Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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EUSA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008



PRICE — 75¢





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PLAITING

SEE INSIDE ‘THE ARTS’

Mario Miller

Jury fails to reach

unanimous decision

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE JURY in the Mario

Miller murder trial failed to.

reach a unanimous decision on
the guilt or innocence of
accused brothers Ricardo and
Ryan Miller yesterday. Justice
Stephen Isaacs had to dismiss
the case without a verdict.

The jury forewoman, howev-
ef, initially announced that they
had found Ricardo Miller guilty,
but with a vote of 11-1 in favour

.of guilt.

Justice Isaacs promptly
reminded her, as per his instruc-
tions before they were sent to
deliberate, that they could only
find the defendant guilty if the
jury vote was 12-0.

She then read the jury’s deci-
sion relating to Ryan Miller
and determined that he was not
guilty with a vote of 7-5 in
favour of acquittal. Again, the
judge had to remind her that
accused persons could only be
found not guilty, as per his
instructions, with a vote of 8-4.

The jury was out for two
hours before delivering its deci-
sions.

After Justice Isaacs dismissed
the case he reminded both the

RICARDO and Ryan Miller
outside of court yesterday.

accused men. that they would
have to reapply for bail. They
were then taken by officers to
be remanded at Her Majesty’s
Prison.

Family members of murder
victim Mario Miller were visibly
shaken up over the outcome of
the trial.

Outside the courthouse, sis-

SEE page 15

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LESLIE MILLER hugs his daughter Leslia Miller eS cer)



NIB chairman says it’s
unfair to blame execs for
contribution shortfalls

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IT WOULD be unfair to
blame National Insurance
Board executives for shortfalls
in contribution collections as
they have not had the right
“organisational infrastructure”
to be “fully effective” in this
regard, NIB chairman Patrick
Ward said yesterday.

’ Mr Ward confirmed that the
board also “aborted the
process” of introducing a per-

formance-related pay systein
that was agreed upon during
the last negotiations with the
union. ’

“There was a little bit of a
mismatch and we just didn’t
think it was the right time to
introduce those performance-
based measures,” said Mr
Ward at a press conference to
announce new NIB initiatives.

Asked if he could further
explain the decision not to
implement the system, he

SEE page eight



"British
"VAmerican



. a otaff
VUE Sidi:

"BE,

Felipe Major/Tribun



PAGE 16



MEDICS prepare to remove the body of Tammeko SED DYE TaLeA

Motorcyclist is —

the third traffic
fatality in 24 hours

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

JUST hours after two teenage
girls died in a gruesome car
wreck off East Bay Street, a
man was killed when his motor-
cycle slipped into an oil deposit
along Peardale Road, becom-

ing the 39th traffic fatality of the
-year.

According to police reports,
25-year-old Tammeko Valenti-
no Delancey was driving south
on Peardale Road around 10pm
Monday when he lost control of

his vehicle and slid off the road. °

SEE page eight

Reports of MP being questioned in connection
with embezzlement.are denied hy police

POLICE denied reports yesterday that a sitting MP had been
brought in for questioning in connection with the embezzlement of

funds from a local corporation.

The politician, who has been under the watchful eye of investi-
gating officers for some time, was rumoured to have been arrested

around noon on Monday.

However, Acting Acsistit Commissioner of Police Hulan Han-
na denied that the politician - whose name is being withheld - or any
other sitting MP was currently in police custody.

Yesterday, reports of the politician’s arrest spread throughout

SEE page 15

a By A eon LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net -

AS OF January next year
all employers and self-
employed people who are
behind in their National
Insurance contributions will
be charged monthly interest
on what they owe and will
be “aggressively pursued”
for payment - with prosecu-
tion in the courts likely for
defaulters.

National Insurance Board
chairman Patrick Ward said

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the move is one which the
new board of directors,
appointed in July, 2008,
hopes will help improve
compliance rates and there-
by shore up the fund’s short-
fall.

Interest will be charged on
arrears. at “a prime rate,”
said NIB acting director
Anthony Curtis. He and oth-
er executives, along with Mr
Ward, were speaking at a
press conference at NIB
headquarters yesterday.

SEE page 15

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PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

Gabrie! Moss

Caral Stubbs

Erinn Treco



Gabriel and
Khristoff star
in fashion
extravaganza

IN A fashion extravaganza
held at:the historic Fort Char-
lotte on Saturday evening, a pair
of 17-year-olds, Gabriel Moss
and Khristoff Symonette, took
top honours as winners of the
ist annual Ford Models’ Super-
model of the Bahamas and
Models242 Male Face of 242.

After a week filled with heavy
downpours, the skies held back
the rain long enough to see the
two teenagers, who were com-
peting against a total of eight
others - six women and two men
- caught by surprise when their
names were announced.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday morning, Gabriel said:
“All the way home last night, I
was saying to myself, ‘I won, I
won’.”

Still in a state of disbelief, the
Grand Bahama native will now
begin preparations to represent
The Bahamas at the Ford Mod-
els’ Supermodel of the World
International grand finale which
is being held in the south-east-
ern European country of Mon-
tenegro.

When she travels to Mon-
tenegro in January, she will be
with 52 other young women
from around the world who will
be all vying for $500,000 in mod-
elling contracts with the leg-
endary modelling agency, Ford
Models Inc.

As winner of the Models242
Male Face of 242, Khristoff is
being considered by Ford Mod-
els for its men’s division and will

Three new
dolphins make a
plash at Atlantis

DOLPHIN Cay Atlantis is
now home to three new Bot-
tlenose dolphins.

Megara, a 12-year-old
female, Hercules, a 10- year-
old male, and Isis, a 10-year-
old female, arrived at their
new home last Thursday.

They were flown non-stop
on a DC-6 aircraft from Tor-

La eh

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd



tola, British Virgin Islands,
to Nassau.

The dolphins, which came
from another dolphin facility,
will be reunited with several
other dolphins that also came
from the same facility in Tor-
tola to Atlantis in 2007.

Dolphin Cay marine mam-
mal specialists Michelle
Davis and Bernard Collie
spent a week in Tortola get-
ting to know the animals and
starting the relationship-
building process prior to the
transport.

Along with the Dolphin
Cay team of husbandry
experts and veterinarians,
and with the help of many
different divisions of Atlantis,
the transport was a success.

Atlantis said yesterday that
the three dolphins are all
doing great in their new sur-
roundings.

Within seconds of being
placed into the pools they
were eating fish and explor-
ing their new environment.
They will stay together for
the next few days as Atlantis’

team of specialists watches
them closely to ensure they
are adjusting to their new
environment.

Next week they will begin
to be introduced to the rest
of the Dolphin Cay family.

have an expenses-paid trip to
New York, where he will shoot
with various photographers,
including, once again, event
photographer Karl Rothen-
berger.

In addition to their travels,
Mae Wayne, editor-in-chief of
SHE Magazine, has offered to
jump start the careers of the
winners by featuring them in a
future edition of her hugely
popular Caribbean magazine.

Taking second place behind
Gabriel on the women’s side
was 18-year-old Carol Stubbs, a
student of Temple Christian
Academy, and she was followed
by 17-year-old Saint Augustine’s
College student Erinn Treco,
who finished third.

On the men’s side, 27-year-
old auto mechanic Godwin
Rolle took second spot behind
the event’s winner, with former
CC Sweeting student, Jon
Michael Burrows, 20, in third
spot.

The event, held under the
patronage of Minister of Cul-
ture Charles Maynard, was
dubbed “A Night Under The
Stars” and paid tribute to two
icons in the Bahamian fashion
industry, Pepper Johnson and
Pat Paul.

Sponsors for the event were
The Tribune, Diamonds Inter-
national, Flaunt It Clothing
Store, Carlos Valentino, Sexy

-Sandles, Pot Pourri, Expressions

Shoes, Coconuts Bahama Grill,
and the Ministry of Tourism.






THE TRIBUNE

| Gs A oe eas ae aD aa



Invest Wisely, Sleep Soundly,
Live the Life You Choose






Nassau - T: 242-502-7010 Freeport - T: 242-351-8928

info@cfal.com | www.cfal.com \e 4

~——_

ee a ms —



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 3



|

NIB announces —
the relaunch =
of its website

‘THE National Insurance
Board yesterday announced the
re-launch of its website, which
will enable retirees, employers
and self-employed persons to do
online much of what they used to
do manually.

The www.nib-bahamas.com
site and its new functions were
designed and implemented for
NIB by IBM software services at
a cost of “hundreds of thou-
sands” of dollars. It is the first of
several e-business initiatives that
NIB chairman Patrick Ward said
the organisation intends to use
to make access to its services
more convenient and less costly
for NIB itself.

It is also hoped that it will
make businesses miore likely to
keep up to date with their pay-
ments, and give NIB a better idea
of who owes what.

Mr Ward said: “The highlight
of the new website is that it now
allows employers and self-
employed persons to submit con-
tributions and statements of con-
tributions online and it allows
retirees to submit benefit claims
online as well.”

Acting director Anthony (Cur-
tis said: “One of the problems
we have always had is that
employers, if they are not pay-
ing the contributions, they are
not required to submit the
monthly C10s or employer return
forms to us. Because of that we
do not have an‘accurate account
of the dollar value of the contri-
butions that would be owed to
us. Because of what we are doing
now it allows employers to actu-
ally go to the website to post their
contributions and we can have
that information on hand so not
only will we have an accurate
account of what contributions are
owed to us but it will also
enhance our ability to actually
process the claims when they are
processed. :

“This feature will alsoenhance
our ability to be of better service
to our claimants as well,” said
Mr Curtis.

Retirement benefit forms can
be submitted from today, while
submission of online contribu-
tion statements will begin on
October 20 of 2008. The infor-
mation will allow NIB to have a
register of all people who work
’ for an organisation online.

“Beginning today, employers
and self-employed persons are

local office. ;

This registration process will
result in each entity being
assigned individual access (user-
name/password) to the online c10
system,” said Mr Ward.

Other information available
on the website will be annual
reports, a list of uncollected
cheques and other information
on NIB andl its role.

e SEE STORY
PAGE ONE

Man in custody
in connection
with shooting

POLICE took a man into
custody in New Providence
on Monday: in connection
with the recent shooting near
the Pepper Pot Takeaway in

Grand Bahama.

’ Acting on a tip at around
6pm, a team of officer's trav-
elled to Inagua Way off
Carmichael Road and
detained Kema Moss.

Mr Moss is currently help-
ing police with their inquiries
into the shooting death.

Police also arrested a man
in his 30s in connection with
the matter.

@ POLICE officers found
an illegal firearm in a New
Providence cemetery. -

Acting on information
from a member of the public
on Monday some time after
9pm, the officers found a .32
calibre handgun at St
Joseph’s Cemetery.

No arrests have been
made and investigations into
the matter continue.

RM Bailey class
of ‘88 meeting

THE graduating class of
1988 of R.M. Bailey will be
holding a meeting tonight
at 7:00 p.m at the school
. on Robinson Road.

’ Plans for the upcoming
Souse Out which will be
held this Saturday October
11 beginning at 7:00 a.m
will be discussed.

Tickets will also be
available for sale at this
time.

For donations and ticket
information call 302-2783.

Please be on time. All —
graduates are invited to
attend.



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Minister of Tourism

is ‘very optimistic’

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS SPECULATION con-
tinues about strategic plans

“for a resurgence of the

tourism industry, Minister
of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace told The
Tribune he feels “very opti-
mistic” going into the next
few months.

The minister, who is today
expected to reveal an action
plan to help strengthen
tourism, noted that
prospects were looking
promising for the industry,
based on the increase in

availability of credit in the
US economy following Con-
gress’ passing of the Bush
administration’s $700 billion
bail-out plan.

The minister warned that
although Americans — who
represent a significant por-
tion of international visitors
to the Bahamas - are
expected to experience
financial ease as a result of
the bail-out, they must still
be convinced to make the
decision to take a vacation
in the Bahamas.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said his main objective is to
assist in generating future

growth and sustainability.
According to persons work-
ing in the tourism industry,
this year has been one of the
toughest as far as generat-
ing revenue and in control-
ling market sustainability.

Response

In response to January
reports of declining arrivals
to the Bahamas, ministry
officials introduced a $12
million “environmentally
sensitive” ad campaign
intended to entice Ameri-
can and European travellers.

However, figures for April ;
and May indicated consis- |
tent declines, except in.
terms of arrivals from Cana- ;

i
}
i
)

da, a sector which has con-
tinued to show growth.
Tourist numbers were fur

ther affected by Tropical %.

Storm Hanna and Hurricane |
Ike. i

When he took the post in #
early July, Minister Vander- ;
pool-Wallace stated that)
increasing fuel prices had)
presented major challenges |
for the industry, adding that
this was “clearly one of’
the things we have to
address.”

Mother of baby ‘attacked by ants in PMH’ plans to sue

A MOTHER whose baby
was attacked by red ants
while being treated for asth-
ma in an incubator is plan-
ning to sue Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for negli-
gence.

Azorator Culmer, 27, of
Lucky Heart Corner off East
Street, Nassau, was dis-
traught to find her two-
month-old daughter Unique
swollen and sore with ant
bites after staying at the hos-
pital overnight in September
last year.

The mother of three said
Unique has been deeply
affected by the trauma, with
scars on her face and eyelids,

bite marks around her nos-
trils, and she is afraid to let
anyone touch her face.

Attorney Craig Butler rep-
resenting Miss Culmer said
his attempt to settle the mat-
ter out of court has been
fruitless and he anticipates
he will have to litigate the
matter in court.

Miss Culmer claims she
alerted a nurse when she
noticed ants in her daugh-
ter's incubator and she had
been assured Unique would
be moved, but the next
morning Unique hospital
staff called to say the baby
was covered in ant bites.

"I couldn't even recognise

her when I gone there," Miss
Culmer said.
"Her. whole face was raw

and then even when the skin ©

grew back she still had marks
on her nose, her lip, her ear
and on her fingers."

Bites

Unique, who is now 15
months old, was called back
to PMH for check-ups in the
first few weeks after the ant
attack to assess the bites and
her respiratory conditions,
but Miss Culmer claims the
hospital have showed little
concern since.

Workshop sponsored
_ by US Embassy aims sou
= to help combat piracy FRReiNsTimaiss

in the Bahamas

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON ©

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN AN ongoing effort to
stamp out the widespread sale
and transit of counterfeit
goods which violate interna-
tional piracy laws, the Ameri-
can Embassy is sponsoring a
workshop to help the
Bahamas develop strategies to
combat piracy of intellectual

- property in the Bahamas.

The transit of counterfeit
drugs, car and airplane parts

_ through the Bahamas coupled
‘with the lack of enforcement

of copyright laws is a major
concern and officials said the
workshop is critical in raising
awareness about the country's
piracy problem.

In 2006, the Bahamas was
removed from the US Trade
Representative's Special 301
priority watchlist — which
examines the adequacy and
effectiveness of intellectual
property rights — after progress
was made with Cable
Bahamas' commitment to the
Television Association of Pro-
gramers (TAP).

In the past, TAP said Cable
Bahamas failed to comply in
narrowing the scope of its
compulsory TV licensing
regime.

Jeff Dubel, political and eco-
nomic chief at the US
Embassy, said both sides were
still engaged in talks to resolve
the issue.

"T think that we took them _

off the watchlist because they
enacted some legislation that
was very positive. The Cable
Bahamas issue is still ongoing
but they're working very hard
to try to resolve that with com-
panies in the states.

"They have made progress
by talking to individual com-
panies, there's still some cable
companies in the states that
want to sell the entire
Caribbean package only. I
think it's going to be a while
before that's resolved, I think

- it's very positive they're talk-

ing to each other and that's
what I would encourage is for

Bid to stamp out the
widespread sale; transit
of counterfeit goods



them to continue talking on
the issue".

Mr Dubel said US officials
are still concerned about the
proliferation of counterfeit
movies, CDs and handbags
which are widely available
throughout the country.

The workshop aims to pro-
vide law enforcement and the
attorney general's office with
strategies for cracking down
on the area.

"A little more effort is need-
ed there but on the whole on
the major issues we are
pleased. But then you look at
some other things in the area
such as the straw market, and
other places — yesterday they
were able to go to a music
store and they were able to
buy counterfeit CDs, counter-
feit DVDs just out in the open,
that's something that's not
acceptable and if I were an
artist working here, that would
bother me".

Raphael Munnings, a musi-
cian who was invited to rep-
resent the Bahamas Musicians
and Entertainers Union, also
advocates the enforcement of
the copyright law for artists’
protection.

"You walk along the streets,
in every food store someone
is pushing some DVD in your
face, some music that you
know it's not original stuff.
We've been talking about it
for a long time but like I said I
think it needs more exposure
and to be more vigilant with
(enforcing) the law".

The Tribune spoke with a

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Bahamian who sells counter-
feit CDs and DVDs, who said
if police enforced the copy-
right law he would obey. But
once that is done, the DVD
and CD market would "shriv-
el up", he said.

"If they enforce it, I'll just
obey the law.

“It ain' hard to crack down
on those places (that:sell coun-
terfeit goods) but then again,
they'll just be more discreet
from then on. And unless
shops down here start selling
(authentic) DVDs and CD for

like $10, the market will shriv- -

el up," he:said.

However, Unique has been
scarred by the experience.

"If you look close you see
the marks on her face, her
eyes and her ears," Miss Cul-
mer said.

"You could see the nibbles
on her nose and her lip. And
she won't let you touch her
face, she will fight you."

Miss Culmer believes
social services would have
intervened if she had shown
the same disregard for her
infant's care, and she wants








“HE PRIPCHA

Unique Sifts Ideas
For She TSFtome

— Siniled

the hospital to compensate
for their negligence.

She said: "They have
showed no concern, no care.
They are trying to keep it
hush, hush and for the con-
dition she was in the bites
must have been there long
because they bit holes in her




skin. That's real negligence '

on their behalf."
Princess Margaret Hospi-

tal failed to respond to calls |
from The Tribune before the ,

paper went to press.

| Nassau’s Premier Store




Baypar! Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

Peony Niae





PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau. Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Baham.i: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Should gambling be legalised? .

IT IS NOW time to face the gambling
issue. Should gambling be made legal in
the Bahamas, or should the anti-gambling
laws be strictly enforced?

This time we have to be realistic, Either
the police can enforce the law, which means
enforcement will have to start at the top
and continue down to the street corner
numbers racketeers, or it will have to be
recognised that gambling has become so
entrenched in its breach that it has to be
legalised.

Prime Minister Ingraham recognised this
fact in February this year when he
announced that he was considering legal-
ising gambling in the Bahamas for both
citizens and residents.

According to the law only tourists can
gamble at the casinos.

The fact is, however, anyone who wants
to gamble is doing so whether it be at the
casino, web shops, in back room pool par-
lours, or playing the numbers. Bahamians,

- and residents of all nationalities are gam-

bling.

And many of the policemen who should
be arresting the culprits are standing in
line at the gaming windows.

Mr Ingraham made his statement when
the crime report, completed in the late

1990’s, was being debated in the House .

earlier this year. =e
That report called for the improved
enforcement of the gaming laws.

“Now, Mr Speaker, this society on a
Sunday morning, you go to the gaming
houses, to Flowers and those places, and it
is like a bank on pay day — government
pay day,” said Mr Ingraham. “They are
set up like a bank, hundreds and hundreds
and hundreds of places. Well, either we
believe that it is illegal, or we believe that
it should be legal.”

“I told the Commissioner of Police last
week,” said Mr Ingraham, “that it seems to
me that we are unable to enforce that law,
and that I was going to give consideration
to legalising the numbers business. Of
course, he didn’t support me in that think-
ing, but the reality is that it is not an
enforceable law. And the society is doing it
everyday. There is webshop here, and a
webshop there, all over the island.”

Judging from the letters we have

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received many Bahamian are fed up —
they want action. Recently, the Flowers
organisation made a generous donation to
NEMA.

Letter writers condemned government
for receiving the donation considering the
source. Hypocrisy! they screamed. Every
time this particular web shop makes a
move, the letter writers pounce with acid
letters. If government can’t enforce this
law, then what other laws have they
shrugged their collective shoulders on and
capitulated? Is this why crime is out of
control? They want to know.:

The boldness of the web shops suggests
that someone has made the operators
believe their operations are legal.

Is it because our current gaming laws do
not cover Internet gaming, and, therefore,
they think they can slip through the legal
net?

Or have they in fact paid a business
licence to government for their operations?
If they have a business licence do they have
it for a webshop or do they have it for
another business in which a web shop is
silently incorporated? Or are they out-and-
out illegal and just flaunting the law? These
are the questions the public want answered.

If these operations are legalised, we sug-
gest that the peop, s Treasury should prof-

wit:

Every numbers house, and web shop
should have a business licence for which
they pay a flat fee plus a certain percentage
of gross.

This is how the radio stations are taxed,
so why not the gaming houses? The police-
man’s job is then made easier.

As he makes his rounds, inspecting these
outlets a business licence should be promi-
nently displayed. If it is not, then arrests can
be made. It is then up to government to do
an efficient job of collecting the taxes.

This could be a lucrative source of rev-
enue to help relieve the strain on the Pub-
lic Treasury at this economically critical

* time.

If not, then close them all down, but
don’t, for heaven’s sake, hold yourselves up
to ridicule by picking on an old, ill man —
a foreign resident at that — to make an
example of what happens to a person who
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THE TRIBUNE



Whose
time 1s 1t,
anyway: >

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ON Friday I went to Parcel
Post (East Street) to collect a
package. It was just after 3.30.
I was informed that the facili-
ty was closed because the Cus-
toms officer had gone home
for the day.

On Monday I went again at
2.00. Again I was told that
they were closed because the
Customs officer had left.

I decided to go first thing
Tuesday morning and, after
collecting my packages, I
asked the officer why, for two
days in a row (at least that I
knew of), there was no offi-
cer on duty in the afternoon.

“Oh, they didn’t tell you?”
was his reply.

“They told me they were
closed because you all had
gone home.”

“They didn’t tell you why?”
he asked.

“No, they didn’t.”

“Well, they know why. They
know why”

“Well, since they won’t,
could you tell me why?” I
asked.

“Oh, yeah, [ll tell you. I'd
be glad to tell you,” ‘he
responded, followed by
silence.

...Well, what was the prob-
lem?”

“The air-conditioning was-
n’t working.”

I had seen a sign posted on
Friday to that effect, but it



Dawes.

lett






ers@tribunemedia.net



looked as if it had been there
awhile. In all fairness, it had
been hot in there that day.

“But,” I said, “it was on yes-
terday.” —

His reply to that was, “Well,
it wasn’t to our liking.”

I was gob-smacked!

“Not to your liking?”

“No, it was on but it wasn’t
to our liking. Don’t complain
to me. Don’t complain to me.”

“But if you were the one
making the decision that it
wasn’t ‘to your liking’ then
you ARE the one to complain
to. It’s not to MY liking that I
couldn’t collect my package
because you were a little
uncomfortable.” _

“Well...well, I wouldn’t even
waste my time.”

I was enraged!

“Well,” I retorted with as
much indignance as I could

- muster, “I’m sorry to have

wasted your time, Mr ‘public
servant’.”

Not being a confrontational
person, or maybe just unwill-
ing to make a public spectacle
of myself, I did not pursue the
matter further and treat him
to a Viveca-style tirade, but, in
the words of a great bard, I
“done been incensed!”

I ask you, dear reader,

whose time hid really been
wasted? He went home to
enjoy the cool comforts of his
car and homie, on my dime
and that of every Bahamian
tax-payer. Meanwhile and
consequently, I was forced to
make three trips to the post
office to collect a $24 pair of
sunglasses!

I considered.writing a letter
to the (Controller of Customs,
but leti’s face it; could I really
expect the solution to come
from within the very organi-
sation that produced the type
of lazy, uncommitted, unre-
pentantly lackadaisical atti-
tudé shown by this man who is
supposed to be’serving the
public? We are, apparently,
to seek their assistance at their
convenience, on their person-
al schedule and, while men
and women work outside in
the burning sun and 90+%
humidity of a sub-tropical cli-
mate, they can apparently

only perform within a narrow |

range of refrigerator-like tem-
peratures.

I would at this point offer a
theory as to why the public at

large-harbours a level of ani-

mus towards the government

and the public service but,
“well, I wouldn’t even waste
my time.”

GRAHAM
THORDARSON
Nassau,

October, 2008.

We want officer Dion Marcus Ranger
transferred back to San Salvador

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I humbly ask that you allow
us a short space in your valu-
able publication to voice our
concerns about a matter we, the
community of San Salvador,
consider important.

A month ago one of our
Police Officers was transferred
from the island.

There was no legitimate rea-
son or explanation as to why he
was transferred.

This officer’s name is Detec-
tive Constable 828 Dion Marcus
Ranger.

Officer Ranger is an officer
who performs his duty with
compassion and love and enjoys

what he is and what he does and.





e eer.
SAY INN Foy ee





. if there were a few more officers

like him the Police Department
would be so much more effec-
tive especially with what is
going on in our Bahamas today

. with the rise in crime.

He along with Constable 2702
Gerard Miller, another one of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force finest, have done a
tremendous job in San Salvador
and they must be commended.

These two officers have done
so much with the youth here on
the island in implementing the
Police Cadet Programme and
also an after school programme
where the kids could go and get
assistance with their homework
and/or any other personal mat-
ter they wanted to discuss.

They also trained the present -

Police Reserve Officers on San
Salvador and did such a fine job
that during their graduation
these Reserve Officers gradu-
ated as one of the leading
squads in The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

These are the type of officers
we need leading our country
not to be transferred from a
place where you have made so
much positive changes because
the officer-in-charge might have
a “beef” so to speak with you or

might be jealous because of the
relationship officers Ranger and
Miller have with the communi-
ty.

We begin to wonder why
there is so much crime in The
Bahamas because some Royal
Bahamas Police Force are too
busy with side issues rather than
trying to deal with alll this crime
going on.

We do not need this on San

Salvador we want, officers like .

Ranger and Miller who care
about their jobs and the com-
munity. Who no matter what
time of day or night if someone
needed help they were there to
assist.

Who no matter how friendly
they were with you if you break
the law you suffer the conse-
quences.

We respect these men and we |
want officer Ranger transferred —
back to.San Salvador. We need |

people like Officers Miller and
Ranger.
Thank you.

CQNCERNED
CITIZENS

The Community of
The Island of

San Salvador,
September, 2008.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 5



Residents consider buying Joe’s

Christians and

Jews on Grand
Bahama to unite
for Israel's 60th
anniversary

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Christians
and Jews on Grand Bahama
will unite in’a historic inter-
denominational service to cel-
ebrate Israel’s 60th anniversary
as a nation.

Pastor Alexis Wallace of
Shalom Caribbean Interna-
tional announced that his min-
istry has planned the first Juda-
ic Christian conclave on Grand
Bahama, with the support of
many local churches and pas-
tors, and Jewish leaders in
Freeport and Florida.

Rev Wallace said that a two-
part event has been planned in





Freeport, beginning on Octo- |:

ber 17 with a “powerful” inter-
denominational service at
7.30pm at the Universal
Household of Faith Church in
Hawksbill.

The second event will be a
special luncheon at the Ruby
Swiss Restaurant on October
18 when the son of a promi-
nent Jewish Bahamian pioneer
will be the keynote guest
speaker.

“Tam delighted that so many
of our friends in the commu-
nity and churches are standing
with us as we celebrate Israel’s
60th anniversary.

"We want to send a charge
out to every church and per-
son that understands the rich
Judaic heritage we have in the
islands that this is something
you do not want to miss,” he
said. .

Rev Wallace said the service
of celebration will be attend-
ed by Rabbi Yaakov Neren-
berg, president of the South
Florida Association of Rabbis.

Also attending will be Grand
Bahama Christian Council
(GBCC) president Sobig
Kemp and a number of local
pastors and gospel artists on
Grand Bahama.

Rev Wallace said that the
conclave will be professionally
recorded and a special souvenir
booklet is being produced for
the event- wy

He also“said that an éditet. }

DVD copy of the conclave and

the booklet will be. officially’

presented to the Israeli gov-
ernment.

“The nation of Israel will
know that the Bahamas is
standing with them and praying
for them and celebrating their
60 anniversary,” he said.

Israel is the world’s only
Jewish state. It has a popula-
tion of 7.28 million that con-
sists of Arab Muslims, Chris-
tians, Druze, and Samaritans,
as well as other religious and
ethnic minority groups.

Bishop Kemp, GBCC presi-
dent, said that Israel has actu-
ally been in existence for over
5,000 years, and is celebrating
its 60 year as a re-born nation.

“From the beginning of the
exodus which was 3320 years
ago, the actual time for Israel
being a nation was 5,768
years,” he said.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOPE Town residents fighting
development plans for Joe's Cay are
considering buying the island to pro-
tect it as a no-build zone.

The Elbow Cay, Abaco commu-
nity of full-time residents and sec-
ond homeowners have formed the
Friends of Hope Town, and are
commissioning an independent
Environmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) of Joe's Cay in addition to
the developer's EJA.

They oppose plans submitted by
Bahamian developer Cavalier Con-
struction to build 20 houses, and a
club house and restaurant on the
4.7acre island 250 feet off Elbow
Cay, which is connected by a thick
forest of mangroves. —

Marina

Residents say it would be over-
development of the cay, and further
plans to dredge a channel, build a
marina and artificial beach would
create silt, destroy fish and crawfish
nurseries, displace bonefish, conch
and nesting white-crown pigeons.

The development will create 40
jobs for a manager, receptionists,
cooks, waiting staff, housemaids,
gardeners and more at “The Island
Club”.

But the Friends of Hope Town say
the jobs are not needed.

Environment Minister Earl
Devaux arranged a meeting last
month and around 100 residents met
with Cavalier's managing director
Richard Wilson and deputy MD
Vernon Wells, as well as represen-
tatives from the Bahamas Environ-

The Island Club at Joe’s Cay

CAVALIER'S plans to develop Joe's Cay off Elbow Cay in Abaco.

mental, Science and Technology
(BEST) commission, the Bahamas
National Trust, the Nature Conser-
vancy, the Hope Town Council and
the government’s director of physi-
cal planning.

Houses

Residents stated they would like
to see around three houses on the
cay with minimal environmental
impact.

Friends of Hope Town spokes-
woman Erika Russell said: "Richard
Wilson said Cavalier are develop-

ing the Bahamas they way they feel,
but if you come here and develop,
you have to work with the town, and
everybody I have spoken to is
against it.

"It is too high density, the cost of
the mangroves and the dredging is
huge, and we don't need the jobs
here, we have more than we can
handle.

“Tf you need a maid or a babysit-
ter they are very hard to find.

"And if more workers come here
then things like crime are going to
go up and we won't be able to cope
with the demand on the infrastruc-
ture."

Cay to protect it from development



The Friends of Hope Town are
commissioning an independent EIA

_ of the cay in addition to Cavalier's

EJA and are considering purchas-
ing the island to protect it as a nat-
ural resource.

Plans

Mr Wells said Cavalier is looking
to Minister Deveaux for a way for-
ward before progressing with their
EIA and architectural plans.

Mr Deveaux was unavailable for
comment before The Tribune went
to press last night.

Claim that mass media partially responsible for young people's ‘deviant’ hehaviour

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE mass media is at least

’ partially responsible for the

a
iow

rowing level of deviant behav-
1our among young people in the
region, it was claimed yester-
day.

According to permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Nation-
al Security Missouri Sherman-
Peter, the strong influence of
western culture on the
Caribbean has led many youths
to abandon their traditions.

Speaking on day two of the
13th annual Conference of Pres-
idents and Governor Generals
of CARICOM, Mrs Sherman-
Peter presented an analysis on
the impact of external influ-
ences on developing countries.

“The impact of external influ-
ence on the social development
of developing countries is a fact
of life, and will continue for the
foreseeable future. Developing
countries know where the gaps
are. It is incumbent upon them
to fill in these gaps,” Mrs Sher-

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She explained that many

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ally come with a downside

' which jis directly connected to

the eventual decline in social
and moral awareness the young.

Employment, professional
development, health, migration,
crime, and education are all
“forces” which influence social
balance according to Mrs Sher-
man-Peter.

Touching on the issue of
crime, she concluded that
although a significant volume
of criminality is still generated
within specific countries, it has
also evolved into a modern epi-
demic which is referred to as
“transnational crime.”

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She noted that according to
the United nations Drug Con-

trol Programme, most transna-

tional criminal acts are related
to the drug trade, but can also

involve human smuggling and —

weapons trafficking.

The conference, which con-
tinues until Friday, is expected
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in attendance with recommen-

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Former BDM
candidate hits —
out at the BTC

PHA prepares to launch new
pharmacy information system

THE Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) this
week held the last leg of training sessions in Nassau
to familiarise staff with a new information man-
agement system that will soon be implemented in all
PHA pharmacies.

Participants included staff from the Grand
Bahama health system, the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, and rep-
resentatives of the Bahamas National Drug Agency.

Philip Gray, pharmacy consultant and project
manager of the initiative, said that the General
Electric centricity pharmacy software will allow
the PHA to standardise processes for staff and
patients at all PHA pharmacies in the hospitals
and some 100 clinics across the archipelago.

Mr Gray said the system will facilitate improved
inventory management while helping pharmacists
deliver enhanced healthcare service to patients
throughout the islands.

“When the Public Hospitals Authority in col-
laboration with the Department of Public Health sat
down and looked at the major concerns and chal-
lenges in pharmacy services in the country, the
thoughts were at that time that we needed to look
at inventory management and certainly the transfer
of information and profiles of patients throughout
the national health system and so it is at this junc-
ture we are at today based on information received

‘from the two entities working cohesively as one
force,” said Mr Gray. :

He explained that with standardised processes,
even if pharmacy staff are transferred from one
island to another, they will be able to function
effectively because everyone will be using the same
system.

Additionally, he said patients will receive
improved service regardless of their movement
through the islands, as their records will be main-
tained and accessible in all of the PHA pharmacies.

Leonard Sturrup, the PHA’s chief deputy phar-
macist for Grand Bahama, said he believes the new
software represents a major improvement for the
public healthcare system that will lead to better
patient outcomes.

“The new system is a big advance over: what
we’ve had in the past and it will help to facilitate

oS ANDRE}p,
SCHOOL



TCL Photo/Terrance Strachan



GREG MILLS, General Electric application specialist,
provides instruction to Public Hospitals Authority staff
during a recent training session on the new Centricity
Pharmacy. Information Management System that will
soon be launched in PHA pharmacies across the
Bahamas.

better health care of all of our patients. Some of the

problems we run into are with patients seeing sev-
eral doctors, having several different kinds of med-
ication for the same ailment. °

“And with the new system we hope it will be
able to track these patients as they move from facil-
ity to facility and from physician to physician so it
will help us in how we manage our patients and
their medications,” Mr Sturrup said.

Vivienne Lockhart, director of the Bahamas
National Drug agency, also participated in the Nas-
sau training sessions and spoke to the system’s
implications for inventory management.

“From the Drug Agency’s standpoint it would
assist ‘us very much in our inventory control, in
that we will be able to see exactly what quantity of
any particular item that is in the system is available,
be it from the floor level that is from the ward to the
pharmacy itself,” she said.

The new pharmacy software system will be
launched in Grand Bahama on November 1.

Grand Bahama will serve as the pilot site for
the project. Implementation at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre in Nassau will follow in January and March
2009 respectively.

S

St

Ex

The International School of the Babamas
FOUNDED 1948



Search for new Principal/CEO,
to take up responsibilities no later than 1 August 2009

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas, was established
in 1948 and is governed by an 11-person, elected board of directors. It is accredited
by both the Council of International Schools and the New England Association
‘of Schools and Colleges and authorized to offer both the Primary Years Programme
and the Diploma Programme of the’International Baccalaureate Organization. The
school’s motto is Ethics and Excellence and its mission statement, philosophy
and aims, as well as much other relevant information, may be accessed on its

website: www.st-andrews.com.

‘The school is divided into the two major divisions of primary school and secondary
school, each of which is led by a head of school. Each division contains over 400
children and total school enrolment is 845. Approximately 70% of the students
at the school are Bahamian and the remaining 30% are drawn from another 21
nations. There are 120 people employed at the school, of which 85 are teachers,
representing eight different countries. The administrative council consists of the
principal and CEO, the assistant principal and admissions director, the two heads
of school, the financial controller and the campus manager.

The principal is the school's chief executive officer, responsible to the board for
the administration of the school in all its aspects. The successful candidate will:

e bea qualified teacher, who possesses an advanced degree, preferably in

education

° - be able to document successful experience as the head or divisional leader
(e.g. primary school; secondary school) of a good international school and/or
a leading independent school in The Bahamas or elsewhere. In any case,
international experience is essential.

© have particular aptitudes in the areas of: school improvement; international
accreditation standards; curriculum; administration; school finances.

e have an intimate knowledge of the programmes of the International
Baccalaureate Organization and of the accreditation protocols of both the
Council of International Schools and the New England Association of Schools

-and Colleges

‘e be aperson of personal and professional integrity '
e becapable of recruiting outstanding teachers and of leading a talented and
disparate group of faculty and staff members in the pursuit of excellence

The salary and benefits offered will be dependent upon the qualifications and
experience of the successful candidate. In addition to salary, benefits include
pension payments, a contribution to health insurance and discounted tuition for

children.

The school is conducting its own search process. Applicants must submit all
relevant documentation listed on the application form, which can be accessed
on the homepage of our school’s website.

Applications may be delivered to the school by hand, sent by express mail or
fax (1 242 364 1739), but the preferred means is by e-mail attachment to:

principalsearch@st-andrews.com. Enquiries by telephone are discouraged.

The deadline for applications is Friday 31 October 2008. During November, the
search committee will consider all applications. The selected short-listed candidates,

along with their spouses, will have the opportunity to meet with faculty members, —

parents, students, staff members and the board of directors before being interviewed
in Nassau by the search committee, which will make its recommendations to the
board of directors once all interviews have been conducted. It is hoped to make
the appointment of the new principal in December.

It should be noted that the search committee and the board reserve the right to
curtail the process if the right candidate is identified during the process or to re-
open the search if the initial process does not identify a suitably qualified candidate.

Principal Search Committee
St Andrew’s School

The International School of The Bahamas

P O Box EE 17430
Yamacraw Hill Road,
Nassau

New Providence
The Bahamas

Fax: + 1 242 364 1739

- E-mail: principalsearch@st-anc 2ws.com.

FORMER candidate for
the Bahamas Democratic
Movement Omar Archer
lashed out at BT'C's execu-
tive board for docking the
pay of 514 workers in hard
economic times.

He called the decision to
punish the workers, who
brought Nassau to a stand-
still during an unauthorised
protest, a "disgrace".

Mr Archer, who lost his bid
for chairman of the Progres-
sive Liberal Party early this
year, argued that BTC should
have reprimanded the
employees in writing, advising
them that any subsequent
action would result in a

harsher penalty, before cut-

ting their pay.

"T think it's a disgrace, giv-
en the economic situation and
the hardship that people are
suffering, I think the worst
thing that you can do right
now to the hard-working,

common man in this country ©

is to cut his or her pay.

"T feel that the industrial
action was expressive of our
democracy and was well with-
in its guidelines. So I'm now
saying publicly that I guaran-
tee you that this very move
will result in the resignation
of the chairman Mr Julian
Francis within the next three
months. I would advise (the
union) that they do and I'll
strongly support any action
in that regard. It's just very
distasteful to treat 514
employees in this way,” Mr












“I think it's a
disgrace, given
the economic
situation and the
hardship that
people are
suffering, I think
the worst thing
that you can do
right now to the
hard-working,
common man in
this country is to
cut his or her

pay.”



Omar Archer

Archer said.

The BTC employees, who
were agitating for more input
into the company’s privatisa-
tion process, protested in
mid-August bringing all of
downtown Nassau and
Freeport to a standstill by
stopping their vehicles in traf-
fic.

The action angered many
members of the public, who
felt they should not suffer
because of an internal BTC
issue. The protesters never
admitted to holding the
demonstration — claiming

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mysteriously broke down at
the same time.

Mr Archer said: "Overall, it
seems as if the government is
trying to take away the aver-
age Bahamian worker's free-
dom of expression and its just
not right, and people should
be free to express themselves
free of the fear of victim-
istion."

Last week, acting BTC
CEO Kirk Griffin said in a
statement that the company
was cutting the pay of 514
workers.

BTC management added
that “due process” is still
being followed in determin-
ing the way in which the
employees are to be sanc-
tioned.



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IHE IHIBUNG

The PLP on Grand

— Bahama claims
government policies —
counter productive —

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport |
Reporter i
dmaycock@tribunemedia.ne

FREEPORT - The PLP
on Grand Bahama claims
that the FNM governmen-
t’s policies are counter
productive and “directly
responsible” for the eco-
nomic slow down that is
currently being experi-
enced in the Bahamas.

The leaders of the PLP
in Freeport made this
assertion at a press con-
ference on Sunday.

“The PLP leadership
on Grand Bahama is of
the view that the Free
National Movement gov-
ernment’s conduct, since
coming to office 17
months ago, has been
counter productive and
directly responsible for
the slowing down, to an
almost full stop, of our
economy,” said members
of the GB PLP Council in
a statement.,

They stated that many
billion dollar projects
were stopped by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham upon his return to
office.

“Ingraham’s stop,
review, amend and cancel
policy created a climate of
distrust in the government
and people of the
Bahamas, and out of the
window went all those
promising projects,”
according to a statement
issued by the PLP.

“This, in our view, did
not only cause foreign
investors already here to
step back and take a sec-
ond look at the security of
their investments in the
country, but it made
potential investors very -
jittery to the point where
potential investments :
were shelved for the time’?
being. And this brought _
about the slowdown which
we have been experienc-
ing ever since.”

While he announced
that several developments
would be reviewed, Mr
Ingraham did not in fact
cancel any projects.

But the PLP noted that
some of the new invest-
ments which materialised
under the PLP administra-
tion have not progressed
on Grand Bahama.

They noted that the sale
of the Royal Oasis Resort
and the investment by
International Distributors
Ltd were set to take place
when the FNM came to
office. However, both -
projects have not gotten
off the ground for over a
year. ;

“We reiterate our call
on the government to
come out from wherever
they are hiding, and
speak to Grand Bahami-
ans.

“We call on the FNM’s,
“power pack team’ on
Grand Bahama to speak
to their constituents and
give us some kind of hope
for our future. You were
very visible during the
election campaign when
you wanted our votes and
you promised us better
representation,” said the
PLP;



Bri

either between 2 and 5 centimeters and has s
_ the axillary lymph nodes.

You can survive breast cancer. Early detection through regular breast self-exams and a regular program of mam

_ y About Stage II Breast Cance i ROAR
7 divided into stage IIA and stage IIB based on tumor size and whether the cancer has spread
bmph nodes (the lymph nodes under the arm). In stage IIA, the cancer is either.no larger than 2 centimeters and has spread to the

axillary lymph nodes, or between 2 and 5 centimeters but has not spread to the axillary lym stage IT
pread to the axillary lymph nodes, or larger than 5 centimeters but has not spread to

Stage II breast cancer is

Groups speak

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A local
environmental group and a
citizen rights organisation
are speaking out against the
proposed expansion of Mar-
tin Marietta Materials.

Earthcare and the Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents stressed
that the project would
severely impact the environ-
ment as well as the health
and safety of the residents of
Eight Mile Rock (EMR).

Martin Marietta has sub-
mitted an Environmental
Impact Assessment study to

the Grand Bahama Port:

Authority and the govern-
ment for review.

The project would involve
major drilling and excavation
on land across the Warren J
Highway. Although the land
is owned by the company,
EMR residents fear that the
blasting and drilling will
damage the freshwater lens-

: . es in the area and damage

homes. ‘

SS

Gail Woon, president of .

Eartheare, is demanding that
the EIA be made available
to the public.

She said international envi-
ronmental law requires that
the public have meaningful
input into decisions which
directly affect their lives.

“The Bahamas needs to
live up to the global treaties
and conventions to which it
has signed on to,” she said.

Stakeholder

“We, the stakeholders,
have been clear from the
outset that we do not want
Martin Marietta Bahama
Rock to continue its drilling
and blasting in our back-
yard.”

Ms Woon claims that the
company has already been
allowed to devalue the prop-
erties in the Queen’s Cove
Subdivision and has offered
no compensation to the
stakeholders there.

“If this project is allowed
to cross the Warren J Levar-
ity Highway compromising
the coppice, the second

largest mangrove nursery in
the country, the freshwater
lens, the health and safety of
residents, further damaging
the largest investment a per-
son has — their home — then
our government would have
failed us, the stakeholders,
miserably,” she said.

Martin Marietta manufac-
tures aggregate materials for
export.

The company has held two
town meetings in EMR con-
cerning their proposed pro-
ject, however many residents
still oppose it.

EMR residents said they
are very concerned about the
damage to the fresh water
lens in the area.

They claim that blasting
conducted by MM has
already caused damage to
their homes.

Ms Woon said that water is
a precious resource and no
corporation or company
should be allowed to destroy
it,

She said the offer to pipe
in city water from Freeport is
a slap in the face to home-
owners in Eight Mile Rock.

“There is no good reason



BYRAN WOODSIDE, Pinewood MP and Minister of State for Youth and Sports, standing at a SMART Board dur-
ing a recent visit to Cleveland Eneas Primary School

Pinewood FNM Association gives
$30,000 donation to school

A DONATION of $30,000
from the Pinewood FNM Associ-
ation made it possible for the
Cleveland Eneas Primary School
students to start the school year
with five new SMART Boards, a

LCD projector, and computer

equipment.

SMART Boards are the
world's leading easy-to-use inter-
active whiteboards that combine
the simplicity of an ordinary
whiteboard with the power of a
computer. :

Pinewood's Member of Parlia-
ment Byran Woodside said this

new technology exposes the chil-
dren of his constituency to the
technology currently being used
globally in education.

“We are pleased to be able to
contribute to improving the tech-
nology that is important for con-
tinued development of the chil-
dren of Pinewood", Mr Wood-
side said.

The MP and other members of
the Pinewood FNM Association
recently visited Cleveland Prima-
ty School as part of the Associa-
tion's annual-back-to-school ini-
tiative.



PINEWOOD MP Byran Woodside talks with computer students at
Cleveland Eneas Primary School.

sh American Financial Breast Cancer Tip

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During the visit, State Minis-
ter Woodside continued his tra-
dition of donating computers,
books and school supplies to the
students. ‘

VVEUVINE OVAL, VULUDLEI OU, CUUY, Fr

MT wo ie er
out against proposed

expansion of Martin Marieta Materials

for our freshwater lens to be
further compromised by
Martin Marietta Bahama
Rock or any other entity cur-
rently carrying on business
at the harbour area.

Right

“Freshwater is a right that
we are entitled to. We will
not stand for our natural
rights to be stomped upon
because a foreign owned cor-
poration wishes to come in
and exploit our resources for
their huge profit at our
expense,” Ms Woon said.

“The Bahamas is one of





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the most water-scarce
countries worldwide; it is
insane to compromise any
more of our freshwater
resources. :

“The time is now to
conserve all of the
freshwater lenses that we
have left.

“Tf our government allows
this huge foreign owned
company to ravage the hopes
and dreams of the largest set-
tlement in the nation for the
profit for the few at the
expense of the many, then
they deserve not to bé voted
back in at the next election
time,” said Ms Woon.






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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

FROM page one

Delancey, of Garden Hills, sus-
tained head injuries and was
pronounced dead at the scene
by emergency medical person-
nel.

There was no evidence that
he was wearing a helmet, police
said.

Officer in-charge of the Traf-
fic Division, Supt Melvin Lundy,
said that because Mr Delancey’s
bike slid into an oil patch, it is
hard to determine if speed
played a factor in his death.

“There was an oil slick in the
road. We believe that was the

Motorcyclist is the third

traffic fatality in 24 hours.

cause of that particular accident
so we can’t say for sure if speed
(was a factor),” Supt Lundy
said, adding that “No helmet
was found on the scene.”

The incident came hours after
a car with four women careened
off East Bay Street, smashed
into a tree before crashing into
another one early Monday
morning. Police said the women
were trapped in the car after the

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early 20s and the other in her
late teens) were taken to hospi-
tal where they remain in “seri-
ous” condition.

Last night the victims were
named as Tameka Brown, 18,
of Key West Street, and
Albereese Roker, 17, of South
Beach. The names of the two
injured women have still not
been released.

This time last year, the coun-
try recorded 36 traffic fatalities
compared to 39 up to press time.
And because the upcoming hol-
iday months are normally filled
with alcohol and parties, police
say they are concerned this
year’s toll will exceed last year’s
toll of 50 deaths.

“It is cause for’ concern
because what happens now,
what we call the ‘party months’
are coming and holidays are
coming so usually the (traffic)
fatalities pick up at the end part
of the year,” Inspector David
Lockhart of the traffic division
said.

Traffic police are beefing up
patrols on roads known for
speeding in hopes of curbing this
year’s statistics.

