Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008



PRICE — 75¢














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way toa

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BIGGEST!

CARS FOR SALE, ”
HELP WANTED
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cocaine.
is seized

Another pair 1n By DENISE MAYCOCK Chief Supt Basil Rahming
Tribune Freeport said a team of Bahamian and
Reporter international law enforcement

hospital after
car hits tree

TWO women are dead, and
another two in hospital after
their Honda Accord careened
off East Bay Street, smashing
into one tree and then rico-
cheting into another during
the early hours of yesterday
morning.

According to an eyewitness
at the scene, the car came to
rest in a heap of twisted metal
near a tree just east of the
Green Parrot restaurant and
bar.

Scratch marks along the
trunk of the tree revealed that
the car might have flown up
into the air nearly six or seven
feet.

A police statement said the
four Women were trapped
inside the dark-coloured Hon-
da after the driver lost control

-and became pinned to a tree

near the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force harbour unit
on East Bay Street, shortly
after 2am. Police say speed
may have been a factor.

Firemen were forced to use
the Jaws of Life to extricate
the women from the vehicle

SEE page eight

ealticm ira Aa Rari

a

THE REMAINS of the car after the horrific

Verdict in the Mario Miller



Teh

be

crash.



murder case expected today

By NATARIO McKENZIE

A. VERDICT in the trial of
two brothers charged in the bru-
tal murder of Mario Miller is
expected today, with the jury
hearing closing arguments in the
case yesterday.

Supreme Court Justice
Stephen Isaacs has been hearing

ihe Taste

(@) 1]



falid only on tuesdays!

the case and is expected to give
his summation this morning
before sending the jury into
deliberations.

Lead attorney fonthe Crown,
Deputy Director of Public Pros-
ecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel
reminded the jury yesterday that
the burden of proof remained
on the prosecution until the end
of the trial and that they alone
were the judges of the facts.

Mrs Bethel described Mario
Miller’s murder as a tragic and
senseless killing, highlighting the
fact that he was stabbed 18
times, with some of his fingers
being partially severed and deep
stab wounds to parts of his neck.

Mrs Bethel asserted that the
prosecution had proven beyond
a reasonable doubt that brothers
Ryan Miller, alias Manny, and
Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar Lee,
had caused the death of Mario
Miller.

Miller, 28, was killed on June
22, 2002. His body was found in
bushes near the Super Value
Food Store in Winton. The pros-
ecution has called 32 witnesses

SEE page eight

mortgage with

Get savings built right into your

Man accused
of stabbing his
father appears

MN as

@ By NATARIO.
McKENZIE






A MAN accused of stab-
bing his father in the chest
multiple times last week
was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday on
attempted murder charges.

Moses Mackey Jr, 20, of
Carmichael Road, was
arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez
charged with the attempted
murder of his father Moses
Mackey Sr.

According to court dock-
ets, Mackey Jr attempted
to cause his father’s death
on Friday, October 3.

Mackey Sr., who is said
to be in his early 40s, was
reportedly stabbed multi-
ple times in the chest
around mid-day last Friday

SEE page eight























*

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et

any
om

2 «7

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -~ More than $7
million worth of cocaine was
seized by Bahamian and inter-
national law enforcement
authorities on Sunday during a
major drug bust at Freeport
Container Port. _

According to police reports,
some 687 pounds of cocaine was
discovered in a container des-
tined for the United States.

ES Ree)





Bahamians

face threat to’

NIB pensions

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
(additional reporting
by ALEX MISSICK)

rmissick@tribungmedia.net

IF THINGS do not change, by
the time Bahamians who were
born between 1981 and 1987
reach their 40s and 50s, the pen-
sions provided by the National
Insurance Board may be no more.

Mentbers of the youngest gen-
eration in our society to remem-
ber the end of the Cold War and
the fall of Communism in Eastern
Europe could be left with a future
filled with uncertainty, as the
most optimistic of estimates —
according to the 7th Actuarial

SEE page six

your savings!

Marsh Harbour: 367.3135

*




officials received information

and proceeded to the container

port, where they were assisted
~by container port agents. ,...

Mr Rahming said authorities
searched a machine inside the
container. The drugs were con-
cealed in a compartment of the
machine.

The drugs have been flown
to New Providence. No arrests
have been made and investiga-
tions are underway.

TOE





























Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
pay their respects to the late
Norman Solomon.

lM MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FINAL farewell to ‘for-
mer MP and leader of-the
opposition Norman Solomon
began yesterday with a solemn
procession in silence from the
House of Assembly to Christ
Church Cathedral.

Mr Solomon’s family front-
ed the silent procession along
Bay Street, with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, Mem-
bers of Parliament, and
Defence Force officers carry-
ing his casket.

At the Anglican cathedral
in George Street, Nassau,
Archbishop Drexel Gomez
led the service with contribu-
tions from 12 friends, relatives,
politicians and colleagues of
Mr Solomon who paid tribute
to his life of selfless service,
remarkable achievement and

SEE page two






Nassau: 356.7764
Freeport: 352.6676/7










FIDELITY

30" ANNIVERSARY








PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008



"Paige. Ann Waugh, daughter of Jeffrey and Judy
Waugh, a former honor student at St. Andrew's
School excelled with top honors her first year at The
University of Tampa. Paige obtained a 4.0 grade point
average and qualified for the Dean's list: few students
achieve this high standard in their first year.

Paige is now a sophomore at The University of Tampa
with a cumulative average of 3.9 which qualifies her
for the honors program.

Paige also performed well in economics in the spring
of last year. She was congratulated by performing

well in the ‘Principal of Economics’ course and for her
outstanding academic achievements. Paige has been
invited to contact the Professor and Chairperson of
the Economics faculty to discuss academic and career
~ opportunities in this field.

_ CONGRATULATIONS Paice * A JOB WELL DONE ..



pests Colina General
gem (surance Agency



Norman Solomon
is laid to rest

FROM page one

ee contribution to the

Bahamas.

Prime Minister Ingraham
hailed him as an outstanding
Bahamian who led an extraordi-
narily. productive life.

“He was a man of many gifts.
He was articulate, imaginative,
courageous and a hard worker,
and he used those gifts for a num-
ber of pursuits,” he said.

“Much of Norman’s time was
dedicated to the promotion of
tourism and a passion he shared
with others for restoration and
further development of the city
of Nassau.

“The Bahamas has lost a great
Bahamian and my colleagues in
Parliament join me in expressing
deep sympathy to his family, and
gratitude for the service of Nor-
man Solomon.”

Serving as an MP for St John’s
constituency, now North
Eleuthera, from 1967 to 1982, Mr
Solomon was revolutionary in
organising and leading the short-
lived Social Democratic Party in
1979, serving as opposition to the
Pindling administration until
1981.

In addition to his political
career, for which he is remem-
bered as one of the country’s
sharpest debaters, Mr Solomon
was an active businessman
with Mademoiselle, The Body
Shop, and Wendy’s among his
successful enterprises, and in 1982
he took over Ardastra Gardens
and Zoo and revamped the park
into a tourist attraction.

Prime Minister Ingraham said


















UM ees

Bernard Rd ~ Mackey St- Thompson Blvd






P
~~











THE TRIBUNE



So ribune staff ; :

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham presents a flag to Katherine
Solomon, the widow of Norman Solomon.

he was proud to have advised the
Queen to grant Mr Solomon the
honour of CMG, Companion in
the most distinguished order of
St Michael and St George, in
2001, for his service to the busi-
ness community.

Frank Comito, director of the
Nassau Tourism Development
Board founded by Mr Solomon in
1994, said his friend Norman had
two loves in his life, his wife
Katherine and lady Nassau.

“Lady Nassau helped to raise
Norman, and as his dear city fell
into disrepair and negligence in
the 1980s he felt the pain,’ "Mr
Comito said.”

“But he could see that although
age and negligence had taken its
toll she could still shine.

“He started the revitalisation
of many sites and knew it could
take years.

“Recently he said to me, ‘it
looks like 40 years of effort have
not been for nought’, and I
said, ‘yes Norman, it has not been
for nought.’”

Director of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said: “Nor-
man believed that tourism was
the best economic development
tool that we had.

“Tt is so important for his mem-
ory and his legacy to go into the
right kind of things, for things to
happen in downtown Bay Street.”

Former Attorney General Sean
McWeeney paid fribute-to Mr
Solomon’s daring to be different,
in personality, dress sense, busi-
ness and politics.

He said: “Norman demon-
strated an individuality that set
him apart.

Tuesday, October 7th

(Today Only)

Enjoy A vom

? i Yi

Ce a

With Every purchase/Trossttham
_ Of A Combo Or More

(While Supplies Last)
(One cake per transaction)



MINISTER OF Touran Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace pays his
respects to Norman Solomon.

He really was different in won-
derful and extraordinary
ways, and we are all the richer
for it.”

A likeness of Mr Solomon will
stand in a prominent place in Nas-
sau as he will not be forgotten,
friend Diane Phillips said.

Mr Solomon is survived by his
wife Katherine, daughters
Andrya Schulte and Alexya
Solomon, sons Sean and Spencer
Solomon, and four grandchildren.

The loving husband, father and
grandfather passed away in a

Florida hospital on Monday, Sep-:

tember 29, after a decade-long
fight with Parkinson's disease and
recent bout of lung cancer.




y








THE TRIBUNE



© In brief | Too many ‘badways managers’

Officers seize
$22,000
drugs haul
from hoat

Police have seized $22,000
worth of marijuana from a
parked boat in the area of
Quarry Mission Road.

Acting on a tip, officers of
the Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV) travelled to Quarry
Mission Road at around
3.30pm on Sunday and con-
ducted a search of a white 25-
foot vessel that was parked in
a yard, ‘

Onboard the vessel, police
reportedly found two large
plastic bags, each containing
10 brown taped packages of

marijuana.

Four men are being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with this matter and two oth-
ers are actively being sought.

Investigations continue.

Police praise
citizen for
turning over
illegal firearm

POLICE are praising the
efforts of a concerned citizen
who turned over an illegal
firearm to the authorities.

The person found a hand-
gun in a bushy area of south-
ern New Providence and
handed it over to the police at
around 12 noon yesterday.

Press liaison officer Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter
Evans said that the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
applauds the efforts of citi-
zens, who upon making such
discoveries, turn the weapons
over to the police.

“This kind of action by con-

cerned citizens lends to a safer
environment for all,” he said.

Expert to
speak up for .
“tax havens’

If you have ever wanted to
hear an expert explain why so-
called tax havens like the
Bahamas are good for the _
world, the Nassau Institute is
inviting you to come and listen
to a top expert talk on the top-
ic.

Dr Dan Mitchell, a member
of the Cato Institute - a world
renowned think tank promot-
ing public policy based on
individual liberty, limited gov-
ernment and free markets -
will talk on the topic “Why
Tax Havens are a blessing” at
a Nassau Institute hosted pub-
lic meeting.

Anexpert ontaxreform
and supply-side tax policy, and
an advocate of flat tax and
international tax competition,
Dr Mitchell is a senior fellow
with the think tank, whose _
articles have been published in
the Wall Street Journal, the
New York-Times, Investor’s
Business Daily and the Wash-
ington Times.

He is also a regular guest on
radio talk shows in the United
States and co-author of a new
book, Global Tax Revolution.

According to the Nassau
Institute, while in the
Bahamas Dr Mitchell will also
meet financial secretary in the
Ministry of Finance, Colin
Higgs, and directors of the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board, Association of Interna-
tional Banks and Trust Com-

panies and the Society of

Trust and Estate Practitioners.

The Nassau Institute’s pub-
lic meeting with Dr Mitchell
will take place on Thursday,

November 6, at 6.30pm. He is

also scheduled to speak on the

radio on November 5 and at a

Rotary Club of East Nassau

meeting on Friday, November

7

Today's PMH
orthopaedic
clinic cancelled

MANAGEMENT at
Princess Margaret Hospital
advises the public that the
orthopaedic clinic scheduled
for today has been cancelled.

Patients holding appoint-
ments for this date should |
contact the orthopaedic clinic
at 502-7862 today to reschéed-
ule appointments.

PMH apologises for any
inconvenience caused.




@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Poor service in the public sec-
tor stems from “badways man-
agers” abusing their power and
from civil servants not getting the
promotions and pay increases
they deserve in a timely manner,
according to President of the
Bahamas Public Service Union
John Pinder.

“The biggest problem we have
is. that there are too many bad-
ways managers in the public ser-
vice: (Bad service) starts’at’the
very top. There are too many per-
sons abusing their power and they
try to promote people based on
how the people worship them and
so they don’t serve, they get peo-
ple to serve them.

“Until we change that mindset
in the public service from the very
top we will always have deficien-
cies and frustrated staffers who
appear not to be going beyond
the call of duty to give the type of
service that the general public
demands.”

Mr Pinder was responding to
comment made by Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham at a recog-
nition ceremony where 13 out-

standing public servants were
nominated for the post of Public
Servant of the Year 2008.

Mr Ingraham said “core char-
acteristics” of courteousness, dis-
cipline, respect for authority and
a willingness to work hard are
“not abundant in our society” and
“sadly ... this is reflected in our
public service which mirrors our
society.”

Denying that an overwhelming
lack of worth ethic abounds in
the public service, Mr Pinder said
that where it does among a “small
percentage” it’s because public
servants are “demoralised.”

“I think because the number
of persons in the public service
are totally frustrated regarding
being able to get promotions and
receive their increments. I think
that to some extent that sort of
demoralises them. And so they
don’t go beyond the call of duty
anymore because they don’t see
any benefit in doing so.”

Mr Pinder called “long over-
due” Mr Ingraham’s expression
at the ceremony of his intention

to initiate-a-“tremendous change”
in the next year to tne burca

| cracy which stops public servants

from being able “to move” with-
in the service.

In a BIS report from the cere-
mony sent to the media yester-
day, Mr Ingraham is quoted as
saying, outside of his official
speech: “The public service in the
Bahamas has become so bureau-
cratic; and it’s so difficult for so
many hard working persons to
move, because the public service
is driven by too great an extent by
what is called paper qualifications,
rather than the ability of persons
to perform functions.”

Mr Pinder said he appreciates
this message. “For many years
the union has been saying that as
long as the government contin-
ues to only put emphasis on
‘added qualifications for promo-

tions you will never have an effi-
cient public service.

Two women,
man in court
semi M tt
ere en)

TWO women and a
man were arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day on cocaine possession
charges.

Police have charged
Harvey Marcian Kerr, 34,
of Tropical Gardens;
Travetha Pyfrom, 28; and
Laranda Charlton, 23, of
Summer Haven with con-
spiracy to possess cocaine
with the intent to supply,
conspiracy to export
cocaine, taking preparato-
ry steps to export cocaine
and possession of cocaine.
with the intent to supply.

It is alleged that the
accused committed the

offenses on October 3.

The prosecution alleges
that they were found in
possession of 1.2 pounds
of cocaine.

The accused pleaded

not guilty to the charges.

Kerr and Pyfrom were

granted bail in the sum of
$10,000. Charlton was
ranted bail in the sum of

15,000.

The case has been

adjourned to October 15.



FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
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18. The nominees are:



Marine Resources

Social Development

Ministry of Legal Affairs

“There
are too
many per-
sons in the
public ser-
vice who
are frustrat-
ed because
they are
performing
at above
their rank
and are not being able to fill those
positions simply because they lack
academic qualifications.”

Yesterday former minister with
responsibility for the public ser-
vice, MP Fred Mitchell said he
was shocked to hear how Mr
Ingraham described the short-
fallings he sees in the public ser-
vice.



LOOT

@ 2008 Public Service Officer of the Year

The 2008 Public Service Officer of the Year will be chosen on October

Jacqueline Fox, Administrative Cadet, Ministry of Agriculture and

Paula Mae Bowleg-Russell, Finance Officer II, Cabinet Office
Marion Rolle, Senior Price Inspector, Formally of Lands and Local
Government now with the Office of the Prime Minister

Shirlelle Strachan-Bevans, Chief Clerk, Ministry of Housing
Chandell Johnson, Administrative Cadet, Ministry of Labour and

Omishee Sears, Senior Accounts Clerk, Ministry of Finance
Michelle Ferguson, Chief Clerk, Governor General’ Office

Verna Ellis, Chief Clerk, Ministry of Works and Transport
Charmine Williams, Accounts Clerk, Ministry of Health

Neil Braitwaite, Senior Counsel, Office of the Attorney General and

Anne Pritchard Archer, Senior Clerk, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Ethel Rolle, Head Messenger, Ministry of Education
Andrea Deleveaux, Head Telephonist, Department of Public Service

in public sector - union chief


















He said Mr Ingraham “came
off as if (he was) denigrating pub-
lic servants.”

He added: “Of course, I accept
there are challenges throughout
not just the public sector but the
private sector too ... you find that
these issues of service are issues
which we have to address and I
think they probably have to be
addressed in the education sys-
tem to reform the culture.

“But I think when you are
prime minister there’s a certain
approach you have to take in
these matters. He’s in a position
to work with the public sector
unions, as we to try to, to rectify
the issues there are, not to stand
up and sound like you are
denouncing public servants.”

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 3





Police ‘back to square one’ in

bid to identify murder victim.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



POLICE are now “back to square one” in their efforts to
identify a young woman who was found with her throat
slashed over the weekend.

Chief Superintendent in-charge of the Central Detective
Unit Glen Miller told The Tribune on Sunday that a fam-
ily had come forward, concerned the murder victim might
be their loved one.

But yesterday Acting Assistant Commissioner Hulan
Hanna said police and the family of the missing girl have
now been able to rule out the possibility that the body is
hers without a formal identification taking place.

“That’s not who they thought it was. So we’re pretty
much back to square one with trying to determine who it
is,” said Mr Hanna. ,

The girl’s body, clad only in red underwear, was found in
a bushy area by a dirt track off the Charles Saunders High-
way on Saturday.

There were signs that the body had been in that spot for
over 24 hours, and:that the victim, believed to be in her late
teens or early 20s, had struggled to fight off her killer.

Apart from those who provided the first potential lead,
Mr Hanna said a number of other concerned members of
the public have since come forward saying the victim might
be their missing loved one.

“We are working with them,” said Mr Hanna. “We're try-
ing to narrow it down to see if anything would result in a
favourable outcome for us.”

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR








The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO: Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387





IN THIS column yesterday we discussed the
case of American Robert Halat, of Lyford Cay,

an 18-year resident of the Bahamas, who enjoys.

casino gambling — a pastime denied all resi-
dents of the Bahamas, be they Bahamian or
foreign.

Because of his ill health — he suffers from
emphysema — the only enjoyment Mr Halat
gets from life these days is going to the casino to
be with his friends and play a game of poker.

For 18 years — the length of time he has
been here since deciding to make the Bahamas
his home— he has gambled at the casino where
he has enjoyed the limited social life that his
health will allow. Suddenly in June of last year
he was notified by the Gaming Board that he
could no longer gamble at the casino. He con-
tacted an MP who promised to work on the
problem for him.

However, since being notified that he was no
longer to play in the casino, he continued to
go there to lunch with his friends. “At my age,”
he said, “where else can you go? I can hardly
move, I have difficulty breathing.” For his com-
plaint he needs an air-conditioned environment.

However, on his 78th birthday, as no one
had made any progress on his problem as
promised, he decided to take matters into his
own hands. He played poker to celebrate his
78th year.

He was charged and taken to court. The
charges against him were dismissed. He was
charged as a Bahamian breaking the law by
gambling, whereas he was an American resi-
dent breaking the law by gambling. Because of
the wrong.wording of the charge he walked
free on a technicality.

However, if it were not for his ill health,
which restricts his travelling, he would renounce
his residency permit immediately and revert to
being a tourist, which is what he has always
considered himself.

He said when he bought his home and
applied for residency he was not told of all the
restrictions that that would entail.

He said he has a Canadian friend, who
refused to become a resident of the Bahamas for
the same reason. Instead his friend leaves Nas-
sau every three months — at present he is in
Vegas — so that he can keep his tourist status,
which will enable him to legally frequent the
Bahamian casinos as often as he likes.

According to Mr Halat the Bahamas would
have more wealthy residents if it were not for
this restriction.

Many persons wonder why casinos are closed
to residents. They say it is discriminatory. Leg-
islators at the time the law was enacted consid-
ered that if foreign residents had been allowed
to frequent the casinos, but Bahamians had
been barred, then it would indeed have been
discriminatory. That is why — to avoid dis-



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Why residents can’t gamble

crimination — it was decided that all residents
regardless of nationality would be barred from
gambling houses in the Bahamas. Casinos were
for tourists only, and to be in the tourist indus-
try a country had to accommodate these visitors
who liked a little fling at the tables.

The Baptists were always against gambling in
any form, and if given a chance would close
down all forms of gambling, casinos included.

But the idea that Bahamians should be kept
from the tables goes way back and has nothing
to do with discrimination.

In the thirties the only gaming house, so dis-
creetly run that most Bahamians did not know
of its existence, was the Bahamian Club. It was
located just east of Xavier’s College, which was
in existence when the casino was in operation.
The Bahamian Club was managed by two very
fine American gentlemen. It was an evening
black-tie event with dinner. Those at the school
would have known it as the Bahamian. Club,
but it is doubtful they would have known it was
a casino.

There was also Hobby Horse Hall, the pop-
ular race track on West Bay Street. There were
races every Friday during the “winter season.”
Hobby Horse with its,quarter breed horses was
extremely popular and open to all. Naturally,
Bahamians who love to:bet, put heavy wagers
down on the horses.

We remember how the late Nurse Alice Hill-
Jones would come to The Tribune to see Sir Eti-
enne, then publisher of this newspaper. She
was in charge of the government’s public health
clinics. She was particularly agitated about the
adverse affect Hobby Horse Hall was having on
the children attending the clinic. .

She maintained that during the racing season,
the weight of the children brought to the clinic
fell off dramatically. Fathers were gambling
away their meagre wages and could not afford
to buy milk for their offspring.

She wanted something done to prevent these
men gambling at the track. If she had had her
way, seeing her scrawny children, she would
have banned them from Hobby Horse.

’And so going way back in the community the
spread of gambling was always a vice on which
concerned citizens wanted to apply brakes.

Then, of course, there were the Baptists,
who tolerated the casinos as long as Bahamians
weren’t involved. And there were others who
remembered the taint that tied casinos to the
Mafia, prostitution and gangland murders.

Gambling was a pastime that a large seg-
ment of concerned Bahamians were against and
from which they tried to protect their citizens.
This is why residents of this country are not
allowed in the casinos. The framers of the laws
in those days did not regard it as discrimination,
rather it was an effort to protect the nation’s
morality.
















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What will —
an Obama
government

be like?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The following is a father's:

response to an e-mail from his
son, a Democratic leaning
Independent, who expressed
his concerns about the quali-
fications of Governor Sara
Palin and the impact of the
present financial crisis:

“Sara is not a genius and
may not have the IQ that
Obama has.

But what kind of Govern-

‘ment will we have with Oba-

ma-Biden? That is the real
question. If you think about
it, the answer is completely
unnerving. These are two of
the most leftist senators in the
Senate. Their careers suggest a
tendency to the very policy
weaknesses that produced the
present financial crisis.

What were those weakness-
es? They seem to be the fol-
lowing: :

1.) The belief that Govern-
ment can solve all problems
and the problems are cast in
such a way as to require "big
government-socialist". solu-
tions, and

2.) The fact that elected
politicians simply cannot say
"NO" to politically attractive
populist ideas and big govern-
ment solutions.

Let's take the present crisis.






LETTERS

etters@tribunemedia.net

At its core was the abandon-:

ment of prudent financial
standards. The prudent stan-
dard for a 30-year mortgage
loan was 20 per cent down and
an earnings stream that could
cover the monthly mortgage
payments. The first risk to a
mortgage loan is that housing
prices will not always go up,
up, and up. Protection against
that housing market risk
necessitated a 20 per cent
down payment that is espe-
cially important if the bor-
rower unexpectedly encoun-
ters difficulty in meeting his
monthly payments.

The other prudent condi-
tion was that the lender would
hold the mortgage to maturity;
but Wall Street developed
mortgage-backed securities, a
security made up of smaller
mortgages, that could be sold
to really big investors in the
U.S. and abroad. All of this
was done with the implicit and
ultimately the explicit guar-
antee of the U.S. Govern-
ment. Of course, Wall Street
made huge commissions.

Thus the UNHOLY

alliance was created: "needy"
voters, Congressmen, Sena-
tors, huge Government mort-
gage corporations and Wall
Street financiers.

Those prudent lending
standards were progressively
dismantled because they
allegedly "discriminated
against the poor and needy!;
and you "cannot discriminate
in this way since everyone
. deserves their own home even
if they can not afford it."

Thus all those who ana-
lyzed the problem correctly,
including George Bush's exec-
utive staff, did not mount the
kind of political crusade that
could stop the train that was
running down the track.
AND, the government-
financed housing bubble (ever
rising home prices) burst, pro-
ducing a financial crisis that
likely will be followed by a
true depression...a drop in
GNP. The size of this crisis
suggests that the worst may
still be in the near future.

This is enough to make
every thinking person uncom-
fortable.

Regards...Dad.”
(Wasn’t John McCain one

of those who voted for dereg-
ulation? — Ed).

Beware of the spider web, Inagua

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I smiled when I read that
three PLP MP’s announced
that some in Inagua were not
getting their share of the
Inagua hurricane relief sup-
plies.

They must think this da’
PLP administration. Or
maybe they are incapable of
giving NEMA, the Bahamas
Red Cross Society, the
Bahamas Conference of
Methodist Churches, other
Church groups, private citi-
zens, businesses and civic
organisations the credit for the
outstanding work they are
doing on behalf of the resi-
dents of Inagua and their fam-
ilies.

Maybe the unions should

reflect on the mischief they

All major credit cards

did before the hurricane, riling
up dem people employed at
Morton Salt.

With all d’at hullabaloo they
spread down there, why
wouldn’t Morton Salt begin
wondering if they have a
future there?

Hopefully the people of
Inagua won’t suffer for the ill-
conceived interference of
these other people.

Already homes are receiv-
ing materials and supplies as
well as qualified labour to
repair roofs, structures and
buildings across the island.

Teams of contractors, car-
penters and other construc-
tion workers have been dis-
patched to ensure that the
work is done well and quickly.

For the first time in our his-

tory, BTC has issued free

phone cards to Inagua resi-
dents so they can call and talk
with relatives while they
restore BTC land lines and
service.

Our Prime Minister has
announced major incentives
for Iguana that will assist in
its redevelopment and restora-
tion in the short to medium
term.

You know, ya have to laugh,
or you would weep at the tac-
tics of the ol’ PLP - d’ey even
trying to make political gains
from Hanna and Ike!

Beware Inagua of the spi-
der web... |

M J McKINNEY
Over da Hill,
Nassau,
September, 2008.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 5



November 15th

By ALEX MISSICK ,



AS WORLD AIDS Day

approaches on December 1, the ;

AIDS Foundation of the }
Bahamas has once again part- }
nered with Colinalmperial to ;
host the Bahamas’ largest annu- }
al AIDS awareness event and }
the major fundraiser for the :
foundation - the 15th annual ;

Red Ribbon Ball.

* The ball, which signals the :
opening of the gala ball season :
in New Providence, will be held :
under the theme “Take the :
Lead” on November 15 at

Atlantis’ Imperial Ballroom.

Colinalmperial has been }
involved with the Red Ribbon }
Ball since 1994, as the former :
company, Imperial Life Finan- :
cial, signed a sponsorship accord }
-with the AIDS Foundation of :
-the Bahamas to commit human :
jand financial resources in the :

fight against HIV/AIDS.

_ Co-chairperson for the Red :
“Ribbon Ball Sandra Smith said ;
‘this event has been Colinalm- :
‘perial’s way of “taking the lead” :
‘wwith the AIDS Foundation of :
the Bahamas to fight the spread }

of HIV and AIDS.

. “Those who plan this event }
from year to year are still main- :
ly ColinaImperial employees. :
However, we would be the first :
‘to admit that our partners, :
including our executive spon- :
sors, make much of this magic :

happen,” Mrs Smith said.

Since its inception, the Red
Ribbon Ball has raised over }
$650,000 for the AIDS Founda- ;

tion.

President of the AIDS Foun- :

dation Camille Barnett said that :
these funds have enabled the :
‘Foundation to do a number of :
‘things, including purchasing a :
house in southern New Provi- ;
dence, which will be renovated :
and reopened as a children’s }

home.

“The children’s home will pri-
marily house adolescents who :
are experiencing health chal- }
lenges. The objective of the :
home will be to stabilise the chil- :
dren (health wise) in a loving, :
structured environment,” Mrs :

Barnett said.

Funds from the ball have also ;
enabled the Foundation to help :
decrease the rate of mother-to- :
child transmission of the disease, :
provide HIV/AIDS education :
and raise awareness of the dis- :
ease, and to bring HIV positive :
children living in the Family :
Islands to New Providence for :

‘treatment.

The funds were further used

‘to support other non-govern- :

mental groups engaged in edu- :
zcation, awareness and testing for :
>HIV; to purchase laboratory }
equipment needed by the:

“national

HIV/AIDS pro- :

“gramme; to support the care and i
‘treatment of patients, and assist :
with the education and training :

of healthcare workers.

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Number of new HIV/AIDS
cases is down from last year

TO GIVE persons an idea of the
impact the National AIDS Pro-
gramme is having on the Bahamian
community, the programme’s direc-
tor Dr Perry Gomez yesterday pre-
sented to the media with statistics
for the first six months of this year.

There were 116 new cases AIDS
infections in the first half of 2008,
down from 179 new cases during the
same period last year, he said.

New HIV infection cases have
decreased. There were only 83 new
cases for the first six months of this
year, down from 305 new cases of
HIV infections for the same time
period in 2007.

The death rate for the disease has
also decreased. There have been 42
deaths related to AIDS/HIV infec-
tions for the first half of this year.
During the first six months of lust
year that number reached 75 deaths.

Dr Gomez said he feels the num-

“I am surpris
but I hope it
holds up because
this would mean
a dramatic
reduction in
new infections.”

Dr Perry Gomez





bers of new cases are very encour-
aging as it comes at a time where
they are focusing the programme
primarily on prevention.

“T am surprised, but I hope it holds
up because this would mean a dra-

matic reduction in new infections,”
Dr Gomez said. :

He was speaking at the announce-
ment of this year’s annual Red Rib-
bon Ball, which aims to promote
AIDS awareness.

This year, the event will be held on
November 15.

Several sponsors have been com-
mitted to the ball through the years.

This year’s executive sponsors for
the event are Kerzner International,
John Bull, American Airlines and
Sunbound.

Mrs Smith noted that Kerzner
International assists each year in
helping the Red Ribbon Ball to lim-
it its direct overhead so that the
donation that is made to the AIDS
Foundation can be maximised.

Additionally, Kerzner Interna-
tional has already donated more
than $125,000 directly to the Foun-
dation.

Senior vice-president in-charge of
public affairs at Kerzner Interna-
tional Ed Fields said Kerzner is
proud to be a part of the pro-
gramme.

Donation

Mr Fields also increased Kerzn-
er’s donation to the Foundation by
presenting a cheque for $25,000 to
Mrs Barnett.

“We have been very proud as
Kerzner International to have been
involved for the past several years, |
to be a part of this success story. We
have been able over a three-year
period to give $1 million to the
National Aids Programme,” Mr
Fields said.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
ig the official patron of this year’s
Red Ribbon Ball.

Governor-General calls on regional
‘challenge’ themselves

leaders to

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AS THE current economic
and financial crisis in the United
States threatens to deal a serious
blow those Caribbean commu-
nities dependent on the US for
tourism dollars, regional leaders
must "challenge" themselves to
maintain and improve existing
national services, while at the
same time creating new ones,

Governor-General Arthur Han-

na said.

The governor-general made
these remarks at the opening
ceremony of the 13th annual
Conference of Presidents and
Governors-General of the
Caribbean Community held at
the Wyndham Resort yesterday
morning.

Addressing a congregation of
nine presidents and governors-
general from the Caribbean, a
delegation of Cabinet ministers,
the leader of the opposition,
public servants and members of
the media, Mr Hanna stated
what many in the region expect
the current banking meltdown
in the US to have a serious rip-
ple effect on small Caribbean
nations.

Mr Hanna said: "In each of
our countries, we rely heavily on
revenue from touristic dollars
for much of our infrastructural
and socio-economic develop-
mental programmes. With the

.exception of Trinidad and Toba-

go, we are not oil producing
communities, and our somewhat
fragile economies are therefore
buffeted by the vagaries of the
global oil market.

"Additionally the current eco-
nomic 'crisis' in the United

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impact all of us for some time
to come. All of these factors will
further challenge the abilities of
each of our member countries
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national services, and to effec-
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Also on hand at the opening
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to ignore "the potential serious
social and economic conse-
quences that loom for our coun-
tries if good order is not restored
quickly to the North American
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The prime minister also noted
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of Dominica, is a forum for dis-

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cussion on the issues affecting
the region. The agenda includes

discussions on: education and.

culture, the impact of external
influences, the importance of
sports, health and social factors,
and patriotism.

Under the theme, "Rebuild-
ing Societies", regional heads
and governors-general hope the
four days of discussion will spark
action in the region in the
months ahead.

Representatives from 10 coun-
tries including the presidents of
Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago,
and the governors-general of
Antigua and Barbuda, Barba-
dos, Belize, Grenada, Jamaica,
St Christopher and Nevis, St
Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines are all attending.

The conference continues
until Thursday, when attendees
will travel to Grand Bahama for
a tour of the second city before
departing to their home coun-
tries.





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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

The I Tribune



FROM page one

Review of the NIB completed in
2001 — predicts the depletion of
NIB’s funds by 2034.

Today NIB pays out $108- $110
million a year in pensions and
takes in about $160 million a
year in terms of contribution
income.

Anthony Curtis, acting direc-
tor of the National Insurance
Board, said there are some rec-
ommendations that have already
been submitted to cabinet to
reverse this progression.

“I could not really get into
those details in that document
right now. It is known that the
population is aging, people are
having fewer children and are
living longer. In that regard, it is
important that we take some

steps to insure the solvency of..

the fund, also to ensure that the
‘benefits remain relevant,” he
said.

Deroy Major, a 28-year-old
civil servant, has been in the gov-
ernment system for more than
two years. Born and raised in
New Providence but based in
Inagua, Mr Major says he wants
to receive a fair pension when
he retires from the government.

Some may say, at 28, why
does he need to think about
retirement? However, Deroy
knows that in no time he will be
at retirement age, just like his
parents. -

“When I reach a certain age, I
don’t want to work hard so it
would be great if I could live off
of my pension. For us as civil ser-
vants, we have to work for 30 or
more years to receive a sensible
pension. Pension in itself is not
all that it’s cracked up to be
because the government isn’t giv-
ing much. I know people who
have had to work 40 years before
they were eligible to receive
$2,000-a-month for pension. The
government needs to come up
with better saving schemes. That
is why a lot of people were hop-
ing for the national health
scheme. It is not nice to receive
your pension and have to turn
around and spend it on health-
care.”

Officials are now looking at
the possibility of actually increas-
ing the wage ceiling of $400 a
week to ensure that the benefits
remain relevant.
_ Many experts say if NIB is to

“meet its commitments to future
generations of pensioners, high-

- Bahamians face threat to NIB pensions.

er contribution rates and/or
reduced benefit promises will be
required.

When it comes to expert opin-
ions about the financial health
of the country’s institutions, not
many are more regarded than
that of former governor of the
Central Bank and Minister of
State for Finance James Smith.

Mr Smith, who serves as chair-
man of Colina Financial Advi-
sors Limited, said that any gov-
ernment is going to be forced at
some point to implement increas-
es in contributions or institute a
reduction in the range of claims.

“The report makes for good
reading but no responsible gov-
ernment will permit a pro-
gramme like National Insurance,
which is probably one of the only
adequate safety nets in the
Bahamas that provides some
form of income to retired people,
to go bust,” he said.

Mr Smith said that there is a
“need to continually review the
fund and to ensure that the pay-
ments will cover the costs over
the next several years.

“To be honest, I can’t say they
are doing a good job because I
don’t'think the contribution lev-
el has changed in 30 years. I
think once they receive a report,
and they are persuaded that
something has to be done, they
will move to make the necessary
increases to contributions which
will probably be the first
response. They need to be forced
at some point to implement
increases in contributions, if
that’s the way to do it, ora
reduction in the range of claims,”
Mr Smith said.

Mr Curtis also pointed out that
the rate of contributions has not
increased since the establishment
of NIB.

“National Insurance is really
a promise to the Bahamian peo-
ple. It’s a promise that look,
when you work and pay your
contributions, in 30 to 40 years
down the road, there is a pack-
age of benefits that you would
be entitled to receive. So we
have to have everything that’s
necessary to ensure that we
deliver on that promise,” the
NIB director said.

Many social security schemes
around the world are reforming
their systems to counter the
effects of aging populations, pro-
jected cash shortfalls and declin-
ing public confidence in these
programmes.

The Bahamas faces similar cir-
cumstances — falling birth rates,
increasing life expectancy among

the elderly, a contribution rate
that is below the average cost of
benefits and a pensioner popu-
lation that is prowing at a faster
rate than the number of contrib-
utors.

On December 31, 2001, NIB
benefits reserves stood at $1.1
billion, just under nine times
total expenditure in 2001. While
this — according to the actuary —
is an acceptable level of funding,
assets are significantly less than
the present value of total benefits
already earned by past and pre-
sent contributors.

Coupled with this, NIB is also
afflicted with high administra-
tive costs. Mr Curtis admitted
that this needs to be contained
but said most of the money is
used and invested to increase the
future viability of NIB.

There may be a controversial
solution to these problems: the
Bahamas, Mr Curtis said, may
have to import labour as the
labour force will not be sufficient
to keep pace with labour
demands.

“The most that we can do to
address those kinds of issues is
that we manage in such a way
that the solvency can be main-
tained. Those things mentioned
(i.e. falling birthrate etc) are
structural changes in terms of
lifestyle and choices that people
make that present a challenge to
us in that if you have an aging
population you have a few con-
tributors.”

NIB also faces another prob- ,

lem. President of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce Dioni-
sio D’aguilar said that the biggest
problem with National Insurance
is collections.

“T think a lot of businesses
have this problem where they
don’t comply. I’m very slow in
complying. What I do is I pre-
pay it. I estimate what my
National Insurance bill is going
to be and then I pay it in advance
because it’s frustrating for me to
file because they base the calcu-
lation on the number of Mon-
days in a month.

“It’s fairly complicated to get
my system of paying bi-weekly
to conform to their system based
‘on the number of Mondays in a
month. So that takes some time
for me to adjust my numbers to
conform with their system and
so therefore I’m never on time
and I’m late. So what I do is I
estimate every six months my bill
is going to be let’s say $35,000
or $37,000, here’s a cheque for
$35,000 I will get you the paper-
work when I get you the paper-

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work, but I comply,” Mr
D’aguilar said.

He said that NIB should con-
form its system to match the
many ways people get paid in
the Bahamas.

“You cither pay weekly, bi-
weekly, bi-monthly or you pay
monthly. So they should allow
you to file based on those four
approved methods, weekly, bi-
weekly, bi-monthly and monthly,
not based on the number or
Mondays in the month. Clearly
the biggest problem they have is
collections. A lot of people don’t
comply,” he said.

Nevertheless, Mr D’aguilar
said that NIB is of vital impor-
tance to the Bahamas as it is the
only form of forced savings in
the country. This is why he feels

“The Actuary
Report said that
NIB’s first cash
flow deficit is
expected in|
2014 with fund
depletion in
2025, while
under optimistic
assumptions,
expenditure is
projected to
exceed income
beginningin
2023 with Fund
depletion in
2034.”



NIB will never be in any real
danger of folding.

“National Insurance will
always have stories about them
running out of money, but I
don’t think it ever will happen
because the government can
always tax to always increase it
or cover it. Again, increase com-
pliance which they won’t get very
far with that in the short term,
increase the rate or the ceiling.
They haven't adjusted the rate,
so they should adjust the ceiling.
They should adjust it anyway as
inflation causes salaries to
increase,” he said.

Mr Curtis said that in the
Bahamas, persons seem not to
like to pay taxes and try to find

ways to get out of it, yet expect
the benefits those taxes are
meant to deliver.

“It seems as though the more
persons who evade taxes, the
more glorified they become. If
persons do not pay taxes, I think
the laws ought to be enforced so
that persons pay the penalty to
ensure that those funds are there
and they can be invested to get
those kinds of returns that we
would like to help to deliver on
the promise down the road,” he
said.

The hard cold fact of the mat-
ter, Mr D’aguilar said, is that
many Bahamians reach retire-
ment penniless and over-lever-
aged because they have no disci-
pline and they don’t know how
to save for the future and how to
save for when they get old.

“Tf there’s any way that you’re
going to revise it, it would be
good if the government (as they
did in Singapore) mandated that
you save 10 per cent of your
salary and that goes into a forced
savings. There may be about

three things that you can take it -

out for, such as to buy a home,
for health and education,” he
said.

Mr Curtis acknowledged the
problem of persons not retiring
with enough. He pointed out that
a lot of people don’t make
enough money to save because
expenses are so high and their
incomes can’t keep pace with the
cost of living.

“To them we are their last
hope. So we have to ensure that
it’s managed in such.a way that it
will be there down the road and
those benefits that are necessary
that persons would wish to have
that we actually make the sys-
tem adaptable to ensure that it
remains relevant for persons now
and down the road. In terms of
the aging population there is lit-
tle we can do in that regard
because people do not wish to
have as many children like they
used to,” he said.

The Actuary Report said that
NIB’s first cash flow deficit is
expected in 2014 with fund
depletion in 2025, while under
optimistic assumptions, expen-
diture is projected to exceed
income beginning in 2023 with
Fund depletion in 2034.

They indicate that under all
reasonable scenarios, depletion
of reserves is expected within 35
years (from the date of the
report) unless reforms are made.

They also show that the con-
tribution rate in the future will
have to be much higher than the

C











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THE TRIBUNE

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present average combined rate |
of 8.8 per cent.

The report points out that in
the US, for example, where the
contribution rate is 12.4 per cent
for pensions (6.2 per cent in the
Bahamas) the Social Security |
Trust Fund is projected to incur |
its first deficit in 2017, and be
exhausted in 2041.

At the end of the day the
Actuarial Report states that the
National Insurance programme
is financially unsustainable and
administrative costs are too high. }

Mr Smith said that he suspects
that government will approach +
the situation from a number of
different angles.

“Tt will be a menu of FoRpOHS:4
es, for instance the return on *
investment, a high percentage —
maybe as much as 70 per cent --
of the assets of national pent»
ance are, in fact, loans to the gov- \i
ernment, holding government '
bonds, which gave a reasonable
rate of return’ in the Bahamas.
It may be that the fund may need
to be more diversified and it may
have to be put under somewhat
of a professional management to
increase the rate of return, and
you need to increase the rate of
return if you don’t want to *
increase the contributions,” he ©
said. )

Because people are living *
longer, persons can remain pro- ‘
ductive a bit longer and this may ,
lead officials to propose an ”
increase in the retirement age.”

“T used to think that 60 was “
very old when I was young but *
now I am five years from 60 and
I recognise how young 60 is. I
can do everything that a 17-year-
old would’ve done and I’m
almost as physically fit as they *
are so why should I retire at 60?
So, as people are living longer,
they are practically healthier
because of the healthcare sys-
tem, there may be a need to ~
actually increase the age of
retirement,” Mr Curtis said.

Meanwhile 28-year-old Deroy |
also learned to take matters into
his own hands by having his own
source of income and not
depending on the government to
take care of him when he reach-
es retirement.

“My suggestion to people my
age is to continue to pay your
National Insurance, but don’t
expect millions of dollars to be
waiting for you when you retire —
generate your own income. Itisa_,
wonderful, free feeling when you
achieve a goal you have set for |
yourself that will take care.of |
you when no-one else will.” |

1
|
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|
|
|
|



Seperpses oi “

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rosea
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INCLUDES: l

¢ Paved Roads « Water & Sewerage.

