Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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This item has the following downloads:


Full Text
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BAHAMAS EDITION





Volume: 104 No.260

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008



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SPECIAL ay ON PAGE THREE



SOFTBALL NEWS ON PAGE 11



Ta ee ee aie





‘Shabba’ may have.
faked own death’

Police investigate
claims of Daryl
Saunders in
‘disappearing act’
while being sought
by notorious gang

POLICE are actively investi- .

gating claims that Daryl “Shabba”
Saunders may have faked his own
death to escape the same fate if
captured by the notorious Zoe
Pound gang that is actively pursu-
ing him.

It has been suggested that
“Shabba” is being sought by the
Haiti-and-Miami-based gang in
connection with a shipment of
cocaine that was stolen by a group
of men in the Kemp Road area.

The drugs allegedly belonged to
the Zoe Pound, which is notori-
ous for its violent and ruthless tac-
tics when dealing with both ene-
mies and associates.

It is with this in mind, a Nassau
Village source said, that Shabba
gained access to a body from the
local mortuary which was then
mutilated and dumped in the back
trunk of his brand new vehicle,
which he then burned to the
ground.

It was claimed that the body was
found by police minus the head
and hands, an attempt to avoid
accurate identification.

While some sources in the
RBPF believe that the body in the
trunk of the car “could be” that of
Saunders, they admit that they
have yet to positively identify it.

Meanwhile, sources in both Nas-
sau Village and Fox Hill say that
stories of Shabba’s “disappearing

SEE page eight

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reduce staff’ if economy softens

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MAJOR retailers are monitoring
the impact the credit crisis in the
United States will have on the local
economy, but say they are deter-
mined to remain loyal to staff and
fiot reduce employment if the econ-
omy softens.

Representatives from Kelly's
Home Centre and the Super Value
chain of stores said they will not spi-
ral into "panic" as pundits specu-
late on the fallout from the US
House of Representatives’ refusal
of a $700 billion bailout plan for



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sinking financial institutions.

But one merchant said if the
tourism sector continues to decline
because of the US’ financial woes,
he will reluctantly have to reduce
his staff's work week.

Andrew Wilson, President and
CEO of the Quality Group of Com-
panies which include John S
George, Radio Shack, QBC and the
Apparel Group, blamed the "fright-
ening trend" of lowered sales, high
overhead costs, and a lackluster
tourism performance on the deci-
sion.

"It's (the slowdown in the US
economy) having an impact on
retailing in general. Every merchant
that I speak to, speaks to the fact
that retail sales are down substan-
tially. That, coupled with the (rise in)

the cost of electricity, is really cre- -

ating a tremendous amount of hard-
ship for retailers.

"We have a lot of people in the
tourism industry that are working
two days, three days and that has
an impact throughout the economy.
Added (to) the high cost of gaso-
line, the high cost of electricity, the
rising costs in the supermarkets —
the disposable income that people
have at the end of the day for things
(non-staple) items is declining," he

said. Mr Wilson, who employs 150
Bahamians throughout his chain of
stores, is considering how to reduce
the brunt of the economic slow-
down.

SEE page eight

CLAIRE HEPBURN is sworn in yesterday as a Supreme Court Judge at Government House. Looking on
is Governor General Arthur Hanna.

Major retailers ‘determined not to |



SEE page eight |

(tirz



Conflicting accounts
UAT Ta

murder circumstances
er PC



@ By MEAGAN
REYNOLDS &
CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporters

CONFLICTING accounts
of the circumstances surround-
ing Mario Miller’s murder,
which accused Ricardo Miller
submitted to police, were read
in the Supreme Court by
Detective Sergeant Michelet
Meronard yesterday.

Ricardo Miller, 32, also
known as Tamar Lee, a fisher-
man off Queen's Highway,
South Andros, told Det. Sgt
Meronard in his statement on
June 27, 2002, that two men he
did not know attacked Mario
Miller with a knife.

However, in his second state-
ment taken on June 30, Lee
said the men who fatally
stabbéd Mario Miller were
“Anwar” and “Pretty”, two
people he involved in the drug
deal with Mario Miller and a
man named “Marco” who he
described as Mario’s friend,

Mario Miller, 28, at the time *
of his murder, of Sassoon Dri-
ve, Winton, was found lying
‘face down in the grass on the
west side of Super Value in



* the Bahamas yesterday pre- |

. Ican economy starts to pick

‘BIC cut pay of |
514 staff over
industrial action

@ By ALISON LOWE .
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FIVE hundred and fourteen Bahamas Telecommunications Work-
ers have had their pay cut in response to the industrial action they took
in protest over their role in BTC’s privatisation talks in August.

Vice President of Marketing and Sales at BTC, Marlon Johnson, said
he did not know the total value of the pay cuts.

BTC management announced the move yesterday, adding that
“due process” is still to be followed in determining in what way staff
members who used BTC vehicles to block downtown Bay Street and

Freeport will be sanctioned.

Previously Chairman Julian Francis had suggested suspensions

may be in order for such workers.

Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union president
Robert Farquharson did not return phone calls ne comment yes-

terday.

Worst effects of the US
economy ‘not yr upon us’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FINANCIAL minds in

di¢ted that it could be any-
where from several months
to a year before the Amer-

up again — with the worst
not yet upon us.

While most point first to
those employed in the
tourism industry as need-
ing to pay most attention
to the Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ Monday warning
that consumers must cut
back on unnecessary spend-
ing and debt acquisitions to
protect themselves, most
agree all Bahamians will be
affected to some extent by
our Northern neighbour’s financial
meltdown.

“The Central Bank is giving peo-
ple some wise advice to not make
unnecessary expenditures because
you need to save to take care of
your necessities like getting to work,
paying your light bill and feeding
yourself,” said Dionisio D’Aguilar,
President of the Chamber of Com-

merce,

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INCOME DROPS $2,000

LESS 101 BUY CARS, FURNISHINGS,

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“The unfortunate thing
is a lot of citizens in this
country are extremely over
leveraged and they’re prob-
ably up to their eyeballs in
debt and its kind of hard to
cut back or to reduce con-
sumption.”

Minister of State Zhivar-
go Laing said he thought
the Central Bank had
offered “prudent advice...I
| think it’s reflective of their
recognition that the cir-
cumstances require that
kind of prudence. And I
believe that people should
heed the warning.”

“Across the board... it
makes sense to exercise
financial prudence that
doesn’t really put one at
risk of really jeopardising
one’s quality of life,” he
said.

The bank’s advice came in the
wake of the failure of the United
States Congress to pass a “bail out”
package which its supporters said
would help to return American
financial markets to some degree
of normalcy, thereby creating
opportunities for businesses and
consumers to borrow money again.

SEE page eight










CHEESE e Ham & CHerEse

Ewioy a

Regular Sub :

Fer onty







PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



| Troyniko
| McNeil in |

\

brief court
Ely ieteheee ©

&

Troyniko McNeil, who was
arrested in connection with the
murder of well known hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor,
appeared in court briefly yesterday for a preliminary inquiry.

The Attorney General is considering a Voluntary Bill of Indict-
ment, which could send the case directly to the Supreme Court.
He is scheduled to appear in court again on November 4.

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WHAT WILL THE CURRENT STATE OF
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THE US ECONG










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UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES BY NEARLY 1 PER CENT

Average household
income drops $2,000

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamian household’s
average income has dropped by
about $2,000 since last year.

And the ranks of the unem-
ployed has grown by more than
12 per cent, while the unem-
ployment rate has increased by
nearly one per cent, the Depart-
ment of Statistics revealed in its
annual Labour Force and
Household Survey.

According to this latest
labour force and household
report released yesterday,
although the labour force has
grown by 2.9 per cent — 5,490

‘persons compared to 4,985 in

2007 — the total number of
unemployed Bahamians has
increased by 12.4 per cent.
With household incomes
dwindling, and unemployment
increasing, a Central Bank offi-
cial said that these changes
reflect the overall economic
condition of the country.
According to the official,
“Most likely the household

LABOUR FORCE AND HOUSEHOLD SURVEY



income changes are going to be

summarizing something that’s
already happening in the econ-
omy. So I think in this case,
there’s a cause and effect.”

“T think a fair interpretation
of the data is that it’s reflecting
a response within the economy
with all the developments that
are taking place internationally

. if you have a continued
growth in the number of per-
sons who are entering the
labour force, unless you are see-

ing growth in job creation or.

employment at the same rate,
you will see an increase in the
unemployment rate.”

The report also indicates that
women are the new driving
force behind the growth in
labour, having a 64 per cent
greater representation — 3,105

women — than men who rep-

resent 36 per cent or 2,430.
Additionally, the rate of

unemployment has changed

from 7.9 per cent in 2007, to 8.7

Laptop thieves have Cable residents on high alert

per cent in 2008. In New-Provi-
dence, the unemployment rate
is reported to have increased
from &.0 to 8.7 per cent, and in
Grand Bahama from 8.8 per
cent to 9.0 per cent-during the
same period.

The report also shows that
private household ownership
increased by 1.4 per cent.
Whereas in 2007, private house-
holds numbered 106,460, this
number has now increased by
some 1,535 private households.
It was also revealed that 60 per
cent of these homes were head-
ed by men.

For 2008,-the new statistics
showed that the average house-
hold income has dropped from
$45,221 in 2007, to $43,427 —
a decrease of $1,794 in 2008.

In New Providence, this
report implies that the average
household income is now $1,471
lower than last year’s, and
$4,840 lower in Grand Bahama.



A string of break-ins and thefts in the Cable
Beach area have residents on high-alert,
according to reports reaching The Tribune.

Although police did not confirm the crimes
up to press time last night, sources claim that
over the last few months, persons living in con-
dominiums in the area were robbed of expen-
sive electronic equipment, particularly laptop
computers, after burglars gained access to their
homes.

The two latest incident were said to have
taken place two nights ago in one of the towers
at Delaporte Point. The culprit or culprits were
thought to have actually scaled the building to
gain access to the penthouse apartments.

"We got a letter from our condo manager '

recently, saying there was a string of robberies
on Cable Beach and warning us to be careful
who we buzz into the complex and to make









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said a resident of the Towers of Cable Beach,
who asked to remain anonymous.

. An officer from the Cable Beach Station
contacted by The Tribune was tight-lipped on
the issue of crime in the area, saying he was
unauthorised to comment.

He would only say that Officer-in-Charge of
the Cable Beach station Chief Superintendent
Berkie Wright, who was said to be out of office
yesterday, will release a statement today on
the reported string of break-ins and thefts in the
area.

Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans said he had not been briefed
on an increase of break-ins or robberies in the
Cable Beach area, but said he would look into

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Pair hailed —
after denying
fraud charges

TWO individuals who
appeared in court yesterday
were charged with five counts
of conspiracy to commit fraud
by false pretenses, one count
of possession of a forged doc-
ument and one count of utter-
ing a false document.

Jamie Richardson, 24; of
Fire Trail Close and James
Winter of Tropical Gardens
both pleaded not guilty to all
seven charges and were grant-
ed bail in the amount of
$7,000 each, with one surety.

One of the charges alleges
that on September 12 they had
in their possession a forged
document identified as a Com-
monwealth Bank cheque in
the amount of $35,000, know-
ing the “same not to be gen-
uine.”

It was also alleged that on
the same day they obtained
from Scotia bank, Rawson
Square $9,000 cash by false
pretenses. Further, it was
alleged that on September 13
they obtained $1,000 cash
from Scotia bank, Rawson
Square, by false pretenses, and
another $1,000 from the same
bank on September 14.

Counts seven charges that
the individuals obtained
$19,000 from Scotia Bank,
Rawson Square by false pre-
tenses. Richardson and Win-
ter’s case was adjourned until
October 2.

Woman arrested in
connection with
firearm possession

A 30-year-old woman was
arrested on Monday in connec-
tion with the possession of an
illegal firearm.

Shortly before 6pm on Mon-
day, officers from the Southern
Division police station conduct-
ed a.search of a private resi-
dence on West Street. Press liai-
son officer Assistant Superin-

_tendent Walter Evans told The

Tribune-that police found .ax38°""*

handgun in the house. The
woman is expectéd to’ be for-.
-mally charged as early as today. ~






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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 3



Rotary luncheon
with minister
is postponed

A SPECIAL Rotary luncheon }
meeting with the Minister of ;
Tourism has been postponed 1 in :
light of the continuing financial :
uncertainty in the United States. ;

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace :
had been expected to speak on }
the topic “Towards a Strategic }
Business Plan for The Tourism }
Sector” at the joint luncheon for :
all Rotary Clubs today, with pro- :
ceeds going to Rotary’s Inagua :

relief fund.

The event was jointly organ- :
ised by Rotary, the Bahamas :
Chamber of Commerce and the :
Nassau Tourism Development }

Board.

However, public relations com- }
pany Visionaire Marketing con- :
firmed yesterday that, like Mr :
Vanderpool-Wallace’s scheduled :
“Meet the Minister” press inter- :
view that was to be televised on :
Monday, the event has been can- :

celled.

Visionaire Marketing said this }
is until the “economic situation in :
the United States has been sta- ;

bilised.”

On Monday a release to the :
media said that the press meeting :
with Mr Vanderpool Wallace :

* where he was due to unveil an }
“aggressive plan of action” for ;
the nation’s number one industry ;

was postponed.

The reason given was that the :
“present financial crisis” in the :
United States and financial bail :
out failure had caused advisers :
to “reshape its plans to ensure :
the Bahamas remains on the cut- }

ting edge”.

RM Bailey Class
of 1988 meeting

ALL ALUMNI of the RM :
Bailey Class of 1988 are being :
urged to attend a “very impor- }
tant” meeting at 7pm tonight at :
the school on Robinson Road. :
Plans for the upcoming class :
banquet will be discussed and :
tickets will be available for sale. :

* Call 302-2783 for more details.

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Straw market to be rebuilt on original site

FNM propose to
spend $18 million
less than PLP plan
The Tribune
REPORT

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter



alowe@tribunemedia.net ,

THE government has budgeted
around $5 million to build a new
straw market on the original site
that could house around 400 ven-
dors and an architect is in, the
process of completing designs for
a revitalised downtown area that
could see Rawson Square turned
into a “green space”.

The green space, which will
incorporate more trees, grass and
other landscaping, will either be
accomodated on an extended
area encompassing Rawson
Square, or on the site where the
straw market tent currently exists
now.

This was revealed by Earl
Deveaux, minister of the envi-
ronment who is standing in for
minister of works Neko Grant.

It involves an adjustment to
plans he had set in motion earlier
this year to have a green space
located on the original Straw
Market site.

He said these initial plans have
been put off “to maintain a sense
of civility” between the govern-
ment and straw vendors.

“We were concerned about
completing the green space and
further inflaming the straw ven-
dors and leading to an issue about
whether (the new market) would
or would not be done, so just to
maintain a sense of civility we will
put the hoarding back and once
we get the design drawings com-
plete we will do the green space
on the alternate site”

Budgeted at $5 million, the
roughly 400 capacity straw market
that the government is planning
will cost over $18 million less than
the proposed market for which
the former government had
entered into a contract and which
the FNM administration con-
demned as too costly.

As the present government
also plans to build, an “authentic

Employment Opportunity

Local Media House is accepting
applications for
Broadcast Journalist / News peperter

The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:

¢ Minimum of 2 years experience
* Must have a good understanding of News

Gathering & Production

* An awareness of current affairs both locally and

globally

¢ Must be an enthusiastic self-starter
¢ The ability and willingness to learn ©

¢ Own transportation

Please submit resumes to:
Patty Roker’

Director of News

Island 102.9 FM
Edmark House

Dowdeswell Street
P. O. Box N-1807

Nassau, Bahamas

Email: reporter@islandfmonline.com

ax (242) 356-4515










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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

TOURISTS walk past the original straw ME CSIC



craft market” at the western end
of the Prince George dock, some
of the vendors who sell such gen-

uinely Bahamian wares will be’
able to operate from those |

premises.

According to Mr Deveaux, at
present — “depending on the day”
— the tented market site contains
anywhere between around 400 to
800 vendors.

Right now the Ministry of
Works is moving to level, contain
and hoard the straw market site
again after numerous panels that
were hiding it from view were
taken down, apparently by people
looking for shutter material dur-
ing the recent hurricane scares.

According to Dr Deveaux, new
designs for downtown have been
drawn up based on the feedback
from a number of interactive con-
sultations that have taken place
over the last four to eight months.

Built into the designs is the idea
that the Woodes Rodgers Wharf

Bahamians are borrowing less to buy

could be extended by as much as

30 feet into the harbour, depend-

ing on how much material is»

dredged from the harbour dur-
ing the exercise to deepen that
waterway.

“There were a number of
meetings over the last four to
eight months but concentrated
more in the last five months. We
took a trip to Delray Beach (Palm
Beach county, Florida) to see
how they improved their down-
town area and Jackson Burnside
was hired by the downtown
development association,” said
Mr Deveaux.

He said the moves by govern-
ment and the association were
based on a sense that while there
are proposals afoot to improve
downtown, coming from private
developers and government, what
needs to be determined before
this happens is how it can be done
in a “sensible, cohesive way.”

“When our government passed

cars, furnishings, domestic appliances

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WITH economic activity slowing,
Bahamians have borrowed signifi-
cantly less money to buy private cars,
furnishings, domestic appliances and’
land this year than in 2007, the gov-
ernor of the Central Bank said yes-
terday.

However, at the same time more
and more Bahamians are resorting
to using credit cards to fund their
lifestyles — to the extent that credit
card debt has increased by some $9
million this year, in comparison to a
lesser increase of $5 million during
the same period last year.

Meanwhile, the public has moved
in greater numbers to consolidate
their debts in 2008 — taking out loans
to pay off other loans, ‘according to!
Governor Wendy Craigg.

“Debt consolidation has increased
by some $48 million compared to
some $28 million in previous years ...
so certainly consumers have increased
the consolidation of their debt to
improve their financial situation,” she
said.

The slowing in consumer credit
growth comes after a two year period
of “above average, double digit”
growth.

It shows that Bahamians are
already to a certain extent trying to
cut back on their spending, as the
Central Bank advised them to do ear-
lier this week in light of the ongoing
credit crisis and economic turmoil in
the United States in particular.

This may be because, as Ms Craigg
and Dionisio D’ Aguilar, president of
the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
say, consumers in this country are
more or less “borrowed up” at this
stage, burdened with debt.

Growth in private sector credit -
the amount of money borrowed by:
private companies — has also fallen
from 14.4 per cent in 2006, to 9.7 per
cent in 2007, down to 4.6 per cent in
2008.

Ms Craigg said that the reduction,
in private sector credit growth gives
an idea of the slowing of the economy
overall.

“Tt gives you an appreciation for

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the evolution of credit, the slowing
in credit growth. (Credit growth, or
lack thereof) follows the same pat-
tern as the rate of growth in the econ-
omy ... it tracks economic activity.”

Ms Craigg told The Tribune that
Bahamian external reserves are up
43 per cent this September compared
to the same time last year at around
$650 million, meaning that Bahamian
banks have a healthy capacity to lend
— unlike American banks.

In a statement issued on Monday,
the Central Bank said the stability of
the domestic financial sector is not
threatened by the current turmoil in
the United States — a positive assess-
ment among a cascade of negative
verdicts in recent weeks.

the Downtown Revitalisation Act
a number of proposals came up
for redevelopment, so we asked
the question, ‘Okay, what do we
do with the improvement? We
need some kind of framework to
put it in’. Klonaris is doing some-
thing, Symonette is doing some-
thing, Bethel is doing something
and you know there are the issues
of parking, taxis, pedestrian walk-
ways and greenspace, how do you
accomodate that in a sensible

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cohesive way?”

“The drawing that Mr (Jack-
son) Burnside has done shows the
trip off the cruise ship into Festi-
val Place around the craft mar-
ket and around the water. That’s
an easy walk, there’s alot of trees,
alot of pedestrian walkways, more
friendly parking and landscaping
and essentially corridors from
Charlotte Street, Frederick and
Parliament street migrating onto
Bay street,” he said.

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PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Keep quality of Bay Street stores

IN ANSWER to retailers’ requests that the
extra five per cent increase in stamp tax on
such luxury items as perfumes, cosmetics and
leather goods be removed to allow competi-
tion, State Minister for Finance Zhivago Laing
replied that merchants will have to “justify”
their arguments for such “remittances.”

Before, we go any further we must let our

- readers into the little secrets of how words are
“spun” and played with in the business of
tourism.

The big sellers in the tourist market are “duty
free” items. Tourists flock to “duty free” coun-
ters thinking they are getting a bargain. What
they don’t know is that nothing is duty free,
it’s just in the name. Persons in business in this
country pay stamp tax in addition to Customs
duty on all imported items. However, luxury
goods retailers — so that they can continue the
duty free sales pitch — pay no duty. Instead
their “duty” is called “stamp tax.” Whereas
most of us pay 7 per cent stamp tax plus duty
that varies with the item purchased, there is
only stamp tax on luxury items — nothing that
is called “duty.”

Years ago that tax was as low as one to two
per cent. Today it is 20 per cent. Government
has since raised the stamp tax to 25 per cent.
This means that there is no longer any incentive
for cruise passengers to leave their ships to shop
in Nassau. Bay Street prices‘are now the same as
those in the cruise ship’s boutiques. This is why
luxury goods retailers are asking for a “remit-
tance.” As one of them said: “This extra five per

_ cent could just be the killer!”

There are those who believe that some of
them will be forced to scale down and eventually
go out of business.

How times have changed! Years ago Bay
‘Street’s luxury stores were the drivers of the
tourist industry. Bay Street was a shopping mec-
ca for northerners.

Americans shopped here for their perfumes,

' linens, cashmeres, doeskins, china and leather
goods, which were indeed practically duty free
and so. much cheaper than in the US.

We remember a group of doctors, who made
at least two trips a year to Nassau — no, not to
gamble at the Bahamian Club, but to fill their
cellars with a wide range of alcoholic bever-
ages that would carry them through their Christ-
mas and New Year’s parties and were prized
Christmas gifts for friends. Even with the plane
fare, shopping for their beverages in Nassau
was a tremendous bargain. They were not the
only ones. This was a common practice with
Americans.

Likewise the shopping for luxury items —
either not available or too expensive in the US

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— were bargains on Bay Street. Our parlia-
mentarians probably don’t remember many of
the shop names that have now disappeared
from the main street.

There was the Old English Store, well known
for its English woolens, cashmere sweaters, doe-
skin gloves and smart Burberry coats, among
many other fine English goods. The Men’s Shop,
owned by the late Fred Sands, uncle of Sir
Stafford Sands, had all of the finest English
goods for men. This store has changed hands
several times. From being known later as_ the
Nassau Shop it is now John Bull. There was Sir
George Robert’s City Gift Shop, managed by
his wife, which carried the finest English, Irish
and European china, silver and crystal. Treasure
Traders with its fine crystal and silver is gone as
is Bernard’s, well known for its English china
and fine line of Wedgwood. In the last article we
wrote on Bernard’s, a spokesman for Wedg-
wood boasted that Bernard’s — because of its
American clientele — was way ahead of all of its
international stores in sales. Wedgwood also
kept Bernard’s stocked with the widest range of
its products.

There was also the Pipe of Peace with its
Dunlop pipes and wide range of tobacco. There
were many other stores, all noted for low priced
luxury items that kept the tourists coming. Most
of them are now a part of history. The only one

' left is Bakers, today the oldest store on Bay

Street in which can still be found items thaf are
sold nowhere else in Nassau.

These shops were so important to attract
tourists that they were included in many travel
articles promoting the Bahamas.

We remember the days when our father, Sir
Etienne Dupuch, was the Bahamas correspon-
dent for the New York Times. The Develop-
ment Board could get nothing published in the
grand old Times, because of its strict policy of
not accepting any information from public rela-
tions firms, especially those tied to govern-
ments.

So Sir Etienne’s good friend Howell Rees of
the Development Board would give Sir Eti-
enne the news releases — often containing the
shopping delights of Bay Street — and these
releases would be published in The Times.
Through Sir Etienne even Nassau’s daily weath-
er was published in The Times.

However, with government’s plan to revi-
talise Bay Street we would suggest the minister
sit down with these merchants and hear their
side of the story.

It would not be amusing if we ended up with
a physically attractive Bay Street, but few qual-
ity shops. Bay Street will have truly earned its
name: Tee Shirt Junction.



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Rosetta

St Cecilia are

committed to

Paul Moss
being our MP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We in St Cecilia have made
up our minds.

We have searched high and
low, looking for a leader to
represent us.

We need a leader with back-
bone, not one who quickly
genuflects.

We cannot let our emotions
prevent us from selecting

someone who not only is will- '

ing but able to transform our
constituency.

We deserve much more.
Other constituencies have pro-
gressed considerably, except
us. The cold facts are that we
always voted PLP.

With all due respect to
Mother Pratt, St Cecilia has
not made much progress.

The people still are not bet-
ter off.

We can make the mistake
and fool ourselves by selecting
a new candidate, or we can let
the people in St Cecilia deter-
mine which one they really
want.

There has been much talk
about the blessing of Paulette
Zonicle by Mother Pratt, but






DaeMes

letters@tridbunemedia.net

that is only speculation.

The PLP is far too wise to
risk using any tactic that will
only seek to divide the peo-
ple by not following the peo-
ple’s wishes.

This is the time; this is the
defining moment where poli-
tics as usual must be discour-
aged.

This i is the time for “real
men” to come to the fore and
be counted.

The length of time in the
PLP or the association or con-
nection with the hierarchy
should not be the criteria by
which a choice is made.

We, in St Cecilia have
already made up our collec-
tive minds. We have seen the
commitment and determina-
tion of Paul Moss.

He is sincere and makes
himself available for us under
many different circumstances.

He loves the youth and
relates to our needs.

He is easy to talk to and
does not talk down to us. He is
a fighter and will not hesitate
to defend St Cecilia at all cost.

His intentions are good. He
is always available and :we love
him.

We have made up our
minds. We are now committed
to Paul Moss and will not stop
until he is the Member of Par-
liament, regardless.

What is so interesting is he -
is attracting FNM and other
undecided to his cause.

His mission to transform St
Cecilia has us looking forward
to his service as an MP.

We want Mr Christie to
take this letter seriously.

We will not be bullied into
accepting what we do not
want.

We will not let the games
that are played in Gambier
House prevent St Cecilia from
moving forward.

We promise to stay behind
Paul Moss until the end, the
very end.

GENE FERGUSON
Nassau,
September, 2008.

Christie isn’t shuffling so
much as begging for unity

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When my Uncle Lou used
to visit from the States, we
always smiled when he would
say in amazememt, “Well shut
my mouth!”

We figured he picked that
up working on the contract
over there.

If he were alive today I
think he would say “well shut
my mouth,” again at the
strange happenings in the PLP
these days.

. Perry Christie ain’t shuffling
so much as begging for unity.

. The same man who nearly

tore this nation apart with his
party’s election courting and
election campaigning after we
vote dem out can today call
for unity!

SSS





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What really does he seek
unity in?

Getting him elected as his
party’s leader?

D’en there’s that one who
think a wife can make him
leader, and the other who fig-
ures we be fooled if he takes
on the garb. of an Obama.
That’s just it, they don’t get
it.

The FNM allowed us to be
better educated, wiser, more
widely travelled and we can’t
be blinded easily anymore by
sweet talk and a few “yankee

dollars,”
again!

Why, I feel sure Uncle Lou
would laugh in his loud and
grumbly voice and shout that,
“dis PLP sure gone down hill
from the first election when
they stood for something
besides, money, greed and
arrogance.’

And I don’t, believe it’s just
Uncle Lou who feels that way.

quoting Uncle Lou

PATIENCE SMITH
Nassau,
September 19, 2008.

Front page headline was
extremely insensitive

‘

- EDITOR, The Tribune.

I found your front page headline “Leslie Miller breaks down
on witness stand” in last night’s edition extremely insensitive.

And it was cheap and tacky.

Who wouldn’t “break down” testifying in the murder trial of

‘one of their children?

I think The Tribune owes Mr Miller and his family an apolo-

gy:

TONY DUNCOMBE
Nassau,
September 18, 2008.

"MAINS RENEWALS

Sans Souci to Fox Hill Road

The Water and Sewerage Corporation advises its
customers and the general public that the
Corporation has begun mains renewal work on
the Eastern Road from Fox Hill Road to San Souci

for a period of eight (8) weeks.

Motorists are

asked to avoid the area as much as possible.



The Corporation apologizes fgr the inconvenience
caused and reminds its customers this is an effort
to improve their water supply.



THE TRIBUNE



© In brief

2008-2009
stonecrab
season opens
on October 16

The Department of Marine
Resources is reminding the
pubic that the 2008/2009 :
stonecrab season will open on .
October 16.

It will continue until May
31, 2009.

The department said: “Dur-
ing the stated period, fishers
are reminded that it is illegal
to take, buy or sell any female
stonecrab.

“Also, fishers are reminded
that all harvested stonecrab
claws must measure more than
four inches in length.

“It constitutes an offence
against the Fisheries Regula-
tions to take, have in your
possession, buy or sell any
stonecrab claws of which mea-
sures less than four inches.”

The department said the
stonecrab industry continues
to play an important role to
the fisheries of the Bahamas,
adding hundreds of thousands
of dollars to the economy.

Fishermen were advised to
adhere to the rules or “face
prosecution to the fullest
extent of the law”.

Embassy to

shut for Chinese
National Day
Holiday

The Chinese Embassy locat-
ed on Village Road will be —
closed today, October 1,
through Friday, October 3, in
observance of the Chinese
National Day Holiday.

China’s National Day is the
anniversary of the founding of
the People’s Republic of Chi-
na in 1949.

Celebrations usually take
the form of parties at amuse-
ment parks by day and fire-
works and special televised
presentations during the
evening.

Many Chinese people have
enjoyed the week-long vaca-
tion since 1999 and use the
occasion to take short excur-
sions to enjoy the beauty of
the ‘golden Fall.’

Bahamas Faith
Ministries makes
donation to help
hurricane victims

BAHAMAS Faith Min-
istries donated atotalof |
$12,500 to various agencies
with responsibility for helping
victims of the recent hurri-
canes. This included $4,000 for
the National Emergency Man-
agement Agency (NEMA),
$2,000 for the Bahamas
Methodist Conference for
Haiti, $2,000 for the Bahamas
Red Cross and $4,500 for the
Bahamas Christian Council
for Inagua, Mayaguana and
Turks and Caicos.

BFM also partnered with
Gems and friends in their ini-
tial hurricane aid to Turks and
Caicos, offering 55 boxes of
food and water.

The cheque presentations
were made last week by pas-
tors Richard Pinder and Hen-
ry Francis.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Ue
EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
a ade Yd

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008,-PAGE 5

EGO @ tty

tee ea

Govt proposes to phase out commercial harvesting totally by April 1 next year

THE government has
announced that it will enhance
the protection extended to marine
-turtles found in Bahamian waters.

This decision comes after
intense lobbying by animal rights
activists, who say far too many
rare turtles are cruelly killed by
fishermen every year.

' Several cases also emerged in
which fishermen were capturing
turtles and holding them in
painful conditions in an effort to
force concerned citizens to “save”
the animals by paying top prices
for their release. .

The government said the deci-
sion is part of its commitment “to
pursue appropriate conservation
policies:‘and strategies so as to
safeguard the marine and terres-
trial environment.

“This also responds to concerns
expressed by citizens and by local
and international non-govern-
mental organisations to the goy-
ernment of the Bahamas calling
for strengthened protection of
marine turtles in the Bahamas,”
said the government in a press
release.

Already, the World Conserva-
tion Union (IUCN) considers all
marine turtles, globally, to be
either “threatened” or “endan-
gered”.

The listing of marine turtles
under Appendix I of the Con-
vention on the International
Trade of Endangered Species of
Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES),
to which the Bahamas is a party,
prohibits international trade in
turtles and their by-products
except under strict conditions.

All marine turtles roam vast
distances and occupy a variety of
different marine habitats during
the course of their lives. As such
they are a truly shared species.

Five of seven known species of
marine turtles are found within

OM Te UES TTS

Comments on the proposed regulations should be addressed to:

The Director

Department of Marine Resources
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources

P 0 Box N-3028
Nassau, NP,
Bahamas.

Or email fisheries@bahamas.gov.bs, or send a fax to (242)-393-0238.

aE

Olive Ridley turtles.

While all five species forage for
food within Bahamian waters, all
except the Olive Ridley are
known to use Bahamian beaches
as nesting sites.

The government said: “The
harvesting of Loggerhead and
Green turtles is of some social
and cultural importance among
certain communities and individ-
uals for food purposes; this how-
ever, is not for the majority of



Bahamians. The fishery based on
these two species is not regarded
to be a major source of income

the waters of the Bahamas. These
are the Green, Loggerhead,
Hawksbill, Leatherback and

Hilton Hotels Corporation
hoping to open more
properties in Bahamas

THE HILTON HOTEL in Nee

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Hilton Hotels Corporation yesterday announced that it
sees great potential in the Bahamas and therefore hopes to
open additional properties in New Providence in the near
future.

As the tourism industry struggles to attract visitors and new
investors in these economically tumultuous times, the Hilton
Hotels Corporation said that although it presently does not
have any confirmed deals in the Bahamas to share with the
public, it hopes to be in a position to do so soon.

Hilton Hotels Corporation yesterday announced expansion
plans to quadruple its presence in the Caribbean and Latin
America by adding 150 new hotels to the portfolio over the next
five years.

“We see great opportunity in the Bahamas, for both focused-
service and full-service luxury properties,” Karla Visconti,

director of communications for the Caribbean and Latin Amer- ,

ica Hilton Hotels.Corporation, told The Tribune.

In the Bahamas this could mean the establishment of a Hilton
Garden Inn or a Hampton Inn, which will target the mid-mar-
ket sector, particularly in Nassau, she said.

New Hilton properties could answer the call for an increase in
the country’s hotel room inventory — an increase especially in
rooms that offer full-service, which is very popular with Euro-
pean and American tourists in other Caribbean countries.

The Hilton Hotels Corporation said that it currently has 13
hotels in the Caribbean and Latin America region and antici-
pates adding another 17 hotels to the Caribbean over the next
five years.

“The goal of Hilton’s development efforts in the Caribbean
will be to add focused-service hotels, such as Hilton Garden Inn
and Hampton Inn, to commercial centres such as San Juan,
Trinidad, and Nassau.

“Another area of growth will be developing luxury branded
hotels and residences in high-end mixed use developments in
markets such as Turks and Caicos, the Lesser Antilles, and the
Bahamas,” the Hilton Hotels Corporation said.

The corporation has already announced eight properties
under development in the Caribbean, including the Conrad.
Bimini Bay Resort and Casino in the Bahamas.





ZL OE EA

SSS

for the average commercial fish-
erman.

The existing guidelines include:

¢ specific minimum harvestable
size limits for Green and Logger-
head turtles ,

e full protection of the Hawks-
bill Turtle

e all species of turtles are pro-
tected on beaches and every-
where during the closed season
for turtles (April 1 — July 31)

e the taking of turtle eggs is
prohibited

e all turtles harvested are to be
landed intact to allow for inspec-

dismembering :
a head of a @
large sea tur-
tle at Montagu ©
fish ramp.



tion A) cc

The Department of Marine
Resources is proposing the fol-
lowing additional guidelines:

e with effect from October 31,
2008, full protection for Olive
Ridley Turtle and Leatherback
turtles

e with effect from December
31, 2008 prohibition of the com-

mercial harvest, purchase, or sale -

of all species of marine turtles
found within the Bahamian exclu-
sive economic zone, and/or of
their by-products such as their
shells

e with effect from April 1, 2009
extend full protection to all
marine turtles found in the exclu-
sive economic zone by prohibiting
the harvesting of all marine tur-
tles except with the permission
of the minister for scientific
research, public display or edu-
cational purposes.

The Department of Marine
Resources said it invites com-
ments from the general public
with regard
enhanced protections.

to proposed:





ca
PHOTO shows body parts and large
head of a dismembered sea turtle at
Montagu fish ramp.



‘BEHEADED! The head of a large sea

turtle with eyes gouged out is on dis-
play at Montagu fish ramp for every-
one to see.



THE HEAD of a large slaughtered sea
turtle and body parts are on display at
the Montagu fish ramp.



THE HEAD of a large slaughtered
sea turtle and “body parts are on
display at the Montagu fish ramp. °

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Climate change ‘is one of the

greatest threats to Bahamas’

Rotaract Club
adopts Adelaite
Primary School's
first grade

THE Rotaract Club of
South East Nassau Centen-
nial in its latest community
effort has adopted Adelaide

. Primary School’s first grade.

“Our goal is to help pro-
vide tools and opportunities
to ‘make dreams real’ for
these children throughout
their primary school years in
accordance with Rotary:
International’s theme for
2008/2009,” the RSENC said
in a statement.

The Rotary Club
conducted several book and
school supplies drives at the
Mall at Marathon and Town
Centre Mall during the
months of July and
August. ‘

“To date, we held four
drives and have been suc-
cessful in receiving dona-
tions of reading books,
school supplies — composi-
tion note books, pencils,
pens, coloured chalk and a
board eraser — and mone-
tary donations — a sub-total
of $653.

“The fundraisers have
been a great opportunity for
club members and potential
members to work together’
for a common goal of raising
awareness of the needs of
Adelaide Primary School
and also as promoting the
initiatives of Rotaract and
Rotary International,” the
Club said.

The RSENC is scheduled
to make its first presenta-
tion of school supplies and
books to Adelaide Primary
School today at 8.50am dur-
ing the school’s morning
assembly.

The Rotary Club’s past
and present projects include
wheel chair ramps for vari-
ous government primary
schools; partnering with the
Bahamahost programme to
deliver informative semi-
nars; promoting blood dri-
ves with Princess Margaret
Hospital; conducting beach
clean-ups at Yamacraw
Beach; a book drive for the
Bilney Lane Children’s
Home, and the maintenance
of Kemp Road Park in part-
nership with the Sponsoring
Rotary Club.





@ GLADSTONE THURSTON
Senior Information
Officer

CLIMATE change poses “one
of the greatest threats” to.the
Bahamas, Minister of the Envi-
ronment Earl Deveaux told Mon-
day’s Environmental Partnership
Forum.

“We must examine how we
can sustain economic prosperity
and provide for our growing pop-

ulation while developing practical '

means of reducing energy con-
sumption and mitigating the
adverse effects on the environ-
ment of such as greenhouse gas
emissions, sea level rise, and
global warming,” he said.

The purpose of the forum was
to introduce the ministry and its
various departments, and to hear
from those who may have differ-
ent approaches, innovative ideas,
and new information.

A town meeting on the envi-
ronment takes place tomorrow
at the College of the Bahamas’
Choices Restaurant, Thompson
Boulevard, beginning at 7.30 pm.

It will feature a ministerial
panel comprising ministers whose
portfolios include critical issues
relating to the environment.

“We seek to instil a sense of
environmental stewardship and
develop innovative strategies and
lifestyle changes in order to com-
bat risks and produce results
which improve our quality of
life,’ Mr Deveaux told the forum.

“We must act now to seek out
innovative ways in which to mit-
igate the adverse impacts on our
marine and terrestrial environ-
ment, while sustaining economic
prosperity and providing for our
growing populations in a sus-
tainable manner.”

The forum featured sessions
on planning for environmental
sustainability; environmental pro-
tection and sustainable use; man-
aging maritime affairs for envi-
ronmental sustainability; ar?
energy strategy for the Bahamas.

Included in the Ministry of the
Environment are the Bahamas
Environmental Science and
Technology Commission
(BEST), the Bahamas National
Geographic Information System


















Centre, the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services, the
Department of Meteorology, the
Department of Physical Planning,
Subdivisions Section, the Nassau
Botanical Gardens, Forestry, the
Port Department, and
the Bahamas Maritime Authori-
tys

The ministry also has relations
with the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation, and with the
non-governmental organisations
the Bahamas National Trust, the
Nature Conservancy, and the
Bahamas National Pride Associ-
ation.

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LEFT: Minister of the Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux (second left)
and the National Children’s
Choir who performed at Mon-
day’s Environmental Partner-
ship Forum. The choir was
directed by Patricia Bazard.

BELOW RIGHT: Members of the
National Children’s Choir.

BELOW LEFT: MINISTER of
State in the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment Phenton Neymour
(left) and Eric Carey, executive
director, Bahamas National
Trust, share ideas

Letisha Henderson/BIS

Ministers of Health agree on
a plan to establish CARPHA

CARICOM ministers of
health have endorsed a plan of
action for the transition of
regional health institutions into
the Caribbean Public Health
Agency by 2010.

The endorsement was made
at the annual Caucus of the
Ministers of Health held in
Washington, DC, on the eve of
the PAHO Directing Council
which began on September 29.

The meeting of health minis-
ters approved the general func-
tions and governance structure
of the Caribbean Public Health
Agency (CARPHA) as pro-
posed by the CARPHA steer-
ing committee presided over by
Dr Leslie Ramsammy, Minis-
ter of Health for Guyana.

The ministers mandated the
Programme Management
Group to finalise the structure
and costing by the end of the
year for approval by CARI-
COM’s Council of Human and
Social Development
(COHSOD) in time for presen-
tation to the intersessional
meeting of the CARICOM
Heads of Government in
March, 2009.

The meeting also commend-
ed PAHO, the CARICOM Sec-
retariat and member states for
co-ordinating a variety of activ-
ities at the regional and nation-
al Caribbean Wellness Day pro-
grammes.

Caribbean Wellness Day was
observed on September 13
under the theme “Love Your
Body” in fulfilment of one of
the recommendations of the
Port of Spain Declaration: Unit-
ing to Fight the Non Commu-
nicable Diseases.

The Port-of-Spain Declara-

. » RESOLUTION

The Caucus of CARICOM Ministers Responsible for
Health:

e Recognised the serious material and health devastation
and post traumatic stress faced by countries of the sub-region
during the 2008 hurricane season.

e Expressed sincere concern for the health and well being of
the peoples of the Bahamas, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and Turks

and Caicos Islands.

e Endorsed the steps taken by the CARICOM Secretariat,
PAHO and other international agencies in assisting these

.

countries.

e Expressed its praise for the individual country efforts by
CARICOM governments, the private sector and civil society

in supporting their recovery.

e Urged continued support for the countries, especially
Haiti, which had been affected by five storms



tion resulted in 15 actionable
recommendations from the first
Summit of Heads of Govern-
ment, held in Trinidad and
Tobago on September 15, 2007.

The ministers endorsed the
programme for sustaining a

“Wellness Revolution” and.

commended both the Canadi-
an government and the Cana-
dian International Develop-
ment Agency (CIDA) for sup-
porting the CARICOM initia-
tives. The programme’s main
priorities include packaging and
labelling of tobacco products
and improving the legal frame-
work to reduce smoking.

Among other issues discussed
and agreed upon were the
Caribbean Regional Strategic
Framework for HIV/AIDS
under the Pan Caribbean Part-
nership Against HIV/AIDS
(PANCAP), and acceptance of
the report towards a regional
medical licensing examination
from the Caribbean Associa-
tion Medical Councils.

The Caucus of Ministers of
Health, recognising the impact
of recent hurricanes on the
region, including several mem-
ber states and associate mem-
bers, in particular the Bahamas,
Haiti, Jamaica and Turks and
Caicos Islands, as well as Cuba,
passed a resolution, expressing
solidarity and support to the
government and people of those
countries.

At the closing session of the
Meeting, Mr Ramsammy, who
also presided over the caucus,
said that it was one of the most
stimulating meetings and urged
that the future health agenda
must place greater emphasis o7
mental health, rehabilitation u
disabilities, early childhood
development, aging, violence as
a public health issue and the
health effects of climate change
and disasters. He appealed to
the Caucus “to build on what
we have to ensure that we leave
a legacy of a healthy
Caribbean”.

SURO
REWARD

For Information leading

to the recovery of a Galvanized triple axle

boat trailer suitable for a 30 foot boat,

trailer stolen last week from a residence in

Blair Estate, person providing the information

leading to its recovery will remain anonymous,

Call: 376-3710 / cell:328-6092



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Windsor Lane community centre to host special festival





IN an effort to improve the resi-
dents’ economic situation, the com-
munity centre in the Windsor Lane
area Will host a special festival next
month..

The Windsor Lane Community
Festival is the brainchild of Pastor
John Henry Higgins, founder of the
Windsor Lane Community Centre.

The community centre in a press
statement said that it is the festi-
val’s short-term goal to expand the

residents’ economic opportunities.

The community hopes to increase
its opportunities by partnering with
governmental and other communi-
ty agencies such as the Ministry of
Tourism, “who we hope will assist
through tourism promotional efforts
and by asking taxi drivers and others
to bring the visitors to our shores
to see the ‘real Bahamas’.

“The residents also realise that
they control their destiny by the

choices they make today.
The entertainment for the festival
will be provided by persons from

the Windsor Lane.community and a:

number of other Bahamian guest
artists.

The Minister of Labour and
Social Development Dion Foulkes
has been invited to officially open
the festival,” community represen-
tatives said.

The Community Centre opened

16 months ago and since then has
organised many community-based
programmes such as after school
homework assistance; the Con-
querors for Christ Junkanoo organ-
isation; liturgical dance; the big
brother, big sister initiative; the
community marching band, and the
food outreach programme.
Presently partnering with the
Windsor Lane Community are the
Ministry of Labour and Social

Development’s community affairs
division; the Department of Urban
Renewal; the Bahamas National
Pride Association; the Ministry of
Environmental Health, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force.

The festival will take place over of
the Discovery Day holiday week-

_ end on October 10, 11 and 12.

The opening ceremony will be
held at 6pm on Friday, October, 10.



discussed

THE Customs duty changes
that angered and confused
members of the business com-
munity a few months ago will
be a topic of discussion at an
upcoming legal forum.

In addition to customs
duties, immigration matters
and anticipated banking
changes are among the topics
to be addressed at the Hals-
bury Chambers’ fourth annu-
al Free Legal Clinic.

The clinic starts at 9am this
Saturday at the New Provi-
dence Community Centre on
Blake Road.

Berchenal Bethell, deputy
comptroller, and Charles
Turner, Superintendent of
Customs, will discuss “Cus-
toms: Changes in Duty Rates”
during a day packed with
expert speakers tackling topics
while the law firm’s attorneys
meet privately with partici-
pants for free consultations.

“Each year the Free Legal
Clinic aims to live up to its
name, ‘Information You Need
for the Life You Want,’
explains Halsbury Chambers
partner Nerissa Greene. “This
year with so much concern
about the increasing cost of
electricity, changes in customs
duties, how best to handle
work permit applications, how
to protect ourselves when con-
tracting to build or renovate
or even what impact the EPA
could have on our jobs, we are
offering — all free of charge —a
comprehensive programme of
information delivered by the
experts themselves who will
also make themselves avail-
able for questions.”

