Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008





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Government to provide
mortgage assistance

PM introduces programme
to help those who may not
be able to sustain payments

HB By CHESTER ROBARDS.
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Government is
set to present a third tier of its
own economic relief programme,
which could be implemented as
early as the beginning of Novem-
ber, according to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

Speaking at this year’s annual

International Monetary

EU ECONOMIC SS
PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

THE Bahamas Government
is set to sign this week a
“goods-only” EPA with the
European Union. Signature of

_ a separate section covering ser- _
vices and other trade-related

_issues has been deferred for up
to six months.

_ Local think tank The Noe :
sau Institute has called for fur--
ther public consultation about —
this important international -
agreement that will have far-
reaching and lasting effects on
the livesofBahamians.
To help its readers under-
stand the issues, The Tribune is
today publishing an informa-

_ tive analysis of the EPA by The
Nassau Institute explaining
what the agreement means for
the Bahamas.

Read n more on Page 5 inside.



Fund/World Bank Group meet-

_ings, Mr Ingraham introduced a

programme created to provide
assistance to individuals who
might not, because of job loss or
other circumstances, be able to
sustain their mortgage payments.

“For persons who would have
lost their jobs, persons in the
hotel sector who would be on
short work weeks, and persons
who for some other unforeseen
circumstance are now unable to
keep current in their mortgage
payment, but who ordinarily
sought to make their mortgage
payments for their homes, we
would like to ensure that these
persons don’t end up losing their
homes because of what we con-
sider to be this temporary setback
— even though we do not know
how long this temporary situa-
tion is likely to exist,” he said.

This will be Government’s
third social assistance programme
enacted in response to a declining
economy here and abroad. The
US, where the economic snow-
ball began its downhill run, has
implemented various stimulus
plans and bailouts to restart its
economy.

“The IMF (International Mon-
etary Fund) is projecting that eco-
nomic recovery is likely to take
place in the major economies of

SEE page 13



ATHLETES HOME FOR CELEBRATION

pea

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TEAM BAHAMAS Olympic medallist Chris Brown gets the thumbs up while
signing for fans on Saturday. Brown was among the Bahamian athletes
home for a celebration of their efforts at the XXIX Beijing Olympic Games.
The party kicked off with a motorcade and concert at Arawak Cay.

The PM calls for
international support
for Caricom countries

AS THE global economic crisis
ripples throughout the Caribbean,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
called for international support
of the Caricom countries at the
Annual International Monetary
Fund and World Bank Group
meeting at the IMF headquarters
in: Washington yesterday.

Delivering a statement on .

behalf of Caricom, Mr Ingraham
commented on the poignant tim-
ing of the annual meeting as the
rising cost of food and fuel is pre-
senting serious macroeconomic,
social and human development



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Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham |

challenges in the Caribbean’s
small, open economies.

In addition to the rising prices
severely impacting living stan-

SEE page 13

your savings:



after st sti

o By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Grand
ahama teenager became the
island’s 10th homicide victim on
Saturday evening when he was
fatally stabbed during an alterca-
tion in the Redwood Lane area.

Chief Supt Basil Rahming said
police are investigating the stab-
bing of a 19-year-old male resi-
dent of Caravel Beach who died
around 8pm at Rand Memorial

Dw



Hospital.



bony
TseteaY

Mr Rahming reported that the
victim suffered multiple stab
wounds about the body. He noted
that two of the deceased’s male

. friends were hospitalized for stab

wounds — one was treated and
discharged, while the other was
detained in hospital.

Police had not released the vic-
tims’ identities up to press time on
Monday.

According to police reports,
the victim was with two male

SEE page 13

Andros teachers row could see
children kept out of two schools

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS

CHILDREN will be kept out of two schools in Andros today if a pair
of teachers, who had been transferred elsewhere-return to their same

classrooms instead.

Parents, who claim the two teachers show disregard for authority and
have compromised their children's education, supported the Ministry of
Education's decision to move them to schools outside of Andros at the

beginning of the academic year.

But in September, the teachers returned to the primary and sec-
ondary schools in central Andros, to the protest of parents.

SEE page 12

Police are
involved
in two
shoot-outs

POLICE were involved in
two shoot-outs and high speed
chases over the holiday week-
end:

Around 3.10 am Sunday,

officers were on mobile patrol
in the Grove area when they
came across a white Nissan
Sentra occupied by several
males.

It is reported that the men

opened fired on police and a
chase followed. The vehicle |
finally stopped in the Florida
Court area. The men aban-
doned the vehicle and fled.

Police checked the vehicle
and found a blood stain on
the front passenger side, but
no arrests were made. They
did, however, retrieve a .09
mm pistol with three live
rounds of ammunition.

Police are still investigating
the matter.

Around 10 pm the same
day police came across upon a
Ford Taurus in the area of
Bougainvillea Boulevard,
South Beach.

According to police, the

SEE page 13










Marsh Harbour:

Weekend sees
a number of

armed robberies:
By CHESTER ROBARDS

Tribune Staff Reporter —

DESPITE an increased police
presence over the holiday week-
end there were a number of rob-
beries involving firearms that offi-
cers have to add to their ever grow-
ing list.

According to Assistant Chief
Superintendent Hulan Hanna
police put special operations units
in place around the island in an
effort to deter crime during a
weekend he says criminals take
advantage of.

“In some areas people just hap-
pen to see the vulnerability of these
establishments, seize the opportu-
nity and subsequently rob these
establishments,” he said.

According to police, around 6.40
on Friday the Midway restaurant
and bar was held up by a man
wearing camouflage who dis-
charged a weapon into the air
while leaving.

On Saturday at around 12.30
am two armed men robbed a man
selling jerk pork on Bimini Avenue
and Market Street.

When officers arrived on the
scene the two masked males in
dark clothing fled. The officer gave
chase, but the men escaped.

Later that day a male opened

SEE page 12




Nassau: 356.7764
Freeport: .352.6676/7
367.3135



FIDELITY

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LA



PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL candidate, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., campaigns at

the Seagate Convention Centre in Toledo, Ohio, Monday, Oct. 13, 2008.

S Coling Genera



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Political strategist amazed by
Bahamian support for Obama

THE TRIBUNE







and knowledge of US system

â„¢ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

OVERWHELMING sup-
port for Barack Obama in the
Bahamas and Bahamians’
detailed knowledge of the US
political system amazed polit-
ical strategist Gary Nordlinger
when he visited Nassau last
week. —

Mr Nordlinger, an award-

winning strategist who has ©

provided political strategies
for hundreds of public offi-
cials, was invited by the Unit-
ed States Embassy and Col-
lege of the Bahamas (COB)
to discuss the US political sys-
tem, electoral college, the
course of historic campaigns
and possible policies of the
Barack Obama or John
McCain administrations at
COB’s Grosvenor Close cam-
pus, Shirley Street, last week.

Nassau was Mr Nordlinger’s
last stop in the Caribbean fol-

‘lowing visits to Jamaica and

Trinidad and Tobago where
he also encountered unani-
mous support for Barack Oba-
ma.

He said: “It's almost this
euphoria for Barack Obama,
they can’t even imagine the
guy losing, but frankly with
international policy in general
there is very little difference
between the two.”

Mr Nordlinger explained
how idealists have dominated
US foreign policy over the last
seven years, while both
McCain and Obama are more
realistic in their approach. _

“Both candidates are much
more traditional, post World
War II,_and multi-latera] in
their approach,” he said.

“They are realists as
opposed to idealists.”

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voted into power as the con-
gress will stay Democratic at
least for the next two years,
and has far more influence
than the president does, Mr
Nordlinger said.

“We are going to see the
Federal Treasury try to get
every potential dollar of tax
revenue they can and that
could affect the Bahamas,” he
added.

Parallels

Mr Nordlinger also main-
tains there are several paral-
lels between McCain and
Obama’s domestic policies.

He said: “Both accept glob-
al warming, both support stem
cell research and both think
something needs to be done
about healthcare. :

“JT think that is one of the
reasons the country is having a
hard time deciding.-People
like both of these candidates.”

The tight election will boil
down to the battleground
states: Florida, Pennsylvania,
Ohio, Virginia, New Hamp-
shire, Colorado, New Mexico,
and Wisconsin, where neither

candidate has a firm strong:
hold, Mr Nordlinger said.
Senator Obama will need to

_ pass the 50 per cent threshold

with around 54 per cent to
secure his seat in these, states,
but the Democratic candidate
has only crossed this mark in
Pennsylvania where he has
obtained 51 percent.

And undecided voters may
not choose him above Sena-
tor McCain because he is bet-
ter known, just as voters chose
Senator Obama over the more
famous Hilary Clinton in the
Democratic presidential pri-
maries.

“We really can’t call this for
Obama just yet,” Mr
Nordlinger told Bahamians
during his presentation in Nas-
sau, “Upcoming US Elections:
The campaign of a lifetime.”

Following his visit, the lead-
ing political strategist said: “I
was just amazed at the high

level of interest in the elec-.

tion and the high level of sup-
port for Obama. —

“And I was really impressed
by people’s very sophisticat-
ed knowledge of the US pollit-
ical system.”

Newly formed committee requests
meeting with Gaming Board Chairman

THE newly formed ad-hoc Committee for Gaming Reform
has formerly requested a meeting with Gaming Board Chair-

man, Malcolm Adderley.

Committee Chairperson Sidney Strachan has written a letter

' requesting that Mr Adderley join with the committee in launch-

ing a formal process to-effectively reform existing gaming law.
Broadly representative and growing, the Committee for Gam-

..ing Reform argues that Bahamian gaming law is arcane. It

maintains that a modern democracy such as The Bahamas is
hypocritical in its treatment of citizens within the framework of

gaming law.

at
E

“The committee is a bit overwhelmed with the support it is
gathering,” said Mr Strachan. “It’s as if we awakened a sleeping
giant; calls are coming in, offers of assistance are being received
and we’ve gotten dozens of high profile citizens willing to get
involved. Our determination to see this matter through is strong
and will continue to grow as this movement gathers more
momentum.

The Committee has requested Mr. Adderley indicate a date
on which he can meet on or before Friday, October 17.

‘
INDE .





THE TRIBUNE





Woman, 21,
killed in car
accident in
Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 21-year-
old woman motorist lost her
life on Sunday, pushing the
traffic fatality count to nine
on Grand Bahama for the
year.

Geraldine Cooper, a resi-
dent of Apt No 2C Gambier
Drive, crashed into a tree
around 11am on Bast Sun-

rise Highway. She was taken-

to Rand Memorial Hospital,
where she died around 1.08
pm of multiple severe
injuries.

According to Chief Supt
Basil Rahming, Ms Cooper
was driving a 2001 Honda
Accord EX, license 32523,
east on the highway when
she lost control of the vehi-
cle. ,

Supt Rahming said it
appears that excessive speed
was the cause of the acci-
dent.

He said according to eye-
witness reports, Ms Cooper
was travelling at a high rate
of speed and, shortly after
passing through the intersec-
tion with Shearwater Drive,
ran off the road onto the
grass median and crashed
head-on into a large tree.

When The Tribune arrived
at the scene around 11.15
am, a large crowd had gath-
ered in the area, peering
inside the wrecked vehicle.

A young woman driver,
wearing an orange T-shirt,
was lying unconscious in the.
front driver’s seat of the car.

The hood of the vehicle
was completely wrapped
around the tree. The entire
front windshield had fallen
out of position as a result of
the force of the impact, land-
ing onto the grassy median
at the base.of the tree.

As-the woman lay motion-
less inside the wreckage, sev-
eral'persons who had initial-
ly witnessed the accident
kept close vigil near the
vehicle, as curious onlookers
continued to assemble in the
area.

A short time later, a police
van arrived at the scene. Fire
services officers were able to
extricate Ms Cooper from
the wreckage with the Jaws
of Life. te

She was taken by EMS
personnel to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where she later
died. Mr Rahming said Traf-
fic Police are continuing
their investigation into this
latest tragic accident. He is
appealing to motorists to.
observe speed limits and to
drive with care and caution.

In brief | Only cal

true emergency, public urged

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter



EMERGENCY medical ser-
vices is being swamped by non-
emergency calls that sometimes
cause severe emergencies to be
put on hold, according to senior
officials at the Public Hospitals
Authority’s EMS division.

Paul Newbold, Director of
EMS for the Public Hospitals
Authority (PHA), held a press
conference yesterday to appeal
to the public not to call EMS
through the 919 dispatch unless
their situation is a legitimate
emergency.

According to Alvery Hanna,

Medical Director for EMS, things

that constitute an actual emer-
gency are chest pains, which could
signify a heart attack, uncontrol-
lable bleeding, bleeding of the
digestional track, shortness of
breath or if one side of the body

person is having a stroke. Elwood
Rolle, Acting Manager of EMS,
said individuals often consider the

ambulance a “Jitney Service”,
adding that the service is “not
perfect.”

He'said there are sometimes
glitches in their dispatch system as
well as technical problems with
their ambulances, for which they
have a dedicated mechanic who
works five days a week and is on
24 hours call. Ambulance
response times would be much
more efficient if the system were
decentralized and units were dis-
persed from their base at the
Princess Margaret Hospital to
various places on the island, Mr
Newbold suggested.

He said the decentralization

plan could come into effect by .

next summer.

From January to September of
this year EMS received 1,773
code 22 calls, which are calls that
might have not required EMS to

frame they received only 29 code
13’s which are considered severe
emergency calls.

Mr Newbold suggested that
because they are obligated to
respond to calls that might not
constitute an actual emergency,
severe emergency calls are some-
times put on hold until a unit is
available. And if all of the 10
ambulances the service employs
on New Providence are engaged,
the Paradise island unit, which

was furnished by Kerzner Inter- ~

national, can be dispatched to the
scene; as in the case of Jean Sit-
ney who was beaten and stabbed
to death in the Mason Addition
area last Tuesday.

“Based on my last statistics we
should have at least now 15
ambulances, a lot of things have

slowed down basically because of

the budget,” said Mr Newbold.
“But if people would only call an
ambulance for a true emergency
we would not need but 10 ambu-
lances.”

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 3

OO) De eS
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DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER
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and Pacific Group of States
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Ghana from October 2-3,
2008.

Mr. Symonette was accompanied by Mr. Frank
Davis, First Secretary/Consul, Bahamas Mission to
. the European Communities, London. The Summit

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette represented the country at
the Sixth Summit of Heads of State and Government
of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of
States (ACP) held in Accram, Ghana from October
2-3, 2008.

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i

PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited.

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

NIB needs careful watching

ACCORDING to the seventh actuarial
report, which itself is not up to date, National
Insurance’s resources could run dry by 2034.
The report referred to this as an optimistic
assessment, which means that the fund could be
in trouble much sooner. In fact it is already in
trouble with acting director Anthony Curtis
admitting that NIB is already “several million
dollars” behind the target set for contribution
collections this year.

Part of the reason given for the rapid deple-
tion of funds is that while the country’s popu-
lation is aging, fewer young people are entering
the labour force to make their contributions.
Add to that the fact:that those who should be
contributing are not, then it does not take much
commonsense to understand that the fund is
indeed reaching crisis point.

Last year it was reported that government
would have to step in and re-evaluate NIB or

the potential negative cash flow and depletion of —

its $1.3 billion reserve fund, projected for 2029,
could be experienced as early as 2014-2015.
About this time last year we reported an
NIB director complaining that he had sleep-
less nights thinking about NIB’s huge over-
staffing and administrative costs. “This is 25
per cent of the revenue,” he said, noting that it
was a high percentage for the Caribbean. There
are no signs that this situation has improved.
Despite this staff overload, NIB: chairman
Patrick: Ward-made-what:onsthe-face of it
_ seemed a strange: statementia Ghia nding,

“executives for shortfalls in contribution collec-
tions as they have not had the right “organisa-
tional infrastructure” to be “fully effective.”
Does this suggest that despite having an abun-
dance of staff they do not have the right staff for
the job?

Mr Ward also admitted that at NIB’s last
union negotiations a performance-related pay
system was agreed, but the process was “abort-
ed” by the board.

Asked by a reporter if he would agree that
shortfalls in contribution collections would sug-
gest that some staff members may. not have
been doing their job, Mr Ward said: “It’s a
good point.” .

He said that when the current board met
for the first time “there was in place a fairly
comprehensive report that dealt with elements
of performance standards, reviews, how cer-
tain things should be done. It was our feeling
that those issues as in place at the time were not
appropriate to be introduced for a variety of rea-
sons, so we aborted that process.”

Despite this verbal shadow boxing, Mr Ward

. did not want his.remarks interpreted as a lack of

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“commitment to improving performance.”
We doubt that anyone — except those close-

ly involved with NIB — would know how to
interpret his words. However, we suspect that
here is a concerned man, with amammoth prob-
lem, who obviously cannot implement the nec-
essary solutions. He is trying to say something,
but in the name of discretion is holding back.

And so we went poking around on our own,
looking for more vocal sources.

’“There’s too much political interference!”
blurted out a frustrated, but reliable source.
Apparently, there are certain people, even cer-

_ tain groups of people, who believe that if they

have the ear of their “representer” in parliament
— be they PLP or FNM — they are exempt
from paying their National Insurance contri-
butions. And they refuse to pay.

There are problems among the building
trades, where workers move from job to job,
and many contractors keep no records of their
employees. Of course, according to law, this is a
must. When a worker is taken ill and submits a
claim for health insurance, a, check with NIB
shov : that he has no insurance, and his employ-
er, or former employer, has no records. Anoth-
er pocket of concern is among domestic employ-
ees.

And now that the economy is sluggish and
some Bahamians are only working a couple
days a week, they don’t let their ethics get in the

»~» way of-creative-methods to-supplement their
A VINCOMEpuinniess
He said itayould*be) unfair.to blame: NIB *:¢..

.,@pparently,:NIB’s: claims for sickness are
now on the rise.

“Because things are sluggish,” we were told,
“some are going to the doctor to get a sick
claim. This is increasing the number of claims.
Can you imagine what $240 a week could mean
to a family?”

Our source said that $240 is based on the
highest salaries, to which most hotel employees,
being in the top bracket, would be entitled.

NIB has promised to improve collection
from all employers and self employed — we
hope these include everyone, especially those
who are being shielded by their political umbrel-
las.

According to NIB those who owe will be
“ageressively pursued” for payment with pros-
ecutions in the courts likely for defaulters.

With the present state of our judicial system
this is.most unlikely unless a special court is
app. ated that will deal with nothing but NIB
matters.

And from what we have been told this court
could be kept in business around the clock.

NIB and its problems need close and careful
scrutiny.



THE TRIBUNE



-Minister’s
‘razzle-dazzle’
speech left me

speechless

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It was with disbelief that I
watched Vanderpool “Razzle-
dazzle” Wallace’s speech on
TV last night. It astounded me

_ so much that I am driven to

write this comment which you
might put into your “letters to
the editor” section. Here
goes....

The comments from Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace on ZNS
on Wednesday night once
again convinced me that all
Ministry of Tourism employ-
ees should be required to
work in the tourism industry
in a hands on position for at
least two years before taking
up any post in this ministry.

With Mr Wallace’s “mile a
minute” style of speaking it
was quite a task to understand
exactly what he was saying,
but I gathered a few facts. He
is going to convince foreign
airlines to lower their fares via
a secret plan. He is going to
start a leaflet or small news-
paper to document visitor’s
opinions as to what is right or
wrong with their Bahamian
experience. He is going to sell
tours and vacation packages
to civil servants stationed 24
hours a day at their computers
manning the. Ministry’s web
site. He is going to promote
the out islands.

There was lots of other stuff
that was somewhat mind bog-
gling, but Mr Wallace was
going at such a lick that facts
and figures were flying past
me at great speed and I could
not grasp it all.

The basic flaws in the busi-
ness of tourism are not too
difficult to see if we care to
look. The Bahamas is a five
star destination due to its
prices. The prices are
inevitable because of the very
high cost of the overheads
(electricity now being the
major stumbling block). The
high prices are not necessarily
a bad thing — they keep the
cheap package tour types
away and it has been proven
that people don’t mind the
prices as long as they feel that
they are getting value for their
money. And this is where it
all falls apart.

Let’s start with appearances.
Right now New Providence
island resembles a construc-



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LETTERS

letters@tribunemecdia.net

tion site. Everywhere you look
there are unfinished buildings,
dilapidated structpres, peeling
paint, knee high grass along
the sides of every road,
garbage and graffiti. In the
eyes of the first world this is all
synonymous with crime and
poverty. Hardly what you
would expect in a five star
resort town. Nowhere is this
more obvious than on Bay
Street itself. And for the cruise
ship passengers this starts as
they are sailing into port with
the ruins of Arawak Cay to
greet them and the graffiti all
over the dock side walls. Little
wonder that hundreds of them
decide not to disembark.

Every day the members of
parliament step out into the
middle of the mess and it
seems to bother them not one
iota.

If you are arriving by air
there is the spectacle of the
airport.

Now I am no expert in con-
struction but if $300,000,000
is being spent on this struc-
ture I will cheerfully eat my
hat. So far all there is to be
seen is some refurbished bath-
rooms, a couple of new lug-
gage carousels, a lick of paint
here and there and a new
parking arrangement. Airport
employees happily parade up
and down through the various
terminals and occasionally
stop to sleep a while on seat-
ing meant for the travelling
public. Not a five star sight.

Taxi service ranges from a
few very good to many incred-
ibly bad — I am sure that
these guys mean well, but
playing a tape of your
favourite preacher’s sermon
at full blast while driving is
not exactly what our north
American clients would con-
sider appropriate after a day
of stressful air travel and a
start to a restful vacation. And

skip the tall stories about
Eddy Murphy living on the
Cable Beach strip or Oprah
living on Paradise Island.

If you attempt to book an
activity (what is left of our
activities as so many of the
quality activities are now
closed). be prepared to
encounter tour agents who do
not know the first thing about
the product they are trying to
“sell”. Remember that their
main objective is to pocket

their kick back which ranges

from 20 per cent to 25 per cent
of the price of the tour. This
practice has helped to keep
the tour prices artificially high
and has put many an entre-
preneur out of business.
Forget about native shows
— they are a thing of the past.
While other Caribbean desti-
nations can boast of their cul-

-tural based night club attrac-

tions, we appear to have none.

If you are hoping to start a
tourist based business, I hope
you have won the lottery as
the banks will laugh at you.
The government offers no
incentives whatsoever to
tourist businesses — in fact
they are looking for ways to
tax you.

As for Out Island visits —
the infrastructure on most of
the outer islands is not com-
plete, there is a basic lack of
activities and some of the
islands are competing with
Nassau in the half finished
building/garbage dump cate-
gory.

I was hoping that Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace would touch
on just one of these basic sub-
jects but apparently they are
not deemed important.

As 90 per cent of our popu-
lation neither know nor care
about tourism, I expect to
hear no critique of his speech.
Let’s hope that Cuba doesn’t
open up any time soon. As the
saying goes “you only miss the
water when the well runs dry.”

FELICITY SMITH
Nassau,
October 9, 2008.

Palin’s debate tactics did not
include answering questions

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wish to make my first impression of Sarah Palin the Vice Presi-
dential debate which is that (1) She did not answer the questions put
to her. (2) She recited at a brisk pace non-stop her talking points
regardless of the question under discussion.

If someone had waved a hand in front of her, it seemed that she could
not stop her spiel because that is the way she had learned the answers.

As usual she was very sarcastic. I suppose she will fool her people
with her tactics, but I find it a strange way of debating for such a high
post. Senator Biden could have been more forceful and not let Palin get
away With her sarcasm:and untruths.

OBSERVER
Nassau,
October, 2008.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 5



EU Economic Partnership - §&
what it means for the Bahamas

@ By THE NASSAU
INSTITUTE

F THE proposed Eco-

nomic Partnership

Agreement with the

European Union cov-
ering trade both in goods and
services is signed in its present
form by the Bahamas, the
effects on the country’s econo-
my and way of life will be far-
reaching.

The Government should be
commended for its efforts to
consult stakeholders, as well as
members of the public through
town meetings, and for its pub-
lication last month of a detailed
explanatory document about
the EPA.

However, it appears that, for
the most part, the Government
has not entered into a genuine
consultation about the funda-
mental issue of whether it is in
the general interest of the
Bahamas to sign an EPA at all;
and many Bahamians remain
uninformed about its likely
impact on their lives and wel-
fare.

There has been no formal-
ized national consultation
involving political parties, the
trades unions, the churches and
the private sector as a whole

Instead, the Government has
taken a policy position, in line
with other CARIFORUM
countries, to go along with the
EPA.

It has sought to explain and
justify its decision rather than
to debate the overall merits and
demerits of the EPA as far as
the nation is concerned.

With the Government now
set to sign later this month a
“goods-only” EPA dealing with

TROPICAL
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PHONE: 322-2157





for reciprocal duty free trade.

treatment than to EU.







disputes with the EU.

SSM HHH

market access issues, aune.
deferring its services offer for
at most six months, it is timely
for the Nassau Institute to set
out briefly the main issues in a
readily comprehensible form
and to draw attention to a num-
ber of questions which should
be examined further.

What is the EPA?

The Lomé Convention of
1975 and its successor, the Coto-
nou Agreement of 2000, pro-
vided preferential tariff access
into the EU for exports from
the African; Caribbean and

. Pacific (ACP) states. This, of

course, included the Bahamas.

The original intention of the
EU was laudable: Its stated pur-
pose was to help eradicate
poverty in the context of sus-
tainable development in devel-
oping countries with a view also

¢ Government set to sign “goods-only” EPA with EU providing

e Requirement under “Most Favoured Nation” rules to offer
other trading partners, including the USA, no less favourable

e Signature of separate section covering services and other
trade-related matters to be deferred for up to six months..

¢ Need for national debate on this important international
agreement which will have widespread and lasting effects.

¢ Government should be more open in discussing services,
regional integration and institutional and legal reform. It
should also reassure the public about costs and means of -

implementation as well as provision for collective resolution of




to pauensieatie democracy “nd
good governance.

Even though cynics suggest-
ed that the EU’s real purpose
was to secure a steady supply
of raw materials or primary
products, the fact was that the
ACP countries benefited from
these trade preferences.

The Cotonou Agreement
envisaged that such preferences
would eventually be replaced
by Free Trade Agreements
(FTA).

’ This was necessary in order
that the EU could meet its non-
discriminatory obligations
required by the World Trade
Organization (WTO). But the
EU itself has now gone further.

Notwithstanding its own pro-
tectionist policies, the EU is
looking (for its own purposes)

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Man, 38,
accused of
having Sex
with girl, 15

A 38-year-old man of Sun-
shine Way accused of having
sexual intercourse with a 15-
year-old girl was arraigned in
a Magistrate’s Court Friday.

According to court dock-
eis, Thomas Nottage is
accused of committing the
offence on Wednesday! May
28. Nottage, who was

‘raigned before Magistrate
jinda Virgill at Court 9,
Nassau Street, was not
required to plead to the. -
charge.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000. The case was
»djourned to November 5.

Twe men in
eourt on
rug charge

Two men were arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court on
Thursday on a marijuana
possession charge.

Police have charged Leslie
}rancis, 26, Tamaro Nelson
Rolle, 32, both of Dublin
Drive off Faith Avenue with
possession of three and a
half pounds of marijuana
with the intent to supply.
According to court dockets
ihe men were found in pos-

session of the drugs on Tues- ,

day, October 7.

Both men, who appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez, pleaded not
ouilly to the charge and were
granted bail in the sum of
£1.0,000.

“he case was adjourned to

ober 16 and transferred —
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Illegal dumping around Bonefish
Pond is threatening the wetlands

lm BY MEGAN REYNOLDS

NEW Providence wetlands
used as an illegal dumping ground
will be cleaned up by the
Bahamas National Trust on Sat-
urday with the public’s help.

The damaging practice of
dumping waste of all kinds in the
wetland area surrounding Bone-
fish Pond off Cowpen Road, was
surveyed by government officials
on a tour of the area led by
BNT's Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee last week.

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, State Minister Phen-
tom Neymour, government offi-
cials and representatives from the
Nature Conservancy, Bahamas
Reef Environment Education
Foundation and Dolphin Encoun-
ters Project BEACH, saw first-
hand how the illegal dumping is
affecting the wetlands. ~

Now the BNT, working with.
the Department of Environmen-
tal Health, the Ministry of the
Environment and othér agencies,
are preparing for a major cleanup
of the area with the help of vol-
unteers.

The BNT's deputy executive
director Lynn Gape said: "Bone-
fish Pond and areas along Cow-

A lot to

eta



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The experience of builders and
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your search for the perfect spot.

First, and perhaps most obvi-
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GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS, including minister or state for culture Charles
Maynard, survey dumped garbage around Bonefish Pond with the Bahamas
National Trust. °

pen Road have been plagued with
illegal dumping for many years.

“Typically, trucks are hired to ~

take rubbish from a household or
a respectable business, unfortu-
nately they often do not make it
to the landfill to offload their car-
go.

“Those visiting the park last
week were shocked to find com-
pany logos visually evident in
much of the garbage found in the
park."

The BNT took a trucking com-
pany to court for dumping in the
park and won a judgment against
the offender two years ago.

It is a firm belief of the BNT

and Department of Environmen-
tal Health that companies and
households should be held
responsible for where their trash
ends up. Ms Gape added: "At
the moment there is an ‘out of
sight, out of mind' mentality
towards garbage disposal and
anyone who hires someone to
take their trash’should care about
where it ends up."

The landfill on Harrold Road
is the only legal dumpsite on New
Providence and only loads that
are 300Ibs and above are charged
a modest fee of $10.

The Department of Environ-
mental Health is encouraging the

REAL
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smallest lots tend to appreciate
more quickly than their larger
neighbours.

Next, imagine how the terrain
will affect aspects like drainage
and the nositioning of the home.
Ask your builder to explain the
impact that irregular terrain will
have on your plan.

Related to the terrain is the
view the property offers. Take
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your view. A gas station may one
day be built on that beautiful
vacant lot out back (if possible
zoning permits at a later date).

And finally, the mantra of real
estate is “location, location, loca-
tion.” Want a faster commute?
Buy a lot near the entrance of
your subdivision. Want to keep
your kids safe from traffic? Then
plan a purchase further toward
the back.



VISITORS, including Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux and State Minis-
ter for Culture Charles Maynard were given a re-usable “green” shopping bag
after surveying the dumping around Bonefish Pond.

public to defer payment to truck-
ing companies until a receipt is
shown that indicates that the load
has been delivered to the land-
fill. Trucks are weighed and a
receipt indicating the weight of
the load and payment are given to
each vehicle offloading at the
landfill. Ms Gape said: "If every-

It’s all common sense, really, -

but it helps to take an organised
and educated approach to this
critical element of home con-
struction.

one insisted on seeing a receipt,
there would be a lot less garbage
on the island of New Provi-
dence."

The clean up will start at 8am
on Saturday, October 18, and go
on until lpm. Members of the
public are encouraged to get
involved.



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shares were sold via private placement and, as of 6"

October, 2008, an additional 1,561,000 shares were sold
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As per the resolution of the Board of Directors of Focol
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HE tHIBUNG

mg BY SIR RONALD
SANDERS

otwithstanding
a decision by
the meeting of
Heads of Gov-
ernment of the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group in Ghana on October
2nd and 3rd to appoint a troi-
ka to “engage in high-level
consultations” on the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European
Union (EU), | several
Caribbean countries will sign a
full agreement tomorrow.

The two Caribbean coun-
tries that have said they will
not are Guyana and Haiti.

In the process, the largest
active group of developing
countries faces disintegration.
It is a sad time for developing
countries for they have lost
the only strength they had —-
their unity in negotiating with
the larger and more powerful
. hations of Europe

At the end of the Ghana
‘meeting, the President of Tan-
zania, Mizengo Peter Pinda,
observed that “it is regrettable
and disturbing that while the
EU comprising the big
economies continue to expand
its membership, the negotia-
tions under EPAs are delib-
erately forcing the ACP
groups and Regional Eco-
nomic Communities to disin-
tegrate.” His observation is
perfectly correct. But, the
ACP has only itself to blame.
While it is true that Caribbean
countries were under no com-
pulsion to sign the EPA on
15th October and they could
have waited for the consulta-
tions of the ACP troika, the
split in the ACP did not begin
with the Caribbean. It was the
former French colonies of
Africa that began the process
by agreeing to the Separation
of Africa into four separate
negotiating groups. To the
Caribbean’s credit, its repre-

sentatives tried to preserve -

ACP unity. Had the ACP
stood-up, the EU would not
have succeeded in separating
them.

The ACP was also not
proactive enough in trying to
use its existing structures for
information-sharing and coor-
dination once the separate
negotiations. began. Even
though their aspirations would
have been different, they
could, at least, have sought to
take account of the special
needs of some of their mem-
ber-states and to demand, in
unison, that those needs be
met.

The EU prevailéd because
it acted as one, the ACP failed
because it allowed itself to be
divided. Now, any prospect of
achieving another of the
objectives identified by the
ACP summit is also blowing in
the wind. That objective was
“to pursue the consideration
of the creation of an ACP
Free Trade Area (FTA). "
The idea of an ACP FTA
came far too late. It should
have been pursued in advance
of negotiations with the EU
for an EPA. But, again, the
wording of the objective
shows how little broad-based
political will there was for it in
the ACP. All that the leaders
agreed to do was to pursue
“the consideration” of the
FTA. The EU and others
could have wanted no better
indication of the lack of
resolve by the ACP.

In the event, by deciding to
sign a full EPA with the EU
without the benefit of discus-




4) Surg ry-M
the breast. —




You can survive breast cancer. Karly detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of

Sir Ronald Sanders

sion by the ACP troika (of
which the current Chairman
of CARICOM would have
been a part), Caribbean coun-
tries, with the exception of
Guyana and Haiti, demon-

, strated scant regard for Africa .

and the Pacific. In the process,
they confirmed the observa-
tion of the Tanzanian Presi-
dent that the EPAs are forcing
the disintegration not only of
the ACP but of regional eco-
nomic communities (such as
CARICOM). This latter
point about CARICOM
should not be lightly brushed
aside, for there is nothing in

‘the EPA that allows the pro-

visions of the CARICOM
Treaty to take precedence
over the clauses of the EPA
should a conflict arise. In this

connection, the individual |

relationship of Caribbean
countries to the EU (and, inci-
déntally, to the Dominican

Republic) will override the -

CARICOM Treaty.

In this regard, it is worth
noting that while the OECS
countries and Belize receive
special and differential treat-
ment from Guyana, Jamaica,
Barbados and Trinidad and

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st patients with breast cancer have surgery to

|



Tobago under the CARI-
COM Treaty, they get no spe-

cial treatment under the EPA.

from the EU. Eventually,
they will all have to give full
reciprocal treatment to the
EU for trade in goods and ser-
vices. The OECS countries
exhibited remarkable loyalty
to the larger CARICOM
states in the EPA negotia-
tions.

They might have achieved
more concessions given their
micro size and greater vulner-

-abilities to exogenous shocks

had they too negotiated sepa-
rately.

The effect on the OECS
was one of Guyana’s Presi-
dent Bharrat Jagdeo
expressed concerns when he
demurred from signing a full
EPA. He argued for two
things: a mandatory review of
the EPA within five years to
remedy harm that it might do
to Caribbean economies; and
the supremacy of the CARI-
COM Treaty over the EPA if
a conflict developed. This
proposition was put to
Caribbean leaders by the
CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral and to the European
Commission after the ACP
meeting.»

Favourable

At the time of writing, it is
not known whether Jagdeo’s
two concerns received a
favourable response from
either the EU or Caribbean
leaders, although the
Caribbean leadership should
have fully embraced both
points in the interest both of
developing the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market and Economy and
of halting any consequential
disintegrating tendencies with-
in CARICOM. If the propos-
al didn’t receive a favourable
response, it will account for
why Jagdeo does not join oth-
er Caribbean leaders in sign-
ing the EPA tomorrow.

Guyana might eventually
have to concede to the EPA in
the absence of support, but its
resistance to an EPA it
regards as lop-sided and its

efforts to preserve the
supremacy of regionalism has
won it respect in Europe and
the Caribbean.

As for the ACP, sadly it is
now almost an irrelevant
organisation. It is no longer a
significant influencer of trade
arrangements with the EU; if
it is to play any role in the





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wider trade negotiations in the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) much work will have
to be done by visionary lead-
ers to inspire it.

That possibility now looks
most unlikely.

@eee

(For the next two weeks,

there will be no commentary,

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUN



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We are becoming a

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

HE value of lit-
eracy in today’s
information-
based, techno-
logically-obsessed econo-
my/society is often understat-

ed, particularly in the

Bahamas.

In this country, where we
are producing a multitude of
arithmetically-challenged, illit-
erate students, literacy pro-
grammes should have long
been a crucial aspect of the
Ministry of Education’s plat-
form since even those techni-
cal, vocational and hands-on
jobs call for someone to meet
the literacy demands of at
least being able to read
instructions/manuals.

In Bahamian schools, liter-
acy problems can be observed
with students at the elemen-
tary level on up to tertiary
institutions.

Sadly, when nearly 60 per
cent of the nation’s high
school graduates finished with
attendance certificates instead
of diplomas — for failing to
meet a cumulative grade point
average (GPA) of 2.0 during
six years of high school — it’s
obvious that many of them
are hopelessly entering society
while being ill-equipped to
enter the workforce as they
are literally unemployable
and unqualified to manage
our country’s affairs. +

It is of the essence that
action be taken immediately
to meet the literacy needs of
students and, as educational
writer Rick Allen notes, that
feat can only be accomplished
with the assistance attainable
through the use of literacy
coaches, who can in turn train
teachers to better facilitate
their students in areas such as
comprehension.

Growing up on Long
Island, I was exposed to vari-
ous types of reading material,
from newspaper articles to fic-
tion to documentaries to com-
ic books to vanity published

Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham



ADRIAN



YOUNG MAN’Ss VIEW





GIBSON





“I have discovered that
numerous students have
unrestricted, uninterrupted
access to the internet,
television, music and can do
whatever they desire.” 7



books. I can vividly remem-
ber calling my parents and
pleading with my grandpar-
ents to purchase any new pub-
lications I found interesting,
as I was given “book order
sheets” by one of my former
teachers every month.

Early exposure to reading
material would no doubt
heighten a student’s abilities
and furnish them with the
ability to comprehend and
make inferences, differenti-
ate between textbooks and
story books, and develop dif-
ferent approaches to under-
standing the various subject
areas taught at their schools.

According to Mr Allen, lit- -
eracy coaches are needed in
schools as they can offer spe-
cial training that could assist
teachers (particularly those in
language, arts and literature)
in providing good, effective’
instruction, while including all
students, expanding upon
their limited comprehension
and vocabulary skills.

Coaches

The MOE should note
that, while the recruitment of
competent literacy coaches
would unquestionably have
an impact in instruction,
assessment and leadership

PROCLAMATION

roles, they would also be cru-
cial to the development of in-
school literacy programmes
and, along with teachers,
develop strategies to better
communicate and reach out
to many of the apathetic,
unlettered students in the
educational system — partic-
ularly public education.

Frankly, a major obstacle
to literacy development is the
increasing numbers of irre-
sponsible parents whose
parental negligence is the root
cause of much of the social
turmoil and educational fail-
ures we now face.

There are countless parents
who have been egregiously
negligible as they fail to
teview their children’s books,
assist with assignments or
express even the slightest
inkling of interest in their edu-
cational advancement.

I have discovered that
numerous students have unre-
stricted, uninterrupted access
to the internet, television,
music and can do whatever
they desire. _

Frankly, since students that
can’t spell “dunce’” to save
their lives can effortlessly
recite the lyrics of vulgar

SEE page 9 ;

WHEREAS, the improvements in health care and living conditions, globally
and in The Bahamas, have caused life expectancy to be extended, resulting in a
growing number of older persons;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Labour and Social Development and the
Department of Social Services seek to create an environment where older persons
are empowered and enabled to age with confidence and pride;

AND WHEREAS, the General Assembly of the United Nations, of which The
Bahamas is a member recognizes Ist October, as International Day for Older
Persons, . with the theme for 2008 being “The Rights of Older Persons’’;

AND WHEREAS, the Department of Social Services of the Ministry of
Labour and Social Development provides services and programmes designed to
enhance the welfare and security of older persons in The Commonwealth of The

Bahamas;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Labour and Social Development and the
Department of Social Services, in conjunction with the National Council on Older
Persons, have again partnered to organize a month of activities to recognize the
rights of older persons and raise the level of awareness in the general public of
those rights; ,

NOW THEREFORE, | Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2008 as
“OLDER PERSONS MONTH”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 2nd day of
October, 2008

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 9



ee PR Se ee
nation of illiterates

The urgent need for an ombudsman!

olitics in the Bahamas has always
attracted certain characters, who in
- certain instances appear to be nothing more
than political gadflies, kleptomaniacs and the
worst possible candidates to be elevated to
the frontlines of representative government. To
use the words of former US Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, “corrupt politicians make
the other ten per cent look bad.”

Frankly, local politics — again in certain
instances — seems to attract a wagon load of
carpetbaggers, who seem intent on enriching
themselves rather than lobbying on behalf of
their constituents and genuinely helping to

foster the national development of their coun- |

With this in-mind, it is imperative that the
office of Ombudsman be established, to serve



as a watchdog, hear complaints against Mem-
bers of Parliament and other government agen-
cies, and possibly to provide independent over-
sight.

Frankly, the office should be held by a well-
vetted, non-partisan Bahamian or, since that is
near impossible, by a qualified foreigner. Hav-
ing an Ombudsman, in addition to other
reforms such as political primaries, referen-
dums, electoral debates, a recall system and
impeachment proceedings would further
empower and no doubt lessen the attempts at
victimisation or unfairness.

Any well-meaning legislator currently occu-
pying a seat in Parliament should not object to

voting in favour of the creation of the office of »

Ombudsman — which will also have the pow-
er to hold those unaccountable elitists among
their ranks responsibue.





FROM page 8

songs, I’ve oftentimes con-
templated rapping lessons

over hip-hop beats to target —

these apathetic, wayward
pupils. They also spell words
just as they sound in rap
videos and construct sen-
tences just like they speak!
The saturation and overuse
~ of media — internet, satellite,
cable, CDs, video games, etc
— has contributed greatly to
rate of illiteracy that we now

see. Many of the students |

from slack households that
permit unlimited access to
various mediums often fail to
‘complete homework, attempt
to read the content of their
subject-related textbooks, and
are unlikely to ever casually
write or read a book.

These days, although the
Ministry of Education is now
requiring that all teachers pos-
sess a degree and a teacher’s

certificate, there remain some ~

teachers who have a degree
but may not have a teaching
certificate — which puts them
and their students at a disad-
vantage in terms of exposure
to effective teaching and read-
ing methodologies.

This can exacerbate the
already challéiiging literacy
problems, since a teacher with

Yeni



no ‘formal teacher training
may be unable to utilise useful
teaching strategies to cater for
a student’s literacy needs.
The struggles with reading
in the Bahamas are quite
apparent in reports about the
BJC and BGCSE examina-
tion results, especially in areas
such as English language and
literature, where there are:
mass failures. Literacy spe-
cialists are desperately needed
in local schools. In the 1930s
and 1940s, my grandparents
had to know how to read
“The Royal Reader” books.

_ Specialists

However, these reading ini-
tiatives and the emphasis once
placed on reading seem to
have been lost to time when
schools are graduating hordes
of illiterates, who are funda-
mentally lost and unprepared
to face a 21st century society.
Not only is the hiring and
training of literacy specialists
overdue, but past pro-
grammes must be re-estab-
lished and books that enlight-
ened my grandparents’ gen-
eration must be ordered in
bulk.

‘According to Mike Merold,
a regional literacy coach in
Alabama, an‘anticipation

guide should be a strategy
used by teachers and students
to discuss content before and
after they have read.
Furthermore, strategies
such as reciprocal teaching
allows for students to work in

. groups, summarise, think crit-

ically and generate questions,
seek clarification and make

predictions. In this case, stu- :

dents can engage in construc-
tive learning.

Reciprocal teaching — a
method I practise — in addi-
tion to conducting formative
assessments and offering a
variety of tasks, can offer
sound instruction and open,
student-centred lessons.

It is patently clear that dri-

- vers on our streets reflect

their inability to read or out-
right ignorance and disrespect
for the law, when they seem
unable or refuse to read and
adhere to stop signs, the yield
and other street signals —
even the simplistic traffic
lights: Finally, Director of
Education Lionel Sands
recently claimed that the stu-
dent-to-teacher ratio at public
schools stands at about 150 to
one. That information is total-
ly incorrect, particularly since
the student-to-teacher ratio

of my (combined classes: far

exceeds 150 to one!

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNY

Food and energy crisis ‘will make it harder
to reach Millennium Development Goals’

Global community meets in New York
to discuss progress on MDGs

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Nassau, The Bahamas



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THE current food and ener-
gy crisis will make meeting the
Millennium Development
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‘recently met in New York to
discuss progress on the Mil-
lennium Development Goals
(MDGs), which are targets
and standards in global

‘poverty, health and sustain-

ability.

But, speaking ahead of the
Commonwealth Finance Min-
isters Meeting opening cete-
mony, Commonwealth civil
society said that while the
countries were generally mov-
ing towards progress, the ris-
ing food and energy crisis
threatens to undo that.

