Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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Around 100 atzociy
affected by murder —
lead. procession —

BE By MEGAN‘REYNOLDS:-- -
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GRUESOME display of
three men in effigy hanging

from a mock gallows was -

paraded through the streets
of Nassau as friends and rela-
tives of the murdered called
for killers to be hanged.

Hundreds joined the par-

ents, grandparents, brothers,
sisters and cousins of men and
women who were killed in
cold.blood as they followed
on foot and by car, a truck
blaring music and bearing the



’ The Tribun





USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

frightening: SCORE ermine: |) lar



Organiser Rodney Moncur
said the three: “hanged men”

_represent the lawmaker, law- |

“breaker, and the law enforcer.
He said: “They are all being
hanged because they are all

contributing to the murder

rate in the country.

_“We are demanding of the.

government to remove the
impediments that prevent the
execution of the death penal
ty.

“There'i is too. much mur-

SEE page 12.

Visa waiver programme among tourism

plans put forward hy Obie Wilcheombe — :

‘Mi By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

PLANS to reform tourism involving the adoption of a visa waiv-
er programme for visitors have been put forward by former tourism

minister Obie Wilchcombe.

The PLP member for West End Bimini i is calling on tourism
officials and businesses to consider his ideas and submit their own
by working together during the current economic crisis.

Part of his vision is for the Ministry of Tourism, hotel sector and

SEE page 12.













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ewer is
declared
bankrupt

THE Supreme Court has
declared a Bahamian lawyer
bankrupt after he failed to trans-
fer a $308,750 loan by Scotiabank
to five of its customers to finance
the purchase of lots and con-

_ struction of homes or apartments.

According to the bank, Jan
Ward and his firm, Ward & Com-

pany, not only “failed or refused .

to pay” the mortgage financing
to the bank’s:-clients, but has also
refused to return the money to
either the bank, or its lawyer, Mr
Cedric L Parker.

The Supreme Court made its
adjudication order against Ward
on October 28 ordering him to
immediately, on receipt of ser-
vice, attend the Receiver/Man-
ager at the Registrar of the

SEE page 12

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008














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@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

ONLY a handful of Bahamians have experi-

enced the ravages of war or seen poverty, pain
and suffering in its most devastating form. Only
‘a few have felt the “unnatural and unwanted
euphoria” that follows killing in the line of duty.

Some of those who have had this experience
— Bahamian men and women, who served as
part of foreign armed forces in Iraq at some






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point during the past five years, will be fea-
‘tured in this newspaper.

Today we tell the story of Grand Bahama
native Adam Goldsmith, who was on active
operations in Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq
as a member of the British Army.

He was the only foreigner and person of
African heritage in his squadron. He was, at
that time, the only serving soldier in the British

SEE page seven



Cuoost From:









li By MEGAN REYNOLDS .
- Tribune Staff Reporter

GUN crimes reported in.

Nassau this weekend ‘include
the shooting of two young
men and the hold up of a gas
station.

The two men were sot
while in Hampton Street, ‘f
Mount Royal Avenue, j. ”
after 10pm on Friday.

' The 18-year-old was shot in
the-right side of his chest, and

“the 24-year-old was shot in the

left side of his body.
Both are in serious condi-

-“tion/and being treated in

Princess. Margaret Hospital..

SEE page 14

“US staff sent to

help solve i ISSUES
at Morton Salt

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter -
alowe@tribunemedia.nét

‘MORTON Salt’s parent:com-
pany has sent staff from the

‘United States to Inagua to

begin work towards mending

‘the relationship between the

salt union and management at
the recovering plant, a union
official said yesterday. -

Wilfred Seymour, a heavy -
- equipment operator of 36 years
‘standing at the Inagua plant and

President of the salt union, the
Bahamas Industrial Manufac-

SEE page 14
























Eusey a.

Regular Sub

Foronty





PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



/Tribune staff

ipé Major.

Do
u



ACTING COMMISSIONER of Police Reginald Fergusomalong with Minister of National Security Tommy
Turnquest turn the lights on for the Christmas trees at Police Headquarters on East Street. The annual
event took place on Thursday.

Meh WL (ce

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 3






TOP EXECUTIVES of Bahamas Ferries recently paid a courtesy call on

Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing

Prime Minister Hubert Ingaraham at his office on Friday, November 14. Pic-

tured from left to right.are: Stuart Ballantyne, of Sea Transportation Corpo- —

ration, the Designer and Builder of Bahamas Ferries’ newest vessel, The
Bohengy II; Craig Symonette, Chairman of Bahamas Ferries; Prime Minister
Ingraham; Khaalis Rolle, Chief Marketing Officer; Captain Harvey Sweeting,
Chief Operating Officer and Stephen Thompson, Bahamas Ferries, Chief

Financial Officer.

Bahamas Ferries request approval
for a ‘state of the art’ terminal

Bahamas Ferries has requested

approval from the Government to
construct a “state of the art”
downtown departure terminal to
serve passengers of Bahamas Fer-
‘ries along with all passengers trav-
eling to and from the Family
Islands via sea.
' “The request was put forward in
a meeting, led by company chair-
man Craig Symonette at the Prime
Minister’s office in the Cecil Wal-
lace- Whitfield Building on Friday,
November 14, 2008. :
It:follows on the heels of the

launch of the company’s newest

ferry, the Bohengy III.

Mr Symonette asked for gov-
ernment’s approval and guidance
for the construction of “a first class
departure lounge facility” at a cen-
tral location along Bay Street.

The Prime Minister informed
Mr Symonette that the govern-
ment. would be happy to accom-
modate the company’s demand.
“It- would be wonderful to have a
first class departure lounge for
domestic travelers,” he said.

The Chairman was accompa-

nied by Stuart Ballantyne, of Sea |

Transportation Corporation, the
Designer and Builder of Bahamas
Ferries’ newest vessel, The
Bohengy II; Stephen Thompson,
Bahamas Ferries, Chief‘Financial
Officer; Captain Harvey Sweet-
ing, Chief Operating Officer and

Reports of braw!
between police and
~ Defence Force officers

‘The Tribune received reports *

of a brawl between:police and
defence force officers taking place
at Potters Cay dock around 11pm
Friday. :

As many as 10 police cars were ~

seen driving at high speed down
East Bay Street. It was reported

that they were headed for Pot- -

ters Cay. However, a police
spokesman said he had no knowl-

edge of anything having occurred.

in the area.

Man pleads guilty

to possession of 142.

With intent to supply

A GARDEN Close man.§is
expected to be sentenced in Mag-
istrate’s Court today after pleading
guilty to possessing 142 pounds of
marijuana with intent to supply.

Twenty-nine-year-old Alvacar-
do Jason Jolly, of Garden Close
off Blue Hill Road, on Friday
pleaded guilty to possession of
marijuana with intent to supply.

Jolly and Shavunka Marie
McKinney, also accused of pos-
sessing marijuana with intent to
supply, were arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane, on Friday.

McKinney, who pleaded not ©
guilty to the charge, is expected.

to appear in court today for a bail
hearing.

According to court dockets, the
two are alleged to have committed
the offence on Thursday, Novem-
ber 20.

Jolly, who was represented by
attorney Dion Smith, pleaded
guilty to the charge while McKin-
ney, who was represented by attor-
ney T’Shura Ambrose, pleaded
not guilty to the charge.

Both accused were remanded
in custody and are expected to
return to court on Monday for a
bail hearing and sentencing.

A 40-year-old man was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
last week on a marijuana posses-
sion charge.

It is alleged that Edney Rolle
was found in possession of eight
pounds of marijuana on Novem-

ber 18, while at Mangrove Cay, .

Andros.
Rolle, who was arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in

Court 8, Bank:Lane, pleaded not °

guilty to the charge. He was
remanded in custody and will
return to court on November 27
for a bail hearing.

id
UU ty

Tas Ma eas
PHONE: 322-2157



Khaalis Rolle, Chief Marketing
Officer.

“We can build lots of ships, but
we would like to create a proper
world class departure terminal,”
said Mr Symonette while speaking

- with Mr Ingraham.

Mr Symonette informed the

Prime Minister that the present
facilities at Potter’s Cay are some-
what restrictive.
_ He committed to building the
facility, which will not only accom-
modate Bahamas Ferries’ passen-
gers but all persons traveling to
and from the Family Islands by
sea.

-The Chairman intends that the
facility will accommodate trav-
ellers checking in and out at the
top level with more cumbersome
operations including the use of
forklifts, heavy equipment, freight
and the movement of vehicles tak-
ing place at the lower level.

The group also discussed a
number of important matters
related to the ferry transportation
service as well'as on going
developments in the Family
Islands. :

Pleased with the meeting,

‘ Symonette said, “The Prime Min-

ister was very receptive and fully
understands the importance of
marine transport in this country,
and I feel very confident that our
company and others as a group in
the ferry business, we will work
with this administration to
achieve mutually beneficial end
goals.”

cos ee -~Bahamians claim their

Cuban medical degrees

‘not being recognised’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

YOUNG Bahamians who
trained for seven years in Cuba to
obtain medical degrees are being
“unfairly frustrated” in their aim
of putting their skills to work in

: their own country because of a

restrictive policy, some claim.’
They say they are being held

: back by the “non-recognition” of

their Cuban qualifications and
told that they have to pay their

fi. way through further training

abroad before they can enter the

: Bahamian healthcare profession.

Two medical graduates have
questioned why the policy is
being enforced, asking whether
rather than scientific considera-
tions, it may be “cold war” style
politics or an “old boy” network
of healthcare professionals keep-
ing the policy in place.

Former C.I. Gibson student,
Lashano Gilbert, 25, took up a
scholarship to learn Spanish and
study medicine in Holguin
Province, Cuba, graduating in
mid-2007.

Exam

He was shocked to hear for-
mer health minister Dr Marcus
Bethel tell Bahamian medical stu-
dents in Cuba in 2004 that their
qualifications would not be recog-
nised in their home country
unless they passed medical board
exams in the United States, the
United Kingdom, Canada or
Jamaica — at a cost of thousands
of dollars, which the graduates
would have to bear.

As for many of his fellow med-
ical students, after having trav-
elled to Cuba to take up the
scholarship because of financial

Graduates say they have
to pay for further training



constraints, the realisation was a

major blow, said Mr Gilbert. ©

Some students dropped out, but
he stayed on.

Mr Gilbert noted that for years
Cuban nationals, trained and cer-
tified in Cuba, have been com-
ing over to practise medicine in
the Bahamas.

According to Cuban ambas-
sador, Jose Luis Ponce, around
40 Cuban physicians have done so
in the last five years.

Cuba is often heralded: by its
friends and begrudgingly
acknowledged by its foes for its
effective healthcare system.

Common indicators of a popu- |

lation’s health — life expectan-
cy, infant mortality rate —

‘regularly show the communist

country producing first world
health care results on a third
world budget.

The World Health Organisa-
tion records that-life expectancy
for women and men is around
five years longer in-Cuba than in
the Bahamas, while the mortality
rate for children under five
is roughly half the Bahamian
rate. ;

Mr Gilbert claims friends from

his course who have returned to.

work in other countries have
found their health authorities
much more accommodating.
While working as a science
teacher at C.H. Reeves school as
a stop gap money-saving mea-
sure, Mr Gilbert is now consider-
ing applying to work as a doctor









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in Spain-or Colombia, where his
degree is accepted.

. “It required hardwork and a
lot of study. Sleepless nights. I
want to come back to my own
country and help my own people
and they tell me I can’t. It’s very
frustrating,” he said.

Requirements |

A 30-year-old colleague, who is
now working in the Bahamas’
tourism industry to save enough
money to sit the foreign board
exams, said he can appreciate the
BMC’s point, but wishes the gov-
ernment would assist graduates
in meeting the requirements.

“T recognise their point of view,
that they want us to be prepared
to treat the Bahamian people, but
at the same time, why not help
me? Why not come up with a
programme, put me under anoth-
er physician, or let me work for
six months and sit my exam?”

Both graduates have years of











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‘experience treating patients, as

the Cuban system requires stu-
dents to undertake both practi-
cal and theoretical training from
the start.

Tahiru Mahama, 35, a Ghana-
ian and 2001 graduate of the
Cuban system said he had to sit
additional qualifying exams when
he returned to practise in Ghana.

However, this extra course of
study was funded by the State,
he noted.

Mr Gilbert suggests that med-
ical authorities in the Bahamas
should allow the graduates to —
practise under the watchful eye of
a certified physician and see what
they are capable of. ‘

Ambassador to Caricom,
Leonard Archer, said if the BMC
is concerned about the doctor’s
competency, they should send a
team to Cuba to assess the scope
of the country’s medical pro-
gramme.

A message left for the Minister
of Health was not returned up to
press time yesterday.





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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE ~



| ] EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI |
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S. iG)

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A.,. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor or 1972-

Pubsshed Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street; P.O. Box N- 3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

‘TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News: Circulation and Advertising). 320. 1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

‘The right wing and politics of paranoia

TALK-RADIO hosts play their listeners as
well as Yo. Yo Ma plays the cello, stroking a
string and making their audience'respond exact-
ly the. way they want.

Nowhere is that more evident than in the
fabricated right-wing outrage about reimposition

of the Fairness Doctrine. Under that long-aban- °

doned rule, radio and TV stations that use the
public airways were required to give equal time
to various sides of an issue. The rule was well-
intended, but in practical terms radio and TV
stations found it safer to avoid political discus-

sion altogether than risk running afoul of the’

law. .-
For that and other reasons, the Fairness Doc-
trine was abandoned more than 20 years ago, a
change that in turn opened the door to creation

_. of right-wing talk radio.
However, with Democrats in control of Con-

gress and Barack Obama about to become pres- -
ident, the maestros of talk radio see-an-oppor-....... .

tunity. They know that the more threatened
their audience feels, the higher their ratings
get. And what better way to rile up their lis-
teners than to claim that the Democrats are
out to silence talk radio itself, the medium that
brings conservatives the truth as they want to
know it. So for months, Rush Limbaugh, Sean

Hannity and others have been warning their.

audiences that: once in power, the Democrats

plan to bring back the Fairness Doctrine. Politi-
cians such as Newt Gingrich have joined the.

chorus, and right-wing pundits insist the issue
_will be part of Obama’s agenda in his first 100
days i in office.

But it’s‘all nonsense: Obama; for example, is °’

on the record as very clearly opposing a new
Fairness Doctrine. The most recent bill calling
for reinstatement of the doctrine was intro-

duced back in:2005 and it went nowhere. In °

the current Congress, controlled by Démocrats
‘in both chambers, no such bills have been intro-
duced and no Democrats have announced or
even suggested an effort to resurrect the policy.
With ‘no justification for their paranoia, right-
wing media outlets have gone seeking it out,
asking individual Democrats whether they think
that restoring the doctrine might be-a good
idea. When they get a yes, it sets off a whole
new round of bemoaning. ‘You get the sense
that the Democrats are amusing therhselves,
- much as you'd toss.a hunk of meat into.a tank of
_ piranas just to watch them go into a frenzy.
The bottom line is that there is no chance

whatsoever of the Fairness Doctrine coming,

back, as those-on the right will no doubt learn in
the months to come. But it won’t matter,
because just as quickly as one justification for
paranoia disappears, another is certain to
emerge. Among a.certain crowd, paranoia is a

steady state that continues independent of evi

dence or proof.

In a famous essay written in 1964, iistanea
Richard Hofstadter traced the evolution of what ©

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he called “the paranoid style i in American pol-
itics,” and his description remains as fresh and
accurate as the day it was written: «

“But the modern right wing ... feels dispos-
sessed,” Hofstadter wrote. “America has been
largely taken away from them,and their kind,
though they are determined to try to repossess

‘it and to prevent the final destructive act of ©

‘ subversion. The old: American virtues have

already been eaten away by cosmopolitans and ~

intellectuals; the old competitive capitalism has
been gradually undermined by socialistic and
communistic schemers....”

It all sounds so familiar, doesn’t it? The pas- _

sage of more than 40 years has confirmed Hof-
stadter’s observation that the paranoid style is

enduring. All that has changed is the degree of
_ influence that the paranoid style has achieved

through-talk radio, and the grip it now holds on
the Republican Party.

In fact, the Democrats have every reason to
encourage rather than break that relationship.

As the paranoid right talks amongst itself on

tadio, Fox News and conservative web sites, as
they egg each other into ever higher fits of hys-
teria, they construct an alternative America
and alternative reality for themselves that is
increasingly divorced from the reality perceived
by mainstream America.

In his piece, Hofstadter made it clear that he
wasn ’t using the term “paranoid” in the clinical

sense. Instead, “it is the use of paranoid modes. ,

of expression by more or less normal people

that makes the phenomenon significant.”

“The paranoid spokesman sees the fate: of
' “Conispiracy in apocalyptic terms — he traffics in
“the birth and death of whole worlds, whole

= political orders, whole systems of human val-

ues,” Hofstadter wrote. “He is always manning
the barricades of civilization. He constantly
lives at a turning point.”

Or, as Home Depot'co-founder Bernie Mar-

‘cus said in an Oct. 17 conference call in which he

tried to rally business leaders to beat back the
Democrats: “This is the demise of a civiliza-
tion. This is how a civilization disappears. I’m
sitting here as.an elder statesman, and I’m
watching this happen, and I don’t believe it.”
Marcus was not referring specifically to Oba-
ma_in those remarks, but there’s no question

that the president-elect stokes such emotions by -

his mere existence. Everything about Obama —

‘his race, his age, his intelligence, his name, his -
. back story — feeds the paranoid’s sense that

America is being stolen from its true owners.

- In fact, if you had to design someone to per-
fectly epitomize their deepest fears, Obama
would be it. Over the next four to eight years,
he’s destined to make Limbaugh, Hannity and
their ilk even-richer than they are today, and in
the process make their listeners seem even more

--- ¢razy and alienated.

(This article was written by Jay Bookman of
Cox News Service c. 2008).

Arawak Cay would
be an ideal venue
for Junkanoo

Bawa

EDITOR, The Tiibwine:

ALL of the Government and
Opposition Parliamentary
Members must, I would imag-
ine, pass through Bay Street at
least once a week, and clearly
they are not reading the news-
papers on their way.

Bay Street itself shouts from °

sidewalk to sidewalk, “Hey
guys, I’m dying and some of my
neighbours are already dead.
Just look, the shops are closed
because there is*no business.”

If they were reading the
newspapers they would know
that tourism is in trouble, as
headline after headline shouts
the news of layoffs, redundan-
cies and firings.

‘Yet I heard last night, from

' good goods, that our national

preoccupation will again be
staged on Bay Street this year
and that plans are already in
place to erect the bleachers
once again on December Sth,
just as any hope of even a little

letters@tribunemedia.net



Christmas business for the mér-—

chants might otherwise kick in.

Do any of these people, who.

ostensibly “run” this country,
have even the slightest under-
standing of what is conducive
to retail business and what is
not? Not a chance! Would any
of them, or their wives, do their
Christmas, or any other shop-
ping, in the Orange Bowl or
Giants Stadium? So what makes
them think that a Bay Street
Bowl is any more attractive to
anyone? Ah, maybe it really is
that they just don’t think!
Well MP’s and Senators,
guess. what — Bay Street busi-
nesses employ people too, and
many are already on short work
weeks and other rotations — Do
you really need to see the head-

line “Bay Street Merchants Lay

off Hundreds” to understand
that junkanoo is not good for
Bay Street?

There could be no better
venue for Junkanoo than what
has evolved to be a thriving cul-

“tural park at Arawak Cay With”

two ideally situated, separate,
roadways that could be
bleachered to the bone.
There is massive space avail-
able in the centre for food and

‘beverage vendors to make a.

much needed buck and the
existing fixed structure eateries
would benefit enormously too.
For my life I cannot see why a:
relocation to a venue such as
this has not been considered. It -
does not negatively impact any-
one and in fact would benefit
an enormous number of peo-
ple, many of whom are strug-
gling today to put bread in their
families’ mouths.

TAMBOURINA
Nassau,
November 19, 2008.

We must learn to change our
lifestyles and watch our, budgets :

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is no time for people
with political ambitions to be

using the unfortunate circum: .
stances of our poor brothers |

and sisters to try and get
mileage for themselves.

The workers who have
been laid off are in deep peril
and I for one sympathize with
them very much.

I wonder if the spokesper-

‘sons who are making so much

noise would rather for
Atlantis or any other hotel to
keep everyone on until they
have to shut down and in the

“ case of Atlantis put 9,000 peo-
ple out of work instead of |

1,500.

These spokespersons can
easily prove their true con-
cerns by. hiring a lot of the

’- workers who have lost their :
- jobs and pay them to do-noth-

America has a chance to

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AMERICA is back! People are
tejoicing. Blacks and whites are
hugging each other and crying
from Florida to New York to
Philadelphia. They are celebrat-
ing in the streets.. There is now
talk of peace. This is what Amer-
ica needed for a long time. Coun-
tries now want to do business with
America. They want to embrace

_America. They want to come to
America. There are smiles on the

faces of Americans.

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ing. (Then we will see true
generosity) because it sounds
to me as if that is what they
want the hotels to do. :

We as Bahamians are going
to have it very rough over the
next 18 months, but if we
learn to change our lifestyles

and watch our budgets by only:

purchasing what we need and
not what we want, we will get
through this crisis by the help
of almighty God.

We have lost alot of our
values for the right things and
sometimes it takes drastic sit-

uations to’ bring: us bags down:

to earth.

This crisis is not the end of
the world. I grew up before
we had so much prosperity in
the Bahamas, when Bahami-
ans helped each other to get

- by day after day. We had it

rough but we were happy,
God-fearing people back then.

- America now has the opportu-_
nity to start fresh. There is anew

President-elect. Someone who °

talks about peace not war. Some-
one who talks about ONE United

' States of America, where blacks

The preachers in our,
churches were preaching

_ because of a desire to truly do

God's work and not a desire
to become a millionaire.

We Bahamians unfortu-
nately over the past 35 years
have made money and mater-

‘lal things our true idol; and™

thereby have put God in sec-
ond place, and when this hap-
pens we have to be brought
back to the right way.

The Bible says we are to
be our brothers keeper and it
also says‘by the sweat of our
brows wé shall eat, so it there-
fore beholds all of us that if”
we have a job then we must
perform to keep that job not
take it for granted that we are
owed anything.

A CONCERNED
BAHAMIAN
November 22, 2008

start. afresh

what the world needed. sonienne
who has a positive message of
hope, change and opportunity for

‘all. Not war and. divisiveness. -

Another John F Kennedy, anoth-
er Martin Luther King: Senator |

and whites can join hands and ~~ Barack Obama.

live as one. Where there is equal
opportunity for all no matter

‘what race, creed.or colour. This is

what America needed. This is

We are offering low price 's starting at 35 00,
No ol is He over i 00. | :

PAT STRACHAN
Nassau,
November 13, 2008.







THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 5



BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Bahamian filmmaker hoping
‘Rain’ will make a splash

m@ MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIAN filmmaker
Maria Govan is anxiously
awaiting the Bahamian pre-



“T feel like it’s a
very common story
in the Bahamas,
where children are

Renel to go to really difficult
places.

“But you learn a great deal
through the process and you
see how it takes shape in the
cutting room. That’s where I

miere of her first narrative raised by really learned a lot about
film ‘Rain’ on the opening myself as a director.”

night of the Bahamas Inter- grandparents oe Following a year of pro-
national Film Festival. family figures in duction in New York, ‘Rain’

The 34-year-old who wrote,
directed and produced the
film about a 14-year-old girl
named Rain (played by first
time actress Renel Brown)
who moves from the family
islands, where her grand-
mother raised her, to Nassau
where she is confronted with
the mother who abandoned
her as an infant, and inner-
city culture.

Ms Govan poured over the
script for eight months to pro-
duce a universal story in a
unique cultural setting that
will not only appeal to
Bahamians, but be something
to which viewers around the
world can relate.

She said: “It’s a reaily sim-
ple relationship story about a
young girl and her mother and
how their connecting trans-
forms each of them in both
positive and negative ways.

“T feel like it's a very com-
mon story in the Bahamas,
where children are raised by
grandparents or family figures
in their lives, and there is an
absence of-men.

“It is looking at young
women and trying to see that
sort of breaking point in our
lives in adolescence as we
come into adulthood, and
what makes young people sur-
vive challenging circum-
stances.”

As a filmmaker with no for-
mal training, Ms Govan pro-
duced two documentaries
about Junkanoo~ and
HIV/AIDS in the Bahamas,
but she forged into new terri-
tory with her first narrative
feature.

“It was a lot harder than I

their lives, and
there is an

absence of men.”



Maria Govan

had ever imagined or antici-
pated,” she said. “And I
learned some difficult and
important lessons along the
way.”

The filmmaker spent eight
months working full time on
the script in 2005, acquired
funding within a year, and
started filming in Nassau,
Eleuthera and Cat Island,
over 21 days in January 2007.

But the shoot was inter-
rupted when the main star,
Renel, fell ill, and the team
was faced with an unpredicted
hold-up.

“It was an expensive issue,
but in retrospect, having had a
chance to look at the shoot
and come back and shoot
again was a gift creatively,”
she reflected. |

Although she had the sup-
port of four producers, includ-
ing Nate Kohn she met
through BIFF’s residency pro-
gramme, Maria was the main
financial producer for her film,
as well as director of a cast
including several actors with
no experience.

“Around money it has been
hard, running out of money
and having to raise money and

having to do a lot of work in ,

our pick ups with no money
whatsoever.

“And as a director, there
was a lot of tough dramatic
content and we had to get

ai Voticed

5

VANHEUSEN

CT ey reed cc
career wear shirt

was ready to premier.

And it was chosen for noth-
ing less than the world’s sec-
ond largest film festival in
Toronto, Canada. -

An audience of around 430
viewers in one of the Toronto
Film Festival’s largest theatres
praised the first viewing of the
movie with a standing ovation,
and it was shown twice more.

Although Miss Govan was
uplifted by the world premier,
she is more excited about
showing it to a Bahamian
audience for the first time.

“I represented the
Bahamas and Bahamians so I
think it’s going to be really
interesting to get their per-
spective,” she said.

‘Rain’ will be shown at the
National Performing Arts
Centre, Shirley Street, at 83pm
on Thursday, December 4.
Tickets are $25 and are avail-
able from www.bintlfilm-
fest.com or by calling BIFF
on 356-5939.

Rain will be shown again
at Galleria JFK Cinema at
5pm on Wednesday, Decem-
ber 10, when tickets are $5.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

- THE TRIBUNE



aricom bureau discusses impact 0

global financial crisis on the region

lm By SHARON TURNER
Bahamas Information
Services

ST. JOHNS, Antigua — The
global financial crisis and its
impact on tourism and foreign
direct investment in the region
were among matters discussed at
the 24th Meeting of the Bureau of
the Conference of Heads of Gov-
ernment of the Caricom Com-
munity in St. John’s, Antigua Sat-
urday.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
-ham participated in the meeting,
along with Bureau members
Baldwin Spencer, Prime Minis-
ter of Antigua and Barbuda and
Chairman of Conference, and

Dean Barrow, Prime Minister of —

Belize.

During the meeting, the
Bureau received.a report from
the Committee of Central Bank

Governors on the implications of °
the global financial crisis for the.

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

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region. The Committee recom-

mended to Heads that Caricom

Governments continue appropri-

ate prudential measures regarding
‘

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despair, you do have life---

‘Life is worth living’.
Please don’t waste it.”

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foreign exchange reserves,
deposit insurance, capitalization
ratios, local asset ratios, cross
boarder supervision and supervi-
sion of non-banks such as insur-
ance companies and pension
funds.

The committee also urged gov-
ernments, where appropriate, to
encourage a change in the com-
position of bank lending toward
more productive and export-relat-
éd activities, to streamline con-
tingency planning with respect to
financial and non-financial sec-
tors and’to undertake public
investment programmes that cre-

_ate jobs and facilitate production

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PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham (2nd left) is pictured
at a press conference held fol-
lowing the close of the 24th
Meeting of the Bureau of the Con-
ference of Heads of Government
of the Caricom Community in St.
John's, Antigua Saturday. The
Bahamas, Antigua and Barbuda
and Belize currently make up the
three-member Bureau. Pictured
from left are Caricom Secretary
General Dr. Edwin Carrington,
Prime Minister Ingraham, Prime:
Minister of Antigua and Barbuda
.and. Conference Chairman Bald-
win Spencer and Prime. Minister
of Belize Dean Barrow.






It was noted that the Caricom
banking sector was spared many
problems because it does not hold.
toxic mortgage-backed securities







Antigua Sun Printing and Publishing

Agreement.

and holds very limited forms of
other types of exposure.

The Bureau urged multilateral
financial institutions (IFI) to show
greater sensitivity toward small
vulnerable economies in this peri-
od of turmoil. In particular, the
IFIs were urged to reverse the
practice of graduation based sole-
ly on GDP per capita.

Members of the Bureau mean-
time reiterated the call for
increased democratization of the.
international financial architec-
ture and encouraged the Com-
mittee of Central Bank Gover-

nors to continue its work with °

respect to contingency planning in
the financial and non-financial
sectors.

Tourism and Foreign
Direct Investment

Regarding the,impact of the
financial crisis on tourism and for-
eign-direct investment in the
region, members took note of the
World Tourism Organization’s
(WTO) report indicating that
tourism worldwide had grown by
7 per cent in 2007 but is expected
to grow:by only 2 per cent in
2008.

- Tourism from the United
States — the region’s principal

market — is expected to be down —

by 6 per cent over thanksgiving.

It is projecfed that Caribbean
tourism will experience negative’
growth next year.

Heads discussed measures
being taken by some resorts in
the region to attract guests,
including price slashing exercis-
es.

The Bureau also took note that
a number of development pro-
jects, -particularly tourism and
hotel related projects, have been
deferred or postponed as a result

of the international financial cri-.

sis, and expressed support for the
efforts of the Caribbean Tourism
Organization (CTO) and Cari-
com Tourism Ministers in mount-

ing an enhanced marketing pro- '

gramme for regional tourism.
As for trade, Heads discussed
the implementation of the EU-
Caricom EPA, indicating that
Heads expect to endorse the
negotiating mandate that will
guide Caricom negotiators in dis-
cussions pean, to:a ,Canada-

f (Oe


























































TUTTI
CU CTT
consitiered

m@ By SHARON TURNER
Bahamas Information
Services



CARICOM bureau
members, including Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
are considering contribut-
ing a further $2 million
more in aid to Haiti to help
it recover from the impact
of four hurricanes and trop- |
ical systems this summer.

The bureau met in St
Johns, Antigua on Saturday
to discuss issues affecting
the community, focusing to
a large extent on the global
financial crisis and its impli-
cations for the Caribbean
community.

Members also found time
to discuss the Haitian situa-
tion, and noted that there
remains an urgent need to
assist the Haitian govern-
ment in the delivery of
food, particularly to com-
munities left isolated by
roads and bridges washed
away during this year’s
storms.

The recent presidential
election in the United
States was also discussed by
The Bureau, which identi-
fied priority issues for
engagement with the. new ..
administration. :

Additionally, the Bureau
reviewed preparations for
upcoming scheduled sum-
mits:.a Summit between the
Heads of Government of
Caricom and the president
of Cuba on December 8; a
Summit of Latin American
and Caribbean Presidents
and Heads of Government
to take place in Bahia,
Brazil December 16-17 and
the 5th Summit of the
Americas scheduled for
Port of Spain, Trinidad and
Tobago in April, 2009.

Prime Minister Ingraham
completes:his Bureau term

,on December 31. President

‘of'Guyana Bharrat Jagdeo. - |
joins. the Bureau in J anual
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THE TRIBUNE





The Bahamas’ | *
‘forgotten’ soldier

FROM page one

military who was a Bahamian
national, the first Bahamian to
become a drill and recruit
instructor at one of the British
Army’s foremost recruiting bar-
racks, ATR Pirbright.

Not only did he suffer rejec-
tion from his fellow recruits
because of his race and national-
ity, survived combat in what
many have described as one of
the most beautiful and deadly
parts of the globe, but his accom-
plishments were virtually ignored
by his country’s government.

For him, the latter would

prove to be the unkindest wound -

he would suffer as a soldier.
“Throughout my time in the

military 1 served Her Majesty

but yet in my heart I always held



“Yes, I have
killed and
experienced the
unnatural and
unwanted
euphoria that
follows. It comes
from the fact that
you have trained
for years for war
and finally you
have proven
yourself. Yet there
still remains in my
mind as to why.”



the Bahamas. Every operation, .

every country I served in, I took
the Bahamas’ flag with me. I nev-
er ever forgot my island roots
and proudly showed it off at
every opportunity and flew it
proudly from. wherever I stayed,”
he told The Tribune.

Perhaps not surprisingly, dur-
ing basic training Adam had to
adjust to a new situation where
he was no longer considered part
of a majority with regard to his
race and ethnicity.

Adam joined the British army
at 29 in 1999 and was the only
ethnic minority soldier in his
squadron. Both his. age — as oth-
er recruits were 18 to 25 -—— and
nationality set him apart from
the other men and women serv-
ing with him. —

On more than one occasion
he was made painfully aware that

the British Army, until quite

recently, had an “abysmal record
of racial and physical abuse.”

At the time that Adam joined
the army there had been in place,
for a few years, a new awareness
of the treatment of ethnic minori-
ties.

“They had a zero tolerance
attitude to any of this behaviour
(racism). But even though it was
enforced, under the surface it

. was and still is prevalent. Not all
personnel were racists, but there
were enough to make you feel
uncomfortable in your daily life,”
he said. a

One encounter stood out im
Adam’s mind, one which he con-
siders a “turning point” in his
basic training. One day he found
a note on his barrack’s bed say-
ing: “Don’t bother carrying on
nigger, your place isn’t here,
there is no black in the. Union
Jack.”

. “This made me furious, yet

there was no way I would ever let
them see that, so all I did-was
throw it away and made my
mind up to never quit and make
my family and country proud,”
he said. Bui

That is exactly what he did. At
the end of his phase one training,
Adam was awarded for being the
best recruit and best recruit at

“When it was announced I
knew then who had left the note
as you could see it on his face.
Three years later I met that same

person on an overseas operation —

and he was one of my subordi-
nates,” he said.

Adam had three major active
operations during his service in
the British Army, but the tour
that impacted the Grand
Bahamian the most was the one
in Iraq. :

In Iraq, Adam experienced for
the first time what he described
as “the true dark side of human-
ity.”

“Yes, I have killed and expe-
rienced the unnatural and
unwanted euphoria that follows.
It comes from the fact that you
have trained for years for war
and finally you have proven
yourself. Yet there still remains
in my mind as to why. Is there a
just reason for killing, especially
for such an unworthy cause?”

. After coming to the end of
his military service last year,
Adam asked to present the flag
to the Bahamas High Commis-
sion at the Bahamas’ Indepen-
dence Day Celebration in Lon-
don. ? ‘

“This is the same flag that as a

Bahamian I treasured and kept |

safe, and proudly displayed all
over the world. It represented to
me the very ideals of a small
country in the Atlantic that has a
long and rich beautiful history

which is filled with a race of - '

beautiful strong people who have
endured over hundreds of years,
foreign rule, hurricanes, racism,
recession and yet somehow has

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stayed strong in character. That
flag kept me strong, focused,
it helped me and gave me
strength.

“It is this which made me fly
the Bahamian flag, to let the
world know that one man from a
small country was doing his part
and representing it the best that
he could,” Adam said. 3

Sadly, the request to present i
to the High Commissioner was
denied,.as it was deemed “unsuit-
able” on this occasion and was
thought to not “fit into the cele-

_brations.”

‘Almost more than anything,
this rejection and insult to every-
thing he felt the Bahamian flag
stood for really shook Adam’s
faith in society and in those
placed above him to govern.

“I cannot explain my shock,
my anger, my shame of this rejec-
tion. Being a soldier should be
accustomed to being shunned by
many, but from my own coun-
try?” .

On a visit to the Bahamas lat-
er that year, Adam presented the
flag at the Coral Harbour Base in

a meeting with officers, of the °

RBDF, without pomp and cere-
mony. It was well received from
a “fellow soldier”, someone who

Adam said “understood the:
meaning of pride, honour, and

self-sacrifice.”

“Not once throughout my
career did any government offi-
cial in the Bahamas acknowledge
the fact that I had served in Iraq
or any other country and never
dishonoured my country, the
Bahamas. I have not always fol-
lowed the right path in my life,

“and I have done things of which

_I am ashamed, but during my

time of service I never disgraced
my country or what it really
stood for,” he said.

It is not hard to find the irony
in Adam’s story, that a country
whose successive governments
continuously bemoan the lack of
pride the youth have in nation-
hood, a country which struggles
to find ways in which to instil a
sense of service in the young,
essentially shrugged off the
accomplishments of Adam and
other young men and women
like him who participated in the
hardest fought and most contro-

_ versial armed conflict, of a.gen-
eration,

Adam said he fears that ser-
vice and self-sacrifice may
become an alien virtue in
‘Bahamians, particularly with a
new generation of young persons
mired in a sense of entitlement.

“T have listened to some
preachers talking for many years

’ of saving the lost and doing the
Lord’s work and yet they preach
from their large churches and

’

country “right or wrong.”

LOCAL NEWS

7.

i

drive in their expensive cars.
Who will stand up in my country
and take account for what is hap-
pening?

“Who has the courage to stand
up and say ‘I will no longer talk,
but act.’ Who has this strength,
who understands self-sacrifice?
Who will stand before the crim-
inals, the corrupt, and the false
prophets?

“This person must have the
same resilience and fortitude that
a solitary man did when he dared
to stand up on that memorable
day in Parliament in 1965 and
throw the mace from the win-
dow and demand independence!
This person is us, you, your
neighbour, everyone. I have seen
poverty, pain and suffering in its
most devastating form. I don’t
want to see it in my Own coun-:
try,” Adam said.

Adam is now overseas work-
ing in the private security indus-
try, training personnel and com-
panies, as a director for ESP
Group, a company that provides
solutions for security concerns
internationally.

As Adam pointed out, long
gone are the days of wars fought
for the defence of a nation or for
the protection of the persecut-
ed. However, Adam firmly
believes that it is a soldier’s duty -
to follow orders and fight for his

“To this day I am proud to
have served and proud of the
men who served alongside me,”
Adam said.

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 7

ADAM GOLDSMITH (above) flies the
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serving with the British Army in Iraq.
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PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS










Felipé Major/Tribune staff

The Annual
Christmas
Jollification

A SPECTACULAR
SELECTION of food, drink
and local crafts was on display
at the weekend as the
Bahamas National Trust on
Village Road held its annual
Jollification event.

Items for sale included
clocks with Bahamian designs
(left), dolls (below) and a host
of straw handbags (top right). .

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THE | HIBUNGE



Mn ee lll a
torm clouds over Caribbean financial services

@ By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat).

OMINOUS clouds are gather-
ing around financial services in
the Caribbean both offshore and
onshore. The clouds are
approaching from two directions
— the new US government that
will take office in January 2009,
and the European Union (EU)
in the implementation of the Eco-

nomic Partnership Agreement

(EPA) that Caribbean countries
have signed.

The Caribbean will well recall
the blacklisting of many of their
jurisdictions in 1998 by the
Organisation for Economic Coop-
eration and Development
(OECD) — known as the rich
nations’ club — when it launched
its so-called ‘harmful tax compe-
tition initiative’ (HTCI). The
OECD claimed that the tax-rev-
enue bases of its member states
were being eroded by competi-
tion from 41 low taxing jurisdic-
tions some of them in the
Caribbean. ,

Alongside the HTCI, the
OECD ’s sister-organisation, the
Financial Action Task Force
(FATF), initiated its “Forty rec-
ommendations on money laun-
dering” which it then unilaterally
sought to impose on the world by
naming countries that it said were
“uncooperative” in the effort to
curb money laundering. Of
course, the so-called recommen-
dations were not recommenda-
tions at all; they were rules that
the OECD countries alone cre-
ated. Eventually, the IMF, also
controlled by the OECD coun-

tries, adopted the “recommenda- '

tions” and now use them as part
of the financial sector appraisal
programmes of countries.

The OECD’s HTCT initiative
was widely seen as an attempt to
kill the offshore financial services
sector of the economies of devel-"
oping states which had turned to
such services as a means of diver-
sifying their economies and ‘easing
their reliance on the exports of

primary products or tourism. The

financial services providers in
some of these countries in the
Caribbean, such as the British
Virgin Islands, the Cayman
Islands, the Bahamas and Bermu-
da, became very good at it and
gave stiff competition to their
rivals in the OECD nations.

oe JIncthe end, the QECD set






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aside its HTCI blacklist but the
intent behind it was never fully
abandoned. The tactical with-

-drawal of the OECD from the
. HTCI owed much to the ability of

the affected countries to argue

their case vigorously in Com-.

monwealth councils where
OECD members Australia,
Britain, Canada and New
Zealand were present, even

though the major breakthrough |

was the decision of the new US
administration of George W Bush
not to support the OECD initia-
tive which was started with the
full cooperation of Lawrence
Summers, the Treasury Secretary
of the previous Democratic Party
government of President Bill

Clinton.

‘Summers has been part of the
election campaign team of the
Democratic President-elect of the
United States, Barack Obama
who is on record ‘as.opposed to
“tax havens”.

In February'2008, Obama co-
sponsored a bill in the US Senate
with Carl Levin, the Senator from
Michigan, which names 13
Caribbean jurisdictions among
those that could be listed by the
Treasury Secretary as “un-coop-
erative” and penalised. Among

‘these countries are the four men-

tioned earlier and Anguilla,
Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados,
Belize, Dominica, Grenada, St

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Levin believes that the total
loss to the US Treasury from off-
shore tax evasion alone approach-

es US$100 billion per year and.

he wants, atnongst other things, to
give the Treasury authority to
take special measures against for-
eign jurisdictions and financial
institutions that impede U.S. tax
enforcement. How quite the US
Treasury will establish that US
tax enforcement is being impeded
is unclear, but given the past his-
tory of how these matters have
been handled, the burden of
proof may very well be imposed
on the foreign jurisdictions and
financial institutions not the US
Treasury.

In any event, a robust pan-
Caribbean response is needed to
the “Stop Tax Havens Abuse
Act” as the Levin-Obama bill is
called. Some Caribbean countries
have had the tendency to go it
alone on these issues, in the belief
that they are better able to nego-
tiate themselves out of them.
But, this problem is far too fun-
damental to the new Caribbean
ideology of services as the sav-
iour of their economies not to be
tackled jointly.

The governments of Jamaica
and Guyana have recently indi-
cated that they wish to establish
financial services, and legislation
has been enacted to do so. In this
connection, with almost all of its
member-states and associate

member states being vulnerable.

to the US bill, the Secretariat of
the Caribbean, Community and
Common Market (Caricom)
might take the initiative to con-
vene a group to start preparing a
pan-Caribbean response.

The EU member states of the
OECD - France, Germany and
Britain in particular — were also
hawks on the HTCI. In March
this year, the 27 Finance Ministers
of the EU announced their deter-
mination “to crack down on tax
havens”. And it is significant that
the EU has sought to introduce
into the EPAs, which it is negoti-
ating with several developing
countries, standards that have not

been agreed in negotiations’ at the...



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World Trade Organisation
(WTO) on the General Agree-
ment on Trade in Services
(GATS). Among these “stan-
dards” are: the OECD’s “Agree-
ment on exchange of information
on tax matters” and a require-
ment that note be taken of the.
“Ten key principles for Informa-
tion Exchange” promulgated by
the finance ministers of the G7
nations.

It is telling that no small state
was invited to the G20 meeting
held in Washington on Novem-
ber 15th to consider the current
global financial crisis, even

women and children.
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though many of these countries
operate financial services and
have borne the brunt of OECD
criticism over financial regulation
and supervision. Without even
acknowledging that the current
crisis resulted from poor over-
sight in the US particularly and
some countries in Europe, the
G20 communiqué stated: “Tax
authorities, drawing upon the
work of relevant bodies such as
the (OECD), should continue
efforts to promote tax informa-
tion exchange. Lack of trans-
parency and a failure to exchange
tax information should be vigor-

ously addressed”

Tax information exchange had
nothing to do with the current
global crisis, but the crisis is being
used to again target the financial
services of small countries.

Recognising that the storm
clouds are gathering, Caribbean
countries should bolster their reg-
ulatory and supervisory systems
so that they are beyond reproach,
but they should also gear them-
selves for a:downpour of new
demands. They would do so bet-
ter if they do it together.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



a ES a
Setting is ripe for inspiring local leader

lm By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

BARACK Obama’s remarkable
ascendancy to the US presidency
should serve as an example. to
Bahamians as we seek to rid the
Bahamas of certain grubby little
crooks in our political system, some
of whom have already graced the
halls of Parliament.

Obama’s election appears to
have brought a new political cul-
ture to world politics that the
Bahamian electorate should also

demand, rather than accepting and .

re-electing many of the same re-
packaged, old washed-up do-noth-

. Ing politicians to the House of

Assembly.
On November 4, America
embraced an agent of change and

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

Dee aa

took a quantum and historic leap as
the eyes of the world was fixed
upon its electoral process.

President-elect Obama con-
vinced America and the world that
“we can” embrace a new political
climate and they (America) did—
but can we?

Mr Obama won the world vote
long before the American poll and,
since the presidential election, has
earned the overwhelming support
of the American people.

A majority of American voters

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rose above race stereotypes and
misplaced fears/prejudices and
elected that nation’s first black pres-
ident, who has expressed his intent
to govern and embody the hopes
and dreams of all Americans.

The fact that American voters
rejected worn-out Republican
orthodoxy for a new direction —

while in many instances overlook-
ing race — demonstrates the evo-



- lution of the American electorate

and leaves a monumental question
about the evolution of the Bahami-
an electorate. President George
Bush — the madern day Herbert




BALDWIN"

Hoover — has overseen two disas-
trous wars, the shattering of Amer-
ica’s once-celebrated reputation
and the most catastrophic econom-
ic meltdown in recent history.

While I whooped and hollered
at my election viewing party, I did
so knowing that there was a press-
ing need for change and that Oba-
ma would inherit a plethora of chal-
lenges, but also because Dr Martin
Luther King’s August 28, 1963,
proclamation of his dream had
become a reality.

Without a doubt, the bones of
Dr King and millions of slaves must
have come together and quaked in
their graves on that fateful Novem-
ber night.

In speaking of the transcendant
political aura surrounding Obama,
Harvard professor Henry Louis
Gates Jr said it best when he sur-
mised:




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BARACK OBAMA’S election win
appears to have brought a new
‘political culture to world politics. (AP)

“From toiling as White House
slaves to President-elect Barack
Obama, we have crossed the ulti-
mate colour line.

“What would Frederick Dou-
glass and W.E.B. Du Bois say if
they could know what our people
had at long last achieved? What

.would Sojourner Truth and Harri-

et Tubman say? What would Dr
King himself say? Would they say
that all those lost hours of brutalis-
ing toil and labour leading to spent,
half-fulfilled lives, all those humili-
ations that our ancestors had to suf-
fer through each and every day, all
those slights and rebuffs and recrim-

‘inations, all those rapes and mur-
ders, lynchings and assassinations,

all those Jim Crow laws and protest

marches, those snarling dogs and.

bone-breaking water hoses, all of
those beatings and all of those
killings, all of those black collec-

tive dreams deferred — that the ©

unbearable pain of all of those
tragedies had, in the end, been
assuaged at least somewhat through
Barack Obama's election?:

“Tt has been crossed by our very
first post-modern Race Man, a man
who embraces his African cultural
and genetic heritage so securely
that he can transcend it, becoming
the candidate of choice to tens of

millions of Americans who do not

look like him.”

Who can we point to on the cur-
rent political landscape that
embraces a new generation of pol-
itics and that we can genuinely pro-

claim as the candidate of choice for.

thousands of Bahamians, as an

“Obama-esque”, transcendent —
political figure?

’ It is high time we disregard par-

_tisanship to — like Obama is con-

tinuing to exemplify — incorporate
the brightest talent in any adminis-
tration to work towards develop-
ing a country and formulating a
progressive national plan that is
free of the divisive politics that con-
tinue to plague this nation.

Just as Obama can potentially be
a great president for America, dur-
ing these turbulent times the set-
ting is ripe for the emergence of an
inspiring, visionary local leader —
after all, great leaders are made
during times of adversity, depriva-
tion and warfare, not in times of
plenty,

Quite frankly, over f the last few
decades — while there have been a
few bright spots — the local politi-
cal scene has been littered with
some absolutely diabolical charac-
ters who have, in some cases, occu-
pied the halls of parliament even
though some of them can only be
likened to tail waggers, nodding
dogs, carpetbaggers and downright
shysters.

In the last few years, the local
political landscape has been far
more preoccupied with myriad
scandals, rather than bona fide
reformist views.

Since 2002, there has been one ~

scandal after another, beginning
with the Korean boat scandal
where PLP cronies allegedly hired

Korean boats to hoover up,

Bahamian fish stocks to supply far
eastern markets.

During this time there were also
claims of victimisation at BAIC,
where it is alleged that then Holy
Cross MP Sidney Stubbs was seek-
ing to victimise FNM workers. It
was also under Mr Stubbs steward-

ship that the Korean boat scandal -

exploded.

