Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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SEE ‘WOMAN’ SECTION

US economic turmoil
forces postponement of

ministry announcement

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Tourism last
night postponed a scheduled
announcement of its “new strat-
egy and direction” for the
nation’s number one industry

Son of assistant director
CT eS
PSSST a
police to give evidence

THE son of Mrs Alberta
Williams Bartlett, who is the
assistant director of Legal
Affairs at the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office, is being sought
by police to give evidence in
the murder trial of Mario
Miller. ;

A subpoena for Daryl
Eliner Bartlett Jr, ordering
that he appear before the
Supreme Court, was-issued
on September 18. However,
Bartlett as of yesterday, has
yet to appear despite con-
tinued attempts by police
and legal officials to locate
him.

- See page three for story.




































in light of worsening economic
turmoil in the United States,
with a Government spokesper-
son saying it must now reshape
its strategy.

“An aggressive plan of action
was forecast to be unveiled this
evening via live broadcast on
ZNS television...but world
attention and focus on the U.S.
financial crisis, especially with
today's failure for a $700 billion
bail out, has caused advisers to
reshape its plans to ensure the
Bahamas remains on the cut-
ting edge in a growing compet-
itive tourism market,” said a
notice to the press from a Govy-
ernment spokesperson.

Newly appointed Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace had been due to take
part in a televised “Meet the
Press” meeting last night. It
would be the first time that Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace was to
speak to the press and answer
questions about his vision for
the tourism industry.

But at almost 6pm, the
release came from Bahamas
Information Services stating
that “given the present finan-
cial market crisis and today’s
financial bail out failure in the

SEE page 11



The Tribune

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE # 1

€] USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

Day ats

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A LEGENDARY BAHAMIAN





BUSINESSMAN AND FORMER PARLIAMENTARIAN Norman Solomon,
who died in a Florida Hospital yesterday about a week before his 79th

birthday.

° SEE STORY TOP RIGHT

Chinese milk products scandal
prompts investigation in Bahamas

WORLDWIDE scandal over
Chinese milk products, blamed
for the deaths of four children
and illnesses of thousands oth-
ers, has spurred an investiga-
tion of imports into the
Bahamas.

Products from China such as
baby formula, dairy-based can-
dies and desserts have been
banned in countries throughout
Asia, Africa, and the European
Union as they were found to
contain the chemical melamine,
which is used to make plastics
and fertiliser.

Rich in nitrogen, melamine is
inexpensive and can be added
to substandard or watered-





down milk to fool quality
checks, which often use nitro-
gen to measure protein levels
in milk.

Four deaths have been
blamed on the toxic milk pow-
der, which causes kidney stones
and agonising complications.
Some 54,000 children fell ill in
China after drinking the tainted
milk formula.

The World Health Organi-
sation and UNICEF have called
China's milk — scandal
"deplorable."

The dangerous chemical has
been found in candy, buns and

SEE page 11

ORO ee
GQ UWN (ie






blow away Big
Red Machines

@ TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a decade-long fight -

with Parkinson's disease and a
recent bout of lung cancer, Nor-
man Solomon, legendary busi-
nessman, former parliamentarian
and a mainstay in Bahamian
society, died in a Florida hospi-
tal yesterday morning.

The "courageous" merchant
and former newspaper colum-
nist died around 4 am yesterday
at the Naples Community Hos-



pital in Naples, Florida about a
week before his 79th birthday.

Friends and colleagues of Mr
Solomon said he and _his wife,
Katherine, left Nassau for Flori-
da to escape the expected strike
of Hurricane Ike.

Family reportedly wanted the
ailing businessman to be close
to specialists should his health

~ take a turn for the worst during

the'storm.
They were planning to return
home this week, friends said. His

. SEE page nine

MP hits back after PM dismisses
remarks in House as ‘sissy talk’

FORT Charlotte MP Alfred Sears said he
would not be intimidated by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s dismissal of his remarks
in the House of Assembly yesterday as simply

“sissy talk”.

“Mr Speaker, the Honourable Member for
North Abaco, the Prime Minister of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas, said ‘that’s sissy
talk’. Now look here, Mr Speaker, in this peri-: §
od of crisis in the country, you have the Prime

SEE page 11

Arrested man ‘in hospital after
alleged beating in custody’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE young man police
arrested for questioning in con-
nection with a kidnapping and
rape that occurred last week
Sunday, is still in hospital suf-
fering from kidney complica-
tions, according to his mother,
Blanche McKenzie.

Eighteen-year-old Renardo
Bastian claims that he was beat-

Pw Arh TAA
TUDENT TAKEN
ai VINE TAACIN
A psy ge WEP SK CK g
Sh ron WwW WANS



MAN IN COURT CHARGED
WITH TRIPLE MURDERS

TN HOSPII
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Saal to a ON
Yhoad PES }

en while in police custody by
officers wielding “baseball bats
and cutlasses” and was subse-
quently taken to the intensive
care unit of Princess Margaret
Hospital.

Bastian and two other men
were suspected of.forcing a
woman into a vehicle and her
boyfriend into the trunk at gun-
point.

SEE page 11











PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ROB
THOMAS
showed his
range of
‘talents,
‘playing the
guitar and
piano during
Saturday
night’s per-
formance.







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AMAS?

ROB THOMAS engages the crowd in the
middle of sets (above) and blasts the
audience with his strong vocals (left).



Rob Thomas
rocks Atlantis

~ ROCKER Rob Thomas,
lead singer of the band Match-
box 20, was the latest interna-
tional music star to perform in
the Atlantis Live Concert
Series.

Mr Thomas and his own solo
band staged a benefit concert
before a sold-out crowd at the
Atlantis Theatre on Saturday
night.

Saturday night’s concert was
a rare acoustic performance by
the singer, who belted out some

of his hits, including "This Is
How a Heart Breaks", "Ever
the Same", and the No. 2 pop
song of all time - “Smooth”.

. Proceeds from the concert
go to the Sidewalk Angels
Foundation, a New York based
charity started by Mr Thomas
and his wife Marisol.

Up next in the Atlantis Live
Concert Series is another
American superstar, Alanis
Morissette, who is scheduled to
perform on October 18.









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Maximum one
year monopoly for
cellular services
after BIC sale

THE Bahamas government
will allow a maximum of a
one year monopoly for cellu-
lar services following the sale
of Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

Addressing the House of
Assembly and responding to
a question posed by former
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, Mr Ingraham
advised the chamber that it
is still the government’s inten-
tion to privatise the Bahamas
Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC) by the end of the
year.

However, whether or not
the government meets this
deadline is a point that is
being questioned, Mr Ingra-
ham said.

“T might say the following,
that the government propos-
es to dispose of 51 per cent of
BTC and retain ownership of
49 per cent. Secondly, the
government proposes that on
the sale of BTC, it would
immediately liberalise fixed
telephone lines and there
would be permitted compe-
tition in that sector.

“Thirdly the government
proposes at a maximum to
permit a monopoly to exist
for cellular service for one
year following the sale of the
majority of BTC. We are
seeking to liberalise the tele-
phone sector of the Bahamas
in the shortest possible time
with the full knowledge that
we are behind everybody else
in our region,” he said.

Fortune Hills
Community to
he launched

PARADISE Real Estate Lim-
ited, in conjunction with Jones
Construction, is set to launch a
new gated community in the Bail-
lou Hill Road area.

This new gated community of
both townhouses and condo-
miniums was the brainchild of
Jones Construction and they have
teamed up with real estate listing
specialists Paradise Real Estate
to offer what they called a
“unique and exciting investment
opportunity” to a specific market
segment.

“First-time home buyers and
young, upward professionals are
where we are focusing our mar-
keting efforts”, explained Zack
Bonczek, sales manager for Par-
adise Real Estate.

He said the community, which
is located at the top of the hill,
Baillou Hill Road, offers first class
amenities and the safety of a con-
trolled and gated environment.

The location is not only con-
venient to downtown and the
west, but also offers owners a
unique opportunity to enjoy views
from one of Nassau’s highest ele-
vations.

“The view is quite breathtak-
ing, especially at night as residents
will enjoy the twinkle of the city
lights,” said Deyvon Jones, pro-
ject director at Fortune Hills.

A special preview was held on
Saturday, September 27, from
10am until 2pm at the Fortune
Hills site.

Sales representatives were on
hand to give guided tours of the
complex and bank representa-
tives were there to assist with
financing.





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 3





© In brief

PM: Govi
moving to
address

Man charged in
triple murders

poverty | @ Separate

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government is taking
steps to alleviate the financial
stresses of those families and indi-
viduals who teeter on and have
fallen below the poverty line,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
revealed yesterday during his con-
tribution to the House of Assem-
bly.

Mr Ingraham spoke about
plans he had drafted in the‘ May
budget communication, to
increase the allocation for the
Department of Social Services.

.“When we came to office in

May of 2007, the annual alloca-

tion for the Department of Social
Services was $26.4 million,” he
said. “In the 2007-2008 budget,
our first budget upon returning
to office last year, we increased
that allocation to $31.8 million,
an increase of $5.4 million or 20.5
per cent. Some $3 million of this
was specifically earmarked for
poverty alleviation.

“Again this year, In the 2008-
2009 budget we provided a fur-

therincrease in the department’s:

allocation amounting to some $7
million or 22 per cent. We did
that so as’to increase assistance to
the poor by almost 45 per cent or
$13 million over a two-year peri-
od.”

According to Mr Ingraham,
these increases as well as increas-
es scheduled to go into effect on
October 1 should be welcomed
by the Bahamian people as they
will provide “assistance to the
poor and disadvantaged among
us.”

He outlined a plethora of
changes with regard to benefits
and increases.

Those include:

e Assistance with utility pay-
ments

e The replacement of regular
electric bulbs with energy-effi-
cient ones

e An increase in provisions of
uniforms and shoes

e Assistance for funeral
expenses.

e Fire relief payment increases

e An increase in monthly pay~
ments to persons medically certi-
fied as being unable to work for a
temporary period and who are
not eligible for National Insur-
ance benefits or assistance pay-
ments —

e Rental assistance increases
for low income or unemployed
persons who are facing eviction

e Increases in minor repairs
allocations for owner-occupied
homes of seniors and persons
with disabilities

e Increases in monthly pay-
ments for children in foster
homes

e Increases in monthly food
assistance based on need for a
specified period

e Increases in emergency food
assistance grants

e Increases in the monthly
allowance for children with dis-
abilities under the age of 16, who
are ineligible for benefits or assis-
tance payments from National
Insurance and whose families are
having financiak difficulties

e Increases in work assistance
payments for an unemployed
needy persons for a job providing
charitable or community service

Mr Ingraham told the house
that “the monies to pay these
increases have been included in
the 2008-2009 budget allocation
of the Department of Social Ser-
vices.

“T trust that none of us who
happens to be a little or a great
deal better off will begrudge
them,” he said.

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homicide
case comes
to court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A MAN charged in the triple
murders of a woman and two men
outside a popular Bain Town club
nearly two weeks ago was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday. A second man charged
in the shooting death of a 34-year-
old a man, which occurred a day
before the triple homicide, was
also arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Brandon Humes, 33, of Cam-
bridge Street was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
at Court One, Bank Lane yester-
day, charged in the murders of
Lavardo Armbrister, 35, of the
Laird Street area, his cousin Sedi-
no Smith, 33, of Yellow Elder Gar-
dens, and Vanessa Williams, 23,
of Baillou Hill Road. According ‘to
court dockets, Humes on Satur-
day September 20, intentionally
caused the deaths of Smith, Arm-
brister and Williams.

According to police reports, the
three victims had just left “The Pit
Restaurant” on Augusta Street at
around 2am on Saturday, Sep-
tember 20, when unknown per-
sons opened fire on them. Mr
Armbrister, Mr Smith and Ms
Williams were walking towards a

CHARGED: Brandon Humes

Chevrolet Impala, when they were
reportedly shot at by two men car-
rying what witnesses claim were
machine guns. Mr Armbrister and
Mr Smith died at the scene, while
Ms Williams, who was said to have
been shot eight times, died short-
ly after she arrived at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Humes was not required to
plead to the charges. Humes told
the court that he was recently
released from prison. He also told
the court that he has lost a kidney
and has a medical condition which
requires that he see a doctor every
three months. Chief Magistrate
Gomez noted his concerns and
remanded him to Her Majesty’s
Prison. His case was adjourned to
October 7 and transferred to
Court 9, Nassau Street.

Mario Pinto, 38, of Sapodilla
Boulevard, Pinewood Gardens,
was arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Gomez yesterday, charged
with the murder of Jeffrey Gib-
son. Gibson, 34, was killed when
gunmen reportedly kicked in the
kitchen door of his Pinewood
Gardens home around 3am on
Friday, September 19 and opened
fire on him as he slept with his
23-year-old girlfriend. The
woman, who fled the scene, was








@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A KEY prosecution witness
in the Mario Miller. murder tri-
al failed to appear in court yes-
terday, resulting in yet another
early adjournment.

Prosecutors yesterday were
trying to locate Daryl Bartlett,
who was called to testify at the
trial, which is into its third week.

Bartlett’s absence resulted in
the prosecution seeking to have
the trial adjourned to today.

Donald Rolle was the only
prosecution witness to take the
stand yesterday.

Rolle, a self employed auto
mechanic, told the court that
around 4.30pm on June 22 — the
day prosecutors say 28-year-old
Mario Miller was murdered —
he was approached by a man
who inquired about the sale of
his 1995 Nissan Maxima.

Mr Rolle said that he and the
man talked for about 10 to 15
minutes.

Mr Rolle identified murder
accused Ryan Miller in court as

- the man who had approached

him about purchasing his car.

According to Mr Rolle, Ryan
Miller asked him if he would
take cocaine for the car. Mr
Rolle said that he told Ryan
Miller, “I don’t work like that.”

The witness told the court
that Ryan Miller then inquired
about the sale price.

Mr Rolle said that he told
Miller that he would sell the car
for between $13,000 and
$14,000. Mr Rolle said that he
and Miller then exchanged con-
tact information.

Mr Rolle told the court that
he saw Ryan Miller again
around mid-day on Monday,
June 24, 2002.

Mr Rolle told the court that
Miller pulled up to his auto
body shop in a black Nissan
Sentra along with a man who
he identified in court yesterday
as Ricardo Miller.

Mr Rolle testified that he and
Ryan Miller went to his office
where Miller pulled $12,500 out
of his pockets.

Mr. Rolle told the court that











» YOUR LOCAL, MEMBER OF THE

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)





Prosecution witness fails to
appear for Mario Miller trial



he did not sign a bill of sale at
that time because he had some
repairs to make to the vehicle.

According to Mr Rolle, the
car was to be turned over in the
name of Tamar’ Lee, the alias
of Ricardo Miller, however he
never saw the brothers again.

Brothers Ryan Miller and
Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar
Lee, are accused of Mario
Miller’s murder.

Miller, then 28, was killed on

June 22, 2002.

His body was found in bushes
near the Super Value Food
Store in Winton.

Lawyer Romona Farquhar-
son represents Ryan Miller.
Ricardo Miller is represented
by Romauld Ferreira.

Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel, with Neil Brathwaite
and Sean Adderley of the
Attorney General’s Office, are
appearing for the Crown.

Last Wednesday the trial was
adjourned early after one wit-
ness took the stand.

wa



Dresses
to
Impress

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

CHARGED: Mario Pinto

shot in her left leg.

Pinto alleged that while in the
custody of officers from the Cen-
tral Detective Unit he was suffo-
cated with a plastic bag over his
head and told that if he did not
“do the right thing” he would not
leave the same way he came. Pin-
to who addressed the court rather
eloquently said that he had signed
some documents that he was not
sure of. He said he was prepared
to accept their contents if they
did in fact reflect what he had
told police, but that they should
be voided if they did not. Pinto
also requested a Voluntary Bill
of Indictment.

“Tam innocent of this charge,”
he told the court. The accused
also requested a public defender
claiming that he was low on cash.

By Donna
Morgan

we

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


















































The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No, Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352.
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

MONDAY the US House of Representa-
tives — and House Republicans in particular
— erred badly by rejecting the $700 billion
plan to save Wall Street from its excesses.

In a fair world, Congress would never have
to contemplate such a measure.

But when a compromise bailout bill came
before the House, the only responsible choice
was to pass it.

The nation’s financial system is in danger
of freezing up because institutions, wary r of
how much soured mortgage debt and credit-
default swaps are floating around Wall Street,
are afraid of lending to each other.

Under the bailout plan, the US Treasury
would take so-called bad paper off financial
companies’ hands and get them lending
again.

The markets have already begun register-
ing their disapproval of the House vote; the
Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly
778 points Monday.

The risk of further economic damage
should chasten lawmakers into reconsidering
the measure this week.

For years, Wall Street insisted that ever-
looser regulatory controls would help money
move more freely and efficiently.

Instead, investment firms poured vast
amounts of money into mortgages to peo-
ple with bad credit.

And these firms got so big that, when those
borrowers fell behind, the entire economy
was at risk. So taxpayers have every right to
be furious about the risk they are being asked
to assume now.

As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. pointed
out Monday, “The American people did not
decide to dangerously weaken our regulato-
ry and oversight policies.”

With good reason, Pelosi laid the dearth of
regulation at the Bush administration’s feet.

After the bill failed, 228-205, House
Republican leader John Boehner blamed
Pelosi, complaining that her speech “poi-
soned our conference, caused a number of
members that we thought we could get, to go
south.”

Oh, come on. While most Democrats were
willing to take the heat for an unpopular but
necessary bill, Boehner got less than a third
of his side to vote for a bill advanced by a
president of his own party.

Are House Republicans really so timid

_ that a few tough words from Pelosi will scare

them off? (Meanwhile, John McCain’s cam-

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Pass this dreadful bailout





paign bizarrely blamed Barack Obama and
congressional Democrats’for the bill’s fail-
ure).

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson first
proposed a massive bailout with little over-
sight.

Pelosi and other Democrats, most notably
Representative Barney Frank, won important
concessions, including pay limits for execu-
tives of bailed-out firms and provisions that
would help taxpayers recoup some of their
money.

The need for a bailout remains an out-
rage. But this much-improved bill still needs
to pass — and quickly

(This commentary was written by The
Boston Globe staff - c. 2008).

Stock markets
tumble as bail-out fails

WORLD stock markets tumbled Monday
amid a flurry of government bank rescues
in Europe that had investors on edge even
before the House voted to reject the Bush
adnuinistration’s rescue plan for the nation’s
financial industry.

Latin American markets were still open
when news that lawmakers on Capitol Hill
had rejected the $700 billion bailout sent
investors running for the exits from Mexico
City to Buenos Aires.

Stocks.in Europe and Asia had earlier end-
ed lower, although less dramatically, as mar-
ket players fretted about the health of the

world’s financial system, even with a USS..

bailout.

Even before the vote in Washington, mar-
kets in Europe and Asia were bleak, as a
flurry of developments around the world
appeared to confirm fears that the global
financial contagion is likely to spread fur-
ther before any recovery.

“There’s an increasing realization that the
cleanup and the mending of all that’s gone
wrong is going to take an extended period to
wor’ through, and we’re going to see an
extended recovery period,” said Jamie Spi-
teri, senior dealer at Shaw Stockbroking in
Sydney.



























GB Chamber
should put
energies to

better use

EDITOR, The Tribune.

, THE Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of commerce and its presi-.
dent should use their energies to
serve Grand Bahama in a more

‘productive way than to pursue

the foolish notion that they can
achieve for their members, who
are licensees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Ltd,
permission to use, willy-nilly,
their “conditionally duty free”
equipment to serve customers
operating outside the official
boundaries of Freeport as delin-
eated, in conjunction with the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

In my view, this is a no brain-
er. The Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment, when it was signed in
1955 considered its territory of
jurisdiction to be all that land
mass acquired by Mr Wallace
Groves, extending out from
Hawksbill Creek in all direc-
tions and as much as Mr Groves
was able to acquire, by whatev-
er means, from the Crown
and/or any private citizen who
was willing to sell to him at the
time.

When this exercise was
exhausted, boundary lines were
set and the delineation of what
we now know as “Freeport”
was forever established.

The Agreement provided for
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Ltd to function as a
quasi-government entity with
powers to issue licenses to
whomever it wishes, to engage
in business activity within its
jurisdiction of governance.

For the sake of emphasis,
these powers were not meant
to be, neither have they ever
been, permitted beyond the
official boundary lines of
Freeport, as delineated.

‘Conditional “exemptions”
from the payment of customs
duties, under the agreement
were meant for the enjoyment
of those entities so licensed and
operating within the Freeport
area.

To remove , any item imported
into Freeport, under the condi-
tions of the agreement, “duty

free” without the prior approval :

of the customs department
would be in breach of the con-
ditions of that agreement and
by extension, in breach of the

customs management act, ren- |

dering the item or items liable

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



to immediate seizure and pay-
ment of the customs duties and
other possible penalties the cus-

toms department may feel

obliged, under the act, to
impose.

To put it bluntly, the cham-
ber’s president is beating a dead
horse; for if what he is advocat-
ing were ever to come about, it

would necessitate major

changes to the agreement
which, changes, would have to
be agreed upon by the Port
Authority, the government and
80 per cent of the port’s
licensees.

The fact that licensees may
trade with entities outside of
Freeport, whether in Eight Mile
Rock or Marsh Harbour, Aba-
co, does not give them the free-
dom to decide, by and of them-
selves, to take their “duty free”
vehicles and or equipment to
Eight Mile Rock and/or Aba-
co. For instance, Mathew Town
is presently beyond the bound-
ary of Freeport and therefore
outside its jurisdiction.

Vehicles imported, condi-
tionally duty free into the
Freeport area under the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement cannot,
now, legally access this little
town, which is almost com-
pletely surrounded. by Freeport,
except for the portion at the
beach area.

If, though,
Bahama Port Authority Ltd
were to convince the residents
to sell this little town to them,
then, I suppose, after some legal
requirements are met, that area
would become, officially, part
of Freeport and the boundary in
that area would be redrawn to
reflect this addition to the city.
This isn’t quite as complicated,

the Grand .

a matter, as the Chamber would
lead us to believe.

If we, who are licensees of
the Port, can import our vehi-
cles duty free and then be. per-
mitted to drive them all over
Grand Bahama Island, willy-nil-
ly, then what’s the point?

People living outside the
Freeport city limits should then, ©
also, be given the same privi-
leges, if fairness counts for any-
thing.

I am aware, acutely, that the
argument here is not one of fair-
ness, however, but one of legal-
ity.

There is no provision, in law,
for importers generally, under
ordinary circumstances, to
import vehicles “duty free,”
therefore persons living outside
Freeport would not be so enti-
tled and so not restricted as to
where they can go in their duty
paid vehicles as we are restrict-
ed, who enjoy the conditional
duty free concessions under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement;
and rightfully so.

As I said before, this is a no
brainer; if you become a
licensee of the Port with access
to all those duty free conces-
sions that the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement provides, then abide °
by all the restrictions govern-
ing those exemptions.

If you wish to travel all over

‘the island, uninhibited, then pay

the-customs duties on your
equipment and vehicles and
desist from trying to find a silly
legal loophole where there is
none.

My advice to the Chamber;
you are beating a dead horse;
find another viable issue to
champion.

FORRESTER J CARROLL
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,

September 29, 2008.

The inspiration of Botswana

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Those people with outlines of Africa on their cars, round
their necks and on their chests just may be on to something!
Botswana, for example, should be an inspiration to us. Inde-
pendent. from Britain in 1966, this population of 1.8 million
people have one of the most beautiful, well preserved, peaceful,
well serviced countries I have seen featured in documentaries.
Botswana reinvests 1/3 of their budget on education. Children
are well educated about the natural wealth of their country
and importance of preserving this natural wealth for the future
of tourism and future generations. 35 per cent of Botswana is
preserved in the form of National Parks and Wildlife Reserves.
There is very little litter and vandalism because those same
well educated children grow up with a sense of national pride,
and an understanding that the country’s future depends’on its

pristine state.

SARA APPLETON

Nassau,
September, 2008.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 5



Groundbreaking
for new Aquinas
College campus —

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ STUDENTS and facul-
ty from Aquinas College
were all smiles yesterday
as the official ground
breaking ceremony was
held for the new campus.

The new school, which
is situated at the rear of
Loyola Hall on Gladstone
Road, is a dream near
realisation according
to principal Shona
Knowles.

“The idea of relocating
Aquinas College began
about 20 years ago, but
’ the actual project was set
in motion some seven
years ago,” Ms Knowles
explained. “I am very
proud to be the principal
> who is going to actually
oversee the relocation of
the school from Madeira
Street to Gladstone Road;
Aquinas College is very
dear and near to me.”

According to the princi-
pal, the new campus,
which will house more
than 500 students in
grades seven to 12, will
offer a number of new
courses.

Included in the new
academic and vocational
options are: auto machan-
ics, electrical installation,
cosmetology, tourism and
hospitality, crafts, allied
health, plumbing, and car-
pentry.

The new. campus will
also feature new labs,

classrooms, and a modern

sporting complex.

Mrs Knowles said the
current student body
count will not change sig-
nificantly; the only real
increase will be in the
number of teachers, due
to the new courses.

Danielle Hall, an eighth
grade student at the
school, said access to the
basketball court at Loyola
Hall is encouragement
enough to become more

athletic. “I’ve been a stu-

dent here for two years,
and now that we are get-
ting a new campus, I am
looking forward to
becoming a part of the
basketball team.”

Other students say that
they are looking forward
to using the new gym and
the new swimming pool,
and say they can now seri-
ously compete with other
school in more sports.

PTA president Ephram
Cargill said: “It’s a grand
occasion for the school
and the diocese, and on
behalf of the parents, we
feel great about it.”

Mr Cargill said that as
Aquinas is his alma mater
and that of all his chil-
dren, this newest project
is definitely “a milestone”
in his eyes.

The school, which was
founded in 1957, is sup-
ported in the project bya
relocation committee, the
Catholic Board of Educa-

tion, the Ministry of Edu- -

cation, teachers, parents,
and students.

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Student taken to hospital
after bus crashes into truck

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



AN AQUINAS COLLEGE stu-
dent was taken to the hospital yes-
terday after a chartered bus carry-
ing school children crashed into a
truck on the Tonique Williams-

Darling Highway.

Police reported that at around
11.30am yesterday, a Bahamas
Experience chartered bus, travel-
ling east on the highway and car-
rying Aquinas College students,
“rear-ended” a white Ford pick-up
in the vicinity of the entrance to

Robin Hood Enterprises.

The truck had reportedly stopped
suddenly’ to avoid an oncoming
vehicle which was over-taking.

Accident

The 25 students involved in the
accident were returning to the
Madeira Street school campus after
attending Aquinas’ ground-break-
ing ceremony at the school’s new

site on Gladstone Road.

Police confirmed that a 10th
grade male: student, who was on
the bus at the time of the accident,
was taken to Princess Margaret
Hospital to be treated for minor

injuries.

None of the other students were
injured in the collision and the

EMERGENCY MEDICAL dispatchers rush a 10th grade Aquinas College student to the hospital.
Thaddeus Williams, 37, was driving

less at an acceptable speed at the
time of the collision, police said.

police investigation into. the acci-
dent is ongoing.
The driver of the chartered bus,



Rodney Moncur

Some former Royal Oasis workers
demonstrate at Department of Labour

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - A small num-
ber of former Royal Oasis work-
ers, who claim they received no
money during the final payout
by government, demonstrated at
the Department of Labour in
Freeport on Friday.

Lionel Morley, second vice-
president of the Bahamas Hotel
Catering Allied Workers Union,
said about 69 former hotel work-
ers Were denied final payments
during the third payout exercise

P held this year in Freeport.

He said the union spoke with
State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing about the situa-
tion following an initial demon-
stration in August.

“This demonstration is about
equity and fairness, and ensuring
that those who are not properly
compensated receive their com-
pensation,” said Mr Morley.

“We have written Minister
Laing explaining our position as
he instructed us to do eight
weeks ago, however, to date we
have not received a response
from him to our letter,” he said.

Mr Morley said initially gov-
ernment made ex-gratis pay-
ments of $3,500 to all workers. A
second payment of $800 was
paid to some workers and $200
to others, he said.

He claims that the third pay-
out was made to only a selected
group of persons.

“The third time they (the gov-

ernment) decided that they.

would make secret phone calls
to those who they believe was
qualified. There was no public
announcement as to these pay-
ments and the union learned
about this through the

grapevine,” Mr Morley claimed.

Mr Morley said that 69 per-
sons were excluded from the list
despite meeting the require-
ments for payment.

He noted that some workers
received $1,200 for their final
payouts while others received
nothing.

“When (the government)
decided who was qualified, the
right and reasonable thing to do
was to contact all those persons
who made applications.

“We have temporary workers
who received monies when
workers who have. been

employed with the company 15
years and longer received noth-

ing.

“You cannot give a person
who worked for lesser years
three times more than those who
were there for a longer time.

Effort

“While we appreciate the gov-
ernment for making an effort to
relieve the burden and hardship
of the workers at Royal Oasis,
we cannot condone and accept
that others were denied pay-
ments,” he said.

Mr Morley said the minister
needs to sit down with the union
to decide how best to resolve
the situation.

He noted that some workers
are still! unemployed and need
their monies to pay bills and to
feed their families.

“The light bills continue to
rise and food prices are escalat-
ing in Freeport, the economy is
bad in Grand Bahama,” he
said.

Peter Dames, a landscape
worker for 13 years at Royal
Oasis, said it is unfair that only

$1000.00
REWARD

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to the recovery of a Galvanized triple axle

boat trailer suitable for a 30 foot boat,

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Call: 376-3710 / cell:328-6092



some workers received pay-
ments.
Mr Dames said he has

remained unemployed since the '

closure of the Royal Oasis in
2004.

“It is an injustice,” he said,
holding a placard at his chest.
“Why give some people and

deny others. Everybody needs
money in these hard economic
times,” he said.

Harcourt Rolle, a banquet
supervisor who was employed at
the hotel for 30 years, said gov-
ernment needs to rectify the sit-
uation. A

Mr Rolle said government

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must ensure that the new owners
of the Royal Oasis are investors
who are able to successfully
operate the resort.

“The government needs to get
someone who could really oper-
ate the hotel, you can’t have an
investor coming in and doing
what they want,” he said.

SC

oe nes



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PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE

SER ae RCN ae A ind sR
Bahamas Sea Turtle group updates web site

THE Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
Group’s campaign to ban the killing of sea
turtles in The Bahamas is gaining momen-
tum, says Jane Mather, president of Advo-
cate for Animal Rights, one of the group’s
organizers.
hey According to Ms Mather, “We recently
es ile! §6launched a redesigned Internet site

BEHEADED! The head of a large sea turtle (www.saveourseaturtles.com) to support

: : i ; r inte ional advertising and turtle
rtle at Montagu fish with eyes gouged out is on display at Mon- OU internationa ; ae
ee a large sea tu t gulls tagu fish ramp for everyone to see. awareness programme that is reaching mil-







Our site includes new information about
sea turtles, interesting articles, photos

magnificent creatures, and links to other
sites.

Ms Mather says more than 5,000 people
have so far signed an online petition (on
Care2petition.com) to end the sea turtle
killings and nearly 230,000 people have
seen our online ad campaign. Bumper
stickers are being seen ever more fre-



PHOTO shows body parts and large head of THE HEAD of a large slaughtered sea tur-
a dismembered sea turtle at Montagu fish tle and body parts are on display at the
ramp. Montagu fish ramp.

lions of Internet users around the world.”

showing the inhumane treatment of these

quently on cars around The Bahamas say-
ing, "Stop the Killing" of sea turtles.

Ms Mather also said press releases are
being sent out worldwide and covered on
environmental web sites to bring attention
to the cruelty that is taking place in The
Bahamas. She hopes the information and
photos on the new Internet site will inform
the public of the cruelty that is taking place
in tourist-oriented destinations like The
Bahamas, and shock people to create a
chain reaction leading to a worldwide ban
on the killing of sea turtles.

According to Kim Aranha, President of
The Bahamas Humane Society, the drive
to save sea turtles is gaining momentum.
Most recently, the Bahamas National Trust
added its voice to the call for a total ban on
harvesting sea turtles, and thousands of
people have signed a petition demanding
swift government action to end the cruelty.

In a press release issued on September.

18, the Bahamas National Trust said it

"joins the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Group, The Nature Conservancy, The
Bahamas Humane Society, Friends of the
Environment and BREEF in the call for a
total ban on the harvesting of sea turtles in
The Bahamas."

Ms Mather says Bahamas fisheries laws
still allow the catching and slaughter of
certain turtles, even though the country is
a party to the Convention on Internation-
al Trade in Endangered Species of Wild
Fauna and Flora (CITES), which calls on
member states to protect all marine turtles
as endangered or threatened. According to
Ms Mather, “One of the conditions of
being a signatory to CITES states that the
signing country is obliged to change their
current legislation to conform to the oblig-
ations of the convention.”

The Bahamas is also a signatory to the
Convention on Biological Diversity, which
commits The Bahamas to avoid the extinc-
tion of any more Bahamian species.

ri doctors on Grand ee BEC team applauded

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Three medical doctors on
Grand Bahama will be recognised and
awarded by the Grand Bahama Medical and
Dental Association this weekend.

Hu

Dr George Charite, association president,

announced that Dr Wiona Pratt, Dr Edgar
Cainglet, and Dr Rolando Corral will be
honored at its annual awards banquet on

Saturday, October 4.

The banquet, which is being held under the-
patronage of the Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis and his wife, will be held
6pm at the Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.

Dr Charite said the minister will also open
the association’s annual medical conference
on Thursday, October 1, at the Westin
Resort. This year’s theme is ‘Building A
Stronger Nation Through Health.’

He said Dr Patty Symonette is expected to
attend the opening, which is also open to

the general public.

Exhibitions will be on display by repre-
sentatives of pharmaceutical companies, the
Baptist Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital, and

the Kendal Regional Hospital.



Dr Charite said the
conference sessions and
lectures will be held on
Friday for medical and
healthcare professionals.

Some of the topics that
will be discussed are
orthopedic medicine,
rehabilitation therapy,
chronic back pain, and

knee reconstructive surgery.
Dental sessions will include mouth pain,
dental implants, and aesthetic dentistry. Ses-

sions will also be held on the emotional

impact of chronic diseases, including a pre-
sentation on HIV/AIDS. .

Malignancies will also be addressed by Dr
Judith Hurley, a genealogist at Jackson
Memorial University in Miami.

Dr Charite said Dr Hurley will also be at
the Grand Bahama Cancer Association on
Thursday between 1pm to 4pm to speak with

women about breast cancer and the history

of ovarian cancer.
Mr Hurley 2 alco be available to conduct

gene studies for persons at the Cancer Asso-

ciation. The medical association will also
hold a cruise on the Bahama Mama on the
evening of Friday, October 3.

’

The event is open to the public.













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Din” for power restoration

mission in Inagua

THE technical team from the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
returned to Nassau on Friday
after spending two weeks
engaged in restoring electricity to
the storm-ravaged Inagua. In the
first week of September, Inagua
took a direct hit from the cate-
gory four Hurricane Ike, which
wrecked havoc on homes, public
infrastructure and the operations
of Morton Bahamas, the major
employer of Inagua and supplier
of electricity to the island through
its private franchise.

The seven-man team from
BEC’s distribution department
included foreman Paul Tynes and
linesmen Hermis Sands,
Chrishawn Knowles, Sherman
Moxey, Talbot McKinney,
Quentin Miller and Clifton
Bullard.

On hand to greet them were
BEC’s general manager Kevin
Basden and engineers Craig
Knowles and Ian Pratt, who
assisted in putting the team
together.

Mr Knowles was also responsi-
ble for travelling to Inagua to
check on the progress of the
works.

In addition to its contribution
of manpower, BEC also shipped
a bucket truck, a pole hole borer
and other materials to Inagua to
assist with the restoration of the
power system.

As a member of CARILEC,
the regional association of elec-
tricity utilities, BEC has con-
tributed to restorations through-
out the CARICOM countries.

Mr Basden thanked and
praised his team.

“I would like to thank all of
our employees who went down
there and their families, the sac-
rifice they made in terms of leav-
ing the comfort of New Provi-
dence, going down to Inagua and
assisting in the restoration
process.

“It was a good team, they
stepped up to the challenge and
they are all proud to be able to
assist. So I want to thank them
and their families whom they
were away from for that period of
time,” he said.

Lending a hand to the BEC
team in the Inagua restoration
effort was the Grand Bahama
Power Company,
announced earlier that it was
motivated by a desire to aid
Inaguans and by gratitude to
BEC for its restoration work in
Grand Bahama following the



which ~

‘Costly exercise’

POWER has now been fully

restored to Inagua, but BEC said the
exercise was a very costly one for the

corporation.

Although BEC has not yet put
dollar figure on the cost of the

a

restoration effort, the corporation’s
general manager Kevin Basden said .
that he expects the price tag to be

high as BEC sent several technicians
and equipment to the storm ravaged

LGN ereledA|

island. “Most certainly the final num-

bers are not in yet, but it was a costly : :

exercise. We sent equipment to assist in erecting poles, we also

sent in a bucket truck to assist as well.
“In addition to those vehicles, we also had to send poles and

other materials for repairs. And you are also looking at the

time for the men. So over all it was costly, there was areal

RAS ee LE.

- need, she-said

Following, the restoration effort in the Mathew Town area,

the next step is to finalise the takeover of Inagua’s power sys-_ -
tem by BEC. This will happen shortly, BEC said. —

“Because of the increasing challenges in this regard, Morton
Bahamas has asked BEC to assume responsibility for electrici- —
ty supply in Inagua. Morton’s aged generation plant and t
mission and distribution network can nolongermeetthe
demands of a growing population for modern amenities. The —_
negotiations are expected to be concluded shortly,” the corpo-

ration said in a statement.

The damages to island power systems arising from passage ~~
of several major hurricanes over the past four years have high- _

lighted the challenges of developing and maintaining an elec-
tricity network in an island nation, BEC said. \

destructive storm seasons of 2004
and 2005.

The BEC team and their coun-
terparts from Grand Bahama
received high praise from Glenn
Bannister, managing director of
Morton Bahamas.

“We are ecstatic and we would
like to thank Mr Kevin Basden
of the Bahamas Electrical Cor-
poration in.Nassau and also Mr
Excell “EO” Ferrell of the Grand
Bahama Power Company for the
excellent work that their team of
men did at Inagua.

“Those guys came to Inagua
and they were up from six in the
morning until late in the night
putting up poles and running lines
and working side by side with our
electricians in Inagua. These guys
worked hard, they were profes-
sional, they were safe, and two
weeks after the hurricane we had
electricity in Inagua. That is truly
amazing. It speaks to the profes-
sionalism that we have at BEC
and the Grand Bahama Power

MAINS RENEWALS

Sans Souci to Fox Hill Road

The Water and Sewerage Corporation advises its
customers and the general public that the
Corporation has begun mains renewal work on
the Eastern Road from Fox Hill Read to San Souci
for a period of ‘eight (8) weeks. Motorists are
asked to avoid the area as much as possible.

The Corporation apologizes for the inconvenience
caused and reminds its customers this is an effort
to improve their water supply.







Company. We are indeed grate-
ful,“ Bannister said. .

Mr Basden spoke of the Cor-'
poration’s motivation to get
things moving again and the
scope and success of the restora-
tion work.

“Our fellow citizens down in

‘Inagua suffered as a result of

Hurricane Ike. The overall objec-
tive was to assist and restore the
power system as quickly as possi-
ble so that the residents of Inagua
would be back in a position of
normalcy.

“We are proud to say 100 per
cent of power has been restored
in Mathew Town - there is one
exception with the building that
houses Batelco, some transform-
ers are needed for that. The situ-
ation, as such, is that that high
level voltage used in Inagua dif-
fers from what we use in New
Providence and other family
islands. So Morton Salt is
attempting to source transformers
and we are doing the same, as
soon as we have them, they will
be replaced,” Mr Basden said.

BEC foreman Paul Tynes
spoke of the challenges faced by
the team he led.

“We had a lot of damaged

-homes, a lot of downed trees,

poles, a lot of the power lines
destroyed, they were 100 per cent
without power, they were also
unable to generate power. When
my team went in we had to assess
the damage and make some
determinations.

“Primarily, the main goal was
to get the main feeders in, to get
power to the airport, the clinics,
the water stations and other pub-
lic buildings. In doing that we
found out that we were able to
get the main feeders in within a
matter of five days or so. I would
say 99.99 per cent of power has
been restored.

“We had to change about 20-25
poles and about four or five trans-
formers and about eight to 10
miles of lines. My team surprised
me, they outdid themselves. They
performed extremely well, when
you look at the conditions we
were faced with —-100 per cent
without power and power gener-
ation.

“There were times when we
did not have water. Under those
conditions the team performed
admirably well,” Mr Tynes said.



(ne mmMibuine

PULULAI, VL!

PRLIVIDLI UU, BUY, ri



OPERATION TOUCH COMMITTEE
GB Burger King franchises donate $1,000 to Turks and Caicos hurricane victims

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Burger King Fran-
chises on Grand Bahama donated
$1,000 to the Operation Touch Com-
mittee, which is raising funds for hur-
ricane victims in the Turks and Caicos
Islands.

The presentation was made on Fri-
day at the Doris Minette Holding Ltd
Headquarters in the Kipling Building.

Racquel Hart, director of market-
ing and training for Burger King Fran-

Campaign launched

chises on Grand Bahama, commended
Operation Touch on its efforts to raise
money to help persons in the Turks
and Caicos.

“We have been touched by the plight
of the residents in the Turks and Caicos
and today we are pleased to donate
$1,000 to aid those persons affected by
Hurricane Ike.

“They have lost a lot and we are glad
to play a part in restoring their lives,
and we trust that this donation will go
a long way,” said Ms Hart.

Committee chairman Simeon Outten
thanked Burger King Franchises for
their contribution to Operation Touch.

Operation Touch recently held a
tele-a-thon and gospel concert at the
Hilton Outten Auditorium in Freeport
to raise funds for the Turks and Caicos.

Mr Outten said the event was very
successful and well supported. He also
noted that they received very positive
feedback on the concert from the pub-
lic.

“We are still putting the figures
together and hopefully sometime next
week we will hold a press conference to
inform the public of the total that was
raised, and how we will go about pre-
senting them to the Turks and Caicos.

“This island is just filled with descen-

dants from the Turks and Caicos and
we want our brothers and sisters, fam-
ily, and friends over there to know we
are thinking about them, praying for
them and doing what we can to help.

Mr Outten said donors gave what
they could despite the economic hard-
ship being experienced in Grand
Bahama.

Anthony Rahming, public relations
spokesman, thanked the entire GB
community for its support.

“Grand Bahama came together and
gave us tremendous support and some
support is still coming in,” he said.

“We are very touched by the fact,

that we have people helping people,
and we want to assure persons that the
money will go to assist those victims to
get their lives back to some normal-
cy,” Mr Rahming said.

The Operation Touch Committee
was formed in conjunction with the
Turks and Caicos Association here on
the island. Some other members are:
Rev Kermit Saunders, co-chairman;
Kenneth Basden, treasurer; Arthur
Jones, assistant treasurer; Andrea
Moss, recording secretary; and Daniel
Williams, assistant public relations offi-
cer.



Ethel Rolle — Education
Employee of the Year 2008/ oF

to allow Bahamians
to gamble in casinos

A NEW committee has
been established to launch a
nation-wide campaign to allow
Bahamians to gamble in the
country’s casinos.

“Deeply concerned with the
discriminatory nature of
Bahamian gaming law, a high
profile ad-hoc.committee has
come together to advocate for
change.

“Comprised of leaders from



New committee formed to
change ‘discriminatory’
Bahamian gaming law

chan. “As a result of current

6 i
business, the professions, com- Asar esult of gaming laws, and in part the
munity and academia, the Current gaming admitted inability of the gov-
ing a fercreaching national L2WS, andin part — poms crugeles ember
= e NamMas § es € ar-
campaign,” the committee the admitted rassingly with significant ille-
os ima he spesianiae inability of the gal wagering by its citizens.
ommittee spokesperson, iy a tetests:s ce the
Sidney Strachan, said: “The SOVermment to Re vonainse. Reale
archaic gaming law as cur- enforce them, the is i ening at the
H as, CUE This is happening

rently constituted discrimi- - Bahamas struggles expense of government rev-
nates against legal residents : enue and unnecessarily limit-
and citizens of the Bahamas. embarrassingly ing the nation’s ability to
ae acd with significant broaden and enrich social,
Greco aAKGAd. illegal wagering by educational and health in a

“The policy places the coun-
try in a bad light nationally
and internationally and denies

its citizens.”



period of pressing need.
“The committee singles this

out as another example of the

asinine nature of gaming laws

its citizens a fundamental
right.

“Tt must be changed and the
committee believes that it
enjoys the breadth and depth
of support nationally to suc-
cessfully advance the argu-
ment.”

By law, Bahamian nation-
als are not permitted to game
in their own country.

This is despite the conscious
determination of government
to make gaming a central ele-
ment of the country’s tourism
product, the committee not-
ed.

“Four significant casinos can
be found within the country
catering to visitors year round.
The current government is
intent on using gaming as the
centre piece of the planned
development of additional
tourism capacity.

“A major economic driver
and source of employment,
tourism is a national GDP pil-
lar.”

The committee includes,
among others: Felix Knowles,
Bob Halat,- Lester R Cox,
Adrian: Gibson, Christina
Cemburu and Sidney Stra-

and policies,” the statement
said.

The committee said it has
approved a framework advo-
cacy plan.

Among other things it
intends to seek meetings with
key government officials,
opposition leaders and special
interest groups.

The plan provides for an
ambitious direct mail cam-
paign, informative materials,
the earning of media attention
and education and awareness
initiatives, it added.





KIA J MOTORS
re

The Power to Surprise



Ministry of Education Employee of the Year
2008/09 is Ethel Rolle, a 30 year veteran who
started as a janitress at the William Gordon Pri-
mary School.

THE ministry said “hard work, dedication,
determination to move upwards and a firm
belief in her abilities” led Mrs Rolle to a two
year posting as a messenger at the Public Ser-
vice Training Centre.

In 1993 she was assigned to the Ministry of
Education, where she is now the head mes-

senger in the offices of the minister of educa- :

tion and the permanent secretary.

Her career goal is to become a supervisor, a
rank she aspires to reach by continuing to pro-
vide outstanding service.

Mrs Rolle believes that quality service to
clients within and outside the Ministry must
always be delivered with efficiency and cheer-
fulness.

She is described as a model employee who
exemplifies exceptional levels of work perfor-
mance and displays high regard and loyalty to
co-workers and job responsibilities.

Her duties include: answering the telephone,
clearing trays, sorting, recording, delivering,
retrieving, copying mail and files and setting up
conference rooms for meetings, all of which
she welcomes with her trademark smile and
enthusiasm. Her dedication extends to Church
of Christ where she worships and serves in the
social club. A mother of three, she enjoys read-
ing, cooking, going for walks and to the beach.

The ministry said: “Mrs Rolle was selected
from an impressive group of well deserving
employees, based upon recommendations,
employee performance appraisal records and
interviews conducted by a panel of judges.”

She will represent the ministry in the Nation-
al Public Officer of the Year Competition for









Benne

the coveted title of Public Officer of the Year
in October.

Minister Carl Bethel, on behalf of the Min-
istry of Education, congratulated Mrs Ethel
Rolle on her “stellar achievement”.

He thanked her for being a “fantastic exam-
ple” for all staff to,follow and said he wishes her
every success.







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Court Gazebos « Grills

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Special




THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas chosen as backdrop for
NBA dance troupe photo shoot





MIAMI HEAT
dance troupe
members on
«# location at
Atlantis.

THE Miami Heat basket-
ball franchise has chosen the
islands of the Bahamas to be

2009 poster and calendar
photo shoot.

The Miami heat dance
troupe began its shoot last
week on Paradise Beach at
the Cove, Atlantis.

Stephen Weber Executive,
vice-president of sales, said
the Miami Heat is excited
about joining forces with the
Ministry of Tourism to pro-
mote both the NBA team
and its dancers, as well as the
islands of the Bahamas.

Heat president of business
operations Eric Woolworth
said in a statement that the
Bahamas is a prime location
for this type of promotion.

“T can’t think of a better
location than the islands of
the Bahamas to host a photo
shoot for the most popular
dance team in the NBA,”
said Mr Woolworth.

“Gorgeous beaches, rich
heritage, close proximity -
it’s South Florida’s home
away from home and we
know the Heat dancers will
be welcomed and pam-
pered.”

The team will give away.
15,000 posters during its first
Bahamas-themed night on
November 14, which will be
played against the Washing-
ton Wizards.

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“ALL THAT piece parcel or lot of land in the Subdivision called
and known as “EASTWOOD? situated in the Eastern District of
the Island of New Providence and being Lot Number Twenty
(20). Situated thereon is a Single Family Residence with Four(4)
Bedrooms and: Two(2) Bathrooms Entry Foyer, Living Room,
Dining Area, Family Room, Kitchen.








Property Size: 9,000 Square Feet.

This property is sold under our Power of Sale contained in
a Mortgage dated 27th February 2006. All offers should be
forwarded in writing in a sealed envelope, addressed to the Risk
Manager P.O.Box N-3180, Nassau, Bahamas and marked “Private
& Confidential”. Bids addressed in the above manner may also
be faxed to 394-0019. All offers must be received by the close of
business 5:30pm, Friday, 31st October 2008.









The right is reserved to reject any or all offers.



* FAST BIDDING INFORMATION |







THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 9



Remembering

Norman Solomon

FROM page one

wife was still in Florida yester-
day.

Although no formal statement
was released by government up
to press time last night, parlia-
mentarians, who learned of his
death yesterday morning during
a House session, observed a
moment of silence in his hon-
our.

An outpouring of condolences
followed news of his death yes-
terday, with many in the busi-
ness and political community
heralding Mr Solomon as a true
"patriot" who worked tirelessly
for the development of his coun-
try.

"He was the most industrious
person I've ever known, and
very meticulous and always
checked details. He never
seemed to get flustered. He
could multi-task better than any-
body I know. And he was a
workaholic," long-time friend
and former politician Michael
Lightbourn told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Lightbourn was a mem-
ber of the short-lived Social
Democratic Party (SDP), which
was organised and led by Mr
Solomon in 1979. The SDP
served as opposition to the Pin-
dling administration until 1981.

Mr Lightbourn last spoke with
Mr Solomon two weeks ago
when his "fading" health was
evident. .

"They were hoping to bring
him back,.but he was in such ill
health, they were nervous about
whether he could handle the
travel and they got him out in
Naples, Florida just before the
hurricane (Ike) threatened," said
Mr Lightbourn, adding that Mr
Solomon's health was going
"downhill" for "quite some
time."

Sir Arthur Foulkes, former
Bahamas high commissioner to
London, described his counter-
part as a "great Bahamian."

"I've observed Parliament for
more than half a century now,
from outside and from inside,
and Mr Solomon was a formi-
dable parliamentary debater and
I can think of no parliamentari-
an who went to Parliament more
meticulously prepared for a
debate than Norman Solomon."

Dubbed “Stormin' Norman”
by the press, the one time leader
of the opposition is also known
for the courageous stance he
took in the House of Assembly
during the early 80s when he
revealed drug lord Carlos "Joe"
Lehder's illicit trade on Nor-
man's Cay.

Said former Tribune news edi-
tor Athena Damianos: "While
others were engaged in a mas-
sive cover-up that put the coun-
try on its present path of law-
lessness, Norman told Parlia-
ment that Norman's Cay was the
site of one of the largest drug
smuggling operations in this part
of the world."

His home and car were later

fire-bombed.

He founded the ,Nassau
Tourism Development Board
(NTDB) in 1994 and served as
co-chairman until his flailing
health forced him to step down
in February, 2007. He remained
an honorary chairman of NTDB
until his death.

"The Bahamas has lost one of
its true patriots. Mr Norman
Solomon was the founding
Chairman of the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board in 1994. In life and in
passing, he has remained our
conscience, our motivator, a
steady and guiding hand, and a
visionary for what we, and in
particular his beloved historic
city of Nassau, could be. His out-
standing contributions to the
nation’s development as a busi-
nessman, journalist, politician
and activist must be celebrated.
Our sympathies go out to his
family in this time of sorrow,"
Charles Klonaris, NTDB Chair-
man said in a statement yester-
day.

Born October 6, 1929, Mr
Solomon was educated at
Queen's College and at Belmont
School in the Bahamas and then
at Bishop's College School in
Canada. He is survived by his
wife Katherine Solomon, his
daughters, Andrya Schulte and
Alexya Solomon; his sons, Sean
Solomon, and Spencer Solomon,
his son-in-law, Christian Schulte,
and daughter-in-law, Julija; his
grand daughters, Christy and
Valentina, and his grandsons,
Alexander and Austin. °

He also served as MP for the
St John's constituency (now
North Eleuthera) from 1967-
1982. He owned a number of

successful businesses, including
Body Shop, Mademoiselle and
Wendy's which were part of the
Solomon Group of Companies.

In 1982, he took over Ardastra
‘Gardens and Zoo and revamped
the park into a tourist attraction

now defunct SDP from 1979 -
1982.

His family - one of the oldest
in the country - arrived in the
Bahamas in 1799 and has an out-
standing reputation in the areas

of business, politics and, in the



He served in Parliament from
1967 -1982 and was leader of the

case of his uncle, Sir Kenneth
_Solomon, in law.

Derek Smith



1979 - NORMAN SOLOMON entering the House of Assembly. Mr Solomon served as a Member of Parliament
from 1967 to 1982. Sgt Paul Farquharson, later commissioner of police, is seen at right. He is presently the
Bahamas High Commissioner to London.









U

tk



© Franklyn G Ferguson

A

THURSDAY DECEMBER 17, 1981. AN HISTORIC picture taking session was held Thursday outside the House for members of parliament who all have to face the electorate next year in

general elections. Prime Minister Lynden Pindling, whose Progressive Liberal Party has been in power since January 1967, was not present for the picture. At present ther are 38 mem-

bers of parliament - 31 being PLP members, four being Free National Movement members and three being Social Democratic Party members. Mr Solomon, the SDP leader, is the first

a m left oe front row. Then, Percy Saunders, chief clerk; Heny Bowen, deputy speaker, Clifford Darling, speaker; Arthur Hanna, deputy PLP leader, Henry Bostwick, leader of the
ree National Movement. :

1989 - BAHAMIANS and tourists were treated
to the sound of bagpipes as Dewar's “White
Label” Piper serenaded Bay Street. The photo
shows Piper Major Willie Cochrane and Norman
Solomon in front of his “Mademoiselle” store.



PAGE 10 THE TRIBUNE



| TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Chinese milk
products —
FROM page one :

carton milk sold to other
countries and regions,
unleashing fear in markets
already shaken by a string
of "made-in-China" scandals
last year.

Creswell Sturrup, Perma-
nent Secretary for the gov-
ernment department of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources, said foreign
imports will be monitored in
an investigation sparked by
the scandal.

A spokesman from the
Ministry of Labour said
there is no cause to panic as
yet, however the issue has
highlighted a need for inde-
pendent product testing in
the Bahamas.

He said: "There has been
a push for the establishment
of a standards bureau in the
Bahamas, as they have in
countries all over the world,
to test products like this.

"We need a well
equipped lab, staffed with
professionals and scientists
to do product tests to assist
the government and the wel-
fare of the Bahamian peo-
ple." :

An independent super-
market manager on Bay
Street, who stocks “White
-Rabbit” milk candies made
in China, said he had not
been warned of the scandal.

However, the sweets
were found to contain unac-
ceptable contamination in
tests carried out by New
Zealand's Food Safety
Authority last week.

"This product contains
sufficiently high levels of
melamine which may cause
health problems," deputy
chief executive Sandra Daly
told The Guardian newspa-
per of London.

She urged people to seek
medical advice if they or
their children had eaten the
sweets, adding: "This is a
serious concern."

Cadbury became the lat-
est foreign company to order
a recall of its Chinese-made
products yesterday after a
test of chocolates made in
the Beijing factory cast
doubt on their safety.

The EU is testing all
products containing more
than 15 per cent milk pow-
der and have issued a ban
on all products from China
for infants and young chil-
dren that contain any pro-
portion of milk.

The United States' Food
and Drug Administration
expanded its checks for ;
melamine last week to :
include products that have
been tested in other coun-
tries and found positive for
melamine.

The FDA has not yet |:
found any positive samples, ¥
and no contaminated prod- :
ucts have been found on the
UK market.

It is not known whether
milk-products made in Chi-
na for sale in the Bahamas
are contaminated.

Financing |

Available ©
on the
Spot

Major blow to new
tourism strategy

FROM page one

United States, the Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism was advised to forego tonight's
scheduled announcements, proposing a
newer strategy and direction” for
tourism.

It said a new date for the Ministry of
Tourism to reveal its “new direction”
for tourism would be announced. °

The postponement comes after yet
another tumultuous day in the United
States, with the already battered financial
market reacting violently to the failure of
Congress to pass a bill which its sup-
porters said would help save a U.S. econ-
omy “on the brink of an economic dis-
aster.”

With North America the origin of the
vast majority of visitors to the Bahamas

MP hits back after PM dismisses

and therefore of money going into
Bahamian pockets the news was also a
serious blow to this dollar-dependent
nation and attracted questions and com-
mentary in the House of Assembly
throughout the day.

The “Bail out” bill proposed by the
Republican party and voted down yes-
terday was to have allowed for the U.S.
Government to purchase so-called “tox-
ic” assets from stricken financial insti-
tutions so that they could get on with
the business of lending money to Amer-
ican consumers and businesses.

The institutions had been effectively
frozen in recent weeks, halting their nor-
mal lending activities and hoarding mon-
ey to protect themselves from the fall
out from the country’s sub-prime mort-
gage crisis.

Their fears grew after several major

financial institutions failed thanks to
their exposure to mortgage-backed secu-
rities over the last three weeks.

Americans, offered loans despite
showing little evidence they could meet
their requirements, had begun defaulting
on their mortgages in greater and greater
numbers in recent years.

With banks increasingly into the prac-
tice of selling on these mortgages, in the
form of “mortgage-backed securities”
to other investors who had initially
hoped to make a profit from them, the
eventual failure of many Americans to
pay them back had a widespread impact ,
throughout the U.S. financial system.

Politicians and technocrats in that
country are now hurrying to come up
with another proposed solution to the
situation.

Steny Hoyer, the House Majority

Leader, had warned of the consequences
of failing to pass the bailout bill that the
Republicans proposed to solve the prob-
lem: “A meltdown would begin on a few
square miles of Manhattan, but before it
was over no city or town in America
would be untouched.”

Meanwhile, Republican Senator Judd
Gregg, a lead negotiator in the bailout
bill negotiations said, “If we don't act
promptly and effectively, then many peo-
ple are going to lose their jobs.”

Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham stated: “We are very carefully
monitoring the evolving financial crisis
and its likely impact in the Bahamas.
We are making assessments about its
likely magnitude and duration. It's not
easy to make a determination about its
magnitude and duration because prob-
lems continue to arise every hour.”

remarks in House as ‘sissy talk’

FROM page one

Minister talking *bout sissy talk.
Mr Speaker, I am not going to
be intimidated by any (the
Speaker ordered the. word with-
drawn) conduct on the part of
the Member of North Abaco.
He is here to answer questions;
to give account to the Bahami-
an people,” Mr Sears said.

Mr Sear’s characterization
of the Prime Minister was sub-
sequently withdrawn from the
Hansard. However the argu-
ment had a lasting impact dur-
ing the morning session of
Opposition Day yesterday.

In fact, Mr Ingraham
informed the House as the
debate over the remarks con-
tinued, that he had no diffi-

_ culty in the term that Mr Sears

used against him.

“Mr Speaker I take no
exception from the words,” Mr
Ingraham said. “None what-
soever. I want the Speaker to
know that I take no exception
from the words coming from
the Member of Fort Charlotte.
He can call me whatever he
likes,” he said.

However, a number of
Opposition Members contin-
ued to'raise objections, stat-
ing that by accepting the
words it would lower the stan-
dards of the House of Assem-
bly.

Leading this charge was the
PLP’s leader of Opposition
Business, Dr Bernard Nottage.

“The Prime Minister said,
‘sissy talk’, and the whole
country heard him. All ’m
talking about is there is a con-
sistent theme coming from
across the other side of the
aisle when certain members
speak, making certain insinu-
ations which we object to. The
particular comment by the PM
in my view is not warranted

Used Car

Advanta

and should not, it ought to not
be made and it certainly
should not be heard by the
country,” said Dr Nottage.

“All I’m saying to you, sir, is
that we ask you to do for the
other side that which you do
with us, and that is to request
them to cease and desist from
this kind of behaviour. That’s
all. I don’t think its appropri-
ate for we to do it, and nei-
ther is it for the Prime Minis-
ter. That’s all I’m saying.”

To this, Mr Ingraham said
that he was “startled” by Dr
Nottage’s “righteous indigna-
tion.”

“He takes no exception to
the Member for Fort Char-
lotte saying (word omitted)
but when the comment is
made from my seat he takes
exception. I understand,” he
said.

House Speaker Alvin Smith
interrupted the proceedings by
saying that he has heard many

. un-Parliamentary things said

from member’s seats and as
such did not involve himself.
However, when things are said
standing and therefore for the
record, it is then that he must
act. ‘

In this vein, the derogatory

remarks made by Mr Sears
about the Prime Minister were
withdrawn. However, Mr
Sears issued a warning to Mr
Ingraham before continuing
with his contribution.

“The Prime Minister should
realise that one day — there
were other politicians who
thought they were all mighty
when they sat in here, and at a
later stage in their career they
found themselves on the other
side. And I want to remind
him of his own mortality and
that he is only sitting there for
a period. And he should
remember that,” said Mr
Sears,

ey

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Arrested man ‘in
hospital after alleged.
beating in custody’

FROM page one

While inside the trunk, the
man was able to phone a
friend who called the police.

Officers patrolling the
Prince Charles Drive area
that night spotted the vehicle
and gave chase.

The men then tried to
abandon the vehicle and flee
on foot.

Officers gave chase and
shot one of the men after he
pointed a gun in their direc-
tion.

According to police Bast-
ian was apprehended after
forcefully resisting arrest,
while the third man escaped.

Mrs McKenzie said that
when she was finally able to

see her son, officers had to
help him into the visitor’s
room. She said they sat him
on the very edge of a soft
couch and he slowly leaned
his head into the rest.

“Mommy they beat me,”
she recalls him saying in a
breathless voice.

Mrs McKenzie said she has
filed a formal complaint to
the police corruption unit
and had been told that an
investigation would begin.

“If he goes before the
magistrate and he says he has
to go to Fox Hill then that’s
what has to happen, but at
least P’ll know he’s alive,”
she said.

Calls to police pregarding
an investigation into the mat-



LZ
GRAD SUL

c ty
af Carcead! ‘Bay
PER VMALBARANAST

ter were not returned up to
press time yesterday. .

According to his mother,
doctors caring for Bastian
said that both of his kidneys
were in danger of shutting
down and that he was not
able to pass his urine.

She said doctors said he
would never be 100 per cent
again.

“The doctor said they are
going to do an X-ray of his
chest because he is still
bringing up blood and vom-
iting,” “Mrs McKenzie
claimed.

She said she hasn’t been
allowed to visit with her son
for almost three days, despite
assurances by police that she
was welcome to do so.

o-Star Luxury Resort
invites qualified applicants
for the following positions:

FRONT OFFICE
MANAGER
. Responsibilities include:

¢ Management of day-
to-day operations &
assignments of front
office staff
Development &
communication of
departmental
strategies & goals
Assisting in managing
hotel revenue genera-
tion & maximization
through full utilization
of company
Monitoring front office
staff to ensure guests
receive prompt
attention & personal
recognition that is the
Grand Isle standard.

RESTAURANT
MANAGER
Responsibilities include:

¢ Management of
day-to-day operations
of department
Ensuring continued
training & devel-
opment of staff to
achieve product &
service standards
Establishment &
revision of customer
care practices to
achieve total client
satisfaction.

Qualifications:

Minimum of two years experience in similar

position

Proven record of superior customer service &

guest relations skills

Excellent written & verbal communications skills
Proven leadership ability & ability to train &
motivate team members

Computer literacy.

EXECUTIVE
CHEF
Responsibilities include:

¢ Creation of full menu
for new restaurant

¢ Coordination,
budgeting &
purchasing of food
for all operations
within the resort

¢ Planning and supervi-
sion of food prepa-
ration & cooking
activities of multiple
kitchens ~

e Ensuring timely
delivery of services

¢ Creation of
decorative food
displays.

Qualifications:

¢ Bachelors or related
culinary degree

e Proven culinary ability

° Proven leadership
ability with the ability
to train & motivate
team members

¢ Previous experience
with food costs &
development of menu
& culinary team.

Bahamian citizenship or residency status with right to work required
Willingness to live on a Family Island essential

For immediate consideration, please send resume to:
e-mail: tracy.stoltz@grandisleresort.com





PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Winless
Rams fire
coach Scott

Linehan

@ By RB FALLSTROM
AP Sports Writer

ST LOUIS (AP) — The
winless St Louis Rams fired
coach Scott Linehan yester-
day, the day after a fourth
straight lopsided loss to start
the season.

Defensive coordinator
Jim Haslett will replace

Linehan on an interim basis. .

The Rams scheduled a news
conference later Monday.

“T have enormous respect
for Scott Linehan as a per-
son and believe under the
right circumstances he will
be regarded one day asa
fine head coach,” owner
Chip Rosenbloom said in a
release.

“Unfortunately, the situa-
tion with the Rams as they
exist today is no longer
acceptable and we have to’
make a change.”

Linehan had an overall
11-25 record in his first head
coaching job. The Rams
have been outscored 147-43
this season, and have
allowed at least 30 points in
seven straight games dating
back to last year.

The move was made
heading into the Rams’ bye
week and several hours after
the Buffalo Bills outscored
them 25-0 in the second halt
of a 31-14 victory Sunday.

St Louis has lost 17 of its
last 20 games overall.

The 0-4 start is the second
straight for the Rams, who
lost their first eight games
last year en route to a 3-13
finish that landed them with
the second pick in the draft.

A sign at Sunday’s home
game read: “Congress. Now
bail out the Rams.”

Haslett was fired as coach
of the New Orleans after the
2005 season, and joined the
Rams on Linehan’s first staff
in 2006.

The Linehan era was
mostly a dreary time for the
franchise, especially on the
heels of the wild highs and
lows of predecessor Mike
Martz, who helped the
Rams win their lone Super
Bowl after the 1999 season
and led them to a second
Super Bowl as coach in the
2001 season. .

The Rams were 8-8 in
2006, Linehan’s first season.
The team rallied to win four
of its Iast six games after
Linehan turned over play-

calling duties to offensive:

coordinator Greg Olson.

Numerous offensive line
injuries, beginning with sev-
en-time Pro Bowl tackle
Orlando Pace’s season-end-
ing shoulder injury in the
opener, paved the way for
last year’s poor season.
Linehan reclaimed play-call-
ing duties that year after
three games.

Linehan, 45, again relin-
quished the play-calling this
season after replacing Olson
with Al Saunders, among
several moves in a staff
overhaul.

Other changes were
made, with training camp
moved to a remote location
in Mequon, Wis., and Line-
han attempting to inject
more energy into a his low-
key personality.

On Sunday, he benched
quarterback Marc Bulger,
the highest-paid player in
franchise history, and went
with 38-year-old backup
Trent Green. That was one
of six lineup changes for the
Bills game.

None of it worked.

Linehan knew his job was
in jeopardy Sunday, having
been put on notice by
Rosenbloom. He emptied
the playbook, going for first
downs twice on fourth down
and using a handful of trick
plays with a juggled lineup
led by Green.

The firing was the second
in-season coaching change
by the Rams this decade.
Martz was replaced after
five games in 2005 by inter-
im coach Joe Vitt due to
medical reasons. Martz was
let go the day after that 5-11
season.

The last Rams coach
removed during the season
for non-medical reasons was
Bob Waterfield, replaced by
Harland Svare after eight
games in 1962 when the
Rams were in Los Angeles.



GREEN BAY Packers’ Greg Jennings celebrates after scoring his second touchdown

against the Buccaneers during the second half...

OC \ A
ges



BUFFALO BILLS wide receiver Lee Evans (83) catches a 39-
yard pass for a touchdown as St Louis Rams’ Jason Craft
(31) defends during the fourth quarter of Sunday’s game in
St Louis...



Tom Gannam/AP

Photos: Chris 0’Meara/AP

in Tampa, Florida. The Buccaneers won 30-21...

ST LOUIS RAMS running back
Steven Jackson (39) runs for an
eight-yard gain as Buffalo Bills’ Ko
Simpson misses the tackle during
the second quarter. The Bills won
31-14...

(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

py

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Yo Williiidiies



MMS

of Sunday’s game in Oakland, California.





ie Chargers wo

TAMPA BAY Buccaneers tight end Alex Smith (81) eludes Green Bay Packers’ Michael Mont-

gomery (96) after catching a touchdown pass during the second quarter of Sunday's game

Paul Sakuma/AP



TRIBUNE SPORTS



Iraq loses
bid to get back
into 2010 World

Cup qualifying

LAUSANNE, Switzerland
(AP) — Iraq lost its bid
Monday for reinstatement in
2010 World Cup qualifying
after the sport’s highest court
refused to punish Qatar for
using an ineligible player.

The Court of Arbitration
for Sport agreed with gov-
erning body FIFA that Iraq
had no right to make an
appeal because it was late in
paying a $2,800 fee.

The Iraqi Football Associ-
atiox. (IFA) missed the dead-
line by 11 days.

“The IFA was fully aware
of the conditions for filing an
appeal with FIFA,” CAS said
in a statement.

The dispute stemmed from
a March 26 Asian qualifier
between Qatar and Iraq in
Doha.

Brazilian-born Emerson
was a Qatar citizen when he
helped his adopted country
beat Iraq 2-0.

But earlier in his career he
had also played for Brazil’s
under-20 team under the
name of Marcio Passos De

Police
arrest

Albuquerque.
FIFA lets players change
nationality but not play for

_two countries.

27 after

clash

WARSAW, Poland (AP)
— Polish soccer fans
punched and kicked each
other during a game, leading
to 27 arrests. f

Tk. outburst happened in
the western city of Szczecin
at a first-division game over
the weekend.

Footage broadcast on state
television showed Wisla
Plock fans scaling a fence to
get into a section reserved
for fans of the home team,
Flota Swinoujscie.

Fans from both teams
attacked each other wildly
before police arrived to
restore order.

Officials have struggled for
Jears to quell hooliganism at
Polish soccer stadiums.
Authorities have stepped up
efforts to combat such vio-
lence, with the country the
co-host for the 2012 Euro-
pean Championship.

The breach of rules was
brought to FIFA’s attention
by football officials in Chi-
na, which was due to play
Qatar in a June 2 qualifier.

FIFA banned Emerson
but cleared Qatar of wrong-
doing, despite article 55 of its
disciplinary code stating that
“if a player takes part in an
official match despite being
ineligible, his team will be
sanctioned by forfeiting the
match.”

Article 31 of the code
states that a forfeit is consid-
ered a 3-0 defeat — a-result
which would have seen Iraq
take Qatar’s place in the cur-
rent qualifying stage.

FIFA’s disciplinary com-
mittee said the code penal-
ties should not apply because
the Qatari federation was
given false information.

It rejected two Iraq
attempts to appeal on tech-
nical grounds.

Delic
advances
at Japan
Open

TOKYO (AP) — Amer
Delic beat Go Soeda of
Japan 6-4, 6-2 Monday to
advance to the second
round of the Japan Open.

Defending champion
David Ferrer of Spain —
the top-seeded player has
a first-round bye along with
second-seeded Andy Rod-

dick.
Rallied

Fifth-seeded Kaia
Kanepi of Estonia rallied
from a slow start for a 4-6,
6-3, 6-4 win over Lucie
Safarova of the Czech
Republic in the women’s
tournament.

Also, Ayumi Morita of
Japan beat New Zealand’s
Marina Erakovic 6-1, 6-4
and Marta Domachowska
defeated Aiko Nakamura
of Japan 6-4, 7-5.



























Premier League So

@ By The Associated Press

¢ Through September 28

ENGLAND
Premier League

TEAM

Q
a=]

Chelsea
Liverpool
Arsenal
West Ham
Hull

Aston Villa
Blackburn
Man City
Portsmouth
Wigan

Man United
W B Albion
Sunderland
Everton
Fulham
Middlesbrough
Bolton
Stoke
Newcastle
Tottenham

DADDDDMNDNANDAADRDUDDHDAVAAVAS

SCOTLAND
Pr smier League

TEAM
Rangers
Celtic
Hearts
Inverness CT
Hibernian
Kilmarnock
Hamilton
Dundee Utd
Falkirk
Motherwell
Aberdeen
St Mirren

ss

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ORR OODRH ANNAN

WwW

BN

INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Pistons sign free
agent guard Acker



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAG

Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

IN THIS February 20, 2008 file photo, Barcelona’s Alex Acker (right) drives to the basket as CSKA
Moscow's Ramunas Siskauskas defends during their Euroleague Basketball match in Moscow.The
Detroit Pistons signed free agent guard:Alex Acker to a contract yesterday. The Pistons selected The six-
foot-five, 185-pound Acker in the second round of the 2005 NBA draft as the 60th overall pick. He played
five games with the Pistons during the 2005-06 season, averaging 1.8 points and one rebound a game...

NBHBRBRDAQAAANANMDO’O







‘IN THIS April 7, 2008 file photo,
Memphis’ Joey Dorsey dunks the
ball during the first half against
Kansas in the championship
game of the NCAA college Final
Four in San Antonio. Dorsey
agreed to a contract yesterday
with the Houston Rockets...

HOUSTON (AP)






Eric Gay/AP

Rookie forward Joey Dorsey
agreed to a contract Monday
with the Houston Rockets.

The six-foot-eight Dorsey
was drafted by Portland ear-
ly in the second round before
the Rockets acquired his
rights.

9E 13

Any increase

in security
budget for 2012
Olympics a ‘price
you alisolutely
have to pay’

SYDNEY, Australia (AP)
— The chairman of the
British Olympic Association
said Monday any increase in
the security budget for the,
2012 London Games is a
“price you absolutely have
to pay” to make the
Olympics secure.

British media reports say
the security budget most
likely will grow to $2.74 bil-
lion, three times the original
estimate.

“Whatever it takes must
be spent,” Lord Colin :
Moynihan said. “That is crit-
ical.”

Moynihan, who met Mon-
day with Australian Olympic
Committee chief John

. Coates, said the security

budget has not been com-
pleted and will be discussed
this week when he returns
home.

“If the security budget is
greater than originally con-
ceived, which it is; that is a
price you absolutely have to
pay to make sure the games
are a success and the, athletes
are secure, and everybody
who comes-to the country as
our guest...is fully secure.”

He said whatever extra
money is spent on security
will not jeopardize other
Olympic operations.

“That can’t be traded off
against other aspects of the
games,” he said.

Moynihan said the global
financial crisis was affecting
some sponsorship arrange-
ments.

“It makes it tougher, no
question,” he said. “I believe
we will achieve our targets.
Some are under greater
strain than they were a mat-
ter of months ago so we need
to respond to that. Ultimate-
ly we’ve given commitments
to the IOC and we need to
see those commitments
through.”

Dorsey was twice named
the Conference USA Defen-
sive Player of the Year for
Memphis, where he was the
league’s career rebounding
leader.

The Rockets also signed
center Marcus Campbell and
guard Von Wafer.







Ng Han Guan/AP

USA’s ANDY RODDICK returns a shot against Israel’s Dudi Sela during their men’s final match of China Open tournament
in Beijing, China, on Sunday. Roddick won 6-4, 7-6, 6-3...





PAGE 14, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



HAMDEN iin eR RB Ne ts AN a an
HAR)
MPF



Cricket
Standings

e The BCA’s standings
are as follows:

Team Ww L
Dynasty Stars 10 0
D Titans 8 2
Scotia. P 7 3
T-Bird Flyers 4 6
D P Boys 3 7
Police 3 7
St Agnes 3 9







SOFTBALL,
from 15

the leagues. It is paying divi-
dends right now.”

Dorsett said the high level of

play in the tournament often
peaks the interest of the Fed-
eration and the national pro-
gramme. —
. “In the past years we have
seen the fruits of the Austin
Knowles tournament bear fruit
in the various senior leagues,
particularly here in New Provi-
dence,” he said.

“There is always an excep-
tional caliber of play emanat-
ing from the tournament. We
see great potential in the pitch-
ing department and we see here
in New Providence quite a few
’ of the young pitchers in the
NPSA. With a youth movement
on the works for our national
teams, it becomes even more
beneficial,” he said.

Dorsett said several islands
have already confirmed partici-
pation, setting the stage for a
truly all-encompassing national
tournament.

“Long Island has been a
dominant force in the Austin
Knowles in recent years and
have already indicated they will
be returning. Other islands have
pledged their participation,
including Exuma, Andros,
Eleuthera and of course schools
here in New Providence,” he
said.

Over 200 trophies, medals
and T-shirts will be awarded to
all participants.

The MGM Wildcats, of Long
Island, are the defending cham-
pions in the boys and girls divi-



sions and will be returning to

defend both titles.

There is no entrance fee for
the tournament, which is open
to all high schools in the coun-
try.

Interested schools may con-
tact tournament director Leroy
Thompson, who is also head
coach at Government High
School, Kelly Smith, or BSF
executives Romell Knowles and
Burket Dorsett.

new stock
arriving daily!

Police upset the
Dorsey Park Boys

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-
ciation continued its regular sea-
son action at Windsor Park Sat-
urday but the game between the
T-Bird Flyers and the Dockin-
dale Titans was rained out.

On Sunday however, the
Police upset the Dorsey Park.
Boys in an exciting match
although it was a low-scoring
game.

Batting first, the Police were
bowled out for just 111 runs.
Greg Taylor Sr scored 36 runs
and Odine Tucker had 18.

a’

¢ Wanderers Masters to play in friendly
against Bahamas’ under-19 team

Bowling for Dorsey Park,
Mario Ford and Gary Camp-
bell took three wickets each.

When the Dorsey Park Boys
batted, they were bowled out
for 93 runs to lose by 18 runs:
Mario Fors scored 61 runs in a
losing effort.

Odine Tucker of the under-15

national team took two wickets
for the Police.

Cricket action continues next
weekend when the Police are
scheduled to play Dorsey Park
Saturday and the Dynasty are
set to face Dockendale on Sun-
day.

And On October 13, the

Wanderers Masters Cricket
Team, made up of players over
the age of 45, are scheduled to
play in a friendly match against
the Bahamas’ under-19 team.

The game at Windsor Park
will serve to prepare the Wan-
derers for their visit to South
Florida in December.

China marks Olympics and
spacewalk for Natic yal Day

@ By ANITA CHANG
Associated Press Writer

BEIJING (AP) — China
kicked off its National Day cel-
ebrations yesterday by high-
lighting its hosting of the Bei-
jing Olympics and the coun-
try’s first spacewalk, two hard-
won successes in a tumultuous
year marked by natural disas-
ters, ethnic unrest and another
food safety scandal.

