

The Colts won nine straight
after starting 3-4, primarily
because Peyton Manning recov-
ered from the preseason knee
problems that hindered him
well into the regular season.

But San Diego, 4-8 at one
point, won its last four to catch
Denver in the AFC West and is
playing now the way it was
expected to when it began the
season as one of the favorites
in the conference.

The Colts have traditionally
had trouble with the Chargers,
who last season knocked them
out of the playoffs with a 28-24

-win in Indy.

‘The Colts won this year in
San Diego 23-20 on a last-play,
51-yard field goal by Adam
Vinatieri — and that was before
the Chargers were playing well.

"You talk about a team that
people don't want to play, this
has to be one of those teams

_ because they've been playing

great football," San Diego's
LaDainian Tomlinson says o

* Indy. iy A








SAN DIEGO CHARGERS quarterback Philip Rivers (17) talks with teammates as they stretch out during football practice at the Chargers’ facility Thurs-





day, Jan. 1, 2009, in San Diego. The Chargers face the Indianapolis Colts on,Saturday, Jan. 3 in an AFC wild-card playoff football game in San Diego.



S SSS

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS quarterback Philip Rivers looks to pass dur-
ing football practice at the Chargers’ facility Thursday, Jan. 1, 2009,



Denis Poroy/AP Photo

in San Diego. The Chargers will face the Indianapolis Colts in San
Diego on Saturday, January 3 in an AFCIl wild-card playoff football

game.

The problem for the Colts is

that they could say the ‘same
thing about the Chargers.

Baltimore (11-5)
at Miami (11-5)

These are the two AFC teams
that aren't playoff repeaters;
they were a combined 6-26 last
season. In fact, Miami's one win
in 2007 was in overtime over
the Ravens after the usually
reliable Matt Stover missed .a
44-yard field goal attempt that
could have won it for Baltimore
— and possibly sent the Dol-
phins to an 0-16 season.

But Bill Parcells took over
the Dolphins, hired Tony Spara-
no as the coach and was lucky
to get Chad Pennington to play
QB when the Jets released him
after trading for Brett Favre.
Miami also benefited from New

RAK
ron

1S x AIC

England's problems after Tom
Brady's injury and from some
imagination (the "Wildcat"
offense) to win the AFC East.

The Ravens, as usual, are
staunch on defense. They also
got stout performances from
rookie QB Joe Flacco and sec-
ond-year running back Le'Ron
McClain.

That made them an offensive
threat for one of the first times
since they moved to Baltimore
in 1995, and they finished by
winning nine of their last 11.

Like the other visitors, the
Ravens are favored, perhaps
because the Dolphins seem to
be one of those "just glad to be
here" teams. Baltimore.won 27-
13 in Miami in the regular sea-
son and, like Indy, is a wild-card
team that could be a threat to
win it all.

S





S

SAN DIEGO CHARGERS running back Darren Sproles runs with the



- Denis Poroy/AP Photo

ball during football practice at the Chargers’ facility Thursday, Jan. 1,
2009, in San Diego. The Chargers face the Indianapolis Colts on Sat-
urday, Jan. 3 in an AFC wild-card playoff football game in San

Diego.

Philadelphia (9-6-1)
at Minnesota (10-6)

The Eagles, a very up-and-
down team, got in last week by
routing Dallas 44-6 after Tampa
Bay and Chicago lost to give
them a shot. This is a team that
seemed out of it after being tied
by lowly Cincinnati, then get-
ting routed in Baltimore in a

‘game in which Andy Reid

pulled Donovan McNabb at
halftime.

McNabb came back the next
week and the Eagles seemed
rejuvenated. They beat two
division winners, the Giants and
Cardinals, and blew out Dallas,
although they threw in a clunk-
er in the next-to-last week by
losing 10-3 in Washington.

"For people to just put us out
for dead, road kill, for that door

to just open up just one more
time for us, you never want to
give a team another opportuni-
ty," McNabb says, "because
when that team gets in, it could

be that team that you talk about’

that you don't want to play. The
way that we're feeling in this
locker room, we can be that:
team."

The Vikings hope they can
get back Pat Williams, the run-
stopping defensive tackle who
has missed the last two games
with a broken shoulder. Min-
nesota was unimpressive in its
finale, a game it went in know-
ing it needed to win, then bare-
ly getting by a Giants team play-
ing backups. One advantage for
Minnesota: Brad Childress, its
coach, is a former offensive
coordinator for the Eagles, so
he knows Philly well. |

Davydenko and Murray advance in Abu Dhabi

@ ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates
Andy Murray defeated James Blake 6-2, 6-2 Thursday

to set up a semifinal meeting with Roger Federer at the
inaugural Capitala World Tennis Championship, accord-
ing to the Associated Press. ,

In the other first-round match, Nikolay Davydenko
ousted Andy Roddick 6-4, 6-4 and will face Rafael Nadal
in Friday's other semifinal. Nadal and Federer received'
first-round byes in the exhibition event, which is not
part of the ATP Tour but features six of the world's top
10 players and offers a winner-take-all prize of $250,000.

Murray broke Blake in the third game and then took a
5-2 lead after using two forehand winners for another
break. The struggling Blake was then broken twice in a
row in the second set as Murray raced out to.a 4-0 lead to
take control of the match.

‘ Roddick started by hitting three aces in his opening ser-
vice game but was broken in the next after missing a
forehand, which was enough to give Davydenko the set.
Roddick then made two unforced errors in the fourth
game of the second set to give Davydenko another break,
and the Russian held his serve the rest of the way.

Capitala is the first major tennis tournament to be
played at the Zayed Sports City in Abu Dhabi, and: Rod-
dick said he was bothered by the shade covering half
the court for the mid-afternoon match. =

"It was tough playing out of the shadows and made it
difficult to spot the ball," he said. "It was always going to
be difficult coming from six weeks over the break. But






i A

RUSSIA’S Nikolay Davydenko returris the ball to
Andy Roddick from U.S. during the first day of
Capitala World Tennis Championship.





\ JAMES
BLAKE
from the
United
States
returns the

i/AP Photo



regardless of this match, I have worked hard in the off- ball t

season and I am happy." And Ml :
The top-ranked Nadal and No. 2 Federer will both ; i 7.

begin their 2009 ATP season by playing in the Qatar tain.

Open in Doha starting Monday. Murray, the defending
champion, and Roddick are also playing in the tourna-
ment. "




ANDY MURRAY from Britain returns the ball to James Blake from U.S. during the first day of Capitala World
Tennis Championship in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2009.

Say

MHA ‘

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TRIBUNE SPORTS

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 13







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CI Gibson Rattlers edge out defending
champs Westminster College Diplomats

na possible Hugh Campbell finals preview, the host team, backed
by a thrilling fourth quarter rally, retained their title in the New
Providence Senior Boys Basketball Classic setting the stage for what
is promising to be an entertaining finish to the remainder of the season.

The C.I Gibson Rattlers narrowly edged out the defending BAISS
Champions, Westminster College Diplomats, 87-86 in the tournament
finals Tuesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.

The Diplomats took a 64-53 lead into the fourth quarter and the lead
grew to as much as 10 midway though the final period before the
Rattlers staged a comeback effort led by the duo of floor general
Junior Denis and leading Drew Rolle.

Denis began the rally with a deep three pointer from the top of the
key and another jumper from distance a few plays later trimmed the
Diplomats lead to just three points. with 2:03 remaining.

After forcing a turnover.on the defensive end, Denis dished an
assist with a long baseball pass to Drew Rolle who finished with a
reverse lay-up to bring the Rattlers within one.

Rolle took a charge on the ensuing possession to forcer the turnover
and giving the Rattlers their first opportunity at a lead since early in the
second quarter.

Fouled on his way to the basket, Rolle made the second of a pair of
free throws to tie the game at 84. :

The Rattlers stifling defense forced their third turnover in as many
possessions and David St. Ville scored on the other end of the floor to
give C.J. Gibson the lead for good.

Rattlers Head Coach Kevin Johnson lauded his team’s perseverance
despite the fourth quarter deficit. ;

“We just kept fighting and we won the game,” he said.

Contrastingly, Diplomats Head Coach Geno Bullard said his team
faltered in the final period due to poor execution.

“It came down to the stretch,” he said, “but bad decision making cost
us this game.” ~ ,



Cl GIBSON RATTLERS’ Drew Rolle stuffs the ball as Westminister Diplo-
mat’s Geno Bullard attempted a lay-up in the final of the New Provi-
dence Basketball Tournament on Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium. oy

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff





Lie Ly

WESTMINISTER Diplomat’s Christoper Stuart dribbles past the defense of
Cl Gibson’s Junior Denis in the New Providence Basketball Tournamen-
t’s final on Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Gymnasium.



WESTMINISTER Diplomat’s Christopher Stuart drives through lane for a
lay-up over the Cl Gibson Rattlers on Wednesday night in the New Prov-
idence Basketball Tournament's final.

WESTMINISTER
Diplomat’s Rashad
Morley goes above
his C! Gibson Rat-
tlers’ defender Drew
Rolle in the final of
, the New Providence
Basketball
Tourna,ment on
‘Wednesday night at
the Kendal Isaacs
Gymnasium.

—

Ml bliss,









WESTMINISTER Diplomat’s Rashad Morley soars over a Cl Gibson Rat-
tlers player for an attempted dunk during the final of the New Provi-
dence Basketball Classic on Wednesday night at the Kendal Isaacs Nation-
al Gymnasium. ( :


PAGE 14, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009.

TRIBUNE SPORTS







2 SSS Shs : : : o 5 |
HONOREE Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier (centre) shares a moment with low net
winners Scott MacKenzie (left) and Crystal Trudeau (right) at the Nocturne
Third Annual New Year’s Golf Challenge yesterday at the Cable Beach Golf
Course.

GLE cael

RACHELLE Gibson, one of the rising young stars, poses above with hon-
oree Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier at the Nocturne Third Annua;l New Year’s Golf
Challenge yesterday at the Cable Beach Golf Course after she dominated
the individual women’s segment.



zs See nares

THE HUSBAND/WIFE TEAM of James and Paula Cooper (left) are presented with their awards for the second net at








@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT’S not everything that a player gets to
be honored by his peers for his contribution
to the sport that they all enjoy.

Yesterday, Poitier found himself in that
elusive category when he was honored at
the Norturne’s Third Annual New Year’s
Day Golf Challenge at the Cable Beach
Golf Club.

Poitier, who has devoted more than four
decades to the sport of amateur golf, said he
was quite thrilled for the gesture..

“Tt was kind fun because everybody know
everybody in golf and so I was happy to
see that many of my friends showed up to
participate,” he stated. “It was nice.”

Having started back in the 1960s, the

- modest 72-year-old Poitier said it’s some-

thing that he enjoyed doing and would not
have traded it in for anything else in the
world: eshat

From the 1970s, Poitier has represented
the Bahamas on the national team, many of
them with his long-time friend Prince ‘Zor-
ro’ Stubbs.

Poitier’s fondest memory came in
Jamaica when the Bahamas won the
Caribbean Amateur Golf Championship
(CAGC). During the championships, he

’ sunk a 100-foot putt to beat out the entire

field of golfers.