“For the full year last year
(there) were 50 (traffic deaths)
and I am hoping we do not sur-
pass 50 (this year). We’re doing
a number of patrols and a num-
ber of speed checks (in high-
speed zones) like John F
Kennedy Drive, 'Tonique
Williams Darling Highway, Har-
rold Road, Gladstone Road,
Coral Harbour...these are areas
which are known for speeding,”
Supt Lundy told The Tribune.

Police are also scheduling
community forums as a venue
to give out tips on driving safety,
he said.

Of the 39 traffic deaths for
the year, 34 were males and five
were females. Insp Lockhart
said the major contributing fac-
tor in those deaths were speed
and alcohol, followed by deaths
relating to pedestrian negli-
gence.

Seventeen of the deaths this
year have been in Nassau.

The male victims were aged
14 to 45 while the females were
between two to 19.

“And you know the majority
of the fatalities are in Nassau.
Last year we had 33 in Nassau,
this year we are up to 17 in Nas-
sau now.

“And our tally count com-
pared to last year this same time,
we're up by three. The same
time last year we were at 36, we
are now at 39.”



ao :
SHREDDING \

Sates COMMUNITY

THE TRIBUNE

NIB chairman says it’s
unfair to blame execs for
contribution shortfalls

FROM page one

added: “I’m not sure I should say because some of the issues are
really proprietory information at this stage. And I am not at lib-
erty to disclose that sort of behind-the-scenes thinking that led
to that decision.”
Mr Ward said that when the current board met for the
first time “there was in place a fairly comprehensive report that
dealt with elements of performance standards, reviews, how
certain things should be done. It was our feeling that those
issues as in place at the time were not appropriate to be intro-
duced for a variety of reasons, so we aborted that process.”

However, he said the Board will “revisit that issue in short
order.”

“T don't want to interpret my remarks as being that there is
no commitment to improving performance,” he said.

Actuarial reports on the NIB have said that that reducing
administrative costs and improving compliance rates of employ-
ers making contributions should be priorities for the organi-
sation.

The seventh actuarial report predicted that, by the most
optimistic assessment, the fund’s resources may be depleted by
2034, in part because the country’s population is ageing while
new people are being born to enter the labour force at a less-
er rate than before.

Acting director Anthony Curtis said that, as of now, the
NIB is already “several million dollars” behind the target it had
set for contribution collections this year.

Yesterday board chairman Mr Ward announced two mea-
sures designed to begin addressing these concerns - charging of
interest on all payments arrears from January 1, 2009, and a
newly redesigned website that allows stakeholders to carry
out online some functions they would have previously had to
do manually.

Asked to say whether he would agree that shortfalls i in con-
tribution collections would indicate that some staff members
may not have been doing their job, and therefore should be act-
ed upon in this respect, Mr Ward said: “It’s a good point.”

“The board has mandated that improving compliance is an
issue that needs to rise to a very high level of priority. Having
done that, what we now need to focus on is developing the kind
of organisational structure that will support that initiative and
make sure that the mandate can be properly pursued.

“I am not sure that we are at the stage where we can be sat-
isfied as a board that we have the kind of organisational struc-
ture that is fully in place that will actually cause the executives
to be as effective as they can be in pursuing those objectives.

“And having said that I’m not entirely sure that it would be
fair for us to look at trying to blame executives for issues that
may not necessarily have come to pass because of issues relat-
ed to their own lack of action.” |

He added that the steps to introduce this kind of reform are
in the “incremental stage of being implemented.”

“Once the board is happy that we’ve given them the kind of
organisational structure and help to pursue the mandates
we've given then I think it would be appropriate for us to
look to effectively hold them accountable for the results that
come in,” said Mr Ward.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 9



Rie ee eS ee a ere
Could pirate gold solve our financial woes?

My name is Captain Kidd,
God's laws I did forbid

And most wickedly I did, as I
sailed, as I sailed

I'd ninety bars of gold, as 1
* sailed, as I sailed,
I’d ninety bars of gold, and
dollars manifold,
With riches uncontrolled, as I
sailed.

I you believe the noise in
the market, the good folks
of San Salvador’ have unimag-
inable wealth in their grasp, and
are taking advice from an inter-
national media figure named
Roberto Savio - an Italian part-
time resident since the 1980s -
on how to divvy up the spoils.

Lending a stamp of authen-
ticity to the story, Dr Savio
recently presented a document
appropriately entitled “From
Individual Greed to Collective
Happiness” to a standing room-
only public meeting in Cock-
burn Town. It offers a blueprint
on how to share out billions in
gold, silver and gems believed
to lie in a collapsed cave at For-
tune Hill, on the island's bar-
ren east coast.

Local historian Cliff Fernan-
der told Tough Call that back in
the 1960s, a friend named James
Rolle (now deceased) told him
about gold bars he had found
in a cave as a child. Although
Fernander searched for the
treasure energetically with both
dynamite and excavators, he
eventually had to give up. But
the story did not die.

It seems that, apart from
Atlantis, no legend is more tan-
talising than the lost treasure of
Captain William Kidd, a Scot
who became a privateer in the

‘late 1600s, captured a rich
Armenian merchant ship in the
Indian Ocean, sailed it back to
the Caribbean, was arrested in
Boston in 1700 and hanged in
London for piracy the follow-
ing year.

Kidd arrived in the West
Indies in April, 1699, in the
Quedah Merchant, his Armen-
ian treasure ship, which he
abandoned off the island of His-
paniola before heading for
Boston. Just last year a wreck
was discovered off the coast of
the Dominican Republic that



“If the goernment does authorise a
definitive xploration, and we do
find billiois of dollars worth of
pirate goll, we can pay off our
national Jebt and build all the
infrastricture we need for the next

25 years”

emmy STE

Indiana Unversity archaeolo-
gists say isXidd’s abandoned
prize vesse

Wheth¢ or not that is true,
most hisprical accounts say
Kidd burid his gold, silver and
gems onan as yet unidentified
island snewhere in the world.
This tak appears to have two
origins.

Firs; in a bid to save his life
after tring sentenced to death,
Kidd vrote that “In my late
proce:dings in the Indies, | have
lodged goods and treasure to
the value of £100,000.” Second,
Kidd actually did bury some
loo! on a cay off Long Island
(New York) on his way to
Boston where he was subse-
quently arrested. But this was
leter recovered by the authori-
ties. Although he has never
been associated historically with
San Salvador, Kidd’ s hypo-
thetical treasure is thought by
many to be located about half a
mile inland from the coast just
north of Pigeon Creek, where
small boats can easily land.

Ownership of the site is con-
fused by the overlapping claims
of no less than 11 families. But
even if the title could be ratio-
nalised, Bahamian law says that
all antiquities found under-
ground belong to the govern-
ment - including treasure.

Dr Keith Tinker, who runs
the Antiquities Corporation,
told Tough Call he was not pre-
pared to comment since the

matter had lately been referred
to the Office of the Prime Min-
ister. And David Davis, perma-
nent secretary at the OPM, did
not return calls.

- But Tinker had authorised
excavations by an earlier trea-
sure hurting group which
caused a similar stir in
2006. That initiative was led by
an ex-US Navy pilot named
Don Patterson, who heads a
company called Old Charter
Salvage, which claims half a

‘century o/ archaeological and

treasure recovery experience
using “the world's most
advanced geological/geophysi-
cal test equipment.”

Treasures

Pievesson permit was
‘evoked when the
recovey attempt collapsed due
to intese squabbling over con-
flictingland claims. But it is said
that rdar penetration and mol-
ecula analysis confirmed the
existace of non-ferrous metal
depgits in Fortune Hill.

Qt his website (www.old-
chater.com), Patterson says he
is witing on a resolution to the

’ tite dispute to relaunch his

epedition: “We have collect-
e numerous stories and tradi-
ons concerning the presence
sf treasures on the island
‘hrough extensive personal
interviews with residents who,

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long ago, have actually seen and
touched these treasures in the
island’s cave system in their
youth. All accounts are consis-
tent as to specific location, and
we have identified numerous
excellent targets.”

He describes the treasure as
“huge caches of gold, silver, and
gems”.

But a new group is now seek-
ing authorisation from the
prime minister’s office to con-
tinue the search by cutting
everyone a piece of the pie. This
group includes Nassau-based
restaurateur Enrico Garzarolli,
an American entrepreneur
named Grant Rose, who is a
long-time visitor to San Sal-
vador, and a committee of lead-
ing citizens that includes Kevin
Williams, Jim Storr, Bert
Deveaux and Charlie Jones.

The group’s lawyer, David
Johnson of Lennox Paton,
recently submitted a petition to
the government with 300 signa-
tures from residents supporting
efforts to definitively resolve
the existence of the treasure.
And this is where Dr Savio
stepped in to suggest a plan to
accommodate all interests -
including the United Nations.

“It is time to learn from the
mistakes of the past,” he said,
arguing that his plan “would
show that love, friendship and
co-operation are the best ways
to distribute riches which have
come through greed and plun-
der, and have been sleeping a
long time in a small hill on the
beautiful island of San Sal-
vador.”

According to one Nassau-
based landowner who preters
to remain anonymous, “it would
be good if enough gold was
found to give everyone a break
financially. But if it’s a lot of
money I think it will cause seri-
ous social friction. That's why
the latest group are trying so
hard to come up with an agree-
ment on the share-out that
everyone can live with.”

Dr Savio founded InterPress
Service, a global news agency
that focuses on North-South
issues, and is connected with a
variety of UN-affiliated policy
institutes and media initiatives.
His proposal calls for the gov-
ernment to keep 70 per cent of
the treasure, with the rest divid-

ed among the prospectors and
investors, other interested par-
ties (such as the various land
claimants), a trust fund for the
people of San Salvador (all
1,000 of them), and the United
Nations children’s charities.
As Enrico Garzarolli put it:
“This would end 50 years of
fighting and make everybody

happy because everybody will °

get something.”

Curse |

he fighting goes back

at least to the 1950s,
according to Clifford Fernan-
der and others. According to
one islander posting on the
Bahamas Issues website: “It is
said that Roy Solomon (a for-
mer representative for the area)
got many gold bars from the
caves. Rumour is that he was
able to open the Pipe of Peace
with some of the gold he got.”

And there’s even a curse
attached to the treasure: “Oth-
er locals who got some of that
gold either died shortly after or
had family members who died.
We were told by the older folks
that during their childhood they
would go in the caves and play
marbles with diamonds and
rubies not knowing what they
were. It is said that these trea-
sures were put there by Cap-
tain Kidd.”

The belief that Kidd left
buried treasure somewhere
around the world has inspired
several great writers, including
Edgar Allan Poe, Washington
Irving and Robert Louis
Stevenson - whose most famous
work is Treasure Island.

According to a 19th century
account: “Captain Kidd is the
most ubiquitous gentleman in
history... The belief that large
deposits of gold were made at
Gardiner’s Island, Dunderberg,
Cro’ Nest, New York City,
Coney Island, Ipswich, the
marshes back of Boston, Cape
Cod, Nantucket, Isles of Shoals,
Money Island, Ocean Beach,
the Bahamas, the Florida Keys,
and elsewhere has caused reck-
less expenditure of actual
wealth...A hope of getting
something for nothing has been
the impetus.”

: hm
CREDIT SUISSE

Some believe Kidd’s treasure
island is now a submerged sand
bar in the Indian‘Ocean. And in
1976, a cave on Providenciales
in the Turks and Caicos Islands
was the object of an unsuccess
ful excavation. There are even
theories that Kidd’s island lies
off the coast of Vietnam or the
Philippines, so it is not that far-
fetched to believe he stashed
gold in the Bahamas.

All the more so when one
considers that the Bahamas was
a notorious haven for pirates.
And Kidd’s name is sometimes
linked to his contemporary - the
so-called robber king, Henry
Avery - in that they are said to
have used the same’ unknown
island to bury their treasure.
And the value of Avery's plun-
der may have been much
greater than that of Kidd,
experts Say.

Avery captured an even rich-
er merchant ship in the Indian
Ocean with a large quantity of
gold and silver. To escape retri-

- bution from the vessel’s Indian

owners he sailed the prize and
its contents to the Bahamas,

’ arriving in Nassau in 1696. After

bribing the governor, Avery's
crew split up - some settled in
Nassau, others left for the
American colonies or returned
to the British Isles.

Some were caught and some
managed to enjoy their retire-
ment. But nothing further was.
heard of Avery himself - or his
share of the booty. And then
there is the pirate called George
Watling, who gave his name to
the island of San Salvador for
many years until the govern-
ment changed it in 1925 for the
publicity value of using the
name Columbus had given it.

Look at it this way. If the gov-
ernment does authorise a defin-
itive exploration, and we do find
billions of dollars worth of
pirate gold, we can pay off our
national debt and build all the
infrastructure we need for the
next 25 years. And we won't
have to fear a global recession.

¢ What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net

Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

Private Banking

is presently considering applications for

SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER ~ CARIBBEAN / UK (Private Banking}

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business

Development Officer covering the Caribbean and UK Markets:

Requirements:

- Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) | in Banking &

Finance

At least seven (10) years banking experience including relationship
management,trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout the Caribbean and UK

Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network within

the market regions.

Strong communication skills in English and a working knowledge of French

would be an asset to facilitate marketing and relationship management with

clients and prospects

Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout the Caribbean and UK and utilize a
network of existing contacts and associates

Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Duties will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore Caribbean and UK based

clients.

Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the

set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures

Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

opportunities

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from the

Caribbean and UK.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

Human Resources Department

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: OCTOBER 17, 2008





PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008 \ THE TRIBU. —



10:30 |







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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 11



LOCAL SPORTS



SPORTS

Miia

Machines
flatten the
Giants

FROM page 14

after they lost their season
opener to last year’s runners-up
St. Andrew’s Hurricanes. This
victory, however, was a sweet
one as SAC utilised their bench
to the fullest.

The starting line-up did their
job as just about everybody had
at least one hit off St. John’s los-
ing pitcher Keanu Thompson,
who later switched with short-
stop Alex Foster.

Anfernee Seymour led the
offensive attack with a 2-for-2 .
day with a pair of (two-run and
one-run) triples, scoring twice.
Bryon Murray was also 2-for-2
with a RBI single and a two-run
in-the-park home run.

Todd Isaacs joined in the hit
parade with his 2-for-2 day,
scoring twice and DeShaun
Wood and Justin Smith both
scored a pair of runs. Devin
Simmons helped out with a two-
run single.

If that wasn’t enough, Antho-
ny Romer came in for Anfernee
Seymour and had a two-run sin-
gle and advanced around the
final three bases on wild pitches
for SAC’s last run.

“We have a lot of seven
graders on the team, so we try
to move it around,” said Todd
about substituting the majority
of the players in the second
inning: We’re not taking any-
body for granted. This is a
three-year team and we’re going
to continue to build as we work
on wininng another title.”

For St. John’s, coach Cher-
covie Wells said they are just
getting started, but they have a
long way to go.

“The programme is in the
beginning stages,” Wells reflect-
ed. “Everybody out there is
basically in grade seven and
fresh into softball and baseball.

“We're just trying to put it
together. Hopefully next year
will be our year. We have a lot
of things to work on, especially
pitching. But we will be okay.”

Despite the blowout by SAC,
Wells said he’s not too overly
concerned about them, if they
were to meet again in the play-
offs, “They’re not that good of a
team. Maybe if they play a hard-
er team you can see their skills,”
he pointed out. “But they were
sure better than us.”

Knowles

FROM page 14

Damm/Pavel Vizner versus
Martin Fischer/Phillipp Oswald.
Going into the tournament,

which has Knowles’ former
partner Daniel Nestor and
Nenad Zimonjic as the top
seeds, Knowles and Bhupathi
are ranked at number four on
ATP Stanford Computer list.

As a result of their perfor-
mances in the tournament,
Knowles and Bhupathi could
become the fourth team to qual-
ify for the year-ending Tennis
Masters Cup in Shanghai, China
in November. Knowles and
Bhupathi are the next team in
line to qualify. The top three
seeded teams of American twin
brothers Bob and Mike Bryan,
No.2 Nestor and Zimonjic and
No.3 Jonathan. Erlich and Andy
Ram, have all secured their
berth.

It’s the first match for
Knowles and Bhupathi since
they got ousted in the quarter-
final of the US Open Grand
Slam in Flushing Meadows,
New York where they lost in
three sets to the team of Maxi-
mo Gonzalez and Juan Monaco
of Argentina in August:

The tournament came right
after both players represented
their respective countries at the
XXIX Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China in carly August.

At the US Open, Knowles
suffered a slight right knee
injury while playing in the sec-
ond round in New York.

Knowles and Bhupathi are
looking for just their third title
for the year. They won back-to-
back titles in Memphis, Ten-
nessee and Dubai in February
and March respectively.

From Vienna, Knowles and
Bhupathi will go on to play at
the Mutua Madrilena Masters
Madrid in Madrid, Spain from
October 12,,the Davidoff Swiss
Indoors in Basel, Switzerland
from October 20 and the BNP
Paribas Masters in Paris, France
from October 26. Through this
string of tournaments, Knowles
and Bhupathi intend to secure
their berth for Shanghai where
only the top eight teams in the
world will get to play.



RENALDO'S RAMBLINGS



Someone has to defend the

worl

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

W e may look back on
this time period

amongst the pantheon of great
sports years. It has the potential
to be revolutionary...like a dou-
ble stuft Oreo of professional
sports. Remember how fun the
roaring twenties was for flap-
pers, speakeasies and people

that wore zoot suits? Remem-.,

ber how fun the Beijing
Olympics were for Jamaicans?
Remember how fun the last six
years has been for Boston fans
in every major sport? I think
I’m going through that right
now, and there’s a chance I may
be peaking as a sports fan.

It began with the Celtics rid-
ding the world of the evil that
masquerades as the joy of Lak-
er fans. I don’t think the world
realizes how close we all came
to seeing this happen before the
Celtics all pushed us out of the
way of a colossal sized bullet.
We owe them a huge debt of
gratitude, like Middle Earth did
to Frodo. What would have
happened if he didn’t get the
ring to Moordoor is kind of
what the world would have
been like if the Celtics didn’t
get the job done. In short, I
don’t know if I’m ready for
another season to start yet.

From then on, the hits kept
coming. We had the Olympics

which provided a myriad of

great sporting moments, pro-
pelling Michael Phelps and
Usain Bolt to international
superstar status. The Yankees
and their “GDP of some third
world countries” payroll failed

to make the playoffs. But per-..

haps the most shocking story-
line of the of the entire year is
going on in South Florida right
now, and I’ll say no more for
fear of jinxing it...but... THE
DOLPHINS ARE RELE-
VANT AGAIN!! Who saw this
coming following an infamous
1-15 season. I'll tell you who
did, no one. Well, maybe Joe
Biden did because he appar-
ently knows everything. But no
one else did? Four games into
the season and last year’s win
total has been doubled.

Now we’ve come full circle
back to the NBA and the 2008-
09. Again, someone has to
defend the world from “The
Evil” (they have Andrew
Bynum back in the lineup), but
that’s just one of the plethora of
intriguing storylines for the
2008-09 season. Can the Celtics
repeat minus James Posey? Will
having Bynum in the lineup be
enough to propel “The Evil”
over the top? Is Ron Artest still
insane? Will Elton Brand be
enough to make Philly legit con-
tenders? Do the Spurs have
anything left? Will my line of
questions ever end? (No) Will
the Blazers’ young talent mesh
quickly enough to make a post-
season run? Can T-Mac and
Yao Ming shed their glass like
skeletal structure and stay
healthy for an entire year? Will
the Knicks come back to the
NBA? Can Mike Beasley stay
out of trouble and bring the
Heat back to prominence? Will
the Mavericks grow a pair? Will
the Magic learn others shots



LOS ANGELES LAKERS’ Kobe Bryant reaches back for a rebound during the first half of game four of the West-



Mark Terrill/AP Photo

ern Conference semifinals against the Sacramento Kings Sunday, May 13, 2001, in Sacramento, Calif. The Lak-
ers won the game, 119-113, to sweep the series.

Loc ON

Micheal Switzer/AP Photo

in Charleston, W.Va.

besides three pointers and
dunks? Will the Kings return to
the NBA? Can the supreme
awesomeness of Greg Oden’s
beard be stopped? Will David
Stern enter the presidential race
at the last second and rule the
entire country like he does the
NBA? With a synthetic leather
laced iron fist.

Before we get to the Ram-
blings’ 08-09 predictions, a few
Maher-like New Rules:

New Rule - If this whole writ-
ing thing doesn’t work out, my
plan B is to become the voice
over guy for all political ads? I
can do that very sarcastic voice

‘every four years and make any-

thing sound worse than it really
is. In between elections I'll look
for work as the info-mercial guy
who always disgusted at his old
product and looks for some-
thing new, or I'll become the
new movie preview guy.

New Rule - Not to sound sub-
jective or anything, but if the
USS. Presidential Election is ini-
tially a tie, the candidates
should play a game of 21, one
on one to determine the next
President. Other tiebreakers
will include first one to put a
pullover sweater on without any
assistance, or first one to be the
only member of his previously

HUNTINGTON'S 0.J. Mayo drives the lane Tuesday,
Dec. 12, 2006, during a high school basketball game




LN
LO AAVVY

WSs
.

Bill Haber/AP Photo



NEW ORLEANS Hornets Chris Paul tries to get
through the Golden State Warriors defense in a

preseason game in New Orleans, on Sunday.

disenfranchised race to

New Rule - Every year, on
the day a new edition Madden
or NBA 2K hits stores it should
prompt the beginning of a week
long holiday. NBA 2K9
dropped yesterday...’ be the
pioneer of this cause, because
I’m not coming in for the rest of
the week.

Onto the 2008-09 predictions...
Most Improved Player
Jamal Crawford, Knicks
This is still the same guy that
posted 50 point outings when
he ran the show for the Bulls a
few years ago, and Crawford
definitely still has that poten-
tial.
‘
Defensive Playér of The Year
Jermaine O’Neal, Raptors
JO has nothing else to do but
block people, change shots and
rebound. He no longer has to
be the number one option on
this team like he was in Indi-
ana and he should be playing
with a boulder sized chip on his
shoulder.

Sixth Man of ‘The Year

Travis Outlaw/Martell Web-
ster, Blazers.

Depends on who wins the
starting small forward spot for
the Blazers. This may be the

most heated in camp competi-
tion for a staring job across the
league. Webster has to prove
he’s not a bust and has to play

his career with the “I was draft- .

ed before CP3 and DWill” tag
and Outlaw is in a contract year.

Rookie of The Year

O.J. Mayo, Grizzlies

To win the ROY there are
basically three things you need:
A team with no discernible
number one scoring option, a
team so bad you have the green

‘light to shoot virtually every

time down the floor, and a cool
sports name. Check, check and
check for O.J.

Most Valuable Player
Lebron James, Cays
It’s time.

East Champions

Cleveland Cavaliers

Mo Williams finally gives
Lebron another reliable scorer
who can create his own shot and
if J.J. Hickson can develop into
a legit low post presence the
Cavs will get to the pinnacle.
Besides, the rest of the Cavs
know that if they want the lux-
ury of playing with Lebron for
the rest of their careers they
have to win before the 2010
summer of free agency.

year?

d from ‘The Evil’

West Champions

New Orleans Hornets

I know what you’re thinking:
How will they get by the Lak-
ers, Spurs, Jazz and Rockets?
Chris Paul, James Posey and
new uniforms.

NBA Champions

New Orleans Hornets

They have a roster filled with
6’8” athletic guys they can
throw at Lebron and they will

_ need every single one of them.

In the end I think David West
will be the eventual difference
maker in the series although
Paul gets the MVP. Posey gets
his third ring, and this becomes
the straw that broke the camel’s
back for Lebron and his career
in Cleveland. Hello summer of
2010 free agency.

All Rookie Team
O.J. Mayo

Jerryd Bayless
Rudy Fernandez
Michael Beasley
Greg Oden

All NBA 1st Team
Chris Paul

Kobe Bryant
Lebron James
Amare Stoudamire
Dwight Howard

Most Likely to be Pegged as
Everyone’s Sexy Sleeper

Philadelphia 76ers

In every single workplace,
school, or bar room conversa-
tion, Philly will be the answer to
the question, “Hey, Pll tell you
what, you know who’s good this
_. You watch,
remember I told you about it
first.”

New Reason Laker fans will
find to make the Kobe over MJ
case

- Kobe will increase the fre-
quency of his gum chewing and
use of the word “defensively”
and the phrase “game of bas-
ketball” to a minimum of once
per sentence in each interview.
These were the key Jordan buzz
words. He’ll be like Sarah Palin
with “maverick” and “reform.”

Player Most Likely to Ruin
a Good Thing

Ron Artest

You're the third option on a
team with two superstars. This.
is the least amount of pressure
you have ever had in your
career. All you have to do is to
not be yourself.

The, “This is Like the 13th
Year In a Row This Guy
Should Have Made the Leap,
Do We Forget It Now?”

Darius Miles

The days when he and Q
Rich were two of the NBA’s

_ brightest young stars seems like

a century ago. At least Q still
wears the headband.

The “I’m Really Good But »
Nobody Cares Because of
Where I Play” Award

Al Jefferson

If you’re the main principle
in a trade for Kevin Garnett,
we should assume you’re worth
being recognized as the building
block of a franchise. Unfortu-
nately for Jefferson, that fran-
chise is Minnesota.



CRICKET

The Dynasty Stars loses unbeaten record

One of the League’s top squads fell
from the ranks of the unbeaten in
Bahamas Cricket Association play over

the weekend.

The Dynasty Stars lost its first match of ,

the season in a closely contested affair ets.

with the Dockendale Titans.

The Stars were all out for 200 runs,
their lowest run total of the season.

Howard Roye led the team with 67
runs while Ryan Tappin chipped in with

ody

Dockendale narrowly escaped with the
win, posting 202 runs for the loss of seven
wickets to win by three wickets.

Top scorers for the Titans included
Kevin Surujlal with 80 runs while Subba
Rao and Rohan Parks each posted 22

run a piece.

Bowling for the Stars, O’Neal Levy,
Lee Melville and Howard Roye took two

wickets each.

Paradise posted 124 runs for the loss of
three wickets while Dorsey Park man-

aged 122 runs.

runs.

tively.

League play continues October [1th at

Windsor Park.

Bowling for the Titans Shanaka Per-
era took five wickets and Dwight Weak-
ley took two wickets.

In other weekend games, Paradise
topped Dorsey Park Boys by seven wick-

Brent Fullerton led the team with 53
runs while Hamilton Guilyard added 28

Top bowlers included Gregory Irvin
who took four wickets and Mark Butler
took three wickets.

Turan Brown and Andy Ford led
Dorsey Park with 28 and 23 runs respec-

In other cricket news, the Common-
wealth Wanderers Masiers (45 years plus)

will prepare for international competi-
tion in an exhibition match against the

President’s Youth team made up of play-

ers from the National Youth teams.
The Masters team has been invited to

play in South Florida on the weekend of

December Sth.

Masters Roster
Byron Brown
Chris Brown

Venris Bennett

Gary Brathwaite
Belville Edwards

Andy Ford

Vianny Jacques
Danavan Morrison

Wayne Patrick

Ramdeo Ramdass

Greg Taylor Sr.

Henry Williams
Edmund Lewis

SWimmers
put to test

FROM page 14

overall, finishing the cace in
lhr 23.33mins, to come second
in the men's 36 and over,
while

27-year-old Mike Guy was
fifth to cross the line, coming
second in the men's 18-35 with
a time of Lhr 25.46mins.

Melodie Watson won the
women's 18-35 category in Lhr
37.45mins.

Relay teams working in
groups of three took on one
lap each, and the women's
team was won by Susan Mor-
ley, Nancy Knowles and Maria
Piazza with a total time of lhr
46.38mins.

Adam Isaac, Harry Winner
and Dale Winner won the
men's relay in Thr 26.33mins.



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Vikings escape Saints
with 30-27 victory

@ By BRETT MARTEL
AP Sports Writer

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
The Saints gave a national

audience a taste of what New:

Orleans’ long-suffering fans
have bemoaned for years.

Not that the Minnesota
Vikings will complain about
being the latest to play a sup-
porting role in the Saints’
stranger-than-fiction, four-
decade history of bizarre and
dramatic losses.

Even Reggie Bush’s record-
tying two punt returns for
touchdowns couldn’t make up
for New Orleans’ numerous
blunders in a 30-27 loss to Min-
nesota on Monday night.

The Saints’ second failed
field goal attempt of the game
— the first. was blocked and
returned 59 yards for a touch-
down — allowed the Vikings to
drive for Ryan Longwell’s
game-winning 30-yard field
goal with 13 seconds left.

“It’s probably one of the
weirdest games I’ve ever been

involved in,” Saints quarter- °

back Drew Brees said. “Just
the way this thing kind of went
back and forth. I’m trying to
digest it all right now and in
the end it’s a loss.

“That’s extremely disap-
pointing, especially when once
again we have a chance to win
it at the end.”

Even some of the Vikings’
mistakes somehow worked in
their favour.

Bernard Berrian caught the

game-tying touchdown pass
with 7:10 to play after running
the wrong route and nearly
colliding with intended receiv-
er Aundrae Allison. When
Vikings linebacker Chad
Greenway yanked Bush’s face
mask, the officials didn’t call
a penalty, but Bush fumbled,
stalling a promising New
Orleans drive.
_ It all made for.a thrilling
contest and a satisfying win for.
‘the Vikings (2-3), who desper-
ately needed one. ©

“This is as good a win as it
gets,” Vikings coach Brad
Childress said. “I don’t know if
I’ve ever been involved in one
that went that way.”

The Vikings had stolen a
bizarre victory in the Louisiana
Superdome before. In 2002,
the Vikings, already out of the
playoffs, elected to go for a
two-point conversion instead
of kicking an extra point to tie
a game at 31 in the final sec-
onds. Daunte Culpepper fum-
bled the snap but still managed
to score in 32-31 victory that
started a three-game losing



Westbrook
suffering
from two

broken ribs

PHILADELPHIA (AP) —
All-Pro running back Brian
Westbrook broke two ribs in
the Eagles’ 23-17 loss to
Washington on Sunday,
though he, kept playing and
finished the game.

Westbrook missed one
game this season with an

ankle injury, but it’s too early '

to know if his latest injury will
keep him out of Sunday’s
game at San Francisco.

“We just have to see,”
coach Andy Reid said Mon-
day. ‘We have to see how it
all works out and exactly the
pain levcl there. Right now,
he’s very sore, so we’ll see
how 1" ngs go over the next
few days.”

Westbrook had 84 total
varus against the P :dskins.
He leads the ragles (2-3) with
194 yards rushing and has six
tonchdowns, two receiving.

‘ae said he was taking a
wait-and-see approach, but
that Correll Buckhalter
should take his place in the
backfield if the injury is limit-
ing him too much later in the
week.

“Do I want to be out there
at 45 per cent and not wanting
to take a hit and hurting this
team more than I'm helping
it?” Westbrook asked on his
radio show on 950 ESPN.
“No. ... L wouldn’t want to set
the team back like that.”

NEW ORLEANS Saints defender Brian |
Young (66) grabs the arm of Minnesota

MAT CIe SMC Ula tcla oye (el ae] sum a-)coyucca a7)
in the second half of Monday's game in [*

New Orleans...

ANS

streak that caused New
Orleans to miss the playoffs.
This time the quarterback
was Gus Frerotte, who repeat-
edly delivered clutch throws
under heavy _ pressure,
absorbed several hard hits and
at one point needed a doctor’s
clearance to return to action.
He passed for 222 yards and
his only TD was the one Berri- ,
an unexpectedly snagged. The

AP Sports Writer
BEREA, Ohio (AP) — The

last time they played ona
Monday night, the Cleveland
Browns wore hideous brown
pants unlikely to ever be seen
again.

The fashion faux pas was

hardly the most humiliating
thing that happened.

The New York Giants made

the Browns look silly on
national TV.

“They embarrassed us,”

Cleveland linebacker Andra
Davis said Monday. “So that’s
going to give us a little extra
fire.”

Back on August 18, the

defending Super Bowl cham-
pions scored 30 unanswered
points in the first half — 16 ina
span of 76 seconds — against
the Browns in a preseason

ame.
Cleveland (1-3) lost quarter-

back Derek Anderson to a
concussion. and four other
starters to injuries that night
and haven’t been the same
team since.

Now coming off their bye

week and as healthy as they’ve
been in a month, the Browns
face a daunting Monday night
rematch with the Giants, who
improved to 4-0 on Sunday
with a 44-6 win over the Seattle
Seahawks.

Davis grimaced as he

recalled Cleveland’s prime-
time debut dud in 2008.

“Everything they did, they

did well, and everything we
did, we did wrong,” he said. “It
gave the world a false sense of
what we know we can do. This
is a good opportunity to show

(AP Photo: Bill Haber)

3

Vikings’ other. touchdown pass
was thrown by halfback
Chester Taylor, who found
Visanthe Shiancoe from 4
yards out.

Longwell’s winning kick was
set up by a pass interference
call on a long throw to Berrian,
who was run into before the
ball came down despite being
double-covered. That was only
the latest gaffe by New



Orleans.

Martin Gramatica, who had
the field goal blocked and
returned for a touchdown in
the first quarter, missed a 46-
yarder that could have given
the Saints (2-3) a lead with two
minutes to go.

New Orleans committed
four turnovers, dropped sev-
eral passes and was called for
11 penalties for 102 yards. New

Orleans tried to catch the
Vikings off guard with an
onside kick, but Minnesota
recovered, setting up Long-
well’s 53-yard field goal, which
tied his season long.

The loss was reminiscent of
a 34-32 setback at Denver in
Week 3, when Gramatica
missed a 43-yard field goal that
could have put the Saints
ahead with about two minutes
to go. ‘

With the Saints trailing 20-10
late in the third quarter Mon-
day, Bush had his first touch-
down return for 71 yards, slip-
ping a tackle early and accel-
erating past a bone-jarring
block at midfield by Jo-Lonn
Dunbar.

’ Bush nearly broke another
punt return, but tripped and
fell at the Minnesota 49. Still,
New Orleans only needed one
first down to set up Gramati-
ca's 53-yard field goal to tie it.

The Vikings kicked to Bush
again and paid for it. Bush
caught the punt on the run and
burst between the only defend-
ers who really had a shot at
him before cutting outside into
the open field for a 64-yard
score.

“Great blocking by my
teammates,” Bush said. “It was
obviously a huge play at a time
of need. It would have been
even sweeter if we had won
this game.”

Bush was the 12th player in
NFL history to return two
punts for TDs in a game. The
last do it was Eddie Drum-
mond of Detroit against Jack-
sonville on November 14, 2004.

Frerotte, connected with
Berrian for 36 yards to the
New Orleans 27, then found
him again for a 33-yard score
to tie it at 27.

“T saw the ball go up and I
said I’m going to score a touch-
down no matter what,” Berri-
an said.

Vikings cornerback Antoine
Winfield scored after recover-
ing Gramatica’s blocked kick
in the first quarter and set up
Minnesota’s second TD with
a forced fumble. on a sack of
Brees that he recovered at the
New Orleans five-yard line.

That set up Taylor’s TD toss,
which gave Minnesota a 17-10
lead in the second quarter.

Brees was 26-of-46 for 330
yards but was intercepted
twice, once on a tipped pass
deep in Vikings territory and
once on a desperation heave
in the final seconds.

His lone touchdown pass
went for 17 yards to Devery
Henderson on the Saints’ first
series of the game.





CLEVELAND Browns quarterback
Derek Anderson (3) fires a pass
against the Pittsburgh Steelers in
Sunday’s game in Cleveland...

(AP Photo: Mark Duncan)

the world that we’re definitely
way better than what we put
out there in preseason.”

The Browns, whose lone win
came against Cincinnati on
September 28, used last week
to heal physically and soothe
some mental bruises they’ve
already absorbed during a
rough first four games of the
season. Coach Romeo Cren-
nel dismissed his players last
Thursday, giving them a three-
day break from football for the
first time since they opened
training camp in July.

Crennel expects to have line-
backer Willie McGinest
(groin), right tackle Ryan
Tucker (hip surgery) and wide
receiver Donte Stallworth
(quadriceps) back for the
Giants. McGinest has missed
the past two games and Stall-
worth has yet to play in the
regular season after signing a
seven-year, $35 million free

Browns hope to avoid another Giant mess

@ By TOM WITHERS

agent contract.

Return specialist Joshua
Cribbs is also closer to 100 per-
cent. The Pro Bowler, who has
been slow to recover from a
high ankle sprain sustained
while returning a kickoff in the
exhibition loss to the Giants,
said the lopsided loss can be a
motivator this time around.

“We took that to heart,”
Cribbs said. “They embar-
rassed us. That will add an
extra chip on our shoulder. We
want that win most of all.

We’re looking for some pay-

back.”

It would be almost impossi-
ble for the Browns to play any
worse than they did during
their second preseason game.
They rallied to lose only 37-34,
a final that only looked
respectable on the scoreboard.
When New York’s starters and
Cleveland’s starters were on
the field, it was a colossal mis-
match made more dramatic
because of the Browns’ self-
destructive play.

They were penalized for 98
yards in the first quarter alone,
but still managed to take a 3-0
lead on Phil Dawson's 56-yard
field goal. *

Less than 10 minutes later,
the Browns trailed 30-3.

Later, Browns general man-
ager Phil Savage describes the
meltdown as “that spell of five
to 10 minutes where we lost
our minds.”

Cleveland gave up two first-
quarter touchdown passes to
quarterback Eli Manning, who
found Domenik Hixon both
times for a 14-3 lead. Then,
during a mind-numbing stretch,
the Browns came completely
unglued as the Giants blocked

a punt out of the end zone for
a safety, Hixon returned the
ensuing free kick 82 yards for a
TD and New York safety
James Butler scooped up a
botched handoff to Jamal
Lewis and went 95 yards for a
score.

“Everything went wrong,
everything,” Davis said. “It was
crazy. And the injuries.”

Lewis hurt his hamstring try-
ing to catch Butler after the
fumble, and on Cleveland's
first possession after the Giants
blew it open, Anderson sus-
tained a concussion on a sack
by Osi Umenyiora.

The beating in New Jersey
changed the tone of Cleve-
land’s preseason, with the
emphasis suddenly on getting
to the September 8 opener
against Dallas without expand-
ing its injury list. ;

Only now, though, are the
Browns getting well, and by
the time kickoff comes around
on Monday, they should be
more complete than at any
time this season. Feeling better
is nice, but the Browns will
need to play at a level they
haven't come close to yet in
order to bring down the
Giants, who are off to their
best start since 1990.

Along with a much-needed
win, the Browns gained some
confidence with their win over
Cincinnati. Potentially, a vic-
tory over the Giants in Cleve-
land's first regular season Mon-

.day night appearance since
2003 would bring even more.

“It could definitely turn the

season around to beat the

Super Bowl champs and do it’

on national television,” Davis
said. “We'll be ready to go.”



Bills QB
Edwards’
Status is
uncertain

@ By JOHN WAWROW
AP Sports Writer



ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
(AP) — Buffalo Bills quar-
terback Trent Edwards was
described as alert but still
experiencing post-concussion
symptoms Monday, leaving
his status uncertain as the
team enters its bye week.

Coach Dick Jauron side-
stepped questions regarding
the quarterback’s health,
except to say that Edwards
showed up at the Bills’ head-
quarters a day after being
slammed to the ground on the
third play from scrimmage
during a 41-17 loss at Arizona.

Jauron wouldn’t say
whether he expected Edwards
to take part in any of the
team’s three practices this
week, and added it was too
early to determine whether
the quarterback would be
ready to play when Buffalo
(4-1)-hosts San Diego (2-3) on
October 19.

When asked whether
Edwards would require more
tests, Jauron closed the dis-
cussion of the player by say-
ing, “I’ve really said about all
I’m going to say about Trent
and leave it at that.” He then
referred questions to Bills
head trainer Bud Carpenter,
who declined requests to
speak to reporters.

Receiver Lee Evans, who
spoke with Edwards,
described the quarterback as
“alert” and noted that “he
seemed to be doing all right.”
Without going into detail,
Evans said it was apparent
that Edwards was still “deal-
ing with some things, so it’s
going to be a little time.”

Safety Donte Whitner said
he expected Edwards to
return in time for the Bills’
next game.

“Tf I had to bet, I’ll say he’ll
be back for San-Diego,” Whit+-
ner said. “He just had a little:
ding.” sii bts

Edwards was hurt when the
back of his helmet bounced
off the turf after being hit
head-on by blitzing safety
Adrian Wilson, who broke in
untouched from the quarter-
back’s right side.

It happened a split-second
after Edwards completed a 13-
yard pass over the middle to
James Hardy. Edwards lay on
the field for a couple of min-
utes and needed help to the
sideline, where trainers paid
careful attention to his neck.

Edwards was then carted to
the locker room and did not
return.

The injury rattled the Bills, :
who have come to rely on his
ability to lead the offense. The
former third-round draft pick
had played a key role in help-
ing Buffalo win its first four
games — the team’s best start
in 16 years. Edwards helped
engineer fourth-quarter come-
back victories in each of his.
previous three games.

Things went downhill two
plays after Edwards was hurt,
when backup J.P. Losman
botched a hand-off with Mar-
shawn Lynch, which resulted
in-a fumble that set up Ari-
zona’s first touchdown.

“Losman looked rusty
appearing in his first game
since a 36-14 loss at Jack-
sonville on November 25,
after which he lost the starting
job to Edwards for the second
time that season. Losman fin-
ished 15-of-21 for 220 yards,
including an 87 yard touch-
down to Evans, but also threw
an interception and lost two
fumbles.

“I felt the whole day, I was
rushing a little bit, maybe
rushing through my reads,”
Losman said. “Maybe I was
just rushing a little bit because
I haven't been under fire like
that in a while. I’m glad it hap-
pened early on in the season
so as we go on, I'll be more
prepared for the situation.”

Losman would take over as
the interim starter if Edwards
can’t play.

The NFL leaves it up to the
discretion of a team’s medical
staff to determine when a
player can resume practicing
or playing after sustaining a
concussion. The only rule is
that a player who loses con-
sciousness would not be
allowed to return in the same
game or practice.

That differs from the NHL,
which requires a player to be
symptom-free for seven days
before being cleared for prac-
tice.



TRIBUNE SPORTS





advanc Ca siNw |

u

oh fi
r ' | * | °

@ By LEONID CHIZHOV

Associated Press Writer

MOSCOW (AP) — Defend-
ing champion Nikolay Davy-
denko defeated Florent Serra
6-1, 7-5 Tuesday in the first
round of the Kremlin Cup. °

In the women’s draw, Svet-
lana Kuznetsova defeated Li
Na 6-4, 7-5.

Sixth-ranked Davydenko had
little trouble against the 53rd-
ranked Serra in the opening set,
but he needed a break in the
11th game to advance to the
second round.

Davydenko is looking for his
third straight title in Moscow.

The fifth-seeded Kuznetso-
va broke early in each set. She
led 4-1 in the second set and
had two match points serving
at 5-3 before Li evened it at 5-S.

However, the Russian broke
Li in the next game and served
out the match on the fourth
match point.

“JT had a very tough first-
round match,” Kuznetsova said.
“Li Na beat many serious oppo-
nents this season and to win in
two sets, I think, it’s not a bad

start to the tournament.
Earlier, Michael Llodra was

upset by Uzbekistan qualilicr

Denis Istomin 7-6 (2), 6-3, who

‘ was playing only his second

ATP Tour match.

The 121st-ranked Istomin
broke easily in the sixth game
of the second set to stop the
sixth-seeded Llodra.

Eighth-seeded Janko Vip-
sarevic of Serbia rallied to beat
Russian qualifier Alexandre
Kudryavtsev 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (6).

Seventh-seeded Vera
Zvonareva ousted Maria Kir-
ilenko 6-4, 6-4, and Ekaterina
Makarova beat Elena Vesnina
7-6 (4), 7-6 (1).

Sixth-seeded Venus Williams
was scheduled to play Flavia
Pennetta later Tuesday.

Kuznetsova, ranked No. 7,
has lost all seven WTA finals
this season.

The women’s field includes
seven of the top-10 players
including No. | Jelena
Jankovic.

US Open champion Serena
Williams, last year’s runner-up,
pulled out because of an ankle
injury.

RUSSIA’S Svetlana Kuznetsova ere rt

albandian ousts
Reynolds at the
Stockholm Open





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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 13

Bb ke wy ay
iznetsova

Sas

RUSSIA’S Nikolay Davydenko returns a shot to France’s Florent Serra at the Kremlin Cup tournament in

Moscow on’ Tuesday...








STOCKHOLM, Sweden (AP) — Top-seed-
ed David Nalbandian cruised past American
Bobby Reynolds 6-1, 6-1 Tuesday and
advanced to the second round of the Stock-
holm Open.

The seventh-ranked Nalbandian will face
either Joachim Johansson or Nicolas Mahut at

the Royal Tennis Hall.

Second-seeded Mario Ancic overcame a
slow start to beat Olivier Rochus 7-6 (6), 6-2
He will face either his brother, Christophe
Rochus, or Steve Darcis. Fifth-secded Rainer
Schuettler ousted Chris Guecione 6-0, 6-3 and
will face Nicol | sud ti

Pennett

MOSCOW (AP) — Venus
Williams was upset in the open-
ing round at the Kremlin Cup,
losing 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 to Flavia
Pennetta:

The eighth-ranked Ameri-
can, who also lost in the first
round of a tournament in
March in Memphis, Tenn.,
dropped to 1-3 against Pennet-
ta.

"T totally came here because
[love winning," Williams said.
"| have never won this title, but
[ just had a day where I could
not control my game. She
played well."

Pennetta and Williams trad-
ed breaks in the first set. The
Italian broke decisively on her
third chance in the ninth game
with a lob.

Williams broke twice in the
second set, but dropped serve
in the first game of the third
set and never recovered.

"Venus is always a tough
opponent," said the 18th-
ranked Pennetta. "Iwas play-
ing my best tennis. My service
was working very well. | am
very happy with the match."

On the men's side, defend:
ing champion Nikolay Davy-
denko advanced by beating
Florent Serra of France 6-1, 7-
S,and Uzbek qualifier Denis
Istomin upset sixth-seeded
Michael Llodra 7-6 (2), 6-3 in
only his second ATP Tour
match, .

The [21st-ranked Istomin
broke decisively in the sixth
game of the second set and will
face French veteran Fabrice
Santoro in the second round.

Robby Ginepri of the United
States defeated Jiri Vanek of
the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-4.

"It's great to get off to a
good start here this week,"
Ginepri said. "| haven't played
since the U.S. Open, so I wasn't
really sure where my game was
going to be, but I'm happy with
the way I played."

‘The sixth-ranked Davydenko
had little trouble against the
53rd-ranked Serra in the open-
ing set, but he needed a break
in the [1th game to advance to
the second round,

Davydenko is looking for his
third straight title in Moscow.

"LT would like to defend my
title here, but as usual I'm my
worst enemy," Davydenko
said,



Photos: Misha Japaridze/AP





Top-seetietl
Wawrinka
unset hy
qualifier
in Vienna

VIENNA, Austria (AP) —
Top-seeded Stanislas Wawrinka
was upset 6-7 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (5)
Tuesday by German qualifier
Philipp Petzschner in.the first
round of the BA Tennis Tro-
phy.
Petzschner had two early
breaks but lost the opening set
after double-faulting in the
tiebreaker.

“This was my first match
against a top-10 player, so it’s
definitely my biggest win so
far,” said the 125th-ranked Pet-
zschner,

The 24-year-old German
added three more breaks to win
the second. He led 5-3 in the
third, but needed a tiebreaker
to close out the match. He won
on his second match point when
Wawrinka netted a backhand.

“I am looking to qualify for
(the Masters Cup in) Shanghai
so this obviously is a disap-
pointing result,” said Wawrinka,
who reached the final in Vienna
last year. “He played well and
he is a talented player but I just
wasn’t aggressive enough.”

The 10th-ranked Wawrinka
became the top-seeded player
after defending champion
Novak Djokovic and James
Blake withdrew from the tour-
nament.

Philipp Kohlschreiber also
advanced to the second round

after beating Marc Gicquel 6-
2, 6-2, while Radek Stepanek
downed Pavel Snobel 6-4, 6-2.

Second-seeded Fernando
Gonzalez rallied from a set
down to beat Simone Bolelli 4-
6, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Ernests Gulbis
defeated Filippo Volandri 6-2,
6-3.

Sixth-seeded Tommy Robre-
do, who was to play Stefan
. Koubek on Tuesday, pulled out
with a hip injury and was
replaced by Santiago Giraldo.

defeats Venus



VENUS WILLIAMS, of the US, serves to Italian Flavia
Pennetta at the Kremlin Cup. Williams...

Eighth-seeded Janko Tip-
sarevic of Serbia rallied to beat
Russian qualifier Alexandre
Kudryavtsev 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (6).

In the women's draw, Svet-
lana Kuznetsova beat Li Na of
China 6-4, 7-5.

The fifth-seeded Kuznetso-
va broke early in each set. She
led 4-1 in the second set and
had two match points serving at
5-3 before Li evened it at 5-5.

However, the Russian broke
next game and then served out
the match on her fourth match
point.

"| had a very tough first-
round match," Kuznetsova
said. "Li Na beat many serious

opponents this season and to
win in two sets, I think, it's not
a bad start to the tournament."