Civil society experts are
concerned that as the. crisis
worsens, it will make the
achievement of the Millenni-
um Development Goals unre-
alistic and could lead to eight
lost years of progress.

Nelcia Robinson, co-ordi-
nator of the Caribbean Asso-
ciation for Feminist Research
and Action, cited the need for
food security to ensure that
those groups identified as vul-
nerable within the Millenni-
um Development Goals will
be able to meet nutritional
basics. “People with, or sup-
porting those with HIV and
AIDS are already hard
pressed to meet their nutri-

_ tional needs,” said Ms Robin-

son. “Increasing costs and
potential increases through
Value Added Tax will only
exacerbate this.”

School

Sarwar Bari, the national
co-ordinator for Pattan Devel-
opment Organisation, said
education-specific MDGs
were also likely to be affected.
“We have done focus groups
and we see that people are
taking their children out of
school because transport costs
are now an issue,” said Mr
Bari. “Girls tend to be the
most affected and this is harm-
ing the MDGs related to gen-
der parity in schools in India,
Bangladesh and Pakistan.”

The education issue isn’t

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lonly specific to Asia. Ms
Robinson reported that the
rising cost of fuel being passed
onto the consumer meant that
children were dropping out of
school or reverting to walking
to school because they could
not afford bus fares.

- Governments face the real-
ity of spending less on social
welfare and development sec-
tors as they try to stem and
support the current crisis but
civil society representatives
are urging them not to lose
sight of the work done
towards the MDG achieve-
ments to date and that nation-
al policies addressing the crisis
should be in line with the
plans for addressing the
MDGs.

Unrest

Civil society representatives
pointed to recent civil unrest
taking place across countries
as people protest against rising
costs of food and energy and
its implications.

Last week, the Common-
wealth Finance Ministers
began a review Common-
wealth civil society’s statement
and recommendations on how
to prevent that unrest and dis-
cuss recommendations.

Commonwealth Foundation
Governance and Democracy
Programme Manager Seth
Lartey said: “The high fuel
and food prices pose different
challenges for each Common-
wealth country.

“There is a need it all
member countries to develop
policy responses to meet those
challenges and address civil
society’s collective concerns
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debate.”

The Commonwealth Foun-
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civil society representatives
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wealth to contribute to the
government proceedings
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 11



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. (BAPD) last week received a
shipment of 50 wheelchairs
with spare parts from China.
This is the fourth shipment
of wheelchairs to the
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Another 60 wheelchairs
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‘The wheelchairs are intend-
ea for persons with physical
disabilities who are unable to
afford to purchase one. The
wheelchairs can be obtained
from the BAPD headquarters
on Dolphin Drive, Nassau.

Funds for these wheelchairs
were donated by Damianos
oO ' Sotheby’s International Real-

~ ity.

On hand to witness the
delivery of the wheelchairs
were Virginia Damianos, Sir
Durward Knowles, Dr
Willard Thompson, Letitia
Armbrister and. Linda
Smith.

“The Bahamas Association
for the Physically Disabled
wishes to publicly thank
Damianos Sotheby’s Interna-
tional Realty for its most gen-
erous donation in continuing
to provide these wheelchairs
to facilitate mobility in those
persons who are physically
disabled.

“It is the generous support
of corporate sponsors like

’ Damianos Sotheby’s Interna-
tional Realty which allow

BAPD to continue to provide

this service to the entire Com-

monwealth of the Bahamas.

“BAPD is also thankful for
the kind assistance to the
Mailboat Company in pro-
viding sea-bound transporta-
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Freeport. BAPD encourages
corporate entities and indi-
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BAPD receives shipment of
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FROM LEFT: LETITIA Armbrister, administrator and welfare officer
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PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

LOCAL NEWS }

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FROM page one
fire on police in the area of Watlins
Street, then fled.

According to police officials, he
took refuge in a house where offi-
cers arrested him but they were
unable to recover the weapon.

On Sunday around 1.15 am at
Fourth Quarters restaurant and
bar a man, who was involved in
an argument, left the building and
discharged a weapon. Police recov-
ered numerous bullet casings out-
side the restaurant.

At 12.35 pm Sunday a man
went to the Princess Margaret
Hospital with gun shot pellet
wounds in his chest. However,
police do not know how he got his
injuries.

He is listed in stable condition.

Around 5.31 pm the same day a
man was robbed at gunpoint of his
red and white 650 trail bike, tag
number 3432. The gunman dis-
charged his weapon in the man’s
direction, but did not hit him.

The 20 Dollar Shop in the area
of East Street south and Coleman’s
Lane was robbed around 8 pm

FROM page one

Parents were so concerned that church members
circled the schools praying for seven days.

Acting Director of Education Lionel Sands is
reported to have finalised the teacher's departure
dates at their schools for October 6, however, last
week they were back in. the Andros schools with let-
ters from another Education official reinstating their

positions.

Principals at both schools walked out, a parent said,
and classes were disrupted once again.
A concerned mother whose 12-year-old son
attends the high school said she and several other
parents are going to keep their children out of school

today if the teachers return.

She said: "We have written a letter to the Ministry
of Education to tell them we will not be sending our
children to school if the teachers remain.

"This is not right and we don't understand how
education could go ahead and do something like this.

"We also have a letter to send to our neighbours in

the US to tell them how it is.

r
XL as

Armed robberies

Sunday. The armed, masked men
fled on foot, discharging a weapon
as they left.

Later that night a man was beat-
en about the body and thrown into
the water at Potters Cay Dock.
Three men, police believe to be
connected with the beating, left
the area in a white Nissan Sentra
licence, number 19565.

They later recovered the vehicle
on East Street South. It is believed
to have been stolen.

According to news reports the
man swam to safety.

Mr Hanna said these type of
incidents are happening much too
frequently and despite the police’s
best efforts, they continue to hap-
pen.

“We believe as bad as it was, it
could have been worse. We had
the area pretty much covered and
you will notice that we took sever-
al weapons off the street and we
took several persons into custody
as well,” he said. ;

“Guns continue to be a prob-

THE TRIBUNE



lem in the community. This year
we have taken a significant number
of weapons off the streets, includ-
ing high powered automatic
weapons, but there are still far too
many guns in the community and
there are far too many people who

are willing to use them and too

many people who are unwilling to
pass the information in and say
where these guns are.

“But with our intelligence and
the fact that an increasing number
of persons are coming forward and
talking to the police, I think we
have done well.” 5

Mr Hanna praised officers for
their vigilance while on patrol in
the community, saying that offi-
cers have recently been using their
police intuition to making stops
and arresting individuals.

“Routine traffic stops have
resulted in persons being arrested
for possession of firearms,” he said.

“We are happy that we didn’t
see greater carnage and greater
criminality, because we believe that
we were able to put measures in
place to do some things effective-

ly.”

Andros teachers row

from school.

rupted.

education."



REGISTRATION POLICY

Beginning November 17th, 2008
you will be able to
reserve courses using IQ web.

All reserved spaces will be cancelled

astelar er

for within seven (7) days

of Reena Teen cert ance

Please visit www.cob.edu.bs

FACULTY POSITIONS

The College of The Bahamas is the national institution of tertiary level education of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The institution grants certificates, diplomas, associate degrees and a
growing number of Bachelor degrees to nearly 4,000 students in the Bahamian archipelago. It has
extensive links with tertiary institutions in the Caribbean and North America and its credits are |
accepted by more than 200 colleges and universities in those regions and in Great Britain. It is poised |
to embark aggressively upon a major expansion of its programme offerings, its research activities, and
its physical facilities, and to incorporate distance teaching methodologies into its repertoire of
strategies for delivering instruction. all with a view to seeking a charter as a university.

Evate!



We are currently seeking to fill the following positions:

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Assistant Professors
» — Accounting
* Banking, Finance and
Economics
» Management & Marketin
* Administrative Office
Management
a ‘
SCHOOL OF SCIENCES &
TECHNOLOGY
Assistant Professors
= Mathematics
«Biology
» Chemistry
= Physics
* Environmental
Sustainability
= Geography

SCHOOL OF NURSING &
ALLIED HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
* Pharmaceutical Sciences
® Nursing
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Assistant Professors
* Early Childhood
Education
Religious Education
Education Research
Reading Education
Science Education

Applicants must possess an earned doctoral degree or equivalent in the area of interest.

SCHOOL OF

COMMUNICATION &

CREATIVE ARTS
Assistant Professors
* Journalism

Spanish

* French

=~ Musie

SCHOOL OF ENGLISH

STUDIES

* College Composition

x Literature and °
Composition
‘

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL

SCIENCES
Assistant Professors

could see children kept
out of two schools

"We were done wrong."

Elma Garraway, permanent secretary at the Min-
istry of Education, did not divulge details of the mix-
up, but said she expected the matter to be resolved
over the weekend so children would not be held back

Ms Garraway said: "We sent our senior officer
down to Andros to investigate this whole matter
because we cannot have children's education inter-

"We are aware of the challenges and we have
come to a decision so the schools in Andros can
move forward and the children can receive quality

Ms Garraway said the principals at both schools
will remain, adding: "They are very good principals
and we would not want to lose them."





=» Public Administration
® Criminal Justice Studies . |

* History

U.W.1. LAW PROGRAMME

LIBRARIES &

INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA

SERVICES ‘

«Public Service and
Fechnical Services

Librarians
CULINARY AND
HOSPITALITY

MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

* Chet

For more information about these positions and how to apply please visit our website at 5

http://www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by October 30, 2008.



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 13



aa: eae
The PM calls for international
support for Caricom countries

FROM page one

dards in the Caribbean nations, employment levels
are falling as tourism declines.

Tourism in the Bahamas was substantially
lower than expected in September, and with the
continued instability of the US economy, con-
tingency plans are being put in place.

In his statement the Prime Minister said:

“The medium term outlook for Less Devel-
oped Countries and Small Island States, such as
ours, appears especially challenging. «

“However, we believe that these challenges
can also present opportunities to us all if the
appropriate international responses are effec-
tive.

“For our part, we intend to do all we can to
implement policies and measures that will repo-
sition our economies for early, resilient, sustain-
able and strong growth to meet the aspirations of
our peoples.”

But as the severity of the problem has com-
pelled governments to implement support pro-
grammes for poor and vulnerable groups, addi-
tional burdens are being placed on already

Mr Ingraham recommended the: status of’

Small Island States as Middle Income Countries
is reviewed to relieve the high public debt hold-
ing governments back from addressing social
issues.

He also praised the new Climate Change
Investment fund, which will help Caricom coun-
tries reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per
cent by 2050, as rising sea levels threaten coastal
developments and the economy.

Efforts to create sustainable regional agricul-
tural and energy.policies are being intensified
across the Caribbean to provide more afford-
able food as prices around the world continue to
soar.

The Prime Minister thanked the Bank, the
Fund and the Caribbean Regional Technical
Assistance Centre (CARTAC) for invaluable
contributions to institutional and capacity build-
ing, and the improvement of management in the
Caribbean, and stressed that the vulnerable
Caribbean must remain a focus for the Fund.

He added: "We are sure that the institutions
will respond urgently and positively to the needs
of the Caribbean Constituency, needs which are

strained fiscal accounts.”

Mortgages
FROM page one

the world from mid-2009,” said
Mr Ingraham

In September, speaking in the

House of Assembly, Prime Min-
ister Ingraham instructed BEC
to reconnect power to homes
where residents were unable to
pay exorbitant electricity bills

because of the excessively high :

fuel surcharges. He also
announced increases to Social
Services aid programmes.

In an effort to mitigate the
unemployment problem, Mr

Ingraham said Government will :
create jobs by expediting its :

public infrastructure projects
and will restart its housing pro-
grammes in Nassau, Grand
Bahama and Abaco.

“So we are putting contin-
gency plans in place to be able
to deal with the situation if a
worst case scenario arises,” Mr.
Ingraham said. “Should circum-
stances require it, The Bahamas
would be able to make arrange-
ments with the private banking
sector to take care of any likely
shortfall that we might experi-
ence,” he said.





extremely urgent in the present unsettled global
economic and financial environment."

Teenager dies after stabbing

FROM page one

friends at a yard at Redwood Lane, where a number of men were
engaged in a gambling game.

There was an altercation and the three men were stabbed.

Mr Rahming said police received a call around 7 pm on Saturday
about a fight on Redwood Lane and that someone may have gotten
injured.

Two police units were dispatched to the location, where they received
information that three men were en route to the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital, suffering from stab wounds received during an altercation.

When officers arrived at the hospital, they saw three men receiving
medical treatment for stab wounds.

The 19-year-old teenager of Caravel Beach had sustained multiple

stab wounds. The second victim was detained as a result of his injuries, :

and the third victim was treated and later discharged into police cus-
tody.

Mr Rahming said Police have recovered the knife believed to have
been used in the incident.

Central Detective Unit officers are investigating the matter.

FROM page one

occupants were acting suspi-
ciously and when officers
approached there was another car
chase.

The fleeing car entered the
Cowpen Road area, hitting two
other vehicles. When the car
came to a stop, the occupants got
out and fired at the police.

Police returned fire and shot
one of the men in the left leg; the

other was shot in his right leg.
Both men were subsequently
arrested, taken to hospital, treat-
ed and discharged from hospital.

One of the men is said to be a
Jamaican who overstayed his time
and the other was from Tall Pines
Estates.

They were found with a 40 mm
pistol with nine live rounds of
ammunition.

Shoot-outs

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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



EU Economic Partnership — what it means for the Bahamas
OPINION

FROM page 5

to other countries to open their
markets to European goods —
former EU Trade Commission-
er, Peter Mandelson, has pub-
licly stated that the EU,'as the
largest economy in the world
and a major trading bloc, is like-
ly to benefit from more accessi-
ble world markets. So, over and
above its commitment to make
arrangements for trade‘in goods
that are compatible with WTO
rules, the EU has proposed an
EPA as a Free Trade Agree-

Intro

ment which, on a basis of reci-
procity, not only provides for
the removal of all tariffs on the

export of goods but also covers .

trade-related matters such as
services, investment, e-com-

merce and capital movements:

as well as issues like competi-

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83 per cent of whose exports of
goods go to them compared to
only 13 per cent to the EU.
Professor Norman Girvan of
the University of the West
Indies states that, since some
72 per cent of 4he Bahamas’ for-
eign currency earnings derive
from tourism and financial ser-
vices, and with the preponder-

_ ance of trade of goods with the

USA, just 4 per cent-of total
export earnings come from
Europe.

The Government is keen to
preserve the duty-free access
for its exports to the EU worth
some $90 million and thereby
to maintain its existing trade
surplus.

Loss of this access would
result, for example, in imposi-
tion by the EU of an 8 pr cent
tariff on crawfish exports.

In return, the EPA requires
the Bahamas to give up tariff
rates on 85 per cent of EU
imports, phased out over a 25-

_ year period. The estimated loss

of revenue is $6 million. Since
the main purpose of import



sore



duties is to generate govern-
ment revenue rather than act
as a barrier to trade, this loss
will have to be offset by other
taxes.

‘Trade-related’
matters

Under this section, a range of
services areas will be opened
up to EU competition enabling
European companies and pro-
fessionals to set up business
here and Bahamians likewise to
enter the EU marketplace.

However,
Zhivargo Laing
(pictured), min-
ister of state for
finance, has
made it clear
that the services
offer to be pre-
f sented to the
EU “mirrors our
current Nation-
al Investment
Policy” which
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up the EU’s services sector is
illusory since there are few
Bahamian companies or indi-
viduals currently equipped or
ready to compete in an EU
market of 27 countries with
over 400 million people and in
the face of prohibitive costs,
non-tariff barriers, subsidies and
other hurdles.

It is not yet clear what the
additional cost will be of com-
plying with the EPA obliga-
tions; for example, the creation
of new institutions, regulatory
bodies and laws.

Effect of the EPA
on trade with third
countries

According to Stephen
Lande, president of Washing-
ton-based consultants Man-
chester Trade, the major con-
cern with the EPA is the impact
of its Most Favoured Nation
(MEN) provision on future rela-
tions with the USA. a

If signatories enter into an
FTA with a developed country
which gives more favourable
treatment than that provided to
the EU under the EPA, they
are obliged to consult the EU
first.

This could interfere with the
Bahamas’ ability to enter into
FTAs with other major trading
countries as well as the USA:

A further consideration is
that the USA, Canada and oth-
er non-EU trade partners are
unlikely to accept that the EU
can expect duty-free access to
the Bahamas ay they can do
so as well. :

In the case of the jUSA, lead-
ing attorney Brian Moree
argued at a Nassau Institute
seminar on the EPA in June
that, since MFN status meant
no discrimination between
countries, the Bahamas would
have to offer.— at the time it
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THE TRIBUNE \

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 15



FROM page 14

this would mean that, because
the Bahamas’ level of trade with
the USA was greater than with

‘ the EU, the starting point in
negotiations would be — in his
words — the ‘EU EPA plus’.
Given that in 2007 the US
exported to the Bahamas some
$2.5 billion worth of goods, the
loss to the latter would be sub-
stantial.

Mr. Moree further argued
that, in order to meet the
WTO’s demands for an end to
one-way discriminatory prefer-
ence regimes such as the Coto-
nou Agreement, a “goods-only”
deal would have been sufficient
so that it was not necessary to
address trade-related issues

such as services, investments, .

capital movements, etc.

_ Nor was it wise to address the
so-called Singapore issues
before it became necessary to
do so.

Way forward

Signature of a “goods-only”
agreement as a first step now
appears to be a fait accompli.

It will secure tariff-free access to _



the huge EU market.

The reciprocal removal of tar-
iffs on imports from the EU will
anyway become necessary as
the Bahamas seeks to join the
World Trade:Organization.
Membership of the WTO will
require the phasing out of
import duties across the board
and development of an alterna-
tive means of generating gov-
ernment revenue.

Meanwhile, deferral of the
Bahamas’ services offer is to be
welcomed.

This will allow time for
debate.

Further issues:
e Services

An agreement covering ser-
vices as well as goods seems,
prima facie, to be heavily in
favour of the EU. It is unneces-
sary because, if the conditions
are suitable, EU investment is
likely to continue without an
EPA.

The Chamber of Commerce
stressed recently the need to
build capacity and competitive-
ness and to develop new ideas
and entrepreneurship.

MoT oy:\ Ra | AY eS)
EU Economic Partnership

But market access to the
EU’s services sector does not
necessarily lead to market pres-
ence. Moreover, inclusion of the
‘Singapore issues’ — government
procurement, intellectual prop-
erty, trade facilitation, invest-
ment and competition policy —
is premature since these issues
have not yet been settled
in WTO global trade talks.

Why should the Bahamas
allow itself to be cajoled by the
EU into jumping the gun and
getting ahead of the WTO
itself?

¢ Regional integration .

One of the stated objectives
of the EPA is to promote
Caribbean regional integration.
It is an exaggeration to claim
that the agreement constitutes
a commitment to CSME, but its
implementation requires some
regional cooperation which will

result in a higher level of inte-
- gration than now exists,

History shows that high lev-
els of economic integration can-
not be achieved without a sig-.

TET a ert
ANDWICH COMBO

nificant degree of political inte-
gration resulting in the creation
of supranational powers vested
in regional agencies.

This raises the question
whether greater regional eco-
nomic integration is in the inter-
est of the Bahamas and thus
whether it shares this objective
with the promoters of the EPA.

Has the matter been
addressed as a general princi-
ple?

There also will be extra costs;
for example, in implementing
common procedures like cus-
toms management.

How will regional agencies
be funded and will contributions
from CARIFORUM member
states be based on GDP fig-
ures? If so, with the highest
GDP in the region the Bahamas
is likely to be called upon to
pay disproportionately more.
Assuming the Government has
studied this, will it publish the
figures?

e Institutional and legal
reform

Advocates of the EPA claim
that, in order to fulfil its com-
mitments under the agreement,
the Bahamas will be forced to
carry out much needed institu-
tional reform; for example, the
tax system, customs, competi-
tion, public services, etc.
Reform of customs administra-
tion is perhaps the most impor-
tant. A host of new legislation,
including harmonization of laws
with CARIFORUM countries,
will also be required.

Has the cost of all this been
assessed? Mr. Laing has spoken

of an “implementation frame-

work” which addresses these
issues. Will he make this avail-
able in order to reassure the

public that the Government has .

the capacity and commitment
to fulfil its obligations in this
respect and to pay for their
implementation? Will he also
provide information about plans
for the “enabling legislation”
which will be required following
signature of the “goods only”
EPA this month?

Conclusion

A cautionary note. The EPA
is entitled as being “between

CARIFORUM states and the
European Community and its
member states”. But, although
the Caribbean Regional Nego-
tiating Machinery has led the
way in negotiations, in practice
Caribbean countries will sign it
individually rather than collec-
tively.

The result will be that, in the
event of any dispute, each coun-
try will be at a serious disad-
vantage since it will be’ pitched

individually against the massive '

resources of the EU.

Have Catibbean negotiators
considered the need to insist
that the region should be able to
speak as one in the settlement

.of disputes affecting individual

countries?

The Government should not
underestimate the repercussions
of a “goods-only” EPA in nego-
tiating trade arrangements with
third countries, and it should
now initiate a public debate
about, in particular, its proposed
services offer.

‘It is important that those
seeking to question the wisdom
of government policy should
not be characterized as being
insular, unenlightened or
opposed to change.

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PAGE 16, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

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PTHE TRIBUNE

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“TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14.

SECTION B e

$8 5m lawsuit: Hilton marina
deal ‘properly terminated’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



a daetdad hans edenabiaem net



* Legal action in New York over terminated $18m sale and downtown Nassau joint venture still going in after almost oe year
cit ail * Marina developer claims Hilton’s new investor reneged on deal terms in sale ‘double cross’ :
$85 million in. * But investor and Hilton companies claim deal abolished after developer failed to meet own obligations
damages over
a failed marina

project adja-
cent to the British Colonial
Hilton remains live almost one

year after it was filed, the -
resort’s. owners alleging their
former partner is trying

through the courts to revive a
deal that was “properly termi-
nated”.

A mountain of US court doc-
uments obtained by Tribune
Business has allowed this news-
paper for the first time to
reveal the extent of the falling
out between New York-based
Island Global Yachting (IGY)
and its ‘joint venture partners
over their proposed downtown
Nassau marina project.

In its lawsuit, which was filed
with the New York state
Supreme Court in late 2007,
IGY accused the British Colo-
nial Hilton’s immediate holding
company, its two main share-

* Biggest losers downtown Nassau and wider Bahamian economy, unless new JV partner found



holders, and their broker/advis-
er of breaching the agreement
they had for the New York-
based company to acquire a
parcel of land adjacent to the
resort for the project.

IGY is alleging that George
Allen, who was acting as a bro-
ker for the British Colonial
Development Company and its
then-majority shareholder,
PRK Holdings, in attempting
to attract new investment into
the resort, “misrepresented”
the impact a new investor
would have on their joint ven-
ture agreement.

That investor was the Lon-
don and Swiss-based boutique
private equity/investment
house Adurion Capital.
Despite allegedly being assured
by Mr Allen that Adurion

‘Mudda Sik’, it’s Kafe Kalik!

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN entrepreneur and his
pattners are planning to” ulti-
mately take a true Bahamian
flavour to some 15-20 locations
throughout the south-east US
and Caribbean, having invest-
ed some $6.5 million in their
Kafe Kalik concept to date via
an approach underwritten by a
well-known catchphrase —
‘Mudda Sik’.

“Close to $3 million” of that
$6.5 million has been invested in
Kafe Kalik’s latest flagship loca-

tion, the Kafe Kalik Royale on
‘



Orlando’s International Drive,
and Tyrone Nabbie and his
partners are looking to expand
their reach in a controlled man-
ner by capitalizing on their
offering of the very best in
Bahamian cuisine and culture.

“Our plan first is to really
regionalize the concept in the
south-east [US] area,” Mr Nab-
bie told Tribune Business. “Our
next target market is either
going to be Tampa or the South
Beach/Fort Lauderdale area.

“We are also in discussions
with Las Vegas right now, as
we have been talking to a prop-
erty there for four months. That
market will be the only excep-
tion at this time if the opportu-
nity looks right for us.

“Our plan is to develop the
concept in a boutique way and,
where appropriate, near the
ocean. It’s a cheesecake factory
model. We will just focus on
prime markets, top locations
and not exceed 15-20 stores.”

Kafe Kalik Royale is the
brand’s fourth restaurant to
open, Mr Nabbie and his part-
ners already possessing two out-
lets in the Bahamas — located
at Festival Place in Nassau and
one in Freeport — plus another
operation at Orlando’s Inter-
national Airport.

The latest restaurant is very
much the flagship location, giv-
en that it has accounted for
almost 50 per cent of the chain’s
total investment to date and
employs some 150 staff.

SEE page 4B

SANDYPORT #4168 Canalfront 4 bedroom 4 bath Island
style home with small canal beach. - Open living/dining room and
gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances and granite coun-
tertops; hurriane-proof windows and boat dock. Fully furnished
and equipped. Reduced to US$1,100,000. Exctusiye LisTING.
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com 242.457.0406

Damuanos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

ber of

M
SiRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | 242.322.2033 | the Bahames MLS



AN outside view of the British Colonial Hilton in New Providence...



would not seek to alter the
terms and conditions attached
to the marina deal, IGY is

claiming in effect that it was
“double crossed” because that
is exactly what Adurion

Realtor wage survey
finding ‘total nonsense’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN realtors have
described as “total nonsense”
and “total rubbish” the finding
by the Department of Statistics
that their profession is the best-
paid in the Bahamas with an
average annual salary of
$197,800, saying the true figure
is between $25,000-$50,000.

William Wong, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president, described
as “total nonsense” the Depart-
ment’s occupational wage sur-
vey findings on the real estate
industry, which were released
last week.

He added: “The National

Pension Plans

i * Mucual Funds

Association of Realtors (NAR)
in the US,-their average is
around $37,000 a year, and it’s
the same in our business or not
far off that.

“Yes, there are some super
agents that make that kind of
money, but the average agents
make $35,000-$50,000. I don’t
know where this is coming
from, but it’s total, total non-
sense. We have 700 members,
and you might have 1 per cent
of them doing very well.” ’

It is unclear where’ the
Department of Statistics
obtained the data for its find-
ings from, although some sug-
gested they may have focused

SEE page 8B ~

. Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

* Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

PAV PAYA)

Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

Bridgetown: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

allegedly attempted to do.

However, the British Colo-
nial Development Company
and its affiliates, in their June
20, 2008, motion to dismiss the
lawsuit, alleged that the marina
joint venture was terminated
because IGY failed to meet its
obligations and close the deal
by the deadline date.

“The lawsuit is [IGY’s]
attempt, after failing to meet
its obligations.under the pur-
chase agreement, to revive a
transaction that was properly
terminated,” the Hilton com-

panies alleged, “after the expi-
ration of the [final] closing
date.”

They further claimed that
IGY had admitted that the
“plans and reports and analy-
ses” it alleged the Hilton com-





We can get you there!

panies had “misap - opriated”
actually belonged t. ‘hem, and
had not supportec the “mis-
representation” cl: n against
Mr Allen.

“Simply put, it i undisput-
ed and supported} the pur-
chase agreement t..at British
Colonial Development Com-
pany was not required to seek
IGY’s consent prior to assign-

ing a portion of its corporate

interest to Adurion. IGY’s con-
sent was simply unnecessary,”

‘the Hilton companies alleged.

Meanwhile, US attorneys
acting for PRK Holdings, Adu-
rion and Mr Allen have been
attempting to have the action
thrown out on jurisdictional
grounds, alleging that New

SEE page 10B

Pepsi-Cola





ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

‘Money at Work





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Le ee a ee
The Bahamian Stock Market



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets __

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian stock market last
week, with investors trading in
10 out of the 24 listed securi-

ROYAL FIDE

ties. Of these, one advanced,
three declined and six remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 119,880 shares

LITY MARKET WRAP

changed hands, a substantial

increase of 86,686 shares, com-
pared to last week's trading vol-
ume of 33,194 shares.
Consolidated Water Company
Bahamian Depository Receipts
(CWCB) was the only advancer

BONEFISH POND NATIONAL PARI

| stay

fact us at 393-1317/or
tmembership@bnt.bs

s

Bonefish Pond

Carmichael Rd

UCSC CON) write

_firatrall Rd

Tonique Darling-Williams Highway



7 Gardening Gloves ;
Water Bottle

Sunscreen

of the week on a volume of 197
BDRs, rising by $0.02 or 0.79

er cent to end the week at
$2.56.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was volume leader with 30,000
shares, its stock price dropping
by $0.01 to end the week at
$7.37.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) fol-
lowed with 22,050 of its shares
trading, its price ending the
week unchanged at $14.15.

Some 20,000 shares of FAM-
GUARD Corporation Holdings
(FAM) also traded, to end the
week unchanged at $8.06.

The laggard of the week was
J.S. Johnson & Company (JSJ)
on a volume of 2,700 shares, its
price sliding by $0.55 or 4.58 per
cent to end the week at $11.45.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national (BOB) also declined
this week, with 18,416 shares
trading, its falling by $0.01 to
end the week at a new 52-week
low of $7.64.

BOND MARKET

No notes traded in the
Bahamian market this week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

JS Johnson Company (JSJ)
released its unaudited financial
results for the six months ending
on June 30, 2008.

JSJ reported net income of
$3.6 million, down by $887,000
or 19.97 per.cent, compared to
$4.4 million in the 2007 second
quarter.

Total income fell by $158,000
or 1.1 per cent to $13.3 million,
compared to $13.5 million at
the end of the 2007 second
quarter.

Total expenses increased by
$729,000 or 8.05 per cent to $9.8
million, compared to $9.1 mil-
lion in 2007.

Net premiums earned in the
period of $4.7 million increased
by $233,000 or 5.3 per cent in
comparison to 2007, while insur-
ance expenses of $3.5 million
increased by $415,000 or 13.6
per cent.

Basic, earnings per share
declined by 15.22 per cent to
$0.39, versus $0.46 for the same
six month period in 2007.

JSJ said the decline in growth
is due in part to the sluggish
economy, which caused a reduc-
tion in new business inquires
and a slowdown in the renewals
of existing business.

Additional efforts will be
made to contain costs and
improve efficiencies.

Bahamas Property Fund

The Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) released its financial
results for the quarter ended
June 30, 2008.

For the quarter, BPF report-
ed rental revenues of $987,500,
while net income was $307,000.

OYSTER Funds (7

The fund family of the SYZ & CO Group

SYZ & CO Bank & Trust Ltd. j
Bayside Executive Park | West Bay Street & Blake Road | P.O. Box N-1089 | Nassau - Bahamas.
Contact: Miguel Gonzalez | Tel. +1 242 327 66 33

Member of the SYZ & CO Group; Geneva | Zurich | Lugano | Locarno | London | Luxembourg | Milan xeric Se | Nassau | Hong Kong

www.syzbank.ch



INDEX 875.87 (-8.00%) YTD

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE °
AML $1.71 $- 0 3.01%
BBL $0.89 $- 0 4.71%
BOB $7.64 $-0.01 18,416 -20.50%
BPF . $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $14.60 _ $- 0 0.00%
BWL $3.49: $- 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $- 22,050 17.43%
CBL $7.37 $-0.01 30,000 12.57%
CHL $2.85... $3 215 -9.52%
CIB $11.70 $e 900; -19.86%
CWCB $2.56 - $+0.02 197 -49.21%
DHS $2.77 ‘$. Qi ay 17.87%
FAM $8.06 Ge 20,000 11.94%
- FRB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FCC $0.40 $- 0 , 48.05%
BCE 2785.25 $- 5,500 1.35%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $12.00 $- 19,902 -7.34%
IGD $8.20 - 0 13:10%
ISJ $11.45 $-0.55 2,700 4.09%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

° Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has declared
a quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on November
7, 2008, to all shareholders of record date September 30, 2008.

e RND Holdings (RND) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Wednesday, October 22, 2008, at
6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Nassau, Bahamas.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS:
¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares

will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually. z

International Markets

FOREX Rates

Weekly % Change
CAD$ 0.8524 -7.80
GBP 1.7042 -4.02
EUR 1.3408 .. -2.78
Commodities
oe. Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $80.42 -13.65
Gold $849.60 +1.14
International Stock Market Indexes:
yah sie i _ Weekly -% Change
DJIA 8,451.19 -18.15
S & P 500 : . 899.22 -18.20
NASDAQ 1,649.51 -15.30
Nikkei 8,276.43 _ -24.33

For the six months ended June
30, 2008, net income was
$870,000, compared to $1.2 mil-
lion for the same period in 2007.

The primary reason for the
change in net income was high-
er expenses during the period,
with other expenses of $497,000
dwarfing the $161,000 in the pri-
or year.

Earnings per share for the six-
month period stood at $0.36, a
decline of $0.13 or 26.53 per
cent from $0.49 for the same
period in 2007.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Share your news|

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












NOTICE OF
RECEIVERSHIP

NASSAU BUILDING
SUPPLIES LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that NASSAU BUILD-
ING SUPPLIES LIMITED, a company incorporat-
ed under The Companies Act, has on ihe 7th day
of October, 2008 been placed into recevership by
the Supreme.Court upon the Ex-Parte Summons
filed on the 16th September, 2008 andbe advised
that JOHN S. BAIN of HLB Galanis Ban has been
appointed the Receiver and Manager }f the prop-
erty and assets of the company.





{He tHipuine



i a
Pepsi closure not

indicative of wider
industry concerns

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHE !
Business Reporter



PEPSI-Cola Bahamas’ deci-
sion to cease manufacturing and
sales/distribution operations in

this nation by December 5,

2008, reflects the company’s
own specific problems rather
than industry-wide issues for
the Bahamian bottling industry
as a whole.

Walter Wells, head of
Caribbean Bottling Company,
the Bahamas-based distributor
for Coca-Cola, told Tribune
Business that Pepsi-Cola, and
other before it such as Bacardi
and Aquapure under its former
ownership, all had challenges
that were unique to their indi-
vidual companies and did not
reflect a general industry
malaise.

“There are challenges i in the
industry, but I still think that it
is still robust,” Mr Wells said.
He explained that the key issue
for bottling companies was vol-
ume.

“You need to produce x
amount of cases a day to break
even, and then whatever you
can produce in excess can be
profit. But, if any circumstance
causes you to not to be able to
produce, then you become
strapped for cash,” Mr Wells
said.

He added that another chal-
lenge was the fact that so much
technology is needed to run the
plant, which is also very expen-
sive to install and maintain.

He said he was not familiar’

with all the details surrounding
Pepsi-Cola’s planned closure
and departure, but could under-
stand how difficult it was to let
employees go, particularly amid
troubling economic times.

“T have told my staff that we
will certainly try to absorb as
many Of the displaced [Pepsi]

py and Art

workers aS we can,” the
Caribbean Bottling Company
head said.

Mr Wells said he was not con-
cerned about the future of his
company, because following a
thorough restructuring where
they focused on increasing effi-
ciency and lowering costs, they
were “very comfortable.”

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, president
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, who also sits on the
Caribbean Bottling Company
Board of Directors, said the
Pepsi-Cola situation showed it
was hard to make money in the
bottling business.

However, he did not think
that the challenges Pepsi-Cola
faced were caused by the cur-
rent economic climate. He said
Pepsi has been struggling for
quite some time, which makes
the decision not surprising.

“It’s very difficult to have a
top-notch commodity, when it
needs a lot of capitalization and
you just don’t have the mon-
ey,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

Some 75 Bahamians will lose
their jobs when Pepsi-Cola
(Bahamas) ceases manufactur-
ing operations on November 14,
and closes its sales and distrib-
ution operations on December
5, due to ongoing profitability
challenges.

In a release issued by Pepsi-
Cola, Rick Wooten, its senior
vice-president of Caribbean
operations, said: “Probably the
most difficult decision a com-
pany can make is to close an
operation. We understand the
impact such a decision has on
employees and on the island of
the Bahamas, and we’re com-
mitted to providing severance
assistance to help those indi-
viduals as they find alternate

.employment.”

He explained that the com-
pany will continue to service
Bahamas customers using a

local distributor to deliver and
sell.

Mr Wooten emphasised that
the decision to cease produc-
tion and sales was not a reflec-
tion of the quality or service
provided by the employees
there, but instead that the over-
all business lacks scale to sup-

port continuation of Bahamas-.

based manufacturing.

The news comes on the heels
of Bacardi’s announcement that
it is also closing its Bahamas
operations by April 2009, plus
the challenges faced by other
distributors, including the for-
mer Caribbean Bottling Com-
pany owners.

The Pepsi-Cola move is again
likely to reignite debate over
whether the Bahamas provides
suitable platform for manufac-
turing operations, given the high
operating cost environment —
especially for electricity, water
and other utilities — coupled
with low labour productivity
and other inefficiencies.

Indeed, it would appear as if
Freeport, rather than New
Providence, is fast becoming the
hub for what manufacturing
activity remains in this nation,
with businesses there able to
benefit from the tax advantages
bestowed by the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.

PepsiAmericas took majority
ownership of Pepsi-Cola
Bahamas in 2001. Despite con-
tinued investments in both
physical and human capital, the
business has not met expecta-
tions for profitability.

Pepsi-Cola Bahamas is a
majority owned subsidiary of
PepsiAmericas, which is the sec-
ond-largest Pepsi bottler with
operations in 19 states, Central
and Eastern Europe including
Ukraine, Romania, Poland,
Hungary, the Czech Republic,
and Republic of Slovakia and
the Caribbean.

Dewgard Plaza
Madeira St Palmdale

OF

Olde Towne - Sandyport

Tel: (242) - 327 -8718/9
Email: renascence@coralwave.com

Jill Redgrave BA ( Hons), MRCSLT

Speech and Language Therapist

Specializing in:

“Speech and Language Therapy - Pre-School and
School- Aged Language Delays and Disorders.

Mark Redgrave Msc. BA (Hons|

Psychotherapist / Art Therapist

Specializing in

* Interpersonal Problems, Depression, Anxiety, Sexual Abuse,
Couple Counseling and Group Therapy, Child and.

Adolescents,



{ULOVAI, VUlLUbDEM 14, cUUO, FAULK ob
“COMMITTED TO COMPLIANCE”
oh to

” } XY
The Rabemnas Arroccation of Complianes Officers
P.O, Box N-9731

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers
Cordially Invites your school to participate in our

2"? Annual
Senior High School Speech Contest

TOPIC:

“Ethics in the Workplace”

Date: November 5" 2008
Time: 6:30pm
Venue: The Sheraton

Theme: .Explain the importance of Ethics in the financial services sector of the Bahamas and
show how we can ensure that strong standards of professional conduct are maintained in the workplace.
The speech must show a clear understanding and draw references to the recent collapses of multimillion
dollar organizations due to unethical behaviour while giving clear isc of how we as Bahamians can
improve upon our ethical standard and practices,

Length of Speech: Between 5-7 minutes.
SCALE OF POINTS

Content, 65: Conform to Topic 25; Knowledge of Subject 10; Practicality of Proposal 10; -
Creativity-Originality 10; Conformance to time 5; Subject Matter Well Organized 5;

Oration, 35: Clarity and Presentation 20; Voice jifledtiodt/Emmciation 10; Emphasis 5
Eligibility Contests are open to ase 11" grade student only from each school.
PRIZ
1° Place:Dell Laptop plus $1,000.00 cheque
2â„¢ Place: Dell Laptop plus $500 cheque
3" Place: Dell Laptop plus $250 secs

Contest Deadlines: Students must register no later than October 17", 2008 by faxing in
registration form to 326-3031 or 328-8744 or by contacting:

Steve Davis

Kesna Pinder: 502-7727 (kesna. pinder@rbe.com)
Jasmine Strachan: (Jasmin,Strachan@combankltd.com)
Name of School:

Name of Participant:

Grade:

Name of Coach:

Signature of Principal:

CAPTAIN
Randy
Butler

The Bshamian Regional Airline

The Board of SkyBahamas is pleased to
announce the appointment of Capt. Randy
Butler as CEO/President of SkyBahamas.
Capt. Butler will be responsible for the day to
day management of our airline, reporting
directly to the Board.

Welcomes
New CEO,
President
: the

SkyBahamas is currently operating
three (3) daily flights to Exuma
as well as one (1) flight to Bimini.



He will lead a team of skilled professionals
in making SkyBahamas the best regional
airline in the Bahamas/Caribbean Region.
Capt. Butler’s vision for Sky Bahamas is to
see the airline thrive immensely by
scheduling more domestic routes and on
demand charter flights from the Islands of
the Bahamas to the USA. Capt. Butler
believes that more strategic scheduling will
bring about more lucrative opportunities
and enhance the local tourism and hotel
industry throughout the Bahamas.

SkyBahamas also operates for
Regional Air three (3) daily flights
to Freeport, Grand Bahama.
SkyBahamas utilizes the SFAAB
340A 33 seater aircraft with full
cabin service.

We are proud to have Capt. Butler join
SkyBahamas as he comes well qualified as
an aviation expert with 22 years of industry —
experience. His experience and credentials
credit him as being more than capable of
leading SkyBahamas to a great and
prominent future.





PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

TRUST ELS ts




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(ACRITS & RORY LARD

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The WORTRst sak qpactolet



a Essay Contest Rules:

» Essay should be 3 to 5 pages, double
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e Allsubmissions must include the entry
form found on www.ecsife.org or at
Sunshine Insurance ’s office at |
Sunshine House, Shirley Street

» Allentries are due via email to
ElmiraCollegeSIFE@gmail.com or in
hard copy to Sunshine House no later
than October 2, 2008

» The top 10 finalists will present their es-
say ideas before a panel of judges on
Saturday, November 22 at Sunshine
House

» Applicants must have a minimum grade

point average of 2.50na4.0 scale

Chamber of Commerce Building
2 Collins Avenue

P 0 Box N 9286

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel. {242} 322 2145

Fax, [242] 322 4649

BAMAMIAN Bunun Comcrns’Asscunn ASSOCIATION _ Eml, bee@coralwave,com

Web. www,.bahamiancontractors.com

~The Bahamian Contractors’ Association
In Association With |
The Ministry of Works & BTVI
. Proudly Presents
‘The
CONTRACTOR 1 “SEMINAR SERIES”
Thursday, October 23, 2008
_ BCPOU Hall, Farrington Road
Registration: 6:30pm
Time
7-9 pm

Speaker
Pat Rahming
Architect

Leeture #1: CONTRACT NEGOTIATION
Job Sourcing, Project Pre-Qualification
Contract Documentation,
Bidding & Contract Negotiation

Lecture #2: ESTIMATING Paul Worrell
Project Take-Off, Schedule of values, Quantity Surveyor
Bid Qualifications, Sub-Contractors ‘ '

Thursday
Oct. 30
7-9 pm

John Michael Clarke
Project Manager

Lecture #3: PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Monthly Valuations, Change Orders
Schedules, Sub Contractor Management

Thursday
Nov. 6
7-9pm

Lecture #4: CONTRACT CLOSE-OUT
Certificate of Occupancy, Punch List,
Final Payment, Retention

Thursday
Nov. 13
7-9 pm

Amos Ferguson
Architect
President, IBA

SEMINAR SERIES SPONSORED BY: ALBANY DEVELOPMENT

BCA “CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION” AT END OF SEMINAR SERIES

FOR EARLY REGISTRATION & INFORMATION CALL:
BCA @ 502-6329 MOW @ 322-4830
or 325-5363 or 356-9738
TOTAL COST $ 50.00

open amet ce 8 AIEEE EMCEE

PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT
Stephen Wrinkle Godfrey Forbes

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ~ Dennis Attfield —
COUNCIL MEMBERS “Terrance Knowles © Brent Burrows ¢ Harold ‘Sonny’ Waugh (Grand Bahama)

vevenmprenpeonsnonanensennmannintenay

“TREASURER
Larry Treco

SECRETARY
Se EE Sccenos

eo —s 607 736 a

,

THE TRIBUNE

KALIK, from 1B

Speaking to Tribune Business
on the third day after its offi-
cial opening, Mr Nabbie said
patron traffic at Kafe Kalik

Royale was “pretty good; a little .

better than expected”.

He added: “We’re located in
the prime outlets at the end of
International Drive. They’re
anticipating about nine million
to 12 million shoppers annually.
We have the anchor restaurant
here, Café Kalik Royale, and
offer the shoppers a true taste
of the Bahamas.

“People love it. We had a
great opening on Friday night.
At least a good 75 per cent of
the customers between the
grand opening and the opening

last Monday came back.

between those days and today
[Friday last]. It’s gone over
well.”

Apart from proving that

. Bahamian entrepreneurs and

companies can succeed in over-
seas expansions, and that this
nation’s cuisine and cultural
heritage are valuable, mar-
ketable commodities, Mr Nab-
bie and Kafe Kalik have also
been doing their bit to help oth-
er Bahamians succeed.

Kalik beer, Graycliff’s cigar
lines, Julie Hoffer’s teas and
spices, Junkanoo dolls and oth-
er product lines produced by
Bahamian entrepreneurs are all
carried, exhibited and sold at
Kafe Kalik Royale, exposing
other national successes to for-
eign markets.

