Citation
The Tribune

Material Information

Title:
The Tribune
Uniform Title:
Tribune (Nassau, Bahamas)
Portion of title:
Nassau tribune
Place of Publication:
Nassau, Bahamas
Publisher:
Tribune
Publication Date:
Copyright Date:
2008
Frequency:
Daily, except Sunday
daily
normalized irregular
Language:
English
Physical Description:
v. : ill. ; 58 cm.

Subjects

Genre:
newspaper ( sobekcm )
newspaper ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
Bahamas

Notes

General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 79, no. 210 (Aug. 3, 1983); title from caption.

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item was contributed to the Digital Library of the Caribbean (dLOC) by the source institution listed in the metadata. This item may or may not be protected by copyright in the country where it was produced. Users of this work have responsibility for determining copyright status prior to reusing, publishing or reproducing this item for purposes other than what is allowed by applicable law, including any applicable international copyright treaty or fair use or fair dealing statutes, which dLOC partners have explicitly supported and endorsed. Any reuse of this item in excess of applicable copyright exceptions may require permission. dLOC would encourage users to contact the source institution directly or dloc@fiu.edu to request more information about copyright status or to provide additional information about the item.
Resource Identifier:
09994850 ( OCLC )

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Full Text






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SEt INSIGHT FRONT

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

€USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION












Three shot in,

*

triple homicitle ‘

@ By KARIN HERIG. _,
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

IN WHAT was described as

a “horrific massacre”’ and. an:

“execution style killing” by eye
witnesses, three persons were
gunned down in a triple homi-
cide in front of a popular Bain
Town club in the early hours of
Saturday.

The deaths of Lavardo Arm-

brister, 35, of the Laird Street
area, his-cousin Sedino Smith,
33, of Yellow Elder Gardens,
and Vanessa Franks- Williams,
. 23, of Baillou Hill Road, have
brought the country’s murder
count to 54 for the year.
Family members yesterday
described Mr Smith as an “out-
spoken” person, while Mf
Armbrister was said to have
been of a quiet disposition.
Residents of the Bain Town
community and witnesses
believe that these latest mur-
ders are connected to Friday’s
Jacaranda Street homicide and
to the man who was found in
the trunk of a burning car in
the Millar’s Creek area last

SEE page two

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ardens.

SEDINO SMI
Yellow Elder

















Man and

LAVARDO ARMRISTER, 35,
of the Laird Stret area.



gunpoint

A MAN and his girl-
friend were abducted by
three gunmen who forced
the man into the trunk and
the woman inside the vehi-
cle.

The incident, which
occurred Sunday marning,
ended without the couple
being seriously hurt as the
man was able to contact a
friend by cell phone while
in the trunk.

The friend then informed

SEE page 13















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A FIRE broke out at a festaurant and sports bar on Gawpen Road yesterday. There were no 5 reports of any
injuries, but one firefighter was taken to hospital with smoke inhalation.

150 prison
inmates
‘have HIV
or AIDS’

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 150 inmates —
11 per cent of prison popula-
tion — are believed to have
tested positive with HIV or
AIDS at Her Majesty’s Pris-
ons, according to inside
sources.

AIDS Secretariat Rosemae
Bain told The Tribune that
although she was unable to
confirm a current account of
infected inmates, she was
aware of a formal study con-

SEE page 12





isis i sf i

ions aati



@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@ -
tribunemedia.net

ajor/Tribune staff

Custom’s Department
delivered to The Tribune
indicate that the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation
owes government more
than $166 million in out-
standing customs duty, dat-
ing back to 1997.

A letter dated August 6,
2008 addressed to Ehurd
Cunningham, Secretary for
Revenue in the Ministry of
Finance, signed by the Act-
ing Comptroller. of Cus-
toms outlines BEC's out-
standing payments.

The letter says that as of
June 30, 2008 BEC owed
Customs $166,144,059.18 in
stamp tax and duty.
~~ Some have suggested
that BEC is in a “catch 22”
situation where if BEC
were made to pay its tax

SEE page 13

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



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Rodney Moncur

THE SCENE OF THE CRIME: Augusta Street, outside The Pit Resaurant. Sedino Smith, 33; Lavardo
Armbrister, 35 and Vanessa Franks-Williams, 23, were gunned own in front of the popular Bain Town

club in the early hours of Saturday.

FROM page one

Wednesday.

According to residents of
Bain Town, one of Saturday’s
victims, Ms Franks-Williams,
was either the wife or the
fiancée of the man found dead
in the burning car. He report-
edly went by the name of
“Shabba.”

While Chief Supt Glen
Miller, officer in charge of the
GDU; yesterday said that
police are getting some “con-
flicting information” about the
motives behind the Saturday
murders, members of the com-
munity believe that all five
killings are drug related.

Some members of the Bain
Town community claimed that

Mr Armbrister and Mr Smith .

were preparing to retaliate
against those responsible for
Shabba’s murder, but were
killed before they could carry
out their plans.

Press liaison officer Asst

Supt Walter Evans reported’

yesterday that the three vic-
tims had just left ‘The Pit
Restaurant’ on Augusta Street
at around 2am on Saturday

“when unknown persons

opened fire on-them.
Mr Armbrister, Mr Smith

Three shot in
triple homicide

and Ms Franks-Williamswere
walking towards a.Cherolet
Impala, registration nmber
205615, when they were rport-
edly shot at by two memarry-
ing what witnesses clain were
machine guns.

Mr Armbrister ad Mr.

Smith died at the scene while
Ms Franks-Williams, wo was
said to have been shc eight
times, died shortly afer she
arrived at the Princes Mar-
garet Hospital.
. When police arrive: at the
scene they found Mrsmith’s
body lying in frontof the
Chevrolet Impala. M Arm-
brister was found withuis body
partially in the front pssenger
side of the left han driven.
vehicle, Mr Evans sai.

According to eye witnesses,
the three victims wee inside
The Pit Restaurant, vhen Mr
Smith allegedly receyed a call
on his cellular te?phone,
prompting him to 2ave the
club.

Witnesses claimthat the
gunmen — one descried as tall,



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the other short — were waiting
for the three victims in a
parked car outside the club.

Mr Armbrister’s father was
in the area close to Augusta
Street when he heard the shots
being fired, not realising at the
time that his son was one of
the victims. _

‘He described the shots as
sounding like an “explosion.”

“A gun went. off, sounded

like a riddler (machine gun),”
he said.
Witnesses ‘noted that

although the bodies of all three
victims were riddled with bul-
lets, the Chevrolet Impala and

nearby property remained -

undamaged. This observation
has led eye witnesses to specu-
late that the gunmen were
experienced and that the triple
murder was an ordered hit.

It is also claimed that
unidentified persons removed’
money and a gun from the
bodies of Mr Armbrister and
Mr Smith and from inside the
Chevrolet Impala right after
the shooting.






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THE TRIBUNE

CORRUPTION, NEPOTISM ALLEGATIONS RESURFACE

alls for commission

© In brief

Police arrest
shooting suspect

POLICE yesterday arrested a
35-year-old male suspect at
around Sam. It is believed that
this man was involved in the
shooting of a reserve police offi-
cer earlier last week in the
Chippingham area.

The suspect, who lives in the
Sears Road area, was found
with a weapon and several live
rounds of ammunition.

Murder charge
expected today

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - One of the
two suspects wanted by police in
connection with the shooting
death of a man in Freeport is
expected to be charged with
murder in Freeport Magistrate’s
Court today.

The suspect is accused of the
death of 32-year-old Roland
Elidor of Hanna Hill, Eight
Mile Rock, who was shot at the
Pepperpot Takeaway Restau-
rant on September 6.

Police investigation into the
incident established that Elidor
was at the Pepperpot around
4am waiting for his take-out
order, along with a number of
other customers, including two
women who had arrived shortly
after him. Three men arrived
shortly afterwards and soon
engaged Elidor in a heated
argument, which quickly esca-
lated.

One of the men pulled out a~
handgun and shot Elidor several
times.




GOVERNMENT will intro-
duce two “important” pieces of
legislation to Parliament designed
to prevent the importation of
“illegitimate and/or fake” phar-
maceutical products and to make
access to affordable medicine eas-
ier, Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said the two pieces
of legislation, if approved by Par-
liament, will not only protect
members of the public from
“unscrupulous” persons and prac-
tices, but will also result in the
availability of cost-effective drugs
to those persons who may be least
able to afford ‘them.

The proposed legislation is also
expected to lead to the establish-
ment of the Bahamas Pharmacy
Council, which will be responsible
for regulating the pharmaceuti-
cal profession; the establishment

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@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter.
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGATIONS of corruption
and nepotism in the Customs
Department have resurfaced, as
a source within the revenue col-
lection agency calls for govern-
ment to "clean-out corrupt" offi-
cers.

The source urges government
to order a Commission of Inquiry
to investigate multiple claims of
bribery and abuse of power, which
is alleged to be “rampant in the
department.”

"We've had people who've
been steeped in corrupt practices
and the evidence was so over-
whelming and they didn't go
nowhere,” the source alleged.
And he (an officer being investi-
gated) is working in a sensitive
area. A number of corrupt offi-
cers, the source claims, are being
considered for high-ranking pro-
motions.

"Maybe a Commission of
Inquiry should be brought on
stream to expose these people.
They just need to maybe transfer
these people to a non-revenue col-
lection department or ministry
where they don't have access to
government's money," said the
source.

Yesterday, Assistant Comp-
troller Clifford Ferguson, who
heads the department’s internal

Legislation to combat fake medicine



“The general purpose of this Act
is to regulate the pharmacy
practice and the conduct of all
persons throughout the country
that are engaged in the

profession.”

of a Prescription Drug Plan that
will provide access to more cost-
effective drugs for the treatment
of chronic diseases and specified
medical conditions, and the estab-
lishment of a Drug Fund that will
fall under the control and man-
agement of the National Insur-
ance Board.

It is also expected to lead toa
reduction in the time patients
have to wait to receive medica-
tion at the Princess Margaret
Hospital or any of the govern-
ment-owned héalth clinics; to lead
to patients being able to receive
their medication at any partici-
pating private pharmacy, and to
result in all senior citizens receiv-








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Dr Hubert Minnis

‘ beginning with these two new and

of inquiry at Customs

delete his name from the compa-
ny's cargo manifest so that he
could avoid paying duty on goods
shipped in his name. Internal doc-
uments in The Tribune's posses-
sion support these claims and on
Thursday Mr Ferguson confirmed
that an investigation on this inci-
dent was underway.

As a result of the inquiry, the
officer (who is still on duty) may
be confined to his office until the
investigation is complete, Mr Fer-

investigations unit, told The Tri-
bune that he is "open" to such an
inquiry.

"Whatever the government
decides, if that is the route they
wish to take — my view (is) I'm
really open. If there is a Commis-
sion of Inquiry I'm sure we'll have
to go through whatever the
process is. I don't have any objec-
tions one way or the other."

Information reaching The Tri-
bune alleges that a customs officer
stationed on a Family Island sup-
posedly receives bribes in the
thousands. Mr Ferguson was not
aware of these allegations, but
said he would look into the matter
with the comptroller. If it were
found necessary an investigation
would be started.

A letter of complaint sent to
the comptroller, dated Septem-
ber 8, outlines the alleged mis-
conduct of an another officer who,
the letter writer claimed, breached
procedure by allowing a man and
his family to leave the customs
area at the airport without "pro-
viding any declaration to the offi-
cer; having their luggage inspect-
ed; or having their passports
stamped." This matter is also
being investigated by the internal
investigation unit, Mr Ferguson
said. On Friday The Tribune
reported that the department was
investigating an officer who
allegedly "abused" his authority
by demanding that a shipping
agent from a cargo company

when this confinement will start.

The issue of corruption in the
Customs Department has been
raised before, the last time being
in July when Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said his gov-
ernment would prosecute all pub-
lic servants, including customs
officers, who break the law.

Also in July, Acting Comptrol-
ler of Customs Anthony Adderley
told The Tribune he would "vig-
orously" seek to address all con-
cerns of impropriety once enough
evidence has been produced.

They were both responding to a
Tribune article that mased cor-
ruption concerns.

Adderley yesterday and Thurs-
day were not returned.
Yesterday, Mr Ferguson said
while the department does receive
a number of complaints against
officers and staff, many investi-
gations "die in the water" in the
"absence of the evidence."

re Minnis

macies. The Act would also lead
to the establishment for the
Bahamas Pharmacy Council and
for other matters connected with
it. “The general purpose of this
Act is to regulate the pharmacy
practice and the conduct of all
persons throughout the country
that are engaged in the profes-
sion,” Dr. Minnis said. “Pertinent
aspects of the profession are
defined and addressed in the pro-
posal which include issues such
as manufacturing, dispensing,
clinical applications and distribu-
tion.”

The Health Minister said the
Council would serve as the gov-
erning body, responsible for reg-
ulating the profession and the
professionals working within it.
He said it would further be able
to “modify and make regulations”
as changes occur in the profes-
sion. The second and equally as
important piece of legislation to
be brought before Parliament, he
said, is expected to lead to the
establishment of a programme for
the supply of certain pharmaceu-
tical products at government-
owned and other health facilities
“at an economic cost” in the
treatment of certain chronic dis-
eases.

ing their medication at no cost,
among other key benefits for res-
idents who fall within specified
categories.

Addressing the Opening of the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation’s second annual Pharma-
ceutical Summit, Dr. Minnis said
that while there are many indi-
viduals, and by extension agen-
cies, that seek to promote and
maintain a high standard within
the pharmaceutical profession,
the profession is “rife” with
unscrupulous individuals who .are
involved at the sales, distribution
and manufacturing levels.

“With this knowledge, it is
therefore necessary for any well-
thinking government to take
action to prevent the importation
of illegitimate and/or fake prod-
ucts from entering the local mar-
ket and reaching an unsuspect-
ing public,” Dr. Minnis said.

“The Government of The
Bahamas, through the Ministry
of Health, endeavours to take the »
relevant steps to protect the
Bahamian public by ensuring that
the appropriate guidelines, poli-
cies and legislation are in place

important pieces of legislation,”
Dr. Minnis added.

Dr. Minnis said the first of the
two pieces of legislation is the
Pharmacy Act, which will provide
for the regulation and control of
the pharmacy practice and for the
registration and licensing of per-
sons qualified to practice in phar-

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR .

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas




Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Inagua’s future still uncertain

INAGUANS are hopeful that Morton’s Salt
Bahamas will rebuild and return under new
ownership. However, they also know that if the
plant does reopen it will not tolerate the dis-
ruptions that Morton’s suffered over the years.

“Tf they do return this will be the island’s last
chance,” said one of the locals, “these new own-
ers are not going to take the nonsense that Mor-
ton’s put up with. Any sign of trouble, they will
lock down and leave.” ’

Asked about the attitude of local unionists
who called a strike just before Hurricane Ike
blew in and destroyed their livelihood, we were
told they are very tight-lipped.

“They don’t know where they stand with the
company,” said a resident. “They don’t know

whether or not they have a job.” In other words -
by contrast to their loud-mouthed blustering.

and threats against the company a few short
weeks ago, they are now quietly hiding behind
that old Bahamian caution: “Shut mouth catch
no flies!” ,
Despite everything Morton’s still shows com-
passion for its staff —including those who dis-

rupted operations. All staff are to receive $1,000 .

each to help them over these hard times, and
some are being recalled and paid to help clean
up the badly damaged plant. Of course, this is
the. hurricane damage. Nothing has been said
about the damage done by unknown hands dur-
ing the industrial unrest — a Molotov cocktail
thrown at Morton’s ‘guest house in Mathew
* Town and the nine brine pumps damaged on the
outskirts of the plant. At the time The Tribune
was told that the damage to each pump was
estimated at $20,000. :

Of course, the union has denied responsibil-
ity for any of this sabotage, but what strikes us
strange is that too often in this country when
there is industrial unrest; sabotage seems part of
the package. We recall the industrial dispute
with BEC in early 2004 when four poles were
cut down, triggering a reaction that shut down
two power plants, leaving the capital in dark-
ness. On other occasions a foreign object has
been thrown across electrical lines, shutting

down all power to large sections of New Provi-
dence.

We recall Works Minister Bradley Roberts
threatening that “reckless and anarchic per-
sons” will face the full extent of the law, and
union leaders denying any blame, claiming that
sabotage was not their style. Needless to say
the “reckléss and anarchic persons” were never
caught.

It all reminds us of TS Eliot’s Macavity — the
mystery cat. / .

“Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like
Macavity,

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At whatever time the deed took place —
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An Inagua resident maintains that there
are a few radicals in their community who are
the troublemakers, “intimidating citizens.” This
resident believes that one of the conditions of
the reopening of the plant will be a demand
that law and order be restored to the island.
Like the majority of residents, the company
will not tolerate vandalism going unpunished.
Inaguans believe, as do we in Nassau, that too
many people suffer under the false impression
that they are above the law and can. do any-

thing as long as:it is labelled “industrial action.” .

In Nassau we are still waiting for-action to be
taken in the recent disruptions causéd in Nassau

when BTC unionists were called out to block
Bay Street. It has been established that the .

strike was illegal. Citizens want an end to it.
And the only way-to end it is if the law is
allowed to take its course. This is what the peo-
ple of Inagua also want. And this is what the salt
plant has to be guaranteed before its owners will
consider reopening.

There are those who tell us that they are sat-
isfied that the new owners will give the salt
plant one more chance because it is one of the
most profitable in its chain.

“It would be a shame if it were to close,” said
a person close to the situation. “This is one
company that is 100 per cent Bahamian oper-
ated from general manager, Glenn Bannister,
right down the line: It-shows what Bahamians
can do.”

It also shows what unreasonable Bahami-
ans can undo.

But on a brighter note, NEMA’s clean-up
operation is going well in Inagua. The roofs of
five house were repaired in.four days. John
Nixon on the staff of the Ministry of Tourism
has been seconded to NEMA as the man on the
ground in Inagua. He expects all the repairs to
be finished long before Christmas. “I want to
put up a Christmas tree for them,” he said.

Mr Nixon, a native Inaguan, is the son of
Jimmy Nixon, who with his brother, Sammy
were. responsible for reviving the flamingo
colony in Inagua. They were the wardens of
the reserve for more than 40 years.

Mr Nixon says he is happy to be overseeing
the restoration of residents’ homes. “I am look-
ing forward to bringing happiness to some of the
old folk and those who need help and to bring
my old home: back even better than it was
before.” oer! 3 he













Dismayed

t

by govt’
double
standards

EDITOR, The Tribune.
KINDLY allow me to

express my disappointment in.

the double standards that the
government of the Bahamas

_ continues to present, not only to

the citizens of the Bahamas, but
the world at large.

What I have witnessed today
reinforces what a so-called num-
bers king said: “Any attempt to
crack down on numbers would
be hypocritical and a big joke”
— taken from an article in The
Nassau Guardian, February 22,
under the heading “Legalise
gambling in the Bahamas.”

A few weeks ago the employ-
ees of BTC were threaten that
they would be disciplined for
the actions they took to protect
their employment rights. There
were many members of parlia-
ment speaking on this matter
and the public was even polled.
There is also a commission to
review the crime in this country.

I was appalled to watch the
evening news on the 16th to’see
a cheque being accepted by
NEMA from a company called
“Flowers” when every Bahami-
an knows its business and the
source of its funds.

What does the Christian




LETTERS

letters@tribunemecia.net



Council have to say about this?

What does the Members of
Parliament, including opposi-
tion, and political leaders have
to say about this? _

Let’s hear from The Cham-
ber of Commerce, talk show
hosts, employer representatives
and, of course, those outspoken
Bahamians.

Are the law makers of this
country going to continue turn-
ing a blind eye by taking hand-
outs from persons who are ina
business that our statute books
legislate against?

What are we teaching our
children, that only some things
are wrong depending on who is
evaluating?

Is the government now going
to legalise gambling in this
country and put the funds to
good use?

Maybe some of the drug deal-
ers, and bank robbers can now
follow suit and start donating.

When you put a certain
amount into the bank you have
to account for its source. As

people professing to be
upstanding citizens of Christian
values we must be very careful
what we do, how we do it and
who it will impact.

We often sit/by and wonder
why the young people are
uncontrollable, but it stems
from us adults.

Or should a proclamation be
made:

“The Prime Minister, The
Attorney General, and the Min-
ister of Security of our beloved
Bahamaland has declared a
period of Amnesty for trans-
gressions, calling all drug lords,
bank robbers, employees who
are stealing, in addition to the
numbers houses and web shops
once you are donating to the
monetary needs of the nation
with effect from September 16,
2008 to November 30, when the
hurricane season closes, only
cash donations shall accepted.”

BTC staff you are also for-
given for your transgressions.

Praying for the nation’s chil-

.dren, my children and grand-

children.

LINDA DENISE EVANS
Nassau,
September, 2008.

Nothing wrong with challenging Christie

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Again thank you for allow-
ing me space in your invaluable
column. This is a short letter to
all prospective candidates for
the leadership of the PLP. First
of all, there is absolutely noth-
ing wrong with challenging Mr
Christie for the leadership of
the party. A belief that one
should not be able to challenge

a leader of any organisation is

nonsensical.

I will state here that there are
indeed protocols in that at crit-
ical times, such as entering into
an election year, such challenges
should not arise. However it is

- presently post-elections andthe

party is in a restructuring stage;
therefore if there is a belief that
the party’s leadership should be
changed or challenged then one
suspects that this is a practical
result of losing an election.

It is this writer’s belief that
there is no need to hide ones
concerns for their party’s sur-
vival; nor should a party mem-
ber be forced to blindly jump
over'a cliff just because they are
instructed to. The long and
short of it is that this cloak and
dagger (heavy on the dagger)
nonsense about undermining
Mr Christie’s leadership must
stop.

If a party member wants to
contest Mr Christie, then they
should do the honourable thing.
They should go to their mem-
bers and inform them of such.
They should publicly announce
their plans and ambitions and
they should also inform Mr
Christie.

Does this all sound naive,

well most political savvy per-
sons would immediately say
“ves” however history has
shown that spineless, under-

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!

handed actions are never suc-
cessful. Bahamians should have
no interest in a “leader” who
cannot speak truth about run-
ning for leadership.

I beg whomever aspires to
this great office; just make your
announcement in the proper
manner, present your case to
your party members, court your
delegates (within reason) and °
present your position to us
Bahamians. i, Mee ae

As strange as this may sound,
and because all of us are so used
to the under-the-table, back-
stabbing politics, it will be a
breath of fresh air and clearly
something that this country has
never seen before. A word to
the wise, think: Transition not
Ouster.

DWAYNE J HANNA
Nassau,
September 14 ,2008.





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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 5



‘A state of nor malcy iS retur ning’ — Hubert Ingraham

PM pleased with Inagua cleanup

IN HIS second trip to Inagua
since the passage of Hurricane
Ike, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said he is very pleased with
the cleanup work to date, and
pointed out that the Inagua All-
Age School remains the first pri-
ority in the schedule of public
works already in progress.

“A state of normalcy is return-
ing to Inagua,” Mr. Ingraham said
following his tour of Mathew
Town Saturday.

On September 9, the Prime
Minister toured the island with a
team of Cabinet Ministers, mem-
bers of the Opposition and gov-
ernment officials who travelled
to get a first-hand view of the
damage caused by the category
four hurricane. On Saturday Mr
Ingraham, National Emergency
Management.Agency (NEMA)
Director Commander Stephen
Russell and Local Government
officials, toured the island’s
Defence Force Base, Adminis-
trator’s Office, All-Age School,
NEMA\’s supplies storage area,
and visited several elderly per-
sons on the island whose roofs,
damaged by the hurricane, have
been repaired by Government.

“Our schedule of public works
was the restoration of water sup-
ply which has now been complet-
ed, the restoration of electricity
supply which is virtually complete
[and] the restoration of telephone
services, which is more than 60
per cent complete,” said Mr
Ingraham.

“The airport will come next,
but the first priority is the public
school.”

While touring the island’s All--
Age school, Mr Ingraham spoke
with parents there and assured
them both of Government’s com-
mitment to providing a safe learn-
ing environment for their chil-
dren, and to landscaping the
grounds of the school for the first
time. —

He told parents that principal-
ly, suitable buildings on the island
would be utilised to accommo-
date students, adding that the use
of trailers would be the last option
considered by Government.

Prior to his discussion with par-
ents at the school, the Prime Min-
ister toured St. Philip’s Parish
Community Centre which was

previously, used as a hurricane.

shelter and has now been desig-.
“persons who lost roofs in the

nated a temporary site for three




Sharon Turner/BIS Photo

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (centre) toured the Royal Bahamas

Defence Force Base in Inagua on Saturday, September 20 and is pictured
viewing two of the vessels at the base. Mr. Ingraham, who toured the base
as part of his second visit to Inagua since the passage of Hurricane Ike,
said it sustained minimal damage during the storm.



of the primary school grades on

the island. “Some parents
expressed concern about some of
the classrooms and the structural
soundness of them,” Mr. Ingra-
ham said. “I assured them that
we would have it viewed by a
structural engineer and have the
results explained to them ina
PTA meeting.”

While at the public school, Mr.
Ingraham also spoke with a
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) staffer about the progress

of electrification at the school and
. how that: process could be expe-

dited. With regard to social work
on the island, Mr. Ingraham cred-
ited Department of Social Ser-
vice workers with doing “an
excellent job” on the ground.
“They have done an excellent job
on the island,” he’said.
“They have provided us with
social assessments for all people
and homes and have put us in a
position to have resources and
assistance allocated.”

Pauline Bowen-Forbes, one of

_the island’s social workers, said

that four to‘five homes of elderly

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra-
ham (right) greets 89 year old

_ Inagua resident Alfred Bain, whose

home lost its roof during Hurri-
cane Ike. Mr. Bain, who recently
left one of the island's shelters fol-
lowing the repair of his roof
thanked Social Service workers on
the island for their assistance to
him.

storm had been repaired, and that
the process of home repairs
would be progressing to the dis-
abled, single parents and then to
the general community.

Mrs. Forbes added that resi-
dents have been moved from
shelters and have returned to
their homes. Expressing his plea-
sure meantime with. the amount
of relief supplies on the island,

Mr. Ingraham said that supplies.

were expected to arrive aboard a
Defence Force craft Saturday

night, with additional supplies -

expected to arrive this week.

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Materials for the repair of at
least 30 homes in Inagua were on
the ground, with work expected
to start this week, according to
Commander Russell. “A new
shipment of supplies arrived just
yesterday (Friday),” he said. “We

are also pleased that some 40 vol-

unteers from the Methodist Habi-
tat programme came on the island
Wednesday — that has definitely
increased our volunteer man-

power and so with the materials
and additional manpower, that
has given us a great boost in going
forward with repairs. I am quite
pleased with how we are pro-
gressing thus far.”

Mr. Ingraham advised that the

‘Morton Salt Company agreed to

donate $50,000 to the Red Cross
in addition to the $150,000 it
recently donated to its employ-
ees in Inagua.



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra- |
ham (far right) listens to the safety |
concerns expressed by a parent:
(far left) during his tour of the .

Inagua All-Age School on Satur- |
day, September 20. Mr. Ingraham

told parents that the Government

would have the school assessed

by a structural engineer with the

results thereof to be reported at a

PTA meeting to be scheduled on

the island.

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PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



IN MEMORY OF



Thelma L, Chompion
“Her children arise and call her blessed; ~
Her husband also, and he praises per"

ou left us piv

It’s s been 2 years since
us always.

you are wit







A virtuous woman, you left an indelible
our lives by instilling godly morals and
that will last a lifetime



If roses

for us. nd t

lace them in our mother’s arm
her they’re from us.



Hold her for a while and tell her that we love he?
and when she turns to smile, plac
her cheek. Remembering her is ea
every day, but there is an ache withi
that will never go aw



We miss you tremendously but
knowing that cne oy we w



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4
d



College is ‘very close’ to

attaining university status

B® By DENISE MAYCOCK
‘Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — COB Presi-
dent Jayne Hodder said the
College of the Bahamas is very
close to attaining university sta-
tus and will be meeting with
government regarding its deci-
sion on a proposal date.

Ms Hodder said that COB
has grown significantly over the
past 35 years and is ready to
make the step towards becom-
ing the University of the
Bahamas. |

“We are hoping to meet
shortly with government offi-
cials and we have a plan for

proposing a date, but I am going ©

to let the government decide on
what that date would be,” she
said during a recent visit to
Freeport.

While in Freeport, Ms Hod-
der announced that construc-
tion of the first phase of the new
COB campus was underway on
Grand Bahama. The project,
which is being carried out by
Reef Construction, will cost $8.4
million.

The new campus will be built
on 50 acres of land donated by
the Grand Bahama Port



Jayne Hodder

Authority.

Although a contract has not
been officially signed, Contrac-
tor Vernon Wells said that his
company has received mobili-
sation payment and has secured
materials, which are expected
to arrive on the island within
the next three to four weeks.

President Hodder said that
programmes at COB have
grown since its inception in

. 1974. At that time, she noted

that only six per cent of pro-
grammes were associate degrees
and the rest were certificates
and diplomas.

“Over the years the transfor- .

mation grew and associate
degrees were 71 per cent and
Bachelors degree came in.

“And would you believe
today 80 per cent of the stu-~

dents are enrolled in BA pro-
grammes. We have graduated
more students with BA degrees
for the first time two years ago
than we did with associate
degrees. So we are proud of the
incredible growth over the past
35 years,” she said.

Ms Hodder said that faculty
at COB has also grown.

“We are ready, our pro-
grammes are ready, and our fac-
ulty is ready. We have grown
our faculty complement and
today 71 per cent are Bahami-
an, and fully close to 30 per cent
are PhD and a growth of about

’ three or four per cent when the

college was created.

“So in some ways we have
been building the university qui-
etly, perhaps too quietly since -
1995 when we began to have
the power to offer BA degrees.

“And so we are going to be
asking the government to make
a decision with respect to adopt-
ing legislation creating the Uni-
versity of the Bahamas and it
will be the Prime Minister’s
responsibility to decide when
that date should be, but we
hope that we did our homework
and hope that we will be able to
make a convincing case,” Ms
Hodder said.







row in heaven, Lord please. pic a bunch .






Plan to ‘revolutionize’ Rotary Club of West Nassau

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

MICHAEL Hepburn, newly elected President
of the Rotary Club of West Nassau, said he
intends to “revolutionize” the organization by
pursuing new endeavours.

One will be a considerable future donation to
the SURE boys programme located Gladstone
Road.

“We’ve always provided assistance — at ‘Sure’
— but this year we’re going to be giving major
assistance, we’re putting in a computer lab,” said
Mr Hepburn.

This will include about 10 computers, which
he believes will assist the at risk minors toward
choosing a more positive future. °

Mr Hepburn said, “We realize that they are
the future, and they could be part of our solution,
or part of our problem.

“If we don’t help them, then they could become
part of our problem.”

The president also explained that the organi-
zation has in place pre-existing auxiliary groups,
including The Interact Club, a junior Rotary
Club, which is at the high school level, and the

Rotaract, which has long been established at the
College of The Bahamas.

“In my administration, I will establish,at least
two new Interact clubs,” said Mr Hepburn.

He said it was of great priority for the organi-
zation to start to recognize the importance of
young people, adding that “they are the future
leaders of our country.”

Mr Hepburn said Rotary has been established
in the Bahamas since the early 1960s, and that
Rotary of West Nassau has existed since 1970. '

Celebrating its 38th anniversary, Mr Hepburn
said his chapter this year will direct much of its
efforts toward youth empowerment.

Additionally, the organization recently
announced the launch of a singing competion,
entitled “Bahamian Stars.”

Although much of Rotary’s work is not publi-
cised, Mr Hepburn said the organization recent-
ly brought its forces together and has made it

‘possible for a mother of six to have a fully func-

tioning bathroom in her Bain Town home.
“We are proud to do it, and the growth of the
organization is a testament to the fact that we

are doing the right thing,” Mr Hepburn said. .

Were looking for
some “old” friends...

RBC Royal Bank of Canada’s Main Branch was built in 1917

This year-in November- RBC Royal
Bank of Canada will celebrate 100 years
of operation in The Bahamas. Our
longevity and success would not have
been possible without the loyal support
of our customers.

We want to honour some of our “oldest”
friends. So we are offering special gifts
for the earliest Royal Bank photos,

. stories, anecdotes and records-an old
passbook, correspondence, statement,
a cancelled cheque, old photos, etc.

‘

If you’re a veteran Royal Bank client,
or if any of your family members were,
we'd love to hear from you. And we’d
especially like to see your old Royal
Bank records.

As we observe our 100th year as the
premier financial institution in The
Bahamas, we want to express our.
appreciation to all our customers.
Without you we could not have come
this far.

Thank you.

If you think you qualify,
please mail a copy of your record to Jan Knowles at
P. O. Box N-7549, East Hill Street, Nassau, Bahamas
by September 30.

Please include your name, telephone number
and email address with all submissions.

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas
Ra AU CE Cee ont Md ee eh ke cok ee





J

\

NY

THE TRIBUNE

‘DR DAVIDSON HEPBURN, Chairman of the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation, which oversees



the National Museum of the Bahamas, reads a selection of Bahamian poetry and short stories to Temple
Christian primary school students at Fort Charlotte last Wednesday. The readings were part of the National Muse-
Jum’s ‘Literacy through Heritage’ event, designed to complement September's National Literacy Month. Dr
‘Hepburn was joined in reading by Patricia Thomas (right) and Leah O’Brien. Other events planned for Nation-
cal Literacy Month include an invitation for high school students to attend the “Lest We Forget” slavery exhibi-
tion at the Pompey Museum from September 22 — 25, 10am — 1pm, dramatic readings and tours of Balcony House
‘on September 25 at 7pm and the opportunity to hear episodes from the popular 1970's radio drama “The Fer-

,gusons of Farm Road” on September 26 at 6pm at the Pompey Museum.

Twenty-five students
set to make history

AFTER much planning and
development, 25 students will
‘make history when they enter
the pre-engineering magnet
programme this month at the
mew Anatol Rodgers High
School in southwestern New
Providence.

The programme is the first of
its kind established in a public
school in The Bahamas.

It will integrate the teaching
‘of science, technology, engi-
neering and mathematics in
preparing high school students
for further studies, and ulti-
mately careers in these fields.

Education Minister Carl
Bethel said the goal of the pro-

gramme is to create a pipeline _

‘of young scientists and engi-
neers locally.

' He said it is an important mis-
sion considering that currently

few Bahamian college-bound

students choose to study science
land engineering. :

+ He said that this creates a
serious void in our national
development as most of the
iexpertise in these fields over the
ie have had to be imported.
' According to Trevor Fergu-
son, Education Officer and Pro-
gramme Organiser for the Pre-
Engineering Magnet Pro-
gramme, the Ministry believes
that the pre-engineering cur-
riculum will spark a greater
interest and appreciation for the
sciences, especially among
women students ~ a segment of
the population that is under-
represented in engineering and
higher technology careers in
The Bahamas.

; Mr. Ferguson said modules
for the programme were pur-
chased from Pitsco Corpora-

tion, a leading US based com- .

pany that has for more than 30
years provided science, tech-
nology, engineering and math-
ematics curricula to schools
throughout the world. |

- Students in the programme
will be enrolled in challenging
introductory courses such as
Principles of Engineering; Dig-
ital Electronics, Computer Inte-
grated Manufacturing, Civil
Engineering and Architecture,
Aerospace Engineering,
Automation and Robotics and
Engineering Design and Devel-
opment.

» The Pre-Engineering Magnet
programme is evidence of the
new public and private sector
partnership initiated to specifi-
cally encourage students’ inter-
ested in the engineering, and
higher technology areas.

| An advisory committee com-
prising engineers from the Min-
istry of Works, Bahamasair,
The Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration, Arawak Homes and
representatives from The Col-
lege of The Bahamas and the
Department of Education
worked on the curriculum and
designed the programme to
ensure that students will be pro-
vided with the most current
knowledge related to science
and technology. —

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Pre-engineering magnet programme at Anatol
Rodgers High School to offer new opportunities

Mr. Ferguson said that this
partnership is essential to the
mission, which is to graduate
technical students who are col-
lege ready and prepared to suc-

- ceed in life. ;

Students of the pre-engineer-
ing magnet programme were
selected from seven Junior High
Schools in New Providence
based on their interest

.. » Cyprian. Gibson,,an, executive

member of.the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Civil Engineers, stated
that the programme is. critical

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

to the development of the coun-
try and must be supported at
every level to ensure that it pro-
duces the next generation of
Bahamian engineers.

Mr. Gibson said that although
there have been major success-
es in such areas as tourism and
banking, the technical sectors
are still under-developed.

However, he feels positive
that the pre-engineering pro-
gramme will reap future divi-
dends for The Bahamas. ~

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an






















Carl rene

LLOYD'S



EDUCATION Minister
Carl Bethel has asked
Androsians to rally around
their students and motivate
them to achieve their dreams
through excellence in educa-
tion.

The Minister went to
Andros to attend the North,
Central Andros and Berry
Islands District schools’ “Back
to School Church Service”,

held at St Paul’s Anglican |

Church in Fresh Creek. He
encouraged those who filled
the church to celebrate “Back



THE TRIBUNE



Help your students achieve their dreams’

Education Minister sends plea to Androsians

to School” with a sense of
urgency and purpose.

He told parents that if they
applied the same unity and
support that was evident by
their presence at the service
to each day of the school year,
students would feel motivat-
ed to improve their perfor-
mance.

He said that education is the
greatest equalizer and can give

te

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persons raised in underprivi-
leged circumstances the
opportunity to improve their
circumstances in life by
empowering them with the
skills and ability to make wise
choices.

The Minister told the audi-

ence that he was committed

to ensuring that the schools in
Andros receive the same
resources that schools have in




New Providence. He said that
the cost of the two new
schools — the Anatol Rodgers
High School and new school
in Freeport — has delayed
attention being focused on the
Lowe Sound and Fresh Creek
Primary Schools, but he
assured them that as soon as
possible those issues will be
addressed.

Vincent Peet, Member of
Parliament for the North
Andros and Berry Islands
constituency, also attended
the service and thanked the
Minister for his commitment
to advancing education in
Andros.

Singing

He encouraged the congre-
gation to heed the Minister’s
appeal to make education a
community affair thus making
it (education) number one
again in Andros.

During the service the stu-
dents and teachers of Central
Andros High School delighted
the visitors and congregation
with their singing talents while
the primary school students
read scriptures that reflected
The Bible’s teaching on the
importance of education:and
knowledge.

The Minister of Education
also’ praised students who
were successful in the 2008 sit-
ting of the BJC and BGCSE
examinations. He told them
that their efforts contributed
significantly to the improve-
ment in the national average.

Host pastor, and Rector of
Stephen’s and St. Paul’s
Parishes in Andros, Rev
Father Donald Kerr, thanked
the Minister for accepting his
invitation to inspire students

in the North, Central Andros
and Berry Islands District.

He also encouraged parents
and the community to become
involved in the students’ edu-
cation as their interest would
have a lasting and positive
impact on the students’ suc-
cess.

Students received school
supplies, textbooks and read-
ing books as a part of the
Back to School celebration.

Accompanying Minister
Bethel to Andros was Perma-
nent Secretary in the Ministry
of Education, Mrs. Elma Gar-
raway; First Assistant Secre-
tary, Mr. Ralph Bowe, and
Mr. Shadrach Johnson, ‘Offi-
cer, Physical Plant in the Min-
istry of Education.

The delegation also took the
opportunity after the services
to inspect schools with the
principals and local govern-
ment officials.

The Minister urged the local
officials to use the resources
allocated to them to do basic
maintenance and promised
them that the Ministry will
supplement whatever was con-
sidered necessary. He said he
was pleased with the pre-
paredness of the classrooms
for students’ learning, and the
enthusiasm of the administra-
tors and teachers displayed in
carrying out the delivery of
education in Andros.

He also praised the net-
works the school administra-
tors have established with win-
ter residents and other donors
who have constantly supplied
their libraries with a source of
quality reading material.

This effort he noted con-
tributed to reading, and
improvement of literacy
throughout the island.

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Management Agency (NEMA), accepted a cheque from executives
of the Most Worshipful Prince Grand Hall Lodge, to assist Inagua
residents in rebuilding their homes damaged by Hurricane Ike on
September 7. Pictured from left are Matt Maura, public relations
director; Kenrick Braithwaite, grand treasurer; Commander Russell; ~
Carl Culmer, grand master; Chrystal Glinton, first assistant secretary,
NEMA; Ersley Johnson Il, grand senior warden; and Wendell Barry,
grand secretary.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are |
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

Eee
available in 134a,
Pe Me te ak

393-2437 * 393-8438
Fax: 394-5720 = Robinson & Claridge Roads

P.O.BOX SS-6218, Nassau, Bahamas
e-mail:info@asahpritchard.com



/



THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 9



. RECENTLY APPOINTED DIRECTOR KIRKWOOD FERGUSON SETS PATH FOR BRIGHT AND PROMISING FUTURE

Success Training College Daytime Institute makes a strong return

THREE months ago Success
Training College appointed Mr
Kirkwood Ferguson director to
its daytime college. In that time
the day college went from about
eight students to almost 80.

Mr Ferguson brings a dynam-
ic and fresh approach to the 25-
year-old institution, said a
spokesman for the college. Suc-
cess was made popular by its Sat-
urday and Evening Institute.