Kuznetsova, ranked No. 7,
has lost all seven WTA finals
this season.

Seventh-seeded Vera
Zvonareva ousted Maria Kir-
ilenko 6-4, 6-4 and Ekaterina
Makarova beat Elena Vesnina

7-6 (4), 7-6 (1) in all-Russian

matches.

The women's field included
seven of the top-10 players,
along with No. 1 Jelena
Jankovic. U.S. Open champi-
on Serena Williams, last year's
runner-up, pulled out because
of an ankle injury.



caro achethy

THE TRIBUNE



WEDNES



In brief

Knowles and
Bhupathi back
on road again

a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER taking a couple
weeks off to recuperate from an
injury, Mark Knowles and his
Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi are back on the road
again. ©,

The duo are in Vienna, ‘Rass!
tria where,they are participating
in the Bank Austria Tennis Tro-
phy this week.

They-are listed as the number
two seeds in the field of 16
teams.

Their first match is scheduled
for today against the team of
Ashley Fisher and Travis Par-
rott. If they win, they will
advance to the quarter-final
where they will meet the winner
of the match between Martin

SEE page 11



1 4

PAGE



SDAY, OCTOBER 8,



2008

12 & 13 « International Sports News



WIN IMPROVES SAC’S RECORD THIS SEASON TO 3-1

Big Red Machines
flatten Giants 19-1

_ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was a first inning blowout for the
Bahamas Association of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools’ junior boys softball defending
champions St. Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines..

The Big Red Machines batted around the
clock twice, producing 14 runs on 11 hits as
they went on to rout the St. John’s Giants 15-
1 in three innings via the ten-run rule yester-
day at St. Augustine’s College.

“Our pitghing have to work,” said SAC’s

coach John Todd, who substituted everybody

_ in the line-up in the second inning except for

the battery mate of pitcher Arien Seymour
and catcher Byron Murray.

“We have a young team and they are not
focussed. When you have a team down, you
have to keep them down because you don’t
know what will happen. So I didn’t want to
take any chances. I wanted the pitching to
get the work in.”

Over the three innings he worked yesterday,
Seymour held the Giants to just two hits,
including a bases loaded jam in the second

inning when he struck ‘out the final batter to

keep St. J ohn’s scoreless.

But in the third, Seymour gave up a lead off
walk to St John’s Keanu Thompson, who
moved up to second on Alex Foster’s single,
got to third on a wild pitch that put Foster at
second.

Seymour then got Kevin Symonette to
ground out at first, but Thompson used his
speed to scoot home with the Giants’ lone
run. Like they did in the second, St. John’s
got the bases loaded, but Seymour struck
out the final batter to end the game.

The win improved SAC’s record to 3-1

SEE page 11.

SPLASHDOWN! 42 swimmers put
their training to test in Abaco race

@ BY MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPEN water swimmers
of all ages put their stami-
na to the test in a Skm

Saturdily.

The 42 swimmers com:
peting in categories from: .’
under 12 to over 36 made .,
the fifth annual Swift =.
Swimming Abaco race the:
biggest yet.

"It was a good race; the - ie

best one we've had out
here," remarked Swift's
head coach Andy Knowles.

There were 12 more
competitors than last
year's 30, and many of
them were young swim-
mers who have been train-
ing intensely to swim indi-
vidually or as part of a
relay team.

12-year-old Abigail
Lowe, who trains with
Swift at St Andrew's
School in Nassau came first
among the girls under 12.

She completed the trian-
gular 5km course, which is
over three miles, in 1hr
37.52 mins.

Abigail said: "It was the
first time I did the whole
race. Last year I did a mile,
and this year I have been
practising hard."

Abaco boy Brian Higgs
won the boy's 13-17 cate-
gory, finishing the race in
Lhr, 29.46mins, and Jen-
nifer Cooke won the girls
13-17 with a time of 2hrs,
31.17mins.

43-year-old David Mor-
ley finished first overall,
winning the men's over 36,
by keeping up a fast and
steady pace, completing
the third lap of the FINA
standard course after Lhr
15.02mins.

He said: "J try to keep
consistent in a race like
this.and it was a great race,
it was really nice and calm.

"L have won before in
my age group, only the
Knowles' and other young
whipper snappers have
come before me, so with-
out them competing this °
year [ had a chance.

"Now I am looking for-
ward to doing it again next.
year!"

Nassau swim mer Simon
Frank was second to cross
the finish in Ihr,
20.19mins, winning the
men's 18-35 category, and
: hristina Winner was not

far behind.

Mrs Winner was the first
women to finish after Lhr
21.01mins and came first in
the women's over 36.

Adam Isaac was fourth

SEE page 11

SWIMMING from the first mark
at Crossing Bay, Marsh Harbour.

DAVID MORLEY,
overall winner. Far
right is Andy Knowles,
head coach at Swift



AGIRL wear- | -
ing the Swift |
Abaco T-shirt
watches the
race from the
dock.








SPECTATORS watch |
swimmers from the dock.







I try to keep
consistent
in a race like
this and it
was a great
race, it Was
really nice
and calm.

David Morley



We
MTD (rs

MEN

Home Runs ©

Derek Christie - 6
Phillip Culmer - 5
Terran Wood - 5
Jamal Johnson - 5
Sherman Ferguson - 4

RBI

Derek Christie - 29
Phillip Culmer -.29
Ramon Johnson - 28
Jamal Johnson - 24
Stephen Brown - 21

Runs

Ramon Storr - 40
Phillip Culmer - 38
Jamal Johnson - 32
Julian Collie - 32
Van Johnson - 31

Hits

Ramon Storr - 37
Phillip Culmer - 32
Julian Collie - 31
three tied with 27

Stolen Bases
Herbie Brown - 7
Lon Johnson - 7
Greg Jones - 5
Alex Rolle 5
Van Johnson - 5

Win/Loss Record
Leroy Thompson - 12/0
Cardinal Gilbert - 12/5
Terrance Culmer - 9/5
Leonard LaFrance - 4/1
Alcott Forbes - 4/2

Strikeouts

Cardinal Gilbert - 68
Leroy Thompson - 61
Roscoe Thompson - 56
Terrance Culmer - 45
Clifford Scavella - 45

ERA

Leroy Thompson - 3.45
Clifford Scavella - 4.49
Cardinal Gilbert - 4.95
Anton Gibson - 5.94
Leonard LaFrance - 5.95

Batting Average
Terran Wood - .529.
Ramon Storr - .507
Phillip Culmer - .500
Julian Collie - .484
Stephen Brown - .443 .

WOMEN

“Home Runs

Thela Johnson - 3
Marvell Miller - 2
Six tied with one

RBIs

Thela Johnson - 22
Christine Edmunds - 16
Dorothy Marshall - 16
Chryshan Percentie - 15
Jeannie Minus - 14

Runs

Thela Johnson - 28
Naressa Seymour - 26
Lathera Brown - 24
Vernie Curry - 23
Tonia Simmons - 23

Hits
Dawn Forbes - 29
Thela Johnson - 29

_ Vantrice Bowleg - 28

Dornette Edwards - 25
Marvell Miller - 24

Stolen Bases

Sharnell Symonette - 12
Lathera Brown - 9
Tonia Simmons - 8
Cleo Symonetter - 7
Neressa Seymour 6

Win/Loss Record
Mary Sweeting - 8/8
Alex Taylor - 8/8
Desiree Coakley - 7/4
Marvell Miller - 7/9
Ernestine Stubbs - 6/5

Strikeouts

Mary Sweeting - 81
Marvell Miller - 42
Ernestine Stubbs - 36
Alex Taylor - 34
Narissa Lockhart - 29

ERA

Marvell Miller - 2.45
Mary Sweeting - 3.48
Ernestine Stubbs - 3.73
Alex Taylor - 4.63
Desiree Coakley - 5.2

Batting Average
Sharnell Symonette - 500
Rosemary Green - .467
Dawn Forbes - .460
Chryshan Percentie - .457
Debbie McLure - .457

INSSENRSRERS







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THE TRIBUNE

Employers behind

on their NIB

contributions to be :

Charged interest

FROM page one

According to NIB’s deputy
director for New Providence,
18,000 of the 24,000 employers
and self-employed people who
are registered to contribute to
the fund were behind on their
payments as of August this
year.

The need to increase con-
tribution compliance levels is
something which, as Mr Ward
noted, has been mentioned in
a number of the organisation’s
actuarial reports, which take
place every five years.

The seventh actuarial
review also noted the NIB
faces being unable to meet
demand in coming years due
to an increase in the ratio of
pensioners to working people
- a problem compounded by
poor payment rates.

Mr Curtis said: “The
National Insurance Act has
always allowed for interest to
be charged on arrears of con-
tributions. However, in the
past interest has not been con-
sistently applied and so
employers have not been felt
compelled to pay in prescribed
time. This has been a con-

tributing factor to the high lev-.

el of non-compliance and the
low percentage of on-time
payments.”

He said that every year the
board loses “a substantial
amount of revenue, in addi-

tion to the contribution pay--

ment itself, in lost interest pay-
ments.”

As of today, said Mr Cur-
tis, the NIB is “several million

dollars” behind the target it-

had hoped to meet for contri-
butions this year. “A large
number” of employers are
anywhere between “six, eight
or 12 months” in arrears.

Such a shortfall means that
the organisation has to cut
back on its investments, sig-
nalling a “big problem...in (its)
ability to meet future
demand” on its resources.

The board is allowing the
lbree month “amnesty peri-
od” because of the signficance
of the change and the fact that
it is “aware that these are
tough economic times for
everybody,” said Mr Ward.

“We're giving employers
and self-employed persons an
amnesty period where they
may come in and pay their
contributions without interest
being added. This amnesty
period began (Monday, Octo-
ber 6).”

As of January 1, 2009, inter-
est will be ~harged on unpaid,
short paid, and late paid
“C10” contributions.

Mr Curtis said: “If they do
not take advantage of this win-
dow (amnesty period) most
certainly the board will be tak-
ing action to have them pros-
ecuted.”

According to the new chair-
man, another means by which

.the board is hoping to
improve payment rates is by
potentially publishing infor-
mation for employees/

- claimants to determine how
up to date their boss is with
paying the contributions
deducted from their salary to
NIB on their behalf.

‘“‘We are examining the best
way that we can disseminate
that information in a public
forum,” said Mr Ward.

Reports of MP
heing questioned
in connection with
embezzlement are
flenied hy police
FROM page one

Nassau’s political scene like
wildfire, with many sitting and
ex-parliamentarians speculating
as to the cause of the arrest.

Some claimed that it rested
solely on his tenure when he
had ministerial responsibilities
at a government corporation.
However, investigations into his
tenure there are still ongoing,
as sources within the police
force insist that they are still
looking into reports that he over
extended his ministerial pow-
ers both in the hiring and firing
of employees at the said corpo-
ration.

FROM page one

ters of Mario Miller, Yasmin Johnson
and Leslia Miller, broke into tears in
their father’s arms.

Leslie Miller himself, Mario’s father,
began to break down while speaking to
reporters immediately after the dis-
missal.

“After six years of waiting and five
years of, in my opinion, deliberate
obstruction of justice by some of the
people in this country in the top eche-
lon, I should say this is what we find in
this country,” said the former Trade
minister.

“There is nothing my family or I can
do about it and Mario certainly isn’t
here to help himself. Whatever posi-
tion is taken, I guess we have to live
with it as a family and.as people.

“For five years I pleaded and raised.
hell in Parliament, in some respects,
trying to get justice for myself and for

‘my son, and in many cases I was ignored

by two of the AGs (Attorney Generals)
who had their own agendas.”

He said accusations made by defence
attorney for Ricardo Miller, Romauld
Ferreira, that he had influence over the
trial because of his position in the gov-

- ernment were far-fetched.

HP recommends Windows Vista

“The average case in this country
takes place within 18 months. Mario’s
took six years. What political influence
could Leslie Miller have had on the gov- »
ernment?” said Mr Miller. “That’s why
I raised so much hell about it.”

He questioned the intentions of those
in positions of authority in the govern-
ment and penal system, and even put to
scrutiny the very moral sense of that
group, as well as the Bahamian people.

“Some of them were more interested
in helping their friends rather than giv-
ing true justice to my dead son who was
butchered,” said Mr Miller.

Mr Miller lauded the efforts of the
prosecution in the case, as well as the
police. He said Mrs Cheryl Grant-
Bethel and her team did “as good a job
as anyone in the world could have
done.”

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 15

Mario Miller
case dismissed

“I would appreciate it if Mrs Bethel
would take the case over again,” he
said.

The case would have ‘to be brought
before the Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral once again in order for a retrial to
be set.

The next trial would be the fourth
time witnesses would have to take the
stand in an attempt to bring closure to a
murder that occurred over six years ago.

Mr Miller said he hopes that when

_the matter is brought to the courts

again, all those with information would
be required to appear before the jury.
“If you notice, one person was never
brought before the court and for five
years I asked my colleagues in Cabinet
to see to it that this gentleman, who
played a role in it, was brought before
the court,” he said. “But that was a no-

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CUIVATaNs

1S PARSON AL
HT

Sealen



no. As you can see, even with the inter-
vention of police he still didn’t show

<
co

“It’s incredible,

“I guess they have friends who are
much more powerful than even justice
in this country, and we gatta live with
it.”

Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar Lee, and
Ryan Miller were on trial for the June,
2002, murder of Mario Miller.

The last day of the trial drew a crowd
inside the courtroom, with family and
friends of Mario Miller and of the
accused packing seats.

Before the jury was brought back in
to deliver their decision, prison and
police officers were on duty through-
out the courtroom.

Mr Miller sent out a plea to Bahami-
ans, saying youths must listen to par-
ents and be careful who they choose as
friends.

He said his son was a good person
but got into some bad thing that he and
his family were not aware of.

“Mario was a decent human being
and a loving person,” said Mr Miller.
“Certain persons decided to paint him
with a brush that I thought was ugly
and I thought it was unfair, especially to
my family, his mother and his sister
Yasmin.”

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functions require aditional hardware. To obtain more information, visit http://www.microsoft.com/windowsvista/getready/hardwre.mspx and http://www.microsoft.com/ windowsvista/getready/capable.mspx. Windows Vista
Upgrade Advisor can help you determine the Windows Vista functions that your computer can execute. To download this tool, visit www.windowsvista.com/upgradeadvisor,



—



PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008



SSS TT AT TNA TAN LN AS TS ST NT EAT TEN TNA TSAR NE ERT TT

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“THe PEOPLE’S NEWSPAPER,”



THE TRIBUNE







WEDNESDAY,



New shipping
firm targets $100k
freight charges goal | ,

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he latest entrant to the Bahami-
an commercial shipping market
believes it could earn $100,000 in
freight charges per week “if we were to
maximise the route” to Florida, the head
of its Nassau-based shipping agency
telling Tribune Business yesterday that it
had leased the former Pioneer Shipping
base on Union Wharf for its own opera-
tions.
Richard Ryan, general manager of
United Shipping, the in-port shipping
agent for Atlantic Caribbean Line, said

the latter was set to begin its twice-week-.

ly service from Florida to Nassau “this
Sunday”, with services on that day and
Friday.

Mr Ryan said Atlantic Caribbean’s
vessel “has the capacity to bring in every

voyage 40 TEUs [twenty-foot equipment |

units]”, and United Shipping had hired
nine new staff - mostly former Pioneer
Shipping employees - to man the new
Nassau operation.

“We did some rough estimates, and if
we were to maximise the route, we were
looking at freight charges per week of
$100,000,” Mr Ryan told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The value of the cargo we would
carry is much harder to estimate.

“IT guess with the demise of Pioneer,
we’re sort of coming in and filling the
gap. We hope to get back the business
that we think went elsewhere, and we’re
hoping people will try our customer ser-

- vice quality, getting the cargo into the

Atlantic Caribbean Line’s

agent confirms Tribune Business
exclusive that it will operate
from former Pioneer Shipping
base on Union Wharf

Bahamas, off the dock and to the cus-
tomer.

“That’s where we our big hit. We will
build the business on customer service.
We hope to get the cargo off the dock in
Nassau as quickly as possible and into the
hands of the owner. We will make sure
the turnaround in Nassau is as quick as
possible. The operation here in Nassau
will be a fully Bahamian operation.”

Mr Ryan said between $50,000-
$100,000 was being invested in upgrading
the former Pioneer Shipping site, with
the main building “totally gutted” to
allow for the fitting of brand new offices.
The outside wall on Bay Street has also
been patched, speckled and upgraded.

“We were in negotiations with the
owners of Union Wharf, who are not the
same as the owners of Pioneer Shipping
Company,” Mr Ryan said of Atlantic
Caribbean’s new Nassau base.

“It’s a separate entity that has, different
owners. They wanted to rent the prop-
erty, and there’s still a need for cargo to
come into the Bahamas. Atlantic
Caribbean saw the opportunity and
chose us to be agents for them.”

Mr Ryan said United Shipping had

SEE page 4B

OCTOBER. 8,

a

2008

i



by NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor |

egasus Wireless Corporation,
the controversial company that
enjoyed an aborted seven-

month stay in Grand Bahama prior to
. the 2007 general election, is under



Sees ae Pes

‘investigation by the US authorities for’

\ yee securities fraud after filing for
hapter 11 bankruptcy earlier this
ear.

, Legal documents filed by the Secu-
ities & Exchange Commission (SEC)
n the US district court for northern
alifornia, copies of which have been
, obtained by Tribune Business, reveal
‘that. for the past six months the US
: capital markets regulator has been
_ investigating Pegasus.
The probe, according to the court
‘ documents, is investigating whether
‘Pegasus and its senior executives made
“materially false statements or omitted
material facts in press releases and
SEC-filings about Pegasus’ financing,
business prospects, use of funds and

“1 finandial condition”.

In other words, the SEC is investt-
| gating Pegasus and its controversial
president and chief executive, Jasper
Knabb, for allegedly attempting to mis-

, lead the market and artificially
inflate/manipulate the company’s.share

‘ price, a form of fraud.
Noting that Pegasus had filed for

idfpaiinnatbabdbdentaneteeminnesensnionaact

, Ba .
investor in
raud probe

ROYAL BFIDELITY



amas

Controversial Pesass
Wireless in Chapter
11 bankruptcy |

Chapter 11 bankruptcy in Florida on

January 28, 2008, some six months
after it exited Grand Bahama, the SEC
alleged: “Pegasus, Wireless Corpora-
tion is a once high- -flying, how-bank-
rupt, penny stock company that made
extravagant claim$ about certain acqui-
sitions, and then mysteriously issued
hundreds of millions of shares of stock
to satisfy so-called debts that previ-
ously had never been, publicly dis-
closed.”

Recounting’ Pegasus’ s history before
Mr Knabb alighted on Grand Bahama
and Freeport ‘in early 2007, the SEC
said it was “a penny, stock company
with virtually no assets or cash, and
an accumulated deficit of more than $3
million” as recently as 2004; when, it
was named Blue Industries.

Then, via’a series of reverse mergers,
it became a supplier of witeless net- -
working products, “In late 2005: and
early 2006, Pegasus announced Sever-
al acquisitions, all supposedly financed
by the company’s chief executive [Mr
Knabb],” the SEC said.

SEE page 4B

NIB urged: Be ‘more ingenious’ on compliance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

75% of employers and self-employed on New Providence behind on NIB contributions



terday he was

THE National Insurance
Board (NIB) needs to be “a bit
more.ingenious” in forcing busi-
nesses and the self-employed
to comply with contribution
payments, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Conimerce’s president
said yesterday, and go further
than simply levying interest
charges against defaulters.

Speaking in the wake of
NIB’s announcement that some
75 per cent of businesses and
self-employed persons in New
Providence were behind on
their contributions to the
nation’s social security scheme,
Dionisio D’Aguilar said non-
compliance needed to be tied
to other government permits
and approvals that these firms
required,

The Chamber president said
that while levying interest
penalties against non-payers
from January 1, 2009, was fine,
a better method of enforcing
NIB compliance was to link this
to business licence renewals,
work permit applications,
exchange control approvals and
corporate registration.

Business and self-employed
persons, he suggested, should
be unable to obtain these per-
mits and approvals unless they
were in full compliance on NIB
contributions - an initiative that
was suggested by the Social
Security Reform Commission
established by the former PLP
government.



“You can.go ahead and levy
interest, but it’s not going to get
compliarice,” Mr D’ Aguilar
said. “They’ve got to figure out
a more ingenious way for peo-
ple to comply. You’ve got to
force people to comply, and
that’s not going to force them to
comply.

“Clearly, people are not pay-
ing when they should be pay-
ing. I understand that. It’s an
admitted way to get people to
comply, but you have to be a
bit more ingenious than that.
Tie it to as many things as pos-
sible, so that if they don’t give
one thing to the Government,
they don’t get anything back
from the Government.”

NIB’s chairman, Patrick
Ward, announced yesterday
that from January 1,'2009, all
employers and self-employed
persons who are behind in their
contributions will be charged
monthly interest on what they
owe and will be “aggressively
pursued” for payment - with
prosecution in the courts likely
for defaulters.

According to NIB’s deputy
director for New Providence,
18,000 of the 24,000 employers
and self-employed people who
are registered to contribute to
the fund were behind on their
payments as of August this
year.

As of January 1, 2009, inter-
est will be charged on unpaid,
short paid, and late: paid con-
tributions.

Interest will be charged on

arrears at “a prime rate,” said
NIB acting director Anthony
Curtis, with many employers
between six to 12 months in
arrears on their contributions.

When asked whether the
levying of interest penalties
would further cripple business-
es in an already-struggling
Bahamian economy, Mr
D’ Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday: “I don’t think
it makes a difference.”

He described NIB payments
as a “critical expense” for
employers to pay, as it was con-
tributing to the retirement
income for employees in a
nation where there was an
extraordinarily low savings rate,
leaving many Bahamians
unable to meet their basic needs
in retirement.

At the same time as enforcing
compliance, Mr D’Aguilar

urged NIB to make it easier for
businesses to pay their contri-
butions through direct debits
from bank accounts - something
that should be facilitated by the
Bahamas Automated Clearing
House (BACH) - and being
more flexible in calculating con-
tributions.

Currently, NIBicalculated the

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Bridgetown: 2-lo.40

contributions a company should
make on its employees’ behalf
using a formula based on the
number of Mondays in a
month, something the Cham-
ber president described as “very
1974”,

Such a system Was not com-
patible with many employer
payroll systems, and Mr

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Men etiArekc haan elf mne

D’ Aguilar called on NIB “to
adjust that” to enable people
to pay contributions based on
their system - weekly, bi-week-
ly, monthly or bi-monthly.

“I wish NIB made it easier
for people to pay. I would think

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

| Fashion Show
eyes ‘dramatic
| surge’ to 1,000
attendees

"i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian
banker organising
a fashion show in
Nassau next [ge
month told Tri- |
bune Business yes- ff

“still optimistic”
that it would
attract some 1,000
visitors to. this
nation, and is hoping for “as
dramatic surge” in confirmed
attendees over the. next few
weeks.

Owen Bethel, president and

Bethel

_ chief executive of the Nassau-

based Montaque Group, which
owns.and is financing the
Islands of the World Fashion
Week, said he was hoping the
global economic downturn
would not impact:attendance,
and would know more once
Paris and Milan fashion weeks
ended.

“I’m quite positive about
that,” Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business on the potential atten-
dance for Islands of the World
Fashion Week.

However; he “still can’t get a
handle” on the true picture
because of the economic uncer-
tainty, and the fact that many
likely attendees will only con-
firm they are coming once the
latest European fashion shows
are over.

“With those who have regis-
tered and confirmed they will
attend, we’re up to about 300-
400,” Mr Bethel said. ““We’re
just ending the Paris and Milan
fashion weeks, and I wouldn’t
be surprised if in the next two
weeks we will'see a dramatic
surge in that.

“I'm hedging my bets, given
the current economic and finan-
cial situation, as to whether that
will have an impact on people’s
thinking on what they’re going
to. get into for the next year.
The US presidential elections
certainly don’t seem to be a



NIB is a faifly fixedscost for factor that has to be considered

most businesses,” Mr D’ Aguilar
said.

_SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



COB teaming with BAIC,

Royal Bank for seminars



DON MAJOR (left), BAIC deputy general manager, is seen with COB president Janyne Hodder and George Roache,

head of commercial lending, Royal Bank of Canada...



Pe aE
Pee Le

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a



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850 @ $ 25.00
858 @ $ 25.00

Contact Sean McCarroll of Seaview Properties for
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Phone: 359 2957

E: sean @seaviewproperties.bs -.

SMALL BUSINESS BANKING



sees
ce tei

GRez

(CRATI

@ By ALEX MISSICK



THE College of the Bahamas
(COB) yesterday unveiled a
new Business Lecture Series, in
partnership with Royal Bank of
Canada (RBC) and the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC).

The seminar series has been
renamed from the BAIC Busi-
ness Lecture Series to the RBC
Small Business Programme, in
recognition of RBC’s gift to the
College earlier this year.

COB president, Janyne Hod-
der, explained: “In January, the
college was a recipient of a gen-
erous $1 million donation from
RBC towards the building of
our new Graduate Business
Centre. As a part of that won-
derful donation, we decided to
name this important pro-
gramme in small business for
RBC, and we very proud to
announce this new partner-
ship.”

The two have teamed up with
BAIC to run a business empow-
erment seminar for existing and
aspiring entrepreneurs wanting
to gain knowledge about Small
Business Management.

The seminar offerings will
aim to educate small business
owners and aspiring entrepre-
neurs in the best practices of
running a business. Participants
will receive advice and strate-
gies presented by industry pro-
fessionals and business acade-
mics from COB.

Royal Bank of Canada’s
manager for small business,
Jerome Pinder, said he will be
participating in the seminar and
share with participants infor-
mation on the products and ser-
vices the bank offered, plus
what it looks for when financing
a Start-up business.

“It does us no good to lend a
client money today and then cut
them free and leave them on
their own. It has to be an on-
going relationship with them in
teaching them as their business
grows,” Mr Pinder explained.

He ‘added that one of the’

worst things for a banker is to

see a client fail in their busi-
ness. Small businesses are
known to have a high rate of
failure, as people tend to jump
into them without getting prop-
er knowledge.

“If we can just educate peo-
ple so that they can see the
whole picture of what it is to
run a business, and see what is
‘reaily involved and perhaps
slow down the rate of failure, I
think it will be a.job well done,”
Mr Pinder said.

Don Major, BAIC’s deputy
general manager, said the Cor-
poration was aware of the role
that small businesses play in the
economy, especially as it relates
to job creation.

“At the end of the day we
expect to provide information
so that they can know what is
available to them,” Mr Major
said. “We want them to learn
expertise in terms of business
knowledge -the nuts and bolts
of business management - and
we want to create an informed
consumer who will go on to
owning their own business.”

Mr Major added that BAIC
was aware that properly-oper-
ated small business enterprises
can provide key goods and ser-
vices for the Bahamian econo-
my.

“Every person that has a
backyard can be a farmer, and
they can reduce their expendi-
ture on foods. So in this lecture
series we are introducing an
Agricultural Careers and
Marine Resources seminar,” Mr
Major said.

“As my chairman always
says: ‘We can feed ourselves. If
not fully, we can reduce our
import bill tremendously’,” Mr
Major said.

The RBC Small Business
Programme, which is free to the

public, begins this semester on

October 9 and will run for six
weeks every Thursday until
November 13 at COB’s Culi-
nary and Hospitality Manage-
ment Institute’s Lecture The-

atre at’fhe Tourism Training | ~
‘Centre on Thompson Boule’

vard.

RU Sag
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
5 Perey A CIC

Bimini
Bay names
marketing

Chief

Bimini Bay Resort and
Marina has appointed Ash
Tembe as vice-president of
sales and marketing.

Most recently, Mr Tembe
held the position of regional
director of customer business
development in the northeast
region for Royal Caribbean
International in Miami.

“Tembe is a great addition
to our team, bringing a diverse
background from positions
with Sandals and Royal
Caribbean,” said Bimini Bay
president Sean Grimberg.

“We are excited for him to
build a strategic and creative
marketing and sales campaign
that people will be talking
about for years to come.”

During his 10-year tenure
with Sandals, the 20-year hos-
pitality veteran was responsi-
ble for developing the Pre-
ferred Sandals Reservations
Specialist programme, and
increasing occupancy and rev-
enue in the northeast region.

While acting as regional
sales director at Royal
Caribbean, Mr Tembe over-
saw a large team and Was
responsible for overall rev-
enue sales of $255 million.

In his new role, Mr Tembe
will focus on creating new
business by branding the
resort through several differ-
ent channels that include the
destination wedding market,
meetings and incentives, the
fishing and boating industry
and leisure travel.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won ap
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Saving our Islands
One Bag at a Time!

You Can Make a Difference

These’ littered plastic bags are an
eyesore and send a poor message to
visitors about The Bahamas. However,
these bags not only mar the beauty

Why should you begin using Green Bags?

Plastic. grocery bags are, everywhere
and their numbers are staggering. No
matter how careful we are they end
up.as unsightly litter on our roadways,
beaches and in our oceans,

of our surroundings but pose a real
threat towildlife. One study estimated
that 100,000 marine animals are killed
annually by plastic bags.

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
The simple act of taking a reusable
green bag to the grocery store will
help keep The Bahamas clean and save
marine animals from a terrible death.

beaten be cada h Mae ata Ped tata
De Sn heey ord



Ra te

Cond





THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 3B

Nassau to

host top

banking
conference

A MAJOR international pri-
vate banking conference will
take place in Nassau in early
2009.

Private Banking World 2009,

which is being organized by.

Terrapinn, is expected to
attract delegates international-
ly and from the Bahamian
financial community. It is
scheduled for February 23-26,
2009, at Atlantis on Paradise
Island.

The Association of Interna-
tional Banks and Trust Com-
panies in the Bahamas (AIBT)
has agreed to join the Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB) as a co-sponsor of the
conference, which will target
high net worth individuals,
family offices and their advi-
sors.

“The hosting of a major con-
ference such as Private Bank-
ing World 2009 is vitally impor-
tant to our jurisdiction,” says
Wendy Warren, BFSB’s chief
executive and executive direc-
tor. “It will provide the
Bahamas with a platform to
attract senior financial execu-
tives as both speakers and del-
egates, and help solidify our
position as a leading interna-
tional financial centre. In addi-
tion the Bahamas will be pro-
moted internationally through
the marketing programme to
support the event:

Ms. Warren added that while.
the conference will expose del-

egates to the global issues that
are redefining the private bank-
ing industry, it will showcase
the jurisdiction to institutions
that are not currently operating
from the Bahamas.

“Banking institutions are the
cornerstone of our interna-
tional financial sector,” said Ms
Warren. “We see the confer-
ence as an opportunity for
global institutions which oper-
ate in other jurisdictions to
examine, the benefits of The
Bahamas.”

Jan Mezulanik, AIBT’s
chairman, said: “Our sponsor-
ship reflects two priorities.
First, the conference will deal
with issues that are critically
important to our members and
other global institutions and
advisors. And second, it will
provide a networking oppor-
tunity for our members in the
Bahamas.”

Private Banking World 2009
builds upon Terrapinn’s region-
al private banking events in
Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin
America and the Middle East.
In addition, Terrapinn has a
global reputation for provid-
ing quality events across vari-
ous industry sectors, including
hedge funds, alternative invest-
ments and'real estate.

Some of the topics to be cov-
ered at Private Banking World
2009 include multi-jurisdic-
tional challenges, bank secrecy,
hiring and retaining the right

A
Cons

talent, where new wealth is
located and how private banks
are finding it, developing a
brand, as well as-the latest
investment trends for wealth
management and asset protec-
tion plans.

Terrapinn is no stranger to
conference management in The
Bahamas. Last November, it
was responsible for bringing to
Nassau Hedge Fund World
Bahamas 2007, which attracted
more than 140 investors, funds
of funds, hedge funds, consul-
tants and asset managers.
Keynote speakers and leading
investors shared their predic-
tions for the hedge fund indus-
try and financial markets in the
next decade. BFSB and the
Ministry of Tourism sponsored
the event.

BFSB was also involved as
a sponsor at Terrapinn’s Alter-
native Investment Summit
Brasil in April 2008. More than
400 international and regional
delegates attended the event
to hear some of the world’s top
fund managers and investors
on the Sao Paulo stage.

Speakers and attendees at
Private banking World 2009
will be top tier private banks,
rising star boutique firms, and
the most sophisticated single-
and multi- family offices. More
than 20 speakers from Europe,
the Middle East and North
America have already con-
firmed their participation.

ANSBACHER

member of the QNB Group

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, part of the Ansbacher
group of companies, specializes in providing clients with
private banking, fiduciary and wealth management services.

Risk Manager

~ An opening has arisen for a risk manager to work closely
with the director for risk management in establishing a
strong framework for risk management and monitoring
risk positions across the bank in credit, market and
operational risk areas. Data compilation, enforcement of
internal controls and report preparation for senior
management and risk committees are also important
aspects of this job. The jobholder is expected to contribute
new ideas designed to improve the efficiency of the
department and to assist with risk management related

projects.

To apply you should hold a bachelor’s degree in business,
accounting or finance and have a minimum of three years’
experience working in an operational or risk management
area within a banking organization. It is expected that you
will possess excellent communication skills and be
proficient in the use of Word, Excel and Power Point.

Please send your resumé with a covering letter to Human
Resource Manager, Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, PO
Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas, hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail
is Friday October 10, 2008.





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS |

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS





CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES (CEES)

VACANCIES

FOR PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS





PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
WEDDING & EVENT PLANNING
i must be able co reach cheor

formation that will enab

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Candidates muse be able to teach informaric
cechnology at the College Level. Candidares must
i ‘bathe subject

area or five years experience ina relaced Held.














} ,
We ee 3.

PART-TIME INSTRUCTORIN |

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
Candidates must be able to wach: Cus
Service at all levels, Candidates enust have
a. Bachelors Degreé in Business Management or
Business ‘Administration and have worked in a
custom: ce environment fo st five years.

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR
IN HEALTH & SAFETY

Candidates must able.co reach Healeh and Safety in
the Workplace,’ didave muse havea Bachelor's
Degree in Operacions Management or Maman
Resources Management and a detailed knowledge
| ofthe Heaith and Safery Ace. Candidates muse have




PART-TIME ING
BEFECTIVE ENGLISH WRITING SKILLS
Candidares must be able ro teach English ar
‘The College level. Candidares must have at
least a Bachelor's Degree in the subject area,
and hive years experience i reaching English.











PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
VETERINARY MEDICINE
Candidates maser able co reach Vererinary

« Medicine ar The College level. Candidates must
have at lease a Doctoral Degree in Vererinary
Medicine and three years pose qualificacion

experience,







PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN





COURSE
SEC



RECEPTION OPERATIONS & SERVICES
fe to teach Frone Office
Reception Services. Candid: have at least
a Bachelor's Degree in Front Office Management

and ar lease five 3

g
;
:
i

Candidates must be able to reach cleaning as‘ic Candidares musr be abi



relates to janitorial services and housekeeping. |
Candidates must have a Bachelor's Degree in



Elome Economics ot related held and five years experience in Operacions

RAL
Vid

Management or C

pose qu alification EXPETENce.





PART-TIME INSTRUCTORIN PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
COLLEGE PREP GEOGRAPHY COLLEGE PREP PHYSICS
{New Providence Campus) i (New Providence Campus)
Canclidaces must be able to teach Geograpt candidates muzst be able co reach Physics









IBOCSE level C



at The College Prep
_ Candidare st. have




arory/ BGCSE






PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN COLLEGE PREP CHEMISTRY (New Providence Campus)

Candidates must be able ro teach Chemistry at The College Preparatory/BGCSE level, Candidates



AK EES





GRADUATES DEGREES

The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise December 2007 and |
April 2008 graduates that degrees are available for collection from |
the Records Department. Before collecting degrees, graduates must |
complete the Graduate Clearance. Form. which may be obtained
from the Records Inquiry Office, First. Floor, Portia M. Smith
Building.

To review your graduation status visit www cob.edu.bs/graduation
iene certegomeete ree ances tecacse See Le A URN ee Re canna

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES - FALL SEMESTER 042008 (SESSIONS 02)

-_ SESSION 2 ae ee]
: be Riess TUITION .
CODE DURATION | DAYS | TIMES: | & FEES |:
6:00 -
6 weeks Monda’ 9:00pm $380.00 | MK ||
: 6:00 - |
ov. 24 | 6weeks | Monday | Stmpm | $488.00






ae | [se lowe |
Cuisine 1 | 806
cooing | 1 [53 | oct 20
Cooking | 1 | 823
ate | [loam |
Cooking Il 1 | 824







Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 - Ree
1 | 813 Nov. 20 | 5 weeks Tues/Thurs 9:00pm $300.00 | LK~ | |

Making | : :
Cake & Pastry COOK cana 6:00 - feat ieee |
1 | 814 Oct. 21 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. 9:00pm $325.00 | PK | |





Making II
Bread Making 1 | 810 Nov. 27. | 6 weeks Thursda 9:00pm $290.00 | LK

Peas | sf [oa [non [smse nes [Son | ass |

Decorating | 1 | 817 5 weeks Mon/Wed. 9:00pm $325.00 | LK

Setar | 1S fone [omc |oueas [aes [Sen | ee | oe |
1 | 818 — Nov.19 | 5 weeks Mon/Wed. 9:00pm $375.00 | PK

Decorating II
BAKING 1 | 830 Oct. 20 Nov. 24 MONDAY 9:00PM $390.00 | PK

Deadline for applications, October 10, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - FALL SEMESTER 042008

time | DAY

~~ | SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE | $30am-
W/S Thurs







DESCRIPTION [stant | DUR | FEE

— et ob te tn ed

NO. NO.
BUSINESS |










cusTgo0 01 [4:30pm 17-Oct_| day | $170.00 |
6:00pm-

Busigo4 | INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS! | 9:00pm__| Thurs ee inves | $225.00 |
9:30am-
RESS MANAGEMENT | 4:30pm _














me eee

O30am-=.—[--- - -f-*

| COMP 960 01 | microsorrpowen rowr | ¢30pm ies ere ha day | $170.00
9:30am 7

COMP930 | 01 | WEB PAGEDESIGNIW/S | 4:30pm ___| Thurs/Fri__|_16-Oct_ | 2 days sateen.
9:30am-

COMP931 __| Wi {4:30pm



| Thurs/Fri $650.00



“1 WEBPAGE DESIGNIW/S



| DECORATING















i nena a ah i nee ssninmgascnemenats ie 1



ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or
email persdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Sche ule and Course Materials,



east eih Di nCS

bs LOCUS IR MDB NSIS EEE BAN ABS AE INES CCT iOS

LEED AD AEN LOI EG GAME LTE CREB es heed.






|
i
|
i
4





P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GERARDIN FORRESTER
of FOX HILL, SPRINGFIELD ROAD, P.O. BOX
EE-16652, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of OCTOBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,



UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International
we look after wealthy private clients by providing them with
comprehensive, value enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are available from
across UBS, helping them provide a full range ui wealth management
Services. ;

in order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the
following positions:

Senior Client Advisor & Client Advisor for the Brazil
Desk

in this challenging position you will be responsible for the Advisory of
existing clients, acquisition of high net worth individuals as well as
presentation and implementation of investment solutions in the client's:
mother tongue Portuguese.

For this position we are searching for a personality who meets the following
requirements:

¢ Extensive experience and a proven track record in wealth management;

* Specialized in the fields of customer relations, investment advice and
portfolio management; ‘

» -Excellent sales and advisory skills as well as solid knowledge of
investment products are key requirements. Fluency in English and
Portuguese is essential.

Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

hrbahamas@ubs.com or

NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

A

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce the following tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The General
Contractor Package for Tender C-116 Early Civil and Relocations lump sum contract

includes the following components: °

¢ Tree and site clearing, including removal; mulching and composting of

organic materials.
* Security fencing supply and installation;

* Demolition and disposal of buildings, fences, miscellaneous structures,

debris and equipment;

¢ Removal and disposal of 2 underground and 1 above ground fuel storage

tanks;

¢ Removal and disposal of existing utilities & installation of new utility
corridor including sanitary and communication ductbank;

¢ — Removal of HMAC roadway by milling and construction of temporary
parking lot and contractor laydown area utilizing existing pavement and

asphalt millings;

¢ — Relocation, supply and installation of temporary parking lot lighting; and
¢ Relocation of existing macerator, pump and trash compactor and removal
and disposal of existing lift station and macerator pit.

Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on Monday, October 6th.

Tender closing is Tuesday, October 28th at 1:00pm.

There will be a Tendc; Briefing Wednesday, October 15th. Please RSVP Traci Brisby
by 1pm Tuesday, October 14th for briefing location details.






ALLE SERA ELLA 5 EO LRA OOOO OE LDL IE COLTER ORIEL





TENDERS



Contract &ProcurementManager
APIA Expansion Project —

_ Ph: (242) 702-1086 » Fax: (242) 377.2117 -
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

Ex-Bahamas investor
in fraud probe

FROM page 1B

“On April 21, 2006, Pegasus
shares began trading on the
Nasdaq market, opening at
$14.45 per share. But the stock
steadily and substantially fell in

the following months, as nega-

tive press articles questioned
Pegasus’ valuation and reported
that the chief executive and
chief financial officer had head-
ed other penny stock compa-
nies whose stock rose and
crashed in short periods of time.
“Also, in mid-2006, Pegasus
began issuing large amounts of
shares, claiming it was doing so
to satisfy debts incurred by Blue
Industries that had not been
previously disclosed to
investors.... Between mid-2006
and 2008, Pegasus issued nearly
500 million shares (more than
75 per cent of the outstanding
shares) based on promissory
notes it claims were made
out....... by Blue Industries.”
Pegasus and Mr Knabb’s
short stay in Freeport is unlike-
ly to be remembered fondly by

‘many, especially the 80-100

employees who felt they had
found what turned out to be
ultimately shortlived employ-
ment at the company’s manu-

facturing facility.

Tribune Business revealed at
the time how the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) had not wanted to
grant Pegasus a business licence
to operate in Freeport, due to
concerns about the firm’s track
record (it was already
embroiled in two class action
lawsuits filed by angry
investors) and ability to deliver
on what it promised.

Yet the GBPA’s concerns
were overridden by the then-

- Christié government. The whole

episode is something of an
embarrassment for the former
PLP government, whose leader
and ministers were actively pro-
moting the merits of Mr Knabb
and his plant in the run-up to
the 2007 general election.
Indeed, many at the time felt
the whole Pegasus investment
was merely a ploy to boost the
re-election chances of sitting
PLP MP Pleasant Bridgewater,
who was then in a keenly fought
contest with the FNM’s Zhivar-
go Laing that she eventually
lost. Ms: Bridgewater acted as
the attorney for Pegasus and
Mr Knabb, and her offices acted
as the initial recruiting station
for the company’s workforce.

Ms Bridgewater and the for-
mer: government, though, are
not part of the SEC probe. Mr
Knabb had previously told Tri-
bune Business that it was Mr
Christie and Obie Wilchcombe
who were instrumental in bring-
ing him to Grand Bahama.

Mr Knabb was rarely out of
the news during his temporary
stay on Grand Bahama, pur-
chasing the ‘mother ship’ for
the Korean fishing boat fleet
that played a pivotal role in
ending Sidney Stubbs’ time as
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
chairman. It was speculated that
he was using the boat for trea-
sure hunting in waters off
Grand Bahama.

Indeed, the Pegasus affair
demonstrates the need for the
Government to conduct better
due diligence on incoming
investors to determine that they
and their projects are in the best
interests of the Bahamas and
Bahamians.

In its last SEC filing, Pegasus
said it had decided in June 2007
to relocate its manufacturing
facilities from Freeport to Tai-
wan. It incurred a $1.96 mil-
lion write-off after closing the
Freeport facility.

ORCS Cte eT ELC



surge’ to 1,000 attendees

FROM page 1B

given the timing.”

Mr Bethel added that he was
“still optimistic we will see a
significant number coming in”,
and “would like to think we will
still hit” the number of 1,000
visitor arrivals for Islands of the
World Fashion Week.

The event is being held from

“November 5-8 at the British






















oo Contact: . |
Traci Brisby








Colonial Hilton and Atlantis
resorts, and could mark an ini-
tial small - but significant step -

towards further diversifying the

Bahamian tourism product and
making it more resilient in the
face of a global economic down-
turn.

If Mr Bethel is successful in
attracting 1,000 visitors from
outside the Bahamas, given the
average tourist per capita spend
of between $1,000 to $1,100, it is
possible that the event’s total
economic contribution may run
to between $1 million to $2 mil-
lion.

That number is not to be
sneezed at, given the pessimistic
outlook for the Bahamian hotel
and tourism industry for the
remainder of 2008 and into
2009.

And if Islands of the World
becomes an established event
on the international fashion cir-
cuit and expands, its economic
and publicity/marketing bene-
fits will be even greater for the
Bahamas in years to come.

To diversify and insulate its
tourism product from the worst
effects of the US economic
downturn, the Bahamas needs
to concentrate more ‘on event-

based tourism, such as the con- *

vention business, small meet-
ings and conferences, weddings
and one-off spectaculars such
as Islands of the World and the
Bahamas International Film
Festival.

In other words, there needs to
be less reliance on the sun,
sand, sea tourism model that
has depended largely on the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FLORAL GARDEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on

‘the 12th day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
~ TENDER FOR GROUP LIFE INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals from |
insurance companies for the administration of life insurance coverage to
homeowners of properties mortgaged to The Corporation.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect an
information package from The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation’s Head
Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field.

The deadline for the collection of the information package is Friday,
October 10, 2008, no later than 4:00 p.m.






THE TRIBUNE



New shipping
firm targets
$100k freight
charges goal

FROM page 1B

started with a “lean” staff com-
plement, but would “ramp up’

with extra employees if the busi

ness demanded it.

He added that the Atlanti~
Caribbean/United Shippin:
venture may actually be aide«
by the economic downturn, ¢:
Bahamian consumers were like
ly to switch in favour of shop
ping at home as opposed ‘>
travelling to Florida, due to th:
heightened cost of travel an
hotel accommodation.

“We know the economy ©
slowing down because of wha? ‘=
happening in the US, and ti.«
Bahamas might feel the pinc!:,”’
Mr Ryan explained. “We fe<',
with what is happening with 2°
cargo and the new fees fo:
checking first and second bag:
that consumers will see th«
opportunity to look for whe’
they need in the Bahamas,
rather than spend $500-$600 c
an air fare.

“We think there may not b-

such ‘a downturn in retai’.
There’s an opportunity for pes-
ple to buy at home as long 2:
the stores ramp up for Christ-
mas.”
Mr Ryan added that Atlantic |
Caribbean was also well-posi-
tioned to service the major
investment projects in the
Bahamas, given that its Fort
Pierce base in Florida was close
to the major lumber trucking
jump-off points in Tampa and
Jacksonville.

Atlantic Caribbean and Unit-
ed Shipping were also fully pre-
pared to take warehouse and
dock space at. Arawak Cay,
once all the commercial ship-
ping and container facilities
moved from downtown Bay
Street in line with the plans to
revitalise Nassau city centre.

United Shipping is already
the in-port agent for Norwegian
Cruise Lines in Nassau.

Bahamas’ proximity to the
wealth centres in Florida, New
York and the east coast US.

Overall, Mr Bethel said
Islands of the World, which is
being organised by Montaque
subsidiary Modes Iles Ltd, was
“moving steadily along”.

He added: “It certainly has a
lot of momentum from the
international media coverage
coming. All the designers are
on board, and going through
the logistics to get their gar-
ments here.”

Among those likely to attend
the Islands of the World Fash-
ion Week are fashion industry
buyers and entrepreneurs, plus
dedicated fashion followers who
move from show to show
throughout the year.

A key aim behind the show is
to provide a regular interna-
tional showcase for up and com
ing designers, and to give ther.
the ability to manufacture their
lines of clothing and have them
purchased by buyers and majo:
merchants outside their coun-
try.
Another goal is to try and
stimulate the revival of the
Bahamian fashion and garment
design/production industry.
While government tax incen-
tives had encouraged the devel-
opment of cottage textile man-
ufacturing industries, especially
seamstresses, none had ‘gone
on’ to develop their skills fur-
ther and expand into design.

pr

ve

t

The proposal should be for a three year period from 1st November,
2008 - 31st October, 2011.













.

THE |RIBUNE

WEUNESDAY, UL IUBEN o, cuvu, 1 MUL ve



Pee ee a
More economic pain ahead, says Bernanke

m@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke warned Tuesday that
the financial crisis has not only
darkened the country’s current
economic performance but also
could prolong the pain.

The Fed chief’s more gloomy
assessment appeared to open
the door wider to an interest
rate cut on or before October
28-29, the central bank’s next
meeting, to brace the wobbly
economy.

Bernanke said the Fed will
“need to consider” whether its
current stance of holding rates
steady “remains appropriate”
given the fallout from the worst
financial crisis in decades.