“This is carrying and bring-
ing along a few other Bahami-
ans to grow with us,” Mr Nab-
bie told Tribune Business.

When asked whether Kafe
Kalik’s growth showed that
Bahamian companies could suc-
ceed outside their home mar-
ket, he replied: “I think we’re a
perfect example that it can be
done, and in a manner that’s
pleasing to the eye and profes-
sional. There’s no doubt about
it.

“There’s a certain degree of
conservatism that we have as a

culture. We put money under .

the mattress, watch it and make
sure we eat every day. It takes a
little bit of risk, a little bit of
guts, but if done correctly the
rewards are there. It’s a great
feeling.”

Underpinning Mr Nabbie’s
success with Kafe Kalik and his
other restaurant businesses,
both in the: -US°-and. the
Bahamas, has been the age-old

Bahamian saying ‘Mudda Sik’.

In his company’s case, it has
been taken to mean much the
same as the staff culture Kerzn-

. er International has attempted

to infuse into its employees,
namely: ‘Blow the customer
away’. For Kafe Kalik, ‘Mudda
Sik’ is simply the ‘Wow’ factor —
wowing customers, suppliers,
employees and the wider com-
munity.

“] think the key is going to
be making sure the people who
we hire, and help us drive the

‘concept, understand what we

are trying achieve,” Mr Nabbie
said. “One element of that is
going to be keeping the authen-
tic element in there alive by hir-
ing Bahamians.

“That’s the number one key.
There are some things we have
done with the concept, where
we have taken a certain phrase
from the Bahamas — ‘Mudda
Sik’. We’ve taken that and built
a company philosophy out of
that one word.

“’Mudda Sik’ is an expression
of excitement, an expression of
teamwork, and expression of
excellence. We created rules
and policies from that, and
‘Mudda Sik’ our customers, our
employees, our partners, our
community. We create rules for
how we behave internally and
treat each other. That kind of
transcends itself into employee
attitudes and gives a sense that
this is truly Bahamian.

“We’re a ‘Mudda Sik’ com-
pany. Our business is about
people. A lot of it is interlinked
— how people are greeted, how
people are treated. That’s the
fundamental perspective going
forward.”

Mr Nabbie said some 15 of
Kafe Kalik Royale’s current
staff complement were Bahami-
ans, including executive chef
Leo Hall. Although in its ini-
tial stages because Kafe Kalik
was a relatively new concept, at
least in the US, Mr Nabbie said
he was working with the US
Department of Labour “in try-
ing to put together a pro-
gramme where we bring
Bahamians in on an exchange
programme.

“It’s very practical for us. We
need a year under our belts, and
then we will have more liberty
to go back and forth. We want
to see if we can get the staff
complement up to 40-50 per
cent Bahamian, if not 100 per
cent. As we hit international

markets; a-strong percentage of -

Bahamians must be part of the

Employers/

brand.”

Mr Nabbie said the ultimate
goal was for his Bahamian staff,
after one year’s employment in
Nassau, to be able to transfer
directly to the Kafe Kalik
restaurants in Florida.

Apart-from the Kafe Kalik
Royale staff, Mr Nabbie and his
partners employ some 130 per-
sons at the Bahamas-based
restaurants. Another 75 staff
are employed at Orlando Air-
port, where he also operates
three other chains on a fran-
chise basis — including McDon-

.ald’s and Sbarro’s.

Mr Nabbie also operates two
Bennigan’s restaurants in
Orlando on a franchise basis,
employing 120 persons, plus the
Outback Steakhouse in Nassau
with another 130 staff.

He told Tribune Business
that the Kafe Kalik concept’s

‘roots could be traced back some

13 years to his background in
the Bahamian hotel and restau-
rant industry, which included a
stint as the Crystal Palace’s vice-
president of food and beverage.

Mr Nabbie played a role in
developing restaurant concepts
such as La Grille and Margari-
taville, and saw no reason why
similar ideas could not be orig-
inated and produced by
Bahamians.

“We can do this thing. We
can do it for ourselves,” Mr
Nabbie said of his thoughts at
the time. “It’s been a pet project
of mine for close to nine years.”
The essence of the concept is
about the culture. It’s a true

. template of Kalik — the sound

that the drums and the cow
bells make.”

Although alive to the’ poten-
tial alliance with Kalik beer,
which he has exploited, Mr
Nabbie explained that the

- restaurant was “an independent

concept by itself”, with its own

designs and fascias. ,
Each Kafe Kalik is different

from the others, Mr Nabbie

' describing the Freeport venue

as the ‘Express’ model, with
Orlando Airport closely fol-
lowing the ‘Bar and Grill’ con-
cept. The Nassau location was
the 150-seat ‘barefoot”’, casual
dining venue, featuring bright
colours and a menu that fea-
tured “a little of everything”.

The Freeport location was
opened five years ago, and
Orlando Airport some two
years ago. Prior to Kafe Kalik
Royale, the Festival Place loca-
tion was the youngest at just
some four months old.

Self-Employed Persons
hte all your National Insurance

WITH AUTOM: Th

tributions bald up?

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Z
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INTEREST, .

“ASSESSMENT ON ARREARS

BEGINNING JANt

ARY 1,

20029





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 5B





Survey exposes

mw By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHE
Tribune Business

Reporter

WITH the Department of
Labour accepting around 500
applications for work permits a
week, the number of discour-
aged workers should not have
increased by as much as a
recent labor survey has indicat-
ed, the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president said.

The latest labour force statis-
tics, which also highlighted that
more than a quarter or 25 per
cent of the Bahamian labour
force has no qualifications,



. reflection of what is happening
-in society, Dionisio D’ Aguilar

told Tribune Business.

The number of discouraged
workers - those who are not
seeking work because they feel
that will not find it - has
increased by 21 per cent from
4,600 in 2007 to 5,795 this year,
which Mr D’ Aguilar found sur-
prising considering just how
many work permit applications
are submitted each week.

“That would indicate that
there are a lot of jobs to be had,
if people go out and look for
them,” he said.

Mr D’Aguilar said the
Bahamas needs to seriously
address the educational and

technical skills of its citizens if
the country was to really move
forward, particularly as it relates
to the civil service.

What is more disappointing,
he said, was that many persons
in the Bahamas simply do not
have a positive attitude when it
comes to working; something
that is an even bigger problem
to deal with.

The Superwash owner said

labour
force’s top weaknesses

he would prefer to have an
employee with the right attitude
towards learning and on-the-
job service, than to have an
employee with the right training
and the wrong attitude.
According to the Department
of Statistics labour force sur-
vey, just 49 per cent of the
labour force has completed sec-
ondary school and 1 per cent of
the labour is recorded as having

no schooling. Men are the main
contributors to these dismal sta-
tistics.

rete
behind the ae E

=r Co mgt [e]1] a
rey a] SPDT WE



while not surprising was a sad

4 BED, 3 1/2 BATH, SPLIT LEVEL HOUSE
LOCATED ON LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK 5
CULBERT’S HILL, WINTON HEIGHTS
PROPERTY COMPRISES 59,395 SQ. FT. OR 1.364 ACRES

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before October 17, 2008.

' For further information, please contact: 356-1608 or 502-0929.

28 PICTET

1805

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited

Invites qualified applicants for the following entry level position:-

GENERAL OFFICER ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant will report directly to the Senior Trust
Officer in charge of a portfolio of trusts.

RESPONSIBILITIES:-

¢ Set up of hard copy and electronic files for new trusts.

¢ File maintenance.

¢ Scanning trust documentation into the Company’s database.

¢ Carrying out the approved closure process for terminated trusts.
¢ General clerical responsibilities within the Trust Department.

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE:-

Prior experience in the trust department of a large bank or in
a law firm would be a distinct advantage.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED. Please send Resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in -

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London,
Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome,
Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich








The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with Items left | in storage:

¢ INGRID HAMILTON
¢ PUBLIC HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
¢ CRYSTAL GLINTON
¢ TANYA MOLLER
¢ SIMONNE BOWE
* CORY FARQUHARSON

¢ SANDRA FERGUSON-BROWN
e SUSAN CULMER

¢ DONNA HIGGS
* DAMON CUMMINGS

e SHAWN SMITH
¢ CARDELL BODIE

All rentals must be paid and items removed no later than October 24th, 2008

stor-it-all

Soldier Road
(by Lowe’s Wholesale),
Telephone: 393-0964





VACANCY
FOR A GENERAL MANAGER
WATER & SEWERAGE CORP ORATION





Under the direction of the Board of Directay, this position is charged wih the general
management and coordination of all aspectsof the Water and Severage Corporation’s
administrative and technical affairs; ensusethat the business of the Corporation is—
conducted on a sound, realisticbasis in accardance with legislation, regulations aa
policies.

Role Specification

Core responsibilities include:

« Planning and directing the mintenance and development of both business and
operational activities in order to maximizecost savings and growth in line with
overall business strateges.

" Taking action to procure, maintain and inprove physical assets of the Corporation
including premises, and equipment to standards appropriate for the business
undertaka.

= Developing and mintaining effective operating systems and techniques requred
to attain maximum utilizaton for computer technology.

" Serving external customers, focusingefforts on discovering and meeting their
needs.

" Contribution to he development of sound business strdegies which creates value
for the business.

The job requires wide experience in adninistration, financial acounting and project
management. Must seek opportunities to helpstaff develop their skills whilst improving
performance in currént role, facilitating caregrogression or full realisation of potatial.

The job holder must be a strategic leadercapable of orchestrating and leding major
cultural change efforts aimed at substatally improving the use and poductivity of
human asvts. Must be a strong advocate ofthe participative minagement philosophy
and be capable of pwoviding strategic leadership in the corporat-wide transition from
“top-down” management to “employee empowered” processes.

Educational Requirements and Experience

We seek a seasoned Business Excutive with a minimum of 10 years senior management
experience with a degree in Business or Engieering; togeher with an MBA, MPA or
Professional Accounting qualification.

We offer a highly competitive base salary abng with attractive fringe benefits package.

Candidates with productive maagement experience and a proven ability to set and meet.
corporate objectives should said resume and salary requirenents sealed and nurked
private an d confidential to:

Chairman
Water & S ewerage Corporation
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

On or before 24" October, 2008



PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

FROM page 1B

tion from the court to prevent
you from transferring your
assets from the country before
the mentioned issues have been
resolved.”

When contacted by Tribune
Business, Mr Moss said: “The

only concerns we have are, first,

that all the non-managerial
employees in there are com-
pensated in accordance with our
agreement and the Employ-
ment Act.

“Some of the primary con-
cerns we have are also to do
with the female employees who
are pregnant, and’who have
been with Pepsi-Cola for 12
months or more, that they
receive full maternity benefits.”

Pepsi-Cola (Americas), the
regional parent for the compa-
ny’s Bahamas-based manufac-
turing, bottling and sales/distri-
bution operation, announced
late last week that the business
in this nation would cease oper-
ating by December 5, 2008, with
the loss of 75 jobs.

Rick Wooten, Pepsi-Cola’s
senior vice-president for the
Caribbean, said in a statement
that the Bahamian operation
was unprofitable, and had strug-
gled ever since the Americas

region took over the business
in 2001-2002.

He implied that the relatively
small size of the Bahamian mar-
ket had prevented Pepsi-Cola’s
operation from achieving the
scale and volume sales neces-
sary to generate profits, despite
repeated investment in tech-
nology and manpower.

Concerns, though, have been
raised before, notably by trade
union leader and attorney Obie
Ferguson, who is also the BBW-
DU’s legal counsel, that
Bahamian employees could be
left exposed — and not be paid
and severance pay and benefits
due to them — when foreign-
owned companies liquidated
their operations in this nation
and repatriated all assets back
home.

This has happened several
times, and while there is no sug-
gestion it would happen in the
case of Pepsi-Cola (Bahamas),
it appears that Mr Moss and Mr
Ferguson felt strongly enough
to effectively fire ‘a warning
shot across the company’s
bows’.

Telling Tribune Business that
the number of unresolved

_ labour disputes with Pepsi-Cola

was “in single digits”, Mr Moss
said: “All of the unresolved dis-

RT GT a7
ea BAAS ET aa EU

just call 02-2371 today!



putes we have, they must indi-
cate they will settle those dis-
putes before they remove their
liquid assets from the compa-

y.
“Any failure to resolve these
disputes will result in us asking
the court to prevent them from
removing their assets until these
disputes are resolved. We are
giving them until October 31 to
meet with us and resolve these
things. Maybe we can resolve
them without going to court.”

An October 8, 2008, letter
that was sent to Mr Moss by Mr
Wooten and Rita Weary, Pepsi-
Cola’s human resources director
for the Caribbean, gave the
BBWDU advance notice of the
closure decision that was
announced to staff on October
9, 2008.

The Pepsi-Cola executives
wrote: “Pepsi Americas has re-
examined its business strategy
and, as a result, has concluded
that it will cease all operations
in the Bahamas effective
December 5, 2008.

“As a result, all employees —

currently represented by the
BBWDU will be rendered
redundant on this date.” That is

when the sales and distribution .

operation will close, with man-
ufacturing shutting down on
November 14, 2008.

Mr Wooten and Ms Weary
said Pepsi-Cola would follow
the provisions in the now-
expired industrial agreement
when it came to the BBWDU
members’ notice and redun-
dancy pay, pointing out that
with the company set to close
there was no point in persisting
with the talks on a replacement
agreement.

“At our last meeting we
informed the union that the

business re-examination was in
process, that it could well
impact bargaining unit employ-
ees and that once a determina-
tion was made we would notify
the union,” the two executives
told Mr Moss.

“We also requested that we
delay bargaining negotiations
in light of the business re-exam-
ination, and when this was
declined expressly reserved our
right to modify our bargaining
position once the re-examina-
tion was concluded.

“In this regard, we would
now propose that we simply
agree to continue the expired
collective bargaining agreement
in place through December 5,
2008, rather than negotiate a
new agreement, as no useful
purpose would seem to be
served by negotiating a new
agreement when no employees
will.be covered by it.”

The timing of the plant’s clo-
sure could not have come at a
worse time, especially for the
75 employees and their fami-
lies, as jobs will be lost just
before Christmas and at a time
when the global economy seems
headed for a prolonged down-
turn.

Mr Moss, though, said he was
not surprised at the closure
announcement, given that Pep-
si-Cola was struggling with its
financial performance through-
out the Caribbean and that the
company was investing more in
the Bahamas than it was
recouping in terms of profit.

“We got involved with that
organisation [Pepsi-Cola] in
2001,” Mr Moss recalled. “It
seems to me that the operation
was flawed from the beginning,
primarily because they had 110
employees at that time. In the

soft drinks industry, that was
not necessary.

“T believe the market here in
the Bahamas is not large
enough to sustain Pepsi-Cola,
Coca-Cola and all the distribu-
tors here in the industry.”

Mr Moss described the mood
of ‘Pepsi-Cola employees fol-
lowing the closure announce-
ment as “aggrieved”, pointing
out that when the BBWDU first
started representing staff the
company was selling cases
priced at $6.75-$7.50 to retailers.
That price had since almost

doubled to $14 per case, while .
staff numbers had been slashed

by near 50 per cent, but still the
operation had trouble being
profitable.

Mr Moss said: “It [the clo-

THE TRIBUNE .

| @

Union warns Pepsi-Cola

sure] was something inevitable, ,,.
and waiting to happen because , ,
of the way they were operating.
They were a high-cost opera-..,

tor, and did not need all the ,
management employees, all the.
non-management employees. ,
They started off on the weene:
foot.”

The situation, though, had’
sent a warning to Bahamian,

workers and trade unions every-,.
where. “It is important for peo- 64

ple to be making a profit, and___,

that the bottom line is being vis- | je

ibly improved,” Mr Moss said. -
“If it isn’t, people should”
become concerned because’ a,

company will not be in business ” ;

for any period of time if it is not,
getting a reasonable return on |;
their bottom line.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LUMIN GLOBAL ASSETS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

YN

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

POLDATORM LTD.

Bi

Notice i is hereby given that i in acco

138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of POLDATORM LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register. —

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TESSA RESOURCES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O: Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

_ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

REDWOOD TREASURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

sordance with ‘Section.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CROSSCOUNTRY INVESTMENT FUND LTD.
VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that 1 Ipgag accordance with Section 137 (8) of

the Tnterniattonal “Business *COnipanies Act 2000 the Dissolution

of CROSSCOUNTRY INVESTMENT FUND LTD. has been

completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 30th day of July:
2008.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CAMILLA SHIPPING LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box N-624,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 18th November, A.D.,
2008. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 9th day of October, A.D., 2008.

Dayrrl Butler
Liquidator
29 Retirement Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BRIDGEWATER SLOPES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 23rd day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

HIGH MOUNTAIN LIMITED.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
CAMILA SHIPPING LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CAMILA SHIPPING LIMITED is in dissolution under the

provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 9th day of
October, 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Dayrrl Butler, 29 Retirement
Road, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 9th day of October, A.D., 2008.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which ‘commenced
on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)





THE TRIBUNE

Trade

dispute fears for |

the Bahamas on EPA. |

A BAHAMIAN economic
think-tank has warned that the
Bahamas could find itself at a
“serious disadvantage” shoulda
trade dispute arise between it
and the European Unidn (EU)
over the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA).

The Nassau Institute said that
while the EPA was negotiated
collectively by the Bahamas
and other CARIFORUM
countries via the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machin-

_ery (CRNM), all would be sign-
_ing the agreement as individ-
ual signatories.

This could potentially expose
each of them, the think-tank
warned, to having. to defend
themselves individually against
the EU’s combined might
should a trade or commercial
dispute arise over the EPA.

The Nassau Institute warned
tg the Bahamas could be at a
“serious disadvantage, since it

will be pitched individually
aghinst the massive resources
offthe EU. Have Caribbean
nepotiators considered the need
- tojinsist that the region should
belable to speak as one in the
settlement of disputes affecting
individual countries?”

Its recent commentary. also
expressed concern about the
EPA’s Most Favoured Nation
) provision, which effec-
tiv ly prohibits the Bahamas
1 other Caribbean states
frgm offering to others better
trdde terms and preferences
than it gives to the EU —a non-
discrimination clause.

‘If signatories enter into a
fr¢e trade agreement (FTA)
with a developed country that
giyes more favourable treat-





mént than that provided to the .

under the EPA, they are
obliged to consult the EU first.
THis could interfere with the
Bahamas’ ability to enter into

‘As with other major trading
ntries as well as the US,” ,

tht -Nassau Institute warned.
‘A further consideration is
that the US, Canada and other
ndn-EU trade partners are
unlikely to ‘accept that the EU
*cah expeet duty-free access to

the Bahamas unless they can

daso as well
‘In the case of the US, lead-



“Dr Larty Carroll ©

Chief Radiologist



Purpose:

To eautate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by Doctors Hosprt

distinguished. physicians.

ee
Get your FREE 2

Pressure, Choles

oe eieens eect between

S

5pm & 6pm,



ing attorney Brian Moree
argued at a Nassau Institute
seminar on the EPA in June
that, since MFN status meant
no discrimination between
countries, the Bahamas would
have to offer — at the time it
negotiated a replacement of the
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) — at least the same trade
preferences and benefits it
offered to the EU.

“In practice, this would mean .

that, because the Bahamas’ lev-
el of trade with the. US was
greater than with the EU, the
starting point in negotiations
would be — in his words — the
‘EU EPA plus’. Given that ‘in
2007 the US exported to the
Bahamas some $2.5 billion
worth of goods, the loss to the
latter would be substantial.”
Warning that the effects from
signing the EPA would be
“substantial” for both the
Bahamian economy and this
nation’s way of life, the Nassau
Institute praised the Govern-
ment for attempting to consult

with industry groups and the
public. -

“However, it appears that,

_ for the most part, the Govern-

ment has not entered into a
genuine consultation about the
fundamental issue of whether
it is in the general interest of
the Bahamas to-sign-an EPA

at all; and many Bahamians

remain yninformed about its

likely impact on their lives and :

welfare,” the Nassau Institute
warned.
““There has beén no fo:

malised national consultation |

involving political parties, the
trades unions, the churches and
the private sector as a whole.
Instead, the Government has
taken a policy position, in line
with other CARIFORUM

countries, to go along with the -

EPA. It has sought to explain
and justify its decision rather
than to debate the overall mer-
its and demerits of the EPA as
far.as the nation.is concerned.”

While the Government want-
ed to preserve duty-free market
access to the EU for $90 million
worth of Bahamian exports,
and maintain its’ present

‘favourable balance of trade

with Eurdpe, the Nassau Insti-



Disti ingui ished. Lecture Series
This Months Topic: °

MRI & Breast Screening

tute said revenues from anoth-
er source would have to replace
the $6 million being given up

on 85 per cent of EU imports -
whose tariffs will be eliminated

over a 25-year period.

“To some observers, the ben-
efit to the Bahamas of opening
up the EU’s services sector is
illusory since there are few
Bahamian companies or indi-
viduals currently equipped or

ready ‘to compete in an EU
market of 27 countries with

over 400 million people and in -
the face of prohibitive costs,

non-tariff barriers, subsidies
and other hurdles,” the Nassau
Institute warned.

“Tt is not yet clear what the
additional cost will be of com-
plying with the EPA obliga-
tions; for example, the creation
of new institutions, regulatory
bodies and laws. The Chamber
of Commerce stressed recently
the need to build capacity. and
competitiveness, and to develop
new ideas and entrepreneur-
ship. But market access to the
EU’s services sector does not
necessarily lead to market pies:

~ ence.’ ts
And the Nassau Institute

added: “Advocates of the EPA
claim that, in order to fulfill its
commitments under the agree-

ment, the Bahamas will be ©
forced to carry out much-need- <
ed.institutional reform; for.
example, the tax system, cus- .

toms, competition, public ser-
vices etc. Reform of customs
administration is perhaps the

most important. A host of new -

legislation, including harmoni-
sation of laws with CARIFO-
RUM countries, will also be
required.

“Has the cost of all this been —

assessed? Zhivargo Laing has
spoken of an ‘implementation
framework’ which addresses
these issues. Will he make this
available in order to reassure
the public that the Government

has the capacity and commit-
-ment to fulfill its obligations in

this respect and to pay for their
implementation? Will he also

provide information about .

plans for the ‘enabling legisla-
tion’ which will be required fol-

. lowing signature of the ‘goods

only’ EPA this month?”



¢Lecture Dates
Thursday, October | 6th ‘08 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP * Seating is Limited » ¢ 302-4603
Coes seerseeeeoece
"Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the nhonth for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

: affecting society today!

2008 Lecture Series

ee
od

Octo
hana

6
; = Dr Larry Carroll
if a November 20th

ae lelcinein

oneal
ee

ae ora ee Cieelai ais aioln
aL December | 8th

S)
Y)



«Depressions
Dp ikea Nene

The Bepariment BE Choperativa ‘Development in collaboration
with the Bahamas Co-operative League Limited cordially invites

Mr. heel Paige

Mr. Serge Gosselin

Mr. Walter ee



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 7B

National Co-operative
- Congress Town Meeting
“The Role of Co- -operatives in National Development”

October 15, 2008

8: 00 P.M. - 9: 30 P. M.
Hosted by Steve McKinney:

LIVE BROADCAS ON. 1540, M:

‘

the general public to attend the National Co- -operative Congress

. Town Meeting and participate in provocative discussions on the
topic “The Role of Co-operatives In National Development‘

Panelists will address issues facing the sector and discuss how. —
Bahamians . can actively participate in ‘the growth - and :
development of the co-operative sector.

PANELISTS INCLUDE:

Executive Director, Southern Co-op
& Land Assistance Fund, USA |
Desjardins Movement, Canada

Mr. Lennie Etienne Chairman, Producers Service Council,

Teachers & Salaried Workers 7

Mr. Cordelt Knowles :
Co- operative Credit Union Limited ae

Bahamas Law Enforcerient:
- Co-operative Credit Union Limited ©

| VENUE:
. College of the Bahamas :
Culinary & Hospitality Training institute

UWI Dining Room

Thompson Boulevard & Big Pond Road
For more information call
pep el 302-0100



NZ Airport

Development Sernety’ . ; BS . eae ‘

_ TENDERS

“ ALE

Nassau Axport Development. Company i is vlbhaied to announce the following tender
associated with the. expansion of the Lynden Pindling International Aiport: The General
Contractor Package for Teivder C-116 Early Civil and Relocations lump sum contract

incest folowing components: | e :

Tree and site salen ented removal; lela, and composting of
organic materials,

Security fencing supply and installation; <

Demolition and disposal of buildings, fences, miscellaneous ebuctires

debris and equipment;

Removal and disposal of 2 baderground and 1 above ground fuel siotagt

tanks;

Removal, and disposal of eidieg utilities & installation of new Bip

“corridor including sanitary and communication ductbank;

* Removal of HMAC roadway by milling. and construction of temporary
parking lot and contractor laydown. area a utilizing existing pavemerit and
asphalt millings;

Relocation, supply and installation of temporary parking lot lighting; ‘and
Relocation of existing macerator, pump and trash compactor and removal
and disposal of existing lift station and macerator pit.

Tender Packages cah be picked up after 1:00 pm, on Monday, October 6th.

Tender closing is Tuesday, October 28th at 1:00pm.

There will be a Tender Briefing Wednesday, October 15th, Please RSVP Traci Bviaby,
“by = Tuesday, October 14th for briefing location deta





PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





To advertise, call 502-2371

BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

www.bahamasengineers.org

NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON
on
Thursday, October 16, 2008

Topic:
“ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITY IN
RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES”

GUEST SPEAKER:

Mr. Alisdar Mclean

Vice Prestident, Marketing

Plasco Energy Group
Place: East Villa Restaurant -
East Bay Street
TIME: 12:00p.m.

Donation: $25.00 per person

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR ATTENDANCE BY E-MAIL
gracesharma05@ yahoo.com
] or. .
jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com
or
quentin.knowles@flameless.com



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008/COM/Bnk/00079
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Commercial Division

BETWEEN

JIN THE MATTER OF BAILIWICK
ov! a) INVESTMENTSLTD.

- AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
ACT, 1992

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that a Petition
for the winding-up of the above-named Company
by the Supreme Court was on the 8" day of
September, A.D., 2008, presented to the said
Court by VENICE BAY HOLDINGS LTD.
whose registered office is situate at Mareva
House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau in
the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND that the said Petition is directed to
be heard before the Court at Charlotte House, 24
Floor in the City of Nassau aforesaid on Friday

the 31* of October, A.D., 2008 at 2:30 o’clock in |

the afternoon and any Creditor or Contributory of
the said Company desirous to support or oppose
the making of an Order on the said Petition may
appear at the time of the hearing in person or by
his Counsel for that purpose; and a copy of the
Petition will be furnished by the undersigned
to any Creditor or Contributory of the said
company requiring such copy on payment of the
prescribed charge for the same.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Chambers
Mareva House
4 George Street:
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

NOTE:- Any person who intends to appear
on the hearing of the said Petition must serve
ca or send by post to the above-named, Notice
in writing of his intention to do so. The Notice
must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and
must be signed by the person or the firm, or his
or their attorney (if any); and must be served, or
if posted, must be sent by post in sufficient time
to reach the Petitioner or its attorneys not later
than 4 o’clock in the afternoon of the 30" day of
October, A.D., 2008.



Real

tor wage survey

finding ‘total nonsense’

FROM page 1B

only on the really high earners
or agents selling for the likes of
Ginn, which generated many
millions in sales revenues before
being hit by the credit crunch
and global downturn, Whether
commissions and basic salaries
were bundled together or treat-
ed separately is another issue.
“Tt’s not me and not my
agents. I say: show me the mon-
ey,” said Mr Wong, adding that
he was going to ask his nine

agents attending the office .

meeting today to show him that
they were earning what the
Occupational Wage Survey said
they should be.

On the apparent discrepancy
between the industry reality and
the survey, Mr Wong said: “It’s
always béen a problem; people
not giving accurate information
to the Department of Statistics.

. Some people exaggerate, some

people under-report and some
people lie to protect their busi-
ness."

Mike Lightbourn, head of
Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty, agreed with Mr Wong’s

EXCLUSIVE LISTING
GRAHAM ACRES

Part of Blair Estates, East

Furnished 4 bed/2 bath house, Living,
Dining and Family Room (1,781 Sq. Ft.)
air-conditioned, large Wooden Deck,
fenced in, landscaped lot in great area.

$345,000.00 Gross

comments, telling Tribune Busi-

ness: “I would guess the average
real estate agent makes $20,000-
$30,000 per year.

“In the US, it’s $37,000 a
year. That would be for a full-
time agent, and there are a lot
of part-time agents. It’s total
rubbish. They’ve made a mis-

‘take in calculating income. They

need to know what the average
agent makes, and there’s no
way in hell that’s [$197,000] pos-
sible. Agents have to split their
earnings with the office.”
Both Mr Wong and Mr
Lightbourn expressed concern

that the survey’s findings might '-

give the general public the
incorrect impression that real-
tors earned huge sums of mon-
ey for very little work.

The BREA president said
that agents might close a sale
once every two, three or even
six months, with cashflow issues
a constant concern in a business
where, like all others, fixed costs
and overheads have to be paid.

“We’re not making money
hand over fist,” he added. “It
takes months and months for a
sale to happen, and to be in this
business you need some disci-
pline.”

For the stories

He and Mr Lightbourne were
also worried that it might attr
a sudden influx of new entran|
lured in by the unrealistic wage

figure, only for those people’s

expectations to be dashed and
the Bahamian real estate mar-
ket to become overcrowded |
with a surplus of agents.

Meanwhile, Mr Wong said
the local, Bahamian component
of the real estate market “seems
to be holding” and was doing
“OK”, with prices remaining
constant.

“As long as the banks keep .
lending mortgages, we’ll be
OK,” Mr Wong said. “The only.
market showing signs of flexi-
bility is the rental market. You
could negotiate a better lease;
because there’s a lot of items
on the market.” )

However, it was a different
story in the international, sec-

‘ond home market for proper-

ties priced at between $2-$5 mil-
lion, the BREA president said.
Potential buyers were “taking
a second look right now and
holding on to their cash”
because of the global economic
turmoil.

“We had a client come into
town looking to purchase a $6.8
million condo at Ocean Place

_ on Paradise Island,” Mr Wong

recalled. “Then he said to me:

‘Sorry, William, I’ve had to
postpone my trip because of
what’s happening on the stock
market.’ And he had cash to
spare. Those persons with mon-
ey are holding back.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is bee, an that FRANTZ JEAN-BAPTISTE
of KEY WEST STREET, P.O. BOX GT-128, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any nm
who knows any reason et registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed 3
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days. from the: |
7TH day of OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister-responsible |
fot pata ally and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
ahamas.

Please call: behind the news,

Real Estate International (Bah.) Co. Ltd.
Tel: 322-4187

e-mail: hw@realestateint.com

read Insight
on Mondays








Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3 years experience in-ac- -
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:






¢ Formulating budgets



¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables




NOTICE is hereby en that RAYMONDE MESIDOR of
#27 EAST AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7TH day of OCTOBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
‘P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements .






° Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers






¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules







e Preparing reports for the regulators








NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LORNA PATRICIA ROBINSON
of 54 GAMBIER LOOP, P.O. BOX F-44574 FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 38RD day of
OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



¢ Must be a team player

e Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members -







¢ Minimum qualifications: BA in Accounting






Please forward resume before
October 20, 2008 to P. O. Box N-7544





Abaco
















0
Bahamas Property Fund i 1.69
7.64 Bank of Bahamas 5 2.09)
0.85 Benchmark 0.89 ' i 2.28)
3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 3.49 0.00 a 2.58)
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 A 1.69)
11.00 Cable Bahamas 14.15 14.16 0.00 1,050 if 1.70
2.85 Colina Holdings 2.85 2.86 0.00 0.118 0.040 24.2 1.40
4.80 Commonwealth Bank (81) ‘ 7.37 7.37 0.00 0.449 0,300 16.4 4.07
1.99 Consolidated Vater BDRS 1.99 2.66 0.87 197 Q.122 0.062 21.0 2.03)
2.26 . Doctor's Hospital 2.77 2.77 0.00 0.2866 0.040 10.8 1.44
6.02 Famguaerd . 8.06 8.06 0.00 0.836 0.280 16.1 3.47)
12,00 Finco 12,00 12.00 0.00 : 0.666 0.8670 18.0 :
11.54 FirstCaribbean Bank 11.70 11.70 0.00
5.05 Focol (S) 5.25 6.25 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00




0.40 Freeport Concrete
5.50 ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson






v9 9 ober 20
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% : . . 30 May 2013

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Serlés B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Séries GC) +.
Fidelity Gln Note Le ccores O) +




- “Beiene #:4.789%



Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)








0.38

SRR Cri
29.00
14,00

SO
th: IV.

SS
SS
Di



Bahamas Supermarkets










1.3371
3.0250

Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund










Colina Money Market Fund 1.4137 2.81 4.21
3.5388 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.6090 -4.95 3.62
11.8192 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.4456 4.29 5.78
100,0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.0000 t
99.9666 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600 1,01 1.01
1.0000 CFAL. High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000
9.1958 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1958 -12.42 “12.42
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0184 1.84 : 1.84
FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0112 1.12 ’





FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0172
SARA GROSS RN :




ja divided by
Bid & - Buying 5 nd Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Lant traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol, - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per ahare for the last 12 mths
NAV - Naot Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamaa Stock Index, January 1, 1904 = 100



52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks



Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close ~ Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the laat 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

fective Date 8/8/2007











(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 9B

Kerzner backs

tourism plans

ia By CARA BRENNEN-
‘ BETHEL
. Tribune Business

, Reporter

KERZNER International
fully supports the proposals to
yevitalise the Bahamian
fourism industry that were out-
lined by tourism minister,. Vin-
gent Vanderpool-Wallace, last
week.

In a statement, Ed Fields,
vice-president of external com-
munication for the Atlantis and
Zone & Only Ocean Club

ewner, told Tribune Business:

While we have not had time
to fully digest the minister's
plan, we are fully supportive
of all and any efforts to






improve and promote our
product.”
Mr Fields said that coupled

_with the plans to improve ser-

vice and address airlift; Kerzn-
er International wanted to see
attention paid to reducing ener-
gy costs, improving labour pro-
ductivity and improvements to
New Providence's overall
physical appearance as a mat-
ter of urgency. He added: “Giv-
en the current economic envi-
ronment, we need to be aware
that discretionary spending is
going to be seriously impacted
and that we need to have a des-
tination that people view as an
affordable and preferred desti-
nation among all the options
available to them.”

Everywhere oe Buyer.

SS

28 PICTET

{805

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace out:
lined the much-anticipated new ~

tourism strategy at a press con-
ference last week, saying the
Ministry of Tourism has repri-

‘oritised its budget to reflect the

most vital areas, including
improvements to the total visi-
tor experience with more tours
and activities.

The plan also calls for
increased airlift and the
rebranding of the Bahamas as

region of islands rather than a’

single destination.

The ministry’s new strategy
comes during a time when the
hotel industry is suffering from
low occupancy levels and sky-
rocketing expenses due to the
ever-increasing price of oil.

Fein

a

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited —

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

JUNIOR TRUST OFFICER

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

- Strong organisational skills.

- Ability to function independently but work as part of a team.

- Ability to function in a high volume, high pressure environment.

Company.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

- Minimum of the STEP Foundation Certificate.
- Sound knowledge of trust drafting, reporting and accounting.
- Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents. .
- Familiarity with the relevant local legislation, particularly the Trustee
Act, 1998 and the Financial Transactions Reporting Act, 2000.
- Working knowledge of legislation in competing jurisdictions.
' - Proficiency in. Microsoft Word and Excel.
- At least five (5) years relevant experience in a Private Bank or Trust

-- Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED. Please send Resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London, |
Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome,
Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law and Equity Division

2008
CLE/QUI/00491

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

HENRY ALEXANDER DARVILLE AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE

ESTATE OF HENRY SAMUEL DARVILLE
NOTICE

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing 62.30 acres referred to as
Parcel “A” being Portion of Original Crown Grant of Marmaduke Wright (D*76)
and known as ‘WoodHill’ situate in the Settlement of Mortimers on the Island
of Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the
West bounded by a 15 feet wide road reservation know as Old Crown Road
running thereon Six Hundred Eight-eight and Fifty-five hundredths (688.55)
square feet more or less on the North East bounded by land now or formerly thes
property of Errol Mortimer running thereon One Thousand Four Hundred Eight-
nine and Eight square feet hundredths (1,489.08) more or less on the South
East bounded by land now or formerly the property of Donald Burrows running
thereon Four Hundred Forty-six and Sixty-eight hundredths (446.68) square feet
more or less on the North East bounded by land now or formerly the property of
Donald Burrows running thereon One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-eight and
Nineteen hundredths (1,998.19) square feet more or less on the North bounded
by land now or formerly the property of Donald Burrows running thereon One
Thousand Two Hundred Ninety-seven and Sixty-five hundredths (1,297.65)
square feet more or less on the North East bounded by land now or formerly the
property of James Major running thereon Two Hundred Thirty-five and Eighty-
nine hundredths (235.89) square feet more or less on the East bounded by a 20
feet wide Crown Road Reservation and by land now or formerly the property of
James Major and Bishop Herman Dean running thereon One Thousand Eight
Hundred Fifty-six and Fifteen hundredths (1,856.15) square feet more or less on
the South bounded by a 20 feet wide road reservation known as Wood Hill Farm
Road running thereon Four Thousand Twenty-four and Sixty-eight hundredths
(4,024.68) square feet more or less.

AND

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing 57.94 acres referred to as
Parcel “B” being Portion of Original Crown Grant to Lewis Johnson (D-124) and
known as ‘WoodHill’ situate in the Settlement of Mortimers on the Island of Long
Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the East
bounded by a 20 feet wide Crown Road Reservation and by land now or formerly
the property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon Five Hundred Eighty-nine and
Sixteen hundredths (589.16) square feet more or less on the South bounded
by land now or formerly the property of Rufus Mortimer running thereon Two
Thousand Two Hundred Thirty-two. and Sixty-three hundredths (2,232.63) square
feet more or less on the South bounded by land now or formerly the property of
Rufus Mortimer running thereon Five Hundred One and Fifty-five hundredths

’ (501.55) square feet more or less on the South West bounded by land and or

formerly the property of Bishop Herman Dean running thereon Two Hundred Two
and Thirteen hundredths (202.13) square feet more or less on the South bounded
by land now or formerly the property of Bishop Herman Dean running thereon
One Hundred Ninety-five and Eleven hundredths (195.11) square feet more
or less on the South West bounded by land the property of Macfield Mortimer
running thereon Four Hundred Fifty-three and Seventy-five hundredths (453.75)
square feet more or less on the North West bounded by land now or formerly
the property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon One Hundred Ninety-five and
Forty hundredths hundredths (195.40) square feet more or less on the South
West bounded by land now or formerly the property of Macfield Mortimer runninge
thereon Two Hundred Seventy-four and Twenty-nine hundredths (274.29) square
feet more or less on the South East bounded by'‘land now or formerly the property
of Macfield Mortimer running thereon One Hundfed Sixty-seven and Twenty-two
hundredths (167.22) square feet more or less on the South West bounded by
land now or formerly the: property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon Two
Hundred Sixteen and Sixty-six hundredths (216.66) square feet more or less on
the North West bounded by Vacant Crown Land running thereon One Thousand
One Hundred Twelve and Sixteen hundredths (1'112.16) square feet more or
less on the North East bounded by a twenty feet wide road reservation known .
as Wood:Hill Road running thereon One Thousand Eighty-one and Twenty-one
hundredths (1081.29) square feet more or less on the North East bounded by
a twenty feet wide road reservation partly known as Wood Hill Road and partly
known as Wood Hill Farm Road running thereon Three Thousand Nine Hundred
Forty-eight and Forty-nine hundredths (3,948.49) square feet more or less.

AND

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing 2.09 acres referred to as Parcel
“C” being Portion of Original Crown Grant to Anthony Friar (D-128) and known
as ‘Woodhill’ situate in the Settlement of Mortimers on the Island of Long Island.
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the South East
bounded by land now or formerly the property of Bishop Herman Dean running
thereon Four Hundred Forty and Forty hundredths (440.40) square feet more
or less on the South West bounded by land now or formerly the property of the
Estate of Jeremiah Mortimer running thereon One Hundred Sixteen and Sixty-
five hundredths (116.65) square feet more- or less on the South West bounded
by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of Jeremiah Mortimer running
thereon Sixty-six and Sixty-nine hundredths (66.69) square feet more or less on
the South West bounded by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of
Jeremiah Mortimer running thereon Sixty-one and Fifty-four hundredths (61.54)
square feet more or less on the North West bounded by land now or formerly
the property of the Estate of Jeremiah Mortimer running thereon Two Hundred
Fifty-one and Thirty-three hundredths (251.33) square feet more or less on the
North East by a road reservation known as Old Crown Road and by land now
or formerly the property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon Three Hundred
Sixty-one and Seventeen hundredths (361.17) ‘square feet more or less.

Henry Alexander Darville as Personal Representative of the Estate of Henry
Samuel Darville claims to be the owner in fee simple of the said land free
from encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme Court in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959
to have his title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:

The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau;
The Office of the Administrator in Long Island

c) The Chambers of Callenders & Co., One Millars Court, Nassau, The
Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower:or right of dower
or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before
the 25" day of November A.D. 2008 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of his claim on or before the said 25" day of November
A.D. 2008 will operate as a bar to such claim.

CALLENDERS & CO.
Chambers
One Millars Court
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner







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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



$85m lawsuit:

Hilton marina

deal ‘properly
terminated’

FROM page 1B

York is not the correct venue
for the case to be heard. This
is despite IGY ‘alleging that
New. York was chosen as the
primary jurisdiction for settling
any disputes over the joint ven-
ture agreement.

Jurg Gassmann, an Adurion
non-executive director and also
a British Colonial Development
Company director, alleged in a
June 19, 2008, affidavit that
IGY’s “consent” for Adurion’s
investment was “not required
and, therefore, was never
requested”.

Vehemently refuting IGY’s
“double-cross” allegation, Mr
Gassmann added: “Moreover,
insofar as I am aware, [IGY]
never granted any consent to
the acquisition.”

IGY had alleged’ that: ait ‘had
twice requested an. extension to

‘the closing deadline, firstly to

January 31, 2007, and then until
June 30, 2007, to give the for-
mer PLP government time to
complete Heads of Agreement
negotiations.

But a July 5, 2007, letter sent
by Mr Gassmann in his capaci-
ty as director and secretary of
the British Colonial Develop-
ment Company and its affiliates
said the marina deal was being
terminated because IGY had

“failed to effectuate” the closing
by deadline day. Its $200,000
deposit was being returned.

In their dismissal motion, the
Hilton companies-allesed-that
IGY ‘had-failed-to fiber” ‘its



SET CRO aan Gl armen

First Name:
Title:

Work:
P.0.Box:

Last Name:
Company:



Telephone # Home:

Fax #
Exact Street Address:















House # House Name:

House Colour: Type of Fence/Wall:

Requested Start oe

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let us be the first on your list.

. mis Anns ae



|







CALL: 502-2385

RW Ey ei
TOD!

obligations by not securing a
Heads of Agreement, and also
failed to obtain other vital doc-
uments such as a parking lot
management agreement and
plan.

They also claimed IGY failed
to perform by the closing date,
and orally agreed extensions —
such as the ones IGY claimed it
received — were not valid under
the terms of the land purchase
agreement, and damaged their
interests.

In its lawsuit, which names
the British Colonial Develop-
ment Company, two affiliated
property companies — Ocean
Bay Properties I and Ocean
Bay Properties II — PRK Hold-
ings, Adurion Capital and Mr
Allen as defendants, IGY
alleged that the deal involved

“the purchase of waterfront
property owned by the [defen-
dants] adjoining the British
Colonial Hilton in Nassau,
Bahamas, to develop an off-
shore, mixed-use mega yacht
marina and resort development.

“Because the [defendants]
wanted to retain a portion of
the equity interest in the prop-
erty, the purchase agreement
provided that the purchase price
would be comprised of $8 mil-
lion in cash payable by IGY and
a $10 million equity interest in
IGY given to the [defendants]
at closing.”

IGY alleged that the pur-
chase agreement was agreed
with the British Colonial Devel-
opment Company on Novem-
ber 7, 2005, and it then began
work on obtaining a Heads of
Agreement for the joint ven-
ture marina from the former
Christie government.

“Nearly $1 million” was spent
by IGY on due diligence, plan-
ning, designs, permitting and
legal costs associated with the
project, and an “approval in
principle” was obtained from
the former PLP government on
December 7, 2006.

However, IGY alleges in its
lawsuit that at about the same

time Adurion’s purchase of a |

majority stake in the British
Colonial Development Compa-
ny turned up on the scene, it
claimed its approval was
required for Adurion to acquire
some of the rights in the joint
venture deal.

“As the work progressed,
with IGY bearing both the
labouring oar and the expense,
in approximately early Decem-
ber 2006, the defendant sellers
and their agent, Allen, advised
that a majority economic inter-
est and a voting interest in
British Colonial [Development
Company] had been acquired
in some manner by Adurion,”
IGY alleged.