Kirkwood Ferguson is a col-
lege professor and a seasoned
professional of hospitality and
tourism management. He comes
to Success Training College fol-
lowing an appointment at The
University of the West Indies,
Centre for Hotel and Tourism
Management in Nassau. Mr Fer-

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THE TRIBUNE



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COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION

Gordon Street, St. Augustine, Trinidad. WI

PRESS RELEASE

The Council of Legal Education is pleased to announce the Sppeineneat of new Principals at its three
Law Schools with effect from August 1 2008.

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas -

Mrs Tonya Bastian Galanis was appointed Principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School.

Tonya Bastian Galanis was called to The Bahamas Bar in 1985 and has been a full-time tutor with the
Eugene Dupuch Law School since its inception in 1998. She began her legal career in the Office of The

Attorney. eral in The Bahamas“where she practiced for more than twelve ‘Years before joining The
Eugene Sune Law School.



Mrs. Galanis is a graduate of St. John’s College and The College of The Bahamas. In 1980 she obtained
a Bachelor of Laws degree (Hons) from the University of The West Indies. She attended the Norman
Manley Law School in Jamaica and was awarded the Certificate in Legal Education from the Council
of Legal Education. Mrs Galanis also earned post-graduate diplomas in legislative drafting from The
Royal Institute of Public Administration in London, England and the University of Ottawa, Ontario
Canada in 1993. More recently, during a year-long sabbatical, Mrs Galanis has undergone studies with
the University of the West Indies leading to a Master of Laws degree in corporate commercial law.

Mrs. Galanis is a member of The Bahamas Bar Asociation and is also involved in numerous civic or-
ganisations, including the Zonta Club of Nassau, where she served as President from 2004 -2006. She
has also served on The Bahamas National Revenue Task Force, The Financial Advisory Services Board,
Caricom Intergovernmental Task Force and The Securities Commission of The Bahamas.

She is married to Philip Galanis and has one daughter, Zoé.

Trinidad & Tobago

Ms Miriam Samaru was appointed Principal of the Hugh Wooding Law School.

Miriam Samaru is a national of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. She is a graduate of the Univer-
sity of the West Indies (1980) and the Hugh Wooding Law School (1982). She was called to the Bar in
Trinidad and Tobago in 1982 and in Saint Lucia in 1996. She has worked as an advocate in Trinidad
and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands and Saint Lucia. She held the post of Solicitor General of Saint
Lucia until she joined the Council of Legal Education at the Eugene Dupuch Law School in Nassau. In
2001, she was appointed Principal of that Law School.

She holds ‘a Master of Laws in Maritime Law and Law of the Sea. She has served on the following
boards: Adoption Board of Trinidad and Tobago, Saint Lucia Air and Sea Ports Authority, Saint Lucia
Civil Aviation Authority and Saint Lucia Solid Waste Management Authority. She is a member of the
Council of Legal Education, the Board of the Faculty of Law, the International Bar Association, the
Commonwealth Lawyers Association and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of Lon-
don. She is a charter member of the Central Pilot Club of Nassau.

She is married to Peter Alonzo.
Jamaica
Professor Stephen Vasciannie was appointed Principal of the Norman Manley Law School.

He holds First Class Honours degrees from the Universities of the West Indies, Oxford and Cambridge.
Professor Vasciannie, who worked as a Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge from 1987 to
1988, was called to the New York Bar in 1990, and to the Jamaican Bar in 1996. He worked part-time
as a Deputy Solicitor-General in Jamaica for the four years leading up to 2008.

Professor Vasciannie is a Professor of International Law and taught at the University of the West Indies,
Mona since 1994. He is a member of the United Nations International Law Commission, the main ad-
visory body for the United Nations on legal matters. He has also served on the Inter-American Juridical
Committee (the main legal advisory body of the Organization of American States), and has been the
President of the Caribbean Conference on Maritime Delimitation since 2005.

He has written books on Human Rights, the Law of the Sea and International Investment Law, and has
published widely in law journals, including the British Yearbook of International Law, the Cambridge

Law Journal, the West Indian Law Journal, and the Foreign Investment Law Journal.

He is married to Lisa, and has two sons, Sean and Dominic.



~ LOCAL NEWS

Combined effort to help
students suspected of
being abused, neglected

Bi By Llonella Gilbert
Bahamas Information
Services

REPRESENTATIVES from
the Suspected Child Abuse and
Neglect (SCAN) Unit, the Min-
istry of Health, the Department
of Public Health and the Ministry
of Education are working togeth-
er to create a set of structured
guidelines to assist students sus-
pected of being abused and
neglected.

Guidance counsellors, social
workers, nurses, teachers and
administrators recently met at the
Holy Cross Anglican church hall
in the first of two workshops to
review, discuss and make recom-
mendations on the Draft School
Protocol, which will contain the
guidelines.

Staff Nurse Fiona St Albord
said the main objectives for the
workshops are to sensitise rele-
vant stakeholders to child abuse;
to point out its indicators; to
explain what to do if a child is
suspected of being abused; to

strengthen networking and part- _

nerships in the care and manage-
ment of abused children and their

families, and to provide a proto- .

col document to assist with the
effective and efficient manage-
ment of abused children in the
schools.

Nurse St Albord said as educa-
tors, the participants come into
contact and deal with children of

abuse: They also on a day-to-day -
basis see first-hand the symptoms

and signs displayed by abused
children, she said.

“You are a lot of times the first
ones to notice the initial indica-
tors of abuse.”

Althea Turner-Neilly, coordi-
nator at the SCAN Unit, said it is
important to have workshops to
introduce and promote the
School Draft Protocol, because
there are students who are vic-
tims of abuse at all levels of the
school system — even at the pre-
school level.

While there is a safety manual
in schools relating to things like
cellular phones; dress codes and
other issues, there is no protocol
that focuses on abuse, be it phys-



Raymond A Bethel/BIS Photo

SUSPECTED Child Abuse & Neglect Unit (SCAN) of the Ministry of
Health, Department of Public Health, held.a SCAN School Protocol
Workshop. under theme “Let Us Embrace, Change, We Have The
Tools”. On Thursday, September 18, 2008, at Holy Cross Anglican
Church Hall. At right is Psychologist, Ms. Wendy Fernander making

her presentation.



” Raymond A Bethel/BIS Phto

PARTICIPANTS of the Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Unit -

(SCAN) workshop.

ical, emotional or sexual, Mrs

‘Turner-Neilly explained.

She noted that once the School
Draft Protocol is completed, it
will have clearly defined steps so
that all schools will -have “easy to
follow steps” on how to handle
suspected abuse cases.

Mrs Turner-Neilly also empha-
sised that teachers and adminis-
trators must report suspected

‘ abuse cases else face possible dis-

ciplinary action.

Teachers.and administrators
from the pre-school and primary
school level attended the first
workshop, while the second work-
shop will be made up of educators

from the junior and senior high
schools.

Mrs Turner-Neilly said after
the recommendations from the
workshop have been evaluated
and analysed, they will be includ-
ed in a draft/position paper, which
will be presented to the Ministry
of Education, the Ministry of
Health and the Department of
Public Health. °

The Ministries and the Depart-
ment will send back their recom-
mendations, instructions and

‘advice on the draft.

The process will continue until
all the stakeholders come to a
consensus on the document.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 11



oN ST
~ Rewards Excellence in Education

On Saturday, September 13th,

members of the Custom

5 Computers Know How Team

S . were joined by Ms. Patricia

Collins, Deputy Director of

Education, to reward the three

winners of the “A’s’ for

Excellence campaign with their
prizes.

To qualify, students had to
achieve at least one “A” in their
final report card, and the lucky
winners were selected in a
random drawing of over 400
students who had entered from
schools in Nassau and the
Family Islands.

. for .
excellence!





“these three winners
_ represent the talented -
thousands out there”

Brittany, Jodi and Chauncy await the rewards for their hard work
throughout the school year. Ms. Collins, educator and Deputy
Director of Education for The Bahamas, noted that “these three
winners represent the talented thousands out there’, and as role
models great things would be expected of them in the future.

Pia Farmer, Marketing Director of CCL remarked that “We were amazed by the enthusiastic response to the campaign, and we
were very proud to see so many children with outstanding results in their school work,” She noted that many of the participants had
received multiple A’s and had obviously worked very hard to excel in their schoolwork. . ; ig







Jodi Dodge a second grader at Saint: Chauncy Bethell, formerly of Faith

Brittany John, now entering grade’9 at

St. Augustine’s School, receives the first
prize of an iMac computer system and
printer from Mechelle Thompson, Retail

Thomas More School, receives her prize
from Tammie Hall-Thompson, line leader for
HP products, while her mother and head

Temple Christian Academy, now
attending grade 7 at St. Anne’s School,
holds his iPod Touch and can’t wait to

Manager of The Know How Store.

Mrs. Farmer explained that the idea for the campaign had
emerged from the company’s core values: “At CCL we strive
to set the highest standards of excellence in our products and
in our services. We are committed to education at all levels,
and our Know How Team members receive continuous
training in order to offer our customers the best service that we
can. So we wanted to promote and reward excellence. In
view of the success of this promotion, we plan to make it an
annual event. So students take note, and work hard so that
maybe you can be a winner next year!”

In her lively remarks, Ms. Collins heartily congratulated
the parents and teachers who support and encourage children

to excel, and noted that “the Ministry of Education welcomes —

partnerships with corporate citizens such as CCL and we look
forward to the continuation of this positive initiative”.

“work hard so that maybe you
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his reward for ‘being the most outstanding male graduating

senior in the country. Tammie Hall-Thompson of Custom
Computers Limited (right), presents the 2008 Valedictorian with
an HP laptop. Participating in the celebration, Lynden ee eas
President, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Bahamas Chapter

_ stands at left while The Hon. W.A. Branville McCartney Minister of

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THE TRIBUNE



150 prison
inmates ‘have
HIV or AIDS’

FROM page one

ducted at the prison in
1990, revealing that about
10 per cent of inmates had
been infected with
HIV/AIDS, Mrs Bain
explained, that since then,
there has not been a similar
study.

Sources within the prison
claim, that apart from
increasing numbers of
infected people at the facil-
ity, only limited measures
have been taken by prison
officials, in reducing the
spread of the diseases.

According to Health Min-
ister Dr Hubert Minnis,
“Any illness — including
HIV/AIDS — is a concern
for. the ministry.”

“The same measures that
we would take in the com-
munity, we would take the
same measure at the prison
in terms of education.”
However, Dr Minnis con-
firmed, that measures such



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

_|_ area or have won an

award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

a4 eee ESR aa ete
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm

Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com

Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com

Share your news

as the supply of condoms to
inmates, or physical sepa-
ration of infected inmates,
have been excluded from
the ongoing education ini-
tiative at the facility.
When asked to confirm
a total count of inmates
infected with HIV/AIDS,
the minister said, he did not
have those figures. He

explained, however, that

“the only people who would
have figures like that would
be Dr Orlando or Dr
Gomez.”

Although The Tribune
did speak with the doctors,
neither was able to provide
any figures. “I don’t know,”
they both said.

Based on a 2007 United
Nations report on AIDS,
“The AIDS virus has been
found in prisons in most
countries of the world.”

The report explains,
“This should be a source of
the utmost concern, not
only for prisoners and












prison staff, but also for
society in genéral. "

The report indicated
that the spread of
HIV/AIDS, and other dis-
ease, including tuberculo-
sis, within prisons, result
from specific ingredients.

Some of which are over-
crowding, atmospheres of
violence and fear, sexual
tension, and boredom. One
confirmed factor that does
exist at Her Majesty’s Pris-
ons is overcrowding.

According to Prison
Supt. Dr Elliston Rahming,
“To the extent that there is
overcrowding, we must look
to our Maximum Security
Facility, which was built 60
years ago to house 450
inmates, but typically hous-
es close to 700 inmates.”

Recommendations
offered by the UN in help-
ing to reduce the spread of
disease in prison facilities
include minimizing prison
populations, providing ade-
quate health care, provid-
ing condoms, and educas
tion.

The report concludes,
“There still exists a strong
current of denial in many
places about male-to-male
sex (especially in prison),
and a corresponding refusal
to do anything which might
be seen as condoning it.”

The report adds, “These
attitudes will have to
change if societies want to
see the rate of HIV infec-

if ‘tion, — inside prison and




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©2008 Creative Edge



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 13

THE TRIBUNE

BEC ‘owes $166m





Sunbound Bahamas would like for the following persons to
contact their main office as soon as possi
We appreciate the public’s assistance in this matter. .

Kevin Fisher
Kent Major
Marcian Clarke
Philippa Knowles

in customs duty’

passing the cost onto the already bur-
dened consumer.

Gabriella Saunders
Travis Douglas

Andre Culmer
Crystal Demeritte
Cory Bethel
Dion Stuart
Dellarese Morrison

Howard Archer



consumers were seeing in their
bills.

Now persons are arguing that the
two year “tax holiday” for BEC
announced in the budget was just for-
malizing a situation that has existed
between BEC and government since

FROM page one

Coper Knowles
Joyce Brennen
Keilli Godet
Julian Lightoourne

bill, its financial situation would be in
dire straits and would send the
company’s surcharge through the
roof.

A summary of the breakdown as
outlined in the letter is as follows:

e November 1997 - December 2002

Duty - $2,080,940.92;

Robyn Tilerain
Tanya Thompson

In his 2008/2009 budget communi-
cation, the Prime Minister proposed
a two year “tax holiday” for BEC
amounting to a 17 per cent rebate on
the cost of imported fuel.

This “tax holiday” was intended to
help slow the rising fuel surcharge

_ Man and girlfriend
abducted at gunpoint

_ FROM page one the police. A police service weapon was dis-
charged.

One of the men was hit in the left side of his
abdomen while the other was caught. The third
man escaped and is actively being sought. One
of the men is an 18-year old resident of
Knowles Drive off Tonique Williams High-
way, and the injured man is a 20-year-old
Kemp Road resident.

Police recovered an imitation firearm, which
was used by one of the men.

*SERENITY*

PRIME LOCATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
¢ Residential Lots 60 x 100 - $80,000
° Residential Corner Lots 64 x 100 - $85,000

1997 — when BEC had not been pay-
ing its taxes to government.

Sources have suggested to The Tri-
bune that no government at this point
could seriously go after the corpora-
tion for these back taxes without

the police of the abduction.

Officers from Mobile Division saw the vehi-
cle in the Prince Charles Drive area shortly
hfterwards and chased the speeding vehicle.
The car stopped in the eastern area of
Prince Charles Drive and two gunmen jumped
out.
~ One of them pointed a gun in the direction of

i

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Stamp Tax - $1,456,658.66;
Total - $3,537,599.58.

e January 2003 - June 2008
Duty - $95,650,858.66;
Stamp Tax - $66,955, 600.94;
Total - $162,606,459.60.

Keith Culmer

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

“LOT NO. 117

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence

PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Portland Boulevard
which is east of Super Value Food Store
Prince Charles Drive. Heading south
turn through the 2nd corner (Continental
Avenue) on'the left. Continue around the
curve then take the 8rd corner on the
left (Tropical Avenue), Traveling north

on Tropical Avenue, the property is the
10th lot on the left or first property after
passing Tote Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split Level
Residential Building with 3 Apts.
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south of Bamboo »
Boulevard off East Street South then
turn through the first corner right onto
.. Bougainvillea.Blvd,.. Heading v..est.on
Bougainvillea Blvd. take the second
corner right onto Madeira Avenue. At
the t-junction, turn left onto Oxford
Drive. Property is the third house right,
on the.corner of Serville Drive and °
Oxford Avenue. ,
APPRAISED VALUE: $397,000

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
take the 4th corner on the right (Turtle
Drive) property is 4th house on right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

4. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES I
LOT NO. 1372
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 Bed / 2 Bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: At junction of Carmichael
Road and Cedar Way (corner opposite
BFM) travel south to the t-junction, turn
right onto Golden Gates Straight, then
take the first corner right onto Comet
Terrace. The property is the second
house on the right, yellow with white
trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

Tristan Sands Keith Miller

WMIBOURID
WS. SUEROUMA.COM
est, TNs

5. BRICEVILLE SUBDIVISION, PINE -
BARREN ROAD .
LOT OF LAND
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Five Unit
Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading west along Prince
Charles Drive from Fox. Hill Road, take
the third corner on the left (Pine Barren
Road). Travel west on Pine Barren Road
then turn through the second corner on
the left (Ceria Close) then the second
corner on the right. The complex is the
last building on the right, painted white,
at the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $292,000

_ LOT NO. 1467
-PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single

Storey Triplex Apartment, 2 - 1 bed/
bath; 1-2 bed /bath;
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on Bamboo
Boulevard off East Street South, turn
through the first corner on the left

...(Thatch.Palm-Avenue). Continue north
on Thatch Palm Avenue, take the first
corner on the right (Guinep Tree Street).
The complex is the third building on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $162,000

. PASTEL GARDENS
LOT NO. 149

289 Wulff Road-East 3. BEL-AIR ESTATES, CARMICHAEL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
ROAD Family Residence, 3 bed./ 1 bath

(just before the Village Road Round on) LOT NO. 259 - PROPERTY SIZE: 5,701 sq. ft.

Tel: (242) 394-4442 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single- LOCATION: From Marshall Road,

Fax: (242) 393-8238 storey Residence travel north along the main entrance

to Pastel Gardens. At the four-way
junction continue north Lemon Street.
The building is the 11th house on the
left painted white trimmed yellow with a
light brown asphalt shingled roof.
APPRAISED VALUE: $142,000

. CHIPPINGHAM
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 2 beds’/ 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on Quarry
Mission Road off Nassau Street,
building is approximately 500 ft from
Nassau Street on the northern side of
the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $130,000

9. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO. “A”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-

j ‘ ey Family Duplex Apartment
GM, Honda, Toyota, Hyundai Also Kea) 4 PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. ft.
selection of: LOCATION: Traveling west on Rocky

Pine Road off Carmichael Road,
property is midway on the third corner
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000



’ Brake Pads & Shoes
Oils/Chemieals: Cooper Tires Trans, Filter Kits
- Kendall
Daytona Fan Belts ‘
- Motoreraft ea amenic East & VACANT LOTS
: Ss Daytona Timing Belts Belt Tensioners/Pulleys
~ Lucas Products Wells Ignition Parts .
Gs adi i ae C.V, Joints/U. Joints 1. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
Moog Suspension parts a ee : LOT NO. 4 and 5 — part of Crown
; Allotments 21 and 22 Grant A8-50 s
Batteries Carter Fuel Pumps Wheel Bearings PROPERTY SIZE: Property is 651 feet 3
~ Motorcraft Eastern Water Pumps ; south of Carmichael Road and 981 feet 5
- Rocket ; Wheel Cylinders west of Golden Isles Road. 3
Rain-X Wiper Blades Brake Ma-‘er Cylinders APPRAISED VALUE: $139,00° 00 &
Spark Plugs
“Momvcreft Fan Motors
~ Champion Gaskets Sets
-NGK
AIC Shock Absorbers INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE
Engine Mounts CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES,
: CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
ee Power Tools & Accessories OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
- Piston rings * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.
~ Con-Rod Bearings olga





PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE ;;



Legal Opinion: “Goods Only”
EPA consistent with WTO rules

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@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

D: Lorand Bartels, a
Lecturer in Interna-

tional Law and Fellow of Trinity
Hall at Cambridge University, has
advised that it is possible for all, a
few, or even one, of the
Caribbean countries on whose
behalf an Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) has been ini-
tialled with the European Union
(EU) to sign a “goods only”
agreement that satisfies World
Trade Organisation (WTO) rules.

His written Opinion arose
from the controversy surround-
ing the EPA and increasing alarm
in Africa, the Caribbean, the
Pacific and the EU over the
adverse effects the agreement
would have on the development
and autonomy of developing
countries.

‘The international Christian
organisation, Christian Aid, has
declared that “far from being a
key concern” development “actu-
ally appears to have been, at the
very least, a marginal issue for

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negotiators on both sides. What is
this going to mean for farmers?
What is this going to mean for
women and children? What is this
going to mean for the poorest sec-
tors in Caribbean society? The
fact that there are no clear devel-
opment benchmarks integrated
into the agreements seems to
indicate that. the powerful part-
ner in this relationship is much
less concerned with development
than with furthering its own inter-
ests. It is the relationship of the
bully to the bullied — not that of
equal partners in a responsible
and fruitful relationship.”

Reluctance

Guyana and Haiti, two of the
Caribbean countries on whose
behalf the EPA was initialled,
have indicated their reluctance to
sign the agreement in its.present
form which covers not only trade
in goods, but also trade in ser-
vices as well as the “Singapore
issues” — government procure-
ment, trade facilitation, invest-
ment and competition policy —
which have not been agreed in
global trade talks and which all
Caribbean countries had joined
other nations: in resisting at the
WTO

After a national consultation
in Guyana involving political par-
ties, trade unions, the private sec-
tor and religious bodies, Guyana’s
President Bharat Jagdeo was

‘mandated to try to convince

Caribbean governments to sign a
“goods only” agreement. The par-
ticipants in the consultation were
mindful that the EU has threat-
ened that, unless Caribbean gov-
ernments signed the agreement,
GSP treatment would be applied
to the region’s crucial exports
such as sugar, rice and rum, and
tariffs would be imposed on
Caribbean bananas that would
make all these goods uncompeti-
tive.

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Experts from various fields
have made it clear that the EPA
would be compatible with WTO
tules as long as it covered trade in
goods. WTO compatibility does
not require an agreement on
trade in services or the “Singa-
pore issues”. The fact that the
EPA was initialled by the Region-
al Negotiating Machinery (RNM)
on behalf of the Caribbean states
was not a commitment to sign it
in its present form, nor was it an
obligation under international
law, treaty law or WTO rules.
And, as Sir Shridath Ramphal has
argued and EU representatives
have agreed, Caribbean countries
“are not precluded by interna-
tional law, by treaty law (or WTO
rules), from renegotiating that ini-
tialled agreement. This much is
clear from general international
law and more specifically from
the 1970 Vienna Convention on
the Law of Treaties.” *

Now Dr Bartels states
unequivocally that it is legally
possible to sign a “goods only”
agreement. He gives three
options, two of which are unprob-
lematic legally. The two are:

¢ amendment of the EPA (by
Protocol) to provide.that for
some Cariforuin States non-goods
parts of the EPA do not apply

This option is the most con-
ventional, both in terms of treaty
practice (c.f., the EU opt-outs on
the Schengen area and the Euro)
and in terms of WTO compati-
bility. This option depends on the
agreement on all EPA parties
(i.e., the EU, the EU Member
States, and all Cariforum States).

e separate agreement provid-
ing for partial (i.e., goods-only)
provisional application of the
EPA by some.CF States

It depends on the agreement
of the EU but not of the other
CF States (or the EU Member
States).

Dr Bartels identifies some dif-
ficulties in adjusting the overall

_ EPA text to cater for countries

that might opt for a “goods only”
agreement, but they are difficul-
ties that could be overcome by
drafting. For instance with respect



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APARTMENT on PARADISE ISLAND

to development cooperation, he
argues: “To the extent that these
Chapters are not applied, these
provisions on development coop-
eration will also not be applied.
Even so, this does not prevent
the EU from continuing to pro-
vide development cooperation in
these areas on an autonomous (or
otherwise agreed) basis.”

The WTO compatibility of a
“goods only” agreement is known
and acknowledged by the EU
whatever its representatives may
say to the Caribbean. Evidence
of this is that the Pacific coun-
tries in a letter dated June 11,
2008 from their lead spokesman
to EU trade Commissioner, Peter

Mandelson, proposed that the.

EPA negotiations “focus on final-

izing outstanding issues related»

to the trade in goods component
and development, with services
and most trade related areas

deferred for future considera- °

tion.” In his reply of July 19, 2008,
Mandelson stated, “We are open
to the idea that some Pacific
countries may decide not to make

commitments in certain areas due

to their specific circumstances.”
So, it is possible to sign a

“goods only” agreement that is}
perfectly compatible with WTO,

rules. As Professors Norman Gir-
van and Vaughan Lewis and
Ambassador Havelock Brewster
have said signing a “goods only”

agreement “will remove whatev- |

er legal justification there may

_ for the threat by the EU to
impose tariffs on Cariforum *

exports.” They have also rightly

noted that deferring negotiations ~”

on services and the Singapore
issues would eliminate “several
contentious features of the EPA”
including “areas of incompatibil-
ity with the Caricom Single Mar-
ket and Economy (CSME)”.
The problem is that some
Caribbean countries have been

’ persuaded that breaking ranks

with other developing countries
on services and the Singapore
issues is in their interest, and the

fallacy or otherwise of that belief — i
. will only be proven by irreversible °

experience.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat).
















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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 15





Surprise, surprise, so what else is new!

Ip the report “Major Drug
Transit Or Major Illicit

Drug Producing Countries For
Fiscal Year 2009”, President
George W Bush identified The
Bahamas, Jamaica, Haiti and the
Dominican Republic as key tran-
sit points for narcotics going into
the US.

Assistant Secretary of State
for International Narcotics and
_ Law Enforcement Affairs, David
Johnson, told the media on Sep-
tember 16th at the release of the
report that the presence of a
country on the list signifies that
the President has determined that
the country has "failed demon-
strably" iu its narcotics fight.

I suggest that the US has failed
demonstrably in its fight to pre-



JOHN

vent its narcotics dealers from
exporting their illegal narcotics
trade to our islands. Those crim-
inals are also responsible for the
vast majority of the illegal guns
that damage our societies. Those

in the north buy and those in the"

south produce and sell and as this
column has pointed out before,
we islanders in the middle suffer.
It is not sufficient for us to be
placed on lists and be assisted in
the struggle.

VIEW FROM AFAR



ee

> SUB ok

The entire cost of the efforts to
stem this illegal trade should be
borne by the buyers without
whom there would be no trade.
Additionally we should be com-
pensated for the consequential
damage done by their citizens
whom they cannot prevent from
coming to ‘our islands to commit
these crimes. :

We in Jamaica and The
Bahamas are caught in the middle
of something bigger than our-



selves, but ‘which is as painful and

damaging as our earlier journeys.

in the Middle Passage. Remem-
ber; when the elephants fight the

WHY ADVERTISING WON’T WORK



As you prepare to sell your
home, you’ll probably consider
the best way to advertise it. Sur-
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work. But marketing does, and
there is a big difference. Your
BREA agent will be more
involved in “marketing” your
home, and here’s why.

A photo and description of
your home’s features, in a news-
paper or magazine or online, is
simply “advertising,” and is not
going to generate much inter-
est. A recent consumer survey
conducted in the US by the
National Association of REAL-
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found these ads helpful in
selecting homes.

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stand the needs and qualifica-

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Chances are that an agent can
“market” your home to many
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Buyers want to purchase a

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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



& By STEPHEN GRAHAM
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan

Taliban militants based near
the Afghan border and their al-
Qaida allies are the most likely
suspects behind a massive truck
bombing at Islamabad's Marriott
Hotel, officials and experts said
Sunday, according to the Associ-
ated Press. At least 53 died in the
explosion, including two U.S.
Defense Department employees
and the Czech ambassador.

The truck sat burning and dis-
abled at the hotel gate for at least
3? minutes as nervous guards
tried to douse the flames before
they, the truck and much of the
hotel forecourt vanished in a fear-
some fireball on Saturday night,
according to dramatic surveillance
footage released Sunday.

The attack on the American
hotel chain during Ramadan,
among the deadliest terrorist
strikes in Pakistan, will test the
resolve of its pro-Western civilian
rulers to crack down on growing
violent extremism which many
here blame on the country's role
in the U.S.-led war on terror.

%, ” *

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

a Ee eee ea ee
Pakistan Marriott blast shows signs of al-Qaida



PAKISTANI SECURITY OFFICIALS inspects to collect evidence from the site of Saturday's massive truck

bombing at the Marriott hotel in Islamabad, Pakistan yesterday.

While no group has claimed
responsibility, the scale of the
blast and its high-profile target
were seen by many as the signa-
ture of media-savvy al-Qaida.

vative, Bahamian television show concludes its fith season, with

Making
Bar And Grill

. Interior Ministry chief Rehman
Malik said "all roads lead to
FATA" in major Pakistani sui-
cide attacks — referring to Fed-
erally Administered Tribal Areas,

Anjum Naveed/AP Photo



where U.S. officials worry that
Osama bin Laden and al-Qaida
No. 2 Ayman al-Zawahri are hid-
ing. Sate
Mahmood Shah, a former gov-

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ernment security chief for Pak-
istan's tribal areas, said that while
the attack had “all the signatures"
of an al-Qaida strike, homegrown
Taliban militants probably had
learned how to execute an attack
of such magnitude.

Al-Qaida was providing "mon-

ey, motivation, direction and all
sort of leadership and using the
Taliban as gun fodder," he sug-
gested. A Pakistani intelligence
official, speaking on condition of
anonymity because he is not
authorized to speak on the record
to media, said investigators were
examining just that theory.
Pakistani Prime Minister
Yousuf Raza Gilani said the
attack was an attempt to "desta-
bilize democracy" in Pakistan,
which this year emerged from
nine years of military rule, and
destroy its already fragile econo-
my. Gilani also claimed that the
bomber attacked the hotel only
after tight security prevented him
from reaching Parliament or the
prime minister's office, where
President Asif Ali Zardari and
many dignitaries were gathered
for dinner. However, the owner

ith Max Conch

Be sure to tune in to another rerun of this episode of the show on Saturday at 10:00 am
on ZNS TV and watch for the sixth season of shows coming soon!

of the hotel accused security
forces of a serious lapse in allow-
ing a dump truck to approach the
hotel unchallenged and not tack-
ling the driver more clinically.

"If I were there and had seen
the suicide bomber, I would have
killed him. “Unfortunately, they
didn't," Sadruddin Hashwani
said. The bomb went off close to
8 p.m. Saturday, when the restau-
rants inside would have been
packed with Muslim diners break-
ing their daily fast during the hol
month of Ramadan. 4

The explosion wrecked ‘a
favorite spot for foreigners as well
as the Pakistani elite that has
been targeted twice before by
militant bombings.

The building — one of the few
places outside the diplomatic dis-
trict where U.S. diplomats were
permitted to socialize — was still
smoldering 24 hours after blast,
which also wounded more than
260 people. Anti-American feel-
ing is running particularly high
following a series of strikes by
US'S. forces based in Afghanistan
on Islamic militants nes‘ed in
Pakistan's tribal belt.

Se@bahdmas

Ale

@
),
oy
0@





avAa a

;



























Make Comractor
Bill long- (sting

Engineer 2veals
“concerns

@ By NEIL HARIELL
Tribune Busiss
Editor ij





THE ororbhe initidtars
Bill must “not jiwork for

the fellows ‘in tindustry

today, but the gi entering

20 years fromow”, a

Bahamian engint has told

Tribune Business

Hammond Rming, a
partner in The Fineering
Group, shared lroncerns
over the draft Bilht he had
submitted to the ner min-
ister responsiblDr Earl
Deveaux, ‘earlienis year,
including suggeshs about

amending the sizéthe pro-
posed Contractorgard.

In his letter to Deveaux,
| Mr Rahming conred the
suggested size of> eight-
member Contract Board,
two of whom must general
contractors, to th8-mem-
ber Florida equivat, based
on that state’s Liceag Law.

While | the posed
Bahamian Boards “slim
and trim”, Mr Rahiy raised
doubts over wher “the
interest and conce of the
more than 20 catiries of



MONDAY,

‘SEPTEMBER. 22,

2008

‘SECTION B ° busines Ree





Luxury goods retailers in
‘survival’ fight on tax rises

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REVERSING the 2008-2009 Budget
tax increases is “vital for the survival” of
many Bahamian luxury goods retailer,
Bay Street merchants have warned, as
the long-term negative effects will far
outweigh the estimated $120,000-
$150,000 short-term revenue gain for the
Government.

Philip Hillier, a senior Solomon’s
Mines executive, said in an e-mail to fel-
low Bay Street merchants that the 5 per
cent duty increase imposed on perfume
and cosmetic imports into the Bahamas
would leave retailers unable-to compete
with the cruise. ships and rival Caribbean
destinations, in addition to further erod-

’ ing the price advantage Bahamian oper-

ators held over their US counterparts.

' The August 2008 document, a copy
of which has been seen by Tribune Busi-
ness, warned that any decrease in sales

‘We'll be a force to
be reckoned with’

* Bay Street merchants argue $120, 000- $150,000 revenue rise om perfume duties
outweighed by long-term negative effects
* Estee Lauder warns tax rises will make pepamian retail unEOnIpeUEye against cruise

ships and Caribbean rivals

* Brand says increases could impact 2,500 sq ft concept store working on with John Bull
* Government says it may consider remittances to retailers if justified

by Bahamian luxury goods retailers
“would lead to laying-off of staff and,
in some cases, the closure of shops, par-
ticularly those only selling perfume/cos-
metics”.

“The combined CIF [Cost of Import-
ed Freight] value of imports of perfume
and cosmetics into the Bahamas is
approximately $10-$12 million,” Mr
Hillier wrote. “On average, the import
duty is approximately 25 per cent, which
gives the Government income of $2.5-$3
million. The increase in the duty rate of

5 per cent therefore only produces a fur-
ther $125,000-$150,000-of revenue.

“The effect of the increase, however,
creates many serious problems, and in
the long-run will produce less revenue,
rather than more.......

“For us to survive, it is vital the
increase in duty, which went into effect

on July 1, 2008, be reconsidered. Our

recommendation is to simplify the duties
on perfume, cosmetics and colognes by
charging a flat 25 per cent across the

board on the CIF price.”

The luxury goods brand partners for
Bahamian retailers have also expressed
their concern about the impact the Bud-
get duty, increases could have on the
international competitiveness of this
country’s retailing sector:

In an August 22, 2008, letter to Duane
Roberts, John Bull’s chief executive, a
senior Estee Lauder executive warned
that the increase in perfume and cos-
metics taxes under the Excise Tax was

SEE page six —

cor eT eee eT
challenge is thrown out



* New insurance intermediary targets greater
transparency and ‘marriage’ between
investment and insurance products .

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

) construction contrors will
be properly represed”’.

As a result, Mrihming
suggested that the ; of the
Bahamian Contract Board
be increased to repent all
categories. a :

Supporting the nito for-
mally regulate the: Jamian
construction industria leg-
islation, and certifyd cate-
gorise all its memb, since





































Developers say
more than $200m
spent on project

Co partner, was speaking after
Supreme Court Justice Estelle
Gray-Evans ruled that the Save
Guana Cay. Association’s sec-
ond judicial review case, this

OPPONENTS of the mullti-

million dollar Baker’s Bay Golf

. & Ocean Club plan to appeal

another Supreme Court ver-

dict in what is becoming a pro-
tracted legal battle to halt the —,

development, their attorney

- telling Tribune Business that

the latest verdict “is not going

year’s time we'll be.a force to be
reckoned with in this market”,
as it aims to attract business
through. initiatives such as full
disclosure of brokerage fees and
the “marrying” of insurance and
investment products.

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune’ Business Editor

A NEWLY-LAUNCHED
Bahamas-based insurance inter-.
mediary believes that “in a_

Ane bsA epistialion wid make ) ss: Well-knowm-brokers Guilden™ .. and better-able toltpn for-.|. Gilbert and Victor Chandler ecu suing their rights”. SEE
eign direct investnt pro- Fred Smith Fred Smith, a Callender’s SOO HGS “4 page seven



jects, Mr Rahming'd Tri-
bune Business: *) very.
important the conctors
have a Bill, but it Ito be |
fair and transparend not |
~ just work for the fellcin the
industry today bute guy
joining 20 years fronw.”
In his letter to Dr'veaux,
Mr Rahming said: “oartic-
ular concern is the ure of
‘| the draft Bill to ove the
minimum qualificens to
become registered 1 con-
tractor, thus leay this
requirement to be denined
by the Board at a latlate.
“The constructiopmpa-
ny thai I consider most
successful construct com-
pany in the Bahas was

SEE ee ty

SEE page nine

_ Every idea begins with a seed of thought.
Colinalmperial ¢an take those seeds and turn
them into reality. Thats the difference becween
Confidence far Life and a lifetime of dreaming.

Green Turtle CAbaco - On highest ridge, 3 BD, 2.5 j
BTH home. Ama: sea & island views. Custom kitchen,
) large deck, scred porch & pool w/trellised gazebos.
Bonus 3rd level n. Internet Ref: # 6451

REDUCEfom $1,300,000 to $850,000 _

Chris rington
Telephonel-309-4925
chris@coldwellkerbahamas.com

Colinalmperial.








Soins
aN A ES]
www.coldwellkerbahamas.com



. Www.inicronet.bs
7 eee
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
56 Madera Strect, Palndate

242-328-3040



iz

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Intreducing: : ; Contractor Bill

«6% House No. 1 « Custom, solid wood cabinets
4 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath - Granite or polished concrete FROM jage one
1949. sq ft. $685,000 counter tops
whiten. 4 * Stainless appliances incl. ; by ie Pane ie cance
3 Bedroom, 2 ‘ /2 Bath ¢ Impact resistant windows with bachelorderees in the field
, : soe . of engineeritg.So why are we
1470. sq ft. $630,000 Open plan living area notadopting Hllniniiminy stan:
» Walk in closets dard when evnioday most suc-
hee, sie ve oF * Central AC throughout ~ af oe have the
edroom, . equivalen yeter !
2068. sq ft. $800,000 » Front and rear porch “Perhaps a ‘rndfather clause’
————— » Completely landscaped can singer bese of con-
— cPitouse No.1 - Gated community eee san
4 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath « 24/7 security 2 sion for registed contractors to

upgrade to a gher level within
; each category |

to# House No. 114 * Tennis courts ere arieett Jt Rahming ques-
3 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath {Om PoWiets Bs500d 10% oe ee hncuded inthe
1912. sq ft. $745,000 ¢ Underground utilities draft Contraprs Bill, whereas
masons had tir own category.

Floor plaris and house specs available on the website And while thafety, health and
welfare of thaiblic was the Bil-

www.charlottevillebahamas.com/listings.htm I’s primary. ccern, he suggested
that personvanting to only
make minomprovements to
their homes offices be given.
an exemptior waiver from the
~ Bill’s provisis.

Mr Rahny also expressed
concern ov the failure to
account forfferent levels of
complexity win specific job cat-
egories, soming he said creat-
ed health anafety concerns.

He explais: “A classic exam-
ple is seen the category ‘Air
conditioningntractors/HVAC
contractors’iere there are no
further cateies to do with air
conditioninjVAC systems.

“This is ply unacceptable,
as this area2ds, as a matter of

’ serious safebncerns, to be bro-
ken out intategories where

*, persons arejable of only main-
tenance of:cified systems or —
the installat of simple systems

Presenting
versus the iillation of complex °

legant Turnke =

im sought after Charlotteville pitals, hotetc) as well as those

_ who are qified and experi-
enced to vertake all of the
above.” |
Still, Mahming told Dr
Deveaux tIproper regulation
and contrcof all professions
relating tonstruction in the

2068. sq ft. $685,000 + Club house & pools

Pa
ba
&
we

‘3
a
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7 AW



THE TRIBUNE

mea Ps See Se
Airports contrac
awards unveiling

within two weeks

@ By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD)
should be able to announce the
winning bids for the contracts to
provide placement agency and
escrow services for the Bahami-
an dollar-denominated compo-
nents of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport’s financ-
ing within the next two weeks,
Tribune Business has been told.

Airport Authority chairman
Frank Watson said he has not
seen any of the bids currently
under review by NAD and is
awaiting their recommendations.
It is understood that among the
bidders are RoyalFidelity Mer-
chant Bank & Trust and Provi-
dence Advisors.

NAD is looking to go to the
capital markets and secure $200
million for the first phase of the
airport’s redevelopment. Includ-
ed in the Request for Proposal
(RFP) that NAD has requested
is the $25 million it is seeking to
secure in Bahamian market by
October.

This is when it expects to
begin initial work at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport,
such as the realignment of the
sewerage and electrical systems,
and begin clearing ground.

On Friday, Mr Watson said
NAD was still working with
Citibank to determine the best
way to put in place and raise the
Bahamian dollars financing. -

He said that as it relates to the
timeline for the project and the
- financing, it is “so far, sa good”.

The first phase of the airport’s'

redevelopment will include the

Nassau Airport

Development Company





execution of high priority pro-
jects, such as improving the
physical and sanitary conditions
at the airport, alleviating park-
ing conditions and air side con-
gestion, managing adequate
check in spaces for additional
air traffic growth, facilitating
group travel and minimising and
streamlining passenger security
checks.

Once it starts, this phase is
anticipated to be completed
within 24 months.

Phase two of the project is
divided into four stages and

facilities and the renovation of
existing ones. This will also
include new US international
arrivals

Phase three encompasses new
international and domestic
departure facilities, while phase
four will include improvement
to general areas of the airport
such as landscaping.

Mr Watson had also told The
Tribune that NAD was hoping it
could award the construction
contract for the physical work
within the first two weeks of
2009, with the actual work start-

includes the construction of new

ing soon thereafter.

aa gael |



acento ones







TROY A. STRACHAN,
Manager, Revenue



The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is pleased
to ‘welcome Troy A. Strachan, Manager, Revenue, effective April

2008. In this position Mr. Strachan is responsible for customer

billing, credit and collection, and maintaining the general ledger
of NAD.