If the Fed does lower its key

rate from two per cent it would
mark an about-face. The Fed
in June had halted an aggres-
sive rate-cutting campaign to
revive the economy out of fear
those low rates would aggra-
vate inflation. Since then, finan-
cial and economic conditions
have deteriorated, while infla-
tion pressures have calmed, giv-
ing the Fed more leeway to
again cut rates.

Many believe the country is
on the brink of, or already in,
its first recession since 2001.

“The outlook for economic
growth has worsened,”

Bernanke said in prepared

remarks to the annual meeting
here of the National Associa-
tion for Business Economics.

All told, economic activity is -

likely to be “subdued” during
the remainder of this year and

into next year, Bernanke said.
“The heightened financial tur-
moil that we have experienced
of late may well lengthen the
period of weak economic per-
formance and further increase
the risks to growth,” he warned.

Consumers

Consumers — major shapers
of economic activity — have
buckled under the weight of ris-
ing joblessness, shrinking pay-
checks, hard-to-get credit,
declining net wealth and tank-

~ ing home and stock values. All
the strains are “now showing -

through more clearly to con-
sumer spending,” Bernanke
said.

-Meanwhile, worsening sales
prospects and a heightened
sense of uncertainty have begun

nesses, making them more cau-
tious to hire and to invest in
their companies, he said.
Employers cut jobs in Sep-
tember at the fastest pace in
more than five years, the gov-
ernment reported last week.
Payrolls were slashed by
159,000 last month alone. It was

the ninth straight month of job’

losses. A staggering 760,000
jobs have disappeared so far
this year. -

The financial and credit
crises, which took a turn for thé
worst in September and con-
tinue to stubbornly persist, are
likely to “increase the restraint
on economic activity in the
period ahead,” Bernanke said.

Even households with good
credit histories are now facing
difficulties obtaining mortgages
or home equity lines of credit,
he noted. Banks are also reduc-

ing credit card limits and denial
rates on auto loan applications
are rising, he said.

Strain

Banks, too, are feeling the
strain of a lockup in lending,
particularly in the market for
commercial paper. |

To that end, the Fed on

Tuesday announced a radical-

plan to buy massive amounts

of this short-term debt in.an.

effort to break through a cred-
it clog that is imperiling the
economy.

“The expansion of Federal
Reserve lending is helping
financial firms cope with
reduced access to their usual
sources of funding,” Bernanke
explained.

Invoking Depression-era
emergency powers, the Fed will

begin buying commercial paper
~ short-term funding that many
companies rely on to pay their
workers and buy supplies.

Bernanke believed the Fed's
bold actions — along with the
$700 billion financial bailout
signed into law by President
Bush on Friday — will help
restore confidence in financial :
markets and help them func-
tion more normally.

He also defended the timing
of the actions by the Fed and
the Bush administration. “We ,
have learned from historical
experience with severe finan-
cial crises that if government ,
intervention comes only at a
point at which many or most
financial institutions are insol-
vent or nearly so, the costs of
restoring the system are great-
ly increased. This is not the sit-
uation we face today,” he said.

to weigh more heavily on busi-

Legal Notice

Notice
CONFIDENCE NAVIGATION
COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

C29 E-CO aN OD Ak

CO
S2wk-Low
1.51 Abaco Markets
11.60 Bahamas Property Fund
7.66 Bank of Bahamas
0.85 Benchmark
3.49 Bahamas Waste
1.95 Fidelity Bank A :
11.00 Cable Bahamas . . : 11.6
°2.85 Colina Holdinga
4.80 Commonwealth Bank (81) ;
2.36 Consolidated Water BORe 4 ‘ -O. 3 fe 19.3
2.25 Doctor's Hospital . . 6 B 10.8
6,02 Famguard ‘8. . . B . 15.1
12.00 | Finco . ; i ’ 18.0
11.54 FirstCaribbean Bank Oo. . 7 . 17.2
5.05 Focol (3) : e 3 E . 13.6
1.00 Foco! Class B Preference ote fe F . F N/M
0.40 Freeport Concrete i . R hs a 11.4
5.50 ICD Utilities . « . 7 : 20.1
8.60 J. S, Johnaon . . . 12.6

SS
52wk-Hi__52wk-Low

Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named Com-
pany are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at
Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-
3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 17th
day of October, 2008. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

TS Getaber SOTF
19 October 2022

30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Dated the 3rd day of October 2008.
LYNDEN MAYCOCK ee eee ee
LIQUIDATOR

0.300
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

“0.000 90
0.300 N/M
2,000 N/M.

NAV Date
30-Sep-08
31-Aug-08
19-Sep-08
31-Aug-08
31-Aug-08
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-08
31-Dec-07
31-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08

Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 — FG Financial Diversified Fund

N MA AGWwi' Dn

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 62 weeke

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthe

P/E - Closing price divided by the Inet 12 month earnings

SB) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000) .
YUELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity :
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vel. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS & - A company’s reported earnings per share for the inst 12 mths

» WAVETREE HOLDINGS LIMITED

: In Voluntary liquidation ;

NAV - Net Asset Value
NIM - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), WAVE-
TREE HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off
the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 30th day of September, 2008.

ES VARSSEUHOS Y GOLONIAL 282 502-7525

BAHAMAS FIRST

General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Balance Sheet as at December 31, 2007

oy

GEDAR S.A.
80 Broad Street
Monrovia
Liberia

Liquidator

2007 2006

ASSETS -

6.813.378 $ 5206247

CLE/qui/01133/2008

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY SIDE

BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
known as Grant B-117, Big Fish Cay, one of the Fish Cays
being fifty-five and a half acres (55.50) situate North of Little
Abaco Island, one of the islands in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas ‘

AND
IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Arthur H. Lowe Jr.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Arthur Havelock Lowe Jr. is applying to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas to have his title to
the following investigated under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act
1959 and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal.working hours at the following places:

e

- 1. “ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land known as
Grant B-117, Big Fish Cay, one of the Fish Cays being
fifty-five and a half acres (55.50) situate North of Little
Abaco Island, one of the islands in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas :

Copies of the same may be inspected during normal office hours at the
following places:

a.) The Registry of the Supreme Court of Nassau, Bahamas.

b.) The Chambers of Andrew C. Allen Law Chambers, 204
Lagoon Court, Olde Towne, Sandyport, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

c.) The Administrator’s Office, Cooper’s Town, Abaco,
The Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said Certificate of Title
is required to file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
their attorney a Statement of his, her or its Claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit served therewith by failure of any such person
to file and serve a Statement of his, her or its Claim aforesaid non-
compliance with this Notice will operate as a bar to such claim.

Andrew C. Allen Chambers
204 Lagoon Court
Olde Towne, Sandyport
Nassau, The Bahamas



Cash $

Term deposits
Investments

Receivables from agents and brokers

Sundry receivables and prepayments
Receivable from remsurers

Interest receivable

Deferred commission costs

Unpaid claims recoverable from reinsurers
Deferred reinsurance cost

Deferred reinsurance premiums
Receivables from related company

Intangible asset

Property and equipment

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Payable to reinsurers

Unearned commission income

Unearned premiums

Payable to agents and brokers

Accrued Habilities
Unpaid claims

EQUITY:
Share capital
Contributed surplus
General reserve
Revaluation surphas
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

3,479,529
21,265,010
20, 742.671

FAS TAT
235,213
91331

7,009,654
10,670,394

4,035,334
26,827,559
23,293,948

2,892,559

2,044,192

2007

14,225,843
5,839,199
42,686,985
466,983
1,462,065

19,352,292
$4,033,367

7,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000
1,269,268

19,546,884
45,916,152

$ 129,949,519

3,304, 799
12,306,410
17,762,546

668.901
241,436
83.955

6,429. 735
13,583,172

4.614.739
26,290,026
14,262,134

2,692,559

1.889.006
$109,3358.665

1,272,587

# yw!

21,441,913

2,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000
1,079,779

7,337,679
28,517,458

$109,335,665

A full copy of the Company's financial statements are available on the Company's website www. dahamasfirst.coim





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





CALVIN & HOBBES






















, Tribune Comics WY TEACHER SIS
MOM AND DAD BOTH
HAVE TO SIGN MY
REPORT CARDS

THIS YEAR.

FOR SHOW AND TELL, I
BROUGHT A SPACE ALIEN
I CAPTURED IN MY BACK
YARD.

TVE BEEN KEEPING \T IN
TWS SPECIAL ZARNIUM-COATED

MOMENT YOU'VE
ALL BEEN




JUDGE PARKER

AN






50, ONE NIGHT HE
GOT LOADED AND
CAME ON TO ME!






C2008 by Norn Amenca Syndicate, inc Wend ngnes reserved

YES, BOB
DION'T LIKE THE
WAY DEWEY WAS

TREATING ME!



YOU TOLD DEWEY
//| ABOUT WHAT BOB DID?

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday ,

JT APPEARS ALAN LANGE WAS
SELLING DRUGS OUT OF THE

AND THE EVIDENCE

WE FOUND BEARS
RAY JENKINS SHOT ALAN LANGE OVER| SeaT'o 2

A DRUG DEAL, WS. MAGEE. JENKINS 15
A HARD-CORE ADDICT; HE CLAIMS
LANGE WAS HIS SUPPLIER.

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NN ANS
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24









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‘ A TERRIBLE DAY AND
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“MARTHA









©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

5 KNOWS HER WAY AROUND THE KITCHEN,
AN’ DENNIS KNOWS 4/5 WAY AROUND MARTHA,”



Difficulty Level *





_ Kakuro Puzzle _

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of edch. vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

© 2008. by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved

A 2
bs SE

MARVIN :

THERE ARE
TWO TYPES OF
PEOPLE






. AND

PARENTS | ae
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Sudoku Answer



st. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



©2004 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

weew kinglealures.com







©2008 Conceptis Pu

10/06



Yes. NOBOVY SEEMS T GUESS THE
“TO WANT THEI FUTURE ISN'T }
FORTUNE TOL? WHAT IT USE? i
i ane move further thart his Rustrious
ey! opponent. Can you spot White's
5 SRE coal scatee
j
:
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winning becouse 1 Re? forces the
queen away alter which 2 Reel





Chess: 8690: 1 Re7 Qxe7 (expecting 2 dxe7 Rxd4
and Black wins} 2 Qg4+! and Black resigned.





T Look, W Here comes PLEASE DON'T CALL
MEN / OUR ay ME “LUCKY”

©2008 by King Features Syndicate. Inc. World nghts ‘eserved.



Across
1 Professional business will

make one furious (11)
The case resulted in prop-
erty passing to the State
(7)
There’s a catch in being .
flat-chested (5)
Double act,
now extinct (4)

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
2 Moved fast when account

got in the red (5)

Six ways to watch televi-
sion? (4)

In such a tune easily
picked up? (6)

A charming thing to wear
(8)

Bird that’s seen from the

= N



cwkus
BRowNE

East dealer.

Famous Hand

feUers of urere can you
make frou the letiers
th Tuakinag

De





been published by Edmond Hoyle in

He had a model mother (8) Equator to Lanzarote (7) i
He refuses to eat more On the verge of retire- fo a Both sides ee bidaling Ws given forthe iad
( o bidding is given for the hand,
2 : : :
acy Ae) ey (5,3,3) aoe a Ea ee ete Hed 4— the sole stipulation being that the
Vessel to put to sea (6) Time may be on its side i P| 95432 final contract is seven clubs redou-
Pretty girl in red and rose (6,5) #5432 bled, played by South.
(8) Such a tyre is flat indeed Po Weeote i be ee 4 65432 There is no way of stopping the
I niusicararbaacecen (8) WEST EAST grand slam if declarer plays cor-
group get p #110 @AKQ rectly. Aces become deuces as South
after the end of the concert It's heavenly under a tree Ww Across Down VI109876 ¥V¥AKQ obliterates every honor card held by
(4) (7) — 1 Harmless outlet for 2 In front (5) #109876 #AKQI East.
Be way out,about a point Make someone take N emotion (6,5) 3. Flat (4) & Sata #KI9 meek s eis _— a a ue
S mond or a heart. Declarer ruffs
2 . ’
(5) . notice? (6) a) 9 Ineffectual (7) 4 Sycophantic follower 98765432 trumps a spade in dummy and
Fancy taking out a Gemini Rule that holds George ini- ou 10 Hooded weatherproof (3-3) v returns a club, capturing East’s nine
(7) tially in check (5) > coat (5) Z ¢— with the ten, Declarer ruffs another
Special band for the match Equality includes one or “” 11 Personal assistant Pete) .: #AQ 1087 epaee a dummy and takes a second
7,4) Bed) x 7 6 Deviating from stan- Final contract seven clubs — trump finesse. When declarer then
(7, Lu (4) redoubled, played by South. tuffs a third round of spades in

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Honour, 4 Especial, 9
Around, 10 Hatstand, 12 Ha-ha, 13
Lamps, 14 Site, 17 Nuts and bolts, 20
Leaning Tower, 23 Ores, 24 Scarf, 25
Talc, 28 Dead heat, 29 Toledo, 30
Delicate, 31 Enosis.

Down: 1 Heathens, 2 Neophyte, 3
Urns, 5 Sharp corners, 6 Erse, 7 Italic,
8 Ladder, 11 Landing craft, 15 Eaten,
16 State, 18 Sweaters, 19 Precious,
21 Loaded, 22 Befall, 26 Chic, 27
Noun.

N
N
,E
|
O
S
Ss
W
0
R
D

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Bronze, 4 Adorable, 9
Cheers, 10 As good as, 12 Lush, 13
Venom, 14 Fell, 17 Steal the show,
20 Achilles’ heel, 23 Avow, 24 Faith,
25 Grip, 28 Gigantic, 29 Pauper, 30
Sideways, 31 Pent-up.

Down: 1 Backlash, 2 Overstep, 3
Zero, 5 Disconsolate, 6 Rook, 7
Badger, 8 Easily, 11 Technicality, 15
Slick, 16 Coast, 18 Decrepit, 19
Claptrap, 21 Ganges, 22 Forged, 26
Anew, 27 Haze.

12
14
16

18

19

22

23

24

Bearing (8) °
Crudely painted (6)
Put in drop by drop
(6)

Old, faithful servant
(8)

Become tired (4)
Rejoice (5)

Stir up public feeling
(7)

Intimidatory (11)



dard (7)

Settled in advance
(3,3,5)

Sodden (11)
Disparage (8)
Falsehood (7)
Renounce (6)
Commit to memory
(5)

Indication (4)

Opening lead — ten of diamonds.

This is probably the most famous
hand in the history of bridge. Legend
has it that the Duke of Cumberland,
more than two centuries ago, held the
East hand and wagered 20,000
pounds against’ the North-South
hands making seven clubs redou-
bled.

The duke lost the bet, since he
was unable to score a single trick

despite his extraordinary array of

high cards, Regardless of whether
the story is true or the hand was actu-
ally dealt, it comes to us from way
back in the days of whist, having first

dummy, his remaining spades
become established.

Declarer returns to his hand by
ruffing a diamond or a heart, cashes
the ace of trumps and chalks up, 13
tricks.

The deal is an extreme example
of the potent power of unusual distri-
bution. Double and triple voids can
easily wreak havoc on point count
and honor tricks.

Incidentally, we'd like to suggest
that if you ever play in a game with
strangers and are dealt the East hand,
you should either ask for a new deal
or head quickly for the nearest exit!

Tomorrow: High-class defense.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Ine,



THE TRIBUNE

GN-758



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00613

Whereas PHILIP BARRINGTON STUBBS, of
Meadows Boulevard, Winton Meadows in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of FRANCES DORIS STUBBS, late of Tucker
Road in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

. Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS . Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
’ PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00614

IN THE ESTATE OF RENEE M. WENTZ, late of 2184
Southwest Spoonville Drive, Palm City in the State
of Florida, one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by JAMES LENNOX MOXEY
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

’ Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the resealed Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to ELIZABETH WENTZ, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, by the Circuit Court for
Martin County, Florida, on the 2nd day of August,
2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00617

Whereas TOINETTE MAJOR, of Carmichael Road
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ARTHUR MAJOR, late of Berry's in the
Island of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION Oct. 9, 08
2008/PRO/npr/00619
IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH H. MOORE, late
and domicile of 75 Macadamia Court in the city of
West Palm Beach in the County of Palm Beach in the
state of Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by FREDERICA GERTRUDE
McCARTNEY, of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to FATHER
DAVID C. KENNEDY and KIRK GRANTHAM, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit
Court for Palm Beach County, Florida, Probate Division
on the 12th day of July, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00620

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF HELEN C. FRANZ (a.k.a. HELEN
CAREY FRANZ), late and domicile of 8401 West
Cypress Drive in the city of Pembroke Pines in the
County of Broward in the state of Florida, one of the
United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of Administration
(Single Personal Representative) in the above estate
granted to MARTHA K. DAULA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit Court for
Broward County, Florida, Probate Division on the 28th
day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00621

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF EDITH MOLLISON (a.k.a. EDITH
W. MOLLISON), late and domicile of No. 175,
Willoughby Street, 8L in the City of Brooklyn, in the
State of New York, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Letters Testamentary, in the above
estate granted to LILLITHE E. MEYERS, the Executor
of the Estate, by the Surrogate's Court in and for the
County of Kings, on the 11th day of January, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00622

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE JOHN SCHEJBAL,
late and domicile of 32 Cold Springs, Hunterdon
County Tewksbury Township, New Jersey, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by LUCIA E. BROUGHTON, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Grant of
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate granted to
EDWARD J. SCHEIBAL, the Executor of the Estate,
by the Court of Hunterdon in the state of New Jersey,
on the 6th day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION Oct. 9, 08

2008/PRO/npr/00623

IN THE ESTATE OF ALPHA SVAFER ROGERS, late
and domiciled of the City of Sundre, in the Province
of Alberta, in the Dominion of Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by STANLEY OSWALD
ANTHONY ISAACS, of East Bay Street in the Eastern
District of New Providence, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Probate, in the above estate granted
to ALPHA LORRAINE MIDNIGHT, the Executrix of
the Estate, by the Surrogate Court of Alberta, Judicial
District of Calgary, on the 5th day of February, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00624

Whereas PATSY CULMER, of Garden Hills No. 1,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration with the Will Annexed of
the Real and Personal Estate of COLLEEN CULMER,
late of Garden Hills No. 1, Southern District, New
Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 7B



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00626

Whereas JACQUELINE BURROWS and DEREK
ALEXANDER BURROWS, both of Pineyard Road,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme ,Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ASHLEY BURROWS, late of Nassau East
North, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00627

IN THE ESTATE OF MAMIE M. BEARD, late of 6239
E. Reno Apt. D Midwest City, Oklahoma 73110, one
of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by KIRKWOOD M. SEYMOUR,
of Sears Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
of Administration in the above estate granted to
TERRY BEARD, Personal Representative, of the
Estate by the District Court of Oklahoma County in

‘the State of Oklahoma, one of the States of United

States of America on the 8th day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00628

Whereas JAMES EDWARD BLAKE Ill, of Freeport,
Grand Bahama and SHAWN MARIE BAKER, of
Deadman's Cay, Long Island, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The. Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The: Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of JAMES EDWARD BLAKE, JR., late of Town
Court, Nassau Street, New Providence, one of the

' Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00629

Whereas CLAYTON DEVEAUX, JR., of South Beach
Estates, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of CLAYTON DEVEAUX SR., late of
Gleniston Gardens, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00630

IN THE ESTATE OF CARMELO J. PATTO, late of 14
Comet Road, Syosset, Nassau, in the State of New
York, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by MICHAEL CRAIG ROBERTS,
of Golf Course Boulevard, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to MARIE J. PATTO, the Executrix, of the
Estate by the Surrogate's Court of Nassau County,
one of the States of United States of America on the
Ath day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

By LISA LAWLOR





EDITERRANEAN dishes that tempt the taste

buds are endless at Provence, an idyllic French

restaurant located at Sandyport. Chef and own-
er Marc Innocenti has been based in the Caribbean for
nearly his whole life, travelling from Jamaica to St Lucia
to Antigua, back to Jamaica and then the Philippines,
before finally settling in Nassau some 13 years ago to
open Sandals Resort. He then followed his passion just six
years ago to create the essence of Mediterranean food ©

with Provence.

Settling in Nassau because
of the great fishing, as well as
the peaceful, more stable
atmosphere, Chef Innocenti
said the quality of food here is
also better than in other
Caribbean countries, possibly
because of the Bahamas'
proximity to the US.

And now, after studying at
the Culinary School in Nice,
France, he has followed his
family tradition in opening a
restaurant. His grandfather
was a chef in France as well as
his uncle, the owner of a
restaurant.

introducing Provence

Located in the back of
Sandyport, Provence is tucked
away in near seclusion from
the other businesses there.
With the option of sitting
inside or out.on the verandah
overlooking the canal, diners
are offered lighter portions of



4

Mediterranean cuisine that
traditionally has a richer taste,
and according to Chef Inno-
centi, his foods are quite
healthy.

In the fresh air one can
breathe in the very essence of
island life. It feels as if you are
sitting over the Bridges of
Seine in Paris, while having
the list of specialties read with
full details of how each is pre-
pared. And with light
melodies dancing off the
water, one may choose from
appetizers such as the Craw-
fish Lobster Thermidor, a deli-
cious cheese montage of
seafood, Escargot Provengale
with bread crumbs in a shal-
low plate or Smoked Salmon
Carpaccio, strips of delicate,
raw salmon seasoned to taste.
Each plate is meticulously pre-
pared with attention to detail,
embracing a palate pleasing
level of excitement as the

tastes unite.

And then there is the plate
principal, the main reason for
coming to this French hide-
away. With dishes covering
the entire range of possible
desires, the decision will be
based on what kind of taste
you are inclined to experience
that day - from pasta dishes
like the Gnocchi Riviera, to
seafood like Swordfish Steak
Canoise and Gambas Pistou
with grilled and marinated
pesto prawns, tomatoes and
herbs. Land dishes are also
available, such as the Magret
de Canard (duck) or the Ulti-
mate Filet Mignon, whose
savoury taste melts in the
mouth.

And a la finale an indul-
gence of sweet, whether it be
the dessert wine Chateau Vari
Monbazillac, or a deeply deli-
cious serving of Zabaglone
Cake with layers of white and

SA AAAI AS WAGER AW

THE TRIBUNE






TUCKED away in near seclusion from the other businesses in Sandyport, Provence provides din-
ers with the option of sitting inside or out on the verandah overlooking the canal. Diners are also
offered palate-pleasing portions of Mediterranean cuisine that traditionally has a richer taste.

dark chocolate, or the Cepe
de Provence - with its vanilla
ice cream, meringue top with
chocolate ganache and roast-
ed almonds.

The Mediterranean lunch is
served between 11:30am and
3pm Monday through Friday,
and the dinner between 6pm
to 10:30pm, Monday through
Saturday. Proyence experi-
ences their high season from

Marley Resor
and Spa.
honours one
LOY AT

CELEBRATING his significant | “
achievements in the culinary field, the
Marley Resort and Spa saluted Chef
Sheldon Tracey Sweeting with a.lun-

cheon yesterday.

Resort representatives presented



ZY

October through late March
when reservations are in
demand.

Tapas, a special Mediter-
ranean meal and activity that
consists of friends sharing a
few dishes and sometimes eat-
ing with their hands, is also
available at Provence. The
tapas menu is a dynamic one,
changing from day to day,
serving both warm cuisine



such as Puntillitas, a battered
and fried baby squid, or cold
ones like mixed olives and
cheese.

Ninety-five per cent of
Provence's diners are
Bahamian, with a healthy
spattering of tourists mixed
in. Chef Innocenti said that
although the economy is
affecting his restaurant, busi-
ness is still going well.

WANA ‘0D =] BMW “BB

Chef Sweeting withia cheque to ‘assist
with defraying the cost of his participa-
tion in the prestigious International *;
Culinary. Art Exhibition (IKA), better
known as the Culinary Olympics:
Stephanie Marley, CEO of Marley
Resort and Spa, said that it gives her
great pleasure to-be able to'make ‘the
presentation on behalf of the resort.
Chef Sweeting spoke candidly about
the upcoming competition, "It's a’ **
dream of mine", he said, seemingly not
content with the bronze medal he and
his teammatés brought home from the’:
Jast competition. "I would like: to break
.that*barrier, and get,the gold, and show-" *:
‘case my talent as a Caribbean chef,’ he.»
asyb(< Gy a bate
It also needs to be understood that’! :
chefs:hailing from the Bahamas! can pro>\
duce Unique, high quality cuisine, as
they will be competing with countries |
like Canada; Sweden; Norway and of |
course the host country Germany. i
' Chef Sweeting also spoke briefly on |
‘the financial challenges regarding the’
competition. eR a ee
"It costs approximately one hundred, —
thousand dollars for the team to travel
and compete. The team consists. of six
'meémbers and two alternates. We have
a few fundraising events but the ”
monies.derived are not nearly enough)
to.fund the team. Therefore, 1am grate-
', ful to the Marley Resort and Spa for the”
gift presented here to me today.”
Marley Resort, a'16-room boutique *
resort situated in posh Cable Beach, °\
opened its doors in February, Chef
Sweeting is the resort's resident-head ©
(o)11c) ie . BAAN ao!





Ee 8

The Tribune

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 9B

UU



‘Show Your Game' shines,

movie Rocky, Apollo Butler
aka Apollo Kre-ed is steadily
demolishing the competition
with his eyes affixed on one
major goal, conquering the
international and local markets
with his heavyweight vocal
skills.

This is no easy feat for a
Caribbean artist, but the incred-
ibly hardworking young man
does not dwell within the realm
of impossibilities. After all, he
has already proven that any-
thing is possible if you are
determined. .

Born on the island of New
Providence to a Jamaican
mother and Bahamian father,
Apollo's father owned a bar
and it is at this family owned
business that his love of music
first blossomed.

His daily diet of Jamaican
80's reggae, and old time
Bahamian music as well as a
host of other genres soon fueled
a fierce aspiration in him which
would be quashed by his father
- now deceased - whom Apollo
felt wanted him to become a
blue collar worker.

"Thad a deep passion for it,"
Apollo said of the music. He
notes though that neither of his
parents supported his music®
career. However the performer
has no intention of giving up
his dreams, though he main-
tains a full-time job. Apollo,
who recently put his college
education on hold, did say how-
ever, that something has to

give.

Reared in the Kemp Road
inner city area, Apollo believes
that this prepared him to face
almost any situation. One crisis
soon began tearing at his home
life however, and forced him to
take his stress out to the streets
where he would fall in with the
wrong crowd. He joined a gang
and, like many young men,
soon found himself in trouble
with the law. Arrested and on
the verge of doing time, Apollg
decided to change his ways.
Music, which he always loved,
gave him a way out.

Having access to his father's
large collection of music and
listening daily to the lyrics,
influenced him to begin writ-
ing in 2005, he now says. In
early 2006 he linked up with
local artist/producer Colyn
McDonald of Visage, and start-
ed to follow his passion for
music. Apollo recorded a num-
ber of songs and later released
his first single to radio, titled
"Girl You Don't Know".

Growing up on the same
blocks as international reg-
gae/gospel artist Landlord, he
was truly inspired when he saw
Landlord's first video on Tem-
po. Touched by Landlord's
accomplishments, he instantly
set a bigger goal for himself. A
chance meeting with Landlord
gave Apollo the tools that he
needed to work with. After a
long 17 months, Apollo. Kre-ed
accomplished his goal of get-
ting himself onto the interna-

as Apollo Kre-ed set to
release new album

LIKE his namesake in the ' tional circuit when his video :

appeared on the international }

station.

In 2007, Apollo literally and :
single handedly propelled him- :
self into the media spotlight and :
on to the local stage with his :
song "It's our Time Nassau". :
The song enjoyed a fair amount :
of airplay on most stations in :
the Bahamas, then by sheer will :
power and tenacity Apollo was :
able to get his music video on :
Tempo, making him the first i
Bahamian rapper on the :
Caribbean's version of MTV. :
The video exceeded his expec- :
tations when it shot to the num- ;
ber ten spot on Tempo's Cross
Caribbean Countdown show in :

early 2008.

Currently the sky is the limit :
for Apollo. He released anoth- }
er single entitled "Show Your :
Game" four months ago. He is :
also working on his first album :
which he has aptly named :
"Round One". The 15 track :
album is set to be released in :
2009 and will feature a few col-

laborations.

Apollo prides himself on pay- }
ing his way. It's all him - all his :
hard work and he has begun to }
see returns. The multi talented :
artist also makes his own beats }
as well as writes his own lyrics :
from his home studio. With :
concert dates piling up and :
international collaborations in :
the pocket, Apollo Kre-ed is :
poised for his shot at interna- :

tional stardom.



SASS

Track Road Theaters
DA Rally

@ By THE VENDETTA GROUP



OUT of the same minds that brought you the
cult classic Bahamian play, Market Fire, comes a
brand new side-splitting comedy Da Rally, which

runs at the Dundas from October 16-18.

The new play comes from the Track Road The-
atre camp whose creative collaborations brought
forth such theatrical gems as Diary of Souls, Dev-
il on the Cross, and Web Shop Horrors.

Track Road Theater is an amalgamation of
talented writers, actors, directors as well as stage,
light and sound crew. Since their incorporation as

. anon-profit organisation in 2002 the team has hit

the ground running with a slew of plays and com-
munity oriented events such as Drama-Rama.
Drama-Rama is a summer programme which

the Track Road team put together to get the next -

generation of theatrical talents ready for their
season soon to come. “We are here to build peo-
ple up and raise the public appreciation of the the-
ater,” said Matthew Kelly, chairman of Track
Road Theatre.

The play, Da Rally, is a hilarious political lam-
poon set in the Bahamas during the election peri-
od. The play takes place around the calamitous
events that happen after an unscrupulous politi-
cian sets the rally dates of the two largest political
parties on the island, (the Green Party and the
Blue Party), on the same night. The ridiculous
twist and turns in the plot will keep all who watch
constantly gasping for air as they laugh.

While sitting in on one of the practices of Da
Rally, which will be directed by Clarence Rolle,
one trend became quite apparent. As parts of



the script were being rehearsed by cast members }
_it became almost impossible to sit there and not :
chuckle. Though the cast has not been together :
_ long their clearly is a great camaraderie amongst :

them.

from Matthew Wildgoose.

Though Mr Wildgoose is young, he is a very
seasoned stage actor whose prowess has earned
him a reputation as a force to be reckoned with in :

the industry.

The leading ladies of the play came to the floor ;
with the same impeccable comedic timing as their :
male counter parts. As Juanita Kelly hysterically :
blurted out her lines the distinction between the :
individual and the character she had become was
clear. Daria Del's smooth and pragmatic address :
to a rally filled with devout constituents was ;

superbly realistic.

Down to the minor utterances of the support-
ing actors, the depth of all the players contributes ;
to the overall side-splitting laugh fest thai is Da }

Rally.

* Tickets for the Da Rally can be purchased at :
the Dundas Box Office. For more info, videos and :
pictures on any of the stories released by The :
Vendetta Group feel free to email us at vendet- :
tagroup242@gmail.com or checkout and join ;

our group on Facebook or Myspace.



With one accord and synchronicity they all :
studied, reviewed and laughed at each other as }
they performed their different roles. One of the }
leading men of the play, Deon Simms, displayed :
his gift for improve comedy as he acted across i



Bahamian jazz artist set
co release third album

@ By LISA LAWLOR

AHAMIAN talent can be found across











Yi
Uy

the world, evidenced by the success

achieved by Vernon Neilly, a top jazz
guitarist who has made a.name for himself in
the US as both a musician and a producer.

One of the few artists great enough to
have a signature guitar string - called the
Giannini Power String - as well as to war-
rant a guitar being manufactured for him
called the Tagima VN-1, Vernon has led a
musical life with three cds under his belt
and the start of his own label, the Los
Angeles-based Boosweet Records.

Vernon is set to release his latest cd, Ver-
non Neilly & Friends "A Tribute To Stevie
Wonder", later this month. Recorded on
three continents, Europe, South America,
and North America, the cd features a num-
ber of international artists including Greg
Howe - who has played with Michael Jack-
son and Justin Timberlake; Kiko Loureiro,
U-Nam, Michael Paulo - who has played
with Al Jarreau and Earth Wind & Fire;
Bill Hudson - who has played with Cellador
and Power Quest; Grammy Award winning
bassist Juan Nelson - who has played with
Vesta Williams and Ben Harper; and oth-
ers paying homage to the musical genius
that is Stevie Wonder.

His earlier work, including his sopho-
more album G-Fire II, gave listeners the
true feel of island life. Both G-Fire, Ver-
non's first album, and G-Fire I are winners
of the 'Smoothie Award' — the jazz indus-
try's most prestigious award granted on the
basis of having a top 20 most played jazz
release on commercial radio.

On his second album, Vernon showcases
his mastery over the stringed instrument
with tunes like "Afternoon Drive" that
cavort to the melody of a Miami Vice, high-
speed car chase, taking the listener up to an
exciting climax. The shells swinging in the
breeze bring the listener back down to the
reality of laidback island life.

His song "Sweat" is played to the melody
of Bob Marley's "Looking In Your Big
Brown Eyes", bringing fond memories of
the reggae superstar to the forefront while
putting a jazzy twist to the slow, rhythmic
song.

Vernon has recorded with, toured with,
and produced for some of the most leg-
endary names in the music business such as
the late blues legend Johnny "Guitar" Wat-
son, Pee Wee Crayton, Charles "Merry

Christmas" Brown, Mary Wells, The Dra-
matics, Motown hit producer Norman
‘Whitfield, rap star Warren G, Howard
Hewitt, Teena Marie, Cuba Gooding Sr
(Main Ingredient), The Coasters, Drifters,
Etta James, George Clinton and many
more.

He produced and mastered the 18 artist
compilation disc "United By Tone" in con-
junction with the worlds leading guitar
pickup manufacturer, Seymour Duncan.
This highly acclaimed limited edition disc
features some of the most tiotable names in
the guitar world such as Slash, Jerry Hor-
ton - who played with Papa Roach; Jen-
nifer Batten - who played with stars Jeff
Beck and Michael Jackson; Gary Hoey,
Jimmy Bruno and Seymour Duncan. Ver-
non's track."Nassau Nights" is the first
song on the disc.

Vernon's albums have been featured in
magazines such as Guitar Player, Guitar
World, Guitar One, 20th Century Guitar,
Vintage Guitar, Jazz Improv, Jazz Times,
Down Beat, Urban Network, Ebony, Our
Weekly, Guitar Player Brazil, Cover Gui-
tarra (Brazil), Smooth Jazz News, Abyss
Jazz, All About Jazz, and many others, as
well as a myriad of newspapers, and e-zines
globally.

Vernon is further extending his career
into the movie business, appearing on the
big screen in Universal's "Along Came Pol-
ly" with Jennifer Aniston and Ben Stiller,
Warner Brothers’ "Starsky and Hutch", as
well as Columbia Pictures' musical spoof
"Walk Hard", featuring the story of fiction-
al musical legend Dewey Cox who embod-
ies the stories of real life rock and roll
artists Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Jim Morri-
son, David Bowie, Brian Wilson, Ray
Charles, Jerry Lee Lewis, Donovan and
most prominently Johnny Cash.

* For more info on Vernon Neilly and his
upcoming release, Vernon Neilly &
Friends "A Tribute To Stevie Wonder", vis-
it boosweet.com or email:
info@boosweet.com





PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



The truth? Hip Hop won't stop

6th Annual Fest a
smashing success

m@ By ARTHIA A NIXON

HE truth in the Truth Hip Hop

Fest can very well be that the

crowd-pleasing, positive-vibes-
flowing event is here to stay.
Founder of the event, Lavard 'Mani-
fest' Parks seemed to sum it up right
when he sang “Good Times” as the
Rainforest Theatre provided just that,
as titillating top-notch talent took the

stage.

Unlike most hip hop shows,
the audience was made up of
toddlers with mothers, tween
boys with fathers, older couples,
teens, families and groups, prov-
ing indeed that the genre of
music doesn't target one demo-
graphic but can build bridges
between generations with pure,
authentic, uplifting and enlight-
ening lyrics. .

Minister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard attended the
event with his wife and took the
opportunity to officially wel-
come the international per-
formers to The Bahamas. He
also noted that he was saddened
by Manifest's recent remarks in
the media about how positive
events such as the Truth Hip
Hop Fest lack the support of
major sponsors and the general
public and pointed out that a
similar event of secular nature
would have major sponsors
clamoring to get on the card.

“When Manifest came to me
last year and told me about this
project, I thought it was excel-
lent,” Mr Maynard said. “I see
the vision he has and the lives
he wants to change, plus I see
where he wants to carry it.
However, it hurt me to know
that my Ministry was unable to
sponsor it. Tonight, I am happy
to say that this year we are
“preaking rear son
we (Ministry of,
one of thespoad

After a soul-stirring opening
by Adrian Edgecombe and
Harvest Generation, Platinum
Soldiers proved themselves to
be party starters with their hit
song “Never Let It Go”. Najie
Dun followed with a surprise
acapella performance of “Why
Take Life” in a voice that
impressed and expressed. Mr




Lynx came and got the older ;

crowd members to show they

still knew how.to move: with. *

“Obedience” ‘before spitting

“Take Control” Hands wayed ,. - Po} t.and we will go and grow in |
and seats emptied as Monty G’*

took the stage and gave the
audience a sample of Lion of
Judah Records with “I Want To
Know”.

The out-of-towners didn't dis-
appoint as. Demetrus brought
the heat from the dirty south

starting off with a twist to the»

secular “We Taking Over” anc

turning it out as “We Rep Jeho-

vah”. In his other performances,

MONTY G rocks the mic.

yep ie



ne “Headbangers”.



he showcased poetic energy,
seemingly never stopping for a
breath with “What Goes
Around”, “Shake 'Em Off”,
“Sick and Tired” and “We
Comin' Through”.

Despite the warning, Bahami-
ans were not prepared for the
raw grit and west coast true life
authenticity spewing from the
vocal chords of Ahmad and
Tena Jones. The 4th Avenue
Jones couple provided a taste
of hip-hop-rock to the line-up
while captivating the audience
with their in-your-face lyrics.

Some of the older attendees
even sang along with Ahmad
who performed his Grammy-
nominated song “Back In The
Day”. Meanwhile, Tena's elec-
trifying vocals matched the
strength of the electric guitar in
the song “Who's Watching Me”
as the pint-sized powerhouse
roared out the lyrics with the
authority of a lioness.

The night, however, belonged
to Manifest and the artists on
the Dunamus Soundz Record
Label, who each displayed tal-
ent and stage presence worthy
of international caliber. Unlike
the other male performers, Rab-
bi presented a delicate yet reflec-
tive tone in his voice as he sang
‘Only Jah Knows'.

7 mwhile, Mr Beeds let the
\fion*know why it was time for
to'release a solo;record in
his set that included a stellar.duet
of “Life is What You Make It”
with the evening's fashionista,
Rudell Capron. He also didn't
stray far away from his theatrical
roots as the actor displayed a
comedic performance during his
song “Bless You”. Manifest blew
thee roof off the building by cli-
maxing the event with his hits, a
duet with Demetrus and of

It was another amazing
year,” declared’ Manifest. “We
feel truly blessed to get to this

‘years to come.” :
The Truth Hip Hop Fest also |
saw the introduction of an artist |

music workshop where interna- iy

tionally-known performers gave
wannabes the inside scoop on
how to make it big.



* Visit www.dunamus-
soundz.com for more informa-
tion.



RUDELL CAPR |
a duet with Mr. ON performs

Beeds,



UW (0) NT oWeyj
4th Ave Jones
LICH a gtoLs
Watching Me.











ut his lyrics ac

apella.



We BEEDS gets
In the Grease

Mehl Mtb,

DEMETRUS
returns to
the stage

straight out
of Jack-
sonville.



THE TRIBUNE



@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON



N this small West Indian island,
various artisans, crafters and
musicians seek to showcase their

creative imagination and talents, as
the Bahamas Arts Festival begins
October 26 to November 2.

A total of eight days have
been set aside to capture the
essence of Bahamian art,
whether it is visual arts, crafts,
or musical arts. The festival will
feature an art and crafts show,
church services and a two day
training programme in decora-
tive plaiting. The Bahamas
National Craft Association
(BNCA) will hold its annual gen-
eral meeting and election of offi-
cers during the week long festi-
val, and there will also be a "bat-
tle of the bands", and the Annu-
al Gala Tea Party.

Introduced to Bahamians
when ex Royal Governor George
Phenney invited women from
Bermuda to share their knowl-
edge of the craft - the art of straw
and decorative plaiting has since
become firmly grounded in the
roots of Bahamian culture.

As part of the upcoming festi-
val, Edison Key, executive chair-
man of the Bahamas Agricultur-
al Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), urged his fellow
Bahamians and straw vendors to
consider and continue to produce
Bahamian made souvenirs.

Dishearten by the numerous
imported goods in the straw mar-
ket, the chairman emphasized
that there are many local items
that can be used to make sou-

‘venirs. Items such as shells,
coconut and straw can be used
in a variety of forms to produce
mementos that entice the eyes of
tourists; it’s just a matter of inven-
tiveness, he said.

The training programme has
been implemented to provide
Bahamians with the opportuni-
ty to learn or enhance various
skills in decorative plaiting.

“Monday and Tuesday will.

feature a training programme in

- decorative plaiting at the Holy
Cross Anglican Church Centre,”
the chairman said. The effort of
encouraging Bahamians to get
involved in souvenir production
are beyond measure, since teams
from BAIC will visit schools to
encourage students to get
involved in this business, which is
classified by Bahamian handi-
crafts specialist as a lucrative
industry.

"Teams from the BAIC and
the Bahamas National Craft
Association will visit high schools
to encourage students to consid-
er souvenir production as a
career, or a secondary income
earner, Or as a very rewarding

, hobby,” he said.

Many Bahamians have
embraced the opportunity given
by the BaIC Handicraft Devel-

opment and Marketing Depart-
ment to train in souvenir cre-
ation. “Over the years the BAIC
Handicraft Development and
Marketing Department has been
making a concerted effort to have
as many Bahamians who want to
train in Bahamian souvenir man-
ufacturing, using as far as possible
only locally found ingredients,”
he said.

There have been new creations
in straw and shell work, from hats
and hand bags of different fash-
ions and styles to jewellery,
broaches, tie pins, pendants, dec-
orations, lamps, mugs, and many
more. He noted further that
when tourists visit the Bahamas

‘they say “we do not want any

cheap, made-in-some-other-coun-
try souvenir, we want something
that is truly Bahamian”.

Mr Key also encouraged
Bahamian to tap into the mil-
lions of dollars sent out of the
country to import souvenirs for
tourists.

On Saturday, November 1,

musicians will rein as they dis- —

play their talents in the competi-
tion, Battle of the Bands. The
battle is fought between high
school musicians, and has been
highly anticipated every year.

ASP Ronald Campbell of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
Band is responsible for the battle
of the bands and is very excited
about the competition. “The
competition is exciting and the
winners are not predictable. All
the bands are very good and
there has never been a consecu-
tive winner since the competi-
tion’s inception,” he said.

Also on Saturday there will be
a Junkanoo competition, so for
those Bahamians who can’t wait
until Boxing Day to feel the rush,
they can enjoy the sound of goat
skin drums and cowbells at the
Bahamas Arts Festival.

The Annual Gala Tea Party

‘will be held on the last Sunday

and will feature delicate Bahami-
an and international brews.

- Entertainment will be provided

by the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, the Falcons, The
Voice of Praise Group, Cream
Gospel, the Pathfinders March-
ing Band and others.

The opening ceremony will be
held on October 26, with Prime
Minister Hubert A Ingraham as
the keynote speaker. Also giv-
ing remarks will be Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace and Minister of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources
Lawrence ‘Larry’ Cartwright.



Learning the art of straw plaiting

FROM page 12

Mrs Strachan long ago mas-
tered all of these techniques,
growing up in a home where
plaiting yards of straw while
talking with family was the
norm. She even plaits other
materials like leather, coconut
bark or native fabrics like
Androsia into her straw works.
Goods produced range from
straw sandals, phone book hold-
ers and pillow cases, to fans,
purses, and hats. Mrs Strachan
prefers to use straw from silver
top palm trees that line the
coasts of many Bahamian
islands because it is strong and
wears well.

Another material used is sisal,
but the process of obtaining
sisal is a very tedious one -
resulting in more expensive and
less common products. Goods
made with sisal are produced
on Cat Island and Andros most-
ly. An advantage to using sisal is
that it can by dyed, whereas the
more popular material of silver
top straw can't be dyed because
it won't maintain the colour. Sil-
ver top may be coloured how-
ever, through a technique
known as "smoking the palm"
in which the plaiter traditional-
ly fans the straw through the
smoke of an old fashioned oil
lamp, although other fires may
be used.

Her daughter and constant
helper Allena Albury said that
there is always a full turn out
to her mother's classes, "Usu-

‘ally women are looking for a

new skill for either a part time
or full time job as a straw ven-
dor," she said. Her classes are
for between 10 and 15 students.

One arts and crafts teacher
Shree Lakshmi Batta explained
that she was brushing up on her
plaiting skills in order to teach
the kids at Queens College a
new technique for their BGCSE
exam coursework.

The quilters at the workshop
were two talented women,
Sarah McClean and Jan Elliott.
Both said straw is definitely a
medium they plan on incorpo-
rating into their quilt works, and
that this new technique came a
bit easier to them since they
already practice crafts.

Leslie Callender and Lisa
Goudie both attended the class
to simply learn a new talent,
saying that it's nice to learn old
traditions and very rare to hear
about these kinds of classes in
Nassau.

Ms Strachan runs straw plait-
ing workshops regularly, as she

. is no longer teaching classes

part time at the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocation Institute

’ (BTVI). She has run workshops
’ in Bimini, Grand Bahama,

Eleuthera and Andros, as well
as picking up silver top straw
from Long Island and Rum
Cay.

* Contact Debbie Strachan
for classes at email deprenter-
prises@hotmail.com or tele-
phone 341-1044 or 456-5695.
The National Art Gallery (328-
5800/1) sells Mrs Strachan's
works in their gift shop, as well
as the Yellow Strawberry Beau-
ty Salon on Rosetta Street (326
7863). The signature clip on all
her straw works is "Depre Col-
lection" - a combination of her
husband's, daughter 's and her
own name.



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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 11B

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008



PRICE — 75¢





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PLAITING

SEE INSIDE ‘THE ARTS’

Mario Miller

Jury fails to reach

unanimous decision

@ By CHESTER ROBARDS

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE JURY in the Mario

Miller murder trial failed to.

reach a unanimous decision on
the guilt or innocence of
accused brothers Ricardo and
Ryan Miller yesterday. Justice
Stephen Isaacs had to dismiss
the case without a verdict.

The jury forewoman, howev-
ef, initially announced that they
had found Ricardo Miller guilty,
but with a vote of 11-1 in favour

.of guilt.

Justice Isaacs promptly
reminded her, as per his instruc-
tions before they were sent to
deliberate, that they could only
find the defendant guilty if the
jury vote was 12-0.

She then read the jury’s deci-
sion relating to Ryan Miller
and determined that he was not
guilty with a vote of 7-5 in
favour of acquittal. Again, the
judge had to remind her that
accused persons could only be
found not guilty, as per his
instructions, with a vote of 8-4.

The jury was out for two
hours before delivering its deci-
sions.

After Justice Isaacs dismissed
the case he reminded both the

RICARDO and Ryan Miller
outside of court yesterday.

accused men. that they would
have to reapply for bail. They
were then taken by officers to
be remanded at Her Majesty’s
Prison.

Family members of murder
victim Mario Miller were visibly
shaken up over the outcome of
the trial.

Outside the courthouse, sis-

SEE page 15

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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

LESLIE MILLER hugs his daughter Leslia Miller eS cer)



NIB chairman says it’s
unfair to blame execs for
contribution shortfalls

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

IT WOULD be unfair to
blame National Insurance
Board executives for shortfalls
in contribution collections as
they have not had the right
“organisational infrastructure”
to be “fully effective” in this
regard, NIB chairman Patrick
Ward said yesterday.

’ Mr Ward confirmed that the
board also “aborted the
process” of introducing a per-

formance-related pay systein
that was agreed upon during
the last negotiations with the
union. ’

“There was a little bit of a
mismatch and we just didn’t
think it was the right time to
introduce those performance-
based measures,” said Mr
Ward at a press conference to
announce new NIB initiatives.

Asked if he could further
explain the decision not to
implement the system, he

SEE page eight



"British
"VAmerican



. a otaff
VUE Sidi:

"BE,

Felipe Major/Tribun



PAGE 16



MEDICS prepare to remove the body of Tammeko SED DYE TaLeA

Motorcyclist is —

the third traffic
fatality in 24 hours

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

JUST hours after two teenage
girls died in a gruesome car
wreck off East Bay Street, a
man was killed when his motor-
cycle slipped into an oil deposit
along Peardale Road, becom-

ing the 39th traffic fatality of the
-year.

According to police reports,
25-year-old Tammeko Valenti-
no Delancey was driving south
on Peardale Road around 10pm
Monday when he lost control of

his vehicle and slid off the road. °

SEE page eight

Reports of MP being questioned in connection
with embezzlement.are denied hy police

POLICE denied reports yesterday that a sitting MP had been
brought in for questioning in connection with the embezzlement of

funds from a local corporation.