“During the ceremonies, the first word
said was ‘where was the gentleman that
sunk the 100 putt. Could you get up and
raise your hand,’” Poitier recalled. °

As he stood up, Poitier said all of the

. golfers and spectators applauded. him, a

feat that he intend to cherish for the rest of
his life.

Locally, Poitier said if there was any tour-
nament that stood out, it would have been
the Pro-Am in Grand Bahama where he
teamed up with pro Jimmy Delancy.

“We won the Pro-Am and I won a whole
lot of trophies and a lot of crystals,” he
recalled. “I said we are going to need anoth-
er plane to carry all these back to Nassau.
So it was fun.”









HONOREE Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier shares the first piece of cake with tournament director Shawn

Thomas yesterday at the Nocturne Third Annual New Year’s Golf Challenge at the Cable Beach Golf

_ Course. j

fo

While Delancy would haye been his best
pro partner, Poitier said he and Stubbs were
undoubtedly the best amateur connection
ever, having won many international tour-
naments together.

“We controlled the Caribbean,” said
Poitier of the days back then when they
played more as partners than they do today
as individuals. “Everybody was afraid of
us, all of the Caribbean countries.”

Puerto Rico, according to Poitier, was by
far the toughest country that he and Stubbs
would have faced. But like everybody else,
Poitier said they found a way to prevail. .

As he look ahead to the future, Poitier
said he’s definitely looking forward to
“sharpen my game because | want to rep-
resent the Bahamas again.”

In the absence of Stubbs, who didn’t play
in the tournament, Poitier teamed up-with’
another veteran George Turnquest. They ;
shot a 65 gross, but finished-with a 60.45

average and a 77 gross. The gross winners
were Eustan Forbes and Richard Gibson Jr.

Bahamas Golf Federation president
Glenn Archer said Norturne could not have
selected a better person to honour.

“Coins is an ordinary, local fellow among
us, who is well respected,” he stated.
“Everybody know him to be a man who
speaks from his-heart, a‘man of integrity.
We're glad to be associated with him.

“I had the good fortune of playing in the
group with him this morning (yesterday)
and we play together whenever we can
every week. - Mk “i

“But he’s a good example of what golf
can do for you in this country.” A

Having worked at just about: all of the
golf properties in the country, Archer said
Poitier has left a legacy behind and although
he’s retired, everybody still hold him upin -
high esteem. E ;

Archer said the federation just hope that

the Nocturne Third Annu

average for the fourth net position.
The first net finishers were Scott
MacKenzie and Crystal Trudeau with a 57.8



wo

al New

Year’s Golf Challenge at the Cable Beach Golf Course from tournament director Shawn Thomas and honoree Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier.



RICHARD
Gibson Jr. (left)
receives one of
his prizes from
tournament |
director Shawn
Thomas and
honoree Har-
court ‘Coins’
Poitier yesterday
at the Norturne
Third Annual
New Year's Golf
Challenge at the
Cable Beach Golf
Course.

they can see more Bahamians making their
contributions as golfing professionals at the
various sites that exist today.

: = eld = fl i
FROM page 15

ing their return to local competition, were awarded a pair of chip-
ping nets for their performances. They shot a 66 gross.

The third net winners were the veteran team of George Turn-
quest and Poitier, who Shot a 59.35 average with a 65 gross.

Rounding out the net scores were Anthony Hinzey and George
Swann with 60.5 and a 64 gross for fourth; Glenn Archer and Rory
Higgs with 60.5 as well to go along with their 71 gross for fifth and
Rodwell Knowles and the Rev. Ian Brathwaite in sixth place.

' Winning the gross category was the combo of Eustan Forbes and
Richard Gibson Jr. They combined for a 62, shooting an impressive
28 on the back nine .

Gibson Jr., 16, said they played exceptionally well. .

“We started off with two birdies before they fell apart on the front
nine,” said Gibson Jr. of their 34. “But in the back nine, we hit four
birdies in a row, then par and three more birdies in a row.”

Playing together for the first time as well, Gibson Jr. said his part-
ner was very consistent with his driver and that enabled him to go
after the greens. Forbes took it a bit further, noting that “we were
firing on all cylinders today and it worked out very well for us. It was
a pretty good combination. We
are winners.”

But Forbes said they really
wanted to win the tournament
because it was being held on hon-
or of Poitier, whom he consider:
to be a very good friend. ,





«_..the feeling of
the tournament
and sincerity and

enthusiasm “We were very honored to mn
this tournament today,” he stated.

demonstrated _ Brother and sister Richard Jr
today was really and Rachelle Gibson dominated
3 _ the individual categories as they
amazing. carted home the longest drives. :

While George Turnquest took the
men’s shortest to the pin, Gibson
won the women’s title.

And in a putting contest, she
beat out Michael Hall for the title as well. It came down to a
shoot-out as Gibson sunk her first shot to seal the deal.

“J just went up there and putt the ball and try to make it,” said
Gibson, a 16-year-old 11th grader at Jordan Prince William. “I
knew that if I didn’t win it:on that shot, I had five more shots to do
it.”

Tournament organizer Shawn Thomas said everything went
very well. “I learn to really work with feeling and the feeling of the
tournament and the sincerity and enthusiasm demonstrated today
was really amazing,” she said.

“I came here shortly after 7 o’clock and I made golfers out here
already. We had fresh boiled fish, fresh grouper and stew fish for
breakfast, but there was a lot of love being expressed by the
juniors, the seniors, the men and the women.”

Thomas said she couldn’t ask for a better way to start the new
year off and she expressed her thanks to sponsors Continental
Connection, Castle Pines, Port St. Lucie, PGA Village, John Bull,
Executive Motors, FML Group of Companies, JS Johnson, First
Choice Property Maintenance & Management, KFC, Deliotte,
Express It, Bahamas Fast Ferries, Bahamas Real Estate Associa-
tion, Civil Society Bahamas, R&E Imports and the Wyndham
Nassau Resort. Tournament director Chris Lewis said the tour-
nament was a success, considering all that was going on.

“For the numbers that we had today, it was still pretty good,” he
said. “The tournament was based for a pretty good charity for '
those sticken with iads, so it was good to start the year off showing
a lot of love and care for the needy.”

Shawn Thomas
JANUARY 2, 2009






WB Pair post the
lowest net score
of 57.8 average
at the Cable
Beach Golf Club

’ g By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net -

COTT MacKenzie

and Crystal Trudeau

played together for

the first. time, but
they were as solid as their court-:
ing relationship yesterday at the
Nocturne’s third annual New
Year’s Golf Challenge.

The duo surprised themselves
when they emerged as the over-
all champions, posting the low-
est net score of 57.8 average at
the Cable Beach Golf Club.

The tournament, held in hon-
our of veteran national team
player Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poiti-
-er, raised funds to assist the
Samaritan Ministries.

By virtue of edging out the
husband/wife team of James
and Paula Cooper, who shot a





PHOTO: Felipé Major/T ribune staff

Cl GIBSON School’s player Drew Rolle lays the ball up over Westminster’ s
Rashad Be at the Kendal Isaac Gym on Wednesday.
, SEE STORY AND: MORE PICTURES ON PAGE 8

INSIDE ¢ Andy Murray advances

ee

WINNERS of inks net category in the hocking ain Annual New Year’s Gol
Challenge — Scott MacKenzie and Crystal Trudeau — accept their awards
from tournament director Shawn Thomas and honoree Harcourt ‘Coins’

Poitier.

59.35, MacKenzie and Trudeau
were presented with a package

.for-a three days/two nights stay

at the Castle Pines PGA Vil-
lage in Port St. Lucie via round
trip tickets on Continental Air-
lines.

For MacKenzie, a-construc-
tion worker who has played in a

number of ‘charity events with.

the Poop Deck, said he and

Trudeau have a wonderful rela-

tionship off the green, so they
wanted to see how well they
would do off the tee.

“We wanted to shoot a lot of

‘pars, but I had no idea that this

was going to happen,” MacKen-
zie stated. “We played against.a
lot of better teams out there.”
They only shot.a-77 gross,
which was a clear indication of
their handicaps. ~
But Trudeau admitted that

‘plying in her first tournament

ever, they “played well” and
she’s definitely going to become :
an ardent golfer.

MacKenzie said it was like

putting “ham and egg” together +



NOCTURNE’S THIRD ANNUAL NEW YEAR’S GOLF CHALLENGE

Mackenzie, Trudeau
— 4 Winning duo!



HONOREE Harcourt ‘Coins’ Poitier
putts at the Nocturne Third Annual
New Year's Golf Challenge yester-
day.
so expect to see them back on
the course in the future.

As the second net winners,
the Coopers, who are also mak-

SEE page 14

Clue #8

One of the objects in the
Secret Sound has been blamed
for numerous deaths.




A True Sports Champion is Gone, but his work to develop
Sports in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas lives on.

ondolences are extended

to the Family of the
Late Phil “Smoker” Smith

ZNS Sports Director

From the Management
and Staff of the
Broadcasting Corporation

of the Bahamas

a Se rie ea
4 ri
Gi ne

Dane


PAGE 16, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



é : - INTERNATIONAL NEWS |

Cuba celebrates the 50th
anniversary of revolution

@ HAVANA

FIFTY YEARS after tri-
umphant armed rebels descend-
ed from the eastern mountains,
communist Cuba celebrated the
revolution’s anniversary Thurs-
day with toned-down festivities
after a trio of devastating hurri-

canes and under the enduring
public absence of an ailing Fidel
Castro, according to Associated
Press.

The austere celebrations,
including dances and concerts
across the island, belied the start
of a year infused with possibili-
ties for increased cash and visi-

tors, and other changes that
might ease Cubans’ daily hard-
ships. Many here hope for
improved relations with the

- United States when President-

elect Barack Obama takes office
Jan. 20 following declarations
he would talk directly with Raul
Castro .and lift. severe restric-

Mashed Potatoes Can Be

changed For Family Fries.

_ No Other Substitutions.



tions on family travel and remit-
tances to the island.

“T hope he gets rid of the
blockade,” 42-year-old Ana
Luisa Mas said as she bought a
pork leg for her family’s. New

Year’s Eve celebration, refer- .

ring to decades-old U.S. trade
sanctions.

“We are.very hopeful that
with Obama our relatives will

“be able to visit us more, and

send us more money,” she said,
maneuvering through hundreds
of shoppers packed inside the
enclosed Cuatro Caminos farm-
ers market, rushing to buy black
beans and rice, salad greens and

other New Year’s Eve dinner

standbys.

“We also hope that Fidel will
stay with us a little bit tone, -
Mas added.

President Raul Castro, who
succeeded ‘his older brother in
February, planned to speak
Thursday night from the same
balcony where Fidel declared
victory over dictator Fulgencio
Batista’s government on Jan. 1,
1959.

No foreign leaders, were

expected at the evening speech -

on a small, leafy plaza, with little
fanfare beyond invitations to
3,000 Communist Party faithful.
Outside the seaside U’S. Inter-
ests Section in Havana, the pop-
ular group Los Van Van were
performing.