The spacewalk on Saturday
boosted a wave of Chinese
pride and patriotism stemming
from the Olympics, which is
still a big news story in the

‘ domestic media one month

after it ended. China’s
Olympic heroes were hon-
oured in a three-hour ceremo-
ny at the Great Hall of the
People that was broadcast live
on national television.

State broadcaster CCTV
showed the three returning
astronauts, with flower gar-
lands around their necks, wav-
ing and smiling as they were
treated to a homecoming
parade in Beijing.

Their mission, including Chi-
na’s first spacewalk, put the
country closer to building a
space station and landing a
man on the moon.

Holding up Chinese flags
and balloons, hundreds of peo-
ple, many of them uniformed
soldiers, cheered and applaud-

CHINESE Prime Minister Wen Jiabao

toasts the guests after delivering a {
speech during a banquet marking the |
59th anniversary of the founding of the
People’s Republic of China on Monday
at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. |
China celebrates its National Day on

October 1.

ed as the astronauts went by,
with some shouting out, .

Sale

A days only

Sept 26th - 30th, 2008

20:

© Housewares Dept
e | inens

¢ Baby Items
as

1) | aise:

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(AP Photo: Guang Niu) 1



“Learn from the astronauts
and salute the astronauts.”

One banner read: “Warmly
celebrate the great success of
the task of the Shenzhou
manned space flight.”

Meanwhile, Vice President
Xi Jinping, who oversaw
preparations for the Beijing
Summer Games, praised what
he said was China’s realization
of a 100-year dream to host
the event and said it would
keep China on its reform path.

“The successful holding of
the Beijing Olympics and Par-
alympics has carried forward
the Olympic spirit, improved
the understanding and friend-
ship between Chinese people
and all people of the world,”
Xi said. “It has...shown the
world the great achievements
of reform and opening and the
building of socialist modern-
ization.”

But Premier Wen Jiabao
touched briefly on some of the
country’s troubles so far this
year during an address at a

dinner banquet that included
many foreign dignitaries.

“We prevailed over the dis-
asters caused by the heavy
snow and sleet storms and the
devastating Wenchuan earth-
quake,” he said, referring to a
freak storm just before Febru-
ary’s Lunar New Year that left
scores dead and hundreds of
thousands stranded during the
country’s busiest travel peri-
od.

A magnitude 7.9 earthquake
in May left nearly 90,000 peo-
ple dead or missing.

“We still face many difficul-
ties and problems in our
endeavor to advance socialist
modernization but we have full
confidence to overcome
them,” he said.

The 59th anniversary of the
founding of the People’s
Republic of China is Wednes-
day. This year also marks 30
years since China started the
economic reforms that turned
the country into the world’s
factory floor and transformed



results

OFFICIAL results of
the first Tom “The Bird’
Grant High School Pre-
Season Volleyball Tour-
nament, which concluded
on Saturday at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, are as
follows:

Junior Girls

HO Nash def.
Sweeting 17-12, 17-11

MVP: Kendra Kemp

Winning coach: Patricia
“Patty” Johnson

Junior Boys

Freedom Baptist def.
CC Sweeting 10-17, 17-13,
15-10

MVP: Javon Davis

Winning coach: Sher-
man Smith.

Senior Girls

CV Bethel def. CC
Sweeting 25-10, 25-16

MVP: Jessica Francis

Winning coach: Glend
Gilcud ;

Senior Boys

Ce



CC Sweeting def. Doris
Johnson 25-23, 25-20

MVP: Gabi Laurence

Winning coach: Andrew
Tynes



all of its major cities.

Economic development has
been slower to reach far-flung
regions like Tibet, where sim-
mering ethnic tensions boiled
over in March.

Anti-government riots

’ erupted in the capital of Lhasa,

sparking sympathy protests in
Tibetan areas across western
China.

The riots stemmed in part
from tensions between
Tibetans and ethnic Han Chi-
nese, many of whom have
flooded into the region to pur-
sue business interests since a
railway link opened in 2006.
Some Tibetans feel the migra-
tion is diluting the region’s
unique culture.

International protests
against China’s crackdown on
the rioting marred Beijing’s
ambitious 21-country Olympic
torch relay and focused an
unwelcome spotlight on the
country’s policies in Tibet.

The latest crisis involves
milk tainted with the industri-
al chemical melamine. China’s
shoddy food safety record is
again under scrutiny after con-
taminated milk powder sick-
ened some 54,000 childrén.

There have been questions
raised whether local officials
delayed revealing until after
the Olympics that the
melamine, used to make plas-
tics and fertilizer, was found
in milk powder and linked to
kidney stones in children. Four
infants’ deaths have been
linked to bad milk powder.

Wen noted that China is
prepared to overcome any dif-
ficulties because of the
strength of the Communist
Party, which played a promi-
nent role in the National Day
celebrations.

“We are confident because
we are fully prepared and have
taken active measures to
address difficulties,” Wen said.
“We are confident because we
can benefit from the successful
experience in reform and
development and rely on our
national strength.”











TRIBUNE

Roddick
wins China
Open

SENET

SEPTEMBER 30, See page 13



2008

AGE 12° NFL HIGHLIGHTS...





King Snake’
softball tourney
slated for next

month

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

HIGH school softball teams
across the country will once again
take advantage of the upcoming
fall semester mid-term break to
decide the Bahamas’ best teams.

The ninth edition of the Austin
“King Snake” Knowles High

School National Softball Tourna- .

ment is scheduled for October
23-25 at the Blue Hills Sporting
Complex.

The Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation created the tournament for
senior boys and girls as a means
of determining a unified national
champion and to help foster the
growth of their development pro-
gramme.

Burket Dorsett, first vice pres-
ident of the BSF, said the tour-
nament has grown exponentially
in its near decade of existence

_ and facilitates the growth of the
local leagues on a yearly basis.

“It has shown tremendous
progress for the game of softball
in the country. We know this year
will be one of the more successful
tournaments we have put on this
far,” he said.

“It is somewhat of a feeder sys-
tem for the senior leagues and we
hope that the coaches of the

teams of those teams that playin .

the New Providence Softball
Association and other leagues
around the country will scout this
tournament-and its young play-
ers:and eventually feed them into

SEE page 14

—_ blow away
Big Red Machines

Bluewaves knock off
the Crusaders 8-

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t Andrew’s Hurri-
canes blew up a
storm yesterday at

the Field of

Dreams as they
stopped the St Augustine’s
Coll Red Machines in
six i a the ten-run rule.

Ta. urricanes, the
Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools’
defending senior boys softball
champions, slowed down the
Big Red Machines 15-5 to
remain undefeated at 3-0.

“We knew they are a pow-
erhouse in softball, but we
came out today and shut them
down,” said winning pitcher
Jarred Higgs as they handed
SAC’s first loss in three
games.

Higgs did his damage by fir-
inv a three-hitter, striking out
six batters through the first
five innings before right field-
er Herman Maycock came in
and closed the door in the
sixth.

“T felt good about my per-
formance. My arm started to
get tired around the fourth
inning, but I worked through
it and Herman came in and

Distributed By:

aby e
vs ee dL
Bie

Se

ne Cas

"SOFTBALL



sealed the deal,” Higgs said.
Before he left, Higgs made

his contribution offensively

with a run batted in on a sin-

~ gle, scoring a run in a three-

run second as St Andrew’s
went on to snatch a 3-1 lead.
The Hurricanes, producing

“L1 hits off losing pitcher Bryon

Ferguson, came up with five
big runs in the third, two in

the fourth and another four -

in the fifth as they took advan-
tage of some costly mistakes
by the Big Red Machines.
Marcus Farrington, who
went 3-for-4 with two RBIs
and three runs scored, had a
solo home run to start the
third run rally. Brandon Bur-
rows, who was 2-for-3, led the
fourth with a RBI single.
Then in the fifth, as St
Andrew’s batted around the
clock, Costa Papageorge
opened the frame with a dou-

ble and scored on Connor -

Albury’s run-producing dou-
ble. After Tariq Kelly got on
board on an error that loaded
the bases, David Sweeting
came through with a RBI
walk and Farrington closed

out the spurt with a RBI sin-
gle.

Hurricanes’ coach Mont-
gomery Nazon said they came
out and did what they had to
do and that was to hold the
Big Red Machines at bay.

“Pretty much, I think we
executed the way we planned
it,’ Nazon stated. “As we con-
tinue to win and ‘go through
the season, we will realize that
we could have another special
season.”

Nazon was referring to their
undefeated regular season as
they clinched the pennant last
year. They almost completed a
rare perfect season, but it was
blemished in the champi-
onship by the Kingsway Acad-
emy Saints.

St Andrew’s, however,
rebounded from the loss and
went on to sweep Kingsway
Academy to win the title.

After getting knocked out
in the playoffs, coach Greg

Burrows is hoping that this
would be the year that the big
Red Machines would regain
their title.

But he admitted that they
didn’t play up to par penne St
Andrew’s.

“They gave us all of our
runs and we gave them all of
theirs,” Burrows pointed out.
“T don’t know. I still think we
have a chance. We didn’t look
good today.

’ “But I had a good little talk
with them and I expect that
we will play like we did in our
first two games.”

Despite their lackluster per-
formance, Byron Ferguson

helped his own cause with -

three unearned runs after he
walked twice and added a
fielder’s choice to lead SAC.
Diego Hutchinson had an
RBI single, scoring a run and
Ricardo Stubbs singled and
scored a run as well for all of
SAC’s offensive Poa

Ferguson, who played a piv-
otal role as the pitcher for St
Augustine’s junior boys team,
said it was just a tough pill to
swallow.

“We came out in the first
couple of innings and played
pretty good,” he said. “Then
we just fell apart, the whole

~ team.”

If the Big Red Machines are
going to get back on track,
Ferguson said he will have to
step up his game and help to
develop the confidence in his
team-mates and they should
be able to do it.

Also yesterday at St
Andrew’s, the St Anne’s Blue-
waves knocked off the Nas-
sau Christian Academy Cru-
saders 8-3. Dominique Collie
picked up the win over P
Nathan.

Angelo Butler had three
hits, scoring three runs, and
Kirk Stubbs added two hits
with three RBIs in the win.

At

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ESDAY,

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2008

ROYAL DFIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Baha Mar Real estate project now 70% sold-out

flownsizes
Development
Company

* Second wave of
redundancies to come;
numbers not specified

* Move designed, to
eliminate ‘duplication’
with future
construction partner

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA Mar_ yesterday
announced more job losses at
its 60-strong Development
’ Company, a senior executive
yesterday telling Tribune Busi-
ness that the developer was
going “to reduce that unit sig-
nificantly” to avoid “duplica-

tion” with a future construction

_company partner.

Although unable to provide a
specific figure for the number
of job losses anticipated, Robert
Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-
president for administration and
external affairs, said: “It’s a re-
engineering of that department,
which will result in a much
smaller Development Compa-
ny.

“Tt will allow the smaller team
to work alongside the construc-
tion organisation partner we
hope to see in the near future.
We don’t want to duplicate

- effort.”

Mr Sands said Baha Mar
“Development Company, which
is a separate unit from Baha
Mar Resorts, the operator of
the Sheraton and Wyndham
resorts, plus the Crystal Palace
casino, has “close to 60 staff at
the moment”.

Many of them will be highly-
qualified Bahamian and expa-
triate architects, engineers and

SEE page 4B



m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter



he Fortune Hills
gated community

now under con- |

struction on Blue

Hill Road has
seemingly bucked negative eco-
nomic trends by selling 70 per
cent of its units, with the devel-
opers confident that the
remaining real estate will be
sold by year’s end.

Deyvon Jones, vice-president
of Jones Construction - the
developers - said that since the
company launched Fortune
Hills six months ago, ‘it had
received tremendous interest
in the three-acre property from
potential buyers. With impres-
sive views across New Provi-
dence, the $7-$8 million pro-
ject will feature a combination
of condos and town hofnes, as
well as a swimming pool and
playground area.

Speaking.to Tribune Busi-
ness at Saturday’s open house,
Mr Jones said the first phase

features two buildings - one —

with nine residences and one
with six.

Once sales are finalised, the
builders only require 60 days
to complete the interiors for
occupancy: Another building
will feature two three-storey
town homes, and although con-
struction will not begin for two
weeks, the buildings are already
fully sold.

“We are on schedule to have

Cable eyes |
telecoms |
licences

* PM’s one-year
cellular monopoly
for BTC post-
privatisation marks
‘seismic shift’ in
telecoms sector
* Government opts |
for liberalisation
over purchase price,
encouraging
competition







@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ presi-
dent made no secret last
night of the company’s
intentions to move into cel-
lular and fixed-line tele-
coms services, after Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
stunned the industry by
announcing that the

SEE E page 5B 5B



* $7-$8m Fortune Hills development bucks economic trends by not relying on pre- “ales
* First phase likely completed by February 2009, with whole development possibly finished by August next year
* Gated community a price point ($249,000-$279,000) ‘that the Bahamas is starved for’

im OUTSIDE view of mo Fortune Hills development te Hill Road...

this first phase completed by
February 2009. Of the units
that we are building now, which
is 17 units, 11 are sold,” Mr
Jones told Tribune Business.

“Our intent is to be out of
this development and have it
sold out within the year, then
build out. In fact, hopefully we
can finish today. If we can get it
sold out by the end of the year,
by August [2009] everything
will be done.”

He added that one factor aid-
ing the developers was that
they have a product in the
ground, so people can actually
see what is being offered. “It’s
not like some projects where



they have a lot of drawings, but
nothing concrete,” Mr Jones
said

He added that Jones Con-
struction secured its project
financing before construction
began, which ensured they
were able to remain on target
with timelines.

Mr Jones said many real
estate projects were dependent
on pre-sales to fund their build-
out, and when the economy
had challenges it negatively
impacted their timelines, affect-
ing consumers’ confidence in
the investment.

Mindful of the current eco-
nomic climate, Mr Jones said

the developers had tried to be
cost effective in building the
property and providing clients
with value for money.

The development has attract-
ed a variety of prospective
homeowners, from young first-
time buyers to older investors
and some foreign investors,

“That has been very encour-
aging for us,” Mr Jones said,
and the developers have pro-
vided homeowners with details
sought on large closets, hard
wood floors, granite counter-
tops and extra storage space.

“These are little things and
attention to details that people
are excited about,” he added.

Zack Bonczek, sales man-
ager for Paradise Real Estate,
which is the property’s exclu-
sive listing agent, explained why
he thinks Fortune Hills has-had
the success it has enjoyed.

“In the Bahamas and in Nas-
sau, gated communities have
become very popular because
people like the security and
safety of a closed environ-
ment,” Mr Bonczek said.

He added that properties in
gated communities tend to
appreciate and hold in value at
a much quicker rate.

“What we're selling here is
an investment opportunity and
a lifestyle,’ Mr Bonczek said.
“The location is interesting. Ini-

tially, I was a bit hesitant, and
then when I had my first site
visit I realised the location pre-
sents an interesting opportuni-
ty and one that we embraced
as soon as we finished our first
visit.”

Mr Bonczek said Fortune
Hills’ location, which is really in
the city centre, was convenient
for downtown Nassau, the air-
port, malls, gas stations, gro-
cery stores and the western end
of the island.

“Every amenity is here. You
have a controlled environment
and you're at the top of the hill,
so now you’re getting views
that most people have not seen
before,” Mr Bonczek said.

“This is a price point
($249,000-$279,000) that the
Bahamas ‘is starved for. We
have lots of first-time home-
owners who are looking for
something to buy and can’t find
anything, because there is noth-
ing to buy and everything that
there is to buy is old and needs
renovation.

“Not everyone has $300,000
lying around, so for those who
appreciate their dollars, you can
get something new, with granite
countertops and hardwood
floors, brand new modern con-
struction, or buy something that

. is old and you have to main-

tain for the rest of your life.” ©

| Credit crunch fears on BTC privatisation 4

i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TELECOMS industry execu-
tives and analysts yesterday
questioned whether the global
credit/liquidity crunch would
make the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company’s (BTC)
sale possible due to the diffi-
culties any buyer would have in
raising debt financing, although
the Government’s privatisation
committee chair said he did not
anticipate any impact.

T. B. Donaldson, who is also
Commonwealth Bank’s chair-
man, said that while the latest

Privatise committee chair sees no impact, but
analysts and telecoms industry insiders unsure

Wall Street financial meltdown
might have impacted BTC’s pri-
vatisation if a deal had already
been reached and a buyer was
still seeking debt financing to
close in the next one to two
months, the committee was
working to a longer timescale.

“From a personal perspec-
tive, I don’t see this affecting
the sale of BTC at all,” Mr
Donaldson told Tribune Busi-

ness, adding that large compa-
nies with deep pockets and cap-
ital bases would not be deterred
from buying into the state-
owned Bahamian telecoms
provider.

The privatisation committee
chairman added that it was
some “three months away from
looking at a deal”, and that it
was “six weeks” before inter-
ested parties were likely to

lodge bids for a 51 per cent
stake in BTC.

Where that leaves Bluewater
Communications Holdings, the
group that agreed a $260 mil-
lion deal in principle to pur-
chase a 49 per cent BTC stake
with the former,Christie admin-
istration, is anyone’s guess.

Mr Donaldson declined to

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Lessons that must be learnt
from US financial ‘meltdown’

LAST week, I wrote about
the-then quickly evolving US
Department of Treasury bailout
program to restore confidence
to the US (and global capital)
markets. As the week pro-
gressed, it appeared as though
Treasury Secretary Henry Paul-
son, with the support of Ben
Bernanke, chairman of the Fed-
eral Reserve (the US Central
Bank) produced a three-page
memoranda, the contents of
which represented a plan to
bailout financial institutions and
presumably stabilise the US and
global economy. Further, Con-
gress was being asked to give
quick bipartisan approval to this
plan.

In that column, I said: “While
the ‘fix’ seems relatively
straightforward, the question is:

‘Who pays the $700 billion
bill?” The only patently clear
thing about the proposed
bailout was that the taxpayer
would pick up the tab.

Questions

The initial proposal was to
give the Treasury Department
total control over this vast sum
of taxpayer funds, in order to
‘save the financial system’.
Treasury Secretary Paulson is
a former Wall Street titan who
ran Goldman Sachs prior to tak-
ing on ‘national service’ by
accepting the job.

So far, so good... however,
once basic and fundamental
questions began to be asked,
the initial impetus behind the
bailout slowed. Clearly, details
had to be worked out and com-





Financial
Focus

By Larry Gibson



promises reached. There were
no initial satisfactory answers
to:

* Who oversees the spending
of the $700 billion?

* What are the precise details
of the bailout?

* Who gets bailed out?

* How much, if any, of the
money will be used to provide
relief to those (everyday citi-
zens) in foreclosure?

To keep this all in perspec-
tive, $700 billion in taxpayers’

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funds is equivalent to $10,000
for every US household.

Should taxpayer funds be

used to bail out ‘Wall Street’,
where the size of ‘golden para-
chutes’ and annual bonuses has
become absolutely obscene to
the extent that they are offen-
sive to our sensibilities? This is
the problem members of Con-
gress find themselves grappling
with, knowing they will have to
face their constituents when
seeking re-election.

Further fallout

Talks slowed and the market
became nervous once again and
then... the Bush administration
and Congress anxiously revived
negotiations on the $700 billion
financial bailout on Friday, one
day after the largest bank col-
lapse (Washington Mutual) in
US history provided a brutal
reminder of the risks of failure.
Washington Mutual had $307
billion in assets, more than
43,000 employees and some
2,300 branches. But its down-
fall was its $227 billion in mort-
gage loans, many of which fell
into the sub-prime category.

Following up on the point
made above about excessive
chief executive golden para-
chutes, CNN reported that
Washington Mutual chief exec-
utive Alan Fishman could walk
away with more than $18 mil-
lion in salary, bonuses and sev-
erance pay after less than three
weeks on the job via the terms
of his employment agreement.

Now you can see why there is
so much pressure to ensure that
none of the taxpayers’ $700 bil-
lion goes to pay such settle-
ments. Is this obscene or what?

i

The theory

The legislation that the Bush
administration is promoting
would allow the US government
to buy bad mortgages and other
impaired assets held by
investors, most of them financial
companies.

The theory is that such sales
would nrevide liquidity to these
financial companies, thus
enabling them to continue lend-
ing and lift a major weight off a
US economy that is already
sputtering.

However, a significant num-
ber of lawmakers, including
many Republicans, are against
such heavy government inter-
vention.

For instance, the opposing
Republicans are proposing that
the government insure the dis-
tressed securities rather than
buy them, and provide addi-
tional tax breaks to give busi-
ness an incentive to invest.

The compromise

Early Sunday morning, the
US House of Representatives
Speaker, Nancy Pelosi,
announced that a compromise
had been reached between the
negotiating parties. The com-
promise was subject to being
‘committed to paper’ for formal
passage on Monday or Tuesday
of this week.

Under the tentative deal,
which when passed will be
known as the *Emergency Eco-
nomic Stabilisation Act 2008”,
contains the following changes
from the original Paulson pro-
posal:

* The rescue programme will
be overseen by the Financial
Stability Oversight Board, con-

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sisting of the chairman of the
Federal Reserve, the secretary
of treasury, the director of the
Federal Home Finance Agency,
the chairman of the Securities
and Exchange Commission, and
the secretary of Housing and
Urban Development

* The $700 billion would be
disbursed in stages, with $250
billion made available immedi-
ately

* The Treasury would estab-
lish an insurance programme -
with premiums paid by the
industry - to mitigate taxpayer
losses

* The bill would also proba-
bly include some curbs on the
compensation of executives at
companies that participate

* The US government would
get the right to receive equity
stakes in companies rescued
under this plan. The measure is
an attempt to reduce fiscal risk
to taxpayers.

Critical lessons

What are the critical lessons
to be learnt from this whole
episode?

Firstly, without a doubt, this
situation is very serious. If noth-
ing is done, credit and liquidity
in the entire financial system
dries up. If there is no credit in
the system, then there will be a
‘financial meltdown’. If there is
a financial meltdown, the ulti-
mate consequences could be
beyond comprehension. There-
fore, it is a precondition of any
resolution that we take steps to
ensure that the mess the system
currently finds itself in is never
repeated.

Second, it shows that in times
of crisis, a bipartisan approach
to solving national issues is in
the best interest of all. The addi-
tions to the original proposal,
as outlined above, clearly
enhance the overall rescue plan
and put in needed checks and
balances.

Achieving a bipartisan solu-

tion does not mean you have to
- capitulate to the position of the

party with the majority position

either.

The Democrats held to posi-
tions which were incorporated
and so, too, did the Republi-
cans insist upon provisions in |
opposition to those proposed
by the President. Bipartisanship
deepens democracy.

Third, we must continually
examine the role of regulation
in society. Strangling levels of
government regulation is not
the answer...neither is complete
deregulation the answer, as
advocated by many ‘free mar-
ket’ pundits.

There is no substitute for
strong, balanced and fair regu-
lation, which is overseen by
competent regulators who
understand the business they
are regulating.

Ultimate question

Finally, the ultimate question:
“Will this plan work?” By the
time you actually read this col-
umn, the market would have
had one trading session in the
US and two in Asia. Hopefully,
by then we would be in posi-
tion to render an opinion. Let’s
keep our fingers crossed.

Until next week...

Postscript

The financial markets reacted
sharply to the House of Repre-
sentatives’ vote against approv-
ing the Bush:administration’s
$700 billion bailout plan. The
Dow Jones Industrial Average
lost seven per cent of its value,
and the S&P 500 index eight
per cent. These events empha-
sise the vulnerability of the US
financial system, and heighten

- the real prospect of a major

meltdown.

Two major bank mergers,
also unveiled yesterday, could
be placed in jeopardy by the
House vote, and the effects will -
ripple around the world -
including in the Bahamas.

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, i is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas,

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies, Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs



THE TRIBUNE



Abaco heads the
approval ratings

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

ABACO has the highest
approval ratings in the coun-
try, attracting a 98 per cent
ranking from persons likely to
recommend the destination to
their friends.

Giving an update on the
island’s impact on tourism,
Frank Comito, executive vice-
president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association, explained
‘that Abaco visitors tend to be
more affluent, stay longer,
spend more money and visit
more frequently. He was one
of the presenters at the Abaco
Business Outllok conference.

Mr Comito said Abaco’s
second home market had

. brought an “explosion of

investors to the island”. Its
average stay was 19 nights per
person for yachters. Persons
who came by private air and
commercial plane stayed for
two and three nights above
the national average.

Mr Comitio said Abaco’s
competive edge can be attrib-
uted to the fact that it has a
diverse culture, is a multi-
island destination, has a pool
of expatriate talents locals can
draw from and a diverse visi-
tor base. .

While the island consistent-
ly scores well on exit surveys,
Mr Comitio said the negative
comments are also consistent
and are areas where there
needs to be improvement.

For instance, he said con-

cerns ranged from the amount
of garbage and litter on the
streets, to the level of crime:
and to the high cost of beer.

Mr Comito said other com-
plaints included the vast num-
ber of stray dogs, plus the
indifferent and rude attitudes
of employees.

Persons also complained
about the consistency of
restaurants and stores being
open, and whether the estab-
lishments ensured that the

‘items offered on the menu

were actually available.

“There is a challenge for
consistency and we need to be
consistent,” Mr Comito said.
“There is nothing in these neg-
ative comments that cannot
be corrected or improved
upon.”

Investors still keen
on airport finance

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ‘
Business Reporter

DESPITE the current eco-
nomic climate, there are still

potential investors interested in |

investing in the Lynden Pindling
International Airport’s recon-
struction, the Nassau Airport
Development Company’s chief
executive told the Abaco Busi-
ness Putlook Conference.
' Craig Richmond said that
while this was a difficult time
to secure funding for major pro-
jects, “there are still persons
interested in airports”.

During a short talk to con-
ference attendants, Mr Rich-
mond gave an update on the

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feedback NAD has had since it
undertook major works to
upgrade the airport.

He said the Lynden Pindling
International Airport had
received the highest approval
ratings jump for washroom
improvements he has ever seen,
noting that those enhancements
probably have made the most
significant impact for passen-
gers.

Mr Richmond said the air-
port received an improvement
rating of 3.8, up from 3.104,
which highlighted just how sig-
nificant the conditions of the
washrooms were to passengers.

“That is the largest single
jump I have ever seen,” he said.
Mr Richmond said that further

improvements, such as the new
retail spaces and flight moni-
tors, have also improved the

quality of the experience for

passengers.

Mr Richmond said that while
NAD was satisfied with the
curb-side changes it imple-
mented, it has taken Bahami-
ans a while to get accustomed to
them.

“I think that for the first six
months, we were towing about
100 cars a week,” he said.

He added that at present,
NAD has five directors and 120
staff. He vowed that within the
next four to five years, three to
five of the company’s top posi-
tions should be taken by
Bahamians.

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PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



aT Ee a
Baha Mar downsizes Development Company

FROM page 1B

other construction related per-
sonnel, and their release will
provide another blow - at least
in the short-term - to an
already-struggling economy.

Baha Mar Development
Company was set up to over-
see the mobilisation, planning
and construction for Baha
Mar’s $2.4 billion Cable Beach
expansion, which was thrown
into ‘limbo’ earlier this year
after Harrah’s Entertainment
withdrew as its 43 per cent equi-
ty and casino partner.

As a result, the need for the
Development Company has
been diminished in the short-

term. “A number of persons
will be affected,” Mr Sands said,
although he could not give num-
bers. “We’re going to reduce
the unit significantly. We're
going to have a much smaller
department.”

The downsizing, he added,
had begun “this week, starting
today. This is at a stage where a
decision to reduce has been
made, and we are going through
the process of restructuring”.

Mr Sands added, though, that
Baha Mar still remained com-
mitted to realising its vision for
Cable Beach, and the issues sur-
rounding its Development
Company subsidiary were “sim-
ply a change in strategy and a

reorganisation”.

One possible factor behind
the restructuring, although this
has not been substantiated,
could be the demands of a con-
struction company partner,
especially a Chinese partner.

Chinese construction compa-
nies are well-known for seek-
ing a high level of control over
any project they are involved
with, as per the proposed $30
million National Stadium. And
some of Baha Mar’s most fruit-
ful talks in its search for a new
partner have been with state-
owned Chinese companies.

Mr Sands indicated to Tri-
bune Business just last wee
that Baha Mar’s talks with

several Chinese state-owned
institutions appear currently
to be its best bet for finding a
new equity partner to replace
Harrah’s Entertainment.

“We continue to have open
dialogue with investors from
China, and will continue to
explore that going forward,”
Mr Sands said. “These talks,
from that time, have been the
ones that have been more
encouraging.

“The talks have been going
forward and will continue.
The key is that we’ve had mul-
tiple meetings with them and
they continue.”

The three Chinese institu-

Credit crunch fears on BTC privatisation







crimminal litigation

Nassau, Bahamas

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FROM page 1B

discuss whether Bluewater had
any time left on its exclusivity
period, or the state of negotia-
tions between the committee
and the group, whose principals
include former Time Warner,
NTL and Sprint executives.
The abiding impression is that
the Government is less than

keen on the Bluewater offer, as.

Tribune Business has repeated-
ly stated, and would like to

open up the privatisation
process to other bidders to see
whether better offers may be
out there.

Referring to industry ‘giants’,
Mr Donaldson said that “people
nibbling at the edges we sus-
pect are giants”, indicating that
the BTC privatisation commit-
tee has received multiple
expressions of interest from
established global telecoms
players.

He confirmed this later in the
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, saying that there were



PW. OAK
& s
\ S s

Treasury Head

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Regional Treasury team,
responsible for developing and implementing strategies for
liability products.
responsibilities include marketing and quoting rates for corporate
foreign exchange contracts, money market instruments and
derivative products and projecting liquidity and rate trends. The
role, is also focused on risk management through monitoring
liquidity and foreign exposure, ensuring compliance with legal,
regulatory, and internal policy requirements, and, managing ratios
and reserves. Additional responsibilities include overseeing all
regulatory and management performance
reporting, and, supervising and training support staff.

currency

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Accounting or Finance, and, a minimum of 5 years Treasury
experience with a major commercial. and/or investment bank; a
Chartered Accountant or CFA designation preferred. Excellent —
communication, and interpersonal
skills, combined with a results orientation and an ability to build
relationships, will round out the ideal candidate. Some travel is

Challenge

Cc rFA





9999900900009000900000
coooocoo00oosocq00c000cocdo
f ceoooo0ccqooavwcococodao



MARKETS
Eeaeenee & ADVISORY SERVICES

edme + 175% 19 October, 2022
%



the position is

Key

October, 2017




May, 2013

2.05%
7.80%
oO 00%.



9.0
13.4

6.70%

}. 900 6.16%

tions involved are the China
Export-Import Bank, China
State Construction and the
Bank of China, but Mr Sands
said it was premature to spec-
ulate on when the talks might
be concluded and timelines
for when things might happen.
Sovereign wealth funds, and
the Asian and Middle East-
ern regions, appear to be the
most ripe in Baha Mar’s
search for new partners. These
areas are currently the best
source of new equity capital,
and the Cable Beach devel-
oper has appointed UBS to
advise it on its options.
When asked whether Baha

“people out there who are inter-
ested” who would be classified
as “major players”.

Adding that the privatisation

* committee would conduct due

diligence on BTC bidders to dis-
cover whether they had the nec-
essary financing in place, with
the process requiring that fund-
ing sources be disclosed, Mr
Donaldson said: “By the end of
the year, we should have a rec-
ommendation into the Govern-
ment.

“They'll have some advice
from us before or by the end of
the year. We’re going all-out.
This is like a full-time job.”

Yet several persons ques-
tioned yesterday whether the
global credit crunch, and cur-
rent difficulties in obtaining
debt financing, were likely to
impact the Government’s
attempts to privatise BTC.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, told
Tribune Business: “One of the
things that is increasingly inter-

Mar was concerned that it
would be unable to find a new
partner before March 2009,
the date when the Treasury
and Crown Lands conveyed
to it would revert back to the
Government if no develop-
ment was happening, Mr
Sands said: “The reality is that
there have been significant
world events that have impact-
ed the timelines of our econo-
my, and all these matters will
be reviewed in due course.

“The most important issue
is that the commitment to the
project is still there, we still
want to move ahead and con-
tinue in that vein.”

esting about this, is in this kind
of global environment, who has
the money to put behind BTC.
Where is this money coming
from?”

His sentiments were echoed
by Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of Systems Resource
Group (SRG) and its IndiGo
Networks subsidiary, which is
BTC’s only legal fixed-line com-

‘petitor, who questioned: “How

saleable is BTC right now?”
He told Tribune Business:
“With all that’s happening in
the world markets, is it viable
for someone to buy BTC? If
someone’s going to come along,
open their pockets and offer an

- all-cash deal it will be fine, but

otherwise where’s:the debt
financing going to come from?

“This seems to me to be the
big question. Has the door
closed on the window [of oppor-
tunity] for any divestment of
BTC, or is the Government
going to have to wait for the
markets to stabilise?”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLY LAZARD of
GAMBLE HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of SEPTEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P-O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT
(No. 46 of 2000)

ALL LOGISTICS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED.

PURSUANT TO SECTION 138 (8) OF
THE INTERNATIQNAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of ALL LOGISTICS INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

Sérgio Messias Pedreiro
(Liquidator)











































we wykNS, Holdings . : x 102. 0.00%, =o NU PRR AN RB ey: Se
4 Ws 9 fd WV VRunde AY SAM
S2wk-Hl | S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Divs Yleld% NAV Date
1.3320 1.2652 Colina Bond Fund 1.3320 3.09% 5.27% 31-Jul-08
3.0250 2.8869 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.0250 0.81% 4.7B% 31-Aug-08 Z “ge ; . AT
1.4119 1.3544 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4137 2.81% 4.21% 19-Sep-08 DISC D g Y 10 9 UN ‘OOF
3.7969 3.3971 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.5807 -5.70% 6.40% 31-Aug-08 ie! ‘i AES ena atN ee ~ %
12.3870 11.7116 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.3870 3.80% 6.77% 31-Aug-08

100.0000

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 31-Dec-07

























100.9600 99.9566 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600 1.01% 1.01% 30-Jun-08
41.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund ; 31-Dec-07 POWER EVERYTHING
10.5000 9.4075 Fidelity International Investment Fund -10.40% 31-Aug-08 ABN ERE RL Ae
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.84% 29-Aug-08
FG Financial Growth Fund 1.12% 29-Aug-08
AST 29628 aot 29-Aug-08



lal Olversified



divided by closing pric
1 Fidelity

cd fictolity
© dally volume et Price -\ or price
Jaily volume




$28,500.00

CALL 424 0352

1 > earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol

biv S-Di
P/E - Closing

Idelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

19 8/8/2007 jue = $1000.00

7IVVI2007








SENIAL. BAAABOREF BAG CO



|

JHE |HIBUNG

IUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 5b





Cable Bahamas
eyes telecoms

—

be et

we

j



licences

FROM page 1B

Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) would only
enjoy a maximum one-year cel-
lular monopoly post-privatisa-
tion.

Anthony Butler, when asked
by Tribune Business whether
Cable Bahamas was interested
in obtaining cellular and fixed-
line telecoms licences once BTC
was privatised, replied: “Very
much so.”

He added: “We have invested
heavily in a state-of-the-art
telecommunications network in
the anticipation that we can
benefit from the business in the
future. That can only be good
for the employees and stake-
holders of Cable Bahamas.”

Pointing out that “technology
is driving the convergence of
services” in telecoms, provid-
ing the base for companies to
bundle video, data and voice
services and deliver their ‘triple
play’ down one line, Mr Butler
said: “It should be one licence
that covers all aspects of
telecommunications.”

He was responding after a
day in which.a seismic shift
appeared to take place with
regard to the Government’s pri-
orities regarding the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) and the wider telecoms
industry.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, in announcing to the
House of Assembly that “the
Government proposes at a max-
imum to permit a monopoly to
exist for cellular service for one
year following the sale of the
majority of BTC”, indicated
that liberalisation and deregu-
Yation - andthe competition,
lower prices and enhanced ser-

vice that should bring - was now ~

the key focus.

That marks a major change
from its predecessors, as the
Christie government seemed
more interested in protecting
BTC from competition and
maximising its purchase price.

Mr Ingraham said: “I might
say the following; that the Gov-
ernment proposes to dispose of
51 per cent of BTC and retain
ownership of 49 per cent.

“Secondly, the Government |

proposes that on the sale of
BTC, it would immediately lib-
eralise fixed telephone lines and
there would be permitted com-
petition in that sector.
“Thirdly, the Government
proposes at a maximum to per-
mit a monopoly to exist for cel-
lular service for one year fol-
lowing the sale of the majority
of BTC. We are seeking to lib-
eralise the telephone sector of
the Bahamas in the shortest
possible time, with the full
knowledge that we are behind
everybody else in our region.”
Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, pres-
ident of BTC’s sole legal fixed-
line telecoms competitor, Indi-
Go Networks, told Tribune
Business that the “maximum
one year” cellular monopoly
that BTC would enjoy post-pri-
vatisation was “quite a dramat-

} ic announcement”.

This contrasted with the

+ Prime Minister’s previous

announcement that three years
would be the “outside” maxi-
mum exclusivity any BTC pur-
chaser would enjoy in terms of
cellular service.

“The sands have shifted, and
if the position of the Govern-
ment is that it’s going to be one
year maximum, that’s a signifi-

cant shift,” Mr Hutton-Ashken-

ny told Tribune Business.
He acknowledged that he
would be “very happy to have a

; cellular licence”, pointing, out

that IndiGo Networks licence,
and that of its parent, Systems

Resource Group (SRG), specif-.

ically prohibited it from offering

INSIGHT

For the stories

oleate Mint Male\ ee
i-Â¥-lo Mp Ly[e/i)s
on Mondays



cellular or cable TV services.

Digicel, Mr Hutton-Ashken-
ny said, was another likely
entrant to the Bahamian tele-
coms market on the cellular
side, given its deep pockets and
regional infrastructure.

Yet the Government’s deci-
sion to reduce BTC’s post-pri-
vatisation cellular monopoly to
a maximum of one year is also
likely to lower the price any bid-
der will want to pay for a 49 per
cent BTC stake.

This is because BTC derives
almost two-thirds of its rev-
enues from its cellular service,
and the earlier competition is
introduced, the less time a buy-
er will have to transform the
company and get it ready for
competition. As a result, they
will want to pay a lower price
for their BTC stake.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive,
explained that a major question
was how long a BTC purchaser
would need to make the com-
pany competitive, “regain some
of their investment capital and
generate a return on their
investment capital”.

“IT don’t know if that window
of one year for cell phones is
sufficient,” Mr Kerr said. “But
for the market and consumer,
that announcement is very pos-
itive. For the consumption of
telecoms services, it’s been a
long time coming.

“Choice should bring better
service and competitive pricing,
plus market efficiency. All boats
will be lifted by a rising tide,
because everyone’s got to com-
pete. Everyone has got to pull
their socks up because there’s
no sole provider. BTC got its
customers by default.”

Mr Kerr said the Govern-
ment could use the proceeds
from selling a 49 per cent BTC
stake to either pay down debt,
develop infrastructure or deliv-
er on its economic and social
agenda.

In addition, telecoms compe-
tition was likely to create extra
jobs.

However, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny described as a “moot
point” the Government’s move
to liberalise fixed-line telecoms
as soon as privatisation was
completed, because through his
company and the likes of Von-
age and Skype, it was already
liberalised.

“The rates have come down

so significantly already that to
all intents and purposes it’s a
liberalised market,” he
explained. “Both we and BTC
offer VoIP packages that are
pretty much on par with Von-
age for international long dis-
tance calls, with packages
around $20 per month. There’s
probably not a lot of room for
prices to fall further.”

Mr Ingraham advised the
House of Assembly yesterday
that it was still the Govern-
ment’s intention to privatise
BTC by the end of the year.

However, whether or not the
Government makes this date is
a matter that is being ques-
tioned, Mr Ingraham said.

I EG A I NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

T.M. PEELL INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of T.M. PEELLINC. has been completed, a Certificate of Disso-
lution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 19th

day of September, 2008.



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LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
STAMFORD TEXTILE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of STAMFORD TEXTILE LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 19th day of September, 2008.



NOTICE

_ INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
ARISTAN INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of ARISTAN INC. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 19th
day of September, 2008.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
ACTON ENERGY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in’accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of ACTON ENERGY LIMITED has been completed, a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution

was the 19th day of September, 2008. |



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
GUADIX CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of GUADIX CORP. has been completed, a Certificate of Disso-
lution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 19th
day of September, 2008.



LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
BUXTON HI TECH (ASIA) LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dis-
solution of BUXTON HI TECH (ASIA) LTD. has been completed,

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 19th day of September, 2008.





PAGE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



- Tribune Comics

Ss

JUDGE PARKER

THESE ARE SOME OF
DEWEY'S GUNS..- THERE'S
MORE SCATTEREP AROUND

THE HOUSE!

ian

ey AS
Sy


















YOU KNOW, YOU'RE THE FIRST
PLUMBER I'VE HIRED WHO DOESN'T
MIND A FEW SUGGESTIONS NOW

reserved




© 2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights





ACCORDING TO OUR
PERSONALITY PROFILES,
WE HAVE NOTHING IN

JUST NOT



THERE'RE THREE OF US AND
I HAVE FOUR VONUTS,
\T WONT VIVIVE..-

A

We
tC

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
SHAME ON YOU, SNERT/

CHES BROWNE

©2008 by King Feature:





Across
1 Right-handed key (6,4) .
6 Pretty loud music (4)

©












Across: 1 Doubles, 5 Exact, 8
Stimulant, 9 Eva, 10 Sack, 12 Turned
up, 14 Castor, 15 Severe, 17
Unamused, 18 Stop, 21 Leo, 22
Gladstone, 24 Ditty, 25 Theatre.
Down: 1 Doses, 2 Uri, 3 Lour, 4
Statue, 5 Extended, 6 Amendment, 7
Trample, 11 Cast about, 13 Go hun-
gry, 14 Coupled, 16 Depart, 19 Piece,
20 Isle, 23 Out.








SEE? WE'RE



MY PROBATION OFFICER |
SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT THAT




MEANT TO BE
TOGETHER /

SO NLL HAVE
To EAT THE
EXTRA ONE!

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

2

3

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

T
R
I : 10 ‘Tie up in a bundle of straw
B (5) 4
11 Weapons that don’t reach
U _ very far? (5,4) 5
12 Polo man breaks in one
N horse (8) 7
E 13 There may be a catch in it
(5) 8
, 15 Struck by Cupid’s dart? (7)
17 Unusual portion of toasted 9
T cheese (7)
W 19 Overlooks wild regions (7) 14
21 Convivial salutation (7)
O 22 Where the retired gardener
may be found working? 16
- (2,3)
24 Bail Anna out of a
I European republic (8) 18
N 27 Cast gets left in desert
(5,4) 20
ile 28 Guarantee a number will
get an indication of pain (5) 21
O 29 Says something further
and sums up (4) 23
N 30 Real idiots may produce
E opinionated articles (10) 25
Down
1 Drinks for infants (4) 26
Cc
R
O
S
S
W
O
R
D




tioned off (9)

NoO..-I
HATE GUNS!





YES, DEAR.
IT’S SERIOUS.

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved

, 1WORK ON MY
( SELF-CONTROL

VU ily CAN'T You Be ToveH
ie LIKE THAT 2062

Work of masters is auc-

Look around a ship for a
rope (5)

When marked down it's not
cheap (7)

Yet delight gives some
men a mournful look (7)
Possibly eager to approve
a proposal (5)

A proposition shows deter-
mination (10)

Choice way to take suste-
nance (1,2,5)

It's as rapid a variety as a
house plant enthusiast may
desire (10)

What to do with an invita-
tion if you don’t wish to turn
up? (4,4)

With radar, Cuba may find
big fish (9)

About five looked really
hungry (7)

Nude in unusual act — it’s
an intimate show (7)

Went through with the drill
without enthusiasm (5)

Not at all a feature of fine
verse (5)

Huts may be built in this
way (4)















EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Tearful, 5 Heron, 8
Limelight, 9 Gag, 10 Pick, 12
Software, 14 Pampas, 15 Effort, 17
Children, 18 Helm, 21 Fit, 22
Adversary, 24 Check, 25 Remorse.
Down: 1 Tulip, 2 Aim, 3 Folk, 4
Legion, 5 Hit it off, 6 Rigmarole, 7
Neglect, 11 Committee, 13 Hard
tack, 14 Pacific, 16 Denver, 19
Maybe, 20 Grim, 23 Air.

THERE SEEMS TO BE ONE
MISSING! ANY IDEA
WHERE IT WENT?

3 BZ

NOT NECESSARILY. HAVEN'T YOU EVER
HEARD THAT OPPOSITES ATTRACT?



CALVIN & HOBBES













I



YA





Difficulty Level & &

WAIT HUGO, I
CAN SOLVE NT,
TILL GO GET MY

(©2000 by King Featurws Syndicate, re. Word rages reserved.












Across

1
6
10
11
12

13
15

17
19
21

Justifiably (4,6)
Central US state (4)
Easily bribed (5)
Seriously (2,7)
Official permission
(8)

Badinage (5)
Specialised school
(7)

Fast sailing ship (7)
Hand over (7)
Charming (7)
Wanderer (5)

To support (8)

A benefit (9)
Prevent from hap-
pening (5)

Secrete (4)
Gradually (4,2,4)

T DONT KNOW
ABOUT NOU, BUT

“T WANT A FOOT-LONG
HOT POG ALL THE WAY!”






N TEST SE I NST
Me PANN iN ‘ SEIS

| 4
Co] /—
=) id

| [eae | |
eZ |
Ve)

nN
_}

VASA
aS

Van
VY w

Zp
Va

a
Ea

|
i



NOT ONLY THAT, BUT WE DONT
HAVE. MOM HERE. TO Boss US
ARQUND! NO EARLY BEDTIME,
NO BATHS, NO DISGUSTING
DINNERS, NO...

MVE

\ I 0 Too.
\T'S VERY
PEACEFUL.








LIKE \T HERE
ON MARS.



“ANP ALLTHE NAPKINS
YOU CAN SPARE.”

_ Kakuro






Se]









[7





VA.













©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

+ WO ©
On WIN|D N

9/27



DID THAT ROCK

1988 Universal Press Syndicate



Sudoku Puzzle

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Difficulty’Level *& *& & *&

Puzzle

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum

of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number -

may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer |

Yesterday's
~ Sudoku Answer

noo
ho2@

Ow
oon
-=NO

NIN +





Emanuel Nato v Arie van der Bosch,
Belgian team championship 2008.
Black (to move) can promote his d2
pawn to a second queen, but White
already has a queen pair on the
board and is poised to checkmate
crudely but effi by 1 Qg8+
Kh6 2 Qaf&+ Kh5 3 Qxh7+ Kg5 4
Qfg8 mate. Seeing no escape, Black
tried 1...Qe2+ 2 Kh3 Qfi+ 3 Kh4
when he is out of checks and

had to resign after d1Q 4 Qg8+.
Black missed his chance. Can you
spot how he could have salvaged

a draw? :

NM WwW FH HAH Nw











=

pled

West dealer.








Chess: 8683: 1..Qf1+! 2 Kxfi d1Q+ 3 Kg2 Qd2+! 4
Kh3 Ghéy 5 Kg2 Qd2+ draws by perpetual check.

HOW many words of four

The letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
Target making a word, each letter may
uses be ee si a ye a
: contain the centre letter ani
there must be at least one
wordsin tl \ t be at least
. ine-letter word. No plurals.
the main Topay’s TARGET
body of Good 27; very good 41; excellent
55 (or more).
Chambers Solution tomorrow. ;
2ist YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
Century dingo doing doling dong
Detonary Ur rhsve “nies tco ln
M NG indige lido limo
(1999 lingo lino tion loin long loping
edition}. moid molding moping oiling

pion pled poling pond pong

eve Becker

South Has a Problem to Solve

the opening three-heart bid by West.



Take this case where North-South
would have been much better off at
three notrump than the inferior con-
tract of five clubs they reached after

nf Both sides vulnerable. Declarer had a lot of work to do

NORTH to make five clubs. He took the open-

| | | | ®AK76 ing heart lead in) dummy and

|| VA3 returned the club ten, winning the

#3832 finesse. Another trump finesse dis-

Poe hele eo) oe he kel #1095 closed that East had_ started) with

WEST EAST three to the king, which in turn meant

Down #1043 QI98 that South’s third heart could not be

1 Brandish (4) ¥QI109764 v8 _ safely ruffed in dummy. Two dia-

2 Fruitlessly (2,2,5) A 10 "4 Q 9765 mond losers also appeared certain

3 Asurvival (5) #7 @K82 since West was very likely to have

, SOUTH the ace for his vulnerable three-bid,

a Necessany (7) $52 The outlook was bleak, but

6 Of the high seas (7) WK52 declarer found the answer. Afier

7 Carrion-feeding ani- K4 drawing East’s last trump, he cashed

mal (5) A QI643 the A-K of spades and ruffed a spade.

8 Not functioning prop- The bidding: He then played his last two trumps,

erly (3,2,5) West North East = South — reducing himself to the K-x of both

9 Discord (8) 34 Pass Pass 4& red suits. On the last trump, West had

14 Nonsense (10) Pass 5 # ; to choose a discard trom the J-10-9
16 Surroundings (8) Opening lead — queen of hearts. of hearts and A-10 of diamonds.

. One of the chief purposes of a If West discarded a heart, South

18 Showing foresight (9) pre-emptive bid is to deprive the — would then play the king and another

20 Piece left over (7) opponents of the ability to exchange heart, compelling West to lead a dia-

21 Favourable review information at a low level. It is there- — mond. And if West discarded the ten

(5-2) fore not surprising that a partnership of diamonds instead, a low diamond

23 Brilliantly coloured (5) often fails to arrive at its best con- — play would convert declarer’s king

25 Sycophant (5) tract aller a pre-emptive bid by the into a trick. Either way, the jig was

26 Halt (4) opposition. up.

South certainly gets full credit
for his excellent play, but West has to
get an assist for having made it pos-
sible to test declarer’s mettle.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc,



THE TRIBUNE

GN-753



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00593

Whereas SAMUEL RAHMING, of Suite I, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine:has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of JOHN JOSEPH VARDINE, late of#8 Yates Street
Schenectady in the State of New York, one of the States
of the United States of The America, deceased.

~ Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00594

Whereas SAMUEL RAHMING, of Suite I, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of CONSETTA VARDINE, late of Pinellas County in the
City of St. Petersburg in the State of Florida, one of the
States of the United States of The America, deceased.

Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008.

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION.

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00595

Whereas LENORA VIRGINIA SYMONETTE a.k.a.
VIRGINIA LENORA SYMONETTE, of Graham Avenue,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of JOHN WELDIN ROBERTS,
late of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00596

Whereas CARLENE D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Michelina De Wey has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of HELEN J. PETRUZZIELLO, late of
6534 Pine Lane, Weed, California, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00597

Whereas CARLENE ,D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Donald W. Knoepfle has made
‘ application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of GENEVIEVE B. KNOEPFLE, late of 95
Carleton Avenue Glen Ellyn Dupage, Illinois, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00598

IN THE ESTATE OF FRANCES DOROTHY SERIO, late of
2 Indianhead Circle, Marblehead, Massachusetts, one of
the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of the City of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Probate of Will Administration with the Will annexed without
Sureties in the above estate granted to KAREN SINGER,
the Administratrix, of the Estate by the Probate and Family
Court Department in the County of Essex in the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one of the States of
United States of America on the 25th day of April, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

_No. 2008/PRO/npr/00599

Whereas GORDON JOSEPH CAREY a.k.a. JOSEPH
GORDON CAREY, of the Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of EDNA MAE CULMER CAREY, late of
Tarpum Bay on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00600

Whereas ELKIN MEADOWS and EUNICE MEADOWS,
both of #3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of RENEE MEADOWS, late of
#3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00601

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway,
Eastern District, and STANLEY OSWALD ANTHONY
ISAACS of the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
Tiffany Knowles have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the Will of the Real and Personal Estate of REGINALD
WINFIELD KNOWLES, late of Tower Estates Drive, Sans
Souci, Eastern District, New Providence,.one of the Islands
of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS © Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00602

IN THE ESTATE OF RALPH CLIFTON SCOTT, late of
1227 Dunwoody Lane in the City of Atlanta, Dekalb County
in the State of Georgia, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery

* Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and DWAYNE
ANDRIAN BRYAN of 37 Bethel Avenue, Western District,
New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to GUSEPPE RAGO, the Executor, of the Estate
by the Probate Court of Dekalb County in the State of
Georgia, one of the States of United States of America on
the 31st day of March, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00603

Whereas BARRY HALL, of the Settlement of Nicholl's
Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MARY
ELIZABETH HALL, late of the Settlement of Nicholl's

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 7B

Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00604

Whereas ROSEMARY FARQUHARSON, of Rolle's Avenue
in the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of FELIX FARQUHARSON, late of Peach Street, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof. ;

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00605

IN THE ESTATE OF LEE LOWELL CARPENIER a.k.a.
LEE L. CARPENIER, late of Bonrock Court, Towson,
Baltimore in the State of Maryland, one of the States of
the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery
Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and J. MICHAEL
SAUNDERS of 11 Oxford Road, Nassau East Subdivision,
Eastern District, New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration
in the above estate granted to FREDERICK A. RAAB, the
Personal Representative, of the Estate by Grace G. Connolly
Register of Wills for Baltimore County.in the State of
Maryland, one of the States of United States of America

on the 11 th day of October, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00606

Whereas HESKET M. NEELY a:k.a. HESKETH M. NEELY,
of Chippingham Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ROLLIE CARTWRIGHT NEELY, late of the Bluff,
Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 2? days from the
date hereof. .
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS __ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00605

Whereas JANE BLONEVA BROWN of Sarah Robinson
Road off Farrington Road in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ALNINA DELPHANE
FERGUSON late of 836 Phippen Waiters Road Dania
Beach in the State of Florida. one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof:

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008fPRO/npr/00612

IN THE ESTATE OF EDWARD CHARLES ALLEN, late of
7754 S.E. Saratoga Drive, Hobe Sound in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by ANTHONY NOMIKOS KLONARIS of Old Fort Bay in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence and
MIKE ATHONY KLONARIS, of Lyford Cay in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to ELIZABETH A. DECKER and GERALDINE M.

‘THAYER the co-personal representatives of the Estate,

by the State of The Circuit Court for Martin County, Florida,
on the 26th day of September, 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar



PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE






The Tribune

DD DTG DD G0” ?F6°F6F;F’°[F.nr.21FFFrwWWO’ BU *e=D’

BO “Duy



A an story









lm By LISA LAWLOR

CELEBRATING the lives of women who
have fought against the increasingly
prevalent disease of breast cancer, the
National Breast Cancer Awareness.
Month, beginning this Wednesday, will
help shed light on an illness that many
Bahamian women have struggled
through, nevertheless emerging as sur-
vivors, role models and hero's to their
families, friends and society at large.

Despite the many strides made in detecting and cea the dis-
ease, and in spite of the many lives affected, breast cancer contin-
ues to be one of the country's dirty little secrets, according to one
survivor. But one organisation that is looking to rip the covers off
the disease, The Sister Sister Support Group is active in providing
support for women recently diagnosed with breast cancer.

Vice president of the group, Nurse Sandra Ferguson Rolle is her-
self a five year survivor at age 57. Emphasizing the importance of
knowing your own body, Nurse Rolle told Tribune Health that in
her case, doctors initially told her that the suspicious lump in her
breast was nothing, that it was simply fibrocystic - a condition of the
breast that is characterized by discomfort, benign lumps and is

more common in black women.

SEE page nine

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‘DESPITE the ios of her hair nurse Sandra rorallsan: Rolle (above), a five-year breast cancer survivor, remains strong and fully committed to supporting women faced with breast cancer. She now serves as the vice-presi-
dent of the Sister-Sister Support Group.




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Why physical therapy matters

a By MARILYN MOFFAT

om d herapy- =

pr

THE origins of physical thera-
Spy, also known as physiotherapy,
“can be found among the ancient
“Greeks, who understood that the
“capacity to move is a vital ele-
‘ment of health and well being.
“Today, physical therapy is an
mepssential part of health services
“delivery systems around the
‘Sworld.
‘= “Its contribution and importance
has grown over the years of the
20th and 21st centuries. As people
live longer and have busier lives
than ever before, wear and tear
‘and chronic diseases take an
gencreasing toll on people’s bod-

mi,

Pr
£%

- President of the World :
Confederation for Purysical

ies. Every year physical therapists
help millions of people to manage

“thé éffects of aging, illness, acci-
= “dents, and the stresses and strains
. Of life...

The profession specialises in
human movement: that is why the
theme of World Physical Therapy
Day is “Movement for Health”.
Physical therapists identify phys-
ical impairments, limitations, and
disabilities that prevent people
from being as independent as
they can be. They analyze the
source of the problems, deter-
mine ways of overcoming them,
and maximize the individual’s
movement potential. While phys-
ical therapists provide treatment,
they also promote people’s
health, fitness, and wellness. That
means they prevent illness.

GOVERNMENT

So physical therapists have an
immense contribution to make.
Studies have indicated how effi-
cient-they are at:>.

¢ treating and preventing back
pain, balance disorders, and
strength decline;

¢ how they can provide exer-
cise programmes for conditions
like coronary heart disease, dia-
betes, obesity, stroke, chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease,
and hypertension, which are
often, caused by unhealthy
lifestyles;

e how: they can help people
affected by disease - such as
Parkinson’s disease, multiple
sclerosis, and HIV/AIDS - injury
or amputation live better, more
independent, lives.

GN-756

~ NOTICE .
NWNISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

SELLING PRICE OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS (LP

PARTA

The general public is advised that the maximum selling price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas
(LPG) where the sale is by cylinder shall be as follows with effect from Wednesday, 1

October, 2008.

1. In New Providence
& Grand Bahama

3. In the Family Islands
(excluding Grand Bahama)

MAXIMUM
SUPPLIERS’ PRICE

$70.00 per L00lbs
(delivered)
OR

- $0.70 per Ib
(delivered)

$88.00 per 100Ibs
(including sea freight)
OR

$0.88 per Ib
(including sea freight)

PART B

MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS’ PRICE

$100.00 per 1001bs
(delivered)
OR

$1.00 per Ib
(delivered)

$110 per 100Ibs
(delivered)
OR
$1.10 per Ib
(including sea freight)

The maximum selling price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) where the sale by bulk
shall be as follows with effect from Wednesday, 1 October, 2008.

1. In New Providence
& Grand Bahama

2. In the Family Islands
(excluding Grand Bahama)

MAXIMUM
SUPPLIERS PRICE
PER US GALLON §

$2.97
(delivered)

$3.74
(including sea freight)

MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS’ PRICE

$4.24
(delivered)

$4.66
(including sea freight)



You only have to look at the
number of people affected by
some of those conditions to get
an idea of the impact physical
therapists can make.

e 350 million people globally
are obese

e Approximately 1.6 billion
adults and at least 20 million
children under the age of five
years are overweight

e At any one time, around five
per cent of a country’s popula-
tion will be affected by back pain

e 180 million people world-
wide have diabetes

¢ Cardiovascular diseases like
heart attack and stroke account
for 29 per cent of the world’s
deaths, and they are on the rise
in developing countries

e 210 million individuals have
chronic, obstructive pulmonary
disease

e Over 40 million people are

we



WMS

living with HIV

So physical therapy doesn’t
just mean more healthy people,
but more productive people who
can contribute to countries’
economies.

And that’s why the World
Confederation for Physical Ther-
apy, which was founded in 1951
to represent physical therapists
internationally, champions the
principle that every individual
is entitled to the highest possible
standard of culturally-appropri-
ate health services — including
physical therapy. These services
are provided in an atmosphere
of trust and respect for human
dignity and underpinned by
sound clinical reasoning and sci-
entific evidence.

We strive to improve global
health by encouraging high stan-
dards of- physical therapy
research, education and prac-
tice; supporting communication
and exchange of information
among physical therapists world-
wide; and collaborating with
national and international organ-



AAA

isations.

Every year on September 8,
physical therapists around the
world use World Physical Ther-
apy Day to draw attention to the
contribution the profession can
make to the health of individuals
and nations. It’s an opportunity
to say what we do, how we do it,
why we do it, and why physical
therapists are the movement,
physical activity, and exercise
experts.



Grains Of Wisdom.
mnt SU pte ad eae

\

4

‘BLACK BEAN
AND RICE

SALAD’

W2 cup olive oil

2

Td cup apple cider vinegar

1 lablespoon Oijan rnustard

1 teaspoon qreund curin

1 teaspoon minced qaric

2-12 cups cooked Mahatma Lang Grain Rice
(abeut 7 cup rave), caked

4 TS-ouiice can blachbeans, rinsed, drained

44 cup chopped red bell pepper

84 cup chopped yelloan bell pepper

44 cup chopped green anians

Lettuce leaves [aptianal)

Whisk oil, vitegar, mustard. contin and gsrlis ¢ medium bers! until we blended, Seasen
drassing tp tasbe with alt and papper. Comtina dice, beans. pagcess and cricrs in lange
_ bewl, Tass salad with aroug> drassing to moisten, Saasan wilh salt aid pape. {Gan bs
mace 8 haurs shead Cover and rafr cerate. > Ling large serving howl wits lettuce saves, if
desired, Spoct sas itio bowl and serve. ivakas F Sansings.

fr NUMBER eis “temerial na ae

Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.
Robinson & Claridge Roads - Tel: 393-2437





THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 9B



Cabbages

| IKE most human families, the cabbage clan is a

widely varying group of vegetables. Broccoli and cau-

“ealiflower, for instance, are almost identical in a botan-

cd sense yet have widely different characteristics. Let’s not
even get into their mutual offspring - the broccoflower.

Head of the clan is the traditional
tight-headed cabbage, a staple in
Europe for centuries. Here in the
Bahamas we mostly use cabbage for
coleslaw but Europeans have dozens of
different ways to serve it from stuffed
cabbage leaves to sauerkraut.

Most members of the cabbage clan
are gross feeders and the seeds or
seedling need to be put into ground
that has been both conditioned and
enriched. I like to apply commercial
cow manure and time-release fertilizer
at least a week ahead of sowing time
and water the area every day. There-
after, cabbages should receive side
dressings of granulated fertilizer every
month or a weekly dose of liquid fer-
tilizer, —

Cabbages should have uninterrupted
early growth and be planted at least
18 inches away from each other. Water
that is so necessary in the early days
becomes an enemy once the heads
have become firm. A heavy downpour
may very well split open the head. This
is not a disaster for the home gardener
but is a tragedy for the commercial

farmer.

There are two things you can do if
you have more mature cabbages than
you can deal with at one particular
time and rain is imminent. One is to
harvest the cabbages because they last
well — several weeks in the refrigerator
— once cut. The other is to cut or break
off many of the roots. This can be done
by inserting a long knife into the
ground and working your way around
each cabbage, cutting the side-pro-
truding roots. Enough roots will be left
alive to maintain the cabbage but not
enough to take in excess water and
split it. The same result can be obtained
by taking hold of the cabbage head
and twisting it just like you feel like
doing to a brattish teenager at times.
Many of the roots will break yet the
plant will survive.

The cultivation of broccoli is identi-
cal to head cabbage up to the harvest
stage. Broccoli heads should be cut as
soon as they reach full size, before the
little flower buds begin to separate.
Leave the plant in the ground because
most broccoli plants put out a bonus of



MOST broccoli plants produce flowerets after the main head has
been cut and these can be harvested for up to two months.



flowerets, initially from the cut area
and then from axils around the plant.
Harvest these flowerets every two to
three days and you will be rewarded
with nutritious morsels for a month or
two.

Many cauliflower varieties claim to
be self-blanching but I would recom-
mend you ignore this and tie the long
leaves over the white curds'as soon as
they start to form. Open up your cau-
liflower packages every day to check
for larvae. Again, harvest as soon as
the curds are white and full, before
they begin to separate and get ‘hairy’.

Brussels sprouts are marginal in the

Bahamas. If you really love sprouts
you may be disappointed in those you
grow. Remove the lower leaves once
sprouts begin to form and then gradu-
ally remove all but the very top leaves
as the sprouts mature. The very lowest
sprouts will be open-leafed and also
can be removed.

If Brussels sprouts can be consid-
ered marginal, kale should be consid-
ered beyond the pale. This is a dis-
tinctly cold weather crop and is best
left to Scotsmen.

Kohlrabi should be grown more
because it is a versatile vegetable, a
cross between turnip and cabbage. It







THERE are a great many variéties of Chinese cabbage anda
great deal of confusion as to.correct names.

grows mostly above ground and sports '
a crown of small leaves. It is the glob-

ular body that is treasured, however.

Peeled and julienned, raw kohlrabi

makes a delicious slaw and also can be

added to stir fry meals without losing

its crispness.

The sign that you have a member of
the cabbage clan is the cross-like for-
mation of the seed leaves, a cruciform.
Chinese cabbages are crucifers but
have so many different varieties they
can be left to an article of their own.

e j-hardy@coralwave.com





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BOG GGQ GG5 ll: »’7lT. FM) lI QQ.WW °W_o_”h—0!”0DB:dennnnn 0 U™>ér°t

A survivor’s story

FROM page eight

Nurse Rolle also has no family
history of breast cancer, leaving
her an unlikely candidate for the
diagnosis.

"Tt is only recently that doc-
tors have started examining
younger women, but those who
don't have a family history of the
disease are still left largely unat-
tended."

She also debunked the mam-
mogram myth that exists in the
Bahamas today, where many
women believe the exam pinches
or is painful. "You can't mind a
mild discomfort that lasts just sec-
onds when it is something that

could save your life," she told
' ‘Tribune Health.

In knowing her own body, and
with her good friend and co-
worker Nurse Sharon Turnquest,
she went to receive her exam
results. When the news came that
her lump was malignant, the first
word that came to mind was
"off". She wanted the diseased
breast to be amputated - com-
pletely off. She cited the Bible
verse that says "if your right hand
offends you, cut it off" as her
inspiration for choosing such a
drastic measure.



As one of 11 children, Nurse
Rolle describes herself as the pil-
lar on which her siblings depend
for strength, and as a result of
how she is viewed, she struggled
with telling them the awful truth.

Not knowing how to tell them,
she sat on Montagu Beach for
hours, thinking of how she could
share the news in a way that did-'
n't seem like she'd just received a
death sentence. The birds on the
beach were all happy go lucky
and she thought to herself, "Lord,
if you're gonna do this for the
birds, you must be gonna do it
for me".

Still, the news of their shaken
pillar hit her family hard. They
were more upset than she was at
her diagnosis, she said, but she
told them, "I am going to live".

Daily sayings, such as "this too
shall pass", helped her through
the fight, she said.

Nurse Rolle would eventually
go through chemotherapy and
radiation treatments, but her faith
and positive attitude caused her
room at the Mount Sinai Hospital
in Florida to be known as the
"life room" with fish for compa-
ny, candies for visitors and a strict
"no negativity" rule that kept the
atmosphere upbeat and alive. It
got to the point where some of



the nurses would come into her
room after a bad day to be uplift-
ed by her attitude.

As often happens to patients
being treated for cancer, Nurse
Rolle lost her hair, and while it
was difficult at first, she came to
accept her baldness and took
pride in her fight. Encouraging
other Bahamian women who are
faced with cancer to accept that
they might find themselves in the
same position, she said that it is
important to realize that it's bet-
ter to be alive with a bald head
than to be dead with all your hair.

The chemotherapy, which kills
the good cells along with the bad,
cancerous ones, and depletes cells
that control hair and fingernail
growth, is a trying experience,
she said. "You have to go into it
with an open mind, and control
the cancer rather than let it con-
trol you".

Nurse Rolle also experienced
sores in her mouth and went
down to a painful 95 pounds
because she was nauseated and
couldn't keep any food down.
Through it all however, she knew

‘she had to ride this storm out,

another of her daily sayings.
While receiving her treatments,

Nurse Rolle said she stayed at.
noes eae in Mueane a facility



iarone BNT in ( Celebrating’

Dale ‘Saturday, October 4, 2008.

Internati onal Migratory Bird Day:
From the Tundra to the Tropics
Connecting Birds, Habitat & People

international Migratory Bird Day is a celebration
of the spectacular journey that migratory. birds
take between their summer and winter homes.
Many species of migratory birds spend the win-
ter in or migrate thrqueh the Caribbean. They rely

on the food, water and shelter provided in our
_ forest, scrub and wetland habitats for up to 9

months out of the year, Let's learn about migra

tory birds and work together to protect them.

Time: 8—lLlam

Location: ‘The Retreat, Village Road

_ Birdwalk to welcome back our winter visitors. Wear Comfortable Shoes

_ Refreshments after the walk

Location:
Admission:



_ Date: Wednesday, October i, 2008 Time: 7 pm
‘The Retreat, Village Road
BNT members - free, General public $2

Special Showing of Crash: A Tale of Two Species
‘The story of an ancient invertebrate and a little Shorebird. -

RedKnots



Horseshoe crabs’ blue blood, which contains copper,
not iron, is prized by the biomedical community for

* its ability to detect bacteria in human medicines. It’s
just one of the amazing qualities of the 350-million-
year-old evolutionary marvel detailed in “Crash: A
‘Tale of Two Species. Written, produced and narrated
by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Allison Argo,
the film explores the fascinating link between the

horseshoe crab and the red knot shorebird, and the

crucial role of humans in their continued survival.

*

For further information call 393-1317

with full accommodations and a
small stipend for sick Bahami-
ans. Today however, the
Bahamas has its own radiation
centre at the Centreville Medical
Pavilion, which means that
women have the option of
remaining at home, near their
families.

Through her fight, her support
system was essential to Nurse
Rolle's eventual recovery. The
church and her family gave her
both emotional support and
financial help.

Now free of cancer, Nurse
Rolle, along with president of the
Sister Sister Support Group,

_ Nurse Sharlene McPhee, saw the

need for women to come togeth-
er where before they had no.out-
let for help. The non-profit
organisation donates all proceeds
to the awareness and research of
breast cancer and lives by the
motto "women helping women".
And they also supply the ports
for sick women's IVs to be insert-
ed at the same time as they have
a mastectomy. ;

At the diagnosis of breast can-
cer, doctors tell women about the
Sister Sister organisation that

’ meets weekly at its headquarters,

on Collin's Avenue to encourage
one another and de-stress while

promoting a new and positive
outlook on life.

"Every time we lose a woman
we feel bad at Sister Sister. That's
somebody that needed to be here
as a mother, a daughter, a sister
or a wife," Nurse Rolle said.

Denim Day. will be Friday,
October 3, when all funds raised
from the sale of pink ribbons will
go to breast cancer awareness.

So please support survivors, and

buy pink.

e For more information on the Sis-
ter Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group contact 326.1929.

res sre 8.8

amber 27th - October 13th, 2008

BUY L

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BUY |

Box Set of Stemware

receive

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2nd place setting

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Sara

PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008
a ae a ai
Fall fashions mm
showcased at
Inagua fundraiser

FROM page 12

In her usual energetic and
sexy style, MC for the event
Phyllis Garroway said that all
greens can go, in dresses, bags,
pants and jackets. Buying
pieces as separates, she said,
allows for mixing and match-
ing, dressing an outfit down for
a casual lunch date or dressing
it up for an evening out. ;

In achieving the laid-back look
for day time shopping and social-
izing, one of the models, Leslie,
wore a sleeveless dress with a
fun headband. At night she can
dress up the same outfit by
adding a wide belt to emphasize
the waist, long earrings and ele-
gantly tying her hair back.

Wearing a bright yellow -

blouse to enhance her top, Sar-
sha also featured a pair of slim-
ming black slacks, adding a big
Nine West purse to complete
her chic, casual look that is ideal
for any outing.

Maydi fashioned the sleeve-
less dress with earth tones
accented by orange to show the

deep contrast possible within .

one piece of clothing. Dressed
along with the fashion is another
big bag, showing that small bags
are a big no-no this season.
Showing an island, breezy
style, Island Blue lives by the
motto to "Love, Laugh and
Dream in Colour". With more
day and lounge wear, Christine
Albury's store carries skirts,
shorts and capris with matching
cotton tanks and tees. Modeled
were broad cloth capris in
colours like confetti pink, Tahi-
ti blue and sunlight yellow, with
casual tops and a handy straw
bag to complete the casual look.
Also essential this season are
cover-ups, to throw over a swim-
suit at the beach or to simply
lounge around in at the house.
Island Blue carries designs from
Fresh Produce, which produces.
sizes as small as a two up to the
plus size 3x. All fabrics are pre-

shrunk thereby guaranteeing the

same fit for the life of your gar-
ment. Other designs are from
Echo Long, Belize and Extra
Plush.

Cooling down even more, and

inding the true island wear,

models from La Playa, who rep-
resented women of every shape
and size, showed’ the newest in
swim wear. Modeled were a vast
array of cuts and styles of swim-
suits, from skimpy bikinis to flat-
tering - and conservatively cov-
ering - one-pieces and everything
inbetween. .

Jhaneale B notably fashioned
a black one piece "monokini"
with a fun flirty skirt attached
and a peek-a-boo bottom. Adei-
ja wore a one piece halter from
the local Bahama Girl brand that
was designed here but made in
Columbia. The halter allows for
maximum support while giving
the most flattering cleavage.

Designs at La Playa are from

| big names like Phax (Columbia),

Bahama Girl - designed by Nas-
sau's own Linda Holowesko -
Jantzen (US), Ritchie (US) and
Panama Jack which has wear for
men, women and children.
_ Owner and "swimsuit guru"
Joanna Nixon sells pieces in sep-
arates to allow for different pro-
portions to find the exact fit in
both a top and bottom. The vari-
ety of swimsuit lines allows Joan-
na to find the right fit for each
customer, who can make
appointments for a personalized
fitting. She also sells a complete
beach wear ensemble, from cov-
er-ups, umbrellas, a full line of
sun care products, beach balls,
buckets and spades.

The Women's Corona Soci-
ety, which became a. registered
charity in 1962 under the Chari-
ty Commissioners, organised the
event. The society primarily acts
as an organisation that welcomes
newly arrived women in the
Bahamas and provides social
networking, helping them to set-
tle in their new home.

The headquarters in London
also provides Bahamian visitors
a variety of services including
































































THE TRIBUNE



SARSHA SWEETING |

Halsbury Law Chambers host
fourth annual free legal clinic

FROM page 12

she hiding from? And are they asking you for money? This could
be a sign of involvement in illegal activity or gangs.

Speaking on "Surviving Divorce or Husband's Death: Who Gets
What?", Nerissa A Greene, a partner at Halsbury Chambers, told
Tribune Woman that the clinic is Halsbury's way of giving back to
the public, and bridging the existing gap between legal profes-
sionals and the general community. ,

Other topics at the free legal clinic include, "Real Estate: What's
Your Home Worth" by Rachel Pinder of Island Living Real Estate.
She said that the housing market is stable here and definitely rec-
ommends everyone getting an appraisal.

"Building or Renovating: Safeguarding Your Investment" with
president of the Bahamian Contractors Association Stephen Wrin-
kle will touch on the fact that there is a deficiency in the Bahamas,



as in the rest of the world, in that people just don't know about con-
struction. During his presentation, Mr Wrinkle will be giving out a
number pointers on how to manage a contractor.

Other topics that will be discussed in the open forum will be the
high cost of energy, the changes in duty rates, EPA and trade
© agreements, better banking, work permits, permanent residency and
\ the right to work.






Prt Sn oie
SS38 Rhee tip,
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First Name:

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es 4551.



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THE TRIBUNE | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 11B





nter to wi 1000 eve ry Saturday by filling inthe coupon in
Saturday's paper and returning it to our office......the more y oe
r the greater your chances of winningll 2 -

"*Only original newsprint eligible, no photocopies or facsimiles. Deadline for delivery Monday at 5 p.m. . oc










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THE TRIBUNE



\

A ome — TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

Fall tashions |
Sionec seen

raised during the es
clean up efforts.
With the end of

sleeveless pieces an
- revealed clothing fc
more casual items
West, Maggy Lon
autumn colours of ¢

ta leaves that enhar
bright colour.

SEE page

#



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half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.



Halsbury Law

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains





Chambers hosts
fourth annual

{free legal clinic

@ By LISA LAWLOR

FEATURING nine experts from a

_ + wide cross section of fields - from real

: estate to banking, construction, and
: dowager and inheritance rights - Hals-
: bury Law Chambers is set to host its
: fourth annual free legal clinic, "Infor-
; mation You Need for the Life You
: Want", on Saturday, October 4 at the «

New Providence Community Centre
on Blake Road.
Assistant Commissioner of Police

: (ACP) Hulan Hanna is expected to be
: among the presenters - speaking on the

topic, "Protect your family: gang-proof-

: ing your children". He told Tribune
i Woman that protecting families from
: chaos begins with parents fulfilling their
; job.

Parents should know what's going

i on with their sons and daughters, he
: said, noting however that the reality of
: the 20th century - where there is often
: only one parent caring for more than
: one child - makes this a difficult task.

“Mothers, on the whole, show a

: greater interest in their children and
: especially the development of sons.
: These may be the exact same persons
; that need correction, but who the moth-
: er feels reluctant to discipline," ACP
: Hanna said.

He pointed out further that in some

: mother/son relationships, when the
; mother does have the courage to disci-
: pline an unruly son, he may react abu-
: Sively, intimidating the mother.

On the other hand, father/son rela-

: tionships tend to be looser, with no
: guidelines or steadfast rules. "The basic
; steps to gang prevention are therefore
: lacking on the part of both parents,"
: he said.

"In many cases, there is no ideal fig-

i ure for a child to emulate for any num-
: ber of reasons, and he or she may there-
: fore feel the urge to join a gang," Mr
’ } Hanna explained.

In this case, the gang becomes a sur-

: rogate family to the child, although not
: the best examples for them to follow. In
: the search for a tight-knit family, a child
: must pay his or her dues; while going
: out, getting in fights, earning their
: "stripes" the hard way, the existing
: gang members have no tolerance or
: acceptance for a new member breaking
: the rules.

In an ironic twist, Mr Hanna said
that a lot of people who are running in
this direction - seeking love and con-
nection with a close knit group - may
actually be unhappy because they feel
they've been coerced into becoming a
member of the group. "And by getting
in fights, drugs and alcohol, what you
get is anything but love, affection and
attention," he said.

"It's surprising that sometimes par-
ents have no clue where their children
have been, and generally when they
don't know, it means they've been with
unsavoury characters," Mr Hanna said.

The first step in gang-proofing chil-
dren is knowing and being familiar with
all aspects of your child's life, from
knowing the child who's coming to your
house, to knowing the home of your
child's friend. This includes friends'
parents and their histories.

"Parents also need to pay attention to
any behavioural change that may hap-
pen in the child. Are they coming home
late into the dark hours? Showing dif-
ferent paraphernalia than usual, using
explicit language, clothing or hair-
styles?" These are all telltale signs, Mr
Hanna said, adding that some signs par-
ents may not think to look for, are if
their children are acting in the opposite
way. If a child who used to come home
late is now arriving early, what is he or

SEE page 10





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vitamins

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759







BAHAMAS EDITION



0-4 Rams dump coach Linehan, 1B





By Charles Rex Arbogast, AP

Alexei Ramirez: Grand slam breaks tie.