In no particular arden these

Friday, November 28th 6:00 - 9:00pm



;,scandals were followed by more

embarrassing episodes such as accu-

_ sations of rape against then Works

Minister Bradley Roberts and the

‘Cabinet Room brawl where Keod

Smith is alleged to have given
Kenyatta Gibson a touch of the old.
kung fu.

There was also the money in the
closet debacle, where it was claimed
that then Financial Investments
Minister Vincent Peet had a bundle
of crisp banknotes stashed in a cup-
board.

During this distasteful episode,
Mr Peet claimed the money was
for his daughter’s college tuition,
which provoked amusement, par-
ticularly the image of the then
financial services minister dragging
a bag of loot across America, as if
he couldn’t simply conduct a wire
transfer.

In yet another repugnant
episode, Shane Gibson’s friendship
with the late Anna Nicole Smith, in
light of the speedy granting of her

- permanent residency status, gave

off a foul stink among many right-

' thinking Bahamians and others

who had applied to the Department
of Immigration, in some instances
for up to five or 10 years.

While there may have been oth-
er scandals, several of the main
players shamelessly offered them-
selves for re-election and in some
instances were elected with the lin-
gering stench of a still unresolved
scandal.

It is past due-that the Bahamian
electorate cease the practice of
electing visionless politicians mere-
ly on the basis of personality and
flair.

Over the last decade, it appears
that we have been repeatedly elect-
ing certain politicians who are out-
right pinheads and tin men, full of
childish bragadoccio but devoid of
a national plan or any appreciable
outlook for the country.

Recently, Minister of Education
Carl Bethel’s intemperate, impetu-

_ous response to a meeting of teach-
ers at the Eight Mile Rock High

School illustrated arrogance and an
unaccountable air that many politi-
cians seem to adopt once they are
elected and elevated to a minister-
ial post.

When the minister ran away
from a group of public school teach-
ers — taxpayers that contribute to
his hefty yearly salary'and perks —
only. to subsequently hold an angry
press conference, the public caught
a glimpse of a man who does not
seem’ to possess the consensus-.
building skills or temperament 'to‘
lead, whether as prime minister
during a serious catastrophe or in
his present role directing a gargan-
tuan ministry and truly transform-
ing our defunct educational system.

While there may have been
some showboating by the Bahamas

‘Union of Teachers (BUT), how

could the minister — someone who

_ actively campaigned for that port-

folio and sought to be a servant of
the people — feel ambushed? If
this had been a gathering for a polit- .
ical rally, would Mr Bethel have
scurried away so quickly? Why

. would Mr Bethel prefer to snob-

bishly set preconditions if the teach-

ers all seem to have wanted to

speak to their issues with him?
This no doubt can be interpreted

‘as behaviour that can sometimes

be equivalent to that of malignant
narcissists.

Frankly, the Bahamas needs
new age, Obama-like leaders who
exhibit high ideals and are moti-
vated, by something other than

‘money, particularly since most of

the current local politicians are
seemingly in the business of self-
aggrdndisement and filling their
pockets.

For far too long, local politics
has been dominated by parochial
figures who cannot see beyond their
backyard, which is a stark contrast
to the international, broad-based
perspective of Obama.

Furthermore, it is high time that
more accountable politicians were
elected to office, particularly since
some are unproductive and uncon-
cerned about the needs of their con-
stituents. Isn’t it perplexing how
certain constituencies remain unde-
veloped, yet they adopt some form
of political tribalism and consis-
tently vote one way every election
cycle.

Among other electoral democ-
ratic reforms, the Bahamas’ consti-
tution should be reframed to limit.a
politician’s parliamentary stay
(elected) to two terms, particularly
since many politicians have stayed
beyond their “best before” (expiry)
date and appear to have abused the
parliamentary process while stifling
the rise of young up-and-comers
who may possess new ideas.

Similar to the US presidential
term limit, a prime minister — like
an.MP — should be limited to two
five-year terms, and the leader of a
party should emerge from democ-
ratic primaries.

In these times of economic
recession, it is time a younger gen-
eration — with moral fortitude —
rise to the pinnacle of our nation’s
highest office. It is sad when there
has been no significant attempt to
diversify our economy since Sir
Stafford Sands established our pre- |
sent economic model — based on
tourism and financial services —
nearly 50 years ago. Although
Bahamians are incredibly docile,
local politics is salvageable but only
by focusing on the issues and steadi-
ly developing a completely different
political ethos.







THE TRIBUNE ; MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 11
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lice, Report. >
: ‘Completed application form (countersigned) .
Three (3) passport - size photographs (one must be
countersigned along with application form)
National Insurance Card
Birth Certificate or Registered Affidavit of Birth (if requesied)
Mother's Birth Certificate
An interview

IF UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE:

* An interview
- Parent or legal guardian must be present with
applicant. :

When using Father's documents. the
Father's Birth Certificate, parents
registered Marriage Certificate and
Father's Passpori.

* While Supplies Last
* With Approved Credit
* Some Stipulations May Apply

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Pick up @ brochure and on appiication fonn fram
‘the Passport Offices iri Nassau at Thompse
and Freeport al National insurance Building. Ea:

* Mall, Expior: Drive; alsa frorn isi) Adrninstrotors’
offices in The Family isicncis.



Public Information line:
242-322-PASS (7277)

ot 242-323-2528

Fax: 242-325-4832

Email: passportofflca@bahamas.gov.bs

Tel: (242) 397-PLUS (7587) mvisA Tel: (242) 352-PLUS (7587)
NASSAU © Town Centre Mall dee GRAND BAHAMA © Madeira Croft
Mon-Sat 9am-9pm ee Mon-Fri 9am-6pm ¢ Sat 9am-4pm
Fax: (242) 325-6368 | Fax: (242) 352-9823

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PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



ROM page one

Supreme Court's office in the Ansbach-
er Building. The Registrar has been
appointed receiver/manager of Ward’s
estate pending an appointment of a
trustee in bankruptcy.

In July Scotiabank’s ex parte petition
to the bank listed Ward as “lately resid-
ing al Lyford Cay and now of Paradise
Island”, and “lately practising now as a
sole practitioner under the style of Ward

Bahamian lawyer

& Co., out of Chambers situated at 103,
Saffrey Square, Bank Lane.”

However, when it filed its debtors
summons against Ward earlier this year it
said that he had ceased operating his
business at Saffrey Square and that it did
not know where he now either lived or
practised.

Ward filed no defence and a final
judgment was entered against him in Sep-

tember last year with damages to be
assessed and costs taxed.

The case, which went to court last year,
stated that Scotiabank had retained Ward
as its lawyer to represent it in the inves-
tigation and certification of title to certain
lots of land in New Providence, and to
provide proof of title to the land in fee
simple and without encumbrances. Once
satisfied of clear title, he was to draw up
conveyances for the bank’s five cus-
tomers, and prepare and secure execution
of a First Demand Legal Mortgage over

a

the lots for the customers in favour of
Scotiabank. These loans were to provide
financing for the customers to purchase
their lots and start building.

Ward, according to the bank’s state-
ment of claim, confirmed that he had
completed his instructions and had drawn
up the five conveyances and mortgages.

He requested the bank to forward him °

the purchase price of the lots so that he
could transfer the loans to the customers.

Scotiabank said that it sent Ward five
bank drafts for $52,250; $52,250, $52,250,

$104,500 and $47,500, totalling $308,750.

The loans Were to go to Valarie Light-
bourne, Lot 15 Victoria Gardéns Subdi-
vision; Sammy and Ann Samuel; Lot 27A
off Croton Road; Ray Robinson and Tra-
cia Wilson, Lot:28 Ideal Estates Subdi-
vision; Lionel Harris, Lot No 18 South
Ocean Estates and Rosenell and Letario
Edgecombe, Lot No. 39 Victoria Gar-
dens Subdivision.

Scotiabank said that Ward never paid
the money to its five customers. Neither
did he return the money to the bank.

Hundreds march fo
killers to be hanged

1. TWYNAM HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
‘LOT NO. 117
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 Bed / 2”? Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading west along
Prince Charles Drive from Fox Hill
Road, take the corner east of Super
Value Food Store. Heading south,
take the second corner on the left,
continue around the curve then take
the third corner on the left. Traveling
north, the property is the 10th lot on
the left or first property after passing
' Tote Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

. SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
SUBDIVISION ;
LOT NO. 1 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apts. -
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south of Bamboo
Boulevard off East Street South then
turn through the first corner right
onto Bougainvillea Blvd. Heading
west on Bougainvillea Blvd. take the
second.corner right onto Madeira
Avenue. At the T-junction, turn left
onto Oxford Drive: Property is the
third house right, on the corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue. -
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES - CARMICHAEL

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3. Bed / 2‘? Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
take the 4th corner on the right +
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th nQURe
on right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES I

LOT NO. 1372 7

- PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 Bed / 2”? Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: At junction of
Carmichael Road and Cedar Way
(corner opposite BFM) travel south
to the t-junction, turn right onto
Golden Gates Straight, then take the
first corner right onto Comet Terrace.
The property is the second house on
the right, yellow with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 17

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 2 beds / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, building is approximately
500 ft from Nassau Street on the
northern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO. “A”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-
Family Duplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
and turn through McKinney. Drive
(Bamboo Shack is on the corner),
then turn left through Rocky Pine
Road. The property is at the end of -
the third corner on the left, painted
light orange.
APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

1. OPULENT HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 28 ;
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot
7,597 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Traveling on Carmichael
Road, west of Millar Road, take

the first new paved road pass “The
Outdoor Patio” on the left, then take
the second left, then first right; the
property is second to the last on the
right, before the road ends.
APPRAISED VALUE: $80,000

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

7. POLHEMUS GARDENS

SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on Boyd

_ Road, from Providence Avenue take
the third corner on the left. The
subject property is the third lot on
the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $169,000

. CORAL LAKES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 39, Block 6.
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence, 1 bed / 1 bath on
Ground and Upper floors.
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,800 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On corner of Masthead
Lane and Reef Lane Road in Coral
Lakes.
APPRAISED VALUE: $227,000

. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 2 Block 5
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey. Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,800 sa. ft..
LOCATION: Situated on the

’ southern side of Cambridge Road
and east of Nassau East Boulevard
APPRAISED VALUE: $214,804

10.WEST STREET NASSAU .

- LOT NO. Commercial Lot of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two (2)
Concrete Block Structures, 1 Single-
storey cottage - 1 bed/ 1 bath &
1-Two-storey apartment - 2 beds ©
/1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 3,895 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of West Street and South of
Delancey Street.

APPRAISED VALUE: $156,104

11.WEST STREET NASSAU

LOT NO. Commercial Lot of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Four Unit Apartment Structure
PROPERTY SIZE: 16,767 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of West Street and South of
Delancey Street.

APPRAISED VALUE: $660,000

12. ELIZABETH ESTATES
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 36
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sa. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of Tobago Crescent in Elizabeth
Estates. :
APPRAISED VALUE: $218,000

13.PINEWOOD GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated.on Mahogany
Street in Pinewood Gardens.
APPRAISED VALUE: $105,000

14.VICTORIA GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 168
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single—
storey residence under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Victoria Gardens
from Gladstone Road, proceed to
the T-junction, heading east along
the road reservation, the property is
13th lot on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

2. BERNARD TERRACE
SUBDIVISION.
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot
9,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Immediately north of
Monastery Park Subdivision and
South of Bernard Road. .
APPRAISED VALUE: $89,000

9

15.FOX HILL - EASTERN DISTRICT
LOT NO. 4 Unit 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Four
Unit Townhouse Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,592 sq. ft. (Unit:
4 - 1,281 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Situated on the
eastern side of Plumbago Drive, .
approximately 198 feet northeast of
Step Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $175,000

16.NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 18

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Seven
Unit Complex: Four 1 bedroom &
Three 2 bedroom Units

PROPERTY SIZE: 17,614 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the left side
of Yamacraw Road opposite the
Treasure Cove Gated Community.
APPRAISED VALUE: $422,000

17.CARMICHAEL VILLAGE

SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Fourplex Apartment: Four 2
bedroom 1 bath Units —
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along

, Carmichael Road from Golden Isles
Road take the first corner on the-
right. The property is the second lot
on the left-from the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $255,000

18.MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Triplex
Apartment: One 2 bedroom/ 2 bath
& Two 2 bedroom /1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on the
left painted green with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

19.GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two 14
bed/1 bath Apartment Units under
construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141'sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith United
Way, take the first corner on the left
(Sunrise Road). Heading south on
Sunrise Road, take the fifth corner
on the left and proceed east to
the first corner on the right. The
- property is the seventh lot on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

20.SQUTH BEACH CROWN

ALLOTMENT —
LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single- ©

storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sa. ft.
LOCATION: On the northwestern
corner of Marshall Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE; $199,000

21.GOLDEN GATES Il

LOT. NO. 738

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 beds /3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Mermaid Boulevard
Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

VACANT LOTS

3. CORAL HARBOUR SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot
12,113 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Hopkins Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

©2008 CreastiveRolations.not

' INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263
NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



FROM page one —

der, too many witnesses being
killed, and too many murder-
ers out on bail.”

With 79 murders in 2007,
and 65 so far in 2008, people
whose lives have been ripped
apart by murder are calling
for capital punishment to
deter ruthless killers. .

The mandatory death
penalty for murderers was
made discretionary after a
Privy Council ruling in 2006.
But the current government
maintains it is committed to
enforcing the death penalty,
and voted against a United
Nations draft resolution for a

~ death penalty moratorium last

week.

However, Mr Moncur said
the government is secretly
opposed to the death penalty
as it is slow to implement the
signing of the death warrant
within five years of sentenc-
ing a convicted murderer, and
action must be taken.

“The government are aid-
ing and abetting the crime,”
he claimed.

“They are secretly opposed «

to the death penalty so by not

_ carrying out the law they have’

subjected thousands of citi-
zens to being murdered.
“Fear of the law, of execu-
tion is a deterrent. But crimi-
nals know the government is
pussyfooting around.”
Around 100 people directly
affected by murder started the

procession at Tom Grant Park
in Yellow Elder at around
11am on Saturday, and hunt
dreds more joined the walk
and motorcade as they pro-

- ceeded along Blue Hill Road,

to Marathon Road, Wulff
Road, East Street, Market
Street and back to Yellow
Elder at around 3.30pm. j

Michaela Brown, 25, and
her relatives were represent+
ing six family members mur-
dered in Nassau in the last 15
years.

She said no one has yet
been found guilty of the mur-
ders of brothers Sirdino Smith
and Marvin Ferguson, their
cousins Lavardo Armbrister
and Terell Smith, Ian Arm-
brister and Jamal.Greenslade.

Miss Brown said: “You -
never get over the death of
someone who has been mur-
dered.

“Coming out here makes
me feel like I'm helping
towards something being done
and giving me some resolu-
tion to the whole situation.

“T feel like now people will
start to listen more.’

The protesters signed a
petition calling on the gov-
ernment to remove obstacles
to carrying out the death
penalty, prevent judges from
lawmaking, make judges sub-
ject to public scrutiny, and
remove bail for those charged
with murder and violent
crime. Organisers intend to
hold a protest march every,
month.

Visa waiver programme
among tourism plans put ©
forward by Obie Wilchcombe

FROM page one

f

Bahamasair to organise package holidays for visitors to cover their
flights and hotels at once, and expand to new markets with revised

immigration laws for visitors.

Mr Wilchcombe suggested government mimics the United States
government’s decision to expand its visa waiver programme,
announced last week, and issue tourist visas for a fee upon arrival

to visitors from ‘other countries.
Direct flights to Latin American countries should also be organ- ~~

ised, Mr Wilchcombe said, to bring in visitors from emerging eco-

nomic markets, such as Brazil.

Another of Mr Wilchcombe’s plans to bring in tourists is to
expand Bahamasair to serve more international destinations, and
allow local airlines to service internal flights.

He said: “Allow Bahamasair to play a different role in national
development. This is opportune time while the sky is not as crowd-
ed for Bahamasair to service the international market beginning
with the expansion of service in the United States.”

Religious conferences could be held in the islands if church
leaders were to draw on their contacts and the Ministry of Tourism
worked with the hotel sector and Bahamasair to host at least five

events a year.

The Sports Tourism unit in the Ministry of Tourism, should be
reactivated to draw athletes in need of relaxing at the end of the sea-

son.

“Special activity could be created,” he said. “What about the ‘It's
Better in The Bahamas Professional Athletes Competition’? ESPN,
ABC, Fox and CBS could record and telecast as teams play golf,
beach volleyball, some track, tennis, etc. The families of the play-
ers, fans media will help fill rooms, eat in the restaurants, ride in taxi

or bus and play in the casino.’

He also suggested pitching filmmakers to shoot movies in the

Bahamas to bring in revenue.

Mr Wilchcombe said: “This is an ideal time for the Bahamas to
get out of the box and make the needed paradigm shift in the
tourism industry, tap into'new markets by reducing the burdensome
visa application process and employ innovative and creative ideas

to attract niche markets.”

ANDEAUS

INSURANCE BROKER Co. Lid.

To our valued clients:

Please be informed that MR. LYNDEN ANDREW
JOHNSON is no longer an employee of Andeaus

Insurance Broker

Company Limited. MR.

JOHNSON is not authorized to conduct any
business transactions for the company. Please
contact the office at 323-4545 for services,

Thank you for your continued patronage.

Management of Andeaus Insurance Broker
Company Limited. \ .

TEL: 323-4545 FAX:328-6357





wep ee ye tte

gi HE TRIBUNE.

‘COMING ~



| FYP & The Paint Centre
188 Wulff. Road
Phone (242) 323-3973 or (242) 325-3976
Open Mon - Fri 7:00am-4:00pm
Saturdays 7:00am-3:00pm

Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com

a

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 13



Gg.
rE Prt ot Street, aes Fes
Phone (242) 326-8543 or (242) 326-5464
Open Mon - Fri 7:30am-4:30pm
Saturdays 8:00am-3:00pm

Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com



2008 Creative Edge



PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

US staff sent to
help solve issues
at Morton Salt

Shooting leaves
two men in hospital

FROM page one

ee when he pressed the buzzer on the locked
door. Once inside, he covered his face with a
scarf and held the cashier at gunpoint,
demanding cash.

Taking the money he got away on a moped
parked at the gas station and fled towards
Culmersville.

No-one was shot when a gunman held up
employees at Texaco gas station on the corner
of Mackey and Madeira Streets at around
5.30pm on Friday.

The armed robber was let in by an employ-





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Turks, Trinidad, Caymary’






FROM page one

turing and Allied Workers
Union, said improvements in
that relationship is a “require-
ment of the parent company,
Rohm Haas.”

“Two personnel came down

last week and had a meeting ©

with the officers. We expect to
move ahead with that. At this
time they were only getting
feedback as to what the issues
are that we really need to deal
with in order to move ahead
with our labour relations.
“They really want that rela-
tionship to improve. I am very
keen on that idea, the whole
bargaining unit is keen on that
idea because that is something

we all needed, we need a good ©

relationship,” said Mr Seymour.
Strain between the unionised
salt workers and management
in recent years has seriously
concerned the salt producing
company, to the point that MP
for the island, V. Alfred Gray,
claimed the company was con-
sidering pulling out of the island
over the summer and moving
its operation to Mexico if things
did not improve.
‘Morton Salt is the island’s

‘primary employer and eco- -

nomic engine, providing jobs

O




QUANTITY

MARBLE ()-

wach)
Company Name:
Telephone Na:

Address:



LANDSCAPING,

for around 70 per cent of |

Inaguans.

Problems for the plant were
exarcebated when Hurricane
Ike tore across the southern
island at category four strength,
causing millions of dollars of
damage to the plant and
prompting Rohm Haas to make
uncertain statements about the
site’s future.

Mr Seymour said improve-
ments would in his mind require
management to “accept the
union as the bargaining unit in
the work place. I don’t feel even
at this time yet (that manage-
ment) really accepts the union
and respects the officers of the
union. If we have an agreement
and you go and do something
which is outside that agreement
and you fail to call the union
and its officers in to discuss the
matter and act on your own that
is a problem.”

In the meantime, despite
grim predictions, the Inagua
plant has bounced back since
Hurricane Ike, and all staff are
back at work.

Salt production targets are
being met, according to the
union president, with around
120,000 tonnes being harvest-
ed every month, much of it
going to the U.S. where it is in

P.O. Box N-313

NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONES (242) 325-1769
OR (242) 323-5904
FAX: (242) 356-6691

~ POINSETTIAS

POT SIZE
RED (R) PINK (P) WHITE (WW)

wane TY semis TY sain $Y} te OES
__®)___.®)_) oe
10” (HIB)
Contact Person:






FREE DELIVERY FOR TWENTY
PLANTS OR MORE!

ARCHER’S NURSERY
#55 DUNMORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM-SOUTH OF
BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY
HOUSE GARDEN & LANDSCAPING PLANTS-SEEDLINGS,
INTERIORSCAPING
YARD & MAINTENANCE SERVICE



P.O Box, eneeneee

high demand for-de-icing roads
at this time.

Workers are still carrying out
repairs to the main administra-
tive building, which was seri-
ously damaged during the hur-
ricane.

“I fancy we are doing quite
well. Things are looking good,”
said Mr Seymour, adding that
employees are “very, very com-
mitted to getting this plant up
and running.’

Mr Seymour noted that the
company is investing in the
plant, having purchased four
new hauling units and a new
generator.

“When you're talking about
that kind of equipment, you are
looking in area of more than
1/2 million dollars (spent) in last
four or five weeks so to me
that’s an indication that Mor-
ton Salt is really committed to
getting the Bahamas plant back

_to normal,” he said.

However, he said, the repair
of the loading dock, which will
cost millions of dollars, has yet
to take place.

“They are really going to
have to make a decision,
whether they are going to spend
$5 or 6 million on this. dock or
build a new dock. This one is
30 years old,” said Mr Seymour.

























PRICE






$10.00
$16.06
$22.00



















;






See pagel7



Sportsbeat...
















Spain upset
Argentina to -

iwin Davis Cup

SPAIN’S Feliciano Lopez, left,
drinks champagne from the
Davis’ Cup trophy as he cele-
brates ‘with teammates in Mar
del Plata, Argentina, Sunday,
Nov. 23, 2008. Spain’s Fer-
nando Verdasco defeated
Argentina's Jose Acasuso 6-3,
6-7 (3), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 in the
Davis Cup final’s third singles
match, giving Spain its third
Davis Cup title.

See page 18



m@ PRIMARY BASKETBALL






Primary Schools’
best-of-three bas-
ketball championships will
get underway at 3:15 p.m. at
Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road.
The series is a rematch of
last year’s final between the
defending champions St. .
Thomas More Sparks and
runners-up St. Bede’s Crush-
" ers.
The sparks, coached by
Nkomo Ferguson, is led by
guard Deajour Adderley and
center Joel Morris. The
Crushers, coached by Don-
nie Culmer and Ricardo
Freemantle, are led by guard
Kyle ‘Flash’ Turnquest and
center Dwight Wheatley.
Game two in the series will
be played on Wednesday at
Loyola Hall. Like they did
last year, St. Bede’s won the
pennant by going undefeated
during the regular season. St.
Thomas only lost one game
and at came at the hands of
St. Bede’s.

@ HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL

THE HO Nash
Lions, DW Davis
Pitbulls and the CR
Walker Knights
have taken the initial lead ,
over the CC Sweeting Scor-
pions and Cobras in the
opening games of the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s best-of-
three volleyball champi-
onships.

On Friday at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, the Lions
roared past the Scorpions in
game one of the junior girls
series and the Pitbulls did
the same in the junior boys.
The Knights shined against
the Cobras in both the senior
girls and boys series.

Game two in ail four series
will be played today, starting
at 4 p.m. at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.



@ HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL

After getting its
season started last
week, the Bahamas
Association of
Independent Secondary
Schools will continue with
games on tap today at vari-
ous schools, starting at 4
p.m. The junior girls and
senior boys. will play today,
while the junior boys and
senior girls will be in action
on Tuesday.



Game one ofthe
“tholic Diocesan: ’

Myron's dream
comes true!

Rolle selected for Rhodes Scholarship for 2009

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was a dream come true for Myron
Rolle on Saturday.

Rolle, the multi-talented Bahamian
student-athlete, was selected as one of
the 32 recipients of the prestigious
Rhodes Scholarship for 2009.

Immediately after receiving the
scholarship, Rolle boarded a private
jet from Alabama to College Park
where he helped the Florida State Uni-
versity Seminoles celebrate a 37-3 rout
over the Maryland Terrapins to keep
their hopes alive for the Athletic Coast

‘Conference championship.

“It.feels tremendous. I’m very excit-
ed, very elated. I had a long day yes-
terday,” said Rolle in an interview with

' The Tribune yesterday. “I started about

8:30 a.m. and didn’t finish until about 4
p.m.

“But when they read the announce-
ment and they called my name, I just
put my head down and thanked the
Lord for providing with the opportuni-
ty. ’'m really thrilled. It was a dream

_.come through for me.”

Rolle,:a 22-year-old safety, said the
goal is now to try and help the Semi-
noles win the league’s Atlantic Divi-
sional title and eventually end up in

the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida in

January.

“After the season is done, J will sit
down with my family and discuss my
future as far as going to Oxford (for
the Rhodes scholarship) or going (ear-
ly) in the NFL (National Football
League’s draft),” Rolle reflected. —

If-he settles for the Rhodes scholar-
ship, Rolle will enroll at the University
of Oxford in England in September,
becoming the fourth Florida State stu-
dent to do so to pursue the all expens-
es. two or three year study.



Te

drills

JANARA PIERRE performs a Black belt
Carter

JULIAN ROLLE performs self-defen

ce





ANTONIZE HIGGS performs a sword Carter durin
Saturday at Kendal Isaac Gym. The event saw a
competing. Cuba, Trinidad and USA were among countries represented. The event

He graduated in just two anda half
years with a 3.75 grade point average
with his bachelor’s degree in exercise
science from Florida State in August
and is now pursuing his master’s degree
in public administration with his ulti-
mate goal of becoming a neurosurgeon.

Rolle, however, is having just as
much success on the football field that
he doesn’t want to turn down a shot at
the NFL either.

Making it to Maryland during the
second quarter for the Seminoles’
blowout win has increased his appetite
for the big league.

“The game was fun, but it was cold in
Maryland,” said Rolle, who was greet-
ed by his parents Beverly and Whitney
Rolle when he arrived at the Locker
Room, but was dosed with a bucket of
water during the celebrations after the

SEE page 18









attracted a big crowd. SEE PAGE 17 for more pictures.

IN ACTI

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

é martial arts tournament on
ot of international black belts







Myron Rolle.



Porky’s
| Stingrays.
stage late
rally

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter



Trailing for much of the game, Porky’s
Stingrays rallied for a fourth quarter come-
back to improve to 4-2.

Nesley Lucien scored on a-quarterback draw
to give the Stingrays the go ahead score, 14-12,.
midway through the fourth quarter.

Shorthanded at the game’s outset with just
13 players available, the Stingrays trailed 12-0
in the first quarter.

The Destroyers offensive playcalling misdi-
rected the Stingrays defense as they effective-
ly moved the ball on the ball on the ground and
netted their first score with an end around.

The Destroyers made it a two possession
game on their next drive, once again keeping it
onthe ground to score from short yardage.

The Stingrays finally reached the scoreboard
in the second quarter when Lucien connected

r with Lawrence Hepburn Jr for a touchdown
reception. my

After the failed ‘conversion the Stingrays
trailed 12-6. :

The Stingrays defensive intensity picked up
considerably in the second quarter and held the
Destroyers without a score in the second half.

- On their third possession of the third quar-
ter, the Destroyers put together their best scor-
ing opportunity of the half but faltered in the
redzone. -

An effective drive on the ground and
through the air, stalled at the Stingrays 10 yard
line as the Destroyers turned the ball over on
downs near the goal line. :

Backed up against their own endzone, the

SEE page 18

Ps



BAHAMAS BASEBALL, FEDERATION

Getting local baseball youngsters to the next level



Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TEAM One Baseball instructors Jim Gemler and Justin Roswell from
Baltimore, Maryland were in town over the weekend to conduct a clin-
ic for local baseball players with prospects of playing in high school
and college over the weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams.



WITH so much talent available in the country, the
Bahamas Baseball Federation felt the best way to
harness the future of the local players is to give
them some international exposure.

Over the weekend, the federation along with
Pony Baseball Bahamas, hosted Team One Bascball
from Baltimore, Maryland.

Clinic directors Jim Gemler and Justin Roswell
participated in a series of activities. ,

They began with a session geared specifically to
the parents on Friday night as they informed them
about the requirements that their children will need
in order to advance to the next level to play in high
school and college in the United States.

Then on Saturday, they conducted an all-day clin-
ic at the Field of Dreams at St. Andrew’s High
School.. They concluded on Sunday with a game to

Baltimore clinic directors help young Bahamians

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

view the players in action. “Baseball is growing by
leaps and bounds as it pertains to our youth,” said
federation secretary general Theodore ‘Teddy’
Sweeting. “So what we wanted to do is bring in
individuals who can help us to get our kids to the
next level.” :

Sweeting said Gemler and Roswell was able to
evaluate the players in practice and game situations
and when they return to the United States, they
will eventually send back the data on the perfor-
mances of the players, indicating who will have the
potential to play at the next level.

° More than 60 players, including two from Grand
Bahama and five from Bimini, participated in the
clinic, which is expected to become ‘an annual one
with sessions scheduled to be conducted in the Fam-
ily Islands starting next year.

Team One Baseball, according to Roswell, said

SEE page 18





PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS







LOCAL SPORTS

Temple Fellowshio, Macedonia win opening games

TEMPLE Fellowship and
Macedonia, deadlocked’ at the
end of the regular season in a
three-way tie at 3-1 with Faith
United for the | 7-and-under pen-
nant, won their opening games in
their respective Baptist Sports
Council's 2008 Rev. Dr. Williams
Thompson's best-of-three soft-
ball playoffs.

Temple Fellowship, who even-
tually was awarded the pennant
by virtue of outscoring their two
counterparts, blested fourth place
Golden Gates 19-6-to snatch the
|-0 lead in their semifinals on Sat-

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urday at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex. Macedonia, the sec-
ond place finishers, nipped third
place Faith United 9-8 in the oth-
er half of the semi's.

Game two in both series will
be played on Saturday at 11 a.m.

Meanwhile, Shaw AME Zion
clinched the men's pennant as
they held off Faith United 11-10.
Shaw AME and Transfiguration
ended the regular season at 8-1
after Transfiguration knocked off
Temple Fellowship 12-10. But by
virtue of beating Transfiguration
in their head-to-head matchup,

Shaw AME was awarded the
pennant.

On Tuesday night at the
Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex, second place
Transfiguration will play third
place Calvary Deliverance in
game one of their best-of-three
playoffs at 7 p.m., followed by
Shaw AME Zion against fourth

-_place Temple Fellowship at 8 p.m.

Game two of their series will be
played on Saturday at noon.

On Saturday at 10 a.m., game
one of the co-ed playoff will get
underway with pennant winning

Golden Gates will meet fourth
place Faith United and second
place Macedonia will play third
place Temple Fellowship.

¢ Here's a summary of the
games played on Saturday:

Temple Fellowship 19, Gold-
en Gates 6 (17-under playoffs):
Dominic Collie helped his own
cause with a perfect 3-for-3 day,
including a in-the-park home run
and Rudolf Fox was 2-for-3 with a
two-run in-the-parker to lead the

pennant winners in their playoff

opener.
Addie Finley and Angelo But-

runs and Gerard Hepburn was 2-
for-3 with two RBIs and two runs.
Finley also had two RBIs.

Collie got the win on the
mound over Winston Hanna.

Macedonia 9, Faith United 8
(17-under playoffs): Quinton
Williams had a one-out RBI sac-
rifice fly to drive in Quintin
Williams with the game winning
run in the bottom of the fifth as
second place Macedonia broke
an 8-8- to seal game one of their
playoffs. ;

Quintin Williams, Bernard Fer-
guson, Kyle Rolle, Winston Sey-
mour and D'Kyle Rolle all had
two hits with Williams, Ferguson
and Seymour scoring twice.

Walter Bell, who helped out

ler were both 2-for-4 with two

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‘Foatenitigs The Portobello Ceilidh Band
and Modern Vintage,
Raffle and Silent Auction

<< ANDREW,
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occ

2 eee /
/ a ae hile
__bstubb: La
ayath a run-producing ae: got
the win on the mound over
D'Angelo Cartwright.

Kenvaughn Sands had two hits,
scoring three times and Stephen
Russell had one hit and scored
twice to lead Faith United.

Shaw AME 11, Faith United
10 (Men): Shanty Albury scored
three times and Walbert Hanna
twice as catcher Dwayne Stevens
came up with the biggest defen-
sive play at the plate on a throw
from in the bottom of the fifth to
preserve the win as Shaw AME
clinched the pennant.

Maxwell Jenoure got thw win
over Collin Knowles.

Kenvaughn Sands crossed the
home plate three times and Tar-
ran Fulford did it twice for Faith
United.

Transfiguration 12, Temple
Fellowship 10 (Men): Relief
pitcher Alvin Lightbourne had
two-run triplre and scored on
Kirk Johnson's RBI single for
Transfiguration as they produced
four runs in the bottom of the
fourth to seal the win.

Johnson, Stephen Brown and
Nelson Farrington all had two hits
with Johnson scoring once,
Brown three times and Farring-
torltwice. Hermas Sands added a
two-run double, scoring a run.

Ricardo Major, Rodney Tay-
lor, Brian Armbrister and Gino
Campbell all had two hits with
Major, Armbrister and Campbell
scoring twice. Angelo Butler had
one hit with a RBI and a run
scored.

Alfred Munnings suffered the
loss.

Calvary Deliverance 16, Gold-
en Gates 7 (Men): Taja Wright
had a perfect 4-for-4 day with
three RBIs and four runs, Jayson
Clarke was 3-for-4 weith a tweo-
run homer, scoring four times;
Jeff Beckles was 3-for-3 with two
RBIs and three runs and Brad





Wood 2-for-4 with two RBIs and -

two runs:
Danny Stubbs got the win over
Johnnie Burrows.
‘Burrows and Dino Sweeting
were both 2-for-3 with Burrows
scoring twice and Sweeting dri-

. ving ina run. Randy Wallace and

Kayle Carey both had a RBI dou-
ble with Wallace scoring a run.

Temple Fellowship 10, Faith
United 5 (Co-ed): Brian Arm-
brister scored three times and
Mardocie Ston and Kayon Jack-
son twice for Temple Fellowship
as they secured third place. for
the playoffs.

Alfred Munnings got the win
over Collin Knowles, who got-on

He

base:three times andscored'onee: -

for fourth place Faith United.








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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 17



MARTIAL ARTS TOURNAMENT: Kendal Isaac Gym SMARK KNOWIES,

KERMIL MILLER performs a sword Carter.














DARRON
Sears tries to
Bons get out of
ae Manfred
a Ginter’s leg
headlock
defence. during the
men’s .
grappling
competition.









































DARON SEARS performs

PHOTOS: Felipé Major/Tribune staff

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_ Sponsored by Plasco Energy Group
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Registration starts @ 5:00 a.m. sharp

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Andy Murray one of

stars at Invitational

MARQUEE PLAYER: World number 4 Andy Murray

This event is scheduled for 5 December at 3.30 p.m. at the
Atlantis Tennis Centre, Paradise Island.

In its 8th year, Mark has hosted many of the top players on the
’ ATP and WTA tennis circuits and the Invitational keeps going from



strength to strength. Amongst the many attendees have been Andre
Agassi, James Blake, Bob & Mike Bryan, Jim Courier, Robbie
Ginepri, Tommy Haas, Fred Stolle, Jennifer Capriati and Nicole
Vaidisoya.

The World #4, ANDY MURRAY of Scotland will be one of the
marquee players this year. The 21-year-old Scot has enjoyed his
most successful year on the ATP Tour in 2008. He reached the .
Wimbledon quarter-finals this summer and has won back to back
Masters Series titles in Cincinnati and Madrid. He reached the-final
of the US Open and has notched wins over the world’s top three this
year — Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. The
great John McEnroe is full of praise for Andy saying such things as
“What I love the most is how incredibly well he’s moving. It’s unbe-
lievable. Most people can’t move on the court like that and find the
position and the angles that Andy’ s able to come up with. He’s got a
great brain and head for tennis.”

Praise indeed from one of the Legends.of Tennis. Andy himself
attributes a lot of this year’s success to. his dedication to a gruelling
fitness and conditioning regime under the guidance of his coach
Miles Maclagan and trainers, Matt Little, Jezz Green and Andrew
Ireland.

The proceeds of the event go to aid local childrenisi charities such
as The Cancer Society, the Sassoon (Bahamas) Foundation for Pedi-
atric Heart Care, The Special Olympics, The Association for the
Physically Disabled and the Mark Knowles Tennis Scholarship
Fund. To date over $300,000 has been distributed to various hae
ties.

Some of the major sponsors are Kerzner International, ‘The alin
istry of Youth & Sports, American Airlines, Bristol Cellars, Everkey
Global Fund, H30, Lombard Odier Darier ‘Hentsch Private Bank &
Trust, Templeton Glgbal Advisors.

There are a few sponsorship opportunities available and interest-
ed parties should contact Vicky Andrews at HYPERLINK "mail-
to:vickyk@batelnet.bs" vickyk@batelnet.bs or cell: 357-9670

Tickets for the exhibition can be purchased at the following out-
lets:

Atlantis Tennis Centre: ‘Nassau Florists, National Tennis Centre,
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PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

| LOCAL SPORTS fairer





Six Pack Abs outslug Andeus Insurance

THE Masters Softball League opened
over the weekend and played three exciting
games at the Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

On Saturday, the Six Pack Abs out-
slugged the Andeus Insurance 25-15 before
the William construction Jets routed the
Bamboo Shack Bulls 16-5. Then on Sun-
day, the Nicolette’s Strokers knocked off
__the Miller lite Royals 16-11.

e Here’s a summary of the three games:

Strokers 16, Royals 11: Ronald ‘Big Boy’
Seymour went 3-for-4 with:a home run, dri-
ving in four runs and scoring twice; Brian
Cartwright was also 3-for-4 with a homer,

&

two RBIs and three runs and Everette
‘Abe’ Johnson went 3-for-4 with a homer,
three RBIws and two runs for Nicolette’s.

Clifton Smith got the win over Harold
‘Banker’ Fritzgerald.

Cyril Miller had a perfect 4-for-4 day
with three RBIs and two runs scored for
Miller Lite.

Jets 16, Bulls 5: Lee Rahming had a per-
fect 3-for-3 day with a homer and two
triples, six RBIs and two runs and Brad

” Smith was 2-for-4 with a homer, four RBIs

and three runs for William Construction.

. Danny Stubbs was the winning pitcher ,

and Johnny Armbrister suffered the loss.
Vernon Bowles had a perfect 3-for-3 day

with two runs for Bamboo Shack.

Abs 25, Andeus Insurance 15: Larry
Thompson was 3-for-4 with two RBIs and
three runs; Anthony Richardon 2-for-5 with
two doubles, three RBIs and three runs;
Will Basden 3-for-5 with three RBIs and

three runs and Tony Brown 2-for-5_ with _|.

four RBIs and two runs for the Six Pack.
Joe Demeritte got the win on the mound

and Larry Forbes was tagged with the loss.

Edwin Culmer was 4-for-5 with a dou-
ble, two RBIs and two runs in a losing
effort. .

The league will continue this weekend:

with a double header on Saturday and Sun-
day.

Porky’s Stingrays stage late rally to improve to 4-2

The Stingrays pressured the
punt and came to within once
- score when they brought down
punter Antonio Bullard in the
endzone for the safety, making
the score 12-8.

On the ensuing free kick
Wayde Higgs’ dynamic return set
up the Stingrays in striking posi-
tion.

After the ball passed through a

FROM page 15

Stingrays mounted a long drive
of there-own, as running back «
Sheldon Lynes gashed through
the Destroyers defense for a
series of big gains.

Porky’s began the fourth quar-
ter within scoring range in the
redzone but failed to convert for
the score.as they too turned the

~pall over oh downs after four ~~ Series of Stingrays players, Higgs’

picked up the ball and reversed
direction up the left sideline with
adept blocking and breaking tack-
les on his way to the Destroyers
seven yard line.

Lucien scored two slays later
to give the Stingrays their first

tries.

A stout defensive effort by the
Stingrays front seven and untime-,
ly dropped. balls from the
Destroyers receivers, forced the
Defense Force to punt backed up
against their own endzone.

-squad but this is an ironman

he said, “Our offensive line let
‘me now they were opening up big
holes so rather than dropping
back to pass on that last drive I
knew I just had to put my head
down and they could open up a
hole for me. to drive it in and
score. ”

An elated Stingrays Head
Coach, Lawrence Hepburn, laud-

lead of the change.

Lucien, the third year quarter-
back and former rookie of the
year, said his team refused to give
up despite falling behind early
and being shorthanded.

“We’re used to having a'big

team,” he said, “When it comes
down to it no matter how people
we have. we suit up and we.ready..._.ed-his-team’s-resiltence:
‘to play.” “These players really dug deep

Lucien credited his entire team __ today to pull it out for this game,”
for a spirited second half effort,in. he said, “When we first got out
particular his offensive lineman _ here we only had a few guys. but
who keyed the scoring drive. they came together today to get

“My team just attacked and ___ this win, hats off to the guys.”-
just attacked and we just came The Destroyers fell to 1-5. ..
out strong in that second half,”.



Nadal-less Spain upset Argentina in Davis Cup

\

. MMAR DEL PLATA, Argentina

Spain won its third Davis Cup title without the services of top-ranked Rafael egation zone in a 1-0 victory over the also struggling Blackburn on Sunday,

Fernando Verdasco defeated Jose Acasuso 6-3, 6-7 (3), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 in front ? while West Ham moved away from danger-with a 1-0-triumph-at Sunderland.”

Nadal, upsetting Argentina 3-1 in the final on Sunday.

of a boisterous Argentine crowd at Islas Malvinas Stadium. Argentina lost at :
home for the first time in 10 years in Davis Cup competition. . ~

Verdasco, replacing David Ferrer in the reverse singles, overcame nine dou- :

ble-faults to beat a shaky Acasuso.in 3 hours, 56 minutes. The 48th-ranked :

Acasuso was a late replacement for the injured Juan Martin del Potro, Argenti- : :

na’s top-ranked player at No. 9.

ries against Australia in the 2000 final and the United States in 2004. Argenti- :
na had reached the final twice, losing to the U.S. in 1981 and Russia in:
2006. After winning match point, Verdasco dropped to the ground in celebration :
~ and was embraced by his teammates. Argentina entered the heavy favorite after :
Nadal withdrew last week because of a knee injury.



Lopez on ‘Saturday. heirs sérved 14 aces, but had 47 unforced, érrors. ..





Despite the support of nearly, 10,000. fans, Acasuso,was: Aot able to:keep up ieee
with Verdasco,.who had played: well in the doubles’ Victory alongside Feliciano



‘Tottenham beat Blackburn to limb out of mire |
a LONDON



Roman Pavlyuchenko’s goal lifted Tottenham out of the Premier League rel-

The ‘Russian striker beat goalkeeper Paul Robinson with a shot from 42
: yards. The victory lifted Spurs to 15th from 19th, taking 13 points in the six
: games since Harry Redknapp took over.
“We have taken 13 points from (a possible) 18, but it’ s lucky we have,” Red-
knapp said.

After eight games without a win, Blackburn slipped to 19th. West Ham end-

i ate ; Mite g A ; a, ; ed arun of seven matches without a victory with a triumph at Sunderland,
Spain won its first Davis Cup title win on the road, adding to home victo- : which has now lost at home for the fourth time in a row. The Black Cats failed

to clear a corner and Valon Behrami’s shot was deflected past goalkeeper. Mar-
: ton Fulop. The Hammers climbed to 13th while Sunderland slipped to 16th.
: Chelsea and Liverpool both squandered chances to move further away in the

: title race on Saturday ‘when, none of the traditional contenders managed to |

i ‘Manchester City.

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TRIBUNE SPORTS



Myron realises a dream
FROM page 15

game. (

“I was on such an emotional high that I didn’t feel the cold. I was just
glad to be there with my team-mates. We won so that was fun too. It
was just a great day for me as everybody congratulated me.”

Rolle, who make it a point to come home just about every summer
to spend time with his family, said he’s eagerly looking forward to the
possibility of returning in December, if his schedule doesn’t get too hec-

ic.

His father, Whitney, a former player and coach with the Pros in the
Commonwealth American Football League, said the next six months
will definitely be a whirlwind for his son.

“We are very proud of what he achieved. That Rhodes scholarship
is something that will be with him for the rest of his life,” he pointed out.

“But I think it’s just going to be a stepping stone in terms of the things
that he is doing because Myron has done a lotof stuff, not only i in foot-
ball, but on the academic side and in the community.”

Calling himself‘a talented, but giving person, the senior Rolle said
“he’s very excited about the award, his team-mates are excited, the
school is excited, his family is excited.

“But he’s going to have to make a decision very soon on what he’s
going to do from a professional career to being a Rhodes scholarship
because he wants to be a doctor and he also wants to play in the

NFL. ”

Depending on how the Seminoles finish their season, they could play
ina Bowl game and even in the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida in Jan-
uary.

On January 20, Rolle is also expected to travel to Washington D.C.
to be a guest at the inauguration for US President-elect Barack Oba-
ma through his involvement in the National Youth Programme for
Medicine.

Additionally, Rolle is “ido expected to begin preparing for the NFL

‘combine where the draft prospects at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis. |

The senior Rolle said at some point soon they are going to have to
sit down and decide, on what is the right course of action his son
should take, whether it’s to continue his educational pursue; at Oxford

~or the NEL -through the-draft.-

But for now; Rolle is Idaking for Wace to playing in the Seminoles’

next game at home in Tallahassee on Saturday when they host Flori- ,

da in a big rivalry.

| Baltimore clinic directors

help young Bahamians
FROM; page 15 eee 3

. they, were invited to come to the Bahamas through Patrick Knowles,

whose son, Ali, has been a part of the programme.

“Patrick has asked us to come down and work with some of these |

kids and those whoare younger so that we can get a foundation going
forward,” he said.

——-We’re-trying to give them:a foundationso that they can move on to

play high school and college football.”

From what he’s seen, (Roswell said there’s definitely a “passion for
the game” and he and Gemler has been pleased with the reception they _
have received from the players.

“I think the base needs to be built year in and year out and you will.

definitely see more players playing college baseball,” he said. ““There’s
a lot of challenge in front of the Bahamian student athletes. -

“But it can be done. The plan just have to be put in place so that the «
players can get the opportunity to do so.’

Knowles, who'came from Grand Bebania to. be a part of the’ pro-- |

gramme, said the niain thing is to get more players exposed thrqugh
Team One Baseball as his son was.



he players go through in the United States,”
ankful that Team One came in to do this ¢
-After he was introduced to Team One Baseball where his son wa

a WE, are ve



“displayed in the showcase, Knowles said he decided to extend thes 3

programme to get more Bahamian players involved.

“This is the first step in putting these guys in,ah environment of what,





“We're trying to get other guys whom they will recommen to com al

to their showcase, rather than us sending everyone,” Knowles said. “So.
we’re happy that ‘they are here to take a look at the players.”

Knowles said the federation and Pony Baseball Bahamas will build
on what transpired this weekend when they host the second of three __
phrases over the weekend of December sc -7 when a Showcase Prospect »

Camp will.take place.

_. A number of University Coaches and Scouts from Major League |

Baseball teams will be in town to conduct the session.

Then on Sunday, December 14, the third anti final session will take

place with a Boarding School Fair/Seminar.

~ Already committed to attend are Southeastern United States (Chris-'
tian School - Arden North Carolina); Darlington School - Rome Geor-
gia; Christchurch School - Christchurch, Mirginia and Rabun Gap -
Rabun, Georgia

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 19





Nag aN wale) NB Ait)

Iraq security pact poses Lau

detainee dilemma for : | S | WALL adil Mackey St - Thompson Blvd
- ] Ma ie ~~ me meme we : , -

{
i

@ By RYAN LUCAS
CAMP CROPPER, Ira



The U.S. military is rushing to build crimi-
nal cases against some 5,000 detainees it
deems dangerous — including suspected mem-
bers of al-Qaida in Iraq — because the pro-
posed security pact with Iraq would end its
right to hold prisoners without charge, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

The agreement, which is to be voted on by
Iraqi lawmakers Wednesday, is primarily
intended to set a timetable calling for Amer-
ican troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.
But it also calls for control of security matters
to shift to Iraqi authorities.

If passed, the deal would mean U.S. troops
could no longer hold people without charge as
they have since the 2003 invasion that ousted
Saddam Hussein. Beginning Jan. 1, all detén-
tions would have to be based on evidence,
and the U.S. would have to prosecute pris-
oners in Iraqi courts or let them go.

"At the end of the day, if there's not enough
. facts to justify a court case, then we'll have to
release," said Brig. Gen. David Quantock,

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Maya Alleruzzo/AP Photo

ACHILD is embraced by her father, who is held
at the U.S. detention facility at Camp Cropper in

Baghdad, Iraq during a visiting “ on vlOneey,

Nov. 10, 2008.

the commander of the U.S. detention system
in Iraq. The Americans have evidence against
only "a few hundred" of the most dangerous
detainees, Quantock said, leaving open the
possibility that thousands could find them-
selves back on Iraq's streets soon.