Fidel Castro’s health is a state
secret and he remains out of
sight after undergoing major
intestinal surgery almost 2 1/2
years ago. But the 82-year-old
continues to write occasional
essays that suggest he still has
some say in government affairs.

Shortly before midnight
Wednesday, a brief statement
by Castro was read on state tele-
vision, congratulating “our hero-
ic people” on the eve of the
anniversary. .

The 77-year-old Raul Castro
appears to be in firm control of
the government, but has yet to
introduce any major reforms
and few expect transcendent
change while his brother is alive.

Officials initially planned a

Chivas Regal - Ltr.
Absolut Apeach - Ltr.
Jacob’s Creek Shiraz
Jacob's Creek _
Chardonnay ©

$67.99



A WOMAN walks down a street with graffitis written on it that read in Span-
ish "Long live Raul" and "Long live Fidel” in reference to Cuba's President
Raul Castro and Fidel Castro in Havana, Monday, Dec. 29, 2008.

more grandiose anniversary cel-
ebration but scaled back after
three hurricanes this year caused
$10 billion in damages and

wiped out nearly a third of -

Cuba’s crops. Raul Castro last
week called for more cost-cut-
ting-measures as the island post-
ed an annual economic growth
of 4.3 percent for the year, bare-
ly half the original government
forecast.

Over a half-century, the tri-
umphant rebels erased illiteracy,
crafted a universal health care
system, and built thousands of
new schools. But after Fidel
Castro embraced communism
in 1961, labor unions lost the
right to strike, the Catholic
Church was harassed, and oppo-
nents of the new povernment
were jailed.

Prisoners

The Havana-based non-gov-
ernmental Cuban Commission
for Human Rights and Recon-
ciliation last counted 219 politi-
cal prisoners on the island, down
from as many as 15,000 in 1964.

Cuba’s revolution was never-
theless long admired through-
out the Third World as Castro
stood up defiantly to the “Yan-
kee imperialists,” and infant
mortality rates began rivaling

-those of developing countries.

Cuban writer Roberto Fer-
nandez Retamar said the revo-
lutionary movement remains
relevant as several regional gov-
ernments embrace milder ver-
sions of the socialist principles
long promoted by the island’s
government. Venezuela, Bolivia

and Ecuador are especially.

strong leftist allies.
“T think that the hopeful

_ moment we have been seeing in

Latin America in recent years

_ has something to do with the

Cuban revolution’s existence,”
said Retamar.

Across the decades, Cuba’s
communist system has hung on,
even after the Iron Curtain col-
lapsed and communist China
‘and Vietnam embraced free
markets while still maintaining
their political systems.

When President George W.
Bush leaves office later this
month, the revolution will have
outlasted 10 American presi:
dents who maintained strict U.S:
sanctions aimed at overthrow-
ing the Cuban leadership.

Outgoing Commerce Secre-
tary Carlos Gutierrez, a Cuban-
American who used his Bush
administration post to promote
hard line‘ policies against the
Castro government, this week
argued against any easing of
sanctions.

“To suggest unconditional
dialogue with the Castro broth-
ers would only signal that the
conditions in Cuba are accept-
able,” Gutierrez wrote in The
Washington Times. “If the Unit-
ed States does. not continue to
stand for the ideals of freedom
and human rights and against
the many guises of tyranny and
oppression, who will?”

But many others think it is
time for a major change in U.S.
policies toward the island, and
that rapprochement could
help force.an opening on the
island.

-: “Confrontation plays up
Havana’ s strong suit,” Marifeli

_ Perez-Stable of the Inter-Amer-

ican.Dialogue, a Washington
think tank, wrote in December.
“Engagement may show how
weak (Cuba’s) hand really is.
Which one is the real hard
line?”

Butler

Sands
Company Limited

Ron Ricardo Dark-
Absolut Blue - Ltr.

" Tanqueray Gin - Ltr.
Bailey’s Caramel ~ Ltr.
Hennessy VS. ~ Ltr.




ceed ee
FRIDAY,

JANUARY 2,



2009

seek Homes forecasting

25% home construction drop

Expects to build 75% of the homes in 2009 that it did in 2008 |

[Bf Adjusts business model from 'build it and they will come' to ‘build it
after deposit is paid’ |

Former Coke warehouse's iparacie to RoyalStar head office is placed

on ‘hold

| By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

Arawak Homes is forecast-
ing that it will construct 25 per
cent fewer homes in 2009 than it
did last year, and is adjusting
its business model to cope with
the sluggish construction and
mortgage markets.

Franklyn Wilson,
Bahamian home construc-
tion/developer’s chairman, told
Tribune Business: “The fact of
the matter is we would be lucky

‘ to build, in 2009, 75 per cent of
the homes we built in 2008.”

While declining to reveal how
many homes Arawak Homes
typically constructs in a normal
year, and how many it built in
2008, Mr Wilson’s comments
further underline the fragile

the.



construction and mortgage mar-
ket, not to mention the overall
Bahamian economy.

He also told Tribune Busi-
ness that Arawak Homes had
adapted its business model from
one of ‘build it and they will
come’ to one of ‘we will build

State of the Bahamian home

Govt: eee fiscal ratios
Ww



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government does not
expect its key fiscal ratios will
reach “any dangerous level” as
a result of the global economic
downturn, a senior minister has
told Tribune Business, thanks
largely to the room offered by a
36 per cent debt-to-GDP ratio.

Zhivargo Laing, minister of
‘state for finance, said that while
the Government wanted to
keep this ratio and the various
fiscal deficit measurements “at
sustainable levels”, it expected
them to “creep up” > due toa

SEE page 2B

Zhivargo Laing

edna

Government urged
to implement 6.5-
15% flat import tax

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

The Government has been urged to introduce a flat rate import
tax of between 6.5-15 per cent as a way:to simplify the existing duty
system and eliminate the rampant tax evasion that costs the
Bahamian government millions of dollars in revenue per year.

A businessman, speaking to Tribune Business on condition of
anonymity, said alternative tax systems — such as Value-Added Tax
_ (VAT) or a sales tax — that had been touted as ‘fixes’ for the exist-

ing import duties system were “doomed to failure”. What was
required instead, he argued, was enhanced management of the
existing tax structure.

The same businessman, who previously disclosed to Tribune
Business how a huge tax evasion industry had grown up around the
practice of submitting invoices from foreign suppliers that grossly
undervalued imported shipments coming into the Bahamas,
enabling local firms to avoid paying substantial stamp and import
duties to the Public Treasury, said: “Perhaps one of the big stum-
bling blocks to the duty system has been the vast, complicated
variety of duty levees.

“This enables people to cheat the system also- rearranging

‘invoices or descriptions so that lower duties are charged. The
Bahamas does not have any significant natural resources other
than our beaches and water, so why the immense variety of duties?
One consideration should be the introduction of a flat import tax
of 6.5% -15 per cent.
- “Furthermore, a complex, prehistoric system of import duties jus-
tifies a larger government. The larger the government, the more jobs
are controlled by that government and the more the people depend
on the government. This will be unsustainable: when government
outgrows the private sector in size and scope; taxes will not sustain
those hundreds of government jobs.”

The businessman added: “Simplicity is the best policy. A smarter
. government is not a larger government. A larger government
requires greater taxes. This would be the case with a sales tax or
‘VAT system. This only benefits the larger companies (VAT) as well
as the government. Which department or ministry will be respon-
sible for ensuring that all businesses are paying their sales taxes ful-

ly, correctly, and on time? This will require further expenditure both —

in government and the private sector, as well as requiring the

SEE page3B is

only once clients have paid us:

the necessary deposit’.

“We are being far less aggres- —

sive in building homes on.a
‘spec’ basis,” Mr Wilson said.
“We build on the basis of peo-
ple coming in and paying a
deposit.” In other words,
Arawak Homes is no longer
starting*home construction on
the assumption a buyer will turn
up once the property is 50-75
per cent complete, but instead
seeking pre-construction com-
mitments from purchasers in
the form of deposits.

The change has everything to
do with the depressed global
and Bahamian economy, and
its impact on potential home
‘buyers. Arawak Homes typi-

cally targets the middle and low-:

er income market, and these are
the segments that have been hit



@ By NEIL HARTNELL -

cause businesses to fail.

Tribune Business Editor

A former Grand Bahama Chamber of.
Commerce president has described as “total
garbage” proposals to create a ‘redundancy
fund’ to compensate laid-off workers, telling
Tribune Business it invited employees to

Chris Lowe, manager at Kelly’s (Freeport),
in response to the suggestion. by Trades
Union Congress (TUC) president Obie Fer-
guson, said it appeared the union leader was
confusing the issue of severance pay —
already covered in the Employment Act —
with the need to mandate that foreign
investors lodge performance bonds.

“It’s absolute garbage for so many rea-
sons,” Mr Lowe told Tribune Business.
“There are so many valid reasons not to

hardest to date.

Bahamian home buyers have
been hit from two sides.
Demand for new homes — and
homes in general — plus mort-
gages has been heavily damp-
ened by rising unemployment

levels, reduced salaries and

wages, and increased job secu-
rity fears.

That uncertainty has led.
many Bahamians to defer or

cancel plans for property pur-
chases, while obtaining mort-
gage financing has also become
more difficult due to the tighter

credit requirements stipulated. :

by commercial banks. Buyers,
especially those in the hotel and
tourism industries, who once
easily qualified for a mortgage

SEE page 2B

S
ce “

‘Mi ByNEILHARTNELL’

Tribune Business Editor

Work by Bahamian profes-
sionals costing “millions in fees”

‘has been “thrown away” by the
protracted wrangling over the |
Bay Street Straw Market, with

no explanation yet forthcoming
as to why under the former PLP

administration the project

expanded three-fold in size and
costs.

Jean-Michael Clarke, presi-
dent and managing director of
VERITAS Consultants, the

’ project managers/quantity sur-’

veyors appointed by. the
Christie government to oversee
the Straw Market project, said

in a paper sent to Tribune Busi-"
ness that the proposed building °

“somehow” expanded from an’.
‘initial 77,000 tyare oe “at.

preliminary design” to “close

to” 200,000 square feet at the.

time the project was sent out to
contractors for bid.

SEE page 5B







-* Bay Street market

project expanded in
size and cost three-.
fold under former
sovernment

-* Building went

from 77,000 to

200,000sq ft, and

costs from $10m to
$31m

* Former project
manager says Straw.
Vendors should be -
involved financially



Oyama)

have previously urged that the Government
mandate that foreign investors lodge’ per-
formance bonds which, in the event that they
suddenly depart this nation, can be used to
meet unpaid bills to creditors and pay
employees what they are owed. | :
Mr Ferguson, in his comments before
Christmas, urged that all Bahamas-based

SEE page 3B



have one [a redundancy
fund]; but I can agreed
that a performance bond
for foreign investors-is
required, especially given
the calibre of some’
investors our government
seems to attract.”
Bahamian business
executives. and unionists





















FAMGUARD

CORPORATION LIMITED |


PAGE 2B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



To EE eee
Arawak Homes forecasting

25% home construction drop

FROM page 1B

may no longer be able to do so,
especially if their incomes have
reduced.