White Sox
stay alive
Detroit 8-2, will play

Minnesota today a
AL Central title, 1

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

m Chicago defeats

THE NATION’S NEWSPAPER



By Robert Zuckerman, Touchstone Pictures

Isla Fisher: Stars as Becky Bloomwood.



| She dares
“| to keep
shopping

m Confessions of

a Shopaholic brings
the heroine of the
chicl¢lit series to
movie screens.
First look, 11B



Dow plunges 778; parties
point fingers as rescue fails

Biggest point crap ever follows divided House's rejection of $700 billion bailout plan

Republicans
blame Pelosi

GOP says

partisan

speech by

House ede

‘poisoned’
ebate, caused

vote switches.

Democrats
strike back

Rep. Barney
Frank says ‘hurt’
GOP ‘decided to
punish’ country.
Pelosi says ‘we
must move

_ forward.’

Bush wanits
new action

‘Disappointed in
the vote. We’ve
put forth a plan
that was big,
because we've
got a big
problem.’

Politics, fear
spell doom
for bailout

Bush, House leaders
can’t stop backlash.

By Richard Wolf, Kathy Kiely,
Fredreka Schouten and John Ft Fritze
USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — When President
Bush came on television at 7:35 a.m.
Monday to urge passage of a $700 billion
Wall Street rescue plan, fellow Repub-
licans working out in the House
gymnasium jeered his remarks.

Hours later, when House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.,
attacked Bush’s “failed economic
policies” on the House floor and
credited Democrats for improving the
proposal, Republicans got angrier.

Bush’s weak political standing even in
‘ his own party and sharp partisan divi-
sions in the House may have contributed
to the plan’s demise, but it was old-



By Mark Wilson, Getty Images

Aftershock: Rep. Eric Cantor,
R-Va., holds speech by Pelosi.



By Lawreneeqackson: AP

To markets: Speaker Pelosi
says vote “cannot stand.”



By Kevin Lamarque, Reuters

Pressing on: Bush says he'll
seek a plan that can pass.

Cover
story

11,100 | i

10,900

10,700

10,500

10,300

9:30am. 10am.

How Dow
responded
to House vote

11am. 12.p.m,.

Sources: C-SPAN; Bloomberg News, USA TODAY research

It’s an ‘extremely worrisome situation’

How they voted

House bailout bill vote:
Democrats [Mj Republicans

Yes 140
65

95
N

>Each member's vote, 2A

Source: U.S, House By Karl Gelles, USA TODAY

fashioned politics that killed the bill. In
the end, too many lawmakers weren't
willing to risk losing their jobs.

“It’s mainly political fear, the reaction
back home,” said Rep. Jim Cooper, D-
Tenn., who backed the bill. “It’s the most
difficult time for people to be statesmen,
37 days before an election” in which all
of the 435 House seats are on the ballot:

Ever since Treasury Secretary
Henry Paulson presented his plan
to Congress 12 days ago, law-
makers had been skeptical. They
didn’t like the $700 billion price
tag or the plan for the U.S. govern-
ment to take over bad private debt,
mostly distressed mortgage securities.

Since then, compromises made to ap-
pease conservative Republicans and

Please see COVER STORY next page >



Concerns multiply
about deeper crisis

By David J. Lynch
USA TODAY

The House vote Monday to reject a
$700 billion financial rescue drew a
swift and pointed reaction from Wall
Street: the largest one-day point loss
ever in the Dow Jones industrial average.

The Dow’s historic 778-point cry for
help followed the stunning 228-205
vote against passage. In percentage
terms, Monday’s 7% drop didn’t even
make the Dow’s all-time top 10. (It was
the 17th worst ever.) But the 8.8% bat-
tering absorbed by the broader Standard
& Poor’s 500 index was its worst since
the “Crash Monday” carnage in 1987.
The tech-heavy Nasdaq dropped 9.1%.

“This is an extremely worrisome situ-
ation,” says Lyle Gramley, a former Fed
governor now at Stanford Financial
Group. “We are going to go through a
significant recession even if the bill
passes. Without it, we could have the
worst recession” since World War II.

With markets in retreat and official

House begins voting
at 1:28 p.m.
Yes: 48; No: 33

Bailout bill fails at .
:0)

6 p.m.

Yes: 205: No: io 228 |



1pm. 2 p.m.

Photo by Richard Drew, AP; research by Ge

Investors lose $1.2 trillion
ia ‘Category 5’ hits Wall Street, 7A

Oil prices fall $10.52 a barrel
i Largest decline in 17 years, 8A

Citigroup rescues Wachovia
i@ Deal gets assist from FDIC, 9A

Washington at a loss to craft an effective
response, fears of a deeper financial cri-
sis were multiplying. Credit markets in-
dicated banks are reluctant to lend even
to other banks, threatening an eventual
credit drought for scores of businesses.
“There is a generalized loss of confidence
in financial markets and financial in-
stitutions that no policy action seem to
be able to control,” former White House
economist Nouriel Roubini wrote on his
influential blog.

Monday's damage wasn't limited to

‘US. stocks. In Brazil, trading was sus-

pended after stocks sank 13.8%. Germa-
ny, Iceland and the United Kingdom
moved to save several threatened banks.
And today in Tokyo, stocks fell 5% in the

3 p.m. 4p.m.

orge Petras and Jae Yang; graphic by Julie Snider, USA TODAY

first half hour of trading.

The market bloodbath capped an ex-
traordinary day in the USA’s citadels of
finance and politics. Earlier Monday, the
Federal Reserve announced it had acted
along with nine foreign central banks to
address a “shortfall” of U.S. dollars in
world markets, effectively making avail-
able a total of $620 billion.’

In a deal midwived by the Federal De-
posit Insurance Corp., Citigroup an-
nounced plans to acquire Wachovia's
banking operations in a $2.1 billion all-
stock transaction. It was the latest in a
flurry of recent deals that have reshaped
the U.S. banking industry.

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, in
the White House driveway, said he was
“very disappointed” with the House
vote. “We need to work as quickly as
possible. We need to get something
done,” Paulson said.

Presidential rivals traded potshots
while urging renewed dealmaking. “One
of the messages I have to Congress is:
Get this done,” said Democrat Barack
Obama. Said Republican John McCain:
“Now it’s time for all members of Con-
gress to go back to the drawing board.”

Contributing: Barbara Hagenbaugh



Newsline

Sports @ Life





General says Iraq must boost its essential services

Ԥ News i Money . . : : nat ae
- confident he could recom- war and President Bush is U.S. Embassy, once a palace for Iraqi
oe rifts also mend pulling more U.S. preparing to leave office. President Saddam Hussein.
crucidl to pr S ___ troops from Iraq next year Republican John McCain Provincial elections next year could
Now at usatoday.com p Ogres but called for a cautious, backed the White House's shift the balance of political power,
. “deliberate” approach “to latest strategy, which also. giving more influence to Sunnis who
@ Investment chat | By jim Michaels make sure that we don't deployed troops in smaller mostly sat out local elections in 2005,
USA TODAY’s USA TODAY step backwards.” outposts in neighbor- National elections later in the year



This is the Bahamas Edition of USA TODAY,
featuring the latest news, sports, business and
entertainment from the United States and around
the world. Extended USA TODAY content can be

found at usatoday.com.

©COPYRIGHT 2008 USA TODAY

a division of Gannett Co., Inc.

personal finance
columnist Sandra
Block answers your .
questions from

in Iraq said Monday.

time will ...

Ray Odierno said.

pen?” he said.



BAGHDAD — Dramatic security
gains made in Iraq over the past year
could be jeopardized if its govern-
ment doesn’t improve essential ser-

“They're working toward this, but if
they don’t do this, the citizens over
potentially start to
move against the government,” Gen.

“What has happened is they have
rejected al-Qaeda, but if the govern-
ment fails them, what would hap-

Odierno told USA TODAY he was

Odierno replaced Gen.
David Petraeus as the
commanding general of
US. forces here in a cere-
mony this month. Odierno

executed the strategy that added
30,000 troops to Iraq and helped re-
duce violence over the past year. Pe-
traeus now leads the U.S. Central

Command.

“In 2006, it was a failed state,”
Odierno said of Iraq. “In 2008, it’s a
fragile state. We've got to move it to a

stable state.”

Odierno takes command as the
American public grows weary of the





Odierno: General

ians. Democrat Barack
Obama has advocated
withdrawing U.S. forces in
Iraq over 16 months while

ment about extra troop cuts could
come early next year after a new
president is elected, the general said.

“My experience tells me that who-
ever the new administration is, they
will listen to what we have to say,” he
said. “They will then conduct their
own assessment. ... | feel comfort-
able with that.”

About 80% of Iraq is. stable or se-
cure, said Odierno in his office in the



hoods to protect Iraqi civil-

could transfer power to new national
leaders.

“We have to make sure that we
have the forces on the ground to
make sure those things happen in a

usatopay NOON-1:30 p.m. ET at | vices such as electricity and bring to- was Petraeus’ No.2 in Iraq says about 80% of — increasing forces in Af- proper way,” Odierno said. There are
Block: What to | money.usatoday.com | gether rival political and religious before returning to the Iraqis secure. ghanistan. about 150,000 U.S. troops in Iraq. The
do about money. factions, the new top U.S. commander USA in February. The two Odierno’s first assess- White House recently announced

plans to draw down by about 8,000
troops early next year.

Another test will come this week,
when Iraq’s government begins tak-
ing over responsibility for the mostly
Sunni local defense groups, which
had been organized and funded by
the U.S. military. Some groups have
expressed concern that the Shiite-
dominated government will disman-
tle them or refuse to pay them.

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2A. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY

How they voted

- Here is how each member voted in the House of Representatives’ 228-205 re-
jection of a $700 billion bailout for the nation’s financial system. A “yes” vote is
a vote in favor of the rescue package. Voting “yes” were 140 Democrats and 65
Republicans. Voting “no” were 95 Democrats and 133 Republicans. Rep. Jerry
Weller, R-Ill., did not vote. There is one vacancy in the 435-member House.

ALABAMA

> Democrats — Cramer, Y; Davis, Y.
> Republicans — Aderholt, N; Ba-
chus, Y; Bonner, Y; Everett, Y; Rogers,
Y.

ALASKA
> Republican — Young, N.

ARIZONA

> Democrats — Giffords, N; Grijalva,
N; Mitchell, N; Pastor, N.

> Republicans — Flake, N; Franks, N;
Renzi, N; Shadegg, N.

ARKANSAS

> Democrats — Berry, Y; Ross, Y;
Snyder, Y.

> Republican — Boozman, Y.

CALIFORNIA

> Democrats — Baca, N; Becerra, N;
Berman, Y; Capps, Y; Cardoza, Y;
Costa, Y; Davis, Y; Eshoo, Y; Farr, Y;
Filner, N; Harman, Y; Honda, Y; Lee,
N; Lofgren, Y; Matsui, Y; McNerney,
Y; Miller, George, Y; Napolitano, N;
Pelosi, Y; Richardson, Y; Roybal-Al-
lard, N; Sanchez, Linda, N; Sanchez,
Loretta, N; Schiff, N; Sherman, N; So-
lis, N; Speier, Y; Stark, N; Tauscher, Y;
Thompson, N; Waters, Y; Watson, N;
Waxman, Y; Woolsey, N.

> Republicans — Bilbray, N; Bono
Mack, 'Y; Calvert, Y; Campbell, Y;
Doolittle, N; Dreier, Y; Gallegly, N;
Herger, Y; Hunter, N; Issa, N; Lewis,
Y; Lungren, Y; McCarthy, N; McKeon,
Y; Miller, Gary, Y; Nunes, N; Rada-
novich, Y; Rohrabacher, N; Royce, N.

COLORADO ‘

> Democrats — DeGette, Y; Perlmut-
ter, Y; Salazar, N; Udall, N.

> Republicans — Lamborn, N; Mus-
grave, N; Tancredo, Y.

CONNECTICUT

> Democrats — Courtney, N; DeLau-
ro, Y; Larson, Y; Murphy, Y.

> Republican — Shays, Y.

DELAWARE
> Republican — Castle, Y.

FLORIDA

> Democrats — Boyd, Y; Brown, C.,
Y; Castor, N; Hastings, Y; Klein, Y;
Mahoney, Y; Meek, Y; Wasserman
Schultz, Y; Wexler, Y.

> Republicans — Bilirakis, N; Brown-
Waite, N; Buchanan, N; Crenshaw, Y;
Diaz-Balart, L., N; Diaz-Balart, M., N;
Feeney, N; Keller, N; Mack, N; Mica,
N; Miller, N; Putnam, Y; Ros-Lehti-
nen, N; Stearns, N; Weldon, Y;
Young, N.

GEORGIA '

> Democrats — Barrow, N; Bishop,
Y; Johnson, N; Lewis, N; Marshall, Y;
Scott, N. .

> Republicans — Broun, N; Deal, N;
Gingrey, N; Kingston, N; Linder, N;
Price, N; Westmoreland, N.

HAWAII
> Democrats — Abercrombie, N; Hi-
rono, N.

IDAHO
> Republicans — Sali, N; Simpson, Y.

ILLINOIS

> Democrats — Bean, Y; Costello, N;
Davis, Y; Emanuel, Y; Foster, Y; Gu-
tierrez, Y; Hare, Y; Jackson, N; Lipin-
ski, N; Rush, N; Schakowsky, Y.

> Republicans — Biggert, N; John-
son, N; Kirk, Y; LaHood, Y; Manzullo,
N; Roskam, N; Shimkus, N; Weller,
X.

INDIANA

* b> Democrats — Carson, N; Donnelly,
Y; Ellsworth, Y; Hill, N; Visclosky, N.
> Republicans — Burton, N; Buyer,
N; Pence, N; Souder, Y.

IOWA

> Democrats — Boswell; Y; Braley,
N; Loebsack, Y.

> Republicans — King, N; Latham, N.

KANSAS
> Democrats — Boyda, N; Moore, Y.
> Republicans — Moran, N; Tiahrt, N.

KENTUCKY

> Democrats — Chandler, N; Yar-
muth, N.

> Republicans — Davis, N; Lewis, Y;
Rogers, Y; Whitfield; N.

LOUISIANA

> Democrats — Cazayoux, N; Jeffer-
son, N; Melancon, Y.

> Republicans — Alexander, N;
Boustany, N; McCrery, Y; Scalise, N.

MAINE
> Democrats — Allen, Y; Michaud, N.

MARYLAND

> Democrats — Cummings, N; Ed-
wards, N; Hoyer, Y; Ruppersberger,
Y; Sarbanes, Y; Van Hollen, Y.

> Republicans — Bartlett, N; Gil-
chrest, Y.

MASSACHUSETTS

> Democrats — Capuano, Y; Dela-
hunt, N; Frank, Y; Lynch, N; Markey,
Y; McGovern, Y; Neal, Y; Olver, Y;
Tierney, N; Tsongas, Y.

MICHIGAN

> Democrats — Conyers, N; Dingell,
Y; Kildee, Y; Kilpatrick, N; Levin, Y;
Stupak, N.

> Republicans — Camp, Y; Ehlers, Y;
Hoekstra, N; Knollenberg, N; McCot-
ter, N; Miller, N; Rogers, N; Upton, Y;
Walberg, N.

MINNESOTA

> Democrats — Ellison, Y; McCol-
lum, Y; Oberstar, Y; Peterson, N;
Walz, N.

> Republicans — Bachmann, N;
Kline, Y; Ramstad, N.

MISSISSIPPI

> Democrats — Childers, N; Taylor,
N; Thompson, N.

> Republican — Pickering, Y.-

BH

MISSOURI

> Democrats — Carnahan, Y; Clay, N;
Cleaver, N; Skelton, Y.

> Republicans — Akin, N; Blunt, Y;
Emerson, Y; Graves, N; Hulshof, N.

MONTANA
> Republican — Rehberg, N.

NEBRASKA
> Republicans — Fortenberry, N;
Smith, N; Terry, N.

NEVADA
> Democrat — Berkley, N.
> Republicans — Heller, N; Porter, Y.

NEW HAMPSHIRE
> Democrats — Hodes, N; Shea-Por-
ter, N.

NEW JERSEY '
> Democrats — Andrews, Y; Holt, Y;
Pallone, Y; Pascrell, N; Payne, N;
Rothman, N; Sires, Y.

> Republicans — Ferguson, Y; Fre-
linghuysen, N; Garrett, N; LoBiondo,
N; Saxton, Y; Smith, N.



NEW MEXICO |

> Democrat — Udall, N.

> Republicans — Pearce, N; Wilson,
Y:

NEW YORK

> Democrats — Ackerman, Y; Arcuri,
Y; Bishop, Y; Clarke, Y; Crowley, Y;
Engel, Y; Gillibrand, N; Hall, Y; Hig-
gins, Y; Hinchey, N; Israel, Y; Lowey,
Y; Maloney, Y; McCarthy, Y; McNulty,
Y; Meeks, Y; Nadler, Y; Rangel, Y;
Serrano, N; Slaughter, Y; Towns, Y;
Velazquez, Y; Weiner, Y.

> Republicans — Fossella, Y; King, Y;
Kuhl, N; McHugh, Y; Reynolds, Y;
Walsh, Y.

NORTH CAROLINA

> Democrats — Butterfield, N; Ethe- -

ridge, Y; Mcintyre, N; Miller, Y; Price,
Y; Shuler, N; Watt, Y.

> Republicans — Coble, N; Foxx, N;
Hayes, N; Jones, N; McHenry, N;
Myrick, N.

NORTH DAKOTA

> Democrat — Pomeroy, Y.
OHIO

> Democrats — Kaptur, N;.Kucinich,
N; Ryan, Y; Space, Y; Sutton, N; Wil-
son, Y. :

> Republicans — Boehner, Y; Chabot,
N; Hobson, Y; Jordan, N; LaTourette,
N; Latta, N; Pryce, Y; Regula, Y;
Schmidt, N; Tiberi, N; Turner, .N.

OKLAHOMA

> Democrat — Boren, Y.

> Republicans — Cole, Y; Fallin, N;
Lucas, N; Sullivan, N.

OREGON

> Democrats — Blumenauer, N; De-
Fazio, N; Hooley, Y; Wu, N.

> Republican — Walden, Y.



PENNSYLVANIA

> Democrats — Altmire, N; Brady, Y;
Carney, N; Doyle, Y; Fattah, Y; Hold-
en, N; Kanjorski, Y; Murphy, P.; Y;
Murtha, Y; Schwartz, Y; Sestak, Y.

> Republicans — Dent, N; English, N;
Gerlach, N; Murphy, T., N; Peterson,
Y; Pitts, N; Platts, N; Shuster, N.

RHODE ISLAND
> Democrats — Kennedy, Y; Lange-
vin, Y. .

SOUTH CAROLINA

> Democrats — Clyburn, Y; Spratt, Y.
> Republicans — Barrett, N; Brown,
Y; Inglis, Y; Wilson, Y.

SOUTH DAKOTA
> Democrat — Herseth Sandlin, N.

TENNESSEE
> Democrats — Cohen, Y; Cooper, Y;
Davis, L., N; Gordon, Y; Tanner, Y. :

~ > Republicans — Blackburn, N; Da-

vis, D., N; Duncan, N; Wamp, N.

TEXAS

> Democrats — Cuellar, N; Doggett,
N; Edwards, Y; Gonzalez, Y; Green,
A., N; Green, G., N; Hinojosa, Y; Jack-
son Lee, N; Johnson, E.B., Y; Lamp-
son, N; Ortiz, N; Reyes, Y; Rodriguez,
N.

> Republicans — Barton, N; Brady, Y;
Burgess, N; Carter, N; Conaway, N;
Culberson, N; Gohmert, N; Granger,
Y; Hall, N; Hensarling, N; Johnson, S.,
N; Marchant, N; McCaul, N; Neuge-
bauer, N; Paul, N; Poe, N; Sessions, Y;
Smith, Y; Thornberry, N.

UTAH

> Democrat — Matheson, N.

> Republicans — Bishop, N; Cannon,
Y,

VERMONT
> Democrat — Welch, N.

VIRGINIA

> Democrats — Boucher, Y; Moran,
Y; Scott, N.

> Republicans — Cantor, Y; Davis, Y;
Drake, N; Forbes, N; Goode, N; Goo-
dlatte, N; Wittman, N; Wolf, Y.

WASHINGTON

> Democrats — Baird, Y; Dicks, Y; In-
slee, N; Larsen, Y; McDermott, Y;
Smith, Y. .

> Republicans — Hastings, N;
McMorris Rodgers, N; Reichert, N.

WEST VIRGINIA

> Democrats — Mollohan, Y; Rahall,
Y,

> Republican — Capito, N.

WISCONSIN

>. Democrats — Baldwin, Y; Kagen,
N; Kind, Y; Moore, Y; Obey, Y.

> Republicans — Petri, N; Ryan, Y;

Sensenbrenner, N.

WYOMING
> Republican — Cubin, Y.

Source; The Associated Press





\

Election concerns undermine rescue bill





By Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images

At the White House: Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson calls regulators powers “insufficient” Monday saying rescue plan urgently needed.

Continued from 1A

populist Democrats in the House
made the vote close. But propo-
nents couldn’t overcome these
obstacles:

> Political fear. More than

.75% of House members who are

in close races in the Nov. 4 elec-
tions wouldn't vote for the bill
when their phone calls and e-
mails were running 10-to-1
against it. “As much as anything
else, it was the barrage of phone
calls that everyone received,”
said Rep. Jim Marshall, D-Ga. He
voted for the bill even though his
southwest Georgia district is rat-
ed a tossup by the non-partisan
Rothenberg Political Report.
Republicans facing tough re-
election challenges deserted
their leaders in droves. Thirty-
two of 37 Republicans listed as

Cover story

endangered by the non-partisan
Cook Political Report voted no,
compared.with 18 of 29 Demo-
crats in the same category.

On the flip side, 22 of 29 Re-
publicans who are leaving the
House this year voted for the bill.
Two of the six retiring Democrats
voted against bill.

“There weren't many vulner-
able members who voted yes,”
said David Wasserman, House
editor for the Cook report. A yes
vote, he said, would give “every
opponent a new blistering ad to
run against you.”

> “Bailout” language. No
matter how the Bush administra-
tion tried to describe the com-
plex-rescue plan, it kept appear-
ing in media accounts as a

“bailout” of Wall Street. “When

you call something a ‘bailout,’
there aren’t a whole lot of people
who are out there who are in fa-
vor of a bailout,” said White
House spokesman Tony Fratto.

> Presidential politics. Re-
publican John McCain interrupt-
ed his campaign to jump into ne-
gotiations on the bill, while
Democrat Barack Obama — who
said he was wary of: injecting
presidential politics into the ne-
gotiations — sought to influence
the White House and his. col-
leagues by phone. In their debate
Friday, both were non-commit-
tal. On Sunday, both backed the
bill. On Monday, McCain blamed
Obama for the failure while Oba-
ma vowed action.

> Bush’s weakness. Four
months from retirement and
holding a 27% approval rating in
the latest USA TODAY/Gallup Poll,
Bush couldn't force enough Re-
publicans. to vote yes. He and
Paulson were joined on the
phones Monday by Vice Presi-
dent Cheney and a bevy of top
White House staff members — to
no avail. “Some people commit-
ted to voting for the bill,” Fratto
said. “Others remain skeptical.”

“The president's embrace may
cost them re-election,” Cooper
said. “They're running like scald-
ed dogs from the White House.”

> Pelosi’s rhetoric. Republi-
can leaders expected more of
their colleagues to vote for the
package. Only 65 of the 199
House GOP members backed the
bill. Same blamed the Democrat-
ic speaker’s speech. “A bipartisan
solution is only as good as the last
person who throws a bomb into
the room,” said Minority Whip
Roy Blunt, R-Mo., his party's chief
vote-counter.

Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass.,
chairman of the House Financial
Services Committee, scoffed,
“Somebody hurt my feelings, so
I will punish the country.’ ”

Cold water, hot tempers

The day’s political and financial
gyrations may have be foretold
inside the House gym Monday
morning, and not just because
Republicans jeered their presi-
dent. The hot water ran out.

“It was an early sign of market
failure,” quipped Cooper, who
watched the Republicans’ react



By Mitch Dumke, Reuters

On Capitol Hill: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, and Rep. Rahm Eman-
uel, D-IIl., attend a news conference after the bailout bill failed to pass.

to Bush’s speech.

House leaders scheduled four
back-to-back votes on unrelated
issues starting at 8 a.m., giving
them time to take members’
pulse on the rescue plan. It quick-
ly became clear they were in
trouble. “We're struggling,” said
Rep. John Murtha, a Pennsylva-
nia Democrat close to Pelosi.

As the three-hour debate un-
folded, the political maneuvering
began. Because the bill was so
unpopular, neither party wanted
to take primary responsibility for
its passage.

The deal worked out
between the leaders
was “we would have
half the votes, and they
would have half the
votes,” Pelosi said later.
Blunt told reporters af-
terward that he
thought he had 75 GOP
votes when the roll call
began. He emerged
with just 65.

Rep. Zach Wamp, R-
Tenn., acknowledged
some “fear of what might hap-
pen” if the bill didn’t pass but
added, “My heart says no, and
I'm very likely to vote my heart.”
Three hours later, he did.

As the day wore on, retiring
House Republicans became a fo-
cus of GOP lobbying. Rep. Jim
McCrery, R-La., had calls from
Bush and Douglas Holtz-Eakin,
McCain's top policy adviser.

“LT have lost a lot of sleep over
this,” McCrery said. He voted yes.

All day long, lawmakers faced
lobbying by outside groups. The
U.S. Chamber of Commerce,
which supported the plan, sent
e-mails to several thousand
members Sunday night, urging
them to bombard lawmakers
with their opinions. “We un-
leashed a full-court arsenal,” said
R. Bruce Josten, the chamber's
top lobbyist.

That didn’t sway enough Re-
publicans, usually the chamber’s
allies. Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Tex-
as said only a few lawmakers
changed their minds in the final
minutes of the vote.

“We came here today willing
to swallow hard,” Hensarling
said. “But we can’t swallow ev-
erything. ... Any model that es-
sentially has taxpayers having to
bail out Wall Street is fundamen-
tally a flawed model.”

Many lawmakers waited to the
last possible minute. As the 15-
minute roll call counted down to
zero, 54 House members had yet
to cast their votes. At that mo-
ment, the tally was 195-185
against the bill.

As Democratic and Republican
leaders tried to corral members
and switch votes, the tally against
the bill mounted. Pelosi, visible in
her cream-colored suit as she
wove through a throng of mostly
navy jackets, buttonholed Demo-
crats.

Congressional Black Caucus
members Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illi-
nois, Bennie Thompson of Mis-



Blunt: Sought 75
GOP votes, got 65.

sissippi and John Lewis of Geor-
gia sat stoned-faced as Pelosi
leaned over to talk with them in
the final minutes of voting. All
three had voted against the plan.

Pelosi told them, Jackson said,
that the stock market was falling
fast and asked for their support to
help revive the bill. Lewis shook
his head and neither Jackson nor
Thompson budged.

. Jackson said he wants an eco-
nomic stimulus package and reg-
ulations barring banks from buy-
ing mortgage securities included
in any bailout. “We have to give a
carrot and stick at the
same time to Wall
Street,” he said.

Then Rep. Joseph
Crowley, D-N.Y.,
shouted to his Repub-
lican colleagues, “The
Dow just dropped 600
points!”

For vulnerable Re-
publicans, a call from
Bush didn't matter as
much as thousands of
calls from back home.
“America just seems to be in a
populist mood right now,” said
Rep. Tom Davis, R-Va., who is not
running again and voted in favor.

Rep. Louie‘ Gohmert, R-Texas,
voted no. He said the plan be-
stowed too much power on Paul-
son. “I don’t want the govern-
ment owning everything in
America,” he said.

Owning ‘the Great Depression’

Once the results were in, the
recriminations began. Democrats
blamed Republicans for produc-
ing one-third of their 199 votes.
Republicans accused Democrats
of being overly partisan.

Some Republicans blamed
Paulson, the plan's architect for
not listening to them. “A man
born without ears,” Rep. Mark
Souder, R-Ind., said.

Much of the talk focused on
the percentages of Democrats
and Republicans who voted for
the plan. While 60% of Democrats
voted yes, only 32% of Repub-
licans did so. Two-thirds “decided
to put political ideology ahead of
the best interests of our great na-
tion,” said House Majority Whip
Jim Clyburn, D-S.C.

Republicans said it was Demo-
crats’ responsibility to pass the
measure, since Democrats con-
trol the House. “We're not in the
majority of the Congress that
failed to act today,” Blunt said.

They also blamed Pelosi's fiery
speech blaming a “right-wing
ideology of anything goes.”
House Minority Leader John
Boehner, R-Ohio, said it “caused a
number of members we thought
we could get, to go south.”

Neither McCain nor Obama
were on Capitol Hill in the hours
before the vote. That didn’t stop
the McCain campaign from blast-
ing Obama for not getting more
involved. McCain returned to
Washington after Friday's debate
but didn’t go back to Capitol Hill.



He lobbied at least 11-House Re-
publicans during his campaign

Â¥ hiatus. Four voted against the

package, including two from his
home state of Arizona.

Even so, he defended his in-
volvement. At a rally in Columbus
before the vote was cast, McCain
said he acted while Obama was

™, “monitoring” the situation.

“That’s not leadership. That’s

«| watching from the sidelines,”
| McCain said.

In a statement, Obama’s cam-

| paign countered, “This is a mo-

ment of national crisis, and to-
day’s inaction in Congress as well
as the angry and hyper-partisan
statement released by the
McCain campaign are exactly
why -the American people are
disgusted with Washington.”
Obama had been in daily con-

| tact with Paulson and congres-

sional Democrats during the past
two weeks. But he has kept his
activities low key, saying that in-
jecting presidential politics com-
plicates the negotiations.

The most ominous warnings
came from those who think the
nation risks financial Armaged-
don absent a rescue bill. “Those
that voted no will own the Great
Depression,” said Sen.’ Lindsey
Graham, R-S.C., a McCain ally.

‘The way forward’

At the end of the day, all Bush
and congressional leaders could
do was rue the stock market's
record 778-point decline and
vow to try again. “We'll be work-
ing with members of Congress,
leaders of Congress, on the way
forward,” Bush said.

Fratto, his spokesman, was
blunt. “We're very concerned
about the markets,” he said.

In the House, which isn’t
scheduled to meet again until
noon Thursday, Frank said Demo-
crats were ready to go back to
work. This time, he said, the ad-
ministration should work better
with Republicans in Congress.

Rep. John Shadegg, R-Ariz.,
one of those McCain didn’t sway,
said supporters should be able to
change enough minds if they
change such things as accounting
rules and increases in insurance
for bank accounts. He said there
isn’t “a shadow ofa doubt” a re-
vised bill will pass the House this
week.

Possible elements of a compro-
mise could include an economic
stimulus plan and bankruptcy
protection for homeowners faced
with foreclosure, which could
win Democratic votes. A require-
ment that Treasury insure rather
than buy bad loans could win
conservative votes.

In the Senate, where bipartisan
support has been stronger than
the House, Sens. Chris Dodd, D-
Conn., and Judd Gregg, R-N.H.,
struck a conciliatory tone. Dodd
said after a cool-down period
and the Jewish holiday of Rosh
Hashanah, lawmakers would get
back to work. “We don't intend to
leave here without the job being
done,” he said.

Blunt said supporters of a res-
cue plan have a powerful new
weapon: the plummeting stock
market. “We're going to have a
couple of days to see how the
marketplace reacts to all this,” he
said. “That may be a good thing.”

Contributing: David Jackson,
Matt Kelley and Jill Lawrence



Corrections
& Clarifications

USA TODAY is committed to accuracy. To reach
us, contact Standards & Recruitment Editor
Brent Jones at 1-800-872-7073 or email accu-
yacy@usatoday.com, Please indicate whether
you're responding to content online or in the
newspaper.

A50 States/50 Days graphic
Monday gave the wrong party af-
filiation for Kentucky's governor,
The governor is a ey ,

During the holy month
Ramadan, Muslims fast fr
dawn until dusk. A pho
in the world briefs Mo;
stated the fasting pe








USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 3A



Nationline

Looking ahead
Voting opens in swing state of Ohio

A week-long period begins today, during which
residents of Ohio, a swing state in the presidential
election, can register to vote and cast an absentee
ballot at the same time.
Both major political parties
have urged supporters to
vote now, although GOP-
backed lawsuits challenged
the legality.

Also today:

> Closing arguments are
scheduled in Bryan, Texas, in
the trial of Darnell Harts-
field, who is accused in the
abduction and murders of
five people from a Kentucky Hudson: Returns to
Fried Chicken restaurant 25 music with CD.
years ago.

> Jennifer Hudson, who won an Academy Award
for her role in Dreamgirls, releases her debut album.



Across the nation

Report: Everglades restoration failing

A multibillion-dollar effort to restore Florida’s Ev-
erglades has made little progress amid funding
woes and bureaucratic red tape, the National Re-
search Council reported. The congressionally man-
dated report warns that degradation of the Ever-
glades could become irreversible if action isn’t
taken quickly. “We're losing the battle to save this
thing,” said William Graf, head of the committee
that wrote the report.

The South Florida Water Management District,
which oversees the 30-year project, blamed
lengthy federal planning and limited federal money.

Trial nears in alleged Fort Dix plot —

Jury selection began under tight security in Cam-
den, NJ., in the federal trial of five men accused of
planning an attack on Fort Dix.

Lawyers were to take at least three weeks to seat
12 jurors and six alternates for a trial scheduled to
last several months. Judge Robert Kugler is keeping
the jury anonymous; even lawyers in the case
won't know their names. The government says the
accused were moving forward witha plan to shoot
soldiers on the Army installation when they were
arrested in May 2007. No attack was carried out,
and lawyers for the men say there was no plot.



By Matt Rourke, AP

Garden in the sky

Green efforts: Mayor Michael Nutter, a Democrat,
places a plant into the roof of the Free Library of
Philadelphia on Monday. It’s the first “green roof”
on a building operated by the city. The roof uses
plants to help maintain the building’s temperature.

Lander finds hint of past water on Mars

The Phoenix lander has found minerals on Mars
that suggest water was there in the past, scientists
said, as the spacecraft enters the last few months of
its life. Michael Hecht, a lead scientist at NASA’s Jet
Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif, said the
lander has found indications of calcium carbonate,
the main ingredient in chalk, and possibly clay. On
Earth, these materials form only in the presence of
water. — Anne Ryman, The Arizona Republic

Gun suit appeal targets Atlanta airport

Gun-rights supporters in Georgia said they will
appeal a federal judge’s decision to dismiss a law-
suit that sought to allow licensed gun owners to
bear arms in Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Interna-
tional Airport. A new state law allows people with a
gun permit to carry guns into restaurants, state
parks and on public transportation, but Atlanta offi-
cials declared the world’s busiest airport a “gun-
free zone.” GeorgiaCarry.org sued, claiming the air-
port qualifies as public transportation. Judge Mar-
. vin Shoob tossed out the suit Friday. State Rep. Tim
Bearden, a Republican who co-sponsored the law,
said the advocacy group is preparing an appeal.

Also ..

> CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA said it is de-

laying its shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Tele-

‘ scope until next year because of an unexpected

breakdown of the telescope Saturday. Shuttle Atlan-

tis was to blast off in two weeks, carrying seven as-

tronauts to upgrade the telescope. Now, NASA must
regroup, and astronauts could get more training.

On Deadline: What others are reporting

In Texas, no place to hide from friends

Some Texans are combining social networking
with cellphones and global positioning technology
to keep track of friends and customers, the Austin
American-Statesman (statesman.com) said.:

“Moximity” allows
users to click a button
on their cellphones to

") For more on this
and other news



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ondeadline.usatoday.com. ' es

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nesses and entertain-
ment venues. Adver-
tisers with the service
can send information
about products and specials to potential customers
nearby. “With Moximity, you can track everybody
with a tap of your finger,” co-founder Bryan Jones
told the newspaper.

The Apple application is available only in Austin,
but Jones plans to expand into other college towns
soon. — Elizabeth Findell

nation, updated 24 hours
a day, seven days a week,
see nationline.usatoday.com.



By John Bacon with staff and wire reports



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Medevac helicopters

Crash renews
calls for tighter
Safety standards

By Alan Levin
USA TODAY

Deaths on air ambulance
flights — including four fatal-
ities over the weekend in
Maryland — have soared to
record levels over the past
year, prompting safety advo-
cates to renew calls for strict-
er controls on medical airlifts,

A Maryland State Police
emergency medical helicop-
ter crashed about midnight
Saturday in a wooded park,
amid fog, according to the Na-
tional Transportation Safety
Board (NTSB). The déad in-
cluded a 17-year-old girl who
had been injured in a car
crash, the pilot and two med-
ical workers. An 18-year-old
woman, who had also been in
a car crash, survived.

Nation



aa Dae Taal



“This is one of the areas of avi-
ation with one of the highest
accident rates overall.”

In 2006, the NTSB issued a
special réport on air ambu-
lance crashes that called for

| tighter rules to address the

By Jose Luis Magana, AP

Four dead: A police officer walks through the wreckage of a, .
medical helicopter that crashed Saturday night in Maryland.

This year, 24 people have
died on medical flights. The
most deaths recorded in a
year previously was 18 in
2004, according to NTSB data.
The six fatal crashes so far this
year equal the highest record-
ed in any previous calendar
year. Over the past 12

months, the trend is even
more stark: A total of 31 peo-
ple have died in eight crashes.

“The safety board is so con-
cerned about this area of avi-
ation safety that we have vot-
ed to hold a public hearing on
EMS operations,” NTSB mem-
ber Debbie Hersman said.

inherent risks of flying heli-
copters to roadside accident
scenes and other dangerous
locations. It also sought to re-
quire computerized systems
that warn pilots when they
get too close to the ground.
Hersman said progress has
been made, but none of the
NTSB recommendations has
been fully implemented.
Investigators are months
away from pronouncing a
cause in the District Heights,
Md., case, but it. appears to
have key factors in common
with the bulk of air ambu-
lance crashes. The crash oc-
curred in poor visibility and
darkness as weather was de-
teriorating, Hersman said.
The pilot had planned to take
the two patients to a hospital

under scrutiny

but was diverted to nearby
Andrews Air Force Base as the
weather got worse, she said.

All but two of the past eight
fatal accidents have been at
night or in poor weather, ac-
cording to NTSB records. Poor
visibility and weather were
also named as a key cause of
accidents in the board’s 2006
report.

Pressing on in bad weather
is “a good way to end up in an
accident,” said Gary Size-
more, president of National
EMS Pilots Association.

“We're saddened, and
we're disappointed, and
we're frustrated,” said Dawn
Mancuso, executive director
of the Association of Air Med-
ical Services. She said she had
just attended a helicopter
safety summit with the
Maryland State Police on Fri-
day. :

The U.S. House and Senate
are considering legislation
that would place new stan-
dards on the industry.



Fishing industry hurting

Boats, docks,

processing

lants ravaged
y Gustav, Ike

By Rick Jervis
USA TODAY

NEW ORLEANS — Usually this time "

in La.



of year, Billy Foret would be guiding
his 73-foot steel hull boat along the
Louisiana coast and pulling in pounds
of white shrimp.

Instead, for the past three weeks,
he’s been pulling soggy drywall and
ruined furniture from his flooded
home in Chauvin, about 70 miles
southwest of New Orleans.

Even if he were able to go out,
many of the buying docks and
shrimp-processing plants he needs
have been wrecked by Hurricanes
Gustav and Ike, which plowed
through the area this month.

“Everyone’s spending money re-
pairing with no income coming in,”
Foret said. “Things are looking pretty
bad for the fishermen right now.”

Gustav and Ike delivered another
one-two punch to Louisiana’s fishing
industry, which was still recovering
from the ruin wrought by Hurricanes
Katrina and Rita three years ago.

The 2005 storms caused an esti-
mated $582 million in damage to the
state’s commercial fishers, most of it
to the shrimping sector, said Rex Caf-
fey, director of Louisiana State Univer-
sity’s Center for Natural Resource Eco-
nomics & Policy.

Gustav and Ike destroyed not only
fishing boats but loading docks, ice
factories, processing plants and other
crucial components of the industry,
Caffey said.

Early estimates show Gustav
caused around $76 million worth of
damage to the fishery infrastructure,
he said. Estimates for Ike are still be-
ing compiled.

The destruction along with rising
fuel costs and cheaper imported
shrimp is taking its toll. “It’s a really
bad situation,” Caffey said. “This has
taken a crippled. industry and hurt it
even more.”

Louisiana produces more than one-
fourth of the seafood in the continen-
tal USA, Caffey said.

On Wednesday, U.S. Commerce
Secretary Carlos Gutierrez declared a
fishery resource disaster for the Gulf
of Mexico. The declaration frees up
federal funds to fishermen in Louisi-
ana and Texas and makes fishing busi-
nesses eligible for Small Business Ad-
ministration loans.

: SS S : S
By Shawn Martin, (Lake Charles, La.) American Press, via AP





Tossed aside by Hurricane Ike: A shrimp boat lies along state Highway 27 on Sept. 17 in Hackberry, La., about 15
miles southwest of Lake Charles. Hurricane Ike had come ashore in Galveston, Texas, four days earlier.



ay,
wz

ES

By PC Piazza, The (Lafayette, La.} Daily Advertiser, via AP

Two days after the storm: When Ike hit on Sept. 13, it destroyed docks and
boats in Cameron, La., about 25 miles southwest of Lake Charles.

Around $175 million in federal
funds were earmarked after Katrina
to help the Louisiana fishing industry,

’ though most of it went to restoring
wrecked habitats where fish and
shrimp live and did not go directly to
fishermen, Caffey said. Many fisher-
men were still waiting on federal
grants and loans when Gustav and Ike
hit, he said.

Clearing storm debris from water-
ways where fishermen work should
be a priority, said Pete Gerica, a fisher-
man who shrimps in Lake Pontchar-
train and Lake Borgne. Gerica tried to
go shrimping last week but his boat

became entangled in branches and
sea grass, bending a propeller.

Katrina wrecked both his boats and
his home, he said. Ike destroyed his
three ice makers. A lot of the progress
made since 2005 — including replac-
ing docks, ice factories and processors
— was wiped out during Gustav and
Ike, Gerica said.

“A lot of the stuff we did after Katri-
na to get people back up is gone,” he
said.
Ironically, Katrina and Rita also
helped fishermen organize more rap-
idly after Gustav and Ike, Gerica said.
Conference calls’ were organized im-

mediately after this year’s storms be-
tween fishermen throughout south-
ern Louisiana and state and federal
officials, assessing damage and plot-
ting strategy — something that took
weeks after Katrina, he said.

“We're still in recovery mode from
the first one,” Gerica said. “So we're
more organized.”

In Jean Lafitte, about 28 miles south
of New Orleans, which was sub-
merged by Ike, fishermen had to deal
with wrecked boats and docks along
with ruined homes.

By early last week, a lot of the fish-
ermen still hadn’t been to their
homes, most of which were located in
the southern part of the town and re-
ceived the highest water. The street to
that part of town was still not acces-
sible.

“You already had fuel at nearly $4
gallon,” Mayor Tim Kerner said. “Now
this comes and makes it so a man
can’t earn a living. Right now it’s ex-
tremely hard to be a fisherman.”

Gordon Rojas, 68, has been shrimp-
ing for more than 40 years in the bay-
ous and bays around Jean Lafitte. His
boat survived Gustav and Ike. But the
docks and ice factories he needs were
destroyed. His house also took on 4
feet of water.

“It used to be a pretty good living
ages ago,” Rojas said as he waited for
another supply truck to arrive. “But
everything's against us now. It’s a dy-
ing business.”



Fire season forces $400M | “xs
in cuts at Forest Service







By Trevor Hughes
USA TODAY

The cost of fighting sum-
mer wildfires in California
and the West has forced U.S.
Forest Service officials to slash
more than $400 million in
spending, causing closures of
some campgrounds and lim-
iting access to some forests.

While the number of fires
and acreage involved is down,
the amount spent to contain
those fires is up. That’s be-
cause the cost of fighting fires
varies depending on where
the fires are burning, said For-
est Service spokeswoman
Donna Drelick.

The Forest Service slashed
$200 million in 2006 and
$100 million in 2007 to cover

wildfire costs, the agency's
budget docurnents show. For-
est Service administrators say
the latest reductions will have
a broad impact across the
country:

>In Vermont and other
sites in the Northeast hit by
heavy rains, washed-out trails
and bridges aren’t being re-
paired, and campgrounds are
being closed, said Kristi Po-
nozzo, spokeswoman for the
Green Mountain National
Forest.

> In Georgia, Louisiana,
Virginia and Arkansas, road
and trail maintenance will be
halted or delayed, limiting ac-
cess into forest areas and in-
creasing the amount of sedi-
ment washed into lakes,
rivers and reservoirs, said

Mike D'Aquino of the U.S. For-
est Service in Georgia.

>In Montana, research
about how wildfires behave,
conducted in partnership
with the University of Mon-
tana, is being cut, said Dave
Tippets, a spokesman for the
service’s 14-state Rocky
Mountain Research Station.

G. Sam Foster, head of the
station, said the cuts will af-
fect research into the pine
bark beetle epidemic in the
Rockies. Rangers will close
campgrounds and declare
some roads and trails off-lim-
its because of the danger of
dead, falling trees, he said.

“The impacts will be far
reaching and will affect all
parts of the Forest Service’s
budget, making it hard for the

By Bob



SOBS SSESAS S
Pennell, (Medford, Ore.) Mail T

Costly effort: A plane sprays fire retardant Sept. 18 over a
grass fire that was threatening homes in Medford, Ore.

agency to accomplish much
beyond the most minimal as-
pects of its many responsibil-
ities,” said Rep. Mark Udall,
D-Colo., who serves on the
House Natural Resources
Committee.

Chris Lancette, a spokes-
man for the Wilderness Soci-
ety, urged the Forest Service
and Congress to consider cre-
ating a firefighting account
structured in the way hurri-

cane and other disaster-re-
covery projects are funded.
Udall endorsed that idea.

As of Sept. 14, the National
Interagency Fire Center re-
ported, 67,269 fires had
burned 4,67 million acres this
year. The Forest Service ex-
pects to spend $1.6 billion to
contain wildfires this year.

Hughes reports for the Fort
Collins Coloradoan



4A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY



Mukasey taps special

Justice report
calls dismissals
‘haphazard’

By Donna Leinwand
USA TODAY *

WASHINGTON — A special
prosecutor will investigate
whether former attorney general
Alberto Gonzales and his staff
broke the law when they fired
nine U.S. attorneys.

Attorney General Michael Mu-
kasey on Monday named Nora
Dannehy, a career prosecutor and
acting U.S. attorney from Con-
necticut, to probe allegations of
criminal misconduct.

Mukasey was responding to a

Department of Justice (DOJ) re-
port that said Bush administra-
tion officials may have dismissed
the U.S. attorneys for political
reasons and made misleading
statements about the dismissals.

Mukasey called the dismissal
process “haphazard, arbitrary
and unprofessional.”

“This report describes a dis-
appointing episode in the history
of the department,” he said.

Gonzales approved the dis-
missals during a Nov. 27, 2006,
meeting but told Congress a few
months later that he couldn't re-
member the meeting. The con-
troversy over.the dismissals led
to the resignations of Gonzales
and many of his top aides.

Gonzales “provided Congress
with a truthful account of his
knowledge of and involvement in

Washington



By Bob Child, AP

Special prosecutor: Nora Dan-
nehy to investigate allegations.

the dismissal of U.S. attorneys,”
said his lawyer, George Terwillig-
er. The report found no evidence
that Gonzales acted ieee
he said.

“The U.S. attorneys are political
appointees and are often subject
to evaluation and criticism by
elected officials,” Terwilliger add-
ed in an e-mail. “It is not improp-
er for senators and others to level
such criticism, nor for DOJ offi-
cials to receive and consider it.”

The report — written by Glenn
Fine, the department’s inspector
general, and Marshall Jarrett,
head of the Office of Professional
Responsibility — concluded the
process used to decide which US.
attorneys would be dismissed
was “fundamentally flawed.”

Gonzales and his top deputy,
Paul McNulty, “abdicated their
responsibility to safeguard the in-
tegrity and independence” of the
Justice Department by failing to
supervise Gonzales’ chief of staff,
Kyle Sampson, who selected

which prosecutors would go
“with virtually no oversight,” the
report said. McNulty and Samp-
son both resigned last year.
“Gonzales bears primary re-
sponsibility for the flawed U.S. at-
torney-removal process and the
resulting turmoil that it created,”

Fine and Jarrett. wrote. “We

found that Gonzales was remark-
ably unengaged.”

The report found “substantial
evidence that partisan political
considerations” motivated some
of the dismissals.

It concluded that Justice De-
partment officials fired New
Mexico U.S. Attorney David Igle-
sias after Republican lawmakers
complained about him. because
he declined to bring public cor-
ruption and voter fraud cases be-
fore the 2006 elections.

prosecutor in firings probe

“I've said all along that’ these
moves were improper and illegal,
and now it appears that they
were criminal as well,” Iglesias
told the Associated Press. “Our
complaints weren’t just com-
plaints of disgruntled former em-
ployees.”

Fine and Jarrett called for addi-
tional investigation because
some administration officials, in-
cluding then-White House advis-
er Karl Rove, refused to answer
questions and turn over some
documents about the dismissals.

“We believe the evidence col-
lected in this investigation is not
complete and that serious allega-
tions have not been fully investi-
gated or resolved,” they wrote.

Dannehy will determine
whether any of the allegations
warrant criminal charges.



Judge scolds prosecutors over witness in Stevens case

By Matt Apuzzo and Tom Hays
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A federal judge
demanded that prosecutors should
explain “under penalty of perjury”
why they allowed an ailing poten-
tial witness in the trial of Repub-
lican Sen. Ted Stevens to go home to
Alaska without telling the court.

US. District Judge Emmet Sulli-
van scolded prosecutors for sending
Robert Williams, the manager of a



AP

Sullivan: Warns of
possible sanctions.

construction project on Stevens’
Alaska cabin, home instead of put-
ting him on the witness stand.

“I find it very, very disturbing that
this has happened,” Sullivan said.
“I'm concerned about the appear-
ance of impropriety.”

The judge ordered prosecutors to
provide a fuller explanation for why
they didn’t tell anyone that Wil-
liams, who was subpoenaed by
both sides, went home last week on
the day the trial opened. Sullivan al-

so warned that sanctions were on
sible but didn’t say what kind.
Stevens, 84, is charged with in-
tentionally failing to disclose on
Senate financial forms that he re-
ceived about $250,000 in home
renovations done in 2001 on his
hillside house from Veco, an Alaska
oil pipeline contractor. Stevens paid
$160,000 for the renovations, but
the prosecution claims the work
was worth far more than that and
Stevens should have known it.





Group complains to
IRS about sermons

A group filed complaints with the Internal Reve-
nue Service against six churches whose pastors en-
dorsed or made comments about political candi-
dates from their pulpits Sunday.

Washington-based Americans United for Sep-
aration of Church and State filed the complaints,
claiming the comments are a violation of IRS rules
that bar churches from making political endorse-
ments if they wish to keep their tax-exempt status.

The Alliance Defense Fund, an Arizona-based
conservative legal group, orchestrated some of the
preachers’ actions to invite IRS scrutiny in the hope
that a legal fight will lead to the restrictions being
found unconstitutional. The IRS has said it would
take action if appropriate. The agency does not
comment on specific complaints.

Obama-McCain ad wars continue

Republican John McCain's campaign released a
radio ad that says some things said by his Demo-
cratic opponent are “simply not true.” Democrat
Barack Obama’s campaign has been saying McCain
opposes stem cell research. As the non-partisan
PolitiFact.com has reported, that’s a false charge.
McCain has voted in the Senate to authorize the
spending of federal funds for research on embryon-
ic stem cell lines.

Obama’s campaign released a TV ad in which the
candidate says it’s “an outrage” that CEOs of some
financial institutions that have failed:in recent
weeks expect to get financial packages worth mil-
lions of dollars. The ad says he would restrict the
pay of executives from those firms if they are res-
cued by a federal bailout package. The ad implies
that McCain economic adviser Carly Fiorina is one
of those financial executives. In fact, she left the
technology firm Hewlett-Packard in 2005.

Debate had fewer viewers than in 2004

Friday’s presidential debate between John
McCain and Barack Obama drew 52.4 million view-
ers, according to Nielsen, a media research compa-
ny. The TV audience for the first presidential debate
of the 2008 election was roughly 16% smaller than
the audience for the first debate between President
Bush and his Democratic rival Sen. John Kerry dur-
ing the 2004 election. The Bush-Kerry debate drew
62.5 ~"""~n viewers on Sept. 30, a Thursday.

Ex-CIA official pleads guilty to fraud

Kyle Foggo, a longtime CIA officer who resigned
in 2006, pleaded guilty to defrauding the United
States of its right to his honest services.

Foggo, who as executive director was the CIA’s
third-highest official, admitted he abused his posi-
tion by causing the agency to hire companies and
people while concealing his personal relationships
with them, the Justice Department said inca state-
ment. He could face up to 20 years in prison.

Most nursing homes cited for violations

More than 90% of U.S. nursing homes were cited
for violating federal standards of care in each of the
past three years, according to a report. For-profit fa-
cilities had a higher percentage of violations than
other nursing homes, said the report released by
the inspector general for the Health and Human
Services Department. Medicare, in trying to in-
crease the quality of care, will post on its website
the names of facilities that fare poorly.



By Mark Memmott with wire reports





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BH

RMR ee es sities

The witness. dispute began this
weekend when Williams, the Veco
employee who supervised the ren-
ovations on Stevens’ house, called
defense lawyers and said prosecu
tors had ignored important facts in
the case.

Williams said the government's
estimates for how much time he
spent at the senator’s house — and
how much that time was worth —
were overblown, according to court
documents.

The value of the renovation is
crucial because Stevens’ defense is
that he thought $160,000 covered
everything so there was no need to
report anything additional on dis-
closure forms.

Stevens said that if anything was
tacked onto the job, Veco founder
Bill Allen did so without telling him.
Because the senator’s wife handles
all his finances, Stevens says, there’s
no way he could have known Allen
was adding on work.



Odds of a child Tua acl professional Pelfer a at

Odds of a child rberne diaeageed with autisr

Some signs to look for:

No big smiles or other joyful
expiessions by 6 months.

No babbling by
12 months.

No words by
| 16 months.

To learn more of the signs of autism, visit autismspeaks.c org

AUTISM SPEAKS"

It’s time to listen.



~«





Returned to safety in Egypt: European tourists, who were taken
hostage by bandits in the Egyptian desert, receive flowers in Cairo.

Tourists rescued
from kidnappers

6 captors killed in
Sudan battle earlier

From wire reports

CAIRO — Egyptian and Suda-
nese troops, backed by European
commandos, swooped down in
helicopters Monday to rescue a
tour group that had been kid-
napped in Egypt and taken on a
10-day dash across the Sahara.

Freedom for the 11 European
tourists and eight Egyptian
guides came hours after Suda-
nese troops killed six of the ab-
ductors and captured two who
revealed where the remaining
gunmen were holding their cap-
tives.

The five Germans, five Italians
and a Romanian, along with eight
Egyptian drivers and guides, ar-
rived in Cairo on a military plane
Monday. They smiled as they
walked across the tarmac to be
greeted with bouquets of flow-
ers.
Military helicopters flew the

freed hostages to a Cairo hospital
for checks. Officials handed them
mobile phones to call their fam-
ilies.

“They seemed exhausted but
said there was no ill treatment,”
said Omaima el-Husseini, a tour-
ism ministry spokeswoman.

The ordeal began Sept. 19 dur-
ing a safari on the Gilf al-Kabir, a
desert plateau renowned for pre-
historic cave art in a remote cor-

‘ner of southwestern Egypt, near
the Libyan and Sudanese borders.
While the tourists were camping,

heavily armed gunmen in SUVs
seized them and took them
across the unguarded border into
Sudan. | ,

The abduction — the first of its
kind involving tourists in Egypt —
was a blow to the Egyptian gov-
ernment, which depends on
tourism as the country’s biggest
foreign currency earner.

Sunday night, Sudanese troops
encountered eight of the kidnap-
pers, apparently sent to get fuel
and food. “Our search efforts
were combing the Sudanese-Lib-
yan border and were surprised to
see a Land Rover with the tourist
company’s logo on it,” Ibrahim
Ezz Eldin Ibrahim, deputy head of
Sudanese intelligence, told Al-Ja-
zeera television. “There was then
a chase and an exchange of fire,
where we killed six of the kid-
nappers and caught two of
them.”

Then, Sudanese troops and an
Egyptian commando team, using
two helicopters, launched a res-
cue mission early Monday, two
Egyptian security officials told
the Associated Press on condition
of anonymity. A German special
police unit and military comman-
dos also were involved, German
Interior and Defense Ministry of-
ficials told the AP, also speaking
on condition of anonymity.

Sudanese Foreign Ministry
spokesman Ali Youssef said the
kidnappers were Sudanese and
Chadians. He accused them of
having ties to ethnic African re-
bels in Darfur that the Sudanese
government has been battling
since early 2003.



U.S. Navy surrounds vessel

USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 5A











seized by pirates off Somalia

The U.S. Navy sent more warships Monday to surround a hijacked
ship loaded with 33 Russian-made tanks and said the cargo had been
destined for unknown buyers in Sudan. U.S. destroyers and cruisers

_ have been deployed within 10 miles of the Ukrainian vessel being
held by Somali pirates demanding $20 million to release the tanks, ri-
fles and ammunition, along with 21 crewmembers. Pirates seized the
MV Faina off Somalia on Thursday.

Lt. Nathan Christensen, a deputy spokesman for the Navy’s 5th
Fleet, said the arms shipment had been destined for Sudan. The Unit-
ed States opposes arms transfers to Sudan, which it considers a state
sponsor of terrorism. A Western diplomat in Kenya, who spoke on
condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the
news media, told the Associated Press the shipment was destined for
southern Sudan — not Darfur — and did not violate the embargo.

Petraeus: Afghanistan fighting might intensify

Gen. David Petraeus warned that combat in Afghanistan could in-
tensify in the coming months as the United States and NATO allies ag-
gressively take on Taliban fighters attempting to hide and gather
strength in the rugged terrain over winter. After talks in London with
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Petraeus said more troops are
needed in Afghanistan, where extremist attacks have made this the
most violent year since the U.S.-led invasion. _

The remarks come days after Defense Secretary Robert Gates said
the Pentagon could send more combat troops to Afghanistan starting
in the spring. Gates cautioned against a buildup in a country that has
repelled invaders,

Pakistanis flee suicide attacks, border violence

Suicide attacks have killed almost 1,200 Pakistanis since July 2007,
most of them civilians, according to military statistics released Mon-
‘day. Meanwhile, heavy fighting between Pakistani troops and in-
surgents on the Afghan border has sent about 20,000 Pakistanis flee-
ing into Afghanistan, the United Nations reported.

EU to monitor Russian pullout from Georgia

Almost 300 monitors from 22 European Union nations were in
place to oversee Russia’s promised troop withdrawal from ‘swaths of
Georgia it has occupied since a war in August. The troop withdrawal
will begin Wednesday, but Russia will keep about 8,000 troops in the
separatist regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.

Iran urged to release nuclear details

A six-year investigation has not ruled out the possibility that Iran
may be running clandestine nuclear programs, said Mohamed EIBa-
radei, the chief United Nations nuclear inspector. A European Union
statement at the opening of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s
145-nation conference declared, “The ifiternational community can-
not accept the prospect of Iran acquiring nuclear weapons.”



By John Bacon with wire reports



U S de ath toll ders, 25, of Avon Lake, Ohio; died
oo Wednesday in Jisr Naft of wounds
suffered when a suicide bomber det-
As of Monday morning, 4,163 USS. onated a vest during operations; 3rd
servicemembers and 11 Defense De- Armored Cavalry Regiment.
partment civilians had been identi- ___» Army Staff Sgt. Ronald Phil-
fied as having died in the lraq war: lips Jr., 33, Conway, S.C.; died Thurs-
3,379 from hostile action and 795 day in Bahbahani of wounds suffered
from non-combat-related incidents, When his vehicle encountered an im-
Latest deaths identified: provised explosive device; 3rd In-
> Army Pfc. Jamel A. Bryant, 22, fantry Division.
Belleville, !ll., died Saturday in Bagh-
dad of injuries suffered in a vehicle Source: Defense Department
accident while on patrol in Wahida; >For details on each American
Ist Armored Division. killed in the war in Iraq, go to

> Army Capt. Michael J. Med- soldiers.usatoday.com





























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6A- TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY :

Across the USA

News from every state

Alabama: Anniston — The Army said
it has passed the halfway point in its in-
cineration of Cold War chemical weap-
ons stored at the Anniston Army Depot.
Contractors for the military began de-
stroying the stockpile of agents in 2003.
The Army said nearly 331,000 rockets,
artillery shells and land mines filled
with nerve agents have been destroyed.

Alaska: Anchorage — Officials of a
new Alaska Native charter school here
hope to boost its enrollment by offering
bus service. The Alaska Native Cultural
Charter School is on the verge of failing
with 152 students. The minimum for
public funding is 151. Officials said bus-
ing would serve students in the most fi-
nancial need and those who live far-
thest from the school.

Arizona: Phoenix — The city is get-
ting a nearly $40 million grant from a
housing and economic recovery law
passed by Congress during the summer.
The money could be used to provide
buyer assistance for foreclosed homes,
rehabilitate homes that become blight-
ed after abandonment and demolish
“homes that are beyond repair. Officials

say Phoenix will be able to assist up to ~

500 properties with the money.

Arkansas: Crossett — An educator
here was arrested as part of a federal in-
vestigation into a drug-trafficking ring in
pecans Texas. Police arrested Mar-
shall J. Kelly, 46, at Crossett High School,
where he worked as the director of cur-
riculum for grades 5-12. Kelly is charged
with conspiracy to distribute and pos-
session of more than 5 kilograms of co-
caine. He is accused of being part of the
Escamilla drug-trafficking organization.

California: Fresno — The City Council
proposed paying homeowners to re-
move lawns and ban water-consuming

landscaping in new construction. Fres-

no charges residents a flat rate for water
no matter how much they use, a prac-
tice that will end by 2013. ... Moss
Landing — Endangered leatherback

cago and Washington. The filing comes
about a year after Creative Loafing’s July
2007 purchase of the Chicagp Reader
and Washington City Paper. ... Key
West — A man who drifted in a disabled
sailboat for six days was rescued by au-
thorities. Michael Beaudet of Key West
was Sailing in the Florida Keys when a
cable that supported his boat's mast
failed and the mast broke, He says he
drank rainwater and ate re plucked
from seaweed while he drifted.



Georgia: Comer — The state Division
of Public Health will study whether a
natural gas pipeline ah aes station
polluted an area in northeast Georgia.

Officials want to know if air, soil and wa-

ter near the Williams Transco compres-
sor station in Comer are contaminated
with high levels of toxic chemicals. Divi-
sion of Public Health spokeswoman Be-
len Moran said residents are complain-
ing their health may be in jeopardy.

Hawaii: Honolulu — Owners of Turtle
Bay Resort on Oahu’s North Shore are
going ahead with plans for more hotels
and other facilities on the land. The city
has given them a six-month extension
of their application to subdivide the sce-
nic shoreside property that many local,
residents want preserved. The resort
owners say a proposal by poli
Gov. Lingle to buy and protect the land is
unlikely to succeed because of a state
budget deficit.

Idaho: Boise — A newly formed group
of environmentalists is working ona

lan to encourage Boise schools and

usinesses to ditch disposable shopping
bags for a week. The group, Bring Your
Own Bags Boise, ultimately wants to en-
courage everyone to carry reusable
bags and make the landfill-clogging
plastic bags obsolete in the city.

Illinois: Chicago — Some people who
work in the Sears Tower are getting free,
self-propelled rides around town. The
nation’s tallest building lets its tenants
use courtesy bicycles during the day as
part of a free service that started this
month. Workers, who reserve the bikes
online, say they use them to get to busi-
ness meetings, and it’s easier than try-
ing to catch a cab downtown. ... Peo-

er Service reports a severe drought in
portions of south-central and south-
eastern Kentucky. Most of the rest of
Kentucky is in a moderate or mild
drought. A water shortage warning was
issued in Magoffin County, which is
pumping water from backup wells.

Louisiana: Alexandria — Hurricane
Gustav, which roared through central
Louisiana earlier this month, hit state
cotton crops hard. The LSU AgCenter re-
ports Gustav, which struck Loujsiana’s
ripe cotton fields on Sept. 1, cost farm-
ers an estimated 58% of their yields, or
about $136.6 million. The high winds of
the storm were followed by heavy rains,
which did extensive damage.

Maine: Augusta — Anew bus service
begins Wednesday between Augusta
and Boston. Concord Coach Lines will

offer five daily roundtrips to South Sta- -

tion and Logan Airport in Boston with a
stop in Portland on the way. The buses
will operate out of the new Augusta
Transportation Center.

Maryland: Baltimore — State's At-
torney Patricia Jessamy is asking for a
review of some cases handled by police
department crime lab technicians. The
technicians had been instructed by de-
tectives not to follow up on the DNA.of
convicted criminals found at crime
scenes because they said it was not rele-
vant. Police and prosecutors wouldn't
give details about the six open homicide
and sex assault cases and three closed
burglary cases over seven years.

Massachusetts: Worcester — Andre
Thompson, 19, pleaded not guilty in the
fatal stabbing of a nephew of University
of Minnesota basketball coach Tubby
Smith. Thompson was arraigned in a
Worcester court on charges including
assault and battery with a dangerous
weapon and armed assault with intent
to murder. Police said Thompson was
one of several men involved in a fight
Sept. 21 that resulted in the death of

* William Smith, 19, a Becker College

freshman from Scotland, Md.

Michigan: Lansing — Close to extinc-
tion two decades ago, the Kirtland’s
warbler has recovered to the point that

was presented by the Association of
Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Servheen is
national grizzly bear recovery coordina-
tor for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
When he started working on the prob-
lem 27 years ago, there were about 200
grizzlies in Yellowstone; today there are
more than 600,

Nebraska: Lincoln — The state's pub-
lic universities and colleges are enjoying
enrollment increases, but the numbers
are down at some more costly private
schools. Union College's enrollment is
914 this fall after reaching 1,015 last
year. Nebraska Wesleyan’s undergradu-
ate enrollment dropped from 1,628 last
fall to 1,606, and Doane’s from 909 to
888. Hastings College bucked the trend
with a record enrollment of 1,146 when
classes began last month. :

Nevada: Las Vegas — The executive
director of the Nevada Commission on
Nuclear Projects resigned amid ques-
tions over whether he illegally gave pay
raises to himself and others in his office.
Commissioners of the state agency
fighting federal plans for a nuclear waste
dump at Yucca Mountain voted to keep
Bob Loux in office until a replacement is
appointed by Republican Gov. Gibbons.
Loux said he did not want the pay raise
controversy to distract the agency from
fighting the dump.

New Hampshire: Manchester —
The weak economy and high fuel costs
are slowing things down at Manchester-
Boston Regional Airport. Passenger traf-
fic in August was down 11% from the
previous August, and cargo operations
were down 14%. Airlines including Del-
ta, Northwest and United have cut back
flights in Manchester in the past year.
Southwest Airlines plans to cut several
flights in January.

New Jersey: Trenton — Gov. Corzine
said hundreds of millions of dollars may
be needed to be cut from the budget
due to the sputtering economy. His ad-
ministration Is reviewing 5% across-the-
board cuts submitted by every depart-

* ment and agency as a precaution. Cor-

zine, a Democrat, did not say how much
revenues are expected to fall short. The
governor is also asking the Legislature to

ers’ license number and birth date, pos-
sibly invalidating them. North Dakota
Secretary of State Al Jaeger said county
auditors should accept the ballot appli-
cations anyway, to avoid penalizing vot-
ers. The state Democratic director said
the law should be followed.

been recaptured. Prison officials said
Marlow Reynolds was caught Sunda
evening in the woods near this Gulf
Coast town about 25 miles from the
Stringfellow Unit in Rosharon, where he
escaped Sept. 9 by climbing a fence at a
prison recreation yard.



Ohio: Moraine — Union officials said
they expect General Motors to close its
SUV plant near Dayton early next year
because of decreased demand for the
large vehicles. The southwest Ohio plant
employs about 1,000 workers. GM has
said it plans to close the factory by 2010,
but International Union of Electronic
Workers-Communication Workers of
America Local 798 President Gaylen
Turner said GM told him the plant will
close sooner.

Oklahoma: Duncan — A man and
woman walked away uninjured from an
emergency landing near here after their
airplane lost power. The Oklahoma
Highway Patrol said the man told inves-
tigators he and his mother were flying
over property they own in Stephens
County when the trouble developed
Sunday afternoon. Investigators said he
tried to glide into a field but clipped a
fence, collapsing the landing gear before
coming to rest.

Oregon: Portland — TriMet said it’s
going to expand security measures for
riders of MAX light rail trains in the
Portland metro area. The transit agency
announced funding for 15 new transit
police officers and more fare inspectors.
The new officers will expand the force
from the current budgeted staff of 43.
Also, a federal grant will add six security
cameras to MAX stations.

Pe Ivania: East Stroudsburg —
Pennsylvania Attorney General Tom
Corbett says a large-scale marijuana op-
eration in the Stroudsburg area has
been broken up. Authorities estimate a
group was responsible for the distribu-
tion of as much as 700 pounds of mari-
juana. Three men were arrested.

Rhode Island: Providence — Some
state agencies fear they will be under-
staffed and overworked because thou-
sands of state employees are retiring.

Utah: Centerville — The state's new-
est freeway, a 14-mile bypass along
Great Salt Lake wetlands, is taking a
heavy toll on raccoons. On just one day
last week, motorists ran over 17 rac-
coons on Legacy Parkway. Wildlife offi-
cials said it’s not such a bad thing: Rac-
coons are not native to Utah and take a
heavy toll on eggs from birds’ nests in
the wetlands. ... Logan — Utah State
University will share a $900,000 gov-
ernment research grant to study biofuel
production in extreme environments.
The school will team with Montana
State University to grow species of algae
that thrive in geothermal vents and the
Great Salt Lake. USU energy lab director
Jeff Muhs said algae that can withstand
saline environments are useful because
they could be used to produce fuels us-
ing plentiful ocean water.

Vermont: Waterbury — The state is
getting a $2.1 million grant to help
serve veterans and others with post-
traumatic stress disorder and similar
problems. The grant will help create
services to help victims of trauma-spec-
trum illnesses who are at risk of getting
in trouble with the law. The grant mon-
ey is being made available by the federal
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Ad-
ministration.

Virginia: Norfolk — The city an-
nounced plans for a series of events to
recall the end of Massive Resistance, the
state’s final effort to deny black students
the right to attend public schools. Nor-
folk’s observance of the 50th anniversa-
ry is to begin with a march Jan. 19 led
by the “Norfolk 17,” the first black stu-
dents to integrate what was then the
city's all-white schools.



Washington: Tacoma — A young
man charged with a fatal shooting at
Foss High School has been found com-
petent to stand trial. A tentative trial
date for Douglas Chanthabouly, 20, was





















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sea turtles were spotted off the central
California coast after a two-year break.
Scientists believe the migrating turtles
returned to the area because of a sub-
stantial increase in their primary food
source, jellyfish. The turtles’ ranks have
been depleted in recent years as they've

been caught in nets and had their nest-

ing sites destroyed by rising tides and
egg hunters.

Colorado: Olathe — A wet spring de-
layed corn planting by about a month
this year in western Colorado but good

weather over the summer helped this .

year’s crop. Colorado State University
Extension Agent Bob Hammond said
the quality of the corn is high. However,
a housing stones for foreign workers
prompted some farmers to cut back on
the acres they planted this year.

Connecticut: Greenwich — The
town is pondering a pool for residents
only, several years after the Connecticut
Supreme Court said the wealthy New
York City suburb had to open its pristine
beaches to outsiders. The town attor-
ney said the 2001 ruling on beach ac-
cess would not apply to a pool proposed
for Byram Park, because a pool isn’t a
“public forum.” The current pool is
open to Greenwich residents with
beach cards at $27 for the season, and
non-residents at $5 per person.

Delaware: Smyrna — Police said a 17-
year-old girl was.charged after calling in
two threats that a bomb was on school
premises. The Smyrna High School stu-
dent told officers that once she realized
school officials were not going to dis-
miss early after she made the calls, she
wrote a note. The girl is charged with
three counts of terroristic threatening
and one count of conspiracy.

D.C.: Five weeks into the school year,
city schools still have dozens of teaching
vacancies. A list by the human resources
department shows 90 unfilled teaching
jobs. School system spokeswoman De-
na Iverson said the list is outdated, with
the chancellor's office aware of 42 open-
ings, most of which she expects will be
filled within two weeks.

Florida: Tampa — The publisher of a
chain of alternative weeklies filed for
bankruptcy. Creative Loafing, based in
Tampa, owns publications in Sarasota,
Tampa Bay, Atlanta, Charlotte, N.C., Chi-

ria — The Illinois Department of
Transportation said it won't plant any
more ash trees in its landscaping pro-
jects because officials say they want to
stop the spread of the invasive emerald
ash borer beetle. The agency said it will
remove any ash trees that are infested.
The insects have been blamed for killing
millions of trees in the Midwest.

Indiana: Indianapolis — More than
70,000 state residents have registered
to vote since the May primary and those
numbers are rising as an Oct. 6 deadline
nears to vote in the Nov. 4 election. Indi-
ana had 4.39 million eligible voters as of
Sept. 21. The May primary'contests for
presidential and gubernatorial candi-
dates prompted a record number of

‘ new voters registrations this year, a

spokesman for the Indiana secretary of
state's office said.

Jowa: Des Moines — Gov. Culver said a
disaster-relief package approved in Con-
gress over the weekend is “a start” to
the state’s recovery from severe weath-
er in the spring and summer. Culver said
the issue now will be how large of a
share lowa gets of the $23 billion. The
governor said he'll continue to press for
disaster assistance in areas such as agri-
culture and transportation, as well as a
big share of the general disaster relief.

Kansas: Wichita — Brian Moline, for-
mer chairman of the Kansas Corpora-
tion Commission and a former state leg-
islator from Wichita, died Monday after
suffering a massive stroke last week. He
was 68. As a utility regulator, Moline
helped investigate the financial dealings
of Westar Energy, leading to the firing
and federal prosecution of then-chief
executive David Wittig. As a lawyer,
Moline founded Kansas Legal Services,
which serves the poor.

Kentucky: Frankfort — Democratic
Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration is
putting “How’s my driving?” stickers on
state-owned vehicles with a telephone
number to lodge complaints. Finance
Secretary Jonathan Miller said state ve-
hicles have been involved in more than
1,100 accidents since last year. He said
state employees driving the vehicles
caused 70% of those accidents, resulting
in nearly $1 million in damage claims.
... Louisville — Prolonged dry weath-
er is cutting into corn and soybean
yields in the state. The National Weath-

the tiny songbird is staking out new ter-
ritory in the upper Midwest. The latest
annual census turned up 1,791 sine
males, the most since monitoring of the
endangered warbler began in 1951, the
Department of Natural Resources re-
ported. The warbler hit a low point in
1987, when only 167 singing males
were found. ... Saginaw — A 12-foot
sandstone memorial to the New York
state-born founder of Saginaw has got-
ten a facelift, nearly 149 years after Nor-
man Little died in the Saginaw River ina
suspected suicide at age 53. Little was
born in Livingston County, N.Y., in 1806
and came to the Saginaw area as a 16-
year-old in 1822.

Minnesota: Minneapolis — The
Minnesota chapter of the Council on
American-Islamic Relations said a group
of local Somali immigrants have re-
solved their dispute with Macy's over
an English-only language policy. The
employees complained that a manager
at the Macy's in Edina told them they
could lose their jobs if they spoke any
language other than English at work.
According to CAIR, the employees have
now been told the company has no such
policy.

Mississippi: Jackson — Jerry St. Pe
has been appointed to a second term on
the Mississippi Gaming Commission.
Gov. Barbour, a Repubilcan, made the
appointment. State Senate confirmation
is required. St. Pe, a businessman and a
retired president of Ingalls Shipbuilding
in Pascagoula, was appointed to the
three-member commission in 2004 to
Se the four-year term of Leonard
Blackwell of Gulfport.

Missouri: St. Louis — For the past
three years, some employees in Lt. Gov.
Kinder’s office have divvied up the pay-
checks of co-workers who took unpaid
leave to do political work, The St. Louis
Post-Dispatch reported. Kinder, a Re-
publican, said the employees received
temporary pay increases because they
took on some of the duties of the work-
er who took leave. Typically the employ-
ee would leave for a few months to
work for Kinder’s political allies.

avoid any bills that would increase
spending. ... Newark — The flight
crew of a Lufthansa jet was to blame for
clipping another plane while taxiing at
Newark Liberty International Airport in
October 2006, the National Transporta-
tion Safety Board said. Investigators said
the crew was distracted by a plane it
was taxiing behind. The left wing of
Lufthansa Flight 403 clipped the right
wing of a Continental 757 that was be-
ing towed. No one was injured.

New Mexico: Santa Fe — Democratic
Gov. Richardson proposed a new state
park along the Pecos River in a canyon
east of Santa Fe. The Pecos Canyon State
Park would be the state’s 36th and
made up of state-owned lands north of
the Pecos village. The bill would autho-
rize the state parks division to enter into
a deal with the Department of Game
and Fish to manage recreation on land
owned by the state Game Commission.

New York: New York — City officials
are suing eight smoke shops that have
been selling tax-free cigarettes on an In-
dian reservation on Long Island. The
lawsuit accuses the small cluster of
shops on the Poospatuck Indian Reser-
vation of breaking state and federal law
by selling massive quantities of ciga-
rettes to Souecaers City officials said
it’s costing hundreds of millions of dol-
lars a year in lost tax revenue. ... A
Manhattan judge dismissed a lawsuit ,
filed by a moviegoer who chomped
down on an unpopped popcorn kernel.
Insurance broker Steve Kaplan sued to
recover $1,250 in dental repairs after he
broke his tooth last year at the AMC-Lin-
coln Square Cinema. A civil court judge
ruled Kaplan could not TeaspnaBIY ex-
pect every kernel to be popped.

North Carolina: wrightsville
Beach — State environmental officials
said two beaches on the sound side of
Wrightsville Beach have high levels of
bacteria that could cause stomach prob-
lems or skin infections. The officials said
the bacteria exceeded the state and fed-
eral standards for recreational use, More
testing was scheduled for the beaches
on Banks Channel.



Montana: Missoula — Bear expert
Chris Servheen was awarded the Ernest
Thompson Seton Award for his part in
the Yellowstone grizzly’s removal from
the endangered species list. The award

North Dakota: Bismarck — The
state’s Republican Party mistakenly
mailed absentee ballot applications to
about 20,000 people more than a week
ago without space for the voter's driv-

The state treasurer's office said already
this year more than 1,200 of roughly
14,000 employees have announced
their departures, about four times the
number that did so between January
and September of last year.