The politician, who has been under the watchful eye of investi-
gating officers for some time, was rumoured to have been arrested

around noon on Monday.

However, Acting Acsistit Commissioner of Police Hulan Han-
na denied that the politician - whose name is being withheld - or any
other sitting MP was currently in police custody.

Yesterday, reports of the politician’s arrest spread throughout

SEE page 15

a By A eon LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net -

AS OF January next year
all employers and self-
employed people who are
behind in their National
Insurance contributions will
be charged monthly interest
on what they owe and will
be “aggressively pursued”
for payment - with prosecu-
tion in the courts likely for
defaulters.

National Insurance Board
chairman Patrick Ward said

Se





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WET Mt Hera (Sud Ciftce)














the move is one which the
new board of directors,
appointed in July, 2008,
hopes will help improve
compliance rates and there-
by shore up the fund’s short-
fall.

Interest will be charged on
arrears. at “a prime rate,”
said NIB acting director
Anthony Curtis. He and oth-
er executives, along with Mr
Ward, were speaking at a
press conference at NIB
headquarters yesterday.

SEE page 15

MORTGAGES
UU VERS ULES
LIFE INSURANCE

LS

AUT SS
& PENSION PLANS

FINANCIAL PLANNING
PLS

is
PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

Gabrie! Moss

Caral Stubbs

Erinn Treco



Gabriel and
Khristoff star
in fashion
extravaganza

IN A fashion extravaganza
held at:the historic Fort Char-
lotte on Saturday evening, a pair
of 17-year-olds, Gabriel Moss
and Khristoff Symonette, took
top honours as winners of the
ist annual Ford Models’ Super-
model of the Bahamas and
Models242 Male Face of 242.

After a week filled with heavy
downpours, the skies held back
the rain long enough to see the
two teenagers, who were com-
peting against a total of eight
others - six women and two men
- caught by surprise when their
names were announced.

Speaking with The Tribune
yesterday morning, Gabriel said:
“All the way home last night, I
was saying to myself, ‘I won, I
won’.”

Still in a state of disbelief, the
Grand Bahama native will now
begin preparations to represent
The Bahamas at the Ford Mod-
els’ Supermodel of the World
International grand finale which
is being held in the south-east-
ern European country of Mon-
tenegro.

When she travels to Mon-
tenegro in January, she will be
with 52 other young women
from around the world who will
be all vying for $500,000 in mod-
elling contracts with the leg-
endary modelling agency, Ford
Models Inc.

As winner of the Models242
Male Face of 242, Khristoff is
being considered by Ford Mod-
els for its men’s division and will

Three new
dolphins make a
plash at Atlantis

DOLPHIN Cay Atlantis is
now home to three new Bot-
tlenose dolphins.

Megara, a 12-year-old
female, Hercules, a 10- year-
old male, and Isis, a 10-year-
old female, arrived at their
new home last Thursday.

They were flown non-stop
on a DC-6 aircraft from Tor-

La eh

Bernard Rd - Mackey St - Thompson Blvd



tola, British Virgin Islands,
to Nassau.

The dolphins, which came
from another dolphin facility,
will be reunited with several
other dolphins that also came
from the same facility in Tor-
tola to Atlantis in 2007.

Dolphin Cay marine mam-
mal specialists Michelle
Davis and Bernard Collie
spent a week in Tortola get-
ting to know the animals and
starting the relationship-
building process prior to the
transport.

Along with the Dolphin
Cay team of husbandry
experts and veterinarians,
and with the help of many
different divisions of Atlantis,
the transport was a success.

Atlantis said yesterday that
the three dolphins are all
doing great in their new sur-
roundings.

Within seconds of being
placed into the pools they
were eating fish and explor-
ing their new environment.
They will stay together for
the next few days as Atlantis’

team of specialists watches
them closely to ensure they
are adjusting to their new
environment.

Next week they will begin
to be introduced to the rest
of the Dolphin Cay family.

have an expenses-paid trip to
New York, where he will shoot
with various photographers,
including, once again, event
photographer Karl Rothen-
berger.

In addition to their travels,
Mae Wayne, editor-in-chief of
SHE Magazine, has offered to
jump start the careers of the
winners by featuring them in a
future edition of her hugely
popular Caribbean magazine.

Taking second place behind
Gabriel on the women’s side
was 18-year-old Carol Stubbs, a
student of Temple Christian
Academy, and she was followed
by 17-year-old Saint Augustine’s
College student Erinn Treco,
who finished third.

On the men’s side, 27-year-
old auto mechanic Godwin
Rolle took second spot behind
the event’s winner, with former
CC Sweeting student, Jon
Michael Burrows, 20, in third
spot.

The event, held under the
patronage of Minister of Cul-
ture Charles Maynard, was
dubbed “A Night Under The
Stars” and paid tribute to two
icons in the Bahamian fashion
industry, Pepper Johnson and
Pat Paul.

Sponsors for the event were
The Tribune, Diamonds Inter-
national, Flaunt It Clothing
Store, Carlos Valentino, Sexy

-Sandles, Pot Pourri, Expressions

Shoes, Coconuts Bahama Grill,
and the Ministry of Tourism.






THE TRIBUNE

| Gs A oe eas ae aD aa



Invest Wisely, Sleep Soundly,
Live the Life You Choose






Nassau - T: 242-502-7010 Freeport - T: 242-351-8928

info@cfal.com | www.cfal.com \e 4

~——_

ee a ms —
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 3



|

NIB announces —
the relaunch =
of its website

‘THE National Insurance
Board yesterday announced the
re-launch of its website, which
will enable retirees, employers
and self-employed persons to do
online much of what they used to
do manually.

The www.nib-bahamas.com
site and its new functions were
designed and implemented for
NIB by IBM software services at
a cost of “hundreds of thou-
sands” of dollars. It is the first of
several e-business initiatives that
NIB chairman Patrick Ward said
the organisation intends to use
to make access to its services
more convenient and less costly
for NIB itself.

It is also hoped that it will
make businesses miore likely to
keep up to date with their pay-
ments, and give NIB a better idea
of who owes what.

Mr Ward said: “The highlight
of the new website is that it now
allows employers and self-
employed persons to submit con-
tributions and statements of con-
tributions online and it allows
retirees to submit benefit claims
online as well.”

Acting director Anthony (Cur-
tis said: “One of the problems
we have always had is that
employers, if they are not pay-
ing the contributions, they are
not required to submit the
monthly C10s or employer return
forms to us. Because of that we
do not have an‘accurate account
of the dollar value of the contri-
butions that would be owed to
us. Because of what we are doing
now it allows employers to actu-
ally go to the website to post their
contributions and we can have
that information on hand so not
only will we have an accurate
account of what contributions are
owed to us but it will also
enhance our ability to actually
process the claims when they are
processed. :

“This feature will alsoenhance
our ability to be of better service
to our claimants as well,” said
Mr Curtis.

Retirement benefit forms can
be submitted from today, while
submission of online contribu-
tion statements will begin on
October 20 of 2008. The infor-
mation will allow NIB to have a
register of all people who work
’ for an organisation online.

“Beginning today, employers
and self-employed persons are

local office. ;

This registration process will
result in each entity being
assigned individual access (user-
name/password) to the online c10
system,” said Mr Ward.

Other information available
on the website will be annual
reports, a list of uncollected
cheques and other information
on NIB andl its role.

e SEE STORY
PAGE ONE

Man in custody
in connection
with shooting

POLICE took a man into
custody in New Providence
on Monday: in connection
with the recent shooting near
the Pepper Pot Takeaway in

Grand Bahama.

’ Acting on a tip at around
6pm, a team of officer's trav-
elled to Inagua Way off
Carmichael Road and
detained Kema Moss.

Mr Moss is currently help-
ing police with their inquiries
into the shooting death.

Police also arrested a man
in his 30s in connection with
the matter.

@ POLICE officers found
an illegal firearm in a New
Providence cemetery. -

Acting on information
from a member of the public
on Monday some time after
9pm, the officers found a .32
calibre handgun at St
Joseph’s Cemetery.

No arrests have been
made and investigations into
the matter continue.

RM Bailey class
of ‘88 meeting

THE graduating class of
1988 of R.M. Bailey will be
holding a meeting tonight
at 7:00 p.m at the school
. on Robinson Road.

’ Plans for the upcoming
Souse Out which will be
held this Saturday October
11 beginning at 7:00 a.m
will be discussed.

Tickets will also be
available for sale at this
time.

For donations and ticket
information call 302-2783.

Please be on time. All —
graduates are invited to
attend.



Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace

Minister of Tourism

is ‘very optimistic’

m@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

AS SPECULATION con-
tinues about strategic plans

“for a resurgence of the

tourism industry, Minister
of Tourism Vincent Van-
derpool-Wallace told The
Tribune he feels “very opti-
mistic” going into the next
few months.

The minister, who is today
expected to reveal an action
plan to help strengthen
tourism, noted that
prospects were looking
promising for the industry,
based on the increase in

availability of credit in the
US economy following Con-
gress’ passing of the Bush
administration’s $700 billion
bail-out plan.

The minister warned that
although Americans — who
represent a significant por-
tion of international visitors
to the Bahamas - are
expected to experience
financial ease as a result of
the bail-out, they must still
be convinced to make the
decision to take a vacation
in the Bahamas.

Mr Vanderpool-Wallace
said his main objective is to
assist in generating future

growth and sustainability.
According to persons work-
ing in the tourism industry,
this year has been one of the
toughest as far as generat-
ing revenue and in control-
ling market sustainability.

Response

In response to January
reports of declining arrivals
to the Bahamas, ministry
officials introduced a $12
million “environmentally
sensitive” ad campaign
intended to entice Ameri-
can and European travellers.

However, figures for April ;
and May indicated consis- |
tent declines, except in.
terms of arrivals from Cana- ;

i
}
i
)

da, a sector which has con-
tinued to show growth.
Tourist numbers were fur

ther affected by Tropical %.

Storm Hanna and Hurricane |
Ike. i

When he took the post in #
early July, Minister Vander- ;
pool-Wallace stated that)
increasing fuel prices had)
presented major challenges |
for the industry, adding that
this was “clearly one of’
the things we have to
address.”

Mother of baby ‘attacked by ants in PMH’ plans to sue

A MOTHER whose baby
was attacked by red ants
while being treated for asth-
ma in an incubator is plan-
ning to sue Princess Mar-
garet Hospital for negli-
gence.

Azorator Culmer, 27, of
Lucky Heart Corner off East
Street, Nassau, was dis-
traught to find her two-
month-old daughter Unique
swollen and sore with ant
bites after staying at the hos-
pital overnight in September
last year.

The mother of three said
Unique has been deeply
affected by the trauma, with
scars on her face and eyelids,

bite marks around her nos-
trils, and she is afraid to let
anyone touch her face.

Attorney Craig Butler rep-
resenting Miss Culmer said
his attempt to settle the mat-
ter out of court has been
fruitless and he anticipates
he will have to litigate the
matter in court.

Miss Culmer claims she
alerted a nurse when she
noticed ants in her daugh-
ter's incubator and she had
been assured Unique would
be moved, but the next
morning Unique hospital
staff called to say the baby
was covered in ant bites.

"I couldn't even recognise

her when I gone there," Miss
Culmer said.
"Her. whole face was raw

and then even when the skin ©

grew back she still had marks
on her nose, her lip, her ear
and on her fingers."

Bites

Unique, who is now 15
months old, was called back
to PMH for check-ups in the
first few weeks after the ant
attack to assess the bites and
her respiratory conditions,
but Miss Culmer claims the
hospital have showed little
concern since.

Workshop sponsored
_ by US Embassy aims sou
= to help combat piracy FRReiNsTimaiss

in the Bahamas

m@ By TANEKA THOMPSON ©

Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

IN AN ongoing effort to
stamp out the widespread sale
and transit of counterfeit
goods which violate interna-
tional piracy laws, the Ameri-
can Embassy is sponsoring a
workshop to help the
Bahamas develop strategies to
combat piracy of intellectual

- property in the Bahamas.

The transit of counterfeit
drugs, car and airplane parts

_ through the Bahamas coupled
‘with the lack of enforcement

of copyright laws is a major
concern and officials said the
workshop is critical in raising
awareness about the country's
piracy problem.

In 2006, the Bahamas was
removed from the US Trade
Representative's Special 301
priority watchlist — which
examines the adequacy and
effectiveness of intellectual
property rights — after progress
was made with Cable
Bahamas' commitment to the
Television Association of Pro-
gramers (TAP).

In the past, TAP said Cable
Bahamas failed to comply in
narrowing the scope of its
compulsory TV licensing
regime.

Jeff Dubel, political and eco-
nomic chief at the US
Embassy, said both sides were
still engaged in talks to resolve
the issue.

"T think that we took them _

off the watchlist because they
enacted some legislation that
was very positive. The Cable
Bahamas issue is still ongoing
but they're working very hard
to try to resolve that with com-
panies in the states.

"They have made progress
by talking to individual com-
panies, there's still some cable
companies in the states that
want to sell the entire
Caribbean package only. I
think it's going to be a while
before that's resolved, I think

- it's very positive they're talk-

ing to each other and that's
what I would encourage is for

Bid to stamp out the
widespread sale; transit
of counterfeit goods



them to continue talking on
the issue".

Mr Dubel said US officials
are still concerned about the
proliferation of counterfeit
movies, CDs and handbags
which are widely available
throughout the country.

The workshop aims to pro-
vide law enforcement and the
attorney general's office with
strategies for cracking down
on the area.

"A little more effort is need-
ed there but on the whole on
the major issues we are
pleased. But then you look at
some other things in the area
such as the straw market, and
other places — yesterday they
were able to go to a music
store and they were able to
buy counterfeit CDs, counter-
feit DVDs just out in the open,
that's something that's not
acceptable and if I were an
artist working here, that would
bother me".

Raphael Munnings, a musi-
cian who was invited to rep-
resent the Bahamas Musicians
and Entertainers Union, also
advocates the enforcement of
the copyright law for artists’
protection.

"You walk along the streets,
in every food store someone
is pushing some DVD in your
face, some music that you
know it's not original stuff.
We've been talking about it
for a long time but like I said I
think it needs more exposure
and to be more vigilant with
(enforcing) the law".

The Tribune spoke with a

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oa

Bahamian who sells counter-
feit CDs and DVDs, who said
if police enforced the copy-
right law he would obey. But
once that is done, the DVD
and CD market would "shriv-
el up", he said.

"If they enforce it, I'll just
obey the law.

“It ain' hard to crack down
on those places (that:sell coun-
terfeit goods) but then again,
they'll just be more discreet
from then on. And unless
shops down here start selling
(authentic) DVDs and CD for

like $10, the market will shriv- -

el up," he:said.

However, Unique has been
scarred by the experience.

"If you look close you see
the marks on her face, her
eyes and her ears," Miss Cul-
mer said.

"You could see the nibbles
on her nose and her lip. And
she won't let you touch her
face, she will fight you."

Miss Culmer believes
social services would have
intervened if she had shown
the same disregard for her
infant's care, and she wants








“HE PRIPCHA

Unique Sifts Ideas
For She TSFtome

— Siniled

the hospital to compensate
for their negligence.

She said: "They have
showed no concern, no care.
They are trying to keep it
hush, hush and for the con-
dition she was in the bites
must have been there long
because they bit holes in her




skin. That's real negligence '

on their behalf."
Princess Margaret Hospi-

tal failed to respond to calls |
from The Tribune before the ,

paper went to press.

| Nassau’s Premier Store




Baypar! Building on Parliament Street
Telephone: (242) 323-6145

Harbour Green Shops at Lyford Cay
Telephone: (242) 362-6527, Fax: (242) 326-9953
P.O. Box N-121, Nassau, N.P., Bahamas
email:info@colesofnassau.com

Peony Niae


PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, PO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau. Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Baham.i: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Should gambling be legalised? .

IT IS NOW time to face the gambling
issue. Should gambling be made legal in
the Bahamas, or should the anti-gambling
laws be strictly enforced?

This time we have to be realistic, Either
the police can enforce the law, which means
enforcement will have to start at the top
and continue down to the street corner
numbers racketeers, or it will have to be
recognised that gambling has become so
entrenched in its breach that it has to be
legalised.

Prime Minister Ingraham recognised this
fact in February this year when he
announced that he was considering legal-
ising gambling in the Bahamas for both
citizens and residents.

According to the law only tourists can
gamble at the casinos.

The fact is, however, anyone who wants
to gamble is doing so whether it be at the
casino, web shops, in back room pool par-
lours, or playing the numbers. Bahamians,

- and residents of all nationalities are gam-

bling.

And many of the policemen who should
be arresting the culprits are standing in
line at the gaming windows.

Mr Ingraham made his statement when
the crime report, completed in the late

1990’s, was being debated in the House .

earlier this year. =e
That report called for the improved
enforcement of the gaming laws.

“Now, Mr Speaker, this society on a
Sunday morning, you go to the gaming
houses, to Flowers and those places, and it
is like a bank on pay day — government
pay day,” said Mr Ingraham. “They are
set up like a bank, hundreds and hundreds
and hundreds of places. Well, either we
believe that it is illegal, or we believe that
it should be legal.”

“I told the Commissioner of Police last
week,” said Mr Ingraham, “that it seems to
me that we are unable to enforce that law,
and that I was going to give consideration
to legalising the numbers business. Of
course, he didn’t support me in that think-
ing, but the reality is that it is not an
enforceable law. And the society is doing it
everyday. There is webshop here, and a
webshop there, all over the island.”

Judging from the letters we have

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received many Bahamian are fed up —
they want action. Recently, the Flowers
organisation made a generous donation to
NEMA.

Letter writers condemned government
for receiving the donation considering the
source. Hypocrisy! they screamed. Every
time this particular web shop makes a
move, the letter writers pounce with acid
letters. If government can’t enforce this
law, then what other laws have they
shrugged their collective shoulders on and
capitulated? Is this why crime is out of
control? They want to know.:

The boldness of the web shops suggests
that someone has made the operators
believe their operations are legal.

Is it because our current gaming laws do
not cover Internet gaming, and, therefore,
they think they can slip through the legal
net?

Or have they in fact paid a business
licence to government for their operations?
If they have a business licence do they have
it for a webshop or do they have it for
another business in which a web shop is
silently incorporated? Or are they out-and-
out illegal and just flaunting the law? These
are the questions the public want answered.

If these operations are legalised, we sug-
gest that the peop, s Treasury should prof-

wit:

Every numbers house, and web shop
should have a business licence for which
they pay a flat fee plus a certain percentage
of gross.

This is how the radio stations are taxed,
so why not the gaming houses? The police-
man’s job is then made easier.

As he makes his rounds, inspecting these
outlets a business licence should be promi-
nently displayed. If it is not, then arrests can
be made. It is then up to government to do
an efficient job of collecting the taxes.

This could be a lucrative source of rev-
enue to help relieve the strain on the Pub-
lic Treasury at this economically critical

* time.

If not, then close them all down, but
don’t, for heaven’s sake, hold yourselves up
to ridicule by picking on an old, ill man —
a foreign resident at that — to make an
example of what happens to a person who
illegally gambles at a casino.



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THE TRIBUNE



Whose
time 1s 1t,
anyway: >

EDITOR, The Tribune.

ON Friday I went to Parcel
Post (East Street) to collect a
package. It was just after 3.30.
I was informed that the facili-
ty was closed because the Cus-
toms officer had gone home
for the day.

On Monday I went again at
2.00. Again I was told that
they were closed because the
Customs officer had left.

I decided to go first thing
Tuesday morning and, after
collecting my packages, I
asked the officer why, for two
days in a row (at least that I
knew of), there was no offi-
cer on duty in the afternoon.

“Oh, they didn’t tell you?”
was his reply.

“They told me they were
closed because you all had
gone home.”

“They didn’t tell you why?”
he asked.

“No, they didn’t.”

“Well, they know why. They
know why”

“Well, since they won’t,
could you tell me why?” I
asked.

“Oh, yeah, [ll tell you. I'd
be glad to tell you,” ‘he
responded, followed by
silence.

...Well, what was the prob-
lem?”

“The air-conditioning was-
n’t working.”

I had seen a sign posted on
Friday to that effect, but it



Dawes.

lett






ers@tribunemedia.net



looked as if it had been there
awhile. In all fairness, it had
been hot in there that day.

“But,” I said, “it was on yes-
terday.” —

His reply to that was, “Well,
it wasn’t to our liking.”

I was gob-smacked!

“Not to your liking?”

“No, it was on but it wasn’t
to our liking. Don’t complain
to me. Don’t complain to me.”

“But if you were the one
making the decision that it
wasn’t ‘to your liking’ then
you ARE the one to complain
to. It’s not to MY liking that I
couldn’t collect my package
because you were a little
uncomfortable.” _

“Well...well, I wouldn’t even
waste my time.”

I was enraged!

“Well,” I retorted with as
much indignance as I could

- muster, “I’m sorry to have

wasted your time, Mr ‘public
servant’.”

Not being a confrontational
person, or maybe just unwill-
ing to make a public spectacle
of myself, I did not pursue the
matter further and treat him
to a Viveca-style tirade, but, in
the words of a great bard, I
“done been incensed!”

I ask you, dear reader,

whose time hid really been
wasted? He went home to
enjoy the cool comforts of his
car and homie, on my dime
and that of every Bahamian
tax-payer. Meanwhile and
consequently, I was forced to
make three trips to the post
office to collect a $24 pair of
sunglasses!

I considered.writing a letter
to the (Controller of Customs,
but leti’s face it; could I really
expect the solution to come
from within the very organi-
sation that produced the type
of lazy, uncommitted, unre-
pentantly lackadaisical atti-
tudé shown by this man who is
supposed to be’serving the
public? We are, apparently,
to seek their assistance at their
convenience, on their person-
al schedule and, while men
and women work outside in
the burning sun and 90+%
humidity of a sub-tropical cli-
mate, they can apparently

only perform within a narrow |

range of refrigerator-like tem-
peratures.

I would at this point offer a
theory as to why the public at

large-harbours a level of ani-

mus towards the government

and the public service but,
“well, I wouldn’t even waste
my time.”

GRAHAM
THORDARSON
Nassau,

October, 2008.

We want officer Dion Marcus Ranger
transferred back to San Salvador

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I humbly ask that you allow
us a short space in your valu-
able publication to voice our
concerns about a matter we, the
community of San Salvador,
consider important.

A month ago one of our
Police Officers was transferred
from the island.

There was no legitimate rea-
son or explanation as to why he
was transferred.

This officer’s name is Detec-
tive Constable 828 Dion Marcus
Ranger.

Officer Ranger is an officer
who performs his duty with
compassion and love and enjoys

what he is and what he does and.





e eer.
SAY INN Foy ee





. if there were a few more officers

like him the Police Department
would be so much more effec-
tive especially with what is
going on in our Bahamas today

. with the rise in crime.

He along with Constable 2702
Gerard Miller, another one of
the Royal Bahamas Police
Force finest, have done a
tremendous job in San Salvador
and they must be commended.

These two officers have done
so much with the youth here on
the island in implementing the
Police Cadet Programme and
also an after school programme
where the kids could go and get
assistance with their homework
and/or any other personal mat-
ter they wanted to discuss.

They also trained the present -

Police Reserve Officers on San
Salvador and did such a fine job
that during their graduation
these Reserve Officers gradu-
ated as one of the leading
squads in The Commonwealth
of The Bahamas.

These are the type of officers
we need leading our country
not to be transferred from a
place where you have made so
much positive changes because
the officer-in-charge might have
a “beef” so to speak with you or

might be jealous because of the
relationship officers Ranger and
Miller have with the communi-
ty.

We begin to wonder why
there is so much crime in The
Bahamas because some Royal
Bahamas Police Force are too
busy with side issues rather than
trying to deal with alll this crime
going on.

We do not need this on San

Salvador we want, officers like .

Ranger and Miller who care
about their jobs and the com-
munity. Who no matter what
time of day or night if someone
needed help they were there to
assist.

Who no matter how friendly
they were with you if you break
the law you suffer the conse-
quences.

We respect these men and we |
want officer Ranger transferred —
back to.San Salvador. We need |

people like Officers Miller and
Ranger.
Thank you.

CQNCERNED
CITIZENS

The Community of
The Island of

San Salvador,
September, 2008.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 5



Residents consider buying Joe’s

Christians and

Jews on Grand
Bahama to unite
for Israel's 60th
anniversary

m By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Christians
and Jews on Grand Bahama
will unite in’a historic inter-
denominational service to cel-
ebrate Israel’s 60th anniversary
as a nation.

Pastor Alexis Wallace of
Shalom Caribbean Interna-
tional announced that his min-
istry has planned the first Juda-
ic Christian conclave on Grand
Bahama, with the support of
many local churches and pas-
tors, and Jewish leaders in
Freeport and Florida.

Rev Wallace said that a two-
part event has been planned in





Freeport, beginning on Octo- |:

ber 17 with a “powerful” inter-
denominational service at
7.30pm at the Universal
Household of Faith Church in
Hawksbill.

The second event will be a
special luncheon at the Ruby
Swiss Restaurant on October
18 when the son of a promi-
nent Jewish Bahamian pioneer
will be the keynote guest
speaker.

“Tam delighted that so many
of our friends in the commu-
nity and churches are standing
with us as we celebrate Israel’s
60th anniversary.

"We want to send a charge
out to every church and per-
son that understands the rich
Judaic heritage we have in the
islands that this is something
you do not want to miss,” he
said. .

Rev Wallace said the service
of celebration will be attend-
ed by Rabbi Yaakov Neren-
berg, president of the South
Florida Association of Rabbis.

Also attending will be Grand
Bahama Christian Council
(GBCC) president Sobig
Kemp and a number of local
pastors and gospel artists on
Grand Bahama.

Rev Wallace said that the
conclave will be professionally
recorded and a special souvenir
booklet is being produced for
the event- wy

He also“said that an éditet. }

DVD copy of the conclave and

the booklet will be. officially’

presented to the Israeli gov-
ernment.

“The nation of Israel will
know that the Bahamas is
standing with them and praying
for them and celebrating their
60 anniversary,” he said.

Israel is the world’s only
Jewish state. It has a popula-
tion of 7.28 million that con-
sists of Arab Muslims, Chris-
tians, Druze, and Samaritans,
as well as other religious and
ethnic minority groups.

Bishop Kemp, GBCC presi-
dent, said that Israel has actu-
ally been in existence for over
5,000 years, and is celebrating
its 60 year as a re-born nation.

“From the beginning of the
exodus which was 3320 years
ago, the actual time for Israel
being a nation was 5,768
years,” he said.

m@ By MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

HOPE Town residents fighting
development plans for Joe's Cay are
considering buying the island to pro-
tect it as a no-build zone.

The Elbow Cay, Abaco commu-
nity of full-time residents and sec-
ond homeowners have formed the
Friends of Hope Town, and are
commissioning an independent
Environmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) of Joe's Cay in addition to
the developer's EJA.

They oppose plans submitted by
Bahamian developer Cavalier Con-
struction to build 20 houses, and a
club house and restaurant on the
4.7acre island 250 feet off Elbow
Cay, which is connected by a thick
forest of mangroves. —

Marina

Residents say it would be over-
development of the cay, and further
plans to dredge a channel, build a
marina and artificial beach would
create silt, destroy fish and crawfish
nurseries, displace bonefish, conch
and nesting white-crown pigeons.

The development will create 40
jobs for a manager, receptionists,
cooks, waiting staff, housemaids,
gardeners and more at “The Island
Club”.

But the Friends of Hope Town say
the jobs are not needed.

Environment Minister Earl
Devaux arranged a meeting last
month and around 100 residents met
with Cavalier's managing director
Richard Wilson and deputy MD
Vernon Wells, as well as represen-
tatives from the Bahamas Environ-

The Island Club at Joe’s Cay

CAVALIER'S plans to develop Joe's Cay off Elbow Cay in Abaco.

mental, Science and Technology
(BEST) commission, the Bahamas
National Trust, the Nature Conser-
vancy, the Hope Town Council and
the government’s director of physi-
cal planning.

Houses

Residents stated they would like
to see around three houses on the
cay with minimal environmental
impact.

Friends of Hope Town spokes-
woman Erika Russell said: "Richard
Wilson said Cavalier are develop-

ing the Bahamas they way they feel,
but if you come here and develop,
you have to work with the town, and
everybody I have spoken to is
against it.

"It is too high density, the cost of
the mangroves and the dredging is
huge, and we don't need the jobs
here, we have more than we can
handle.

“Tf you need a maid or a babysit-
ter they are very hard to find.

"And if more workers come here
then things like crime are going to
go up and we won't be able to cope
with the demand on the infrastruc-
ture."

Cay to protect it from development



The Friends of Hope Town are
commissioning an independent EIA

_ of the cay in addition to Cavalier's

EJA and are considering purchas-
ing the island to protect it as a nat-
ural resource.

Plans

Mr Wells said Cavalier is looking
to Minister Deveaux for a way for-
ward before progressing with their
EIA and architectural plans.

Mr Deveaux was unavailable for
comment before The Tribune went
to press last night.

Claim that mass media partially responsible for young people's ‘deviant’ hehaviour

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE mass media is at least

’ partially responsible for the

a
iow

rowing level of deviant behav-
1our among young people in the
region, it was claimed yester-
day.

According to permanent sec-
retary in the Ministry of Nation-
al Security Missouri Sherman-
Peter, the strong influence of
western culture on the
Caribbean has led many youths
to abandon their traditions.

Speaking on day two of the
13th annual Conference of Pres-
idents and Governor Generals
of CARICOM, Mrs Sherman-
Peter presented an analysis on
the impact of external influ-
ences on developing countries.

“The impact of external influ-
ence on the social development
of developing countries is a fact
of life, and will continue for the
foreseeable future. Developing
countries know where the gaps
are. It is incumbent upon them
to fill in these gaps,” Mrs Sher-

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She explained that many

developing countries around the

world are vulnerable to external

_ forces, and that the effects usu-

ally come with a downside

' which jis directly connected to

the eventual decline in social
and moral awareness the young.

Employment, professional
development, health, migration,
crime, and education are all
“forces” which influence social
balance according to Mrs Sher-
man-Peter.

Touching on the issue of
crime, she concluded that
although a significant volume
of criminality is still generated
within specific countries, it has
also evolved into a modern epi-
demic which is referred to as
“transnational crime.”

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She noted that according to
the United nations Drug Con-

trol Programme, most transna-

tional criminal acts are related
to the drug trade, but can also

involve human smuggling and —

weapons trafficking.

The conference, which con-
tinues until Friday, is expected
to provide the various officials
in attendance with recommen-

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Former BDM
candidate hits —
out at the BTC

PHA prepares to launch new
pharmacy information system

THE Public Hospitals Authority (PHA) this
week held the last leg of training sessions in Nassau
to familiarise staff with a new information man-
agement system that will soon be implemented in all
PHA pharmacies.

Participants included staff from the Grand
Bahama health system, the Princess Margaret Hos-
pital, Sandilands Rehabilitation Centre, and rep-
resentatives of the Bahamas National Drug Agency.

Philip Gray, pharmacy consultant and project
manager of the initiative, said that the General
Electric centricity pharmacy software will allow
the PHA to standardise processes for staff and
patients at all PHA pharmacies in the hospitals
and some 100 clinics across the archipelago.

Mr Gray said the system will facilitate improved
inventory management while helping pharmacists
deliver enhanced healthcare service to patients
throughout the islands.

“When the Public Hospitals Authority in col-
laboration with the Department of Public Health sat
down and looked at the major concerns and chal-
lenges in pharmacy services in the country, the
thoughts were at that time that we needed to look
at inventory management and certainly the transfer
of information and profiles of patients throughout
the national health system and so it is at this junc-
ture we are at today based on information received

‘from the two entities working cohesively as one
force,” said Mr Gray. :

He explained that with standardised processes,
even if pharmacy staff are transferred from one
island to another, they will be able to function
effectively because everyone will be using the same
system.

Additionally, he said patients will receive
improved service regardless of their movement
through the islands, as their records will be main-
tained and accessible in all of the PHA pharmacies.

Leonard Sturrup, the PHA’s chief deputy phar-
macist for Grand Bahama, said he believes the new
software represents a major improvement for the
public healthcare system that will lead to better
patient outcomes.

“The new system is a big advance over: what
we’ve had in the past and it will help to facilitate

oS ANDRE}p,
SCHOOL



TCL Photo/Terrance Strachan



GREG MILLS, General Electric application specialist,
provides instruction to Public Hospitals Authority staff
during a recent training session on the new Centricity
Pharmacy. Information Management System that will
soon be launched in PHA pharmacies across the
Bahamas.

better health care of all of our patients. Some of the

problems we run into are with patients seeing sev-
eral doctors, having several different kinds of med-
ication for the same ailment. °

“And with the new system we hope it will be
able to track these patients as they move from facil-
ity to facility and from physician to physician so it
will help us in how we manage our patients and
their medications,” Mr Sturrup said.

Vivienne Lockhart, director of the Bahamas
National Drug agency, also participated in the Nas-
sau training sessions and spoke to the system’s
implications for inventory management.

“From the Drug Agency’s standpoint it would
assist ‘us very much in our inventory control, in
that we will be able to see exactly what quantity of
any particular item that is in the system is available,
be it from the floor level that is from the ward to the
pharmacy itself,” she said.

The new pharmacy software system will be
launched in Grand Bahama on November 1.

Grand Bahama will serve as the pilot site for
the project. Implementation at the Princess Mar-
garet Hospital and Sandilands Rehabilitation Cen-
tre in Nassau will follow in January and March
2009 respectively.

S

St

Ex

The International School of the Babamas
FOUNDED 1948



Search for new Principal/CEO,
to take up responsibilities no later than 1 August 2009

St Andrew’s School, The International School of The Bahamas, was established
in 1948 and is governed by an 11-person, elected board of directors. It is accredited
by both the Council of International Schools and the New England Association
‘of Schools and Colleges and authorized to offer both the Primary Years Programme
and the Diploma Programme of the’International Baccalaureate Organization. The
school’s motto is Ethics and Excellence and its mission statement, philosophy
and aims, as well as much other relevant information, may be accessed on its

website: www.st-andrews.com.

‘The school is divided into the two major divisions of primary school and secondary
school, each of which is led by a head of school. Each division contains over 400
children and total school enrolment is 845. Approximately 70% of the students
at the school are Bahamian and the remaining 30% are drawn from another 21
nations. There are 120 people employed at the school, of which 85 are teachers,
representing eight different countries. The administrative council consists of the
principal and CEO, the assistant principal and admissions director, the two heads
of school, the financial controller and the campus manager.

The principal is the school's chief executive officer, responsible to the board for
the administration of the school in all its aspects. The successful candidate will:

e bea qualified teacher, who possesses an advanced degree, preferably in

education

° - be able to document successful experience as the head or divisional leader
(e.g. primary school; secondary school) of a good international school and/or
a leading independent school in The Bahamas or elsewhere. In any case,
international experience is essential.

© have particular aptitudes in the areas of: school improvement; international
accreditation standards; curriculum; administration; school finances.

e have an intimate knowledge of the programmes of the International
Baccalaureate Organization and of the accreditation protocols of both the
Council of International Schools and the New England Association of Schools

-and Colleges

‘e be aperson of personal and professional integrity '
e becapable of recruiting outstanding teachers and of leading a talented and
disparate group of faculty and staff members in the pursuit of excellence

The salary and benefits offered will be dependent upon the qualifications and
experience of the successful candidate. In addition to salary, benefits include
pension payments, a contribution to health insurance and discounted tuition for

children.

The school is conducting its own search process. Applicants must submit all
relevant documentation listed on the application form, which can be accessed
on the homepage of our school’s website.

Applications may be delivered to the school by hand, sent by express mail or
fax (1 242 364 1739), but the preferred means is by e-mail attachment to:

principalsearch@st-andrews.com. Enquiries by telephone are discouraged.

The deadline for applications is Friday 31 October 2008. During November, the
search committee will consider all applications. The selected short-listed candidates,

along with their spouses, will have the opportunity to meet with faculty members, —

parents, students, staff members and the board of directors before being interviewed
in Nassau by the search committee, which will make its recommendations to the
board of directors once all interviews have been conducted. It is hoped to make
the appointment of the new principal in December.

It should be noted that the search committee and the board reserve the right to
curtail the process if the right candidate is identified during the process or to re-
open the search if the initial process does not identify a suitably qualified candidate.

Principal Search Committee
St Andrew’s School

The International School of The Bahamas

P O Box EE 17430
Yamacraw Hill Road,
Nassau

New Providence
The Bahamas

Fax: + 1 242 364 1739

- E-mail: principalsearch@st-anc 2ws.com.

FORMER candidate for
the Bahamas Democratic
Movement Omar Archer
lashed out at BT'C's execu-
tive board for docking the
pay of 514 workers in hard
economic times.

He called the decision to
punish the workers, who
brought Nassau to a stand-
still during an unauthorised
protest, a "disgrace".

Mr Archer, who lost his bid
for chairman of the Progres-
sive Liberal Party early this
year, argued that BTC should
have reprimanded the
employees in writing, advising
them that any subsequent
action would result in a

harsher penalty, before cut-

ting their pay.

"T think it's a disgrace, giv-
en the economic situation and
the hardship that people are
suffering, I think the worst
thing that you can do right
now to the hard-working,

common man in this country ©

is to cut his or her pay.

"T feel that the industrial
action was expressive of our
democracy and was well with-
in its guidelines. So I'm now
saying publicly that I guaran-
tee you that this very move
will result in the resignation
of the chairman Mr Julian
Francis within the next three
months. I would advise (the
union) that they do and I'll
strongly support any action
in that regard. It's just very
distasteful to treat 514
employees in this way,” Mr












“I think it's a
disgrace, given
the economic
situation and the
hardship that
people are
suffering, I think
the worst thing
that you can do
right now to the
hard-working,
common man in
this country is to
cut his or her

pay.”



Omar Archer

Archer said.

The BTC employees, who
were agitating for more input
into the company’s privatisa-
tion process, protested in
mid-August bringing all of
downtown Nassau and
Freeport to a standstill by
stopping their vehicles in traf-
fic.

The action angered many
members of the public, who
felt they should not suffer
because of an internal BTC
issue. The protesters never
admitted to holding the
demonstration — claiming

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mysteriously broke down at
the same time.

Mr Archer said: "Overall, it
seems as if the government is
trying to take away the aver-
age Bahamian worker's free-
dom of expression and its just
not right, and people should
be free to express themselves
free of the fear of victim-
istion."

Last week, acting BTC
CEO Kirk Griffin said in a
statement that the company
was cutting the pay of 514
workers.

BTC management added
that “due process” is still
being followed in determin-
ing the way in which the
employees are to be sanc-
tioned.



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The PLP on Grand

— Bahama claims
government policies —
counter productive —

@ By DENISE
MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport |
Reporter i
dmaycock@tribunemedia.ne

FREEPORT - The PLP
on Grand Bahama claims
that the FNM governmen-
t’s policies are counter
productive and “directly
responsible” for the eco-
nomic slow down that is
currently being experi-
enced in the Bahamas.

The leaders of the PLP
in Freeport made this
assertion at a press con-
ference on Sunday.

“The PLP leadership
on Grand Bahama is of
the view that the Free
National Movement gov-
ernment’s conduct, since
coming to office 17
months ago, has been
counter productive and
directly responsible for
the slowing down, to an
almost full stop, of our
economy,” said members
of the GB PLP Council in
a statement.,

They stated that many
billion dollar projects
were stopped by Prime
Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham upon his return to
office.

“Ingraham’s stop,
review, amend and cancel
policy created a climate of
distrust in the government
and people of the
Bahamas, and out of the
window went all those
promising projects,”
according to a statement
issued by the PLP.

“This, in our view, did
not only cause foreign
investors already here to
step back and take a sec-
ond look at the security of
their investments in the
country, but it made
potential investors very -
jittery to the point where
potential investments :
were shelved for the time’?
being. And this brought _
about the slowdown which
we have been experienc-
ing ever since.”

While he announced
that several developments
would be reviewed, Mr
Ingraham did not in fact
cancel any projects.

But the PLP noted that
some of the new invest-
ments which materialised
under the PLP administra-
tion have not progressed
on Grand Bahama.

They noted that the sale
of the Royal Oasis Resort
and the investment by
International Distributors
Ltd were set to take place
when the FNM came to
office. However, both -
projects have not gotten
off the ground for over a
year. ;

“We reiterate our call
on the government to
come out from wherever
they are hiding, and
speak to Grand Bahami-
ans.

“We call on the FNM’s,
“power pack team’ on
Grand Bahama to speak
to their constituents and
give us some kind of hope
for our future. You were
very visible during the
election campaign when
you wanted our votes and
you promised us better
representation,” said the
PLP;



Bri

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Groups speak

m@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport
Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - A local
environmental group and a
citizen rights organisation
are speaking out against the
proposed expansion of Mar-
tin Marietta Materials.

Earthcare and the Grand
Bahama Committee for Con-
cerned Residents stressed
that the project would
severely impact the environ-
ment as well as the health
and safety of the residents of
Eight Mile Rock (EMR).

Martin Marietta has sub-
mitted an Environmental
Impact Assessment study to

the Grand Bahama Port:

Authority and the govern-
ment for review.

The project would involve
major drilling and excavation
on land across the Warren J
Highway. Although the land
is owned by the company,
EMR residents fear that the
blasting and drilling will
damage the freshwater lens-

: . es in the area and damage

homes. ‘

SS

Gail Woon, president of .

Eartheare, is demanding that
the EIA be made available
to the public.

She said international envi-
ronmental law requires that
the public have meaningful
input into decisions which
directly affect their lives.

“The Bahamas needs to
live up to the global treaties
and conventions to which it
has signed on to,” she said.

Stakeholder

“We, the stakeholders,
have been clear from the
outset that we do not want
Martin Marietta Bahama
Rock to continue its drilling
and blasting in our back-
yard.”

Ms Woon claims that the
company has already been
allowed to devalue the prop-
erties in the Queen’s Cove
Subdivision and has offered
no compensation to the
stakeholders there.

“If this project is allowed
to cross the Warren J Levar-
ity Highway compromising
the coppice, the second

largest mangrove nursery in
the country, the freshwater
lens, the health and safety of
residents, further damaging
the largest investment a per-
son has — their home — then
our government would have
failed us, the stakeholders,
miserably,” she said.

Martin Marietta manufac-
tures aggregate materials for
export.

The company has held two
town meetings in EMR con-
cerning their proposed pro-
ject, however many residents
still oppose it.

EMR residents said they
are very concerned about the
damage to the fresh water
lens in the area.

They claim that blasting
conducted by MM has
already caused damage to
their homes.

Ms Woon said that water is
a precious resource and no
corporation or company
should be allowed to destroy
it,

She said the offer to pipe
in city water from Freeport is
a slap in the face to home-
owners in Eight Mile Rock.

“There is no good reason



BYRAN WOODSIDE, Pinewood MP and Minister of State for Youth and Sports, standing at a SMART Board dur-
ing a recent visit to Cleveland Eneas Primary School

Pinewood FNM Association gives
$30,000 donation to school

A DONATION of $30,000
from the Pinewood FNM Associ-
ation made it possible for the
Cleveland Eneas Primary School
students to start the school year
with five new SMART Boards, a

LCD projector, and computer

equipment.

SMART Boards are the
world's leading easy-to-use inter-
active whiteboards that combine
the simplicity of an ordinary
whiteboard with the power of a
computer. :

Pinewood's Member of Parlia-
ment Byran Woodside said this

new technology exposes the chil-
dren of his constituency to the
technology currently being used
globally in education.

“We are pleased to be able to
contribute to improving the tech-
nology that is important for con-
tinued development of the chil-
dren of Pinewood", Mr Wood-
side said.

The MP and other members of
the Pinewood FNM Association
recently visited Cleveland Prima-
ty School as part of the Associa-
tion's annual-back-to-school ini-
tiative.



PINEWOOD MP Byran Woodside talks with computer students at
Cleveland Eneas Primary School.

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During the visit, State Minis-
ter Woodside continued his tra-
dition of donating computers,
books and school supplies to the
students. ‘

VVEUVINE OVAL, VULUDLEI OU, CUUY, Fr

MT wo ie er
out against proposed

expansion of Martin Marieta Materials

for our freshwater lens to be
further compromised by
Martin Marietta Bahama
Rock or any other entity cur-
rently carrying on business
at the harbour area.

Right

“Freshwater is a right that
we are entitled to. We will
not stand for our natural
rights to be stomped upon
because a foreign owned cor-
poration wishes to come in
and exploit our resources for
their huge profit at our
expense,” Ms Woon said.

“The Bahamas is one of





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the most water-scarce
countries worldwide; it is
insane to compromise any
more of our freshwater
resources. :

“The time is now to
conserve all of the
freshwater lenses that we
have left.

“Tf our government allows
this huge foreign owned
company to ravage the hopes
and dreams of the largest set-
tlement in the nation for the
profit for the few at the
expense of the many, then
they deserve not to bé voted
back in at the next election
time,” said Ms Woon.






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PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

FROM page one

Delancey, of Garden Hills, sus-
tained head injuries and was
pronounced dead at the scene
by emergency medical person-
nel.

There was no evidence that
he was wearing a helmet, police
said.

Officer in-charge of the Traf-
fic Division, Supt Melvin Lundy,
said that because Mr Delancey’s
bike slid into an oil patch, it is
hard to determine if speed
played a factor in his death.

“There was an oil slick in the
road. We believe that was the

Motorcyclist is the third

traffic fatality in 24 hours.

cause of that particular accident
so we can’t say for sure if speed
(was a factor),” Supt Lundy
said, adding that “No helmet
was found on the scene.”

The incident came hours after
a car with four women careened
off East Bay Street, smashed
into a tree before crashing into
another one early Monday
morning. Police said the women
were trapped in the car after the

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Jaws-of-life were used to
extract the women from the
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restaurant and bar. Two of the
women (both believed to be 18)
died at the scene while the oth-
er two (one said to be in her

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early 20s and the other in her
late teens) were taken to hospi-
tal where they remain in “seri-
ous” condition.

Last night the victims were
named as Tameka Brown, 18,
of Key West Street, and
Albereese Roker, 17, of South
Beach. The names of the two
injured women have still not
been released.

This time last year, the coun-
try recorded 36 traffic fatalities
compared to 39 up to press time.
And because the upcoming hol-
iday months are normally filled
with alcohol and parties, police
say they are concerned this
year’s toll will exceed last year’s
toll of 50 deaths.

“It is cause for’ concern
because what happens now,
what we call the ‘party months’
are coming and holidays are
coming so usually the (traffic)
fatalities pick up at the end part
of the year,” Inspector David
Lockhart of the traffic division
said.

Traffic police are beefing up
patrols on roads known for
speeding in hopes of curbing this
year’s statistics.

“For the full year last year
(there) were 50 (traffic deaths)
and I am hoping we do not sur-
pass 50 (this year). We’re doing
a number of patrols and a num-
ber of speed checks (in high-
speed zones) like John F
Kennedy Drive, 'Tonique
Williams Darling Highway, Har-
rold Road, Gladstone Road,
Coral Harbour...these are areas
which are known for speeding,”
Supt Lundy told The Tribune.

Police are also scheduling
community forums as a venue
to give out tips on driving safety,
he said.

Of the 39 traffic deaths for
the year, 34 were males and five
were females. Insp Lockhart
said the major contributing fac-
tor in those deaths were speed
and alcohol, followed by deaths
relating to pedestrian negli-
gence.

Seventeen of the deaths this
year have been in Nassau.

The male victims were aged
14 to 45 while the females were
between two to 19.

“And you know the majority
of the fatalities are in Nassau.
Last year we had 33 in Nassau,
this year we are up to 17 in Nas-
sau now.

“And our tally count com-
pared to last year this same time,
we're up by three. The same
time last year we were at 36, we
are now at 39.”



ao :
SHREDDING \

Sates COMMUNITY

THE TRIBUNE

NIB chairman says it’s
unfair to blame execs for
contribution shortfalls

FROM page one

added: “I’m not sure I should say because some of the issues are
really proprietory information at this stage. And I am not at lib-
erty to disclose that sort of behind-the-scenes thinking that led
to that decision.”
Mr Ward said that when the current board met for the
first time “there was in place a fairly comprehensive report that
dealt with elements of performance standards, reviews, how
certain things should be done. It was our feeling that those
issues as in place at the time were not appropriate to be intro-
duced for a variety of reasons, so we aborted that process.”

However, he said the Board will “revisit that issue in short
order.”

“T don't want to interpret my remarks as being that there is
no commitment to improving performance,” he said.

Actuarial reports on the NIB have said that that reducing
administrative costs and improving compliance rates of employ-
ers making contributions should be priorities for the organi-
sation.

The seventh actuarial report predicted that, by the most
optimistic assessment, the fund’s resources may be depleted by
2034, in part because the country’s population is ageing while
new people are being born to enter the labour force at a less-
er rate than before.

Acting director Anthony Curtis said that, as of now, the
NIB is already “several million dollars” behind the target it had
set for contribution collections this year.