Phone ¢ Cable »« Electricity « Street Lights i
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Jogging Trails « Playground ¢ Basketball
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325-6456 . 325-6447/9 |

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THE TRIBUNE

MiMi |<“ ie

A GENERAL view of the Atlantis
Share your news

hotel which is a part of $1.5 bil-
The Tribune wants to hear from

lion resort is seen, on the
people who are making news in

Jumeira Palm Island in Dubai,

United Arab Emirates, Wednes-
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good

day, Sept. 17, 2008.
cause, campaigning for

improvements in the area or
have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.













+74 ,

DUBAI, where Sol. Kerzner’s
latest Atlantis mega-resort has just
opened, has been depicted in a
leading UK newspaper as a glitzy
resort city with no accountability
or rule of law.

The booming Middle East sheik-
dom, where sharia law finds itself at
odds with a mass influx of foreign
workers, is full of social tension,
according to writer Carole Cad-
wallader in The Observer, the Lon-
don Sunday paper.

Dubai will be in the spotlight this
week when two British expatriates
face trial for allegedly having sex
on a beach. They could face jail
terms of up to six years.

The case has focused attention
on the huge gulf between local cus-
toms and the attitudes of many for-








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WRT TACT
FM
Control System

ACCOUNTANTS from
the Public Treasury have com-



newspaper depicts
another side of Dubai

Claim that Middle Eastern city -
home to new Atlantis - has no
accountability or rule of law

tune-hunting foreigners cashing in
on Dubai’s phenomenal growth.

One expatriate woman is quoted
in the article as saying: “Oh, yes, it
looks good, doesn’t it? But we’ve all
made a pact with the devil to be
here. You get the tax-free salary,
but in return you give up all your
rights. There’s no accountability,
no transparency, no rule of law.

“There’s no legislative body.
Very few employment rights. It
looks like a modern country, but it
takes more than a few skyscrapers
to create one of those.”

Kerzner has recreated his Par-
adise Island Atlantis dream on
Dubai’s spectacular development
called The Palm.

A huge pink edifice modelled on
the Paradise Island original looms
over the multi-fingered waterfront
development where soccer star
David Beckham and his wife Vic-
toria are among resident celebri-
ties.

Like the Paradise Island resort,
the Dubai Atlantis has a $25,000 a
night bridge suite. It cost $1.5 billion
to build and has more than 1,500

rooms and 65,000 marine animals.

But The Observer article high-
lights growing tension created by
Dubai’s attempt to cash in on west-
ern tourism and.its impact on local
customs.

Ms Cadwallader points out that
Dubai already has a third of world’s
building cranes in place, and is
about to have the world’s biggest
shopping mall and its biggest air-
port, with six runways on a site as
big as Hong Kong Island.

“What’s more, if you stay in your
hotel, you need never even know
you're in an Islamic state where it’s
illegal to hold your wife’s hand in
public, or be gay, or found with
.003g of cannabis - less than a grain
of sugar - on the sole of your shoe,”
she writes.

Keith Brown, a British youth
worker, was convicted for the
cannabis offence and received four
years in jail.

The two people facing trial this
week are, she says, victims of an
“ideological schism” who could pay
an exceedingly high price for their
actions.

Kamran Jebreili/AP




CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch |

Private Banking

is presently considering applications for

SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER - CARIBBEAN / UK (Private Banking)

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business

Development Officer covering the Caribbean and UK Markets:
Requirements:

* Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking &

Finance

At least seven (10) years banking experience including relationship
management,trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout the Caribbean and UK
Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network within
the market regions.
Strong communication skills in English and a working knowledge of French
‘would be an asset to facilitate marketing and relationship management with
clients and prospects

Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout the Caribbean and UK and utilize a
network of existing contacts and associates

Possess a confident and outgoing personality
Duties will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore Caribbean and UK based

clients.

Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures

Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

menced with a pilot of the
SSA Financial Management
and Inventory Control System
at the Ministry of Education
which will be implemented at
all government ministries.

Officers of the supplies sec-
tion of the Ministry of Edu-
cation were trained in the use
of the inventory module (soft-
ware), and they have already
begun organising the ware-
house and coding the inven-
tory items in the supplies sec-
tion.

They are now beginning to
move into the next phase,
which is to take a physical
count of the inventory items,
and once this is done, they will
key the information into the
inventory system. The min-
istry expects that the system.
will be fully functional within
the next month.

It is anticipated that the
new inventory will improve
efficiency and accountability.

Officers from the Public
Treasury involved in this ini-

_tiative are Mary Mitchell,
senior deputy treasurer; Mar-
ilyn Davis, accountant; Cheryl
Williamson, accountant; Jer-

maine Rolle, trainee accoun-
tant; Levardo Lewis, treasury
officer.

The ministry’s team was
comprised of Elma Garraway,
permanent secretary; Cole-
man Andrews, first assistant
secretary; Shandles Barry,
financial controller; Rodney
Johnson, senior accountant;
Jennifer Lightbourne, senior
supplies officer; Arthur May-
cock, chief supplies officer;
Ella Jane Grant, senior exec-
utive secretary; Cadwell Tay-
lor, assistant store keeper;
Garnell Johnson, chief clerk,
and Bernadette Johnson,
clerk.






















































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PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Man accused ©

of stabbing
his father

appears
in court

FROM page one

in the area of East Street
and Sands Road.

According to reports,
detectives travelling
west on Sands Road
noticed a black Ford
Expedition driving
erratically and decided
to investigate.

When the officers
were able to get a clear
view of the two men
inside the vehicle, they
noticed that the man in
the back seat had one
arm around the driver’s
neck and was swinging
his other arm in a stab-

’ bing motion.

They then used their
black Crown Victoria to
stop the Expedition.,
Both vehicles came to
rest facing each other
bumper-to-bumper.

Mackey Jr., who was
not represented by an
attorney, was not
required to plead to the
attempted murder
charge.

Prosecutor Sergeant
Sean Thurston told the
court that the prosecu-
tion objected to bail
being granted to the
accused. Mackey Jr was
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The case has been
adjourned to Friday,
October 10, and trans-
ferred to Court 9, Nas-
sau Street.

Chief Magistrate
Gomez told Mackey Jr
that he would be
remanded to prison in
light of his father’s con-
dition. Mackey Sr was
listed in critical condi-
tion yesterday.

- DAIHATSU

:

i

Verdict in the Mario Miller
murder case expected today

FROM page one

at the three-week trial.

Mrs Bethel called upon jurors to be

dispassionate in considering the evidence
and to put aside sympathy and preju-
dice.
Mrs Bethel called it an “insult” to sug-
gest that there was political pressure
behind the Mario Miller murder investi-
gation as Ricardo Miller’s attorney
Ramauld Ferreira did.

She asserted that no preferential treat-
ment had been given to the Miller fam-
ily. Mrs Bethel said that, although the
accused often claimed that they were

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being lied on, they were the only two
people who had a reason to lie as they
were on trial for murder.

She told the court that Ricardo Miller,
in particular, had given numerous fab-
rications and false accounts.

The prosecutor told the jury that the
evidence revealed there was a drug trans-
action. She said the two men conspired
to commit theft and then murder.

Mrs Bethel said that-Mario did not
deserve to die in the way that he did and
that the blood of the deceased had liter-
ally been left on the hands of the accused
men.

Highlighting the forensic evidence in
the case, Mrs Bethel said that Mario

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Miller’s blood had been found in Ryan
Miller’s car and that Ricardo Miller’s
blood, mixed with Mario’s blood, was
found in the deceased’s jeep.

Mr Ferreira contended that the pros-
ecution had adduced no evidence to
show that his client had killed Mario
Miller and described the prosecution’s
case as “woefully inadequate.” *

Mr Ferreira told the jury that it was, in
fact, an insult to assume that the murder
investigation was not politically moti-
vated.

Mr Ferreira said that Mario Miller was
a drug dealer who was killed over stolen
cocaine. He told the jurors that the pros-
ecution sought to have them make



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“assumptions but said the prosecution’

was not entitled to make any assump-
tions.

Attorney Romona Farquharson, rep-
resenting Ryan Miller, told jurors that
her client had played no part in the mur-
der of Mario Miller.

She reminded jurors that Ryan Miller
has not been charged with possession of
dangerous drugs but murder. She said
her client should not be judged based
on what his brother had said but as a
separate defendant.

She contended that the prosecution
had adduced weak evidence with respect
to her client.

The case resumes today at 10am.

women
killed

in crash
FROM page one

and Emergency Medical Ser-
vices staff pronounced two of
the women dead at the scene.

The other two women were
taken to hospital in a respon-
sive state.

Each victim is believed to
be around 18 years old, one
of Key West Street and anoth-
er from South Beach Estates.

Police are withholding the
names of the four women until
their families have been
informed.









Tel: 356-3145 * 325-6447/9 © 362-1144
After 6pm: 341-7184 ¢ 424-5227 © 324-1685



THE TRIBUNE



Top ten things



@ BY INIGO “NAUGHTY”
ZENICAZELAYA

OW, another

week has come
and gone and it’s time for the
“Smile” once again. In all hon-
esty people, I wish I had more
time to spend on this column
this week but if you saw the
Vice-Presidential debate you
know Sarah Palin left us with
so many “nuggets” I have to
start writing some new jokes;
she may be my HBO special
waiting to happen.

So as I try to bang out as
much political humour as I
can before the US presiden-
tial elections, I want all the
“Smilers” to know I haven’t
— nor will I — forget your
comedy needs. .

Just bear with me this week
because God is raining punch-
lines down on us comedians
like manna from heaven, and
I’m diligently using most of
my time to stock up for those
dark days ahead.

A lot of people have e-
mailed me and said they
enjoyed my ‘Lists.’ You may
remember the ‘His’ and ‘Her’
football lists before the NFL
season kicked off, and I think
it’s safe to say those house-

holds that are turmoil-free this '

football season followed my
advice.

No need to thank me, thank -

each other (wink, wink).

So with that being said it’s
‘List’ time again, and the first
Saturday in every month from
here on out will feature a new

elt Palin



“Top Ten.” So here we go:

The Top Ten Things Men
Wished Women Knew.

10 Crying is blackmail.

9 Ask for what you want,
subtle hints don’t work.

8 Sunday = Sports.

7 Christopher Columbus
didn’t need directions, and
neither do we.

6 Learn to work the toilet

seat. If it’s up put it down, and-

vice versa.

5 Anything we said six to
eight months ago is inadmissi-
ble in a present-day argument.

4 A headache that lasts 17
months is a problem. See a
doctor.

~~
ch i
|

wished





3 Let us ogle. How can we
know how beautiful you are
if we don’t look at other
women?

2 Don’t rub the lamp if you
don’t want the ‘Genie’ to pop
out.

1 Nothing says I love you
like ‘Sex’.

There you have it. A great
list for you ladies to use to tap
into your husband’s or
boyfriend’s (or boss’s —
whatever the case may be)
psyche.

Before | conclude, I realise
I have probably incurred the
wrath of more than a few
ladies. Where is the list for the
men to follow you may ask?

The answer is we don’t need
a list to follow. Despite
rumours to the contrary, men
really do know all we ever will
about women...we do!

T'llprove it!

Here ts a list of the “Top
Ten Things Men Know About
Women.”

BISHIIMONTERO SPORT 2008 _/

‘



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 9

)
(CINCINOCIING



April 26, 1932 - October 7, 2007

/t was a year ago early on a Sunday morn
When you left us
To begin your final journey home
We did not want to say good-bye.
We could not help ourselves.
We cried...oh, how we cried.

We should have let go
But we could not, you know
You were safe from suffering
You were free of pain
Ard we, we were left to treasure
Your memory
again... and again
And so we do.

We see your smile in
the tvinkling eye of a kindly man
We see your joy in a grandfather
laughing with a child
We hear your words as you comforted us
And ave hold on to your strength
With all the strength that we have
Though we miss you so
Never are you far away
For we think of you with love
Every hour, every day.

Remembered by: Wile: Mavis A. Deveaux: Your loving children: Youlanda Deveaux, Christopher Deveaux, }
Lindel Stuart and Wendy Deveaux and Grandchildren: Chrishanda Deveaux, Jaden Stuart and’ Janai Adderley. 5



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"TUESDAY EVENING





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@ WTV4J |wood (CC) testants face a competition that McCain (R) and Barack Obama (D) discuss issues; Tom Brokaw moder-
tests their endurance. (N) ates, (Live) (CC)
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BBCI lews America |(Latenight). Report McCain (R) and Barack Obama (D) discuss issues; Tom Brokaw moder-

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

OCTOBER 7, 2008






| 8:00 | 8:30 _|
NETWORK CHANNELS

Florida Roadtrip |Nova “Arctic Dinosaurs” A field ex- [Presidential Debate At Belmont University-Nashville, candidates John
pedition to collect new fossil clues McCain (R) and Barack Obama (D} discuss issues; Tom Brokaw moder-
on Alaska’s North Slope. ates. (Live) M (CC)

NCIS A distinguished senator asks Presidential Debate At Belmont Universily-Nashville, candidates John
Gibbs to solve the murder of a fe- jMcCain (R) and Barack Obama (D) discuss issues; Tom Brokaw moder-
male Naval officer. (N) (CC) ates. (Live) ( (CC)













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icc) port 1 (CC) [22 Minutes (CC) (CC)
fc) Kudlow & |On the Money Deal or No Deal Contestants get a |The-Big Idea With Donny Deutsch
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THE TRIBUNE

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 11





LDL:





TRIBUNE SPORTS

Stunning rallies by

-PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

the Titans, Colts



NFL ROUND-UP



â„¢@ By The Associated Press

THE Titans were beaten for
the first time. The Colts were
headed for a 1-3 start.

Not so fast.

Thanks to a stunning rally,
Tennessee edged Baltimore 13-
10 in a brutally physical and
penalty-filled game Sunday.
Then Indianapolis; helped
greatly by gifts from Houston,
topped the Titans’ comeback

« with an even more improbable
turnaround for a 31-27 victo-
“Ty.
“The idea today was to get a
little swagger back,” Colts star
-Peyton Manning said after
‘throwing for two touchdowns
‘in a 2:10 span late in the fourth
‘quarter. “I was proud of the
-guys for never giving up and
fighting ’til the end.”

The Colts scored 21 points
in that 2:10 — two touchdowns
thanks to fumbles by Texans
quarterback Sage Rosenfels —
then intercepted Rosenfels’
last-ditch comeback attempt.

Manning connected with
Reggie Wayne on a 5-yarder
with 1:54 remaining for the
decisive points. Linebacker
Gary Brackett returned a fum-
ble by quarterback Rosenfels
68 yards for a score in between
Manning’s TD throws.

“For one play I made a real-
ly stupid mistake and that start-
ed the downward spiral,”
Rosenfels said. “I feel like I Jet
those guys down.” =

Rookie Tom Santi caught
the other late score, a 7-yarder
to bring the Colts (2-2) to 27-17
with 4:04 to go. It was his first
NFL touchdown.

Tennessee now is the AFC’s
lone undefeated team thanks
to some late magic from Kerry
Collins and a hard-hitting



INDIANAPOLIS COLTS defensive end Robert
Mathis (98) strips the ball from Houston
Texans quarterback Sage Rosenfels (18) in
the fourth quarter Sunday's game in Houston.
The Colts recovered the fumble...

(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

Titans (5-0) trailed 10-6 before

Collins directed an 11-play, 80-
yard scoring drive. The march

defense.
Kerry Collins threw an 11-

was flagged for a blow to
Collins’ helmet — although it
appeared to be incidental con-

yard touchdown pass to Alge
Crumpler with 1:56 left. The

T

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co was then intercepted by
Nick Harper, assuring the
Ravens (2-2) a second straight
defeat.

“It wasn’t always pretty
today. It wasn’t my best game,”
Collins said. “But at the end of
the game we found a way to
win.”

Elsewhere, it was: Chicago
34, Detroit 7; Miami.17, San
Diego 10; Atlanta 27, Green
Bay 24; N.Y. Giants 44, Seattle
6; Carolina 34, Kansas City 0;
Washington 23, Philadelphia
17; Denver 16, Tampa Bay 13;
Dallas 31, Cincinnati 22; Ari-
zona 41, Buffalo 17; New Eng-
land 30, San Francisco 21; and
Pittsburgh 26, Jacksonville 21.
The New York Jets, Oakland,
St. Louis and Cleveland had
open dates. ,

On Monday night, Minneso-
ta (1-3) is at New Orleans (2-2).

Colts 31, Texans 27

Backup Rosenfels, playing
for the ill Matt Schaub, had the
winless Texans (0-4) ahead by
17 points before the late col-
lapse.

“All of our team played
great football today, played
winning football and I made
those mistakes that cost foot-
ball games,” Rosenfels said.
“There is no reason we should
have lost that game.”

The Texans played the LOOth
game in franchise history in
their hurricane-damaged stadi-
um with the retractable roof
open; the roof couldn’t be
repaired in time for Sunday’s
game. Houston was supposed
to host Baltimore in Week 2
when Hurricane Ike hit, but
that game was postponed until
Nov. 9.

Titans 13, Ravens 10

At Baltimore, the game was
marred by several skirmishes,
most of which resulted in per-
sonal foul penalties. Tennessee
was penalized [0 times for 78
yards, including two 15-yard
infractions that fueled both
Baltimore’s scoring drives.

The Ravens received 11
penalties for 91 yards ina
matchup between two teams
that once were, and seem to
still be, bitter rivals.

Wey

PRs

UU
a EE
on Mondays



TENNESSEE TITANS’ Keith Bulluck signals 5-0 while walking off the

Rob Carr/AP

field after the Titans defeated the Baltimore Ravens Sunday. The
Titans remained unbeaten with the win...

ey 4 >
~~ i



J Pat Carter/AP

MIAMI DOLPHINS player Joey Porter (55) celebrates during the
final seconds of Sunday’s game against the San Diego Chargers in

Miami...

Suggs was livid about the
roughing call.

“Tf anybody can go back and
show something I did illegal,
then I would be happy to say I
messed up and got what I
deserved,” he said. “We hit
arms. It just goes to show the
referee has too much power.”

Cardinals 41, Bills 17

At Glendale, Ariz., Buffalo’s
second-year quarterback Trent
Edwards went down with a
concussion on a fierce hit from
safety Adrian Wilson on the
third play of the game.

Rookie Tim Hightower had
a pair of touchdown runs and
Kurt Warner threw to Larry
Fitzgerald twice for scores. The
Cardinals (3-2) are 3-0 at home.

Steelers 26, Jaguars 21

At Jacksonville, Fla., Ben
Roethlisberger threw for 309
yards and three touchdowns,
helping the Steelers (4-1) over-
come their offensive woes and
snap a four-game losing streak
against Jacksonville (2-3).

Roethlisberger finished 26-
of-41, rebounding from an
interception on his third pass
that Rashean Mathis returned
72 yards for a score. Roethlis-
berger’s perfect 8-yard fade
pass to Hines Ward in the cor-
ner of the end zone put the
Steelers ahead 26-21 with 1:53
remaining.

Broncos 16, Buccaneers 13

At Denver, Jay Cutler guid-
ed a patient Denver offense
over the Buccaneers (3-2).
Brandon Stokley hauled in
Cutler’s pass in the right flat
and followed Brandon Mar-
shall’s big block for a 10-yard
touchdown, and Matt Prater
kicked three field goals for
Denver (4-1).

Cowboys 31, Bengals 22

At Irving, Texas, Dallas (4-1)
led 17-0 after only three dri-
ves, but ended up getting big
plays from Terrell Owens,
Tank Johnson and Keith Davis
to stave off the bumbling Ben-
gals (0-5).

Tony Romo was 14-of-23 for
a season-low 176 yards, but
threw three touchdown passes
— two in the fourth quarter.

Cincinnati quarterback Car-
son Palmer returned after miss-
ing a game with a sore elbow
and was 23-of-39 for 217 yards
with two touchdown passes.

Patriots 30, 49ers 21

At San Francisco, Kevin
Faulk rushed for two scores,
Matt Cassel had 259 yards pass-
ing and the Patriots won in San

Francisco (2-3) for the first
time in franchise history.

Randy Moss had five catches
for 111 yards for the Patriots
(3-1).

Dolphins 17, Chargers 10

At Miami, Ronnie Brown
scored the decisive tolichdown
from the single-wing formation
the Dolphins revived two
weeks ago. Miami (2-2) held
LaDainian Tomlinson to 35
yards on 12 carries. The Charg-
ers fell to 2-3.

Giants 44, Seahawks 6

East Rutherford, N.J., In a
nearly flawless performance,
Eli Manning threw two touch-
downs, Brandon Jacobs.ran for °
two more and the unbeaten
Giants (4-0) scored on their
first five possessions.

Falcons 27, Packers 24

At Green Bay, Wis., Atlanta
rookie quarterback Matt Ryan
turned in another sharp per-
formance, completing 16 of 26
passes for 194 yards, two touch-
downs and an interception
against the banged-up Packers
(2-3).

Michael Turner ran for 121
yards and a touchdown for the

new-look Falcons (3-2).

Redskins 23, Eagles 17

At Philadelphia, Clinton Por-
tis ran for 145 yards and one
touchdown and wide receiver
Antwaan Randle El threw a
TD pass for Washington (4-1).

Brian Westbrook, back in
the Philadelphia (2-3) lineup
after missing a game with an
ankle injury, had just 84 total
yards.

Panthers 34, Chiefs 0

Charlotte, N.C., DeAngelo
Williams had 123 yards rush-
ing and scored three touch-
downs, and the Panthers (4-1)
handed the Chiefs their first
shutout in nearly six years.

Tony Gonzalez caught a 6-
yard pass for the Chiefs (1-4)
late in the first quarter to move
past Shannon Sharpe for the
NEL’s career leader for yards
receiving for a tight end.

Bears 34, Lions 7

At Detroit, Kyle Orton set
career highs in yards passing,
completions and quarterback
rating while throwing two
touchdowns. He was 24-of-34
for 334 yards and had a [21.4
rating, improving to 3-0 against
the Lions.

Chicago (3-2) built a 31-0
lead before rookie Kevin Smith
scored for the Lions (0-4) mid-
way through the third quarter.



TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS
3 ry rar 7 cy % 5

~ Jelena Jankovic |
wins Porsche |
Grand Prix

@ By NESHA STARCEVIC
AP Sports Writer



STUTTGART, Germany
(AP) — New No. 1 Jelena
Jankovic won her second title
in two weeks, defeating Nadia
Petrova of Russia 6-4, 6-3 Sun-
day in the final of the Porsche
Grand Prix. °

The 23-year-old Serb also
won the China Open last week
and the Italian Open earlier
this year.

“Tam really proud o
myself,” she said. “I am playing
with a lot of confidence and I
played some good tennis this
week.”

Jankovic was assured of tak-
ing the top ranking Monday
from Serena Williams regard-
less of the outcome of the final.
She already held the No. 1 spot
for one week in August.

“I feel that every day I am
getting better and better. Iam
really working on my game, I
want to reach my full poten-
tial,” Jankovic said. Soe

Williams became the No. 1
after defeating Jankovic at the
US Open final, but the Amer-
ican will. drop in the rankings
after losing her opening match
in Stuttgart. _

Jankovic won her eighth
career title after overcoming a
brief lapse in the second set
against the 18th-ranked Russ-
ian, who won the Stuttgart
tournament in 2006.

After the win, Jankovic took
a spin in the red Porsche 911
convertible given to the win-

ner and appeared to have

more trouble controlling the
powerful car than the match.

She broke serve in the open-
ing game and it was enough to
give her the set against an
error-prone Petrova.

“I really wanted to win this
trophy, and when you want too
much, sometimes it doesn’t
work in tennis,” Petrova said.
“T gave it my best.”

Jankovic also broke to start
the second set, but Petrova
broke back to tie it at 3-3. The
Russian was unable to keep
the-momentum, however, and
dropped serve again after a
series of errors. Jankovic won-
the match when Petrova
pushed a forehand long.

“I got a bit flat in the middle
of the second set, I had some
tough matches behind me and
I was getting tired,” Jankovic
said. “I tried to stay positive, to
be aggressive and to switch
into a higher gear, it was an
important game.”

Petrova had not dropped a
set this week until the final.
Jankovic has been playing with
a painful left foot after tearing
off a toe nail. She needed
painkiller shots before her
semifinal win over Venus

_Williams and got two more
before the final.

Asked about her foot at the
post-match news conference,
Jankovic misunderstood the
question and replied, “The
food is great.”





JELENA JANKOVIC
waves to supporters after
defeating Nadia Petrova
(bottom right)...

JELENA JANKOVIC poses in a Porsche Carrera 4S sports car after her victory in the final match of
the Porsche Grand Prix yesterday in Stuttgart, Germany...






















Realizing the mistake,
Jankovic burst out laughing
and then added:

“It’s numb during the match
and I don’t feel anything, but
after a couple of hours it hurts
a lot,” she said. “The doctor
told me to wear flip-flops but I
am flying to Serbia tonight, I
can’t go in flip-flops like I am
going to the beach.”

Jankovic is scheduled to play
the Kremlin Cup next week.
Although she left open
whether she would actually
show up in Moscow for the
tournament, which Williams is
skipping.

“I feel tired now, but men-
tally I am not tired, I am hun-
gry to do well. I want to finish
the year as No. 1,” she said.



Berdych defeats Del Potro
to win the Japan Open —

@ By JIM ARMSTRONG
AP Sports Writer



TOKYO (AP) — Tomas
Berdych won the Japan Open
for his first singles title in 16
months, beating Juan Martin
Del Potro 6-1, 6-4 on Sunday.

The ninth-seeded Czech
relied on strong serves and sol-
id groundstrokes to beat the
Argentine, who won*29 of 30
matches going into the final.

“At this level of tennis, it’s
important to be consistent,”
said the 23-year-old Berdych,
who had 11 aces. “I was able to
do that all week and am thrilled
to win the title.”

In the women’s event, top-
seeded Caroline Wozniacki
defeated fifth-seeded Kaia
Kanepi of Estonia 6-2, 3-6, 6-1.
It was the Dane’s third singles
title in three months, having
claimed events in Stockholm
and New Haven.

“She was serving really well
in the second set and had the
advantage,” said Wozniacki. “I
just tried to step it up in the
third set and play better on my
return and it worked out for
me.”

After struggling for much of
this season, Berdych said he’s
Starting to get his game back.
He reached the semifinals of
the Bangkok Open last month.

“In today’s tennis everything
is so close and tough,” said
Berdych. “It’s all about having
confidence on the court. If you
win one or two matches every-
thing can come together.”

Berdych coasted through the
first set, then broke to go ahead
2-1 in the second set. :

Del Potro fought back, lob-
bing the Czech to cut the lead
to 5-4, but Berdych held serve
in the final game to take the
fifth title of his career.

Del Potro, seeded fifth, was

&.

looking to win his fifth title of
the year but got off to a shaky
start and wasn’t able to recover.

He took some medicine for
his stomach during the first set.

“T was a little confused with
his game,” said Del Potro.
“After the first set, I started to
play a little better but it was
too late. didn’t have a chance



JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO,

missing a shot against Tomas
Berdych of Czech Republic in
their final match at the Japan
Open Sunday in Tokyo...

TOMAS BERDYCH, of the Czech
Republic, returns a shot against
Juan Martin del Potro (bottom left),
of Argentina, at the Japan Open
yesterday in Tokyo...



Yi

aT

(Photos: Shizuo Kambayashi/AP)

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to do anything with his game.”

Berdych defeated second-
seeded Andy Roddick in the
semifinals to reach Sunday’s
final. Del Potro had defeated
top-seeded David Ferrer in the
quarterfinals before advancing
to the final with a win over last
_year’s runner-up Richard Gas-
quet of France.

) y

of Argentina, reacts after ©

Photos: Matthias Schrader/AP

“2,

2

Por

ck-Oulourlinternet\Deals





‘

THE TRIBUNE






- AN
OQQQNN



TUESDAY,




OCTOBER 7,



Ke
% at
SNe Nermaanaeneee

2008.










Jankovic
wins the
Porsche
Grand Prix...

See page 13



Hurricanes blow
away Comets 13-2

& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he St Andrew’s
Hurricanes are
getting better and
better as the sea-
son progresses.

The Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary
Schools’ senior boys champions
improved their undefeated
record to 4-0 with a 13-2 rout
over the Queen’s College
Comets (2-2) yesterday at
Queen’s College.

“We have a good team, but
we're still trying to fine tune
our offense,” said Hurricanes’
coach Montgomery Nazon.
“We’re looking good. We’re
basically focusing on keeping
our opponents’ runs down. We
are trying not to allow our
opponents to score more than

®

Senior boys champions
have 4-0 record

five runs. We’re trying to get
our offense to win the game.”

It wasn’t just the offense, but
the defense that did the job
against the Comets.

Jared Higgs had another big
game on the mound, this time
firing a two-hitter with six strike
outs as he went the distance in
the abbreviated five-inning
game that was stopped via the
ten-run rule.

On at least two occasions

with runners in scoring position,
Higgs came up with a strike out
to kill Queen’s College’s rally
in both the second and the
fourth.

And in the fifth, after
Comets’ losing pitcher Celsan
Toote walked and advanced all
the way to third on an error,
only to score on a wild pitch,
the Hurricanes stopped them
from scoring again and possi-
bly extending the game to the

seventh inning.

“T think we played really well
today, even though we made
some errors,” said St Andrew’s
right fielder Herman Maycock.
“We just looked at this as a bat-
ting practice.”

Maycock, who went 2-for-3
with two RBIs and a run scored,
said if they continue to play the
way they are doing now, they
should have a very good chance
to go all the way and repeat as



Darling surprised over warning

_ & By BRENT STUBBS
_ Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

JAY DARLING is sur-
prised that he got a warning
from the Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federa-
tion (BBFF), claiming he did-
n't do anything wrong by ask-
ing for more funding.

“T have sent a letter to Dan-
ny and the vice-president and
I’ve asked them to explain to
me why I’ve received a warn-
ing letter for saying the truth,”
Darling told Tribune Sports.

“JT have not received any
response,” said Darling, who
won a gold medal in the men’s
middleweight division at the
36th Central American and
Caribbean Bodybuilding and
Fitness Championships.

On Friday, BBFF president
Danny Sumner noted that
because Darling asked for
more funding, he was in direct
violation of the constitution
of the International Federa-
tion of Bodybuilders — the
governing body of the BBFF
—and, as a result, was given a
public warning.

He also announced that
female bodybuilder Lorraine
LaFleur would be suspended
for three years because of her
alleged unsportsmanlike con-
duct at the championships.

In addition, Sumner also
revealed that female fitness
competitor Sherice Mackey
would receive a one-year sus-
pension for allegedly failing
to compete at the champi-
onships.

At The Tribune yesterday,
Darling produced a copy of
the constitution of the Inter-
national Federation of Body-
builders. He pointed out Arti-
cle 27 under the heading
‘Cash Awards’, which reads:

“National, Regional and
Continental Federations are
free to present cash awards at
designated events. For events
at and below the national lev-
el, the respective National Fed-
eration shall decide the rules
and regulations governing
cash awards, and the terms
and conditions governing par-
ticipation, except that a
National Federation may not
invite other countries, or ath-
letes from other countries, to



participate in a competition at

this level.

“For events above the
national level and at or below
the continental level, the





JAY DARLING is surprised that he got a warning from the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation
(BBFF), claiming he didn’t do anything wrong by asking for more funding...

respective Continental Feder-
ation shall decide the rules and
regulations governing cash
awards, and the terms and
conditions governing partici-
pation.”

Darling claimed that Sum-
ner “has no credit” in saying
that any athlete receiving
money and is an amateur
receiving money, is in direct
violation of that rule and
could be suspended.

“He’s saying that no body-
builder has the right to solicit
funds, yet they give us sponsor
sheets and they encourage us
to go out and collect monies,”
Darling said.

Darling, who has won 10
medals in the CAC Champi-
onships over the past decade,
said there was nothing wrong
with the comments he made.

“The suspensions that he -

sent out this week are illegal
because we have a discipline

committee, headed by Mr
Richard Demeritte, and he
has not signed any letters,” he
said. “Things like this have to
stop,” Darling said. “I haven’t
been given any letter about
my warning, but my name has
been mentioned -all through
the media, but no-one has
told me what I said wrong.
That is something that I dis-
agree with. In light of these
things, I’m asking for Mr
Sumner to give me a public
apology in the forum that he
brought my good name down.
I was only speaking the
truth.”

Even though there is a cry
by the athletes for money,
Darling said they never get it,
but they will compete, so it’s
not just the money they are
after.

While Darling said he’s not
condoning what LaFleur did
on stage, he noted that even

Sumner questioned the deci-
sion of the judges when he
heard the results.

Darling said Sumner should
rescind his decisions on the
suspensions because Richard
Demeritte, chairman of the
discipline committee, was not
present at the meeting when
the decision was made.

“I can only say that the past
couple of days was a personal
attack and I charge Danny
Sumner with direct violation
of the official code of conduct
where he is to refrain from
personal contact with any
member of the IFBB, which is
me,” he said.

“T have a letter that | am
putting to him that he needs
to apologise to me in the same
forum that he made his alle-
gations against me in public.
He just needs to come to the
public and be a man and apol-
ogise.”





champions.

St Andrew’s struck first, scor-
ing two unearned runs in the
top of the first on a Tarig Kelly
RBI sacrifice fly that plated
Conner Albury and David
Sweeting, who followed with a
double, got to third on a wild
pitch and scored on an error.

Queen’s College got on the
scoreboard in the bottom of the
frame when Ashton McKenzie
drew a one-out walk and moved
around the bases on three con-
secutive wild pitches.

In the:second, the Hurricanes
added three more runs on three

hits as Ben Pinder, Higgs’ and’

Albury.all scored the plate to
extend the lead to 5-1.

They duplicated the three-
three feat in the third as Bran-
don Burrows, Ben Pinder and
Higgs got a run each to push
the lead to 8-1.

After Marcus Farrington
walked and scored an unearned
run in the fourth for a 9-1 lead,
the Hurricanes blew the game
open with four more runs in the
fifth, highlighted by Albury’s
big bases clearing double that
drove home Maycock, Higgs
and Costa Papageorge before
he continued home on a two-
base error.

At that point, it was 13-1 and
it appeared as if the Comets
were going to be.stopped.

Queen’s College needed at
least two runs to avoid going
home early, but they only man-
aged to get one as the game was
eventually stopped.

“We were beaten by a much
better ball club, much better
ball club,” Comets’ coach Gary
Markham pointed out. “They
were pretty sound on both sides
of the ball.

“We didn’t help ourselves.
We made a lot of mistakes,
errors in center field, errors on
the infield, we had about six
errors at once in one inning.”

Markham said St Andrew’s
deserved the victory because
they had an all-around good
game, but he’s hoping that they

‘can bounce back and get ready

for the playoffs.

Softball
statistics
released

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

WITH the 2008 New Provi- .
dence Softball Association reg-
ular season in the books and
both championship series
intensely underway, regular sea-
son statistical leaders were
released for the first time.

All four teams in the cham-
pionship series boast several
players among league leaders.

In the men’s: division,
although the Truckers were
absent from the top of the
leaderboard in terms,of hitting,
ace pitcher Leroy Thompson
was the league’s most dominant
force on the mound...) »

Thompson finished: with a
perfect 12-0 record, one of only
two double digit winners‘in the
league along with the Pros’ Car-

dinal Gilbert (12-5). Thompson

finished second in strikéouts,
with 61 in just 73 innings.
Gilbert led the league with 68
pitches but needed 94 2/3
innings to do so.

The Truckers’ Terran Wood
hit .529 to lead the league in
batting average.

Nine of the league’s top 20
hitters were members of one of
the championship squads, the
Truckers or New Breed.

The Commodores dynamic
trio dominated at the plate,
leading in a myriad of statistical
categories. Ramon Storr led the
league in hits (37), runs (40),
and finished second batting
average with .507.

Teammate Phillip Culmer
trailed closely behind, finishing
second in hits (32), runs (38),
tied for the league lead in RBIs
(29) and finished tied for sec-
ond in home runs with five.

Yet another Commodore,
Derek Christie, led the league
with six home runs and tied
Culmer for the lead league in
RBI with 29.

In the women’s division, The

‘Sharks’ Thela Johnson was the

dominant slugger, leading her
team’s bid to a championship
appearance.

Johnson led the league in
home runs (28), RBIs (22),
home runs (three), and tied for -
the league lead in hits (29).

BTC’s Dawn Forbes held a
share of the league lead in hits.
Her teammate Sharnell Symon-
ette led the league with a .500
batting average and with 12
stolen bases.

Mary Sweeting dominated
from the mound much like
Johnson did at the plate leading
in virtually every category.

Sweeting led in strikeouts
(81), nearly doubling her near-
est competitor, BTC’s Marvell
Miller with 41, although Sweet-
ing pitched just two more
innings.

Sweeting tied for the league
led with an 8-8 record with the
Sharks’ Alex Taylor. She also
finished second with an ERA
of 3.48, while Miller led the

_ league with an ERA of 2.45.

e SEE Wednesday’s Sports
section for the full softball sta-
tistics table

Slice takes a fall

lâ„¢ By RENALDO DORSETT

Sports Reporter



THE massive rise in popular-
ity of one of mixed martial arts’
most popular fighters took a
step back this weekend at the
hands of an opponent who is
not well known.

Kimbo Slice was stopped just
14 seconds into his fight Satur-
day night against Seth Petruzel-
li in a modified main event of
Elite XC: Saturday Night
Fights.

Kevin Ferguson, a Bahami-
an native better known as Kim-
bo Slice, was originally sched-
uled to face MMA and WWE
legend Ken Shammrock. How-
ever, Shammrock sustained a
cut over his left eye on Friday,
forcing him out of competition.

Petruzelli was originally
scheduled to fight on the under-
card in the light heavyweight
division against Aaron Rosa.

At just a little over 205
pounds, Petruzelli was out-



MARTIAL ARTS



weighed by nearly 20 pounds
but accepted an opportunity at
the increased exposure of a
main event bout against Slice.

He garnered national atten-
tion after being featured in a
series of street fights on the
Internet, prompting his debut
as a professional MMA fighter
in 2007.

After the opening bell, Slice
appeared to be the early aggres-
sor and charged toward
Petruzelli’s corner. The rela-
tively unknown Petruzelli
blocked him with a short kick
and connected on a jab which
sent Slice to the floor.

The fight was stopped by ret-
eree Troy Waugh = after
Petruzelli delivered a series of
haymakers to a defenseless
Slice. Petruzelli improved his
record to 11-4 with eight knock-
outs, while Slice fell to 3-1.



THE TRIBUNE | | TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 1





WENDY’S



Norman Solomon
Former Franchisee Passes Away



nt weaqweraqactes: Seep eneeae: pana.an out sqpuecnectavanpevanps recenpesqoyssswetevanpertemnécessmevatesemeenertnianpraneitainsseunsehserntsessawesemseaneseencemasenessenreeeag ees ePersnniesns GaneerAerunsUsenerrrwenserard Cone MOReeentar se serwsyeseresewT ees AiDensere reins ernreensnTnteweehin ser ThentinATseenesrseen
eeeenepeeretene: seayonesyesgsremeunnaevedys pteceeqereye tenesneneanartens nes ae eeevanpereny. ,

The Wendy's family has lost a dear friend. Norman Solomon,

who started the Wendy's franchise organization in The.

Aten Danae Peear Sarens an tesantnes ep mre tae

amanrenenens

- Bahamas, passed away on Sunday, Sapembet 28. Dave ;

phen as ease

Thomas and Norman enjoyed a close friendship.

Norman opened his first store on Mackey Street in Nassau in
June, 1988. His franchise grew to six stores and eventually
included Freeport on Grand Bahama Island. In 1994 he

received his first Wendy Award. Norman had an energetic —

MALT DE SES PASTY RAT EH RGR R RMS AGA PERTERROPL EES IAP SEL REEDS U4 READ ERESHANES PETE AS ARE RANT ARE RE NPY Fe:

anparanesecers,

annem nensane:

presence and his restaurants enj joyed a tremendous following.

ead pnea nes

Ses rereesay

- The Bahamas restaurants have consistently ranked i in the top

canengiae

25 in system wide sales and transactions. Over time, Norman’ Ss
daughter, Andrya Solomon-Schulte took on the responsibility

ates neprepaeeaganesoeneapepasetnaten tate caee:

of overseeing the restaurants, and in 2001 their franchise —
received another Wendy Award. Norman was also a member of

Parliament in The Bahamas.

In 2005, the Salat sold their franchise to’ Chris and

| Terry Tsavoussis. Our deepest sympathies go out to Norman’s

Ade res e kee neomeperan nes nares renee ramesroanseqor nes Eeate ene apanrer

family and associates.





we.
-<_ .

«
oe «
=F.





@ By PAULINE JELINEK
and MATTHEW LEE
WASHINGTON

China has abruptly canceled a series
of military and diplomatic contacts with
the United States to protest a planned
$6.5 billion package of U.S. arms sale
to Taiwan, American officials told The
Associated Press on Monday.

Beijing has notified the U.S. that it
will not go forward with several senior
level visits and other cooperative mili-
tary-to-military plans, said Marine Maj.
Stewart Upton, a Defense Department
spokesman.

"In response to Friday's announce-
ment of Taiwan arms sales, the Peo-
ple's Republic of China canceled or
postponed several upcoming military-
to-military exchanges," Upton said,
lamenting that "China's continued
politicization of our military relation-
ship results in missed opportunities."

The Chinese action will not affect
the country's participation with the
United States in six-nation talks aimed
at getting North Korea to give up its
nuclear weapons or its participation in
the international effort on Iran's





oT





P Photo/Wally Santana



A

a ee BS nea evenerer ny

TAIWAN PRESIDENT Ma Ying-jeou opens the 2008 Taiwan Business Alliance Conference
in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Oct. 6, 2008. The two-day conference has attracted more than
300 business people from China in hopes of increased foreign investment. Taiwanese have
invested more than US$100 billion on the Chinese mainland, but Taiwan has long
barred reverse investment from China for fear it would give China economic and politi-
cal control of the island. China has now cancelled military/diplomatic ties with US.

nuclear program, U.S. officials said.
But it does include the cancellation

of an upcoming U.S. visit by a senior

Chinese general, other similar trips,

the indefinite postponement of meet-
ings on stopping the spread of weapons
of mass destruction, the officials said.



Mall at Marathon
Tel - 394-4880

TT Paes em Lt US
Fri - Sat 11 a.m. to 12 a.m,

military C

several port calls by naval vessels and -

"It's an unfortunate step," said
deputy State Department spokesman
Robert Wood.

Beijing is furious with the U.S. deci-
sion to sell Taiwan the huge $6.5 billion
package of advanced weaponry and
military items, including guided mis-
siles and attack helicopters. China,
which regards Taiwan as a renegade
province, says the sale interferes with
internal Chinese affairs and harms its

_national security.

"The Chinese government and the
Chinese people strongly oppose and
object to the U.S. government's
actions, which harm Chinese interests
and Sino-U.S. relations," its foreign
ministry said in a statement Saturday,
adding that U.S. diplomats had been
summoned to hear a strong protest.

China's Ambassador to the United
States, Zhou Wenzhong, was expected
to register a similar protest about the
arms sale on Monday with the State
Department. A Chinese Embassy
spokesman in Washington said it would
be "only natural" for the ambassador
to lodge the protest.

Upton said.the sale does not repre-
sent a change in U.S. policy and that



gtion:

on. When you —

THE TRIBUNE



ontacts with US

Washington is only upholding the pro-
visions of the Taiwan Relations Act
under which the U.S. makes available
items necessary for Taiwan to main-
tain a sufficient self defense.

Taiwan, which opened a business

‘conference yesterday in the hope of
increasing foreign investment, relies
on U:S. weapons to keep pace with
China's massive arms buildup across,
the Taiwan Strait. U.S. arms sales to.
Taiwan are a crucial matter because
any dispute between China and Tai-
wan could ensnare the United States.

Washington is Taiwan's most impor-
tant ally and largest arms supplier. ;

The U.S. Defense Security Cooper;
_ation Agency announced Friday that it
had notified the U.S. Congress of plans’
to sell up to $6.5 billion-in advanced
weaponry to Taiwan. Under proce-
dures for such foreign military sales,
the deal would proceed if no lawmak=
er voices an objection within 30 days of
the notification.

Beijing claims Taiwan as its own ter-
ritory and has threatened to invade
should the self-governing islanu ever
formalize its de facto independence.









:




SOOO OOV0000?