“British Colonial requested
IGY’s consent, under the pur-

‘chase agreement, to assign some

of the sellers’ rights under the
purchase agreement to Aduri-
on.

“At this critical stage of the
transaction, which was close to
closing after over an entire
year’s worth of work by IGY, to
induce IGY to agree to the
assignment, the sellers and their
agent, Allen, specifically repre-
sented to IGY that Adurion
would stand by the transaction
as already agreed upon, and
would not block the closing or
try to renegotiate the deal.

“Allen and the sellers led
IGY to believe that the trans-
action would proceed to clos-
ing, and that Adurion would not

_ fail to honour the agreements

previously agreed upon by the
sellers. However, as soon as
Adurion acquired its interest,
it immediately began to attempt
to renegotiate the terms that
had been agreed pursuant to
the purchase agreement, includ-
ing the sale price, various oblig-
ations and management rights.”

IGY alleged that Adurion,
“evidently believing that the
sellers should get a better deal

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



than that already agreed to in
writing,” attempted to alter tHe
shareholder agreement for the
joint venture marina project —
something that ultimately led
to its collapse.

The New York-based com-
pany, well-known for develop-
ing five-star resort/marina prop-
erties throughout — the
Caribbean, said the marina deal
could not close because with-
out a shareholder agreement it
would be unable to obtain a
Heads of Agreement with the
Government.

The Government needed ©
“evidence that [the joint ven-
ture entity] would be the right-
ful owner of the property”
before it would approve the
project and grant a seabed
lease.

When contacted by Tribune
Business, Andrew Farkas,
IGY’s chairman and chief exec-
utive, although surprised this
newspaper had obtained the
documents, confirmed that the
legal action was still live. He
said: “It’s before the courts.”

When asked whether he
would consider alternative sites
in the Bahamas for such a pro-
ject, Mr Farkas replied: “I’m
always looking.”

Arguably the biggest losers
from this situation, apart from
the British Colonial Hilton, are
downtown Nassau and the
wider Bahamian economy. The
IGY/British Colonial project
could have been a key compo-
nent of the Bay Street/down-
town Nassau redevelopment
plans, and might still be if Adu-
rion can find another joint ven-
ture partner to replace IGY —
albeit after several years have
been lost.

An economic impact study
for the IGY development had
projected that it would create
700 permanent full-time jobs
and a further 400 indirect per-
manent jobs for Bahamians if
it had been completed on land
immediately to the west of the.
Hilton, next to the Western
Esplanade. .

The project was also seejeee
ed to create 200-250 full-time
jobs in the construction phase,
and have a total economic
impact of $222.8 milliou over a
20-year period — something that
would have been very iuandy if
it had already got going in the
current economic climate.

When completed, the joint
venture was scheduled to have a
72-slip marina, 200-unit condo-
hotel, 24 beachfront villas and
other office, retail, residential
and parking areas. According
to plans obtained by Tribune
Business, it would have includ-
ed 20,000 square feet of marina
retail space; 25,000 square feet
of general retail space; 35,000
square feet of office space;375
parking units and 140-180 resi-
dential units bordering Bay
Street.

And it is possible that the
Bahamas may have also lost
IGY as a potential investor.
Claiming it had been “irrepara-
bly harmed” in its $85 million
damages claim, the lawsuit said:
“The property on which the
marina and resort were to be
developed is unique, and it is
on information and belief the
only viable site tor IGY for such
a project on the island of New
Providence, the Bahamas.”

The Hilton project’s failure
“minimizes IGY’s ability to
develop a marina on a differ-
ent parcel of land. As set forth
above, the Bahamian govern-
ment was not initially inclined
to approve one marina, let
alone two.

“In any event, Nassau is a
small island and the market and
Nassau cannot support an infi-
nite number of such projects.
Any new development would
require IGY to engage in the
same process to obtain a Heads
of Agreement, and the same
officials within government who
worked on this transaction with
IGY might consider that IGY
does not have the ability or
intention to complete an alter-
native marina development due
to the failure to complete this
transaction.”

IGY also alleged that its work
might be used to’ develop the
Hilton marina project with a
different investor.



Pd



Expo to feature a
fashion show, a
special seminar, a
live broadcast of
Kirk Johnson's
‘Matters of the
Heart’ on ZNS, as:





Marriage
Extravaganza

| Ls ourney

m@ By LISA LAWLOR



ERHAPS putting their wisdom to

the test, the principals of Marriage
Keepers husband and wife team Ted and
Sandra Sealy, will host a live wedding
between Kristina Major and Antonio
Williams, both products of the Sealys' pre-
marriage classes, during their upcoming
expo - Marriage Extravaganza: A Lovers
Journey, Sunday, October 19 at the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort at 12pm.

Johnson's "Matters of
the Heart" on ZNS, as







the counsellors, who
themselves have been
married for 35 years,
sending to the public
with this "wedding
extravaganza"? It's all
about love...and learn-
ing about the other
person, the two say.
Love is the basis of
any union between
« two people. But in

featuring &

THE TRIBUNE

Marriage

-EXITAVagaNzZa

details of the everyday affairs we each deal
with — and after marriage those everyday
affairs will include two people. Repeated-
ly asking your partner to put away the
dishes may seem like a small thing now,
but Mrs Sealy said these issues are magni-
fied 200 per cent after marriage.

And the Sealys are very upfront with
their clients. If they don't believe you're
ready or at a good point in your life to
unite, the counsellors will advise against
matriage at this time.

Many people get really excited about

r os The upcoming expo will also feature a _ the wedding, but after all this is only a one

‘ welLas-individual --fashion show, displaying bridal gowns from .. day.event. "And what happens after that?"
: three Bahamas-based stores - including Mrs Sealy said. Do you plan on keeping all
counselling Classic Formal Wear, a special seminar,a your money in your own bank account or
sessions live broadcast of Kirk getting a joint account? Do you expect

him to cook seven days a week? How do
you communicate? Are you the talker,

Me riage presenis well as individual coun- _ constantly cutting off your partner? Or do
E> GF ‘S selling sessions. you feel you're always making sacrifices for
t Sa priate The what message are your partner?

"You must find out the needs of your
partner, and make an outline of where
you expect your life to be in five years, 10
years, 20 years," she said.

These are all hard questions and issues
to deal with, but if you're thinking of join-
ing your life with another human being,
you must find answers now, rather than
six months into the marriage.

The Sealys have been with The Mar-
riage Keepers organisation - a non-affili-
ated, public organisation that offers coun-

and make an

years, 10 years,

bs N SHOW yam ee mets this, there is a selling regardless of religion, age or race -

ss, Pere ace Wedding & ST elt requirement of for 10 years as licensed marriage officers.
ae me Det ERO ba Heart learning about each. The organisation also
e Live Broa :

other's past, present
e 1 Day NTL OL



and future. The SEE page 2C
Sealys advice is to be:
sure to get pre-marital education in the
form of seminars (like the one next
Sunday), books, counselling and
; classes at The Marriage se
before marriage.

"You must learn the unique-
ness of your partner," Mrs Sealy
cautioned. "Learn their needs,
discuss each of your roles in the
marriage, responsibilities, deci-
sion making policies, history of
in-laws, finances and sex."

Pointing to the horrifying sta-
tistic that the majority of people
don't truly know who it is they're
marrying before the big day, Mrs
Sealy told Tribune Woman that
individuals must know the intimate
details of their partner's life; is your
partner an early or late riser? Does
she eat breakfast? What kind of
toilet paper does he use? Does
she hang up her towel after each
use? Does he leave it on the
floor?

These are all tiny, minuscule



“You must find
out the needs of

your partner,
outline of where
you expect your
life to be in five

20 years.”



Ted Sealy





Fresh
Harmony

Enjoy Real Softness | \...



Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759











































agate

ensue




i



ov

AGE 2C, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE
















{rom people who are
making news in their
ncighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

# award.

| Uso, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

REE



ohare your news

lhe Tribune wants to hear

TO TEMPTATION



It’s your life; who’s in control?

@ By MICHELLE M MILLER, CC

Life, until you take ownership of, you
cannot take control over.
Michelle M Miller

NO MATTER how we think we have
things under control, something quickly
happens that seemingly causes us to lose
it. These interruptions - changes - that
are in many ways a natural part of life are
still met with very little confidence ‘or
preparation.

With all of the economic upheaval in
the atmosphere, many are stricken by
anxiety; believing that being in control
speaks to having immediate answers to
life's ever-changing challenges. But real
control is not about having instantaneous
control over what happens. The power
comes from your willingness to control
how you respond to what happens. The
operative word here is respond not react.

Simply put; stuff always happen - its
called life! You however, have been giv-
en full authority and power over your
life, the question is what does this mean
to you?

Ultimately, the degree to which you

- see yourself as a “victim of” or “victorious

over” circumstances depends on your
understanding of your personal power.
Too many are too quick to outsource
their power; believing that power is exter-
nal. This relegates many to the role of
victim rather than being victorious.

Control the things you can

The Serenity Prayer persuades that we
accept the things that we cannot change,
and change the things we can. This same



truth applies to controlling the things that
we can,

Your strongest point of control, tas to
do with you - your behaviour, habits, atti-
tudes, beliefs etc. The most challenging
part of any adversity is not the adversity
itself, but the courage to pick yourself
up, dust yourself off and move forward.

While this may not be an easy step, it is
doable if you accept personal responsi-
bility for your life and your power. The
real power is knowing that you have the
power.

Get in the driver seat

Sitting in the driver seat, speeding down
the free-way of life is an empowering,
liberating feeling. And after driving a
while you soon become a better navigator

of the road, confidently averting the ditch-
es and detours you encounter.

But even as a skilled driver, if you allow
yourself to become preoccupied with
imminent detours or ditches, you will
become overwhelmed and afraid - doubt-
ing your own ability to handle such chal-
lenges.

You must therefore come to a sense
of knowing that regardless of the chang-
ing signs along the road, you are in con-
trol and you have the confidence to ade-
quately respond to life's changing course.

Final thoughts...

Whether you believe it or not, hitching
a ride on the passenger side will keep
you separated from the driver's seat of
your life - that.is powerless and out. of
control.

Remember, unless you find the courage
to control the things that you can, you
will not find the courage to accept the
things that you cannot control.

Taking ownership of your life gives you
the power to control the way in which
you respond to life. At the end of the
day, it is your life; you are ultimately in
control and you can always make some-
thing better happen.

e For your personal copy of the booklet
'52, Ways To SkyRocket Your
Success Booklet' - visit www.coachme-
forward.com

Questions/Comments are welcome

Website: www.coachmeforward.com

E-mail: coach4ward@yahoo.com

Tel: 429-6770

Mail: Box CB-13060

Nassau, Bahamas

ie
seiacioncoal








FROM page one

teaches seminars in conjunc-
tion with Bahamas Faith Min-
istries International.

If you are planning to
become married, Mrs Sealy
recommends starting pre-mar-
ital classes a year before the
marriage date, ideally. She
advises against being engaged
for only a short time before
the wedding, "what's the
rush? You have the rest of
your lives together," she said.

She also advises against
"practice living together"

Marriage

because this is an affront to
the sanctity of marriage. Mrs
Sealy said that far too many
people take marriage too
lightly, treating it like a
microwave or television. If it
isn't working, you can't just
buy another one.

"Most issues are developed
over weeks or months until
you finally reach your boiling
point. Once you're in coun-
selling, you can't expect a

* quick fix, but must give the

problem time to be worked

out between the two part-
ners," Mrs Sealy said.

Other information you must
know on your partner? Par-
ents, in-laws, habits of their
home that came from parents.
If your fiancé doesn't like the
way his parents interacted, it's
possible this will play out in
your relationship, whether it
be aggressive abuse or passive
acceptance.

Mrs Sealy told Tribune .

Woman that we're all differ-
ent, we're socialized differ-
ently and we can't generalize
marriage rules. A lot of the

everyday, mundane activities.

and experiences we all go
through will test a person's
temperament. So how does
your partner deal with their
problems?

In an effort to support the
development of healthy
Bahamian marriages, the.
Sealys also host marriage
weeks throughout the year.
They also hold seminars and
meetings, have family get-
togethers, and cruises.

© For more information on >
the Marriage Extravaganza”
call 356-7712, 63 80%





a:b eS ‘ ‘ x
ane

ee ini buat Cie

i anes age he 4 ir
Be Soa.
hua gc

Sy 3a are: sa Ps

Vice Chee nunlaan enka

Cle EL





THE TRIBUNE

his children and adolescents

Provided by Adelma Penn,
Camelta Barnes and Shandera
Smith, nutritionists from the
Department of Public '
Health/Ministry of Health

(5°72 nutrition is the
basis for good health. _

We enjoy and lead healthier
lives when we learn and prac-
tice healthy eating especially
when we begin doing it early
in our lives.

Children and adolescents are
in a growing phase and it is
essential that they receive ade-
quate nutrition to facilitate and
maintain healthy growth.
Younger children, under 10,
need lesser servings of food
while adolescents, 10 - 19, need
more. These servings should be
spread throughout the day dur-
ing regular meal times. Addi-
tionally, males usually need
more food than females. Their
energy intake will also vary
based on their activity level.
The more active they are, the
more energy they need.

Please note __ that
toddlers/preschoolers would
need about half the amount of
_ servings of foods needed for

children less than 10 years.

-We advise and encourage
you:to prepare three balanced
meals for your child/children
everyday at regular times. But
just what are balanced meals?
A balanced meal is one that
has food from each food group
provided in the right propor-
tions. This means it must
include adequate carbohy-
drates, protein, fat, vitamins
and minerals, fibre and water.

Here are some general
guidelines:

CARBOHYDRATES/STARCHES
(bread, rice, cereal, pasta, potato,
cassava, crackers etc)
This group should form the
basis of our diet. They provide
energy, fibre, vitamins and min-
erals. Try to include more
whole grains like oats, whole
wheat bread and brown rice.
- Children need about 4 - 5 serv-
ings while adolescents need
about 5 - 7 servings daily. A
‘serving is:

‘© 1 slice of bread

¢ 1/2 hotdog, hamburger bun,

English muffin

¢ 8 animal crackers

¢ 3 graham crackers

¢ 1 small piece of cornbread,

banana bread

¢ 1/2 cup of cooked cereal, rice,

grits, pasta, macaroni, spaghet-
ti,

sweet potato, corn, mashed ©
potato, plantain °
¢ 3 oz potatoes
° 1 ounce of ready-to-eat cereal

‘VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
These contain vitamins, min-
erals and fibre. Children need
about 2 - 3 servings of vegeta-
bles and 1 - 2 servings of fruits
daily.
On the other hand, ‘adoles-

cents need about 3 - 4 servings:

of vegetables and 2 - 3 servings
of fruit daily. They need to eat
a variety of fruits and vegeta-
bles. Try to include a vegetable
or fruit with vitamins C and A
like oranges and carrots. A
serving is:

¢ 1/2 cup non leafy vegetables

like carrots -

° 1 cup leafy vegetables like let-
tuce

¢ 1 medium oran¢e, apple,

or banana (size ofa tennis ball) +

¢ 1/2 grapefruit

1 cup of juice

¢ 1/4 cup raisins

¢ 17 small grapes, 10°

large grapes

¢ 1 cup cubed/1 slice melons
(cantaloupe, watermelon)

\

MEAT, POULTRY, FISH,
EGGS, BEANS, PEAS AND
MEAT ALTERNATIVES

These foods provide a signif-
icant amount of proteins need-
ed for energy, building muscle
mass and bones and for pro-
tecting against disease.

These foods also have iron
and lots of other important
nutrients.

Eat more poultry and fish
rather than red meats. Children
need 3 - 4 servings daily and
adolescents need 5 - 6 servings
daily. A serving is:

¢ 1 ounce of lean cooked meat,
poultry, or fish

¢ 1 medium egg

¢ 1/2 cup of cooked dry beans
or peas

¢ 1 tablespoon of peanut butter
¢ A small handful of nuts

DAIRY PRODUCTS

These are filled with calci-
um, Vitamin A, riboflavin and
protein. Choose low fat milk
and yogurt. Children need at
least two servings of milk and
cheese every day while adoles-
cents need about three serv-
ings daily. A sérving is:

¢-T cup of buttermilk or whole
milky ctotedied

° 1/2 - 1 ounce of cheese

¢ 1 cup of yogurt

WATER

Children and adolescents
need to be well hydrated, espe-
cially if they are very active. It
also. keeps their immune sys-
tem healthy. Ensure that they
have about 5 - 8 eight-ounce
cups everyday.

FAT - BUTTER, MARGARINE, MAYONNAISE,
COOKING OIL; SALT - TABLE SALT, SALTED
FOODS, AND SUGAR - CANDIES, COOKIES

We encourage you to choose
and teach your children to
choose foods that are low in
fat, salt and sugar. Try to
include more plant oils - corn,
olive, canola etc - in your diet:
Use cooking methods that
require little or no fat such as
baking and steaming. Use more
herbs as seasonings and satisfy
your sweet tooth with dried
fruits.

A SPECIAL WORD
ON “JUNK” FOODS
While these foods don't con-

" tribute a lot of nutrients, they

are a favourite for many chil-
dren and adults too! You don't
have to completely eliminate
them from your child's diet, but
don't make it an everyday part
of their diet, maybe once or
twice per week.

Here are some additional tips
or ways to involve your
child/children in developing
healthy eating and lifestyle
practices: :

e As they get older involve
them more in shopping for
food. Teach them how to select
more nutritious foods by read-
ing labels, how to choose fresh
foods by checking for expira-
tion dates and examining fruits
and vegetables.

¢ Involve them in meal plan- |

ning and food preparation. Let
them choose a recipe for a meal
two or more times a week.

e Don't use food as a reward
or punishment.

e Show your children that
you enjoy eating fruit and veg-
etables. They learn more from
what you do rather than what
you say.

e Have as many meals
together in a relaxed setting as
much as possible.

We really want our children



IUESDAY, OC LOBER 14, Z2UU5, PAVE 35U



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PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE

Choosing sunglasses or yOUr kids

ARES

Dex you ever notice how cute kids
look in sunglasses? Believe it or
not sunglasses may save their skin

and eyes later in life b

by blocking the

sun's. powerful ultravio et rays (VR.

Children under. age 10 are ‘at

"recommended by a doctor, plas-

high risk for skin and.eye dam ‘ tic is safer.

age from ultraviolet rays. The
skin on their eyelids and around) _
their eyes is more delicate ‘and
vulnerable than adult skin. It'is
also suggested that until about -
age 10 the lens of a child’s-eye is .
not as opaque as an adult's thus:
allowing greater solar penetra: _
tion and greater UVR induced,
ocular changes, =’, ay
UVR exposure’ ‘catises 90 per.
cent of all skin cancers. In addis, ;;
tion, retinal exposure to UVR’

macular degeneration, which are’, .

both causes of visual. impair
ment. UVR: damage: ‘builds over



time, so the sooner. you | Start:

protecting your children’s eyes. |
from the sun, the lower their

risk will be of ever’ ‘developing:

future eye problems. yee

Good sunglasses protect: ‘both ‘

the skin around the,eye’ and. the.

eye itself. While children tinder ;

six months: should ,nof, be
exposed to the sun, once they
reach six-months they should °

wear sunglasses outside. Ifthey






§. Frames should be bendable
» but, unbreakable.

6. Ensure the glasses fit snug-
oy close to the face.

‘7. Let the kids choose. You
are not-the one who has to wear
“the glasses. Children - especial-
‘ly older kids and teens - are like-
«lier to' wear them if they get to
“select them.

‘8. Check to see ‘that the lens-
es are riot scratched or warped

‘orhave any other flaws that can °
is associated with Cataracts and i «distort vision. Remember very

‘:young.children may not know
how to check to see if there are
‘any: abnormalities so it is up to
you to check. _

,9Double up - sunglasses only
block rays that come directly
through the lenses. The skin
around the eyes remains vul-
‘ nerable’ to rays entering from
the sides or top or that are
flected: upwards off snow, sand
swater. Wearing a wide
"brimnied. hat blocks out the

. sun's ays from above and the

sides while shielding the face

require prescription glasses, they: and neck.

should also wear Prescription \
sunglasses, .. -

Keep the: followin rules. in: é
mind when buying aunglanies,
for your children, '

way



1. Find glasses that block 99-
100 per cent ofboth UVA anil
UVB rays of the sun. Buy one

that indicate the pereentage of
the, |
better, so. look for large wraps

UVR protection they provi
2. The more skin covered,

around styles. “ah SE

speeds. Their sunglasses should
match this active lifestyle, Find
impact resistant, scratch proof
lenses that don’t pop out of the
frames.

4 Avoid glass lenses unless

place oie one oie) ane Ria reaE

plate, | tea cup 8













ayy

3. Use plsygroud-proot lenis
es - kids run, fall and bounce. off."

objects all the time. at-alarming ©.’

1 salad }

“Seeking the shade during the

r ‘hours, of 10am and 4pm also
provides another level of pro- -

“tection.
We need to teach children

Ht ‘dearly: on’the importance of

‘wearing sunglasses. Just as we
-teach them to brush their teeth,
-wash their hands before eating
‘and wearing seat belts, so to
~Mmust they learn the need to

‘wear sunglasses and thus prac-
,» tice good habits that last their
lifetime.



* If you have any questions

_ please do not hesitate to con-
tact Dr Richelle Knowles at
Olde Town Mall, Sandyport
327-8718/9 or email at
drknowles1 @hotmail.com.

bread & butter

Teast Gite eotie eu lale Rs marcia cians)



























































BUY |

receive

0° off

place setting consists of: 1 i: AY Tal= yaa in. =3



Te Rey Stemware

.

(excludes Lismore and all toasting flutes & net items)

OG 25%




Lynn Chase ane
& accessories

promotion applies to Bridal & China Dept only
* must be same or lesser value

acl
Fax: (242

(CoS 7al a aoe



Ca Wa

Oe) 393-4002
393-4096

moto
mrt

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
Ry Wiate epg oly tT}
www.kellysbahamas.com

PICTURED from left are Chris Lloyd, operations manager,
BASRA; Richard Parker, vice commodore, BASRA; Michele
Rassin, vice president operations, Doctors Hospital; and
Charles Sealy, chief executive officer, Doctors Hospital.



THE season for balls and ban-
quets is on the horizon, a chance
for many to kick up their heels on
the dance floor and have a good
time, all in the name of some very
deserving organisations. Many
charitable organisations in the
Bahamas depend on the finan-
cial gains of these balls in order to
do their good works for the com-
munity. The Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association is no differ-
ent, and the BASRA Ball is their
main fund-raising event.

As one walks into the office
of BASRA, there are framed
accolades hanging all over the
walls — silver jubilee awards, pub-
lic service commendations, cer-
tificates of appreciation and dis-
tinguished service awards. Each
is well deserved as BASRA per-
sonnel put in a lot of time on the
open seas - tracking, assisting,
rescuing and saving lives - and all
of it free of charge by committed

cates.

are out on unseaworthy boats,

them as well,” said Chris Lloyd,
BASRA's operations manager.

Pregnancy and child
/hirth better with
Chiropractic care



IF you are pregnant, one of

i the best things you can do for
; yourself and your baby is to see
: a doctor of chiropractic. Yes,

? chiropractic adjustments are

: safe during pregnancy. Doctors
: of chiropractic make alterations
: in technique and patient posi-

: tioning to accommodate for the

:, increase in belly and breast size.

Many chiropractic adjusting

tables are specially designed
: with abdominal pieces that

'drop-away', allowing pregnant

? woman to lay face down.





During pregnancy, a women's
p y,

i body secretes hormones that

_ { help to relax her ligaments.

_ | Without these hormones, her

: pelvis would not expand enough
: to allow the birth of the baby.

_ + When you add the increase in
_} weight, shift in centre of gravity
_ } and the change in biomechanics
. | - due to the weight - all out in

i front - it is no wonder that preg-

® } nant women are prone to back

pain.
Most often, during pregnancy,

: low back pain is a result of ver-

: tebral subluxations and muscle

: ‘spasm. A vertebral subluxation

: is the misalignment of a bone in
: your spine. Subluxations cause

? muscle spasms and stress on the
: spine which causes postural dis-
: tortions which in turn affect

: nerves, muscles, and mobility of

; joints. Gentle chiropractic

? adjustments help ease the low

: back pain and keep your body -
: nerves, muscles, organs, etc -

: functioning at their optimum.

Low back pain is the most

? common reason that pregnant

: women seek chiropractic care.

: The degree of pain ranges from
: barely noticeable to debilitating,
: with stabbing or shooting pain

: into the legs and buttocks. Pain
? in the mid-back becomes more
: frequent as the breasts become
? denser from milk gland produc-
tion. Fluxes of hormones also

? contribute to headache occur-

: rence.

Women who suffer migraines

: and were taking medication pri-
: or to becoming pregnant often

: look to chiropractic for relief,

: since they can no longer take

: the medication. Many patients.
: actually find that the adjust-

: ments are more effective than ~
: the medications.

Aside from ‘symptom relief’,

: receiving chiropractic care dur-
‘ing pregnancy has other benefits

to mother, baby and upcoming

: labour. The uterus is supported

: by ligaments that attach to the

dents have qualified for interna-
tional sailing competitions, but :
are unable to compete as they :

do not have safe boating certifi- | cam cause a decrease in space in

pelvis. If the bones in your
pelvis are subluxated, it can put
tension on those ligaments. This

? the uterus, as well as in the

"BASRA is committed to pro- : Pelvis ring.
viding the materials for these'stu- i the Side welned prcneriy is.
ents who qualify to take the : anoy, Satrulocedue dune
Sx, ANG We give up caine Une labour. Women who have
ona Saturday to ensure that they : undergone chiropractic adjust-
know the material. During our : ments during their pregnancy

patrols we see many persons who : report that labour is easier and

It is important to ensure that

: less stressful on their bodies.

having no life jackets, and no }
communication tools, so this ;
course, the ABC (America’s }
Boating Course) will benefit :

Many side effects of pregnan-
cy can be reduced with chiro-
practic adjustments - low back
pain, leg cramps, mid-back pain,

: neck pain, headaches, carpal
: tunnel symptoms, and even nau-

Doctors Hospital, a corporate | S4:

Pasiet OE BASRA: peorauly find a chiropractor who is
made its annual donation in sup- } tained in caring for pregnant
port of the tremendous work } \omen and start enjoying your
they do each year. “Community ; pregnancy. Chiropractic care
involvement is an integral part | through pregnancy is not only

of our culture and values. BAS- : safe, it is essential.

Don't just grin and bear it,

volunteers.

The Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association stands by, ready and
willing to lend a hand to those
in distress at sea, 24 hours a day
with boats, planes and commu-
nication equipment, and as a
result, donations, grants and lega-
cies from all sectors of the com-
munity are extremely important
and BASRA depends on these
contributions to function and
maintain its service in Bahamian
waters.

The major fund-raiser, the
2008 BASRA Ball, will take
place on Friday, November 7 at
the Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort's convention centre. At
the ball, BASRA, its: corporate
friends and members of the pub-
lic will join together to ensure
that this most vital service — air
and sea rescue — is continued.
The funds raised will also ensure
that emergency assistance is pro-
vided to those persons in distress
and stranded at sea.

Proceeds from the ball are ear-
marked for equipment to
enhance patrols of Bahamian
waters, BASRA will also pro-
vide needed assistance to the
junior sailing programme in the
public schools. “Many of our stu-

* our annual charitable giving pro- :

.ber 7 at the Sandals Royal

RA is one of the organisations in :
gramme, as Doctors Hospital | + Susan Donald is a doctor
supports such a worthy cause that } of chiropractic at the Life Chiro-
affects many people’s lives. : practic Centre. For more infor-
"We are always happy to lend ; â„¢ation please call 393-2774.

our assistance to those.persons in
distress and stranded at sea :
through our donation to BAS- :
RA. This gift to BASRA will :
help the organisation to contin- :
ue to develop their new initia- ;
tives and provide emergency }
assistance,” said Michele Rassin, :
vice president of operations,
Doctors Hospital.

* The 2008 BASRA Ball will
take place on Friday, Novem-

Bahamian Resort Convention
Centre. For more information,
call the BASRA office at 325-
8864; any funds you are willing
to give will be gratefully appre-
ciated in support of the untiring:
work of the BASRA. Youcan — }
also help by volunteering your
services, becoming a BASRA
member, registering for a class,
or by forwarding your donation
to Bahamas Air-Sea Rescue
Association, PO Box SS 6247,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The Tribine wants to hear
from peale who are
making tpws in their
neighbowhoods. Perhaps
you are rising funds for a
good caue, campaigning
for imprvements in the
area or hive won an
award.

If so, calls on 322-1986
and shar¢your story.





THE TRIBUNE

Root Crops

MM,

W
§N{HQ,

Vdd



Md

VN
© vegetables. In Europe,

Li

MMM
Za

gardeners and farmers would grow
plenty of root crops in autumn and
then bury them in straw below

\ with soil to
protect them from 1, _-.. Preserved
this way root crops would provide
sustenance through. to spring.’

ground and cover



HERE in the Bahamas we do not have
to worry about surviving the winter
months bui we can still take advantage
of the keeping qualities of root crops.
Most.can be harvested and then kept in
the refrigerator for several weeks or until
needed.

Instead of growing root crops in rows, I
prefer to set them out in blocks, or grids,
leaving enough room for each to develop
properly. This saves a lot of space and
increases your garden output.

Beets are popular in the Bahamas but
there is a very big difference between
canned beets and those we grow and bake
or boil ourselves. Beets should be picked
while they are a little short of maturity, at
the stage when all the sugars have devel-
oped but no fibre has developed. Plant
beets..every four to six weeks for a con-
tinuous supply.

Beet seeds are contained within a knob-
bly capsulé' so thinning out is necessary

i :



*y OOT crops contain some
of the most popular of all



once the seedlings are established. Plant
the capsules four inches apart in a grid

and keep them well watered to ensure’

quick germination. Beets are not heavy
feeders but appreciate compost or com-
mercial cow manure mixed into the soil.
They are a 90-day crop but can be pulled
after 60-70 days. Detroit Dark Red is the
standard variety.

King of the root crops is the carrot. Car-
rots come in all sorts of shapes besides
the traditional taper. Chantenay is a very
popular variety, medium-sized and tor-
pedo-shaped, often with a red core.
Nantes varieties are almost cylindrical
and give good value. If size matters to
you, try an Imperator variety. These are
the largest of all and have the traditional
carrot tapering.

Carrots can be grown in a grid two-inch-
es apart (three inches for Imperator) in
soil that has not been recently composted.

Frésh compost encourages the carrots to °

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 5C

fork and develop side roots. Mature com-
post from a previous growing season will
not affect the carrots. The sandier the
soil, the better your carrots will grow.

I usually only grow two sets of carrots
each winter: one in October, the next in
January. Carrots keep so well — both in

the ground and in the refrigerator — that .

the pulling.time is not critical.
Kohlrabi is a cabbage/turnip cross that
some people may not consider a root crop
because it grows mainly above ground.
Sow the seeds six-inches apart in a grid
and keep them watered well. Kohlrabi
likes plenty of cow manure and fertilizer
and produces quickly, often in 60 days.
A rutabaga is also a cabbage/turnip
cross but has very different characteristics
— much more like turnip than cabbage but
still much milder in taste than a turnip. Of
all the root crops, est
TO STOW ST a *
“--Rutabagas can “‘grow'to'a








rutabaga is the easi
Me RRP RIB AS Dis Ai ARDS fe



so are candidates to be grown in rows

rather than grids. Rutabagas can be stored.
for weeks once they are harvested so you
may only need one or two crops during
the fall/winter growing season.

Turnips also should be grown in rows. It
is important that turnips always have
moist soil because the slightest drought
will turn them bitter. Turnips can grow
to be very large but have the best flavour
when golf ball size.

Both turnips and beets provide us with
a leaf crop as well. The foliage from
turnips and beets is often more highly
prized than the roots. Steam them lightly
and add butter.

Irish potatoes should fit into this cate-
gory but because their cultivation is com-
pletely different we will consider them
separatély at a later date.

Veteran deejay, Dion Da Butcha of
100 Jamz, read to the students of
St. Anne’s School and Mt. Caramel
Preparatory Academy at the Pompey

Museum of

Slavery and

Emancipation on Thursday,
September 25, 2008.

The Museum is located on Bay Street at Vendue
House, an 18th century slave auction. site.

The week of readings, which focused on slavery,
was organized by The National Museum of The
Bahamas-AMMC, a division of The Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports & Culture, in observance

of National Literacy
September.



Month, celebrated in
Dion is St. Anne’s graduate.



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

_ THE TRIBUNE





Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER

ahs ta



DO YOU THINK

DEWEY'S BEST

FRIEND KILLED
HIM OVER DIXIEZ

I THINK IT'S
WARMING UP TO

YOU, MR. RIVER! d Enis iotiaaceoasdar

World rights reserved.

THEIR MINDS!



APT 3-G

HE WAS BUSY: TRYING TO ;
LIVE UP TO YOUR EXPECTATIONS.
YOU CALLED HIM YOUR HERO,

A GREAT ARTIST. ,

car
“n7

THE MORE YOU BUILT
TORE HIMSELF DOWN.

H\M UP, THE HARDER HE









HEY! THESE
PRICES HAVE .
DOUBLED SINCE
YESTERDAY! y

cS

www. kingfeatures.com

TIGER

©2008 by King Featues Syndicate, Inc. Word nghts 1oserved




I KNOW, I WANNA
RUN A MORE

©2008 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved

A SUNVIAL. IT .
TELLS TIME 6Y
THE SHATOW

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
you NEVER Y WHAT 1S YouR







WELL, THERE'S
MORE TO IT
THAN DOUBLING
THE PRICE OF
EVERYTHING ON

THE MENU!
wy



OH, I KNOW, I'LL
GET AROUND TO
IMPROVING THE





ROME WASN'T BUILT IN
A DAY, YOU KNOW

(©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

WHAT ABOUT
AT NIGHT?



COULD IT
PICK uP SLEEPING BAG PoINe E
ANYTHING), WW OLR Mie Koa? SLEEPING



1





14

15
17

18




Across

Pole and Russian fought
together (7)

A capital position to be in
(5)

Person transported by

still terrifying (8)
Country song about a
sailor (6)

Service charge (6)
How, initially, ownership
may be established (8)
Golfing association (4)



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE

©2008 by King Features Syndicate. Inc. World rights reserved.

Down

1
2

Hybrid ape is brown (5)
A ship that carries goods
overland (3)

A knotty problem for the
ship’s navigator? (4)

Dad's cooked greens (9) 4 Its victim'gets the point (6)
9 She's a bit of a harridan 5. They are empowered to go
(3) over our heads (8)

10 Very popular winter sports 6 Ideal trio to arrange daily
range (4) work (9)
12 More safe somehow, but 7 Sharpshooter employed in

- the rigging (4-3)

Simple enough difference
of opinion, but he goes to
court (9)

Unusual individual (8)

No object in bothering
Melissa (7)






























21 | follow the Spanish priest 16 Elementary meal prepared Ww Across Down
(3) to give inside information a | 1 Conspicuous (7) 1 Inventor of dynamite
22 Hawaiian garland no doubt (6) N 5 Bracing (5) (5)
put together without haste 19 Acustomer or one of the N -8 Delighting 2 Abeverage (3)
) eta ; a the eye (9) 3 The two (4)
24 Very distant until 20 Rising old city in complete ‘ :
now (2,3) collapse (4) > 9 Hole in the ground 4 Strain (6)
25 One in charge is possibly _ | 23 Thing laid on the table for ” (3) , 5 Discoverer of the
a German (7) breakfast, maybe (3) | BE | 10 Be short of (4 New World (8)

12 Brass wind instru- 6

ment (8)

PEP ee

re ee
‘a

Ce SO

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution









Indigestible, 4 Rimmed, 6 Owned, 7
Resident, 8 Break the bank, 12

Passer-by, 15 Average, 16 Cheese,
18 Riser, 19 Less.

Substantiate, 4 Redden, 6 Limbo, 7 24
Accident, 8 On reflection, 12
Trimaran, 15 Get down, 16 Slalom,

18 Local, 19 Type. power (7)



14 Call to appear (6) 4

Across: 1 Spaniard, 5 Pour, 9 Crowd, Across: 1 Ancestry, 5 Plea, 9 15 Production (6) 11. Amphibious raiding
10 Marines, 11 Single-handed, 13 Throb, 10 Dynamic, 11 Off the 17 Interim (8) troops (9)

August, 14 Strain, 17 Straightened, 20 __ record, 13 Ruling, 14 Slogan, 17 48: Canteofi t(4 13. Exact ite (8
Resolve, 21 Adage, 22 Yard, 23 Multiplicity, 20 Recital, 21 Ivory, 22 entre of target (4) xact opposite (8)
Weakness. Nile, 23 Eminence. 21 Boy (3) 14 Alike (7)

Down: 1 Sack, 2 Adoring, 3 Down: 1 Anti, 2 Careful, 3 22 Indifferent (9) 16 Collision (6)

Hazardous (5)
25 Oppressive use of 20

CALVIN & HOBBES

CALVIN, WILLNOU RUN AND | [7
GET MY PURSE, PLEASE?
1 NEED THE CALCULATOR.







HERE YOu








wid DAILYIN IK. COM






IM NOT GOING
TO TP You i

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday ‘to
Sunday









08, NoetH AnercaSund,













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|
|

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a
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|}





oon
oO RN
no alo





Scandal at the Dubai Open, where
a lowly-anked franian crushed

3 couple of grandmasters before
they discovered that he was
receiving text messages from 3
Tehran computer. Today's puzzle
helped to give the game dway.
White, the GM, has just played
Bxh6 on the assumption that Black
had just blundered away a pawn
and would continue gxh6 Naxfée
Bxf6 Qxié oF B/Nxed deed when
Black's queen is attacked so that
the h& bishop can retreat to safety.
But Black's robotic and strong
response proved that it was White
who had fatlen lot a trap and was

manoeuvre?










Pat ee ds!

On the spur of the
moment (9)
Tolerant (7)

19 Fortunate (5)
Burn partially (4)
23 Acan (3)



about fo lose significant matenal.
Can you spot Black's subtle sitican

8
LEONARD BARDEN 7
6

[8|1/4








©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



10/10

The HOW many words of four
Target letters or more can you make
arge from the letters shown here?
uses In making a word, each letter
may be used onee only. Each
words in must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
the main letter word, No plurals.
nine-letter word. No p
hody of TODAY'S TARGET
Good 16; very good 24;
Chambers excellent 32 (or more). Solution
21
st tomorrow.
Century — YesTERDAY's SOLUTION
ever ewer over OVERPOWER
Dictionary
peer poorer pore power
(1999 prove repro reprove rope
a rove rover rower veer weep
edition)



Yesterday's









©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc. .



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





Chess: 8494: 1... Bred! 2 dred Qg4! (threatening
both Qxhd and gxh6} 3 Cegd Nxgd. Black threatens
Nah6, guhé and Bxh4, so White drops a piece and
eventually the game.



Were Wwooer Wore wove





1. You are declarer with the West
hand at Six Spades, and North leads
the jack of diamonds. Assuming the
missing trumps are divided 2-1, how
would you play the hand?

West East
AQ) 10763 @K94
WK I4 VA10762
@5 @AK9
106 &K 3

2. You are declarer with the West
hand at Four Hearts, and North leads
the queen of spades. How would you
play the hand?

West East
4762 @A85
VAKI9O4 ¥Q105
@A64 #983
&)9 AK 42

we

1. Win the diamond with the king,
cash the A-K of trumps, lead a low
heart to your king and a heart back to
dummy’s ace. If the queen of hearts
appears on the first or second round
of the suit, you have 13 tricks. If the
queen does not appear and the hearts
are divided 3-2, you still make all the
tricks by discarding the jack of hearts
on the ace of diamonds, ruffling a
heart and returning to dummy with a
trump to discard both your clubs on
the 10-7 of hearts:

Finally, if it turns out that either
defender started with the Q-x-x-x of

Test Your Play

hearts, discard your jack of hearts on
the ace of diamonds and return to
your hand by ruffing a heart. Now
lead a club toward the king and keep
your fingers crossed, hoping that
North rather than South holds the
ace.

2. Win the spade with the ace and
lead a low club toward your jack! If
South has the queen, he will presum-
ably play it, and this will give you
three club tricks instead of the two

‘you started with. The defenders will

now probably cash two spade tricks
and shift to a diamond.

Win the diamond with the ace,
cash the A-K of trump and jack of
clubs, cross to dummy with a tramp
and discard two diamonds on the A-
K of clubs. This method of play suc-
ceeds if the trumps are divided 3-2
(and also when the: defender with
four trumps has at least four clubs).

If South plays low on the club lead
from dummy at trick two, you should
assume he does not have the queen.
You therefore play the nine, not the
jack, [f South has the ten, your nine
will force North’s queen, and you
will be in essentially the same posi-
tion as before.

You are not certain to make the
contract with any method of play, but
the one suggesttd offers by far the
best chance of developing a 10th
trick.

Tomorrow: A necessary risk.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.



TUESDAY. OCTOBER 14, 2008



~———t : = ee —=

EVENING. — ~ OCTOBER 8, 2008
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>

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The Tribune

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008





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Government to provide
mortgage assistance

PM introduces programme
to help those who may not
be able to sustain payments

HB By CHESTER ROBARDS.
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamas Government is
set to present a third tier of its
own economic relief programme,
which could be implemented as
early as the beginning of Novem-
ber, according to Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham.

Speaking at this year’s annual

International Monetary

EU ECONOMIC SS
PARTNERSHIP AGREEMENT

THE Bahamas Government
is set to sign this week a
“goods-only” EPA with the
European Union. Signature of

_ a separate section covering ser- _
vices and other trade-related

_issues has been deferred for up
to six months.

_ Local think tank The Noe :
sau Institute has called for fur--
ther public consultation about —
this important international -
agreement that will have far-
reaching and lasting effects on
the livesofBahamians.
To help its readers under-
stand the issues, The Tribune is
today publishing an informa-

_ tive analysis of the EPA by The
Nassau Institute explaining
what the agreement means for
the Bahamas.

Read n more on Page 5 inside.



Fund/World Bank Group meet-

_ings, Mr Ingraham introduced a

programme created to provide
assistance to individuals who
might not, because of job loss or
other circumstances, be able to
sustain their mortgage payments.

“For persons who would have
lost their jobs, persons in the
hotel sector who would be on
short work weeks, and persons
who for some other unforeseen
circumstance are now unable to
keep current in their mortgage
payment, but who ordinarily
sought to make their mortgage
payments for their homes, we
would like to ensure that these
persons don’t end up losing their
homes because of what we con-
sider to be this temporary setback
— even though we do not know
how long this temporary situa-
tion is likely to exist,” he said.

This will be Government’s
third social assistance programme
enacted in response to a declining
economy here and abroad. The
US, where the economic snow-
ball began its downhill run, has
implemented various stimulus
plans and bailouts to restart its
economy.

“The IMF (International Mon-
etary Fund) is projecting that eco-
nomic recovery is likely to take
place in the major economies of

SEE page 13



ATHLETES HOME FOR CELEBRATION

pea

ai Cmtt i emma

a



TEAM BAHAMAS Olympic medallist Chris Brown gets the thumbs up while
signing for fans on Saturday. Brown was among the Bahamian athletes
home for a celebration of their efforts at the XXIX Beijing Olympic Games.
The party kicked off with a motorcade and concert at Arawak Cay.

The PM calls for
international support
for Caricom countries

AS THE global economic crisis
ripples throughout the Caribbean,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
called for international support
of the Caricom countries at the
Annual International Monetary
Fund and World Bank Group
meeting at the IMF headquarters
in: Washington yesterday.

Delivering a statement on .

behalf of Caricom, Mr Ingraham
commented on the poignant tim-
ing of the annual meeting as the
rising cost of food and fuel is pre-
senting serious macroeconomic,
social and human development



mortgage with

Get savings built right into your

mn Turner/BIS



Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham |

challenges in the Caribbean’s
small, open economies.

In addition to the rising prices
severely impacting living stan-

SEE page 13

your savings:



after st sti

o By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A Grand
ahama teenager became the
island’s 10th homicide victim on
Saturday evening when he was
fatally stabbed during an alterca-
tion in the Redwood Lane area.

Chief Supt Basil Rahming said
police are investigating the stab-
bing of a 19-year-old male resi-
dent of Caravel Beach who died
around 8pm at Rand Memorial

Dw



Hospital.



bony
TseteaY

Mr Rahming reported that the
victim suffered multiple stab
wounds about the body. He noted
that two of the deceased’s male

. friends were hospitalized for stab

wounds — one was treated and
discharged, while the other was
detained in hospital.

Police had not released the vic-
tims’ identities up to press time on
Monday.

According to police reports,
the victim was with two male

SEE page 13

Andros teachers row could see
children kept out of two schools

@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS

CHILDREN will be kept out of two schools in Andros today if a pair
of teachers, who had been transferred elsewhere-return to their same

classrooms instead.

Parents, who claim the two teachers show disregard for authority and
have compromised their children's education, supported the Ministry of
Education's decision to move them to schools outside of Andros at the

beginning of the academic year.

But in September, the teachers returned to the primary and sec-
ondary schools in central Andros, to the protest of parents.