Yesterday board chairman Mr Ward announced two mea-
sures designed to begin addressing these concerns - charging of
interest on all payments arrears from January 1, 2009, and a
newly redesigned website that allows stakeholders to carry
out online some functions they would have previously had to
do manually.

Asked to say whether he would agree that shortfalls i in con-
tribution collections would indicate that some staff members
may not have been doing their job, and therefore should be act-
ed upon in this respect, Mr Ward said: “It’s a good point.”

“The board has mandated that improving compliance is an
issue that needs to rise to a very high level of priority. Having
done that, what we now need to focus on is developing the kind
of organisational structure that will support that initiative and
make sure that the mandate can be properly pursued.

“I am not sure that we are at the stage where we can be sat-
isfied as a board that we have the kind of organisational struc-
ture that is fully in place that will actually cause the executives
to be as effective as they can be in pursuing those objectives.

“And having said that I’m not entirely sure that it would be
fair for us to look at trying to blame executives for issues that
may not necessarily have come to pass because of issues relat-
ed to their own lack of action.” |

He added that the steps to introduce this kind of reform are
in the “incremental stage of being implemented.”

“Once the board is happy that we’ve given them the kind of
organisational structure and help to pursue the mandates
we've given then I think it would be appropriate for us to
look to effectively hold them accountable for the results that
come in,” said Mr Ward.



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THE TRIBUNE



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 9



Rie ee eS ee a ere
Could pirate gold solve our financial woes?

My name is Captain Kidd,
God's laws I did forbid

And most wickedly I did, as I
sailed, as I sailed

I'd ninety bars of gold, as 1
* sailed, as I sailed,
I’d ninety bars of gold, and
dollars manifold,
With riches uncontrolled, as I
sailed.

I you believe the noise in
the market, the good folks
of San Salvador’ have unimag-
inable wealth in their grasp, and
are taking advice from an inter-
national media figure named
Roberto Savio - an Italian part-
time resident since the 1980s -
on how to divvy up the spoils.

Lending a stamp of authen-
ticity to the story, Dr Savio
recently presented a document
appropriately entitled “From
Individual Greed to Collective
Happiness” to a standing room-
only public meeting in Cock-
burn Town. It offers a blueprint
on how to share out billions in
gold, silver and gems believed
to lie in a collapsed cave at For-
tune Hill, on the island's bar-
ren east coast.

Local historian Cliff Fernan-
der told Tough Call that back in
the 1960s, a friend named James
Rolle (now deceased) told him
about gold bars he had found
in a cave as a child. Although
Fernander searched for the
treasure energetically with both
dynamite and excavators, he
eventually had to give up. But
the story did not die.

It seems that, apart from
Atlantis, no legend is more tan-
talising than the lost treasure of
Captain William Kidd, a Scot
who became a privateer in the

‘late 1600s, captured a rich
Armenian merchant ship in the
Indian Ocean, sailed it back to
the Caribbean, was arrested in
Boston in 1700 and hanged in
London for piracy the follow-
ing year.

Kidd arrived in the West
Indies in April, 1699, in the
Quedah Merchant, his Armen-
ian treasure ship, which he
abandoned off the island of His-
paniola before heading for
Boston. Just last year a wreck
was discovered off the coast of
the Dominican Republic that



“If the goernment does authorise a
definitive xploration, and we do
find billiois of dollars worth of
pirate goll, we can pay off our
national Jebt and build all the
infrastricture we need for the next

25 years”

emmy STE

Indiana Unversity archaeolo-
gists say isXidd’s abandoned
prize vesse

Wheth¢ or not that is true,
most hisprical accounts say
Kidd burid his gold, silver and
gems onan as yet unidentified
island snewhere in the world.
This tak appears to have two
origins.

Firs; in a bid to save his life
after tring sentenced to death,
Kidd vrote that “In my late
proce:dings in the Indies, | have
lodged goods and treasure to
the value of £100,000.” Second,
Kidd actually did bury some
loo! on a cay off Long Island
(New York) on his way to
Boston where he was subse-
quently arrested. But this was
leter recovered by the authori-
ties. Although he has never
been associated historically with
San Salvador, Kidd’ s hypo-
thetical treasure is thought by
many to be located about half a
mile inland from the coast just
north of Pigeon Creek, where
small boats can easily land.

Ownership of the site is con-
fused by the overlapping claims
of no less than 11 families. But
even if the title could be ratio-
nalised, Bahamian law says that
all antiquities found under-
ground belong to the govern-
ment - including treasure.

Dr Keith Tinker, who runs
the Antiquities Corporation,
told Tough Call he was not pre-
pared to comment since the

matter had lately been referred
to the Office of the Prime Min-
ister. And David Davis, perma-
nent secretary at the OPM, did
not return calls.

- But Tinker had authorised
excavations by an earlier trea-
sure hurting group which
caused a similar stir in
2006. That initiative was led by
an ex-US Navy pilot named
Don Patterson, who heads a
company called Old Charter
Salvage, which claims half a

‘century o/ archaeological and

treasure recovery experience
using “the world's most
advanced geological/geophysi-
cal test equipment.”

Treasures

Pievesson permit was
‘evoked when the
recovey attempt collapsed due
to intese squabbling over con-
flictingland claims. But it is said
that rdar penetration and mol-
ecula analysis confirmed the
existace of non-ferrous metal
depgits in Fortune Hill.

Qt his website (www.old-
chater.com), Patterson says he
is witing on a resolution to the

’ tite dispute to relaunch his

epedition: “We have collect-
e numerous stories and tradi-
ons concerning the presence
sf treasures on the island
‘hrough extensive personal
interviews with residents who,

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long ago, have actually seen and
touched these treasures in the
island’s cave system in their
youth. All accounts are consis-
tent as to specific location, and
we have identified numerous
excellent targets.”

He describes the treasure as
“huge caches of gold, silver, and
gems”.

But a new group is now seek-
ing authorisation from the
prime minister’s office to con-
tinue the search by cutting
everyone a piece of the pie. This
group includes Nassau-based
restaurateur Enrico Garzarolli,
an American entrepreneur
named Grant Rose, who is a
long-time visitor to San Sal-
vador, and a committee of lead-
ing citizens that includes Kevin
Williams, Jim Storr, Bert
Deveaux and Charlie Jones.

The group’s lawyer, David
Johnson of Lennox Paton,
recently submitted a petition to
the government with 300 signa-
tures from residents supporting
efforts to definitively resolve
the existence of the treasure.
And this is where Dr Savio
stepped in to suggest a plan to
accommodate all interests -
including the United Nations.

“It is time to learn from the
mistakes of the past,” he said,
arguing that his plan “would
show that love, friendship and
co-operation are the best ways
to distribute riches which have
come through greed and plun-
der, and have been sleeping a
long time in a small hill on the
beautiful island of San Sal-
vador.”

According to one Nassau-
based landowner who preters
to remain anonymous, “it would
be good if enough gold was
found to give everyone a break
financially. But if it’s a lot of
money I think it will cause seri-
ous social friction. That's why
the latest group are trying so
hard to come up with an agree-
ment on the share-out that
everyone can live with.”

Dr Savio founded InterPress
Service, a global news agency
that focuses on North-South
issues, and is connected with a
variety of UN-affiliated policy
institutes and media initiatives.
His proposal calls for the gov-
ernment to keep 70 per cent of
the treasure, with the rest divid-

ed among the prospectors and
investors, other interested par-
ties (such as the various land
claimants), a trust fund for the
people of San Salvador (all
1,000 of them), and the United
Nations children’s charities.
As Enrico Garzarolli put it:
“This would end 50 years of
fighting and make everybody

happy because everybody will °

get something.”

Curse |

he fighting goes back

at least to the 1950s,
according to Clifford Fernan-
der and others. According to
one islander posting on the
Bahamas Issues website: “It is
said that Roy Solomon (a for-
mer representative for the area)
got many gold bars from the
caves. Rumour is that he was
able to open the Pipe of Peace
with some of the gold he got.”

And there’s even a curse
attached to the treasure: “Oth-
er locals who got some of that
gold either died shortly after or
had family members who died.
We were told by the older folks
that during their childhood they
would go in the caves and play
marbles with diamonds and
rubies not knowing what they
were. It is said that these trea-
sures were put there by Cap-
tain Kidd.”

The belief that Kidd left
buried treasure somewhere
around the world has inspired
several great writers, including
Edgar Allan Poe, Washington
Irving and Robert Louis
Stevenson - whose most famous
work is Treasure Island.

According to a 19th century
account: “Captain Kidd is the
most ubiquitous gentleman in
history... The belief that large
deposits of gold were made at
Gardiner’s Island, Dunderberg,
Cro’ Nest, New York City,
Coney Island, Ipswich, the
marshes back of Boston, Cape
Cod, Nantucket, Isles of Shoals,
Money Island, Ocean Beach,
the Bahamas, the Florida Keys,
and elsewhere has caused reck-
less expenditure of actual
wealth...A hope of getting
something for nothing has been
the impetus.”

: hm
CREDIT SUISSE

Some believe Kidd’s treasure
island is now a submerged sand
bar in the Indian‘Ocean. And in
1976, a cave on Providenciales
in the Turks and Caicos Islands
was the object of an unsuccess
ful excavation. There are even
theories that Kidd’s island lies
off the coast of Vietnam or the
Philippines, so it is not that far-
fetched to believe he stashed
gold in the Bahamas.

All the more so when one
considers that the Bahamas was
a notorious haven for pirates.
And Kidd’s name is sometimes
linked to his contemporary - the
so-called robber king, Henry
Avery - in that they are said to
have used the same’ unknown
island to bury their treasure.
And the value of Avery's plun-
der may have been much
greater than that of Kidd,
experts Say.

Avery captured an even rich-
er merchant ship in the Indian
Ocean with a large quantity of
gold and silver. To escape retri-

- bution from the vessel’s Indian

owners he sailed the prize and
its contents to the Bahamas,

’ arriving in Nassau in 1696. After

bribing the governor, Avery's
crew split up - some settled in
Nassau, others left for the
American colonies or returned
to the British Isles.

Some were caught and some
managed to enjoy their retire-
ment. But nothing further was.
heard of Avery himself - or his
share of the booty. And then
there is the pirate called George
Watling, who gave his name to
the island of San Salvador for
many years until the govern-
ment changed it in 1925 for the
publicity value of using the
name Columbus had given it.

Look at it this way. If the gov-
ernment does authorise a defin-
itive exploration, and we do find
billions of dollars worth of
pirate gold, we can pay off our
national debt and build all the
infrastructure we need for the
next 25 years. And we won't
have to fear a global recession.

¢ What do you think? Send
comments to larry@tribuneme-
dia.net

Or visit www.bahamapun-
dit.com

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch

Private Banking

is presently considering applications for

SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER ~ CARIBBEAN / UK (Private Banking}

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business

Development Officer covering the Caribbean and UK Markets:

Requirements:

- Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) | in Banking &

Finance

At least seven (10) years banking experience including relationship
management,trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout the Caribbean and UK

Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network within

the market regions.

Strong communication skills in English and a working knowledge of French

would be an asset to facilitate marketing and relationship management with

clients and prospects

Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout the Caribbean and UK and utilize a
network of existing contacts and associates

Possess a confident and outgoing personality

Duties will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore Caribbean and UK based

clients.

Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the

set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures

Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

opportunities

Management of accounts/relationships with clients originating from the

Caribbean and UK.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE IN WRITING. Persons not meeting the minimum
requirements need not apply. Telephone calls will not be accepted.

Applications should be submitted to:

P.O. Box N-4928
Nassau, Bahamas
or via fax 356-8148

Human Resources Department

DEADLINE FOR RECEIPT OF APPLICATIONS IS: OCTOBER 17, 2008


PAGE 10, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008 \ THE TRIBU. —



10:30 |







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TRIBUNE SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 11



LOCAL SPORTS



SPORTS

Miia

Machines
flatten the
Giants

FROM page 14

after they lost their season
opener to last year’s runners-up
St. Andrew’s Hurricanes. This
victory, however, was a sweet
one as SAC utilised their bench
to the fullest.

The starting line-up did their
job as just about everybody had
at least one hit off St. John’s los-
ing pitcher Keanu Thompson,
who later switched with short-
stop Alex Foster.

Anfernee Seymour led the
offensive attack with a 2-for-2 .
day with a pair of (two-run and
one-run) triples, scoring twice.
Bryon Murray was also 2-for-2
with a RBI single and a two-run
in-the-park home run.

Todd Isaacs joined in the hit
parade with his 2-for-2 day,
scoring twice and DeShaun
Wood and Justin Smith both
scored a pair of runs. Devin
Simmons helped out with a two-
run single.

If that wasn’t enough, Antho-
ny Romer came in for Anfernee
Seymour and had a two-run sin-
gle and advanced around the
final three bases on wild pitches
for SAC’s last run.

“We have a lot of seven
graders on the team, so we try
to move it around,” said Todd
about substituting the majority
of the players in the second
inning: We’re not taking any-
body for granted. This is a
three-year team and we’re going
to continue to build as we work
on wininng another title.”

For St. John’s, coach Cher-
covie Wells said they are just
getting started, but they have a
long way to go.

“The programme is in the
beginning stages,” Wells reflect-
ed. “Everybody out there is
basically in grade seven and
fresh into softball and baseball.

“We're just trying to put it
together. Hopefully next year
will be our year. We have a lot
of things to work on, especially
pitching. But we will be okay.”

Despite the blowout by SAC,
Wells said he’s not too overly
concerned about them, if they
were to meet again in the play-
offs, “They’re not that good of a
team. Maybe if they play a hard-
er team you can see their skills,”
he pointed out. “But they were
sure better than us.”

Knowles

FROM page 14

Damm/Pavel Vizner versus
Martin Fischer/Phillipp Oswald.
Going into the tournament,

which has Knowles’ former
partner Daniel Nestor and
Nenad Zimonjic as the top
seeds, Knowles and Bhupathi
are ranked at number four on
ATP Stanford Computer list.

As a result of their perfor-
mances in the tournament,
Knowles and Bhupathi could
become the fourth team to qual-
ify for the year-ending Tennis
Masters Cup in Shanghai, China
in November. Knowles and
Bhupathi are the next team in
line to qualify. The top three
seeded teams of American twin
brothers Bob and Mike Bryan,
No.2 Nestor and Zimonjic and
No.3 Jonathan. Erlich and Andy
Ram, have all secured their
berth.

It’s the first match for
Knowles and Bhupathi since
they got ousted in the quarter-
final of the US Open Grand
Slam in Flushing Meadows,
New York where they lost in
three sets to the team of Maxi-
mo Gonzalez and Juan Monaco
of Argentina in August:

The tournament came right
after both players represented
their respective countries at the
XXIX Olympic Games in Bei-
jing, China in carly August.

At the US Open, Knowles
suffered a slight right knee
injury while playing in the sec-
ond round in New York.

Knowles and Bhupathi are
looking for just their third title
for the year. They won back-to-
back titles in Memphis, Ten-
nessee and Dubai in February
and March respectively.

From Vienna, Knowles and
Bhupathi will go on to play at
the Mutua Madrilena Masters
Madrid in Madrid, Spain from
October 12,,the Davidoff Swiss
Indoors in Basel, Switzerland
from October 20 and the BNP
Paribas Masters in Paris, France
from October 26. Through this
string of tournaments, Knowles
and Bhupathi intend to secure
their berth for Shanghai where
only the top eight teams in the
world will get to play.



RENALDO'S RAMBLINGS



Someone has to defend the

worl

@ by RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

W e may look back on
this time period

amongst the pantheon of great
sports years. It has the potential
to be revolutionary...like a dou-
ble stuft Oreo of professional
sports. Remember how fun the
roaring twenties was for flap-
pers, speakeasies and people

that wore zoot suits? Remem-.,

ber how fun the Beijing
Olympics were for Jamaicans?
Remember how fun the last six
years has been for Boston fans
in every major sport? I think
I’m going through that right
now, and there’s a chance I may
be peaking as a sports fan.

It began with the Celtics rid-
ding the world of the evil that
masquerades as the joy of Lak-
er fans. I don’t think the world
realizes how close we all came
to seeing this happen before the
Celtics all pushed us out of the
way of a colossal sized bullet.
We owe them a huge debt of
gratitude, like Middle Earth did
to Frodo. What would have
happened if he didn’t get the
ring to Moordoor is kind of
what the world would have
been like if the Celtics didn’t
get the job done. In short, I
don’t know if I’m ready for
another season to start yet.

From then on, the hits kept
coming. We had the Olympics

which provided a myriad of

great sporting moments, pro-
pelling Michael Phelps and
Usain Bolt to international
superstar status. The Yankees
and their “GDP of some third
world countries” payroll failed

to make the playoffs. But per-..

haps the most shocking story-
line of the of the entire year is
going on in South Florida right
now, and I’ll say no more for
fear of jinxing it...but... THE
DOLPHINS ARE RELE-
VANT AGAIN!! Who saw this
coming following an infamous
1-15 season. I'll tell you who
did, no one. Well, maybe Joe
Biden did because he appar-
ently knows everything. But no
one else did? Four games into
the season and last year’s win
total has been doubled.

Now we’ve come full circle
back to the NBA and the 2008-
09. Again, someone has to
defend the world from “The
Evil” (they have Andrew
Bynum back in the lineup), but
that’s just one of the plethora of
intriguing storylines for the
2008-09 season. Can the Celtics
repeat minus James Posey? Will
having Bynum in the lineup be
enough to propel “The Evil”
over the top? Is Ron Artest still
insane? Will Elton Brand be
enough to make Philly legit con-
tenders? Do the Spurs have
anything left? Will my line of
questions ever end? (No) Will
the Blazers’ young talent mesh
quickly enough to make a post-
season run? Can T-Mac and
Yao Ming shed their glass like
skeletal structure and stay
healthy for an entire year? Will
the Knicks come back to the
NBA? Can Mike Beasley stay
out of trouble and bring the
Heat back to prominence? Will
the Mavericks grow a pair? Will
the Magic learn others shots



LOS ANGELES LAKERS’ Kobe Bryant reaches back for a rebound during the first half of game four of the West-



Mark Terrill/AP Photo

ern Conference semifinals against the Sacramento Kings Sunday, May 13, 2001, in Sacramento, Calif. The Lak-
ers won the game, 119-113, to sweep the series.

Loc ON

Micheal Switzer/AP Photo

in Charleston, W.Va.

besides three pointers and
dunks? Will the Kings return to
the NBA? Can the supreme
awesomeness of Greg Oden’s
beard be stopped? Will David
Stern enter the presidential race
at the last second and rule the
entire country like he does the
NBA? With a synthetic leather
laced iron fist.

Before we get to the Ram-
blings’ 08-09 predictions, a few
Maher-like New Rules:

New Rule - If this whole writ-
ing thing doesn’t work out, my
plan B is to become the voice
over guy for all political ads? I
can do that very sarcastic voice

‘every four years and make any-

thing sound worse than it really
is. In between elections I'll look
for work as the info-mercial guy
who always disgusted at his old
product and looks for some-
thing new, or I'll become the
new movie preview guy.

New Rule - Not to sound sub-
jective or anything, but if the
USS. Presidential Election is ini-
tially a tie, the candidates
should play a game of 21, one
on one to determine the next
President. Other tiebreakers
will include first one to put a
pullover sweater on without any
assistance, or first one to be the
only member of his previously

HUNTINGTON'S 0.J. Mayo drives the lane Tuesday,
Dec. 12, 2006, during a high school basketball game




LN
LO AAVVY

WSs
.

Bill Haber/AP Photo



NEW ORLEANS Hornets Chris Paul tries to get
through the Golden State Warriors defense in a

preseason game in New Orleans, on Sunday.

disenfranchised race to

New Rule - Every year, on
the day a new edition Madden
or NBA 2K hits stores it should
prompt the beginning of a week
long holiday. NBA 2K9
dropped yesterday...’ be the
pioneer of this cause, because
I’m not coming in for the rest of
the week.

Onto the 2008-09 predictions...
Most Improved Player
Jamal Crawford, Knicks
This is still the same guy that
posted 50 point outings when
he ran the show for the Bulls a
few years ago, and Crawford
definitely still has that poten-
tial.
‘
Defensive Playér of The Year
Jermaine O’Neal, Raptors
JO has nothing else to do but
block people, change shots and
rebound. He no longer has to
be the number one option on
this team like he was in Indi-
ana and he should be playing
with a boulder sized chip on his
shoulder.

Sixth Man of ‘The Year

Travis Outlaw/Martell Web-
ster, Blazers.

Depends on who wins the
starting small forward spot for
the Blazers. This may be the

most heated in camp competi-
tion for a staring job across the
league. Webster has to prove
he’s not a bust and has to play

his career with the “I was draft- .

ed before CP3 and DWill” tag
and Outlaw is in a contract year.

Rookie of The Year

O.J. Mayo, Grizzlies

To win the ROY there are
basically three things you need:
A team with no discernible
number one scoring option, a
team so bad you have the green

‘light to shoot virtually every

time down the floor, and a cool
sports name. Check, check and
check for O.J.

Most Valuable Player
Lebron James, Cays
It’s time.

East Champions

Cleveland Cavaliers

Mo Williams finally gives
Lebron another reliable scorer
who can create his own shot and
if J.J. Hickson can develop into
a legit low post presence the
Cavs will get to the pinnacle.
Besides, the rest of the Cavs
know that if they want the lux-
ury of playing with Lebron for
the rest of their careers they
have to win before the 2010
summer of free agency.

year?

d from ‘The Evil’

West Champions

New Orleans Hornets

I know what you’re thinking:
How will they get by the Lak-
ers, Spurs, Jazz and Rockets?
Chris Paul, James Posey and
new uniforms.

NBA Champions

New Orleans Hornets

They have a roster filled with
6’8” athletic guys they can
throw at Lebron and they will

_ need every single one of them.

In the end I think David West
will be the eventual difference
maker in the series although
Paul gets the MVP. Posey gets
his third ring, and this becomes
the straw that broke the camel’s
back for Lebron and his career
in Cleveland. Hello summer of
2010 free agency.

All Rookie Team
O.J. Mayo

Jerryd Bayless
Rudy Fernandez
Michael Beasley
Greg Oden

All NBA 1st Team
Chris Paul

Kobe Bryant
Lebron James
Amare Stoudamire
Dwight Howard

Most Likely to be Pegged as
Everyone’s Sexy Sleeper

Philadelphia 76ers

In every single workplace,
school, or bar room conversa-
tion, Philly will be the answer to
the question, “Hey, Pll tell you
what, you know who’s good this
_. You watch,
remember I told you about it
first.”

New Reason Laker fans will
find to make the Kobe over MJ
case

- Kobe will increase the fre-
quency of his gum chewing and
use of the word “defensively”
and the phrase “game of bas-
ketball” to a minimum of once
per sentence in each interview.
These were the key Jordan buzz
words. He’ll be like Sarah Palin
with “maverick” and “reform.”

Player Most Likely to Ruin
a Good Thing

Ron Artest

You're the third option on a
team with two superstars. This.
is the least amount of pressure
you have ever had in your
career. All you have to do is to
not be yourself.

The, “This is Like the 13th
Year In a Row This Guy
Should Have Made the Leap,
Do We Forget It Now?”

Darius Miles

The days when he and Q
Rich were two of the NBA’s

_ brightest young stars seems like

a century ago. At least Q still
wears the headband.

The “I’m Really Good But »
Nobody Cares Because of
Where I Play” Award

Al Jefferson

If you’re the main principle
in a trade for Kevin Garnett,
we should assume you’re worth
being recognized as the building
block of a franchise. Unfortu-
nately for Jefferson, that fran-
chise is Minnesota.



CRICKET

The Dynasty Stars loses unbeaten record

One of the League’s top squads fell
from the ranks of the unbeaten in
Bahamas Cricket Association play over

the weekend.

The Dynasty Stars lost its first match of ,

the season in a closely contested affair ets.

with the Dockendale Titans.

The Stars were all out for 200 runs,
their lowest run total of the season.

Howard Roye led the team with 67
runs while Ryan Tappin chipped in with

ody

Dockendale narrowly escaped with the
win, posting 202 runs for the loss of seven
wickets to win by three wickets.

Top scorers for the Titans included
Kevin Surujlal with 80 runs while Subba
Rao and Rohan Parks each posted 22

run a piece.

Bowling for the Stars, O’Neal Levy,
Lee Melville and Howard Roye took two

wickets each.

Paradise posted 124 runs for the loss of
three wickets while Dorsey Park man-

aged 122 runs.

runs.

tively.

League play continues October [1th at

Windsor Park.

Bowling for the Titans Shanaka Per-
era took five wickets and Dwight Weak-
ley took two wickets.

In other weekend games, Paradise
topped Dorsey Park Boys by seven wick-

Brent Fullerton led the team with 53
runs while Hamilton Guilyard added 28

Top bowlers included Gregory Irvin
who took four wickets and Mark Butler
took three wickets.

Turan Brown and Andy Ford led
Dorsey Park with 28 and 23 runs respec-

In other cricket news, the Common-
wealth Wanderers Masiers (45 years plus)

will prepare for international competi-
tion in an exhibition match against the

President’s Youth team made up of play-

ers from the National Youth teams.
The Masters team has been invited to

play in South Florida on the weekend of

December Sth.

Masters Roster
Byron Brown
Chris Brown

Venris Bennett

Gary Brathwaite
Belville Edwards

Andy Ford

Vianny Jacques
Danavan Morrison

Wayne Patrick

Ramdeo Ramdass

Greg Taylor Sr.

Henry Williams
Edmund Lewis

SWimmers
put to test

FROM page 14

overall, finishing the cace in
lhr 23.33mins, to come second
in the men's 36 and over,
while

27-year-old Mike Guy was
fifth to cross the line, coming
second in the men's 18-35 with
a time of Lhr 25.46mins.

Melodie Watson won the
women's 18-35 category in Lhr
37.45mins.

Relay teams working in
groups of three took on one
lap each, and the women's
team was won by Susan Mor-
ley, Nancy Knowles and Maria
Piazza with a total time of lhr
46.38mins.

Adam Isaac, Harry Winner
and Dale Winner won the
men's relay in Thr 26.33mins.
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

TRIBUNE SPORTS



Vikings escape Saints
with 30-27 victory

@ By BRETT MARTEL
AP Sports Writer

NEW ORLEANS (AP) —
The Saints gave a national

audience a taste of what New:

Orleans’ long-suffering fans
have bemoaned for years.

Not that the Minnesota
Vikings will complain about
being the latest to play a sup-
porting role in the Saints’
stranger-than-fiction, four-
decade history of bizarre and
dramatic losses.

Even Reggie Bush’s record-
tying two punt returns for
touchdowns couldn’t make up
for New Orleans’ numerous
blunders in a 30-27 loss to Min-
nesota on Monday night.

The Saints’ second failed
field goal attempt of the game
— the first. was blocked and
returned 59 yards for a touch-
down — allowed the Vikings to
drive for Ryan Longwell’s
game-winning 30-yard field
goal with 13 seconds left.

“It’s probably one of the
weirdest games I’ve ever been

involved in,” Saints quarter- °

back Drew Brees said. “Just
the way this thing kind of went
back and forth. I’m trying to
digest it all right now and in
the end it’s a loss.

“That’s extremely disap-
pointing, especially when once
again we have a chance to win
it at the end.”

Even some of the Vikings’
mistakes somehow worked in
their favour.

Bernard Berrian caught the

game-tying touchdown pass
with 7:10 to play after running
the wrong route and nearly
colliding with intended receiv-
er Aundrae Allison. When
Vikings linebacker Chad
Greenway yanked Bush’s face
mask, the officials didn’t call
a penalty, but Bush fumbled,
stalling a promising New
Orleans drive.
_ It all made for.a thrilling
contest and a satisfying win for.
‘the Vikings (2-3), who desper-
ately needed one. ©

“This is as good a win as it
gets,” Vikings coach Brad
Childress said. “I don’t know if
I’ve ever been involved in one
that went that way.”

The Vikings had stolen a
bizarre victory in the Louisiana
Superdome before. In 2002,
the Vikings, already out of the
playoffs, elected to go for a
two-point conversion instead
of kicking an extra point to tie
a game at 31 in the final sec-
onds. Daunte Culpepper fum-
bled the snap but still managed
to score in 32-31 victory that
started a three-game losing



Westbrook
suffering
from two

broken ribs

PHILADELPHIA (AP) —
All-Pro running back Brian
Westbrook broke two ribs in
the Eagles’ 23-17 loss to
Washington on Sunday,
though he, kept playing and
finished the game.

Westbrook missed one
game this season with an

ankle injury, but it’s too early '

to know if his latest injury will
keep him out of Sunday’s
game at San Francisco.

“We just have to see,”
coach Andy Reid said Mon-
day. ‘We have to see how it
all works out and exactly the
pain levcl there. Right now,
he’s very sore, so we’ll see
how 1" ngs go over the next
few days.”

Westbrook had 84 total
varus against the P :dskins.
He leads the ragles (2-3) with
194 yards rushing and has six
tonchdowns, two receiving.

‘ae said he was taking a
wait-and-see approach, but
that Correll Buckhalter
should take his place in the
backfield if the injury is limit-
ing him too much later in the
week.

“Do I want to be out there
at 45 per cent and not wanting
to take a hit and hurting this
team more than I'm helping
it?” Westbrook asked on his
radio show on 950 ESPN.
“No. ... L wouldn’t want to set
the team back like that.”

NEW ORLEANS Saints defender Brian |
Young (66) grabs the arm of Minnesota

MAT CIe SMC Ula tcla oye (el ae] sum a-)coyucca a7)
in the second half of Monday's game in [*

New Orleans...

ANS

streak that caused New
Orleans to miss the playoffs.
This time the quarterback
was Gus Frerotte, who repeat-
edly delivered clutch throws
under heavy _ pressure,
absorbed several hard hits and
at one point needed a doctor’s
clearance to return to action.
He passed for 222 yards and
his only TD was the one Berri- ,
an unexpectedly snagged. The

AP Sports Writer
BEREA, Ohio (AP) — The

last time they played ona
Monday night, the Cleveland
Browns wore hideous brown
pants unlikely to ever be seen
again.

The fashion faux pas was

hardly the most humiliating
thing that happened.

The New York Giants made

the Browns look silly on
national TV.

“They embarrassed us,”

Cleveland linebacker Andra
Davis said Monday. “So that’s
going to give us a little extra
fire.”

Back on August 18, the

defending Super Bowl cham-
pions scored 30 unanswered
points in the first half — 16 ina
span of 76 seconds — against
the Browns in a preseason

ame.
Cleveland (1-3) lost quarter-

back Derek Anderson to a
concussion. and four other
starters to injuries that night
and haven’t been the same
team since.

Now coming off their bye

week and as healthy as they’ve
been in a month, the Browns
face a daunting Monday night
rematch with the Giants, who
improved to 4-0 on Sunday
with a 44-6 win over the Seattle
Seahawks.

Davis grimaced as he

recalled Cleveland’s prime-
time debut dud in 2008.

“Everything they did, they

did well, and everything we
did, we did wrong,” he said. “It
gave the world a false sense of
what we know we can do. This
is a good opportunity to show

(AP Photo: Bill Haber)

3

Vikings’ other. touchdown pass
was thrown by halfback
Chester Taylor, who found
Visanthe Shiancoe from 4
yards out.

Longwell’s winning kick was
set up by a pass interference
call on a long throw to Berrian,
who was run into before the
ball came down despite being
double-covered. That was only
the latest gaffe by New



Orleans.

Martin Gramatica, who had
the field goal blocked and
returned for a touchdown in
the first quarter, missed a 46-
yarder that could have given
the Saints (2-3) a lead with two
minutes to go.

New Orleans committed
four turnovers, dropped sev-
eral passes and was called for
11 penalties for 102 yards. New

Orleans tried to catch the
Vikings off guard with an
onside kick, but Minnesota
recovered, setting up Long-
well’s 53-yard field goal, which
tied his season long.

The loss was reminiscent of
a 34-32 setback at Denver in
Week 3, when Gramatica
missed a 43-yard field goal that
could have put the Saints
ahead with about two minutes
to go. ‘

With the Saints trailing 20-10
late in the third quarter Mon-
day, Bush had his first touch-
down return for 71 yards, slip-
ping a tackle early and accel-
erating past a bone-jarring
block at midfield by Jo-Lonn
Dunbar.

’ Bush nearly broke another
punt return, but tripped and
fell at the Minnesota 49. Still,
New Orleans only needed one
first down to set up Gramati-
ca's 53-yard field goal to tie it.

The Vikings kicked to Bush
again and paid for it. Bush
caught the punt on the run and
burst between the only defend-
ers who really had a shot at
him before cutting outside into
the open field for a 64-yard
score.

“Great blocking by my
teammates,” Bush said. “It was
obviously a huge play at a time
of need. It would have been
even sweeter if we had won
this game.”

Bush was the 12th player in
NFL history to return two
punts for TDs in a game. The
last do it was Eddie Drum-
mond of Detroit against Jack-
sonville on November 14, 2004.

Frerotte, connected with
Berrian for 36 yards to the
New Orleans 27, then found
him again for a 33-yard score
to tie it at 27.

“T saw the ball go up and I
said I’m going to score a touch-
down no matter what,” Berri-
an said.

Vikings cornerback Antoine
Winfield scored after recover-
ing Gramatica’s blocked kick
in the first quarter and set up
Minnesota’s second TD with
a forced fumble. on a sack of
Brees that he recovered at the
New Orleans five-yard line.

That set up Taylor’s TD toss,
which gave Minnesota a 17-10
lead in the second quarter.

Brees was 26-of-46 for 330
yards but was intercepted
twice, once on a tipped pass
deep in Vikings territory and
once on a desperation heave
in the final seconds.

His lone touchdown pass
went for 17 yards to Devery
Henderson on the Saints’ first
series of the game.





CLEVELAND Browns quarterback
Derek Anderson (3) fires a pass
against the Pittsburgh Steelers in
Sunday’s game in Cleveland...

(AP Photo: Mark Duncan)

the world that we’re definitely
way better than what we put
out there in preseason.”

The Browns, whose lone win
came against Cincinnati on
September 28, used last week
to heal physically and soothe
some mental bruises they’ve
already absorbed during a
rough first four games of the
season. Coach Romeo Cren-
nel dismissed his players last
Thursday, giving them a three-
day break from football for the
first time since they opened
training camp in July.

Crennel expects to have line-
backer Willie McGinest
(groin), right tackle Ryan
Tucker (hip surgery) and wide
receiver Donte Stallworth
(quadriceps) back for the
Giants. McGinest has missed
the past two games and Stall-
worth has yet to play in the
regular season after signing a
seven-year, $35 million free

Browns hope to avoid another Giant mess

@ By TOM WITHERS

agent contract.

Return specialist Joshua
Cribbs is also closer to 100 per-
cent. The Pro Bowler, who has
been slow to recover from a
high ankle sprain sustained
while returning a kickoff in the
exhibition loss to the Giants,
said the lopsided loss can be a
motivator this time around.

“We took that to heart,”
Cribbs said. “They embar-
rassed us. That will add an
extra chip on our shoulder. We
want that win most of all.

We’re looking for some pay-

back.”

It would be almost impossi-
ble for the Browns to play any
worse than they did during
their second preseason game.
They rallied to lose only 37-34,
a final that only looked
respectable on the scoreboard.
When New York’s starters and
Cleveland’s starters were on
the field, it was a colossal mis-
match made more dramatic
because of the Browns’ self-
destructive play.

They were penalized for 98
yards in the first quarter alone,
but still managed to take a 3-0
lead on Phil Dawson's 56-yard
field goal. *

Less than 10 minutes later,
the Browns trailed 30-3.

Later, Browns general man-
ager Phil Savage describes the
meltdown as “that spell of five
to 10 minutes where we lost
our minds.”

Cleveland gave up two first-
quarter touchdown passes to
quarterback Eli Manning, who
found Domenik Hixon both
times for a 14-3 lead. Then,
during a mind-numbing stretch,
the Browns came completely
unglued as the Giants blocked

a punt out of the end zone for
a safety, Hixon returned the
ensuing free kick 82 yards for a
TD and New York safety
James Butler scooped up a
botched handoff to Jamal
Lewis and went 95 yards for a
score.

“Everything went wrong,
everything,” Davis said. “It was
crazy. And the injuries.”

Lewis hurt his hamstring try-
ing to catch Butler after the
fumble, and on Cleveland's
first possession after the Giants
blew it open, Anderson sus-
tained a concussion on a sack
by Osi Umenyiora.

The beating in New Jersey
changed the tone of Cleve-
land’s preseason, with the
emphasis suddenly on getting
to the September 8 opener
against Dallas without expand-
ing its injury list. ;

Only now, though, are the
Browns getting well, and by
the time kickoff comes around
on Monday, they should be
more complete than at any
time this season. Feeling better
is nice, but the Browns will
need to play at a level they
haven't come close to yet in
order to bring down the
Giants, who are off to their
best start since 1990.

Along with a much-needed
win, the Browns gained some
confidence with their win over
Cincinnati. Potentially, a vic-
tory over the Giants in Cleve-
land's first regular season Mon-

.day night appearance since
2003 would bring even more.

“It could definitely turn the

season around to beat the

Super Bowl champs and do it’

on national television,” Davis
said. “We'll be ready to go.”



Bills QB
Edwards’
Status is
uncertain

@ By JOHN WAWROW
AP Sports Writer



ORCHARD PARK, N.Y.
(AP) — Buffalo Bills quar-
terback Trent Edwards was
described as alert but still
experiencing post-concussion
symptoms Monday, leaving
his status uncertain as the
team enters its bye week.

Coach Dick Jauron side-
stepped questions regarding
the quarterback’s health,
except to say that Edwards
showed up at the Bills’ head-
quarters a day after being
slammed to the ground on the
third play from scrimmage
during a 41-17 loss at Arizona.

Jauron wouldn’t say
whether he expected Edwards
to take part in any of the
team’s three practices this
week, and added it was too
early to determine whether
the quarterback would be
ready to play when Buffalo
(4-1)-hosts San Diego (2-3) on
October 19.

When asked whether
Edwards would require more
tests, Jauron closed the dis-
cussion of the player by say-
ing, “I’ve really said about all
I’m going to say about Trent
and leave it at that.” He then
referred questions to Bills
head trainer Bud Carpenter,
who declined requests to
speak to reporters.

Receiver Lee Evans, who
spoke with Edwards,
described the quarterback as
“alert” and noted that “he
seemed to be doing all right.”
Without going into detail,
Evans said it was apparent
that Edwards was still “deal-
ing with some things, so it’s
going to be a little time.”

Safety Donte Whitner said
he expected Edwards to
return in time for the Bills’
next game.

“Tf I had to bet, I’ll say he’ll
be back for San-Diego,” Whit+-
ner said. “He just had a little:
ding.” sii bts

Edwards was hurt when the
back of his helmet bounced
off the turf after being hit
head-on by blitzing safety
Adrian Wilson, who broke in
untouched from the quarter-
back’s right side.

It happened a split-second
after Edwards completed a 13-
yard pass over the middle to
James Hardy. Edwards lay on
the field for a couple of min-
utes and needed help to the
sideline, where trainers paid
careful attention to his neck.

Edwards was then carted to
the locker room and did not
return.

The injury rattled the Bills, :
who have come to rely on his
ability to lead the offense. The
former third-round draft pick
had played a key role in help-
ing Buffalo win its first four
games — the team’s best start
in 16 years. Edwards helped
engineer fourth-quarter come-
back victories in each of his.
previous three games.

Things went downhill two
plays after Edwards was hurt,
when backup J.P. Losman
botched a hand-off with Mar-
shawn Lynch, which resulted
in-a fumble that set up Ari-
zona’s first touchdown.

“Losman looked rusty
appearing in his first game
since a 36-14 loss at Jack-
sonville on November 25,
after which he lost the starting
job to Edwards for the second
time that season. Losman fin-
ished 15-of-21 for 220 yards,
including an 87 yard touch-
down to Evans, but also threw
an interception and lost two
fumbles.

“I felt the whole day, I was
rushing a little bit, maybe
rushing through my reads,”
Losman said. “Maybe I was
just rushing a little bit because
I haven't been under fire like
that in a while. I’m glad it hap-
pened early on in the season
so as we go on, I'll be more
prepared for the situation.”

Losman would take over as
the interim starter if Edwards
can’t play.

The NFL leaves it up to the
discretion of a team’s medical
staff to determine when a
player can resume practicing
or playing after sustaining a
concussion. The only rule is
that a player who loses con-
sciousness would not be
allowed to return in the same
game or practice.

That differs from the NHL,
which requires a player to be
symptom-free for seven days
before being cleared for prac-
tice.
TRIBUNE SPORTS





advanc Ca siNw |

u

oh fi
r ' | * | °

@ By LEONID CHIZHOV

Associated Press Writer

MOSCOW (AP) — Defend-
ing champion Nikolay Davy-
denko defeated Florent Serra
6-1, 7-5 Tuesday in the first
round of the Kremlin Cup. °

In the women’s draw, Svet-
lana Kuznetsova defeated Li
Na 6-4, 7-5.

Sixth-ranked Davydenko had
little trouble against the 53rd-
ranked Serra in the opening set,
but he needed a break in the
11th game to advance to the
second round.

Davydenko is looking for his
third straight title in Moscow.

The fifth-seeded Kuznetso-
va broke early in each set. She
led 4-1 in the second set and
had two match points serving
at 5-3 before Li evened it at 5-S.

However, the Russian broke
Li in the next game and served
out the match on the fourth
match point.

“JT had a very tough first-
round match,” Kuznetsova said.
“Li Na beat many serious oppo-
nents this season and to win in
two sets, I think, it’s not a bad

start to the tournament.
Earlier, Michael Llodra was

upset by Uzbekistan qualilicr

Denis Istomin 7-6 (2), 6-3, who

‘ was playing only his second

ATP Tour match.

The 121st-ranked Istomin
broke easily in the sixth game
of the second set to stop the
sixth-seeded Llodra.

Eighth-seeded Janko Vip-
sarevic of Serbia rallied to beat
Russian qualifier Alexandre
Kudryavtsev 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (6).

Seventh-seeded Vera
Zvonareva ousted Maria Kir-
ilenko 6-4, 6-4, and Ekaterina
Makarova beat Elena Vesnina
7-6 (4), 7-6 (1).

Sixth-seeded Venus Williams
was scheduled to play Flavia
Pennetta later Tuesday.

Kuznetsova, ranked No. 7,
has lost all seven WTA finals
this season.

The women’s field includes
seven of the top-10 players
including No. | Jelena
Jankovic.

US Open champion Serena
Williams, last year’s runner-up,
pulled out because of an ankle
injury.

RUSSIA’S Svetlana Kuznetsova ere rt

albandian ousts
Reynolds at the
Stockholm Open





Fa eS OT

IAL SPO

ma seiiad

erie.
4" INU Co)s








WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 13

Bb ke wy ay
iznetsova

Sas

RUSSIA’S Nikolay Davydenko returns a shot to France’s Florent Serra at the Kremlin Cup tournament in

Moscow on’ Tuesday...








STOCKHOLM, Sweden (AP) — Top-seed-
ed David Nalbandian cruised past American
Bobby Reynolds 6-1, 6-1 Tuesday and
advanced to the second round of the Stock-
holm Open.

The seventh-ranked Nalbandian will face
either Joachim Johansson or Nicolas Mahut at

the Royal Tennis Hall.

Second-seeded Mario Ancic overcame a
slow start to beat Olivier Rochus 7-6 (6), 6-2
He will face either his brother, Christophe
Rochus, or Steve Darcis. Fifth-secded Rainer
Schuettler ousted Chris Guecione 6-0, 6-3 and
will face Nicol | sud ti

Pennett

MOSCOW (AP) — Venus
Williams was upset in the open-
ing round at the Kremlin Cup,
losing 6-4, 2-6, 6-4 to Flavia
Pennetta:

The eighth-ranked Ameri-
can, who also lost in the first
round of a tournament in
March in Memphis, Tenn.,
dropped to 1-3 against Pennet-
ta.

"T totally came here because
[love winning," Williams said.
"| have never won this title, but
[ just had a day where I could
not control my game. She
played well."

Pennetta and Williams trad-
ed breaks in the first set. The
Italian broke decisively on her
third chance in the ninth game
with a lob.

Williams broke twice in the
second set, but dropped serve
in the first game of the third
set and never recovered.

"Venus is always a tough
opponent," said the 18th-
ranked Pennetta. "Iwas play-
ing my best tennis. My service
was working very well. | am
very happy with the match."

On the men's side, defend:
ing champion Nikolay Davy-
denko advanced by beating
Florent Serra of France 6-1, 7-
S,and Uzbek qualifier Denis
Istomin upset sixth-seeded
Michael Llodra 7-6 (2), 6-3 in
only his second ATP Tour
match, .

The [21st-ranked Istomin
broke decisively in the sixth
game of the second set and will
face French veteran Fabrice
Santoro in the second round.

Robby Ginepri of the United
States defeated Jiri Vanek of
the Czech Republic 6-3, 6-4.

"It's great to get off to a
good start here this week,"
Ginepri said. "| haven't played
since the U.S. Open, so I wasn't
really sure where my game was
going to be, but I'm happy with
the way I played."

‘The sixth-ranked Davydenko
had little trouble against the
53rd-ranked Serra in the open-
ing set, but he needed a break
in the [1th game to advance to
the second round,

Davydenko is looking for his
third straight title in Moscow.

"LT would like to defend my
title here, but as usual I'm my
worst enemy," Davydenko
said,



Photos: Misha Japaridze/AP





Top-seetietl
Wawrinka
unset hy
qualifier
in Vienna

VIENNA, Austria (AP) —
Top-seeded Stanislas Wawrinka
was upset 6-7 (5), 6-2, 7-6 (5)
Tuesday by German qualifier
Philipp Petzschner in.the first
round of the BA Tennis Tro-
phy.
Petzschner had two early
breaks but lost the opening set
after double-faulting in the
tiebreaker.

“This was my first match
against a top-10 player, so it’s
definitely my biggest win so
far,” said the 125th-ranked Pet-
zschner,

The 24-year-old German
added three more breaks to win
the second. He led 5-3 in the
third, but needed a tiebreaker
to close out the match. He won
on his second match point when
Wawrinka netted a backhand.

“I am looking to qualify for
(the Masters Cup in) Shanghai
so this obviously is a disap-
pointing result,” said Wawrinka,
who reached the final in Vienna
last year. “He played well and
he is a talented player but I just
wasn’t aggressive enough.”

The 10th-ranked Wawrinka
became the top-seeded player
after defending champion
Novak Djokovic and James
Blake withdrew from the tour-
nament.

Philipp Kohlschreiber also
advanced to the second round

after beating Marc Gicquel 6-
2, 6-2, while Radek Stepanek
downed Pavel Snobel 6-4, 6-2.

Second-seeded Fernando
Gonzalez rallied from a set
down to beat Simone Bolelli 4-
6, 7-6 (2), 6-2. Ernests Gulbis
defeated Filippo Volandri 6-2,
6-3.

Sixth-seeded Tommy Robre-
do, who was to play Stefan
. Koubek on Tuesday, pulled out
with a hip injury and was
replaced by Santiago Giraldo.

defeats Venus



VENUS WILLIAMS, of the US, serves to Italian Flavia
Pennetta at the Kremlin Cup. Williams...

Eighth-seeded Janko Tip-
sarevic of Serbia rallied to beat
Russian qualifier Alexandre
Kudryavtsev 4-6, 6-3, 7-6 (6).

In the women's draw, Svet-
lana Kuznetsova beat Li Na of
China 6-4, 7-5.

The fifth-seeded Kuznetso-
va broke early in each set. She
led 4-1 in the second set and
had two match points serving at
5-3 before Li evened it at 5-5.

However, the Russian broke
next game and then served out
the match on her fourth match
point.

"| had a very tough first-
round match," Kuznetsova
said. "Li Na beat many serious

opponents this season and to
win in two sets, I think, it's not
a bad start to the tournament."

Kuznetsova, ranked No. 7,
has lost all seven WTA finals
this season.

Seventh-seeded Vera
Zvonareva ousted Maria Kir-
ilenko 6-4, 6-4 and Ekaterina
Makarova beat Elena Vesnina

7-6 (4), 7-6 (1) in all-Russian

matches.

The women's field included
seven of the top-10 players,
along with No. 1 Jelena
Jankovic. U.S. Open champi-
on Serena Williams, last year's
runner-up, pulled out because
of an ankle injury.
caro achethy

THE TRIBUNE



WEDNES



In brief

Knowles and
Bhupathi back
on road again

a By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

AFTER taking a couple
weeks off to recuperate from an
injury, Mark Knowles and his
Indian partner Mahesh Bhu-
pathi are back on the road
again. ©,

The duo are in Vienna, ‘Rass!
tria where,they are participating
in the Bank Austria Tennis Tro-
phy this week.

They-are listed as the number
two seeds in the field of 16
teams.