Prior to joining NAD Mr. Strachan was a Commissions Manager at
Gems Investments Ltd., an International Hedge Fund company.
Mr. Strachan obtained an Associate of Arts Degree in Accounting
and a Bachelor of Business Administration in Private Banking &
Finance from The College of The Bahamas. He is an Associate of
The Bahamas Institute of Banks and recently completed a Master
of Business Administration in Finance from Nova Southeastern
University

DONALD BUTLER, CPP,
Manager, Parking & Ground Transportation

Donald Butler was promoted from Supervisor to Manager
Parking/Ground Transportation effective January 1, 2008. In this
position Mr. Butler is responsible for formulating the policies,
procedures, systems and controls required to optimize the car
parking facilities and ground transportation operations at Lynden
Pindling International Airport.

Mr. Butler joined the National Parking Association (NPA) as a
member in April 2007 and was immediately enrolled in the
certified parking manager programme. The National Parking
Association (NPA) which has its headquarters in Washington
D.C. is an international network of more than 1200 companies,
representing thousands of parking industry professionals. Mr.
Butler successfully passed his exam in October 2007 and is the
first Bahamian to have obtained the title of Certified Parking
Professional (CPP).

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, Race 3B

Ta Moa ATTN

OP TE le)
The Principal Heritage Conservation Agency of The Bahamas

THEME: PROMOTING

Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation {AMP
articipate in the observance of National Literacy Month d
September 2008. AMMC will sponsor and host the follow

programs at the designated AMMC sites.

of Headings from Slave Journals and Related Documents by loca
_. personalities for Junior High and Senior High School Students. Mond:
September 22 through Thursday, September 25, 2008, 10:00 a.m. to: 0 |
‘at The Pompey Museum of Slavery and Emancipation, Bay Street, next
‘the Straw Market . Admission: $3.00 per person. Books will be on sale. Contact
Miss Odia Richardson 326-2566 or call 356-0495 to reserve your group. Schoo
will be given designated times to tour the Museum and attend the readings

2. Open House and An Evening of Recitals at the Balcony House Mus

on Market Street opposite the Central Bank of The Bahamas. Thursday, 25th
September, 2008, at 7:00 p.m. Recitals by Dr. Davidson Hepburn

Ms. Cookie Allens with tours of the House. THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVIT
‘TO ATTEND. Donations are welcomed. Refreshments on sa

Episodes from the Fergusons of Farm Road, the well known. 70 |
rama by Jeanne Thompson, at, The Pompey Museum of Slave y
ncipation, Bay Street next to the Straw Market; Friday, 26th Septemb
at 7:00 p.m. Admission: $15.00 per person includes refresht
LIC 1S INVITED. Please call 356- 0495 or 326-2561



FORT CHARLOTTE...

" still the best venue for weddings, —
social gatherings and meetings.

Call Mrs. Christine Rolle
Tel: 242 326-4872, 326-4861
Fax: 326-4860 for details.

; ALTENTION JUNIOR HIGH |
AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
Throughout’ The Bahamas

: Reserve “The Lest We Forget
The Triumph Over Slavery”
Traveling Exhibition :
t| created by The Schomburg Center
& UNESCO Slave Route Project.
Tt s FREE and eoueatonas .

Three locations to serve you: |
Fort Charlotte, Fort Fincastle
and The Pompey Museum.

The places to shop for
authentic Babamian-made
handicrafts, unique gifts,
jewellery se Babames
authored B iN





Ni D) S iespepsible for the development, operation, managementandr maintenance _
the -fourtt busiest airport in the Caribbean, serving over 3 million passengers each: ee a

With the design of Phase Hf airportexpansion currently underway, NADi is cease exciting
“new emplo yen opportunities for qualified | Bahamian poe |



BRYANT A. BETHELL,
Director, Corporate Finance

The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) warmly
welcomes Bryant A. Bethell, as Director, Corporate Finance,
effective March 10, 2008. In this position Mr. Bethell is primarily
responsible for managing financial forecasts and projections,
evaluating investment. and financing arrangements and
corporate cash management for NAD. His duties also include
managing contractual and reporting relationships with financial
institutions, government entities and airlines.

Mr. Bethell has held financial positions with leading firms in
both the Offshore Financial Services Industry and the Insurance
Sector. In May 1987, Mr. Bethell obtained a Bachelor of Science
Degree in Accounting from Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, ‘
Alabama. Mr. Bethell is a member of the Bahamas Institute of ~
Chartered Accountants and the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants.



KYO DICKINSON
Supervisor, Response Team

Kyo Dickinson was promoted from Response Plumber Level
4 to Supervisor, Response Team effective April 1, 2008. In this
position Mr. Dickinson is responsible for overseeing the multi-
disciplinary Maintenance Response Teams to ensure that all
daily operational maintenance calls are addressed.











PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUN /
J






lassau Airport

elopment Company





EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

large private estate in Nassau seeking an Estate Manager capable
of effectively managing the estate and supervising the household staff.
_ Candidate must have a technical background to be able to maintain all
>quipment on the estate. Previous experience working with large private
estate, small luxury hotel or embassy essential. Applications and resumes
should include references from previous three employers. Send resume,

Ar PEOPLE |

SHENIQUA SMITH, Co



Courteous, energetic and ready to face
the world are just a few adjectives that
describe Sheniqua Smith, the very first
Concierge of the Month for the Nassau
Airport Development Company, within the
Customer Experience Team. Sheniqua
comes to work every day as excited as
if it were her first day. Her excitement
and passion are contagious, r’ ‘ivating
others, and she greets everyo with a
warm and genuine smile.

Sheniqua was born in Nassau on October
14, 1977 and educated at L. W. Young
Senior School. She has worked as a
clerk, and Assistant Manager and now
as a Concierge at NAD. In this position
Sheniqua frequently interacts with tourists
helping to provide a positive first and last
impression of The Bahamas.

We proudly salute Sheniqua for her hard
work and determination and her example
as a great ambassador for NAD and The
Bahamas.

e\tificates and references to:



“OF FAME
\VIBERS



ESTATE MANAGER
P. O. BOX N-7776 , sLOT 193)
-NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The College of The Bahamas Alumni Association

HALL OF FAME
SEEKING NOMINATIONS

What We Are About

The Alumni Association Hall of Fame was established in spring of 2001 by the Executive _
Board of the Association. The purpose is to recognize annually a COB alumna/alumnus who
is making significant contributions to the development of The Bahamas. It is envisioned that
honourees will play a major role in the _ndraising efforts of the Association.

On May 11, 2001, the Alumni Association named Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Pastor, Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Church as its first inductee. Subsequently named were Larry Gibson, a financial
services expert (2002); Laura Pratt-Charlton, a pharmacist /entrepreneur (2003); Tanya.
McCartney, an attorney and a former member of the Senate (2004); Vernice Walkine,
Director Genetal of Tourism (2005), Keith Bell, Former Superintendant of the Royal Bahamas ~
Police Force(2006), Charles Sealy, Chief Executive Officer, Doctor’s Hospital (2007).

Each honouree is presented with a 36” Silver European Cup, which symbolizes his or her
outpouring of inspiration that causes others to thirst for “knowledge, truth and integrity”,
the values promoted by The College of The Bahamas and reflected in the institution's motto.

Hall of Fame Award Criteria:

What It Takes to Be Nominated and Become a Member of The Hall of Fame

The Alumni Association of The College of The Bahamas views induction into its Hall of Fame
; as its highest honour. It is a designation extended to individuals whose lives are the hallmark
of The College’s motto “Knowledge, Truth, Integrity.”







To be considered for the Alumni Association Hall of Fame, nominees must:
Have distinguished themselves as students, academically and socially, while at The

College of The Bahamas

Be among the best in their chosen fields of endeavour, displaying scrupulous conduct

that stands as an example to others.

Be a leader and relentless worker whose success benefits co-workers, those they
supervise or employ and the community in general.

~ Excel in civic outreach and make a contribution to society that is easily visible within
their fields and the wider scop xf Bahamian Life.
Exhibit strength of character that translates generally into community strengthening,
personifying their alma mater’s motto “Knowledge, Truth, Integrity’

Be nominated



The Hall of Fame Award Nomination Form
May be obtained from

The Office of Alumni Relations & Development (Upstairs, Administration Block (A-Block}}

Oakes Field Campus Or may be downloaded from http://my.cob.edu,bs

All nomination forms, along with a current portfolio and photograph, must be submitted by

Wednesday, October 8, 2008.

For more informatio: , please call the Office of Alumni Relations & Development at 302-4359.
Portfolio Size: Fiv '5) pages (maxim) * Font size: 12 pt * Paper 8.5 inches x 11 inches



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE US financial crisis
and global credit/liquidity
crunch are likely to result
in banks bringing securiti-
zations back onshore from
international financial cen-
tres, a Bahamian attorney
said, although the loss of
business will impact other
jurisdictions more than this
nation.

Michael Paton, a Lennox
Paton partner and head of
its financial services group
practice, told Tribune Busi-
ness that as a result of the
sub-prime mortgage mess,
and collapses of the invest-
ment banks Lehman Broth-
ers and Bear Stearns,
onshore regulators would
likely mandate that securi-
tization-related transac-
tions be brought back
onshore and on to banks’
balance sheets.

He explained: “I think
there’s going to be a scal-
ing down compared to pri-
or issues. Securitisations
will take place, but they
will probably be covered


































issues, so they’d be brought
back on the bank’s balance
sheet with recourse to the
bank’s capital.

“We can expect to see
quite a downturn in securi-
tization products issued
offshore, and more banks
will be forced to streamline
capital behind these issues.
There will be a lot more
regulation of derivatives
than there was in the past.”

Focus

. The Bahamas, with its
focus primarily being on
traditional private wealth
management, is less likely
to be impacted by moves
towards tougher securiti-
zation and derivatives
transactions, and their

“movement back on shore,

when compared to rival
international financial cen-
tres such as the Cayman
Islands and British Virgin
Islands.

Mr Paton said: “The
Bahamas hasn’t had that
much of a market share in

_the structured transactions

business. I expect the fall-
out would be more down
in places like Cayman.

“The banks doing struc-|

tured product work here
were primarily the Swiss
banks, and they have
already been forced by the
Swiss regulators to bring
those transactions back
onshore.” ;
Acknowledging that he
had witnessed a downturn
in the offshore securitiza-
tion business over the past
four to five years due to
regulatory tightening
already in motion, Mr
Paton said: “In the
Bahamas, it’s not really the

»

- model fat the vast majority

merral PATON, a Lennox Paton partner



of institutions that are
here.

“To the extent that there
are some institutions that
do more sophisticated
structured transactions, it’s
‘nothing that will have a
macroeconomic impact on
the Bahamas.”

Rationale

He added: “There’s still
going to be a rationale for
securitisations to help the
big banks manage risk
exposure and capital expo-
sure, but.it’s going to be





done in a more regulated)

. Manner, with recourse to

the bank’s capital. Theyj
will not be able to go off-+
shore.” i
Securitisations usuall
involve the creation of a
special purpose vehicle
(SPV) that is held off-bal3
ance sheet, meaning it does}
not appear on a bank’s bal-} |
ance sheet. For example}
banks will pool a-collection;
of assets — such as mort-
gages — and then use the}
SPV to issue bonds that are}
backed from the revenue;
streams created by the

mortgage repayments.



Half Day Forum |



UPDATING YOU ON MATTERS RELATED TO:
_+ Observations on risk management practices in international banks

— INCOLLABORATION WITH THE
CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
BACO IS PROUD TO HOST ITS

2nd HALF DAY FORUM

during the recent market turbulence

- Automated Clearing House System (ACHS)

Speakers include:

« Stanislaw J. Bereza

Inspector of Banks and Trust Companies

© Brian Smith

Project Manager of ACHS

Seating is limited therefore registration is restricted to 2 pasons per

Register with:

DATE: 25th September 2008
TIME: 8:30am -12:00 noon

VENUE: British Colonial Hilton

Cost; FREE

organization

Tel: 242-323-0871 or 323-0872
Fax: 242-325-5674

www, bacobahamas.com

into@ bacobahamas.com





4
8
a



Sot Sea a ha ad lt RR Nis skort

|













THE I RIBUNE

MUNDAY, SEP EMDEM 22, 2UU0, FAUE oD



Bahamian

has ‘never seen the

world economy looking this grim’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

A BAHAMIAN financial
services professional has
told Tribune Business that
he has “never seen it so
grim in all my professional
life” when it comes to the
global markets, and criti-
cised the Government for
seemingly not having a plan
to deal with the situation.

Paul Moss, who is seek-
ing the PLP’s St Cecilia
nomination at the next gen-
eral election and runs his
own financial services busi-
ness, Dominion Manage-
ment Services, said: “I don’t
believe our leaders are tak-
ing the crisis seriously
enough. It’s going to come
to the Bahamas.

“What are the contingen-
cies that the Government

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



ll MSS

has in place or put in place

to serve as a buffer against

the shock to come?”
With the US economic

downturn meaning that
Americans, who account for
85 per cent of visitors to
this nation, were travelling
and spending less, and the
Wall Street financial crisis
taking its toll on employ-
ment and consumer confi-
dence, Mr Moss said: “This
does not look so good.

“I have never seen it so
grim in all my professional
life. In a lot of ways, there’s
not a lot we can do. We’re
going to have to suffer, but
I do not think our Parlia-
ment is talented enough to
see what kind of cushion we
have to drum up to stop this
crisis from coming our way.
It’s very serious, but no
one’s paying any attention.”

Mr Moss called for a
national conclave to be
held, so that the Bahamas’
greatest economic and busi-

_ ness brains could come

Colina.

Holdings Bahamas Limited

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited
Class “A” Preference Shares

The Board of Directors

of Colina Holdings

Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is pleased to announce
that a Preference Share Dividend for the period
July 1, 2008 to September 30, 2008 at the annual’
rate of B$ Prime +2.25% will be paid to the

Class “A”

Preference Shareholders

of record

of CHBL on the 30th day of September 2008.

Payment will be made through the Company’s

Registrar

and Transfer

Agent, CFAL Ltd.

within 10 business days of the record date.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau,

Bahamas, an one tes

international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland,
presently accepting applications for.

together to devise a way out
of the problems likely to
impact this nation in the
next 12-18 months.

Meanwhile, Mr Moss,
who is a stern opponent of
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) that this
nation is due to sign next
month with the European
Union (EU), criticised his
own party for its stance on
the trade treaty.

“I’m very disappointed in
the Government’s decision
to go ahead and sign, even
though they have not done
a sufficient job in consulting
the Bahamian people,” Mr

Moss said. “The consulta-
tions the minister [Zhivargo
Laing] talks about were a
sales pitch.

“T’condemn not just his
actions, but the actions of
Parliament, including the
Opposition. I believe they
have not just let down the
people in this country and
generations to come, but
their ancestors and those
who fought for this coun-
try.”

Praising President Jagdeo
of Guyana for his stance
against the EPA, Mr Moss
told Tribune Business that
over the next few weeks he

and the organisation which
he heads, Bahamians Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF), would
work to generate support
both inside and outside the
Bahamas and see if we can
gain sufficient numbers to
make this country not go
forward with this agree-
ment.

“Tt may sound like a done
deal, but we are optimistic.
I believe we will get past
that issue, wiser heads will
prevail and the Opposition
will wake up from its slum-
ber.”

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
SITUATED ON DOUBLE LOTS TOTALING 23,753 SQ. FT.

LOCATED BERNARD ROAD
Approximately 500 feet east of the Village Road Round About

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Mena Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas

to reach us before September 29, 2008.
For further information, please contact:

356-1608 or 502-0929

yf AR fa uh 19



RBC WEALTH MANAGEMENT (BAHAMAS)

is considering

suitable applications for

Investment Manager

Candidates for this vacancy should possess the following qualifications:
* University degree (preferably in Business and/or Economics)
« CFA designation (or candidacy), certifications in the areas of Financial
Planning and/or portfolio management
Minimum 5 years investment industry experience

Account Officer - External Asset Managers Desk

Applicants for the position of Account Officer for the External Asset Managers
(EAM) Desk must have at least 5 years experience in the offshore banking
‘sector, good knowledge of international investment instruments, money and
financial markets, ability to partner with team members, must be confident
regarding customer relations, knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is a
. must.

Personal qualities :-
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude .
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities :-
Service & advise allocated EAM and clients
Maintain & follow up allocated relationships
‘Liaise directly with customers
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external counterparts
Meet deadlines on timely basis
submit — their

Interested individuals with should

-resume/curriculum vitae to :-

such qualifications

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre
West Bay Street

P. O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no.: (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

Portfolio management experience (5 years + }

PC Literate-and experience using industry standard software

Specialized knowledge in sales, investment policy statements and general
knowledge in tax legislation, financial planning, estate and trust.

Fluency in English and French (language skills in spanish would be an asset
but are not required) :

' Responsibilities Include:

Retention and growth of the private client discretionary investment
management business °

Assisting high net worth clients in establishing their investment objectives and
tolerance for risk

Development and implementation of customized portfolio strategies

Provide counsel to clients on the firm’s investment policies and strategies and

* communicate portfolio performance

Oversight of performance investment reviews to ensure a suitable/appropriate
asset allocation is in place and opine on investment performance where
appropriate

* Overall sales and relationship management.

RBC Wealth Management services high net worth clients in over 150 countries
around the world. Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited
plays a central role in the international wealth management network.

This position offers opportunities for career and professional development. We
offer an attractive compensation package, which includes incentive bonuses and
a comprehensive health & benefits plan.

' Applicants should apply by

Tuesday, September 23, 2008 to:

Shelly Mackey

RBC Wealth Management (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3024

Blake Road & West Bay Street,

Nassau, Bahamas

Email: Shelly. Mackey @rbc.com

All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence. We will only respond
to applicants with suitable qualifications and experience.

a RBC
Neb atatah (chaos eaaan \ | eee Bee Ta
SR aka aaNet hc ea LRBC| of Canada





PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

/
THE TRIBUNE. /





Luxury goods retailers in

All tenders must reach the office of the Financial Controller or the respective Family Island Local Office

TENDER FOR

MOTOR VEHICLES

‘The National Insurance Board is pleased to offer for sale, by sealed tender only, the vehicles below.
Interested persons may view the vehicles and obtain tender guidelines by contacting the Purchasing,
Stores and Auxiliary Services Department of the National Insurance Board located in the Board’s
Jumbey Village Complex, Baillou Hill Road. For further information, you may contact the Department
at telephone number 502-1781 or 502-1858. Family Island residents may contact the Family Island
Local O ffice Managers who will be able to assist.



Manager no later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday September 26, 2008, in order to be considered.

Year
2003

fear
2003

Year
2003

Year
2003

2003.

2003
2003
2002
2003
2003

BIMINI LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
Nissan X-trail

Chassis No.
JNIBNT30Z0008079

KEMP’S BAY (ANDROS) LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
Wrangler Jeep

Chassis No.
1J4FA29123P346409

MAYAGUANA LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
Wrangler Jeep

Chassis No.
1JAFA29143P360103

NEW PROVIDENCE

Make & Model
Nissan AD Wagon
Nissan AD Wagon

Nissan AD Wagon

Nissan X-trail
Wrangler Jeep
Wrangler Jeep
Nissan Platina

Chassis No.
3NIDY0552ZK005150
3NIDY0556ZK005149
3N1IDY0558Z.K005282
JNITBNT30Z0008924

1J4FA49S12P768884

1J4FA29123P360104
3NIJD01D5ZL080106

NORTH ELEUTHERA SUB-OFFICE

Make & Model
Nissan AD Wagon

Chassis No.
3N1DY0556Z.K005264

SIMMS (LONG ISLAND) LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
_ Nissan X-trail

‘Chassis No.

~ JNITBNT30Z0009814

License No.

116974

License No.

117515

License No.

6510

‘License No.

116977
117712
116979
116978
145960
118668
35023

License No.

116975

License No.

1632



FROM page one

likely to have a “negative
effect”.

Israel Assa, Estee Lauder’s
vice-president/general manag-
er for travel retailing in the
Americas region, also referred
to the 2,500 square foot store it
was working to build with John
Bull to act as a showcase for its
top brands. These included
Estee Lauder, Tommy Hil-
figer, Sean John, Tom Ford,
Donna Karan and Jo Malone.

Describing this concept store
as Estee Lauder’s first in the
Americas region, Mr Assa
wrote: “This is by far the most
ambitious project we have
undertaken in the Caribbean.

“We are most concerned.

that this increase in duty will
have a negative effect on the
retail success of our project.
The duty increase could lead
to a long-term effect that
diminishes the ability of John
Bull, and the Bahamas in gen-
eral, to remain competitive
with retailers on other
Caribbean islands. That would
be most unfortunate.

“As a major brand supplier
in this category we would, at
a minimum, like to see the
Government reconsider its
decision and go back to previ-
ous duty levels.”

Tribune Business under-.

stands that Bahamian luxury
goods retailers have not given

- up their lobbying effort to

encourage the Government to
reverse the duty increases,
despite the administration’s ini-
tial stance that they would
remain in place during the cur-
rent fiscal year.

Several Bay Street mer-
chants met with Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for

finance, and his ministry offi-

cials, on July 28,.2008,.,to. dis-

cuss the issue. Among those
retailers to raise concerns were
Fred Hazelwood at John Bull,
Peter Phillips at Brass &
Leather, and Tim Lightbourne
of the Perfume Shop.

In reply, Ehurd Cunning-
ham, the Ministry of Finance’s
revenue secretary, said in an

August 13, 2008, letter: “Please .

be advised that the minister
has examined the position and
has taken into account the
points expressed. The matter
will be monitored and will be
reviewed during the next Bud-
get exercise.

“T am to advise that should it
be warranted, the Government
could give consideration to
remitting any duties paid in
respect of the items men-
tioned.”

Among the major concerns
of Bahamian luxury goods
retailers are that any rise in
import duties automatically
impacts their margins and prof-

itability. This is because the -

perfume brands fix prices
across. the Caribbean and
Americas region, with dis-
counters cut off from supply.
As aresult, if Bahamian lux-

" ury goods retailers increased

their prices to compensate for
the duty increases, it would
make them uncompetitive with
rival Caribbean destinations
and the cruise ships’ on- -board
retail offerings. It is understood
that 45 per cent of Bay Street
merchants’ business, on aver-
age, comes from cruise tourists.

“In speaking to some ven-
dors, the Bahamas receives the
largest discount on prices in
order to compensate for the
high rate of import duties in
the Caribbean. There is no
room for a further discount,”
Solomon’s Mines’ Ne ilfer

-warned in his e-mail:
. With shopping a “major
tourist PcIBNy EPI the retail -

‘survival’ fight on tax rises

industry is also concerned the
tax increases — and any subse-
quent price increases — will
undermine the ‘duty free’
retailing concept in the
Bahamas.

While perfume and luxury
goods products were once sold
in the Bahamas as much as 25
per cent below US prices,
today the price differential is
nominal, particularly on Euro-
pean brands due to the
strength of the euro increasing
supply costs for retailer.

Mr Hillier added: “Christ-
mas is here for us, as we place
orders this month for delivery
in late.September or early ©
October. Gift sets are the main
attraction and account for over
60 per cent of business at
Christmas.

“The margin given us by
suppliers, however, is much
lower, as the gift sets include
free items such as body cream
and aftershave. If we have to
pay another 5 per cent duty on
them it will be disastrous for
us.”

Tribune Business previously
revealed Bay Street’s concern
over the Budget duty increases
last month. Joan Thompson,
owner of the Brass & Leather
and Fendi stores, said the
increase in the duty rate for
leather products, from 20 per
cent to 25 per cent, coupled
with the drastic increase in
electricity and other operating
costs, would wipe out the price
advantage previously held over
US retail and push margins
into unprofitable territory.

She and others warned that,
together with the economic
downturn, the Budget tax
increases and subsequent price’
rises were likely to reduce
sales, reduce profitability,

‘impact employment and lead
-to a lower revenue take for the

Treasury. }

Vy,





- TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 7B



FROM page one

and approvals given to the Bak-
er’s Bay developers by govern-
ment agencies, had failed to
comply with the court’s rules
and should be thrown out.

Justice Gray-Evans also
‘refused the Association’s appli-
cation for an injunction to pre-
vent the developers, Discovery
Land Company, from continu-
ing to build-out Baker’s Bay,
and declined to permit its
request for full disclosure of all
government permits and
licences granted “in its present
form”.

And, finally, the judge also
declined the Association’s
request for an order requiring
the Attorney General to take
action against Discovery Land
Company if it continued to work
under the permits and approvals
that were the subject of the
court challenge.

Justice Gray-Evans said: “In
my view, until the permits and
approvals granted have been
quashed, the developers are
entitled to operate under them.”

In response, Mr Smith said
the Association was “disap-
pointed, but it is not going to
discourage us from continuing
to pursue that which the Asso-
ciation regards as its rights. We

will be appealing, and hope the -

Association will be successful
on appeal”.

When asked whether it was
now time to drop the legal bat-
tler, given that Discovery Land
Company and Baker’s Bay were
being held up by the Govern-
ment as the model for environ-
mentally sustainable develop-
ment in the Bahamas, Mr Smith
told Tribune Business: “That’s
allowing expediency to succeed
over principle and rights.

“The people of Guana Cay
continue to wish to have their
rights vindicated. Unfortunately,
it’s taking a lot longer than
anticipated. Their complaints
about abuse of' local rights and

central government overriding _

local government remain. This
case is very important, because
we’re dealing with people’s
rights and with process. To what
extent can central government
ride roughshod over local rights,
especially when the locals are
trying to protect those rights.

This is a seminal case, and it will

be prosecuted.”

On the environmental side,
Mr Smith said the Association
“has never complained about
the bonafides of Discovery Land
Company’s intentions to miti-
gate environmental damage.as
much as they can. It is simply
saying that Discovery Land
Company chose the wrong place
to anchor its project”.

Mr Smith added that many of
the environmental protection
measures being employed at
Baker’s Bay had resulted from
the Association’s pressure. He

. argued that the project was too
large for Guana Cay and was
compromising the previous
“organic development” the
community’s local and foreign
residents had enjoyed.
















Baker's Bay

In her judgment, Justice
Gray-Evans noted that both the
Government agencies and the
developers, who were named
as defendants, argued that
under Supreme Court order 53,
rule 4, the Association had not
complied with the procedure
for judicial review proceedings
by filing them within six months
of when the matter at issue first
arose.

The issue at stake was the
series of permits granted to Dis-
covery Land Company by vari-
ous government agencies
between May 31, 2005, and
March 7, 2007, and whether
these authorities had the power
to grant such approvals.

However, Mr Smith argued

that because the Association
did not know of these permits
until May 30, 2007, the applica-
tion date started running from
then. As a result, the judicial
review application was in com-
pliance with the Supreme
Court’s rules, as it was made
on September 25, 2007.
. Yet Discovery Land Compa-
ny and its then-attorney,
Michael Barnett, argued that
the Association also failed to
explain the four-month delay
between acquiring knowledge
of the permits and the,actual
Judicial Review application fil-
ing.

Justice Gray-Evans found:
“Further, the [developers] say
that as a result of the [Associa-
tion’s] delay, they have suffered
—and are likely to suffer — prej-

“They say. that pursuant to
the [approvals] decisions, some
of which had been made more
than two years before the appli-
cation, they have invested a
considerable amount of mon-

ey, some $200 million thus far,

in*the development; have
engaged the services of con-
tractors and sub-contractors,
who in turn now provide
employment for many Bahami-
ans; and have to date done a



IN HOUSE

INVESTMENTS LFD



y

great deal of work on the Bak-
er’s Bay project, some portions
of which had been completed
while others were near com-
pletion.”

Ultimately, Justice Gray-
Evans said the Association did
not adequately explain that
four-month delay and, as a
result, it did not move with
‘utmost promptness’ - when it
became aware of the permits
issued - in challenging them.

She added that the case was
not one “in which leave should
have been granted”, and set
aside that which was granted
to the Association by former
Acting Justice Maynard.

The Association’s “inability
or unwillingness” to give an
undertaking for damages
caused if a ‘stop work’ injunc-
tion was granted against Bak-
er’s Bay also meant that appli-
cation was refused by Justice
Gray-Evans.

In addition, she found that
the Association’s discovery
application for all permits and
approvals granted to Baker’s
Bay was “too broad”. “I accept
the [Government and develop-
er] submission that discovery
should be limited to specific
approvals, permits and licences,
and the decision-making
process surrounding them, all
of which, to my mind, should

- be a matter of public record,”

Justice Gray-Evans said.

Both the Government and
Baker’s Bay had accused the
Association of undertaking “a
fishing expedition”. Justice
Gray-Evans added: “The Gov-
ernment respondents are con-
cerned that the scope of the
applicants’ application for dis-
covery may extend to a class of
documents or particular docu-
ments in respect of which the
respondents might wish to
make an objection, and there-
fore require more specificity.

“In the result, they say that .

they reserve the right to object
to the production of any docu-
ment or class of documents on.
ground of public interest immu-
nity.”



NOTICE TO |
SHAREHOLDERS










in the usual manner.

Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah.) Ltd

Is seeking candidates for the positions of

1. Production Supervisor
2. Bottle Blow Moulding Technician
3. Line Maintenance Technician
_4, Senior Electrician

5. Refrigeration Technician

If you are interested in these positions and feel you have
the necessary experience to perform these jobs, please
submit your resume by applying. in writing by hand de-
livery or mail to:

Human Resource Manager
Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah.) Ltd

P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas

Or by email to:

: Jfountain-moss @cbcbahamas.com
on or before Friday October 3rd, 2008

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has
declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all
shareholders of coil at September 15, 2008 as follows:

Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).
The payment will be made September 30, 2008 through

Royal Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited




m Group.

The Junkanoo Corporation New Providence Limited

In partnership with
The MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Application
for
Prospective Judges
Applicant must be 21yrs or over

OFFICAL USE ONLY

JUDGE NUMBER

The 2008 / 2009 Junkanoo Season

Please PRINT LEGIBLY all information in the spaces provided below and answer all questions and provide doc-
umentation including a passport photo as requested or application may be subject to outright rejection

All information given by applicants will be subject to follow up background investigations and checks.

A. PERSONAL INFORMATION













Full Name (Ms./Mt./Mrs.) SURNAME FIRST MIDDLE
Alias ‘ Maiden name aliases nick names
Address:
(STREET, CITY, ISLAND)
Date of Birth _. Country of Birth Age
DD/MM/YY
P.O. Box Sex Nationality
Telephone (W) (H) Seok eras, __(C)
Employer Profession
f Employer's Address
2 Lemail: i



B. GENERAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Have you resided in the Bahamas for more than five years? (If NO please state previous residence)



Have you ever judged a Junkanoo Parade? (IF YES please give year(s) of parade)



a. Do you currently participate/rush with any Junkanoo group? __ If yes, name



yb. Have you participated/rushed with any Junkanoo Group before If yes, name t

group.





c. Are you an avid supporter of any Junkanoo Group? ~ If yes, name

group.









jd. Do you have any relatives and/or close friends who participate with any Junkanoo Group?



Hf yes name persons and group(s)



e. Do you presently have any personal affiliation wi th ANY Junkanoo Grdttp? (If YES please name the
Group. : .

f£. Do you have any religious reason that may prevent you from judging a parade? (If YES please explain)

g. Do you work on Boxing Day and/or New Years? (If YES please state which)



h. Why-do you wish to be a judge?





§ Have you ever participated in any Junkanoo parade(s) before? (If YES please give the year and name of the



grou p)

Explain how “integrity” relates to a judge and the parade.



$$



C. Given the above, are you confident that you are able to Judge a parade fairly and in an unbiased manner, based solely on
y y Judge a p Y y
your training and the presentation and performance of the groups during the parades? Yes or No

Do you sec Judging of Junkanoo Parades as a National contribution and civic duty? Yes or No
Do you know of any reason that would disqualify you for being allowed to Judge any parade? Yes or No

D. MEDICAL INFORMATION

Please note this section is for insurance and medical emergency purpose ONLY

| Do you have any medical condition(s) that might prevent you from judging? (EG: asthma, heart condition, diabetes, hyperten-

sion, optical, hearing, etc.) If YES please explain and list any medication that you take for that condition.



Are you allergic to any specific medicine? (If yes please list)
I understand that I may be liable to take a medical examination to determine my abilities in areas related to my ability to judge
the parade and agree to the same.



Emergency Contact (LIST’ 2 PERSONS TO CONTACT IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY)





1. Name Relationship

Telephone (Ww) _(H) a ee rs (CG)
2. Name Relationship

Telephone (W) (H) wh see, - C)
Declaration

I, declare that the information I have provided in this application is true and correct. I further agree that I am of sound
mind and body and pledge to be sober during the parade and to abide by all of the rules, regulations and assignments set

| forth by JCNP or its assigns. I further understand and accept the full responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of
|. the information that I have herein provided, and accept full and complete responsibility for the same. If any of the infor-

mation is found to be false and or misleading, either prior during or after a parade that I have Judged, I render my self
incapable of judging again in the future, and agree to stand liable for any such act, and that any and all scores tendered
by me will be discarded.



APPLICANT SIGANTURE DATE

PASTE
PHOTO HERE

Completed applications should be submitted to the
Ministry of Culture, Morro Castle, Attention Mrs. Joan Henderson on
or before Friday, October 10, 2008



PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



i
tied Yoowore

AL

Baker's Bap

Do You Want to be a Baker’s Bay Star?

Join us at our

“SEARCH FOR STARS”

Do you want to work with an organization that is
progressive, dynamic, and growing with great benefits?

Do you want an exciting career opportunity on one of the
fastest growing Family Islands in The Bahamas?

Do you want to work with a team of committed,
hardworking, creative hospitality professionals?

If you answered “YES”, then you need to be a part of the
Baker’s Bay Search for Stars at Our Lucaya.
Freeport, Grand. Bahama and British Colonial Hilton,
Nassau, Bahamas.

We are ‘extraordinary people creating extraordinary
experiences and we're seeking Stars in the following key
areas:
Culinary
Food and Beverage Service
Accounting
Emergency Medical Technician/Nurse
Residential Services/Inn Management
Activities Management
Information Technology (IT)
Security

Interview Schedule
Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama

- Monday, September 29, 2008
9:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. AND 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008
8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. AND 6:00 p.m. - 8:00p.m.

British Colonial Hilton, Nassau,
New Providence

Wednesday, October 1, 2008
9:00 am - 4:30 p.m. AND 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Thursday, October 2008
8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Call 242-367-0800 or email hr@bakersbayclub.com to
submit your resume and schedule your interview!

“Becoming the Employer of Choice
in The Bahamas!”



S41m ICD deal BISX's
‘largest bloc trade ever'

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE five million-share
transaction that saw Lady
Henrietta St George sell her
50 per cent ICD Utilities stake
for $41 million was “the
largest bloc trade we’ve had
by a wide margin” on the
Bahamas International Secu-

rities Exchange (BISX), its
chief executive has told Tri-
bune Business.

Keith Davies said that while
the value and volume of the
share sale to Canadian power
producer Emera would boost
BISX’s year-to-date trading
statistics, the impact on the
exchange’s All-Share Index
was harder to predict. This

was simply because the Index
was weighted towards market
capitalisation, with First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) dominating it sim-
ply because it had far more
issued shares than other pub-
lic companies.

“It doesn’t matter about the
size or the amount of the secu-
rities involved,” Mr Davies
told Tribune Business. “What

people did not see was all the
work done at the back end to
ensure the trade happened
when it was supposed to, and
that all participants were fully
aware of the disclosure
requirements. That was all
done to ensure it went off
without a hitch.

“On BISX, it’s as easy to
trade one share as it is to trade
five million shares.”

gets
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

OPPORTUNITY

The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking
candidates for the role of Manager, People. The successful
candidate will be responsible for all aspects of human resource
management at NAD, including employee compensation,
payroll and benefits, training, labour relations, health and safety,
communications, social activities and community involvement.
This position reports to the Vice President, Finance and Chief
Financial Officer and will involve daily interaction with NAD
staff, senior management, and executives.

The ideal candidate will have a post secondary education in a
field consistent with human resource management, and will be
able to work independently to manage multiple priorities and
stakeholders in a fast paced work environment. At least five
years experience in a similar position is preferred.

This position offers competitive compensation and benefits,
consistent with experience and qualifications.



LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENING

Professional Development
Tile Laying (£5 Weeks}
MATAWIRLP. OS, Sane bra

Aceminting 1 (12 Weeks}

Bre £075, 6-9pe

Sat. 104. Sam lom $306
Agtounting LF (12 Weeks}

Pre DOS, G-Ypim

Sak. 14, Sarn- 1 gin

Quick Books (12 Weeks}

Pree HVS, GS pri

vad. 1004, Sue Lona

esas

Intra, € “omputers Apphcations 1 12 Weeks}
Sat. 104, Qani-3par $345

Intro. Computers AppHeations 1H (L2 Weeks}
Sak, 104, Hamed pin

At Review (1 Weeks}
Bri 103, & 1Opra

Nail Care & Artistry (15 Weeks}
Mfon. Paes. Thurs 10/8, & iOens

Facial Technology (0 Weeks:

Adon. Tues. Thars.
Face Care & Make-up Application (10Weeks}
Sat. 10/4, Gaen3om $375
Aervlic Nails 10 Weeks}

Fr 23, 6. bp 7 $300
Barhering 1 (15 Weeks}

Mon. Wed. 9/8, 6-H lpn: $306

Vile Laying-How fo Do 43 Weeks}

Sat. 14h Yani dn $300
Basic Blue Print Reading & -

Estiniating 1 Residential (28 Weeks}

Sat IDL Yam Spm $320
Basic Blue Print Reading &

Estimating HW Commercial (10 Weeks)

bre 103. Gp pat $350

MG, 6.16pm ~ $378

Drswall bustallation (25 Weeks}
MOPIWRUP. OFS, §

Winday
(0 Weeks)

Mon. Wed. 9/29, San ipm
Tues. Weil, 83%, 6 - lpi
‘Tues. Thurs. 0/30, Sane «3 pen

freatment Drapery & Valence

Sewing (10 Weeks}

_ Sat. 104, Sampras.

Painting & Decorating 48 Weeks}
(Residential & Commercial}

Mon. Wel. 0/29, Sam-lorm

Tues. Thurs. 9220, Sanne} peat

Tues. Weil. 830, &-f0par $3)

Upholstery E (18 Weeks}
Tues. Thurs. 030, 6-10pe S300
Upholstery Uf (18 Werks)
Mon. Wed. 9/29, 6 Ifpm
Straw Craft 1 (18 Weeks}
Man. Wed. 9/29, Sam-lom
Straw Cratt Advanced 11 8 Weeks}
Mon. Wed. 9/29, 6-i0pn: $340

Grice

50)2-6338/9

Office Hours: Monday-Friday * 9am-5pm

BIVE reserves the right ta cancel courses ifa minimum number
| of students have not registered. Students will receive a fuil
refund if classes are canceled by the institution.

BTV reserves the right te change Tuition, Fees, Course Content,
OC oare aus SOs a Geel. e

Early registration heips eliminate the disappointment of course

Shell Souvenir Manufacturing (10 Weeks)
Mon. Wed, 4/24, dam. | pun

arial es

‘Tues. Thurs. 9/30, 9am-Lpns
‘Thes. Wed. 9730, (-1apm

Marine Outboard Eagine

Preventive Maintenance (16 Weeks)
Mon. 16, 6-9pni

Wed. 10/6, 6-99 $3)

Moe iriicite aes Lisa Onirae he ltiinn raises

10 WEEK K PROGRAMS.
OCT 3 - DEC 6, 2008

12 WEEK PROGRAMS

OCT 3 - DEC 20, 2008

Small Gas Eagine Repair (0) Weeks)
Sat. 10/4, Jam-3prn $30)

SEPT §

15 WEEK PROGRAMS
- DEC 20, 2008

MORE HAPPENINGS! Fr BTVI Coe

Oil-rich Nigeria enjoys ‘brain gain

® LAGOS, Nigeria
Associated Press

THEY speak in the clipped tones of the British upper class or

~ the soft drawl of southern California. They boast degrees and
work experience from elite overseas institutions. And now

they're coming home.

Nigerians who left their homeland to seek riches abroad are
increasingly returning as Africa's biggest oil producer rides an
energy bonanza that is opening up unprecedented opportunities.

Abiola Lawal, 41, is part of this "brain gain."

He was earning a six-figure salary with business software
giant SAP*AG in southern California before he returned to
Nigeria in 2005 after 17 years abroad, joining a major Nigerian
energy firm, Oando PLC, as chief strategy officer.

"There are lots of 30- and 40-something-year-olds who are
CEOs in this country, and that would never be in the States or
the U.K. because the experience pool is much deeper there,"
said Lawal. "In the States I will have opportunities, but not at

' the level we are getting them in Nigeria, and that's the reality."

While most of Nigeria's 140 million citizens are deeply impov-

_ erished, some parts of the waterfront commercial capital of

Lagos are becoming mini boomtowns.

With petrodollars strengthening the economy and the gov-
ernment deregulating key industries, Nigeria's telecommuni-
cations, banking and energy sectors are growing at double and
sometimes triple digit rates, with stock prices to match. The over-
all economy is forecast to grow’at about 9 percent in 2008.