South Carolina: Charleston—A fire «

chief from Maryland will take over the
cee that lost nine firefighters to
a furniture store blaze last year. Mayor
Joe Riley said Montgomery County, Md.,
Fire Chief Thomas Carr must still be con-
firmed by the Charleston city council,
but unanimous approval is expected.
Former chief Rusty Thomas retired in
June amid growing questions over the
department's outdated procedures and
equipment.

South Dakota: Rapid City — The
Rapid City Regional Airport board
named Cameron Humphres as the air-

ort’s executive director, taking over

rom Mason Short, who resigned
abruptly in August. Mayor Alan Hanks
said Short's resignation was a personnel
issue, which restricts the information
he could provide. Humphres, who has
been deputy airport director the past 15
months, retired from a 20-year Air
Force career in 2005.



Tennessee: Nashville — Gov. Brede-
sen's appointment of Appeals Judge
Sharon Lee to the Tennessee Supreme
Court will give women a majority on
the state's high court for the frst time.
Lee, 54, will be the third woman on the
five-member court. The vacancy was
created by the retirement of Tennessee
Chief Justice William Barker. The ap-
polnement is Democrat Bredesen's
ourth to the court,

Texas: Houston — A TV news pioneer,
Ray Miller, has died at the age of 89.
KPRC-T'V in Houston reports its former
news director had been in ill health for a
long time. He served as news director
during the 1960s and '70s before retir-
ing in 1979, Miller was a member of the
KPRC Radio staff when its owners, the
Hobby family, bought KLEE-TV and
changed its call letters to KPRC-TV. His
reporters, including future Sen. Kay Bai-
ley Hutchison, a Republican, remember
Miller as a demanding taskmaster with
high standards. ... Brazoria — A con-
victed killer who escaped from a prison
in the path of Hurricane Ike days before
the storm slammed the Texas coast has

set for March 9 in Pierce County Superi-
or Court. He has been held in a mental
hospital since the January 2007 killing
of Samnang Kok, 17. Defense lawyers
agree that Chanthabouly is competent
to stand trial, but they say he was insane
at the time of the shooting.

West Virginia: Williamstown —
About 300 people turned out to help
Hino Motors Manufacturing USA cele-
brate the grand opening of its William-
stown plant. The event included a tour
of the assembly line and a display of sev-
eral trucks. The first vehicle rolled off
the assembly line last November; now
production is in full swing.

Wisconsin: Kenosha — A federal offi-
cial said the investigation into a helicop-
ter crash that killed two people could
take up to a year. National Transporta-
tion Safety Board investigator Ed Mal-
inowski said he's looking into the pilot's
aviation background, the aircraft's me-
chanical records and the weather. The
helicopter crashed into a house in the

re-dawn fog of Sept. 21, killing the pi-
lot and passenger.





Wyoming: Gillette — The Campbell
County Sheriff's Office is reconsidering
its policy of not taping interrogations of
suspects after a jury acquitted a woman
who claimed that her confession in a
molestation case was coerced. No tape
was available of the interrogation of Ste-
as Pettigrew. Her trial ended with a

ung jury. Campbell County is the only
Wyoming county that does not record
at least some interrogations.

US. territory: Virgin Islands — The
government said a recent prison break
compromised security on St. Croix and
it is moving inmates off the island. The
number of inmates and their destina-
tion were not announced. The territo-
ry’s attorney general ordered the trans-
fers because of concerns raised by the
Sept. 20 escape from the Golden Grove
Adult Correctional Facility. One of the
three convicts was killed during a
search, another was captured and the
third remains at large.

The Associated Press



}) Get news updated 24 hours a
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Tuesday September 30,2008 =
Moneyline

Monday markets

Index
Dow Industrial average
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USA TODAY Internet 50 110.88 WY 11.96
Oil, light sweet crude, barrel $96.37 W 10.52
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Nikkei slides on bailout rejection

Japanese stocks tumbled this morning, with the
Nikkei average hitting a low for the year, after the
Dow industrials plunged following the rejection of a
$700 billion financial bailout by the U.S. House of
Representatives. The benchmark: Nikkei average
was down 4.8% in the first half hour of trade, shed-
ding more than 500 points to 11,160.83. The broad-
er Topix was down 5%.

Fannie, Freddie receive subpoenas

Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae both received sub-
poenas Monday as part of a federal grand jury in-
vestigation into the mortgage giants, which now
have been taken over by the government and put
into conservatorship. They also received requests
from the Securities and Exchange Commission to
preserve documents as part of a probe into their ac-
counting practices. The subpoena seeks documents
relating to accounting, disclosure and corporate
governance matters for Jan. 1, 2007, to the present.

Greenhouse gas auction raises $40M

The nation’s first cap-and-trade greenhouse gas
auction raised nearly $40 million to be spent by
Northeast states on renewable and energy-efficient
technologies. Under the Regional Greenhouse Gas
Initiative, or RGGI, all fossil fuel-burning power
plants in a 10-state region are required to buy cred-
its to cover the carbon they emit. The RGGI states:
Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York,
Rhode Island and Vermont. The initiative is seen as
a possible model for a national program to reduce
emissions of carbon dioxide, blamed for global
warming. Energy, financial and environmental in-
terests paid $3.07 per allotted ton of emissions,
about 65% more than the minimum price of $1.86.

ImClone to name bidder by Wednesday

ImClone Systems says it expects either a propos-
al or rejection by Wednesday from a yet-to-be-
named potential buyer offering $70 per share. The
offer, from a large pharmaceutical company, would
top offers made by the company’s cancer drug part-
ner Bristol-Myers Squibb. ImClone rejected an ini-
tial $60-per-share and a higher $62-per-share offer
from Bristol-Myers, calling both bids too low. By
the end of Wednesday, ImClone says, the name of
the $70-per-share bidder will be revealed regard-
less of whether it makes a firm proposal.

Starbucks launches new hot chocolate

Starbucks today will launch a new, adult-targeted
Signature Hot Chocolate, in addition to the hot
chocolate it already serves. The Signature blend is a
blend of four kinds of cocoa. A “tall” cup costs about
$2.85; the current blend goes for about $2.45. Un-
like Chantico, the ultra-rich chocolate drink that
Starbucks introduced then dropped less than two
years ago, the new blend is not as rich.

By Eric Nordwall from staff and wire reports

Consumer confidence report today

The Conference Board releases its con-
sumer confidence index for September at
10 a.m. ET. Go to money.usatoday.com.



USA TODAY Snapshots®



Voting with pocketbook

Which political party would your
investments do better with?





Democrats

41%






Another party 4

Republicans

36%




s







No answer |
9
15%
Source: Edward Jones survey of
1,004 adults 18 and older
conducted by Opinion Research

Sept. 5-8. Weighted to represent
actual population





By Jae Yang and Keith Simmons, USA TODAY





By Tim A. Parker for USA TODAY

Growing business: A WeCar awaits a by-the-hour renter.

Business Travel

Rental cars
by the hour
gain favor

Car sharing, an on-
line business that
rents cars to people
by the hour, is going
corporate. Go to:
travel.usatoday.com



5 vee y ji
Claim based on number of available.GPS solutions that carriers offer and independent data. Environment may

OTE TIT am
traffic jams.

Get voice-guided directions
from the *1 wireless provider
of GPS solutions. :

Get it on the Now Network” oS
sprint.com/smartphones ~

is

limit GPS info. Coverage not available everywhere. ©2008 Sprint.



The failure of the $700 billion bailout Monday sent the S&P 500
to its worst percentage loss since October 1987 and cost investors ...

$1.2 trillic

st Fo) a
Racotriov 267 Na

SIRI) 15K@ 0.72



By Richard Drew, AP

Waiting game: Traders on the floor of the NYSE watch as the vote on the bailout package is counted.

Vote hits Wall St.
hurricane .

like a

The S&P tumbled ...

Intraday values

Mon. open:
1213.01

Mon. close:






4p.m.

Source: Bloomberg News

By Karl Gelles, USA TODAY

... and oil fell ...

Investors drove down yee fear-
ing that an economic slump could
hurt energy demand, story 2B.




Price per barrel of

Moe cee light, sweet crude:

$106.89



_ $106
$102
$98
$94
$90 '
0 Luvin
9am. 4p.m.

Source: Bloomberg, News

By Adrienne Lewis, USA TODAY

... leading investors
to flee to safety

Prices soared Monday on U.S. Trea-
sury securities causing the yields
they pay to plunge, story 2B:

— Yield —
Treasury Monday Friday
3-month 0.14% 0.87%
12-month 1.49% 1.84%
2-year 1.67% 2.13%
10-year 3.58% 3.86%

Source: Associated Press



Cover story

Investors jump
ship for the safe
of bonds and cas

By Adam Shell
USA TODAY

NEW YORK — The “nay” vote heard
around the world wiped out $1.2 tril-
lion in stock market wealth Monday,
the first one-day trillion-dollar loss in
Wall Street history.

Warnings of a stock meltdown
turned into a scary self-fulfilling
prophecy after a divided House voted
down a financial rescue plan that was
specifically created to avoid the kind

> An ‘extremely worri-
some situation,’ 1A

of panic selling that engulfed markets
around the globe.

The financial fallout was of the Ar-
mageddon proportions that some
predicted if the $700 billion bill —
which was promoted by the Bush ad-
ministration as the best way to boost
investor confidence and unclog fro-
zen credit markets that have created
a daily bank death watch on Main
Street — failed to pass.

“It was the equivalent of a Category
5 hurricane,” says Scott Black, presi-
dent at Delphi Management.

The broad U.S. stock market, as
measured by the Standard & Poor's
500-stock index, suffered an 8.8% free
fall — its biggest percentage decline
since the 1987 stock market crash.
Only one stock in the index — Camp-
bell Soup — finished higher,

The 30 stocks in the Dow Jones in-
dustrial average suffered their worst
one-day point drop ever, plunging
777.68 points, or 7%, to 10,365.45.

The massive losses “made the hair
on the back of your neck stand up,”

See COVER STORY next page >







Monday's plunge

Dow Jones
industrial average

Â¥778 points

The biggest single-day point
drop in history, with the Dow
ending the day at its lowest
close since Oct. 27, 2005.

V70%

17th-worst percentage drop
ever; worst percentage loss
since the day that trading re-
sumed aftér the 9/11 attacks.

Nasdaq composite

W9I1%

The technology-packed index
fell to 1984 — first close below
2000 since May 2005.

S&P 500

V8.8%

The benchmark Standard &
Poor's 500 index had its low-
est close since October 2004.

> Only one S&P 500 stock —
Campbell Soup — ended the
day with a gain.

: i
By Jin Lee, Bloomberg, News

> The worst drop was the 82%
plunge in Wachovia Bank.



> Citigroup buyin
Wachovia's bank-
ing operations, 9A





The economy ©

Economic
forecasts
get even
more dire

Analysts keep eye on
consumers, Fed rate

By Barbara Hagenbaugh and Sue Kirchhoff
USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — Gloomy economic fore-
casts got gloomier Monday after many econo-
mists took the view that the House defeat of
the Bush administration bailout plan would
further depress business and consumer confi-
dence.

First Trust Advisors economists Brian Wes-
bury and Robert Stein, who had firmly been
in the “no recession” camp before Monday,
said their opinion changed.

“Never in history has a drop in consumer
confidence caused a recession,” they said in a
note to clients. “But that does not mean there
won't be a first time. It could happen in the
next few months, and we would expect to see
some very negative (economic) data.”

Some forecasters, such as those at econom-
ic consulting firm Global Insight, predicted the
Federal Reserve would soon cut its.target for
short-term interest rates: to try to give the
economy a boost. But it’s unclear how much
good that would do, given that the problem
isn't lending rates but a lack of ability or desire
on the part of banks to lend at any price.

The Fed has other tools, and it’s been using
them. Monday morning, the Fed said it is in-
creasing its so-called swap lines with foreign
central banks to $620 billion from $290 billion
in an effort to keep dollars flowing worldwide.
It also increased the amount of loans it would
make to domestic banks.

Economists noted that House rejection of
the plan came after top officials, including
President Bush, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke
and Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson,
warned of dire consequences if something is
not done. Now that Congress has rejected the
bill, at least for now, people are likely to hun-
ker down even if they are not feeling a direct
effect of the credit crunch. »

But some economists say concerns may be
a bit overblown.

_ “Credit conditions may well be difficult for a
period, but I don’t think there’s anything to
suggest this is going to be Armageddon,” says
Jeffrey Miron, a Harvard lecturer who op-
poses the bailout. He argues companies
should be allowed to fail. “Somebody has to
pay for the mistakes.”

Consumers, whose spending accounts for
more than two-thirds of all U.S. economic ac-
tivity, were pulling back even before the fi-
nancial meltdown this month. Consumer
spending was flat in August, the Commerce
Department said Monday.

“The economy looks terrible,” says Donald
Straszheim of Roth Capital Partners. He pre-
dicts more banks will soon fail, and businesses
will have to close because they won't be able
to get cash for day-to-day operations. “What

~ business person would hire right now given

the uncertain and negative environment? No-
body.” /

The Fed's interest rate target, which influ-
ences borrowing costs economywide, is at 2%,
the lowest since December 2004.

James Paulsen, chief investment strategist
at Wells Capital Management, however, says a
rate cut could backfire on the Fed by further
fueling panic. “You add to the mania,” he says.

We’ve never had the pleasure of meeting,
but we will help save your life.

When you help the American Red Cross, you help America.

America is a place where we look out for each other. And with someone in America needing
blood every two seconds, there’s someone who needs you to roll up your sleeve today.

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Red Cross

Call 1-800-RED CROSS or visit redcross.org



HIS20174



8A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY

Financial market fears °



Credit markets

Loan costs soar as access tightens

Investors rush into safe
government securities

By Matt Krantz
USA TODAY

If the credit markets are truly the lifeblood be-
tween Wall Street and the economy, that artery suf-
fered a major shock Monday.

Unnerved by the House of Representatives’ un-
expected blockage of the proposed $700 billion fi-
nancial bailout plan, credit markets constricted fur-
ther as investors got even pickier about to whom
they would lend money and gravitated to‘only the
safest borrowers, including the U.S. government.

The bond market's tightness is presenting busi-
nesses and consumers with dramatically higher in-
terest costs and less access to loans, the last thing the
economy needs as the global financial system slows.

“Credit is a lifeline to our economy. This is ex-
tremely serious,” says Robert Gahagan, director of
taxable bond investment at American Century In-
vestments. “This will cause good firms to not have

Some think
stock plunge
may signal a
selling climax

Continued from 7A

says hedge fund manager Patrick Adams of Choice
Investment Management.

On the New York Stock Exchange, more than
3,000 stocks finished down, and fewer than 200
stocks closed higher.

Many Wall Street pros blamed iawmakers for the
historic downdraft.

“Congress snatched defeat from the jaws of vic-
tory,” says Michael Farr, president of money man-
* agement firm Farr: Miller & Washington. “And
stockholders voted with their feet.”

Gary Kaltbaum, president of Kalt-
Cover baum & Associates, blames the sell-

off on “the scare tactics” used by law-
story makers. “They set this drop up by

scaring us. They said if the vote was
not yes, the market would get crushed.” And it was.

Investors scurried to the sidelines’ and to the
safety of cash and U.S. government bonds because
they fear that the banking system is at greater risk
of seizing up and causing untold damage to an
economy already struggling under the weight of
the worst housing bust and credit crisis since the
Great Depression, says Jack Ablin, chief investment
officer at Harris Private Bank.

The centerpiece of the plan, hatched by Treasury
Secretary Henry Paulson, was for the government
to buy toxic mortgage-related assets from banks so
that they could begin lending again. But that plan is
on hold, causing investors to fret about worst-case
scenarios. “It is a race against time,” says Ablin.

The market's big fear, says Ablin, is that the credit
markets will freeze up so severely that ordinary
Americans, as well as businesses in sectors outside
the troubled financial sector, will not be able to get
loans. And if credit, the gas that powers the econo-
my, is not available or in plentiful supply, the econo-
my will suffer a significant slowdown.

US. investors are also starting to become con-
cerned that the credit crunch will infect the entire
world, causing a global economic slowdown.

“The situation is not beyond repair,” says Doug
Peta, market strategist at J&W Seligman. “But it
looks like Congress will have to go back to the
drawing board, which will delay passage of the bill.
And every day of delay is another day of pressure
on banks.”

Individual investors are starting to wonder if time
is running out.

What began as a fairly normal day at investment
firm T. Rowe Price got more complicated after the
bailout defeat in the afternoon. “We saw a spike in
call volumes,” says spokesman Steve Norwitz,
Many callers “were expressing concern about the
market and asking for advice, such as what they
should do now and how this might (affect) their
portfolio,” he says. The firm doesn’t disclose num-
bers for mutual fund redemptions, but there’s “no
doubt we saw a pickup in selling, or people ex-
changing out of equity funds,” says Norwitz, who
added that there was also some buying.

Clients were ringing up Farr, as well. “I’ve.had cli-
ents call who wanted to sell everything,” he says.
But some were seeking bargains. “One client called
at 3:30 p.m. and wanted to buy $500,000 worth of
his favorite 10 stocks,” he says.

Some Wall Street pros say the massive sell-off
had all the earmarks of a selling climax. For ex-
ample, a closely followed “fear index,” known as
the VIX, closed at 46.72, its highest ever, says Be-
spoke Investment Group. Only four other: times
since 1990 has the VIX closed above 40, and the
S&P 500 was up 8.7%, on average, a month later and
11.3% higher three months later, Bespoke says.

_ The rising fear resulted in big losses in the tech-
nology-dominated Nasdaq, which tumbled 9.1%,
closing below 2000 for the first time since May
2005. Bank stocks also took it on the chin. An ex-
change traded fund that tracks banks fell 14.4%. The
banking sector was rocked by Citigroup’s takeover
of troubled North Carolina bank Wachovia. Last
week, Washington Mutual collapsed and was
bought by JPMorgan Chase in the biggest bank fail-
ure in history.

The market nose-dived even though the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission’s 10-day emergen-
cy ban on short sales of stock for more than 1,000
financial firms remained in place. Short sellers, who
profit when stock prices fall, have been blamed for
putting investment bank Lehman Bros. out of busi-
ness. The ban, which took effect on Sept. 18, is set
to expire late Thursday night. But the SEC can ex-
tend it for 10 trading days.

“The selling was pretty climactic,” says Price
Headley, chief analyst at BigTrends.com. “This is

the ability to get credit.”
The flight to safety was clear in the:
> Rush for government securities. The race in-
to Treasuries, especially the ones considered safest
because they mature the soonest,
showed just how nervous bond in-
vestors have become.’

“Credit is a lifeline

rowing costs skyrocket. Companies with lower credit
ratings, either because of their smaller size or weak-
er financial health, are paying 10.8 percentage points
above Treasuries with equivalent maturities, accord-
ing to the Merrill Lynch U.S. High
Yield index.

Not only does that mean bond

Investors scrambled to buy the {09 our economy. investors are Be a distress
safest security they could find: among companies, but borrowing
three-month Treasury bills. The This is extremely for these companies as a group is
three-month yield sank to 0.14% serious.’ as costly as it’s been since October
from 0.87%. That’s a big decline con- — Robert Gahagan 2002. “Expectations are for the de-
sidering that the Treasury increased American Century _ fault rate to keep moving higher in
the supply Monday by selling addi- Investments _ this weaker economy,” says Wan-

tional securities, says Tom di Galo-

ma at Jefferies. Investors also piled

into 10-year Treasuries, pushing the yield down to
3.58% from 3.86%, the biggest decline since Sept. 15
after Lehman's collapse and Merrill Lynch's forced
sale to Bank of America, Bloomberg News says.

“It’s been, ‘Buy the safest asset you can: Treasury
bills.’ That’s where everyone is hiding,” di Galoma
says. “Money is flowing out of stocks and into bills.”

> Rising aversion to riskier companies’ debt.
Any company with even a hint of risk is seeing bor-



Chong Kung at FAF Advisors.

> Caution toward companies

normally viewed as bulletproof. The value of
bonds inthe most highly rated U.S. companies has
fallen 11% this year, on track for the worst year for
them since 1994, says money manager Ken Winans
of Winans International.

The credit market’s reaction to the news boils
down to one word, “panic,” says Marilyn Cohen of
Envision Capital Management. “However bad it is in
the stock market, it’s worse in the bond market.”



By Richard Drew, AP

Not a good day: Trader Michael Kilkenny, right, takes a breather after the close of a busy and disheartening
trading day on Monday. Trading was heavy — and the outcome was equally heavy.

about as scared as people can get, and often occurs

_ at major crisis points.” The market is like a coiled

spring right now, he says, and could rebound sharp-
ly if the government comes back and passes some
kind of revised bailout plan.

Dan Seiver, a finance professor at San Diego State
University, says the market is in a no-win situation.
If the government passes a bailout bill, it will be ex-
pensive, and there will be great uncertainty as to
whether it will work. If no bailout arrives, the level
of uncertainty as to how bad things will get and
how many banks will fail will nag at the market.

One thing the government must stop is the per-
ception that a bank a day could fail. “At some point,
Wall Street will lose all confidence when you take
these banks out one at a time,” says Seiver. “It’s like
staring into an abyss. The abyss has a bottom, but
you don’t know how far down it is.”

There is a general consensus that a bailout of
some sort is needed to avert a very bad outcome.

“If the no vote is categorically a no, then they are
playing with fire,” says Robert Barbera, chief econo-
mist at ITG. “I'm not saying I know for certain that
the financial system can survive with this help. But
what I am saying is I would not run that experi-
ment even if it was politically advantageous.”

The stakes are high. Barbera says “confidence
with a capital C” is presumed to be in place only
when investors believe the system as they know it
is there when they wake up in the morning.

He notes that the government's prior attempts at
stabilizing the market based on a situation-by-
situation basis have failed to stabilize global mar-
kets. And the government risks a poor outcome if it
doesn’t come up with a comprehensive solution.

Black of Delphi Management agrees. “This is se-
vere. We have never seen anything like it in our life-
time. There is no perfect solution. But there has to
be a sense of urgency, because we risk a complete
capitulation of our global banking system.”

Signs of U.S.-style banking woes spreading
around the globe intensified Monday. European
governments announced a handful of bank bailouts
of their own. And stock prices fell sharply in
Europe, Asia and South America. London shares fell
5.3%, Germany dropped 4.2%, and France fell 5%.
Latin American stocks fell more sharply because
they were still trading when the failed bailout vote
news broke. Brazil’s market fell 9.4%. Early today in
Tokyo, stocks fell 5% in the first half-hour of trading.

Investors again rushed into safe investments. The
price of gold topped $900 an ounce in after-hours
trading. And the yield on the three-month Treasury
bill fell to 0.14% from 0.87% Friday, a clear sign that
investors were looking to preserve capital.

The selling pressure was so intense that it caused
problems at the New York Stock Exchange. The
stock drop accelerated sharply shortly before the
market closed, causing a 10-minute delay after the
4 p.m. closing before the record decline became of-
ficial. “There were huge sell imbalances at the end,”
said NYSE spokesman Scott Peterson, adding it was
difficult to determine immediately if the late drop
resulted from hedge funds or other major players
using electronic trades to sell large volumes of
shares.

Legal Notice

Rejection of
rescue plan
pushes oil

prices down

10% decline is biggest
one-day drop in 17 years ,

By Paul Davidson
USA TODAY

Oil prices plummeted nearly 10% Monday
as the House rejected the White House’s
proposed bailout of financial markets, stok-
ing fears of a deep, lingering economic slump
that would stifle energy demand.

Light sweet crude for November delivery
closed down $10.52 to settle at $96.37 on
the New York Mercantile Exchange — the
biggest one-day drop since January 1991,
the Oil Price Information Service says.

The rescue plan would let the govern-
ment snap up banks’ troubled mortgages,
helping credit and capital flow again, and
greasing the wheels of.the economy.

“Everybody is afraid (the failure to ap-
prove the plan) is going to lead to some kind
of financial breakdown,” says Peter Beutel,
president of energy risk management firm
Cameron Hanover. “That banks will not be
willing to lend money, people will not be
willing to do business and they won't have
jobs. If people are not working, they're not
driving cars.”

The bailout’s derailment wasn’t the only
factor weighing on oil prices. Even before
news broke of the House vote, crude was
headed lower on anticipation of a global eco-
nomic slowdown and a strengthening dollar,
says DTN senior analyst Darin Newsom.

Crude is now off 35% from its July 11 trad-
ing high of $147.27. After sinking much of
the summer, prices edged up after Hurri-
canes Gustav and Ike knocked out oil pro-
duction in the Gulf of Mexico. But oil prices
are down 20% the past week as the region’s
output ratcheted back up and negotiations
on the bailout foundered.

Monday’s drop will likely be felt at the
pump in a few weeks, Beutel says. Whole-
sale gasoline prices closed down 27 cents at
$2.40 Monday. Nationwide, the average
price of a gallon of regular gas was $3.64,
down 1.2 cents from Sunday, AAA says.

Beutel has been projecting that crude
would fall to about $80 a barrel in the next.
few months, driving gasoline prices to about
$3 a gallon. But a financial meltdown, he
says, could push prices far lower.

—— -

Legai Notice

UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT
CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
LOS ANGELES DIVISION

In re:

THORPE INSULATION COMPANY,

Debtor





Case No.: 2:07-19271-BB

| (Jointly Administered with Case No.:

2:07-20016-BB)

Chapter 11 .

NOTICE OF MOTION AND MOTION OF DEBT-
ORS FOR ORDER APPROVING: (1) INSUR-
ANCE SETTLEMENT WITH GENERAL INSUR-
ANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA; (2) SALE OF
INSURANCE POLICIES FREE AND CLEAR OF
CLAIMS AND INTERESTS; MEMORANDUM OF

| POINTS AND AUTHORITIES

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Thorpe Insulation Company (“Thorpe”) and Pacific Insula-

Insurance.



tion Company (“Pacific” and together with Thorpe, the “Debtors”) have filed, in the United
States Bankruptcy Court for the Central District of California, a motion to approve a
settlement agreement pursuant to 11 U.S.C. §§ 105(a) and 363 and Fed. R. Bankr. P.
2002(I), and 9019(a), with respect to General Insurance Company of America (“General
Insurance” or “Insurer”). The motion seeks an-order of the Court approving the settle-
ment agreement and the releases and compromises of claims reflected in the settle-
ment agreement between the Debtors, various other non-debtor parties and General

This settlement agreement (the “Settlement Agreement”) includes the sale of insur-
ance policies free and clear of liens, claims, encumbrances, and other interests. If the

motion is approved, Thorpe will sell, and the Insurer will purchase, the insurance poli-
cies described mote particularly in the Settlement Agreement, free and clear of all liens,
claims, encumbrances, and other interests. In exchange for the sale of such policies, and
for the additional consideration provided in the Settlement Agreement, including mutual
releases and covenants not to sue between the parties, General Insurance will make the
following payments: (i) $5 million on the Settlement Effective Date; and (ii) an additional
$4.75 million within two Business Days following the Plan Effective Date, conditioned
upon General Insurance being identified as a Settling Insurer and a Protected Party (as
defined in the Plan) for whose benefit the Permanent Injunction is to issue.

If you have a claim against or an interest in the insurance policies, your rights may be

affected.

If you wish to object to any aspect of the motion or the sale of the insurance policies,

you must both: (1) file with the Clerk of the Court at 255 E. Temple Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90012 a written response stating the specific facts upon which the objection is based,
together with a proof of service that a copy of the response was served on (i) Richard W.
Esterkin, Morgan Lewis LLP, 300 S. Grand Avenue, 22nd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071-
3132; (ii) Jeremy V. Richards, Pachulski Stang Zieh! & Jones LLP, 10100 Santa Monica
Blvd., Suite 1100, Los Angeles, CA 90067; (iii) the Office of the United States Trustee,
Attn: Russell Clementson, 725 S. Figueroa St., 26th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90017; (iv)
counsel for the Unsecured Creditors Committee, Peter Benvenutti,
333 Bush St., San Francisco, CA 94104-2878, and Peter Van N. Lockwood, Caplin &
Drysdale, 1 Thomas Circle N.W., Washington, DC 20005; (v) Janet A. Shapiro, The Sha-
piro Law Firm, 212 S. Gale Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90211-3406 and (vi) all other parties

Heller Ehrman LLP,

The historic losses shook up many investors, in-

entitled to notice pursuant to the Order Limiting Scope of Notice entered on November

cluding one who says he rarely gets spooked. “Am |
scared? A little, and I pride myself on not being
shaken by the market,” says Robb Muse, 39, a fi-
nancial services eae from ae Asked



Contributing: Sandra Block in McLean, Va, and
Kevin McCoy



attend the hearing

16, 2007, Docket No. 135, no later than October 16, 2008, and (2)

on October 30, 2008, at 10:00 a.m.,

Angeles, CA 90012.

Copies of the motions and documentation supporting the motions, as well as formal
notice of the motions, can be obtained on the Court's website at www.cacb.uscourts,

gov or by contacting counsel at the addresses set forth above.

in Courtroom 1475, 255 E. Temple Street, Los



*«

If your cash is
FDIC insured,
you can relax

No one has ever lost a
dime of protected money

‘Old photographs of Depression-era bank runs
are popping up all over the place, and that raises a
couple of questions. Why don’t people wear hats
anymore? And, more important, could this happen
to your bank? .

Concerns about bank
safety and soundness have
been exacerbated by the re-
cent downfall of two of the
nation’s largest financial in-
stitutions. Thursday, the
Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp. seized Washington
Mutual, the nation’s largest
savings and loan, and bro-
kered a sale to JPMorgan
Chase for $1.9 billion. On
Monday, Citigroup said it
will acquire Wachovia's banking business, a deal
that was also negotiated by the FDIC.

The FDIC emphasized that Wachovia didn’t fail
and that all depositors were protected. Likewise,
none of Washington Mutual’s depositors lost any
money, and customers have experienced no dis-
ruption in service.

No one has ever lost a dime of FDIC-insured de-
posits. Still, the prospect of a bank failure unnerves
a lot of people, particularly in light of ongoing may-
hem in the stock market.

The FDIC maintains a list of troubled banks but



By Sandra Block



















Bank failures in 2008 _

Closing
Bank Assets date
Washington Mutual $307 billion _ Sept. 25
Ameribank : $115 million _ Sept. 19
Silver State Bank $2.0 billion Sept. 5
Integrity Bank $1.1 billion. Aug. 29
Columbian Bank and Trust $752 million _ Aug. 22
First Priority Bank $259 million Aug. 1
First Heritage Bank $254 million uly 25
First National Bank of Reno $3.4 billion July 25
IndyMac $32.0 billion July 11
First Integrity Bank $54.7 million __ May 30
ANB Financial $2.1 billion May 9
Hume Bank $18.7 million March 7
Douglass National Bank $58.5 million Jan. 25
Source: FDIC

ah, Personal finance columnist Sandra Block
will answer your questions about how to
protect your savings and investments from

noon to 1:30 p.m. ET today. Go to money.usatoday
.com to submit your questions and read the chat.



doesn't publicly disclose it because regulators don’t
want to trigger a run on those banks. There are,
however, other ways to check on your bank's fi-
nancial health. Bankrate.com assigns a “Safe &
Sound” rating to banks, thrifts and credit unions,
based on profitability, liquidity, asset quality and
other criteria. Veribanc, an independent ratings
agency, will provide a financial rating for any bank,
thrift or credit union, for $10 per institution. Go to
www.eribanc.com, or call 800-837-4226.

While closing accounts at a bank that appears to
be on shaky ground could give you peace of mind, it
could also cost you money. If you withdraw funds
from a certificate of deposit before it has matured,
you'll have to pay an early-withdrawal penalty.

A better option: Make sure all of your deposits
are insured. No customer has ever lost a dime in in-
sured deposits in a bank failure. But not all bank
customers have that protection. The FDIC estimates
that about 37% of all bank deposits are uninsured.
Some of those accounts belong to businesses that
keep more than $100,000 in the bank to pay bills,
but other accounts may belong to people who don’t
understand the deposit insurance limits.

In the Washington Mutual and Wachovia trans-
actions, all deposits were included in the deal, so no
depositor lost money. But it doesn’t always work
out that way. When the FDIC took over IndyMac in
July, about 10,000 customers of the California-
based mortgage lender had uninsured deposits of

about $1 billion. Those customers received an “ad- |.

vance dividend” of 50% of their deposits. Additional
payments won't be made until the FDIC sells In-
dyMac’s assets, which hasn’t happened yet, says
FDIC spokesman Andrew Gray. If your deposits are
uninsured, you may have to wait months or years to
get your money back, if you get it at all.

The FDIC insures up to $100,000 for individual
accounts, $200,000 for joint accounts and up to
$250,000 for retirement accounts. But when a bank
fails, some customers discover that. they have inad-
vertently exceeded the limits. Here’s what you
need to know:

> Joint accounts are covered for up to $200,000
if both account holders have equal withdrawal
rights. If one account holder needs the other's per-
mission to take withdrawals, it’s not considered a
joint account for insurance purposes.

> If you have deposits at two banks that merge,
you could end up exceeding deposit insurance lim-
its. As the banking industry becomes increasingly
concentrated, this could become an issue for more
savers. When two banks merge, the FDIC provides
full coverage for six months after the merger, or in
the case of CDs, until maturity. After that, deposi-
tors need to move some of their money to an unaf-
filiated bank to maintain full protection.

> You can significantly increase your coverage
with revocable trust accounts, typically known as
payable-on-death or living-trust accounts. The
FDIC will cover up to $100,000 per beneficiary for
these accounts. In the past, the coverage was lim-
ited to “qualifying beneficiaries,” defined as
spouses, children, grandchildren, parents and sib-
lings. But last week, the FDIC voted to eliminate this
requirement. Now, deposit insurance will cover any
beneficiary named in the trust.

The FDIC provides an online tool to help you cal-
culate your coverage for all of your bank accounts.
Go to www fdic.gov and search for the Electronic
Deposit Insurance Estimator.





To suggest columns, e-mail: sblock@usatoday.com.

BH







USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 9A

Bailout



Concerns about
regional banks
continue to spread

_ By Del Jones
USA TODAY

Worldwide banking remained in turmoil Mon-
day as Wachovia became the latest giant to top-
ple, agreeing to sell most of its operations to Ci-
tigroup in a deal brokered by the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp.

All deposits in Wachovia are protected, even
those with accounts in excess of the $100,000
FDIC insurance.

“Today’s action will ensure seamless continuity
of service from their bank and full protection for
deposits,” FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair said. “There
will be no interruption in services, and bank cus-
tomers should expect business as usual.”

Citigroup will acquire most of Wachovia's as-
sets and liabilities, but Wachovia will continue to
own! brakerage A.G. Edwards and investment
manager Evergreen Investments. Charlotte-
based Wachovia will also continue as a publicly
traded company.

Concerns about Wachovia's financial health
have hammered the company’s share price. Fri-
day, Wachovia closed at $10, off 81% from its 52-
week high. By Monday's close, Wachovia had
slumped to $1.84.

Wachovia's financial problems can be traced to
its 2006, $24 billion acquisition of Golden West
Financial. Wachovia inherited a deteriorating
$122 billion portfolio of loans that let borrowers
skip some payments. Wachovia posted a $9.1 bil-
lion loss for the second quarter, slashed its divi-
dend and announced plans to cut 11,350 jobs,
mostly in its mortgage business.

Havoc across the Atlantic

Wachovia may be the last big bank considered
to be in immediate trouble, but fears continue to
spread among the next+tier regional banks.

Havoc also reached across the Atlantic Monday,
where Britain nationalized Bradford & Bingley,
Britain’s ninth-largest mortgage lender. It was the
second UK. bank to be taken on by the British

a

No deposits lost:
Two women use
the ATMs at a Wa-
chovia branch in
Miami on Monday,
the day Citigroup
announced it
would buy Wa-
chovia’s banking
operations. The
FDIC brokered the
deal.

By Joe Raedle,
Getty Images



How Citigroup and Wachovia compare







services, says Jim Eckenrode, an
executive at TowerGroup, a re-
search and advisory services firm

Citigroup Wachovia : as
2007 revenue (billions $507 $56.7 for the financial services industry.
2007 net income (billions $3.6 $63 Donn Vickrey, chief analyst at
Assets’ $2.2 trillion $8.1 billion Gradient Analytics, a stock re-
Headquarters New York Charlotte search firm in Scottsdale, Ariz.,
Fortune 500 rank - 3g | says that as the country Is left
Employees 387,000 720,000 with few large banks, consumers

1 —as of March 31; Sources: Hoover's, Fortune, Citigroup, Wachovia

can expect lower yields on sav-
ings and higher fees.



government. Also, Belgium, the Netherlands and
Luxembourg pumped $16.4 billion into Fortis to
stabilize Belgium's largest financial services firm,
taking on a 49% stake.

Elsewhere: :

> Morgan Stanley said it would sell a 21% stake
to Japan’s Mitsubishi UF] Financial Group for
$9 billion to shore up its finances. Even so, Mor-
gan Stanley stock closed down 15% to $20.99.

> Lehman Bros., which became the largest
bankruptcy filing in US. history on Sept. 15, said
it would sell its investment management busi-
ness to private-equity firms Bain Capital Partners
and Heltman & Friedman for $2.2 billion.

The Wachovia deal came just four days after
the FDIC brokered the sale of Washington Mutu-
al, the nation’s largest savings and loan, to JPMor-
gan Chase.

“Citigroup passed over Washington Mutual be-
cause they were focused on a bigger target: Wa-
chovia,” says Bart Narter of Celent, a Boston-
based financial research and consulting firm. He
says the deal makes Citigroup an instant player in
the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states. It will add
731 branches in Florida, 323 in North Carolina,
320 in New Jersey and 309 in Pennsylvania, Nar-
ter says.

Citigroup, in an effort to shore up its capital po-
sition, said it will sell $10 billion in common stock
and cut its quarterly dividend 50%, to 16 cents a
share. Citigroup paid $2.1 billion for Wachovia
and agreed to absorb $42 billion in losses from
Wachovia's $312 billion loan portfolio, with the
FDIC covering any remaining losses. Citigroup
will issue $12 billion in preferred stock and war-
rants to the FDIC.

Citigroup lost 12% to $17.75.

Continuing consolidation leaves four giant
banks: Bank of America, JPMorgan .Chase, Ci-
tigroup and Wells Fargo. Going forward, they will
press their advantage with new products and

Banks will likely offer expand-
ed services to big customers such as managers of
large assets. “For the average consumer, it’s going
to be a bad deal,” Vickrey says.

Consolidation could create opportunity for
small and midsize banks, which focus on com-
munity and small-business banking, says Jay Sid-
hu, former CEO of Sovereign Bancorp, which runs
Sidhu Special Purpose Capital out of Reading, Pa.

Sidhu says smaller banks are now poised to
prosper, and he intends to invest at least
$250 million in them in. upcoming months. “Cap-
ital and superior management will be the keys for
survival and growth in this environment,” he
says.

Regional bank stocks slammed

Whatever their prospects, regional bank stocks
sank in the broad market's Monday slide.

Sovereign Bancorp tumbled 72% to $2.33. Fifth
Third Bancorp sank 44% to $9.11; FirstFed Fi-
nancial dropped 25% to $7.50; and KeyCorp
slumped 33% to $9.80. The Financial Select Sector
SPDR (ticker: XLF), a fund that holds 85 large-
company financial stocks, dropped 13%.

There were 117 banks and thrifts in trouble
during the second quarter, the highest level since
2003, the FDIC says, but that number could
climb. “There are a number of regional banks
which may need help, either because of the
weakening mortgage market or simply because
of the weakening economy,” Michael Sheldon,
chief market strategist of RDM Financial Group,
told the Associated Press.

This year, 13 banks have failed. Aside from
Washington Mutual, two others failed this
month: Ameribank and Silver State Bank. Only
three banks failed in 2007, and none failed in
2005 and 2006, the FDIC says.



Contributing: Paul Davidson



| Hiring continues slowing

quarter. What the survey found:
Percentage who said they

would... 59% 63%
25% 23%
14%
Bim â„¢ now ae 5%
Q3 Actual Q4Planned

Staffing plans by company size, fourth quarter
1-50 employees





Hiring managers were surveyed about whether their companies plan to increase,
decrease or make no change in the number of full-time permanent staff in the fourth
quarter of this year. They were also asked about hiring and layoffs during the third



CU CareerBuilder.com
Let 4 quarterly job outlook

Finding qualified job candidates
Does your company, at your location, currently have positions for which



i increase

Decrease you cannot find qualified candidates?
Make no change Yes HESRRS aac

[_] Company undecided Nol

Not sur

Wage gauge







Not sure








What do you expect the average
change in salaries will be for full-



Yes

*1.3%
4-10%

b. ' - | time, permanent employees, at 11% or mor
pa ae 738 LJ 3% your location, in the 4th quarter Bars
51-250 employees of 2008 compared with the 4th No change
YOY ee ia "Be 63% [| 3% quarter of 2007? Decrease fil
More than 250 employees Company undecided {| 4%
Hs he Aone ane U Have there been layoffs of Do you anticipate layoffs of
Staffing plans by region, fourth quarter permanent full-time staff, at your permanent full-time staff, at your
Wi : ot -theast location, this quarter (3rd quarter, location, next quarter (Uct. 1
ss Mone sau Nopteast July 1 through Sept. 30, 2008)? through Dec. 31, 2008)?
62% 65% 63% 63% No ve
84% 81%
a 9% 227% 0% oe 0% 2%
5%
am oO es 2% 3% ian



Not sure Yes

Note: Totals may not equal 100% due to rounding,

Results based on an online survey for USA TC DAY and CareerBuilder.com by Harris Interactive
of 3,061 hiring managers and human resource professionals (employed full-time, not self-
employed, in private companies with at least significant involvement in hiring decisions).
Survey conducted Aug, 21 - Sept. 9. Responses weighted when necessary.








Job market
likely to remain
flat, survey says

Nearly two-thirds of U.S. employers plan to keep
their payrolls stable at the end of the year, while one in
10 expect to cut staff, according to a survey out today
that points to further deterioration in the job market.

Sixty-three percent of hiring managers said they
planned no change in the number of full-time, perma-
nent employees at their companies in the October-De-
cember quarter. That was up from 59% who said their
staffing levels were unchanged in the July-September
period, according to an online survey for USA TODAY

By Adrienne Lewis, USA TODAY

and CareerBuilder.com by Harris Interactive.

The survey, conducted Aug. 21-Sept. 9, involved
3,061 hiring managers and human resource profes-
sionals, CareerBuilder.com is’a job-finding site jointly
owned by Tribune, McClatchy, Microsoft and USA TO-
DAY parent Gannett.

U.S. employers cut jobs for eight consecutive months
through August, according to the Labor Department.
Last month, the unemployment rate jumped from 5.7%

to 6.1%, the highest in five years.



10A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY













Markets Monday









pS UN.
TODAY



































Track the major market indexes updated continuously









se throughout the day at money.usatoday.com
*
usaTopavintemetsoindex | 25 NYSE stocks fell for each 1 that rose | 2"... sew
: ; Index Close Mon. 2008
The USA TODAY Internet 50 is a capital- S&P 500 110642. -88% -24.6%
ization-weighted index that consists of S&P Midcap ————i698.21—-7.3% 18.6%
the e-~Consumer 25 and the e-Business Bloomberg News or 19%, to $43.75. Genworth Financial | pow transports 4503.89 52% 45%
25. The indexes are benchmarked at 100 : NYSE Nasd tumbled $3.14, or 39%, to $5.00. Aflac Dow utilities 423.63. -4.8% -204%
as of Dec. 31, 2001. The components are NEW YORK — US. stocks plunged oe fell $8.63, or 14%, to $51.25. NYSE composite 720401 -8.7% -26.0%
updated quarterly. Monday and the Standard & Poor's 500 Advances 166 Advances 417 > A measure of energy shares in the Nasdaq 100 1496.15. 10.5% -28.2%
7 tumbled the most since the 1987 crash atl nape S&P 500 tumbled 11%, the biggest drop | Russell2000___— 657.72 -6.7% 14.1%
Internet50 after the House of Representatives re- | Peumss —*108 Declines 2, since at least 1989. Crude oil fell the | Amexcomposite 1758.92 -8.2% 27.0%
160 jected a $700 billion plan to rescue the | Newhighs____10 Newhighs" _16 | most in almost seven years on concern | 2 Wilshires00O 11,322.76 -8.3% | -23.6%
financial system (stories, 1A, 7A). Newlows 986 Newlows 689 | global demand will drop (story, 8A). EX- Exchange traded funds
The Dow Jones industrial average slid | Volume(in millions) — Volume (in millions) xonMobil dropped the most in six | Effs are index funds that trade like stocks on major
777.68 points to 10,354.45 for its big- | Up 157 years, falling $6.59, or 8%, to $74.06. | exchanges. Petg. change
ar gest point drop ever as U.S. stocks lost | Down 6,894 Down Chesapeake Energy lost the most in | stock’ Ticker__Mon. _2008
$1.2 trillion in market value. The MSCI | ta! 7,054 Total almost 10 years, sliding $5.27, or 14%, to | SPDR SPY -78% _-23,8%
World index of 23 developed markets $32.60. ConocoPhillips sank $6.93, or | SPDR Financial” XLF 13.2% _ -35.8%
slid 6.9%, the most in 21 years. day after the September 2001 terrorist 9%, to $69.31, the most since 1989, Na- | PowerShsQQQTrust_ QQQQ__-79% _ -26.2%
The S&P 500 fell 106.59 points, or attacks, sending the 30-stock gauge to tional Oilwell Varco slumped $8.96, or | iShares Rus 2000 IWM__=79% _-14.3%
8.8%, to 1106.42 vs. the 7.0% drop Mon- an almost three-year low as all of its 16%, to $45.61. ie
cae usatooay | day in the Dow. The Nasdaq composite components fell at least 2.8%. A gauge of > Apple slumped $22.98, or 18%, to eer a Be a
Pct. chg. index declined 199.61 points, or 9.1%, expected stock market volatility $105.26, the biggest drop in eight years: iShs FISEChinadS XD a6 C45 7%
Mon. Chg. __Day _2008 | to 1983.73, its steepest plunge since climbed toa record. Morgan Stanley cut its rating for the | proshsultras@ps00 SSO 213.8% 243.8%
meres aS ae oe a April 2000. Twenty-five stocks fell for) | maker of Macintosh computers and | ‘prosh ultra ht 00 QID 20.0% 61.9%
e-Consumer25 18615-2286 -109% —387% | each that.rose on the New York Stock Highlights: Wachovia tumbled iPod music players to “equal weight” | sppREner XLE_-11.9% _-24.8%
Gaede BanaesLnee Exchange as 2 billion shares were trad- $8.16, or 82%, to $1.84 after the bank from “overweight,” saying price cuts | ProShsUltraQQQ QLD -19.3% 52.2%
ed on the floor, 35% more than the was sold to Citigroup in a deal bro- will curb profit growth. SPDRGold Trusts GLD_— 3.4% «8.6%
e-Consumer 25 | three-month average. kered by the Federal Deposit Insurance DJADiamondsTr__—DIA__—_—-5.8% _-21.0%
1-800-Flowers.com 5.99 -0.14 -2.3% -31.4% The S&P 500 sank to its lowest since Corp. (story, 9A). Quotes on your cellphone iShares EAFE ‘EFA -11.2% -32.4%
Amazon.com 63.35_-7.35 -10.4% -31.6% | October 2004 as all 10 of its industry > Insurance companies tumbled on Send text message to heRanked by market capltallzaugn
Baidu.com 231.20-29.55 -11.3% -40.7% | groups tumbled at least 4.2%. The Dow concern that investment losses could 4INFO (44636) with: Foreign markets
BlueNile 42.50 -0.56_-1.3% -37.6% | average’s retreat was its steepest on a hurt profits and capital levels. MetLife, TW eStock ticker (dell) or
ExIrade 2.60 -0,85-24.6% —26.8% : Gi afi : ie : i Mon, Petecntage chance
Etrade __2.60 ~0.85-24.6% -26.8% | percentage basis since the first trading the biggest U.S. life insurer, lost $10.06, ¢Fund ticker (agthx) Ind close Prev.day
eBay 19.95 =262 110% 399% Shanghal 1328 nhs —~63 78
. = x e e . le = .
aan _15 -022 38% 2S | Dow Jones industrial average japan (Nike) 11,7436 13% -23.3%
Google 381.00-50.04 -11.6% 44.9% | 13,200 ee ee
IACInterActive 14.86 -2.14-12.6% -36.7% | 17.800 Sydney 839.2 ESS 24 GE
InfoSpace 10.77: -0.52 -4.6% 153% , Mon. close: 10,365.45 Singapore 2361.3. -21% -31.9%
intuit 29.92 -2.02 -63% -53% | 12,400 Change: 777.68; -7.0% uinbat eee ae ee
2GlobalComm 22.55 0.96 41% 65% 6 months ago: -17.8% Frankfurt 5807.1 -4.2% -28.0%
pT a SOs dD cae caoae - 12,000 In 2008: -21.9% Hong Kong 17,880.77 4.3% 35.7%
Move 2.02 20.26 11.4% 17.6% faa Zurich 5445.7 4.6% -21.4%
Netflix 31.60 -1.27 -3.9% 18.7% |" Milan 138220 “47% _ 33.3%
Overstock.com 1790 -2.29 -113% 153% | 11.290 Paris cece ie Seek
Priceline 66.84 -8.16-10.9% 41.8% |" condon ol ile Re
Schwab, Charles 21.73 -2.59 -10.6% 15.0% | 10,800 ae
Sina 32.88 -2.74 -27% 25.8% Johan. (Comp.) _23,087.7_-5.8%__-20.3%
SkillSoft 9850.19 20% 3.0% | 10,400. Mexico City 23,955.7 -6.4% -18.9%.
Stamps.com 71,720.01. 01% 23.8% or Toronto 11,285.1 -6.9% -18.4%
TD Ameritr 16,00 2.29 -12.5% -20.2% | 7000... DONTE Oe ee
United Online 9.44 029 -3.0% ~20.1% Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Brussels 2589.5 -8.0% -37.3%
Yahoo 1688 -2.04-10.8% -274% | DJ Wilshire 5000 Nasdaq composite index puis esis ate
Source: The Associated Press
» The e-Consumer 25 is published Tuesdays and Thursdays, 15000 ls Mutual funds
the e-Business 25 on Wednesdays and Fridays. For both tables | 14,500 2600 '
mean ae O08 2500 1S atgest since aint eee
Readers’ choice stocks 13,500 | 2400 Fund, ranked by size Mon. 4wks. 2008
Stocks that appear most in portfolios at USATODAY- | !3,000 2300 Amer. Funds Growth -8.2% -15.3% -23.7%
com’. 12,500 2200 aa Pimco Instl PIMS: TotRt 0.8% -2.0% 1.1%
‘ Pctg. change
Mon. Chg. = once {2,000 Monicloaeaa4 2100 7 een Amer. Funds A: CapIBA p -5.3% -10.1% -20.1%
ATRT 27.75 -2.25 -25% -33.2% 111,500 2000 Amer. Funds A: CapWGA p © 8.0% -13.7% -26.2%
Alia : 1935 =154 =a 1708 11,000 | 000 Fidelity Contrafund -7.3% -13.1% -24.1%
e 20-22, “ls. —4b, : < 7 i -6: -12. -22.
BenkotAneiia —3025_-645 tax “zara | MW AF May Jun Jet Aug Sep-Oct Mar pr May Jun Jul aug Sep ct | Reese octamer
Chevron 77.50 -9.45 -10.9% -17.0% ;
aC ET TESTES es N ew York Sto ck Exch ange N. as d a q Washington Mutual Inv -7.2% -10.0% ~19.7%
Ge a7 7s oa) HL soll 1775 22.40 -119% 239.7% ; . Vanguard 500 Index -8.8% -13.6% -23.5%
COO Ce Ss 5103 2145 <28% c1csy | Most active shares Most shares traded Most active shares Most shares traded Dodge&Cox: Stock -10.5% -18.3% -30.1%
Dell 15.41 -1.59 -9.4% -37.1% Volume Last Chg Percent Chg Volume Last Ch Percent Chg Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk__-8.5% -13,6% -22.4%
Walt Disne 29.73 -3.02 -9.2% -7.9% | Citigrp 189,436,500 17.75 -2.40 VangFncl 666.6 -2.78 | PwShsQQQ 290,997,600 37.82 _-3.26 PwShsQQQ _* 748 -3.26 | Europacific Growth -8.0% -13.8% -28.5%
ExxonMobil 74.06 -659 -8.2% -21.0%"} AmintlGp 149,987,700 250 -0.65 ClayGSol 263.2 -3.54 | Microsoft 127,857,700 25.01 -2.39 iShGIbREn 48.0 -4.17 | Dodge&Cox: Intistk -9.7% -18.0% -31.0%
Ford Motor 417 -0.64 -13.3% -38.0% | iShR2K 142,691,500 65.05 _-5.58 VangEurPc 253.6 -3.71 | Apple 91,958,100 105.26 -22.98 PSWindEnn 38.2 -1.83 | Fidelity Divintl 8.9% -16.4% —30.7%
GeneralElectric 23.10 -2.15 -8.5% -37.7%'.| iShEMkts 117,539,200 31.61 —4.18 iShLShtT 246.6 -0.05 | intel 90,824,100_17.27_ -1.93 FTUSLiq 346 -2.16 | New Perspective Fund 74% 12.8% 25.0%
General Motors 8.51 -1.25 -12.8% -65.8% | BkofAm 95,697,500 30.25 -6.45 VangSTBd 241.1 0.11 | Cisco 85,368,500 21.79 -2.03 BldrsEm 29.5 -4.74 . :
Google 381.00-50.04 -11.6% -44.9% | JPMorgCh 75,738,800 41.00 -7.24 VangTotBd 219.7 037 | Oracle 57,760,100 18.77 -1.85 FidNasdldx 233-675 | Lipperfundindexes 44441 return!
Hewlett-Packard 44.55 -3.26 -6.8% -11.7% Pfizer 70,147,600 17.65 -1.01 iShDJIns 184.1 -2.70 Qualcom 49,618,000 39.88 -5.96 iShAsian 26.8 -2.13 Type of Lipper index Mon. 4wks. 2008
Home Depot 24.99 -1.47 -5.6% -7.2% | Genklec 68,623,700 23.10 -2.15 MktVRus 181.7 -5.17 | Comcast 46,242,200 18.01 -2.69 iShACWXn 242 -445 | Balanced 5.0% 9.6% 16.0%
Intel 17.27 -1.93 -10.1% -35.2% | WellsFargo 64,385,200 33.25 -4.06 WTindia 173.1 1.80 | RschMotn 44,567,700 61.73 -9.03 PSNsqSCn 240 -1.46 | Equity income “8.2% AA2A% 222.6%
IBM 114.46 -496 -4.2% 59% | CVRD 55,899,100 16.70 -4.19 iShFnSc 155.3 -659 | Dell 38,552,500 15.41 —1.59 PwShHlth 225 -171 | Gog 6k CMON ADE
Preos cia) Se Biggest gainers Biggest losers Biggest gainers Biggest losers International 8.8% -15.8% 30.7%
Microsoft 5.01 7.39 87% 79.7% Last_ Chg. Pct Last_ Chg Pct Last Ch Pet Last_ Chg Pet Large-cap core -8.2% -13.5% -22.9%
Motorola 6.68 0.95 -12.5% —58.4% VeraSun 4.00 1.80 81.8 SovrgnBcp 2.33 -6.04 -72.2 DearbrnBe 10.00 440 78.6 CapWest 3.39 -7.47 -68.8 Large-cap growth -8.6% -16.9% -26.7%
ae (so7cies one ieee oe 9.60 2.55 36.2 RegionsFn 8.25 -5.75 -41.1 | PacEthan 2.08 0.70 50.7 ‘FifthThird 9.11 -7.05 -43.6 | Large-cap value 85% —12.8% 223.9%
Pepsico. --~69.66 2.05 =2.9% 8.2% RaserT 8.50 2.26 36.2 Genworth 5.00 -3.14 -38.6 LNB Bncp 10.79 3.59 49.9 RainierPac 440 -2.31 -344 Midcap growth 8.3% 177% 27.5%
Pee nae 17.65 -1.01 54% 223% FedAgric 3.75 0.89 31.1 Conseco 3.20 -1.79 -35.9 HelicosBio 2.38 0.74 44.8 VirtualRn 7.79 -3.95 -33.6 Midcap valu “7.7% -15.0% 21.9%
: - - OO p value 2 . 9%
Procter&Gamble 66.75 =209 =30% o1z | GypSemwi 650 150 300 FstHorizon 7.25 -4.02 -35.7 | BeasleyB 2.99 088 41.7 CitizRe 313-154 33.0 rer crn aa Ee
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sodeycom US. government bond 08% 1.2% 2.6%
e 1- Capital gains and dividends reinvested Source: Lipper
Currency per dollar Treasuries Key rates 6mos. Yr. me:
New York rates Mon. Fri. aS Yr.ago 27-00% »—~ SO year E bong viele Mins 12s Prime lendin 9.00% 5.25% 7.75% Commodities Close Mon. 3008
Australian dollar __‘1.2439__-1.2038 1.0909 _ 1.1253 Federal funds 1.08% 2.38% 4.92% | Aluminum (Ib. $1.11 -2.0% 3.7%
British pound"! 0.5510 0.5427 0.5021 _0.4889 | [4.43% | | Cattle (Ib.) 0.9805 -2.9% 1.9%
Canadian dollar 1.0399 1.0320 1.0191 0.9938 4.00% | Consumer rates 6mos. Yr. _| Coffee (Ib.) 1,293 3.8% -5.1%
Chinese yuan 6.8493 6.8493 7.0175 7.5070 | eye Savings Mon. a a Copper (Ib.) 2.9175 53% 3.7%
an i 0.6910 0.6841 0.6345 0.7006 | Money market funds 1.80% 2.17% 4.54% Corn (bushel) 5.13. -5.5% +12.6%
Hong Kong dollar __7.7640__7.7760__7.7821__7.7710 é Tax-free money funds 3.67% 2.04% 3.23% | CRBindex 343.22 5.9% -43%
indian rupee 47170 46512 39.746 39675 00% | 10-year T-note yield Mon. 3.58%} Bank money market 0.70% 0.66% 0.90% | Ethanol gal, 217 3.9% -8.4%
Israeli shekel 3.4530 3.4235 3.5298 4.0180 3 th T-bill di : 6-mo. CDs 2.09% 1.95% 3.50% Gasoline, unleaded (gal.) 2.397 -10.1% 3.2%
japanese yen 10443 106.06 100.00__114.74 a MiG ee. EVES 2.45% 1.97% 3.71% | Gold (troy oz.) 888.20 0.6% 6.4%
Mexican peso 11.0505 10.7925 10.6940 10.9333 2.00% Bag 5-yr. CDs 3.48% 2.77% 3.94% | Lumber(1,000bd.ft) 20380 3.6% -13.1%
Norwegian krone___5.7737_5.6721__5.1177_5.3920 ae nw NR aes Mortgage rates "| Natural gas (btw 7.2210 3.4% 3.5%
Singapore dollar 1.4280 1.4263 1.3812 1.4859 | hase = “s 30-yr.fixed (FHLMC) 5.78% 5.87% 6.34% | Oil, heating (gal.) 2.7604 7.8% 4.4%
South African rand 8.3333 8.1037 8.1169 6.8716 qoy “Bonds! isk oe ote 15-yrfixed(FHLMC) 5.35% 5.27% 5.98% | Oil, It.swt.crude(barrel) 96.37 -9.8% 0.4%
South Korean won 1185.30 1160.40 1000.00 91491 © loro 1591042 06% 45% Adj. rate (FHLMC) 5.03% 5.15% 5.65% | Platinum (troy oz. 1,075.40 _-3.4% -29.6%
Swedish krona 6.7568 6.6313 5.9595 6.4375 hee ese 5320056 07% 52% L-yr. T-ARM index! 1.95% 1.60% 4.05% | Pork bellies (Ib.) 0.9675 2.9% 12.5%
Swiss franc 1.0873 1.0891 0.9977 _ 1.1635 a ace hal i ‘ Tith Dist. ARM index 2.@98% 3.970% 4.277% | Silver(troy oz, 12981 3.5% -12.3%
Taiwan dolar «3245.32.15 3040 32.77 : Lateef sen 20 Sources: Money nd epor. ban | Soybeans bushel) 1094-6 O% _-88%
1 - dollars per pound: 1.8149; 2 - dollars per euro: 1.4472 ' Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oa“ , Bi : : Wheat (bushel) 6.68 -6.7% -24.5%







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"USA TODAY hopes to serve as a forum for better understanding and unity
to help make the USA truly one nation."

-Allen H. Neuharth, Founder, Sept. 15, 1982
President and Publisher: Craig A. Moon

Editor: Ken Paulson
Exec. Editors: John Hillkirk, Kinsey Wilson
Editor, Editorial Page: Brian Gallagher

Managing Editors:

News, Cavol Stevens; Money, Jim Henderson;
Sports, Monte Lorell; Life, Susan Weiss;
Design, Richard Curtis;

Network, Chet Czarniak



Senior Vice Presidents:
Advertising, Brett Wilson;
Circulation, Larry Lindquist;
Electronic, Jeff Webber
Marketing, Susan Lavington
Vice Presidents:
Finance, Myron Maslowsky;
Human Resources, Janet Richardson;

Production, Ken Kirkhart

Today’s debate: Financial rescue

At critical moment of crisis,
irresponsibility wins the day |

Our view:

GOP GOP ideologues fail test of leadership,
block their own president's proposal.

So, at a pivotal moment of se-
vere crisis for our country, here’s
what passes for leadership: fin-
ger-pcinting.

No sooner had the House of
Representatives surprised ev-
eryone by voting down a plan to
shore up the nation’s financial .
markets, then out came the ac-
cusations and blame shifting.

House Republican leaders,

brandishing a copy of a need- “($700 billion economy at risk. If this country
lessly partisan speech Speaker represents) the endures a period of serious eco-
Nancy Pelosi had delivered be- f th h homic hardship, it is hard’ to
mate costs ofthe Bush."
fore the vote, angrily. claimed administration’s imagine the whole party not
she had caused a dozen Repub- failed ; being blamed. Republicans, af-
licans to abandon the plan. In FaH€G ECONOMIC ter all, have controlled the |
other words, as Democrat Bar- Policies. White House for nearly eight
ney Frank, the Financial Services _ years and Congress for six of
Committee chairman, aptly put — Nancy Pelosi, those years. They loosened con-
it, their feelings were so hurt House speaker trols over Wall Street and ig-

that they could no longer vote in
the national interest. Poor boys.
Perhaps someone should hand
them a crying towel.

And perhaps someone could
tell Pelosi that this was no time
to indulge in the House’s usual
partisan antics.

Not to be outdone, Republican
presidential nominee John
McCain chimed in.a few hours





everyone of them deserves blame. But that
party was at least able’ to muster a healthy

majority of its members, almost 60%, under |

the assumption that the other side would get
something close to a majority —
this on a plan coming from a Re-
publican president.

Not so the Republicans. In a
sense, those who voted against
the measure are behaving like
the Wall Street titans who
helped cause the financial crisis.
While those titans put their
companies and the economy at
risk, the Republican opponents
are putting their party and the

nored the excesses that were
building up.

The hubris of the House Re-
publicans’ action is breathtak-
ing. They rejected the pleas of
President Bush, who shares
their free-market beliefs. They
rejected their nominee for
president, who supported the
measure. They rebuffed the
three top Republican leaders of

later saying that his opponent, - Reuters the House — Minority Leader
Barack Obama, and the Demo- “This is an John Boehner of Ohio, Whip
crats had not exercised adequate j; Ww Roy Blunt of Missouri and Con-
leadership. Never mind that jake where ference Chairman Adam Put-
McCain's grandstanding over the Speak Pel 5 nam of Florida, as well as the
past week — suspending his peaker Felosi's ranking Republican on the Fi-
campaign so he could lead failure to listen, nancial Services Committee,

Washington out of partisan
deadlock, then reversing field —
achieved nothing other than to
inject presidential politics into a
difficult situation. Obama, mean-
while, took a few ill-timed jabs
at his competitor, accusing
McCain of voting against com-
mon-sense financial regulations.

This is standard politics, but
perhaps both could hold off on
the blame game until a solution
to the immediate crisis is in
place. There’s still plenty of time
to argue about who caused
what, but not much time to

failure to lead.”

— Rep. Eric Cantor,



Bloomberg News

Spencer Bachus of Alabama.

Perhaps most troubling, they
spurned the entreaties of non-
partisan and entirely free-mar-
ket-oriented leaders such as
Federal Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke and Treasury Secre-
tary Henry Paulson, as well as
Berkshire Hathaway Chairman
Warren Buffett, perhaps the
most respected capitalist in the
world. Last week, he. told Fox
Business Channel, “If Congress
doesn’t help us on this, heaven
help us.”

The House Republicans lis-

R-Va.

keep the economy out of crisis. “Sen. Obama . tened only to the angry phone

Fortunately, the finger-point- and his alliesin calls of constituents, who even-

ing is neither constant nor uni- Congress infused _ tually will see that the problem

versal. In fact, responsible lead- unnecessary is the behavior that led to the

ers in both parties, including partisanship into crisis, not the proposed solution
Pelosi and the Republican lead- th ” to it.

_ ership, voted for the measure. € process. Whether they were driven by

They ':ave been trying to find a
bipartisan answer. The bill failed
primarily because of the obsti-

nacy of_a group of rank-and-file House Re-'

publicans, an odd assemblage who are rigidly
' ideological, fiercely partisan, and utterly di-
vorced from reality, including their own cul-
pability in creating this crisis. Overall, Repub-
‘ licans voted 133-65 against the measure,
while most Democrats supported it.

To be sure, a minority of Democrats, 95 in
all, also voted against the plan. And each and

— Sen. John McCain
RAri

a misplaced sense that this plan
was too intrusive on free mar-
kets or by a basic fear of the up-
coming election is inconsequential. What's
important is that when a tough, unpopular
decision was needed, they did not answer.
Perhaps the House will come to its senses

Ariz.

in the next few days. Perhaps a serious eco-

nomic calamity can be averted.

It is obviously time for the politicians to
put their fingers back in their pockets and get
to work doing what is right for all Americans.

The sky is not falling

Opposing view:
Lawmakers have time to improve
fundamentally flawed bailout.



By John Shadegg

Every Republican who voted against the
Emergency Economic Stabilization Act on
Monday believes that Congress must address
this crisis. They take it seriously and stand
ready to vote for reasonable legislation. They
were unwilling to give Treasury Secretary
Henry Paulson a blank check.

The sky is not falling. The market will re-
turn. Secretary Paulson is getting a lesson in
civics. The world he has entered is different
than: the wheeling-and-dealing Goldman
Sachs world where he made his fortune.

Members of Congress have a duty to pro-
tect the interests of the American. people.
That is precisely what they did. The vote
against the measure was solidly bipartisan.

Paulson's $700 billion dollar plan was fun-
damentally flawed. The bill asked for a blank
check. It did not specify which assets could
be purchased or the procedure by’ which
they would be purchased.

Regrettably, Congressional Democrats in-
serted extraneous provisions and chose to
put groups such as ACORN (a liberal housing
advocacy group) and trial lawyers before the
American people. After Sen. John McCain, R-
Ariz., courageously halted the stampede,
most negotiation time was spent removing
harmful Democrat language, rather than im-
proving Paulson’s proposal.

House Republicans want to protect the
American people and our nation’s financial

institutions, enabling them to make the loans
needed to run America’s economy, It is also
critical to calm public anxiety.

To begin, “mark to market,” the account-

ing rule that requires mortgage-backed se-'

curities to be valued at fire-sale prices, must
be suspended. For reasons that are incom-
prehensible, Paulson and congressional
Democrats refused to include such a provi-
sion. It’s a systemic reform Congress must in-
sist upon to reduce taxpayer exposure and
prevent this crisis from reoccurring. Further,
an update to the Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp., increasing its $100,000 limit, would
relieve the concern of millions of Americans
for their life savings. It’s hard to imagine why
anyone would oppose such a change.

Many House conservatives do not like the
structure of Paulson's proposal to have the
government purchase troubled assets. But
there is nothing inherent in this plan that’s
inconsistent with the two reforms outlined
above.

Americans need to understand that the
Senate was not scheduled to vote on this bill
until Wednesday evening, as a result of the
Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah today. We
have ample time to.reach an acceptable com-
promise if all parties act in good faith. The
Democratic House majority can move to re-
consider its bill if Speaker Nancy Pelosi will
allow an amendment to improve it by mak-
ing changes, including those I have outlined.

This problem can be solved in the very
near future, and the market will come back.

Rep. John Shadegg, R-Arizona, first elected
in 1994, has held a number of Republican lead-
ership positions in the House.

Information Technology, John Palmisano; 4



USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 11A





Syngas

H an
Sue vey We
Ki



By Win McNamee, Getty Images

Debate Round 1: Presidential nominees John McCain and Barack
Obama shake hands before going to their corners in Oxford, Miss.

First debate offered few
insights on candidates

Jim Lehrer, the moderator of
the first presidential debate,
sounded like a marriage coun-
selor as he admonished the can-
didates to talk to each other in-
stead of directing their
comments to the moder-
ator, the audience or
the TV cameras. Of ¢




about his lack of experience per
se. Looking at the mess experi-
enced politicians have made of
the nation, some fresh blood
would be welcome. Nonethe-
less, | would be more ready to
vote for him and his mes-

sage of change if he had

% graduated to the next




course, this was EL stage of ignorance,
just as well; nei- goes" _ which is “he who
ther candidate knows not, and

seemed to have
anything worth-
while to say (“Rivals
diverge on economy
war,” USATODAY.com, Friday).

Republican John McCain and
Democrat Barack Obama talked
about all the problems they
would fix as president, but nei-
ther gave any insight into how
any of his promises would ne
accomplished.

It's too bad we don't have any
real good choices in our presi-
dential candidates this year. |
guess it will come down to try-
ing to decide which one will be
the lesser of two evils.

Bob Billings
West Palm Beach, Fla.

Confidence is a flaw

I watched the presidential de-
bate Friday because, for the first
time in 30 years, | actually like
both candidates. | wanted to see
what differences, if any, might
exist between them.

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz.,
came over as expected. He’s no
movie star but is someone with
a proven record which, unfortu-
nately, he does not present as
well as he might.

Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill, |
found disturbing for exactly the
reason so many people seem to
be attracted to him. He is very
articulate and exudes confi-
dence. The problem is that his
confidence is in his ability to
manage situations he has only
read about and has not experi-
enced. He is so confident in his
own.abilities that he is willing to
take anything on, but he has no
idea of his limitations, so he is
potentially a menace.

According to an Arabian prov-
erb, one level of ignorance is “he
whw knows not, and knows not
he knows not; he is a fool —
shun him.” | fear this is the
source of the image presented
by Obama.

I do not worry too much

re



knows he knows
not; he is a child —
teach him.”

I was considering a vote
for Obama, if only to flush the
toilet and get some new ideas
into the system. For the mo-
ment, however, it seems that
once again, old and sneaky will
beat young and enthusiastic.

Douglas L. Marriott
South Lebanon, Ohio

Be true to character

During Friday’s debate, I saw
John McCain come across as a
pseudo alpha male and Barack
Obama, who was too amiable,
as the subservient male. So the
American voters lost.

How so? We do not need the

' new leader of the free world to

be a macho alpha male or one
who is subservient to anyone.
What we need is a strong, confi-
dent and focused leader who is
balanced in his identity and who
has no fear in showing the
world exactly who he is.

I believe that Obama is head
and shoulders above McCain in
honesty, integrity, intellect and
sincerity to do what is in the
best interest of this country and
the world. But he must honor
who he is and be subservient to
no one.

Edward Breeding
Las Cruces, N.M.

Both fall short

The first presidential debate
turned out to be “Mississippi
Yearning.” I kept waiting for
presidential nominees John
McCain and Barack Obama to
demonstrate their leadership
skills on foreign policy and eco-
nomic problems. Both seemed
to fall short.

No matter who wins, it could
be a long four years ahead for
the American people.

Kenneth L. Zimmerman
Huntington Beach, Calif.









in
Werte

By Scott Stantis, The Birmingham (Ala.) News, for USA TODAY

Chemicals contained
in cosmetics are safe

USA TODAY's article “Consumer groups fret
over chemicals in teen cosmetics” called undue
attention to yet another study by an activist
group devoted to finding hazards in consumer
products, especially cosmetics (USATO-
DAY.com, Wednesday).

This new report rehashes the group's tired
mantra, that the mere detection of some
chemical in our bodies necessarily indicates
toxicity. This is patently false, as any reputable
toxicologist will attest.

The minuscule amounts of these chemicals
could not possibly cause harm. Studies incrimi-
nating such chemicals have come from rodent
experiments at much higher exposures than
humans have, with no relevance to human
health.

These chemicals have passed the test of
time, as well as other evaluations done by ex-
pert panels evaluating their real health risks.
Despite these alarms raised about chemicals,
our health and longevity continue to improve,
and cancer death rates are declining.

It is a disservice to publicize scares such as
this one about cosmetics.

Gilbert Ross, M.D.

Medical director, American Council on
Science and Health

New York

Teen on path of healing

The most important information in USA TO-
DAY’s article “Teen recounts ’02 abduction or-
deal” is Shawn Hornbeck smiling often during
the interview. It's also heartening to hear that
he is back in school and that therapy is helping
him cope (News, Thursday).

This brave young man does not need to tell
his ordeal to anyone, yet he has found the path
of healing that serves him. Obviously, his family
is loving and supportive.

Shawn should know that most: of us have
suffered in our lives and that there is no judg-
ment. What continue to be sent his way are
prayers for continued healing and gratitude for
the safe places his family and therapist have
created for him to do so.

I did not have to watch Shawn tell his story
on CBS’ 48 Houfs:Mystery to know any more.

Leslie Johanson
Roswell, Ga.

Let the taxpayers decide

If the leaders in Washington want to bail out
this economy, then they should leave the $700
billion to the rightful owners: taxpayers. It’s
our money. We should decide who gets bailed
out (“Leaders back historic bailout; ‘Now. we
have to get the votes,’ " News, Monday).

I can’t imagine that wé would give all this
money to people who failed to handle it prop-
erly the first time. How can we expect that this
won't happen again if we bail people out every
time they get burned by their own greed?

Louis N. Lembo
Columbia, Tenn.

Give Torre some credit

Now that the New York Yankees have been
officially eliminated from the Major League
Baseball playoffs ard a
World Series appear-
ance is impossible, it is
time for columnist Al
Neuharth to admit that
the problem with the
Yankees was not Joe
Torre. Neuharth has
been very critical of
Torre for the past sever-
al years while he was
manager in New York.

Ironically, Torre in one
season as the manager
of the Los Angeles
Dodgers is gearing up his team for the playoffs
and a shot at a world championship, while the
Yankees are going home.

Torre was not the problem in New York. Up-
per management and the players were to
blame for keeping the team from winning a
World Series for the past several years. The
best talent one of the wealthiest owners in
baseball could buy was not enough.

Neuharth would do his readers a favor by re-
tracting some of his long-held theories about
the Yankees.





Getty Images

Torre: Now man-
ages L.A. Dodgers.

Terry Friedlander
Ketchum, Idaho



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12A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY



The Forum

A chance to improve bailout

By Joseph E. Stiglitz

he bailout package the
House defeated on Monday
was far better than the one
originally proposed by the
Bush administration. In many re-
spects, the rescue plan was better
than nothing, and perhaps with a
little extra time, our leaders can
tailor a plan to focus more on our
economy than on Wall Street. They
should try because the plan still
isn’t nearly as helpful as it could be.

Most economists believe that
the $700 billion in the bill could be
focused more effectively to benefit
America’s economy, America’s

‘workers, America’s taxpayers and
America’s homeowners. Perhaps ~
enough lawmakers on Capito! Hill
saw this, too.

How all this plays out will depend
on how the bill will be implement-
ed: The devil is in the details. And
the details — assuming that most of
these same elements will be in-
cluded in any compromise — are left to an ad-
ministration whose policies led to the crisis.

What does this rescue plan as presently
constituted mean for the ordinary American?
Almost surely, the unemployment rate will
still increase, growth will remain anemic,
house prices will continue to fall, the number
of houses in foreclosure will continue to rise,
credit will bé harder to get, states and local-
ities will remain in a fiscal crisis, and there
will be cutbacks in basic public services. The
growing unemployment: will mean wages
will not be able to keep up with the increase
in food and fuel prices, so real incomes of
those with jobs are likely to decline.

This bill is based on trickle-down econom-
ics: by throwing money at Wall Street, (and
$700 billion is a lot of money) some of it will
eventually seep down to the rest of the econ-
omy. Banks might lend more than they other-
wise would. Firms that otherwise might have
had trouble getting credit will be able to do
so. So fewer people will be fired.

Little help for homeowners

For homeowners, the relief is too indirect.
The banks are unwilling or unable to restruc-
ture the mortgages to enable homeowners to
stay in their homes. The main relief to those
who worry about losing their homes is that
the government is a more humane lender.
But it comes at a cost, to the taxpayer.

The rescue bill is like a massive blood in-
fusion, into a patient with internal bleeding. It
does little about the source of hemorrhaging,
the losses from the loans that were made be-
yond. people’s ability to pay, mortgages that
exceed the value of the houses. And ‘it does

\



Rescue package could use less Wall
Street and a little more Main Street.



little about the consequences of these de-
faults, the hole in the banks’ balance sheet.

We had a housing bubble. The bubble
fueled a consumption binge. Savings plum-
meted to the lowest levels since the Great
Depression — essentially to zero. It is good
that these excesses might be curbed, but
these’excesses fueled the economy. In the ad-
justment, growth will inevitably slow.

The bill is intended to prevent a collapse of
the financial system. It lent recklessly. It was
supposed to allocate capital well and manage
risk, thereby increasing the efficiency of our
economy. These economywide benefits pro-
vided the justification for the high returns in
the sector and the high levels of pay for their
executives. But financial markets didn’t allo-
cate capital well; they didn’t manage risk;
they created it.

And now, taxpayers are being asked to take
on these bad mortgages and the non-trans-
parent products that they based on their bad
mortgages, so complex that not even they
can price them. We are assured that no one
on Wall Street is willing to touch these toxic
mortgages but that we, the taxpayers, are go-
ing to make a profit, or at least not lose any-
thing. Maybe, but I wouldn't count on it.

Meanwhile, our national debt, which has
increased from $5.7 trillion to more than $9
trillion in the past seven years, and was set to
increase by almost $1 trillion more, in the
next couple of years without the bailout, will
go up even more. And these numbers do not
even include the bills to be paid for the Iraq
and Afghanistan wars, such as the more than
half a trillion we are likely to have to pay for
those returning from these wars with disabil-
ities — more than 40% of the 1.7 million who
have been deployed.

When interest rates return to more normal

levels, of say 5%, this means we'll
be paying as interest on our nation-
al debt more than half a trillion dol-
lars a year. With American savings
so low, much of this money is bor-
rowed abroad, especially from Chi-
na. We will be sending checks
there, rather than building schools,
roads and hospitals at home, or de-
veloping new green technologies
that will make us more compet-
itive. There are no two ways about
it: Our living standards in the fu-
ture will be lower than they other-
‘ wise would have been.

What now?