Deputy director of immi-
gration Lambert Campbell
will discuss “Work Permits,
Permanent Residency, Right
to Work: Making the System
Work for You.”

Mr Bethell and‘Mr Turner’s
presentation on customs
duties comes amidst a wave
of confusion over the revisions

,in the duty rates and what
they mean for the economy of
the Bahamas.

“Being a small island nation
the economy of the Bahamas
relies on the importation of
goods and the immigration of
foreign workers for suste-
nance,” said Ms Greene.

“There is a lot.of confusion
over the new customs rates,
what has been lowered, what
has been raised and what this
means for the Bahamian mar-
ket.

“We're also happy to have
the deputy director of immi-
gration speak at the clinic to
éxplain the changes made to
the department to expedite
the process, as well as inform-







Brian Smith



ing those attending of how to
make the system work jas
quickly and efficiently as it can
for them.”

Also speaking at the event
will be Brian Smith, business
manager of the Bahamas
Automated Clearing House
(BACH).

Mr Smith will introduce the
concept of a clearing house
and what it means for the
Bahamian financial services
industry and the future of
banking.

BACH aims to modernise
the financial services industry
by allowing the new system to
clear cheques by the close of

business the following day,

even if drawn on one bank
and deposited at another.

The system also enables
employers to directly deposit
funds into their employees’
accounts, regardless of finan-
cial institution used. ©

Among other speakers at
this year’s clinic are Acting
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna; real
estate expert Rachel Pinder
of Island Living Real Estate;
president of the Bahamian
Contractors Association;
Stephen Wrinkle, director of
economic planning in the Min-
istry of Finance Simon. Wil-
son; general manager of BEC
Kevin Basden and Halsbury
Chambers partner Nerissa
Greene.

| British

of a,



"American

SSS

A WOMAN lost control of her vehicle while driving on West Bay Street on Monday night and crashed through the walls of the popular n






Rodney Moncur

ight

club Cocktails and Dreams. According to eye witnesses, the accident occurred at around 9.30pm on Monday. Although the vehicle sus-
tained considerable damage, the driver was unharmed. Witnesses said the sound of the impact could be heard as far as Arawak Cay.



FNM mourns passing of Meritorious
Council member Sylvia Roberts _

THE Free National Move-
ment is mourning the passing
of Sylvia Roberts, .a member of
the party’s Meritorious Coun-
cil who died last week after
serving the FNM for many

years.
FNM national chairman Sen-
ator Johnley Ferguson

described Ms Roberts, a native
of Rum Cay, as part of the
“basic human infrastructure of
the party, who has been with
the movement through all its
changing scenes since the estab-
lishment of the FNM in 1972,
and who has remained faithful
right up until the time of her
death last week.”

“Through the years Sylvia-

Roberts has served the party in
very many capacities, and was
extremely active in the FNM
Women’s Association through a
number of administrations,
especially assisting the Associ-
ation in its efforts to establish
branches in the Family Islands,”
the chairman said.

“However, in a larger sense,
Sylvia Roberts was one of those
FNMs who always understood
precisely what was the mission
of the Free National Move-
ment, what was necessary to
explain that mission to the
Bahamian people, and who sim-
ply got on with the job.

“It was because of the bold
and determined efforts of such
as Sylvia Roberts that the FNM,
in August of 1992, was able
finally to break the political
foothold of the then ruling
organisation to make the FNM
the government, and it was

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because of FNMs like her in
1997 and in 2007 that made vic-
tory possible,” he said.

For many years Ms Roberts,
a sister of former Member of
Parliament Oscar Johnson,
worked in the downtown Straw
Market, where she became a
strong advocate for the rights
of vendors, and where she also
spread the FNM’s political mes-
sage.

“She was the FNM’s eyes,
ears and voice in the Straw
Market,” Senator Ferguson
said.

“There she kept the balance
and was often able to bring to
the FNM’s table of deliverance
some who were formerly
doubters.”

Mr Ferguson described the
deceased as someone, “who has
served so long and so faithfully,
and who never once pulled back
in the face of disappointments
in the party.”

The chairman said that the
FNM will in due course make
an announcement on what
arrangements will be made to
honour and pay tribute to the

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56:

OQ AQABEF

memory of Ms Roberts.

For her services to the party,
Ms Roberts was made a mem-
ber of the FNM’s Meritorious
Council, a position reserved for
the FNM’s most distinguished
members.

“We will miss her greatly,”
Mr Ferguson said, “but we are
extremely grateful that through
her years of dedicated service,
Sylvia Roberts has been able to
plant firm footsteps of commit-
ment which have become guide-
lines for others, especially the
youth in our party, to follow.”












PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

The lack of'a decision on the plan
leaves the financial system in melt-
down, and makes it more likely that
Americans, will lose their jobs or
simply have reason to remain cau-
tious in their spending habits.

The Central Bank said the situa-
tion will have “real economic con-
sequences” for the Bahamas.

Mr D’ Aguilar agreed: “We need
a healthy American economy for
ours to be healthy. A vacation is
the last thing on the list that Amer-
icans spend money on.”

However, the BCC President
noted that with Government
employing a large portion of this
country’s workers, he sees those
people as being protected from the
downturn, along with those in the
banking industry.

Promoting the bail out plan
before it was narrowly voted down
in Congress on Monday, Steny

Hoyer, House Majority Leader,,

said it would help save the U.S.

WOOD AN

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ENGINEERING

Worst effects

economy from “a meltdown
(which) would begin on a few
square miles of Manhattan, but
(would leave) no city or town in
America untouched” by the time
it was over.

Another supporter said without
prompt action in the form of the
now-defeated bill, “many people
are going to lose their jobs.”

Yesterday, former minister of
state for finance, James Smith said:
“I think it’s good that the Central
Bank would give us a warning
ahead of time that because there’s
likely to be some dark clouds on
the horizon, so it’s best to get the
umbrella open.”

“No matter what the outcome,
in terms of the passage of the bill or
not it’s likely to have an adverse
affect on the Bahamas over the
short term, at least the next six
months..”

He added: “We may not be

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adversely affected uniformly but I:
think all of us will be affected one :

way or the other because even the ;

wealthy might have businesses that : Winton on June 22, 2002. His tor-

depend on the low income guys to : so was saturated in blood and there
support that business so if the low : t ‘
income guy is not coming to buy : hands, Det. Sgt Meronard testi-
anything because he is not work- ;
ing then really that’s going to affect : : S
the bottom line of the wealthy busi- | doned in bush off Yamacraw
: Beach, with blood on the steering

i wheel and passenger seat. The
: visor had been slashed.

Lee maintains in both state- °
? ments that “Marco” had called him
: over from Andros to find a buyer

"That is one of the options that for a supply of cocaine.
we have to:look at. Unfortunate- : |. D ¢
ly... there's a lot of costs that we : different buyers and different cir-
can't control and with fewer cus- :
tomers coming in these stores one of : der.
the few options that's going to } 1 ;
remain available is to stagger your | â„¢an he did not know got in the

tagger y ? back of Mario’s jeep as they were

"We've tried our best to keep oe a eat guide bata
our entire staff working. We under- Matas. i aL tfc eens
stand the hardship that cutting back | ‘*@tl0 WIM a Knite.

would bring, but I think we're pret- : ;
ty much at that point where there's : poste Dae sua, ane Mat tant)

: : : the bushes after he had been
not going to be any other options i Hracked

left for us except to cut the work
(week) and try to spread the hard- | Mario's gold/green Infiniti jee

ship as fairly as possible through- i and aces Lee to follow seotliee
? man who took off in the car Lee

Rupert Roberts, President of the : had been driving.

Super Value chain of foodstores :

and stakeholder in Bed, Bath and ; pushes near Yamacraw beach, Lee

Home, is confident the US economy : gaid the men told him to drive
will rebound and that the local retail : them in his car until they were met
Pe a : by Darren also known as “Pork

"There's been no indication of :
people, not even tightening their :

belts. Consumers are carrying on :

ness owner.”

Major retailers |

FROM page one

staff.

out the enterprise".

sector will not suffer.

as usual," he said, adding "Reducing
enter into our minds."
economy he would rather take a

said.

General Manager of Kelly's :
Home Centre, Greg Kelly, said the :
effects of the US' financial woes :
were still "unfolding" and he could :
not speculate how much it would }
: place so they could steal the drugs

He added that he did not antici- :
pate mass layoffs at Kelly's Home :
Centre and that the store had :
ordered 80 per cent of its Christ- :

‘mas stock in anticipation of a robust front of the store and went inside.

affect retail sales in the Bahamas.

holiday shopping season.

‘Shabba’

FROM page one

out those communities.

Even family and friends of Saun- :
ders have admitted at the wake :
that was held for him, that they :
were unsure of whose death they :

were in fact mourning.

According to high level sources
within the Royal Bahamas Police :

Force, a similar case was seen a : cycle, grabbed a box and school

few years ago when a morons
drug dealer faked his death to
avoid retribution by a competing
faction in Nassau.

As it relates to this latest matter,

Zoe Pound has reportedly sent out :
a warning that they want their ship- :
. Ment returned to them “by any :

means.”

Additionally, sources in the }
Kemp Road area confirm that this :
gang, which has connections as far :
south as Haiti and all the way up to :
New York, is headquartered in :
New Providence in the Carmichael :

Road area.

Reportedly, hitmen from the :
Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and :
Haiti are used mainly by Zoe :
Pound to carry out their more :

“heinous crimes.”

“We are following some leads :
that is what we are :
hearing at this time as well,” said :
another source within the police :

into that ...

force.

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FROM page one

were wounds to his face, chest and

fied.
Mario’s jeep was found aban-

But the two statements involved
cumstances of Mario Miller’s mur-
In the first statement, Lee said a

Lee said he cut his hand trying

Two other men ran towards

After abandoning the jeep in

chop” at the main road.
However, in his second state-
ment, taken on June 30, Lee said a

: deal had been sealed between
staff hasn't entered and will not i.

Mario Miller and a prison officer,

: not mentioned in the first state-
But if faced with a softening }
: when he met with Mr Miller, Mar-
loss before closing down stores, he :
: Avenue on Friday, June 21.

ment, who examined the drugs
co, Ryan Miller and Lee in Collins

Lee said in this statement, that
while playing cards with “Pretty”
and “Anwar” that evening, they
wanted in on the deal, and Lee
agreed to lead them to the meeting

from Mario.

Once in the car with Mario out-
side the Super Value, Lee’s broth-
er Ryan Miller arrived, parked in

Meanwhile Pretty and Anwar

jumped into the jeep.

Lee said: “Anwar pulled me

back and that’s when I saw he had
: a knife, which cut me in my left
: hand.

“He had the knife at Mario’s

throat and he climbed through the
act” are being whispered through- :

passenger side.
“Pretty was in the back stabbing
Mario.
“Mario ran to the grass and
Pretty and Anwar ran after him.
“Then my brother came out and
called out, what’s happening?”
In the statement, Lee recalls that
another man pulled up on a motor-

Mario Miller

bag containing the cocaine from
the back of Mario’s vehicle and
rode off, while Pretty and Anwar
made off in their car.

When Lee saw Mario was dead,
Ryan told him to follow him to
Yamacraw Beach where they
abandoned the jeep.

Lee said: “I told them (Pretty

» and Anwar) you all should not kill

him just take the stuff and go.”

They gave Lee and his brother
three kilos of cocaine and threat-
ened Lee saying. “If you talk or
tell anyone the boys are going to
deal with you.” Lee said he and
his brother Ryan bought two cars
with 2.5 kilos of cocaine and
returned to Andros.

When the court went back in
session, after breaking for lunch,
jurors were presented with Ryan
Miller’s account of the day Mario
was murdered.

In Ryan Miller’s record of the
interview, he was asked by Det Sgt
Meronard if he was involved in
Mario Miller's death.

He said he was not involved.

Ryan Miller’s statement, which
was also read by Det Sgt
Meronard, said that on Friday the
21, the day before the murder, his
brother, Tamar Lee, “jumped into
his car” to go and pick up a gen-
tleman named Marco.

Marco had told them that he
knew someone named Enal Pratt,
a Prison Officer who would buy
cocaine.

Ryan told Lee that he was famil- .

iar with Pratt and urged his broth-
er and Marco to let him tell Pratt
about the cocaine..

Ryan said in the statement that
they went to see Mario at a hair
place on Shirley Street and Mario
told Marco where to meet him.

They all met later that day
“behind Collins Avenue next to a
Haitian church.” Mario was in his
jeep, Ryan, Ricardo and Marco
were together in Ryan’s vehicle
and Pratt was in his own.car. They
then all jumped into Mario’s jeep
to check out the cocaine. Ryan
recounts in his statement that later
that night they were all playing 21
with Ryan Wells when Lee began
telling people at the game that
Mario had some cocaine.

Ryan said that he advised Lee .

that night not to discuss the “stuff”.

The next day, the day of the
murder, Ryan told police that his
brother used his car to once again
pick up Marco.

Ryan professes that he was at
home all day with his sisters until
Lee came back at 3pm and showed
him a large cut on his hand which
he said he got while involved in a
fight.

Lee then asked his brother to
take him to the hospital to ‘have
his hand treated.

When they arrived back home,
Ryan said that Lee revealed three
brown, wrapped packages in the
trunk of the car.

He said his brother gave him
one of the packages and said “here
is a key of cocaine for me having
your car all day.”

Ryan said they looked like the
same packages that he had seen
the day before in Mario’s jeep.

Ryan then dropped Lee to the
airport the next day to catch a
flight to Andros.

He said when they got to the
airport he saw only his package of
cocaine in the trunk.

They then went to Carmichael
Road and The Grove a day later to
exchange the keys of cocaine for
two cars.

Upon cross-examination by
lawyer for murder accused Tamar
Lee, Romauld Ferreira, Det Sgt
Meronard was asked if he knew
the deceased’s father. He said that
he did. Ferreira suggésted that Det
Sgt Meronard was under pressure
to solve the murder because the
father of the deceased was a mem-
ber of Parliament and that he was
in haste to pin the murder on his
client.

Ferreira also suggested that Det
Sgt Meronard, when he received
Tamar Lee’s second statement, did
not inform him to his right to an
attorney. However, Det Sgt
Meronard insisted that he did
inform him as to his right to an
attorney. And also insisted that
the second statement was taken
because of all the “lies” that Lee
was telling.

Ferreira while conducting his
cross-examination said he would
question Meronard’s ability to con-
duct an investigation.

Ferreira said that Meronard
questioned only Lee on the June
27 because he was under so much
pressure to find a killer.

Det Sgt Meronard responded
loudly: “Never...never the truth.”

Meronard during the line of
questioning said that they never
found a murder weapon, but
indicted the Miller brothers on cir-
cumstantial evidence.

On cross-examination by lawyer
for murder accused Ryan Miller,
Ramona Farquharson asked Det
Sgt Meronard if he had observed
any cuts or bruises on Ryan Miller.

He said: “No.”

During the line of questioning,

Det Sgt Meronard admitted that:

at no time did Ryan say he had
any knowledge of a plot to kill
Mario.

The detective also said that the
deceased would have had contact
with a number of persons with
respect to selling cocaine and that
he would have come across more
persons than Ryan Miller with
respect to purchasing cocaine.

‘The trial will'resume today in
the court of Justice Stephen Isaacs
at 10 am.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 9

RaMeEM Ee eK eS



Time for us to cherish Nassau’s rich history

Srverst weeks ago
Tough Call was in Savan-
nah — a 200-plus-year- -old city in
Georgia that is about the size of
Nassau, with an impressive level
of historical preservation that
earns billions of tourist dollars a
year.

But Savannah can't begin to
compete with Florence — a 2000-
plus-year-old city in Italy that I
had the occasion to explore a few
days ago. The past is overwhelm-
ingly present throughout this his-
torical treasure house of some
365,000 people — and it sends a
crystal-clear message to Bahami-
ans. In Florence there is scarcely
a modern building to be found
and, in a curious reversal of con-
ditions in Nassau, it is the con-
temporary buildings that are most
likely to suffer from neglect. In
Florence, a historic building (the
earliest date back to the 11th cen-
tury) is a ticket to affluence rather
than an encumbrance to be razed
under cover of darkness.

Florence was the home of the
Medici, a family which rose to
prominence in the 13th century
as bankers to the Pope, went on
to become leaders of the powerful
Florentine oligarchy, and later
ascended to the grand duchy of
Tuscany...in the process creating
what is today an astonishingly rich
tourist attraction.

The Medici were collectors,
patrons of geniuses like Michelan-
gelo and Galileo, and rulers who
presided over Florence's greatest
public works — the monuments
that millions of visitors from
around the world come to gawk
over today. Anna Maria, the last
of the Medicis, died in 1743, after
bequeathing all her properties
and treasures to what eventually
became the Italian republic.

But don't think that tourism is
a new-fangled phenomenon here.
In fact, visitors have been admir-
ing the city from the 16th century
onwards when Sir Tobie Math-
ews, a son of the Archbishop of
York, famously wrote: "I live in
Fiorence in an-excellent cool ter-
rene, eate good melons, drink
wholesome wine, look upon
excellent devout pictures, and
heer choyce music."

Exactly four hundred years lat-
er, on the occasion of Tough Cal-
I's visit, the product is essentially
the same. And it earns big bucks
for contemporary Florentines.
More than 11 million people vis-

it Tuscany every year,.and all of .

them head for Florence. Yet
despite this crowding in a rela-



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Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

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tively small space, the city is rated
the best destination in Europe,
and one of the best in the world.
Despite little parking and
thousands of tourists as well as
local pedestrians, dogs and cats
sharing the narrow cobblestone
streets with buses, cars, carriages,
mopeds and bicycles, it all seems
to work — with no gridlock and
no visible garbage. And a zillion
historic monuments, friendly trat-
torias and hole-in-the-wall shops
prise euros out of your pocket at
every turn — with few regrets. A
gelato here, a hand-made leather
bag there, a museum everywhere.
According to the United
Nations, 60 per cent of the world's
most important works of art are
located in Italy, and half of them
are in Florence, which was
declared a World Heritage Site
many years ago. In fact, the city is
in danger of becoming an open-
air museum based exclusively on
tourism, with over 1.6 million
people a year visiting the Uffizi
art gallery alone.
The key factor is history —
which in Florence begins with the
Romans and advances through

- the Middle Ages to the Renais-

sance and beyond. Julius Caesar
established a settlement on a ford
of the River Arno in 59 BC, and
the town became capital of the
province of Tuscia in the 3rd cen-
tury AD. Tuscany itself is named
after even earlier inhabitants —
the Etruscans who preceded the
Romans. As medieval Europe
recovered from the disintegration
of the Roman Empire, Florence
became a powerful city state and
a centre of trade and finance.
From the 14th century onwards,
its leaders supported some of the
world's greatest philosopHers,
architects, sculptors and painters
in a flowering of human knowl-
edge that became known as the
Renaissance. In a single Floren-
tine church, for example, one can
find the remains of Galileo,
Michelangelo and Machiavelli, as
well as memorials to other his-
torical notables who once called
the city home, such as Dante and
Leonardo da Vinci.

In sum, Florence is, as Queen

‘Victoria wrote disapprovingly in



1893 "a town full of attractions
and temptations to expense."
And it is also, as the philosopher

Henry James said, "the most
beautiful view in the world,"

In the Bahamas, while we
manage to squeeze a billion dol-
lars a year out of the four million
tourists who visit by air or cruise
ship — most of it leaves the coun-
try immediately to pay for
imports. And the fact is, we could
earn a helluva lot more if we had
a product to sell other than prox-
imity to America or sun, sand and
sea. We may not have the sheer
volume of monuments and art
that a city with a 2000-year histo-
ry can display, but there is no
doubt that Nassau's historical nar-
rative could be made equally as
compelling as Florence's if we
applied ourselves to the job.

If we took the trouble to
restore and maintain our histori-
cal assets instead of discounting

and discarding them, we could ,

certainly earn more from our vis-
itors than the margin on a brace
of 'hey, mon’ t-shirts.

Our historical narrative begins
with the Lucayans, an Amerindi-
an tribe that carved several set-
tlements out of the coastal bush
on, New Providence hundreds of
years before Columbus — the
Italian who sailed the ocean blue
— came across them on San Sal-
vador. And Tough Call was part
of an archaeological investigation
years ago that found evidence of
a pre-Lucayan settlement on Par-
adise Island. After the Lucayans
were shipped off to slavery in His-
paniola by the Spanish, Nassau
was settled by English colonists in
1648. These people were express-
ing the conflicts of the English
civil war — a complex struggle
between Catholics and Protes-
tants as well as between king and
parliament that led to the world's
first bill of rights. The Eleutherian
Adventurers who established the
first permanent European settle-
ment in the Bahamas were essen-
tially puritans fleeing from roy-
alist oppression. The cave at
North Eleuthera where these first
settlers worshipped and camped
out following a shipwreck has
been largely ignored and used as

ean

a dumping ground rather than
treated as a major tourist attrac-

tion. It was recently defaced by

vandals even though it is a grave
site for both Lucayans and Euro-
peans. The island of New Provi-
dence was settled from Eleuthera,
and it remained an obscure
British outpost until the arrival
of Henry Avery in 1696 launched
the age of piracy.

In a recent book by journalist
Colin Woodard called Republic
of Pirates, this fascinating period
of Bahamian history is described
as "a long-lost tale of tyranny and
resistance, a maritime revolt that
shook the very foundations of the

_ newly-formed British Empire,

bringing transatlantic commerce
to a standstill and fueling the
democratic sentiments that would
later drive the American revolu-
tion. At its centre was a pirate
republic, a zone of freedom in an
authoritarian age."

These pirates were sailors,

indentured servants and runaway

slaves who rebelled against their
oppressors — a few thousand
crewmen of various races and
nationalities who took part in a
golden age from 1715 to 1725.
And most of the best-known buc-
caneers were based in Nassau
until the British sent an ex-priva-
teer named Woodes Rogers to
restore order.

Then there was the American
Revolution, that “shot heard
around the world” which led to
the immigration of thousands of
loyalists and their slaves-in the
late 1700s. These immigrants built
many of Nassau's most historic

landmarks, and tried but failed

to set up a plantation economy
on the out islands.

Slavery and the abolition of
the slave trade (as well as slav-
ery itself in 1834) is another key
piece of the Bahamian historical
puzzle. And the fact is that the
Bahamas’ African heritage was
forged not only by slaves, but by
thousands of Africans set free on
our islands by the Royal Navy.
Several settlements on New Prov-
i ambier and Ade-





people.

Most readers will be more
familiar with Nassau's 20th cen-
tury history — which included
colourful activities like bootleg-
ging, military occupation during
the Second World War, dramatic
political and social advances dur-
ing the 1960s, as well as a diverse
group of celebrity tourists.

It is a narrative that any movie
scriptwriter or souvenir producer

GE

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would die for, yet we turn our
backs on this incredibly rich lega-
cy every day, dumping garbage
over the landscape and tearing
down-the landmarks. Perhaps —
with the threat of a global eco-
nomic depression looming — now
is the time to learn from cities
like Savannah and Florence,
which have created and:saved so

much to offer travellers while:
earning a good living.
Tough Call? I don't think so. =

What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com.

> ‘

Bahamas Bus & Truck Co., Ltd,

Montrose Avenue
Phone:322-1722 « Fax: 326-7452

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2008 Creative Edge

manétzaaed



PAGE 10 THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAYEVENING ©. OCTOBER 1, 2008

7:30 | 8:00 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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MAXE |





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killer. O'R |Chianese. Premiere. 1 'R' (CC)





‘TMC fe Tw







‘

THE TRIBUNE



PA GE 14





FORE Mer eee nen cic a



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008






Bryant
and Lakers
to open

camp
See page 14





Sharks get
revenge,
devour the
Wildcats

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

LAST year, manager Stephen “Bish-
op” Beneby thought he had the team
that could go all the way and win the
New Providence Softball Association
ladies’ championship crown. The Lady
Sharks, however, got devoured by the
Pineapple Air Wildcats.

But this year, Proper Care Pool
returned to the league’s best-of-seven
championship series after getting
revenge by knocking off the Wildcats.
The Sharks will now take on an unex-
pected opponent — the Sigma Brack-
ettes,

Speaking to Tribune Sports about
the Brackettes, who stunned the pen-
mant winning Boomer George
Swingers in three straight games to
clinch their berth in the final, Beneby

said they’re not taking Sigma for grant- -

ed.
“Softball is played between the lines
and regardless of who yoy are, you
have to respect the game,” Beneby
said. “If you don’t respect the game,
the game won’t respect you.”

Beneby said the Lady Sharks will
be engaged in a very intriguing series
that could start either Thursday or Fri-
day night at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex, depending on the out-
come of the men’s playoffs between
New Breed and the King’s Real Estate
Pros. ;

. “‘Thave a lot of respect for the pitch-

er we’re going up against,” said Bene-
by, referring to Sigma’s Ernestine But-
ler-Stubbs, who came out of retire-
ment just before the start of the play-
offs.

“She has been around for a long
time and she’s still serviceable, still
doing the job. We look for it to be a
good series. I think we have the better
team. But the game is played between
the lines and we will play it for what it’s
worth.”

Beneby’s pitching staff is back with
the youthful 1-2 punch of Thela John-
son and Alex Taylor. And if they can
remain focused, he’s confident that
half of their job is done.

“We have to realize that every play
counts, so as simple as having two outs
and a ground ball to one of your better
infielders and a minor play causes you
to lose the championship, I think we
are over that now,” he stated.

“We talked about it, we put it
behind us, we put this whole entire
season behind us now and we are just
concentrating on this part of the sea-
son. I spent a lot of time talking to the
youth on the team, trying to get them
motivated more than they are being
here.”

If they can block out all of the neg-
ative talk that will be going on during
the game and play up to their poten-
tial, Beneby said they would have suc-
cessfully completed the other half of
their task.

“TI think we have a very explosive
offensive club,” said Beneby, who has
been relying heavily on the bulk of his
line-up, including Vonetta Nairn,
Thela Johnson, Debbie McClure and
Kelly Smith.

“Whilst we’re not a super defensive
team, I think we’re adequate enough
to go out there and make the plays.
You make the routine plays and the
hard plays will take care of itself. But
you have to definitely make your rou-
tine plays.”

Brackettes’ manager Bobby “Bay-
lor” Fernander was not available for
comment, but Beneby said based on
the way they have been playing, he’s
predicting that his Lady Sharks will
win the series 4-1.

With the squad that he has, Fernan-
der probably doesn’t feel the same
way.

Fernander has acquired the services
of two former Wildcats in Jean Minus
and Renee “Sunshine” Sweeting-
Davis, who have added to the veteran-
youthful combo that includes Vandette
Smith, Zella Symonette, Vantrice
Bowleg, Tonia Simmons, Shevette
Taylor and Theota Williams.

The series will definitely come down
to who wants it the most with the Lady
Sharks trying to redeem themselves
from last year’s defeat and the Brack-
ettes out to prove that they are for
real after their surprising playoff upset.

The winner of the championship title
will represent the NPSA in the
Bahamas Softball Federation’s Nation-
al Round Robin Championships sched-
uled for October 30 to November 2.









roll

SAC’s pitcher Arien Seymour
in action yesterday when the
Big Red Machines continued a

ry FOX (left), Kingsway eC S eae i ne



Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

fter losing

their season.

opener a week

ago to the St

Andrew’s
Hurricanes, the St Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
continued a two-game winning
streak yesterday.

Their latest victims were the
Kingsway Academy Saints,
whom the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Secondary
Schools’ junior boys champi-
ons rolled past 7-3.

While SAC improved to 2-1,
Kingsway Academy suffered
their first defeat in three games
for the identical record.

Played at Kingsway Acade-
my, SAC exploded for five big
runs in the top of the third,
highlighted by Anfrenee Sey-
mour’s one-out two-run single.

Seymour, playing shortstop,
also came up with one of three
big defensive plays in the bot-
tom of the fifth as he tracked
down a long shot from Saints’
Ian Fox in short centrefield and
still managed to throw him out

- at first.

Second baseman. Anthony
Romer came up with the final
two sensational plays when he
had to go on the run to catch
two consecutive bloopers from
Crachad Laing and Jamique
Johnson to end the game.

“We're back on the road
now. We’re rolling,” said
SAC’s coach John Todd. “We
don’t have any problems. We
will be there. As long as we
can hit the’ball, that’s the key.
We have the defense.”

Romer, one of the rookie
players on the team, Said the
game plan was to simply play
good defense.

“We just came out knowing
that we could beat them,” he

. pointed out. “We practice our

defense every day and we do
some batting practice.”

Against St Andrew’s, Romer
said they didn’t hit the ball, but
he’s confident that if they meet
again, they will be victorious.

Winning pitcher for the Big
Red Machines was Arien Sey-
mour, who fired a two-hitter,
striking out four. Seymour not-
ed that their defense was what
got the job done.

“We could have worked on
the bats a little more,” he
stressed. “I think we looked
pretty good. We’re going to
meet St Andrew’s again and
we will beat them.”







out Saints 7-3





KINGSWAY pitcher C Laing...

Apart from the fifth inning,
the Big Red Machines also:
came up with a run in both the
first and fourth inning.

Todd Isaacs, playing centre-
field, was 1-for-3 with two runs,
Anfrenee Seymour was also 1-
for-3 with his two RBIs and
two runs scored and Byron
Murray went 2-for-3 with a run
scored.

For the Saints, Tameko
Williamson had a perfect 2-for-
2 day with a run scored and
catcher Zachary Albury drew a
pair of walks, scoring a run.
Winston Saunders walked and
scored the other run.

Rev Steven Duncombe,
Kingsway Academy’s coach,
said it was a tough loss.

“I don’t think we were alert
defensively, we didn’t play a
gocd mental game, so we just
have to cut down on the men-
tal errors,” he said.

“The guys were just out of
position, they didn’t know
where to go to back up the ball,
so there was a lot of mental
errors. The runs we lost by
were all unearned, so we feel
good. We’re right in every-
thing.”

Despite the loss, Crachad
Laing gave up seven hits and
had five strike outs.

“This wasn’t one of my best
outings. I promise that the next
time we are going to win,” he
projected.

He agreed with Duncombe
that once they cut down on
their mental errors and get in
the position where they should
be, they will be victorious
again.

“We just need more prac-._
tice,” he admitted.

Bahamian players hoping to shine in NCAA

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter



WHILE the start of the 2008-2009
NCAA basketball season is still more
than a month away, two Bahamian
players are looking to make sharp
impacts as newcomers in their respec-
tive Division I programmes.

Dwight Miller and Probese Leo,
two of many Bahamian players play-
ing at the collegiate level in the US,
signed letters of intent earlier this year
to attend high profile D-I pro-
grammes.

Miller, the more highly touted of
the two, attends the University of
Pittsburgh and enters a programme
expected to contend for a Big East
title and NCAA tournament berth. .

The six-foot eight inch, 230 pound
forward is part of a freshman class
which includes Travon Woodall, Nasir

Robinson, and redshirt freshman

Austin Wallace,



BASKETBALL



Miller rose to national prominence
when he was featured in the Houston
Chronicle and various Houston-area
television stations for his private work-
out sessions with NBA Hall of Famer
Hakeem Olajuwon.

Miller, who displayed a series of
successful performances at various
summer camps tn 2007 — most notably
his award-winning outing at the
Reebok U camp, garnered interest
from a myriad of schools before he
decided on Pittsburgh.

Pittsburgh is also the alma-mater
of Bahamian national team standout
Doyle Hudson.

The Panthers recently announced
a contract extension for head coach
Jamie Dixon who is set to begin his
sixth season with ine team.

i)

They finished 27-10 last season and
captured its second Big East Tourna-
ment title in school history.

The Panthers are expected to be
among the top contenders for both
the Big East regular season and tour-
nament title.

The team returns two of its leading
scorers from last season — lead guard
Levance Fields and high flying for-
ward Sam Young.

The team is slated to begin the
2008-09 regular season on November
14 against Farleigh Dickinson Uni-
versily.

Leo, like Miller, attended St Pius
X High School in Houston, Texas and
is a member of the Frank Rutherford
Elite Development Programme.

He enters a Bucknell University
Programme looking to return to its
2005 Cinderella season which brought
national recognition and critical
acclaim.

The Bison authored the bigyest

upset of the 2005’season when, as the
14th seed, they upset the third ranked
Kansas Jayhawks in the opening
round of the NCAA tournament.

The win was the first NCAA tour-
nament win ever for the Bison and
first for any team from the Patriot
League.

Leo should compete for playing
time on a guard heavy roster.

At six foot, nine inches, he joins
senior center Josh Linthicum (6°11)
as the only players on the roster taller
than 6’8”.

Leo is joined in the 2008-09 fresh-
man class by Enoch Andoh, Bryan
Cohen and Ryan Ebner.

The Bison finished last season at
12-19 and lost in the second round of
the Patriot League tournament.

Also on November 14, Leo and the
Bison open the season on the road at
the University of Maryland against
the perennial ACC powerhouse Ter-
rapins.



PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS

Bills sign FB | :
Mclntyre,
release
Barnes

ORCHARD PARK, N Y
(AP) — The Buffalo Bills
shuffled fullbacks Tuesday by
signing Corey McIntyre and
releasing Darian Barnes.

McIntyre, an unsigned free
agent with three years of NFL
experience, spent last season
with Atlanta before his Sep-
tember release. He also _ :

layed with Cleveland and KS : 4 .
New Orleans, and is regarded \ \ i. oR oo : Steelers

ble blocker and spe- ; = =
Sere ee PITTSBURGH Steelers’ James Harrison (top) leaps into the stands on top of teammate linebacker LaMarr Wood-

cial teams player. ;
The moves come as the ley after Woodley picked up a fumble by Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco and returned it seven yards



Photos: Gene J Puskar/AP

PITTSBURGH Steelers receiver Santonio Holmes (left) eludes Bal-
timore Ravens’ Ed Reed on his way to a 38-yard touchdown
reception in the third quarter...



undefeated Bills (4-0) prepare
to play at Arizona (2-2) on
Sunday, Buffalo's final game
before its bye week.

Barnes’ release comes after
he sprained his right foot in
Buffalo’s 24-23 win over Oak-’
land on September 21 and
missed last weekend’s game
at St Louis.

The lone fullback on the
Bills* roster, Barnes is a seven-
year NFL veteran who was in
his first season with Buffalo.
He had two catches for 34
yards this season and was used
as a lead blocker for running
backs Marshawn Lynch and
Fred Jackson.

The Bills have reintroduced
the fullback position in their
offense this season under first-
year coordinator Turk Schon-
ert.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



RO aa aad

Despite injuries, Steelers
beat Ravens 23-20 in OT

@ By ALAN ROBINSON
AP Sports Writer



PITTSBURGH (AP) — An
overtime win over rival Balti-
more left the Pittsburgh Steel-
ers hurting, Ben Roethlisberg-
er screaming and coach Mike
Tomlin calmly explaining what
happens next.

“No rest for the weary,”
Tomlin said after the Steelers
played terribly for most of
three quarters before beating
the Ravens 23-20 Monday
night to take over first place
in the AFC North.

A lot of rest for the injured,
however, and that may be the
Steelers’ No. 1 problem fol-
lowing a resourceful effort that
was needed to overcome a
strong game by Ravens rookie

Take over first place in AFC North

quarterback Joe Flacco in his
first NFL road start.

The physical-as-usual game
against Baltimore cost the
Steelers right guard Kendall
Simmons (torn Achilles) and
first-round draft pick Rashard
Mendenhall (fractured shoul-
der) for the season, key
injuries that will test their
depth and resiliency.

The Steelers (3-1) were so
beaten up that they ended the
game with only one healthy
running back, Mewelde
Moore, who was signed to be a
third-down back but played on

â„¢

nearly every down of overtime.
Moore made important catch-
es of Roethlisberger-thrown
passes of 24 and 7 yards to set
up Jeff Reed's third field goal
of the game, a 46-yarder that
won it with about six minutes
gone in overtime.

“A 46-yarder there isn’t a
given, and a 53-yarder isn’t
easy,” Reed said, a reference
to Moore’s 7-yard catch ahead
of his seventh and longest
career game winner. “I get too
much credit. My foot won it,
but that’s what I’m supposed
to do in that situation.”



Or exactly what Roethlis-

berger told his teammates dur- |

ing an emotional locker room
talk — an outburst he felt was

‘ needed after the Steelers were

outgained 146-46 while falling
behind 13-3 at halftime. Balti-
more ended with a 243-237
yardage edge despite Flacco’s
192 yards passing during a 16-
of-31 night.

“We lost a lot of guys,”
Roethlisberger said. “I was
more emotional, more vocal
than I’ve ever been at halftime.
I screamed at our offense. We
were terrible in the first half.
Not that we were great in the
second half, but we bounced
back.”

So did the Ravens (2-1), who
were in position to open a divi-
sion lead by winning only to
lose a 10-point lead in a span
of only 15 seconds late in the
third quarter.

The Steelers, depleted offen-
sively by injuries, went to a no-
huddle offense almost out of
desperation, and Roethlis-
berger responded with a 38-
yard scoring pass to Santonio
Holmes to end their only TD
drive of the game. The four-
play drive was aided by a 15-
yard personal foul penalty on
Baltimore's Jarret Jackson that
gave Pittsburgh its initial first
down since its opening drive.

The touchdown also gave
the Steelers some much-need-
ed momentum, and they got
plenty more when James Har-
rison’s hit forced a Flacco fum-
ble on Baltimore's next play
from scrimmage. LaMarr
Woodley picked up the ball at
the 7 — he planned only to fall
on it, then realized he could
return it — and scored to make
it 17-13.

Before the two-TD burst,

_the Steelers had been held

without a touchdown for near-
ly eight quarters, or since the
first half of a 10-6 win at Cleve-
land on September 14.

Many rookie quarterbacks
would have been flustered, but
Flacco — forced to shoulder
more of the offense with run-
ning back Willis McGahee out
for much of the game with a
chest injury — came back to
lead a game-tying drive end-
ed by Le’Ron McClain’s 2-
yard run with 4:02 remaining.

“There’s nothing you can
say about this game, other than -
the fact a couple of plays went
against us,” coach John Har-
baugh said. “Aside from that,
our guys played well enough
to win. They played their
hearts out.”

Since they drafted him, Flac-
co has impressed the Ravens
with his big-league arm. On a
night they may have lost a
game but gained a leader, he
also showed them a poise
uncommon for a quarterback
playing only his third NFL
game.

“We've got to take care of
the ball. If we take care of the
ball there, it’s a different sto-
ry,” Flacco said. “I was really
proud of the way we came
back. I think we did a pretty
good job at weathering what
they threw at us overall, but
we just have to find a way to
win.”

Tomlin knows what the
Steelers gained, besides an
important victory before they
take on Jacksonville (2-2) on
Sunday night following a'short
week of preparation. The
Jaguars put the Steelers out of
the playoffs in January after
also beating them in Pittsburgh
the month before.

“You can’t blink and we did-
n't,” Tomlin said.

“Does that mean we have a
chance to be something spe-
cial? Maybe. Right now, all
that it means is we are 3-1 and
we have to go to Jacksonville
on a short week against an
AFC opponent we have some
issues with.”

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AN RIV eet

BALTIMORE RAVENS quarterback Joe Flacco (5) walks off the field after
the Pittsburgh Steelers won the game...

eevee re re





TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 13

Bondarenko and

illiams win at the
Porsche Grand Prix

STUTTGART, Germany
(AP) — Qualifier Kateryna
Bondarenko of Ukraine ral-
lied to upset 15th-ranked
Flavia Pennetta of Italy 4-6,
6-2, 6-1 Tuesday at the
Porsche Grand Prix.

Bondarenko. next plays
Venus Williams who defeat-
ed Anna-Lena Groenefeld 6-
1, 6-2 in their first round
match.

The WTA indoor tourna-
ment features eight of the top
10 female players, with only
Ana Ivanovic and Maria
Sharapova missing.

Another qualifier advanced
when Tsvetana Pironkova ,.
beat teenager Alize Cornet 6-
2, 6-1. The Bulgarian next
faces third-seeded Dinara
Safina. Safina had a bye into
the second round along with
the other top three players in
the tournament — Serena
Williams, Jelena Jankovic and
Elena Dementieva.

Marion Bartoli of France
advanced by defeating
Dominika Cibulkova of Slo-
vakia 6-3, 6-1, and Victoria
Azarenka wasted a 5-2 lead
before overcoming Agnes
Szavay 7-5, 6-3.



ua
Fo
et CoE
reer
Bg
Beer era

INSSSESASSESESISISS



= Thomas Kienzle/AP

—

So

VENUS WILLIAMS of the USA serves to Anna-Lena
Groenefeld during their first round match at the
Porsche Grand Prix Tuesday in Stuttgart, Germany.
Williams won the match 6-1, 6-2...

ESSN

SERENA WILLIAMS returns the ball during the first
round double match with her sister Venus against
Daniela Hantuchova from Slovakia and Agnes Szavay
from Hungary at the Porsche Grand Prix Monday...



GERMANY’S Anna-Lena Groenefeld
returns the ball to Venus Williams
during their first round match...

Real Madrid
defeats Zenit 2-1

REAL MADRID’S Arjen Robben (above) jumps over Zenit’s goalkeeper
Vyacheslav Malafeev saving the goal during the Group H Champions
League soccer match at the Petrovsky stadium Tuesday in St Petersburg,
Russia. Real Madrid won 2-1...

(AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)





WHAT'S HAPPENING

FIFA, UEFA reject new
Polish soccer board

@ By RYAN LUCAS
Associated Press Writer

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES
ST 20TH - OCTOBER 3RD, 2008

WARSAW, Poland (AP) —
The governing bodies of world
and European soccer will not
recognize the new administra-

-tor of the troubled Polish soc-
cer federation, possibly endan-
gering the country’s right to
co-host the 2012 European
Championship.

FIFA and UEFA said Tues-
day the suspension of the Pol-
ish federation board was not
legitimate.

UEFA spokesman William
Gaillard said a condition of
sticking with Poland and
Ukraine for European soccer’s
showcase event was the con-
tinuing support of the two gov-
ernments for their respective
soccer associations.

“In this case, it seems it’s
falling far short of the goal,”
he said.

Gaillard warned that if the
conflict is not resolved “in a
satisfactory way” by the end
of October, then “UEFA will
have to take some decisions,
which of course could include
sanctions.”

FIFA and UFFA said they
continue to recognize the fed-
eration’s current leadership.as
the “only legitimate authori-
ty” to run Polish soccer.

The Polish board was sus-
pended Monday after a ruling
by the Polish Olympic Com-
mittee’s arbitration court.
Robert Zawlocki was appoint-
ed temporary chief of the fed-
eration in response to a motion
submitted by the Ministry of
Sport.

Poland’s Minister of Sport,

_Miroslaw Drzewiecki, reject-
ed the assertion that the tem-
porary administrator was ille-
gitimate, saying it was “in line
with the law.”

He said he plans to head a
delegation to meet with FIFA
and UEFA leaders at the end
of the week to explain the sit-
uation.

Last week, UEFA’s execu-
tive committee ruled that
Poland and Ukraine would

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POLAND’S Minister of. Sport,
Miroslaw Drzewiecki, defends the
decision by an independent arbi-
tration court to suspend the gov-
erning board of the Polish Soc-
cer Federation and appoint a tem-
porary chief in Warsaw, Poland,
on Tuesday...

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remain as Euro 2012 co-hosts
but warned they could still lose
the tournament if preparations
fall behind schedule.
Proposals will be submitted

referees, players and club offi-
cials — with rigging matches
in the top domestic leagues.
Twenty-nine clubs have been
implicated.









PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

New Pacers hope
to he improved

@ By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer



INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The
most visible Indiana Pacers from
the past three years were nowhere
to be found Monday on the
team’s media day.

Jermaine O'Neal was traded to
Toronto in the offseason. The
Pacers have said Jamaal Tinsley
will not play for them again after
his on-court antics and off-court
problems damaged their reputa-
tion.

Ron Artest and Stephen Jack-
son have been gone for a while
now, traded in the Pacers’ effort
to rid themselves of malcontents.

Jeff Foster and Austin Croshere
are the only players left from the
team involved in the brawl with
Detroit Pistons fans in 2004, and
Croshere was a recent addition
who is not promised a spot on the
team.

After two draft-day moves and
the Croshere pickup, eight new
players showed up for Media Day.
The Pacers hope the changes help
the franchise start winning again,
project a more wholesome image
and improve last season's league-
worst attendance. '

“Whole new ballgame this go-
round,” coach Jim O’Brien said.
“We're virtually starting with half
the team that is new, and very
positive additions to our basket-
ball team and our franchise.”

Team president Larry Bird got
busy after the team went 36-46
and missed the playoffs last sea-
son. The Pacers had one of the
best offenses and worst defenses
in league last season, prompting
Bird to add speed at the guard
spots and size in the post.

The team appears to be build-
ing around a mainstay, fourth-
year forward Danny Granger. He

averaged 19.6 points and 6.1 ©

rebounds per game last season
while shooting 40 per cent from
three-point range.

O’Brien knows Granger can
score. Now, he wants to see him
become a dominant defensive
player.

“I would hope he impacts it
from a leadership standpoint at
the defensive end more than any
other area,” he said.

Mike Dunleavy is coming off a
breakout season. The shooting
guard averaged 19.1 points, 5.2
rebounds and 3.5 assists per game
last season and he believes he can

‘= be better this year:

O’Brien applauded Granger
and Dunleavy for their produc-
tion last season, but said gaudy
statistics won’t matter if the Pac-
ers miss the playoffs again.

“Danny and Mike put up big
numbers, but everybody in the
league will say people don’t pay
attention to big numbers if they
come on a mediocre basketball
team.”

Granger said he knows the Pac-
ers are an afterthought without
the big names from the past.

“We’ve got a big opportunity
in front of us,” he said. “A lot of
people are not expecting much
from us. Sometimes, that’s a good
thing.”

The key pickup was point guard
T J Ford, who likely will replace
Tinsley, who remains on the ros-
ter but isn’t expected to play. Ford
averaged 12.1 points and 6.1
assists per game for the Raptors
last season before coming to the
Pacers in the O’Neal trade.

Granger is excited to have Ford
as the point guard, and compared
him to San Antonio point guard
Tony Parker. ;

“He’s incredibly fast,” Granger
said. “He’s a pass-first point
guard, and he can score the ball.”

Granger, Dunleavy and Ford
are among those expected to fill
O’Neal’s leadership role.

“T think it’s going to be a bunch
of guys,” O’Brien said. “The best
teams I’ve ever been around have
had a bunch of leaders who feel
comfortable leading and very
comfortable in allowing other
people to lead also.”

The Pacers also added point
guard Jarrett Jack in a trade with
Portland. Jack is expected to play
both guard spots and push Ford.