Describing the overall eco-
nomic climate as “brutal”, Mr
Wilson told Tribune Business
on the prospects for 2009: “I
wish I could be positive. It’s a
question of picking a word that
says ‘bad’. This is not a very
good environment for the hous-
ing business, period. I just can’t
find any good news. Every-
where you look it’s bad news.”

Arawak Homes is part of the
Sunshine Holdings group, which
includes Sunshine Finance, its
mortgage lending and financial
arm; Sunshine Insurance, its
insurance agency and. broker-
age; Sun Shipping, a shipping
firm; and a position as the
largest institutional investor in
BISX-listed Freeport Oil Hold-
ings (FOCOL), with a 22.6 per
cent stake.

A sister company, Sunenine
Partners, holds a substantial
stake in insurance company
RoyalStar Assurance, and is.the
largest investor in Eleuthera
Properties, the holding compa-
ny for the Cotton Bay resort
development.

Yet, in common with many
foreign and Bahamian-related
investment projects, Sunshine
Holdings and its affiliates have
been forced by the economic
downturn and its attendant
uncertainty to place planned
developments on hold.

Such a fate has befallen the
upgrade. of the former
Caribbean Bottling Company
warehouse on JFK Drive, which
Sunshine Holdings purchased
from BISX-listed Premier Real

Estate Investment Corporation. .

The plan had been to invest $5
million in the property’s acqui-
sition and upgrade, but Mr Wil-
son confirmed the latter part of
that strategy was on hold.

He told Tribune Business:

“We're sitting on it for a while.

That’s on hold until we see
where we’re going. The plan
remains the same; it’s a ques-
tion of when we implement it.”

The former JFK Drive ware-
house had been used by the
Bahamian Coca-Cola franchise
until it was acquired by new
owners, who terminated the
lease on the property. Sunshine
Holdings had planned to trans-
form it into RoyalStar Assur-
ance’s new corporate head-
quarters, and also a branch
office for the Sunshine Insur-

Do you want your child to have
NIM slash ests
K4 to Grade 4 8am-3pm

Sires

ance and Arawak Homes opet-
ations now located at Blue Hill
Road.

Meanwhile, Mr Wilson said
a major issue facing all Bahami-
an companies, not just his own,
was the ability, of clients and
consumers to pay the monies
they owed on a timely basis.
Many clients were in a position
where they could not pay, or
did not want to.

“Every business today has
seen a huge rise in collectables
[accounts receivables],” Mr Wil-
son explained.

“The auditors in this town

must be having nightmares,

because of all the provisions for
bad debts.

“That will determine how the
profits are.

“We cannot immune our-
selves from the environment in
which we find ourselves, and
the fact of the matter is that
people are increasingly — and
unfortunately — unable to meet
their obligations in a timely
manner.” |

Going forward, Mr Wilson
urged Bahamians to develop
“sreater national consensus” on
how development should take
place in this nation, and also
equip themselves with greater
“discipline” — not just when it

i"

ISOM aca

MOON CN eueUeCo Socks
eit ci aaa i Sse ae
Oster ics iter] a
(Expanding one grade per year)

i'm lovin’ it



came to managing their mon-
ey. Advocating that countries
and their citizens needed to
“prepare for bad” when the
economic times were good, Mr
Wilson argued that economic

‘development in the Bahamas

had been impeded by the 2007
general election campaign, and
the subsequent fallout from the
FNM-led debate over whether
the country was “ giving away
too much land” to outside
developers.

“When this thing turns
around, it’s in our country’s best
interests to develop greater
national consensus on what we
regard as development,” Mr
Wilson said. “This is not new.

“We are not selling land at a

rate where Bahamians are dis-
enfranchised from their land. It
would be helpful for the country
to create greater consensus on
what constitutes development.”

The current economic uncer-
tainty, Mr Wilson added, was
“raising a very major question
for us. A major issue for us is
the matter of discipline”.

He added that “for years and
years and years, different finan-
cial advisers have been making
statements about saving more.
Where’s the evidence ‘anyone
listened?”

With 90.4 per ‘cent of
Bahamian bank accounts hold-
ing $10,000 or less, and account-
ing for just 7.3 per cent of total
deposits, the evidence suggests
that ‘far too few Bahamians
have established a savings safe-
ty net to enable them to ride
out times like these.

“Beyond developing a greater
consensus on what constitutes
development, this other issue is
greater and wider discipline,”
Mr Wilson said.

“Financially is just one of the
ways this lack of discipline man-
ifests itself.”

Govt: Key fiscal

ratios will miss
‘danger levels’

FROM page 1B |

combination of reduced rev-
enues and increased spending
on social assistance pro-
grammes.

However, given that 'the
Bahamas’ nation debt-GDP
ratio stood at 36 per cent at the
time the 2008-2009 Budget was
unveiled, Mr Laing said the
Government “had a gap” it
could exploit to minimize the
downturn’s impact before the
likes of international credit rat-
ing agencies and the Interna-
tional Monetary Fund (IMF)
started to express concern.

The 38-40 per cent debt-to-
GDP ratio bracket was largely
regarded as a approaching a lev-
el where warning signs were
required. “We are right now
using that gap,” Mr Laing told
Tribune Business.

“When you have fiscal space,
you can use that space in times
like this and not get pounced
into trouble.

“We have some room to
manovere, and we are seeking
where. necessary to use that
room.

“T think, in the circumstances,
that there will be some creep
up in the GDP-to-debt ratios
and the fiscal deficit.

“We have anticipated any
number of scenarios, from the
best case to the worst case, and
one does not know entirely

_ where circumstances will take

us, but right now we don’t
expect to get to any dangerous
level on the debt-to-GDP
ratio.”

The Bahamas’ rolative fiscal
prudence, in comparison to
Caribbean rivals:such. as Bar-
bados and Jamaica, the latter
having more than three times’
the national debt regarded as
safe by the IMF, had safe-

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guarded this nation’s ability to
borrow at competitive interest
rates and “carry itself through”.

While the Bahamas, with a
36 per cent debt-to-GDP ratio,
had “two percentage points of
space”, Mr Laing pointed to the
problems of its Caribbean

. peers, who had no ability to

increase spending on social pro-
grammes or readily borrow as
needed.

Although declining to specify
how long the Bahamian public
finances could withstand the
current economic turbulence,
and run higher-than-ideal fiscal
deficits and a rising national
debt, Mr Laing implied that
heavy reliance was being placed
on the stimulus packages intro-
duced by the US and other
developed countries to turn
matters around.

4
Tumaround

“No country, including the
Bahamas, is interested in having
the current circumstances last
beyond 18 months,” Mr Laing
said. “That would be very diffi-
cult for any ecomomy and any
fiscal regime. We hope to have
a turnaround sooner rather than
later.

“From our point of view, we
are hoping for a turnaround
sooner rather than later because .
no. economy would want to
endure this for the medium-
term.”

In its latest report on the
Bahamas’ sovereign credit rat-
ing, Standard & Poor’s (S&P),
the Wall Street credit rating
agency, backed up Bahamians
who had argued that the Gov-
ernment was relying on
increased GDP levels and ris-
ing revenues to keep the key
fiscal ratios in check.

For 2007, Bahamian GDP is
estimated to have risen to about
$6.7 billion, and critics of the
Government’s fiscal stance,
such as the Nassau Institute’s
Rick Lowe, have argued that
successive administration have
failed’ to‘reduce the size of gov- -
ernment — which is getting ever-
bigger — and rein in public
spending.

However, responding to
claims that government was get-
ting ever-bigger in the
Bahamas, Mr Laing told Tri-
bune Business: “Quite frankly,
that’s an illusion that’s pointed
out. When you look at the size
of government to GDP, that’s
not changed over the years.
That’s what’s important........

“T don’t regard that as an
issue. Our greatest need, in so. :
far as government is concerned,
is to improve the efficiency and
effectiveness of government,
causing the services rendered
to people to be done in a man-
ner where the people receiving
those services are satisfied, and
significantly satisfied.

“That is the important inten-
tion. ’m talking about taking
that investment in public ser-
vice salaries and emoluments
into the kind of experience that
both domestic and internation-
al clients regard as top notch.
We are working on that.”

Mr Laing said there were no
plans to reduce public spend-
ing in this Budget year unless
extreme circumstances war-
ranted it, given that this was the
Government’s most important
“counter-cyclical tool”. The
only instructions given to gov-
ernment ministries and agen-
cies, and their accountants, was
to crack down on fraud and
wastage.

‘The minister added that while
the Government’s efforts to
enhance revenue collection had
already borne fruit, the effects
were unlikely to be seen this fis-
cal year due to the likely drop in
overall collections caused by the
economic downturn.


Ph thle

oP wwe Ny se ewe

a



Redundancy fund
idea 'total garbage’

FROM < page 1B

employers be required to pay an undefined amount into this
redundancy fund, arguing that it would provide much-needed
relief for employees of companies that had suddenly ceased
operations or departed from this nation — the likes of Pioneer
Shipping, Driftwood and Gladstone Farms.

However, Mr Lowe immediately questioned who would con-
tribute to such a ‘redundancy fund’, the amount they would con-
tribute and the frequency of contributions, and how much
employees who were made redundant would receive.

“First off, on what basis will contributions to the fund be
made, and what will be the yield per employee should the busi-
ness fail?” Mr Lowe asked. “I could almost guarantee a lot of
businesses will become redundant and fold-up.

“It’s amassing a pot of money, and no one can touch it unless
the business goes under, which will encourage some people to
ensure their employer does go under. It would be an incredible
incentive for employees to cause a business to fail for a short-
term windfall.”

The former Grand Bahama Chamber president added: “Who
would manage it? Under what criteria would it be dispersed? Is
this something our great government would manage benevo-
lently? That’s go the way NIB is managed.

“There’s nothing right about it. It’s appropriation of other peo-
ple’s property. It’s another form of taxation.”

Given that Bahamian companies were already mandated to
make statutory severance payments to laid-off employees, Mr
Lowe said a ‘redundancy fund’ would add another “phenome-
nal cost” to the costs of doing business.

“Would the unions be required to have one if they go bust?”
Mr Lowe asked. “I think it’s a wonderful idea for the unions to
have one for their members if they go bust, but not the private
sector. It would be detrimental.”

Giner coca mca ts Airport
Saturday, 20 December 2008

REWARD OFFERED

424-0783/356-2068
Bracelet has a very personal history
and sentimental value to the owner

NOTICE |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
No. 45 of 2000



In Voluntary Liquidat
ie

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No. 45 of 2000),
JAFRA INVESTMENTS LIMITED, is in dissolution. Conti-
nental Liquidators Inc. is the Liquidator and can be contacted
at 60 Market Square, P.O. Box 1906, Belize City, Belize. All
persons having claims against the above-named company are
required to send their names, addresses and particulars of their
debts or claims to the Liquidator before 30th day of January,
2009.

Vor: Contusatai Liqulatoss, Ine. ;
Liquidator









‘wt Harvard Business School
/ Caribbean Business Club .
ay’ Member of Student Clubs of HBS, Inc.