SEE page 12

Police are
involved
in two
shoot-outs

POLICE were involved in
two shoot-outs and high speed
chases over the holiday week-
end:

Around 3.10 am Sunday,

officers were on mobile patrol
in the Grove area when they
came across a white Nissan
Sentra occupied by several
males.

It is reported that the men

opened fired on police and a
chase followed. The vehicle |
finally stopped in the Florida
Court area. The men aban-
doned the vehicle and fled.

Police checked the vehicle
and found a blood stain on
the front passenger side, but
no arrests were made. They
did, however, retrieve a .09
mm pistol with three live
rounds of ammunition.

Police are still investigating
the matter.

Around 10 pm the same
day police came across upon a
Ford Taurus in the area of
Bougainvillea Boulevard,
South Beach.

According to police, the

SEE page 13










Marsh Harbour:

Weekend sees
a number of

armed robberies:
By CHESTER ROBARDS

Tribune Staff Reporter —

DESPITE an increased police
presence over the holiday week-
end there were a number of rob-
beries involving firearms that offi-
cers have to add to their ever grow-
ing list.

According to Assistant Chief
Superintendent Hulan Hanna
police put special operations units
in place around the island in an
effort to deter crime during a
weekend he says criminals take
advantage of.

“In some areas people just hap-
pen to see the vulnerability of these
establishments, seize the opportu-
nity and subsequently rob these
establishments,” he said.

According to police, around 6.40
on Friday the Midway restaurant
and bar was held up by a man
wearing camouflage who dis-
charged a weapon into the air
while leaving.

On Saturday at around 12.30
am two armed men robbed a man
selling jerk pork on Bimini Avenue
and Market Street.

When officers arrived on the
scene the two masked males in
dark clothing fled. The officer gave
chase, but the men escaped.

Later that day a male opened

SEE page 12




Nassau: 356.7764
Freeport: .352.6676/7
367.3135



FIDELITY

30" ANNIVERSARY

LA
PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL candidate, Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., campaigns at

the Seagate Convention Centre in Toledo, Ohio, Monday, Oct. 13, 2008.

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Political strategist amazed by
Bahamian support for Obama

THE TRIBUNE







and knowledge of US system

â„¢ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

OVERWHELMING sup-
port for Barack Obama in the
Bahamas and Bahamians’
detailed knowledge of the US
political system amazed polit-
ical strategist Gary Nordlinger
when he visited Nassau last
week. —

Mr Nordlinger, an award-

winning strategist who has ©

provided political strategies
for hundreds of public offi-
cials, was invited by the Unit-
ed States Embassy and Col-
lege of the Bahamas (COB)
to discuss the US political sys-
tem, electoral college, the
course of historic campaigns
and possible policies of the
Barack Obama or John
McCain administrations at
COB’s Grosvenor Close cam-
pus, Shirley Street, last week.

Nassau was Mr Nordlinger’s
last stop in the Caribbean fol-

‘lowing visits to Jamaica and

Trinidad and Tobago where
he also encountered unani-
mous support for Barack Oba-
ma.

He said: “It's almost this
euphoria for Barack Obama,
they can’t even imagine the
guy losing, but frankly with
international policy in general
there is very little difference
between the two.”

Mr Nordlinger explained
how idealists have dominated
US foreign policy over the last
seven years, while both
McCain and Obama are more
realistic in their approach. _

“Both candidates are much
more traditional, post World
War II,_and multi-latera] in
their approach,” he said.

“They are realists as
opposed to idealists.”

Offshore banking will prob-
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voted into power as the con-
gress will stay Democratic at
least for the next two years,
and has far more influence
than the president does, Mr
Nordlinger said.

“We are going to see the
Federal Treasury try to get
every potential dollar of tax
revenue they can and that
could affect the Bahamas,” he
added.

Parallels

Mr Nordlinger also main-
tains there are several paral-
lels between McCain and
Obama’s domestic policies.

He said: “Both accept glob-
al warming, both support stem
cell research and both think
something needs to be done
about healthcare. :

“JT think that is one of the
reasons the country is having a
hard time deciding.-People
like both of these candidates.”

The tight election will boil
down to the battleground
states: Florida, Pennsylvania,
Ohio, Virginia, New Hamp-
shire, Colorado, New Mexico,
and Wisconsin, where neither

candidate has a firm strong:
hold, Mr Nordlinger said.
Senator Obama will need to

_ pass the 50 per cent threshold

with around 54 per cent to
secure his seat in these, states,
but the Democratic candidate
has only crossed this mark in
Pennsylvania where he has
obtained 51 percent.

And undecided voters may
not choose him above Sena-
tor McCain because he is bet-
ter known, just as voters chose
Senator Obama over the more
famous Hilary Clinton in the
Democratic presidential pri-
maries.

“We really can’t call this for
Obama just yet,” Mr
Nordlinger told Bahamians
during his presentation in Nas-
sau, “Upcoming US Elections:
The campaign of a lifetime.”

Following his visit, the lead-
ing political strategist said: “I
was just amazed at the high

level of interest in the elec-.

tion and the high level of sup-
port for Obama. —

“And I was really impressed
by people’s very sophisticat-
ed knowledge of the US pollit-
ical system.”

Newly formed committee requests
meeting with Gaming Board Chairman

THE newly formed ad-hoc Committee for Gaming Reform
has formerly requested a meeting with Gaming Board Chair-

man, Malcolm Adderley.

Committee Chairperson Sidney Strachan has written a letter

' requesting that Mr Adderley join with the committee in launch-

ing a formal process to-effectively reform existing gaming law.
Broadly representative and growing, the Committee for Gam-

..ing Reform argues that Bahamian gaming law is arcane. It

maintains that a modern democracy such as The Bahamas is
hypocritical in its treatment of citizens within the framework of

gaming law.

at
E

“The committee is a bit overwhelmed with the support it is
gathering,” said Mr Strachan. “It’s as if we awakened a sleeping
giant; calls are coming in, offers of assistance are being received
and we’ve gotten dozens of high profile citizens willing to get
involved. Our determination to see this matter through is strong
and will continue to grow as this movement gathers more
momentum.

The Committee has requested Mr. Adderley indicate a date
on which he can meet on or before Friday, October 17.

‘
INDE .


THE TRIBUNE





Woman, 21,
killed in car
accident in
Grand Bahama

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A 21-year-
old woman motorist lost her
life on Sunday, pushing the
traffic fatality count to nine
on Grand Bahama for the
year.

Geraldine Cooper, a resi-
dent of Apt No 2C Gambier
Drive, crashed into a tree
around 11am on Bast Sun-

rise Highway. She was taken-

to Rand Memorial Hospital,
where she died around 1.08
pm of multiple severe
injuries.

According to Chief Supt
Basil Rahming, Ms Cooper
was driving a 2001 Honda
Accord EX, license 32523,
east on the highway when
she lost control of the vehi-
cle. ,

Supt Rahming said it
appears that excessive speed
was the cause of the acci-
dent.

He said according to eye-
witness reports, Ms Cooper
was travelling at a high rate
of speed and, shortly after
passing through the intersec-
tion with Shearwater Drive,
ran off the road onto the
grass median and crashed
head-on into a large tree.

When The Tribune arrived
at the scene around 11.15
am, a large crowd had gath-
ered in the area, peering
inside the wrecked vehicle.

A young woman driver,
wearing an orange T-shirt,
was lying unconscious in the.
front driver’s seat of the car.

The hood of the vehicle
was completely wrapped
around the tree. The entire
front windshield had fallen
out of position as a result of
the force of the impact, land-
ing onto the grassy median
at the base.of the tree.

As-the woman lay motion-
less inside the wreckage, sev-
eral'persons who had initial-
ly witnessed the accident
kept close vigil near the
vehicle, as curious onlookers
continued to assemble in the
area.

A short time later, a police
van arrived at the scene. Fire
services officers were able to
extricate Ms Cooper from
the wreckage with the Jaws
of Life. te

She was taken by EMS
personnel to Rand Memorial
Hospital, where she later
died. Mr Rahming said Traf-
fic Police are continuing
their investigation into this
latest tragic accident. He is
appealing to motorists to.
observe speed limits and to
drive with care and caution.

In brief | Only cal

true emergency, public urged

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter



EMERGENCY medical ser-
vices is being swamped by non-
emergency calls that sometimes
cause severe emergencies to be
put on hold, according to senior
officials at the Public Hospitals
Authority’s EMS division.

Paul Newbold, Director of
EMS for the Public Hospitals
Authority (PHA), held a press
conference yesterday to appeal
to the public not to call EMS
through the 919 dispatch unless
their situation is a legitimate
emergency.

According to Alvery Hanna,

Medical Director for EMS, things

that constitute an actual emer-
gency are chest pains, which could
signify a heart attack, uncontrol-
lable bleeding, bleeding of the
digestional track, shortness of
breath or if one side of the body

person is having a stroke. Elwood
Rolle, Acting Manager of EMS,
said individuals often consider the

ambulance a “Jitney Service”,
adding that the service is “not
perfect.”

He'said there are sometimes
glitches in their dispatch system as
well as technical problems with
their ambulances, for which they
have a dedicated mechanic who
works five days a week and is on
24 hours call. Ambulance
response times would be much
more efficient if the system were
decentralized and units were dis-
persed from their base at the
Princess Margaret Hospital to
various places on the island, Mr
Newbold suggested.

He said the decentralization

plan could come into effect by .

next summer.

From January to September of
this year EMS received 1,773
code 22 calls, which are calls that
might have not required EMS to

frame they received only 29 code
13’s which are considered severe
emergency calls.

Mr Newbold suggested that
because they are obligated to
respond to calls that might not
constitute an actual emergency,
severe emergency calls are some-
times put on hold until a unit is
available. And if all of the 10
ambulances the service employs
on New Providence are engaged,
the Paradise island unit, which

was furnished by Kerzner Inter- ~

national, can be dispatched to the
scene; as in the case of Jean Sit-
ney who was beaten and stabbed
to death in the Mason Addition
area last Tuesday.

“Based on my last statistics we
should have at least now 15
ambulances, a lot of things have

slowed down basically because of

the budget,” said Mr Newbold.
“But if people would only call an
ambulance for a true emergency
we would not need but 10 ambu-
lances.”

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 3

OO) De eS
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Ghana from October 2-3,
2008.

Mr. Symonette was accompanied by Mr. Frank
Davis, First Secretary/Consul, Bahamas Mission to
. the European Communities, London. The Summit

Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign
Affairs Brent Symonette represented the country at
the Sixth Summit of Heads of State and Government
of the African, Caribbean and Pacific Group of
States (ACP) held in Accram, Ghana from October
2-3, 2008.

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited.

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

NIB needs careful watching

ACCORDING to the seventh actuarial
report, which itself is not up to date, National
Insurance’s resources could run dry by 2034.
The report referred to this as an optimistic
assessment, which means that the fund could be
in trouble much sooner. In fact it is already in
trouble with acting director Anthony Curtis
admitting that NIB is already “several million
dollars” behind the target set for contribution
collections this year.

Part of the reason given for the rapid deple-
tion of funds is that while the country’s popu-
lation is aging, fewer young people are entering
the labour force to make their contributions.
Add to that the fact:that those who should be
contributing are not, then it does not take much
commonsense to understand that the fund is
indeed reaching crisis point.

Last year it was reported that government
would have to step in and re-evaluate NIB or

the potential negative cash flow and depletion of —

its $1.3 billion reserve fund, projected for 2029,
could be experienced as early as 2014-2015.
About this time last year we reported an
NIB director complaining that he had sleep-
less nights thinking about NIB’s huge over-
staffing and administrative costs. “This is 25
per cent of the revenue,” he said, noting that it
was a high percentage for the Caribbean. There
are no signs that this situation has improved.
Despite this staff overload, NIB: chairman
Patrick: Ward-made-what:onsthe-face of it
_ seemed a strange: statementia Ghia nding,

“executives for shortfalls in contribution collec-
tions as they have not had the right “organisa-
tional infrastructure” to be “fully effective.”
Does this suggest that despite having an abun-
dance of staff they do not have the right staff for
the job?

Mr Ward also admitted that at NIB’s last
union negotiations a performance-related pay
system was agreed, but the process was “abort-
ed” by the board.

Asked by a reporter if he would agree that
shortfalls in contribution collections would sug-
gest that some staff members may. not have
been doing their job, Mr Ward said: “It’s a
good point.” .

He said that when the current board met
for the first time “there was in place a fairly
comprehensive report that dealt with elements
of performance standards, reviews, how cer-
tain things should be done. It was our feeling
that those issues as in place at the time were not
appropriate to be introduced for a variety of rea-
sons, so we aborted that process.”

Despite this verbal shadow boxing, Mr Ward

. did not want his.remarks interpreted as a lack of

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“commitment to improving performance.”
We doubt that anyone — except those close-

ly involved with NIB — would know how to
interpret his words. However, we suspect that
here is a concerned man, with amammoth prob-
lem, who obviously cannot implement the nec-
essary solutions. He is trying to say something,
but in the name of discretion is holding back.

And so we went poking around on our own,
looking for more vocal sources.

’“There’s too much political interference!”
blurted out a frustrated, but reliable source.
Apparently, there are certain people, even cer-

_ tain groups of people, who believe that if they

have the ear of their “representer” in parliament
— be they PLP or FNM — they are exempt
from paying their National Insurance contri-
butions. And they refuse to pay.

There are problems among the building
trades, where workers move from job to job,
and many contractors keep no records of their
employees. Of course, according to law, this is a
must. When a worker is taken ill and submits a
claim for health insurance, a, check with NIB
shov : that he has no insurance, and his employ-
er, or former employer, has no records. Anoth-
er pocket of concern is among domestic employ-
ees.

And now that the economy is sluggish and
some Bahamians are only working a couple
days a week, they don’t let their ethics get in the

»~» way of-creative-methods to-supplement their
A VINCOMEpuinniess
He said itayould*be) unfair.to blame: NIB *:¢..

.,@pparently,:NIB’s: claims for sickness are
now on the rise.

“Because things are sluggish,” we were told,
“some are going to the doctor to get a sick
claim. This is increasing the number of claims.
Can you imagine what $240 a week could mean
to a family?”

Our source said that $240 is based on the
highest salaries, to which most hotel employees,
being in the top bracket, would be entitled.

NIB has promised to improve collection
from all employers and self employed — we
hope these include everyone, especially those
who are being shielded by their political umbrel-
las.

According to NIB those who owe will be
“ageressively pursued” for payment with pros-
ecutions in the courts likely for defaulters.

With the present state of our judicial system
this is.most unlikely unless a special court is
app. ated that will deal with nothing but NIB
matters.

And from what we have been told this court
could be kept in business around the clock.

NIB and its problems need close and careful
scrutiny.



THE TRIBUNE



-Minister’s
‘razzle-dazzle’
speech left me

speechless

EDITOR, The Tribune.

It was with disbelief that I
watched Vanderpool “Razzle-
dazzle” Wallace’s speech on
TV last night. It astounded me

_ so much that I am driven to

write this comment which you
might put into your “letters to
the editor” section. Here
goes....

The comments from Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace on ZNS
on Wednesday night once
again convinced me that all
Ministry of Tourism employ-
ees should be required to
work in the tourism industry
in a hands on position for at
least two years before taking
up any post in this ministry.

With Mr Wallace’s “mile a
minute” style of speaking it
was quite a task to understand
exactly what he was saying,
but I gathered a few facts. He
is going to convince foreign
airlines to lower their fares via
a secret plan. He is going to
start a leaflet or small news-
paper to document visitor’s
opinions as to what is right or
wrong with their Bahamian
experience. He is going to sell
tours and vacation packages
to civil servants stationed 24
hours a day at their computers
manning the. Ministry’s web
site. He is going to promote
the out islands.

There was lots of other stuff
that was somewhat mind bog-
gling, but Mr Wallace was
going at such a lick that facts
and figures were flying past
me at great speed and I could
not grasp it all.

The basic flaws in the busi-
ness of tourism are not too
difficult to see if we care to
look. The Bahamas is a five
star destination due to its
prices. The prices are
inevitable because of the very
high cost of the overheads
(electricity now being the
major stumbling block). The
high prices are not necessarily
a bad thing — they keep the
cheap package tour types
away and it has been proven
that people don’t mind the
prices as long as they feel that
they are getting value for their
money. And this is where it
all falls apart.

Let’s start with appearances.
Right now New Providence
island resembles a construc-



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LETTERS

letters@tribunemecdia.net

tion site. Everywhere you look
there are unfinished buildings,
dilapidated structpres, peeling
paint, knee high grass along
the sides of every road,
garbage and graffiti. In the
eyes of the first world this is all
synonymous with crime and
poverty. Hardly what you
would expect in a five star
resort town. Nowhere is this
more obvious than on Bay
Street itself. And for the cruise
ship passengers this starts as
they are sailing into port with
the ruins of Arawak Cay to
greet them and the graffiti all
over the dock side walls. Little
wonder that hundreds of them
decide not to disembark.

Every day the members of
parliament step out into the
middle of the mess and it
seems to bother them not one
iota.

If you are arriving by air
there is the spectacle of the
airport.

Now I am no expert in con-
struction but if $300,000,000
is being spent on this struc-
ture I will cheerfully eat my
hat. So far all there is to be
seen is some refurbished bath-
rooms, a couple of new lug-
gage carousels, a lick of paint
here and there and a new
parking arrangement. Airport
employees happily parade up
and down through the various
terminals and occasionally
stop to sleep a while on seat-
ing meant for the travelling
public. Not a five star sight.

Taxi service ranges from a
few very good to many incred-
ibly bad — I am sure that
these guys mean well, but
playing a tape of your
favourite preacher’s sermon
at full blast while driving is
not exactly what our north
American clients would con-
sider appropriate after a day
of stressful air travel and a
start to a restful vacation. And

skip the tall stories about
Eddy Murphy living on the
Cable Beach strip or Oprah
living on Paradise Island.

If you attempt to book an
activity (what is left of our
activities as so many of the
quality activities are now
closed). be prepared to
encounter tour agents who do
not know the first thing about
the product they are trying to
“sell”. Remember that their
main objective is to pocket

their kick back which ranges

from 20 per cent to 25 per cent
of the price of the tour. This
practice has helped to keep
the tour prices artificially high
and has put many an entre-
preneur out of business.
Forget about native shows
— they are a thing of the past.
While other Caribbean desti-
nations can boast of their cul-

-tural based night club attrac-

tions, we appear to have none.

If you are hoping to start a
tourist based business, I hope
you have won the lottery as
the banks will laugh at you.
The government offers no
incentives whatsoever to
tourist businesses — in fact
they are looking for ways to
tax you.

As for Out Island visits —
the infrastructure on most of
the outer islands is not com-
plete, there is a basic lack of
activities and some of the
islands are competing with
Nassau in the half finished
building/garbage dump cate-
gory.

I was hoping that Mr Van-
derpool-Wallace would touch
on just one of these basic sub-
jects but apparently they are
not deemed important.

As 90 per cent of our popu-
lation neither know nor care
about tourism, I expect to
hear no critique of his speech.
Let’s hope that Cuba doesn’t
open up any time soon. As the
saying goes “you only miss the
water when the well runs dry.”

FELICITY SMITH
Nassau,
October 9, 2008.

Palin’s debate tactics did not
include answering questions

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I wish to make my first impression of Sarah Palin the Vice Presi-
dential debate which is that (1) She did not answer the questions put
to her. (2) She recited at a brisk pace non-stop her talking points
regardless of the question under discussion.

If someone had waved a hand in front of her, it seemed that she could
not stop her spiel because that is the way she had learned the answers.

As usual she was very sarcastic. I suppose she will fool her people
with her tactics, but I find it a strange way of debating for such a high
post. Senator Biden could have been more forceful and not let Palin get
away With her sarcasm:and untruths.

OBSERVER
Nassau,
October, 2008.



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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 5



EU Economic Partnership - §&
what it means for the Bahamas

@ By THE NASSAU
INSTITUTE

F THE proposed Eco-

nomic Partnership

Agreement with the

European Union cov-
ering trade both in goods and
services is signed in its present
form by the Bahamas, the
effects on the country’s econo-
my and way of life will be far-
reaching.

The Government should be
commended for its efforts to
consult stakeholders, as well as
members of the public through
town meetings, and for its pub-
lication last month of a detailed
explanatory document about
the EPA.

However, it appears that, for
the most part, the Government
has not entered into a genuine
consultation about the funda-
mental issue of whether it is in
the general interest of the
Bahamas to sign an EPA at all;
and many Bahamians remain
uninformed about its likely
impact on their lives and wel-
fare.

There has been no formal-
ized national consultation
involving political parties, the
trades unions, the churches and
the private sector as a whole

Instead, the Government has
taken a policy position, in line
with other CARIFORUM
countries, to go along with the
EPA.

It has sought to explain and
justify its decision rather than
to debate the overall merits and
demerits of the EPA as far as
the nation is concerned.

With the Government now
set to sign later this month a
“goods-only” EPA dealing with

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

PEST CONTROL
PHONE: 322-2157





for reciprocal duty free trade.

treatment than to EU.







disputes with the EU.

SSM HHH

market access issues, aune.
deferring its services offer for
at most six months, it is timely
for the Nassau Institute to set
out briefly the main issues in a
readily comprehensible form
and to draw attention to a num-
ber of questions which should
be examined further.

What is the EPA?

The Lomé Convention of
1975 and its successor, the Coto-
nou Agreement of 2000, pro-
vided preferential tariff access
into the EU for exports from
the African; Caribbean and

. Pacific (ACP) states. This, of

course, included the Bahamas.

The original intention of the
EU was laudable: Its stated pur-
pose was to help eradicate
poverty in the context of sus-
tainable development in devel-
oping countries with a view also

¢ Government set to sign “goods-only” EPA with EU providing

e Requirement under “Most Favoured Nation” rules to offer
other trading partners, including the USA, no less favourable

e Signature of separate section covering services and other
trade-related matters to be deferred for up to six months..

¢ Need for national debate on this important international
agreement which will have widespread and lasting effects.

¢ Government should be more open in discussing services,
regional integration and institutional and legal reform. It
should also reassure the public about costs and means of -

implementation as well as provision for collective resolution of




to pauensieatie democracy “nd
good governance.

Even though cynics suggest-
ed that the EU’s real purpose
was to secure a steady supply
of raw materials or primary
products, the fact was that the
ACP countries benefited from
these trade preferences.

The Cotonou Agreement
envisaged that such preferences
would eventually be replaced
by Free Trade Agreements
(FTA).

’ This was necessary in order
that the EU could meet its non-
discriminatory obligations
required by the World Trade
Organization (WTO). But the
EU itself has now gone further.

Notwithstanding its own pro-
tectionist policies, the EU is
looking (for its own purposes)

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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

LOCAL NEWS

THE TRIBUNE



Man, 38,
accused of
having Sex
with girl, 15

A 38-year-old man of Sun-
shine Way accused of having
sexual intercourse with a 15-
year-old girl was arraigned in
a Magistrate’s Court Friday.

According to court dock-
eis, Thomas Nottage is
accused of committing the
offence on Wednesday! May
28. Nottage, who was

‘raigned before Magistrate
jinda Virgill at Court 9,
Nassau Street, was not
required to plead to the. -
charge.

He was granted bail in the
sum of $10,000. The case was
»djourned to November 5.

Twe men in
eourt on
rug charge

Two men were arraigned
in a Magistrate’s Court on
Thursday on a marijuana
possession charge.

Police have charged Leslie
}rancis, 26, Tamaro Nelson
Rolle, 32, both of Dublin
Drive off Faith Avenue with
possession of three and a
half pounds of marijuana
with the intent to supply.
According to court dockets
ihe men were found in pos-

session of the drugs on Tues- ,

day, October 7.

Both men, who appeared
before Chief Magistrate
Roger Gomez, pleaded not
ouilly to the charge and were
granted bail in the sum of
£1.0,000.

“he case was adjourned to

ober 16 and transferred —
to Court 8, Bank Lane:




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Illegal dumping around Bonefish
Pond is threatening the wetlands

lm BY MEGAN REYNOLDS

NEW Providence wetlands
used as an illegal dumping ground
will be cleaned up by the
Bahamas National Trust on Sat-
urday with the public’s help.

The damaging practice of
dumping waste of all kinds in the
wetland area surrounding Bone-
fish Pond off Cowpen Road, was
surveyed by government officials
on a tour of the area led by
BNT's Coastal Awareness Com-
mittee last week.

Environment Minister Earl
Deveaux, State Minister Phen-
tom Neymour, government offi-
cials and representatives from the
Nature Conservancy, Bahamas
Reef Environment Education
Foundation and Dolphin Encoun-
ters Project BEACH, saw first-
hand how the illegal dumping is
affecting the wetlands. ~

Now the BNT, working with.
the Department of Environmen-
tal Health, the Ministry of the
Environment and othér agencies,
are preparing for a major cleanup
of the area with the help of vol-
unteers.

The BNT's deputy executive
director Lynn Gape said: "Bone-
fish Pond and areas along Cow-

A lot to

eta



B uy or build? If you’re
” considering new eon-
struction, the first item on your
To Do list is to find a suitable lot.
The experience of builders and
architects points to a few key fea-
tures you should investigate in
your search for the perfect spot.

First, and perhaps most obvi-
ous, is the size of the lot. The larg-
er the lot, the greater the cost,
depending on location. Coiisider
the property taxes, mortgage pay-
ments and how much mainte-
nance it will require if you build a
large home. Remember that the

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GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS, including minister or state for culture Charles
Maynard, survey dumped garbage around Bonefish Pond with the Bahamas
National Trust. °

pen Road have been plagued with
illegal dumping for many years.

“Typically, trucks are hired to ~

take rubbish from a household or
a respectable business, unfortu-
nately they often do not make it
to the landfill to offload their car-
go.

“Those visiting the park last
week were shocked to find com-
pany logos visually evident in
much of the garbage found in the
park."

The BNT took a trucking com-
pany to court for dumping in the
park and won a judgment against
the offender two years ago.

It is a firm belief of the BNT

and Department of Environmen-
tal Health that companies and
households should be held
responsible for where their trash
ends up. Ms Gape added: "At
the moment there is an ‘out of
sight, out of mind' mentality
towards garbage disposal and
anyone who hires someone to
take their trash’should care about
where it ends up."

The landfill on Harrold Road
is the only legal dumpsite on New
Providence and only loads that
are 300Ibs and above are charged
a modest fee of $10.

The Department of Environ-
mental Health is encouraging the

REAL
aU ED



smallest lots tend to appreciate
more quickly than their larger
neighbours.

Next, imagine how the terrain
will affect aspects like drainage
and the nositioning of the home.
Ask your builder to explain the
impact that irregular terrain will
have on your plan.

Related to the terrain is the
view the property offers. Take
great care in discovering how

adjoining land might be devel-

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oped, and how that could affect
your view. A gas station may one
day be built on that beautiful
vacant lot out back (if possible
zoning permits at a later date).

And finally, the mantra of real
estate is “location, location, loca-
tion.” Want a faster commute?
Buy a lot near the entrance of
your subdivision. Want to keep
your kids safe from traffic? Then
plan a purchase further toward
the back.



VISITORS, including Minister of Environment Earl Deveaux and State Minis-
ter for Culture Charles Maynard were given a re-usable “green” shopping bag
after surveying the dumping around Bonefish Pond.

public to defer payment to truck-
ing companies until a receipt is
shown that indicates that the load
has been delivered to the land-
fill. Trucks are weighed and a
receipt indicating the weight of
the load and payment are given to
each vehicle offloading at the
landfill. Ms Gape said: "If every-

It’s all common sense, really, -

but it helps to take an organised
and educated approach to this
critical element of home con-
struction.

one insisted on seeing a receipt,
there would be a lot less garbage
on the island of New Provi-
dence."

The clean up will start at 8am
on Saturday, October 18, and go
on until lpm. Members of the
public are encouraged to get
involved.



Focol Holdings Limited advises the public that as of 31°
July, 2008, 11,799,000 class ‘B’ perpetual preference
shares were sold via private placement and, as of 6"

October, 2008, an additional 1,561,000 shares were sold
for a total of thirteen million, three hundred and sixty
thousand dollars ($13,360,000).

As per the resolution of the Board of Directors of Focol
Holdings Limited, Colina Financial Advisors Limited

(CFAL) and Royal

Fidelity Capital

Markets. are

authorized to continue selling via private placement any
unsold portion (1,640,000) of the 15 million class ‘B’

oq

etual preference shares approved by shareholders on
March, 2008 under the same terms as-those previous

(13,360,000) class ‘B’ shares sold as of 6" October,

2008.

Colina Financial Advisors Limited (CFAL) will continue

to act as the escrow agent for the offering.

“Fuelling Growth For People”


HE tHIBUNG

mg BY SIR RONALD
SANDERS

otwithstanding
a decision by
the meeting of
Heads of Gov-
ernment of the African,
Caribbean and Pacific (ACP)
group in Ghana on October
2nd and 3rd to appoint a troi-
ka to “engage in high-level
consultations” on the Eco-
nomic Partnership Agreement
(EPA) with the European
Union (EU), | several
Caribbean countries will sign a
full agreement tomorrow.

The two Caribbean coun-
tries that have said they will
not are Guyana and Haiti.

In the process, the largest
active group of developing
countries faces disintegration.
It is a sad time for developing
countries for they have lost
the only strength they had —-
their unity in negotiating with
the larger and more powerful
. hations of Europe

At the end of the Ghana
‘meeting, the President of Tan-
zania, Mizengo Peter Pinda,
observed that “it is regrettable
and disturbing that while the
EU comprising the big
economies continue to expand
its membership, the negotia-
tions under EPAs are delib-
erately forcing the ACP
groups and Regional Eco-
nomic Communities to disin-
tegrate.” His observation is
perfectly correct. But, the
ACP has only itself to blame.
While it is true that Caribbean
countries were under no com-
pulsion to sign the EPA on
15th October and they could
have waited for the consulta-
tions of the ACP troika, the
split in the ACP did not begin
with the Caribbean. It was the
former French colonies of
Africa that began the process
by agreeing to the Separation
of Africa into four separate
negotiating groups. To the
Caribbean’s credit, its repre-

sentatives tried to preserve -

ACP unity. Had the ACP
stood-up, the EU would not
have succeeded in separating
them.

The ACP was also not
proactive enough in trying to
use its existing structures for
information-sharing and coor-
dination once the separate
negotiations. began. Even
though their aspirations would
have been different, they
could, at least, have sought to
take account of the special
needs of some of their mem-
ber-states and to demand, in
unison, that those needs be
met.

The EU prevailéd because
it acted as one, the ACP failed
because it allowed itself to be
divided. Now, any prospect of
achieving another of the
objectives identified by the
ACP summit is also blowing in
the wind. That objective was
“to pursue the consideration
of the creation of an ACP
Free Trade Area (FTA). "
The idea of an ACP FTA
came far too late. It should
have been pursued in advance
of negotiations with the EU
for an EPA. But, again, the
wording of the objective
shows how little broad-based
political will there was for it in
the ACP. All that the leaders
agreed to do was to pursue
“the consideration” of the
FTA. The EU and others
could have wanted no better
indication of the lack of
resolve by the ACP.

In the event, by deciding to
sign a full EPA with the EU
without the benefit of discus-




4) Surg ry-M
the breast. —




You can survive breast cancer. Karly detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of

Sir Ronald Sanders

sion by the ACP troika (of
which the current Chairman
of CARICOM would have
been a part), Caribbean coun-
tries, with the exception of
Guyana and Haiti, demon-

, strated scant regard for Africa .

and the Pacific. In the process,
they confirmed the observa-
tion of the Tanzanian Presi-
dent that the EPAs are forcing
the disintegration not only of
the ACP but of regional eco-
nomic communities (such as
CARICOM). This latter
point about CARICOM
should not be lightly brushed
aside, for there is nothing in

‘the EPA that allows the pro-

visions of the CARICOM
Treaty to take precedence
over the clauses of the EPA
should a conflict arise. In this

connection, the individual |

relationship of Caribbean
countries to the EU (and, inci-
déntally, to the Dominican

Republic) will override the -

CARICOM Treaty.

In this regard, it is worth
noting that while the OECS
countries and Belize receive
special and differential treat-
ment from Guyana, Jamaica,
Barbados and Trinidad and

Leave the financing to us, we'll leave the shopping to you.




st patients with breast cancer have surgery to

|



Tobago under the CARI-
COM Treaty, they get no spe-

cial treatment under the EPA.

from the EU. Eventually,
they will all have to give full
reciprocal treatment to the
EU for trade in goods and ser-
vices. The OECS countries
exhibited remarkable loyalty
to the larger CARICOM
states in the EPA negotia-
tions.

They might have achieved
more concessions given their
micro size and greater vulner-

-abilities to exogenous shocks

had they too negotiated sepa-
rately.

The effect on the OECS
was one of Guyana’s Presi-
dent Bharrat Jagdeo
expressed concerns when he
demurred from signing a full
EPA. He argued for two
things: a mandatory review of
the EPA within five years to
remedy harm that it might do
to Caribbean economies; and
the supremacy of the CARI-
COM Treaty over the EPA if
a conflict developed. This
proposition was put to
Caribbean leaders by the
CARICOM Secretary-Gen-
eral and to the European
Commission after the ACP
meeting.»

Favourable

At the time of writing, it is
not known whether Jagdeo’s
two concerns received a
favourable response from
either the EU or Caribbean
leaders, although the
Caribbean leadership should
have fully embraced both
points in the interest both of
developing the Caribbean Sin-
gle Market and Economy and
of halting any consequential
disintegrating tendencies with-
in CARICOM. If the propos-
al didn’t receive a favourable
response, it will account for
why Jagdeo does not join oth-
er Caribbean leaders in sign-
ing the EPA tomorrow.

Guyana might eventually
have to concede to the EPA in
the absence of support, but its
resistance to an EPA it
regards as lop-sided and its

efforts to preserve the
supremacy of regionalism has
won it respect in Europe and
the Caribbean.

As for the ACP, sadly it is
now almost an irrelevant
organisation. It is no longer a
significant influencer of trade
arrangements with the EU; if
it is to play any role in the





LUEOVATL, UVIUDENM 14, CUU0, FAUE 7s

wider trade negotiations in the
World Trade Organisation
(WTO) much work will have
to be done by visionary lead-
ers to inspire it.

That possibility now looks
most unlikely.

@eee

(For the next two weeks,

there will be no commentary,

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ACP irrelevant: CARICOM at risk

from Sir Ronald Sanders).

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com
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(The writer is a business con-

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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUN



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We are becoming a

@ By ADRIAN GIBSON
ajbahama@hotmail.com

HE value of lit-
eracy in today’s
information-
based, techno-
logically-obsessed econo-
my/society is often understat-

ed, particularly in the

Bahamas.

In this country, where we
are producing a multitude of
arithmetically-challenged, illit-
erate students, literacy pro-
grammes should have long
been a crucial aspect of the
Ministry of Education’s plat-
form since even those techni-
cal, vocational and hands-on
jobs call for someone to meet
the literacy demands of at
least being able to read
instructions/manuals.

In Bahamian schools, liter-
acy problems can be observed
with students at the elemen-
tary level on up to tertiary
institutions.

Sadly, when nearly 60 per
cent of the nation’s high
school graduates finished with
attendance certificates instead
of diplomas — for failing to
meet a cumulative grade point
average (GPA) of 2.0 during
six years of high school — it’s
obvious that many of them
are hopelessly entering society
while being ill-equipped to
enter the workforce as they
are literally unemployable
and unqualified to manage
our country’s affairs. +

It is of the essence that
action be taken immediately
to meet the literacy needs of
students and, as educational
writer Rick Allen notes, that
feat can only be accomplished
with the assistance attainable
through the use of literacy
coaches, who can in turn train
teachers to better facilitate
their students in areas such as
comprehension.

Growing up on Long
Island, I was exposed to vari-
ous types of reading material,
from newspaper articles to fic-
tion to documentaries to com-
ic books to vanity published

Rt. Hon. Hubert A. Ingraham



ADRIAN



YOUNG MAN’Ss VIEW





GIBSON





“I have discovered that
numerous students have
unrestricted, uninterrupted
access to the internet,
television, music and can do
whatever they desire.” 7



books. I can vividly remem-
ber calling my parents and
pleading with my grandpar-
ents to purchase any new pub-
lications I found interesting,
as I was given “book order
sheets” by one of my former
teachers every month.

Early exposure to reading
material would no doubt
heighten a student’s abilities
and furnish them with the
ability to comprehend and
make inferences, differenti-
ate between textbooks and
story books, and develop dif-
ferent approaches to under-
standing the various subject
areas taught at their schools.

According to Mr Allen, lit- -
eracy coaches are needed in
schools as they can offer spe-
cial training that could assist
teachers (particularly those in
language, arts and literature)
in providing good, effective’
instruction, while including all
students, expanding upon
their limited comprehension
and vocabulary skills.

Coaches

The MOE should note
that, while the recruitment of
competent literacy coaches
would unquestionably have
an impact in instruction,
assessment and leadership

PROCLAMATION

roles, they would also be cru-
cial to the development of in-
school literacy programmes
and, along with teachers,
develop strategies to better
communicate and reach out
to many of the apathetic,
unlettered students in the
educational system — partic-
ularly public education.

Frankly, a major obstacle
to literacy development is the
increasing numbers of irre-
sponsible parents whose
parental negligence is the root
cause of much of the social
turmoil and educational fail-
ures we now face.

There are countless parents
who have been egregiously
negligible as they fail to
teview their children’s books,
assist with assignments or
express even the slightest
inkling of interest in their edu-
cational advancement.

I have discovered that
numerous students have unre-
stricted, uninterrupted access
to the internet, television,
music and can do whatever
they desire. _

Frankly, since students that
can’t spell “dunce’” to save
their lives can effortlessly
recite the lyrics of vulgar

SEE page 9 ;

WHEREAS, the improvements in health care and living conditions, globally
and in The Bahamas, have caused life expectancy to be extended, resulting in a
growing number of older persons;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Labour and Social Development and the
Department of Social Services seek to create an environment where older persons
are empowered and enabled to age with confidence and pride;

AND WHEREAS, the General Assembly of the United Nations, of which The
Bahamas is a member recognizes Ist October, as International Day for Older
Persons, . with the theme for 2008 being “The Rights of Older Persons’’;

AND WHEREAS, the Department of Social Services of the Ministry of
Labour and Social Development provides services and programmes designed to
enhance the welfare and security of older persons in The Commonwealth of The

Bahamas;

AND WHEREAS, the Ministry of Labour and Social Development and the
Department of Social Services, in conjunction with the National Council on Older
Persons, have again partnered to organize a month of activities to recognize the
rights of older persons and raise the level of awareness in the general public of
those rights; ,

NOW THEREFORE, | Hubert A. Ingraham, Prime Minister of The Com-
monwealth of The Bahamas, do hereby proclaim the month of October, 2008 as
“OLDER PERSONS MONTH”.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF,
I have hereunto set my Hand
and Seal this 2nd day of
October, 2008

HUBERT A. INGRAHAM
PRIME MINISTER


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 9



ee PR Se ee
nation of illiterates

The urgent need for an ombudsman!

olitics in the Bahamas has always
attracted certain characters, who in
- certain instances appear to be nothing more
than political gadflies, kleptomaniacs and the
worst possible candidates to be elevated to
the frontlines of representative government. To
use the words of former US Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger, “corrupt politicians make
the other ten per cent look bad.”

Frankly, local politics — again in certain
instances — seems to attract a wagon load of
carpetbaggers, who seem intent on enriching
themselves rather than lobbying on behalf of
their constituents and genuinely helping to

foster the national development of their coun- |

With this in-mind, it is imperative that the
office of Ombudsman be established, to serve



as a watchdog, hear complaints against Mem-
bers of Parliament and other government agen-
cies, and possibly to provide independent over-
sight.

Frankly, the office should be held by a well-
vetted, non-partisan Bahamian or, since that is
near impossible, by a qualified foreigner. Hav-
ing an Ombudsman, in addition to other
reforms such as political primaries, referen-
dums, electoral debates, a recall system and
impeachment proceedings would further
empower and no doubt lessen the attempts at
victimisation or unfairness.

Any well-meaning legislator currently occu-
pying a seat in Parliament should not object to

voting in favour of the creation of the office of »

Ombudsman — which will also have the pow-
er to hold those unaccountable elitists among
their ranks responsibue.





FROM page 8

songs, I’ve oftentimes con-
templated rapping lessons

over hip-hop beats to target —

these apathetic, wayward
pupils. They also spell words
just as they sound in rap
videos and construct sen-
tences just like they speak!
The saturation and overuse
~ of media — internet, satellite,
cable, CDs, video games, etc
— has contributed greatly to
rate of illiteracy that we now

see. Many of the students |

from slack households that
permit unlimited access to
various mediums often fail to
‘complete homework, attempt
to read the content of their
subject-related textbooks, and
are unlikely to ever casually
write or read a book.

These days, although the
Ministry of Education is now
requiring that all teachers pos-
sess a degree and a teacher’s

certificate, there remain some ~

teachers who have a degree
but may not have a teaching
certificate — which puts them
and their students at a disad-
vantage in terms of exposure
to effective teaching and read-
ing methodologies.

This can exacerbate the
already challéiiging literacy
problems, since a teacher with

Yeni



no ‘formal teacher training
may be unable to utilise useful
teaching strategies to cater for
a student’s literacy needs.
The struggles with reading
in the Bahamas are quite
apparent in reports about the
BJC and BGCSE examina-
tion results, especially in areas
such as English language and
literature, where there are:
mass failures. Literacy spe-
cialists are desperately needed
in local schools. In the 1930s
and 1940s, my grandparents
had to know how to read
“The Royal Reader” books.

_ Specialists

However, these reading ini-
tiatives and the emphasis once
placed on reading seem to
have been lost to time when
schools are graduating hordes
of illiterates, who are funda-
mentally lost and unprepared
to face a 21st century society.
Not only is the hiring and
training of literacy specialists
overdue, but past pro-
grammes must be re-estab-
lished and books that enlight-
ened my grandparents’ gen-
eration must be ordered in
bulk.

‘According to Mike Merold,
a regional literacy coach in
Alabama, an‘anticipation

guide should be a strategy
used by teachers and students
to discuss content before and
after they have read.
Furthermore, strategies
such as reciprocal teaching
allows for students to work in

. groups, summarise, think crit-

ically and generate questions,
seek clarification and make

predictions. In this case, stu- :

dents can engage in construc-
tive learning.

Reciprocal teaching — a
method I practise — in addi-
tion to conducting formative
assessments and offering a
variety of tasks, can offer
sound instruction and open,
student-centred lessons.

It is patently clear that dri-

- vers on our streets reflect

their inability to read or out-
right ignorance and disrespect
for the law, when they seem
unable or refuse to read and
adhere to stop signs, the yield
and other street signals —
even the simplistic traffic
lights: Finally, Director of
Education Lionel Sands
recently claimed that the stu-
dent-to-teacher ratio at public
schools stands at about 150 to
one. That information is total-
ly incorrect, particularly since
the student-to-teacher ratio

of my (combined classes: far

exceeds 150 to one!

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PAGE 10, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNY

Food and energy crisis ‘will make it harder
to reach Millennium Development Goals’

Global community meets in New York
to discuss progress on MDGs

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THE current food and ener-
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Millennium Development
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‘recently met in New York to
discuss progress on the Mil-
lennium Development Goals
(MDGs), which are targets
and standards in global

‘poverty, health and sustain-

ability.

But, speaking ahead of the
Commonwealth Finance Min-
isters Meeting opening cete-
mony, Commonwealth civil
society said that while the
countries were generally mov-
ing towards progress, the ris-
ing food and energy crisis
threatens to undo that.

Civil society experts are
concerned that as the. crisis
worsens, it will make the
achievement of the Millenni-
um Development Goals unre-
alistic and could lead to eight
lost years of progress.

Nelcia Robinson, co-ordi-
nator of the Caribbean Asso-
ciation for Feminist Research
and Action, cited the need for
food security to ensure that
those groups identified as vul-
nerable within the Millenni-
um Development Goals will
be able to meet nutritional
basics. “People with, or sup-
porting those with HIV and
AIDS are already hard
pressed to meet their nutri-

_ tional needs,” said Ms Robin-

son. “Increasing costs and
potential increases through
Value Added Tax will only
exacerbate this.”

School

Sarwar Bari, the national
co-ordinator for Pattan Devel-
opment Organisation, said
education-specific MDGs
were also likely to be affected.
“We have done focus groups
and we see that people are
taking their children out of
school because transport costs
are now an issue,” said Mr
Bari. “Girls tend to be the
most affected and this is harm-
ing the MDGs related to gen-
der parity in schools in India,
Bangladesh and Pakistan.”

The education issue isn’t

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lonly specific to Asia. Ms
Robinson reported that the
rising cost of fuel being passed
onto the consumer meant that
children were dropping out of
school or reverting to walking
to school because they could
not afford bus fares.

- Governments face the real-
ity of spending less on social
welfare and development sec-
tors as they try to stem and
support the current crisis but
civil society representatives
are urging them not to lose
sight of the work done
towards the MDG achieve-
ments to date and that nation-
al policies addressing the crisis
should be in line with the
plans for addressing the
MDGs.