O’Brien ‘said Troy Murphy is
the favourite to start at power for-
ward. He averaged 12.2 points and
7.2 rebounds last season.

The battle for the starting cen-
ter spot likely will be the most
contested. Jeff Foster remains, but
the team added Rasho Nesterovic
and draft pick Roy Hibbert in the
trade with Toronto.

“We want there to be great
competition,” O’Brien said. “We
want there to be daily wars at that
position, to see people getting
their lips cut and nose bloodied
so that whoever gets that job will
be toughened by his teammates.”

Another player to watch is
Brandon Rush, a rookie who
helped Kansas win the college
national championship last sea-
son. The new-look Pacers expect
to make the postseason this sea-
son. “That’s the only way I can
look at things,” O’Brien said. “If
we get accomplished team lead-
ership, team ownership for
- defense, absolutely, we’ll be in the
playoffs.”

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Bryant and Lakers are

ready to open camp ©

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

EL SEGUNDO, Califor-
nia (AP) — With his
Olympic gold medal hanging
around the neck of last sea-
son’s NBA MVP trophy,
Kobe Bryant is eager to
move on and find out if the
Los Angeles Lakers can win
their first championship since
2002.

Already things are much
quieter than a year ago, when
the Lakers’ season began in
turmoil, with Bryant calling
the team’s front office “a
mess” and asking to be trad-
ed. They eventually turned
things around and reached
the NBA finals, losing to the
Boston Celtics in six games.

“There’s a lot to be happy
about, a lot to be thankful
about,” a smiling Bryant said
Monday when the Lakers
reunited on the eve of train-
ing camp. “We’re in much
better position now than we
were. We’re the favourites
for a reason. We got all the
tools here, now it’s on us to
do the work.” ,

The best news is the return
of seven-foot, 285-pound
Andrew Bynum, who sus-
tained a season-ending knee
injury January 13. He was
averaging 13.1 points, 10.2
rebounds, 2.06 blocks and
shooting a league-best 63.6
per cent from the field when
he got hurt.

“T feel fine, the knee is
fine,” he said. “I’m definitely
100 per cent.” '

With Bynum in the mid-
dle and 7-0 Pau Gasol at for-
ward, the Lakers figure to
improve significantly in
rebounding and shat block-
ing.

MIAMI Heat player Dwyane Wade talks to the media...

“We have a lot of talent
on this team,” Bynum said.
“The big focus this year is
going to be on the defensive
end,”

Just don’t refer to Bynum
and Gasol as the twin tow-
ers.

“That’s a Texas thing,”
Bryant said with a frown.

Acquiring Gasol in Febru-
ary helped the Lakers win
the tough Western Confer-
ence and come within two
games of taking the league
title.

But Gasol, a 250-pounder,
didn’t have the bulk needed
to match up against Boston’s
heftier players.

“It was just about getting
stronger over the summer,
not necessarily about getting
tougher. You can’t get
through the San Antonios



(AP Photo: J Pat Carter)

Wade: It’s ‘strictly

all about winning
right now’

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — There’s plenty that Dwyane Wade

wants these days.

He wants it known that his hope is to spend the rest of
his career with the Miami Heat, despite incessant spec-
ulation that he’ll opt out of his contract in two years. He
wants privacy when it comes to the sensitive subject of his
ongoing divorce, which he won’t discuss in specifics. He
wants vindication for a restaurant deal that went bad and
got worse when he was sued for $25 million, something

he says smeared his name.

But on the court this season, he insists none of that will

cloud his thinking.

“It’s strictly all about winning right now,” the 2006
NBA finals MVP and newly minted Olympic gold
medallist told The Associated Press to advance Satur-

‘day’s start of training camp. “My goal this year is to

make sure this team becomes a team. I felt the last two
years we kind of slipped away from that, so P’ll make sure
this team builds its camaraderie back and make sure

we’re a lot better than last year.

“As long as we win, I will be happy.”

Arenas fined $15,000 by NBA



GILBERT ARENAS answers questions for the media during the Wizards training



and the Utahs without being
tough,” Bryant said. “Boston
was a stronger team. What
we want to shore up is
becoming a better defensive
team. Boston was better.”

Csach Phil Jackson

up clean shaven for
*s media day.

-ed to look younger,”
the 63-year-old grandfather
said jokingly.

Bryant turned 30 last
month — a day after helping
the US win a gold medal
over Gasol and Spain at the
Beijing Olympics. Jackson
wants to reduce his super-
star’s minutes, but that was
the plan last season and it
didn’t happen.

“T still played 40 minutes.
I’m comfortable,” Bryant
said.

Jackson also wants the

LAKERS’ Kobe Bryant
poses for a photograph
during the team’s
media day...

Kevork Djansezian/AP

Lakers to emphasize defense,
with Bryant taking the lead.

‘“We’re hoping this year is
one where his leadership
defensively will also be as
prominent as his offensive
ability,” he said.

Bryant plans to play a full
season without having
surgery on his right pinkie
because recovery would take
too long. He damaged liga-
ments in the finger in Feb-
ruary, but averaged 28.3
points while playing in all 82
games and the playoffs.

“The finger is fine,” he
said, adding that it gets sore if
he accidentally bumps it.

The only way he’ll consid-
er surgery is if the Lakers
don’t win a title this season.

“If we win a championship,
I ain’t doing nothing,” he
said. “I’m leaving it alone.”

James confident he can
lead Cavs to NBA crown

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio
(AP) — LeBron James keeps
his Olympic gold medal in his
home office, and from time to
time Cleveland’s star takes a
peek at it.

“It’s a pretty sight,” he said.

James spent part of his sum-
mer helping the US basketball
team redeem its global superi-
ority by winning it all at the
Beijing Games. At just 23, he
was the undisputed leader of
that 12-player squad comprised
of superstar talents and super-
sized egos.

“If you can lead 11 of the
best guys in the world, you can
lead anybody,” James said
Monday. “If I can lead Kobe
Bryant and MVPs, I should be
able to lead Daniel Gibson.”

James has visions of another

exquisite, glittering prize — the.

NBA championship trophy.

And he thinks it’s within the’

Cavaliers’ reach.

“As a leader, I think I can
lead these guys to the champi-
onship,” he said. “We really
believe that. It’s not about
making the playoffs for our
team anymore. It’s about win-
ning a championship.”

The Cavaliers have come
close. Two years ago, they
made their first trip to the finals
before being overwhelmed and
swept in four straight by the
San Antonio Spurs. Last sea-
son, they pushed the eventual
champion Boston Celtics to



Lisa Billings/AP



camp in Richmond, Va. on Saturday. Arenas was fined $15,000 by the NBA for
declining to make himself available on Friday...

{ :





seven games in the Eastern
Conference semifinals but lost.

This year, the Cavs, who
acquired point guard Mo
Williams this summer in a trade
from Milwaukee, feel they can
finish the job.

“We all have one goal, and
that’s a championship,” said
Williams, who averaged 17.2
points, 6.3 assists and 3.5
rebounds for the Bucks.
“That’s the goal, and we’re not
just talk. Every team in the
league on media day is saying

they are going to win a cham-’

pionship. But we're confident.
We know that if we put in the
work and focus, we can do it.
It’s all we talk about.”

On the eve of opening train-
ing camp, Cleveland is already
in better shape than it was at
the same point last year.

On Media Day 2007, two key
players — forwards Anderson
Varejao and Sasha Pavlovic —
were in the early stages of con-
tract holdouts that would carry
on for weeks. Guard Eric Snow
had just injured his knee during
an off-season workout and was
set for surgery, and guard

‘Damon Jones used his first

opportunity to meet with
reporters to say he wanted to
be traded.

It was hardly an idyllic start
to camp, and the trouble car-
ried over into the regular sea-
son.

The Cavaliers started out
struggling and at the February
21 trading deadline, general
manager Danny Ferry turned

NBA Calendar

@ By The Associated Press



October 24: Preseason ends
October 27: Rosters set for opening day @ 6pm
October 28: Start of regular season
January 5: 10-day contracts may now be signed
January 10: All player contracts are guaranteed
for the remainder of the season
February 15: All-Star game (Phoenix)
February 19: Trading Deadline @ 3pm
April 8-11: Portsmouth Invitational Tournament (Portsmouth, Va)
April 15: Regular season ends ;
April 16: Rosters set for playoffs @ 3pm
April 18: Playoffs begin
April 26: Early entry eligibility deadline (11:59pm)
May 19: Draft lottery
June 5: NBA finals start date (possible move to June 3)
June 15: NBA draft early entry entrant withdrawal deadline (Spm)
June 18: NBA finals latest possible end date
June 25: NBA draft



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Jackson
returns
to Lakers
relaxed

EL SEGUNDO, California
(AP) — Don’t be fooled by
Phil Jackson’s tan and relaxed
demeanor. He’s still upset
about missing out on another
NBA title last summer.

“There’s still a little angst
and anger there,” the Los
Angeles Lakers’ coach told
reporters Friday at the team’s
practice facility.

The Lakers lost the NBA
Finals to the Boston Celtics
in six games in June, costing
the Hall of Fame coach a
chance at his league-record
10th coaching title.

Jackson appeared tanned,
rested and relaxed as he spoke
with reporters about his sum-
mer of boating, swimming and
spending time with his grand-
children. He also spoke of
possible changes that could
help Los Angeles win another
title.

Although the Lakers have
the core of their rotation back
from last season, Jackson said
he’s not content with the sta-
tus quo. Above all, he’s eager
to see how well Andrew
Bynum mixes with fellow sev-
en-footer Pau.Gasol.

Bynum was in the midst of a
breakout season when he suf-
fered a partially dislocated left
kneecap January 13 and did
not play again in 2007-08. The
Lakers acquired Gasol from
the Memphis Grizzlies on
February 1, and he and league
MVP Kobe Bryant led them
to the finals.

Jackson wants to play
Bynum at center, with Gasol
moving to power forward and
Lamar Odom shifting from
power forward to small for-
ward. There’s also a chance
that Jackson will start Trevor
Ariza and use Odom as a sixth
man.

“To adjust the two of them
on the floor at the same time
and Lamar at a wing spot is
going to be our goal this year
at training camp, to figure out
how to do that,” Jackson said.
“Pau has a role to play.on the
floor with Andrew. He’s got
to face the basket a little bit
more. So, yeah, we have some _
adjustments to make.” -

Jackson agreed that the
Lakers lacked the necessary
physical presence to compete
with the Celtics in the finals.
However, he said Bynum’s
return to form will solve some
of the Lakers’ lack of muscle
around the basket.

“We know we weren’t a
muscular, physical team, but
we were able to get to where
we did by finesse and speed,”
Jackson said. “I was always
‘impressed by our ability to be
as resilient as we were.”

Jackson said he did not dis-
agree with Bryant’s decision
to delay surgery on his right
pinkie until after the season.
Bryant was injured February
5, and played the rest of the
season as well as in the
Olympics with damaged liga-
ments.

The Lakers begin training
camp Tuesday. They open the
regular season October 28
against the Portland Trail
Blazers.

over half his active roster.

The hope is continuity will
replace chaos this time.

“There’s not much of an
excuse now,” James said. “We
have guys that can go out and
play. Mo can dominate a game.
We all know what I can do on
the court. We had guys hold
out for personal reasons last
year. We had guys who were
here, but not mentally here. It’s
just a different feeling.”

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 15

THE TRIBUNE

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WEDNESDAY,

AN OUTSIDE view of the British Colonial Hilton hotel...



Hilton eyes ‘mid-
market’ hotel projects
for the Bahamas

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

HILTON Hotels yesterday
gave a timely boost to the flag-
ging Bahamian tourism and
hotel industry by announcing it
was targeting this nation for
new resort projects, including
much-needed properties aimed
at the mid-priced market.

Karla Visconti, communica-
tions director for Hilton Hotels
Corporation’s Latin America
and Caribbean region, con-
firmed in an e-mail reply to Tri-
bune Business’s questions that
the five-star global hotel brand
would “target the mid-market
sector, particularly in Nassau”.

Hilton Hotels yesterday
unveiled plans to “bring” anoth-
_ er 17 resort-properties to the
Caribbean over the next five
years, to.add to the 13 it cur-
rently has in the region. The
company presently brands two
Bahamas-based properties - the
British Colonial Hilton, in

downtown Nassau, which is °

owned by private equity firm
Adurion ‘and a major Canadi-
an pension fund, and the Con-
rad Bimini Bay Resort & Casi-
no being developed by the Mia-
mi-based Capo Group.

Ms Visconti told Tribune
Business yesterday: “We recog-
nise the importance of our pres-
ence in the Bahamas and will
seek opportunities to grow our
brands there.

Looking ‘particularly .
in Nassau’ for Hilton —
Garden Inn and Hampton
Inn-branded resorts as
part of expansion plans

“Hilton Garden Inn and
Hampton Inn will target the
mid-market sector, particular-
ly in Nassau, and we are also
interested in bringing luxury
brands to high-end mixed use
developments in the Bahamas
as well.”

Hilton Hotels’ plans to devel-
op the mid-priced hotel seg-
ment will be music to the ears of
many in the Bahamian resort
and tourism industry, as this is a
category where this nation, to
put it bluntly, lacks product.

Most Bahamas-based resorts
have taken their cue from
Kerzner International’s success
on Paradise Island and moved
to position their properties at
the five-star, premium end of
the market.

The high operating costs
faced by Bahamas-based hotels
have also contributed to this
imbalance, as owners and oper-
ators have to offer'a top-quality
product to enable them to
charge the high room rates that
will cover their expenses.

The late Butch Kerzner had

SEE page 3B

Product to boost
building industry

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter



A NEW construction prod-
uct could revolutionise the
Bahamian industry by reducing
the amount of concrete cracks
occurring in buildings and the
labour costs involved in con-
struction, its proponents told
_ Tribune Business yesterday.

The product is Glass Fibre
Reinforced Polymer (GFRP)
rebar, which can replace the
steel used to reinforce concrete
blocks. It will be unveiled in the
Bahamas at a seminar next
week.

- The GFRP rebar’s advantage
is that unlike steel, the fiber-
glass will not rust or contract,
explained Robert:Samia, an



American construction consul-
tant with ties to the Bahamas
for the past two decades.

He added that one of the rea-
sons why there are so many
cracks in Bahamian buildings is
the stress is placed on the con-

‘crete, due to the steel rusting

and the fact that steel expands
quicker than cement.

Using the GFRP rebar would
therefore reduce the amount of
cracks and decrease the amount
of money needed for repairing
them, Mr Samia said.

Since it will not rust, he
added, it was especially suited
for island construction, as it will
eliminate the danger for struc-
tures near the sea.

Mr Samia said that using the
GFRP rebar can help reduce
labour costs in construction. He

- explained that this was possible

because the fibreglass rebar was
much lighter than steel, involv-
ing less manpower to move and
transport it. The GFRP rebar
did not have to be welded
together either,” Mr Samia said.
The rebar can be cut at the spe-
cific angles needed for the pro-
ject at the factory, which is
something that an experienced
and organised contractor would
have no problem knowing
ahead of time - exactly what
angles he would need.

There is no special training
needed to install it, Mr Samia
added, saying that all that is
needed is “ about five minutes
of instruction”.

Mr Samia said the Nebraska
firm, Hughes Brothers, will be
in Nassau next week on Octo-
ber 9 at the Hilton to host a spe-
cial seminar on the benefits of
using rebar for contractors and
engineers,



O-CT





AS

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas

Property Fund is

“hoping” to close

the purchase of

its third property

some time this month, the

BISX-listed fund’s president

told Tribune Business yester-

day, with a tripling of the com-

pany’s ‘other expenses’ during

the 2008 first half blamed on its

exposure to vacant space in the
Bahamas Financial Centre.

Michael Anderson, also

president of RoyalFidelity

Merchant Bank & Trust, the

Bahamas Property Fund’s

administrator and major share-

holder, said he had “been wait-

ing” for the property’s vendor

Tipped worker woes
behind household



ROYAL BFIDELITY

NASSAU OFFICE |
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



Money at Work






Fund ‘hoping’ for

October deal close

* BISX-listed Bahamas Property Fund in talks to purchase third property

* First half results hit by exposure to 8-9% vdcant space in Bahamas
Financial Centre, and resulting maintenance charge

“Other expenses’ triple, pushing net income |
down almost 27% despite 5% revenue rise

to “come back to me” and
indicate whether they were
willing and able to proceed
with the transaction.
Declining to name either the
vendor or property involved,
Mr Anderson said he had
received some documents
relating to the potential sale,
and the seller was “getting all
the pieces of the puzzle togeth-
er to enter into the saie this
week.
“I’m hopeful that in the next

earnings drop

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

UNDER-
EMPLOY- |
MENT among |}
Bahamian hotel
workers who |
derive most of
their income |
from commis- |
sions (tips) is
likely to be a
major factor
behind the 4.1
per cent year-on-year decline
in average household income,
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president said
yesterday.

Responding to the initial
findings of the Department
of Statistics 2008 Labour
Force Survey, which found
average household income in
the Bahamas had dropped by
almost $1,800 year-over-year



D’Aguilar

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* Average household earnings
drop almost $1,800 per family
between 2007 and 2008, Labour
Force Survey finds

* Unemployment up, as economy
unable to create jobs fast enough
to meet demand, with men again
being left behind

* Underemployment major
problem, as Chamber chief
says numbers likely to
‘continue deteriorating’

- falling from $45,221 in 2007
to $43,427 this year - Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said it simply pro-
vided more evidence of an
economic downturn.

Apart from an increase in
the unemployment rate,
which grew from 7.9 per cent
in 2007 to 8.7 per cent in 2008,

SEE page 6B.





month or so we will be able to
close the transaction,” he
added.

When asked why the
Bahamas Property Fund was
eyeing an acquisition, Mr
Anderson replied: “The key
benefit we’re seeking for our
shareholders is diversification.

“We need to be able to have
a wide range of properties, not
just one. We don’t want to be
susceptible to changes in one
area or another.”

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

BENCHMARK
(Bahamas) president yester-
day said he was “positive and
optimistic” about the BISX-
listed company’s 2008 third
quarter performance due to a
rebound in financial stocks,
although he admitted the
company’s Bahamian invest-
ment portfolio was “over-
weight” in that industry. ‘

Some 68 per cent of Bench-
mark’s Bahamian investment
portfolio was allocated to
financial services stocks as at
the 2008 second quarter end
on June 30, the sector
accounting for $4.494 million
of the portfolio’s $6,591 mil-
lion value, but Julian Brown
told Tribune Business the
company’s “hands are tied”.

He explained that Bench-
mark’s Bahamian investment
portfolio “has to some degree
reflect the capitalisation of the
market”, which in the

Benchmark ‘positive and
optimistic’ on Q3 results

Meanwhile, Mr Anderson
explained that the Bahamas
Property Fund’s increase in
other expenses - from $161,356

in the 2007 first half to

$497,135 this year - was
because the Fund had to pick
up the bill for excess common
area maintenance (CAM)
expenses incurred in the 2007
financial year.
Mr Anderson explained that

SEE page 4B



* Company admits ‘overweight’
in financial stocks

* Pursuing twin-track court
and talks process to resolve ~
$5.6m dispute

Bahamas context is dominat-
ed by the banks - chiefly First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), which accounts
for-more than 40 per cent of |
BISX’s market cap.

It is further supported by
the likes of Bank of the
Bahamas _ International,
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas),
Commonwealth Bank and the
insurance companies, Fam-
Guard Corporation and Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas).

As a result, Mr Brown
explained that Benchmark
had to effectively ‘track’ the
financial services stocks list-
ed on BISX and the company
could not “go too far away

SEE page 5B

‘best of class’ employees?

PLAN

Royal Fidelity Pension Plan

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

SANE Vee)

Bridgetown: 246.467.4000

royalfidelity.com

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work





PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







out of the 24 listed securities.
Of those, two advanced and
three remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 47,168 shares

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a very quiet week in

he Bahamian stock market,
vith investors trading in five

NOTICE

o

Pursuant to. the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Comipanies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 24th day of September,

A.D., 2008.

‘Dated the 30th day of September, A.D., 2008.

Dayrrl R. Butler
Liquidator of
ACTS BAHAMAS LTD.

NOTICE

TECHNICAL HOLDINGS LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been. dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 20th day of March,

A.D., 2008.
Dated the 30th day of September, A.D., 2008.
Dayrrl R. Butler

Liquidator of
ACTS BAHAMAS LTD.





Sake 8 oS «

Financial Intelligence Unit

LEGAL COUNSEL

ee

changed hands, a substantial
decline of 5,176,121 shares, in
comparison to last week's
record trading volume of
5,223,289 shares.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) (CIB) was the
main advancer, with 1,200 of its
shares trading, climbing by
$0.10 or 0.87 per cent to end the
week at $11.65.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader, with
37,318 shares trading, rising by
$0.07 to close at $7.37. Some
8,050 Cable Bahamas shares
(CAB), and 500 shares in
FOCOL Oil Holdings (FCL),
also traded, of which both
remained unchanged, to end the
week at $14.15 and $5.25
respectively.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded in $35,000
(par value) worth of Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Notes, all in
Series D Notes (FBB15) due
for redemption in 2015.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) released unaudited
financial results for the six
months ending on July 31, 2008.
DHS reported net income of
$1.6 million, a decrease of
$848,000 or 34.2 per cent com-
pared to $2.5 million for the
same period in the 2007 first
half.

For the quarter, DHS report-
ed net income of $649,000, com-
pared to $1.2 million for the
2007 second quarter, a decline
of $515,000 or 44.2 per cent.
Total net revenues stood at $9.7
million, down $810,000 or 7.5
per cent from $10.8 million for

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Legal Counsel at the

Financial Intelligence Unit (the “FIU”).

JOB SUMMARY:

The successful applicant will be responsible for the provision of legal advice to the Director and
the Financial Intelligence Unit relative to its statutory mandate under the Financial Intelligence

Unit Act, 2000.

RESPONSIBLE TO:
The Director of the Financial Intelligence Unit.

The successful applicant must:

° Be a Counsel and Attorney-At-Law in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and a

member of The Bahamas Bar.
* Have detailed knowledge of existing financial legislation.

* Be computer literate in the use of various Microsoft applications including Word, Excel, ,

and PowerPoint.
* Possess strong leadership and communication skills.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

¢ Responsible for ensuring that the Financial Intelligence Unit is kept abreast of legislative

developments relative to its functions.

* Responsible for making recommendations to the Director relative to the legal issues

affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.

* Responsible for liaison between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the Office of the
Attorney General relative to Jegal issues affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.

* Responsible for the provision of training of industry participants in the Financial Services
Sector in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

* Responsible fdr drafting of legal documents for Memoranda of Understanding between
the Financial Intelligence Unit and foreign Financial Intelligence Units.

* Responsible for assisting with other duties relative to the proper functioning of the

Financial Intelligence Unit as required by the Director,

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:

* Bachelor of Laws Degree (LLB) with legal professional qualification; five years call to The

Bahamas Bar.

* Experience in Compliance, Civil, Criminal & Corporate Law, Assets Tracing and

Forfeiture.
* Excellent attitude and an appreciation for time management.

* Competitive salary commensurate with experience
° 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract.

Interested persons may obtain additional information from the FIU’s website at
www.bahamas.gov.bs/fiu and should submit written applications inclusive of resumes and

copies of relevant certificate(s) by 15" October 2008 to:

Anthony M. Johnson
Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O, Box SB 50086
Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas



the same three-month period in
2007, while total expenses also
declined by $243,000 or 2.6 per
cent to $9.2 million.

For the six-month period,
earnings per common share
declined to $0.16 or 36 per cent
versus $0.25 for the same period
in 2007. Management indicat-
ed that patient activity was
down in the 2008 second quar-
ter, due to a decline in elective
admissions, as general econom-
ic conditions continue to affect
individual health care choices.
This resulted in a decrease in
patient days of 6.4 per cent.

Total assets and liabilities
stood at $30.4 million and $9
million respectively, compared
to $31.3 million and $11.5 mil-
lion at year-end 2008.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank. (Bahamas) (CIB)
released unaudited financial
results for the nine months end-
ed July 31, 2008. CIB reported
net income for the most recent
quarter of $26.7 million, in com-
parison to $17.8 million for the
same three-month period in
2007.

Net interest income, which is
a primary measure of the bank's
core performance, was $38.6
million for the quarter, repre-
senting a slight increase of $4
million or 11.6 per cent, com-
pared to $34.6 million for the
comparative period.

In addition to positive interest
margins, CIB also experienced
an increase in its operating
income of $13.3 million, which
was up by $7.3 million quarter-
over-quarter. At the end of the
nine-month period, earnings per
share stood at $0.48, a decrease
of 30.4 per cent compared to
the $0.69 reported in the 2007
third quarter.

CIB’s total assets and liabili-
ties were $4.4 billion and $3.7
billion respectively, compared
to $4.8 billion and $4.2 billion at
year-end 2007.

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of its private place-
ment offering. The preferred
shares will be paying a dividend
rate of prime + 1.75 per cent,
payable semi-annually.



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 879.65 YTD (-7.60%)















BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.81 ¢: 0 9.04%
BBL $0.89 $- 0 4.71%
BOB $8.50 $- 0 -11.55%
BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 0.00%
BWL $3.49 $- 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $- 8,050 17.43%
CBL = $7.37. ~—s $+0.07-——-37,318 -12.57%
CHL $285 -° $- -9.52%
CIB $11.65 $+0.10 1,200 -20.21%
CWCB $3.71 $-0.89 0 -26.39%
DHS $2.77 $- 0 17.87%
FAM $8.06 ss $ 0 11.94%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FCC $0.40 G: 0 -48,05%
FCL« *» $5.25 $- 600 1.35%
FCLR $1.00 $ 0 0.00%
FIN $12.00 $- 0 -7.34%
ICD $8.20 © -"-$- 0 13.10%
ISJ $12.00 $- 0 9.09%
PRE _ $10.00 $ 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:




e Cable Bahamas (CAB) has declared a quarterly dividend of
$0.06 per share, payable on September 30, 2008, to all shareholders
of record date September 15, 2008. -)

¢ Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a quarterly divi-
dend of $0.05 per share, payable on September 30, 2008, to all
shareholders of record date September 12, 2008.

¢ Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS) has declared a semi-
annual dividend of $0.02 per share, payable on September 30,
2008, to all shareholders of record date September 17, 2008.

© Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has declared a
quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on November 7,
2008, to all shareholders of record date September 30, 2008.

e RND Holdings (RND) will be holding its Annual General
Meeting on Wednesday, October 22, 2008, at 6pm at the British
Colonial Hilton, Nassau, Bahamas.














Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ZEFA INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 30, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. i

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are re-
quired on or before the 12th day of November, 2008 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of
the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

October 1, 2008
SHAKIRA BURROWS

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



“Meeting the needs of advertisers

and readers motivates me to do

a good job. The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune

My Verve, My Vlewspaper!





THE TRIBUNE



@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter

AFTER a protracted legal
battle, and no response to a let-
ter he wrote a year ago, a dis-
gruntled Bahamian is once
again appealing to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham to assist
him in settling a court case he
initiated against the National
Insurance Board (NIB).

Anthony Wright said he was
in the process of writing a letter

to Mr Ingraham, appealing to |

him to intervene so that he can
receive an alleged settlement
he claims he was granted by the
Industrial Tribunal for workers
compensation stemming from
an injury sustained while on the
job in 1982.



FROM page 1B

himself argued that Baha Mar ,

should target the mid-priced
market with its product at Cable
Beach, rather than go head-to-
head with Kerzner Internation-
al, as this would expand the
industry’s product offering,
choice and enable it to tap into
an entirely new market that the
Bahamas currently does not
serve. It would also have bol-
stered Kerzner’s position, too, if
Baha Mar had done that.

In its release yesterday,
Hilton Hotels said it wanted to
“add focused-service hotels” in
the Caribbean’s main commer-
cial centres, including Nassau,
through the Hilton Garden Inn
and Hampton Inn brands. It
was also focusing on the devel-
opment of luxury branded-
hotels and residences in mixed-
use developments across the
Bahamas.

However, no projects have
been finalised yet, with Ms Vis-
conti telling Tribune Business:
“At this time, we do not have
confirmed hotels to announce
in the Bahamas, other than
those you mention [British
Colonial Hilton and Conrad



PM Ingraham

After many legal battles, Mr
Wright, in a desperate bid to
get the monies he alleges are
owed to him, filed a petition to
wind-up NIB on March 12,
2008. NIB, though, has denied
the allegations and is opposing
him in court.

SIM Ma recmeI CSUN a lm NOK Men

tives whose efforts will be sole-
ly to grow our presence in the
Caribbean and Latin America.

“Hilton Hotels Corporation
is both a management and fran-
chise property, and seeks to
grow throughout the region
with either opportunity. We will

Almost exactly a year ago
today, Mr Wright outlined the
details of the case to Mr Ingra-
ham in a letter pleading for the
Prime Minister to address the
issue.

“He has yet to respond, and
so I am going to send him a let-
ter this week, once again out-
lining what has happened,” Mr
Wright said.

He added that he remains
committed to pushing for the
wind-up, which if granted would
throw the country’s $1.3 billion
social security system into chaos
and potentially jeopardise the
institution that hundreds of
Bahamians rely on for their
retirement income.

Mr Wright alleged that the
court case was waiting for a new
date for the matter to be heard



always look for the right fit in
the right market with the right
brand.”

The Caribbean development
efforts will be lead by Gregory
Rockett, Hilton’s vice-president,
development, for the Caribbean
and southeast US.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138(8) of The
International Business Companies Act 2000, of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, notice is hereby given’
that BRICKELL EQUITIES CORPORATION LTD. has
been dissolved and struck off the Register as of 16th

September, 2008.

King & Co.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

d-up case

before a judge.

He said the matter was
adjourned by a Registrar
because there was some con-
cern as to whether NIB would
fall under the rules of the Com-
panies Act.

The action was the result of
an injury Mr Wright allegedly
sustained back in 1982 while an
employee at Franklyn Chemi-
cals, a company then based on
Grand Bahama.

Mr Wright said he suffered a
fall that left him with a ruptured
disc and damage to the soft tis-
sue of his back.

He claimed that NIB
declined to pay for his treat-
ment abroad, saying it would

be more affordable for him to -

receive treatment in a Bahami-
an hospital.

Mr Wright alleged that ever
since he has faced health chal-
lenges resulting from the fall,

‘including pain and a month-

long hospital stay in 1994, plus
many subsequent out-patient
visits.

STANDARD

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 3B

fo. Mt Te Me OE eer ee.
Plea to PM over NIB win

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PRINCE
ALBERT DEVEAUX JR. A.K.A.
PRINCE DEVEAUX of Taylor
Street in the Southern District of
the Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The

after which date the Executrix will proceed to distribute ©
the assets having regard only to the claims of which she

shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all’ persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

Bahamas,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on
or before Friday the 21st day of November A. D., 2008

MICHELLE Y. CAMPBELL & CO.

Chambers

#55 Mackey Street

P. O. Box N-9180
Nassau, Bahamas

Executrix of the above Estate |



AVWMOUMCES

the retirement of

Mr. Paul B. Johnson
effective from October 3rd, 2008.

Paul started at JBR on Wuiff Road as a youngster
of 14 years old. He could be seen sweeping the
shop floor, helping out in all departments and

under his father, Mr. Buck Johnson’s guidance and
tutelage grew with the business and became

General Manager, contributing in making JBR the -

success it is today.

Mr. William (Billy) Lowe and the JBR group of
companies would like to wish Paul well as he
enters into this new stage of his life, and we will
be forever grateful for his boundless dedication

and service.

HARDWARE

AND PLUMBING

Bimini Bay Resort & Casino]. Monique Cartwright-Winder

*What we have is an expand-
ed team of development execu-

REWARD

A reward is being offered for information leading
to the recovery of and/or the arrest of the persons

Marsh Harbour, Abaco







FAMILY GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



» BALANCE SHEET .
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)














2008 Toyota Yar














SBA PIOAOL BOOS














TOTAL

responsible for the theft of a 2008 Toyota Yaris; 2007 2006
which occurred around August 13, 2008 in Redland ee eee
Acres, off Soldier Road Bank term deposits $ 10,732,604 $ 8,430,710
Financial Investment Assets:
oe Held-to-maturity 39,063,136 33,409,618
Colour: Olive Green Fair value through profit and loss 8,561,549 6,843,481
Serial #: JTDBW93320-1105523 Loans 70,369,406 65,415,166
License Ht: 201820 Total investment assets 128,726,695 114,098,975
: : ' ; Cash and bank balances 2,050,995 1,141,473
Identifying Markings ‘“Apple’’ on front wind- Receivables and other assets ~ 2,064,805 2,256,737
shield, ““Appleseed’’ on rear windshield, a scratch Premiums reesivanie 2,365,386 peas
Property, plant and equipment, net 11,724,764 12,690,740



on left rea d :
left rear fender and dent on rear bumper. TOTAL $ 146,932,645 $ 132,902,887
. . LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Please call CDU, Stolen Vehicles Unit 502-9938, awe

502-9942, 302-3900 or 357-7502. Reserves for future policyholders’ benefits $ 94,481,860 $ 84,891,696
Other policyholders’ funds 5,833,961 5,919,613 °

Policy liabilities 100,315,821 90,811,309

; Payables and accruals 6,555,202 6,460,604

YS Total liabilities 106,871,023 97,271,913

EQUITY:

Share capital 1,707,462 1,707,462

Share premium 11,401,314 11,401,314

Revaluation surplus 2,518,187 2,688,415

Retained earnings 24,434,659 19,833,783

Total equity 40,061,622 35,630,974

$ 146,932,645 $ 132,902,887

These financial statements were approved by the Board of Directors on April 10, 2008

(Mim noms

Director



and are signed on its behalf by:

Director

The complete set of audited financial statements is available on the
company’s website at www.familyguardian.com



PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

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THE TRIBUNE

Fund ‘hoping’ for October deal close

FROM page 1B

at the start of each year, a Bud-
get was drawn up to cover the
estimated CAM expenses for
its two properties - the Bahamas
Financial Centre in downtown
Nassau and One Marina Drive
on Paradise Island.

CAM expenses are the funds
necessary to maintain areas in
the properties that are used by
all tenants, such as electricity
for the corridors, reception area
and external lighting, with each
tenant’s contribution based on
the amount of square footage
they have leased.

However, if the estimated
CAM budget falls short of pro-
jections, then a “shortfall or
overage assessment” is levied
against the tenants in the fol-

TS

PUTS (Ty

TU aS
were
on Mondays



lowing financial year to pay off
the balance due.

With some 8-9 per cent of
space in the Bahamas Financial
Centre vacant, the Bahamas
Property Fund was thus
exposed to this share of the
CAM overage budget for the
property when it was sent out
by the property manager dur-
ing the 2008 second quarter,
hence the increase in other
expenses. Some $371,258 in oth-
er expenses were incurred dur-
ing the 2008 second quarter.

“We did not know about the
overage for 2007 until we were
billed for it in 2008,” Mr Ander-
son said. “That 8-9 per cent of
space is still vacant, and with
the market as it is it is a struggle
to find good tenants.”

With the Bahamas Financial
Centre featuring all kinds of

infrastructure to cope with’

every contingency and emer-
gency, it was a property geared
chiefly to international banks
and companies that needed to
provide seamless service and
continue operations in the event
of disasters such as hurricanes.

“You've got to be a particular
kind of client that needs those
niche aspects,” Mr Anderson
explained. “There’s not a large
group of clients that meets that
interest.”

The Bahamas Property
Fund’s One Marina Drive prop-
erty, though, was helping to off-



Treasury Head

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES

' Reporting to our Regional Treasury team, the position is
responsible iu: ueveloping and implementing strategies for
local/foreign
responsibilities include marketing and quoting rates for corporate
foreign exchange contracts, money market instruments and
derivative products and projecting liquidity and rate trends. The
role is also focused on risk management through monitoring.
liquidity and foreign exposure, ensuring compliance with legal,
regulatory, and internal policy requirements, and, managing ratios ©

currency

liability

products. Key

set the loss of a major tenant at
the Bahamas Financial Centre,
capitalising on its unique posi-
tion as the only high-end, pur-
pose built office space on Par-
adise Island to ensure it was 100
per cent leased.

Mr Anderson said there was
“nothing at this stage to make
us feel there’s a problem with
any one of our tenants” at the
Bahamas Financial Centre as a
result of the credit/liquidity
crunch in the global financial
system, with clients such as
Credit Suisse and JP Morgan
Chase not part of the current
round of consolidation taking
place. ,

Outlining the Bahamas Prop- °

erty Fund’s business model, he
explained that all tenants were
on leases ranging from three to
five years in duration. The built-
in annual rental increases varied
depending on the lease length,
with rental fees increasing by
3-5 per cent normally for a
three-year lease, and 2-3 per
cent for a five-year lease.
Acknowledging that it was
hard to find new tenants, espe-
cially in the current economic

climate, if one was to leave, Mr .-

Anderson said the Bahamas
Property Fund aimed to keep
tenants for at least 10-15 years.



Builders of The Bahamas

“The key criteria for us is
rental rates and interest rates,”
Mr Anderson explained. “As
we go forward, we’ll start to see
bank interest payments drop as
we pay down debt. We have
benefited from relatively low
interest rates, and steadily grow- ~
ing rental rates. As long as we
don’t lose too many tenants,
that model works for us.”

Once the vacant space in the
Bahamas Financial Centre was
filled, Mr Anderson said the
Bahamas Property Fund would
be able to recover the CAM
overage payout.

He added that the company’s
rental rates were competitive,
especially against rival new
properties, due to the latter’s .
greater construction costs.

For the 2008 first half, the
Bahamas Property Fund saw
rental revenues increase by 5
per cent to $1.982 million, com-
pared to $1.887 million the year
before.

However, the tripling in oth-
er expenses saw the fund’s oper-
ating expenses increase by 56.3
per cent to $1.065 million, com-
pared to $681,379 in 2007..

As a result, net income
dropped 26.6 per cent to
$869,736, compared to $1.185
million for the 2007 first half.



An encyclopedia of personal & business profiles
& in history by William Cartwright has hit the World
m@ Market! This 219 full-colour page book stands
alone in quality as it delivers intriguing information
on The Bahamas and those who have contributed
to its development in a MAJOR way, It features

artists, athletes, educators, politicians, professionals,
religious leaders and much, much more! Pick up your
copy at United Bookshop in the Marathon Mall or
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Litigation Attorney Required
For a growing Law Practice
Qualifications:
Minimum three (3) years experience in civil, commercial and
crimminal liugation

Please e-mail resume in Microsoft Word or PDF format to
.- » lawprofessions@ gmail.com
-. onor before October 6, 2008

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BENSON ARISTIL of
WASHINGTON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day
of SEPTEMBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. _

team. You will interact with and reserves. Additional responsibilities include overseeing all
related financial, regulatory and management performance

colleagues from around the | gl 1d
Caribbean region andiacross the | reporting, ane) supervising and training support staff.

‘organization globally, providing
treasury management to our
‘local team. In addition to a great
career, we offer a competitive
salary and benefits package.

Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Accounting or Finance, and, a minimum of 5 years Treasury
experience with a major commercial and/or investment bank; a
Chartered Accountant or CFA. designation preferred. Excellent
marketing/sales, analytical, communication, and interpersonal
skills, combined with a results orientation and an ability to build
relationships, will round out the ideal candidate. Some travel is
" required.



| Interested candidates ‘should
forward a copy of their resume

by October 3, 2008 to: Human
Resources, P.O. Box N-1576,

NOTICE

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED |
|



Neo Peete OR. o Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (4) of the
oe oe oe OR Email: - International Business Companies Act, 2000, notice
ianice, bson@citL.com Challenge is hereby given that:-

yourself to a career like no other |
, i



(a) EM Securities Limited is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 20th day of March, 2008; and



Seer anaeininnananannnarigs

(c) The Liquidator is Andre J. Feldman of Argus
Advisors, First Commercial Centre, Suite #1,
Second Floor, P.O. Box F-42411, East Mall Drive,
Freeport, Grand Bahama Island Bahamas.

ARGUS ADVISORS



Lega! Notice

NOTICE

BYNA VALLEY CORPORATION

saan OO enn

&
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BYNA VALLEY
CORPORATION has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
| therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

ad rates





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 5B



eT a OR «eee
Benchmark ‘positive and

optimistic’ on Q3 results

FROM page 1B

from that”.

He explained that if Bench-
mark deviated from its finan-
cial services holdings and
became underweight in them,
it would underperform the
Bahamian market, whereas if it
‘tracked’ them it would, at
worst, stay in line with the gen-
eral market’s performance. The
company had to look for sec-
. tors that were well-capitalised
and liquid.

“I understand we are over-
weight in financial services, but
our hands are tied,” Mr Brown

told Tribune Business. “We

have a fairly heavy investment
in Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, but that stock has not per-
formed well over the past 12
months. We will not be putting
$3-$4 million into, other sectors
because it is not prudent.”

Despite the relatively poor
performance of financial stocks
during the 2008 first half, large-
ly due to the depreciation in
FirstCaribbean’s and Com-
monwealth’s share prices, Mr
Brown said he was not aban-
doning the industry.

“It was the one that had us
over the top last year. Com-
monwealth Bank performed
extremely well last year, and as
a result our portfolio performed
extremely well. We: have suf-
fered the consequences” of the
decline in banking stocks, Mr
Brown said, the unrealised
$1.277 million loss caused by
the reduction in value of its

ter, and will be putting out those
numbers soon.”

’ Meanwhile, Mr Brown said
Benchmark (Bahamas) was
“still working” on resolving the
issue that forced it to take a
one-time, $5.616 million bad
debt provision at the end of fis-
cal 2007. That event wiped out
$1.06 per share in book value
and the company’s retained
earnings.

The problems related to mar-
gin trading that Benchmark’s
subsidiary, Alliance Investment
Management, was doing for a
client, and the securities it was
holding as collateral. The val-
ue of those securities fell amid
the stock market slide in the
2007 fourth quarter. '

Mr Brown said Benchmark
was pursuing a twin-track
approach to resolving the prob-
lem, talking directly to the client

involved as well as having initi-
ated an action before the
Supreme Court over it.

Meanwhile, Mr Brown said
the Wall Street turmoil had
benefited Alliance through
increasing the trading activity
and volumes initiated by its
clients.

The increase in cash on
Benchmark’s books at the end
of the second quarter, from
$8.546 million at year-end 2007
to $17.705 million at June 30,
2008, directly reflected “growth
in” Alliance’s business, Mr
Brown said. The amount due
to customers increased from
$19.582 million to $31.129 mil-
lion over the same time period.

The Benchmark president
said the company did not antic-
ipate any problems with its
planned shopping complex/real
estate project for the

Legal Notice

NOTICE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ZACHARY ENTERPRISES LTD. -

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance: with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ZACH-
ARY ENTERPRISES LTD. has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 19th day of September, 2008.

‘Carmichael Road area as a

result of the current economic
downturn, Mr Brown added.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national is understood to be ear-
marked as the anchor tenant,
and Mr Brown said the prop-
erty was likely to ultimately be
fully tenanted.

“I think that where we’re
aiming, we should be coming
out of this slow period, because
the project is likely to take a
year to finish. We will work
through the slow period and
things will pick up by the time
we go to market for leases,” Mr
Brown said.

Construction is likely to begin
before 2008 year-end.

Mr Brown said Benchmark
had no plans to bolster its capi-
tal base, adding that any capital
raising done by the company
was likely to seek funds for spe-
cific projects.



LTS) a
ea MCAS ET TIME

STIR ary CTL

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
‘ (No.45 of 2000)

- SENECA ENTERPRISES INC.

‘In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), SENECA
ENTERPRISES INC. has been dissolved and struck off the Regis-
ter according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 19th day of September, 2008.

Robert Philip Surcouf
Harbour Reach
Rue De Carteret
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands

Liquidator





SEEKING Messenger

We are secking to employ a team player with a passion for success and a

desire to get ahead.





Skills and Requirements -

>f Excellent navigation and geographic knowledge;
>» A keen sense of punctuality and time management;
Amiable and reliable;
Excellent oral and communication skills;
‘Ability to multitask;
Ability to work well under pressure;

VVVVV








investment portfolio being
greater than its $929,648 loss
for the 2008 half year.

And he added: “The finan-
cial stocks have done extremely
weli in the third quarter in
terms of price, and from that
things are basically looking
extremely good. We’re positive
and optimistic on the third quar-

Excellent driving record.
Robert Philip Surcouf
Harbour Reach
Rue De Carteret
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands
Liquidator

Minimum Requirements

> Education to high school level;
> Minimum two years driving experience;
> Valid Driver's License.

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
messengeropportunity@gmail.com







OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR
SUPREME CourT, NASSAU

Financial Intelligence Unit

The public is hereby notified that the premises occupied by the Supreme
- Court have been extended by the addition of a temporary annex in the
Saffrey Square Building, East Street North.

ACCOUNTANT

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Accountant at the
Financial Intelligence Unit (the “FIU”).

The relevant notice under section 53(1) of the Supreme Court Act was
posted on 25 September 2008 and the Court will commence work from those
premises on Monday, 29 September.

JOB SUMMARY: 7

The successful applicant will be responsible for the provision of accounting services to the FIU,
inclusive of the proper management of all aspects of the. organization’s accounting functions
relative to its statatory mandate under the Financial Intelligence Unit Act, 2000.

Senior Justice Anita Allen will relocate to this annex which will be known
The “Supreme Court (Saffrey Square) Apnex 1”.

RESPONSIBLE TO:
The Director of the Financial Intelligence Unit.

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:
The successful applicant must: :
¢ Be a Public Accountant in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and a member of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA).
Possess current detailed knowledge of various accounting standards including GAAP
and IAS. :
Have a minimum of five (5) years experience at a management level.
Previous audit experience with an established accounting firm and or a governmental
agency would be an asset.
Be computer literate in the use of various Microsoft applications including Word, Excel,
and PowerPoint.
° — Possess strong leadership and communication skills.

onna D Newton
(Acting Registrar)



KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
The successful applicant will be responsible for:

* Preparation of financial statements and other financial reports on a monthly basis,
Producing reports necessary for the annual audit of the Unit's accounts.
Coordination of the annual audit of accounts with the external auditors.
Preparation of annual budget and monthly payroll.

Monthly reconciliation of bank account. ;

Purchases, payment of suppliers and cash disbursements.

Periodic review of the Unit’s accounting system, applications and procedures to enhance
efficiency.

Performing other related duties as may be necessary,

CHAMBERS OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:
“* Minimum of five (5) years accounting experience.

SITTINGS OF THE COURT NOTICE °
SECTION 53(1) OF THE SUPREME COURT ACT, CHAPTER 53 :

Competitive salary commensurate with experience.
15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract.

Interested — persons additional information from the FIU’s website at

www.-bahamas.gov.b
copies of relevant certificate(s) by 15" October 2008 to:

may obtain

Ly IS HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Supreme Court will sit at Suite'No. 105,
Saffrey Square, East Street North, Nassau.

