Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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- FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

WEATHER



Pm lovin’ it







The Tribune



el el
AC
up all night!

NecDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

ANY






HIGH 82F
LOW 69F

SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.14





BAHAMAS EDITION



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

ere |
Anejo Ltr

yeas
I $13.55 each

BRISTOL

Buy 2 Get 1 FEEE!!

Available at all Bristol Locations Nation wide

stores

did not
pass on
savings

â„¢ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE government’s
intervention in cutting Custom’s
duties on certain food items
throughout the country, the cost
of these items has increased in
many areas while others showed
little decrease or no movement
at all.

This information, released
yesterday by the Department
of Statistics reveals the concern
of many, that the reduction in
the import duty offered by the
government was never “passed
on” to the Bahamian consumer
(see page 6 for statistics).

In his 2008/2009 Budget com- -
muniqué, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced
that import duties on food items
such as fresh fruits, frozen veg-
etables, cereals, oatmeal, and
bread, would be eliminated.

Additionally, the Prime Min-
ister promised that duty would
be reduced on items such as
sweet peppers, canned corn,
pigeon peas and carrots.

However, in the Department
of Statistics’ attempts to dis-
cover whether these reductions
in duty had been passed on to
consumers throughout the Fam-
ily Islands and New Providence,
it discovered that while some
prices showed a noticeable
decrease, on many islands other
items on which duty was elimi-
nated, showed increases.

These food products include,
oatmeal, breakfast cereals, and
pasta, Of those items which
showed a noticeable decrease
in prices were oranges, grape-
fruits, bananas, plantains, and
tomatoes.

In Eleuthera, the price of
plantains dropped by 43 per
cent. Decreases in the price of
plantain was also found on
Grand Bahama, Eleuthera,

SEE page 8

Anna Nicole remembered

LARRY Birkhead and Howard K Stern were in Nassau last week, reportedly to mark Anna
Nicole Smith’s birthday with her baby daughter, Dannielynn.

A headstone (AT BOTTOM OF PHOTO, BETWEEN TREE AND GAZEBO) has now been
placed on the late cover girl’s grave at Lakeview Cemetery, where she is buried alongside her son
Daniel.

Birkhead, the father of Dannielynn, and Stern, who was Anna’s lawyer and constant companion,
were seen at Nassau’s Outback Restaurant in East Bay Street on Thanksgiving Day.

“They seemed to be in good spirits and on very friendly terms,” said a fellow diner.

Anna Nicole died in February last year, six months after Daniel died at Doctors Hospital in Nas-
sau. An inquest found that Daniel died of drug use. Anna’s death in Florida was declared to be
accidental. Birkhead and Stern contested baby Dannielyn’s paternity in the Bahamian courts, but
after DNA tests Birkhead was named as biological father.

Row heats up as Jewish
symbols are removed

WORKMEN removed Jewish symbols from
Bay Street Christmas decorations yesterday after
protests by Christians sparked a major row.

The nine-candle menorahs attached to lamp-

_ posts in Rawson Square were taken down after
they had been described as an “insult” by one
Anglican priest.













Now a row has broken out over the protests,
with one Jewish Tribune reader lambasting pro-
testers as “small-minded and ignorant.”

Ms Susan Katz Lightbourn said: “I happen to

SEE page 8

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE # 1









24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays

PRICE — 75¢

SiC erece VG GEvasie
Many Many Wine or
Spirit Brands on Sale!



Bahamian
— deportees:
denied bail

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men, recently deported
from Jamaica, were remanded
in prison yesterday until the
completion of their respective
trials when a local magistrate
revoked their bail.

Ian Porter of Star Estates
and Marvin Reckley of Glad-
stone Road, out on bail on drug

- trafficking. charges, were arrest-

ed in Jamaica last month. The
men were charged with immi-

‘gration violations and ordered

to be deported. Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel had issued a war-
rant of arrest for Porter after
he failed to appear in court on
May 29 this year.

Porter is charged in connec-
tion with a major drug seizure
off Marshall Road in 2006.
According to reports, police
seized 20 crocus sacks contain-
ing 921 pounds of marijuana.
The drugs, which have an esti-

mated street value of $921,000,

was discovered in a Chevrolet
Astro van. Magistrate Bethel
revoked Porter’s bail in view of
his bail violation. He was
remanded until the completion
of his trial. He is expected back
in court on December 16.

An arrest warrant was issued
for Marvin Reckley, also known
as Marvin Sherman, in June

after he failed to show up for |

Developer
faces ‘S5m

back pay’
allegation



= By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

A US company could owe
160 Bahamian construction
workers up to $5 million in back
pay, according to the workers’
representatives.

Errol McKinney of EM and
Associates, during a press con-
ference yesterday, told local
media that construction work-
ers employed at a site on Bock
Cay, Exuma had to work 10
hours a day, seven days a week,
for 28 continuous days.

Following almost a month of

work, employees were given a

week off without pay.
According to Mr McKinney
the company employing the

workers were allegedly in -

breach of the. Bahamas’
Employment Act by not com-
pensating employees properly
for overtime and vacation pay.

“Instead of the company giv-
ing each employee two weeks
vacation after completing 12
months of employment, the
company decided to calculate

SEE page 8



" his trial in the Supreme Court in

connection with the seizure of
cocaine and marijuana in June
2006. Magistrate Bethel also
issued a warrant for Reckley’s
arrest in. September when he
failed to appear in court for his
firearm and ammunition case.
Reckley’s bail was also revoked

SEE page 8
Attorney
General
urged to
‘intervene’
with resort

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Hotel

Managerial Association is
asking for the attorney gen-
eral's "urgent intervention"
to facilitate legal proceed-
ings against the manage-
ment of Harborside at
Atlantis for not negotiating
an industrial agreement with
its union in a timely fash-
ion.
- In a press release issued
yesterday by lawyer Obie
Ferguson, BHMA's presi-
dent, it was claimed that
Harborside's management
failed to "treat and enter
into negotiations" with
BHMaA "ona timely basis",
as mandated By Section
41(3)-of the Industrial Rela-
tions Act.

Said the release: "We the
workers were given recog-
nition on December 11,
2007 by the Minister of
Labour (as a bargaining
agent) and since then our
union tried consistently to
get management to sit down
and negotiate an Industrial
Agreement, but the compa-
ny refused to do so.

"It is important that the
attorney general knows that
time is of the essence when
dealing with recognition. It
is to this end we seek his
urgent intervention. ©

It pointed out that
presently they are “without
proper representation”,
alleging that the company
was breaking “the law in
denying us our fundamen-
tal rights guaranteed under
the laws of the Bahamas."
In their statement they
claimed that the "delayed
process" was staged to. dis-
courage employees from

SEE page 8













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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: NE at 12-25 Knots 6-8 Feet 3-5 Miles 78° F
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87/30 73/228 FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 5-7 Feet 3-5 Miles

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elevation on the human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day.



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AccuWeather.com §
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Low:70°F/21°C

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THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGE 3



Ja (Xs
probe

home
invasion



POLICE say they have
launched an “intensive
investigation” into a Friday
morning home invasion in
Highbury Park.

Shortly before 4am on
Friday, a family in that
neighbourhood wakened to
the sound of someone
entering their home.

The culprits were carry-
ing firearms and robbed the
family of cash, jewellery,
cell phones, and a vehicle
before speeding off.

¢ POLICE are investigat-
ing a Friday morning shoot-
ing that left a security guard
in hospital in serious condi-
tion.

According to police, the ,

incident occurred shortly
after 2am on Friday.

The security guard, who
was on duty at Nassau
Christian Academy, was
reportedly approached by
three masked gunmen who
demanded cash.

Police could not confirm
if any cash was taken, how-
ever before leaving one of
the gunmen shot the securi-
ty guard in the chest.

The victim was taken to
hospital where he remains
in serious condition.

¢ DRUG enforcement
officers confiscated about
$22,000 worth of marijuana
from a home in eastern New
Providence on Thursday
night.

According to reports,
sometime before 8pm on
Thursday, DEU officers
executed a search warrant
on a home in eastern New
Providence.

The officers found a sack
containing two brown taped
packages of marijuana.

The drugs. weigh. 20
pounds,. Police‘said that-one
persons is assisting’ with
their investigation into the



Fires the ‘height
of incompetence’

m= By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government says it is
moving to deal with the vexing
problem of dump fires — which
flared up again this week lead-
ing to health concerns in sur-
rounding neighbourhoods.

“We believe it is at the height
of incompetence that a society
as advanced as the Bahamas
cannot manage garbage better
than it does and that the popu-
lation continues to suffer from
these combustions for whatever
reason,” Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux said.

For more than 16 years the
New Providence city dump has
been a constant problem and
for the second time this year,
serious fires posed a‘ danger, not
only to nearby homes, but to
the health of those who live in
the area.

“I cannot say that we will not

‘have anymore fires, but some

of the. proposals we have in
hand will accommodate dealing
with the dump more efficiently.
That is the mandate that I have
been given and that is the goal
that I have set,” Mr Deveaux
said.

He explained that the fire at
the dump this week was either
caused by “hot garbage” being

MME a ie
end. Although firefighters were able to contain most of the He oN aeed 0a
evening, there were still fires burning ol) under the dump.

deposited there, or was started
by someone. Investigations into
the cause of the fire are contin-
uing.

“The people of the Bahamas
have spent too much money on
the control of garbage for per-
sons living so near to have to
deal with that odour ‘and the
smoke caused by the fire, Mr
Deveaux said.

He said the best managed
landfill in the Bahamas is on



the island of Abaco, but even
that has its share of fires from
time to time.

“North Andros is not the best

example of a landfill site |

because the same people that
built that one built the one here
in Nassau, but at.a later point
we will have the proposals fully
reviewed to prevent the fire
problem at the dump sites,” Mr
Deveaux added.



Port brings Christmas cheer

m= By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Port Authority deliv-
ered hundreds of gift wrapped
toys to poor families in East
Grand Bahama yesterday.

A group of employees trav-
elled to High Rock, Pelican
Point, McClean’s Town, and by
ferry to nearby Sweeting’s Cay
and distributed Christmas gifts
to 200 children in those com-
munities.

Ms Willamae Ferguson,
GBPA Employee of the Year,
said the toy distribution drive
was implemented to help strug-
gling families during the Christ-
mas season.

“We want to ensure that the
less fortunate children have a
Merry Christmas especially dur-
ing this time when the economy

THE WESTIN

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND

is down.

“The GBPA management
and staff would like for them
to enjoy Christmas and we hope
that our contributions will help
them do just that.”

“T think persons would be
happy to know that we are
thinking of them... because
sometimes parents are not able
to buy for their kids gifts at
Christmas time,” she said.

Ms Ferguson, a 36-year
employee of the human
resources department, was
recently named employee of the
year.

She was selected from among
15 possible candidates from var-

ious departments in the civil ser-

vice.

“Tam honoured to have been
awarded because it tells me I
am doing something that is
making an impression in my
department and the company,
she said.

The Grand Bahama Port

Grand Bahama Island



OUR LUCAYA>

Resort

QUR LUCAYA
RESORT

EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXISTS FOR BANQUET MANAGER

The successful candidate effectively monitor the daily operations
of the banquet department including providing support and
guidance to fellow banquet and stewarding persons to ensure
a successful and effective operation ending in a positive guess

experience.

Authority has also taken the
time to decorate various traffic
circles and roundabouts
throughout Freeport with holi-
day lights and festive decora-
tions.s

According to a public rela-
tions spokesman, a great deal
of care and attention went into
the selection and placement of
the themed décor for the traffic
circles.

“The Grand Bahama Port
Authority is aware that the

Christmas spirit for Grand
“Bahama truly comes alive when
the circles are lit,”

she said.

We're celebrating

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Resume should be forwarded on or before
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or
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PAGE 4, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Democrats and Republicans face new roles

-WASHINGTON — President-elect
Barack Obama campaigned on a platform
of change. And based on election results,
Americans bought his sales pitch. 2008 was
what pundits called a “change election.”

Some coming transformations are clear.
We already know the Obama administration
will propose new policies on taxes, spend-
ing, environment, energy and health care, to
name a few. No big surprises here.

But Obama’s election will also produce
some more subtle, yet equally significant
changes. For one, congressional roles and
strategies will shift. Both Democrats and
Republicans will inherit new positions in rela-
tion to the White House. How both parties
adapt to their changed circumstances will
define Washington politics for at least the

_hext two years.

The new president, along with Democrat-
ic congressional majorities in the House and
Senate, creates a relatively rare government
institutional environment: unified party con-
trol of the legislative and executive branches.
For the past 30 years, divided government
has been more the norm in Washington. In 15
of the 20 Congresses between 1969-2008, dif-
ferent parties have controlled the White

House and one or both chambers in. i -_

islative branch. When the 111th.Cofigress

convenes in January, it will do so une Hnd="

fied Democratic Party control, conditions
this town has not experienced in 16 vous.
since the beginning of the Clinton adminis-
tration.

Unified party control requires congres-
sional Derhocrats to adapt in several ways.

First, they must pivot from a legislative
majority that routinely opposed a president. to
one that now tries to enact a president’s agen-
da. That means learning to follow the White
House rather thar developing an alternative
programme.

Second, congressional policy development
under these conditions will be more con-
strained. In unified party government, the
majority in Congress usually doesn’t move
too far afield from the White House. For
example, when Republicans controlled the
House during President George W. Bush’s
first term, House Speaker Dennis Hastert
routinely asked GOP lawmakers to reshape
legislation so the White House would not
have to veto any bills. The president’s party in
Congress needs to coordinate closely with
the White House. Democrats have not done
that since 1993.

Third, congressional Democrats will also
have to re-adjust their communications strate-
gies. For the past eight years, whether in the
majority or minority in Congress, Democ-
rats tried to offer an alternative message from

ANNIE A. WALLACE
Born: Feb, 28th, 1910
Died. Dec. 6th, 1985

Capitol Hill to the Bush White House. They
created communications mechanisms. through
congressional leadership offices in the House
and Senate to highlight their differences from
the Republican administration. Now the same
entities that opposed the president for the
past eight years must communicate how and
why they support him. They must move from
telling Americans why the White House’s
policies are wrong to showing why this pres-
ident is right.

The skills and. tactics required for these -

two different tasks are not always the same.
Offence and defence are as different in gov-
erning as they are on the gridiron. Democrats

‘may spend the first few months of 2009 on a
steep learning curve, trying to figure out their
new roles.

Congressional Republicans also face
changed circumstances and an equally daunt-
ing learning curve. Despite President Bush’s
sliding popularity in his second term, the con-
gressional GOP laboured with a Republican
White House for eight years. No more.

This change is a two-edged sword. Presi-
dents always dominate the communications
agenda. No matter how hard Republicans
tried to distance themselves from an unpop-

ular.president over the past. several .years,...
“2.George W. Bush was the face of the party.

The GOP now enjoys a new freedom,’ but
it’s accompanied by fresh challenges. First,
without the White House bully pulpit, com-
municating becomes more difficult. It’s
unclear how Republican lawmakers break
through the cacophony of voices to deliver
the party’s message. Americans pay less
attention when the election is over and often
care little about what the enon party has
to say.

Moreover, confronting ihe White House -

includes its own set of challenges. Does
opposing the new president and the con-
gressional majority make Republicans look
petty, vindictive and obstructionist? Does
“soing along” validate voters’ view that
installing unified Democratic control was a
good thing?’ Each approach — opposition or
compromise — is tricky and fraught with
risk.

This election will produce change in some
less than obvious ways. The first unified
Democratic government in more than a
decade, along with Republicans learning to
operate without a GOP White House after
eight years, means new congressional roles
and strategies. How quickly and effectively
each party adapts will provide another engine
for change in the next election cycle.

(This article was written by Gary Andres - -
Hearst Newspapers - c. 2008).



RAPHAEL LOCKHART
Born: Sent. 12th, 1928
Died: July 1st, 1888

As the bells of the Yuletide ring
CAPT. NORISHL. WALLACE joyously, your family and friends share EILEEN WALLACE LOCKHART

Born: Feb. 14th, 1908
Died: Nov. 8th, 1979

Bee

Dad, this would have been your centenarian year,

your wonderful praises.

Is anyone
looking out
for workers?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would like your indulgence
in addressing the recent firing of
workers at the Atlantis proper-
ty on Paradise Island. Not only
do I wish to address the mass
firing but the treatment of the
workers by our employer under
the possible guise of the eco-
nomic downturn, the lack of
representation on behalf of
many of the fired workers, the
apparent lack of due diligence
by the Hotel Union on behalf of

_ its members and the total failure

of this government to take a
proactive approach to cause
whatever was necessary to pro-
tect workers job in this coun-
try.

First let me say that one must
recognize that there is a global
economic downturn which is
causing many businesses to
either restructure or take pru-
dent steps if they wish to con-
tinue in business. I accept that
the Atlantis property found it
necessary to reassess its ongoing
commitment in the Bahamas,
and made a decision that, for
them to achieve a position that
they thought was beneficial to
their operation going forward,
they should cut back on staff.

I also recognized that as a
major employer in the
Bahamas, the Atlantis benefited
from. concessions by the
Bahamas government. If only
because of this, I expected the
government to initiate exten-
sive negotiations with the
Atlantis and the Hotel Union.
These negotiations would have
looked at the cost to Atlantis
going forward, with the view of
finding solutions which would
save cost to the Atlantis and
save jobs if only in the short
term. Let’s remember in 1991
during the Gulf War, the Hotel
Union and the Atlantis negoti-
ated and concessions were
made. The agreement between
the Atlantis and the Hotel
Union provides for short work
weeks, rotations, and layoffs.
The parties are presently in con-
tract negotiations and could
have looked at further conces-
sions. Why weren’t these areas
aggressively encouraged by the
Bahamas government before
allowing the termination of 800
workers?

Let us now look at what the
Atlantis property did. Accord-
ing to their spokesperson, a
decision to down size was made.
After some consultation with
the Hotel Union, those hotel
workers who were not best suit-
ed to further the Atlantis in the
way forward were selected for
termination. In the Casino
where I work, there was no con-
sultation or negotiation on
behalf of the casino workers to
be terminated. The month prior
to the firing, persons were called
in and told that because of their
sick record, should it become
necessary to layoff they would
be the first to be fired. *

Born: Oct. 31st, 1938
Died: July 26th,1997

No Time has not erased your sweet memories, it has only caused our
sadness of your earthly departure to drift into contentment.

but thank God for for the quality time you spent with us.
Let light perpetual shine upon such outstanding family members.

Children: Brunell Munroe & Ella Rahming;

grands, greatgrands & great-great grand son Stephano Fox.



LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




Eventually the Atlantis fired
some 800 workers; most of
whom were hotel union mem-
bers. Their termination pack-
ages were negotiated by the
Hotel Union, but there were
some 40 casino workers who
were also terminated. During
their termination, some of the
casino workers were threatened
with non payment. of their ter-
mination cheque, should they
not sign the company release
form. Some of them foolishly
did and were therefore denied
the opportunity of further pur-
suing any money owed to them.
What is so interesting about this

is that in my, opinion these 40.

casino workers were taken
advantage of and were denied
the opportunity to have some-
one look after their interest. It is
no secret that this situation
exists at the Atlantis Casino
because both governments
FNM and PLP, have stood in
the way and have prevented
casino workers from exercising
their constitutional right to join
a union. Would it, therefore, be
safe to say that our govern-
ments do not believe in the rule
of law, but expects others to?
It must be noted that while
the Atlantis casino workers
were being taken advantage of,
nothing was heard from the
politicians or church, except one
church leader who gleefully
commented on the settlement
package of one fired worker
who was adequately compen-
sated. While some 13 Bahamian
‘Games Supervisors, witl fami-
lies and commitments, were
being fired, there ‘dre several
unmarried/unattached expat
supervisors being allowed to
have gainful employment in the
Bahamas. In fact the only fired
expat is married with a Bahami-
an family. This is certainly not
right, but who is looking out for
Bahamian casino workers?
What kind of country do we














EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHILE returning to my
office from lunch today, I was
deeply disturbed to see trailers
of carnival rides plying along
Victoria Avenue. Having
regard to the current eco-
nomic environment, I sub-
scribe to the view that goy-
ernment should do all in its
power to ensure that thrifti-
ness abounds. We must
acknowledge that there are
many intellectually challenged
‘individuals amongst us, includ-
ing some recently laid off
workers, who see nothing
wrong with blowing their mea-

No carnival for prudence

have when Bahamians are
being fired and foreigners are
given more rights for employ-
ment in our own country? I
love these expats who are my
friends, but I am a Bahamian.

Based on the information
available to me, it appears that
the Hotel Union was powerless
in this whole termination exer-
cise. In my opinion persons in
the tipping categories were
shafted, and that is why some
are taking legal action. It is
interesting that one of the
spokesperson for Atlantis
claims that fired workers were
given their just due. If this is so,
I wonder why it was necessary
to require persons to sign a let-
ter of release. If no money is
owed, then there would be no
need for persons to sign a doc-
ument that may not be in their
best interest.

Again, we recognize the glob-
al economic downturn. Howev-
er, many are wondering
whether our employer used this

‘ fact to accomplish a previously
considered retrenchment?

There is no doubt that the firing
of the 800 Atlantis workers was
a business decision based on
future projection, and not for
the present time. Atlantis paid

- fired workers approximately
. five million dollars in advance,

six months to one year pay. This
being the case, makes it puz-
zling that the Bahamas govern-
ment, Atlantis and the Hotel
Union did not work out.a deal
that would have allowed work-
ers the flexibility of reduced
work weeks, rotations, layoffs
or voluntary separations. Were
these avenues explored before
final steps were taken to termi-
nate? Would it have made a
difference for Atlantis or the

employeés?’ ‘These are just

some-of the question that I am
addressing my mind to.

TYRONE (ROCK)

’ MORRIS
Bahamas Association of
Casino Employees.
Nassau, ,
December, 2008.



ger financial resources at the
carnival in December and
then showing up at the
Department of Social Services
in January seeking assistance.
I need not tell you who will
end up footing the bill for
their folly.

Please print so that similar
and dissenting views regard-
ing government intervention
or censorship in harsh times,
such as these, can be dis-
cussed.

‘A A WOODSIDE
Nassau,
November, 2008.



a VC a CeO DTS LL ety ae Pa Today!
AE CS CMO ee TL Ta te LT





THE TRIBUNE

AG’s office brands
Cash duo ‘vexatious’

JUSTICE campaigners Greg
and Tanya Cash have been
branded “vexatious litigants”
by the Attorney General’s
Office — a move expected to
spark yet more controversy in
their six-year fight with the Bap-
tist education authorities.

Since 2002 Mr and Mrs Cash
have made a number of allega-
tions, including claims of unfair
dismissal and breach of human
and constitutional rights. But
they claim Baptist education
officials and the courts have
ey ee to obstruct them.

Mr and Mrs Cash yesterday
said: “This makes us more res-
olute than ever because this is a
fight not just for us, but also the
Bahamian people.”

The couple have been sum-
moned to appear before the
Supreme Court on Thursday,
December 18, to argue against
the AG’s claim that their vari-
ous court actions are vexatious.

But Mr Cash and his wife said
the fight would go on — and that
the Privy Council would soon
have the chance to hear their
‘various disclosures about the
Bahamas legal system.

_ Mr Cash said: “We can’t give
up because we know that God is



m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"I vex at those people who
seem so upset over the hanging
of Jewish decorations on Bay
Street: I don't understand how
people who claim to be religious
can become so angry over some-
thing as simple as Hanukkah
decorations. It's ridiculous!

"It doesn't matter who
believes what. I thought the spir-
it of the season meant being lov-
ing, compassionate and.kind,—
not being intolerant of other
people's beliefs and celebra-
tions. I think as a society we
really need to move beyond
that."

- TOLERANT BAHAMIAN, -

NASSAU

"I vex and very sad to see my
fellow Bahamians on US tele-
vision 'beggin' for financial and
medical assistance from another
‘country especially when our
_ government is spending millions
' of Bahamian business and cus-

toms duties tax payer dollars to

give basically free medical care,

free schooling and subsidised
' college tuition at COB to per-
; sons who are not even Bahami-
| ancitizens..° *

“Our quality of life should not -



| aN and Greg Cash

using us to bring down the
stronghold of injustice in this
country. God is not pleased with
the way our country is being
run. What we are doing is for
the best of all.”

In the Attorney General’s

action against Mr and Mrs’

Cash, an order is being sought
to ensure they cannot institute
any legal proceedings without
the court’s leave.

In its writ, the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office accuses Mr and
Mrs Cash of “habitually and
persistently and without any

_ reasonable ground” instituting

vexatious legal proceedings.

be on how well we treat and put
these politicians, doctors, pas-
tors and non citizens on
pedestals, but rather on how
well we treat our own weakest
Bahamian citizens whose par-
ents and fore-parents have sac-
rificed and suffered here to pro-
vide and create for their own
descendants in our Bahama-
land!"

- SAD BAHAMIAN CITIZEN

"I am vex and fed up with all
the in-fighting in the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union. It's like every-

“day or every other day you see

(union officials) squabbling over
something or another, throwing
insults left and right.

"These are grown men, put
in a position to oversee that
union members are treated fair-
ly by their employers, not to be
tearing each other down in the
media. I mean, there are more
important things going on in this
country, people wondering how
they ga' pay their bills an' ting,
and these people can't. work
together? Take a page from our
black brother Barack Obama
and put your own agenda aside
to work for the people, man."

- GWENDOLYN, NASSAU

"I vex because some people
can't control their attitudes at

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Gea eras sess

1. MEDICAL ASSISTING

2. DENTAL ASSISTING |

3. HEALTH INFORMATION MGT

| 4, MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT
_|Call for registration and program details.
| PH: 324-7770 FX: 324-0119

SUCCESS TRAINING COLLEGE, BERNARD RD, NASSAU. |

EAGLES NEST
COMMUNITY CHURCH

ISAIAH 40: 31 “But those who wait on the Lord
shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with
wings like eagles. They shall run and not be weary,
they shall walk and not faint.”

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO JOIN US
IN OUR WORSHIP SERVICES

Under the PT of

ed | DAVE LAMB
on SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7th at 10.00 am

at



The couple plan to mount a
strong defence against this
claim.

At a recent Appeal Court
hearing, the president Dame
Joan Sawyer called Mrs Cash
“a disgrace to Bahamian wom-
anhood” and asked about her
education level.

She also threatened to jail her
for contempt of court after Mrs
Cash suggested that the judge
should recuse herself.