Harvard Business School and

Hotels may have been

'too hasty' on lay-offs

@ By. CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Tribune Business Reporter
Many laid-off hotel industry

workers were called back to
work by their former employers

‘over the New Year period to

meet the demand from high
occupancies, with a leading
union official suggesting some

properties may have laid-off:

staff too soon.

Leo Douglas, the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union secretary-gen-
eral, told Tribune Business that
Atlantis had called in at least
30 laid-off employees to accom-
modate guests.

In some cases, Mr Douglas
said existing staff in certain
departments had _ been
swamped, with several staff
members having to work over-
time or double shifts.

“So they had to call in per-
sons, which is a good thing,” he
said.

Some persons who visited the
Atlantis resort over the Christ-
mas weekend said that the
property was so crowded that
it was difficult to get dinner
reservations, a far cry from a
few weeks before when the
property. was virtually empty,
with occupancies well below 50
per cent.

Mr Douglas said he felt that,
in some cases, the hotels may
have acted too quickly in let-
ting some people go, rather than
waiting until the holiday season
- always a busy time -had
passed. “ft 2

“T think it was like when the
gas prices were so high and peo-
ple reacted. I think that the

‘hotels may have acted too
quickly, and what they are find-’
_ing is that some departments

need more staff. Now that

things are busy, they do not,

have the numbers that they
need,” he explained.

Mr Douglas added that he
would like to see a system in

Govt urged to implement
6.5-15% flat import tax

FROM page 1B

establishment of yet more gov-
ernment jobs, probably to
become yet another inefficient
department.

“The potential revenue is
there for the Government in the

form of import duties. A sim-.

ple database management
scheme would enable the Gov-
ernment to harness the poten-
tial, reap what is rightfully theirs
and direct investment where it
should Be - in public services,

healthcare, education - rather

than in back-office administra-
tion jobs where papers are
passed from one desk to anoth-
er to be repeatedly stamped by
government personnel.”
ion



The businessman, though,

questioned whether the Gov- .

ernment had the political will
to make meaningful tax reforms
and clamp down on the amount
of evasion currently taking
place through the submission
of falsified, undervalued invoic-
es.
“The entire system we have
built over the last 30 years
depends on the very illegal

scams I have outlined here,” the ,

businessman told Tribune Busi-
ness. “I see only a shrug of the
shoulders and a passing “That’s

Wharton
+ Caribbean Business Initiative Club
Member of Whartan Graduate Assoc.

The Wharton School of University of Pennsylvania _





how you do business in the .

Bahamas, so stop whining’.

“Tourism is directly related.

to this issue in that the Bahamas
is one of the most expensive per
day vacations in the Caribbean.
It all comes back to the high
taxation through our system,
which causes the hotel opera-
tions. to be much more costly
than their other Caribbean
counterparts. It is not just the
plane and hotel fare that a visi-
tor factors into their travel
plans. ..

“With the global economic -

situation getting worse by the
day, we had better come up
with a way to compete with the

likes of Mexico, Las Vegas and’
soon to be an open Cuba, that
2 AgiG : te :

= toxth t
- Bahamas vacati



gladly vist d

Nassau Airport

Development Company: (oS 8 SF oe Fey

place where the first persons
fired can be rehired in events
like these.

Looking onward to 2009, Mr
Douglas said he is confident
that this year will bring good
news to the hotel industry.

“I am an optimistic person,




















Nassau Airport

Development Company

2009.

‘

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce
the C-260 Elevators and Escalators Request For Proposals
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling International
Airport, The scope of work includes but is not limited to:

* Design and fabrication of the Elevators and Escalators

conforming to the requirements of the RFP;

* Supply and installation of elevators and escalators,

* Control'and monitoring systems; and
Interface with building systems for security, fire, and various
agency requirements.

This request for proposal is of interest to Elevators and Escalators
Vendors, however should also interest local Electrical and
Mechanical Trade Contactors.

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up after
4:00 pm, on Tuesday, December 16, 2008

Request for Proposal closing is at 3:00 p.m., Thursday, February
5th, 2009.

There will be a Tender Briefing, Tuesday January 13th. Please
RSVP Traci Brisby by pm Monday, January 12th for briefing
location details.

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to
announce the C-220 Structural Steel Stage 1 Tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden’ Pindling
International Airport. The C-220 Steel Stage 1 Lump Sum
Contract will include the following components:

* Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, shop painting,
transport and installation of Structural Steel Joist; and °

“Supply, shop drawings, fabrication, transport and
installations of steel decking. Hs
Tender Packages’ ‘can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on

Thursday, December. 18th, 2008. Please contact Traci
Brisby for more informati

‘Tender closing igat 3:00pm, Thursday, January 22nd,
There willbe a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 8th.

Please RSVP Traci Brisby by 1pm January 7th for
briefing location details.

and I believe that things will get
better, especially once the pres-
ident-elect Barack Obama is
sworn in and things begin to
improve in the United States.
Then the Bahamas will begin
to see things improve and visitor
levels come back up,” he said.



















































PAGE 4B, FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009

THE TRIBUNE



Wall Street hits bankers in wallet

Wall Street is hitting its
bankers where it hurts — in the
wallet, according to the New York
Times News Service.

Citigroup's chief executive and
chairman said on Wednesday that
they would forgo their bonuses
for 2008 and slash the amounts
paid to other senior bankers, join-
ing a growing list of financial
executives who are passing up
some pay.

In a memo to bank employees,
Vikram S. Pandit, Citigroup's
chief executive, said that he and
Winfried F.W. Bischoff, the
bank's chairman, would not take
year-end rewards.

''The harsh realities of 2008,
primarily our earnings results,
mean that our bonus pool is dra-
matically lower than last year,"
Pandit wrote about a year in
which the bank announced tens
of billions of losses.

“The argument is always made
about this excessive compensation,
that it’s necessary to keep these peo-
ple. That will now be tested, and ’'m
not sure if there’s anywhere for

them to go.”



"The most senior leaders
should be affected the most."

But Pandit's remarks may
strike some as several weeks late,
if not a few million dollars short.
Citigroup, one of the biggest
recipients of taxpayer money, has
taken in $45 billion in fresh capi-
tal from the government's bailout

funds.

Nearly every chief executive

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CRYSTAL KEY INTERNATIONAL LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above-named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced an
the 31st day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Richard Cellini

on Wall Street has indicated that
he will decline a 2008 bonus, with
Kenneth D. Lewis of Bank of
America and John Stumpf of
Wells Fargo the hold-outs so far.

. Other banks have clamped
down on pay even more than Cit-

_ igroup under pressure from Con-

gress, regulators and investors.

’ Wachovia, for example, said it is

slashing compensation not just in
the executive suite, but all the
way down through its ranks as its
merger with Wells Fargo neared
completion Wednesday night.

"What's different about this
year versus last year is. that the
USS. taxpayer is part of the equa-
tion so how things appear is
important," said Rakesh Khu-
rana, a professor at Harvard Busi-
ness School.

Compensation

On Wall Street, compensation
is always.a hot button. But now
the tension is heightened: pay too
much and risk a political back-
lash, pay too little and risk losing
talented employees. The prospect
of losing workers to hedge funds
and private equity firms has
helped drive up pay in the indus-
try in past years.

"The argument is always made

about this excessive compensa- -

tion, that it's necessary to keep
these people," said Richard Celli-
ni, a senior vice president at
Integrity Interactive, a. consult-
ing firm in Waltham, Mass. "That

will now be tested, and I'm not
sure if there's anywhere for them
to go."

The government provided very
few guidelines about Wall Street
compensation when it injected

‘billions of dollars of capital into

banks late last year, and only
described limits on pay to the
highest-ranking executives. That
gave the banks great discretion
over the size and form of bonuses
for traders, midlevel executives
and others.

Many banks, like Citigroup, are
making the biggest pay reductions
on their senior executives. Bonus-
es at the top of Citigroup will be
down at least 40 percent for 10
members of its senior leadership
team, according to a corporate
filing released on Wednesday.

Robert E. Rubin, an. influential °

Citigroup. board member and
senior adviser to its leadership
team, also turned down his 2008
bonus.

But. other banks have taken

more aggressive actions. Credit

Suisse, Morgan Stanley and UBS
have extended so-called clawback
agreements to cover all employ-
ees, allowing the banks to recoy-
er a portion of bonuses ‘if they
are later shown to have been
based on flawed bets. Citigroup's
new clawback policy applies euly
to its executives. j

Pandit said that cidercup
would continue to pay the bulk of
its employees well as long as they

-performed. .

''Meritocracy requires differ-
entiation in pay," Pandit said.

That is in stark contrast to the
2008 pay plan at Wachovia, where
bonuses were drastically slashed
for the rank-and-file. Many df
Wachovia's senior executives,
though, could still reap riches
from its shot-gun merger with
Wells Fargo.

On a conference call on Dec.
19, Tim Sloan, a Wells Fargo
executive who will head the glob-
al markets and'investment bank-

bankers that they would not
receive big bonuses. Instead, their
allocated bonus money will be

returned to shareholders. He also —

said there would be no retention
packages, according to a
Wachovia employee who listened

to the call. A Wells Fargo spokes- |

woman declined to comment.

"T know that's very painful to
hear, but that's the reality," Sloan
told the employees, as recount-
ed by the participant. "It just
would have been irresponsible to

the company's shareholders to do’
-anything else."

But some employees com-
plained that the rules were being
changed late in the game. One
employee who identified himself
as a third-year vice president said
the bank's decision was putting
its employees in "financial
extremis" and, in some cases, at
risk of not making their mortgage

payments.

Wachovia's senfor executives
— including Robert:K. Steel, who
served as chief executive for just a
few months — will not take home
a discretionary bonus for 2008.
Of course, that is not to say that
all of them will wind up empty-
handed.

According to corporate filings,
10 of Wachovia's senior. execu-
tives are eligible to receive up to
$98.2 million in severance pay-
outs upon the completion of its
merger with Wells Fargo.

Christy Phillips-Brown, a

‘ Wachovia spokeswoman, said
‘that the payouts were. "contrac-

tual obligations" and could turn
out to be less if four Wachovia
executives who accepted positions
remain at Wells Fargo. Steel, who
already annaunced his departure,
will not receive any severance

pay.

' Legal Notice

NOTICE

RED EAGLE VENTURES LIMITED _

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act'2000, the
dissolution of RED EAGLE VENTURES LIMITED has

_been completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-
“| sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the
’ Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



ing unit, told a group of Wachovia

' ” Legal Notice

NOTICE

- Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TIBALD VENTURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation) MCH INTERNATIONAL LTD.

ADNIL MANAGEMENT LTD.

Notice is hereby given that the above-named.
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 30th day of December 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section-138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MCH INTERNATIONAL LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ADNIL MANAGEMENT LTD. has been |
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register. the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.’

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator) ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

- NOTICE

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Legil Notice ste
NOTICE
WHITE VALLEY LILLIES LTD.