Unrest

Civil society representatives
pointed to recent civil unrest
taking place across countries
as people protest against rising
costs of food and energy and
its implications.

Last week, the Common-
wealth Finance Ministers
began a review Common-
wealth civil society’s statement
and recommendations on how
to prevent that unrest and dis-
cuss recommendations.

Commonwealth Foundation
Governance and Democracy
Programme Manager Seth
Lartey said: “The high fuel
and food prices pose different
challenges for each Common-
wealth country.

“There is a need it all
member countries to develop
policy responses to meet those
challenges and address civil
society’s collective concerns
and contribute to a global
debate.”

The Commonwealth Foun-
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from around the Common-
wealth to contribute to the
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 11



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Damianos Sotheby’s Interna-
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CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

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GRADUATES
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The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise December 2007 and
April 2008 graduates that degrees are available for collection from
* the Records Department. Before collecting degrees, graduates must
complete the Graduate Clearance Form which may be obtained
from the Records Inquiry Office, First Floor, Portia M. Smith

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FROM page one
fire on police in the area of Watlins
Street, then fled.

According to police officials, he
took refuge in a house where offi-
cers arrested him but they were
unable to recover the weapon.

On Sunday around 1.15 am at
Fourth Quarters restaurant and
bar a man, who was involved in
an argument, left the building and
discharged a weapon. Police recov-
ered numerous bullet casings out-
side the restaurant.

At 12.35 pm Sunday a man
went to the Princess Margaret
Hospital with gun shot pellet
wounds in his chest. However,
police do not know how he got his
injuries.

He is listed in stable condition.

Around 5.31 pm the same day a
man was robbed at gunpoint of his
red and white 650 trail bike, tag
number 3432. The gunman dis-
charged his weapon in the man’s
direction, but did not hit him.

The 20 Dollar Shop in the area
of East Street south and Coleman’s
Lane was robbed around 8 pm

FROM page one

Parents were so concerned that church members
circled the schools praying for seven days.

Acting Director of Education Lionel Sands is
reported to have finalised the teacher's departure
dates at their schools for October 6, however, last
week they were back in. the Andros schools with let-
ters from another Education official reinstating their

positions.

Principals at both schools walked out, a parent said,
and classes were disrupted once again.
A concerned mother whose 12-year-old son
attends the high school said she and several other
parents are going to keep their children out of school

today if the teachers return.

She said: "We have written a letter to the Ministry
of Education to tell them we will not be sending our
children to school if the teachers remain.

"This is not right and we don't understand how
education could go ahead and do something like this.

"We also have a letter to send to our neighbours in

the US to tell them how it is.

r
XL as

Armed robberies

Sunday. The armed, masked men
fled on foot, discharging a weapon
as they left.

Later that night a man was beat-
en about the body and thrown into
the water at Potters Cay Dock.
Three men, police believe to be
connected with the beating, left
the area in a white Nissan Sentra
licence, number 19565.

They later recovered the vehicle
on East Street South. It is believed
to have been stolen.

According to news reports the
man swam to safety.

Mr Hanna said these type of
incidents are happening much too
frequently and despite the police’s
best efforts, they continue to hap-
pen.

“We believe as bad as it was, it
could have been worse. We had
the area pretty much covered and
you will notice that we took sever-
al weapons off the street and we
took several persons into custody
as well,” he said. ;

“Guns continue to be a prob-

THE TRIBUNE



lem in the community. This year
we have taken a significant number
of weapons off the streets, includ-
ing high powered automatic
weapons, but there are still far too
many guns in the community and
there are far too many people who

are willing to use them and too

many people who are unwilling to
pass the information in and say
where these guns are.

“But with our intelligence and
the fact that an increasing number
of persons are coming forward and
talking to the police, I think we
have done well.” 5

Mr Hanna praised officers for
their vigilance while on patrol in
the community, saying that offi-
cers have recently been using their
police intuition to making stops
and arresting individuals.

“Routine traffic stops have
resulted in persons being arrested
for possession of firearms,” he said.

“We are happy that we didn’t
see greater carnage and greater
criminality, because we believe that
we were able to put measures in
place to do some things effective-

ly.”

Andros teachers row

from school.

rupted.

education."



REGISTRATION POLICY

Beginning November 17th, 2008
you will be able to
reserve courses using IQ web.

All reserved spaces will be cancelled

astelar er

for within seven (7) days

of Reena Teen cert ance

Please visit www.cob.edu.bs

FACULTY POSITIONS

The College of The Bahamas is the national institution of tertiary level education of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas. The institution grants certificates, diplomas, associate degrees and a
growing number of Bachelor degrees to nearly 4,000 students in the Bahamian archipelago. It has
extensive links with tertiary institutions in the Caribbean and North America and its credits are |
accepted by more than 200 colleges and universities in those regions and in Great Britain. It is poised |
to embark aggressively upon a major expansion of its programme offerings, its research activities, and
its physical facilities, and to incorporate distance teaching methodologies into its repertoire of
strategies for delivering instruction. all with a view to seeking a charter as a university.

Evate!



We are currently seeking to fill the following positions:

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
Assistant Professors
» — Accounting
* Banking, Finance and
Economics
» Management & Marketin
* Administrative Office
Management
a ‘
SCHOOL OF SCIENCES &
TECHNOLOGY
Assistant Professors
= Mathematics
«Biology
» Chemistry
= Physics
* Environmental
Sustainability
= Geography

SCHOOL OF NURSING &
ALLIED HEALTH
PROFESSIONS
* Pharmaceutical Sciences
® Nursing
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
Assistant Professors
* Early Childhood
Education
Religious Education
Education Research
Reading Education
Science Education

Applicants must possess an earned doctoral degree or equivalent in the area of interest.

SCHOOL OF

COMMUNICATION &

CREATIVE ARTS
Assistant Professors
* Journalism

Spanish

* French

=~ Musie

SCHOOL OF ENGLISH

STUDIES

* College Composition

x Literature and °
Composition
‘

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL

SCIENCES
Assistant Professors

could see children kept
out of two schools

"We were done wrong."

Elma Garraway, permanent secretary at the Min-
istry of Education, did not divulge details of the mix-
up, but said she expected the matter to be resolved
over the weekend so children would not be held back

Ms Garraway said: "We sent our senior officer
down to Andros to investigate this whole matter
because we cannot have children's education inter-

"We are aware of the challenges and we have
come to a decision so the schools in Andros can
move forward and the children can receive quality

Ms Garraway said the principals at both schools
will remain, adding: "They are very good principals
and we would not want to lose them."





=» Public Administration
® Criminal Justice Studies . |

* History

U.W.1. LAW PROGRAMME

LIBRARIES &

INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA

SERVICES ‘

«Public Service and
Fechnical Services

Librarians
CULINARY AND
HOSPITALITY

MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

* Chet

For more information about these positions and how to apply please visit our website at 5

http://www.cob.edu.bs/hrapply

To ensure consideration, application materials must be received by October 30, 2008.
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 13



aa: eae
The PM calls for international
support for Caricom countries

FROM page one

dards in the Caribbean nations, employment levels
are falling as tourism declines.

Tourism in the Bahamas was substantially
lower than expected in September, and with the
continued instability of the US economy, con-
tingency plans are being put in place.

In his statement the Prime Minister said:

“The medium term outlook for Less Devel-
oped Countries and Small Island States, such as
ours, appears especially challenging. «

“However, we believe that these challenges
can also present opportunities to us all if the
appropriate international responses are effec-
tive.

“For our part, we intend to do all we can to
implement policies and measures that will repo-
sition our economies for early, resilient, sustain-
able and strong growth to meet the aspirations of
our peoples.”

But as the severity of the problem has com-
pelled governments to implement support pro-
grammes for poor and vulnerable groups, addi-
tional burdens are being placed on already

Mr Ingraham recommended the: status of’

Small Island States as Middle Income Countries
is reviewed to relieve the high public debt hold-
ing governments back from addressing social
issues.

He also praised the new Climate Change
Investment fund, which will help Caricom coun-
tries reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 50 per
cent by 2050, as rising sea levels threaten coastal
developments and the economy.

Efforts to create sustainable regional agricul-
tural and energy.policies are being intensified
across the Caribbean to provide more afford-
able food as prices around the world continue to
soar.

The Prime Minister thanked the Bank, the
Fund and the Caribbean Regional Technical
Assistance Centre (CARTAC) for invaluable
contributions to institutional and capacity build-
ing, and the improvement of management in the
Caribbean, and stressed that the vulnerable
Caribbean must remain a focus for the Fund.

He added: "We are sure that the institutions
will respond urgently and positively to the needs
of the Caribbean Constituency, needs which are

strained fiscal accounts.”

Mortgages
FROM page one

the world from mid-2009,” said
Mr Ingraham

In September, speaking in the

House of Assembly, Prime Min-
ister Ingraham instructed BEC
to reconnect power to homes
where residents were unable to
pay exorbitant electricity bills

because of the excessively high :

fuel surcharges. He also
announced increases to Social
Services aid programmes.

In an effort to mitigate the
unemployment problem, Mr

Ingraham said Government will :
create jobs by expediting its :

public infrastructure projects
and will restart its housing pro-
grammes in Nassau, Grand
Bahama and Abaco.

“So we are putting contin-
gency plans in place to be able
to deal with the situation if a
worst case scenario arises,” Mr.
Ingraham said. “Should circum-
stances require it, The Bahamas
would be able to make arrange-
ments with the private banking
sector to take care of any likely
shortfall that we might experi-
ence,” he said.





extremely urgent in the present unsettled global
economic and financial environment."

Teenager dies after stabbing

FROM page one

friends at a yard at Redwood Lane, where a number of men were
engaged in a gambling game.

There was an altercation and the three men were stabbed.

Mr Rahming said police received a call around 7 pm on Saturday
about a fight on Redwood Lane and that someone may have gotten
injured.

Two police units were dispatched to the location, where they received
information that three men were en route to the Rand Memorial Hos-
pital, suffering from stab wounds received during an altercation.

When officers arrived at the hospital, they saw three men receiving
medical treatment for stab wounds.

The 19-year-old teenager of Caravel Beach had sustained multiple

stab wounds. The second victim was detained as a result of his injuries, :

and the third victim was treated and later discharged into police cus-
tody.

Mr Rahming said Police have recovered the knife believed to have
been used in the incident.

Central Detective Unit officers are investigating the matter.

FROM page one

occupants were acting suspi-
ciously and when officers
approached there was another car
chase.

The fleeing car entered the
Cowpen Road area, hitting two
other vehicles. When the car
came to a stop, the occupants got
out and fired at the police.

Police returned fire and shot
one of the men in the left leg; the

other was shot in his right leg.
Both men were subsequently
arrested, taken to hospital, treat-
ed and discharged from hospital.

One of the men is said to be a
Jamaican who overstayed his time
and the other was from Tall Pines
Estates.

They were found with a 40 mm
pistol with nine live rounds of
ammunition.

Shoot-outs

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PAGE 14, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



LOCAL NEWS



EU Economic Partnership — what it means for the Bahamas
OPINION

FROM page 5

to other countries to open their
markets to European goods —
former EU Trade Commission-
er, Peter Mandelson, has pub-
licly stated that the EU,'as the
largest economy in the world
and a major trading bloc, is like-
ly to benefit from more accessi-
ble world markets. So, over and
above its commitment to make
arrangements for trade‘in goods
that are compatible with WTO
rules, the EU has proposed an
EPA as a Free Trade Agree-

Intro

ment which, on a basis of reci-
procity, not only provides for
the removal of all tariffs on the

export of goods but also covers .

trade-related matters such as
services, investment, e-com-

merce and capital movements:

as well as issues like competi-

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83 per cent of whose exports of
goods go to them compared to
only 13 per cent to the EU.
Professor Norman Girvan of
the University of the West
Indies states that, since some
72 per cent of 4he Bahamas’ for-
eign currency earnings derive
from tourism and financial ser-
vices, and with the preponder-

_ ance of trade of goods with the

USA, just 4 per cent-of total
export earnings come from
Europe.

The Government is keen to
preserve the duty-free access
for its exports to the EU worth
some $90 million and thereby
to maintain its existing trade
surplus.

Loss of this access would
result, for example, in imposi-
tion by the EU of an 8 pr cent
tariff on crawfish exports.

In return, the EPA requires
the Bahamas to give up tariff
rates on 85 per cent of EU
imports, phased out over a 25-

_ year period. The estimated loss

of revenue is $6 million. Since
the main purpose of import



sore



duties is to generate govern-
ment revenue rather than act
as a barrier to trade, this loss
will have to be offset by other
taxes.

‘Trade-related’
matters

Under this section, a range of
services areas will be opened
up to EU competition enabling
European companies and pro-
fessionals to set up business
here and Bahamians likewise to
enter the EU marketplace.

However,
Zhivargo Laing
(pictured), min-
ister of state for
finance, has
made it clear
that the services
offer to be pre-
f sented to the
EU “mirrors our
current Nation-
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other hurdles.

It is not yet clear what the
additional cost will be of com-
plying with the EPA obliga-
tions; for example, the creation
of new institutions, regulatory
bodies and laws.

Effect of the EPA
on trade with third
countries

According to Stephen
Lande, president of Washing-
ton-based consultants Man-
chester Trade, the major con-
cern with the EPA is the impact
of its Most Favoured Nation
(MEN) provision on future rela-
tions with the USA. a

If signatories enter into an
FTA with a developed country
which gives more favourable
treatment than that provided to
the EU under the EPA, they
are obliged to consult the EU
first.

This could interfere with the
Bahamas’ ability to enter into
FTAs with other major trading
countries as well as the USA:

A further consideration is
that the USA, Canada and oth-
er non-EU trade partners are
unlikely to accept that the EU
can expect duty-free access to
the Bahamas ay they can do
so as well. :

In the case of the jUSA, lead-
ing attorney Brian Moree
argued at a Nassau Institute
seminar on the EPA in June
that, since MFN status meant
no discrimination between
countries, the Bahamas would
have to offer.— at the time it
negotiated a replacement of the
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) — at least the same trade
preferences and benefits it
offered to the EU. In practice,

Ltd.

presents

For further information

Call: 356-6133

2 Website: www.islandsfashionweek.com

Sponsored by:

Qebahaaias
oF





aac cali nM ct



ke
THE TRIBUNE \

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 15



FROM page 14

this would mean that, because
the Bahamas’ level of trade with
the USA was greater than with

‘ the EU, the starting point in
negotiations would be — in his
words — the ‘EU EPA plus’.
Given that in 2007 the US
exported to the Bahamas some
$2.5 billion worth of goods, the
loss to the latter would be sub-
stantial.

Mr. Moree further argued
that, in order to meet the
WTO’s demands for an end to
one-way discriminatory prefer-
ence regimes such as the Coto-
nou Agreement, a “goods-only”
deal would have been sufficient
so that it was not necessary to
address trade-related issues

such as services, investments, .

capital movements, etc.

_ Nor was it wise to address the
so-called Singapore issues
before it became necessary to
do so.

Way forward

Signature of a “goods-only”
agreement as a first step now
appears to be a fait accompli.

It will secure tariff-free access to _



the huge EU market.

The reciprocal removal of tar-
iffs on imports from the EU will
anyway become necessary as
the Bahamas seeks to join the
World Trade:Organization.
Membership of the WTO will
require the phasing out of
import duties across the board
and development of an alterna-
tive means of generating gov-
ernment revenue.

Meanwhile, deferral of the
Bahamas’ services offer is to be
welcomed.

This will allow time for
debate.

Further issues:
e Services

An agreement covering ser-
vices as well as goods seems,
prima facie, to be heavily in
favour of the EU. It is unneces-
sary because, if the conditions
are suitable, EU investment is
likely to continue without an
EPA.

The Chamber of Commerce
stressed recently the need to
build capacity and competitive-
ness and to develop new ideas
and entrepreneurship.

MoT oy:\ Ra | AY eS)
EU Economic Partnership

But market access to the
EU’s services sector does not
necessarily lead to market pres-
ence. Moreover, inclusion of the
‘Singapore issues’ — government
procurement, intellectual prop-
erty, trade facilitation, invest-
ment and competition policy —
is premature since these issues
have not yet been settled
in WTO global trade talks.

Why should the Bahamas
allow itself to be cajoled by the
EU into jumping the gun and
getting ahead of the WTO
itself?

¢ Regional integration .

One of the stated objectives
of the EPA is to promote
Caribbean regional integration.
It is an exaggeration to claim
that the agreement constitutes
a commitment to CSME, but its
implementation requires some
regional cooperation which will

result in a higher level of inte-
- gration than now exists,

History shows that high lev-
els of economic integration can-
not be achieved without a sig-.

TET a ert
ANDWICH COMBO

nificant degree of political inte-
gration resulting in the creation
of supranational powers vested
in regional agencies.

This raises the question
whether greater regional eco-
nomic integration is in the inter-
est of the Bahamas and thus
whether it shares this objective
with the promoters of the EPA.

Has the matter been
addressed as a general princi-
ple?

There also will be extra costs;
for example, in implementing
common procedures like cus-
toms management.

How will regional agencies
be funded and will contributions
from CARIFORUM member
states be based on GDP fig-
ures? If so, with the highest
GDP in the region the Bahamas
is likely to be called upon to
pay disproportionately more.
Assuming the Government has
studied this, will it publish the
figures?

e Institutional and legal
reform

Advocates of the EPA claim
that, in order to fulfil its com-
mitments under the agreement,
the Bahamas will be forced to
carry out much needed institu-
tional reform; for example, the
tax system, customs, competi-
tion, public services, etc.
Reform of customs administra-
tion is perhaps the most impor-
tant. A host of new legislation,
including harmonization of laws
with CARIFORUM countries,
will also be required.

Has the cost of all this been
assessed? Mr. Laing has spoken

of an “implementation frame-

work” which addresses these
issues. Will he make this avail-
able in order to reassure the

public that the Government has .

the capacity and commitment
to fulfil its obligations in this
respect and to pay for their
implementation? Will he also
provide information about plans
for the “enabling legislation”
which will be required following
signature of the “goods only”
EPA this month?

Conclusion

A cautionary note. The EPA
is entitled as being “between

CARIFORUM states and the
European Community and its
member states”. But, although
the Caribbean Regional Nego-
tiating Machinery has led the
way in negotiations, in practice
Caribbean countries will sign it
individually rather than collec-
tively.

The result will be that, in the
event of any dispute, each coun-
try will be at a serious disad-
vantage since it will be’ pitched

individually against the massive '

resources of the EU.

Have Catibbean negotiators
considered the need to insist
that the region should be able to
speak as one in the settlement

.of disputes affecting individual

countries?

The Government should not
underestimate the repercussions
of a “goods-only” EPA in nego-
tiating trade arrangements with
third countries, and it should
now initiate a public debate
about, in particular, its proposed
services offer.

‘It is important that those
seeking to question the wisdom
of government policy should
not be characterized as being
insular, unenlightened or
opposed to change.

DousLe Stack
Comso



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formula. The surcharge for the month of October will be 22.649 cents per kwh, down from the September rate of 23.3 cents.

ia es aS t Pyar eee


PAGE 16, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

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FROM fief: Butch Rerzner,
Vanessa Kerzner, Hany WePike and
Joann MePike in South Africa.

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ROYAL BFIDELITY

Money at Work




PTHE TRIBUNE

Wy

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801



FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



“TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14.

SECTION B e

$8 5m lawsuit: Hilton marina
deal ‘properly terminated’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor



a daetdad hans edenabiaem net



* Legal action in New York over terminated $18m sale and downtown Nassau joint venture still going in after almost oe year
cit ail * Marina developer claims Hilton’s new investor reneged on deal terms in sale ‘double cross’ :
$85 million in. * But investor and Hilton companies claim deal abolished after developer failed to meet own obligations
damages over
a failed marina

project adja-
cent to the British Colonial
Hilton remains live almost one

year after it was filed, the -
resort’s. owners alleging their
former partner is trying

through the courts to revive a
deal that was “properly termi-
nated”.

A mountain of US court doc-
uments obtained by Tribune
Business has allowed this news-
paper for the first time to
reveal the extent of the falling
out between New York-based
Island Global Yachting (IGY)
and its ‘joint venture partners
over their proposed downtown
Nassau marina project.

In its lawsuit, which was filed
with the New York state
Supreme Court in late 2007,
IGY accused the British Colo-
nial Hilton’s immediate holding
company, its two main share-

* Biggest losers downtown Nassau and wider Bahamian economy, unless new JV partner found



holders, and their broker/advis-
er of breaching the agreement
they had for the New York-
based company to acquire a
parcel of land adjacent to the
resort for the project.

IGY is alleging that George
Allen, who was acting as a bro-
ker for the British Colonial
Development Company and its
then-majority shareholder,
PRK Holdings, in attempting
to attract new investment into
the resort, “misrepresented”
the impact a new investor
would have on their joint ven-
ture agreement.

That investor was the Lon-
don and Swiss-based boutique
private equity/investment
house Adurion Capital.
Despite allegedly being assured
by Mr Allen that Adurion

‘Mudda Sik’, it’s Kafe Kalik!

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

AN entrepreneur and his
pattners are planning to” ulti-
mately take a true Bahamian
flavour to some 15-20 locations
throughout the south-east US
and Caribbean, having invest-
ed some $6.5 million in their
Kafe Kalik concept to date via
an approach underwritten by a
well-known catchphrase —
‘Mudda Sik’.

“Close to $3 million” of that
$6.5 million has been invested in
Kafe Kalik’s latest flagship loca-

tion, the Kafe Kalik Royale on
‘



Orlando’s International Drive,
and Tyrone Nabbie and his
partners are looking to expand
their reach in a controlled man-
ner by capitalizing on their
offering of the very best in
Bahamian cuisine and culture.

“Our plan first is to really
regionalize the concept in the
south-east [US] area,” Mr Nab-
bie told Tribune Business. “Our
next target market is either
going to be Tampa or the South
Beach/Fort Lauderdale area.

“We are also in discussions
with Las Vegas right now, as
we have been talking to a prop-
erty there for four months. That
market will be the only excep-
tion at this time if the opportu-
nity looks right for us.

“Our plan is to develop the
concept in a boutique way and,
where appropriate, near the
ocean. It’s a cheesecake factory
model. We will just focus on
prime markets, top locations
and not exceed 15-20 stores.”

Kafe Kalik Royale is the
brand’s fourth restaurant to
open, Mr Nabbie and his part-
ners already possessing two out-
lets in the Bahamas — located
at Festival Place in Nassau and
one in Freeport — plus another
operation at Orlando’s Inter-
national Airport.

The latest restaurant is very
much the flagship location, giv-
en that it has accounted for
almost 50 per cent of the chain’s
total investment to date and
employs some 150 staff.

SEE page 4B

SANDYPORT #4168 Canalfront 4 bedroom 4 bath Island
style home with small canal beach. - Open living/dining room and
gourmet kitchen with stainless steel appliances and granite coun-
tertops; hurriane-proof windows and boat dock. Fully furnished
and equipped. Reduced to US$1,100,000. Exctusiye LisTING.
Lana.Rademaker@SothebysRealty.com 242.457.0406

Damuanos

Sothebys

INTERNATIONAL REALTY

ber of

M
SiRbahamas.com | t 242.322.2305 | 242.322.2033 | the Bahames MLS



AN outside view of the British Colonial Hilton in New Providence...



would not seek to alter the
terms and conditions attached
to the marina deal, IGY is

claiming in effect that it was
“double crossed” because that
is exactly what Adurion

Realtor wage survey
finding ‘total nonsense’

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHAMIAN realtors have
described as “total nonsense”
and “total rubbish” the finding
by the Department of Statistics
that their profession is the best-
paid in the Bahamas with an
average annual salary of
$197,800, saying the true figure
is between $25,000-$50,000.

William Wong, the Bahamas
Real Estate Association’s
(BREA) president, described
as “total nonsense” the Depart-
ment’s occupational wage sur-
vey findings on the real estate
industry, which were released
last week.

He added: “The National

Pension Plans

i * Mucual Funds

Association of Realtors (NAR)
in the US,-their average is
around $37,000 a year, and it’s
the same in our business or not
far off that.

“Yes, there are some super
agents that make that kind of
money, but the average agents
make $35,000-$50,000. I don’t
know where this is coming
from, but it’s total, total non-
sense. We have 700 members,
and you might have 1 per cent
of them doing very well.” ’

It is unclear where’ the
Department of Statistics
obtained the data for its find-
ings from, although some sug-
gested they may have focused

SEE page 8B ~

. Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

* Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

* Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts

PAV PAYA)

Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

Bridgetown: 246.435.1955

royalfidelity.com

allegedly attempted to do.

However, the British Colo-
nial Development Company
and its affiliates, in their June
20, 2008, motion to dismiss the
lawsuit, alleged that the marina
joint venture was terminated
because IGY failed to meet its
obligations and close the deal
by the deadline date.

“The lawsuit is [IGY’s]
attempt, after failing to meet
its obligations.under the pur-
chase agreement, to revive a
transaction that was properly
terminated,” the Hilton com-

panies alleged, “after the expi-
ration of the [final] closing
date.”

They further claimed that
IGY had admitted that the
“plans and reports and analy-
ses” it alleged the Hilton com-





We can get you there!

panies had “misap - opriated”
actually belonged t. ‘hem, and
had not supportec the “mis-
representation” cl: n against
Mr Allen.

“Simply put, it i undisput-
ed and supported} the pur-
chase agreement t..at British
Colonial Development Com-
pany was not required to seek
IGY’s consent prior to assign-

ing a portion of its corporate

interest to Adurion. IGY’s con-
sent was simply unnecessary,”

‘the Hilton companies alleged.

Meanwhile, US attorneys
acting for PRK Holdings, Adu-
rion and Mr Allen have been
attempting to have the action
thrown out on jurisdictional
grounds, alleging that New

SEE page 10B

Pepsi-Cola





ROYAL 3 FIDELITY

‘Money at Work


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Le ee a ee
The Bahamian Stock Market



@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets __

IT was an active week in the
Bahamian stock market last
week, with investors trading in
10 out of the 24 listed securi-

ROYAL FIDE

ties. Of these, one advanced,
three declined and six remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 119,880 shares

LITY MARKET WRAP

changed hands, a substantial

increase of 86,686 shares, com-
pared to last week's trading vol-
ume of 33,194 shares.
Consolidated Water Company
Bahamian Depository Receipts
(CWCB) was the only advancer

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of the week on a volume of 197
BDRs, rising by $0.02 or 0.79

er cent to end the week at
$2.56.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was volume leader with 30,000
shares, its stock price dropping
by $0.01 to end the week at
$7.37.

Cable Bahamas (CAB) fol-
lowed with 22,050 of its shares
trading, its price ending the
week unchanged at $14.15.

Some 20,000 shares of FAM-
GUARD Corporation Holdings
(FAM) also traded, to end the
week unchanged at $8.06.

The laggard of the week was
J.S. Johnson & Company (JSJ)
on a volume of 2,700 shares, its
price sliding by $0.55 or 4.58 per
cent to end the week at $11.45.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national (BOB) also declined
this week, with 18,416 shares
trading, its falling by $0.01 to
end the week at a new 52-week
low of $7.64.

BOND MARKET

No notes traded in the
Bahamian market this week.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

JS Johnson Company (JSJ)
released its unaudited financial
results for the six months ending
on June 30, 2008.

JSJ reported net income of
$3.6 million, down by $887,000
or 19.97 per.cent, compared to
$4.4 million in the 2007 second
quarter.

Total income fell by $158,000
or 1.1 per cent to $13.3 million,
compared to $13.5 million at
the end of the 2007 second
quarter.

Total expenses increased by
$729,000 or 8.05 per cent to $9.8
million, compared to $9.1 mil-
lion in 2007.

Net premiums earned in the
period of $4.7 million increased
by $233,000 or 5.3 per cent in
comparison to 2007, while insur-
ance expenses of $3.5 million
increased by $415,000 or 13.6
per cent.

Basic, earnings per share
declined by 15.22 per cent to
$0.39, versus $0.46 for the same
six month period in 2007.

JSJ said the decline in growth
is due in part to the sluggish
economy, which caused a reduc-
tion in new business inquires
and a slowdown in the renewals
of existing business.

Additional efforts will be
made to contain costs and
improve efficiencies.

Bahamas Property Fund

The Bahamas Property Fund
(BPF) released its financial
results for the quarter ended
June 30, 2008.

For the quarter, BPF report-
ed rental revenues of $987,500,
while net income was $307,000.

OYSTER Funds (7

The fund family of the SYZ & CO Group

SYZ & CO Bank & Trust Ltd. j
Bayside Executive Park | West Bay Street & Blake Road | P.O. Box N-1089 | Nassau - Bahamas.
Contact: Miguel Gonzalez | Tel. +1 242 327 66 33

Member of the SYZ & CO Group; Geneva | Zurich | Lugano | Locarno | London | Luxembourg | Milan xeric Se | Nassau | Hong Kong

www.syzbank.ch



INDEX 875.87 (-8.00%) YTD

CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE

BISX

SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE °
AML $1.71 $- 0 3.01%
BBL $0.89 $- 0 4.71%
BOB $7.64 $-0.01 18,416 -20.50%
BPF . $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $14.60 _ $- 0 0.00%
BWL $3.49: $- 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $- 22,050 17.43%
CBL $7.37 $-0.01 30,000 12.57%
CHL $2.85... $3 215 -9.52%
CIB $11.70 $e 900; -19.86%
CWCB $2.56 - $+0.02 197 -49.21%
DHS $2.77 ‘$. Qi ay 17.87%
FAM $8.06 Ge 20,000 11.94%
- FRB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FCC $0.40 $- 0 , 48.05%
BCE 2785.25 $- 5,500 1.35%
FCLB $1.00 $- 0 0.00%
FIN $12.00 $- 19,902 -7.34%
IGD $8.20 - 0 13:10%
ISJ $11.45 $-0.55 2,700 4.09%
PRE $10.00 $- 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:

° Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has declared
a quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on November
7, 2008, to all shareholders of record date September 30, 2008.

e RND Holdings (RND) announced it will be holding its
Annual General Meeting on Wednesday, October 22, 2008, at
6pm at the British Colonial Hilton, Nassau, Bahamas.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS:
¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares

will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually. z

International Markets

FOREX Rates

Weekly % Change
CAD$ 0.8524 -7.80
GBP 1.7042 -4.02
EUR 1.3408 .. -2.78
Commodities
oe. Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $80.42 -13.65
Gold $849.60 +1.14
International Stock Market Indexes:
yah sie i _ Weekly -% Change
DJIA 8,451.19 -18.15
S & P 500 : . 899.22 -18.20
NASDAQ 1,649.51 -15.30
Nikkei 8,276.43 _ -24.33

For the six months ended June
30, 2008, net income was
$870,000, compared to $1.2 mil-
lion for the same period in 2007.

The primary reason for the
change in net income was high-
er expenses during the period,
with other expenses of $497,000
dwarfing the $161,000 in the pri-
or year.

Earnings per share for the six-
month period stood at $0.36, a
decline of $0.13 or 26.53 per
cent from $0.49 for the same
period in 2007.

INSIGHT

For the stories

behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays



Share your news|

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.












NOTICE OF
RECEIVERSHIP

NASSAU BUILDING
SUPPLIES LIMITED

NOTICE is hereby given that NASSAU BUILD-
ING SUPPLIES LIMITED, a company incorporat-
ed under The Companies Act, has on ihe 7th day
of October, 2008 been placed into recevership by
the Supreme.Court upon the Ex-Parte Summons
filed on the 16th September, 2008 andbe advised
that JOHN S. BAIN of HLB Galanis Ban has been
appointed the Receiver and Manager }f the prop-
erty and assets of the company.


{He tHipuine



i a
Pepsi closure not

indicative of wider
industry concerns

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHE !
Business Reporter



PEPSI-Cola Bahamas’ deci-
sion to cease manufacturing and
sales/distribution operations in

this nation by December 5,

2008, reflects the company’s
own specific problems rather
than industry-wide issues for
the Bahamian bottling industry
as a whole.

Walter Wells, head of
Caribbean Bottling Company,
the Bahamas-based distributor
for Coca-Cola, told Tribune
Business that Pepsi-Cola, and
other before it such as Bacardi
and Aquapure under its former
ownership, all had challenges
that were unique to their indi-
vidual companies and did not
reflect a general industry
malaise.

“There are challenges i in the
industry, but I still think that it
is still robust,” Mr Wells said.
He explained that the key issue
for bottling companies was vol-
ume.

“You need to produce x
amount of cases a day to break
even, and then whatever you
can produce in excess can be
profit. But, if any circumstance
causes you to not to be able to
produce, then you become
strapped for cash,” Mr Wells
said.

He added that another chal-
lenge was the fact that so much
technology is needed to run the
plant, which is also very expen-
sive to install and maintain.

He said he was not familiar’

with all the details surrounding
Pepsi-Cola’s planned closure
and departure, but could under-
stand how difficult it was to let
employees go, particularly amid
troubling economic times.

“T have told my staff that we
will certainly try to absorb as
many Of the displaced [Pepsi]

py and Art

workers aS we can,” the
Caribbean Bottling Company
head said.

Mr Wells said he was not con-
cerned about the future of his
company, because following a
thorough restructuring where
they focused on increasing effi-
ciency and lowering costs, they
were “very comfortable.”

Dionisio D’ Aguilar, president
of the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce, who also sits on the
Caribbean Bottling Company
Board of Directors, said the
Pepsi-Cola situation showed it
was hard to make money in the
bottling business.

However, he did not think
that the challenges Pepsi-Cola
faced were caused by the cur-
rent economic climate. He said
Pepsi has been struggling for
quite some time, which makes
the decision not surprising.

“It’s very difficult to have a
top-notch commodity, when it
needs a lot of capitalization and
you just don’t have the mon-
ey,” Mr D’ Aguilar said.

Some 75 Bahamians will lose
their jobs when Pepsi-Cola
(Bahamas) ceases manufactur-
ing operations on November 14,
and closes its sales and distrib-
ution operations on December
5, due to ongoing profitability
challenges.

In a release issued by Pepsi-
Cola, Rick Wooten, its senior
vice-president of Caribbean
operations, said: “Probably the
most difficult decision a com-
pany can make is to close an
operation. We understand the
impact such a decision has on
employees and on the island of
the Bahamas, and we’re com-
mitted to providing severance
assistance to help those indi-
viduals as they find alternate

.employment.”

He explained that the com-
pany will continue to service
Bahamas customers using a

local distributor to deliver and
sell.

Mr Wooten emphasised that
the decision to cease produc-
tion and sales was not a reflec-
tion of the quality or service
provided by the employees
there, but instead that the over-
all business lacks scale to sup-

port continuation of Bahamas-.

based manufacturing.

The news comes on the heels
of Bacardi’s announcement that
it is also closing its Bahamas
operations by April 2009, plus
the challenges faced by other
distributors, including the for-
mer Caribbean Bottling Com-
pany owners.

The Pepsi-Cola move is again
likely to reignite debate over
whether the Bahamas provides
suitable platform for manufac-
turing operations, given the high
operating cost environment —
especially for electricity, water
and other utilities — coupled
with low labour productivity
and other inefficiencies.

Indeed, it would appear as if
Freeport, rather than New
Providence, is fast becoming the
hub for what manufacturing
activity remains in this nation,
with businesses there able to
benefit from the tax advantages
bestowed by the Hawksbill
Creek Agreement.

PepsiAmericas took majority
ownership of Pepsi-Cola
Bahamas in 2001. Despite con-
tinued investments in both
physical and human capital, the
business has not met expecta-
tions for profitability.

Pepsi-Cola Bahamas is a
majority owned subsidiary of
PepsiAmericas, which is the sec-
ond-largest Pepsi bottler with
operations in 19 states, Central
and Eastern Europe including
Ukraine, Romania, Poland,
Hungary, the Czech Republic,
and Republic of Slovakia and
the Caribbean.

Dewgard Plaza
Madeira St Palmdale

OF

Olde Towne - Sandyport

Tel: (242) - 327 -8718/9
Email: renascence@coralwave.com

Jill Redgrave BA ( Hons), MRCSLT

Speech and Language Therapist

Specializing in:

“Speech and Language Therapy - Pre-School and
School- Aged Language Delays and Disorders.

Mark Redgrave Msc. BA (Hons|

Psychotherapist / Art Therapist

Specializing in

* Interpersonal Problems, Depression, Anxiety, Sexual Abuse,
Couple Counseling and Group Therapy, Child and.

Adolescents,



{ULOVAI, VUlLUbDEM 14, cUUO, FAULK ob
“COMMITTED TO COMPLIANCE”
oh to

” } XY
The Rabemnas Arroccation of Complianes Officers
P.O, Box N-9731

The Bahamas Association of Compliance Officers
Cordially Invites your school to participate in our

2"? Annual
Senior High School Speech Contest

TOPIC:

“Ethics in the Workplace”

Date: November 5" 2008
Time: 6:30pm
Venue: The Sheraton

Theme: .Explain the importance of Ethics in the financial services sector of the Bahamas and
show how we can ensure that strong standards of professional conduct are maintained in the workplace.
The speech must show a clear understanding and draw references to the recent collapses of multimillion
dollar organizations due to unethical behaviour while giving clear isc of how we as Bahamians can
improve upon our ethical standard and practices,

Length of Speech: Between 5-7 minutes.
SCALE OF POINTS

Content, 65: Conform to Topic 25; Knowledge of Subject 10; Practicality of Proposal 10; -
Creativity-Originality 10; Conformance to time 5; Subject Matter Well Organized 5;

Oration, 35: Clarity and Presentation 20; Voice jifledtiodt/Emmciation 10; Emphasis 5
Eligibility Contests are open to ase 11" grade student only from each school.
PRIZ
1° Place:Dell Laptop plus $1,000.00 cheque
2â„¢ Place: Dell Laptop plus $500 cheque
3" Place: Dell Laptop plus $250 secs

Contest Deadlines: Students must register no later than October 17", 2008 by faxing in
registration form to 326-3031 or 328-8744 or by contacting:

Steve Davis

Kesna Pinder: 502-7727 (kesna. pinder@rbe.com)
Jasmine Strachan: (Jasmin,Strachan@combankltd.com)
Name of School:

Name of Participant:

Grade:

Name of Coach:

Signature of Principal:

CAPTAIN
Randy
Butler

The Bshamian Regional Airline

The Board of SkyBahamas is pleased to
announce the appointment of Capt. Randy
Butler as CEO/President of SkyBahamas.
Capt. Butler will be responsible for the day to
day management of our airline, reporting
directly to the Board.

Welcomes
New CEO,
President
: the

SkyBahamas is currently operating
three (3) daily flights to Exuma
as well as one (1) flight to Bimini.



He will lead a team of skilled professionals
in making SkyBahamas the best regional
airline in the Bahamas/Caribbean Region.
Capt. Butler’s vision for Sky Bahamas is to
see the airline thrive immensely by
scheduling more domestic routes and on
demand charter flights from the Islands of
the Bahamas to the USA. Capt. Butler
believes that more strategic scheduling will
bring about more lucrative opportunities
and enhance the local tourism and hotel
industry throughout the Bahamas.

SkyBahamas also operates for
Regional Air three (3) daily flights
to Freeport, Grand Bahama.
SkyBahamas utilizes the SFAAB
340A 33 seater aircraft with full
cabin service.

We are proud to have Capt. Butler join
SkyBahamas as he comes well qualified as
an aviation expert with 22 years of industry —
experience. His experience and credentials
credit him as being more than capable of
leading SkyBahamas to a great and
prominent future.


PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

TRUST ELS ts




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(ACRITS & RORY LARD

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The WORTRst sak qpactolet



a Essay Contest Rules:

» Essay should be 3 to 5 pages, double
spaced, 12 point font

e Allsubmissions must include the entry
form found on www.ecsife.org or at
Sunshine Insurance ’s office at |
Sunshine House, Shirley Street

» Allentries are due via email to
ElmiraCollegeSIFE@gmail.com or in
hard copy to Sunshine House no later
than October 2, 2008

» The top 10 finalists will present their es-
say ideas before a panel of judges on
Saturday, November 22 at Sunshine
House

» Applicants must have a minimum grade

point average of 2.50na4.0 scale

Chamber of Commerce Building
2 Collins Avenue

P 0 Box N 9286

Nassau, The Bahamas

Tel. {242} 322 2145

Fax, [242] 322 4649

BAMAMIAN Bunun Comcrns’Asscunn ASSOCIATION _ Eml, bee@coralwave,com

Web. www,.bahamiancontractors.com

~The Bahamian Contractors’ Association
In Association With |
The Ministry of Works & BTVI
. Proudly Presents
‘The
CONTRACTOR 1 “SEMINAR SERIES”
Thursday, October 23, 2008
_ BCPOU Hall, Farrington Road
Registration: 6:30pm
Time
7-9 pm

Speaker
Pat Rahming
Architect

Leeture #1: CONTRACT NEGOTIATION
Job Sourcing, Project Pre-Qualification
Contract Documentation,
Bidding & Contract Negotiation

Lecture #2: ESTIMATING Paul Worrell
Project Take-Off, Schedule of values, Quantity Surveyor
Bid Qualifications, Sub-Contractors ‘ '

Thursday
Oct. 30
7-9 pm

John Michael Clarke
Project Manager

Lecture #3: PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Monthly Valuations, Change Orders
Schedules, Sub Contractor Management

Thursday
Nov. 6
7-9pm

Lecture #4: CONTRACT CLOSE-OUT
Certificate of Occupancy, Punch List,
Final Payment, Retention

Thursday
Nov. 13
7-9 pm

Amos Ferguson
Architect
President, IBA

SEMINAR SERIES SPONSORED BY: ALBANY DEVELOPMENT

BCA “CERTIFICATE OF COMPLETION” AT END OF SEMINAR SERIES

FOR EARLY REGISTRATION & INFORMATION CALL:
BCA @ 502-6329 MOW @ 322-4830
or 325-5363 or 356-9738
TOTAL COST $ 50.00

open amet ce 8 AIEEE EMCEE

PRESIDENT VICE PRESIDENT
Stephen Wrinkle Godfrey Forbes

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ~ Dennis Attfield —
COUNCIL MEMBERS “Terrance Knowles © Brent Burrows ¢ Harold ‘Sonny’ Waugh (Grand Bahama)

vevenmprenpeonsnonanensennmannintenay

“TREASURER
Larry Treco

SECRETARY
Se EE Sccenos

eo —s 607 736 a

,

THE TRIBUNE

KALIK, from 1B

Speaking to Tribune Business
on the third day after its offi-
cial opening, Mr Nabbie said
patron traffic at Kafe Kalik

Royale was “pretty good; a little .

better than expected”.

He added: “We’re located in
the prime outlets at the end of
International Drive. They’re
anticipating about nine million
to 12 million shoppers annually.
We have the anchor restaurant
here, Café Kalik Royale, and
offer the shoppers a true taste
of the Bahamas.

“People love it. We had a
great opening on Friday night.
At least a good 75 per cent of
the customers between the
grand opening and the opening

last Monday came back.

between those days and today
[Friday last]. It’s gone over
well.”

Apart from proving that

. Bahamian entrepreneurs and

companies can succeed in over-
seas expansions, and that this
nation’s cuisine and cultural
heritage are valuable, mar-
ketable commodities, Mr Nab-
bie and Kafe Kalik have also
been doing their bit to help oth-
er Bahamians succeed.

Kalik beer, Graycliff’s cigar
lines, Julie Hoffer’s teas and
spices, Junkanoo dolls and oth-
er product lines produced by
Bahamian entrepreneurs are all
carried, exhibited and sold at
Kafe Kalik Royale, exposing
other national successes to for-
eign markets.

“This is carrying and bring-
ing along a few other Bahami-
ans to grow with us,” Mr Nab-
bie told Tribune Business.

When asked whether Kafe
Kalik’s growth showed that
Bahamian companies could suc-
ceed outside their home mar-
ket, he replied: “I think we’re a
perfect example that it can be
done, and in a manner that’s
pleasing to the eye and profes-
sional. There’s no doubt about
it.

“There’s a certain degree of
conservatism that we have as a

culture. We put money under .

the mattress, watch it and make
sure we eat every day. It takes a
little bit of risk, a little bit of
guts, but if done correctly the
rewards are there. It’s a great
feeling.”

Underpinning Mr Nabbie’s
success with Kafe Kalik and his
other restaurant businesses,
both in the: -US°-and. the
Bahamas, has been the age-old

Bahamian saying ‘Mudda Sik’.

In his company’s case, it has
been taken to mean much the
same as the staff culture Kerzn-

. er International has attempted

to infuse into its employees,
namely: ‘Blow the customer
away’. For Kafe Kalik, ‘Mudda
Sik’ is simply the ‘Wow’ factor —
wowing customers, suppliers,
employees and the wider com-
munity.

“] think the key is going to
be making sure the people who
we hire, and help us drive the

‘concept, understand what we

are trying achieve,” Mr Nabbie
said. “One element of that is
going to be keeping the authen-
tic element in there alive by hir-
ing Bahamians.

“That’s the number one key.
There are some things we have
done with the concept, where
we have taken a certain phrase
from the Bahamas — ‘Mudda
Sik’. We’ve taken that and built
a company philosophy out of
that one word.