However, at the following
hearing, Dame Joan did not
appear, and the sitting judges
said the contempt matter was
not being pursued.

work. I am tired of coming in
my office bright and cheery, say-
ing 'Morning' to everyone only
to get their nasty grunts in
return. Sometimes I just want
to scream at them, 'My lawd the

_day just start and you already

sour?’

"And den, dey wonder why
they can't get nowhere in life,
why no one is want do things
for dem. Try waking up in the
morning with a smile on your
face. I know, you might have
problems but if you ain’ home-
less, jobless and got food on ya'
table, ya betta thank Jesus and
stop complaining. Dese people
round here is yuck up my vexa-
tion and send my pressure up,
but I ga keep a smile on my face
‘cause I thank da’ Lord I ain'
living my life like dat.”

- CHEERFUL IN THE FACE OF
ADVERSITY, NASSAU

¢ Something got you vex?
Send your rants to
whyyouvex@tribunemedia. net.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

mR UE
PHONE: 322-2157













The Paradise Island Harbour Resort
(Formerly: Holiday Inn Sun Spree Resort)
Paradise Island, East of the round-about at the foot of the ‘old’ bridge

Join us in our Praise and Worship services and hearing from God's word where
“We Love God and Love People”

For more details:

Email:



revdavidlamb@yahoo.com




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGE 5





LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

a Franklin knows
ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
“EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Holida O/
“China” 25% :

Portmeirion
“Holly & Ivy” Dinnerware/Bakeware
cia

ristmas Tree’ Dinnerware ra Accessories











ae Worcester
“Ho

Ribbon” Dinnerware

Lenox Christmas

Dinnerware * Stemware ¢ Giftware * Ornaments

Certified International
Christmas Dinnerware & Accessories

Special ends
December 24th, 2008

ees

fy Ce ates aera)




New arrival of





C ig

_ China &.,

Figurines , a Rey VIL wea) See

Monday-Friday 9:00am8:
Sa Soo
Fax: (242) 393-4096 Sx pohomencom






The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the
following position:

’ CASHIER

Serves as Collection Clerk with responsibility foe collecting Consular
fees in accordance with specific guidelines.

Receives logs of all incoming visa applications from courier service
agents and maintains a spreadsheet log of same.

Examines Non-Immigrant Visa applicants for basic requirements to
ensure completeness.

Serves as back-up NIV Clerk. Prints Machine Readable Visas (MRV)
approved by the Consular Office.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of Secondary School 1s required.

- MS Office Computer Applications required

- One year of experience in performing basic clerical and cashiering
functions.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must be able to operate an electronic cash register.
- Must Lo good interpersonal skills.
- Must have the ability to deal with the general public.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:



The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance- -based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen
Street. Completed applications should be returned to the United States
Embassy: addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than,
December 9, 2008. Telephone calls will not be accepted.






















PAGE 6, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008
















ee)

PRICE | Aug-Sep 08
Sep-08 | % change

AREERERRES

FOOD ITEMS





PRICE
Aug-08



UNIT









HRISH POTATOES | Sibs. [3.19 4.39 38%
[MACKEREL JACK | 150z. [126 | 4.60 | 27%
OATMEAL | 14 oz, [97 3.32 12%
9%

CONCH a res fee
[COOKING OWS | 16 oz [2.04 28 TT
ISTEWBEEF | ih 3.68 | 3.937%

IMACARON! | i6oz, ft? | 182 | Bo

IBREAD (WHITE) | ig) | 25468]
[FLOUR Sis. 436 458 5%
[GROUND BEEF Tb 3.23 3.39%
ONIONS TS tbs. | 2.76 | 2.89 | 5%

SPARE RIBS pis ere et bm
DAISY CHEESE ;
pruwerocns | sm | tos | sue | oe |
DRUMSTICKS 1 Ib. 1.36 1.42 4%

[TURKEY (WHOLE) [th T8693 | 4%
[FRESH MILK | i/2 gal. | 3.47 3.60 [4%
[CORNED BEEF [i oz 55 60 8%
[SLICED CHEESE [6 oz. 2.6270 3%
IBLACKPEPPER | 2oz. | 2.08 2.13 2%
|PORKCHOPS | tb. 2.96 | 3.03 | 2%
[BOXED SALT | 26 0z, | 0.80 | 0.91 2%
IBACON tt ago | 5.07 | 2%

[MAYONNAISE | 320z, [3.83 8.87 | 1%
IGRAPES (WHITE) | tb. | 2.93 [2.96 | 1%
[CANNED TUNA | 6 oz. 4.02.03
STEAK tt eo 88
MUSTARD (0 Bon eer 28 te
[CRAB MEAT Tio 4.06 409%



~Grace anv Peace Wrescevin rn

NETRA aaa ee
NORTH AMERICA

(WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED)



Worship Time: 1lam & 6pm
Prayer Time: 10:15am to 10:45am
Church School During Worship Service



SPECIAL SERVICES
Candlelight - Dec. 21 @ 7pm
Christmas Vigil - Dec. 24 @ 11pm
Watchnight - Dec. 31 @ 11pm







Place:Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
PO, Box SS-5631 J

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE





























THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
wmmeng ':O- Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas t
seem Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
wee CHURCH SERVICES
my SUNDAY,DECEMBER 07, 2008
Bi B FIRST SUNDAY IN ADVENT

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC :

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive

11:00AM Rey. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC








COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road

11:00AM Pastor Henry Whyte/HC



CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard ;
10:00AM Mrs.Minerva Knowles
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM
7:00PM

Rev. Charles New
Rev. Charles New/HC






GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rey. James Neily/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections-Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William R. Higgs/HC,

KEKE KK KKK K KEKE KEKKKKREREKREKRKEEKRERKEREKE
RADIO PROGRAMMES

‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

Your Host: Rev. Godfrey A. Bethel

‘METHODIST MOMENTS? on cach weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Godfrey A. Bethel

see oles fae oe oe tf fae aoa ek fea off foe ofa oak ooo a
Saturday, December 6, 2008 - Annual Christmas Fair,
12:00 noon - 5 p, at Epworth Hall, Shirley Street.

Monday, December 8, 2008 - Nassau Regional Women’s
mcvent Service at St. Michael’s Methodist Church at
:00 pm..

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427 —
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7TH, 2008

7:00 am: Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 am: Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis. Tezel Anderson (HC)
7:00 pm: Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Nathaile Thompson



€ Ten og cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)




PRICE PRICE | Aug-Sep 08
UNIT Aug-08 Sep-08 | % change

FOOD ITEMS











HAM (WHO Gs a es
ITEABAGS __——~—=«((2S packet] ~— 2.39 [239 0%
ae eel ae | oe
FROZEN 11.5 02. 1.26 0%

[CRAWFISH | it T2250 | 2250 [0%
[CHICKEN(WHOLE) | ib. [198 98 0%
[CANNED SOUP 10.502. [1.237 [123 0%
[CABBAGE | Ct TA 94 0%




















, TOMATOES |_tib. | 208 | 2.05
BABY JUICE p 4oz. [069 0.68 1% |
1





V
PREMISES-800 UNITS
(INCLUDING
SURCHARGE ‘ permonth| 306.91 300.31 -2%

5
girs

BABY MILK

CHICKEN PARTS
FRESH & FROZEN 1 Ib. 2 “3%

08
KETCHUP
31



SWEET PEPPERS -
GREEN 1b 3.03 2.92 ~A%
| 0.99 |





APPLES

4%
ARROTS
per g

15%

a
premuny) | erga | sae .
PREMIUM per gal 5.68 5.35 6%

C

[DIESEL pergal | 6.

4%
IGRAPES(RED) | th | 259 213 | -18%

















.FOOD ITEMS UNIT Aug-08 | Sep-08 % change |
PRICE PRICE | Aug-Sep 08].

5 VY DRIV
186.76 | 224.24

IPORKCHOPS | tb. | 2.93 | 3.06 | 4%
IROASTBEEF | tb. 462 479 | 4%
CABBAGE ib 08s 0.88 4%



PREMISES-550 UNITS










5S
7

PLANTAIN | each [0.93 [096 | 3% |
TURKEY WINGS &
IGRAPEFRUITS | each [140 [4a | 3%
BANANAS tb. 0.97 0.99 |
[CANNEDTUNA | Goz | 4.01 1.03

:

:

:

erits abs 3.87 | 3.42) |

STEAK tb. 10.74 0.8





INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

ASSEMALIES OF 800)

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
Medstte ae MT ea ask

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Warship Service ...
Sunday School for all ages ...
Adult Education

Worship Service

Spanish Service

Evening Worship Service

8.30 am.
9.45 am.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club} 4-16 yrs.
Missioneties (Girls Club} 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God
ee) TSW NEUE CUM eCeeM eA TLI(S

Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O. Box: N-1566

~ [LIMES 1 [each =] 0.367} 0.3740] 3% 2 |

- [BOXED SALT

c a
Zz >
in 5
> z
e >
a i)
oO
a
mm
=
e
=







TETAS LAI Ose CLL MRA cle MMU ACACIA LS CCL CKO





THE TRIBUNE








CAKE Mix 1.302,
BAEAD (WHITE fig. | 8.05 [8.080%
i]. sot | Set ahs Om

n
po
m
=
ow
m
â„¢
wt
s












0%

ov

| 6.66 [0% |

Tt

ORANGES _-
LIMES

APPLES _ 0.86
CARROTS

ad

FRUIT JUICES (FROZEN)

Se
PIGEON PEAS (CAN
















FLOUR

CANNED SOUP 1.59
CORN (CANNED

SPARE RIBS
3%

| L f
1Ib 2.13 2.04 4%

ICORN(CANNED) | :
HOT DOGS
NEAPPLES
FRESH & FROZEN ;

ACARONI (PASTA 3
NLEADED SUPER

tgal. 5.63 5. 5%

NLEADED PREMIUM a

4

U D
GASOLINE
U D

34
WEET PEPPERS
74

wn

LETTUCE
GRAPES (RED
3ibs

IONIONS = 2s
TOMATOES

CELERY

PRICE | PRICE e
[CORNEDBEEF | tb, | 1.85 | 2.03 | 10%

HAM (SLICE [| iib, | 6.25 | 6.60 | 6%
LAMB CHOPS

Aug-Sep 08

ICANNEDTUNA | Goz. | 4.19 | 4.23 | 8%
[CORN(CANNED) | 484g. | 4.76 [| 1.8t | 8%

DRUMSTICKS | OGD. 1) 479° F184

PEANUT BUTTER

OATMEAL UAT
PORK CHOPS ib. | 2.08 f°3.04 of 2% |
SPAGHETTI (DRY

FRUIT JUICES .
3.04 3.09 2%

FROZEN

120z.

| 2oz. | 2.60 [262 [1% |

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<|q/>12

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Z| >| D
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“E5|3
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m|P\m
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TURKEY (WHOLE) |i. | 4.93 [1.93 [0%
[TURKEY(SLICE) | ib, | 9.89 | 9.89 | 0% |
FRESH & FROZEN FISH
[MARGARINE | tb. T5252 [0%
[APPLES Csd| Seach S| S099 [| 0.99 | 0% |
FRESH & FROZEN) tb. 2.48 0%










XG

BABY JUICE
FRUIT JUICES Saad
NOT FROZEN ee

GRAPEFRUITS
SPARE RIBS
CHICKEN (WHOLE
CATSUP

FRESH MILK
LETTUCE

|b. | 2.94 2.86 2%

2%
2%

2
“2%
2%

23%








| tib. | lb. | 2.28 | 28 | 2.23 |

CABBAGE A A a
STEAK | [ib [70.44 10.14_[ 3% |
DAISY CHEESE [—tib. [6.11 | 4.95 | 3%
CAKE MIX
HOT DOGS
MUSTARD
ISEASON ALL | 3.2502, | 2.99 | 2.18
ISH POTATOES [_1lb. [1.24 [1.17] 6%
BREAD (WHITE) |g. [3.17] 2.98 | 6%
[SWEET PEPPERS | ib | 2.04 | 276 | 6%
DIESEL—————~d| gal 6.37 | 5.96 | 6% |.
[ORANGES | each | 0.61 | 0.67 | 7%
12%

ONIONS ib 37 | 1.06 [23% J





BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

~~ FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC





(Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills




“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are” |§
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622 jf



PP bilmoiwe





Scotiabank donates
computers to Long
Island High School

Managing director of Scotia-
bank Barry Malcolm led a dele-
gationto Long Island to present
the NGM Major High School
with state-of-the-art computers
and 2stablish a much-needed
computer lab.

Tie lab is the second donat-
ed Sy Scotiabank; earlier this
year, it donated 30 computers
alcng with software to the CC
Sveeting High School.

Both of these donations were
part of the Bright Future pro-
giamme, which is designed by
the bank to give back to com-
nunities in a way that touches
the lives of'young people.

Mr Malcolm was accompa-

tied to Long Island by Perma-
nent Secretary in the Ministry
of Education, Elma Garraway;
vice president of retail bank-
ing, Wayde Christie; and
senior manager of products
aid marketing Dwight Bur-
TOWS.
' Addressing the students of
the school at a special ceremony
marking the occasion, Mr Mal-
_ colm said: “Long Island has a
‘long and distinguished history
of producing stellar educators-
and achieving great things in
education.

“Long Island has so wonder-



‘Health Fair to promote
‘Self Ownership’ of health

THE Bahamas Primary
_Health Care Traning Centre is
taking a major step forward in its
effort to ensure ‘hat residents of
Fox Hill and surrounding com-
munities take ownership of their
health. : :
The centre has announced
that it will be hosting its first
community health fair on Satur-
> day, Decemer13 on the front
lawn of the Fox Hill Clinic.

Dr Cangice Cargill, director
of the centre, said the fair is part
of the centre’s mandate to

improve ‘health in the commu-
nity by getting residents to
understand the importance of
taking responsibility for their
own well-being through healthi-
er lifestyle choices.

-Healthier choices, she said,
lead :o healthier lives and less
illness.

The event is part of a larger
Department of Public Health
awareness and education cam-
paign, which aims to promote
healthy living throughout the
Bahamas. Reape oe

_ The campaign focuses partic-.
ularly on chronic non-commu-
nicable diseases such as diabetes,
hypertension, strokes and cer-

* tain cardiac conditions which
have become major issues in
many communities.

“We are really trying to reach

“- out to the entire community so_

that we can help build healthy
lifestyles and healthier commu-
nities by getting people to take
ownership of their health,” Dr
Cargill said.

“A lot of persons tend to rely
solely upon the physician and/or
the nurse to ensure that they live
healthy lifestyles and really and
truly, the physician should be at
the end of the spectrum.

“We want to help people
understand that maintaining
quality health, and managing
their health, is really about what
they can do on a daily basis —
hence the types of lifestyles they
employ and/or enjoy are very



AMY of KEY WE

knows an

to the Minister
Citizenship, P.O.Box





for Nationality and

naturalization should not

Citizenship,



NOTICE

NOTICE is peeby aeons that LUCKSON ANASTOL
d STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6TH day
responsible for Nationalit
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLANGE CHARLES.
AMY of JOE FARRINGTON ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying. to the Minister responsible

itizenship,
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/

a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of DECEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau,

S A
a : \

fully demonstrated over the
years just how powerful an
island community is in terms of
providing quality education in
our Bahamas. I commend the
people of this island communi-
ty for their efforts.”

On behalf of the minister of
education and the government,
Mrs Garraway expressed grati-
tude for the gift.

“This event marks and pro-
vides the tangible evidence of
support Scotiabank continues
to demonstrate in assisting the
government and the people of
the Bahamas, ensuring that we

important to maintaining good
health.”

Dr Cargill said the fair will
offer tests for particular diseases
— glaucoma, cholesterol, hyper-
tension and diabetes, among oth-
ers — but will also focus on a
more holistic approach to health.
She explained that good health is
not just the absence of disease,
but also “mental, physical; social
and spiritual” well-being.

Banking and financial services
professionals will make presen-

tations on budgeting, which, Dr .

Cargill said, “is very relevant
considering the impact the fall-
out from the declining world
economies can have, and are
having, on small-island states
such as the Bahamas.”

“We have also have profes-
sionals from the psychological
realm who will speak about
managing stress during tough
economic times, while we have
also scheduled a presentation on
gardening which we feel will
serve two purposes by first,

‘encouraging more persons to

grow fruits and vegetables in
their backyards which can
reduce their costs while encour-
aging them to eat more healthy,
while also reducing stress.
“One of the benefits of gar-
dening is stress reduction and so
we want to encourage more per-
sons to take up gardening as a
hobby. We will also have a
masseuse, therapist and fitness
instructor who will make pre-
sentations on the importance of
exercise and good relaxation
techniques because those things
also help to reduce stress lev-
els,” Dr Cargill said.
Organisers of the event have
arranged two competitions for
schools in the area as a further
promotion of healthy living. Stu-
dents will engage in a healthy

cooking competition and prizes .

will be awarded for first, second
and third-place finishers.
“For the younger children in

junior high and primary school










of DECEMBER 2008
and










for registration/




e granted, should send





Bahamas.





EXECUTIVES of Scotiabank and officials from the Ministry of Education
presented 12 computers to the NGM Major High School's computer lab.
































have access to the highest tech-
nological level of education in
our country,” she said.

Long Island’s district super-
intendent of education, Basil
McHardy, termed the donation
of 12 computers a “good cor-
porate act of contributing to
community building”.

“Scotiabank’s donation of the
computer lab is a clear state-
ment of its support for educa-
tion and training of the youth of
South Long Island. More specif-
ically it demonstrates the bank’s
support of information tech-
nology,” McHardy said.

“Where You Get The Maximum For The Minimum”
The pall ee araince ALLMAJOR
_ CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

Tel: 393-4147/8
Mon.-Fri: 10am-8pm

Sat.1Qam-9pm : :

‘Sav-A-Ghek will be

accepted for regular

priced items only

we will have an art competition Village Road
in which we will ask the primary

school students to produce a

drawing of a basket of fruit and

prizes for first, second and third

place finishers will be awarded,

while the junior high students a
will be asked to come up with ,
their own depiction of our
theme,” Dr Cargill said.

Shopping Centre
Tel: 393-2019
Mon.-Sat |
“1O0am-7pm

MAIN STORE
Rosetta St.
Tel: 322-8596
Mon-Fri.
8:30am-5:30
Sat. 9am-Gpm













SHAMILTON BEACH Proctor-Silex












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10 speed........ 35900 |





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| : 5 cup....... $B5OC
Doo iS te Masta SHOP ON-LINE \_ Tons........821%
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Electric Room Heaters......553°°




JWIN Portable CD Radio.....5520
JWIN Cassette Recorders...

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Massagers
Dr. Schol Foot Spa... scene $3700
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| WAHL Body Massager (2 speed).nun..8310 |










HOOVER Stick Vacuum.. $9500







PAGE 8, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



iii a
Food price concern Protests ‘ridiculous’

FROM page one

North Andros, and Abaco.

However, higher prices were
recorded for the same product
in New Providence, Cat Island,
and Exuma.

“Most islands registered sig-
nificant decreases in the price
of limes,” the report said. “Cat
Island’s average price decreased
40 per cent followed by
Eleuthera with 20 per cent.

“New Providence and Exu-
ma also reported decreases.
North Andros and Grand
Bahama reported increases
while South Andros’ prices
remained constant for the peri-
od. With the exception of New
Providence, which reported a
five per cent increase in the
average price of tomatoes per
pound, all islands reported
decreases ranging from 21 per
cent in Abaco to four per cent
in South Andros.

“The average price of
oranges decreased moderately
for most islands. The decreases
ranged from five per cent in
South Andros and Exuma to
three per cent in Grand
Bahama. The islands of Cat
Island, Abaco .and North
Andros reported increases for
oranges. New Providence
reported a 22 per cent decline in
the average price of a five
pound bag of oranges.”

The report also revealed that
there were other items in which
duty was eliminated but “very
little or no reflection on price
reduction to the consumer” was
seen.

“Exuma was the only island
which registered a price
decrease for oatmeal. All other




Accountant.




Qualifications: .

needed.

vendors.

Aging.

Nn &

Manager.




Bist

Abaco Markets

¢ Bachelor of Sciénce Degree

Please email your resume to:
grandbahjobs@ yahoo.com

islands recorded price increases
ranging from 19 per cent in
Grand Bahama to one per cent
in South Andros.

“Abaco, South Andros and
Cat Island experienced a slight
decrease in the cost of pasta,
however, the price of this item
increased by 18 per cent in New
Providence and in Grand
Bahama.

“All islands registered price
increases for breakfast cereal.
Items for which duty was
reduced included sweet pep-
pers, some types of frozen veg-
etables, canned corn, pigeon
peas and carrots. The change in
the prices of these items vary
from island to island. -

“Eleuthera and Grand
Bahama both reported decreas-
es in the average price of pigeon
peas (16 oz can). Price increas-
es ranged from 14 per cent in
Exuma to three per cent in New
Providence. The islands of
Eleuthera and Grand Bahama
showed a significant decrease
in the price of sweet peppers
(per pound) — 55 per cent and
23 per cent, respectively. All
other islands reported price
increases.”

All islands throughout the
country recorded increases in
the price of canned corn. Lower
prices for two pound bags of
carrots were seen on three
islands — Eleuthera, Cat Island

and North Andros. New Provi- .

dence, along with Abaco and
South Andros
increased prices and Grand
Bahama’s prices remained con-
stant. For a full detailed table of
the price reductions or increas-
es, visit the Department of Sta-
tistic’s website -
statistics.bahamas.gov.bs

JOB VACANCY
JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT

Local jpatiutactunne & company in ‘Freeport, Grand Bahama is seeking a Junior

‘

aa |

¢ Proficient in the use of Microsoft Applications. Candidate must be able
_ to creaté and maintain EXCEL spreadsheets.
e Ability to communicate effectively - written and oral.

Responsibilities will include:
1. Accounts Payable - coding, data entry, preparing cheques, emailing
remittance advices, filing and resolving discrepancies with invoices and

2. Monitoring and resolving outstanding or aged transactions on the A/P
3. Assist with month-end closing procedures - Posting accruals, amortizations,
performing g/l account reconciliations.

. Assist with year-end audits.
. Special Projects as required by the Financial Controller or Accounting

The company offers a competitive salary with outstanding benefits.

— FIDELITY



Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark .

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDORs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

reported.

int Accounting is ‘preferred with 1 to 2 years
of work experience. Candidates who have earned an Associate Degree in
Accounting will be considered if they have 3 to 5 years of work experience.

° Proficient in the use of automated accounting systems.

¢ Ability to solve problems and apply appropriate accounting standards as

FROM page one

be Jewish, and am very proud
of that fact by the way, and have
been living here in Nassau for
the past 20 years.

“I know there have been
issues with the Star of David
decorations that have been dis-
played in the past, but this is
ridiculous.”

She lashed out at a local busi-

nessman and Anglican deacon
Neil Nairn for objecting to the
menorahs.
’ And she said most other Jews
would object to what she
termed an “outright bigoted
‘attitude.”

“Is having the menorah up
for all to see so disgraceful?”
she asked, “Why not let every-
one believe in their own reli-
gion and have them co-exist
side by side?”

Ms Lightbourn pointed out
that the Jewish festival of
Chanukah (also spelt Han-
nukah) is being celebrated this










Duo’s bail
revoked




FROM page one

by the magistrate yesterday.
He was also remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison until
the completion of his trial.
His case was adjourned to
March 31, 2009. Both men
are represented by lawyer
Dion Smith. ;




































age Pricing bases) ~
Dail Vol.



month “and happens to be an
important rite of being Jewish.”

She said those who felt the
menorahs had been put up
because they “looked nice” had
delivered a slap in the face for
Jews...

“How condescending! I real-
ly thought that people here had
advanced with the times. I hope
that these attitudes don’t rep-
resent the general public.

“T would hate to think that -

most people here feel the same
or feel as if sharing the spot-
light with another religion is
somehow ruining the meaning
of Christmas.”



Decorations such as these
Menorah candles were removed

The blue and silver menorahs
were displayed under Christ-
mas wreaths as part of Nassau’s
‘Festival of Light’ decorations.

Protests were made to. The
Tribune because they were said
to symbolise a religion that was

anti-Christian. {

The ‘menorahs ‘were
described as “inappropriate”
for a Christian festival because
Jews did not believe Christ was
the Son of God.

Last night, the local Greek
Orthodox Church joined the
debate, declaring that an indi-
Vidual member of their church
who sparked the protest was

', not representative of the church

as a whole.

A church member said: “We
are all horrified. As Chiistians,
never would we have done this,
especially to slight another reli-
gious group.”

Union seeks ‘intervention’
over Harborside dispute

FROM page one

union membership.

When contacted yesterday,
Mr Ferguson said because of
the recent firings at Harborside,
employees were anxious to have
an agreement that outlined the
resort's policies when it came
to lay offs. He alleged that it
was a "criminal offence" for
Harborside not to meet with
BHMA for negotiations.

"Quite a bit of them got fired
the other day and that put some
fear in them — and they are
without a union. The BHMA is
the bargaining agent for these
workers and what they are enti-

tled to is a collective agreement
which would lay out how the
employers would deal with

_ them in slow economic times in

terms of lay offs.

"To date they have refused
to negotiate that agreement.
This is the first industrial agree-
ment the union hopes to nego-
tiate. Even though the union
has been declared the bargain-
ing agent for Harborside
employees, the company has
not recognised it as (such)," Mr
Ferguson said.

Because there is no agree-
ment, if there is a dispute it has
to go to the labour board
instead of the bargaining agents
being able to sit down to nego-

tiate differences. If an agree-
ment were in place, Mr Fergu-

‘son said, BHMA would be able

to go to the employer first to
work out issues.

Attempts to secure somitents
from Harborside's management
and Attorney General Michael
Barnett were unsuccessful up’
to press time.

Last month, about 140 per-
sons were fired from Harbor-
side's sales, marketing and
administrative areas, days after
the Atlantis Resort & Casino
— thé country's largest private
employer and joint venture
partner with Harborside's own-
er, Starwood Vacation Owner-
ship — laid off 800 employees.

Exuma developer faces
‘back pay’ allegations

FROM page one

four per cent of the employees’
basic wage at the end of the
year and pay that amount to the
employees as vacation pay,” he
said.

According to documents pro-
vided by Mr McKinney, Bock
Cay offered to pay employees
time and a half for working on
Saturdays and double time for
Sundays.