Is there anything we can do in
the short term to mitigate some of
the pain? For one, it makes little
sense to throw people out of
homes. We need bankruptcy re-
form, as Democrats have demand-
ed; we need assistance to average
homeowners. We pay through our
tax system nearly half of mortgage
interest for the rich, but little if anything to
find housing for the poor who don’t own
homes. Converting our mortgage deduction
to a cashable tax credit would not only be
fairer, it also would help ordinary Americans
to stay in their homes.

Finally, the best way to keep the economy
going is spending a fraction of the $700 billion
on a stimulus package (rather than through
trickle-down measures), The biggest bang for
the buck comes from increased unemploy-
ment. insurance (which the president has
threatened to veto), but we also need aid for
states and localities (without which they will
have to cut back on spending, depressing the
economy further) and more investment.

The basic lesson of economics is that re-
sources are scarce, and that there is no such
thing as a free lunch, a free war, or a free bail-
out. Those on Wall Street did very well for
themselves in the past few years, garnering
more than 30% of corporate profits. But un-
less a tax is imposed explicitly on,the fi-
nancial industry (which the Republicans re-
fused to do), all of us might have to pick up
the tab.

The best that could be said for the bailout
in the form defeated was that things might be
worse without it. The best that could be said
for the defeat is that it gives Congress a
chance to come up with a bill that focuses
less on Wall Street and more on our economy.

Joseph E. Stiglitz,.a professor at Columbia
University, was awarded the Nobel Prize in
economics in 2001 and served as chairman of
President Clinton's Council of Economic Ad-
visers. He is co-author, with Linda Bilmes, of
The Three Trillion Dollar War: The True Cost
of the Iraq Conflict.

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Why Obama needs to fight
‘like Ali, and not Louis

By DeWayne Wickham

| watched Friday's presidential
debate with my wife and father
in-law, two rabid supporters of
Barack Obama’s candidacy. After
the suspense created by John
McCain’s threatened withdrawal,.
they greeted his decision to show

up with the anticipation of the

fight fans who cheered Mike Ty-
son on to victory when he dom-
inated heavyweight boxing.
What they wanted was for
Obama to score a first-round
knockout, as Tyson did
with machine-like ef-
ficiency throughout
much of his career.
What they got from
the Democratic nomi-
nee was a perfor-
mance that fell short
of their expectations.
They wanted a one-
sided slugfest. What
they got was a crafty
boxing match in
which Obama be-
haved more like Muhammad Ali
than “Iron Mike.” Obama out-
pointed McCain, his Republican

‘opponent, with verbal punches

and jabs that while not drawing
blood, kept the ex-Navy fighter
pilot off balance. There were no
knockdowns, and if Obama
pulled some punches — as when
he failed to respond to McCain’s
repeated assertions that he didn’t
understand something — that's
understandable.

No Louis vs. Schmeling

After all, this wasn’t a replay of
Joe Louis’ historic rematch with
Max Schmeling, when the globe
was hurtling toward World War
II. On the eve of that 1938 fight,
President Franklin Roosevelt told

Louis at a White House meeting: .

“Joe, we need muscles like yours
to beat Germany.”

Back then, Americans wanted
to see Louis, a black man, get the
better of Schmeling, a poster
child of Adolf Hitler’s Aryan su-
premacy claim. But in this presi-
dential race, Obama has to avoid
tripping over this nation’s racial
fault line. He can disagree with
McCain, an aging, white war hero
and four-term U.S. senator, but he
can’t appear to be too disagree-
able when taking him on.

That’s because race still mat-



GE.
AFP/Getty Images

Obama: Delicate
political dance.

ters in the politics of this nation.
When asked whether Obama's
race would influence how they'll
vote, 10% of whites said it makes.
them “less likely to vote” to‘elect
him this country’s first black
president, according to a recent
psspuated Press-Yahoo News
poll.

Obama's challenge

At a time when Obama is the
lone black among the 100 US.
senators, and just two of the 50
governors are black,
the poll found that
16% of whites believe
that blacks already
have too much politi-
cal influence. And 21%
of whites think black
leaders “have been
trying to push too
fast,” while 31% of
whites said blacks are
responsible for most
of the nation’s racial
tensions. To wip the
presidency, Obama has to avoid
being seen as too black, too
pushy and too hungry to wield
the powers:of the presidency.

The white vote is the most
fragile part of the coalition he has
cobbled together. To win in No-
vember, Obama must convince a
sizeable number (though not
necessarily a majority) of whites
that they can trust him — and he
must allay the fears of some that
a black man can’t be trusted to
treat whites fairly if he gets the
Oval Office job.

Ironically, Friday’s debate was
held on the campus of the Uni-
versity of Mississippi, a school
that was a hotbed of racial bigot-
ry in the early 1960s when segre-
gationist Ross Barnett, then the
state’s governor, tried mightily to
keep blacks out of Ole Miss.

Now, nearly a half-century lat-
er, Obama seeks access to this
nation’s most segregated public
institution — the presidency of
the United States. And with two
more presidential debates left
before voters go tothe polls, he
understands that while he has to
get the best of McCain, he cannot
be seen to have battered him un-
mercifully without causing some
people to vote their racial fears.

DeWayne Wickham writes on
Tuesdays for USA TODAY.

A
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US economic turmoil
forces postponement of

ministry announcement

@ By ALISON LOWE
Tribune Staff Reporter

alowe@tribunemedia.net

THE Ministry of Tourism last
night postponed a scheduled
announcement of its “new strat-
egy and direction” for the
nation’s number one industry

Son of assistant director
CT eS
PSSST a
police to give evidence

THE son of Mrs Alberta
Williams Bartlett, who is the
assistant director of Legal
Affairs at the Attorney Gen-
eral’s office, is being sought
by police to give evidence in
the murder trial of Mario
Miller. ;

A subpoena for Daryl
Eliner Bartlett Jr, ordering
that he appear before the
Supreme Court, was-issued
on September 18. However,
Bartlett as of yesterday, has
yet to appear despite con-
tinued attempts by police
and legal officials to locate
him.

- See page three for story.




































in light of worsening economic
turmoil in the United States,
with a Government spokesper-
son saying it must now reshape
its strategy.

“An aggressive plan of action
was forecast to be unveiled this
evening via live broadcast on
ZNS television...but world
attention and focus on the U.S.
financial crisis, especially with
today's failure for a $700 billion
bail out, has caused advisers to
reshape its plans to ensure the
Bahamas remains on the cut-
ting edge in a growing compet-
itive tourism market,” said a
notice to the press from a Govy-
ernment spokesperson.

Newly appointed Minister of
Tourism Vincent Vanderpool-
Wallace had been due to take
part in a televised “Meet the
Press” meeting last night. It
would be the first time that Mr
Vanderpool-Wallace was to
speak to the press and answer
questions about his vision for
the tourism industry.

But at almost 6pm, the
release came from Bahamas
Information Services stating
that “given the present finan-
cial market crisis and today’s
financial bail out failure in the

SEE page 11



The Tribune

ANY TIME...ANY PLACE, WE’RE # 1

€] USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

Day ats

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A LEGENDARY BAHAMIAN





BUSINESSMAN AND FORMER PARLIAMENTARIAN Norman Solomon,
who died in a Florida Hospital yesterday about a week before his 79th

birthday.

° SEE STORY TOP RIGHT

Chinese milk products scandal
prompts investigation in Bahamas

WORLDWIDE scandal over
Chinese milk products, blamed
for the deaths of four children
and illnesses of thousands oth-
ers, has spurred an investiga-
tion of imports into the
Bahamas.

Products from China such as
baby formula, dairy-based can-
dies and desserts have been
banned in countries throughout
Asia, Africa, and the European
Union as they were found to
contain the chemical melamine,
which is used to make plastics
and fertiliser.

Rich in nitrogen, melamine is
inexpensive and can be added
to substandard or watered-





down milk to fool quality
checks, which often use nitro-
gen to measure protein levels
in milk.

Four deaths have been
blamed on the toxic milk pow-
der, which causes kidney stones
and agonising complications.
Some 54,000 children fell ill in
China after drinking the tainted
milk formula.

The World Health Organi-
sation and UNICEF have called
China's milk — scandal
"deplorable."

The dangerous chemical has
been found in candy, buns and

SEE page 11

ORO ee
GQ UWN (ie






blow away Big
Red Machines

@ TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

AFTER a decade-long fight -

with Parkinson's disease and a
recent bout of lung cancer, Nor-
man Solomon, legendary busi-
nessman, former parliamentarian
and a mainstay in Bahamian
society, died in a Florida hospi-
tal yesterday morning.

The "courageous" merchant
and former newspaper colum-
nist died around 4 am yesterday
at the Naples Community Hos-



pital in Naples, Florida about a
week before his 79th birthday.

Friends and colleagues of Mr
Solomon said he and _his wife,
Katherine, left Nassau for Flori-
da to escape the expected strike
of Hurricane Ike.

Family reportedly wanted the
ailing businessman to be close
to specialists should his health

~ take a turn for the worst during

the'storm.
They were planning to return
home this week, friends said. His

. SEE page nine

MP hits back after PM dismisses
remarks in House as ‘sissy talk’

FORT Charlotte MP Alfred Sears said he
would not be intimidated by Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham’s dismissal of his remarks
in the House of Assembly yesterday as simply

“sissy talk”.

“Mr Speaker, the Honourable Member for
North Abaco, the Prime Minister of the Com-
monwealth of the Bahamas, said ‘that’s sissy
talk’. Now look here, Mr Speaker, in this peri-: §
od of crisis in the country, you have the Prime

SEE page 11

Arrested man ‘in hospital after
alleged beating in custody’

lm By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE young man police
arrested for questioning in con-
nection with a kidnapping and
rape that occurred last week
Sunday, is still in hospital suf-
fering from kidney complica-
tions, according to his mother,
Blanche McKenzie.

Eighteen-year-old Renardo
Bastian claims that he was beat-

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en while in police custody by
officers wielding “baseball bats
and cutlasses” and was subse-
quently taken to the intensive
care unit of Princess Margaret
Hospital.

Bastian and two other men
were suspected of.forcing a
woman into a vehicle and her
boyfriend into the trunk at gun-
point.

SEE page 11








PAGE 2, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



ROB
THOMAS
showed his
range of
‘talents,
‘playing the
guitar and
piano during
Saturday
night’s per-
formance.







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rT STATE OF
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N FOR THE BAI



AMAS?

ROB THOMAS engages the crowd in the
middle of sets (above) and blasts the
audience with his strong vocals (left).



Rob Thomas
rocks Atlantis

~ ROCKER Rob Thomas,
lead singer of the band Match-
box 20, was the latest interna-
tional music star to perform in
the Atlantis Live Concert
Series.

Mr Thomas and his own solo
band staged a benefit concert
before a sold-out crowd at the
Atlantis Theatre on Saturday
night.

Saturday night’s concert was
a rare acoustic performance by
the singer, who belted out some

of his hits, including "This Is
How a Heart Breaks", "Ever
the Same", and the No. 2 pop
song of all time - “Smooth”.

. Proceeds from the concert
go to the Sidewalk Angels
Foundation, a New York based
charity started by Mr Thomas
and his wife Marisol.

Up next in the Atlantis Live
Concert Series is another
American superstar, Alanis
Morissette, who is scheduled to
perform on October 18.









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Maximum one
year monopoly for
cellular services
after BIC sale

THE Bahamas government
will allow a maximum of a
one year monopoly for cellu-
lar services following the sale
of Bahamas Telecommuni-
cations Company, Prime Min-
ister Hubert Ingraham said
yesterday.

Addressing the House of
Assembly and responding to
a question posed by former
Prime Minister Perry
Christie, Mr Ingraham
advised the chamber that it
is still the government’s inten-
tion to privatise the Bahamas
Telecommunications Com-
pany (BTC) by the end of the
year.

However, whether or not
the government meets this
deadline is a point that is
being questioned, Mr Ingra-
ham said.

“T might say the following,
that the government propos-
es to dispose of 51 per cent of
BTC and retain ownership of
49 per cent. Secondly, the
government proposes that on
the sale of BTC, it would
immediately liberalise fixed
telephone lines and there
would be permitted compe-
tition in that sector.

“Thirdly the government
proposes at a maximum to
permit a monopoly to exist
for cellular service for one
year following the sale of the
majority of BTC. We are
seeking to liberalise the tele-
phone sector of the Bahamas
in the shortest possible time
with the full knowledge that
we are behind everybody else
in our region,” he said.

Fortune Hills
Community to
he launched

PARADISE Real Estate Lim-
ited, in conjunction with Jones
Construction, is set to launch a
new gated community in the Bail-
lou Hill Road area.

This new gated community of
both townhouses and condo-
miniums was the brainchild of
Jones Construction and they have
teamed up with real estate listing
specialists Paradise Real Estate
to offer what they called a
“unique and exciting investment
opportunity” to a specific market
segment.

“First-time home buyers and
young, upward professionals are
where we are focusing our mar-
keting efforts”, explained Zack
Bonczek, sales manager for Par-
adise Real Estate.

He said the community, which
is located at the top of the hill,
Baillou Hill Road, offers first class
amenities and the safety of a con-
trolled and gated environment.

The location is not only con-
venient to downtown and the
west, but also offers owners a
unique opportunity to enjoy views
from one of Nassau’s highest ele-
vations.

“The view is quite breathtak-
ing, especially at night as residents
will enjoy the twinkle of the city
lights,” said Deyvon Jones, pro-
ject director at Fortune Hills.

A special preview was held on
Saturday, September 27, from
10am until 2pm at the Fortune
Hills site.

Sales representatives were on
hand to give guided tours of the
complex and bank representa-
tives were there to assist with
financing.


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 3





© In brief

PM: Govi
moving to
address

Man charged in
triple murders

poverty | @ Separate

m@ By CHESTER ROBARDS
Tribune Staff Reporter

THE government is taking
steps to alleviate the financial
stresses of those families and indi-
viduals who teeter on and have
fallen below the poverty line,
Prime Minister Hubert Ingraham
revealed yesterday during his con-
tribution to the House of Assem-
bly.

Mr Ingraham spoke about
plans he had drafted in the‘ May
budget communication, to
increase the allocation for the
Department of Social Services.

.“When we came to office in

May of 2007, the annual alloca-

tion for the Department of Social
Services was $26.4 million,” he
said. “In the 2007-2008 budget,
our first budget upon returning
to office last year, we increased
that allocation to $31.8 million,
an increase of $5.4 million or 20.5
per cent. Some $3 million of this
was specifically earmarked for
poverty alleviation.

“Again this year, In the 2008-
2009 budget we provided a fur-

therincrease in the department’s:

allocation amounting to some $7
million or 22 per cent. We did
that so as’to increase assistance to
the poor by almost 45 per cent or
$13 million over a two-year peri-
od.”

According to Mr Ingraham,
these increases as well as increas-
es scheduled to go into effect on
October 1 should be welcomed
by the Bahamian people as they
will provide “assistance to the
poor and disadvantaged among
us.”

He outlined a plethora of
changes with regard to benefits
and increases.

Those include:

e Assistance with utility pay-
ments

e The replacement of regular
electric bulbs with energy-effi-
cient ones

e An increase in provisions of
uniforms and shoes

e Assistance for funeral
expenses.

e Fire relief payment increases

e An increase in monthly pay~
ments to persons medically certi-
fied as being unable to work for a
temporary period and who are
not eligible for National Insur-
ance benefits or assistance pay-
ments —

e Rental assistance increases
for low income or unemployed
persons who are facing eviction

e Increases in minor repairs
allocations for owner-occupied
homes of seniors and persons
with disabilities

e Increases in monthly pay-
ments for children in foster
homes

e Increases in monthly food
assistance based on need for a
specified period

e Increases in emergency food
assistance grants

e Increases in the monthly
allowance for children with dis-
abilities under the age of 16, who
are ineligible for benefits or assis-
tance payments from National
Insurance and whose families are
having financiak difficulties

e Increases in work assistance
payments for an unemployed
needy persons for a job providing
charitable or community service

Mr Ingraham told the house
that “the monies to pay these
increases have been included in
the 2008-2009 budget allocation
of the Department of Social Ser-
vices.

“T trust that none of us who
happens to be a little or a great
deal better off will begrudge
them,” he said.

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homicide
case comes
to court

@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A MAN charged in the triple
murders of a woman and two men
outside a popular Bain Town club
nearly two weeks ago was
arraigned in a Magistrate’s Court
yesterday. A second man charged
in the shooting death of a 34-year-
old a man, which occurred a day
before the triple homicide, was
also arraigned in a Magistrate’s
Court yesterday.

Brandon Humes, 33, of Cam-
bridge Street was arraigned before
Chief Magistrate Roger Gomez
at Court One, Bank Lane yester-
day, charged in the murders of
Lavardo Armbrister, 35, of the
Laird Street area, his cousin Sedi-
no Smith, 33, of Yellow Elder Gar-
dens, and Vanessa Williams, 23,
of Baillou Hill Road. According ‘to
court dockets, Humes on Satur-
day September 20, intentionally
caused the deaths of Smith, Arm-
brister and Williams.

According to police reports, the
three victims had just left “The Pit
Restaurant” on Augusta Street at
around 2am on Saturday, Sep-
tember 20, when unknown per-
sons opened fire on them. Mr
Armbrister, Mr Smith and Ms
Williams were walking towards a

CHARGED: Brandon Humes

Chevrolet Impala, when they were
reportedly shot at by two men car-
rying what witnesses claim were
machine guns. Mr Armbrister and
Mr Smith died at the scene, while
Ms Williams, who was said to have
been shot eight times, died short-
ly after she arrived at the Princess
Margaret Hospital.

Humes was not required to
plead to the charges. Humes told
the court that he was recently
released from prison. He also told
the court that he has lost a kidney
and has a medical condition which
requires that he see a doctor every
three months. Chief Magistrate
Gomez noted his concerns and
remanded him to Her Majesty’s
Prison. His case was adjourned to
October 7 and transferred to
Court 9, Nassau Street.

Mario Pinto, 38, of Sapodilla
Boulevard, Pinewood Gardens,
was arraigned before Chief Mag-
istrate Gomez yesterday, charged
with the murder of Jeffrey Gib-
son. Gibson, 34, was killed when
gunmen reportedly kicked in the
kitchen door of his Pinewood
Gardens home around 3am on
Friday, September 19 and opened
fire on him as he slept with his
23-year-old girlfriend. The
woman, who fled the scene, was








@ By NATARIO McKENZIE

A KEY prosecution witness
in the Mario Miller. murder tri-
al failed to appear in court yes-
terday, resulting in yet another
early adjournment.

Prosecutors yesterday were
trying to locate Daryl Bartlett,
who was called to testify at the
trial, which is into its third week.

Bartlett’s absence resulted in
the prosecution seeking to have
the trial adjourned to today.

Donald Rolle was the only
prosecution witness to take the
stand yesterday.

Rolle, a self employed auto
mechanic, told the court that
around 4.30pm on June 22 — the
day prosecutors say 28-year-old
Mario Miller was murdered —
he was approached by a man
who inquired about the sale of
his 1995 Nissan Maxima.

Mr Rolle said that he and the
man talked for about 10 to 15
minutes.

Mr Rolle identified murder
accused Ryan Miller in court as

- the man who had approached

him about purchasing his car.

According to Mr Rolle, Ryan
Miller asked him if he would
take cocaine for the car. Mr
Rolle said that he told Ryan
Miller, “I don’t work like that.”

The witness told the court
that Ryan Miller then inquired
about the sale price.

Mr Rolle said that he told
Miller that he would sell the car
for between $13,000 and
$14,000. Mr Rolle said that he
and Miller then exchanged con-
tact information.

Mr Rolle told the court that
he saw Ryan Miller again
around mid-day on Monday,
June 24, 2002.

Mr Rolle told the court that
Miller pulled up to his auto
body shop in a black Nissan
Sentra along with a man who
he identified in court yesterday
as Ricardo Miller.

Mr Rolle testified that he and
Ryan Miller went to his office
where Miller pulled $12,500 out
of his pockets.

Mr. Rolle told the court that











» YOUR LOCAL, MEMBER OF THE

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)





Prosecution witness fails to
appear for Mario Miller trial



he did not sign a bill of sale at
that time because he had some
repairs to make to the vehicle.

According to Mr Rolle, the
car was to be turned over in the
name of Tamar’ Lee, the alias
of Ricardo Miller, however he
never saw the brothers again.

Brothers Ryan Miller and
Ricardo Miller, alias Tamar
Lee, are accused of Mario
Miller’s murder.

Miller, then 28, was killed on

June 22, 2002.

His body was found in bushes
near the Super Value Food
Store in Winton.

Lawyer Romona Farquhar-
son represents Ryan Miller.
Ricardo Miller is represented
by Romauld Ferreira.

Deputy Director of Public
Prosecutions Cheryl Grant-
Bethel, with Neil Brathwaite
and Sean Adderley of the
Attorney General’s Office, are
appearing for the Crown.

Last Wednesday the trial was
adjourned early after one wit-
ness took the stand.

wa



Dresses
to
Impress

Tim Clarke/Tribune staff

CHARGED: Mario Pinto

shot in her left leg.

Pinto alleged that while in the
custody of officers from the Cen-
tral Detective Unit he was suffo-
cated with a plastic bag over his
head and told that if he did not
“do the right thing” he would not
leave the same way he came. Pin-
to who addressed the court rather
eloquently said that he had signed
some documents that he was not
sure of. He said he was prepared
to accept their contents if they
did in fact reflect what he had
told police, but that they should
be voided if they did not. Pinto
also requested a Voluntary Bill
of Indictment.

“Tam innocent of this charge,”
he told the court. The accused
also requested a public defender
claiming that he was low on cash.

By Donna
Morgan

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PAGE 4, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR


















































The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI

Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No, Master
LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt., O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972
Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas
Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352.
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387
Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608

MONDAY the US House of Representa-
tives — and House Republicans in particular
— erred badly by rejecting the $700 billion
plan to save Wall Street from its excesses.

In a fair world, Congress would never have
to contemplate such a measure.

But when a compromise bailout bill came
before the House, the only responsible choice
was to pass it.

The nation’s financial system is in danger
of freezing up because institutions, wary r of
how much soured mortgage debt and credit-
default swaps are floating around Wall Street,
are afraid of lending to each other.

Under the bailout plan, the US Treasury
would take so-called bad paper off financial
companies’ hands and get them lending
again.

The markets have already begun register-
ing their disapproval of the House vote; the
Dow Jones Industrial Average fell nearly
778 points Monday.

The risk of further economic damage
should chasten lawmakers into reconsidering
the measure this week.

For years, Wall Street insisted that ever-
looser regulatory controls would help money
move more freely and efficiently.

Instead, investment firms poured vast
amounts of money into mortgages to peo-
ple with bad credit.

And these firms got so big that, when those
borrowers fell behind, the entire economy
was at risk. So taxpayers have every right to
be furious about the risk they are being asked
to assume now.

As House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. pointed
out Monday, “The American people did not
decide to dangerously weaken our regulato-
ry and oversight policies.”

With good reason, Pelosi laid the dearth of
regulation at the Bush administration’s feet.

After the bill failed, 228-205, House
Republican leader John Boehner blamed
Pelosi, complaining that her speech “poi-
soned our conference, caused a number of
members that we thought we could get, to go
south.”

Oh, come on. While most Democrats were
willing to take the heat for an unpopular but
necessary bill, Boehner got less than a third
of his side to vote for a bill advanced by a
president of his own party.

Are House Republicans really so timid

_ that a few tough words from Pelosi will scare

them off? (Meanwhile, John McCain’s cam-

Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348

Pass this dreadful bailout





paign bizarrely blamed Barack Obama and
congressional Democrats’for the bill’s fail-
ure).

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson first
proposed a massive bailout with little over-
sight.

Pelosi and other Democrats, most notably
Representative Barney Frank, won important
concessions, including pay limits for execu-
tives of bailed-out firms and provisions that
would help taxpayers recoup some of their
money.

The need for a bailout remains an out-
rage. But this much-improved bill still needs
to pass — and quickly

(This commentary was written by The
Boston Globe staff - c. 2008).

Stock markets
tumble as bail-out fails

WORLD stock markets tumbled Monday
amid a flurry of government bank rescues
in Europe that had investors on edge even
before the House voted to reject the Bush
adnuinistration’s rescue plan for the nation’s
financial industry.

Latin American markets were still open
when news that lawmakers on Capitol Hill
had rejected the $700 billion bailout sent
investors running for the exits from Mexico
City to Buenos Aires.

Stocks.in Europe and Asia had earlier end-
ed lower, although less dramatically, as mar-
ket players fretted about the health of the

world’s financial system, even with a USS..

bailout.

Even before the vote in Washington, mar-
kets in Europe and Asia were bleak, as a
flurry of developments around the world
appeared to confirm fears that the global
financial contagion is likely to spread fur-
ther before any recovery.

“There’s an increasing realization that the
cleanup and the mending of all that’s gone
wrong is going to take an extended period to
wor’ through, and we’re going to see an
extended recovery period,” said Jamie Spi-
teri, senior dealer at Shaw Stockbroking in
Sydney.



























GB Chamber
should put
energies to

better use

EDITOR, The Tribune.

, THE Grand Bahama Cham-
ber of commerce and its presi-.
dent should use their energies to
serve Grand Bahama in a more

‘productive way than to pursue

the foolish notion that they can
achieve for their members, who
are licensees of the Grand
Bahama Port Authority Ltd,
permission to use, willy-nilly,
their “conditionally duty free”
equipment to serve customers
operating outside the official
boundaries of Freeport as delin-
eated, in conjunction with the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement.

In my view, this is a no brain-
er. The Hawksbill Creek Agree-
ment, when it was signed in
1955 considered its territory of
jurisdiction to be all that land
mass acquired by Mr Wallace
Groves, extending out from
Hawksbill Creek in all direc-
tions and as much as Mr Groves
was able to acquire, by whatev-
er means, from the Crown
and/or any private citizen who
was willing to sell to him at the
time.

When this exercise was
exhausted, boundary lines were
set and the delineation of what
we now know as “Freeport”
was forever established.

The Agreement provided for
the Grand Bahama Port
Authority Ltd to function as a
quasi-government entity with
powers to issue licenses to
whomever it wishes, to engage
in business activity within its
jurisdiction of governance.

For the sake of emphasis,
these powers were not meant
to be, neither have they ever
been, permitted beyond the
official boundary lines of
Freeport, as delineated.

‘Conditional “exemptions”
from the payment of customs
duties, under the agreement
were meant for the enjoyment
of those entities so licensed and
operating within the Freeport
area.

To remove , any item imported
into Freeport, under the condi-
tions of the agreement, “duty

free” without the prior approval :

of the customs department
would be in breach of the con-
ditions of that agreement and
by extension, in breach of the

customs management act, ren- |

dering the item or items liable

LETTERS

letters@tribunemedia.net



to immediate seizure and pay-
ment of the customs duties and
other possible penalties the cus-

toms department may feel

obliged, under the act, to
impose.

To put it bluntly, the cham-
ber’s president is beating a dead
horse; for if what he is advocat-
ing were ever to come about, it

would necessitate major

changes to the agreement
which, changes, would have to
be agreed upon by the Port
Authority, the government and
80 per cent of the port’s
licensees.

The fact that licensees may
trade with entities outside of
Freeport, whether in Eight Mile
Rock or Marsh Harbour, Aba-
co, does not give them the free-
dom to decide, by and of them-
selves, to take their “duty free”
vehicles and or equipment to
Eight Mile Rock and/or Aba-
co. For instance, Mathew Town
is presently beyond the bound-
ary of Freeport and therefore
outside its jurisdiction.

Vehicles imported, condi-
tionally duty free into the
Freeport area under the Hawks-
bill Creek Agreement cannot,
now, legally access this little
town, which is almost com-
pletely surrounded. by Freeport,
except for the portion at the
beach area.

If, though,
Bahama Port Authority Ltd
were to convince the residents
to sell this little town to them,
then, I suppose, after some legal
requirements are met, that area
would become, officially, part
of Freeport and the boundary in
that area would be redrawn to
reflect this addition to the city.
This isn’t quite as complicated,

the Grand .

a matter, as the Chamber would
lead us to believe.

If we, who are licensees of
the Port, can import our vehi-
cles duty free and then be. per-
mitted to drive them all over
Grand Bahama Island, willy-nil-
ly, then what’s the point?

People living outside the
Freeport city limits should then, ©
also, be given the same privi-
leges, if fairness counts for any-
thing.

I am aware, acutely, that the
argument here is not one of fair-
ness, however, but one of legal-
ity.

There is no provision, in law,
for importers generally, under
ordinary circumstances, to
import vehicles “duty free,”
therefore persons living outside
Freeport would not be so enti-
tled and so not restricted as to
where they can go in their duty
paid vehicles as we are restrict-
ed, who enjoy the conditional
duty free concessions under the
Hawksbill Creek Agreement;
and rightfully so.

As I said before, this is a no
brainer; if you become a
licensee of the Port with access
to all those duty free conces-
sions that the Hawksbill Creek
Agreement provides, then abide °
by all the restrictions govern-
ing those exemptions.

If you wish to travel all over

‘the island, uninhibited, then pay

the-customs duties on your
equipment and vehicles and
desist from trying to find a silly
legal loophole where there is
none.

My advice to the Chamber;
you are beating a dead horse;
find another viable issue to
champion.

FORRESTER J CARROLL
Freeport,

Grand Bahama,

September 29, 2008.

The inspiration of Botswana

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Those people with outlines of Africa on their cars, round
their necks and on their chests just may be on to something!
Botswana, for example, should be an inspiration to us. Inde-
pendent. from Britain in 1966, this population of 1.8 million
people have one of the most beautiful, well preserved, peaceful,
well serviced countries I have seen featured in documentaries.
Botswana reinvests 1/3 of their budget on education. Children
are well educated about the natural wealth of their country
and importance of preserving this natural wealth for the future
of tourism and future generations. 35 per cent of Botswana is
preserved in the form of National Parks and Wildlife Reserves.
There is very little litter and vandalism because those same
well educated children grow up with a sense of national pride,
and an understanding that the country’s future depends’on its

pristine state.

SARA APPLETON

Nassau,
September, 2008.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 5



Groundbreaking
for new Aquinas
College campus —

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

_ STUDENTS and facul-
ty from Aquinas College
were all smiles yesterday
as the official ground
breaking ceremony was
held for the new campus.

The new school, which
is situated at the rear of
Loyola Hall on Gladstone
Road, is a dream near
realisation according
to principal Shona
Knowles.

“The idea of relocating
Aquinas College began
about 20 years ago, but
’ the actual project was set
in motion some seven
years ago,” Ms Knowles
explained. “I am very
proud to be the principal
> who is going to actually
oversee the relocation of
the school from Madeira
Street to Gladstone Road;
Aquinas College is very
dear and near to me.”

According to the princi-
pal, the new campus,
which will house more
than 500 students in
grades seven to 12, will
offer a number of new
courses.

Included in the new
academic and vocational
options are: auto machan-
ics, electrical installation,
cosmetology, tourism and
hospitality, crafts, allied
health, plumbing, and car-
pentry.

The new. campus will
also feature new labs,

classrooms, and a modern

sporting complex.

Mrs Knowles said the
current student body
count will not change sig-
nificantly; the only real
increase will be in the
number of teachers, due
to the new courses.

Danielle Hall, an eighth
grade student at the
school, said access to the
basketball court at Loyola
Hall is encouragement
enough to become more

athletic. “I’ve been a stu-

dent here for two years,
and now that we are get-
ting a new campus, I am
looking forward to
becoming a part of the
basketball team.”

Other students say that
they are looking forward
to using the new gym and
the new swimming pool,
and say they can now seri-
ously compete with other
school in more sports.

PTA president Ephram
Cargill said: “It’s a grand
occasion for the school
and the diocese, and on
behalf of the parents, we
feel great about it.”

Mr Cargill said that as
Aquinas is his alma mater
and that of all his chil-
dren, this newest project
is definitely “a milestone”
in his eyes.

The school, which was
founded in 1957, is sup-
ported in the project bya
relocation committee, the
Catholic Board of Educa-

tion, the Ministry of Edu- -

cation, teachers, parents,
and students.

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Student taken to hospital
after bus crashes into truck

@ By LLOYD L ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter



AN AQUINAS COLLEGE stu-
dent was taken to the hospital yes-
terday after a chartered bus carry-
ing school children crashed into a
truck on the Tonique Williams-

Darling Highway.

Police reported that at around
11.30am yesterday, a Bahamas
Experience chartered bus, travel-
ling east on the highway and car-
rying Aquinas College students,
“rear-ended” a white Ford pick-up
in the vicinity of the entrance to

Robin Hood Enterprises.

The truck had reportedly stopped
suddenly’ to avoid an oncoming
vehicle which was over-taking.

Accident

The 25 students involved in the
accident were returning to the
Madeira Street school campus after
attending Aquinas’ ground-break-
ing ceremony at the school’s new

site on Gladstone Road.

Police confirmed that a 10th
grade male: student, who was on
the bus at the time of the accident,
was taken to Princess Margaret
Hospital to be treated for minor

injuries.

None of the other students were
injured in the collision and the

EMERGENCY MEDICAL dispatchers rush a 10th grade Aquinas College student to the hospital.
Thaddeus Williams, 37, was driving

less at an acceptable speed at the
time of the collision, police said.

police investigation into. the acci-
dent is ongoing.
The driver of the chartered bus,



Rodney Moncur

Some former Royal Oasis workers
demonstrate at Department of Labour

@ By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - A small num-
ber of former Royal Oasis work-
ers, who claim they received no
money during the final payout
by government, demonstrated at
the Department of Labour in
Freeport on Friday.

Lionel Morley, second vice-
president of the Bahamas Hotel
Catering Allied Workers Union,
said about 69 former hotel work-
ers Were denied final payments
during the third payout exercise

P held this year in Freeport.

He said the union spoke with
State Minister for Finance
Zhivargo Laing about the situa-
tion following an initial demon-
stration in August.

“This demonstration is about
equity and fairness, and ensuring
that those who are not properly
compensated receive their com-
pensation,” said Mr Morley.

“We have written Minister
Laing explaining our position as
he instructed us to do eight
weeks ago, however, to date we
have not received a response
from him to our letter,” he said.

Mr Morley said initially gov-
ernment made ex-gratis pay-
ments of $3,500 to all workers. A
second payment of $800 was
paid to some workers and $200
to others, he said.

He claims that the third pay-
out was made to only a selected
group of persons.

“The third time they (the gov-

ernment) decided that they.

would make secret phone calls
to those who they believe was
qualified. There was no public
announcement as to these pay-
ments and the union learned
about this through the

grapevine,” Mr Morley claimed.

Mr Morley said that 69 per-
sons were excluded from the list
despite meeting the require-
ments for payment.

He noted that some workers
received $1,200 for their final
payouts while others received
nothing.

“When (the government)
decided who was qualified, the
right and reasonable thing to do
was to contact all those persons
who made applications.

“We have temporary workers
who received monies when
workers who have. been

employed with the company 15
years and longer received noth-

ing.

“You cannot give a person
who worked for lesser years
three times more than those who
were there for a longer time.

Effort

“While we appreciate the gov-
ernment for making an effort to
relieve the burden and hardship
of the workers at Royal Oasis,
we cannot condone and accept
that others were denied pay-
ments,” he said.

Mr Morley said the minister
needs to sit down with the union
to decide how best to resolve
the situation.

He noted that some workers
are still! unemployed and need
their monies to pay bills and to
feed their families.

“The light bills continue to
rise and food prices are escalat-
ing in Freeport, the economy is
bad in Grand Bahama,” he
said.

Peter Dames, a landscape
worker for 13 years at Royal
Oasis, said it is unfair that only

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some workers received pay-
ments.
Mr Dames said he has

remained unemployed since the '

closure of the Royal Oasis in
2004.

“It is an injustice,” he said,
holding a placard at his chest.
“Why give some people and

deny others. Everybody needs
money in these hard economic
times,” he said.

Harcourt Rolle, a banquet
supervisor who was employed at
the hotel for 30 years, said gov-
ernment needs to rectify the sit-
uation. A

Mr Rolle said government

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must ensure that the new owners
of the Royal Oasis are investors
who are able to successfully
operate the resort.

“The government needs to get
someone who could really oper-
ate the hotel, you can’t have an
investor coming in and doing
what they want,” he said.

SC

oe nes



Paradancal investments Linaited
Tel: 356-3145 © 325-6447/9 © 362-1144
After 6pm: 341-7184 © 424-5227 © 324-1685
PAGE 6, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE

SER ae RCN ae A ind sR
Bahamas Sea Turtle group updates web site

THE Bahamas Sea Turtle Conservation
Group’s campaign to ban the killing of sea
turtles in The Bahamas is gaining momen-
tum, says Jane Mather, president of Advo-
cate for Animal Rights, one of the group’s
organizers.
hey According to Ms Mather, “We recently
es ile! §6launched a redesigned Internet site

BEHEADED! The head of a large sea turtle (www.saveourseaturtles.com) to support

: : i ; r inte ional advertising and turtle
rtle at Montagu fish with eyes gouged out is on display at Mon- OU internationa ; ae
ee a large sea tu t gulls tagu fish ramp for everyone to see. awareness programme that is reaching mil-







Our site includes new information about
sea turtles, interesting articles, photos

magnificent creatures, and links to other
sites.

Ms Mather says more than 5,000 people
have so far signed an online petition (on
Care2petition.com) to end the sea turtle
killings and nearly 230,000 people have
seen our online ad campaign. Bumper
stickers are being seen ever more fre-



PHOTO shows body parts and large head of THE HEAD of a large slaughtered sea tur-
a dismembered sea turtle at Montagu fish tle and body parts are on display at the
ramp. Montagu fish ramp.

lions of Internet users around the world.”

showing the inhumane treatment of these

quently on cars around The Bahamas say-
ing, "Stop the Killing" of sea turtles.

Ms Mather also said press releases are
being sent out worldwide and covered on
environmental web sites to bring attention
to the cruelty that is taking place in The
Bahamas. She hopes the information and
photos on the new Internet site will inform
the public of the cruelty that is taking place
in tourist-oriented destinations like The
Bahamas, and shock people to create a
chain reaction leading to a worldwide ban
on the killing of sea turtles.

According to Kim Aranha, President of
The Bahamas Humane Society, the drive
to save sea turtles is gaining momentum.
Most recently, the Bahamas National Trust
added its voice to the call for a total ban on
harvesting sea turtles, and thousands of
people have signed a petition demanding
swift government action to end the cruelty.

In a press release issued on September.

18, the Bahamas National Trust said it

"joins the Bahamas Sea Turtle Conserva-
tion Group, The Nature Conservancy, The
Bahamas Humane Society, Friends of the
Environment and BREEF in the call for a
total ban on the harvesting of sea turtles in
The Bahamas."

Ms Mather says Bahamas fisheries laws
still allow the catching and slaughter of
certain turtles, even though the country is
a party to the Convention on Internation-
al Trade in Endangered Species of Wild
Fauna and Flora (CITES), which calls on
member states to protect all marine turtles
as endangered or threatened. According to
Ms Mather, “One of the conditions of
being a signatory to CITES states that the
signing country is obliged to change their
current legislation to conform to the oblig-
ations of the convention.”

The Bahamas is also a signatory to the
Convention on Biological Diversity, which
commits The Bahamas to avoid the extinc-
tion of any more Bahamian species.

ri doctors on Grand ee BEC team applauded

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net



FREEPORT - Three medical doctors on
Grand Bahama will be recognised and
awarded by the Grand Bahama Medical and
Dental Association this weekend.

Hu

Dr George Charite, association president,

announced that Dr Wiona Pratt, Dr Edgar
Cainglet, and Dr Rolando Corral will be
honored at its annual awards banquet on

Saturday, October 4.

The banquet, which is being held under the-
patronage of the Minister of Health Dr
Hubert Minnis and his wife, will be held
6pm at the Westin at Our Lucaya Resort.

Dr Charite said the minister will also open
the association’s annual medical conference
on Thursday, October 1, at the Westin
Resort. This year’s theme is ‘Building A
Stronger Nation Through Health.’

He said Dr Patty Symonette is expected to
attend the opening, which is also open to

the general public.

Exhibitions will be on display by repre-
sentatives of pharmaceutical companies, the
Baptist Hospital, Mount Sinai Hospital, and

the Kendal Regional Hospital.



Dr Charite said the
conference sessions and
lectures will be held on
Friday for medical and
healthcare professionals.

Some of the topics that
will be discussed are
orthopedic medicine,
rehabilitation therapy,
chronic back pain, and

knee reconstructive surgery.
Dental sessions will include mouth pain,
dental implants, and aesthetic dentistry. Ses-

sions will also be held on the emotional

impact of chronic diseases, including a pre-
sentation on HIV/AIDS. .

Malignancies will also be addressed by Dr
Judith Hurley, a genealogist at Jackson
Memorial University in Miami.

Dr Charite said Dr Hurley will also be at
the Grand Bahama Cancer Association on
Thursday between 1pm to 4pm to speak with

women about breast cancer and the history

of ovarian cancer.
Mr Hurley 2 alco be available to conduct

gene studies for persons at the Cancer Asso-

ciation. The medical association will also
hold a cruise on the Bahama Mama on the
evening of Friday, October 3.

’

The event is open to the public.













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Din” for power restoration

mission in Inagua

THE technical team from the
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
returned to Nassau on Friday
after spending two weeks
engaged in restoring electricity to
the storm-ravaged Inagua. In the
first week of September, Inagua
took a direct hit from the cate-
gory four Hurricane Ike, which
wrecked havoc on homes, public
infrastructure and the operations
of Morton Bahamas, the major
employer of Inagua and supplier
of electricity to the island through
its private franchise.

The seven-man team from
BEC’s distribution department
included foreman Paul Tynes and
linesmen Hermis Sands,
Chrishawn Knowles, Sherman
Moxey, Talbot McKinney,
Quentin Miller and Clifton
Bullard.

On hand to greet them were
BEC’s general manager Kevin
Basden and engineers Craig
Knowles and Ian Pratt, who
assisted in putting the team
together.

Mr Knowles was also responsi-
ble for travelling to Inagua to
check on the progress of the
works.

In addition to its contribution
of manpower, BEC also shipped
a bucket truck, a pole hole borer
and other materials to Inagua to
assist with the restoration of the
power system.

As a member of CARILEC,
the regional association of elec-
tricity utilities, BEC has con-
tributed to restorations through-
out the CARICOM countries.

Mr Basden thanked and
praised his team.

“I would like to thank all of
our employees who went down
there and their families, the sac-
rifice they made in terms of leav-
ing the comfort of New Provi-
dence, going down to Inagua and
assisting in the restoration
process.

“It was a good team, they
stepped up to the challenge and
they are all proud to be able to
assist. So I want to thank them
and their families whom they
were away from for that period of
time,” he said.

Lending a hand to the BEC
team in the Inagua restoration
effort was the Grand Bahama
Power Company,
announced earlier that it was
motivated by a desire to aid
Inaguans and by gratitude to
BEC for its restoration work in
Grand Bahama following the



which ~

‘Costly exercise’

POWER has now been fully

restored to Inagua, but BEC said the
exercise was a very costly one for the

corporation.

Although BEC has not yet put
dollar figure on the cost of the

a

restoration effort, the corporation’s
general manager Kevin Basden said .
that he expects the price tag to be

high as BEC sent several technicians
and equipment to the storm ravaged

LGN ereledA|

island. “Most certainly the final num-

bers are not in yet, but it was a costly : :

exercise. We sent equipment to assist in erecting poles, we also

sent in a bucket truck to assist as well.
“In addition to those vehicles, we also had to send poles and

other materials for repairs. And you are also looking at the

time for the men. So over all it was costly, there was areal

RAS ee LE.

- need, she-said

Following, the restoration effort in the Mathew Town area,

the next step is to finalise the takeover of Inagua’s power sys-_ -
tem by BEC. This will happen shortly, BEC said. —

“Because of the increasing challenges in this regard, Morton
Bahamas has asked BEC to assume responsibility for electrici- —
ty supply in Inagua. Morton’s aged generation plant and t
mission and distribution network can nolongermeetthe
demands of a growing population for modern amenities. The —_
negotiations are expected to be concluded shortly,” the corpo-

ration said in a statement.

The damages to island power systems arising from passage ~~
of several major hurricanes over the past four years have high- _

lighted the challenges of developing and maintaining an elec-
tricity network in an island nation, BEC said. \

destructive storm seasons of 2004
and 2005.

The BEC team and their coun-
terparts from Grand Bahama
received high praise from Glenn
Bannister, managing director of
Morton Bahamas.

“We are ecstatic and we would
like to thank Mr Kevin Basden
of the Bahamas Electrical Cor-
poration in.Nassau and also Mr
Excell “EO” Ferrell of the Grand
Bahama Power Company for the
excellent work that their team of
men did at Inagua.

“Those guys came to Inagua
and they were up from six in the
morning until late in the night
putting up poles and running lines
and working side by side with our
electricians in Inagua. These guys
worked hard, they were profes-
sional, they were safe, and two
weeks after the hurricane we had
electricity in Inagua. That is truly
amazing. It speaks to the profes-
sionalism that we have at BEC
and the Grand Bahama Power

MAINS RENEWALS

Sans Souci to Fox Hill Road

The Water and Sewerage Corporation advises its
customers and the general public that the
Corporation has begun mains renewal work on
the Eastern Road from Fox Hill Read to San Souci
for a period of ‘eight (8) weeks. Motorists are
asked to avoid the area as much as possible.

The Corporation apologizes for the inconvenience
caused and reminds its customers this is an effort
to improve their water supply.







Company. We are indeed grate-
ful,“ Bannister said. .

Mr Basden spoke of the Cor-'
poration’s motivation to get
things moving again and the
scope and success of the restora-
tion work.

“Our fellow citizens down in

‘Inagua suffered as a result of

Hurricane Ike. The overall objec-
tive was to assist and restore the
power system as quickly as possi-
ble so that the residents of Inagua
would be back in a position of
normalcy.

“We are proud to say 100 per
cent of power has been restored
in Mathew Town - there is one
exception with the building that
houses Batelco, some transform-
ers are needed for that. The situ-
ation, as such, is that that high
level voltage used in Inagua dif-
fers from what we use in New
Providence and other family
islands. So Morton Salt is
attempting to source transformers
and we are doing the same, as
soon as we have them, they will
be replaced,” Mr Basden said.

BEC foreman Paul Tynes
spoke of the challenges faced by
the team he led.

“We had a lot of damaged

-homes, a lot of downed trees,

poles, a lot of the power lines
destroyed, they were 100 per cent
without power, they were also
unable to generate power. When
my team went in we had to assess
the damage and make some
determinations.

“Primarily, the main goal was
to get the main feeders in, to get
power to the airport, the clinics,
the water stations and other pub-
lic buildings. In doing that we
found out that we were able to
get the main feeders in within a
matter of five days or so. I would
say 99.99 per cent of power has
been restored.

“We had to change about 20-25
poles and about four or five trans-
formers and about eight to 10
miles of lines. My team surprised
me, they outdid themselves. They
performed extremely well, when
you look at the conditions we
were faced with —-100 per cent
without power and power gener-
ation.

“There were times when we
did not have water. Under those
conditions the team performed
admirably well,” Mr Tynes said.
(ne mmMibuine

PULULAI, VL!

PRLIVIDLI UU, BUY, ri



OPERATION TOUCH COMMITTEE
GB Burger King franchises donate $1,000 to Turks and Caicos hurricane victims

@ BY DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - Burger King Fran-
chises on Grand Bahama donated
$1,000 to the Operation Touch Com-
mittee, which is raising funds for hur-
ricane victims in the Turks and Caicos
Islands.

The presentation was made on Fri-
day at the Doris Minette Holding Ltd
Headquarters in the Kipling Building.

Racquel Hart, director of market-
ing and training for Burger King Fran-

Campaign launched

chises on Grand Bahama, commended
Operation Touch on its efforts to raise
money to help persons in the Turks
and Caicos.

“We have been touched by the plight
of the residents in the Turks and Caicos
and today we are pleased to donate
$1,000 to aid those persons affected by
Hurricane Ike.

“They have lost a lot and we are glad
to play a part in restoring their lives,
and we trust that this donation will go
a long way,” said Ms Hart.

Committee chairman Simeon Outten
thanked Burger King Franchises for
their contribution to Operation Touch.

Operation Touch recently held a
tele-a-thon and gospel concert at the
Hilton Outten Auditorium in Freeport
to raise funds for the Turks and Caicos.

Mr Outten said the event was very
successful and well supported. He also
noted that they received very positive
feedback on the concert from the pub-
lic.

“We are still putting the figures
together and hopefully sometime next
week we will hold a press conference to
inform the public of the total that was
raised, and how we will go about pre-
senting them to the Turks and Caicos.

“This island is just filled with descen-

dants from the Turks and Caicos and
we want our brothers and sisters, fam-
ily, and friends over there to know we
are thinking about them, praying for
them and doing what we can to help.

Mr Outten said donors gave what
they could despite the economic hard-
ship being experienced in Grand
Bahama.

Anthony Rahming, public relations
spokesman, thanked the entire GB
community for its support.

“Grand Bahama came together and
gave us tremendous support and some
support is still coming in,” he said.

“We are very touched by the fact,

that we have people helping people,
and we want to assure persons that the
money will go to assist those victims to
get their lives back to some normal-
cy,” Mr Rahming said.

The Operation Touch Committee
was formed in conjunction with the
Turks and Caicos Association here on
the island. Some other members are:
Rev Kermit Saunders, co-chairman;
Kenneth Basden, treasurer; Arthur
Jones, assistant treasurer; Andrea
Moss, recording secretary; and Daniel
Williams, assistant public relations offi-
cer.



Ethel Rolle — Education
Employee of the Year 2008/ oF

to allow Bahamians
to gamble in casinos

A NEW committee has
been established to launch a
nation-wide campaign to allow
Bahamians to gamble in the
country’s casinos.

“Deeply concerned with the
discriminatory nature of
Bahamian gaming law, a high
profile ad-hoc.committee has
come together to advocate for
change.

“Comprised of leaders from



New committee formed to
change ‘discriminatory’
Bahamian gaming law

chan. “As a result of current

6 i
business, the professions, com- Asar esult of gaming laws, and in part the
munity and academia, the Current gaming admitted inability of the gov-
ing a fercreaching national L2WS, andin part — poms crugeles ember
= e NamMas § es € ar-
campaign,” the committee the admitted rassingly with significant ille-
os ima he spesianiae inability of the gal wagering by its citizens.
ommittee spokesperson, iy a tetests:s ce the
Sidney Strachan, said: “The SOVermment to Re vonainse. Reale
archaic gaming law as cur- enforce them, the is i ening at the
H as, CUE This is happening

rently constituted discrimi- - Bahamas struggles expense of government rev-
nates against legal residents : enue and unnecessarily limit-
and citizens of the Bahamas. embarrassingly ing the nation’s ability to
ae acd with significant broaden and enrich social,
Greco aAKGAd. illegal wagering by educational and health in a

“The policy places the coun-
try in a bad light nationally
and internationally and denies

its citizens.”



period of pressing need.
“The committee singles this

out as another example of the

asinine nature of gaming laws

its citizens a fundamental
right.

“Tt must be changed and the
committee believes that it
enjoys the breadth and depth
of support nationally to suc-
cessfully advance the argu-
ment.”

By law, Bahamian nation-
als are not permitted to game
in their own country.

This is despite the conscious
determination of government
to make gaming a central ele-
ment of the country’s tourism
product, the committee not-
ed.

“Four significant casinos can
be found within the country
catering to visitors year round.
The current government is
intent on using gaming as the
centre piece of the planned
development of additional
tourism capacity.

“A major economic driver
and source of employment,
tourism is a national GDP pil-
lar.”

The committee includes,
among others: Felix Knowles,
Bob Halat,- Lester R Cox,
Adrian: Gibson, Christina
Cemburu and Sidney Stra-

and policies,” the statement
said.

The committee said it has
approved a framework advo-
cacy plan.

Among other things it
intends to seek meetings with
key government officials,
opposition leaders and special
interest groups.

The plan provides for an
ambitious direct mail cam-
paign, informative materials,
the earning of media attention
and education and awareness
initiatives, it added.





KIA J MOTORS
re

The Power to Surprise



Ministry of Education Employee of the Year
2008/09 is Ethel Rolle, a 30 year veteran who
started as a janitress at the William Gordon Pri-
mary School.

THE ministry said “hard work, dedication,
determination to move upwards and a firm
belief in her abilities” led Mrs Rolle to a two
year posting as a messenger at the Public Ser-
vice Training Centre.

In 1993 she was assigned to the Ministry of
Education, where she is now the head mes-

senger in the offices of the minister of educa- :

tion and the permanent secretary.

Her career goal is to become a supervisor, a
rank she aspires to reach by continuing to pro-
vide outstanding service.

Mrs Rolle believes that quality service to
clients within and outside the Ministry must
always be delivered with efficiency and cheer-
fulness.

She is described as a model employee who
exemplifies exceptional levels of work perfor-
mance and displays high regard and loyalty to
co-workers and job responsibilities.

Her duties include: answering the telephone,
clearing trays, sorting, recording, delivering,
retrieving, copying mail and files and setting up
conference rooms for meetings, all of which
she welcomes with her trademark smile and
enthusiasm. Her dedication extends to Church
of Christ where she worships and serves in the
social club. A mother of three, she enjoys read-
ing, cooking, going for walks and to the beach.

The ministry said: “Mrs Rolle was selected
from an impressive group of well deserving
employees, based upon recommendations,
employee performance appraisal records and
interviews conducted by a panel of judges.”

She will represent the ministry in the Nation-
al Public Officer of the Year Competition for









Benne

the coveted title of Public Officer of the Year
in October.

Minister Carl Bethel, on behalf of the Min-
istry of Education, congratulated Mrs Ethel
Rolle on her “stellar achievement”.

He thanked her for being a “fantastic exam-
ple” for all staff to,follow and said he wishes her
every success.







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THE TRIBUNE

Bahamas chosen as backdrop for
NBA dance troupe photo shoot





MIAMI HEAT
dance troupe
members on
«# location at
Atlantis.

THE Miami Heat basket-
ball franchise has chosen the
islands of the Bahamas to be

2009 poster and calendar
photo shoot.

The Miami heat dance
troupe began its shoot last
week on Paradise Beach at
the Cove, Atlantis.

Stephen Weber Executive,
vice-president of sales, said
the Miami Heat is excited
about joining forces with the
Ministry of Tourism to pro-
mote both the NBA team
and its dancers, as well as the
islands of the Bahamas.

Heat president of business
operations Eric Woolworth
said in a statement that the
Bahamas is a prime location
for this type of promotion.

“T can’t think of a better
location than the islands of
the Bahamas to host a photo
shoot for the most popular
dance team in the NBA,”
said Mr Woolworth.

“Gorgeous beaches, rich
heritage, close proximity -
it’s South Florida’s home
away from home and we
know the Heat dancers will
be welcomed and pam-
pered.”

The team will give away.
15,000 posters during its first
Bahamas-themed night on
November 14, which will be
played against the Washing-
ton Wizards.

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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 9



Remembering

Norman Solomon

FROM page one

wife was still in Florida yester-
day.

Although no formal statement
was released by government up
to press time last night, parlia-
mentarians, who learned of his
death yesterday morning during
a House session, observed a
moment of silence in his hon-
our.

An outpouring of condolences
followed news of his death yes-
terday, with many in the busi-
ness and political community
heralding Mr Solomon as a true
"patriot" who worked tirelessly
for the development of his coun-
try.

"He was the most industrious
person I've ever known, and
very meticulous and always
checked details. He never
seemed to get flustered. He
could multi-task better than any-
body I know. And he was a
workaholic," long-time friend
and former politician Michael
Lightbourn told The Tribune
yesterday.

Mr Lightbourn was a mem-
ber of the short-lived Social
Democratic Party (SDP), which
was organised and led by Mr
Solomon in 1979. The SDP
served as opposition to the Pin-
dling administration until 1981.

Mr Lightbourn last spoke with
Mr Solomon two weeks ago
when his "fading" health was
evident. .

"They were hoping to bring
him back,.but he was in such ill
health, they were nervous about
whether he could handle the
travel and they got him out in
Naples, Florida just before the
hurricane (Ike) threatened," said
Mr Lightbourn, adding that Mr
Solomon's health was going
"downhill" for "quite some
time."

Sir Arthur Foulkes, former
Bahamas high commissioner to
London, described his counter-
part as a "great Bahamian."

"I've observed Parliament for
more than half a century now,
from outside and from inside,
and Mr Solomon was a formi-
dable parliamentary debater and
I can think of no parliamentari-
an who went to Parliament more
meticulously prepared for a
debate than Norman Solomon."

Dubbed “Stormin' Norman”
by the press, the one time leader
of the opposition is also known
for the courageous stance he
took in the House of Assembly
during the early 80s when he
revealed drug lord Carlos "Joe"
Lehder's illicit trade on Nor-
man's Cay.

Said former Tribune news edi-
tor Athena Damianos: "While
others were engaged in a mas-
sive cover-up that put the coun-
try on its present path of law-
lessness, Norman told Parlia-
ment that Norman's Cay was the
site of one of the largest drug
smuggling operations in this part
of the world."

His home and car were later

fire-bombed.

He founded the ,Nassau
Tourism Development Board
(NTDB) in 1994 and served as
co-chairman until his flailing
health forced him to step down
in February, 2007. He remained
an honorary chairman of NTDB
until his death.

"The Bahamas has lost one of
its true patriots. Mr Norman
Solomon was the founding
Chairman of the Nassau
Tourism and Development
Board in 1994. In life and in
passing, he has remained our
conscience, our motivator, a
steady and guiding hand, and a
visionary for what we, and in
particular his beloved historic
city of Nassau, could be. His out-
standing contributions to the
nation’s development as a busi-
nessman, journalist, politician
and activist must be celebrated.
Our sympathies go out to his
family in this time of sorrow,"
Charles Klonaris, NTDB Chair-
man said in a statement yester-
day.

Born October 6, 1929, Mr
Solomon was educated at
Queen's College and at Belmont
School in the Bahamas and then
at Bishop's College School in
Canada. He is survived by his
wife Katherine Solomon, his
daughters, Andrya Schulte and
Alexya Solomon; his sons, Sean
Solomon, and Spencer Solomon,
his son-in-law, Christian Schulte,
and daughter-in-law, Julija; his
grand daughters, Christy and
Valentina, and his grandsons,
Alexander and Austin. °

He also served as MP for the
St John's constituency (now
North Eleuthera) from 1967-
1982. He owned a number of

successful businesses, including
Body Shop, Mademoiselle and
Wendy's which were part of the
Solomon Group of Companies.

In 1982, he took over Ardastra
‘Gardens and Zoo and revamped
the park into a tourist attraction

now defunct SDP from 1979 -
1982.

His family - one of the oldest
in the country - arrived in the
Bahamas in 1799 and has an out-
standing reputation in the areas

of business, politics and, in the



He served in Parliament from
1967 -1982 and was leader of the

case of his uncle, Sir Kenneth
_Solomon, in law.

Derek Smith



1979 - NORMAN SOLOMON entering the House of Assembly. Mr Solomon served as a Member of Parliament
from 1967 to 1982. Sgt Paul Farquharson, later commissioner of police, is seen at right. He is presently the
Bahamas High Commissioner to London.









U

tk



© Franklyn G Ferguson

A

THURSDAY DECEMBER 17, 1981. AN HISTORIC picture taking session was held Thursday outside the House for members of parliament who all have to face the electorate next year in

general elections. Prime Minister Lynden Pindling, whose Progressive Liberal Party has been in power since January 1967, was not present for the picture. At present ther are 38 mem-

bers of parliament - 31 being PLP members, four being Free National Movement members and three being Social Democratic Party members. Mr Solomon, the SDP leader, is the first

a m left oe front row. Then, Percy Saunders, chief clerk; Heny Bowen, deputy speaker, Clifford Darling, speaker; Arthur Hanna, deputy PLP leader, Henry Bostwick, leader of the
ree National Movement. :

1989 - BAHAMIANS and tourists were treated
to the sound of bagpipes as Dewar's “White
Label” Piper serenaded Bay Street. The photo
shows Piper Major Willie Cochrane and Norman
Solomon in front of his “Mademoiselle” store.
PAGE 10 THE TRIBUNE



| TUESDAY EVENING SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

7:30 | 8:00 | 8:30 | 9:00 | 9:30 | 10:00 | 10:30

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Ae Florida Roadtrip |Nova “Sputnik Declassified” Early |P.0.V. “Critical Condition” Four critically ill Americans
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THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 11



LOCAL NEWS



Chinese milk
products —
FROM page one :

carton milk sold to other
countries and regions,
unleashing fear in markets
already shaken by a string
of "made-in-China" scandals
last year.

Creswell Sturrup, Perma-
nent Secretary for the gov-
ernment department of
Agriculture and Marine
Resources, said foreign
imports will be monitored in
an investigation sparked by
the scandal.

A spokesman from the
Ministry of Labour said
there is no cause to panic as
yet, however the issue has
highlighted a need for inde-
pendent product testing in
the Bahamas.

He said: "There has been
a push for the establishment
of a standards bureau in the
Bahamas, as they have in
countries all over the world,
to test products like this.

"We need a well
equipped lab, staffed with
professionals and scientists
to do product tests to assist
the government and the wel-
fare of the Bahamian peo-
ple." :

An independent super-
market manager on Bay
Street, who stocks “White
-Rabbit” milk candies made
in China, said he had not
been warned of the scandal.

However, the sweets
were found to contain unac-
ceptable contamination in
tests carried out by New
Zealand's Food Safety
Authority last week.

"This product contains
sufficiently high levels of
melamine which may cause
health problems," deputy
chief executive Sandra Daly
told The Guardian newspa-
per of London.

She urged people to seek
medical advice if they or
their children had eaten the
sweets, adding: "This is a
serious concern."

Cadbury became the lat-
est foreign company to order
a recall of its Chinese-made
products yesterday after a
test of chocolates made in
the Beijing factory cast
doubt on their safety.

The EU is testing all
products containing more
than 15 per cent milk pow-
der and have issued a ban
on all products from China
for infants and young chil-
dren that contain any pro-
portion of milk.

The United States' Food
and Drug Administration
expanded its checks for ;
melamine last week to :
include products that have
been tested in other coun-
tries and found positive for
melamine.

The FDA has not yet |:
found any positive samples, ¥
and no contaminated prod- :
ucts have been found on the
UK market.

It is not known whether
milk-products made in Chi-
na for sale in the Bahamas
are contaminated.

Financing |

Available ©
on the
Spot

Major blow to new
tourism strategy

FROM page one

United States, the Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism was advised to forego tonight's
scheduled announcements, proposing a
newer strategy and direction” for
tourism.

It said a new date for the Ministry of
Tourism to reveal its “new direction”
for tourism would be announced. °

The postponement comes after yet
another tumultuous day in the United
States, with the already battered financial
market reacting violently to the failure of
Congress to pass a bill which its sup-
porters said would help save a U.S. econ-
omy “on the brink of an economic dis-
aster.”

With North America the origin of the
vast majority of visitors to the Bahamas

MP hits back after PM dismisses

and therefore of money going into
Bahamian pockets the news was also a
serious blow to this dollar-dependent
nation and attracted questions and com-
mentary in the House of Assembly
throughout the day.

The “Bail out” bill proposed by the
Republican party and voted down yes-
terday was to have allowed for the U.S.
Government to purchase so-called “tox-
ic” assets from stricken financial insti-
tutions so that they could get on with
the business of lending money to Amer-
ican consumers and businesses.

The institutions had been effectively
frozen in recent weeks, halting their nor-
mal lending activities and hoarding mon-
ey to protect themselves from the fall
out from the country’s sub-prime mort-
gage crisis.

Their fears grew after several major

financial institutions failed thanks to
their exposure to mortgage-backed secu-
rities over the last three weeks.

Americans, offered loans despite
showing little evidence they could meet
their requirements, had begun defaulting
on their mortgages in greater and greater
numbers in recent years.

With banks increasingly into the prac-
tice of selling on these mortgages, in the
form of “mortgage-backed securities”
to other investors who had initially
hoped to make a profit from them, the
eventual failure of many Americans to
pay them back had a widespread impact ,
throughout the U.S. financial system.

Politicians and technocrats in that
country are now hurrying to come up
with another proposed solution to the
situation.

Steny Hoyer, the House Majority

Leader, had warned of the consequences
of failing to pass the bailout bill that the
Republicans proposed to solve the prob-
lem: “A meltdown would begin on a few
square miles of Manhattan, but before it
was over no city or town in America
would be untouched.”

Meanwhile, Republican Senator Judd
Gregg, a lead negotiator in the bailout
bill negotiations said, “If we don't act
promptly and effectively, then many peo-
ple are going to lose their jobs.”

Yesterday Prime Minister Hubert
Ingraham stated: “We are very carefully
monitoring the evolving financial crisis
and its likely impact in the Bahamas.
We are making assessments about its
likely magnitude and duration. It's not
easy to make a determination about its
magnitude and duration because prob-
lems continue to arise every hour.”

remarks in House as ‘sissy talk’

FROM page one

Minister talking *bout sissy talk.
Mr Speaker, I am not going to
be intimidated by any (the
Speaker ordered the. word with-
drawn) conduct on the part of
the Member of North Abaco.
He is here to answer questions;
to give account to the Bahami-
an people,” Mr Sears said.

Mr Sear’s characterization
of the Prime Minister was sub-
sequently withdrawn from the
Hansard. However the argu-
ment had a lasting impact dur-
ing the morning session of
Opposition Day yesterday.

In fact, Mr Ingraham
informed the House as the
debate over the remarks con-
tinued, that he had no diffi-

_ culty in the term that Mr Sears

used against him.

“Mr Speaker I take no
exception from the words,” Mr
Ingraham said. “None what-
soever. I want the Speaker to
know that I take no exception
from the words coming from
the Member of Fort Charlotte.
He can call me whatever he
likes,” he said.

However, a number of
Opposition Members contin-
ued to'raise objections, stat-
ing that by accepting the
words it would lower the stan-
dards of the House of Assem-
bly.

Leading this charge was the
PLP’s leader of Opposition
Business, Dr Bernard Nottage.

“The Prime Minister said,
‘sissy talk’, and the whole
country heard him. All ’m
talking about is there is a con-
sistent theme coming from
across the other side of the
aisle when certain members
speak, making certain insinu-
ations which we object to. The
particular comment by the PM
in my view is not warranted

Used Car

Advanta

and should not, it ought to not
be made and it certainly
should not be heard by the
country,” said Dr Nottage.

“All I’m saying to you, sir, is
that we ask you to do for the
other side that which you do
with us, and that is to request
them to cease and desist from
this kind of behaviour. That’s
all. I don’t think its appropri-
ate for we to do it, and nei-
ther is it for the Prime Minis-
ter. That’s all I’m saying.”

To this, Mr Ingraham said
that he was “startled” by Dr
Nottage’s “righteous indigna-
tion.”

“He takes no exception to
the Member for Fort Char-
lotte saying (word omitted)
but when the comment is
made from my seat he takes
exception. I understand,” he
said.

House Speaker Alvin Smith
interrupted the proceedings by
saying that he has heard many

. un-Parliamentary things said

from member’s seats and as
such did not involve himself.
However, when things are said
standing and therefore for the
record, it is then that he must
act. ‘

In this vein, the derogatory

remarks made by Mr Sears
about the Prime Minister were
withdrawn. However, Mr
Sears issued a warning to Mr
Ingraham before continuing
with his contribution.

“The Prime Minister should
realise that one day — there
were other politicians who
thought they were all mighty
when they sat in here, and at a
later stage in their career they
found themselves on the other
side. And I want to remind
him of his own mortality and
that he is only sitting there for
a period. And he should
remember that,” said Mr
Sears,

ey

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Arrested man ‘in
hospital after alleged.
beating in custody’

FROM page one

While inside the trunk, the
man was able to phone a
friend who called the police.

Officers patrolling the
Prince Charles Drive area
that night spotted the vehicle
and gave chase.

The men then tried to
abandon the vehicle and flee
on foot.

Officers gave chase and
shot one of the men after he
pointed a gun in their direc-
tion.

According to police Bast-
ian was apprehended after
forcefully resisting arrest,
while the third man escaped.

Mrs McKenzie said that
when she was finally able to

see her son, officers had to
help him into the visitor’s
room. She said they sat him
on the very edge of a soft
couch and he slowly leaned
his head into the rest.

“Mommy they beat me,”
she recalls him saying in a
breathless voice.

Mrs McKenzie said she has
filed a formal complaint to
the police corruption unit
and had been told that an
investigation would begin.

“If he goes before the
magistrate and he says he has
to go to Fox Hill then that’s
what has to happen, but at
least P’ll know he’s alive,”
she said.

Calls to police pregarding
an investigation into the mat-



LZ
GRAD SUL

c ty
af Carcead! ‘Bay
PER VMALBARANAST

ter were not returned up to
press time yesterday. .

According to his mother,
doctors caring for Bastian
said that both of his kidneys
were in danger of shutting
down and that he was not
able to pass his urine.

She said doctors said he
would never be 100 per cent
again.

“The doctor said they are
going to do an X-ray of his
chest because he is still
bringing up blood and vom-
iting,” “Mrs McKenzie
claimed.

She said she hasn’t been
allowed to visit with her son
for almost three days, despite
assurances by police that she
was welcome to do so.

o-Star Luxury Resort
invites qualified applicants
for the following positions:

FRONT OFFICE
MANAGER
. Responsibilities include:

¢ Management of day-
to-day operations &
assignments of front
office staff
Development &
communication of
departmental
strategies & goals
Assisting in managing
hotel revenue genera-
tion & maximization
through full utilization
of company
Monitoring front office
staff to ensure guests
receive prompt
attention & personal
recognition that is the
Grand Isle standard.

RESTAURANT
MANAGER
Responsibilities include:

¢ Management of
day-to-day operations
of department
Ensuring continued
training & devel-
opment of staff to
achieve product &
service standards
Establishment &
revision of customer
care practices to
achieve total client
satisfaction.

Qualifications:

Minimum of two years experience in similar

position

Proven record of superior customer service &

guest relations skills

Excellent written & verbal communications skills
Proven leadership ability & ability to train &
motivate team members

Computer literacy.

EXECUTIVE
CHEF
Responsibilities include:

¢ Creation of full menu
for new restaurant

¢ Coordination,
budgeting &
purchasing of food
for all operations
within the resort

¢ Planning and supervi-
sion of food prepa-
ration & cooking
activities of multiple
kitchens ~

e Ensuring timely
delivery of services

¢ Creation of
decorative food
displays.

Qualifications:

¢ Bachelors or related
culinary degree

e Proven culinary ability

° Proven leadership
ability with the ability
to train & motivate
team members

¢ Previous experience
with food costs &
development of menu
& culinary team.

Bahamian citizenship or residency status with right to work required
Willingness to live on a Family Island essential

For immediate consideration, please send resume to:
e-mail: tracy.stoltz@grandisleresort.com


PAGE 12, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Winless
Rams fire
coach Scott

Linehan

@ By RB FALLSTROM
AP Sports Writer

ST LOUIS (AP) — The
winless St Louis Rams fired
coach Scott Linehan yester-
day, the day after a fourth
straight lopsided loss to start
the season.

Defensive coordinator
Jim Haslett will replace

Linehan on an interim basis. .

The Rams scheduled a news
conference later Monday.

“T have enormous respect
for Scott Linehan as a per-
son and believe under the
right circumstances he will
be regarded one day asa
fine head coach,” owner
Chip Rosenbloom said in a
release.

“Unfortunately, the situa-
tion with the Rams as they
exist today is no longer
acceptable and we have to’
make a change.”

Linehan had an overall
11-25 record in his first head
coaching job. The Rams
have been outscored 147-43
this season, and have
allowed at least 30 points in
seven straight games dating
back to last year.

The move was made
heading into the Rams’ bye
week and several hours after
the Buffalo Bills outscored
them 25-0 in the second halt
of a 31-14 victory Sunday.

St Louis has lost 17 of its
last 20 games overall.

The 0-4 start is the second
straight for the Rams, who
lost their first eight games
last year en route to a 3-13
finish that landed them with
the second pick in the draft.

A sign at Sunday’s home
game read: “Congress. Now
bail out the Rams.”

Haslett was fired as coach
of the New Orleans after the
2005 season, and joined the
Rams on Linehan’s first staff
in 2006.

The Linehan era was
mostly a dreary time for the
franchise, especially on the
heels of the wild highs and
lows of predecessor Mike
Martz, who helped the
Rams win their lone Super
Bowl after the 1999 season
and led them to a second
Super Bowl as coach in the
2001 season. .

The Rams were 8-8 in
2006, Linehan’s first season.
The team rallied to win four
of its Iast six games after
Linehan turned over play-

calling duties to offensive:

coordinator Greg Olson.

Numerous offensive line
injuries, beginning with sev-
en-time Pro Bowl tackle
Orlando Pace’s season-end-
ing shoulder injury in the
opener, paved the way for
last year’s poor season.
Linehan reclaimed play-call-
ing duties that year after
three games.

Linehan, 45, again relin-
quished the play-calling this
season after replacing Olson
with Al Saunders, among
several moves in a staff
overhaul.

Other changes were
made, with training camp
moved to a remote location
in Mequon, Wis., and Line-
han attempting to inject
more energy into a his low-
key personality.

On Sunday, he benched
quarterback Marc Bulger,
the highest-paid player in
franchise history, and went
with 38-year-old backup
Trent Green. That was one
of six lineup changes for the
Bills game.

None of it worked.

Linehan knew his job was
in jeopardy Sunday, having
been put on notice by
Rosenbloom. He emptied
the playbook, going for first
downs twice on fourth down
and using a handful of trick
plays with a juggled lineup
led by Green.

The firing was the second
in-season coaching change
by the Rams this decade.
Martz was replaced after
five games in 2005 by inter-
im coach Joe Vitt due to
medical reasons. Martz was
let go the day after that 5-11
season.

The last Rams coach
removed during the season
for non-medical reasons was
Bob Waterfield, replaced by
Harland Svare after eight
games in 1962 when the
Rams were in Los Angeles.



GREEN BAY Packers’ Greg Jennings celebrates after scoring his second touchdown

against the Buccaneers during the second half...

OC \ A
ges



BUFFALO BILLS wide receiver Lee Evans (83) catches a 39-
yard pass for a touchdown as St Louis Rams’ Jason Craft
(31) defends during the fourth quarter of Sunday’s game in
St Louis...



Tom Gannam/AP

Photos: Chris 0’Meara/AP

in Tampa, Florida. The Buccaneers won 30-21...

ST LOUIS RAMS running back
Steven Jackson (39) runs for an
eight-yard gain as Buffalo Bills’ Ko
Simpson misses the tackle during
the second quarter. The Bills won
31-14...

(AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

py

ildtiyyy

Yo Williiidiies



MMS

of Sunday’s game in Oakland, California.





ie Chargers wo

TAMPA BAY Buccaneers tight end Alex Smith (81) eludes Green Bay Packers’ Michael Mont-

gomery (96) after catching a touchdown pass during the second quarter of Sunday's game

Paul Sakuma/AP
TRIBUNE SPORTS



Iraq loses
bid to get back
into 2010 World

Cup qualifying

LAUSANNE, Switzerland
(AP) — Iraq lost its bid
Monday for reinstatement in
2010 World Cup qualifying
after the sport’s highest court
refused to punish Qatar for
using an ineligible player.

The Court of Arbitration
for Sport agreed with gov-
erning body FIFA that Iraq
had no right to make an
appeal because it was late in
paying a $2,800 fee.

The Iraqi Football Associ-
atiox. (IFA) missed the dead-
line by 11 days.

“The IFA was fully aware
of the conditions for filing an
appeal with FIFA,” CAS said
in a statement.

The dispute stemmed from
a March 26 Asian qualifier
between Qatar and Iraq in
Doha.

Brazilian-born Emerson
was a Qatar citizen when he
helped his adopted country
beat Iraq 2-0.

But earlier in his career he
had also played for Brazil’s
under-20 team under the
name of Marcio Passos De

Police
arrest

Albuquerque.
FIFA lets players change
nationality but not play for

_two countries.

27 after

clash

WARSAW, Poland (AP)
— Polish soccer fans
punched and kicked each
other during a game, leading
to 27 arrests. f

Tk. outburst happened in
the western city of Szczecin
at a first-division game over
the weekend.

Footage broadcast on state
television showed Wisla
Plock fans scaling a fence to
get into a section reserved
for fans of the home team,
Flota Swinoujscie.

Fans from both teams
attacked each other wildly
before police arrived to
restore order.

Officials have struggled for
Jears to quell hooliganism at
Polish soccer stadiums.
Authorities have stepped up
efforts to combat such vio-
lence, with the country the
co-host for the 2012 Euro-
pean Championship.

The breach of rules was
brought to FIFA’s attention
by football officials in Chi-
na, which was due to play
Qatar in a June 2 qualifier.

FIFA banned Emerson
but cleared Qatar of wrong-
doing, despite article 55 of its
disciplinary code stating that
“if a player takes part in an
official match despite being
ineligible, his team will be
sanctioned by forfeiting the
match.”

Article 31 of the code
states that a forfeit is consid-
ered a 3-0 defeat — a-result
which would have seen Iraq
take Qatar’s place in the cur-
rent qualifying stage.

FIFA’s disciplinary com-
mittee said the code penal-
ties should not apply because
the Qatari federation was
given false information.

It rejected two Iraq
attempts to appeal on tech-
nical grounds.

Delic
advances
at Japan
Open

TOKYO (AP) — Amer
Delic beat Go Soeda of
Japan 6-4, 6-2 Monday to
advance to the second
round of the Japan Open.

Defending champion
David Ferrer of Spain —
the top-seeded player has
a first-round bye along with
second-seeded Andy Rod-

dick.
Rallied

Fifth-seeded Kaia
Kanepi of Estonia rallied
from a slow start for a 4-6,
6-3, 6-4 win over Lucie
Safarova of the Czech
Republic in the women’s
tournament.

Also, Ayumi Morita of
Japan beat New Zealand’s
Marina Erakovic 6-1, 6-4
and Marta Domachowska
defeated Aiko Nakamura
of Japan 6-4, 7-5.



























Premier League So

@ By The Associated Press

¢ Through September 28

ENGLAND
Premier League

TEAM

Q
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Chelsea
Liverpool
Arsenal
West Ham
Hull

Aston Villa
Blackburn
Man City
Portsmouth
Wigan

Man United
W B Albion
Sunderland
Everton
Fulham
Middlesbrough
Bolton
Stoke
Newcastle
Tottenham

DADDDDMNDNANDAADRDUDDHDAVAAVAS

SCOTLAND
Pr smier League

TEAM
Rangers
Celtic
Hearts
Inverness CT
Hibernian
Kilmarnock
Hamilton
Dundee Utd
Falkirk
Motherwell
Aberdeen
St Mirren

ss

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ORR OODRH ANNAN

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INTERNATIONAL SPORTS

Pistons sign free
agent guard Acker



TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAG

Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

IN THIS February 20, 2008 file photo, Barcelona’s Alex Acker (right) drives to the basket as CSKA
Moscow's Ramunas Siskauskas defends during their Euroleague Basketball match in Moscow.The
Detroit Pistons signed free agent guard:Alex Acker to a contract yesterday. The Pistons selected The six-
foot-five, 185-pound Acker in the second round of the 2005 NBA draft as the 60th overall pick. He played
five games with the Pistons during the 2005-06 season, averaging 1.8 points and one rebound a game...