“We have a lot of work to do," he said.

Part of the challenge stems from differ-:

ences between the U.S. and Iraqi legal sys-

IVS BETTER IN THE

tems. In the United States, forensic evidence |

is widely used in the courts. Not so in Iraq..

"We've got a number of guys right now
that are covered in TNT (explosive residue).
However, that's not admissible in Iraqi court,"
Quantock said. "What wins the day in Iraqi
courts today is two eyewitness statements or a
confession."

The USS. is training Iraqi forensic specialists
and pushing to make such evidence more
acceptable in court. Iraqi judges are slowly
bending, but it is expected to take time before
forensic evidence wins wide approval. .

The transition comes amid a marked
improvement in security that has boosted the
confidence of Iraq's government and allowed
security-based detention to give way to a civil-
ian justice system. It would also mark a major
step toward shutting down a detention sys-
tem that was tainted by the scandal at Abu
Ghraib prison outside Baghdad, where U.S.
guards abused detainees. US. forces are hold-
ing around 16,500 detainees in all. The largest
facility, with some 12,900 prisoners, is at Camp
Bucca near the city of Basra, some 340 miles
southea.t of Baghdad.

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THE TRIBUNE



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T___INTERNATIONALNEWS
Iraqi Cabinet campaigns

for security pact with US

@ By HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press Writer

BAGHDAD (AP)
Pirates, foreign attacks, a plum-
meting economy. Iraqi govern-
ment ministers are cataloguing
warnings about the future if
lawmakers reject the proposed
security pact with the US.

It's all part of a campaign by
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki
to rally support for the agree-
ment going into parliament's
crucial vote Wednesday on the
deal that would keep American
troops in Iraq through 2011.

On Sunday, Finance Minis-
ter Bayan Jabr sought to reas-
sure lawmakers who argued the
pact would remove.UN protec-
tion for Iraq's assets, opening
the way for claimants armed
with court rulings to demand
billions of dollars in compensa-
tion for Iraqi actions during
Saddam Hussein's 23-year rule.

He said Iraq would seek
Washington's help to secure a
new, "limited" UN resolution
to protect the $60 billion-plus
that Iraq has in two separate,
US-based funds. The assets are
now shielded by a Security
Council resolution that expires

‘December 31 and by a Presi-

dent George W Bush executive

order that expires in May.:
Revenues from Iraq's oil and

natural gas exports, which

_ account for at least 90 per cent

of the country's income, are
held in one of the two accounts,
the Development Fund for Iraq
set up in 2003. It has about $20
billion, from which the Iraqi

‘government withdraws as

required. The Iraqi central
bank's foreign reserves, more
than $40 billion, are in the oth-
er fund. i

Joining in al-Maliki's offen-
sive, Planning Minister Ali
Baban warned Sunday that
security will deteriorate if the
agreement does not pass, keep-
ing investors away and setting
back reconstruction efforts.
"That will have a negative
impact on economic growth
tates," he said.

On Saturday, Defense Min-

e



A CHILD holds a poster of Iraqi
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki dur-
ing a demonstration in support of a
US-Iraqi security pact in pea
Baghdad, oe

(AP Photo: Khalid Mohammed)

ister Abdul-Qader al-Obeidi
warned that Iraq could risk
internal unrest and foreign
attacks as well as piracy target-
ing its oil exports in the Persian
Gulf if US forces abruptly
pulled out from Iraq.

The prime minister took the

lead last week in marketing the
deal. He went on national tele-
vision and addressed a news
conference to campaign for the
agreement and against the
renewal of the UN mandate
that currently governs the pres-
ence of US forces in Iraq.

The pact was less than ideal,
he said, but it provides a clear
and firm timeline for-the with-
drawal of US troops — from
cities by next June 30 and the
entire country by January 1,
2012 — and is a "solid prelude"
to the restoration of Iraq's full
sovereignty.

Al-Maliki had hoped parlia-
ment would pass the agreement
by consensus, but a six-hour
debate in the legislature Satur-
day suggested that goal might
be beyond reach.

Many of the lawmakers who
spoke berated the government
for not keeping them informed
during months of négotiations
that produced the pact.

Others said the deal infringes
on Iraq's sovereignty and lacks
a firm US commitment to come



to Iraq's rescue in the case of a .
foreign threat. Some said it
made no sense to adopt an
agreement with a US. adminis-
tration with less than two
months left in office.

Many Iraqis see the pact as
prolonging what they consider a
US occupation, even if some
believe that is necessary to help
Iraq's nascent security forces
fight an insurgency that has suf-
fered severe setbacks but still
carries out regular attacks.

Besides a timeline for US
withdrawal, the agreement pro-
vides for Iraqi oversight of the
operations and movements of
American troops and gives
Iraqis limited jurisdiction over
US soldiers and civilian Penta-
gon employees in cases of seri-
ous crimes committed while off-
base and off duty. It also bars
US forces from using Iraqi ter-
ritory to attack neighboring
nations.

Al-Maliki could muster just
over 140 votes if the pact gets
the support of lawmakers from
the main Shiite and Kurdish
blocs, his main coalition part-
ners. But for a wide margin of
victory, he needs the votes of
the 44 lawmakers from the
largest Sunni Arab bloc that is
also a coalition partner but
whose support for the deal is
uncertain.

A respectable number of
Sunni votes in favor of the
agreement would satisfy al-
Maliki and, just as important-

‘ly, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sis-

tani, the country's most influ-
ential Shiite critic who has indi-
cated the pact will be viable
only if it is backed by a large
number of lawmakers. —
Al-Sistani enjoys such enor-
mous support among Iraq's -Shi-
ite majority that he could sink
the deal by speaking publicly
against it or stating his dissatis-
faction over the margin of pas-
sage. It's the latter that has al-

~ Maliki's Cabinet ministers talk-

ing up the agreement.

e Associated Press writer Qas-
sim Abdul-Zahra contributed to
this report.

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Meltdown |

leaves ghost
-resorts—

Hi By DANICA COTO
Associa.ed Press Writer

PUNTA CANA, Dominican
Republic (AP) — The ocean
glows a milky turquoise. Tiny

waves lap at the powder-beige ©

sand, in no rush to reach the
line of postcard-perfect palm
trees.

Hundreds of luxury villas are
positioned to take in the view,
but there are no guests. There
are no roofs either; neatly tied
bundles of red tiles are stacked
outside. The wind slams doors
and rustles the yellowed news-
paper taped to the windows.

The paralyzed work scene at
the Cap Cana resort, a devel-
opment including four luxury
hotels, three golf courses and a
mega-yacht marina, is a victim
of the ‘global financial crisis that
has hit the Caribbean's tourism
industry especially hard.

Cap Cana fired 500 workers
last month after Lehman Broth-
ers declared bankruptcy and a
$250 million loan fell through.
Talks to re-negotiate a $100 mil-
lion short-term loan collapsed
last week, and more layoffs are
expected.

“Our project has been affect-
ed by the economic tsunami
that has paralyzed the global
financial markets," said Cap
Cana President Ricardo
Hazoury.

Construction is also paralyzed
at the Ritz-Carlton Molasses

. Reef resort in secluded West
Caicos, where 60 Chinese work-
ers revolted last month to
demand back wages. About 160
workers have been sent home
to China, and it's unclear when
construction will resume at the
hotel, marina and condomini-
um project, which is three-quar-
ters complete. :

This month, the sprawling

‘Atlantis resort in the Bahamas ~~

laid off about 800 workers, cit-
* ing low occupancy rates. Baha
Mar Resorts Ltd. laid off about
40 employees at its Sheraton
Resort in the Bahamas and 40

more at the Wyndham Nassau |
Resort. The Bahamas Hotel

Catering and Allied Workers
Union has called a demonstra-
tion Thursday to demand gov-
ernment aid.

"T've been in the business 38

years. I have seen the impact of
the Gulf War. I have seen the
recession of the '80s. Certainly

September 11," said Robert

Sands, senior-vice president of
external affairs at Baha Mar.
"But nothing has been of a
global nature, which makes the
current financial situation we're
in much more worrisome."

In Puerto Rico, the Caribe

Hilton laid off more than 50.

people this month because of
rising costs and. sluggish occu-
pancy rates. The last time the
hotel had to lay off workers was
after the September 11 attacks,
General Manager Jose Campo
said:

"What worries me is that this
will last longer," he said. "We
are mounting an aggressive
campaign, but the situation is
what it is." :

Even the normally busy holi-
day season is expected to be rel-
atively quiet.

"There is space available for
the. holiday season and
beyond," said Alec Sanguinetti,
CEO of the Caribbean Hotel
& Tourism Association. "This is



IN THIS October 16, 2008 file photo, the paralyzed construction of the Ritz-
Carlton Molasses Resort on the small undeveloped island of West Caicos
in the Turks and Caicos Islands...

often a time when hotels are
sold out and vacationers are

looking for any place that has.

availability. "

Workers are spending their
days off looking for jobs out-
side the tourism industry. Oth-
ers have already been sent
home.

Victor Felipe Feliz, 24, has
been feeding his two children
on store credit since he lost his
construction job at Cap Cana
last month.

"I need to work so I can buy
Pampers, so I can buy food,"
he said. "It has been a couple of
months since I bought clothes. I
can't afford anything."

Cap Cana plans to fire anoth-
er 1,000 workers in the coming
months, according to a compa-
ny official who spoke only on
condition of anonymity because

he wasn't authorized to release.

the information. But Cap Cana
President Ricardo Hazoury said
he expects the project to go for-
ward as the company out-
sources certain services.

The 50-square-mile (130-
square-kilometer) development
is nestled in the Dominican
Republic's easternmost point

amid lush jungle. Its develop-

ers include Deutsche Bank, the
Trump Organization and the
Ritz Carlton Hotel Company:
Cap Cana runs‘more like a
city than a private development.
It generates its own power and
water and has hundreds of villas
and condominiums — even a
school. Some of the villas and

‘hotels are inhabited, but most
remain under construction.

"We used to have a lot of
workers — brick layers,

plumbers, electricians," said

Wilkin Cuevamato, who was
laid off but later found work at
another Cap Cana property.
"The majority have left and
gone home."

Tourists willing to make last-
minute travel arrangements will
find some real bargains as hotels
react to the soft period, accord-
ing to Scott Berman, a tourism
adviser for Pricewaterhouse
Coopers in Miami.

"If you're flexible and have

‘time on your hands, you're

going to,find some favorable
deals this winter," he said.

But cheaper rooms are often
offset by expensive airfare,
according to Renaldo Inesta,
division manager for AAA in
Puerto Rico. American Air-
lines, the main carrier to the
island, has cut back flights by
44 per cent, though other air-
lines are stepping in to reduce
the overall drop to 14 per cent.

Beyond the holiday season,
the picture is bleak. Getting

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money to finance new projects
will be difficult amid the credit
squeeze. A new UN report pre-
dicts access to external financing
for the region will be limited,
and what is available will come
with high interest rates.

But some remain optimistic.
In September, even as the finan-
cial crisis was gathering steam,
Hilton Hotels Corp. announced
plans to build 17 hotels in the
Caribbean, adding to the 13 it
already has.

"We have analyzed the
region," said Gregory Rockett,
who is overseeing the expan-
sion. "We are very confident
that in the next five years we
can do these numbers."

And Sanguinetti points out
that for North Americans, the
Caribbean remains a quick and
attractive getaway.

"We provide a relaxing
escape from the tensions that
people are facing at work dur-
ing this economic crisis," he
said. "We expect that, pent-up
demand will be released."



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TOURISTS sunbathe in the Bahia
Tortuga Resort in Punta Cana,
Dominican Republic. The global
financial crisis has halted work
on this multimillion dollar project
overlooking a turquoise sea,
turning it into a ghost resort. It is
among growing signs that the
Caribbean is headed for tough
times as construction workers
and resort employees are laid
off by the hundreds and antici-
pated peak season bookings are
at a trickle.

(AP Photo: Kena Betancur)















































THE TRIBUNE



PAGE 24, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Strategies for booking hotels on a budget

@ By BETH J HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor

NEW YORK (AP) — When
the economy was booming,
many hotel companies began
building new properties. Some
of those are opening now,
resulting in a 2.5 per cent
increase in hotel room supply

this year, just as demand is.

dropping by around one per
cent or more, according to Jan
Freitag of Smith Travel
Research.

"We're going to see a sub-
stantial decline in occupancy
this year," agreed Bjorn Han-
son, an associate professbr of
hospitality and tourism at New
York University's Tisch Cen-
ter.

Excess supply means oppor-
tunities for consumers. Here are
some strategies for booking
hotels on a budget.

BASICS: It's generally cheap-
er to stay in major cities on
weekends, when there are few-
er business travelers, and in
resort areas on weekdays and
offseason, when there are fewer
tourists.

Visitors to urban centers may
save by booking outside main
tourist areas. For San Diego,
for example, "you could stay in
Carlsbad or even up as far as
Oceanside," said Joe McIner-
ney, CEO of the American

» Hotel & Lodging Association.

But research the cost and time
of commuting in each day, to
make sure the tradeoff is worth

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Westchester might be cheaper
than Manhattan, but your sav-

‘ings might be offset by daily

train and cab fare or tolls and
parking.

You'll also pay less outside
of peak holiday time, and some
new hotels charge lower intro-
ductory rates. Canyon Ranch's
new destination spa.in Miami

Beach has nightly starting prices:

at $200 through December 3.
Rates go up December 4-23,
starting at $650 a night, and
December 24-January 1, to
$1,100 a night.

Places hard-hit by the down-
turn may also offer deals. The
Bahamas’ Atlantis mega-resort,
with nearly 3,000 rooms on Par-
adise Island, recently laid off
800 workers. It's now offering a
three-night package starting at
$299 a person, including two
sessions interacting with dol-
phins (normally $110 each), and
$99 airfare each way on JetBlue
from New-York, $89 from
Boston (book by December 18,
offer ends December 25,
http://www.atlantis.com, black-
outs apply). In addition, the
Nassau Paradise Island Promo-
tion Board is offering a $250
rebate on air-inclusive packages
(three-to-six night stays, book
through November 30, for trav-
el completed by February 28).
An Atlantis package offered
this time last year started at low-
er rates of $259 a person, but
did not include dolphins, air-
fare discounts or rebates.

REWARDS

PROGRAMMES

Most hotel chains have loy-
alty or frequent guest pro-

- grammes that allow you to use

points for free nights. "Every
traveler should be a member of
every frequent guest pro-
gramme," said Hanson. Joining
usually costs nothing; points
accumulate. and often don't
expire; and most hotel chains
now have.no blackout dates for
using points to book rooms.
Many hotel chains offer
cobranded credit cards with
enough bonus points for a free
night. Sign up for a new Mar-
riott Visa card and get a certifi-
cate for one free night's stay,
plus 25,000 bonus points, which
are enough for another night's
stay at Marriotts in many mar-
kets, including January in’ Mia-
mi, where you can go to the
beach, or Salt Lake City, where
you can ski. If you travel with a

spouse or friend, that person

can sign up for his or her own
card and get points for free
nights as well.

Research how fast points
accumulate before signing up.
Different chains have different
systems. With Hilton, you get



S
esort in the Bahamas...

up to 20,000 bonus points for
signing up for Hilton HHonors
Platinum Credit Card from
American Express (10,000
points for your first purchase
with the card, 2,500 points for

each of your first four stays at

Hilton Family hotels). Card-
holders can also earn five points
for every dollar spent at Hilton
Family hotels, grocery stores,
drugstores, gas stations, restau-
rants and on US postal services
and wireless phone bills.

For. other purchases, Hilton
cobrand card holders earn three
points per dollar. In addition,
the programme has an option
where you earn 15 points for
every dollar you spend at Hilton
Family hotels, as long as you
choose hotel-stay points as your
sole reward. Hilton also has an
"earnings mall" where you can
earn extra points for shopping
at various retailers like iTunes.

For overviews of what each
hotel credit card offers and how
many dollars you must spend
to accumulate more points,
check out http://www.credit-
cards.com/travel-rewards.php.

But be aware that when you
apply for new credit cards, "it
impacts your credit card rating,"
said Gail Cunningham, spokes-
woman for the National: Foun-
dation for Credit Counseling.
For example, applying for four
or five hotel credit cards to get
several free nights with signup
bonus points "can signal to
lenders that you're desperate
for credit, that you're just get-
ting credit everywhere you

can," Cunningham said. That::

can hurt you if you're looking to
get approved for a loan.
Others who should avoid
rewards credit cards, Cunning-
ham says, are those tempted by

new lines of credit to buy things .

they can't afford; and those who
carry balances from month to
month. Don't let the value of
your rewards get wiped out by
interest. Rewards credit cards,
Cunningham added, are only
for those "with the most pris-
tine of credit ratings."

BOOKING ©

McInerney of AH&LA says
your first stop should be the
hotel's own Web site. "That's

' where you're going to get the

best price," he said.

In addition, said Hanson, |

“most brands have a guarantee
that.if you find a lower rate,
they'll match it or pay the dif-





ference, or you can stay for
free."

- Ask for discounts for AAA
membership, military service or
corporate rates.

Alternatively, figure out how
much you want to pay, the type

‘of hotel you'd like to stay in,

and bid for a room through a
booking site like Priceline.com.
You won't know which hotel
you're staying at until after
you've paid; but you can speci-
fy the category of hotel using
the star-ratings system.

Note that star ratings are
inconsistent. A four-star hotel
on one site might only be a
three-star hotel on another.
Priceline has a "Winning Bids"
advice feature that eliminates
some of the guesswork by pro-
viding examples of brands for
each star rating along with win-
ning bids paid in different mar-
kets. Hotels accept the dis-
counted bids because they'd
rather fill rooms at lower prices
than leave them empty. Price-
line says its customers pay 46-48
per cent less than if they booked
through the hotels directly.

Another strategy: See what
rates are offered at specific
hotels online, "then call the
hotel directly" and ask if there's
a lower rate, Hanson said. "A
third of the time there will be."

"When there's an empty
room, it's just losing money.
Any amount of money you pay
for that room is found money,"
agreed Tim Zagat, who has just
published "Top US Hotels,
Resorts & Spas 2009."

Zagat encourages consumers
to negotiate hard. "Ask for
package rates, ask for the lowest
rate, ask for an upgrade. There
are all kinds of deals out there.
Not to ask is to look stupid,"
he said.

Call the hotel at its local
phone number, not the chain's
800 number. "The branded
hotel company has limits on
what it can do, but the individ-
ual owner can do anything he
feels like," Zagat said.

Once you make a reservation,
check to see if prices drop, then
rebook. "If the booking pace is
slower than forecast, hotels
switch to a lower rate sched-
ule," Hanson said. Sy
“Look for free Internet service
and'free breakfast; avoid rip-
off goodies in the mini-bar, and
use your cell:so you don't get
charged for the hotel room
phone.

Despite the economy, Freitag
of Smith Travel says he does-
n't think hotel prices will drop -
the way they did after Sept.
11th. But he does think con-
sumers can expect better value
for what they pay — better

‘views, free Internet, free access

to the health club, pay for two
nights and get a third free.

"The takeaway for the con-
sumer: Don't be shy about ask-
ing for those things," Freitag
said.

"With occupancies dropping,
the most important person in
the transaction is the man or
woman who checks you in. Be
nice,-and ask, 'Do you have a
nice room for me?'"

THIS undated photo
released by Atlantis,
Paradise Island shows
the Marina at the
Atlantis resort in the
Bahamas.

(AP Photo: Macduff
Everton)

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THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 25



Children dying in Haiti,



rs

victims of food crisis

lm By JONATHAN M KATZ
Associated Press Writer

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
(AP) — The five-year-old
teetered on broomstick legs —
he weighed less than 20 pounds,
even after days of drinking
enriched milk. Nearby, a four-
year-old girl hung from a strap
attached to a scale, her wide
eyes lifeless; her emaciated arms
dangling weakly.

In pockets of Haiti accessible
only by donkey or foot, chil-
dren are dying of malnutrition
— their already meager food
_ supply cut by a series of devas-

tating storms that destroyed
crops, wiped out livestock and
sent food prices spiraling.

At least 26 severely malnour-
ished children have died in the
past four weeks in the remote
region of Baie d'Orange in
Haiti's southeast, aid workers
said Thursday, and there are
fears the toll will rise much

_ higher if help does not come
quickly to the impoverished
Caribbean nation. i

Another 65 severely mal-

nourished children are being
’ treated in makeshift tent clin-
ics in the mountainous area, or

at hospitals where they were .

evacuated in Port-au-Prince and
elsewhere, said Max Cosci, who
heads the Belgian contingent of
Doctors Without Borders in
Haiti.

One evacuee, a seven-year-
old girl, died while being treat-
ed, Cosci said, adding: "The sit-

_uation is extremely, extremely
fragile and dangerous."

At a makeshift malnutrition
ward at a Doctors Without Bor-

ders hospital in the capital, 10
emaciated children were under
emergency care Thursday, their
stomachs swollen and hair fad-
ed by pigmentation loss caused
by malnutrition. Several had the
puffy faces typical of kwash-
iorkor, a protein-deficiency dis-
order.
ouveBive-year-old Mackenson
»;Duclair, his ribs protruding and
his legs. little more than skin
stretched over bones, weighed
in at 19.8 pounds, even after
days of drinking milk enriched
with potassium and salt. Doc-
tors said he needed to gain
another five pounds before he
could go home.

Dangling from a scale mount-
ed from the ceiling, four-year-
old Venecia Lonis looked as
limp as a rag doll as doctors
weighed her, her huge brown
eyes expressionless, her hair
_tied with bright yellow bows.

Mackenson's grandmother,
who has raised him since his
mother died, said she barely has
a can of corn grits to feed her-
self, the boy and her eight-year-
old granddaughter each day.

"These things did not happen
when I was growing up," 72-
year-old Ticouloute Fortune
said.

Rural families already strug-
gling with soaring food prices
in Haiti, the Western Hemi-
sphere's poorest country, lost
their safety nets when fields

were destroyed and livestock.

wiped out by the storms, which
killed nearly 800 people and
caused $1 billion worth of dam-
age in August and September.

UN World Food Programme
country director Myrta Kaulard
said she fears more deaths from
malnutrition in other isolated
parts of Haiti, and search and
medical teams were fanning out
in the northwest and along the
southwestern peninsula to

check.
The World Food Program

thas sent more than 30 tons of

food aid — enough to feed
5,800 people for two weeks —
into the remote southeastern
region since September, and
other groups funded by the U.S.
Agency for International Devel-

opment have sent food as well, |

she said.

But the steep, narrow paths:

and poor visibility make it dif-
ficult to deliver the food to the
mountain communities where
hunger is worsening. In one
case, a WFP truck flipped over
while struggling up a hill and
slid into a ravine, killing a an aid
worker.

"Theres always a bottleneck:
The same situation that the peo-
ple are facing is the same situa-
tion we're also facing," Kaulard
told The Associated Press
Thursday.

Haiti in general ait the
mountain villages in particular
have long suffered from chron-

_ic hunger. Child malnutrition

rates have been high for years
— the WFP reported in 2007
that nearly a quarter of children









1

were chronically malnourished.
: Remote.rural areas in partic-

_ ular grow only enough staples

to feed themselves less than sev-
en months out of the year,
Kaulard said.

But throughout the year, aid
workers and officials have been
seeing hunger get more severe,
and now people who live in the
mountains and aid groups who
are working there say the situa-
tion is worse than it has been
in the past.

This year, for instance, Haiti's

‘agriculture ministry estimates

60 per cent of the harvest was
lost. in the storms nationwide.
Land quality is already poor
and farmers lost seeds for next
year when the storms hit,
Kaulard said. -

_ Effects.of the storms vary
widely from village to’ village
and even family to family. In

some places, food supplies seem

intact. In others, Doctors With-
out Borders has found rates of
severe malnutrition as high as
five per cent.

Aid shortages may soon com-
pound the problem. Donor
countries have funded only a
third of the UN's $105 million
aid appeal for Haiti following
the storms, and resources could
tun out in January, Kaulard
said.

At the hospital Thursday,
Enock Augustin sat beside the
bed where his five-year-old
daughter Bertha was sleeping:
The fragile-looking child was
evacuated by helicopter
November 8 with vomiting and
diarrhea. When she arrived,



S|
FOUR-YEAR-OLD Venecia Lonis, who suffers from malnutrition, is
weighed at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Port-au-Prince...



THREE-YEAR-OLD Pierre Davidson, who suffers from
malnutrition, lies on a bed at the Doctors Without
Borders hospital’in Port-au-Prince. Aid workers fear
hunger is worsening in rural Haiti after at least 26
children died of conditions exacerbated by a lack: of
nutrition, raising concerns that a grave food crisis
may be brewing colton Te four devastatiag tropical

storms...

nearly a quarter of her body

‘weight was due to fluid reten-

tion, a‘sign of severe protein









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The swelling gradually reced-

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enriched milk and-treated with
antibiotics and anti-worm fned-
icine; she shrank to just 21
pounds.

She has since gained about

two pounds but can't go home’

until she reaches 26 pounds;
doctors said.

For months, the Anonetig

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and plants,"
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unreachable and "the price of
everything went sky high."

The entire family subsisted
on two cups of corn grits, and .
Bertha began shrinking —- and
then swelling — before his eyes.

"She was really bad. We put
her in the helicopter and they
brought her here," Augustin
said. "I-hope the government
will hear about us and bring
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PAGE 26, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008









MONDAY EVENING NOVEMBER 24, 2008

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THE TRIBUNE








































































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China builds economic ties with Cuba

@ By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press Writer

HAVANA (AP) — China’s president signed
trade deals with communist ally Cuba and agreed
to help modernize its ports and hospitals, part
of a Latin America trip on which Chinese busi-
nessmen have been snapping up raw materials.

Taking the long view at a time of financial cri-
sis, China is investing heavily in commodity-pro-
ducing countries, and Cuba is no exception. More
than a dozen deals agreed to by President Hu
Jintao included purchases of Cuban nickel and
sugar, along with pledges to send food and build-
ing materials to help the Caribbean nation recov-
er from three major hurricanes.

Hu signed off on a second, $70 million phase of
$350 million in Chinese credit to renovate Cuban
hospitals. China also committed to help reno-
vate Cuba's crucial, but aging, ports.

It was unclear how many of the deals were on
credit. Havana has already borrowed extensively
from Beijing — loans it might have trouble repay-
ing as it recovers from Hurricanes Gustav, Ike and
Paloma, all of which hit Cuba this year.

Hu thanked Cuba for sending doctors to China
after last year’s devastating earthquake, and for
educational programmes on the island attended
by about 2,000 Chinese, including medical stu-
dents.

China's president also met with ailing former
President Fidel Castro. Cuba released a photo
of the pair shaking hands and chatting. Hu wore
a business suit and the former Cuban president
had on exercise clothing that has become his
standard uniform since undergoing emergency
intestinal surgery and disappearing from public
view in July 2006.

Cuban authorities provided no further details,
but China's official Xinhua News Agency said
the two held a long discussion.

"I see in person that you have recovered and
have been energetic, so I feel very pleased," Xin-
hua reported Hu told Castro.

Castro replied: "We are old friends. I am hap-
py to see that you are as energetic as when I met
you last time."

Hu met with Castro during his first visit to
Cuba in 2004. The 82-year-old has an undisclosed.
illness and brother Raul Castro, five years his
junior, formally succeeded him as president in
February.

Accompanying Hu on a visit to a school for
Chinese students on Tuesday, Raul Castro sang
snippets of a song about China and Mao Zedong
he said he learned while traveling the world in
1953. At first, hundreds of students gathered in an

‘auditorium seemed confused, but they soon sang

along, clapping in time.

"Even though the physical distance that sepa-
rates China and Cuba is great, friendship between
both people goes back a long way," Hu said.

Cuba depended heavily on Soviet largesse and
turned a cold shoulder to China during the Cold
War's Sino-Soviet split. But ties warmed after
the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, and
Cuba now has no problem dealing with both Bei-
jing and Moscow...

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CHINA’S President Hu Jintao (left) waves as Cuba's
President Raul Castro walks with him during Jintao's
departure from the airport in Havana.

(AP Photo: Ismael Francisco)

China is Cuba's No. 2 trading partner after
Venezuela, where socialist President Hugo
Chavez provides nearly 100,000 barrels of oil a
day to the island at favourable prices.

The ties have brought a tangible benefit to res-
idents of the’ Cuban capital, where more than
3,000 shiny new Yutong buses replaced smoke-
belching, Soviet era buses.

But Hu's visit poses something of an ideologi-
cal challenge, since some Cubans speculated that
Raul Castro might follow a Chinese model of
reform after becoming president in February.
China transformed its economy three decades
ago by embracing market reforms even as its
Communist Party maintained strict political con-
trol.

Cuba's communist government, however, still
controls well over 90 per cent of the economy
and shows no sign of easing its grip on political or
economic matters, even as’ Raul Castro has

expanded foreign trade 39 per cent since becom-

ing president and signed a major offshore oil
exploration deal with Brazil.

On the eve of Hu's visit, the Communist Party
newspaper Granma praised China's reforms as
having "sparked a gigantic investment process
that brought quick results." But it also criticized .
"the evils of such an accelerated spiral: unequal

distribution of the country's income, a marked dif-

ference between city and country, and the érosion
of the environment."

Hu brought a large delegation of Chinese busi-
nessmen who have busily pursued deals despite
the global financial crisis, continuing a trend that
has seen China's trade with Latin America j jump
from to $103 billion last year from $10 billion in
2000.

Kirby Jones, president of the Washington-based
US-Cuba Trade Association, said Hu's stop in
Cuba is more about business than ideology. Jones;
whose organisation opposes the US trade embar-
go against Cuba, said Cuba is eagerly pursuing
deals with other countries.

Noting that Russian President Dmitry
Medvedev visits next week, he said Russia and
China are "perfect examples of the rest of the
world jumping in to fill the void left by the US."









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12m poultry
farm project
‘best hope’ in

North Andros

W By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

» A.PROPOSED $12. million
poultry farm project for North
Andros, which could employ
between 30-50 persons, is
emerging as the best short-term
hope for reviving the area’s
moribund economy, with a deal
for new equity investment in
the $250 million Chub Cay pro-
ject still not completed.

Vincent Peet; the PLP MP
for North Andros and the Berry
Islands, told Tribune Business
that the virtual standstill at
Chub Cay, where. only a “skele-
ton crew” now remained, had
made a “devastating impact” on
his constituency’s economy,
where unemployment was now
“very high — in the double digits,
certainly”.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra- |

ham had earlier this year told
Tribune Business that the three
investors behind the Chub Cay
project had contacted him to
inform him they had found a

new equity partner, who would
inject the capital needed to take .

the development forward.

However, Mr Peet indicated
there had been little progress
since then, and although the
deal to bring the still-unnamed
equity partner on board
remains on the table, it has not
been sealed given the global
economic turmoil.

Now, with Chub Cay likely
to remain in ‘cold storage’ for

-the-short-term:at:least;-rorth

Andros appears to be pinning
its hopes on a venture much
closer to its farming roots. |
“We are pretty close, I
believe, to cementing.a poultry
operation in north Andros,” Mr
Peet told Tribune Business, “It
was approved earlier in the
year, and we’re now pretty close
to moving that to the next level,

which will create some eco- °

nomic activity
Andros.”
The former minister of finan-

in ‘north

cial services and investments’

said the proposed poultry farm
was owned by a consortium of
Canadian investors, along with
an American “who haa:long
association with the Bahamas”.

“We’re hoping it can be -

raised to the point where they
can start to import items, equip-
ment and the rest, if not before
Christmas then early in the New
Year, so that it will create at
least some activity,” Mr Peet
told Tribune Business.

“We’ve been making grad-
ual, incremental moves to bring

SEE page 7B

GCE

eras resort project
‘remains on the table’

(

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

proposed mega resort
project for eastern
Grand Bahama,
which would involve a $2.2 bil-
lion investment in its first phase
alone, remains ‘on the table’,

. Tribune Business has been told,

with the main resort and casino
partners still willing to be

involved despite the global eco-

nomic turmoil.

The Bahamas Golden Beach
Development Company project,
which is understood to be ear-
marked for a site east of Pelican
Point in eastern Grand

Bahama, and. involve a four
hotel/four casino facility, was
said by sources to have over-
come the Government’s initial
reluctance to give the go-ahead
due to the amount of Crown
Land required. .

The. developers had initially
sought a site covering some
2,000 acres of Crown Land in

eastern Grand Bahama, a posi-

tion that contrasted totally with
the one taken up by the gov-
erning FNM party prior to its
May 2007 election, which want-
ed to prevent sizeable Crown
acreage being taken up by such
projertss

However, Tribune Business

was told that Bahamas. Golden
Beach Development Company
appeared to have surmounted
that particular obstacle, at least
for the moment, by reducing
the amount of Crown Land
sought from over 2,000 acres to
slightly more than 1,000 acres.
In addition, it had earlier this
year shown the Government
that there was no other suitable

‘site for its project in eastern

Grand Bahama.
Bahamas Golden Beach

Development Company ‘has.

since been, conducting environ-
mental studies and test borings
on the proposed development
site, Tribune Business has been

told, and has adjusted its plans
after discovering a fresh water
lense some 50 feet below the
surface. ,

As a result, sources suggested

‘ the developers had decided to

move the proposed marina and

its entrance some 2,000 feet fur-

ther down the beach. In addi-
tion, the marina’s sides will
lined by specialist materials
designed to prevent the sea’s
salt water from contaminating

the lense.

Furthermore, Tribune Busi-
ness has been told that the
developers’ main partners, Fox-

SEE page 4B



500 work TTT mee

--'that the Department of Immigratidn*wasâ„¢*

‘cessor’s suggestion that the



@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter | :

THE Department of Immigration is pro-
cessing an average of 500 work permit appli- -

cations per. week, Tribune Business has
been told, with the minister responsible
saying it was “unacceptable” for some appli-
cations to take eight to nine months.
Branville McCartney, minister of state.
for immigration, said: “At the moment, we.

are processing an average of 500 work f per-,

mits each week. That figure is for new appli-
cations and for those that need to be
renewed. —

“Some of these applications were, sub-

mitted eight to nine months ago, and it is.

unacceptable to have businesses waiting
for that long.”
Still, Mr McCartney expressed pleasure

making significant inroads into processing
Business
subsidies

‘not fiscally
prudent’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE minister of state for:
finance has slammed his prede-

Government should effectively
subsidise major Bahamian busi-
nesses to prevent worker lay-
offs, describing the plan as not
“fiscally prudent” and poten-
tially “an enormous drain on
the Treasury”.

Zhivargo Laing, responding
to James Smith’s suggestion that.
the Government pay subven- °
tions to key businesses to ensure
unemployment was minimized,
said implementing such a
scheme was fraught with com-
plications and likely to place an
unsustainable burden on the
Bahamian taxpayer.

- Among the issues that would
have to be resolved, Mr Laing
said, were what kind of subven-
tion or subsidy to use, how long
it would be given for, “how do
you justify it in the circum-
stances for any business”, which
businesses should receive a sub-
sidy, and how the whole process
could be monitored.

“When a big business lays- -off
500 people, small and medium-
sized businesses are also impact-
ed by that decision,” Mr Laing
said. “Say if five small and
medium-sized businesses, were
to each lay-off 100 persons each
as a result, making another 500
persons, yet the subvention was
only given to the bigger busi-
ness. Why do you do it for the

SEE page 3B

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“week tO “cut
work permit applications.

work permits in a
timely manner.

.He said that recent-
ly the Department
created a special
internal division,
whose. sole purpose
will be to focus on'the
work permit applica-
tions coming out, of
_ the country’ s two
main ‘industries -
- tourism and financial services.

“Since that started,\we have seen a Sent

NV Or Tatas ae

turnaround in the work permits for those

areas and gotten great feedback,’ ” the min-
ister said.

Since Mr ‘McCartney ‘assumed’ his nose i

at the beginning of the summer, he said he
has met with the Immigration Board'e a
are the Hates Backloe



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CONVENIENT











step

_Mr McCartney said he remained: com-:
mitted to ensuring that:each work permit «

application was processed in a timely man-
ner once there were no specific challenges
in, individual cases - namely three to four
weeks for first time applications, and two to
three weeks for those that need to be
renewed. .

He added that the Immigration. Depart

ment was also working to improve ‘the

process for spousal permits and. permanent
_. Tesidency, approvals as well.
Among other improvements on theagen-

da for the Department, he said, was a dras-

tic improvement in the telephone system. _

Mr McCartney said that at the moment,

calling into the Department was a: night i



mare that needed to bé addressed.

He said he would like persons to be able
.to, call. into the Department and get, an
sta atie onthe peti

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Corporation
promises ‘no
complacency’
on oil price
drop

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
‘Tribune Business Editor _

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (BEC) will “not
become complacent” in its
search for renewable energy
suppliers, even though the fuel
surcharge component on power
bills is likely to fall to $0.17 per

‘kilowatt hour for December.’

and “lower than $0.15” for Jan-
uary.

Kevin Basden, BEC’s gener-
al manager, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Corporation ‘had
reduced:the number of poten-
tial renewable energy suppliers
from the 30 bids that responded
to its request for proposal
(RFP) to around 15, a 50 per
cent cut.

With the pre-qualifying phase
now over, Mr Basden said BEC
and its renewable energy com-

, Mittee were preparing for a

more detailed evaluation of the
remaining bidders’ proposals,
once Board and government

-- approval was forthcoming.

But while global oil prices

have dropped by almost two-

thirds or some 67 per cent in
the past four. months, down
from a July high of around $147
per barrel to the current $49.13
-price as measured by Brent
Crude, Mr Basden said BEC
-. planned to persist in its renew-
~ able energy.search.

“We're not going to hinder = an

‘the process or become com-










PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





@

International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change

CAD$ 0.7863 -2.75
GBP 1.4894 +1.06
EUR 1.2592 -0.10
Commodities

Weekly. % Change
Crude Oil $49.93 -11.39
Gold $799.10 +7.70

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly
DJIA , 8,046.42
S & P 500 800.03
NASDAQ 1,384.35
Nikkei 7,910.79

% Change

-5.31

8.39,
-8.74 |

-6,52

| ae ae seein Sal PRN g
hic rien cree slic canal:







By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian market, with
investors trading in five out of
the 24 listed securities. Of these,
two declined and three
remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 95,934 shares |
changed hands, representing a.
significant increase of 51,389
shares, versus last week's trad-
ing volume of 44,545 shares.

There were no advancers in
the market this week. Com-
monwealth Bank (CBL) led the
volume with 28,150 of its shares
trading, the stock declining by
$0.08 to end the week
unchanged at $7.20.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) traded 6,500 shares

and closed at $1.92. Benchmark
(Bahamas) (BBL) fell by $0.08
to end the week at $0.73. Colina
Holdings (CHL) saw 284 shares
trade, and closed unchanged at
$2.83.

Investors traded in Focol
Class 'B'-Perpetual Preference
shares for the first time this
week on the Bahamian
exchange. A total of 60,000
shares changed hands at the par
value price of $1.

‘BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market this week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

There were no financial
results reported by any of the 24
listed companies during the
week.

Share your

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

& Scotiabank





rl

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 863.48 —(-9.30%) YTD
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
‘SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML’. . $1.71 $- 0 3.01%
BBL _-$0.73 $-0.08 ' 1,000 -14.12%
BOB _ $7.64 $. 0h -20.50%
BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $T46062:-- $- 0 0.00%
BWL $3.49 $- 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $e. 17.43%
CBE: 1$7:20 $-0.10 28,150 -14,59%
CHL $2.83. $- 284 -10.16%
CIB $11.50 $- 0 -21.23%
CWCB $1.92 $-0.17 6,500 -61.90%
DHS — $2.65 $- 0 12.77%
FAM $7.80 s 0 8.33%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FOG.) $0.33 he 0 “57.14%
FCL $5.20 $: 0; 0.39%
“FCLB $1.00 e 60,000 0.00%
FIN _ $11.89 3 Oar: 8.19%
ICD.” $6.81 $ 0 6.07%
ISI $11.10 e ee 0.91%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
_ DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

e Bank of the Bahamas (BOB) has declared a semi-annual div-
idend of $0.16 per share, payable. on November 25, 2008, to‘all -
shareholders of record date November 17, 2008.

° Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 per share, payable on November 28,
2008, to all shareholders of record date November 20, 2008.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS:

¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares
will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually.

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BBy JEANNINE AVERSA _
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The government } was weighing a

plan on Sunday to rescue Citi-.

group Inc., whose stock has
been hammered on worries

about its financial health.

The Treasury Department
and. the Federal Reserve have
been in discussions over the
weekend to devise a strategy to
stabilize the company, accord-
ing to people familiar with the
talks. They spoke on condition
of anonymity because the dis-
cussions were ongoing.

A spokesman for New York-
based Citigroup declined com-
ment: —

The company has seen its
shares lose 60 per cent of their
value in the past week, reflect-
ing a crisis of confidence among
skittish investors who are wor-
ried all the risky debt on Citi-
group's balance sheet will turn
into losses as the economy |
worsens and the markets stay
turbulent — losses that could
be nearly impossible. to reverse.

Citigroup is such a large,
interconnected player in the
financial system that if it were to
collapse it would wreak havoc
on already fragile financial and
economic conditions.

Analysts consider Citigroup
the most vulnerable among the

. major US banks — especially

after it failed to nab Wachovia

‘Corp., which was bought

instead by Wells Fargo: & Co.
That was a missed opportunity
for Citi to gets its hands on
much-needed US deposits that
would bolster its cash position.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight

on Mondays -







THE TRIBUNE



a ae

Chamber chief
calls for major

economic summit

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
called on the Prime Minister to
convene an economic summit
of industry leaders to discuss
proactive measures which could
minimise the effects of the glob-
al economic crisis on the
Bahamas.

Saying that government and:

the private sector do not indi-
vidually have all the solutions
on the best way forward, Dion-
isio D’ Aguilar said such a meet-
ing to exchange ideas could only
be a positive and helpful thing.
Mr D’ Aguilar said he and his
board were certainly willing to
accept.any offer from Prime
Minister Ingraham to attend
such a meeting.
The Chamber president said
that rather than provide hand-
outs to persons who have lost
their jobs, the Government
should consider incentive mea-
sures that would encourage
businesses to retain employees.

Dionisio D’Aguilar



One way this could be done,

he said, was to allow fora
reduction in certain business
taxes and fees once employee
count remained at certain levels.

’ Another suggestion, he said,

would be to negotiate with the
Central Bank to reduce the
interest rate on loans to make it
easiér for persons to repay their
debts. - :
The Chamber president said
his Board was to meet with
BEC in the near future, and the
Chamber will be asking the

Corporation to publish the
prices it purchases fuel at, so
that the public ‘can directly see
the correlation between the fuel
surcharge and the BEC fuel
purchase price. Huge surcharges
as a result of fluctuating oil
prices have

driven utility bills through the
roof, placing a huge burden on
business owners.

As it relates to BEC, Mr
D’ Aguilar said it was past time
that the Government revise the
law to allow persons to generate
their own electricity and sell the
excess back into the grid.

Mr D’ Aguilar, who recently
headed a tour to the Island
School on Eleuthera, told West
Nassau Rotarians that the
school reckons that it saves

$60,000 a year on reverse meter- ~

ing.
The Island School is able to

provide the fuel for all its vehi-

cles through recycling cooking
oil it purchases from the

Princess Cruise lines. The Island ©

School also estimates that it is

relying on BEC for only 20 per |

cent of its needs . .

Business subsidies ‘not fiscally prudent’

FROM page 1B

=asut)paneddonsusramable/ situation: i +

big business and not the small one?”

Another problem, Mr Laing said, was that if
companies found it necessary to lay-off hundreds
of workers, given that economic conditions were
predicted to worsen, what would happen if they
laid-off a second set of employees after receiving
a subsidy?

“There is the suggestion that, having subvent-
ed them in the first instance, do you go back and
subvent them for a second time?” Mr Laing
asked. “How is that a fiscally prudent thing to do.

“he cS

That is inctedible to me.



it was an incredible suggestion coming from him
[Mr Smith].”

Mr Laing said that rather than subsidise the
private sector, the traditional model used across
the developed world was to provide some form of
financial assistance to the unemployed.

He explained that unemployment benefits had
more predictable costs, and were easier to manage
and budget for than any private sector subsidy
programme.

Mr Laing questioned why, with unemployment
levels higher than current ones during the 2003-
2005 period under the PLP administration, Mr

ad not used his gavernment offic&“and

set. ~ Smith
{GhtxeCHbnet Post thento-pus for-some’form of pri-

vate sector,or unemployment assistance pro-









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PAGE 4B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

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THE TRIBUNE



$2.2bn resort project ‘remains on the table’

FROM page 1B

woods Development Company

and Plantt Hollywood, plus

financial backer UBS, are still
willing to be involved despite
the global economic turmoil
that has left the credit and stock
markets in chaos.

“There’s a lot of guys that
want to be part of it, but they
want to see government
approvals first,” a source famil-
iar with the situation told Tri-
bune Business. “With the eco-
nomic climate the way it is, the
developers have had to make
some adjustments. The markets
are in turmoil, but a lot of peo-
ple still want to come offshore,

and the Bahamas is a favourite

place for tax reasons if they can
get this going.”

David Davis, permanent sec-
retary in the Office of the Prime
Minister, did not return a call
seeking comment on the cur-
rent status of the Bahamas
Golden Beach Development
Company puoject before press
time.

‘However, Zhivates Laing,
minister of state for finance,
confirmed that the project was
“still out there”, even though
he thought the Crown Land fac-
tor was still the major issue.

“T think the issue with them
was that ‘they were seeking to

remote location,”

do something that required a
large tract of Crown Land,” he
added. “The Government was
unwilling to give that much
land, consistent with what we
indicated prior to the election —
that we would not grant Crown
Land for such purposes.

“I think the bottom line was

land. They initially wanted 2,000.

acres. The Government was
unwilling to do so. If they found
the land on their own, no prob-
lem.”

Tribune Business, though,
understands that Bahamas
Golden Beach Development
Company is still proposing to
construct four hotel/casinos, pri-
vate airport, a major cruise ship
port via an offshore buoy, and

. general entertainment district.

“It’s a giant project, and
beyond the scope of what
Atlantis is, because it’s in a
the source
said. “If any island can handle
that, Freeport can, and it’s in a
great location vis-a-vis the US.”

The Government, though is
likely to be skeptical — and
understandably so — about
Bahamas Golden Beach Devel-
opment Company’s ability to
pull such a project off, given the
global economit turbulence that

.has impacted existing resorts,

both those under construction
and in existence. Atlantis, once
considered impregnable, has

laid-off 800 staff already.

Still, given the grim predic-
tions for the Bahamian econo-
my for 2009, it is also hard to
argue against developments that
could provide a major employ-
ment and economic activity
boost,

Tribune Business previously
reported that initial projections.
for the Bahamas Golden Beach
Development project had
pegged peak construction
employment at about just under
3,000 jobs, with a total annual
wage bill of over $143 million.

When full operations of the
resort complex began, more
than 3,000 permanent jobs were
slated for creation, with the first —
phase alone involving the build-
out of 2,400 rooms.

The developers and their
strategic partners are all under-
stood to be willing to invest a
total of $265 million in equity
into Bahamas Golden Beach’
Development, with UBS hav-
ing initially offered to provide a
$500 million credit facility.

Apart from Planet Holly-
wood and Foxwoods, the other
strategic partners in the early
going were Omni Hotels; Taub-
man, a $2.5 billion listed US
company specializing in gaming
retail and manager of 30 US
shopping malls; Bagliooni
Hotels; and Atlantic Marina
Holdings.

TSMC UL CUCM On

ATTENTI

ALLBRITISH CITIZE

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)

Will be conducting a Consular Surgery concerning Passport and Nationality
queries from 10:00am to 4:00pm on Friday, 28 November 2008 at te British
Honorary Consul’ s residence in Winton.

If you are interested, please make an ‘ipiibininiene before

‘Thursday, 27 November, 2008.

Appointments can be booked by calling 324-4089

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

~ DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION |

NOTICE

Procurement of School Computers & Printers —

\

The Department of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’) now invites sealed bids, from
Suppliers, for the procurement of school computers and printers for Ministry of Education Schools.

Interested Bidders. may collect the bidding documents from the Purchasing/Supplies
Section of the Ministry of Education Headquarters, Thompson Blvd. from Monday 24" November,
2008, and obtain further information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed envelope bearing no
identity of the bidder and endorsed with the Subles bided on (e.g. “School Computers and

Printers”).

‘Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address, on or before Friday, 12"

December, 2008 by 5:00 p.m. (local time).

It will not be necessary to submit bids in person ~

since they may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or their
representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday 16" December, 2008 at the first

address below.

(1) The Chairman Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield ©

Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242)327-1530

Purchasing/Supplies Section

SALE ON CURRENT INVENTORY ONLY, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-8571

Lightbourne Marine
East Bay Street, Nassau
242-393-5285

The Department reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders





IHE I RIDUINE

MUNDAL, NOVLIVIBER "4, 2Uvo, MAGE ov



Minister: moratorium on permits not necessary

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

BRANVILLE McCartney,
minister of state for immigra-
tion, has said trade union calls
for a one-year moratorium on
new work permit applications
are not necessary due to the
Immigration Department’s cur-
rent policy.