But according labour laws,
said Mr McKinney, the employ-
ees are entitled to double time
for Saturdays and Sundays.

Two employees who were
fired, this year also-claimed that
the company promised to pay
for their travel expenses to and
from Bock Cay as they were not
allowed to remain on the island
when they were not working.

However, they say, the com-
pany never absorbed the
expense, which somet me:
totalled $2,100 a year for travel
to New Providence.

Mr McKinney said the matter
had been brought to his atten-
tion after employees came to
him seeking representation for
wrongful termination.

He immediately contacted
management at Bock Cay on
behalf of the workers, asking
that the company correct their
miscalculation of the overtime
payment.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS

ROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

AL

0.200
0.160
0,020
0.090
0.040
0.240
0.040
0.300
0.052
0.040
0.280
0.570
0.450
0.170
0.000
0.000
0.300
0.620
0.000

Interest
19 October 2017

“After receiving no reply... I

filed a dispute at the depart-
ment of labour in Nassau on

behalf of all workers, present |

and former of Bock Cay on

June 10, 2008,” said MrWitk-

inney..; 1g RN
He said he then t Adhested an

audience with Labour Director
Harcourt Brown, who he claims
declined to meet with him.

“I now understand why the
Director of Labour declined to
meet with me,” he said. Mr
McKinney claimed that the rea-
son was, according to docu-
ments from Bock Cay, which
he now had in his possession,
the director had allowed the
company’s management to “pay
the employees overtime pay,
vacation pay, holiday pay and
termination pay.” Mr McKin-
ney contended that the pay-
ments were incorrect.

General Manager of Bock
Cay Hubert Rolle said workers
were compensated fairly and
the company followed the
labour policies of the Bahamas
in calculating pay.

“At Bock Cay it is important
and imperative for Bock Cay to
follow and abide by the laws








Applicants must:

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following position for the |
2008 - 2009 School Year.

MUSIC

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian School

B. | Have a Bachelor‘s Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the
area of specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

D. Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent ,

and rules ofthe Bahamas and
this we have ¢one in advisemént
with the labour department in
Exuma and any further ques-
tions can be phced towards the
labour board,” said Mr Rolle.

According to Kenneth
Clarke, a former time keeper
at Bock Cay, the company
reversed its position and paid a
portion of the overtime that was
disputed after inquiries into the
incorrect pay began.

He said, according to the
Labour Act, employees are
entitled to double time after 40
hours of work.

He and Mr McKinney con-
tend that the company violat-
ed this policy.

“The end result is that work-
ers who are everyday people
are told that if you follow the
law and be a good citizen that
you can progress in life and do -
well. These people are now
faced with a situation where
they work seven days a week
and particularly four weeks at a
time without a break and then
find out” that they are not get-
ting what they are entitled to.
“That’s very upsetting,” said
Mr Clarke.


















1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

P 3 Prime + 1:75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + A 20 7%

Panic Mote 7) | stitute

‘Weekly Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

ter: Seeritios :
29.00
14.00
0.55
sea Funds

YTD% Last 12 Months



Bahamas Supermarkets

Div $
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

NNNZOWOMODAY
ONNNOO}
NORGORSY

OOO,

YIELO - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price o nd Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-th ounter price

Weekly Vol.



‘BISX ALL SH.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume
ge - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
jonds per share paid In the last 12 months
divided by the last 12 month earnings
plit - Effective Date 8/8/2007



- Trading volume of the prior week

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful



EPS $.- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mt

EPS $ _

0.000
0.001

4.540

-0.041

0.002

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Div S
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.300
0.000

Yield %

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E Yield

N/M
256.6

9.0
N/M
261.9

31-Oct-08
30-Nov-08
28-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
30-Nov-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
31-Dec-07
30-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08



S CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-802-7525

















communication skills.

E. Have the ability to prepare .
students for all examinations to the BJC/
BGCSE levels

F.

Be willing to participate in the high school’s

extra curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum
three

vitae, recent colored

references to:

The Principal

Temple Christian High School

P.O. Box N-1566

Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 15th, 2008





Mr. Neil Hamilton





THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGE 9
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PAGE 10,SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008



THE TRiwe, woe

CALVIN & HOBBES»







I SHOULD'VE USED
A BIGGER KNIFE!

MY PARTNER SAYS
YOU TRIED TO KILL
YOUR FATHER...

STABBED HIM
17 TMES?











BUT IT WAS
MORE LIKE 20
TIMES..-AND I. BLEW IT!



12-2.



. FOR SKELETONS!

oy





















ASS. \
0 tame) i) SN
: Rg yg y
; ONZE i Sunday
MAKE A LIST OF EVERYTHING MONEY 16 ALWAYS” 13] FOR NOW, A SMILE WILL DO NEY
THAT NEEDS TO BE DONE, MARGOJ | APPROPRIATE, BUT | m NICELY. ood
WE CAN WORK THAT] 2 D
i
£
3
5
f
j



PLEASE, MR.B....IT TOOK ME )
A WEEK TO MEMORIZE
MY SALES TALK

>
IT'S gone) |
TO BEA

VERY
WORTHY

CAUSE...
ANO YOu
SEE...BLAH,
| BLAH, BLAH

WANNA Buy
A CUBS SCOUT
RAFFLE TICKET
FOR e CHRISTMAS











wo YY



© 2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc: World Rights reserved

OUR NICE RETIREMENT NEST EGG
TURNED INTO HUMPTY DUMPTY

I CAN'T BELIEVE WE LOST
EVERYTHING WHEN THE
STOCK MARKET FELL...









FAN LETTER?
DON'T YOu WANT

TO SENV HIMALIST
OF WHAT YOu WANT

: HIM TO BRING

WILL YOU HELP ME
WRITE A FAN LETTER
TO SANTA CLAVS7,










Matthew Sadler v Alexandre
Boog, Biel, Switzerland, 1993.
Sadler was England number
three and still only in his mid-
twenties when, a decade ago, he





















- Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on, a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. -The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares.so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis. Sudoku increases from. Monday. to

BRB Era:
6/5] [1] (3) [7/4
PB bode sy ol a9
ee Od TEL
Le s[6P 2 Bh es
Pee ee
Pa alli LA 5
7/9] [2] [8] [1/6]

Difficulty Level * *






BUILD THAT
TIGER PIT I
KEEP ASKING
HIM ABOUT ?



















©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King:Féeatures Syndicate, Inc.










Best described as.a number crossword, the task in. Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to:9,.so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number-on‘its top. No number . °
2. . may be used.in the same block more than once... The difficulty -
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Here as White {to move} Sadler
has only levet material, so his

abandoned chess in favour of a 3] 2 opponent hoped for a draw. How
solid business career in computer ttt Gi pie wn quickly oe
; technology. His absence dealt == *{_} fd 2
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE a heavy blow to the national an Meese ees cher AA
wuars ror Y 2’ RUNNING HAVE You g team, who had been regular (a
BREAKFAST | OUT OF THINGS EVER TRIED he fi ~ contenders for medals in world
2 TO ZAND “and European championshios, =
S PANCAKES ? pean championships. :
é The young grandmaster has ! HOW many words of four letters






proved irreplaceable and indeed

|



(©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

t.) sae his career switch set a trend for
se casseans Stowe other talents to drop out early. So uses
for the past decade the England words in
squad has regularly struggled on the main
fs} Hi rs the lower boards and even fallen hody of
eae out of the world top ten nations. =n
Ist

~~ RYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
1 Bert perhaps and Jack in
church (5)
Liking for a swan song (8)
Dim sun, when out, will

Across
1 Aide round Rhode Island
to get rid of a headache,
maybe (7)
Time to finish is what



i AVR MECKEKR
hardly encourage it! (6) Ve DOECKEK
poets may need (5) aly “tC. RARE
ici: i AG OK AN AN S \ SN
Night angler gets bite (4) Official title of great SS AN ACR .. Os S
; merit (10) 2
Dead cute in a way, and
well read (8) Payment before mountain Go Wi th th e Odds
: pe ot ascent (4)
Dramatic trials (10) Rescninie ‘ola ene bald South dealer. to lose a spade trick eventually, the.»
it’s natural to.find a hotel cae é North-South cane fate oF the cane hinged on avoid- .
; ee ae ing a trump loser.
Sui, a tea break (6) Appears wet perhaps, but o. te ; Roscoe sat ee
ake something known e standard play wi 1s. combina-
bout calf meat (6) ° may be salvaged (5,5) KI6 tion, but was equally aware that the
about call mea ) Animals cannot be put @)75 percentages could easily be altered
Realise what shares may inside this vessel (8) WEST EAST by information gained anywhere
-do (10) C poe inst OQ108 43953 . along the line, In the present case, he
es ampaigniig againes-an Actoas v2 %Q76 had learned from the first three tricks”
A pure one in a common area for play? (7) Lu ‘ 0954 #10832 that West had started with six clubs
market perhaps (8) A drama involves the a eee loyal (7) Colony of bees (5) #AKQ) es O84 of ‘Bast only Abe: eat
One who leads on a fleet (6) N mal - office (5) Habituate (8) aK 64 seven. other cards ‘that ~ were
sheriff? (4) Profiteer without gain, that. | = Mischievous (4) Eager for food (6 WKI985 unknown, while East held 11. Taking
Oo. Harmless (8) : 6) AQT this a step further, South reasoned
7 : ener : armless s .
BU. Lie cies a airecuon anne euane NS) > Thoroughbred 492 that if the defenders hold 18. cards
entrance (5) What happened during a ” Assume false The bidding: ._, that are unknown, the player with 11. .
4 t ike i arance (10) horses:(30) South West North = East of them is much more likely to have
21 Trainee goes round Grand ransport strike in gf appe a sae Lene a "
Algeria? (4 WwW Mase departiira (6 In addition (4) ly 2@ 39 Pass a specific missing card. than. the
National course (7) geria? (4) ass departure (6) 4y player who has only seven.

Strongly built (6) 6 In particular (7)
Whatever it takes
(2,3,5)

Painstakingly

Opening lead — king of clubs.

When declarer holds nine cards
in a suit and is missing Q-x-x-x, the
normal play is to cash the A-K to try
to drop the queen. It is important.to
realize, though, that percentagewise
the edge in favor of playing this way
— as opposed to a second-round
finesse — is very slight. For this rea-
son, any clues acquired from the bid-
ding or play may justify taking a
finesse instead.

Consider this deal where West
started with three top clubs, declarer
ruffing the third round as East dis-
carded a diamond. Since South had

Yesterday’s Easy Solution Noisy and
disorderly (10)
Original (8)
Springy (7)
Discourteous

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution
ATTENTION!

Across: 1 Tour de force, 9 Laggard,
10 Forgo, 11 Zone, 12 Fraction, 14
Allure, 16 Hard up, 18 Romantic, 19
Aria, 22 Image, 23 Profile, 24
Journey’s end.

Down: 2 Organ, 3 Real, 4 Endure, 5
Official, 6 Carried, 7 Blaze a trail, 8
Going places, 13 Grandeur, 15
Lumbago, 17 Simple, 20 Reign, 21
Toss.

THIS FEATURE IS NOT AVAILABLE cavetul:(8)

Determined

intention (4) .
Utter confusion (5) disregard)

Deeply saddening Moodily silent (5)

event (7) Spanish painter (4)







NJ sriage \
ve Becker

: OF more can you make from the
: letters shown here? In making a
: word, each letter may be used
Ponce. only; Bach must contain
> the centre letter and there must

| No plurals.

| FODAY'S TARGET. S
: Good 22: very good 33; excellent 44
: tor more), Solution tomorrow.

: YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION i
: erring gent gone goner gotten

: grin groin ignore ignorer. inert

: Ingot inter into intro iron nitre
: note orient region reign rein

i rent RETORTING ring. ringer

? rotten rotting tenor tent tern —
i: tigon tine ting tinge tint. toeing
i tone tong torn torrent toting

? trigen trine triton ftritone





aS KWAN

Â¥



Accordingly, declarer led a heart
to the ace at trick four and returned a
heart toward his hand. After East fol-
lowed low, South finessed the jack
and so brought home the contract.

It is true that the play of the jack
could easily have lost to the queen.
There was certainly no guarantee
that the finesse would succeed, But it
was the right thing to do because,
under the circumstances, it was the
percentage play.

When all you have is favorable
odds to rely on, you should do as
they dictate, and you will win many
more times than you lose.

Tomorrow: Stayman stumbles.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.

: be. atdeast one nine-letter ward... +. .





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PAGE 12 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008




The Road Traffic Department hereby give
notice of its intention to introduce to its
Public Bus Route Inventory six (6)
modified bus routes and nine (9) new bus
routes.

Further, the Controller in accordance with
Section 85 Sub Section-1 of Chapter 220
of the Road Traffic Act, wishes to invite
franchise holders interested in operating
the modified and new routes to submit an
application through the Franchise Unit of
the Road Traffic Department ~ Thompson
Blvd., before 5:00 pm on December 12,
2008.

MODIFIED ROUTES

dL. Route 2a (Together with 2C,
provides a new east-west route to
Blair Estate and Dunmore Avenue
areas) .

George St., Duke St., Marlborough St.,
West Bay St., Chippingham Rd., Dunmore
Ave., Boyd Rd., Nassau St., Poinciana
Ave., Wulff Rd., East St., Gibbs Cr., Sixth
Terr., Madeira St., Mackey St., Pyfrom
Rd., Kemp Rd., Wulff Rd., Village Rd., St
Andrews Dr., Commonwealth St., Newgate
Rd., Eastern Rd., Shirley St., Princess St.,
Duke St., Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd.,
Bay St. (Downtown), George St.

2: Route 4 (New East-west route via
Wulff Road, provides service to
previously un-serviced McKinney
Ave, and Marlin Dr. areas)

Fox Hill Round-a-bout, Bernard Rd., Wulff
Rd., Poinciana Dr., Thompson Blvd.,
Bethel Ave., McKinney Ave., JFK Dr.,
Prospect Rd., Sandford Dr., Marlin Dr.,
Sea View Dr., West Bay St., Marlborough
St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St. (Downtown)
, Elizabeth Ave. Elizabeth Ave., Shirley
St., East St., Princess St., Duke St.,
Cumberland St., Marlborough St., West
Bay St., Sea View Dr., Marlin Dr., Sandford
Dr., Prospect Rd., JFK Dr., McKinney
Ave., Bethel Ave., Thompson Blvd.,
Poinciana Dr., Wulff Rd., Bernard Rd.,
Fox Hill Round-a-bout.

3: Route 12 (Feeder Route to provide
service to Blake Road, new housing
at Windsor Field, Mt Pleasant

‘Village, Southwest Road and north-
south link at the western end of New
Providence. Interchanges to high
frequency services to Downtown at
Sandy Port (Route 10B) and Bacardi
Road (Route 16)

Sandy Port, West Bay St., Blake Rd., JFK
Dr., Windsor Field Rd., (Lyford Cay
Entrance),Western Rd., Mount Pleasant
Village, Southwest Rd., Adelaide Village
-Rd., Adelaide Rd., Coral Height Ave.,
_ Coral Harbour Rd., Carmichael Rd.,
Bacardi Rd., (Return) Bacardi Rd.,
Carmichael Rd., Coral Harbour Rd., Coral
Height Ave., Adelaide Rd., Adelaide
Village, Adelaide Rd., South West Rd.,
Mount Pleasant Village, Western Rd.,
(Lyford Cay Entrance), Windsor Field Rd.,
JFK Dr., Blake Rd., West Bay St., Sandy
Port

4. Route 20 (New route to provide
service to new housing estate)

THE TRIBUNE

Ministry of Works & Transport
Road Traffic Department —

NOTICE |

Spine Rd. of Lynden Pindling Estates,
Pigeon Plum St., Windsor Place Rd.,
Abundant Life Rd., East-West Highway.,

Marathon Rd., Marathon Mall, Robinson:

Rd., Minnie St., Wulff Rd., Collins Ave.,
Shirley St., Princess St., Duke St.,
Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St.
(Downtown) (Return) Bay St.
(Downtown), Christie St., Shirley St.,
Collins Ave., Wulff Rd., Minnie St.,
Robinson Rd., Marathon Mall, Marathon
Rd., East-West Highway, Abundant Life
Rd., Windsor Place Rd., Pigeon Plum St.,
Spine Road of Lynden Pindling Estates

ay Route 22 (Provides service to New
Subdivision and New School)

Bay St. (Downtown), Elizabeth Ave., Sands
Rd., East Hill St., Market St., Wulff Rd.,
Poinciana Dr., Thompson Blvd., Bethel
Ave., McKinney Ave., Christie Ave.,
Tonique William-Darling Hwy. (Harold
Road), Summerwinds Plaza, Sir Milo
Butler Hwy., Carmichael Rd., Faith Ave.
South (to include the new High School)
Marshall Rd., Baillou Hill Rd., Cowpen
Rd., Faith Ave., Carmichael Rd., Sir Milo
Butler Hwy., Tonique William-Darling
Hwy. (Harold Road), Summerwinds Plaza,
Christie Ave., McKinney Ave., Bethel Ave.,
Thompson Blvd., Poinciana Dr., Baillou
Hill Rd., Cumberland St., Navy Lion Road,
Bay St. (Downtown), Elizabeth Ave.

6. Route 22A (Provides anti-clockwise
service from new high school on Faith Ave
South along un-serviced areas of Cowpen
Road)

South West High School, Faith Ave.,
Cowpen Rd., Baillou Hill Rd., Cumberland
St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St. (Downtown),
Elizabeth Ave., Sands Rd., East Hill St.,
Market St., Robinson Rd., Baillou Hill
Rd., South Beach Rd., Marshall Rd.,
Southwest new high school Faith Ave.
South

NEW ROUTES

bs Route 2C (Together with 2A to
provide a new east-west route to
Blair Estates and Dunmore Avenue
areas)

George St., Cumberland St., Navy Lion
Rd., Bay St. (Downtown), East Bay St.,
Eastern Rd., Newgate Rd., Commonwealth
St., St. Andrews Dr., Village Rd., Wulff
Rd., Kemp Rd., Pyfrom Rd., Mackey St.,
Madeira St., Sixth Ter., Gibbs Corner.,
East St., Wulff Rd., Poinciana Ave., Nassau
St., Boyd Rd., Dunmore Ave.,
Chippingham Rd., West Bay St.,
Marlborough St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St.
(Downtown), George St.

2s Route 5C (As an initial route,
clockwise via Kemp Rd.)

Bay St. (Downtown), East Bay St., Village
Rd., Wulff Rd., Marathon Rd., Marathon
Mall ., Robinson Rd., Prince Charles Dr.,
Soldier Rd., Taylor St., Alexandria Blvd.,
Breadfruit St., Sapodilla Blvd., Willow
Tree Ave., Gilbert St., Kennedy Sub Rd.,
Malcolm Rd., Baillou Hill Rd.,
Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St.
(Downtown).

ee Route 10D (To provide service near

Paradise Island Bridge and to other
tourist attractions near Downtown)

West Bay St., (Radisson Hotel),
Marlborough St., Bay St., (Downtown),
East Bay St., Village Rd., Shirley St.,
Princess St., Duke St., Cumberland St.,
Marlborough St., West Bay St., (Radisson
Hotel)

4. Route 13 (Feeder route to provide
service to Tropical Gardens Rd.
Interchange to high frequency.
services to Downtown available at
Sandy Port)

Sandyport, West Bay St., Fernander Rd.,
Curtis Rd., Douglass Rd., Tropical
Gardens., Windsor Field Rd., JFK Dr.,
Blake Rd., West Bay St., Sandy Port

> Route 21B (To provide anti-
clockwise service to New School |
via Baillou Hill Rd. and East St.)

South West High School, Marshall Rd.,
South Beach Rd., summer Haven, East St.,
Sands Rd., Shirley St. Princess St., Market
St., Robinson Rd., Baillou Hill Rd., South
Beach Rd., Marshall Rd., South West High
School

6. Route 21C (To provide clockwise
service to New Subdivision and
New School)

Bay St. (Downtown), East Bay St.,
Elizabeth Ave., Sands Rd., East St.,
Summer Haven, South Beach Rd.,
Marshall Rd., (South Western High School,
Faith Ave., St. Vincent Rd., Baillou Hill
Rd., Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay
St., (Downtown)

7 Route 21D (To provide direct
service to South Beach along East
Street)

East Hill St., East St., Zion Blvd., Jordan

Prince William School, South Beach Rd.,

East St., East Hill St.,

8. Route 24 (Flamingo Gardens, to

provide service to St. Vincent Road
and link from Carmichael to
Eastwest)

Flamingo Gardens Primary School,
(Montgomery Ave), Carmichael Rd., Faith
Ave., St. Vincent Rd., Blue Hill Rd., St.
Vincent Rd., Faith Ave., Carmichael Rd.,
Montgomery Ave., Flamingo Gardens
Primary School

2, Route 25 (Provides service near to

. Paradise Island (Western) Bridge
and links East Street and Soldier
Road with Golden Gates Shopping
Centre.)

Golden Gates Shopping Centre, Baillou
Hill Rd., Soldier Rd., East St., Wulff Rd.,
Village Rd., Shirley St., Church St.
(Paradise Island Western Bridge), Mackey
St., Wulff Rd., East St., Soldier Rd., Baillou
hill Rd., Golden Gates Shopping Centre

All applications submitted will be heard
by the New Providence Road Traffic
Authority.

CONTROLLER
ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT



TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — The Denver Nuggets start-
ed celebrating too soon, not that they ever had a
chance in this one as the San Antonio Spurs raced
to a 108-91 win at the Pepsi Center.

The Nuggets had won 12 of 15 since acquiring
Chauncey Billups from Detroit in the Allen Iver-
son trade, including a 132-93 shellacking of Toron-
to that still had them aglow 48 hours later.

The Spurs were still exasperated over their
double-digit loss to Detroit on Tuesday night,
and a double-digit defeat at the hands of Denver
last month when they were short-handed.

San Antonio jumpéd out to a 20-point half-
time lead and never looked back, getting 22 points
from Tony Parker and 21 from Manu Ginobili,
two players who were sidelined when the Nuggets
beat the Spurs 91-81 last month in San Antonio.

Tim Duncan also chipped in 21 points for the
Spurs, who snapped a two-game skid.

"T said at halftime to the team, 'I don't know
who you are right now. You're not the same team
that I've seen play for 20 games,'" Nuggets coach
George Karl said. "We never got the personality
that we've kind of been riding."

In the only other NBA game Thursday night,
the Dallas Mavericks beat the Phoenix Suns 112-
OF; - 4

Billups, the former University of Colorado star,
had enjoyed a wonderful homecoming up to this
point, helping the franchise get off to its best
start since the 1976-77 team won 13 of its first 19.

"You shouldn't celebrate in a season," Karl

said. "But our start, the changes that we've made,
where we've put ourselves, it's probably hard not
to feel celebratory about. And again, the game of
basketball is an intense, physical competition, a
mental competition and when you're playing a
championship competitor and we make the mis-
takes that we made —- plus I honestly think they
(were eager for payback) — maybe we got too
happy.in that game," Karl said.

"And I've always been a fan of Duncan, Gino-
bili, Parker and Pap (coach Gregg Popovich).
They have a grit to them and that's why they
win. And those four guys showed up tonight big
time."

Denver's dismal showing came just 48 hours
after a 39-point blowout of Toronto, an embar-
rassment that served as the last straw in Sam

. Mitchell's tenure as Raptors coach. Karl lament-

ed the firing long and hard before Thursday's
tip-off.

After routing the Raptors, Billups declared it
was just one of those games where everything
worked: "Throughout the season you usually get
two or three of those games," he said. "Unfortu-
nately, you usually get two or three on the other
side, those games wh-re nothing really works."

This game was cer! .inly one of those.

"I might have talke it up on us, I don't know,".
Billups said Thursday. "That was an ugly game.
Games like that you have to wash them off in
the shower and just forget about them as soon as
possible. They picked us apart. They just out-
played us all over the place."

One game after doling out 37 assists, the
Nuggets handed out just 19. And they missed 40

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



KS SS 7 SS

OAKLAND’S Darren McFadden breaks away from San Diego’s Stephen
Cooper on a pass reception in the fourth quarter Thursday night...

LT, Rivers lead Chargers
to 34-7 win over Raiders

@ By BERNIE WILSON
AP Sports Writer

SAN DIEGO (AP) —
LaDainian Tomlinson can still
run the ball and his San Diego
Chargers finally looked like
world-beaters.

It might not matter, though,
because the Chargers still need
a miracle to get to the playoffs.

Tomlinson scored on a 3-yard
run against his favorite punch-
ing bag and Philip Rivers threw
three touchdown passes, includ-
ing a 59-yarder to Vincent Jack-
son, to give the Chargers a 34-7
victory against the Oakland
Raiders on Thursday night.

The Chargers beat their
archrivals for the 11th straight
time in a series dating to the
birth of the AFL in 1960.

The Chargers (5-8) snapped a
three-game losing streak and

_ won for just the second time in
seven games. Once considered
favorites to reach the Super
Bowl, they're still in deep trou-
ble, trailing Denver by 2 1/2
games in the AFC West. The
Broncos have four to play.

"It was desperately needed
but it was one win for us," Tom-
linson said. "We don't want to
make it more than what it is."

On Sunday, Tomlinson was
held to 24 yards, the second-
lowest total of his brilliant eight-
year career, in a listless 22-16
home loss to Atlanta.

"After the showing last week,
I think we wanted to prove to
everyone that that wasn't us,"
said Tomlinson, who's having
the worst season of his career.
"It's good that it was a short
week. We got to show people
who we are as a group."

San Diego's Darren Sproles
caught two TD passes. His 87-
yard touchdown on a punt
return in the fourth quarter was
called back after rookie
Antoine Cason was called for
an illegal block in the back.

Oakland quarterback JaMar-
cus Russell was intercepted
twice by linebacker Stephen
Cooper and also lost a fumble,
leading to 17 points for the
Chargers. Russell sprained his
right ankle after his second

pickoff and didn't return. X-

rays were negative, and Russell
left the locker room on crutch-
es.
Andrew Walter replaced
Russell at the start of the third
quarter. Walter was intercepted
by Matt Wilhelm late in the
fourth quarter.

The Raiders (3-10) reached
double digit losses for the sixth
straight year. They are 22-71
since being routed by Tampa
Bay and former Raiders coach
Jon Gruden in the Super Bowl
in San Diego on Jan. 26, 2003.