“’Mudda Sik’ is an expression
of excitement, an expression of
teamwork, and expression of
excellence. We created rules
and policies from that, and
‘Mudda Sik’ our customers, our
employees, our partners, our
community. We create rules for
how we behave internally and
treat each other. That kind of
transcends itself into employee
attitudes and gives a sense that
this is truly Bahamian.

“We’re a ‘Mudda Sik’ com-
pany. Our business is about
people. A lot of it is interlinked
— how people are greeted, how
people are treated. That’s the
fundamental perspective going
forward.”

Mr Nabbie said some 15 of
Kafe Kalik Royale’s current
staff complement were Bahami-
ans, including executive chef
Leo Hall. Although in its ini-
tial stages because Kafe Kalik
was a relatively new concept, at
least in the US, Mr Nabbie said
he was working with the US
Department of Labour “in try-
ing to put together a pro-
gramme where we bring
Bahamians in on an exchange
programme.

“It’s very practical for us. We
need a year under our belts, and
then we will have more liberty
to go back and forth. We want
to see if we can get the staff
complement up to 40-50 per
cent Bahamian, if not 100 per
cent. As we hit international

markets; a-strong percentage of -

Bahamians must be part of the

Employers/

brand.”

Mr Nabbie said the ultimate
goal was for his Bahamian staff,
after one year’s employment in
Nassau, to be able to transfer
directly to the Kafe Kalik
restaurants in Florida.

Apart-from the Kafe Kalik
Royale staff, Mr Nabbie and his
partners employ some 130 per-
sons at the Bahamas-based
restaurants. Another 75 staff
are employed at Orlando Air-
port, where he also operates
three other chains on a fran-
chise basis — including McDon-

.ald’s and Sbarro’s.

Mr Nabbie also operates two
Bennigan’s restaurants in
Orlando on a franchise basis,
employing 120 persons, plus the
Outback Steakhouse in Nassau
with another 130 staff.

He told Tribune Business
that the Kafe Kalik concept’s

‘roots could be traced back some

13 years to his background in
the Bahamian hotel and restau-
rant industry, which included a
stint as the Crystal Palace’s vice-
president of food and beverage.

Mr Nabbie played a role in
developing restaurant concepts
such as La Grille and Margari-
taville, and saw no reason why
similar ideas could not be orig-
inated and produced by
Bahamians.

“We can do this thing. We
can do it for ourselves,” Mr
Nabbie said of his thoughts at
the time. “It’s been a pet project
of mine for close to nine years.”
The essence of the concept is
about the culture. It’s a true

. template of Kalik — the sound

that the drums and the cow
bells make.”

Although alive to the’ poten-
tial alliance with Kalik beer,
which he has exploited, Mr
Nabbie explained that the

- restaurant was “an independent

concept by itself”, with its own

designs and fascias. ,
Each Kafe Kalik is different

from the others, Mr Nabbie

' describing the Freeport venue

as the ‘Express’ model, with
Orlando Airport closely fol-
lowing the ‘Bar and Grill’ con-
cept. The Nassau location was
the 150-seat ‘barefoot”’, casual
dining venue, featuring bright
colours and a menu that fea-
tured “a little of everything”.

The Freeport location was
opened five years ago, and
Orlando Airport some two
years ago. Prior to Kafe Kalik
Royale, the Festival Place loca-
tion was the youngest at just
some four months old.

Self-Employed Persons
hte all your National Insurance

WITH AUTOM: Th

tributions bald up?

ee

ey

eee)

Z
U3

INTEREST, .

“ASSESSMENT ON ARREARS

BEGINNING JANt

ARY 1,

20029


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 5B





Survey exposes

mw By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHE
Tribune Business

Reporter

WITH the Department of
Labour accepting around 500
applications for work permits a
week, the number of discour-
aged workers should not have
increased by as much as a
recent labor survey has indicat-
ed, the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president said.

The latest labour force statis-
tics, which also highlighted that
more than a quarter or 25 per
cent of the Bahamian labour
force has no qualifications,



. reflection of what is happening
-in society, Dionisio D’ Aguilar

told Tribune Business.

The number of discouraged
workers - those who are not
seeking work because they feel
that will not find it - has
increased by 21 per cent from
4,600 in 2007 to 5,795 this year,
which Mr D’ Aguilar found sur-
prising considering just how
many work permit applications
are submitted each week.

“That would indicate that
there are a lot of jobs to be had,
if people go out and look for
them,” he said.

Mr D’Aguilar said the
Bahamas needs to seriously
address the educational and

technical skills of its citizens if
the country was to really move
forward, particularly as it relates
to the civil service.

What is more disappointing,
he said, was that many persons
in the Bahamas simply do not
have a positive attitude when it
comes to working; something
that is an even bigger problem
to deal with.

The Superwash owner said

labour
force’s top weaknesses

he would prefer to have an
employee with the right attitude
towards learning and on-the-
job service, than to have an
employee with the right training
and the wrong attitude.
According to the Department
of Statistics labour force sur-
vey, just 49 per cent of the
labour force has completed sec-
ondary school and 1 per cent of
the labour is recorded as having

no schooling. Men are the main
contributors to these dismal sta-
tistics.

rete
behind the ae E

=r Co mgt [e]1] a
rey a] SPDT WE



while not surprising was a sad

4 BED, 3 1/2 BATH, SPLIT LEVEL HOUSE
LOCATED ON LOTS 4 & 5, BLOCK 5
CULBERT’S HILL, WINTON HEIGHTS
PROPERTY COMPRISES 59,395 SQ. FT. OR 1.364 ACRES

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Manager, Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before October 17, 2008.

' For further information, please contact: 356-1608 or 502-0929.

28 PICTET

1805

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited

Invites qualified applicants for the following entry level position:-

GENERAL OFFICER ADMINISTRATOR

The successful applicant will report directly to the Senior Trust
Officer in charge of a portfolio of trusts.

RESPONSIBILITIES:-

¢ Set up of hard copy and electronic files for new trusts.

¢ File maintenance.

¢ Scanning trust documentation into the Company’s database.

¢ Carrying out the approved closure process for terminated trusts.
¢ General clerical responsibilities within the Trust Department.

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE:-

Prior experience in the trust department of a large bank or in
a law firm would be a distinct advantage.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED. Please send Resume to:

The Human Resources Manager
Bayside Executive Park
P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in -

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London,
Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome,
Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich








The following persons are asked to contact

STOR-IT-ALL OF NASSAU, LIMITED

in connection with Items left | in storage:

¢ INGRID HAMILTON
¢ PUBLIC HOSPITAL AUTHORITY
¢ CRYSTAL GLINTON
¢ TANYA MOLLER
¢ SIMONNE BOWE
* CORY FARQUHARSON

¢ SANDRA FERGUSON-BROWN
e SUSAN CULMER

¢ DONNA HIGGS
* DAMON CUMMINGS

e SHAWN SMITH
¢ CARDELL BODIE

All rentals must be paid and items removed no later than October 24th, 2008

stor-it-all

Soldier Road
(by Lowe’s Wholesale),
Telephone: 393-0964





VACANCY
FOR A GENERAL MANAGER
WATER & SEWERAGE CORP ORATION





Under the direction of the Board of Directay, this position is charged wih the general
management and coordination of all aspectsof the Water and Severage Corporation’s
administrative and technical affairs; ensusethat the business of the Corporation is—
conducted on a sound, realisticbasis in accardance with legislation, regulations aa
policies.

Role Specification

Core responsibilities include:

« Planning and directing the mintenance and development of both business and
operational activities in order to maximizecost savings and growth in line with
overall business strateges.

" Taking action to procure, maintain and inprove physical assets of the Corporation
including premises, and equipment to standards appropriate for the business
undertaka.

= Developing and mintaining effective operating systems and techniques requred
to attain maximum utilizaton for computer technology.

" Serving external customers, focusingefforts on discovering and meeting their
needs.

" Contribution to he development of sound business strdegies which creates value
for the business.

The job requires wide experience in adninistration, financial acounting and project
management. Must seek opportunities to helpstaff develop their skills whilst improving
performance in currént role, facilitating caregrogression or full realisation of potatial.

The job holder must be a strategic leadercapable of orchestrating and leding major
cultural change efforts aimed at substatally improving the use and poductivity of
human asvts. Must be a strong advocate ofthe participative minagement philosophy
and be capable of pwoviding strategic leadership in the corporat-wide transition from
“top-down” management to “employee empowered” processes.

Educational Requirements and Experience

We seek a seasoned Business Excutive with a minimum of 10 years senior management
experience with a degree in Business or Engieering; togeher with an MBA, MPA or
Professional Accounting qualification.

We offer a highly competitive base salary abng with attractive fringe benefits package.

Candidates with productive maagement experience and a proven ability to set and meet.
corporate objectives should said resume and salary requirenents sealed and nurked
private an d confidential to:

Chairman
Water & S ewerage Corporation
P.O. Box N-3905
Nassau, Bahamas

On or before 24" October, 2008
PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

FROM page 1B

tion from the court to prevent
you from transferring your
assets from the country before
the mentioned issues have been
resolved.”

When contacted by Tribune
Business, Mr Moss said: “The

only concerns we have are, first,

that all the non-managerial
employees in there are com-
pensated in accordance with our
agreement and the Employ-
ment Act.

“Some of the primary con-
cerns we have are also to do
with the female employees who
are pregnant, and’who have
been with Pepsi-Cola for 12
months or more, that they
receive full maternity benefits.”

Pepsi-Cola (Americas), the
regional parent for the compa-
ny’s Bahamas-based manufac-
turing, bottling and sales/distri-
bution operation, announced
late last week that the business
in this nation would cease oper-
ating by December 5, 2008, with
the loss of 75 jobs.

Rick Wooten, Pepsi-Cola’s
senior vice-president for the
Caribbean, said in a statement
that the Bahamian operation
was unprofitable, and had strug-
gled ever since the Americas

region took over the business
in 2001-2002.

He implied that the relatively
small size of the Bahamian mar-
ket had prevented Pepsi-Cola’s
operation from achieving the
scale and volume sales neces-
sary to generate profits, despite
repeated investment in tech-
nology and manpower.

Concerns, though, have been
raised before, notably by trade
union leader and attorney Obie
Ferguson, who is also the BBW-
DU’s legal counsel, that
Bahamian employees could be
left exposed — and not be paid
and severance pay and benefits
due to them — when foreign-
owned companies liquidated
their operations in this nation
and repatriated all assets back
home.

This has happened several
times, and while there is no sug-
gestion it would happen in the
case of Pepsi-Cola (Bahamas),
it appears that Mr Moss and Mr
Ferguson felt strongly enough
to effectively fire ‘a warning
shot across the company’s
bows’.

Telling Tribune Business that
the number of unresolved

_ labour disputes with Pepsi-Cola

was “in single digits”, Mr Moss
said: “All of the unresolved dis-

RT GT a7
ea BAAS ET aa EU

just call 02-2371 today!



putes we have, they must indi-
cate they will settle those dis-
putes before they remove their
liquid assets from the compa-

y.
“Any failure to resolve these
disputes will result in us asking
the court to prevent them from
removing their assets until these
disputes are resolved. We are
giving them until October 31 to
meet with us and resolve these
things. Maybe we can resolve
them without going to court.”

An October 8, 2008, letter
that was sent to Mr Moss by Mr
Wooten and Rita Weary, Pepsi-
Cola’s human resources director
for the Caribbean, gave the
BBWDU advance notice of the
closure decision that was
announced to staff on October
9, 2008.

The Pepsi-Cola executives
wrote: “Pepsi Americas has re-
examined its business strategy
and, as a result, has concluded
that it will cease all operations
in the Bahamas effective
December 5, 2008.

“As a result, all employees —

currently represented by the
BBWDU will be rendered
redundant on this date.” That is

when the sales and distribution .

operation will close, with man-
ufacturing shutting down on
November 14, 2008.

Mr Wooten and Ms Weary
said Pepsi-Cola would follow
the provisions in the now-
expired industrial agreement
when it came to the BBWDU
members’ notice and redun-
dancy pay, pointing out that
with the company set to close
there was no point in persisting
with the talks on a replacement
agreement.

“At our last meeting we
informed the union that the

business re-examination was in
process, that it could well
impact bargaining unit employ-
ees and that once a determina-
tion was made we would notify
the union,” the two executives
told Mr Moss.

“We also requested that we
delay bargaining negotiations
in light of the business re-exam-
ination, and when this was
declined expressly reserved our
right to modify our bargaining
position once the re-examina-
tion was concluded.

“In this regard, we would
now propose that we simply
agree to continue the expired
collective bargaining agreement
in place through December 5,
2008, rather than negotiate a
new agreement, as no useful
purpose would seem to be
served by negotiating a new
agreement when no employees
will.be covered by it.”

The timing of the plant’s clo-
sure could not have come at a
worse time, especially for the
75 employees and their fami-
lies, as jobs will be lost just
before Christmas and at a time
when the global economy seems
headed for a prolonged down-
turn.

Mr Moss, though, said he was
not surprised at the closure
announcement, given that Pep-
si-Cola was struggling with its
financial performance through-
out the Caribbean and that the
company was investing more in
the Bahamas than it was
recouping in terms of profit.

“We got involved with that
organisation [Pepsi-Cola] in
2001,” Mr Moss recalled. “It
seems to me that the operation
was flawed from the beginning,
primarily because they had 110
employees at that time. In the

soft drinks industry, that was
not necessary.

“T believe the market here in
the Bahamas is not large
enough to sustain Pepsi-Cola,
Coca-Cola and all the distribu-
tors here in the industry.”

Mr Moss described the mood
of ‘Pepsi-Cola employees fol-
lowing the closure announce-
ment as “aggrieved”, pointing
out that when the BBWDU first
started representing staff the
company was selling cases
priced at $6.75-$7.50 to retailers.
That price had since almost

doubled to $14 per case, while .
staff numbers had been slashed

by near 50 per cent, but still the
operation had trouble being
profitable.

Mr Moss said: “It [the clo-

THE TRIBUNE .

| @

Union warns Pepsi-Cola

sure] was something inevitable, ,,.
and waiting to happen because , ,
of the way they were operating.
They were a high-cost opera-..,

tor, and did not need all the ,
management employees, all the.
non-management employees. ,
They started off on the weene:
foot.”

The situation, though, had’
sent a warning to Bahamian,

workers and trade unions every-,.
where. “It is important for peo- 64

ple to be making a profit, and___,

that the bottom line is being vis- | je

ibly improved,” Mr Moss said. -
“If it isn’t, people should”
become concerned because’ a,

company will not be in business ” ;

for any period of time if it is not,
getting a reasonable return on |;
their bottom line.”

Legal Notice

NOTICE

LUMIN GLOBAL ASSETS LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

YN

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced

on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

POLDATORM LTD.

Bi

Notice i is hereby given that i in acco

138(8) of the International Business Companies Act
2000, the dissolution of POLDATORM LTD. has been
completed; a Certificate of Dissolution has been
issued and the Company has therefore been struck

off the Register. —

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

TESSA RESOURCES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 24th day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O: Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

_ ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

Legal Notice

NOTICE

REDWOOD TREASURES LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. 0. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

sordance with ‘Section.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

CROSSCOUNTRY INVESTMENT FUND LTD.
VOLUNTARILY LIQUIDATED

Notice is hereby given that 1 Ipgag accordance with Section 137 (8) of

the Tnterniattonal “Business *COnipanies Act 2000 the Dissolution

of CROSSCOUNTRY INVESTMENT FUND LTD. has been

completed, a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the
Company has therefore been struck off the Register of Companies.

The Date of the Completion of dissolution was the 30th day of July:
2008.

Legal Notice

NOTICE
CAMILLA SHIPPING LIMITED

Creditors having debts or claims against the above-
named Company are required to send particulars
thereof to the undersigned c/o P. O. Box N-624,
Nassau, Bahamas on or before 18th November, A.D.,
2008. In default thereof they will be excluded from
the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

Dated the 9th day of October, A.D., 2008.

Dayrrl Butler
Liquidator
29 Retirement Road
Nassau, Bahamas

Legal Notice

NOTICE

BRIDGEWATER SLOPES INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on
the 23rd day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)



Legal Notice

NOTICE

HIGH MOUNTAIN LIMITED.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced
on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)

NOTICE
CAMILA SHIPPING LIMITED

NOTIC EIS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CAMILA SHIPPING LIMITED is in dissolution under the

provisions of the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The dissolution of the said Company commenced on the 9th day of
October, 2008 when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted to and
registered by the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said Company is Dayrrl Butler, 29 Retirement
Road, Nassau, Bahamas.

Dated the 9th day of October, A.D., 2008.

HARRY B. SANDS, LOBOSKY MANAGEMENT CO. LTD.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

Legal Notice

NOTICE

HEARTLINK DEVELOPMENT INC.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which ‘commenced
on the 9th day of October 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)


THE TRIBUNE

Trade

dispute fears for |

the Bahamas on EPA. |

A BAHAMIAN economic
think-tank has warned that the
Bahamas could find itself at a
“serious disadvantage” shoulda
trade dispute arise between it
and the European Unidn (EU)
over the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA).

The Nassau Institute said that
while the EPA was negotiated
collectively by the Bahamas
and other CARIFORUM
countries via the Caribbean
Regional Negotiating Machin-

_ery (CRNM), all would be sign-
_ing the agreement as individ-
ual signatories.

This could potentially expose
each of them, the think-tank
warned, to having. to defend
themselves individually against
the EU’s combined might
should a trade or commercial
dispute arise over the EPA.

The Nassau Institute warned
tg the Bahamas could be at a
“serious disadvantage, since it

will be pitched individually
aghinst the massive resources
offthe EU. Have Caribbean
nepotiators considered the need
- tojinsist that the region should
belable to speak as one in the
settlement of disputes affecting
individual countries?”

Its recent commentary. also
expressed concern about the
EPA’s Most Favoured Nation
) provision, which effec-
tiv ly prohibits the Bahamas
1 other Caribbean states
frgm offering to others better
trdde terms and preferences
than it gives to the EU —a non-
discrimination clause.

‘If signatories enter into a
fr¢e trade agreement (FTA)
with a developed country that
giyes more favourable treat-





mént than that provided to the .

under the EPA, they are
obliged to consult the EU first.
THis could interfere with the
Bahamas’ ability to enter into

‘As with other major trading
ntries as well as the US,” ,

tht -Nassau Institute warned.
‘A further consideration is
that the US, Canada and other
ndn-EU trade partners are
unlikely to ‘accept that the EU
*cah expeet duty-free access to

the Bahamas unless they can

daso as well
‘In the case of the US, lead-



“Dr Larty Carroll ©

Chief Radiologist



Purpose:

To eautate the public about
the important health issues,
presented by Doctors Hosprt

distinguished. physicians.

ee
Get your FREE 2

Pressure, Choles

oe eieens eect between

S

5pm & 6pm,



ing attorney Brian Moree
argued at a Nassau Institute
seminar on the EPA in June
that, since MFN status meant
no discrimination between
countries, the Bahamas would
have to offer — at the time it
negotiated a replacement of the
Caribbean Basin Initiative
(CBI) — at least the same trade
preferences and benefits it
offered to the EU.

“In practice, this would mean .

that, because the Bahamas’ lev-
el of trade with the. US was
greater than with the EU, the
starting point in negotiations
would be — in his words — the
‘EU EPA plus’. Given that ‘in
2007 the US exported to the
Bahamas some $2.5 billion
worth of goods, the loss to the
latter would be substantial.”
Warning that the effects from
signing the EPA would be
“substantial” for both the
Bahamian economy and this
nation’s way of life, the Nassau
Institute praised the Govern-
ment for attempting to consult

with industry groups and the
public. -

“However, it appears that,

_ for the most part, the Govern-

ment has not entered into a
genuine consultation about the
fundamental issue of whether
it is in the general interest of
the Bahamas to-sign-an EPA

at all; and many Bahamians

remain yninformed about its

likely impact on their lives and :

welfare,” the Nassau Institute
warned.
““There has beén no fo:

malised national consultation |

involving political parties, the
trades unions, the churches and
the private sector as a whole.
Instead, the Government has
taken a policy position, in line
with other CARIFORUM

countries, to go along with the -

EPA. It has sought to explain
and justify its decision rather
than to debate the overall mer-
its and demerits of the EPA as
far.as the nation.is concerned.”

While the Government want-
ed to preserve duty-free market
access to the EU for $90 million
worth of Bahamian exports,
and maintain its’ present

‘favourable balance of trade

with Eurdpe, the Nassau Insti-



Disti ingui ished. Lecture Series
This Months Topic: °

MRI & Breast Screening

tute said revenues from anoth-
er source would have to replace
the $6 million being given up

on 85 per cent of EU imports -
whose tariffs will be eliminated

over a 25-year period.

“To some observers, the ben-
efit to the Bahamas of opening
up the EU’s services sector is
illusory since there are few
Bahamian companies or indi-
viduals currently equipped or

ready ‘to compete in an EU
market of 27 countries with

over 400 million people and in -
the face of prohibitive costs,

non-tariff barriers, subsidies
and other hurdles,” the Nassau
Institute warned.

“Tt is not yet clear what the
additional cost will be of com-
plying with the EPA obliga-
tions; for example, the creation
of new institutions, regulatory
bodies and laws. The Chamber
of Commerce stressed recently
the need to build capacity. and
competitiveness, and to develop
new ideas and entrepreneur-
ship. But market access to the
EU’s services sector does not
necessarily lead to market pies:

~ ence.’ ts
And the Nassau Institute

added: “Advocates of the EPA
claim that, in order to fulfill its
commitments under the agree-

ment, the Bahamas will be ©
forced to carry out much-need- <
ed.institutional reform; for.
example, the tax system, cus- .

toms, competition, public ser-
vices etc. Reform of customs
administration is perhaps the

most important. A host of new -

legislation, including harmoni-
sation of laws with CARIFO-
RUM countries, will also be
required.

“Has the cost of all this been —

assessed? Zhivargo Laing has
spoken of an ‘implementation
framework’ which addresses
these issues. Will he make this
available in order to reassure
the public that the Government

has the capacity and commit-
-ment to fulfill its obligations in

this respect and to pay for their
implementation? Will he also

provide information about .

plans for the ‘enabling legisla-
tion’ which will be required fol-

. lowing signature of the ‘goods

only’ EPA this month?”



¢Lecture Dates
Thursday, October | 6th ‘08 @ 6PM
Doctors Hospital Conference Room
RSVP * Seating is Limited » ¢ 302-4603
Coes seerseeeeoece
"Please join us as our guest every third
Thursday of the nhonth for this scintillating
series of the most relevant health issues

: affecting society today!

2008 Lecture Series

ee
od

Octo
hana

6
; = Dr Larry Carroll
if a November 20th

ae lelcinein

oneal
ee

ae ora ee Cieelai ais aioln
aL December | 8th

S)
Y)



«Depressions
Dp ikea Nene

The Bepariment BE Choperativa ‘Development in collaboration
with the Bahamas Co-operative League Limited cordially invites

Mr. heel Paige

Mr. Serge Gosselin

Mr. Walter ee



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 7B

National Co-operative
- Congress Town Meeting
“The Role of Co- -operatives in National Development”

October 15, 2008

8: 00 P.M. - 9: 30 P. M.
Hosted by Steve McKinney:

LIVE BROADCAS ON. 1540, M:

‘

the general public to attend the National Co- -operative Congress

. Town Meeting and participate in provocative discussions on the
topic “The Role of Co-operatives In National Development‘

Panelists will address issues facing the sector and discuss how. —
Bahamians . can actively participate in ‘the growth - and :
development of the co-operative sector.

PANELISTS INCLUDE:

Executive Director, Southern Co-op
& Land Assistance Fund, USA |
Desjardins Movement, Canada

Mr. Lennie Etienne Chairman, Producers Service Council,

Teachers & Salaried Workers 7

Mr. Cordelt Knowles :
Co- operative Credit Union Limited ae

Bahamas Law Enforcerient:
- Co-operative Credit Union Limited ©

| VENUE:
. College of the Bahamas :
Culinary & Hospitality Training institute

UWI Dining Room

Thompson Boulevard & Big Pond Road
For more information call
pep el 302-0100



NZ Airport

Development Sernety’ . ; BS . eae ‘

_ TENDERS

“ ALE

Nassau Axport Development. Company i is vlbhaied to announce the following tender
associated with the. expansion of the Lynden Pindling International Aiport: The General
Contractor Package for Teivder C-116 Early Civil and Relocations lump sum contract

incest folowing components: | e :

Tree and site salen ented removal; lela, and composting of
organic materials,

Security fencing supply and installation; <

Demolition and disposal of buildings, fences, miscellaneous ebuctires

debris and equipment;

Removal and disposal of 2 baderground and 1 above ground fuel siotagt

tanks;

Removal, and disposal of eidieg utilities & installation of new Bip

“corridor including sanitary and communication ductbank;

* Removal of HMAC roadway by milling. and construction of temporary
parking lot and contractor laydown. area a utilizing existing pavemerit and
asphalt millings;

Relocation, supply and installation of temporary parking lot lighting; ‘and
Relocation of existing macerator, pump and trash compactor and removal
and disposal of existing lift station and macerator pit.

Tender Packages cah be picked up after 1:00 pm, on Monday, October 6th.

Tender closing is Tuesday, October 28th at 1:00pm.

There will be a Tender Briefing Wednesday, October 15th, Please RSVP Traci Bviaby,
“by = Tuesday, October 14th for briefing location deta


PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





To advertise, call 502-2371

BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS

www.bahamasengineers.org

NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS SOCIETY OF ENGINEERS
CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO ATTEND

THE MONTHLY LUNCHEON
on
Thursday, October 16, 2008

Topic:
“ENGINEERING OPPORTUNITY IN
RENEWABLE TECHNOLOGIES”

GUEST SPEAKER:

Mr. Alisdar Mclean

Vice Prestident, Marketing

Plasco Energy Group
Place: East Villa Restaurant -
East Bay Street
TIME: 12:00p.m.

Donation: $25.00 per person

IF POSSIBLE PLEASE CONFIRM YOUR ATTENDANCE BY E-MAIL
gracesharma05@ yahoo.com
] or. .
jeelliott@bahamaselectricity.com
or
quentin.knowles@flameless.com



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 2008/COM/Bnk/00079
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Commercial Division

BETWEEN

JIN THE MATTER OF BAILIWICK
ov! a) INVESTMENTSLTD.

- AND

IN THE MATTER OF THE COMPANIES
ACT, 1992

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that a Petition
for the winding-up of the above-named Company
by the Supreme Court was on the 8" day of
September, A.D., 2008, presented to the said
Court by VENICE BAY HOLDINGS LTD.
whose registered office is situate at Mareva
House, 4 George Street in the City of Nassau in
the Island of New Providence one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas.

AND that the said Petition is directed to
be heard before the Court at Charlotte House, 24
Floor in the City of Nassau aforesaid on Friday

the 31* of October, A.D., 2008 at 2:30 o’clock in |

the afternoon and any Creditor or Contributory of
the said Company desirous to support or oppose
the making of an Order on the said Petition may
appear at the time of the hearing in person or by
his Counsel for that purpose; and a copy of the
Petition will be furnished by the undersigned
to any Creditor or Contributory of the said
company requiring such copy on payment of the
prescribed charge for the same.

McKINNEY, BANCROFT & HUGHES
Chambers
Mareva House
4 George Street:
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner

NOTE:- Any person who intends to appear
on the hearing of the said Petition must serve
ca or send by post to the above-named, Notice
in writing of his intention to do so. The Notice
must state the name and address of the person,
or, if a firm, the name and address of the firm and
must be signed by the person or the firm, or his
or their attorney (if any); and must be served, or
if posted, must be sent by post in sufficient time
to reach the Petitioner or its attorneys not later
than 4 o’clock in the afternoon of the 30" day of
October, A.D., 2008.



Real

tor wage survey

finding ‘total nonsense’

FROM page 1B

only on the really high earners
or agents selling for the likes of
Ginn, which generated many
millions in sales revenues before
being hit by the credit crunch
and global downturn, Whether
commissions and basic salaries
were bundled together or treat-
ed separately is another issue.
“Tt’s not me and not my
agents. I say: show me the mon-
ey,” said Mr Wong, adding that
he was going to ask his nine

agents attending the office .

meeting today to show him that
they were earning what the
Occupational Wage Survey said
they should be.

On the apparent discrepancy
between the industry reality and
the survey, Mr Wong said: “It’s
always béen a problem; people
not giving accurate information
to the Department of Statistics.

. Some people exaggerate, some

people under-report and some
people lie to protect their busi-
ness."

Mike Lightbourn, head of
Coldwell Banker Lightbourn
Realty, agreed with Mr Wong’s

EXCLUSIVE LISTING
GRAHAM ACRES

Part of Blair Estates, East

Furnished 4 bed/2 bath house, Living,
Dining and Family Room (1,781 Sq. Ft.)
air-conditioned, large Wooden Deck,
fenced in, landscaped lot in great area.

$345,000.00 Gross

comments, telling Tribune Busi-

ness: “I would guess the average
real estate agent makes $20,000-
$30,000 per year.

“In the US, it’s $37,000 a
year. That would be for a full-
time agent, and there are a lot
of part-time agents. It’s total
rubbish. They’ve made a mis-

‘take in calculating income. They

need to know what the average
agent makes, and there’s no
way in hell that’s [$197,000] pos-
sible. Agents have to split their
earnings with the office.”
Both Mr Wong and Mr
Lightbourn expressed concern

that the survey’s findings might '-

give the general public the
incorrect impression that real-
tors earned huge sums of mon-
ey for very little work.

The BREA president said
that agents might close a sale
once every two, three or even
six months, with cashflow issues
a constant concern in a business
where, like all others, fixed costs
and overheads have to be paid.

“We’re not making money
hand over fist,” he added. “It
takes months and months for a
sale to happen, and to be in this
business you need some disci-
pline.”

For the stories

He and Mr Lightbourne were
also worried that it might attr
a sudden influx of new entran|
lured in by the unrealistic wage

figure, only for those people’s

expectations to be dashed and
the Bahamian real estate mar-
ket to become overcrowded |
with a surplus of agents.

Meanwhile, Mr Wong said
the local, Bahamian component
of the real estate market “seems
to be holding” and was doing
“OK”, with prices remaining
constant.

“As long as the banks keep .
lending mortgages, we’ll be
OK,” Mr Wong said. “The only.
market showing signs of flexi-
bility is the rental market. You
could negotiate a better lease;
because there’s a lot of items
on the market.” )

However, it was a different
story in the international, sec-

‘ond home market for proper-

ties priced at between $2-$5 mil-
lion, the BREA president said.
Potential buyers were “taking
a second look right now and
holding on to their cash”
because of the global economic
turmoil.

“We had a client come into
town looking to purchase a $6.8
million condo at Ocean Place

_ on Paradise Island,” Mr Wong

recalled. “Then he said to me:

‘Sorry, William, I’ve had to
postpone my trip because of
what’s happening on the stock
market.’ And he had cash to
spare. Those persons with mon-
ey are holding back.”

NOTICE

NOTICE is bee, an that FRANTZ JEAN-BAPTISTE
of KEY WEST STREET, P.O. BOX GT-128, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization
as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any nm
who knows any reason et registration/ naturalization
should not be granted, should send a written and signed 3
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days. from the: |
7TH day of OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister-responsible |
fot pata ally and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
ahamas.

Please call: behind the news,

Real Estate International (Bah.) Co. Ltd.
Tel: 322-4187

e-mail: hw@realestateint.com

read Insight
on Mondays








Position of Accountant

A financial institution seeks an Accountant. Candi-
dates must have at least 3 years experience in-ac- -
counting in the financial industry with sound knowl-
edge of but not limited to:






¢ Formulating budgets



¢ Managing Accounts Receivables and Payables




NOTICE is hereby en that RAYMONDE MESIDOR of
#27 EAST AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7TH day of OCTOBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
‘P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



¢ Preparation of monthly and annual financial re-
ports and statements .






° Preparation of bank reconciliations and various
general ledger accounts to the sub ledgers






¢ Co-ordinate the annual audit with external auditors
and preparation of the necessary schedules







e Preparing reports for the regulators








NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LORNA PATRICIA ROBINSON
of 54 GAMBIER LOOP, P.O. BOX F-44574 FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 38RD day of
OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.



¢ Must be a team player

e Must possess people skills and be prepared to
interact with members -







¢ Minimum qualifications: BA in Accounting






Please forward resume before
October 20, 2008 to P. O. Box N-7544





Abaco
















0
Bahamas Property Fund i 1.69
7.64 Bank of Bahamas 5 2.09)
0.85 Benchmark 0.89 ' i 2.28)
3.49 Bahamas Waste 3.49 3.49 0.00 a 2.58)
1.95 Fidelity Bank 2.37 2.37 0.00 A 1.69)
11.00 Cable Bahamas 14.15 14.16 0.00 1,050 if 1.70
2.85 Colina Holdings 2.85 2.86 0.00 0.118 0.040 24.2 1.40
4.80 Commonwealth Bank (81) ‘ 7.37 7.37 0.00 0.449 0,300 16.4 4.07
1.99 Consolidated Vater BDRS 1.99 2.66 0.87 197 Q.122 0.062 21.0 2.03)
2.26 . Doctor's Hospital 2.77 2.77 0.00 0.2866 0.040 10.8 1.44
6.02 Famguaerd . 8.06 8.06 0.00 0.836 0.280 16.1 3.47)
12,00 Finco 12,00 12.00 0.00 : 0.666 0.8670 18.0 :
11.54 FirstCaribbean Bank 11.70 11.70 0.00
5.05 Focol (S) 5.25 6.25 0.00
1.00 Focol Class B Preference 1.00 1.00 0.00




0.40 Freeport Concrete
5.50 ICD Utilities
J. S. Johnson






v9 9 ober 20
Prime + 1.75% 19 October 2022
7% : . . 30 May 2013

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Serlés B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Séries GC) +.
Fidelity Gln Note Le ccores O) +




- “Beiene #:4.789%



Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)








0.38

SRR Cri
29.00
14,00

SO
th: IV.

SS
SS
Di



Bahamas Supermarkets










1.3371
3.0250

Colina Bond Fund
Colina MSI Preferred Fund










Colina Money Market Fund 1.4137 2.81 4.21
3.5388 Fidelity Bahamas G & 1 Fund 3.6090 -4.95 3.62
11.8192 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.4456 4.29 5.78
100,0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 100.0000 t
99.9666 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600 1,01 1.01
1.0000 CFAL. High Grade Bond Fund 1.0000
9.1958 Fidelity International Investment Fund 9.1958 -12.42 “12.42
1.0000 FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.0184 1.84 : 1.84
FG Financial Growth Fund 1.0112 1.12 ’





FG Financial Diversified Fund 1.0172
SARA GROSS RN :




ja divided by
Bid & - Buying 5 nd Fidelity
Ask & - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Lant traded over-the-counter price

Weekly Vol, - Trading volume of the prior week

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per ahare for the last 12 mths
NAV - Naot Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamaa Stock Index, January 1, 1904 = 100



52wk-Hi - Highest closing price In last 52 weeks
52wk-Low - Lowest closing price In last 52 weeks



Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume
Today's Close ~ Current day's weighted price for daily volume
Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Daily Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the laat 12 months

P/E - Closing price divided by the last 12 month earnings

fective Date 8/8/2007











(S) - 4-for-1 Stock Split


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 9B

Kerzner backs

tourism plans

ia By CARA BRENNEN-
‘ BETHEL
. Tribune Business

, Reporter

KERZNER International
fully supports the proposals to
yevitalise the Bahamian
fourism industry that were out-
lined by tourism minister,. Vin-
gent Vanderpool-Wallace, last
week.

In a statement, Ed Fields,
vice-president of external com-
munication for the Atlantis and
Zone & Only Ocean Club

ewner, told Tribune Business:

While we have not had time
to fully digest the minister's
plan, we are fully supportive
of all and any efforts to






improve and promote our
product.”
Mr Fields said that coupled

_with the plans to improve ser-

vice and address airlift; Kerzn-
er International wanted to see
attention paid to reducing ener-
gy costs, improving labour pro-
ductivity and improvements to
New Providence's overall
physical appearance as a mat-
ter of urgency. He added: “Giv-
en the current economic envi-
ronment, we need to be aware
that discretionary spending is
going to be seriously impacted
and that we need to have a des-
tination that people view as an
affordable and preferred desti-
nation among all the options
available to them.”

Everywhere oe Buyer.

SS

28 PICTET

{805

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace out:
lined the much-anticipated new ~

tourism strategy at a press con-
ference last week, saying the
Ministry of Tourism has repri-

‘oritised its budget to reflect the

most vital areas, including
improvements to the total visi-
tor experience with more tours
and activities.

The plan also calls for
increased airlift and the
rebranding of the Bahamas as

region of islands rather than a’

single destination.

The ministry’s new strategy
comes during a time when the
hotel industry is suffering from
low occupancy levels and sky-
rocketing expenses due to the
ever-increasing price of oil.

Fein

a

Pictet Bank & Trust Limited —

Invites qualified applicants for the following position:-

JUNIOR TRUST OFFICER

REQUIRED SKILLS:-

- Strong organisational skills.

- Ability to function independently but work as part of a team.

- Ability to function in a high volume, high pressure environment.

Company.

EDUCATION AND EXPERIENCE:-

- Minimum of the STEP Foundation Certificate.
- Sound knowledge of trust drafting, reporting and accounting.
- Ability to read and assimilate complex trust documents. .
- Familiarity with the relevant local legislation, particularly the Trustee
Act, 1998 and the Financial Transactions Reporting Act, 2000.
- Working knowledge of legislation in competing jurisdictions.
' - Proficiency in. Microsoft Word and Excel.
- At least five (5) years relevant experience in a Private Bank or Trust

-- Knowledge of French or Spanish would be an asset.

ABSOLUTELY NO TELEPHONE CALLS WILL BE
ACCEPTED. Please send Resume and two (2) references to:

The Human Resources Manager

Bayside Executive Park

P. O. Box N-4837
Nassau, Bahamas

Offices in

Florence, Frankfurt, Geneva, Hong Kong, Lausanne, London, |
Luxembourg, Madrid, Milan, Montreal, Nassau, Paris, Rome,
Singapore, Tokyo, Turin, Zurich

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law and Equity Division

2008
CLE/QUI/00491

IN THE MATTER OF The Quieting Titles Act, 1959

AND

HENRY ALEXANDER DARVILLE AS PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE

ESTATE OF HENRY SAMUEL DARVILLE
NOTICE

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing 62.30 acres referred to as
Parcel “A” being Portion of Original Crown Grant of Marmaduke Wright (D*76)
and known as ‘WoodHill’ situate in the Settlement of Mortimers on the Island
of Long Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the
West bounded by a 15 feet wide road reservation know as Old Crown Road
running thereon Six Hundred Eight-eight and Fifty-five hundredths (688.55)
square feet more or less on the North East bounded by land now or formerly thes
property of Errol Mortimer running thereon One Thousand Four Hundred Eight-
nine and Eight square feet hundredths (1,489.08) more or less on the South
East bounded by land now or formerly the property of Donald Burrows running
thereon Four Hundred Forty-six and Sixty-eight hundredths (446.68) square feet
more or less on the North East bounded by land now or formerly the property of
Donald Burrows running thereon One Thousand Nine Hundred Ninety-eight and
Nineteen hundredths (1,998.19) square feet more or less on the North bounded
by land now or formerly the property of Donald Burrows running thereon One
Thousand Two Hundred Ninety-seven and Sixty-five hundredths (1,297.65)
square feet more or less on the North East bounded by land now or formerly the
property of James Major running thereon Two Hundred Thirty-five and Eighty-
nine hundredths (235.89) square feet more or less on the East bounded by a 20
feet wide Crown Road Reservation and by land now or formerly the property of
James Major and Bishop Herman Dean running thereon One Thousand Eight
Hundred Fifty-six and Fifteen hundredths (1,856.15) square feet more or less on
the South bounded by a 20 feet wide road reservation known as Wood Hill Farm
Road running thereon Four Thousand Twenty-four and Sixty-eight hundredths
(4,024.68) square feet more or less.

AND

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing 57.94 acres referred to as
Parcel “B” being Portion of Original Crown Grant to Lewis Johnson (D-124) and
known as ‘WoodHill’ situate in the Settlement of Mortimers on the Island of Long
Island one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the East
bounded by a 20 feet wide Crown Road Reservation and by land now or formerly
the property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon Five Hundred Eighty-nine and
Sixteen hundredths (589.16) square feet more or less on the South bounded
by land now or formerly the property of Rufus Mortimer running thereon Two
Thousand Two Hundred Thirty-two. and Sixty-three hundredths (2,232.63) square
feet more or less on the South bounded by land now or formerly the property of
Rufus Mortimer running thereon Five Hundred One and Fifty-five hundredths

’ (501.55) square feet more or less on the South West bounded by land and or

formerly the property of Bishop Herman Dean running thereon Two Hundred Two
and Thirteen hundredths (202.13) square feet more or less on the South bounded
by land now or formerly the property of Bishop Herman Dean running thereon
One Hundred Ninety-five and Eleven hundredths (195.11) square feet more
or less on the South West bounded by land the property of Macfield Mortimer
running thereon Four Hundred Fifty-three and Seventy-five hundredths (453.75)
square feet more or less on the North West bounded by land now or formerly
the property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon One Hundred Ninety-five and
Forty hundredths hundredths (195.40) square feet more or less on the South
West bounded by land now or formerly the property of Macfield Mortimer runninge
thereon Two Hundred Seventy-four and Twenty-nine hundredths (274.29) square
feet more or less on the South East bounded by'‘land now or formerly the property
of Macfield Mortimer running thereon One Hundfed Sixty-seven and Twenty-two
hundredths (167.22) square feet more or less on the South West bounded by
land now or formerly the: property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon Two
Hundred Sixteen and Sixty-six hundredths (216.66) square feet more or less on
the North West bounded by Vacant Crown Land running thereon One Thousand
One Hundred Twelve and Sixteen hundredths (1'112.16) square feet more or
less on the North East bounded by a twenty feet wide road reservation known .
as Wood:Hill Road running thereon One Thousand Eighty-one and Twenty-one
hundredths (1081.29) square feet more or less on the North East bounded by
a twenty feet wide road reservation partly known as Wood Hill Road and partly
known as Wood Hill Farm Road running thereon Three Thousand Nine Hundred
Forty-eight and Forty-nine hundredths (3,948.49) square feet more or less.

AND

ALL THAT piece parcel or tract of land containing 2.09 acres referred to as Parcel
“C” being Portion of Original Crown Grant to Anthony Friar (D-128) and known
as ‘Woodhill’ situate in the Settlement of Mortimers on the Island of Long Island.
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas on the South East
bounded by land now or formerly the property of Bishop Herman Dean running
thereon Four Hundred Forty and Forty hundredths (440.40) square feet more
or less on the South West bounded by land now or formerly the property of the
Estate of Jeremiah Mortimer running thereon One Hundred Sixteen and Sixty-
five hundredths (116.65) square feet more- or less on the South West bounded
by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of Jeremiah Mortimer running
thereon Sixty-six and Sixty-nine hundredths (66.69) square feet more or less on
the South West bounded by land now or formerly the property of the Estate of
Jeremiah Mortimer running thereon Sixty-one and Fifty-four hundredths (61.54)
square feet more or less on the North West bounded by land now or formerly
the property of the Estate of Jeremiah Mortimer running thereon Two Hundred
Fifty-one and Thirty-three hundredths (251.33) square feet more or less on the
North East by a road reservation known as Old Crown Road and by land now
or formerly the property of Macfield Mortimer running thereon Three Hundred
Sixty-one and Seventeen hundredths (361.17) ‘square feet more or less.

Henry Alexander Darville as Personal Representative of the Estate of Henry
Samuel Darville claims to be the owner in fee simple of the said land free
from encumbrances and has made application to the Supreme Court in the
Commonwealth of the Bahamas under section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act 1959
to have his title to the said land investigated and the nature and extent thereof
determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in
accordance with the provisions of the said Act

A plan of the said land may be inspected during normal office hours in the
following places:

The Registry of the Supreme Court in the City of Nassau;
The Office of the Administrator in Long Island

c) The Chambers of Callenders & Co., One Millars Court, Nassau, The
Bahamas, Attorneys for the Petitioner.

NOTICE is hereby given that any person having dower:or right of dower
or an Adverse Claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall on or before
the 25" day of November A.D. 2008 file in the Supreme Court and serve on the
Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his claim in the prescribed form,
verified by an Affidavit to be filed therewith. Failure of any such person to file
and serve a statement of his claim on or before the said 25" day of November
A.D. 2008 will operate as a bar to such claim.

CALLENDERS & CO.
Chambers
One Millars Court
Nassau, The Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner




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PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



$85m lawsuit:

Hilton marina

deal ‘properly
terminated’

FROM page 1B

York is not the correct venue
for the case to be heard. This
is despite IGY ‘alleging that
New. York was chosen as the
primary jurisdiction for settling
any disputes over the joint ven-
ture agreement.

Jurg Gassmann, an Adurion
non-executive director and also
a British Colonial Development
Company director, alleged in a
June 19, 2008, affidavit that
IGY’s “consent” for Adurion’s
investment was “not required
and, therefore, was never
requested”.