Their first match is scheduled
for today against the team of
Ashley Fisher and Travis Par-
rott. If they win, they will
advance to the quarter-final
where they will meet the winner
of the match between Martin

SEE page 11



1 4

PAGE



SDAY, OCTOBER 8,



2008

12 & 13 « International Sports News



WIN IMPROVES SAC’S RECORD THIS SEASON TO 3-1

Big Red Machines
flatten Giants 19-1

_ By BRENT STUBBS

Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

IT was a first inning blowout for the
Bahamas Association of Independent Sec-
ondary Schools’ junior boys softball defending
champions St. Augustine’s College Big Red
Machines..

The Big Red Machines batted around the
clock twice, producing 14 runs on 11 hits as
they went on to rout the St. John’s Giants 15-
1 in three innings via the ten-run rule yester-
day at St. Augustine’s College.

“Our pitghing have to work,” said SAC’s

coach John Todd, who substituted everybody

_ in the line-up in the second inning except for

the battery mate of pitcher Arien Seymour
and catcher Byron Murray.

“We have a young team and they are not
focussed. When you have a team down, you
have to keep them down because you don’t
know what will happen. So I didn’t want to
take any chances. I wanted the pitching to
get the work in.”

Over the three innings he worked yesterday,
Seymour held the Giants to just two hits,
including a bases loaded jam in the second

inning when he struck ‘out the final batter to

keep St. J ohn’s scoreless.

But in the third, Seymour gave up a lead off
walk to St John’s Keanu Thompson, who
moved up to second on Alex Foster’s single,
got to third on a wild pitch that put Foster at
second.

Seymour then got Kevin Symonette to
ground out at first, but Thompson used his
speed to scoot home with the Giants’ lone
run. Like they did in the second, St. John’s
got the bases loaded, but Seymour struck
out the final batter to end the game.

The win improved SAC’s record to 3-1

SEE page 11.

SPLASHDOWN! 42 swimmers put
their training to test in Abaco race

@ BY MEGAN
REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

OPEN water swimmers
of all ages put their stami-
na to the test in a Skm

Saturdily.

The 42 swimmers com:
peting in categories from: .’
under 12 to over 36 made .,
the fifth annual Swift =.
Swimming Abaco race the:
biggest yet.

"It was a good race; the - ie

best one we've had out
here," remarked Swift's
head coach Andy Knowles.

There were 12 more
competitors than last
year's 30, and many of
them were young swim-
mers who have been train-
ing intensely to swim indi-
vidually or as part of a
relay team.

12-year-old Abigail
Lowe, who trains with
Swift at St Andrew's
School in Nassau came first
among the girls under 12.

She completed the trian-
gular 5km course, which is
over three miles, in 1hr
37.52 mins.

Abigail said: "It was the
first time I did the whole
race. Last year I did a mile,
and this year I have been
practising hard."

Abaco boy Brian Higgs
won the boy's 13-17 cate-
gory, finishing the race in
Lhr, 29.46mins, and Jen-
nifer Cooke won the girls
13-17 with a time of 2hrs,
31.17mins.

43-year-old David Mor-
ley finished first overall,
winning the men's over 36,
by keeping up a fast and
steady pace, completing
the third lap of the FINA
standard course after Lhr
15.02mins.

He said: "J try to keep
consistent in a race like
this.and it was a great race,
it was really nice and calm.

"L have won before in
my age group, only the
Knowles' and other young
whipper snappers have
come before me, so with-
out them competing this °
year [ had a chance.

"Now I am looking for-
ward to doing it again next.
year!"

Nassau swim mer Simon
Frank was second to cross
the finish in Ihr,
20.19mins, winning the
men's 18-35 category, and
: hristina Winner was not

far behind.

Mrs Winner was the first
women to finish after Lhr
21.01mins and came first in
the women's over 36.

Adam Isaac was fourth

SEE page 11

SWIMMING from the first mark
at Crossing Bay, Marsh Harbour.

DAVID MORLEY,
overall winner. Far
right is Andy Knowles,
head coach at Swift



AGIRL wear- | -
ing the Swift |
Abaco T-shirt
watches the
race from the
dock.








SPECTATORS watch |
swimmers from the dock.







I try to keep
consistent
in a race like
this and it
was a great
race, it Was
really nice
and calm.

David Morley



We
MTD (rs

MEN

Home Runs ©

Derek Christie - 6
Phillip Culmer - 5
Terran Wood - 5
Jamal Johnson - 5
Sherman Ferguson - 4

RBI

Derek Christie - 29
Phillip Culmer -.29
Ramon Johnson - 28
Jamal Johnson - 24
Stephen Brown - 21

Runs

Ramon Storr - 40
Phillip Culmer - 38
Jamal Johnson - 32
Julian Collie - 32
Van Johnson - 31

Hits

Ramon Storr - 37
Phillip Culmer - 32
Julian Collie - 31
three tied with 27

Stolen Bases
Herbie Brown - 7
Lon Johnson - 7
Greg Jones - 5
Alex Rolle 5
Van Johnson - 5

Win/Loss Record
Leroy Thompson - 12/0
Cardinal Gilbert - 12/5
Terrance Culmer - 9/5
Leonard LaFrance - 4/1
Alcott Forbes - 4/2

Strikeouts

Cardinal Gilbert - 68
Leroy Thompson - 61
Roscoe Thompson - 56
Terrance Culmer - 45
Clifford Scavella - 45

ERA

Leroy Thompson - 3.45
Clifford Scavella - 4.49
Cardinal Gilbert - 4.95
Anton Gibson - 5.94
Leonard LaFrance - 5.95

Batting Average
Terran Wood - .529.
Ramon Storr - .507
Phillip Culmer - .500
Julian Collie - .484
Stephen Brown - .443 .

WOMEN

“Home Runs

Thela Johnson - 3
Marvell Miller - 2
Six tied with one

RBIs

Thela Johnson - 22
Christine Edmunds - 16
Dorothy Marshall - 16
Chryshan Percentie - 15
Jeannie Minus - 14

Runs

Thela Johnson - 28
Naressa Seymour - 26
Lathera Brown - 24
Vernie Curry - 23
Tonia Simmons - 23

Hits
Dawn Forbes - 29
Thela Johnson - 29

_ Vantrice Bowleg - 28

Dornette Edwards - 25
Marvell Miller - 24

Stolen Bases

Sharnell Symonette - 12
Lathera Brown - 9
Tonia Simmons - 8
Cleo Symonetter - 7
Neressa Seymour 6

Win/Loss Record
Mary Sweeting - 8/8
Alex Taylor - 8/8
Desiree Coakley - 7/4
Marvell Miller - 7/9
Ernestine Stubbs - 6/5

Strikeouts

Mary Sweeting - 81
Marvell Miller - 42
Ernestine Stubbs - 36
Alex Taylor - 34
Narissa Lockhart - 29

ERA

Marvell Miller - 2.45
Mary Sweeting - 3.48
Ernestine Stubbs - 3.73
Alex Taylor - 4.63
Desiree Coakley - 5.2

Batting Average
Sharnell Symonette - 500
Rosemary Green - .467
Dawn Forbes - .460
Chryshan Percentie - .457
Debbie McLure - .457

INSSENRSRERS







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THE TRIBUNE

Employers behind

on their NIB

contributions to be :

Charged interest

FROM page one

According to NIB’s deputy
director for New Providence,
18,000 of the 24,000 employers
and self-employed people who
are registered to contribute to
the fund were behind on their
payments as of August this
year.

The need to increase con-
tribution compliance levels is
something which, as Mr Ward
noted, has been mentioned in
a number of the organisation’s
actuarial reports, which take
place every five years.

The seventh actuarial
review also noted the NIB
faces being unable to meet
demand in coming years due
to an increase in the ratio of
pensioners to working people
- a problem compounded by
poor payment rates.

Mr Curtis said: “The
National Insurance Act has
always allowed for interest to
be charged on arrears of con-
tributions. However, in the
past interest has not been con-
sistently applied and so
employers have not been felt
compelled to pay in prescribed
time. This has been a con-

tributing factor to the high lev-.

el of non-compliance and the
low percentage of on-time
payments.”

He said that every year the
board loses “a substantial
amount of revenue, in addi-

tion to the contribution pay--

ment itself, in lost interest pay-
ments.”

As of today, said Mr Cur-
tis, the NIB is “several million

dollars” behind the target it-

had hoped to meet for contri-
butions this year. “A large
number” of employers are
anywhere between “six, eight
or 12 months” in arrears.

Such a shortfall means that
the organisation has to cut
back on its investments, sig-
nalling a “big problem...in (its)
ability to meet future
demand” on its resources.

The board is allowing the
lbree month “amnesty peri-
od” because of the signficance
of the change and the fact that
it is “aware that these are
tough economic times for
everybody,” said Mr Ward.

“We're giving employers
and self-employed persons an
amnesty period where they
may come in and pay their
contributions without interest
being added. This amnesty
period began (Monday, Octo-
ber 6).”

As of January 1, 2009, inter-
est will be ~harged on unpaid,
short paid, and late paid
“C10” contributions.

Mr Curtis said: “If they do
not take advantage of this win-
dow (amnesty period) most
certainly the board will be tak-
ing action to have them pros-
ecuted.”

According to the new chair-
man, another means by which

.the board is hoping to
improve payment rates is by
potentially publishing infor-
mation for employees/

- claimants to determine how
up to date their boss is with
paying the contributions
deducted from their salary to
NIB on their behalf.

‘“‘We are examining the best
way that we can disseminate
that information in a public
forum,” said Mr Ward.

Reports of MP
heing questioned
in connection with
embezzlement are
flenied hy police
FROM page one

Nassau’s political scene like
wildfire, with many sitting and
ex-parliamentarians speculating
as to the cause of the arrest.

Some claimed that it rested
solely on his tenure when he
had ministerial responsibilities
at a government corporation.
However, investigations into his
tenure there are still ongoing,
as sources within the police
force insist that they are still
looking into reports that he over
extended his ministerial pow-
ers both in the hiring and firing
of employees at the said corpo-
ration.

FROM page one

ters of Mario Miller, Yasmin Johnson
and Leslia Miller, broke into tears in
their father’s arms.

Leslie Miller himself, Mario’s father,
began to break down while speaking to
reporters immediately after the dis-
missal.

“After six years of waiting and five
years of, in my opinion, deliberate
obstruction of justice by some of the
people in this country in the top eche-
lon, I should say this is what we find in
this country,” said the former Trade
minister.

“There is nothing my family or I can
do about it and Mario certainly isn’t
here to help himself. Whatever posi-
tion is taken, I guess we have to live
with it as a family and.as people.

“For five years I pleaded and raised.
hell in Parliament, in some respects,
trying to get justice for myself and for

‘my son, and in many cases I was ignored

by two of the AGs (Attorney Generals)
who had their own agendas.”

He said accusations made by defence
attorney for Ricardo Miller, Romauld
Ferreira, that he had influence over the
trial because of his position in the gov-

- ernment were far-fetched.

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“The average case in this country
takes place within 18 months. Mario’s
took six years. What political influence
could Leslie Miller have had on the gov- »
ernment?” said Mr Miller. “That’s why
I raised so much hell about it.”

He questioned the intentions of those
in positions of authority in the govern-
ment and penal system, and even put to
scrutiny the very moral sense of that
group, as well as the Bahamian people.

“Some of them were more interested
in helping their friends rather than giv-
ing true justice to my dead son who was
butchered,” said Mr Miller.

Mr Miller lauded the efforts of the
prosecution in the case, as well as the
police. He said Mrs Cheryl Grant-
Bethel and her team did “as good a job
as anyone in the world could have
done.”

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 15

Mario Miller
case dismissed

“I would appreciate it if Mrs Bethel
would take the case over again,” he
said.

The case would have ‘to be brought
before the Office of the Attorney Gen-
eral once again in order for a retrial to
be set.

The next trial would be the fourth
time witnesses would have to take the
stand in an attempt to bring closure to a
murder that occurred over six years ago.

Mr Miller said he hopes that when

_the matter is brought to the courts

again, all those with information would
be required to appear before the jury.
“If you notice, one person was never
brought before the court and for five
years I asked my colleagues in Cabinet
to see to it that this gentleman, who
played a role in it, was brought before
the court,” he said. “But that was a no-

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no. As you can see, even with the inter-
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<
co

“It’s incredible,

“I guess they have friends who are
much more powerful than even justice
in this country, and we gatta live with
it.”

Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar Lee, and
Ryan Miller were on trial for the June,
2002, murder of Mario Miller.

The last day of the trial drew a crowd
inside the courtroom, with family and
friends of Mario Miller and of the
accused packing seats.

Before the jury was brought back in
to deliver their decision, prison and
police officers were on duty through-
out the courtroom.

Mr Miller sent out a plea to Bahami-
ans, saying youths must listen to par-
ents and be careful who they choose as
friends.

He said his son was a good person
but got into some bad thing that he and
his family were not aware of.

“Mario was a decent human being
and a loving person,” said Mr Miller.
“Certain persons decided to paint him
with a brush that I thought was ugly
and I thought it was unfair, especially to
my family, his mother and his sister
Yasmin.”

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—
PAGE 16, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008



SSS TT AT TNA TAN LN AS TS ST NT EAT TEN TNA TSAR NE ERT TT

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“THe PEOPLE’S NEWSPAPER,”



THE TRIBUNE




WEDNESDAY,



New shipping
firm targets $100k
freight charges goal | ,

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

he latest entrant to the Bahami-
an commercial shipping market
believes it could earn $100,000 in
freight charges per week “if we were to
maximise the route” to Florida, the head
of its Nassau-based shipping agency
telling Tribune Business yesterday that it
had leased the former Pioneer Shipping
base on Union Wharf for its own opera-
tions.
Richard Ryan, general manager of
United Shipping, the in-port shipping
agent for Atlantic Caribbean Line, said

the latter was set to begin its twice-week-.

ly service from Florida to Nassau “this
Sunday”, with services on that day and
Friday.

Mr Ryan said Atlantic Caribbean’s
vessel “has the capacity to bring in every

voyage 40 TEUs [twenty-foot equipment |

units]”, and United Shipping had hired
nine new staff - mostly former Pioneer
Shipping employees - to man the new
Nassau operation.

“We did some rough estimates, and if
we were to maximise the route, we were
looking at freight charges per week of
$100,000,” Mr Ryan told Tribune Busi-
ness. “The value of the cargo we would
carry is much harder to estimate.

“IT guess with the demise of Pioneer,
we’re sort of coming in and filling the
gap. We hope to get back the business
that we think went elsewhere, and we’re
hoping people will try our customer ser-

- vice quality, getting the cargo into the

Atlantic Caribbean Line’s

agent confirms Tribune Business
exclusive that it will operate
from former Pioneer Shipping
base on Union Wharf

Bahamas, off the dock and to the cus-
tomer.

“That’s where we our big hit. We will
build the business on customer service.
We hope to get the cargo off the dock in
Nassau as quickly as possible and into the
hands of the owner. We will make sure
the turnaround in Nassau is as quick as
possible. The operation here in Nassau
will be a fully Bahamian operation.”

Mr Ryan said between $50,000-
$100,000 was being invested in upgrading
the former Pioneer Shipping site, with
the main building “totally gutted” to
allow for the fitting of brand new offices.
The outside wall on Bay Street has also
been patched, speckled and upgraded.

“We were in negotiations with the
owners of Union Wharf, who are not the
same as the owners of Pioneer Shipping
Company,” Mr Ryan said of Atlantic
Caribbean’s new Nassau base.

“It’s a separate entity that has, different
owners. They wanted to rent the prop-
erty, and there’s still a need for cargo to
come into the Bahamas. Atlantic
Caribbean saw the opportunity and
chose us to be agents for them.”

Mr Ryan said United Shipping had

SEE page 4B

OCTOBER. 8,

a

2008

i



by NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor |

egasus Wireless Corporation,
the controversial company that
enjoyed an aborted seven-

month stay in Grand Bahama prior to
. the 2007 general election, is under



Sees ae Pes

‘investigation by the US authorities for’

\ yee securities fraud after filing for
hapter 11 bankruptcy earlier this
ear.

, Legal documents filed by the Secu-
ities & Exchange Commission (SEC)
n the US district court for northern
alifornia, copies of which have been
, obtained by Tribune Business, reveal
‘that. for the past six months the US
: capital markets regulator has been
_ investigating Pegasus.
The probe, according to the court
‘ documents, is investigating whether
‘Pegasus and its senior executives made
“materially false statements or omitted
material facts in press releases and
SEC-filings about Pegasus’ financing,
business prospects, use of funds and

“1 finandial condition”.

In other words, the SEC is investt-
| gating Pegasus and its controversial
president and chief executive, Jasper
Knabb, for allegedly attempting to mis-

, lead the market and artificially
inflate/manipulate the company’s.share

‘ price, a form of fraud.
Noting that Pegasus had filed for

idfpaiinnatbabdbdentaneteeminnesensnionaact

, Ba .
investor in
raud probe

ROYAL BFIDELITY



amas

Controversial Pesass
Wireless in Chapter
11 bankruptcy |

Chapter 11 bankruptcy in Florida on

January 28, 2008, some six months
after it exited Grand Bahama, the SEC
alleged: “Pegasus, Wireless Corpora-
tion is a once high- -flying, how-bank-
rupt, penny stock company that made
extravagant claim$ about certain acqui-
sitions, and then mysteriously issued
hundreds of millions of shares of stock
to satisfy so-called debts that previ-
ously had never been, publicly dis-
closed.”

Recounting’ Pegasus’ s history before
Mr Knabb alighted on Grand Bahama
and Freeport ‘in early 2007, the SEC
said it was “a penny, stock company
with virtually no assets or cash, and
an accumulated deficit of more than $3
million” as recently as 2004; when, it
was named Blue Industries.

Then, via’a series of reverse mergers,
it became a supplier of witeless net- -
working products, “In late 2005: and
early 2006, Pegasus announced Sever-
al acquisitions, all supposedly financed
by the company’s chief executive [Mr
Knabb],” the SEC said.

SEE page 4B

NIB urged: Be ‘more ingenious’ on compliance

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

75% of employers and self-employed on New Providence behind on NIB contributions



terday he was

THE National Insurance
Board (NIB) needs to be “a bit
more.ingenious” in forcing busi-
nesses and the self-employed
to comply with contribution
payments, the Bahamas Cham-
ber of Conimerce’s president
said yesterday, and go further
than simply levying interest
charges against defaulters.

Speaking in the wake of
NIB’s announcement that some
75 per cent of businesses and
self-employed persons in New
Providence were behind on
their contributions to the
nation’s social security scheme,
Dionisio D’Aguilar said non-
compliance needed to be tied
to other government permits
and approvals that these firms
required,

The Chamber president said
that while levying interest
penalties against non-payers
from January 1, 2009, was fine,
a better method of enforcing
NIB compliance was to link this
to business licence renewals,
work permit applications,
exchange control approvals and
corporate registration.

Business and self-employed
persons, he suggested, should
be unable to obtain these per-
mits and approvals unless they
were in full compliance on NIB
contributions - an initiative that
was suggested by the Social
Security Reform Commission
established by the former PLP
government.



“You can.go ahead and levy
interest, but it’s not going to get
compliarice,” Mr D’ Aguilar
said. “They’ve got to figure out
a more ingenious way for peo-
ple to comply. You’ve got to
force people to comply, and
that’s not going to force them to
comply.

“Clearly, people are not pay-
ing when they should be pay-
ing. I understand that. It’s an
admitted way to get people to
comply, but you have to be a
bit more ingenious than that.
Tie it to as many things as pos-
sible, so that if they don’t give
one thing to the Government,
they don’t get anything back
from the Government.”

NIB’s chairman, Patrick
Ward, announced yesterday
that from January 1,'2009, all
employers and self-employed
persons who are behind in their
contributions will be charged
monthly interest on what they
owe and will be “aggressively
pursued” for payment - with
prosecution in the courts likely
for defaulters.

According to NIB’s deputy
director for New Providence,
18,000 of the 24,000 employers
and self-employed people who
are registered to contribute to
the fund were behind on their
payments as of August this
year.

As of January 1, 2009, inter-
est will be charged on unpaid,
short paid, and late: paid con-
tributions.

Interest will be charged on

arrears at “a prime rate,” said
NIB acting director Anthony
Curtis, with many employers
between six to 12 months in
arrears on their contributions.

When asked whether the
levying of interest penalties
would further cripple business-
es in an already-struggling
Bahamian economy, Mr
D’ Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness yesterday: “I don’t think
it makes a difference.”

He described NIB payments
as a “critical expense” for
employers to pay, as it was con-
tributing to the retirement
income for employees in a
nation where there was an
extraordinarily low savings rate,
leaving many Bahamians
unable to meet their basic needs
in retirement.

At the same time as enforcing
compliance, Mr D’Aguilar

urged NIB to make it easier for
businesses to pay their contri-
butions through direct debits
from bank accounts - something
that should be facilitated by the
Bahamas Automated Clearing
House (BACH) - and being
more flexible in calculating con-
tributions.

Currently, NIBicalculated the

eV OU a Es ws)
Nassau: 242
Freeport: Peas

Sy sy Wales)
Bridgetown: 2-lo.40

contributions a company should
make on its employees’ behalf
using a formula based on the
number of Mondays in a
month, something the Cham-
ber president described as “very
1974”,

Such a system Was not com-
patible with many employer
payroll systems, and Mr

Seo Te no hel Oli] y
35.1 30s

ane tel Ohe)

Men etiArekc haan elf mne

D’ Aguilar called on NIB “to
adjust that” to enable people
to pay contributions based on
their system - weekly, bi-week-
ly, monthly or bi-monthly.

“I wish NIB made it easier
for people to pay. I would think

Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE

(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE

(242) 351-3010

| Fashion Show
eyes ‘dramatic
| surge’ to 1,000
attendees

"i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Bahamian
banker organising
a fashion show in
Nassau next [ge
month told Tri- |
bune Business yes- ff

“still optimistic”
that it would
attract some 1,000
visitors to. this
nation, and is hoping for “as
dramatic surge” in confirmed
attendees over the. next few
weeks.

Owen Bethel, president and

Bethel

_ chief executive of the Nassau-

based Montaque Group, which
owns.and is financing the
Islands of the World Fashion
Week, said he was hoping the
global economic downturn
would not impact:attendance,
and would know more once
Paris and Milan fashion weeks
ended.

“I’m quite positive about
that,” Mr Bethel told Tribune
Business on the potential atten-
dance for Islands of the World
Fashion Week.

However; he “still can’t get a
handle” on the true picture
because of the economic uncer-
tainty, and the fact that many
likely attendees will only con-
firm they are coming once the
latest European fashion shows
are over.

“With those who have regis-
tered and confirmed they will
attend, we’re up to about 300-
400,” Mr Bethel said. ““We’re
just ending the Paris and Milan
fashion weeks, and I wouldn’t
be surprised if in the next two
weeks we will'see a dramatic
surge in that.

“I'm hedging my bets, given
the current economic and finan-
cial situation, as to whether that
will have an impact on people’s
thinking on what they’re going
to. get into for the next year.
The US presidential elections
certainly don’t seem to be a



NIB is a faifly fixedscost for factor that has to be considered

most businesses,” Mr D’ Aguilar
said.

_SEE page 4B

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©
PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



COB teaming with BAIC,

Royal Bank for seminars



DON MAJOR (left), BAIC deputy general manager, is seen with COB president Janyne Hodder and George Roache,

head of commercial lending, Royal Bank of Canada...



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standard, with ample parking.

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Contact Sean McCarroll of Seaview Properties for
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(CRATI

@ By ALEX MISSICK



THE College of the Bahamas
(COB) yesterday unveiled a
new Business Lecture Series, in
partnership with Royal Bank of
Canada (RBC) and the
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC).

The seminar series has been
renamed from the BAIC Busi-
ness Lecture Series to the RBC
Small Business Programme, in
recognition of RBC’s gift to the
College earlier this year.

COB president, Janyne Hod-
der, explained: “In January, the
college was a recipient of a gen-
erous $1 million donation from
RBC towards the building of
our new Graduate Business
Centre. As a part of that won-
derful donation, we decided to
name this important pro-
gramme in small business for
RBC, and we very proud to
announce this new partner-
ship.”

The two have teamed up with
BAIC to run a business empow-
erment seminar for existing and
aspiring entrepreneurs wanting
to gain knowledge about Small
Business Management.

The seminar offerings will
aim to educate small business
owners and aspiring entrepre-
neurs in the best practices of
running a business. Participants
will receive advice and strate-
gies presented by industry pro-
fessionals and business acade-
mics from COB.

Royal Bank of Canada’s
manager for small business,
Jerome Pinder, said he will be
participating in the seminar and
share with participants infor-
mation on the products and ser-
vices the bank offered, plus
what it looks for when financing
a Start-up business.

“It does us no good to lend a
client money today and then cut
them free and leave them on
their own. It has to be an on-
going relationship with them in
teaching them as their business
grows,” Mr Pinder explained.

He ‘added that one of the’

worst things for a banker is to

see a client fail in their busi-
ness. Small businesses are
known to have a high rate of
failure, as people tend to jump
into them without getting prop-
er knowledge.

“If we can just educate peo-
ple so that they can see the
whole picture of what it is to
run a business, and see what is
‘reaily involved and perhaps
slow down the rate of failure, I
think it will be a.job well done,”
Mr Pinder said.

Don Major, BAIC’s deputy
general manager, said the Cor-
poration was aware of the role
that small businesses play in the
economy, especially as it relates
to job creation.

“At the end of the day we
expect to provide information
so that they can know what is
available to them,” Mr Major
said. “We want them to learn
expertise in terms of business
knowledge -the nuts and bolts
of business management - and
we want to create an informed
consumer who will go on to
owning their own business.”

Mr Major added that BAIC
was aware that properly-oper-
ated small business enterprises
can provide key goods and ser-
vices for the Bahamian econo-
my.

“Every person that has a
backyard can be a farmer, and
they can reduce their expendi-
ture on foods. So in this lecture
series we are introducing an
Agricultural Careers and
Marine Resources seminar,” Mr
Major said.

“As my chairman always
says: ‘We can feed ourselves. If
not fully, we can reduce our
import bill tremendously’,” Mr
Major said.

The RBC Small Business
Programme, which is free to the

public, begins this semester on

October 9 and will run for six
weeks every Thursday until
November 13 at COB’s Culi-
nary and Hospitality Manage-
ment Institute’s Lecture The-

atre at’fhe Tourism Training | ~
‘Centre on Thompson Boule’

vard.

RU Sag
Tribune - the #1 newspaper
in circulation, just call
5 Perey A CIC

Bimini
Bay names
marketing

Chief

Bimini Bay Resort and
Marina has appointed Ash
Tembe as vice-president of
sales and marketing.

Most recently, Mr Tembe
held the position of regional
director of customer business
development in the northeast
region for Royal Caribbean
International in Miami.

“Tembe is a great addition
to our team, bringing a diverse
background from positions
with Sandals and Royal
Caribbean,” said Bimini Bay
president Sean Grimberg.

“We are excited for him to
build a strategic and creative
marketing and sales campaign
that people will be talking
about for years to come.”

During his 10-year tenure
with Sandals, the 20-year hos-
pitality veteran was responsi-
ble for developing the Pre-
ferred Sandals Reservations
Specialist programme, and
increasing occupancy and rev-
enue in the northeast region.

While acting as regional
sales director at Royal
Caribbean, Mr Tembe over-
saw a large team and Was
responsible for overall rev-
enue sales of $255 million.

In his new role, Mr Tembe
will focus on creating new
business by branding the
resort through several differ-
ent channels that include the
destination wedding market,
meetings and incentives, the
fishing and boating industry
and leisure travel.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won ap
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



Saving our Islands
One Bag at a Time!

You Can Make a Difference

These’ littered plastic bags are an
eyesore and send a poor message to
visitors about The Bahamas. However,
these bags not only mar the beauty

Why should you begin using Green Bags?

Plastic. grocery bags are, everywhere
and their numbers are staggering. No
matter how careful we are they end
up.as unsightly litter on our roadways,
beaches and in our oceans,

of our surroundings but pose a real
threat towildlife. One study estimated
that 100,000 marine animals are killed
annually by plastic bags.

YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE!
The simple act of taking a reusable
green bag to the grocery store will
help keep The Bahamas clean and save
marine animals from a terrible death.

beaten be cada h Mae ata Ped tata
De Sn heey ord



Ra te

Cond


THE TRIBUNE





WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 3B

Nassau to

host top

banking
conference

A MAJOR international pri-
vate banking conference will
take place in Nassau in early
2009.

Private Banking World 2009,

which is being organized by.

Terrapinn, is expected to
attract delegates international-
ly and from the Bahamian
financial community. It is
scheduled for February 23-26,
2009, at Atlantis on Paradise
Island.

The Association of Interna-
tional Banks and Trust Com-
panies in the Bahamas (AIBT)
has agreed to join the Bahamas
Financial Services Board
(BFSB) as a co-sponsor of the
conference, which will target
high net worth individuals,
family offices and their advi-
sors.

“The hosting of a major con-
ference such as Private Bank-
ing World 2009 is vitally impor-
tant to our jurisdiction,” says
Wendy Warren, BFSB’s chief
executive and executive direc-
tor. “It will provide the
Bahamas with a platform to
attract senior financial execu-
tives as both speakers and del-
egates, and help solidify our
position as a leading interna-
tional financial centre. In addi-
tion the Bahamas will be pro-
moted internationally through
the marketing programme to
support the event:

Ms. Warren added that while.
the conference will expose del-

egates to the global issues that
are redefining the private bank-
ing industry, it will showcase
the jurisdiction to institutions
that are not currently operating
from the Bahamas.

“Banking institutions are the
cornerstone of our interna-
tional financial sector,” said Ms
Warren. “We see the confer-
ence as an opportunity for
global institutions which oper-
ate in other jurisdictions to
examine, the benefits of The
Bahamas.”

Jan Mezulanik, AIBT’s
chairman, said: “Our sponsor-
ship reflects two priorities.
First, the conference will deal
with issues that are critically
important to our members and
other global institutions and
advisors. And second, it will
provide a networking oppor-
tunity for our members in the
Bahamas.”

Private Banking World 2009
builds upon Terrapinn’s region-
al private banking events in
Asia, Eastern Europe, Latin
America and the Middle East.
In addition, Terrapinn has a
global reputation for provid-
ing quality events across vari-
ous industry sectors, including
hedge funds, alternative invest-
ments and'real estate.

Some of the topics to be cov-
ered at Private Banking World
2009 include multi-jurisdic-
tional challenges, bank secrecy,
hiring and retaining the right

A
Cons

talent, where new wealth is
located and how private banks
are finding it, developing a
brand, as well as-the latest
investment trends for wealth
management and asset protec-
tion plans.

Terrapinn is no stranger to
conference management in The
Bahamas. Last November, it
was responsible for bringing to
Nassau Hedge Fund World
Bahamas 2007, which attracted
more than 140 investors, funds
of funds, hedge funds, consul-
tants and asset managers.
Keynote speakers and leading
investors shared their predic-
tions for the hedge fund indus-
try and financial markets in the
next decade. BFSB and the
Ministry of Tourism sponsored
the event.

BFSB was also involved as
a sponsor at Terrapinn’s Alter-
native Investment Summit
Brasil in April 2008. More than
400 international and regional
delegates attended the event
to hear some of the world’s top
fund managers and investors
on the Sao Paulo stage.

Speakers and attendees at
Private banking World 2009
will be top tier private banks,
rising star boutique firms, and
the most sophisticated single-
and multi- family offices. More
than 20 speakers from Europe,
the Middle East and North
America have already con-
firmed their participation.

ANSBACHER

member of the QNB Group

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, part of the Ansbacher
group of companies, specializes in providing clients with
private banking, fiduciary and wealth management services.

Risk Manager

~ An opening has arisen for a risk manager to work closely
with the director for risk management in establishing a
strong framework for risk management and monitoring
risk positions across the bank in credit, market and
operational risk areas. Data compilation, enforcement of
internal controls and report preparation for senior
management and risk committees are also important
aspects of this job. The jobholder is expected to contribute
new ideas designed to improve the efficiency of the
department and to assist with risk management related

projects.

To apply you should hold a bachelor’s degree in business,
accounting or finance and have a minimum of three years’
experience working in an operational or risk management
area within a banking organization. It is expected that you
will possess excellent communication skills and be
proficient in the use of Word, Excel and Power Point.

Please send your resumé with a covering letter to Human
Resource Manager, Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, PO
Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas, hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail
is Friday October 10, 2008.





THE COLLEGE OF THE BAHAMAS |

Visit our website at www.cob.edu.bs



EDUCATING & TRAINING BAHAMIANS





CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION & EXTENSION SERVICES (CEES)

VACANCIES

FOR PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS





PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
WEDDING & EVENT PLANNING
i must be able co reach cheor

formation that will enab

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
Candidates muse be able to teach informaric
cechnology at the College Level. Candidares must
i ‘bathe subject

area or five years experience ina relaced Held.














} ,
We ee 3.

PART-TIME INSTRUCTORIN |

SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE
Candidates must be able to wach: Cus
Service at all levels, Candidates enust have
a. Bachelors Degreé in Business Management or
Business ‘Administration and have worked in a
custom: ce environment fo st five years.

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR
IN HEALTH & SAFETY

Candidates must able.co reach Healeh and Safety in
the Workplace,’ didave muse havea Bachelor's
Degree in Operacions Management or Maman
Resources Management and a detailed knowledge
| ofthe Heaith and Safery Ace. Candidates muse have




PART-TIME ING
BEFECTIVE ENGLISH WRITING SKILLS
Candidares must be able ro teach English ar
‘The College level. Candidares must have at
least a Bachelor's Degree in the subject area,
and hive years experience i reaching English.











PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
VETERINARY MEDICINE
Candidates maser able co reach Vererinary

« Medicine ar The College level. Candidates must
have at lease a Doctoral Degree in Vererinary
Medicine and three years pose qualificacion

experience,







PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN





COURSE
SEC



RECEPTION OPERATIONS & SERVICES
fe to teach Frone Office
Reception Services. Candid: have at least
a Bachelor's Degree in Front Office Management

and ar lease five 3

g
;
:
i

Candidates must be able to reach cleaning as‘ic Candidares musr be abi



relates to janitorial services and housekeeping. |
Candidates must have a Bachelor's Degree in



Elome Economics ot related held and five years experience in Operacions

RAL
Vid

Management or C

pose qu alification EXPETENce.





PART-TIME INSTRUCTORIN PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN
COLLEGE PREP GEOGRAPHY COLLEGE PREP PHYSICS
{New Providence Campus) i (New Providence Campus)
Canclidaces must be able to teach Geograpt candidates muzst be able co reach Physics









IBOCSE level C



at The College Prep
_ Candidare st. have




arory/ BGCSE






PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR IN COLLEGE PREP CHEMISTRY (New Providence Campus)

Candidates must be able ro teach Chemistry at The College Preparatory/BGCSE level, Candidates



AK EES





GRADUATES DEGREES

The College of The Bahamas wishes to advise December 2007 and |
April 2008 graduates that degrees are available for collection from |
the Records Department. Before collecting degrees, graduates must |
complete the Graduate Clearance. Form. which may be obtained
from the Records Inquiry Office, First. Floor, Portia M. Smith
Building.

To review your graduation status visit www cob.edu.bs/graduation
iene certegomeete ree ances tecacse See Le A URN ee Re canna

CULINARY & HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE

INDUSTRY TRAINING DEPARTMENT
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES - FALL SEMESTER 042008 (SESSIONS 02)

-_ SESSION 2 ae ee]
: be Riess TUITION .
CODE DURATION | DAYS | TIMES: | & FEES |:
6:00 -
6 weeks Monda’ 9:00pm $380.00 | MK ||
: 6:00 - |
ov. 24 | 6weeks | Monday | Stmpm | $488.00






ae | [se lowe |
Cuisine 1 | 806
cooing | 1 [53 | oct 20
Cooking | 1 | 823
ate | [loam |
Cooking Il 1 | 824







Cake & Pastry COOK 6:00 - Ree
1 | 813 Nov. 20 | 5 weeks Tues/Thurs 9:00pm $300.00 | LK~ | |

Making | : :
Cake & Pastry COOK cana 6:00 - feat ieee |
1 | 814 Oct. 21 5 weeks Tues/Thurs. 9:00pm $325.00 | PK | |





Making II
Bread Making 1 | 810 Nov. 27. | 6 weeks Thursda 9:00pm $290.00 | LK

Peas | sf [oa [non [smse nes [Son | ass |

Decorating | 1 | 817 5 weeks Mon/Wed. 9:00pm $325.00 | LK

Setar | 1S fone [omc |oueas [aes [Sen | ee | oe |
1 | 818 — Nov.19 | 5 weeks Mon/Wed. 9:00pm $375.00 | PK

Decorating II
BAKING 1 | 830 Oct. 20 Nov. 24 MONDAY 9:00PM $390.00 | PK

Deadline for applications, October 10, 2008 at 4:00 p.m.
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION AND EXTENSION SERVICES
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT - FALL SEMESTER 042008

time | DAY

~~ | SUPERIOR CUSTOMER SERVICE | $30am-
W/S Thurs







DESCRIPTION [stant | DUR | FEE

— et ob te tn ed

NO. NO.
BUSINESS |










cusTgo0 01 [4:30pm 17-Oct_| day | $170.00 |
6:00pm-

Busigo4 | INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS! | 9:00pm__| Thurs ee inves | $225.00 |
9:30am-
RESS MANAGEMENT | 4:30pm _














me eee

O30am-=.—[--- - -f-*

| COMP 960 01 | microsorrpowen rowr | ¢30pm ies ere ha day | $170.00
9:30am 7

COMP930 | 01 | WEB PAGEDESIGNIW/S | 4:30pm ___| Thurs/Fri__|_16-Oct_ | 2 days sateen.
9:30am-

COMP931 __| Wi {4:30pm



| Thurs/Fri $650.00



“1 WEBPAGE DESIGNIW/S



| DECORATING















i nena a ah i nee ssninmgascnemenats ie 1



ENQUIRIES: Contact the Co-ordinator at Tel: (242) 325-5714 / (242) 328-0093 / 328-1936 / 302-4300 ext. 5202 or
email persdev@cob.edu.bs

All fees are included with the exception of the application fee of $40.00 (one time).
CEES reserve the right to change Tuition, Fees, Course Content, Course Sche ule and Course Materials,



east eih Di nCS

bs LOCUS IR MDB NSIS EEE BAN ABS AE INES CCT iOS

LEED AD AEN LOI EG GAME LTE CREB es heed.



|
i
|
i
4





P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.




PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that GERARDIN FORRESTER
of FOX HILL, SPRINGFIELD ROAD, P.O. BOX
EE-16652, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to the
Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for
registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 8TH day of OCTOBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,



UBS

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International
we look after wealthy private clients by providing them with
comprehensive, value enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are available from
across UBS, helping them provide a full range ui wealth management
Services. ;

in order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the
following positions:

Senior Client Advisor & Client Advisor for the Brazil
Desk

in this challenging position you will be responsible for the Advisory of
existing clients, acquisition of high net worth individuals as well as
presentation and implementation of investment solutions in the client's:
mother tongue Portuguese.

For this position we are searching for a personality who meets the following
requirements:

¢ Extensive experience and a proven track record in wealth management;

* Specialized in the fields of customer relations, investment advice and
portfolio management; ‘

» -Excellent sales and advisory skills as well as solid knowledge of
investment products are key requirements. Fluency in English and
Portuguese is essential.

Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-7757
Nassau, Bahamas

hrbahamas@ubs.com or

NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

A

Nassau Airport Development Company is pleased to announce the following tender
associated with the expansion of the Lynden Pindling International Airport. The General
Contractor Package for Tender C-116 Early Civil and Relocations lump sum contract

includes the following components: °

¢ Tree and site clearing, including removal; mulching and composting of

organic materials.
* Security fencing supply and installation;

* Demolition and disposal of buildings, fences, miscellaneous structures,

debris and equipment;

¢ Removal and disposal of 2 underground and 1 above ground fuel storage

tanks;

¢ Removal and disposal of existing utilities & installation of new utility
corridor including sanitary and communication ductbank;

¢ — Removal of HMAC roadway by milling and construction of temporary
parking lot and contractor laydown area utilizing existing pavement and

asphalt millings;

¢ — Relocation, supply and installation of temporary parking lot lighting; and
¢ Relocation of existing macerator, pump and trash compactor and removal
and disposal of existing lift station and macerator pit.

Tender Packages can be picked up after 1:00 pm, on Monday, October 6th.

Tender closing is Tuesday, October 28th at 1:00pm.

There will be a Tendc; Briefing Wednesday, October 15th. Please RSVP Traci Brisby
by 1pm Tuesday, October 14th for briefing location details.






ALLE SERA ELLA 5 EO LRA OOOO OE LDL IE COLTER ORIEL





TENDERS



Contract &ProcurementManager
APIA Expansion Project —

_ Ph: (242) 702-1086 » Fax: (242) 377.2117 -
P.O. Box AP 59229, Nassau, Bahamas
email: traci.brisby@nas.bs

Ex-Bahamas investor
in fraud probe

FROM page 1B

“On April 21, 2006, Pegasus
shares began trading on the
Nasdaq market, opening at
$14.45 per share. But the stock
steadily and substantially fell in

the following months, as nega-

tive press articles questioned
Pegasus’ valuation and reported
that the chief executive and
chief financial officer had head-
ed other penny stock compa-
nies whose stock rose and
crashed in short periods of time.
“Also, in mid-2006, Pegasus
began issuing large amounts of
shares, claiming it was doing so
to satisfy debts incurred by Blue
Industries that had not been
previously disclosed to
investors.... Between mid-2006
and 2008, Pegasus issued nearly
500 million shares (more than
75 per cent of the outstanding
shares) based on promissory
notes it claims were made
out....... by Blue Industries.”
Pegasus and Mr Knabb’s
short stay in Freeport is unlike-
ly to be remembered fondly by

‘many, especially the 80-100

employees who felt they had
found what turned out to be
ultimately shortlived employ-
ment at the company’s manu-

facturing facility.

Tribune Business revealed at
the time how the Grand
Bahama Port Authority
(GBPA) had not wanted to
grant Pegasus a business licence
to operate in Freeport, due to
concerns about the firm’s track
record (it was already
embroiled in two class action
lawsuits filed by angry
investors) and ability to deliver
on what it promised.

Yet the GBPA’s concerns
were overridden by the then-

- Christié government. The whole

episode is something of an
embarrassment for the former
PLP government, whose leader
and ministers were actively pro-
moting the merits of Mr Knabb
and his plant in the run-up to
the 2007 general election.
Indeed, many at the time felt
the whole Pegasus investment
was merely a ploy to boost the
re-election chances of sitting
PLP MP Pleasant Bridgewater,
who was then in a keenly fought
contest with the FNM’s Zhivar-
go Laing that she eventually
lost. Ms: Bridgewater acted as
the attorney for Pegasus and
Mr Knabb, and her offices acted
as the initial recruiting station
for the company’s workforce.

Ms Bridgewater and the for-
mer: government, though, are
not part of the SEC probe. Mr
Knabb had previously told Tri-
bune Business that it was Mr
Christie and Obie Wilchcombe
who were instrumental in bring-
ing him to Grand Bahama.

Mr Knabb was rarely out of
the news during his temporary
stay on Grand Bahama, pur-
chasing the ‘mother ship’ for
the Korean fishing boat fleet
that played a pivotal role in
ending Sidney Stubbs’ time as
Bahamas Agricultural and
Industrial Corporation (BAIC)
chairman. It was speculated that
he was using the boat for trea-
sure hunting in waters off
Grand Bahama.

Indeed, the Pegasus affair
demonstrates the need for the
Government to conduct better
due diligence on incoming
investors to determine that they
and their projects are in the best
interests of the Bahamas and
Bahamians.

In its last SEC filing, Pegasus
said it had decided in June 2007
to relocate its manufacturing
facilities from Freeport to Tai-
wan. It incurred a $1.96 mil-
lion write-off after closing the
Freeport facility.

ORCS Cte eT ELC



surge’ to 1,000 attendees

FROM page 1B

given the timing.”

Mr Bethel added that he was
“still optimistic we will see a
significant number coming in”,
and “would like to think we will
still hit” the number of 1,000
visitor arrivals for Islands of the
World Fashion Week.

The event is being held from

“November 5-8 at the British






















oo Contact: . |
Traci Brisby








Colonial Hilton and Atlantis
resorts, and could mark an ini-
tial small - but significant step -

towards further diversifying the

Bahamian tourism product and
making it more resilient in the
face of a global economic down-
turn.

If Mr Bethel is successful in
attracting 1,000 visitors from
outside the Bahamas, given the
average tourist per capita spend
of between $1,000 to $1,100, it is
possible that the event’s total
economic contribution may run
to between $1 million to $2 mil-
lion.

That number is not to be
sneezed at, given the pessimistic
outlook for the Bahamian hotel
and tourism industry for the
remainder of 2008 and into
2009.

And if Islands of the World
becomes an established event
on the international fashion cir-
cuit and expands, its economic
and publicity/marketing bene-
fits will be even greater for the
Bahamas in years to come.

To diversify and insulate its
tourism product from the worst
effects of the US economic
downturn, the Bahamas needs
to concentrate more ‘on event-

based tourism, such as the con- *

vention business, small meet-
ings and conferences, weddings
and one-off spectaculars such
as Islands of the World and the
Bahamas International Film
Festival.

In other words, there needs to
be less reliance on the sun,
sand, sea tourism model that
has depended largely on the

Legal Notice

NOTICE

FLORAL GARDEN LTD.

(In Voluntary Liquidation)

Notice is hereby given that the above named
Company is in dissolution, which commenced on

‘the 12th day of September 2008. The Liquidator
is Argosa Corp. Inc., P. O. Box N-7757 Nassau,

Bahamas.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.
(Liquidator)







NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
~ TENDER FOR GROUP LIFE INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals from |
insurance companies for the administration of life insurance coverage to
homeowners of properties mortgaged to The Corporation.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect an
information package from The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation’s Head
Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field.

The deadline for the collection of the information package is Friday,
October 10, 2008, no later than 4:00 p.m.






THE TRIBUNE



New shipping
firm targets
$100k freight
charges goal

FROM page 1B

started with a “lean” staff com-
plement, but would “ramp up’

with extra employees if the busi

ness demanded it.

He added that the Atlanti~
Caribbean/United Shippin:
venture may actually be aide«
by the economic downturn, ¢:
Bahamian consumers were like
ly to switch in favour of shop
ping at home as opposed ‘>
travelling to Florida, due to th:
heightened cost of travel an
hotel accommodation.

“We know the economy ©
slowing down because of wha? ‘=
happening in the US, and ti.«
Bahamas might feel the pinc!:,”’
Mr Ryan explained. “We fe<',
with what is happening with 2°
cargo and the new fees fo:
checking first and second bag:
that consumers will see th«
opportunity to look for whe’
they need in the Bahamas,
rather than spend $500-$600 c
an air fare.

“We think there may not b-

such ‘a downturn in retai’.
There’s an opportunity for pes-
ple to buy at home as long 2:
the stores ramp up for Christ-
mas.”
Mr Ryan added that Atlantic |
Caribbean was also well-posi-
tioned to service the major
investment projects in the
Bahamas, given that its Fort
Pierce base in Florida was close
to the major lumber trucking
jump-off points in Tampa and
Jacksonville.

Atlantic Caribbean and Unit-
ed Shipping were also fully pre-
pared to take warehouse and
dock space at. Arawak Cay,
once all the commercial ship-
ping and container facilities
moved from downtown Bay
Street in line with the plans to
revitalise Nassau city centre.

United Shipping is already
the in-port agent for Norwegian
Cruise Lines in Nassau.

Bahamas’ proximity to the
wealth centres in Florida, New
York and the east coast US.

Overall, Mr Bethel said
Islands of the World, which is
being organised by Montaque
subsidiary Modes Iles Ltd, was
“moving steadily along”.

He added: “It certainly has a
lot of momentum from the
international media coverage
coming. All the designers are
on board, and going through
the logistics to get their gar-
ments here.”

Among those likely to attend
the Islands of the World Fash-
ion Week are fashion industry
buyers and entrepreneurs, plus
dedicated fashion followers who
move from show to show
throughout the year.

A key aim behind the show is
to provide a regular interna-
tional showcase for up and com
ing designers, and to give ther.
the ability to manufacture their
lines of clothing and have them
purchased by buyers and majo:
merchants outside their coun-
try.
Another goal is to try and
stimulate the revival of the
Bahamian fashion and garment
design/production industry.
While government tax incen-
tives had encouraged the devel-
opment of cottage textile man-
ufacturing industries, especially
seamstresses, none had ‘gone
on’ to develop their skills fur-
ther and expand into design.

pr

ve

t

The proposal should be for a three year period from 1st November,
2008 - 31st October, 2011.










.

THE |RIBUNE

WEUNESDAY, UL IUBEN o, cuvu, 1 MUL ve



Pee ee a
More economic pain ahead, says Bernanke

m@ By JEANNINE AVERSA
AP Economics Writer

WASHINGTON (AP) —
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke warned Tuesday that
the financial crisis has not only
darkened the country’s current
economic performance but also
could prolong the pain.

The Fed chief’s more gloomy
assessment appeared to open
the door wider to an interest
rate cut on or before October
28-29, the central bank’s next
meeting, to brace the wobbly
economy.