‘great game against," Tomlin-

"It's clear that we're not
close," cornerback Nnamdi
Asomugha said. "We don't play
good football, we don't play
sound football. We've been
undisciplined. You just wonder
how many people care and how
many people are upset."

Tomlinson's TD midway
through the first quarter was
his 137th, moving him into sole
possession of fifth place on the
career list. He had been tied
with Marshall Faulk, who was
at the game working for the
NFL Network.

_L.T. had 91 yards on 25 car-
ries. He has 1,906 career rush-
ing yards and 22 total touch-
downs, 19 on the ground, in 16
games against the Raiders.
They are his most yards and
touchdowns against any oppo-
nent.

"I think there are always cer-
tain teams that you enjoy play-
ing and you seem to match up
well against and seem to have a

son said. "I can't explain it."

Three plays into Oakland's
first possession, Russell fum-
bled as he was being sacked by
outside linebacker Shaun
Phillips, and inside linebacker
Jyles Tucker recovered at the
12-yard line. Tomlinson carried
three straight times, scoring
untouched off left tackle for a
10-0 lead.

Rivers threw an 8-yard TD
pass to Sproles early in the sec-
ond quarter, capping a 15-play,
96-yard drive that took 8 min-
utes, 29 seconds. Tomlinson and
Sproles carried five times each
and Rivers had three carries on
the drive.

San Diego got the ball back
on Cooper's first pickoff. Jack-
son got behind two defenders
and hauled in Rivers' scoring
pass down the right sideline to
make it 24-0.

' Russell was hit by Phillips
while passing late in the second .
quarter and the ball went
straight to Cooper, who later-
alled to Antonio Cromartie for
a 14-yard gain. Russell was hurt
on that play. ,

San Diego's Nate Kaeding
kicked field goals of 20 ad 39
yards.

After Kaeding's second field
goal, Oakland's Justin Miller
returned the kickoff 92 yards
for a touchdown.

Rivers was 10-of-22 for 214
yards. Jackson had five catches
for a career-high 148 yards.

"I'm sick of losing, especially
like that," Raiders tight end
Zach Miller said. "We never
really got going on offense and
when we did, penalties and
interceptions and fumbles killed
us. As an offense we were inept
again."

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Multi Discount Furniture drawing will be held Friday, December 12th 2008

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGT




TONY PARKER works the ball inside against Nuggets
guard Chauncey Billups.in the fourth quarter Thursday
night... :

percent of their free throws while San Antonio
was going 17-of-18 from the stripe.

In the first half, Billups scored just 3 points on
1-of-7 shooting and doled a single assist. Billups

== -

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scored nine points in the fourth quarter | ft
with 12. 4
"I thought Tony did as good a job as anyboc 4

can do on Chauncey," Popovich said. "He's just sot

tough a cover. Bruce (Bowen) did his usual goog
job. When we play good defense like that ands
make some shots we're a pretty good tcai."»

And one that's starting to get healthy.

"T think as a team we played some of
basketball," Duncan said. "We \
consistent defensively. In the see
were a lot more aggressive getting (0 1)
There was a stretch there where we were ior
people too much, but other than that, cons:
tently throughout the game we played well
moved the ball well and Manu and ‘tom
some points."

aed

ad ae as EE

ena se

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4

Mavericks 112, Suns 97 4
At Dallas, Dirk Nowitzki matched his season:

high with 39 points and new starter J.J. Barca:

provided a spark with 18 points to help the Mave
’ ericks to their eighth win in nine games. 4

Nowitzki had 37 points through three quart:
and Jason Terry continued his recent roll off ihe
bench with 19 points for Dallas. 8
Steve Nash and Shaquille O'Neal returned tot
the lineup for Phoenix after missing the two pr 4
vious games, Nash because of flu-like syimpiot s
and O'Neal because of sore knees and coach | “4
ry Porter's plan to avoid using him in bachk-toa
back games. q

Nash had 20 points and 10 assists with

ing the fourth quarter. Amare Stoudeimiic iif
Phoenix with 28 points.
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_ PAGE 14, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



0. J SIMPSON speaks during his

OJ Simpson sentenced to 2
as much as 33 years

m By KEN RITTER

Associated Press Writer

LAS VEGAS (AP) - A bro-
ken O J Simpson was sentenced
Friday to as much as 33 years in
prison for a hotel armed rob-
bery after a judge rejected his
apology and said, "It was much
more than stupidity."

‘The 61-year-old football Hall
of Famer stood shackled and

stone-faced as Judge Jackie >

Glass rattled off the punish-
ment. Moments before, Simp-
son made a rambling, five-
minute plea for leniency, simul-
taneously apologising for the
holdup as a foolish mistake and
trying to justify his actions.

He choked back tears as he
told her: "I didn't want to steal
anything from anyone. ... I'm
sorry, Sorry."

Simpson said he was simply
trying to retrieve sports memo-
rabilia and other mementos,
including his first wife's wed-
ding ring, from two dealers
when he stormed a Las Vegas
hotel room on. September 13,
2007.

But the judge emphasized
that it was a violent confronta-
tion in which at least one gun
was drawn, and she said some-
one could have been shot. She
said the evidence was over-
whelming, with the planning,

the confrontation itself and the
aftermath all recorded on audio
or videotape.

Glass, a no-nonsense judge
known for her tough sentences,
imposed such a complex series
of consecutive and concurrent
sentences that even many attor-
neys watching the case were
confused as to how much time
Simpson got.

Simpson could serve up to 33
years but could be eligible for
parole after nine years, accord-
ing to Elana Roberto, the
judge's clerk.

The judge said several times
that her sentence in the Las
Vegas case had nothing to do
with Simpson's 1995 acquittal
in the slaying of his ex-wife
Nicole Brown Simpson and her
friend Ronald Goldman.

"I'm not here to try and cause
any retribution or any payback
for anything else," Glass said.

Simpson was immediately led
away to prison after the judge
refused to permit him to go free
on bail while he appeals.

Simpson's co-defendant and
former golfing buddy, Clarence
"C.J. Stewart, also was sen-
tenced to at least 15 years. .

Outside court, Goldman's
father, Fred Goldman, and sis-
ter, Kim, said they were delight-

_ed with the sentence. .

"We are thrilled, and it's a

bittersweet moment," Fred
Goldman said. "It was satisfying
seeing him in shackles like he
belongs."

The Goldmans took a mea-
sure of credit for Simpson's fate,
saying their relentless pursuit
of his assets to satisfy a $33.5
million wrongful-death judg-
ment. "pushed him over the
edge" and led him to commit
the robbery to recover some of
his sports memorabilia.

Simpson and Stewart were
both brought to the courtroom
in dark blue jail uniforms, their
hands. shackled to their waists
with chains. Simpson, who
looked weary and had not been
expected to-speak, delivered a
somber statement to the judge:

As he spoke in a hoarse
voice, the courtroom was
hushed. His two sisters, Shirley
Baker and Carmelita Durio, sat
in the front row of the court-
room, along with his adult
daughter..

Both men were convicted
Oct. 3 of 12 criminal ‘charges,
including kidnapping and armed
robbery.

"As stupid and as ill-con-
ceived as it was, it wasn't some-
thing that was from this evil
mind they teach us about,"
Simpson attorney Yale
Galanter said before sentenc-
ing.

"Not bright, not smart, not
well thought out, but certainly
not from an evil mind,"
Galanter said.

Most of the 63 seats in the
courtroom were taken by
media, lawyers and family mem-
bers of the defendants. Fifteen
members of the public were also
allowed.

After sentencing was over,
the Goldmans left the court-
room and Kim threw her arms
around her father and. wept.

Simpson's sisters declined to
comment, but Shirley Baker
said on her way out: "It's not
over."

Jurors who heard 13 days of
testimony said after the verdict
that they were convinced of
Simpson's guilt because of
audio recordings that were
secretly made of the Sept. 13,
2007, robbery at the Palace Sta-
tion casino hotel.

The confrontation involved
sports memorabilia brokers
Alfred Beardsley and Bruce
Fromong. It was recorded by
collectibles dealer Thomas Ric-
cio, who was acting as middle-
man.

"Don't let nobody out of this
room!" Simpson commands on
the recordings, and instructs
other men to scoop up items he
insists had been stolen from
him.

yesterday in Las Vegas...

On Tuesday, Glass is sched-
uled to sentence four former
co-defendants who took plea
deals and testified against Simp-
son and Stewart.

Michael.McClinton, Charles
Cashmore, Walter Alexander




Isaac Brekken/AP

and Charles Ehrlich could
receive probation or prison
time. McClinton could get up
to 11 years; the others face less.

e AP Special Correspondent
Linda Deutsch contributed to
this report.

FROM page 15

goals and objectives.”

Tribune: Our better student-
athletes prefer to go abroad to
study rather than stay at home.
How do you intend to encour-
age them to make COB a pri-
ority?

Rolle: “I think the financial
aid is critical to what we do. The
reality of it is money counts.
When student-athletes and par-
ents sit down and discuss where
they will go, one of the top
three decisions research shows
is athletic scholarships.

“When I decided where I was
going to go as a student-athlete,
I looked at who was going to

' provide the most financial aid.
’ There’s no denying that at all.

“The Minister (of Youth,
Sports and Culture, Desmond
Bannister), in his wisdom,
recognised that and said how
can we build the university and
they decided to put their money
behind us.

“So that now provides us with .

the opportunity to go out there
and recruit and not only recruit,
but to say hey we can sustain
you throughout your stay at the
college. We can now recruit
some of these students.
“Secondly, we have to pro-
vide competition for our stu-
dent-athletes. In my research in
graduate school, I found out

that the most, important thing
for Bahamians is competition,
testing their skills. So we have
to find a way to allow them to
test their skills with teams that
are comparable.

“That’s why the travel that
our team does is so very critical.
Our student-athletes want to
compare themselves with their
peers abroad.

“And thirdly, facilities obvi-
ously have to play a role in it.
We have a ways to go in that.
But I’m very pleased that the
minister has committed to the
construction of the national
facilities that will enable us to
play some of our games.

“I’m also pleased to know

We’re looking for a few good
people to join our team.

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that the athletics facilities is on

. the agenda for the capital of the

College of the Bahamas. We
were off for a while, but we
made it back. So everybody can
see the new facilities that are
going up here in New Provi-
dence and in Grand Bahama
and an athletic facility is one of
them.”

Tribune: You have a well
established staff on board now.
How do they fare in the overall
scheme of things in the way for-
ward?

Rolle: “1 think the support
staff brings a tremendous
amount of experience.

“Bradley (Cooper) has the

‘bulk of his responsibility dealing

with the Wellness-and Fitness
Center and we will be looking
at how we can collaborate with
government and their agencies
to address some of these crises



EAST STREET, NA



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby quer that DOYLE SOUFFRANT of

AS SAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of NOVEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

that we are faced with like-the
report we got this week that 70
per cent of the Bahamian public
is obese.

“We will be trying to find a
way to deal with this issue and
so we will be collaborating with
the government agencies
because we have a role to play
in nation building.

“As for Sean (Bastian), he
will work more closely with me
and with the intramural pro-
gramme. We want to make
intramural more vibrant. We
want more of our students to
participate in intramural. We
want Our students to’h
gooddime:because stude
letes are aselect group. ~_

“And we have Keith Cox
who is fairly new to the institu-
tion, but he will also work with
the Wellness and Fitness Center
and the teams in their strength





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“We have a small staff, but
as we move forward, we have

to put in place all of the other-

things that are missing. We need
to have a SID and someone
who is in charge of rules and
regulations. So we know that
going forward, the department
has to grow. But with what we
have, we know we can accom-
plish a lot.”

Tribune: The Caribs’ athletic
teams are traveling and partici-
pating in the NAIA, but they
are getting a valuable lesson try-
ing to compete on par with their
peers. What do you think needs
o be done to get them ata

Rolle: “We are in year three
of the travel experience, but we
were using it to get-our feet wet
and to determine which direc-
tion the programme will be
going in.

“At the beginning of this
semester, we have determined
that our student-athletes be full
time. students. Previously we
allowed part-time students to
play. But we realise that our
students have to be full time
with 12 or more credits.

“We've taken our fair share
of punishment as some people
would say in the sporting world,
but that comes with the growing
pain. So I’m not at all discour-
aged by-the score at the end of

the day when we get beat by 40°

or 50 or 60 or 70 points.

“If you ask most of those
teams what it was like when
they started out, they will tell
you the same thing. So we have

to build on that and more and .

more as we play games, we will
get there. We have to invest in
our coaches and their devélop-
ment and we have to ensure
that our student-athletes have
time off to practice and play
games.

“So those issues have to be
addressed if we are going to
solidify and build the pro-
gramme. So I’m not at all dis-
couraged by the scores. | know
as Bahamians we will like to
win. But anybody who knows
anything about building a pro-
gramme know that you will take

your share of licks early. So ’m_ |

not-discouraged at all.”
Tribune: Let’s look at the way
forward. Where would you like
to see the athletic programme
go?
Rolle: “People who work
with athletics know that it takes
a great deal of funding and
we're working with an instita-
tion that won’t be in a position
right now to get to the top
where we can make money like
the Division One schools do.
“We have to be real about
this thing. I want us to be a sol-
id NAIA or Division I or III
programme, whichever we
determine that we will be. I
believe some of those discus-
sions still have to be discussed
to determine which direction
we will take.
“I can not say that in 2-3
years we will be a full fledge

» NAIA institution or we are

going to NCAA Division II or
ILL. These are some discussions
that have to be had with the
stockholders. We just want to
ensure that whatever affiliation
we have, it lines up with the
vision of the College of the
Bahamas.”





Raga eagtenteâ„¢

2008



O J Simpson
gets as much
as 33 years
in prison...
See page 14



Tim Clarke/Tribune stati a j

—



a Addn mel ron in the basketball tournament..

Minister opens Special

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hree countries and
six teams will
make up the
package for the
Bahamas Special
Olympics Caribbean Basket-
ball Tournament which jumped
off yesterday at Loyola Hall.

Officially opened by Minis-
ter of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Desmond Bannister, the
tournament will come to a close
today following action begin-
ning at 9 am.

Back in the Bahamas for the
second time in three years is
Barbados, the runners-up in
2006 and the Cayman Islands,
who are making their maiden
voyage on the international
scene.

e

| Up close and personal with K Rolle

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ON December 1, the College
of the Bahamas ushered in a
new era with the appointment
of Kimberley Rolle as the new
athletic director.

She replaced Greg Harshaw,
who was instrumental in getting
the college’s athletic pro-
gramme established within the
. National Association of Inter-

collegiate Athletics.

“It’s very exciting because
you don’t often get to do what
you love and get paid for it,”
Rolle quipped. “So I’m very
excited about the opportunity.

“I do understand that it’s one
that will come with its chal-
lenges because whenever you
are in a young and growing pro-
gramme, there are a lot of
bumps and bruises that come

-along with it. But the exciting
part is that you have your hand
print on something that can
have a great impact on a lot of
lives.”

Rolle, a former long-time
women’s national team player,
excelled for the Sharks at SC

McPherson. She graduated in ~

1991 before she went to Hen-
derson State University where

Ist - “Partridge in a Pear Tree”
[| 2nd - “Two Turtle Doves”
‘3rd - “Three French Hens”
4th - “Four Calling Birds”
5th - “Five Gold Rings”
_ 6th - “Six Geese-A-Laying”

Kimberley Rolle

she graduated in 1995 with her
Bachelor of Arts degree in
Communications.

Earlier this year she returned
after a sting at Miami Universi-
ty of Ohio where she completed
her masters in sports studies.

Last October, Rolle was
inducted into the Henderson
University Reddies Hall of
Fame for the tremendous
impact she made on their wom-
en’s basketball team.

A former news reporter at
The Tribune, Rolle is married to
former basketball standout Bac-
cus Rolle and is the proud
mother of one son.

On Thursday, Tribune Sports
sat down with Rolle for an in-
depth interview during which

4

~ WATERFORD’

CRYSTAL





she revealed her plans for the
department.

Tribune: What role do you
intend to play and how do you
intend to execute it?

Rolle: “I think first of all, the
position of athletic director in
the contents of the College of
the Bahamas has a three-strand
approach. One would be health
and wellness, two intramural
and three would be intercolle-
giate athletics.

“I know often times we have
a tendency to focus a great deal
on the intercollegiate aspects of
it, but in the capacity that I sit as
the director of athletics, I’m

really responsible for those

three stands.

“So the challenge for me
therefore is to ensure that the
focus of all three strands
receives adequate attention and
support. Obviously the inter-
collegiate athletics is one that
kind of generates more excite-
ment, particularly among young
people.

“We do have membership
with the NAIA and one of the
things that I intend to do early
in the new year is to see where
we will go with that and what is
our next step if we,are to go ful-
ly with that or we change direc-
tion and go. forward to the
NCAA Division II or III level.

“Whoever we become affili-
ated with, we want to make sure
that they are in line with the
goals and visions of the college
from an academic prospective.

“And being a sticker for aca-
demics, I want our students
when they come here to leave
with an academic degree. Gone
are the days where students
come here for a year or two and
they use this as a springboard.
We want them.to leave as a
four-year letterman and with a
degree.” :

Tribune: You're stepping into
the programme as a female as
well, how has that-been going?

Rolle: “I don’t really look at
my gender as one to deter any-
thing that I want to do. Obvi-
ously, the research is there to
support it that this is a male ori-
ented profession. There is no
question about that.

“There are only a hand full
of female athletic directors at
the Division One level. Most of
the female directors you would
find at the Division II or III or
NAIA level.

“But the research also shows
that more and more women are
getting the opportunities
because the position calls for a
great deal of diversification and
you have to be able to commu-
nicate with donors and alumni,
so you have to have a diverse
skill set and I think with that in
mind, knowing the business of
athletics, has really helped.

“ve been pleased by how
I’ve been received by Sean

. (Bastian), Bradley (Cooper)

and the rest of the staff and I
don’t think we’re going to allow
gender to be an issue with our

SEE page 14°

They are being joined by
defending champions Grand

' Bahama; Abaco, also making

its debut in the tournament,

- and New Providence, to be rep-

resented by two teams.
Bahamas Special Olympics’
director Basil Christie said they

_had anticipated at least some

20 teams coming in to compete,
but because of the internation-
al economic crisis, the numbers
have decreased tremendously.
“We are very pleased with
this tournament. This is the
biggest this tournament has
ever been,” Christie noted.
“We wanted to invite the teams
here because the only competi-
tion our athletes get is every
four years at the World Games.
“So we have decided to pro-
mote the sport of basketball in
the region because most of the
countries only play cricket. But
they love basketball and so we
have decided to promote this
opportunity for them.”
Despite the faci that the
majority of the teams opted not
to travel here anymore to com-
pete, Christie sajd they intend
to make it an annual one and
they intend to continue to invite
their Caribbean counterparts.
Coaches from both Barba-
dos and the Cayman Islands
have indicated that they intend
to make the best of their trip
here and their aim is to win the
title.
Ian Small, who is in town

with an.eight-member team,

said after finishing up as the
runners-up to Grand Bahama
in Grand Bahama two years
ago, they are going after the
whole hog this year. *

“We want to win this thing,”
he stressed. “We’re not as good
as I would like for us to be
because of our financial situa-
tion, but I’m confident that we
are good enough to win.”

Small said the team will be
defensively minded, but they
have a good crop of big players

who should be able to hold

their own offensively.

Fareed Hosein, coach of the
Cayman Islands, said the sky is
the limit for them as they try
to gain some integnational
exposure.

“For the Cayman Islands,
this is our first Special Olympics
team that we have formed for
basketball and this is our first
overseas trip and actually our
first game,” Hosein lamented.

“Our expectations is not to
necessarily come away with the
gold medal, but that we will
learn how to play on the inter-
national scene, so we can take it
further when we get back to
the Cayman Islands.”

If there’s any consolation for
the Cayman Islands, Hosein
said to expect to see them run
the floor very effectively
because “we are very quick.”

“We are very inexperienced
and so we’re not sure. how to
play in an enyironment. We

-' don’t know. what to expect.”

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Olympics tournament

The expectations are defi-
nitely soaring high for the
Bahamas to keep the title here,
considering that they have four
teams entered in the field.

DeMario Minus, one of the
coaches of the New Providence
teams, said they have all been
working very hard and if the
players follow instructions, they,
should be very competitive.

“Our players have developed
a bond with each other. They
are like a family. So if anything,
you can expect them to pro-
duce a lot of energy,” Minus
projected.

As for their opponents,
Minus said Barbados has a lot

of height, which could pose

some problems: for the
Bahamas. He feels that Grand
Bahama matches up best
against them.

In opening the tournament,
Bannister welcomed all of the
players to the Bahamas and he
encouraged them to enjoy
themselves. But he indicated
that it’s his hope that the
Bahamas would be able to keep
the title here. an

Bannister also commended
Christie, his executives and the
many volunteers who help to
make Special Olympics the
vibrant sporting body that it is
in the country today.

During the ceremony, the
Stapledon Dance Troop put on
a splendid display as they per-
formed to the tune: “You Rise
Me Up.”

CR enti
RO a heal

PN 8

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PAGE 16, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





5

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lyn G Ferguson, JP

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Oo Ss ‘hy Fra

a - goa Ra LEN hese SP UE NTS DS ES He ED coset oce oy PLACA seri

NASSAU EWENTS CAPTURED .O CAMERA











= ; : yo

PICTURED (I-r) are: attorney and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, Senator Allyson Gibson; cancer
survivor, Stephanie Siegel; president of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Terrance Fountain; Olympic gold

medalist and honourary co-chair of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas/Susan G Komen for the Cure Stride for 2 ok pee 4 f
Life, Eldece Clarke-Lewis; Member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, cancer survivor Dr Agreta Eneas-Carey. : ; 2g Sooea F a ae fe



_ (ABOVE) Members of the Links with the minister of health. Pictured (I-
r) are: (top. row) Link Yolanda Cash Jackson (of the Greater Miami Chap-
ter); Link Janice McCants Miller; Link Lynda Gibson; Link Michelle Major;
, — Link Jacqueline Reckley; Link Cristel Cole (of the Greater Miami Chapter);
i Link Christel Sands Feaste; Link Deborah Fraser.

Bottom row: Link Allyson Gibson; Link Agreta Eneas Carey; honourary
co-chair of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas/Susan G Komen Stride for
Life and wife of baseball sensation Hank Aaron, Link Billie Aaron; Minis- -
ter of Health, Dr Hubert Minnis; Link Edith Powell; Link Toni Lewis (of the
Las Vegas Chapter); Link Marilyn Rahming; Link Diane Bowe Pindling; Link
Sharlyn Wilson Smith.

CURE STRIDE FOR

*® The Nassau Chapter of the Links, Inc partnered
with United States Ambassador Ned L Siegel and Min-
ister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis to host a welcome
reception for participants of the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas/Susan G Komen for the Cure Stride for Life
Walk.

Those visiting the Bahamas to support the fight
against breast cancer in our country were welcomed by
friendly faces, the sounds of junkanoo courtesy of the

Prime Time Dancers junkanoo group and a live band,
Roughie.

' ; Corporate sponsors for the event included the Min-
PICTURED (I-r) are: past director of the AIDS Foundation of the Bahamas and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, attorney Sharlyn Smith; istry of Tourism, Burns House Limited and Baha Mar
infectious disease specialist, Dr Perry Gomez; director of the Pan-American Health Organisation, Dr Merle Lewis; director of the Public Health Recdrts :

Authority, Dr Baldwin Carey. ’ .







*










PICTURED (I-r) are: United States Ambassador to the Bahamas, Ned L Siegel; Katrina
McGhee of Susan G Komen for the Cure; Jennifer Segall of Susan G Komen for the
Cure; Stephanie Siegel, a cancer survivor; Julie Bernstien of Susan G Komen for the
Cure; Tina Lewis, board member of Susan G Komen for the Cure and member of the
Links (Las Vegas Chapter) and Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis.



fa ss ; 7 £3 8
PICTURED (I-r) are: attorney and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, Christel

Sands Feaste, insurance executive and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, ‘PICTURED (I-r) are: Louis Harold Joseph, ambassador of the Republic of Haiti to the Bahamas; Xiuling Xie; Dingxian Hu ambas-
Lynda Gibson; bank executive and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, Diane — sador of the People’s Republic of China in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Bowe Pindling; Dr Tracey Halkitas. :



Herguson

ved

DVifference :

P.O. Box N-4659,
_Nassau, Bahamas _





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- FRUIT & NUT
McFLURRY

WEATHER



Pm lovin’ it







The Tribune



el el
AC
up all night!

NecDonald’s downtown

drive-thru is now open

ANY






HIGH 82F
LOW 69F

SUNNY

Volume: 105 No.14





BAHAMAS EDITION



SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

ere |
Anejo Ltr

yeas
I $13.55 each

BRISTOL

Buy 2 Get 1 FEEE!!

Available at all Bristol Locations Nation wide

stores

did not
pass on
savings

â„¢ By PAUL TURNQUEST
Tribune Staff Reporter
pturnquest@tribunemedia.net

DESPITE government’s
intervention in cutting Custom’s
duties on certain food items
throughout the country, the cost
of these items has increased in
many areas while others showed
little decrease or no movement
at all.

This information, released
yesterday by the Department
of Statistics reveals the concern
of many, that the reduction in
the import duty offered by the
government was never “passed
on” to the Bahamian consumer
(see page 6 for statistics).

In his 2008/2009 Budget com- -
muniqué, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham announced
that import duties on food items
such as fresh fruits, frozen veg-
etables, cereals, oatmeal, and
bread, would be eliminated.

Additionally, the Prime Min-
ister promised that duty would
be reduced on items such as
sweet peppers, canned corn,
pigeon peas and carrots.

However, in the Department
of Statistics’ attempts to dis-
cover whether these reductions
in duty had been passed on to
consumers throughout the Fam-
ily Islands and New Providence,
it discovered that while some
prices showed a noticeable
decrease, on many islands other
items on which duty was elimi-
nated, showed increases.

These food products include,
oatmeal, breakfast cereals, and
pasta, Of those items which
showed a noticeable decrease
in prices were oranges, grape-
fruits, bananas, plantains, and
tomatoes.

In Eleuthera, the price of
plantains dropped by 43 per
cent. Decreases in the price of
plantain was also found on
Grand Bahama, Eleuthera,

SEE page 8

Anna Nicole remembered

LARRY Birkhead and Howard K Stern were in Nassau last week, reportedly to mark Anna
Nicole Smith’s birthday with her baby daughter, Dannielynn.