NBHBRBRDAQAAANANMDO’O







‘IN THIS April 7, 2008 file photo,
Memphis’ Joey Dorsey dunks the
ball during the first half against
Kansas in the championship
game of the NCAA college Final
Four in San Antonio. Dorsey
agreed to a contract yesterday
with the Houston Rockets...

HOUSTON (AP)






Eric Gay/AP

Rookie forward Joey Dorsey
agreed to a contract Monday
with the Houston Rockets.

The six-foot-eight Dorsey
was drafted by Portland ear-
ly in the second round before
the Rockets acquired his
rights.

9E 13

Any increase

in security
budget for 2012
Olympics a ‘price
you alisolutely
have to pay’

SYDNEY, Australia (AP)
— The chairman of the
British Olympic Association
said Monday any increase in
the security budget for the,
2012 London Games is a
“price you absolutely have
to pay” to make the
Olympics secure.

British media reports say
the security budget most
likely will grow to $2.74 bil-
lion, three times the original
estimate.

“Whatever it takes must
be spent,” Lord Colin :
Moynihan said. “That is crit-
ical.”

Moynihan, who met Mon-
day with Australian Olympic
Committee chief John

. Coates, said the security

budget has not been com-
pleted and will be discussed
this week when he returns
home.

“If the security budget is
greater than originally con-
ceived, which it is; that is a
price you absolutely have to
pay to make sure the games
are a success and the, athletes
are secure, and everybody
who comes-to the country as
our guest...is fully secure.”

He said whatever extra
money is spent on security
will not jeopardize other
Olympic operations.

“That can’t be traded off
against other aspects of the
games,” he said.

Moynihan said the global
financial crisis was affecting
some sponsorship arrange-
ments.

“It makes it tougher, no
question,” he said. “I believe
we will achieve our targets.
Some are under greater
strain than they were a mat-
ter of months ago so we need
to respond to that. Ultimate-
ly we’ve given commitments
to the IOC and we need to
see those commitments
through.”

Dorsey was twice named
the Conference USA Defen-
sive Player of the Year for
Memphis, where he was the
league’s career rebounding
leader.

The Rockets also signed
center Marcus Campbell and
guard Von Wafer.







Ng Han Guan/AP

USA’s ANDY RODDICK returns a shot against Israel’s Dudi Sela during their men’s final match of China Open tournament
in Beijing, China, on Sunday. Roddick won 6-4, 7-6, 6-3...


PAGE 14, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

TRIBUNE SPORTS



HAMDEN iin eR RB Ne ts AN a an
HAR)
MPF



Cricket
Standings

e The BCA’s standings
are as follows:

Team Ww L
Dynasty Stars 10 0
D Titans 8 2
Scotia. P 7 3
T-Bird Flyers 4 6
D P Boys 3 7
Police 3 7
St Agnes 3 9







SOFTBALL,
from 15

the leagues. It is paying divi-
dends right now.”

Dorsett said the high level of

play in the tournament often
peaks the interest of the Fed-
eration and the national pro-
gramme. —
. “In the past years we have
seen the fruits of the Austin
Knowles tournament bear fruit
in the various senior leagues,
particularly here in New Provi-
dence,” he said.

“There is always an excep-
tional caliber of play emanat-
ing from the tournament. We
see great potential in the pitch-
ing department and we see here
in New Providence quite a few
’ of the young pitchers in the
NPSA. With a youth movement
on the works for our national
teams, it becomes even more
beneficial,” he said.

Dorsett said several islands
have already confirmed partici-
pation, setting the stage for a
truly all-encompassing national
tournament.

“Long Island has been a
dominant force in the Austin
Knowles in recent years and
have already indicated they will
be returning. Other islands have
pledged their participation,
including Exuma, Andros,
Eleuthera and of course schools
here in New Providence,” he
said.

Over 200 trophies, medals
and T-shirts will be awarded to
all participants.

The MGM Wildcats, of Long
Island, are the defending cham-
pions in the boys and girls divi-



sions and will be returning to

defend both titles.

There is no entrance fee for
the tournament, which is open
to all high schools in the coun-
try.

Interested schools may con-
tact tournament director Leroy
Thompson, who is also head
coach at Government High
School, Kelly Smith, or BSF
executives Romell Knowles and
Burket Dorsett.

new stock
arriving daily!

Police upset the
Dorsey Park Boys

THE Bahamas Cricket Asso-
ciation continued its regular sea-
son action at Windsor Park Sat-
urday but the game between the
T-Bird Flyers and the Dockin-
dale Titans was rained out.

On Sunday however, the
Police upset the Dorsey Park.
Boys in an exciting match
although it was a low-scoring
game.

Batting first, the Police were
bowled out for just 111 runs.
Greg Taylor Sr scored 36 runs
and Odine Tucker had 18.

a’

¢ Wanderers Masters to play in friendly
against Bahamas’ under-19 team

Bowling for Dorsey Park,
Mario Ford and Gary Camp-
bell took three wickets each.

When the Dorsey Park Boys
batted, they were bowled out
for 93 runs to lose by 18 runs:
Mario Fors scored 61 runs in a
losing effort.

Odine Tucker of the under-15

national team took two wickets
for the Police.

Cricket action continues next
weekend when the Police are
scheduled to play Dorsey Park
Saturday and the Dynasty are
set to face Dockendale on Sun-
day.

And On October 13, the

Wanderers Masters Cricket
Team, made up of players over
the age of 45, are scheduled to
play in a friendly match against
the Bahamas’ under-19 team.

The game at Windsor Park
will serve to prepare the Wan-
derers for their visit to South
Florida in December.

China marks Olympics and
spacewalk for Natic yal Day

@ By ANITA CHANG
Associated Press Writer

BEIJING (AP) — China
kicked off its National Day cel-
ebrations yesterday by high-
lighting its hosting of the Bei-
jing Olympics and the coun-
try’s first spacewalk, two hard-
won successes in a tumultuous
year marked by natural disas-
ters, ethnic unrest and another
food safety scandal.

The spacewalk on Saturday
boosted a wave of Chinese
pride and patriotism stemming
from the Olympics, which is
still a big news story in the

‘ domestic media one month

after it ended. China’s
Olympic heroes were hon-
oured in a three-hour ceremo-
ny at the Great Hall of the
People that was broadcast live
on national television.

State broadcaster CCTV
showed the three returning
astronauts, with flower gar-
lands around their necks, wav-
ing and smiling as they were
treated to a homecoming
parade in Beijing.

Their mission, including Chi-
na’s first spacewalk, put the
country closer to building a
space station and landing a
man on the moon.

Holding up Chinese flags
and balloons, hundreds of peo-
ple, many of them uniformed
soldiers, cheered and applaud-

CHINESE Prime Minister Wen Jiabao

toasts the guests after delivering a {
speech during a banquet marking the |
59th anniversary of the founding of the
People’s Republic of China on Monday
at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing. |
China celebrates its National Day on

October 1.

ed as the astronauts went by,
with some shouting out, .

Sale

A days only

Sept 26th - 30th, 2008

20:

© Housewares Dept
e | inens

¢ Baby Items
as

1) | aise:

ah

Fax: (242

oes 393-4002
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*except on red tagged and net items

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Mall at Marathon
Monday-Friday 9:00am8:00pm
Saturday 9:00am-9;00pm
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www.kellysbahamas.com



(AP Photo: Guang Niu) 1



“Learn from the astronauts
and salute the astronauts.”

One banner read: “Warmly
celebrate the great success of
the task of the Shenzhou
manned space flight.”

Meanwhile, Vice President
Xi Jinping, who oversaw
preparations for the Beijing
Summer Games, praised what
he said was China’s realization
of a 100-year dream to host
the event and said it would
keep China on its reform path.

“The successful holding of
the Beijing Olympics and Par-
alympics has carried forward
the Olympic spirit, improved
the understanding and friend-
ship between Chinese people
and all people of the world,”
Xi said. “It has...shown the
world the great achievements
of reform and opening and the
building of socialist modern-
ization.”

But Premier Wen Jiabao
touched briefly on some of the
country’s troubles so far this
year during an address at a

dinner banquet that included
many foreign dignitaries.

“We prevailed over the dis-
asters caused by the heavy
snow and sleet storms and the
devastating Wenchuan earth-
quake,” he said, referring to a
freak storm just before Febru-
ary’s Lunar New Year that left
scores dead and hundreds of
thousands stranded during the
country’s busiest travel peri-
od.

A magnitude 7.9 earthquake
in May left nearly 90,000 peo-
ple dead or missing.

“We still face many difficul-
ties and problems in our
endeavor to advance socialist
modernization but we have full
confidence to overcome
them,” he said.

The 59th anniversary of the
founding of the People’s
Republic of China is Wednes-
day. This year also marks 30
years since China started the
economic reforms that turned
the country into the world’s
factory floor and transformed



results

OFFICIAL results of
the first Tom “The Bird’
Grant High School Pre-
Season Volleyball Tour-
nament, which concluded
on Saturday at the Kendal
Isaacs Gymnasium, are as
follows:

Junior Girls

HO Nash def.
Sweeting 17-12, 17-11

MVP: Kendra Kemp

Winning coach: Patricia
“Patty” Johnson

Junior Boys

Freedom Baptist def.
CC Sweeting 10-17, 17-13,
15-10

MVP: Javon Davis

Winning coach: Sher-
man Smith.

Senior Girls

CV Bethel def. CC
Sweeting 25-10, 25-16

MVP: Jessica Francis

Winning coach: Glend
Gilcud ;

Senior Boys

Ce



CC Sweeting def. Doris
Johnson 25-23, 25-20

MVP: Gabi Laurence

Winning coach: Andrew
Tynes



all of its major cities.

Economic development has
been slower to reach far-flung
regions like Tibet, where sim-
mering ethnic tensions boiled
over in March.

Anti-government riots

’ erupted in the capital of Lhasa,

sparking sympathy protests in
Tibetan areas across western
China.

The riots stemmed in part
from tensions between
Tibetans and ethnic Han Chi-
nese, many of whom have
flooded into the region to pur-
sue business interests since a
railway link opened in 2006.
Some Tibetans feel the migra-
tion is diluting the region’s
unique culture.

International protests
against China’s crackdown on
the rioting marred Beijing’s
ambitious 21-country Olympic
torch relay and focused an
unwelcome spotlight on the
country’s policies in Tibet.

The latest crisis involves
milk tainted with the industri-
al chemical melamine. China’s
shoddy food safety record is
again under scrutiny after con-
taminated milk powder sick-
ened some 54,000 childrén.

There have been questions
raised whether local officials
delayed revealing until after
the Olympics that the
melamine, used to make plas-
tics and fertilizer, was found
in milk powder and linked to
kidney stones in children. Four
infants’ deaths have been
linked to bad milk powder.

Wen noted that China is
prepared to overcome any dif-
ficulties because of the
strength of the Communist
Party, which played a promi-
nent role in the National Day
celebrations.

“We are confident because
we are fully prepared and have
taken active measures to
address difficulties,” Wen said.
“We are confident because we
can benefit from the successful
experience in reform and
development and rely on our
national strength.”








TRIBUNE

Roddick
wins China
Open

SENET

SEPTEMBER 30, See page 13



2008

AGE 12° NFL HIGHLIGHTS...





King Snake’
softball tourney
slated for next

month

@ By RENALDO DORSETT
Sports Reporter

HIGH school softball teams
across the country will once again
take advantage of the upcoming
fall semester mid-term break to
decide the Bahamas’ best teams.

The ninth edition of the Austin
“King Snake” Knowles High

School National Softball Tourna- .

ment is scheduled for October
23-25 at the Blue Hills Sporting
Complex.

The Bahamas Softball Feder-
ation created the tournament for
senior boys and girls as a means
of determining a unified national
champion and to help foster the
growth of their development pro-
gramme.

Burket Dorsett, first vice pres-
ident of the BSF, said the tour-
nament has grown exponentially
in its near decade of existence

_ and facilitates the growth of the
local leagues on a yearly basis.

“It has shown tremendous
progress for the game of softball
in the country. We know this year
will be one of the more successful
tournaments we have put on this
far,” he said.

“It is somewhat of a feeder sys-
tem for the senior leagues and we
hope that the coaches of the

teams of those teams that playin .

the New Providence Softball
Association and other leagues
around the country will scout this
tournament-and its young play-
ers:and eventually feed them into

SEE page 14

—_ blow away
Big Red Machines

Bluewaves knock off
the Crusaders 8-

@ By BRENT STUBBS
Senior Sports Reporter
bstubbs@tribunemedia.net

t Andrew’s Hurri-
canes blew up a
storm yesterday at

the Field of

Dreams as they
stopped the St Augustine’s
Coll Red Machines in
six i a the ten-run rule.

Ta. urricanes, the
Bahamas Association of Inde-
pendent Secondary Schools’
defending senior boys softball
champions, slowed down the
Big Red Machines 15-5 to
remain undefeated at 3-0.

“We knew they are a pow-
erhouse in softball, but we
came out today and shut them
down,” said winning pitcher
Jarred Higgs as they handed
SAC’s first loss in three
games.

Higgs did his damage by fir-
inv a three-hitter, striking out
six batters through the first
five innings before right field-
er Herman Maycock came in
and closed the door in the
sixth.

“T felt good about my per-
formance. My arm started to
get tired around the fourth
inning, but I worked through
it and Herman came in and

Distributed By:

aby e
vs ee dL
Bie

Se

ne Cas

"SOFTBALL



sealed the deal,” Higgs said.
Before he left, Higgs made

his contribution offensively

with a run batted in on a sin-

~ gle, scoring a run in a three-

run second as St Andrew’s
went on to snatch a 3-1 lead.
The Hurricanes, producing

“L1 hits off losing pitcher Bryon

Ferguson, came up with five
big runs in the third, two in

the fourth and another four -

in the fifth as they took advan-
tage of some costly mistakes
by the Big Red Machines.
Marcus Farrington, who
went 3-for-4 with two RBIs
and three runs scored, had a
solo home run to start the
third run rally. Brandon Bur-
rows, who was 2-for-3, led the
fourth with a RBI single.
Then in the fifth, as St
Andrew’s batted around the
clock, Costa Papageorge
opened the frame with a dou-

ble and scored on Connor -

Albury’s run-producing dou-
ble. After Tariq Kelly got on
board on an error that loaded
the bases, David Sweeting
came through with a RBI
walk and Farrington closed

out the spurt with a RBI sin-
gle.

Hurricanes’ coach Mont-
gomery Nazon said they came
out and did what they had to
do and that was to hold the
Big Red Machines at bay.

“Pretty much, I think we
executed the way we planned
it,’ Nazon stated. “As we con-
tinue to win and ‘go through
the season, we will realize that
we could have another special
season.”

Nazon was referring to their
undefeated regular season as
they clinched the pennant last
year. They almost completed a
rare perfect season, but it was
blemished in the champi-
onship by the Kingsway Acad-
emy Saints.

St Andrew’s, however,
rebounded from the loss and
went on to sweep Kingsway
Academy to win the title.

After getting knocked out
in the playoffs, coach Greg

Burrows is hoping that this
would be the year that the big
Red Machines would regain
their title.

But he admitted that they
didn’t play up to par penne St
Andrew’s.

“They gave us all of our
runs and we gave them all of
theirs,” Burrows pointed out.
“T don’t know. I still think we
have a chance. We didn’t look
good today.

’ “But I had a good little talk
with them and I expect that
we will play like we did in our
first two games.”

Despite their lackluster per-
formance, Byron Ferguson

helped his own cause with -

three unearned runs after he
walked twice and added a
fielder’s choice to lead SAC.
Diego Hutchinson had an
RBI single, scoring a run and
Ricardo Stubbs singled and
scored a run as well for all of
SAC’s offensive Poa

Ferguson, who played a piv-
otal role as the pitcher for St
Augustine’s junior boys team,
said it was just a tough pill to
swallow.

“We came out in the first
couple of innings and played
pretty good,” he said. “Then
we just fell apart, the whole

~ team.”

If the Big Red Machines are
going to get back on track,
Ferguson said he will have to
step up his game and help to
develop the confidence in his
team-mates and they should
be able to do it.

Also yesterday at St
Andrew’s, the St Anne’s Blue-
waves knocked off the Nas-
sau Christian Academy Cru-
saders 8-3. Dominique Collie
picked up the win over P
Nathan.

Angelo Butler had three
hits, scoring three runs, and
Kirk Stubbs added two hits
with three RBIs in the win.

At

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2008

ROYAL DFIDELITY



Money at Work

NASSAU OFFICE
(242) 356-9801

FREEPORT OFFICE
(242) 351-3010

Baha Mar Real estate project now 70% sold-out

flownsizes
Development
Company

* Second wave of
redundancies to come;
numbers not specified

* Move designed, to
eliminate ‘duplication’
with future
construction partner

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

BAHA Mar_ yesterday
announced more job losses at
its 60-strong Development
’ Company, a senior executive
yesterday telling Tribune Busi-
ness that the developer was
going “to reduce that unit sig-
nificantly” to avoid “duplica-

tion” with a future construction

_company partner.

Although unable to provide a
specific figure for the number
of job losses anticipated, Robert
Sands, Baha Mar’s senior vice-
president for administration and
external affairs, said: “It’s a re-
engineering of that department,
which will result in a much
smaller Development Compa-
ny.

“Tt will allow the smaller team
to work alongside the construc-
tion organisation partner we
hope to see in the near future.
We don’t want to duplicate

- effort.”

Mr Sands said Baha Mar
“Development Company, which
is a separate unit from Baha
Mar Resorts, the operator of
the Sheraton and Wyndham
resorts, plus the Crystal Palace
casino, has “close to 60 staff at
the moment”.

Many of them will be highly-
qualified Bahamian and expa-
triate architects, engineers and

SEE page 4B



m@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter



he Fortune Hills
gated community

now under con- |

struction on Blue

Hill Road has
seemingly bucked negative eco-
nomic trends by selling 70 per
cent of its units, with the devel-
opers confident that the
remaining real estate will be
sold by year’s end.

Deyvon Jones, vice-president
of Jones Construction - the
developers - said that since the
company launched Fortune
Hills six months ago, ‘it had
received tremendous interest
in the three-acre property from
potential buyers. With impres-
sive views across New Provi-
dence, the $7-$8 million pro-
ject will feature a combination
of condos and town hofnes, as
well as a swimming pool and
playground area.

Speaking.to Tribune Busi-
ness at Saturday’s open house,
Mr Jones said the first phase

features two buildings - one —

with nine residences and one
with six.

Once sales are finalised, the
builders only require 60 days
to complete the interiors for
occupancy: Another building
will feature two three-storey
town homes, and although con-
struction will not begin for two
weeks, the buildings are already
fully sold.

“We are on schedule to have

Cable eyes |
telecoms |
licences

* PM’s one-year
cellular monopoly
for BTC post-
privatisation marks
‘seismic shift’ in
telecoms sector
* Government opts |
for liberalisation
over purchase price,
encouraging
competition







@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Business Editor

CABLE Bahamas’ presi-
dent made no secret last
night of the company’s
intentions to move into cel-
lular and fixed-line tele-
coms services, after Prime
Minister Hubert Ingraham
stunned the industry by
announcing that the

SEE E page 5B 5B



* $7-$8m Fortune Hills development bucks economic trends by not relying on pre- “ales
* First phase likely completed by February 2009, with whole development possibly finished by August next year
* Gated community a price point ($249,000-$279,000) ‘that the Bahamas is starved for’

im OUTSIDE view of mo Fortune Hills development te Hill Road...

this first phase completed by
February 2009. Of the units
that we are building now, which
is 17 units, 11 are sold,” Mr
Jones told Tribune Business.

“Our intent is to be out of
this development and have it
sold out within the year, then
build out. In fact, hopefully we
can finish today. If we can get it
sold out by the end of the year,
by August [2009] everything
will be done.”

He added that one factor aid-
ing the developers was that
they have a product in the
ground, so people can actually
see what is being offered. “It’s
not like some projects where



they have a lot of drawings, but
nothing concrete,” Mr Jones
said

He added that Jones Con-
struction secured its project
financing before construction
began, which ensured they
were able to remain on target
with timelines.

Mr Jones said many real
estate projects were dependent
on pre-sales to fund their build-
out, and when the economy
had challenges it negatively
impacted their timelines, affect-
ing consumers’ confidence in
the investment.

Mindful of the current eco-
nomic climate, Mr Jones said

the developers had tried to be
cost effective in building the
property and providing clients
with value for money.

The development has attract-
ed a variety of prospective
homeowners, from young first-
time buyers to older investors
and some foreign investors,

“That has been very encour-
aging for us,” Mr Jones said,
and the developers have pro-
vided homeowners with details
sought on large closets, hard
wood floors, granite counter-
tops and extra storage space.

“These are little things and
attention to details that people
are excited about,” he added.

Zack Bonczek, sales man-
ager for Paradise Real Estate,
which is the property’s exclu-
sive listing agent, explained why
he thinks Fortune Hills has-had
the success it has enjoyed.

“In the Bahamas and in Nas-
sau, gated communities have
become very popular because
people like the security and
safety of a closed environ-
ment,” Mr Bonczek said.

He added that properties in
gated communities tend to
appreciate and hold in value at
a much quicker rate.

“What we're selling here is
an investment opportunity and
a lifestyle,’ Mr Bonczek said.
“The location is interesting. Ini-

tially, I was a bit hesitant, and
then when I had my first site
visit I realised the location pre-
sents an interesting opportuni-
ty and one that we embraced
as soon as we finished our first
visit.”

Mr Bonczek said Fortune
Hills’ location, which is really in
the city centre, was convenient
for downtown Nassau, the air-
port, malls, gas stations, gro-
cery stores and the western end
of the island.

“Every amenity is here. You
have a controlled environment
and you're at the top of the hill,
so now you’re getting views
that most people have not seen
before,” Mr Bonczek said.

“This is a price point
($249,000-$279,000) that the
Bahamas ‘is starved for. We
have lots of first-time home-
owners who are looking for
something to buy and can’t find
anything, because there is noth-
ing to buy and everything that
there is to buy is old and needs
renovation.

“Not everyone has $300,000
lying around, so for those who
appreciate their dollars, you can
get something new, with granite
countertops and hardwood
floors, brand new modern con-
struction, or buy something that

. is old and you have to main-

tain for the rest of your life.” ©

| Credit crunch fears on BTC privatisation 4

i By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

TELECOMS industry execu-
tives and analysts yesterday
questioned whether the global
credit/liquidity crunch would
make the Bahamas Telecom-
munications Company’s (BTC)
sale possible due to the diffi-
culties any buyer would have in
raising debt financing, although
the Government’s privatisation
committee chair said he did not
anticipate any impact.

T. B. Donaldson, who is also
Commonwealth Bank’s chair-
man, said that while the latest

Privatise committee chair sees no impact, but
analysts and telecoms industry insiders unsure

Wall Street financial meltdown
might have impacted BTC’s pri-
vatisation if a deal had already
been reached and a buyer was
still seeking debt financing to
close in the next one to two
months, the committee was
working to a longer timescale.

“From a personal perspec-
tive, I don’t see this affecting
the sale of BTC at all,” Mr
Donaldson told Tribune Busi-

ness, adding that large compa-
nies with deep pockets and cap-
ital bases would not be deterred
from buying into the state-
owned Bahamian telecoms
provider.

The privatisation committee
chairman added that it was
some “three months away from
looking at a deal”, and that it
was “six weeks” before inter-
ested parties were likely to

lodge bids for a 51 per cent
stake in BTC.

Where that leaves Bluewater
Communications Holdings, the
group that agreed a $260 mil-
lion deal in principle to pur-
chase a 49 per cent BTC stake
with the former,Christie admin-
istration, is anyone’s guess.

Mr Donaldson declined to

SEE page 4B

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PAGE 2B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE





Lessons that must be learnt
from US financial ‘meltdown’

LAST week, I wrote about
the-then quickly evolving US
Department of Treasury bailout
program to restore confidence
to the US (and global capital)
markets. As the week pro-
gressed, it appeared as though
Treasury Secretary Henry Paul-
son, with the support of Ben
Bernanke, chairman of the Fed-
eral Reserve (the US Central
Bank) produced a three-page
memoranda, the contents of
which represented a plan to
bailout financial institutions and
presumably stabilise the US and
global economy. Further, Con-
gress was being asked to give
quick bipartisan approval to this
plan.

In that column, I said: “While
the ‘fix’ seems relatively
straightforward, the question is:

‘Who pays the $700 billion
bill?” The only patently clear
thing about the proposed
bailout was that the taxpayer
would pick up the tab.

Questions

The initial proposal was to
give the Treasury Department
total control over this vast sum
of taxpayer funds, in order to
‘save the financial system’.
Treasury Secretary Paulson is
a former Wall Street titan who
ran Goldman Sachs prior to tak-
ing on ‘national service’ by
accepting the job.

So far, so good... however,
once basic and fundamental
questions began to be asked,
the initial impetus behind the
bailout slowed. Clearly, details
had to be worked out and com-





Financial
Focus

By Larry Gibson



promises reached. There were
no initial satisfactory answers
to:

* Who oversees the spending
of the $700 billion?

* What are the precise details
of the bailout?

* Who gets bailed out?

* How much, if any, of the
money will be used to provide
relief to those (everyday citi-
zens) in foreclosure?

To keep this all in perspec-
tive, $700 billion in taxpayers’

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funds is equivalent to $10,000
for every US household.

Should taxpayer funds be

used to bail out ‘Wall Street’,
where the size of ‘golden para-
chutes’ and annual bonuses has
become absolutely obscene to
the extent that they are offen-
sive to our sensibilities? This is
the problem members of Con-
gress find themselves grappling
with, knowing they will have to
face their constituents when
seeking re-election.

Further fallout

Talks slowed and the market
became nervous once again and
then... the Bush administration
and Congress anxiously revived
negotiations on the $700 billion
financial bailout on Friday, one
day after the largest bank col-
lapse (Washington Mutual) in
US history provided a brutal
reminder of the risks of failure.
Washington Mutual had $307
billion in assets, more than
43,000 employees and some
2,300 branches. But its down-
fall was its $227 billion in mort-
gage loans, many of which fell
into the sub-prime category.

Following up on the point
made above about excessive
chief executive golden para-
chutes, CNN reported that
Washington Mutual chief exec-
utive Alan Fishman could walk
away with more than $18 mil-
lion in salary, bonuses and sev-
erance pay after less than three
weeks on the job via the terms
of his employment agreement.

Now you can see why there is
so much pressure to ensure that
none of the taxpayers’ $700 bil-
lion goes to pay such settle-
ments. Is this obscene or what?

i

The theory

The legislation that the Bush
administration is promoting
would allow the US government
to buy bad mortgages and other
impaired assets held by
investors, most of them financial
companies.

The theory is that such sales
would nrevide liquidity to these
financial companies, thus
enabling them to continue lend-
ing and lift a major weight off a
US economy that is already
sputtering.

However, a significant num-
ber of lawmakers, including
many Republicans, are against
such heavy government inter-
vention.

For instance, the opposing
Republicans are proposing that
the government insure the dis-
tressed securities rather than
buy them, and provide addi-
tional tax breaks to give busi-
ness an incentive to invest.

The compromise

Early Sunday morning, the
US House of Representatives
Speaker, Nancy Pelosi,
announced that a compromise
had been reached between the
negotiating parties. The com-
promise was subject to being
‘committed to paper’ for formal
passage on Monday or Tuesday
of this week.

Under the tentative deal,
which when passed will be
known as the *Emergency Eco-
nomic Stabilisation Act 2008”,
contains the following changes
from the original Paulson pro-
posal:

* The rescue programme will
be overseen by the Financial
Stability Oversight Board, con-

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sisting of the chairman of the
Federal Reserve, the secretary
of treasury, the director of the
Federal Home Finance Agency,
the chairman of the Securities
and Exchange Commission, and
the secretary of Housing and
Urban Development

* The $700 billion would be
disbursed in stages, with $250
billion made available immedi-
ately

* The Treasury would estab-
lish an insurance programme -
with premiums paid by the
industry - to mitigate taxpayer
losses

* The bill would also proba-
bly include some curbs on the
compensation of executives at
companies that participate

* The US government would
get the right to receive equity
stakes in companies rescued
under this plan. The measure is
an attempt to reduce fiscal risk
to taxpayers.

Critical lessons

What are the critical lessons
to be learnt from this whole
episode?

Firstly, without a doubt, this
situation is very serious. If noth-
ing is done, credit and liquidity
in the entire financial system
dries up. If there is no credit in
the system, then there will be a
‘financial meltdown’. If there is
a financial meltdown, the ulti-
mate consequences could be
beyond comprehension. There-
fore, it is a precondition of any
resolution that we take steps to
ensure that the mess the system
currently finds itself in is never
repeated.

Second, it shows that in times
of crisis, a bipartisan approach
to solving national issues is in
the best interest of all. The addi-
tions to the original proposal,
as outlined above, clearly
enhance the overall rescue plan
and put in needed checks and
balances.

Achieving a bipartisan solu-

tion does not mean you have to
- capitulate to the position of the

party with the majority position

either.

The Democrats held to posi-
tions which were incorporated
and so, too, did the Republi-
cans insist upon provisions in |
opposition to those proposed
by the President. Bipartisanship
deepens democracy.

Third, we must continually
examine the role of regulation
in society. Strangling levels of
government regulation is not
the answer...neither is complete
deregulation the answer, as
advocated by many ‘free mar-
ket’ pundits.

There is no substitute for
strong, balanced and fair regu-
lation, which is overseen by
competent regulators who
understand the business they
are regulating.

Ultimate question

Finally, the ultimate question:
“Will this plan work?” By the
time you actually read this col-
umn, the market would have
had one trading session in the
US and two in Asia. Hopefully,
by then we would be in posi-
tion to render an opinion. Let’s
keep our fingers crossed.

Until next week...

Postscript

The financial markets reacted
sharply to the House of Repre-
sentatives’ vote against approv-
ing the Bush:administration’s
$700 billion bailout plan. The
Dow Jones Industrial Average
lost seven per cent of its value,
and the S&P 500 index eight
per cent. These events empha-
sise the vulnerability of the US
financial system, and heighten

- the real prospect of a major

meltdown.

Two major bank mergers,
also unveiled yesterday, could
be placed in jeopardy by the
House vote, and the effects will -
ripple around the world -
including in the Bahamas.

NB: Larry R. Gibson, a Char-
tered Financial Analyst, i is vice-
president - pensions, Colonial
Pensions Services (Bahamas),
a wholly-owned subsidiary of
Colonial Group International,
which owns Atlantic Medical
Insurance and is a major share-
holder of Security & General
Insurance Company in the
Bahamas,

The views expressed are those
of the author and do not neces-
sarily represent those of Colo-
nial Group International or
any of its subsidiary and/or
affiliated companies, Please
direct any questions or com-
ments to rlgibson@atlantic-
house.com.bs
THE TRIBUNE



Abaco heads the
approval ratings

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL
Business Reporter

ABACO has the highest
approval ratings in the coun-
try, attracting a 98 per cent
ranking from persons likely to
recommend the destination to
their friends.

Giving an update on the
island’s impact on tourism,
Frank Comito, executive vice-
president of the Bahamas
Hotel Association, explained
‘that Abaco visitors tend to be
more affluent, stay longer,
spend more money and visit
more frequently. He was one
of the presenters at the Abaco
Business Outllok conference.

Mr Comito said Abaco’s
second home market had

. brought an “explosion of

investors to the island”. Its
average stay was 19 nights per
person for yachters. Persons
who came by private air and
commercial plane stayed for
two and three nights above
the national average.

Mr Comitio said Abaco’s
competive edge can be attrib-
uted to the fact that it has a
diverse culture, is a multi-
island destination, has a pool
of expatriate talents locals can
draw from and a diverse visi-
tor base. .

While the island consistent-
ly scores well on exit surveys,
Mr Comitio said the negative
comments are also consistent
and are areas where there
needs to be improvement.

For instance, he said con-

cerns ranged from the amount
of garbage and litter on the
streets, to the level of crime:
and to the high cost of beer.

Mr Comito said other com-
plaints included the vast num-
ber of stray dogs, plus the
indifferent and rude attitudes
of employees.

Persons also complained
about the consistency of
restaurants and stores being
open, and whether the estab-
lishments ensured that the

‘items offered on the menu

were actually available.

“There is a challenge for
consistency and we need to be
consistent,” Mr Comito said.
“There is nothing in these neg-
ative comments that cannot
be corrected or improved
upon.”

Investors still keen
on airport finance

@ By CARA BRENNEN-
BETHEL ‘
Business Reporter

DESPITE the current eco-
nomic climate, there are still

potential investors interested in |

investing in the Lynden Pindling
International Airport’s recon-
struction, the Nassau Airport
Development Company’s chief
executive told the Abaco Busi-
ness Putlook Conference.
' Craig Richmond said that
while this was a difficult time
to secure funding for major pro-
jects, “there are still persons
interested in airports”.

During a short talk to con-
ference attendants, Mr Rich-
mond gave an update on the

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feedback NAD has had since it
undertook major works to
upgrade the airport.

He said the Lynden Pindling
International Airport had
received the highest approval
ratings jump for washroom
improvements he has ever seen,
noting that those enhancements
probably have made the most
significant impact for passen-
gers.

Mr Richmond said the air-
port received an improvement
rating of 3.8, up from 3.104,
which highlighted just how sig-
nificant the conditions of the
washrooms were to passengers.

“That is the largest single
jump I have ever seen,” he said.
Mr Richmond said that further

improvements, such as the new
retail spaces and flight moni-
tors, have also improved the

quality of the experience for

passengers.

Mr Richmond said that while
NAD was satisfied with the
curb-side changes it imple-
mented, it has taken Bahami-
ans a while to get accustomed to
them.

“I think that for the first six
months, we were towing about
100 cars a week,” he said.

He added that at present,
NAD has five directors and 120
staff. He vowed that within the
next four to five years, three to
five of the company’s top posi-
tions should be taken by
Bahamians.

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 3B

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REWARD

A reward is being offered for information leading
to the recovery of and/or the arrest of the persons



_ responsible for the theft of a 2008 Toyota Yaris;

which occurred around August 13, 2008 in Redland
Acres, off Soldier Road

Colour: Olive Green

Serial #: JT DBW93320-1105523

License #: 201820 7
Identifying Markings ‘Apple’? on front. wind-
shield, ‘“‘Appleseed”’ on rear windshield, a scratch
on left rear fender and dent on rear bumper.

Please call CDU, Stolen Vehicles Unit 502-9938,
502-9942, 302-3900 or 357-7502.





SUC) e10K0 N 9007

ee ee ee ee

ee

ee ee eS

56.4 2, me ©

Sty iy Soy
PAGE 4B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



aT Ee a
Baha Mar downsizes Development Company

FROM page 1B

other construction related per-
sonnel, and their release will
provide another blow - at least
in the short-term - to an
already-struggling economy.

Baha Mar Development
Company was set up to over-
see the mobilisation, planning
and construction for Baha
Mar’s $2.4 billion Cable Beach
expansion, which was thrown
into ‘limbo’ earlier this year
after Harrah’s Entertainment
withdrew as its 43 per cent equi-
ty and casino partner.

As a result, the need for the
Development Company has
been diminished in the short-

term. “A number of persons
will be affected,” Mr Sands said,
although he could not give num-
bers. “We’re going to reduce
the unit significantly. We're
going to have a much smaller
department.”

The downsizing, he added,
had begun “this week, starting
today. This is at a stage where a
decision to reduce has been
made, and we are going through
the process of restructuring”.

Mr Sands added, though, that
Baha Mar still remained com-
mitted to realising its vision for
Cable Beach, and the issues sur-
rounding its Development
Company subsidiary were “sim-
ply a change in strategy and a

reorganisation”.

One possible factor behind
the restructuring, although this
has not been substantiated,
could be the demands of a con-
struction company partner,
especially a Chinese partner.

Chinese construction compa-
nies are well-known for seek-
ing a high level of control over
any project they are involved
with, as per the proposed $30
million National Stadium. And
some of Baha Mar’s most fruit-
ful talks in its search for a new
partner have been with state-
owned Chinese companies.

Mr Sands indicated to Tri-
bune Business just last wee
that Baha Mar’s talks with

several Chinese state-owned
institutions appear currently
to be its best bet for finding a
new equity partner to replace
Harrah’s Entertainment.

“We continue to have open
dialogue with investors from
China, and will continue to
explore that going forward,”
Mr Sands said. “These talks,
from that time, have been the
ones that have been more
encouraging.

“The talks have been going
forward and will continue.
The key is that we’ve had mul-
tiple meetings with them and
they continue.”

The three Chinese institu-

Credit crunch fears on BTC privatisation







crimminal litigation

Nassau, Bahamas

(242)

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Abaco Markets

Benchmark
Bahamas Waste
Fidelity Bank
Cable Bahamas
Colina Holdings

Doctor's Hospital
Famguard
Finco

Focol (S)

ICD Utilitles
J. S. Joh



1000.00
1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity
Fidelity.





14.25
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on or before October 6, 2008

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salary and benefits package:

Interested candidates should
forward a copy of their resume
by October 3, 2008 to: Human
Resources, P.O. Box N-1576,

Bahamas Property Fund
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Commonwealth Bank (S1)
Consolidated Water BDORs

FirstCaribbean Bank

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FROM page 1B

discuss whether Bluewater had
any time left on its exclusivity
period, or the state of negotia-
tions between the committee
and the group, whose principals
include former Time Warner,
NTL and Sprint executives.
The abiding impression is that
the Government is less than

keen on the Bluewater offer, as.

Tribune Business has repeated-
ly stated, and would like to

open up the privatisation
process to other bidders to see
whether better offers may be
out there.

Referring to industry ‘giants’,
Mr Donaldson said that “people
nibbling at the edges we sus-
pect are giants”, indicating that
the BTC privatisation commit-
tee has received multiple
expressions of interest from
established global telecoms
players.

He confirmed this later in the
interview with Tribune Busi-
ness, saying that there were



PW. OAK
& s
\ S s

Treasury Head

ROLE RESPONSIBILITIES
Reporting to our Regional Treasury team,
responsible for developing and implementing strategies for
liability products.
responsibilities include marketing and quoting rates for corporate
foreign exchange contracts, money market instruments and
derivative products and projecting liquidity and rate trends. The
role, is also focused on risk management through monitoring
liquidity and foreign exposure, ensuring compliance with legal,
regulatory, and internal policy requirements, and, managing ratios
and reserves. Additional responsibilities include overseeing all
regulatory and management performance
reporting, and, supervising and training support staff.

currency

KNOWLEDGE/ SKILLS REQUIRED

Candidates must possess a Bachelor's degree in Economics,
Accounting or Finance, and, a minimum of 5 years Treasury
experience with a major commercial. and/or investment bank; a
Chartered Accountant or CFA designation preferred. Excellent —
communication, and interpersonal
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relationships, will round out the ideal candidate. Some travel is

Challenge

Cc rFA





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MARKETS
Eeaeenee & ADVISORY SERVICES

edme + 175% 19 October, 2022
%



the position is

Key

October, 2017




May, 2013

2.05%
7.80%
oO 00%.



9.0
13.4

6.70%

}. 900 6.16%

tions involved are the China
Export-Import Bank, China
State Construction and the
Bank of China, but Mr Sands
said it was premature to spec-
ulate on when the talks might
be concluded and timelines
for when things might happen.
Sovereign wealth funds, and
the Asian and Middle East-
ern regions, appear to be the
most ripe in Baha Mar’s
search for new partners. These
areas are currently the best
source of new equity capital,
and the Cable Beach devel-
oper has appointed UBS to
advise it on its options.
When asked whether Baha

“people out there who are inter-
ested” who would be classified
as “major players”.

Adding that the privatisation

* committee would conduct due

diligence on BTC bidders to dis-
cover whether they had the nec-
essary financing in place, with
the process requiring that fund-
ing sources be disclosed, Mr
Donaldson said: “By the end of
the year, we should have a rec-
ommendation into the Govern-
ment.

“They'll have some advice
from us before or by the end of
the year. We’re going all-out.
This is like a full-time job.”

Yet several persons ques-
tioned yesterday whether the
global credit crunch, and cur-
rent difficulties in obtaining
debt financing, were likely to
impact the Government’s
attempts to privatise BTC.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive, told
Tribune Business: “One of the
things that is increasingly inter-

Mar was concerned that it
would be unable to find a new
partner before March 2009,
the date when the Treasury
and Crown Lands conveyed
to it would revert back to the
Government if no develop-
ment was happening, Mr
Sands said: “The reality is that
there have been significant
world events that have impact-
ed the timelines of our econo-
my, and all these matters will
be reviewed in due course.

“The most important issue
is that the commitment to the
project is still there, we still
want to move ahead and con-
tinue in that vein.”

esting about this, is in this kind
of global environment, who has
the money to put behind BTC.
Where is this money coming
from?”

His sentiments were echoed
by Paul Hutton-Ashkenny,
president of Systems Resource
Group (SRG) and its IndiGo
Networks subsidiary, which is
BTC’s only legal fixed-line com-

‘petitor, who questioned: “How

saleable is BTC right now?”
He told Tribune Business:
“With all that’s happening in
the world markets, is it viable
for someone to buy BTC? If
someone’s going to come along,
open their pockets and offer an

- all-cash deal it will be fine, but

otherwise where’s:the debt
financing going to come from?

“This seems to me to be the
big question. Has the door
closed on the window [of oppor-
tunity] for any divestment of
BTC, or is the Government
going to have to wait for the
markets to stabilise?”

NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that WISLY LAZARD of
GAMBLE HEIGHTS, NASSAU, BAHAMAS is applying
to the Minister responsible for Nationality and Citizenship,
for registration/naturalization as a citizen of The Bahamas,
and that any person who knows any reason why
registration/ naturalization should not be granted, should
send a written and signed statement of the facts within
twenty-eight days from the 23RD day of SEPTEMBER
2008 to the Minister responsible for Nationality and
Citizenship, P-O.Box N- 7147, Nassau, Bahamas.

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
COMPANIES ACT
(No. 46 of 2000)

ALL LOGISTICS INTERNATIONAL LIMITED.

PURSUANT TO SECTION 138 (8) OF
THE INTERNATIQNAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

Notice is hereby given in accordance with Section 138(8)
of the International Business Companies Act, 2000,
the dissolution of ALL LOGISTICS INTERNATIONAL
LIMITED. has been completed; a Certificate of Dissolution
has been issued and the company has therefore been
struck off the Register.

Sérgio Messias Pedreiro
(Liquidator)











































we wykNS, Holdings . : x 102. 0.00%, =o NU PRR AN RB ey: Se
4 Ws 9 fd WV VRunde AY SAM
S2wk-Hl | S2wk-Low Fund Name NAV YTD% Last 12 Months Divs Yleld% NAV Date
1.3320 1.2652 Colina Bond Fund 1.3320 3.09% 5.27% 31-Jul-08
3.0250 2.8869 Colina MSI Preferred Fund 3.0250 0.81% 4.7B% 31-Aug-08 Z “ge ; . AT
1.4119 1.3544 Colina Money Market Fund 1.4137 2.81% 4.21% 19-Sep-08 DISC D g Y 10 9 UN ‘OOF
3.7969 3.3971 Fidelity Bahamas G & | Fund 3.5807 -5.70% 6.40% 31-Aug-08 ie! ‘i AES ena atN ee ~ %
12.3870 11.7116 Fidelity Prime Income Fund 12.3870 3.80% 6.77% 31-Aug-08

100.0000

100.0000 100.0000 CFAL Global Bond Fund 31-Dec-07

























100.9600 99.9566 CFAL Global Equity Fund 100.9600 1.01% 1.01% 30-Jun-08
41.0000 1.0000 CFAL High Grade Bond Fund ; 31-Dec-07 POWER EVERYTHING
10.5000 9.4075 Fidelity International Investment Fund -10.40% 31-Aug-08 ABN ERE RL Ae
FG Financial Preferred Income Fund 1.84% 29-Aug-08
FG Financial Growth Fund 1.12% 29-Aug-08
AST 29628 aot 29-Aug-08



lal Olversified



divided by closing pric
1 Fidelity

cd fictolity
© dally volume et Price -\ or price
Jaily volume




$28,500.00

CALL 424 0352

1 > earnings per share for the last 12 mths
Dally Vol

biv S-Di
P/E - Closing

Idelity Bahamas Stock Index. January 1, 1994 = 100

19 8/8/2007 jue = $1000.00

7IVVI2007








SENIAL. BAAABOREF BAG CO
|

JHE |HIBUNG

IUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 5b





Cable Bahamas
eyes telecoms

—

be et

we

j



licences

FROM page 1B

Bahamas Telecommunications
Company (BTC) would only
enjoy a maximum one-year cel-
lular monopoly post-privatisa-
tion.

Anthony Butler, when asked
by Tribune Business whether
Cable Bahamas was interested
in obtaining cellular and fixed-
line telecoms licences once BTC
was privatised, replied: “Very
much so.”

He added: “We have invested
heavily in a state-of-the-art
telecommunications network in
the anticipation that we can
benefit from the business in the
future. That can only be good
for the employees and stake-
holders of Cable Bahamas.”

Pointing out that “technology
is driving the convergence of
services” in telecoms, provid-
ing the base for companies to
bundle video, data and voice
services and deliver their ‘triple
play’ down one line, Mr Butler
said: “It should be one licence
that covers all aspects of
telecommunications.”

He was responding after a
day in which.a seismic shift
appeared to take place with
regard to the Government’s pri-
orities regarding the Bahamas
Telecommunications Company
(BTC) and the wider telecoms
industry.

Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham, in announcing to the
House of Assembly that “the
Government proposes at a max-
imum to permit a monopoly to
exist for cellular service for one
year following the sale of the
majority of BTC”, indicated
that liberalisation and deregu-
Yation - andthe competition,
lower prices and enhanced ser-

vice that should bring - was now ~

the key focus.

That marks a major change
from its predecessors, as the
Christie government seemed
more interested in protecting
BTC from competition and
maximising its purchase price.

Mr Ingraham said: “I might
say the following; that the Gov-
ernment proposes to dispose of
51 per cent of BTC and retain
ownership of 49 per cent.

“Secondly, the Government |

proposes that on the sale of
BTC, it would immediately lib-
eralise fixed telephone lines and
there would be permitted com-
petition in that sector.
“Thirdly, the Government
proposes at a maximum to per-
mit a monopoly to exist for cel-
lular service for one year fol-
lowing the sale of the majority
of BTC. We are seeking to lib-
eralise the telephone sector of
the Bahamas in the shortest
possible time, with the full
knowledge that we are behind
everybody else in our region.”
Paul Hutton-Ashkenny, pres-
ident of BTC’s sole legal fixed-
line telecoms competitor, Indi-
Go Networks, told Tribune
Business that the “maximum
one year” cellular monopoly
that BTC would enjoy post-pri-
vatisation was “quite a dramat-

} ic announcement”.

This contrasted with the

+ Prime Minister’s previous

announcement that three years
would be the “outside” maxi-
mum exclusivity any BTC pur-
chaser would enjoy in terms of
cellular service.

“The sands have shifted, and
if the position of the Govern-
ment is that it’s going to be one
year maximum, that’s a signifi-

cant shift,” Mr Hutton-Ashken-

ny told Tribune Business.
He acknowledged that he
would be “very happy to have a

; cellular licence”, pointing, out

that IndiGo Networks licence,
and that of its parent, Systems

Resource Group (SRG), specif-.

ically prohibited it from offering

INSIGHT

For the stories

oleate Mint Male\ ee
i-Â¥-lo Mp Ly[e/i)s
on Mondays



cellular or cable TV services.

Digicel, Mr Hutton-Ashken-
ny said, was another likely
entrant to the Bahamian tele-
coms market on the cellular
side, given its deep pockets and
regional infrastructure.

Yet the Government’s deci-
sion to reduce BTC’s post-pri-
vatisation cellular monopoly to
a maximum of one year is also
likely to lower the price any bid-
der will want to pay for a 49 per
cent BTC stake.

This is because BTC derives
almost two-thirds of its rev-
enues from its cellular service,
and the earlier competition is
introduced, the less time a buy-
er will have to transform the
company and get it ready for
competition. As a result, they
will want to pay a lower price
for their BTC stake.

Kenwood Kerr, Providence
Advisors’ chief executive,
explained that a major question
was how long a BTC purchaser
would need to make the com-
pany competitive, “regain some
of their investment capital and
generate a return on their
investment capital”.

“IT don’t know if that window
of one year for cell phones is
sufficient,” Mr Kerr said. “But
for the market and consumer,
that announcement is very pos-
itive. For the consumption of
telecoms services, it’s been a
long time coming.

“Choice should bring better
service and competitive pricing,
plus market efficiency. All boats
will be lifted by a rising tide,
because everyone’s got to com-
pete. Everyone has got to pull
their socks up because there’s
no sole provider. BTC got its
customers by default.”

Mr Kerr said the Govern-
ment could use the proceeds
from selling a 49 per cent BTC
stake to either pay down debt,
develop infrastructure or deliv-
er on its economic and social
agenda.

In addition, telecoms compe-
tition was likely to create extra
jobs.

However, Mr Hutton-
Ashkenny described as a “moot
point” the Government’s move
to liberalise fixed-line telecoms
as soon as privatisation was
completed, because through his
company and the likes of Von-
age and Skype, it was already
liberalised.

“The rates have come down

so significantly already that to
all intents and purposes it’s a
liberalised market,” he
explained. “Both we and BTC
offer VoIP packages that are
pretty much on par with Von-
age for international long dis-
tance calls, with packages
around $20 per month. There’s
probably not a lot of room for
prices to fall further.”

Mr Ingraham advised the
House of Assembly yesterday
that it was still the Govern-
ment’s intention to privatise
BTC by the end of the year.

However, whether or not the
Government makes this date is
a matter that is being ques-
tioned, Mr Ingraham said.

I EG A I NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)

T.M. PEELL INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of T.M. PEELLINC. has been completed, a Certificate of Disso-
lution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 19th

day of September, 2008.



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LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
STAMFORD TEXTILE LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of STAMFORD TEXTILE LIMITED has been completed, a
Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 19th day of September, 2008.



NOTICE

_ INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
ARISTAN INC.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of ARISTAN INC. has been completed, a Certificate of Dissolu-
tion has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 19th
day of September, 2008.



LEGAL NOTICE

NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
ACTON ENERGY LIMITED

Notice is hereby given that in’accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of ACTON ENERGY LIMITED has been completed, a Certifi-
cate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has therefore
been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution

was the 19th day of September, 2008. |



NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
GUADIX CORP.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of the
International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dissolu-
tion of GUADIX CORP. has been completed, a Certificate of Disso-
lution has been issued and the Company has therefore been struck off
the Register. The date of completion of the dissolution was the 19th
day of September, 2008.



LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS COMPANIES ACT

(No.45 of 2000)
BUXTON HI TECH (ASIA) LTD.

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with Section 137 (8) of
the International Business Companies Act, No. 45 of 2000, the Dis-
solution of BUXTON HI TECH (ASIA) LTD. has been completed,

a Certificate of Dissolution has been issued and the Company has
therefore been struck off the Register. The date of completion of the
dissolution was the 19th day of September, 2008.


PAGE, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



- Tribune Comics

Ss

JUDGE PARKER

THESE ARE SOME OF
DEWEY'S GUNS..- THERE'S
MORE SCATTEREP AROUND

THE HOUSE!

ian

ey AS
Sy


















YOU KNOW, YOU'RE THE FIRST
PLUMBER I'VE HIRED WHO DOESN'T
MIND A FEW SUGGESTIONS NOW

reserved




© 2008 by King Features Syndicate, Inc. World Rights





ACCORDING TO OUR
PERSONALITY PROFILES,
WE HAVE NOTHING IN

JUST NOT



THERE'RE THREE OF US AND
I HAVE FOUR VONUTS,
\T WONT VIVIVE..-

A

We
tC

HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
SHAME ON YOU, SNERT/

CHES BROWNE

©2008 by King Feature:





Across
1 Right-handed key (6,4) .
6 Pretty loud music (4)

©












Across: 1 Doubles, 5 Exact, 8
Stimulant, 9 Eva, 10 Sack, 12 Turned
up, 14 Castor, 15 Severe, 17
Unamused, 18 Stop, 21 Leo, 22
Gladstone, 24 Ditty, 25 Theatre.
Down: 1 Doses, 2 Uri, 3 Lour, 4
Statue, 5 Extended, 6 Amendment, 7
Trample, 11 Cast about, 13 Go hun-
gry, 14 Coupled, 16 Depart, 19 Piece,
20 Isle, 23 Out.








SEE? WE'RE



MY PROBATION OFFICER |
SAYS IT'S IMPORTANT THAT




MEANT TO BE
TOGETHER /

SO NLL HAVE
To EAT THE
EXTRA ONE!

CRYPTIC PUZZLE

2

3

Yesterday’s Cryptic Solution

T
R
I : 10 ‘Tie up in a bundle of straw
B (5) 4
11 Weapons that don’t reach
U _ very far? (5,4) 5
12 Polo man breaks in one
N horse (8) 7
E 13 There may be a catch in it
(5) 8
, 15 Struck by Cupid’s dart? (7)
17 Unusual portion of toasted 9
T cheese (7)
W 19 Overlooks wild regions (7) 14
21 Convivial salutation (7)
O 22 Where the retired gardener
may be found working? 16
- (2,3)
24 Bail Anna out of a
I European republic (8) 18
N 27 Cast gets left in desert
(5,4) 20
ile 28 Guarantee a number will
get an indication of pain (5) 21
O 29 Says something further
and sums up (4) 23
N 30 Real idiots may produce
E opinionated articles (10) 25
Down
1 Drinks for infants (4) 26
Cc
R
O
S
S
W
O
R
D




tioned off (9)

NoO..-I
HATE GUNS!





YES, DEAR.
IT’S SERIOUS.

©2008 by North America Syndicate, Inc. World rights reserved

, 1WORK ON MY
( SELF-CONTROL

VU ily CAN'T You Be ToveH
ie LIKE THAT 2062

Work of masters is auc-

Look around a ship for a
rope (5)

When marked down it's not
cheap (7)

Yet delight gives some
men a mournful look (7)
Possibly eager to approve
a proposal (5)

A proposition shows deter-
mination (10)

Choice way to take suste-
nance (1,2,5)

It's as rapid a variety as a
house plant enthusiast may
desire (10)

What to do with an invita-
tion if you don’t wish to turn
up? (4,4)

With radar, Cuba may find
big fish (9)

About five looked really
hungry (7)

Nude in unusual act — it’s
an intimate show (7)

Went through with the drill
without enthusiasm (5)

Not at all a feature of fine
verse (5)

Huts may be built in this
way (4)















EASY PUZZLE

Yesterday’s Easy Solution

Across: 1 Tearful, 5 Heron, 8
Limelight, 9 Gag, 10 Pick, 12
Software, 14 Pampas, 15 Effort, 17
Children, 18 Helm, 21 Fit, 22
Adversary, 24 Check, 25 Remorse.
Down: 1 Tulip, 2 Aim, 3 Folk, 4
Legion, 5 Hit it off, 6 Rigmarole, 7
Neglect, 11 Committee, 13 Hard
tack, 14 Pacific, 16 Denver, 19
Maybe, 20 Grim, 23 Air.

THERE SEEMS TO BE ONE
MISSING! ANY IDEA
WHERE IT WENT?

3 BZ

NOT NECESSARILY. HAVEN'T YOU EVER
HEARD THAT OPPOSITES ATTRACT?



CALVIN & HOBBES













I



YA





Difficulty Level & &

WAIT HUGO, I
CAN SOLVE NT,
TILL GO GET MY

(©2000 by King Featurws Syndicate, re. Word rages reserved.












Across

1
6
10
11
12

13
15

17
19
21

Justifiably (4,6)
Central US state (4)
Easily bribed (5)
Seriously (2,7)
Official permission
(8)

Badinage (5)
Specialised school
(7)

Fast sailing ship (7)
Hand over (7)
Charming (7)
Wanderer (5)

To support (8)

A benefit (9)
Prevent from hap-
pening (5)

Secrete (4)
Gradually (4,2,4)

T DONT KNOW
ABOUT NOU, BUT

“T WANT A FOOT-LONG
HOT POG ALL THE WAY!”






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NOT ONLY THAT, BUT WE DONT
HAVE. MOM HERE. TO Boss US
ARQUND! NO EARLY BEDTIME,
NO BATHS, NO DISGUSTING
DINNERS, NO...

MVE

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\T'S VERY
PEACEFUL.








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ON MARS.



“ANP ALLTHE NAPKINS
YOU CAN SPARE.”

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©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

+ WO ©
On WIN|D N

9/27



DID THAT ROCK

1988 Universal Press Syndicate



Sudoku Puzzle

Sudoku is a number-placing puzzle based on a 9x9 grid with
several given numbers. The object is to place the numbers 1 to
9 in the empty squares so the each row, each column and each
3x3 box contains the same number only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Sudoku increases from Monday to
Sunday



























©2008 Conceptis Puzzles, Dist. by King Features Syndicate, Inc.

Difficulty’Level *& *& & *&

Puzzle

Best described as a number crossword, the task in Kakuro is to
fill all of the empty squares, using numbers 1 to 9, so the sum of
each horizontal block equals the number to its left, and the sum

of each vertical block equals the number on its top. No number -

may be used in the same block more than once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis Kakuro increases from Monday to Sunday.



Yesterday's
Kakuro Answer |

Yesterday's
~ Sudoku Answer

noo
ho2@

Ow
oon
-=NO

NIN +





Emanuel Nato v Arie van der Bosch,
Belgian team championship 2008.
Black (to move) can promote his d2
pawn to a second queen, but White
already has a queen pair on the
board and is poised to checkmate
crudely but effi by 1 Qg8+
Kh6 2 Qaf&+ Kh5 3 Qxh7+ Kg5 4
Qfg8 mate. Seeing no escape, Black
tried 1...Qe2+ 2 Kh3 Qfi+ 3 Kh4
when he is out of checks and

had to resign after d1Q 4 Qg8+.
Black missed his chance. Can you
spot how he could have salvaged

a draw? :

NM WwW FH HAH Nw











=

pled

West dealer.








Chess: 8683: 1..Qf1+! 2 Kxfi d1Q+ 3 Kg2 Qd2+! 4
Kh3 Ghéy 5 Kg2 Qd2+ draws by perpetual check.

HOW many words of four

The letters or more can you make
from the letters shown here? In
Target making a word, each letter may
uses be ee si a ye a
: contain the centre letter ani
there must be at least one
wordsin tl \ t be at least
. ine-letter word. No plurals.
the main Topay’s TARGET
body of Good 27; very good 41; excellent
55 (or more).
Chambers Solution tomorrow. ;
2ist YESTERDAY'S SOLUTION
Century dingo doing doling dong
Detonary Ur rhsve “nies tco ln
M NG indige lido limo
(1999 lingo lino tion loin long loping
edition}. moid molding moping oiling

pion pled poling pond pong

eve Becker

South Has a Problem to Solve

the opening three-heart bid by West.



Take this case where North-South
would have been much better off at
three notrump than the inferior con-
tract of five clubs they reached after

nf Both sides vulnerable. Declarer had a lot of work to do

NORTH to make five clubs. He took the open-

| | | | ®AK76 ing heart lead in) dummy and

|| VA3 returned the club ten, winning the

#3832 finesse. Another trump finesse dis-

Poe hele eo) oe he kel #1095 closed that East had_ started) with

WEST EAST three to the king, which in turn meant

Down #1043 QI98 that South’s third heart could not be

1 Brandish (4) ¥QI109764 v8 _ safely ruffed in dummy. Two dia-

2 Fruitlessly (2,2,5) A 10 "4 Q 9765 mond losers also appeared certain

3 Asurvival (5) #7 @K82 since West was very likely to have

, SOUTH the ace for his vulnerable three-bid,

a Necessany (7) $52 The outlook was bleak, but

6 Of the high seas (7) WK52 declarer found the answer. Afier

7 Carrion-feeding ani- K4 drawing East’s last trump, he cashed

mal (5) A QI643 the A-K of spades and ruffed a spade.

8 Not functioning prop- The bidding: He then played his last two trumps,

erly (3,2,5) West North East = South — reducing himself to the K-x of both

9 Discord (8) 34 Pass Pass 4& red suits. On the last trump, West had

14 Nonsense (10) Pass 5 # ; to choose a discard trom the J-10-9
16 Surroundings (8) Opening lead — queen of hearts. of hearts and A-10 of diamonds.

. One of the chief purposes of a If West discarded a heart, South

18 Showing foresight (9) pre-emptive bid is to deprive the — would then play the king and another

20 Piece left over (7) opponents of the ability to exchange heart, compelling West to lead a dia-

21 Favourable review information at a low level. It is there- — mond. And if West discarded the ten

(5-2) fore not surprising that a partnership of diamonds instead, a low diamond

23 Brilliantly coloured (5) often fails to arrive at its best con- — play would convert declarer’s king

25 Sycophant (5) tract aller a pre-emptive bid by the into a trick. Either way, the jig was

26 Halt (4) opposition. up.

South certainly gets full credit
for his excellent play, but West has to
get an assist for having made it pos-
sible to test declarer’s mettle.

©2008 King Features Syndicate Inc,
THE TRIBUNE

GN-753



SUPREME
COURT

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00593

Whereas SAMUEL RAHMING, of Suite I, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine:has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of JOHN JOSEPH VARDINE, late of#8 Yates Street
Schenectady in the State of New York, one of the States
of the United States of The America, deceased.

~ Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00594

Whereas SAMUEL RAHMING, of Suite I, Chancery House,
The Mall Drive, Freeport, Grand Bahama, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed
of Power of Attorney for Vincent Vardine has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of CONSETTA VARDINE, late of Pinellas County in the
City of St. Petersburg in the State of Florida, one of the
States of the United States of The America, deceased.

Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008.

THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION.

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00595

Whereas LENORA VIRGINIA SYMONETTE a.k.a.
VIRGINIA LENORA SYMONETTE, of Graham Avenue,
New Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, has made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of JOHN WELDIN ROBERTS,
late of Marsh Harbour, Abaco, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00596

Whereas CARLENE D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Michelina De Wey has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of HELEN J. PETRUZZIELLO, late of
6534 Pine Lane, Weed, California, one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

Oct. 2, 2008

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00597

Whereas CARLENE ,D. FARQUHARSON, of the Western
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of
Power of Attorney for Donald W. Knoepfle has made
‘ application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration with the will of the Real and
Personal Estate of GENEVIEVE B. KNOEPFLE, late of 95
Carleton Avenue Glen Ellyn Dupage, Illinois, one of the
States of the United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00598

IN THE ESTATE OF FRANCES DOROTHY SERIO, late of
2 Indianhead Circle, Marblehead, Massachusetts, one of
the States of the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by W. CHRISTOPHER GOUTHRO of the City of Freeport,
Grand Bahama, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth
of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law, the Authorized Attorney
in The Bahamas for obtaining the Resealed Grant of
Probate of Will Administration with the Will annexed without
Sureties in the above estate granted to KAREN SINGER,
the Administratrix, of the Estate by the Probate and Family
Court Department in the County of Essex in the
Commonwealth of Massachusetts, one of the States of
United States of America on the 25th day of April, 2007.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

_No. 2008/PRO/npr/00599

Whereas GORDON JOSEPH CAREY a.k.a. JOSEPH
GORDON CAREY, of the Eastern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas, for letters of administration of the Real and
Personal Estate of EDNA MAE CULMER CAREY, late of
Tarpum Bay on the Island of Eleuthera, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00600

Whereas ELKIN MEADOWS and EUNICE MEADOWS,
both of #3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of RENEE MEADOWS, late of
#3 Rich Cloves, Southwestern District, New Providence,
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas,
deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00601

Whereas WARREN SCOTT WARD, of Winton Highway,
Eastern District, and STANLEY OSWALD ANTHONY
ISAACS of the Eastern Road, Eastern District, New
Providence, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas, Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for
Tiffany Knowles have made application to the Supreme
Court of The Bahamas, for letters of administration with
the Will of the Real and Personal Estate of REGINALD
WINFIELD KNOWLES, late of Tower Estates Drive, Sans
Souci, Eastern District, New Providence,.one of the Islands
of Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS © Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00602

IN THE ESTATE OF RALPH CLIFTON SCOTT, late of
1227 Dunwoody Lane in the City of Atlanta, Dekalb County
in the State of Georgia, one of the States of the United
States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery

* Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands

of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and DWAYNE
ANDRIAN BRYAN of 37 Bethel Avenue, Western District,
New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-At-Law, the
Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for obtaining the
Resealed Grant of Letters Testamentary in the above estate
granted to GUSEPPE RAGO, the Executor, of the Estate
by the Probate Court of Dekalb County in the State of
Georgia, one of the States of United States of America on
the 31st day of March, 2008.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS _ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00603

Whereas BARRY HALL, of the Settlement of Nicholl's
Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made application
to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for letters of
administration of the Real and Personal Estate of MARY
ELIZABETH HALL, late of the Settlement of Nicholl's

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 7B

Town on the Island of Andros, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 21 days from the
date hereof.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00604

Whereas ROSEMARY FARQUHARSON, of Rolle's Avenue
in the Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has made
application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas, for
letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of FELIX FARQUHARSON, late of Peach Street, Eastern
District, New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof. ;

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008/PRO/npr/00605

IN THE ESTATE OF LEE LOWELL CARPENIER a.k.a.
LEE L. CARPENIER, late of Bonrock Court, Towson,
Baltimore in the State of Maryland, one of the States of
the United States of America, deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by MICHELLE ANTIONETTE HORTON of Monastery
Park, Eastern District, New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, and J. MICHAEL
SAUNDERS of 11 Oxford Road, Nassau East Subdivision,
Eastern District, New Providence, The Bahamas Attorneys-
At-Law, the Authorized Attorneys in The Bahamas for
obtaining the Resealed Grant of Letters of Administration
in the above estate granted to FREDERICK A. RAAB, the
Personal Representative, of the Estate by Grace G. Connolly
Register of Wills for Baltimore County.in the State of
Maryland, one of the States of United States of America

on the 11 th day of October, 2006.

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00606

Whereas HESKET M. NEELY a:k.a. HESKETH M. NEELY,
of Chippingham Western District, New Providence, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, has
made application to the Supreme Court of The Bahamas,
for letters of administration of the Real and Personal Estate
of ROLLIE CARTWRIGHT NEELY, late of the Bluff,
Eleuthera, one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 2? days from the
date hereof. .
Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS __ Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

No. 2008/PRO/npr/00605

Whereas JANE BLONEVA BROWN of Sarah Robinson
Road off Farrington Road in the Island of New Providence
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas
has made application to the Supreme Court of The
Bahamas. for letters of administration of the
Real and Personal Estate of ALNINA DELPHANE
FERGUSON late of 836 Phippen Waiters Road Dania
Beach in the State of Florida. one of the States of the
United States of America, deceased.

Notice is hereby given that such applications will be heard
by the said Court at the expiration of 14 days from the
date hereof:

Desiree Robinson
(for) Registrar

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS Oct. 2, 2008
THE SUPREME COURT
PROBATE DIVISION

2008fPRO/npr/00612

IN THE ESTATE OF EDWARD CHARLES ALLEN, late of
7754 S.E. Saratoga Drive, Hobe Sound in the State of
Florida, one of the States of the United States of America,
deceased.

NOTICE is hereby given that after the expiration of fourteen
days from the date hereof, application will be made to the
Supreme Court of The Bahamas in the Probate Division
by ANTHONY NOMIKOS KLONARIS of Old Fort Bay in
the Western District of the Island of New Providence and
MIKE ATHONY KLONARIS, of Lyford Cay in the Western
District of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands
of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Attorney-At-Law,
the Authorized Attorney in The Bahamas for obtaining the
resealed Letters of Administration in the above estate
granted to ELIZABETH A. DECKER and GERALDINE M.

‘THAYER the co-personal representatives of the Estate,

by the State of The Circuit Court for Martin County, Florida,
on the 26th day of September, 2007.

Nicoya Neilly
(for) Registrar
PAGE 8B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

THE TRIBUNE






The Tribune

DD DTG DD G0” ?F6°F6F;F’°[F.nr.21FFFrwWWO’ BU *e=D’

BO “Duy



A an story









lm By LISA LAWLOR

CELEBRATING the lives of women who
have fought against the increasingly
prevalent disease of breast cancer, the
National Breast Cancer Awareness.
Month, beginning this Wednesday, will
help shed light on an illness that many
Bahamian women have struggled
through, nevertheless emerging as sur-
vivors, role models and hero's to their
families, friends and society at large.

Despite the many strides made in detecting and cea the dis-
ease, and in spite of the many lives affected, breast cancer contin-
ues to be one of the country's dirty little secrets, according to one
survivor. But one organisation that is looking to rip the covers off
the disease, The Sister Sister Support Group is active in providing
support for women recently diagnosed with breast cancer.

Vice president of the group, Nurse Sandra Ferguson Rolle is her-
self a five year survivor at age 57. Emphasizing the importance of
knowing your own body, Nurse Rolle told Tribune Health that in
her case, doctors initially told her that the suspicious lump in her
breast was nothing, that it was simply fibrocystic - a condition of the
breast that is characterized by discomfort, benign lumps and is

more common in black women.

SEE page nine

seeceaneceeegeeeceeseneeseeeneeeeeeseseeeeeeaeausenetenneee whe eeee



Ee LLL



‘DESPITE the ios of her hair nurse Sandra rorallsan: Rolle (above), a five-year breast cancer survivor, remains strong and fully committed to supporting women faced with breast cancer. She now serves as the vice-presi-
dent of the Sister-Sister Support Group.




SSS A." BHR FEE

SOGGY 0 °° "ww °e°°ep *' "Ei "U "»l? >?"PF"F5F®'B»ht'» 8hhl"lh""F»E UE WWiiWWWWWWWIRDBIIIAAIDVI. .w WMD

Why physical therapy matters

a By MARILYN MOFFAT

om d herapy- =

pr

THE origins of physical thera-
Spy, also known as physiotherapy,
“can be found among the ancient
“Greeks, who understood that the
“capacity to move is a vital ele-
‘ment of health and well being.
“Today, physical therapy is an
mepssential part of health services
“delivery systems around the
‘Sworld.
‘= “Its contribution and importance
has grown over the years of the
20th and 21st centuries. As people
live longer and have busier lives
than ever before, wear and tear
‘and chronic diseases take an
gencreasing toll on people’s bod-

mi,

Pr
£%

- President of the World :
Confederation for Purysical

ies. Every year physical therapists
help millions of people to manage

“thé éffects of aging, illness, acci-
= “dents, and the stresses and strains
. Of life...

The profession specialises in
human movement: that is why the
theme of World Physical Therapy
Day is “Movement for Health”.
Physical therapists identify phys-
ical impairments, limitations, and
disabilities that prevent people
from being as independent as
they can be. They analyze the
source of the problems, deter-
mine ways of overcoming them,
and maximize the individual’s
movement potential. While phys-
ical therapists provide treatment,
they also promote people’s
health, fitness, and wellness. That
means they prevent illness.

GOVERNMENT

So physical therapists have an
immense contribution to make.
Studies have indicated how effi-
cient-they are at:>.

¢ treating and preventing back
pain, balance disorders, and
strength decline;

¢ how they can provide exer-
cise programmes for conditions
like coronary heart disease, dia-
betes, obesity, stroke, chronic
obstructive pulmonary disease,
and hypertension, which are
often, caused by unhealthy
lifestyles;

e how: they can help people
affected by disease - such as
Parkinson’s disease, multiple
sclerosis, and HIV/AIDS - injury
or amputation live better, more
independent, lives.

GN-756

~ NOTICE .
NWNISTRY OF LABOUR AND SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

SELLING PRICE OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS (LP

PARTA

The general public is advised that the maximum selling price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas
(LPG) where the sale is by cylinder shall be as follows with effect from Wednesday, 1

October, 2008.

1. In New Providence
& Grand Bahama

3. In the Family Islands
(excluding Grand Bahama)

MAXIMUM
SUPPLIERS’ PRICE

$70.00 per L00lbs
(delivered)
OR

- $0.70 per Ib
(delivered)

$88.00 per 100Ibs
(including sea freight)
OR

$0.88 per Ib
(including sea freight)

PART B

MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS’ PRICE

$100.00 per 1001bs
(delivered)
OR

$1.00 per Ib
(delivered)

$110 per 100Ibs
(delivered)
OR
$1.10 per Ib
(including sea freight)

The maximum selling price of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) where the sale by bulk
shall be as follows with effect from Wednesday, 1 October, 2008.

1. In New Providence
& Grand Bahama

2. In the Family Islands
(excluding Grand Bahama)

MAXIMUM
SUPPLIERS PRICE
PER US GALLON §

$2.97
(delivered)

$3.74
(including sea freight)

MAXIMUM
DISTRIBUTORS’ PRICE

$4.24
(delivered)

$4.66
(including sea freight)



You only have to look at the
number of people affected by
some of those conditions to get
an idea of the impact physical
therapists can make.

e 350 million people globally
are obese

e Approximately 1.6 billion
adults and at least 20 million
children under the age of five
years are overweight

e At any one time, around five
per cent of a country’s popula-
tion will be affected by back pain

e 180 million people world-
wide have diabetes

¢ Cardiovascular diseases like
heart attack and stroke account
for 29 per cent of the world’s
deaths, and they are on the rise
in developing countries

e 210 million individuals have
chronic, obstructive pulmonary
disease

e Over 40 million people are

we



WMS

living with HIV

So physical therapy doesn’t
just mean more healthy people,
but more productive people who
can contribute to countries’
economies.

And that’s why the World
Confederation for Physical Ther-
apy, which was founded in 1951
to represent physical therapists
internationally, champions the
principle that every individual
is entitled to the highest possible
standard of culturally-appropri-
ate health services — including
physical therapy. These services
are provided in an atmosphere
of trust and respect for human
dignity and underpinned by
sound clinical reasoning and sci-
entific evidence.

We strive to improve global
health by encouraging high stan-
dards of- physical therapy
research, education and prac-
tice; supporting communication
and exchange of information
among physical therapists world-
wide; and collaborating with
national and international organ-



AAA

isations.

Every year on September 8,
physical therapists around the
world use World Physical Ther-
apy Day to draw attention to the
contribution the profession can
make to the health of individuals
and nations. It’s an opportunity
to say what we do, how we do it,
why we do it, and why physical
therapists are the movement,
physical activity, and exercise
experts.



Grains Of Wisdom.
mnt SU pte ad eae

\

4

‘BLACK BEAN
AND RICE

SALAD’

W2 cup olive oil

2

Td cup apple cider vinegar

1 lablespoon Oijan rnustard

1 teaspoon qreund curin

1 teaspoon minced qaric

2-12 cups cooked Mahatma Lang Grain Rice
(abeut 7 cup rave), caked

4 TS-ouiice can blachbeans, rinsed, drained

44 cup chopped red bell pepper

84 cup chopped yelloan bell pepper

44 cup chopped green anians

Lettuce leaves [aptianal)

Whisk oil, vitegar, mustard. contin and gsrlis ¢ medium bers! until we blended, Seasen
drassing tp tasbe with alt and papper. Comtina dice, beans. pagcess and cricrs in lange
_ bewl, Tass salad with aroug> drassing to moisten, Saasan wilh salt aid pape. {Gan bs
mace 8 haurs shead Cover and rafr cerate. > Ling large serving howl wits lettuce saves, if
desired, Spoct sas itio bowl and serve. ivakas F Sansings.

fr NUMBER eis “temerial na ae

Distributed by ASA H. PRITCHARD, LTD.
Robinson & Claridge Roads - Tel: 393-2437


THE TRIBUNE

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 9B



Cabbages

| IKE most human families, the cabbage clan is a

widely varying group of vegetables. Broccoli and cau-

“ealiflower, for instance, are almost identical in a botan-

cd sense yet have widely different characteristics. Let’s not
even get into their mutual offspring - the broccoflower.

Head of the clan is the traditional
tight-headed cabbage, a staple in
Europe for centuries. Here in the
Bahamas we mostly use cabbage for
coleslaw but Europeans have dozens of
different ways to serve it from stuffed
cabbage leaves to sauerkraut.

Most members of the cabbage clan
are gross feeders and the seeds or
seedling need to be put into ground
that has been both conditioned and
enriched. I like to apply commercial
cow manure and time-release fertilizer
at least a week ahead of sowing time
and water the area every day. There-
after, cabbages should receive side
dressings of granulated fertilizer every
month or a weekly dose of liquid fer-
tilizer, —

Cabbages should have uninterrupted
early growth and be planted at least
18 inches away from each other. Water
that is so necessary in the early days
becomes an enemy once the heads
have become firm. A heavy downpour
may very well split open the head. This
is not a disaster for the home gardener
but is a tragedy for the commercial

farmer.

There are two things you can do if
you have more mature cabbages than
you can deal with at one particular
time and rain is imminent. One is to
harvest the cabbages because they last
well — several weeks in the refrigerator
— once cut. The other is to cut or break
off many of the roots. This can be done
by inserting a long knife into the
ground and working your way around
each cabbage, cutting the side-pro-
truding roots. Enough roots will be left
alive to maintain the cabbage but not
enough to take in excess water and
split it. The same result can be obtained
by taking hold of the cabbage head
and twisting it just like you feel like
doing to a brattish teenager at times.
Many of the roots will break yet the
plant will survive.

The cultivation of broccoli is identi-
cal to head cabbage up to the harvest
stage. Broccoli heads should be cut as
soon as they reach full size, before the
little flower buds begin to separate.
Leave the plant in the ground because
most broccoli plants put out a bonus of



MOST broccoli plants produce flowerets after the main head has
been cut and these can be harvested for up to two months.



flowerets, initially from the cut area
and then from axils around the plant.
Harvest these flowerets every two to
three days and you will be rewarded
with nutritious morsels for a month or
two.

Many cauliflower varieties claim to
be self-blanching but I would recom-
mend you ignore this and tie the long
leaves over the white curds'as soon as
they start to form. Open up your cau-
liflower packages every day to check
for larvae. Again, harvest as soon as
the curds are white and full, before
they begin to separate and get ‘hairy’.

Brussels sprouts are marginal in the

Bahamas. If you really love sprouts
you may be disappointed in those you
grow. Remove the lower leaves once
sprouts begin to form and then gradu-
ally remove all but the very top leaves
as the sprouts mature. The very lowest
sprouts will be open-leafed and also
can be removed.

If Brussels sprouts can be consid-
ered marginal, kale should be consid-
ered beyond the pale. This is a dis-
tinctly cold weather crop and is best
left to Scotsmen.

Kohlrabi should be grown more
because it is a versatile vegetable, a
cross between turnip and cabbage. It







THERE are a great many variéties of Chinese cabbage anda
great deal of confusion as to.correct names.

grows mostly above ground and sports '
a crown of small leaves. It is the glob-

ular body that is treasured, however.

Peeled and julienned, raw kohlrabi

makes a delicious slaw and also can be

added to stir fry meals without losing

its crispness.