John Pinder, the National
Congress of Trade Union
(NCTU) president, had last
week suggested that the Goy-
ernment suspend the granting
of new work permits for 12
months, so that qualified, out-
of-work Bahamians, can then
fill the vacant positions left by
foreigners.

Mr McCartney, in respond-
ing to the call, said such a mea-
sure was not necessary because
the Immigration Board already

- takes into account whether a

. Bahamian is available to fill a
position before a work permit is
granted. He said that if this is
the case, and the position can-
not be filled by a Bahamian, it







could place companies at a
major disadvantage and nega-
tively impact their operations if
they were unable to access the
skilled labour they required
because a work permit morato-
rium was in place.

Mr McCartney said the Immi-
gration Department was very
vigilant about enforcing the pol-
icy, and ensuring that every
Bahamian who can fill a posi-
tion did so was something that
was standard and always done.

He said the Immigration
Department fully understood
that Bahamians were hurting
and massive amounts of people
were being laid off. “You just
had Atlantis and Harborside lay
off almost 1,000 people, and
now the Hilton has laid off
almost 20 persons, as well as
Pepsi and Pizza: Hut, who also
let people go,” Mr McCartney
said.

“That is a significant amount
of jobs lost per capita, but what
is concerning is that you are not

hearing about the amount of |

small businesses who are letting
small amounts of people go.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

pdt COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Known as Maxwell House, Hawkins Hill, Nassau

Main Building Comprises Approx. 3,640 sq. ft.
Detached Storage: 756 sq. ft.





ey
2
i

- Located approximately 152 feet south of Shirley Street
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
: to reach us on or before December 5, 2008. ;

The economy is bad and it will
only get worse.”

Mr McCartney said that while
things were bad, they were like-
ly to get better, and he told
Bahamians to bear up and work
jobs that they may not wish to.

“T can’t tell you the amount of
work permit requests for per-
sons to be handymen and
labourers because Bahamians
do not want to do that, but if
that is the difference. between
being employed and being:
unemployed, than you should
be the best labourer that you
can be,” he added.

Mr McCartney said that hav-
ing a job will enable persons to
have greater flexibility in nego-
tiating with their creditors and
landlords. “You can go to your
landlord and say I am making
$200 a week, and this is how
much I can pay each week,
rather than not being employed
and not being able to bring in
any income at all,” he explained.

He also called on civic organ-
isations to continue to do their
part to assist Bahamians who
are unemployed and in need.












PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s Application to
Modify Schedule 1 of its Interim License

The Public Utilities Commission (“PUC” or “the Commission”)
The Bahamas’ regulator of the telecommunications sector, is pleased
to invite comments on its consultation document on the captioned
application from the Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC).

The objectives of this public consultation are to:

a) inform the public and interested parties of BIC’s application to

b) indicate the Commission’s intention for the

from BTC; and

modify Schedule 1 of their Interim Licence to include rates for
various GSM Cellular Mobile Services;

application received

c) invite comments from the public and interested parties.

. The Commission is required to exercise its powers and functions in a manner
that is timely, transparent, obj ective, non-discriminatory and consistent with
the objectives of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, ‘and any other relevant

documents.

Wie ; #
The Public Consultation Document can be obtained from the Commission’s
office located at 4% Terrace East, Collins Avenue, Nassau or downloaded
from the Commission’s web site at Wwww.pucbahamas.gov.bs. Written

comments should be submitted b

facsimile or e-mail to:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette,

Executive Director

Public Utilities Commission

P.O. Box N — 4860

y November 28, 2008 via post, hand delivery,

Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 242 322 4437
Fax: 242 323 7288

Email: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs.











Large wholesale company is looking for a

to manage day-to-day operations.





Serious inquiries only please send resume
detailing qualifications, experience, and
work history to P.O. Box N-4401





fittention: Mr. Lightbourne
or Hr. Sawyer



PRICEWAIERHOUSE(COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

‘

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate. ;

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund
benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:
Human Resources Partner -
PricewaterhouseCoopers

_ P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

SO APR



GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
NOTICE S



Procurement of Computers & Printers for the Districts Homework Centres/Study Hall | programme

1.0 _ The Department of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’) now invites sealed bids, from |

Suppliers for the procurement of computers and printers for the Ministry of Education Homework
_ Centres/Study Hall Programme.

2.0 Interested Bidders may collect the bidding documents from the Purchasing/Supplies
Section of the Ministry of Education Headquarters, Thompson Blvd. from Monday, 24" November,
2008, and obtain further information, at the second address given below.

3.0 Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed envelope bearing no

identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject bided on (e.g. “Homework Centre Computers _|,
“and Printers’ ). meg

40 Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address, on or before Friday, 12" ;
November, 2008 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since
they may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

5.0 Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or their :

representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday 16 " December, 2008 at the first
address below. ,

(1) The Chairman Tenders Board
' Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

So I AEE DO OR

ETE RE OT | eT

ET,

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Department reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders







eee WEES

PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Corporation promises ‘no complacency’ on oil price drop

FROM page 1B

the price of oil,” he told Tri-
bune Business. “We're going to
continue on this path.

“We've already evaluated
and produced a short-list of
companies. We went down from
about 30 to about half that
number. We’ve approached our
principals about the next step,
so we’re waiting for that” deci-
sion to be made.

Mr Basden added: “Now that
we’ve pre-qualified them, we
will now get into the meat of it
with the remaining qualities to
see whether they can deliver
what BEC is looking for. We’ve
completed the initial evaluation,
and the meat of the process
itself will involve a more

detailed review of ali their pro-
posals.”

The BEC general manager
said that-among the remaining
contenders were a variety of dif-
ferent renewable, sustainable
energy sources, including solar,
wind, hydrokinetic and waste-
to-energy (biomass) proposals.

“The quality of the propos-
als is pretty good. It’s what we
were expecting,” Mr Basden
told Tribune Business, adding
that BEC was maintaining an
open mind on how many
renewable energy providers it
eventually contracted with.

“We are still open in terms
of that,” he explained, “because
of the archipelagic nature of the
Bahamas, which means we do
not just have one island. So we
could possibly end up with one

) Copies of the filed

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Nassau - Fresh Creek $99.99

Nassau - Moore’s Is. $180.00
Nassau - San Andros $99.99

Contact Performance Air at 362-1608/362-2302

Cg
Visit us on the web at www.performance-air.com



IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE BAHAMAS

T OF THE 2008/CLE/qui/916
Common Law and Equity Division ;

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land situate in the Settlement of Salt Pond
in the Island of Long Island one of the islands of
the said Commonwealth of The Bahamas which

_, said lot is bounded Northwardly by land now or
oe other y We See eS By ohn Kadwles
and running together thereon Three hundred
and Sixty Seven and Five hundredths (367.05)
feet Southwardly by land now or formerly the
property of the’said corns Knowles and running
thereon One hundred and Seventy Two and Fifty
Eight hundredths (172.58) feet Westwardly
partially by land now or formerly the PEOpe rey
of John Knowles and partially by land now or
formerly the property of George Knowles and
running thereon Two hundred and_ Two and
Fifteen hundredths (202.15) feet and Eastwardly
by a. (30) feet wide road reservation and
running ereon Two hundred and Sixty Seven °
(267) feet which said pieee parcel or lot of land
has such position boundaries shape marks and
dimensions as are on a‘ plan filed herein and
thereon coloured Pink.

ee MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act,

ey
My

AND IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
Randolph Lawrence Knowles. '

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

The Petition of RANDOLPH LAWRENCE KNOWLES of the
Imperial Park subdivision in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands in the Cornmonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:

_ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate

in the Settlement of Salt Pond in the Island
of Long Island one of. the islands of the said
Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said
lot is bounded Northwardly by land now or
formerly the property claimed by John Knowles
and running together thereon Three hundred
and Sixty Seven and Five hundredths (367.05)
feet Southwardly by land now or formerly
the property of the said George Knowles and
running thereon One hundred and_ Seventy
Two and’ Fifty Bie hundredths (172.58) feet
Westwardly partially by land now or formerly
the prope of John Knowles and partially by
land now or formerly the ErOpery of George
Knowles and running thereon Two hundred
and Two and Fifteen hundredths (202.15) feet
and Eastwardly by a tye (30) feet wide road
reservation and running thereon Two hundred
and Sixty Seven (267) feet. \

Randolph Lawrence Knowles claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possesion of the said piece parcel or tract of land
free from encumbrances.

And the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said piece’ parcel or tract
of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined

and declared in a-Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in

accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or a
right to dower or an adverse claim or_a claim not recognised in the
Petition shall by the end of 30 days after the final publication in the
newspapers of this Notice on December 8, 2008 file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified a an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
ef Claim within the time prescribed will operate as a bar to such
claim.

lan may be inspected at the Registry of the
Supreme Court, and at the chambers of Messrs. Harry B. Sands,
Lobosky & Company situated at Fifty Shirley Street, Nassau,
Bahamas during normal business hours.

DATED the 15" day of October A. D., 2008

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY & COMPANY
ny siurley Street
Shirley House .
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



[renewable energy supplier] in
New Providence and one in the
Family Islands.”

Apart from diversifying
BEC’s electrical generation
sources and potentially reducing
the cost of energy in this nation,
an issue that has impacted all
businesses and consumers, the
move into sustainable energy

. also has energy security and

environmental implications.

Mr Basden said: “At the end
of the day, we are looking at
having renewable energy as a
built-in component of the ener-
gy generation mix, which will
reduce the use of fossil fuels as
well as being environmentally
friendly.”

With BEC set to spend more
than $350 million on fuel
imports in 2008, a bill that has
more than quadrupled from the
$80 million spend six years ago,
a. base of Bahamas-based
renewable energy suppliers
could also substantially reduce
the annual drain on this nation’s
foreign exchange reserves.

Among the bidders to reveal
their hand over BEC’s renew-
able energy RFP have been a
host of waste-to-energy (bio-
mass) proposals. Plasco Ener-

WANTED

gy Group; a rival consortium
featuring Bahamas Waste; the
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Resources Company, a group
headed by Bahamian firm
Waste Not; and a group featur-
ing GPEC Global (Canada) and

ENERSOL (Bahamas) all sub- -

mitted proposals for a biomass

_ plant worth around $100 mil-

lion.

Meanwhile, Mr Basden
“most emphatically” denied
concerns raised by Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent, Dionisio D’ Aguilar, that
BEC’s fuel surcharge was show-
ing no correlation with global
oil market prices, and was drop-

ping at a much slower rate than

it had increased by earlier this
year.

With high energy costs jeop-
ardizing the Bahamian econo-
my’s sustainability, Mr
D?Aguilar had previously told
Tribune Business that while
BEC’s surcharge had fallen by
5.6 per cent in November 2008
compared to the previous
month, over the same period
global oil prices had dropped
by 27.7 per cent.

However, Mr Basden said
BEC’s fuel surcharge did “fol-

Applications for the position of: i

Must have experience in managing people.
Must have excellent organizational skills,
Excellent customer service and sales skills.

Please mail -
Resume and photogtaph to:

Assistant Manager Position
P.O. Box SP-63144
Nassau, Bahamas

~~ ASSISTANT MANAGER fora i
RETAIL STORE :
I

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or email us at powersave@coralwave.com

TEACHING VACANCIES

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Teachers
for positions available.

Two (2) MUSIC TEACHERS

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or
Master Degrees from an accredited University
or College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application form, please.
contact the Anglican Central Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone (242)

322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed
application forms with copies of required
documents must be sent by Friday, December
5th, 2008 to the Anglican Education
Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority

P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas




low the world market. The only
lag has to do with inventory”
bought at a previous price that
had to be used up.

Describing Mr D’Aguilar’s
assertions as “not correct”, Mr
Basden said: “It’s a direct cor-
relation, and what we have
offered to the Chamber of
Commerce is that they put
together a team together to sit
with us and go through the
process” of calculating the fuel
surcharge.

“We want to be transparent,”
Mr Basden added, explaining
that there were numerous fac-
tors involved in calculating the
fuel surcharge. The cost of a
particular fuel shipment, he
said, was calculated on a five-
day bill of lading, using the
average of the two days before,
the two days after, and the actu-
al day the fuel was landed. And
BEC received numerous
monthly fuel shipments. ,

‘And while the per barrel
price referred to crude oil, Mr
Basden said the price of-its
derivatives — such as diesel and
gasoline — varied according to
the product. “The increase in

the price of diesel was much
more than the price of gaso-
line,” he added, BEC using
diesel to run its turbines and
generators.

And, in the short-term, it
appears there will be better
news for BEC customers, espe-
cially businesses, who have been
unable to benefit from the Gov-
ernment’s capping of the fuel
surcharge at $0.15 per kilowatt
(KwH) hour for residential con-
sumers who less than 800 KwH
per month.

“Based on the projections, we
anticipate it being in the range
of $0.17, and even lower for
January,” Mr Basden said of
the fuel surcharge, the most
volatile bill component and the
one chiefly responsible for the
soaring energy prices experi-
enced in 2008.

While January’s figure had
not been confirmed, BEC antic-
ipated it would be “lower than
$0.15”. “I’m not comfortable
with that number yet,” Mr Bas-
den said. “I’m a bit more com-
fortable for December than
January, but that’s what the
projections say.”

MEDICAL SUPPLIES & UNIFORMS ETC.
P.O. BOX CR 56022
medgear247 @ yahoo.com

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(West of Centreville Primary School or South of Super Wash)

6

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items marked over $10
(While Supplies Last)

Scrub Sets - Lab Coats - Clogs
Medical Supplies
AVON Products, Pantyhose, Cleaning Products

** GASH SALES ONLY **

MONDAY - FRIDAY 3:30 AM TO SPM SATURDAYS 9AM - 1PM

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For Rent/Lease

In Pristine Condition, 3 bedroom, 3 1/2 baths Condo,



6689

with 2 car garage, gated community with pool. Its
centrally located close to the beach, down town and
airport. $4,500 per month / yearly lease only.
Available immediately.

4 bedroom, 2 1/5 baths house beautifully landscaped
with large swimming pool and spa: Tastefully furnished
fit for a king. In the western district

$9,000 o.n.o. monthly, long-term lease only.

327-3591 / 359-3590

Need an Attorney in Florida? Call...

7

FRANCES BLISSETT
ATTORNEY -AT-LAW

Frances Blissett, PA,

Property Management, Real Estate Law,
Family Law and Evictions

16211 N.E. 18th Avenue, N. Miami Beach, FL.33162
Dade Tel:(305) 947-5777 - Fax:(305) 947-5766
Broward Tel: (954) 961-0340 - Fax:(954) 961-0390





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 7B.



Dima oii
$12m poultry farm project ‘best hope’ in North Andros

FROM page 1B

it to a point where they can start
bringing in equipment.”

Mr Peet added of the $12 mil-
lion project, which will be locat-
ed in the north Andros area
known as the Barc: “We’re hop-
ing that if it gets going, it will
employ anywhere between 30-
50 persons, which will be a
major dent” in the unemploy-
ment figures.

While the investors behind
the poultry farm were likely to
eventually lock to export their
produce to New Providence and
foreign markets, Mr Peet said:
“We're just hoping it takes
place. We are cautiously opti-
mistic, but in the present cli-
mate, we just have to wait and
see.”

As for Chub Cay, he added:
“When I spoke recently with

the investors, they were «Sali
hopeful, but with the world
economy being what it is, they
can’t guarantee anything.

“They were hopeful the new
equity partner will continue.
There was still an agreement in
principle in place, and they were
still hopeful........

“Right now, everything is just
touch and go. They are hope-
ful, we are hopeful. We cer-
tainly need something to hap-
pen at Chub. We hope the
transaction is consummated, but
nothing is done yet.”

With the investors still “hop-
ing the transaction will go
through”, Chub Cay had eftec-
tively been place in ‘caretaker
mode’, with a “skeleton crew”
on the island — part of the Berry
Islands chain — to maintain the
property.

Apart from several foreign
second home owners complet-
ing construction of their prop-

erties, building work on the
Chub Cay project had effec-
tively ceased for the time being.

The south Florida investor
trio behind the Chub Cay Club
& Associates project includes
Kaye Pearson, head of Interna-
tional Marinas, who used to run
the Fort Lauderdale Interna-
tional Boat Show and manage
the Port Lucaya Marina on
Grand Bahama. His partners
are Walt McCrory and Bob
Moss, who heads his own con-
struction firm.

Prior to the work halt, the
Chub Cay marina had been
completed, some $16 million
worth.of infrastructure installed
on the island, and a number of
private homes constructed with
more planned. However, work
to upgrade the existing club-
house and convert it to a hotel
has not been completed.

“it’s one of the finest mari-
nas in this part of the world for

mega yachts and ordinary
yachts,” Mr Peet confirmed.
But without the injection of
extra capital funding, Chub Cay
will likely find it extremely dif-
ficult to attract already scarce
debt financing to move the pro-
ject forward.

The MP confirmed that Chub
Cay’s woes had had a “devas-
tating impact” on north Andros
and its economy, as the project,
which was a 10-minute flight
from the island, had provided
most of his constituents’

‘employment.

“If Nassau is bad, Andras is
worse,” Mr Peet added. “The
north Andros economy is very,
very bad. The only glimmer of
hope really is in the agricultur-
al sector. More effort is being
made to get more farmers
involved, so the agricultural sec-
tor is where the Government is
pushing to stimulate the econo-
my.”

The Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) had increased its on-
ground presence and assistance
to north Andros farmers, seek-
ing to get their produce accept-
ed by major New Providence
food, wholesalers and retailers.

Even with the area’s limited
employment there had been
“downsizing” in the workforce,
Mr Peet told Tribune Business,

with the Government being the
area’s major employer.

He added that two initiatives
to spur economic activity — the
construction of an $8 million
sea wall at Lowe Sound, and a
pre-school/primary school com-
plex in the same area — which
had been approved prior to the
May 2007 election, had been
cancelled by the incoming FNM
administration.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),

Rosbery International Investments Ltd. is in dissolution.
Alrena H. Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at The
Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough &
Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
-Liquidator before 8th December, 2008.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

NEN WUT
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
ar EY Perey a CPE

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, (No. 45 of
2000), STAR FLOW INVESTMENT INC., is in dissolution.
JOSE DAVID SKAF NETO is the Liquidator and can be con-
tacted at Sector Setor SHIS QI 07, cj, 12, Casa 11, Brasilia,
Brasil, 71615-320.



LEGAL NOTICE:
NOTICE
TULIP GARDEN LIMITED

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Legal Notice

NOTICE

All persons having claims against the above-named company NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

are required to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts of claims to the Liquidator before the 18th day of
December, 2008.

(a) PIERS OVERSEAS CORP. is in dissolution under the .
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on November 21, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and reeisleied by
the Registrar General.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), Tulip
Garden Limited is in dissolution. Tulip Garden (PTC) Limited
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at East Asia Corporate Ser-
vices (BVI) Limited, East Asia Chambers, P.O. Box 901, Road Town,
Tortola, British Virgin Isalnds. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before 20th
December, 2008.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. .

G. Cc

| NOTICE. —,
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of December, 2008 to.send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company .or, in default thereof, they may.be excluded
from the benefit of any distrioution made before such debts are proved.

NOVEMBER 24, 2008_
In Voluntary Liquidation LAKEISHA COLLIE

: . - -, LIMITED,
as ‘Tr ustee of the Tulip Garden Unit ‘Trust
Liquidator

ne as decries » LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) Ae

of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
RIO UNIVERSE LTD. is in dissolution: Ms. Alrena Moxey
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas.
All persons having claims against the above-named company
are required to send their names addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator before 5th December,.
2008.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Legal Notice

NOTICE |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000): (a) UPWOOD INVESTMENTS CORP. is in dissolution under the

provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on November 21, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

GALLAVAN LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

(c) The etigiaaiee of the said company is ILakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of.the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), GALLA-
JAN LTD. has been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the. Registrar General on
the 14th day of November, 2008.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of December, 2008 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Trinity Methodist Chu ch.
Annual

HOLIDAY &
CV

Saturday 29th November 2008
12 noon - 6:00 pm

Luis Pineyrua Pittaluga
Juncal 1305
Suite 21, Montevideo
Uruguay
Liquidator

NOVEMBER 24, 2008
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas .

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + * ; : T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series os + 7 : : 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Seri Prime + 1.7

52wk- low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
000. .0O

19 oo 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

egal aaiana

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 0.480
Ss

0.000
AS

ABDAB —
Bahamas Supermarkets
DH

SS
NAV Da’
31-Oct- oe
7-Nov-08
14-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
31-Dec-07
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
one Sotee

AA

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond’Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

100.2421
100.9600
1.0000
10.5000
1.0264
# 1.0289
Bon 1.0287

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest cl. sing price in last 52 weeks

Church Grounds - Frederick Street
& Trinity Place fa Close > Cumantiaye weibried cries tor daly ature
Adequate Parking with Security, See cue re mney
off Frederick Street. Pot ng penn by tha tn 1 mon earn

Bid & - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity ,
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(SS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-602:



~



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Ce ena ACLs ] | ae





HEY, THANKS!
GETTING A LITTLE

9

8

NIPPY TONIGHT, i
:

i
&

DENNIS THE MENACE

prkP74





al
A GOOP NIGHT! #3






Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from. Monday to
Sunday :




3] WHILE WE/RE STUCK ©
HERE DEALING WITH
THE AFTERSHOCKS?

IF YOU ASK
) ME, LU ANN
15 THE
LUCKY ONEL]

WE WEDDING PLANNERS ) ALL I COULD THINK ABOUT
HAVE TO LOOK HAPPY WAS POOR LU ANN FLYING
SOT PASTED yo AVAY, ALL ALONE.

“PUhS CIUaWy WON 'BI0cE)






aS Le

SCOPE Cat
5 84










FINe:., 1
tLe TELL
YOu...

AREN'T YOU GOING
TO TELL ME WHAT J
IT ISP A







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“THIS (5 A RECORD! 1 DIDN'T EVEN GET TO
FINISH MY BREAKFAST!”

dicate, Inc. World Rights reserved
7 —_



© 2008 by King

Best described as’a number crossword, the task'in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.















1/5/2/9/4/8/3/6|
4/3/5'7/6|2/1/9|
9

7|119/6/3|5/4/8]
5/6|1/4/8}7/2/3
7/2/5[6/9/ 1)







www.kingfeatures.com







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist: by King Features Syndicate, Inc.













01} 69|—+| {c/n |a}a|N







O)|Co|NO} 0

&

NOTHING IN












Bee BOLEING PARTICULAR BOUT Ce ei ) HOW many words of four.
_, HUGO? IN PARTICULAR? i ' letters or more can you make
j ae from the letters shown here? In. .....,
4 Target’ Making a-word, each letter may
| uses be used once only. Each must
: wordsin containthe centre letterand |
j har there must be at least one
7 Chambers Be ete wo Noplurals.
| | 21st INS
oN uF es : : | | Cety . Good 18; very good 27; excellent. |
vercone \ War, Ja! Like PE Noe sag | 30 (OF More). p
HAGAR FZ _ i COMING BACK / edition), | Solution tomorrow. | e
As YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION |
: sik _ down endow ENDOWMENT |
i : meow meowed mewed mowed
: mown newt newton nowt.
8 owed owned towed town

townee twee tweed weed ..
ween wend went wont wonted

... CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across *’ - Down Cg
Denied that profits help (8) 1 She may have’all sorts of

jobs to do this Friday (4)

-A friegd much changed (4)
saith pressure in the
middle of bridges (5)

In tennis people may play

them for one point (7)
Successful enterprise
gives cash to the
cotton-worker (5-7)
Starfish? (6)

Man getting cue all wrong
shows sharpness (6)

Not the death rate,
apparently (4,2,6)
Passed.on a message
concerning new delay (7)
A fringe gathering of lace-
makers (5)

It's Ena’s turn to be
reasonable (4)

Deadly feud conducted

with relative bitterness (8) 19

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Socialism, 8 Error, 9 Off-
peak, 10 Seat of learning, 11 Dragon,
12 Increase, 15 Pentagon, 18 Fervid,
20 Riders, 21 Strange, 22 Tinge, 23
Delighted.

Down: 2 Offer, 3 Impugn, 5 Meteor, 6

Fretsaw; 7 Proffered, 11 Desperate,
13 Confetti, 14 Anodyne, 16 Agreed,
17 Breach, 19 Ingle.

ate

Entrances out of the
weather? (7)

Agrees with someone as
tall as oneself? (4,3,2,3).
Organise sit-ins and make
repeated demands (6)
She cuts the length (5)
Choosing the wrong type
will lead to this (8)

This clue is yet to be
found (12)

Pure ices for them, of
course (8)

Feline requiring a detailed
description (4,3)

Promise to drink one’s
health (6)

One girl takes on a hair-
dressing business .. . (5)
...and another gives
some clever answers (4)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Ostracism, 8 Occur, 9
Rampage, 10 Mimosa, 11 Detect,
12 Alienate, 15 Inexpert, 18
Reason, 20 Evenly, 21 Applied, 22
Lying, 23 Mendacity.

Down: 2 Suave, 3 Rapier, 4
Cogitate, 5 Motive, 6 Scholar, 7
Break even, 11 Decidedly, 13

Intrepid, 14 Bedevil, 16 Phlegm, 17

Garlic, 19 Overt.

Lu
=
N
N
_
QO.
>
”)
x |:
LL -

Across

1
5

9
10
11
113
14
17

26
21

22
23

Northern US state (8)
Russian emperor (4)
Fight (5)

In the direction of (7)
Grief-stricken (12)
Mischievous child (6)
Rigorous (6)
Complete

discretion (5,7)
Complete col-
lapse (7)

Deep ravine (5)
Interval of calm (4)
Abstaining from
alcohol (8)

Down

1 To disguise (4)

2 Constantly
ring (7)
Prodigality (12)
Bear witness (6)
Wash with stiff
brush (5)
Expression of
esteem (8)
Shakespearean
comedy (7,5)
Self-destructive (8)
Receive by
bequest (7)
To strip of
property (6)
Rise up 5)
Be aware of (4)

recur-





Future Shoc

South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH

@J98

Â¥Q 104

OTN A,

#K QJ 1083
WEST EAST
$52 A63
“¥K9O7 ¥853
Q986543 #3102
b? . A765

SOUTH

#KQ1074

VAI62

@AK

£94
The bidding:
South West North East
1¢ Pass 26 Pass
29 Pas 24 Pass
44

Opening lead — two of clubs.

Today’s hand features excellent
play by a defender. It illustrates how
foresight can overcome the uncer-
tainties that often accompany defen-
sive play.

West led the deuce of clubs
against four spades, and East took
the ace as South dropped the nine. It
wasn’t difficult for East to deduce
that’ West’s lead was a singleton —
only the four was missing, and’ West

would have led that card rather than->

the deuce from the doubleton 4-2.
But instead of impulsively return-
ing a club for West to ruff. which

- would have handed declarer the con-

tract, East paused to corisider where ;
his side might collect the setting |
trick. The ace of clubs, a club ruff |
and the trump ace would account for |
three tricks, but a fourth trick would }
be needed if the contract was to be |
defeated.

On the bidding, it was likely. that
South held exactly five spades. West
was therefore a favorite to hold two
spades, so the club ruff could be
postponed until East regained: the
lead with the ace of spades.

The setting trick, if there was one,
could either be the ace of hearts, ace
of diamonds or king of hearts. If
West had either red ace, the contract
would-be set regardless of what East
returned at trick two. But if West had
the king of hearts, it was essential to |
return a heart at this point. Other-
wise, South would eventually get rid
of his hearts on dummy’s clubs.

So East shifted to a heart at trick
two. Declarer had no choice but to
finesse, losing to the king, and West
returned a heart to dummy’s queen,
When the eight of spades was next
led, East rose with the ace and
returned a club, and West’s ruff put
the finishing touch on a well- |
defended hand.

Tomorrow: Combinations and percentages.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 9B



@ By MIKE MELIA
Associated Press Writer

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
(AP) — A new witness has
come forward in the 2005 dis-
appearance of American
teenager Natalee Holloway in
Aruba, and prosecutors said
they are seeking more evidence

against the only remaining sus-

pect.

A woman told Dutch police
this month that Joran van der
Sloot confessed to her years ago
that he was involved in Hol-
loway’s disappearance, accord-
ing to Ann Angela, a spokes-
woman for the Aruba Prosecu-
tors’ Office.

INDOOR

But the Dutch Caribbean
island’s chief prosecutor said
authorities still lack proof they
need to convict Van der Sloot,
who has been arrested twice
and released for lack of evi-
dence.

- “After three years of inves-
tigating, it is very, very difficult
to find that evidence,” prose-
cutor Hans Mos told The Asso-
ciated Press. “We have to be

realistic.”

Holloway, an 18- year-old
from Mountain Brook, Alaba-
ma, was last seen in May 2005
leaving a bar in the Aruban cap-
ital Oranjestad with Van der
Sloot on the final night of a high
school graduation trip to the

UNTSe Ta

Aruba police pursue new
evidence in Holloway case

island. Extensive searches have
found no trace of her.
Investigators reopened the
case earlier this year based on
hidden-camera recordings made

by a Dutch TV crime show. On’

the video, Van der Sloot says
Holloway collapsed on the
beach after they left the bar and
that he called a friend to dump
her body at sea.

The new witness, once a
friend of Van der Sloot, con-
firmed that he gave her roughly
the same account shortly after
Holloway’s disappearance. But

Mos said her statement does

not bring authorities any closer
to resolving the case.
He also said the witness

torewide

3 Ce Pe To cn Pg



would lack credibility in court
unless she explains why she
waited so long to come forward.

Attorneys for Van der Sloot
didnot immediately respond to
messages seeking comment and
there was no answer at his par-

ents' home in Aruba.
Van der Sloot was last known
to be living in Thailand but his

current whereabouts are a .

“mystery,” Angela said. ©
Angela said Aruban authori-
ties hope to decide by the end

ROSS

of this year whether to prose-
cute Van der Sloot or close the
case for good.

Natalee Holloway’s mother,
Beth Holloway, did not imme-
diately return a telephone call
Tuesday seeking comment.

UN IVERSITY

EST. 1978

Join us!

Ross University School of Medicine is experiencing remarkable
growth and is excited about our new clinical site in Freeport, Grand

Bahama Island!

We invite fualiied persons to apply for the position of Director of
Housing. The successful candidate must possess the following
minimum requirements:

Bachelor's degree preferred or in related field required.
Excellent communication and interpersonal skills.

Ability to effectively work with students, faculty and staff.
Three to five years property management experience
Outstanding administrative, planning and supervisory skills.

Ross University offers highly competitive salaries and a
comprehensive benefits package including tuition assistance for
graduate and undergraduate degrees.

To apply, please visit our website at www.RossU.edu/med, select
“career “and copy/paste your resume, or complete an online application

process.

We’re looking for a few good
people to join our team.

DO YOU HAVE.

WHAT IT TAKES?

Apply for the position of

Sales Executive

es Must ops — to ne ee ca





accounts/collections and receivi bles

Please drop off resumes to

The Tribune
Hy Voice. My Hewspaper!

Shirley & Deveaux Streets
or email: tribune@tribunemedia.net
c/o Sales Manager





PAGE 10B,; MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Readers respond to ‘Hard Times’

ear Mr Marquis, I
could not agree with
you more in your

article. I have been telling
people for years of their gross
misunderstanding of service
and money attitudes and I
think that people need to not
only hear these words, but »
now they will understand what
they mean.

God’s word in Luke 18:14

_ says: “I tell you, this man went
to his house justified rather
than the other; for everyone.
who exalts himself will be
humbled, but he who humbles
himself will be exalted.”

If the service staff and the
majority of persons adhere to
a rule that they declare most
Sundays in church while peo-
ple are watching them, I say to
them: “Live the truth of these
words rather than looking

. good in front of other people
because God knows what we
really think and who we really.
are!”

Humility has been lost in
this country and if more peo-
ple travelled the world, they
will finally understand the
Haitians and the Cubans and

. many other nationalities
across the world. Thank you
for your time.

— Ian Moree

YOUR reference to the
bag-packer who thought ten
cents poor reward for packing
three items into a plastic bag
reminded me of something

that happened to me when I |
went to the foodstore.

Iam elderly and appreciat-
ed the boy taking the basket
to my car, but when I handed
him a handful of change as a
tip, he threw it on the ground —
and walked off.

I said “My need.is obviously

Rey page 12 <4

action: ;
When it beanie ‘lene that

Thompson was not going to do

anything to earn his fee, Mr

Moree sought solace from ‘

another lawyer, only to find she
wanted a $2,500 retainer, also

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays







greater than yours” and pro-
ceeded to pick up the money,
which I personally could not
afford to leave lying in the car
park.

It made me wonder what
kind of home such a boy
comes from, where coins are
regarded as too lowly to han-
dle, and where money, which
people have to work so hard
for, is so poorly regarded.

Thanks for another very

‘informative and enlightening
Insight.
— Nassau pensioner

THE ungrateful waitress
you referred to ought to have
been fired on the spot. Her

- attitude was disgraceful.

— Lesley Mills

Mr Marquis,
Finally an accurate and

* courageous article on the state

of affairs in this country.

We have been in trouble for
years now and are waiting for
the revolution that will be tak-
ing place in this country.
Nobody has been listening and
paying attention to what we

- have been experiencing in the

workplace.

We applaud the article and
-have made copies for all of
our staff members as
REQUIRED READING!

Warm regards, —

— Tina Knowles

Chelsea's Choice

FOR a long time now it has
been obvious that many '
Bahamians (not all, I’m happy
to say) have failed to make the
connection between their own
working standards and the
success of the company they
work for. In fact, ’ve found
that many restaurant staff,
instead of making a fuss of
regular customers, adopt a
‘familiarity breeds contempt’
attitude, seeming to take their
customer for granted.

Though I dread a full-on
recession in this country, I
reluctantly have to admit that
it might do some good in the
long run, if only to knock
sense into those who really
seem to believe that the world
and its brother owe them a liv-
ing.

The. waitress who handed
the change back to the cus-
tomer needs to taste unem-
ployment in the hope that she
will be a better person at the
end of it.

— Veronica Bastian

I KNOW the restaurant of
which you speak. I had lunch
there one day and a guy was
up at the bar cussing and
blinding while the waitresses
laughed and encouraged him.
The ‘management’ (what a
laugh!) sat behind the till see-
ing nothing and hearing less,
as though frightened to take

disciplinary action.’

— GHB, The Grove

‘

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

ThelTribune

The stories behind the news

HARD TIMES

It’s going to get
far worse before
it gets better

By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor
(Additional reporting
by Alex Missick)

wo months ago, ¢
‘an impudent and
ungrateful wait-
ress at a Nassau
restaurant was so

iffronted at being left a tip in
‘oins instead of notes that she
‘eturned it to the customer.

The intention, of course, was
0 cause him embarrassment in
front of others, But the result of
er stupidity. was a loss of busi-
ess for her employers, because
he customer — who had been

sing the restaurant for nearly a

ecade — vowed never. to
eturn,

Ata foodstore check-out, a
fchoolboy bag-packer was so
insulted at being given a ten
ent piece for loading three
items into a plastic bag that he
hctually began making sarcastic

FORTY years ago, just before he left New
Providence, the then colonial Governor Sir
Ralph Grey warned Bahamians not to take

their prosperity for granted. He felt there

was a tendency for them to believe they .

had divine protection. As Atlantis laid off
800 workers last week, and the world
financial crisis deepened, the Bahamas
found itself confronted with the prospect
of real hardship for many of its people
for the first time in half a century.
INSIGHT reports...

dentally, that his greatest ambi- | announcement by Atlantis that

AN ATLANTIS WORKER can

be seen when she was laid-off
© after working at the resort for
* anumber of years...

tion in life was to work at

emarks | to his colleagues. The
id: * Atlantis or become a drug-deal-
y lake er,
Hid cael that, leaving the
pchoolbpy, gazing into his emp-
'y palm.

At a-Nassau secondary
school, a teacher was amazed
o discover that students
‘efused to handle coinage at all,
regarding it as beneath them.

themselves, but reveal a mind-

ing 40 years of plenty. Many
Bahamians possess a sense of
entitlement born of a misguided
belief that the good times were
open-ended, and that their
nation was blessed like no oth-
er. Now it’s wake-up time.

scala me time, Last week's devastating

The incidents are trivial in—

set which has developed dur-"

10 per cent of its staff was on
the way out came as little sur-
prise to those who have been
following economic develop-
ments closely, And it willcome weeks,
as no surprise, either; if the Nonetheless, Atlantis’s deci-
hotel lays off more people in sion certainly shocked those
the New Year, with the final — who fail, for whatever reason,
figure possibly as high as 1,500. to make the connection
between the quality of their
work and the stability and sus-
tainability of their position.
Not long ago, mass lay-offs
at the Paradise Island resort
were unthinkable. In the late
1990s and-early 2000s, Atlantis
was second only to Disney as a
leading resort brand of the
Americas. Tourists were falling
over themselves to savour its

ers and others were haying to

It has been clear for months
that hotel occupancy has been
way down, that restaurants
were being closed for long peri-
ods every month, and that wait-

i TN a2 of ie November 17 edition of /NS/GHT...



make do with shortened work ,

ply another nail in the busi-
ness’s coffin, which is now more
or Jess ready for formal burial.

Will the staff — and espe-
cially the waitress with the off-
hand manner — ever make the
connection between the restau-
rant’s decline and their own dis-
graceful behaviour?

Probably, particularly if they
find themselves in the predica-
ment now being suffered by
thousands of Bahamian fami-
lies who face penury after
decades of relative financial
security... *

agement had to cap pay cheque
repayments to creditors, rea-
soning that they had a social
responsibility not only to their
own staff but also their fami-
lies,
Now that business is bad,
workers who not so long ago
were on a financial high have
hit the skids, and the fall-out
will be very unpleasant.

The first publicly expressed
utterance signalling looming
catastrophe came when a senior
construction worker on PI told
me weeks ago that Atlantis

that delivered last week's

founder So! Kerzner had lost
hope of running a five-star

The fact that it was Atlantis

names in the dossier of shame

doing nothing in return.

“She ripped me-off, too,”. Mr -.
Moree.told INSIGHT, “I;would

like to know where or to whom
I must go to take this com-
plaint.”

It’s a good question, and one

INSIGHT is asked at least once ©

a week. Unfortunately, we don’t
know the answer.

Every time The Tribune car-
ries another photograph of
rookie lawyers lining up in wigs
and gowns to be admitted into a
thoroughly disorganised and
increasingly discredited profes-
sion, we wonder whether just
one of them will be strong
enough to cry “Enough is
enough” and try to change its
course.





In fact, one attorney I like

- and respect has more than ONCE g..
expressed dismay at the.state.

of his trade, wondering whether

it can ever be pulled from the. :
. mire in which it now finds itself.
He has even considered forming —
_ regarded as a sick joke — a dis-
. turbing judgment considering

a group of like-minded lawyers
to bring pressure on the rest.
INSIGHT was told by one
legal source that, some decent
attorneys ‘are constrained by
commercial and family consid-
erations from: speaking out.
They also had to live with the
legacy of the Pindling era when

“Nobody moves, nobody gets.
hurt” was the prevailing credo. "

“It’s time-consuming to take
on legal issues for the sake. of

_ principle and an expensive risk

The Heagusstl of Farm Road

@ The Pompey Museum

Friday November 2st, 2008-7 p.m.
(Admission $is.co— refreshments tacluded)
Bor bookings please call 456-0495



“Deoumibor wt A Bestival of Lights +

“Holiday Events:

ning Ceremony

@ Collins House Grounds— Shirley Street, 7 pan.
fopened to the public}

“Deceunbox 4th-- Christmas Comin’: Song Catnpecbittons for Schools

@ Collins House G rounds, 7pm

{Admission $¢-Studente $7-Adulta)

* becember wth. Christmas Magic: Holiday Open House
@ the Balcomy Hlouss Moxaeum- 22 Noon & pam,
Reatuxing;s tows, poetry readings, amnisi ovaft & food faty, live

entertainment, children's commer featuring: ome



with Mis, Claaae
1 $2-Chil



(Adonisaio



” Oecemiber 219t— Christmas at Fort Charlotte— 650 pm.
Peatuatng t the Royal Bahkames iDefense Force Concert Band
(Adunission $40- Reception te follow}

trem $_-Gemer al)

ammaxet painting, cogkka decor. ating and visita





EAB: TRA SRT OBS TONES EMMITT PIT OEE IR TE TEE

venture,” the source added,
pointing out that the “consci-

Sentious and diligent” are prob-

ably in a-minority.

A foreign barrister told me.
that the Bahamas Bar is held in.

such low. ésteem that it is

that inward foreign investment
relies heavily on the rule of law
being in place.

It’s certainly true that if the

Bahamas media were to operate
at the same level of efficiency as
much of the legal profession,
no newspaper would ever
appear, and no television pro-
gramme would ever be made.

.It really is as bad as that.

But INSIGHT’s concern lies



“with the victims: ordinaty

adéspair i in their own land at the
apparent hopelessness, of. thes
_ situation.

sional climate that leads.a
woman attorney to believe,
without any sense of shame,
that.she can misappropriate a
client’s funds for her own busi-
ness use, with no hint of
accountability.

When she finally handed the
money over, she was right on
the brink of being exposed by
The Tribune. Evidently that,

and the threat of a writ, prompt-, .

ed an instant desire to do the
decent thing.
Self-interest and self-preser-

TENDER FOR

CAFETERIA OPERATION



ahamians who feel mounting &
mekind of justice-prevailed:: ‘Reft
“to her own profession’ stegula- .

“And it wonders at a prolee

ssvation were; of;.course, the

‘prime motivatoys:but at least a

tory machinery, it’s unlikely that
her client-would ever have got

~ her money back.

As a result, one more ordi- °
nary Bahamian would have fall-
en foul of the kind of cynical
exploitation which has now
become commonplace. One
more family would have been
left out of pocket by a lawyer’s
greed. How much longer can
this diabolical situation be
allowed to continue right at the
heart of our system of justice? ©

e Have you fallen victim toa .

rogue lawyer? Please fax details
to 328-2398 or e-mail



~ The National Insurance Boatd invites suitably qualified businesses to wea tenders for
the contract to operate the cafeteria of the National Insurance Board’s Head Oftice,
Clifford Darling C omplen, Baillou Hill Road.

The following requirements must be met:

1. Tenders must be Hienyed with the’ proper licensing authorities,

“

Tenders must meet all the requirements of the Ministry of Health and other televant |
agencies related to food services.

Tenders must be ible to provide food for 320, or more persons dat ee

Tenders must be able to ptovide lunch for Board and/or Executive : Management
eennes

All National Insurance contributions should be curtent.

Interested persons may cdect a Bid Application from the Directot’s - Office of shes
National Insurance Boatd’s Head Office, Clifford Darling Complex, ,Baillou Hill Road.

All proposals should be sealed, marked “Bid for Cafeteria,” and must beldelivered not :
later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 5, 2008, to: pin Sa

The Cafeteria Comunittee

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Clifford Darling Complex
Baillou Hill Road
Nassau, Bahamas












AERA LENCO

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





La qo

Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY















: _ WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: » ~ Eat 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
| ats 2 Tuesday: _ NE at 5-10 Knots . 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
| FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F



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84°-66° F 82°-62° F , 83°-64° F



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elevation on the-human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. sf ao 5:28pm. 2.3 11:21pm. 0.1.
: Tuesday 54am. 29 t210pm. 0.1



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High:78°F/26°C’
Low: 62° F/17° G:



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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

With a new engine and bigger payload. Suzuki's
APV still gives legendary fuel efficiency in three.
versions - pick-up, panel van or passenger van.



The Tribune

ON-THE-SPOT-FINANCING

_ funds are no longer there to repay the
aggrieved clients.”
Another prominent figure has been
named as a rogue lawyer by a woman
laiming that he messed up a divorce
action, kept her money and lost her
papers. —
_ Repeatedly she has tried to get a
response from this man, all to no avail.
-“T could never reach him on the
_ phone. At one point he told me to call
back on another number, but it was.a
wrong number.
_ “Once he said my husband had the
_. papers, but he didn’t and asked: What
ae papers? The lawyer even lied to me,
_ Saying my husband had moved, when .
_ in fact my husband had been living i in ;
the same house for the past ten years.”
‘The woman made repeated trips, at
: considerable expense, from a Family
Island to see the lawyer, usually with
no result. Once a secretary said she
felt sorry for the client and asked her
fo call back in five minutes. When she
did so, another girl answered and said
the lawyer was not in.
-. When she was eventually able to
ce speak to the lawyer, he said: “Call by
my office tomorrow.” When she did
so, he had left for the United States.
“What do you do with people like
_ him?” she asked INSIGHT in despair,
“IT wrote him to give me back my mon-
ey, saying if he didn’t let me have it, I
would report him to the Bar Associa-
tion.
- “I got nothing from him. In one let-
ter, I asked him'to give the money toa
third party, but he never did. I wrote
him another letter. It came back.”
_ Left:in limbo, the client now feels
powerless. The lawyer still has her
money, the divorce matter is still unre- -
‘solved; the papers appear to be lost or
mislaid, and the same old pattern of
_ dishonesty and incompetence has
emerged to the detriment of an inno-
cent person seeking closure.
. In this case, the combination of pro-
fessional neglect, downright tardiness
and inexplicable heartlessness is par-
ticularly poignant because the legally-
- qualified villain involved could possi-
bly be seeking your support at the
next general election. His name
‘reclines in INSIGHT’s dossier of
shame, awaiting resurrection when the
time is right.

Now let’s consider the case of Eric
Moree, one of Andrew Thompson’s
victims, who handed over nearly
cause ae of that $11,000 for work ona property trans-

‘control their 3

wing’ goes on and :
1s0 deep that the SEE page 10 ay





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Full Text


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McFLURRY
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Volume: 105 No.3







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SOF
70F

SUNNY, SHOWER
AND BREENY

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Meus:

in the dossier @

NEE

SEE INSIGHT SECTION



Around 100 atzociy
affected by murder —
lead. procession —

BE By MEGAN‘REYNOLDS:-- -
Tribune Staff Reporter

A GRUESOME display of
three men in effigy hanging

from a mock gallows was -

paraded through the streets
of Nassau as friends and rela-
tives of the murdered called
for killers to be hanged.

Hundreds joined the par-

ents, grandparents, brothers,
sisters and cousins of men and
women who were killed in
cold.blood as they followed
on foot and by car, a truck
blaring music and bearing the



’ The Tribun





USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

frightening: SCORE ermine: |) lar



Organiser Rodney Moncur
said the three: “hanged men”

_represent the lawmaker, law- |

“breaker, and the law enforcer.
He said: “They are all being
hanged because they are all

contributing to the murder

rate in the country.

_“We are demanding of the.

government to remove the
impediments that prevent the
execution of the death penal
ty.

“There'i is too. much mur-

SEE page 12.

Visa waiver programme among tourism

plans put forward hy Obie Wilcheombe — :

‘Mi By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

PLANS to reform tourism involving the adoption of a visa waiv-
er programme for visitors have been put forward by former tourism

minister Obie Wilchcombe.

The PLP member for West End Bimini i is calling on tourism
officials and businesses to consider his ideas and submit their own
by working together during the current economic crisis.

Part of his vision is for the Ministry of Tourism, hotel sector and

SEE page 12.













For Her




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ewer is
declared
bankrupt

THE Supreme Court has
declared a Bahamian lawyer
bankrupt after he failed to trans-
fer a $308,750 loan by Scotiabank
to five of its customers to finance
the purchase of lots and con-

_ struction of homes or apartments.

According to the bank, Jan
Ward and his firm, Ward & Com-

pany, not only “failed or refused .

to pay” the mortgage financing
to the bank’s:-clients, but has also
refused to return the money to
either the bank, or its lawyer, Mr
Cedric L Parker.

The Supreme Court made its
adjudication order against Ward
on October 28 ordering him to
immediately, on receipt of ser-
vice, attend the Receiver/Man-
ager at the Registrar of the

SEE page 12

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008














More Meat.... More Flavour

ot march for =
to toe aged


























@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
rmissick@tribunemedia.net

ONLY a handful of Bahamians have experi-

enced the ravages of war or seen poverty, pain
and suffering in its most devastating form. Only
‘a few have felt the “unnatural and unwanted
euphoria” that follows killing in the line of duty.

Some of those who have had this experience
— Bahamian men and women, who served as
part of foreign armed forces in Iraq at some






Quiznos SuB

MMMM. TOASTYE



point during the past five years, will be fea-
‘tured in this newspaper.

Today we tell the story of Grand Bahama
native Adam Goldsmith, who was on active
operations in Kosovo, Afghanistan, and Iraq
as a member of the British Army.

He was the only foreigner and person of
African heritage in his squadron. He was, at
that time, the only serving soldier in the British

SEE page seven



Cuoost From:









li By MEGAN REYNOLDS .
- Tribune Staff Reporter

GUN crimes reported in.

Nassau this weekend ‘include
the shooting of two young
men and the hold up of a gas
station.

The two men were sot
while in Hampton Street, ‘f
Mount Royal Avenue, j. ”
after 10pm on Friday.

' The 18-year-old was shot in
the-right side of his chest, and

“the 24-year-old was shot in the

left side of his body.
Both are in serious condi-

-“tion/and being treated in

Princess. Margaret Hospital..