A headstone (AT BOTTOM OF PHOTO, BETWEEN TREE AND GAZEBO) has now been
placed on the late cover girl’s grave at Lakeview Cemetery, where she is buried alongside her son
Daniel.

Birkhead, the father of Dannielynn, and Stern, who was Anna’s lawyer and constant companion,
were seen at Nassau’s Outback Restaurant in East Bay Street on Thanksgiving Day.

“They seemed to be in good spirits and on very friendly terms,” said a fellow diner.

Anna Nicole died in February last year, six months after Daniel died at Doctors Hospital in Nas-
sau. An inquest found that Daniel died of drug use. Anna’s death in Florida was declared to be
accidental. Birkhead and Stern contested baby Dannielyn’s paternity in the Bahamian courts, but
after DNA tests Birkhead was named as biological father.

Row heats up as Jewish
symbols are removed

WORKMEN removed Jewish symbols from
Bay Street Christmas decorations yesterday after
protests by Christians sparked a major row.

The nine-candle menorahs attached to lamp-

_ posts in Rawson Square were taken down after
they had been described as an “insult” by one
Anglican priest.













Now a row has broken out over the protests,
with one Jewish Tribune reader lambasting pro-
testers as “small-minded and ignorant.”

Ms Susan Katz Lightbourn said: “I happen to

SEE page 8

TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE # 1









24 hours

Fridays & Saturdays

PRICE — 75¢

SiC erece VG GEvasie
Many Many Wine or
Spirit Brands on Sale!



Bahamian
— deportees:
denied bail

@ By NATARIO MCKENZIE
Tribune Staff Reporter

TWO men, recently deported
from Jamaica, were remanded
in prison yesterday until the
completion of their respective
trials when a local magistrate
revoked their bail.

Ian Porter of Star Estates
and Marvin Reckley of Glad-
stone Road, out on bail on drug

- trafficking. charges, were arrest-

ed in Jamaica last month. The
men were charged with immi-

‘gration violations and ordered

to be deported. Magistrate Car-
olita Bethel had issued a war-
rant of arrest for Porter after
he failed to appear in court on
May 29 this year.

Porter is charged in connec-
tion with a major drug seizure
off Marshall Road in 2006.
According to reports, police
seized 20 crocus sacks contain-
ing 921 pounds of marijuana.
The drugs, which have an esti-

mated street value of $921,000,

was discovered in a Chevrolet
Astro van. Magistrate Bethel
revoked Porter’s bail in view of
his bail violation. He was
remanded until the completion
of his trial. He is expected back
in court on December 16.

An arrest warrant was issued
for Marvin Reckley, also known
as Marvin Sherman, in June

after he failed to show up for |

Developer
faces ‘S5m

back pay’
allegation



= By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

A US company could owe
160 Bahamian construction
workers up to $5 million in back
pay, according to the workers’
representatives.

Errol McKinney of EM and
Associates, during a press con-
ference yesterday, told local
media that construction work-
ers employed at a site on Bock
Cay, Exuma had to work 10
hours a day, seven days a week,
for 28 continuous days.

Following almost a month of

work, employees were given a

week off without pay.
According to Mr McKinney
the company employing the

workers were allegedly in -

breach of the. Bahamas’
Employment Act by not com-
pensating employees properly
for overtime and vacation pay.

“Instead of the company giv-
ing each employee two weeks
vacation after completing 12
months of employment, the
company decided to calculate

SEE page 8



" his trial in the Supreme Court in

connection with the seizure of
cocaine and marijuana in June
2006. Magistrate Bethel also
issued a warrant for Reckley’s
arrest in. September when he
failed to appear in court for his
firearm and ammunition case.
Reckley’s bail was also revoked

SEE page 8
Attorney
General
urged to
‘intervene’
with resort

@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

THE Bahamas Hotel

Managerial Association is
asking for the attorney gen-
eral's "urgent intervention"
to facilitate legal proceed-
ings against the manage-
ment of Harborside at
Atlantis for not negotiating
an industrial agreement with
its union in a timely fash-
ion.
- In a press release issued
yesterday by lawyer Obie
Ferguson, BHMA's presi-
dent, it was claimed that
Harborside's management
failed to "treat and enter
into negotiations" with
BHMaA "ona timely basis",
as mandated By Section
41(3)-of the Industrial Rela-
tions Act.

Said the release: "We the
workers were given recog-
nition on December 11,
2007 by the Minister of
Labour (as a bargaining
agent) and since then our
union tried consistently to
get management to sit down
and negotiate an Industrial
Agreement, but the compa-
ny refused to do so.

"It is important that the
attorney general knows that
time is of the essence when
dealing with recognition. It
is to this end we seek his
urgent intervention. ©

It pointed out that
presently they are “without
proper representation”,
alleging that the company
was breaking “the law in
denying us our fundamen-
tal rights guaranteed under
the laws of the Bahamas."
In their statement they
claimed that the "delayed
process" was staged to. dis-
courage employees from

SEE page 8










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INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

| (BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS



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Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: NE at 12-25 Knots 6-8 Feet 3-5 Miles 78° F
FIC FIC FIC FIC Sunday: __NE at 10-20 Knots 4-7 Feet 10-20 Miles 78°F
87/30 73/228 FREEPORT Today: NE at 10-20 Knots 5-7 Feet 3-5 Miles

MODERATE | HIGH




43/6- 39/3 s Sunday: SE at 8-16 Knots 3-6 Feet 10-20 Miles









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ABACO bes Temperature 3:34 p.m. 22 9:36pm. -0.1
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AccuWeather.com §
Forecasts and graphics provided by a oa? & ESOT : = Bel 1S EXNY Showers ; » 4 80/63
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_—


THE TRIBUNE

LOCAL NEWS

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGE 3



Ja (Xs
probe

home
invasion



POLICE say they have
launched an “intensive
investigation” into a Friday
morning home invasion in
Highbury Park.

Shortly before 4am on
Friday, a family in that
neighbourhood wakened to
the sound of someone
entering their home.

The culprits were carry-
ing firearms and robbed the
family of cash, jewellery,
cell phones, and a vehicle
before speeding off.

¢ POLICE are investigat-
ing a Friday morning shoot-
ing that left a security guard
in hospital in serious condi-
tion.

According to police, the ,

incident occurred shortly
after 2am on Friday.

The security guard, who
was on duty at Nassau
Christian Academy, was
reportedly approached by
three masked gunmen who
demanded cash.

Police could not confirm
if any cash was taken, how-
ever before leaving one of
the gunmen shot the securi-
ty guard in the chest.

The victim was taken to
hospital where he remains
in serious condition.

¢ DRUG enforcement
officers confiscated about
$22,000 worth of marijuana
from a home in eastern New
Providence on Thursday
night.

According to reports,
sometime before 8pm on
Thursday, DEU officers
executed a search warrant
on a home in eastern New
Providence.

The officers found a sack
containing two brown taped
packages of marijuana.

The drugs. weigh. 20
pounds,. Police‘said that-one
persons is assisting’ with
their investigation into the



Fires the ‘height
of incompetence’

m= By ALEX MISSICK
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government says it is
moving to deal with the vexing
problem of dump fires — which
flared up again this week lead-
ing to health concerns in sur-
rounding neighbourhoods.

“We believe it is at the height
of incompetence that a society
as advanced as the Bahamas
cannot manage garbage better
than it does and that the popu-
lation continues to suffer from
these combustions for whatever
reason,” Environment Minister
Earl Deveaux said.

For more than 16 years the
New Providence city dump has
been a constant problem and
for the second time this year,
serious fires posed a‘ danger, not
only to nearby homes, but to
the health of those who live in
the area.

“I cannot say that we will not

‘have anymore fires, but some

of the. proposals we have in
hand will accommodate dealing
with the dump more efficiently.
That is the mandate that I have
been given and that is the goal
that I have set,” Mr Deveaux
said.

He explained that the fire at
the dump this week was either
caused by “hot garbage” being

MME a ie
end. Although firefighters were able to contain most of the He oN aeed 0a
evening, there were still fires burning ol) under the dump.

deposited there, or was started
by someone. Investigations into
the cause of the fire are contin-
uing.

“The people of the Bahamas
have spent too much money on
the control of garbage for per-
sons living so near to have to
deal with that odour ‘and the
smoke caused by the fire, Mr
Deveaux said.

He said the best managed
landfill in the Bahamas is on



the island of Abaco, but even
that has its share of fires from
time to time.

“North Andros is not the best

example of a landfill site |

because the same people that
built that one built the one here
in Nassau, but at.a later point
we will have the proposals fully
reviewed to prevent the fire
problem at the dump sites,” Mr
Deveaux added.



Port brings Christmas cheer

m= By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - The Grand
Bahama Port Authority deliv-
ered hundreds of gift wrapped
toys to poor families in East
Grand Bahama yesterday.

A group of employees trav-
elled to High Rock, Pelican
Point, McClean’s Town, and by
ferry to nearby Sweeting’s Cay
and distributed Christmas gifts
to 200 children in those com-
munities.

Ms Willamae Ferguson,
GBPA Employee of the Year,
said the toy distribution drive
was implemented to help strug-
gling families during the Christ-
mas season.

“We want to ensure that the
less fortunate children have a
Merry Christmas especially dur-
ing this time when the economy

THE WESTIN

GRAND BAHAMA ISLAND

is down.

“The GBPA management
and staff would like for them
to enjoy Christmas and we hope
that our contributions will help
them do just that.”

“T think persons would be
happy to know that we are
thinking of them... because
sometimes parents are not able
to buy for their kids gifts at
Christmas time,” she said.

Ms Ferguson, a 36-year
employee of the human
resources department, was
recently named employee of the
year.

She was selected from among
15 possible candidates from var-

ious departments in the civil ser-

vice.

“Tam honoured to have been
awarded because it tells me I
am doing something that is
making an impression in my
department and the company,
she said.

The Grand Bahama Port

Grand Bahama Island



OUR LUCAYA>

Resort

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RESORT

EXCELLENT CAREER OPPORTUNITY
EXISTS FOR BANQUET MANAGER

The successful candidate effectively monitor the daily operations
of the banquet department including providing support and
guidance to fellow banquet and stewarding persons to ensure
a successful and effective operation ending in a positive guess

experience.

Authority has also taken the
time to decorate various traffic
circles and roundabouts
throughout Freeport with holi-
day lights and festive decora-
tions.s

According to a public rela-
tions spokesman, a great deal
of care and attention went into
the selection and placement of
the themed décor for the traffic
circles.

“The Grand Bahama Port
Authority is aware that the

Christmas spirit for Grand
“Bahama truly comes alive when
the circles are lit,”

she said.

We're celebrating

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Resume should be forwarded on or before
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Hal at [242] eee RE pases is Cae Se MEER 322-52 i


PAGE 4, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Democrats and Republicans face new roles

-WASHINGTON — President-elect
Barack Obama campaigned on a platform
of change. And based on election results,
Americans bought his sales pitch. 2008 was
what pundits called a “change election.”

Some coming transformations are clear.
We already know the Obama administration
will propose new policies on taxes, spend-
ing, environment, energy and health care, to
name a few. No big surprises here.

But Obama’s election will also produce
some more subtle, yet equally significant
changes. For one, congressional roles and
strategies will shift. Both Democrats and
Republicans will inherit new positions in rela-
tion to the White House. How both parties
adapt to their changed circumstances will
define Washington politics for at least the

_hext two years.

The new president, along with Democrat-
ic congressional majorities in the House and
Senate, creates a relatively rare government
institutional environment: unified party con-
trol of the legislative and executive branches.
For the past 30 years, divided government
has been more the norm in Washington. In 15
of the 20 Congresses between 1969-2008, dif-
ferent parties have controlled the White

House and one or both chambers in. i -_

islative branch. When the 111th.Cofigress

convenes in January, it will do so une Hnd="

fied Democratic Party control, conditions
this town has not experienced in 16 vous.
since the beginning of the Clinton adminis-
tration.

Unified party control requires congres-
sional Derhocrats to adapt in several ways.

First, they must pivot from a legislative
majority that routinely opposed a president. to
one that now tries to enact a president’s agen-
da. That means learning to follow the White
House rather thar developing an alternative
programme.

Second, congressional policy development
under these conditions will be more con-
strained. In unified party government, the
majority in Congress usually doesn’t move
too far afield from the White House. For
example, when Republicans controlled the
House during President George W. Bush’s
first term, House Speaker Dennis Hastert
routinely asked GOP lawmakers to reshape
legislation so the White House would not
have to veto any bills. The president’s party in
Congress needs to coordinate closely with
the White House. Democrats have not done
that since 1993.

Third, congressional Democrats will also
have to re-adjust their communications strate-
gies. For the past eight years, whether in the
majority or minority in Congress, Democ-
rats tried to offer an alternative message from

ANNIE A. WALLACE
Born: Feb, 28th, 1910
Died. Dec. 6th, 1985

Capitol Hill to the Bush White House. They
created communications mechanisms. through
congressional leadership offices in the House
and Senate to highlight their differences from
the Republican administration. Now the same
entities that opposed the president for the
past eight years must communicate how and
why they support him. They must move from
telling Americans why the White House’s
policies are wrong to showing why this pres-
ident is right.

The skills and. tactics required for these -

two different tasks are not always the same.
Offence and defence are as different in gov-
erning as they are on the gridiron. Democrats

‘may spend the first few months of 2009 on a
steep learning curve, trying to figure out their
new roles.

Congressional Republicans also face
changed circumstances and an equally daunt-
ing learning curve. Despite President Bush’s
sliding popularity in his second term, the con-
gressional GOP laboured with a Republican
White House for eight years. No more.

This change is a two-edged sword. Presi-
dents always dominate the communications
agenda. No matter how hard Republicans
tried to distance themselves from an unpop-

ular.president over the past. several .years,...
“2.George W. Bush was the face of the party.

The GOP now enjoys a new freedom,’ but
it’s accompanied by fresh challenges. First,
without the White House bully pulpit, com-
municating becomes more difficult. It’s
unclear how Republican lawmakers break
through the cacophony of voices to deliver
the party’s message. Americans pay less
attention when the election is over and often
care little about what the enon party has
to say.

Moreover, confronting ihe White House -

includes its own set of challenges. Does
opposing the new president and the con-
gressional majority make Republicans look
petty, vindictive and obstructionist? Does
“soing along” validate voters’ view that
installing unified Democratic control was a
good thing?’ Each approach — opposition or
compromise — is tricky and fraught with
risk.

This election will produce change in some
less than obvious ways. The first unified
Democratic government in more than a
decade, along with Republicans learning to
operate without a GOP White House after
eight years, means new congressional roles
and strategies. How quickly and effectively
each party adapts will provide another engine
for change in the next election cycle.

(This article was written by Gary Andres - -
Hearst Newspapers - c. 2008).



RAPHAEL LOCKHART
Born: Sent. 12th, 1928
Died: July 1st, 1888

As the bells of the Yuletide ring
CAPT. NORISHL. WALLACE joyously, your family and friends share EILEEN WALLACE LOCKHART

Born: Feb. 14th, 1908
Died: Nov. 8th, 1979

Bee

Dad, this would have been your centenarian year,

your wonderful praises.

Is anyone
looking out
for workers?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I would like your indulgence
in addressing the recent firing of
workers at the Atlantis proper-
ty on Paradise Island. Not only
do I wish to address the mass
firing but the treatment of the
workers by our employer under
the possible guise of the eco-
nomic downturn, the lack of
representation on behalf of
many of the fired workers, the
apparent lack of due diligence
by the Hotel Union on behalf of

_ its members and the total failure

of this government to take a
proactive approach to cause
whatever was necessary to pro-
tect workers job in this coun-
try.

First let me say that one must
recognize that there is a global
economic downturn which is
causing many businesses to
either restructure or take pru-
dent steps if they wish to con-
tinue in business. I accept that
the Atlantis property found it
necessary to reassess its ongoing
commitment in the Bahamas,
and made a decision that, for
them to achieve a position that
they thought was beneficial to
their operation going forward,
they should cut back on staff.

I also recognized that as a
major employer in the
Bahamas, the Atlantis benefited
from. concessions by the
Bahamas government. If only
because of this, I expected the
government to initiate exten-
sive negotiations with the
Atlantis and the Hotel Union.
These negotiations would have
looked at the cost to Atlantis
going forward, with the view of
finding solutions which would
save cost to the Atlantis and
save jobs if only in the short
term. Let’s remember in 1991
during the Gulf War, the Hotel
Union and the Atlantis negoti-
ated and concessions were
made. The agreement between
the Atlantis and the Hotel
Union provides for short work
weeks, rotations, and layoffs.
The parties are presently in con-
tract negotiations and could
have looked at further conces-
sions. Why weren’t these areas
aggressively encouraged by the
Bahamas government before
allowing the termination of 800
workers?

Let us now look at what the
Atlantis property did. Accord-
ing to their spokesperson, a
decision to down size was made.
After some consultation with
the Hotel Union, those hotel
workers who were not best suit-
ed to further the Atlantis in the
way forward were selected for
termination. In the Casino
where I work, there was no con-
sultation or negotiation on
behalf of the casino workers to
be terminated. The month prior
to the firing, persons were called
in and told that because of their
sick record, should it become
necessary to layoff they would
be the first to be fired. *

Born: Oct. 31st, 1938
Died: July 26th,1997

No Time has not erased your sweet memories, it has only caused our
sadness of your earthly departure to drift into contentment.

but thank God for for the quality time you spent with us.
Let light perpetual shine upon such outstanding family members.

Children: Brunell Munroe & Ella Rahming;

grands, greatgrands & great-great grand son Stephano Fox.



LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net




Eventually the Atlantis fired
some 800 workers; most of
whom were hotel union mem-
bers. Their termination pack-
ages were negotiated by the
Hotel Union, but there were
some 40 casino workers who
were also terminated. During
their termination, some of the
casino workers were threatened
with non payment. of their ter-
mination cheque, should they
not sign the company release
form. Some of them foolishly
did and were therefore denied
the opportunity of further pur-
suing any money owed to them.
What is so interesting about this

is that in my, opinion these 40.

casino workers were taken
advantage of and were denied
the opportunity to have some-
one look after their interest. It is
no secret that this situation
exists at the Atlantis Casino
because both governments
FNM and PLP, have stood in
the way and have prevented
casino workers from exercising
their constitutional right to join
a union. Would it, therefore, be
safe to say that our govern-
ments do not believe in the rule
of law, but expects others to?
It must be noted that while
the Atlantis casino workers
were being taken advantage of,
nothing was heard from the
politicians or church, except one
church leader who gleefully
commented on the settlement
package of one fired worker
who was adequately compen-
sated. While some 13 Bahamian
‘Games Supervisors, witl fami-
lies and commitments, were
being fired, there ‘dre several
unmarried/unattached expat
supervisors being allowed to
have gainful employment in the
Bahamas. In fact the only fired
expat is married with a Bahami-
an family. This is certainly not
right, but who is looking out for
Bahamian casino workers?
What kind of country do we














EDITOR, The Tribune.
WHILE returning to my
office from lunch today, I was
deeply disturbed to see trailers
of carnival rides plying along
Victoria Avenue. Having
regard to the current eco-
nomic environment, I sub-
scribe to the view that goy-
ernment should do all in its
power to ensure that thrifti-
ness abounds. We must
acknowledge that there are
many intellectually challenged
‘individuals amongst us, includ-
ing some recently laid off
workers, who see nothing
wrong with blowing their mea-

No carnival for prudence

have when Bahamians are
being fired and foreigners are
given more rights for employ-
ment in our own country? I
love these expats who are my
friends, but I am a Bahamian.

Based on the information
available to me, it appears that
the Hotel Union was powerless
in this whole termination exer-
cise. In my opinion persons in
the tipping categories were
shafted, and that is why some
are taking legal action. It is
interesting that one of the
spokesperson for Atlantis
claims that fired workers were
given their just due. If this is so,
I wonder why it was necessary
to require persons to sign a let-
ter of release. If no money is
owed, then there would be no
need for persons to sign a doc-
ument that may not be in their
best interest.

Again, we recognize the glob-
al economic downturn. Howev-
er, many are wondering
whether our employer used this

‘ fact to accomplish a previously
considered retrenchment?

There is no doubt that the firing
of the 800 Atlantis workers was
a business decision based on
future projection, and not for
the present time. Atlantis paid

- fired workers approximately
. five million dollars in advance,

six months to one year pay. This
being the case, makes it puz-
zling that the Bahamas govern-
ment, Atlantis and the Hotel
Union did not work out.a deal
that would have allowed work-
ers the flexibility of reduced
work weeks, rotations, layoffs
or voluntary separations. Were
these avenues explored before
final steps were taken to termi-
nate? Would it have made a
difference for Atlantis or the

employeés?’ ‘These are just

some-of the question that I am
addressing my mind to.

TYRONE (ROCK)

’ MORRIS
Bahamas Association of
Casino Employees.
Nassau, ,
December, 2008.



ger financial resources at the
carnival in December and
then showing up at the
Department of Social Services
in January seeking assistance.
I need not tell you who will
end up footing the bill for
their folly.

Please print so that similar
and dissenting views regard-
ing government intervention
or censorship in harsh times,
such as these, can be dis-
cussed.

‘A A WOODSIDE
Nassau,
November, 2008.



a VC a CeO DTS LL ety ae Pa Today!
AE CS CMO ee TL Ta te LT


THE TRIBUNE

AG’s office brands
Cash duo ‘vexatious’

JUSTICE campaigners Greg
and Tanya Cash have been
branded “vexatious litigants”
by the Attorney General’s
Office — a move expected to
spark yet more controversy in
their six-year fight with the Bap-
tist education authorities.

Since 2002 Mr and Mrs Cash
have made a number of allega-
tions, including claims of unfair
dismissal and breach of human
and constitutional rights. But
they claim Baptist education
officials and the courts have
ey ee to obstruct them.

Mr and Mrs Cash yesterday
said: “This makes us more res-
olute than ever because this is a
fight not just for us, but also the
Bahamian people.”

The couple have been sum-
moned to appear before the
Supreme Court on Thursday,
December 18, to argue against
the AG’s claim that their vari-
ous court actions are vexatious.

But Mr Cash and his wife said
the fight would go on — and that
the Privy Council would soon
have the chance to hear their
‘various disclosures about the
Bahamas legal system.

_ Mr Cash said: “We can’t give
up because we know that God is



m By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
whyyouvex@tribunemedia.net

"I vex at those people who
seem so upset over the hanging
of Jewish decorations on Bay
Street: I don't understand how
people who claim to be religious
can become so angry over some-
thing as simple as Hanukkah
decorations. It's ridiculous!

"It doesn't matter who
believes what. I thought the spir-
it of the season meant being lov-
ing, compassionate and.kind,—
not being intolerant of other
people's beliefs and celebra-
tions. I think as a society we
really need to move beyond
that."

- TOLERANT BAHAMIAN, -

NASSAU

"I vex and very sad to see my
fellow Bahamians on US tele-
vision 'beggin' for financial and
medical assistance from another
‘country especially when our
_ government is spending millions
' of Bahamian business and cus-

toms duties tax payer dollars to

give basically free medical care,

free schooling and subsidised
' college tuition at COB to per-
; sons who are not even Bahami-
| ancitizens..° *

“Our quality of life should not -



| aN and Greg Cash

using us to bring down the
stronghold of injustice in this
country. God is not pleased with
the way our country is being
run. What we are doing is for
the best of all.”

In the Attorney General’s

action against Mr and Mrs’

Cash, an order is being sought
to ensure they cannot institute
any legal proceedings without
the court’s leave.

In its writ, the Attorney Gen-
eral’s Office accuses Mr and
Mrs Cash of “habitually and
persistently and without any

_ reasonable ground” instituting

vexatious legal proceedings.

be on how well we treat and put
these politicians, doctors, pas-
tors and non citizens on
pedestals, but rather on how
well we treat our own weakest
Bahamian citizens whose par-
ents and fore-parents have sac-
rificed and suffered here to pro-
vide and create for their own
descendants in our Bahama-
land!"

- SAD BAHAMIAN CITIZEN

"I am vex and fed up with all
the in-fighting in the Bahamas
Hotel, Catering and Allied
Workers Union. It's like every-

“day or every other day you see

(union officials) squabbling over
something or another, throwing
insults left and right.

"These are grown men, put
in a position to oversee that
union members are treated fair-
ly by their employers, not to be
tearing each other down in the
media. I mean, there are more
important things going on in this
country, people wondering how
they ga' pay their bills an' ting,
and these people can't. work
together? Take a page from our
black brother Barack Obama
and put your own agenda aside
to work for the people, man."

- GWENDOLYN, NASSAU

"I vex because some people
can't control their attitudes at

ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS
Gea eras sess

1. MEDICAL ASSISTING

2. DENTAL ASSISTING |

3. HEALTH INFORMATION MGT

| 4, MEDICAL OFFICE ASSISTANT
_|Call for registration and program details.
| PH: 324-7770 FX: 324-0119

SUCCESS TRAINING COLLEGE, BERNARD RD, NASSAU. |

EAGLES NEST
COMMUNITY CHURCH

ISAIAH 40: 31 “But those who wait on the Lord
shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with
wings like eagles. They shall run and not be weary,
they shall walk and not faint.”

WE CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO JOIN US
IN OUR WORSHIP SERVICES

Under the PT of

ed | DAVE LAMB
on SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7th at 10.00 am

at



The couple plan to mount a
strong defence against this
claim.

At a recent Appeal Court
hearing, the president Dame
Joan Sawyer called Mrs Cash
“a disgrace to Bahamian wom-
anhood” and asked about her
education level.

She also threatened to jail her
for contempt of court after Mrs
Cash suggested that the judge
should recuse herself.

However, at the following
hearing, Dame Joan did not
appear, and the sitting judges
said the contempt matter was
not being pursued.

work. I am tired of coming in
my office bright and cheery, say-
ing 'Morning' to everyone only
to get their nasty grunts in
return. Sometimes I just want
to scream at them, 'My lawd the

_day just start and you already

sour?’

"And den, dey wonder why
they can't get nowhere in life,
why no one is want do things
for dem. Try waking up in the
morning with a smile on your
face. I know, you might have
problems but if you ain’ home-
less, jobless and got food on ya'
table, ya betta thank Jesus and
stop complaining. Dese people
round here is yuck up my vexa-
tion and send my pressure up,
but I ga keep a smile on my face
‘cause I thank da’ Lord I ain'
living my life like dat.”