The sign that you have a member of
the cabbage clan is the cross-like for-
mation of the seed leaves, a cruciform.
Chinese cabbages are crucifers but
have so many different varieties they
can be left to an article of their own.

e j-hardy@coralwave.com





EE ese:

BOG GGQ GG5 ll: »’7lT. FM) lI QQ.WW °W_o_”h—0!”0DB:dennnnn 0 U™>ér°t

A survivor’s story

FROM page eight

Nurse Rolle also has no family
history of breast cancer, leaving
her an unlikely candidate for the
diagnosis.

"Tt is only recently that doc-
tors have started examining
younger women, but those who
don't have a family history of the
disease are still left largely unat-
tended."

She also debunked the mam-
mogram myth that exists in the
Bahamas today, where many
women believe the exam pinches
or is painful. "You can't mind a
mild discomfort that lasts just sec-
onds when it is something that

could save your life," she told
' ‘Tribune Health.

In knowing her own body, and
with her good friend and co-
worker Nurse Sharon Turnquest,
she went to receive her exam
results. When the news came that
her lump was malignant, the first
word that came to mind was
"off". She wanted the diseased
breast to be amputated - com-
pletely off. She cited the Bible
verse that says "if your right hand
offends you, cut it off" as her
inspiration for choosing such a
drastic measure.



As one of 11 children, Nurse
Rolle describes herself as the pil-
lar on which her siblings depend
for strength, and as a result of
how she is viewed, she struggled
with telling them the awful truth.

Not knowing how to tell them,
she sat on Montagu Beach for
hours, thinking of how she could
share the news in a way that did-'
n't seem like she'd just received a
death sentence. The birds on the
beach were all happy go lucky
and she thought to herself, "Lord,
if you're gonna do this for the
birds, you must be gonna do it
for me".

Still, the news of their shaken
pillar hit her family hard. They
were more upset than she was at
her diagnosis, she said, but she
told them, "I am going to live".

Daily sayings, such as "this too
shall pass", helped her through
the fight, she said.

Nurse Rolle would eventually
go through chemotherapy and
radiation treatments, but her faith
and positive attitude caused her
room at the Mount Sinai Hospital
in Florida to be known as the
"life room" with fish for compa-
ny, candies for visitors and a strict
"no negativity" rule that kept the
atmosphere upbeat and alive. It
got to the point where some of



the nurses would come into her
room after a bad day to be uplift-
ed by her attitude.

As often happens to patients
being treated for cancer, Nurse
Rolle lost her hair, and while it
was difficult at first, she came to
accept her baldness and took
pride in her fight. Encouraging
other Bahamian women who are
faced with cancer to accept that
they might find themselves in the
same position, she said that it is
important to realize that it's bet-
ter to be alive with a bald head
than to be dead with all your hair.

The chemotherapy, which kills
the good cells along with the bad,
cancerous ones, and depletes cells
that control hair and fingernail
growth, is a trying experience,
she said. "You have to go into it
with an open mind, and control
the cancer rather than let it con-
trol you".

Nurse Rolle also experienced
sores in her mouth and went
down to a painful 95 pounds
because she was nauseated and
couldn't keep any food down.
Through it all however, she knew

‘she had to ride this storm out,

another of her daily sayings.
While receiving her treatments,

Nurse Rolle said she stayed at.
noes eae in Mueane a facility



iarone BNT in ( Celebrating’

Dale ‘Saturday, October 4, 2008.

Internati onal Migratory Bird Day:
From the Tundra to the Tropics
Connecting Birds, Habitat & People

international Migratory Bird Day is a celebration
of the spectacular journey that migratory. birds
take between their summer and winter homes.
Many species of migratory birds spend the win-
ter in or migrate thrqueh the Caribbean. They rely

on the food, water and shelter provided in our
_ forest, scrub and wetland habitats for up to 9

months out of the year, Let's learn about migra

tory birds and work together to protect them.

Time: 8—lLlam

Location: ‘The Retreat, Village Road

_ Birdwalk to welcome back our winter visitors. Wear Comfortable Shoes

_ Refreshments after the walk

Location:
Admission:



_ Date: Wednesday, October i, 2008 Time: 7 pm
‘The Retreat, Village Road
BNT members - free, General public $2

Special Showing of Crash: A Tale of Two Species
‘The story of an ancient invertebrate and a little Shorebird. -

RedKnots



Horseshoe crabs’ blue blood, which contains copper,
not iron, is prized by the biomedical community for

* its ability to detect bacteria in human medicines. It’s
just one of the amazing qualities of the 350-million-
year-old evolutionary marvel detailed in “Crash: A
‘Tale of Two Species. Written, produced and narrated
by Emmy Award-winning filmmaker Allison Argo,
the film explores the fascinating link between the

horseshoe crab and the red knot shorebird, and the

crucial role of humans in their continued survival.

*

For further information call 393-1317

with full accommodations and a
small stipend for sick Bahami-
ans. Today however, the
Bahamas has its own radiation
centre at the Centreville Medical
Pavilion, which means that
women have the option of
remaining at home, near their
families.

Through her fight, her support
system was essential to Nurse
Rolle's eventual recovery. The
church and her family gave her
both emotional support and
financial help.

Now free of cancer, Nurse
Rolle, along with president of the
Sister Sister Support Group,

_ Nurse Sharlene McPhee, saw the

need for women to come togeth-
er where before they had no.out-
let for help. The non-profit
organisation donates all proceeds
to the awareness and research of
breast cancer and lives by the
motto "women helping women".
And they also supply the ports
for sick women's IVs to be insert-
ed at the same time as they have
a mastectomy. ;

At the diagnosis of breast can-
cer, doctors tell women about the
Sister Sister organisation that

’ meets weekly at its headquarters,

on Collin's Avenue to encourage
one another and de-stress while

promoting a new and positive
outlook on life.

"Every time we lose a woman
we feel bad at Sister Sister. That's
somebody that needed to be here
as a mother, a daughter, a sister
or a wife," Nurse Rolle said.

Denim Day. will be Friday,
October 3, when all funds raised
from the sale of pink ribbons will
go to breast cancer awareness.

So please support survivors, and

buy pink.

e For more information on the Sis-
ter Sister Breast Cancer Support
Group contact 326.1929.

res sre 8.8

amber 27th - October 13th, 2008

BUY L

place setting < of China

Te-t4-hA

i

ne x

ree) (eCacMersy iil ay

= setting consists of 1 dinner, 1 salad, 1 bread & butter
plate; 1 tea cup & saucer eres Perch) items)

BUY |

Box Set of Stemware

receive

eS

2nd Box m

(excludes net items)

2nd place setting

consists of: 1 goblet; 1 wine; ‘laflute
sane Eee and all toasting flutes & net items)

place setting

Ox



Bad

yy

Lynn Chase Ae
& accessories

off thee applies to Bridal & China Dept only
* must be same or lesser value

OE

ors KL w. (00 a td PG Soe Rea
ye 393-4096

melo
Home

Mall at Marathon
PMNetats panacea aseserees Nee s1 a)

Sunday (ert)
www. kellysbahamas.com

Cs
fndsictat

Sara

PAGE 10B, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008
a ae a ai
Fall fashions mm
showcased at
Inagua fundraiser

FROM page 12

In her usual energetic and
sexy style, MC for the event
Phyllis Garroway said that all
greens can go, in dresses, bags,
pants and jackets. Buying
pieces as separates, she said,
allows for mixing and match-
ing, dressing an outfit down for
a casual lunch date or dressing
it up for an evening out. ;

In achieving the laid-back look
for day time shopping and social-
izing, one of the models, Leslie,
wore a sleeveless dress with a
fun headband. At night she can
dress up the same outfit by
adding a wide belt to emphasize
the waist, long earrings and ele-
gantly tying her hair back.

Wearing a bright yellow -

blouse to enhance her top, Sar-
sha also featured a pair of slim-
ming black slacks, adding a big
Nine West purse to complete
her chic, casual look that is ideal
for any outing.

Maydi fashioned the sleeve-
less dress with earth tones
accented by orange to show the

deep contrast possible within .

one piece of clothing. Dressed
along with the fashion is another
big bag, showing that small bags
are a big no-no this season.
Showing an island, breezy
style, Island Blue lives by the
motto to "Love, Laugh and
Dream in Colour". With more
day and lounge wear, Christine
Albury's store carries skirts,
shorts and capris with matching
cotton tanks and tees. Modeled
were broad cloth capris in
colours like confetti pink, Tahi-
ti blue and sunlight yellow, with
casual tops and a handy straw
bag to complete the casual look.
Also essential this season are
cover-ups, to throw over a swim-
suit at the beach or to simply
lounge around in at the house.
Island Blue carries designs from
Fresh Produce, which produces.
sizes as small as a two up to the
plus size 3x. All fabrics are pre-

shrunk thereby guaranteeing the

same fit for the life of your gar-
ment. Other designs are from
Echo Long, Belize and Extra
Plush.

Cooling down even more, and

inding the true island wear,

models from La Playa, who rep-
resented women of every shape
and size, showed’ the newest in
swim wear. Modeled were a vast
array of cuts and styles of swim-
suits, from skimpy bikinis to flat-
tering - and conservatively cov-
ering - one-pieces and everything
inbetween. .

Jhaneale B notably fashioned
a black one piece "monokini"
with a fun flirty skirt attached
and a peek-a-boo bottom. Adei-
ja wore a one piece halter from
the local Bahama Girl brand that
was designed here but made in
Columbia. The halter allows for
maximum support while giving
the most flattering cleavage.

Designs at La Playa are from

| big names like Phax (Columbia),

Bahama Girl - designed by Nas-
sau's own Linda Holowesko -
Jantzen (US), Ritchie (US) and
Panama Jack which has wear for
men, women and children.
_ Owner and "swimsuit guru"
Joanna Nixon sells pieces in sep-
arates to allow for different pro-
portions to find the exact fit in
both a top and bottom. The vari-
ety of swimsuit lines allows Joan-
na to find the right fit for each
customer, who can make
appointments for a personalized
fitting. She also sells a complete
beach wear ensemble, from cov-
er-ups, umbrellas, a full line of
sun care products, beach balls,
buckets and spades.

The Women's Corona Soci-
ety, which became a. registered
charity in 1962 under the Chari-
ty Commissioners, organised the
event. The society primarily acts
as an organisation that welcomes
newly arrived women in the
Bahamas and provides social
networking, helping them to set-
tle in their new home.

The headquarters in London
also provides Bahamian visitors
a variety of services including
































































THE TRIBUNE



SARSHA SWEETING |

Halsbury Law Chambers host
fourth annual free legal clinic

FROM page 12

she hiding from? And are they asking you for money? This could
be a sign of involvement in illegal activity or gangs.

Speaking on "Surviving Divorce or Husband's Death: Who Gets
What?", Nerissa A Greene, a partner at Halsbury Chambers, told
Tribune Woman that the clinic is Halsbury's way of giving back to
the public, and bridging the existing gap between legal profes-
sionals and the general community. ,

Other topics at the free legal clinic include, "Real Estate: What's
Your Home Worth" by Rachel Pinder of Island Living Real Estate.
She said that the housing market is stable here and definitely rec-
ommends everyone getting an appraisal.

"Building or Renovating: Safeguarding Your Investment" with
president of the Bahamian Contractors Association Stephen Wrin-
kle will touch on the fact that there is a deficiency in the Bahamas,



as in the rest of the world, in that people just don't know about con-
struction. During his presentation, Mr Wrinkle will be giving out a
number pointers on how to manage a contractor.

Other topics that will be discussed in the open forum will be the
high cost of energy, the changes in duty rates, EPA and trade
© agreements, better banking, work permits, permanent residency and
\ the right to work.






Prt Sn oie
SS38 Rhee tip,
te 3







First Name:

Last Name:





¢ The 4th Annual Free Legal Clinic, sponsored by Halsbury Law
Chambers is slated for Saturday, October 4 at 8:45. Lawyers will-be







Com pany: Title: available for free consultation until 3pm. For more information call 393-
es 4551.



Fax #: P.0.Box:

Exact Street Address:














Si UE
Everywhere The Buyers Are!
Knit ant gents \ ai \ +:







House #: House Name:
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Requested Start Date:









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545.95 | 584.95 | 5160 | or5
PO Se Oi oe an nc |”

|
THE TRIBUNE | TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008, PAGE 11B





nter to wi 1000 eve ry Saturday by filling inthe coupon in
Saturday's paper and returning it to our office......the more y oe
r the greater your chances of winningll 2 -

"*Only original newsprint eligible, no photocopies or facsimiles. Deadline for delivery Monday at 5 p.m. . oc










rte rel tp ig

v















THE TRIBUNE



\

A ome — TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

Fall tashions |
Sionec seen

raised during the es
clean up efforts.
With the end of

sleeveless pieces an
- revealed clothing fc
more casual items
West, Maggy Lon
autumn colours of ¢

ta leaves that enhar
bright colour.

SEE page

#



x

half the amount of sugar as a cup of ordinary hot chocolate.



Halsbury Law

Ovaltine’s unique recipe includes milk and cocoa powder, 15 essential
and minerals, and complex carbohydrates. One cup of hot milky Ovaltine contains





Chambers hosts
fourth annual

{free legal clinic

@ By LISA LAWLOR

FEATURING nine experts from a

_ + wide cross section of fields - from real

: estate to banking, construction, and
: dowager and inheritance rights - Hals-
: bury Law Chambers is set to host its
: fourth annual free legal clinic, "Infor-
; mation You Need for the Life You
: Want", on Saturday, October 4 at the «

New Providence Community Centre
on Blake Road.
Assistant Commissioner of Police

: (ACP) Hulan Hanna is expected to be
: among the presenters - speaking on the

topic, "Protect your family: gang-proof-

: ing your children". He told Tribune
i Woman that protecting families from
: chaos begins with parents fulfilling their
; job.

Parents should know what's going

i on with their sons and daughters, he
: said, noting however that the reality of
: the 20th century - where there is often
: only one parent caring for more than
: one child - makes this a difficult task.

“Mothers, on the whole, show a

: greater interest in their children and
: especially the development of sons.
: These may be the exact same persons
; that need correction, but who the moth-
: er feels reluctant to discipline," ACP
: Hanna said.

He pointed out further that in some

: mother/son relationships, when the
; mother does have the courage to disci-
: pline an unruly son, he may react abu-
: Sively, intimidating the mother.

On the other hand, father/son rela-

: tionships tend to be looser, with no
: guidelines or steadfast rules. "The basic
; steps to gang prevention are therefore
: lacking on the part of both parents,"
: he said.

"In many cases, there is no ideal fig-

i ure for a child to emulate for any num-
: ber of reasons, and he or she may there-
: fore feel the urge to join a gang," Mr
’ } Hanna explained.

In this case, the gang becomes a sur-

: rogate family to the child, although not
: the best examples for them to follow. In
: the search for a tight-knit family, a child
: must pay his or her dues; while going
: out, getting in fights, earning their
: "stripes" the hard way, the existing
: gang members have no tolerance or
: acceptance for a new member breaking
: the rules.

In an ironic twist, Mr Hanna said
that a lot of people who are running in
this direction - seeking love and con-
nection with a close knit group - may
actually be unhappy because they feel
they've been coerced into becoming a
member of the group. "And by getting
in fights, drugs and alcohol, what you
get is anything but love, affection and
attention," he said.

"It's surprising that sometimes par-
ents have no clue where their children
have been, and generally when they
don't know, it means they've been with
unsavoury characters," Mr Hanna said.

The first step in gang-proofing chil-
dren is knowing and being familiar with
all aspects of your child's life, from
knowing the child who's coming to your
house, to knowing the home of your
child's friend. This includes friends'
parents and their histories.

"Parents also need to pay attention to
any behavioural change that may hap-
pen in the child. Are they coming home
late into the dark hours? Showing dif-
ferent paraphernalia than usual, using
explicit language, clothing or hair-
styles?" These are all telltale signs, Mr
Hanna said, adding that some signs par-
ents may not think to look for, are if
their children are acting in the opposite
way. If a child who used to come home
late is now arriving early, what is he or

SEE page 10





x

vitamins

Distributed by: BWA, East West Highway * 394-1759




BAHAMAS EDITION



0-4 Rams dump coach Linehan, 1B





By Charles Rex Arbogast, AP

Alexei Ramirez: Grand slam breaks tie.



White Sox
stay alive
Detroit 8-2, will play

Minnesota today a
AL Central title, 1

Tuesday, September 30, 2008

m Chicago defeats

THE NATION’S NEWSPAPER



By Robert Zuckerman, Touchstone Pictures

Isla Fisher: Stars as Becky Bloomwood.



| She dares
“| to keep
shopping

m Confessions of

a Shopaholic brings
the heroine of the
chicl¢lit series to
movie screens.
First look, 11B



Dow plunges 778; parties
point fingers as rescue fails

Biggest point crap ever follows divided House's rejection of $700 billion bailout plan

Republicans
blame Pelosi

GOP says

partisan

speech by

House ede

‘poisoned’
ebate, caused

vote switches.

Democrats
strike back

Rep. Barney
Frank says ‘hurt’
GOP ‘decided to
punish’ country.
Pelosi says ‘we
must move

_ forward.’

Bush wanits
new action

‘Disappointed in
the vote. We’ve
put forth a plan
that was big,
because we've
got a big
problem.’

Politics, fear
spell doom
for bailout

Bush, House leaders
can’t stop backlash.

By Richard Wolf, Kathy Kiely,
Fredreka Schouten and John Ft Fritze
USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — When President
Bush came on television at 7:35 a.m.
Monday to urge passage of a $700 billion
Wall Street rescue plan, fellow Repub-
licans working out in the House
gymnasium jeered his remarks.

Hours later, when House
Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.,
attacked Bush’s “failed economic
policies” on the House floor and
credited Democrats for improving the
proposal, Republicans got angrier.

Bush’s weak political standing even in
‘ his own party and sharp partisan divi-
sions in the House may have contributed
to the plan’s demise, but it was old-



By Mark Wilson, Getty Images

Aftershock: Rep. Eric Cantor,
R-Va., holds speech by Pelosi.



By Lawreneeqackson: AP

To markets: Speaker Pelosi
says vote “cannot stand.”



By Kevin Lamarque, Reuters

Pressing on: Bush says he'll
seek a plan that can pass.

Cover
story

11,100 | i

10,900

10,700

10,500

10,300

9:30am. 10am.

How Dow
responded
to House vote

11am. 12.p.m,.

Sources: C-SPAN; Bloomberg News, USA TODAY research

It’s an ‘extremely worrisome situation’

How they voted

House bailout bill vote:
Democrats [Mj Republicans

Yes 140
65

95
N

>Each member's vote, 2A

Source: U.S, House By Karl Gelles, USA TODAY

fashioned politics that killed the bill. In
the end, too many lawmakers weren't
willing to risk losing their jobs.

“It’s mainly political fear, the reaction
back home,” said Rep. Jim Cooper, D-
Tenn., who backed the bill. “It’s the most
difficult time for people to be statesmen,
37 days before an election” in which all
of the 435 House seats are on the ballot:

Ever since Treasury Secretary
Henry Paulson presented his plan
to Congress 12 days ago, law-
makers had been skeptical. They
didn’t like the $700 billion price
tag or the plan for the U.S. govern-
ment to take over bad private debt,
mostly distressed mortgage securities.

Since then, compromises made to ap-
pease conservative Republicans and

Please see COVER STORY next page >



Concerns multiply
about deeper crisis

By David J. Lynch
USA TODAY

The House vote Monday to reject a
$700 billion financial rescue drew a
swift and pointed reaction from Wall
Street: the largest one-day point loss
ever in the Dow Jones industrial average.

The Dow’s historic 778-point cry for
help followed the stunning 228-205
vote against passage. In percentage
terms, Monday’s 7% drop didn’t even
make the Dow’s all-time top 10. (It was
the 17th worst ever.) But the 8.8% bat-
tering absorbed by the broader Standard
& Poor’s 500 index was its worst since
the “Crash Monday” carnage in 1987.
The tech-heavy Nasdaq dropped 9.1%.

“This is an extremely worrisome situ-
ation,” says Lyle Gramley, a former Fed
governor now at Stanford Financial
Group. “We are going to go through a
significant recession even if the bill
passes. Without it, we could have the
worst recession” since World War II.

With markets in retreat and official

House begins voting
at 1:28 p.m.
Yes: 48; No: 33

Bailout bill fails at .
:0)

6 p.m.

Yes: 205: No: io 228 |



1pm. 2 p.m.

Photo by Richard Drew, AP; research by Ge

Investors lose $1.2 trillion
ia ‘Category 5’ hits Wall Street, 7A

Oil prices fall $10.52 a barrel
i Largest decline in 17 years, 8A

Citigroup rescues Wachovia
i@ Deal gets assist from FDIC, 9A

Washington at a loss to craft an effective
response, fears of a deeper financial cri-
sis were multiplying. Credit markets in-
dicated banks are reluctant to lend even
to other banks, threatening an eventual
credit drought for scores of businesses.
“There is a generalized loss of confidence
in financial markets and financial in-
stitutions that no policy action seem to
be able to control,” former White House
economist Nouriel Roubini wrote on his
influential blog.

Monday's damage wasn't limited to

‘US. stocks. In Brazil, trading was sus-

pended after stocks sank 13.8%. Germa-
ny, Iceland and the United Kingdom
moved to save several threatened banks.
And today in Tokyo, stocks fell 5% in the

3 p.m. 4p.m.

orge Petras and Jae Yang; graphic by Julie Snider, USA TODAY

first half hour of trading.

The market bloodbath capped an ex-
traordinary day in the USA’s citadels of
finance and politics. Earlier Monday, the
Federal Reserve announced it had acted
along with nine foreign central banks to
address a “shortfall” of U.S. dollars in
world markets, effectively making avail-
able a total of $620 billion.’

In a deal midwived by the Federal De-
posit Insurance Corp., Citigroup an-
nounced plans to acquire Wachovia's
banking operations in a $2.1 billion all-
stock transaction. It was the latest in a
flurry of recent deals that have reshaped
the U.S. banking industry.

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson, in
the White House driveway, said he was
“very disappointed” with the House
vote. “We need to work as quickly as
possible. We need to get something
done,” Paulson said.

Presidential rivals traded potshots
while urging renewed dealmaking. “One
of the messages I have to Congress is:
Get this done,” said Democrat Barack
Obama. Said Republican John McCain:
“Now it’s time for all members of Con-
gress to go back to the drawing board.”

Contributing: Barbara Hagenbaugh



Newsline

Sports @ Life





General says Iraq must boost its essential services

Ԥ News i Money . . : : nat ae
- confident he could recom- war and President Bush is U.S. Embassy, once a palace for Iraqi
oe rifts also mend pulling more U.S. preparing to leave office. President Saddam Hussein.
crucidl to pr S ___ troops from Iraq next year Republican John McCain Provincial elections next year could
Now at usatoday.com p Ogres but called for a cautious, backed the White House's shift the balance of political power,
. “deliberate” approach “to latest strategy, which also. giving more influence to Sunnis who
@ Investment chat | By jim Michaels make sure that we don't deployed troops in smaller mostly sat out local elections in 2005,
USA TODAY’s USA TODAY step backwards.” outposts in neighbor- National elections later in the year



This is the Bahamas Edition of USA TODAY,
featuring the latest news, sports, business and
entertainment from the United States and around
the world. Extended USA TODAY content can be

found at usatoday.com.

©COPYRIGHT 2008 USA TODAY

a division of Gannett Co., Inc.

personal finance
columnist Sandra
Block answers your .
questions from

in Iraq said Monday.

time will ...

Ray Odierno said.

pen?” he said.



BAGHDAD — Dramatic security
gains made in Iraq over the past year
could be jeopardized if its govern-
ment doesn’t improve essential ser-

“They're working toward this, but if
they don’t do this, the citizens over
potentially start to
move against the government,” Gen.

“What has happened is they have
rejected al-Qaeda, but if the govern-
ment fails them, what would hap-

Odierno told USA TODAY he was

Odierno replaced Gen.
David Petraeus as the
commanding general of
US. forces here in a cere-
mony this month. Odierno

executed the strategy that added
30,000 troops to Iraq and helped re-
duce violence over the past year. Pe-
traeus now leads the U.S. Central

Command.

“In 2006, it was a failed state,”
Odierno said of Iraq. “In 2008, it’s a
fragile state. We've got to move it to a

stable state.”

Odierno takes command as the
American public grows weary of the





Odierno: General

ians. Democrat Barack
Obama has advocated
withdrawing U.S. forces in
Iraq over 16 months while

ment about extra troop cuts could
come early next year after a new
president is elected, the general said.

“My experience tells me that who-
ever the new administration is, they
will listen to what we have to say,” he
said. “They will then conduct their
own assessment. ... | feel comfort-
able with that.”

About 80% of Iraq is. stable or se-
cure, said Odierno in his office in the



hoods to protect Iraqi civil-

could transfer power to new national
leaders.

“We have to make sure that we
have the forces on the ground to
make sure those things happen in a

usatopay NOON-1:30 p.m. ET at | vices such as electricity and bring to- was Petraeus’ No.2 in Iraq says about 80% of — increasing forces in Af- proper way,” Odierno said. There are
Block: What to | money.usatoday.com | gether rival political and religious before returning to the Iraqis secure. ghanistan. about 150,000 U.S. troops in Iraq. The
do about money. factions, the new top U.S. commander USA in February. The two Odierno’s first assess- White House recently announced

plans to draw down by about 8,000
troops early next year.

Another test will come this week,
when Iraq’s government begins tak-
ing over responsibility for the mostly
Sunni local defense groups, which
had been organized and funded by
the U.S. military. Some groups have
expressed concern that the Shiite-
dominated government will disman-
tle them or refuse to pay them.

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2A. TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY

How they voted

- Here is how each member voted in the House of Representatives’ 228-205 re-
jection of a $700 billion bailout for the nation’s financial system. A “yes” vote is
a vote in favor of the rescue package. Voting “yes” were 140 Democrats and 65
Republicans. Voting “no” were 95 Democrats and 133 Republicans. Rep. Jerry
Weller, R-Ill., did not vote. There is one vacancy in the 435-member House.

ALABAMA

> Democrats — Cramer, Y; Davis, Y.
> Republicans — Aderholt, N; Ba-
chus, Y; Bonner, Y; Everett, Y; Rogers,
Y.

ALASKA
> Republican — Young, N.

ARIZONA

> Democrats — Giffords, N; Grijalva,
N; Mitchell, N; Pastor, N.

> Republicans — Flake, N; Franks, N;
Renzi, N; Shadegg, N.

ARKANSAS

> Democrats — Berry, Y; Ross, Y;
Snyder, Y.

> Republican — Boozman, Y.

CALIFORNIA

> Democrats — Baca, N; Becerra, N;
Berman, Y; Capps, Y; Cardoza, Y;
Costa, Y; Davis, Y; Eshoo, Y; Farr, Y;
Filner, N; Harman, Y; Honda, Y; Lee,
N; Lofgren, Y; Matsui, Y; McNerney,
Y; Miller, George, Y; Napolitano, N;
Pelosi, Y; Richardson, Y; Roybal-Al-
lard, N; Sanchez, Linda, N; Sanchez,
Loretta, N; Schiff, N; Sherman, N; So-
lis, N; Speier, Y; Stark, N; Tauscher, Y;
Thompson, N; Waters, Y; Watson, N;
Waxman, Y; Woolsey, N.

> Republicans — Bilbray, N; Bono
Mack, 'Y; Calvert, Y; Campbell, Y;
Doolittle, N; Dreier, Y; Gallegly, N;
Herger, Y; Hunter, N; Issa, N; Lewis,
Y; Lungren, Y; McCarthy, N; McKeon,
Y; Miller, Gary, Y; Nunes, N; Rada-
novich, Y; Rohrabacher, N; Royce, N.

COLORADO ‘

> Democrats — DeGette, Y; Perlmut-
ter, Y; Salazar, N; Udall, N.

> Republicans — Lamborn, N; Mus-
grave, N; Tancredo, Y.

CONNECTICUT

> Democrats — Courtney, N; DeLau-
ro, Y; Larson, Y; Murphy, Y.

> Republican — Shays, Y.

DELAWARE
> Republican — Castle, Y.

FLORIDA

> Democrats — Boyd, Y; Brown, C.,
Y; Castor, N; Hastings, Y; Klein, Y;
Mahoney, Y; Meek, Y; Wasserman
Schultz, Y; Wexler, Y.

> Republicans — Bilirakis, N; Brown-
Waite, N; Buchanan, N; Crenshaw, Y;
Diaz-Balart, L., N; Diaz-Balart, M., N;
Feeney, N; Keller, N; Mack, N; Mica,
N; Miller, N; Putnam, Y; Ros-Lehti-
nen, N; Stearns, N; Weldon, Y;
Young, N.

GEORGIA '

> Democrats — Barrow, N; Bishop,
Y; Johnson, N; Lewis, N; Marshall, Y;
Scott, N. .

> Republicans — Broun, N; Deal, N;
Gingrey, N; Kingston, N; Linder, N;
Price, N; Westmoreland, N.

HAWAII
> Democrats — Abercrombie, N; Hi-
rono, N.

IDAHO
> Republicans — Sali, N; Simpson, Y.

ILLINOIS

> Democrats — Bean, Y; Costello, N;
Davis, Y; Emanuel, Y; Foster, Y; Gu-
tierrez, Y; Hare, Y; Jackson, N; Lipin-
ski, N; Rush, N; Schakowsky, Y.

> Republicans — Biggert, N; John-
son, N; Kirk, Y; LaHood, Y; Manzullo,
N; Roskam, N; Shimkus, N; Weller,
X.

INDIANA

* b> Democrats — Carson, N; Donnelly,
Y; Ellsworth, Y; Hill, N; Visclosky, N.
> Republicans — Burton, N; Buyer,
N; Pence, N; Souder, Y.

IOWA

> Democrats — Boswell; Y; Braley,
N; Loebsack, Y.

> Republicans — King, N; Latham, N.

KANSAS
> Democrats — Boyda, N; Moore, Y.
> Republicans — Moran, N; Tiahrt, N.

KENTUCKY

> Democrats — Chandler, N; Yar-
muth, N.

> Republicans — Davis, N; Lewis, Y;
Rogers, Y; Whitfield; N.

LOUISIANA

> Democrats — Cazayoux, N; Jeffer-
son, N; Melancon, Y.

> Republicans — Alexander, N;
Boustany, N; McCrery, Y; Scalise, N.

MAINE
> Democrats — Allen, Y; Michaud, N.

MARYLAND

> Democrats — Cummings, N; Ed-
wards, N; Hoyer, Y; Ruppersberger,
Y; Sarbanes, Y; Van Hollen, Y.

> Republicans — Bartlett, N; Gil-
chrest, Y.

MASSACHUSETTS

> Democrats — Capuano, Y; Dela-
hunt, N; Frank, Y; Lynch, N; Markey,
Y; McGovern, Y; Neal, Y; Olver, Y;
Tierney, N; Tsongas, Y.

MICHIGAN

> Democrats — Conyers, N; Dingell,
Y; Kildee, Y; Kilpatrick, N; Levin, Y;
Stupak, N.

> Republicans — Camp, Y; Ehlers, Y;
Hoekstra, N; Knollenberg, N; McCot-
ter, N; Miller, N; Rogers, N; Upton, Y;
Walberg, N.

MINNESOTA

> Democrats — Ellison, Y; McCol-
lum, Y; Oberstar, Y; Peterson, N;
Walz, N.

> Republicans — Bachmann, N;
Kline, Y; Ramstad, N.

MISSISSIPPI

> Democrats — Childers, N; Taylor,
N; Thompson, N.

> Republican — Pickering, Y.-

BH

MISSOURI

> Democrats — Carnahan, Y; Clay, N;
Cleaver, N; Skelton, Y.

> Republicans — Akin, N; Blunt, Y;
Emerson, Y; Graves, N; Hulshof, N.

MONTANA
> Republican — Rehberg, N.

NEBRASKA
> Republicans — Fortenberry, N;
Smith, N; Terry, N.

NEVADA
> Democrat — Berkley, N.
> Republicans — Heller, N; Porter, Y.

NEW HAMPSHIRE
> Democrats — Hodes, N; Shea-Por-
ter, N.

NEW JERSEY '
> Democrats — Andrews, Y; Holt, Y;
Pallone, Y; Pascrell, N; Payne, N;
Rothman, N; Sires, Y.

> Republicans — Ferguson, Y; Fre-
linghuysen, N; Garrett, N; LoBiondo,
N; Saxton, Y; Smith, N.



NEW MEXICO |

> Democrat — Udall, N.

> Republicans — Pearce, N; Wilson,
Y:

NEW YORK

> Democrats — Ackerman, Y; Arcuri,
Y; Bishop, Y; Clarke, Y; Crowley, Y;
Engel, Y; Gillibrand, N; Hall, Y; Hig-
gins, Y; Hinchey, N; Israel, Y; Lowey,
Y; Maloney, Y; McCarthy, Y; McNulty,
Y; Meeks, Y; Nadler, Y; Rangel, Y;
Serrano, N; Slaughter, Y; Towns, Y;
Velazquez, Y; Weiner, Y.

> Republicans — Fossella, Y; King, Y;
Kuhl, N; McHugh, Y; Reynolds, Y;
Walsh, Y.

NORTH CAROLINA

> Democrats — Butterfield, N; Ethe- -

ridge, Y; Mcintyre, N; Miller, Y; Price,
Y; Shuler, N; Watt, Y.

> Republicans — Coble, N; Foxx, N;
Hayes, N; Jones, N; McHenry, N;
Myrick, N.

NORTH DAKOTA

> Democrat — Pomeroy, Y.
OHIO

> Democrats — Kaptur, N;.Kucinich,
N; Ryan, Y; Space, Y; Sutton, N; Wil-
son, Y. :

> Republicans — Boehner, Y; Chabot,
N; Hobson, Y; Jordan, N; LaTourette,
N; Latta, N; Pryce, Y; Regula, Y;
Schmidt, N; Tiberi, N; Turner, .N.

OKLAHOMA

> Democrat — Boren, Y.

> Republicans — Cole, Y; Fallin, N;
Lucas, N; Sullivan, N.

OREGON

> Democrats — Blumenauer, N; De-
Fazio, N; Hooley, Y; Wu, N.

> Republican — Walden, Y.



PENNSYLVANIA

> Democrats — Altmire, N; Brady, Y;
Carney, N; Doyle, Y; Fattah, Y; Hold-
en, N; Kanjorski, Y; Murphy, P.; Y;
Murtha, Y; Schwartz, Y; Sestak, Y.

> Republicans — Dent, N; English, N;
Gerlach, N; Murphy, T., N; Peterson,
Y; Pitts, N; Platts, N; Shuster, N.

RHODE ISLAND
> Democrats — Kennedy, Y; Lange-
vin, Y. .

SOUTH CAROLINA

> Democrats — Clyburn, Y; Spratt, Y.
> Republicans — Barrett, N; Brown,
Y; Inglis, Y; Wilson, Y.

SOUTH DAKOTA
> Democrat — Herseth Sandlin, N.

TENNESSEE
> Democrats — Cohen, Y; Cooper, Y;
Davis, L., N; Gordon, Y; Tanner, Y. :

~ > Republicans — Blackburn, N; Da-

vis, D., N; Duncan, N; Wamp, N.

TEXAS

> Democrats — Cuellar, N; Doggett,
N; Edwards, Y; Gonzalez, Y; Green,
A., N; Green, G., N; Hinojosa, Y; Jack-
son Lee, N; Johnson, E.B., Y; Lamp-
son, N; Ortiz, N; Reyes, Y; Rodriguez,
N.

> Republicans — Barton, N; Brady, Y;
Burgess, N; Carter, N; Conaway, N;
Culberson, N; Gohmert, N; Granger,
Y; Hall, N; Hensarling, N; Johnson, S.,
N; Marchant, N; McCaul, N; Neuge-
bauer, N; Paul, N; Poe, N; Sessions, Y;
Smith, Y; Thornberry, N.

UTAH

> Democrat — Matheson, N.

> Republicans — Bishop, N; Cannon,
Y,

VERMONT
> Democrat — Welch, N.

VIRGINIA

> Democrats — Boucher, Y; Moran,
Y; Scott, N.

> Republicans — Cantor, Y; Davis, Y;
Drake, N; Forbes, N; Goode, N; Goo-
dlatte, N; Wittman, N; Wolf, Y.

WASHINGTON

> Democrats — Baird, Y; Dicks, Y; In-
slee, N; Larsen, Y; McDermott, Y;
Smith, Y. .

> Republicans — Hastings, N;
McMorris Rodgers, N; Reichert, N.

WEST VIRGINIA

> Democrats — Mollohan, Y; Rahall,
Y,

> Republican — Capito, N.

WISCONSIN

>. Democrats — Baldwin, Y; Kagen,
N; Kind, Y; Moore, Y; Obey, Y.

> Republicans — Petri, N; Ryan, Y;

Sensenbrenner, N.

WYOMING
> Republican — Cubin, Y.

Source; The Associated Press





\

Election concerns undermine rescue bill





By Saul Loeb, AFP/Getty Images

At the White House: Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson calls regulators powers “insufficient” Monday saying rescue plan urgently needed.

Continued from 1A

populist Democrats in the House
made the vote close. But propo-
nents couldn’t overcome these
obstacles:

> Political fear. More than

.75% of House members who are

in close races in the Nov. 4 elec-
tions wouldn't vote for the bill
when their phone calls and e-
mails were running 10-to-1
against it. “As much as anything
else, it was the barrage of phone
calls that everyone received,”
said Rep. Jim Marshall, D-Ga. He
voted for the bill even though his
southwest Georgia district is rat-
ed a tossup by the non-partisan
Rothenberg Political Report.
Republicans facing tough re-
election challenges deserted
their leaders in droves. Thirty-
two of 37 Republicans listed as

Cover story

endangered by the non-partisan
Cook Political Report voted no,
compared.with 18 of 29 Demo-
crats in the same category.

On the flip side, 22 of 29 Re-
publicans who are leaving the
House this year voted for the bill.
Two of the six retiring Democrats
voted against bill.

“There weren't many vulner-
able members who voted yes,”
said David Wasserman, House
editor for the Cook report. A yes
vote, he said, would give “every
opponent a new blistering ad to
run against you.”

> “Bailout” language. No
matter how the Bush administra-
tion tried to describe the com-
plex-rescue plan, it kept appear-
ing in media accounts as a

“bailout” of Wall Street. “When

you call something a ‘bailout,’
there aren’t a whole lot of people
who are out there who are in fa-
vor of a bailout,” said White
House spokesman Tony Fratto.

> Presidential politics. Re-
publican John McCain interrupt-
ed his campaign to jump into ne-
gotiations on the bill, while
Democrat Barack Obama — who
said he was wary of: injecting
presidential politics into the ne-
gotiations — sought to influence
the White House and his. col-
leagues by phone. In their debate
Friday, both were non-commit-
tal. On Sunday, both backed the
bill. On Monday, McCain blamed
Obama for the failure while Oba-
ma vowed action.

> Bush’s weakness. Four
months from retirement and
holding a 27% approval rating in
the latest USA TODAY/Gallup Poll,
Bush couldn't force enough Re-
publicans. to vote yes. He and
Paulson were joined on the
phones Monday by Vice Presi-
dent Cheney and a bevy of top
White House staff members — to
no avail. “Some people commit-
ted to voting for the bill,” Fratto
said. “Others remain skeptical.”

“The president's embrace may
cost them re-election,” Cooper
said. “They're running like scald-
ed dogs from the White House.”

> Pelosi’s rhetoric. Republi-
can leaders expected more of
their colleagues to vote for the
package. Only 65 of the 199
House GOP members backed the
bill. Same blamed the Democrat-
ic speaker’s speech. “A bipartisan
solution is only as good as the last
person who throws a bomb into
the room,” said Minority Whip
Roy Blunt, R-Mo., his party's chief
vote-counter.

Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass.,
chairman of the House Financial
Services Committee, scoffed,
“Somebody hurt my feelings, so
I will punish the country.’ ”

Cold water, hot tempers

The day’s political and financial
gyrations may have be foretold
inside the House gym Monday
morning, and not just because
Republicans jeered their presi-
dent. The hot water ran out.

“It was an early sign of market
failure,” quipped Cooper, who
watched the Republicans’ react



By Mitch Dumke, Reuters

On Capitol Hill: Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif, and Rep. Rahm Eman-
uel, D-IIl., attend a news conference after the bailout bill failed to pass.

to Bush’s speech.

House leaders scheduled four
back-to-back votes on unrelated
issues starting at 8 a.m., giving
them time to take members’
pulse on the rescue plan. It quick-
ly became clear they were in
trouble. “We're struggling,” said
Rep. John Murtha, a Pennsylva-
nia Democrat close to Pelosi.

As the three-hour debate un-
folded, the political maneuvering
began. Because the bill was so
unpopular, neither party wanted
to take primary responsibility for
its passage.

The deal worked out
between the leaders
was “we would have
half the votes, and they
would have half the
votes,” Pelosi said later.
Blunt told reporters af-
terward that he
thought he had 75 GOP
votes when the roll call
began. He emerged
with just 65.

Rep. Zach Wamp, R-
Tenn., acknowledged
some “fear of what might hap-
pen” if the bill didn’t pass but
added, “My heart says no, and
I'm very likely to vote my heart.”
Three hours later, he did.

As the day wore on, retiring
House Republicans became a fo-
cus of GOP lobbying. Rep. Jim
McCrery, R-La., had calls from
Bush and Douglas Holtz-Eakin,
McCain's top policy adviser.

“LT have lost a lot of sleep over
this,” McCrery said. He voted yes.

All day long, lawmakers faced
lobbying by outside groups. The
U.S. Chamber of Commerce,
which supported the plan, sent
e-mails to several thousand
members Sunday night, urging
them to bombard lawmakers
with their opinions. “We un-
leashed a full-court arsenal,” said
R. Bruce Josten, the chamber's
top lobbyist.

That didn’t sway enough Re-
publicans, usually the chamber’s
allies. Rep. Jeb Hensarling of Tex-
as said only a few lawmakers
changed their minds in the final
minutes of the vote.

“We came here today willing
to swallow hard,” Hensarling
said. “But we can’t swallow ev-
erything. ... Any model that es-
sentially has taxpayers having to
bail out Wall Street is fundamen-
tally a flawed model.”

Many lawmakers waited to the
last possible minute. As the 15-
minute roll call counted down to
zero, 54 House members had yet
to cast their votes. At that mo-
ment, the tally was 195-185
against the bill.

As Democratic and Republican
leaders tried to corral members
and switch votes, the tally against
the bill mounted. Pelosi, visible in
her cream-colored suit as she
wove through a throng of mostly
navy jackets, buttonholed Demo-
crats.

Congressional Black Caucus
members Jesse Jackson Jr. of Illi-
nois, Bennie Thompson of Mis-



Blunt: Sought 75
GOP votes, got 65.

sissippi and John Lewis of Geor-
gia sat stoned-faced as Pelosi
leaned over to talk with them in
the final minutes of voting. All
three had voted against the plan.

Pelosi told them, Jackson said,
that the stock market was falling
fast and asked for their support to
help revive the bill. Lewis shook
his head and neither Jackson nor
Thompson budged.

. Jackson said he wants an eco-
nomic stimulus package and reg-
ulations barring banks from buy-
ing mortgage securities included
in any bailout. “We have to give a
carrot and stick at the
same time to Wall
Street,” he said.

Then Rep. Joseph
Crowley, D-N.Y.,
shouted to his Repub-
lican colleagues, “The
Dow just dropped 600
points!”

For vulnerable Re-
publicans, a call from
Bush didn't matter as
much as thousands of
calls from back home.
“America just seems to be in a
populist mood right now,” said
Rep. Tom Davis, R-Va., who is not
running again and voted in favor.

Rep. Louie‘ Gohmert, R-Texas,
voted no. He said the plan be-
stowed too much power on Paul-
son. “I don’t want the govern-
ment owning everything in
America,” he said.

Owning ‘the Great Depression’

Once the results were in, the
recriminations began. Democrats
blamed Republicans for produc-
ing one-third of their 199 votes.
Republicans accused Democrats
of being overly partisan.

Some Republicans blamed
Paulson, the plan's architect for
not listening to them. “A man
born without ears,” Rep. Mark
Souder, R-Ind., said.

Much of the talk focused on
the percentages of Democrats
and Republicans who voted for
the plan. While 60% of Democrats
voted yes, only 32% of Repub-
licans did so. Two-thirds “decided
to put political ideology ahead of
the best interests of our great na-
tion,” said House Majority Whip
Jim Clyburn, D-S.C.

Republicans said it was Demo-
crats’ responsibility to pass the
measure, since Democrats con-
trol the House. “We're not in the
majority of the Congress that
failed to act today,” Blunt said.

They also blamed Pelosi's fiery
speech blaming a “right-wing
ideology of anything goes.”
House Minority Leader John
Boehner, R-Ohio, said it “caused a
number of members we thought
we could get, to go south.”

Neither McCain nor Obama
were on Capitol Hill in the hours
before the vote. That didn’t stop
the McCain campaign from blast-
ing Obama for not getting more
involved. McCain returned to
Washington after Friday's debate
but didn’t go back to Capitol Hill.



He lobbied at least 11-House Re-
publicans during his campaign

Â¥ hiatus. Four voted against the

package, including two from his
home state of Arizona.

Even so, he defended his in-
volvement. At a rally in Columbus
before the vote was cast, McCain
said he acted while Obama was

™, “monitoring” the situation.

“That’s not leadership. That’s

«| watching from the sidelines,”
| McCain said.

In a statement, Obama’s cam-

| paign countered, “This is a mo-

ment of national crisis, and to-
day’s inaction in Congress as well
as the angry and hyper-partisan
statement released by the
McCain campaign are exactly
why -the American people are
disgusted with Washington.”
Obama had been in daily con-

| tact with Paulson and congres-

sional Democrats during the past
two weeks. But he has kept his
activities low key, saying that in-
jecting presidential politics com-
plicates the negotiations.

The most ominous warnings
came from those who think the
nation risks financial Armaged-
don absent a rescue bill. “Those
that voted no will own the Great
Depression,” said Sen.’ Lindsey
Graham, R-S.C., a McCain ally.

‘The way forward’

At the end of the day, all Bush
and congressional leaders could
do was rue the stock market's
record 778-point decline and
vow to try again. “We'll be work-
ing with members of Congress,
leaders of Congress, on the way
forward,” Bush said.

Fratto, his spokesman, was
blunt. “We're very concerned
about the markets,” he said.

In the House, which isn’t
scheduled to meet again until
noon Thursday, Frank said Demo-
crats were ready to go back to
work. This time, he said, the ad-
ministration should work better
with Republicans in Congress.

Rep. John Shadegg, R-Ariz.,
one of those McCain didn’t sway,
said supporters should be able to
change enough minds if they
change such things as accounting
rules and increases in insurance
for bank accounts. He said there
isn’t “a shadow ofa doubt” a re-
vised bill will pass the House this
week.

Possible elements of a compro-
mise could include an economic
stimulus plan and bankruptcy
protection for homeowners faced
with foreclosure, which could
win Democratic votes. A require-
ment that Treasury insure rather
than buy bad loans could win
conservative votes.

In the Senate, where bipartisan
support has been stronger than
the House, Sens. Chris Dodd, D-
Conn., and Judd Gregg, R-N.H.,
struck a conciliatory tone. Dodd
said after a cool-down period
and the Jewish holiday of Rosh
Hashanah, lawmakers would get
back to work. “We don't intend to
leave here without the job being
done,” he said.

Blunt said supporters of a res-
cue plan have a powerful new
weapon: the plummeting stock
market. “We're going to have a
couple of days to see how the
marketplace reacts to all this,” he
said. “That may be a good thing.”

Contributing: David Jackson,
Matt Kelley and Jill Lawrence



Corrections
& Clarifications

USA TODAY is committed to accuracy. To reach
us, contact Standards & Recruitment Editor
Brent Jones at 1-800-872-7073 or email accu-
yacy@usatoday.com, Please indicate whether
you're responding to content online or in the
newspaper.

A50 States/50 Days graphic
Monday gave the wrong party af-
filiation for Kentucky's governor,
The governor is a ey ,

During the holy month
Ramadan, Muslims fast fr
dawn until dusk. A pho
in the world briefs Mo;
stated the fasting pe





USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 3A



Nationline

Looking ahead
Voting opens in swing state of Ohio

A week-long period begins today, during which
residents of Ohio, a swing state in the presidential
election, can register to vote and cast an absentee
ballot at the same time.
Both major political parties
have urged supporters to
vote now, although GOP-
backed lawsuits challenged
the legality.

Also today:

> Closing arguments are
scheduled in Bryan, Texas, in
the trial of Darnell Harts-
field, who is accused in the
abduction and murders of
five people from a Kentucky Hudson: Returns to
Fried Chicken restaurant 25 music with CD.
years ago.

> Jennifer Hudson, who won an Academy Award
for her role in Dreamgirls, releases her debut album.



Across the nation

Report: Everglades restoration failing

A multibillion-dollar effort to restore Florida’s Ev-
erglades has made little progress amid funding
woes and bureaucratic red tape, the National Re-
search Council reported. The congressionally man-
dated report warns that degradation of the Ever-
glades could become irreversible if action isn’t
taken quickly. “We're losing the battle to save this
thing,” said William Graf, head of the committee
that wrote the report.

The South Florida Water Management District,
which oversees the 30-year project, blamed
lengthy federal planning and limited federal money.

Trial nears in alleged Fort Dix plot —

Jury selection began under tight security in Cam-
den, NJ., in the federal trial of five men accused of
planning an attack on Fort Dix.

Lawyers were to take at least three weeks to seat
12 jurors and six alternates for a trial scheduled to
last several months. Judge Robert Kugler is keeping
the jury anonymous; even lawyers in the case
won't know their names. The government says the
accused were moving forward witha plan to shoot
soldiers on the Army installation when they were
arrested in May 2007. No attack was carried out,
and lawyers for the men say there was no plot.



By Matt Rourke, AP

Garden in the sky

Green efforts: Mayor Michael Nutter, a Democrat,
places a plant into the roof of the Free Library of
Philadelphia on Monday. It’s the first “green roof”
on a building operated by the city. The roof uses
plants to help maintain the building’s temperature.

Lander finds hint of past water on Mars

The Phoenix lander has found minerals on Mars
that suggest water was there in the past, scientists
said, as the spacecraft enters the last few months of
its life. Michael Hecht, a lead scientist at NASA’s Jet
Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif, said the
lander has found indications of calcium carbonate,
the main ingredient in chalk, and possibly clay. On
Earth, these materials form only in the presence of
water. — Anne Ryman, The Arizona Republic

Gun suit appeal targets Atlanta airport

Gun-rights supporters in Georgia said they will
appeal a federal judge’s decision to dismiss a law-
suit that sought to allow licensed gun owners to
bear arms in Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta Interna-
tional Airport. A new state law allows people with a
gun permit to carry guns into restaurants, state
parks and on public transportation, but Atlanta offi-
cials declared the world’s busiest airport a “gun-
free zone.” GeorgiaCarry.org sued, claiming the air-
port qualifies as public transportation. Judge Mar-
. vin Shoob tossed out the suit Friday. State Rep. Tim
Bearden, a Republican who co-sponsored the law,
said the advocacy group is preparing an appeal.

Also ..

> CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. — NASA said it is de-

laying its shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Tele-

‘ scope until next year because of an unexpected

breakdown of the telescope Saturday. Shuttle Atlan-

tis was to blast off in two weeks, carrying seven as-

tronauts to upgrade the telescope. Now, NASA must
regroup, and astronauts could get more training.

On Deadline: What others are reporting

In Texas, no place to hide from friends

Some Texans are combining social networking
with cellphones and global positioning technology
to keep track of friends and customers, the Austin
American-Statesman (statesman.com) said.:

“Moximity” allows
users to click a button
on their cellphones to

") For more on this
and other news



__ Stories,seetheOn find _someone’s last

‘ Deadline news blog at known location, as
ondeadline.usatoday.com. ' es

For news from across the well as nearby busi

nesses and entertain-
ment venues. Adver-
tisers with the service
can send information
about products and specials to potential customers
nearby. “With Moximity, you can track everybody
with a tap of your finger,” co-founder Bryan Jones
told the newspaper.

The Apple application is available only in Austin,
but Jones plans to expand into other college towns
soon. — Elizabeth Findell

nation, updated 24 hours
a day, seven days a week,
see nationline.usatoday.com.



By John Bacon with staff and wire reports



‘Please recycle



D> aA PP Sign up for USA TODAY's FREE Daily Briefing
Sei e-mail
uit Fe e-mail newsletter to receive the world’s top
WALLS news each morning.

Go to email.usatoday.com







Medevac helicopters

Crash renews
calls for tighter
Safety standards

By Alan Levin
USA TODAY

Deaths on air ambulance
flights — including four fatal-
ities over the weekend in
Maryland — have soared to
record levels over the past
year, prompting safety advo-
cates to renew calls for strict-
er controls on medical airlifts,

A Maryland State Police
emergency medical helicop-
ter crashed about midnight
Saturday in a wooded park,
amid fog, according to the Na-
tional Transportation Safety
Board (NTSB). The déad in-
cluded a 17-year-old girl who
had been injured in a car
crash, the pilot and two med-
ical workers. An 18-year-old
woman, who had also been in
a car crash, survived.

Nation



aa Dae Taal



“This is one of the areas of avi-
ation with one of the highest
accident rates overall.”

In 2006, the NTSB issued a
special réport on air ambu-
lance crashes that called for

| tighter rules to address the

By Jose Luis Magana, AP

Four dead: A police officer walks through the wreckage of a, .
medical helicopter that crashed Saturday night in Maryland.

This year, 24 people have
died on medical flights. The
most deaths recorded in a
year previously was 18 in
2004, according to NTSB data.
The six fatal crashes so far this
year equal the highest record-
ed in any previous calendar
year. Over the past 12

months, the trend is even
more stark: A total of 31 peo-
ple have died in eight crashes.

“The safety board is so con-
cerned about this area of avi-
ation safety that we have vot-
ed to hold a public hearing on
EMS operations,” NTSB mem-
ber Debbie Hersman said.

inherent risks of flying heli-
copters to roadside accident
scenes and other dangerous
locations. It also sought to re-
quire computerized systems
that warn pilots when they
get too close to the ground.
Hersman said progress has
been made, but none of the
NTSB recommendations has
been fully implemented.
Investigators are months
away from pronouncing a
cause in the District Heights,
Md., case, but it. appears to
have key factors in common
with the bulk of air ambu-
lance crashes. The crash oc-
curred in poor visibility and
darkness as weather was de-
teriorating, Hersman said.
The pilot had planned to take
the two patients to a hospital

under scrutiny

but was diverted to nearby
Andrews Air Force Base as the
weather got worse, she said.

All but two of the past eight
fatal accidents have been at
night or in poor weather, ac-
cording to NTSB records. Poor
visibility and weather were
also named as a key cause of
accidents in the board’s 2006
report.

Pressing on in bad weather
is “a good way to end up in an
accident,” said Gary Size-
more, president of National
EMS Pilots Association.

“We're saddened, and
we're disappointed, and
we're frustrated,” said Dawn
Mancuso, executive director
of the Association of Air Med-
ical Services. She said she had
just attended a helicopter
safety summit with the
Maryland State Police on Fri-
day. :

The U.S. House and Senate
are considering legislation
that would place new stan-
dards on the industry.



Fishing industry hurting

Boats, docks,

processing

lants ravaged
y Gustav, Ike

By Rick Jervis
USA TODAY

NEW ORLEANS — Usually this time "

in La.



of year, Billy Foret would be guiding
his 73-foot steel hull boat along the
Louisiana coast and pulling in pounds
of white shrimp.

Instead, for the past three weeks,
he’s been pulling soggy drywall and
ruined furniture from his flooded
home in Chauvin, about 70 miles
southwest of New Orleans.

Even if he were able to go out,
many of the buying docks and
shrimp-processing plants he needs
have been wrecked by Hurricanes
Gustav and Ike, which plowed
through the area this month.

“Everyone’s spending money re-
pairing with no income coming in,”
Foret said. “Things are looking pretty
bad for the fishermen right now.”

Gustav and Ike delivered another
one-two punch to Louisiana’s fishing
industry, which was still recovering
from the ruin wrought by Hurricanes
Katrina and Rita three years ago.

The 2005 storms caused an esti-
mated $582 million in damage to the
state’s commercial fishers, most of it
to the shrimping sector, said Rex Caf-
fey, director of Louisiana State Univer-
sity’s Center for Natural Resource Eco-
nomics & Policy.

Gustav and Ike destroyed not only
fishing boats but loading docks, ice
factories, processing plants and other
crucial components of the industry,
Caffey said.

Early estimates show Gustav
caused around $76 million worth of
damage to the fishery infrastructure,
he said. Estimates for Ike are still be-
ing compiled.

The destruction along with rising
fuel costs and cheaper imported
shrimp is taking its toll. “It’s a really
bad situation,” Caffey said. “This has
taken a crippled. industry and hurt it
even more.”

Louisiana produces more than one-
fourth of the seafood in the continen-
tal USA, Caffey said.

On Wednesday, U.S. Commerce
Secretary Carlos Gutierrez declared a
fishery resource disaster for the Gulf
of Mexico. The declaration frees up
federal funds to fishermen in Louisi-
ana and Texas and makes fishing busi-
nesses eligible for Small Business Ad-
ministration loans.

: SS S : S
By Shawn Martin, (Lake Charles, La.) American Press, via AP





Tossed aside by Hurricane Ike: A shrimp boat lies along state Highway 27 on Sept. 17 in Hackberry, La., about 15
miles southwest of Lake Charles. Hurricane Ike had come ashore in Galveston, Texas, four days earlier.



ay,
wz

ES

By PC Piazza, The (Lafayette, La.} Daily Advertiser, via AP

Two days after the storm: When Ike hit on Sept. 13, it destroyed docks and
boats in Cameron, La., about 25 miles southwest of Lake Charles.

Around $175 million in federal
funds were earmarked after Katrina
to help the Louisiana fishing industry,

’ though most of it went to restoring
wrecked habitats where fish and
shrimp live and did not go directly to
fishermen, Caffey said. Many fisher-
men were still waiting on federal
grants and loans when Gustav and Ike
hit, he said.

Clearing storm debris from water-
ways where fishermen work should
be a priority, said Pete Gerica, a fisher-
man who shrimps in Lake Pontchar-
train and Lake Borgne. Gerica tried to
go shrimping last week but his boat

became entangled in branches and
sea grass, bending a propeller.

Katrina wrecked both his boats and
his home, he said. Ike destroyed his
three ice makers. A lot of the progress
made since 2005 — including replac-
ing docks, ice factories and processors
— was wiped out during Gustav and
Ike, Gerica said.

“A lot of the stuff we did after Katri-
na to get people back up is gone,” he
said.
Ironically, Katrina and Rita also
helped fishermen organize more rap-
idly after Gustav and Ike, Gerica said.
Conference calls’ were organized im-

mediately after this year’s storms be-
tween fishermen throughout south-
ern Louisiana and state and federal
officials, assessing damage and plot-
ting strategy — something that took
weeks after Katrina, he said.

“We're still in recovery mode from
the first one,” Gerica said. “So we're
more organized.”

In Jean Lafitte, about 28 miles south
of New Orleans, which was sub-
merged by Ike, fishermen had to deal
with wrecked boats and docks along
with ruined homes.

By early last week, a lot of the fish-
ermen still hadn’t been to their
homes, most of which were located in
the southern part of the town and re-
ceived the highest water. The street to
that part of town was still not acces-
sible.

“You already had fuel at nearly $4
gallon,” Mayor Tim Kerner said. “Now
this comes and makes it so a man
can’t earn a living. Right now it’s ex-
tremely hard to be a fisherman.”

Gordon Rojas, 68, has been shrimp-
ing for more than 40 years in the bay-
ous and bays around Jean Lafitte. His
boat survived Gustav and Ike. But the
docks and ice factories he needs were
destroyed. His house also took on 4
feet of water.

“It used to be a pretty good living
ages ago,” Rojas said as he waited for
another supply truck to arrive. “But
everything's against us now. It’s a dy-
ing business.”



Fire season forces $400M | “xs
in cuts at Forest Service







By Trevor Hughes
USA TODAY

The cost of fighting sum-
mer wildfires in California
and the West has forced U.S.
Forest Service officials to slash
more than $400 million in
spending, causing closures of
some campgrounds and lim-
iting access to some forests.

While the number of fires
and acreage involved is down,
the amount spent to contain
those fires is up. That’s be-
cause the cost of fighting fires
varies depending on where
the fires are burning, said For-
est Service spokeswoman
Donna Drelick.

The Forest Service slashed
$200 million in 2006 and
$100 million in 2007 to cover

wildfire costs, the agency's
budget docurnents show. For-
est Service administrators say
the latest reductions will have
a broad impact across the
country:

>In Vermont and other
sites in the Northeast hit by
heavy rains, washed-out trails
and bridges aren’t being re-
paired, and campgrounds are
being closed, said Kristi Po-
nozzo, spokeswoman for the
Green Mountain National
Forest.

> In Georgia, Louisiana,
Virginia and Arkansas, road
and trail maintenance will be
halted or delayed, limiting ac-
cess into forest areas and in-
creasing the amount of sedi-
ment washed into lakes,
rivers and reservoirs, said

Mike D'Aquino of the U.S. For-
est Service in Georgia.

>In Montana, research
about how wildfires behave,
conducted in partnership
with the University of Mon-
tana, is being cut, said Dave
Tippets, a spokesman for the
service’s 14-state Rocky
Mountain Research Station.

G. Sam Foster, head of the
station, said the cuts will af-
fect research into the pine
bark beetle epidemic in the
Rockies. Rangers will close
campgrounds and declare
some roads and trails off-lim-
its because of the danger of
dead, falling trees, he said.

“The impacts will be far
reaching and will affect all
parts of the Forest Service’s
budget, making it hard for the

By Bob



SOBS SSESAS S
Pennell, (Medford, Ore.) Mail T

Costly effort: A plane sprays fire retardant Sept. 18 over a
grass fire that was threatening homes in Medford, Ore.

agency to accomplish much
beyond the most minimal as-
pects of its many responsibil-
ities,” said Rep. Mark Udall,
D-Colo., who serves on the
House Natural Resources
Committee.

Chris Lancette, a spokes-
man for the Wilderness Soci-
ety, urged the Forest Service
and Congress to consider cre-
ating a firefighting account
structured in the way hurri-

cane and other disaster-re-
covery projects are funded.
Udall endorsed that idea.

As of Sept. 14, the National
Interagency Fire Center re-
ported, 67,269 fires had
burned 4,67 million acres this
year. The Forest Service ex-
pects to spend $1.6 billion to
contain wildfires this year.

Hughes reports for the Fort
Collins Coloradoan
4A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY



Mukasey taps special

Justice report
calls dismissals
‘haphazard’

By Donna Leinwand
USA TODAY *

WASHINGTON — A special
prosecutor will investigate
whether former attorney general
Alberto Gonzales and his staff
broke the law when they fired
nine U.S. attorneys.

Attorney General Michael Mu-
kasey on Monday named Nora
Dannehy, a career prosecutor and
acting U.S. attorney from Con-
necticut, to probe allegations of
criminal misconduct.

Mukasey was responding to a

Department of Justice (DOJ) re-
port that said Bush administra-
tion officials may have dismissed
the U.S. attorneys for political
reasons and made misleading
statements about the dismissals.

Mukasey called the dismissal
process “haphazard, arbitrary
and unprofessional.”

“This report describes a dis-
appointing episode in the history
of the department,” he said.

Gonzales approved the dis-
missals during a Nov. 27, 2006,
meeting but told Congress a few
months later that he couldn't re-
member the meeting. The con-
troversy over.the dismissals led
to the resignations of Gonzales
and many of his top aides.

Gonzales “provided Congress
with a truthful account of his
knowledge of and involvement in

Washington



By Bob Child, AP

Special prosecutor: Nora Dan-
nehy to investigate allegations.

the dismissal of U.S. attorneys,”
said his lawyer, George Terwillig-
er. The report found no evidence
that Gonzales acted ieee
he said.

“The U.S. attorneys are political
appointees and are often subject
to evaluation and criticism by
elected officials,” Terwilliger add-
ed in an e-mail. “It is not improp-
er for senators and others to level
such criticism, nor for DOJ offi-
cials to receive and consider it.”

The report — written by Glenn
Fine, the department’s inspector
general, and Marshall Jarrett,
head of the Office of Professional
Responsibility — concluded the
process used to decide which US.
attorneys would be dismissed
was “fundamentally flawed.”

Gonzales and his top deputy,
Paul McNulty, “abdicated their
responsibility to safeguard the in-
tegrity and independence” of the
Justice Department by failing to
supervise Gonzales’ chief of staff,
Kyle Sampson, who selected

which prosecutors would go
“with virtually no oversight,” the
report said. McNulty and Samp-
son both resigned last year.
“Gonzales bears primary re-
sponsibility for the flawed U.S. at-
torney-removal process and the
resulting turmoil that it created,”

Fine and Jarrett. wrote. “We

found that Gonzales was remark-
ably unengaged.”

The report found “substantial
evidence that partisan political
considerations” motivated some
of the dismissals.

It concluded that Justice De-
partment officials fired New
Mexico U.S. Attorney David Igle-
sias after Republican lawmakers
complained about him. because
he declined to bring public cor-
ruption and voter fraud cases be-
fore the 2006 elections.

prosecutor in firings probe

“I've said all along that’ these
moves were improper and illegal,
and now it appears that they
were criminal as well,” Iglesias
told the Associated Press. “Our
complaints weren’t just com-
plaints of disgruntled former em-
ployees.”

Fine and Jarrett called for addi-
tional investigation because
some administration officials, in-
cluding then-White House advis-
er Karl Rove, refused to answer
questions and turn over some
documents about the dismissals.

“We believe the evidence col-
lected in this investigation is not
complete and that serious allega-
tions have not been fully investi-
gated or resolved,” they wrote.

Dannehy will determine
whether any of the allegations
warrant criminal charges.



Judge scolds prosecutors over witness in Stevens case

By Matt Apuzzo and Tom Hays
The Associated Press

WASHINGTON — A federal judge
demanded that prosecutors should
explain “under penalty of perjury”
why they allowed an ailing poten-
tial witness in the trial of Repub-
lican Sen. Ted Stevens to go home to
Alaska without telling the court.

US. District Judge Emmet Sulli-
van scolded prosecutors for sending
Robert Williams, the manager of a



AP

Sullivan: Warns of
possible sanctions.

construction project on Stevens’
Alaska cabin, home instead of put-
ting him on the witness stand.

“I find it very, very disturbing that
this has happened,” Sullivan said.
“I'm concerned about the appear-
ance of impropriety.”

The judge ordered prosecutors to
provide a fuller explanation for why
they didn’t tell anyone that Wil-
liams, who was subpoenaed by
both sides, went home last week on
the day the trial opened. Sullivan al-

so warned that sanctions were on
sible but didn’t say what kind.
Stevens, 84, is charged with in-
tentionally failing to disclose on
Senate financial forms that he re-
ceived about $250,000 in home
renovations done in 2001 on his
hillside house from Veco, an Alaska
oil pipeline contractor. Stevens paid
$160,000 for the renovations, but
the prosecution claims the work
was worth far more than that and
Stevens should have known it.





Group complains to
IRS about sermons

A group filed complaints with the Internal Reve-
nue Service against six churches whose pastors en-
dorsed or made comments about political candi-
dates from their pulpits Sunday.

Washington-based Americans United for Sep-
aration of Church and State filed the complaints,
claiming the comments are a violation of IRS rules
that bar churches from making political endorse-
ments if they wish to keep their tax-exempt status.

The Alliance Defense Fund, an Arizona-based
conservative legal group, orchestrated some of the
preachers’ actions to invite IRS scrutiny in the hope
that a legal fight will lead to the restrictions being
found unconstitutional. The IRS has said it would
take action if appropriate. The agency does not
comment on specific complaints.

Obama-McCain ad wars continue

Republican John McCain's campaign released a
radio ad that says some things said by his Demo-
cratic opponent are “simply not true.” Democrat
Barack Obama’s campaign has been saying McCain
opposes stem cell research. As the non-partisan
PolitiFact.com has reported, that’s a false charge.
McCain has voted in the Senate to authorize the
spending of federal funds for research on embryon-
ic stem cell lines.

Obama’s campaign released a TV ad in which the
candidate says it’s “an outrage” that CEOs of some
financial institutions that have failed:in recent
weeks expect to get financial packages worth mil-
lions of dollars. The ad says he would restrict the
pay of executives from those firms if they are res-
cued by a federal bailout package. The ad implies
that McCain economic adviser Carly Fiorina is one
of those financial executives. In fact, she left the
technology firm Hewlett-Packard in 2005.

Debate had fewer viewers than in 2004

Friday’s presidential debate between John
McCain and Barack Obama drew 52.4 million view-
ers, according to Nielsen, a media research compa-
ny. The TV audience for the first presidential debate
of the 2008 election was roughly 16% smaller than
the audience for the first debate between President
Bush and his Democratic rival Sen. John Kerry dur-
ing the 2004 election. The Bush-Kerry debate drew
62.5 ~"""~n viewers on Sept. 30, a Thursday.

Ex-CIA official pleads guilty to fraud

Kyle Foggo, a longtime CIA officer who resigned
in 2006, pleaded guilty to defrauding the United
States of its right to his honest services.

Foggo, who as executive director was the CIA’s
third-highest official, admitted he abused his posi-
tion by causing the agency to hire companies and
people while concealing his personal relationships
with them, the Justice Department said inca state-
ment. He could face up to 20 years in prison.

Most nursing homes cited for violations

More than 90% of U.S. nursing homes were cited
for violating federal standards of care in each of the
past three years, according to a report. For-profit fa-
cilities had a higher percentage of violations than
other nursing homes, said the report released by
the inspector general for the Health and Human
Services Department. Medicare, in trying to in-
crease the quality of care, will post on its website
the names of facilities that fare poorly.



By Mark Memmott with wire reports





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BH

RMR ee es sities

The witness. dispute began this
weekend when Williams, the Veco
employee who supervised the ren-
ovations on Stevens’ house, called
defense lawyers and said prosecu
tors had ignored important facts in
the case.

Williams said the government's
estimates for how much time he
spent at the senator’s house — and
how much that time was worth —
were overblown, according to court
documents.

The value of the renovation is
crucial because Stevens’ defense is
that he thought $160,000 covered
everything so there was no need to
report anything additional on dis-
closure forms.

Stevens said that if anything was
tacked onto the job, Veco founder
Bill Allen did so without telling him.
Because the senator’s wife handles
all his finances, Stevens says, there’s
no way he could have known Allen
was adding on work.



Odds of a child Tua acl professional Pelfer a at

Odds of a child rberne diaeageed with autisr

Some signs to look for:

No big smiles or other joyful
expiessions by 6 months.

No babbling by
12 months.

No words by
| 16 months.

To learn more of the signs of autism, visit autismspeaks.c org

AUTISM SPEAKS"

It’s time to listen.



~«


Returned to safety in Egypt: European tourists, who were taken
hostage by bandits in the Egyptian desert, receive flowers in Cairo.

Tourists rescued
from kidnappers

6 captors killed in
Sudan battle earlier

From wire reports

CAIRO — Egyptian and Suda-
nese troops, backed by European
commandos, swooped down in
helicopters Monday to rescue a
tour group that had been kid-
napped in Egypt and taken on a
10-day dash across the Sahara.

Freedom for the 11 European
tourists and eight Egyptian
guides came hours after Suda-
nese troops killed six of the ab-
ductors and captured two who
revealed where the remaining
gunmen were holding their cap-
tives.

The five Germans, five Italians
and a Romanian, along with eight
Egyptian drivers and guides, ar-
rived in Cairo on a military plane
Monday. They smiled as they
walked across the tarmac to be
greeted with bouquets of flow-
ers.
Military helicopters flew the

freed hostages to a Cairo hospital
for checks. Officials handed them
mobile phones to call their fam-
ilies.

“They seemed exhausted but
said there was no ill treatment,”
said Omaima el-Husseini, a tour-
ism ministry spokeswoman.

The ordeal began Sept. 19 dur-
ing a safari on the Gilf al-Kabir, a
desert plateau renowned for pre-
historic cave art in a remote cor-

‘ner of southwestern Egypt, near
the Libyan and Sudanese borders.
While the tourists were camping,

heavily armed gunmen in SUVs
seized them and took them
across the unguarded border into
Sudan. | ,

The abduction — the first of its
kind involving tourists in Egypt —
was a blow to the Egyptian gov-
ernment, which depends on
tourism as the country’s biggest
foreign currency earner.

Sunday night, Sudanese troops
encountered eight of the kidnap-
pers, apparently sent to get fuel
and food. “Our search efforts
were combing the Sudanese-Lib-
yan border and were surprised to
see a Land Rover with the tourist
company’s logo on it,” Ibrahim
Ezz Eldin Ibrahim, deputy head of
Sudanese intelligence, told Al-Ja-
zeera television. “There was then
a chase and an exchange of fire,
where we killed six of the kid-
nappers and caught two of
them.”

Then, Sudanese troops and an
Egyptian commando team, using
two helicopters, launched a res-
cue mission early Monday, two
Egyptian security officials told
the Associated Press on condition
of anonymity. A German special
police unit and military comman-
dos also were involved, German
Interior and Defense Ministry of-
ficials told the AP, also speaking
on condition of anonymity.

Sudanese Foreign Ministry
spokesman Ali Youssef said the
kidnappers were Sudanese and
Chadians. He accused them of
having ties to ethnic African re-
bels in Darfur that the Sudanese
government has been battling
since early 2003.



U.S. Navy surrounds vessel

USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 5A











seized by pirates off Somalia

The U.S. Navy sent more warships Monday to surround a hijacked
ship loaded with 33 Russian-made tanks and said the cargo had been
destined for unknown buyers in Sudan. U.S. destroyers and cruisers

_ have been deployed within 10 miles of the Ukrainian vessel being
held by Somali pirates demanding $20 million to release the tanks, ri-
fles and ammunition, along with 21 crewmembers. Pirates seized the
MV Faina off Somalia on Thursday.

Lt. Nathan Christensen, a deputy spokesman for the Navy’s 5th
Fleet, said the arms shipment had been destined for Sudan. The Unit-
ed States opposes arms transfers to Sudan, which it considers a state
sponsor of terrorism. A Western diplomat in Kenya, who spoke on
condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to speak to the
news media, told the Associated Press the shipment was destined for
southern Sudan — not Darfur — and did not violate the embargo.

Petraeus: Afghanistan fighting might intensify

Gen. David Petraeus warned that combat in Afghanistan could in-
tensify in the coming months as the United States and NATO allies ag-
gressively take on Taliban fighters attempting to hide and gather
strength in the rugged terrain over winter. After talks in London with
British Prime Minister Gordon Brown, Petraeus said more troops are
needed in Afghanistan, where extremist attacks have made this the
most violent year since the U.S.-led invasion. _

The remarks come days after Defense Secretary Robert Gates said
the Pentagon could send more combat troops to Afghanistan starting
in the spring. Gates cautioned against a buildup in a country that has
repelled invaders,

Pakistanis flee suicide attacks, border violence

Suicide attacks have killed almost 1,200 Pakistanis since July 2007,
most of them civilians, according to military statistics released Mon-
‘day. Meanwhile, heavy fighting between Pakistani troops and in-
surgents on the Afghan border has sent about 20,000 Pakistanis flee-
ing into Afghanistan, the United Nations reported.

EU to monitor Russian pullout from Georgia

Almost 300 monitors from 22 European Union nations were in
place to oversee Russia’s promised troop withdrawal from ‘swaths of
Georgia it has occupied since a war in August. The troop withdrawal
will begin Wednesday, but Russia will keep about 8,000 troops in the
separatist regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.

Iran urged to release nuclear details

A six-year investigation has not ruled out the possibility that Iran
may be running clandestine nuclear programs, said Mohamed EIBa-
radei, the chief United Nations nuclear inspector. A European Union
statement at the opening of the International Atomic Energy Agency’s
145-nation conference declared, “The ifiternational community can-
not accept the prospect of Iran acquiring nuclear weapons.”



By John Bacon with wire reports



U S de ath toll ders, 25, of Avon Lake, Ohio; died
oo Wednesday in Jisr Naft of wounds
suffered when a suicide bomber det-
As of Monday morning, 4,163 USS. onated a vest during operations; 3rd
servicemembers and 11 Defense De- Armored Cavalry Regiment.
partment civilians had been identi- ___» Army Staff Sgt. Ronald Phil-
fied as having died in the lraq war: lips Jr., 33, Conway, S.C.; died Thurs-
3,379 from hostile action and 795 day in Bahbahani of wounds suffered
from non-combat-related incidents, When his vehicle encountered an im-
Latest deaths identified: provised explosive device; 3rd In-
> Army Pfc. Jamel A. Bryant, 22, fantry Division.
Belleville, !ll., died Saturday in Bagh-
dad of injuries suffered in a vehicle Source: Defense Department
accident while on patrol in Wahida; >For details on each American
Ist Armored Division. killed in the war in Iraq, go to

> Army Capt. Michael J. Med- soldiers.usatoday.com





























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nonbank affiliate of Wachovia Corporation. Mer


6A- TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY :

Across the USA

News from every state

Alabama: Anniston — The Army said
it has passed the halfway point in its in-
cineration of Cold War chemical weap-
ons stored at the Anniston Army Depot.
Contractors for the military began de-
stroying the stockpile of agents in 2003.
The Army said nearly 331,000 rockets,
artillery shells and land mines filled
with nerve agents have been destroyed.

Alaska: Anchorage — Officials of a
new Alaska Native charter school here
hope to boost its enrollment by offering
bus service. The Alaska Native Cultural
Charter School is on the verge of failing
with 152 students. The minimum for
public funding is 151. Officials said bus-
ing would serve students in the most fi-
nancial need and those who live far-
thest from the school.

Arizona: Phoenix — The city is get-
ting a nearly $40 million grant from a
housing and economic recovery law
passed by Congress during the summer.
The money could be used to provide
buyer assistance for foreclosed homes,
rehabilitate homes that become blight-
ed after abandonment and demolish
“homes that are beyond repair. Officials

say Phoenix will be able to assist up to ~

500 properties with the money.

Arkansas: Crossett — An educator
here was arrested as part of a federal in-
vestigation into a drug-trafficking ring in
pecans Texas. Police arrested Mar-
shall J. Kelly, 46, at Crossett High School,
where he worked as the director of cur-
riculum for grades 5-12. Kelly is charged
with conspiracy to distribute and pos-
session of more than 5 kilograms of co-
caine. He is accused of being part of the
Escamilla drug-trafficking organization.

California: Fresno — The City Council
proposed paying homeowners to re-
move lawns and ban water-consuming

landscaping in new construction. Fres-

no charges residents a flat rate for water
no matter how much they use, a prac-
tice that will end by 2013. ... Moss
Landing — Endangered leatherback

cago and Washington. The filing comes
about a year after Creative Loafing’s July
2007 purchase of the Chicagp Reader
and Washington City Paper. ... Key
West — A man who drifted in a disabled
sailboat for six days was rescued by au-
thorities. Michael Beaudet of Key West
was Sailing in the Florida Keys when a
cable that supported his boat's mast
failed and the mast broke, He says he
drank rainwater and ate re plucked
from seaweed while he drifted.