“ACES HIGH CORP. A & B PARTNERS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138 (8) of the International Business ‘Companies Act 2000,
the dissolution of WHITE VALLEY LILLIES LTD. has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has’ been is-

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of A & B PARTNERS LTD. has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of ACES HIGH CORP. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been. issued and the on

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC,
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice |

NOTICE

MAX WEALTH LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of MAX WEALTH LIMITED has been com-

pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the -

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator) -

Legal Notice

NOTICE

KINETIC TRADING LIMITED

Notice is hereby. given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of KINETIC TRADING LIMITED has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

‘Legal Notice

NOTICE

BLUE OCEAN SPRINGS LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of BLUE OCEAN SPRINGS LTD. has been

completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009, PAGE 5B



Millions ‘thrown away'
in Straw Market work

FROM page 1B

As project managers, Mr
Clarke said VERITAS Consul-
tants did “not know all the pro-
gressions” that led to the
increase in the proposed Straw
Market’s size, a question that
was better answered by’ the for-
mer government and the archi-
tect.

He indicated, though, that as
a result of discussions between
the Government, the architect
and stakeholders such as the
straw vendors themselves, it
appeared that all concerned had
agreed that the new Straw Mar-
ket building should be almost
200,000 square feet.

This size contrasted sharply,
according to Mr Clarke, with
the proposed Straw Market
scope presented to his company
and rivals when they responded
- to the project manager Request
for Proposal (RFP) issued by
the Ministry of Works in 2005.
That showed a building 70,000
square feet in size, and costing
$10 million.

Yet, when appointed, VERI-
TAS Consulting was confronted
with preliminary design docu-
ments showing a 200,000 square
foot structure. The initial bud-

get based on this had risen by 80

per cent, from $10 million to
$18 million, “plus or minus 25

«per cent” because the design
had not reached a stage where
costs could be determined.

‘When we received our terms
of reference for this project
from the Ministry of Works, it
said that the building would be
77,000 square feet and cost $10
million,” Mr Clarke wrote.

“Throughout our tenure as
project officers, we have never
seen a building of this scope
named the New Straw Market.
As early as January 2006, the
size of the building was already
known to have exceeded 77,000

. square feet and the cost-of the.

* building was known to be more
than $10 million. Our earliest
documents always had the
structure at over 180,000 square
feet.”

The increase in size inevitably
meant an increase in costs. The
77,000 square foot Straw Mar-
ket was priced at $129 per
square foot, but at 200,000
square feet the project would
cost between $29-$37 million.
That, Mr Clarke said, translated
into a price of between $107-
$185 per square foot.

“Why the discrepancy? Much
of it had to do with the con-
tractor’s cost of doing the work
or general conditions as it is
called in the industry. We found
the general conditions of one
contractor to be twice as high as

other contractors,” Mr.Clarke -

said.

Perhaps the best explanation
for the apparent ‘muddle’ sur-
rounding the Straw Market’s
rebuilding during the five years

of the Christie. administration

was that the then-government

could not decide on what they:

wanted the project to be, and

then make their case by clearly *

communicating the objectives
to the Bahamian people.
Based on what Mr Clarke’s
paper details, it appears the for-
. mer PLP government could not
make up its mind on whetHer it
. wanted a relatively simple, low-
cost permanent structure to
house Bay Street’s straw ven-
dors, or whether it desired a
- grand ‘monument’ that would
stand as the centerpiece of
downtown Nassau’s revitaliza-
tion.
The final version included a
restaurant/nightclub, with open-
air dining on the roof; an obser-
vation tower that would have
been the highest point on’ Bay
Street; six elevators; and a base-
ment with a vendors’ lounge
and storage for their goods. The
structure was open, so that all
vendors could be seen, regard-
less of where they were located.
The Christie government
seemingly settled on this option
towards the end of its,time in
office but, as Mr Clarke noted,
the project as structured would
have represented an enormous
transfer of taxpayer. monies
from the general Bahamian

population to the Straw Ven- ;

dors — a subsidy, gift, call it what
you will.

VERITAS Consultants
developed a $31.399 million
baseline budget for the project,
Mr Clarke said, and three of the
four contractors who made the
final bid selection round came
within 10 per cent of this bid
average. Five out of nine con-
tractors invited to bid under the

“Throughout
our tenure as
project officers,
we have never
seen a building of
this scope named
the New Straw
Market.”





Jean-Michael Clarke

PLP government did so. -
There then seemed to be a

recognition that the project’s

costs might be too high. As a

result, Mr Clarke said $5.586-

million was saved by eliminating
the basement entirely. Else-
where, work on the commercial
area of the roof was scaled
back; a decision was taken to
switch from using A-grade

materials (designed to resist salt.

air and ship smoke) to cheaper
B-grade materials; and the pos-
sibility of importing materials
duty-free was also assessed.
However, because the base-
ment elimination was not decid-
ed upon until January 2007, the
Straw Market project start date

had to be pushed back to late _

March-April 2007 — just before
the general election.

Mr Clarke recommended that
whatever happened with the
Straw Market moving forward,
the vendors themselves needed
to have a sense of ownership,
for otherwise “the chances of
maintaining the Straw Market
in good condition dwindle”.

“I do not believe that we
should give a $23 million gift
without condition to the Straw
Vendors,” Mr Clarke said. “I
believe the costs should be
shared. If the Government has
allocated $10 million for the
Straw Market, rent from the
500-700 vendors and artisans
who are expected to occupy the

Nassau Airport

Development Company

building, as well as revenues
from the rental of the commer-
cial space on the roof level, and
the observation tower.”
Currently, it appears the
Ingraham administration has
reverted back to the original
$10 million Straw Market plan,
dropping the six-floor plan in
favour of a single storey struc-
ture, and eliminating the
‘grandiose’ observation tower,
nightclub/restaurant and base-
ment plans. As previously
revealed by Tribune Business,
the Government cancelled the
Straw Market contract with
contractors Woslee Dominion,

-on the grounds that it did not

want to commit more than half
its 2007-2008 Budget for capital
works to one project.

Mr Clarke urged that a “‘non-
partisan” solution was needed
to resolve the more than sev-
en-year wait for the Straw Mar-
ket’s rebirth, following its
destruction in the September

2001 fire. He added: “There are
Bahamian professionals who
have worked hard trying to
bring this project to fruition;

their accounts have not been |

settled. There are Straw Ven-
dors housed in what cannot be
classed as a first-rate facility,
befitting world famous sta-
tus....... There is the focal of
Bahamian experience, the heart
of downtown in urgent need of
revitalization, and we continue
to creep toward a solution.

“What is disheartening about
the proposed Straw Market is
that the efforts made by the
Bahamian professionals work-
ing on this project will be
thrown away. I cannot say
whether these individuals have
been asked to work on any
alternate solutions, but it seems
wasteful to spend million — yes,
millions of dollars — on fees and
preparation to totally scrap the
plan and start again from
scratch.”

Legal Notice .

NOTICE

WENDOVER WILLOW LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of WENDOVER WILLOW LIMITED has

been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been is-

sued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce the C-280
Apron Drive Bridges Request For Proposal associated with the expansion of
the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The scope of work includes but is
not limited to:

Fabrication of five (5), Apron Drive Bridges conforming to the
requirements of the RFP, for Stage 1 Construction and five (5) Apron
» Drive Bridges for Stage 2 Construction, (2012);

Transportation and installation of Apron Drive Bridges in accordance
with the Stage 1 and Stage 2 Terminal Expansion Schedule;

Testing, commissioning and training.

This request for proposal.is of interest to Apron Drive Bridge Vendors, however
should also interest local Electrical Trade Contractors. |

Request For Proposal Packages will be available for pick up after 1:00 pm, on
Thursday, December 18th, 2008.

Request for Proposal closing is Wednesday, February 11th at 3:00pm,

2009.

There will be a Tender Briefing, Thursday, January 15th. Please RSVP Traci
Brisby by 1pm Wednesday, January 14th for briefing location details.



Legal Notice

NOTICE
VICTORIA INVESTMENTS
GROUP LTD.

he

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the |.
dissolution of VICTORIA INVESTMENTS GROUP |

LID. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has
been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off |

‘

the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

VESTINA CLAUDETTE CORP.

Oy



Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the |
dissolution of VESTINA CLAUDETTE CORP. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and

the Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

y

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

PALAGNEDRA CO. LTD.

.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 |
(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of PALAGNEDRA CO. LTD. has been com-
pleted; a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the

Company has therefore been struck off the Register.

x

\

ARGOSA CORP. INC,
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

THE PICCHELINA CORPORATION

Oy

_ Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138

(8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, the
dissolution of THE PICCHELINA CORPORATION
has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck off the

Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

TOP STAR INC.

=o

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section

138 (8) of the International Business Companies Act 2000, |

| the dissolution of TOP STAR INC. has been completed;

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Com-

pany has therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


PAGE 6B, FRIDAY, JANUARY. 2, 2009

BUSINESS

THE TRibuwe







1 wants fuel taxes

hiked to fund highways

By JOAN LOWY

WASHINGTON

A SO percent increase in gaso-
line and diesel fuel taxes is
being urged by a federal com-
mission to finance highway con-
struction and repair until the
government devises another
way for motorists to pay for
using public roads, according to
the Associated Press.

The National Commission on
Surface Transportation Infra-
structure Financing, a 15-mem-
ber panel created by Congress,
1s the second group ina year to

call for higher fuel taxes.

With motorists driving less
and buying less fuel, the cur-
rent 18.4 cents a gallon gas tax
and 24.4 cents a gallon diesel
tax fail to raise enough to keep
pace with the cost of road,
bridge and transit programs.

In a report expected in late
January, members of the infra-
structure financing commission
say they will urge Congress to
raise the gas tax by 10 cents a
gallon and the diesel fuel tax by
12 to 15 cents a gallon. At the
same time, the commission will
recommend tying the fuel tax
rates to inflation.

‘The commission will also rec-
ommend that states raise their
fuel taxes and make greater use
of toll roads and fees for rush-
hour driving.

A tax increase on this order
would be politically treacher-
ous for Democratic leaders in
Congress — a gas tax hike was
one of the reasons they lost con-
trol of the House and Senate in
the 1994 elections. President-
elect Barack Obama has.
expressed concern about rais-
ing gas taxes in the current eco-
nomic climate. But commission
members said the government
must find the money some-
where. *

"I'm not excited about a gas
tax increase, but the reality is
our current gas tax doesn't pay

| HEL
WANTED

Accounts Clerk urgently needed with
minimum of 3 years experience, proficient
in Microsoft applications, preferably 30
years and older-

Fax resume to 394-3885

for upkeep of the system we
have now," said Adrian Moore,
vice president of the Reason
Foundation, a libertarian think
tank in Los Angeles, and a
member of the highway revenue
commission. "We can either let
the roads go to hell or we can
pay more."

The dilemma for Congress is
that highway and transit pro-
-grams are dependent for rev-
enue on fuel taxes that are not
sustainable. Many Americans
are driving less and switching
to more fuel-efficient cars and
trucks, and a shift to new fuels
and technologies like plug-in
hybrid electric cars will further
erode gasoline sales.

According to a draft of the
financing commission's recom-
mendations, the nation needs
to move to a new system that
taxes motorists according to
how much they use roads.