SEE page 14

“US staff sent to

help solve i ISSUES
at Morton Salt

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter -
alowe@tribunemedia.nét

‘MORTON Salt’s parent:com-
pany has sent staff from the

‘United States to Inagua to

begin work towards mending

‘the relationship between the

salt union and management at
the recovering plant, a union
official said yesterday. -

Wilfred Seymour, a heavy -
- equipment operator of 36 years
‘standing at the Inagua plant and

President of the salt union, the
Bahamas Industrial Manufac-

SEE page 14
























Eusey a.

Regular Sub

Foronty


PAGE 2, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008 THE TRIBUNE



/Tribune staff

ipé Major.

Do
u



ACTING COMMISSIONER of Police Reginald Fergusomalong with Minister of National Security Tommy
Turnquest turn the lights on for the Christmas trees at Police Headquarters on East Street. The annual
event took place on Thursday.

Meh WL (ce

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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 3






TOP EXECUTIVES of Bahamas Ferries recently paid a courtesy call on

Anastasia Stubbs/Visionaire Marketing

Prime Minister Hubert Ingaraham at his office on Friday, November 14. Pic-

tured from left to right.are: Stuart Ballantyne, of Sea Transportation Corpo- —

ration, the Designer and Builder of Bahamas Ferries’ newest vessel, The
Bohengy II; Craig Symonette, Chairman of Bahamas Ferries; Prime Minister
Ingraham; Khaalis Rolle, Chief Marketing Officer; Captain Harvey Sweeting,
Chief Operating Officer and Stephen Thompson, Bahamas Ferries, Chief

Financial Officer.

Bahamas Ferries request approval
for a ‘state of the art’ terminal

Bahamas Ferries has requested

approval from the Government to
construct a “state of the art”
downtown departure terminal to
serve passengers of Bahamas Fer-
‘ries along with all passengers trav-
eling to and from the Family
Islands via sea.
' “The request was put forward in
a meeting, led by company chair-
man Craig Symonette at the Prime
Minister’s office in the Cecil Wal-
lace- Whitfield Building on Friday,
November 14, 2008. :
It:follows on the heels of the

launch of the company’s newest

ferry, the Bohengy III.

Mr Symonette asked for gov-
ernment’s approval and guidance
for the construction of “a first class
departure lounge facility” at a cen-
tral location along Bay Street.

The Prime Minister informed
Mr Symonette that the govern-
ment. would be happy to accom-
modate the company’s demand.
“It- would be wonderful to have a
first class departure lounge for
domestic travelers,” he said.

The Chairman was accompa-

nied by Stuart Ballantyne, of Sea |

Transportation Corporation, the
Designer and Builder of Bahamas
Ferries’ newest vessel, The
Bohengy II; Stephen Thompson,
Bahamas Ferries, Chief‘Financial
Officer; Captain Harvey Sweet-
ing, Chief Operating Officer and

Reports of braw!
between police and
~ Defence Force officers

‘The Tribune received reports *

of a brawl between:police and
defence force officers taking place
at Potters Cay dock around 11pm
Friday. :

As many as 10 police cars were ~

seen driving at high speed down
East Bay Street. It was reported

that they were headed for Pot- -

ters Cay. However, a police
spokesman said he had no knowl-

edge of anything having occurred.

in the area.

Man pleads guilty

to possession of 142.

With intent to supply

A GARDEN Close man.§is
expected to be sentenced in Mag-
istrate’s Court today after pleading
guilty to possessing 142 pounds of
marijuana with intent to supply.

Twenty-nine-year-old Alvacar-
do Jason Jolly, of Garden Close
off Blue Hill Road, on Friday
pleaded guilty to possession of
marijuana with intent to supply.

Jolly and Shavunka Marie
McKinney, also accused of pos-
sessing marijuana with intent to
supply, were arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in
Court 8, Bank Lane, on Friday.

McKinney, who pleaded not ©
guilty to the charge, is expected.

to appear in court today for a bail
hearing.

According to court dockets, the
two are alleged to have committed
the offence on Thursday, Novem-
ber 20.

Jolly, who was represented by
attorney Dion Smith, pleaded
guilty to the charge while McKin-
ney, who was represented by attor-
ney T’Shura Ambrose, pleaded
not guilty to the charge.

Both accused were remanded
in custody and are expected to
return to court on Monday for a
bail hearing and sentencing.

A 40-year-old man was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
last week on a marijuana posses-
sion charge.

It is alleged that Edney Rolle
was found in possession of eight
pounds of marijuana on Novem-

ber 18, while at Mangrove Cay, .

Andros.
Rolle, who was arraigned before
Magistrate Carolita Bethel in

Court 8, Bank:Lane, pleaded not °

guilty to the charge. He was
remanded in custody and will
return to court on November 27
for a bail hearing.

id
UU ty

Tas Ma eas
PHONE: 322-2157



Khaalis Rolle, Chief Marketing
Officer.

“We can build lots of ships, but
we would like to create a proper
world class departure terminal,”
said Mr Symonette while speaking

- with Mr Ingraham.

Mr Symonette informed the

Prime Minister that the present
facilities at Potter’s Cay are some-
what restrictive.
_ He committed to building the
facility, which will not only accom-
modate Bahamas Ferries’ passen-
gers but all persons traveling to
and from the Family Islands by
sea.

-The Chairman intends that the
facility will accommodate trav-
ellers checking in and out at the
top level with more cumbersome
operations including the use of
forklifts, heavy equipment, freight
and the movement of vehicles tak-
ing place at the lower level.

The group also discussed a
number of important matters
related to the ferry transportation
service as well'as on going
developments in the Family
Islands. :

Pleased with the meeting,

‘ Symonette said, “The Prime Min-

ister was very receptive and fully
understands the importance of
marine transport in this country,
and I feel very confident that our
company and others as a group in
the ferry business, we will work
with this administration to
achieve mutually beneficial end
goals.”

cos ee -~Bahamians claim their

Cuban medical degrees

‘not being recognised’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

YOUNG Bahamians who
trained for seven years in Cuba to
obtain medical degrees are being
“unfairly frustrated” in their aim
of putting their skills to work in

: their own country because of a

restrictive policy, some claim.’
They say they are being held

: back by the “non-recognition” of

their Cuban qualifications and
told that they have to pay their

fi. way through further training

abroad before they can enter the

: Bahamian healthcare profession.

Two medical graduates have
questioned why the policy is
being enforced, asking whether
rather than scientific considera-
tions, it may be “cold war” style
politics or an “old boy” network
of healthcare professionals keep-
ing the policy in place.

Former C.I. Gibson student,
Lashano Gilbert, 25, took up a
scholarship to learn Spanish and
study medicine in Holguin
Province, Cuba, graduating in
mid-2007.

Exam

He was shocked to hear for-
mer health minister Dr Marcus
Bethel tell Bahamian medical stu-
dents in Cuba in 2004 that their
qualifications would not be recog-
nised in their home country
unless they passed medical board
exams in the United States, the
United Kingdom, Canada or
Jamaica — at a cost of thousands
of dollars, which the graduates
would have to bear.

As for many of his fellow med-
ical students, after having trav-
elled to Cuba to take up the
scholarship because of financial

Graduates say they have
to pay for further training



constraints, the realisation was a

major blow, said Mr Gilbert. ©

Some students dropped out, but
he stayed on.

Mr Gilbert noted that for years
Cuban nationals, trained and cer-
tified in Cuba, have been com-
ing over to practise medicine in
the Bahamas.

According to Cuban ambas-
sador, Jose Luis Ponce, around
40 Cuban physicians have done so
in the last five years.

Cuba is often heralded: by its
friends and begrudgingly
acknowledged by its foes for its
effective healthcare system.

Common indicators of a popu- |

lation’s health — life expectan-
cy, infant mortality rate —

‘regularly show the communist

country producing first world
health care results on a third
world budget.

The World Health Organisa-
tion records that-life expectancy
for women and men is around
five years longer in-Cuba than in
the Bahamas, while the mortality
rate for children under five
is roughly half the Bahamian
rate. ;

Mr Gilbert claims friends from

his course who have returned to.

work in other countries have
found their health authorities
much more accommodating.
While working as a science
teacher at C.H. Reeves school as
a stop gap money-saving mea-
sure, Mr Gilbert is now consider-
ing applying to work as a doctor









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in Spain-or Colombia, where his
degree is accepted.

. “It required hardwork and a
lot of study. Sleepless nights. I
want to come back to my own
country and help my own people
and they tell me I can’t. It’s very
frustrating,” he said.

Requirements |

A 30-year-old colleague, who is
now working in the Bahamas’
tourism industry to save enough
money to sit the foreign board
exams, said he can appreciate the
BMC’s point, but wishes the gov-
ernment would assist graduates
in meeting the requirements.

“T recognise their point of view,
that they want us to be prepared
to treat the Bahamian people, but
at the same time, why not help
me? Why not come up with a
programme, put me under anoth-
er physician, or let me work for
six months and sit my exam?”

Both graduates have years of











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‘experience treating patients, as

the Cuban system requires stu-
dents to undertake both practi-
cal and theoretical training from
the start.

Tahiru Mahama, 35, a Ghana-
ian and 2001 graduate of the
Cuban system said he had to sit
additional qualifying exams when
he returned to practise in Ghana.

However, this extra course of
study was funded by the State,
he noted.

Mr Gilbert suggests that med-
ical authorities in the Bahamas
should allow the graduates to —
practise under the watchful eye of
a certified physician and see what
they are capable of. ‘

Ambassador to Caricom,
Leonard Archer, said if the BMC
is concerned about the doctor’s
competency, they should send a
team to Cuba to assess the scope
of the country’s medical pro-
gramme.

A message left for the Minister
of Health was not returned up to
press time yesterday.





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PAGE 4, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE ~



| ] EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI |
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S. iG)

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A.,. LL.B.

Publisher/Editor or 1972-

Pubsshed Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street; P.O. Box N- 3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

‘TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News: Circulation and Advertising). 320. 1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

‘The right wing and politics of paranoia

TALK-RADIO hosts play their listeners as
well as Yo. Yo Ma plays the cello, stroking a
string and making their audience'respond exact-
ly the. way they want.

Nowhere is that more evident than in the
fabricated right-wing outrage about reimposition

of the Fairness Doctrine. Under that long-aban- °

doned rule, radio and TV stations that use the
public airways were required to give equal time
to various sides of an issue. The rule was well-
intended, but in practical terms radio and TV
stations found it safer to avoid political discus-

sion altogether than risk running afoul of the’

law. .-
For that and other reasons, the Fairness Doc-
trine was abandoned more than 20 years ago, a
change that in turn opened the door to creation

_. of right-wing talk radio.
However, with Democrats in control of Con-

gress and Barack Obama about to become pres- -
ident, the maestros of talk radio see-an-oppor-....... .

tunity. They know that the more threatened
their audience feels, the higher their ratings
get. And what better way to rile up their lis-
teners than to claim that the Democrats are
out to silence talk radio itself, the medium that
brings conservatives the truth as they want to
know it. So for months, Rush Limbaugh, Sean

Hannity and others have been warning their.

audiences that: once in power, the Democrats

plan to bring back the Fairness Doctrine. Politi-
cians such as Newt Gingrich have joined the.

chorus, and right-wing pundits insist the issue
_will be part of Obama’s agenda in his first 100
days i in office.

But it’s‘all nonsense: Obama; for example, is °’

on the record as very clearly opposing a new
Fairness Doctrine. The most recent bill calling
for reinstatement of the doctrine was intro-

duced back in:2005 and it went nowhere. In °

the current Congress, controlled by Démocrats
‘in both chambers, no such bills have been intro-
duced and no Democrats have announced or
even suggested an effort to resurrect the policy.
With ‘no justification for their paranoia, right-
wing media outlets have gone seeking it out,
asking individual Democrats whether they think
that restoring the doctrine might be-a good
idea. When they get a yes, it sets off a whole
new round of bemoaning. ‘You get the sense
that the Democrats are amusing therhselves,
- much as you'd toss.a hunk of meat into.a tank of
_ piranas just to watch them go into a frenzy.
The bottom line is that there is no chance

whatsoever of the Fairness Doctrine coming,

back, as those-on the right will no doubt learn in
the months to come. But it won’t matter,
because just as quickly as one justification for
paranoia disappears, another is certain to
emerge. Among a.certain crowd, paranoia is a

steady state that continues independent of evi

dence or proof.

In a famous essay written in 1964, iistanea
Richard Hofstadter traced the evolution of what ©

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he called “the paranoid style i in American pol-
itics,” and his description remains as fresh and
accurate as the day it was written: «

“But the modern right wing ... feels dispos-
sessed,” Hofstadter wrote. “America has been
largely taken away from them,and their kind,
though they are determined to try to repossess

‘it and to prevent the final destructive act of ©

‘ subversion. The old: American virtues have

already been eaten away by cosmopolitans and ~

intellectuals; the old competitive capitalism has
been gradually undermined by socialistic and
communistic schemers....”

It all sounds so familiar, doesn’t it? The pas- _

sage of more than 40 years has confirmed Hof-
stadter’s observation that the paranoid style is

enduring. All that has changed is the degree of
_ influence that the paranoid style has achieved

through-talk radio, and the grip it now holds on
the Republican Party.

In fact, the Democrats have every reason to
encourage rather than break that relationship.

As the paranoid right talks amongst itself on

tadio, Fox News and conservative web sites, as
they egg each other into ever higher fits of hys-
teria, they construct an alternative America
and alternative reality for themselves that is
increasingly divorced from the reality perceived
by mainstream America.

In his piece, Hofstadter made it clear that he
wasn ’t using the term “paranoid” in the clinical

sense. Instead, “it is the use of paranoid modes. ,

of expression by more or less normal people

that makes the phenomenon significant.”

“The paranoid spokesman sees the fate: of
' “Conispiracy in apocalyptic terms — he traffics in
“the birth and death of whole worlds, whole

= political orders, whole systems of human val-

ues,” Hofstadter wrote. “He is always manning
the barricades of civilization. He constantly
lives at a turning point.”

Or, as Home Depot'co-founder Bernie Mar-

‘cus said in an Oct. 17 conference call in which he

tried to rally business leaders to beat back the
Democrats: “This is the demise of a civiliza-
tion. This is how a civilization disappears. I’m
sitting here as.an elder statesman, and I’m
watching this happen, and I don’t believe it.”
Marcus was not referring specifically to Oba-
ma_in those remarks, but there’s no question

that the president-elect stokes such emotions by -

his mere existence. Everything about Obama —

‘his race, his age, his intelligence, his name, his -
. back story — feeds the paranoid’s sense that

America is being stolen from its true owners.

- In fact, if you had to design someone to per-
fectly epitomize their deepest fears, Obama
would be it. Over the next four to eight years,
he’s destined to make Limbaugh, Hannity and
their ilk even-richer than they are today, and in
the process make their listeners seem even more

--- ¢razy and alienated.

(This article was written by Jay Bookman of
Cox News Service c. 2008).

Arawak Cay would
be an ideal venue
for Junkanoo

Bawa

EDITOR, The Tiibwine:

ALL of the Government and
Opposition Parliamentary
Members must, I would imag-
ine, pass through Bay Street at
least once a week, and clearly
they are not reading the news-
papers on their way.

Bay Street itself shouts from °

sidewalk to sidewalk, “Hey
guys, I’m dying and some of my
neighbours are already dead.
Just look, the shops are closed
because there is*no business.”

If they were reading the
newspapers they would know
that tourism is in trouble, as
headline after headline shouts
the news of layoffs, redundan-
cies and firings.

‘Yet I heard last night, from

' good goods, that our national

preoccupation will again be
staged on Bay Street this year
and that plans are already in
place to erect the bleachers
once again on December Sth,
just as any hope of even a little

letters@tribunemedia.net



Christmas business for the mér-—

chants might otherwise kick in.

Do any of these people, who.

ostensibly “run” this country,
have even the slightest under-
standing of what is conducive
to retail business and what is
not? Not a chance! Would any
of them, or their wives, do their
Christmas, or any other shop-
ping, in the Orange Bowl or
Giants Stadium? So what makes
them think that a Bay Street
Bowl is any more attractive to
anyone? Ah, maybe it really is
that they just don’t think!
Well MP’s and Senators,
guess. what — Bay Street busi-
nesses employ people too, and
many are already on short work
weeks and other rotations — Do
you really need to see the head-

line “Bay Street Merchants Lay

off Hundreds” to understand
that junkanoo is not good for
Bay Street?

There could be no better
venue for Junkanoo than what
has evolved to be a thriving cul-

“tural park at Arawak Cay With”

two ideally situated, separate,
roadways that could be
bleachered to the bone.
There is massive space avail-
able in the centre for food and

‘beverage vendors to make a.

much needed buck and the
existing fixed structure eateries
would benefit enormously too.
For my life I cannot see why a:
relocation to a venue such as
this has not been considered. It -
does not negatively impact any-
one and in fact would benefit
an enormous number of peo-
ple, many of whom are strug-
gling today to put bread in their
families’ mouths.

TAMBOURINA
Nassau,
November 19, 2008.

We must learn to change our
lifestyles and watch our, budgets :

EDITOR, The Tribune.

This is no time for people
with political ambitions to be

using the unfortunate circum: .
stances of our poor brothers |

and sisters to try and get
mileage for themselves.

The workers who have
been laid off are in deep peril
and I for one sympathize with
them very much.

I wonder if the spokesper-

‘sons who are making so much

noise would rather for
Atlantis or any other hotel to
keep everyone on until they
have to shut down and in the

“ case of Atlantis put 9,000 peo-
ple out of work instead of |

1,500.

These spokespersons can
easily prove their true con-
cerns by. hiring a lot of the

’- workers who have lost their :
- jobs and pay them to do-noth-

America has a chance to

EDITOR, The Tribune.

AMERICA is back! People are
tejoicing. Blacks and whites are
hugging each other and crying
from Florida to New York to
Philadelphia. They are celebrat-
ing in the streets.. There is now
talk of peace. This is what Amer-
ica needed for a long time. Coun-
tries now want to do business with
America. They want to embrace

_America. They want to come to
America. There are smiles on the

faces of Americans.

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ing. (Then we will see true
generosity) because it sounds
to me as if that is what they
want the hotels to do. :

We as Bahamians are going
to have it very rough over the
next 18 months, but if we
learn to change our lifestyles

and watch our budgets by only:

purchasing what we need and
not what we want, we will get
through this crisis by the help
of almighty God.

We have lost alot of our
values for the right things and
sometimes it takes drastic sit-

uations to’ bring: us bags down:

to earth.

This crisis is not the end of
the world. I grew up before
we had so much prosperity in
the Bahamas, when Bahami-
ans helped each other to get

- by day after day. We had it

rough but we were happy,
God-fearing people back then.

- America now has the opportu-_
nity to start fresh. There is anew

President-elect. Someone who °

talks about peace not war. Some-
one who talks about ONE United

' States of America, where blacks

The preachers in our,
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BAHAMIAN
November 22, 2008

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November 13, 2008.




THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 5



BAHAMAS INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

Bahamian filmmaker hoping
‘Rain’ will make a splash

m@ MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

BAHAMIAN filmmaker
Maria Govan is anxiously
awaiting the Bahamian pre-



“T feel like it’s a
very common story
in the Bahamas,
where children are

Renel to go to really difficult
places.

“But you learn a great deal
through the process and you
see how it takes shape in the
cutting room. That’s where I

miere of her first narrative raised by really learned a lot about
film ‘Rain’ on the opening myself as a director.”

night of the Bahamas Inter- grandparents oe Following a year of pro-
national Film Festival. family figures in duction in New York, ‘Rain’

The 34-year-old who wrote,
directed and produced the
film about a 14-year-old girl
named Rain (played by first
time actress Renel Brown)
who moves from the family
islands, where her grand-
mother raised her, to Nassau
where she is confronted with
the mother who abandoned
her as an infant, and inner-
city culture.

Ms Govan poured over the
script for eight months to pro-
duce a universal story in a
unique cultural setting that
will not only appeal to
Bahamians, but be something
to which viewers around the
world can relate.

She said: “It’s a reaily sim-
ple relationship story about a
young girl and her mother and
how their connecting trans-
forms each of them in both
positive and negative ways.

“T feel like it's a very com-
mon story in the Bahamas,
where children are raised by
grandparents or family figures
in their lives, and there is an
absence of-men.

“It is looking at young
women and trying to see that
sort of breaking point in our
lives in adolescence as we
come into adulthood, and
what makes young people sur-
vive challenging circum-
stances.”

As a filmmaker with no for-
mal training, Ms Govan pro-
duced two documentaries
about Junkanoo~ and
HIV/AIDS in the Bahamas,
but she forged into new terri-
tory with her first narrative
feature.

“It was a lot harder than I

their lives, and
there is an

absence of men.”



Maria Govan

had ever imagined or antici-
pated,” she said. “And I
learned some difficult and
important lessons along the
way.”

The filmmaker spent eight
months working full time on
the script in 2005, acquired
funding within a year, and
started filming in Nassau,
Eleuthera and Cat Island,
over 21 days in January 2007.

But the shoot was inter-
rupted when the main star,
Renel, fell ill, and the team
was faced with an unpredicted
hold-up.

“It was an expensive issue,
but in retrospect, having had a
chance to look at the shoot
and come back and shoot
again was a gift creatively,”
she reflected. |

Although she had the sup-
port of four producers, includ-
ing Nate Kohn she met
through BIFF’s residency pro-
gramme, Maria was the main
financial producer for her film,
as well as director of a cast
including several actors with
no experience.

“Around money it has been
hard, running out of money
and having to raise money and

having to do a lot of work in ,

our pick ups with no money
whatsoever.

“And as a director, there
was a lot of tough dramatic
content and we had to get

ai Voticed

5

VANHEUSEN

CT ey reed cc
career wear shirt

was ready to premier.

And it was chosen for noth-
ing less than the world’s sec-
ond largest film festival in
Toronto, Canada. -

An audience of around 430
viewers in one of the Toronto
Film Festival’s largest theatres
praised the first viewing of the
movie with a standing ovation,
and it was shown twice more.

Although Miss Govan was
uplifted by the world premier,
she is more excited about
showing it to a Bahamian
audience for the first time.

“I represented the
Bahamas and Bahamians so I
think it’s going to be really
interesting to get their per-
spective,” she said.

‘Rain’ will be shown at the
National Performing Arts
Centre, Shirley Street, at 83pm
on Thursday, December 4.
Tickets are $25 and are avail-
able from www.bintlfilm-
fest.com or by calling BIFF
on 356-5939.

Rain will be shown again
at Galleria JFK Cinema at
5pm on Wednesday, Decem-
ber 10, when tickets are $5.

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- THE TRIBUNE



aricom bureau discusses impact 0

global financial crisis on the region

lm By SHARON TURNER
Bahamas Information
Services

ST. JOHNS, Antigua — The
global financial crisis and its
impact on tourism and foreign
direct investment in the region
were among matters discussed at
the 24th Meeting of the Bureau of
the Conference of Heads of Gov-
ernment of the Caricom Com-
munity in St. John’s, Antigua Sat-
urday.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
-ham participated in the meeting,
along with Bureau members
Baldwin Spencer, Prime Minis-
ter of Antigua and Barbuda and
Chairman of Conference, and

Dean Barrow, Prime Minister of —

Belize.

During the meeting, the
Bureau received.a report from
the Committee of Central Bank

Governors on the implications of °
the global financial crisis for the.

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region. The Committee recom-

mended to Heads that Caricom

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foreign exchange reserves,
deposit insurance, capitalization
ratios, local asset ratios, cross
boarder supervision and supervi-
sion of non-banks such as insur-
ance companies and pension
funds.

The committee also urged gov-
ernments, where appropriate, to
encourage a change in the com-
position of bank lending toward
more productive and export-relat-
éd activities, to streamline con-
tingency planning with respect to
financial and non-financial sec-
tors and’to undertake public
investment programmes that cre-

_ate jobs and facilitate production

of tradable/export goods.

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PRIME MINISTER Hubert
Ingraham (2nd left) is pictured
at a press conference held fol-
lowing the close of the 24th
Meeting of the Bureau of the Con-
ference of Heads of Government
of the Caricom Community in St.
John's, Antigua Saturday. The
Bahamas, Antigua and Barbuda
and Belize currently make up the
three-member Bureau. Pictured
from left are Caricom Secretary
General Dr. Edwin Carrington,
Prime Minister Ingraham, Prime:
Minister of Antigua and Barbuda
.and. Conference Chairman Bald-
win Spencer and Prime. Minister
of Belize Dean Barrow.






It was noted that the Caricom
banking sector was spared many
problems because it does not hold.
toxic mortgage-backed securities







Antigua Sun Printing and Publishing

Agreement.

and holds very limited forms of
other types of exposure.

The Bureau urged multilateral
financial institutions (IFI) to show
greater sensitivity toward small
vulnerable economies in this peri-
od of turmoil. In particular, the
IFIs were urged to reverse the
practice of graduation based sole-
ly on GDP per capita.

Members of the Bureau mean-
time reiterated the call for
increased democratization of the.
international financial architec-
ture and encouraged the Com-
mittee of Central Bank Gover-

nors to continue its work with °

respect to contingency planning in
the financial and non-financial
sectors.

Tourism and Foreign
Direct Investment

Regarding the,impact of the
financial crisis on tourism and for-
eign-direct investment in the
region, members took note of the
World Tourism Organization’s
(WTO) report indicating that
tourism worldwide had grown by
7 per cent in 2007 but is expected
to grow:by only 2 per cent in
2008.

- Tourism from the United
States — the region’s principal

market — is expected to be down —

by 6 per cent over thanksgiving.

It is projecfed that Caribbean
tourism will experience negative’
growth next year.

Heads discussed measures
being taken by some resorts in
the region to attract guests,
including price slashing exercis-
es.

The Bureau also took note that
a number of development pro-
jects, -particularly tourism and
hotel related projects, have been
deferred or postponed as a result

of the international financial cri-.

sis, and expressed support for the
efforts of the Caribbean Tourism
Organization (CTO) and Cari-
com Tourism Ministers in mount-

ing an enhanced marketing pro- '

gramme for regional tourism.
As for trade, Heads discussed
the implementation of the EU-
Caricom EPA, indicating that
Heads expect to endorse the
negotiating mandate that will
guide Caricom negotiators in dis-
cussions pean, to:a ,Canada-

f (Oe


























































TUTTI
CU CTT
consitiered

m@ By SHARON TURNER
Bahamas Information
Services



CARICOM bureau
members, including Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham,
are considering contribut-
ing a further $2 million
more in aid to Haiti to help
it recover from the impact
of four hurricanes and trop- |
ical systems this summer.

The bureau met in St
Johns, Antigua on Saturday
to discuss issues affecting
the community, focusing to
a large extent on the global
financial crisis and its impli-
cations for the Caribbean
community.

Members also found time
to discuss the Haitian situa-
tion, and noted that there
remains an urgent need to
assist the Haitian govern-
ment in the delivery of
food, particularly to com-
munities left isolated by
roads and bridges washed
away during this year’s
storms.

The recent presidential
election in the United
States was also discussed by
The Bureau, which identi-
fied priority issues for
engagement with the. new ..
administration. :

Additionally, the Bureau
reviewed preparations for
upcoming scheduled sum-
mits:.a Summit between the
Heads of Government of
Caricom and the president
of Cuba on December 8; a
Summit of Latin American
and Caribbean Presidents
and Heads of Government
to take place in Bahia,
Brazil December 16-17 and
the 5th Summit of the
Americas scheduled for
Port of Spain, Trinidad and
Tobago in April, 2009.

Prime Minister Ingraham
completes:his Bureau term

,on December 31. President

‘of'Guyana Bharrat Jagdeo. - |
joins. the Bureau in J anual
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THE TRIBUNE





The Bahamas’ | *
‘forgotten’ soldier

FROM page one

military who was a Bahamian
national, the first Bahamian to
become a drill and recruit
instructor at one of the British
Army’s foremost recruiting bar-
racks, ATR Pirbright.

Not only did he suffer rejec-
tion from his fellow recruits
because of his race and national-
ity, survived combat in what
many have described as one of
the most beautiful and deadly
parts of the globe, but his accom-
plishments were virtually ignored
by his country’s government.

For him, the latter would

prove to be the unkindest wound -

he would suffer as a soldier.
“Throughout my time in the

military 1 served Her Majesty

but yet in my heart I always held



“Yes, I have
killed and
experienced the
unnatural and
unwanted
euphoria that
follows. It comes
from the fact that
you have trained
for years for war
and finally you
have proven
yourself. Yet there
still remains in my
mind as to why.”



the Bahamas. Every operation, .

every country I served in, I took
the Bahamas’ flag with me. I nev-
er ever forgot my island roots
and proudly showed it off at
every opportunity and flew it
proudly from. wherever I stayed,”
he told The Tribune.

Perhaps not surprisingly, dur-
ing basic training Adam had to
adjust to a new situation where
he was no longer considered part
of a majority with regard to his
race and ethnicity.

Adam joined the British army
at 29 in 1999 and was the only
ethnic minority soldier in his
squadron. Both his. age — as oth-
er recruits were 18 to 25 -—— and
nationality set him apart from
the other men and women serv-
ing with him. —

On more than one occasion
he was made painfully aware that

the British Army, until quite

recently, had an “abysmal record
of racial and physical abuse.”

At the time that Adam joined
the army there had been in place,
for a few years, a new awareness
of the treatment of ethnic minori-
ties.

“They had a zero tolerance
attitude to any of this behaviour
(racism). But even though it was
enforced, under the surface it

. was and still is prevalent. Not all
personnel were racists, but there
were enough to make you feel
uncomfortable in your daily life,”
he said. a

One encounter stood out im
Adam’s mind, one which he con-
siders a “turning point” in his
basic training. One day he found
a note on his barrack’s bed say-
ing: “Don’t bother carrying on
nigger, your place isn’t here,
there is no black in the. Union
Jack.”

. “This made me furious, yet

there was no way I would ever let
them see that, so all I did-was
throw it away and made my
mind up to never quit and make
my family and country proud,”
he said. Bui

That is exactly what he did. At
the end of his phase one training,
Adam was awarded for being the
best recruit and best recruit at

“When it was announced I
knew then who had left the note
as you could see it on his face.
Three years later I met that same

person on an overseas operation —

and he was one of my subordi-
nates,” he said.

Adam had three major active
operations during his service in
the British Army, but the tour
that impacted the Grand
Bahamian the most was the one
in Iraq. :

In Iraq, Adam experienced for
the first time what he described
as “the true dark side of human-
ity.”

“Yes, I have killed and expe-
rienced the unnatural and
unwanted euphoria that follows.
It comes from the fact that you
have trained for years for war
and finally you have proven
yourself. Yet there still remains
in my mind as to why. Is there a
just reason for killing, especially
for such an unworthy cause?”

. After coming to the end of
his military service last year,
Adam asked to present the flag
to the Bahamas High Commis-
sion at the Bahamas’ Indepen-
dence Day Celebration in Lon-
don. ? ‘

“This is the same flag that as a

Bahamian I treasured and kept |

safe, and proudly displayed all
over the world. It represented to
me the very ideals of a small
country in the Atlantic that has a
long and rich beautiful history

which is filled with a race of - '

beautiful strong people who have
endured over hundreds of years,
foreign rule, hurricanes, racism,
recession and yet somehow has

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stayed strong in character. That
flag kept me strong, focused,
it helped me and gave me
strength.

“It is this which made me fly
the Bahamian flag, to let the
world know that one man from a
small country was doing his part
and representing it the best that
he could,” Adam said. 3

Sadly, the request to present i
to the High Commissioner was
denied,.as it was deemed “unsuit-
able” on this occasion and was
thought to not “fit into the cele-

_brations.”

‘Almost more than anything,
this rejection and insult to every-
thing he felt the Bahamian flag
stood for really shook Adam’s
faith in society and in those
placed above him to govern.

“I cannot explain my shock,
my anger, my shame of this rejec-
tion. Being a soldier should be
accustomed to being shunned by
many, but from my own coun-
try?” .

On a visit to the Bahamas lat-
er that year, Adam presented the
flag at the Coral Harbour Base in

a meeting with officers, of the °

RBDF, without pomp and cere-
mony. It was well received from
a “fellow soldier”, someone who

Adam said “understood the:
meaning of pride, honour, and

self-sacrifice.”

“Not once throughout my
career did any government offi-
cial in the Bahamas acknowledge
the fact that I had served in Iraq
or any other country and never
dishonoured my country, the
Bahamas. I have not always fol-
lowed the right path in my life,

“and I have done things of which

_I am ashamed, but during my

time of service I never disgraced
my country or what it really
stood for,” he said.

It is not hard to find the irony
in Adam’s story, that a country
whose successive governments
continuously bemoan the lack of
pride the youth have in nation-
hood, a country which struggles
to find ways in which to instil a
sense of service in the young,
essentially shrugged off the
accomplishments of Adam and
other young men and women
like him who participated in the
hardest fought and most contro-

_ versial armed conflict, of a.gen-
eration,

Adam said he fears that ser-
vice and self-sacrifice may
become an alien virtue in
‘Bahamians, particularly with a
new generation of young persons
mired in a sense of entitlement.

“T have listened to some
preachers talking for many years

’ of saving the lost and doing the
Lord’s work and yet they preach
from their large churches and

’

country “right or wrong.”

LOCAL NEWS

7.

i

drive in their expensive cars.
Who will stand up in my country
and take account for what is hap-
pening?

“Who has the courage to stand
up and say ‘I will no longer talk,
but act.’ Who has this strength,
who understands self-sacrifice?
Who will stand before the crim-
inals, the corrupt, and the false
prophets?

“This person must have the
same resilience and fortitude that
a solitary man did when he dared
to stand up on that memorable
day in Parliament in 1965 and
throw the mace from the win-
dow and demand independence!
This person is us, you, your
neighbour, everyone. I have seen
poverty, pain and suffering in its
most devastating form. I don’t
want to see it in my Own coun-:
try,” Adam said.

Adam is now overseas work-
ing in the private security indus-
try, training personnel and com-
panies, as a director for ESP
Group, a company that provides
solutions for security concerns
internationally.

As Adam pointed out, long
gone are the days of wars fought
for the defence of a nation or for
the protection of the persecut-
ed. However, Adam firmly
believes that it is a soldier’s duty -
to follow orders and fight for his

“To this day I am proud to
have served and proud of the
men who served alongside me,”
Adam said.

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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 7

ADAM GOLDSMITH (above) flies the
Bahamian flag (left and below) while
serving with the British Army in Iraq.
Adam had three major active operations ©
during his service in the British Army,

_ but the tour that impacted the Grand
Bahamian the most was the one in Iraq.







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PAGE 8, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008 THE TRIBUNE
LOCAL NEWS










Felipé Major/Tribune staff

The Annual
Christmas
Jollification

A SPECTACULAR
SELECTION of food, drink
and local crafts was on display
at the weekend as the
Bahamas National Trust on
Village Road held its annual
Jollification event.

Items for sale included
clocks with Bahamian designs
(left), dolls (below) and a host
of straw handbags (top right). .

Sunday, November 30° at 630pm
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THE | HIBUNGE



Mn ee lll a
torm clouds over Caribbean financial services

@ By SIR RONALD SANDERS

(The writer is a business
consultant and former
Caribbean diplomat).

OMINOUS clouds are gather-
ing around financial services in
the Caribbean both offshore and
onshore. The clouds are
approaching from two directions
— the new US government that
will take office in January 2009,
and the European Union (EU)
in the implementation of the Eco-

nomic Partnership Agreement

(EPA) that Caribbean countries
have signed.

The Caribbean will well recall
the blacklisting of many of their
jurisdictions in 1998 by the
Organisation for Economic Coop-
eration and Development
(OECD) — known as the rich
nations’ club — when it launched
its so-called ‘harmful tax compe-
tition initiative’ (HTCI). The
OECD claimed that the tax-rev-
enue bases of its member states
were being eroded by competi-
tion from 41 low taxing jurisdic-
tions some of them in the
Caribbean. ,

Alongside the HTCI, the
OECD ’s sister-organisation, the
Financial Action Task Force
(FATF), initiated its “Forty rec-
ommendations on money laun-
dering” which it then unilaterally
sought to impose on the world by
naming countries that it said were
“uncooperative” in the effort to
curb money laundering. Of
course, the so-called recommen-
dations were not recommenda-
tions at all; they were rules that
the OECD countries alone cre-
ated. Eventually, the IMF, also
controlled by the OECD coun-

tries, adopted the “recommenda- '

tions” and now use them as part
of the financial sector appraisal
programmes of countries.

The OECD’s HTCT initiative
was widely seen as an attempt to
kill the offshore financial services
sector of the economies of devel-"
oping states which had turned to
such services as a means of diver-
sifying their economies and ‘easing
their reliance on the exports of

primary products or tourism. The

financial services providers in
some of these countries in the
Caribbean, such as the British
Virgin Islands, the Cayman
Islands, the Bahamas and Bermu-
da, became very good at it and
gave stiff competition to their
rivals in the OECD nations.

oe JIncthe end, the QECD set






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aside its HTCI blacklist but the
intent behind it was never fully
abandoned. The tactical with-

-drawal of the OECD from the
. HTCI owed much to the ability of

the affected countries to argue

their case vigorously in Com-.

monwealth councils where
OECD members Australia,
Britain, Canada and New
Zealand were present, even

though the major breakthrough |

was the decision of the new US
administration of George W Bush
not to support the OECD initia-
tive which was started with the
full cooperation of Lawrence
Summers, the Treasury Secretary
of the previous Democratic Party
government of President Bill

Clinton.

‘Summers has been part of the
election campaign team of the
Democratic President-elect of the
United States, Barack Obama
who is on record ‘as.opposed to
“tax havens”.

In February'2008, Obama co-
sponsored a bill in the US Senate
with Carl Levin, the Senator from
Michigan, which names 13
Caribbean jurisdictions among
those that could be listed by the
Treasury Secretary as “un-coop-
erative” and penalised. Among

‘these countries are the four men-

tioned earlier and Anguilla,
Antigua and Barbuda, Barbados,
Belize, Dominica, Grenada, St

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cent and the Grenadines.

Levin believes that the total
loss to the US Treasury from off-
shore tax evasion alone approach-

es US$100 billion per year and.

he wants, atnongst other things, to
give the Treasury authority to
take special measures against for-
eign jurisdictions and financial
institutions that impede U.S. tax
enforcement. How quite the US
Treasury will establish that US
tax enforcement is being impeded
is unclear, but given the past his-
tory of how these matters have
been handled, the burden of
proof may very well be imposed
on the foreign jurisdictions and
financial institutions not the US
Treasury.

In any event, a robust pan-
Caribbean response is needed to
the “Stop Tax Havens Abuse
Act” as the Levin-Obama bill is
called. Some Caribbean countries
have had the tendency to go it
alone on these issues, in the belief
that they are better able to nego-
tiate themselves out of them.
But, this problem is far too fun-
damental to the new Caribbean
ideology of services as the sav-
iour of their economies not to be
tackled jointly.

The governments of Jamaica
and Guyana have recently indi-
cated that they wish to establish
financial services, and legislation
has been enacted to do so. In this
connection, with almost all of its
member-states and associate

member states being vulnerable.

to the US bill, the Secretariat of
the Caribbean, Community and
Common Market (Caricom)
might take the initiative to con-
vene a group to start preparing a
pan-Caribbean response.

The EU member states of the
OECD - France, Germany and
Britain in particular — were also
hawks on the HTCI. In March
this year, the 27 Finance Ministers
of the EU announced their deter-
mination “to crack down on tax
havens”. And it is significant that
the EU has sought to introduce
into the EPAs, which it is negoti-
ating with several developing
countries, standards that have not

been agreed in negotiations’ at the...



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World Trade Organisation
(WTO) on the General Agree-
ment on Trade in Services
(GATS). Among these “stan-
dards” are: the OECD’s “Agree-
ment on exchange of information
on tax matters” and a require-
ment that note be taken of the.
“Ten key principles for Informa-
tion Exchange” promulgated by
the finance ministers of the G7
nations.

It is telling that no small state
was invited to the G20 meeting
held in Washington on Novem-
ber 15th to consider the current
global financial crisis, even

women and children.
With each purchase you can enter to win

though many of these countries
operate financial services and
have borne the brunt of OECD
criticism over financial regulation
and supervision. Without even
acknowledging that the current
crisis resulted from poor over-
sight in the US particularly and
some countries in Europe, the
G20 communiqué stated: “Tax
authorities, drawing upon the
work of relevant bodies such as
the (OECD), should continue
efforts to promote tax informa-
tion exchange. Lack of trans-
parency and a failure to exchange
tax information should be vigor-

ously addressed”

Tax information exchange had
nothing to do with the current
global crisis, but the crisis is being
used to again target the financial
services of small countries.

Recognising that the storm
clouds are gathering, Caribbean
countries should bolster their reg-
ulatory and supervisory systems
so that they are beyond reproach,
but they should also gear them-
selves for a:downpour of new
demands. They would do so bet-
ter if they do it together.

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PAGE 10, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



a ES a
Setting is ripe for inspiring local leader

lm By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

BARACK Obama’s remarkable
ascendancy to the US presidency
should serve as an example. to
Bahamians as we seek to rid the
Bahamas of certain grubby little
crooks in our political system, some
of whom have already graced the
halls of Parliament.

Obama’s election appears to
have brought a new political cul-
ture to world politics that the
Bahamian electorate should also

demand, rather than accepting and .

re-electing many of the same re-
packaged, old washed-up do-noth-

. Ing politicians to the House of

Assembly.
On November 4, America
embraced an agent of change and

YOUNG MAN’s VIEW

Dee aa

took a quantum and historic leap as
the eyes of the world was fixed
upon its electoral process.

President-elect Obama con-
vinced America and the world that
“we can” embrace a new political
climate and they (America) did—
but can we?

Mr Obama won the world vote
long before the American poll and,
since the presidential election, has
earned the overwhelming support
of the American people.

A majority of American voters

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rose above race stereotypes and
misplaced fears/prejudices and
elected that nation’s first black pres-
ident, who has expressed his intent
to govern and embody the hopes
and dreams of all Americans.

The fact that American voters
rejected worn-out Republican
orthodoxy for a new direction —

while in many instances overlook-
ing race — demonstrates the evo-



- lution of the American electorate

and leaves a monumental question
about the evolution of the Bahami-
an electorate. President George
Bush — the madern day Herbert




BALDWIN"

Hoover — has overseen two disas-
trous wars, the shattering of Amer-
ica’s once-celebrated reputation
and the most catastrophic econom-
ic meltdown in recent history.

While I whooped and hollered
at my election viewing party, I did
so knowing that there was a press-
ing need for change and that Oba-
ma would inherit a plethora of chal-
lenges, but also because Dr Martin
Luther King’s August 28, 1963,
proclamation of his dream had
become a reality.

Without a doubt, the bones of
Dr King and millions of slaves must
have come together and quaked in
their graves on that fateful Novem-
ber night.

In speaking of the transcendant
political aura surrounding Obama,
Harvard professor Henry Louis
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BARACK OBAMA’S election win
appears to have brought a new
‘political culture to world politics. (AP)

“From toiling as White House
slaves to President-elect Barack
Obama, we have crossed the ulti-
mate colour line.

“What would Frederick Dou-
glass and W.E.B. Du Bois say if
they could know what our people
had at long last achieved? What

.would Sojourner Truth and Harri-

et Tubman say? What would Dr
King himself say? Would they say
that all those lost hours of brutalis-
ing toil and labour leading to spent,
half-fulfilled lives, all those humili-
ations that our ancestors had to suf-
fer through each and every day, all
those slights and rebuffs and recrim-

‘inations, all those rapes and mur-
ders, lynchings and assassinations,

all those Jim Crow laws and protest

marches, those snarling dogs and.

bone-breaking water hoses, all of
those beatings and all of those
killings, all of those black collec-

tive dreams deferred — that the ©

unbearable pain of all of those
tragedies had, in the end, been
assuaged at least somewhat through
Barack Obama's election?:

“Tt has been crossed by our very
first post-modern Race Man, a man
who embraces his African cultural
and genetic heritage so securely
that he can transcend it, becoming
the candidate of choice to tens of

millions of Americans who do not

look like him.”

Who can we point to on the cur-
rent political landscape that
embraces a new generation of pol-
itics and that we can genuinely pro-

claim as the candidate of choice for.

thousands of Bahamians, as an

“Obama-esque”, transcendent —
political figure?

’ It is high time we disregard par-

_tisanship to — like Obama is con-

tinuing to exemplify — incorporate
the brightest talent in any adminis-
tration to work towards develop-
ing a country and formulating a
progressive national plan that is
free of the divisive politics that con-
tinue to plague this nation.

Just as Obama can potentially be
a great president for America, dur-
ing these turbulent times the set-
ting is ripe for the emergence of an
inspiring, visionary local leader —
after all, great leaders are made
during times of adversity, depriva-
tion and warfare, not in times of
plenty,

Quite frankly, over f the last few
decades — while there have been a
few bright spots — the local politi-
cal scene has been littered with
some absolutely diabolical charac-
ters who have, in some cases, occu-
pied the halls of parliament even
though some of them can only be
likened to tail waggers, nodding
dogs, carpetbaggers and downright
shysters.

In the last few years, the local
political landscape has been far
more preoccupied with myriad
scandals, rather than bona fide
reformist views.

Since 2002, there has been one ~

scandal after another, beginning
with the Korean boat scandal
where PLP cronies allegedly hired

Korean boats to hoover up,

Bahamian fish stocks to supply far
eastern markets.

During this time there were also
claims of victimisation at BAIC,
where it is alleged that then Holy
Cross MP Sidney Stubbs was seek-
ing to victimise FNM workers. It
was also under Mr Stubbs steward-

ship that the Korean boat scandal -

exploded.

In no particular arden these

Friday, November 28th 6:00 - 9:00pm



;,scandals were followed by more

embarrassing episodes such as accu-

_ sations of rape against then Works

Minister Bradley Roberts and the

‘Cabinet Room brawl where Keod

Smith is alleged to have given
Kenyatta Gibson a touch of the old.
kung fu.

There was also the money in the
closet debacle, where it was claimed
that then Financial Investments
Minister Vincent Peet had a bundle
of crisp banknotes stashed in a cup-
board.

During this distasteful episode,
Mr Peet claimed the money was
for his daughter’s college tuition,
which provoked amusement, par-
ticularly the image of the then
financial services minister dragging
a bag of loot across America, as if
he couldn’t simply conduct a wire
transfer.

In yet another repugnant
episode, Shane Gibson’s friendship
with the late Anna Nicole Smith, in
light of the speedy granting of her

- permanent residency status, gave

off a foul stink among many right-

' thinking Bahamians and others

who had applied to the Department
of Immigration, in some instances
for up to five or 10 years.

While there may have been oth-
er scandals, several of the main
players shamelessly offered them-
selves for re-election and in some
instances were elected with the lin-
gering stench of a still unresolved
scandal.

It is past due-that the Bahamian
electorate cease the practice of
electing visionless politicians mere-
ly on the basis of personality and
flair.

Over the last decade, it appears
that we have been repeatedly elect-
ing certain politicians who are out-
right pinheads and tin men, full of
childish bragadoccio but devoid of
a national plan or any appreciable
outlook for the country.

Recently, Minister of Education
Carl Bethel’s intemperate, impetu-

_ous response to a meeting of teach-
ers at the Eight Mile Rock High

School illustrated arrogance and an
unaccountable air that many politi-
cians seem to adopt once they are
elected and elevated to a minister-
ial post.

When the minister ran away
from a group of public school teach-
ers — taxpayers that contribute to
his hefty yearly salary'and perks —
only. to subsequently hold an angry
press conference, the public caught
a glimpse of a man who does not
seem’ to possess the consensus-.
building skills or temperament 'to‘
lead, whether as prime minister
during a serious catastrophe or in
his present role directing a gargan-
tuan ministry and truly transform-
ing our defunct educational system.

While there may have been
some showboating by the Bahamas

‘Union of Teachers (BUT), how

could the minister — someone who

_ actively campaigned for that port-

folio and sought to be a servant of
the people — feel ambushed? If
this had been a gathering for a polit- .
ical rally, would Mr Bethel have
scurried away so quickly? Why

. would Mr Bethel prefer to snob-

bishly set preconditions if the teach-

ers all seem to have wanted to

speak to their issues with him?
This no doubt can be interpreted

‘as behaviour that can sometimes

be equivalent to that of malignant
narcissists.

Frankly, the Bahamas needs
new age, Obama-like leaders who
exhibit high ideals and are moti-
vated, by something other than

‘money, particularly since most of

the current local politicians are
seemingly in the business of self-
aggrdndisement and filling their
pockets.

For far too long, local politics
has been dominated by parochial
figures who cannot see beyond their
backyard, which is a stark contrast
to the international, broad-based
perspective of Obama.

Furthermore, it is high time that
more accountable politicians were
elected to office, particularly since
some are unproductive and uncon-
cerned about the needs of their con-
stituents. Isn’t it perplexing how
certain constituencies remain unde-
veloped, yet they adopt some form
of political tribalism and consis-
tently vote one way every election
cycle.

Among other electoral democ-
ratic reforms, the Bahamas’ consti-
tution should be reframed to limit.a
politician’s parliamentary stay
(elected) to two terms, particularly
since many politicians have stayed
beyond their “best before” (expiry)
date and appear to have abused the
parliamentary process while stifling
the rise of young up-and-comers
who may possess new ideas.