This growth has created a growing appetite for internationally
business savvy recruits. Many companies now organize career
fairs in major cities in the U.S. and Europe, seeking to person-
ally woo Africans with overseas training and work experience.

For many Nigerian expatriates, it's a tempting proposal: the

chance to contribute to the development of their country while

enjoying compensation packages that often include fast-track
promotion, housing, a maid, a car and a driver.

No firm figures exist for how many Nigerians educated or.
working overseas are coming home. But recruitment companies
report hundreds of applications for each job they advertise and
up to 85 percent of the applicants are Nigerians working in the

NOTICE

LIQUIDATION SALE

BY RECEIVER FOR BEST PRICE
HOME & OFFICE CENTRE

HLB Galanis. Bain hereby invites Business
Houses and Individuals to bid on a large
quantity of Home and Office supplies. The
items are brand new and all price quotations
must be firm and will be valid for 30 days.

Interested companies or individuals may
collect a copy of The Inventory List from the
Receptionist’s Desk in Shirlaw House on
Shirley Street between 9:00 am and
4:30 pm, Monday through Friday or
alternatively call the office and we will email a
copy of The Inventory List.

The deadline for submission of tenders is
Friday 26th September, 2008.

All offers should be made in writing in a sealed
envelope and delivered to:

Mr. John S. Bain

Receiver & Manager

HLB Galanis Bain

Shirlaw House, Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3205

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 328-4540

The Receivers reserve the right to reject any -
and all offers.





WE 7

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

will today open the doors of
their partnership, Chandler
Gilbert Insurance Associates,
to the Bahamian public, with
the goal of providing.‘true’
insurance brokerage services to
clients.

Mr Gilbert, a former
Bahamas Insurance Brokers
Association (BIBA) president,
told Tribune Business in an
exclusive interview: “You and I
both know there are some
changes that need to occur in
this market.

“Clients go to an intermedi-
ary and say they want this
placed. The intermediary acts
more as a PO Box to receive
the information, which is passed
on to the insurer, without the
intermediary finding out what
the clients’ needs are.

“Very little insurance broking
goes on. Most are agents of
insurance companies, except in
instances where large clients are
involved. That is something we
are looking to bring to the mar-
ket — making sure the product
suits the needs of the client.
Even though we may be agents
of insurers, we will see how
products can be tailor-made to
suit the interests of clients,
rather than just taken off-the-
shelf.”

Mr Gilbert said Chandler

‘Gilbert Insurance Associates,

which unlike many rivals has
been set up as a partnership to
provide insurance agency, bro-
kerage and consultancy services,
was “going to be much more
transparent in the way we oper-
ate”.

This will involve the company
disclosing upfront to clients
what brokerage fee/commission
Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates will receive in return
for placing their business with a
certain carrier.

Just like how attorneys and
accountants disclose their fees
and hourly rates, Mr Gilbert
said the company would do the
same’for insurance clients. Too
often, he explained, clients just
saw a single figure — the premi-
um they paid — without knowing
how much of that would be paid
to a broker or agent.

The former BIBA president
said that when he worked in
Bermuda for Marsh McLennan,
the company always disclosed
on paperwork for clients the net
premium. price it paid.and the
brokerage fee/commission it

a



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE.9B

4“)

‘We'll be a force to
be reckoned with’

would earn itself.

“Many players in the
[Bahamas] market are reluctant
‘to disclose that [brokerage fee]
information,” Mr Gilbert told
Tribune Business. “But I don’t
see why there should be any dif-
ficulty when it comes to our
income.”

Mr Chandler, a former senior
executive with J. S. Johnson, said
the duo were also looking to
develop a full line of products
for specific groups that shared
similar risk profiles.

Almost a risk pooling mecha-
nism, Mr Chandler confirmed
that Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates would “in’a sense be
focusing on attracting people
with similar risk characteristics”
such as accountants, architects
and engineers. The programmes
developed would look to take
care of all their insurance needs.

Another initiative that Chan-
dler Gilbert Insurance Associ-
ates is eyeing is the “blending of
insurance products with invest-
ment products”.

Mr Gilbert said the company

was currently working with a
Bahamas-based investment
management firm, who he
declined to name, “in creating
some investment products that
can be tied in with insurance
products, probably the home.

“Meeting a catastrophe
deductible of 2 per cent could
be difficult for a large number of
persons, and this is something
we’re looking to do to alleviate
that financial stress.”

Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates is working closely
with a London-based broker to
provide clients with access to the
international insurance market,
and Mr Chandler added: “We
fee] hat in a year’s time we’ll
be a force to be reckoned with in
this market.

“We'll grow as needed and be
very cautious in trying to con-
trol the horse that has just bolt-
ed out of the gate. We’ll be see-
ing how we can grow outside the
Bahamas, too, although that'll
be long-term. There’s a lot of
interest from Caribbean firms
coming in here.”

Or

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- BahamArts Festival 2008



A National Trade show promoting Bahamian made Arts & Crafts/Gifts/Souvenirs
October 31° - November 2", 2008
10:00 am ~ 11:00 pm daily







Arawak Cay,
Nassau, Bahamas

Company Name:
Contact Person:
P.O. Box: ota, dons
Island: Settlement:
Telephone: Cellular:
Fax: E-mail:

Cost of Booth: $150.00 Craft (NCA Members)

Cost of Seminars: $50.00

$175.00 (Non-members)
Food Boo $200.00

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Booths Available on 1° Come 1° Serve Basis

(Comes with 1 tables & 2 chairs)

Please fill out the form and drop off to BAIC

ONLY 80 Booths Available...

Don’t wait! Register Now!!!!!

Non-Refundable

(ALL Completed forms should be returned to Lekeisha Thompson)

Mr Chandler said both poten-
tial commercial and residential
clients had shown interest in
their company already, its cre-
ation having been a project start-
ed some 18 months ago.

Another area of focus, he
added, was combating the
“increasing disquiet” among
Bahamian insurance consumers
about rising costs, especially
homeowners insurance premi-

ums.

Asked why he and Mr Gilbert
had set up their own business,
Mr Chandler replied: “One of
the driving reasons is that we
believe and see there is a disqui-
et on the part of the public with
what they’re getting for the mon-
ey they’re investing in insurance.

“It’s mostly the home, where
the premium is going up because
of catastrophe perils. We feel.a




>



2008/2009 Officers & Directors

President

David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.
_ POBox N-4837, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302.2217

Fax: (242) 327 6610

Email:dramirez@pictet.com

Vice-President

Christopher Dorsett, CFA

Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 8668

Fax: (242) 302 8569

Email: Christopher.a.dorsett@citigroup.com

Treasurer

Sonia Beneby, CFA

ScotiaTrust

PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5718

Fax: (242) 502 6944

Email: soniacurry@bloomberg.net

Secretary

Karen Pinder, CFA, CATA

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5400

Fax: (242) 502 5428

Email: karen pinder@efgbank.com

Programs & Public Relations

Jeremy Dyck, CFA

LOM Securities (Bahamas) Ltd.

PO Box CB 12762-525, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 323 0032

Fax: (242) 323-0084

Email: jeremy.dyck@lom.com

Education

Velma Miller

Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Limited
PO Box N 4853, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 356 7764

Fax: (242) 326 3000

Email: velma.miller(@royalfidelity.com

Scholarships

Warren Pustam, CFA, CGA
EverKey Global Partners

PO Box N 7776-518, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 3093

Fax: (242) 362 6950

Email: warren@everkeyglobal.com








Membership

Pamela Musgrove, CFA

Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.

PO Box CB 12407, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7008

Fax: (242) 356 3677

Email: pmusgrove@cfal.com

Past President
Kristina M. Fox, CFA
CIT Holdings Limited
PO Box N 1328, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 363 1501
Fax: (242) 362 1502

« Email: kf@cit.co.uk


























lot of this is not treated
fairly.”

He explained that homes
which were possibly a superior
risk were being charged the
same premium as those proper-
ties that might represent a
greater risk, with the Bahamas’
location also having an impact
on catastrophe premiums.
Because reinsurers lump this
nation together with Florida,
every time a hurricane hits the
US state, the Bahamas is direct-
ly impacted.

“We're going to be much
more client-focused,” Mr Chan-
dler said, adding that

Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates was planning to
embrace Internet technology to
enhance service and help clients
avoid having to spend an entire
lunch-hour and more coming to

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

In The Rapidly Expanding Carmichael Road Area
Lot #5 Block 2, Millars Heights Subdivision

Property Comprises 18,292.55 SqFt. |.
With 106 Ft. on High Traffic Carmichael Road

Interested person should submit offers in writing

addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, |
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before Septmeber 29, 2008.

For further information, Please contact:

356-1608 or 502-0929

CFA Society of The Bahamas

- MONTHLY LUNCHEON SPEAKER EVENT

Topic:
World”

Date: .
11:30 am

12:00 pm
Please arrive promptly!

Time:

Location:
Arawak Room

Speaker:

La Jolla, CA

Cost: Members - $25.00

Non-Members - $35.00

General Meeting
Speaker’s Address

Sheraton Cable Beach Resort

Lawrence S. Speidell, CFA
Founder and Chief Investment Officer
Frontier Market Asset Management, LLC

their office to deal with insur
ance matters.

Chandler Gilbert Insuranc:
Associates is based at 20 Mon
trose Avenue, and will be offer
ing a full line of general insur
ance coverage, plus act as a bro
ker on the life, health and pen
sions side.

The company is set up as :
partnership, much like a firm of
attorneys or accountants, the aim
being to have “a partnership of
associates working together fo
the entire good of the compa
ny”.

Mr Gilbert and Mr Chandler
are the two founding partners
and staff members, with the
company poised to take on an
administrative assistance in time:
for its opening today. The busi-
ness is finally licensed by the,

-Registrar of Insurance.








a ae eo




















“Frontier Stock Markets: ‘The Next to Join the Emerging |

Wednesday September 24, 2008

Sa SE eens ote

<0 Sem - 5 cee

(Cheques payable to: CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Reservations:




Select Fund.

From 2003 to 2006 he was Executive Vice President at Laffer
Associates, an investment management and c.unomic research
firm. Prior to joining Art Laffer, Larry was a Partner and Director of | |
Global Research and Management at Nicholas Applegate where he
launched the firm’s emerging markets products and developed enhanced the firm's international and global quantitative
disciplines. Larry also spent eleven years as a Trustee at
Batterymarch Financial Management where he was a portfolio
manager for domestic and international strategies, was responsible -
for one of the first equity funds in China and worked on the




PRE-REGISTRATON REQUIRED -
by Monday September 22, 2008, contact:
Jeremy Dyck, CFA, tel..323-0032, jeremy.dyck@lom.com

* Prepayment required through one of the Board Members

Larry Speidell is founding partner and chief investment officer of |
Frontier Market Asset Management, sponsor of the Frontier Market

Sea tee





development of a fund for Russia. As Senior Vice President and

portfolio manager at Putnam Management Company from 1971 to

1983, Larry served as a member of that firm's Investment Policy

Committee.

Larry is a past president of the Boston Securities Analysts Society
and a past director of the Investor Responsibility Research Center
in Washington, D.C. Prior to the investment business, he earned
his B.E. in Mechanical Engineering from Yale University and his
M.B.A. from Harvard University, served as a submarine officer in
the U.S. Navy and was an auditor with Arthur Anderson & Co.












PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008



THE TRIBUNE

- Judge says Lehman can
sell units to Barclays

AIRCRAFT DISPATCHER

SkyBahamas, The Bahamas Regional
Airline, is recruiting a licensed Aircraft
Dispatcher to work in its Operations
Control Center. Applicants must be
mature, responsible individuals, capable of
performing under time constraints and
high pressure, and must be prepared to
work shifts. Salary will commensurate
with qualifications and experience. Please
fax resume to: (242)327-6042 or email to
occ@skybahamas.net.

ready for a change?

Burns House Group of Companies is
looking for an ambitious Marketing Manager
with a proven track record in consumer
marketing.

Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is
the leading beverage company in the Bahamas.
With its broad portfolio of consumer brands,
extending from beer to spirits and wines, BHG

|| is market leader and trend setter in the respective
categories.

Within our marketing department we seek to
fill the position of Marketing Manager. In this
pasition you will be responsible for a large

ortfolio ‘of consumer brands like Budweiser

eer, Ricardo rums, Climax energy drink..
Hennessy cognac and Carlo Rossi wines to name
afew. The marketing manager we are ook for
is a team player has profound knowledge of the
marketing mix is an excellent planner with great
passion for execution. ; .

BHG will offer you a challenging environment
with international growth potential. We offer an
above market average incentive programme and
international training opportunities

|| Profile of the ideal candidate
¢ Bachelors Degree in Marketing or Business

Administration is essential;
Masters in Business an advantage
3-5 years of supervisory experience in
marketin
Team building skills
Consumer goods Marketing experience

Interested? Send your resume by email to:
~ ccash@burnshouse.com Or fax to Human

Resources Manager: (242) 326-6275

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S) +

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

1CD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MS! Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G &1 Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Fidelity International Investment Fund

FG Financial Preferred !ncome Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund
wu GF inancial Diversified Fund
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19Dec02=1,00000. ro
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

y'S weighted price for daity volume
weighted price for daity volume

daa PSE Le Peg SE ek ee ad
-’.Looking for a challenge and.





ey NMaeReRraRRR

NEW YORK
Associated Press

A BANKRUPTCY judge decid-
ed early Saturday that Lehman
Brothers can sell its investment
banking and trading businesses to
Barclays, the first major step to
wind down the nation's fourth-
largest investment bank.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James
Peck gave his decision in a court-
room packed with lawyers at the
end of an eight-hour hearing that
extended into the wee hours, cap-
ping a week of financial turmoil.

The deal was said to be worth
$1.75 billion earlier in the week but
the value was in flux after lawyers
announced changes to the terms on
Friday. It may now be worth closer
to $1.35 billion, which includes the
$960 million price tag on Lehman's
Midtown Manhattan office tower.

Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.
filed the biggest bankruptcy in U.S.

history Monday, after Barclays PLC ,

declined to buy the investment
bank in its entirety.

. The British bank will take con- :
trol of Lehman units that employ

about 9,000 employees in the U.S.

"Not only is the sale a good
match economically, but it will save
the jobs of thousands of employ-
ees," said Lehman lawyer Harvey
Miller of Weil, Gotshal & Manges.

Barclays took on a potential lia-
bility of $2.5 billion to be paid as
severance, in case it decides not to
keep certain Lehman employees

beyond the guaranteed 90 days. But
observers have said Barclays’ main
reason for acquiring Lehman is to
get its people and presence in North
America, making widespread lay-
offs less likely.

"It's unimaginable to me that
they can run the business without
people," said Lehman's financial
adviser, Barry Ridings, of Lazard
Ltd.

Barclays had little competition
to land the deal.

Miller said that before it filed for
bankruptcy, Lehman had negotiat-
ed with just one other bidder, Bank
of America Corp. BofA instead
announced Monday that it would
buy Merrill Lynch & Co., saving it
from a fate similar to Lehman's.
That deal was originally valued at
$50 billion.

Miller said that since Lehman,
filed for bankruptcy, Barclays had
been the only buyer to express
interest in acquiring even parts
of the 158-year-old investment
bank.

"The substance of this transac-
tion is to continue a business for
the benefit of the economy," Miller
said in court. :

Lehman lawyers announced a
number of changes to the deal
before the hearing, which started
at 4:30 p.m. Friday and continued
well past midnight.

Lehman lawyers said the value of

. stock Barclays will buy and liabili-

ties it will assume has fallen since
the start of the week due to market

volatility. Under the new deal, Bar-
clays will buy $47.4 billion in secu-
rities and assume $45.5 billion in
liabilities.

Barclays also said it would buy
three additional units — Lehman
Brothers Canada Inc., Argentina-
based Lehman Brothers Sudamer-
ica SA and Lehman Brothers
Uruguay SA. The two South Amer-
ican entities are part of Lehman's
money management business. Bar-
clays is not paying extra to get the
three units.

There was no change to a $250
million goodwill payment and the
purchase of two data centers in
New Jersey that will go to Barclays,
although Barclays may pay less for
them. Lehman's investment man-
agement business Neuberger
Berman was not bought by Bar-
clays.

The Securities Investor Protec-
tion Corp. liquidated Lehman
accounts Friday under a bankrupt-
cy-style process to transfer assets
from 639,000 Lehman customer
accounts — about 130,000 of which
are owned by individual investors
— to Barclays accounts.

In a statement Saturday, the
SIPC, which maintains funds to pro-
tect investors’ assets at failed bro-
kerage firms, said Lehman cus-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division
BETWEEN:-

tomers "should have full access to
their accounts in very short order."
Friday night's hearing drew more



than 200 lawyers and observers, ~

who spilled into overflow rooms on
two floors of the U.S. Bankruptcy
Court in Lower Manhattan.

In response to the extraordinary
events of the week, the Bush
administration announced Friday
the biggest proposed government
intervention in financial markets
since the Great Depression. Some
are calling it an "RTC-style bailout"
in reference: to the government-
owned Resolution Trust Corp. that

wound down the assets of savings |

and loan associations, mostly in the
1980s.

"Somehow Lehman Brothers }) |

gets left on the sidelines," said
Daniel Golden of Akin Gump
Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, who
represents clients holding about $9
billion in bonds. "We believe this
was a flawed sales process. It bene-
fits Barclays and the federal gov-
ernment but not the creditors of
this estate.

"The economic landscape seems
to have changed over the last two
days," he said. "Yet the debtors
and the Fed seem determined that

nothing get in the way of this trans- |

action."

2006 /CLE/qui/00375

AB ENTIRE sess

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

TO ALL POTENTIAL
__ LANDLORDS

Ross University School of Medicine (Bahamas)
Ltd. is seeking 1 or 2 bedroom accommodations.

Affordable, safe and secure (with or willing to
provide security screens), clean surroundings,
must be fully furnished, air-conditioned, turn
key (pots, dishes, linen) ready to move in
accommodations. Complete for 1 or 2 persons.
Accommodations must be within a 5 mile
radius of the Sea Horse Shopping Centre
(Freeport, Bahamas).

Please submit your applications with how you
meet the standards above to:

The Administrator .
Ross University (Bahamas) Ltd.
P.O. Box F-60087, Freeport, Bahamas

EG CAPI

TAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

pre:

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31-Aug-08
12-Sep-08
31-Aug-08
31-Aug-08
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-08
31-Dec-07
31-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08

-10.40%
1.84%
1.12%

1.72%

divided by closing price

IN THE MATTER OF All that piece
parcel or lot of land containing 30,190
square feet situate in the Settlement of
the Ferry in the Island of Exuma, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. ‘

AND IN THE MATTER of The Quieting
Title Act (Chapter 393 of the 2000
Revised Edition of the Statute Laws of
The Bahamas).

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition
of Alvera Russell.

NOTICE

yw

Pursuant to the Order of the Supreme Court filed the 8" day of

August, A.D. 2008.

_ The Petition of Alvera Russell, of the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or Lot of land
containing 30,190 square feet situate in the
Settlement of the Ferry in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas bounded on the NORTH by
a Public Road and running thereon One
Hundred and Eighty-five and Fifty-five
hundredths (185.55) feet on the EAST by
land now or formerly the property James
Cooper and running thereon One Hundred and
Ninety-nine and Twenty-seven hundredths
(199.27) feet and on SOUTH by the sea and
running thereon One Hundred and Forty-eight
and ten Hundredths (148.10) feet on and on
the WEST by land now or formerly said to
be the property of H.G. Christie and running
thereon One hundred and Sixty and Three ,
hundredths (160.03) feet.

Alvera Russell, claims to be the owner of the land the
subject of this Petition hereinbefore described in fee simple free
from encumbrances.

And the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the aforesaid Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of the Quieting Title Act (Chapter 393), to have her
title to the said tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having Dower or
a right of Dower or an Adverse Claim or a Claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the publication of these presents file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his
claim in the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after
the publication of these presents shall operate as.a bar to such
claims.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:-

The Registry of the Supreme Court;

The Administrator’s Office in the Settlement of George
Town, Exuma; and

The Chambers of Allen, Allen & Co, the Attorneys
for the Petitioner, whose address for service is Allen
House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, New Providence,
The Bahamas.

Dated this 12" day of August, A.D., 2008.

ALLEN, ALLEN & CO.,
Chambers,

Allen House,

Dowdeswell Street,

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index
+ - Nominal vaiue = $1000.00

Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

m day to day
n ‘faded today

DIV S - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE





THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 11B



(ei a =



§ By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS

LAST WEEK was one of
the most active ones to
date in the Bahamian stock
market, with investors trad-
ing in nine out of the 24
listed securities, of which
four advanced, one
declined and four remained
unchanged. A total of

5,223,289 shares changed.

hands,. a_ substantial
increase of 5,103,854 share,
in comparison to last
week's trading volume of
119,435 shares.

Fixed income securities

traded for the first time this
week on BISX since its
inception, with investors
trading in $46,000 (par val-
ue) worth of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Notes.

Some $36,000 worth of
Fidelity Series D Notes
(FBB15), due for redemp-
tion in 2015, and $10,000
worth of Fidelity Series C
Notes due for redemption
in 2013 (FBB13), traded
respectively.

In the equity market ICD
Utilities (ICD) dominated
this week's market rally, on
a volume of five million
shares, its stock rising by
$2.63 or 47.2 per cent to
close at a new 52-week

“high of $8.20.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) followed the trend
with 90,814 of its shares

PCT Ci

trading, rising by $0.30 or

4.3 per cent to close at
$7.30. FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB) and Cable Bahamas
(CAB) also advanced this
week.

Some 5,500 CIB and
4,300 CAB shares changed
hands, of which both
jumped by $0.05 to end the
week at $11.60 and $14.15
respectively.

Some 114,925 shares of
Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
(CHL) also traded this
week, closing unchanged at
$2.85. Doctors Hospital
Health Systems (DHS) was
the laggard of the week
with 6,000 shares trading,
falling by $0.01 to close at
$2.77.

COMPANY NEWS:
Earnings Releases:
Cable Bahamas (CAB)
released unaudited finan-
cial results for the six
months ending June 30,
2008. For the period net
income climbed to $12.9
million, an increase of $2.6
million or 25 per cent.
For the most recent quar-
ter, net income was $7.4
million compared to $5.3
million for the 2007 second
quarter, an increase of $2.1
million or 38 per cent. CAB
reported operating income
of $7.7 million for the quar-
ter, an increase of $1.2 mil-
lion or 18 per cent quarter-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CAPTIVA LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

‘(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 19, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required.on or before the 20th day of October, 2008 to‘send ‘their’ *
~ names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the .
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof,.they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED-COMPANY



Ela Set ttle CM Ela lit
Pes el) i pole Menem aL
Toy ey (Tete oM NC LULA (oe

Please Fax Resume
394-3885
Ca ae ee
HIE SPORTS, SPINE &
- REHABILITATION CENTRE

WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE

Kathryn de Souza-MD ,

For her recent U.S. board

2008, to all shareholders of

Week ending 19.09.08

FINDEX = 876.73

TRADING STATISTICS

(-7.91%) YTD

area uct Base and Biss CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
diluted earnings per share SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
for the quarter increased AML... een. SLB et aicacseniiets Go acide ioncacentiees Oi Se aeiteateisiis 9.04%
from $0.27 in the 2007 sec- BBLi..wesseseseseseerees COBO Se hice Pea MARS IRS OI eae O cairn tite aes 4.71%
ond quarter to $0.37, TEP- BOB... S850. tcahvatacnte Ges gisele ccasteanien Oscche Sad ents -11.55%
resenting an increase Of BpR ce $480 et asad Ge el ET a uasesiet (ee ere sc 0.00%
$0.10 or 37.04 per cent. = * Bey $14.60 Go wanaainoietiteans (es ve 0.00%
Total agsetseand liabili- - BSE ene apenas oe : EN ie oe
ties stood at $184.1 million BW Liiiiticsiececs G9 A se isiibcicncnatbevese Sa hr ac ccdest Lisere Gove vacaleciU wevedlvbudusdetcccsusaswvesiueess Z .
and $85.3 million respec- CAB arti d eee $14 V5 cibidteesitecteistecens $+0.05 aubeceeedacsdeecsacsegeoees 4,300 igeedsdecosavetsseasesases 17.43%
tively, compared to $175.3 CBLeseessessesseeeneeees S730 oivecctteccccrtda cates SAO 30 ete A ieacbleheseins 90,814 ccreccscesecsciecoeess -13.40%
million and $87 million at | CHL. eee GD B95 icon Auth coeees cle atssui cues etoelass eet PAO ZS os aterase tacceress -9.52%
year-end 2007. The growth CIB avec $11.60 plies aeuge ©5005 aso decinsioiate 51500 ssiSadncaks -20.55%
in the company's asset base CWCB......csessssssseee $460 iscsi caked $540.28 vcsacrcscaceecticcssosstis Ose ane -8.73%
is ane : se N DHS tosciaee GOOF ccna, Memon te C00b xtc 6.000 sks ciaed: 17.87%
roject investments uring °
the peel PRAM oteadante LC ee eee Shas Sh pecan Oo heen 11.94%
PRB eine Ge ioe pcs Bot, Sie eee esate On iteeteae -10.57%
Dividends/AGM Notes: — FBB13........sss::sss0008 $100.00...0...cccocesssecsesense Ge i ate 10k aoa ees, 0.00%
Cable Bahamas (CAB) — FBBIS.ieeesscssssssscseee $100.00 ciieciseclicessacctsset ak ot easel ie 8 Ache Bcc eects iccae atin 0.00%
has declared a quarterly PFBB17.....ccseeee $100.00 sicccsesesscrssececeote GO ee tetas elon ae) 0. kta 0.00%
dividend of $0.06 per share, PBBI2. ese $100.00 cccccssetescoseasste Gk ewe oe ca cin fit ete 0.00%
payable on September 30,. FCC $0.40 $- 0 48.05%
pO08, to all shareholders of FOC enn A rgerctae Sire ar Perio ores fis
record date September 15, FCL $ . sccccvcvcccccccccccccccceccceneeeee ‘ eee ee eeeeeseeeserereeeeeessesess ° (o}

2008.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) has
declared a semi-annual div-
idend of $0.02 per share,
payable on September 30,

record date September 17,



PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS: ne
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced that it will be extending the deadline of its private placement offer-



2008. ing. The preferred shares will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally. ; '
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a quar- .
terly dividend of $0.05 per
share, payable on Septem-
ber 30, 2008 to all share-— oo
holders of record date Sep- INTERNATIONAL MARKETS COMMODITIES é
. Weekly % Change
tember. 12, 2008. BORE Rates Crude Oil 10440 43.62
Consolidated Water Weekly % Change Gold 877.00 413.97
Company BDRs (CWCB) . ‘ caste
has declared a quarterly Caps 0.9543 +1.27 INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES
dividend of $0.013 per — $ Weekl % Change =.
GBP 1.8836 +5.07 y Change oe.
share, payable on Novem- EUR 1.4483 1.81 DJIA 11,388.44 “ 49,30-
ber 7, 2008, to all share- : Di S&P500 1,255.08 +0.27
holders of record date Sep- NASDAQ 2,273.90 +0.56
tember 30, 2008. Nikkei 11,920.86 -2.41

THE NORWEGIAN MINISTRY

OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

is pleased to announce the appointment of
John Moyell
as the Royal Norwegian Honorary Consul to

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas

as of 29 August, 2008

The address of the consulate:

Royal Norwegian Consulate
Dockendale House, 2nd floor
; West Bay Street
P.O. Box CB-13048
Nassau, Bahamas
1 242.322 4270 — fax 1 242 322 4280
eMail: Norwegianconsulate @ moyell.com

. Se
°PP Ere BAHAR

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

_ and Alfred Adde:

certification in Sports Medicine.

_ Dr. de Souza is the only US board
certified Physiatrist and Sports
Medicine Specialist in the Bahamas.

For appointments, please contact
the Sports, Spine and Rehabilitation
Centre at 327-0708.

The Office is located on Blake Road
at the Western Medical Plaza.

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas, a statutory agency
responsible for the oversight, supervision and regulation of the Investment
Funds, Securities and Capital Markets in or from The Bahamas, as well
as the supervision of Financial and Corporate Service Providers, invites
applications from qualified Bahamians for the following position:

LEGAL OFFICER

Responsibilities:

e Ensuring that participants in the industry are in compliance with
provisions under the legislation

¢ Overseeing the litigation matters of the Commission

Qualifications and Experience:

¢ Called to the Bahamas Bar at least 3 years

¢ Court / litigation experience

Competencies:

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

e Excellent legal research skills

e Excellent.analytical skills

° cee in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
ord)

A competitive salary dnd benefits are being offered. To apply, please
write attaching a resume to:

MANAGER —- HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Applications should be submitted no later than September 30, 2008

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2007 / CLE / QTA/ 501

Common Law and Equity Division

> 0) IN‘ THEMATTER[of{ALL THAT piece parcel:or tract of
, « land comprising, 33-240 acres, more or less originally a.
"part of the Glintong Estate in the Settlement of Glentons
or Glintons, in the Northern District of the Island of Long
Island, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and bounded on the WEST by the Sea at High :
Water Mark, on the NORTH partly by land now or formerly
the property of Basil Rahming and partly by land the
property of the Anglican Diocese, on the EAST by the Main
_ Public Road formerly known as the Main King’s Highway,
and on the SOUTH partly by Land the Property of the
Treasurer of The Bahamas now Glenton Primary School
and partly by land now ar formerly said to be the property
Sigismund (Cigman) Burrows and Alfred Adderley

AND :
AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Dr. Calvin Adderley,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Hubert Roy
Adderley }
AND
"AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.

NOTICE

_ The Petition of Dr. Calvin A. Adderley Sr. of P. O. Box 30009, of Ocean View

Drive, Stella Maris, Bahamas, Clinical Psychologist, as ATTORNEY BY DEED OF,
POWER OF ATTORNEY for Hubert Roy Adderley of 1908 Northwest 186% Street,
Carol City in the State of Florida, one of the United States of America, in respect of:-

ALL THAT PIECE PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND comprising 33.240 Acres .
originally a part of the Glintons Estate in the Settlement of Glentons or Glintons, Long
Island one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, BOUNDED ON THE
NORTH by an ancient stone wall separating said parcel from land said to be land the
property of one BASIL RAHMING and running thereon (N 51 degrees 51°19”) 567.86”
feet and partly by the aforesaid ancient stone wall separating said parcel from land the
property of the Anglican Diocese and running thereon (N 51 degrees 25’ 59”) 729.87
feet ON THE EAST partly by the Main Public Road of Long Island, formerly known
as the Main King’s Highway and running thereon N 165 degrees 24’ 18” 737.31 feet
thence running (N 169 degrees 46’ 25’) 253.17 feet thence ON the SOUTH by land the
Property of the Treasurer of The Bahamas now comprising the Glentons Primary School
(Bahamas Government) Compound and running thereon (N 267 degrees 15’ 09”) 217.25
feet thence ON THE EAST again by land the Property of the Treasurer of The Bahamas
now comprising the aforesaid Glentons Primary School (Bahamas Government)
Compound and running thereon (N 168 degrees 16’ 40”) 347.84 feet thence
ON THE SOUTH by an ancient stone wall separating said bpacel from land
said to be land now or formerly the property o: a igman) Burrows

ay and running thereon N 232 degrees 22’ 26” 964.44 feet
thence ON THE WEST again by the aforesaid ancient stone wall ae
said parcel from land said to be land the pepe of Sigismund (Ci man}
Burrows and Alfred Adderley and running thereon N339 degrees 54
thence ON THE SOUTH again by Sigismund (Cigman) Burrows and Alfred
Adderley now or formerly by the property of sigma (Ci an) Burrows
and Alfred Adderley and running thereon partly N 240 degrees 23° 229” 92.46
feet and partly running ( N 234 degrees 04’ 54”) 126.69 thence AND ON THE
WEST by the High Water Mark of the Sea and running thereon (N 350 degrees
08° aha running thereon 1080.05 feet which said ‘piece parcel or Tract
of land has the position shape boundaries markers and dimensions shown on
Registered Plan 163L.1. a copy of which is filed in the above Action in support
hereof and is thereon shown in PINK.

The Petitioner Dr. Calvin A. Adderley Sr. as Attorney By Deed of Power

of Attorney for Hubert Roy Adderley claims to be the owner in fee simple in

ossession of the said land free from encumbrances and has made application

‘0 the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3

of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated

and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the said Act. .

The Petition inter alia recognizes the entitlement the late Rhoda Smith, late
of the said Settlement of Glintons, Long Island or her personal representatives
and assigns to a 2.233 acres parcel being situate within the above said 33,240
piece parcel or tract of land.

A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal business hours at the
following places:-

. The Resistry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas...
_ The Office of the Administrator, Clarence Town, Long Island, The

Bahamas.
. The Chambers of the Petitioner’s attorneys, Messrs. Maillis and Maillis,
Sones, Fort Nassau House, Marlborough Street, Nassau, The
amas

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person haying dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 30" day of October A.D. 2008 file in the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his or her claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit and other prescribed papers to be
filed therewith. Failure of any person to file and serve a Statement of his claim
within the prescribed time will operate as a bar to such claim.

DATED the 26" ty of A A.D. 2008
MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers, Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner







PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF C@iMMERCE AND
THE BAHAMAS HOTEL ASSOCIAAION IN GOLLABORAZION
WITH THE BAHAMAS MESNISTRY OF FiNANCE ANS THE
INTER-AMERICAN DEVELGIPMENT BANE.
PRESENTS,“ GLOBALIZATION CONFERENCE

“Towards the Future: GiSbalization, F inancing and
Competitiveness”

Thursday, October 2nd, 2008
and
Friday, October 3rd, 2008
~ 8:30am-2:00pm:

he SH, veraton.Gahle Rearh.Recarten,

F ‘dependence Ballroom
‘rade Show Officially G opens @ 2:00pm on Fi riday,

‘Bahamas Business 7

P. by Thursday, September, 25th, 2008
“t Ms. Anastarcia Huyler Tel: 322-2145 i
GEG MEANT TCO eect

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Rt. Hon. Hubert
Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas °

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION - Oct. 2nd
“Financing. and Private Sector Development
in The Bahamas” i

THANKS: Yvette Sands,
“Co- Chair Globalization and Foreign Ai
Comnaces BCOC Director, BCOC

Hon. Zhivargo Laing, Minister. of State, a Finance,....
Ministry of Finance i

SESSIONI =
MODERATOR: Oscar Spencer, Representative
Inter-American Development Bank, ee

: of Economic Globalization and Small
Island Sebleping States: Trade NeaoHaten and
the Caribbean Reality” #
Topic: “Report: Roadmap for Improving, SME . ,
Competitiveness” H.E. /Henr f Gill, ees
Philippe Schinecuinn sultant, Inter-A
Development Bank.

SESSION I ;
MODERATOR: I. Chester Caper Hon. Treasu
’ Bahamas Chamber of Commerce *

Topic: “SME Challenges Venture Financitia?

Edison Sumner, Bahamas Venture Capital Fi
Darron Cash, Bahamas Development Bank
Michael Anderson, Royal Fidelity

Frank Davis, Bahamas Cooperative Credit League

to CARICOM Rt
Dave Kowlessar, Tra Consultant, Dykon i
Development Group

» Brian Moree, Senior Partner, McKinney Bancroft
& Hughes

OFFICIAL OPENING CEREMONY - Oct. 3rd
MODERATOR: Philip Simon
Executive Director, Banas Chamber of Commerce

WELCOME REMARKS: Gershan Major. '

Chairperson, Globalization and Foreign Affairs :
. Committee, BCOC : *Caribbean Economies inn. Fra of Free Trade”
REMARKS/ INTRODUCTION OF KEYNOTE

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism
SPEAKER: Dionisio D’Aguilar, President,BCOC. i ' LR NAT \ a

Dress: Business Attire
Valet Service Available

Sessions are Free
Luuricty; $50.00 per Person



(INN
pr. yy
Ry

QVS,

Scotiabank

_FORGIVE & FORGE

ee em is aes) Coane)

WIN CASH PRIZES
or $1,500, $2,500
ano $10, 000

ited enter

Bly

THE TRIBUNE -





Paulson resists
calls for added
help in bailout

i WASHINGTON
Associated Press

TREASURY Secretary
Henry Paulson is resisting a
Democratic push to add addi-
tional help for households to
the $700 billion bailout bill.

Paulson said Sunday that
because financial markets
remain under severe stress
there is an urgent need for
Congress to: act quickly with-
out adding other measures that
could slow down passage.

"We need this to be clean
and to be quick," Paulson said
in an interview on ABC's "This
Week."

Paulson resisted suggestions

being made by Democrats that
the program be changed to
include further relief for home-
owners facing mortgage fore-
closures and to include an addi-

‘tional $50 billion stimulus

effort. Some Democrats have

‘also suggested capping com-

pensation of executives at firms
who get the bailout help. |
Paulson said he was con-
cerned that debate over adding
all of those proposals would
slow the economy down, delay-
ing the rescue effort that i is SO
urgently needed to get finan-
cial markets moving again. —
"The biggest help we can
give the American people right
now is to stabilize the financial
system," Paulson said.
However, Sen. Charles
Schumer, D-N.Y., said that he
believed there would be
changes to the three-page Paul-
son plan.and that agreement
could be reached quickly.
Schumer said that he was
pushing to get a provision
where the government would
receive stock warrants in return
for the bailout relief and for
creation of a government over-

UR APA A

sight board to: supervise the
huge operation, which under
Paulson's plan would be run
out of the Treasury Depart-
ment. He said Paulson seemed
receptive to changes when he
had discussed his ideas with
him.

"T have told him ... we need
changes related to housing, we
need to put the taxpayer first
ahead of bondholders, share-
holders," Schumer, said on
"Fox News Sunday."

Paulson seid in the interviews
that he had been talking to oth-
er governments about the need
for them to offer similar relief
because the current financial
crisis is global.

"The credit markets are still
very fragile right now and
frozen," Paulson said in an
interview on NBC's Meet the
Press. "We need to deal with
this and deal with it quickly."

Paulson said that the nation's.

outdated regulatory system for
financial markets must be over-

hauled but the first job is to get -

the most sweeping rescue pack-
age since the Great Depression
passed by Congress in coming
days.

Paulson made the rounds of '

the television talk shows on
Sunday to stress the need for
speed in getting the bailout
package approved. The admin-
istration was negotiating the
details of the proposal with
members of Congress with the
expectation that it can be

_ passed in the next week..

Paulson said that "it pains
me tremendously to have the

American taxpayer put in this -

position but it is better than the
alternative."

Both Paulson and President
Bush have argued that the
alternative would be. credit
markets that remain frozen,

“ZERO CASH DOWN IF YOU OWN YOUR PROPERTY

NO MATTER WHAT YOUR GOALS ARE, WE CAN HELP YOU:
‘BUY A HOUSE

‘FINANCE THE CONSTRUCTION OF A HOME

‘REFINANCE A MORTGAGE FROM ANOTHER INSTITUTION
‘RENOVATE YOUR CURRENT HOME

CONTEST ENDS SEPTEMBER 3OTH

_ include relief for homeowners

meaning that businesses will
fail because they can't get the
loans they need to operate and
the economy will grind to a halt

because consumers won't be

able to get loans to make the
purchases that keep the econ-
omy moving forward.

On Saturday, Bush said the
White House is ready to work
with Congress to quickly enact
legislation to allow the govern-
ment to purchase hundreds of
billions of dollars worth of bad
debt linked to the collapse of
the housing market.

Congressional aides and
adrhinistration officials were
working through the weekend
to fill in the details of the pro-
posal.

The Bush proposal that |

would dole out huge sums of

_money to Wall Street firms and

bankers is a mere three pages
in length and is vague in terms
of determining, which institu-
tions would qualify or say what
— if anything — taxpayers
would get in return.

"It's a rather brief bill with a
lot of money," ‘said Sen. Chris
Dodd, D-Conn., the Banking
Committee chairman. "We
understand the importance of
the anticipation in the markets,
but we also know that what
we're doing is going to have
consequences for decades to
come. There's not a second act
to this — we've got to get this
right."

Democrats, who say they will
work with the administration
to pass a plan, ‘are demanding it




struggling with mounting debt
not just for Wall Street.

The proposal would raise the
statutory limit on the national
debt from $10.6 trillion to $14:3
trillion to make room for the
massive rescue,

AND WITH OUR MORTGAGE CAMPAIGN YOU'LL BENEFIT FROM:
‘LOW INTEREST RATE

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‘VISA, MASTERCARD OR A SCOTIALINE LINE OF CREDIT (CONDITIONS APPLY)

CALL OR VISIT US TODAY



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SEt INSIGHT FRONT

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

€USA TODAY

BAHAMAS EDITION












Three shot in,

*

triple homicitle ‘

@ By KARIN HERIG. _,
Tribune Staff Reporter
kherig@tribunemedia.net

IN WHAT was described as

a “horrific massacre”’ and. an:

“execution style killing” by eye
witnesses, three persons were
gunned down in a triple homi-
cide in front of a popular Bain
Town club in the early hours of
Saturday.