Vehemently refuting IGY’s
“double-cross” allegation, Mr
Gassmann added: “Moreover,
insofar as I am aware, [IGY]
never granted any consent to
the acquisition.”

IGY had alleged’ that: ait ‘had
twice requested an. extension to

‘the closing deadline, firstly to

January 31, 2007, and then until
June 30, 2007, to give the for-
mer PLP government time to
complete Heads of Agreement
negotiations.

But a July 5, 2007, letter sent
by Mr Gassmann in his capaci-
ty as director and secretary of
the British Colonial Develop-
ment Company and its affiliates
said the marina deal was being
terminated because IGY had

“failed to effectuate” the closing
by deadline day. Its $200,000
deposit was being returned.

In their dismissal motion, the
Hilton companies-allesed-that
IGY ‘had-failed-to fiber” ‘its



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obligations by not securing a
Heads of Agreement, and also
failed to obtain other vital doc-
uments such as a parking lot
management agreement and
plan.

They also claimed IGY failed
to perform by the closing date,
and orally agreed extensions —
such as the ones IGY claimed it
received — were not valid under
the terms of the land purchase
agreement, and damaged their
interests.

In its lawsuit, which names
the British Colonial Develop-
ment Company, two affiliated
property companies — Ocean
Bay Properties I and Ocean
Bay Properties II — PRK Hold-
ings, Adurion Capital and Mr
Allen as defendants, IGY
alleged that the deal involved

“the purchase of waterfront
property owned by the [defen-
dants] adjoining the British
Colonial Hilton in Nassau,
Bahamas, to develop an off-
shore, mixed-use mega yacht
marina and resort development.

“Because the [defendants]
wanted to retain a portion of
the equity interest in the prop-
erty, the purchase agreement
provided that the purchase price
would be comprised of $8 mil-
lion in cash payable by IGY and
a $10 million equity interest in
IGY given to the [defendants]
at closing.”

IGY alleged that the pur-
chase agreement was agreed
with the British Colonial Devel-
opment Company on Novem-
ber 7, 2005, and it then began
work on obtaining a Heads of
Agreement for the joint ven-
ture marina from the former
Christie government.

“Nearly $1 million” was spent
by IGY on due diligence, plan-
ning, designs, permitting and
legal costs associated with the
project, and an “approval in
principle” was obtained from
the former PLP government on
December 7, 2006.

However, IGY alleges in its
lawsuit that at about the same

time Adurion’s purchase of a |

majority stake in the British
Colonial Development Compa-
ny turned up on the scene, it
claimed its approval was
required for Adurion to acquire
some of the rights in the joint
venture deal.

“As the work progressed,
with IGY bearing both the
labouring oar and the expense,
in approximately early Decem-
ber 2006, the defendant sellers
and their agent, Allen, advised
that a majority economic inter-
est and a voting interest in
British Colonial [Development
Company] had been acquired
in some manner by Adurion,”
IGY alleged.

“British Colonial requested
IGY’s consent, under the pur-

‘chase agreement, to assign some

of the sellers’ rights under the
purchase agreement to Aduri-
on.

“At this critical stage of the
transaction, which was close to
closing after over an entire
year’s worth of work by IGY, to
induce IGY to agree to the
assignment, the sellers and their
agent, Allen, specifically repre-
sented to IGY that Adurion
would stand by the transaction
as already agreed upon, and
would not block the closing or
try to renegotiate the deal.

“Allen and the sellers led
IGY to believe that the trans-
action would proceed to clos-
ing, and that Adurion would not

_ fail to honour the agreements

previously agreed upon by the
sellers. However, as soon as
Adurion acquired its interest,
it immediately began to attempt
to renegotiate the terms that
had been agreed pursuant to
the purchase agreement, includ-
ing the sale price, various oblig-
ations and management rights.”

IGY alleged that Adurion,
“evidently believing that the
sellers should get a better deal

For the stories
behind the news,

read Insight
on Mondays



than that already agreed to in
writing,” attempted to alter tHe
shareholder agreement for the
joint venture marina project —
something that ultimately led
to its collapse.

The New York-based com-
pany, well-known for develop-
ing five-star resort/marina prop-
erties throughout — the
Caribbean, said the marina deal
could not close because with-
out a shareholder agreement it
would be unable to obtain a
Heads of Agreement with the
Government.

The Government needed ©
“evidence that [the joint ven-
ture entity] would be the right-
ful owner of the property”
before it would approve the
project and grant a seabed
lease.

When contacted by Tribune
Business, Andrew Farkas,
IGY’s chairman and chief exec-
utive, although surprised this
newspaper had obtained the
documents, confirmed that the
legal action was still live. He
said: “It’s before the courts.”

When asked whether he
would consider alternative sites
in the Bahamas for such a pro-
ject, Mr Farkas replied: “I’m
always looking.”

Arguably the biggest losers
from this situation, apart from
the British Colonial Hilton, are
downtown Nassau and the
wider Bahamian economy. The
IGY/British Colonial project
could have been a key compo-
nent of the Bay Street/down-
town Nassau redevelopment
plans, and might still be if Adu-
rion can find another joint ven-
ture partner to replace IGY —
albeit after several years have
been lost.

An economic impact study
for the IGY development had
projected that it would create
700 permanent full-time jobs
and a further 400 indirect per-
manent jobs for Bahamians if
it had been completed on land
immediately to the west of the.
Hilton, next to the Western
Esplanade. .

The project was also seejeee
ed to create 200-250 full-time
jobs in the construction phase,
and have a total economic
impact of $222.8 milliou over a
20-year period — something that
would have been very iuandy if
it had already got going in the
current economic climate.

When completed, the joint
venture was scheduled to have a
72-slip marina, 200-unit condo-
hotel, 24 beachfront villas and
other office, retail, residential
and parking areas. According
to plans obtained by Tribune
Business, it would have includ-
ed 20,000 square feet of marina
retail space; 25,000 square feet
of general retail space; 35,000
square feet of office space;375
parking units and 140-180 resi-
dential units bordering Bay
Street.

And it is possible that the
Bahamas may have also lost
IGY as a potential investor.
Claiming it had been “irrepara-
bly harmed” in its $85 million
damages claim, the lawsuit said:
“The property on which the
marina and resort were to be
developed is unique, and it is
on information and belief the
only viable site tor IGY for such
a project on the island of New
Providence, the Bahamas.”

The Hilton project’s failure
“minimizes IGY’s ability to
develop a marina on a differ-
ent parcel of land. As set forth
above, the Bahamian govern-
ment was not initially inclined
to approve one marina, let
alone two.

“In any event, Nassau is a
small island and the market and
Nassau cannot support an infi-
nite number of such projects.
Any new development would
require IGY to engage in the
same process to obtain a Heads
of Agreement, and the same
officials within government who
worked on this transaction with
IGY might consider that IGY
does not have the ability or
intention to complete an alter-
native marina development due
to the failure to complete this
transaction.”

IGY also alleged that its work
might be used to’ develop the
Hilton marina project with a
different investor.
Pd



Expo to feature a
fashion show, a
special seminar, a
live broadcast of
Kirk Johnson's
‘Matters of the
Heart’ on ZNS, as:





Marriage
Extravaganza

| Ls ourney

m@ By LISA LAWLOR



ERHAPS putting their wisdom to

the test, the principals of Marriage
Keepers husband and wife team Ted and
Sandra Sealy, will host a live wedding
between Kristina Major and Antonio
Williams, both products of the Sealys' pre-
marriage classes, during their upcoming
expo - Marriage Extravaganza: A Lovers
Journey, Sunday, October 19 at the Wyn-
dham Nassau Resort at 12pm.

Johnson's "Matters of
the Heart" on ZNS, as







the counsellors, who
themselves have been
married for 35 years,
sending to the public
with this "wedding
extravaganza"? It's all
about love...and learn-
ing about the other
person, the two say.
Love is the basis of
any union between
« two people. But in

featuring &

THE TRIBUNE

Marriage

-EXITAVagaNzZa

details of the everyday affairs we each deal
with — and after marriage those everyday
affairs will include two people. Repeated-
ly asking your partner to put away the
dishes may seem like a small thing now,
but Mrs Sealy said these issues are magni-
fied 200 per cent after marriage.

And the Sealys are very upfront with
their clients. If they don't believe you're
ready or at a good point in your life to
unite, the counsellors will advise against
matriage at this time.

Many people get really excited about

r os The upcoming expo will also feature a _ the wedding, but after all this is only a one

‘ welLas-individual --fashion show, displaying bridal gowns from .. day.event. "And what happens after that?"
: three Bahamas-based stores - including Mrs Sealy said. Do you plan on keeping all
counselling Classic Formal Wear, a special seminar,a your money in your own bank account or
sessions live broadcast of Kirk getting a joint account? Do you expect

him to cook seven days a week? How do
you communicate? Are you the talker,

Me riage presenis well as individual coun- _ constantly cutting off your partner? Or do
E> GF ‘S selling sessions. you feel you're always making sacrifices for
t Sa priate The what message are your partner?

"You must find out the needs of your
partner, and make an outline of where
you expect your life to be in five years, 10
years, 20 years," she said.

These are all hard questions and issues
to deal with, but if you're thinking of join-
ing your life with another human being,
you must find answers now, rather than
six months into the marriage.

The Sealys have been with The Mar-
riage Keepers organisation - a non-affili-
ated, public organisation that offers coun-

and make an

years, 10 years,

bs N SHOW yam ee mets this, there is a selling regardless of religion, age or race -

ss, Pere ace Wedding & ST elt requirement of for 10 years as licensed marriage officers.
ae me Det ERO ba Heart learning about each. The organisation also
e Live Broa :

other's past, present
e 1 Day NTL OL



and future. The SEE page 2C
Sealys advice is to be:
sure to get pre-marital education in the
form of seminars (like the one next
Sunday), books, counselling and
; classes at The Marriage se
before marriage.

"You must learn the unique-
ness of your partner," Mrs Sealy
cautioned. "Learn their needs,
discuss each of your roles in the
marriage, responsibilities, deci-
sion making policies, history of
in-laws, finances and sex."

Pointing to the horrifying sta-
tistic that the majority of people
don't truly know who it is they're
marrying before the big day, Mrs
Sealy told Tribune Woman that
individuals must know the intimate
details of their partner's life; is your
partner an early or late riser? Does
she eat breakfast? What kind of
toilet paper does he use? Does
she hang up her towel after each
use? Does he leave it on the
floor?

These are all tiny, minuscule



“You must find
out the needs of

your partner,
outline of where
you expect your
life to be in five

20 years.”



Ted Sealy





Fresh
Harmony

Enjoy Real Softness | \...



Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759











































agate

ensue




i
ov

AGE 2C, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE
















{rom people who are
making news in their
ncighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an

# award.

| Uso, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

REE



ohare your news

lhe Tribune wants to hear

TO TEMPTATION



It’s your life; who’s in control?

@ By MICHELLE M MILLER, CC

Life, until you take ownership of, you
cannot take control over.
Michelle M Miller

NO MATTER how we think we have
things under control, something quickly
happens that seemingly causes us to lose
it. These interruptions - changes - that
are in many ways a natural part of life are
still met with very little confidence ‘or
preparation.

With all of the economic upheaval in
the atmosphere, many are stricken by
anxiety; believing that being in control
speaks to having immediate answers to
life's ever-changing challenges. But real
control is not about having instantaneous
control over what happens. The power
comes from your willingness to control
how you respond to what happens. The
operative word here is respond not react.

Simply put; stuff always happen - its
called life! You however, have been giv-
en full authority and power over your
life, the question is what does this mean
to you?

Ultimately, the degree to which you

- see yourself as a “victim of” or “victorious

over” circumstances depends on your
understanding of your personal power.
Too many are too quick to outsource
their power; believing that power is exter-
nal. This relegates many to the role of
victim rather than being victorious.

Control the things you can

The Serenity Prayer persuades that we
accept the things that we cannot change,
and change the things we can. This same



truth applies to controlling the things that
we can,

Your strongest point of control, tas to
do with you - your behaviour, habits, atti-
tudes, beliefs etc. The most challenging
part of any adversity is not the adversity
itself, but the courage to pick yourself
up, dust yourself off and move forward.

While this may not be an easy step, it is
doable if you accept personal responsi-
bility for your life and your power. The
real power is knowing that you have the
power.

Get in the driver seat

Sitting in the driver seat, speeding down
the free-way of life is an empowering,
liberating feeling. And after driving a
while you soon become a better navigator

of the road, confidently averting the ditch-
es and detours you encounter.

But even as a skilled driver, if you allow
yourself to become preoccupied with
imminent detours or ditches, you will
become overwhelmed and afraid - doubt-
ing your own ability to handle such chal-
lenges.

You must therefore come to a sense
of knowing that regardless of the chang-
ing signs along the road, you are in con-
trol and you have the confidence to ade-
quately respond to life's changing course.

Final thoughts...

Whether you believe it or not, hitching
a ride on the passenger side will keep
you separated from the driver's seat of
your life - that.is powerless and out. of
control.

Remember, unless you find the courage
to control the things that you can, you
will not find the courage to accept the
things that you cannot control.

Taking ownership of your life gives you
the power to control the way in which
you respond to life. At the end of the
day, it is your life; you are ultimately in
control and you can always make some-
thing better happen.

e For your personal copy of the booklet
'52, Ways To SkyRocket Your
Success Booklet' - visit www.coachme-
forward.com

Questions/Comments are welcome

Website: www.coachmeforward.com

E-mail: coach4ward@yahoo.com

Tel: 429-6770

Mail: Box CB-13060

Nassau, Bahamas

ie
seiacioncoal








FROM page one

teaches seminars in conjunc-
tion with Bahamas Faith Min-
istries International.

If you are planning to
become married, Mrs Sealy
recommends starting pre-mar-
ital classes a year before the
marriage date, ideally. She
advises against being engaged
for only a short time before
the wedding, "what's the
rush? You have the rest of
your lives together," she said.

She also advises against
"practice living together"

Marriage

because this is an affront to
the sanctity of marriage. Mrs
Sealy said that far too many
people take marriage too
lightly, treating it like a
microwave or television. If it
isn't working, you can't just
buy another one.

"Most issues are developed
over weeks or months until
you finally reach your boiling
point. Once you're in coun-
selling, you can't expect a

* quick fix, but must give the

problem time to be worked

out between the two part-
ners," Mrs Sealy said.

Other information you must
know on your partner? Par-
ents, in-laws, habits of their
home that came from parents.
If your fiancé doesn't like the
way his parents interacted, it's
possible this will play out in
your relationship, whether it
be aggressive abuse or passive
acceptance.

Mrs Sealy told Tribune .

Woman that we're all differ-
ent, we're socialized differ-
ently and we can't generalize
marriage rules. A lot of the

everyday, mundane activities.

and experiences we all go
through will test a person's
temperament. So how does
your partner deal with their
problems?

In an effort to support the
development of healthy
Bahamian marriages, the.
Sealys also host marriage
weeks throughout the year.
They also hold seminars and
meetings, have family get-
togethers, and cruises.

© For more information on >
the Marriage Extravaganza”
call 356-7712, 63 80%





a:b eS ‘ ‘ x
ane

ee ini buat Cie

i anes age he 4 ir
Be Soa.
hua gc

Sy 3a are: sa Ps

Vice Chee nunlaan enka

Cle EL


THE TRIBUNE

his children and adolescents

Provided by Adelma Penn,
Camelta Barnes and Shandera
Smith, nutritionists from the
Department of Public '
Health/Ministry of Health

(5°72 nutrition is the
basis for good health. _

We enjoy and lead healthier
lives when we learn and prac-
tice healthy eating especially
when we begin doing it early
in our lives.

Children and adolescents are
in a growing phase and it is
essential that they receive ade-
quate nutrition to facilitate and
maintain healthy growth.
Younger children, under 10,
need lesser servings of food
while adolescents, 10 - 19, need
more. These servings should be
spread throughout the day dur-
ing regular meal times. Addi-
tionally, males usually need
more food than females. Their
energy intake will also vary
based on their activity level.
The more active they are, the
more energy they need.

Please note __ that
toddlers/preschoolers would
need about half the amount of
_ servings of foods needed for

children less than 10 years.

-We advise and encourage
you:to prepare three balanced
meals for your child/children
everyday at regular times. But
just what are balanced meals?
A balanced meal is one that
has food from each food group
provided in the right propor-
tions. This means it must
include adequate carbohy-
drates, protein, fat, vitamins
and minerals, fibre and water.

Here are some general
guidelines:

CARBOHYDRATES/STARCHES
(bread, rice, cereal, pasta, potato,
cassava, crackers etc)
This group should form the
basis of our diet. They provide
energy, fibre, vitamins and min-
erals. Try to include more
whole grains like oats, whole
wheat bread and brown rice.
- Children need about 4 - 5 serv-
ings while adolescents need
about 5 - 7 servings daily. A
‘serving is:

‘© 1 slice of bread

¢ 1/2 hotdog, hamburger bun,

English muffin

¢ 8 animal crackers

¢ 3 graham crackers

¢ 1 small piece of cornbread,

banana bread

¢ 1/2 cup of cooked cereal, rice,

grits, pasta, macaroni, spaghet-
ti,

sweet potato, corn, mashed ©
potato, plantain °
¢ 3 oz potatoes
° 1 ounce of ready-to-eat cereal

‘VEGETABLES AND FRUITS
These contain vitamins, min-
erals and fibre. Children need
about 2 - 3 servings of vegeta-
bles and 1 - 2 servings of fruits
daily.
On the other hand, ‘adoles-

cents need about 3 - 4 servings:

of vegetables and 2 - 3 servings
of fruit daily. They need to eat
a variety of fruits and vegeta-
bles. Try to include a vegetable
or fruit with vitamins C and A
like oranges and carrots. A
serving is:

¢ 1/2 cup non leafy vegetables

like carrots -

° 1 cup leafy vegetables like let-
tuce

¢ 1 medium oran¢e, apple,

or banana (size ofa tennis ball) +

¢ 1/2 grapefruit

1 cup of juice

¢ 1/4 cup raisins

¢ 17 small grapes, 10°

large grapes

¢ 1 cup cubed/1 slice melons
(cantaloupe, watermelon)

\

MEAT, POULTRY, FISH,
EGGS, BEANS, PEAS AND
MEAT ALTERNATIVES

These foods provide a signif-
icant amount of proteins need-
ed for energy, building muscle
mass and bones and for pro-
tecting against disease.

These foods also have iron
and lots of other important
nutrients.

Eat more poultry and fish
rather than red meats. Children
need 3 - 4 servings daily and
adolescents need 5 - 6 servings
daily. A serving is:

¢ 1 ounce of lean cooked meat,
poultry, or fish

¢ 1 medium egg

¢ 1/2 cup of cooked dry beans
or peas

¢ 1 tablespoon of peanut butter
¢ A small handful of nuts

DAIRY PRODUCTS

These are filled with calci-
um, Vitamin A, riboflavin and
protein. Choose low fat milk
and yogurt. Children need at
least two servings of milk and
cheese every day while adoles-
cents need about three serv-
ings daily. A sérving is:

¢-T cup of buttermilk or whole
milky ctotedied

° 1/2 - 1 ounce of cheese

¢ 1 cup of yogurt

WATER

Children and adolescents
need to be well hydrated, espe-
cially if they are very active. It
also. keeps their immune sys-
tem healthy. Ensure that they
have about 5 - 8 eight-ounce
cups everyday.

FAT - BUTTER, MARGARINE, MAYONNAISE,
COOKING OIL; SALT - TABLE SALT, SALTED
FOODS, AND SUGAR - CANDIES, COOKIES

We encourage you to choose
and teach your children to
choose foods that are low in
fat, salt and sugar. Try to
include more plant oils - corn,
olive, canola etc - in your diet:
Use cooking methods that
require little or no fat such as
baking and steaming. Use more
herbs as seasonings and satisfy
your sweet tooth with dried
fruits.

A SPECIAL WORD
ON “JUNK” FOODS
While these foods don't con-

" tribute a lot of nutrients, they

are a favourite for many chil-
dren and adults too! You don't
have to completely eliminate
them from your child's diet, but
don't make it an everyday part
of their diet, maybe once or
twice per week.

Here are some additional tips
or ways to involve your
child/children in developing
healthy eating and lifestyle
practices: :

e As they get older involve
them more in shopping for
food. Teach them how to select
more nutritious foods by read-
ing labels, how to choose fresh
foods by checking for expira-
tion dates and examining fruits
and vegetables.

¢ Involve them in meal plan- |

ning and food preparation. Let
them choose a recipe for a meal
two or more times a week.

e Don't use food as a reward
or punishment.

e Show your children that
you enjoy eating fruit and veg-
etables. They learn more from
what you do rather than what
you say.

e Have as many meals
together in a relaxed setting as
much as possible.

We really want our children



IUESDAY, OC LOBER 14, Z2UU5, PAVE 35U



to grow up to be intelligent,
strong and healthy adults.

The foundation we lay for
them now determines whether
we will have a healthy genera-
tion or a sickly one.

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S \ SST Se es SNS Se ASS
NAS \ < SEN UNEASE RNS
SARA he Sk Nee Se a ee he Se he Nee Nc MRA

WE OM Re Re Ce ee Cm OME TT) ie
for Race Weekend November 14th — 16th, 2008. a
TO ENTER: purchase any three participating Kraft or Nabisco products between
9/25/08 ~ 10/24/08. Attach three labels to your filled out entry form, answer the skill
question and drop into official ballot boxes located at participating stores or deliver to —
d’Albenas Agency Ltd., Madeira Street or Purity Bakery Market & McPherson Street.
To enter you must be 21 years or older, : < oe
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WIN A VIP RACE EXPERIENCE!



___ Address:

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Nabisco & Kraft are packed full of GREAT T__ ST __
PAGE 4C, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

THE TRIBUNE

Choosing sunglasses or yOUr kids

ARES

Dex you ever notice how cute kids
look in sunglasses? Believe it or
not sunglasses may save their skin

and eyes later in life b

by blocking the

sun's. powerful ultravio et rays (VR.

Children under. age 10 are ‘at

"recommended by a doctor, plas-

high risk for skin and.eye dam ‘ tic is safer.

age from ultraviolet rays. The
skin on their eyelids and around) _
their eyes is more delicate ‘and
vulnerable than adult skin. It'is
also suggested that until about -
age 10 the lens of a child’s-eye is .
not as opaque as an adult's thus:
allowing greater solar penetra: _
tion and greater UVR induced,
ocular changes, =’, ay
UVR exposure’ ‘catises 90 per.
cent of all skin cancers. In addis, ;;
tion, retinal exposure to UVR’

macular degeneration, which are’, .

both causes of visual. impair
ment. UVR: damage: ‘builds over



time, so the sooner. you | Start:

protecting your children’s eyes. |
from the sun, the lower their

risk will be of ever’ ‘developing:

future eye problems. yee

Good sunglasses protect: ‘both ‘

the skin around the,eye’ and. the.

eye itself. While children tinder ;

six months: should ,nof, be
exposed to the sun, once they
reach six-months they should °

wear sunglasses outside. Ifthey






§. Frames should be bendable
» but, unbreakable.

6. Ensure the glasses fit snug-
oy close to the face.

‘7. Let the kids choose. You
are not-the one who has to wear
“the glasses. Children - especial-
‘ly older kids and teens - are like-
«lier to' wear them if they get to
“select them.

‘8. Check to see ‘that the lens-
es are riot scratched or warped

‘orhave any other flaws that can °
is associated with Cataracts and i «distort vision. Remember very

‘:young.children may not know
how to check to see if there are
‘any: abnormalities so it is up to
you to check. _

,9Double up - sunglasses only
block rays that come directly
through the lenses. The skin
around the eyes remains vul-
‘ nerable’ to rays entering from
the sides or top or that are
flected: upwards off snow, sand
swater. Wearing a wide
"brimnied. hat blocks out the

. sun's ays from above and the

sides while shielding the face

require prescription glasses, they: and neck.

should also wear Prescription \
sunglasses, .. -

Keep the: followin rules. in: é
mind when buying aunglanies,
for your children, '

way



1. Find glasses that block 99-
100 per cent ofboth UVA anil
UVB rays of the sun. Buy one

that indicate the pereentage of
the, |
better, so. look for large wraps

UVR protection they provi
2. The more skin covered,

around styles. “ah SE

speeds. Their sunglasses should
match this active lifestyle, Find
impact resistant, scratch proof
lenses that don’t pop out of the
frames.

4 Avoid glass lenses unless

place oie one oie) ane Ria reaE

plate, | tea cup 8













ayy

3. Use plsygroud-proot lenis
es - kids run, fall and bounce. off."

objects all the time. at-alarming ©.’

1 salad }

“Seeking the shade during the

r ‘hours, of 10am and 4pm also
provides another level of pro- -

“tection.
We need to teach children

Ht ‘dearly: on’the importance of

‘wearing sunglasses. Just as we
-teach them to brush their teeth,
-wash their hands before eating
‘and wearing seat belts, so to
~Mmust they learn the need to

‘wear sunglasses and thus prac-
,» tice good habits that last their
lifetime.



* If you have any questions

_ please do not hesitate to con-
tact Dr Richelle Knowles at
Olde Town Mall, Sandyport
327-8718/9 or email at
drknowles1 @hotmail.com.

bread & butter

Teast Gite eotie eu lale Rs marcia cians)



























































BUY |

receive

0° off

place setting consists of: 1 i: AY Tal= yaa in. =3



Te Rey Stemware

.

(excludes Lismore and all toasting flutes & net items)

OG 25%




Lynn Chase ane
& accessories

promotion applies to Bridal & China Dept only
* must be same or lesser value

acl
Fax: (242

(CoS 7al a aoe



Ca Wa

Oe) 393-4002
393-4096

moto
mrt

Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9:00pm
Ry Wiate epg oly tT}
www.kellysbahamas.com

PICTURED from left are Chris Lloyd, operations manager,
BASRA; Richard Parker, vice commodore, BASRA; Michele
Rassin, vice president operations, Doctors Hospital; and
Charles Sealy, chief executive officer, Doctors Hospital.



THE season for balls and ban-
quets is on the horizon, a chance
for many to kick up their heels on
the dance floor and have a good
time, all in the name of some very
deserving organisations. Many
charitable organisations in the
Bahamas depend on the finan-
cial gains of these balls in order to
do their good works for the com-
munity. The Bahamas Air Sea
Rescue Association is no differ-
ent, and the BASRA Ball is their
main fund-raising event.

As one walks into the office
of BASRA, there are framed
accolades hanging all over the
walls — silver jubilee awards, pub-
lic service commendations, cer-
tificates of appreciation and dis-
tinguished service awards. Each
is well deserved as BASRA per-
sonnel put in a lot of time on the
open seas - tracking, assisting,
rescuing and saving lives - and all
of it free of charge by committed

cates.

are out on unseaworthy boats,

them as well,” said Chris Lloyd,
BASRA's operations manager.

Pregnancy and child
/hirth better with
Chiropractic care



IF you are pregnant, one of

i the best things you can do for
; yourself and your baby is to see
: a doctor of chiropractic. Yes,

? chiropractic adjustments are

: safe during pregnancy. Doctors
: of chiropractic make alterations
: in technique and patient posi-

: tioning to accommodate for the

:, increase in belly and breast size.

Many chiropractic adjusting

tables are specially designed
: with abdominal pieces that

'drop-away', allowing pregnant

? woman to lay face down.





During pregnancy, a women's
p y,

i body secretes hormones that

_ { help to relax her ligaments.

_ | Without these hormones, her

: pelvis would not expand enough
: to allow the birth of the baby.

_ + When you add the increase in
_} weight, shift in centre of gravity
_ } and the change in biomechanics
. | - due to the weight - all out in

i front - it is no wonder that preg-

® } nant women are prone to back

pain.
Most often, during pregnancy,

: low back pain is a result of ver-

: tebral subluxations and muscle

: ‘spasm. A vertebral subluxation

: is the misalignment of a bone in
: your spine. Subluxations cause

? muscle spasms and stress on the
: spine which causes postural dis-
: tortions which in turn affect

: nerves, muscles, and mobility of

; joints. Gentle chiropractic

? adjustments help ease the low

: back pain and keep your body -
: nerves, muscles, organs, etc -

: functioning at their optimum.

Low back pain is the most

? common reason that pregnant

: women seek chiropractic care.

: The degree of pain ranges from
: barely noticeable to debilitating,
: with stabbing or shooting pain

: into the legs and buttocks. Pain
? in the mid-back becomes more
: frequent as the breasts become
? denser from milk gland produc-
tion. Fluxes of hormones also

? contribute to headache occur-

: rence.

Women who suffer migraines

: and were taking medication pri-
: or to becoming pregnant often

: look to chiropractic for relief,

: since they can no longer take

: the medication. Many patients.
: actually find that the adjust-

: ments are more effective than ~
: the medications.

Aside from ‘symptom relief’,

: receiving chiropractic care dur-
‘ing pregnancy has other benefits

to mother, baby and upcoming

: labour. The uterus is supported

: by ligaments that attach to the

dents have qualified for interna-
tional sailing competitions, but :
are unable to compete as they :

do not have safe boating certifi- | cam cause a decrease in space in

pelvis. If the bones in your
pelvis are subluxated, it can put
tension on those ligaments. This

? the uterus, as well as in the

"BASRA is committed to pro- : Pelvis ring.
viding the materials for these'stu- i the Side welned prcneriy is.
ents who qualify to take the : anoy, Satrulocedue dune
Sx, ANG We give up caine Une labour. Women who have
ona Saturday to ensure that they : undergone chiropractic adjust-
know the material. During our : ments during their pregnancy

patrols we see many persons who : report that labour is easier and

It is important to ensure that

: less stressful on their bodies.

having no life jackets, and no }
communication tools, so this ;
course, the ABC (America’s }
Boating Course) will benefit :

Many side effects of pregnan-
cy can be reduced with chiro-
practic adjustments - low back
pain, leg cramps, mid-back pain,

: neck pain, headaches, carpal
: tunnel symptoms, and even nau-

Doctors Hospital, a corporate | S4:

Pasiet OE BASRA: peorauly find a chiropractor who is
made its annual donation in sup- } tained in caring for pregnant
port of the tremendous work } \omen and start enjoying your
they do each year. “Community ; pregnancy. Chiropractic care
involvement is an integral part | through pregnancy is not only

of our culture and values. BAS- : safe, it is essential.

Don't just grin and bear it,

volunteers.

The Bahamas Air Sea Rescue
Association stands by, ready and
willing to lend a hand to those
in distress at sea, 24 hours a day
with boats, planes and commu-
nication equipment, and as a
result, donations, grants and lega-
cies from all sectors of the com-
munity are extremely important
and BASRA depends on these
contributions to function and
maintain its service in Bahamian
waters.

The major fund-raiser, the
2008 BASRA Ball, will take
place on Friday, November 7 at
the Sandals Royal Bahamian
Resort's convention centre. At
the ball, BASRA, its: corporate
friends and members of the pub-
lic will join together to ensure
that this most vital service — air
and sea rescue — is continued.
The funds raised will also ensure
that emergency assistance is pro-
vided to those persons in distress
and stranded at sea.

Proceeds from the ball are ear-
marked for equipment to
enhance patrols of Bahamian
waters, BASRA will also pro-
vide needed assistance to the
junior sailing programme in the
public schools. “Many of our stu-

* our annual charitable giving pro- :

.ber 7 at the Sandals Royal

RA is one of the organisations in :
gramme, as Doctors Hospital | + Susan Donald is a doctor
supports such a worthy cause that } of chiropractic at the Life Chiro-
affects many people’s lives. : practic Centre. For more infor-
"We are always happy to lend ; â„¢ation please call 393-2774.

our assistance to those.persons in
distress and stranded at sea :
through our donation to BAS- :
RA. This gift to BASRA will :
help the organisation to contin- :
ue to develop their new initia- ;
tives and provide emergency }
assistance,” said Michele Rassin, :
vice president of operations,
Doctors Hospital.

* The 2008 BASRA Ball will
take place on Friday, Novem-

Bahamian Resort Convention
Centre. For more information,
call the BASRA office at 325-
8864; any funds you are willing
to give will be gratefully appre-
ciated in support of the untiring:
work of the BASRA. Youcan — }
also help by volunteering your
services, becoming a BASRA
member, registering for a class,
or by forwarding your donation
to Bahamas Air-Sea Rescue
Association, PO Box SS 6247,
Nassau, Bahamas.

The Tribine wants to hear
from peale who are
making tpws in their
neighbowhoods. Perhaps
you are rising funds for a
good caue, campaigning
for imprvements in the
area or hive won an
award.

If so, calls on 322-1986
and shar¢your story.


THE TRIBUNE

Root Crops

MM,

W
§N{HQ,

Vdd



Md

VN
© vegetables. In Europe,

Li

MMM
Za

gardeners and farmers would grow
plenty of root crops in autumn and
then bury them in straw below

\ with soil to
protect them from 1, _-.. Preserved
this way root crops would provide
sustenance through. to spring.’

ground and cover



HERE in the Bahamas we do not have
to worry about surviving the winter
months bui we can still take advantage
of the keeping qualities of root crops.
Most.can be harvested and then kept in
the refrigerator for several weeks or until
needed.

Instead of growing root crops in rows, I
prefer to set them out in blocks, or grids,
leaving enough room for each to develop
properly. This saves a lot of space and
increases your garden output.

Beets are popular in the Bahamas but
there is a very big difference between
canned beets and those we grow and bake
or boil ourselves. Beets should be picked
while they are a little short of maturity, at
the stage when all the sugars have devel-
oped but no fibre has developed. Plant
beets..every four to six weeks for a con-
tinuous supply.

Beet seeds are contained within a knob-
bly capsulé' so thinning out is necessary

i :



*y OOT crops contain some
of the most popular of all



once the seedlings are established. Plant
the capsules four inches apart in a grid

and keep them well watered to ensure’

quick germination. Beets are not heavy
feeders but appreciate compost or com-
mercial cow manure mixed into the soil.
They are a 90-day crop but can be pulled
after 60-70 days. Detroit Dark Red is the
standard variety.

King of the root crops is the carrot. Car-
rots come in all sorts of shapes besides
the traditional taper. Chantenay is a very
popular variety, medium-sized and tor-
pedo-shaped, often with a red core.
Nantes varieties are almost cylindrical
and give good value. If size matters to
you, try an Imperator variety. These are
the largest of all and have the traditional
carrot tapering.

Carrots can be grown in a grid two-inch-
es apart (three inches for Imperator) in
soil that has not been recently composted.

Frésh compost encourages the carrots to °

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008, PAGE 5C

fork and develop side roots. Mature com-
post from a previous growing season will
not affect the carrots. The sandier the
soil, the better your carrots will grow.

I usually only grow two sets of carrots
each winter: one in October, the next in
January. Carrots keep so well — both in

the ground and in the refrigerator — that .

the pulling.time is not critical.
Kohlrabi is a cabbage/turnip cross that
some people may not consider a root crop
because it grows mainly above ground.
Sow the seeds six-inches apart in a grid
and keep them watered well. Kohlrabi
likes plenty of cow manure and fertilizer
and produces quickly, often in 60 days.
A rutabaga is also a cabbage/turnip
cross but has very different characteristics
— much more like turnip than cabbage but
still much milder in taste than a turnip. Of
all the root crops, est
TO STOW ST a *
“--Rutabagas can “‘grow'to'a








rutabaga is the easi
Me RRP RIB AS Dis Ai ARDS fe



so are candidates to be grown in rows

rather than grids. Rutabagas can be stored.
for weeks once they are harvested so you
may only need one or two crops during
the fall/winter growing season.

Turnips also should be grown in rows. It
is important that turnips always have
moist soil because the slightest drought
will turn them bitter. Turnips can grow
to be very large but have the best flavour
when golf ball size.

Both turnips and beets provide us with
a leaf crop as well. The foliage from
turnips and beets is often more highly
prized than the roots. Steam them lightly
and add butter.

Irish potatoes should fit into this cate-
gory but because their cultivation is com-
pletely different we will consider them
separatély at a later date.

Veteran deejay, Dion Da Butcha of
100 Jamz, read to the students of
St. Anne’s School and Mt. Caramel
Preparatory Academy at the Pompey

Museum of

Slavery and

Emancipation on Thursday,
September 25, 2008.

The Museum is located on Bay Street at Vendue
House, an 18th century slave auction. site.

The week of readings, which focused on slavery,
was organized by The National Museum of The
Bahamas-AMMC, a division of The Ministry of
Education, Youth, Sports & Culture, in observance

of National Literacy
September.



Month, celebrated in
Dion is St. Anne’s graduate.
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 14, 2008

_ THE TRIBUNE





Tribune Comics
JUDGE PARKER

ahs ta



DO YOU THINK

DEWEY'S BEST

FRIEND KILLED
HIM OVER DIXIEZ

I THINK IT'S
WARMING UP TO

YOU, MR. RIVER! d Enis iotiaaceoasdar

World rights reserved.

THEIR MINDS!



APT 3-G

HE WAS BUSY: TRYING TO ;
LIVE UP TO YOUR EXPECTATIONS.
YOU CALLED HIM YOUR HERO,

A GREAT ARTIST. ,

car
“n7

THE MORE YOU BUILT
TORE HIMSELF DOWN.

H\M UP, THE HARDER HE









HEY! THESE
PRICES HAVE .
DOUBLED SINCE
YESTERDAY! y

cS

www. kingfeatures.com

TIGER

©2008 by King Featues Syndicate, Inc. Word nghts 1oserved




I KNOW, I WANNA
RUN A MORE

©2008 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World Rights reserved

A SUNVIAL. IT .
TELLS TIME 6Y
THE SHATOW

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
you NEVER Y WHAT 1S YouR







WELL, THERE'S
MORE TO IT
THAN DOUBLING
THE PRICE OF
EVERYTHING ON

THE MENU!
wy



OH, I KNOW, I'LL
GET AROUND TO
IMPROVING THE





ROME WASN'T BUILT IN
A DAY, YOU KNOW

(©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

WHAT ABOUT
AT NIGHT?



COULD IT
PICK uP SLEEPING BAG PoINe E
ANYTHING), WW OLR Mie Koa? SLEEPING



1





14

15
17

18




Across

Pole and Russian fought
together (7)

A capital position to be in
(5)

Person transported by

still terrifying (8)
Country song about a
sailor (6)

Service charge (6)
How, initially, ownership
may be established (8)
Golfing association (4)



| CRYPTIC PUZZLE

©2008 by King Features Syndicate. Inc. World rights reserved.

Down

1
2

Hybrid ape is brown (5)
A ship that carries goods
overland (3)

A knotty problem for the
ship’s navigator? (4)

Dad's cooked greens (9) 4 Its victim'gets the point (6)
9 She's a bit of a harridan 5. They are empowered to go
(3) over our heads (8)

10 Very popular winter sports 6 Ideal trio to arrange daily
range (4) work (9)
12 More safe somehow, but 7 Sharpshooter employed in

- the rigging (4-3)

Simple enough difference
of opinion, but he goes to
court (9)

Unusual individual (8)

No object in bothering
Melissa (7)






























21 | follow the Spanish priest 16 Elementary meal prepared Ww Across Down
(3) to give inside information a | 1 Conspicuous (7) 1 Inventor of dynamite
22 Hawaiian garland no doubt (6) N 5 Bracing (5) (5)
put together without haste 19 Acustomer or one of the N -8 Delighting 2 Abeverage (3)
) eta ; a the eye (9) 3 The two (4)
24 Very distant until 20 Rising old city in complete ‘ :
now (2,3) collapse (4) > 9 Hole in the ground 4 Strain (6)
25 One in charge is possibly _ | 23 Thing laid on the table for ” (3) , 5 Discoverer of the
a German (7) breakfast, maybe (3) | BE | 10 Be short of (4 New World (8)

12 Brass wind instru- 6

ment (8)

PEP ee

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Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution









Indigestible, 4 Rimmed, 6 Owned, 7
Resident, 8 Break the bank, 12

Passer-by, 15 Average, 16 Cheese,
18 Riser, 19 Less.

Substantiate, 4 Redden, 6 Limbo, 7 24
Accident, 8 On reflection, 12
Trimaran, 15 Get down, 16 Slalom,

18 Local, 19 Type. power (7)



14 Call to appear (6) 4

Across: 1 Spaniard, 5 Pour, 9 Crowd, Across: 1 Ancestry, 5 Plea, 9 15 Production (6) 11. Amphibious raiding
10 Marines, 11 Single-handed, 13 Throb, 10 Dynamic, 11 Off the 17 Interim (8) troops (9)

August, 14 Strain, 17 Straightened, 20 __ record, 13 Ruling, 14 Slogan, 17 48: Canteofi t(4 13. Exact ite (8
Resolve, 21 Adage, 22 Yard, 23 Multiplicity, 20 Recital, 21 Ivory, 22 entre of target (4) xact opposite (8)
Weakness. Nile, 23 Eminence. 21 Boy (3) 14 Alike (7)

Down: 1 Sack, 2 Adoring, 3 Down: 1 Anti, 2 Careful, 3 22 Indifferent (9) 16 Collision (6)

Hazardous (5)
25 Oppressive use of 20

CALVIN & HOBBES

CALVIN, WILLNOU RUN AND | [7
GET MY PURSE, PLEASE?
1 NEED THE CALCULATOR.







HERE YOu








wid DAILYIN IK. COM






IM NOT GOING
TO TP You i

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday ‘to
Sunday









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Scandal at the Dubai Open, where
a lowly-anked franian crushed

3 couple of grandmasters before
they discovered that he was
receiving text messages from 3
Tehran computer. Today's puzzle
helped to give the game dway.
White, the GM, has just played
Bxh6 on the assumption that Black
had just blundered away a pawn
and would continue gxh6 Naxfée
Bxf6 Qxié oF B/Nxed deed when
Black's queen is attacked so that
the h& bishop can retreat to safety.
But Black's robotic and strong
response proved that it was White
who had fatlen lot a trap and was

manoeuvre?










Pat ee ds!

On the spur of the
moment (9)
Tolerant (7)

19 Fortunate (5)
Burn partially (4)
23 Acan (3)



about fo lose significant matenal.
Can you spot Black's subtle sitican

8
LEONARD BARDEN 7
6

[8|1/4








©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



10/10

The HOW many words of four
Target letters or more can you make
arge from the letters shown here?
uses In making a word, each letter
may be used onee only. Each
words in must contain the centre letter
and there must be at least one
the main letter word, No plurals.
nine-letter word. No p
hody of TODAY'S TARGET
Good 16; very good 24;
Chambers excellent 32 (or more). Solution
21
st tomorrow.
Century — YesTERDAY's SOLUTION
ever ewer over OVERPOWER
Dictionary
peer poorer pore power
(1999 prove repro reprove rope
a rove rover rower veer weep
edition)



Yesterday's









©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc. .



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.





Chess: 8494: 1... Bred! 2 dred Qg4! (threatening
both Qxhd and gxh6} 3 Cegd Nxgd. Black threatens
Nah6, guhé and Bxh4, so White drops a piece and
eventually the game.



Were Wwooer Wore wove





1. You are declarer with the West
hand at Six Spades, and North leads
the jack of diamonds. Assuming the
missing trumps are divided 2-1, how
would you play the hand?

West East
AQ) 10763 @K94
WK I4 VA10762
@5 @AK9
106 &K 3

2. You are declarer with the West
hand at Four Hearts, and North leads
the queen of spades. How would you
play the hand?

West East
4762 @A85
VAKI9O4 ¥Q105
@A64 #983
&)9 AK 42

we

1. Win the diamond with the king,
cash the A-K of trumps, lead a low
heart to your king and a heart back to
dummy’s ace. If the queen of hearts
appears on the first or second round
of the suit, you have 13 tricks. If the
queen does not appear and the hearts
are divided 3-2, you still make all the
tricks by discarding the jack of hearts
on the ace of diamonds, ruffling a
heart and returning to dummy with a
trump to discard both your clubs on
the 10-7 of hearts:

Finally, if it turns out that either
defender started with the Q-x-x-x of

Test Your Play

hearts, discard your jack of hearts on
the ace of diamonds and return to
your hand by ruffing a heart. Now
lead a club toward the king and keep
your fingers crossed, hoping that
North rather than South holds the
ace.

2. Win the spade with the ace and
lead a low club toward your jack! If
South has the queen, he will presum-
ably play it, and this will give you
three club tricks instead of the two

‘you started with. The defenders will

now probably cash two spade tricks
and shift to a diamond.

Win the diamond with the ace,
cash the A-K of trump and jack of
clubs, cross to dummy with a tramp
and discard two diamonds on the A-
K of clubs. This method of play suc-
ceeds if the trumps are divided 3-2
(and also when the: defender with
four trumps has at least four clubs).

If South plays low on the club lead
from dummy at trick two, you should
assume he does not have the queen.
You therefore play the nine, not the
jack, [f South has the ten, your nine
will force North’s queen, and you
will be in essentially the same posi-
tion as before.

You are not certain to make the
contract with any method of play, but
the one suggesttd offers by far the
best chance of developing a 10th
trick.

Tomorrow: A necessary risk.
©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc.
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 14, 2008



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\ »
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>

| HE TRIBUNE











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