Similar to the US presidential
term limit, a prime minister — like
an.MP — should be limited to two
five-year terms, and the leader of a
party should emerge from democ-
ratic primaries.

In these times of economic
recession, it is time a younger gen-
eration — with moral fortitude —
rise to the pinnacle of our nation’s
highest office. It is sad when there
has been no significant attempt to
diversify our economy since Sir
Stafford Sands established our pre- |
sent economic model — based on
tourism and financial services —
nearly 50 years ago. Although
Bahamians are incredibly docile,
local politics is salvageable but only
by focusing on the issues and steadi-
ly developing a completely different
political ethos.




THE TRIBUNE ; MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 11
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PAGE 12, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



ROM page one

Supreme Court's office in the Ansbach-
er Building. The Registrar has been
appointed receiver/manager of Ward’s
estate pending an appointment of a
trustee in bankruptcy.

In July Scotiabank’s ex parte petition
to the bank listed Ward as “lately resid-
ing al Lyford Cay and now of Paradise
Island”, and “lately practising now as a
sole practitioner under the style of Ward

Bahamian lawyer

& Co., out of Chambers situated at 103,
Saffrey Square, Bank Lane.”

However, when it filed its debtors
summons against Ward earlier this year it
said that he had ceased operating his
business at Saffrey Square and that it did
not know where he now either lived or
practised.

Ward filed no defence and a final
judgment was entered against him in Sep-

tember last year with damages to be
assessed and costs taxed.

The case, which went to court last year,
stated that Scotiabank had retained Ward
as its lawyer to represent it in the inves-
tigation and certification of title to certain
lots of land in New Providence, and to
provide proof of title to the land in fee
simple and without encumbrances. Once
satisfied of clear title, he was to draw up
conveyances for the bank’s five cus-
tomers, and prepare and secure execution
of a First Demand Legal Mortgage over

a

the lots for the customers in favour of
Scotiabank. These loans were to provide
financing for the customers to purchase
their lots and start building.

Ward, according to the bank’s state-
ment of claim, confirmed that he had
completed his instructions and had drawn
up the five conveyances and mortgages.

He requested the bank to forward him °

the purchase price of the lots so that he
could transfer the loans to the customers.

Scotiabank said that it sent Ward five
bank drafts for $52,250; $52,250, $52,250,

$104,500 and $47,500, totalling $308,750.

The loans Were to go to Valarie Light-
bourne, Lot 15 Victoria Gardéns Subdi-
vision; Sammy and Ann Samuel; Lot 27A
off Croton Road; Ray Robinson and Tra-
cia Wilson, Lot:28 Ideal Estates Subdi-
vision; Lionel Harris, Lot No 18 South
Ocean Estates and Rosenell and Letario
Edgecombe, Lot No. 39 Victoria Gar-
dens Subdivision.

Scotiabank said that Ward never paid
the money to its five customers. Neither
did he return the money to the bank.

Hundreds march fo
killers to be hanged

1. TWYNAM HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION
‘LOT NO. 117
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence, 3 Bed / 2”? Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading west along
Prince Charles Drive from Fox Hill
Road, take the corner east of Super
Value Food Store. Heading south,
take the second corner on the left,
continue around the curve then take
the third corner on the left. Traveling
north, the property is the 10th lot on
the left or first property after passing
' Tote Avenue.
APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

. SOUTH BEACH ESTATES
SUBDIVISION ;
LOT NO. 1 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split
Level Residential Building with 3
Apts. -
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south of Bamboo
Boulevard off East Street South then
turn through the first corner right
onto Bougainvillea Blvd. Heading
west on Bougainvillea Blvd. take the
second.corner right onto Madeira
Avenue. At the T-junction, turn left
onto Oxford Drive: Property is the
third house right, on the corner of
Serville Drive and Oxford Avenue. -
APPRAISED VALUE: $297,000

. BEL-AIR ESTATES - CARMICHAEL

LOT NO. 259

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3. Bed / 2‘? Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
take the 4th corner on the right +
(Turtle Drive) property is 4th nQURe
on right.

APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES I

LOT NO. 1372 7

- PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 Bed / 2”? Baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: At junction of
Carmichael Road and Cedar Way
(corner opposite BFM) travel south
to the t-junction, turn right onto
Golden Gates Straight, then take the
first corner right onto Comet Terrace.
The property is the second house on
the right, yellow with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

. CHIPPINGHAM SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 17

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 2 beds / 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on
Quarry Mission Road off Nassau
Street, building is approximately
500 ft from Nassau Street on the
northern side of the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO. “A”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-
Family Duplex Apartment
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel west on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
and turn through McKinney. Drive
(Bamboo Shack is on the corner),
then turn left through Rocky Pine
Road. The property is at the end of -
the third corner on the left, painted
light orange.
APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000

1. OPULENT HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 28 ;
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot
7,597 sq. ft.

LOCATION: Traveling on Carmichael
Road, west of Millar Road, take

the first new paved road pass “The
Outdoor Patio” on the left, then take
the second left, then first right; the
property is second to the last on the
right, before the road ends.
APPRAISED VALUE: $80,000

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

7. POLHEMUS GARDENS

SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on Boyd

_ Road, from Providence Avenue take
the third corner on the left. The
subject property is the third lot on
the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $169,000

. CORAL LAKES SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 39, Block 6.
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Residence, 1 bed / 1 bath on
Ground and Upper floors.
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,800 sq. ft.
LOCATION: On corner of Masthead
Lane and Reef Lane Road in Coral
Lakes.
APPRAISED VALUE: $227,000

. NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 2 Block 5
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey. Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,800 sa. ft..
LOCATION: Situated on the

’ southern side of Cambridge Road
and east of Nassau East Boulevard
APPRAISED VALUE: $214,804

10.WEST STREET NASSAU .

- LOT NO. Commercial Lot of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two (2)
Concrete Block Structures, 1 Single-
storey cottage - 1 bed/ 1 bath &
1-Two-storey apartment - 2 beds ©
/1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 3,895 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of West Street and South of
Delancey Street.

APPRAISED VALUE: $156,104

11.WEST STREET NASSAU

LOT NO. Commercial Lot of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Two-
storey Four Unit Apartment Structure
PROPERTY SIZE: 16,767 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of West Street and South of
Delancey Street.

APPRAISED VALUE: $660,000

12. ELIZABETH ESTATES
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 36
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sa. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the western
side of Tobago Crescent in Elizabeth
Estates. :
APPRAISED VALUE: $218,000

13.PINEWOOD GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated.on Mahogany
Street in Pinewood Gardens.
APPRAISED VALUE: $105,000

14.VICTORIA GARDENS
SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 168
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single—
storey residence under construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Victoria Gardens
from Gladstone Road, proceed to
the T-junction, heading east along
the road reservation, the property is
13th lot on the left.
APPRAISED VALUE: $90,000

2. BERNARD TERRACE
SUBDIVISION.
LOT NO. 14
PROPERTY SIZE: Multi-Family Lot
9,700 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Immediately north of
Monastery Park Subdivision and
South of Bernard Road. .
APPRAISED VALUE: $89,000

9

15.FOX HILL - EASTERN DISTRICT
LOT NO. 4 Unit 4
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Four
Unit Townhouse Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 8,592 sq. ft. (Unit:
4 - 1,281 sq. ft.)
LOCATION: Situated on the
eastern side of Plumbago Drive, .
approximately 198 feet northeast of
Step Street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $175,000

16.NASSAU EAST SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. 4 Block 18

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Seven
Unit Complex: Four 1 bedroom &
Three 2 bedroom Units

PROPERTY SIZE: 17,614 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Situated on the left side
of Yamacraw Road opposite the
Treasure Cove Gated Community.
APPRAISED VALUE: $422,000

17.CARMICHAEL VILLAGE

SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Fourplex Apartment: Four 2
bedroom 1 bath Units —
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east along

, Carmichael Road from Golden Isles
Road take the first corner on the-
right. The property is the second lot
on the left-from the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $255,000

18.MARSHALL ROAD

LOT NO. 17D

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Triplex
Apartment: One 2 bedroom/ 2 bath
& Two 2 bedroom /1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west along
Marshall Road from South Beach
Road, take the first corner on the
right (Tiao End Road). The subject
property is the fourth building on the
left painted green with white trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $288,000

19.GAMBLE HEIGHTS SUBDIVISION

LOT NO. Parcel of Land
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION:
Split Level Residence with Two 14
bed/1 bath Apartment Units under
construction
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,141'sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling south on
Blue Hill Road from Faith United
Way, take the first corner on the left
(Sunrise Road). Heading south on
Sunrise Road, take the fifth corner
on the left and proceed east to
the first corner on the right. The
- property is the seventh lot on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $150,000

20.SQUTH BEACH CROWN

ALLOTMENT —
LOT NO. 52

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single- ©

storey Residence, 3 beds / 2 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 37,550 sa. ft.
LOCATION: On the northwestern
corner of Marshall Rd.
APPRAISED VALUE; $199,000

21.GOLDEN GATES Il

LOT. NO. 738

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 beds /3 baths
PROPERTY SIZE: 7,500 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Mermaid Boulevard
Road

APPRAISED VALUE: $203,000

VACANT LOTS

3. CORAL HARBOUR SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 13
PROPERTY SIZE: Single Family Lot
12,113 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Hopkins Drive
APPRAISED VALUE: $120,000

©2008 CreastiveRolations.not

' INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS
TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES, CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263
NASSAU, BAHAMAS OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
* WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.



FROM page one —

der, too many witnesses being
killed, and too many murder-
ers out on bail.”

With 79 murders in 2007,
and 65 so far in 2008, people
whose lives have been ripped
apart by murder are calling
for capital punishment to
deter ruthless killers. .

The mandatory death
penalty for murderers was
made discretionary after a
Privy Council ruling in 2006.
But the current government
maintains it is committed to
enforcing the death penalty,
and voted against a United
Nations draft resolution for a

~ death penalty moratorium last

week.

However, Mr Moncur said
the government is secretly
opposed to the death penalty
as it is slow to implement the
signing of the death warrant
within five years of sentenc-
ing a convicted murderer, and
action must be taken.

“The government are aid-
ing and abetting the crime,”
he claimed.

“They are secretly opposed «

to the death penalty so by not

_ carrying out the law they have’

subjected thousands of citi-
zens to being murdered.
“Fear of the law, of execu-
tion is a deterrent. But crimi-
nals know the government is
pussyfooting around.”
Around 100 people directly
affected by murder started the

procession at Tom Grant Park
in Yellow Elder at around
11am on Saturday, and hunt
dreds more joined the walk
and motorcade as they pro-

- ceeded along Blue Hill Road,

to Marathon Road, Wulff
Road, East Street, Market
Street and back to Yellow
Elder at around 3.30pm. j

Michaela Brown, 25, and
her relatives were represent+
ing six family members mur-
dered in Nassau in the last 15
years.

She said no one has yet
been found guilty of the mur-
ders of brothers Sirdino Smith
and Marvin Ferguson, their
cousins Lavardo Armbrister
and Terell Smith, Ian Arm-
brister and Jamal.Greenslade.

Miss Brown said: “You -
never get over the death of
someone who has been mur-
dered.

“Coming out here makes
me feel like I'm helping
towards something being done
and giving me some resolu-
tion to the whole situation.

“T feel like now people will
start to listen more.’

The protesters signed a
petition calling on the gov-
ernment to remove obstacles
to carrying out the death
penalty, prevent judges from
lawmaking, make judges sub-
ject to public scrutiny, and
remove bail for those charged
with murder and violent
crime. Organisers intend to
hold a protest march every,
month.

Visa waiver programme
among tourism plans put ©
forward by Obie Wilchcombe

FROM page one

f

Bahamasair to organise package holidays for visitors to cover their
flights and hotels at once, and expand to new markets with revised

immigration laws for visitors.

Mr Wilchcombe suggested government mimics the United States
government’s decision to expand its visa waiver programme,
announced last week, and issue tourist visas for a fee upon arrival

to visitors from ‘other countries.
Direct flights to Latin American countries should also be organ- ~~

ised, Mr Wilchcombe said, to bring in visitors from emerging eco-

nomic markets, such as Brazil.

Another of Mr Wilchcombe’s plans to bring in tourists is to
expand Bahamasair to serve more international destinations, and
allow local airlines to service internal flights.

He said: “Allow Bahamasair to play a different role in national
development. This is opportune time while the sky is not as crowd-
ed for Bahamasair to service the international market beginning
with the expansion of service in the United States.”

Religious conferences could be held in the islands if church
leaders were to draw on their contacts and the Ministry of Tourism
worked with the hotel sector and Bahamasair to host at least five

events a year.

The Sports Tourism unit in the Ministry of Tourism, should be
reactivated to draw athletes in need of relaxing at the end of the sea-

son.

“Special activity could be created,” he said. “What about the ‘It's
Better in The Bahamas Professional Athletes Competition’? ESPN,
ABC, Fox and CBS could record and telecast as teams play golf,
beach volleyball, some track, tennis, etc. The families of the play-
ers, fans media will help fill rooms, eat in the restaurants, ride in taxi

or bus and play in the casino.’

He also suggested pitching filmmakers to shoot movies in the

Bahamas to bring in revenue.

Mr Wilchcombe said: “This is an ideal time for the Bahamas to
get out of the box and make the needed paradigm shift in the
tourism industry, tap into'new markets by reducing the burdensome
visa application process and employ innovative and creative ideas

to attract niche markets.”

ANDEAUS

INSURANCE BROKER Co. Lid.

To our valued clients:

Please be informed that MR. LYNDEN ANDREW
JOHNSON is no longer an employee of Andeaus

Insurance Broker

Company Limited. MR.

JOHNSON is not authorized to conduct any
business transactions for the company. Please
contact the office at 323-4545 for services,

Thank you for your continued patronage.

Management of Andeaus Insurance Broker
Company Limited. \ .

TEL: 323-4545 FAX:328-6357


wep ee ye tte

gi HE TRIBUNE.

‘COMING ~



| FYP & The Paint Centre
188 Wulff. Road
Phone (242) 323-3973 or (242) 325-3976
Open Mon - Fri 7:00am-4:00pm
Saturdays 7:00am-3:00pm

Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com

a

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 13



Gg.
rE Prt ot Street, aes Fes
Phone (242) 326-8543 or (242) 326-5464
Open Mon - Fri 7:30am-4:30pm
Saturdays 8:00am-3:00pm

Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com



2008 Creative Edge
PAGE 14, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS

US staff sent to
help solve issues
at Morton Salt

Shooting leaves
two men in hospital

FROM page one

ee when he pressed the buzzer on the locked
door. Once inside, he covered his face with a
scarf and held the cashier at gunpoint,
demanding cash.

Taking the money he got away on a moped
parked at the gas station and fled towards
Culmersville.

No-one was shot when a gunman held up
employees at Texaco gas station on the corner
of Mackey and Madeira Streets at around
5.30pm on Friday.

The armed robber was let in by an employ-





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Turks, Trinidad, Caymary’






FROM page one

turing and Allied Workers
Union, said improvements in
that relationship is a “require-
ment of the parent company,
Rohm Haas.”

“Two personnel came down

last week and had a meeting ©

with the officers. We expect to
move ahead with that. At this
time they were only getting
feedback as to what the issues
are that we really need to deal
with in order to move ahead
with our labour relations.
“They really want that rela-
tionship to improve. I am very
keen on that idea, the whole
bargaining unit is keen on that
idea because that is something

we all needed, we need a good ©

relationship,” said Mr Seymour.
Strain between the unionised
salt workers and management
in recent years has seriously
concerned the salt producing
company, to the point that MP
for the island, V. Alfred Gray,
claimed the company was con-
sidering pulling out of the island
over the summer and moving
its operation to Mexico if things
did not improve.
‘Morton Salt is the island’s

‘primary employer and eco- -

nomic engine, providing jobs

O




QUANTITY

MARBLE ()-

wach)
Company Name:
Telephone Na:

Address:



LANDSCAPING,

for around 70 per cent of |

Inaguans.

Problems for the plant were
exarcebated when Hurricane
Ike tore across the southern
island at category four strength,
causing millions of dollars of
damage to the plant and
prompting Rohm Haas to make
uncertain statements about the
site’s future.

Mr Seymour said improve-
ments would in his mind require
management to “accept the
union as the bargaining unit in
the work place. I don’t feel even
at this time yet (that manage-
ment) really accepts the union
and respects the officers of the
union. If we have an agreement
and you go and do something
which is outside that agreement
and you fail to call the union
and its officers in to discuss the
matter and act on your own that
is a problem.”

In the meantime, despite
grim predictions, the Inagua
plant has bounced back since
Hurricane Ike, and all staff are
back at work.

Salt production targets are
being met, according to the
union president, with around
120,000 tonnes being harvest-
ed every month, much of it
going to the U.S. where it is in

P.O. Box N-313

NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TELEPHONES (242) 325-1769
OR (242) 323-5904
FAX: (242) 356-6691

~ POINSETTIAS

POT SIZE
RED (R) PINK (P) WHITE (WW)

wane TY semis TY sain $Y} te OES
__®)___.®)_) oe
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Contact Person:






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PLANTS OR MORE!

ARCHER’S NURSERY
#55 DUNMORE AVE, CHIPPINGHAM-SOUTH OF
BAHAMAS HUMANE SOCIETY
HOUSE GARDEN & LANDSCAPING PLANTS-SEEDLINGS,
INTERIORSCAPING
YARD & MAINTENANCE SERVICE



P.O Box, eneeneee

high demand for-de-icing roads
at this time.

Workers are still carrying out
repairs to the main administra-
tive building, which was seri-
ously damaged during the hur-
ricane.

“I fancy we are doing quite
well. Things are looking good,”
said Mr Seymour, adding that
employees are “very, very com-
mitted to getting this plant up
and running.’

Mr Seymour noted that the
company is investing in the
plant, having purchased four
new hauling units and a new
generator.

“When you're talking about
that kind of equipment, you are
looking in area of more than
1/2 million dollars (spent) in last
four or five weeks so to me
that’s an indication that Mor-
ton Salt is really committed to
getting the Bahamas plant back

_to normal,” he said.

However, he said, the repair
of the loading dock, which will
cost millions of dollars, has yet
to take place.

“They are really going to
have to make a decision,
whether they are going to spend
$5 or 6 million on this. dock or
build a new dock. This one is
30 years old,” said Mr Seymour.

























PRICE






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$16.06
$22.00



















;



See pagel7



Sportsbeat...
















Spain upset
Argentina to -

iwin Davis Cup

SPAIN’S Feliciano Lopez, left,
drinks champagne from the
Davis’ Cup trophy as he cele-
brates ‘with teammates in Mar
del Plata, Argentina, Sunday,
Nov. 23, 2008. Spain’s Fer-
nando Verdasco defeated
Argentina's Jose Acasuso 6-3,
6-7 (3), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 in the
Davis Cup final’s third singles
match, giving Spain its third
Davis Cup title.

See page 18



m@ PRIMARY BASKETBALL






Primary Schools’
best-of-three bas-
ketball championships will
get underway at 3:15 p.m. at
Loyola Hall, Gladstone
Road.
The series is a rematch of
last year’s final between the
defending champions St. .
Thomas More Sparks and
runners-up St. Bede’s Crush-
" ers.
The sparks, coached by
Nkomo Ferguson, is led by
guard Deajour Adderley and
center Joel Morris. The
Crushers, coached by Don-
nie Culmer and Ricardo
Freemantle, are led by guard
Kyle ‘Flash’ Turnquest and
center Dwight Wheatley.
Game two in the series will
be played on Wednesday at
Loyola Hall. Like they did
last year, St. Bede’s won the
pennant by going undefeated
during the regular season. St.
Thomas only lost one game
and at came at the hands of
St. Bede’s.

@ HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL

THE HO Nash
Lions, DW Davis
Pitbulls and the CR
Walker Knights
have taken the initial lead ,
over the CC Sweeting Scor-
pions and Cobras in the
opening games of the Gov-
ernment Secondary Schools
Sports Association’s best-of-
three volleyball champi-
onships.

On Friday at the DW
Davis Gymnasium, the Lions
roared past the Scorpions in
game one of the junior girls
series and the Pitbulls did
the same in the junior boys.
The Knights shined against
the Cobras in both the senior
girls and boys series.

Game two in ail four series
will be played today, starting
at 4 p.m. at the DW Davis
Gymnasium.



@ HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL

After getting its
season started last
week, the Bahamas
Association of
Independent Secondary
Schools will continue with
games on tap today at vari-
ous schools, starting at 4
p.m. The junior girls and
senior boys. will play today,
while the junior boys and
senior girls will be in action
on Tuesday.



Game one ofthe
“tholic Diocesan: ’

Myron's dream
comes true!

Rolle selected for Rhodes Scholarship for 2009

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was a dream come true for Myron
Rolle on Saturday.

Rolle, the multi-talented Bahamian
student-athlete, was selected as one of
the 32 recipients of the prestigious
Rhodes Scholarship for 2009.

Immediately after receiving the
scholarship, Rolle boarded a private
jet from Alabama to College Park
where he helped the Florida State Uni-
versity Seminoles celebrate a 37-3 rout
over the Maryland Terrapins to keep
their hopes alive for the Athletic Coast

‘Conference championship.

“It.feels tremendous. I’m very excit-
ed, very elated. I had a long day yes-
terday,” said Rolle in an interview with

' The Tribune yesterday. “I started about

8:30 a.m. and didn’t finish until about 4
p.m.

“But when they read the announce-
ment and they called my name, I just
put my head down and thanked the
Lord for providing with the opportuni-
ty. ’'m really thrilled. It was a dream

_.come through for me.”

Rolle,:a 22-year-old safety, said the
goal is now to try and help the Semi-
noles win the league’s Atlantic Divi-
sional title and eventually end up in

the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida in

January.

“After the season is done, J will sit
down with my family and discuss my
future as far as going to Oxford (for
the Rhodes scholarship) or going (ear-
ly) in the NFL (National Football
League’s draft),” Rolle reflected. —

If-he settles for the Rhodes scholar-
ship, Rolle will enroll at the University
of Oxford in England in September,
becoming the fourth Florida State stu-
dent to do so to pursue the all expens-
es. two or three year study.



Te

drills

JANARA PIERRE performs a Black belt
Carter

JULIAN ROLLE performs self-defen

ce





ANTONIZE HIGGS performs a sword Carter durin
Saturday at Kendal Isaac Gym. The event saw a
competing. Cuba, Trinidad and USA were among countries represented. The event

He graduated in just two anda half
years with a 3.75 grade point average
with his bachelor’s degree in exercise
science from Florida State in August
and is now pursuing his master’s degree
in public administration with his ulti-
mate goal of becoming a neurosurgeon.

Rolle, however, is having just as
much success on the football field that
he doesn’t want to turn down a shot at
the NFL either.

Making it to Maryland during the
second quarter for the Seminoles’
blowout win has increased his appetite
for the big league.

“The game was fun, but it was cold in
Maryland,” said Rolle, who was greet-
ed by his parents Beverly and Whitney
Rolle when he arrived at the Locker
Room, but was dosed with a bucket of
water during the celebrations after the

SEE page 18









attracted a big crowd. SEE PAGE 17 for more pictures.

IN ACTI

Felipé Major/Tribune staff

é martial arts tournament on
ot of international black belts







Myron Rolle.



Porky’s
| Stingrays.
stage late
rally

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter



Trailing for much of the game, Porky’s
Stingrays rallied for a fourth quarter come-
back to improve to 4-2.

Nesley Lucien scored on a-quarterback draw
to give the Stingrays the go ahead score, 14-12,.
midway through the fourth quarter.

Shorthanded at the game’s outset with just
13 players available, the Stingrays trailed 12-0
in the first quarter.

The Destroyers offensive playcalling misdi-
rected the Stingrays defense as they effective-
ly moved the ball on the ball on the ground and
netted their first score with an end around.

The Destroyers made it a two possession
game on their next drive, once again keeping it
onthe ground to score from short yardage.

The Stingrays finally reached the scoreboard
in the second quarter when Lucien connected

r with Lawrence Hepburn Jr for a touchdown
reception. my

After the failed ‘conversion the Stingrays
trailed 12-6. :

The Stingrays defensive intensity picked up
considerably in the second quarter and held the
Destroyers without a score in the second half.

- On their third possession of the third quar-
ter, the Destroyers put together their best scor-
ing opportunity of the half but faltered in the
redzone. -

An effective drive on the ground and
through the air, stalled at the Stingrays 10 yard
line as the Destroyers turned the ball over on
downs near the goal line. :

Backed up against their own endzone, the

SEE page 18

Ps



BAHAMAS BASEBALL, FEDERATION

Getting local baseball youngsters to the next level



Felipé Major/Tribune staff



TEAM One Baseball instructors Jim Gemler and Justin Roswell from
Baltimore, Maryland were in town over the weekend to conduct a clin-
ic for local baseball players with prospects of playing in high school
and college over the weekend at the St. Andrew’s Field of Dreams.



WITH so much talent available in the country, the
Bahamas Baseball Federation felt the best way to
harness the future of the local players is to give
them some international exposure.

Over the weekend, the federation along with
Pony Baseball Bahamas, hosted Team One Bascball
from Baltimore, Maryland.

Clinic directors Jim Gemler and Justin Roswell
participated in a series of activities. ,

They began with a session geared specifically to
the parents on Friday night as they informed them
about the requirements that their children will need
in order to advance to the next level to play in high
school and college in the United States.

Then on Saturday, they conducted an all-day clin-
ic at the Field of Dreams at St. Andrew’s High
School.. They concluded on Sunday with a game to

Baltimore clinic directors help young Bahamians

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

view the players in action. “Baseball is growing by
leaps and bounds as it pertains to our youth,” said
federation secretary general Theodore ‘Teddy’
Sweeting. “So what we wanted to do is bring in
individuals who can help us to get our kids to the
next level.” :

Sweeting said Gemler and Roswell was able to
evaluate the players in practice and game situations
and when they return to the United States, they
will eventually send back the data on the perfor-
mances of the players, indicating who will have the
potential to play at the next level.

° More than 60 players, including two from Grand
Bahama and five from Bimini, participated in the
clinic, which is expected to become ‘an annual one
with sessions scheduled to be conducted in the Fam-
ily Islands starting next year.

Team One Baseball, according to Roswell, said

SEE page 18


PAGE 16, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS







LOCAL SPORTS

Temple Fellowshio, Macedonia win opening games

TEMPLE Fellowship and
Macedonia, deadlocked’ at the
end of the regular season in a
three-way tie at 3-1 with Faith
United for the | 7-and-under pen-
nant, won their opening games in
their respective Baptist Sports
Council's 2008 Rev. Dr. Williams
Thompson's best-of-three soft-
ball playoffs.

Temple Fellowship, who even-
tually was awarded the pennant
by virtue of outscoring their two
counterparts, blested fourth place
Golden Gates 19-6-to snatch the
|-0 lead in their semifinals on Sat-

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urday at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex. Macedonia, the sec-
ond place finishers, nipped third
place Faith United 9-8 in the oth-
er half of the semi's.

Game two in both series will
be played on Saturday at 11 a.m.

Meanwhile, Shaw AME Zion
clinched the men's pennant as
they held off Faith United 11-10.
Shaw AME and Transfiguration
ended the regular season at 8-1
after Transfiguration knocked off
Temple Fellowship 12-10. But by
virtue of beating Transfiguration
in their head-to-head matchup,

Shaw AME was awarded the
pennant.

On Tuesday night at the
Banker's Field at the Baillou Hills
Sporting Complex, second place
Transfiguration will play third
place Calvary Deliverance in
game one of their best-of-three
playoffs at 7 p.m., followed by
Shaw AME Zion against fourth

-_place Temple Fellowship at 8 p.m.

Game two of their series will be
played on Saturday at noon.

On Saturday at 10 a.m., game
one of the co-ed playoff will get
underway with pennant winning

Golden Gates will meet fourth
place Faith United and second
place Macedonia will play third
place Temple Fellowship.

¢ Here's a summary of the
games played on Saturday:

Temple Fellowship 19, Gold-
en Gates 6 (17-under playoffs):
Dominic Collie helped his own
cause with a perfect 3-for-3 day,
including a in-the-park home run
and Rudolf Fox was 2-for-3 with a
two-run in-the-parker to lead the

pennant winners in their playoff

opener.
Addie Finley and Angelo But-

runs and Gerard Hepburn was 2-
for-3 with two RBIs and two runs.
Finley also had two RBIs.

Collie got the win on the
mound over Winston Hanna.

Macedonia 9, Faith United 8
(17-under playoffs): Quinton
Williams had a one-out RBI sac-
rifice fly to drive in Quintin
Williams with the game winning
run in the bottom of the fifth as
second place Macedonia broke
an 8-8- to seal game one of their
playoffs. ;

Quintin Williams, Bernard Fer-
guson, Kyle Rolle, Winston Sey-
mour and D'Kyle Rolle all had
two hits with Williams, Ferguson
and Seymour scoring twice.

Walter Bell, who helped out

ler were both 2-for-4 with two

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occ

2 eee /
/ a ae hile
__bstubb: La
ayath a run-producing ae: got
the win on the mound over
D'Angelo Cartwright.

Kenvaughn Sands had two hits,
scoring three times and Stephen
Russell had one hit and scored
twice to lead Faith United.

Shaw AME 11, Faith United
10 (Men): Shanty Albury scored
three times and Walbert Hanna
twice as catcher Dwayne Stevens
came up with the biggest defen-
sive play at the plate on a throw
from in the bottom of the fifth to
preserve the win as Shaw AME
clinched the pennant.

Maxwell Jenoure got thw win
over Collin Knowles.

Kenvaughn Sands crossed the
home plate three times and Tar-
ran Fulford did it twice for Faith
United.

Transfiguration 12, Temple
Fellowship 10 (Men): Relief
pitcher Alvin Lightbourne had
two-run triplre and scored on
Kirk Johnson's RBI single for
Transfiguration as they produced
four runs in the bottom of the
fourth to seal the win.

Johnson, Stephen Brown and
Nelson Farrington all had two hits
with Johnson scoring once,
Brown three times and Farring-
torltwice. Hermas Sands added a
two-run double, scoring a run.

Ricardo Major, Rodney Tay-
lor, Brian Armbrister and Gino
Campbell all had two hits with
Major, Armbrister and Campbell
scoring twice. Angelo Butler had
one hit with a RBI and a run
scored.

Alfred Munnings suffered the
loss.

Calvary Deliverance 16, Gold-
en Gates 7 (Men): Taja Wright
had a perfect 4-for-4 day with
three RBIs and four runs, Jayson
Clarke was 3-for-4 weith a tweo-
run homer, scoring four times;
Jeff Beckles was 3-for-3 with two
RBIs and three runs and Brad





Wood 2-for-4 with two RBIs and -

two runs:
Danny Stubbs got the win over
Johnnie Burrows.
‘Burrows and Dino Sweeting
were both 2-for-3 with Burrows
scoring twice and Sweeting dri-

. ving ina run. Randy Wallace and

Kayle Carey both had a RBI dou-
ble with Wallace scoring a run.

Temple Fellowship 10, Faith
United 5 (Co-ed): Brian Arm-
brister scored three times and
Mardocie Ston and Kayon Jack-
son twice for Temple Fellowship
as they secured third place. for
the playoffs.

Alfred Munnings got the win
over Collin Knowles, who got-on

He

base:three times andscored'onee: -

for fourth place Faith United.








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TRIBUNE SPORTS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 17



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stars at Invitational

MARQUEE PLAYER: World number 4 Andy Murray

This event is scheduled for 5 December at 3.30 p.m. at the
Atlantis Tennis Centre, Paradise Island.

In its 8th year, Mark has hosted many of the top players on the
’ ATP and WTA tennis circuits and the Invitational keeps going from



strength to strength. Amongst the many attendees have been Andre
Agassi, James Blake, Bob & Mike Bryan, Jim Courier, Robbie
Ginepri, Tommy Haas, Fred Stolle, Jennifer Capriati and Nicole
Vaidisoya.

The World #4, ANDY MURRAY of Scotland will be one of the
marquee players this year. The 21-year-old Scot has enjoyed his
most successful year on the ATP Tour in 2008. He reached the .
Wimbledon quarter-finals this summer and has won back to back
Masters Series titles in Cincinnati and Madrid. He reached the-final
of the US Open and has notched wins over the world’s top three this
year — Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Novak Djokovic. The
great John McEnroe is full of praise for Andy saying such things as
“What I love the most is how incredibly well he’s moving. It’s unbe-
lievable. Most people can’t move on the court like that and find the
position and the angles that Andy’ s able to come up with. He’s got a
great brain and head for tennis.”

Praise indeed from one of the Legends.of Tennis. Andy himself
attributes a lot of this year’s success to. his dedication to a gruelling
fitness and conditioning regime under the guidance of his coach
Miles Maclagan and trainers, Matt Little, Jezz Green and Andrew
Ireland.

The proceeds of the event go to aid local childrenisi charities such
as The Cancer Society, the Sassoon (Bahamas) Foundation for Pedi-
atric Heart Care, The Special Olympics, The Association for the
Physically Disabled and the Mark Knowles Tennis Scholarship
Fund. To date over $300,000 has been distributed to various hae
ties.

Some of the major sponsors are Kerzner International, ‘The alin
istry of Youth & Sports, American Airlines, Bristol Cellars, Everkey
Global Fund, H30, Lombard Odier Darier ‘Hentsch Private Bank &
Trust, Templeton Glgbal Advisors.

There are a few sponsorship opportunities available and interest-
ed parties should contact Vicky Andrews at HYPERLINK "mail-
to:vickyk@batelnet.bs" vickyk@batelnet.bs or cell: 357-9670

Tickets for the exhibition can be purchased at the following out-
lets:

Atlantis Tennis Centre: ‘Nassau Florists, National Tennis Centre,
Gourmet Market at Caves Village, Lyford Cay Tennis Club



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PAGE 18, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

| LOCAL SPORTS fairer





Six Pack Abs outslug Andeus Insurance

THE Masters Softball League opened
over the weekend and played three exciting
games at the Archdeacon William Thomp-
son Softball Park at the Southern Recre-
ation Grounds.

On Saturday, the Six Pack Abs out-
slugged the Andeus Insurance 25-15 before
the William construction Jets routed the
Bamboo Shack Bulls 16-5. Then on Sun-
day, the Nicolette’s Strokers knocked off
__the Miller lite Royals 16-11.

e Here’s a summary of the three games:

Strokers 16, Royals 11: Ronald ‘Big Boy’
Seymour went 3-for-4 with:a home run, dri-
ving in four runs and scoring twice; Brian
Cartwright was also 3-for-4 with a homer,

&

two RBIs and three runs and Everette
‘Abe’ Johnson went 3-for-4 with a homer,
three RBIws and two runs for Nicolette’s.

Clifton Smith got the win over Harold
‘Banker’ Fritzgerald.

Cyril Miller had a perfect 4-for-4 day
with three RBIs and two runs scored for
Miller Lite.

Jets 16, Bulls 5: Lee Rahming had a per-
fect 3-for-3 day with a homer and two
triples, six RBIs and two runs and Brad

” Smith was 2-for-4 with a homer, four RBIs

and three runs for William Construction.

. Danny Stubbs was the winning pitcher ,

and Johnny Armbrister suffered the loss.
Vernon Bowles had a perfect 3-for-3 day

with two runs for Bamboo Shack.

Abs 25, Andeus Insurance 15: Larry
Thompson was 3-for-4 with two RBIs and
three runs; Anthony Richardon 2-for-5 with
two doubles, three RBIs and three runs;
Will Basden 3-for-5 with three RBIs and

three runs and Tony Brown 2-for-5_ with _|.

four RBIs and two runs for the Six Pack.
Joe Demeritte got the win on the mound

and Larry Forbes was tagged with the loss.

Edwin Culmer was 4-for-5 with a dou-
ble, two RBIs and two runs in a losing
effort. .

The league will continue this weekend:

with a double header on Saturday and Sun-
day.

Porky’s Stingrays stage late rally to improve to 4-2

The Stingrays pressured the
punt and came to within once
- score when they brought down
punter Antonio Bullard in the
endzone for the safety, making
the score 12-8.

On the ensuing free kick
Wayde Higgs’ dynamic return set
up the Stingrays in striking posi-
tion.

After the ball passed through a

FROM page 15

Stingrays mounted a long drive
of there-own, as running back «
Sheldon Lynes gashed through
the Destroyers defense for a
series of big gains.

Porky’s began the fourth quar-
ter within scoring range in the
redzone but failed to convert for
the score.as they too turned the

~pall over oh downs after four ~~ Series of Stingrays players, Higgs’

picked up the ball and reversed
direction up the left sideline with
adept blocking and breaking tack-
les on his way to the Destroyers
seven yard line.

Lucien scored two slays later
to give the Stingrays their first

tries.

A stout defensive effort by the
Stingrays front seven and untime-,
ly dropped. balls from the
Destroyers receivers, forced the
Defense Force to punt backed up
against their own endzone.

-squad but this is an ironman

he said, “Our offensive line let
‘me now they were opening up big
holes so rather than dropping
back to pass on that last drive I
knew I just had to put my head
down and they could open up a
hole for me. to drive it in and
score. ”

An elated Stingrays Head
Coach, Lawrence Hepburn, laud-

lead of the change.

Lucien, the third year quarter-
back and former rookie of the
year, said his team refused to give
up despite falling behind early
and being shorthanded.

“We’re used to having a'big

team,” he said, “When it comes
down to it no matter how people
we have. we suit up and we.ready..._.ed-his-team’s-resiltence:
‘to play.” “These players really dug deep

Lucien credited his entire team __ today to pull it out for this game,”
for a spirited second half effort,in. he said, “When we first got out
particular his offensive lineman _ here we only had a few guys. but
who keyed the scoring drive. they came together today to get

“My team just attacked and ___ this win, hats off to the guys.”-
just attacked and we just came The Destroyers fell to 1-5. ..
out strong in that second half,”.



Nadal-less Spain upset Argentina in Davis Cup

\

. MMAR DEL PLATA, Argentina

Spain won its third Davis Cup title without the services of top-ranked Rafael egation zone in a 1-0 victory over the also struggling Blackburn on Sunday,

Fernando Verdasco defeated Jose Acasuso 6-3, 6-7 (3), 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 in front ? while West Ham moved away from danger-with a 1-0-triumph-at Sunderland.”

Nadal, upsetting Argentina 3-1 in the final on Sunday.

of a boisterous Argentine crowd at Islas Malvinas Stadium. Argentina lost at :
home for the first time in 10 years in Davis Cup competition. . ~

Verdasco, replacing David Ferrer in the reverse singles, overcame nine dou- :

ble-faults to beat a shaky Acasuso.in 3 hours, 56 minutes. The 48th-ranked :

Acasuso was a late replacement for the injured Juan Martin del Potro, Argenti- : :

na’s top-ranked player at No. 9.

ries against Australia in the 2000 final and the United States in 2004. Argenti- :
na had reached the final twice, losing to the U.S. in 1981 and Russia in:
2006. After winning match point, Verdasco dropped to the ground in celebration :
~ and was embraced by his teammates. Argentina entered the heavy favorite after :
Nadal withdrew last week because of a knee injury.



Lopez on ‘Saturday. heirs sérved 14 aces, but had 47 unforced, érrors. ..





Despite the support of nearly, 10,000. fans, Acasuso,was: Aot able to:keep up ieee
with Verdasco,.who had played: well in the doubles’ Victory alongside Feliciano



‘Tottenham beat Blackburn to limb out of mire |
a LONDON



Roman Pavlyuchenko’s goal lifted Tottenham out of the Premier League rel-

The ‘Russian striker beat goalkeeper Paul Robinson with a shot from 42
: yards. The victory lifted Spurs to 15th from 19th, taking 13 points in the six
: games since Harry Redknapp took over.
“We have taken 13 points from (a possible) 18, but it’ s lucky we have,” Red-
knapp said.

After eight games without a win, Blackburn slipped to 19th. West Ham end-

i ate ; Mite g A ; a, ; ed arun of seven matches without a victory with a triumph at Sunderland,
Spain won its first Davis Cup title win on the road, adding to home victo- : which has now lost at home for the fourth time in a row. The Black Cats failed

to clear a corner and Valon Behrami’s shot was deflected past goalkeeper. Mar-
: ton Fulop. The Hammers climbed to 13th while Sunderland slipped to 16th.
: Chelsea and Liverpool both squandered chances to move further away in the

: title race on Saturday ‘when, none of the traditional contenders managed to |

i ‘Manchester City.

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Myron realises a dream
FROM page 15

game. (

“I was on such an emotional high that I didn’t feel the cold. I was just
glad to be there with my team-mates. We won so that was fun too. It
was just a great day for me as everybody congratulated me.”

Rolle, who make it a point to come home just about every summer
to spend time with his family, said he’s eagerly looking forward to the
possibility of returning in December, if his schedule doesn’t get too hec-

ic.

His father, Whitney, a former player and coach with the Pros in the
Commonwealth American Football League, said the next six months
will definitely be a whirlwind for his son.

“We are very proud of what he achieved. That Rhodes scholarship
is something that will be with him for the rest of his life,” he pointed out.

“But I think it’s just going to be a stepping stone in terms of the things
that he is doing because Myron has done a lotof stuff, not only i in foot-
ball, but on the academic side and in the community.”

Calling himself‘a talented, but giving person, the senior Rolle said
“he’s very excited about the award, his team-mates are excited, the
school is excited, his family is excited.

“But he’s going to have to make a decision very soon on what he’s
going to do from a professional career to being a Rhodes scholarship
because he wants to be a doctor and he also wants to play in the

NFL. ”

Depending on how the Seminoles finish their season, they could play
ina Bowl game and even in the Orange Bowl in Miami, Florida in Jan-
uary.

On January 20, Rolle is also expected to travel to Washington D.C.
to be a guest at the inauguration for US President-elect Barack Oba-
ma through his involvement in the National Youth Programme for
Medicine.

Additionally, Rolle is “ido expected to begin preparing for the NFL

‘combine where the draft prospects at the RCA Dome in Indianapolis. |

The senior Rolle said at some point soon they are going to have to
sit down and decide, on what is the right course of action his son
should take, whether it’s to continue his educational pursue; at Oxford

~or the NEL -through the-draft.-

But for now; Rolle is Idaking for Wace to playing in the Seminoles’

next game at home in Tallahassee on Saturday when they host Flori- ,

da in a big rivalry.

| Baltimore clinic directors

help young Bahamians
FROM; page 15 eee 3

. they, were invited to come to the Bahamas through Patrick Knowles,

whose son, Ali, has been a part of the programme.

“Patrick has asked us to come down and work with some of these |

kids and those whoare younger so that we can get a foundation going
forward,” he said.

——-We’re-trying to give them:a foundationso that they can move on to

play high school and college football.”

From what he’s seen, (Roswell said there’s definitely a “passion for
the game” and he and Gemler has been pleased with the reception they _
have received from the players.

“I think the base needs to be built year in and year out and you will.

definitely see more players playing college baseball,” he said. ““There’s
a lot of challenge in front of the Bahamian student athletes. -

“But it can be done. The plan just have to be put in place so that the «
players can get the opportunity to do so.’

Knowles, who'came from Grand Bebania to. be a part of the’ pro-- |

gramme, said the niain thing is to get more players exposed thrqugh
Team One Baseball as his son was.



he players go through in the United States,”
ankful that Team One came in to do this ¢
-After he was introduced to Team One Baseball where his son wa

a WE, are ve



“displayed in the showcase, Knowles said he decided to extend thes 3

programme to get more Bahamian players involved.

“This is the first step in putting these guys in,ah environment of what,





“We're trying to get other guys whom they will recommen to com al

to their showcase, rather than us sending everyone,” Knowles said. “So.
we’re happy that ‘they are here to take a look at the players.”

Knowles said the federation and Pony Baseball Bahamas will build
on what transpired this weekend when they host the second of three __
phrases over the weekend of December sc -7 when a Showcase Prospect »

Camp will.take place.

_. A number of University Coaches and Scouts from Major League |

Baseball teams will be in town to conduct the session.

Then on Sunday, December 14, the third anti final session will take

place with a Boarding School Fair/Seminar.

~ Already committed to attend are Southeastern United States (Chris-'
tian School - Arden North Carolina); Darlington School - Rome Geor-
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Rabun, Georgia

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 19





Nag aN wale) NB Ait)

Iraq security pact poses Lau

detainee dilemma for : | S | WALL adil Mackey St - Thompson Blvd
- ] Ma ie ~~ me meme we : , -

{
i

@ By RYAN LUCAS
CAMP CROPPER, Ira



The U.S. military is rushing to build crimi-
nal cases against some 5,000 detainees it
deems dangerous — including suspected mem-
bers of al-Qaida in Iraq — because the pro-
posed security pact with Iraq would end its
right to hold prisoners without charge, accord-
ing to the Associated Press.

The agreement, which is to be voted on by
Iraqi lawmakers Wednesday, is primarily
intended to set a timetable calling for Amer-
ican troops to leave Iraq by the end of 2011.
But it also calls for control of security matters
to shift to Iraqi authorities.

If passed, the deal would mean U.S. troops
could no longer hold people without charge as
they have since the 2003 invasion that ousted
Saddam Hussein. Beginning Jan. 1, all detén-
tions would have to be based on evidence,
and the U.S. would have to prosecute pris-
oners in Iraqi courts or let them go.

"At the end of the day, if there's not enough
. facts to justify a court case, then we'll have to
release," said Brig. Gen. David Quantock,

Authentic Fashion Show
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Pollen demonstration

Lil Dicey Doh Boys Choir

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-70 BOOTHS —



Maya Alleruzzo/AP Photo

ACHILD is embraced by her father, who is held
at the U.S. detention facility at Camp Cropper in

Baghdad, Iraq during a visiting “ on vlOneey,

Nov. 10, 2008.

the commander of the U.S. detention system
in Iraq. The Americans have evidence against
only "a few hundred" of the most dangerous
detainees, Quantock said, leaving open the
possibility that thousands could find them-
selves back on Iraq's streets soon.

“We have a lot of work to do," he said.

Part of the challenge stems from differ-:

ences between the U.S. and Iraqi legal sys-

IVS BETTER IN THE

tems. In the United States, forensic evidence |

is widely used in the courts. Not so in Iraq..

"We've got a number of guys right now
that are covered in TNT (explosive residue).
However, that's not admissible in Iraqi court,"
Quantock said. "What wins the day in Iraqi
courts today is two eyewitness statements or a
confession."

The USS. is training Iraqi forensic specialists
and pushing to make such evidence more
acceptable in court. Iraqi judges are slowly
bending, but it is expected to take time before
forensic evidence wins wide approval. .

The transition comes amid a marked
improvement in security that has boosted the
confidence of Iraq's government and allowed
security-based detention to give way to a civil-
ian justice system. It would also mark a major
step toward shutting down a detention sys-
tem that was tainted by the scandal at Abu
Ghraib prison outside Baghdad, where U.S.
guards abused detainees. US. forces are hold-
ing around 16,500 detainees in all. The largest
facility, with some 12,900 prisoners, is at Camp
Bucca near the city of Basra, some 340 miles
southea.t of Baghdad.

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T___INTERNATIONALNEWS
Iraqi Cabinet campaigns

for security pact with US

@ By HAMZA HENDAWI
Associated Press Writer

BAGHDAD (AP)
Pirates, foreign attacks, a plum-
meting economy. Iraqi govern-
ment ministers are cataloguing
warnings about the future if
lawmakers reject the proposed
security pact with the US.

It's all part of a campaign by
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki
to rally support for the agree-
ment going into parliament's
crucial vote Wednesday on the
deal that would keep American
troops in Iraq through 2011.

On Sunday, Finance Minis-
ter Bayan Jabr sought to reas-
sure lawmakers who argued the
pact would remove.UN protec-
tion for Iraq's assets, opening
the way for claimants armed
with court rulings to demand
billions of dollars in compensa-
tion for Iraqi actions during
Saddam Hussein's 23-year rule.

He said Iraq would seek
Washington's help to secure a
new, "limited" UN resolution
to protect the $60 billion-plus
that Iraq has in two separate,
US-based funds. The assets are
now shielded by a Security
Council resolution that expires

‘December 31 and by a Presi-

dent George W Bush executive

order that expires in May.:
Revenues from Iraq's oil and

natural gas exports, which

_ account for at least 90 per cent

of the country's income, are
held in one of the two accounts,
the Development Fund for Iraq
set up in 2003. It has about $20
billion, from which the Iraqi

‘government withdraws as

required. The Iraqi central
bank's foreign reserves, more
than $40 billion, are in the oth-
er fund. i

Joining in al-Maliki's offen-
sive, Planning Minister Ali
Baban warned Sunday that
security will deteriorate if the
agreement does not pass, keep-
ing investors away and setting
back reconstruction efforts.
"That will have a negative
impact on economic growth
tates," he said.

On Saturday, Defense Min-

e



A CHILD holds a poster of Iraqi
Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki dur-
ing a demonstration in support of a
US-Iraqi security pact in pea
Baghdad, oe

(AP Photo: Khalid Mohammed)

ister Abdul-Qader al-Obeidi
warned that Iraq could risk
internal unrest and foreign
attacks as well as piracy target-
ing its oil exports in the Persian
Gulf if US forces abruptly
pulled out from Iraq.