- CHEERFUL IN THE FACE OF
ADVERSITY, NASSAU

¢ Something got you vex?
Send your rants to
whyyouvex@tribunemedia. net.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

mR UE
PHONE: 322-2157













The Paradise Island Harbour Resort
(Formerly: Holiday Inn Sun Spree Resort)
Paradise Island, East of the round-about at the foot of the ‘old’ bridge

Join us in our Praise and Worship services and hearing from God's word where
“We Love God and Love People”

For more details:

Email:



revdavidlamb@yahoo.com




SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGE 5





LIGHT AND LIFE COMMUNITY CHURCH

Grounded In The Past &
Geared To The Future

Worship time: Llam & 7pm
Sunday School: 9:45am
Prayer time: 6:30pm
Place:

The Madeira
Shopping Center

a Franklin knows
ALL ARE WELCOME TO ATTEND

Pastor: Rev. Dr Franklin Knowles

P.O.Box EE-16807
Telephone number 325-5712
“EMAIL - lynnk@ batelnet.bs

Holida O/
“China” 25% :

Portmeirion
“Holly & Ivy” Dinnerware/Bakeware
cia

ristmas Tree’ Dinnerware ra Accessories











ae Worcester
“Ho

Ribbon” Dinnerware

Lenox Christmas

Dinnerware * Stemware ¢ Giftware * Ornaments

Certified International
Christmas Dinnerware & Accessories

Special ends
December 24th, 2008

ees

fy Ce ates aera)




New arrival of





C ig

_ China &.,

Figurines , a Rey VIL wea) See

Monday-Friday 9:00am8:
Sa Soo
Fax: (242) 393-4096 Sx pohomencom






The American Embassy is presently considering applications for the
following position:

’ CASHIER

Serves as Collection Clerk with responsibility foe collecting Consular
fees in accordance with specific guidelines.

Receives logs of all incoming visa applications from courier service
agents and maintains a spreadsheet log of same.

Examines Non-Immigrant Visa applicants for basic requirements to
ensure completeness.

Serves as back-up NIV Clerk. Prints Machine Readable Visas (MRV)
approved by the Consular Office.

This position is open to candidates with the following qualifications:

- Completion of Secondary School 1s required.

- MS Office Computer Applications required

- One year of experience in performing basic clerical and cashiering
functions.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES:

- Must be able to operate an electronic cash register.
- Must Lo good interpersonal skills.
- Must have the ability to deal with the general public.

BENEFITS PROVIDED INCLUDE:



The successful candidate will be offered an excellent compensation
package including performance- -based incentives, medical and dental
insurance, life insurance, pension and opportunities for training and
development.

Applicants must be Bahamian citizens or U.S. citizens who are eligible
for employment under Bahamian laws and regulations.

Application forms are available from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday at the security area of the American Embassy, Queen
Street. Completed applications should be returned to the United States
Embassy: addressed to the Human Resources Office no later than,
December 9, 2008. Telephone calls will not be accepted.



















PAGE 6, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008
















ee)

PRICE | Aug-Sep 08
Sep-08 | % change

AREERERRES

FOOD ITEMS





PRICE
Aug-08



UNIT









HRISH POTATOES | Sibs. [3.19 4.39 38%
[MACKEREL JACK | 150z. [126 | 4.60 | 27%
OATMEAL | 14 oz, [97 3.32 12%
9%

CONCH a res fee
[COOKING OWS | 16 oz [2.04 28 TT
ISTEWBEEF | ih 3.68 | 3.937%

IMACARON! | i6oz, ft? | 182 | Bo

IBREAD (WHITE) | ig) | 25468]
[FLOUR Sis. 436 458 5%
[GROUND BEEF Tb 3.23 3.39%
ONIONS TS tbs. | 2.76 | 2.89 | 5%

SPARE RIBS pis ere et bm
DAISY CHEESE ;
pruwerocns | sm | tos | sue | oe |
DRUMSTICKS 1 Ib. 1.36 1.42 4%

[TURKEY (WHOLE) [th T8693 | 4%
[FRESH MILK | i/2 gal. | 3.47 3.60 [4%
[CORNED BEEF [i oz 55 60 8%
[SLICED CHEESE [6 oz. 2.6270 3%
IBLACKPEPPER | 2oz. | 2.08 2.13 2%
|PORKCHOPS | tb. 2.96 | 3.03 | 2%
[BOXED SALT | 26 0z, | 0.80 | 0.91 2%
IBACON tt ago | 5.07 | 2%

[MAYONNAISE | 320z, [3.83 8.87 | 1%
IGRAPES (WHITE) | tb. | 2.93 [2.96 | 1%
[CANNED TUNA | 6 oz. 4.02.03
STEAK tt eo 88
MUSTARD (0 Bon eer 28 te
[CRAB MEAT Tio 4.06 409%



~Grace anv Peace Wrescevin rn

NETRA aaa ee
NORTH AMERICA

(WHERE GOD IS ADORED AND EVERYONE IS AFFIRMED)



Worship Time: 1lam & 6pm
Prayer Time: 10:15am to 10:45am
Church School During Worship Service



SPECIAL SERVICES
Candlelight - Dec. 21 @ 7pm
Christmas Vigil - Dec. 24 @ 11pm
Watchnight - Dec. 31 @ 11pm







Place:Twynam Heights
off Prince Charles Drive
Minister: Rev. Henley Perry
PO, Box SS-5631 J

Telephone number: 324-2538
Telefax number: 324-2587

COME TO WORSHIP, LEAVE TO SERVE





























THE BAHAMAS CONFERENCE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH

Hillside Estates, Baltic Avenue, Off Mackey Street.
wmmeng ':O- Box SS-5103, Nassau, Bahamas t
seem Phone: 393-3726/393-2355/Fax:393-8135
wee CHURCH SERVICES
my SUNDAY,DECEMBER 07, 2008
Bi B FIRST SUNDAY IN ADVENT

AGAPE METHODIST CHURCH, Soldier Road
11:00AM Rev. Mark Carey/HC :

ASCENSION METHODIST CHURCH,
Prince Charles Drive

11:00AM Rey. Dr. Laverne Lockhart/HC








COKE MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Bernard Road

11:00AM Pastor Henry Whyte/HC



CURRY MEMORIAL METHODIST CHURCH,
Zion Boulevard ;
10:00AM Mrs.Minerva Knowles
EBENEZER METHODIST CHURCH,
East Shirley Street
11:00AM
7:00PM

Rev. Charles New
Rev. Charles New/HC






GLOBAL VILLAGE METHODIST CHURCH,
Queen’s College Campus
9:30AM Rey. James Neily/HC

ST. MICHAEL’S METHODIST CHURCH, Churchill Avenue
8:00AM Connections-Rev. Philip Stubbs
9:30AM Rev. Philip Stubbs/HC

TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, Frederick Street
11:00AM Rev. William R. Higgs/HC,

KEKE KK KKK K KEKE KEKKKKREREKREKRKEEKRERKEREKE
RADIO PROGRAMMES

‘RENEWAL’ on Sunday at 10:30 a.m. on ZNS 1

Your Host: Rev. Godfrey A. Bethel

‘METHODIST MOMENTS? on cach weekday at 6:55 a.m.
Your Host: Rev. Godfrey A. Bethel

see oles fae oe oe tf fae aoa ek fea off foe ofa oak ooo a
Saturday, December 6, 2008 - Annual Christmas Fair,
12:00 noon - 5 p, at Epworth Hall, Shirley Street.

Monday, December 8, 2008 - Nassau Regional Women’s
mcvent Service at St. Michael’s Methodist Church at
:00 pm..

The Holy Ghost Prayer-Line number is 326-7427 —
(www.gtwesley.org)

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7TH, 2008

7:00 am: Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Mathilda Woodside
11:00 am: Rev. Carla Culmer/ Sis. Tezel Anderson (HC)
7:00 pm: Rev. Carla Culmer/Sis. Nathaile Thompson



€ Ten og cares upon Him, for He cares for us” (1 Peter 5:7)




PRICE PRICE | Aug-Sep 08
UNIT Aug-08 Sep-08 | % change

FOOD ITEMS











HAM (WHO Gs a es
ITEABAGS __——~—=«((2S packet] ~— 2.39 [239 0%
ae eel ae | oe
FROZEN 11.5 02. 1.26 0%

[CRAWFISH | it T2250 | 2250 [0%
[CHICKEN(WHOLE) | ib. [198 98 0%
[CANNED SOUP 10.502. [1.237 [123 0%
[CABBAGE | Ct TA 94 0%




















, TOMATOES |_tib. | 208 | 2.05
BABY JUICE p 4oz. [069 0.68 1% |
1





V
PREMISES-800 UNITS
(INCLUDING
SURCHARGE ‘ permonth| 306.91 300.31 -2%

5
girs

BABY MILK

CHICKEN PARTS
FRESH & FROZEN 1 Ib. 2 “3%

08
KETCHUP
31



SWEET PEPPERS -
GREEN 1b 3.03 2.92 ~A%
| 0.99 |





APPLES

4%
ARROTS
per g

15%

a
premuny) | erga | sae .
PREMIUM per gal 5.68 5.35 6%

C

[DIESEL pergal | 6.

4%
IGRAPES(RED) | th | 259 213 | -18%

















.FOOD ITEMS UNIT Aug-08 | Sep-08 % change |
PRICE PRICE | Aug-Sep 08].

5 VY DRIV
186.76 | 224.24

IPORKCHOPS | tb. | 2.93 | 3.06 | 4%
IROASTBEEF | tb. 462 479 | 4%
CABBAGE ib 08s 0.88 4%



PREMISES-550 UNITS










5S
7

PLANTAIN | each [0.93 [096 | 3% |
TURKEY WINGS &
IGRAPEFRUITS | each [140 [4a | 3%
BANANAS tb. 0.97 0.99 |
[CANNEDTUNA | Goz | 4.01 1.03

:

:

:

erits abs 3.87 | 3.42) |

STEAK tb. 10.74 0.8





INSIGHT

For the stories behind the news,
read Insight on Mondays

ASSEMALIES OF 800)

OPPORTUNITIES FOR
Medstte ae MT ea ask

SUNDAY SERVICES

Morning Warship Service ...
Sunday School for all ages ...
Adult Education

Worship Service

Spanish Service

Evening Worship Service

8.30 am.
9.45 am.

WEDNESDAY at 7:30 p.m.

Selective Bible Teaching
Royal Rangers (Boys Club} 4-16 yrs.
Missioneties (Girls Club} 4-16 yrs.

FRIDAY at 7:30 p.m.
Youth Ministry Meeting

RADIO MINISTRY
Sundays at 8:30 a.m. - ZNS 1 - TEMPLE TIME

Visit Our Book Store: TEMPLE BIBLE & BOOK SUPPLY

EVANGELISTIC TEMPLE

Assembly Of God
ee) TSW NEUE CUM eCeeM eA TLI(S

Tel: 322-8304, Fax: 322-4793, P.O. Box: N-1566

~ [LIMES 1 [each =] 0.367} 0.3740] 3% 2 |

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THE TRIBUNE








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CANNED SOUP 1.59
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HAM (SLICE [| iib, | 6.25 | 6.60 | 6%
LAMB CHOPS

Aug-Sep 08

ICANNEDTUNA | Goz. | 4.19 | 4.23 | 8%
[CORN(CANNED) | 484g. | 4.76 [| 1.8t | 8%

DRUMSTICKS | OGD. 1) 479° F184

PEANUT BUTTER

OATMEAL UAT
PORK CHOPS ib. | 2.08 f°3.04 of 2% |
SPAGHETTI (DRY

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TURKEY (WHOLE) |i. | 4.93 [1.93 [0%
[TURKEY(SLICE) | ib, | 9.89 | 9.89 | 0% |
FRESH & FROZEN FISH
[MARGARINE | tb. T5252 [0%
[APPLES Csd| Seach S| S099 [| 0.99 | 0% |
FRESH & FROZEN) tb. 2.48 0%










XG

BABY JUICE
FRUIT JUICES Saad
NOT FROZEN ee

GRAPEFRUITS
SPARE RIBS
CHICKEN (WHOLE
CATSUP

FRESH MILK
LETTUCE

|b. | 2.94 2.86 2%

2%
2%

2
“2%
2%

23%








| tib. | lb. | 2.28 | 28 | 2.23 |

CABBAGE A A a
STEAK | [ib [70.44 10.14_[ 3% |
DAISY CHEESE [—tib. [6.11 | 4.95 | 3%
CAKE MIX
HOT DOGS
MUSTARD
ISEASON ALL | 3.2502, | 2.99 | 2.18
ISH POTATOES [_1lb. [1.24 [1.17] 6%
BREAD (WHITE) |g. [3.17] 2.98 | 6%
[SWEET PEPPERS | ib | 2.04 | 276 | 6%
DIESEL—————~d| gal 6.37 | 5.96 | 6% |.
[ORANGES | each | 0.61 | 0.67 | 7%
12%

ONIONS ib 37 | 1.06 [23% J





BAPTIST BIBLE CHURCH
SOLDIER ROAD & OLD TRAIL

~~ FUNDAMENTAL
EVANGELISTIC





(Sunday School: 10am
Preaching 11am & 7:30pm
Radio Bible Hour:

Sunday 6pm - ZNS 2

Wed. Prayer & Praise 7:30pm

Pastor:H. Mills




“Preaching the Bible as is, to men as they are” |§
Pastor: H. Mills ¢ Phone: 393-0563 * Box N-3622 jf
PP bilmoiwe





Scotiabank donates
computers to Long
Island High School

Managing director of Scotia-
bank Barry Malcolm led a dele-
gationto Long Island to present
the NGM Major High School
with state-of-the-art computers
and 2stablish a much-needed
computer lab.

Tie lab is the second donat-
ed Sy Scotiabank; earlier this
year, it donated 30 computers
alcng with software to the CC
Sveeting High School.

Both of these donations were
part of the Bright Future pro-
giamme, which is designed by
the bank to give back to com-
nunities in a way that touches
the lives of'young people.

Mr Malcolm was accompa-

tied to Long Island by Perma-
nent Secretary in the Ministry
of Education, Elma Garraway;
vice president of retail bank-
ing, Wayde Christie; and
senior manager of products
aid marketing Dwight Bur-
TOWS.
' Addressing the students of
the school at a special ceremony
marking the occasion, Mr Mal-
_ colm said: “Long Island has a
‘long and distinguished history
of producing stellar educators-
and achieving great things in
education.

“Long Island has so wonder-



‘Health Fair to promote
‘Self Ownership’ of health

THE Bahamas Primary
_Health Care Traning Centre is
taking a major step forward in its
effort to ensure ‘hat residents of
Fox Hill and surrounding com-
munities take ownership of their
health. : :
The centre has announced
that it will be hosting its first
community health fair on Satur-
> day, Decemer13 on the front
lawn of the Fox Hill Clinic.

Dr Cangice Cargill, director
of the centre, said the fair is part
of the centre’s mandate to

improve ‘health in the commu-
nity by getting residents to
understand the importance of
taking responsibility for their
own well-being through healthi-
er lifestyle choices.

-Healthier choices, she said,
lead :o healthier lives and less
illness.

The event is part of a larger
Department of Public Health
awareness and education cam-
paign, which aims to promote
healthy living throughout the
Bahamas. Reape oe

_ The campaign focuses partic-.
ularly on chronic non-commu-
nicable diseases such as diabetes,
hypertension, strokes and cer-

* tain cardiac conditions which
have become major issues in
many communities.

“We are really trying to reach

“- out to the entire community so_

that we can help build healthy
lifestyles and healthier commu-
nities by getting people to take
ownership of their health,” Dr
Cargill said.

“A lot of persons tend to rely
solely upon the physician and/or
the nurse to ensure that they live
healthy lifestyles and really and
truly, the physician should be at
the end of the spectrum.

“We want to help people
understand that maintaining
quality health, and managing
their health, is really about what
they can do on a daily basis —
hence the types of lifestyles they
employ and/or enjoy are very



AMY of KEY WE

knows an

to the Minister
Citizenship, P.O.Box





for Nationality and

naturalization should not

Citizenship,



NOTICE

NOTICE is peeby aeons that LUCKSON ANASTOL
d STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS,
is applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality
and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a
citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person who
reason why registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and
signed statement of the facts within twenty-eight
days from the 6TH day
responsible for Nationalit
N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that KERLANGE CHARLES.
AMY of JOE FARRINGTON ROAD, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS, is applying. to the Minister responsible

itizenship,
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that
any person who knows any reason why registration/

a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 6TH day of DECEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau,

S A
a : \

fully demonstrated over the
years just how powerful an
island community is in terms of
providing quality education in
our Bahamas. I commend the
people of this island communi-
ty for their efforts.”

On behalf of the minister of
education and the government,
Mrs Garraway expressed grati-
tude for the gift.

“This event marks and pro-
vides the tangible evidence of
support Scotiabank continues
to demonstrate in assisting the
government and the people of
the Bahamas, ensuring that we

important to maintaining good
health.”

Dr Cargill said the fair will
offer tests for particular diseases
— glaucoma, cholesterol, hyper-
tension and diabetes, among oth-
ers — but will also focus on a
more holistic approach to health.
She explained that good health is
not just the absence of disease,
but also “mental, physical; social
and spiritual” well-being.

Banking and financial services
professionals will make presen-

tations on budgeting, which, Dr .

Cargill said, “is very relevant
considering the impact the fall-
out from the declining world
economies can have, and are
having, on small-island states
such as the Bahamas.”

“We have also have profes-
sionals from the psychological
realm who will speak about
managing stress during tough
economic times, while we have
also scheduled a presentation on
gardening which we feel will
serve two purposes by first,

‘encouraging more persons to

grow fruits and vegetables in
their backyards which can
reduce their costs while encour-
aging them to eat more healthy,
while also reducing stress.
“One of the benefits of gar-
dening is stress reduction and so
we want to encourage more per-
sons to take up gardening as a
hobby. We will also have a
masseuse, therapist and fitness
instructor who will make pre-
sentations on the importance of
exercise and good relaxation
techniques because those things
also help to reduce stress lev-
els,” Dr Cargill said.
Organisers of the event have
arranged two competitions for
schools in the area as a further
promotion of healthy living. Stu-
dents will engage in a healthy

cooking competition and prizes .

will be awarded for first, second
and third-place finishers.
“For the younger children in

junior high and primary school










of DECEMBER 2008
and










for registration/




e granted, should send





Bahamas.





EXECUTIVES of Scotiabank and officials from the Ministry of Education
presented 12 computers to the NGM Major High School's computer lab.
































have access to the highest tech-
nological level of education in
our country,” she said.

Long Island’s district super-
intendent of education, Basil
McHardy, termed the donation
of 12 computers a “good cor-
porate act of contributing to
community building”.

“Scotiabank’s donation of the
computer lab is a clear state-
ment of its support for educa-
tion and training of the youth of
South Long Island. More specif-
ically it demonstrates the bank’s
support of information tech-
nology,” McHardy said.

“Where You Get The Maximum For The Minimum”
The pall ee araince ALLMAJOR
_ CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

Tel: 393-4147/8
Mon.-Fri: 10am-8pm

Sat.1Qam-9pm : :

‘Sav-A-Ghek will be

accepted for regular

priced items only

we will have an art competition Village Road
in which we will ask the primary

school students to produce a

drawing of a basket of fruit and

prizes for first, second and third

place finishers will be awarded,

while the junior high students a
will be asked to come up with ,
their own depiction of our
theme,” Dr Cargill said.

Shopping Centre
Tel: 393-2019
Mon.-Sat |
“1O0am-7pm

MAIN STORE
Rosetta St.
Tel: 322-8596
Mon-Fri.
8:30am-5:30
Sat. 9am-Gpm













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PAGE 8, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



iii a
Food price concern Protests ‘ridiculous’

FROM page one

North Andros, and Abaco.

However, higher prices were
recorded for the same product
in New Providence, Cat Island,
and Exuma.

“Most islands registered sig-
nificant decreases in the price
of limes,” the report said. “Cat
Island’s average price decreased
40 per cent followed by
Eleuthera with 20 per cent.

“New Providence and Exu-
ma also reported decreases.
North Andros and Grand
Bahama reported increases
while South Andros’ prices
remained constant for the peri-
od. With the exception of New
Providence, which reported a
five per cent increase in the
average price of tomatoes per
pound, all islands reported
decreases ranging from 21 per
cent in Abaco to four per cent
in South Andros.

“The average price of
oranges decreased moderately
for most islands. The decreases
ranged from five per cent in
South Andros and Exuma to
three per cent in Grand
Bahama. The islands of Cat
Island, Abaco .and North
Andros reported increases for
oranges. New Providence
reported a 22 per cent decline in
the average price of a five
pound bag of oranges.”

The report also revealed that
there were other items in which
duty was eliminated but “very
little or no reflection on price
reduction to the consumer” was
seen.

“Exuma was the only island
which registered a price
decrease for oatmeal. All other




Accountant.




Qualifications: .

needed.

vendors.

Aging.

Nn &

Manager.




Bist

Abaco Markets

¢ Bachelor of Sciénce Degree

Please email your resume to:
grandbahjobs@ yahoo.com

islands recorded price increases
ranging from 19 per cent in
Grand Bahama to one per cent
in South Andros.

“Abaco, South Andros and
Cat Island experienced a slight
decrease in the cost of pasta,
however, the price of this item
increased by 18 per cent in New
Providence and in Grand
Bahama.

“All islands registered price
increases for breakfast cereal.
Items for which duty was
reduced included sweet pep-
pers, some types of frozen veg-
etables, canned corn, pigeon
peas and carrots. The change in
the prices of these items vary
from island to island. -

“Eleuthera and Grand
Bahama both reported decreas-
es in the average price of pigeon
peas (16 oz can). Price increas-
es ranged from 14 per cent in
Exuma to three per cent in New
Providence. The islands of
Eleuthera and Grand Bahama
showed a significant decrease
in the price of sweet peppers
(per pound) — 55 per cent and
23 per cent, respectively. All
other islands reported price
increases.”

All islands throughout the
country recorded increases in
the price of canned corn. Lower
prices for two pound bags of
carrots were seen on three
islands — Eleuthera, Cat Island

and North Andros. New Provi- .

dence, along with Abaco and
South Andros
increased prices and Grand
Bahama’s prices remained con-
stant. For a full detailed table of
the price reductions or increas-
es, visit the Department of Sta-
tistic’s website -
statistics.bahamas.gov.bs

JOB VACANCY
JUNIOR ACCOUNTANT

Local jpatiutactunne & company in ‘Freeport, Grand Bahama is seeking a Junior

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Responsibilities will include:
1. Accounts Payable - coding, data entry, preparing cheques, emailing
remittance advices, filing and resolving discrepancies with invoices and

2. Monitoring and resolving outstanding or aged transactions on the A/P
3. Assist with month-end closing procedures - Posting accruals, amortizations,
performing g/l account reconciliations.

. Assist with year-end audits.
. Special Projects as required by the Financial Controller or Accounting

The company offers a competitive salary with outstanding benefits.

— FIDELITY



Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas

Benchmark .

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDORs

Doctor's Hospital

Famguard
Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank

Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson

1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +

reported.

int Accounting is ‘preferred with 1 to 2 years
of work experience. Candidates who have earned an Associate Degree in
Accounting will be considered if they have 3 to 5 years of work experience.

° Proficient in the use of automated accounting systems.

¢ Ability to solve problems and apply appropriate accounting standards as

FROM page one

be Jewish, and am very proud
of that fact by the way, and have
been living here in Nassau for
the past 20 years.

“I know there have been
issues with the Star of David
decorations that have been dis-
played in the past, but this is
ridiculous.”

She lashed out at a local busi-

nessman and Anglican deacon
Neil Nairn for objecting to the
menorahs.
’ And she said most other Jews
would object to what she
termed an “outright bigoted
‘attitude.”

“Is having the menorah up
for all to see so disgraceful?”
she asked, “Why not let every-
one believe in their own reli-
gion and have them co-exist
side by side?”

Ms Lightbourn pointed out
that the Jewish festival of
Chanukah (also spelt Han-
nukah) is being celebrated this










Duo’s bail
revoked




FROM page one

by the magistrate yesterday.
He was also remanded to
Her Majesty’s Prison until
the completion of his trial.
His case was adjourned to
March 31, 2009. Both men
are represented by lawyer
Dion Smith. ;




































age Pricing bases) ~
Dail Vol.



month “and happens to be an
important rite of being Jewish.”

She said those who felt the
menorahs had been put up
because they “looked nice” had
delivered a slap in the face for
Jews...

“How condescending! I real-
ly thought that people here had
advanced with the times. I hope
that these attitudes don’t rep-
resent the general public.

“T would hate to think that -

most people here feel the same
or feel as if sharing the spot-
light with another religion is
somehow ruining the meaning
of Christmas.”



Decorations such as these
Menorah candles were removed

The blue and silver menorahs
were displayed under Christ-
mas wreaths as part of Nassau’s
‘Festival of Light’ decorations.

Protests were made to. The
Tribune because they were said
to symbolise a religion that was

anti-Christian. {

The ‘menorahs ‘were
described as “inappropriate”
for a Christian festival because
Jews did not believe Christ was
the Son of God.

Last night, the local Greek
Orthodox Church joined the
debate, declaring that an indi-
Vidual member of their church
who sparked the protest was

', not representative of the church

as a whole.

A church member said: “We
are all horrified. As Chiistians,
never would we have done this,
especially to slight another reli-
gious group.”

Union seeks ‘intervention’
over Harborside dispute

FROM page one

union membership.

When contacted yesterday,
Mr Ferguson said because of
the recent firings at Harborside,
employees were anxious to have
an agreement that outlined the
resort's policies when it came
to lay offs. He alleged that it
was a "criminal offence" for
Harborside not to meet with
BHMA for negotiations.

"Quite a bit of them got fired
the other day and that put some
fear in them — and they are
without a union. The BHMA is
the bargaining agent for these
workers and what they are enti-

tled to is a collective agreement
which would lay out how the
employers would deal with

_ them in slow economic times in

terms of lay offs.

"To date they have refused
to negotiate that agreement.
This is the first industrial agree-
ment the union hopes to nego-
tiate. Even though the union
has been declared the bargain-
ing agent for Harborside
employees, the company has
not recognised it as (such)," Mr
Ferguson said.

Because there is no agree-
ment, if there is a dispute it has
to go to the labour board
instead of the bargaining agents
being able to sit down to nego-

tiate differences. If an agree-
ment were in place, Mr Fergu-

‘son said, BHMA would be able

to go to the employer first to
work out issues.