The deaths of Lavardo Arm-

brister, 35, of the Laird Street
area, his-cousin Sedino Smith,
33, of Yellow Elder Gardens,
and Vanessa Franks- Williams,
. 23, of Baillou Hill Road, have
brought the country’s murder
count to 54 for the year.
Family members yesterday
described Mr Smith as an “out-
spoken” person, while Mf
Armbrister was said to have
been of a quiet disposition.
Residents of the Bain Town
community and witnesses
believe that these latest mur-
ders are connected to Friday’s
Jacaranda Street homicide and
to the man who was found in
the trunk of a burning car in
the Millar’s Creek area last

SEE page two

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/ 7 PHLavedPHn

\



, 33, OF
ardens.

SEDINO SMI
Yellow Elder

















Man and

LAVARDO ARMRISTER, 35,
of the Laird Stret area.



gunpoint

A MAN and his girl-
friend were abducted by
three gunmen who forced
the man into the trunk and
the woman inside the vehi-
cle.

The incident, which
occurred Sunday marning,
ended without the couple
being seriously hurt as the
man was able to contact a
friend by cell phone while
in the trunk.

The friend then informed

SEE page 13















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More Meat.... More Flavour





A FIRE broke out at a festaurant and sports bar on Gawpen Road yesterday. There were no 5 reports of any
injuries, but one firefighter was taken to hospital with smoke inhalation.

150 prison
inmates
‘have HIV
or AIDS’

@ By LLOYD ALLEN
Tribune Staff Reporter

MORE than 150 inmates —
11 per cent of prison popula-
tion — are believed to have
tested positive with HIV or
AIDS at Her Majesty’s Pris-
ons, according to inside
sources.

AIDS Secretariat Rosemae
Bain told The Tribune that
although she was unable to
confirm a current account of
infected inmates, she was
aware of a formal study con-

SEE page 12





isis i sf i

ions aati



@ By TANEKA
THOMPSON
Tribune Staff
Reporter
tthompson@ -
tribunemedia.net

ajor/Tribune staff

Custom’s Department
delivered to The Tribune
indicate that the Bahamas
Electricity Corporation
owes government more
than $166 million in out-
standing customs duty, dat-
ing back to 1997.

A letter dated August 6,
2008 addressed to Ehurd
Cunningham, Secretary for
Revenue in the Ministry of
Finance, signed by the Act-
ing Comptroller. of Cus-
toms outlines BEC's out-
standing payments.

The letter says that as of
June 30, 2008 BEC owed
Customs $166,144,059.18 in
stamp tax and duty.
~~ Some have suggested
that BEC is in a “catch 22”
situation where if BEC
were made to pay its tax

SEE page 13

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DOCUMENTS from the ~@

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PAGE 2, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



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Rodney Moncur

THE SCENE OF THE CRIME: Augusta Street, outside The Pit Resaurant. Sedino Smith, 33; Lavardo
Armbrister, 35 and Vanessa Franks-Williams, 23, were gunned own in front of the popular Bain Town

club in the early hours of Saturday.

FROM page one

Wednesday.

According to residents of
Bain Town, one of Saturday’s
victims, Ms Franks-Williams,
was either the wife or the
fiancée of the man found dead
in the burning car. He report-
edly went by the name of
“Shabba.”

While Chief Supt Glen
Miller, officer in charge of the
GDU; yesterday said that
police are getting some “con-
flicting information” about the
motives behind the Saturday
murders, members of the com-
munity believe that all five
killings are drug related.

Some members of the Bain
Town community claimed that

Mr Armbrister and Mr Smith .

were preparing to retaliate
against those responsible for
Shabba’s murder, but were
killed before they could carry
out their plans.

Press liaison officer Asst

Supt Walter Evans reported’

yesterday that the three vic-
tims had just left ‘The Pit
Restaurant’ on Augusta Street
at around 2am on Saturday

“when unknown persons

opened fire on-them.
Mr Armbrister, Mr Smith

Three shot in
triple homicide

and Ms Franks-Williamswere
walking towards a.Cherolet
Impala, registration nmber
205615, when they were rport-
edly shot at by two memarry-
ing what witnesses clain were
machine guns.

Mr Armbrister ad Mr.

Smith died at the scene while
Ms Franks-Williams, wo was
said to have been shc eight
times, died shortly afer she
arrived at the Princes Mar-
garet Hospital.
. When police arrive: at the
scene they found Mrsmith’s
body lying in frontof the
Chevrolet Impala. M Arm-
brister was found withuis body
partially in the front pssenger
side of the left han driven.
vehicle, Mr Evans sai.

According to eye witnesses,
the three victims wee inside
The Pit Restaurant, vhen Mr
Smith allegedly receyed a call
on his cellular te?phone,
prompting him to 2ave the
club.

Witnesses claimthat the
gunmen — one descried as tall,



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the other short — were waiting
for the three victims in a
parked car outside the club.

Mr Armbrister’s father was
in the area close to Augusta
Street when he heard the shots
being fired, not realising at the
time that his son was one of
the victims. _

‘He described the shots as
sounding like an “explosion.”

“A gun went. off, sounded

like a riddler (machine gun),”
he said.
Witnesses ‘noted that

although the bodies of all three
victims were riddled with bul-
lets, the Chevrolet Impala and

nearby property remained -

undamaged. This observation
has led eye witnesses to specu-
late that the gunmen were
experienced and that the triple
murder was an ordered hit.

It is also claimed that
unidentified persons removed’
money and a gun from the
bodies of Mr Armbrister and
Mr Smith and from inside the
Chevrolet Impala right after
the shooting.






ns for the 13th
has the brightest
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=e

THE TRIBUNE

CORRUPTION, NEPOTISM ALLEGATIONS RESURFACE

alls for commission

© In brief

Police arrest
shooting suspect

POLICE yesterday arrested a
35-year-old male suspect at
around Sam. It is believed that
this man was involved in the
shooting of a reserve police offi-
cer earlier last week in the
Chippingham area.

The suspect, who lives in the
Sears Road area, was found
with a weapon and several live
rounds of ammunition.

Murder charge
expected today

By DENISE MAYCOCK
Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT - One of the
two suspects wanted by police in
connection with the shooting
death of a man in Freeport is
expected to be charged with
murder in Freeport Magistrate’s
Court today.

The suspect is accused of the
death of 32-year-old Roland
Elidor of Hanna Hill, Eight
Mile Rock, who was shot at the
Pepperpot Takeaway Restau-
rant on September 6.

Police investigation into the
incident established that Elidor
was at the Pepperpot around
4am waiting for his take-out
order, along with a number of
other customers, including two
women who had arrived shortly
after him. Three men arrived
shortly afterwards and soon
engaged Elidor in a heated
argument, which quickly esca-
lated.

One of the men pulled out a~
handgun and shot Elidor several
times.




GOVERNMENT will intro-
duce two “important” pieces of
legislation to Parliament designed
to prevent the importation of
“illegitimate and/or fake” phar-
maceutical products and to make
access to affordable medicine eas-
ier, Health Minister Dr Hubert
Minnis said.

Dr Minnis said the two pieces
of legislation, if approved by Par-
liament, will not only protect
members of the public from
“unscrupulous” persons and prac-
tices, but will also result in the
availability of cost-effective drugs
to those persons who may be least
able to afford ‘them.

The proposed legislation is also
expected to lead to the establish-
ment of the Bahamas Pharmacy
Council, which will be responsible
for regulating the pharmaceuti-
cal profession; the establishment

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@ By TANEKA THOMPSON
Tribune Staff Reporter.
tthompson@tribunemedia.net

ALLEGATIONS of corruption
and nepotism in the Customs
Department have resurfaced, as
a source within the revenue col-
lection agency calls for govern-
ment to "clean-out corrupt" offi-
cers.

The source urges government
to order a Commission of Inquiry
to investigate multiple claims of
bribery and abuse of power, which
is alleged to be “rampant in the
department.”

"We've had people who've
been steeped in corrupt practices
and the evidence was so over-
whelming and they didn't go
nowhere,” the source alleged.
And he (an officer being investi-
gated) is working in a sensitive
area. A number of corrupt offi-
cers, the source claims, are being
considered for high-ranking pro-
motions.

"Maybe a Commission of
Inquiry should be brought on
stream to expose these people.
They just need to maybe transfer
these people to a non-revenue col-
lection department or ministry
where they don't have access to
government's money," said the
source.

Yesterday, Assistant Comp-
troller Clifford Ferguson, who
heads the department’s internal

Legislation to combat fake medicine



“The general purpose of this Act
is to regulate the pharmacy
practice and the conduct of all
persons throughout the country
that are engaged in the

profession.”

of a Prescription Drug Plan that
will provide access to more cost-
effective drugs for the treatment
of chronic diseases and specified
medical conditions, and the estab-
lishment of a Drug Fund that will
fall under the control and man-
agement of the National Insur-
ance Board.

It is also expected to lead toa
reduction in the time patients
have to wait to receive medica-
tion at the Princess Margaret
Hospital or any of the govern-
ment-owned héalth clinics; to lead
to patients being able to receive
their medication at any partici-
pating private pharmacy, and to
result in all senior citizens receiv-








~ YOUR LOCAL MEMBER OF THE-

PROCHEM SYSTEM (sm)










Dr Hubert Minnis

‘ beginning with these two new and

of inquiry at Customs

delete his name from the compa-
ny's cargo manifest so that he
could avoid paying duty on goods
shipped in his name. Internal doc-
uments in The Tribune's posses-
sion support these claims and on
Thursday Mr Ferguson confirmed
that an investigation on this inci-
dent was underway.

As a result of the inquiry, the
officer (who is still on duty) may
be confined to his office until the
investigation is complete, Mr Fer-

investigations unit, told The Tri-
bune that he is "open" to such an
inquiry.

"Whatever the government
decides, if that is the route they
wish to take — my view (is) I'm
really open. If there is a Commis-
sion of Inquiry I'm sure we'll have
to go through whatever the
process is. I don't have any objec-
tions one way or the other."

Information reaching The Tri-
bune alleges that a customs officer
stationed on a Family Island sup-
posedly receives bribes in the
thousands. Mr Ferguson was not
aware of these allegations, but
said he would look into the matter
with the comptroller. If it were
found necessary an investigation
would be started.

A letter of complaint sent to
the comptroller, dated Septem-
ber 8, outlines the alleged mis-
conduct of an another officer who,
the letter writer claimed, breached
procedure by allowing a man and
his family to leave the customs
area at the airport without "pro-
viding any declaration to the offi-
cer; having their luggage inspect-
ed; or having their passports
stamped." This matter is also
being investigated by the internal
investigation unit, Mr Ferguson
said. On Friday The Tribune
reported that the department was
investigating an officer who
allegedly "abused" his authority
by demanding that a shipping
agent from a cargo company

when this confinement will start.

The issue of corruption in the
Customs Department has been
raised before, the last time being
in July when Prime Minister
Hubert Ingraham said his gov-
ernment would prosecute all pub-
lic servants, including customs
officers, who break the law.

Also in July, Acting Comptrol-
ler of Customs Anthony Adderley
told The Tribune he would "vig-
orously" seek to address all con-
cerns of impropriety once enough
evidence has been produced.

They were both responding to a
Tribune article that mased cor-
ruption concerns.

Adderley yesterday and Thurs-
day were not returned.
Yesterday, Mr Ferguson said
while the department does receive
a number of complaints against
officers and staff, many investi-
gations "die in the water" in the
"absence of the evidence."

re Minnis

macies. The Act would also lead
to the establishment for the
Bahamas Pharmacy Council and
for other matters connected with
it. “The general purpose of this
Act is to regulate the pharmacy
practice and the conduct of all
persons throughout the country
that are engaged in the profes-
sion,” Dr. Minnis said. “Pertinent
aspects of the profession are
defined and addressed in the pro-
posal which include issues such
as manufacturing, dispensing,
clinical applications and distribu-
tion.”

The Health Minister said the
Council would serve as the gov-
erning body, responsible for reg-
ulating the profession and the
professionals working within it.
He said it would further be able
to “modify and make regulations”
as changes occur in the profes-
sion. The second and equally as
important piece of legislation to
be brought before Parliament, he
said, is expected to lead to the
establishment of a programme for
the supply of certain pharmaceu-
tical products at government-
owned and other health facilities
“at an economic cost” in the
treatment of certain chronic dis-
eases.

ing their medication at no cost,
among other key benefits for res-
idents who fall within specified
categories.

Addressing the Opening of the
Bahamas Pharmaceutical Asso-
ciation’s second annual Pharma-
ceutical Summit, Dr. Minnis said
that while there are many indi-
viduals, and by extension agen-
cies, that seek to promote and
maintain a high standard within
the pharmaceutical profession,
the profession is “rife” with
unscrupulous individuals who .are
involved at the sales, distribution
and manufacturing levels.

“With this knowledge, it is
therefore necessary for any well-
thinking government to take
action to prevent the importation
of illegitimate and/or fake prod-
ucts from entering the local mar-
ket and reaching an unsuspect-
ing public,” Dr. Minnis said.

“The Government of The
Bahamas, through the Ministry
of Health, endeavours to take the »
relevant steps to protect the
Bahamian public by ensuring that
the appropriate guidelines, poli-
cies and legislation are in place

important pieces of legislation,”
Dr. Minnis added.

Dr. Minnis said the first of the
two pieces of legislation is the
Pharmacy Act, which will provide
for the regulation and control of
the pharmacy practice and for the
registration and licensing of per-
sons qualified to practice in phar-

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PAGE 4, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

EDITORIAL/LETTERS TO THE EDITOR .

THE TRIBUNE





The Tribune Limited

NULLIUS ADDICTUS JURARE IN VERBA MAGISTRI
Being Bound to Swear to The Dogmas of No Master



LEON E. H. DUPUCH, Publisher/Editor 1903-1914

SIR ETIENNE DUPUCH, Kt, O.B.E., K.M., K.C.S.G.,
(Hon.) LL.D., D.Litt.

Publisher/Editor 1919-1972

Contributing Editor 1972-1991

EILEEN DUPUCH CARRON, C.M.G., M.S., B.A., LL.B.

Publisher/Editor 1972-

Published Daily Monday to Saturday

Shirley Street, RO. Box N-3207, Nassau, Bahamas




Insurance Management Building., P.O. F-485, Freeport, Grand Bahama

TELEPHONES

Switchboard (News, Circulation and Advertising) 322-1986
Advertising Manager - (242) 502-2352
Circulation Department - (242) 502-2387

Nassau Fax: - (242) 328-2398
Freeport, Grand Bahama: 1-(242)-352-6608
Freeport fax: (242) 352-9348



Inagua’s future still uncertain

INAGUANS are hopeful that Morton’s Salt
Bahamas will rebuild and return under new
ownership. However, they also know that if the
plant does reopen it will not tolerate the dis-
ruptions that Morton’s suffered over the years.

“Tf they do return this will be the island’s last
chance,” said one of the locals, “these new own-
ers are not going to take the nonsense that Mor-
ton’s put up with. Any sign of trouble, they will
lock down and leave.” ’

Asked about the attitude of local unionists
who called a strike just before Hurricane Ike
blew in and destroyed their livelihood, we were
told they are very tight-lipped.

“They don’t know where they stand with the
company,” said a resident. “They don’t know

whether or not they have a job.” In other words -
by contrast to their loud-mouthed blustering.

and threats against the company a few short
weeks ago, they are now quietly hiding behind
that old Bahamian caution: “Shut mouth catch
no flies!” ,
Despite everything Morton’s still shows com-
passion for its staff —including those who dis-

rupted operations. All staff are to receive $1,000 .

each to help them over these hard times, and
some are being recalled and paid to help clean
up the badly damaged plant. Of course, this is
the. hurricane damage. Nothing has been said
about the damage done by unknown hands dur-
ing the industrial unrest — a Molotov cocktail
thrown at Morton’s ‘guest house in Mathew
* Town and the nine brine pumps damaged on the
outskirts of the plant. At the time The Tribune
was told that the damage to each pump was
estimated at $20,000. :

Of course, the union has denied responsibil-
ity for any of this sabotage, but what strikes us
strange is that too often in this country when
there is industrial unrest; sabotage seems part of
the package. We recall the industrial dispute
with BEC in early 2004 when four poles were
cut down, triggering a reaction that shut down
two power plants, leaving the capital in dark-
ness. On other occasions a foreign object has
been thrown across electrical lines, shutting

down all power to large sections of New Provi-
dence.

We recall Works Minister Bradley Roberts
threatening that “reckless and anarchic per-
sons” will face the full extent of the law, and
union leaders denying any blame, claiming that
sabotage was not their style. Needless to say
the “reckléss and anarchic persons” were never
caught.

It all reminds us of TS Eliot’s Macavity — the
mystery cat. / .

“Macavity, Macavity, there’s no one like
Macavity,

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He always has an alibi, and ore or two to
Spare, Seti triea eet e

At whatever time the deed took place —
Macavity wasn’t there!”

An Inagua resident maintains that there
are a few radicals in their community who are
the troublemakers, “intimidating citizens.” This
resident believes that one of the conditions of
the reopening of the plant will be a demand
that law and order be restored to the island.
Like the majority of residents, the company
will not tolerate vandalism going unpunished.
Inaguans believe, as do we in Nassau, that too
many people suffer under the false impression
that they are above the law and can. do any-

thing as long as:it is labelled “industrial action.” .

In Nassau we are still waiting for-action to be
taken in the recent disruptions causéd in Nassau

when BTC unionists were called out to block
Bay Street. It has been established that the .

strike was illegal. Citizens want an end to it.
And the only way-to end it is if the law is
allowed to take its course. This is what the peo-
ple of Inagua also want. And this is what the salt
plant has to be guaranteed before its owners will
consider reopening.

There are those who tell us that they are sat-
isfied that the new owners will give the salt
plant one more chance because it is one of the
most profitable in its chain.

“It would be a shame if it were to close,” said
a person close to the situation. “This is one
company that is 100 per cent Bahamian oper-
ated from general manager, Glenn Bannister,
right down the line: It-shows what Bahamians
can do.”

It also shows what unreasonable Bahami-
ans can undo.

But on a brighter note, NEMA’s clean-up
operation is going well in Inagua. The roofs of
five house were repaired in.four days. John
Nixon on the staff of the Ministry of Tourism
has been seconded to NEMA as the man on the
ground in Inagua. He expects all the repairs to
be finished long before Christmas. “I want to
put up a Christmas tree for them,” he said.

Mr Nixon, a native Inaguan, is the son of
Jimmy Nixon, who with his brother, Sammy
were. responsible for reviving the flamingo
colony in Inagua. They were the wardens of
the reserve for more than 40 years.

Mr Nixon says he is happy to be overseeing
the restoration of residents’ homes. “I am look-
ing forward to bringing happiness to some of the
old folk and those who need help and to bring
my old home: back even better than it was
before.” oer! 3 he













Dismayed

t

by govt’
double
standards

EDITOR, The Tribune.
KINDLY allow me to

express my disappointment in.

the double standards that the
government of the Bahamas

_ continues to present, not only to

the citizens of the Bahamas, but
the world at large.

What I have witnessed today
reinforces what a so-called num-
bers king said: “Any attempt to
crack down on numbers would
be hypocritical and a big joke”
— taken from an article in The
Nassau Guardian, February 22,
under the heading “Legalise
gambling in the Bahamas.”

A few weeks ago the employ-
ees of BTC were threaten that
they would be disciplined for
the actions they took to protect
their employment rights. There
were many members of parlia-
ment speaking on this matter
and the public was even polled.
There is also a commission to
review the crime in this country.

I was appalled to watch the
evening news on the 16th to’see
a cheque being accepted by
NEMA from a company called
“Flowers” when every Bahami-
an knows its business and the
source of its funds.

What does the Christian




LETTERS

letters@tribunemecia.net



Council have to say about this?

What does the Members of
Parliament, including opposi-
tion, and political leaders have
to say about this? _

Let’s hear from The Cham-
ber of Commerce, talk show
hosts, employer representatives
and, of course, those outspoken
Bahamians.

Are the law makers of this
country going to continue turn-
ing a blind eye by taking hand-
outs from persons who are ina
business that our statute books
legislate against?

What are we teaching our
children, that only some things
are wrong depending on who is
evaluating?

Is the government now going
to legalise gambling in this
country and put the funds to
good use?

Maybe some of the drug deal-
ers, and bank robbers can now
follow suit and start donating.

When you put a certain
amount into the bank you have
to account for its source. As

people professing to be
upstanding citizens of Christian
values we must be very careful
what we do, how we do it and
who it will impact.

We often sit/by and wonder
why the young people are
uncontrollable, but it stems
from us adults.

Or should a proclamation be
made:

“The Prime Minister, The
Attorney General, and the Min-
ister of Security of our beloved
Bahamaland has declared a
period of Amnesty for trans-
gressions, calling all drug lords,
bank robbers, employees who
are stealing, in addition to the
numbers houses and web shops
once you are donating to the
monetary needs of the nation
with effect from September 16,
2008 to November 30, when the
hurricane season closes, only
cash donations shall accepted.”

BTC staff you are also for-
given for your transgressions.

Praying for the nation’s chil-

.dren, my children and grand-

children.

LINDA DENISE EVANS
Nassau,
September, 2008.

Nothing wrong with challenging Christie

EDITOR, The Tribune.

Again thank you for allow-
ing me space in your invaluable
column. This is a short letter to
all prospective candidates for
the leadership of the PLP. First
of all, there is absolutely noth-
ing wrong with challenging Mr
Christie for the leadership of
the party. A belief that one
should not be able to challenge

a leader of any organisation is

nonsensical.

I will state here that there are
indeed protocols in that at crit-
ical times, such as entering into
an election year, such challenges
should not arise. However it is

- presently post-elections andthe

party is in a restructuring stage;
therefore if there is a belief that
the party’s leadership should be
changed or challenged then one
suspects that this is a practical
result of losing an election.

It is this writer’s belief that
there is no need to hide ones
concerns for their party’s sur-
vival; nor should a party mem-
ber be forced to blindly jump
over'a cliff just because they are
instructed to. The long and
short of it is that this cloak and
dagger (heavy on the dagger)
nonsense about undermining
Mr Christie’s leadership must
stop.

If a party member wants to
contest Mr Christie, then they
should do the honourable thing.
They should go to their mem-
bers and inform them of such.
They should publicly announce
their plans and ambitions and
they should also inform Mr
Christie.

Does this all sound naive,

well most political savvy per-
sons would immediately say
“ves” however history has
shown that spineless, under-

For the best deal in town on
pre-owned cars, with warranty!

handed actions are never suc-
cessful. Bahamians should have
no interest in a “leader” who
cannot speak truth about run-
ning for leadership.

I beg whomever aspires to
this great office; just make your
announcement in the proper
manner, present your case to
your party members, court your
delegates (within reason) and °
present your position to us
Bahamians. i, Mee ae

As strange as this may sound,
and because all of us are so used
to the under-the-table, back-
stabbing politics, it will be a
breath of fresh air and clearly
something that this country has
never seen before. A word to
the wise, think: Transition not
Ouster.

DWAYNE J HANNA
Nassau,
September 14 ,2008.





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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 5



‘A state of nor malcy iS retur ning’ — Hubert Ingraham

PM pleased with Inagua cleanup

IN HIS second trip to Inagua
since the passage of Hurricane
Ike, Prime Minister Hubert Ingra-
ham said he is very pleased with
the cleanup work to date, and
pointed out that the Inagua All-
Age School remains the first pri-
ority in the schedule of public
works already in progress.

“A state of normalcy is return-
ing to Inagua,” Mr. Ingraham said
following his tour of Mathew
Town Saturday.

On September 9, the Prime
Minister toured the island with a
team of Cabinet Ministers, mem-
bers of the Opposition and gov-
ernment officials who travelled
to get a first-hand view of the
damage caused by the category
four hurricane. On Saturday Mr
Ingraham, National Emergency
Management.Agency (NEMA)
Director Commander Stephen
Russell and Local Government
officials, toured the island’s
Defence Force Base, Adminis-
trator’s Office, All-Age School,
NEMA\’s supplies storage area,
and visited several elderly per-
sons on the island whose roofs,
damaged by the hurricane, have
been repaired by Government.

“Our schedule of public works
was the restoration of water sup-
ply which has now been complet-
ed, the restoration of electricity
supply which is virtually complete
[and] the restoration of telephone
services, which is more than 60
per cent complete,” said Mr
Ingraham.

“The airport will come next,
but the first priority is the public
school.”

While touring the island’s All--
Age school, Mr Ingraham spoke
with parents there and assured
them both of Government’s com-
mitment to providing a safe learn-
ing environment for their chil-
dren, and to landscaping the
grounds of the school for the first
time. —

He told parents that principal-
ly, suitable buildings on the island
would be utilised to accommo-
date students, adding that the use
of trailers would be the last option
considered by Government.

Prior to his discussion with par-
ents at the school, the Prime Min-
ister toured St. Philip’s Parish
Community Centre which was

previously, used as a hurricane.

shelter and has now been desig-.
“persons who lost roofs in the

nated a temporary site for three




Sharon Turner/BIS Photo

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingraham (centre) toured the Royal Bahamas

Defence Force Base in Inagua on Saturday, September 20 and is pictured
viewing two of the vessels at the base. Mr. Ingraham, who toured the base
as part of his second visit to Inagua since the passage of Hurricane Ike,
said it sustained minimal damage during the storm.



of the primary school grades on

the island. “Some parents
expressed concern about some of
the classrooms and the structural
soundness of them,” Mr. Ingra-
ham said. “I assured them that
we would have it viewed by a
structural engineer and have the
results explained to them ina
PTA meeting.”

While at the public school, Mr.
Ingraham also spoke with a
Bahamas Electricity Corporation
(BEC) staffer about the progress

of electrification at the school and
. how that: process could be expe-

dited. With regard to social work
on the island, Mr. Ingraham cred-
ited Department of Social Ser-
vice workers with doing “an
excellent job” on the ground.
“They have done an excellent job
on the island,” he’said.
“They have provided us with
social assessments for all people
and homes and have put us in a
position to have resources and
assistance allocated.”

Pauline Bowen-Forbes, one of

_the island’s social workers, said

that four to‘five homes of elderly

PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra-
ham (right) greets 89 year old

_ Inagua resident Alfred Bain, whose

home lost its roof during Hurri-
cane Ike. Mr. Bain, who recently
left one of the island's shelters fol-
lowing the repair of his roof
thanked Social Service workers on
the island for their assistance to
him.

storm had been repaired, and that
the process of home repairs
would be progressing to the dis-
abled, single parents and then to
the general community.

Mrs. Forbes added that resi-
dents have been moved from
shelters and have returned to
their homes. Expressing his plea-
sure meantime with. the amount
of relief supplies on the island,

Mr. Ingraham said that supplies.

were expected to arrive aboard a
Defence Force craft Saturday

night, with additional supplies -

expected to arrive this week.

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Materials for the repair of at
least 30 homes in Inagua were on
the ground, with work expected
to start this week, according to
Commander Russell. “A new
shipment of supplies arrived just
yesterday (Friday),” he said. “We

are also pleased that some 40 vol-

unteers from the Methodist Habi-
tat programme came on the island
Wednesday — that has definitely
increased our volunteer man-

power and so with the materials
and additional manpower, that
has given us a great boost in going
forward with repairs. I am quite
pleased with how we are pro-
gressing thus far.”

Mr. Ingraham advised that the

‘Morton Salt Company agreed to

donate $50,000 to the Red Cross
in addition to the $150,000 it
recently donated to its employ-
ees in Inagua.



PRIME MINISTER Hubert Ingra- |
ham (far right) listens to the safety |
concerns expressed by a parent:
(far left) during his tour of the .

Inagua All-Age School on Satur- |
day, September 20. Mr. Ingraham

told parents that the Government

would have the school assessed

by a structural engineer with the

results thereof to be reported at a

PTA meeting to be scheduled on

the island.

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Ph: 325-3336
PAGE 6, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



IN MEMORY OF



Thelma L, Chompion
“Her children arise and call her blessed; ~
Her husband also, and he praises per"

ou left us piv

It’s s been 2 years since
us always.

you are wit







A virtuous woman, you left an indelible
our lives by instilling godly morals and
that will last a lifetime



If roses

for us. nd t

lace them in our mother’s arm
her they’re from us.



Hold her for a while and tell her that we love he?
and when she turns to smile, plac
her cheek. Remembering her is ea
every day, but there is an ache withi
that will never go aw



We miss you tremendously but
knowing that cne oy we w



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4
d



College is ‘very close’ to

attaining university status

B® By DENISE MAYCOCK
‘Tribune Freeport Reporter
dmaycock@tribunemedia.net

FREEPORT — COB Presi-
dent Jayne Hodder said the
College of the Bahamas is very
close to attaining university sta-
tus and will be meeting with
government regarding its deci-
sion on a proposal date.

Ms Hodder said that COB
has grown significantly over the
past 35 years and is ready to
make the step towards becom-
ing the University of the
Bahamas. |

“We are hoping to meet
shortly with government offi-
cials and we have a plan for

proposing a date, but I am going ©

to let the government decide on
what that date would be,” she
said during a recent visit to
Freeport.

While in Freeport, Ms Hod-
der announced that construc-
tion of the first phase of the new
COB campus was underway on
Grand Bahama. The project,
which is being carried out by
Reef Construction, will cost $8.4
million.

The new campus will be built
on 50 acres of land donated by
the Grand Bahama Port



Jayne Hodder

Authority.

Although a contract has not
been officially signed, Contrac-
tor Vernon Wells said that his
company has received mobili-
sation payment and has secured
materials, which are expected
to arrive on the island within
the next three to four weeks.

President Hodder said that
programmes at COB have
grown since its inception in

. 1974. At that time, she noted

that only six per cent of pro-
grammes were associate degrees
and the rest were certificates
and diplomas.

“Over the years the transfor- .

mation grew and associate
degrees were 71 per cent and
Bachelors degree came in.

“And would you believe
today 80 per cent of the stu-~

dents are enrolled in BA pro-
grammes. We have graduated
more students with BA degrees
for the first time two years ago
than we did with associate
degrees. So we are proud of the
incredible growth over the past
35 years,” she said.

Ms Hodder said that faculty
at COB has also grown.

“We are ready, our pro-
grammes are ready, and our fac-
ulty is ready. We have grown
our faculty complement and
today 71 per cent are Bahami-
an, and fully close to 30 per cent
are PhD and a growth of about

’ three or four per cent when the

college was created.

“So in some ways we have
been building the university qui-
etly, perhaps too quietly since -
1995 when we began to have
the power to offer BA degrees.

“And so we are going to be
asking the government to make
a decision with respect to adopt-
ing legislation creating the Uni-
versity of the Bahamas and it
will be the Prime Minister’s
responsibility to decide when
that date should be, but we
hope that we did our homework
and hope that we will be able to
make a convincing case,” Ms
Hodder said.







row in heaven, Lord please. pic a bunch .






Plan to ‘revolutionize’ Rotary Club of West Nassau

@ By LLOYD ALLEN

MICHAEL Hepburn, newly elected President
of the Rotary Club of West Nassau, said he
intends to “revolutionize” the organization by
pursuing new endeavours.

One will be a considerable future donation to
the SURE boys programme located Gladstone
Road.

“We’ve always provided assistance — at ‘Sure’
— but this year we’re going to be giving major
assistance, we’re putting in a computer lab,” said
Mr Hepburn.

This will include about 10 computers, which
he believes will assist the at risk minors toward
choosing a more positive future. °

Mr Hepburn said, “We realize that they are
the future, and they could be part of our solution,
or part of our problem.

“If we don’t help them, then they could become
part of our problem.”

The president also explained that the organi-
zation has in place pre-existing auxiliary groups,
including The Interact Club, a junior Rotary
Club, which is at the high school level, and the

Rotaract, which has long been established at the
College of The Bahamas.

“In my administration, I will establish,at least
two new Interact clubs,” said Mr Hepburn.

He said it was of great priority for the organi-
zation to start to recognize the importance of
young people, adding that “they are the future
leaders of our country.”

Mr Hepburn said Rotary has been established
in the Bahamas since the early 1960s, and that
Rotary of West Nassau has existed since 1970. '

Celebrating its 38th anniversary, Mr Hepburn
said his chapter this year will direct much of its
efforts toward youth empowerment.

Additionally, the organization recently
announced the launch of a singing competion,
entitled “Bahamian Stars.”

Although much of Rotary’s work is not publi-
cised, Mr Hepburn said the organization recent-
ly brought its forces together and has made it

‘possible for a mother of six to have a fully func-

tioning bathroom in her Bain Town home.
“We are proud to do it, and the growth of the
organization is a testament to the fact that we

are doing the right thing,” Mr Hepburn said. .

Were looking for
some “old” friends...

RBC Royal Bank of Canada’s Main Branch was built in 1917

This year-in November- RBC Royal
Bank of Canada will celebrate 100 years
of operation in The Bahamas. Our
longevity and success would not have
been possible without the loyal support
of our customers.

We want to honour some of our “oldest”
friends. So we are offering special gifts
for the earliest Royal Bank photos,

. stories, anecdotes and records-an old
passbook, correspondence, statement,
a cancelled cheque, old photos, etc.

‘

If you’re a veteran Royal Bank client,
or if any of your family members were,
we'd love to hear from you. And we’d
especially like to see your old Royal
Bank records.

As we observe our 100th year as the
premier financial institution in The
Bahamas, we want to express our.
appreciation to all our customers.
Without you we could not have come
this far.

Thank you.

If you think you qualify,
please mail a copy of your record to Jan Knowles at
P. O. Box N-7549, East Hill Street, Nassau, Bahamas
by September 30.

Please include your name, telephone number
and email address with all submissions.

RBC > HELPING YOU SUCCEED

www.rbcroyalbank.com/caribbean/bahamas
Ra AU CE Cee ont Md ee eh ke cok ee


J

\

NY

THE TRIBUNE

‘DR DAVIDSON HEPBURN, Chairman of the Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation, which oversees



the National Museum of the Bahamas, reads a selection of Bahamian poetry and short stories to Temple
Christian primary school students at Fort Charlotte last Wednesday. The readings were part of the National Muse-
Jum’s ‘Literacy through Heritage’ event, designed to complement September's National Literacy Month. Dr
‘Hepburn was joined in reading by Patricia Thomas (right) and Leah O’Brien. Other events planned for Nation-
cal Literacy Month include an invitation for high school students to attend the “Lest We Forget” slavery exhibi-
tion at the Pompey Museum from September 22 — 25, 10am — 1pm, dramatic readings and tours of Balcony House
‘on September 25 at 7pm and the opportunity to hear episodes from the popular 1970's radio drama “The Fer-

,gusons of Farm Road” on September 26 at 6pm at the Pompey Museum.

Twenty-five students
set to make history

AFTER much planning and
development, 25 students will
‘make history when they enter
the pre-engineering magnet
programme this month at the
mew Anatol Rodgers High
School in southwestern New
Providence.

The programme is the first of
its kind established in a public
school in The Bahamas.

It will integrate the teaching
‘of science, technology, engi-
neering and mathematics in
preparing high school students
for further studies, and ulti-
mately careers in these fields.

Education Minister Carl
Bethel said the goal of the pro-

gramme is to create a pipeline _

‘of young scientists and engi-
neers locally.

' He said it is an important mis-
sion considering that currently

few Bahamian college-bound

students choose to study science
land engineering. :

+ He said that this creates a
serious void in our national
development as most of the
iexpertise in these fields over the
ie have had to be imported.
' According to Trevor Fergu-
son, Education Officer and Pro-
gramme Organiser for the Pre-
Engineering Magnet Pro-
gramme, the Ministry believes
that the pre-engineering cur-
riculum will spark a greater
interest and appreciation for the
sciences, especially among
women students ~ a segment of
the population that is under-
represented in engineering and
higher technology careers in
The Bahamas.

; Mr. Ferguson said modules
for the programme were pur-
chased from Pitsco Corpora-

tion, a leading US based com- .

pany that has for more than 30
years provided science, tech-
nology, engineering and math-
ematics curricula to schools
throughout the world. |

- Students in the programme
will be enrolled in challenging
introductory courses such as
Principles of Engineering; Dig-
ital Electronics, Computer Inte-
grated Manufacturing, Civil
Engineering and Architecture,
Aerospace Engineering,
Automation and Robotics and
Engineering Design and Devel-
opment.

» The Pre-Engineering Magnet
programme is evidence of the
new public and private sector
partnership initiated to specifi-
cally encourage students’ inter-
ested in the engineering, and
higher technology areas.

| An advisory committee com-
prising engineers from the Min-
istry of Works, Bahamasair,
The Water and Sewerage Cor-
poration, Arawak Homes and
representatives from The Col-
lege of The Bahamas and the
Department of Education
worked on the curriculum and
designed the programme to
ensure that students will be pro-
vided with the most current
knowledge related to science
and technology. —

TROPICAL
NY

FOR PEST PROBLEMS
tilt) esi ada l Y



Pre-engineering magnet programme at Anatol
Rodgers High School to offer new opportunities

Mr. Ferguson said that this
partnership is essential to the
mission, which is to graduate
technical students who are col-
lege ready and prepared to suc-

- ceed in life. ;

Students of the pre-engineer-
ing magnet programme were
selected from seven Junior High
Schools in New Providence
based on their interest

.. » Cyprian. Gibson,,an, executive

member of.the Bahamas Soci-
ety of Civil Engineers, stated
that the programme is. critical

Betty Taylor

Journalist / Entrepreneur

to the development of the coun-
try and must be supported at
every level to ensure that it pro-
duces the next generation of
Bahamian engineers.

Mr. Gibson said that although
there have been major success-
es in such areas as tourism and
banking, the technical sectors
are still under-developed.

However, he feels positive
that the pre-engineering pro-
gramme will reap future divi-
dends for The Bahamas. ~

/ \

“As the storms of life are
passing by, be strong and
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an






















Carl rene

LLOYD'S



EDUCATION Minister
Carl Bethel has asked
Androsians to rally around
their students and motivate
them to achieve their dreams
through excellence in educa-
tion.

The Minister went to
Andros to attend the North,
Central Andros and Berry
Islands District schools’ “Back
to School Church Service”,

held at St Paul’s Anglican |

Church in Fresh Creek. He
encouraged those who filled
the church to celebrate “Back



THE TRIBUNE



Help your students achieve their dreams’

Education Minister sends plea to Androsians

to School” with a sense of
urgency and purpose.

He told parents that if they
applied the same unity and
support that was evident by
their presence at the service
to each day of the school year,
students would feel motivat-
ed to improve their perfor-
mance.

He said that education is the
greatest equalizer and can give

te

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persons raised in underprivi-
leged circumstances the
opportunity to improve their
circumstances in life by
empowering them with the
skills and ability to make wise
choices.

The Minister told the audi-

ence that he was committed

to ensuring that the schools in
Andros receive the same
resources that schools have in




New Providence. He said that
the cost of the two new
schools — the Anatol Rodgers
High School and new school
in Freeport — has delayed
attention being focused on the
Lowe Sound and Fresh Creek
Primary Schools, but he
assured them that as soon as
possible those issues will be
addressed.

Vincent Peet, Member of
Parliament for the North
Andros and Berry Islands
constituency, also attended
the service and thanked the
Minister for his commitment
to advancing education in
Andros.

Singing

He encouraged the congre-
gation to heed the Minister’s
appeal to make education a
community affair thus making
it (education) number one
again in Andros.

During the service the stu-
dents and teachers of Central
Andros High School delighted
the visitors and congregation
with their singing talents while
the primary school students
read scriptures that reflected
The Bible’s teaching on the
importance of education:and
knowledge.

The Minister of Education
also’ praised students who
were successful in the 2008 sit-
ting of the BJC and BGCSE
examinations. He told them
that their efforts contributed
significantly to the improve-
ment in the national average.

Host pastor, and Rector of
Stephen’s and St. Paul’s
Parishes in Andros, Rev
Father Donald Kerr, thanked
the Minister for accepting his
invitation to inspire students

in the North, Central Andros
and Berry Islands District.

He also encouraged parents
and the community to become
involved in the students’ edu-
cation as their interest would
have a lasting and positive
impact on the students’ suc-
cess.

Students received school
supplies, textbooks and read-
ing books as a part of the
Back to School celebration.

Accompanying Minister
Bethel to Andros was Perma-
nent Secretary in the Ministry
of Education, Mrs. Elma Gar-
raway; First Assistant Secre-
tary, Mr. Ralph Bowe, and
Mr. Shadrach Johnson, ‘Offi-
cer, Physical Plant in the Min-
istry of Education.

The delegation also took the
opportunity after the services
to inspect schools with the
principals and local govern-
ment officials.

The Minister urged the local
officials to use the resources
allocated to them to do basic
maintenance and promised
them that the Ministry will
supplement whatever was con-
sidered necessary. He said he
was pleased with the pre-
paredness of the classrooms
for students’ learning, and the
enthusiasm of the administra-
tors and teachers displayed in
carrying out the delivery of
education in Andros.

He also praised the net-
works the school administra-
tors have established with win-
ter residents and other donors
who have constantly supplied
their libraries with a source of
quality reading material.

This effort he noted con-
tributed to reading, and
improvement of literacy
throughout the island.

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Management Agency (NEMA), accepted a cheque from executives
of the Most Worshipful Prince Grand Hall Lodge, to assist Inagua
residents in rebuilding their homes damaged by Hurricane Ike on
September 7. Pictured from left are Matt Maura, public relations
director; Kenrick Braithwaite, grand treasurer; Commander Russell; ~
Carl Culmer, grand master; Chrystal Glinton, first assistant secretary,
NEMA; Ersley Johnson Il, grand senior warden; and Wendell Barry,
grand secretary.