The prime minister took the

lead last week in marketing the
deal. He went on national tele-
vision and addressed a news
conference to campaign for the
agreement and against the
renewal of the UN mandate
that currently governs the pres-
ence of US forces in Iraq.

The pact was less than ideal,
he said, but it provides a clear
and firm timeline for-the with-
drawal of US troops — from
cities by next June 30 and the
entire country by January 1,
2012 — and is a "solid prelude"
to the restoration of Iraq's full
sovereignty.

Al-Maliki had hoped parlia-
ment would pass the agreement
by consensus, but a six-hour
debate in the legislature Satur-
day suggested that goal might
be beyond reach.

Many of the lawmakers who
spoke berated the government
for not keeping them informed
during months of négotiations
that produced the pact.

Others said the deal infringes
on Iraq's sovereignty and lacks
a firm US commitment to come



to Iraq's rescue in the case of a .
foreign threat. Some said it
made no sense to adopt an
agreement with a US. adminis-
tration with less than two
months left in office.

Many Iraqis see the pact as
prolonging what they consider a
US occupation, even if some
believe that is necessary to help
Iraq's nascent security forces
fight an insurgency that has suf-
fered severe setbacks but still
carries out regular attacks.

Besides a timeline for US
withdrawal, the agreement pro-
vides for Iraqi oversight of the
operations and movements of
American troops and gives
Iraqis limited jurisdiction over
US soldiers and civilian Penta-
gon employees in cases of seri-
ous crimes committed while off-
base and off duty. It also bars
US forces from using Iraqi ter-
ritory to attack neighboring
nations.

Al-Maliki could muster just
over 140 votes if the pact gets
the support of lawmakers from
the main Shiite and Kurdish
blocs, his main coalition part-
ners. But for a wide margin of
victory, he needs the votes of
the 44 lawmakers from the
largest Sunni Arab bloc that is
also a coalition partner but
whose support for the deal is
uncertain.

A respectable number of
Sunni votes in favor of the
agreement would satisfy al-
Maliki and, just as important-

‘ly, Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sis-

tani, the country's most influ-
ential Shiite critic who has indi-
cated the pact will be viable
only if it is backed by a large
number of lawmakers. —
Al-Sistani enjoys such enor-
mous support among Iraq's -Shi-
ite majority that he could sink
the deal by speaking publicly
against it or stating his dissatis-
faction over the margin of pas-
sage. It's the latter that has al-

~ Maliki's Cabinet ministers talk-

ing up the agreement.

e Associated Press writer Qas-
sim Abdul-Zahra contributed to
this report.

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INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Meltdown |

leaves ghost
-resorts—

Hi By DANICA COTO
Associa.ed Press Writer

PUNTA CANA, Dominican
Republic (AP) — The ocean
glows a milky turquoise. Tiny

waves lap at the powder-beige ©

sand, in no rush to reach the
line of postcard-perfect palm
trees.

Hundreds of luxury villas are
positioned to take in the view,
but there are no guests. There
are no roofs either; neatly tied
bundles of red tiles are stacked
outside. The wind slams doors
and rustles the yellowed news-
paper taped to the windows.

The paralyzed work scene at
the Cap Cana resort, a devel-
opment including four luxury
hotels, three golf courses and a
mega-yacht marina, is a victim
of the ‘global financial crisis that
has hit the Caribbean's tourism
industry especially hard.

Cap Cana fired 500 workers
last month after Lehman Broth-
ers declared bankruptcy and a
$250 million loan fell through.
Talks to re-negotiate a $100 mil-
lion short-term loan collapsed
last week, and more layoffs are
expected.

“Our project has been affect-
ed by the economic tsunami
that has paralyzed the global
financial markets," said Cap
Cana President Ricardo
Hazoury.

Construction is also paralyzed
at the Ritz-Carlton Molasses

. Reef resort in secluded West
Caicos, where 60 Chinese work-
ers revolted last month to
demand back wages. About 160
workers have been sent home
to China, and it's unclear when
construction will resume at the
hotel, marina and condomini-
um project, which is three-quar-
ters complete. :

This month, the sprawling

‘Atlantis resort in the Bahamas ~~

laid off about 800 workers, cit-
* ing low occupancy rates. Baha
Mar Resorts Ltd. laid off about
40 employees at its Sheraton
Resort in the Bahamas and 40

more at the Wyndham Nassau |
Resort. The Bahamas Hotel

Catering and Allied Workers
Union has called a demonstra-
tion Thursday to demand gov-
ernment aid.

"T've been in the business 38

years. I have seen the impact of
the Gulf War. I have seen the
recession of the '80s. Certainly

September 11," said Robert

Sands, senior-vice president of
external affairs at Baha Mar.
"But nothing has been of a
global nature, which makes the
current financial situation we're
in much more worrisome."

In Puerto Rico, the Caribe

Hilton laid off more than 50.

people this month because of
rising costs and. sluggish occu-
pancy rates. The last time the
hotel had to lay off workers was
after the September 11 attacks,
General Manager Jose Campo
said:

"What worries me is that this
will last longer," he said. "We
are mounting an aggressive
campaign, but the situation is
what it is." :

Even the normally busy holi-
day season is expected to be rel-
atively quiet.

"There is space available for
the. holiday season and
beyond," said Alec Sanguinetti,
CEO of the Caribbean Hotel
& Tourism Association. "This is



IN THIS October 16, 2008 file photo, the paralyzed construction of the Ritz-
Carlton Molasses Resort on the small undeveloped island of West Caicos
in the Turks and Caicos Islands...

often a time when hotels are
sold out and vacationers are

looking for any place that has.

availability. "

Workers are spending their
days off looking for jobs out-
side the tourism industry. Oth-
ers have already been sent
home.

Victor Felipe Feliz, 24, has
been feeding his two children
on store credit since he lost his
construction job at Cap Cana
last month.

"I need to work so I can buy
Pampers, so I can buy food,"
he said. "It has been a couple of
months since I bought clothes. I
can't afford anything."

Cap Cana plans to fire anoth-
er 1,000 workers in the coming
months, according to a compa-
ny official who spoke only on
condition of anonymity because

he wasn't authorized to release.

the information. But Cap Cana
President Ricardo Hazoury said
he expects the project to go for-
ward as the company out-
sources certain services.

The 50-square-mile (130-
square-kilometer) development
is nestled in the Dominican
Republic's easternmost point

amid lush jungle. Its develop-

ers include Deutsche Bank, the
Trump Organization and the
Ritz Carlton Hotel Company:
Cap Cana runs‘more like a
city than a private development.
It generates its own power and
water and has hundreds of villas
and condominiums — even a
school. Some of the villas and

‘hotels are inhabited, but most
remain under construction.

"We used to have a lot of
workers — brick layers,

plumbers, electricians," said

Wilkin Cuevamato, who was
laid off but later found work at
another Cap Cana property.
"The majority have left and
gone home."

Tourists willing to make last-
minute travel arrangements will
find some real bargains as hotels
react to the soft period, accord-
ing to Scott Berman, a tourism
adviser for Pricewaterhouse
Coopers in Miami.

"If you're flexible and have

‘time on your hands, you're

going to,find some favorable
deals this winter," he said.

But cheaper rooms are often
offset by expensive airfare,
according to Renaldo Inesta,
division manager for AAA in
Puerto Rico. American Air-
lines, the main carrier to the
island, has cut back flights by
44 per cent, though other air-
lines are stepping in to reduce
the overall drop to 14 per cent.

Beyond the holiday season,
the picture is bleak. Getting

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money to finance new projects
will be difficult amid the credit
squeeze. A new UN report pre-
dicts access to external financing
for the region will be limited,
and what is available will come
with high interest rates.

But some remain optimistic.
In September, even as the finan-
cial crisis was gathering steam,
Hilton Hotels Corp. announced
plans to build 17 hotels in the
Caribbean, adding to the 13 it
already has.

"We have analyzed the
region," said Gregory Rockett,
who is overseeing the expan-
sion. "We are very confident
that in the next five years we
can do these numbers."

And Sanguinetti points out
that for North Americans, the
Caribbean remains a quick and
attractive getaway.

"We provide a relaxing
escape from the tensions that
people are facing at work dur-
ing this economic crisis," he
said. "We expect that, pent-up
demand will be released."



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TOURISTS sunbathe in the Bahia
Tortuga Resort in Punta Cana,
Dominican Republic. The global
financial crisis has halted work
on this multimillion dollar project
overlooking a turquoise sea,
turning it into a ghost resort. It is
among growing signs that the
Caribbean is headed for tough
times as construction workers
and resort employees are laid
off by the hundreds and antici-
pated peak season bookings are
at a trickle.

(AP Photo: Kena Betancur)












































THE TRIBUNE



PAGE 24, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

INTERNATIONAL NEWS



Strategies for booking hotels on a budget

@ By BETH J HARPAZ
AP Travel Editor

NEW YORK (AP) — When
the economy was booming,
many hotel companies began
building new properties. Some
of those are opening now,
resulting in a 2.5 per cent
increase in hotel room supply

this year, just as demand is.

dropping by around one per
cent or more, according to Jan
Freitag of Smith Travel
Research.

"We're going to see a sub-
stantial decline in occupancy
this year," agreed Bjorn Han-
son, an associate professbr of
hospitality and tourism at New
York University's Tisch Cen-
ter.

Excess supply means oppor-
tunities for consumers. Here are
some strategies for booking
hotels on a budget.

BASICS: It's generally cheap-
er to stay in major cities on
weekends, when there are few-
er business travelers, and in
resort areas on weekdays and
offseason, when there are fewer
tourists.

Visitors to urban centers may
save by booking outside main
tourist areas. For San Diego,
for example, "you could stay in
Carlsbad or even up as far as
Oceanside," said Joe McIner-
ney, CEO of the American

» Hotel & Lodging Association.

But research the cost and time
of commuting in each day, to
make sure the tradeoff is worth

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THIS UNDATED photo released by Atlantis, Paradise Island shows the Atlantis r

Westchester might be cheaper
than Manhattan, but your sav-

‘ings might be offset by daily

train and cab fare or tolls and
parking.

You'll also pay less outside
of peak holiday time, and some
new hotels charge lower intro-
ductory rates. Canyon Ranch's
new destination spa.in Miami

Beach has nightly starting prices:

at $200 through December 3.
Rates go up December 4-23,
starting at $650 a night, and
December 24-January 1, to
$1,100 a night.

Places hard-hit by the down-
turn may also offer deals. The
Bahamas’ Atlantis mega-resort,
with nearly 3,000 rooms on Par-
adise Island, recently laid off
800 workers. It's now offering a
three-night package starting at
$299 a person, including two
sessions interacting with dol-
phins (normally $110 each), and
$99 airfare each way on JetBlue
from New-York, $89 from
Boston (book by December 18,
offer ends December 25,
http://www.atlantis.com, black-
outs apply). In addition, the
Nassau Paradise Island Promo-
tion Board is offering a $250
rebate on air-inclusive packages
(three-to-six night stays, book
through November 30, for trav-
el completed by February 28).
An Atlantis package offered
this time last year started at low-
er rates of $259 a person, but
did not include dolphins, air-
fare discounts or rebates.

REWARDS

PROGRAMMES

Most hotel chains have loy-
alty or frequent guest pro-

- grammes that allow you to use

points for free nights. "Every
traveler should be a member of
every frequent guest pro-
gramme," said Hanson. Joining
usually costs nothing; points
accumulate. and often don't
expire; and most hotel chains
now have.no blackout dates for
using points to book rooms.
Many hotel chains offer
cobranded credit cards with
enough bonus points for a free
night. Sign up for a new Mar-
riott Visa card and get a certifi-
cate for one free night's stay,
plus 25,000 bonus points, which
are enough for another night's
stay at Marriotts in many mar-
kets, including January in’ Mia-
mi, where you can go to the
beach, or Salt Lake City, where
you can ski. If you travel with a

spouse or friend, that person

can sign up for his or her own
card and get points for free
nights as well.

Research how fast points
accumulate before signing up.
Different chains have different
systems. With Hilton, you get



S
esort in the Bahamas...

up to 20,000 bonus points for
signing up for Hilton HHonors
Platinum Credit Card from
American Express (10,000
points for your first purchase
with the card, 2,500 points for

each of your first four stays at

Hilton Family hotels). Card-
holders can also earn five points
for every dollar spent at Hilton
Family hotels, grocery stores,
drugstores, gas stations, restau-
rants and on US postal services
and wireless phone bills.

For. other purchases, Hilton
cobrand card holders earn three
points per dollar. In addition,
the programme has an option
where you earn 15 points for
every dollar you spend at Hilton
Family hotels, as long as you
choose hotel-stay points as your
sole reward. Hilton also has an
"earnings mall" where you can
earn extra points for shopping
at various retailers like iTunes.

For overviews of what each
hotel credit card offers and how
many dollars you must spend
to accumulate more points,
check out http://www.credit-
cards.com/travel-rewards.php.

But be aware that when you
apply for new credit cards, "it
impacts your credit card rating,"
said Gail Cunningham, spokes-
woman for the National: Foun-
dation for Credit Counseling.
For example, applying for four
or five hotel credit cards to get
several free nights with signup
bonus points "can signal to
lenders that you're desperate
for credit, that you're just get-
ting credit everywhere you

can," Cunningham said. That::

can hurt you if you're looking to
get approved for a loan.
Others who should avoid
rewards credit cards, Cunning-
ham says, are those tempted by

new lines of credit to buy things .

they can't afford; and those who
carry balances from month to
month. Don't let the value of
your rewards get wiped out by
interest. Rewards credit cards,
Cunningham added, are only
for those "with the most pris-
tine of credit ratings."

BOOKING ©

McInerney of AH&LA says
your first stop should be the
hotel's own Web site. "That's

' where you're going to get the

best price," he said.

In addition, said Hanson, |

“most brands have a guarantee
that.if you find a lower rate,
they'll match it or pay the dif-





ference, or you can stay for
free."

- Ask for discounts for AAA
membership, military service or
corporate rates.

Alternatively, figure out how
much you want to pay, the type

‘of hotel you'd like to stay in,

and bid for a room through a
booking site like Priceline.com.
You won't know which hotel
you're staying at until after
you've paid; but you can speci-
fy the category of hotel using
the star-ratings system.

Note that star ratings are
inconsistent. A four-star hotel
on one site might only be a
three-star hotel on another.
Priceline has a "Winning Bids"
advice feature that eliminates
some of the guesswork by pro-
viding examples of brands for
each star rating along with win-
ning bids paid in different mar-
kets. Hotels accept the dis-
counted bids because they'd
rather fill rooms at lower prices
than leave them empty. Price-
line says its customers pay 46-48
per cent less than if they booked
through the hotels directly.

Another strategy: See what
rates are offered at specific
hotels online, "then call the
hotel directly" and ask if there's
a lower rate, Hanson said. "A
third of the time there will be."

"When there's an empty
room, it's just losing money.
Any amount of money you pay
for that room is found money,"
agreed Tim Zagat, who has just
published "Top US Hotels,
Resorts & Spas 2009."

Zagat encourages consumers
to negotiate hard. "Ask for
package rates, ask for the lowest
rate, ask for an upgrade. There
are all kinds of deals out there.
Not to ask is to look stupid,"
he said.

Call the hotel at its local
phone number, not the chain's
800 number. "The branded
hotel company has limits on
what it can do, but the individ-
ual owner can do anything he
feels like," Zagat said.

Once you make a reservation,
check to see if prices drop, then
rebook. "If the booking pace is
slower than forecast, hotels
switch to a lower rate sched-
ule," Hanson said. Sy
“Look for free Internet service
and'free breakfast; avoid rip-
off goodies in the mini-bar, and
use your cell:so you don't get
charged for the hotel room
phone.

Despite the economy, Freitag
of Smith Travel says he does-
n't think hotel prices will drop -
the way they did after Sept.
11th. But he does think con-
sumers can expect better value
for what they pay — better

‘views, free Internet, free access

to the health club, pay for two
nights and get a third free.

"The takeaway for the con-
sumer: Don't be shy about ask-
ing for those things," Freitag
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THE TRIBUNE

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 25



Children dying in Haiti,



rs

victims of food crisis

lm By JONATHAN M KATZ
Associated Press Writer

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti
(AP) — The five-year-old
teetered on broomstick legs —
he weighed less than 20 pounds,
even after days of drinking
enriched milk. Nearby, a four-
year-old girl hung from a strap
attached to a scale, her wide
eyes lifeless; her emaciated arms
dangling weakly.

In pockets of Haiti accessible
only by donkey or foot, chil-
dren are dying of malnutrition
— their already meager food
_ supply cut by a series of devas-

tating storms that destroyed
crops, wiped out livestock and
sent food prices spiraling.

At least 26 severely malnour-
ished children have died in the
past four weeks in the remote
region of Baie d'Orange in
Haiti's southeast, aid workers
said Thursday, and there are
fears the toll will rise much

_ higher if help does not come
quickly to the impoverished
Caribbean nation. i

Another 65 severely mal-

nourished children are being
’ treated in makeshift tent clin-
ics in the mountainous area, or

at hospitals where they were .

evacuated in Port-au-Prince and
elsewhere, said Max Cosci, who
heads the Belgian contingent of
Doctors Without Borders in
Haiti.

One evacuee, a seven-year-
old girl, died while being treat-
ed, Cosci said, adding: "The sit-

_uation is extremely, extremely
fragile and dangerous."

At a makeshift malnutrition
ward at a Doctors Without Bor-

ders hospital in the capital, 10
emaciated children were under
emergency care Thursday, their
stomachs swollen and hair fad-
ed by pigmentation loss caused
by malnutrition. Several had the
puffy faces typical of kwash-
iorkor, a protein-deficiency dis-
order.
ouveBive-year-old Mackenson
»;Duclair, his ribs protruding and
his legs. little more than skin
stretched over bones, weighed
in at 19.8 pounds, even after
days of drinking milk enriched
with potassium and salt. Doc-
tors said he needed to gain
another five pounds before he
could go home.

Dangling from a scale mount-
ed from the ceiling, four-year-
old Venecia Lonis looked as
limp as a rag doll as doctors
weighed her, her huge brown
eyes expressionless, her hair
_tied with bright yellow bows.

Mackenson's grandmother,
who has raised him since his
mother died, said she barely has
a can of corn grits to feed her-
self, the boy and her eight-year-
old granddaughter each day.

"These things did not happen
when I was growing up," 72-
year-old Ticouloute Fortune
said.

Rural families already strug-
gling with soaring food prices
in Haiti, the Western Hemi-
sphere's poorest country, lost
their safety nets when fields

were destroyed and livestock.

wiped out by the storms, which
killed nearly 800 people and
caused $1 billion worth of dam-
age in August and September.

UN World Food Programme
country director Myrta Kaulard
said she fears more deaths from
malnutrition in other isolated
parts of Haiti, and search and
medical teams were fanning out
in the northwest and along the
southwestern peninsula to

check.
The World Food Program

thas sent more than 30 tons of

food aid — enough to feed
5,800 people for two weeks —
into the remote southeastern
region since September, and
other groups funded by the U.S.
Agency for International Devel-

opment have sent food as well, |

she said.

But the steep, narrow paths:

and poor visibility make it dif-
ficult to deliver the food to the
mountain communities where
hunger is worsening. In one
case, a WFP truck flipped over
while struggling up a hill and
slid into a ravine, killing a an aid
worker.

"Theres always a bottleneck:
The same situation that the peo-
ple are facing is the same situa-
tion we're also facing," Kaulard
told The Associated Press
Thursday.

Haiti in general ait the
mountain villages in particular
have long suffered from chron-

_ic hunger. Child malnutrition

rates have been high for years
— the WFP reported in 2007
that nearly a quarter of children









1

were chronically malnourished.
: Remote.rural areas in partic-

_ ular grow only enough staples

to feed themselves less than sev-
en months out of the year,
Kaulard said.

But throughout the year, aid
workers and officials have been
seeing hunger get more severe,
and now people who live in the
mountains and aid groups who
are working there say the situa-
tion is worse than it has been
in the past.

This year, for instance, Haiti's

‘agriculture ministry estimates

60 per cent of the harvest was
lost. in the storms nationwide.
Land quality is already poor
and farmers lost seeds for next
year when the storms hit,
Kaulard said. -

_ Effects.of the storms vary
widely from village to’ village
and even family to family. In

some places, food supplies seem

intact. In others, Doctors With-
out Borders has found rates of
severe malnutrition as high as
five per cent.

Aid shortages may soon com-
pound the problem. Donor
countries have funded only a
third of the UN's $105 million
aid appeal for Haiti following
the storms, and resources could
tun out in January, Kaulard
said.

At the hospital Thursday,
Enock Augustin sat beside the
bed where his five-year-old
daughter Bertha was sleeping:
The fragile-looking child was
evacuated by helicopter
November 8 with vomiting and
diarrhea. When she arrived,



S|
FOUR-YEAR-OLD Venecia Lonis, who suffers from malnutrition, is
weighed at the Doctors Without Borders hospital in Port-au-Prince...



THREE-YEAR-OLD Pierre Davidson, who suffers from
malnutrition, lies on a bed at the Doctors Without
Borders hospital’in Port-au-Prince. Aid workers fear
hunger is worsening in rural Haiti after at least 26
children died of conditions exacerbated by a lack: of
nutrition, raising concerns that a grave food crisis
may be brewing colton Te four devastatiag tropical

storms...

nearly a quarter of her body

‘weight was due to fluid reten-

tion, a‘sign of severe protein









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The swelling gradually reced-

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enriched milk and-treated with
antibiotics and anti-worm fned-
icine; she shrank to just 21
pounds.

She has since gained about

two pounds but can't go home’

until she reaches 26 pounds;
doctors said.

For months, the Anonetig

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"Every time a hurricane came

. through, it killed our animals
and plants,"
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said Augustin, a

washed out, markets became
unreachable and "the price of
everything went sky high."

The entire family subsisted
on two cups of corn grits, and .
Bertha began shrinking —- and
then swelling — before his eyes.

"She was really bad. We put
her in the helicopter and they
brought her here," Augustin
said. "I-hope the government
will hear about us and bring
more support."

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Pern ixg

THE TRIBUNE

























let Charlie the

“Bahamian Puppet and

his sidekick Derek put
some smiles on your

kids’s faces.

Bring | your children to the
MeV Hour at McDonald's in’
Oakes Field every Thursday
from 3:30pm to 4:30pm during the
month of November 2008..

Enjoy Great Food, Prizes and Lots of Fun.

i'm lovin’ it


THE TRIBUNE : MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 27









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China builds economic ties with Cuba

@ By WILL WEISSERT
Associated Press Writer

HAVANA (AP) — China’s president signed
trade deals with communist ally Cuba and agreed
to help modernize its ports and hospitals, part
of a Latin America trip on which Chinese busi-
nessmen have been snapping up raw materials.

Taking the long view at a time of financial cri-
sis, China is investing heavily in commodity-pro-
ducing countries, and Cuba is no exception. More
than a dozen deals agreed to by President Hu
Jintao included purchases of Cuban nickel and
sugar, along with pledges to send food and build-
ing materials to help the Caribbean nation recov-
er from three major hurricanes.

Hu signed off on a second, $70 million phase of
$350 million in Chinese credit to renovate Cuban
hospitals. China also committed to help reno-
vate Cuba's crucial, but aging, ports.

It was unclear how many of the deals were on
credit. Havana has already borrowed extensively
from Beijing — loans it might have trouble repay-
ing as it recovers from Hurricanes Gustav, Ike and
Paloma, all of which hit Cuba this year.

Hu thanked Cuba for sending doctors to China
after last year’s devastating earthquake, and for
educational programmes on the island attended
by about 2,000 Chinese, including medical stu-
dents.

China's president also met with ailing former
President Fidel Castro. Cuba released a photo
of the pair shaking hands and chatting. Hu wore
a business suit and the former Cuban president
had on exercise clothing that has become his
standard uniform since undergoing emergency
intestinal surgery and disappearing from public
view in July 2006.

Cuban authorities provided no further details,
but China's official Xinhua News Agency said
the two held a long discussion.

"I see in person that you have recovered and
have been energetic, so I feel very pleased," Xin-
hua reported Hu told Castro.

Castro replied: "We are old friends. I am hap-
py to see that you are as energetic as when I met
you last time."

Hu met with Castro during his first visit to
Cuba in 2004. The 82-year-old has an undisclosed.
illness and brother Raul Castro, five years his
junior, formally succeeded him as president in
February.

Accompanying Hu on a visit to a school for
Chinese students on Tuesday, Raul Castro sang
snippets of a song about China and Mao Zedong
he said he learned while traveling the world in
1953. At first, hundreds of students gathered in an

‘auditorium seemed confused, but they soon sang

along, clapping in time.

"Even though the physical distance that sepa-
rates China and Cuba is great, friendship between
both people goes back a long way," Hu said.

Cuba depended heavily on Soviet largesse and
turned a cold shoulder to China during the Cold
War's Sino-Soviet split. But ties warmed after
the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, and
Cuba now has no problem dealing with both Bei-
jing and Moscow...

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CHINA’S President Hu Jintao (left) waves as Cuba's
President Raul Castro walks with him during Jintao's
departure from the airport in Havana.

(AP Photo: Ismael Francisco)

China is Cuba's No. 2 trading partner after
Venezuela, where socialist President Hugo
Chavez provides nearly 100,000 barrels of oil a
day to the island at favourable prices.

The ties have brought a tangible benefit to res-
idents of the’ Cuban capital, where more than
3,000 shiny new Yutong buses replaced smoke-
belching, Soviet era buses.

But Hu's visit poses something of an ideologi-
cal challenge, since some Cubans speculated that
Raul Castro might follow a Chinese model of
reform after becoming president in February.
China transformed its economy three decades
ago by embracing market reforms even as its
Communist Party maintained strict political con-
trol.

Cuba's communist government, however, still
controls well over 90 per cent of the economy
and shows no sign of easing its grip on political or
economic matters, even as’ Raul Castro has

expanded foreign trade 39 per cent since becom-

ing president and signed a major offshore oil
exploration deal with Brazil.

On the eve of Hu's visit, the Communist Party
newspaper Granma praised China's reforms as
having "sparked a gigantic investment process
that brought quick results." But it also criticized .
"the evils of such an accelerated spiral: unequal

distribution of the country's income, a marked dif-

ference between city and country, and the érosion
of the environment."

Hu brought a large delegation of Chinese busi-
nessmen who have busily pursued deals despite
the global financial crisis, continuing a trend that
has seen China's trade with Latin America j jump
from to $103 billion last year from $10 billion in
2000.

Kirby Jones, president of the Washington-based
US-Cuba Trade Association, said Hu's stop in
Cuba is more about business than ideology. Jones;
whose organisation opposes the US trade embar-
go against Cuba, said Cuba is eagerly pursuing
deals with other countries.

Noting that Russian President Dmitry
Medvedev visits next week, he said Russia and
China are "perfect examples of the rest of the
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12m poultry
farm project
‘best hope’ in

North Andros

W By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

» A.PROPOSED $12. million
poultry farm project for North
Andros, which could employ
between 30-50 persons, is
emerging as the best short-term
hope for reviving the area’s
moribund economy, with a deal
for new equity investment in
the $250 million Chub Cay pro-
ject still not completed.

Vincent Peet; the PLP MP
for North Andros and the Berry
Islands, told Tribune Business
that the virtual standstill at
Chub Cay, where. only a “skele-
ton crew” now remained, had
made a “devastating impact” on
his constituency’s economy,
where unemployment was now
“very high — in the double digits,
certainly”.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra- |

ham had earlier this year told
Tribune Business that the three
investors behind the Chub Cay
project had contacted him to
inform him they had found a

new equity partner, who would
inject the capital needed to take .

the development forward.

However, Mr Peet indicated
there had been little progress
since then, and although the
deal to bring the still-unnamed
equity partner on board
remains on the table, it has not
been sealed given the global
economic turmoil.

Now, with Chub Cay likely
to remain in ‘cold storage’ for

-the-short-term:at:least;-rorth

Andros appears to be pinning
its hopes on a venture much
closer to its farming roots. |
“We are pretty close, I
believe, to cementing.a poultry
operation in north Andros,” Mr
Peet told Tribune Business, “It
was approved earlier in the
year, and we’re now pretty close
to moving that to the next level,

which will create some eco- °

nomic activity
Andros.”
The former minister of finan-

in ‘north

cial services and investments’

said the proposed poultry farm
was owned by a consortium of
Canadian investors, along with
an American “who haa:long
association with the Bahamas”.

“We’re hoping it can be -

raised to the point where they
can start to import items, equip-
ment and the rest, if not before
Christmas then early in the New
Year, so that it will create at
least some activity,” Mr Peet
told Tribune Business.

“We’ve been making grad-
ual, incremental moves to bring

SEE page 7B

GCE

eras resort project
‘remains on the table’

(

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

proposed mega resort
project for eastern
Grand Bahama,
which would involve a $2.2 bil-
lion investment in its first phase
alone, remains ‘on the table’,

. Tribune Business has been told,

with the main resort and casino
partners still willing to be

involved despite the global eco-

nomic turmoil.

The Bahamas Golden Beach
Development Company project,
which is understood to be ear-
marked for a site east of Pelican
Point in eastern Grand

Bahama, and. involve a four
hotel/four casino facility, was
said by sources to have over-
come the Government’s initial
reluctance to give the go-ahead
due to the amount of Crown
Land required. .

The. developers had initially
sought a site covering some
2,000 acres of Crown Land in

eastern Grand Bahama, a posi-

tion that contrasted totally with
the one taken up by the gov-
erning FNM party prior to its
May 2007 election, which want-
ed to prevent sizeable Crown
acreage being taken up by such
projertss

However, Tribune Business

was told that Bahamas. Golden
Beach Development Company
appeared to have surmounted
that particular obstacle, at least
for the moment, by reducing
the amount of Crown Land
sought from over 2,000 acres to
slightly more than 1,000 acres.
In addition, it had earlier this
year shown the Government
that there was no other suitable

‘site for its project in eastern

Grand Bahama.
Bahamas Golden Beach

Development Company ‘has.

since been, conducting environ-
mental studies and test borings
on the proposed development
site, Tribune Business has been

told, and has adjusted its plans
after discovering a fresh water
lense some 50 feet below the
surface. ,

As a result, sources suggested

‘ the developers had decided to

move the proposed marina and

its entrance some 2,000 feet fur-

ther down the beach. In addi-
tion, the marina’s sides will
lined by specialist materials
designed to prevent the sea’s
salt water from contaminating

the lense.

Furthermore, Tribune Busi-
ness has been told that the
developers’ main partners, Fox-

SEE page 4B



500 work TTT mee

--'that the Department of Immigratidn*wasâ„¢*

‘cessor’s suggestion that the



@ By CARA BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business Reporter | :

THE Department of Immigration is pro-
cessing an average of 500 work permit appli- -

cations per. week, Tribune Business has
been told, with the minister responsible
saying it was “unacceptable” for some appli-
cations to take eight to nine months.
Branville McCartney, minister of state.
for immigration, said: “At the moment, we.

are processing an average of 500 work f per-,

mits each week. That figure is for new appli-
cations and for those that need to be
renewed. —

“Some of these applications were, sub-

mitted eight to nine months ago, and it is.

unacceptable to have businesses waiting
for that long.”
Still, Mr McCartney expressed pleasure

making significant inroads into processing
Business
subsidies

‘not fiscally
prudent’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE minister of state for:
finance has slammed his prede-

Government should effectively
subsidise major Bahamian busi-
nesses to prevent worker lay-
offs, describing the plan as not
“fiscally prudent” and poten-
tially “an enormous drain on
the Treasury”.

Zhivargo Laing, responding
to James Smith’s suggestion that.
the Government pay subven- °
tions to key businesses to ensure
unemployment was minimized,
said implementing such a
scheme was fraught with com-
plications and likely to place an
unsustainable burden on the
Bahamian taxpayer.

- Among the issues that would
have to be resolved, Mr Laing
said, were what kind of subven-
tion or subsidy to use, how long
it would be given for, “how do
you justify it in the circum-
stances for any business”, which
businesses should receive a sub-
sidy, and how the whole process
could be monitored.

“When a big business lays- -off
500 people, small and medium-
sized businesses are also impact-
ed by that decision,” Mr Laing
said. “Say if five small and
medium-sized businesses, were
to each lay-off 100 persons each
as a result, making another 500
persons, yet the subvention was
only given to the bigger busi-
ness. Why do you do it for the

SEE page 3B

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“week tO “cut
work permit applications.

work permits in a
timely manner.

.He said that recent-
ly the Department
created a special
internal division,
whose. sole purpose
will be to focus on'the
work permit applica-
tions coming out, of
_ the country’ s two
main ‘industries -
- tourism and financial services.

“Since that started,\we have seen a Sent

NV Or Tatas ae

turnaround in the work permits for those

areas and gotten great feedback,’ ” the min-
ister said.

Since Mr ‘McCartney ‘assumed’ his nose i

at the beginning of the summer, he said he
has met with the Immigration Board'e a
are the Hates Backloe



wwe E
EASY
CONVENIENT











step

_Mr McCartney said he remained: com-:
mitted to ensuring that:each work permit «

application was processed in a timely man-
ner once there were no specific challenges
in, individual cases - namely three to four
weeks for first time applications, and two to
three weeks for those that need to be
renewed. .

He added that the Immigration. Depart

ment was also working to improve ‘the

process for spousal permits and. permanent
_. Tesidency, approvals as well.
Among other improvements on theagen-

da for the Department, he said, was a dras-

tic improvement in the telephone system. _

Mr McCartney said that at the moment,

calling into the Department was a: night i



mare that needed to bé addressed.

He said he would like persons to be able
.to, call. into the Department and get, an
sta atie onthe peti

upde ate”

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Corporation
promises ‘no
complacency’
on oil price
drop

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
‘Tribune Business Editor _

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation (BEC) will “not
become complacent” in its
search for renewable energy
suppliers, even though the fuel
surcharge component on power
bills is likely to fall to $0.17 per

‘kilowatt hour for December.’

and “lower than $0.15” for Jan-
uary.

Kevin Basden, BEC’s gener-
al manager, told Tribune Busi-
ness that the Corporation ‘had
reduced:the number of poten-
tial renewable energy suppliers
from the 30 bids that responded
to its request for proposal
(RFP) to around 15, a 50 per
cent cut.

With the pre-qualifying phase
now over, Mr Basden said BEC
and its renewable energy com-

, Mittee were preparing for a

more detailed evaluation of the
remaining bidders’ proposals,
once Board and government

-- approval was forthcoming.

But while global oil prices

have dropped by almost two-

thirds or some 67 per cent in
the past four. months, down
from a July high of around $147
per barrel to the current $49.13
-price as measured by Brent
Crude, Mr Basden said BEC
-. planned to persist in its renew-
~ able energy.search.

“We're not going to hinder = an

‘the process or become com-







PAGE 2B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





@

International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change

CAD$ 0.7863 -2.75
GBP 1.4894 +1.06
EUR 1.2592 -0.10
Commodities

Weekly. % Change
Crude Oil $49.93 -11.39
Gold $799.10 +7.70

International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly
DJIA , 8,046.42
S & P 500 800.03
NASDAQ 1,384.35
Nikkei 7,910.79

% Change

-5.31

8.39,
-8.74 |

-6,52

| ae ae seein Sal PRN g
hic rien cree slic canal:







By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian market, with
investors trading in five out of
the 24 listed securities. Of these,
two declined and three
remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 95,934 shares |
changed hands, representing a.
significant increase of 51,389
shares, versus last week's trad-
ing volume of 44,545 shares.

There were no advancers in
the market this week. Com-
monwealth Bank (CBL) led the
volume with 28,150 of its shares
trading, the stock declining by
$0.08 to end the week
unchanged at $7.20.

Consolidated Water Compa-
ny (CWCB) traded 6,500 shares

and closed at $1.92. Benchmark
(Bahamas) (BBL) fell by $0.08
to end the week at $0.73. Colina
Holdings (CHL) saw 284 shares
trade, and closed unchanged at
$2.83.

Investors traded in Focol
Class 'B'-Perpetual Preference
shares for the first time this
week on the Bahamian
exchange. A total of 60,000
shares changed hands at the par
value price of $1.

‘BOND MARKET
No notes traded in the
Bahamian market this week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

There were no financial
results reported by any of the 24
listed companies during the
week.

Share your

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps

you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

& Scotiabank





rl

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 863.48 —(-9.30%) YTD
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
‘SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML’. . $1.71 $- 0 3.01%
BBL _-$0.73 $-0.08 ' 1,000 -14.12%
BOB _ $7.64 $. 0h -20.50%
BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $T46062:-- $- 0 0.00%
BWL $3.49 $- 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $e. 17.43%
CBE: 1$7:20 $-0.10 28,150 -14,59%
CHL $2.83. $- 284 -10.16%
CIB $11.50 $- 0 -21.23%
CWCB $1.92 $-0.17 6,500 -61.90%
DHS — $2.65 $- 0 12.77%
FAM $7.80 s 0 8.33%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FOG.) $0.33 he 0 “57.14%
FCL $5.20 $: 0; 0.39%
“FCLB $1.00 e 60,000 0.00%
FIN _ $11.89 3 Oar: 8.19%
ICD.” $6.81 $ 0 6.07%
ISI $11.10 e ee 0.91%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
_ DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

e Bank of the Bahamas (BOB) has declared a semi-annual div-
idend of $0.16 per share, payable. on November 25, 2008, to‘all -
shareholders of record date November 17, 2008.

° Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared an extraordi-
nary dividend of $0.06 per share, payable on November 28,
2008, to all shareholders of record date November 20, 2008.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS:

¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares
will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually.

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BBy JEANNINE AVERSA _
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
The government } was weighing a

plan on Sunday to rescue Citi-.

group Inc., whose stock has
been hammered on worries

about its financial health.

The Treasury Department
and. the Federal Reserve have
been in discussions over the
weekend to devise a strategy to
stabilize the company, accord-
ing to people familiar with the
talks. They spoke on condition
of anonymity because the dis-
cussions were ongoing.

A spokesman for New York-
based Citigroup declined com-
ment: —

The company has seen its
shares lose 60 per cent of their
value in the past week, reflect-
ing a crisis of confidence among
skittish investors who are wor-
ried all the risky debt on Citi-
group's balance sheet will turn
into losses as the economy |
worsens and the markets stay
turbulent — losses that could
be nearly impossible. to reverse.

Citigroup is such a large,
interconnected player in the
financial system that if it were to
collapse it would wreak havoc
on already fragile financial and
economic conditions.

Analysts consider Citigroup
the most vulnerable among the

. major US banks — especially

after it failed to nab Wachovia

‘Corp., which was bought

instead by Wells Fargo: & Co.
That was a missed opportunity
for Citi to gets its hands on
much-needed US deposits that
would bolster its cash position.

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight

on Mondays -




THE TRIBUNE



a ae

Chamber chief
calls for major

economic summit

m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

THE Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president has
called on the Prime Minister to
convene an economic summit
of industry leaders to discuss
proactive measures which could
minimise the effects of the glob-
al economic crisis on the
Bahamas.

Saying that government and:

the private sector do not indi-
vidually have all the solutions
on the best way forward, Dion-
isio D’ Aguilar said such a meet-
ing to exchange ideas could only
be a positive and helpful thing.
Mr D’ Aguilar said he and his
board were certainly willing to
accept.any offer from Prime
Minister Ingraham to attend
such a meeting.
The Chamber president said
that rather than provide hand-
outs to persons who have lost
their jobs, the Government
should consider incentive mea-
sures that would encourage
businesses to retain employees.

Dionisio D’Aguilar



One way this could be done,

he said, was to allow fora
reduction in certain business
taxes and fees once employee
count remained at certain levels.

’ Another suggestion, he said,

would be to negotiate with the
Central Bank to reduce the
interest rate on loans to make it
easiér for persons to repay their
debts. - :
The Chamber president said
his Board was to meet with
BEC in the near future, and the
Chamber will be asking the

Corporation to publish the
prices it purchases fuel at, so
that the public ‘can directly see
the correlation between the fuel
surcharge and the BEC fuel
purchase price. Huge surcharges
as a result of fluctuating oil
prices have

driven utility bills through the
roof, placing a huge burden on
business owners.

As it relates to BEC, Mr
D’ Aguilar said it was past time
that the Government revise the
law to allow persons to generate
their own electricity and sell the
excess back into the grid.

Mr D’ Aguilar, who recently
headed a tour to the Island
School on Eleuthera, told West
Nassau Rotarians that the
school reckons that it saves

$60,000 a year on reverse meter- ~

ing.
The Island School is able to

provide the fuel for all its vehi-

cles through recycling cooking
oil it purchases from the

Princess Cruise lines. The Island ©

School also estimates that it is

relying on BEC for only 20 per |

cent of its needs . .

Business subsidies ‘not fiscally prudent’

FROM page 1B

=asut)paneddonsusramable/ situation: i +

big business and not the small one?”

Another problem, Mr Laing said, was that if
companies found it necessary to lay-off hundreds
of workers, given that economic conditions were
predicted to worsen, what would happen if they
laid-off a second set of employees after receiving
a subsidy?

“There is the suggestion that, having subvent-
ed them in the first instance, do you go back and
subvent them for a second time?” Mr Laing
asked. “How is that a fiscally prudent thing to do.

“he cS

That is inctedible to me.



it was an incredible suggestion coming from him
[Mr Smith].”

Mr Laing said that rather than subsidise the
private sector, the traditional model used across
the developed world was to provide some form of
financial assistance to the unemployed.

He explained that unemployment benefits had
more predictable costs, and were easier to manage
and budget for than any private sector subsidy
programme.

Mr Laing questioned why, with unemployment
levels higher than current ones during the 2003-
2005 period under the PLP administration, Mr

ad not used his gavernment offic&“and

set. ~ Smith
{GhtxeCHbnet Post thento-pus for-some’form of pri-

vate sector,or unemployment assistance pro-









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THE TRIBUNE



$2.2bn resort project ‘remains on the table’

FROM page 1B

woods Development Company

and Plantt Hollywood, plus

financial backer UBS, are still
willing to be involved despite
the global economic turmoil
that has left the credit and stock
markets in chaos.

“There’s a lot of guys that
want to be part of it, but they
want to see government
approvals first,” a source famil-
iar with the situation told Tri-
bune Business. “With the eco-
nomic climate the way it is, the
developers have had to make
some adjustments. The markets
are in turmoil, but a lot of peo-
ple still want to come offshore,

and the Bahamas is a favourite

place for tax reasons if they can
get this going.”

David Davis, permanent sec-
retary in the Office of the Prime
Minister, did not return a call
seeking comment on the cur-
rent status of the Bahamas
Golden Beach Development
Company puoject before press
time.

‘However, Zhivates Laing,
minister of state for finance,
confirmed that the project was
“still out there”, even though
he thought the Crown Land fac-
tor was still the major issue.

“T think the issue with them
was that ‘they were seeking to

remote location,”

do something that required a
large tract of Crown Land,” he
added. “The Government was
unwilling to give that much
land, consistent with what we
indicated prior to the election —
that we would not grant Crown
Land for such purposes.

“I think the bottom line was

land. They initially wanted 2,000.

acres. The Government was
unwilling to do so. If they found
the land on their own, no prob-
lem.”

Tribune Business, though,
understands that Bahamas
Golden Beach Development
Company is still proposing to
construct four hotel/casinos, pri-
vate airport, a major cruise ship
port via an offshore buoy, and

. general entertainment district.

“It’s a giant project, and
beyond the scope of what
Atlantis is, because it’s in a
the source
said. “If any island can handle
that, Freeport can, and it’s in a
great location vis-a-vis the US.”

The Government, though is
likely to be skeptical — and
understandably so — about
Bahamas Golden Beach Devel-
opment Company’s ability to
pull such a project off, given the
global economit turbulence that

.has impacted existing resorts,

both those under construction
and in existence. Atlantis, once
considered impregnable, has

laid-off 800 staff already.

Still, given the grim predic-
tions for the Bahamian econo-
my for 2009, it is also hard to
argue against developments that
could provide a major employ-
ment and economic activity
boost,

Tribune Business previously
reported that initial projections.
for the Bahamas Golden Beach
Development project had
pegged peak construction
employment at about just under
3,000 jobs, with a total annual
wage bill of over $143 million.

When full operations of the
resort complex began, more
than 3,000 permanent jobs were
slated for creation, with the first —
phase alone involving the build-
out of 2,400 rooms.

The developers and their
strategic partners are all under-
stood to be willing to invest a
total of $265 million in equity
into Bahamas Golden Beach’
Development, with UBS hav-
ing initially offered to provide a
$500 million credit facility.

Apart from Planet Holly-
wood and Foxwoods, the other
strategic partners in the early
going were Omni Hotels; Taub-
man, a $2.5 billion listed US
company specializing in gaming
retail and manager of 30 US
shopping malls; Bagliooni
Hotels; and Atlantic Marina
Holdings.

TSMC UL CUCM On

ATTENTI

ALLBRITISH CITIZE

The Vice Consul for The Bahamas (based in Kingston, Jamaica)

Will be conducting a Consular Surgery concerning Passport and Nationality
queries from 10:00am to 4:00pm on Friday, 28 November 2008 at te British
Honorary Consul’ s residence in Winton.

If you are interested, please make an ‘ipiibininiene before

‘Thursday, 27 November, 2008.

Appointments can be booked by calling 324-4089

GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION

~ DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION |

NOTICE

Procurement of School Computers & Printers —

\

The Department of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’) now invites sealed bids, from
Suppliers, for the procurement of school computers and printers for Ministry of Education Schools.

Interested Bidders. may collect the bidding documents from the Purchasing/Supplies
Section of the Ministry of Education Headquarters, Thompson Blvd. from Monday 24" November,
2008, and obtain further information, at the second address given below.

Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed envelope bearing no
identity of the bidder and endorsed with the Subles bided on (e.g. “School Computers and

Printers”).

‘Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address, on or before Friday, 12"

December, 2008 by 5:00 p.m. (local time).

It will not be necessary to submit bids in person ~

since they may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or their
representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday 16" December, 2008 at the first

address below.

(1) The Chairman Tenders Board

Ministry of Finance

Cecil Wallace Whitfield ©

Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tele: (242)327-1530

Purchasing/Supplies Section

SALE ON CURRENT INVENTORY ONLY, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST Ministry of Education

P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-8571

Lightbourne Marine
East Bay Street, Nassau
242-393-5285

The Department reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders


IHE I RIDUINE

MUNDAL, NOVLIVIBER "4, 2Uvo, MAGE ov



Minister: moratorium on permits not necessary

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

BRANVILLE McCartney,
minister of state for immigra-
tion, has said trade union calls
for a one-year moratorium on
new work permit applications
are not necessary due to the
Immigration Department’s cur-
rent policy.

John Pinder, the National
Congress of Trade Union
(NCTU) president, had last
week suggested that the Goy-
ernment suspend the granting
of new work permits for 12
months, so that qualified, out-
of-work Bahamians, can then
fill the vacant positions left by
foreigners.

Mr McCartney, in respond-
ing to the call, said such a mea-
sure was not necessary because
the Immigration Board already

- takes into account whether a

. Bahamian is available to fill a
position before a work permit is
granted. He said that if this is
the case, and the position can-
not be filled by a Bahamian, it







could place companies at a
major disadvantage and nega-
tively impact their operations if
they were unable to access the
skilled labour they required
because a work permit morato-
rium was in place.

Mr McCartney said the Immi-
gration Department was very
vigilant about enforcing the pol-
icy, and ensuring that every
Bahamian who can fill a posi-
tion did so was something that
was standard and always done.

He said the Immigration
Department fully understood
that Bahamians were hurting
and massive amounts of people
were being laid off. “You just
had Atlantis and Harborside lay
off almost 1,000 people, and
now the Hilton has laid off
almost 20 persons, as well as
Pepsi and Pizza: Hut, who also
let people go,” Mr McCartney
said.

“That is a significant amount
of jobs lost per capita, but what
is concerning is that you are not

hearing about the amount of |

small businesses who are letting
small amounts of people go.

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

pdt COMMERCIAL BUILDING
Known as Maxwell House, Hawkins Hill, Nassau

Main Building Comprises Approx. 3,640 sq. ft.
Detached Storage: 756 sq. ft.





ey
2
i

- Located approximately 152 feet south of Shirley Street
Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
: to reach us on or before December 5, 2008. ;

The economy is bad and it will
only get worse.”

Mr McCartney said that while
things were bad, they were like-
ly to get better, and he told
Bahamians to bear up and work
jobs that they may not wish to.

“T can’t tell you the amount of
work permit requests for per-
sons to be handymen and
labourers because Bahamians
do not want to do that, but if
that is the difference. between
being employed and being:
unemployed, than you should
be the best labourer that you
can be,” he added.

Mr McCartney said that hav-
ing a job will enable persons to
have greater flexibility in nego-
tiating with their creditors and
landlords. “You can go to your
landlord and say I am making
$200 a week, and this is how
much I can pay each week,
rather than not being employed
and not being able to bring in
any income at all,” he explained.

He also called on civic organ-
isations to continue to do their
part to assist Bahamians who
are unemployed and in need.












PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC CONSULTATION

Bahamas Telecommunications Company’s Application to
Modify Schedule 1 of its Interim License

The Public Utilities Commission (“PUC” or “the Commission”)
The Bahamas’ regulator of the telecommunications sector, is pleased
to invite comments on its consultation document on the captioned
application from the Bahamas Telecommunications Company Ltd. (BTC).