Attempts to secure somitents
from Harborside's management
and Attorney General Michael
Barnett were unsuccessful up’
to press time.

Last month, about 140 per-
sons were fired from Harbor-
side's sales, marketing and
administrative areas, days after
the Atlantis Resort & Casino
— thé country's largest private
employer and joint venture
partner with Harborside's own-
er, Starwood Vacation Owner-
ship — laid off 800 employees.

Exuma developer faces
‘back pay’ allegations

FROM page one

four per cent of the employees’
basic wage at the end of the
year and pay that amount to the
employees as vacation pay,” he
said.

According to documents pro-
vided by Mr McKinney, Bock
Cay offered to pay employees
time and a half for working on
Saturdays and double time for
Sundays.

But according labour laws,
said Mr McKinney, the employ-
ees are entitled to double time
for Saturdays and Sundays.

Two employees who were
fired, this year also-claimed that
the company promised to pay
for their travel expenses to and
from Bock Cay as they were not
allowed to remain on the island
when they were not working.

However, they say, the com-
pany never absorbed the
expense, which somet me:
totalled $2,100 a year for travel
to New Providence.

Mr McKinney said the matter
had been brought to his atten-
tion after employees came to
him seeking representation for
wrongful termination.

He immediately contacted
management at Bock Cay on
behalf of the workers, asking
that the company correct their
miscalculation of the overtime
payment.

EG CAPITAL MARKETS

ROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

AL

0.200
0.160
0,020
0.090
0.040
0.240
0.040
0.300
0.052
0.040
0.280
0.570
0.450
0.170
0.000
0.000
0.300
0.620
0.000

Interest
19 October 2017

“After receiving no reply... I

filed a dispute at the depart-
ment of labour in Nassau on

behalf of all workers, present |

and former of Bock Cay on

June 10, 2008,” said MrWitk-

inney..; 1g RN
He said he then t Adhested an

audience with Labour Director
Harcourt Brown, who he claims
declined to meet with him.

“I now understand why the
Director of Labour declined to
meet with me,” he said. Mr
McKinney claimed that the rea-
son was, according to docu-
ments from Bock Cay, which
he now had in his possession,
the director had allowed the
company’s management to “pay
the employees overtime pay,
vacation pay, holiday pay and
termination pay.” Mr McKin-
ney contended that the pay-
ments were incorrect.

General Manager of Bock
Cay Hubert Rolle said workers
were compensated fairly and
the company followed the
labour policies of the Bahamas
in calculating pay.

“At Bock Cay it is important
and imperative for Bock Cay to
follow and abide by the laws








Applicants must:

TEACHING VACANCY
Temple Christian High School
Shirley Street

Invites applications from qualified Christian
teachers for the following position for the |
2008 - 2009 School Year.

MUSIC

A. Bea practicing born-again Christian who is
willing to subscribe to the Statement of Faith
of Temple Christian School

B. | Have a Bachelor‘s Degree in Education or higher
from a recognized College or University in the
area of specialization.

C. Have a valid Teacher’s Certificate or Diploma.

D. Have at least two years teaching experience in
the relevant subject area with excellent ,

and rules ofthe Bahamas and
this we have ¢one in advisemént
with the labour department in
Exuma and any further ques-
tions can be phced towards the
labour board,” said Mr Rolle.

According to Kenneth
Clarke, a former time keeper
at Bock Cay, the company
reversed its position and paid a
portion of the overtime that was
disputed after inquiries into the
incorrect pay began.

He said, according to the
Labour Act, employees are
entitled to double time after 40
hours of work.

He and Mr McKinney con-
tend that the company violat-
ed this policy.

“The end result is that work-
ers who are everyday people
are told that if you follow the
law and be a good citizen that
you can progress in life and do -
well. These people are now
faced with a situation where
they work seven days a week
and particularly four weeks at a
time without a break and then
find out” that they are not get-
ting what they are entitled to.
“That’s very upsetting,” said
Mr Clarke.


















1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +

P 3 Prime + 1:75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) + A 20 7%

Panic Mote 7) | stitute

‘Weekly Vol.
Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

ter: Seeritios :
29.00
14.00
0.55
sea Funds

YTD% Last 12 Months



Bahamas Supermarkets

Div $
Colina Bond Fund

Colina MSI Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund

NNNZOWOMODAY
ONNNOO}
NORGORSY

OOO,

YIELO - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price o nd Fidelity

Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-th ounter price

Weekly Vol.



‘BISX ALL SH.
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks
Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close - Current day's welghted price for dally volume
ge - Change in closing price from day to day
Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today
jonds per share paid In the last 12 months
divided by the last 12 month earnings
plit - Effective Date 8/8/2007



- Trading volume of the prior week

NAV - Net Asset Value
N/M - Not Meaningful



EPS $.- A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mt

EPS $ _

0.000
0.001

4.540

-0.041

0.002

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Div S
0.300
0.480
0.000

0.000
0.300
0.000

Yield %

19 October 2022
30 May 2013
29 May 2015

P/E Yield

N/M
256.6

9.0
N/M
261.9

31-Oct-08
30-Nov-08
28-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
30-Nov-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
31-Dec-07
30-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08



S CAPITAL MARKETS 242-396-4000 | COLONIAL 242-802-7525

















communication skills.

E. Have the ability to prepare .
students for all examinations to the BJC/
BGCSE levels

F.

Be willing to participate in the high school’s

extra curricular programmes.

Application must be picked up at the High School
Office on Shirley Street and be returned with a full
curriculum
three

vitae, recent colored

references to:

The Principal

Temple Christian High School

P.O. Box N-1566

Nassau, Bahamas
Deadline for application is December 15th, 2008





Mr. Neil Hamilton


THE TRIBUNE SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGE 9
ENE eae

Von









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PAGE 10,SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008



THE TRiwe, woe

CALVIN & HOBBES»







I SHOULD'VE USED
A BIGGER KNIFE!

MY PARTNER SAYS
YOU TRIED TO KILL
YOUR FATHER...

STABBED HIM
17 TMES?











BUT IT WAS
MORE LIKE 20
TIMES..-AND I. BLEW IT!



12-2.



. FOR SKELETONS!

oy





















ASS. \
0 tame) i) SN
: Rg yg y
; ONZE i Sunday
MAKE A LIST OF EVERYTHING MONEY 16 ALWAYS” 13] FOR NOW, A SMILE WILL DO NEY
THAT NEEDS TO BE DONE, MARGOJ | APPROPRIATE, BUT | m NICELY. ood
WE CAN WORK THAT] 2 D
i
£
3
5
f
j



PLEASE, MR.B....IT TOOK ME )
A WEEK TO MEMORIZE
MY SALES TALK

>
IT'S gone) |
TO BEA

VERY
WORTHY

CAUSE...
ANO YOu
SEE...BLAH,
| BLAH, BLAH

WANNA Buy
A CUBS SCOUT
RAFFLE TICKET
FOR e CHRISTMAS











wo YY



© 2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc: World Rights reserved

OUR NICE RETIREMENT NEST EGG
TURNED INTO HUMPTY DUMPTY

I CAN'T BELIEVE WE LOST
EVERYTHING WHEN THE
STOCK MARKET FELL...









FAN LETTER?
DON'T YOu WANT

TO SENV HIMALIST
OF WHAT YOu WANT

: HIM TO BRING

WILL YOU HELP ME
WRITE A FAN LETTER
TO SANTA CLAVS7,










Matthew Sadler v Alexandre
Boog, Biel, Switzerland, 1993.
Sadler was England number
three and still only in his mid-
twenties when, a decade ago, he





















- Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on, a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. -The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares.so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis. Sudoku increases from. Monday. to

BRB Era:
6/5] [1] (3) [7/4
PB bode sy ol a9
ee Od TEL
Le s[6P 2 Bh es
Pee ee
Pa alli LA 5
7/9] [2] [8] [1/6]

Difficulty Level * *






BUILD THAT
TIGER PIT I
KEEP ASKING
HIM ABOUT ?



















©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King:Féeatures Syndicate, Inc.










Best described as.a number crossword, the task in. Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to:9,.so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number-on‘its top. No number . °
2. . may be used.in the same block more than once... The difficulty -
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Here as White {to move} Sadler
has only levet material, so his

abandoned chess in favour of a 3] 2 opponent hoped for a draw. How
solid business career in computer ttt Gi pie wn quickly oe
; technology. His absence dealt == *{_} fd 2
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE a heavy blow to the national an Meese ees cher AA
wuars ror Y 2’ RUNNING HAVE You g team, who had been regular (a
BREAKFAST | OUT OF THINGS EVER TRIED he fi ~ contenders for medals in world
2 TO ZAND “and European championshios, =
S PANCAKES ? pean championships. :
é The young grandmaster has ! HOW many words of four letters






proved irreplaceable and indeed

|



(©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

t.) sae his career switch set a trend for
se casseans Stowe other talents to drop out early. So uses
for the past decade the England words in
squad has regularly struggled on the main
fs} Hi rs the lower boards and even fallen hody of
eae out of the world top ten nations. =n
Ist

~~ RYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
1 Bert perhaps and Jack in
church (5)
Liking for a swan song (8)
Dim sun, when out, will

Across
1 Aide round Rhode Island
to get rid of a headache,
maybe (7)
Time to finish is what



i AVR MECKEKR
hardly encourage it! (6) Ve DOECKEK
poets may need (5) aly “tC. RARE
ici: i AG OK AN AN S \ SN
Night angler gets bite (4) Official title of great SS AN ACR .. Os S
; merit (10) 2
Dead cute in a way, and
well read (8) Payment before mountain Go Wi th th e Odds
: pe ot ascent (4)
Dramatic trials (10) Rescninie ‘ola ene bald South dealer. to lose a spade trick eventually, the.»
it’s natural to.find a hotel cae é North-South cane fate oF the cane hinged on avoid- .
; ee ae ing a trump loser.
Sui, a tea break (6) Appears wet perhaps, but o. te ; Roscoe sat ee
ake something known e standard play wi 1s. combina-
bout calf meat (6) ° may be salvaged (5,5) KI6 tion, but was equally aware that the
about call mea ) Animals cannot be put @)75 percentages could easily be altered
Realise what shares may inside this vessel (8) WEST EAST by information gained anywhere
-do (10) C poe inst OQ108 43953 . along the line, In the present case, he
es ampaigniig againes-an Actoas v2 %Q76 had learned from the first three tricks”
A pure one in a common area for play? (7) Lu ‘ 0954 #10832 that West had started with six clubs
market perhaps (8) A drama involves the a eee loyal (7) Colony of bees (5) #AKQ) es O84 of ‘Bast only Abe: eat
One who leads on a fleet (6) N mal - office (5) Habituate (8) aK 64 seven. other cards ‘that ~ were
sheriff? (4) Profiteer without gain, that. | = Mischievous (4) Eager for food (6 WKI985 unknown, while East held 11. Taking
Oo. Harmless (8) : 6) AQT this a step further, South reasoned
7 : ener : armless s .
BU. Lie cies a airecuon anne euane NS) > Thoroughbred 492 that if the defenders hold 18. cards
entrance (5) What happened during a ” Assume false The bidding: ._, that are unknown, the player with 11. .
4 t ike i arance (10) horses:(30) South West North = East of them is much more likely to have
21 Trainee goes round Grand ransport strike in gf appe a sae Lene a "
Algeria? (4 WwW Mase departiira (6 In addition (4) ly 2@ 39 Pass a specific missing card. than. the
National course (7) geria? (4) ass departure (6) 4y player who has only seven.

Strongly built (6) 6 In particular (7)
Whatever it takes
(2,3,5)

Painstakingly

Opening lead — king of clubs.

When declarer holds nine cards
in a suit and is missing Q-x-x-x, the
normal play is to cash the A-K to try
to drop the queen. It is important.to
realize, though, that percentagewise
the edge in favor of playing this way
— as opposed to a second-round
finesse — is very slight. For this rea-
son, any clues acquired from the bid-
ding or play may justify taking a
finesse instead.

Consider this deal where West
started with three top clubs, declarer
ruffing the third round as East dis-
carded a diamond. Since South had

Yesterday’s Easy Solution Noisy and
disorderly (10)
Original (8)
Springy (7)
Discourteous

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution
ATTENTION!

Across: 1 Tour de force, 9 Laggard,
10 Forgo, 11 Zone, 12 Fraction, 14
Allure, 16 Hard up, 18 Romantic, 19
Aria, 22 Image, 23 Profile, 24
Journey’s end.

Down: 2 Organ, 3 Real, 4 Endure, 5
Official, 6 Carried, 7 Blaze a trail, 8
Going places, 13 Grandeur, 15
Lumbago, 17 Simple, 20 Reign, 21
Toss.

THIS FEATURE IS NOT AVAILABLE cavetul:(8)

Determined

intention (4) .
Utter confusion (5) disregard)

Deeply saddening Moodily silent (5)

event (7) Spanish painter (4)







NJ sriage \
ve Becker

: OF more can you make from the
: letters shown here? In making a
: word, each letter may be used
Ponce. only; Bach must contain
> the centre letter and there must

| No plurals.

| FODAY'S TARGET. S
: Good 22: very good 33; excellent 44
: tor more), Solution tomorrow.

: YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION i
: erring gent gone goner gotten

: grin groin ignore ignorer. inert

: Ingot inter into intro iron nitre
: note orient region reign rein

i rent RETORTING ring. ringer

? rotten rotting tenor tent tern —
i: tigon tine ting tinge tint. toeing
i tone tong torn torrent toting

? trigen trine triton ftritone





aS KWAN

Â¥



Accordingly, declarer led a heart
to the ace at trick four and returned a
heart toward his hand. After East fol-
lowed low, South finessed the jack
and so brought home the contract.

It is true that the play of the jack
could easily have lost to the queen.
There was certainly no guarantee
that the finesse would succeed, But it
was the right thing to do because,
under the circumstances, it was the
percentage play.

When all you have is favorable
odds to rely on, you should do as
they dictate, and you will win many
more times than you lose.

Tomorrow: Stayman stumbles.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.

: be. atdeast one nine-letter ward... +. .


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PAGE 12 SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008




The Road Traffic Department hereby give
notice of its intention to introduce to its
Public Bus Route Inventory six (6)
modified bus routes and nine (9) new bus
routes.

Further, the Controller in accordance with
Section 85 Sub Section-1 of Chapter 220
of the Road Traffic Act, wishes to invite
franchise holders interested in operating
the modified and new routes to submit an
application through the Franchise Unit of
the Road Traffic Department ~ Thompson
Blvd., before 5:00 pm on December 12,
2008.

MODIFIED ROUTES

dL. Route 2a (Together with 2C,
provides a new east-west route to
Blair Estate and Dunmore Avenue
areas) .

George St., Duke St., Marlborough St.,
West Bay St., Chippingham Rd., Dunmore
Ave., Boyd Rd., Nassau St., Poinciana
Ave., Wulff Rd., East St., Gibbs Cr., Sixth
Terr., Madeira St., Mackey St., Pyfrom
Rd., Kemp Rd., Wulff Rd., Village Rd., St
Andrews Dr., Commonwealth St., Newgate
Rd., Eastern Rd., Shirley St., Princess St.,
Duke St., Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd.,
Bay St. (Downtown), George St.

2: Route 4 (New East-west route via
Wulff Road, provides service to
previously un-serviced McKinney
Ave, and Marlin Dr. areas)

Fox Hill Round-a-bout, Bernard Rd., Wulff
Rd., Poinciana Dr., Thompson Blvd.,
Bethel Ave., McKinney Ave., JFK Dr.,
Prospect Rd., Sandford Dr., Marlin Dr.,
Sea View Dr., West Bay St., Marlborough
St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St. (Downtown)
, Elizabeth Ave. Elizabeth Ave., Shirley
St., East St., Princess St., Duke St.,
Cumberland St., Marlborough St., West
Bay St., Sea View Dr., Marlin Dr., Sandford
Dr., Prospect Rd., JFK Dr., McKinney
Ave., Bethel Ave., Thompson Blvd.,
Poinciana Dr., Wulff Rd., Bernard Rd.,
Fox Hill Round-a-bout.

3: Route 12 (Feeder Route to provide
service to Blake Road, new housing
at Windsor Field, Mt Pleasant

‘Village, Southwest Road and north-
south link at the western end of New
Providence. Interchanges to high
frequency services to Downtown at
Sandy Port (Route 10B) and Bacardi
Road (Route 16)

Sandy Port, West Bay St., Blake Rd., JFK
Dr., Windsor Field Rd., (Lyford Cay
Entrance),Western Rd., Mount Pleasant
Village, Southwest Rd., Adelaide Village
-Rd., Adelaide Rd., Coral Height Ave.,
_ Coral Harbour Rd., Carmichael Rd.,
Bacardi Rd., (Return) Bacardi Rd.,
Carmichael Rd., Coral Harbour Rd., Coral
Height Ave., Adelaide Rd., Adelaide
Village, Adelaide Rd., South West Rd.,
Mount Pleasant Village, Western Rd.,
(Lyford Cay Entrance), Windsor Field Rd.,
JFK Dr., Blake Rd., West Bay St., Sandy
Port

4. Route 20 (New route to provide
service to new housing estate)

THE TRIBUNE

Ministry of Works & Transport
Road Traffic Department —

NOTICE |

Spine Rd. of Lynden Pindling Estates,
Pigeon Plum St., Windsor Place Rd.,
Abundant Life Rd., East-West Highway.,

Marathon Rd., Marathon Mall, Robinson:

Rd., Minnie St., Wulff Rd., Collins Ave.,
Shirley St., Princess St., Duke St.,
Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St.
(Downtown) (Return) Bay St.
(Downtown), Christie St., Shirley St.,
Collins Ave., Wulff Rd., Minnie St.,
Robinson Rd., Marathon Mall, Marathon
Rd., East-West Highway, Abundant Life
Rd., Windsor Place Rd., Pigeon Plum St.,
Spine Road of Lynden Pindling Estates

ay Route 22 (Provides service to New
Subdivision and New School)

Bay St. (Downtown), Elizabeth Ave., Sands
Rd., East Hill St., Market St., Wulff Rd.,
Poinciana Dr., Thompson Blvd., Bethel
Ave., McKinney Ave., Christie Ave.,
Tonique William-Darling Hwy. (Harold
Road), Summerwinds Plaza, Sir Milo
Butler Hwy., Carmichael Rd., Faith Ave.
South (to include the new High School)
Marshall Rd., Baillou Hill Rd., Cowpen
Rd., Faith Ave., Carmichael Rd., Sir Milo
Butler Hwy., Tonique William-Darling
Hwy. (Harold Road), Summerwinds Plaza,
Christie Ave., McKinney Ave., Bethel Ave.,
Thompson Blvd., Poinciana Dr., Baillou
Hill Rd., Cumberland St., Navy Lion Road,
Bay St. (Downtown), Elizabeth Ave.

6. Route 22A (Provides anti-clockwise
service from new high school on Faith Ave
South along un-serviced areas of Cowpen
Road)

South West High School, Faith Ave.,
Cowpen Rd., Baillou Hill Rd., Cumberland
St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St. (Downtown),
Elizabeth Ave., Sands Rd., East Hill St.,
Market St., Robinson Rd., Baillou Hill
Rd., South Beach Rd., Marshall Rd.,
Southwest new high school Faith Ave.
South

NEW ROUTES

bs Route 2C (Together with 2A to
provide a new east-west route to
Blair Estates and Dunmore Avenue
areas)

George St., Cumberland St., Navy Lion
Rd., Bay St. (Downtown), East Bay St.,
Eastern Rd., Newgate Rd., Commonwealth
St., St. Andrews Dr., Village Rd., Wulff
Rd., Kemp Rd., Pyfrom Rd., Mackey St.,
Madeira St., Sixth Ter., Gibbs Corner.,
East St., Wulff Rd., Poinciana Ave., Nassau
St., Boyd Rd., Dunmore Ave.,
Chippingham Rd., West Bay St.,
Marlborough St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St.
(Downtown), George St.

2s Route 5C (As an initial route,
clockwise via Kemp Rd.)

Bay St. (Downtown), East Bay St., Village
Rd., Wulff Rd., Marathon Rd., Marathon
Mall ., Robinson Rd., Prince Charles Dr.,
Soldier Rd., Taylor St., Alexandria Blvd.,
Breadfruit St., Sapodilla Blvd., Willow
Tree Ave., Gilbert St., Kennedy Sub Rd.,
Malcolm Rd., Baillou Hill Rd.,
Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay St.
(Downtown).

ee Route 10D (To provide service near

Paradise Island Bridge and to other
tourist attractions near Downtown)

West Bay St., (Radisson Hotel),
Marlborough St., Bay St., (Downtown),
East Bay St., Village Rd., Shirley St.,
Princess St., Duke St., Cumberland St.,
Marlborough St., West Bay St., (Radisson
Hotel)

4. Route 13 (Feeder route to provide
service to Tropical Gardens Rd.
Interchange to high frequency.
services to Downtown available at
Sandy Port)

Sandyport, West Bay St., Fernander Rd.,
Curtis Rd., Douglass Rd., Tropical
Gardens., Windsor Field Rd., JFK Dr.,
Blake Rd., West Bay St., Sandy Port

> Route 21B (To provide anti-
clockwise service to New School |
via Baillou Hill Rd. and East St.)

South West High School, Marshall Rd.,
South Beach Rd., summer Haven, East St.,
Sands Rd., Shirley St. Princess St., Market
St., Robinson Rd., Baillou Hill Rd., South
Beach Rd., Marshall Rd., South West High
School

6. Route 21C (To provide clockwise
service to New Subdivision and
New School)

Bay St. (Downtown), East Bay St.,
Elizabeth Ave., Sands Rd., East St.,
Summer Haven, South Beach Rd.,
Marshall Rd., (South Western High School,
Faith Ave., St. Vincent Rd., Baillou Hill
Rd., Cumberland St., Navy Lion Rd., Bay
St., (Downtown)

7 Route 21D (To provide direct
service to South Beach along East
Street)

East Hill St., East St., Zion Blvd., Jordan

Prince William School, South Beach Rd.,

East St., East Hill St.,

8. Route 24 (Flamingo Gardens, to

provide service to St. Vincent Road
and link from Carmichael to
Eastwest)

Flamingo Gardens Primary School,
(Montgomery Ave), Carmichael Rd., Faith
Ave., St. Vincent Rd., Blue Hill Rd., St.
Vincent Rd., Faith Ave., Carmichael Rd.,
Montgomery Ave., Flamingo Gardens
Primary School

2, Route 25 (Provides service near to

. Paradise Island (Western) Bridge
and links East Street and Soldier
Road with Golden Gates Shopping
Centre.)

Golden Gates Shopping Centre, Baillou
Hill Rd., Soldier Rd., East St., Wulff Rd.,
Village Rd., Shirley St., Church St.
(Paradise Island Western Bridge), Mackey
St., Wulff Rd., East St., Soldier Rd., Baillou
hill Rd., Golden Gates Shopping Centre

All applications submitted will be heard
by the New Providence Road Traffic
Authority.

CONTROLLER
ROAD TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT
TRIBUNE SPORTS

@ By ARNIE STAPLETON
AP Sports Writer

DENVER (AP) — The Denver Nuggets start-
ed celebrating too soon, not that they ever had a
chance in this one as the San Antonio Spurs raced
to a 108-91 win at the Pepsi Center.

The Nuggets had won 12 of 15 since acquiring
Chauncey Billups from Detroit in the Allen Iver-
son trade, including a 132-93 shellacking of Toron-
to that still had them aglow 48 hours later.

The Spurs were still exasperated over their
double-digit loss to Detroit on Tuesday night,
and a double-digit defeat at the hands of Denver
last month when they were short-handed.

San Antonio jumpéd out to a 20-point half-
time lead and never looked back, getting 22 points
from Tony Parker and 21 from Manu Ginobili,
two players who were sidelined when the Nuggets
beat the Spurs 91-81 last month in San Antonio.

Tim Duncan also chipped in 21 points for the
Spurs, who snapped a two-game skid.

"T said at halftime to the team, 'I don't know
who you are right now. You're not the same team
that I've seen play for 20 games,'" Nuggets coach
George Karl said. "We never got the personality
that we've kind of been riding."

In the only other NBA game Thursday night,
the Dallas Mavericks beat the Phoenix Suns 112-
OF; - 4

Billups, the former University of Colorado star,
had enjoyed a wonderful homecoming up to this
point, helping the franchise get off to its best
start since the 1976-77 team won 13 of its first 19.

"You shouldn't celebrate in a season," Karl

said. "But our start, the changes that we've made,
where we've put ourselves, it's probably hard not
to feel celebratory about. And again, the game of
basketball is an intense, physical competition, a
mental competition and when you're playing a
championship competitor and we make the mis-
takes that we made —- plus I honestly think they
(were eager for payback) — maybe we got too
happy.in that game," Karl said.

"And I've always been a fan of Duncan, Gino-
bili, Parker and Pap (coach Gregg Popovich).
They have a grit to them and that's why they
win. And those four guys showed up tonight big
time."

Denver's dismal showing came just 48 hours
after a 39-point blowout of Toronto, an embar-
rassment that served as the last straw in Sam

. Mitchell's tenure as Raptors coach. Karl lament-

ed the firing long and hard before Thursday's
tip-off.

After routing the Raptors, Billups declared it
was just one of those games where everything
worked: "Throughout the season you usually get
two or three of those games," he said. "Unfortu-
nately, you usually get two or three on the other
side, those games wh-re nothing really works."

This game was cer! .inly one of those.

"I might have talke it up on us, I don't know,".
Billups said Thursday. "That was an ugly game.
Games like that you have to wash them off in
the shower and just forget about them as soon as
possible. They picked us apart. They just out-
played us all over the place."

One game after doling out 37 assists, the
Nuggets handed out just 19. And they missed 40

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS



KS SS 7 SS

OAKLAND’S Darren McFadden breaks away from San Diego’s Stephen
Cooper on a pass reception in the fourth quarter Thursday night...

LT, Rivers lead Chargers
to 34-7 win over Raiders

@ By BERNIE WILSON
AP Sports Writer

SAN DIEGO (AP) —
LaDainian Tomlinson can still
run the ball and his San Diego
Chargers finally looked like
world-beaters.

It might not matter, though,
because the Chargers still need
a miracle to get to the playoffs.

Tomlinson scored on a 3-yard
run against his favorite punch-
ing bag and Philip Rivers threw
three touchdown passes, includ-
ing a 59-yarder to Vincent Jack-
son, to give the Chargers a 34-7
victory against the Oakland
Raiders on Thursday night.