Anthony M. Johnson
Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas

by direction of the Chief Justice

Ak,

Registrar (Acting)
25 September 2008





PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE

Tipped worker woes behind household earnings drop

FROM page 1B

sparking a decline in house-
hold income, Mr D’ Aguilar also
identified the reduced work
weeks being experienced by
many hotel and tourism sector
employees as another factor.

“A large part of the work-
force is paid on a commission
basis through tips and gratu-
ities, and when economic.activ-
ity is down, the tipped part of
their income goes down,” the
Chamber president explained.

“Those are probably the two
main reasons why household
income is down. I don’t think
there has been any reduction in
salaries for salaried workers.
You're either underemployed,
unemployed or your commis-
sion income is less”

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
president, added: “What you’re
seeing in that [survey] is reflect-
ed by the underemployment
that is occurring in the Bahamas
because of the slowdown in the
economy.”

Apart from the impact on
employees reliant on gratuities
and tips, Mr Nutt said house-
hold income was being increas-
ingly impacted by the tendency
of retail stores and other busi-
nesses to reduce their working
hours to cut back on costs, espe-
cially utilities.

Using an example; Mr
D’ Aguilar said hotel waiters
may still be working five days a
week, but due to the decline in
tourism numbers they were
serving less clients. All of which
translated into fewer gratuities.

“For anyone on commission-
based compensation, there’s no
doubt that economic activity is
lower,” Mr D’ Aguilar told Tri-
bune Business. “If you’re earn-
ings are based on making a per-
centage of that activity, and eco-
nomic activity is down, you’re
going to go home with less
income.”

He predicted that the eco-
nomic climate was likely to get
tougher than the Department
of Statistics survey findings
showed, and said: “Those num-
bers will deteriorate, that’s my

BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED

Unaudited Financial Statements
Six months ended June 30, 2008

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Balance Sheet (unaudited)

gut feeling.

“Unemployment will contin-
ue to rise, and household
income will continue to decline.
If household income declines,
that’s compounded by the fact
that the purchasing power of
that has gone down significant-
ly because of inflation. You’re
making less, but things have
increased in price. It’s a double
whammy.”

Average household income
in New Providence had been
less affected by the economic
woes, standing at $46,692, while
in Grand Bahama the corre-
sponding figure was $40,381.
Still, the survey’s release rep-
resented another raft of bad
news, coming right behind Wall
Street’s continuing woes.

The Labour Force and
Household Income Survey, a
one-time snapshot of economic
trends and conditions that exist-
ed in the Bahamas in May 2008,
found that some 5,490 persons
joined the Bahamian workforce
in 2008, an increase of 2.9 per
cent upon 2007 numbers.

Yet only 3,430 of those per-

2

June30 December31
2008 “» 2007

Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 94,219 $ 3,061
Accounts receivable, net 1,545,445 1,385,545
Inventory 359,934 399,839
Loans and other assets 146,732 58,545
Deposits : 12,900 _ 12,900
Investment in associate 151,754 105,869
Total current assets 2,310,984 1,965,759
Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment, net 7,480,584 7,207,137
Total assets $ 9,791,568 $ 9,172,896
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Liabilities
Bank overdraft $ 253,108 $ 195,021
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities ‘ 463,015. 1p bds208 ms cyey
Security deposits . m 404,212 0 382.619, > of
Bank loan re 400,000- St Sey eS
Total liabilities SOO\. CITA 1,520,335 1,091,546
Shareholders’ equity
Share capital 42,000 42,000
Contributed surplus 2,752,113 2,752,113
Retained earnings 5,477,120 5,287,237
Total shareholders’ equity 8,271,233 8,081,350
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 9,791,568 $ 9,172,896

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statement of

Income and Retained Earnings (unaudited)
Six months ended June 30

sons, or 62.5 per cent, was able
to find work. This meant that
almost four out of every 10 new
Bahamian labour force entrants,
the majority of them most like-
ly high school leavers, was
unable to find work. ;

Statistics -

The Department of Statistics
said the 3,430 person - 2 per
cent - growth in the employed
labour force did not match the
2.9 per cent increase in the over-
all labour force, resulting in a
12.4 per cent increase in the
unemployed labour force.

Effectively, this means that
the Bahamian economy is not
growing fast enough - and pro-
viding enough jobs - to meet
the demand that exists, espe-
cially among young Bahamians.
Apart from prolonged unem-
ployment, the likely social con-
sequences - increased crime and
living standards deterioration -
are all too obvious, with a sig-
nificant sector of society getting
left behind. :

_The Labour Force Survey

also provided further anecdo-
tal evidence of the disengage-
ment of Bahamian men from
the education system and
labour force, as 3,105 or 56.6
per cent of the new labour force
entrants were women, as
opposed to 2,385 men.

‘ And, more tellingly, women
accounted for 64 per cent of the
3,430 new labour force entrants
who found work.

When it came to unemploy-
ment, the increase from 7.9 per
cent to 8.7 per cent was still
below where'the Survey calcu-
lated it to be in the aftermath of
the September 11, 2001, terror
attacks, when unemployment
was forecast to have risen to 9.1
per cent.

Nevertheless, the 0.8 per cent
increase in the rate is likely to
imply that between 1,000-2,000
more Bahamians are out of
work when compared to 2007
numbers, with the impact felt
by some 1,000-2,000 families.

According to the Labour
Force Survey, the unemploy-
ment rate on New Providence
increased from 8 per cent in

BalKamas Waste Limited

2007 to 8.7 per cent in 2008, and
on Grand Bahama it rose over
the same time period from 8.8
per cent to 9 per cent.

Meanwhile, Mr D’ Aguilar
said businesses were experienc-
ing first-hand the impact rising
costs, coupled with reduced
income, was having on house-
hold purchasing power.

Companies were grappling
with a mix of sales declined,
having to increase their prices to
combat rising operating costs,
and a decline in sales of high
margin products as consumers
cut back spending to staples.
With the latter development,
while sales might be up, profits
were down.

“I don’t think we need much
more evidence that the econo-
my is in a downturn,” Mr
D’ Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “You look at the loan
default rate at banks, increases
in inflation, costs, and the
increase in unemployment.

“You can look for as many
statistics as you like, but we’re
in a downturn and have to
adjust.”

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements

1. Corporate Information

June 30, 2008

Bahamas Waste Limited (“BWL”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18, 1987 under the name of Bahamas Waste Systems Limited. On-December
7, 1999, the Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste Limited. The latest audited accounts of
the BWL were prepared on December 31, 2007.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2008 were authorized
for issue by the directors on September 29, 2008. °

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

. Basis of Preparation

ye These condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 3007 have been

prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2007 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company’s annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2007, except for the adoption of new Standards and Interpretations,
noted below. Adoption of these Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the
financial position or performance of the Company. x
¢ IFRIC 11 — JERS 2 — Group and Treasury Share Trasanctions was issued in November

2006, and becomes effective for financial years beginning on or after March 1, 2007. This

interpretation addresses group and treasury share transactions related to share-based

payments to employees.

2008 2007
Sales and services rendered $ 3,879,395 $ 3,995,590
Cost of sales and direct expenses 2,732,903 2,445,207
Gross profit . ‘ 1,146,492 1,550,383
Expenses
Operating 943,592 946,899
Interest and bank charges 13,017 3,112
Total operating expenses 956,609 950,011
Net income from operations 189,883 600,372:
Retained earnings at beginning of period 5,287,247 4,614,544
Retained earnings at end of period $ 5,477,130 $ 5,214,916
Earnings per share $ 05 $§$ 0.14



See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)

Six months ended June 30



Cash flows from operating activities

Net income

Adjustments for items not involving use of cash: ¢

Depreciation
Bad debt expense

Change in non-cash working capital items

Increase in accounts receivable
Increase in inventory, loans and other assets
Decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Increase in security deposits

Net cash flow provided by operating activities



Cash flows from investing activities

Purchase of property, plant and equipment
Investment in joint ventures (Green System Ltd.)

Net change in investments in associates

Net cash flow used in investing activities



Cash flows from financing activities

Proceeds from bank loan

Net cash flow from financing activities

Net increase in cash

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period



Cash and cash equivalents represented by:

Cash
Bank overdrafts





2008 2007

$ 189,883 +$ 600,372
619,386 589,294

7 22,031:

809,269 1,211,697
(159,900) (130,363)
(48,282) (103,383)
(50,891) 16,332
21,593 30,159
571,789 1,024,442
(892,823) (962,812)
(50,000) é
4,105 10,989
(938,718) (951,823)
400,000 -
400,000
33,071 72,619
(191,960 181,379
$__(158,889) $ 253,998
$ 94,219 $ 253,998
(253,108) ee
$ (158,889) $ 253,998

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed financial statements.

¢ IFRIC 12 — Service Concession Arrangements; was issued in November 2006 and
becomes effective for financial years beginning on or after January 1, 2008. This
interpretation gives guidance on the accounting by operators for public-to-private service
concession arrangements.

¢ IFRIC 14 - JAS 19- The Limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding
Requirements and their Interaction; was issued in July 2007 and becomes effective for
annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2008. This interpretation provides
guidance on how to assess the limit on the,amount of surplus in a defined benefit scheme
that can be recognized as an asset under IAS 19 Employee Benefits.

The adoption of the above interpretations did not a material impact on the financial statements
when implemented in 2008.

3. Earnings Per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.

‘2008
4,200,000

2007

Shares outstanding at June 30 4,200,000

4. _ Related Party Transactions

During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and significant obligations to the related parties at June 30, 2008.

5. Bank Loan

On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing
location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company has paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 loan agreement with the Royal Bank of Canada. The term of the loan is five
years with an interest sate of 7% per annum.

Rahamas Waste I.imited

6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.



THE TRIBUNE

GN-753



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

Oct. 2, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00593

Whereas SAMUEL.RAHMING, of Suite |, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of JOHN JOSEPH VARDINE, late of#8 Yates Street
Schenectady in the State of New York, one of the States
of the United States of The America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
_ THE SUPREME. COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00594

Whereas SAMUEL RAHMING, of Suite |, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration. of the Real and Personal Estate
of CONSETTA VARDINE, late of Pinellas County in the
City of St. Petersburg in the State of Florida, one of the
States of the United States of The America, deceased.

Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
No. 2008/PRO/npr/00595

Whereas LENORA VIRGINIA SYMONETTE a.k.a.
VIRGINIA LENORA SYMONETTE, of Graham Avenue,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of JOHN WELDIN ROBERTS,
late of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

by the said Court at the expiration of 21 feeye from the.

date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

Oct. 2, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00596

Whereas CARLENE D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Michelina De Wey has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of HELEN J. PETRUZZIELLO, late of
6534 Pine Lane, Weed, California, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

‘Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00597

Whereas CARLENE D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Donald W. Knoepfle has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of GENEVIEVE B. KNOEPFLE, late of 95
Carleton Avenue Glen Ellyn Dupage, Illinois, one of the
States of the. United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

'2008/PRO/npr/00598

IN THE ESTATE OF FRANCES DOROTHY SERIO, late of
2 Indianhead Circle, Marblehead, Massachusetts, one of
the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of the City of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed. Grant of
Probate of Will Administration with the Will annexed without
Sureties in the above estate granted to KAREN SINGER,
the Administratrix, of the Estate by the Probate and Family
Court Department in the County of Essex. in the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one of the States of

United. States of America on the 25th day of April, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS __ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00599 ;

Whereas GORDON JOSEPH CAREY a.k.a. JOSEPH
GORDON CAREY, of the Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of EDNA MAE CULMER CAREY, late of
Tarpum Bay on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00600

Whereas ELKIN MEADOWS and EUNICE MEADOWS,
both of #3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of RENEE MEADOWS, late of
#3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00601

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway,
Eastern District, and STANLEY OSWALD ANTHONY
ISAACS of the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
Tiffany Knowles have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the Will of the Real and Personal Estate of REGINALD
WINFIELD KNOWLES, late of Tower Estates Drive, Sans
Souci, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

~ Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00602

IN THE ESTATE OF RALPH CLIFTON SCOTT, late of
1227 Dunwoody Lane in the City of Atlanta, Dekalb County
in the State of Georgia, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery
Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and DWAYNE
ANDRIAN BRYAN of 37 Bethel Avenue, Western District;
New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to GUSEPPE RAGO, the Executor, of the Estate
by the Probate Court of Dekalb County in the State of
Georgia, one of the States of United States of America on
the 31st day of March, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00603

Whereas BARRY HALL, of the Settlement of Nicholl's
Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MARY
ELIZABETH HALL, late of the Settlement of Nicholl's

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 7B

Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 ae from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00604

Whereas ROSEMARY FARQUHARSON, of Rolle's Avenue
in the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration. of the Real and Personal Estate
of FELIX FARQUHARSON, late of Peach Street, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the '
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00605

IN THE ESTATE OF LEE.LOWELL CARPENIER a.k.a.
LEE L. CARPENIER, late of Bonrock Court, Towson,
Baltimore in the State of Maryland, one of the States of |
the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery
Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and J. MICHAEL
SAUNDERS of 11 Oxford Road, Nassau East Subdivision,
Eastern District, New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration
in the above estate granted to FREDERICK A..RAAB, the
Personal Representative, of the Estate by Grace G. Connolly
Register of Wills for Baltimore County in the State of
Maryland, one of the States of United States of America
on the 11 th day of October, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00606

Whereas HESKET M. NEELY a.k.a. HESKETH M. NEELY,
of Chippingham Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ROLLIE CARTWRIGHT NEELY, late of the Bluff,
Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00605

Whereas JANE BLONEVA BROWN of Sarah Robinson
Road off Farrington Road in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ALNINA DELPHANE
FERGUSON late of 836 Phippen Waiters Road Dania
Beach in the State of Florida. one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008fPRO/npr/00612

IN THE ESTATE OF EDWARD CHARLES ALLEN, late of
7754 S.E. Saratoga Drive, Hobe Sound in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by ANTHONY NOMIKOS KLONARIS of Old Fort Bay in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence and
MIKE ATHONY KLONARIS, of Lyford Cay in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to ELIZABETH A. DECKER and GERALDINE M.
THAYER the co-personal representatives of the Estate,
by the State of The Circuit Court for Martin County, Florida,
on the 26th day of September, 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



PAGE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 01, 2008

COMIC PAGE

THE TRIBUNE



JUDGE









IS YOUR
UNCLE DON



GET UP! IT’S TIME FoR
THE BZEADWINNER TO

GUN MISSING,
PETECTIVE
ROBERTS ASKS
WHO ELSE HAS
ACCESS TO
THE CASE!

YES, 2 CHOKE <...
THATS ALAN

T INTERVIEWED A YOUNG FELLO
TODAY, RIGHT OUT OF ES

LOOKING FOR

Tribune Comics

PARKER

DEWEY'S FRIEND, BILL
DUGGAN, HAS A KEY



\>GASPz... OH
BLAZE.’

- Z





COLLEGE,

A JOB AS
OFFICE
MANAGER

SIGN HERE, PLEASE, FOR
THE PERSONAL EFFECTS.









ANP YOU SAY
THE GUN WAS
IN THE CASE
YESTERDAY?












www.kingfeatures.com

WHY Ake You.
BAREFOOT 7

GO To WORK /

CRYPTIC PUZZLE



JHE BREADWINNER
1G ON A PIET...

wow Blonde.com

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.






























HE ACTUALLY DOZEO OFF
WHILE | WAS READING
nS2Z HIS RESUME

BOY, IT
REALLY TOOK
ME BACK!





YOU LOOK PALE!
WHY DON'T YOLI SIT
DOWN, MS. JULEP?

CALVIN & HOBBES

OH MY GOSH, THAT ROCK
MOVED! THERE'S SOMETHING
UNDER IT!







BECAUSE IM NOT .
WEARING SHOES | as

H TOLD low
"He RTOS Tee Ne

IN A SLICE OF BREAD









“AT LEAST MY BALL IS STILL AS GOOD AS NEw.”





Roman Lovkov v Sanan Sjugirov,
Russian under-20 championship
2008. The black player is aged only
14, yet he shared the title ahead

of several older and higher ranked
opponents. He also produced the
most stunning move of the event

in today's puzzle. Black (to play) is

a pawn down, and White has just
offered the exchange of queens,
expecting to consolidate his material
lead. Black's next turn looks like

a misprint, but it was completely
sound and quickly forced checkmate
or decisive material gain. Can you
find Black's winner?

IT MUST BE A MARTIAN /
OW NO! OH NO! ITS PROBABLY
SOME CREEPY, TENTACLED,



Down

Noose offering escape? (8)
A number claim it is
changeable, like the
weather (8)

Across
1 Sheep providing tufty wool 2
(5) 3
Calculates that the factory
must now be on strike

ma2acod=- 2 4

T
W
0
I
N .
O
N
E
Cc
R
O
S
S
W
Oo
R
D

(5,3)
Firm | sold out (5)
Terrier breed
Ena transformed (8)
He goes into top
gear — at a very low rate
(5)
Take a chance with the
better half (3)
Colourless type
out on bail (6) .
Unnatural cunning (6)
Chest expander (3)
Intends to change names
(5)
The takings to pass on to
somebody else? (8)
Starring roles for ushers
(5)
Diana’s bloomer
will result in catastrophe
(8)

27 Frank can be obtuse (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Treble clef, 6 Fair, 10
Truss, 11 Small arms, 12 Palomino,
13 Creel, 15 Smitten, 17 Rarebit, 19
Ignores, 21 Cheerio, 22 In bed, 24
Albanian, 27 Throw over, 28 Vouch,
29 Adds, 30 Editorials.

Down: 1 Tots, 2 Education, 3 Lasso, 4

Cushion, 5 Enamour, 7 Agree, 8
Resolution, 9 Ala carte, 14 Aspidistra,
16 Turn down, 18 Barracuda, 20
Starved, 21 Cabaret, 23 Bored, 25
Never, 26 Thus.

Twice appearing as an
understudy (6)

Go around in a woman's
garment (5)
Want a partner for animal
surgery? (5)

Where one may sit or get
to one’s feet (5)

Large jungle creeper (3)
It helps to make road °
repairs a work of art (3)
Herein a peculiar tale, out
of this world (8)

Attacked and made to run?
(6,2)

The evergreen trees that
baffle exiles (6)

Room for mental improve-
ment, perhaps (5)

Many get reckless and
have a smash (5)

Trick includes nothing to
cause provocation (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 With reason, 6 Ohio, 10
Venal, 11 In earnest, 12 Sanction,
13 Chaff, 15 Academy, 17 Clipper,
19 Deliver, 21 Winsome, 22 Rover,
24 Maintain, 27 Advantage, 28
Avert, 29 Hide, 30 Step by step.
Down: 1 Wave, 2 To no avail, 3

Relic, 4 Ability, 5 Oceanic, 7 Hyena,

8 Out of order, 9 Friction, 14
Balderdash, 16 Environs, 18

Provident, 20 Remnant, 21 Write-up,

23 Vivid, 25 Toady, 26 Stop.

Across

1

Large mariné mam-
mali (5)

Most memorable fea-
ture (4,4)

Silly (5)

Infectious (8)
Sumptuous meal (5)
Taxi (3)

Capital of Colombia
(6)

Greek capital (6)
Unnaturally pale (3)
To faint (5)
Tchaikovsky ballet
(4,4)

Wish for enviously
(5)

Envoy (8)

Mutual vagreement

(5)



Sycophantic follower
(6-2)

Venture

unlikely to succeed
(8)

Albanian capital (6)
Throw (5)

Plunder (5)

Point in development
(5)

Cry of crow (3)
Prohibit (3)

Decisive confronta-
tion (8)

Blameless (8)
Capital of Turkey (6)
Up to now (2,3)

To quibble (5)

Force of explosion

(5)





YOU'RE RIGHT!
THERE'S A
TENTACLE NON!




BUG-EYED



Sunday





Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to















Difficulty Level *

_Kakuro Puzzle

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top.. No number
may be used in the. same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

y King Features Syndicate, Inc.

©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist





North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
a)9
Â¥A9IS3
#KQI
&AI107
WEST EAST
43 #8762
Â¥K82 Vj764
@85 #1097
#KQ9852 $43
SOUTH
@AKQ105
Â¥Q10
$A6432
6
The bidding:
North Kast South = West
lv Pass 1 Pass’
| NT Pass 3¢ Pass
4¢ Pass 54 Pass
6& Pass 6¢ Pass
7¢

Opening lead — king of clubs.

This deal, from the 1956 U.S.-
Italy world championship match,
became famous not because it was
brilliantly played, but because it was-
nu

The American team gained 750
points when it bid and made a grand
slam in diamonds while the Italians
stopped ina small slam. Both declar-
ers made all the tricks on identical
lines of play, but the fact is that they
each missed the correct way to try to
score 13 tricks.



Famous Hand







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.






ite resigned 2 threats are Qc2 mate .
Sel ase frces witifeif 3 Gd2 Quod when
Black is ahead on material and stit has his



HOW many words of
four letters or mare can
you make fom the
letters shown here? In
making a word, ench
letter wey be used once






the a wre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
plurals, or verb forms
ending in “s”, no words
with initial capitais and
neo words with a hyphen
or ppostrophe permitted.
The first word of a
phrase is permitted (e.g. |
inkjet. in inkjet. printer}.
TODAY'S TARGET

Goad 12; very Rood 18; |
exceiient 24 (or more)
Soluuion Monday.

YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
cent coin coined cone
coned confide |
CONFIDENT confine 1
confined conned i
contend dent dentin
dine dint clone feint
fend fend find fine
fined tuned fond font
teon indent infect info
intend into intone
Intoned neon nice nine
nonce None nonet
ved ce





no! often once
tend tendon, tenon |
tine tinned tone toned |
tonic tonne



At both tables, declarer won the
club lead with the ace and cashed
five diamonds and five spades, leav-
ing South with just the Q-10 of
hearts. On the last spade, West, who
held the queen of clubs and K-8 of
hearts, had to discard in front of
dummy’s A-9 of hearts and jack of
clubs. Both Wests discarded a heart,
and declarer won the last two tricks
with the ace and queen of hearts.

This line of play succeeded only
because West had the king of hearts.
However, a method of play was
available that would have succeeded
even if East had the king.

The best chance for 13 tricks is to
win the club, ruff'a club, cash the K-
Q of diamonds and ruff another club.
Declarer then leads a spade to the
jack and ruffs dummy’s last’ club

“With the ace. A heart to the ace fol-
lowed by a third round of trumps per-
mits declarer to discard the heart ten,
run the spades and thus score all the
tricks.

The recommended play works
whenever the diamonds break 3-2, a
68 percent probability. The approach
adopted by both declarers wins only
when West has the heart king, a 50
percent chance, and is still available
if the diamonds divide 4-1,

At this level of competition, it is
surprising that neither declarer found
the line of play that offered the max-
imum chance of scoring 13° tricks.
Even world-famous experts, it
appears, have blind spots!

Tomorrow: The fine art of falsecarding.
C208 King Peatures Syndicate Ine.



THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE

9B



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ribune

The -T

SN © °°" wv 6 ° > E*"r°*'"'"F"' °F °§°er’BnnNNSGna TFB AeA

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LEE

Eating the Baham an way

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON

How the Bahamian diet has changed

AY the words guava duff and imme-

diately the enticing aroma of the

warm, mouthwatering, fruit-filled
dessert covered in a rich, buttery sauce
that melts in your mouth, floods your sens-
es. With visions of this truly Bahamian
dessert dancing before your mind’s eye,
you're sense A is almost able to

catch a burst of the deliciousl

sweet gua-

va mixed into the dough, and get a gentle
whiff of the buttery, rum ladened sauce.

For many years now this sweet.and
delectable native: pastry - whose
ingredients have been slightly twisted
to satisfy the modern Bahamian
palate - has teased the Bahamian
tongue. But emerging in recent
years to claim the top spot as
Bahamian favourites, pastries such
as cheesecake, chocolate cake, straw-
berry filled pie and rum cake have
all dominated the Bahamian sweet
tooth and have assumed satisfaction
over traditional Bahamian desserts.
Like our choices in dessert, the
Bahamian diet has also changed dra-
matically over the years - what used
to be breakfast is now a snack. The
traditional slice of bread with butter
and cup of tea was not only breakfast
for many over the years, but it was
also lunch as well.

Lady Ingrid Darling, wife of former
Governor General Sir Clifford Dar-
ling, and the author of Many Tastes
of the Bahamas & Culinary Influ-
ences of the Caribbean, said “Back
in the day we would get up real early
and for breakfast we would have a
slice of homemade bread with butter
and tea, and nothing more. That was
it, we also had that for lunch as well.”

For dinner, or supper as they called
it, it was usually cornbeef and grits or
rice. Today Bahamians are not accus-
tomed to eating corn beef and grits
for dinner. “All we usually ate was
tinned food, we had cornbeef and

‘grits for dinner.”

Preparation of food however, has
been done differently since Bahami-
ans have become more economically
prosperous, and more conscious of
the food they eat and how it is pre-
pared.

Executive Chef and Culinary Train-

er at the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Edwin Johnson said that the way food
was prepared 30 or 40 years ago in the
Bahamas has changed dramatically.
“Methods of preparation involved
using fatty oils. You are seeing a

healthier approach to food prepara-.
tion methods. People are now eook-

ing with olive oil and using the origi-
nal fats that are made within the prod-
uct. Since people are more aware of
diabetes and hypertension they tend
not to cook with much fat.”

A favourite for frying foods was
lard years ago, since health is empha-
sized greatly today however, people
fry foods with either corn or vegetable
oil. Another favourite food enhancer
back in the day was salt pork or salt
beef. Educated on the unhealthiness
of using these highly salted meats as
food enhancers, people are now using
healthier alternatives that give the
same taste. “Since I am aware that
salt pork and salt beef are not so
healthy, I use smoked turkey or bacon
and to me it tastes just as good as
using salt pork or salt beef ,“ Lady
Darling said.

Regular Sunday dinner in the past
consisted of more than one side order
- remember the baked macaroni and
potato salad, now that the country’s
health IQ has increased, people are
now aware that numerous side orders
does not a balanced diet make, so
they are cutting back on the amount
of food that they are putting on their
plate.

Another element that has impacted

the way Bahamian eat is the amount.

of time it took to prepare foods. In
the 1940s, 50s and 60s the advances in
food technology that we see today
were just in the beginning stages. As

a result, Lady Darling noted, the time
and effort that was exerted when
making dinner for the family is not
made when today’s home chefs step
into the kitchen.

“When I was growing up food
preparation took a very long time.
We started to prepare for dinner from

in the morning. Many persons today

carry on busy lives, so when they do
return to their homes from a long,
hard day at work they are tired.”
Lady Darling also noted that even
the drink that accompanied a full
course meal has changed, from the
old time lemonade or switcher as they
called it, to orange juice and sodas.

Taking a look at traditional
Bahamian pastries, it is probably true
that many Bahamians probably can-
not remember the last time they tast-
ed a flour cake. As far as moderniz-
ing Bahamian pastries, the only
thing that is done differently is that
now they are made to entice the eyes
as well as the taste buds. Inventive-
ness and creativity have been applied
to the methods of preparing these
delicious sweet treats. They are not
prepared traditionally, since the new
baking methods lend themselves to
making the treats look as attractive
as possible. For public display
coconut tarts are made much small-
er and are often packaged in bag-
gies with little decorations, Chef
Johnson said. He also drew an illus-
tration using the banana bread. “One
time ago you would just bake the
bread without being conscious of its
attractiveness. Now we try to bake
the bread in a way where people can
not only enjoy the taste but admire
its presentation”.

Catherine Campbell, an island
style baker for many years, continues
to keep up with the traditional style
of Bahamian baking. Among the
sweet treats to come out of her
kitchen are benny cake, peanut cake,
potato bread, banana bread, flour
cake and many others. Even she has
been trying to modernized the pre-
sentation of her pastries, however.
“I have been trying to invent new
ways to improve the appearance of
my pastries. I am still in the process
of finding the great look that would
make my pastries look very attrac-
tive.”

_ While the ingredients and look of
many Bahamian dishes may have
changed over the years, the ingredi-
ents of those core Bahamian pastries
- the benny cake, potato bread, the
guava duff - have not. They are as
deliciously made today, as they were
40 to 50 years ago.

Filling

sia Mee ot eel Laon (a

=

NX
\ \







PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER ..1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune

~ Home

rown stars

take to the spotlight

m@ By JASON TAYLOR



VEN though Lil Wayne’s disappointing no show can't be

overlooked - it cannot be allowed to overshadowed the

spectacular performances by the up and coming talented
and versatile Bahamian acts that paraded the stage, and the
superb performance by the gifted and charismatic Buju Banton,
who has never failed the Bahamian people yet - whether in

appearance or performance.

One of the hottest acts of the night, veteran Bahamian
star Bobo Ken, of the Make em Listen crew, scotched
the stage with his performances of “Do as you please",
"The Warning” and his fiery hit “Gun Violence”, demon-
strating the real life situations in his subject matter that can
be reflected in everyday Bahamian life. “I sing about my
whole life experience and what I see people going
through,” he said, taking a stance similar to that of new
rapper and writer RappQuelle.

“T try to give truth and honesty in my music...it has to be
real not a facade... try to give people authentic, Rap-
pQuelle soul rebel music,” Quelle said. Performing “80's
Back” and “So Nice” Quelle felt that the enthusiasm of the
crowd was more than he expected. It was, in one word,
encouraging, he said. :

Gone are the days when young Bahamians attend a
live event and are completely oblivious to the talent being
displayed, or feel embarrassed to actually enjoy what's
being played by their fellow Bahamians. They nodded
their heads and swayed their bodies to their own home
grown rock stars. :

Dolly Boy’s “Put it Together” is a testimony of that, as
the crowd’s familiarity with the song injected a burst of
energy to inspire the young Freeport native to go all out.
“] thought that was an American rapper who sang that
song” an audience member said cheerfully, undoubtedly

‘proud to find out that it was none other than the "Boss for
the Ports" - a true son of the 242, ,

“We ain’t local no more we international” Dolly Boy
said confidently, referring not just to the steadily growing
popularity of Bahamian artists abroad, but to how as
artists, producers and songwriters that the Bahamian
product is increasingly being seen on a world class level.

Bahamian born and bred Golden Child, who now
resides in Fort Lauderdale, brought his A-game to the
concert. Not only did he come out with dancers, but dur-
ing his performance of “Brand New" he was accompanied
on stage by D J Fines, the two time Heineken Green Syn-

eS







ergy Bahamas winner.

Another son of the soil that made the trek back home to
perform was BlackSoultan, who hit up the crowd with
his rap single, "Imma Stack (Be L.A.)". For BlackSoultan,
whose quiet looks belay an intense, rhythmical delivery
style, his embrace of the rap art form reflects his total
love for the genre and the reason why, although he has a
law degree, he has thrown himself fully.into a live filled
with music.

Based in Los Angeles, BlackSoultan arrived with a
word for Bahamian artists, telling Tribune Entertainment
that local artists have the talent and the ability to compete
with any artist in any genre coming out of the US. "You
don't have to conform to the standards out there, you
can just put your Bahamian touch on it and you'll have a
viable product," he said.

About the lack of support some artists felt they were giv-
en, BlackSoultan said that despite the poor treatment,
they should look at Saturday night's performance as an
opportunity to showcase their talent. Although they were
not being paid, he said, you never know who might have
been in the audience to see them and, "You can't put a
price on exposure and on talent".

These, along with other Bahamian acts such as Frisco
and Omri - both of the Make em Listen crew, graced the
stage on Saturday without a hitch, without their ego getting
the best of them and they represented and they did it
despite the controversy of Bahamian artists getting paid lit-
tle or nothing for such a big event.

In the end, the local home grown acts triumphed where
the big names failed! We should applaud our 242 enter-
tainers not only on performance, but on professionalism.
They didn't want to give the 242 acts anything, but the acts
gave everything, and when they rolled out the red carpet
for strangers they didn't even bother to show up,

They say karma is a beast and it sure bit the head off of
the Poppin Bottles concert.



‘Bahamian fans get drenched while Lil
Wayne "parties like a rock star" |

lm By JASON TAYLOR



AS most of the Bahamas already knows Lil Wayne, the
self proclaimed "greatest rapper alive", whose June 10
album release, Tha Carter II, was heralded as a billboards
phenomenon, failed to make an appearance at the 'Poppin
Bottles' concert, held on the grounds of Bristol Wine &
Spirits over the weekend.

The iconic rap star - allegedly paid $210,000 for his appear-
ance, and said to have been partying at an Atlantis nightclub
when the concert was going on - was scheduled to make a leg-
endary appearance and thus make history in the Bahamas, but
it never “popped” off. For some, the weak promotion that pre-
ceded the concert is now thought of as a reflection of the lack
of confidence that the main act was actually going to show up.

In a statement apologizing for the debacle, officials from Red
- City Entertainment, the concert promoters, said issues arose
late Friday night, the original date of the concert, concerning
the sound and lights production for the event.

"These circumstances were dealt with, but not to the satis-
faction of the company’s owner," the statement read, "there-
fore the event was canceled for that evening."

According to Tribune sources, the company responsible for
the sound system demanded an additional $15,000 to complete
the job. When negotiations broke down with the promoters,
however, the concert was called off for the evening.

In their statement to the press, Red City said that the man-
agement teams for Buju Banton - also slated to appear - and Lil
Wayne were contacted to arrange for the event to take place
on Saturday as an alternative. Both were said to have agreed
to the change, but Lil Wayne’s management would later
demand additional monies, a reported $10,000, which Red
City now says was paid.

Red City maintains that on Saturday evening they were
informed that Lil Wayne was on the way to the venue and set
to perform after 2am.

"At no time was Red City Entertainment notified that Lil
Wayne would not perform. We continued through the night to
inform our hosts, DJ Pencil and Empress, that Wayne was
coming because that is what we were being told by his man-
agement. Unable to locate him, we sent our team members
to the Atlantis to discover he was partying at the nightclub
there all night," the statement read.

"Red City Entertainment would like to apologize to
patrons, vendors, workers, police, media friends, sponsors
and the Bahamian staff that worked tirelessly to make this
event happen. Our sponsors, including Bristol Wine and
Spirits, BTC, Bacardi and 100 JAMZ have been extreme-
ly supportive during the associated incidences with this
event."

With no official word from “Weezy F Baby” aka Lil
Wayne himself however, as to why he failed to make an
appearance at the event, Bahamian fans have been left to
hold the bag and wonder what really happened: Was Lil
Wayne even here? Could the promoters, Red City,
afford to pay for a big name act like Lil Wayne, Bird-
man and Buju Banton and still afford to pay for the



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Lingerie models bring sexy —
to Bahamain shores

sound and stage management and the numerous extras :

involved or were they in over their heads from the begin- ;
ning? Did Lil Wayne’s.ego actually propel him to a level i m@ By RENALDO DORSETT

where he felt that performing for the Bahamian people was :
beneath him? Or was there some sinister plot to use his name :
and image to sell tickets while he celebrated his birthday in the

the minds of jaded concert goers and of curious minds alike -
different perspectives stemming from one common thought - :
: Bahamas during a weekend of
; ; : “Glitz, Glamour and Style.”

did perform, Patricia Chatti, who heads the Make 'em Listen ;

Why didn't Lil Wayne show up?
Representing a number of the talented Bahamian artists who

organisation, told Tribune Entertainment that Dwayne Michael } ){odel Search” grand finale ended

Carter Jr - Lil Wayne's real name, actually arrived at the

© Aven) PF . e reas ey rhaps : ‘
event on Saturday evening, but for some reason perh ApS ' Beach Resort Ballroom with the
the rain or he got impatient when he wasn't moved through : sélection of Brandi Reed and
security and into the venue quickly enough - he left. "That's the’ ; Br - ine S meaets The. +
difference between a third world Caribbean artist and an } rooke stuart. DE EW ON eLe
: named the grand prize winners in

"If this were an R&B or jazz artist that would never have } the miss-size and plus-size cate-
happened. That was crazy, it was like 5:30 in the morning ; Sores respectively,

American artist.

when it all came to
light," she said.



































Lil Wayne

Tribune Reporter

AN extensive search for a duo of

Bahamas for free? These are all valid questions that linger in | new spokespersons for one of the

world's leading designers of inti-
mate apparel, culminated in the

The Shirley of Hollywood “Sexy

: Saturday at the Sheraton Cable

Both winners will become the

: 2008-09 spokespersons for Shirley
; of Hollywood respective lines of lin-
: gerie.

Reed, of Miami, Florida and

: sponsored by Playthings, was cho-
: sen as the winner amongst a group
: of 18 miss-size models.

The 25-year-old native of Can-

: ton, Michigan has several highlights
: during her young career including
: being named a finalist in the Miss
: Hawaiian Tropic Super Bowl, and
: being featured on a Hooters calen-

i dar.

Reed said it was an honour to be

: chosen to continue the legacy set
: forth by premiere Shirley’s models.





“Shirley of Hollywood is a sexy,

: sophisticated and timeless brand.
: Shirley is deserving of a model that
: evokes all of these qualities as well

as beauty and grace,” she said, “I
: will represent Shirley to the very
: best of my ability. It would enhance

: els.”

: my career as a model and I will aim

to carry on Shirley‘s legacy of
‘creme de la creme’ lingerie mod-

Former winners of the Shirley

? cover model search include Brooke

Burke, Leeann Tweeden and Play-
boy Playmates Tyran Richads and
Victoria Silvstedt.

Stuart, a 28-year-old registered
dental assistant from Temecula,
California took the top honour
amongst the trio of crowd favoured
plus size models.

Stuart said becoming a spokesper-
son for a company which embodies
diversity in their apparel and
philosophies is a dream come true.

“Shirley has shown women for 20
years that there are no limitations
on who can be sexy. I would love to
promote that message, no matter
what shape or size we are, we feel
and are amazing,” she said, “As a
model for Shirley of Hollywood, I
want to share that positive attitude
with all women so they will realize
what makes us unique and so beau-
tiful.”

The competition began with over
100 aspiring models listing their pro-
files on the TheBachelorGuy.com
and after 300,000 visitors to the site,
the top 21 were chosen for the
finale in the Bahamas. ;

Local songstress Terez Hepburn
opened the show performing her hit
“Bus Driver” and later returned to
the stage to perform “All Up In My
Business.”

A star studded list of celebrities
and well known figures in the indus-
try served as judges for the finale
including fashion designer and phil-
anthropist Peter Nygard, Ron Rice
of Hawaiian Tropic, Akin Ayodele
and Nate Jones of the Miami Dol-
phins, T J Slaughter formerly of the
San Francisco 49ers, and the
Schlobohm family who serve as
executives for the Shirley’s of Hol-
lywood brand.

Event sponsors included NBC,
ESPN, EXTRA, Telemundo,
Nygard.com, BlueRay Technolo-
gies, LLC, Fifth Avenue Models,
TheBachelorGuy.com, Rockstar
Energy Drink, Paul Mitchell and
PlayerXT.com.

More pictures on page 11





THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 11B



BROOKE STUART
plus-size model
winner

‘
&

Bi

REET!

. Ba

Sexy Model







BRAND! REED miss-
size model winner

A BEVY of beauties showcased the latest lingerie fashions during Shirley of Hollywood's “Sexy Model Search’ Peo ee —
- grand finale held on Saturday at the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort. Two winners, in the miss-size and plus- the Distinguished P: tronage of RO Gla apt os ULL
size categories, were selected as the leading faces of Shirley 2008/09 campaign. DEFOE! OT ING GANAS is ae FACE OF
f 6 Major/Tribune staff



The Seraphook

FROM page 12

teaching children each day, was not quite the
right fit. She needed something a little more artis-
tic, with a deeper look into the emotions of
human beings. ;

She believes that "scrapping is a form of art that
involves human creativity and the putting togeth-
er of art in the form of collages, ribbons, glitter,
and patterns. It is a 20th Century art form, Keshia

‘says, with both photography and creative art
embedded into the same form. You can both pre-
serve memories and display beautiful art work,
two passions that Keshia holds in common with
her customers and friends.

Her growing customer base is evident, as she
says her store is filled to the brim on Saturdays,
the most popular day of the week for working
parents who may take their kids to a Saturday

’



children's scrap' class. Her first children's class will
be this Saturday, October 4, where she can accom-
modate 20 students aged 10 to 18 years.

Besides being displayed on the walls of a home,
Keshia also provides 12 x 12 album inserts for her
classes that teach the two page design.

Other classes scheduled to begin this month
include the theme "My Family" and "My Jour-
nal" with a visiting scrapper' at the end of the
month. ..

Keshia sends emails to all persons interested
with details of the next class scheduled — provid-
ing information such as what will be covered,
from shells to crocodiles, to the newest tech-
niques in the scrapping world.

* For more information on classes at The Scrapbook
Cottage, contact Keshia Pratt at 356.6747 or send an
email to: the.scrapbookcottage@yahoo.com.



In Honor of Pepper
Johnson and Pat Paul

TICKET LOCATIONS:

DIAMONDS INTERNATIONAL
® All locations

CARLOS VALENTINO
¢ Bay & Victoria St

FLAUNT IT
© Rosetta St.

COCO-NUTS BAHAMA GRILL
¢ West Bay Street

URBAN NATION
e Mall at Marathon

Tickets are $50 general admission, $25 Students (with ID a‘ $100 Mkt which includes pre-event
reception at CoCo Nuts Grill, West Bay Street on FFHa¥» ASINNBF 9, #18 and event after party.

For further information please contact 488-8889 or 496-8899 or email us at MAdAalSe4Bhahamas@yahaa-cam:

2 Re o REREGS
The Tribune SReReat |
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See page 10



_ Scrapbook (now a verb shortened at times to "scrapping").is







OM ate it a
Bahamain shores /

See page 10 & 11





























Pye aec ee kel.





NEW art outlet in the Bahamas
allows both children and adults' cre-
ativity to blossom and preserve
memories artistically. The Scrapbook
Cottage, located at Dowdeswell and
Deveaux Streets, has been up and |
running for just a month, with owner















brates the light, carefree feeling of relaxing days. Euphoria will move your
scrapbook pages into pure bliss".

The classes for adults are intended to teach Bahamians a new, relax-
ing hobby they can then complete in the comfort of their own home.
The gatherings will serve as an avenue to let the creative juices flow,
while snacking on brownies, cookies and other goodies along
with juices and teas.

While all materials will be pre-cut and ready to craft with at
class time, patrons of the scrapbooking classes may then
take their new skills home to create endless art pieces for the
home. Keshia has found that the trend among mothers who

Keshia Pratt reporting that business is &
le ce
going very well. 3
5

The former primary teacher from Nassau Christian Academy starts her =
first scrapbooking class for adults today, where they will create albums with the =
theme of Euphoria. The idea of transcending happiness is key to this concept S
and Keshia said she chose this theme because "the enchanting layout cele- +
hh

that the younger mothers enjoy displaying their scrap-
books with pride of what their child has done, as well as
their own artistic ability. The older mothers, on the oth-
er hand, enjoy preserving memories while telling their sto-:
ries through art.

"Scrapbooking is all about the classes," Keshia said,
"you can build great groups of friends who have the
same interests." And her reason for opening the store
was that she wanted to build this niche for people in
the Bahamas.

It all started in 2004 when she took her first scrap-
booking class in Ohio while also attending a lot of
trade shows across the US. She discovered that her job,
while satisfying in that she fulfilled her primary love of

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Volume: 104 No.260

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008



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SPECIAL ay ON PAGE THREE



SOFTBALL NEWS ON PAGE 11



Ta ee ee aie





‘Shabba’ may have.
faked own death’

Police investigate
claims of Daryl
Saunders in
‘disappearing act’
while being sought
by notorious gang

POLICE are actively investi- .

gating claims that Daryl “Shabba”
Saunders may have faked his own
death to escape the same fate if
captured by the notorious Zoe
Pound gang that is actively pursu-
ing him.

It has been suggested that
“Shabba” is being sought by the
Haiti-and-Miami-based gang in
connection with a shipment of
cocaine that was stolen by a group
of men in the Kemp Road area.

The drugs allegedly belonged to
the Zoe Pound, which is notori-
ous for its violent and ruthless tac-
tics when dealing with both ene-
mies and associates.

It is with this in mind, a Nassau
Village source said, that Shabba
gained access to a body from the
local mortuary which was then
mutilated and dumped in the back
trunk of his brand new vehicle,
which he then burned to the
ground.

It was claimed that the body was
found by police minus the head
and hands, an attempt to avoid
accurate identification.

While some sources in the
RBPF believe that the body in the
trunk of the car “could be” that of
Saunders, they admit that they
have yet to positively identify it.

Meanwhile, sources in both Nas-
sau Village and Fox Hill say that
stories of Shabba’s “disappearing

SEE page eight

‘you can rest easy knowing

that you have-excellent insurance
coverage no matter which
way the wind blows.

_ gNobody does it better.

) INSURANCE MANAGEMENT

(BAHAMAS) LIMITED, INSURANCE BROKERS & AGENTS.

Aho
WD) 7404

6) Grn Bhan |
1 Te) 5050



reduce staff’ if economy softens

@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

MAJOR retailers are monitoring
the impact the credit crisis in the
United States will have on the local
economy, but say they are deter-
mined to remain loyal to staff and
fiot reduce employment if the econ-
omy softens.

Representatives from Kelly's
Home Centre and the Super Value
chain of stores said they will not spi-
ral into "panic" as pundits specu-
late on the fallout from the US
House of Representatives’ refusal
of a $700 billion bailout plan for



| Eeuther | Frum
Tel (040) 382-2062 | Tel (240) $86s2304





sinking financial institutions.

But one merchant said if the
tourism sector continues to decline
because of the US’ financial woes,
he will reluctantly have to reduce
his staff's work week.

Andrew Wilson, President and
CEO of the Quality Group of Com-
panies which include John S
George, Radio Shack, QBC and the
Apparel Group, blamed the "fright-
ening trend" of lowered sales, high
overhead costs, and a lackluster
tourism performance on the deci-
sion.

"It's (the slowdown in the US
economy) having an impact on
retailing in general. Every merchant
that I speak to, speaks to the fact
that retail sales are down substan-
tially. That, coupled with the (rise in)

the cost of electricity, is really cre- -

ating a tremendous amount of hard-
ship for retailers.

"We have a lot of people in the
tourism industry that are working
two days, three days and that has
an impact throughout the economy.
Added (to) the high cost of gaso-
line, the high cost of electricity, the
rising costs in the supermarkets —
the disposable income that people
have at the end of the day for things
(non-staple) items is declining," he

said. Mr Wilson, who employs 150
Bahamians throughout his chain of
stores, is considering how to reduce
the brunt of the economic slow-
down.

SEE page eight

CLAIRE HEPBURN is sworn in yesterday as a Supreme Court Judge at Government House. Looking on
is Governor General Arthur Hanna.