Bernanke said the Fed will
“need to consider” whether its
current stance of holding rates
steady “remains appropriate”
given the fallout from the worst
financial crisis in decades.

If the Fed does lower its key

rate from two per cent it would
mark an about-face. The Fed
in June had halted an aggres-
sive rate-cutting campaign to
revive the economy out of fear
those low rates would aggra-
vate inflation. Since then, finan-
cial and economic conditions
have deteriorated, while infla-
tion pressures have calmed, giv-
ing the Fed more leeway to
again cut rates.

Many believe the country is
on the brink of, or already in,
its first recession since 2001.

“The outlook for economic
growth has worsened,”

Bernanke said in prepared

remarks to the annual meeting
here of the National Associa-
tion for Business Economics.

All told, economic activity is -

likely to be “subdued” during
the remainder of this year and

into next year, Bernanke said.
“The heightened financial tur-
moil that we have experienced
of late may well lengthen the
period of weak economic per-
formance and further increase
the risks to growth,” he warned.

Consumers

Consumers — major shapers
of economic activity — have
buckled under the weight of ris-
ing joblessness, shrinking pay-
checks, hard-to-get credit,
declining net wealth and tank-

~ ing home and stock values. All
the strains are “now showing -

through more clearly to con-
sumer spending,” Bernanke
said.

-Meanwhile, worsening sales
prospects and a heightened
sense of uncertainty have begun

nesses, making them more cau-
tious to hire and to invest in
their companies, he said.
Employers cut jobs in Sep-
tember at the fastest pace in
more than five years, the gov-
ernment reported last week.
Payrolls were slashed by
159,000 last month alone. It was

the ninth straight month of job’

losses. A staggering 760,000
jobs have disappeared so far
this year. -

The financial and credit
crises, which took a turn for thé
worst in September and con-
tinue to stubbornly persist, are
likely to “increase the restraint
on economic activity in the
period ahead,” Bernanke said.

Even households with good
credit histories are now facing
difficulties obtaining mortgages
or home equity lines of credit,
he noted. Banks are also reduc-

ing credit card limits and denial
rates on auto loan applications
are rising, he said.

Strain

Banks, too, are feeling the
strain of a lockup in lending,
particularly in the market for
commercial paper. |

To that end, the Fed on

Tuesday announced a radical-

plan to buy massive amounts

of this short-term debt in.an.

effort to break through a cred-
it clog that is imperiling the
economy.

“The expansion of Federal
Reserve lending is helping
financial firms cope with
reduced access to their usual
sources of funding,” Bernanke
explained.

Invoking Depression-era
emergency powers, the Fed will

begin buying commercial paper
~ short-term funding that many
companies rely on to pay their
workers and buy supplies.

Bernanke believed the Fed's
bold actions — along with the
$700 billion financial bailout
signed into law by President
Bush on Friday — will help
restore confidence in financial :
markets and help them func-
tion more normally.

He also defended the timing
of the actions by the Fed and
the Bush administration. “We ,
have learned from historical
experience with severe finan-
cial crises that if government ,
intervention comes only at a
point at which many or most
financial institutions are insol-
vent or nearly so, the costs of
restoring the system are great-
ly increased. This is not the sit-
uation we face today,” he said.

to weigh more heavily on busi-

Legal Notice

Notice
CONFIDENCE NAVIGATION
COMPANY LIMITED
(In Voluntary Liquidation)

C29 E-CO aN OD Ak

CO
S2wk-Low
1.51 Abaco Markets
11.60 Bahamas Property Fund
7.66 Bank of Bahamas
0.85 Benchmark
3.49 Bahamas Waste
1.95 Fidelity Bank A :
11.00 Cable Bahamas . . : 11.6
°2.85 Colina Holdinga
4.80 Commonwealth Bank (81) ;
2.36 Consolidated Water BORe 4 ‘ -O. 3 fe 19.3
2.25 Doctor's Hospital . . 6 B 10.8
6,02 Famguard ‘8. . . B . 15.1
12.00 | Finco . ; i ’ 18.0
11.54 FirstCaribbean Bank Oo. . 7 . 17.2
5.05 Focol (3) : e 3 E . 13.6
1.00 Foco! Class B Preference ote fe F . F N/M
0.40 Freeport Concrete i . R hs a 11.4
5.50 ICD Utilities . « . 7 : 20.1
8.60 J. S, Johnaon . . . 12.6

SS
52wk-Hi__52wk-Low

Creditors having debts or claims againts the above-named Com-
pany are required to send particulars thereof to the undersigned at
Ocean Centre, Montagu Foreshore, East Bay Street, P.O. Box N-
3247, Nassau, Bahamas as sole Liquidator on or before the 17th
day of October, 2008. In default thereof they will be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made by the Liquidator.

TS Getaber SOTF
19 October 2022

30 May 2013
29 May 2015

Dated the 3rd day of October 2008.
LYNDEN MAYCOCK ee eee ee
LIQUIDATOR

0.300
0.480 N/M
0.000 256.6

Supermarkets
6.00 Caribbean Crossings (Pref)

“0.000 90
0.300 N/M
2,000 N/M.

NAV Date
30-Sep-08
31-Aug-08
19-Sep-08
31-Aug-08
31-Aug-08
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-08
31-Dec-07
31-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08

Yield %
Colina Bond Fund
Colina MS! Preferred Fund
Colina Money Market Fund
Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund
Fidelity Prime Income Fund
CFAL Global Bond Fund
CFAL Global Equity Fund
CFAL High Grade Bond Fund
Fidelity International Investment Fund
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund
FG Financial Growth Fund
1.0000 — FG Financial Diversified Fund

N MA AGWwi' Dn

BISX ALL SHARE INDEX - 19 Dec 02 = 1,000.00

S2wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 62 weeke

S2wk-Low - Lowest closing price in last 52 weeks

Previous Close - Previous day's weighted price for dally volume

Today's Close - Current day's weighted price for daily volume

Change - Change in closing price from day to day

Dally Vol. - Number of total shares traded today

DIV $ - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 monthe

P/E - Closing price divided by the Inet 12 month earnings

SB) - 4-for-1 Stock Split - Effective Date 8/8/2007

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000) .
YUELD - last 12 month dividends divided by closing price
Bid $ - Buying price of Colina and Fidelity :
Ask $ - Selling price of Colina and fidelity
Last Price - Last traded over-the-counter price
Weekly Vel. - Trading volume of the prior week
EPS & - A company’s reported earnings per share for the inst 12 mths

» WAVETREE HOLDINGS LIMITED

: In Voluntary liquidation ;

NAV - Net Asset Value
NIM - Not Meaningful
FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), WAVE-
TREE HOLDINGS LIMITED has been dissolved and struck off
the Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 30th day of September, 2008.

ES VARSSEUHOS Y GOLONIAL 282 502-7525

BAHAMAS FIRST

General Insurance Co. Ltd.
Balance Sheet as at December 31, 2007

oy

GEDAR S.A.
80 Broad Street
Monrovia
Liberia

Liquidator

2007 2006

ASSETS -

6.813.378 $ 5206247

CLE/qui/01133/2008

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT
COMMON LAW & EQUITY SIDE

BETWEEN

IN THE MATTER OF ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land
known as Grant B-117, Big Fish Cay, one of the Fish Cays
being fifty-five and a half acres (55.50) situate North of Little
Abaco Island, one of the islands in the Commonwealth of the
Bahamas ‘

AND
IN THE MATTER of Quieting Titles Act 1959
AND

IN THE MATTER of the Petition of
Arthur H. Lowe Jr.

NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that Arthur Havelock Lowe Jr. is applying to the
Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of the Bahamas to have his title to
the following investigated under Section 3 of the Quieting Titles Act
1959 and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a
Certificate of Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the
provisions of the said Act. A plan of the said land may be inspected during
normal.working hours at the following places:

e

- 1. “ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land known as
Grant B-117, Big Fish Cay, one of the Fish Cays being
fifty-five and a half acres (55.50) situate North of Little
Abaco Island, one of the islands in the Commonwealth of
the Bahamas :

Copies of the same may be inspected during normal office hours at the
following places:

a.) The Registry of the Supreme Court of Nassau, Bahamas.

b.) The Chambers of Andrew C. Allen Law Chambers, 204
Lagoon Court, Olde Towne, Sandyport, Nassau, The
Bahamas.

c.) The Administrator’s Office, Cooper’s Town, Abaco,
The Bahamas.

Any person who objects to the granting of the said Certificate of Title
is required to file in the Supreme Court and serve on the Petitioner or
their attorney a Statement of his, her or its Claim in the prescribed form
verified by an Affidavit served therewith by failure of any such person
to file and serve a Statement of his, her or its Claim aforesaid non-
compliance with this Notice will operate as a bar to such claim.

Andrew C. Allen Chambers
204 Lagoon Court
Olde Towne, Sandyport
Nassau, The Bahamas



Cash $

Term deposits
Investments

Receivables from agents and brokers

Sundry receivables and prepayments
Receivable from remsurers

Interest receivable

Deferred commission costs

Unpaid claims recoverable from reinsurers
Deferred reinsurance cost

Deferred reinsurance premiums
Receivables from related company

Intangible asset

Property and equipment

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

Payable to reinsurers

Unearned commission income

Unearned premiums

Payable to agents and brokers

Accrued Habilities
Unpaid claims

EQUITY:
Share capital
Contributed surplus
General reserve
Revaluation surphas
Retained earnings
Total equity
TOTAL

3,479,529
21,265,010
20, 742.671

FAS TAT
235,213
91331

7,009,654
10,670,394

4,035,334
26,827,559
23,293,948

2,892,559

2,044,192

2007

14,225,843
5,839,199
42,686,985
466,983
1,462,065

19,352,292
$4,033,367

7,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000
1,269,268

19,546,884
45,916,152

$ 129,949,519

3,304, 799
12,306,410
17,762,546

668.901
241,436
83.955

6,429. 735
13,583,172

4.614.739
26,290,026
14,262,134

2,692,559

1.889.006
$109,3358.665

1,272,587

# yw!

21,441,913

2,500,000
14,100,000
3,500,000
1,079,779

7,337,679
28,517,458

$109,335,665

A full copy of the Company's financial statements are available on the Company's website www. dahamasfirst.coim


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008 THE TRIBUNE





CALVIN & HOBBES






















, Tribune Comics WY TEACHER SIS
MOM AND DAD BOTH
HAVE TO SIGN MY
REPORT CARDS

THIS YEAR.

FOR SHOW AND TELL, I
BROUGHT A SPACE ALIEN
I CAPTURED IN MY BACK
YARD.

TVE BEEN KEEPING \T IN
TWS SPECIAL ZARNIUM-COATED

MOMENT YOU'VE
ALL BEEN




JUDGE PARKER

AN






50, ONE NIGHT HE
GOT LOADED AND
CAME ON TO ME!






C2008 by Norn Amenca Syndicate, inc Wend ngnes reserved

YES, BOB
DION'T LIKE THE
WAY DEWEY WAS

TREATING ME!



YOU TOLD DEWEY
//| ABOUT WHAT BOB DID?

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday ,

JT APPEARS ALAN LANGE WAS
SELLING DRUGS OUT OF THE

AND THE EVIDENCE

WE FOUND BEARS
RAY JENKINS SHOT ALAN LANGE OVER| SeaT'o 2

A DRUG DEAL, WS. MAGEE. JENKINS 15
A HARD-CORE ADDICT; HE CLAIMS
LANGE WAS HIS SUPPLIER.

N S
LA ARS
Eh \
NN ANS
RNY



UT.
24









~ SOMEBODY HAD
‘ A TERRIBLE DAY AND
{ NEEDED A REMINDER AS
Pa) TO WHY HE GOT OUT
= OF BED. TODAY!!







one

“MARTHA









©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

5 KNOWS HER WAY AROUND THE KITCHEN,
AN’ DENNIS KNOWS 4/5 WAY AROUND MARTHA,”



Difficulty Level *





_ Kakuro Puzzle _

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of edch. vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

© 2008. by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved

A 2
bs SE

MARVIN :

THERE ARE
TWO TYPES OF
PEOPLE






. AND

PARENTS | ae
RE ey

Sudoku Answer



st. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



©2004 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.

weew kinglealures.com







©2008 Conceptis Pu

10/06



Yes. NOBOVY SEEMS T GUESS THE
“TO WANT THEI FUTURE ISN'T }
FORTUNE TOL? WHAT IT USE? i
i ane move further thart his Rustrious
ey! opponent. Can you spot White's
5 SRE coal scatee
j
:
§





winning becouse 1 Re? forces the
queen away alter which 2 Reel





Chess: 8690: 1 Re7 Qxe7 (expecting 2 dxe7 Rxd4
and Black wins} 2 Qg4+! and Black resigned.





T Look, W Here comes PLEASE DON'T CALL
MEN / OUR ay ME “LUCKY”

©2008 by King Features Syndicate. Inc. World nghts ‘eserved.



Across
1 Professional business will

make one furious (11)
The case resulted in prop-
erty passing to the State
(7)
There’s a catch in being .
flat-chested (5)
Double act,
now extinct (4)

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

Down
2 Moved fast when account

got in the red (5)

Six ways to watch televi-
sion? (4)

In such a tune easily
picked up? (6)

A charming thing to wear
(8)

Bird that’s seen from the

= N



cwkus
BRowNE

East dealer.

Famous Hand

feUers of urere can you
make frou the letiers
th Tuakinag

De





been published by Edmond Hoyle in

He had a model mother (8) Equator to Lanzarote (7) i
He refuses to eat more On the verge of retire- fo a Both sides ee bidaling Ws given forthe iad
( o bidding is given for the hand,
2 : : :
acy Ae) ey (5,3,3) aoe a Ea ee ete Hed 4— the sole stipulation being that the
Vessel to put to sea (6) Time may be on its side i P| 95432 final contract is seven clubs redou-
Pretty girl in red and rose (6,5) #5432 bled, played by South.
(8) Such a tyre is flat indeed Po Weeote i be ee 4 65432 There is no way of stopping the
I niusicararbaacecen (8) WEST EAST grand slam if declarer plays cor-
group get p #110 @AKQ rectly. Aces become deuces as South
after the end of the concert It's heavenly under a tree Ww Across Down VI109876 ¥V¥AKQ obliterates every honor card held by
(4) (7) — 1 Harmless outlet for 2 In front (5) #109876 #AKQI East.
Be way out,about a point Make someone take N emotion (6,5) 3. Flat (4) & Sata #KI9 meek s eis _— a a ue
S mond or a heart. Declarer ruffs
2 . ’
(5) . notice? (6) a) 9 Ineffectual (7) 4 Sycophantic follower 98765432 trumps a spade in dummy and
Fancy taking out a Gemini Rule that holds George ini- ou 10 Hooded weatherproof (3-3) v returns a club, capturing East’s nine
(7) tially in check (5) > coat (5) Z ¢— with the ten, Declarer ruffs another
Special band for the match Equality includes one or “” 11 Personal assistant Pete) .: #AQ 1087 epaee a dummy and takes a second
7,4) Bed) x 7 6 Deviating from stan- Final contract seven clubs — trump finesse. When declarer then
(7, Lu (4) redoubled, played by South. tuffs a third round of spades in

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Honour, 4 Especial, 9
Around, 10 Hatstand, 12 Ha-ha, 13
Lamps, 14 Site, 17 Nuts and bolts, 20
Leaning Tower, 23 Ores, 24 Scarf, 25
Talc, 28 Dead heat, 29 Toledo, 30
Delicate, 31 Enosis.

Down: 1 Heathens, 2 Neophyte, 3
Urns, 5 Sharp corners, 6 Erse, 7 Italic,
8 Ladder, 11 Landing craft, 15 Eaten,
16 State, 18 Sweaters, 19 Precious,
21 Loaded, 22 Befall, 26 Chic, 27
Noun.

N
N
,E
|
O
S
Ss
W
0
R
D

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Bronze, 4 Adorable, 9
Cheers, 10 As good as, 12 Lush, 13
Venom, 14 Fell, 17 Steal the show,
20 Achilles’ heel, 23 Avow, 24 Faith,
25 Grip, 28 Gigantic, 29 Pauper, 30
Sideways, 31 Pent-up.

Down: 1 Backlash, 2 Overstep, 3
Zero, 5 Disconsolate, 6 Rook, 7
Badger, 8 Easily, 11 Technicality, 15
Slick, 16 Coast, 18 Decrepit, 19
Claptrap, 21 Ganges, 22 Forged, 26
Anew, 27 Haze.

12
14
16

18

19

22

23

24

Bearing (8) °
Crudely painted (6)
Put in drop by drop
(6)

Old, faithful servant
(8)

Become tired (4)
Rejoice (5)

Stir up public feeling
(7)

Intimidatory (11)



dard (7)

Settled in advance
(3,3,5)

Sodden (11)
Disparage (8)
Falsehood (7)
Renounce (6)
Commit to memory
(5)

Indication (4)

Opening lead — ten of diamonds.

This is probably the most famous
hand in the history of bridge. Legend
has it that the Duke of Cumberland,
more than two centuries ago, held the
East hand and wagered 20,000
pounds against’ the North-South
hands making seven clubs redou-
bled.

The duke lost the bet, since he
was unable to score a single trick

despite his extraordinary array of

high cards, Regardless of whether
the story is true or the hand was actu-
ally dealt, it comes to us from way
back in the days of whist, having first

dummy, his remaining spades
become established.

Declarer returns to his hand by
ruffing a diamond or a heart, cashes
the ace of trumps and chalks up, 13
tricks.

The deal is an extreme example
of the potent power of unusual distri-
bution. Double and triple voids can
easily wreak havoc on point count
and honor tricks.

Incidentally, we'd like to suggest
that if you ever play in a game with
strangers and are dealt the East hand,
you should either ask for a new deal
or head quickly for the nearest exit!

Tomorrow: High-class defense.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Ine,
THE TRIBUNE

GN-758



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00613

Whereas PHILIP BARRINGTON STUBBS, of
Meadows Boulevard, Winton Meadows in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of FRANCES DORIS STUBBS, late of Tucker
Road in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

. Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS . Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
’ PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00614

IN THE ESTATE OF RENEE M. WENTZ, late of 2184
Southwest Spoonville Drive, Palm City in the State
of Florida, one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by JAMES LENNOX MOXEY
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the

’ Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the resealed Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to ELIZABETH WENTZ, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, by the Circuit Court for
Martin County, Florida, on the 2nd day of August,
2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00617

Whereas TOINETTE MAJOR, of Carmichael Road
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ARTHUR MAJOR, late of Berry's in the
Island of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION Oct. 9, 08
2008/PRO/npr/00619
IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH H. MOORE, late
and domicile of 75 Macadamia Court in the city of
West Palm Beach in the County of Palm Beach in the
state of Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by FREDERICA GERTRUDE
McCARTNEY, of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to FATHER
DAVID C. KENNEDY and KIRK GRANTHAM, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit
Court for Palm Beach County, Florida, Probate Division
on the 12th day of July, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00620

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF HELEN C. FRANZ (a.k.a. HELEN
CAREY FRANZ), late and domicile of 8401 West
Cypress Drive in the city of Pembroke Pines in the
County of Broward in the state of Florida, one of the
United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of Administration
(Single Personal Representative) in the above estate
granted to MARTHA K. DAULA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit Court for
Broward County, Florida, Probate Division on the 28th
day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00621

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF EDITH MOLLISON (a.k.a. EDITH
W. MOLLISON), late and domicile of No. 175,
Willoughby Street, 8L in the City of Brooklyn, in the
State of New York, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Letters Testamentary, in the above
estate granted to LILLITHE E. MEYERS, the Executor
of the Estate, by the Surrogate's Court in and for the
County of Kings, on the 11th day of January, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00622

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE JOHN SCHEJBAL,
late and domicile of 32 Cold Springs, Hunterdon
County Tewksbury Township, New Jersey, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by LUCIA E. BROUGHTON, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Grant of
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate granted to
EDWARD J. SCHEIBAL, the Executor of the Estate,
by the Court of Hunterdon in the state of New Jersey,
on the 6th day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION Oct. 9, 08

2008/PRO/npr/00623

IN THE ESTATE OF ALPHA SVAFER ROGERS, late
and domiciled of the City of Sundre, in the Province
of Alberta, in the Dominion of Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by STANLEY OSWALD
ANTHONY ISAACS, of East Bay Street in the Eastern
District of New Providence, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Probate, in the above estate granted
to ALPHA LORRAINE MIDNIGHT, the Executrix of
the Estate, by the Surrogate Court of Alberta, Judicial
District of Calgary, on the 5th day of February, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00624

Whereas PATSY CULMER, of Garden Hills No. 1,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration with the Will Annexed of
the Real and Personal Estate of COLLEEN CULMER,
late of Garden Hills No. 1, Southern District, New
Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 7B



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00626

Whereas JACQUELINE BURROWS and DEREK
ALEXANDER BURROWS, both of Pineyard Road,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme ,Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ASHLEY BURROWS, late of Nassau East
North, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00627

IN THE ESTATE OF MAMIE M. BEARD, late of 6239
E. Reno Apt. D Midwest City, Oklahoma 73110, one
of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of

fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by KIRKWOOD M. SEYMOUR,
of Sears Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
of Administration in the above estate granted to
TERRY BEARD, Personal Representative, of the
Estate by the District Court of Oklahoma County in

‘the State of Oklahoma, one of the States of United

States of America on the 8th day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00628

Whereas JAMES EDWARD BLAKE Ill, of Freeport,
Grand Bahama and SHAWN MARIE BAKER, of
Deadman's Cay, Long Island, one of the Islands of
the Commonwealth of The. Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The: Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of JAMES EDWARD BLAKE, JR., late of Town
Court, Nassau Street, New Providence, one of the

' Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,

deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00629

Whereas CLAYTON DEVEAUX, JR., of South Beach
Estates, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of CLAYTON DEVEAUX SR., late of
Gleniston Gardens, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00630

IN THE ESTATE OF CARMELO J. PATTO, late of 14
Comet Road, Syosset, Nassau, in the State of New
York, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by MICHAEL CRAIG ROBERTS,
of Golf Course Boulevard, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to MARIE J. PATTO, the Executrix, of the
Estate by the Surrogate's Court of Nassau County,
one of the States of United States of America on the
Ath day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
PAGE 8B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

By LISA LAWLOR





EDITERRANEAN dishes that tempt the taste

buds are endless at Provence, an idyllic French

restaurant located at Sandyport. Chef and own-
er Marc Innocenti has been based in the Caribbean for
nearly his whole life, travelling from Jamaica to St Lucia
to Antigua, back to Jamaica and then the Philippines,
before finally settling in Nassau some 13 years ago to
open Sandals Resort. He then followed his passion just six
years ago to create the essence of Mediterranean food ©

with Provence.

Settling in Nassau because
of the great fishing, as well as
the peaceful, more stable
atmosphere, Chef Innocenti
said the quality of food here is
also better than in other
Caribbean countries, possibly
because of the Bahamas'
proximity to the US.

And now, after studying at
the Culinary School in Nice,
France, he has followed his
family tradition in opening a
restaurant. His grandfather
was a chef in France as well as
his uncle, the owner of a
restaurant.

introducing Provence

Located in the back of
Sandyport, Provence is tucked
away in near seclusion from
the other businesses there.
With the option of sitting
inside or out.on the verandah
overlooking the canal, diners
are offered lighter portions of



4

Mediterranean cuisine that
traditionally has a richer taste,
and according to Chef Inno-
centi, his foods are quite
healthy.

In the fresh air one can
breathe in the very essence of
island life. It feels as if you are
sitting over the Bridges of
Seine in Paris, while having
the list of specialties read with
full details of how each is pre-
pared. And with light
melodies dancing off the
water, one may choose from
appetizers such as the Craw-
fish Lobster Thermidor, a deli-
cious cheese montage of
seafood, Escargot Provengale
with bread crumbs in a shal-
low plate or Smoked Salmon
Carpaccio, strips of delicate,
raw salmon seasoned to taste.
Each plate is meticulously pre-
pared with attention to detail,
embracing a palate pleasing
level of excitement as the

tastes unite.

And then there is the plate
principal, the main reason for
coming to this French hide-
away. With dishes covering
the entire range of possible
desires, the decision will be
based on what kind of taste
you are inclined to experience
that day - from pasta dishes
like the Gnocchi Riviera, to
seafood like Swordfish Steak
Canoise and Gambas Pistou
with grilled and marinated
pesto prawns, tomatoes and
herbs. Land dishes are also
available, such as the Magret
de Canard (duck) or the Ulti-
mate Filet Mignon, whose
savoury taste melts in the
mouth.

And a la finale an indul-
gence of sweet, whether it be
the dessert wine Chateau Vari
Monbazillac, or a deeply deli-
cious serving of Zabaglone
Cake with layers of white and

SA AAAI AS WAGER AW

THE TRIBUNE






TUCKED away in near seclusion from the other businesses in Sandyport, Provence provides din-
ers with the option of sitting inside or out on the verandah overlooking the canal. Diners are also
offered palate-pleasing portions of Mediterranean cuisine that traditionally has a richer taste.

dark chocolate, or the Cepe
de Provence - with its vanilla
ice cream, meringue top with
chocolate ganache and roast-
ed almonds.

The Mediterranean lunch is
served between 11:30am and
3pm Monday through Friday,
and the dinner between 6pm
to 10:30pm, Monday through
Saturday. Proyence experi-
ences their high season from

Marley Resor
and Spa.
honours one
LOY AT

CELEBRATING his significant | “
achievements in the culinary field, the
Marley Resort and Spa saluted Chef
Sheldon Tracey Sweeting with a.lun-

cheon yesterday.

Resort representatives presented



ZY

October through late March
when reservations are in
demand.

Tapas, a special Mediter-
ranean meal and activity that
consists of friends sharing a
few dishes and sometimes eat-
ing with their hands, is also
available at Provence. The
tapas menu is a dynamic one,
changing from day to day,
serving both warm cuisine



such as Puntillitas, a battered
and fried baby squid, or cold
ones like mixed olives and
cheese.

Ninety-five per cent of
Provence's diners are
Bahamian, with a healthy
spattering of tourists mixed
in. Chef Innocenti said that
although the economy is
affecting his restaurant, busi-
ness is still going well.

WANA ‘0D =] BMW “BB

Chef Sweeting withia cheque to ‘assist
with defraying the cost of his participa-
tion in the prestigious International *;
Culinary. Art Exhibition (IKA), better
known as the Culinary Olympics:
Stephanie Marley, CEO of Marley
Resort and Spa, said that it gives her
great pleasure to-be able to'make ‘the
presentation on behalf of the resort.
Chef Sweeting spoke candidly about
the upcoming competition, "It's a’ **
dream of mine", he said, seemingly not
content with the bronze medal he and
his teammatés brought home from the’:
Jast competition. "I would like: to break
.that*barrier, and get,the gold, and show-" *:
‘case my talent as a Caribbean chef,’ he.»
asyb(< Gy a bate
It also needs to be understood that’! :
chefs:hailing from the Bahamas! can pro>\
duce Unique, high quality cuisine, as
they will be competing with countries |
like Canada; Sweden; Norway and of |
course the host country Germany. i
' Chef Sweeting also spoke briefly on |
‘the financial challenges regarding the’
competition. eR a ee
"It costs approximately one hundred, —
thousand dollars for the team to travel
and compete. The team consists. of six
'meémbers and two alternates. We have
a few fundraising events but the ”
monies.derived are not nearly enough)
to.fund the team. Therefore, 1am grate-
', ful to the Marley Resort and Spa for the”
gift presented here to me today.”
Marley Resort, a'16-room boutique *
resort situated in posh Cable Beach, °\
opened its doors in February, Chef
Sweeting is the resort's resident-head ©
(o)11c) ie . BAAN ao!


Ee 8

The Tribune

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008, PAGE 9B

UU



‘Show Your Game' shines,

movie Rocky, Apollo Butler
aka Apollo Kre-ed is steadily
demolishing the competition
with his eyes affixed on one
major goal, conquering the
international and local markets
with his heavyweight vocal
skills.

This is no easy feat for a
Caribbean artist, but the incred-
ibly hardworking young man
does not dwell within the realm
of impossibilities. After all, he
has already proven that any-
thing is possible if you are
determined. .

Born on the island of New
Providence to a Jamaican
mother and Bahamian father,
Apollo's father owned a bar
and it is at this family owned
business that his love of music
first blossomed.

His daily diet of Jamaican
80's reggae, and old time
Bahamian music as well as a
host of other genres soon fueled
a fierce aspiration in him which
would be quashed by his father
- now deceased - whom Apollo
felt wanted him to become a
blue collar worker.

"Thad a deep passion for it,"
Apollo said of the music. He
notes though that neither of his
parents supported his music®
career. However the performer
has no intention of giving up
his dreams, though he main-
tains a full-time job. Apollo,
who recently put his college
education on hold, did say how-
ever, that something has to

give.

Reared in the Kemp Road
inner city area, Apollo believes
that this prepared him to face
almost any situation. One crisis
soon began tearing at his home
life however, and forced him to
take his stress out to the streets
where he would fall in with the
wrong crowd. He joined a gang
and, like many young men,
soon found himself in trouble
with the law. Arrested and on
the verge of doing time, Apollg
decided to change his ways.
Music, which he always loved,
gave him a way out.

Having access to his father's
large collection of music and
listening daily to the lyrics,
influenced him to begin writ-
ing in 2005, he now says. In
early 2006 he linked up with
local artist/producer Colyn
McDonald of Visage, and start-
ed to follow his passion for
music. Apollo recorded a num-
ber of songs and later released
his first single to radio, titled
"Girl You Don't Know".

Growing up on the same
blocks as international reg-
gae/gospel artist Landlord, he
was truly inspired when he saw
Landlord's first video on Tem-
po. Touched by Landlord's
accomplishments, he instantly
set a bigger goal for himself. A
chance meeting with Landlord
gave Apollo the tools that he
needed to work with. After a
long 17 months, Apollo. Kre-ed
accomplished his goal of get-
ting himself onto the interna-

as Apollo Kre-ed set to
release new album

LIKE his namesake in the ' tional circuit when his video :

appeared on the international }

station.

In 2007, Apollo literally and :
single handedly propelled him- :
self into the media spotlight and :
on to the local stage with his :
song "It's our Time Nassau". :
The song enjoyed a fair amount :
of airplay on most stations in :
the Bahamas, then by sheer will :
power and tenacity Apollo was :
able to get his music video on :
Tempo, making him the first i
Bahamian rapper on the :
Caribbean's version of MTV. :
The video exceeded his expec- :
tations when it shot to the num- ;
ber ten spot on Tempo's Cross
Caribbean Countdown show in :

early 2008.

Currently the sky is the limit :
for Apollo. He released anoth- }
er single entitled "Show Your :
Game" four months ago. He is :
also working on his first album :
which he has aptly named :
"Round One". The 15 track :
album is set to be released in :
2009 and will feature a few col-

laborations.

Apollo prides himself on pay- }
ing his way. It's all him - all his :
hard work and he has begun to }
see returns. The multi talented :
artist also makes his own beats }
as well as writes his own lyrics :
from his home studio. With :
concert dates piling up and :
international collaborations in :
the pocket, Apollo Kre-ed is :
poised for his shot at interna- :

tional stardom.



SASS

Track Road Theaters
DA Rally

@ By THE VENDETTA GROUP



OUT of the same minds that brought you the
cult classic Bahamian play, Market Fire, comes a
brand new side-splitting comedy Da Rally, which

runs at the Dundas from October 16-18.

The new play comes from the Track Road The-
atre camp whose creative collaborations brought
forth such theatrical gems as Diary of Souls, Dev-
il on the Cross, and Web Shop Horrors.

Track Road Theater is an amalgamation of
talented writers, actors, directors as well as stage,
light and sound crew. Since their incorporation as

. anon-profit organisation in 2002 the team has hit

the ground running with a slew of plays and com-
munity oriented events such as Drama-Rama.
Drama-Rama is a summer programme which

the Track Road team put together to get the next -

generation of theatrical talents ready for their
season soon to come. “We are here to build peo-
ple up and raise the public appreciation of the the-
ater,” said Matthew Kelly, chairman of Track
Road Theatre.

The play, Da Rally, is a hilarious political lam-
poon set in the Bahamas during the election peri-
od. The play takes place around the calamitous
events that happen after an unscrupulous politi-
cian sets the rally dates of the two largest political
parties on the island, (the Green Party and the
Blue Party), on the same night. The ridiculous
twist and turns in the plot will keep all who watch
constantly gasping for air as they laugh.

While sitting in on one of the practices of Da
Rally, which will be directed by Clarence Rolle,
one trend became quite apparent. As parts of



the script were being rehearsed by cast members }
_it became almost impossible to sit there and not :
chuckle. Though the cast has not been together :
_ long their clearly is a great camaraderie amongst :

them.

from Matthew Wildgoose.

Though Mr Wildgoose is young, he is a very
seasoned stage actor whose prowess has earned
him a reputation as a force to be reckoned with in :

the industry.

The leading ladies of the play came to the floor ;
with the same impeccable comedic timing as their :
male counter parts. As Juanita Kelly hysterically :
blurted out her lines the distinction between the :
individual and the character she had become was
clear. Daria Del's smooth and pragmatic address :
to a rally filled with devout constituents was ;

superbly realistic.

Down to the minor utterances of the support-
ing actors, the depth of all the players contributes ;
to the overall side-splitting laugh fest thai is Da }

Rally.

* Tickets for the Da Rally can be purchased at :
the Dundas Box Office. For more info, videos and :
pictures on any of the stories released by The :
Vendetta Group feel free to email us at vendet- :
tagroup242@gmail.com or checkout and join ;

our group on Facebook or Myspace.



With one accord and synchronicity they all :
studied, reviewed and laughed at each other as }
they performed their different roles. One of the }
leading men of the play, Deon Simms, displayed :
his gift for improve comedy as he acted across i



Bahamian jazz artist set
co release third album

@ By LISA LAWLOR

AHAMIAN talent can be found across











Yi
Uy

the world, evidenced by the success

achieved by Vernon Neilly, a top jazz
guitarist who has made a.name for himself in
the US as both a musician and a producer.

One of the few artists great enough to
have a signature guitar string - called the
Giannini Power String - as well as to war-
rant a guitar being manufactured for him
called the Tagima VN-1, Vernon has led a
musical life with three cds under his belt
and the start of his own label, the Los
Angeles-based Boosweet Records.

Vernon is set to release his latest cd, Ver-
non Neilly & Friends "A Tribute To Stevie
Wonder", later this month. Recorded on
three continents, Europe, South America,
and North America, the cd features a num-
ber of international artists including Greg
Howe - who has played with Michael Jack-
son and Justin Timberlake; Kiko Loureiro,
U-Nam, Michael Paulo - who has played
with Al Jarreau and Earth Wind & Fire;
Bill Hudson - who has played with Cellador
and Power Quest; Grammy Award winning
bassist Juan Nelson - who has played with
Vesta Williams and Ben Harper; and oth-
ers paying homage to the musical genius
that is Stevie Wonder.

His earlier work, including his sopho-
more album G-Fire II, gave listeners the
true feel of island life. Both G-Fire, Ver-
non's first album, and G-Fire I are winners
of the 'Smoothie Award' — the jazz indus-
try's most prestigious award granted on the
basis of having a top 20 most played jazz
release on commercial radio.

On his second album, Vernon showcases
his mastery over the stringed instrument
with tunes like "Afternoon Drive" that
cavort to the melody of a Miami Vice, high-
speed car chase, taking the listener up to an
exciting climax. The shells swinging in the
breeze bring the listener back down to the
reality of laidback island life.

His song "Sweat" is played to the melody
of Bob Marley's "Looking In Your Big
Brown Eyes", bringing fond memories of
the reggae superstar to the forefront while
putting a jazzy twist to the slow, rhythmic
song.

Vernon has recorded with, toured with,
and produced for some of the most leg-
endary names in the music business such as
the late blues legend Johnny "Guitar" Wat-
son, Pee Wee Crayton, Charles "Merry

Christmas" Brown, Mary Wells, The Dra-
matics, Motown hit producer Norman
‘Whitfield, rap star Warren G, Howard
Hewitt, Teena Marie, Cuba Gooding Sr
(Main Ingredient), The Coasters, Drifters,
Etta James, George Clinton and many
more.

He produced and mastered the 18 artist
compilation disc "United By Tone" in con-
junction with the worlds leading guitar
pickup manufacturer, Seymour Duncan.
This highly acclaimed limited edition disc
features some of the most tiotable names in
the guitar world such as Slash, Jerry Hor-
ton - who played with Papa Roach; Jen-
nifer Batten - who played with stars Jeff
Beck and Michael Jackson; Gary Hoey,
Jimmy Bruno and Seymour Duncan. Ver-
non's track."Nassau Nights" is the first
song on the disc.

Vernon's albums have been featured in
magazines such as Guitar Player, Guitar
World, Guitar One, 20th Century Guitar,
Vintage Guitar, Jazz Improv, Jazz Times,
Down Beat, Urban Network, Ebony, Our
Weekly, Guitar Player Brazil, Cover Gui-
tarra (Brazil), Smooth Jazz News, Abyss
Jazz, All About Jazz, and many others, as
well as a myriad of newspapers, and e-zines
globally.

Vernon is further extending his career
into the movie business, appearing on the
big screen in Universal's "Along Came Pol-
ly" with Jennifer Aniston and Ben Stiller,
Warner Brothers’ "Starsky and Hutch", as
well as Columbia Pictures' musical spoof
"Walk Hard", featuring the story of fiction-
al musical legend Dewey Cox who embod-
ies the stories of real life rock and roll
artists Bob Dylan, Elvis Presley, Jim Morri-
son, David Bowie, Brian Wilson, Ray
Charles, Jerry Lee Lewis, Donovan and
most prominently Johnny Cash.

* For more info on Vernon Neilly and his
upcoming release, Vernon Neilly &
Friends "A Tribute To Stevie Wonder", vis-
it boosweet.com or email:
info@boosweet.com


PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



The truth? Hip Hop won't stop

6th Annual Fest a
smashing success

m@ By ARTHIA A NIXON

HE truth in the Truth Hip Hop

Fest can very well be that the

crowd-pleasing, positive-vibes-
flowing event is here to stay.
Founder of the event, Lavard 'Mani-
fest' Parks seemed to sum it up right
when he sang “Good Times” as the
Rainforest Theatre provided just that,
as titillating top-notch talent took the

stage.

Unlike most hip hop shows,
the audience was made up of
toddlers with mothers, tween
boys with fathers, older couples,
teens, families and groups, prov-
ing indeed that the genre of
music doesn't target one demo-
graphic but can build bridges
between generations with pure,
authentic, uplifting and enlight-
ening lyrics. .

Minister of State for Culture
Charles Maynard attended the
event with his wife and took the
opportunity to officially wel-
come the international per-
formers to The Bahamas. He
also noted that he was saddened
by Manifest's recent remarks in
the media about how positive
events such as the Truth Hip
Hop Fest lack the support of
major sponsors and the general
public and pointed out that a
similar event of secular nature
would have major sponsors
clamoring to get on the card.

“When Manifest came to me
last year and told me about this
project, I thought it was excel-
lent,” Mr Maynard said. “I see
the vision he has and the lives
he wants to change, plus I see
where he wants to carry it.
However, it hurt me to know
that my Ministry was unable to
sponsor it. Tonight, I am happy
to say that this year we are
“preaking rear son
we (Ministry of,
one of thespoad

After a soul-stirring opening
by Adrian Edgecombe and
Harvest Generation, Platinum
Soldiers proved themselves to
be party starters with their hit
song “Never Let It Go”. Najie
Dun followed with a surprise
acapella performance of “Why
Take Life” in a voice that
impressed and expressed. Mr




Lynx came and got the older ;

crowd members to show they

still knew how.to move: with. *

“Obedience” ‘before spitting

“Take Control” Hands wayed ,. - Po} t.and we will go and grow in |
and seats emptied as Monty G’*

took the stage and gave the
audience a sample of Lion of
Judah Records with “I Want To
Know”.

The out-of-towners didn't dis-
appoint as. Demetrus brought
the heat from the dirty south

starting off with a twist to the»

secular “We Taking Over” anc

turning it out as “We Rep Jeho-

vah”. In his other performances,

MONTY G rocks the mic.

yep ie



ne “Headbangers”.



he showcased poetic energy,
seemingly never stopping for a
breath with “What Goes
Around”, “Shake 'Em Off”,
“Sick and Tired” and “We
Comin' Through”.

Despite the warning, Bahami-
ans were not prepared for the
raw grit and west coast true life
authenticity spewing from the
vocal chords of Ahmad and
Tena Jones. The 4th Avenue
Jones couple provided a taste
of hip-hop-rock to the line-up
while captivating the audience
with their in-your-face lyrics.

Some of the older attendees
even sang along with Ahmad
who performed his Grammy-
nominated song “Back In The
Day”. Meanwhile, Tena's elec-
trifying vocals matched the
strength of the electric guitar in
the song “Who's Watching Me”
as the pint-sized powerhouse
roared out the lyrics with the
authority of a lioness.

The night, however, belonged
to Manifest and the artists on
the Dunamus Soundz Record
Label, who each displayed tal-
ent and stage presence worthy
of international caliber. Unlike
the other male performers, Rab-
bi presented a delicate yet reflec-
tive tone in his voice as he sang
‘Only Jah Knows'.

7 mwhile, Mr Beeds let the
\fion*know why it was time for
to'release a solo;record in
his set that included a stellar.duet
of “Life is What You Make It”
with the evening's fashionista,
Rudell Capron. He also didn't
stray far away from his theatrical
roots as the actor displayed a
comedic performance during his
song “Bless You”. Manifest blew
thee roof off the building by cli-
maxing the event with his hits, a
duet with Demetrus and of

It was another amazing
year,” declared’ Manifest. “We
feel truly blessed to get to this

‘years to come.” :
The Truth Hip Hop Fest also |
saw the introduction of an artist |

music workshop where interna- iy

tionally-known performers gave
wannabes the inside scoop on
how to make it big.



* Visit www.dunamus-
soundz.com for more informa-
tion.



RUDELL CAPR |
a duet with Mr. ON performs

Beeds,



UW (0) NT oWeyj
4th Ave Jones
LICH a gtoLs
Watching Me.











ut his lyrics ac

apella.



We BEEDS gets
In the Grease

Mehl Mtb,

DEMETRUS
returns to
the stage

straight out
of Jack-
sonville.
THE TRIBUNE



@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON



N this small West Indian island,
various artisans, crafters and
musicians seek to showcase their

creative imagination and talents, as
the Bahamas Arts Festival begins
October 26 to November 2.

A total of eight days have
been set aside to capture the
essence of Bahamian art,
whether it is visual arts, crafts,
or musical arts. The festival will
feature an art and crafts show,
church services and a two day
training programme in decora-
tive plaiting. The Bahamas
National Craft Association
(BNCA) will hold its annual gen-
eral meeting and election of offi-
cers during the week long festi-
val, and there will also be a "bat-
tle of the bands", and the Annu-
al Gala Tea Party.

Introduced to Bahamians
when ex Royal Governor George
Phenney invited women from
Bermuda to share their knowl-
edge of the craft - the art of straw
and decorative plaiting has since
become firmly grounded in the
roots of Bahamian culture.

As part of the upcoming festi-
val, Edison Key, executive chair-
man of the Bahamas Agricultur-
al Industrial Corporation
(BAIC), urged his fellow
Bahamians and straw vendors to
consider and continue to produce
Bahamian made souvenirs.

Dishearten by the numerous
imported goods in the straw mar-
ket, the chairman emphasized
that there are many local items
that can be used to make sou-

‘venirs. Items such as shells,
coconut and straw can be used
in a variety of forms to produce
mementos that entice the eyes of
tourists; it’s just a matter of inven-
tiveness, he said.

The training programme has
been implemented to provide
Bahamians with the opportuni-
ty to learn or enhance various
skills in decorative plaiting.

“Monday and Tuesday will.

feature a training programme in

- decorative plaiting at the Holy
Cross Anglican Church Centre,”
the chairman said. The effort of
encouraging Bahamians to get
involved in souvenir production
are beyond measure, since teams
from BAIC will visit schools to
encourage students to get
involved in this business, which is
classified by Bahamian handi-
crafts specialist as a lucrative
industry.

"Teams from the BAIC and
the Bahamas National Craft
Association will visit high schools
to encourage students to consid-
er souvenir production as a
career, or a secondary income
earner, Or as a very rewarding

, hobby,” he said.

Many Bahamians have
embraced the opportunity given
by the BaIC Handicraft Devel-

opment and Marketing Depart-
ment to train in souvenir cre-
ation. “Over the years the BAIC
Handicraft Development and
Marketing Department has been
making a concerted effort to have
as many Bahamians who want to
train in Bahamian souvenir man-
ufacturing, using as far as possible
only locally found ingredients,”
he said.

There have been new creations
in straw and shell work, from hats
and hand bags of different fash-
ions and styles to jewellery,
broaches, tie pins, pendants, dec-
orations, lamps, mugs, and many
more. He noted further that
when tourists visit the Bahamas

‘they say “we do not want any

cheap, made-in-some-other-coun-
try souvenir, we want something
that is truly Bahamian”.

Mr Key also encouraged
Bahamian to tap into the mil-
lions of dollars sent out of the
country to import souvenirs for
tourists.

On Saturday, November 1,

musicians will rein as they dis- —

play their talents in the competi-
tion, Battle of the Bands. The
battle is fought between high
school musicians, and has been
highly anticipated every year.

ASP Ronald Campbell of the
Royal Bahamas Police Force
Band is responsible for the battle
of the bands and is very excited
about the competition. “The
competition is exciting and the
winners are not predictable. All
the bands are very good and
there has never been a consecu-
tive winner since the competi-
tion’s inception,” he said.

Also on Saturday there will be
a Junkanoo competition, so for
those Bahamians who can’t wait
until Boxing Day to feel the rush,
they can enjoy the sound of goat
skin drums and cowbells at the
Bahamas Arts Festival.

The Annual Gala Tea Party

‘will be held on the last Sunday

and will feature delicate Bahami-
an and international brews.

- Entertainment will be provided

by the Royal Bahamas Police
Force, the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force, the Falcons, The
Voice of Praise Group, Cream
Gospel, the Pathfinders March-
ing Band and others.

The opening ceremony will be
held on October 26, with Prime
Minister Hubert A Ingraham as
the keynote speaker. Also giv-
ing remarks will be Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool
Wallace and Minister of Agri-
culture and Marine Resources
Lawrence ‘Larry’ Cartwright.



Learning the art of straw plaiting

FROM page 12

Mrs Strachan long ago mas-
tered all of these techniques,
growing up in a home where
plaiting yards of straw while
talking with family was the
norm. She even plaits other
materials like leather, coconut
bark or native fabrics like
Androsia into her straw works.
Goods produced range from
straw sandals, phone book hold-
ers and pillow cases, to fans,
purses, and hats. Mrs Strachan
prefers to use straw from silver
top palm trees that line the
coasts of many Bahamian
islands because it is strong and
wears well.

Another material used is sisal,
but the process of obtaining
sisal is a very tedious one -
resulting in more expensive and
less common products. Goods
made with sisal are produced
on Cat Island and Andros most-
ly. An advantage to using sisal is
that it can by dyed, whereas the
more popular material of silver
top straw can't be dyed because
it won't maintain the colour. Sil-
ver top may be coloured how-
ever, through a technique
known as "smoking the palm"
in which the plaiter traditional-
ly fans the straw through the
smoke of an old fashioned oil
lamp, although other fires may
be used.

Her daughter and constant
helper Allena Albury said that
there is always a full turn out
to her mother's classes, "Usu-

‘ally women are looking for a

new skill for either a part time
or full time job as a straw ven-
dor," she said. Her classes are
for between 10 and 15 students.

One arts and crafts teacher
Shree Lakshmi Batta explained
that she was brushing up on her
plaiting skills in order to teach
the kids at Queens College a
new technique for their BGCSE
exam coursework.

The quilters at the workshop
were two talented women,
Sarah McClean and Jan Elliott.
Both said straw is definitely a
medium they plan on incorpo-
rating into their quilt works, and
that this new technique came a
bit easier to them since they
already practice crafts.

Leslie Callender and Lisa
Goudie both attended the class
to simply learn a new talent,
saying that it's nice to learn old
traditions and very rare to hear
about these kinds of classes in
Nassau.

Ms Strachan runs straw plait-
ing workshops regularly, as she

. is no longer teaching classes

part time at the Bahamas Tech-
nical and Vocation Institute

’ (BTVI). She has run workshops
’ in Bimini, Grand Bahama,

Eleuthera and Andros, as well
as picking up silver top straw
from Long Island and Rum
Cay.

* Contact Debbie Strachan
for classes at email deprenter-
prises@hotmail.com or tele-
phone 341-1044 or 456-5695.
The National Art Gallery (328-
5800/1) sells Mrs Strachan's
works in their gift shop, as well
as the Yellow Strawberry Beau-
ty Salon on Rosetta Street (326
7863). The signature clip on all
her straw works is "Depre Col-
lection" - a combination of her
husband's, daughter 's and her
own name.



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