S100m BEC conversion

pie TRIBUNE



MAW ah TERRE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7,




ROYAL DFIDELITY

cost estimate over LNG

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor

Converting
the Bahamas
Electricity
Corporation’s
(BEC) tur-
bines to gen-
erate power
from burning
liquefied nat-
ural gas
(LNG )
“would
require huge capital invest-
ment” in the region of $100 mil-
lion, Tribune Business was told
yesterday, with the Government
wanting to submit the proposal

.)

lam DLeerlly



Government
seeing if it can
‘reconcile’
Bluewater
BTC offer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s privati-
sation committee is assessing
~ whether the administration’s
objectives for the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
-(BTG).can be. “reconciled”with
the offer submitted by Bluewa-
ter Communications Holding,

a government minister saying it -

would “move on to the next -
_ phase” if a deal was unreach-
~ able.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for. finance, told Tribune

SEE page 5B





62.2-acre Rum Plant situated in the south-west portion of New
Providence offers 1,235 feet of water frontage with a rocky shoreline,

7 individual warehouses totalling 254,123 square feet and security gate at
entry. Additionally there are 16 buildings, including an 11,106 square foot
Administration building and a 65,230 sq. ft. Industrial building. Industrial
electrical supply, Desalination Plant and three standby Generators ensure
continuous electrical supply. For further information contact:
George.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.362.4211 :

Damianos |

Member of
SiRbahamas.com | t 242.3222305 | 242.322.2033 | the Buhorros MLS

* Technical review of AES proposal required before government

decision on approving New Providence power supply offer
* Top four renewable energy proposals submitted to BEC
will be forwarded for government approval -

by AES Corporation to a “full
technical review” before reach-
ing a decision.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of

the environment, who has ulti-

mate ministerial responsibility
for BEC, said it was impossible
to provide a timeline for how
long the technical review would
take and when the Government

BEC fuel costs

quadruple to
over $350m

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s (BEC) fuel bill
has more than-quadrupled over
the last six years, rising from
$80 million to more than $350
million as a result of soaring
global oil prices.

With no predictable end to
the skyrocketing fuel surcharges
and large BEC bills, the Cor-
poration’s general manager,
Kevin Basden, encouraged
Bahamians to practice stronger
energy conservation measures.
He said that BEC as. a company
is also facing the burden, with
their largest and most signifi-
cant expense being fuel.

He added that this had made
it increasingly difficult for com-
panies to budget for longer peri-
ods, because the fuel surcharge
can alter utility bills by so much.

Mr Basden spoke to persons
attending a free legal clinic
sponsored by Halisbury Cham-
bers at the weekend, and
warned them that until the Gov-
ernment and BEC can access
renewable energy sources or
there is a constant decline in oil
prices, the only way they can
reduce their light bills is through
conservation measures.

Mr. Basden stressed the
importance of having air con-
ditioning units that were prop-
erly fitted to windows and the
size of rooms. He added that
solar water heaters are the
biggest difference makers in
reducing utility costs, and will
pay-off their investment within
two years.

Other helpful tips were to
unplug appliances, adjust the
thermostat on the fridge, ensure

SEE page 5B










Sotheby's

INTERNATIONAL REALTY



would make a.decision, even
though AES has been pressing
for an answer by year-end. |
Dr Deveaux said that AES
and its attorneys had been push-
ing for a government decision
on whether. to ‘make the
approval in principle that was
granted to its project back in
2001 a full, formalised approval

Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

IT is “100 per cent.certain”
that Digicel will bid for one of
the two new cellular licences
that will be auctioned one year
after the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
is privatised, a senior company
executive yesterday saying that
for him entering this market
“would be the crown jewel”.

Bahamian E. Jay Saunders,
Digicel’s general manager for
the Turks & Caicos Islands,
described the Bahamian cellular
market as “very significant” for
the company, which has opera-
tions in most other Caribbean
territories.

Explaining that it was “100
per cent certain” that it would
bid for a licence to provide cel-
lular services in the Bahamas
post-privatisation, Mr Saunders
told Tribune Business: “The
Bahamas is very, very impor-
tant for Digicel.

“To me as a Bahamian, I see

‘it as the crown jewel for me per-

sonally. For Digicel, it’s a very

Significant market. It’s not a

| °* Pension Plans

. Mitwal Funds

that would allow it to proceed.
The US power generation

giant had initially sought gov-

ernment approval to supply
Florida with LNG via a pipeline
and regasification terminal at
Ocean Cay, a man-made island
off Bimini.

Yet AES had earlier this year
modified its proposal, in light

of the issues the Bahamas and
BEC were experiencing with
soaring energy costs as a result
of rising global oil prices, and
offered to supply New Provi-
dence with LNG from the Bimi-
ni plant, too.

“AES is asking for a formal

SEE page 3B

telecoms market a
‘crown jewel for Digicel |

**100% certain’ regional cellular giant will bid against
likes of Cable Bahamas for two cellular licences

* New entrants must offer services by two years after BTC
privatised, with licence auction to take place after one year

* Criteria for new licence winners favours established
foreign companies, not Bahamians

poor market.”

Pointing out that the
Bahamas had 10 times the num-
ber of potential customers when
compared to the Turks &
Caicos Islands, for example, Mr
Saunders added: “The Bahamas
is a significant market in.terms
of the economy and GDP.
You're getting a market that is
pretty well-to-do, and the pop-
ulation size makes it a very
good one for Digicel” to target.

Mr Saunders said all those
factors meant that numerous
carriers besides Digicel were all
eyeing the Bahamian telecom-
munications market and work-
ing out how to enter it, once
privatisation and liberalisa-
tion/deregulation took place.

More details emerged yester-
day on the Government’s
deregulation strategy for the
telecoms sector, Prime Minis-

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

° Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

* Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts —

BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

Bridgetown: 246.467.4000

CUA

ter Hubert Ingraham having
unveiled the broad outline last
week in Parliament.

Apart from selling a 51 per
cent stake in BTC, the Govern-
ment plans to liberalise fixed-
line telecoms as soon as the pri-
vatisation is completed, with
deregulation of cellular services
beginning one year after this
date.

A statement.issued on behalf
of the BTC privatisation com-
mittee said that exactly one year
from the privatisation’s com-
pletion, a request for proposal
(RFP) or tender document
would be issued inviting expres-
sions of interest in the two new
Bahamian cellular licences that
would be issued.

-A public consultation would
take place at the same time, and

SEE page 4B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Film
Studios
cut from
4,500 ©

to ‘120 >

acres’

* Purchaser says
asking price cut
to $5m as a result,
as it awaits revised
deal with
government

* Concerns over
smaller Studios’
economic viability,
as time running out
on attracting new
‘Pirates of the
Caribbean movie

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A POTENTIAL bidder for
the Bahamas Film Studios yes-
terday said it was awaiting the
receipt of a revised agreement .
between the vendor and the
Government, having been told
by the seller the asking price
had been reduced to $5 million.

This was because the projec-
t’s size had been drastically cut
by the Government from 3,500
acres to just 120 acres.

Bahamian banker Owen
Bethel, who put together the
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional consortium, told Tribune
Business that the existing sales
agreement between his group
and the vendor, Bahamas Film
Studios chairman Ross Fuller,
had expired on October 5, 2008.

“He is requesting $5 million
to enter into a new agreement
with him, based on the new
terms,” Mr Bethel, president of
the Nassau-based Montaque

SEE page 4B

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work





PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008







® By Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets .

IT was a very quiet week in
the Bahamian stock market,
with investors trading in eight
out of the 24 listed securities,
of which two advanced, two
declined and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 33,194 shares
changed hands, a slight decline
from last week's trading volume
of 47,168 shares.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) (CIB) led the
advance for a second consecu-
tive week, with 11,233 of its
shares trading, jumping by $0.05
or 0.42 per cent to close the
week at $11.75.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
followed, with 9,161 of its shares

trading, gaining by $0.01 to
close at $7.38. Some 5,000
shares of FOCOL Holdings
(FCLB) Class ‘B’ preferred
shares traded for the first time
this week, for a total value of
$5,000.

Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas
(CAB) saw 4,000 of its shares
trade, its stock ending the week
unchanged at $14.15.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national was the biggest declin-
er of the week with 1,000 shares
trading, dropping by $0.85 or
10 per cent to close at a new
52-week low of $7.65. Some
1,000 shares of Abaco Markets
(AML) traded, its stock price
declining this week by $0.10 or
5.85 per cent to close at $1.71.

BOND MARKET
Investors traded in $27,000
(par value) Fidelity Bank

(Bahamas) Notes, all in Series
D Notes, (FBB15), which are
due for redemption in 2015.

PANY NE

Earnings Releases

Bahamas Waste (BWL)
released unaudited financial
results for the six-month period
ended June 30, 2008. BWL's
gross profit stood at $1.2 mil-
lion versus $1.6 million for the
comparative period in 2007, a
decline of $404,000 or 26.1 per
cent.

Sales revenues of $3.8 million’

were down by $116,000, while

the cost of sales, some $2.7 mil-

lion, was up by $288,000. Total
operating expenses climbed by
$7,000 to $957,000 from
$950,000 for the same six-month
period in 2007.

The movement in BWL's rev-

All offices professionally fitted out to a extremely high [
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850 @ $ 25.00 = $ 1,771.00
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floor plans and to view your new office.

Phone: 359 2957

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enues and expenses resulted in
net income from operations
declining by $410,000 or 68 per
cent from the prior year peri-
od, totalling $190,000. Earnings
er share declined by $0.09 to
0.05, versus $0.14 at the end
of the 2007 second quarter.
BWL's total assets and liabil-

ities stood at $9.8 million and’

$1:5 million respectively, com-
pared to $9.2-million and $1.1
million at year-end 2007.

Abaco Markets (AML)
released unaudited financial

results for the quarter ended |

July 31,2008. AML's net prof-
it stood at $162,000, a decrease
of $348,000 from the $544,000
recorded during the same peri-
od in 2007.

For the most recent quarter,
AML’s sales grew to $22.7 mil-
lion, compared to $21.8 million
in the 2007 second quarter, a
change of $878,000, while the
$16.2 million cost of sales
increased by $1.1 million.

Net operating profit declined
by $446,000 or 53.4 per cent to
$389,000, compared to $835,000
for the comparative period in
2007.

Selling and general adminis-
trative expenses were $6.2 mil-
lion in the quarter, compared
to $5.8 million in the 2007 sec-
ond quarter, an increase of
$301,000 or 5.1 per cent. Profit

er share dropped to $0.01 from
0.032 in 2007.











House #:
House Colour:

Requested Start Date:

House Name:

Type of Fence/Wall:

No matter what vour schedil

Cohn Mo ROC eae OOM AOL ae Ei),

Lf

ee bel eee hh

mae
f

{
INTHS







THE TRIBUNE

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 877.49 (2. 83%) YTD
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.71 $-0.10 1,000 3.01%
BBL _ $0.89 $- 0 4.71%
BOB: $7.65 $-0.85 1,000 -20.40%
BPF $11.80 get 0 0.00%
BSL $14.60 gos! 0 0.00%
BWL .'$3.49----$-". 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $- | 4,000 17.43%
CBL . $738.4. 4 $4001 9.161 12.46%
CHL’. $2.85" Fo ge | 9.52%
CIB $11.70 $40.05 11,233 19.86%
CWCB $2.54 $-117 0 -49.60%
DHS. $2.77 | 0 17.87%
FAM $8.06 $- | 0 11.94%
EBB $2.37 $-).| 0 10.57%
FCC —-$0.40 $- 0 -48.05%
FCL $5.25 $- 1,800 135%
FCLB $1.00 FIN. $12.00 $- 0 734%
ICD ‘$8.20 $- 0 13.10%
ISI $12.00 $- 0: 9.09%
PRE _ $10.00 $- 0 0.00% |
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES: |

¢ Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has declared
a quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on November
7, 2008, to all shareholders of record date September 30, 2008.

¢ RND Holdings (RND) announced it will hold its Annual
General Meeting on Wednesday, October 22, 2008, at 6pm at the
British Colonial Hilton, N asa Bahamas.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFF ERINGS:

¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares
will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually.

International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change

CAD$ 0.9246 7.18
GBP 1.7756 -3.70
EUR 1.3792 -5.69
Commodities

Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $93.13 -13.03
Gold $840.00 -5.08
International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly % Change
DJIA 10,325.38 -7.34
S& P 500 1,099.23 -7.34
NASDAQ 1,099.23 -9.40
Nikkei 10,938.14 -8.03

TO TEMPTATION











LETS SM 777
ea MS Ey ARTE
just call 502-2371 today!



THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 3B



SEES Va ee ae ee
Hotel body denies endorsement claim

THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) has denied
attempting to infringe on the
rights of businesses to freely
conduct business with the
Bahamian hotel industry, and
said it is not attempting to intro-
duce an endorsement pro-
gramme.

In a statement issues yester-
day, the BHA said it “took
strong exception” with state-
ments made by former Minister
of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe.

It said that last June, the
BHA announced its plans to
explore the options of endors-
ing an in-room publication,
preferably with-the Dupuch
Publications Welcome
Bahamas book, which is already

BEC, from 1B

decision on that approval in
principle,” Dr Deveaux
explained. “To get a formal
approval, their revised plan
needs to be subjected to a tech-
nical review.

“They are now suggesting
something different today - co-
generation with BEC to supply

electrical generation and instal- -

lation for New Providence. In
order for that request to be
accommodated, a full technical
review of the proposal is
required.”

Dr Deveaux was unable to
say when the technical review
would start and how long it
would take, as the Government

would first have to advertise the .

job and then select a winning
bidder.

Any review would be a two-
phased process, as apart from
the technical review carried out
by the Government’s consul-
tants, Dr Deveaux said the Min-
istry of the Environment had
already asked BEC to “review
and comment” on the proposals
AES had submitted to it.

Any review would have to
consider the environmental,
economic, timescale and tech-
nical issues involved in AES
constructing a $150-$200 mil-
lion, 120-mile LNG pipeline

from Bimini to supply BEC’s.

turbine gemerators at the Blue
Hills plant, the minister said.
The ultimate objective was to
determine whether the AES
proposal was “feasible and sus-
tainable”, given BEC’s current

in a number of hotel rooms at
no charge to the publisher.
The BHA said it planned to
levy a small fee on Dupuch
publications in return for its
exclusive right of distribution
inside member hotel rooms
throughout the country.

The proceeds from any part-'

nership with a publisher would
be used to support education
and environmental projects
with young people.

‘The BHA said: “As is the
case in countless jurisdictions
around the world, there is a
privilege to being able to place
a publication inside a hotel
room.

“Throughout the Caribbean,
including places like Aruba,

power generation supply that
was based on bunker C fuel.

“In this case, AES has offered
to do something in New Provi-
dence,” Dr Deveaux explained
to Tribune Business, “which
was to sweeten the pot and con-
vert some of BEC’s generators
to burn LNG.

“That would require huge
capital investment and a shift
in the way BEC supplies power.
That number we heard was in
the region of $100 million.”

Perspective

He added: “From the per-
spective of BEC as a corpora-
tion, it needs to make a deci-
sion as a Board whether it
wants to do this.

“The Government also needs
to review, from a strategic point
of view, whether this is the
direction it wants to go in. To
make that decision, we need
advice at arm’s length from
BEC.”

The $100 million capital
investment cost cited by the
minister appears to be slightly at
odds with figures previously cit-
ed by Aaron Samson, the AES
LNG managing director, who
said in June that the cost of con-
verting BEC’s seven to eight
combustion turbines at Blue
Hills to take LNG had been
estimated at between $1-$1.5
million each, making a maxi-
mum total of $12 million.

Mr Samson had projected
that BEC could save between
$1.4 billion to $4 billion - $80
million to $210 million per

Sy:
za

Meanie



Curacao, St Lucia, the Turks
and Caicos, and around the

annum - in fuel costs over a 15-
year period if it switched to
using LNG, based on two sets
of data for future global oil
prices.

Yet Tribune Business under-
stands that the Government’s
concerns over the AES propos-
al relate to long-term LNG
prices, and whether they would
increase at the same rate - and
reach the same level - as oil
prices as global demand
increased. Such a development
would negate any advantages
from switching BEC to LNG.

Dr Deveaux said he did not
believe the more than seven-
year wait that AES had
endured for a final government
decision on whether to approve
its project would negatively
impact investor confidence in
the Bahamas.

“This was not a straight up

" and down investment proposal

per se,” he added, pointing out
that apart from AES, both El
Paso and Tractebel had sub-
mitted LNG pipeline and ter-
minal proposals to the Govern-
ment. Concerns over the envi-
ronment, and questions over
whether the Bahamas had the
technical ability and capacity to
oversee an LNG industry, had
to be answered.

Only AES had remained in
the game, and “the circum-
stances then [in 2001] are total-
ly different from the circum-
stances now. We’re plagued
with high energy costs”.

The AES propoSal would -
also be subjected to,a separate »

review from the planned audit

member of the QNB Group

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, part of the Ansbacher
group of companies, specializes in providing clients with
private banking, fiduciary and wealth management services.

Risk Manager

An opening has arisen for a risk manager to work closely
with the director for risk management in establishing a
‘ strong framework for risk management and monitoring
risk positions across the bank in credit, market and
operational risk areas. Data compilation, enforcement of
internal controls and report preparation for senior
management and risk committees are also important
aspects of this job. The jobholder is expected to contribute
new ideas designed to improve the efficiency of the
department and to assist with risk management related

projects.

To apply you should hold a bachelor’s degree in business,
accounting or finance and have a minimum of three years’
experience working in an operational or risk management
area within a banking organization. It is expected that you
will possess excellent communication skills and be
proficient in the use of Word, Excel and Power Point.

Please send your resumé with a covering letter to Human
Resource Manager, Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, PO
Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas, hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail
is Friday October 10, 2008.

«

world, publishers pay for the
exclusive privilege of in-room
access either to the hotel or a
hotel association or convention
bureau.

“This exclusive privilege then
allows the publisher to generate
the distribution volume and
exclusivity necessary to com-
mand rates from advertisers.

“It is not our intention to
embrace any broad endorse-
ment policy covering all busi-
nesses. All publishers would
continue to be able to distribute
their materials as they present-
ly do in public areas within
hotels. Much as is done with
in-room movie operators, this
exclusive right of access, which
allows a publisher or movie

of BEC, The request for pro-
posal (RFP) for the latter con-
tract was due to go out immi-
nently, with interested parties
having 60 days to respond.

“Tt would include a review of
BEC’s energy mix,” Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.






' Including all materials and registration costs

Location:

Start Date:

Duration:



Office Assistant/Training Coordinator
Email: candice@lignumtech.com



Days/Time:

provider to effectively corner a
market through in-room access,
should have a cost attached to
it.’

The BHA added that it was
“unfortunate that Mr Wilch-
combe elected to go public on
this matter” without sitting
down with it to get the full facts.

The BHA added: “BHA's
track record in recent years in
support of its allied members
and small businesses speaks
clearly to its desire to promote
and protect the interests of all
tourism-related businesses in
the Bahamas.

“There is a distinct difference
between a hotel allowing a pub-
lisher to have exclusive rights
to being the sole provider of an

“What is the appropriate mix?

We intend to arrive at a sus-
tainable and cost effective ener-
gy mix. BEC needs a compre-
hensive, secure mix of energy
sources.”

He added that BEC’s RFP
for bids from renewable energy

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in-room publication and allow-
ing for businesses like taxis,
ground transportation providers
and other businesses to have
general access to facilities
through venues like tour desks,
counter displays, concierges,
etc.

“BHA has held initial discus-
sions with Dupuch Publications
and is awaiting a response to
its expressed desire to partner.
It indicates that Welcome
Bahamas is a fine publication,
and its first preference is clear-
ly to work with them to help
broaden support for their pub-
lication and put back into the
community monies which can
specifically help to improve the
tourism product.”



suppliers had generated “a large
number of responses” that were
now under review.

“A- number of them were
very attractive. The top four will
be submitted for our [govern-
ment] review and approval,” Dr
Deveaux said.










’







ae.

PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Film Studios cut from 3,500 to ‘120 acres’

FROM 1B

Group, said of Mr Fuller.

“The period of the [previous] con-
tract has expired as of October Sth.”

Those new terms include a major
reduction in the size of the land avail-
able for the Bahamas Film Studios
development, which has been cut by
the Government from the 3,500 acres
envisaged in the initial Heads of
Agreement to just 120 acres.

Such a move had previously been
foreshadowed by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham in an interview with
Tribune Business earlier this year, but
Mr Bethel said yesterday that he and
his group were now in a ‘wait and see
mode’, their next move depending on
the terms of the revised agreement
between Mr Fuller and the Govern-
ment.

“We still not seen an agreement

th between him [Mr Fuller] and the Gov-



ernment, although he has indicated to
us he knows what the terms are,” Mr
Bethel said.

The substantial reduction in the size
of the Bahamas Film Studios is likely to
be the key factor impacting any future
moves by Mr Bethel’s group and other
potential bidders.

Mr Bethel had warned back in July

‘that the Government’s determination

to repossess much of the 3,500 acres of
Crown Land leased to the original
developers by the former Christie gov-
ernment back in 2003 would affect the
development’s feasibility and sustain-
ability from an economic and finan-
cial standpoint.

The previous PLP administration
had leased almost the entire former
US Air Force Missile Base to the initial
trio of developers - Hans Schutte, Paul
Quigley and Michael Collyer, all of
whom are now deceased - and Prime
Minister Ingraham felt those terms
were unduly generous, with too much
land granted.

Yet that land was critical to their
plans, and those of Mr Bethel’s group
and other developers, as the real estate
component would have generated the
majority of the Bahamas Film Studios’
revenues and profits.

Apart from the existing water tank
and associated film/TV production
facilities already at the Bahamas Film
Studios, the project’s economic sus-
tainability always depended on the
development of a hotel, movie theme
park and residential real estate com-
ponent. ;

Mr Bethel’s group had previously
pledged to invest upwards of $90 mil-
lion in completing the original vision
for the Bahamas Film Studios, but will
now renegotiate the original deal,
which involved a purchase price of
under $14 million.

Therefore, by reducing the land
available to any future developers, the
Government may have undermined
the Bahamas Film Studios’ economic
viability. It has been able to renegotiate
the terms of the original Heads of
Agreement because the project has
defaulted on its lease payments to the
Government and obligations/commit-
ments as contained in that agreement,
something Mr Fuller has denied.

Meanwhile, Mr Bethel yesterday
warned that time was running out if
the Bahamas was to attract Disney’s

Pirates of the Caribbean IV to film at
the Bahamas Film Studios.

With the producers targeting a like-
ly Christmas 2009 release, filming
would start in the 2008 first half and the
Bahamas Film Studios needed several
months’ preparation if Disney was
even to consider it as a shooting loca-
tion.

“Disney has given the green light
for Pirates of the Caribbean IV, and
the question is where it will be shot,”
Mr Bethel said.

“They’re not stating exactly when in
the New Year they would like to film,
but we anticipate it’s in the first half of
the year.”

When asked how long it would take
to make Bahamas Film Studios ready
for Disney, Mr Bethel replied: “You’re
looking at a task of probably four to six
months.”

That makes it critical to sort out the
Bahamas Film Studios’ future imme-
diately, as the economic benefits could
be considerable - especially in a time of
economic downturn. The Pirates of the
Caribbean II and III sequels pumped
some $40 million into the Grand

Bahama economy when they were
filmed previously. ‘

Another uncertainty hanging over
the Bahamas Film Studios is whether a
$300,000 claim against it by a Bahami-
an engineering company has been set-
tled.

Phoenix Engineering had filed an
action against the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios’ immediate holding company,

‘Gold Rock Creek Enterprises, claiming

it was owed that sum for unpaid engi-
neering and Environmental Impact
Assessment (EJA) work.

The action was settled, but was con-
tingent on Mr Bethel’s group purchas
ing the Bahamas Film Studios by end
August 2008 - a deadline missed by
over a month and counting.

Some $300,000 was supposed to be
withheld from the purchase price pai:
by Mr Bethel’s group to Mr Fulle:,
and used to settle the debt. Otherwise.
the injunction previously obtained by
Phoenix Engineering to prevent th
Bahamas Film Studios’ sale until it:
debt was settled would be reinstated

It is uncertain whether this has hay
pened.

Bahamas telecoms market a ‘crown jewel’ for Digicel



FROM 1B

this would be followed by an
auction process for the two
licences. The successful bidders
would then need time to build

Services.

following positions:

Desk

mother tongue Portuguese.

requirements:

portfolio management;

Portuguese is essential.

hrbahamas@ubs,com or

The Tribune

Senior Client Advisor & Client Advisor for the Brau

In this challenging position you will be responsible for the Advisory of
existing clients, acquisition of high net worth individuals as well as
presentation and implementation of investment solutions in the client's

‘For this position we are searching for a personality who meets the following

¢ Extensive experience and a proven track record in wealth management;
¢ Specialized in the fields of customer relations, investment advice and

their networks, recruit staff and
negotiate technical agreements,
with the licences stipulating that
they must begin offering ser-
vices to Bahamian consumers
by the second anniversary of
the BTC privatisation comple-

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International
we look after wealthy private clients by providing them with
comprehensive, vaiue enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
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In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the



» Excellent sales and advisory skills as well as solid knowledge of
investment products are key requirements. Fluency in English and

Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-775
Nassau, Baharr s



tion.

That means cellular phone
competition will be introduced
to the Bahamas, at the latest,
two years after BTC’s privati-
sation ended, rather than one
year as the Prime Minister’s
announcement seemed to indi-
cate.

The privatisation committee’s
statement also indicated that
the likely winners of the two
cellular licences will be estab-
lished international telecoms
firms, rather than Bahamian
companies.

The criteria is based upon
bidders having a ‘track record of
success’, top-quality manage-
ment and the necessary finan-
cial and operational strength.

Mr Saunders yesterday indi-
cated that two years was a rela-
tively long time between the
date of privatisation and liber-
lication, but acknowledged that
the Government had to balance
this goal with the need to allow
BTC’s purchaser to earn an ini-
tial return on capital and pre-
pare the company for competi-
ON tb are

The Digicel executive also
praised the Government for
providing a liberalisation
timetable, with dates and time-
lines, adding that his company
had a tradition of launching into
new markets “very shortly after
getting the licence”.

In Turks & Caicos, for
instance, it had begun offering
services to customers some
three months after it had won
its licence.

As for the Bahamas, Mr
Saunders said Digicel was “not
leaning towards any particular
option on our entry”, being pre-
pared to either acquire a stake
in BTC or enter itself from
scratch as a ‘greenfield’ new-
comer, constructing its own
infrastructure and network.

“Digicel is committed to com-
ing to the Bahamas, and if we
get a licence we will ensure we
give the Bahamian people the
best network available,” Mr
Saunders told Tribune Business.
“The management of Digicel
will ensure the country gets the
latest technology rolled-out.

“We're just waiting for the

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANTZ JEAN-BAPTISTE
of KEY WEST STREET, P.O. BOX GT-128, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not. be granted, should send a written and signed .
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7TH day of OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LORNA PATRICIA ROBINSON
of 54 GAMBIER LOOP, P.O. BOX F-44574 FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of
OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, FINESSE INDIRA BUTLER mother
of AURORA ALEXANDRIA COX of SUN AVENUE, CANTERBURY PARK,
in The Eastern District, New Providence, Bahamas, intend to change
my child’s name to AURORA ALEXANDRIA BUTLER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication



EXCLUSIVE LISTING
GRAHAM ACRES

Part of Blair gare East

Furnished 4 bed/2 bath house, Living,
Dining and Family Room (1,781 Sq. Ft.)
air-conditioned, large Wooden Deck,
fenced in, landscaped lot in great area.

$345,000.00 Gross

Please call: er
Real Estate International (Bah.) Co. Ltd.

Tel: 322-4187

Merc tel



Government to liberalise the
market. The typical way we do
things is not to push a govern-
ment, and sit back and wait.

“We hope our record in the
Caribbean, Central America
and South Pacific would indi-
cate to the Bahamas govern-
ment we should be one consid-
ered as one of the few compa-
nies to get a licence.”

Mr Saunders said the bene-
fits from telecoms sector com-
petition and liberalisation were
even greater than could possibly
be stated, as businesses and con-
sumers would enjoy more
choice, better service and lower
prices.

At a time when all costs were
going up, telecoms costs in the
Bahamas could come down.

Digicel finished its last fiscal
year on March 31, 2008, with
6.54 million customers, a 39 per
cent increase compared to the
same quarter in the previous
fiscal year. It operates in 23
markets, including Anguilla,
Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba,
Barbados, Bermuda, Bonaire,

the Cayman Islands, Curacao,

Dominica, El Salvador, French
Guiana, Grenada, Guadeloupe,
Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Mar-
tinique, St. Kitts & Nevis, St.
Lucia, St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, Suriname, Turks
and Caicos and Trinidad &
Tobago. It also provides cover-
age in St Martin and St Barths.

And Digicel has also bee:
granted licenses to operate ir
the British Virgin Islands, Hor
duras and Panama.

Digicel, which launched in
April 2001, directly employs
more than 4,000 people and has
1,000 retail stores. Total invest
ment in its infrastructure has
been more than $2 billion.

Meanwhile, the privatisation
committee confirmed yesterday
that the Bahamian telecoms
regulatory environment, includ-
ing the Telecommunications
Act and the Telecommunica-
tions Sector Policy, would have
to be changed to bring them in
line with the Government’s lib-
eralisation objectives.

It added that recommenda-
tions to achieve this were being
drafted, and were likely to be
completed within the next few
weeks.

KPMG Corporate Finance,
the privatisation committee’s
advisor, is reviewing BTC’s
updated business plan, which is
a key document in establishing
the company’s value to a poten-
tial bidder.

KPMG is alSo working on
revising the legal and regulato-
ry issues in the Bahamian tele-
coms industry. The legal firms
working on the privatisation on
the Government’s behalf are
Higgs & Johnson and the inter-
national firm of Charles Rus-
sell.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMONDE MESIDOR of
#27 EAST AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7TH day of OCTOBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





















team player.

CAVES POINT MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING OF MEMBERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 2008
Annual General Meeting of CAVES POINT
MANAGEMENT LIMITED will be held at
7:30p.m. on Wednesday 15th October
2008 at Caves Point Condominium, West
Bay Street, New Providence, Bahamas. :

Please contact the Property Manager for |
a copy of the Agenda.

SE ee EE De ee REE]
eS GS se EeW eee
Small Retail Store specializing in girls |
accessories is seeking a cashier/senior |
sales associate (20-30 years) with |
sales experience, must be computer
literate, pleasant, well-groomed and a



Please send resumes by e-mail to:
ecooke@coralwave.com
or by: Fax to 394-7019 (Fax & Phone)






«





THE TRIBUNE

etd
IUESDAY, OC LOBER /, 2UU0, FAUL oD



Government seeing if it can
‘reconcile’ Bluewater BTC offer

FROM 1B

Business: “The reality is that
the Government is seeking to
advance the privatisation
process. Bluewater is an identi-
fied prospect in that regard.

“The talks that were being
held were seeing whether what
Bluewater proposed to do, and
what the Government is trying
to do, can be reconciled.

“If an agreement can be had,
so be it. The Government seeks
to do what is necessary to
advance the privatisation and
the aims which it has set. If that
player is already at the table,

then it will be done. If it is not -

done with the player at the
table, we will move on to the
next phase.”

Mr Laing’s comments are
unlikely to comfort Bluewater,
especially as the BTC privati-
sation committee yesterday con-
firmed an earlier Tribune Busi-
ness exclusive that Citigroup’s
New York arm had been hired
“to identify a buyer” for the 51
per cent stake the Government
intends to sell. ;

Why hire an investment bank
to find a buyer if one has
already been found in the shape
of Bluewater?

As this newspaper has previ-
ously reported, the Government
appears increasingly eager to
open up the bidding process and
conduct a ‘beauty contest’ auc-
tion process to see whether there
are better offers than Bluewater’s
out there despite the latter
protesting it still has time to run
on an exclusivity period.

Tribune Business also under-
stands that Bluewater and the
Government are disputing
whether the bidding group has

an exclusivity period and sales
agreement in principle in place,
an issue that could - if unresolved
- send both parties into arbitration
and further delay a privatisation
process that has dragged on for 10
years and cost taxpayers and bid-
ding groups millions of dollars.
Bluewater has been locked in
talks with the Government over
BTC’s privatisation for three to

four years, and is understood to .

have spent $6-$7 million on the
process to date.
It concluded an agreement in

_principle with the former Christie

government shortly before it left
office that would have seen it pay
$260 million for a 49 per cent
BTC stake over a six-year period.

Yet Bluewater will offer a sub-
stantially lower sum for a stake in
the state-owned firm due to the
Government’s decision to reduce
the post-privatisation exclusivity
periods to the bare minimum.

Philip Davis, of Davis & Co,
the attorney for the Bluewater
Communications Holdings con-
sortium, said Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s announce-
ment this week that BTC would
only maintain a “maximum” one-
year cellular monopoly post-pri-
vatisation had dramatically
“diminished” the company’s val-
ue and the price his clients were
likely to pay.

He added that if the Govern-

‘ment had stuck to the original

terms and had been prepared to
sell a 75 per cent stake in BTC, as

: jt had indicated in talks with Blue-

water, the group would have been
prepared “to pay $400 million”.
“Our client is still willing and
anxious to consummate the
agreement that was arrived at, on
the same terms that have been

on the table,” Mr Davis told Tri-
bune Business.
“With the new announcement

. that has been made, this obvi-

ously diminishes the value of
BTC and we will have to assess
the agreement we have in the
light of the stated intent of the
Government.

“That will definitely require a
revision of the numbers. It will
affect the rate of return on invest-
ed capital. It will further diminish
the value drastically.” :

BTC’s.real value lies in its cel-
lular monopoly, which generates
almost two-thirds of its revenue.
The longer the cellular exclusivi-
ty period post-privatisation, the
more a buyer is likely to be
induced to pay, given that it will
generate revenues and profits to
cover the purchase price and
obtain time to ready the state-
owned incumbent for competi-
tion.

BTC’s fixed-line revenues have
been eroded by IndiGo Net-
works, plus Voice. over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) and callback ser-
vices, while Cable Bahamas has
edged it out on the Internet side.
As a result, cellular is the only
valuable service left.

But the Prime Minister’s
announcement last Monday of a
seismic shift in government poli-
cy towards liberalisation/deregu-
lation, as opposed to preserving
BTC’s value and maximising its
profits, while benefiting the likes
of Cable Bahamas and IndiGo is
not in favour of BTC and its
potential privatisation partners.

Some $225 million was to be
paid up front; a further $30 mil-
lion after the five-year cellular
exclusivity was ended, and $5 mil-
lion after year six.

BEC fuel costs quadruple

to over $350m



FROM 1B

there is attic insulation, and that
all heater leaks are repaired
immediately. When using wash-
ers and dryers, Mr Basden said

it was important that they be
run at full load, and added that
perhaps line drying may be
more cost effective.

Further, Mr Basden said that
when buying appliances, one

should look for those which
have a higher energy efficien-
cy rating, and pointed out that
while they may be initially more
expensive, in the long run they
justify the cost.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(GOPERS
POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR

AUDIT MANAGER

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancy in its Nassau and Freeport Offices for Audit
Managers whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should be
employed in public accounting and have at least (1) year of experience at the As-
sistant Manager/Manager level in managing a portfolio of diverse client engage-
ments. Candidates are also required to have a high level of computer literacy.

The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and other
areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different lev-
els of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance. In addition,
the Firm provides excellent medical insutance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit your application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
_ “Audit Manager Position”

PricewaterhouseCoopers

P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP LIFE INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals from
insurance companies for the administration of life insurance coverage to
homeowners of properties mortgaged to The Corporation.

The proposal should be for a three year period from 1st November,
2008 - 31st October, 2011.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect an
information package from The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation’s Head
Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field.

The deadline for the collection of the information package is Friday,
October 10, 2008, no later than 4:00 p.m.



FOCOL |
OLDINGS LTD.

PREFERRED
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased to announce a



dividend payment to all holders of
Class ‘B’ preference shares
as of October 15, 2008
payable within fifteen business days
of the record date
through CFAL Ltd.





(BN FEL

LIL

American Academy of
Project Management

LIGNUM INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (LIT) THE ONLY
AUTHORIZED REGISTERED EDUCATION PROVIDER (R.E.P)
OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMD IN THE
BAHAMAS AND THE CARIBBEAN.

RISK MANAGEMENT
PMI-RMPâ„¢ Certification
AAPM-CPRMâ„¢

This course provides the applied training of Project/Business Risk
Management techniques and processes. Participants will learn how to
identify risks, qualify & quantify risks, respond to risks, and monitor and
control risks in a project life cycle and in the business operations
development process.

A good understanding of Project Management and Business Acumen is a
pre-requisite for this course. Preferrably a certification in Project
Management.

Course RM-LIT921 RISK MANAGEMENT the following classes:
WEEKDAY CLASSES

October 13-15, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
October 22-24, 2008 — 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

SATURDAY CLASSES
October 11th, 18th, & 25" — 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
November o. 15", & 2 2008 — 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Call for our next PMP. CIPM Certification Course dates.

CONTACT:
LIGNUM TECHNOLOGIES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
HARBOR BAY PLAZA, EAST BAY STREET
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 393-2164
FAX: (242) 394-4971





‘PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





: Tribune Comics .

Y

JUDGE PARKER

A WINCHESTER
MODEL 70 WITH A
A LELIPOLD SCOPE...
NICE RIFLE!





BILL DUGGAN HAS
ACCESS TO THE

COULD THIS
RIFLE BE,

(©2008 by North Amenca Syndicaie, inc. Word agrts reserves.

RECEIVING END!



AND THAT, MS. MAGEE, IS
WHY WE CALLED IN THE
NARCOTICS UNIT. :

YOU CAUGHT \ YUP. IT WAS PRETTY | THE KID SPILLED HIS
THE PERSON | EASY. RAY JENKINS | GUTS, COULDN'T




















HORRIBLE FOR HER, BUT
NOT SO BAD FOR ME

N

BUT THAT
WOULD BE
HORRIBLE
FOR YOU!!

I AGREE...1 JUST
WANTED YOU TO
HEAR HOW IT
SOUNDED

HONEY, I'M IN THE MOOD FOR A BIG
SANDWICH WITH SALAMI, ONIONS,
PICKLES, SWISS CHEESE,
MUSTARD...









© 2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved



. MADE ME REALIZE HOW
MUCH I MISS MY PET

|

YOU'RE
LEAVING
ALREADY ?

YEAH, I NEED
| TO GET HOME
TO CATRINA, MY

WATCHING YOU
PLAY WITH

www .kinglealures.com

IT WANNA SEN?
A BIRTHOAY CARD
To suzy

HEY, GIVE ME A
RTE ANP TLL
CARRY IT OVER



(©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Word rights reserved.

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

HERNIA, IT MAKES ME REALL L
HERNIA IT MAKES Ne REALLY I JUST LIKE X IT SEEN6 LIKE A

LE HAVING YO. BEING NEAR WATE OF TIME .. I COULD
STARE AT ME WHILE I READ,’ HAWET! UST SITTING ALWAYS TURN
: oe THERE LIKE THAT/ THE cee





FOR YOU...

©2008 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.







CALVIN & HOBBES






WI,DAD/ GUESS Y
WHAT HOBBES
AND T DID!









YEP, WE WERE GOING TD LIVE

THERE BECAUSE EARTH |S

SO POLLUTED, BUT WE

DISCOVERED THAT MARS IS

INHABITED, SO WE CAME
BACK HOME .



Sunday

YOU DIDNT | No, THEY DIDN'T

AFRAID WE'D JUNK
UP MARS THE















Y

WHAT'S MY Good AND CAN YOU
BRIEFCASE
DOING OUT,
AND WHY












Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to



















Puzzle



























Sidney Johnston v Frank Marshall,
Chicago 1899. Marshall was
United States champion for a
quarter of a century, but he
occasionally suffered horrible
defeats, losing, in his own words,
“like a child". tn this early career
game the grandmaster took his
unknown opponent too lightly
and fell into a difficult position.
Marshall's last tum was Ne4xBg3,
hoping for 1 hxg3 Kh8 when Black
fights on, But Johnston secured
his niche in chess history by a
forced sequence which fed to the
ignominy of checkmate. Can you
spot White's winning plan?

~







=
a

27



17 They may be relied upon "1
to fix things when brought
together (4,3,5)

20 ‘It's inclined to attract sight- 15

Bringing down a plane
used for putting troops into
action (7,5)

Absorbed in the system (5)

CRYPTIC PUZZLE | c ~
Across Down .
1 Part of the day in which 1 They don’t believe he Pes ae
there’s no glory (6) requires foreign capital (8) || nee ||
4 Particular mix of ale and 2 They open out for a novice
spice (8) ; (8) fee Peale adie a
9 About three minutes in the 3 Is paid, it’s said, for making |_| Rout "|
"ring (6) large amounts of tea (4) 7
10 Bowlers may hang around 5 They should be carefully eb ee tla |
here, and that's strange (8) rounded, inside and out oz fea |
12. Exclamation of surprise (5,7) -
when doubled up in laugh- 6 o Irish seer is reformed eect
ter (2-2
13 sii 2 50 amps (5) 7 Sort of type inclined to Pt | ||
14 Place it within the borders impress (6) ete || Pe |
of Singapore (4) 8 A snake’s game compan-
ion (6) ei







j seers in Italy (7,5) 16 Situation
; | bs 23 Minerals found in the for- 18 ay (8) He oleetl calle aes
yy est (4) -— i the heat for those who feel
N j 24 It’s worn in one’s car for the cold (8) ww Across ; Down
yy warmth (5) 19 Possibly price a ring — to I 1 Copper-tin 1 Sudden adverse
yy 25 All capital chemists will us it's valuable (8) N alloy (6) reaction (8)
is provide it (4) 21 Being wealthy, was N 4 Very lovely (8) 2 Exceed (8)
yy 0 28 Tie completely round (4,4) charged (6) — 9 Good 3 Nought (4)
iy N 29 Fuss about the French in 22 Happen to be autumn (6) 0. health! (6) 5 Very sad (12)
ay Spain (6) 26 Young bird lacking the > 10 Virtually (2,4,2) 6 Castle in chess (4)
y E 30 Lace tied in a dainty way knowledge to be fashion- wo” 12 Luxuriant (4) 7 Aburrowing animal
Le (8) able (4) x 13 Snake (6)
Le 31 Greek-Cypriot union is 27 It may be proper for a sis- wi poison (5) 8 Without difficulty (6)
one's design (6) ter to admit nothing (4) 14 Cut down (4) 11 An esoteric detail
yj C : . ‘ , . 17 Attract most publicity (12)
R Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution (5,3,4) 15 Expanse of spilt oil
We : : ‘ 20 Only vulnerable point (5)
| oO Across: 1 Shift, 4 Gelatin, 8 Bit, 9 Across: 1 Lapse, 4 Hogarth, 8 (8,4) 16 To progress without
ey Roadworks, 10 Economy, 11 Oasis, Own, 9 Sauvignon, 10 Scandal, 11 23 Deslaté (4) effort (5)
j S y 13 Thumbs, 15 Anodes, 18 Stern, 19 Fancy, 13 Expert, 15 Placid, 18 24 Confidence (5) 18 Enfeebled b 8)
Z Eardrum, 21 Topiarist, 23 Ado, 24 Press, 19 Canvass, 21 Kiwi fruit, 23 : : y age (
; igh : ; : : ’ 25 Firm 19 Plausible nonsense
Ss Premium, 25 Rests. IOU, 24 Resolve, 25 Scent. hold (4) (8)
La Down: 1 Subject, 2 Introduce, 3 Down: 1 Look-see, 2 Pineapple, 3 8 :
W Torso, 4 Gladys, 5 Lowdown, 6 Tar, 7 Eased, 4 Hourly, 5 Gainful, 6 Run, 7 - Be - ah lo
Noses, 12 Side roads, 14 Bengali, 16 Handy, 12. Nectarine, 14 Restful, 16 we Fi
O S : : person (6) 22 Counterfeit (6)
y ummons, 17 Medium, 18 Setup, 20 Disrupt, 17 Accuse, 18 Poker, 20 30 Crabwise (8) 26 Afresh (4)
R Ole AeC Oe: Noles meee 31 Repressed (4-2) 27 Mental confusion (4)

Difficulty Level *& & *& *&

Yesterday's _
Sudoku Answer







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.