Major retailers ‘determined not to |



SEE page eight |

(tirz



Conflicting accounts
UAT Ta

murder circumstances
er PC



@ By MEAGAN
REYNOLDS &
CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporters

CONFLICTING accounts
of the circumstances surround-
ing Mario Miller’s murder,
which accused Ricardo Miller
submitted to police, were read
in the Supreme Court by
Detective Sergeant Michelet
Meronard yesterday.

Ricardo Miller, 32, also
known as Tamar Lee, a fisher-
man off Queen's Highway,
South Andros, told Det. Sgt
Meronard in his statement on
June 27, 2002, that two men he
did not know attacked Mario
Miller with a knife.

However, in his second state-
ment taken on June 30, Lee
said the men who fatally
stabbéd Mario Miller were
“Anwar” and “Pretty”, two
people he involved in the drug
deal with Mario Miller and a
man named “Marco” who he
described as Mario’s friend,

Mario Miller, 28, at the time *
of his murder, of Sassoon Dri-
ve, Winton, was found lying
‘face down in the grass on the
west side of Super Value in



* the Bahamas yesterday pre- |

. Ican economy starts to pick

‘BIC cut pay of |
514 staff over
industrial action

@ By ALISON LOWE .
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FIVE hundred and fourteen Bahamas Telecommunications Work-
ers have had their pay cut in response to the industrial action they took
in protest over their role in BTC’s privatisation talks in August.

Vice President of Marketing and Sales at BTC, Marlon Johnson, said
he did not know the total value of the pay cuts.

BTC management announced the move yesterday, adding that
“due process” is still to be followed in determining in what way staff
members who used BTC vehicles to block downtown Bay Street and

Freeport will be sanctioned.

Previously Chairman Julian Francis had suggested suspensions

may be in order for such workers.

Bahamas Communications and Public Officers Union president
Robert Farquharson did not return phone calls ne comment yes-

terday.

Worst effects of the US
economy ‘not yr upon us’

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff
Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

FINANCIAL minds in

di¢ted that it could be any-
where from several months
to a year before the Amer-

up again — with the worst
not yet upon us.

While most point first to
those employed in the
tourism industry as need-
ing to pay most attention
to the Central Bank of the
Bahamas’ Monday warning
that consumers must cut
back on unnecessary spend-
ing and debt acquisitions to
protect themselves, most
agree all Bahamians will be
affected to some extent by
our Northern neighbour’s financial
meltdown.

“The Central Bank is giving peo-
ple some wise advice to not make
unnecessary expenditures because
you need to save to take care of
your necessities like getting to work,
paying your light bill and feeding
yourself,” said Dionisio D’Aguilar,
President of the Chamber of Com-

merce,

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“The unfortunate thing
is a lot of citizens in this
country are extremely over
leveraged and they’re prob-
ably up to their eyeballs in
debt and its kind of hard to
cut back or to reduce con-
sumption.”

Minister of State Zhivar-
go Laing said he thought
the Central Bank had
offered “prudent advice...I
| think it’s reflective of their
recognition that the cir-
cumstances require that
kind of prudence. And I
believe that people should
heed the warning.”

“Across the board... it
makes sense to exercise
financial prudence that
doesn’t really put one at
risk of really jeopardising
one’s quality of life,” he
said.

The bank’s advice came in the
wake of the failure of the United
States Congress to pass a “bail out”
package which its supporters said
would help to return American
financial markets to some degree
of normalcy, thereby creating
opportunities for businesses and
consumers to borrow money again.

SEE page eight










CHEESE e Ham & CHerEse

Ewioy a

Regular Sub :

Fer onty




PAGE 2, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



| Troyniko
| McNeil in |

\

brief court
Ely ieteheee ©

&

Troyniko McNeil, who was
arrested in connection with the
murder of well known hand-
bag designer Harl Taylor,
appeared in court briefly yesterday for a preliminary inquiry.

The Attorney General is considering a Voluntary Bill of Indict-
ment, which could send the case directly to the Supreme Court.
He is scheduled to appear in court again on November 4.

eneva Brass Seaioods
‘A Bahamian Family Seafood Tradition”
Pe er SS

MON ATL COM CON Cen



































Store #1 (Farrington Rd.) - 325-0116




Store #3 (Carmichael Rd.) - 341-3664

Cas trees cata

WHAT WILL THE CURRENT STATE OF
TY AND THE UPCOMING
ELECTION MEAN FOR THE BAHAMAS?

THE US ECONG










CALL IN AND ASK YOUR QUESTIONS OR SHARE YOUR VIEWS.
AND YOU CAN E-MAIL YOUR QUESTIONS AND COMMENTS NOW TO

yourvoice@financialvoice.org

UNEMPLOYMENT RATE RISES BY NEARLY 1 PER CENT

Average household
income drops $2,000

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN

Tribune Staff Reporter

THE Bahamian household’s
average income has dropped by
about $2,000 since last year.

And the ranks of the unem-
ployed has grown by more than
12 per cent, while the unem-
ployment rate has increased by
nearly one per cent, the Depart-
ment of Statistics revealed in its
annual Labour Force and
Household Survey.

According to this latest
labour force and household
report released yesterday,
although the labour force has
grown by 2.9 per cent — 5,490

‘persons compared to 4,985 in

2007 — the total number of
unemployed Bahamians has
increased by 12.4 per cent.
With household incomes
dwindling, and unemployment
increasing, a Central Bank offi-
cial said that these changes
reflect the overall economic
condition of the country.
According to the official,
“Most likely the household

LABOUR FORCE AND HOUSEHOLD SURVEY



income changes are going to be

summarizing something that’s
already happening in the econ-
omy. So I think in this case,
there’s a cause and effect.”

“T think a fair interpretation
of the data is that it’s reflecting
a response within the economy
with all the developments that
are taking place internationally

. if you have a continued
growth in the number of per-
sons who are entering the
labour force, unless you are see-

ing growth in job creation or.

employment at the same rate,
you will see an increase in the
unemployment rate.”

The report also indicates that
women are the new driving
force behind the growth in
labour, having a 64 per cent
greater representation — 3,105

women — than men who rep-

resent 36 per cent or 2,430.
Additionally, the rate of

unemployment has changed

from 7.9 per cent in 2007, to 8.7

Laptop thieves have Cable residents on high alert

per cent in 2008. In New-Provi-
dence, the unemployment rate
is reported to have increased
from &.0 to 8.7 per cent, and in
Grand Bahama from 8.8 per
cent to 9.0 per cent-during the
same period.

The report also shows that
private household ownership
increased by 1.4 per cent.
Whereas in 2007, private house-
holds numbered 106,460, this
number has now increased by
some 1,535 private households.
It was also revealed that 60 per
cent of these homes were head-
ed by men.

For 2008,-the new statistics
showed that the average house-
hold income has dropped from
$45,221 in 2007, to $43,427 —
a decrease of $1,794 in 2008.

In New Providence, this
report implies that the average
household income is now $1,471
lower than last year’s, and
$4,840 lower in Grand Bahama.



A string of break-ins and thefts in the Cable
Beach area have residents on high-alert,
according to reports reaching The Tribune.

Although police did not confirm the crimes
up to press time last night, sources claim that
over the last few months, persons living in con-
dominiums in the area were robbed of expen-
sive electronic equipment, particularly laptop
computers, after burglars gained access to their
homes.

The two latest incident were said to have
taken place two nights ago in one of the towers
at Delaporte Point. The culprit or culprits were
thought to have actually scaled the building to
gain access to the penthouse apartments.

"We got a letter from our condo manager '

recently, saying there was a string of robberies
on Cable Beach and warning us to be careful
who we buzz into the complex and to make









2009 Mitsubishi

LANCER

Test Drive One

TODAY!

sure that front and patio doors are secured,"
said a resident of the Towers of Cable Beach,
who asked to remain anonymous.

. An officer from the Cable Beach Station
contacted by The Tribune was tight-lipped on
the issue of crime in the area, saying he was
unauthorised to comment.

He would only say that Officer-in-Charge of
the Cable Beach station Chief Superintendent
Berkie Wright, who was said to be out of office
yesterday, will release a statement today on
the reported string of break-ins and thefts in the
area.

Press Liaison Officer Assistant Superinten-
dent Walter Evans said he had not been briefed
on an increase of break-ins or robberies in the
Cable Beach area, but said he would look into

‘the matter.

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Pair hailed —
after denying
fraud charges

TWO individuals who
appeared in court yesterday
were charged with five counts
of conspiracy to commit fraud
by false pretenses, one count
of possession of a forged doc-
ument and one count of utter-
ing a false document.

Jamie Richardson, 24; of
Fire Trail Close and James
Winter of Tropical Gardens
both pleaded not guilty to all
seven charges and were grant-
ed bail in the amount of
$7,000 each, with one surety.

One of the charges alleges
that on September 12 they had
in their possession a forged
document identified as a Com-
monwealth Bank cheque in
the amount of $35,000, know-
ing the “same not to be gen-
uine.”

It was also alleged that on
the same day they obtained
from Scotia bank, Rawson
Square $9,000 cash by false
pretenses. Further, it was
alleged that on September 13
they obtained $1,000 cash
from Scotia bank, Rawson
Square, by false pretenses, and
another $1,000 from the same
bank on September 14.

Counts seven charges that
the individuals obtained
$19,000 from Scotia Bank,
Rawson Square by false pre-
tenses. Richardson and Win-
ter’s case was adjourned until
October 2.

Woman arrested in
connection with
firearm possession

A 30-year-old woman was
arrested on Monday in connec-
tion with the possession of an
illegal firearm.

Shortly before 6pm on Mon-
day, officers from the Southern
Division police station conduct-
ed a.search of a private resi-
dence on West Street. Press liai-
son officer Assistant Superin-

_tendent Walter Evans told The

Tribune-that police found .ax38°""*

handgun in the house. The
woman is expectéd to’ be for-.
-mally charged as early as today. ~






MITSUBISHI












Se

THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 3



Rotary luncheon
with minister
is postponed

A SPECIAL Rotary luncheon }
meeting with the Minister of ;
Tourism has been postponed 1 in :
light of the continuing financial :
uncertainty in the United States. ;

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace :
had been expected to speak on }
the topic “Towards a Strategic }
Business Plan for The Tourism }
Sector” at the joint luncheon for :
all Rotary Clubs today, with pro- :
ceeds going to Rotary’s Inagua :

relief fund.

The event was jointly organ- :
ised by Rotary, the Bahamas :
Chamber of Commerce and the :
Nassau Tourism Development }

Board.

However, public relations com- }
pany Visionaire Marketing con- :
firmed yesterday that, like Mr :
Vanderpool-Wallace’s scheduled :
“Meet the Minister” press inter- :
view that was to be televised on :
Monday, the event has been can- :

celled.

Visionaire Marketing said this }
is until the “economic situation in :
the United States has been sta- ;

bilised.”

On Monday a release to the :
media said that the press meeting :
with Mr Vanderpool Wallace :

* where he was due to unveil an }
“aggressive plan of action” for ;
the nation’s number one industry ;

was postponed.

The reason given was that the :
“present financial crisis” in the :
United States and financial bail :
out failure had caused advisers :
to “reshape its plans to ensure :
the Bahamas remains on the cut- }

ting edge”.

RM Bailey Class
of 1988 meeting

ALL ALUMNI of the RM :
Bailey Class of 1988 are being :
urged to attend a “very impor- }
tant” meeting at 7pm tonight at :
the school on Robinson Road. :
Plans for the upcoming class :
banquet will be discussed and :
tickets will be available for sale. :

* Call 302-2783 for more details.

FOR 3 IN 1 LAWN SERVICE
Fertilizer, Fungicide,
Pest Control

BU Pe CTC
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Straw market to be rebuilt on original site

FNM propose to
spend $18 million
less than PLP plan
The Tribune
REPORT

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter



alowe@tribunemedia.net ,

THE government has budgeted
around $5 million to build a new
straw market on the original site
that could house around 400 ven-
dors and an architect is in, the
process of completing designs for
a revitalised downtown area that
could see Rawson Square turned
into a “green space”.

The green space, which will
incorporate more trees, grass and
other landscaping, will either be
accomodated on an extended
area encompassing Rawson
Square, or on the site where the
straw market tent currently exists
now.

This was revealed by Earl
Deveaux, minister of the envi-
ronment who is standing in for
minister of works Neko Grant.

It involves an adjustment to
plans he had set in motion earlier
this year to have a green space
located on the original Straw
Market site.

He said these initial plans have
been put off “to maintain a sense
of civility” between the govern-
ment and straw vendors.

“We were concerned about
completing the green space and
further inflaming the straw ven-
dors and leading to an issue about
whether (the new market) would
or would not be done, so just to
maintain a sense of civility we will
put the hoarding back and once
we get the design drawings com-
plete we will do the green space
on the alternate site”

Budgeted at $5 million, the
roughly 400 capacity straw market
that the government is planning
will cost over $18 million less than
the proposed market for which
the former government had
entered into a contract and which
the FNM administration con-
demned as too costly.

As the present government
also plans to build, an “authentic

Employment Opportunity

Local Media House is accepting
applications for
Broadcast Journalist / News peperter

The successful candidate should possess the
following qualifications:

¢ Minimum of 2 years experience
* Must have a good understanding of News

Gathering & Production

* An awareness of current affairs both locally and

globally

¢ Must be an enthusiastic self-starter
¢ The ability and willingness to learn ©

¢ Own transportation

Please submit resumes to:
Patty Roker’

Director of News

Island 102.9 FM
Edmark House

Dowdeswell Street
P. O. Box N-1807

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Email: reporter@islandfmonline.com

ax (242) 356-4515










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Felipé Major/Tribune staff

TOURISTS walk past the original straw ME CSIC



craft market” at the western end
of the Prince George dock, some
of the vendors who sell such gen-

uinely Bahamian wares will be’
able to operate from those |

premises.

According to Mr Deveaux, at
present — “depending on the day”
— the tented market site contains
anywhere between around 400 to
800 vendors.

Right now the Ministry of
Works is moving to level, contain
and hoard the straw market site
again after numerous panels that
were hiding it from view were
taken down, apparently by people
looking for shutter material dur-
ing the recent hurricane scares.

According to Dr Deveaux, new
designs for downtown have been
drawn up based on the feedback
from a number of interactive con-
sultations that have taken place
over the last four to eight months.

Built into the designs is the idea
that the Woodes Rodgers Wharf

Bahamians are borrowing less to buy

could be extended by as much as

30 feet into the harbour, depend-

ing on how much material is»

dredged from the harbour dur-
ing the exercise to deepen that
waterway.

“There were a number of
meetings over the last four to
eight months but concentrated
more in the last five months. We
took a trip to Delray Beach (Palm
Beach county, Florida) to see
how they improved their down-
town area and Jackson Burnside
was hired by the downtown
development association,” said
Mr Deveaux.

He said the moves by govern-
ment and the association were
based on a sense that while there
are proposals afoot to improve
downtown, coming from private
developers and government, what
needs to be determined before
this happens is how it can be done
in a “sensible, cohesive way.”

“When our government passed

cars, furnishings, domestic appliances

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter
alowe@tribunemedia.net

WITH economic activity slowing,
Bahamians have borrowed signifi-
cantly less money to buy private cars,
furnishings, domestic appliances and’
land this year than in 2007, the gov-
ernor of the Central Bank said yes-
terday.

However, at the same time more
and more Bahamians are resorting
to using credit cards to fund their
lifestyles — to the extent that credit
card debt has increased by some $9
million this year, in comparison to a
lesser increase of $5 million during
the same period last year.

Meanwhile, the public has moved
in greater numbers to consolidate
their debts in 2008 — taking out loans
to pay off other loans, ‘according to!
Governor Wendy Craigg.

“Debt consolidation has increased
by some $48 million compared to
some $28 million in previous years ...
so certainly consumers have increased
the consolidation of their debt to
improve their financial situation,” she
said.

The slowing in consumer credit
growth comes after a two year period
of “above average, double digit”
growth.

It shows that Bahamians are
already to a certain extent trying to
cut back on their spending, as the
Central Bank advised them to do ear-
lier this week in light of the ongoing
credit crisis and economic turmoil in
the United States in particular.

This may be because, as Ms Craigg
and Dionisio D’ Aguilar, president of
the Bahamas Chamber of Commerce
say, consumers in this country are
more or less “borrowed up” at this
stage, burdened with debt.

Growth in private sector credit -
the amount of money borrowed by:
private companies — has also fallen
from 14.4 per cent in 2006, to 9.7 per
cent in 2007, down to 4.6 per cent in
2008.

Ms Craigg said that the reduction,
in private sector credit growth gives
an idea of the slowing of the economy
overall.

“Tt gives you an appreciation for

eS, All new Toyota vehicles are backed by a 3-year/60,000-mile factory warranty.

the evolution of credit, the slowing
in credit growth. (Credit growth, or
lack thereof) follows the same pat-
tern as the rate of growth in the econ-
omy ... it tracks economic activity.”

Ms Craigg told The Tribune that
Bahamian external reserves are up
43 per cent this September compared
to the same time last year at around
$650 million, meaning that Bahamian
banks have a healthy capacity to lend
— unlike American banks.

In a statement issued on Monday,
the Central Bank said the stability of
the domestic financial sector is not
threatened by the current turmoil in
the United States — a positive assess-
ment among a cascade of negative
verdicts in recent weeks.

the Downtown Revitalisation Act
a number of proposals came up
for redevelopment, so we asked
the question, ‘Okay, what do we
do with the improvement? We
need some kind of framework to
put it in’. Klonaris is doing some-
thing, Symonette is doing some-
thing, Bethel is doing something
and you know there are the issues
of parking, taxis, pedestrian walk-
ways and greenspace, how do you
accomodate that in a sensible

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alot of pedestrian walkways, more
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and essentially corridors from
Charlotte Street, Frederick and
Parliament street migrating onto
Bay street,” he said.

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/
PAGE 4, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master

LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,

(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, P.O. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES
Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Keep quality of Bay Street stores

IN ANSWER to retailers’ requests that the
extra five per cent increase in stamp tax on
such luxury items as perfumes, cosmetics and
leather goods be removed to allow competi-
tion, State Minister for Finance Zhivago Laing
replied that merchants will have to “justify”
their arguments for such “remittances.”

Before, we go any further we must let our

- readers into the little secrets of how words are
“spun” and played with in the business of
tourism.

The big sellers in the tourist market are “duty
free” items. Tourists flock to “duty free” coun-
ters thinking they are getting a bargain. What
they don’t know is that nothing is duty free,
it’s just in the name. Persons in business in this
country pay stamp tax in addition to Customs
duty on all imported items. However, luxury
goods retailers — so that they can continue the
duty free sales pitch — pay no duty. Instead
their “duty” is called “stamp tax.” Whereas
most of us pay 7 per cent stamp tax plus duty
that varies with the item purchased, there is
only stamp tax on luxury items — nothing that
is called “duty.”

Years ago that tax was as low as one to two
per cent. Today it is 20 per cent. Government
has since raised the stamp tax to 25 per cent.
This means that there is no longer any incentive
for cruise passengers to leave their ships to shop
in Nassau. Bay Street prices‘are now the same as
those in the cruise ship’s boutiques. This is why
luxury goods retailers are asking for a “remit-
tance.” As one of them said: “This extra five per

_ cent could just be the killer!”

There are those who believe that some of
them will be forced to scale down and eventually
go out of business.

How times have changed! Years ago Bay
‘Street’s luxury stores were the drivers of the
tourist industry. Bay Street was a shopping mec-
ca for northerners.

Americans shopped here for their perfumes,

' linens, cashmeres, doeskins, china and leather
goods, which were indeed practically duty free
and so. much cheaper than in the US.

We remember a group of doctors, who made
at least two trips a year to Nassau — no, not to
gamble at the Bahamian Club, but to fill their
cellars with a wide range of alcoholic bever-
ages that would carry them through their Christ-
mas and New Year’s parties and were prized
Christmas gifts for friends. Even with the plane
fare, shopping for their beverages in Nassau
was a tremendous bargain. They were not the
only ones. This was a common practice with
Americans.

Likewise the shopping for luxury items —
either not available or too expensive in the US

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— were bargains on Bay Street. Our parlia-
mentarians probably don’t remember many of
the shop names that have now disappeared
from the main street.

There was the Old English Store, well known
for its English woolens, cashmere sweaters, doe-
skin gloves and smart Burberry coats, among
many other fine English goods. The Men’s Shop,
owned by the late Fred Sands, uncle of Sir
Stafford Sands, had all of the finest English
goods for men. This store has changed hands
several times. From being known later as_ the
Nassau Shop it is now John Bull. There was Sir
George Robert’s City Gift Shop, managed by
his wife, which carried the finest English, Irish
and European china, silver and crystal. Treasure
Traders with its fine crystal and silver is gone as
is Bernard’s, well known for its English china
and fine line of Wedgwood. In the last article we
wrote on Bernard’s, a spokesman for Wedg-
wood boasted that Bernard’s — because of its
American clientele — was way ahead of all of its
international stores in sales. Wedgwood also
kept Bernard’s stocked with the widest range of
its products.

There was also the Pipe of Peace with its
Dunlop pipes and wide range of tobacco. There
were many other stores, all noted for low priced
luxury items that kept the tourists coming. Most
of them are now a part of history. The only one

' left is Bakers, today the oldest store on Bay

Street in which can still be found items thaf are
sold nowhere else in Nassau.

These shops were so important to attract
tourists that they were included in many travel
articles promoting the Bahamas.

We remember the days when our father, Sir
Etienne Dupuch, was the Bahamas correspon-
dent for the New York Times. The Develop-
ment Board could get nothing published in the
grand old Times, because of its strict policy of
not accepting any information from public rela-
tions firms, especially those tied to govern-
ments.

So Sir Etienne’s good friend Howell Rees of
the Development Board would give Sir Eti-
enne the news releases — often containing the
shopping delights of Bay Street — and these
releases would be published in The Times.
Through Sir Etienne even Nassau’s daily weath-
er was published in The Times.

However, with government’s plan to revi-
talise Bay Street we would suggest the minister
sit down with these merchants and hear their
side of the story.

It would not be amusing if we ended up with
a physically attractive Bay Street, but few qual-
ity shops. Bay Street will have truly earned its
name: Tee Shirt Junction.



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The $ Sale You’y ve e Been Waiting For s Here...

“New Inventory

Rosetta

St Cecilia are

committed to

Paul Moss
being our MP

EDITOR, The Tribune.

We in St Cecilia have made
up our minds.

We have searched high and
low, looking for a leader to
represent us.

We need a leader with back-
bone, not one who quickly
genuflects.

We cannot let our emotions
prevent us from selecting

someone who not only is will- '

ing but able to transform our
constituency.

We deserve much more.
Other constituencies have pro-
gressed considerably, except
us. The cold facts are that we
always voted PLP.

With all due respect to
Mother Pratt, St Cecilia has
not made much progress.

The people still are not bet-
ter off.

We can make the mistake
and fool ourselves by selecting
a new candidate, or we can let
the people in St Cecilia deter-
mine which one they really
want.

There has been much talk
about the blessing of Paulette
Zonicle by Mother Pratt, but






DaeMes

letters@tridbunemedia.net

that is only speculation.

The PLP is far too wise to
risk using any tactic that will
only seek to divide the peo-
ple by not following the peo-
ple’s wishes.

This is the time; this is the
defining moment where poli-
tics as usual must be discour-
aged.

This i is the time for “real
men” to come to the fore and
be counted.

The length of time in the
PLP or the association or con-
nection with the hierarchy
should not be the criteria by
which a choice is made.

We, in St Cecilia have
already made up our collec-
tive minds. We have seen the
commitment and determina-
tion of Paul Moss.

He is sincere and makes
himself available for us under
many different circumstances.

He loves the youth and
relates to our needs.

He is easy to talk to and
does not talk down to us. He is
a fighter and will not hesitate
to defend St Cecilia at all cost.

His intentions are good. He
is always available and :we love
him.

We have made up our
minds. We are now committed
to Paul Moss and will not stop
until he is the Member of Par-
liament, regardless.

What is so interesting is he -
is attracting FNM and other
undecided to his cause.

His mission to transform St
Cecilia has us looking forward
to his service as an MP.

We want Mr Christie to
take this letter seriously.

We will not be bullied into
accepting what we do not
want.

We will not let the games
that are played in Gambier
House prevent St Cecilia from
moving forward.

We promise to stay behind
Paul Moss until the end, the
very end.

GENE FERGUSON
Nassau,
September, 2008.

Christie isn’t shuffling so
much as begging for unity

EDITOR, The Tribune.

When my Uncle Lou used
to visit from the States, we
always smiled when he would
say in amazememt, “Well shut
my mouth!”

We figured he picked that
up working on the contract
over there.

If he were alive today I
think he would say “well shut
my mouth,” again at the
strange happenings in the PLP
these days.

. Perry Christie ain’t shuffling
so much as begging for unity.

. The same man who nearly

tore this nation apart with his
party’s election courting and
election campaigning after we
vote dem out can today call
for unity!

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What really does he seek
unity in?

Getting him elected as his
party’s leader?

D’en there’s that one who
think a wife can make him
leader, and the other who fig-
ures we be fooled if he takes
on the garb. of an Obama.
That’s just it, they don’t get
it.

The FNM allowed us to be
better educated, wiser, more
widely travelled and we can’t
be blinded easily anymore by
sweet talk and a few “yankee

dollars,”
again!

Why, I feel sure Uncle Lou
would laugh in his loud and
grumbly voice and shout that,
“dis PLP sure gone down hill
from the first election when
they stood for something
besides, money, greed and
arrogance.’

And I don’t, believe it’s just
Uncle Lou who feels that way.

quoting Uncle Lou

PATIENCE SMITH
Nassau,
September 19, 2008.

Front page headline was
extremely insensitive

‘

- EDITOR, The Tribune.

I found your front page headline “Leslie Miller breaks down
on witness stand” in last night’s edition extremely insensitive.

And it was cheap and tacky.

Who wouldn’t “break down” testifying in the murder trial of

‘one of their children?

I think The Tribune owes Mr Miller and his family an apolo-

gy:

TONY DUNCOMBE
Nassau,
September 18, 2008.

"MAINS RENEWALS

Sans Souci to Fox Hill Road

The Water and Sewerage Corporation advises its
customers and the general public that the
Corporation has begun mains renewal work on
the Eastern Road from Fox Hill Road to San Souci

for a period of eight (8) weeks.

Motorists are

asked to avoid the area as much as possible.



The Corporation apologizes fgr the inconvenience
caused and reminds its customers this is an effort
to improve their water supply.
THE TRIBUNE



© In brief

2008-2009
stonecrab
season opens
on October 16

The Department of Marine
Resources is reminding the
pubic that the 2008/2009 :
stonecrab season will open on .
October 16.

It will continue until May
31, 2009.

The department said: “Dur-
ing the stated period, fishers
are reminded that it is illegal
to take, buy or sell any female
stonecrab.

“Also, fishers are reminded
that all harvested stonecrab
claws must measure more than
four inches in length.

“It constitutes an offence
against the Fisheries Regula-
tions to take, have in your
possession, buy or sell any
stonecrab claws of which mea-
sures less than four inches.”

The department said the
stonecrab industry continues
to play an important role to
the fisheries of the Bahamas,
adding hundreds of thousands
of dollars to the economy.

Fishermen were advised to
adhere to the rules or “face
prosecution to the fullest
extent of the law”.

Embassy to

shut for Chinese
National Day
Holiday

The Chinese Embassy locat-
ed on Village Road will be —
closed today, October 1,
through Friday, October 3, in
observance of the Chinese
National Day Holiday.

China’s National Day is the
anniversary of the founding of
the People’s Republic of Chi-
na in 1949.

Celebrations usually take
the form of parties at amuse-
ment parks by day and fire-
works and special televised
presentations during the
evening.

Many Chinese people have
enjoyed the week-long vaca-
tion since 1999 and use the
occasion to take short excur-
sions to enjoy the beauty of
the ‘golden Fall.’

Bahamas Faith
Ministries makes
donation to help
hurricane victims

BAHAMAS Faith Min-
istries donated atotalof |
$12,500 to various agencies
with responsibility for helping
victims of the recent hurri-
canes. This included $4,000 for
the National Emergency Man-
agement Agency (NEMA),
$2,000 for the Bahamas
Methodist Conference for
Haiti, $2,000 for the Bahamas
Red Cross and $4,500 for the
Bahamas Christian Council
for Inagua, Mayaguana and
Turks and Caicos.

BFM also partnered with
Gems and friends in their ini-
tial hurricane aid to Turks and
Caicos, offering 55 boxes of
food and water.

The cheque presentations
were made last week by pas-
tors Richard Pinder and Hen-
ry Francis.

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Ue
EXTERMINATORS
FOR PEST PROBLEMS
a ade Yd

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008,-PAGE 5

EGO @ tty

tee ea

Govt proposes to phase out commercial harvesting totally by April 1 next year

THE government has
announced that it will enhance
the protection extended to marine
-turtles found in Bahamian waters.

This decision comes after
intense lobbying by animal rights
activists, who say far too many
rare turtles are cruelly killed by
fishermen every year.

' Several cases also emerged in
which fishermen were capturing
turtles and holding them in
painful conditions in an effort to
force concerned citizens to “save”
the animals by paying top prices
for their release. .

The government said the deci-
sion is part of its commitment “to
pursue appropriate conservation
policies:‘and strategies so as to
safeguard the marine and terres-
trial environment.

“This also responds to concerns
expressed by citizens and by local
and international non-govern-
mental organisations to the goy-
ernment of the Bahamas calling
for strengthened protection of
marine turtles in the Bahamas,”
said the government in a press
release.

Already, the World Conserva-
tion Union (IUCN) considers all
marine turtles, globally, to be
either “threatened” or “endan-
gered”.

The listing of marine turtles
under Appendix I of the Con-
vention on the International
Trade of Endangered Species of
Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES),
to which the Bahamas is a party,
prohibits international trade in
turtles and their by-products
except under strict conditions.

All marine turtles roam vast
distances and occupy a variety of
different marine habitats during
the course of their lives. As such
they are a truly shared species.

Five of seven known species of
marine turtles are found within

OM Te UES TTS

Comments on the proposed regulations should be addressed to:

The Director

Department of Marine Resources
Ministry of Agriculture and Marine Resources

P 0 Box N-3028
Nassau, NP,
Bahamas.

Or email fisheries@bahamas.gov.bs, or send a fax to (242)-393-0238.

aE

Olive Ridley turtles.

While all five species forage for
food within Bahamian waters, all
except the Olive Ridley are
known to use Bahamian beaches
as nesting sites.

The government said: “The
harvesting of Loggerhead and
Green turtles is of some social
and cultural importance among
certain communities and individ-
uals for food purposes; this how-
ever, is not for the majority of



Bahamians. The fishery based on
these two species is not regarded
to be a major source of income

the waters of the Bahamas. These
are the Green, Loggerhead,
Hawksbill, Leatherback and

Hilton Hotels Corporation
hoping to open more
properties in Bahamas

THE HILTON HOTEL in Nee

@ By KARIN HERIG
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

THE Hilton Hotels Corporation yesterday announced that it
sees great potential in the Bahamas and therefore hopes to
open additional properties in New Providence in the near
future.

As the tourism industry struggles to attract visitors and new
investors in these economically tumultuous times, the Hilton
Hotels Corporation said that although it presently does not
have any confirmed deals in the Bahamas to share with the
public, it hopes to be in a position to do so soon.

Hilton Hotels Corporation yesterday announced expansion
plans to quadruple its presence in the Caribbean and Latin
America by adding 150 new hotels to the portfolio over the next
five years.

“We see great opportunity in the Bahamas, for both focused-
service and full-service luxury properties,” Karla Visconti,

director of communications for the Caribbean and Latin Amer- ,

ica Hilton Hotels.Corporation, told The Tribune.

In the Bahamas this could mean the establishment of a Hilton
Garden Inn or a Hampton Inn, which will target the mid-mar-
ket sector, particularly in Nassau, she said.

New Hilton properties could answer the call for an increase in
the country’s hotel room inventory — an increase especially in
rooms that offer full-service, which is very popular with Euro-
pean and American tourists in other Caribbean countries.

The Hilton Hotels Corporation said that it currently has 13
hotels in the Caribbean and Latin America region and antici-
pates adding another 17 hotels to the Caribbean over the next
five years.

“The goal of Hilton’s development efforts in the Caribbean
will be to add focused-service hotels, such as Hilton Garden Inn
and Hampton Inn, to commercial centres such as San Juan,
Trinidad, and Nassau.

“Another area of growth will be developing luxury branded
hotels and residences in high-end mixed use developments in
markets such as Turks and Caicos, the Lesser Antilles, and the
Bahamas,” the Hilton Hotels Corporation said.

The corporation has already announced eight properties
under development in the Caribbean, including the Conrad.
Bimini Bay Resort and Casino in the Bahamas.





ZL OE EA

SSS

for the average commercial fish-
erman.

The existing guidelines include:

¢ specific minimum harvestable
size limits for Green and Logger-
head turtles ,

e full protection of the Hawks-
bill Turtle

e all species of turtles are pro-
tected on beaches and every-
where during the closed season
for turtles (April 1 — July 31)

e the taking of turtle eggs is
prohibited

e all turtles harvested are to be
landed intact to allow for inspec-

dismembering :
a head of a @
large sea tur-
tle at Montagu ©
fish ramp.



tion A) cc

The Department of Marine
Resources is proposing the fol-
lowing additional guidelines:

e with effect from October 31,
2008, full protection for Olive
Ridley Turtle and Leatherback
turtles

e with effect from December
31, 2008 prohibition of the com-

mercial harvest, purchase, or sale -

of all species of marine turtles
found within the Bahamian exclu-
sive economic zone, and/or of
their by-products such as their
shells

e with effect from April 1, 2009
extend full protection to all
marine turtles found in the exclu-
sive economic zone by prohibiting
the harvesting of all marine tur-
tles except with the permission
of the minister for scientific
research, public display or edu-
cational purposes.

The Department of Marine
Resources said it invites com-
ments from the general public
with regard
enhanced protections.

to proposed:





ca
PHOTO shows body parts and large
head of a dismembered sea turtle at
Montagu fish ramp.



‘BEHEADED! The head of a large sea

turtle with eyes gouged out is on dis-
play at Montagu fish ramp for every-
one to see.



THE HEAD of a large slaughtered sea
turtle and body parts are on display at
the Montagu fish ramp.



THE HEAD of a large slaughtered
sea turtle and “body parts are on
display at the Montagu fish ramp. °

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PAGE 6, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



Climate change ‘is one of the

greatest threats to Bahamas’

Rotaract Club
adopts Adelaite
Primary School's
first grade

THE Rotaract Club of
South East Nassau Centen-
nial in its latest community
effort has adopted Adelaide

. Primary School’s first grade.

“Our goal is to help pro-
vide tools and opportunities
to ‘make dreams real’ for
these children throughout
their primary school years in
accordance with Rotary:
International’s theme for
2008/2009,” the RSENC said
in a statement.

The Rotary Club
conducted several book and
school supplies drives at the
Mall at Marathon and Town
Centre Mall during the
months of July and
August. ‘

“To date, we held four
drives and have been suc-
cessful in receiving dona-
tions of reading books,
school supplies — composi-
tion note books, pencils,
pens, coloured chalk and a
board eraser — and mone-
tary donations — a sub-total
of $653.

“The fundraisers have
been a great opportunity for
club members and potential
members to work together’
for a common goal of raising
awareness of the needs of
Adelaide Primary School
and also as promoting the
initiatives of Rotaract and
Rotary International,” the
Club said.

The RSENC is scheduled
to make its first presenta-
tion of school supplies and
books to Adelaide Primary
School today at 8.50am dur-
ing the school’s morning
assembly.

The Rotary Club’s past
and present projects include
wheel chair ramps for vari-
ous government primary
schools; partnering with the
Bahamahost programme to
deliver informative semi-
nars; promoting blood dri-
ves with Princess Margaret
Hospital; conducting beach
clean-ups at Yamacraw
Beach; a book drive for the
Bilney Lane Children’s
Home, and the maintenance
of Kemp Road Park in part-
nership with the Sponsoring
Rotary Club.





@ GLADSTONE THURSTON
Senior Information
Officer

CLIMATE change poses “one
of the greatest threats” to.the
Bahamas, Minister of the Envi-
ronment Earl Deveaux told Mon-
day’s Environmental Partnership
Forum.

“We must examine how we
can sustain economic prosperity
and provide for our growing pop-

ulation while developing practical '

means of reducing energy con-
sumption and mitigating the
adverse effects on the environ-
ment of such as greenhouse gas
emissions, sea level rise, and
global warming,” he said.

The purpose of the forum was
to introduce the ministry and its
various departments, and to hear
from those who may have differ-
ent approaches, innovative ideas,
and new information.

A town meeting on the envi-
ronment takes place tomorrow
at the College of the Bahamas’
Choices Restaurant, Thompson
Boulevard, beginning at 7.30 pm.

It will feature a ministerial
panel comprising ministers whose
portfolios include critical issues
relating to the environment.

“We seek to instil a sense of
environmental stewardship and
develop innovative strategies and
lifestyle changes in order to com-
bat risks and produce results
which improve our quality of
life,’ Mr Deveaux told the forum.

“We must act now to seek out
innovative ways in which to mit-
igate the adverse impacts on our
marine and terrestrial environ-
ment, while sustaining economic
prosperity and providing for our
growing populations in a sus-
tainable manner.”

The forum featured sessions
on planning for environmental
sustainability; environmental pro-
tection and sustainable use; man-
aging maritime affairs for envi-
ronmental sustainability; ar?
energy strategy for the Bahamas.

Included in the Ministry of the
Environment are the Bahamas
Environmental Science and
Technology Commission
(BEST), the Bahamas National
Geographic Information System


















Centre, the Department of Envi-
ronmental Health Services, the
Department of Meteorology, the
Department of Physical Planning,
Subdivisions Section, the Nassau
Botanical Gardens, Forestry, the
Port Department, and
the Bahamas Maritime Authori-
tys

The ministry also has relations
with the Bahamas Electricity
Corporation, the Water and Sew-
erage Corporation, and with the
non-governmental organisations
the Bahamas National Trust, the
Nature Conservancy, and the
Bahamas National Pride Associ-
ation.

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LEFT: Minister of the Environ-
ment Earl Deveaux (second left)
and the National Children’s
Choir who performed at Mon-
day’s Environmental Partner-
ship Forum. The choir was
directed by Patricia Bazard.

BELOW RIGHT: Members of the
National Children’s Choir.

BELOW LEFT: MINISTER of
State in the Ministry of the Envi-
ronment Phenton Neymour
(left) and Eric Carey, executive
director, Bahamas National
Trust, share ideas

Letisha Henderson/BIS

Ministers of Health agree on
a plan to establish CARPHA

CARICOM ministers of
health have endorsed a plan of
action for the transition of
regional health institutions into
the Caribbean Public Health
Agency by 2010.

The endorsement was made
at the annual Caucus of the
Ministers of Health held in
Washington, DC, on the eve of
the PAHO Directing Council
which began on September 29.

The meeting of health minis-
ters approved the general func-
tions and governance structure
of the Caribbean Public Health
Agency (CARPHA) as pro-
posed by the CARPHA steer-
ing committee presided over by
Dr Leslie Ramsammy, Minis-
ter of Health for Guyana.

The ministers mandated the
Programme Management
Group to finalise the structure
and costing by the end of the
year for approval by CARI-
COM’s Council of Human and
Social Development
(COHSOD) in time for presen-
tation to the intersessional
meeting of the CARICOM
Heads of Government in
March, 2009.

The meeting also commend-
ed PAHO, the CARICOM Sec-
retariat and member states for
co-ordinating a variety of activ-
ities at the regional and nation-
al Caribbean Wellness Day pro-
grammes.

Caribbean Wellness Day was
observed on September 13
under the theme “Love Your
Body” in fulfilment of one of
the recommendations of the
Port of Spain Declaration: Unit-
ing to Fight the Non Commu-
nicable Diseases.

The Port-of-Spain Declara-

. » RESOLUTION

The Caucus of CARICOM Ministers Responsible for
Health:

e Recognised the serious material and health devastation
and post traumatic stress faced by countries of the sub-region
during the 2008 hurricane season.

e Expressed sincere concern for the health and well being of
the peoples of the Bahamas, Cuba, Haiti, Jamaica and Turks

and Caicos Islands.

e Endorsed the steps taken by the CARICOM Secretariat,
PAHO and other international agencies in assisting these

.

countries.

e Expressed its praise for the individual country efforts by
CARICOM governments, the private sector and civil society

in supporting their recovery.

e Urged continued support for the countries, especially
Haiti, which had been affected by five storms



tion resulted in 15 actionable
recommendations from the first
Summit of Heads of Govern-
ment, held in Trinidad and
Tobago on September 15, 2007.

The ministers endorsed the
programme for sustaining a

“Wellness Revolution” and.

commended both the Canadi-
an government and the Cana-
dian International Develop-
ment Agency (CIDA) for sup-
porting the CARICOM initia-
tives. The programme’s main
priorities include packaging and
labelling of tobacco products
and improving the legal frame-
work to reduce smoking.

Among other issues discussed
and agreed upon were the
Caribbean Regional Strategic
Framework for HIV/AIDS
under the Pan Caribbean Part-
nership Against HIV/AIDS
(PANCAP), and acceptance of
the report towards a regional
medical licensing examination
from the Caribbean Associa-
tion Medical Councils.

The Caucus of Ministers of
Health, recognising the impact
of recent hurricanes on the
region, including several mem-
ber states and associate mem-
bers, in particular the Bahamas,
Haiti, Jamaica and Turks and
Caicos Islands, as well as Cuba,
passed a resolution, expressing
solidarity and support to the
government and people of those
countries.

At the closing session of the
Meeting, Mr Ramsammy, who
also presided over the caucus,
said that it was one of the most
stimulating meetings and urged
that the future health agenda
must place greater emphasis o7
mental health, rehabilitation u
disabilities, early childhood
development, aging, violence as
a public health issue and the
health effects of climate change
and disasters. He appealed to
the Caucus “to build on what
we have to ensure that we leave
a legacy of a healthy
Caribbean”.

SURO
REWARD

For Information leading

to the recovery of a Galvanized triple axle

boat trailer suitable for a 30 foot boat,

trailer stolen last week from a residence in

Blair Estate, person providing the information

leading to its recovery will remain anonymous,

Call: 376-3710 / cell:328-6092



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a eee a TE

Windsor Lane community centre to host special festival





IN an effort to improve the resi-
dents’ economic situation, the com-
munity centre in the Windsor Lane
area Will host a special festival next
month..

The Windsor Lane Community
Festival is the brainchild of Pastor
John Henry Higgins, founder of the
Windsor Lane Community Centre.

The community centre in a press
statement said that it is the festi-
val’s short-term goal to expand the

residents’ economic opportunities.

The community hopes to increase
its opportunities by partnering with
governmental and other communi-
ty agencies such as the Ministry of
Tourism, “who we hope will assist
through tourism promotional efforts
and by asking taxi drivers and others
to bring the visitors to our shores
to see the ‘real Bahamas’.

“The residents also realise that
they control their destiny by the

choices they make today.
The entertainment for the festival
will be provided by persons from

the Windsor Lane.community and a:

number of other Bahamian guest
artists.

The Minister of Labour and
Social Development Dion Foulkes
has been invited to officially open
the festival,” community represen-
tatives said.

The Community Centre opened

16 months ago and since then has
organised many community-based
programmes such as after school
homework assistance; the Con-
querors for Christ Junkanoo organ-
isation; liturgical dance; the big
brother, big sister initiative; the
community marching band, and the
food outreach programme.
Presently partnering with the
Windsor Lane Community are the
Ministry of Labour and Social

Development’s community affairs
division; the Department of Urban
Renewal; the Bahamas National
Pride Association; the Ministry of
Environmental Health, and the
Royal Bahamas Police Force.

The festival will take place over of
the Discovery Day holiday week-

_ end on October 10, 11 and 12.

The opening ceremony will be
held at 6pm on Friday, October, 10.



discussed

THE Customs duty changes
that angered and confused
members of the business com-
munity a few months ago will
be a topic of discussion at an
upcoming legal forum.

In addition to customs
duties, immigration matters
and anticipated banking
changes are among the topics
to be addressed at the Hals-
bury Chambers’ fourth annu-
al Free Legal Clinic.

The clinic starts at 9am this
Saturday at the New Provi-
dence Community Centre on
Blake Road.

Berchenal Bethell, deputy
comptroller, and Charles
Turner, Superintendent of
Customs, will discuss “Cus-
toms: Changes in Duty Rates”
during a day packed with
expert speakers tackling topics
while the law firm’s attorneys
meet privately with partici-
pants for free consultations.

“Each year the Free Legal
Clinic aims to live up to its
name, ‘Information You Need
for the Life You Want,’
explains Halsbury Chambers
partner Nerissa Greene. “This
year with so much concern
about the increasing cost of
electricity, changes in customs
duties, how best to handle
work permit applications, how
to protect ourselves when con-
tracting to build or renovate
or even what impact the EPA
could have on our jobs, we are
offering — all free of charge —a
comprehensive programme of
information delivered by the
experts themselves who will
also make themselves avail-
able for questions.”

Deputy director of immi-
gration Lambert Campbell
will discuss “Work Permits,
Permanent Residency, Right
to Work: Making the System
Work for You.”

Mr Bethell and‘Mr Turner’s
presentation on customs
duties comes amidst a wave
of confusion over the revisions

,in the duty rates and what
they mean for the economy of
the Bahamas.

“Being a small island nation
the economy of the Bahamas
relies on the importation of
goods and the immigration of
foreign workers for suste-
nance,” said Ms Greene.

“There is a lot.of confusion
over the new customs rates,
what has been lowered, what
has been raised and what this
means for the Bahamian mar-
ket.

“We're also happy to have
the deputy director of immi-
gration speak at the clinic to
éxplain the changes made to
the department to expedite
the process, as well as inform-







Brian Smith



ing those attending of how to
make the system work jas
quickly and efficiently as it can
for them.”

Also speaking at the event
will be Brian Smith, business
manager of the Bahamas
Automated Clearing House
(BACH).

Mr Smith will introduce the
concept of a clearing house
and what it means for the
Bahamian financial services
industry and the future of
banking.

BACH aims to modernise
the financial services industry
by allowing the new system to
clear cheques by the close of

business the following day,

even if drawn on one bank
and deposited at another.