The objectives of this public consultation are to:

a) inform the public and interested parties of BIC’s application to

b) indicate the Commission’s intention for the

from BTC; and

modify Schedule 1 of their Interim Licence to include rates for
various GSM Cellular Mobile Services;

application received

c) invite comments from the public and interested parties.

. The Commission is required to exercise its powers and functions in a manner
that is timely, transparent, obj ective, non-discriminatory and consistent with
the objectives of the Telecommunications Act, 1999, ‘and any other relevant

documents.

Wie ; #
The Public Consultation Document can be obtained from the Commission’s
office located at 4% Terrace East, Collins Avenue, Nassau or downloaded
from the Commission’s web site at Wwww.pucbahamas.gov.bs. Written

comments should be submitted b

facsimile or e-mail to:

Mr. Michael J. Symonette,

Executive Director

Public Utilities Commission

P.O. Box N — 4860

y November 28, 2008 via post, hand delivery,

Fourth Terrace East, Collins Avenue

Nassau, Bahamas

Telephone: 242 322 4437
Fax: 242 323 7288

Email: PUC@pucbahamas.gov.bs.











Large wholesale company is looking for a

to manage day-to-day operations.





Serious inquiries only please send resume
detailing qualifications, experience, and
work history to P.O. Box N-4401





fittention: Mr. Lightbourne
or Hr. Sawyer



PRICEWAIERHOUSE(COPERS

POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR
SENIOR ASSOCIATES

‘

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancies for qualified accountants whose
qualifications make them eligible for membership in the Bahamas Institute of
Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should have at least three (3)
recent years of public accounting and auditing experience and be computer
literate. ;

The positions offer challenging work in the financial services industry and
other areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes
different levels of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance.
In addition, the Firm provides excellent medical insurance and provident fund
benefits.

Please submit an application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:
Human Resources Partner -
PricewaterhouseCoopers

_ P.O. Box N-3910
Nassau, The Bahamas

SO APR



GOVERNMENT NOTICE
MINISTRY OF EDUCATION
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
NOTICE S



Procurement of Computers & Printers for the Districts Homework Centres/Study Hall | programme

1.0 _ The Department of Education, (hereafter called the “Purchaser’) now invites sealed bids, from |

Suppliers for the procurement of computers and printers for the Ministry of Education Homework
_ Centres/Study Hall Programme.

2.0 Interested Bidders may collect the bidding documents from the Purchasing/Supplies
Section of the Ministry of Education Headquarters, Thompson Blvd. from Monday, 24" November,
2008, and obtain further information, at the second address given below.

3.0 Bids must be in English and shall be enclosed in duplicates in a sealed envelope bearing no

identity of the bidder and endorsed with the subject bided on (e.g. “Homework Centre Computers _|,
“and Printers’ ). meg

40 Bids must be deposited in the tender box provided, at the first address, on or before Friday, 12" ;
November, 2008 by 5:00 p.m. (local time). It will not be necessary to submit bids in person since
they may be sent by mail. Late bids will be rejected and returned unopened.

5.0 Bids will be opened at the public ceremony, in the presence of those Bidders or their :

representatives who choose to attend, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday 16 " December, 2008 at the first
address below. ,

(1) The Chairman Tenders Board
' Ministry of Finance
Cecil Wallace Whitfield
Cable Beach
P.O. Box N3017
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242)327-1530

So I AEE DO OR

ETE RE OT | eT

ET,

(2) Purchasing/Supplies Section
Ministry of Education
P.O. Box N-3913/4
Nassau, The Bahamas
Tele: (242) 502-8571

The Department reserves the right to reject any or all Tenders




eee WEES

PAGE 6B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Corporation promises ‘no complacency’ on oil price drop

FROM page 1B

the price of oil,” he told Tri-
bune Business. “We're going to
continue on this path.

“We've already evaluated
and produced a short-list of
companies. We went down from
about 30 to about half that
number. We’ve approached our
principals about the next step,
so we’re waiting for that” deci-
sion to be made.

Mr Basden added: “Now that
we’ve pre-qualified them, we
will now get into the meat of it
with the remaining qualities to
see whether they can deliver
what BEC is looking for. We’ve
completed the initial evaluation,
and the meat of the process
itself will involve a more

detailed review of ali their pro-
posals.”

The BEC general manager
said that-among the remaining
contenders were a variety of dif-
ferent renewable, sustainable
energy sources, including solar,
wind, hydrokinetic and waste-
to-energy (biomass) proposals.

“The quality of the propos-
als is pretty good. It’s what we
were expecting,” Mr Basden
told Tribune Business, adding
that BEC was maintaining an
open mind on how many
renewable energy providers it
eventually contracted with.

“We are still open in terms
of that,” he explained, “because
of the archipelagic nature of the
Bahamas, which means we do
not just have one island. So we
could possibly end up with one

) Copies of the filed

PERFORMANCE AIR.
ROUND TRIP FARE —
Nassau - Fresh Creek $99.99

Nassau - Moore’s Is. $180.00
Nassau - San Andros $99.99

Contact Performance Air at 362-1608/362-2302

Cg
Visit us on the web at www.performance-air.com



IN THE SUPREME COURT OF THE BAHAMAS

T OF THE 2008/CLE/qui/916
Common Law and Equity Division ;

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel
or lot of land situate in the Settlement of Salt Pond
in the Island of Long Island one of the islands of
the said Commonwealth of The Bahamas which

_, said lot is bounded Northwardly by land now or
oe other y We See eS By ohn Kadwles
and running together thereon Three hundred
and Sixty Seven and Five hundredths (367.05)
feet Southwardly by land now or formerly the
property of the’said corns Knowles and running
thereon One hundred and Seventy Two and Fifty
Eight hundredths (172.58) feet Westwardly
partially by land now or formerly the PEOpe rey
of John Knowles and partially by land now or
formerly the property of George Knowles and
running thereon Two hundred and_ Two and
Fifteen hundredths (202.15) feet and Eastwardly
by a. (30) feet wide road reservation and
running ereon Two hundred and Sixty Seven °
(267) feet which said pieee parcel or lot of land
has such position boundaries shape marks and
dimensions as are on a‘ plan filed herein and
thereon coloured Pink.

ee MATTER OF the Quieting Titles Act,

ey
My

AND IN THE MATTER OF the Petition of
Randolph Lawrence Knowles. '

NOTICE
The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

The Petition of RANDOLPH LAWRENCE KNOWLES of the
Imperial Park subdivision in the Island of New Providence, one of
the Islands in the Cornmonwealth of The Bahamas in respect of:

_ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land situate

in the Settlement of Salt Pond in the Island
of Long Island one of. the islands of the said
Commonwealth of The Bahamas which said
lot is bounded Northwardly by land now or
formerly the property claimed by John Knowles
and running together thereon Three hundred
and Sixty Seven and Five hundredths (367.05)
feet Southwardly by land now or formerly
the property of the said George Knowles and
running thereon One hundred and_ Seventy
Two and’ Fifty Bie hundredths (172.58) feet
Westwardly partially by land now or formerly
the prope of John Knowles and partially by
land now or formerly the ErOpery of George
Knowles and running thereon Two hundred
and Two and Fifteen hundredths (202.15) feet
and Eastwardly by a tye (30) feet wide road
reservation and running thereon Two hundred
and Sixty Seven (267) feet. \

Randolph Lawrence Knowles claims to be the owner of the fee
simple estate in possesion of the said piece parcel or tract of land
free from encumbrances.

And the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme Court of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3 of the Quieting
Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said piece’ parcel or tract
of land investigated and the nature and extent thereof determined

and declared in a-Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in

accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person having dower or a
right to dower or an adverse claim or_a claim not recognised in the
Petition shall by the end of 30 days after the final publication in the
newspapers of this Notice on December 8, 2008 file in the Supreme
Court and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of
his claim in the prescribed form verified a an Affidavit to be filed
therewith. Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
ef Claim within the time prescribed will operate as a bar to such
claim.

lan may be inspected at the Registry of the
Supreme Court, and at the chambers of Messrs. Harry B. Sands,
Lobosky & Company situated at Fifty Shirley Street, Nassau,
Bahamas during normal business hours.

DATED the 15" day of October A. D., 2008

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY & COMPANY
ny siurley Street
Shirley House .
Nassau, Bahamas

Attorneys for the Petitioner



[renewable energy supplier] in
New Providence and one in the
Family Islands.”

Apart from diversifying
BEC’s electrical generation
sources and potentially reducing
the cost of energy in this nation,
an issue that has impacted all
businesses and consumers, the
move into sustainable energy

. also has energy security and

environmental implications.

Mr Basden said: “At the end
of the day, we are looking at
having renewable energy as a
built-in component of the ener-
gy generation mix, which will
reduce the use of fossil fuels as
well as being environmentally
friendly.”

With BEC set to spend more
than $350 million on fuel
imports in 2008, a bill that has
more than quadrupled from the
$80 million spend six years ago,
a. base of Bahamas-based
renewable energy suppliers
could also substantially reduce
the annual drain on this nation’s
foreign exchange reserves.

Among the bidders to reveal
their hand over BEC’s renew-
able energy RFP have been a
host of waste-to-energy (bio-
mass) proposals. Plasco Ener-

WANTED

gy Group; a rival consortium
featuring Bahamas Waste; the
Bahamas Renewable Energy
Resources Company, a group
headed by Bahamian firm
Waste Not; and a group featur-
ing GPEC Global (Canada) and

ENERSOL (Bahamas) all sub- -

mitted proposals for a biomass

_ plant worth around $100 mil-

lion.

Meanwhile, Mr Basden
“most emphatically” denied
concerns raised by Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce presi-
dent, Dionisio D’ Aguilar, that
BEC’s fuel surcharge was show-
ing no correlation with global
oil market prices, and was drop-

ping at a much slower rate than

it had increased by earlier this
year.

With high energy costs jeop-
ardizing the Bahamian econo-
my’s sustainability, Mr
D?Aguilar had previously told
Tribune Business that while
BEC’s surcharge had fallen by
5.6 per cent in November 2008
compared to the previous
month, over the same period
global oil prices had dropped
by 27.7 per cent.

However, Mr Basden said
BEC’s fuel surcharge did “fol-

Applications for the position of: i

Must have experience in managing people.
Must have excellent organizational skills,
Excellent customer service and sales skills.

Please mail -
Resume and photogtaph to:

Assistant Manager Position
P.O. Box SP-63144
Nassau, Bahamas

~~ ASSISTANT MANAGER fora i
RETAIL STORE :
I

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for details phone: 393-8814

visit our website at:

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or email us at powersave@coralwave.com

TEACHING VACANCIES

The Anglican Central Education Authority
invites applications from qualified Teachers
for positions available.

Two (2) MUSIC TEACHERS

Only qualified Teachers, with Bachelor or
Master Degrees from an accredited University
or College and Teaching Certificate need apply.

For further details and application form, please.
contact the Anglican Central Education
Authority on Sands Road at telephone (242)

322-3015/6/7.

Letters of application and/or completed
application forms with copies of required
documents must be sent by Friday, December
5th, 2008 to the Anglican Education
Department addressed to:-

The Director of Education
Anglican Central Education Authority

P.O. Box N-656
Nassau, Bahamas




low the world market. The only
lag has to do with inventory”
bought at a previous price that
had to be used up.

Describing Mr D’Aguilar’s
assertions as “not correct”, Mr
Basden said: “It’s a direct cor-
relation, and what we have
offered to the Chamber of
Commerce is that they put
together a team together to sit
with us and go through the
process” of calculating the fuel
surcharge.

“We want to be transparent,”
Mr Basden added, explaining
that there were numerous fac-
tors involved in calculating the
fuel surcharge. The cost of a
particular fuel shipment, he
said, was calculated on a five-
day bill of lading, using the
average of the two days before,
the two days after, and the actu-
al day the fuel was landed. And
BEC received numerous
monthly fuel shipments. ,

‘And while the per barrel
price referred to crude oil, Mr
Basden said the price of-its
derivatives — such as diesel and
gasoline — varied according to
the product. “The increase in

the price of diesel was much
more than the price of gaso-
line,” he added, BEC using
diesel to run its turbines and
generators.

And, in the short-term, it
appears there will be better
news for BEC customers, espe-
cially businesses, who have been
unable to benefit from the Gov-
ernment’s capping of the fuel
surcharge at $0.15 per kilowatt
(KwH) hour for residential con-
sumers who less than 800 KwH
per month.

“Based on the projections, we
anticipate it being in the range
of $0.17, and even lower for
January,” Mr Basden said of
the fuel surcharge, the most
volatile bill component and the
one chiefly responsible for the
soaring energy prices experi-
enced in 2008.

While January’s figure had
not been confirmed, BEC antic-
ipated it would be “lower than
$0.15”. “I’m not comfortable
with that number yet,” Mr Bas-
den said. “I’m a bit more com-
fortable for December than
January, but that’s what the
projections say.”

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Need an Attorney in Florida? Call...

7

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Dade Tel:(305) 947-5777 - Fax:(305) 947-5766
Broward Tel: (954) 961-0340 - Fax:(954) 961-0390


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 7B.



Dima oii
$12m poultry farm project ‘best hope’ in North Andros

FROM page 1B

it to a point where they can start
bringing in equipment.”

Mr Peet added of the $12 mil-
lion project, which will be locat-
ed in the north Andros area
known as the Barc: “We’re hop-
ing that if it gets going, it will
employ anywhere between 30-
50 persons, which will be a
major dent” in the unemploy-
ment figures.

While the investors behind
the poultry farm were likely to
eventually lock to export their
produce to New Providence and
foreign markets, Mr Peet said:
“We're just hoping it takes
place. We are cautiously opti-
mistic, but in the present cli-
mate, we just have to wait and
see.”

As for Chub Cay, he added:
“When I spoke recently with

the investors, they were «Sali
hopeful, but with the world
economy being what it is, they
can’t guarantee anything.

“They were hopeful the new
equity partner will continue.
There was still an agreement in
principle in place, and they were
still hopeful........

“Right now, everything is just
touch and go. They are hope-
ful, we are hopeful. We cer-
tainly need something to hap-
pen at Chub. We hope the
transaction is consummated, but
nothing is done yet.”

With the investors still “hop-
ing the transaction will go
through”, Chub Cay had eftec-
tively been place in ‘caretaker
mode’, with a “skeleton crew”
on the island — part of the Berry
Islands chain — to maintain the
property.

Apart from several foreign
second home owners complet-
ing construction of their prop-

erties, building work on the
Chub Cay project had effec-
tively ceased for the time being.

The south Florida investor
trio behind the Chub Cay Club
& Associates project includes
Kaye Pearson, head of Interna-
tional Marinas, who used to run
the Fort Lauderdale Interna-
tional Boat Show and manage
the Port Lucaya Marina on
Grand Bahama. His partners
are Walt McCrory and Bob
Moss, who heads his own con-
struction firm.

Prior to the work halt, the
Chub Cay marina had been
completed, some $16 million
worth.of infrastructure installed
on the island, and a number of
private homes constructed with
more planned. However, work
to upgrade the existing club-
house and convert it to a hotel
has not been completed.

“it’s one of the finest mari-
nas in this part of the world for

mega yachts and ordinary
yachts,” Mr Peet confirmed.
But without the injection of
extra capital funding, Chub Cay
will likely find it extremely dif-
ficult to attract already scarce
debt financing to move the pro-
ject forward.

The MP confirmed that Chub
Cay’s woes had had a “devas-
tating impact” on north Andros
and its economy, as the project,
which was a 10-minute flight
from the island, had provided
most of his constituents’

‘employment.

“If Nassau is bad, Andras is
worse,” Mr Peet added. “The
north Andros economy is very,
very bad. The only glimmer of
hope really is in the agricultur-
al sector. More effort is being
made to get more farmers
involved, so the agricultural sec-
tor is where the Government is
pushing to stimulate the econo-
my.”

The Bahamas Agricultural
and Industrial Corporation
(BAIC) had increased its on-
ground presence and assistance
to north Andros farmers, seek-
ing to get their produce accept-
ed by major New Providence
food, wholesalers and retailers.

Even with the area’s limited
employment there had been
“downsizing” in the workforce,
Mr Peet told Tribune Business,

with the Government being the
area’s major employer.

He added that two initiatives
to spur economic activity — the
construction of an $8 million
sea wall at Lowe Sound, and a
pre-school/primary school com-
plex in the same area — which
had been approved prior to the
May 2007 election, had been
cancelled by the incoming FNM
administration.

LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4)
of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),

Rosbery International Investments Ltd. is in dissolution.
Alrena H. Moxey is the Liquidator and can be contacted at The
Winterbotham Trust Company Limited, Marlborough &
Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas. All persons having claims
against the above-named company are required to send their
names addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
-Liquidator before 8th December, 2008.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT. 2000
(No. 45 of 2000)

NEN WUT
the #1 newspaper in circulation,
ar EY Perey a CPE

In Voluntary Liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138(4)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000, (No. 45 of
2000), STAR FLOW INVESTMENT INC., is in dissolution.
JOSE DAVID SKAF NETO is the Liquidator and can be con-
tacted at Sector Setor SHIS QI 07, cj, 12, Casa 11, Brasilia,
Brasil, 71615-320.



LEGAL NOTICE:
NOTICE
TULIP GARDEN LIMITED

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

In Voluntary Liquidation

Legal Notice

NOTICE

All persons having claims against the above-named company NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

are required to send their names, addresses and particulars of
their debts of claims to the Liquidator before the 18th day of
December, 2008.

(a) PIERS OVERSEAS CORP. is in dissolution under the .
provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on November 21, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and reeisleied by
the Registrar General.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000), Tulip
Garden Limited is in dissolution. Tulip Garden (PTC) Limited
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at East Asia Corporate Ser-
vices (BVI) Limited, East Asia Chambers, P.O. Box 901, Road Town,
Tortola, British Virgin Isalnds. All persons having claims against the
above-named company are required to send their names addresses
and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator before 20th
December, 2008.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. .

G. Cc

| NOTICE. —,
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of December, 2008 to.send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company .or, in default thereof, they may.be excluded
from the benefit of any distrioution made before such debts are proved.

NOVEMBER 24, 2008_
In Voluntary Liquidation LAKEISHA COLLIE

: . - -, LIMITED,
as ‘Tr ustee of the Tulip Garden Unit ‘Trust
Liquidator

ne as decries » LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 138 (4) Ae

of the International Business Companies Act, (No.45 of 2000),
RIO UNIVERSE LTD. is in dissolution: Ms. Alrena Moxey
is the Liquidator and can be contacted at Winterbotham
Place, Marlborough & Queen Streets, Nassau, Bahamas.
All persons having claims against the above-named company
are required to send their names addresses and particulars of
their debts or claims to the Liquidator before 5th December,.
2008.

Legal Notice
NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

Legal Notice

NOTICE |

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000): (a) UPWOOD INVESTMENTS CORP. is in dissolution under the

provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on November 21, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by
the Registrar General.

GALLAVAN LTD.

In Voluntary liquidation

ALRENA MOXEY
LIQUIDATOR

(c) The etigiaaiee of the said company is ILakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of.the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), GALLA-
JAN LTD. has been dissolved and struck off the Register according
to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the. Registrar General on
the 14th day of November, 2008.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required on or before the 19th day of December, 2008 to send their
names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

Trinity Methodist Chu ch.
Annual

HOLIDAY &
CV

Saturday 29th November 2008
12 noon - 6:00 pm

Luis Pineyrua Pittaluga
Juncal 1305
Suite 21, Montevideo
Uruguay
Liquidator

NOVEMBER 24, 2008
LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY

EG CAPITAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas .

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S)

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

ICD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

Interest
Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) + * ; : T%
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) + Prime + 1.75%
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series os + 7 : : 7%
Fidelity Bank Note 15 (Seri Prime + 1.7

52wk- low
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
000. .0O

19 oo 2017
19 October 2022
30 May 2013

egal aaiana

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref) 0.480
Ss

0.000
AS

ABDAB —
Bahamas Supermarkets
DH

SS
NAV Da’
31-Oct- oe
7-Nov-08
14-Nov-08
31-Oct-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
30-Sep-08
31-Dec-07
31-Oct-08
31-Oct-08
one Sotee

AA

Fund Name
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond’Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
FG Financial Diversified Fund

100.2421
100.9600
1.0000
10.5000
1.0264
# 1.0289
Bon 1.0287

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -

52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest cl. sing price in last 52 weeks

Church Grounds - Frederick Street
& Trinity Place fa Close > Cumantiaye weibried cries tor daly ature
Adequate Parking with Security, See cue re mney
off Frederick Street. Pot ng penn by tha tn 1 mon earn

Bid & - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity ,
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity

Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol. - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100
(SS) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

(S1) - 3-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 7/11/2007

TO TRADE CALL: COLINA 242-602:



~
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Ce ena ACLs ] | ae





HEY, THANKS!
GETTING A LITTLE

9

8

NIPPY TONIGHT, i
:

i
&

DENNIS THE MENACE

prkP74





al
A GOOP NIGHT! #3






Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from. Monday to
Sunday :




3] WHILE WE/RE STUCK ©
HERE DEALING WITH
THE AFTERSHOCKS?

IF YOU ASK
) ME, LU ANN
15 THE
LUCKY ONEL]

WE WEDDING PLANNERS ) ALL I COULD THINK ABOUT
HAVE TO LOOK HAPPY WAS POOR LU ANN FLYING
SOT PASTED yo AVAY, ALL ALONE.

“PUhS CIUaWy WON 'BI0cE)






aS Le

SCOPE Cat
5 84










FINe:., 1
tLe TELL
YOu...

AREN'T YOU GOING
TO TELL ME WHAT J
IT ISP A







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

“THIS (5 A RECORD! 1 DIDN'T EVEN GET TO
FINISH MY BREAKFAST!”

dicate, Inc. World Rights reserved
7 —_



© 2008 by King

Best described as’a number crossword, the task'in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.















1/5/2/9/4/8/3/6|
4/3/5'7/6|2/1/9|
9

7|119/6/3|5/4/8]
5/6|1/4/8}7/2/3
7/2/5[6/9/ 1)







www.kingfeatures.com







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist: by King Features Syndicate, Inc.













01} 69|—+| {c/n |a}a|N







O)|Co|NO} 0

&

NOTHING IN












Bee BOLEING PARTICULAR BOUT Ce ei ) HOW many words of four.
_, HUGO? IN PARTICULAR? i ' letters or more can you make
j ae from the letters shown here? In. .....,
4 Target’ Making a-word, each letter may
| uses be used once only. Each must
: wordsin containthe centre letterand |
j har there must be at least one
7 Chambers Be ete wo Noplurals.
| | 21st INS
oN uF es : : | | Cety . Good 18; very good 27; excellent. |
vercone \ War, Ja! Like PE Noe sag | 30 (OF More). p
HAGAR FZ _ i COMING BACK / edition), | Solution tomorrow. | e
As YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION |
: sik _ down endow ENDOWMENT |
i : meow meowed mewed mowed
: mown newt newton nowt.
8 owed owned towed town

townee twee tweed weed ..
ween wend went wont wonted

... CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Across *’ - Down Cg
Denied that profits help (8) 1 She may have’all sorts of

jobs to do this Friday (4)

-A friegd much changed (4)
saith pressure in the
middle of bridges (5)

In tennis people may play

them for one point (7)
Successful enterprise
gives cash to the
cotton-worker (5-7)
Starfish? (6)

Man getting cue all wrong
shows sharpness (6)

Not the death rate,
apparently (4,2,6)
Passed.on a message
concerning new delay (7)
A fringe gathering of lace-
makers (5)

It's Ena’s turn to be
reasonable (4)

Deadly feud conducted

with relative bitterness (8) 19

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Socialism, 8 Error, 9 Off-
peak, 10 Seat of learning, 11 Dragon,
12 Increase, 15 Pentagon, 18 Fervid,
20 Riders, 21 Strange, 22 Tinge, 23
Delighted.

Down: 2 Offer, 3 Impugn, 5 Meteor, 6

Fretsaw; 7 Proffered, 11 Desperate,
13 Confetti, 14 Anodyne, 16 Agreed,
17 Breach, 19 Ingle.

ate

Entrances out of the
weather? (7)

Agrees with someone as
tall as oneself? (4,3,2,3).
Organise sit-ins and make
repeated demands (6)
She cuts the length (5)
Choosing the wrong type
will lead to this (8)

This clue is yet to be
found (12)

Pure ices for them, of
course (8)

Feline requiring a detailed
description (4,3)

Promise to drink one’s
health (6)

One girl takes on a hair-
dressing business .. . (5)
...and another gives
some clever answers (4)

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Ostracism, 8 Occur, 9
Rampage, 10 Mimosa, 11 Detect,
12 Alienate, 15 Inexpert, 18
Reason, 20 Evenly, 21 Applied, 22
Lying, 23 Mendacity.

Down: 2 Suave, 3 Rapier, 4
Cogitate, 5 Motive, 6 Scholar, 7
Break even, 11 Decidedly, 13

Intrepid, 14 Bedevil, 16 Phlegm, 17

Garlic, 19 Overt.

Lu
=
N
N
_
QO.
>
”)
x |:
LL -

Across

1
5

9
10
11
113
14
17

26
21

22
23

Northern US state (8)
Russian emperor (4)
Fight (5)

In the direction of (7)
Grief-stricken (12)
Mischievous child (6)
Rigorous (6)
Complete

discretion (5,7)
Complete col-
lapse (7)

Deep ravine (5)
Interval of calm (4)
Abstaining from
alcohol (8)

Down

1 To disguise (4)

2 Constantly
ring (7)
Prodigality (12)
Bear witness (6)
Wash with stiff
brush (5)
Expression of
esteem (8)
Shakespearean
comedy (7,5)
Self-destructive (8)
Receive by
bequest (7)
To strip of
property (6)
Rise up 5)
Be aware of (4)

recur-





Future Shoc

South dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH

@J98

Â¥Q 104

OTN A,

#K QJ 1083
WEST EAST
$52 A63
“¥K9O7 ¥853
Q986543 #3102
b? . A765

SOUTH

#KQ1074

VAI62

@AK

£94
The bidding:
South West North East
1¢ Pass 26 Pass
29 Pas 24 Pass
44

Opening lead — two of clubs.

Today’s hand features excellent
play by a defender. It illustrates how
foresight can overcome the uncer-
tainties that often accompany defen-
sive play.

West led the deuce of clubs
against four spades, and East took
the ace as South dropped the nine. It
wasn’t difficult for East to deduce
that’ West’s lead was a singleton —
only the four was missing, and’ West

would have led that card rather than->

the deuce from the doubleton 4-2.
But instead of impulsively return-
ing a club for West to ruff. which

- would have handed declarer the con-

tract, East paused to corisider where ;
his side might collect the setting |
trick. The ace of clubs, a club ruff |
and the trump ace would account for |
three tricks, but a fourth trick would }
be needed if the contract was to be |
defeated.

On the bidding, it was likely. that
South held exactly five spades. West
was therefore a favorite to hold two
spades, so the club ruff could be
postponed until East regained: the
lead with the ace of spades.

The setting trick, if there was one,
could either be the ace of hearts, ace
of diamonds or king of hearts. If
West had either red ace, the contract
would-be set regardless of what East
returned at trick two. But if West had
the king of hearts, it was essential to |
return a heart at this point. Other-
wise, South would eventually get rid
of his hearts on dummy’s clubs.

So East shifted to a heart at trick
two. Declarer had no choice but to
finesse, losing to the king, and West
returned a heart to dummy’s queen,
When the eight of spades was next
led, East rose with the ace and
returned a club, and West’s ruff put
the finishing touch on a well- |
defended hand.

Tomorrow: Combinations and percentages.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008, PAGE 9B



@ By MIKE MELIA
Associated Press Writer

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico
(AP) — A new witness has
come forward in the 2005 dis-
appearance of American
teenager Natalee Holloway in
Aruba, and prosecutors said
they are seeking more evidence

against the only remaining sus-

pect.

A woman told Dutch police
this month that Joran van der
Sloot confessed to her years ago
that he was involved in Hol-
loway’s disappearance, accord-
ing to Ann Angela, a spokes-
woman for the Aruba Prosecu-
tors’ Office.

INDOOR

But the Dutch Caribbean
island’s chief prosecutor said
authorities still lack proof they
need to convict Van der Sloot,
who has been arrested twice
and released for lack of evi-
dence.

- “After three years of inves-
tigating, it is very, very difficult
to find that evidence,” prose-
cutor Hans Mos told The Asso-
ciated Press. “We have to be

realistic.”

Holloway, an 18- year-old
from Mountain Brook, Alaba-
ma, was last seen in May 2005
leaving a bar in the Aruban cap-
ital Oranjestad with Van der
Sloot on the final night of a high
school graduation trip to the

UNTSe Ta

Aruba police pursue new
evidence in Holloway case

island. Extensive searches have
found no trace of her.
Investigators reopened the
case earlier this year based on
hidden-camera recordings made

by a Dutch TV crime show. On’

the video, Van der Sloot says
Holloway collapsed on the
beach after they left the bar and
that he called a friend to dump
her body at sea.

The new witness, once a
friend of Van der Sloot, con-
firmed that he gave her roughly
the same account shortly after
Holloway’s disappearance. But

Mos said her statement does

not bring authorities any closer
to resolving the case.
He also said the witness

torewide

3 Ce Pe To cn Pg



would lack credibility in court
unless she explains why she
waited so long to come forward.

Attorneys for Van der Sloot
didnot immediately respond to
messages seeking comment and
there was no answer at his par-

ents' home in Aruba.
Van der Sloot was last known
to be living in Thailand but his

current whereabouts are a .

“mystery,” Angela said. ©
Angela said Aruban authori-
ties hope to decide by the end

ROSS

of this year whether to prose-
cute Van der Sloot or close the
case for good.

Natalee Holloway’s mother,
Beth Holloway, did not imme-
diately return a telephone call
Tuesday seeking comment.

UN IVERSITY

EST. 1978

Join us!

Ross University School of Medicine is experiencing remarkable
growth and is excited about our new clinical site in Freeport, Grand

Bahama Island!

We invite fualiied persons to apply for the position of Director of
Housing. The successful candidate must possess the following
minimum requirements:

Bachelor's degree preferred or in related field required.
Excellent communication and interpersonal skills.

Ability to effectively work with students, faculty and staff.
Three to five years property management experience
Outstanding administrative, planning and supervisory skills.

Ross University offers highly competitive salaries and a
comprehensive benefits package including tuition assistance for
graduate and undergraduate degrees.

To apply, please visit our website at www.RossU.edu/med, select
“career “and copy/paste your resume, or complete an online application

process.

We’re looking for a few good
people to join our team.

DO YOU HAVE.

WHAT IT TAKES?

Apply for the position of

Sales Executive

es Must ops — to ne ee ca





accounts/collections and receivi bles

Please drop off resumes to

The Tribune
Hy Voice. My Hewspaper!

Shirley & Deveaux Streets
or email: tribune@tribunemedia.net
c/o Sales Manager


PAGE 10B,; MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



INSIGHT



Readers respond to ‘Hard Times’

ear Mr Marquis, I
could not agree with
you more in your

article. I have been telling
people for years of their gross
misunderstanding of service
and money attitudes and I
think that people need to not
only hear these words, but »
now they will understand what
they mean.

God’s word in Luke 18:14

_ says: “I tell you, this man went
to his house justified rather
than the other; for everyone.
who exalts himself will be
humbled, but he who humbles
himself will be exalted.”

If the service staff and the
majority of persons adhere to
a rule that they declare most
Sundays in church while peo-
ple are watching them, I say to
them: “Live the truth of these
words rather than looking

. good in front of other people
because God knows what we
really think and who we really.
are!”

Humility has been lost in
this country and if more peo-
ple travelled the world, they
will finally understand the
Haitians and the Cubans and

. many other nationalities
across the world. Thank you
for your time.

— Ian Moree

YOUR reference to the
bag-packer who thought ten
cents poor reward for packing
three items into a plastic bag
reminded me of something

that happened to me when I |
went to the foodstore.

Iam elderly and appreciat-
ed the boy taking the basket
to my car, but when I handed
him a handful of change as a
tip, he threw it on the ground —
and walked off.

I said “My need.is obviously

Rey page 12 <4

action: ;
When it beanie ‘lene that

Thompson was not going to do

anything to earn his fee, Mr

Moree sought solace from ‘

another lawyer, only to find she
wanted a $2,500 retainer, also

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays







greater than yours” and pro-
ceeded to pick up the money,
which I personally could not
afford to leave lying in the car
park.

It made me wonder what
kind of home such a boy
comes from, where coins are
regarded as too lowly to han-
dle, and where money, which
people have to work so hard
for, is so poorly regarded.

Thanks for another very

‘informative and enlightening
Insight.
— Nassau pensioner

THE ungrateful waitress
you referred to ought to have
been fired on the spot. Her

- attitude was disgraceful.

— Lesley Mills

Mr Marquis,
Finally an accurate and

* courageous article on the state

of affairs in this country.

We have been in trouble for
years now and are waiting for
the revolution that will be tak-
ing place in this country.
Nobody has been listening and
paying attention to what we

- have been experiencing in the

workplace.

We applaud the article and
-have made copies for all of
our staff members as
REQUIRED READING!

Warm regards, —

— Tina Knowles

Chelsea's Choice

FOR a long time now it has
been obvious that many '
Bahamians (not all, I’m happy
to say) have failed to make the
connection between their own
working standards and the
success of the company they
work for. In fact, ’ve found
that many restaurant staff,
instead of making a fuss of
regular customers, adopt a
‘familiarity breeds contempt’
attitude, seeming to take their
customer for granted.

Though I dread a full-on
recession in this country, I
reluctantly have to admit that
it might do some good in the
long run, if only to knock
sense into those who really
seem to believe that the world
and its brother owe them a liv-
ing.

The. waitress who handed
the change back to the cus-
tomer needs to taste unem-
ployment in the hope that she
will be a better person at the
end of it.

— Veronica Bastian

I KNOW the restaurant of
which you speak. I had lunch
there one day and a guy was
up at the bar cussing and
blinding while the waitresses
laughed and encouraged him.
The ‘management’ (what a
laugh!) sat behind the till see-
ing nothing and hearing less,
as though frightened to take

disciplinary action.’

— GHB, The Grove

‘

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 2008

ThelTribune

The stories behind the news

HARD TIMES

It’s going to get
far worse before
it gets better

By JOHN MARQUIS
Managing Editor
(Additional reporting
by Alex Missick)

wo months ago, ¢
‘an impudent and
ungrateful wait-
ress at a Nassau
restaurant was so

iffronted at being left a tip in
‘oins instead of notes that she
‘eturned it to the customer.

The intention, of course, was
0 cause him embarrassment in
front of others, But the result of
er stupidity. was a loss of busi-
ess for her employers, because
he customer — who had been

sing the restaurant for nearly a

ecade — vowed never. to
eturn,

Ata foodstore check-out, a
fchoolboy bag-packer was so
insulted at being given a ten
ent piece for loading three
items into a plastic bag that he
hctually began making sarcastic

FORTY years ago, just before he left New
Providence, the then colonial Governor Sir
Ralph Grey warned Bahamians not to take

their prosperity for granted. He felt there

was a tendency for them to believe they .

had divine protection. As Atlantis laid off
800 workers last week, and the world
financial crisis deepened, the Bahamas
found itself confronted with the prospect
of real hardship for many of its people
for the first time in half a century.
INSIGHT reports...

dentally, that his greatest ambi- | announcement by Atlantis that

AN ATLANTIS WORKER can

be seen when she was laid-off
© after working at the resort for
* anumber of years...

tion in life was to work at

emarks | to his colleagues. The
id: * Atlantis or become a drug-deal-
y lake er,
Hid cael that, leaving the
pchoolbpy, gazing into his emp-
'y palm.

At a-Nassau secondary
school, a teacher was amazed
o discover that students
‘efused to handle coinage at all,
regarding it as beneath them.

themselves, but reveal a mind-

ing 40 years of plenty. Many
Bahamians possess a sense of
entitlement born of a misguided
belief that the good times were
open-ended, and that their
nation was blessed like no oth-
er. Now it’s wake-up time.

scala me time, Last week's devastating

The incidents are trivial in—

set which has developed dur-"

10 per cent of its staff was on
the way out came as little sur-
prise to those who have been
following economic develop-
ments closely, And it willcome weeks,
as no surprise, either; if the Nonetheless, Atlantis’s deci-
hotel lays off more people in sion certainly shocked those
the New Year, with the final — who fail, for whatever reason,
figure possibly as high as 1,500. to make the connection
between the quality of their
work and the stability and sus-
tainability of their position.
Not long ago, mass lay-offs
at the Paradise Island resort
were unthinkable. In the late
1990s and-early 2000s, Atlantis
was second only to Disney as a
leading resort brand of the
Americas. Tourists were falling
over themselves to savour its

ers and others were haying to

It has been clear for months
that hotel occupancy has been
way down, that restaurants
were being closed for long peri-
ods every month, and that wait-

i TN a2 of ie November 17 edition of /NS/GHT...



make do with shortened work ,

ply another nail in the busi-
ness’s coffin, which is now more
or Jess ready for formal burial.

Will the staff — and espe-
cially the waitress with the off-
hand manner — ever make the
connection between the restau-
rant’s decline and their own dis-
graceful behaviour?

Probably, particularly if they
find themselves in the predica-
ment now being suffered by
thousands of Bahamian fami-
lies who face penury after
decades of relative financial
security... *

agement had to cap pay cheque
repayments to creditors, rea-
soning that they had a social
responsibility not only to their
own staff but also their fami-
lies,
Now that business is bad,
workers who not so long ago
were on a financial high have
hit the skids, and the fall-out
will be very unpleasant.

The first publicly expressed
utterance signalling looming
catastrophe came when a senior
construction worker on PI told
me weeks ago that Atlantis

that delivered last week's

founder So! Kerzner had lost
hope of running a five-star

The fact that it was Atlantis

names in the dossier of shame

doing nothing in return.

“She ripped me-off, too,”. Mr -.
Moree.told INSIGHT, “I;would

like to know where or to whom
I must go to take this com-
plaint.”

It’s a good question, and one

INSIGHT is asked at least once ©

a week. Unfortunately, we don’t
know the answer.

Every time The Tribune car-
ries another photograph of
rookie lawyers lining up in wigs
and gowns to be admitted into a
thoroughly disorganised and
increasingly discredited profes-
sion, we wonder whether just
one of them will be strong
enough to cry “Enough is
enough” and try to change its
course.





In fact, one attorney I like

- and respect has more than ONCE g..
expressed dismay at the.state.

of his trade, wondering whether

it can ever be pulled from the. :
. mire in which it now finds itself.
He has even considered forming —
_ regarded as a sick joke — a dis-
. turbing judgment considering

a group of like-minded lawyers
to bring pressure on the rest.
INSIGHT was told by one
legal source that, some decent
attorneys ‘are constrained by
commercial and family consid-
erations from: speaking out.
They also had to live with the
legacy of the Pindling era when

“Nobody moves, nobody gets.
hurt” was the prevailing credo. "

“It’s time-consuming to take
on legal issues for the sake. of

_ principle and an expensive risk

The Heagusstl of Farm Road

@ The Pompey Museum

Friday November 2st, 2008-7 p.m.
(Admission $is.co— refreshments tacluded)
Bor bookings please call 456-0495



“Deoumibor wt A Bestival of Lights +

“Holiday Events:

ning Ceremony

@ Collins House Grounds— Shirley Street, 7 pan.
fopened to the public}

“Deceunbox 4th-- Christmas Comin’: Song Catnpecbittons for Schools

@ Collins House G rounds, 7pm

{Admission $¢-Studente $7-Adulta)

* becember wth. Christmas Magic: Holiday Open House
@ the Balcomy Hlouss Moxaeum- 22 Noon & pam,
Reatuxing;s tows, poetry readings, amnisi ovaft & food faty, live

entertainment, children's commer featuring: ome



with Mis, Claaae
1 $2-Chil



(Adonisaio



” Oecemiber 219t— Christmas at Fort Charlotte— 650 pm.
Peatuatng t the Royal Bahkames iDefense Force Concert Band
(Adunission $40- Reception te follow}

trem $_-Gemer al)

ammaxet painting, cogkka decor. ating and visita





EAB: TRA SRT OBS TONES EMMITT PIT OEE IR TE TEE

venture,” the source added,
pointing out that the “consci-

Sentious and diligent” are prob-

ably in a-minority.

A foreign barrister told me.
that the Bahamas Bar is held in.

such low. ésteem that it is

that inward foreign investment
relies heavily on the rule of law
being in place.

It’s certainly true that if the

Bahamas media were to operate
at the same level of efficiency as
much of the legal profession,
no newspaper would ever
appear, and no television pro-
gramme would ever be made.

.It really is as bad as that.

But INSIGHT’s concern lies



“with the victims: ordinaty

adéspair i in their own land at the
apparent hopelessness, of. thes
_ situation.

sional climate that leads.a
woman attorney to believe,
without any sense of shame,
that.she can misappropriate a
client’s funds for her own busi-
ness use, with no hint of
accountability.

When she finally handed the
money over, she was right on
the brink of being exposed by
The Tribune. Evidently that,

and the threat of a writ, prompt-, .

ed an instant desire to do the
decent thing.
Self-interest and self-preser-

TENDER FOR

CAFETERIA OPERATION



ahamians who feel mounting &
mekind of justice-prevailed:: ‘Reft
“to her own profession’ stegula- .

“And it wonders at a prolee

ssvation were; of;.course, the

‘prime motivatoys:but at least a

tory machinery, it’s unlikely that
her client-would ever have got

~ her money back.

As a result, one more ordi- °
nary Bahamian would have fall-
en foul of the kind of cynical
exploitation which has now
become commonplace. One
more family would have been
left out of pocket by a lawyer’s
greed. How much longer can
this diabolical situation be
allowed to continue right at the
heart of our system of justice? ©

e Have you fallen victim toa .

rogue lawyer? Please fax details
to 328-2398 or e-mail



~ The National Insurance Boatd invites suitably qualified businesses to wea tenders for
the contract to operate the cafeteria of the National Insurance Board’s Head Oftice,
Clifford Darling C omplen, Baillou Hill Road.

The following requirements must be met:

1. Tenders must be Hienyed with the’ proper licensing authorities,

“

Tenders must meet all the requirements of the Ministry of Health and other televant |
agencies related to food services.

Tenders must be ible to provide food for 320, or more persons dat ee

Tenders must be able to ptovide lunch for Board and/or Executive : Management
eennes

All National Insurance contributions should be curtent.

Interested persons may cdect a Bid Application from the Directot’s - Office of shes
National Insurance Boatd’s Head Office, Clifford Darling Complex, ,Baillou Hill Road.

All proposals should be sealed, marked “Bid for Cafeteria,” and must beldelivered not :
later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday, December 5, 2008, to: pin Sa

The Cafeteria Comunittee

THE NATIONAL INSURANCE BOARD

Clifford Darling Complex
Baillou Hill Road
Nassau, Bahamas









AERA LENCO

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED. INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS





La qo

Today Tuesday WINDS WAVES VISIBILITY















: _ WATER TEMPS.
High = Low W High Low W WASSAU Today: » ~ Eat 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
| ats 2 Tuesday: _ NE at 5-10 Knots . 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
| FREEPORT Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F



45/7 33/0 c











eS LEE a FORECAST

\ccu Weather RealFeel




AccuWeather RealFee



VAAN eae era

84°-66° F 82°-62° F , 83°-64° F



VAgistsriis

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i : 4 Tuesday: __NE at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
: r i : as s ABACO Today: E at 15-20 Knots 3-5 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
Mostly sunny,a ~—- Mainly clear with a Mostly suriny. 4 Sunshine with a Sunny and i Sunshine and The higher the AccuWeather UV Index™ number, the Tuesday: _NE at 5-10 Knots 2-3 Feet 10-20 Miles 80° F
shower: breezy, shower in spots. | passing shower. comfortable. 4 _ pleasant. i greater fhe need fer eye and skin. protection.
High: 81°. =| ~~ High: 80° High: 80° 4 High: 80°. |
High: 80° Low: 70° Low: 69° LOW: 65° Low: 65° LOW: See

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The exclusive AccuWeather RealFeel Temperature® is an index that combines the effects of temperature, wind, humidity, sunshine intensity, cloudiness, precipitation, pressure, and Today 5:10am. 2.9 > 11:26am. 0.2 P76 RR ee. * * :
elevation on the-human body—everything that effects how warm or cold a person feels. Temperatures reflect the high and the low for the day. sf ao 5:28pm. 2.3 11:21pm. 0.1.
: Tuesday 54am. 29 t210pm. 0.1



5 6:10pm. 2.3 =
ioe Weiinesday® 35am. 29 12:02am. 0.0



Statistics are for Nassau through 1. m. yesterday







ABACO : Fa ene eee 6:49 p.m. . 2.3 12:52 p.m. 0.1

Cc High ap ceavesesssuacvavenstivs Sgietteussysrsianva terete a7 ie = Thursday 7:14 a.m. 99 12:42am. 0.0

= Low ... ve veesessesee 08° F/20° C : : 7:27 p.m. 23 4:32 p.m. 0.1

A Normal high siisectnnns doutiwuse.veeietie BO F27°C ©
Normal OW ......esseesssecceeeeeees vesssieeee 09° F/21°C — SRE i.
= Last year's HIgh .a:sssessscsccssecsssesnssieey G2” F/2B° Cs Sw Paes a)
High: 75° F/24° 2 es Last year's |OW- ...sssssseceseserseeseeeeeee B® F/T9° Go "

een E = : Precipitation _:. Sumtise...... 6:33 a.m.: Moonrise. .... 3:49 a.m.
ee AS Of 1 p.m. yeSterday vccccccsecsssesne 0.00" “Sunset... .5:20 p.m. Moonset... . 3:10 p.m.





- Year tO date w...ccccsessseseseseseseseeeseeseres 46,43" - First Full
“High: 74°F/23°C : Normal year to date 0. w. 48.85" ee 5
Low:58° F/14°C si ;
= AccuWeather.com 34/1 29/-1 § FX) showers
: : 55s : Forecasts and graphics provided by. RES ea aS / [234 T-storms’
ge ; : gee AccuWeather, Inc. ©2008 © Nov. 27 Dec. 5 Dec. 12 la"o'd Rain © SR
_<.. : F/26° i om ; ae © Aaa ELEUTHERA : : = [*, 4 Flurries Fronts

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: Forecast ee temperatures are for selected cities. Stationary egg

65° F/18°C — oA

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KEY WEST : : . lM agli, CATISLAND
High: 77° F/25°C a = ee High: 74° F/23°C




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SANSALVADOR PE OE,
High:78°F/26°C’
Low: 62° F/17° G:



Shown is today's weather. Temperatures are today's
highs and tonights's lows.

29)... 15/2: sh

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which way the wind blows.
body. oes it better,

High Low W






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Jacksonville



«Kansas City” EDISU
‘Las VOR High: 80° F/27°C
Lae: RSE





(3 28/-2 st ee
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5 -s 679 45/7
23-6 s 54/12 —

: Cleveland





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Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunder-

; re : storms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice, Prcp-precipitation, Tr-trace



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MONDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 2008

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APV still gives legendary fuel efficiency in three.
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The Tribune

ON-THE-SPOT-FINANCING

_ funds are no longer there to repay the
aggrieved clients.”
Another prominent figure has been
named as a rogue lawyer by a woman
laiming that he messed up a divorce
action, kept her money and lost her
papers. —
_ Repeatedly she has tried to get a
response from this man, all to no avail.
-“T could never reach him on the
_ phone. At one point he told me to call
back on another number, but it was.a
wrong number.
_ “Once he said my husband had the
_. papers, but he didn’t and asked: What
ae papers? The lawyer even lied to me,
_ Saying my husband had moved, when .
_ in fact my husband had been living i in ;
the same house for the past ten years.”
‘The woman made repeated trips, at
: considerable expense, from a Family
Island to see the lawyer, usually with
no result. Once a secretary said she
felt sorry for the client and asked her
fo call back in five minutes. When she
did so, another girl answered and said
the lawyer was not in.
-. When she was eventually able to
ce speak to the lawyer, he said: “Call by
my office tomorrow.” When she did
so, he had left for the United States.
“What do you do with people like
_ him?” she asked INSIGHT in despair,
“IT wrote him to give me back my mon-
ey, saying if he didn’t let me have it, I
would report him to the Bar Associa-
tion.
- “I got nothing from him. In one let-
ter, I asked him'to give the money toa
third party, but he never did. I wrote
him another letter. It came back.”
_ Left:in limbo, the client now feels
powerless. The lawyer still has her
money, the divorce matter is still unre- -
‘solved; the papers appear to be lost or
mislaid, and the same old pattern of
_ dishonesty and incompetence has
emerged to the detriment of an inno-
cent person seeking closure.
. In this case, the combination of pro-
fessional neglect, downright tardiness
and inexplicable heartlessness is par-
ticularly poignant because the legally-
- qualified villain involved could possi-
bly be seeking your support at the
next general election. His name
‘reclines in INSIGHT’s dossier of
shame, awaiting resurrection when the
time is right.

Now let’s consider the case of Eric
Moree, one of Andrew Thompson’s
victims, who handed over nearly
cause ae of that $11,000 for work ona property trans-

‘control their 3

wing’ goes on and :
1s0 deep that the SEE page 10 ay





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