©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
hody of

Chambers |

2ist
Century

Dictionary

(1999
edition)







Chess: 8689: 1 Ne7#41 Kh8 2 NgGe! bgé 3 hxg3+
Qh4 4 Rxh4 mate.



HOW many words of four Jetlers
or mare can you Make from the
tettors shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET |

Good 3i; very good 45; excellent 59
for more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

acre alcove atvo Dice brace
caber cable calve care carob
carol carve cave caver celeb
cere vereal clear cleave cleaver
clever clove clover coal cobra
coeval cola cole coral corbel
core cove cover crab crave creel
creole lace oracle race
REVOCABLE yocable voral



East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH
a@ls54
VÂ¥AQ93
O86
&Q 109
WEST EAST
@K.10832 ®AT76
52 ¥I1084
#17 #10943
#K763 42
SOUTH
409
VÂ¥K76
@AK52
RAISS
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass INT Pass 3 NT

cad three of spades.

The outcome of many contracts is
preordained from the time dummy
first. appears. Declarer may have
everything he needs to assure the
contract beyond a doubt, or the
defenders may be certain to emerge
victorious.

The most interesting and instruc-
tive deals — and the ones that pres-
ent the greatest challenge in the play

are those where the outcome
depends entirely on how well or how
badly each side plays.

For example, take the present case
where West led the three of spades
against three notrump. East won the

spade with the ace and returned the
seven, South playing the queen. West
allowed the queen to hold in order to
maintain communication: with part-
ner if East gained the lead again.

Declarer thereupon cashed the A-
Q-K of diamonds and the A-K-Q of
hearts, hoping to find either red suit
divided 3-3. However, neither suit
broke favorably, leaving South a
trick short of his goal and apparently
in need of a successful club finesse.

But South was a first-rate declarer
and saw a much safer alternative.
Instead of attempting the club
finesse, he led the jack of spades
from dummy! This proved to be
exactly the right medicine because,
after West cashed three spade tricks,
he was forced to return a club from
the K-x. As a result, declarer made
three notrump.

Well done by declarer, you could
easily say, but let’s backtrack to trick
two when West elected to duck the
queen of spades. This was the
moment when West unwisely placed
his neck on the chopping block and
subjected himself to what happened
later on.

He should have realized from
South’s opening notrump bid that
there was almost no chance that East
would gain the lead again. West
should therefore have taken his king
and returned a spade at trick three.
Had he done that, South would even-
tually have gone down one.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Ine.



THE TRIBUNE

GN-758



‘SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00613

Whereas PHILIP BARRINGTON STUBBS, of
Meadows Boulevard, Winton Meadows in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of FRANCES DORIS STUBBS, late of Tucker
Road in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00614

IN THE ESTATE OF RENEE M. WENTZ, late of 2184
Southwest Spoonville Drive, Palm City in the State
of Florida, one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by JAMES LENNOX MOXEY
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island
- of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the resealed Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to ELIZABETH WENTZ, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, by the Circuit Court for
Martin County, Florida, on the 2nd day of August,
2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00617

Whereas TOINETTE MAJOR, of Carmichael Road
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,

for letters of administration of the Real and Personal.

Estate of ARTHUR MAJOR, late of Berry's in the
Island of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION ©
2008/PRO/npr/00619

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH H. MOORE, late
and domicile of 75 Macadamia Court in the city of
West Palm Beach in the County of Palm Beach in the
state of Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made toe the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by FREDERICA GERTRUDE
McCARTNEY, of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to FATHER
DAVID C. KENNEDY and KIRK GRANTHAM, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit
Court for Palm Beach County, Florida, Probate Division
on the 12th day of July, 2007.

‘Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00620

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF HELEN C. FRANZ (a.k.a. HELEN
CAREY FRANZ), late and domicile of 8401 West
Cypress Drive in the city of Pembroke Pines in the
County of Broward in the state of Florida, one of the
United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of Administration
(Single Personal Representative) in the above estate
granted to MARTHA K. DAULA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit Court for
Broward County, Florida, Probate Division on the 28th
day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00621

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF EDITH MOLLISON (a.k.a. EDITH
W. MOLLISON), late and domicile of No. 175,
Willoughby Street, 8L in the City of Brooklyn, in the
State of New York, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Letters Testamentary, in the above
estate granted to LILLITHE E. MEYERS, the Executor
of the Estate, by the Surrogate's Court in and for the
County of Kings, on the 11th day of January, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00622

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE JOHN SCHEJBAL,
late and domicile of 32 Cold Springs, Hunterdon
County Tewksbury Township, New Jersey, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by LUCIA E. BROUGHTON, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Grant of
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate granted to
EDWARD J. SCHEIBAL, the Executor of the Estate,
by the Court of Hunterdon in the state of New Jersey,
on the 6th day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION Oct. 9, 08
2008/PRO/npr/00623 ,
IN THE ESTATE OF ALPHA SVAFER ROGERS, late
and domiciled of the City of Sundre, in the Province
of Alberta, in the Dominion of Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by STANLEY OSWALD
ANTHONY ISAACS, of East Bay Street in the Eastern
District of New Providence, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Probate, in the above estate granted
to ALPHA LORRAINE MIDNIGHT, the Executrix of
the Estate, by the Surrogate Court of Alberta, Judicial

- District of Calgary, on the 5th day of February, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00624

Whereas PATSY CULMER, of Garden Hills No. 1,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration with the Will Annexed of
the Real and Personal Estate of COLLEEN CULMER,
late of Garden Hills No. 1, Southern District, New
Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 7B

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00626

Whereas JACQUELINE BURROWS and DEREK
ALEXANDER BURROWS, both of Pineyard Road,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ASHLEY BURROWS, late of Nassau East
North, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00627

IN THE ESTATE OF MAMIE M. BEARD, late of 6239
E. Reno Apt. D Midwest City, Oklahoma 73110, one
of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by KIRKWOOD M. SEYMOUR,
of Sears Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
of Administration in the above estate granted to
TERRY BEARD, Personal Representative, of the
Estate by the District Court of Oklahoma County in
the State of Oklahoma, one of the States of United
States of America on the 8th day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT ”
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00628

Whereas JAMES EDWARD BLAKE III, of Freeport,
Grand Bahama and SHAWN MARIE BAKER, of
Deadman's Gay, Léng.tsland, one of the Islands of |
the Commonweal: of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of JAMES EDWARD BLAKE, JR., late of Town
Court, Nassau Street, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00629

Whereas CLAYTON DEVEAUX, JR., of South Beach
Estates, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of CLAYTON DEVEAUX SR., late of
Gleniston Gardens, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
. (for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00630

IN THE ESTATE OF CARMELO J.°PATTO, late of 14
Comet Road, Syosset, Nassau, in the State of New
York, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by MICHAEL CRAIG ROBERTS,
of Golf Course Boulevard, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to MARIE J. PATTO, the Executrix, of the
Estate by the Surrogate's Court of Nassau County,
one of the States of United States of America on the
Ath day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008 THE TRIBUNE









BO O:Y (8




e Tribune



@ By LISA LAWLOR



THE

, INCREASING
AHAMIAN doctors are RuMbeKot
e e b t
preparing to begin further ages
research to determine the De Beliaftes

cult to continue

sweeping the

suffering of °
these women

under the rug.

frequency with which the breast
cancer gene - [BRCA 1 has
been identified as the breast

cancer susceptibility gene] -
occurs in the local population
that has already been diag-
nosed with the disease, The Tri-
bune has learned.

A part of the research team, oncologist Dr John Lunn
told Tribune Health that this study - once funding has been
secured - continues earlier research that took a look at 20
Bahamian women below the age of 50 who were diag-
nosed with breast cancer. Because of the smiall size of the
first study however - with only 20 participants - doctors are
looking for further statistical evidence with which to support

their initial findings.

In the initial study, Dr Lunn and fellow researchers
found that BRCA 1 was present in 14 out of 20 women.

“The most worrying fact about the Bahamian preva-
lence of breast cancer," Dr Lunn said, "is that there are
more cases of young women with breast cancer in our
country than in other countries,"

A third study wiil also be conducted on women who
don't have breast cancer to see how prevalent the gene is
in the Bahamas. This study will test 100 new mothers
because they represent a breast cancer free population.

Explaining the chromosome system of the human body
- some 700 mutations have been found around the world -
Dr Lunn said that in the Bahamas, two have been found
that both relate to breast cancer — the BRCA 1 and the
BRCA 2. The first mutation is believed to have originated
in West Africa and the other here in the Bahamas.

OPTIONS

The increasing number of breast cancer diagnoses in
the Bahamas makes it difficult to continue sweeping the suf-

fering of these women under the rug. At the Surgical Suite

of 68 Collins Avenue, headed by oncologist Dr Charles Dig-
giss, they alone had four diagnoses in September.

This number, multiplied by the numerous private: offices
and oncologists, public hospitals plus women who choose
to seek medical attention in the US, results in a significant
number of Bahamian women suffering, from the indis-

criminate disease.

According to Dr Lunn, who has been practicing in Nas-

sau for 46 years and has seen roughly 100 patients per
year with the disease, said that in the case of breast cancer,

‘i
S\

\

\N\

m@ By DR WEL'MILYA
FRANCIS DDS

SW




Teeth can be sensitive for
numerous reasons. One of the
main reasons that teeth become
sensitive is decay. A tooth with a

Decay spreads along sound
tooth structure with a destruc-
tive pattern. Eventually, sensi-
tivity will become a horrible



dy to




tooth. A tooth with root expo-
sure in the mouth is more sus-
ceptible to sensitivity, as tem-
perature, acidity, sticky-food,



patients should have both breasts removed in a mastecto- ARE your teeth very sensi-

my even if only one is affected. There have been patients
who have even gotten their ovaries removed to be totally
safe of the cancer coming back. With these recommenda-

tive to cold drinks? Do you
‘squirm when you drink your
coffee? Do your teeth bother

tions carried out, the doctor said there is a low chance of

you whenever you eat some-

recurrence at only five per cent.

However there are many who don't follow their doc-
tors recommendations, he said. In both women who have
breast cancer and don't want to confront the fear of return
of the disease, and in women who have a sister, mother or
grandmother who suffered the disease, they avoid testing
far too often and for far too long.

Although there are no confirmed risks in terms of foods
or activities that cause breast cancer, the highest risks Dr

. Lunn listed are as follows:
1) genetics
2) obesity



thing sweet? Do your teeth hurt
whenever you chew? Do your
teeth hurt when you simply
breathe through your mouth?
If there is no severe pain pre-
sent, some people will simply
ignore these sensations because
they only last as long as the
stimulus is on the tooth. Some
make the necessary adaptation
by avoiding chewing on that
side of the mouth. The thought

3) hormone replacement therapy (taking estrogen)
because of menopause symptoms

Looking at the breast cancer risk for men, Dr Lunn said
their risk is extremely low and their cases are rarely seen in
breast cancer studies. And although they do exist, he has
never had a male patient with the disease.



* For more information on breast cancer or the upcom-
ing study, contact Dr Lunn at 325.0734.

IEEE USD SLESSIISSI EPS IDSE RSS RES ees cesses



A brighter future for skin

lm By SARAH SIMPSON

APPEARING on her vaca-
tion yacht in the 1920s looking
bronzed and no doubt fashion-
able, Coco Chanel set forth a
movement that made the dark-
ening - or tanning - of skin a
sign of health and affluence.
From that moment on women
of the 20s had to add tanning to
their demanding “beautifica-
tion” regimens that already
included the bobbing of hair,
binding of breasts and slimming
of the waistline.

Thanks in part to awareness
that UV light leads to advanced
aging and skin cancer, tanning is
falling out of favour as a sign of
health. Consumers worldwide
are more and more interested
in obtaining light, brighter skin.
The main reason why may stem
from market research studies
that indicate that an uneven skin
tone is perceived as “aged skin”
while a more even skin coloura-
tion is judged to be “healthier
and more youthful.”

Traditionally, lightening and
brightening products were pop-
ular in Asian-Pacific and
African regions: currently, the
Asian market leads the world

in the number of products on
the market to treat pigmenta-
tion issues. Asia alone accounts
for 37 per cent of the overall
worldwide sales. As populations
mature globally, pigmentation
issues become more prevalent.
This has tripped an enormous
surge in skin brightening prod-
ucts in the past decade.

BRIGHTER SKIN -
BUT AT WHAT COST?

Hyper-pigmentation is the
result of daylight exposure,
endocrine (hormonal) factors
and changes, usage of prescrip-
tion drugs and wound healing
when skin has been damaged.
No matter how it is triggered,
hyper-pigmentation shows on
skin in the form of brown spots
(also referred to as age spots)
and can cause an uneven, mot-
tled skin tone.

Those looking to brighten skin
often run into two different, dis-
appointing scenarios: the prod-
ucts don't deliver results as
promised or even worse, skin

health suffers at the cost of

brightening results.

¢ Hydroquinone, long consid-
ered a staple ingredient in skin
brightening products, has since

is to try their best to avoid what-
ever causes the pain.

While there is an intuition
that something is not right, the
inclination of many is not to try
to address the problem, but to
avoid it. Sensitive teeth can be
the result of decay, gum reces-
sion and periodontal disease,
cracked teeth, worn enamel or
worn fillings.



been banned in many countries,
and reduced to a level of 2 per
cent in over-the-counter. treat-
ments due to concerns about
skin health and cancer-causing
potential. Treating hyperpig-
mentation without regard to skin
health can lead to sensitivity, irri-

cavity is a tooth with a hole
formed from decay. However, a
tooth may have decay and not
have a visible hole in it.

Decay is the breakdown of
hard tooth structure by bacteria
in the presence of some substrate
(food). The enamel and dentin
of a tooth normally possess some
hardness. Decayed tooth struc-
ture is softer and its presence in
a tooth causes a weakening
effect. So, eating, drinking or bit-
ing serves as a stimulus to trigger
pain and sensitivity in the pres-
ence of this demineralized, bac-
teria thriving tooth structure.

One thing many people are
unaware of is that decay spreads.
It may be tempting to ignore that
small cavity that was diagnosed
one year ago. However, you are
walking with an untimely bomb
in your mouth. Decay will not
just remain localized to one spot
in the tooth as it spreads lateral-
ly.

tation, photo damage, exposure
to potentially dangerous agents

and premature aging.

A NEW ERA IN BRIGHTENING
FROM THE SKIN HEALTH
EXPERTS

Dedicated to results without

toothache with possible infec-
tion and swelling when you least
expect it, or your tooth will just
completely blow out.

Sensitivity could also be the
result of exposed root surfaces.
As explained in the article,
“Why are my teeth getting
longer”, recession, which is gum
loss, can leave the root surfaces
of teeth exposed. Gum loss may
also be associated with bone
loss (periodontitis).

The roots are normally cov-
ered by gum tissue. The cemen-
tum, which is the outer layer of
the root, is not as hard in struc-
ture as enamel, which is the out-
er-most portion of the crown of
a tooth (that part of a tooth that
we use to bite and eat with).
Underneath both enamel and
cementum lies dentin, which is
the least calcified and least hard
of all the tooth layers.

The dentinal layer encases the
nerves and blood vessels of the



compromising skin health, Der-
malogica extensively researched
the latest ingredients, technolo-
gy, searching for ingredients

that would safely go beyond:

minimizing the appearance of
hyper-pigmentation.
The company's research

pressure etc, may stimulate the
nerves in the tooth.

Worn enamel, worn fillings
and cracked teeth also cause
sensitivity. Enamel or a filling
that has some wear increases
the chances that stimuli are’
passed through dentin tubules
and on to the nerves. All the
layers of a tooth contribute to
its structure and have an addi-
tive effect on the protection of
the tooth. Even a crack in one
of the layers interferes with this
effect. Thus, sensitivity may be
felt.

Sensitive teeth are a warning
that something is wrong. Since
some of us have a high toler-
ance for pain, we may simply
ignore it. This sensitivity may
be sporadic, but it should be
treated. Consider tooth sensi-
tivity as the body's way of
telling you that you need to seek
treatment before the condition
gets worse.

uncovered ingredients that
would work synthetically by
preparing skin to optimize
reception of brightening actives,
preventing formation of pig-
mentation on a cellular level
and protecting against further
development of hyperpigmen-
tation caused by environmen-
tal assault.

This research has led to the
development of ChromaWhite
TRx, the only system that rapid-
ly delivers visible brightening
and improved skin tone while
improving skin health. Chro-
maWhite TRx is free of hydro-
quinone, which treats hyper-
pigmentation safely, without the
worry of skin health issues.



+ Sarah Simpson is a skin
care therapist at the Dermal
Clinic. Visit her and her team
of skin and body therapists at
One Sandyport Plaza (the
same building as Ballys
Gym). For more information
about their September Face
Treatment special for all new
clients visit www.dermal-clin-
ic.com or call 327.6788



THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 9B



: TVG

Common causes —
of “foot odour’ —



PREVIOUSLY, lL addressed :
those persons who may have :
discontinued walking and/or }
running as a form of exercise :
due to pain in the foot. The :
response was well received as :
many have indicated an incen- }
tive to return to their former }

routine with proper footwear.

Today, I will address a topic
that I am asked about ona dai- :
ly basis - foot odour, or its sci- |

entific term bromidrosis.

If you are one of many peo- }
ple who suffer from foot odour :
- smelly feet - you are not alone. :
Did you know that most of what :
we call foot odours are actually :
shoe odours? As you will dis- :
cover later, some people are :
more prone to smelly feet, and :
there are a lot of factors that :
contribute to foot and nasty :

shoe odours.

COMMON CAUSES

Among some of the factors }
contributing to foot odour are ;
cleanliness and hygiene habits, :
sweat, and footwear such as
socks and shoes. However, ;
excessive perspiration has been ;
- seen as a significant contribu- ;

tor to this condition.

In technical terms, excessive }
perspiration is known as hyper- :
ridrosis: a rapid production of :
sweat that cannot be evaporat- :
ed as fast as it is produced. ;
When this happens, the shoe's ;
material or parts become satu- ;
rated with moisture. In the per- ;
spiration there is also bacterial ;
waste. You may ask what is this :
bacterial waste? Perspiration is :
body “waste” and has an abun- :

Territorial beh

TERRITORIAL behaviour in dogs
reminds us of their wolf-like ancestors.
This behaviour includes defensive and
offensive territorial aggression, terri-
torial marking - urine, stool, scratch
marks, etc - or territorial investigation.

TERRITORIAL INVESTIGATION

When a dog investigates his territory
it is crucial for their survival. By inves-
tigating its surroundings it provides
information regarding natural
resources, detection of intruders that
would compete for food and water or
threaten the safety of young. Males
tend to explore larger areas than do
females.

*
TERRITORIAL MARKING

Dogs claim their territory by leaving
deposits of urine or stool. Urine may be
voided in a crouching position or a stand-
ing position with a lifted leg. Both males
and females urinate in either position,
though vertical surfaces (trees, lamp

&



poles) are more often targeted by mature
males.

A dog’s walk around the neighbour-
hood is equivalent to the territorial patrol
of its wild relatives - wolves etc.
Unmarked areas as well as previous
traces of other dogs are marked by fresh
deposits of urine or stool.

A dog’s territory includes the area sur-
rounding its home and eventually any-
where your dog has explored.

TERRITORIAL AGGRESSIVENESS

This may begin as a dog approaches
sexual maturity at six months of age,
but may not develop fully until three
years of age. Not all dogs are born with
equal territorial instincts.



MTR a ee






Many pet owners view territorial
aggressiveness as desirable. A dog that
is praised for barking when it is star-
tled by noise outside may eventually
become a good watchdog. For the most
part, however, unless the dog has some
inborn predisposition, it may be difficult
for the average pet owner to train a
reliable watchdog. Still, the intimidating
effect of a large dog’s size may com-
pensate for it sociable nature.

Dog owners can unintentionally
encourage undesirable territorial behav-
iour. Barking and other forms of aggres-
siveness can be reinforced by attention,
even if the attention is negative, such as
scolding. Tolerating objectionable

behaviour is the same as encouraging it.

SOLUTIONS
_If your pet has become a problem,
teach it the limits of acceptable behav-
iour,
e Train your dog to sit and stay when
anyone, including you, enters or leaves

aviour in dogs

the home.

e If necessary use a leash during
training.

e Teaching your dog to assume a
calm and controlled attitude reinforces
its submissive rank. The dog will grad-
ually understand that it need not
defend against or fear visitors.

Territorial defence in males is not

-affected by castration, though this may

reduce the size of their territory and
the frequency of territorial marking.
Other types of aggression - influenced
by sexual hormones - may contribute to
the intensity of territorial aggression
by adding to the dog’s motivation or
to its general state of arousal.

* Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at
the Central Animal Hospital. Ques-
tions or comments should be direct-
ed to potcake59 @hotmail.com. Dr
Sands can also be contacted at 325-
1288





TOMATOES for the first crop of the new
growing season should already be in the
ground.

dance of bacteria. In addition, it
is believed that approximately :
98 per cent of this perspiration :
is moisture and 2 per cent is ;
solids - mostly acids and salts. ;
These bacteria thrive on mois- :
ture, warmth and darkness - just :
like bacteria that causes toe fun- :

BULBS AND RHIZOMES planted now
will wait until their appointed season
before producing. You may have to wait
almost a year for gladiolas.



gus.

SOLUTIONS

In terms of cleanliness and :
hygiene habits, wash your feet :
daily and dry thoroughly before :
putting on footwear. Wear only :
clean, absorbent socks. Refrain :
from wearing yesterday's nylons }
or socks just because they smell :
clean. One wear is enough to :
leave behind sufficient foot per- :
spiration for odour-causing bac- :
teria to thrive on. It will be :
enough to leave feet stinky and :
dirty. I repeat, do not re-use :
nylons or socks because they :
appear dry and smell clean, it is :

a big mistake.

Always use a clean pair of :
socks, preferably specially- :
designed cotton or synthetic per- :
spiration wicking fabric to get :
rid of foot odour. For example, :
Thorlos and Balga brands of :
cushioned socks are specially :
designed to provide insulation :
and air flow and wicks away :
moisture to keep your foot from }

getting too hot or too cold.

Footwear is another impor- :
tant factor. When selecting :
shoes it is important to avoid :
shoes or boots with non-breath- :
able upper materials, especially :
closed-type shoes or simply :
tight-fitting shoes. For example, :
leather with its unique internal ;
structure of fibres and inter-fibre :
air spaces, plus its surface pores, :
has excellent breathing capacity. :

Don't allow yourself to be :
embarrassed by foot odour, seek :
the help of a specialist who can :
direct you to the correct :
footwear to address your prob- :

lem.

There is no need to wear two :
or three pairs of socks at once in }
an effort to absorb moisture. }
Invest in a pair of anatomically- :
designed terry cushioned mois- :
ture-wicking socks. There are :
also various types of insoles :
made from moisture wicking :
material that are used to combat :
this problem. And always wear }
shoes with breathable upper :
material as it is extremely
important that this problem be :
addressed, otherwise it can lead :
to more serious foot conditions. :

* Bernadette D Gibson, a :
board certified pedorthist, is the :
proprietor of Foot Solutions, a :
health and weliness franchise :
that focuses on foot care and :
proper shoe fit, located in the :

Sandyport Plaza.

The views expressed are :
those of the author and do not :
necessarily represent those of :
Foot Solutions Incorporated or :

any of its subsidiary and/or affil-

iated companies. Please direct :
any questions or comments to :
nassau @footsolutions.com or :

327-FEET (3338).






OCTOBER has become
my favourite month of the
year. In my younger days I
loved the spring months and
the languid days of summer.
These days I find myself
debilitated by the summer
heat and I look forward to
cooler weather. That will
come towards the end of
October. Shortly after that I
will probably be complaining
about the cold. That’s one of
the privileges of age.

October is a busy month in
the garden. Those gardeners
who started their stock veg-
etables early will be able to
add cool weather crops such
as peas, spinach, cauliflower
and lettuce before the end of
the month. Those who have
left all vegetable growing
until October should experi-
ence optimum conditions and
strong initial growth.

Larger tomatoes tend to
need cool nights in order to
set fruit, usually about 68
degrees or less. Night temper-
atures will be at this stage
before the end of October
and within 60 days - around
about Christmas — the toma-
to-eating season will have
begun.

Root crops such as carrots,
beets and turnips germinate
more readily in cool soil.
October-sown carrots will be
full by February, but before
then there will be thinnings to
enjoy. Beets are best enjoyed
young, probably by January.

Zucchini and other sum-
mer squashes are fast grow-
ers. A hill or two established
early can be added to each
month in order to have a long
growing season without a glut
an any given time. Winter
squashes take longer to
mature. Don’t forget cal-
abaza pumpkin, if you have
the room. ‘

Green beans are amongst
the easiest of vegetables to
grow, particularly the bush
type. To grow pole beans you
will need a form of trellising.
The plants take longer to
grow but are more productive
and give a much larger har-
vest.

Green peas should be start-
ed in late October. Most vari-
eties like to be staked and
this makes picking the pods
easier. Strangely enough,
snow peas are even easier



than regular green peas and
have a longer season of pro-
ductivity.

One important aspect of
cabbage cultivation is the
need for uninterrupted
growth. Whether heading
cabbage, broccoli or cauli-
flower, the growth should be
continuous and the plants
should be fed and watered
well. Most broccoli plants
produce flowerets after the
main head has been cut and
many people enjoy these
more than the head.

By the end of October you
can plant just about any flow-
ering annual with good
chances of success. It’s time
to buy those packets or
seedling trays of impatiens
and petunias, and to experi-
ment with any plant that
catches your fancy.

Bulbs and rhizomes plant-
ed in October will establish
themselves during the cool,
dry season and be in place to
flower whenever their
appointed time comes along.

Flowering shrubs mostly
bloom better in the cooler
months than in summer. For
this reason we should be very
careful about pruning ~ very
little, if at all. Do not prune
poinsettias. They are well
along the way to producing
the material for their distinc-
tive colourful bracts and must
be left alone.

Citrus and fruit trees need
to be fed during autumn and
October is a good time to get
that chore out of the way.
Apply chelated iron in
drench form to the taproots
and apply the appropriate
fertilizer along the drip line
of each tree. The ground
should be thoroughly wet
before adding fertilizer. To
finish the job, wet the leaves
with a minor nutrient spray
that will do wonders for the
health of your trees.

Many of the insects that
troubled us during the sum-
mer months will disappear as
the weather cools down. The
grass will slow down its
growth rate, and that is a true
blessing.

Enjoy October. It is a busy
month, but a very important
one.

+ j. hardy@coralwave.com

BUY |

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393-4096 Perel at





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 10



whose

Every sunrise is another pre-sent
opportunity for you to confidently move
your life forward.





MICHELLE M MILLER

WITH the insurmountable amount of
distress about a so. called 'depressed'
economy permeating everywhere, most
people are now operating in panic mode
- seriously blinded by fear rather than
faith.

It may be just me, but I find it baf-
fling that so many folks claim to be walk-
ing by faith and not by sight, yet have no
idea how to connect with the power of
faith when life presents an unusual
dilemma.

The fact is people only think they
know but when it comes to exerting the
power of faith, they seem to have no
idea. But it's ludicrous to think that the
power that actually creates life is some-
how unable or unwilling to support it.

Fundamentally, the power to. solve
life's challenges comes from knowing
that you have the power to solve life
challenges.

This means that you accept that you
are born with the incredible power to
fix, formulate, repair, restore, achieve,
attain, design and create anything that
you want to be, do or have and life sim-
ply says - “when you move, I move”.

The problem here is that most people

have bought into the varied illusions of

lack and limitation which are consistently
perpetrated by scarcity thinking.

It is this type of mindset that builds a
momentum of ignorance, feeding the
delusion that there isn't enough and only



GROUP PHOTO: Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc in attendance at the Gala Ball. Seated from left are, Cindy Dorsett, chapter president; Delores Smith,
charter member and Norma Jean Tucker, international regional director.

Sorority honours members
for outstanding service

the so called 'strong' will survive - inad-
vertently causing those perceived as
'‘weak' to fall prey to an unfulfilled life of
uncertainty.

No doubt, there is a need for a shift
towards prosperity thinking which
inspires the notion that regardless of out-
er appearances the inner sanctity of life
remains an abundant storehouse of pos-
sibility, ready to supply our every need.

FINAL THOUGHT

As an enthusiastic student of life, I
know for sure that everything that hap-
pens or that fails to happen in life is
directly related to what we believe -
about ourselves and about life.

Ultimately, what you believe becomes
your life. The things you buy into, what
you think, what you listen to, watch,
accept, judge, fear, hate, love, trust and
distrust eventually creates your experi-
ences.

This may seem a far-fetched notion
to some, but whether you believe it or
not the power of life supports your every
command. Your goal is to pay attention
to the kind of commands you are issuing

members - Mrs Muriel Frazier




to life.

Belief is a powerful thing. However, it
is suppose to provide a means of growth
and transformation, consistently allowing
you to move towards a new level of
understanding about yourself and about
life.

For instance, people once believed the
world was flat, but as life provided ne
information there was a shift in thinking
which created a new understanding.

You must therefore find ways to
remain open to life's new ideas and new
information, as they serve to remind you
to constantly reevaluate your thinking -
focusing not so much on who you are
now but on the person you want to be
from now on,

Remember - regardless of emotive
media forecasts, your economic and spir-
itual well-being is competently support-
ed by a greater power. This abundant
power always surrounds you, protects
you, supports you and confidently resides
within you.

Without a doubt, this power of life is
always on your side, the question is -
whose side are you on?

Today is a brand new day; shift your
thinking and make something better hap-
pen.

*Questions/comments are welcome.
Check out Michelle's website at:
www.coachmeforward.com

E-mail: coach4ward@ yahoo.com or
call 429.6770

PO Box CB-13060

Nassau, Bahamas

Years' Award.

you are born with
the incredible power
to fix, formulate,

design and create
anything that you
want to be, do or

have and life simply
says - “when you

ALPHA Kappa Alpha

' Sorority - the Eta Psi Omega

Chapter - marked its 45th char-
ter anniversary last month of
“Sisterhood, Scholarship and

Service” given to the commu-
nity of New Providence.
Acknowledging the amazing
contributions made by four
phenomenal women, all charter



Eneas, Mrs Donna Donaldson-
Towns, Mrs Delores Casey-
Smith and Mrs Shirley Van-
derpool - the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority leaders were
thankful for the vision they
had in chartering the chapter
and the integral foundation laid
down for future generations of
Alpha women.

In recognition of the 45th
charter anniversary, a gala ball
was held at the Sheraton Cable
Beach ballroom. The ladies of
Alpha Kappa Alpha used the
occasion to honour the service
of Fourteen committed and
dedicated persons from other
Greek organisations.

One nominee from each
organisation represented was
selected by a panel of judges
and was awarded with the
chapter's 'Service Through the
Years' Award.

The nominees were:

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,
Inc members

e Terrance Fountain

e Ricardo P Deveaux, recip-
ient of the ‘Service Through
the Years' Award

e Ishmael Smith, Jr

From the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Inc were,

e Laura Pratt-Charlton

e Dianne Seymour

e Rhonda Wright, recipient
of the 'Service Through the

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,
Inc

e Jonathan C Ford, recipient
of the 'Service Through the
Years' Award

e Sean Blyden

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority,
Inc

¢ Cyndi Williams-Rahming,
recipient of the ‘Service
Through the Years' Award

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity,
Inc

e Harrison Lockhart

e Kareem C Hanna, recipi-
ent of the ‘Service Through the
Years' Award

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc

e Nadia Racquel Braynen

e Christie Cash, recipient of
the ‘Service Through the
Years' Award

e Taisha Lloyd

Mrs Mavis Johnson-Collie,
immediate past president of the
Eta Psi Omega Chapter, Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc, and
immediate past president of the
Pan-Hellenic Council, was also

erecognized for her leadership
and contribution to the chap-
ter.

Beginning with chapter mem-
bers giving thanks at St Barn-
abas Anglican Church, the gala
ball was the culmination of a

| Passive
aggression
the silent —_















CAUTION! Passive aggres-
sion is the silent killer of your
best laid plans and arduous
efforts at building morale within
your team.

It is all very familiar. You ask a
member of your team to com-
plete a task. They agree to carry
out your request with apparent
commitment. They seem to buy
into the plan and they put on a
show of inspired enthusiasm.
What is really going on in their







repair, restore,
achieve, attain,



along with this so that I can fool

with the plan and that all will be
well."

Their motives for the show of
fakery are:



1. The team member may feel
their ideas or opinions will not
be listened to, so why bother?

2. The member may feel the
team leader was given a job
someone else should have got-
ten so they will set out to prove
the team leader's incompetence.

3. Morale may be low and
employees are not motivated to
get things done.

4. Employees want to appear
to be co-operative to avoid reper-
cussions, but don't agree with the
request.

move, | move”




Sabotage can happen in vari-
ous ways. Here are a few more
examples:



1. Proactive sabotage where
employees methodically plan
their destructive strategies.

2. Strategies where employees
just do nothing and come up with
elaborate, and somewhat logical
reasons for not meeting expec-
tations when the rubber hits the
road.

3. Assigning a project to some-
one else because you don’t want
to do it and it is easy to blame
someone else for not getting the
work done.

i. Passive aggression is a symp-
be atom ofdew morale and morale
hallen’ nges ‘usually take consis-
tent, concerted effort to unravel
so here are a few suggestions:

1. You-ean avoid the effects of
stealthy sabotage caused by pas-
sive aggression by tuning into
members of your team.

2. In compliance circles they
talk about KYC - Know Your
Client. It will benefit you to get to
know and understand your
employees and their patterns so
you are not.blindsided by pas-
sive aggressive behaviour.

3. Identify and develop your
leadership skill gaps. If you are a
manager or supervisor, under-
stand how your leadership style,
integrity and knowledge of your
role affect the rest of your team.
: 4, Ensure you organise yourself
: so you can track delegated tasks.
Remember to follow up consis-
tently and keep in mind that you
should get the facts because con-
sistent follow-up can be thwarted
by inaccurate or superficial
reports.

No plan is fool-proof and some
hard core, "passive aggressives"
are relentless. So here are a few
more tips for leaders facing teams
that demonstrate passive aggres-
series of events which took ; sive behaviour:
place throughout the week. :

Other activities included the ;
launch of the 50 million pound
challenge, a global effort of the
sorority to do its part in the :
effort to lose weight, and a wel- :
come reception on the spec-

tacular Martini X Yacht. The

guest of honour at the welcome }
reception was the internation- :
al regional director Norma
Jean Tucker who flew in from
California to celebrate the ;
occasion with the local mem- :
bers.

Eta Psi Omega chapter has
had much to celebrate this year
as 2008 also marks the centen- :
nial anniversary of the sorority. :
As the chapter continues to cel-
ebrate the sorority's centennial :
anniversary and its 45 anniver- }
sary, the membership, led by :
Cindy Dorsett, president, con- :
tinues to, uphold the ideals of :
the sorority's s founders and the
chapter's charter members.

It.is through sheer strength :
and a commitment to ‘service
to all mankind,’ that the extra-
ordinary service programmes
of the sorority will be imple-
mented. This contribution and
that of the many other service
champions from each of the
Greek fraternities and sorori-
ties in New Providence who
give of themselves, will affect
positive change in the commu-
nity leaving a permanent lega-
cy behind.

e Measure morale using an
employee opinion survey and use
this information to identify the
morale busters. Then, develop
an action plan designed to
address leadership behavioural
gaps in employees’ satisfaction

e Sharpen your leadership
skills

e If all else fails and the situa-
tion becomes intractable - con-
sider making a macro level deci-
sion, (eg, restructure the team,
place employees in appropriate
roles, develop coaching skills and
implement corrective action con-
sistently).



~ Remember, the number one
reason good employees leave an
organisation is leadership. If you
are a leader and you allow toxic,
passive aggressive behaviour to
silently kill the performance of
your team, you will end up being
held accountable or playing the
blame game. Both of these
options are suboptimal so once
you attempt to understand the
reason for the behaviour, seek to
address the root issues.





e Yvette Bethel is the president
of Organizational Soul. She can
be contacted by telephone at
242.424.7100 or tax - 242.324.1631
or write to her at PO Box N-311,
Nassau, Bahamas. Interested per-
sons can also check out her web-
site at: www.orgsoul.com.



minds is..."I will pretend to go .

them into thinking that I agree |

athe canduithinn TARA ea UAReee



THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 11B





Baha Mar Resorts Hosts BAHA MAR
| ‘Welcome Back’ Rece “he yn NASSAU, FHE BAHAMAS



Seated f-R} Andrea Myers, First Caribbean; Peter Goudie, Bahamas Supermarkets; Robert D.L. Sands,

Baha Mar; Lottis Shearer, C.O.B.; Richard English, Baha Mar; Leah R. Davis, Baha Mar; Yvette Ingraham, PRESIDENT °S SC HOLARS
J.S. Johnson Insurance. Staading (LR! Jacqueline King, FirstCaribbean; Delia Ferguson; Crystal McCoy; , P RO C RA M M E
Amina Sarr; Lanadia Davis; Deangelo Ferguson; Lowrell Edgecombe; Vaughn Roberts, Baha Mar; é ‘ ? rs
LaKeisha Moncur; Neucasha Greene; Maureen French, Lyford Cay Foundation; Latoya Moncur.

A Special Event for the Scholars
of The College of the Bahamas’
President's Scholars Programme

ye








Baha Mar Resorts Ltd. treated Scholars of the
College of the Bahamas’ prestigious President's



Ree PY es

Vaughn Roberts, Baha Mar VP of Finance; i Monique Toppin, COB Professor and PSP



Felicity Humblestone, COB Director of: Selection Committee; Lottis Shearer, COB S h l P t WW | B k
Development; Maureen French, Lyford Cay Director of Student Leadership; Peter Goudie, Cnolars rogramme to a € COME ac

® . . $e . . a; ew .
Scholarship Foundation ! Bahamas Supermarkets Limited reception to officially start the 2008-9 academic

year. The President's Scholars Programme
is a four-year scholarship and_ personal
development programme designed to identify
a limited number of outstanding students
‘in order to foster their intellectual growth,
refine the leadership skills and enhance their
Robert Sands, SVP Adiminististion andi Extainal | 1 LAK R’ Dave, bilseady of Sani Relations, relationship with The College of the Bahamas.

Affairs, Baha Mar Resorts; Richard English, SVP | | Baha Mar Resorts; Crystal McCoy, Baha Mar’s PSP The Programme which began in 2006.
Sales & Marketing, Baha Mar Resorts Scholar; Robert Sands; Lottis Shearer



Baha Mar Resorts Ltd, a patron of the President's
Scholars Programme also joined hands, with
other patrons including J.S. Johnson Insurance,
FirstCaribbean Bank and Bahamas Supermarkets
in congratulating the students on their outstanding
accomplishments to date and encouraging them
in their pursuit of academic excellence.




C.O.B. Ladies: Monique Toppin;
Yolanda Darville, COB, Development Associate;
Felicity Humblestone; Lottis Shearer

j PSP Scholars: Neucasha Greene, Lowrell Edgecome,
Monique Toppin,Amina Sarr and Delia Ferguson,







a ‘ bs date Vii | i jig) . iat, © e ‘ 7 a é % : re : a * me ee ee _—
Baha Mar's Leah Davis and _ Robert Sands, SVP Administration - _ Recognizing the males participating | C.O.B.'s President's Scholars ‘ Andrea Myers, PSP Donor,
Robert Sands chat with C.O.B.'s and External Affairs, Baha Mar __ in the PSP Programme (Standing L-R) / © FirstCaribbean; Monique Toppin;
President's Scholars i Resorts, shares a few words of Peter Goudie; Robert Sands; i ; Vicente Roberts; Lottis Shearer
» encouragement with the Scholars Rick English; Vaughn Roberts, \

_ . Vicente Roberts (Sitting L-R) PSP
‘ Scholars: Justin McFall, Matthew
Strachan and DeAngelo Ferguson
“ (missing Valentino Rahming)



— ee — ee ie 2 eee



Pa) esti Wah seus

OR the past few years,

TNs) ae a week, Adri-

anna Munnings Wee
start her morning by leading
her kindergarten class in
Rielle MeN (-1 mre Miya ole vars
dents would often stop singin
and start listening as she Fil
their day with melodious
royale

same Way she captured the attention of her class-

room, Ms Munnings mesmerized her church. Now,

alter years of dedication and holding onto a life long

dream, she is on the verge of breaking orito the big
scene.

“its. always been something | wanted to do since |
was a child.” Ms Munnings said of her singing. "When
I write ms songs. | write them from the heart and in all
Baa I put myself and my emotions into it because
that’s how 1 express myself best. ft doesn't matter if lam
happy. frightened or overwhelmed. if 1 don't put it into
Boe hike 1 am adequately doing myself

slice.”

_ A Slellar performer with Andresian roots, Ms
Munnings has been described by many as a singer with
it oinling on her vocal chords.

eee Ber err icayiitcien
Pia Uti ities Lira eer ural beer raver erreaea toe a

Siete seat usta leith elie meemrs rth rom lam reat merg

keeping ic locked away. I've had some dark days in
omy life - tough limes, humble beginnings, heartaches
and heartbreaks - but | know that my brighter day is
“here and that's actually the name of my first single.”

_ Ms Munnings’ plans to mark her musical debut with
E pce eta Le iol the sant sivsbicnden ts nis

} te eons in
iu holies a: Se WALI La

—>

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7,

a







2008



Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway ¢ 394-1759





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AND F-STORM |

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008



PRICE — 75¢














Nal) om

Singing her

way toa

Ne ET

BIGGEST!

CARS FOR SALE, ”
HELP WANTED
Ose

Killed in crash

in

NE gL) Bate
Bei i en |
os oe fe Y
, /
i. Pah



a





cocaine.
is seized

Another pair 1n By DENISE MAYCOCK Chief Supt Basil Rahming
Tribune Freeport said a team of Bahamian and
Reporter international law enforcement

hospital after
car hits tree

TWO women are dead, and
another two in hospital after
their Honda Accord careened
off East Bay Street, smashing
into one tree and then rico-
cheting into another during
the early hours of yesterday
morning.

According to an eyewitness
at the scene, the car came to
rest in a heap of twisted metal
near a tree just east of the
Green Parrot restaurant and
bar.

Scratch marks along the
trunk of the tree revealed that
the car might have flown up
into the air nearly six or seven
feet.

A police statement said the
four Women were trapped
inside the dark-coloured Hon-
da after the driver lost control

-and became pinned to a tree

near the Royal Bahamas
Defence Force harbour unit
on East Bay Street, shortly
after 2am. Police say speed
may have been a factor.

Firemen were forced to use
the Jaws of Life to extricate
the women from the vehicle

SEE page eight

ealticm ira Aa Rari

a

THE REMAINS of the car after the horrific

Verdict in the Mario Miller



Teh

be

crash.



murder case expected today

By NATARIO McKENZIE

A. VERDICT in the trial of
two brothers charged in the bru-
tal murder of Mario Miller is
expected today, with the jury
hearing closing arguments in the
case yesterday.

Supreme Court Justice
Stephen Isaacs has been hearing

ihe Taste

(@) 1]



falid only on tuesdays!

the case and is expected to give
his summation this morning
before sending the jury into
deliberations.

Lead attorney fonthe Crown,
Deputy Director of Public Pros-
ecutions Cheryl Grant-Bethel
reminded the jury yesterday that
the burden of proof remained
on the prosecution until the end
of the trial and that they alone
were the judges of the facts.

Mrs Bethel described Mario
Miller’s murder as a tragic and
senseless killing, highlighting the
fact that he was stabbed 18
times, with some of his fingers
being partially severed and deep
stab wounds to parts of his neck.

Mrs Bethel asserted that the
prosecution had proven beyond
a reasonable doubt that brothers
Ryan Miller, alias Manny, and
Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar Lee,
had caused the death of Mario
Miller.

Miller, 28, was killed on June
22, 2002. His body was found in
bushes near the Super Value
Food Store in Winton. The pros-
ecution has called 32 witnesses

SEE page eight

mortgage with

Get savings built right into your

Man accused
of stabbing his
father appears

MN as

@ By NATARIO.
McKENZIE






A MAN accused of stab-
bing his father in the chest
multiple times last week
was arraigned in Magis-
trate’s Court yesterday on
attempted murder charges.