Georgia: Comer — The state Division
of Public Health will study whether a
natural gas pipeline ah aes station
polluted an area in northeast Georgia.

Officials want to know if air, soil and wa-

ter near the Williams Transco compres-
sor station in Comer are contaminated
with high levels of toxic chemicals. Divi-
sion of Public Health spokeswoman Be-
len Moran said residents are complain-
ing their health may be in jeopardy.

Hawaii: Honolulu — Owners of Turtle
Bay Resort on Oahu’s North Shore are
going ahead with plans for more hotels
and other facilities on the land. The city
has given them a six-month extension
of their application to subdivide the sce-
nic shoreside property that many local,
residents want preserved. The resort
owners say a proposal by poli
Gov. Lingle to buy and protect the land is
unlikely to succeed because of a state
budget deficit.

Idaho: Boise — A newly formed group
of environmentalists is working ona

lan to encourage Boise schools and

usinesses to ditch disposable shopping
bags for a week. The group, Bring Your
Own Bags Boise, ultimately wants to en-
courage everyone to carry reusable
bags and make the landfill-clogging
plastic bags obsolete in the city.

Illinois: Chicago — Some people who
work in the Sears Tower are getting free,
self-propelled rides around town. The
nation’s tallest building lets its tenants
use courtesy bicycles during the day as
part of a free service that started this
month. Workers, who reserve the bikes
online, say they use them to get to busi-
ness meetings, and it’s easier than try-
ing to catch a cab downtown. ... Peo-

er Service reports a severe drought in
portions of south-central and south-
eastern Kentucky. Most of the rest of
Kentucky is in a moderate or mild
drought. A water shortage warning was
issued in Magoffin County, which is
pumping water from backup wells.

Louisiana: Alexandria — Hurricane
Gustav, which roared through central
Louisiana earlier this month, hit state
cotton crops hard. The LSU AgCenter re-
ports Gustav, which struck Loujsiana’s
ripe cotton fields on Sept. 1, cost farm-
ers an estimated 58% of their yields, or
about $136.6 million. The high winds of
the storm were followed by heavy rains,
which did extensive damage.

Maine: Augusta — Anew bus service
begins Wednesday between Augusta
and Boston. Concord Coach Lines will

offer five daily roundtrips to South Sta- -

tion and Logan Airport in Boston with a
stop in Portland on the way. The buses
will operate out of the new Augusta
Transportation Center.

Maryland: Baltimore — State's At-
torney Patricia Jessamy is asking for a
review of some cases handled by police
department crime lab technicians. The
technicians had been instructed by de-
tectives not to follow up on the DNA.of
convicted criminals found at crime
scenes because they said it was not rele-
vant. Police and prosecutors wouldn't
give details about the six open homicide
and sex assault cases and three closed
burglary cases over seven years.

Massachusetts: Worcester — Andre
Thompson, 19, pleaded not guilty in the
fatal stabbing of a nephew of University
of Minnesota basketball coach Tubby
Smith. Thompson was arraigned in a
Worcester court on charges including
assault and battery with a dangerous
weapon and armed assault with intent
to murder. Police said Thompson was
one of several men involved in a fight
Sept. 21 that resulted in the death of

* William Smith, 19, a Becker College

freshman from Scotland, Md.

Michigan: Lansing — Close to extinc-
tion two decades ago, the Kirtland’s
warbler has recovered to the point that

was presented by the Association of
Fish and Wildlife Agencies. Servheen is
national grizzly bear recovery coordina-
tor for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
When he started working on the prob-
lem 27 years ago, there were about 200
grizzlies in Yellowstone; today there are
more than 600,

Nebraska: Lincoln — The state's pub-
lic universities and colleges are enjoying
enrollment increases, but the numbers
are down at some more costly private
schools. Union College's enrollment is
914 this fall after reaching 1,015 last
year. Nebraska Wesleyan’s undergradu-
ate enrollment dropped from 1,628 last
fall to 1,606, and Doane’s from 909 to
888. Hastings College bucked the trend
with a record enrollment of 1,146 when
classes began last month. :

Nevada: Las Vegas — The executive
director of the Nevada Commission on
Nuclear Projects resigned amid ques-
tions over whether he illegally gave pay
raises to himself and others in his office.
Commissioners of the state agency
fighting federal plans for a nuclear waste
dump at Yucca Mountain voted to keep
Bob Loux in office until a replacement is
appointed by Republican Gov. Gibbons.
Loux said he did not want the pay raise
controversy to distract the agency from
fighting the dump.

New Hampshire: Manchester —
The weak economy and high fuel costs
are slowing things down at Manchester-
Boston Regional Airport. Passenger traf-
fic in August was down 11% from the
previous August, and cargo operations
were down 14%. Airlines including Del-
ta, Northwest and United have cut back
flights in Manchester in the past year.
Southwest Airlines plans to cut several
flights in January.

New Jersey: Trenton — Gov. Corzine
said hundreds of millions of dollars may
be needed to be cut from the budget
due to the sputtering economy. His ad-
ministration Is reviewing 5% across-the-
board cuts submitted by every depart-

* ment and agency as a precaution. Cor-

zine, a Democrat, did not say how much
revenues are expected to fall short. The
governor is also asking the Legislature to

ers’ license number and birth date, pos-
sibly invalidating them. North Dakota
Secretary of State Al Jaeger said county
auditors should accept the ballot appli-
cations anyway, to avoid penalizing vot-
ers. The state Democratic director said
the law should be followed.

been recaptured. Prison officials said
Marlow Reynolds was caught Sunda
evening in the woods near this Gulf
Coast town about 25 miles from the
Stringfellow Unit in Rosharon, where he
escaped Sept. 9 by climbing a fence at a
prison recreation yard.



Ohio: Moraine — Union officials said
they expect General Motors to close its
SUV plant near Dayton early next year
because of decreased demand for the
large vehicles. The southwest Ohio plant
employs about 1,000 workers. GM has
said it plans to close the factory by 2010,
but International Union of Electronic
Workers-Communication Workers of
America Local 798 President Gaylen
Turner said GM told him the plant will
close sooner.

Oklahoma: Duncan — A man and
woman walked away uninjured from an
emergency landing near here after their
airplane lost power. The Oklahoma
Highway Patrol said the man told inves-
tigators he and his mother were flying
over property they own in Stephens
County when the trouble developed
Sunday afternoon. Investigators said he
tried to glide into a field but clipped a
fence, collapsing the landing gear before
coming to rest.

Oregon: Portland — TriMet said it’s
going to expand security measures for
riders of MAX light rail trains in the
Portland metro area. The transit agency
announced funding for 15 new transit
police officers and more fare inspectors.
The new officers will expand the force
from the current budgeted staff of 43.
Also, a federal grant will add six security
cameras to MAX stations.

Pe Ivania: East Stroudsburg —
Pennsylvania Attorney General Tom
Corbett says a large-scale marijuana op-
eration in the Stroudsburg area has
been broken up. Authorities estimate a
group was responsible for the distribu-
tion of as much as 700 pounds of mari-
juana. Three men were arrested.

Rhode Island: Providence — Some
state agencies fear they will be under-
staffed and overworked because thou-
sands of state employees are retiring.

Utah: Centerville — The state's new-
est freeway, a 14-mile bypass along
Great Salt Lake wetlands, is taking a
heavy toll on raccoons. On just one day
last week, motorists ran over 17 rac-
coons on Legacy Parkway. Wildlife offi-
cials said it’s not such a bad thing: Rac-
coons are not native to Utah and take a
heavy toll on eggs from birds’ nests in
the wetlands. ... Logan — Utah State
University will share a $900,000 gov-
ernment research grant to study biofuel
production in extreme environments.
The school will team with Montana
State University to grow species of algae
that thrive in geothermal vents and the
Great Salt Lake. USU energy lab director
Jeff Muhs said algae that can withstand
saline environments are useful because
they could be used to produce fuels us-
ing plentiful ocean water.

Vermont: Waterbury — The state is
getting a $2.1 million grant to help
serve veterans and others with post-
traumatic stress disorder and similar
problems. The grant will help create
services to help victims of trauma-spec-
trum illnesses who are at risk of getting
in trouble with the law. The grant mon-
ey is being made available by the federal
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Ad-
ministration.

Virginia: Norfolk — The city an-
nounced plans for a series of events to
recall the end of Massive Resistance, the
state’s final effort to deny black students
the right to attend public schools. Nor-
folk’s observance of the 50th anniversa-
ry is to begin with a march Jan. 19 led
by the “Norfolk 17,” the first black stu-
dents to integrate what was then the
city's all-white schools.



Washington: Tacoma — A young
man charged with a fatal shooting at
Foss High School has been found com-
petent to stand trial. A tentative trial
date for Douglas Chanthabouly, 20, was





















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sea turtles were spotted off the central
California coast after a two-year break.
Scientists believe the migrating turtles
returned to the area because of a sub-
stantial increase in their primary food
source, jellyfish. The turtles’ ranks have
been depleted in recent years as they've

been caught in nets and had their nest-

ing sites destroyed by rising tides and
egg hunters.

Colorado: Olathe — A wet spring de-
layed corn planting by about a month
this year in western Colorado but good

weather over the summer helped this .

year’s crop. Colorado State University
Extension Agent Bob Hammond said
the quality of the corn is high. However,
a housing stones for foreign workers
prompted some farmers to cut back on
the acres they planted this year.

Connecticut: Greenwich — The
town is pondering a pool for residents
only, several years after the Connecticut
Supreme Court said the wealthy New
York City suburb had to open its pristine
beaches to outsiders. The town attor-
ney said the 2001 ruling on beach ac-
cess would not apply to a pool proposed
for Byram Park, because a pool isn’t a
“public forum.” The current pool is
open to Greenwich residents with
beach cards at $27 for the season, and
non-residents at $5 per person.

Delaware: Smyrna — Police said a 17-
year-old girl was.charged after calling in
two threats that a bomb was on school
premises. The Smyrna High School stu-
dent told officers that once she realized
school officials were not going to dis-
miss early after she made the calls, she
wrote a note. The girl is charged with
three counts of terroristic threatening
and one count of conspiracy.

D.C.: Five weeks into the school year,
city schools still have dozens of teaching
vacancies. A list by the human resources
department shows 90 unfilled teaching
jobs. School system spokeswoman De-
na Iverson said the list is outdated, with
the chancellor's office aware of 42 open-
ings, most of which she expects will be
filled within two weeks.

Florida: Tampa — The publisher of a
chain of alternative weeklies filed for
bankruptcy. Creative Loafing, based in
Tampa, owns publications in Sarasota,
Tampa Bay, Atlanta, Charlotte, N.C., Chi-

ria — The Illinois Department of
Transportation said it won't plant any
more ash trees in its landscaping pro-
jects because officials say they want to
stop the spread of the invasive emerald
ash borer beetle. The agency said it will
remove any ash trees that are infested.
The insects have been blamed for killing
millions of trees in the Midwest.

Indiana: Indianapolis — More than
70,000 state residents have registered
to vote since the May primary and those
numbers are rising as an Oct. 6 deadline
nears to vote in the Nov. 4 election. Indi-
ana had 4.39 million eligible voters as of
Sept. 21. The May primary'contests for
presidential and gubernatorial candi-
dates prompted a record number of

‘ new voters registrations this year, a

spokesman for the Indiana secretary of
state's office said.

Jowa: Des Moines — Gov. Culver said a
disaster-relief package approved in Con-
gress over the weekend is “a start” to
the state’s recovery from severe weath-
er in the spring and summer. Culver said
the issue now will be how large of a
share lowa gets of the $23 billion. The
governor said he'll continue to press for
disaster assistance in areas such as agri-
culture and transportation, as well as a
big share of the general disaster relief.

Kansas: Wichita — Brian Moline, for-
mer chairman of the Kansas Corpora-
tion Commission and a former state leg-
islator from Wichita, died Monday after
suffering a massive stroke last week. He
was 68. As a utility regulator, Moline
helped investigate the financial dealings
of Westar Energy, leading to the firing
and federal prosecution of then-chief
executive David Wittig. As a lawyer,
Moline founded Kansas Legal Services,
which serves the poor.

Kentucky: Frankfort — Democratic
Gov. Steve Beshear’s administration is
putting “How’s my driving?” stickers on
state-owned vehicles with a telephone
number to lodge complaints. Finance
Secretary Jonathan Miller said state ve-
hicles have been involved in more than
1,100 accidents since last year. He said
state employees driving the vehicles
caused 70% of those accidents, resulting
in nearly $1 million in damage claims.
... Louisville — Prolonged dry weath-
er is cutting into corn and soybean
yields in the state. The National Weath-

the tiny songbird is staking out new ter-
ritory in the upper Midwest. The latest
annual census turned up 1,791 sine
males, the most since monitoring of the
endangered warbler began in 1951, the
Department of Natural Resources re-
ported. The warbler hit a low point in
1987, when only 167 singing males
were found. ... Saginaw — A 12-foot
sandstone memorial to the New York
state-born founder of Saginaw has got-
ten a facelift, nearly 149 years after Nor-
man Little died in the Saginaw River ina
suspected suicide at age 53. Little was
born in Livingston County, N.Y., in 1806
and came to the Saginaw area as a 16-
year-old in 1822.

Minnesota: Minneapolis — The
Minnesota chapter of the Council on
American-Islamic Relations said a group
of local Somali immigrants have re-
solved their dispute with Macy's over
an English-only language policy. The
employees complained that a manager
at the Macy's in Edina told them they
could lose their jobs if they spoke any
language other than English at work.
According to CAIR, the employees have
now been told the company has no such
policy.

Mississippi: Jackson — Jerry St. Pe
has been appointed to a second term on
the Mississippi Gaming Commission.
Gov. Barbour, a Repubilcan, made the
appointment. State Senate confirmation
is required. St. Pe, a businessman and a
retired president of Ingalls Shipbuilding
in Pascagoula, was appointed to the
three-member commission in 2004 to
Se the four-year term of Leonard
Blackwell of Gulfport.

Missouri: St. Louis — For the past
three years, some employees in Lt. Gov.
Kinder’s office have divvied up the pay-
checks of co-workers who took unpaid
leave to do political work, The St. Louis
Post-Dispatch reported. Kinder, a Re-
publican, said the employees received
temporary pay increases because they
took on some of the duties of the work-
er who took leave. Typically the employ-
ee would leave for a few months to
work for Kinder’s political allies.

avoid any bills that would increase
spending. ... Newark — The flight
crew of a Lufthansa jet was to blame for
clipping another plane while taxiing at
Newark Liberty International Airport in
October 2006, the National Transporta-
tion Safety Board said. Investigators said
the crew was distracted by a plane it
was taxiing behind. The left wing of
Lufthansa Flight 403 clipped the right
wing of a Continental 757 that was be-
ing towed. No one was injured.

New Mexico: Santa Fe — Democratic
Gov. Richardson proposed a new state
park along the Pecos River in a canyon
east of Santa Fe. The Pecos Canyon State
Park would be the state’s 36th and
made up of state-owned lands north of
the Pecos village. The bill would autho-
rize the state parks division to enter into
a deal with the Department of Game
and Fish to manage recreation on land
owned by the state Game Commission.

New York: New York — City officials
are suing eight smoke shops that have
been selling tax-free cigarettes on an In-
dian reservation on Long Island. The
lawsuit accuses the small cluster of
shops on the Poospatuck Indian Reser-
vation of breaking state and federal law
by selling massive quantities of ciga-
rettes to Souecaers City officials said
it’s costing hundreds of millions of dol-
lars a year in lost tax revenue. ... A
Manhattan judge dismissed a lawsuit ,
filed by a moviegoer who chomped
down on an unpopped popcorn kernel.
Insurance broker Steve Kaplan sued to
recover $1,250 in dental repairs after he
broke his tooth last year at the AMC-Lin-
coln Square Cinema. A civil court judge
ruled Kaplan could not TeaspnaBIY ex-
pect every kernel to be popped.

North Carolina: wrightsville
Beach — State environmental officials
said two beaches on the sound side of
Wrightsville Beach have high levels of
bacteria that could cause stomach prob-
lems or skin infections. The officials said
the bacteria exceeded the state and fed-
eral standards for recreational use, More
testing was scheduled for the beaches
on Banks Channel.



Montana: Missoula — Bear expert
Chris Servheen was awarded the Ernest
Thompson Seton Award for his part in
the Yellowstone grizzly’s removal from
the endangered species list. The award

North Dakota: Bismarck — The
state’s Republican Party mistakenly
mailed absentee ballot applications to
about 20,000 people more than a week
ago without space for the voter's driv-

The state treasurer's office said already
this year more than 1,200 of roughly
14,000 employees have announced
their departures, about four times the
number that did so between January
and September of last year.

South Carolina: Charleston—A fire «

chief from Maryland will take over the
cee that lost nine firefighters to
a furniture store blaze last year. Mayor
Joe Riley said Montgomery County, Md.,
Fire Chief Thomas Carr must still be con-
firmed by the Charleston city council,
but unanimous approval is expected.
Former chief Rusty Thomas retired in
June amid growing questions over the
department's outdated procedures and
equipment.

South Dakota: Rapid City — The
Rapid City Regional Airport board
named Cameron Humphres as the air-

ort’s executive director, taking over

rom Mason Short, who resigned
abruptly in August. Mayor Alan Hanks
said Short's resignation was a personnel
issue, which restricts the information
he could provide. Humphres, who has
been deputy airport director the past 15
months, retired from a 20-year Air
Force career in 2005.



Tennessee: Nashville — Gov. Brede-
sen's appointment of Appeals Judge
Sharon Lee to the Tennessee Supreme
Court will give women a majority on
the state's high court for the frst time.
Lee, 54, will be the third woman on the
five-member court. The vacancy was
created by the retirement of Tennessee
Chief Justice William Barker. The ap-
polnement is Democrat Bredesen's
ourth to the court,

Texas: Houston — A TV news pioneer,
Ray Miller, has died at the age of 89.
KPRC-T'V in Houston reports its former
news director had been in ill health for a
long time. He served as news director
during the 1960s and '70s before retir-
ing in 1979, Miller was a member of the
KPRC Radio staff when its owners, the
Hobby family, bought KLEE-TV and
changed its call letters to KPRC-TV. His
reporters, including future Sen. Kay Bai-
ley Hutchison, a Republican, remember
Miller as a demanding taskmaster with
high standards. ... Brazoria — A con-
victed killer who escaped from a prison
in the path of Hurricane Ike days before
the storm slammed the Texas coast has

set for March 9 in Pierce County Superi-
or Court. He has been held in a mental
hospital since the January 2007 killing
of Samnang Kok, 17. Defense lawyers
agree that Chanthabouly is competent
to stand trial, but they say he was insane
at the time of the shooting.

West Virginia: Williamstown —
About 300 people turned out to help
Hino Motors Manufacturing USA cele-
brate the grand opening of its William-
stown plant. The event included a tour
of the assembly line and a display of sev-
eral trucks. The first vehicle rolled off
the assembly line last November; now
production is in full swing.

Wisconsin: Kenosha — A federal offi-
cial said the investigation into a helicop-
ter crash that killed two people could
take up to a year. National Transporta-
tion Safety Board investigator Ed Mal-
inowski said he's looking into the pilot's
aviation background, the aircraft's me-
chanical records and the weather. The
helicopter crashed into a house in the

re-dawn fog of Sept. 21, killing the pi-
lot and passenger.





Wyoming: Gillette — The Campbell
County Sheriff's Office is reconsidering
its policy of not taping interrogations of
suspects after a jury acquitted a woman
who claimed that her confession in a
molestation case was coerced. No tape
was available of the interrogation of Ste-
as Pettigrew. Her trial ended with a

ung jury. Campbell County is the only
Wyoming county that does not record
at least some interrogations.

US. territory: Virgin Islands — The
government said a recent prison break
compromised security on St. Croix and
it is moving inmates off the island. The
number of inmates and their destina-
tion were not announced. The territo-
ry’s attorney general ordered the trans-
fers because of concerns raised by the
Sept. 20 escape from the Golden Grove
Adult Correctional Facility. One of the
three convicts was killed during a
search, another was captured and the
third remains at large.

The Associated Press



}) Get news updated 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week. Visit us on
the Web at usatoday.com




Tuesday September 30,2008 =
Moneyline

Monday markets

Index
Dow Industrial average
Nasdaq composite



Close Change
10,365.45 W 777.68
1983.73 ¥ 199.61









Standard & Poor's 500 1106.42 ¥ 106.59
Treasury note, 10-year yield 3.58% ¥ 0.28
USA TODAY Internet 50 110.88 WY 11.96
Oil, light sweet crude, barrel $96.37 W 10.52
Euro (dollars per euro $1.4472 W 0.0146
Yen per dollar 104.43 ¥ 1.63

Sources: USA TODAY research, MarketWatch.com
> Market scoreboard with currencies, 10A

How's the market doing today?

E=U2Q Track the major market indexes updated
yie.eY\@ continuously throughout the day at

money.usatoday.com

Nikkei slides on bailout rejection

Japanese stocks tumbled this morning, with the
Nikkei average hitting a low for the year, after the
Dow industrials plunged following the rejection of a
$700 billion financial bailout by the U.S. House of
Representatives. The benchmark: Nikkei average
was down 4.8% in the first half hour of trade, shed-
ding more than 500 points to 11,160.83. The broad-
er Topix was down 5%.

Fannie, Freddie receive subpoenas

Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae both received sub-
poenas Monday as part of a federal grand jury in-
vestigation into the mortgage giants, which now
have been taken over by the government and put
into conservatorship. They also received requests
from the Securities and Exchange Commission to
preserve documents as part of a probe into their ac-
counting practices. The subpoena seeks documents
relating to accounting, disclosure and corporate
governance matters for Jan. 1, 2007, to the present.

Greenhouse gas auction raises $40M

The nation’s first cap-and-trade greenhouse gas
auction raised nearly $40 million to be spent by
Northeast states on renewable and energy-efficient
technologies. Under the Regional Greenhouse Gas
Initiative, or RGGI, all fossil fuel-burning power
plants in a 10-state region are required to buy cred-
its to cover the carbon they emit. The RGGI states:
Connecticut, Delaware, Maine, Maryland, Massa-
chusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York,
Rhode Island and Vermont. The initiative is seen as
a possible model for a national program to reduce
emissions of carbon dioxide, blamed for global
warming. Energy, financial and environmental in-
terests paid $3.07 per allotted ton of emissions,
about 65% more than the minimum price of $1.86.

ImClone to name bidder by Wednesday

ImClone Systems says it expects either a propos-
al or rejection by Wednesday from a yet-to-be-
named potential buyer offering $70 per share. The
offer, from a large pharmaceutical company, would
top offers made by the company’s cancer drug part-
ner Bristol-Myers Squibb. ImClone rejected an ini-
tial $60-per-share and a higher $62-per-share offer
from Bristol-Myers, calling both bids too low. By
the end of Wednesday, ImClone says, the name of
the $70-per-share bidder will be revealed regard-
less of whether it makes a firm proposal.

Starbucks launches new hot chocolate

Starbucks today will launch a new, adult-targeted
Signature Hot Chocolate, in addition to the hot
chocolate it already serves. The Signature blend is a
blend of four kinds of cocoa. A “tall” cup costs about
$2.85; the current blend goes for about $2.45. Un-
like Chantico, the ultra-rich chocolate drink that
Starbucks introduced then dropped less than two
years ago, the new blend is not as rich.

By Eric Nordwall from staff and wire reports

Consumer confidence report today

The Conference Board releases its con-
sumer confidence index for September at
10 a.m. ET. Go to money.usatoday.com.



USA TODAY Snapshots®



Voting with pocketbook

Which political party would your
investments do better with?





Democrats

41%






Another party 4

Republicans

36%




s







No answer |
9
15%
Source: Edward Jones survey of
1,004 adults 18 and older
conducted by Opinion Research

Sept. 5-8. Weighted to represent
actual population





By Jae Yang and Keith Simmons, USA TODAY





By Tim A. Parker for USA TODAY

Growing business: A WeCar awaits a by-the-hour renter.

Business Travel

Rental cars
by the hour
gain favor

Car sharing, an on-
line business that
rents cars to people
by the hour, is going
corporate. Go to:
travel.usatoday.com



5 vee y ji
Claim based on number of available.GPS solutions that carriers offer and independent data. Environment may

OTE TIT am
traffic jams.

Get voice-guided directions
from the *1 wireless provider
of GPS solutions. :

Get it on the Now Network” oS
sprint.com/smartphones ~

is

limit GPS info. Coverage not available everywhere. ©2008 Sprint.



The failure of the $700 billion bailout Monday sent the S&P 500
to its worst percentage loss since October 1987 and cost investors ...

$1.2 trillic

st Fo) a
Racotriov 267 Na

SIRI) 15K@ 0.72



By Richard Drew, AP

Waiting game: Traders on the floor of the NYSE watch as the vote on the bailout package is counted.

Vote hits Wall St.
hurricane .

like a

The S&P tumbled ...

Intraday values

Mon. open:
1213.01

Mon. close:






4p.m.

Source: Bloomberg News

By Karl Gelles, USA TODAY

... and oil fell ...

Investors drove down yee fear-
ing that an economic slump could
hurt energy demand, story 2B.




Price per barrel of

Moe cee light, sweet crude:

$106.89



_ $106
$102
$98
$94
$90 '
0 Luvin
9am. 4p.m.

Source: Bloomberg, News

By Adrienne Lewis, USA TODAY

... leading investors
to flee to safety

Prices soared Monday on U.S. Trea-
sury securities causing the yields
they pay to plunge, story 2B:

— Yield —
Treasury Monday Friday
3-month 0.14% 0.87%
12-month 1.49% 1.84%
2-year 1.67% 2.13%
10-year 3.58% 3.86%

Source: Associated Press



Cover story

Investors jump
ship for the safe
of bonds and cas

By Adam Shell
USA TODAY

NEW YORK — The “nay” vote heard
around the world wiped out $1.2 tril-
lion in stock market wealth Monday,
the first one-day trillion-dollar loss in
Wall Street history.

Warnings of a stock meltdown
turned into a scary self-fulfilling
prophecy after a divided House voted
down a financial rescue plan that was
specifically created to avoid the kind

> An ‘extremely worri-
some situation,’ 1A

of panic selling that engulfed markets
around the globe.

The financial fallout was of the Ar-
mageddon proportions that some
predicted if the $700 billion bill —
which was promoted by the Bush ad-
ministration as the best way to boost
investor confidence and unclog fro-
zen credit markets that have created
a daily bank death watch on Main
Street — failed to pass.

“It was the equivalent of a Category
5 hurricane,” says Scott Black, presi-
dent at Delphi Management.

The broad U.S. stock market, as
measured by the Standard & Poor's
500-stock index, suffered an 8.8% free
fall — its biggest percentage decline
since the 1987 stock market crash.
Only one stock in the index — Camp-
bell Soup — finished higher,

The 30 stocks in the Dow Jones in-
dustrial average suffered their worst
one-day point drop ever, plunging
777.68 points, or 7%, to 10,365.45.

The massive losses “made the hair
on the back of your neck stand up,”

See COVER STORY next page >







Monday's plunge

Dow Jones
industrial average

Â¥778 points

The biggest single-day point
drop in history, with the Dow
ending the day at its lowest
close since Oct. 27, 2005.

V70%

17th-worst percentage drop
ever; worst percentage loss
since the day that trading re-
sumed aftér the 9/11 attacks.

Nasdaq composite

W9I1%

The technology-packed index
fell to 1984 — first close below
2000 since May 2005.

S&P 500

V8.8%

The benchmark Standard &
Poor's 500 index had its low-
est close since October 2004.

> Only one S&P 500 stock —
Campbell Soup — ended the
day with a gain.

: i
By Jin Lee, Bloomberg, News

> The worst drop was the 82%
plunge in Wachovia Bank.



> Citigroup buyin
Wachovia's bank-
ing operations, 9A





The economy ©

Economic
forecasts
get even
more dire

Analysts keep eye on
consumers, Fed rate

By Barbara Hagenbaugh and Sue Kirchhoff
USA TODAY

WASHINGTON — Gloomy economic fore-
casts got gloomier Monday after many econo-
mists took the view that the House defeat of
the Bush administration bailout plan would
further depress business and consumer confi-
dence.

First Trust Advisors economists Brian Wes-
bury and Robert Stein, who had firmly been
in the “no recession” camp before Monday,
said their opinion changed.

“Never in history has a drop in consumer
confidence caused a recession,” they said in a
note to clients. “But that does not mean there
won't be a first time. It could happen in the
next few months, and we would expect to see
some very negative (economic) data.”

Some forecasters, such as those at econom-
ic consulting firm Global Insight, predicted the
Federal Reserve would soon cut its.target for
short-term interest rates: to try to give the
economy a boost. But it’s unclear how much
good that would do, given that the problem
isn't lending rates but a lack of ability or desire
on the part of banks to lend at any price.

The Fed has other tools, and it’s been using
them. Monday morning, the Fed said it is in-
creasing its so-called swap lines with foreign
central banks to $620 billion from $290 billion
in an effort to keep dollars flowing worldwide.
It also increased the amount of loans it would
make to domestic banks.

Economists noted that House rejection of
the plan came after top officials, including
President Bush, Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke
and Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson,
warned of dire consequences if something is
not done. Now that Congress has rejected the
bill, at least for now, people are likely to hun-
ker down even if they are not feeling a direct
effect of the credit crunch. »

But some economists say concerns may be
a bit overblown.

_ “Credit conditions may well be difficult for a
period, but I don’t think there’s anything to
suggest this is going to be Armageddon,” says
Jeffrey Miron, a Harvard lecturer who op-
poses the bailout. He argues companies
should be allowed to fail. “Somebody has to
pay for the mistakes.”

Consumers, whose spending accounts for
more than two-thirds of all U.S. economic ac-
tivity, were pulling back even before the fi-
nancial meltdown this month. Consumer
spending was flat in August, the Commerce
Department said Monday.

“The economy looks terrible,” says Donald
Straszheim of Roth Capital Partners. He pre-
dicts more banks will soon fail, and businesses
will have to close because they won't be able
to get cash for day-to-day operations. “What

~ business person would hire right now given

the uncertain and negative environment? No-
body.” /

The Fed's interest rate target, which influ-
ences borrowing costs economywide, is at 2%,
the lowest since December 2004.

James Paulsen, chief investment strategist
at Wells Capital Management, however, says a
rate cut could backfire on the Fed by further
fueling panic. “You add to the mania,” he says.

We’ve never had the pleasure of meeting,
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America is a place where we look out for each other. And with someone in America needing
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Red Cross

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HIS20174
8A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY

Financial market fears °



Credit markets

Loan costs soar as access tightens

Investors rush into safe
government securities

By Matt Krantz
USA TODAY

If the credit markets are truly the lifeblood be-
tween Wall Street and the economy, that artery suf-
fered a major shock Monday.

Unnerved by the House of Representatives’ un-
expected blockage of the proposed $700 billion fi-
nancial bailout plan, credit markets constricted fur-
ther as investors got even pickier about to whom
they would lend money and gravitated to‘only the
safest borrowers, including the U.S. government.

The bond market's tightness is presenting busi-
nesses and consumers with dramatically higher in-
terest costs and less access to loans, the last thing the
economy needs as the global financial system slows.

“Credit is a lifeline to our economy. This is ex-
tremely serious,” says Robert Gahagan, director of
taxable bond investment at American Century In-
vestments. “This will cause good firms to not have

Some think
stock plunge
may signal a
selling climax

Continued from 7A

says hedge fund manager Patrick Adams of Choice
Investment Management.

On the New York Stock Exchange, more than
3,000 stocks finished down, and fewer than 200
stocks closed higher.

Many Wall Street pros blamed iawmakers for the
historic downdraft.

“Congress snatched defeat from the jaws of vic-
tory,” says Michael Farr, president of money man-
* agement firm Farr: Miller & Washington. “And
stockholders voted with their feet.”

Gary Kaltbaum, president of Kalt-
Cover baum & Associates, blames the sell-

off on “the scare tactics” used by law-
story makers. “They set this drop up by

scaring us. They said if the vote was
not yes, the market would get crushed.” And it was.

Investors scurried to the sidelines’ and to the
safety of cash and U.S. government bonds because
they fear that the banking system is at greater risk
of seizing up and causing untold damage to an
economy already struggling under the weight of
the worst housing bust and credit crisis since the
Great Depression, says Jack Ablin, chief investment
officer at Harris Private Bank.

The centerpiece of the plan, hatched by Treasury
Secretary Henry Paulson, was for the government
to buy toxic mortgage-related assets from banks so
that they could begin lending again. But that plan is
on hold, causing investors to fret about worst-case
scenarios. “It is a race against time,” says Ablin.

The market's big fear, says Ablin, is that the credit
markets will freeze up so severely that ordinary
Americans, as well as businesses in sectors outside
the troubled financial sector, will not be able to get
loans. And if credit, the gas that powers the econo-
my, is not available or in plentiful supply, the econo-
my will suffer a significant slowdown.

US. investors are also starting to become con-
cerned that the credit crunch will infect the entire
world, causing a global economic slowdown.

“The situation is not beyond repair,” says Doug
Peta, market strategist at J&W Seligman. “But it
looks like Congress will have to go back to the
drawing board, which will delay passage of the bill.
And every day of delay is another day of pressure
on banks.”

Individual investors are starting to wonder if time
is running out.

What began as a fairly normal day at investment
firm T. Rowe Price got more complicated after the
bailout defeat in the afternoon. “We saw a spike in
call volumes,” says spokesman Steve Norwitz,
Many callers “were expressing concern about the
market and asking for advice, such as what they
should do now and how this might (affect) their
portfolio,” he says. The firm doesn’t disclose num-
bers for mutual fund redemptions, but there’s “no
doubt we saw a pickup in selling, or people ex-
changing out of equity funds,” says Norwitz, who
added that there was also some buying.

Clients were ringing up Farr, as well. “I’ve.had cli-
ents call who wanted to sell everything,” he says.
But some were seeking bargains. “One client called
at 3:30 p.m. and wanted to buy $500,000 worth of
his favorite 10 stocks,” he says.

Some Wall Street pros say the massive sell-off
had all the earmarks of a selling climax. For ex-
ample, a closely followed “fear index,” known as
the VIX, closed at 46.72, its highest ever, says Be-
spoke Investment Group. Only four other: times
since 1990 has the VIX closed above 40, and the
S&P 500 was up 8.7%, on average, a month later and
11.3% higher three months later, Bespoke says.

_ The rising fear resulted in big losses in the tech-
nology-dominated Nasdaq, which tumbled 9.1%,
closing below 2000 for the first time since May
2005. Bank stocks also took it on the chin. An ex-
change traded fund that tracks banks fell 14.4%. The
banking sector was rocked by Citigroup’s takeover
of troubled North Carolina bank Wachovia. Last
week, Washington Mutual collapsed and was
bought by JPMorgan Chase in the biggest bank fail-
ure in history.

The market nose-dived even though the Securi-
ties and Exchange Commission’s 10-day emergen-
cy ban on short sales of stock for more than 1,000
financial firms remained in place. Short sellers, who
profit when stock prices fall, have been blamed for
putting investment bank Lehman Bros. out of busi-
ness. The ban, which took effect on Sept. 18, is set
to expire late Thursday night. But the SEC can ex-
tend it for 10 trading days.

“The selling was pretty climactic,” says Price
Headley, chief analyst at BigTrends.com. “This is

the ability to get credit.”
The flight to safety was clear in the:
> Rush for government securities. The race in-
to Treasuries, especially the ones considered safest
because they mature the soonest,
showed just how nervous bond in-
vestors have become.’

“Credit is a lifeline

rowing costs skyrocket. Companies with lower credit
ratings, either because of their smaller size or weak-
er financial health, are paying 10.8 percentage points
above Treasuries with equivalent maturities, accord-
ing to the Merrill Lynch U.S. High
Yield index.

Not only does that mean bond

Investors scrambled to buy the {09 our economy. investors are Be a distress
safest security they could find: among companies, but borrowing
three-month Treasury bills. The This is extremely for these companies as a group is
three-month yield sank to 0.14% serious.’ as costly as it’s been since October
from 0.87%. That’s a big decline con- — Robert Gahagan 2002. “Expectations are for the de-
sidering that the Treasury increased American Century _ fault rate to keep moving higher in
the supply Monday by selling addi- Investments _ this weaker economy,” says Wan-

tional securities, says Tom di Galo-

ma at Jefferies. Investors also piled

into 10-year Treasuries, pushing the yield down to
3.58% from 3.86%, the biggest decline since Sept. 15
after Lehman's collapse and Merrill Lynch's forced
sale to Bank of America, Bloomberg News says.

“It’s been, ‘Buy the safest asset you can: Treasury
bills.’ That’s where everyone is hiding,” di Galoma
says. “Money is flowing out of stocks and into bills.”

> Rising aversion to riskier companies’ debt.
Any company with even a hint of risk is seeing bor-



Chong Kung at FAF Advisors.

> Caution toward companies

normally viewed as bulletproof. The value of
bonds inthe most highly rated U.S. companies has
fallen 11% this year, on track for the worst year for
them since 1994, says money manager Ken Winans
of Winans International.

The credit market’s reaction to the news boils
down to one word, “panic,” says Marilyn Cohen of
Envision Capital Management. “However bad it is in
the stock market, it’s worse in the bond market.”



By Richard Drew, AP

Not a good day: Trader Michael Kilkenny, right, takes a breather after the close of a busy and disheartening
trading day on Monday. Trading was heavy — and the outcome was equally heavy.

about as scared as people can get, and often occurs

_ at major crisis points.” The market is like a coiled

spring right now, he says, and could rebound sharp-
ly if the government comes back and passes some
kind of revised bailout plan.

Dan Seiver, a finance professor at San Diego State
University, says the market is in a no-win situation.
If the government passes a bailout bill, it will be ex-
pensive, and there will be great uncertainty as to
whether it will work. If no bailout arrives, the level
of uncertainty as to how bad things will get and
how many banks will fail will nag at the market.

One thing the government must stop is the per-
ception that a bank a day could fail. “At some point,
Wall Street will lose all confidence when you take
these banks out one at a time,” says Seiver. “It’s like
staring into an abyss. The abyss has a bottom, but
you don’t know how far down it is.”

There is a general consensus that a bailout of
some sort is needed to avert a very bad outcome.

“If the no vote is categorically a no, then they are
playing with fire,” says Robert Barbera, chief econo-
mist at ITG. “I'm not saying I know for certain that
the financial system can survive with this help. But
what I am saying is I would not run that experi-
ment even if it was politically advantageous.”

The stakes are high. Barbera says “confidence
with a capital C” is presumed to be in place only
when investors believe the system as they know it
is there when they wake up in the morning.

He notes that the government's prior attempts at
stabilizing the market based on a situation-by-
situation basis have failed to stabilize global mar-
kets. And the government risks a poor outcome if it
doesn’t come up with a comprehensive solution.

Black of Delphi Management agrees. “This is se-
vere. We have never seen anything like it in our life-
time. There is no perfect solution. But there has to
be a sense of urgency, because we risk a complete
capitulation of our global banking system.”

Signs of U.S.-style banking woes spreading
around the globe intensified Monday. European
governments announced a handful of bank bailouts
of their own. And stock prices fell sharply in
Europe, Asia and South America. London shares fell
5.3%, Germany dropped 4.2%, and France fell 5%.
Latin American stocks fell more sharply because
they were still trading when the failed bailout vote
news broke. Brazil’s market fell 9.4%. Early today in
Tokyo, stocks fell 5% in the first half-hour of trading.

Investors again rushed into safe investments. The
price of gold topped $900 an ounce in after-hours
trading. And the yield on the three-month Treasury
bill fell to 0.14% from 0.87% Friday, a clear sign that
investors were looking to preserve capital.

The selling pressure was so intense that it caused
problems at the New York Stock Exchange. The
stock drop accelerated sharply shortly before the
market closed, causing a 10-minute delay after the
4 p.m. closing before the record decline became of-
ficial. “There were huge sell imbalances at the end,”
said NYSE spokesman Scott Peterson, adding it was
difficult to determine immediately if the late drop
resulted from hedge funds or other major players
using electronic trades to sell large volumes of
shares.

Legal Notice

Rejection of
rescue plan
pushes oil

prices down

10% decline is biggest
one-day drop in 17 years ,

By Paul Davidson
USA TODAY

Oil prices plummeted nearly 10% Monday
as the House rejected the White House’s
proposed bailout of financial markets, stok-
ing fears of a deep, lingering economic slump
that would stifle energy demand.

Light sweet crude for November delivery
closed down $10.52 to settle at $96.37 on
the New York Mercantile Exchange — the
biggest one-day drop since January 1991,
the Oil Price Information Service says.

The rescue plan would let the govern-
ment snap up banks’ troubled mortgages,
helping credit and capital flow again, and
greasing the wheels of.the economy.

“Everybody is afraid (the failure to ap-
prove the plan) is going to lead to some kind
of financial breakdown,” says Peter Beutel,
president of energy risk management firm
Cameron Hanover. “That banks will not be
willing to lend money, people will not be
willing to do business and they won't have
jobs. If people are not working, they're not
driving cars.”

The bailout’s derailment wasn’t the only
factor weighing on oil prices. Even before
news broke of the House vote, crude was
headed lower on anticipation of a global eco-
nomic slowdown and a strengthening dollar,
says DTN senior analyst Darin Newsom.

Crude is now off 35% from its July 11 trad-
ing high of $147.27. After sinking much of
the summer, prices edged up after Hurri-
canes Gustav and Ike knocked out oil pro-
duction in the Gulf of Mexico. But oil prices
are down 20% the past week as the region’s
output ratcheted back up and negotiations
on the bailout foundered.

Monday’s drop will likely be felt at the
pump in a few weeks, Beutel says. Whole-
sale gasoline prices closed down 27 cents at
$2.40 Monday. Nationwide, the average
price of a gallon of regular gas was $3.64,
down 1.2 cents from Sunday, AAA says.

Beutel has been projecting that crude
would fall to about $80 a barrel in the next.
few months, driving gasoline prices to about
$3 a gallon. But a financial meltdown, he
says, could push prices far lower.

—— -

Legai Notice

UNITED STATES BANKRUPTCY COURT
CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA
LOS ANGELES DIVISION

In re:

THORPE INSULATION COMPANY,

Debtor





Case No.: 2:07-19271-BB

| (Jointly Administered with Case No.:

2:07-20016-BB)

Chapter 11 .

NOTICE OF MOTION AND MOTION OF DEBT-
ORS FOR ORDER APPROVING: (1) INSUR-
ANCE SETTLEMENT WITH GENERAL INSUR-
ANCE COMPANY OF AMERICA; (2) SALE OF
INSURANCE POLICIES FREE AND CLEAR OF
CLAIMS AND INTERESTS; MEMORANDUM OF

| POINTS AND AUTHORITIES

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that Thorpe Insulation Company (“Thorpe”) and Pacific Insula-

Insurance.



tion Company (“Pacific” and together with Thorpe, the “Debtors”) have filed, in the United
States Bankruptcy Court for the Central District of California, a motion to approve a
settlement agreement pursuant to 11 U.S.C. §§ 105(a) and 363 and Fed. R. Bankr. P.
2002(I), and 9019(a), with respect to General Insurance Company of America (“General
Insurance” or “Insurer”). The motion seeks an-order of the Court approving the settle-
ment agreement and the releases and compromises of claims reflected in the settle-
ment agreement between the Debtors, various other non-debtor parties and General

This settlement agreement (the “Settlement Agreement”) includes the sale of insur-
ance policies free and clear of liens, claims, encumbrances, and other interests. If the

motion is approved, Thorpe will sell, and the Insurer will purchase, the insurance poli-
cies described mote particularly in the Settlement Agreement, free and clear of all liens,
claims, encumbrances, and other interests. In exchange for the sale of such policies, and
for the additional consideration provided in the Settlement Agreement, including mutual
releases and covenants not to sue between the parties, General Insurance will make the
following payments: (i) $5 million on the Settlement Effective Date; and (ii) an additional
$4.75 million within two Business Days following the Plan Effective Date, conditioned
upon General Insurance being identified as a Settling Insurer and a Protected Party (as
defined in the Plan) for whose benefit the Permanent Injunction is to issue.

If you have a claim against or an interest in the insurance policies, your rights may be

affected.

If you wish to object to any aspect of the motion or the sale of the insurance policies,

you must both: (1) file with the Clerk of the Court at 255 E. Temple Street, Los Angeles,
CA 90012 a written response stating the specific facts upon which the objection is based,
together with a proof of service that a copy of the response was served on (i) Richard W.
Esterkin, Morgan Lewis LLP, 300 S. Grand Avenue, 22nd Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90071-
3132; (ii) Jeremy V. Richards, Pachulski Stang Zieh! & Jones LLP, 10100 Santa Monica
Blvd., Suite 1100, Los Angeles, CA 90067; (iii) the Office of the United States Trustee,
Attn: Russell Clementson, 725 S. Figueroa St., 26th Floor, Los Angeles, CA 90017; (iv)
counsel for the Unsecured Creditors Committee, Peter Benvenutti,
333 Bush St., San Francisco, CA 94104-2878, and Peter Van N. Lockwood, Caplin &
Drysdale, 1 Thomas Circle N.W., Washington, DC 20005; (v) Janet A. Shapiro, The Sha-
piro Law Firm, 212 S. Gale Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90211-3406 and (vi) all other parties

Heller Ehrman LLP,

The historic losses shook up many investors, in-

entitled to notice pursuant to the Order Limiting Scope of Notice entered on November

cluding one who says he rarely gets spooked. “Am |
scared? A little, and I pride myself on not being
shaken by the market,” says Robb Muse, 39, a fi-
nancial services eae from ae Asked



Contributing: Sandra Block in McLean, Va, and
Kevin McCoy



attend the hearing

16, 2007, Docket No. 135, no later than October 16, 2008, and (2)

on October 30, 2008, at 10:00 a.m.,

Angeles, CA 90012.

Copies of the motions and documentation supporting the motions, as well as formal
notice of the motions, can be obtained on the Court's website at www.cacb.uscourts,

gov or by contacting counsel at the addresses set forth above.

in Courtroom 1475, 255 E. Temple Street, Los
*«

If your cash is
FDIC insured,
you can relax

No one has ever lost a
dime of protected money

‘Old photographs of Depression-era bank runs
are popping up all over the place, and that raises a
couple of questions. Why don’t people wear hats
anymore? And, more important, could this happen
to your bank? .

Concerns about bank
safety and soundness have
been exacerbated by the re-
cent downfall of two of the
nation’s largest financial in-
stitutions. Thursday, the
Federal Deposit Insurance
Corp. seized Washington
Mutual, the nation’s largest
savings and loan, and bro-
kered a sale to JPMorgan
Chase for $1.9 billion. On
Monday, Citigroup said it
will acquire Wachovia's banking business, a deal
that was also negotiated by the FDIC.

The FDIC emphasized that Wachovia didn’t fail
and that all depositors were protected. Likewise,
none of Washington Mutual’s depositors lost any
money, and customers have experienced no dis-
ruption in service.

No one has ever lost a dime of FDIC-insured de-
posits. Still, the prospect of a bank failure unnerves
a lot of people, particularly in light of ongoing may-
hem in the stock market.

The FDIC maintains a list of troubled banks but



By Sandra Block



















Bank failures in 2008 _

Closing
Bank Assets date
Washington Mutual $307 billion _ Sept. 25
Ameribank : $115 million _ Sept. 19
Silver State Bank $2.0 billion Sept. 5
Integrity Bank $1.1 billion. Aug. 29
Columbian Bank and Trust $752 million _ Aug. 22
First Priority Bank $259 million Aug. 1
First Heritage Bank $254 million uly 25
First National Bank of Reno $3.4 billion July 25
IndyMac $32.0 billion July 11
First Integrity Bank $54.7 million __ May 30
ANB Financial $2.1 billion May 9
Hume Bank $18.7 million March 7
Douglass National Bank $58.5 million Jan. 25
Source: FDIC

ah, Personal finance columnist Sandra Block
will answer your questions about how to
protect your savings and investments from

noon to 1:30 p.m. ET today. Go to money.usatoday
.com to submit your questions and read the chat.



doesn't publicly disclose it because regulators don’t
want to trigger a run on those banks. There are,
however, other ways to check on your bank's fi-
nancial health. Bankrate.com assigns a “Safe &
Sound” rating to banks, thrifts and credit unions,
based on profitability, liquidity, asset quality and
other criteria. Veribanc, an independent ratings
agency, will provide a financial rating for any bank,
thrift or credit union, for $10 per institution. Go to
www.eribanc.com, or call 800-837-4226.

While closing accounts at a bank that appears to
be on shaky ground could give you peace of mind, it
could also cost you money. If you withdraw funds
from a certificate of deposit before it has matured,
you'll have to pay an early-withdrawal penalty.

A better option: Make sure all of your deposits
are insured. No customer has ever lost a dime in in-
sured deposits in a bank failure. But not all bank
customers have that protection. The FDIC estimates
that about 37% of all bank deposits are uninsured.
Some of those accounts belong to businesses that
keep more than $100,000 in the bank to pay bills,
but other accounts may belong to people who don’t
understand the deposit insurance limits.

In the Washington Mutual and Wachovia trans-
actions, all deposits were included in the deal, so no
depositor lost money. But it doesn’t always work
out that way. When the FDIC took over IndyMac in
July, about 10,000 customers of the California-
based mortgage lender had uninsured deposits of

about $1 billion. Those customers received an “ad- |.

vance dividend” of 50% of their deposits. Additional
payments won't be made until the FDIC sells In-
dyMac’s assets, which hasn’t happened yet, says
FDIC spokesman Andrew Gray. If your deposits are
uninsured, you may have to wait months or years to
get your money back, if you get it at all.

The FDIC insures up to $100,000 for individual
accounts, $200,000 for joint accounts and up to
$250,000 for retirement accounts. But when a bank
fails, some customers discover that. they have inad-
vertently exceeded the limits. Here’s what you
need to know:

> Joint accounts are covered for up to $200,000
if both account holders have equal withdrawal
rights. If one account holder needs the other's per-
mission to take withdrawals, it’s not considered a
joint account for insurance purposes.

> If you have deposits at two banks that merge,
you could end up exceeding deposit insurance lim-
its. As the banking industry becomes increasingly
concentrated, this could become an issue for more
savers. When two banks merge, the FDIC provides
full coverage for six months after the merger, or in
the case of CDs, until maturity. After that, deposi-
tors need to move some of their money to an unaf-
filiated bank to maintain full protection.

> You can significantly increase your coverage
with revocable trust accounts, typically known as
payable-on-death or living-trust accounts. The
FDIC will cover up to $100,000 per beneficiary for
these accounts. In the past, the coverage was lim-
ited to “qualifying beneficiaries,” defined as
spouses, children, grandchildren, parents and sib-
lings. But last week, the FDIC voted to eliminate this
requirement. Now, deposit insurance will cover any
beneficiary named in the trust.

The FDIC provides an online tool to help you cal-
culate your coverage for all of your bank accounts.
Go to www fdic.gov and search for the Electronic
Deposit Insurance Estimator.





To suggest columns, e-mail: sblock@usatoday.com.

BH







USA TODAY - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - 9A

Bailout



Concerns about
regional banks
continue to spread

_ By Del Jones
USA TODAY

Worldwide banking remained in turmoil Mon-
day as Wachovia became the latest giant to top-
ple, agreeing to sell most of its operations to Ci-
tigroup in a deal brokered by the Federal Deposit
Insurance Corp.

All deposits in Wachovia are protected, even
those with accounts in excess of the $100,000
FDIC insurance.

“Today’s action will ensure seamless continuity
of service from their bank and full protection for
deposits,” FDIC Chairman Sheila Bair said. “There
will be no interruption in services, and bank cus-
tomers should expect business as usual.”

Citigroup will acquire most of Wachovia's as-
sets and liabilities, but Wachovia will continue to
own! brakerage A.G. Edwards and investment
manager Evergreen Investments. Charlotte-
based Wachovia will also continue as a publicly
traded company.

Concerns about Wachovia's financial health
have hammered the company’s share price. Fri-
day, Wachovia closed at $10, off 81% from its 52-
week high. By Monday's close, Wachovia had
slumped to $1.84.

Wachovia's financial problems can be traced to
its 2006, $24 billion acquisition of Golden West
Financial. Wachovia inherited a deteriorating
$122 billion portfolio of loans that let borrowers
skip some payments. Wachovia posted a $9.1 bil-
lion loss for the second quarter, slashed its divi-
dend and announced plans to cut 11,350 jobs,
mostly in its mortgage business.

Havoc across the Atlantic

Wachovia may be the last big bank considered
to be in immediate trouble, but fears continue to
spread among the next+tier regional banks.

Havoc also reached across the Atlantic Monday,
where Britain nationalized Bradford & Bingley,
Britain’s ninth-largest mortgage lender. It was the
second UK. bank to be taken on by the British

a

No deposits lost:
Two women use
the ATMs at a Wa-
chovia branch in
Miami on Monday,
the day Citigroup
announced it
would buy Wa-
chovia’s banking
operations. The
FDIC brokered the
deal.

By Joe Raedle,
Getty Images



How Citigroup and Wachovia compare







services, says Jim Eckenrode, an
executive at TowerGroup, a re-
search and advisory services firm

Citigroup Wachovia : as
2007 revenue (billions $507 $56.7 for the financial services industry.
2007 net income (billions $3.6 $63 Donn Vickrey, chief analyst at
Assets’ $2.2 trillion $8.1 billion Gradient Analytics, a stock re-
Headquarters New York Charlotte search firm in Scottsdale, Ariz.,
Fortune 500 rank - 3g | says that as the country Is left
Employees 387,000 720,000 with few large banks, consumers

1 —as of March 31; Sources: Hoover's, Fortune, Citigroup, Wachovia

can expect lower yields on sav-
ings and higher fees.



government. Also, Belgium, the Netherlands and
Luxembourg pumped $16.4 billion into Fortis to
stabilize Belgium's largest financial services firm,
taking on a 49% stake.

Elsewhere: :

> Morgan Stanley said it would sell a 21% stake
to Japan’s Mitsubishi UF] Financial Group for
$9 billion to shore up its finances. Even so, Mor-
gan Stanley stock closed down 15% to $20.99.

> Lehman Bros., which became the largest
bankruptcy filing in US. history on Sept. 15, said
it would sell its investment management busi-
ness to private-equity firms Bain Capital Partners
and Heltman & Friedman for $2.2 billion.

The Wachovia deal came just four days after
the FDIC brokered the sale of Washington Mutu-
al, the nation’s largest savings and loan, to JPMor-
gan Chase.

“Citigroup passed over Washington Mutual be-
cause they were focused on a bigger target: Wa-
chovia,” says Bart Narter of Celent, a Boston-
based financial research and consulting firm. He
says the deal makes Citigroup an instant player in
the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic states. It will add
731 branches in Florida, 323 in North Carolina,
320 in New Jersey and 309 in Pennsylvania, Nar-
ter says.

Citigroup, in an effort to shore up its capital po-
sition, said it will sell $10 billion in common stock
and cut its quarterly dividend 50%, to 16 cents a
share. Citigroup paid $2.1 billion for Wachovia
and agreed to absorb $42 billion in losses from
Wachovia's $312 billion loan portfolio, with the
FDIC covering any remaining losses. Citigroup
will issue $12 billion in preferred stock and war-
rants to the FDIC.

Citigroup lost 12% to $17.75.

Continuing consolidation leaves four giant
banks: Bank of America, JPMorgan .Chase, Ci-
tigroup and Wells Fargo. Going forward, they will
press their advantage with new products and

Banks will likely offer expand-
ed services to big customers such as managers of
large assets. “For the average consumer, it’s going
to be a bad deal,” Vickrey says.

Consolidation could create opportunity for
small and midsize banks, which focus on com-
munity and small-business banking, says Jay Sid-
hu, former CEO of Sovereign Bancorp, which runs
Sidhu Special Purpose Capital out of Reading, Pa.

Sidhu says smaller banks are now poised to
prosper, and he intends to invest at least
$250 million in them in. upcoming months. “Cap-
ital and superior management will be the keys for
survival and growth in this environment,” he
says.

Regional bank stocks slammed

Whatever their prospects, regional bank stocks
sank in the broad market's Monday slide.

Sovereign Bancorp tumbled 72% to $2.33. Fifth
Third Bancorp sank 44% to $9.11; FirstFed Fi-
nancial dropped 25% to $7.50; and KeyCorp
slumped 33% to $9.80. The Financial Select Sector
SPDR (ticker: XLF), a fund that holds 85 large-
company financial stocks, dropped 13%.

There were 117 banks and thrifts in trouble
during the second quarter, the highest level since
2003, the FDIC says, but that number could
climb. “There are a number of regional banks
which may need help, either because of the
weakening mortgage market or simply because
of the weakening economy,” Michael Sheldon,
chief market strategist of RDM Financial Group,
told the Associated Press.

This year, 13 banks have failed. Aside from
Washington Mutual, two others failed this
month: Ameribank and Silver State Bank. Only
three banks failed in 2007, and none failed in
2005 and 2006, the FDIC says.



Contributing: Paul Davidson



| Hiring continues slowing

quarter. What the survey found:
Percentage who said they

would... 59% 63%
25% 23%
14%
Bim â„¢ now ae 5%
Q3 Actual Q4Planned

Staffing plans by company size, fourth quarter
1-50 employees





Hiring managers were surveyed about whether their companies plan to increase,
decrease or make no change in the number of full-time permanent staff in the fourth
quarter of this year. They were also asked about hiring and layoffs during the third



CU CareerBuilder.com
Let 4 quarterly job outlook

Finding qualified job candidates
Does your company, at your location, currently have positions for which



i increase

Decrease you cannot find qualified candidates?
Make no change Yes HESRRS aac

[_] Company undecided Nol

Not sur

Wage gauge







Not sure








What do you expect the average
change in salaries will be for full-



Yes

*1.3%
4-10%

b. ' - | time, permanent employees, at 11% or mor
pa ae 738 LJ 3% your location, in the 4th quarter Bars
51-250 employees of 2008 compared with the 4th No change
YOY ee ia "Be 63% [| 3% quarter of 2007? Decrease fil
More than 250 employees Company undecided {| 4%
Hs he Aone ane U Have there been layoffs of Do you anticipate layoffs of
Staffing plans by region, fourth quarter permanent full-time staff, at your permanent full-time staff, at your
Wi : ot -theast location, this quarter (3rd quarter, location, next quarter (Uct. 1
ss Mone sau Nopteast July 1 through Sept. 30, 2008)? through Dec. 31, 2008)?
62% 65% 63% 63% No ve
84% 81%
a 9% 227% 0% oe 0% 2%
5%
am oO es 2% 3% ian



Not sure Yes

Note: Totals may not equal 100% due to rounding,

Results based on an online survey for USA TC DAY and CareerBuilder.com by Harris Interactive
of 3,061 hiring managers and human resource professionals (employed full-time, not self-
employed, in private companies with at least significant involvement in hiring decisions).
Survey conducted Aug, 21 - Sept. 9. Responses weighted when necessary.








Job market
likely to remain
flat, survey says

Nearly two-thirds of U.S. employers plan to keep
their payrolls stable at the end of the year, while one in
10 expect to cut staff, according to a survey out today
that points to further deterioration in the job market.

Sixty-three percent of hiring managers said they
planned no change in the number of full-time, perma-
nent employees at their companies in the October-De-
cember quarter. That was up from 59% who said their
staffing levels were unchanged in the July-September
period, according to an online survey for USA TODAY

By Adrienne Lewis, USA TODAY

and CareerBuilder.com by Harris Interactive.

The survey, conducted Aug. 21-Sept. 9, involved
3,061 hiring managers and human resource profes-
sionals, CareerBuilder.com is’a job-finding site jointly
owned by Tribune, McClatchy, Microsoft and USA TO-
DAY parent Gannett.

U.S. employers cut jobs for eight consecutive months
through August, according to the Labor Department.
Last month, the unemployment rate jumped from 5.7%

to 6.1%, the highest in five years.
10A - TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 2008 - USA TODAY













Markets Monday









pS UN.
TODAY



































Track the major market indexes updated continuously









se throughout the day at money.usatoday.com
*
usaTopavintemetsoindex | 25 NYSE stocks fell for each 1 that rose | 2"... sew
: ; Index Close Mon. 2008
The USA TODAY Internet 50 is a capital- S&P 500 110642. -88% -24.6%
ization-weighted index that consists of S&P Midcap ————i698.21—-7.3% 18.6%
the e-~Consumer 25 and the e-Business Bloomberg News or 19%, to $43.75. Genworth Financial | pow transports 4503.89 52% 45%
25. The indexes are benchmarked at 100 : NYSE Nasd tumbled $3.14, or 39%, to $5.00. Aflac Dow utilities 423.63. -4.8% -204%
as of Dec. 31, 2001. The components are NEW YORK — US. stocks plunged oe fell $8.63, or 14%, to $51.25. NYSE composite 720401 -8.7% -26.0%
updated quarterly. Monday and the Standard & Poor's 500 Advances 166 Advances 417 > A measure of energy shares in the Nasdaq 100 1496.15. 10.5% -28.2%
7 tumbled the most since the 1987 crash atl nape S&P 500 tumbled 11%, the biggest drop | Russell2000___— 657.72 -6.7% 14.1%
Internet50 after the House of Representatives re- | Peumss —*108 Declines 2, since at least 1989. Crude oil fell the | Amexcomposite 1758.92 -8.2% 27.0%
160 jected a $700 billion plan to rescue the | Newhighs____10 Newhighs" _16 | most in almost seven years on concern | 2 Wilshires00O 11,322.76 -8.3% | -23.6%
financial system (stories, 1A, 7A). Newlows 986 Newlows 689 | global demand will drop (story, 8A). EX- Exchange traded funds
The Dow Jones industrial average slid | Volume(in millions) — Volume (in millions) xonMobil dropped the most in six | Effs are index funds that trade like stocks on major
777.68 points to 10,354.45 for its big- | Up 157 years, falling $6.59, or 8%, to $74.06. | exchanges. Petg. change
ar gest point drop ever as U.S. stocks lost | Down 6,894 Down Chesapeake Energy lost the most in | stock’ Ticker__Mon. _2008
$1.2 trillion in market value. The MSCI | ta! 7,054 Total almost 10 years, sliding $5.27, or 14%, to | SPDR SPY -78% _-23,8%
World index of 23 developed markets $32.60. ConocoPhillips sank $6.93, or | SPDR Financial” XLF 13.2% _ -35.8%
slid 6.9%, the most in 21 years. day after the September 2001 terrorist 9%, to $69.31, the most since 1989, Na- | PowerShsQQQTrust_ QQQQ__-79% _ -26.2%
The S&P 500 fell 106.59 points, or attacks, sending the 30-stock gauge to tional Oilwell Varco slumped $8.96, or | iShares Rus 2000 IWM__=79% _-14.3%
8.8%, to 1106.42 vs. the 7.0% drop Mon- an almost three-year low as all of its 16%, to $45.61. ie
cae usatooay | day in the Dow. The Nasdaq composite components fell at least 2.8%. A gauge of > Apple slumped $22.98, or 18%, to eer a Be a
Pct. chg. index declined 199.61 points, or 9.1%, expected stock market volatility $105.26, the biggest drop in eight years: iShs FISEChinadS XD a6 C45 7%
Mon. Chg. __Day _2008 | to 1983.73, its steepest plunge since climbed toa record. Morgan Stanley cut its rating for the | proshsultras@ps00 SSO 213.8% 243.8%
meres aS ae oe a April 2000. Twenty-five stocks fell for) | maker of Macintosh computers and | ‘prosh ultra ht 00 QID 20.0% 61.9%
e-Consumer25 18615-2286 -109% —387% | each that.rose on the New York Stock Highlights: Wachovia tumbled iPod music players to “equal weight” | sppREner XLE_-11.9% _-24.8%
Gaede BanaesLnee Exchange as 2 billion shares were trad- $8.16, or 82%, to $1.84 after the bank from “overweight,” saying price cuts | ProShsUltraQQQ QLD -19.3% 52.2%
ed on the floor, 35% more than the was sold to Citigroup in a deal bro- will curb profit growth. SPDRGold Trusts GLD_— 3.4% «8.6%
e-Consumer 25 | three-month average. kered by the Federal Deposit Insurance DJADiamondsTr__—DIA__—_—-5.8% _-21.0%
1-800-Flowers.com 5.99 -0.14 -2.3% -31.4% The S&P 500 sank to its lowest since Corp. (story, 9A). Quotes on your cellphone iShares EAFE ‘EFA -11.2% -32.4%
Amazon.com 63.35_-7.35 -10.4% -31.6% | October 2004 as all 10 of its industry > Insurance companies tumbled on Send text message to heRanked by market capltallzaugn
Baidu.com 231.20-29.55 -11.3% -40.7% | groups tumbled at least 4.2%. The Dow concern that investment losses could 4INFO (44636) with: Foreign markets
BlueNile 42.50 -0.56_-1.3% -37.6% | average’s retreat was its steepest on a hurt profits and capital levels. MetLife, TW eStock ticker (dell) or
ExIrade 2.60 -0,85-24.6% —26.8% : Gi afi : ie : i Mon, Petecntage chance
Etrade __2.60 ~0.85-24.6% -26.8% | percentage basis since the first trading the biggest U.S. life insurer, lost $10.06, ¢Fund ticker (agthx) Ind close Prev.day
eBay 19.95 =262 110% 399% Shanghal 1328 nhs —~63 78
. = x e e . le = .
aan _15 -022 38% 2S | Dow Jones industrial average japan (Nike) 11,7436 13% -23.3%
Google 381.00-50.04 -11.6% 44.9% | 13,200 ee ee
IACInterActive 14.86 -2.14-12.6% -36.7% | 17.800 Sydney 839.2 ESS 24 GE
InfoSpace 10.77: -0.52 -4.6% 153% , Mon. close: 10,365.45 Singapore 2361.3. -21% -31.9%
intuit 29.92 -2.02 -63% -53% | 12,400 Change: 777.68; -7.0% uinbat eee ae ee
2GlobalComm 22.55 0.96 41% 65% 6 months ago: -17.8% Frankfurt 5807.1 -4.2% -28.0%
pT a SOs dD cae caoae - 12,000 In 2008: -21.9% Hong Kong 17,880.77 4.3% 35.7%
Move 2.02 20.26 11.4% 17.6% faa Zurich 5445.7 4.6% -21.4%
Netflix 31.60 -1.27 -3.9% 18.7% |" Milan 138220 “47% _ 33.3%
Overstock.com 1790 -2.29 -113% 153% | 11.290 Paris cece ie Seek
Priceline 66.84 -8.16-10.9% 41.8% |" condon ol ile Re
Schwab, Charles 21.73 -2.59 -10.6% 15.0% | 10,800 ae
Sina 32.88 -2.74 -27% 25.8% Johan. (Comp.) _23,087.7_-5.8%__-20.3%
SkillSoft 9850.19 20% 3.0% | 10,400. Mexico City 23,955.7 -6.4% -18.9%.
Stamps.com 71,720.01. 01% 23.8% or Toronto 11,285.1 -6.9% -18.4%
TD Ameritr 16,00 2.29 -12.5% -20.2% | 7000... DONTE Oe ee
United Online 9.44 029 -3.0% ~20.1% Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Brussels 2589.5 -8.0% -37.3%
Yahoo 1688 -2.04-10.8% -274% | DJ Wilshire 5000 Nasdaq composite index puis esis ate
Source: The Associated Press
» The e-Consumer 25 is published Tuesdays and Thursdays, 15000 ls Mutual funds
the e-Business 25 on Wednesdays and Fridays. For both tables | 14,500 2600 '
mean ae O08 2500 1S atgest since aint eee
Readers’ choice stocks 13,500 | 2400 Fund, ranked by size Mon. 4wks. 2008
Stocks that appear most in portfolios at USATODAY- | !3,000 2300 Amer. Funds Growth -8.2% -15.3% -23.7%
com’. 12,500 2200 aa Pimco Instl PIMS: TotRt 0.8% -2.0% 1.1%
‘ Pctg. change
Mon. Chg. = once {2,000 Monicloaeaa4 2100 7 een Amer. Funds A: CapIBA p -5.3% -10.1% -20.1%
ATRT 27.75 -2.25 -25% -33.2% 111,500 2000 Amer. Funds A: CapWGA p © 8.0% -13.7% -26.2%
Alia : 1935 =154 =a 1708 11,000 | 000 Fidelity Contrafund -7.3% -13.1% -24.1%
e 20-22, “ls. —4b, : < 7 i -6: -12. -22.
BenkotAneiia —3025_-645 tax “zara | MW AF May Jun Jet Aug Sep-Oct Mar pr May Jun Jul aug Sep ct | Reese octamer
Chevron 77.50 -9.45 -10.9% -17.0% ;
aC ET TESTES es N ew York Sto ck Exch ange N. as d a q Washington Mutual Inv -7.2% -10.0% ~19.7%
Ge a7 7s oa) HL soll 1775 22.40 -119% 239.7% ; . Vanguard 500 Index -8.8% -13.6% -23.5%
COO Ce Ss 5103 2145 <28% c1csy | Most active shares Most shares traded Most active shares Most shares traded Dodge&Cox: Stock -10.5% -18.3% -30.1%
Dell 15.41 -1.59 -9.4% -37.1% Volume Last Chg Percent Chg Volume Last Ch Percent Chg Vanguard Idx Fds: TotStk__-8.5% -13,6% -22.4%
Walt Disne 29.73 -3.02 -9.2% -7.9% | Citigrp 189,436,500 17.75 -2.40 VangFncl 666.6 -2.78 | PwShsQQQ 290,997,600 37.82 _-3.26 PwShsQQQ _* 748 -3.26 | Europacific Growth -8.0% -13.8% -28.5%
ExxonMobil 74.06 -659 -8.2% -21.0%"} AmintlGp 149,987,700 250 -0.65 ClayGSol 263.2 -3.54 | Microsoft 127,857,700 25.01 -2.39 iShGIbREn 48.0 -4.17 | Dodge&Cox: Intistk -9.7% -18.0% -31.0%
Ford Motor 417 -0.64 -13.3% -38.0% | iShR2K 142,691,500 65.05 _-5.58 VangEurPc 253.6 -3.71 | Apple 91,958,100 105.26 -22.98 PSWindEnn 38.2 -1.83 | Fidelity Divintl 8.9% -16.4% —30.7%
GeneralElectric 23.10 -2.15 -8.5% -37.7%'.| iShEMkts 117,539,200 31.61 —4.18 iShLShtT 246.6 -0.05 | intel 90,824,100_17.27_ -1.93 FTUSLiq 346 -2.16 | New Perspective Fund 74% 12.8% 25.0%
General Motors 8.51 -1.25 -12.8% -65.8% | BkofAm 95,697,500 30.25 -6.45 VangSTBd 241.1 0.11 | Cisco 85,368,500 21.79 -2.03 BldrsEm 29.5 -4.74 . :
Google 381.00-50.04 -11.6% -44.9% | JPMorgCh 75,738,800 41.00 -7.24 VangTotBd 219.7 037 | Oracle 57,760,100 18.77 -1.85 FidNasdldx 233-675 | Lipperfundindexes 44441 return!
Hewlett-Packard 44.55 -3.26 -6.8% -11.7% Pfizer 70,147,600 17.65 -1.01 iShDJIns 184.1 -2.70 Qualcom 49,618,000 39.88 -5.96 iShAsian 26.8 -2.13 Type of Lipper index Mon. 4wks. 2008
Home Depot 24.99 -1.47 -5.6% -7.2% | Genklec 68,623,700 23.10 -2.15 MktVRus 181.7 -5.17 | Comcast 46,242,200 18.01 -2.69 iShACWXn 242 -445 | Balanced 5.0% 9.6% 16.0%
Intel 17.27 -1.93 -10.1% -35.2% | WellsFargo 64,385,200 33.25 -4.06 WTindia 173.1 1.80 | RschMotn 44,567,700 61.73 -9.03 PSNsqSCn 240 -1.46 | Equity income “8.2% AA2A% 222.6%
IBM 114.46 -496 -4.2% 59% | CVRD 55,899,100 16.70 -4.19 iShFnSc 155.3 -659 | Dell 38,552,500 15.41 —1.59 PwShHlth 225 -171 | Gog 6k CMON ADE
Preos cia) Se Biggest gainers Biggest losers Biggest gainers Biggest losers International 8.8% -15.8% 30.7%
Microsoft 5.01 7.39 87% 79.7% Last_ Chg. Pct Last_ Chg Pct Last Ch Pet Last_ Chg Pet Large-cap core -8.2% -13.5% -22.9%
Motorola 6.68 0.95 -12.5% —58.4% VeraSun 4.00 1.80 81.8 SovrgnBcp 2.33 -6.04 -72.2 DearbrnBe 10.00 440 78.6 CapWest 3.39 -7.47 -68.8 Large-cap growth -8.6% -16.9% -26.7%
ae (so7cies one ieee oe 9.60 2.55 36.2 RegionsFn 8.25 -5.75 -41.1 | PacEthan 2.08 0.70 50.7 ‘FifthThird 9.11 -7.05 -43.6 | Large-cap value 85% —12.8% 223.9%
Pepsico. --~69.66 2.05 =2.9% 8.2% RaserT 8.50 2.26 36.2 Genworth 5.00 -3.14 -38.6 LNB Bncp 10.79 3.59 49.9 RainierPac 440 -2.31 -344 Midcap growth 8.3% 177% 27.5%
Pee nae 17.65 -1.01 54% 223% FedAgric 3.75 0.89 31.1 Conseco 3.20 -1.79 -35.9 HelicosBio 2.38 0.74 44.8 VirtualRn 7.79 -3.95 -33.6 Midcap valu “7.7% -15.0% 21.9%
: - - OO p value 2 . 9%
Procter&Gamble 66.75 =209 =30% o1z | GypSemwi 650 150 300 FstHorizon 7.25 -4.02 -35.7 | BeasleyB 2.99 088 41.7 CitizRe 313-154 33.0 rer crn aa Ee
Sat 06 Didciaax cose | iarcB 6.75 1.32 243 MuellrBn 5.48 -2.78 -33.7 | ValenceTch 430 1.15 36.5 Cal-Maine 2636-1155 305 | [PS - ee ae
Nenana 3062 c156 <48% —299% $ CosanLtd 950 1.38 17.0 Keycorp __—9.80_ -4.90 -33.3 | BankHldgs 3.75 0.96 34.4 SecurBk 3.50 -1.44 -29.1 LitCap Valle ——
Wal-Mart 58452226 237% 230% | Cansiv 3.95 0.53 15.5 Guarfncln 3.31. -1.63 -33.0 | FFABKIA 6.39 1.60 33.4 ConvOrgan 4.33 -1.70 -28.2 | Science & technology 2s 18.4% -28.8%
4= To See the top 50 stocks In véader pottfoling and find out FBL Fn 29.16 3.47 13.5 Gramrcy 2.48 -1.20 -32.6 |. Telular 2.68 0.58 27.6 TandyBr 3.80 -1.49 -28.2 | Small-cap growth =6.7% 141% 24.2%
more about them and this list, go to: readerschoice.usa SagaCom 5.60 055 10.9 BkAtlArs 6.60 -2.90 -30.5 Amriana 9.25 1.90 25.9 HarisHa 5.45 -2.13 -28.1 Small-cap value -6.4% -10.2% -12.8%
sodeycom US. government bond 08% 1.2% 2.6%
e 1- Capital gains and dividends reinvested Source: Lipper
Currency per dollar Treasuries Key rates 6mos. Yr. me:
New York rates Mon. Fri. aS Yr.ago 27-00% »—~ SO year E bong viele Mins 12s Prime lendin 9.00% 5.25% 7.75% Commodities Close Mon. 3008
Australian dollar __‘1.2439__-1.2038 1.0909 _ 1.1253 Federal funds 1.08% 2.38% 4.92% | Aluminum (Ib. $1.11 -2.0% 3.7%
British pound"! 0.5510 0.5427 0.5021 _0.4889 | [4.43% | | Cattle (Ib.) 0.9805 -2.9% 1.9%
Canadian dollar 1.0399 1.0320 1.0191 0.9938 4.00% | Consumer rates 6mos. Yr. _| Coffee (Ib.) 1,293 3.8% -5.1%
Chinese yuan 6.8493 6.8493 7.0175 7.5070 | eye Savings Mon. a a Copper (Ib.) 2.9175 53% 3.7%
an i 0.6910 0.6841 0.6345 0.7006 | Money market funds 1.80% 2.17% 4.54% Corn (bushel) 5.13. -5.5% +12.6%
Hong Kong dollar __7.7640__7.7760__7.7821__7.7710 é Tax-free money funds 3.67% 2.04% 3.23% | CRBindex 343.22 5.9% -43%
indian rupee 47170 46512 39.746 39675 00% | 10-year T-note yield Mon. 3.58%} Bank money market 0.70% 0.66% 0.90% | Ethanol gal, 217 3.9% -8.4%
Israeli shekel 3.4530 3.4235 3.5298 4.0180 3 th T-bill di : 6-mo. CDs 2.09% 1.95% 3.50% Gasoline, unleaded (gal.) 2.397 -10.1% 3.2%
japanese yen 10443 106.06 100.00__114.74 a MiG ee. EVES 2.45% 1.97% 3.71% | Gold (troy oz.) 888.20 0.6% 6.4%
Mexican peso 11.0505 10.7925 10.6940 10.9333 2.00% Bag 5-yr. CDs 3.48% 2.77% 3.94% | Lumber(1,000bd.ft) 20380 3.6% -13.1%
Norwegian krone___5.7737_5.6721__5.1177_5.3920 ae nw NR aes Mortgage rates "| Natural gas (btw 7.2210 3.4% 3.5%
Singapore dollar 1.4280 1.4263 1.3812 1.4859 | hase = “s 30-yr.fixed (FHLMC) 5.78% 5.87% 6.34% | Oil, heating (gal.) 2.7604 7.8% 4.4%
South African rand 8.3333 8.1037 8.1169 6.8716 qoy “Bonds! isk oe ote 15-yrfixed(FHLMC) 5.35% 5.27% 5.98% | Oil, It.swt.crude(barrel) 96.37 -9.8% 0.4%
South Korean won 1185.30 1160.40 1000.00 91491 © loro 1591042 06% 45% Adj. rate (FHLMC) 5.03% 5.15% 5.65% | Platinum (troy oz. 1,075.40 _-3.4% -29.6%
Swedish krona 6.7568 6.6313 5.9595 6.4375 hee ese 5320056 07% 52% L-yr. T-ARM index! 1.95% 1.60% 4.05% | Pork bellies (Ib.) 0.9675 2.9% 12.5%
Swiss franc 1.0873 1.0891 0.9977 _ 1.1635 a ace hal i ‘ Tith Dist. ARM index 2.@98% 3.970% 4.277% | Silver(troy oz, 12981 3.5% -12.3%
Taiwan dolar «3245.32.15 3040 32.77 : Lateef sen 20 Sources: Money nd epor. ban | Soybeans bushel) 1094-6 O% _-88%
1 - dollars per pound: 1.8149; 2 - dollars per euro: 1.4472 ' Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oa“ , Bi : : Wheat (bushel) 6.68 -6.7% -24.5%







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