Share your news

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are |
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

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Fax: 394-5720 = Robinson & Claridge Roads

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/
THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 9



. RECENTLY APPOINTED DIRECTOR KIRKWOOD FERGUSON SETS PATH FOR BRIGHT AND PROMISING FUTURE

Success Training College Daytime Institute makes a strong return

THREE months ago Success
Training College appointed Mr
Kirkwood Ferguson director to
its daytime college. In that time
the day college went from about
eight students to almost 80.

Mr Ferguson brings a dynam-
ic and fresh approach to the 25-
year-old institution, said a
spokesman for the college. Suc-
cess was made popular by its Sat-
urday and Evening Institute.

Kirkwood Ferguson is a col-
lege professor and a seasoned
professional of hospitality and
tourism management. He comes
to Success Training College fol-
lowing an appointment at The
University of the West Indies,
Centre for Hotel and Tourism
Management in Nassau. Mr Fer-

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THE TRIBUNE



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COUNCIL OF LEGAL EDUCATION

Gordon Street, St. Augustine, Trinidad. WI

PRESS RELEASE

The Council of Legal Education is pleased to announce the Sppeineneat of new Principals at its three
Law Schools with effect from August 1 2008.

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas -

Mrs Tonya Bastian Galanis was appointed Principal of the Eugene Dupuch Law School.

Tonya Bastian Galanis was called to The Bahamas Bar in 1985 and has been a full-time tutor with the
Eugene Dupuch Law School since its inception in 1998. She began her legal career in the Office of The

Attorney. eral in The Bahamas“where she practiced for more than twelve ‘Years before joining The
Eugene Sune Law School.



Mrs. Galanis is a graduate of St. John’s College and The College of The Bahamas. In 1980 she obtained
a Bachelor of Laws degree (Hons) from the University of The West Indies. She attended the Norman
Manley Law School in Jamaica and was awarded the Certificate in Legal Education from the Council
of Legal Education. Mrs Galanis also earned post-graduate diplomas in legislative drafting from The
Royal Institute of Public Administration in London, England and the University of Ottawa, Ontario
Canada in 1993. More recently, during a year-long sabbatical, Mrs Galanis has undergone studies with
the University of the West Indies leading to a Master of Laws degree in corporate commercial law.

Mrs. Galanis is a member of The Bahamas Bar Asociation and is also involved in numerous civic or-
ganisations, including the Zonta Club of Nassau, where she served as President from 2004 -2006. She
has also served on The Bahamas National Revenue Task Force, The Financial Advisory Services Board,
Caricom Intergovernmental Task Force and The Securities Commission of The Bahamas.

She is married to Philip Galanis and has one daughter, Zoé.

Trinidad & Tobago

Ms Miriam Samaru was appointed Principal of the Hugh Wooding Law School.

Miriam Samaru is a national of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago. She is a graduate of the Univer-
sity of the West Indies (1980) and the Hugh Wooding Law School (1982). She was called to the Bar in
Trinidad and Tobago in 1982 and in Saint Lucia in 1996. She has worked as an advocate in Trinidad
and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands and Saint Lucia. She held the post of Solicitor General of Saint
Lucia until she joined the Council of Legal Education at the Eugene Dupuch Law School in Nassau. In
2001, she was appointed Principal of that Law School.

She holds ‘a Master of Laws in Maritime Law and Law of the Sea. She has served on the following
boards: Adoption Board of Trinidad and Tobago, Saint Lucia Air and Sea Ports Authority, Saint Lucia
Civil Aviation Authority and Saint Lucia Solid Waste Management Authority. She is a member of the
Council of Legal Education, the Board of the Faculty of Law, the International Bar Association, the
Commonwealth Lawyers Association and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies, University of Lon-
don. She is a charter member of the Central Pilot Club of Nassau.

She is married to Peter Alonzo.
Jamaica
Professor Stephen Vasciannie was appointed Principal of the Norman Manley Law School.

He holds First Class Honours degrees from the Universities of the West Indies, Oxford and Cambridge.
Professor Vasciannie, who worked as a Research Fellow at the University of Cambridge from 1987 to
1988, was called to the New York Bar in 1990, and to the Jamaican Bar in 1996. He worked part-time
as a Deputy Solicitor-General in Jamaica for the four years leading up to 2008.

Professor Vasciannie is a Professor of International Law and taught at the University of the West Indies,
Mona since 1994. He is a member of the United Nations International Law Commission, the main ad-
visory body for the United Nations on legal matters. He has also served on the Inter-American Juridical
Committee (the main legal advisory body of the Organization of American States), and has been the
President of the Caribbean Conference on Maritime Delimitation since 2005.

He has written books on Human Rights, the Law of the Sea and International Investment Law, and has
published widely in law journals, including the British Yearbook of International Law, the Cambridge

Law Journal, the West Indian Law Journal, and the Foreign Investment Law Journal.

He is married to Lisa, and has two sons, Sean and Dominic.



~ LOCAL NEWS

Combined effort to help
students suspected of
being abused, neglected

Bi By Llonella Gilbert
Bahamas Information
Services

REPRESENTATIVES from
the Suspected Child Abuse and
Neglect (SCAN) Unit, the Min-
istry of Health, the Department
of Public Health and the Ministry
of Education are working togeth-
er to create a set of structured
guidelines to assist students sus-
pected of being abused and
neglected.

Guidance counsellors, social
workers, nurses, teachers and
administrators recently met at the
Holy Cross Anglican church hall
in the first of two workshops to
review, discuss and make recom-
mendations on the Draft School
Protocol, which will contain the
guidelines.

Staff Nurse Fiona St Albord
said the main objectives for the
workshops are to sensitise rele-
vant stakeholders to child abuse;
to point out its indicators; to
explain what to do if a child is
suspected of being abused; to

strengthen networking and part- _

nerships in the care and manage-
ment of abused children and their

families, and to provide a proto- .

col document to assist with the
effective and efficient manage-
ment of abused children in the
schools.

Nurse St Albord said as educa-
tors, the participants come into
contact and deal with children of

abuse: They also on a day-to-day -
basis see first-hand the symptoms

and signs displayed by abused
children, she said.

“You are a lot of times the first
ones to notice the initial indica-
tors of abuse.”

Althea Turner-Neilly, coordi-
nator at the SCAN Unit, said it is
important to have workshops to
introduce and promote the
School Draft Protocol, because
there are students who are vic-
tims of abuse at all levels of the
school system — even at the pre-
school level.

While there is a safety manual
in schools relating to things like
cellular phones; dress codes and
other issues, there is no protocol
that focuses on abuse, be it phys-



Raymond A Bethel/BIS Photo

SUSPECTED Child Abuse & Neglect Unit (SCAN) of the Ministry of
Health, Department of Public Health, held.a SCAN School Protocol
Workshop. under theme “Let Us Embrace, Change, We Have The
Tools”. On Thursday, September 18, 2008, at Holy Cross Anglican
Church Hall. At right is Psychologist, Ms. Wendy Fernander making

her presentation.



” Raymond A Bethel/BIS Phto

PARTICIPANTS of the Suspected Child Abuse and Neglect Unit -

(SCAN) workshop.

ical, emotional or sexual, Mrs

‘Turner-Neilly explained.

She noted that once the School
Draft Protocol is completed, it
will have clearly defined steps so
that all schools will -have “easy to
follow steps” on how to handle
suspected abuse cases.

Mrs Turner-Neilly also empha-
sised that teachers and adminis-
trators must report suspected

‘ abuse cases else face possible dis-

ciplinary action.

Teachers.and administrators
from the pre-school and primary
school level attended the first
workshop, while the second work-
shop will be made up of educators

from the junior and senior high
schools.

Mrs Turner-Neilly said after
the recommendations from the
workshop have been evaluated
and analysed, they will be includ-
ed in a draft/position paper, which
will be presented to the Ministry
of Education, the Ministry of
Health and the Department of
Public Health. °

The Ministries and the Depart-
ment will send back their recom-
mendations, instructions and

‘advice on the draft.

The process will continue until
all the stakeholders come to a
consensus on the document.

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THE TRIBUNE MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 11



oN ST
~ Rewards Excellence in Education

On Saturday, September 13th,

members of the Custom

5 Computers Know How Team

S . were joined by Ms. Patricia

Collins, Deputy Director of

Education, to reward the three

winners of the “A’s’ for

Excellence campaign with their
prizes.

To qualify, students had to
achieve at least one “A” in their
final report card, and the lucky
winners were selected in a
random drawing of over 400
students who had entered from
schools in Nassau and the
Family Islands.

. for .
excellence!





“these three winners
_ represent the talented -
thousands out there”

Brittany, Jodi and Chauncy await the rewards for their hard work
throughout the school year. Ms. Collins, educator and Deputy
Director of Education for The Bahamas, noted that “these three
winners represent the talented thousands out there’, and as role
models great things would be expected of them in the future.

Pia Farmer, Marketing Director of CCL remarked that “We were amazed by the enthusiastic response to the campaign, and we
were very proud to see so many children with outstanding results in their school work,” She noted that many of the participants had
received multiple A’s and had obviously worked very hard to excel in their schoolwork. . ; ig







Jodi Dodge a second grader at Saint: Chauncy Bethell, formerly of Faith

Brittany John, now entering grade’9 at

St. Augustine’s School, receives the first
prize of an iMac computer system and
printer from Mechelle Thompson, Retail

Thomas More School, receives her prize
from Tammie Hall-Thompson, line leader for
HP products, while her mother and head

Temple Christian Academy, now
attending grade 7 at St. Anne’s School,
holds his iPod Touch and can’t wait to

Manager of The Know How Store.

Mrs. Farmer explained that the idea for the campaign had
emerged from the company’s core values: “At CCL we strive
to set the highest standards of excellence in our products and
in our services. We are committed to education at all levels,
and our Know How Team members receive continuous
training in order to offer our customers the best service that we
can. So we wanted to promote and reward excellence. In
view of the success of this promotion, we plan to make it an
annual event. So students take note, and work hard so that
maybe you can be a winner next year!”

In her lively remarks, Ms. Collins heartily congratulated
the parents and teachers who support and encourage children

to excel, and noted that “the Ministry of Education welcomes —

partnerships with corporate citizens such as CCL and we look
forward to the continuation of this positive initiative”.

“work hard so that maybe you
can be a winner next year”




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his reward for ‘being the most outstanding male graduating

senior in the country. Tammie Hall-Thompson of Custom
Computers Limited (right), presents the 2008 Valedictorian with
an HP laptop. Participating in the celebration, Lynden ee eas
President, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., Bahamas Chapter

_ stands at left while The Hon. W.A. Branville McCartney Minister of

State in the Ministry of Tourism & Aviation looks on.

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THE TRIBUNE



150 prison
inmates ‘have
HIV or AIDS’

FROM page one

ducted at the prison in
1990, revealing that about
10 per cent of inmates had
been infected with
HIV/AIDS, Mrs Bain
explained, that since then,
there has not been a similar
study.

Sources within the prison
claim, that apart from
increasing numbers of
infected people at the facil-
ity, only limited measures
have been taken by prison
officials, in reducing the
spread of the diseases.

According to Health Min-
ister Dr Hubert Minnis,
“Any illness — including
HIV/AIDS — is a concern
for. the ministry.”

“The same measures that
we would take in the com-
munity, we would take the
same measure at the prison
in terms of education.”
However, Dr Minnis con-
firmed, that measures such



The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the

_|_ area or have won an

award.
If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.

a4 eee ESR aa ete
Open Mon-Fri 7:00am-4:00pm, Saturday 7:00am-3:00pm

Tel: 323-3973 or 325-3976 Fax: 322-3937

Web: www.buildersmallbahamas.com

Email: info@buildersmallbahamas.com

Share your news

as the supply of condoms to
inmates, or physical sepa-
ration of infected inmates,
have been excluded from
the ongoing education ini-
tiative at the facility.
When asked to confirm
a total count of inmates
infected with HIV/AIDS,
the minister said, he did not
have those figures. He

explained, however, that

“the only people who would
have figures like that would
be Dr Orlando or Dr
Gomez.”

Although The Tribune
did speak with the doctors,
neither was able to provide
any figures. “I don’t know,”
they both said.

Based on a 2007 United
Nations report on AIDS,
“The AIDS virus has been
found in prisons in most
countries of the world.”

The report explains,
“This should be a source of
the utmost concern, not
only for prisoners and












prison staff, but also for
society in genéral. "

The report indicated
that the spread of
HIV/AIDS, and other dis-
ease, including tuberculo-
sis, within prisons, result
from specific ingredients.

Some of which are over-
crowding, atmospheres of
violence and fear, sexual
tension, and boredom. One
confirmed factor that does
exist at Her Majesty’s Pris-
ons is overcrowding.

According to Prison
Supt. Dr Elliston Rahming,
“To the extent that there is
overcrowding, we must look
to our Maximum Security
Facility, which was built 60
years ago to house 450
inmates, but typically hous-
es close to 700 inmates.”

Recommendations
offered by the UN in help-
ing to reduce the spread of
disease in prison facilities
include minimizing prison
populations, providing ade-
quate health care, provid-
ing condoms, and educas
tion.

The report concludes,
“There still exists a strong
current of denial in many
places about male-to-male
sex (especially in prison),
and a corresponding refusal
to do anything which might
be seen as condoning it.”

The report adds, “These
attitudes will have to
change if societies want to
see the rate of HIV infec-

if ‘tion, — inside prison and




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©2008 Creative Edge
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 13

THE TRIBUNE

BEC ‘owes $166m





Sunbound Bahamas would like for the following persons to
contact their main office as soon as possi
We appreciate the public’s assistance in this matter. .

Kevin Fisher
Kent Major
Marcian Clarke
Philippa Knowles

in customs duty’

passing the cost onto the already bur-
dened consumer.

Gabriella Saunders
Travis Douglas

Andre Culmer
Crystal Demeritte
Cory Bethel
Dion Stuart
Dellarese Morrison

Howard Archer



consumers were seeing in their
bills.

Now persons are arguing that the
two year “tax holiday” for BEC
announced in the budget was just for-
malizing a situation that has existed
between BEC and government since

FROM page one

Coper Knowles
Joyce Brennen
Keilli Godet
Julian Lightoourne

bill, its financial situation would be in
dire straits and would send the
company’s surcharge through the
roof.

A summary of the breakdown as
outlined in the letter is as follows:

e November 1997 - December 2002

Duty - $2,080,940.92;

Robyn Tilerain
Tanya Thompson

In his 2008/2009 budget communi-
cation, the Prime Minister proposed
a two year “tax holiday” for BEC
amounting to a 17 per cent rebate on
the cost of imported fuel.

This “tax holiday” was intended to
help slow the rising fuel surcharge

_ Man and girlfriend
abducted at gunpoint

_ FROM page one the police. A police service weapon was dis-
charged.

One of the men was hit in the left side of his
abdomen while the other was caught. The third
man escaped and is actively being sought. One
of the men is an 18-year old resident of
Knowles Drive off Tonique Williams High-
way, and the injured man is a 20-year-old
Kemp Road resident.

Police recovered an imitation firearm, which
was used by one of the men.

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1997 — when BEC had not been pay-
ing its taxes to government.

Sources have suggested to The Tri-
bune that no government at this point
could seriously go after the corpora-
tion for these back taxes without

the police of the abduction.

Officers from Mobile Division saw the vehi-
cle in the Prince Charles Drive area shortly
hfterwards and chased the speeding vehicle.
The car stopped in the eastern area of
Prince Charles Drive and two gunmen jumped
out.
~ One of them pointed a gun in the direction of

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Stamp Tax - $1,456,658.66;
Total - $3,537,599.58.

e January 2003 - June 2008
Duty - $95,650,858.66;
Stamp Tax - $66,955, 600.94;
Total - $162,606,459.60.

Keith Culmer

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

“LOT NO. 117

PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Family Residence

PROPERTY SIZE: 8,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Enter Portland Boulevard
which is east of Super Value Food Store
Prince Charles Drive. Heading south
turn through the 2nd corner (Continental
Avenue) on'the left. Continue around the
curve then take the 8rd corner on the
left (Tropical Avenue), Traveling north

on Tropical Avenue, the property is the
10th lot on the left or first property after
passing Tote Avenue.

APPRAISED VALUE: $302,000

SUBDIVISION
LOT NO. 1 Block 22
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Split Level
Residential Building with 3 Apts.
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,600 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travel south of Bamboo »
Boulevard off East Street South then
turn through the first corner right onto
.. Bougainvillea.Blvd,.. Heading v..est.on
Bougainvillea Blvd. take the second
corner right onto Madeira Avenue. At
the t-junction, turn left onto Oxford
Drive. Property is the third house right,
on the.corner of Serville Drive and °
Oxford Avenue. ,
APPRAISED VALUE: $397,000

PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Travelling east on
Carmichael Road from Faith Avenue
take the 4th corner on the right (Turtle
Drive) property is 4th house on right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $186,000

4. GOLDEN GATES ESTATES I
LOT NO. 1372
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single-
storey Residence, 4 Bed / 2 Bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: At junction of Carmichael
Road and Cedar Way (corner opposite
BFM) travel south to the t-junction, turn
right onto Golden Gates Straight, then
take the first corner right onto Comet
Terrace. The property is the second
house on the right, yellow with white
trim.
APPRAISED VALUE: $224,000

Tristan Sands Keith Miller

WMIBOURID
WS. SUEROUMA.COM
est, TNs

5. BRICEVILLE SUBDIVISION, PINE -
BARREN ROAD .
LOT OF LAND
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Five Unit
Apartment Complex
PROPERTY SIZE: 10,200 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Heading west along Prince
Charles Drive from Fox. Hill Road, take
the third corner on the left (Pine Barren
Road). Travel west on Pine Barren Road
then turn through the second corner on
the left (Ceria Close) then the second
corner on the right. The complex is the
last building on the right, painted white,
at the dead end.
APPRAISED VALUE: $292,000

_ LOT NO. 1467
-PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single

Storey Triplex Apartment, 2 - 1 bed/
bath; 1-2 bed /bath;
PROPERTY SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling east on Bamboo
Boulevard off East Street South, turn
through the first corner on the left

...(Thatch.Palm-Avenue). Continue north
on Thatch Palm Avenue, take the first
corner on the right (Guinep Tree Street).
The complex is the third building on the
right.
APPRAISED VALUE: $162,000

. PASTEL GARDENS
LOT NO. 149

289 Wulff Road-East 3. BEL-AIR ESTATES, CARMICHAEL PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
ROAD Family Residence, 3 bed./ 1 bath

(just before the Village Road Round on) LOT NO. 259 - PROPERTY SIZE: 5,701 sq. ft.

Tel: (242) 394-4442 PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single- LOCATION: From Marshall Road,

Fax: (242) 393-8238 storey Residence travel north along the main entrance

to Pastel Gardens. At the four-way
junction continue north Lemon Street.
The building is the 11th house on the
left painted white trimmed yellow with a
light brown asphalt shingled roof.
APPRAISED VALUE: $142,000

. CHIPPINGHAM
LOT NO. 17
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Single
Storey Residence, 2 beds’/ 1 bath
PROPERTY SIZE: 6,375 sq. ft.
LOCATION: Traveling west on Quarry
Mission Road off Nassau Street,
building is approximately 500 ft from
Nassau Street on the northern side of
the street.
APPRAISED VALUE: $130,000

9. ROCKY PINE ROAD
LOT NO. “A”
PROPERTY DESCRIPTION: Multi-

j ‘ ey Family Duplex Apartment
GM, Honda, Toyota, Hyundai Also Kea) 4 PROPERTY SIZE: 7,288 sq. ft.
selection of: LOCATION: Traveling west on Rocky

Pine Road off Carmichael Road,
property is midway on the third corner
on the left.

APPRAISED VALUE: $275,000



’ Brake Pads & Shoes
Oils/Chemieals: Cooper Tires Trans, Filter Kits
- Kendall
Daytona Fan Belts ‘
- Motoreraft ea amenic East & VACANT LOTS
: Ss Daytona Timing Belts Belt Tensioners/Pulleys
~ Lucas Products Wells Ignition Parts .
Gs adi i ae C.V, Joints/U. Joints 1. CARMICHAEL VILLAGE
Moog Suspension parts a ee : LOT NO. 4 and 5 — part of Crown
; Allotments 21 and 22 Grant A8-50 s
Batteries Carter Fuel Pumps Wheel Bearings PROPERTY SIZE: Property is 651 feet 3
~ Motorcraft Eastern Water Pumps ; south of Carmichael Road and 981 feet 5
- Rocket ; Wheel Cylinders west of Golden Isles Road. 3
Rain-X Wiper Blades Brake Ma-‘er Cylinders APPRAISED VALUE: $139,00° 00 &
Spark Plugs
“Momvcreft Fan Motors
~ Champion Gaskets Sets
-NGK
AIC Shock Absorbers INTERESTED PARTIES SHOULD SUBMIT OFFERS INCLUSIVE OF TELEPHONE
Engine Mounts CONTACT AND POSTAL ADDRESS TO: CB DISTRESSED PROPERTIES,
: CREDIT RISK MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT, P.O BOX - SS-6263 NASSAU, BAHAMAS
ee Power Tools & Accessories OR EMAIL US AT: DISTRESSED.PROPERTIES@COMBANKLTD.COM
- Piston rings * WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO REJECT ANY OR ALL OFFERS.
~ Con-Rod Bearings olga


PAGE 14, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE ;;



Legal Opinion: “Goods Only”
EPA consistent with WTO rules

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@ By Sir Ronald Sanders

D: Lorand Bartels, a
Lecturer in Interna-

tional Law and Fellow of Trinity
Hall at Cambridge University, has
advised that it is possible for all, a
few, or even one, of the
Caribbean countries on whose
behalf an Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) has been ini-
tialled with the European Union
(EU) to sign a “goods only”
agreement that satisfies World
Trade Organisation (WTO) rules.

His written Opinion arose
from the controversy surround-
ing the EPA and increasing alarm
in Africa, the Caribbean, the
Pacific and the EU over the
adverse effects the agreement
would have on the development
and autonomy of developing
countries.

‘The international Christian
organisation, Christian Aid, has
declared that “far from being a
key concern” development “actu-
ally appears to have been, at the
very least, a marginal issue for

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negotiators on both sides. What is
this going to mean for farmers?
What is this going to mean for
women and children? What is this
going to mean for the poorest sec-
tors in Caribbean society? The
fact that there are no clear devel-
opment benchmarks integrated
into the agreements seems to
indicate that. the powerful part-
ner in this relationship is much
less concerned with development
than with furthering its own inter-
ests. It is the relationship of the
bully to the bullied — not that of
equal partners in a responsible
and fruitful relationship.”

Reluctance

Guyana and Haiti, two of the
Caribbean countries on whose
behalf the EPA was initialled,
have indicated their reluctance to
sign the agreement in its.present
form which covers not only trade
in goods, but also trade in ser-
vices as well as the “Singapore
issues” — government procure-
ment, trade facilitation, invest-
ment and competition policy —
which have not been agreed in
global trade talks and which all
Caribbean countries had joined
other nations: in resisting at the
WTO

After a national consultation
in Guyana involving political par-
ties, trade unions, the private sec-
tor and religious bodies, Guyana’s
President Bharat Jagdeo was

‘mandated to try to convince

Caribbean governments to sign a
“goods only” agreement. The par-
ticipants in the consultation were
mindful that the EU has threat-
ened that, unless Caribbean gov-
ernments signed the agreement,
GSP treatment would be applied
to the region’s crucial exports
such as sugar, rice and rum, and
tariffs would be imposed on
Caribbean bananas that would
make all these goods uncompeti-
tive.

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Experts from various fields
have made it clear that the EPA
would be compatible with WTO
tules as long as it covered trade in
goods. WTO compatibility does
not require an agreement on
trade in services or the “Singa-
pore issues”. The fact that the
EPA was initialled by the Region-
al Negotiating Machinery (RNM)
on behalf of the Caribbean states
was not a commitment to sign it
in its present form, nor was it an
obligation under international
law, treaty law or WTO rules.
And, as Sir Shridath Ramphal has
argued and EU representatives
have agreed, Caribbean countries
“are not precluded by interna-
tional law, by treaty law (or WTO
rules), from renegotiating that ini-
tialled agreement. This much is
clear from general international
law and more specifically from
the 1970 Vienna Convention on
the Law of Treaties.” *

Now Dr Bartels states
unequivocally that it is legally
possible to sign a “goods only”
agreement. He gives three
options, two of which are unprob-
lematic legally. The two are:

¢ amendment of the EPA (by
Protocol) to provide.that for
some Cariforuin States non-goods
parts of the EPA do not apply

This option is the most con-
ventional, both in terms of treaty
practice (c.f., the EU opt-outs on
the Schengen area and the Euro)
and in terms of WTO compati-
bility. This option depends on the
agreement on all EPA parties
(i.e., the EU, the EU Member
States, and all Cariforum States).

e separate agreement provid-
ing for partial (i.e., goods-only)
provisional application of the
EPA by some.CF States

It depends on the agreement
of the EU but not of the other
CF States (or the EU Member
States).

Dr Bartels identifies some dif-
ficulties in adjusting the overall

_ EPA text to cater for countries

that might opt for a “goods only”
agreement, but they are difficul-
ties that could be overcome by
drafting. For instance with respect



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APARTMENT on PARADISE ISLAND

to development cooperation, he
argues: “To the extent that these
Chapters are not applied, these
provisions on development coop-
eration will also not be applied.
Even so, this does not prevent
the EU from continuing to pro-
vide development cooperation in
these areas on an autonomous (or
otherwise agreed) basis.”

The WTO compatibility of a
“goods only” agreement is known
and acknowledged by the EU
whatever its representatives may
say to the Caribbean. Evidence
of this is that the Pacific coun-
tries in a letter dated June 11,
2008 from their lead spokesman
to EU trade Commissioner, Peter

Mandelson, proposed that the.

EPA negotiations “focus on final-

izing outstanding issues related»

to the trade in goods component
and development, with services
and most trade related areas

deferred for future considera- °

tion.” In his reply of July 19, 2008,
Mandelson stated, “We are open
to the idea that some Pacific
countries may decide not to make

commitments in certain areas due

to their specific circumstances.”
So, it is possible to sign a

“goods only” agreement that is}
perfectly compatible with WTO,

rules. As Professors Norman Gir-
van and Vaughan Lewis and
Ambassador Havelock Brewster
have said signing a “goods only”

agreement “will remove whatev- |

er legal justification there may

_ for the threat by the EU to
impose tariffs on Cariforum *

exports.” They have also rightly

noted that deferring negotiations ~”

on services and the Singapore
issues would eliminate “several
contentious features of the EPA”
including “areas of incompatibil-
ity with the Caricom Single Mar-
ket and Economy (CSME)”.
The problem is that some
Caribbean countries have been

’ persuaded that breaking ranks

with other developing countries
on services and the Singapore
issues is in their interest, and the

fallacy or otherwise of that belief — i
. will only be proven by irreversible °

experience.

Responses to: ronald-
sanders29@hotmail.com to:ronaldsanders29@hotmail.com

(The writer is a business con-
sultant and former Caribbean
diplomat).
















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THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 15





Surprise, surprise, so what else is new!

Ip the report “Major Drug
Transit Or Major Illicit

Drug Producing Countries For
Fiscal Year 2009”, President
George W Bush identified The
Bahamas, Jamaica, Haiti and the
Dominican Republic as key tran-
sit points for narcotics going into
the US.

Assistant Secretary of State
for International Narcotics and
_ Law Enforcement Affairs, David
Johnson, told the media on Sep-
tember 16th at the release of the
report that the presence of a
country on the list signifies that
the President has determined that
the country has "failed demon-
strably" iu its narcotics fight.

I suggest that the US has failed
demonstrably in its fight to pre-



JOHN

vent its narcotics dealers from
exporting their illegal narcotics
trade to our islands. Those crim-
inals are also responsible for the
vast majority of the illegal guns
that damage our societies. Those

in the north buy and those in the"

south produce and sell and as this
column has pointed out before,
we islanders in the middle suffer.
It is not sufficient for us to be
placed on lists and be assisted in
the struggle.

VIEW FROM AFAR



ee

> SUB ok

The entire cost of the efforts to
stem this illegal trade should be
borne by the buyers without
whom there would be no trade.
Additionally we should be com-
pensated for the consequential
damage done by their citizens
whom they cannot prevent from
coming to ‘our islands to commit
these crimes. :

We in Jamaica and The
Bahamas are caught in the middle
of something bigger than our-



selves, but ‘which is as painful and

damaging as our earlier journeys.

in the Middle Passage. Remem-
ber; when the elephants fight the

WHY ADVERTISING WON’T WORK



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BREA agent will be more
involved in “marketing” your
home, and here’s why.

A photo and description of
your home’s features, in a news-
paper or magazine or online, is
simply “advertising,” and is not
going to generate much inter-
est. A recent consumer survey
conducted in the US by the
National Association of REAL-
TORS® revealed that fewer
than five per cent of buyers
found these ads helpful in
selecting homes.

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stand the needs and qualifica-

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Chances are that an agent can
“market” your home to many
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Buyers want to purchase a

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countries becomes clear.



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PAGE 16, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



& By STEPHEN GRAHAM
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan

Taliban militants based near
the Afghan border and their al-
Qaida allies are the most likely
suspects behind a massive truck
bombing at Islamabad's Marriott
Hotel, officials and experts said
Sunday, according to the Associ-
ated Press. At least 53 died in the
explosion, including two U.S.
Defense Department employees
and the Czech ambassador.

The truck sat burning and dis-
abled at the hotel gate for at least
3? minutes as nervous guards
tried to douse the flames before
they, the truck and much of the
hotel forecourt vanished in a fear-
some fireball on Saturday night,
according to dramatic surveillance
footage released Sunday.

The attack on the American
hotel chain during Ramadan,
among the deadliest terrorist
strikes in Pakistan, will test the
resolve of its pro-Western civilian
rulers to crack down on growing
violent extremism which many
here blame on the country's role
in the U.S.-led war on terror.

%, ” *

INTERNATIONAL NEWS

a Ee eee ea ee
Pakistan Marriott blast shows signs of al-Qaida



PAKISTANI SECURITY OFFICIALS inspects to collect evidence from the site of Saturday's massive truck

bombing at the Marriott hotel in Islamabad, Pakistan yesterday.

While no group has claimed
responsibility, the scale of the
blast and its high-profile target
were seen by many as the signa-
ture of media-savvy al-Qaida.

vative, Bahamian television show concludes its fith season, with

Making
Bar And Grill

. Interior Ministry chief Rehman
Malik said "all roads lead to
FATA" in major Pakistani sui-
cide attacks — referring to Fed-
erally Administered Tribal Areas,

Anjum Naveed/AP Photo



where U.S. officials worry that
Osama bin Laden and al-Qaida
No. 2 Ayman al-Zawahri are hid-
ing. Sate
Mahmood Shah, a former gov-

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ernment security chief for Pak-
istan's tribal areas, said that while
the attack had “all the signatures"
of an al-Qaida strike, homegrown
Taliban militants probably had
learned how to execute an attack
of such magnitude.

Al-Qaida was providing "mon-

ey, motivation, direction and all
sort of leadership and using the
Taliban as gun fodder," he sug-
gested. A Pakistani intelligence
official, speaking on condition of
anonymity because he is not
authorized to speak on the record
to media, said investigators were
examining just that theory.
Pakistani Prime Minister
Yousuf Raza Gilani said the
attack was an attempt to "desta-
bilize democracy" in Pakistan,
which this year emerged from
nine years of military rule, and
destroy its already fragile econo-
my. Gilani also claimed that the
bomber attacked the hotel only
after tight security prevented him
from reaching Parliament or the
prime minister's office, where
President Asif Ali Zardari and
many dignitaries were gathered
for dinner. However, the owner

ith Max Conch

Be sure to tune in to another rerun of this episode of the show on Saturday at 10:00 am
on ZNS TV and watch for the sixth season of shows coming soon!

of the hotel accused security
forces of a serious lapse in allow-
ing a dump truck to approach the
hotel unchallenged and not tack-
ling the driver more clinically.

"If I were there and had seen
the suicide bomber, I would have
killed him. “Unfortunately, they
didn't," Sadruddin Hashwani
said. The bomb went off close to
8 p.m. Saturday, when the restau-
rants inside would have been
packed with Muslim diners break-
ing their daily fast during the hol
month of Ramadan. 4

The explosion wrecked ‘a
favorite spot for foreigners as well
as the Pakistani elite that has
been targeted twice before by
militant bombings.

The building — one of the few
places outside the diplomatic dis-
trict where U.S. diplomats were
permitted to socialize — was still
smoldering 24 hours after blast,
which also wounded more than
260 people. Anti-American feel-
ing is running particularly high
following a series of strikes by
US'S. forces based in Afghanistan
on Islamic militants nes‘ed in
Pakistan's tribal belt.

Se@bahdmas

Ale

@
),
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0@


avAa a

;



























Make Comractor
Bill long- (sting

Engineer 2veals
“concerns

@ By NEIL HARIELL
Tribune Busiss
Editor ij





THE ororbhe initidtars
Bill must “not jiwork for

the fellows ‘in tindustry

today, but the gi entering

20 years fromow”, a

Bahamian engint has told

Tribune Business

Hammond Rming, a
partner in The Fineering
Group, shared lroncerns
over the draft Bilht he had
submitted to the ner min-
ister responsiblDr Earl
Deveaux, ‘earlienis year,
including suggeshs about

amending the sizéthe pro-
posed Contractorgard.

In his letter to Deveaux,
| Mr Rahming conred the
suggested size of> eight-
member Contract Board,
two of whom must general
contractors, to th8-mem-
ber Florida equivat, based
on that state’s Liceag Law.

While | the posed
Bahamian Boards “slim
and trim”, Mr Rahiy raised
doubts over wher “the
interest and conce of the
more than 20 catiries of



MONDAY,

‘SEPTEMBER. 22,

2008

‘SECTION B ° busines Ree





Luxury goods retailers in
‘survival’ fight on tax rises

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

REVERSING the 2008-2009 Budget
tax increases is “vital for the survival” of
many Bahamian luxury goods retailer,
Bay Street merchants have warned, as
the long-term negative effects will far
outweigh the estimated $120,000-
$150,000 short-term revenue gain for the
Government.

Philip Hillier, a senior Solomon’s
Mines executive, said in an e-mail to fel-
low Bay Street merchants that the 5 per
cent duty increase imposed on perfume
and cosmetic imports into the Bahamas
would leave retailers unable-to compete
with the cruise. ships and rival Caribbean
destinations, in addition to further erod-

’ ing the price advantage Bahamian oper-

ators held over their US counterparts.

' The August 2008 document, a copy
of which has been seen by Tribune Busi-
ness, warned that any decrease in sales

‘We'll be a force to
be reckoned with’

* Bay Street merchants argue $120, 000- $150,000 revenue rise om perfume duties
outweighed by long-term negative effects
* Estee Lauder warns tax rises will make pepamian retail unEOnIpeUEye against cruise

ships and Caribbean rivals

* Brand says increases could impact 2,500 sq ft concept store working on with John Bull
* Government says it may consider remittances to retailers if justified

by Bahamian luxury goods retailers
“would lead to laying-off of staff and,
in some cases, the closure of shops, par-
ticularly those only selling perfume/cos-
metics”.

“The combined CIF [Cost of Import-
ed Freight] value of imports of perfume
and cosmetics into the Bahamas is
approximately $10-$12 million,” Mr
Hillier wrote. “On average, the import
duty is approximately 25 per cent, which
gives the Government income of $2.5-$3
million. The increase in the duty rate of

5 per cent therefore only produces a fur-
ther $125,000-$150,000-of revenue.

“The effect of the increase, however,
creates many serious problems, and in
the long-run will produce less revenue,
rather than more.......

“For us to survive, it is vital the
increase in duty, which went into effect

on July 1, 2008, be reconsidered. Our

recommendation is to simplify the duties
on perfume, cosmetics and colognes by
charging a flat 25 per cent across the

board on the CIF price.”

The luxury goods brand partners for
Bahamian retailers have also expressed
their concern about the impact the Bud-
get duty, increases could have on the
international competitiveness of this
country’s retailing sector:

In an August 22, 2008, letter to Duane
Roberts, John Bull’s chief executive, a
senior Estee Lauder executive warned
that the increase in perfume and cos-
metics taxes under the Excise Tax was

SEE page six —

cor eT eee eT
challenge is thrown out



* New insurance intermediary targets greater
transparency and ‘marriage’ between
investment and insurance products .

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

) construction contrors will
be properly represed”’.

As a result, Mrihming
suggested that the ; of the
Bahamian Contract Board
be increased to repent all
categories. a :

Supporting the nito for-
mally regulate the: Jamian
construction industria leg-
islation, and certifyd cate-
gorise all its memb, since





































Developers say
more than $200m
spent on project

Co partner, was speaking after
Supreme Court Justice Estelle
Gray-Evans ruled that the Save
Guana Cay. Association’s sec-
ond judicial review case, this

OPPONENTS of the mullti-

million dollar Baker’s Bay Golf

. & Ocean Club plan to appeal

another Supreme Court ver-

dict in what is becoming a pro-
tracted legal battle to halt the —,

development, their attorney

- telling Tribune Business that

the latest verdict “is not going

year’s time we'll be.a force to be
reckoned with in this market”,
as it aims to attract business
through. initiatives such as full
disclosure of brokerage fees and
the “marrying” of insurance and
investment products.

a By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune’ Business Editor

A NEWLY-LAUNCHED
Bahamas-based insurance inter-.
mediary believes that “in a_

Ane bsA epistialion wid make ) ss: Well-knowm-brokers Guilden™ .. and better-able toltpn for-.|. Gilbert and Victor Chandler ecu suing their rights”. SEE
eign direct investnt pro- Fred Smith Fred Smith, a Callender’s SOO HGS “4 page seven



jects, Mr Rahming'd Tri-
bune Business: *) very.
important the conctors
have a Bill, but it Ito be |
fair and transparend not |
~ just work for the fellcin the
industry today bute guy
joining 20 years fronw.”
In his letter to Dr'veaux,
Mr Rahming said: “oartic-
ular concern is the ure of
‘| the draft Bill to ove the
minimum qualificens to
become registered 1 con-
tractor, thus leay this
requirement to be denined
by the Board at a latlate.
“The constructiopmpa-
ny thai I consider most
successful construct com-
pany in the Bahas was

SEE ee ty

SEE page nine

_ Every idea begins with a seed of thought.
Colinalmperial ¢an take those seeds and turn
them into reality. Thats the difference becween
Confidence far Life and a lifetime of dreaming.

Green Turtle CAbaco - On highest ridge, 3 BD, 2.5 j
BTH home. Ama: sea & island views. Custom kitchen,
) large deck, scred porch & pool w/trellised gazebos.
Bonus 3rd level n. Internet Ref: # 6451

REDUCEfom $1,300,000 to $850,000 _

Chris rington
Telephonel-309-4925
chris@coldwellkerbahamas.com

Colinalmperial.








Soins
aN A ES]
www.coldwellkerbahamas.com



. Www.inicronet.bs
7 eee
BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY
56 Madera Strect, Palndate

242-328-3040
iz

PAGE 2B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008 THE TRIBUNE

Intreducing: : ; Contractor Bill

«6% House No. 1 « Custom, solid wood cabinets
4 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath - Granite or polished concrete FROM jage one
1949. sq ft. $685,000 counter tops
whiten. 4 * Stainless appliances incl. ; by ie Pane ie cance
3 Bedroom, 2 ‘ /2 Bath ¢ Impact resistant windows with bachelorderees in the field
, : soe . of engineeritg.So why are we
1470. sq ft. $630,000 Open plan living area notadopting Hllniniiminy stan:
» Walk in closets dard when evnioday most suc-
hee, sie ve oF * Central AC throughout ~ af oe have the
edroom, . equivalen yeter !
2068. sq ft. $800,000 » Front and rear porch “Perhaps a ‘rndfather clause’
————— » Completely landscaped can singer bese of con-
— cPitouse No.1 - Gated community eee san
4 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath « 24/7 security 2 sion for registed contractors to

upgrade to a gher level within
; each category |

to# House No. 114 * Tennis courts ere arieett Jt Rahming ques-
3 Bedroom, 3 1/2 Bath {Om PoWiets Bs500d 10% oe ee hncuded inthe
1912. sq ft. $745,000 ¢ Underground utilities draft Contraprs Bill, whereas
masons had tir own category.

Floor plaris and house specs available on the website And while thafety, health and
welfare of thaiblic was the Bil-

www.charlottevillebahamas.com/listings.htm I’s primary. ccern, he suggested
that personvanting to only
make minomprovements to
their homes offices be given.
an exemptior waiver from the
~ Bill’s provisis.

Mr Rahny also expressed
concern ov the failure to
account forfferent levels of
complexity win specific job cat-
egories, soming he said creat-
ed health anafety concerns.

He explais: “A classic exam-
ple is seen the category ‘Air
conditioningntractors/HVAC
contractors’iere there are no
further cateies to do with air
conditioninjVAC systems.