Moses Mackey Jr, 20, of
Carmichael Road, was
arraigned before Chief
Magistrate Roger Gomez
charged with the attempted
murder of his father Moses
Mackey Sr.

According to court dock-
ets, Mackey Jr attempted
to cause his father’s death
on Friday, October 3.

Mackey Sr., who is said
to be in his early 40s, was
reportedly stabbed multi-
ple times in the chest
around mid-day last Friday

SEE page eight























*

ea eG
et

any
om

2 «7

dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT -~ More than $7
million worth of cocaine was
seized by Bahamian and inter-
national law enforcement
authorities on Sunday during a
major drug bust at Freeport
Container Port. _

According to police reports,
some 687 pounds of cocaine was
discovered in a container des-
tined for the United States.

ES Ree)





Bahamians

face threat to’

NIB pensions

@ By RUPERT MISSICK Jr
(additional reporting
by ALEX MISSICK)

rmissick@tribungmedia.net

IF THINGS do not change, by
the time Bahamians who were
born between 1981 and 1987
reach their 40s and 50s, the pen-
sions provided by the National
Insurance Board may be no more.

Mentbers of the youngest gen-
eration in our society to remem-
ber the end of the Cold War and
the fall of Communism in Eastern
Europe could be left with a future
filled with uncertainty, as the
most optimistic of estimates —
according to the 7th Actuarial

SEE page six

your savings!

Marsh Harbour: 367.3135

*




officials received information

and proceeded to the container

port, where they were assisted
~by container port agents. ,...

Mr Rahming said authorities
searched a machine inside the
container. The drugs were con-
cealed in a compartment of the
machine.

The drugs have been flown
to New Providence. No arrests
have been made and investiga-
tions are underway.

TOE





























Tim Clarke/Tribune staff



MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT
pay their respects to the late
Norman Solomon.

lM MEGAN REYNOLDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

A FINAL farewell to ‘for-
mer MP and leader of-the
opposition Norman Solomon
began yesterday with a solemn
procession in silence from the
House of Assembly to Christ
Church Cathedral.

Mr Solomon’s family front-
ed the silent procession along
Bay Street, with Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham, Mem-
bers of Parliament, and
Defence Force officers carry-
ing his casket.

At the Anglican cathedral
in George Street, Nassau,
Archbishop Drexel Gomez
led the service with contribu-
tions from 12 friends, relatives,
politicians and colleagues of
Mr Solomon who paid tribute
to his life of selfless service,
remarkable achievement and

SEE page two






Nassau: 356.7764
Freeport: 352.6676/7










FIDELITY

30" ANNIVERSARY





PAGE 2, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008



"Paige. Ann Waugh, daughter of Jeffrey and Judy
Waugh, a former honor student at St. Andrew's
School excelled with top honors her first year at The
University of Tampa. Paige obtained a 4.0 grade point
average and qualified for the Dean's list: few students
achieve this high standard in their first year.

Paige is now a sophomore at The University of Tampa
with a cumulative average of 3.9 which qualifies her
for the honors program.

Paige also performed well in economics in the spring
of last year. She was congratulated by performing

well in the ‘Principal of Economics’ course and for her
outstanding academic achievements. Paige has been
invited to contact the Professor and Chairperson of
the Economics faculty to discuss academic and career
~ opportunities in this field.

_ CONGRATULATIONS Paice * A JOB WELL DONE ..



pests Colina General
gem (surance Agency



Norman Solomon
is laid to rest

FROM page one

ee contribution to the

Bahamas.

Prime Minister Ingraham
hailed him as an outstanding
Bahamian who led an extraordi-
narily. productive life.

“He was a man of many gifts.
He was articulate, imaginative,
courageous and a hard worker,
and he used those gifts for a num-
ber of pursuits,” he said.

“Much of Norman’s time was
dedicated to the promotion of
tourism and a passion he shared
with others for restoration and
further development of the city
of Nassau.

“The Bahamas has lost a great
Bahamian and my colleagues in
Parliament join me in expressing
deep sympathy to his family, and
gratitude for the service of Nor-
man Solomon.”

Serving as an MP for St John’s
constituency, now North
Eleuthera, from 1967 to 1982, Mr
Solomon was revolutionary in
organising and leading the short-
lived Social Democratic Party in
1979, serving as opposition to the
Pindling administration until
1981.

In addition to his political
career, for which he is remem-
bered as one of the country’s
sharpest debaters, Mr Solomon
was an active businessman
with Mademoiselle, The Body
Shop, and Wendy’s among his
successful enterprises, and in 1982
he took over Ardastra Gardens
and Zoo and revamped the park
into a tourist attraction.

Prime Minister Ingraham said


















UM ees

Bernard Rd ~ Mackey St- Thompson Blvd






P
~~











THE TRIBUNE



So ribune staff ; :

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham presents a flag to Katherine
Solomon, the widow of Norman Solomon.

he was proud to have advised the
Queen to grant Mr Solomon the
honour of CMG, Companion in
the most distinguished order of
St Michael and St George, in
2001, for his service to the busi-
ness community.

Frank Comito, director of the
Nassau Tourism Development
Board founded by Mr Solomon in
1994, said his friend Norman had
two loves in his life, his wife
Katherine and lady Nassau.

“Lady Nassau helped to raise
Norman, and as his dear city fell
into disrepair and negligence in
the 1980s he felt the pain,’ "Mr
Comito said.”

“But he could see that although
age and negligence had taken its
toll she could still shine.

“He started the revitalisation
of many sites and knew it could
take years.

“Recently he said to me, ‘it
looks like 40 years of effort have
not been for nought’, and I
said, ‘yes Norman, it has not been
for nought.’”

Director of Tourism Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace said: “Nor-
man believed that tourism was
the best economic development
tool that we had.

“Tt is so important for his mem-
ory and his legacy to go into the
right kind of things, for things to
happen in downtown Bay Street.”

Former Attorney General Sean
McWeeney paid fribute-to Mr
Solomon’s daring to be different,
in personality, dress sense, busi-
ness and politics.

He said: “Norman demon-
strated an individuality that set
him apart.

Tuesday, October 7th

(Today Only)

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With Every purchase/Trossttham
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MINISTER OF Touran Vincent
Vanderpool-Wallace pays his
respects to Norman Solomon.

He really was different in won-
derful and extraordinary
ways, and we are all the richer
for it.”

A likeness of Mr Solomon will
stand in a prominent place in Nas-
sau as he will not be forgotten,
friend Diane Phillips said.

Mr Solomon is survived by his
wife Katherine, daughters
Andrya Schulte and Alexya
Solomon, sons Sean and Spencer
Solomon, and four grandchildren.

The loving husband, father and
grandfather passed away in a

Florida hospital on Monday, Sep-:

tember 29, after a decade-long
fight with Parkinson's disease and
recent bout of lung cancer.




y





THE TRIBUNE



© In brief | Too many ‘badways managers’

Officers seize
$22,000
drugs haul
from hoat

Police have seized $22,000
worth of marijuana from a
parked boat in the area of
Quarry Mission Road.

Acting on a tip, officers of
the Drug Enforcement Unit
(DEV) travelled to Quarry
Mission Road at around
3.30pm on Sunday and con-
ducted a search of a white 25-
foot vessel that was parked in
a yard, ‘

Onboard the vessel, police
reportedly found two large
plastic bags, each containing
10 brown taped packages of

marijuana.

Four men are being ques-
tioned by police in connection
with this matter and two oth-
ers are actively being sought.

Investigations continue.

Police praise
citizen for
turning over
illegal firearm

POLICE are praising the
efforts of a concerned citizen
who turned over an illegal
firearm to the authorities.

The person found a hand-
gun in a bushy area of south-
ern New Providence and
handed it over to the police at
around 12 noon yesterday.

Press liaison officer Assis-
tant Superintendent Walter
Evans said that the Royal
Bahamas Police Force
applauds the efforts of citi-
zens, who upon making such
discoveries, turn the weapons
over to the police.

“This kind of action by con-

cerned citizens lends to a safer
environment for all,” he said.

Expert to
speak up for .
“tax havens’

If you have ever wanted to
hear an expert explain why so-
called tax havens like the
Bahamas are good for the _
world, the Nassau Institute is
inviting you to come and listen
to a top expert talk on the top-
ic.

Dr Dan Mitchell, a member
of the Cato Institute - a world
renowned think tank promot-
ing public policy based on
individual liberty, limited gov-
ernment and free markets -
will talk on the topic “Why
Tax Havens are a blessing” at
a Nassau Institute hosted pub-
lic meeting.

Anexpert ontaxreform
and supply-side tax policy, and
an advocate of flat tax and
international tax competition,
Dr Mitchell is a senior fellow
with the think tank, whose _
articles have been published in
the Wall Street Journal, the
New York-Times, Investor’s
Business Daily and the Wash-
ington Times.

He is also a regular guest on
radio talk shows in the United
States and co-author of a new
book, Global Tax Revolution.

According to the Nassau
Institute, while in the
Bahamas Dr Mitchell will also
meet financial secretary in the
Ministry of Finance, Colin
Higgs, and directors of the
Bahamas Financial Services
Board, Association of Interna-
tional Banks and Trust Com-

panies and the Society of

Trust and Estate Practitioners.

The Nassau Institute’s pub-
lic meeting with Dr Mitchell
will take place on Thursday,

November 6, at 6.30pm. He is

also scheduled to speak on the

radio on November 5 and at a

Rotary Club of East Nassau

meeting on Friday, November

7

Today's PMH
orthopaedic
clinic cancelled

MANAGEMENT at
Princess Margaret Hospital
advises the public that the
orthopaedic clinic scheduled
for today has been cancelled.

Patients holding appoint-
ments for this date should |
contact the orthopaedic clinic
at 502-7862 today to reschéed-
ule appointments.

PMH apologises for any
inconvenience caused.




@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

Poor service in the public sec-
tor stems from “badways man-
agers” abusing their power and
from civil servants not getting the
promotions and pay increases
they deserve in a timely manner,
according to President of the
Bahamas Public Service Union
John Pinder.

“The biggest problem we have
is. that there are too many bad-
ways managers in the public ser-
vice: (Bad service) starts’at’the
very top. There are too many per-
sons abusing their power and they
try to promote people based on
how the people worship them and
so they don’t serve, they get peo-
ple to serve them.

“Until we change that mindset
in the public service from the very
top we will always have deficien-
cies and frustrated staffers who
appear not to be going beyond
the call of duty to give the type of
service that the general public
demands.”

Mr Pinder was responding to
comment made by Prime Minis-
ter Hubert Ingraham at a recog-
nition ceremony where 13 out-

standing public servants were
nominated for the post of Public
Servant of the Year 2008.

Mr Ingraham said “core char-
acteristics” of courteousness, dis-
cipline, respect for authority and
a willingness to work hard are
“not abundant in our society” and
“sadly ... this is reflected in our
public service which mirrors our
society.”

Denying that an overwhelming
lack of worth ethic abounds in
the public service, Mr Pinder said
that where it does among a “small
percentage” it’s because public
servants are “demoralised.”

“I think because the number
of persons in the public service
are totally frustrated regarding
being able to get promotions and
receive their increments. I think
that to some extent that sort of
demoralises them. And so they
don’t go beyond the call of duty
anymore because they don’t see
any benefit in doing so.”

Mr Pinder called “long over-
due” Mr Ingraham’s expression
at the ceremony of his intention

to initiate-a-“tremendous change”
in the next year to tne burca

| cracy which stops public servants

from being able “to move” with-
in the service.

In a BIS report from the cere-
mony sent to the media yester-
day, Mr Ingraham is quoted as
saying, outside of his official
speech: “The public service in the
Bahamas has become so bureau-
cratic; and it’s so difficult for so
many hard working persons to
move, because the public service
is driven by too great an extent by
what is called paper qualifications,
rather than the ability of persons
to perform functions.”

Mr Pinder said he appreciates
this message. “For many years
the union has been saying that as
long as the government contin-
ues to only put emphasis on
‘added qualifications for promo-

tions you will never have an effi-
cient public service.

Two women,
man in court
semi M tt
ere en)

TWO women and a
man were arraigned in
Magistrate’s Court yester-
day on cocaine possession
charges.

Police have charged
Harvey Marcian Kerr, 34,
of Tropical Gardens;
Travetha Pyfrom, 28; and
Laranda Charlton, 23, of
Summer Haven with con-
spiracy to possess cocaine
with the intent to supply,
conspiracy to export
cocaine, taking preparato-
ry steps to export cocaine
and possession of cocaine.
with the intent to supply.

It is alleged that the
accused committed the

offenses on October 3.

The prosecution alleges
that they were found in
possession of 1.2 pounds
of cocaine.

The accused pleaded

not guilty to the charges.

Kerr and Pyfrom were

granted bail in the sum of
$10,000. Charlton was
ranted bail in the sum of

15,000.

The case has been

adjourned to October 15.



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18. The nominees are:



Marine Resources

Social Development

Ministry of Legal Affairs

“There
are too
many per-
sons in the
public ser-
vice who
are frustrat-
ed because
they are
performing
at above
their rank
and are not being able to fill those
positions simply because they lack
academic qualifications.”

Yesterday former minister with
responsibility for the public ser-
vice, MP Fred Mitchell said he
was shocked to hear how Mr
Ingraham described the short-
fallings he sees in the public ser-
vice.



LOOT

@ 2008 Public Service Officer of the Year

The 2008 Public Service Officer of the Year will be chosen on October

Jacqueline Fox, Administrative Cadet, Ministry of Agriculture and

Paula Mae Bowleg-Russell, Finance Officer II, Cabinet Office
Marion Rolle, Senior Price Inspector, Formally of Lands and Local
Government now with the Office of the Prime Minister

Shirlelle Strachan-Bevans, Chief Clerk, Ministry of Housing
Chandell Johnson, Administrative Cadet, Ministry of Labour and

Omishee Sears, Senior Accounts Clerk, Ministry of Finance
Michelle Ferguson, Chief Clerk, Governor General’ Office

Verna Ellis, Chief Clerk, Ministry of Works and Transport
Charmine Williams, Accounts Clerk, Ministry of Health

Neil Braitwaite, Senior Counsel, Office of the Attorney General and

Anne Pritchard Archer, Senior Clerk, Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Ethel Rolle, Head Messenger, Ministry of Education
Andrea Deleveaux, Head Telephonist, Department of Public Service

in public sector - union chief


















He said Mr Ingraham “came
off as if (he was) denigrating pub-
lic servants.”

He added: “Of course, I accept
there are challenges throughout
not just the public sector but the
private sector too ... you find that
these issues of service are issues
which we have to address and I
think they probably have to be
addressed in the education sys-
tem to reform the culture.

“But I think when you are
prime minister there’s a certain
approach you have to take in
these matters. He’s in a position
to work with the public sector
unions, as we to try to, to rectify
the issues there are, not to stand
up and sound like you are
denouncing public servants.”

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Police ‘back to square one’ in

bid to identify murder victim.

By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net



POLICE are now “back to square one” in their efforts to
identify a young woman who was found with her throat
slashed over the weekend.

Chief Superintendent in-charge of the Central Detective
Unit Glen Miller told The Tribune on Sunday that a fam-
ily had come forward, concerned the murder victim might
be their loved one.

But yesterday Acting Assistant Commissioner Hulan
Hanna said police and the family of the missing girl have
now been able to rule out the possibility that the body is
hers without a formal identification taking place.

“That’s not who they thought it was. So we’re pretty
much back to square one with trying to determine who it
is,” said Mr Hanna. ,

The girl’s body, clad only in red underwear, was found in
a bushy area by a dirt track off the Charles Saunders High-
way on Saturday.

There were signs that the body had been in that spot for
over 24 hours, and:that the victim, believed to be in her late
teens or early 20s, had struggled to fight off her killer.

Apart from those who provided the first potential lead,
Mr Hanna said a number of other concerned members of
the public have since come forward saying the victim might
be their missing loved one.

“We are working with them,” said Mr Hanna. “We're try-
ing to narrow it down to see if anything would result in a
favourable outcome for us.”

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR








The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt. O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO: Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387





IN THIS column yesterday we discussed the
case of American Robert Halat, of Lyford Cay,

an 18-year resident of the Bahamas, who enjoys.

casino gambling — a pastime denied all resi-
dents of the Bahamas, be they Bahamian or
foreign.

Because of his ill health — he suffers from
emphysema — the only enjoyment Mr Halat
gets from life these days is going to the casino to
be with his friends and play a game of poker.

For 18 years — the length of time he has
been here since deciding to make the Bahamas
his home— he has gambled at the casino where
he has enjoyed the limited social life that his
health will allow. Suddenly in June of last year
he was notified by the Gaming Board that he
could no longer gamble at the casino. He con-
tacted an MP who promised to work on the
problem for him.

However, since being notified that he was no
longer to play in the casino, he continued to
go there to lunch with his friends. “At my age,”
he said, “where else can you go? I can hardly
move, I have difficulty breathing.” For his com-
plaint he needs an air-conditioned environment.

However, on his 78th birthday, as no one
had made any progress on his problem as
promised, he decided to take matters into his
own hands. He played poker to celebrate his
78th year.

He was charged and taken to court. The
charges against him were dismissed. He was
charged as a Bahamian breaking the law by
gambling, whereas he was an American resi-
dent breaking the law by gambling. Because of
the wrong.wording of the charge he walked
free on a technicality.

However, if it were not for his ill health,
which restricts his travelling, he would renounce
his residency permit immediately and revert to
being a tourist, which is what he has always
considered himself.

He said when he bought his home and
applied for residency he was not told of all the
restrictions that that would entail.

He said he has a Canadian friend, who
refused to become a resident of the Bahamas for
the same reason. Instead his friend leaves Nas-
sau every three months — at present he is in
Vegas — so that he can keep his tourist status,
which will enable him to legally frequent the
Bahamian casinos as often as he likes.

According to Mr Halat the Bahamas would
have more wealthy residents if it were not for
this restriction.

Many persons wonder why casinos are closed
to residents. They say it is discriminatory. Leg-
islators at the time the law was enacted consid-
ered that if foreign residents had been allowed
to frequent the casinos, but Bahamians had
been barred, then it would indeed have been
discriminatory. That is why — to avoid dis-



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crimination — it was decided that all residents
regardless of nationality would be barred from
gambling houses in the Bahamas. Casinos were
for tourists only, and to be in the tourist indus-
try a country had to accommodate these visitors
who liked a little fling at the tables.

The Baptists were always against gambling in
any form, and if given a chance would close
down all forms of gambling, casinos included.

But the idea that Bahamians should be kept
from the tables goes way back and has nothing
to do with discrimination.

In the thirties the only gaming house, so dis-
creetly run that most Bahamians did not know
of its existence, was the Bahamian Club. It was
located just east of Xavier’s College, which was
in existence when the casino was in operation.
The Bahamian Club was managed by two very
fine American gentlemen. It was an evening
black-tie event with dinner. Those at the school
would have known it as the Bahamian. Club,
but it is doubtful they would have known it was
a casino.

There was also Hobby Horse Hall, the pop-
ular race track on West Bay Street. There were
races every Friday during the “winter season.”
Hobby Horse with its,quarter breed horses was
extremely popular and open to all. Naturally,
Bahamians who love to:bet, put heavy wagers
down on the horses.

We remember how the late Nurse Alice Hill-
Jones would come to The Tribune to see Sir Eti-
enne, then publisher of this newspaper. She
was in charge of the government’s public health
clinics. She was particularly agitated about the
adverse affect Hobby Horse Hall was having on
the children attending the clinic. .

She maintained that during the racing season,
the weight of the children brought to the clinic
fell off dramatically. Fathers were gambling
away their meagre wages and could not afford
to buy milk for their offspring.

She wanted something done to prevent these
men gambling at the track. If she had had her
way, seeing her scrawny children, she would
have banned them from Hobby Horse.

’And so going way back in the community the
spread of gambling was always a vice on which
concerned citizens wanted to apply brakes.

Then, of course, there were the Baptists,
who tolerated the casinos as long as Bahamians
weren’t involved. And there were others who
remembered the taint that tied casinos to the
Mafia, prostitution and gangland murders.

Gambling was a pastime that a large seg-
ment of concerned Bahamians were against and
from which they tried to protect their citizens.
This is why residents of this country are not
allowed in the casinos. The framers of the laws
in those days did not regard it as discrimination,
rather it was an effort to protect the nation’s
morality.
















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What will —
an Obama
government

be like?

EDITOR, The Tribune.

The following is a father's:

response to an e-mail from his
son, a Democratic leaning
Independent, who expressed
his concerns about the quali-
fications of Governor Sara
Palin and the impact of the
present financial crisis:

“Sara is not a genius and
may not have the IQ that
Obama has.

But what kind of Govern-

‘ment will we have with Oba-

ma-Biden? That is the real
question. If you think about
it, the answer is completely
unnerving. These are two of
the most leftist senators in the
Senate. Their careers suggest a
tendency to the very policy
weaknesses that produced the
present financial crisis.

What were those weakness-
es? They seem to be the fol-
lowing: :

1.) The belief that Govern-
ment can solve all problems
and the problems are cast in
such a way as to require "big
government-socialist". solu-
tions, and

2.) The fact that elected
politicians simply cannot say
"NO" to politically attractive
populist ideas and big govern-
ment solutions.

Let's take the present crisis.






LETTERS

etters@tribunemedia.net

At its core was the abandon-:

ment of prudent financial
standards. The prudent stan-
dard for a 30-year mortgage
loan was 20 per cent down and
an earnings stream that could
cover the monthly mortgage
payments. The first risk to a
mortgage loan is that housing
prices will not always go up,
up, and up. Protection against
that housing market risk
necessitated a 20 per cent
down payment that is espe-
cially important if the bor-
rower unexpectedly encoun-
ters difficulty in meeting his
monthly payments.

The other prudent condi-
tion was that the lender would
hold the mortgage to maturity;
but Wall Street developed
mortgage-backed securities, a
security made up of smaller
mortgages, that could be sold
to really big investors in the
U.S. and abroad. All of this
was done with the implicit and
ultimately the explicit guar-
antee of the U.S. Govern-
ment. Of course, Wall Street
made huge commissions.

Thus the UNHOLY

alliance was created: "needy"
voters, Congressmen, Sena-
tors, huge Government mort-
gage corporations and Wall
Street financiers.

Those prudent lending
standards were progressively
dismantled because they
allegedly "discriminated
against the poor and needy!;
and you "cannot discriminate
in this way since everyone
. deserves their own home even
if they can not afford it."

Thus all those who ana-
lyzed the problem correctly,
including George Bush's exec-
utive staff, did not mount the
kind of political crusade that
could stop the train that was
running down the track.
AND, the government-
financed housing bubble (ever
rising home prices) burst, pro-
ducing a financial crisis that
likely will be followed by a
true depression...a drop in
GNP. The size of this crisis
suggests that the worst may
still be in the near future.

This is enough to make
every thinking person uncom-
fortable.

Regards...Dad.”
(Wasn’t John McCain one

of those who voted for dereg-
ulation? — Ed).

Beware of the spider web, Inagua

EDITOR, The Tribune.

I smiled when I read that
three PLP MP’s announced
that some in Inagua were not
getting their share of the
Inagua hurricane relief sup-
plies.

They must think this da’
PLP administration. Or
maybe they are incapable of
giving NEMA, the Bahamas
Red Cross Society, the
Bahamas Conference of
Methodist Churches, other
Church groups, private citi-
zens, businesses and civic
organisations the credit for the
outstanding work they are
doing on behalf of the resi-
dents of Inagua and their fam-
ilies.

Maybe the unions should

reflect on the mischief they

All major credit cards

did before the hurricane, riling
up dem people employed at
Morton Salt.

With all d’at hullabaloo they
spread down there, why
wouldn’t Morton Salt begin
wondering if they have a
future there?

Hopefully the people of
Inagua won’t suffer for the ill-
conceived interference of
these other people.

Already homes are receiv-
ing materials and supplies as
well as qualified labour to
repair roofs, structures and
buildings across the island.

Teams of contractors, car-
penters and other construc-
tion workers have been dis-
patched to ensure that the
work is done well and quickly.

For the first time in our his-

tory, BTC has issued free

phone cards to Inagua resi-
dents so they can call and talk
with relatives while they
restore BTC land lines and
service.

Our Prime Minister has
announced major incentives
for Iguana that will assist in
its redevelopment and restora-
tion in the short to medium
term.

You know, ya have to laugh,
or you would weep at the tac-
tics of the ol’ PLP - d’ey even
trying to make political gains
from Hanna and Ike!

Beware Inagua of the spi-
der web... |

M J McKINNEY
Over da Hill,
Nassau,
September, 2008.





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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 5



November 15th

By ALEX MISSICK ,



AS WORLD AIDS Day

approaches on December 1, the ;

AIDS Foundation of the }
Bahamas has once again part- }
nered with Colinalmperial to ;
host the Bahamas’ largest annu- }
al AIDS awareness event and }
the major fundraiser for the :
foundation - the 15th annual ;

Red Ribbon Ball.

* The ball, which signals the :
opening of the gala ball season :
in New Providence, will be held :
under the theme “Take the :
Lead” on November 15 at

Atlantis’ Imperial Ballroom.

Colinalmperial has been }
involved with the Red Ribbon }
Ball since 1994, as the former :
company, Imperial Life Finan- :
cial, signed a sponsorship accord }
-with the AIDS Foundation of :
-the Bahamas to commit human :
jand financial resources in the :

fight against HIV/AIDS.

_ Co-chairperson for the Red :
“Ribbon Ball Sandra Smith said ;
‘this event has been Colinalm- :
‘perial’s way of “taking the lead” :
‘wwith the AIDS Foundation of :
the Bahamas to fight the spread }

of HIV and AIDS.

. “Those who plan this event }
from year to year are still main- :
ly ColinaImperial employees. :
However, we would be the first :
‘to admit that our partners, :
including our executive spon- :
sors, make much of this magic :

happen,” Mrs Smith said.

Since its inception, the Red
Ribbon Ball has raised over }
$650,000 for the AIDS Founda- ;

tion.

President of the AIDS Foun- :

dation Camille Barnett said that :
these funds have enabled the :
‘Foundation to do a number of :
‘things, including purchasing a :
house in southern New Provi- ;
dence, which will be renovated :
and reopened as a children’s }

home.

“The children’s home will pri-
marily house adolescents who :
are experiencing health chal- }
lenges. The objective of the :
home will be to stabilise the chil- :
dren (health wise) in a loving, :
structured environment,” Mrs :

Barnett said.

Funds from the ball have also ;
enabled the Foundation to help :
decrease the rate of mother-to- :
child transmission of the disease, :
provide HIV/AIDS education :
and raise awareness of the dis- :
ease, and to bring HIV positive :
children living in the Family :
Islands to New Providence for :

‘treatment.

The funds were further used

‘to support other non-govern- :

mental groups engaged in edu- :
zcation, awareness and testing for :
>HIV; to purchase laboratory }
equipment needed by the:

“national

HIV/AIDS pro- :

“gramme; to support the care and i
‘treatment of patients, and assist :
with the education and training :

of healthcare workers.

TROPICAL
EXTERMINATORS

YH
PHONE: 322-2157



Number of new HIV/AIDS
cases is down from last year

TO GIVE persons an idea of the
impact the National AIDS Pro-
gramme is having on the Bahamian
community, the programme’s direc-
tor Dr Perry Gomez yesterday pre-
sented to the media with statistics
for the first six months of this year.

There were 116 new cases AIDS
infections in the first half of 2008,
down from 179 new cases during the
same period last year, he said.

New HIV infection cases have
decreased. There were only 83 new
cases for the first six months of this
year, down from 305 new cases of
HIV infections for the same time
period in 2007.

The death rate for the disease has
also decreased. There have been 42
deaths related to AIDS/HIV infec-
tions for the first half of this year.
During the first six months of lust
year that number reached 75 deaths.

Dr Gomez said he feels the num-

“I am surpris
but I hope it
holds up because
this would mean
a dramatic
reduction in
new infections.”

Dr Perry Gomez





bers of new cases are very encour-
aging as it comes at a time where
they are focusing the programme
primarily on prevention.

“T am surprised, but I hope it holds
up because this would mean a dra-

matic reduction in new infections,”
Dr Gomez said. :

He was speaking at the announce-
ment of this year’s annual Red Rib-
bon Ball, which aims to promote
AIDS awareness.

This year, the event will be held on
November 15.

Several sponsors have been com-
mitted to the ball through the years.

This year’s executive sponsors for
the event are Kerzner International,
John Bull, American Airlines and
Sunbound.

Mrs Smith noted that Kerzner
International assists each year in
helping the Red Ribbon Ball to lim-
it its direct overhead so that the
donation that is made to the AIDS
Foundation can be maximised.

Additionally, Kerzner Interna-
tional has already donated more
than $125,000 directly to the Foun-
dation.

Senior vice-president in-charge of
public affairs at Kerzner Interna-
tional Ed Fields said Kerzner is
proud to be a part of the pro-
gramme.

Donation

Mr Fields also increased Kerzn-
er’s donation to the Foundation by
presenting a cheque for $25,000 to
Mrs Barnett.

“We have been very proud as
Kerzner International to have been
involved for the past several years, |
to be a part of this success story. We
have been able over a three-year
period to give $1 million to the
National Aids Programme,” Mr
Fields said.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
ig the official patron of this year’s
Red Ribbon Ball.

Governor-General calls on regional
‘challenge’ themselves

leaders to

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AS THE current economic
and financial crisis in the United
States threatens to deal a serious
blow those Caribbean commu-
nities dependent on the US for
tourism dollars, regional leaders
must "challenge" themselves to
maintain and improve existing
national services, while at the
same time creating new ones,

Governor-General Arthur Han-

na said.

The governor-general made
these remarks at the opening
ceremony of the 13th annual
Conference of Presidents and
Governors-General of the
Caribbean Community held at
the Wyndham Resort yesterday
morning.

Addressing a congregation of
nine presidents and governors-
general from the Caribbean, a
delegation of Cabinet ministers,
the leader of the opposition,
public servants and members of
the media, Mr Hanna stated
what many in the region expect
the current banking meltdown
in the US to have a serious rip-
ple effect on small Caribbean
nations.

Mr Hanna said: "In each of
our countries, we rely heavily on
revenue from touristic dollars
for much of our infrastructural
and socio-economic develop-
mental programmes. With the

.exception of Trinidad and Toba-

go, we are not oil producing
communities, and our somewhat
fragile economies are therefore
buffeted by the vagaries of the
global oil market.

"Additionally the current eco-
nomic 'crisis' in the United

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States will very likely negatively
impact all of us for some time
to come. All of these factors will
further challenge the abilities of
each of our member countries
to maintain and improve existing
national services, and to effec-
tively initiate and implement
new ones".

Also on hand at the opening
ceremony, Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said that in
the face of international eco-
nomic uncertainty, the
Caribbean region cannot afford
to ignore "the potential serious
social and economic conse-
quences that loom for our coun-
tries if good order is not restored
quickly to the North American
economy and indeed to that of
Europe and Asia".

The prime minister also noted
that the heads of state are "Well
placed" to be the catalysts for
the region to overcome chal-
lenges to the area's progress and
advancement.

The conference, which was
last held in the Commonwealth
of Dominica, is a forum for dis-

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cussion on the issues affecting
the region. The agenda includes

discussions on: education and.

culture, the impact of external
influences, the importance of
sports, health and social factors,
and patriotism.

Under the theme, "Rebuild-
ing Societies", regional heads
and governors-general hope the
four days of discussion will spark
action in the region in the
months ahead.

Representatives from 10 coun-
tries including the presidents of
Dominica, Trinidad and Tobago,
and the governors-general of
Antigua and Barbuda, Barba-
dos, Belize, Grenada, Jamaica,
St Christopher and Nevis, St
Lucia, St Vincent and the
Grenadines are all attending.

The conference continues
until Thursday, when attendees
will travel to Grand Bahama for
a tour of the second city before
departing to their home coun-
tries.





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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

The I Tribune



FROM page one

Review of the NIB completed in
2001 — predicts the depletion of
NIB’s funds by 2034.

Today NIB pays out $108- $110
million a year in pensions and
takes in about $160 million a
year in terms of contribution
income.

Anthony Curtis, acting direc-
tor of the National Insurance
Board, said there are some rec-
ommendations that have already
been submitted to cabinet to
reverse this progression.

“I could not really get into
those details in that document
right now. It is known that the
population is aging, people are
having fewer children and are
living longer. In that regard, it is
important that we take some

steps to insure the solvency of..

the fund, also to ensure that the
‘benefits remain relevant,” he
said.

Deroy Major, a 28-year-old
civil servant, has been in the gov-
ernment system for more than
two years. Born and raised in
New Providence but based in
Inagua, Mr Major says he wants
to receive a fair pension when
he retires from the government.

Some may say, at 28, why
does he need to think about
retirement? However, Deroy
knows that in no time he will be
at retirement age, just like his
parents. -

“When I reach a certain age, I
don’t want to work hard so it
would be great if I could live off
of my pension. For us as civil ser-
vants, we have to work for 30 or
more years to receive a sensible
pension. Pension in itself is not
all that it’s cracked up to be
because the government isn’t giv-
ing much. I know people who
have had to work 40 years before
they were eligible to receive
$2,000-a-month for pension. The
government needs to come up
with better saving schemes. That
is why a lot of people were hop-
ing for the national health
scheme. It is not nice to receive
your pension and have to turn
around and spend it on health-
care.”

Officials are now looking at
the possibility of actually increas-
ing the wage ceiling of $400 a
week to ensure that the benefits
remain relevant.
_ Many experts say if NIB is to

“meet its commitments to future
generations of pensioners, high-

- Bahamians face threat to NIB pensions.

er contribution rates and/or
reduced benefit promises will be
required.

When it comes to expert opin-
ions about the financial health
of the country’s institutions, not
many are more regarded than
that of former governor of the
Central Bank and Minister of
State for Finance James Smith.

Mr Smith, who serves as chair-
man of Colina Financial Advi-
sors Limited, said that any gov-
ernment is going to be forced at
some point to implement increas-
es in contributions or institute a
reduction in the range of claims.

“The report makes for good
reading but no responsible gov-
ernment will permit a pro-
gramme like National Insurance,
which is probably one of the only
adequate safety nets in the
Bahamas that provides some
form of income to retired people,
to go bust,” he said.

Mr Smith said that there is a
“need to continually review the
fund and to ensure that the pay-
ments will cover the costs over
the next several years.

“To be honest, I can’t say they
are doing a good job because I
don’t'think the contribution lev-
el has changed in 30 years. I
think once they receive a report,
and they are persuaded that
something has to be done, they
will move to make the necessary
increases to contributions which
will probably be the first
response. They need to be forced
at some point to implement
increases in contributions, if
that’s the way to do it, ora
reduction in the range of claims,”
Mr Smith said.

Mr Curtis also pointed out that
the rate of contributions has not
increased since the establishment
of NIB.

“National Insurance is really
a promise to the Bahamian peo-
ple. It’s a promise that look,
when you work and pay your
contributions, in 30 to 40 years
down the road, there is a pack-
age of benefits that you would
be entitled to receive. So we
have to have everything that’s
necessary to ensure that we
deliver on that promise,” the
NIB director said.

Many social security schemes
around the world are reforming
their systems to counter the
effects of aging populations, pro-
jected cash shortfalls and declin-
ing public confidence in these
programmes.

The Bahamas faces similar cir-
cumstances — falling birth rates,
increasing life expectancy among

the elderly, a contribution rate
that is below the average cost of
benefits and a pensioner popu-
lation that is prowing at a faster
rate than the number of contrib-
utors.

On December 31, 2001, NIB
benefits reserves stood at $1.1
billion, just under nine times
total expenditure in 2001. While
this — according to the actuary —
is an acceptable level of funding,
assets are significantly less than
the present value of total benefits
already earned by past and pre-
sent contributors.

Coupled with this, NIB is also
afflicted with high administra-
tive costs. Mr Curtis admitted
that this needs to be contained
but said most of the money is
used and invested to increase the
future viability of NIB.

There may be a controversial
solution to these problems: the
Bahamas, Mr Curtis said, may
have to import labour as the
labour force will not be sufficient
to keep pace with labour
demands.

“The most that we can do to
address those kinds of issues is
that we manage in such a way
that the solvency can be main-
tained. Those things mentioned
(i.e. falling birthrate etc) are
structural changes in terms of
lifestyle and choices that people
make that present a challenge to
us in that if you have an aging
population you have a few con-
tributors.”

NIB also faces another prob- ,

lem. President of the Bahamas
Chamber of Commerce Dioni-
sio D’aguilar said that the biggest
problem with National Insurance
is collections.

“T think a lot of businesses
have this problem where they
don’t comply. I’m very slow in
complying. What I do is I pre-
pay it. I estimate what my
National Insurance bill is going
to be and then I pay it in advance
because it’s frustrating for me to
file because they base the calcu-
lation on the number of Mon-
days in a month.

“It’s fairly complicated to get
my system of paying bi-weekly
to conform to their system based
‘on the number of Mondays in a
month. So that takes some time
for me to adjust my numbers to
conform with their system and
so therefore I’m never on time
and I’m late. So what I do is I
estimate every six months my bill
is going to be let’s say $35,000
or $37,000, here’s a cheque for
$35,000 I will get you the paper-
work when I get you the paper-

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work, but I comply,” Mr
D’aguilar said.

He said that NIB should con-
form its system to match the
many ways people get paid in
the Bahamas.

“You cither pay weekly, bi-
weekly, bi-monthly or you pay
monthly. So they should allow
you to file based on those four
approved methods, weekly, bi-
weekly, bi-monthly and monthly,
not based on the number or
Mondays in the month. Clearly
the biggest problem they have is
collections. A lot of people don’t
comply,” he said.

Nevertheless, Mr D’aguilar
said that NIB is of vital impor-
tance to the Bahamas as it is the
only form of forced savings in
the country. This is why he feels

“The Actuary
Report said that
NIB’s first cash
flow deficit is
expected in|
2014 with fund
depletion in
2025, while
under optimistic
assumptions,
expenditure is
projected to
exceed income
beginningin
2023 with Fund
depletion in
2034.”



NIB will never be in any real
danger of folding.

“National Insurance will
always have stories about them
running out of money, but I
don’t think it ever will happen
because the government can
always tax to always increase it
or cover it. Again, increase com-
pliance which they won’t get very
far with that in the short term,
increase the rate or the ceiling.
They haven't adjusted the rate,
so they should adjust the ceiling.
They should adjust it anyway as
inflation causes salaries to
increase,” he said.

Mr Curtis said that in the
Bahamas, persons seem not to
like to pay taxes and try to find

ways to get out of it, yet expect
the benefits those taxes are
meant to deliver.

“It seems as though the more
persons who evade taxes, the
more glorified they become. If
persons do not pay taxes, I think
the laws ought to be enforced so
that persons pay the penalty to
ensure that those funds are there
and they can be invested to get
those kinds of returns that we
would like to help to deliver on
the promise down the road,” he
said.

The hard cold fact of the mat-
ter, Mr D’aguilar said, is that
many Bahamians reach retire-
ment penniless and over-lever-
aged because they have no disci-
pline and they don’t know how
to save for the future and how to
save for when they get old.

“Tf there’s any way that you’re
going to revise it, it would be
good if the government (as they
did in Singapore) mandated that
you save 10 per cent of your
salary and that goes into a forced
savings. There may be about

three things that you can take it -

out for, such as to buy a home,
for health and education,” he
said.

Mr Curtis acknowledged the
problem of persons not retiring
with enough. He pointed out that
a lot of people don’t make
enough money to save because
expenses are so high and their
incomes can’t keep pace with the
cost of living.

“To them we are their last
hope. So we have to ensure that
it’s managed in such.a way that it
will be there down the road and
those benefits that are necessary
that persons would wish to have
that we actually make the sys-
tem adaptable to ensure that it
remains relevant for persons now
and down the road. In terms of
the aging population there is lit-
tle we can do in that regard
because people do not wish to
have as many children like they
used to,” he said.

The Actuary Report said that
NIB’s first cash flow deficit is
expected in 2014 with fund
depletion in 2025, while under
optimistic assumptions, expen-
diture is projected to exceed
income beginning in 2023 with
Fund depletion in 2034.

They indicate that under all
reasonable scenarios, depletion
of reserves is expected within 35
years (from the date of the
report) unless reforms are made.

They also show that the con-
tribution rate in the future will
have to be much higher than the

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THE TRIBUNE

aaa 4

present average combined rate |
of 8.8 per cent.

The report points out that in
the US, for example, where the
contribution rate is 12.4 per cent
for pensions (6.2 per cent in the
Bahamas) the Social Security |
Trust Fund is projected to incur |
its first deficit in 2017, and be
exhausted in 2041.

At the end of the day the
Actuarial Report states that the
National Insurance programme
is financially unsustainable and
administrative costs are too high. }

Mr Smith said that he suspects
that government will approach +
the situation from a number of
different angles.

“Tt will be a menu of FoRpOHS:4
es, for instance the return on *
investment, a high percentage —
maybe as much as 70 per cent --
of the assets of national pent»
ance are, in fact, loans to the gov- \i
ernment, holding government '
bonds, which gave a reasonable
rate of return’ in the Bahamas.
It may be that the fund may need
to be more diversified and it may
have to be put under somewhat
of a professional management to
increase the rate of return, and
you need to increase the rate of
return if you don’t want to *
increase the contributions,” he ©
said. )

Because people are living *
longer, persons can remain pro- ‘
ductive a bit longer and this may ,
lead officials to propose an ”
increase in the retirement age.”

“T used to think that 60 was “
very old when I was young but *
now I am five years from 60 and
I recognise how young 60 is. I
can do everything that a 17-year-
old would’ve done and I’m
almost as physically fit as they *
are so why should I retire at 60?
So, as people are living longer,
they are practically healthier
because of the healthcare sys-
tem, there may be a need to ~
actually increase the age of
retirement,” Mr Curtis said.

Meanwhile 28-year-old Deroy |
also learned to take matters into
his own hands by having his own
source of income and not
depending on the government to
take care of him when he reach-
es retirement.

“My suggestion to people my
age is to continue to pay your
National Insurance, but don’t
expect millions of dollars to be
waiting for you when you retire —
generate your own income. Itisa_,
wonderful, free feeling when you
achieve a goal you have set for |
yourself that will take care.of |
you when no-one else will.” |

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As

VOW A |
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THE TRIBUNE

MiMi |<“ ie

A GENERAL view of the Atlantis
Share your news

hotel which is a part of $1.5 bil-
The Tribune wants to hear from

lion resort is seen, on the
people who are making news in

Jumeira Palm Island in Dubai,

United Arab Emirates, Wednes-
their neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a good

day, Sept. 17, 2008.
cause, campaigning for

improvements in the area or
have won an award.

If so, call us on 322-1986 and
share your story.













+74 ,

DUBAI, where Sol. Kerzner’s
latest Atlantis mega-resort has just
opened, has been depicted in a
leading UK newspaper as a glitzy
resort city with no accountability
or rule of law.

The booming Middle East sheik-
dom, where sharia law finds itself at
odds with a mass influx of foreign
workers, is full of social tension,
according to writer Carole Cad-
wallader in The Observer, the Lon-
don Sunday paper.

Dubai will be in the spotlight this
week when two British expatriates
face trial for allegedly having sex
on a beach. They could face jail
terms of up to six years.

The case has focused attention
on the huge gulf between local cus-
toms and the attitudes of many for-








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FM
Control System

ACCOUNTANTS from
the Public Treasury have com-



newspaper depicts
another side of Dubai

Claim that Middle Eastern city -
home to new Atlantis - has no
accountability or rule of law

tune-hunting foreigners cashing in
on Dubai’s phenomenal growth.

One expatriate woman is quoted
in the article as saying: “Oh, yes, it
looks good, doesn’t it? But we’ve all
made a pact with the devil to be
here. You get the tax-free salary,
but in return you give up all your
rights. There’s no accountability,
no transparency, no rule of law.

“There’s no legislative body.
Very few employment rights. It
looks like a modern country, but it
takes more than a few skyscrapers
to create one of those.”

Kerzner has recreated his Par-
adise Island Atlantis dream on
Dubai’s spectacular development
called The Palm.