The system also enables
employers to directly deposit
funds into their employees’
accounts, regardless of finan-
cial institution used. ©

Among other speakers at
this year’s clinic are Acting
Assistant Commissioner of
Police Hulan Hanna; real
estate expert Rachel Pinder
of Island Living Real Estate;
president of the Bahamian
Contractors Association;
Stephen Wrinkle, director of
economic planning in the Min-
istry of Finance Simon. Wil-
son; general manager of BEC
Kevin Basden and Halsbury
Chambers partner Nerissa
Greene.

| British

of a,



"American

SSS

A WOMAN lost control of her vehicle while driving on West Bay Street on Monday night and crashed through the walls of the popular n






Rodney Moncur

ight

club Cocktails and Dreams. According to eye witnesses, the accident occurred at around 9.30pm on Monday. Although the vehicle sus-
tained considerable damage, the driver was unharmed. Witnesses said the sound of the impact could be heard as far as Arawak Cay.



FNM mourns passing of Meritorious
Council member Sylvia Roberts _

THE Free National Move-
ment is mourning the passing
of Sylvia Roberts, .a member of
the party’s Meritorious Coun-
cil who died last week after
serving the FNM for many

years.
FNM national chairman Sen-
ator Johnley Ferguson

described Ms Roberts, a native
of Rum Cay, as part of the
“basic human infrastructure of
the party, who has been with
the movement through all its
changing scenes since the estab-
lishment of the FNM in 1972,
and who has remained faithful
right up until the time of her
death last week.”

“Through the years Sylvia-

Roberts has served the party in
very many capacities, and was
extremely active in the FNM
Women’s Association through a
number of administrations,
especially assisting the Associ-
ation in its efforts to establish
branches in the Family Islands,”
the chairman said.

“However, in a larger sense,
Sylvia Roberts was one of those
FNMs who always understood
precisely what was the mission
of the Free National Move-
ment, what was necessary to
explain that mission to the
Bahamian people, and who sim-
ply got on with the job.

“It was because of the bold
and determined efforts of such
as Sylvia Roberts that the FNM,
in August of 1992, was able
finally to break the political
foothold of the then ruling
organisation to make the FNM
the government, and it was

n Financial Breast Cancer Tip

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because of FNMs like her in
1997 and in 2007 that made vic-
tory possible,” he said.

For many years Ms Roberts,
a sister of former Member of
Parliament Oscar Johnson,
worked in the downtown Straw
Market, where she became a
strong advocate for the rights
of vendors, and where she also
spread the FNM’s political mes-
sage.

“She was the FNM’s eyes,
ears and voice in the Straw
Market,” Senator Ferguson
said.

“There she kept the balance
and was often able to bring to
the FNM’s table of deliverance
some who were formerly
doubters.”

Mr Ferguson described the
deceased as someone, “who has
served so long and so faithfully,
and who never once pulled back
in the face of disappointments
in the party.”

The chairman said that the
FNM will in due course make
an announcement on what
arrangements will be made to
honour and pay tribute to the

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56:

OQ AQABEF

memory of Ms Roberts.

For her services to the party,
Ms Roberts was made a mem-
ber of the FNM’s Meritorious
Council, a position reserved for
the FNM’s most distinguished
members.

“We will miss her greatly,”
Mr Ferguson said, “but we are
extremely grateful that through
her years of dedicated service,
Sylvia Roberts has been able to
plant firm footsteps of commit-
ment which have become guide-
lines for others, especially the
youth in our party, to follow.”









PAGE 8, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

The lack of'a decision on the plan
leaves the financial system in melt-
down, and makes it more likely that
Americans, will lose their jobs or
simply have reason to remain cau-
tious in their spending habits.

The Central Bank said the situa-
tion will have “real economic con-
sequences” for the Bahamas.

Mr D’ Aguilar agreed: “We need
a healthy American economy for
ours to be healthy. A vacation is
the last thing on the list that Amer-
icans spend money on.”

However, the BCC President
noted that with Government
employing a large portion of this
country’s workers, he sees those
people as being protected from the
downturn, along with those in the
banking industry.

Promoting the bail out plan
before it was narrowly voted down
in Congress on Monday, Steny

Hoyer, House Majority Leader,,

said it would help save the U.S.

WOOD AN

DESIGN

ENGINEERING

Worst effects

economy from “a meltdown
(which) would begin on a few
square miles of Manhattan, but
(would leave) no city or town in
America untouched” by the time
it was over.

Another supporter said without
prompt action in the form of the
now-defeated bill, “many people
are going to lose their jobs.”

Yesterday, former minister of
state for finance, James Smith said:
“I think it’s good that the Central
Bank would give us a warning
ahead of time that because there’s
likely to be some dark clouds on
the horizon, so it’s best to get the
umbrella open.”

“No matter what the outcome,
in terms of the passage of the bill or
not it’s likely to have an adverse
affect on the Bahamas over the
short term, at least the next six
months..”

He added: “We may not be

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adversely affected uniformly but I:
think all of us will be affected one :

way or the other because even the ;

wealthy might have businesses that : Winton on June 22, 2002. His tor-

depend on the low income guys to : so was saturated in blood and there
support that business so if the low : t ‘
income guy is not coming to buy : hands, Det. Sgt Meronard testi-
anything because he is not work- ;
ing then really that’s going to affect : : S
the bottom line of the wealthy busi- | doned in bush off Yamacraw
: Beach, with blood on the steering

i wheel and passenger seat. The
: visor had been slashed.

Lee maintains in both state- °
? ments that “Marco” had called him
: over from Andros to find a buyer

"That is one of the options that for a supply of cocaine.
we have to:look at. Unfortunate- : |. D ¢
ly... there's a lot of costs that we : different buyers and different cir-
can't control and with fewer cus- :
tomers coming in these stores one of : der.
the few options that's going to } 1 ;
remain available is to stagger your | â„¢an he did not know got in the

tagger y ? back of Mario’s jeep as they were

"We've tried our best to keep oe a eat guide bata
our entire staff working. We under- Matas. i aL tfc eens
stand the hardship that cutting back | ‘*@tl0 WIM a Knite.

would bring, but I think we're pret- : ;
ty much at that point where there's : poste Dae sua, ane Mat tant)

: : : the bushes after he had been
not going to be any other options i Hracked

left for us except to cut the work
(week) and try to spread the hard- | Mario's gold/green Infiniti jee

ship as fairly as possible through- i and aces Lee to follow seotliee
? man who took off in the car Lee

Rupert Roberts, President of the : had been driving.

Super Value chain of foodstores :

and stakeholder in Bed, Bath and ; pushes near Yamacraw beach, Lee

Home, is confident the US economy : gaid the men told him to drive
will rebound and that the local retail : them in his car until they were met
Pe a : by Darren also known as “Pork

"There's been no indication of :
people, not even tightening their :

belts. Consumers are carrying on :

ness owner.”

Major retailers |

FROM page one

staff.

out the enterprise".

sector will not suffer.

as usual," he said, adding "Reducing
enter into our minds."
economy he would rather take a

said.

General Manager of Kelly's :
Home Centre, Greg Kelly, said the :
effects of the US' financial woes :
were still "unfolding" and he could :
not speculate how much it would }
: place so they could steal the drugs

He added that he did not antici- :
pate mass layoffs at Kelly's Home :
Centre and that the store had :
ordered 80 per cent of its Christ- :

‘mas stock in anticipation of a robust front of the store and went inside.

affect retail sales in the Bahamas.

holiday shopping season.

‘Shabba’

FROM page one

out those communities.

Even family and friends of Saun- :
ders have admitted at the wake :
that was held for him, that they :
were unsure of whose death they :

were in fact mourning.

According to high level sources
within the Royal Bahamas Police :

Force, a similar case was seen a : cycle, grabbed a box and school

few years ago when a morons
drug dealer faked his death to
avoid retribution by a competing
faction in Nassau.

As it relates to this latest matter,

Zoe Pound has reportedly sent out :
a warning that they want their ship- :
. Ment returned to them “by any :

means.”

Additionally, sources in the }
Kemp Road area confirm that this :
gang, which has connections as far :
south as Haiti and all the way up to :
New York, is headquartered in :
New Providence in the Carmichael :

Road area.

Reportedly, hitmen from the :
Dominican Republic, Jamaica, and :
Haiti are used mainly by Zoe :
Pound to carry out their more :

“heinous crimes.”

“We are following some leads :
that is what we are :
hearing at this time as well,” said :
another source within the police :

into that ...

force.

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FROM page one

were wounds to his face, chest and

fied.
Mario’s jeep was found aban-

But the two statements involved
cumstances of Mario Miller’s mur-
In the first statement, Lee said a

Lee said he cut his hand trying

Two other men ran towards

After abandoning the jeep in

chop” at the main road.
However, in his second state-
ment, taken on June 30, Lee said a

: deal had been sealed between
staff hasn't entered and will not i.

Mario Miller and a prison officer,

: not mentioned in the first state-
But if faced with a softening }
: when he met with Mr Miller, Mar-
loss before closing down stores, he :
: Avenue on Friday, June 21.

ment, who examined the drugs
co, Ryan Miller and Lee in Collins

Lee said in this statement, that
while playing cards with “Pretty”
and “Anwar” that evening, they
wanted in on the deal, and Lee
agreed to lead them to the meeting

from Mario.

Once in the car with Mario out-
side the Super Value, Lee’s broth-
er Ryan Miller arrived, parked in

Meanwhile Pretty and Anwar

jumped into the jeep.

Lee said: “Anwar pulled me

back and that’s when I saw he had
: a knife, which cut me in my left
: hand.

“He had the knife at Mario’s

throat and he climbed through the
act” are being whispered through- :

passenger side.
“Pretty was in the back stabbing
Mario.
“Mario ran to the grass and
Pretty and Anwar ran after him.
“Then my brother came out and
called out, what’s happening?”
In the statement, Lee recalls that
another man pulled up on a motor-

Mario Miller

bag containing the cocaine from
the back of Mario’s vehicle and
rode off, while Pretty and Anwar
made off in their car.

When Lee saw Mario was dead,
Ryan told him to follow him to
Yamacraw Beach where they
abandoned the jeep.

Lee said: “I told them (Pretty

» and Anwar) you all should not kill

him just take the stuff and go.”

They gave Lee and his brother
three kilos of cocaine and threat-
ened Lee saying. “If you talk or
tell anyone the boys are going to
deal with you.” Lee said he and
his brother Ryan bought two cars
with 2.5 kilos of cocaine and
returned to Andros.

When the court went back in
session, after breaking for lunch,
jurors were presented with Ryan
Miller’s account of the day Mario
was murdered.

In Ryan Miller’s record of the
interview, he was asked by Det Sgt
Meronard if he was involved in
Mario Miller's death.

He said he was not involved.

Ryan Miller’s statement, which
was also read by Det Sgt
Meronard, said that on Friday the
21, the day before the murder, his
brother, Tamar Lee, “jumped into
his car” to go and pick up a gen-
tleman named Marco.

Marco had told them that he
knew someone named Enal Pratt,
a Prison Officer who would buy
cocaine.

Ryan told Lee that he was famil- .

iar with Pratt and urged his broth-
er and Marco to let him tell Pratt
about the cocaine..

Ryan said in the statement that
they went to see Mario at a hair
place on Shirley Street and Mario
told Marco where to meet him.

They all met later that day
“behind Collins Avenue next to a
Haitian church.” Mario was in his
jeep, Ryan, Ricardo and Marco
were together in Ryan’s vehicle
and Pratt was in his own.car. They
then all jumped into Mario’s jeep
to check out the cocaine. Ryan
recounts in his statement that later
that night they were all playing 21
with Ryan Wells when Lee began
telling people at the game that
Mario had some cocaine.

Ryan said that he advised Lee .

that night not to discuss the “stuff”.

The next day, the day of the
murder, Ryan told police that his
brother used his car to once again
pick up Marco.

Ryan professes that he was at
home all day with his sisters until
Lee came back at 3pm and showed
him a large cut on his hand which
he said he got while involved in a
fight.

Lee then asked his brother to
take him to the hospital to ‘have
his hand treated.

When they arrived back home,
Ryan said that Lee revealed three
brown, wrapped packages in the
trunk of the car.

He said his brother gave him
one of the packages and said “here
is a key of cocaine for me having
your car all day.”

Ryan said they looked like the
same packages that he had seen
the day before in Mario’s jeep.

Ryan then dropped Lee to the
airport the next day to catch a
flight to Andros.

He said when they got to the
airport he saw only his package of
cocaine in the trunk.

They then went to Carmichael
Road and The Grove a day later to
exchange the keys of cocaine for
two cars.

Upon cross-examination by
lawyer for murder accused Tamar
Lee, Romauld Ferreira, Det Sgt
Meronard was asked if he knew
the deceased’s father. He said that
he did. Ferreira suggésted that Det
Sgt Meronard was under pressure
to solve the murder because the
father of the deceased was a mem-
ber of Parliament and that he was
in haste to pin the murder on his
client.

Ferreira also suggested that Det
Sgt Meronard, when he received
Tamar Lee’s second statement, did
not inform him to his right to an
attorney. However, Det Sgt
Meronard insisted that he did
inform him as to his right to an
attorney. And also insisted that
the second statement was taken
because of all the “lies” that Lee
was telling.

Ferreira while conducting his
cross-examination said he would
question Meronard’s ability to con-
duct an investigation.

Ferreira said that Meronard
questioned only Lee on the June
27 because he was under so much
pressure to find a killer.

Det Sgt Meronard responded
loudly: “Never...never the truth.”

Meronard during the line of
questioning said that they never
found a murder weapon, but
indicted the Miller brothers on cir-
cumstantial evidence.

On cross-examination by lawyer
for murder accused Ryan Miller,
Ramona Farquharson asked Det
Sgt Meronard if he had observed
any cuts or bruises on Ryan Miller.

He said: “No.”

During the line of questioning,

Det Sgt Meronard admitted that:

at no time did Ryan say he had
any knowledge of a plot to kill
Mario.

The detective also said that the
deceased would have had contact
with a number of persons with
respect to selling cocaine and that
he would have come across more
persons than Ryan Miller with
respect to purchasing cocaine.

‘The trial will'resume today in
the court of Justice Stephen Isaacs
at 10 am.

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THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 9

RaMeEM Ee eK eS



Time for us to cherish Nassau’s rich history

Srverst weeks ago
Tough Call was in Savan-
nah — a 200-plus-year- -old city in
Georgia that is about the size of
Nassau, with an impressive level
of historical preservation that
earns billions of tourist dollars a
year.

But Savannah can't begin to
compete with Florence — a 2000-
plus-year-old city in Italy that I
had the occasion to explore a few
days ago. The past is overwhelm-
ingly present throughout this his-
torical treasure house of some
365,000 people — and it sends a
crystal-clear message to Bahami-
ans. In Florence there is scarcely
a modern building to be found
and, in a curious reversal of con-
ditions in Nassau, it is the con-
temporary buildings that are most
likely to suffer from neglect. In
Florence, a historic building (the
earliest date back to the 11th cen-
tury) is a ticket to affluence rather
than an encumbrance to be razed
under cover of darkness.

Florence was the home of the
Medici, a family which rose to
prominence in the 13th century
as bankers to the Pope, went on
to become leaders of the powerful
Florentine oligarchy, and later
ascended to the grand duchy of
Tuscany...in the process creating
what is today an astonishingly rich
tourist attraction.

The Medici were collectors,
patrons of geniuses like Michelan-
gelo and Galileo, and rulers who
presided over Florence's greatest
public works — the monuments
that millions of visitors from
around the world come to gawk
over today. Anna Maria, the last
of the Medicis, died in 1743, after
bequeathing all her properties
and treasures to what eventually
became the Italian republic.

But don't think that tourism is
a new-fangled phenomenon here.
In fact, visitors have been admir-
ing the city from the 16th century
onwards when Sir Tobie Math-
ews, a son of the Archbishop of
York, famously wrote: "I live in
Fiorence in an-excellent cool ter-
rene, eate good melons, drink
wholesome wine, look upon
excellent devout pictures, and
heer choyce music."

Exactly four hundred years lat-
er, on the occasion of Tough Cal-
I's visit, the product is essentially
the same. And it earns big bucks
for contemporary Florentines.
More than 11 million people vis-

it Tuscany every year,.and all of .

them head for Florence. Yet
despite this crowding in a rela-



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tively small space, the city is rated
the best destination in Europe,
and one of the best in the world.
Despite little parking and
thousands of tourists as well as
local pedestrians, dogs and cats
sharing the narrow cobblestone
streets with buses, cars, carriages,
mopeds and bicycles, it all seems
to work — with no gridlock and
no visible garbage. And a zillion
historic monuments, friendly trat-
torias and hole-in-the-wall shops
prise euros out of your pocket at
every turn — with few regrets. A
gelato here, a hand-made leather
bag there, a museum everywhere.
According to the United
Nations, 60 per cent of the world's
most important works of art are
located in Italy, and half of them
are in Florence, which was
declared a World Heritage Site
many years ago. In fact, the city is
in danger of becoming an open-
air museum based exclusively on
tourism, with over 1.6 million
people a year visiting the Uffizi
art gallery alone.
The key factor is history —
which in Florence begins with the
Romans and advances through

- the Middle Ages to the Renais-

sance and beyond. Julius Caesar
established a settlement on a ford
of the River Arno in 59 BC, and
the town became capital of the
province of Tuscia in the 3rd cen-
tury AD. Tuscany itself is named
after even earlier inhabitants —
the Etruscans who preceded the
Romans. As medieval Europe
recovered from the disintegration
of the Roman Empire, Florence
became a powerful city state and
a centre of trade and finance.
From the 14th century onwards,
its leaders supported some of the
world's greatest philosopHers,
architects, sculptors and painters
in a flowering of human knowl-
edge that became known as the
Renaissance. In a single Floren-
tine church, for example, one can
find the remains of Galileo,
Michelangelo and Machiavelli, as
well as memorials to other his-
torical notables who once called
the city home, such as Dante and
Leonardo da Vinci.

In sum, Florence is, as Queen

‘Victoria wrote disapprovingly in



1893 "a town full of attractions
and temptations to expense."
And it is also, as the philosopher

Henry James said, "the most
beautiful view in the world,"

In the Bahamas, while we
manage to squeeze a billion dol-
lars a year out of the four million
tourists who visit by air or cruise
ship — most of it leaves the coun-
try immediately to pay for
imports. And the fact is, we could
earn a helluva lot more if we had
a product to sell other than prox-
imity to America or sun, sand and
sea. We may not have the sheer
volume of monuments and art
that a city with a 2000-year histo-
ry can display, but there is no
doubt that Nassau's historical nar-
rative could be made equally as
compelling as Florence's if we
applied ourselves to the job.

If we took the trouble to
restore and maintain our histori-
cal assets instead of discounting

and discarding them, we could ,

certainly earn more from our vis-
itors than the margin on a brace
of 'hey, mon’ t-shirts.

Our historical narrative begins
with the Lucayans, an Amerindi-
an tribe that carved several set-
tlements out of the coastal bush
on, New Providence hundreds of
years before Columbus — the
Italian who sailed the ocean blue
— came across them on San Sal-
vador. And Tough Call was part
of an archaeological investigation
years ago that found evidence of
a pre-Lucayan settlement on Par-
adise Island. After the Lucayans
were shipped off to slavery in His-
paniola by the Spanish, Nassau
was settled by English colonists in
1648. These people were express-
ing the conflicts of the English
civil war — a complex struggle
between Catholics and Protes-
tants as well as between king and
parliament that led to the world's
first bill of rights. The Eleutherian
Adventurers who established the
first permanent European settle-
ment in the Bahamas were essen-
tially puritans fleeing from roy-
alist oppression. The cave at
North Eleuthera where these first
settlers worshipped and camped
out following a shipwreck has
been largely ignored and used as

ean

a dumping ground rather than
treated as a major tourist attrac-

tion. It was recently defaced by

vandals even though it is a grave
site for both Lucayans and Euro-
peans. The island of New Provi-
dence was settled from Eleuthera,
and it remained an obscure
British outpost until the arrival
of Henry Avery in 1696 launched
the age of piracy.

In a recent book by journalist
Colin Woodard called Republic
of Pirates, this fascinating period
of Bahamian history is described
as "a long-lost tale of tyranny and
resistance, a maritime revolt that
shook the very foundations of the

_ newly-formed British Empire,

bringing transatlantic commerce
to a standstill and fueling the
democratic sentiments that would
later drive the American revolu-
tion. At its centre was a pirate
republic, a zone of freedom in an
authoritarian age."

These pirates were sailors,

indentured servants and runaway

slaves who rebelled against their
oppressors — a few thousand
crewmen of various races and
nationalities who took part in a
golden age from 1715 to 1725.
And most of the best-known buc-
caneers were based in Nassau
until the British sent an ex-priva-
teer named Woodes Rogers to
restore order.

Then there was the American
Revolution, that “shot heard
around the world” which led to
the immigration of thousands of
loyalists and their slaves-in the
late 1700s. These immigrants built
many of Nassau's most historic

landmarks, and tried but failed

to set up a plantation economy
on the out islands.

Slavery and the abolition of
the slave trade (as well as slav-
ery itself in 1834) is another key
piece of the Bahamian historical
puzzle. And the fact is that the
Bahamas’ African heritage was
forged not only by slaves, but by
thousands of Africans set free on
our islands by the Royal Navy.
Several settlements on New Prov-
i ambier and Ade-





people.

Most readers will be more
familiar with Nassau's 20th cen-
tury history — which included
colourful activities like bootleg-
ging, military occupation during
the Second World War, dramatic
political and social advances dur-
ing the 1960s, as well as a diverse
group of celebrity tourists.

It is a narrative that any movie
scriptwriter or souvenir producer

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would die for, yet we turn our
backs on this incredibly rich lega-
cy every day, dumping garbage
over the landscape and tearing
down-the landmarks. Perhaps —
with the threat of a global eco-
nomic depression looming — now
is the time to learn from cities
like Savannah and Florence,
which have created and:saved so

much to offer travellers while:
earning a good living.
Tough Call? I don't think so. =

What do you think? Send com-
ments to larry@tribunemedia.net

Or visit
www.bahamapundit.com.

> ‘

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2008 Creative Edge

manétzaaed
PAGE 10 THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAYEVENING ©. OCTOBER 1, 2008

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‘TMC fe Tw




‘

THE TRIBUNE



PA GE 14





FORE Mer eee nen cic a



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008






Bryant
and Lakers
to open

camp
See page 14





Sharks get
revenge,
devour the
Wildcats

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

LAST year, manager Stephen “Bish-
op” Beneby thought he had the team
that could go all the way and win the
New Providence Softball Association
ladies’ championship crown. The Lady
Sharks, however, got devoured by the
Pineapple Air Wildcats.

But this year, Proper Care Pool
returned to the league’s best-of-seven
championship series after getting
revenge by knocking off the Wildcats.
The Sharks will now take on an unex-
pected opponent — the Sigma Brack-
ettes,

Speaking to Tribune Sports about
the Brackettes, who stunned the pen-
mant winning Boomer George
Swingers in three straight games to
clinch their berth in the final, Beneby

said they’re not taking Sigma for grant- -

ed.
“Softball is played between the lines
and regardless of who yoy are, you
have to respect the game,” Beneby
said. “If you don’t respect the game,
the game won’t respect you.”

Beneby said the Lady Sharks will
be engaged in a very intriguing series
that could start either Thursday or Fri-
day night at the Baillou Hills Sport-
ing Complex, depending on the out-
come of the men’s playoffs between
New Breed and the King’s Real Estate
Pros. ;

. “‘Thave a lot of respect for the pitch-

er we’re going up against,” said Bene-
by, referring to Sigma’s Ernestine But-
ler-Stubbs, who came out of retire-
ment just before the start of the play-
offs.

“She has been around for a long
time and she’s still serviceable, still
doing the job. We look for it to be a
good series. I think we have the better
team. But the game is played between
the lines and we will play it for what it’s
worth.”

Beneby’s pitching staff is back with
the youthful 1-2 punch of Thela John-
son and Alex Taylor. And if they can
remain focused, he’s confident that
half of their job is done.

“We have to realize that every play
counts, so as simple as having two outs
and a ground ball to one of your better
infielders and a minor play causes you
to lose the championship, I think we
are over that now,” he stated.

“We talked about it, we put it
behind us, we put this whole entire
season behind us now and we are just
concentrating on this part of the sea-
son. I spent a lot of time talking to the
youth on the team, trying to get them
motivated more than they are being
here.”

If they can block out all of the neg-
ative talk that will be going on during
the game and play up to their poten-
tial, Beneby said they would have suc-
cessfully completed the other half of
their task.

“TI think we have a very explosive
offensive club,” said Beneby, who has
been relying heavily on the bulk of his
line-up, including Vonetta Nairn,
Thela Johnson, Debbie McClure and
Kelly Smith.

“Whilst we’re not a super defensive
team, I think we’re adequate enough
to go out there and make the plays.
You make the routine plays and the
hard plays will take care of itself. But
you have to definitely make your rou-
tine plays.”

Brackettes’ manager Bobby “Bay-
lor” Fernander was not available for
comment, but Beneby said based on
the way they have been playing, he’s
predicting that his Lady Sharks will
win the series 4-1.

With the squad that he has, Fernan-
der probably doesn’t feel the same
way.

Fernander has acquired the services
of two former Wildcats in Jean Minus
and Renee “Sunshine” Sweeting-
Davis, who have added to the veteran-
youthful combo that includes Vandette
Smith, Zella Symonette, Vantrice
Bowleg, Tonia Simmons, Shevette
Taylor and Theota Williams.

The series will definitely come down
to who wants it the most with the Lady
Sharks trying to redeem themselves
from last year’s defeat and the Brack-
ettes out to prove that they are for
real after their surprising playoff upset.

The winner of the championship title
will represent the NPSA in the
Bahamas Softball Federation’s Nation-
al Round Robin Championships sched-
uled for October 30 to November 2.









roll

SAC’s pitcher Arien Seymour
in action yesterday when the
Big Red Machines continued a

ry FOX (left), Kingsway eC S eae i ne



Photos: Felipé Major/Tribune Staff

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

fter losing

their season.

opener a week

ago to the St

Andrew’s
Hurricanes, the St Augustine’s
College Big Red Machines
continued a two-game winning
streak yesterday.

Their latest victims were the
Kingsway Academy Saints,
whom the Bahamas Associa-
tion of Independent Secondary
Schools’ junior boys champi-
ons rolled past 7-3.

While SAC improved to 2-1,
Kingsway Academy suffered
their first defeat in three games
for the identical record.

Played at Kingsway Acade-
my, SAC exploded for five big
runs in the top of the third,
highlighted by Anfrenee Sey-
mour’s one-out two-run single.

Seymour, playing shortstop,
also came up with one of three
big defensive plays in the bot-
tom of the fifth as he tracked
down a long shot from Saints’
Ian Fox in short centrefield and
still managed to throw him out

- at first.

Second baseman. Anthony
Romer came up with the final
two sensational plays when he
had to go on the run to catch
two consecutive bloopers from
Crachad Laing and Jamique
Johnson to end the game.

“We're back on the road
now. We’re rolling,” said
SAC’s coach John Todd. “We
don’t have any problems. We
will be there. As long as we
can hit the’ball, that’s the key.
We have the defense.”

Romer, one of the rookie
players on the team, Said the
game plan was to simply play
good defense.

“We just came out knowing
that we could beat them,” he

. pointed out. “We practice our

defense every day and we do
some batting practice.”

Against St Andrew’s, Romer
said they didn’t hit the ball, but
he’s confident that if they meet
again, they will be victorious.

Winning pitcher for the Big
Red Machines was Arien Sey-
mour, who fired a two-hitter,
striking out four. Seymour not-
ed that their defense was what
got the job done.

“We could have worked on
the bats a little more,” he
stressed. “I think we looked
pretty good. We’re going to
meet St Andrew’s again and
we will beat them.”







out Saints 7-3





KINGSWAY pitcher C Laing...

Apart from the fifth inning,
the Big Red Machines also:
came up with a run in both the
first and fourth inning.

Todd Isaacs, playing centre-
field, was 1-for-3 with two runs,
Anfrenee Seymour was also 1-
for-3 with his two RBIs and
two runs scored and Byron
Murray went 2-for-3 with a run
scored.

For the Saints, Tameko
Williamson had a perfect 2-for-
2 day with a run scored and
catcher Zachary Albury drew a
pair of walks, scoring a run.
Winston Saunders walked and
scored the other run.

Rev Steven Duncombe,
Kingsway Academy’s coach,
said it was a tough loss.

“I don’t think we were alert
defensively, we didn’t play a
gocd mental game, so we just
have to cut down on the men-
tal errors,” he said.

“The guys were just out of
position, they didn’t know
where to go to back up the ball,
so there was a lot of mental
errors. The runs we lost by
were all unearned, so we feel
good. We’re right in every-
thing.”

Despite the loss, Crachad
Laing gave up seven hits and
had five strike outs.

“This wasn’t one of my best
outings. I promise that the next
time we are going to win,” he
projected.

He agreed with Duncombe
that once they cut down on
their mental errors and get in
the position where they should
be, they will be victorious
again.

“We just need more prac-._
tice,” he admitted.

Bahamian players hoping to shine in NCAA

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter



WHILE the start of the 2008-2009
NCAA basketball season is still more
than a month away, two Bahamian
players are looking to make sharp
impacts as newcomers in their respec-
tive Division I programmes.

Dwight Miller and Probese Leo,
two of many Bahamian players play-
ing at the collegiate level in the US,
signed letters of intent earlier this year
to attend high profile D-I pro-
grammes.

Miller, the more highly touted of
the two, attends the University of
Pittsburgh and enters a programme
expected to contend for a Big East
title and NCAA tournament berth. .

The six-foot eight inch, 230 pound
forward is part of a freshman class
which includes Travon Woodall, Nasir

Robinson, and redshirt freshman

Austin Wallace,



BASKETBALL



Miller rose to national prominence
when he was featured in the Houston
Chronicle and various Houston-area
television stations for his private work-
out sessions with NBA Hall of Famer
Hakeem Olajuwon.

Miller, who displayed a series of
successful performances at various
summer camps tn 2007 — most notably
his award-winning outing at the
Reebok U camp, garnered interest
from a myriad of schools before he
decided on Pittsburgh.

Pittsburgh is also the alma-mater
of Bahamian national team standout
Doyle Hudson.

The Panthers recently announced
a contract extension for head coach
Jamie Dixon who is set to begin his
sixth season with ine team.

i)

They finished 27-10 last season and
captured its second Big East Tourna-
ment title in school history.

The Panthers are expected to be
among the top contenders for both
the Big East regular season and tour-
nament title.

The team returns two of its leading
scorers from last season — lead guard
Levance Fields and high flying for-
ward Sam Young.

The team is slated to begin the
2008-09 regular season on November
14 against Farleigh Dickinson Uni-
versily.

Leo, like Miller, attended St Pius
X High School in Houston, Texas and
is a member of the Frank Rutherford
Elite Development Programme.

He enters a Bucknell University
Programme looking to return to its
2005 Cinderella season which brought
national recognition and critical
acclaim.

The Bison authored the bigyest

upset of the 2005’season when, as the
14th seed, they upset the third ranked
Kansas Jayhawks in the opening
round of the NCAA tournament.

The win was the first NCAA tour-
nament win ever for the Bison and
first for any team from the Patriot
League.

Leo should compete for playing
time on a guard heavy roster.

At six foot, nine inches, he joins
senior center Josh Linthicum (6°11)
as the only players on the roster taller
than 6’8”.

Leo is joined in the 2008-09 fresh-
man class by Enoch Andoh, Bryan
Cohen and Ryan Ebner.

The Bison finished last season at
12-19 and lost in the second round of
the Patriot League tournament.

Also on November 14, Leo and the
Bison open the season on the road at
the University of Maryland against
the perennial ACC powerhouse Ter-
rapins.
PAGE 12, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008 TRIBUNE SPORTS

Bills sign FB | :
Mclntyre,
release
Barnes

ORCHARD PARK, N Y
(AP) — The Buffalo Bills
shuffled fullbacks Tuesday by
signing Corey McIntyre and
releasing Darian Barnes.

McIntyre, an unsigned free
agent with three years of NFL
experience, spent last season
with Atlanta before his Sep-
tember release. He also _ :

layed with Cleveland and KS : 4 .
New Orleans, and is regarded \ \ i. oR oo : Steelers

ble blocker and spe- ; = =
Sere ee PITTSBURGH Steelers’ James Harrison (top) leaps into the stands on top of teammate linebacker LaMarr Wood-

cial teams player. ;
The moves come as the ley after Woodley picked up a fumble by Baltimore Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco and returned it seven yards



Photos: Gene J Puskar/AP

PITTSBURGH Steelers receiver Santonio Holmes (left) eludes Bal-
timore Ravens’ Ed Reed on his way to a 38-yard touchdown
reception in the third quarter...



undefeated Bills (4-0) prepare
to play at Arizona (2-2) on
Sunday, Buffalo's final game
before its bye week.

Barnes’ release comes after
he sprained his right foot in
Buffalo’s 24-23 win over Oak-’
land on September 21 and
missed last weekend’s game
at St Louis.

The lone fullback on the
Bills* roster, Barnes is a seven-
year NFL veteran who was in
his first season with Buffalo.
He had two catches for 34
yards this season and was used
as a lead blocker for running
backs Marshawn Lynch and
Fred Jackson.

The Bills have reintroduced
the fullback position in their
offense this season under first-
year coordinator Turk Schon-
ert.

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the

news, read
Insight on
Mondays



RO aa aad

Despite injuries, Steelers
beat Ravens 23-20 in OT

@ By ALAN ROBINSON
AP Sports Writer



PITTSBURGH (AP) — An
overtime win over rival Balti-
more left the Pittsburgh Steel-
ers hurting, Ben Roethlisberg-
er screaming and coach Mike
Tomlin calmly explaining what
happens next.

“No rest for the weary,”
Tomlin said after the Steelers
played terribly for most of
three quarters before beating
the Ravens 23-20 Monday
night to take over first place
in the AFC North.

A lot of rest for the injured,
however, and that may be the
Steelers’ No. 1 problem fol-
lowing a resourceful effort that
was needed to overcome a
strong game by Ravens rookie

Take over first place in AFC North

quarterback Joe Flacco in his
first NFL road start.

The physical-as-usual game
against Baltimore cost the
Steelers right guard Kendall
Simmons (torn Achilles) and
first-round draft pick Rashard
Mendenhall (fractured shoul-
der) for the season, key
injuries that will test their
depth and resiliency.

The Steelers (3-1) were so
beaten up that they ended the
game with only one healthy
running back, Mewelde
Moore, who was signed to be a
third-down back but played on

â„¢

nearly every down of overtime.
Moore made important catch-
es of Roethlisberger-thrown
passes of 24 and 7 yards to set
up Jeff Reed's third field goal
of the game, a 46-yarder that
won it with about six minutes
gone in overtime.

“A 46-yarder there isn’t a
given, and a 53-yarder isn’t
easy,” Reed said, a reference
to Moore’s 7-yard catch ahead
of his seventh and longest
career game winner. “I get too
much credit. My foot won it,
but that’s what I’m supposed
to do in that situation.”



Or exactly what Roethlis-

berger told his teammates dur- |

ing an emotional locker room
talk — an outburst he felt was

‘ needed after the Steelers were

outgained 146-46 while falling
behind 13-3 at halftime. Balti-
more ended with a 243-237
yardage edge despite Flacco’s
192 yards passing during a 16-
of-31 night.

“We lost a lot of guys,”
Roethlisberger said. “I was
more emotional, more vocal
than I’ve ever been at halftime.
I screamed at our offense. We
were terrible in the first half.
Not that we were great in the
second half, but we bounced
back.”

So did the Ravens (2-1), who
were in position to open a divi-
sion lead by winning only to
lose a 10-point lead in a span
of only 15 seconds late in the
third quarter.

The Steelers, depleted offen-
sively by injuries, went to a no-
huddle offense almost out of
desperation, and Roethlis-
berger responded with a 38-
yard scoring pass to Santonio
Holmes to end their only TD
drive of the game. The four-
play drive was aided by a 15-
yard personal foul penalty on
Baltimore's Jarret Jackson that
gave Pittsburgh its initial first
down since its opening drive.

The touchdown also gave
the Steelers some much-need-
ed momentum, and they got
plenty more when James Har-
rison’s hit forced a Flacco fum-
ble on Baltimore's next play
from scrimmage. LaMarr
Woodley picked up the ball at
the 7 — he planned only to fall
on it, then realized he could
return it — and scored to make
it 17-13.

Before the two-TD burst,

_the Steelers had been held

without a touchdown for near-
ly eight quarters, or since the
first half of a 10-6 win at Cleve-
land on September 14.

Many rookie quarterbacks
would have been flustered, but
Flacco — forced to shoulder
more of the offense with run-
ning back Willis McGahee out
for much of the game with a
chest injury — came back to
lead a game-tying drive end-
ed by Le’Ron McClain’s 2-
yard run with 4:02 remaining.

“There’s nothing you can
say about this game, other than -
the fact a couple of plays went
against us,” coach John Har-
baugh said. “Aside from that,
our guys played well enough
to win. They played their
hearts out.”

Since they drafted him, Flac-
co has impressed the Ravens
with his big-league arm. On a
night they may have lost a
game but gained a leader, he
also showed them a poise
uncommon for a quarterback
playing only his third NFL
game.

“We've got to take care of
the ball. If we take care of the
ball there, it’s a different sto-
ry,” Flacco said. “I was really
proud of the way we came
back. I think we did a pretty
good job at weathering what
they threw at us overall, but
we just have to find a way to
win.”

Tomlin knows what the
Steelers gained, besides an
important victory before they
take on Jacksonville (2-2) on
Sunday night following a'short
week of preparation. The
Jaguars put the Steelers out of
the playoffs in January after
also beating them in Pittsburgh
the month before.

“You can’t blink and we did-
n't,” Tomlin said.

“Does that mean we have a
chance to be something spe-
cial? Maybe. Right now, all
that it means is we are 3-1 and
we have to go to Jacksonville
on a short week against an
AFC opponent we have some
issues with.”

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BALTIMORE RAVENS quarterback Joe Flacco (5) walks off the field after
the Pittsburgh Steelers won the game...

eevee re re


TRIBUNE SPORTS WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 13

Bondarenko and

illiams win at the
Porsche Grand Prix

STUTTGART, Germany
(AP) — Qualifier Kateryna
Bondarenko of Ukraine ral-
lied to upset 15th-ranked
Flavia Pennetta of Italy 4-6,
6-2, 6-1 Tuesday at the
Porsche Grand Prix.

Bondarenko. next plays
Venus Williams who defeat-
ed Anna-Lena Groenefeld 6-
1, 6-2 in their first round
match.

The WTA indoor tourna-
ment features eight of the top
10 female players, with only
Ana Ivanovic and Maria
Sharapova missing.

Another qualifier advanced
when Tsvetana Pironkova ,.
beat teenager Alize Cornet 6-
2, 6-1. The Bulgarian next
faces third-seeded Dinara
Safina. Safina had a bye into
the second round along with
the other top three players in
the tournament — Serena
Williams, Jelena Jankovic and
Elena Dementieva.

Marion Bartoli of France
advanced by defeating
Dominika Cibulkova of Slo-
vakia 6-3, 6-1, and Victoria
Azarenka wasted a 5-2 lead
before overcoming Agnes
Szavay 7-5, 6-3.



ua
Fo
et CoE
reer
Bg
Beer era

INSSSESASSESESISISS



= Thomas Kienzle/AP

—

So

VENUS WILLIAMS of the USA serves to Anna-Lena
Groenefeld during their first round match at the
Porsche Grand Prix Tuesday in Stuttgart, Germany.
Williams won the match 6-1, 6-2...

ESSN

SERENA WILLIAMS returns the ball during the first
round double match with her sister Venus against
Daniela Hantuchova from Slovakia and Agnes Szavay
from Hungary at the Porsche Grand Prix Monday...



GERMANY’S Anna-Lena Groenefeld
returns the ball to Venus Williams
during their first round match...

Real Madrid
defeats Zenit 2-1

REAL MADRID’S Arjen Robben (above) jumps over Zenit’s goalkeeper
Vyacheslav Malafeev saving the goal during the Group H Champions
League soccer match at the Petrovsky stadium Tuesday in St Petersburg,
Russia. Real Madrid won 2-1...

(AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky)





WHAT'S HAPPENING

FIFA, UEFA reject new
Polish soccer board

@ By RYAN LUCAS
Associated Press Writer

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT COURSES
ST 20TH - OCTOBER 3RD, 2008

WARSAW, Poland (AP) —
The governing bodies of world
and European soccer will not
recognize the new administra-

-tor of the troubled Polish soc-
cer federation, possibly endan-
gering the country’s right to
co-host the 2012 European
Championship.

FIFA and UEFA said Tues-
day the suspension of the Pol-
ish federation board was not
legitimate.

UEFA spokesman William
Gaillard said a condition of
sticking with Poland and
Ukraine for European soccer’s
showcase event was the con-
tinuing support of the two gov-
ernments for their respective
soccer associations.

“In this case, it seems it’s
falling far short of the goal,”
he said.

Gaillard warned that if the
conflict is not resolved “in a
satisfactory way” by the end
of October, then “UEFA will
have to take some decisions,
which of course could include
sanctions.”

FIFA and UFFA said they
continue to recognize the fed-
eration’s current leadership.as
the “only legitimate authori-
ty” to run Polish soccer.

The Polish board was sus-
pended Monday after a ruling
by the Polish Olympic Com-
mittee’s arbitration court.
Robert Zawlocki was appoint-
ed temporary chief of the fed-
eration in response to a motion
submitted by the Ministry of
Sport.

Poland’s Minister of Sport,

_Miroslaw Drzewiecki, reject-
ed the assertion that the tem-
porary administrator was ille-
gitimate, saying it was “in line
with the law.”

He said he plans to head a
delegation to meet with FIFA
and UEFA leaders at the end
of the week to explain the sit-
uation.

Last week, UEFA’s execu-
tive committee ruled that
Poland and Ukraine would

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POLAND’S Minister of. Sport,
Miroslaw Drzewiecki, defends the
decision by an independent arbi-
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erning board of the Polish Soc-
cer Federation and appoint a tem-
porary chief in Warsaw, Poland,
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remain as Euro 2012 co-hosts
but warned they could still lose
the tournament if preparations
fall behind schedule.
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referees, players and club offi-
cials — with rigging matches
in the top domestic leagues.
Twenty-nine clubs have been
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PAGE 14, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

New Pacers hope
to he improved

@ By CLIFF BRUNT
AP Sports Writer



INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The
most visible Indiana Pacers from
the past three years were nowhere
to be found Monday on the
team’s media day.

Jermaine O'Neal was traded to
Toronto in the offseason. The
Pacers have said Jamaal Tinsley
will not play for them again after
his on-court antics and off-court
problems damaged their reputa-
tion.

Ron Artest and Stephen Jack-
son have been gone for a while
now, traded in the Pacers’ effort
to rid themselves of malcontents.

Jeff Foster and Austin Croshere
are the only players left from the
team involved in the brawl with
Detroit Pistons fans in 2004, and
Croshere was a recent addition
who is not promised a spot on the
team.

After two draft-day moves and
the Croshere pickup, eight new
players showed up for Media Day.
The Pacers hope the changes help
the franchise start winning again,
project a more wholesome image
and improve last season's league-
worst attendance. '

“Whole new ballgame this go-
round,” coach Jim O’Brien said.
“We're virtually starting with half
the team that is new, and very
positive additions to our basket-
ball team and our franchise.”

Team president Larry Bird got
busy after the team went 36-46
and missed the playoffs last sea-
son. The Pacers had one of the
best offenses and worst defenses
in league last season, prompting
Bird to add speed at the guard
spots and size in the post.

The team appears to be build-
ing around a mainstay, fourth-
year forward Danny Granger. He

averaged 19.6 points and 6.1 ©

rebounds per game last season
while shooting 40 per cent from
three-point range.

O’Brien knows Granger can
score. Now, he wants to see him
become a dominant defensive
player.

“I would hope he impacts it
from a leadership standpoint at
the defensive end more than any
other area,” he said.

Mike Dunleavy is coming off a
breakout season. The shooting
guard averaged 19.1 points, 5.2
rebounds and 3.5 assists per game
last season and he believes he can

‘= be better this year:

O’Brien applauded Granger
and Dunleavy for their produc-
tion last season, but said gaudy
statistics won’t matter if the Pac-
ers miss the playoffs again.

“Danny and Mike put up big
numbers, but everybody in the
league will say people don’t pay
attention to big numbers if they
come on a mediocre basketball
team.”

Granger said he knows the Pac-
ers are an afterthought without
the big names from the past.

“We’ve got a big opportunity
in front of us,” he said. “A lot of
people are not expecting much
from us. Sometimes, that’s a good
thing.”

The key pickup was point guard
T J Ford, who likely will replace
Tinsley, who remains on the ros-
ter but isn’t expected to play. Ford
averaged 12.1 points and 6.1
assists per game for the Raptors
last season before coming to the
Pacers in the O’Neal trade.

Granger is excited to have Ford
as the point guard, and compared
him to San Antonio point guard
Tony Parker. ;

“He’s incredibly fast,” Granger
said. “He’s a pass-first point
guard, and he can score the ball.”

Granger, Dunleavy and Ford
are among those expected to fill
O’Neal’s leadership role.

“T think it’s going to be a bunch
of guys,” O’Brien said. “The best
teams I’ve ever been around have
had a bunch of leaders who feel
comfortable leading and very
comfortable in allowing other
people to lead also.”

The Pacers also added point
guard Jarrett Jack in a trade with
Portland. Jack is expected to play
both guard spots and push Ford.

O’Brien ‘said Troy Murphy is
the favourite to start at power for-
ward. He averaged 12.2 points and
7.2 rebounds last season.

The battle for the starting cen-
ter spot likely will be the most
contested. Jeff Foster remains, but
the team added Rasho Nesterovic
and draft pick Roy Hibbert in the
trade with Toronto.

“We want there to be great
competition,” O’Brien said. “We
want there to be daily wars at that
position, to see people getting
their lips cut and nose bloodied
so that whoever gets that job will
be toughened by his teammates.”

Another player to watch is
Brandon Rush, a rookie who
helped Kansas win the college
national championship last sea-
son. The new-look Pacers expect
to make the postseason this sea-
son. “That’s the only way I can
look at things,” O’Brien said. “If
we get accomplished team lead-
ership, team ownership for
- defense, absolutely, we’ll be in the
playoffs.”

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Bryant and Lakers are

ready to open camp ©

@ By BETH HARRIS
AP Sports Writer

EL SEGUNDO, Califor-
nia (AP) — With his
Olympic gold medal hanging
around the neck of last sea-
son’s NBA MVP trophy,
Kobe Bryant is eager to
move on and find out if the
Los Angeles Lakers can win
their first championship since
2002.

Already things are much
quieter than a year ago, when
the Lakers’ season began in
turmoil, with Bryant calling
the team’s front office “a
mess” and asking to be trad-
ed. They eventually turned
things around and reached
the NBA finals, losing to the
Boston Celtics in six games.