“This is ply unacceptable,
as this area2ds, as a matter of

’ serious safebncerns, to be bro-
ken out intategories where

*, persons arejable of only main-
tenance of:cified systems or —
the installat of simple systems

Presenting
versus the iillation of complex °

legant Turnke =

im sought after Charlotteville pitals, hotetc) as well as those

_ who are qified and experi-
enced to vertake all of the
above.” |
Still, Mahming told Dr
Deveaux tIproper regulation
and contrcof all professions
relating tonstruction in the

2068. sq ft. $685,000 + Club house & pools

Pa
ba
&
we

‘3
a
-
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9
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7 AW
THE TRIBUNE

mea Ps See Se
Airports contrac
awards unveiling

within two weeks

@ By CARA
BRENNEN-BETHEL
Tribune Business
Reporter

THE Nassau Airport Devel-
opment Company (NAD)
should be able to announce the
winning bids for the contracts to
provide placement agency and
escrow services for the Bahami-
an dollar-denominated compo-
nents of the Lynden Pindling
International Airport’s financ-
ing within the next two weeks,
Tribune Business has been told.

Airport Authority chairman
Frank Watson said he has not
seen any of the bids currently
under review by NAD and is
awaiting their recommendations.
It is understood that among the
bidders are RoyalFidelity Mer-
chant Bank & Trust and Provi-
dence Advisors.

NAD is looking to go to the
capital markets and secure $200
million for the first phase of the
airport’s redevelopment. Includ-
ed in the Request for Proposal
(RFP) that NAD has requested
is the $25 million it is seeking to
secure in Bahamian market by
October.

This is when it expects to
begin initial work at the Lynden
Pindling International Airport,
such as the realignment of the
sewerage and electrical systems,
and begin clearing ground.

On Friday, Mr Watson said
NAD was still working with
Citibank to determine the best
way to put in place and raise the
Bahamian dollars financing. -

He said that as it relates to the
timeline for the project and the
- financing, it is “so far, sa good”.

The first phase of the airport’s'

redevelopment will include the

Nassau Airport

Development Company





execution of high priority pro-
jects, such as improving the
physical and sanitary conditions
at the airport, alleviating park-
ing conditions and air side con-
gestion, managing adequate
check in spaces for additional
air traffic growth, facilitating
group travel and minimising and
streamlining passenger security
checks.

Once it starts, this phase is
anticipated to be completed
within 24 months.

Phase two of the project is
divided into four stages and

facilities and the renovation of
existing ones. This will also
include new US international
arrivals

Phase three encompasses new
international and domestic
departure facilities, while phase
four will include improvement
to general areas of the airport
such as landscaping.

Mr Watson had also told The
Tribune that NAD was hoping it
could award the construction
contract for the physical work
within the first two weeks of
2009, with the actual work start-

includes the construction of new

ing soon thereafter.

aa gael |



acento ones







TROY A. STRACHAN,
Manager, Revenue



The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is pleased
to ‘welcome Troy A. Strachan, Manager, Revenue, effective April

2008. In this position Mr. Strachan is responsible for customer

billing, credit and collection, and maintaining the general ledger
of NAD.

Prior to joining NAD Mr. Strachan was a Commissions Manager at
Gems Investments Ltd., an International Hedge Fund company.
Mr. Strachan obtained an Associate of Arts Degree in Accounting
and a Bachelor of Business Administration in Private Banking &
Finance from The College of The Bahamas. He is an Associate of
The Bahamas Institute of Banks and recently completed a Master
of Business Administration in Finance from Nova Southeastern
University

DONALD BUTLER, CPP,
Manager, Parking & Ground Transportation

Donald Butler was promoted from Supervisor to Manager
Parking/Ground Transportation effective January 1, 2008. In this
position Mr. Butler is responsible for formulating the policies,
procedures, systems and controls required to optimize the car
parking facilities and ground transportation operations at Lynden
Pindling International Airport.

Mr. Butler joined the National Parking Association (NPA) as a
member in April 2007 and was immediately enrolled in the
certified parking manager programme. The National Parking
Association (NPA) which has its headquarters in Washington
D.C. is an international network of more than 1200 companies,
representing thousands of parking industry professionals. Mr.
Butler successfully passed his exam in October 2007 and is the
first Bahamian to have obtained the title of Certified Parking
Professional (CPP).

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, Race 3B

Ta Moa ATTN

OP TE le)
The Principal Heritage Conservation Agency of The Bahamas

THEME: PROMOTING

Antiquities, Monuments and Museums Corporation {AMP
articipate in the observance of National Literacy Month d
September 2008. AMMC will sponsor and host the follow

programs at the designated AMMC sites.

of Headings from Slave Journals and Related Documents by loca
_. personalities for Junior High and Senior High School Students. Mond:
September 22 through Thursday, September 25, 2008, 10:00 a.m. to: 0 |
‘at The Pompey Museum of Slavery and Emancipation, Bay Street, next
‘the Straw Market . Admission: $3.00 per person. Books will be on sale. Contact
Miss Odia Richardson 326-2566 or call 356-0495 to reserve your group. Schoo
will be given designated times to tour the Museum and attend the readings

2. Open House and An Evening of Recitals at the Balcony House Mus

on Market Street opposite the Central Bank of The Bahamas. Thursday, 25th
September, 2008, at 7:00 p.m. Recitals by Dr. Davidson Hepburn

Ms. Cookie Allens with tours of the House. THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVIT
‘TO ATTEND. Donations are welcomed. Refreshments on sa

Episodes from the Fergusons of Farm Road, the well known. 70 |
rama by Jeanne Thompson, at, The Pompey Museum of Slave y
ncipation, Bay Street next to the Straw Market; Friday, 26th Septemb
at 7:00 p.m. Admission: $15.00 per person includes refresht
LIC 1S INVITED. Please call 356- 0495 or 326-2561



FORT CHARLOTTE...

" still the best venue for weddings, —
social gatherings and meetings.

Call Mrs. Christine Rolle
Tel: 242 326-4872, 326-4861
Fax: 326-4860 for details.

; ALTENTION JUNIOR HIGH |
AND SENIOR HIGH SCHOOLS
Throughout’ The Bahamas

: Reserve “The Lest We Forget
The Triumph Over Slavery”
Traveling Exhibition :
t| created by The Schomburg Center
& UNESCO Slave Route Project.
Tt s FREE and eoueatonas .

Three locations to serve you: |
Fort Charlotte, Fort Fincastle
and The Pompey Museum.

The places to shop for
authentic Babamian-made
handicrafts, unique gifts,
jewellery se Babames
authored B iN





Ni D) S iespepsible for the development, operation, managementandr maintenance _
the -fourtt busiest airport in the Caribbean, serving over 3 million passengers each: ee a

With the design of Phase Hf airportexpansion currently underway, NADi is cease exciting
“new emplo yen opportunities for qualified | Bahamian poe |



BRYANT A. BETHELL,
Director, Corporate Finance

The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) warmly
welcomes Bryant A. Bethell, as Director, Corporate Finance,
effective March 10, 2008. In this position Mr. Bethell is primarily
responsible for managing financial forecasts and projections,
evaluating investment. and financing arrangements and
corporate cash management for NAD. His duties also include
managing contractual and reporting relationships with financial
institutions, government entities and airlines.

Mr. Bethell has held financial positions with leading firms in
both the Offshore Financial Services Industry and the Insurance
Sector. In May 1987, Mr. Bethell obtained a Bachelor of Science
Degree in Accounting from Tuskegee University in Tuskegee, ‘
Alabama. Mr. Bethell is a member of the Bahamas Institute of ~
Chartered Accountants and the American Institute of Certified
Public Accountants.



KYO DICKINSON
Supervisor, Response Team

Kyo Dickinson was promoted from Response Plumber Level
4 to Supervisor, Response Team effective April 1, 2008. In this
position Mr. Dickinson is responsible for overseeing the multi-
disciplinary Maintenance Response Teams to ensure that all
daily operational maintenance calls are addressed.








PAGE 4B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

BUSINESS

THE TRIBUN /
J






lassau Airport

elopment Company





EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY

large private estate in Nassau seeking an Estate Manager capable
of effectively managing the estate and supervising the household staff.
_ Candidate must have a technical background to be able to maintain all
>quipment on the estate. Previous experience working with large private
estate, small luxury hotel or embassy essential. Applications and resumes
should include references from previous three employers. Send resume,

Ar PEOPLE |

SHENIQUA SMITH, Co



Courteous, energetic and ready to face
the world are just a few adjectives that
describe Sheniqua Smith, the very first
Concierge of the Month for the Nassau
Airport Development Company, within the
Customer Experience Team. Sheniqua
comes to work every day as excited as
if it were her first day. Her excitement
and passion are contagious, r’ ‘ivating
others, and she greets everyo with a
warm and genuine smile.

Sheniqua was born in Nassau on October
14, 1977 and educated at L. W. Young
Senior School. She has worked as a
clerk, and Assistant Manager and now
as a Concierge at NAD. In this position
Sheniqua frequently interacts with tourists
helping to provide a positive first and last
impression of The Bahamas.

We proudly salute Sheniqua for her hard
work and determination and her example
as a great ambassador for NAD and The
Bahamas.

e\tificates and references to:



“OF FAME
\VIBERS



ESTATE MANAGER
P. O. BOX N-7776 , sLOT 193)
-NASSAU, BAHAMAS

The College of The Bahamas Alumni Association

HALL OF FAME
SEEKING NOMINATIONS

What We Are About

The Alumni Association Hall of Fame was established in spring of 2001 by the Executive _
Board of the Association. The purpose is to recognize annually a COB alumna/alumnus who
is making significant contributions to the development of The Bahamas. It is envisioned that
honourees will play a major role in the _ndraising efforts of the Association.

On May 11, 2001, the Alumni Association named Bishop Neil C. Ellis, Pastor, Mount Tabor
Full Gospel Church as its first inductee. Subsequently named were Larry Gibson, a financial
services expert (2002); Laura Pratt-Charlton, a pharmacist /entrepreneur (2003); Tanya.
McCartney, an attorney and a former member of the Senate (2004); Vernice Walkine,
Director Genetal of Tourism (2005), Keith Bell, Former Superintendant of the Royal Bahamas ~
Police Force(2006), Charles Sealy, Chief Executive Officer, Doctor’s Hospital (2007).

Each honouree is presented with a 36” Silver European Cup, which symbolizes his or her
outpouring of inspiration that causes others to thirst for “knowledge, truth and integrity”,
the values promoted by The College of The Bahamas and reflected in the institution's motto.

Hall of Fame Award Criteria:

What It Takes to Be Nominated and Become a Member of The Hall of Fame

The Alumni Association of The College of The Bahamas views induction into its Hall of Fame
; as its highest honour. It is a designation extended to individuals whose lives are the hallmark
of The College’s motto “Knowledge, Truth, Integrity.”







To be considered for the Alumni Association Hall of Fame, nominees must:
Have distinguished themselves as students, academically and socially, while at The

College of The Bahamas

Be among the best in their chosen fields of endeavour, displaying scrupulous conduct

that stands as an example to others.

Be a leader and relentless worker whose success benefits co-workers, those they
supervise or employ and the community in general.

~ Excel in civic outreach and make a contribution to society that is easily visible within
their fields and the wider scop xf Bahamian Life.
Exhibit strength of character that translates generally into community strengthening,
personifying their alma mater’s motto “Knowledge, Truth, Integrity’

Be nominated



The Hall of Fame Award Nomination Form
May be obtained from

The Office of Alumni Relations & Development (Upstairs, Administration Block (A-Block}}

Oakes Field Campus Or may be downloaded from http://my.cob.edu,bs

All nomination forms, along with a current portfolio and photograph, must be submitted by

Wednesday, October 8, 2008.

For more informatio: , please call the Office of Alumni Relations & Development at 302-4359.
Portfolio Size: Fiv '5) pages (maxim) * Font size: 12 pt * Paper 8.5 inches x 11 inches



@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

THE US financial crisis
and global credit/liquidity
crunch are likely to result
in banks bringing securiti-
zations back onshore from
international financial cen-
tres, a Bahamian attorney
said, although the loss of
business will impact other
jurisdictions more than this
nation.

Michael Paton, a Lennox
Paton partner and head of
its financial services group
practice, told Tribune Busi-
ness that as a result of the
sub-prime mortgage mess,
and collapses of the invest-
ment banks Lehman Broth-
ers and Bear Stearns,
onshore regulators would
likely mandate that securi-
tization-related transac-
tions be brought back
onshore and on to banks’
balance sheets.

He explained: “I think
there’s going to be a scal-
ing down compared to pri-
or issues. Securitisations
will take place, but they
will probably be covered


































issues, so they’d be brought
back on the bank’s balance
sheet with recourse to the
bank’s capital.

“We can expect to see
quite a downturn in securi-
tization products issued
offshore, and more banks
will be forced to streamline
capital behind these issues.
There will be a lot more
regulation of derivatives
than there was in the past.”

Focus

. The Bahamas, with its
focus primarily being on
traditional private wealth
management, is less likely
to be impacted by moves
towards tougher securiti-
zation and derivatives
transactions, and their

“movement back on shore,

when compared to rival
international financial cen-
tres such as the Cayman
Islands and British Virgin
Islands.

Mr Paton said: “The
Bahamas hasn’t had that
much of a market share in

_the structured transactions

business. I expect the fall-
out would be more down
in places like Cayman.

“The banks doing struc-|

tured product work here
were primarily the Swiss
banks, and they have
already been forced by the
Swiss regulators to bring
those transactions back
onshore.” ;
Acknowledging that he
had witnessed a downturn
in the offshore securitiza-
tion business over the past
four to five years due to
regulatory tightening
already in motion, Mr
Paton said: “In the
Bahamas, it’s not really the

»

- model fat the vast majority

merral PATON, a Lennox Paton partner



of institutions that are
here.

“To the extent that there
are some institutions that
do more sophisticated
structured transactions, it’s
‘nothing that will have a
macroeconomic impact on
the Bahamas.”

Rationale

He added: “There’s still
going to be a rationale for
securitisations to help the
big banks manage risk
exposure and capital expo-
sure, but.it’s going to be





done in a more regulated)

. Manner, with recourse to

the bank’s capital. Theyj
will not be able to go off-+
shore.” i
Securitisations usuall
involve the creation of a
special purpose vehicle
(SPV) that is held off-bal3
ance sheet, meaning it does}
not appear on a bank’s bal-} |
ance sheet. For example}
banks will pool a-collection;
of assets — such as mort-
gages — and then use the}
SPV to issue bonds that are}
backed from the revenue;
streams created by the

mortgage repayments.



Half Day Forum |



UPDATING YOU ON MATTERS RELATED TO:
_+ Observations on risk management practices in international banks

— INCOLLABORATION WITH THE
CENTRAL BANK OF THE BAHAMAS
BACO IS PROUD TO HOST ITS

2nd HALF DAY FORUM

during the recent market turbulence

- Automated Clearing House System (ACHS)

Speakers include:

« Stanislaw J. Bereza

Inspector of Banks and Trust Companies

© Brian Smith

Project Manager of ACHS

Seating is limited therefore registration is restricted to 2 pasons per

Register with:

DATE: 25th September 2008
TIME: 8:30am -12:00 noon

VENUE: British Colonial Hilton

Cost; FREE

organization

Tel: 242-323-0871 or 323-0872
Fax: 242-325-5674

www, bacobahamas.com

into@ bacobahamas.com





4
8
a



Sot Sea a ha ad lt RR Nis skort

|










THE I RIBUNE

MUNDAY, SEP EMDEM 22, 2UU0, FAUE oD



Bahamian

has ‘never seen the

world economy looking this grim’

m@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business
Editor

A BAHAMIAN financial
services professional has
told Tribune Business that
he has “never seen it so
grim in all my professional
life” when it comes to the
global markets, and criti-
cised the Government for
seemingly not having a plan
to deal with the situation.

Paul Moss, who is seek-
ing the PLP’s St Cecilia
nomination at the next gen-
eral election and runs his
own financial services busi-
ness, Dominion Manage-
ment Services, said: “I don’t
believe our leaders are tak-
ing the crisis seriously
enough. It’s going to come
to the Bahamas.

“What are the contingen-
cies that the Government

The Tribune wants to hear
from people who are
making news in their
neighbourhoods. Perhaps
you are raising funds for a
good cause, campaigning
for improvements in the
area or have won an
award.

If so, call us on 322-1986
and share your story.



ll MSS

has in place or put in place

to serve as a buffer against

the shock to come?”
With the US economic

downturn meaning that
Americans, who account for
85 per cent of visitors to
this nation, were travelling
and spending less, and the
Wall Street financial crisis
taking its toll on employ-
ment and consumer confi-
dence, Mr Moss said: “This
does not look so good.

“I have never seen it so
grim in all my professional
life. In a lot of ways, there’s
not a lot we can do. We’re
going to have to suffer, but
I do not think our Parlia-
ment is talented enough to
see what kind of cushion we
have to drum up to stop this
crisis from coming our way.
It’s very serious, but no
one’s paying any attention.”

Mr Moss called for a
national conclave to be
held, so that the Bahamas’
greatest economic and busi-

_ ness brains could come

Colina.

Holdings Bahamas Limited

Colina Holdings Bahamas Limited
Class “A” Preference Shares

The Board of Directors

of Colina Holdings

Bahamas Limited (CHBL) is pleased to announce
that a Preference Share Dividend for the period
July 1, 2008 to September 30, 2008 at the annual’
rate of B$ Prime +2.25% will be paid to the

Class “A”

Preference Shareholders

of record

of CHBL on the 30th day of September 2008.

Payment will be made through the Company’s

Registrar

and Transfer

Agent, CFAL Ltd.

within 10 business days of the record date.

BSI OVERSEAS (BAHAMAS) LIMITED

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited, Nassau,

Bahamas, an one tes

international private bank, with its headquarters in Lugano, Switzerland,
presently accepting applications for.

together to devise a way out
of the problems likely to
impact this nation in the
next 12-18 months.

Meanwhile, Mr Moss,
who is a stern opponent of
the Economic Partnership
Agreement (EPA) that this
nation is due to sign next
month with the European
Union (EU), criticised his
own party for its stance on
the trade treaty.

“I’m very disappointed in
the Government’s decision
to go ahead and sign, even
though they have not done
a sufficient job in consulting
the Bahamian people,” Mr

Moss said. “The consulta-
tions the minister [Zhivargo
Laing] talks about were a
sales pitch.

“T’condemn not just his
actions, but the actions of
Parliament, including the
Opposition. I believe they
have not just let down the
people in this country and
generations to come, but
their ancestors and those
who fought for this coun-
try.”

Praising President Jagdeo
of Guyana for his stance
against the EPA, Mr Moss
told Tribune Business that
over the next few weeks he

and the organisation which
he heads, Bahamians Agi-
tating for a Referendum on
Free Trade (BARF), would
work to generate support
both inside and outside the
Bahamas and see if we can
gain sufficient numbers to
make this country not go
forward with this agree-
ment.

“Tt may sound like a done
deal, but we are optimistic.
I believe we will get past
that issue, wiser heads will
prevail and the Opposition
will wake up from its slum-
ber.”

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY
COMMERCIAL BUILDING
SITUATED ON DOUBLE LOTS TOTALING 23,753 SQ. FT.

LOCATED BERNARD ROAD
Approximately 500 feet east of the Village Road Round About

Interested persons should submit offers in writing addressed to:
The Mena Credit Risk Management, P.O. Box N-7518,

Nassau, Bahamas

to reach us before September 29, 2008.
For further information, please contact:

356-1608 or 502-0929

yf AR fa uh 19



RBC WEALTH MANAGEMENT (BAHAMAS)

is considering

suitable applications for

Investment Manager

Candidates for this vacancy should possess the following qualifications:
* University degree (preferably in Business and/or Economics)
« CFA designation (or candidacy), certifications in the areas of Financial
Planning and/or portfolio management
Minimum 5 years investment industry experience

Account Officer - External Asset Managers Desk

Applicants for the position of Account Officer for the External Asset Managers
(EAM) Desk must have at least 5 years experience in the offshore banking
‘sector, good knowledge of international investment instruments, money and
financial markets, ability to partner with team members, must be confident
regarding customer relations, knowledge of local legislation, regulatory &
statutory matters as well as international banking practices. Fluency in Italian is a
. must.

Personal qualities :-
Excellent organizational, communication and computer skills
Goal-oriented, self-motivated, positive attitude .
Commitment to quality and service excellence
Able to work with minimal supervision
Flexibility in office hours and hands-on approach when necessary

Responsibilities :-
Service & advise allocated EAM and clients
Maintain & follow up allocated relationships
‘Liaise directly with customers
Foster and maintain communication with internal/external counterparts
Meet deadlines on timely basis
submit — their

Interested individuals with should

-resume/curriculum vitae to :-

such qualifications

Human Resources Manager

BSI Overseas (Bahamas) Limited
Goodman’s Bay Corporate Centre
West Bay Street

P. O. Box N-7130

Nassau, Bahamas

Fax no.: (242) 502 2303 or email: ruby.kerr@bsibank.com

(ABSOLUTELY NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE)
Only applicants having the above attributes will be contacted.

Portfolio management experience (5 years + }

PC Literate-and experience using industry standard software

Specialized knowledge in sales, investment policy statements and general
knowledge in tax legislation, financial planning, estate and trust.

Fluency in English and French (language skills in spanish would be an asset
but are not required) :

' Responsibilities Include:

Retention and growth of the private client discretionary investment
management business °

Assisting high net worth clients in establishing their investment objectives and
tolerance for risk

Development and implementation of customized portfolio strategies

Provide counsel to clients on the firm’s investment policies and strategies and

* communicate portfolio performance

Oversight of performance investment reviews to ensure a suitable/appropriate
asset allocation is in place and opine on investment performance where
appropriate

* Overall sales and relationship management.

RBC Wealth Management services high net worth clients in over 150 countries
around the world. Royal Bank of Canada Trust Company (Bahamas) Limited
plays a central role in the international wealth management network.

This position offers opportunities for career and professional development. We
offer an attractive compensation package, which includes incentive bonuses and
a comprehensive health & benefits plan.

' Applicants should apply by

Tuesday, September 23, 2008 to:

Shelly Mackey

RBC Wealth Management (Bahamas) Limited
P.O. Box N-3024

Blake Road & West Bay Street,

Nassau, Bahamas

Email: Shelly. Mackey @rbc.com

All applications will be treated in the strictest confidence. We will only respond
to applicants with suitable qualifications and experience.

a RBC
Neb atatah (chaos eaaan \ | eee Bee Ta
SR aka aaNet hc ea LRBC| of Canada


PAGE 6B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

/
THE TRIBUNE. /





Luxury goods retailers in

All tenders must reach the office of the Financial Controller or the respective Family Island Local Office

TENDER FOR

MOTOR VEHICLES

‘The National Insurance Board is pleased to offer for sale, by sealed tender only, the vehicles below.
Interested persons may view the vehicles and obtain tender guidelines by contacting the Purchasing,
Stores and Auxiliary Services Department of the National Insurance Board located in the Board’s
Jumbey Village Complex, Baillou Hill Road. For further information, you may contact the Department
at telephone number 502-1781 or 502-1858. Family Island residents may contact the Family Island
Local O ffice Managers who will be able to assist.



Manager no later than 4:00 p.m. on Friday September 26, 2008, in order to be considered.

Year
2003

fear
2003

Year
2003

Year
2003

2003.

2003
2003
2002
2003
2003

BIMINI LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
Nissan X-trail

Chassis No.
JNIBNT30Z0008079

KEMP’S BAY (ANDROS) LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
Wrangler Jeep

Chassis No.
1J4FA29123P346409

MAYAGUANA LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
Wrangler Jeep

Chassis No.
1JAFA29143P360103

NEW PROVIDENCE

Make & Model
Nissan AD Wagon
Nissan AD Wagon

Nissan AD Wagon

Nissan X-trail
Wrangler Jeep
Wrangler Jeep
Nissan Platina

Chassis No.
3NIDY0552ZK005150
3NIDY0556ZK005149
3N1IDY0558Z.K005282
JNITBNT30Z0008924

1J4FA49S12P768884

1J4FA29123P360104
3NIJD01D5ZL080106

NORTH ELEUTHERA SUB-OFFICE

Make & Model
Nissan AD Wagon

Chassis No.
3N1DY0556Z.K005264

SIMMS (LONG ISLAND) LOCAL OFFICE

Make & Model
_ Nissan X-trail

‘Chassis No.

~ JNITBNT30Z0009814

License No.

116974

License No.

117515

License No.

6510

‘License No.

116977
117712
116979
116978
145960
118668
35023

License No.

116975

License No.

1632



FROM page one

likely to have a “negative
effect”.

Israel Assa, Estee Lauder’s
vice-president/general manag-
er for travel retailing in the
Americas region, also referred
to the 2,500 square foot store it
was working to build with John
Bull to act as a showcase for its
top brands. These included
Estee Lauder, Tommy Hil-
figer, Sean John, Tom Ford,
Donna Karan and Jo Malone.

Describing this concept store
as Estee Lauder’s first in the
Americas region, Mr Assa
wrote: “This is by far the most
ambitious project we have
undertaken in the Caribbean.

“We are most concerned.

that this increase in duty will
have a negative effect on the
retail success of our project.
The duty increase could lead
to a long-term effect that
diminishes the ability of John
Bull, and the Bahamas in gen-
eral, to remain competitive
with retailers on other
Caribbean islands. That would
be most unfortunate.

“As a major brand supplier
in this category we would, at
a minimum, like to see the
Government reconsider its
decision and go back to previ-
ous duty levels.”

Tribune Business under-.

stands that Bahamian luxury
goods retailers have not given

- up their lobbying effort to

encourage the Government to
reverse the duty increases,
despite the administration’s ini-
tial stance that they would
remain in place during the cur-
rent fiscal year.

Several Bay Street mer-
chants met with Zhivargo
Laing, minister of state for

finance, and his ministry offi-

cials, on July 28,.2008,.,to. dis-

cuss the issue. Among those
retailers to raise concerns were
Fred Hazelwood at John Bull,
Peter Phillips at Brass &
Leather, and Tim Lightbourne
of the Perfume Shop.

In reply, Ehurd Cunning-
ham, the Ministry of Finance’s
revenue secretary, said in an

August 13, 2008, letter: “Please .

be advised that the minister
has examined the position and
has taken into account the
points expressed. The matter
will be monitored and will be
reviewed during the next Bud-
get exercise.

“T am to advise that should it
be warranted, the Government
could give consideration to
remitting any duties paid in
respect of the items men-
tioned.”

Among the major concerns
of Bahamian luxury goods
retailers are that any rise in
import duties automatically
impacts their margins and prof-

itability. This is because the -

perfume brands fix prices
across. the Caribbean and
Americas region, with dis-
counters cut off from supply.
As aresult, if Bahamian lux-

" ury goods retailers increased

their prices to compensate for
the duty increases, it would
make them uncompetitive with
rival Caribbean destinations
and the cruise ships’ on- -board
retail offerings. It is understood
that 45 per cent of Bay Street
merchants’ business, on aver-
age, comes from cruise tourists.

“In speaking to some ven-
dors, the Bahamas receives the
largest discount on prices in
order to compensate for the
high rate of import duties in
the Caribbean. There is no
room for a further discount,”
Solomon’s Mines’ Ne ilfer

-warned in his e-mail:
. With shopping a “major
tourist PcIBNy EPI the retail -

‘survival’ fight on tax rises

industry is also concerned the
tax increases — and any subse-
quent price increases — will
undermine the ‘duty free’
retailing concept in the
Bahamas.

While perfume and luxury
goods products were once sold
in the Bahamas as much as 25
per cent below US prices,
today the price differential is
nominal, particularly on Euro-
pean brands due to the
strength of the euro increasing
supply costs for retailer.

Mr Hillier added: “Christ-
mas is here for us, as we place
orders this month for delivery
in late.September or early ©
October. Gift sets are the main
attraction and account for over
60 per cent of business at
Christmas.

“The margin given us by
suppliers, however, is much
lower, as the gift sets include
free items such as body cream
and aftershave. If we have to
pay another 5 per cent duty on
them it will be disastrous for
us.”

Tribune Business previously
revealed Bay Street’s concern
over the Budget duty increases
last month. Joan Thompson,
owner of the Brass & Leather
and Fendi stores, said the
increase in the duty rate for
leather products, from 20 per
cent to 25 per cent, coupled
with the drastic increase in
electricity and other operating
costs, would wipe out the price
advantage previously held over
US retail and push margins
into unprofitable territory.

She and others warned that,
together with the economic
downturn, the Budget tax
increases and subsequent price’
rises were likely to reduce
sales, reduce profitability,

‘impact employment and lead
-to a lower revenue take for the

Treasury. }

Vy,


- TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 7B



FROM page one

and approvals given to the Bak-
er’s Bay developers by govern-
ment agencies, had failed to
comply with the court’s rules
and should be thrown out.

Justice Gray-Evans also
‘refused the Association’s appli-
cation for an injunction to pre-
vent the developers, Discovery
Land Company, from continu-
ing to build-out Baker’s Bay,
and declined to permit its
request for full disclosure of all
government permits and
licences granted “in its present
form”.

And, finally, the judge also
declined the Association’s
request for an order requiring
the Attorney General to take
action against Discovery Land
Company if it continued to work
under the permits and approvals
that were the subject of the
court challenge.

Justice Gray-Evans said: “In
my view, until the permits and
approvals granted have been
quashed, the developers are
entitled to operate under them.”

In response, Mr Smith said
the Association was “disap-
pointed, but it is not going to
discourage us from continuing
to pursue that which the Asso-
ciation regards as its rights. We

will be appealing, and hope the -

Association will be successful
on appeal”.

When asked whether it was
now time to drop the legal bat-
tler, given that Discovery Land
Company and Baker’s Bay were
being held up by the Govern-
ment as the model for environ-
mentally sustainable develop-
ment in the Bahamas, Mr Smith
told Tribune Business: “That’s
allowing expediency to succeed
over principle and rights.

“The people of Guana Cay
continue to wish to have their
rights vindicated. Unfortunately,
it’s taking a lot longer than
anticipated. Their complaints
about abuse of' local rights and

central government overriding _

local government remain. This
case is very important, because
we’re dealing with people’s
rights and with process. To what
extent can central government
ride roughshod over local rights,
especially when the locals are
trying to protect those rights.

This is a seminal case, and it will

be prosecuted.”

On the environmental side,
Mr Smith said the Association
“has never complained about
the bonafides of Discovery Land
Company’s intentions to miti-
gate environmental damage.as
much as they can. It is simply
saying that Discovery Land
Company chose the wrong place
to anchor its project”.

Mr Smith added that many of
the environmental protection
measures being employed at
Baker’s Bay had resulted from
the Association’s pressure. He

. argued that the project was too
large for Guana Cay and was
compromising the previous
“organic development” the
community’s local and foreign
residents had enjoyed.
















Baker's Bay

In her judgment, Justice
Gray-Evans noted that both the
Government agencies and the
developers, who were named
as defendants, argued that
under Supreme Court order 53,
rule 4, the Association had not
complied with the procedure
for judicial review proceedings
by filing them within six months
of when the matter at issue first
arose.

The issue at stake was the
series of permits granted to Dis-
covery Land Company by vari-
ous government agencies
between May 31, 2005, and
March 7, 2007, and whether
these authorities had the power
to grant such approvals.

However, Mr Smith argued

that because the Association
did not know of these permits
until May 30, 2007, the applica-
tion date started running from
then. As a result, the judicial
review application was in com-
pliance with the Supreme
Court’s rules, as it was made
on September 25, 2007.
. Yet Discovery Land Compa-
ny and its then-attorney,
Michael Barnett, argued that
the Association also failed to
explain the four-month delay
between acquiring knowledge
of the permits and the,actual
Judicial Review application fil-
ing.

Justice Gray-Evans found:
“Further, the [developers] say
that as a result of the [Associa-
tion’s] delay, they have suffered
—and are likely to suffer — prej-

“They say. that pursuant to
the [approvals] decisions, some
of which had been made more
than two years before the appli-
cation, they have invested a
considerable amount of mon-

ey, some $200 million thus far,

in*the development; have
engaged the services of con-
tractors and sub-contractors,
who in turn now provide
employment for many Bahami-
ans; and have to date done a



IN HOUSE

INVESTMENTS LFD



y

great deal of work on the Bak-
er’s Bay project, some portions
of which had been completed
while others were near com-
pletion.”

Ultimately, Justice Gray-
Evans said the Association did
not adequately explain that
four-month delay and, as a
result, it did not move with
‘utmost promptness’ - when it
became aware of the permits
issued - in challenging them.

She added that the case was
not one “in which leave should
have been granted”, and set
aside that which was granted
to the Association by former
Acting Justice Maynard.

The Association’s “inability
or unwillingness” to give an
undertaking for damages
caused if a ‘stop work’ injunc-
tion was granted against Bak-
er’s Bay also meant that appli-
cation was refused by Justice
Gray-Evans.

In addition, she found that
the Association’s discovery
application for all permits and
approvals granted to Baker’s
Bay was “too broad”. “I accept
the [Government and develop-
er] submission that discovery
should be limited to specific
approvals, permits and licences,
and the decision-making
process surrounding them, all
of which, to my mind, should

- be a matter of public record,”

Justice Gray-Evans said.

Both the Government and
Baker’s Bay had accused the
Association of undertaking “a
fishing expedition”. Justice
Gray-Evans added: “The Gov-
ernment respondents are con-
cerned that the scope of the
applicants’ application for dis-
covery may extend to a class of
documents or particular docu-
ments in respect of which the
respondents might wish to
make an objection, and there-
fore require more specificity.

“In the result, they say that .

they reserve the right to object
to the production of any docu-
ment or class of documents on.
ground of public interest immu-
nity.”



NOTICE TO |
SHAREHOLDERS










in the usual manner.

Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah.) Ltd

Is seeking candidates for the positions of

1. Production Supervisor
2. Bottle Blow Moulding Technician
3. Line Maintenance Technician
_4, Senior Electrician

5. Refrigeration Technician

If you are interested in these positions and feel you have
the necessary experience to perform these jobs, please
submit your resume by applying. in writing by hand de-
livery or mail to:

Human Resource Manager
Caribbean Bottling Co. (Bah.) Ltd

P.O. Box N-1123
Nassau, Bahamas

Or by email to:

: Jfountain-moss @cbcbahamas.com
on or before Friday October 3rd, 2008

The Board of directors of In House Investments Limited has
declared a quarterly dividend for Preferred Shares to all
shareholders of coil at September 15, 2008 as follows:

Preferred Shares 7.25% per annum (payment quarterly).
The payment will be made September 30, 2008 through

Royal Fidelity Share Registrars & Transfer Agents Limited




m Group.

The Junkanoo Corporation New Providence Limited

In partnership with
The MINISTRY OF YOUTH, SPORTS & CULTURE

Application
for
Prospective Judges
Applicant must be 21yrs or over

OFFICAL USE ONLY

JUDGE NUMBER

The 2008 / 2009 Junkanoo Season

Please PRINT LEGIBLY all information in the spaces provided below and answer all questions and provide doc-
umentation including a passport photo as requested or application may be subject to outright rejection

All information given by applicants will be subject to follow up background investigations and checks.

A. PERSONAL INFORMATION













Full Name (Ms./Mt./Mrs.) SURNAME FIRST MIDDLE
Alias ‘ Maiden name aliases nick names
Address:
(STREET, CITY, ISLAND)
Date of Birth _. Country of Birth Age
DD/MM/YY
P.O. Box Sex Nationality
Telephone (W) (H) Seok eras, __(C)
Employer Profession
f Employer's Address
2 Lemail: i



B. GENERAL & BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Have you resided in the Bahamas for more than five years? (If NO please state previous residence)



Have you ever judged a Junkanoo Parade? (IF YES please give year(s) of parade)



a. Do you currently participate/rush with any Junkanoo group? __ If yes, name



yb. Have you participated/rushed with any Junkanoo Group before If yes, name t

group.





c. Are you an avid supporter of any Junkanoo Group? ~ If yes, name

group.









jd. Do you have any relatives and/or close friends who participate with any Junkanoo Group?



Hf yes name persons and group(s)



e. Do you presently have any personal affiliation wi th ANY Junkanoo Grdttp? (If YES please name the
Group. : .

f£. Do you have any religious reason that may prevent you from judging a parade? (If YES please explain)

g. Do you work on Boxing Day and/or New Years? (If YES please state which)



h. Why-do you wish to be a judge?





§ Have you ever participated in any Junkanoo parade(s) before? (If YES please give the year and name of the



grou p)

Explain how “integrity” relates to a judge and the parade.



$$



C. Given the above, are you confident that you are able to Judge a parade fairly and in an unbiased manner, based solely on
y y Judge a p Y y
your training and the presentation and performance of the groups during the parades? Yes or No

Do you sec Judging of Junkanoo Parades as a National contribution and civic duty? Yes or No
Do you know of any reason that would disqualify you for being allowed to Judge any parade? Yes or No

D. MEDICAL INFORMATION

Please note this section is for insurance and medical emergency purpose ONLY

| Do you have any medical condition(s) that might prevent you from judging? (EG: asthma, heart condition, diabetes, hyperten-

sion, optical, hearing, etc.) If YES please explain and list any medication that you take for that condition.



Are you allergic to any specific medicine? (If yes please list)
I understand that I may be liable to take a medical examination to determine my abilities in areas related to my ability to judge
the parade and agree to the same.



Emergency Contact (LIST’ 2 PERSONS TO CONTACT IN THE EVENT OF AN EMERGENCY)





1. Name Relationship

Telephone (Ww) _(H) a ee rs (CG)
2. Name Relationship

Telephone (W) (H) wh see, - C)
Declaration

I, declare that the information I have provided in this application is true and correct. I further agree that I am of sound
mind and body and pledge to be sober during the parade and to abide by all of the rules, regulations and assignments set

| forth by JCNP or its assigns. I further understand and accept the full responsibility for the completeness and accuracy of
|. the information that I have herein provided, and accept full and complete responsibility for the same. If any of the infor-

mation is found to be false and or misleading, either prior during or after a parade that I have Judged, I render my self
incapable of judging again in the future, and agree to stand liable for any such act, and that any and all scores tendered
by me will be discarded.



APPLICANT SIGANTURE DATE

PASTE
PHOTO HERE

Completed applications should be submitted to the
Ministry of Culture, Morro Castle, Attention Mrs. Joan Henderson on
or before Friday, October 10, 2008
PAGE 8B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE TRIBUNE



i
tied Yoowore

AL

Baker's Bap

Do You Want to be a Baker’s Bay Star?

Join us at our

“SEARCH FOR STARS”

Do you want to work with an organization that is
progressive, dynamic, and growing with great benefits?

Do you want an exciting career opportunity on one of the
fastest growing Family Islands in The Bahamas?

Do you want to work with a team of committed,
hardworking, creative hospitality professionals?

If you answered “YES”, then you need to be a part of the
Baker’s Bay Search for Stars at Our Lucaya.
Freeport, Grand. Bahama and British Colonial Hilton,
Nassau, Bahamas.

We are ‘extraordinary people creating extraordinary
experiences and we're seeking Stars in the following key
areas:
Culinary
Food and Beverage Service
Accounting
Emergency Medical Technician/Nurse
Residential Services/Inn Management
Activities Management
Information Technology (IT)
Security

Interview Schedule
Our Lucaya, Freeport, Grand Bahama

- Monday, September 29, 2008
9:00 a.m.- 4:30 p.m. AND 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Tuesday, September 30, 2008
8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. AND 6:00 p.m. - 8:00p.m.

British Colonial Hilton, Nassau,
New Providence

Wednesday, October 1, 2008
9:00 am - 4:30 p.m. AND 6:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Thursday, October 2008
8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Call 242-367-0800 or email hr@bakersbayclub.com to
submit your resume and schedule your interview!

“Becoming the Employer of Choice
in The Bahamas!”



S41m ICD deal BISX's
‘largest bloc trade ever'

@ By NEIL HARTNELL
Tribune Business Editor

THE five million-share
transaction that saw Lady
Henrietta St George sell her
50 per cent ICD Utilities stake
for $41 million was “the
largest bloc trade we’ve had
by a wide margin” on the
Bahamas International Secu-

rities Exchange (BISX), its
chief executive has told Tri-
bune Business.

Keith Davies said that while
the value and volume of the
share sale to Canadian power
producer Emera would boost
BISX’s year-to-date trading
statistics, the impact on the
exchange’s All-Share Index
was harder to predict. This

was simply because the Index
was weighted towards market
capitalisation, with First-
Caribbean International Bank
(Bahamas) dominating it sim-
ply because it had far more
issued shares than other pub-
lic companies.

“It doesn’t matter about the
size or the amount of the secu-
rities involved,” Mr Davies
told Tribune Business. “What

people did not see was all the
work done at the back end to
ensure the trade happened
when it was supposed to, and
that all participants were fully
aware of the disclosure
requirements. That was all
done to ensure it went off
without a hitch.

“On BISX, it’s as easy to
trade one share as it is to trade
five million shares.”

gets
NAD

Nassau Airport

Development Company

OPPORTUNITY

The Nassau Airport Development Company (NAD) is seeking
candidates for the role of Manager, People. The successful
candidate will be responsible for all aspects of human resource
management at NAD, including employee compensation,
payroll and benefits, training, labour relations, health and safety,
communications, social activities and community involvement.
This position reports to the Vice President, Finance and Chief
Financial Officer and will involve daily interaction with NAD
staff, senior management, and executives.

The ideal candidate will have a post secondary education in a
field consistent with human resource management, and will be
able to work independently to manage multiple priorities and
stakeholders in a fast paced work environment. At least five
years experience in a similar position is preferred.