"Most if not all of the com-
missioners have a strong belief
and commitment that we need a
fundamental transformation of
the current system," said com-



Accountant urgently needed with minimum
of 5 years experience, preferably 35 years
and older -

Fax resume to 394-3885



Cleaning/Messenger needed, preferably
35 years or older must have valid drivers
license.

Fax 394-3885





mission chairman Robert
Atkinson, president of the
Information Technology and
Innovation Foundation, a tech-
nology policy think tank in
Washington.

A study by the Transporta-
tion Research Board of the
National Academies estimated
that the annual gap between
revenues and the investment
needed to improve highway and
transit systems was about $105
billion in 2007, and will increase
to $134 billion in 2017 under
current trends.

Projected shortfalls in rev-°

enue led the National Surface
Transportation Policy and Rev-
enue Study Commission, in a
report issued in January 2008, to
call for an increase of as much
as 40 cents a gallon in the gas
tax, phased in over five years.
Charles Whittington, chair-
man of the American Trucking
Associations, which supports a
fuel tax increase as long as the
money goes to highway pro-
jects, said Congress may decide
to disguise a fuel tax hike as a
surcharge to combat climate
change. Transportation is
responsible for about a third of
all U.S. carbon emissions cre-
ated by burning fossil fuels.
Traffic congestion wastes an
estimated 2.9 billion gallons of





Retail Store Manager

Small Retail Store specializing in
girls accessories is seeking a dynamic,
energetic, and highly motivated
Store Manager (30-40 years) with
prior retail managerial experience

to handle all aspects of store operations.

Please send resumes by e-mail to

bahamas.com @ gmail.com



IN THIS NOV. 21, 2007 file photo, Shell Oil Company's Deer Park refinery and petrochemical facility is shown
in the background as vehicles travel along Highway 225 in Deer Park, Texas. A 50 percent increase in gasoline
and diesel fuel taxes is being urged by a federal commissiion to finance highway construction and repair until
a government devises another way for motorists to pay for using public roads.

fuel a year. Less congestion
would reduce greenhouse gases
and dependence on foreign oil.

"Instead of calling it a gas tax,
call it a carbon tax," Whitting-
ton said. "As long as we label it
as something else we may have
the momentum and acceptance
to move forward."

Bottlenecks around the.
nation cost the trucking industry
about 243 million lost truck
hours and about $7.8 billion per
year, according to the commis-
sion. The financing commission
thinks the long-term solution is
a mileage-based revenue sys-
tem. While details have not
been worked out, such 4 system
would mean equipping every
car and truck with a device that
uses global positioning satellites
and transponders to record how
many miles the vehicle has been
driven, the type of roads and
time of day. Creation and instal-
lation of such a system would
take about 10 years.

Moore said commission
members were initially con-
cerned that using technology to
track driving might violate dri-
vers' privacy, but they've been
assured that such a system could=
be designed to prevent vehicles
from being "tracked in some
big brotherish way."









EG CAPITAL

= ) FIDELITY

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S) ‘
Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Premier Real Estate

11.87
10.45
5.01
1.00
0.30
5.50
8.60
10.00

S2wk-Low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

_..1900,00

| S2wk-Hi
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidélity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

#1000.00
41000.00
1000.00

P52wk-Hi
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
20 RND Hold



11.87
10.45
5.17
1.00
0.30
6.13
11.10
10.00

999999999999999990
OOCOCODOONDOCAOCOOOD
ceoo0o0o0co0cooucaooco0o00nd

F290
200
3:00

YO YBSnds Hades die PSsentage PU
Last Sale

Change Daily Vol. __

ABDAB

Bahamas Supermarkets

RND

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

1.4336
3.7969
412.5597
§100.24214
100.9600
1.0000
10.5000
41.0264

100.0000

96.7492
1.0000
9.0775
1.0000
1.0000
1.0000

BISX ALL

SHARE INDEX - 16
520i tl 3

~ Higher

ing price from day to day

> Number of tot



shares traded today



Date 8/8/2007



pr share paid in the last 12 months
fivided by the last 12 month earnings

‘@ Date 7/11/2007

“33.39
11.83
0.45.
gs BIS Listed
NA_Vv
1.3455
2.9522
1.4336
3.4931
12.5597
100.2421
96.7492
1.0000
9.0775
1.0264
1.0289

floc Fund | 1,0287

Bid $
Ask S

Last Price
Weekly Vol

35.01 29.00
12.68 14.00
OOS csinileaibuken 5
Miuitvial ands:
YTD% Las
4.90
-1.27
4.75
-15.79
5.73
0.24
-3.25
0.00 0.00
-13.55 -13.55
2.64 2.64
2.89 2.89
2.87 2.87

-1.62
4.25
-8.00
5.25
0.24
-3.25

MARKET TERMS
YIELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
- Buying price of Colina and Fidetity

- Selling price of Colina and fidelity
- Last traded over-the-counter price
- Trading volume of the prior week

SAARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

19 October 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

29M

30-Nov-08
30-Nov-08
26-Dec-08
30-Nov-08
30-Nov-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
31-Dec-07
30-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08

EPSS-A sorpany's reported earnings por share for the last 12 mths

NAY -

Net As

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 =



100

Crit) ear MUTE I eam

Waitaity TST ee



lm By ALAN SCHER ZAGIER
COLUMBIA, Mo.

A federal conservation program originally designed to help
small farmers is now disproportionately benefiting industrial live-
stock operations, according to a new report by a family farm advo-
cacy group, according to the Associated Press.

The Campaign for Family Farms and the Environment examined
five years worth of payments through the federal Environmental
Quality Incentives Program, known as EQIP.

Nationally, industrial hog operations accounted for 37 percent of
all EQIP payments, the group determined, even though such busi-
nesses account for less than 11 percent of that industry. Industrial
dairies received 54 percent of all EQIP dairy contracts. Such busi-
nesses represent only 3.9 percent of all dairy operations.

The study found similar disparities on the state level in lowa, Min-
nesota and Missouri. ;

"This report demonstrates what family farmers have known for
years: This corporate-controlled, industrial model of livestock pro-
duction can't survive without taxpayer support," said Rhonda Per-
ry, a Howard County livestock farmer and program director of the
Missouri Rural Crisis Center.

But Don Nikodim, executive vice president of the Missouri Pork

| Association, said the program is working as Congress intended.

Even with the family farm group's estimate that industrial opera-
tions are receiving $35 million annually, that still leaves plenty of the:
$6.1 billion set aside six years. ago for other producers.

"It's available to all sizes of producers," Nikodim said. "Small
farms can use it just like large farms."

Because of their larger size, industrial operations often own
more land and so need more money, he said.

When Congress created the conservation program in the 1996
Farm Bill, grants were limited to $50,000 over five years and waste
storage facilities were excluded from eligibility. Participants are
, required to match the federal payments.

Six years later, lawmakers expanded EQIP to include industrial
farms. The maximum payment level was increased to $450,000, with
60 percent of allocations set aside for livestock farmers.

The head ofthe federal agency that administers EQIP noted that
Congress intended the program to be "size neutral."

Contracts issued this year averaged $31,235, with more than 82

' percent of payments since 2002 falling under $25,000, said Arlen

Lancaster, chief of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural
Resources Conservation Service.

" Although a handful of large livestock operations have received
EQIP funds, they are certainly not the majority," he said.

The 2008 Farm Bill, which awaits congressional approval, pro-
poses reducing the cap on maximum payments to $300,000 overall.
But the Agriculture Department can waive the limit for projects
with "special environmental significance."

That revision isn't good enough for the report's authors, a group
that includes lowa Citizens for Community Improvement and the
Land Stewardship: Project in Minnesota.

Among the changes sought: lowering the cap to $150,000; requir-
ing the Agriculture Department to give priority to contracts based
on cost-efficiency, not amount of pollution generated; and restor-
ing the prohibition on using EQIP for waste storage.

According to the report, an unidentified producer in Becker
County, Minn., received $285,000 in 2003 to build a manure lagoon
nearly 1 million cubic feet in size.

And in Missouri, the federal agency Hug approved a total of
nearly $5 million since 2003 to move manure off farms that produce
too much waste to apply to their own cropland. ~

"The money for years has helped support the factory farms'
industry under the guise of environmental stewardship," said Lisa
Whalen, rural project director for the Iowa citizens' group.

Lancaster, though, noted that fewer than 0.5 percent of the
EQIP contracts awarded in Iowa, Minnesota and Missouri since
2002 topped $250,000.

The study defines industrial farms as those with at least 2,000 hogs
or more than 500 dairy cows. Those levels are slightly lower than the
definition of confined animal feeding operations outlined in the Pe
eral Clean Water Act.

PUBLIC NOTICE
INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL

The Public is hereby advised that |, EDWARD
SAINTIL of SEA BREEZE LANE, P.O. Box SS-
6582, Nassau, Bahamas, intend to change my name
to EDWARD ISRAEL SAINTIL. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you
may write such objections to the Chief Passport Officer,
P.O.Box N-742, Nassau, Bahamas no later than thirty
(30) days after the date of publication of this notice.












ea
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

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Provision and Maintenance of Plants —



Nassau Airport Development Company Lid. invites tenders for
provision and maintenance of plants at Lynden Pindling
International Airport



In keeping with NAD’s objective to develop and maintain a
world-class gateway to The Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
proponents:

+ Must be 100% Bahamian owned & operated

* Mustbe holders of a current business license

* Must demonstrate the ability to fulfill the requirements set out
in NAD’s official Request for Proposal

* Must show a track record of commitment to service with
excellence

* Request for Proposals may be collected from NAD’s
corporate office in Terminal — 1 at the Lynden Pindling
International Airport between the hours of 1 0:00am — 4:00pm
commencing January 2 - 6, 2009.



Deadline for submissions of Proposals
is January 9, 2009 at 3:00pm. ~



Telephone (242) 702-1000/1022


THE TRIBUNE



www, kingfeatures.com

COMIC PAGE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 2, 2009 PAGE 7B





CALVIN & HOBBES







NOTHING EVER CHANGES.
IT'S JUST SCHOOL,

EVERY DAY L
HAVE TO GET
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MEAN TO IT7 :
: jose Capablanca v Max Wallson, army homed in oat. his white king
i simultaneous display, Brooklyn gt the edge of the hoard, and after _
& TA15. Capa was world champion — piack's next tuen he resigned,
3] for only six years, butthe Cuban, commenting gracefully but
g] whodoubled asa parttime antruthsuly “Very fine®, Black's
5 diplomat, conveyed such an gir saetic is rather banal you
8] af effortless superiority that it” paveth ate} ee ig ea
was 3 mini-seasation when he encboicts by Qxb8, What
fost event an exhibition game. fanned? ves
On that evesitg in Brooklyn he MSPPEREA:

_ LEONARD BARDEN” |
agreed ta take on 65 opponents :
rather than his usuai 36, and

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE











Fox ‘N ame of New York's best speed
OKAY, MEN— THE PLAN 16. To. ‘/ WY MUFFLER some ERS geet
BSCE TIE SKM “2 eich Hone Seocceeceare)

ZILENTLY. Ee IN My CLOSET. _ pas usual OGpercent

standards, his concessian of six








shone dofaats was something af 3
YEAH,! HAVE TOLD. disaster, and in tuday’s position
MINE WAS US SOONER, aa unknown college student
- ACHRIBTMA HAGAR / recovered from a poor position
PRESENT / to launch a decisive attack, Capa




could only watch as the black

“ ©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

cues BROWNE

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

\

Down .