“There’s a lot to be happy
about, a lot to be thankful
about,” a smiling Bryant said
Monday when the Lakers
reunited on the eve of train-
ing camp. “We’re in much
better position now than we
were. We’re the favourites
for a reason. We got all the
tools here, now it’s on us to
do the work.” ,

The best news is the return
of seven-foot, 285-pound
Andrew Bynum, who sus-
tained a season-ending knee
injury January 13. He was
averaging 13.1 points, 10.2
rebounds, 2.06 blocks and
shooting a league-best 63.6
per cent from the field when
he got hurt.

“T feel fine, the knee is
fine,” he said. “I’m definitely
100 per cent.” '

With Bynum in the mid-
dle and 7-0 Pau Gasol at for-
ward, the Lakers figure to
improve significantly in
rebounding and shat block-
ing.

MIAMI Heat player Dwyane Wade talks to the media...

“We have a lot of talent
on this team,” Bynum said.
“The big focus this year is
going to be on the defensive
end,”

Just don’t refer to Bynum
and Gasol as the twin tow-
ers.

“That’s a Texas thing,”
Bryant said with a frown.

Acquiring Gasol in Febru-
ary helped the Lakers win
the tough Western Confer-
ence and come within two
games of taking the league
title.

But Gasol, a 250-pounder,
didn’t have the bulk needed
to match up against Boston’s
heftier players.

“It was just about getting
stronger over the summer,
not necessarily about getting
tougher. You can’t get
through the San Antonios



(AP Photo: J Pat Carter)

Wade: It’s ‘strictly

all about winning
right now’

@ By TIM REYNOLDS
AP Sports Writer

MIAMI (AP) — There’s plenty that Dwyane Wade

wants these days.

He wants it known that his hope is to spend the rest of
his career with the Miami Heat, despite incessant spec-
ulation that he’ll opt out of his contract in two years. He
wants privacy when it comes to the sensitive subject of his
ongoing divorce, which he won’t discuss in specifics. He
wants vindication for a restaurant deal that went bad and
got worse when he was sued for $25 million, something

he says smeared his name.

But on the court this season, he insists none of that will

cloud his thinking.

“It’s strictly all about winning right now,” the 2006
NBA finals MVP and newly minted Olympic gold
medallist told The Associated Press to advance Satur-

‘day’s start of training camp. “My goal this year is to

make sure this team becomes a team. I felt the last two
years we kind of slipped away from that, so P’ll make sure
this team builds its camaraderie back and make sure

we’re a lot better than last year.

“As long as we win, I will be happy.”

Arenas fined $15,000 by NBA



GILBERT ARENAS answers questions for the media during the Wizards training



and the Utahs without being
tough,” Bryant said. “Boston
was a stronger team. What
we want to shore up is
becoming a better defensive
team. Boston was better.”

Csach Phil Jackson

up clean shaven for
*s media day.

-ed to look younger,”
the 63-year-old grandfather
said jokingly.

Bryant turned 30 last
month — a day after helping
the US win a gold medal
over Gasol and Spain at the
Beijing Olympics. Jackson
wants to reduce his super-
star’s minutes, but that was
the plan last season and it
didn’t happen.

“T still played 40 minutes.
I’m comfortable,” Bryant
said.

Jackson also wants the

LAKERS’ Kobe Bryant
poses for a photograph
during the team’s
media day...

Kevork Djansezian/AP

Lakers to emphasize defense,
with Bryant taking the lead.

‘“We’re hoping this year is
one where his leadership
defensively will also be as
prominent as his offensive
ability,” he said.

Bryant plans to play a full
season without having
surgery on his right pinkie
because recovery would take
too long. He damaged liga-
ments in the finger in Feb-
ruary, but averaged 28.3
points while playing in all 82
games and the playoffs.

“The finger is fine,” he
said, adding that it gets sore if
he accidentally bumps it.

The only way he’ll consid-
er surgery is if the Lakers
don’t win a title this season.

“If we win a championship,
I ain’t doing nothing,” he
said. “I’m leaving it alone.”

James confident he can
lead Cavs to NBA crown

@ By TOM WITHERS
AP Sports Writer

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio
(AP) — LeBron James keeps
his Olympic gold medal in his
home office, and from time to
time Cleveland’s star takes a
peek at it.

“It’s a pretty sight,” he said.

James spent part of his sum-
mer helping the US basketball
team redeem its global superi-
ority by winning it all at the
Beijing Games. At just 23, he
was the undisputed leader of
that 12-player squad comprised
of superstar talents and super-
sized egos.

“If you can lead 11 of the
best guys in the world, you can
lead anybody,” James said
Monday. “If I can lead Kobe
Bryant and MVPs, I should be
able to lead Daniel Gibson.”

James has visions of another

exquisite, glittering prize — the.

NBA championship trophy.

And he thinks it’s within the’

Cavaliers’ reach.

“As a leader, I think I can
lead these guys to the champi-
onship,” he said. “We really
believe that. It’s not about
making the playoffs for our
team anymore. It’s about win-
ning a championship.”

The Cavaliers have come
close. Two years ago, they
made their first trip to the finals
before being overwhelmed and
swept in four straight by the
San Antonio Spurs. Last sea-
son, they pushed the eventual
champion Boston Celtics to



Lisa Billings/AP



camp in Richmond, Va. on Saturday. Arenas was fined $15,000 by the NBA for
declining to make himself available on Friday...

{ :





seven games in the Eastern
Conference semifinals but lost.

This year, the Cavs, who
acquired point guard Mo
Williams this summer in a trade
from Milwaukee, feel they can
finish the job.

“We all have one goal, and
that’s a championship,” said
Williams, who averaged 17.2
points, 6.3 assists and 3.5
rebounds for the Bucks.
“That’s the goal, and we’re not
just talk. Every team in the
league on media day is saying

they are going to win a cham-’

pionship. But we're confident.
We know that if we put in the
work and focus, we can do it.
It’s all we talk about.”

On the eve of opening train-
ing camp, Cleveland is already
in better shape than it was at
the same point last year.

On Media Day 2007, two key
players — forwards Anderson
Varejao and Sasha Pavlovic —
were in the early stages of con-
tract holdouts that would carry
on for weeks. Guard Eric Snow
had just injured his knee during
an off-season workout and was
set for surgery, and guard

‘Damon Jones used his first

opportunity to meet with
reporters to say he wanted to
be traded.

It was hardly an idyllic start
to camp, and the trouble car-
ried over into the regular sea-
son.

The Cavaliers started out
struggling and at the February
21 trading deadline, general
manager Danny Ferry turned

NBA Calendar

@ By The Associated Press



October 24: Preseason ends
October 27: Rosters set for opening day @ 6pm
October 28: Start of regular season
January 5: 10-day contracts may now be signed
January 10: All player contracts are guaranteed
for the remainder of the season
February 15: All-Star game (Phoenix)
February 19: Trading Deadline @ 3pm
April 8-11: Portsmouth Invitational Tournament (Portsmouth, Va)
April 15: Regular season ends ;
April 16: Rosters set for playoffs @ 3pm
April 18: Playoffs begin
April 26: Early entry eligibility deadline (11:59pm)
May 19: Draft lottery
June 5: NBA finals start date (possible move to June 3)
June 15: NBA draft early entry entrant withdrawal deadline (Spm)
June 18: NBA finals latest possible end date
June 25: NBA draft



TRIBUNE SPORTS

Jackson
returns
to Lakers
relaxed

EL SEGUNDO, California
(AP) — Don’t be fooled by
Phil Jackson’s tan and relaxed
demeanor. He’s still upset
about missing out on another
NBA title last summer.

“There’s still a little angst
and anger there,” the Los
Angeles Lakers’ coach told
reporters Friday at the team’s
practice facility.

The Lakers lost the NBA
Finals to the Boston Celtics
in six games in June, costing
the Hall of Fame coach a
chance at his league-record
10th coaching title.

Jackson appeared tanned,
rested and relaxed as he spoke
with reporters about his sum-
mer of boating, swimming and
spending time with his grand-
children. He also spoke of
possible changes that could
help Los Angeles win another
title.

Although the Lakers have
the core of their rotation back
from last season, Jackson said
he’s not content with the sta-
tus quo. Above all, he’s eager
to see how well Andrew
Bynum mixes with fellow sev-
en-footer Pau.Gasol.

Bynum was in the midst of a
breakout season when he suf-
fered a partially dislocated left
kneecap January 13 and did
not play again in 2007-08. The
Lakers acquired Gasol from
the Memphis Grizzlies on
February 1, and he and league
MVP Kobe Bryant led them
to the finals.

Jackson wants to play
Bynum at center, with Gasol
moving to power forward and
Lamar Odom shifting from
power forward to small for-
ward. There’s also a chance
that Jackson will start Trevor
Ariza and use Odom as a sixth
man.

“To adjust the two of them
on the floor at the same time
and Lamar at a wing spot is
going to be our goal this year
at training camp, to figure out
how to do that,” Jackson said.
“Pau has a role to play.on the
floor with Andrew. He’s got
to face the basket a little bit
more. So, yeah, we have some _
adjustments to make.” -

Jackson agreed that the
Lakers lacked the necessary
physical presence to compete
with the Celtics in the finals.
However, he said Bynum’s
return to form will solve some
of the Lakers’ lack of muscle
around the basket.

“We know we weren’t a
muscular, physical team, but
we were able to get to where
we did by finesse and speed,”
Jackson said. “I was always
‘impressed by our ability to be
as resilient as we were.”

Jackson said he did not dis-
agree with Bryant’s decision
to delay surgery on his right
pinkie until after the season.
Bryant was injured February
5, and played the rest of the
season as well as in the
Olympics with damaged liga-
ments.

The Lakers begin training
camp Tuesday. They open the
regular season October 28
against the Portland Trail
Blazers.

over half his active roster.

The hope is continuity will
replace chaos this time.

“There’s not much of an
excuse now,” James said. “We
have guys that can go out and
play. Mo can dominate a game.
We all know what I can do on
the court. We had guys hold
out for personal reasons last
year. We had guys who were
here, but not mentally here. It’s
just a different feeling.”

N
\
N
N
\
\
\
\\
NS
\
\
SS
N
WS
N
NY
\
N
SS
\
N
.
KS
\


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 15

THE TRIBUNE

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WEDNESDAY,

AN OUTSIDE view of the British Colonial Hilton hotel...



Hilton eyes ‘mid-
market’ hotel projects
for the Bahamas

lm By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

HILTON Hotels yesterday
gave a timely boost to the flag-
ging Bahamian tourism and
hotel industry by announcing it
was targeting this nation for
new resort projects, including
much-needed properties aimed
at the mid-priced market.

Karla Visconti, communica-
tions director for Hilton Hotels
Corporation’s Latin America
and Caribbean region, con-
firmed in an e-mail reply to Tri-
bune Business’s questions that
the five-star global hotel brand
would “target the mid-market
sector, particularly in Nassau”.

Hilton Hotels yesterday
unveiled plans to “bring” anoth-
_ er 17 resort-properties to the
Caribbean over the next five
years, to.add to the 13 it cur-
rently has in the region. The
company presently brands two
Bahamas-based properties - the
British Colonial Hilton, in

downtown Nassau, which is °

owned by private equity firm
Adurion ‘and a major Canadi-
an pension fund, and the Con-
rad Bimini Bay Resort & Casi-
no being developed by the Mia-
mi-based Capo Group.

Ms Visconti told Tribune
Business yesterday: “We recog-
nise the importance of our pres-
ence in the Bahamas and will
seek opportunities to grow our
brands there.

Looking ‘particularly .
in Nassau’ for Hilton —
Garden Inn and Hampton
Inn-branded resorts as
part of expansion plans

“Hilton Garden Inn and
Hampton Inn will target the
mid-market sector, particular-
ly in Nassau, and we are also
interested in bringing luxury
brands to high-end mixed use
developments in the Bahamas
as well.”

Hilton Hotels’ plans to devel-
op the mid-priced hotel seg-
ment will be music to the ears of
many in the Bahamian resort
and tourism industry, as this is a
category where this nation, to
put it bluntly, lacks product.

Most Bahamas-based resorts
have taken their cue from
Kerzner International’s success
on Paradise Island and moved
to position their properties at
the five-star, premium end of
the market.

The high operating costs
faced by Bahamas-based hotels
have also contributed to this
imbalance, as owners and oper-
ators have to offer'a top-quality
product to enable them to
charge the high room rates that
will cover their expenses.

The late Butch Kerzner had

SEE page 3B

Product to boost
building industry

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter



A NEW construction prod-
uct could revolutionise the
Bahamian industry by reducing
the amount of concrete cracks
occurring in buildings and the
labour costs involved in con-
struction, its proponents told
_ Tribune Business yesterday.

The product is Glass Fibre
Reinforced Polymer (GFRP)
rebar, which can replace the
steel used to reinforce concrete
blocks. It will be unveiled in the
Bahamas at a seminar next
week.

- The GFRP rebar’s advantage
is that unlike steel, the fiber-
glass will not rust or contract,
explained Robert:Samia, an



American construction consul-
tant with ties to the Bahamas
for the past two decades.

He added that one of the rea-
sons why there are so many
cracks in Bahamian buildings is
the stress is placed on the con-

‘crete, due to the steel rusting

and the fact that steel expands
quicker than cement.

Using the GFRP rebar would
therefore reduce the amount of
cracks and decrease the amount
of money needed for repairing
them, Mr Samia said.

Since it will not rust, he
added, it was especially suited
for island construction, as it will
eliminate the danger for struc-
tures near the sea.

Mr Samia said that using the
GFRP rebar can help reduce
labour costs in construction. He

- explained that this was possible

because the fibreglass rebar was
much lighter than steel, involv-
ing less manpower to move and
transport it. The GFRP rebar
did not have to be welded
together either,” Mr Samia said.
The rebar can be cut at the spe-
cific angles needed for the pro-
ject at the factory, which is
something that an experienced
and organised contractor would
have no problem knowing
ahead of time - exactly what
angles he would need.

There is no special training
needed to install it, Mr Samia
added, saying that all that is
needed is “ about five minutes
of instruction”.

Mr Samia said the Nebraska
firm, Hughes Brothers, will be
in Nassau next week on Octo-
ber 9 at the Hilton to host a spe-
cial seminar on the benefits of
using rebar for contractors and
engineers,



O-CT





AS

@ By NEIL HARTNELL

Tribune Business Editor

he Bahamas

Property Fund is

“hoping” to close

the purchase of

its third property

some time this month, the

BISX-listed fund’s president

told Tribune Business yester-

day, with a tripling of the com-

pany’s ‘other expenses’ during

the 2008 first half blamed on its

exposure to vacant space in the
Bahamas Financial Centre.

Michael Anderson, also

president of RoyalFidelity

Merchant Bank & Trust, the

Bahamas Property Fund’s

administrator and major share-

holder, said he had “been wait-

ing” for the property’s vendor

Tipped worker woes
behind household



ROYAL BFIDELITY

NASSAU OFFICE |
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010



Money at Work






Fund ‘hoping’ for

October deal close

* BISX-listed Bahamas Property Fund in talks to purchase third property

* First half results hit by exposure to 8-9% vdcant space in Bahamas
Financial Centre, and resulting maintenance charge

“Other expenses’ triple, pushing net income |
down almost 27% despite 5% revenue rise

to “come back to me” and
indicate whether they were
willing and able to proceed
with the transaction.
Declining to name either the
vendor or property involved,
Mr Anderson said he had
received some documents
relating to the potential sale,
and the seller was “getting all
the pieces of the puzzle togeth-
er to enter into the saie this
week.
“I’m hopeful that in the next

earnings drop

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

UNDER-
EMPLOY- |
MENT among |}
Bahamian hotel
workers who |
derive most of
their income |
from commis- |
sions (tips) is
likely to be a
major factor
behind the 4.1
per cent year-on-year decline
in average household income,
the Bahamas Chamber of
Commerce’s president said
yesterday.

Responding to the initial
findings of the Department
of Statistics 2008 Labour
Force Survey, which found
average household income in
the Bahamas had dropped by
almost $1,800 year-over-year



D’Aguilar

How do you attract and retain

WITH A ‘BEST OF CLASS’ PENSIO|
Superior performance * Cost effective * Customised
Call the Royal Fidelity pension experts today!

* Average household earnings
drop almost $1,800 per family
between 2007 and 2008, Labour
Force Survey finds

* Unemployment up, as economy
unable to create jobs fast enough
to meet demand, with men again
being left behind

* Underemployment major
problem, as Chamber chief
says numbers likely to
‘continue deteriorating’

- falling from $45,221 in 2007
to $43,427 this year - Dionisio
D’ Aguilar said it simply pro-
vided more evidence of an
economic downturn.

Apart from an increase in
the unemployment rate,
which grew from 7.9 per cent
in 2007 to 8.7 per cent in 2008,

SEE page 6B.





month or so we will be able to
close the transaction,” he
added.

When asked why the
Bahamas Property Fund was
eyeing an acquisition, Mr
Anderson replied: “The key
benefit we’re seeking for our
shareholders is diversification.

“We need to be able to have
a wide range of properties, not
just one. We don’t want to be
susceptible to changes in one
area or another.”

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

BENCHMARK
(Bahamas) president yester-
day said he was “positive and
optimistic” about the BISX-
listed company’s 2008 third
quarter performance due to a
rebound in financial stocks,
although he admitted the
company’s Bahamian invest-
ment portfolio was “over-
weight” in that industry. ‘

Some 68 per cent of Bench-
mark’s Bahamian investment
portfolio was allocated to
financial services stocks as at
the 2008 second quarter end
on June 30, the sector
accounting for $4.494 million
of the portfolio’s $6,591 mil-
lion value, but Julian Brown
told Tribune Business the
company’s “hands are tied”.

He explained that Bench-
mark’s Bahamian investment
portfolio “has to some degree
reflect the capitalisation of the
market”, which in the

Benchmark ‘positive and
optimistic’ on Q3 results

Meanwhile, Mr Anderson
explained that the Bahamas
Property Fund’s increase in
other expenses - from $161,356

in the 2007 first half to

$497,135 this year - was
because the Fund had to pick
up the bill for excess common
area maintenance (CAM)
expenses incurred in the 2007
financial year.
Mr Anderson explained that

SEE page 4B



* Company admits ‘overweight’
in financial stocks

* Pursuing twin-track court
and talks process to resolve ~
$5.6m dispute

Bahamas context is dominat-
ed by the banks - chiefly First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas), which accounts
for-more than 40 per cent of |
BISX’s market cap.

It is further supported by
the likes of Bank of the
Bahamas _ International,
Fidelity Bank (Bahamas),
Commonwealth Bank and the
insurance companies, Fam-
Guard Corporation and Coli-
na Holdings (Bahamas).

As a result, Mr Brown
explained that Benchmark
had to effectively ‘track’ the
financial services stocks list-
ed on BISX and the company
could not “go too far away

SEE page 5B

‘best of class’ employees?

PLAN

Royal Fidelity Pension Plan

BAHAMAS
Nassau: 242.356.9801

Freeport: 242.351.3010

SANE Vee)

Bridgetown: 246.467.4000

royalfidelity.com

ROYAL FIDELITY

Money at Work


PAGE 2B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE







out of the 24 listed securities.
Of those, two advanced and
three remained unchanged.

EQUITY MARKET
A total of 47,168 shares

@ By RoyalFidelity Capital
Markets

IT was a very quiet week in

he Bahamian stock market,
vith investors trading in five

NOTICE

o

Pursuant to. the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Comipanies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 24th day of September,

A.D., 2008.

‘Dated the 30th day of September, A.D., 2008.

Dayrrl R. Butler
Liquidator of
ACTS BAHAMAS LTD.

NOTICE

TECHNICAL HOLDINGS LTD.

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act 2000, notice is hereby
given that the above-named Company has been. dissolved and
struck off the Register pursuant to a Certificate of Dissolution
issued by the Registrar General on the 20th day of March,

A.D., 2008.
Dated the 30th day of September, A.D., 2008.
Dayrrl R. Butler

Liquidator of
ACTS BAHAMAS LTD.





Sake 8 oS «

Financial Intelligence Unit

LEGAL COUNSEL

ee

changed hands, a substantial
decline of 5,176,121 shares, in
comparison to last week's
record trading volume of
5,223,289 shares.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank (Bahamas) (CIB) was the
main advancer, with 1,200 of its
shares trading, climbing by
$0.10 or 0.87 per cent to end the
week at $11.65.

Commonwealth Bank (CBL)
was the volume leader, with
37,318 shares trading, rising by
$0.07 to close at $7.37. Some
8,050 Cable Bahamas shares
(CAB), and 500 shares in
FOCOL Oil Holdings (FCL),
also traded, of which both
remained unchanged, to end the
week at $14.15 and $5.25
respectively.

BOND MARKET

Investors traded in $35,000
(par value) worth of Fidelity
Bank (Bahamas) Notes, all in
Series D Notes (FBB15) due
for redemption in 2015.

COMPANY NEWS

Earnings Releases

Doctors Hospital Health Sys-
tems (DHS) released unaudited
financial results for the six
months ending on July 31, 2008.
DHS reported net income of
$1.6 million, a decrease of
$848,000 or 34.2 per cent com-
pared to $2.5 million for the
same period in the 2007 first
half.

For the quarter, DHS report-
ed net income of $649,000, com-
pared to $1.2 million for the
2007 second quarter, a decline
of $515,000 or 44.2 per cent.
Total net revenues stood at $9.7
million, down $810,000 or 7.5
per cent from $10.8 million for

INSIGHT

For the stories
behind the news,
read Insight
on Mondays

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Legal Counsel at the

Financial Intelligence Unit (the “FIU”).

JOB SUMMARY:

The successful applicant will be responsible for the provision of legal advice to the Director and
the Financial Intelligence Unit relative to its statutory mandate under the Financial Intelligence

Unit Act, 2000.

RESPONSIBLE TO:
The Director of the Financial Intelligence Unit.

The successful applicant must:

° Be a Counsel and Attorney-At-Law in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and a

member of The Bahamas Bar.
* Have detailed knowledge of existing financial legislation.

* Be computer literate in the use of various Microsoft applications including Word, Excel, ,

and PowerPoint.
* Possess strong leadership and communication skills.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:

¢ Responsible for ensuring that the Financial Intelligence Unit is kept abreast of legislative

developments relative to its functions.

* Responsible for making recommendations to the Director relative to the legal issues

affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.

* Responsible for liaison between the Financial Intelligence Unit and the Office of the
Attorney General relative to Jegal issues affecting the Financial Intelligence Unit.

* Responsible for the provision of training of industry participants in the Financial Services
Sector in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Intelligence Unit Act 2000.

* Responsible fdr drafting of legal documents for Memoranda of Understanding between
the Financial Intelligence Unit and foreign Financial Intelligence Units.

* Responsible for assisting with other duties relative to the proper functioning of the

Financial Intelligence Unit as required by the Director,

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:

* Bachelor of Laws Degree (LLB) with legal professional qualification; five years call to The

Bahamas Bar.

* Experience in Compliance, Civil, Criminal & Corporate Law, Assets Tracing and

Forfeiture.
* Excellent attitude and an appreciation for time management.

* Competitive salary commensurate with experience
° 15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract.

Interested persons may obtain additional information from the FIU’s website at
www.bahamas.gov.bs/fiu and should submit written applications inclusive of resumes and

copies of relevant certificate(s) by 15" October 2008 to:

Anthony M. Johnson
Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O, Box SB 50086
Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas



the same three-month period in
2007, while total expenses also
declined by $243,000 or 2.6 per
cent to $9.2 million.

For the six-month period,
earnings per common share
declined to $0.16 or 36 per cent
versus $0.25 for the same period
in 2007. Management indicat-
ed that patient activity was
down in the 2008 second quar-
ter, due to a decline in elective
admissions, as general econom-
ic conditions continue to affect
individual health care choices.
This resulted in a decrease in
patient days of 6.4 per cent.

Total assets and liabilities
stood at $30.4 million and $9
million respectively, compared
to $31.3 million and $11.5 mil-
lion at year-end 2008.

FirstCaribbean International
Bank. (Bahamas) (CIB)
released unaudited financial
results for the nine months end-
ed July 31, 2008. CIB reported
net income for the most recent
quarter of $26.7 million, in com-
parison to $17.8 million for the
same three-month period in
2007.

Net interest income, which is
a primary measure of the bank's
core performance, was $38.6
million for the quarter, repre-
senting a slight increase of $4
million or 11.6 per cent, com-
pared to $34.6 million for the
comparative period.

In addition to positive interest
margins, CIB also experienced
an increase in its operating
income of $13.3 million, which
was up by $7.3 million quarter-
over-quarter. At the end of the
nine-month period, earnings per
share stood at $0.48, a decrease
of 30.4 per cent compared to
the $0.69 reported in the 2007
third quarter.

CIB’s total assets and liabili-
ties were $4.4 billion and $3.7
billion respectively, compared
to $4.8 billion and $4.2 billion at
year-end 2007.

Private Placement Offerings:

FOCOL Holdings (FCL)
announced it will be extending
the deadline of its private place-
ment offering. The preferred
shares will be paying a dividend
rate of prime + 1.75 per cent,
payable semi-annually.



The Bahamian Stock Market

FINDEX 879.65 YTD (-7.60%)















BISX CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
AML $1.81 ¢: 0 9.04%
BBL $0.89 $- 0 4.71%
BOB $8.50 $- 0 -11.55%
BPF $11.80 $- 0 0.00%
BSL $14.60 $- 0 0.00%
BWL $3.49 $- 0 -4.64%
CAB $14.15 $- 8,050 17.43%
CBL = $7.37. ~—s $+0.07-——-37,318 -12.57%
CHL $285 -° $- -9.52%
CIB $11.65 $+0.10 1,200 -20.21%
CWCB $3.71 $-0.89 0 -26.39%
DHS $2.77 $- 0 17.87%
FAM $8.06 ss $ 0 11.94%
FBB $2.37 $- 0 -10.57%
FCC $0.40 G: 0 -48,05%
FCL« *» $5.25 $- 600 1.35%
FCLR $1.00 $ 0 0.00%
FIN $12.00 $- 0 -7.34%
ICD $8.20 © -"-$- 0 13.10%
ISJ $12.00 $- 0 9.09%
PRE _ $10.00 $ 0 0.00%
DIVIDEND/AGM NOTES:




e Cable Bahamas (CAB) has declared a quarterly dividend of
$0.06 per share, payable on September 30, 2008, to all shareholders
of record date September 15, 2008. -)

¢ Commonwealth Bank (CBL) has declared a quarterly divi-
dend of $0.05 per share, payable on September 30, 2008, to all
shareholders of record date September 12, 2008.

¢ Doctors Hospital Health Systems (DHS) has declared a semi-
annual dividend of $0.02 per share, payable on September 30,
2008, to all shareholders of record date September 17, 2008.

© Consolidated Water Company BDRs (CWCB) has declared a
quarterly dividend of $0.013 per share, payable on November 7,
2008, to all shareholders of record date September 30, 2008.

e RND Holdings (RND) will be holding its Annual General
Meeting on Wednesday, October 22, 2008, at 6pm at the British
Colonial Hilton, Nassau, Bahamas.














Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) ZEFA INVESTMENTS LTD. is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 30, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by the
Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Shakira Burrows of 2nd Terrace
West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas. i

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are re-
quired on or before the 12th day of November, 2008 to send their names
and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the Liquidator of
the company or, in default thereof, they may be excluded from the benefit
of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

October 1, 2008
SHAKIRA BURROWS

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED COMPANY



“Meeting the needs of advertisers

and readers motivates me to do

a good job. The Tribune is

my newspaper.”

ESTHER BARRY
PRODUCTION MANAGER

THE TRIBUNE

The Tribune

My Verve, My Vlewspaper!


THE TRIBUNE



@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL

Business Reporter

AFTER a protracted legal
battle, and no response to a let-
ter he wrote a year ago, a dis-
gruntled Bahamian is once
again appealing to Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham to assist
him in settling a court case he
initiated against the National
Insurance Board (NIB).

Anthony Wright said he was
in the process of writing a letter

to Mr Ingraham, appealing to |

him to intervene so that he can
receive an alleged settlement
he claims he was granted by the
Industrial Tribunal for workers
compensation stemming from
an injury sustained while on the
job in 1982.



FROM page 1B

himself argued that Baha Mar ,

should target the mid-priced
market with its product at Cable
Beach, rather than go head-to-
head with Kerzner Internation-
al, as this would expand the
industry’s product offering,
choice and enable it to tap into
an entirely new market that the
Bahamas currently does not
serve. It would also have bol-
stered Kerzner’s position, too, if
Baha Mar had done that.

In its release yesterday,
Hilton Hotels said it wanted to
“add focused-service hotels” in
the Caribbean’s main commer-
cial centres, including Nassau,
through the Hilton Garden Inn
and Hampton Inn brands. It
was also focusing on the devel-
opment of luxury branded-
hotels and residences in mixed-
use developments across the
Bahamas.

However, no projects have
been finalised yet, with Ms Vis-
conti telling Tribune Business:
“At this time, we do not have
confirmed hotels to announce
in the Bahamas, other than
those you mention [British
Colonial Hilton and Conrad



PM Ingraham

After many legal battles, Mr
Wright, in a desperate bid to
get the monies he alleges are
owed to him, filed a petition to
wind-up NIB on March 12,
2008. NIB, though, has denied
the allegations and is opposing
him in court.

SIM Ma recmeI CSUN a lm NOK Men

tives whose efforts will be sole-
ly to grow our presence in the
Caribbean and Latin America.

“Hilton Hotels Corporation
is both a management and fran-
chise property, and seeks to
grow throughout the region
with either opportunity. We will

Almost exactly a year ago
today, Mr Wright outlined the
details of the case to Mr Ingra-
ham in a letter pleading for the
Prime Minister to address the
issue.

“He has yet to respond, and
so I am going to send him a let-
ter this week, once again out-
lining what has happened,” Mr
Wright said.

He added that he remains
committed to pushing for the
wind-up, which if granted would
throw the country’s $1.3 billion
social security system into chaos
and potentially jeopardise the
institution that hundreds of
Bahamians rely on for their
retirement income.

Mr Wright alleged that the
court case was waiting for a new
date for the matter to be heard



always look for the right fit in
the right market with the right
brand.”

The Caribbean development
efforts will be lead by Gregory
Rockett, Hilton’s vice-president,
development, for the Caribbean
and southeast US.

Legal Notice

NOTICE

Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138(8) of The
International Business Companies Act 2000, of The
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, notice is hereby given’
that BRICKELL EQUITIES CORPORATION LTD. has
been dissolved and struck off the Register as of 16th

September, 2008.

King & Co.
Attorneys for the above-named Company

d-up case

before a judge.

He said the matter was
adjourned by a Registrar
because there was some con-
cern as to whether NIB would
fall under the rules of the Com-
panies Act.

The action was the result of
an injury Mr Wright allegedly
sustained back in 1982 while an
employee at Franklyn Chemi-
cals, a company then based on
Grand Bahama.

Mr Wright said he suffered a
fall that left him with a ruptured
disc and damage to the soft tis-
sue of his back.

He claimed that NIB
declined to pay for his treat-
ment abroad, saying it would

be more affordable for him to -

receive treatment in a Bahami-
an hospital.

Mr Wright alleged that ever
since he has faced health chal-
lenges resulting from the fall,

‘including pain and a month-

long hospital stay in 1994, plus
many subsequent out-patient
visits.

STANDARD

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 3B

fo. Mt Te Me OE eer ee.
Plea to PM over NIB win

NOTICE

IN THE ESTATE OF PRINCE
ALBERT DEVEAUX JR. A.K.A.
PRINCE DEVEAUX of Taylor
Street in the Southern District of
the Island of New Providence one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth

of The

after which date the Executrix will proceed to distribute ©
the assets having regard only to the claims of which she

shall then have had notice.

AND NOTICE is hereby also given that all’ persons
indebted to the said Estate are requested to make full
settlement on or before the date hereinbefore mentioned.

Bahamas,

deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that all persons having any claim
or demand against the above Estate are required to send
the same duly certified in writing to the Undersigned on
or before Friday the 21st day of November A. D., 2008

MICHELLE Y. CAMPBELL & CO.

Chambers

#55 Mackey Street

P. O. Box N-9180
Nassau, Bahamas

Executrix of the above Estate |



AVWMOUMCES

the retirement of

Mr. Paul B. Johnson
effective from October 3rd, 2008.

Paul started at JBR on Wuiff Road as a youngster
of 14 years old. He could be seen sweeping the
shop floor, helping out in all departments and

under his father, Mr. Buck Johnson’s guidance and
tutelage grew with the business and became

General Manager, contributing in making JBR the -

success it is today.

Mr. William (Billy) Lowe and the JBR group of
companies would like to wish Paul well as he
enters into this new stage of his life, and we will
be forever grateful for his boundless dedication

and service.

HARDWARE

AND PLUMBING

Bimini Bay Resort & Casino]. Monique Cartwright-Winder

*What we have is an expand-
ed team of development execu-

REWARD

A reward is being offered for information leading
to the recovery of and/or the arrest of the persons

Marsh Harbour, Abaco







FAMILY GUARDIAN INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED



» BALANCE SHEET .
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2007
(Expressed in Bahamian dollars)














2008 Toyota Yar














SBA PIOAOL BOOS














TOTAL

responsible for the theft of a 2008 Toyota Yaris; 2007 2006
which occurred around August 13, 2008 in Redland ee eee
Acres, off Soldier Road Bank term deposits $ 10,732,604 $ 8,430,710
Financial Investment Assets:
oe Held-to-maturity 39,063,136 33,409,618
Colour: Olive Green Fair value through profit and loss 8,561,549 6,843,481
Serial #: JTDBW93320-1105523 Loans 70,369,406 65,415,166
License Ht: 201820 Total investment assets 128,726,695 114,098,975
: : ' ; Cash and bank balances 2,050,995 1,141,473
Identifying Markings ‘“Apple’’ on front wind- Receivables and other assets ~ 2,064,805 2,256,737
shield, ““Appleseed’’ on rear windshield, a scratch Premiums reesivanie 2,365,386 peas
Property, plant and equipment, net 11,724,764 12,690,740



on left rea d :
left rear fender and dent on rear bumper. TOTAL $ 146,932,645 $ 132,902,887
. . LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Please call CDU, Stolen Vehicles Unit 502-9938, awe

502-9942, 302-3900 or 357-7502. Reserves for future policyholders’ benefits $ 94,481,860 $ 84,891,696
Other policyholders’ funds 5,833,961 5,919,613 °

Policy liabilities 100,315,821 90,811,309

; Payables and accruals 6,555,202 6,460,604

YS Total liabilities 106,871,023 97,271,913

EQUITY:

Share capital 1,707,462 1,707,462

Share premium 11,401,314 11,401,314

Revaluation surplus 2,518,187 2,688,415

Retained earnings 24,434,659 19,833,783

Total equity 40,061,622 35,630,974

$ 146,932,645 $ 132,902,887

These financial statements were approved by the Board of Directors on April 10, 2008

(Mim noms

Director



and are signed on its behalf by:

Director

The complete set of audited financial statements is available on the
company’s website at www.familyguardian.com
PAGE 4B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

To advertise, call 502-2371

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THE TRIBUNE

Fund ‘hoping’ for October deal close

FROM page 1B

at the start of each year, a Bud-
get was drawn up to cover the
estimated CAM expenses for
its two properties - the Bahamas
Financial Centre in downtown
Nassau and One Marina Drive
on Paradise Island.

CAM expenses are the funds
necessary to maintain areas in
the properties that are used by
all tenants, such as electricity
for the corridors, reception area
and external lighting, with each
tenant’s contribution based on
the amount of square footage
they have leased.

However, if the estimated
CAM budget falls short of pro-
jections, then a “shortfall or
overage assessment” is levied
against the tenants in the fol-

TS

PUTS (Ty

TU aS
were
on Mondays



lowing financial year to pay off
the balance due.

With some 8-9 per cent of
space in the Bahamas Financial
Centre vacant, the Bahamas
Property Fund was thus
exposed to this share of the
CAM overage budget for the
property when it was sent out
by the property manager dur-
ing the 2008 second quarter,
hence the increase in other
expenses. Some $371,258 in oth-
er expenses were incurred dur-
ing the 2008 second quarter.

“We did not know about the
overage for 2007 until we were
billed for it in 2008,” Mr Ander-
son said. “That 8-9 per cent of
space is still vacant, and with
the market as it is it is a struggle
to find good tenants.”

With the Bahamas Financial
Centre featuring all kinds of

infrastructure to cope with’

every contingency and emer-
gency, it was a property geared
chiefly to international banks
and companies that needed to
provide seamless service and
continue operations in the event
of disasters such as hurricanes.

“You've got to be a particular
kind of client that needs those
niche aspects,” Mr Anderson
explained. “There’s not a large
group of clients that meets that
interest.”

The Bahamas Property
Fund’s One Marina Drive prop-
erty, though, was helping to off-



Treasury Head

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES

' Reporting to our Regional Treasury team, the position is
responsible iu: ueveloping and implementing strategies for
local/foreign
responsibilities include marketing and quoting rates for corporate
foreign exchange contracts, money market instruments and
derivative products and projecting liquidity and rate trends. The
role is also focused on risk management through monitoring.
liquidity and foreign exposure, ensuring compliance with legal,
regulatory, and internal policy requirements, and, managing ratios ©

currency

liability

products. Key

set the loss of a major tenant at
the Bahamas Financial Centre,
capitalising on its unique posi-
tion as the only high-end, pur-
pose built office space on Par-
adise Island to ensure it was 100
per cent leased.

Mr Anderson said there was
“nothing at this stage to make
us feel there’s a problem with
any one of our tenants” at the
Bahamas Financial Centre as a
result of the credit/liquidity
crunch in the global financial
system, with clients such as
Credit Suisse and JP Morgan
Chase not part of the current
round of consolidation taking
place. ,

Outlining the Bahamas Prop- °

erty Fund’s business model, he
explained that all tenants were
on leases ranging from three to
five years in duration. The built-
in annual rental increases varied
depending on the lease length,
with rental fees increasing by
3-5 per cent normally for a
three-year lease, and 2-3 per
cent for a five-year lease.
Acknowledging that it was
hard to find new tenants, espe-
cially in the current economic

climate, if one was to leave, Mr .-

Anderson said the Bahamas
Property Fund aimed to keep
tenants for at least 10-15 years.



Builders of The Bahamas

“The key criteria for us is
rental rates and interest rates,”
Mr Anderson explained. “As
we go forward, we’ll start to see
bank interest payments drop as
we pay down debt. We have
benefited from relatively low
interest rates, and steadily grow- ~
ing rental rates. As long as we
don’t lose too many tenants,
that model works for us.”

Once the vacant space in the
Bahamas Financial Centre was
filled, Mr Anderson said the
Bahamas Property Fund would
be able to recover the CAM
overage payout.

He added that the company’s
rental rates were competitive,
especially against rival new
properties, due to the latter’s .
greater construction costs.

For the 2008 first half, the
Bahamas Property Fund saw
rental revenues increase by 5
per cent to $1.982 million, com-
pared to $1.887 million the year
before.

However, the tripling in oth-
er expenses saw the fund’s oper-
ating expenses increase by 56.3
per cent to $1.065 million, com-
pared to $681,379 in 2007..

As a result, net income
dropped 26.6 per cent to
$869,736, compared to $1.185
million for the 2007 first half.



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Litigation Attorney Required
For a growing Law Practice
Qualifications:
Minimum three (3) years experience in civil, commercial and
crimminal liugation

Please e-mail resume in Microsoft Word or PDF format to
.- » lawprofessions@ gmail.com
-. onor before October 6, 2008

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that BENSON ARISTIL of
WASHINGTON STREET, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is
applying to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, for registration/naturalization as a citizen
of The Bahamas, and that any person who knows any
reason why registration/ naturalization should not be
granted, should send a written and signed statement
of the facts within twenty-eight days from the 24TH day
of SEPTEMBER 2008 to the Minister responsible for
Nationality and Citizenship, P.O.Box N- 7147, Nassau,
Bahamas. _

team. You will interact with and reserves. Additional responsibilities include overseeing all
related financial, regulatory and management performance

colleagues from around the | gl 1d
Caribbean region andiacross the | reporting, ane) supervising and training support staff.

‘organization globally, providing
treasury management to our
‘local team. In addition to a great
career, we offer a competitive
salary and benefits package.

Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Accounting or Finance, and, a minimum of 5 years Treasury
experience with a major commercial and/or investment bank; a
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marketing/sales, analytical, communication, and interpersonal
skills, combined with a results orientation and an ability to build
relationships, will round out the ideal candidate. Some travel is
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| Interested candidates ‘should
forward a copy of their resume

by October 3, 2008 to: Human
Resources, P.O. Box N-1576,

NOTICE

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED |
|



Neo Peete OR. o Pursuant to the provisions of Section 138 (4) of the
oe oe oe OR Email: - International Business Companies Act, 2000, notice
ianice, bson@citL.com Challenge is hereby given that:-

yourself to a career like no other |
, i



(a) EM Securities Limited is in dissolution;

(b) The date of commencement of the dissolution
is the 20th day of March, 2008; and



Seer anaeininnananannnarigs

(c) The Liquidator is Andre J. Feldman of Argus
Advisors, First Commercial Centre, Suite #1,
Second Floor, P.O. Box F-42411, East Mall Drive,
Freeport, Grand Bahama Island Bahamas.

ARGUS ADVISORS



Lega! Notice

NOTICE

BYNA VALLEY CORPORATION

saan OO enn

&
Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section
138(8) of the International Business Companies
Act 2000, the dissolution of BYNA VALLEY
CORPORATION has been completed; a Certificate
of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
| therefore been struck off the Register.

ARGOSA CORP. INC.

(Liquidator)

ad rates


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 5B



eT a OR «eee
Benchmark ‘positive and

optimistic’ on Q3 results

FROM page 1B

from that”.

He explained that if Bench-
mark deviated from its finan-
cial services holdings and
became underweight in them,
it would underperform the
Bahamian market, whereas if it
‘tracked’ them it would, at
worst, stay in line with the gen-
eral market’s performance. The
company had to look for sec-
. tors that were well-capitalised
and liquid.

“I understand we are over-
weight in financial services, but
our hands are tied,” Mr Brown

told Tribune Business. “We

have a fairly heavy investment
in Grand Bahama Power Com-
pany, but that stock has not per-
formed well over the past 12
months. We will not be putting
$3-$4 million into, other sectors
because it is not prudent.”

Despite the relatively poor
performance of financial stocks
during the 2008 first half, large-
ly due to the depreciation in
FirstCaribbean’s and Com-
monwealth’s share prices, Mr
Brown said he was not aban-
doning the industry.

“It was the one that had us
over the top last year. Com-
monwealth Bank performed
extremely well last year, and as
a result our portfolio performed
extremely well. We: have suf-
fered the consequences” of the
decline in banking stocks, Mr
Brown said, the unrealised
$1.277 million loss caused by
the reduction in value of its

ter, and will be putting out those
numbers soon.”

’ Meanwhile, Mr Brown said
Benchmark (Bahamas) was
“still working” on resolving the
issue that forced it to take a
one-time, $5.616 million bad
debt provision at the end of fis-
cal 2007. That event wiped out
$1.06 per share in book value
and the company’s retained
earnings.

The problems related to mar-
gin trading that Benchmark’s
subsidiary, Alliance Investment
Management, was doing for a
client, and the securities it was
holding as collateral. The val-
ue of those securities fell amid
the stock market slide in the
2007 fourth quarter. '

Mr Brown said Benchmark
was pursuing a twin-track
approach to resolving the prob-
lem, talking directly to the client

involved as well as having initi-
ated an action before the
Supreme Court over it.

Meanwhile, Mr Brown said
the Wall Street turmoil had
benefited Alliance through
increasing the trading activity
and volumes initiated by its
clients.

The increase in cash on
Benchmark’s books at the end
of the second quarter, from
$8.546 million at year-end 2007
to $17.705 million at June 30,
2008, directly reflected “growth
in” Alliance’s business, Mr
Brown said. The amount due
to customers increased from
$19.582 million to $31.129 mil-
lion over the same time period.

The Benchmark president
said the company did not antic-
ipate any problems with its
planned shopping complex/real
estate project for the

Legal Notice

NOTICE



INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
(No.45 of 2000)

ZACHARY ENTERPRISES LTD. -

In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance: with Section 137 (4) of
the International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), ZACH-
ARY ENTERPRISES LTD. has been dissolved and struck off the
Register according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the
Registrar General on the 19th day of September, 2008.

‘Carmichael Road area as a

result of the current economic
downturn, Mr Brown added.

Bank of the Bahamas Inter-
national is understood to be ear-
marked as the anchor tenant,
and Mr Brown said the prop-
erty was likely to ultimately be
fully tenanted.

“I think that where we’re
aiming, we should be coming
out of this slow period, because
the project is likely to take a
year to finish. We will work
through the slow period and
things will pick up by the time
we go to market for leases,” Mr
Brown said.

Construction is likely to begin
before 2008 year-end.

Mr Brown said Benchmark
had no plans to bolster its capi-
tal base, adding that any capital
raising done by the company
was likely to seek funds for spe-
cific projects.



LTS) a
ea MCAS ET TIME

STIR ary CTL

Legal Notice

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT
‘ (No.45 of 2000)

- SENECA ENTERPRISES INC.

‘In Voluntary liquidation

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (4) of the
International Business Companies Act (No. 45 of 2000), SENECA
ENTERPRISES INC. has been dissolved and struck off the Regis-
ter according to the Certificate of Dissolution issued by the Registrar
General on the 19th day of September, 2008.

Robert Philip Surcouf
Harbour Reach
Rue De Carteret
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands

Liquidator





SEEKING Messenger

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desire to get ahead.





Skills and Requirements -

>f Excellent navigation and geographic knowledge;
>» A keen sense of punctuality and time management;
Amiable and reliable;
Excellent oral and communication skills;
‘Ability to multitask;
Ability to work well under pressure;

VVVVV








investment portfolio being
greater than its $929,648 loss
for the 2008 half year.

And he added: “The finan-
cial stocks have done extremely
weli in the third quarter in
terms of price, and from that
things are basically looking
extremely good. We’re positive
and optimistic on the third quar-

Excellent driving record.
Robert Philip Surcouf
Harbour Reach
Rue De Carteret
St. Helier, Jersey
Channel Islands
Liquidator

Minimum Requirements

> Education to high school level;
> Minimum two years driving experience;
> Valid Driver's License.

APPLY VIA EMAIL TO:
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OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR
SUPREME CourT, NASSAU

Financial Intelligence Unit

The public is hereby notified that the premises occupied by the Supreme
- Court have been extended by the addition of a temporary annex in the
Saffrey Square Building, East Street North.