A huge pink edifice modelled on
the Paradise Island original looms
over the multi-fingered waterfront
development where soccer star
David Beckham and his wife Vic-
toria are among resident celebri-
ties.

Like the Paradise Island resort,
the Dubai Atlantis has a $25,000 a
night bridge suite. It cost $1.5 billion
to build and has more than 1,500

rooms and 65,000 marine animals.

But The Observer article high-
lights growing tension created by
Dubai’s attempt to cash in on west-
ern tourism and.its impact on local
customs.

Ms Cadwallader points out that
Dubai already has a third of world’s
building cranes in place, and is
about to have the world’s biggest
shopping mall and its biggest air-
port, with six runways on a site as
big as Hong Kong Island.

“What’s more, if you stay in your
hotel, you need never even know
you're in an Islamic state where it’s
illegal to hold your wife’s hand in
public, or be gay, or found with
.003g of cannabis - less than a grain
of sugar - on the sole of your shoe,”
she writes.

Keith Brown, a British youth
worker, was convicted for the
cannabis offence and received four
years in jail.

The two people facing trial this
week are, she says, victims of an
“ideological schism” who could pay
an exceedingly high price for their
actions.

Kamran Jebreili/AP




CREDIT SUISSE

Credit Suisse, Nassau Branch |

Private Banking

is presently considering applications for

SENIOR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER - CARIBBEAN / UK (Private Banking)

The Private Banking Business Area is accepting applications for a Business

Development Officer covering the Caribbean and UK Markets:
Requirements:

* Applicants should possess a University Degree (or equivalent) in Banking &

Finance

At least seven (10) years banking experience including relationship
management,trading, trade reconciliation, custody business and securities

markets

Marketing experience throughout the Caribbean and UK
Must have established international client base with assets under
management in excess of US$100 Mio and a well developed network within
the market regions.
Strong communication skills in English and a working knowledge of French
‘would be an asset to facilitate marketing and relationship management with
clients and prospects

Good computer skills (Word, Excel, Power Point, Outlook & Bloomberg)
Willing to travel extensively throughout the Caribbean and UK and utilize a
network of existing contacts and associates

Possess a confident and outgoing personality
Duties will include:

Acquisition and development of new offshore Caribbean and UK based

clients.

Marketing of estate planning, private banking and portfolio management
services to prospective clients along with additional services, such as, the
set-up of companies and trusts together with administrative procedures

Advising clients of clients origin on products, services and investment

menced with a pilot of the
SSA Financial Management
and Inventory Control System
at the Ministry of Education
which will be implemented at
all government ministries.

Officers of the supplies sec-
tion of the Ministry of Edu-
cation were trained in the use
of the inventory module (soft-
ware), and they have already
begun organising the ware-
house and coding the inven-
tory items in the supplies sec-
tion.

They are now beginning to
move into the next phase,
which is to take a physical
count of the inventory items,
and once this is done, they will
key the information into the
inventory system. The min-
istry expects that the system.
will be fully functional within
the next month.

It is anticipated that the
new inventory will improve
efficiency and accountability.

Officers from the Public
Treasury involved in this ini-

_tiative are Mary Mitchell,
senior deputy treasurer; Mar-
ilyn Davis, accountant; Cheryl
Williamson, accountant; Jer-

maine Rolle, trainee accoun-
tant; Levardo Lewis, treasury
officer.

The ministry’s team was
comprised of Elma Garraway,
permanent secretary; Cole-
man Andrews, first assistant
secretary; Shandles Barry,
financial controller; Rodney
Johnson, senior accountant;
Jennifer Lightbourne, senior
supplies officer; Arthur May-
cock, chief supplies officer;
Ella Jane Grant, senior exec-
utive secretary; Cadwell Tay-
lor, assistant store keeper;
Garnell Johnson, chief clerk,
and Bernadette Johnson,
clerk.






















































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RGAE


PAGE 8, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Man accused ©

of stabbing
his father

appears
in court

FROM page one

in the area of East Street
and Sands Road.

According to reports,
detectives travelling
west on Sands Road
noticed a black Ford
Expedition driving
erratically and decided
to investigate.

When the officers
were able to get a clear
view of the two men
inside the vehicle, they
noticed that the man in
the back seat had one
arm around the driver’s
neck and was swinging
his other arm in a stab-

’ bing motion.

They then used their
black Crown Victoria to
stop the Expedition.,
Both vehicles came to
rest facing each other
bumper-to-bumper.

Mackey Jr., who was
not represented by an
attorney, was not
required to plead to the
attempted murder
charge.

Prosecutor Sergeant
Sean Thurston told the
court that the prosecu-
tion objected to bail
being granted to the
accused. Mackey Jr was
remanded to Her
Majesty’s Prison.

The case has been
adjourned to Friday,
October 10, and trans-
ferred to Court 9, Nas-
sau Street.

Chief Magistrate
Gomez told Mackey Jr
that he would be
remanded to prison in
light of his father’s con-
dition. Mackey Sr was
listed in critical condi-
tion yesterday.

- DAIHATSU

:

i

Verdict in the Mario Miller
murder case expected today

FROM page one

at the three-week trial.

Mrs Bethel called upon jurors to be

dispassionate in considering the evidence
and to put aside sympathy and preju-
dice.
Mrs Bethel called it an “insult” to sug-
gest that there was political pressure
behind the Mario Miller murder investi-
gation as Ricardo Miller’s attorney
Ramauld Ferreira did.

She asserted that no preferential treat-
ment had been given to the Miller fam-
ily. Mrs Bethel said that, although the
accused often claimed that they were

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being lied on, they were the only two
people who had a reason to lie as they
were on trial for murder.

She told the court that Ricardo Miller,
in particular, had given numerous fab-
rications and false accounts.

The prosecutor told the jury that the
evidence revealed there was a drug trans-
action. She said the two men conspired
to commit theft and then murder.

Mrs Bethel said that-Mario did not
deserve to die in the way that he did and
that the blood of the deceased had liter-
ally been left on the hands of the accused
men.

Highlighting the forensic evidence in
the case, Mrs Bethel said that Mario

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Miller’s blood had been found in Ryan
Miller’s car and that Ricardo Miller’s
blood, mixed with Mario’s blood, was
found in the deceased’s jeep.

Mr Ferreira contended that the pros-
ecution had adduced no evidence to
show that his client had killed Mario
Miller and described the prosecution’s
case as “woefully inadequate.” *

Mr Ferreira told the jury that it was, in
fact, an insult to assume that the murder
investigation was not politically moti-
vated.

Mr Ferreira said that Mario Miller was
a drug dealer who was killed over stolen
cocaine. He told the jurors that the pros-
ecution sought to have them make



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Including:

‘Confidence Investments Limited

“assumptions but said the prosecution’

was not entitled to make any assump-
tions.

Attorney Romona Farquharson, rep-
resenting Ryan Miller, told jurors that
her client had played no part in the mur-
der of Mario Miller.

She reminded jurors that Ryan Miller
has not been charged with possession of
dangerous drugs but murder. She said
her client should not be judged based
on what his brother had said but as a
separate defendant.

She contended that the prosecution
had adduced weak evidence with respect
to her client.

The case resumes today at 10am.

women
killed

in crash
FROM page one

and Emergency Medical Ser-
vices staff pronounced two of
the women dead at the scene.

The other two women were
taken to hospital in a respon-
sive state.

Each victim is believed to
be around 18 years old, one
of Key West Street and anoth-
er from South Beach Estates.

Police are withholding the
names of the four women until
their families have been
informed.









Tel: 356-3145 * 325-6447/9 © 362-1144
After 6pm: 341-7184 ¢ 424-5227 © 324-1685
THE TRIBUNE



Top ten things



@ BY INIGO “NAUGHTY”
ZENICAZELAYA

OW, another

week has come
and gone and it’s time for the
“Smile” once again. In all hon-
esty people, I wish I had more
time to spend on this column
this week but if you saw the
Vice-Presidential debate you
know Sarah Palin left us with
so many “nuggets” I have to
start writing some new jokes;
she may be my HBO special
waiting to happen.

So as I try to bang out as
much political humour as I
can before the US presiden-
tial elections, I want all the
“Smilers” to know I haven’t
— nor will I — forget your
comedy needs. .

Just bear with me this week
because God is raining punch-
lines down on us comedians
like manna from heaven, and
I’m diligently using most of
my time to stock up for those
dark days ahead.

A lot of people have e-
mailed me and said they
enjoyed my ‘Lists.’ You may
remember the ‘His’ and ‘Her’
football lists before the NFL
season kicked off, and I think
it’s safe to say those house-

holds that are turmoil-free this '

football season followed my
advice.

No need to thank me, thank -

each other (wink, wink).

So with that being said it’s
‘List’ time again, and the first
Saturday in every month from
here on out will feature a new

elt Palin



“Top Ten.” So here we go:

The Top Ten Things Men
Wished Women Knew.

10 Crying is blackmail.

9 Ask for what you want,
subtle hints don’t work.

8 Sunday = Sports.

7 Christopher Columbus
didn’t need directions, and
neither do we.

6 Learn to work the toilet

seat. If it’s up put it down, and-

vice versa.

5 Anything we said six to
eight months ago is inadmissi-
ble in a present-day argument.

4 A headache that lasts 17
months is a problem. See a
doctor.

~~
ch i
|

wished





3 Let us ogle. How can we
know how beautiful you are
if we don’t look at other
women?

2 Don’t rub the lamp if you
don’t want the ‘Genie’ to pop
out.

1 Nothing says I love you
like ‘Sex’.

There you have it. A great
list for you ladies to use to tap
into your husband’s or
boyfriend’s (or boss’s —
whatever the case may be)
psyche.

Before | conclude, I realise
I have probably incurred the
wrath of more than a few
ladies. Where is the list for the
men to follow you may ask?

The answer is we don’t need
a list to follow. Despite
rumours to the contrary, men
really do know all we ever will
about women...we do!

T'llprove it!

Here ts a list of the “Top
Ten Things Men Know About
Women.”

BISHIIMONTERO SPORT 2008 _/

‘



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 9

)
(CINCINOCIING



April 26, 1932 - October 7, 2007

/t was a year ago early on a Sunday morn
When you left us
To begin your final journey home
We did not want to say good-bye.
We could not help ourselves.
We cried...oh, how we cried.

We should have let go
But we could not, you know
You were safe from suffering
You were free of pain
Ard we, we were left to treasure
Your memory
again... and again
And so we do.

We see your smile in
the tvinkling eye of a kindly man
We see your joy in a grandfather
laughing with a child
We hear your words as you comforted us
And ave hold on to your strength
With all the strength that we have
Though we miss you so
Never are you far away
For we think of you with love
Every hour, every day.

Remembered by: Wile: Mavis A. Deveaux: Your loving children: Youlanda Deveaux, Christopher Deveaux, }
Lindel Stuart and Wendy Deveaux and Grandchildren: Chrishanda Deveaux, Jaden Stuart and’ Janai Adderley. 5



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LDL:


TRIBUNE SPORTS

Stunning rallies by

-PAGE 12, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

the Titans, Colts



NFL ROUND-UP



â„¢@ By The Associated Press

THE Titans were beaten for
the first time. The Colts were
headed for a 1-3 start.

Not so fast.

Thanks to a stunning rally,
Tennessee edged Baltimore 13-
10 in a brutally physical and
penalty-filled game Sunday.
Then Indianapolis; helped
greatly by gifts from Houston,
topped the Titans’ comeback

« with an even more improbable
turnaround for a 31-27 victo-
“Ty.
“The idea today was to get a
little swagger back,” Colts star
-Peyton Manning said after
‘throwing for two touchdowns
‘in a 2:10 span late in the fourth
‘quarter. “I was proud of the
-guys for never giving up and
fighting ’til the end.”

The Colts scored 21 points
in that 2:10 — two touchdowns
thanks to fumbles by Texans
quarterback Sage Rosenfels —
then intercepted Rosenfels’
last-ditch comeback attempt.

Manning connected with
Reggie Wayne on a 5-yarder
with 1:54 remaining for the
decisive points. Linebacker
Gary Brackett returned a fum-
ble by quarterback Rosenfels
68 yards for a score in between
Manning’s TD throws.

“For one play I made a real-
ly stupid mistake and that start-
ed the downward spiral,”
Rosenfels said. “I feel like I Jet
those guys down.” =

Rookie Tom Santi caught
the other late score, a 7-yarder
to bring the Colts (2-2) to 27-17
with 4:04 to go. It was his first
NFL touchdown.

Tennessee now is the AFC’s
lone undefeated team thanks
to some late magic from Kerry
Collins and a hard-hitting



INDIANAPOLIS COLTS defensive end Robert
Mathis (98) strips the ball from Houston
Texans quarterback Sage Rosenfels (18) in
the fourth quarter Sunday's game in Houston.
The Colts recovered the fumble...

(AP Photo: David J Phillip)

Titans (5-0) trailed 10-6 before

Collins directed an 11-play, 80-
yard scoring drive. The march

defense.
Kerry Collins threw an 11-

was flagged for a blow to
Collins’ helmet — although it
appeared to be incidental con-

yard touchdown pass to Alge
Crumpler with 1:56 left. The

T

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co was then intercepted by
Nick Harper, assuring the
Ravens (2-2) a second straight
defeat.

“It wasn’t always pretty
today. It wasn’t my best game,”
Collins said. “But at the end of
the game we found a way to
win.”

Elsewhere, it was: Chicago
34, Detroit 7; Miami.17, San
Diego 10; Atlanta 27, Green
Bay 24; N.Y. Giants 44, Seattle
6; Carolina 34, Kansas City 0;
Washington 23, Philadelphia
17; Denver 16, Tampa Bay 13;
Dallas 31, Cincinnati 22; Ari-
zona 41, Buffalo 17; New Eng-
land 30, San Francisco 21; and
Pittsburgh 26, Jacksonville 21.
The New York Jets, Oakland,
St. Louis and Cleveland had
open dates. ,

On Monday night, Minneso-
ta (1-3) is at New Orleans (2-2).

Colts 31, Texans 27

Backup Rosenfels, playing
for the ill Matt Schaub, had the
winless Texans (0-4) ahead by
17 points before the late col-
lapse.

“All of our team played
great football today, played
winning football and I made
those mistakes that cost foot-
ball games,” Rosenfels said.
“There is no reason we should
have lost that game.”

The Texans played the LOOth
game in franchise history in
their hurricane-damaged stadi-
um with the retractable roof
open; the roof couldn’t be
repaired in time for Sunday’s
game. Houston was supposed
to host Baltimore in Week 2
when Hurricane Ike hit, but
that game was postponed until
Nov. 9.

Titans 13, Ravens 10

At Baltimore, the game was
marred by several skirmishes,
most of which resulted in per-
sonal foul penalties. Tennessee
was penalized [0 times for 78
yards, including two 15-yard
infractions that fueled both
Baltimore’s scoring drives.

The Ravens received 11
penalties for 91 yards ina
matchup between two teams
that once were, and seem to
still be, bitter rivals.

Wey

PRs

UU
a EE
on Mondays



TENNESSEE TITANS’ Keith Bulluck signals 5-0 while walking off the

Rob Carr/AP

field after the Titans defeated the Baltimore Ravens Sunday. The
Titans remained unbeaten with the win...

ey 4 >
~~ i



J Pat Carter/AP

MIAMI DOLPHINS player Joey Porter (55) celebrates during the
final seconds of Sunday’s game against the San Diego Chargers in

Miami...

Suggs was livid about the
roughing call.

“Tf anybody can go back and
show something I did illegal,
then I would be happy to say I
messed up and got what I
deserved,” he said. “We hit
arms. It just goes to show the
referee has too much power.”

Cardinals 41, Bills 17

At Glendale, Ariz., Buffalo’s
second-year quarterback Trent
Edwards went down with a
concussion on a fierce hit from
safety Adrian Wilson on the
third play of the game.

Rookie Tim Hightower had
a pair of touchdown runs and
Kurt Warner threw to Larry
Fitzgerald twice for scores. The
Cardinals (3-2) are 3-0 at home.

Steelers 26, Jaguars 21

At Jacksonville, Fla., Ben
Roethlisberger threw for 309
yards and three touchdowns,
helping the Steelers (4-1) over-
come their offensive woes and
snap a four-game losing streak
against Jacksonville (2-3).

Roethlisberger finished 26-
of-41, rebounding from an
interception on his third pass
that Rashean Mathis returned
72 yards for a score. Roethlis-
berger’s perfect 8-yard fade
pass to Hines Ward in the cor-
ner of the end zone put the
Steelers ahead 26-21 with 1:53
remaining.

Broncos 16, Buccaneers 13

At Denver, Jay Cutler guid-
ed a patient Denver offense
over the Buccaneers (3-2).
Brandon Stokley hauled in
Cutler’s pass in the right flat
and followed Brandon Mar-
shall’s big block for a 10-yard
touchdown, and Matt Prater
kicked three field goals for
Denver (4-1).

Cowboys 31, Bengals 22

At Irving, Texas, Dallas (4-1)
led 17-0 after only three dri-
ves, but ended up getting big
plays from Terrell Owens,
Tank Johnson and Keith Davis
to stave off the bumbling Ben-
gals (0-5).

Tony Romo was 14-of-23 for
a season-low 176 yards, but
threw three touchdown passes
— two in the fourth quarter.

Cincinnati quarterback Car-
son Palmer returned after miss-
ing a game with a sore elbow
and was 23-of-39 for 217 yards
with two touchdown passes.

Patriots 30, 49ers 21

At San Francisco, Kevin
Faulk rushed for two scores,
Matt Cassel had 259 yards pass-
ing and the Patriots won in San

Francisco (2-3) for the first
time in franchise history.

Randy Moss had five catches
for 111 yards for the Patriots
(3-1).

Dolphins 17, Chargers 10

At Miami, Ronnie Brown
scored the decisive tolichdown
from the single-wing formation
the Dolphins revived two
weeks ago. Miami (2-2) held
LaDainian Tomlinson to 35
yards on 12 carries. The Charg-
ers fell to 2-3.

Giants 44, Seahawks 6

East Rutherford, N.J., In a
nearly flawless performance,
Eli Manning threw two touch-
downs, Brandon Jacobs.ran for °
two more and the unbeaten
Giants (4-0) scored on their
first five possessions.

Falcons 27, Packers 24

At Green Bay, Wis., Atlanta
rookie quarterback Matt Ryan
turned in another sharp per-
formance, completing 16 of 26
passes for 194 yards, two touch-
downs and an interception
against the banged-up Packers
(2-3).

Michael Turner ran for 121
yards and a touchdown for the

new-look Falcons (3-2).

Redskins 23, Eagles 17

At Philadelphia, Clinton Por-
tis ran for 145 yards and one
touchdown and wide receiver
Antwaan Randle El threw a
TD pass for Washington (4-1).

Brian Westbrook, back in
the Philadelphia (2-3) lineup
after missing a game with an
ankle injury, had just 84 total
yards.

Panthers 34, Chiefs 0

Charlotte, N.C., DeAngelo
Williams had 123 yards rush-
ing and scored three touch-
downs, and the Panthers (4-1)
handed the Chiefs their first
shutout in nearly six years.

Tony Gonzalez caught a 6-
yard pass for the Chiefs (1-4)
late in the first quarter to move
past Shannon Sharpe for the
NEL’s career leader for yards
receiving for a tight end.

Bears 34, Lions 7

At Detroit, Kyle Orton set
career highs in yards passing,
completions and quarterback
rating while throwing two
touchdowns. He was 24-of-34
for 334 yards and had a [21.4
rating, improving to 3-0 against
the Lions.

Chicago (3-2) built a 31-0
lead before rookie Kevin Smith
scored for the Lions (0-4) mid-
way through the third quarter.
TRIBUNE SPORTS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 13



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS
3 ry rar 7 cy % 5

~ Jelena Jankovic |
wins Porsche |
Grand Prix

@ By NESHA STARCEVIC
AP Sports Writer



STUTTGART, Germany
(AP) — New No. 1 Jelena
Jankovic won her second title
in two weeks, defeating Nadia
Petrova of Russia 6-4, 6-3 Sun-
day in the final of the Porsche
Grand Prix. °

The 23-year-old Serb also
won the China Open last week
and the Italian Open earlier
this year.

“Tam really proud o
myself,” she said. “I am playing
with a lot of confidence and I
played some good tennis this
week.”

Jankovic was assured of tak-
ing the top ranking Monday
from Serena Williams regard-
less of the outcome of the final.
She already held the No. 1 spot
for one week in August.

“I feel that every day I am
getting better and better. Iam
really working on my game, I
want to reach my full poten-
tial,” Jankovic said. Soe

Williams became the No. 1
after defeating Jankovic at the
US Open final, but the Amer-
ican will. drop in the rankings
after losing her opening match
in Stuttgart. _

Jankovic won her eighth
career title after overcoming a
brief lapse in the second set
against the 18th-ranked Russ-
ian, who won the Stuttgart
tournament in 2006.

After the win, Jankovic took
a spin in the red Porsche 911
convertible given to the win-

ner and appeared to have

more trouble controlling the
powerful car than the match.

She broke serve in the open-
ing game and it was enough to
give her the set against an
error-prone Petrova.

“I really wanted to win this
trophy, and when you want too
much, sometimes it doesn’t
work in tennis,” Petrova said.
“T gave it my best.”

Jankovic also broke to start
the second set, but Petrova
broke back to tie it at 3-3. The
Russian was unable to keep
the-momentum, however, and
dropped serve again after a
series of errors. Jankovic won-
the match when Petrova
pushed a forehand long.

“I got a bit flat in the middle
of the second set, I had some
tough matches behind me and
I was getting tired,” Jankovic
said. “I tried to stay positive, to
be aggressive and to switch
into a higher gear, it was an
important game.”

Petrova had not dropped a
set this week until the final.
Jankovic has been playing with
a painful left foot after tearing
off a toe nail. She needed
painkiller shots before her
semifinal win over Venus

_Williams and got two more
before the final.

Asked about her foot at the
post-match news conference,
Jankovic misunderstood the
question and replied, “The
food is great.”





JELENA JANKOVIC
waves to supporters after
defeating Nadia Petrova
(bottom right)...

JELENA JANKOVIC poses in a Porsche Carrera 4S sports car after her victory in the final match of
the Porsche Grand Prix yesterday in Stuttgart, Germany...






















Realizing the mistake,
Jankovic burst out laughing
and then added:

“It’s numb during the match
and I don’t feel anything, but
after a couple of hours it hurts
a lot,” she said. “The doctor
told me to wear flip-flops but I
am flying to Serbia tonight, I
can’t go in flip-flops like I am
going to the beach.”

Jankovic is scheduled to play
the Kremlin Cup next week.
Although she left open
whether she would actually
show up in Moscow for the
tournament, which Williams is
skipping.

“I feel tired now, but men-
tally I am not tired, I am hun-
gry to do well. I want to finish
the year as No. 1,” she said.



Berdych defeats Del Potro
to win the Japan Open —

@ By JIM ARMSTRONG
AP Sports Writer



TOKYO (AP) — Tomas
Berdych won the Japan Open
for his first singles title in 16
months, beating Juan Martin
Del Potro 6-1, 6-4 on Sunday.

The ninth-seeded Czech
relied on strong serves and sol-
id groundstrokes to beat the
Argentine, who won*29 of 30
matches going into the final.

“At this level of tennis, it’s
important to be consistent,”
said the 23-year-old Berdych,
who had 11 aces. “I was able to
do that all week and am thrilled
to win the title.”

In the women’s event, top-
seeded Caroline Wozniacki
defeated fifth-seeded Kaia
Kanepi of Estonia 6-2, 3-6, 6-1.
It was the Dane’s third singles
title in three months, having
claimed events in Stockholm
and New Haven.

“She was serving really well
in the second set and had the
advantage,” said Wozniacki. “I
just tried to step it up in the
third set and play better on my
return and it worked out for
me.”

After struggling for much of
this season, Berdych said he’s
Starting to get his game back.
He reached the semifinals of
the Bangkok Open last month.

“In today’s tennis everything
is so close and tough,” said
Berdych. “It’s all about having
confidence on the court. If you
win one or two matches every-
thing can come together.”

Berdych coasted through the
first set, then broke to go ahead
2-1 in the second set. :

Del Potro fought back, lob-
bing the Czech to cut the lead
to 5-4, but Berdych held serve
in the final game to take the
fifth title of his career.

Del Potro, seeded fifth, was

&.

looking to win his fifth title of
the year but got off to a shaky
start and wasn’t able to recover.

He took some medicine for
his stomach during the first set.

“T was a little confused with
his game,” said Del Potro.
“After the first set, I started to
play a little better but it was
too late. didn’t have a chance



JUAN MARTIN DEL POTRO,

missing a shot against Tomas
Berdych of Czech Republic in
their final match at the Japan
Open Sunday in Tokyo...

TOMAS BERDYCH, of the Czech
Republic, returns a shot against
Juan Martin del Potro (bottom left),
of Argentina, at the Japan Open
yesterday in Tokyo...



Yi

aT

(Photos: Shizuo Kambayashi/AP)

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to do anything with his game.”

Berdych defeated second-
seeded Andy Roddick in the
semifinals to reach Sunday’s
final. Del Potro had defeated
top-seeded David Ferrer in the
quarterfinals before advancing
to the final with a win over last
_year’s runner-up Richard Gas-
quet of France.

) y

of Argentina, reacts after ©

Photos: Matthias Schrader/AP

“2,

2

Por

ck-Oulourlinternet\Deals


‘

THE TRIBUNE






- AN
OQQQNN



TUESDAY,




OCTOBER 7,



Ke
% at
SNe Nermaanaeneee

2008.










Jankovic
wins the
Porsche
Grand Prix...

See page 13



Hurricanes blow
away Comets 13-2

& By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

he St Andrew’s
Hurricanes are
getting better and
better as the sea-
son progresses.

The Bahamas Association of
Independent Secondary
Schools’ senior boys champions
improved their undefeated
record to 4-0 with a 13-2 rout
over the Queen’s College
Comets (2-2) yesterday at
Queen’s College.

“We have a good team, but
we're still trying to fine tune
our offense,” said Hurricanes’
coach Montgomery Nazon.
“We’re looking good. We’re
basically focusing on keeping
our opponents’ runs down. We
are trying not to allow our
opponents to score more than

®

Senior boys champions
have 4-0 record

five runs. We’re trying to get
our offense to win the game.”

It wasn’t just the offense, but
the defense that did the job
against the Comets.

Jared Higgs had another big
game on the mound, this time
firing a two-hitter with six strike
outs as he went the distance in
the abbreviated five-inning
game that was stopped via the
ten-run rule.

On at least two occasions

with runners in scoring position,
Higgs came up with a strike out
to kill Queen’s College’s rally
in both the second and the
fourth.

And in the fifth, after
Comets’ losing pitcher Celsan
Toote walked and advanced all
the way to third on an error,
only to score on a wild pitch,
the Hurricanes stopped them
from scoring again and possi-
bly extending the game to the

seventh inning.

“T think we played really well
today, even though we made
some errors,” said St Andrew’s
right fielder Herman Maycock.
“We just looked at this as a bat-
ting practice.”

Maycock, who went 2-for-3
with two RBIs and a run scored,
said if they continue to play the
way they are doing now, they
should have a very good chance
to go all the way and repeat as



Darling surprised over warning

_ & By BRENT STUBBS
_ Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

JAY DARLING is sur-
prised that he got a warning
from the Bahamas Body-
building and Fitness Federa-
tion (BBFF), claiming he did-
n't do anything wrong by ask-
ing for more funding.

“T have sent a letter to Dan-
ny and the vice-president and
I’ve asked them to explain to
me why I’ve received a warn-
ing letter for saying the truth,”
Darling told Tribune Sports.

“JT have not received any
response,” said Darling, who
won a gold medal in the men’s
middleweight division at the
36th Central American and
Caribbean Bodybuilding and
Fitness Championships.

On Friday, BBFF president
Danny Sumner noted that
because Darling asked for
more funding, he was in direct
violation of the constitution
of the International Federa-
tion of Bodybuilders — the
governing body of the BBFF
—and, as a result, was given a
public warning.

He also announced that
female bodybuilder Lorraine
LaFleur would be suspended
for three years because of her
alleged unsportsmanlike con-
duct at the championships.

In addition, Sumner also
revealed that female fitness
competitor Sherice Mackey
would receive a one-year sus-
pension for allegedly failing
to compete at the champi-
onships.

At The Tribune yesterday,
Darling produced a copy of
the constitution of the Inter-
national Federation of Body-
builders. He pointed out Arti-
cle 27 under the heading
‘Cash Awards’, which reads:

“National, Regional and
Continental Federations are
free to present cash awards at
designated events. For events
at and below the national lev-
el, the respective National Fed-
eration shall decide the rules
and regulations governing
cash awards, and the terms
and conditions governing par-
ticipation, except that a
National Federation may not
invite other countries, or ath-
letes from other countries, to



participate in a competition at

this level.

“For events above the
national level and at or below
the continental level, the





JAY DARLING is surprised that he got a warning from the Bahamas Bodybuilding and Fitness Federation
(BBFF), claiming he didn’t do anything wrong by asking for more funding...

respective Continental Feder-
ation shall decide the rules and
regulations governing cash
awards, and the terms and
conditions governing partici-
pation.”

Darling claimed that Sum-
ner “has no credit” in saying
that any athlete receiving
money and is an amateur
receiving money, is in direct
violation of that rule and
could be suspended.

“He’s saying that no body-
builder has the right to solicit
funds, yet they give us sponsor
sheets and they encourage us
to go out and collect monies,”
Darling said.

Darling, who has won 10
medals in the CAC Champi-
onships over the past decade,
said there was nothing wrong
with the comments he made.

“The suspensions that he -

sent out this week are illegal
because we have a discipline

committee, headed by Mr
Richard Demeritte, and he
has not signed any letters,” he
said. “Things like this have to
stop,” Darling said. “I haven’t
been given any letter about
my warning, but my name has
been mentioned -all through
the media, but no-one has
told me what I said wrong.
That is something that I dis-
agree with. In light of these
things, I’m asking for Mr
Sumner to give me a public
apology in the forum that he
brought my good name down.
I was only speaking the
truth.”

Even though there is a cry
by the athletes for money,
Darling said they never get it,
but they will compete, so it’s
not just the money they are
after.

While Darling said he’s not
condoning what LaFleur did
on stage, he noted that even

Sumner questioned the deci-
sion of the judges when he
heard the results.

Darling said Sumner should
rescind his decisions on the
suspensions because Richard
Demeritte, chairman of the
discipline committee, was not
present at the meeting when
the decision was made.

“I can only say that the past
couple of days was a personal
attack and I charge Danny
Sumner with direct violation
of the official code of conduct
where he is to refrain from
personal contact with any
member of the IFBB, which is
me,” he said.

“T have a letter that | am
putting to him that he needs
to apologise to me in the same
forum that he made his alle-
gations against me in public.
He just needs to come to the
public and be a man and apol-
ogise.”





champions.

St Andrew’s struck first, scor-
ing two unearned runs in the
top of the first on a Tarig Kelly
RBI sacrifice fly that plated
Conner Albury and David
Sweeting, who followed with a
double, got to third on a wild
pitch and scored on an error.

Queen’s College got on the
scoreboard in the bottom of the
frame when Ashton McKenzie
drew a one-out walk and moved
around the bases on three con-
secutive wild pitches.

In the:second, the Hurricanes
added three more runs on three

hits as Ben Pinder, Higgs’ and’

Albury.all scored the plate to
extend the lead to 5-1.

They duplicated the three-
three feat in the third as Bran-
don Burrows, Ben Pinder and
Higgs got a run each to push
the lead to 8-1.

After Marcus Farrington
walked and scored an unearned
run in the fourth for a 9-1 lead,
the Hurricanes blew the game
open with four more runs in the
fifth, highlighted by Albury’s
big bases clearing double that
drove home Maycock, Higgs
and Costa Papageorge before
he continued home on a two-
base error.

At that point, it was 13-1 and
it appeared as if the Comets
were going to be.stopped.

Queen’s College needed at
least two runs to avoid going
home early, but they only man-
aged to get one as the game was
eventually stopped.

“We were beaten by a much
better ball club, much better
ball club,” Comets’ coach Gary
Markham pointed out. “They
were pretty sound on both sides
of the ball.

“We didn’t help ourselves.
We made a lot of mistakes,
errors in center field, errors on
the infield, we had about six
errors at once in one inning.”

Markham said St Andrew’s
deserved the victory because
they had an all-around good
game, but he’s hoping that they

‘can bounce back and get ready

for the playoffs.

Softball
statistics
released

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

WITH the 2008 New Provi- .
dence Softball Association reg-
ular season in the books and
both championship series
intensely underway, regular sea-
son statistical leaders were
released for the first time.

All four teams in the cham-
pionship series boast several
players among league leaders.

In the men’s: division,
although the Truckers were
absent from the top of the
leaderboard in terms,of hitting,
ace pitcher Leroy Thompson
was the league’s most dominant
force on the mound...) »

Thompson finished: with a
perfect 12-0 record, one of only
two double digit winners‘in the
league along with the Pros’ Car-

dinal Gilbert (12-5). Thompson

finished second in strikéouts,
with 61 in just 73 innings.
Gilbert led the league with 68
pitches but needed 94 2/3
innings to do so.

The Truckers’ Terran Wood
hit .529 to lead the league in
batting average.

Nine of the league’s top 20
hitters were members of one of
the championship squads, the
Truckers or New Breed.

The Commodores dynamic
trio dominated at the plate,
leading in a myriad of statistical
categories. Ramon Storr led the
league in hits (37), runs (40),
and finished second batting
average with .507.

Teammate Phillip Culmer
trailed closely behind, finishing
second in hits (32), runs (38),
tied for the league lead in RBIs
(29) and finished tied for sec-
ond in home runs with five.

Yet another Commodore,
Derek Christie, led the league
with six home runs and tied
Culmer for the lead league in
RBI with 29.

In the women’s division, The

‘Sharks’ Thela Johnson was the

dominant slugger, leading her
team’s bid to a championship
appearance.

Johnson led the league in
home runs (28), RBIs (22),
home runs (three), and tied for -
the league lead in hits (29).

BTC’s Dawn Forbes held a
share of the league lead in hits.
Her teammate Sharnell Symon-
ette led the league with a .500
batting average and with 12
stolen bases.

Mary Sweeting dominated
from the mound much like
Johnson did at the plate leading
in virtually every category.

Sweeting led in strikeouts
(81), nearly doubling her near-
est competitor, BTC’s Marvell
Miller with 41, although Sweet-
ing pitched just two more
innings.

Sweeting tied for the league
led with an 8-8 record with the
Sharks’ Alex Taylor. She also
finished second with an ERA
of 3.48, while Miller led the

_ league with an ERA of 2.45.

e SEE Wednesday’s Sports
section for the full softball sta-
tistics table

Slice takes a fall

lâ„¢ By RENALDO DORSETT

Sports Reporter



THE massive rise in popular-
ity of one of mixed martial arts’
most popular fighters took a
step back this weekend at the
hands of an opponent who is
not well known.

Kimbo Slice was stopped just
14 seconds into his fight Satur-
day night against Seth Petruzel-
li in a modified main event of
Elite XC: Saturday Night
Fights.

Kevin Ferguson, a Bahami-
an native better known as Kim-
bo Slice, was originally sched-
uled to face MMA and WWE
legend Ken Shammrock. How-
ever, Shammrock sustained a
cut over his left eye on Friday,
forcing him out of competition.

Petruzelli was originally
scheduled to fight on the under-
card in the light heavyweight
division against Aaron Rosa.

At just a little over 205
pounds, Petruzelli was out-



MARTIAL ARTS



weighed by nearly 20 pounds
but accepted an opportunity at
the increased exposure of a
main event bout against Slice.

He garnered national atten-
tion after being featured in a
series of street fights on the
Internet, prompting his debut
as a professional MMA fighter
in 2007.

After the opening bell, Slice
appeared to be the early aggres-
sor and charged toward
Petruzelli’s corner. The rela-
tively unknown Petruzelli
blocked him with a short kick
and connected on a jab which
sent Slice to the floor.

The fight was stopped by ret-
eree Troy Waugh = after
Petruzelli delivered a series of
haymakers to a defenseless
Slice. Petruzelli improved his
record to 11-4 with eight knock-
outs, while Slice fell to 3-1.
THE TRIBUNE | | TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 1





WENDY’S



Norman Solomon
Former Franchisee Passes Away



nt weaqweraqactes: Seep eneeae: pana.an out sqpuecnectavanpevanps recenpesqoyssswetevanpertemnécessmevatesemeenertnianpraneitainsseunsehserntsessawesemseaneseencemasenessenreeeag ees ePersnniesns GaneerAerunsUsenerrrwenserard Cone MOReeentar se serwsyeseresewT ees AiDensere reins ernreensnTnteweehin ser ThentinATseenesrseen
eeeenepeeretene: seayonesyesgsremeunnaevedys pteceeqereye tenesneneanartens nes ae eeevanpereny. ,

The Wendy's family has lost a dear friend. Norman Solomon,

who started the Wendy's franchise organization in The.

Aten Danae Peear Sarens an tesantnes ep mre tae

amanrenenens

- Bahamas, passed away on Sunday, Sapembet 28. Dave ;

phen as ease

Thomas and Norman enjoyed a close friendship.

Norman opened his first store on Mackey Street in Nassau in
June, 1988. His franchise grew to six stores and eventually
included Freeport on Grand Bahama Island. In 1994 he

received his first Wendy Award. Norman had an energetic —

MALT DE SES PASTY RAT EH RGR R RMS AGA PERTERROPL EES IAP SEL REEDS U4 READ ERESHANES PETE AS ARE RANT ARE RE NPY Fe:

anparanesecers,

annem nensane:

presence and his restaurants enj joyed a tremendous following.

ead pnea nes

Ses rereesay

- The Bahamas restaurants have consistently ranked i in the top

canengiae

25 in system wide sales and transactions. Over time, Norman’ Ss
daughter, Andrya Solomon-Schulte took on the responsibility

ates neprepaeeaganesoeneapepasetnaten tate caee:

of overseeing the restaurants, and in 2001 their franchise —
received another Wendy Award. Norman was also a member of

Parliament in The Bahamas.

In 2005, the Salat sold their franchise to’ Chris and

| Terry Tsavoussis. Our deepest sympathies go out to Norman’s

Ade res e kee neomeperan nes nares renee ramesroanseqor nes Eeate ene apanrer

family and associates.


we.
-<_ .

«
oe «
=F.





@ By PAULINE JELINEK
and MATTHEW LEE
WASHINGTON

China has abruptly canceled a series
of military and diplomatic contacts with
the United States to protest a planned
$6.5 billion package of U.S. arms sale
to Taiwan, American officials told The
Associated Press on Monday.

Beijing has notified the U.S. that it
will not go forward with several senior
level visits and other cooperative mili-
tary-to-military plans, said Marine Maj.
Stewart Upton, a Defense Department
spokesman.

"In response to Friday's announce-
ment of Taiwan arms sales, the Peo-
ple's Republic of China canceled or
postponed several upcoming military-
to-military exchanges," Upton said,
lamenting that "China's continued
politicization of our military relation-
ship results in missed opportunities."

The Chinese action will not affect
the country's participation with the
United States in six-nation talks aimed
at getting North Korea to give up its
nuclear weapons or its participation in
the international effort on Iran's





oT





P Photo/Wally Santana



A

a ee BS nea evenerer ny

TAIWAN PRESIDENT Ma Ying-jeou opens the 2008 Taiwan Business Alliance Conference
in Taipei, Taiwan, Monday, Oct. 6, 2008. The two-day conference has attracted more than
300 business people from China in hopes of increased foreign investment. Taiwanese have
invested more than US$100 billion on the Chinese mainland, but Taiwan has long
barred reverse investment from China for fear it would give China economic and politi-
cal control of the island. China has now cancelled military/diplomatic ties with US.

nuclear program, U.S. officials said.
But it does include the cancellation

of an upcoming U.S. visit by a senior

Chinese general, other similar trips,

the indefinite postponement of meet-
ings on stopping the spread of weapons
of mass destruction, the officials said.



Mall at Marathon
Tel - 394-4880

TT Paes em Lt US
Fri - Sat 11 a.m. to 12 a.m,

military C

several port calls by naval vessels and -

"It's an unfortunate step," said
deputy State Department spokesman
Robert Wood.

Beijing is furious with the U.S. deci-
sion to sell Taiwan the huge $6.5 billion
package of advanced weaponry and
military items, including guided mis-
siles and attack helicopters. China,
which regards Taiwan as a renegade
province, says the sale interferes with
internal Chinese affairs and harms its

_national security.

"The Chinese government and the
Chinese people strongly oppose and
object to the U.S. government's
actions, which harm Chinese interests
and Sino-U.S. relations," its foreign
ministry said in a statement Saturday,
adding that U.S. diplomats had been
summoned to hear a strong protest.

China's Ambassador to the United
States, Zhou Wenzhong, was expected
to register a similar protest about the
arms sale on Monday with the State
Department. A Chinese Embassy
spokesman in Washington said it would
be "only natural" for the ambassador
to lodge the protest.

Upton said.the sale does not repre-
sent a change in U.S. policy and that



gtion:

on. When you —

THE TRIBUNE



ontacts with US

Washington is only upholding the pro-
visions of the Taiwan Relations Act
under which the U.S. makes available
items necessary for Taiwan to main-
tain a sufficient self defense.

Taiwan, which opened a business

‘conference yesterday in the hope of
increasing foreign investment, relies
on U:S. weapons to keep pace with
China's massive arms buildup across,
the Taiwan Strait. U.S. arms sales to.
Taiwan are a crucial matter because
any dispute between China and Tai-
wan could ensnare the United States.

Washington is Taiwan's most impor-
tant ally and largest arms supplier. ;

The U.S. Defense Security Cooper;
_ation Agency announced Friday that it
had notified the U.S. Congress of plans’
to sell up to $6.5 billion-in advanced
weaponry to Taiwan. Under proce-
dures for such foreign military sales,
the deal would proceed if no lawmak=
er voices an objection within 30 days of
the notification.

Beijing claims Taiwan as its own ter-
ritory and has threatened to invade
should the self-governing islanu ever
formalize its de facto independence.






:




SOOO OOV0000?





S100m BEC conversion

pie TRIBUNE



MAW ah TERRE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7,




ROYAL DFIDELITY

cost estimate over LNG

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
_ Tribune Business Editor

Converting
the Bahamas
Electricity
Corporation’s
(BEC) tur-
bines to gen-
erate power
from burning
liquefied nat-
ural gas
(LNG )
“would
require huge capital invest-
ment” in the region of $100 mil-
lion, Tribune Business was told
yesterday, with the Government
wanting to submit the proposal

.)

lam DLeerlly



Government
seeing if it can
‘reconcile’
Bluewater
BTC offer

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE Government’s privati-
sation committee is assessing
~ whether the administration’s
objectives for the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
-(BTG).can be. “reconciled”with
the offer submitted by Bluewa-
ter Communications Holding,

a government minister saying it -

would “move on to the next -
_ phase” if a deal was unreach-
~ able.
Zhivargo Laing, minister of
state for. finance, told Tribune

SEE page 5B





62.2-acre Rum Plant situated in the south-west portion of New
Providence offers 1,235 feet of water frontage with a rocky shoreline,

7 individual warehouses totalling 254,123 square feet and security gate at
entry. Additionally there are 16 buildings, including an 11,106 square foot
Administration building and a 65,230 sq. ft. Industrial building. Industrial
electrical supply, Desalination Plant and three standby Generators ensure
continuous electrical supply. For further information contact:
George.Damianos@SothebysRealty.com 242.362.4211 :

Damianos |

Member of
SiRbahamas.com | t 242.3222305 | 242.322.2033 | the Buhorros MLS

* Technical review of AES proposal required before government

decision on approving New Providence power supply offer
* Top four renewable energy proposals submitted to BEC
will be forwarded for government approval -

by AES Corporation to a “full
technical review” before reach-
ing a decision.

Dr Earl Deveaux, minister of

the environment, who has ulti-

mate ministerial responsibility
for BEC, said it was impossible
to provide a timeline for how
long the technical review would
take and when the Government

BEC fuel costs

quadruple to
over $350m

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter

THE Bahamas Electricity
Corporation’s (BEC) fuel bill
has more than-quadrupled over
the last six years, rising from
$80 million to more than $350
million as a result of soaring
global oil prices.