2 Over one ounce of
oxygen (5)
Having a down on? (6)

4 The birthright of their crazy
generation (8)
Bring about a result (6)
Dread going round the
globe and therefore

‘Across
1 Light nonsense is still
produced (9).
Father has to confess and
make headlines (5)
Children’s playthings? (7)
No corner stone? (6)

Leave for the Sahara

perhaps (6) don’t (7) South dealer.
Withdraw a summary (8) Apparently outstanding, Both sides va
Everything is plain; the but hardly fine (9) aK94
alert is over (3,5) A classic dream once ED ‘3
: ‘ shattered (9) a
Attacked the copper with _ $8752
id (6) Gave a shriek and scared WEST EAST
aci 2
‘There's hostility when | oe Across #00 10 86 v4 3 :
One on a diet may turn out) =| LJ 4105 #8763
cast my net around (6) so (7) x 1 US political 2 To change (5) A 93 #K 4
Stop and go after amber The French take shelter to N scandal (9) 3 Scope (6) ’ SOUT H
5 @A73
changes (7) be hidden (6) Oo. Open to suspicion (5) 4 Exceed accepted ¥K72
Fights for food left over (6) iclati ini ¢A4
A once rough sea (5) 9g > 9 Legislative act (7) limits (2,3,3) QI 106
They keep shops eer 2 Obvious (6) 5 Treat as identical (6) Ae a North East
smartened perhaps (9) a Ww US wild horse (6) 6 Do good to (7) l& Pass 1¢ Pass
arms (5) , 1 NT Pass 3 NT

Restlessly excited (8) Former (9) Opening lead — queen of hearts.

Yesterday’s Easy Solution Profanity (9)
Blood feud (8)

Done without

Air force unit (8)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

One of the first rules of defensive
play learned by the aspiring new
player is “second-hand low.” Some-
time later he discovers that the rule
has its exceptions, as all such rules
do.

The trouble is that the proper time
to abandon this stricture is not sub-
ject to precise definition. About all
that can be said is that a defender
should depart from the usual practice
whenever there appears to be a good
reason for doing so.

Consider this case where West

Across: 1 Reflect, 4 Beset, 7 Gate,
8 Oratorio, 10 Dilly-dally, 12 Antics,
13 Unique, 15 Stagecoach, 18

_ Overhead, 19 Bias, 20 Tenor, 21
Amnesty.
Down: 1 Rigid, 2 Futility, 3 Thread,
4 Bottleneck, 5 Spry, 6 Trouble, 9
Eye-catcher, 11 Aquarius, 12
Affront, 14 Iguana, 16 Hasty, 17
Lean.

ATTENTION! F Display enticingly (6)
Expression of

THIS FEATURE IS NOT AVAILABLE respect (6) formality (7)
Pertinacious (6)
Under

consideration (2,4)

Furtive procedure (7)
A signalling code (5)
Requiring great

effort (9) Reveal a secret (3,2)



| 02} ] 01 Nin] O} 1/00
Colon] ©: }o}AIN
|N)@O]o @: A} M|O] a





0/0)
AiD/O ho

N

o
re





: Chexe soisien BBR Rat aad yehea resigned
P prcuumn nd EBea2 Gade FADE RATS
** He} Qezmaie.



+ HOW many wards of four letters
or more can you nuke from the
fetters shown here? Ta making 2
word, eavh letter may be used ored
ony. Raoh must contain the centre
letter and there must be atleast
ane rine-bether word, Ne pharals.

FODAY'S TARGET
Good 18; very good 27; excellent 36
far more}. Sohatien famorraw,

SATURDAY'S SQLUTTON
ADVENTURE aunt avenue daunt
denature denture duet dune
Suvet endxe endure enure
enured ebade nature meuter
mude revae rude xrued rnpe mat
tenure temired ime trued funa
tondra fame fiprect tuner bree
turn tumed under unrated
unread urea vanot yvaunied
vaunter venture venbured venue



Second-Hand High -

leads the queen of hearts, ducked all
around. A second heart puts the lead
in dummy, and a club is. led. What
should East do?

First, let's see what happens if
East plays low. South plays the
queen, and West is faced with a no-
win situation. Ifhe takes the trick, he
loses the entry to his heart suit, and
declarer ends up with 10 tricks after
driving out the king of clubs at his
next opportunity. And if West refuses
to take the queen with the ace, South
has nine tricks.

Now let’s see what happens if
East puts up the king when the first
club is led. After the king holds, East
retums a heart, and the contract goes
down one as soon as West gains the
lead with the club ace.

The question, then, is how can
East know that this is the time not to
play second-hand low? The answer
lies in the fact that most notrump
contracts fail because the defense
establishes a long suit and then is
able to run it. This objective is
defeated if the suit cannot be cashed
after it becomes established.

In the present case, East cannot
tell what side entry his partner may
have, but he should reason that play-
ing the club king cannot cost if South
has the A-Q. If West has the ace,
however, the king play performs the
vital function of preserving his entry
until the hearts are established.

Tomorrow: A hard look into the future.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.


INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS









Saturday WAVES _ VISIBILITY WATER TEMPS.
Low W WASSAU Today: VAR at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles 78° F

FIC NE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles 78° F
VAR at 6-12 Knots 2-4 Feet 5-7 Miles WF
NE at 7-14 Knots
NE at 7-14 Knots . 3-5 Feet 5-7 Miles qi FE





High













Lots of sun with a Mainly clear witha =| Plenty of sun. Sunshine and patchy





Bright sunshine. Sunny to partly The higher the AccuWeather UV Indexâ„¢ number, the NE at 8-16 Knots 3-5 Feet
. shower; breezy. shower in spots. | "clouds. i | cloudy and breezy, | greater the need for eye and skin protection. ;
High: 79° ~ High: 80° High: 81° =| ~~ High: 85°







‘Low: 68°

uWeather RealFeel

Low: 71°

Low: 70°

AccuWeather R

Low: 69° _- Low: 70°

PHA rs) RealFeel AccuWeather RealFeel ; HATA matte
76°-68° F 78°-74° F 86°-69° F if 95°-72°F

The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 14:13am. 2.3 5:02 4m. 04
elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. 2 14:41 p.m. 2.3 5:27 p.m. 0.0

Sunday 12:33am. 24 6:54am. 0.2







cE te ©





iseegienctiay














Statistics are for Nassau through 1 p.m. yesterday












: ABACO TR act 12:55 p.m. 2.1 7:04pm. -0.1
High: 72° F/22°C ee sisaes sebeseeencsecas aadbatacesaveeshedessanree ee : ica : Monday 1:33 a.m. 05 8:00 a.m. 0.2
- S a pasissctaane nes dasastyesee seusauseteadet pri iets -56 p.m. : : _m. -0.
—— Low:53°F/12°C Normal high ................ vee, 78° F/26° C ee ae Ne
Normal lOW ......c.sesesseseseeeeeees wedaasbeaeee 66° F/19° C
. WEST PALM BEACH Last year's High ...ssccsssesssssssseeseseenee 83° F/28° C
High:76°F/24°C Last year's IOW ......sscscseecceeeceee Lacals F236 = : ene
Low: 62° F/A7°C Precipitation Sunrise... .... 6:55 a.m. Moonrise. ... 10:41 a.m.

0.29" Sunset....... 5:33 p.m. Moonset. ... 11:05 p.m.

0.00"
"0.06" Full Last New

As of 1 p.m. yesterday
Year to date
Normal year to date





High: 71° F/22°C
Low: 53° F/12°C























AccuWeather.com Showers Bs
Forecasts and graphics provided by r = T-storms oo
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2009 Jan. 4 Jan. 10 Jan.17 Jan. 26 [o%0"4 Rain a
-7R° ° ELEUTHERA Fronts
igh: 76° F/24°C - High:77° F/25°C L*, 4 Flurries Cold ==-=0
w: 63° F/17°C eae ‘. : PEK] Snow Shown are noon positions of weather systems and SN isc ia
Low: 62°F/17°C i [x ~1 Ice precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day. j

2 Forecast high/low temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary gen












KEY WEST CATISLAND 84/28 atte
High: 76° F/24°C High: 74° F/23°C
Low: 66° F/19°C Low: 59° F/15°C
es

AUTO INSURANCE



aoe _ SAN SALVADOR ©
PC > High: 76°F/24°C
Low: 63°F/17°C



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.



High: 79° F/26°C
Low: 65° F/18°C





Our
out us!



High: 78° F/26"









Today Saturday . Today Saturday a Today " Saturday MAYAGUANA e a SESS yess
High Low W High Low W High Low W High Low W- High Low W ‘High Low W High: 78° F/26° C ! 4/1. 67/9 po
FIC FIC FIC FIC . 94/34 721s
Albuquerque 57/13 320 s 52/41 31/0 c Philadelphia ace
Anchorage —-1/-18-12/-24 pe -1/-18-11/-23 pce _ Jacksonville Phosnie CROOKEDIS /ACKLINS 3 t t
Atlanta 50/10 37/2 c 64/17 500 pc Kansas City OU Can trust.



Atlantic City 46/7 27/-2 c¢ 42/5 20/-6 pc Las Vegas RAGGED ISLAND Low:66°F/19°C


















Baltimore — 40/4 26/3 c 41/5 26/-3 pc Little Rock eae cae

Boston 35/1 26/-3 sf 30/-1 22/-5 pe Los Angeles . Dae ‘

Buffalo «34/1 19/-7 sf 29-1 16-8 sf Louisville —46/7.-33/0 aes

Charleston,SC 62/16 43/6 c° 63/17 52/11 pc Memphis 58/14 51/10 pe GREAT INAGU A ue ir

Chicago (28/-2 18-7 © = 38/8. «31/0 cc «= Miami == 76/24 63/17 High: 84°F/29°C

Cleveland 36/2 21/-6 st 32/0 26/-3 pc Minneapolis 16/-8 13/-10 c Low: 65° F/18°G =

Dallas «74/23 GO/IS pc 71/21 41/5 pc Nashville 5241 39/ ; : he 7

Denver 58/14 24/-4 ¢ 38/3 5/-15 sn New Orleans 73/22 62/16 c t Tallahassee Thi :
Detroit «32/0. 18/-7 sf 34/1 24/-4 c NewYork —«- 37/2 30/-1. 5/-3 pc. Tampa a ikreery 29-sn (er eh (2 (2 f)) 332-2862 | Tel (242) 336-2304 E
Honolulu 81/27 70/21 c 80/26 70/21 pc Oklahoma City 62/16 46/7 s pe Tucson 70/21 44/6 ; ‘ eal 3 rs e 2 < . a
Houston 76/24 64/17 pc 73/22 58/14 t Orlando + ==» 74/23 52/11 c «77/25 56/13 pc Washington, DC 44/6 28/-2 Sea ce Fide aearad Fon Crp arannn fae _ eg



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