The Chargers beat their
archrivals for the 11th straight
time in a series dating to the
birth of the AFL in 1960.

The Chargers (5-8) snapped a
three-game losing streak and

_ won for just the second time in
seven games. Once considered
favorites to reach the Super
Bowl, they're still in deep trou-
ble, trailing Denver by 2 1/2
games in the AFC West. The
Broncos have four to play.

"It was desperately needed
but it was one win for us," Tom-
linson said. "We don't want to
make it more than what it is."

On Sunday, Tomlinson was
held to 24 yards, the second-
lowest total of his brilliant eight-
year career, in a listless 22-16
home loss to Atlanta.

"After the showing last week,
I think we wanted to prove to
everyone that that wasn't us,"
said Tomlinson, who's having
the worst season of his career.
"It's good that it was a short
week. We got to show people
who we are as a group."

San Diego's Darren Sproles
caught two TD passes. His 87-
yard touchdown on a punt
return in the fourth quarter was
called back after rookie
Antoine Cason was called for
an illegal block in the back.

Oakland quarterback JaMar-
cus Russell was intercepted
twice by linebacker Stephen
Cooper and also lost a fumble,
leading to 17 points for the
Chargers. Russell sprained his
right ankle after his second

pickoff and didn't return. X-

rays were negative, and Russell
left the locker room on crutch-
es.
Andrew Walter replaced
Russell at the start of the third
quarter. Walter was intercepted
by Matt Wilhelm late in the
fourth quarter.

The Raiders (3-10) reached
double digit losses for the sixth
straight year. They are 22-71
since being routed by Tampa
Bay and former Raiders coach
Jon Gruden in the Super Bowl
in San Diego on Jan. 26, 2003.

‘great game against," Tomlin-

"It's clear that we're not
close," cornerback Nnamdi
Asomugha said. "We don't play
good football, we don't play
sound football. We've been
undisciplined. You just wonder
how many people care and how
many people are upset."

Tomlinson's TD midway
through the first quarter was
his 137th, moving him into sole
possession of fifth place on the
career list. He had been tied
with Marshall Faulk, who was
at the game working for the
NFL Network.

_L.T. had 91 yards on 25 car-
ries. He has 1,906 career rush-
ing yards and 22 total touch-
downs, 19 on the ground, in 16
games against the Raiders.
They are his most yards and
touchdowns against any oppo-
nent.

"I think there are always cer-
tain teams that you enjoy play-
ing and you seem to match up
well against and seem to have a

son said. "I can't explain it."

Three plays into Oakland's
first possession, Russell fum-
bled as he was being sacked by
outside linebacker Shaun
Phillips, and inside linebacker
Jyles Tucker recovered at the
12-yard line. Tomlinson carried
three straight times, scoring
untouched off left tackle for a
10-0 lead.

Rivers threw an 8-yard TD
pass to Sproles early in the sec-
ond quarter, capping a 15-play,
96-yard drive that took 8 min-
utes, 29 seconds. Tomlinson and
Sproles carried five times each
and Rivers had three carries on
the drive.

San Diego got the ball back
on Cooper's first pickoff. Jack-
son got behind two defenders
and hauled in Rivers' scoring
pass down the right sideline to
make it 24-0.

' Russell was hit by Phillips
while passing late in the second .
quarter and the ball went
straight to Cooper, who later-
alled to Antonio Cromartie for
a 14-yard gain. Russell was hurt
on that play. ,

San Diego's Nate Kaeding
kicked field goals of 20 ad 39
yards.

After Kaeding's second field
goal, Oakland's Justin Miller
returned the kickoff 92 yards
for a touchdown.

Rivers was 10-of-22 for 214
yards. Jackson had five catches
for a career-high 148 yards.

"I'm sick of losing, especially
like that," Raiders tight end
Zach Miller said. "We never
really got going on offense and
when we did, penalties and
interceptions and fumbles killed
us. As an offense we were inept
again."

Buy any vehicle ana NTER TO
Multi Discount Furniture drawing will be held Friday, December 12th 2008

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008, PAGT




TONY PARKER works the ball inside against Nuggets
guard Chauncey Billups.in the fourth quarter Thursday
night... :

percent of their free throws while San Antonio
was going 17-of-18 from the stripe.

In the first half, Billups scored just 3 points on
1-of-7 shooting and doled a single assist. Billups

== -

SS

\

Va 91,000.00 Gif

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4

3

4

i q

i

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scored nine points in the fourth quarter | ft
with 12. 4
"I thought Tony did as good a job as anyboc 4

can do on Chauncey," Popovich said. "He's just sot

tough a cover. Bruce (Bowen) did his usual goog
job. When we play good defense like that ands
make some shots we're a pretty good tcai."»

And one that's starting to get healthy.

"T think as a team we played some of
basketball," Duncan said. "We \
consistent defensively. In the see
were a lot more aggressive getting (0 1)
There was a stretch there where we were ior
people too much, but other than that, cons:
tently throughout the game we played well
moved the ball well and Manu and ‘tom
some points."

aed

ad ae as EE

ena se

i
4

Mavericks 112, Suns 97 4
At Dallas, Dirk Nowitzki matched his season:

high with 39 points and new starter J.J. Barca:

provided a spark with 18 points to help the Mave
’ ericks to their eighth win in nine games. 4

Nowitzki had 37 points through three quart:
and Jason Terry continued his recent roll off ihe
bench with 19 points for Dallas. 8
Steve Nash and Shaquille O'Neal returned tot
the lineup for Phoenix after missing the two pr 4
vious games, Nash because of flu-like syimpiot s
and O'Neal because of sore knees and coach | “4
ry Porter's plan to avoid using him in bachk-toa
back games. q

Nash had 20 points and 10 assists with

ing the fourth quarter. Amare Stoudeimiic iif
Phoenix with 28 points.
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_ PAGE 14, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



0. J SIMPSON speaks during his

OJ Simpson sentenced to 2
as much as 33 years

m By KEN RITTER

Associated Press Writer

LAS VEGAS (AP) - A bro-
ken O J Simpson was sentenced
Friday to as much as 33 years in
prison for a hotel armed rob-
bery after a judge rejected his
apology and said, "It was much
more than stupidity."

‘The 61-year-old football Hall
of Famer stood shackled and

stone-faced as Judge Jackie >

Glass rattled off the punish-
ment. Moments before, Simp-
son made a rambling, five-
minute plea for leniency, simul-
taneously apologising for the
holdup as a foolish mistake and
trying to justify his actions.

He choked back tears as he
told her: "I didn't want to steal
anything from anyone. ... I'm
sorry, Sorry."

Simpson said he was simply
trying to retrieve sports memo-
rabilia and other mementos,
including his first wife's wed-
ding ring, from two dealers
when he stormed a Las Vegas
hotel room on. September 13,
2007.

But the judge emphasized
that it was a violent confronta-
tion in which at least one gun
was drawn, and she said some-
one could have been shot. She
said the evidence was over-
whelming, with the planning,

the confrontation itself and the
aftermath all recorded on audio
or videotape.

Glass, a no-nonsense judge
known for her tough sentences,
imposed such a complex series
of consecutive and concurrent
sentences that even many attor-
neys watching the case were
confused as to how much time
Simpson got.

Simpson could serve up to 33
years but could be eligible for
parole after nine years, accord-
ing to Elana Roberto, the
judge's clerk.

The judge said several times
that her sentence in the Las
Vegas case had nothing to do
with Simpson's 1995 acquittal
in the slaying of his ex-wife
Nicole Brown Simpson and her
friend Ronald Goldman.

"I'm not here to try and cause
any retribution or any payback
for anything else," Glass said.

Simpson was immediately led
away to prison after the judge
refused to permit him to go free
on bail while he appeals.

Simpson's co-defendant and
former golfing buddy, Clarence
"C.J. Stewart, also was sen-
tenced to at least 15 years. .

Outside court, Goldman's
father, Fred Goldman, and sis-
ter, Kim, said they were delight-

_ed with the sentence. .

"We are thrilled, and it's a

bittersweet moment," Fred
Goldman said. "It was satisfying
seeing him in shackles like he
belongs."

The Goldmans took a mea-
sure of credit for Simpson's fate,
saying their relentless pursuit
of his assets to satisfy a $33.5
million wrongful-death judg-
ment. "pushed him over the
edge" and led him to commit
the robbery to recover some of
his sports memorabilia.

Simpson and Stewart were
both brought to the courtroom
in dark blue jail uniforms, their
hands. shackled to their waists
with chains. Simpson, who
looked weary and had not been
expected to-speak, delivered a
somber statement to the judge:

As he spoke in a hoarse
voice, the courtroom was
hushed. His two sisters, Shirley
Baker and Carmelita Durio, sat
in the front row of the court-
room, along with his adult
daughter..

Both men were convicted
Oct. 3 of 12 criminal ‘charges,
including kidnapping and armed
robbery.

"As stupid and as ill-con-
ceived as it was, it wasn't some-
thing that was from this evil
mind they teach us about,"
Simpson attorney Yale
Galanter said before sentenc-
ing.

"Not bright, not smart, not
well thought out, but certainly
not from an evil mind,"
Galanter said.

Most of the 63 seats in the
courtroom were taken by
media, lawyers and family mem-
bers of the defendants. Fifteen
members of the public were also
allowed.

After sentencing was over,
the Goldmans left the court-
room and Kim threw her arms
around her father and. wept.

Simpson's sisters declined to
comment, but Shirley Baker
said on her way out: "It's not
over."

Jurors who heard 13 days of
testimony said after the verdict
that they were convinced of
Simpson's guilt because of
audio recordings that were
secretly made of the Sept. 13,
2007, robbery at the Palace Sta-
tion casino hotel.

The confrontation involved
sports memorabilia brokers
Alfred Beardsley and Bruce
Fromong. It was recorded by
collectibles dealer Thomas Ric-
cio, who was acting as middle-
man.

"Don't let nobody out of this
room!" Simpson commands on
the recordings, and instructs
other men to scoop up items he
insists had been stolen from
him.

yesterday in Las Vegas...

On Tuesday, Glass is sched-
uled to sentence four former
co-defendants who took plea
deals and testified against Simp-
son and Stewart.

Michael.McClinton, Charles
Cashmore, Walter Alexander




Isaac Brekken/AP

and Charles Ehrlich could
receive probation or prison
time. McClinton could get up
to 11 years; the others face less.

e AP Special Correspondent
Linda Deutsch contributed to
this report.

FROM page 15

goals and objectives.”

Tribune: Our better student-
athletes prefer to go abroad to
study rather than stay at home.
How do you intend to encour-
age them to make COB a pri-
ority?

Rolle: “I think the financial
aid is critical to what we do. The
reality of it is money counts.
When student-athletes and par-
ents sit down and discuss where
they will go, one of the top
three decisions research shows
is athletic scholarships.

“When I decided where I was
going to go as a student-athlete,
I looked at who was going to

' provide the most financial aid.
’ There’s no denying that at all.

“The Minister (of Youth,
Sports and Culture, Desmond
Bannister), in his wisdom,
recognised that and said how
can we build the university and
they decided to put their money
behind us.

“So that now provides us with .

the opportunity to go out there
and recruit and not only recruit,
but to say hey we can sustain
you throughout your stay at the
college. We can now recruit
some of these students.
“Secondly, we have to pro-
vide competition for our stu-
dent-athletes. In my research in
graduate school, I found out

that the most, important thing
for Bahamians is competition,
testing their skills. So we have
to find a way to allow them to
test their skills with teams that
are comparable.

“That’s why the travel that
our team does is so very critical.
Our student-athletes want to
compare themselves with their
peers abroad.

“And thirdly, facilities obvi-
ously have to play a role in it.
We have a ways to go in that.
But I’m very pleased that the
minister has committed to the
construction of the national
facilities that will enable us to
play some of our games.

“I’m also pleased to know

We’re looking for a few good
people to join our team.

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that the athletics facilities is on

. the agenda for the capital of the

College of the Bahamas. We
were off for a while, but we
made it back. So everybody can
see the new facilities that are
going up here in New Provi-
dence and in Grand Bahama
and an athletic facility is one of
them.”

Tribune: You have a well
established staff on board now.
How do they fare in the overall
scheme of things in the way for-
ward?

Rolle: “1 think the support
staff brings a tremendous
amount of experience.

“Bradley (Cooper) has the

‘bulk of his responsibility dealing

with the Wellness-and Fitness
Center and we will be looking
at how we can collaborate with
government and their agencies
to address some of these crises



EAST STREET, NA



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby quer that DOYLE SOUFFRANT of

AS SAU, BAHAMAS, is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 29TH day of NOVEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N-7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

that we are faced with like-the
report we got this week that 70
per cent of the Bahamian public
is obese.

“We will be trying to find a
way to deal with this issue and
so we will be collaborating with
the government agencies
because we have a role to play
in nation building.

“As for Sean (Bastian), he
will work more closely with me
and with the intramural pro-
gramme. We want to make
intramural more vibrant. We
want more of our students to
participate in intramural. We
want Our students to’h
gooddime:because stude
letes are aselect group. ~_

“And we have Keith Cox
who is fairly new to the institu-
tion, but he will also work with
the Wellness and Fitness Center
and the teams in their strength





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“We have a small staff, but
as we move forward, we have

to put in place all of the other-

things that are missing. We need
to have a SID and someone
who is in charge of rules and
regulations. So we know that
going forward, the department
has to grow. But with what we
have, we know we can accom-
plish a lot.”

Tribune: The Caribs’ athletic
teams are traveling and partici-
pating in the NAIA, but they
are getting a valuable lesson try-
ing to compete on par with their
peers. What do you think needs
o be done to get them ata

Rolle: “We are in year three
of the travel experience, but we
were using it to get-our feet wet
and to determine which direc-
tion the programme will be
going in.

“At the beginning of this
semester, we have determined
that our student-athletes be full
time. students. Previously we
allowed part-time students to
play. But we realise that our
students have to be full time
with 12 or more credits.

“We've taken our fair share
of punishment as some people
would say in the sporting world,
but that comes with the growing
pain. So I’m not at all discour-
aged by-the score at the end of

the day when we get beat by 40°

or 50 or 60 or 70 points.

“If you ask most of those
teams what it was like when
they started out, they will tell
you the same thing. So we have

to build on that and more and .

more as we play games, we will
get there. We have to invest in
our coaches and their devélop-
ment and we have to ensure
that our student-athletes have
time off to practice and play
games.

“So those issues have to be
addressed if we are going to
solidify and build the pro-
gramme. So I’m not at all dis-
couraged by the scores. | know
as Bahamians we will like to
win. But anybody who knows
anything about building a pro-
gramme know that you will take

your share of licks early. So ’m_ |

not-discouraged at all.”
Tribune: Let’s look at the way
forward. Where would you like
to see the athletic programme
go?
Rolle: “People who work
with athletics know that it takes
a great deal of funding and
we're working with an instita-
tion that won’t be in a position
right now to get to the top
where we can make money like
the Division One schools do.
“We have to be real about
this thing. I want us to be a sol-
id NAIA or Division I or III
programme, whichever we
determine that we will be. I
believe some of those discus-
sions still have to be discussed
to determine which direction
we will take.
“I can not say that in 2-3
years we will be a full fledge

» NAIA institution or we are

going to NCAA Division II or
ILL. These are some discussions
that have to be had with the
stockholders. We just want to
ensure that whatever affiliation
we have, it lines up with the
vision of the College of the
Bahamas.”


Raga eagtenteâ„¢

2008



O J Simpson
gets as much
as 33 years
in prison...
See page 14



Tim Clarke/Tribune stati a j

—



a Addn mel ron in the basketball tournament..

Minister opens Special

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

hree countries and
six teams will
make up the
package for the
Bahamas Special
Olympics Caribbean Basket-
ball Tournament which jumped
off yesterday at Loyola Hall.

Officially opened by Minis-
ter of Youth, Sports and Cul-
ture Desmond Bannister, the
tournament will come to a close
today following action begin-
ning at 9 am.

Back in the Bahamas for the
second time in three years is
Barbados, the runners-up in
2006 and the Cayman Islands,
who are making their maiden
voyage on the international
scene.

e

| Up close and personal with K Rolle

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

ON December 1, the College
of the Bahamas ushered in a
new era with the appointment
of Kimberley Rolle as the new
athletic director.

She replaced Greg Harshaw,
who was instrumental in getting
the college’s athletic pro-
gramme established within the
. National Association of Inter-

collegiate Athletics.

“It’s very exciting because
you don’t often get to do what
you love and get paid for it,”
Rolle quipped. “So I’m very
excited about the opportunity.

“I do understand that it’s one
that will come with its chal-
lenges because whenever you
are in a young and growing pro-
gramme, there are a lot of
bumps and bruises that come

-along with it. But the exciting
part is that you have your hand
print on something that can
have a great impact on a lot of
lives.”

Rolle, a former long-time
women’s national team player,
excelled for the Sharks at SC

McPherson. She graduated in ~

1991 before she went to Hen-
derson State University where

Ist - “Partridge in a Pear Tree”
[| 2nd - “Two Turtle Doves”
‘3rd - “Three French Hens”
4th - “Four Calling Birds”
5th - “Five Gold Rings”
_ 6th - “Six Geese-A-Laying”

Kimberley Rolle

she graduated in 1995 with her
Bachelor of Arts degree in
Communications.

Earlier this year she returned
after a sting at Miami Universi-
ty of Ohio where she completed
her masters in sports studies.

Last October, Rolle was
inducted into the Henderson
University Reddies Hall of
Fame for the tremendous
impact she made on their wom-
en’s basketball team.

A former news reporter at
The Tribune, Rolle is married to
former basketball standout Bac-
cus Rolle and is the proud
mother of one son.

On Thursday, Tribune Sports
sat down with Rolle for an in-
depth interview during which

4

~ WATERFORD’

CRYSTAL





she revealed her plans for the
department.

Tribune: What role do you
intend to play and how do you
intend to execute it?

Rolle: “I think first of all, the
position of athletic director in
the contents of the College of
the Bahamas has a three-strand
approach. One would be health
and wellness, two intramural
and three would be intercolle-
giate athletics.

“I know often times we have
a tendency to focus a great deal
on the intercollegiate aspects of
it, but in the capacity that I sit as
the director of athletics, I’m

really responsible for those

three stands.

“So the challenge for me
therefore is to ensure that the
focus of all three strands
receives adequate attention and
support. Obviously the inter-
collegiate athletics is one that
kind of generates more excite-
ment, particularly among young
people.

“We do have membership
with the NAIA and one of the
things that I intend to do early
in the new year is to see where
we will go with that and what is
our next step if we,are to go ful-
ly with that or we change direc-
tion and go. forward to the
NCAA Division II or III level.

“Whoever we become affili-
ated with, we want to make sure
that they are in line with the
goals and visions of the college
from an academic prospective.

“And being a sticker for aca-
demics, I want our students
when they come here to leave
with an academic degree. Gone
are the days where students
come here for a year or two and
they use this as a springboard.
We want them.to leave as a
four-year letterman and with a
degree.” :

Tribune: You're stepping into
the programme as a female as
well, how has that-been going?

Rolle: “I don’t really look at
my gender as one to deter any-
thing that I want to do. Obvi-
ously, the research is there to
support it that this is a male ori-
ented profession. There is no
question about that.

“There are only a hand full
of female athletic directors at
the Division One level. Most of
the female directors you would
find at the Division II or III or
NAIA level.

“But the research also shows
that more and more women are
getting the opportunities
because the position calls for a
great deal of diversification and
you have to be able to commu-
nicate with donors and alumni,
so you have to have a diverse
skill set and I think with that in
mind, knowing the business of
athletics, has really helped.

“ve been pleased by how
I’ve been received by Sean

. (Bastian), Bradley (Cooper)

and the rest of the staff and I
don’t think we’re going to allow
gender to be an issue with our

SEE page 14°

They are being joined by
defending champions Grand

' Bahama; Abaco, also making

its debut in the tournament,

- and New Providence, to be rep-

resented by two teams.
Bahamas Special Olympics’
director Basil Christie said they

_had anticipated at least some

20 teams coming in to compete,
but because of the internation-
al economic crisis, the numbers
have decreased tremendously.
“We are very pleased with
this tournament. This is the
biggest this tournament has
ever been,” Christie noted.
“We wanted to invite the teams
here because the only competi-
tion our athletes get is every
four years at the World Games.
“So we have decided to pro-
mote the sport of basketball in
the region because most of the
countries only play cricket. But
they love basketball and so we
have decided to promote this
opportunity for them.”
Despite the faci that the
majority of the teams opted not
to travel here anymore to com-
pete, Christie sajd they intend
to make it an annual one and
they intend to continue to invite
their Caribbean counterparts.
Coaches from both Barba-
dos and the Cayman Islands
have indicated that they intend
to make the best of their trip
here and their aim is to win the
title.
Ian Small, who is in town

with an.eight-member team,

said after finishing up as the
runners-up to Grand Bahama
in Grand Bahama two years
ago, they are going after the
whole hog this year. *

“We want to win this thing,”
he stressed. “We’re not as good
as I would like for us to be
because of our financial situa-
tion, but I’m confident that we
are good enough to win.”

Small said the team will be
defensively minded, but they
have a good crop of big players

who should be able to hold

their own offensively.

Fareed Hosein, coach of the
Cayman Islands, said the sky is
the limit for them as they try
to gain some integnational
exposure.

“For the Cayman Islands,
this is our first Special Olympics
team that we have formed for
basketball and this is our first
overseas trip and actually our
first game,” Hosein lamented.

“Our expectations is not to
necessarily come away with the
gold medal, but that we will
learn how to play on the inter-
national scene, so we can take it
further when we get back to
the Cayman Islands.”

If there’s any consolation for
the Cayman Islands, Hosein
said to expect to see them run
the floor very effectively
because “we are very quick.”

“We are very inexperienced
and so we’re not sure. how to
play in an enyironment. We

-' don’t know. what to expect.”

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Olympics tournament

The expectations are defi-
nitely soaring high for the
Bahamas to keep the title here,
considering that they have four
teams entered in the field.

DeMario Minus, one of the
coaches of the New Providence
teams, said they have all been
working very hard and if the
players follow instructions, they,
should be very competitive.

“Our players have developed
a bond with each other. They
are like a family. So if anything,
you can expect them to pro-
duce a lot of energy,” Minus
projected.

As for their opponents,
Minus said Barbados has a lot

of height, which could pose

some problems: for the
Bahamas. He feels that Grand
Bahama matches up best
against them.

In opening the tournament,
Bannister welcomed all of the
players to the Bahamas and he
encouraged them to enjoy
themselves. But he indicated
that it’s his hope that the
Bahamas would be able to keep
the title here. an

Bannister also commended
Christie, his executives and the
many volunteers who help to
make Special Olympics the
vibrant sporting body that it is
in the country today.

During the ceremony, the
Stapledon Dance Troop put on
a splendid display as they per-
formed to the tune: “You Rise
Me Up.”

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Bahamasair - All Locations
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Treasures Travel
Diamond Travel & Tours
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Thrifty features quality. products of DainlerChrysiet Motors and otter fine cars
PAGE 16, SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS





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NASSAU EWENTS CAPTURED .O CAMERA











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PICTURED (I-r) are: attorney and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, Senator Allyson Gibson; cancer
survivor, Stephanie Siegel; president of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas, Terrance Fountain; Olympic gold

medalist and honourary co-chair of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas/Susan G Komen for the Cure Stride for 2 ok pee 4 f
Life, Eldece Clarke-Lewis; Member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, cancer survivor Dr Agreta Eneas-Carey. : ; 2g Sooea F a ae fe



_ (ABOVE) Members of the Links with the minister of health. Pictured (I-
r) are: (top. row) Link Yolanda Cash Jackson (of the Greater Miami Chap-
ter); Link Janice McCants Miller; Link Lynda Gibson; Link Michelle Major;
, — Link Jacqueline Reckley; Link Cristel Cole (of the Greater Miami Chapter);
i Link Christel Sands Feaste; Link Deborah Fraser.

Bottom row: Link Allyson Gibson; Link Agreta Eneas Carey; honourary
co-chair of the Cancer Society of the Bahamas/Susan G Komen Stride for
Life and wife of baseball sensation Hank Aaron, Link Billie Aaron; Minis- -
ter of Health, Dr Hubert Minnis; Link Edith Powell; Link Toni Lewis (of the
Las Vegas Chapter); Link Marilyn Rahming; Link Diane Bowe Pindling; Link
Sharlyn Wilson Smith.

CURE STRIDE FOR

*® The Nassau Chapter of the Links, Inc partnered
with United States Ambassador Ned L Siegel and Min-
ister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis to host a welcome
reception for participants of the Cancer Society of the
Bahamas/Susan G Komen for the Cure Stride for Life
Walk.

Those visiting the Bahamas to support the fight
against breast cancer in our country were welcomed by
friendly faces, the sounds of junkanoo courtesy of the

Prime Time Dancers junkanoo group and a live band,
Roughie.

' ; Corporate sponsors for the event included the Min-
PICTURED (I-r) are: past director of the AIDS Foundation of the Bahamas and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, attorney Sharlyn Smith; istry of Tourism, Burns House Limited and Baha Mar
infectious disease specialist, Dr Perry Gomez; director of the Pan-American Health Organisation, Dr Merle Lewis; director of the Public Health Recdrts :

Authority, Dr Baldwin Carey. ’ .







*










PICTURED (I-r) are: United States Ambassador to the Bahamas, Ned L Siegel; Katrina
McGhee of Susan G Komen for the Cure; Jennifer Segall of Susan G Komen for the
Cure; Stephanie Siegel, a cancer survivor; Julie Bernstien of Susan G Komen for the
Cure; Tina Lewis, board member of Susan G Komen for the Cure and member of the
Links (Las Vegas Chapter) and Minister of Health Dr Hubert Minnis.



fa ss ; 7 £3 8
PICTURED (I-r) are: attorney and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, Christel

Sands Feaste, insurance executive and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, ‘PICTURED (I-r) are: Louis Harold Joseph, ambassador of the Republic of Haiti to the Bahamas; Xiuling Xie; Dingxian Hu ambas-
Lynda Gibson; bank executive and member of the Nassau Chapter of the Links, Diane — sador of the People’s Republic of China in the Commonwealth of the Bahamas.
Bowe Pindling; Dr Tracey Halkitas. :



Herguson

ved

DVifference :

P.O. Box N-4659,
_Nassau, Bahamas _