With no predictable end to
the skyrocketing fuel surcharges
and large BEC bills, the Cor-
poration’s general manager,
Kevin Basden, encouraged
Bahamians to practice stronger
energy conservation measures.
He said that BEC as. a company
is also facing the burden, with
their largest and most signifi-
cant expense being fuel.

He added that this had made
it increasingly difficult for com-
panies to budget for longer peri-
ods, because the fuel surcharge
can alter utility bills by so much.

Mr Basden spoke to persons
attending a free legal clinic
sponsored by Halisbury Cham-
bers at the weekend, and
warned them that until the Gov-
ernment and BEC can access
renewable energy sources or
there is a constant decline in oil
prices, the only way they can
reduce their light bills is through
conservation measures.

Mr. Basden stressed the
importance of having air con-
ditioning units that were prop-
erly fitted to windows and the
size of rooms. He added that
solar water heaters are the
biggest difference makers in
reducing utility costs, and will
pay-off their investment within
two years.

Other helpful tips were to
unplug appliances, adjust the
thermostat on the fridge, ensure

SEE page 5B










Sotheby's

INTERNATIONAL REALTY



would make a.decision, even
though AES has been pressing
for an answer by year-end. |
Dr Deveaux said that AES
and its attorneys had been push-
ing for a government decision
on whether. to ‘make the
approval in principle that was
granted to its project back in
2001 a full, formalised approval

Bahamas

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

IT is “100 per cent.certain”
that Digicel will bid for one of
the two new cellular licences
that will be auctioned one year
after the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company (BTC)
is privatised, a senior company
executive yesterday saying that
for him entering this market
“would be the crown jewel”.

Bahamian E. Jay Saunders,
Digicel’s general manager for
the Turks & Caicos Islands,
described the Bahamian cellular
market as “very significant” for
the company, which has opera-
tions in most other Caribbean
territories.

Explaining that it was “100
per cent certain” that it would
bid for a licence to provide cel-
lular services in the Bahamas
post-privatisation, Mr Saunders
told Tribune Business: “The
Bahamas is very, very impor-
tant for Digicel.

“To me as a Bahamian, I see

‘it as the crown jewel for me per-

sonally. For Digicel, it’s a very

Significant market. It’s not a

| °* Pension Plans

. Mitwal Funds

that would allow it to proceed.
The US power generation

giant had initially sought gov-

ernment approval to supply
Florida with LNG via a pipeline
and regasification terminal at
Ocean Cay, a man-made island
off Bimini.

Yet AES had earlier this year
modified its proposal, in light

of the issues the Bahamas and
BEC were experiencing with
soaring energy costs as a result
of rising global oil prices, and
offered to supply New Provi-
dence with LNG from the Bimi-
ni plant, too.

“AES is asking for a formal

SEE page 3B

telecoms market a
‘crown jewel for Digicel |

**100% certain’ regional cellular giant will bid against
likes of Cable Bahamas for two cellular licences

* New entrants must offer services by two years after BTC
privatised, with licence auction to take place after one year

* Criteria for new licence winners favours established
foreign companies, not Bahamians

poor market.”

Pointing out that the
Bahamas had 10 times the num-
ber of potential customers when
compared to the Turks &
Caicos Islands, for example, Mr
Saunders added: “The Bahamas
is a significant market in.terms
of the economy and GDP.
You're getting a market that is
pretty well-to-do, and the pop-
ulation size makes it a very
good one for Digicel” to target.

Mr Saunders said all those
factors meant that numerous
carriers besides Digicel were all
eyeing the Bahamian telecom-
munications market and work-
ing out how to enter it, once
privatisation and liberalisa-
tion/deregulation took place.

More details emerged yester-
day on the Government’s
deregulation strategy for the
telecoms sector, Prime Minis-

* Stock Brokerage

* Corporate Finance

° Investment Management

* Trusts & Estate Planning

* Personal Pension Plan Accounts

* Education Investment Accounts —

BAHAMAS

Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

BARBADOS

Bridgetown: 246.467.4000

CUA

ter Hubert Ingraham having
unveiled the broad outline last
week in Parliament.

Apart from selling a 51 per
cent stake in BTC, the Govern-
ment plans to liberalise fixed-
line telecoms as soon as the pri-
vatisation is completed, with
deregulation of cellular services
beginning one year after this
date.

A statement.issued on behalf
of the BTC privatisation com-
mittee said that exactly one year
from the privatisation’s com-
pletion, a request for proposal
(RFP) or tender document
would be issued inviting expres-
sions of interest in the two new
Bahamian cellular licences that
would be issued.

-A public consultation would
take place at the same time, and

SEE page 4B



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Film
Studios
cut from
4,500 ©

to ‘120 >

acres’

* Purchaser says
asking price cut
to $5m as a result,
as it awaits revised
deal with
government

* Concerns over
smaller Studios’
economic viability,
as time running out
on attracting new
‘Pirates of the
Caribbean movie

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

A POTENTIAL bidder for
the Bahamas Film Studios yes-
terday said it was awaiting the
receipt of a revised agreement .
between the vendor and the
Government, having been told
by the seller the asking price
had been reduced to $5 million.

This was because the projec-
t’s size had been drastically cut
by the Government from 3,500
acres to just 120 acres.

Bahamian banker Owen
Bethel, who put together the
Bahamas FilmInvest Interna-
tional consortium, told Tribune
Business that the existing sales
agreement between his group
and the vendor, Bahamas Film
Studios chairman Ross Fuller,
had expired on October 5, 2008.

“He is requesting $5 million
to enter into a new agreement
with him, based on the new
terms,” Mr Bethel, president of
the Nassau-based Montaque

SEE page 4B

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work


PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008







® By Royal Fidelity Capital
Markets .

IT was a very quiet week in
the Bahamian stock market,
with investors trading in eight
out of the 24 listed securities,
of which two advanced, two
declined and three remained
unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET

A total of 33,194 shares
changed hands, a slight decline
from last week's trading volume
of 47,168 shares.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) (CIB) led the
advance for a second consecu-
tive week, with 11,233 of its
shares trading, jumping by $0.05
or 0.42 per cent to close the
week at $11.75.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
followed, with 9,161 of its shares

trading, gaining by $0.01 to
close at $7.38. Some 5,000
shares of FOCOL Holdings
(FCLB) Class ‘B’ preferred
shares traded for the first time
this week, for a total value of
$5,000.

Meanwhile, Cable Bahamas
(CAB) saw 4,000 of its shares
trade, its stock ending the week
unchanged at $14.15.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national was the biggest declin-
er of the week with 1,000 shares
trading, dropping by $0.85 or
10 per cent to close at a new
52-week low of $7.65. Some
1,000 shares of Abaco Markets
(AML) traded, its stock price
declining this week by $0.10 or
5.85 per cent to close at $1.71.

BOND MARKET
Investors traded in $27,000
(par value) Fidelity Bank

(Bahamas) Notes, all in Series
D Notes, (FBB15), which are
due for redemption in 2015.

PANY NE

Earnings Releases

Bahamas Waste (BWL)
released unaudited financial
results for the six-month period
ended June 30, 2008. BWL's
gross profit stood at $1.2 mil-
lion versus $1.6 million for the
comparative period in 2007, a
decline of $404,000 or 26.1 per
cent.

Sales revenues of $3.8 million’

were down by $116,000, while

the cost of sales, some $2.7 mil-

lion, was up by $288,000. Total
operating expenses climbed by
$7,000 to $957,000 from
$950,000 for the same six-month
period in 2007.

The movement in BWL's rev-

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enues and expenses resulted in
net income from operations
declining by $410,000 or 68 per
cent from the prior year peri-
od, totalling $190,000. Earnings
er share declined by $0.09 to
0.05, versus $0.14 at the end
of the 2007 second quarter.
BWL's total assets and liabil-

ities stood at $9.8 million and’

$1:5 million respectively, com-
pared to $9.2-million and $1.1
million at year-end 2007.

Abaco Markets (AML)
released unaudited financial

results for the quarter ended |

July 31,2008. AML's net prof-
it stood at $162,000, a decrease
of $348,000 from the $544,000
recorded during the same peri-
od in 2007.

For the most recent quarter,
AML’s sales grew to $22.7 mil-
lion, compared to $21.8 million
in the 2007 second quarter, a
change of $878,000, while the
$16.2 million cost of sales
increased by $1.1 million.

Net operating profit declined
by $446,000 or 53.4 per cent to
$389,000, compared to $835,000
for the comparative period in
2007.

Selling and general adminis-
trative expenses were $6.2 mil-
lion in the quarter, compared
to $5.8 million in the 2007 sec-
ond quarter, an increase of
$301,000 or 5.1 per cent. Profit

er share dropped to $0.01 from
0.032 in 2007.











House #:
House Colour:

Requested Start Date:

House Name:

Type of Fence/Wall:

No matter what vour schedil

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{
INTHS







THE TRIBUNE

The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 877.49 (2. 83%) YTD
BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.71 $-0.10 1,000 3.01%
BBL _ $0.89 $- 0 4.71%
BOB: $7.65 $-0.85 1,000 -20.40%
BPF $11.80 get 0 0.00%
BSL $14.60 gos! 0 0.00%
BWL .'$3.49----$-". 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $- | 4,000 17.43%
CBL . $738.4. 4 $4001 9.161 12.46%
CHL’. $2.85" Fo ge | 9.52%
CIB $11.70 $40.05 11,233 19.86%
CWCB $2.54 $-117 0 -49.60%
DHS. $2.77 | 0 17.87%
FAM $8.06 $- | 0 11.94%
EBB $2.37 $-).| 0 10.57%
FCC —-$0.40 $- 0 -48.05%
FCL $5.25 $- 1,800 135%
FCLB $1.00 FIN. $12.00 $- 0 734%
ICD ‘$8.20 $- 0 13.10%
ISI $12.00 $- 0: 9.09%
PRE _ $10.00 $- 0 0.00% |
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES: |

¢ Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has declared
a quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on November
7, 2008, to all shareholders of record date September 30, 2008.

¢ RND Holdings (RND) announced it will hold its Annual
General Meeting on Wednesday, October 22, 2008, at 6pm at the
British Colonial Hilton, N asa Bahamas.

PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFF ERINGS:

¢ FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced it will be extending the
deadline of its private placement offering. The preferred shares
will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable
semi-annually.

International Markets

FOREX Rates
Weekly % Change

CAD$ 0.9246 7.18
GBP 1.7756 -3.70
EUR 1.3792 -5.69
Commodities

Weekly % Change
Crude Oil $93.13 -13.03
Gold $840.00 -5.08
International Stock Market Indexes:

Weekly % Change
DJIA 10,325.38 -7.34
S& P 500 1,099.23 -7.34
NASDAQ 1,099.23 -9.40
Nikkei 10,938.14 -8.03

TO TEMPTATION











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just call 502-2371 today!
THE TRIBUNE



TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 3B



SEES Va ee ae ee
Hotel body denies endorsement claim

THE Bahamas Hotel Asso-
ciation (BHA) has denied
attempting to infringe on the
rights of businesses to freely
conduct business with the
Bahamian hotel industry, and
said it is not attempting to intro-
duce an endorsement pro-
gramme.

In a statement issues yester-
day, the BHA said it “took
strong exception” with state-
ments made by former Minister
of Tourism Obie Wilchcombe.

It said that last June, the
BHA announced its plans to
explore the options of endors-
ing an in-room publication,
preferably with-the Dupuch
Publications Welcome
Bahamas book, which is already

BEC, from 1B

decision on that approval in
principle,” Dr Deveaux
explained. “To get a formal
approval, their revised plan
needs to be subjected to a tech-
nical review.

“They are now suggesting
something different today - co-
generation with BEC to supply

electrical generation and instal- -

lation for New Providence. In
order for that request to be
accommodated, a full technical
review of the proposal is
required.”

Dr Deveaux was unable to
say when the technical review
would start and how long it
would take, as the Government

would first have to advertise the .

job and then select a winning
bidder.

Any review would be a two-
phased process, as apart from
the technical review carried out
by the Government’s consul-
tants, Dr Deveaux said the Min-
istry of the Environment had
already asked BEC to “review
and comment” on the proposals
AES had submitted to it.

Any review would have to
consider the environmental,
economic, timescale and tech-
nical issues involved in AES
constructing a $150-$200 mil-
lion, 120-mile LNG pipeline

from Bimini to supply BEC’s.

turbine gemerators at the Blue
Hills plant, the minister said.
The ultimate objective was to
determine whether the AES
proposal was “feasible and sus-
tainable”, given BEC’s current

in a number of hotel rooms at
no charge to the publisher.
The BHA said it planned to
levy a small fee on Dupuch
publications in return for its
exclusive right of distribution
inside member hotel rooms
throughout the country.

The proceeds from any part-'

nership with a publisher would
be used to support education
and environmental projects
with young people.

‘The BHA said: “As is the
case in countless jurisdictions
around the world, there is a
privilege to being able to place
a publication inside a hotel
room.

“Throughout the Caribbean,
including places like Aruba,

power generation supply that
was based on bunker C fuel.

“In this case, AES has offered
to do something in New Provi-
dence,” Dr Deveaux explained
to Tribune Business, “which
was to sweeten the pot and con-
vert some of BEC’s generators
to burn LNG.

“That would require huge
capital investment and a shift
in the way BEC supplies power.
That number we heard was in
the region of $100 million.”

Perspective

He added: “From the per-
spective of BEC as a corpora-
tion, it needs to make a deci-
sion as a Board whether it
wants to do this.

“The Government also needs
to review, from a strategic point
of view, whether this is the
direction it wants to go in. To
make that decision, we need
advice at arm’s length from
BEC.”

The $100 million capital
investment cost cited by the
minister appears to be slightly at
odds with figures previously cit-
ed by Aaron Samson, the AES
LNG managing director, who
said in June that the cost of con-
verting BEC’s seven to eight
combustion turbines at Blue
Hills to take LNG had been
estimated at between $1-$1.5
million each, making a maxi-
mum total of $12 million.

Mr Samson had projected
that BEC could save between
$1.4 billion to $4 billion - $80
million to $210 million per

Sy:
za

Meanie



Curacao, St Lucia, the Turks
and Caicos, and around the

annum - in fuel costs over a 15-
year period if it switched to
using LNG, based on two sets
of data for future global oil
prices.

Yet Tribune Business under-
stands that the Government’s
concerns over the AES propos-
al relate to long-term LNG
prices, and whether they would
increase at the same rate - and
reach the same level - as oil
prices as global demand
increased. Such a development
would negate any advantages
from switching BEC to LNG.

Dr Deveaux said he did not
believe the more than seven-
year wait that AES had
endured for a final government
decision on whether to approve
its project would negatively
impact investor confidence in
the Bahamas.

“This was not a straight up

" and down investment proposal

per se,” he added, pointing out
that apart from AES, both El
Paso and Tractebel had sub-
mitted LNG pipeline and ter-
minal proposals to the Govern-
ment. Concerns over the envi-
ronment, and questions over
whether the Bahamas had the
technical ability and capacity to
oversee an LNG industry, had
to be answered.

Only AES had remained in
the game, and “the circum-
stances then [in 2001] are total-
ly different from the circum-
stances now. We’re plagued
with high energy costs”.

The AES propoSal would -
also be subjected to,a separate »

review from the planned audit

member of the QNB Group

Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, part of the Ansbacher
group of companies, specializes in providing clients with
private banking, fiduciary and wealth management services.

Risk Manager

An opening has arisen for a risk manager to work closely
with the director for risk management in establishing a
‘ strong framework for risk management and monitoring
risk positions across the bank in credit, market and
operational risk areas. Data compilation, enforcement of
internal controls and report preparation for senior
management and risk committees are also important
aspects of this job. The jobholder is expected to contribute
new ideas designed to improve the efficiency of the
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projects.

To apply you should hold a bachelor’s degree in business,
accounting or finance and have a minimum of three years’
experience working in an operational or risk management
area within a banking organization. It is expected that you
will possess excellent communication skills and be
proficient in the use of Word, Excel and Power Point.

Please send your resumé with a covering letter to Human
Resource Manager, Ansbacher (Bahamas) Limited, PO
Box N-7768, Nassau, Bahamas, hrmanager@ansbacher.bs

The deadline for all applications by hand, fax or e-mail
is Friday October 10, 2008.

«

world, publishers pay for the
exclusive privilege of in-room
access either to the hotel or a
hotel association or convention
bureau.

“This exclusive privilege then
allows the publisher to generate
the distribution volume and
exclusivity necessary to com-
mand rates from advertisers.

“It is not our intention to
embrace any broad endorse-
ment policy covering all busi-
nesses. All publishers would
continue to be able to distribute
their materials as they present-
ly do in public areas within
hotels. Much as is done with
in-room movie operators, this
exclusive right of access, which
allows a publisher or movie

of BEC, The request for pro-
posal (RFP) for the latter con-
tract was due to go out immi-
nently, with interested parties
having 60 days to respond.

“Tt would include a review of
BEC’s energy mix,” Dr
Deveaux told Tribune Business.






' Including all materials and registration costs

Location:

Start Date:

Duration:



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Days/Time:

provider to effectively corner a
market through in-room access,
should have a cost attached to
it.’

The BHA added that it was
“unfortunate that Mr Wilch-
combe elected to go public on
this matter” without sitting
down with it to get the full facts.

The BHA added: “BHA's
track record in recent years in
support of its allied members
and small businesses speaks
clearly to its desire to promote
and protect the interests of all
tourism-related businesses in
the Bahamas.

“There is a distinct difference
between a hotel allowing a pub-
lisher to have exclusive rights
to being the sole provider of an

“What is the appropriate mix?

We intend to arrive at a sus-
tainable and cost effective ener-
gy mix. BEC needs a compre-
hensive, secure mix of energy
sources.”

He added that BEC’s RFP
for bids from renewable energy

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in-room publication and allow-
ing for businesses like taxis,
ground transportation providers
and other businesses to have
general access to facilities
through venues like tour desks,
counter displays, concierges,
etc.

“BHA has held initial discus-
sions with Dupuch Publications
and is awaiting a response to
its expressed desire to partner.
It indicates that Welcome
Bahamas is a fine publication,
and its first preference is clear-
ly to work with them to help
broaden support for their pub-
lication and put back into the
community monies which can
specifically help to improve the
tourism product.”



suppliers had generated “a large
number of responses” that were
now under review.

“A- number of them were
very attractive. The top four will
be submitted for our [govern-
ment] review and approval,” Dr
Deveaux said.










’




ae.

PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Film Studios cut from 3,500 to ‘120 acres’

FROM 1B

Group, said of Mr Fuller.

“The period of the [previous] con-
tract has expired as of October Sth.”

Those new terms include a major
reduction in the size of the land avail-
able for the Bahamas Film Studios
development, which has been cut by
the Government from the 3,500 acres
envisaged in the initial Heads of
Agreement to just 120 acres.

Such a move had previously been
foreshadowed by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham in an interview with
Tribune Business earlier this year, but
Mr Bethel said yesterday that he and
his group were now in a ‘wait and see
mode’, their next move depending on
the terms of the revised agreement
between Mr Fuller and the Govern-
ment.

“We still not seen an agreement

th between him [Mr Fuller] and the Gov-



ernment, although he has indicated to
us he knows what the terms are,” Mr
Bethel said.

The substantial reduction in the size
of the Bahamas Film Studios is likely to
be the key factor impacting any future
moves by Mr Bethel’s group and other
potential bidders.

Mr Bethel had warned back in July

‘that the Government’s determination

to repossess much of the 3,500 acres of
Crown Land leased to the original
developers by the former Christie gov-
ernment back in 2003 would affect the
development’s feasibility and sustain-
ability from an economic and finan-
cial standpoint.

The previous PLP administration
had leased almost the entire former
US Air Force Missile Base to the initial
trio of developers - Hans Schutte, Paul
Quigley and Michael Collyer, all of
whom are now deceased - and Prime
Minister Ingraham felt those terms
were unduly generous, with too much
land granted.

Yet that land was critical to their
plans, and those of Mr Bethel’s group
and other developers, as the real estate
component would have generated the
majority of the Bahamas Film Studios’
revenues and profits.

Apart from the existing water tank
and associated film/TV production
facilities already at the Bahamas Film
Studios, the project’s economic sus-
tainability always depended on the
development of a hotel, movie theme
park and residential real estate com-
ponent. ;

Mr Bethel’s group had previously
pledged to invest upwards of $90 mil-
lion in completing the original vision
for the Bahamas Film Studios, but will
now renegotiate the original deal,
which involved a purchase price of
under $14 million.

Therefore, by reducing the land
available to any future developers, the
Government may have undermined
the Bahamas Film Studios’ economic
viability. It has been able to renegotiate
the terms of the original Heads of
Agreement because the project has
defaulted on its lease payments to the
Government and obligations/commit-
ments as contained in that agreement,
something Mr Fuller has denied.

Meanwhile, Mr Bethel yesterday
warned that time was running out if
the Bahamas was to attract Disney’s

Pirates of the Caribbean IV to film at
the Bahamas Film Studios.

With the producers targeting a like-
ly Christmas 2009 release, filming
would start in the 2008 first half and the
Bahamas Film Studios needed several
months’ preparation if Disney was
even to consider it as a shooting loca-
tion.

“Disney has given the green light
for Pirates of the Caribbean IV, and
the question is where it will be shot,”
Mr Bethel said.

“They’re not stating exactly when in
the New Year they would like to film,
but we anticipate it’s in the first half of
the year.”

When asked how long it would take
to make Bahamas Film Studios ready
for Disney, Mr Bethel replied: “You’re
looking at a task of probably four to six
months.”

That makes it critical to sort out the
Bahamas Film Studios’ future imme-
diately, as the economic benefits could
be considerable - especially in a time of
economic downturn. The Pirates of the
Caribbean II and III sequels pumped
some $40 million into the Grand

Bahama economy when they were
filmed previously. ‘

Another uncertainty hanging over
the Bahamas Film Studios is whether a
$300,000 claim against it by a Bahami-
an engineering company has been set-
tled.

Phoenix Engineering had filed an
action against the Bahamas Film Stu-
dios’ immediate holding company,

‘Gold Rock Creek Enterprises, claiming

it was owed that sum for unpaid engi-
neering and Environmental Impact
Assessment (EJA) work.

The action was settled, but was con-
tingent on Mr Bethel’s group purchas
ing the Bahamas Film Studios by end
August 2008 - a deadline missed by
over a month and counting.

Some $300,000 was supposed to be
withheld from the purchase price pai:
by Mr Bethel’s group to Mr Fulle:,
and used to settle the debt. Otherwise.
the injunction previously obtained by
Phoenix Engineering to prevent th
Bahamas Film Studios’ sale until it:
debt was settled would be reinstated

It is uncertain whether this has hay
pened.

Bahamas telecoms market a ‘crown jewel’ for Digicel



FROM 1B

this would be followed by an
auction process for the two
licences. The successful bidders
would then need time to build

Services.

following positions:

Desk

mother tongue Portuguese.

requirements:

portfolio management;

Portuguese is essential.

hrbahamas@ubs,com or

The Tribune

Senior Client Advisor & Client Advisor for the Brau

In this challenging position you will be responsible for the Advisory of
existing clients, acquisition of high net worth individuals as well as
presentation and implementation of investment solutions in the client's

‘For this position we are searching for a personality who meets the following

¢ Extensive experience and a proven track record in wealth management;
¢ Specialized in the fields of customer relations, investment advice and

their networks, recruit staff and
negotiate technical agreements,
with the licences stipulating that
they must begin offering ser-
vices to Bahamian consumers
by the second anniversary of
the BTC privatisation comple-

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd. is one of the world's leading financial institutions in the
Caribbean. Through our Business Area Wealth Management International
we look after wealthy private clients by providing them with
comprehensive, vaiue enhancing services. Our client advisors combine
strong personal relationships with the resources that are available from
across UBS, helping them provide a full range of wealth management

In order to strengthen our team in Nassau, we are looking to fill the



» Excellent sales and advisory skills as well as solid knowledge of
investment products are key requirements. Fluency in English and

Written applications should be addressed to:

UBS (Bahamas) Ltd.
Human Resources
P.O. Box N-775
Nassau, Baharr s



tion.

That means cellular phone
competition will be introduced
to the Bahamas, at the latest,
two years after BTC’s privati-
sation ended, rather than one
year as the Prime Minister’s
announcement seemed to indi-
cate.

The privatisation committee’s
statement also indicated that
the likely winners of the two
cellular licences will be estab-
lished international telecoms
firms, rather than Bahamian
companies.

The criteria is based upon
bidders having a ‘track record of
success’, top-quality manage-
ment and the necessary finan-
cial and operational strength.

Mr Saunders yesterday indi-
cated that two years was a rela-
tively long time between the
date of privatisation and liber-
lication, but acknowledged that
the Government had to balance
this goal with the need to allow
BTC’s purchaser to earn an ini-
tial return on capital and pre-
pare the company for competi-
ON tb are

The Digicel executive also
praised the Government for
providing a liberalisation
timetable, with dates and time-
lines, adding that his company
had a tradition of launching into
new markets “very shortly after
getting the licence”.

In Turks & Caicos, for
instance, it had begun offering
services to customers some
three months after it had won
its licence.

As for the Bahamas, Mr
Saunders said Digicel was “not
leaning towards any particular
option on our entry”, being pre-
pared to either acquire a stake
in BTC or enter itself from
scratch as a ‘greenfield’ new-
comer, constructing its own
infrastructure and network.

“Digicel is committed to com-
ing to the Bahamas, and if we
get a licence we will ensure we
give the Bahamian people the
best network available,” Mr
Saunders told Tribune Business.
“The management of Digicel
will ensure the country gets the
latest technology rolled-out.

“We're just waiting for the

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that FRANTZ JEAN-BAPTISTE
of KEY WEST STREET, P.O. BOX GT-128, NASSAU,
BAHAMAS is applying to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/naturalization

as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization
should not. be granted, should send a written and signed .
statement of the facts within twenty-eight days from the
7TH day of OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible
for Nationality and Citizenship, PO.Box N- 7147, Nassau,

Bahamas.



NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that LORNA PATRICIA ROBINSON
of 54 GAMBIER LOOP, P.O. BOX F-44574 FREEPORT,
GRAND BAHAMA, BAHAMAS, is applying to the Minister
responsible for Nationality and Citizenship, for registration/
naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas, and that any person
who knows any reason why registration/ naturalization should
not be granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 3RD day of
OCTOBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.











of this notice.

PUBLIC NOTICE

INTENT TO CHANGE NAME BY DEED POLL
The Public is hereby advised that |, FINESSE INDIRA BUTLER mother
of AURORA ALEXANDRIA COX of SUN AVENUE, CANTERBURY PARK,
in The Eastern District, New Providence, Bahamas, intend to change
my child’s name to AURORA ALEXANDRIA BUTLER. If there are any
objections to this change of name by Deed Poll, you may write such
objections to the Chief Passport Officer, PO.Box N-742, Nassau,
Bahamas no later than thirty (30) days after the date of the publication



EXCLUSIVE LISTING
GRAHAM ACRES

Part of Blair gare East

Furnished 4 bed/2 bath house, Living,
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air-conditioned, large Wooden Deck,
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$345,000.00 Gross

Please call: er
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Government to liberalise the
market. The typical way we do
things is not to push a govern-
ment, and sit back and wait.

“We hope our record in the
Caribbean, Central America
and South Pacific would indi-
cate to the Bahamas govern-
ment we should be one consid-
ered as one of the few compa-
nies to get a licence.”

Mr Saunders said the bene-
fits from telecoms sector com-
petition and liberalisation were
even greater than could possibly
be stated, as businesses and con-
sumers would enjoy more
choice, better service and lower
prices.

At a time when all costs were
going up, telecoms costs in the
Bahamas could come down.

Digicel finished its last fiscal
year on March 31, 2008, with
6.54 million customers, a 39 per
cent increase compared to the
same quarter in the previous
fiscal year. It operates in 23
markets, including Anguilla,
Antigua & Barbuda, Aruba,
Barbados, Bermuda, Bonaire,

the Cayman Islands, Curacao,

Dominica, El Salvador, French
Guiana, Grenada, Guadeloupe,
Guyana, Haiti, Jamaica, Mar-
tinique, St. Kitts & Nevis, St.
Lucia, St. Vincent and the
Grenadines, Suriname, Turks
and Caicos and Trinidad &
Tobago. It also provides cover-
age in St Martin and St Barths.

And Digicel has also bee:
granted licenses to operate ir
the British Virgin Islands, Hor
duras and Panama.

Digicel, which launched in
April 2001, directly employs
more than 4,000 people and has
1,000 retail stores. Total invest
ment in its infrastructure has
been more than $2 billion.

Meanwhile, the privatisation
committee confirmed yesterday
that the Bahamian telecoms
regulatory environment, includ-
ing the Telecommunications
Act and the Telecommunica-
tions Sector Policy, would have
to be changed to bring them in
line with the Government’s lib-
eralisation objectives.

It added that recommenda-
tions to achieve this were being
drafted, and were likely to be
completed within the next few
weeks.

KPMG Corporate Finance,
the privatisation committee’s
advisor, is reviewing BTC’s
updated business plan, which is
a key document in establishing
the company’s value to a poten-
tial bidder.

KPMG is alSo working on
revising the legal and regulato-
ry issues in the Bahamian tele-
coms industry. The legal firms
working on the privatisation on
the Government’s behalf are
Higgs & Johnson and the inter-
national firm of Charles Rus-
sell.

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that RAYMONDE MESIDOR of
#27 EAST AVENUE, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying to
the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,

and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 7TH day of OCTOBER 2008
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.





















team player.

CAVES POINT MANAGEMENT LIMITED

NOTICE OF ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING OF MEMBERS

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 2008
Annual General Meeting of CAVES POINT
MANAGEMENT LIMITED will be held at
7:30p.m. on Wednesday 15th October
2008 at Caves Point Condominium, West
Bay Street, New Providence, Bahamas. :

Please contact the Property Manager for |
a copy of the Agenda.

SE ee EE De ee REE]
eS GS se EeW eee
Small Retail Store specializing in girls |
accessories is seeking a cashier/senior |
sales associate (20-30 years) with |
sales experience, must be computer
literate, pleasant, well-groomed and a



Please send resumes by e-mail to:
ecooke@coralwave.com
or by: Fax to 394-7019 (Fax & Phone)






«


THE TRIBUNE

etd
IUESDAY, OC LOBER /, 2UU0, FAUL oD



Government seeing if it can
‘reconcile’ Bluewater BTC offer

FROM 1B

Business: “The reality is that
the Government is seeking to
advance the privatisation
process. Bluewater is an identi-
fied prospect in that regard.

“The talks that were being
held were seeing whether what
Bluewater proposed to do, and
what the Government is trying
to do, can be reconciled.

“If an agreement can be had,
so be it. The Government seeks
to do what is necessary to
advance the privatisation and
the aims which it has set. If that
player is already at the table,

then it will be done. If it is not -

done with the player at the
table, we will move on to the
next phase.”

Mr Laing’s comments are
unlikely to comfort Bluewater,
especially as the BTC privati-
sation committee yesterday con-
firmed an earlier Tribune Busi-
ness exclusive that Citigroup’s
New York arm had been hired
“to identify a buyer” for the 51
per cent stake the Government
intends to sell. ;

Why hire an investment bank
to find a buyer if one has
already been found in the shape
of Bluewater?

As this newspaper has previ-
ously reported, the Government
appears increasingly eager to
open up the bidding process and
conduct a ‘beauty contest’ auc-
tion process to see whether there
are better offers than Bluewater’s
out there despite the latter
protesting it still has time to run
on an exclusivity period.

Tribune Business also under-
stands that Bluewater and the
Government are disputing
whether the bidding group has

an exclusivity period and sales
agreement in principle in place,
an issue that could - if unresolved
- send both parties into arbitration
and further delay a privatisation
process that has dragged on for 10
years and cost taxpayers and bid-
ding groups millions of dollars.
Bluewater has been locked in
talks with the Government over
BTC’s privatisation for three to

four years, and is understood to .

have spent $6-$7 million on the
process to date.
It concluded an agreement in

_principle with the former Christie

government shortly before it left
office that would have seen it pay
$260 million for a 49 per cent
BTC stake over a six-year period.

Yet Bluewater will offer a sub-
stantially lower sum for a stake in
the state-owned firm due to the
Government’s decision to reduce
the post-privatisation exclusivity
periods to the bare minimum.

Philip Davis, of Davis & Co,
the attorney for the Bluewater
Communications Holdings con-
sortium, said Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s announce-
ment this week that BTC would
only maintain a “maximum” one-
year cellular monopoly post-pri-
vatisation had dramatically
“diminished” the company’s val-
ue and the price his clients were
likely to pay.

He added that if the Govern-

‘ment had stuck to the original

terms and had been prepared to
sell a 75 per cent stake in BTC, as

: jt had indicated in talks with Blue-

water, the group would have been
prepared “to pay $400 million”.
“Our client is still willing and
anxious to consummate the
agreement that was arrived at, on
the same terms that have been

on the table,” Mr Davis told Tri-
bune Business.
“With the new announcement

. that has been made, this obvi-

ously diminishes the value of
BTC and we will have to assess
the agreement we have in the
light of the stated intent of the
Government.

“That will definitely require a
revision of the numbers. It will
affect the rate of return on invest-
ed capital. It will further diminish
the value drastically.” :

BTC’s.real value lies in its cel-
lular monopoly, which generates
almost two-thirds of its revenue.
The longer the cellular exclusivi-
ty period post-privatisation, the
more a buyer is likely to be
induced to pay, given that it will
generate revenues and profits to
cover the purchase price and
obtain time to ready the state-
owned incumbent for competi-
tion.

BTC’s fixed-line revenues have
been eroded by IndiGo Net-
works, plus Voice. over Internet
Protocol (VoIP) and callback ser-
vices, while Cable Bahamas has
edged it out on the Internet side.
As a result, cellular is the only
valuable service left.

But the Prime Minister’s
announcement last Monday of a
seismic shift in government poli-
cy towards liberalisation/deregu-
lation, as opposed to preserving
BTC’s value and maximising its
profits, while benefiting the likes
of Cable Bahamas and IndiGo is
not in favour of BTC and its
potential privatisation partners.

Some $225 million was to be
paid up front; a further $30 mil-
lion after the five-year cellular
exclusivity was ended, and $5 mil-
lion after year six.

BEC fuel costs quadruple

to over $350m



FROM 1B

there is attic insulation, and that
all heater leaks are repaired
immediately. When using wash-
ers and dryers, Mr Basden said

it was important that they be
run at full load, and added that
perhaps line drying may be
more cost effective.

Further, Mr Basden said that
when buying appliances, one

should look for those which
have a higher energy efficien-
cy rating, and pointed out that
while they may be initially more
expensive, in the long run they
justify the cost.

PRICEWATERHOUSE(GOPERS
POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR

AUDIT MANAGER

PricewaterhouseCoopers has vacancy in its Nassau and Freeport Offices for Audit
Managers whose qualifications make the individuals eligible for membership in
the Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants. Prospective candidates should be
employed in public accounting and have at least (1) year of experience at the As-
sistant Manager/Manager level in managing a portfolio of diverse client engage-
ments. Candidates are also required to have a high level of computer literacy.

The position offers challenging work in the financial services industry and other
areas of industry and commerce. The salary scale, which recognizes different lev-
els of experience and skill, is designed to reward high performance. In addition,
the Firm provides excellent medical insutance and provident fund benefits.

Please submit your application letter with your Curriculum Vitae to:

Human Resources Partner
_ “Audit Manager Position”

PricewaterhouseCoopers

P.O.Box N-3910
Nassau, Bahamas

NOTICE

THE BAHAMAS MORTGAGE CORPORATION
TENDER FOR GROUP LIFE INSURANCE

The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation is inviting proposals from
insurance companies for the administration of life insurance coverage to
homeowners of properties mortgaged to The Corporation.

The proposal should be for a three year period from 1st November,
2008 - 31st October, 2011.

Companies interested in submitting a proposal may collect an
information package from The Bahamas Mortgage Corporation’s Head
Office, Russell Road, Oakes Field.

The deadline for the collection of the information package is Friday,
October 10, 2008, no later than 4:00 p.m.



FOCOL |
OLDINGS LTD.

PREFERRED
DIVIDEND PAYMENT

FOCOL is pleased to announce a



dividend payment to all holders of
Class ‘B’ preference shares
as of October 15, 2008
payable within fifteen business days
of the record date
through CFAL Ltd.





(BN FEL

LIL

American Academy of
Project Management

LIGNUM INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY (LIT) THE ONLY
AUTHORIZED REGISTERED EDUCATION PROVIDER (R.E.P)
OF PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE (PMD IN THE
BAHAMAS AND THE CARIBBEAN.

RISK MANAGEMENT
PMI-RMPâ„¢ Certification
AAPM-CPRMâ„¢

This course provides the applied training of Project/Business Risk
Management techniques and processes. Participants will learn how to
identify risks, qualify & quantify risks, respond to risks, and monitor and
control risks in a project life cycle and in the business operations
development process.

A good understanding of Project Management and Business Acumen is a
pre-requisite for this course. Preferrably a certification in Project
Management.

Course RM-LIT921 RISK MANAGEMENT the following classes:
WEEKDAY CLASSES

October 13-15, 2008 -- 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
October 22-24, 2008 — 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

SATURDAY CLASSES
October 11th, 18th, & 25" — 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
November o. 15", & 2 2008 — 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Call for our next PMP. CIPM Certification Course dates.

CONTACT:
LIGNUM TECHNOLOGIES (BAHAMAS) LTD.
HARBOR BAY PLAZA, EAST BAY STREET
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
TEL: (242) 393-2164
FAX: (242) 394-4971


‘PAGE 6B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





: Tribune Comics .

Y

JUDGE PARKER

A WINCHESTER
MODEL 70 WITH A
A LELIPOLD SCOPE...
NICE RIFLE!





BILL DUGGAN HAS
ACCESS TO THE

COULD THIS
RIFLE BE,

(©2008 by North Amenca Syndicaie, inc. Word agrts reserves.

RECEIVING END!



AND THAT, MS. MAGEE, IS
WHY WE CALLED IN THE
NARCOTICS UNIT. :

YOU CAUGHT \ YUP. IT WAS PRETTY | THE KID SPILLED HIS
THE PERSON | EASY. RAY JENKINS | GUTS, COULDN'T




















HORRIBLE FOR HER, BUT
NOT SO BAD FOR ME

N

BUT THAT
WOULD BE
HORRIBLE
FOR YOU!!

I AGREE...1 JUST
WANTED YOU TO
HEAR HOW IT
SOUNDED

HONEY, I'M IN THE MOOD FOR A BIG
SANDWICH WITH SALAMI, ONIONS,
PICKLES, SWISS CHEESE,
MUSTARD...









© 2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights reserved



. MADE ME REALIZE HOW
MUCH I MISS MY PET

|

YOU'RE
LEAVING
ALREADY ?

YEAH, I NEED
| TO GET HOME
TO CATRINA, MY

WATCHING YOU
PLAY WITH

www .kinglealures.com

IT WANNA SEN?
A BIRTHOAY CARD
To suzy

HEY, GIVE ME A
RTE ANP TLL
CARRY IT OVER



(©2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. Word rights reserved.

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE

HERNIA, IT MAKES ME REALL L
HERNIA IT MAKES Ne REALLY I JUST LIKE X IT SEEN6 LIKE A

LE HAVING YO. BEING NEAR WATE OF TIME .. I COULD
STARE AT ME WHILE I READ,’ HAWET! UST SITTING ALWAYS TURN
: oe THERE LIKE THAT/ THE cee





FOR YOU...

©2008 by King Features Syndicate, inc. World rights reserved.







CALVIN & HOBBES






WI,DAD/ GUESS Y
WHAT HOBBES
AND T DID!









YEP, WE WERE GOING TD LIVE

THERE BECAUSE EARTH |S

SO POLLUTED, BUT WE

DISCOVERED THAT MARS IS

INHABITED, SO WE CAME
BACK HOME .



Sunday

YOU DIDNT | No, THEY DIDN'T

AFRAID WE'D JUNK
UP MARS THE















Y

WHAT'S MY Good AND CAN YOU
BRIEFCASE
DOING OUT,
AND WHY












Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to



















Puzzle



























Sidney Johnston v Frank Marshall,
Chicago 1899. Marshall was
United States champion for a
quarter of a century, but he
occasionally suffered horrible
defeats, losing, in his own words,
“like a child". tn this early career
game the grandmaster took his
unknown opponent too lightly
and fell into a difficult position.
Marshall's last tum was Ne4xBg3,
hoping for 1 hxg3 Kh8 when Black
fights on, But Johnston secured
his niche in chess history by a
forced sequence which fed to the
ignominy of checkmate. Can you
spot White's winning plan?

~







=
a

27



17 They may be relied upon "1
to fix things when brought
together (4,3,5)

20 ‘It's inclined to attract sight- 15

Bringing down a plane
used for putting troops into
action (7,5)

Absorbed in the system (5)

CRYPTIC PUZZLE | c ~
Across Down .
1 Part of the day in which 1 They don’t believe he Pes ae
there’s no glory (6) requires foreign capital (8) || nee ||
4 Particular mix of ale and 2 They open out for a novice
spice (8) ; (8) fee Peale adie a
9 About three minutes in the 3 Is paid, it’s said, for making |_| Rout "|
"ring (6) large amounts of tea (4) 7
10 Bowlers may hang around 5 They should be carefully eb ee tla |
here, and that's strange (8) rounded, inside and out oz fea |
12. Exclamation of surprise (5,7) -
when doubled up in laugh- 6 o Irish seer is reformed eect
ter (2-2
13 sii 2 50 amps (5) 7 Sort of type inclined to Pt | ||
14 Place it within the borders impress (6) ete || Pe |
of Singapore (4) 8 A snake’s game compan-
ion (6) ei







j seers in Italy (7,5) 16 Situation
; | bs 23 Minerals found in the for- 18 ay (8) He oleetl calle aes
yy est (4) -— i the heat for those who feel
N j 24 It’s worn in one’s car for the cold (8) ww Across ; Down
yy warmth (5) 19 Possibly price a ring — to I 1 Copper-tin 1 Sudden adverse
yy 25 All capital chemists will us it's valuable (8) N alloy (6) reaction (8)
is provide it (4) 21 Being wealthy, was N 4 Very lovely (8) 2 Exceed (8)
yy 0 28 Tie completely round (4,4) charged (6) — 9 Good 3 Nought (4)
iy N 29 Fuss about the French in 22 Happen to be autumn (6) 0. health! (6) 5 Very sad (12)
ay Spain (6) 26 Young bird lacking the > 10 Virtually (2,4,2) 6 Castle in chess (4)
y E 30 Lace tied in a dainty way knowledge to be fashion- wo” 12 Luxuriant (4) 7 Aburrowing animal
Le (8) able (4) x 13 Snake (6)
Le 31 Greek-Cypriot union is 27 It may be proper for a sis- wi poison (5) 8 Without difficulty (6)
one's design (6) ter to admit nothing (4) 14 Cut down (4) 11 An esoteric detail
yj C : . ‘ , . 17 Attract most publicity (12)
R Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution Yesterday’s Easy Solution (5,3,4) 15 Expanse of spilt oil
We : : ‘ 20 Only vulnerable point (5)
| oO Across: 1 Shift, 4 Gelatin, 8 Bit, 9 Across: 1 Lapse, 4 Hogarth, 8 (8,4) 16 To progress without
ey Roadworks, 10 Economy, 11 Oasis, Own, 9 Sauvignon, 10 Scandal, 11 23 Deslaté (4) effort (5)
j S y 13 Thumbs, 15 Anodes, 18 Stern, 19 Fancy, 13 Expert, 15 Placid, 18 24 Confidence (5) 18 Enfeebled b 8)
Z Eardrum, 21 Topiarist, 23 Ado, 24 Press, 19 Canvass, 21 Kiwi fruit, 23 : : y age (
; igh : ; : : ’ 25 Firm 19 Plausible nonsense
Ss Premium, 25 Rests. IOU, 24 Resolve, 25 Scent. hold (4) (8)
La Down: 1 Subject, 2 Introduce, 3 Down: 1 Look-see, 2 Pineapple, 3 8 :
W Torso, 4 Gladys, 5 Lowdown, 6 Tar, 7 Eased, 4 Hourly, 5 Gainful, 6 Run, 7 - Be - ah lo
Noses, 12 Side roads, 14 Bengali, 16 Handy, 12. Nectarine, 14 Restful, 16 we Fi
O S : : person (6) 22 Counterfeit (6)
y ummons, 17 Medium, 18 Setup, 20 Disrupt, 17 Accuse, 18 Poker, 20 30 Crabwise (8) 26 Afresh (4)
R Ole AeC Oe: Noles meee 31 Repressed (4-2) 27 Mental confusion (4)

Difficulty Level *& & *& *&

Yesterday's _
Sudoku Answer







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.



Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number
may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.













©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

The
Target
uses
words in
the main
hody of

Chambers |

2ist
Century

Dictionary

(1999
edition)







Chess: 8689: 1 Ne7#41 Kh8 2 NgGe! bgé 3 hxg3+
Qh4 4 Rxh4 mate.



HOW many words of four Jetlers
or mare can you Make from the
tettors shown here? In making a
word, each letter may be used once
only. Each must contain the centre
letter and there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No plurals.
TODAY'S TARGET |

Good 3i; very good 45; excellent 59
for more). Solution tomorrow.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION

acre alcove atvo Dice brace
caber cable calve care carob
carol carve cave caver celeb
cere vereal clear cleave cleaver
clever clove clover coal cobra
coeval cola cole coral corbel
core cove cover crab crave creel
creole lace oracle race
REVOCABLE yocable voral



East dealer.
Both sides vulnerable.

NORTH
a@ls54
VÂ¥AQ93
O86
&Q 109
WEST EAST
@K.10832 ®AT76
52 ¥I1084
#17 #10943
#K763 42
SOUTH
409
VÂ¥K76
@AK52
RAISS
The bidding:
East South West North
Pass INT Pass 3 NT

cad three of spades.

The outcome of many contracts is
preordained from the time dummy
first. appears. Declarer may have
everything he needs to assure the
contract beyond a doubt, or the
defenders may be certain to emerge
victorious.

The most interesting and instruc-
tive deals — and the ones that pres-
ent the greatest challenge in the play

are those where the outcome
depends entirely on how well or how
badly each side plays.

For example, take the present case
where West led the three of spades
against three notrump. East won the

spade with the ace and returned the
seven, South playing the queen. West
allowed the queen to hold in order to
maintain communication: with part-
ner if East gained the lead again.

Declarer thereupon cashed the A-
Q-K of diamonds and the A-K-Q of
hearts, hoping to find either red suit
divided 3-3. However, neither suit
broke favorably, leaving South a
trick short of his goal and apparently
in need of a successful club finesse.

But South was a first-rate declarer
and saw a much safer alternative.
Instead of attempting the club
finesse, he led the jack of spades
from dummy! This proved to be
exactly the right medicine because,
after West cashed three spade tricks,
he was forced to return a club from
the K-x. As a result, declarer made
three notrump.

Well done by declarer, you could
easily say, but let’s backtrack to trick
two when West elected to duck the
queen of spades. This was the
moment when West unwisely placed
his neck on the chopping block and
subjected himself to what happened
later on.

He should have realized from
South’s opening notrump bid that
there was almost no chance that East
would gain the lead again. West
should therefore have taken his king
and returned a spade at trick three.
Had he done that, South would even-
tually have gone down one.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Ine.
THE TRIBUNE

GN-758



‘SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00613

Whereas PHILIP BARRINGTON STUBBS, of
Meadows Boulevard, Winton Meadows in the Island
of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of FRANCES DORIS STUBBS, late of Tucker
Road in the Western District of the Island of New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00614

IN THE ESTATE OF RENEE M. WENTZ, late of 2184
Southwest Spoonville Drive, Palm City in the State
of Florida, one of the States of the United States of
America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by JAMES LENNOX MOXEY
of West Bay Street in the Western District of the Island
- of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the resealed Letters of Administration in the above
estate granted to ELIZABETH WENTZ, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, by the Circuit Court for
Martin County, Florida, on the 2nd day of August,
2006.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00617

Whereas TOINETTE MAJOR, of Carmichael Road
in the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,

for letters of administration of the Real and Personal.

Estate of ARTHUR MAJOR, late of Berry's in the
Island of Long Island, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION ©
2008/PRO/npr/00619

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF ELIZABETH H. MOORE, late
and domicile of 75 Macadamia Court in the city of
West Palm Beach in the County of Palm Beach in the
state of Florida, one of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made toe the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by FREDERICA GERTRUDE
McCARTNEY, of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-
Law, the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of
Administration in the above estate granted to FATHER
DAVID C. KENNEDY and KIRK GRANTHAM, the
Personal Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit
Court for Palm Beach County, Florida, Probate Division
on the 12th day of July, 2007.

‘Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00620

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF HELEN C. FRANZ (a.k.a. HELEN
CAREY FRANZ), late and domicile of 8401 West
Cypress Drive in the city of Pembroke Pines in the
County of Broward in the state of Florida, one of the
United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by EARL A. CASH, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of The Grant of Letters of Administration
(Single Personal Representative) in the above estate
granted to MARTHA K. DAULA, the Personal
Representative of the Estate, of the Circuit Court for
Broward County, Florida, Probate Division on the 28th
day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00621

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF EDITH MOLLISON (a.k.a. EDITH
W. MOLLISON), late and domicile of No. 175,
Willoughby Street, 8L in the City of Brooklyn, in the
State of New York, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by ANDREW DWAYNE FORBES,
Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Letters Testamentary, in the above
estate granted to LILLITHE E. MEYERS, the Executor
of the Estate, by the Surrogate's Court in and for the
County of Kings, on the 11th day of January, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION
2008/PRO/npr/00622

Oct. 9, 08

IN THE ESTATE OF GEORGE JOHN SCHEJBAL,
late and domicile of 32 Cold Springs, Hunterdon
County Tewksbury Township, New Jersey, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by LUCIA E. BROUGHTON, of
the Western District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealing of Grant of
Letters Testamentary, in the above estate granted to
EDWARD J. SCHEIBAL, the Executor of the Estate,
by the Court of Hunterdon in the state of New Jersey,
on the 6th day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

PROBATE DIVISION Oct. 9, 08
2008/PRO/npr/00623 ,
IN THE ESTATE OF ALPHA SVAFER ROGERS, late
and domiciled of the City of Sundre, in the Province
of Alberta, in the Dominion of Canada, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by STANLEY OSWALD
ANTHONY ISAACS, of East Bay Street in the Eastern
District of New Providence, Attorney-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining
the Resealing of Probate, in the above estate granted
to ALPHA LORRAINE MIDNIGHT, the Executrix of
the Estate, by the Surrogate Court of Alberta, Judicial

- District of Calgary, on the 5th day of February, 2001.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00624

Whereas PATSY CULMER, of Garden Hills No. 1,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration with the Will Annexed of
the Real and Personal Estate of COLLEEN CULMER,
late of Garden Hills No. 1, Southern District, New
Providence, The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 7B

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT :
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00626

Whereas JACQUELINE BURROWS and DEREK
ALEXANDER BURROWS, both of Pineyard Road,
Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of ASHLEY BURROWS, late of Nassau East
North, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00627

IN THE ESTATE OF MAMIE M. BEARD, late of 6239
E. Reno Apt. D Midwest City, Oklahoma 73110, one
of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by KIRKWOOD M. SEYMOUR,
of Sears Road, Eastern District, New Providence, one
of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney in The
Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters
of Administration in the above estate granted to
TERRY BEARD, Personal Representative, of the
Estate by the District Court of Oklahoma County in
the State of Oklahoma, one of the States of United
States of America on the 8th day of April, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS. Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT ”
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00628

Whereas JAMES EDWARD BLAKE III, of Freeport,
Grand Bahama and SHAWN MARIE BAKER, of
Deadman's Gay, Léng.tsland, one of the Islands of |
the Commonweal: of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal
Estate of JAMES EDWARD BLAKE, JR., late of Town
Court, Nassau Street, New Providence, one of the
Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00629

Whereas CLAYTON DEVEAUX, JR., of South Beach
Estates, Southern District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of CLAYTON DEVEAUX SR., late of
Gleniston Gardens, Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be
heard by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days
from the date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
. (for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 9, 08
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00630

IN THE ESTATE OF CARMELO J.°PATTO, late of 14
Comet Road, Syosset, Nassau, in the State of New
York, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of
fourteen days from the date hereof, application will
be made to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas in
the Probate Division by MICHAEL CRAIG ROBERTS,
of Golf Course Boulevard, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized
Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed
Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to MARIE J. PATTO, the Executrix, of the
Estate by the Surrogate's Court of Nassau County,
one of the States of United States of America on the
Ath day of February, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008 THE TRIBUNE









BO O:Y (8




e Tribune



@ By LISA LAWLOR



THE

, INCREASING
AHAMIAN doctors are RuMbeKot
e e b t
preparing to begin further ages
research to determine the De Beliaftes

cult to continue

sweeping the

suffering of °
these women

under the rug.

frequency with which the breast
cancer gene - [BRCA 1 has
been identified as the breast

cancer susceptibility gene] -
occurs in the local population
that has already been diag-
nosed with the disease, The Tri-
bune has learned.

A part of the research team, oncologist Dr John Lunn
told Tribune Health that this study - once funding has been
secured - continues earlier research that took a look at 20
Bahamian women below the age of 50 who were diag-
nosed with breast cancer. Because of the smiall size of the
first study however - with only 20 participants - doctors are
looking for further statistical evidence with which to support

their initial findings.

In the initial study, Dr Lunn and fellow researchers
found that BRCA 1 was present in 14 out of 20 women.

“The most worrying fact about the Bahamian preva-
lence of breast cancer," Dr Lunn said, "is that there are
more cases of young women with breast cancer in our
country than in other countries,"

A third study wiil also be conducted on women who
don't have breast cancer to see how prevalent the gene is
in the Bahamas. This study will test 100 new mothers
because they represent a breast cancer free population.

Explaining the chromosome system of the human body
- some 700 mutations have been found around the world -
Dr Lunn said that in the Bahamas, two have been found
that both relate to breast cancer — the BRCA 1 and the
BRCA 2. The first mutation is believed to have originated
in West Africa and the other here in the Bahamas.

OPTIONS

The increasing number of breast cancer diagnoses in
the Bahamas makes it difficult to continue sweeping the suf-

fering of these women under the rug. At the Surgical Suite

of 68 Collins Avenue, headed by oncologist Dr Charles Dig-
giss, they alone had four diagnoses in September.

This number, multiplied by the numerous private: offices
and oncologists, public hospitals plus women who choose
to seek medical attention in the US, results in a significant
number of Bahamian women suffering, from the indis-

criminate disease.

According to Dr Lunn, who has been practicing in Nas-

sau for 46 years and has seen roughly 100 patients per
year with the disease, said that in the case of breast cancer,

‘i
S\

\

\N\

m@ By DR WEL'MILYA
FRANCIS DDS

SW




Teeth can be sensitive for
numerous reasons. One of the
main reasons that teeth become
sensitive is decay. A tooth with a

Decay spreads along sound
tooth structure with a destruc-
tive pattern. Eventually, sensi-
tivity will become a horrible



dy to




tooth. A tooth with root expo-
sure in the mouth is more sus-
ceptible to sensitivity, as tem-
perature, acidity, sticky-food,



patients should have both breasts removed in a mastecto- ARE your teeth very sensi-

my even if only one is affected. There have been patients
who have even gotten their ovaries removed to be totally
safe of the cancer coming back. With these recommenda-

tive to cold drinks? Do you
‘squirm when you drink your
coffee? Do your teeth bother

tions carried out, the doctor said there is a low chance of

you whenever you eat some-

recurrence at only five per cent.

However there are many who don't follow their doc-
tors recommendations, he said. In both women who have
breast cancer and don't want to confront the fear of return
of the disease, and in women who have a sister, mother or
grandmother who suffered the disease, they avoid testing
far too often and for far too long.

Although there are no confirmed risks in terms of foods
or activities that cause breast cancer, the highest risks Dr

. Lunn listed are as follows:
1) genetics
2) obesity



thing sweet? Do your teeth hurt
whenever you chew? Do your
teeth hurt when you simply
breathe through your mouth?
If there is no severe pain pre-
sent, some people will simply
ignore these sensations because
they only last as long as the
stimulus is on the tooth. Some
make the necessary adaptation
by avoiding chewing on that
side of the mouth. The thought

3) hormone replacement therapy (taking estrogen)
because of menopause symptoms

Looking at the breast cancer risk for men, Dr Lunn said
their risk is extremely low and their cases are rarely seen in
breast cancer studies. And although they do exist, he has
never had a male patient with the disease.



* For more information on breast cancer or the upcom-
ing study, contact Dr Lunn at 325.0734.

IEEE USD SLESSIISSI EPS IDSE RSS RES ees cesses



A brighter future for skin

lm By SARAH SIMPSON

APPEARING on her vaca-
tion yacht in the 1920s looking
bronzed and no doubt fashion-
able, Coco Chanel set forth a
movement that made the dark-
ening - or tanning - of skin a
sign of health and affluence.
From that moment on women
of the 20s had to add tanning to
their demanding “beautifica-
tion” regimens that already
included the bobbing of hair,
binding of breasts and slimming
of the waistline.

Thanks in part to awareness
that UV light leads to advanced
aging and skin cancer, tanning is
falling out of favour as a sign of
health. Consumers worldwide
are more and more interested
in obtaining light, brighter skin.
The main reason why may stem
from market research studies
that indicate that an uneven skin
tone is perceived as “aged skin”
while a more even skin coloura-
tion is judged to be “healthier
and more youthful.”

Traditionally, lightening and
brightening products were pop-
ular in Asian-Pacific and
African regions: currently, the
Asian market leads the world

in the number of products on
the market to treat pigmenta-
tion issues. Asia alone accounts
for 37 per cent of the overall
worldwide sales. As populations
mature globally, pigmentation
issues become more prevalent.
This has tripped an enormous
surge in skin brightening prod-
ucts in the past decade.

BRIGHTER SKIN -
BUT AT WHAT COST?

Hyper-pigmentation is the
result of daylight exposure,
endocrine (hormonal) factors
and changes, usage of prescrip-
tion drugs and wound healing
when skin has been damaged.
No matter how it is triggered,
hyper-pigmentation shows on
skin in the form of brown spots
(also referred to as age spots)
and can cause an uneven, mot-
tled skin tone.

Those looking to brighten skin
often run into two different, dis-
appointing scenarios: the prod-
ucts don't deliver results as
promised or even worse, skin

health suffers at the cost of

brightening results.

¢ Hydroquinone, long consid-
ered a staple ingredient in skin
brightening products, has since

is to try their best to avoid what-
ever causes the pain.

While there is an intuition
that something is not right, the
inclination of many is not to try
to address the problem, but to
avoid it. Sensitive teeth can be
the result of decay, gum reces-
sion and periodontal disease,
cracked teeth, worn enamel or
worn fillings.



been banned in many countries,
and reduced to a level of 2 per
cent in over-the-counter. treat-
ments due to concerns about
skin health and cancer-causing
potential. Treating hyperpig-
mentation without regard to skin
health can lead to sensitivity, irri-

cavity is a tooth with a hole
formed from decay. However, a
tooth may have decay and not
have a visible hole in it.

Decay is the breakdown of
hard tooth structure by bacteria
in the presence of some substrate
(food). The enamel and dentin
of a tooth normally possess some
hardness. Decayed tooth struc-
ture is softer and its presence in
a tooth causes a weakening
effect. So, eating, drinking or bit-
ing serves as a stimulus to trigger
pain and sensitivity in the pres-
ence of this demineralized, bac-
teria thriving tooth structure.

One thing many people are
unaware of is that decay spreads.
It may be tempting to ignore that
small cavity that was diagnosed
one year ago. However, you are
walking with an untimely bomb
in your mouth. Decay will not
just remain localized to one spot
in the tooth as it spreads lateral-
ly.

tation, photo damage, exposure
to potentially dangerous agents

and premature aging.

A NEW ERA IN BRIGHTENING
FROM THE SKIN HEALTH
EXPERTS

Dedicated to results without

toothache with possible infec-
tion and swelling when you least
expect it, or your tooth will just
completely blow out.

Sensitivity could also be the
result of exposed root surfaces.
As explained in the article,
“Why are my teeth getting
longer”, recession, which is gum
loss, can leave the root surfaces
of teeth exposed. Gum loss may
also be associated with bone
loss (periodontitis).

The roots are normally cov-
ered by gum tissue. The cemen-
tum, which is the outer layer of
the root, is not as hard in struc-
ture as enamel, which is the out-
er-most portion of the crown of
a tooth (that part of a tooth that
we use to bite and eat with).
Underneath both enamel and
cementum lies dentin, which is
the least calcified and least hard
of all the tooth layers.

The dentinal layer encases the
nerves and blood vessels of the



compromising skin health, Der-
malogica extensively researched
the latest ingredients, technolo-
gy, searching for ingredients

that would safely go beyond:

minimizing the appearance of
hyper-pigmentation.
The company's research

pressure etc, may stimulate the
nerves in the tooth.

Worn enamel, worn fillings
and cracked teeth also cause
sensitivity. Enamel or a filling
that has some wear increases
the chances that stimuli are’
passed through dentin tubules
and on to the nerves. All the
layers of a tooth contribute to
its structure and have an addi-
tive effect on the protection of
the tooth. Even a crack in one
of the layers interferes with this
effect. Thus, sensitivity may be
felt.

Sensitive teeth are a warning
that something is wrong. Since
some of us have a high toler-
ance for pain, we may simply
ignore it. This sensitivity may
be sporadic, but it should be
treated. Consider tooth sensi-
tivity as the body's way of
telling you that you need to seek
treatment before the condition
gets worse.

uncovered ingredients that
would work synthetically by
preparing skin to optimize
reception of brightening actives,
preventing formation of pig-
mentation on a cellular level
and protecting against further
development of hyperpigmen-
tation caused by environmen-
tal assault.

This research has led to the
development of ChromaWhite
TRx, the only system that rapid-
ly delivers visible brightening
and improved skin tone while
improving skin health. Chro-
maWhite TRx is free of hydro-
quinone, which treats hyper-
pigmentation safely, without the
worry of skin health issues.



+ Sarah Simpson is a skin
care therapist at the Dermal
Clinic. Visit her and her team
of skin and body therapists at
One Sandyport Plaza (the
same building as Ballys
Gym). For more information
about their September Face
Treatment special for all new
clients visit www.dermal-clin-
ic.com or call 327.6788
THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 9B



: TVG

Common causes —
of “foot odour’ —



PREVIOUSLY, lL addressed :
those persons who may have :
discontinued walking and/or }
running as a form of exercise :
due to pain in the foot. The :
response was well received as :
many have indicated an incen- }
tive to return to their former }

routine with proper footwear.

Today, I will address a topic
that I am asked about ona dai- :
ly basis - foot odour, or its sci- |

entific term bromidrosis.

If you are one of many peo- }
ple who suffer from foot odour :
- smelly feet - you are not alone. :
Did you know that most of what :
we call foot odours are actually :
shoe odours? As you will dis- :
cover later, some people are :
more prone to smelly feet, and :
there are a lot of factors that :
contribute to foot and nasty :

shoe odours.

COMMON CAUSES

Among some of the factors }
contributing to foot odour are ;
cleanliness and hygiene habits, :
sweat, and footwear such as
socks and shoes. However, ;
excessive perspiration has been ;
- seen as a significant contribu- ;

tor to this condition.

In technical terms, excessive }
perspiration is known as hyper- :
ridrosis: a rapid production of :
sweat that cannot be evaporat- :
ed as fast as it is produced. ;
When this happens, the shoe's ;
material or parts become satu- ;
rated with moisture. In the per- ;
spiration there is also bacterial ;
waste. You may ask what is this :
bacterial waste? Perspiration is :
body “waste” and has an abun- :

Territorial beh

TERRITORIAL behaviour in dogs
reminds us of their wolf-like ancestors.
This behaviour includes defensive and
offensive territorial aggression, terri-
torial marking - urine, stool, scratch
marks, etc - or territorial investigation.

TERRITORIAL INVESTIGATION

When a dog investigates his territory
it is crucial for their survival. By inves-
tigating its surroundings it provides
information regarding natural
resources, detection of intruders that
would compete for food and water or
threaten the safety of young. Males
tend to explore larger areas than do
females.

*
TERRITORIAL MARKING

Dogs claim their territory by leaving
deposits of urine or stool. Urine may be
voided in a crouching position or a stand-
ing position with a lifted leg. Both males
and females urinate in either position,
though vertical surfaces (trees, lamp

&



poles) are more often targeted by mature
males.

A dog’s walk around the neighbour-
hood is equivalent to the territorial patrol
of its wild relatives - wolves etc.
Unmarked areas as well as previous
traces of other dogs are marked by fresh
deposits of urine or stool.

A dog’s territory includes the area sur-
rounding its home and eventually any-
where your dog has explored.

TERRITORIAL AGGRESSIVENESS

This may begin as a dog approaches
sexual maturity at six months of age,
but may not develop fully until three
years of age. Not all dogs are born with
equal territorial instincts.



MTR a ee






Many pet owners view territorial
aggressiveness as desirable. A dog that
is praised for barking when it is star-
tled by noise outside may eventually
become a good watchdog. For the most
part, however, unless the dog has some
inborn predisposition, it may be difficult
for the average pet owner to train a
reliable watchdog. Still, the intimidating
effect of a large dog’s size may com-
pensate for it sociable nature.

Dog owners can unintentionally
encourage undesirable territorial behav-
iour. Barking and other forms of aggres-
siveness can be reinforced by attention,
even if the attention is negative, such as
scolding. Tolerating objectionable

behaviour is the same as encouraging it.

SOLUTIONS
_If your pet has become a problem,
teach it the limits of acceptable behav-
iour,
e Train your dog to sit and stay when
anyone, including you, enters or leaves

aviour in dogs

the home.

e If necessary use a leash during
training.

e Teaching your dog to assume a
calm and controlled attitude reinforces
its submissive rank. The dog will grad-
ually understand that it need not
defend against or fear visitors.

Territorial defence in males is not

-affected by castration, though this may

reduce the size of their territory and
the frequency of territorial marking.
Other types of aggression - influenced
by sexual hormones - may contribute to
the intensity of territorial aggression
by adding to the dog’s motivation or
to its general state of arousal.

* Dr Basil Sands is a veterinarian at
the Central Animal Hospital. Ques-
tions or comments should be direct-
ed to potcake59 @hotmail.com. Dr
Sands can also be contacted at 325-
1288





TOMATOES for the first crop of the new
growing season should already be in the
ground.

dance of bacteria. In addition, it
is believed that approximately :
98 per cent of this perspiration :
is moisture and 2 per cent is ;
solids - mostly acids and salts. ;
These bacteria thrive on mois- :
ture, warmth and darkness - just :
like bacteria that causes toe fun- :

BULBS AND RHIZOMES planted now
will wait until their appointed season
before producing. You may have to wait
almost a year for gladiolas.



gus.

SOLUTIONS

In terms of cleanliness and :
hygiene habits, wash your feet :
daily and dry thoroughly before :
putting on footwear. Wear only :
clean, absorbent socks. Refrain :
from wearing yesterday's nylons }
or socks just because they smell :
clean. One wear is enough to :
leave behind sufficient foot per- :
spiration for odour-causing bac- :
teria to thrive on. It will be :
enough to leave feet stinky and :
dirty. I repeat, do not re-use :
nylons or socks because they :
appear dry and smell clean, it is :

a big mistake.

Always use a clean pair of :
socks, preferably specially- :
designed cotton or synthetic per- :
spiration wicking fabric to get :
rid of foot odour. For example, :
Thorlos and Balga brands of :
cushioned socks are specially :
designed to provide insulation :
and air flow and wicks away :
moisture to keep your foot from }

getting too hot or too cold.

Footwear is another impor- :
tant factor. When selecting :
shoes it is important to avoid :
shoes or boots with non-breath- :
able upper materials, especially :
closed-type shoes or simply :
tight-fitting shoes. For example, :
leather with its unique internal ;
structure of fibres and inter-fibre :
air spaces, plus its surface pores, :
has excellent breathing capacity. :

Don't allow yourself to be :
embarrassed by foot odour, seek :
the help of a specialist who can :
direct you to the correct :
footwear to address your prob- :

lem.

There is no need to wear two :
or three pairs of socks at once in }
an effort to absorb moisture. }
Invest in a pair of anatomically- :
designed terry cushioned mois- :
ture-wicking socks. There are :
also various types of insoles :
made from moisture wicking :
material that are used to combat :
this problem. And always wear }
shoes with breathable upper :
material as it is extremely
important that this problem be :
addressed, otherwise it can lead :
to more serious foot conditions. :

* Bernadette D Gibson, a :
board certified pedorthist, is the :
proprietor of Foot Solutions, a :
health and weliness franchise :
that focuses on foot care and :
proper shoe fit, located in the :

Sandyport Plaza.

The views expressed are :
those of the author and do not :
necessarily represent those of :
Foot Solutions Incorporated or :

any of its subsidiary and/or affil-

iated companies. Please direct :
any questions or comments to :
nassau @footsolutions.com or :

327-FEET (3338).






OCTOBER has become
my favourite month of the
year. In my younger days I
loved the spring months and
the languid days of summer.
These days I find myself
debilitated by the summer
heat and I look forward to
cooler weather. That will
come towards the end of
October. Shortly after that I
will probably be complaining
about the cold. That’s one of
the privileges of age.

October is a busy month in
the garden. Those gardeners
who started their stock veg-
etables early will be able to
add cool weather crops such
as peas, spinach, cauliflower
and lettuce before the end of
the month. Those who have
left all vegetable growing
until October should experi-
ence optimum conditions and
strong initial growth.

Larger tomatoes tend to
need cool nights in order to
set fruit, usually about 68
degrees or less. Night temper-
atures will be at this stage
before the end of October
and within 60 days - around
about Christmas — the toma-
to-eating season will have
begun.

Root crops such as carrots,
beets and turnips germinate
more readily in cool soil.
October-sown carrots will be
full by February, but before
then there will be thinnings to
enjoy. Beets are best enjoyed
young, probably by January.

Zucchini and other sum-
mer squashes are fast grow-
ers. A hill or two established
early can be added to each
month in order to have a long
growing season without a glut
an any given time. Winter
squashes take longer to
mature. Don’t forget cal-
abaza pumpkin, if you have
the room. ‘

Green beans are amongst
the easiest of vegetables to
grow, particularly the bush
type. To grow pole beans you
will need a form of trellising.
The plants take longer to
grow but are more productive
and give a much larger har-
vest.

Green peas should be start-
ed in late October. Most vari-
eties like to be staked and
this makes picking the pods
easier. Strangely enough,
snow peas are even easier



than regular green peas and
have a longer season of pro-
ductivity.

One important aspect of
cabbage cultivation is the
need for uninterrupted
growth. Whether heading
cabbage, broccoli or cauli-
flower, the growth should be
continuous and the plants
should be fed and watered
well. Most broccoli plants
produce flowerets after the
main head has been cut and
many people enjoy these
more than the head.

By the end of October you
can plant just about any flow-
ering annual with good
chances of success. It’s time
to buy those packets or
seedling trays of impatiens
and petunias, and to experi-
ment with any plant that
catches your fancy.

Bulbs and rhizomes plant-
ed in October will establish
themselves during the cool,
dry season and be in place to
flower whenever their
appointed time comes along.

Flowering shrubs mostly
bloom better in the cooler
months than in summer. For
this reason we should be very
careful about pruning ~ very
little, if at all. Do not prune
poinsettias. They are well
along the way to producing
the material for their distinc-
tive colourful bracts and must
be left alone.

Citrus and fruit trees need
to be fed during autumn and
October is a good time to get
that chore out of the way.
Apply chelated iron in
drench form to the taproots
and apply the appropriate
fertilizer along the drip line
of each tree. The ground
should be thoroughly wet
before adding fertilizer. To
finish the job, wet the leaves
with a minor nutrient spray
that will do wonders for the
health of your trees.

Many of the insects that
troubled us during the sum-
mer months will disappear as
the weather cools down. The
grass will slow down its
growth rate, and that is a true
blessing.

Enjoy October. It is a busy
month, but a very important
one.

+ j. hardy@coralwave.com

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2nd place setting

place setting consists of: 1 dinner, 1 salad, 1 bread & butter

plate; 1 tea cup & saucer (excludes Herend & net items)

BUY 1

Box Set of Stemware -

att oy AAS

‘Oy

2nd Box

(excludes net items)

September 27th - October 13th, 2008

=10)

place setting of Stemware

rs

ete a

ye

2nd place-setting.

place setting consists of: 1 goblet; 1 wine; 1 flute

0

Tel: (242) 393-4002
Fax: (242

(excludes Lismore and all toasting flutes & net items)

Lynn Chase China

& accessories

(| eee '

* must be same or lesservalue > .*

Kelly's "1:

as Mall at Marathon
PACT oars (am eee es Nee) aru)
Riley 9:00am-9:00pm

Sund closed
393-4096 Perel at


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 10



whose

Every sunrise is another pre-sent
opportunity for you to confidently move
your life forward.





MICHELLE M MILLER

WITH the insurmountable amount of
distress about a so. called 'depressed'
economy permeating everywhere, most
people are now operating in panic mode
- seriously blinded by fear rather than
faith.

It may be just me, but I find it baf-
fling that so many folks claim to be walk-
ing by faith and not by sight, yet have no
idea how to connect with the power of
faith when life presents an unusual
dilemma.

The fact is people only think they
know but when it comes to exerting the
power of faith, they seem to have no
idea. But it's ludicrous to think that the
power that actually creates life is some-
how unable or unwilling to support it.

Fundamentally, the power to. solve
life's challenges comes from knowing
that you have the power to solve life
challenges.

This means that you accept that you
are born with the incredible power to
fix, formulate, repair, restore, achieve,
attain, design and create anything that
you want to be, do or have and life sim-
ply says - “when you move, I move”.

The problem here is that most people

have bought into the varied illusions of

lack and limitation which are consistently
perpetrated by scarcity thinking.

It is this type of mindset that builds a
momentum of ignorance, feeding the
delusion that there isn't enough and only



GROUP PHOTO: Members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc in attendance at the Gala Ball. Seated from left are, Cindy Dorsett, chapter president; Delores Smith,
charter member and Norma Jean Tucker, international regional director.

Sorority honours members
for outstanding service

the so called 'strong' will survive - inad-
vertently causing those perceived as
'‘weak' to fall prey to an unfulfilled life of
uncertainty.

No doubt, there is a need for a shift
towards prosperity thinking which
inspires the notion that regardless of out-
er appearances the inner sanctity of life
remains an abundant storehouse of pos-
sibility, ready to supply our every need.

FINAL THOUGHT

As an enthusiastic student of life, I
know for sure that everything that hap-
pens or that fails to happen in life is
directly related to what we believe -
about ourselves and about life.

Ultimately, what you believe becomes
your life. The things you buy into, what
you think, what you listen to, watch,
accept, judge, fear, hate, love, trust and
distrust eventually creates your experi-
ences.

This may seem a far-fetched notion
to some, but whether you believe it or
not the power of life supports your every
command. Your goal is to pay attention
to the kind of commands you are issuing

members - Mrs Muriel Frazier




to life.

Belief is a powerful thing. However, it
is suppose to provide a means of growth
and transformation, consistently allowing
you to move towards a new level of
understanding about yourself and about
life.

For instance, people once believed the
world was flat, but as life provided ne
information there was a shift in thinking
which created a new understanding.

You must therefore find ways to
remain open to life's new ideas and new
information, as they serve to remind you
to constantly reevaluate your thinking -
focusing not so much on who you are
now but on the person you want to be
from now on,

Remember - regardless of emotive
media forecasts, your economic and spir-
itual well-being is competently support-
ed by a greater power. This abundant
power always surrounds you, protects
you, supports you and confidently resides
within you.

Without a doubt, this power of life is
always on your side, the question is -
whose side are you on?

Today is a brand new day; shift your
thinking and make something better hap-
pen.

*Questions/comments are welcome.
Check out Michelle's website at:
www.coachmeforward.com

E-mail: coach4ward@ yahoo.com or
call 429.6770

PO Box CB-13060

Nassau, Bahamas

Years' Award.

you are born with
the incredible power
to fix, formulate,

design and create
anything that you
want to be, do or

have and life simply
says - “when you

ALPHA Kappa Alpha

' Sorority - the Eta Psi Omega

Chapter - marked its 45th char-
ter anniversary last month of
“Sisterhood, Scholarship and

Service” given to the commu-
nity of New Providence.
Acknowledging the amazing
contributions made by four
phenomenal women, all charter



Eneas, Mrs Donna Donaldson-
Towns, Mrs Delores Casey-
Smith and Mrs Shirley Van-
derpool - the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority leaders were
thankful for the vision they
had in chartering the chapter
and the integral foundation laid
down for future generations of
Alpha women.

In recognition of the 45th
charter anniversary, a gala ball
was held at the Sheraton Cable
Beach ballroom. The ladies of
Alpha Kappa Alpha used the
occasion to honour the service
of Fourteen committed and
dedicated persons from other
Greek organisations.

One nominee from each
organisation represented was
selected by a panel of judges
and was awarded with the
chapter's 'Service Through the
Years' Award.

The nominees were:

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity,
Inc members

e Terrance Fountain

e Ricardo P Deveaux, recip-
ient of the ‘Service Through
the Years' Award

e Ishmael Smith, Jr

From the Alpha Kappa
Alpha Sorority, Inc were,

e Laura Pratt-Charlton

e Dianne Seymour

e Rhonda Wright, recipient
of the 'Service Through the

Omega Psi Phi Fraternity,
Inc

e Jonathan C Ford, recipient
of the 'Service Through the
Years' Award

e Sean Blyden

Delta Sigma Theta Sorority,
Inc

¢ Cyndi Williams-Rahming,
recipient of the ‘Service
Through the Years' Award

Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity,
Inc

e Harrison Lockhart

e Kareem C Hanna, recipi-
ent of the ‘Service Through the
Years' Award

Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc

e Nadia Racquel Braynen

e Christie Cash, recipient of
the ‘Service Through the
Years' Award

e Taisha Lloyd

Mrs Mavis Johnson-Collie,
immediate past president of the
Eta Psi Omega Chapter, Alpha
Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc, and
immediate past president of the
Pan-Hellenic Council, was also

erecognized for her leadership
and contribution to the chap-
ter.

Beginning with chapter mem-
bers giving thanks at St Barn-
abas Anglican Church, the gala
ball was the culmination of a

| Passive
aggression
the silent —_















CAUTION! Passive aggres-
sion is the silent killer of your
best laid plans and arduous
efforts at building morale within
your team.

It is all very familiar. You ask a
member of your team to com-
plete a task. They agree to carry
out your request with apparent
commitment. They seem to buy
into the plan and they put on a
show of inspired enthusiasm.
What is really going on in their







repair, restore,
achieve, attain,



along with this so that I can fool

with the plan and that all will be
well."

Their motives for the show of
fakery are:



1. The team member may feel
their ideas or opinions will not
be listened to, so why bother?

2. The member may feel the
team leader was given a job
someone else should have got-
ten so they will set out to prove
the team leader's incompetence.

3. Morale may be low and
employees are not motivated to
get things done.

4. Employees want to appear
to be co-operative to avoid reper-
cussions, but don't agree with the
request.

move, | move”




Sabotage can happen in vari-
ous ways. Here are a few more
examples:



1. Proactive sabotage where
employees methodically plan
their destructive strategies.

2. Strategies where employees
just do nothing and come up with
elaborate, and somewhat logical
reasons for not meeting expec-
tations when the rubber hits the
road.

3. Assigning a project to some-
one else because you don’t want
to do it and it is easy to blame
someone else for not getting the
work done.

i. Passive aggression is a symp-
be atom ofdew morale and morale
hallen’ nges ‘usually take consis-
tent, concerted effort to unravel
so here are a few suggestions:

1. You-ean avoid the effects of
stealthy sabotage caused by pas-
sive aggression by tuning into
members of your team.

2. In compliance circles they
talk about KYC - Know Your
Client. It will benefit you to get to
know and understand your
employees and their patterns so
you are not.blindsided by pas-
sive aggressive behaviour.

3. Identify and develop your
leadership skill gaps. If you are a
manager or supervisor, under-
stand how your leadership style,
integrity and knowledge of your
role affect the rest of your team.
: 4, Ensure you organise yourself
: so you can track delegated tasks.
Remember to follow up consis-
tently and keep in mind that you
should get the facts because con-
sistent follow-up can be thwarted
by inaccurate or superficial
reports.

No plan is fool-proof and some
hard core, "passive aggressives"
are relentless. So here are a few
more tips for leaders facing teams
that demonstrate passive aggres-
series of events which took ; sive behaviour:
place throughout the week. :

Other activities included the ;
launch of the 50 million pound
challenge, a global effort of the
sorority to do its part in the :
effort to lose weight, and a wel- :
come reception on the spec-

tacular Martini X Yacht. The

guest of honour at the welcome }
reception was the internation- :
al regional director Norma
Jean Tucker who flew in from
California to celebrate the ;
occasion with the local mem- :
bers.

Eta Psi Omega chapter has
had much to celebrate this year
as 2008 also marks the centen- :
nial anniversary of the sorority. :
As the chapter continues to cel-
ebrate the sorority's centennial :
anniversary and its 45 anniver- }
sary, the membership, led by :
Cindy Dorsett, president, con- :
tinues to, uphold the ideals of :
the sorority's s founders and the
chapter's charter members.

It.is through sheer strength :
and a commitment to ‘service
to all mankind,’ that the extra-
ordinary service programmes
of the sorority will be imple-
mented. This contribution and
that of the many other service
champions from each of the
Greek fraternities and sorori-
ties in New Providence who
give of themselves, will affect
positive change in the commu-
nity leaving a permanent lega-
cy behind.

e Measure morale using an
employee opinion survey and use
this information to identify the
morale busters. Then, develop
an action plan designed to
address leadership behavioural
gaps in employees’ satisfaction

e Sharpen your leadership
skills

e If all else fails and the situa-
tion becomes intractable - con-
sider making a macro level deci-
sion, (eg, restructure the team,
place employees in appropriate
roles, develop coaching skills and
implement corrective action con-
sistently).



~ Remember, the number one
reason good employees leave an
organisation is leadership. If you
are a leader and you allow toxic,
passive aggressive behaviour to
silently kill the performance of
your team, you will end up being
held accountable or playing the
blame game. Both of these
options are suboptimal so once
you attempt to understand the
reason for the behaviour, seek to
address the root issues.





e Yvette Bethel is the president
of Organizational Soul. She can
be contacted by telephone at
242.424.7100 or tax - 242.324.1631
or write to her at PO Box N-311,
Nassau, Bahamas. Interested per-
sons can also check out her web-
site at: www.orgsoul.com.



minds is..."I will pretend to go .

them into thinking that I agree |

athe canduithinn TARA ea UAReee
THE TRIBUNE TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 2008, PAGE 11B





Baha Mar Resorts Hosts BAHA MAR
| ‘Welcome Back’ Rece “he yn NASSAU, FHE BAHAMAS



Seated f-R} Andrea Myers, First Caribbean; Peter Goudie, Bahamas Supermarkets; Robert D.L. Sands,

Baha Mar; Lottis Shearer, C.O.B.; Richard English, Baha Mar; Leah R. Davis, Baha Mar; Yvette Ingraham, PRESIDENT °S SC HOLARS
J.S. Johnson Insurance. Staading (LR! Jacqueline King, FirstCaribbean; Delia Ferguson; Crystal McCoy; , P RO C RA M M E
Amina Sarr; Lanadia Davis; Deangelo Ferguson; Lowrell Edgecombe; Vaughn Roberts, Baha Mar; é ‘ ? rs
LaKeisha Moncur; Neucasha Greene; Maureen French, Lyford Cay Foundation; Latoya Moncur.

A Special Event for the Scholars
of The College of the Bahamas’
President's Scholars Programme

ye








Baha Mar Resorts Ltd. treated Scholars of the
College of the Bahamas’ prestigious President's



Ree PY es

Vaughn Roberts, Baha Mar VP of Finance; i Monique Toppin, COB Professor and PSP



Felicity Humblestone, COB Director of: Selection Committee; Lottis Shearer, COB S h l P t WW | B k
Development; Maureen French, Lyford Cay Director of Student Leadership; Peter Goudie, Cnolars rogramme to a € COME ac

® . . $e . . a; ew .
Scholarship Foundation ! Bahamas Supermarkets Limited reception to officially start the 2008-9 academic

year. The President's Scholars Programme
is a four-year scholarship and_ personal
development programme designed to identify
a limited number of outstanding students
‘in order to foster their intellectual growth,
refine the leadership skills and enhance their
Robert Sands, SVP Adiminististion andi Extainal | 1 LAK R’ Dave, bilseady of Sani Relations, relationship with The College of the Bahamas.

Affairs, Baha Mar Resorts; Richard English, SVP | | Baha Mar Resorts; Crystal McCoy, Baha Mar’s PSP The Programme which began in 2006.
Sales & Marketing, Baha Mar Resorts Scholar; Robert Sands; Lottis Shearer



Baha Mar Resorts Ltd, a patron of the President's
Scholars Programme also joined hands, with
other patrons including J.S. Johnson Insurance,
FirstCaribbean Bank and Bahamas Supermarkets
in congratulating the students on their outstanding
accomplishments to date and encouraging them
in their pursuit of academic excellence.




C.O.B. Ladies: Monique Toppin;
Yolanda Darville, COB, Development Associate;
Felicity Humblestone; Lottis Shearer

j PSP Scholars: Neucasha Greene, Lowrell Edgecome,
Monique Toppin,Amina Sarr and Delia Ferguson,







a ‘ bs date Vii | i jig) . iat, © e ‘ 7 a é % : re : a * me ee ee _—
Baha Mar's Leah Davis and _ Robert Sands, SVP Administration - _ Recognizing the males participating | C.O.B.'s President's Scholars ‘ Andrea Myers, PSP Donor,
Robert Sands chat with C.O.B.'s and External Affairs, Baha Mar __ in the PSP Programme (Standing L-R) / © FirstCaribbean; Monique Toppin;
President's Scholars i Resorts, shares a few words of Peter Goudie; Robert Sands; i ; Vicente Roberts; Lottis Shearer
» encouragement with the Scholars Rick English; Vaughn Roberts, \

_ . Vicente Roberts (Sitting L-R) PSP
‘ Scholars: Justin McFall, Matthew
Strachan and DeAngelo Ferguson
“ (missing Valentino Rahming)



— ee — ee ie 2 eee
Pa) esti Wah seus

OR the past few years,

TNs) ae a week, Adri-

anna Munnings Wee
start her morning by leading
her kindergarten class in
Rielle MeN (-1 mre Miya ole vars
dents would often stop singin
and start listening as she Fil
their day with melodious
royale

same Way she captured the attention of her class-

room, Ms Munnings mesmerized her church. Now,

alter years of dedication and holding onto a life long

dream, she is on the verge of breaking orito the big
scene.

“its. always been something | wanted to do since |
was a child.” Ms Munnings said of her singing. "When
I write ms songs. | write them from the heart and in all
Baa I put myself and my emotions into it because
that’s how 1 express myself best. ft doesn't matter if lam
happy. frightened or overwhelmed. if 1 don't put it into
Boe hike 1 am adequately doing myself

slice.”

_ A Slellar performer with Andresian roots, Ms
Munnings has been described by many as a singer with
it oinling on her vocal chords.

eee Ber err icayiitcien
Pia Uti ities Lira eer ural beer raver erreaea toe a

Siete seat usta leith elie meemrs rth rom lam reat merg

keeping ic locked away. I've had some dark days in
omy life - tough limes, humble beginnings, heartaches
and heartbreaks - but | know that my brighter day is
“here and that's actually the name of my first single.”

_ Ms Munnings’ plans to mark her musical debut with
E pce eta Le iol the sant sivsbicnden ts nis

} te eons in
iu holies a: Se WALI La

—>

THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7,

a







2008



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