ACCOUNTANT

Applications are invited from suitably qualified persons for the post of Accountant at the
Financial Intelligence Unit (the “FIU”).

The relevant notice under section 53(1) of the Supreme Court Act was
posted on 25 September 2008 and the Court will commence work from those
premises on Monday, 29 September.

JOB SUMMARY: 7

The successful applicant will be responsible for the provision of accounting services to the FIU,
inclusive of the proper management of all aspects of the. organization’s accounting functions
relative to its statatory mandate under the Financial Intelligence Unit Act, 2000.

Senior Justice Anita Allen will relocate to this annex which will be known
The “Supreme Court (Saffrey Square) Apnex 1”.

RESPONSIBLE TO:
The Director of the Financial Intelligence Unit.

CRITICAL COMPETENCIES:
The successful applicant must: :
¢ Be a Public Accountant in the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and a member of the
Bahamas Institute of Chartered Accountants (BICA).
Possess current detailed knowledge of various accounting standards including GAAP
and IAS. :
Have a minimum of five (5) years experience at a management level.
Previous audit experience with an established accounting firm and or a governmental
agency would be an asset.
Be computer literate in the use of various Microsoft applications including Word, Excel,
and PowerPoint.
° — Possess strong leadership and communication skills.

onna D Newton
(Acting Registrar)



KEY RESPONSIBILITIES:
The successful applicant will be responsible for:

* Preparation of financial statements and other financial reports on a monthly basis,
Producing reports necessary for the annual audit of the Unit's accounts.
Coordination of the annual audit of accounts with the external auditors.
Preparation of annual budget and monthly payroll.

Monthly reconciliation of bank account. ;

Purchases, payment of suppliers and cash disbursements.

Periodic review of the Unit’s accounting system, applications and procedures to enhance
efficiency.

Performing other related duties as may be necessary,

CHAMBERS OF THE CHIEF JUSTICE

KNOWLEDGE, SKILLS & EXPERIENCE:
“* Minimum of five (5) years accounting experience.

SITTINGS OF THE COURT NOTICE °
SECTION 53(1) OF THE SUPREME COURT ACT, CHAPTER 53 :

Competitive salary commensurate with experience.
15% gratuity upon successful completion of contract.

Interested — persons additional information from the FIU’s website at

www.-bahamas.gov.b
copies of relevant certificate(s) by 15" October 2008 to:

may obtain

Ly IS HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Supreme Court will sit at Suite'No. 105,
Saffrey Square, East Street North, Nassau.

Anthony M. Johnson
Director

Financial Intelligence Unit
P.O. Box SB 50086
Frederick Street

Nassau, Bahamas

by direction of the Chief Justice

Ak,

Registrar (Acting)
25 September 2008


PAGE 6B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE

Tipped worker woes behind household earnings drop

FROM page 1B

sparking a decline in house-
hold income, Mr D’ Aguilar also
identified the reduced work
weeks being experienced by
many hotel and tourism sector
employees as another factor.

“A large part of the work-
force is paid on a commission
basis through tips and gratu-
ities, and when economic.activ-
ity is down, the tipped part of
their income goes down,” the
Chamber president explained.

“Those are probably the two
main reasons why household
income is down. I don’t think
there has been any reduction in
salaries for salaried workers.
You're either underemployed,
unemployed or your commis-
sion income is less”

Brian Nutt, the Bahamas
Employers Confederation’s
president, added: “What you’re
seeing in that [survey] is reflect-
ed by the underemployment
that is occurring in the Bahamas
because of the slowdown in the
economy.”

Apart from the impact on
employees reliant on gratuities
and tips, Mr Nutt said house-
hold income was being increas-
ingly impacted by the tendency
of retail stores and other busi-
nesses to reduce their working
hours to cut back on costs, espe-
cially utilities.

Using an example; Mr
D’ Aguilar said hotel waiters
may still be working five days a
week, but due to the decline in
tourism numbers they were
serving less clients. All of which
translated into fewer gratuities.

“For anyone on commission-
based compensation, there’s no
doubt that economic activity is
lower,” Mr D’ Aguilar told Tri-
bune Business. “If you’re earn-
ings are based on making a per-
centage of that activity, and eco-
nomic activity is down, you’re
going to go home with less
income.”

He predicted that the eco-
nomic climate was likely to get
tougher than the Department
of Statistics survey findings
showed, and said: “Those num-
bers will deteriorate, that’s my

BAHAMAS WASTE LIMITED

Unaudited Financial Statements
Six months ended June 30, 2008

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Balance Sheet (unaudited)

gut feeling.

“Unemployment will contin-
ue to rise, and household
income will continue to decline.
If household income declines,
that’s compounded by the fact
that the purchasing power of
that has gone down significant-
ly because of inflation. You’re
making less, but things have
increased in price. It’s a double
whammy.”

Average household income
in New Providence had been
less affected by the economic
woes, standing at $46,692, while
in Grand Bahama the corre-
sponding figure was $40,381.
Still, the survey’s release rep-
resented another raft of bad
news, coming right behind Wall
Street’s continuing woes.

The Labour Force and
Household Income Survey, a
one-time snapshot of economic
trends and conditions that exist-
ed in the Bahamas in May 2008,
found that some 5,490 persons
joined the Bahamian workforce
in 2008, an increase of 2.9 per
cent upon 2007 numbers.

Yet only 3,430 of those per-

2

June30 December31
2008 “» 2007

Assets
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents $ 94,219 $ 3,061
Accounts receivable, net 1,545,445 1,385,545
Inventory 359,934 399,839
Loans and other assets 146,732 58,545
Deposits : 12,900 _ 12,900
Investment in associate 151,754 105,869
Total current assets 2,310,984 1,965,759
Non-current assets
Property, plant and equipment, net 7,480,584 7,207,137
Total assets $ 9,791,568 $ 9,172,896
Liabilities and shareholders’ equity
Liabilities
Bank overdraft $ 253,108 $ 195,021
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities ‘ 463,015. 1p bds208 ms cyey
Security deposits . m 404,212 0 382.619, > of
Bank loan re 400,000- St Sey eS
Total liabilities SOO\. CITA 1,520,335 1,091,546
Shareholders’ equity
Share capital 42,000 42,000
Contributed surplus 2,752,113 2,752,113
Retained earnings 5,477,120 5,287,237
Total shareholders’ equity 8,271,233 8,081,350
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity $ 9,791,568 $ 9,172,896

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statement of

Income and Retained Earnings (unaudited)
Six months ended June 30

sons, or 62.5 per cent, was able
to find work. This meant that
almost four out of every 10 new
Bahamian labour force entrants,
the majority of them most like-
ly high school leavers, was
unable to find work. ;

Statistics -

The Department of Statistics
said the 3,430 person - 2 per
cent - growth in the employed
labour force did not match the
2.9 per cent increase in the over-
all labour force, resulting in a
12.4 per cent increase in the
unemployed labour force.

Effectively, this means that
the Bahamian economy is not
growing fast enough - and pro-
viding enough jobs - to meet
the demand that exists, espe-
cially among young Bahamians.
Apart from prolonged unem-
ployment, the likely social con-
sequences - increased crime and
living standards deterioration -
are all too obvious, with a sig-
nificant sector of society getting
left behind. :

_The Labour Force Survey

also provided further anecdo-
tal evidence of the disengage-
ment of Bahamian men from
the education system and
labour force, as 3,105 or 56.6
per cent of the new labour force
entrants were women, as
opposed to 2,385 men.

‘ And, more tellingly, women
accounted for 64 per cent of the
3,430 new labour force entrants
who found work.

When it came to unemploy-
ment, the increase from 7.9 per
cent to 8.7 per cent was still
below where'the Survey calcu-
lated it to be in the aftermath of
the September 11, 2001, terror
attacks, when unemployment
was forecast to have risen to 9.1
per cent.

Nevertheless, the 0.8 per cent
increase in the rate is likely to
imply that between 1,000-2,000
more Bahamians are out of
work when compared to 2007
numbers, with the impact felt
by some 1,000-2,000 families.

According to the Labour
Force Survey, the unemploy-
ment rate on New Providence
increased from 8 per cent in

BalKamas Waste Limited

2007 to 8.7 per cent in 2008, and
on Grand Bahama it rose over
the same time period from 8.8
per cent to 9 per cent.

Meanwhile, Mr D’ Aguilar
said businesses were experienc-
ing first-hand the impact rising
costs, coupled with reduced
income, was having on house-
hold purchasing power.

Companies were grappling
with a mix of sales declined,
having to increase their prices to
combat rising operating costs,
and a decline in sales of high
margin products as consumers
cut back spending to staples.
With the latter development,
while sales might be up, profits
were down.

“I don’t think we need much
more evidence that the econo-
my is in a downturn,” Mr
D’ Aguilar told Tribune Busi-
ness. “You look at the loan
default rate at banks, increases
in inflation, costs, and the
increase in unemployment.

“You can look for as many
statistics as you like, but we’re
in a downturn and have to
adjust.”

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Financial Statements

1. Corporate Information

June 30, 2008

Bahamas Waste Limited (“BWL”) was incorporated under the laws of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas on August 18, 1987 under the name of Bahamas Waste Systems Limited. On-December
7, 1999, the Company changed its name to Bahamas Waste Limited. The latest audited accounts of
the BWL were prepared on December 31, 2007.

The quarter ends of BWL fall on March 31, June 30 and September 30, with the year end of the
Company being December 31.

The condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 2008 were authorized
for issue by the directors on September 29, 2008. °

2. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

. Basis of Preparation

ye These condensed interim financial statements for the six months ended June 30, 3007 have been

prepared in accordance with International Accounting Standard 34 Interim Financial Reporting.

The condensed interim financial statements do not include all of the information and disclosures
required in the annual financial statements, and should be read in conjunction with the December
31, 2007 audited financial statements.

The accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the interim condensed financial statements are
consistent with those followed in the preparation of the Company’s annual financial statements for
the year ended December 31, 2007, except for the adoption of new Standards and Interpretations,
noted below. Adoption of these Standards and Interpretations did not have any effect on the
financial position or performance of the Company. x
¢ IFRIC 11 — JERS 2 — Group and Treasury Share Trasanctions was issued in November

2006, and becomes effective for financial years beginning on or after March 1, 2007. This

interpretation addresses group and treasury share transactions related to share-based

payments to employees.

2008 2007
Sales and services rendered $ 3,879,395 $ 3,995,590
Cost of sales and direct expenses 2,732,903 2,445,207
Gross profit . ‘ 1,146,492 1,550,383
Expenses
Operating 943,592 946,899
Interest and bank charges 13,017 3,112
Total operating expenses 956,609 950,011
Net income from operations 189,883 600,372:
Retained earnings at beginning of period 5,287,247 4,614,544
Retained earnings at end of period $ 5,477,130 $ 5,214,916
Earnings per share $ 05 $§$ 0.14



See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed financial statements.

Bahamas Waste Limited

Condensed Statements of Cash Flows (unaudited)

Six months ended June 30



Cash flows from operating activities

Net income

Adjustments for items not involving use of cash: ¢

Depreciation
Bad debt expense

Change in non-cash working capital items

Increase in accounts receivable
Increase in inventory, loans and other assets
Decrease in accounts payable and accrued liabilities
Increase in security deposits

Net cash flow provided by operating activities



Cash flows from investing activities

Purchase of property, plant and equipment
Investment in joint ventures (Green System Ltd.)

Net change in investments in associates

Net cash flow used in investing activities



Cash flows from financing activities

Proceeds from bank loan

Net cash flow from financing activities

Net increase in cash

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the period
Cash and cash equivalents at end of the period



Cash and cash equivalents represented by:

Cash
Bank overdrafts





2008 2007

$ 189,883 +$ 600,372
619,386 589,294

7 22,031:

809,269 1,211,697
(159,900) (130,363)
(48,282) (103,383)
(50,891) 16,332
21,593 30,159
571,789 1,024,442
(892,823) (962,812)
(50,000) é
4,105 10,989
(938,718) (951,823)
400,000 -
400,000
33,071 72,619
(191,960 181,379
$__(158,889) $ 253,998
$ 94,219 $ 253,998
(253,108) ee
$ (158,889) $ 253,998

See accompanying notes to unaudited condensed financial statements.

¢ IFRIC 12 — Service Concession Arrangements; was issued in November 2006 and
becomes effective for financial years beginning on or after January 1, 2008. This
interpretation gives guidance on the accounting by operators for public-to-private service
concession arrangements.

¢ IFRIC 14 - JAS 19- The Limit on a Defined Benefit Asset, Minimum Funding
Requirements and their Interaction; was issued in July 2007 and becomes effective for
annual periods beginning on or after January 1, 2008. This interpretation provides
guidance on how to assess the limit on the,amount of surplus in a defined benefit scheme
that can be recognized as an asset under IAS 19 Employee Benefits.

The adoption of the above interpretations did not a material impact on the financial statements
when implemented in 2008.

3. Earnings Per Share

Earnings per share were calculated based on the shares outstanding at the end of the period, which
approximated average shares outstanding during the period.

‘2008
4,200,000

2007

Shares outstanding at June 30 4,200,000

4. _ Related Party Transactions

During the quarter, BWL entered into transactions with related parties. All transactions were
conducted at arms length and significant obligations to the related parties at June 30, 2008.

5. Bank Loan

On June 1, 2008, the Company entered in agreement to purchase property adjacent to its existing
location for $500,000. Pursuant to that agreement, the Company has paid the vendor $100,000 and
entered into a $400,000 loan agreement with the Royal Bank of Canada. The term of the loan is five
years with an interest sate of 7% per annum.

Rahamas Waste I.imited

6. Commitments and Contingencies

The Company guarantees its compactors for a 60-day period from the date of purchase. The
Company is reimbursed by the manufacturer for any claims paid under such guarantees.
THE TRIBUNE

GN-753



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

Oct. 2, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00593

Whereas SAMUEL.RAHMING, of Suite |, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of JOHN JOSEPH VARDINE, late of#8 Yates Street
Schenectady in the State of New York, one of the States
of the United States of The America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
_ THE SUPREME. COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00594

Whereas SAMUEL RAHMING, of Suite |, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration. of the Real and Personal Estate
of CONSETTA VARDINE, late of Pinellas County in the
City of St. Petersburg in the State of Florida, one of the
States of the United States of The America, deceased.

Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT

PROBATE DIVISION
No. 2008/PRO/npr/00595

Whereas LENORA VIRGINIA SYMONETTE a.k.a.
VIRGINIA LENORA SYMONETTE, of Graham Avenue,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of JOHN WELDIN ROBERTS,
late of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

by the said Court at the expiration of 21 feeye from the.

date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

Oct. 2, 2008

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00596

Whereas CARLENE D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Michelina De Wey has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of HELEN J. PETRUZZIELLO, late of
6534 Pine Lane, Weed, California, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

‘Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00597

Whereas CARLENE D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Donald W. Knoepfle has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of GENEVIEVE B. KNOEPFLE, late of 95
Carleton Avenue Glen Ellyn Dupage, Illinois, one of the
States of the. United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar



COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

'2008/PRO/npr/00598

IN THE ESTATE OF FRANCES DOROTHY SERIO, late of
2 Indianhead Circle, Marblehead, Massachusetts, one of
the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of the City of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed. Grant of
Probate of Will Administration with the Will annexed without
Sureties in the above estate granted to KAREN SINGER,
the Administratrix, of the Estate by the Probate and Family
Court Department in the County of Essex. in the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one of the States of

United. States of America on the 25th day of April, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS __ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00599 ;

Whereas GORDON JOSEPH CAREY a.k.a. JOSEPH
GORDON CAREY, of the Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of EDNA MAE CULMER CAREY, late of
Tarpum Bay on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00600

Whereas ELKIN MEADOWS and EUNICE MEADOWS,
both of #3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of RENEE MEADOWS, late of
#3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00601

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway,
Eastern District, and STANLEY OSWALD ANTHONY
ISAACS of the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
Tiffany Knowles have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the Will of the Real and Personal Estate of REGINALD
WINFIELD KNOWLES, late of Tower Estates Drive, Sans
Souci, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

~ Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard

by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00602

IN THE ESTATE OF RALPH CLIFTON SCOTT, late of
1227 Dunwoody Lane in the City of Atlanta, Dekalb County
in the State of Georgia, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery
Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and DWAYNE
ANDRIAN BRYAN of 37 Bethel Avenue, Western District;
New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to GUSEPPE RAGO, the Executor, of the Estate
by the Probate Court of Dekalb County in the State of
Georgia, one of the States of United States of America on
the 31st day of March, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS = Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00603

Whereas BARRY HALL, of the Settlement of Nicholl's
Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MARY
ELIZABETH HALL, late of the Settlement of Nicholl's

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 7B

Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 ae from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00604

Whereas ROSEMARY FARQUHARSON, of Rolle's Avenue
in the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration. of the Real and Personal Estate
of FELIX FARQUHARSON, late of Peach Street, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the '
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00605

IN THE ESTATE OF LEE.LOWELL CARPENIER a.k.a.
LEE L. CARPENIER, late of Bonrock Court, Towson,
Baltimore in the State of Maryland, one of the States of |
the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery
Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and J. MICHAEL
SAUNDERS of 11 Oxford Road, Nassau East Subdivision,
Eastern District, New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration
in the above estate granted to FREDERICK A..RAAB, the
Personal Representative, of the Estate by Grace G. Connolly
Register of Wills for Baltimore County in the State of
Maryland, one of the States of United States of America
on the 11 th day of October, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00606

Whereas HESKET M. NEELY a.k.a. HESKETH M. NEELY,
of Chippingham Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ROLLIE CARTWRIGHT NEELY, late of the Bluff,
Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00605

Whereas JANE BLONEVA BROWN of Sarah Robinson
Road off Farrington Road in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ALNINA DELPHANE
FERGUSON late of 836 Phippen Waiters Road Dania
Beach in the State of Florida. one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008fPRO/npr/00612

IN THE ESTATE OF EDWARD CHARLES ALLEN, late of
7754 S.E. Saratoga Drive, Hobe Sound in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by ANTHONY NOMIKOS KLONARIS of Old Fort Bay in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence and
MIKE ATHONY KLONARIS, of Lyford Cay in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to ELIZABETH A. DECKER and GERALDINE M.
THAYER the co-personal representatives of the Estate,
by the State of The Circuit Court for Martin County, Florida,
on the 26th day of September, 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar
PAGE, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 01, 2008

COMIC PAGE

THE TRIBUNE



JUDGE









IS YOUR
UNCLE DON



GET UP! IT’S TIME FoR
THE BZEADWINNER TO

GUN MISSING,
PETECTIVE
ROBERTS ASKS
WHO ELSE HAS
ACCESS TO
THE CASE!

YES, 2 CHOKE <...
THATS ALAN

T INTERVIEWED A YOUNG FELLO
TODAY, RIGHT OUT OF ES

LOOKING FOR

Tribune Comics

PARKER

DEWEY'S FRIEND, BILL
DUGGAN, HAS A KEY



\>GASPz... OH
BLAZE.’

- Z





COLLEGE,

A JOB AS
OFFICE
MANAGER

SIGN HERE, PLEASE, FOR
THE PERSONAL EFFECTS.









ANP YOU SAY
THE GUN WAS
IN THE CASE
YESTERDAY?












www.kingfeatures.com

WHY Ake You.
BAREFOOT 7

GO To WORK /

CRYPTIC PUZZLE



JHE BREADWINNER
1G ON A PIET...

wow Blonde.com

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved.






























HE ACTUALLY DOZEO OFF
WHILE | WAS READING
nS2Z HIS RESUME

BOY, IT
REALLY TOOK
ME BACK!





YOU LOOK PALE!
WHY DON'T YOLI SIT
DOWN, MS. JULEP?

CALVIN & HOBBES

OH MY GOSH, THAT ROCK
MOVED! THERE'S SOMETHING
UNDER IT!







BECAUSE IM NOT .
WEARING SHOES | as

H TOLD low
"He RTOS Tee Ne

IN A SLICE OF BREAD









“AT LEAST MY BALL IS STILL AS GOOD AS NEw.”





Roman Lovkov v Sanan Sjugirov,
Russian under-20 championship
2008. The black player is aged only
14, yet he shared the title ahead

of several older and higher ranked
opponents. He also produced the
most stunning move of the event

in today's puzzle. Black (to play) is

a pawn down, and White has just
offered the exchange of queens,
expecting to consolidate his material
lead. Black's next turn looks like

a misprint, but it was completely
sound and quickly forced checkmate
or decisive material gain. Can you
find Black's winner?

IT MUST BE A MARTIAN /
OW NO! OH NO! ITS PROBABLY
SOME CREEPY, TENTACLED,



Down

Noose offering escape? (8)
A number claim it is
changeable, like the
weather (8)

Across
1 Sheep providing tufty wool 2
(5) 3
Calculates that the factory
must now be on strike

ma2acod=- 2 4

T
W
0
I
N .
O
N
E
Cc
R
O
S
S
W
Oo
R
D

(5,3)
Firm | sold out (5)
Terrier breed
Ena transformed (8)
He goes into top
gear — at a very low rate
(5)
Take a chance with the
better half (3)
Colourless type
out on bail (6) .
Unnatural cunning (6)
Chest expander (3)
Intends to change names
(5)
The takings to pass on to
somebody else? (8)
Starring roles for ushers
(5)
Diana’s bloomer
will result in catastrophe
(8)

27 Frank can be obtuse (5)

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

Across: 1 Treble clef, 6 Fair, 10
Truss, 11 Small arms, 12 Palomino,
13 Creel, 15 Smitten, 17 Rarebit, 19
Ignores, 21 Cheerio, 22 In bed, 24
Albanian, 27 Throw over, 28 Vouch,
29 Adds, 30 Editorials.

Down: 1 Tots, 2 Education, 3 Lasso, 4

Cushion, 5 Enamour, 7 Agree, 8
Resolution, 9 Ala carte, 14 Aspidistra,
16 Turn down, 18 Barracuda, 20
Starved, 21 Cabaret, 23 Bored, 25
Never, 26 Thus.

Twice appearing as an
understudy (6)

Go around in a woman's
garment (5)
Want a partner for animal
surgery? (5)

Where one may sit or get
to one’s feet (5)

Large jungle creeper (3)
It helps to make road °
repairs a work of art (3)
Herein a peculiar tale, out
of this world (8)

Attacked and made to run?
(6,2)

The evergreen trees that
baffle exiles (6)

Room for mental improve-
ment, perhaps (5)

Many get reckless and
have a smash (5)

Trick includes nothing to
cause provocation (5)

EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 With reason, 6 Ohio, 10
Venal, 11 In earnest, 12 Sanction,
13 Chaff, 15 Academy, 17 Clipper,
19 Deliver, 21 Winsome, 22 Rover,
24 Maintain, 27 Advantage, 28
Avert, 29 Hide, 30 Step by step.
Down: 1 Wave, 2 To no avail, 3

Relic, 4 Ability, 5 Oceanic, 7 Hyena,

8 Out of order, 9 Friction, 14
Balderdash, 16 Environs, 18

Provident, 20 Remnant, 21 Write-up,

23 Vivid, 25 Toady, 26 Stop.

Across

1

Large mariné mam-
mali (5)

Most memorable fea-
ture (4,4)

Silly (5)

Infectious (8)
Sumptuous meal (5)
Taxi (3)

Capital of Colombia
(6)

Greek capital (6)
Unnaturally pale (3)
To faint (5)
Tchaikovsky ballet
(4,4)

Wish for enviously
(5)

Envoy (8)

Mutual vagreement

(5)



Sycophantic follower
(6-2)

Venture

unlikely to succeed
(8)

Albanian capital (6)
Throw (5)

Plunder (5)

Point in development
(5)

Cry of crow (3)
Prohibit (3)

Decisive confronta-
tion (8)

Blameless (8)
Capital of Turkey (6)
Up to now (2,3)

To quibble (5)

Force of explosion

(5)





YOU'RE RIGHT!
THERE'S A
TENTACLE NON!




BUG-EYED



Sunday





Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to















Difficulty Level *

_Kakuro Puzzle

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum
of each vertical block equals the number on its top.. No number
may be used in the. same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.

y King Features Syndicate, Inc.

©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist





North dealer.
North-South vulnerable.

NORTH
a)9
Â¥A9IS3
#KQI
&AI107
WEST EAST
43 #8762
Â¥K82 Vj764
@85 #1097
#KQ9852 $43
SOUTH
@AKQ105
Â¥Q10
$A6432
6
The bidding:
North Kast South = West
lv Pass 1 Pass’
| NT Pass 3¢ Pass
4¢ Pass 54 Pass
6& Pass 6¢ Pass
7¢

Opening lead — king of clubs.

This deal, from the 1956 U.S.-
Italy world championship match,
became famous not because it was
brilliantly played, but because it was-
nu

The American team gained 750
points when it bid and made a grand
slam in diamonds while the Italians
stopped ina small slam. Both declar-
ers made all the tricks on identical
lines of play, but the fact is that they
each missed the correct way to try to
score 13 tricks.



Famous Hand







©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.






ite resigned 2 threats are Qc2 mate .
Sel ase frces witifeif 3 Gd2 Quod when
Black is ahead on material and stit has his



HOW many words of
four letters or mare can
you make fom the
letters shown here? In
making a word, ench
letter wey be used once






the a wre letter and
there must be at least
one nine-letter word. No
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TODAY'S TARGET

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At both tables, declarer won the
club lead with the ace and cashed
five diamonds and five spades, leav-
ing South with just the Q-10 of
hearts. On the last spade, West, who
held the queen of clubs and K-8 of
hearts, had to discard in front of
dummy’s A-9 of hearts and jack of
clubs. Both Wests discarded a heart,
and declarer won the last two tricks
with the ace and queen of hearts.

This line of play succeeded only
because West had the king of hearts.
However, a method of play was
available that would have succeeded
even if East had the king.

The best chance for 13 tricks is to
win the club, ruff'a club, cash the K-
Q of diamonds and ruff another club.
Declarer then leads a spade to the
jack and ruffs dummy’s last’ club

“With the ace. A heart to the ace fol-
lowed by a third round of trumps per-
mits declarer to discard the heart ten,
run the spades and thus score all the
tricks.

The recommended play works
whenever the diamonds break 3-2, a
68 percent probability. The approach
adopted by both declarers wins only
when West has the heart king, a 50
percent chance, and is still available
if the diamonds divide 4-1,

At this level of competition, it is
surprising that neither declarer found
the line of play that offered the max-
imum chance of scoring 13° tricks.
Even world-famous experts, it
appears, have blind spots!

Tomorrow: The fine art of falsecarding.
C208 King Peatures Syndicate Ine.
THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE

9B



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Eating the Baham an way

@ By JEFFARAH GIBSON

How the Bahamian diet has changed

AY the words guava duff and imme-

diately the enticing aroma of the

warm, mouthwatering, fruit-filled
dessert covered in a rich, buttery sauce
that melts in your mouth, floods your sens-
es. With visions of this truly Bahamian
dessert dancing before your mind’s eye,
you're sense A is almost able to

catch a burst of the deliciousl

sweet gua-

va mixed into the dough, and get a gentle
whiff of the buttery, rum ladened sauce.

For many years now this sweet.and
delectable native: pastry - whose
ingredients have been slightly twisted
to satisfy the modern Bahamian
palate - has teased the Bahamian
tongue. But emerging in recent
years to claim the top spot as
Bahamian favourites, pastries such
as cheesecake, chocolate cake, straw-
berry filled pie and rum cake have
all dominated the Bahamian sweet
tooth and have assumed satisfaction
over traditional Bahamian desserts.
Like our choices in dessert, the
Bahamian diet has also changed dra-
matically over the years - what used
to be breakfast is now a snack. The
traditional slice of bread with butter
and cup of tea was not only breakfast
for many over the years, but it was
also lunch as well.

Lady Ingrid Darling, wife of former
Governor General Sir Clifford Dar-
ling, and the author of Many Tastes
of the Bahamas & Culinary Influ-
ences of the Caribbean, said “Back
in the day we would get up real early
and for breakfast we would have a
slice of homemade bread with butter
and tea, and nothing more. That was
it, we also had that for lunch as well.”

For dinner, or supper as they called
it, it was usually cornbeef and grits or
rice. Today Bahamians are not accus-
tomed to eating corn beef and grits
for dinner. “All we usually ate was
tinned food, we had cornbeef and

‘grits for dinner.”

Preparation of food however, has
been done differently since Bahami-
ans have become more economically
prosperous, and more conscious of
the food they eat and how it is pre-
pared.

Executive Chef and Culinary Train-

er at the Wyndham Nassau Resort,
Edwin Johnson said that the way food
was prepared 30 or 40 years ago in the
Bahamas has changed dramatically.
“Methods of preparation involved
using fatty oils. You are seeing a

healthier approach to food prepara-.
tion methods. People are now eook-

ing with olive oil and using the origi-
nal fats that are made within the prod-
uct. Since people are more aware of
diabetes and hypertension they tend
not to cook with much fat.”

A favourite for frying foods was
lard years ago, since health is empha-
sized greatly today however, people
fry foods with either corn or vegetable
oil. Another favourite food enhancer
back in the day was salt pork or salt
beef. Educated on the unhealthiness
of using these highly salted meats as
food enhancers, people are now using
healthier alternatives that give the
same taste. “Since I am aware that
salt pork and salt beef are not so
healthy, I use smoked turkey or bacon
and to me it tastes just as good as
using salt pork or salt beef ,“ Lady
Darling said.

Regular Sunday dinner in the past
consisted of more than one side order
- remember the baked macaroni and
potato salad, now that the country’s
health IQ has increased, people are
now aware that numerous side orders
does not a balanced diet make, so
they are cutting back on the amount
of food that they are putting on their
plate.

Another element that has impacted

the way Bahamian eat is the amount.

of time it took to prepare foods. In
the 1940s, 50s and 60s the advances in
food technology that we see today
were just in the beginning stages. As

a result, Lady Darling noted, the time
and effort that was exerted when
making dinner for the family is not
made when today’s home chefs step
into the kitchen.

“When I was growing up food
preparation took a very long time.
We started to prepare for dinner from

in the morning. Many persons today

carry on busy lives, so when they do
return to their homes from a long,
hard day at work they are tired.”
Lady Darling also noted that even
the drink that accompanied a full
course meal has changed, from the
old time lemonade or switcher as they
called it, to orange juice and sodas.

Taking a look at traditional
Bahamian pastries, it is probably true
that many Bahamians probably can-
not remember the last time they tast-
ed a flour cake. As far as moderniz-
ing Bahamian pastries, the only
thing that is done differently is that
now they are made to entice the eyes
as well as the taste buds. Inventive-
ness and creativity have been applied
to the methods of preparing these
delicious sweet treats. They are not
prepared traditionally, since the new
baking methods lend themselves to
making the treats look as attractive
as possible. For public display
coconut tarts are made much small-
er and are often packaged in bag-
gies with little decorations, Chef
Johnson said. He also drew an illus-
tration using the banana bread. “One
time ago you would just bake the
bread without being conscious of its
attractiveness. Now we try to bake
the bread in a way where people can
not only enjoy the taste but admire
its presentation”.

Catherine Campbell, an island
style baker for many years, continues
to keep up with the traditional style
of Bahamian baking. Among the
sweet treats to come out of her
kitchen are benny cake, peanut cake,
potato bread, banana bread, flour
cake and many others. Even she has
been trying to modernized the pre-
sentation of her pastries, however.
“I have been trying to invent new
ways to improve the appearance of
my pastries. I am still in the process
of finding the great look that would
make my pastries look very attrac-
tive.”

_ While the ingredients and look of
many Bahamian dishes may have
changed over the years, the ingredi-
ents of those core Bahamian pastries
- the benny cake, potato bread, the
guava duff - have not. They are as
deliciously made today, as they were
40 to 50 years ago.

Filling

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PAGE 10B, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER ..1, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



The Tribune

~ Home

rown stars

take to the spotlight

m@ By JASON TAYLOR



VEN though Lil Wayne’s disappointing no show can't be

overlooked - it cannot be allowed to overshadowed the

spectacular performances by the up and coming talented
and versatile Bahamian acts that paraded the stage, and the
superb performance by the gifted and charismatic Buju Banton,
who has never failed the Bahamian people yet - whether in

appearance or performance.

One of the hottest acts of the night, veteran Bahamian
star Bobo Ken, of the Make em Listen crew, scotched
the stage with his performances of “Do as you please",
"The Warning” and his fiery hit “Gun Violence”, demon-
strating the real life situations in his subject matter that can
be reflected in everyday Bahamian life. “I sing about my
whole life experience and what I see people going
through,” he said, taking a stance similar to that of new
rapper and writer RappQuelle.

“T try to give truth and honesty in my music...it has to be
real not a facade... try to give people authentic, Rap-
pQuelle soul rebel music,” Quelle said. Performing “80's
Back” and “So Nice” Quelle felt that the enthusiasm of the
crowd was more than he expected. It was, in one word,
encouraging, he said. :

Gone are the days when young Bahamians attend a
live event and are completely oblivious to the talent being
displayed, or feel embarrassed to actually enjoy what's
being played by their fellow Bahamians. They nodded
their heads and swayed their bodies to their own home
grown rock stars. :

Dolly Boy’s “Put it Together” is a testimony of that, as
the crowd’s familiarity with the song injected a burst of
energy to inspire the young Freeport native to go all out.
“] thought that was an American rapper who sang that
song” an audience member said cheerfully, undoubtedly

‘proud to find out that it was none other than the "Boss for
the Ports" - a true son of the 242, ,

“We ain’t local no more we international” Dolly Boy
said confidently, referring not just to the steadily growing
popularity of Bahamian artists abroad, but to how as
artists, producers and songwriters that the Bahamian
product is increasingly being seen on a world class level.

Bahamian born and bred Golden Child, who now
resides in Fort Lauderdale, brought his A-game to the
concert. Not only did he come out with dancers, but dur-
ing his performance of “Brand New" he was accompanied
on stage by D J Fines, the two time Heineken Green Syn-

eS







ergy Bahamas winner.

Another son of the soil that made the trek back home to
perform was BlackSoultan, who hit up the crowd with
his rap single, "Imma Stack (Be L.A.)". For BlackSoultan,
whose quiet looks belay an intense, rhythmical delivery
style, his embrace of the rap art form reflects his total
love for the genre and the reason why, although he has a
law degree, he has thrown himself fully.into a live filled
with music.

Based in Los Angeles, BlackSoultan arrived with a
word for Bahamian artists, telling Tribune Entertainment
that local artists have the talent and the ability to compete
with any artist in any genre coming out of the US. "You
don't have to conform to the standards out there, you
can just put your Bahamian touch on it and you'll have a
viable product," he said.

About the lack of support some artists felt they were giv-
en, BlackSoultan said that despite the poor treatment,
they should look at Saturday night's performance as an
opportunity to showcase their talent. Although they were
not being paid, he said, you never know who might have
been in the audience to see them and, "You can't put a
price on exposure and on talent".

These, along with other Bahamian acts such as Frisco
and Omri - both of the Make em Listen crew, graced the
stage on Saturday without a hitch, without their ego getting
the best of them and they represented and they did it
despite the controversy of Bahamian artists getting paid lit-
tle or nothing for such a big event.

In the end, the local home grown acts triumphed where
the big names failed! We should applaud our 242 enter-
tainers not only on performance, but on professionalism.
They didn't want to give the 242 acts anything, but the acts
gave everything, and when they rolled out the red carpet
for strangers they didn't even bother to show up,

They say karma is a beast and it sure bit the head off of
the Poppin Bottles concert.



‘Bahamian fans get drenched while Lil
Wayne "parties like a rock star" |

lm By JASON TAYLOR



AS most of the Bahamas already knows Lil Wayne, the
self proclaimed "greatest rapper alive", whose June 10
album release, Tha Carter II, was heralded as a billboards
phenomenon, failed to make an appearance at the 'Poppin
Bottles' concert, held on the grounds of Bristol Wine &
Spirits over the weekend.

The iconic rap star - allegedly paid $210,000 for his appear-
ance, and said to have been partying at an Atlantis nightclub
when the concert was going on - was scheduled to make a leg-
endary appearance and thus make history in the Bahamas, but
it never “popped” off. For some, the weak promotion that pre-
ceded the concert is now thought of as a reflection of the lack
of confidence that the main act was actually going to show up.

In a statement apologizing for the debacle, officials from Red
- City Entertainment, the concert promoters, said issues arose
late Friday night, the original date of the concert, concerning
the sound and lights production for the event.

"These circumstances were dealt with, but not to the satis-
faction of the company’s owner," the statement read, "there-
fore the event was canceled for that evening."

According to Tribune sources, the company responsible for
the sound system demanded an additional $15,000 to complete
the job. When negotiations broke down with the promoters,
however, the concert was called off for the evening.

In their statement to the press, Red City said that the man-
agement teams for Buju Banton - also slated to appear - and Lil
Wayne were contacted to arrange for the event to take place
on Saturday as an alternative. Both were said to have agreed
to the change, but Lil Wayne’s management would later
demand additional monies, a reported $10,000, which Red
City now says was paid.

Red City maintains that on Saturday evening they were
informed that Lil Wayne was on the way to the venue and set
to perform after 2am.

"At no time was Red City Entertainment notified that Lil
Wayne would not perform. We continued through the night to
inform our hosts, DJ Pencil and Empress, that Wayne was
coming because that is what we were being told by his man-
agement. Unable to locate him, we sent our team members
to the Atlantis to discover he was partying at the nightclub
there all night," the statement read.

"Red City Entertainment would like to apologize to
patrons, vendors, workers, police, media friends, sponsors
and the Bahamian staff that worked tirelessly to make this
event happen. Our sponsors, including Bristol Wine and
Spirits, BTC, Bacardi and 100 JAMZ have been extreme-
ly supportive during the associated incidences with this
event."

With no official word from “Weezy F Baby” aka Lil
Wayne himself however, as to why he failed to make an
appearance at the event, Bahamian fans have been left to
hold the bag and wonder what really happened: Was Lil
Wayne even here? Could the promoters, Red City,
afford to pay for a big name act like Lil Wayne, Bird-
man and Buju Banton and still afford to pay for the



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Lingerie models bring sexy —
to Bahamain shores

sound and stage management and the numerous extras :

involved or were they in over their heads from the begin- ;
ning? Did Lil Wayne’s.ego actually propel him to a level i m@ By RENALDO DORSETT

where he felt that performing for the Bahamian people was :
beneath him? Or was there some sinister plot to use his name :
and image to sell tickets while he celebrated his birthday in the

the minds of jaded concert goers and of curious minds alike -
different perspectives stemming from one common thought - :
: Bahamas during a weekend of
; ; : “Glitz, Glamour and Style.”

did perform, Patricia Chatti, who heads the Make 'em Listen ;

Why didn't Lil Wayne show up?
Representing a number of the talented Bahamian artists who

organisation, told Tribune Entertainment that Dwayne Michael } ){odel Search” grand finale ended

Carter Jr - Lil Wayne's real name, actually arrived at the

© Aven) PF . e reas ey rhaps : ‘
event on Saturday evening, but for some reason perh ApS ' Beach Resort Ballroom with the
the rain or he got impatient when he wasn't moved through : sélection of Brandi Reed and
security and into the venue quickly enough - he left. "That's the’ ; Br - ine S meaets The. +
difference between a third world Caribbean artist and an } rooke stuart. DE EW ON eLe
: named the grand prize winners in

"If this were an R&B or jazz artist that would never have } the miss-size and plus-size cate-
happened. That was crazy, it was like 5:30 in the morning ; Sores respectively,

American artist.

when it all came to
light," she said.



































Lil Wayne

Tribune Reporter

AN extensive search for a duo of

Bahamas for free? These are all valid questions that linger in | new spokespersons for one of the

world's leading designers of inti-
mate apparel, culminated in the

The Shirley of Hollywood “Sexy

: Saturday at the Sheraton Cable

Both winners will become the

: 2008-09 spokespersons for Shirley
; of Hollywood respective lines of lin-
: gerie.

Reed, of Miami, Florida and

: sponsored by Playthings, was cho-
: sen as the winner amongst a group
: of 18 miss-size models.

The 25-year-old native of Can-

: ton, Michigan has several highlights
: during her young career including
: being named a finalist in the Miss
: Hawaiian Tropic Super Bowl, and
: being featured on a Hooters calen-

i dar.

Reed said it was an honour to be

: chosen to continue the legacy set
: forth by premiere Shirley’s models.





“Shirley of Hollywood is a sexy,

: sophisticated and timeless brand.
: Shirley is deserving of a model that
: evokes all of these qualities as well

as beauty and grace,” she said, “I
: will represent Shirley to the very
: best of my ability. It would enhance

: els.”

: my career as a model and I will aim

to carry on Shirley‘s legacy of
‘creme de la creme’ lingerie mod-

Former winners of the Shirley

? cover model search include Brooke

Burke, Leeann Tweeden and Play-
boy Playmates Tyran Richads and
Victoria Silvstedt.

Stuart, a 28-year-old registered
dental assistant from Temecula,
California took the top honour
amongst the trio of crowd favoured
plus size models.

Stuart said becoming a spokesper-
son for a company which embodies
diversity in their apparel and
philosophies is a dream come true.

“Shirley has shown women for 20
years that there are no limitations
on who can be sexy. I would love to
promote that message, no matter
what shape or size we are, we feel
and are amazing,” she said, “As a
model for Shirley of Hollywood, I
want to share that positive attitude
with all women so they will realize
what makes us unique and so beau-
tiful.”

The competition began with over
100 aspiring models listing their pro-
files on the TheBachelorGuy.com
and after 300,000 visitors to the site,
the top 21 were chosen for the
finale in the Bahamas. ;

Local songstress Terez Hepburn
opened the show performing her hit
“Bus Driver” and later returned to
the stage to perform “All Up In My
Business.”

A star studded list of celebrities
and well known figures in the indus-
try served as judges for the finale
including fashion designer and phil-
anthropist Peter Nygard, Ron Rice
of Hawaiian Tropic, Akin Ayodele
and Nate Jones of the Miami Dol-
phins, T J Slaughter formerly of the
San Francisco 49ers, and the
Schlobohm family who serve as
executives for the Shirley’s of Hol-
lywood brand.

Event sponsors included NBC,
ESPN, EXTRA, Telemundo,
Nygard.com, BlueRay Technolo-
gies, LLC, Fifth Avenue Models,
TheBachelorGuy.com, Rockstar
Energy Drink, Paul Mitchell and
PlayerXT.com.

More pictures on page 11


THE TRIBUNE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2008, PAGE 11B



BROOKE STUART
plus-size model
winner

‘
&

Bi

REET!

. Ba

Sexy Model







BRAND! REED miss-
size model winner

A BEVY of beauties showcased the latest lingerie fashions during Shirley of Hollywood's “Sexy Model Search’ Peo ee —
- grand finale held on Saturday at the Sheraton Cable Beach Resort. Two winners, in the miss-size and plus- the Distinguished P: tronage of RO Gla apt os ULL
size categories, were selected as the leading faces of Shirley 2008/09 campaign. DEFOE! OT ING GANAS is ae FACE OF
f 6 Major/Tribune staff



The Seraphook

FROM page 12

teaching children each day, was not quite the
right fit. She needed something a little more artis-
tic, with a deeper look into the emotions of
human beings. ;

She believes that "scrapping is a form of art that
involves human creativity and the putting togeth-
er of art in the form of collages, ribbons, glitter,
and patterns. It is a 20th Century art form, Keshia

‘says, with both photography and creative art
embedded into the same form. You can both pre-
serve memories and display beautiful art work,
two passions that Keshia holds in common with
her customers and friends.

Her growing customer base is evident, as she
says her store is filled to the brim on Saturdays,
the most popular day of the week for working
parents who may take their kids to a Saturday

’



children's scrap' class. Her first children's class will
be this Saturday, October 4, where she can accom-
modate 20 students aged 10 to 18 years.

Besides being displayed on the walls of a home,
Keshia also provides 12 x 12 album inserts for her
classes that teach the two page design.

Other classes scheduled to begin this month
include the theme "My Family" and "My Jour-
nal" with a visiting scrapper' at the end of the
month. ..

Keshia sends emails to all persons interested
with details of the next class scheduled — provid-
ing information such as what will be covered,
from shells to crocodiles, to the newest tech-
niques in the scrapping world.

* For more information on classes at The Scrapbook
Cottage, contact Keshia Pratt at 356.6747 or send an
email to: the.scrapbookcottage@yahoo.com.



In Honor of Pepper
Johnson and Pat Paul

TICKET LOCATIONS:

DIAMONDS INTERNATIONAL
® All locations

CARLOS VALENTINO
¢ Bay & Victoria St

FLAUNT IT
© Rosetta St.

COCO-NUTS BAHAMA GRILL
¢ West Bay Street

URBAN NATION
e Mall at Marathon

Tickets are $50 general admission, $25 Students (with ID a‘ $100 Mkt which includes pre-event
reception at CoCo Nuts Grill, West Bay Street on FFHa¥» ASINNBF 9, #18 and event after party.

For further information please contact 488-8889 or 496-8899 or email us at MAdAalSe4Bhahamas@yahaa-cam:

2 Re o REREGS
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NEW art outlet in the Bahamas
allows both children and adults' cre-
ativity to blossom and preserve
memories artistically. The Scrapbook
Cottage, located at Dowdeswell and
Deveaux Streets, has been up and |
running for just a month, with owner















brates the light, carefree feeling of relaxing days. Euphoria will move your
scrapbook pages into pure bliss".

The classes for adults are intended to teach Bahamians a new, relax-
ing hobby they can then complete in the comfort of their own home.
The gatherings will serve as an avenue to let the creative juices flow,
while snacking on brownies, cookies and other goodies along
with juices and teas.

While all materials will be pre-cut and ready to craft with at
class time, patrons of the scrapbooking classes may then
take their new skills home to create endless art pieces for the
home. Keshia has found that the trend among mothers who

Keshia Pratt reporting that business is &
le ce
going very well. 3
5

The former primary teacher from Nassau Christian Academy starts her =
first scrapbooking class for adults today, where they will create albums with the =
theme of Euphoria. The idea of transcending happiness is key to this concept S
and Keshia said she chose this theme because "the enchanting layout cele- +
hh

that the younger mothers enjoy displaying their scrap-
books with pride of what their child has done, as well as
their own artistic ability. The older mothers, on the oth-
er hand, enjoy preserving memories while telling their sto-:
ries through art.

"Scrapbooking is all about the classes," Keshia said,
"you can build great groups of friends who have the
same interests." And her reason for opening the store
was that she wanted to build this niche for people in
the Bahamas.

It all started in 2004 when she took her first scrap-
booking class in Ohio while also attending a lot of
trade shows across the US. She discovered that her job,
while satisfying in that she fulfilled her primary love of

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won IF