This position offers competitive compensation and benefits,
consistent with experience and qualifications.



LOOK WHAT'S HAPPENING

Professional Development
Tile Laying (£5 Weeks}
MATAWIRLP. OS, Sane bra

Aceminting 1 (12 Weeks}

Bre £075, 6-9pe

Sat. 104. Sam lom $306
Agtounting LF (12 Weeks}

Pre DOS, G-Ypim

Sak. 14, Sarn- 1 gin

Quick Books (12 Weeks}

Pree HVS, GS pri

vad. 1004, Sue Lona

esas

Intra, € “omputers Apphcations 1 12 Weeks}
Sat. 104, Qani-3par $345

Intro. Computers AppHeations 1H (L2 Weeks}
Sak, 104, Hamed pin

At Review (1 Weeks}
Bri 103, & 1Opra

Nail Care & Artistry (15 Weeks}
Mfon. Paes. Thurs 10/8, & iOens

Facial Technology (0 Weeks:

Adon. Tues. Thars.
Face Care & Make-up Application (10Weeks}
Sat. 10/4, Gaen3om $375
Aervlic Nails 10 Weeks}

Fr 23, 6. bp 7 $300
Barhering 1 (15 Weeks}

Mon. Wed. 9/8, 6-H lpn: $306

Vile Laying-How fo Do 43 Weeks}

Sat. 14h Yani dn $300
Basic Blue Print Reading & -

Estiniating 1 Residential (28 Weeks}

Sat IDL Yam Spm $320
Basic Blue Print Reading &

Estimating HW Commercial (10 Weeks)

bre 103. Gp pat $350

MG, 6.16pm ~ $378

Drswall bustallation (25 Weeks}
MOPIWRUP. OFS, §

Winday
(0 Weeks)

Mon. Wed. 9/29, San ipm
Tues. Weil, 83%, 6 - lpi
‘Tues. Thurs. 0/30, Sane «3 pen

freatment Drapery & Valence

Sewing (10 Weeks}

_ Sat. 104, Sampras.

Painting & Decorating 48 Weeks}
(Residential & Commercial}

Mon. Wel. 0/29, Sam-lorm

Tues. Thurs. 9220, Sanne} peat

Tues. Weil. 830, &-f0par $3)

Upholstery E (18 Weeks}
Tues. Thurs. 030, 6-10pe S300
Upholstery Uf (18 Werks)
Mon. Wed. 9/29, 6 Ifpm
Straw Craft 1 (18 Weeks}
Man. Wed. 9/29, Sam-lom
Straw Cratt Advanced 11 8 Weeks}
Mon. Wed. 9/29, 6-i0pn: $340

Grice

50)2-6338/9

Office Hours: Monday-Friday * 9am-5pm

BIVE reserves the right ta cancel courses ifa minimum number
| of students have not registered. Students will receive a fuil
refund if classes are canceled by the institution.

BTV reserves the right te change Tuition, Fees, Course Content,
OC oare aus SOs a Geel. e

Early registration heips eliminate the disappointment of course

Shell Souvenir Manufacturing (10 Weeks)
Mon. Wed, 4/24, dam. | pun

arial es

‘Tues. Thurs. 9/30, 9am-Lpns
‘Thes. Wed. 9730, (-1apm

Marine Outboard Eagine

Preventive Maintenance (16 Weeks)
Mon. 16, 6-9pni

Wed. 10/6, 6-99 $3)

Moe iriicite aes Lisa Onirae he ltiinn raises

10 WEEK K PROGRAMS.
OCT 3 - DEC 6, 2008

12 WEEK PROGRAMS

OCT 3 - DEC 20, 2008

Small Gas Eagine Repair (0) Weeks)
Sat. 10/4, Jam-3prn $30)

SEPT §

15 WEEK PROGRAMS
- DEC 20, 2008

MORE HAPPENINGS! Fr BTVI Coe

Oil-rich Nigeria enjoys ‘brain gain

® LAGOS, Nigeria
Associated Press

THEY speak in the clipped tones of the British upper class or

~ the soft drawl of southern California. They boast degrees and
work experience from elite overseas institutions. And now

they're coming home.

Nigerians who left their homeland to seek riches abroad are
increasingly returning as Africa's biggest oil producer rides an
energy bonanza that is opening up unprecedented opportunities.

Abiola Lawal, 41, is part of this "brain gain."

He was earning a six-figure salary with business software
giant SAP*AG in southern California before he returned to
Nigeria in 2005 after 17 years abroad, joining a major Nigerian
energy firm, Oando PLC, as chief strategy officer.

"There are lots of 30- and 40-something-year-olds who are
CEOs in this country, and that would never be in the States or
the U.K. because the experience pool is much deeper there,"
said Lawal. "In the States I will have opportunities, but not at

' the level we are getting them in Nigeria, and that's the reality."

While most of Nigeria's 140 million citizens are deeply impov-

_ erished, some parts of the waterfront commercial capital of

Lagos are becoming mini boomtowns.

With petrodollars strengthening the economy and the gov-
ernment deregulating key industries, Nigeria's telecommuni-
cations, banking and energy sectors are growing at double and
sometimes triple digit rates, with stock prices to match. The over-
all economy is forecast to grow’at about 9 percent in 2008.

This growth has created a growing appetite for internationally
business savvy recruits. Many companies now organize career
fairs in major cities in the U.S. and Europe, seeking to person-
ally woo Africans with overseas training and work experience.

For many Nigerian expatriates, it's a tempting proposal: the

chance to contribute to the development of their country while

enjoying compensation packages that often include fast-track
promotion, housing, a maid, a car and a driver.

No firm figures exist for how many Nigerians educated or.
working overseas are coming home. But recruitment companies
report hundreds of applications for each job they advertise and
up to 85 percent of the applicants are Nigerians working in the

NOTICE

LIQUIDATION SALE

BY RECEIVER FOR BEST PRICE
HOME & OFFICE CENTRE

HLB Galanis. Bain hereby invites Business
Houses and Individuals to bid on a large
quantity of Home and Office supplies. The
items are brand new and all price quotations
must be firm and will be valid for 30 days.

Interested companies or individuals may
collect a copy of The Inventory List from the
Receptionist’s Desk in Shirlaw House on
Shirley Street between 9:00 am and
4:30 pm, Monday through Friday or
alternatively call the office and we will email a
copy of The Inventory List.

The deadline for submission of tenders is
Friday 26th September, 2008.

All offers should be made in writing in a sealed
envelope and delivered to:

Mr. John S. Bain

Receiver & Manager

HLB Galanis Bain

Shirlaw House, Shirley Street
P.O. Box N-3205

Nassau, Bahamas

Tel: (242) 328-4540

The Receivers reserve the right to reject any -
and all offers.


WE 7

THE TRIBUNE



FROM page one

will today open the doors of
their partnership, Chandler
Gilbert Insurance Associates,
to the Bahamian public, with
the goal of providing.‘true’
insurance brokerage services to
clients.

Mr Gilbert, a former
Bahamas Insurance Brokers
Association (BIBA) president,
told Tribune Business in an
exclusive interview: “You and I
both know there are some
changes that need to occur in
this market.

“Clients go to an intermedi-
ary and say they want this
placed. The intermediary acts
more as a PO Box to receive
the information, which is passed
on to the insurer, without the
intermediary finding out what
the clients’ needs are.

“Very little insurance broking
goes on. Most are agents of
insurance companies, except in
instances where large clients are
involved. That is something we
are looking to bring to the mar-
ket — making sure the product
suits the needs of the client.
Even though we may be agents
of insurers, we will see how
products can be tailor-made to
suit the interests of clients,
rather than just taken off-the-
shelf.”

Mr Gilbert said Chandler

‘Gilbert Insurance Associates,

which unlike many rivals has
been set up as a partnership to
provide insurance agency, bro-
kerage and consultancy services,
was “going to be much more
transparent in the way we oper-
ate”.

This will involve the company
disclosing upfront to clients
what brokerage fee/commission
Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates will receive in return
for placing their business with a
certain carrier.

Just like how attorneys and
accountants disclose their fees
and hourly rates, Mr Gilbert
said the company would do the
same’for insurance clients. Too
often, he explained, clients just
saw a single figure — the premi-
um they paid — without knowing
how much of that would be paid
to a broker or agent.

The former BIBA president
said that when he worked in
Bermuda for Marsh McLennan,
the company always disclosed
on paperwork for clients the net
premium. price it paid.and the
brokerage fee/commission it

a



MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE.9B

4“)

‘We'll be a force to
be reckoned with’

would earn itself.

“Many players in the
[Bahamas] market are reluctant
‘to disclose that [brokerage fee]
information,” Mr Gilbert told
Tribune Business. “But I don’t
see why there should be any dif-
ficulty when it comes to our
income.”

Mr Chandler, a former senior
executive with J. S. Johnson, said
the duo were also looking to
develop a full line of products
for specific groups that shared
similar risk profiles.

Almost a risk pooling mecha-
nism, Mr Chandler confirmed
that Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates would “in’a sense be
focusing on attracting people
with similar risk characteristics”
such as accountants, architects
and engineers. The programmes
developed would look to take
care of all their insurance needs.

Another initiative that Chan-
dler Gilbert Insurance Associ-
ates is eyeing is the “blending of
insurance products with invest-
ment products”.

Mr Gilbert said the company

was currently working with a
Bahamas-based investment
management firm, who he
declined to name, “in creating
some investment products that
can be tied in with insurance
products, probably the home.

“Meeting a catastrophe
deductible of 2 per cent could
be difficult for a large number of
persons, and this is something
we’re looking to do to alleviate
that financial stress.”

Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates is working closely
with a London-based broker to
provide clients with access to the
international insurance market,
and Mr Chandler added: “We
fee] hat in a year’s time we’ll
be a force to be reckoned with in
this market.

“We'll grow as needed and be
very cautious in trying to con-
trol the horse that has just bolt-
ed out of the gate. We’ll be see-
ing how we can grow outside the
Bahamas, too, although that'll
be long-term. There’s a lot of
interest from Caribbean firms
coming in here.”

Or

"GOLCOTAINGS"

JEWELLERY REPAIRS AND
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35% Off Sale
on all interchangeable clasp,
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23rd Sept - 26th Sept

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- BahamArts Festival 2008



A National Trade show promoting Bahamian made Arts & Crafts/Gifts/Souvenirs
October 31° - November 2", 2008
10:00 am ~ 11:00 pm daily







Arawak Cay,
Nassau, Bahamas

Company Name:
Contact Person:
P.O. Box: ota, dons
Island: Settlement:
Telephone: Cellular:
Fax: E-mail:

Cost of Booth: $150.00 Craft (NCA Members)

Cost of Seminars: $50.00

$175.00 (Non-members)
Food Boo $200.00

(Must have a current Health Certificate)
Booths Available on 1° Come 1° Serve Basis

(Comes with 1 tables & 2 chairs)

Please fill out the form and drop off to BAIC

ONLY 80 Booths Available...

Don’t wait! Register Now!!!!!

Non-Refundable

(ALL Completed forms should be returned to Lekeisha Thompson)

Mr Chandler said both poten-
tial commercial and residential
clients had shown interest in
their company already, its cre-
ation having been a project start-
ed some 18 months ago.

Another area of focus, he
added, was combating the
“increasing disquiet” among
Bahamian insurance consumers
about rising costs, especially
homeowners insurance premi-

ums.

Asked why he and Mr Gilbert
had set up their own business,
Mr Chandler replied: “One of
the driving reasons is that we
believe and see there is a disqui-
et on the part of the public with
what they’re getting for the mon-
ey they’re investing in insurance.

“It’s mostly the home, where
the premium is going up because
of catastrophe perils. We feel.a




>



2008/2009 Officers & Directors

President

David Ramirez, CFA

Pictet Bank & Trust Ltd.
_ POBox N-4837, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 302.2217

Fax: (242) 327 6610

Email:dramirez@pictet.com

Vice-President

Christopher Dorsett, CFA

Citigroup Corporate & Investment Bank
PO Box N 8158, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 302 8668

Fax: (242) 302 8569

Email: Christopher.a.dorsett@citigroup.com

Treasurer

Sonia Beneby, CFA

ScotiaTrust

PO Box N 3016, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5718

Fax: (242) 502 6944

Email: soniacurry@bloomberg.net

Secretary

Karen Pinder, CFA, CATA

EFG Bank & Trust (Bahamas) Ltd.
PO Box SS 6289, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 5400

Fax: (242) 502 5428

Email: karen pinder@efgbank.com

Programs & Public Relations

Jeremy Dyck, CFA

LOM Securities (Bahamas) Ltd.

PO Box CB 12762-525, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 323 0032

Fax: (242) 323-0084

Email: jeremy.dyck@lom.com

Education

Velma Miller

Royal Fidelity Merchant Bank & Trust Limited
PO Box N 4853, Nassau, Bahamas

Ph: (242) 356 7764

Fax: (242) 326 3000

Email: velma.miller(@royalfidelity.com

Scholarships

Warren Pustam, CFA, CGA
EverKey Global Partners

PO Box N 7776-518, Nassau Bahamas
Ph: (242) 362 3093

Fax: (242) 362 6950

Email: warren@everkeyglobal.com








Membership

Pamela Musgrove, CFA

Colina Financial Advisors, Ltd.

PO Box CB 12407, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 502 7008

Fax: (242) 356 3677

Email: pmusgrove@cfal.com

Past President
Kristina M. Fox, CFA
CIT Holdings Limited
PO Box N 1328, Nassau, Bahamas
Ph: (242) 363 1501
Fax: (242) 362 1502

« Email: kf@cit.co.uk


























lot of this is not treated
fairly.”

He explained that homes
which were possibly a superior
risk were being charged the
same premium as those proper-
ties that might represent a
greater risk, with the Bahamas’
location also having an impact
on catastrophe premiums.
Because reinsurers lump this
nation together with Florida,
every time a hurricane hits the
US state, the Bahamas is direct-
ly impacted.

“We're going to be much
more client-focused,” Mr Chan-
dler said, adding that

Chandler Gilbert Insurance
Associates was planning to
embrace Internet technology to
enhance service and help clients
avoid having to spend an entire
lunch-hour and more coming to

INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

In The Rapidly Expanding Carmichael Road Area
Lot #5 Block 2, Millars Heights Subdivision

Property Comprises 18,292.55 SqFt. |.
With 106 Ft. on High Traffic Carmichael Road

Interested person should submit offers in writing

addressed to:

The Manager, Credit Risk Management, |
P.O. Box N-7518, Nassau, Bahamas
to reach us before Septmeber 29, 2008.

For further information, Please contact:

356-1608 or 502-0929

CFA Society of The Bahamas

- MONTHLY LUNCHEON SPEAKER EVENT

Topic:
World”

Date: .
11:30 am

12:00 pm
Please arrive promptly!

Time:

Location:
Arawak Room

Speaker:

La Jolla, CA

Cost: Members - $25.00

Non-Members - $35.00

General Meeting
Speaker’s Address

Sheraton Cable Beach Resort

Lawrence S. Speidell, CFA
Founder and Chief Investment Officer
Frontier Market Asset Management, LLC

their office to deal with insur
ance matters.

Chandler Gilbert Insuranc:
Associates is based at 20 Mon
trose Avenue, and will be offer
ing a full line of general insur
ance coverage, plus act as a bro
ker on the life, health and pen
sions side.

The company is set up as :
partnership, much like a firm of
attorneys or accountants, the aim
being to have “a partnership of
associates working together fo
the entire good of the compa
ny”.

Mr Gilbert and Mr Chandler
are the two founding partners
and staff members, with the
company poised to take on an
administrative assistance in time:
for its opening today. The busi-
ness is finally licensed by the,

-Registrar of Insurance.








a ae eo




















“Frontier Stock Markets: ‘The Next to Join the Emerging |

Wednesday September 24, 2008

Sa SE eens ote

<0 Sem - 5 cee

(Cheques payable to: CFA Society of The Bahamas)

Reservations:




Select Fund.

From 2003 to 2006 he was Executive Vice President at Laffer
Associates, an investment management and c.unomic research
firm. Prior to joining Art Laffer, Larry was a Partner and Director of | |
Global Research and Management at Nicholas Applegate where he
launched the firm’s emerging markets products and developed enhanced the firm's international and global quantitative
disciplines. Larry also spent eleven years as a Trustee at
Batterymarch Financial Management where he was a portfolio
manager for domestic and international strategies, was responsible -
for one of the first equity funds in China and worked on the




PRE-REGISTRATON REQUIRED -
by Monday September 22, 2008, contact:
Jeremy Dyck, CFA, tel..323-0032, jeremy.dyck@lom.com

* Prepayment required through one of the Board Members

Larry Speidell is founding partner and chief investment officer of |
Frontier Market Asset Management, sponsor of the Frontier Market

Sea tee





development of a fund for Russia. As Senior Vice President and

portfolio manager at Putnam Management Company from 1971 to

1983, Larry served as a member of that firm's Investment Policy

Committee.

Larry is a past president of the Boston Securities Analysts Society
and a past director of the Investor Responsibility Research Center
in Washington, D.C. Prior to the investment business, he earned
his B.E. in Mechanical Engineering from Yale University and his
M.B.A. from Harvard University, served as a submarine officer in
the U.S. Navy and was an auditor with Arthur Anderson & Co.









PAGE 10B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008



THE TRIBUNE

- Judge says Lehman can
sell units to Barclays

AIRCRAFT DISPATCHER

SkyBahamas, The Bahamas Regional
Airline, is recruiting a licensed Aircraft
Dispatcher to work in its Operations
Control Center. Applicants must be
mature, responsible individuals, capable of
performing under time constraints and
high pressure, and must be prepared to
work shifts. Salary will commensurate
with qualifications and experience. Please
fax resume to: (242)327-6042 or email to
occ@skybahamas.net.

ready for a change?

Burns House Group of Companies is
looking for an ambitious Marketing Manager
with a proven track record in consumer
marketing.

Burns House Group of Companies (BHG) is
the leading beverage company in the Bahamas.
With its broad portfolio of consumer brands,
extending from beer to spirits and wines, BHG

|| is market leader and trend setter in the respective
categories.

Within our marketing department we seek to
fill the position of Marketing Manager. In this
pasition you will be responsible for a large

ortfolio ‘of consumer brands like Budweiser

eer, Ricardo rums, Climax energy drink..
Hennessy cognac and Carlo Rossi wines to name
afew. The marketing manager we are ook for
is a team player has profound knowledge of the
marketing mix is an excellent planner with great
passion for execution. ; .

BHG will offer you a challenging environment
with international growth potential. We offer an
above market average incentive programme and
international training opportunities

|| Profile of the ideal candidate
¢ Bachelors Degree in Marketing or Business

Administration is essential;
Masters in Business an advantage
3-5 years of supervisory experience in
marketin
Team building skills
Consumer goods Marketing experience

Interested? Send your resume by email to:
~ ccash@burnshouse.com Or fax to Human

Resources Manager: (242) 326-6275

Abaco Markets

Bahamas Property Fund
Bank of Bahamas
Benchmark

Bahamas Waste

Fidelity Bank

Cable Bahamas

Colina Holdings
Commonwealth Bank ($1)
Consolidated Water BDRs
Doctor's Hospital
Famguard

Finco

FirstCaribbean Bank
Focol (S) +

Focol Class B Preference
Freeport Concrete

1CD Utilities

J. S. Johnson

1000.00
1000.00
1000.00

Fidelity Bank Note 17 (Series A) +
Fidelity Bank Note 22 (Series B) +
Fidelity Bank Note 13 (Series C) +

Bahamas Supermarkets
Caribbean Crossings (Pref)
RND Holdings

ABDAB
Bahamas Supermarkets

Colina Bond Fund

Colina MS! Preferred Fund

Colina Money Market Fund

Fidelity Bahamas G &1 Fund

Fidelity Prime Income Fund

CFAL Global Bond Fund

CFAL Global Equity Fund

CFAL High Grade Bond Fund

Fidelity International Investment Fund

FG Financial Preferred !ncome Fund

FG Financial Growth Fund
wu GF inancial Diversified Fund
BISX ALL SHARE INDEX -19Dec02=1,00000. ro
52wk-Hi - Highest closing price in last 52 weeks

y'S weighted price for daity volume
weighted price for daity volume

daa PSE Le Peg SE ek ee ad
-’.Looking for a challenge and.





ey NMaeReRraRRR

NEW YORK
Associated Press

A BANKRUPTCY judge decid-
ed early Saturday that Lehman
Brothers can sell its investment
banking and trading businesses to
Barclays, the first major step to
wind down the nation's fourth-
largest investment bank.

U.S. Bankruptcy Judge James
Peck gave his decision in a court-
room packed with lawyers at the
end of an eight-hour hearing that
extended into the wee hours, cap-
ping a week of financial turmoil.

The deal was said to be worth
$1.75 billion earlier in the week but
the value was in flux after lawyers
announced changes to the terms on
Friday. It may now be worth closer
to $1.35 billion, which includes the
$960 million price tag on Lehman's
Midtown Manhattan office tower.

Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc.
filed the biggest bankruptcy in U.S.

history Monday, after Barclays PLC ,

declined to buy the investment
bank in its entirety.

. The British bank will take con- :
trol of Lehman units that employ

about 9,000 employees in the U.S.

"Not only is the sale a good
match economically, but it will save
the jobs of thousands of employ-
ees," said Lehman lawyer Harvey
Miller of Weil, Gotshal & Manges.

Barclays took on a potential lia-
bility of $2.5 billion to be paid as
severance, in case it decides not to
keep certain Lehman employees

beyond the guaranteed 90 days. But
observers have said Barclays’ main
reason for acquiring Lehman is to
get its people and presence in North
America, making widespread lay-
offs less likely.

"It's unimaginable to me that
they can run the business without
people," said Lehman's financial
adviser, Barry Ridings, of Lazard
Ltd.

Barclays had little competition
to land the deal.

Miller said that before it filed for
bankruptcy, Lehman had negotiat-
ed with just one other bidder, Bank
of America Corp. BofA instead
announced Monday that it would
buy Merrill Lynch & Co., saving it
from a fate similar to Lehman's.
That deal was originally valued at
$50 billion.

Miller said that since Lehman,
filed for bankruptcy, Barclays had
been the only buyer to express
interest in acquiring even parts
of the 158-year-old investment
bank.

"The substance of this transac-
tion is to continue a business for
the benefit of the economy," Miller
said in court. :

Lehman lawyers announced a
number of changes to the deal
before the hearing, which started
at 4:30 p.m. Friday and continued
well past midnight.

Lehman lawyers said the value of

. stock Barclays will buy and liabili-

ties it will assume has fallen since
the start of the week due to market

volatility. Under the new deal, Bar-
clays will buy $47.4 billion in secu-
rities and assume $45.5 billion in
liabilities.

Barclays also said it would buy
three additional units — Lehman
Brothers Canada Inc., Argentina-
based Lehman Brothers Sudamer-
ica SA and Lehman Brothers
Uruguay SA. The two South Amer-
ican entities are part of Lehman's
money management business. Bar-
clays is not paying extra to get the
three units.

There was no change to a $250
million goodwill payment and the
purchase of two data centers in
New Jersey that will go to Barclays,
although Barclays may pay less for
them. Lehman's investment man-
agement business Neuberger
Berman was not bought by Bar-
clays.

The Securities Investor Protec-
tion Corp. liquidated Lehman
accounts Friday under a bankrupt-
cy-style process to transfer assets
from 639,000 Lehman customer
accounts — about 130,000 of which
are owned by individual investors
— to Barclays accounts.

In a statement Saturday, the
SIPC, which maintains funds to pro-
tect investors’ assets at failed bro-
kerage firms, said Lehman cus-

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS

IN THE SUPREME COURT

Common Law & Equity Division
BETWEEN:-

tomers "should have full access to
their accounts in very short order."
Friday night's hearing drew more



than 200 lawyers and observers, ~

who spilled into overflow rooms on
two floors of the U.S. Bankruptcy
Court in Lower Manhattan.

In response to the extraordinary
events of the week, the Bush
administration announced Friday
the biggest proposed government
intervention in financial markets
since the Great Depression. Some
are calling it an "RTC-style bailout"
in reference: to the government-
owned Resolution Trust Corp. that

wound down the assets of savings |

and loan associations, mostly in the
1980s.

"Somehow Lehman Brothers }) |

gets left on the sidelines," said
Daniel Golden of Akin Gump
Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP, who
represents clients holding about $9
billion in bonds. "We believe this
was a flawed sales process. It bene-
fits Barclays and the federal gov-
ernment but not the creditors of
this estate.

"The economic landscape seems
to have changed over the last two
days," he said. "Yet the debtors
and the Fed seem determined that

nothing get in the way of this trans- |

action."

2006 /CLE/qui/00375

AB ENTIRE sess

SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

TO ALL POTENTIAL
__ LANDLORDS

Ross University School of Medicine (Bahamas)
Ltd. is seeking 1 or 2 bedroom accommodations.

Affordable, safe and secure (with or willing to
provide security screens), clean surroundings,
must be fully furnished, air-conditioned, turn
key (pots, dishes, linen) ready to move in
accommodations. Complete for 1 or 2 persons.
Accommodations must be within a 5 mile
radius of the Sea Horse Shopping Centre
(Freeport, Bahamas).

Please submit your applications with how you
meet the standards above to:

The Administrator .
Ross University (Bahamas) Ltd.
P.O. Box F-60087, Freeport, Bahamas

EG CAPI

TAL MARKETS
BROKERAGE & ADVISORY SERVICES

pre:

999999009909990000
eoo00000c0c0og0000c0sd
coo0ooazango000000080

antage Pricing bs
Dail
T% October, 2017
Prime + 1.75% October, 2022
T%

31-Aug-08
12-Sep-08
31-Aug-08
31-Aug-08
31-Dec-07
30-Jun-08
31-Dec-07
31-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08
29-Aug-08

-10.40%
1.84%
1.12%

1.72%

divided by closing price

IN THE MATTER OF All that piece
parcel or lot of land containing 30,190
square feet situate in the Settlement of
the Ferry in the Island of Exuma, one of
the Islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas. ‘

AND IN THE MATTER of The Quieting
Title Act (Chapter 393 of the 2000
Revised Edition of the Statute Laws of
The Bahamas).

AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition
of Alvera Russell.

NOTICE

yw

Pursuant to the Order of the Supreme Court filed the 8" day of

August, A.D. 2008.

_ The Petition of Alvera Russell, of the Southern District
of the Island of New Providence, one of the Islands of the
Commonwealth of The Bahamas, in respect of:-

ALL THAT piece parcel or Lot of land
containing 30,190 square feet situate in the
Settlement of the Ferry in the Island of Exuma
one of the Islands of the Commonwealth of
The Bahamas bounded on the NORTH by
a Public Road and running thereon One
Hundred and Eighty-five and Fifty-five
hundredths (185.55) feet on the EAST by
land now or formerly the property James
Cooper and running thereon One Hundred and
Ninety-nine and Twenty-seven hundredths
(199.27) feet and on SOUTH by the sea and
running thereon One Hundred and Forty-eight
and ten Hundredths (148.10) feet on and on
the WEST by land now or formerly said to
be the property of H.G. Christie and running
thereon One hundred and Sixty and Three ,
hundredths (160.03) feet.

Alvera Russell, claims to be the owner of the land the
subject of this Petition hereinbefore described in fee simple free
from encumbrances.

And the Petitioner has made application to the Supreme
Court of the aforesaid Commonwealth of The Bahamas under
Section 3 of the Quieting Title Act (Chapter 393), to have her
title to the said tract of land investigated and the nature and
extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of Title to
be granted in accordance with the provisions of the said Act.

Notice is hereby given that all persons having Dower or
a right of Dower or an Adverse Claim or a Claim not recognized
in the Petition shall on or before expiration of Thirty (30) days
after the publication of these presents file in the Supreme Court
and serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a statement of his
claim in the prescribed form verified by an affidavit to be filed
therewith.

Failure of any such person to file and serve a Statement
of his claim on or before the expiration of Thirty (30) days after
the publication of these presents shall operate as.a bar to such
claims.

Copies of the filed plan may be inspected at:-

The Registry of the Supreme Court;

The Administrator’s Office in the Settlement of George
Town, Exuma; and

The Chambers of Allen, Allen & Co, the Attorneys
for the Petitioner, whose address for service is Allen
House, Dowdeswell Street, Nassau, New Providence,
The Bahamas.

Dated this 12" day of August, A.D., 2008.

ALLEN, ALLEN & CO.,
Chambers,

Allen House,

Dowdeswell Street,

EPS $ - A company's reported earnings per share for the last 12 mths
NAV - Net Asset Value

N/M - Not Meaningful

FINDEX - The Fidelity Bahamas Stock Index
+ - Nominal vaiue = $1000.00

Nassau, Bahamas.
Attorneys for the Petitioner

m day to day
n ‘faded today

DIV S - Dividends per share paid in the last 12 months

January 1, 1994 = 100

TO TRADE


THE TRIBUNE

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008, PAGE 11B



(ei a =



§ By ROYALFIDELITY
CAPITAL MARKETS

LAST WEEK was one of
the most active ones to
date in the Bahamian stock
market, with investors trad-
ing in nine out of the 24
listed securities, of which
four advanced, one
declined and four remained
unchanged. A total of

5,223,289 shares changed.

hands,. a_ substantial
increase of 5,103,854 share,
in comparison to last
week's trading volume of
119,435 shares.

Fixed income securities

traded for the first time this
week on BISX since its
inception, with investors
trading in $46,000 (par val-
ue) worth of Fidelity Bank
(Bahamas) Notes.

Some $36,000 worth of
Fidelity Series D Notes
(FBB15), due for redemp-
tion in 2015, and $10,000
worth of Fidelity Series C
Notes due for redemption
in 2013 (FBB13), traded
respectively.

In the equity market ICD
Utilities (ICD) dominated
this week's market rally, on
a volume of five million
shares, its stock rising by
$2.63 or 47.2 per cent to
close at a new 52-week

“high of $8.20.

Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) followed the trend
with 90,814 of its shares

PCT Ci

trading, rising by $0.30 or

4.3 per cent to close at
$7.30. FirstCaribbean Inter-
national Bank (Bahamas)
(CIB) and Cable Bahamas
(CAB) also advanced this
week.

Some 5,500 CIB and
4,300 CAB shares changed
hands, of which both
jumped by $0.05 to end the
week at $11.60 and $14.15
respectively.

Some 114,925 shares of
Colina Holdings (Bahamas)
(CHL) also traded this
week, closing unchanged at
$2.85. Doctors Hospital
Health Systems (DHS) was
the laggard of the week
with 6,000 shares trading,
falling by $0.01 to close at
$2.77.

COMPANY NEWS:
Earnings Releases:
Cable Bahamas (CAB)
released unaudited finan-
cial results for the six
months ending June 30,
2008. For the period net
income climbed to $12.9
million, an increase of $2.6
million or 25 per cent.
For the most recent quar-
ter, net income was $7.4
million compared to $5.3
million for the 2007 second
quarter, an increase of $2.1
million or 38 per cent. CAB
reported operating income
of $7.7 million for the quar-
ter, an increase of $1.2 mil-
lion or 18 per cent quarter-

Legal Notice

NOTICE

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN as follows:

(a) CAPTIVA LIMITED is in dissolution under the provisions of
the International Business Companies Act 2000.

‘(b) The Dissolution of said Company commenced on September 19, 2008
when its Articles of Dissolution were submitted and registered by

the Registrar General.

(c) The Liquidator of the said company is Lakeisha Collie of 2nd Terrace

West, Centreville, Nassau, Bahamas.

(d) All persons having Claims against the above-named Company are
required.on or before the 20th day of October, 2008 to‘send ‘their’ *
~ names and addresses and particulars of their debts or claims to the .
Liquidator of the company or, in default thereof,.they may be excluded
from the benefit of any distribution made before such debts are proved.

SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

LAKEISHA COLLIE

LIQUIDATOR OF THE ABOVE-NAMED-COMPANY



Ela Set ttle CM Ela lit
Pes el) i pole Menem aL
Toy ey (Tete oM NC LULA (oe

Please Fax Resume
394-3885
Ca ae ee
HIE SPORTS, SPINE &
- REHABILITATION CENTRE

WOULD LIKE TO CONGRATULATE

Kathryn de Souza-MD ,

For her recent U.S. board

2008, to all shareholders of

Week ending 19.09.08

FINDEX = 876.73

TRADING STATISTICS

(-7.91%) YTD

area uct Base and Biss CLOSING CHANGE VOLUME YTD PRICE
diluted earnings per share SYMBOL PRICE CHANGE
for the quarter increased AML... een. SLB et aicacseniiets Go acide ioncacentiees Oi Se aeiteateisiis 9.04%
from $0.27 in the 2007 sec- BBLi..wesseseseseseerees COBO Se hice Pea MARS IRS OI eae O cairn tite aes 4.71%
ond quarter to $0.37, TEP- BOB... S850. tcahvatacnte Ges gisele ccasteanien Oscche Sad ents -11.55%
resenting an increase Of BpR ce $480 et asad Ge el ET a uasesiet (ee ere sc 0.00%
$0.10 or 37.04 per cent. = * Bey $14.60 Go wanaainoietiteans (es ve 0.00%
Total agsetseand liabili- - BSE ene apenas oe : EN ie oe
ties stood at $184.1 million BW Liiiiticsiececs G9 A se isiibcicncnatbevese Sa hr ac ccdest Lisere Gove vacaleciU wevedlvbudusdetcccsusaswvesiueess Z .
and $85.3 million respec- CAB arti d eee $14 V5 cibidteesitecteistecens $+0.05 aubeceeedacsdeecsacsegeoees 4,300 igeedsdecosavetsseasesases 17.43%
tively, compared to $175.3 CBLeseessessesseeeneeees S730 oivecctteccccrtda cates SAO 30 ete A ieacbleheseins 90,814 ccreccscesecsciecoeess -13.40%
million and $87 million at | CHL. eee GD B95 icon Auth coeees cle atssui cues etoelass eet PAO ZS os aterase tacceress -9.52%
year-end 2007. The growth CIB avec $11.60 plies aeuge ©5005 aso decinsioiate 51500 ssiSadncaks -20.55%
in the company's asset base CWCB......csessssssseee $460 iscsi caked $540.28 vcsacrcscaceecticcssosstis Ose ane -8.73%
is ane : se N DHS tosciaee GOOF ccna, Memon te C00b xtc 6.000 sks ciaed: 17.87%
roject investments uring °
the peel PRAM oteadante LC ee eee Shas Sh pecan Oo heen 11.94%
PRB eine Ge ioe pcs Bot, Sie eee esate On iteeteae -10.57%
Dividends/AGM Notes: — FBB13........sss::sss0008 $100.00...0...cccocesssecsesense Ge i ate 10k aoa ees, 0.00%
Cable Bahamas (CAB) — FBBIS.ieeesscssssssscseee $100.00 ciieciseclicessacctsset ak ot easel ie 8 Ache Bcc eects iccae atin 0.00%
has declared a quarterly PFBB17.....ccseeee $100.00 sicccsesesscrssececeote GO ee tetas elon ae) 0. kta 0.00%
dividend of $0.06 per share, PBBI2. ese $100.00 cccccssetescoseasste Gk ewe oe ca cin fit ete 0.00%
payable on September 30,. FCC $0.40 $- 0 48.05%
pO08, to all shareholders of FOC enn A rgerctae Sire ar Perio ores fis
record date September 15, FCL $ . sccccvcvcccccccccccccccceccceneeeee ‘ eee ee eeeeeseeeserereeeeeessesess ° (o}

2008.

Doctors Hospital Health
Systems (DHS) has
declared a semi-annual div-
idend of $0.02 per share,
payable on September 30,

record date September 17,



PRIVATE PLACEMENT OFFERINGS: ne
FOCOL Holdings (FCL) announced that it will be extending the deadline of its private placement offer-



2008. ing. The preferred shares will be paying a dividend rate of prime + 1.75 per cent, payable semi-annu-
ally. ; '
Commonwealth Bank
(CBL) has declared a quar- .
terly dividend of $0.05 per
share, payable on Septem-
ber 30, 2008 to all share-— oo
holders of record date Sep- INTERNATIONAL MARKETS COMMODITIES é
. Weekly % Change
tember. 12, 2008. BORE Rates Crude Oil 10440 43.62
Consolidated Water Weekly % Change Gold 877.00 413.97
Company BDRs (CWCB) . ‘ caste
has declared a quarterly Caps 0.9543 +1.27 INTERNATIONAL STOCK MARKET INDEXES
dividend of $0.013 per — $ Weekl % Change =.
GBP 1.8836 +5.07 y Change oe.
share, payable on Novem- EUR 1.4483 1.81 DJIA 11,388.44 “ 49,30-
ber 7, 2008, to all share- : Di S&P500 1,255.08 +0.27
holders of record date Sep- NASDAQ 2,273.90 +0.56
tember 30, 2008. Nikkei 11,920.86 -2.41

THE NORWEGIAN MINISTRY

OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS

is pleased to announce the appointment of
John Moyell
as the Royal Norwegian Honorary Consul to

The Commonwealth of The Bahamas

as of 29 August, 2008

The address of the consulate:

Royal Norwegian Consulate
Dockendale House, 2nd floor
; West Bay Street
P.O. Box CB-13048
Nassau, Bahamas
1 242.322 4270 — fax 1 242 322 4280
eMail: Norwegianconsulate @ moyell.com

. Se
°PP Ere BAHAR

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS

_ and Alfred Adde:

certification in Sports Medicine.

_ Dr. de Souza is the only US board
certified Physiatrist and Sports
Medicine Specialist in the Bahamas.

For appointments, please contact
the Sports, Spine and Rehabilitation
Centre at 327-0708.

The Office is located on Blake Road
at the Western Medical Plaza.

The Securities Commission of The Bahamas, a statutory agency
responsible for the oversight, supervision and regulation of the Investment
Funds, Securities and Capital Markets in or from The Bahamas, as well
as the supervision of Financial and Corporate Service Providers, invites
applications from qualified Bahamians for the following position:

LEGAL OFFICER

Responsibilities:

e Ensuring that participants in the industry are in compliance with
provisions under the legislation

¢ Overseeing the litigation matters of the Commission

Qualifications and Experience:

¢ Called to the Bahamas Bar at least 3 years

¢ Court / litigation experience

Competencies:

¢ Excellent oral and written communication skills

e Excellent legal research skills

e Excellent.analytical skills

° cee in computer skills (Microsoft Office applications, particularly
ord)

A competitive salary dnd benefits are being offered. To apply, please
write attaching a resume to:

MANAGER —- HUMAN RESOURCES
SECURITIES COMMISSION OF THE BAHAMAS
P. O. BOX N-8347
NASSAU, BAHAMAS
Fax: 356-7530
E-Mail: info@scb.gov.bs

Applications should be submitted no later than September 30, 2008

COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS
IN THE SUPREME COURT

2007 / CLE / QTA/ 501

Common Law and Equity Division

> 0) IN‘ THEMATTER[of{ALL THAT piece parcel:or tract of
, « land comprising, 33-240 acres, more or less originally a.
"part of the Glintong Estate in the Settlement of Glentons
or Glintons, in the Northern District of the Island of Long
Island, one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The
Bahamas, and bounded on the WEST by the Sea at High :
Water Mark, on the NORTH partly by land now or formerly
the property of Basil Rahming and partly by land the
property of the Anglican Diocese, on the EAST by the Main
_ Public Road formerly known as the Main King’s Highway,
and on the SOUTH partly by Land the Property of the
Treasurer of The Bahamas now Glenton Primary School
and partly by land now ar formerly said to be the property
Sigismund (Cigman) Burrows and Alfred Adderley

AND :
AND IN THE MATTER of the Petition of Dr. Calvin Adderley,
Attorney by Deed of Power of Attorney for Hubert Roy
Adderley }
AND
"AND IN THE MATTER of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959.

NOTICE

_ The Petition of Dr. Calvin A. Adderley Sr. of P. O. Box 30009, of Ocean View

Drive, Stella Maris, Bahamas, Clinical Psychologist, as ATTORNEY BY DEED OF,
POWER OF ATTORNEY for Hubert Roy Adderley of 1908 Northwest 186% Street,
Carol City in the State of Florida, one of the United States of America, in respect of:-

ALL THAT PIECE PARCEL OR TRACT OF LAND comprising 33.240 Acres .
originally a part of the Glintons Estate in the Settlement of Glentons or Glintons, Long
Island one of the islands of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, BOUNDED ON THE
NORTH by an ancient stone wall separating said parcel from land said to be land the
property of one BASIL RAHMING and running thereon (N 51 degrees 51°19”) 567.86”
feet and partly by the aforesaid ancient stone wall separating said parcel from land the
property of the Anglican Diocese and running thereon (N 51 degrees 25’ 59”) 729.87
feet ON THE EAST partly by the Main Public Road of Long Island, formerly known
as the Main King’s Highway and running thereon N 165 degrees 24’ 18” 737.31 feet
thence running (N 169 degrees 46’ 25’) 253.17 feet thence ON the SOUTH by land the
Property of the Treasurer of The Bahamas now comprising the Glentons Primary School
(Bahamas Government) Compound and running thereon (N 267 degrees 15’ 09”) 217.25
feet thence ON THE EAST again by land the Property of the Treasurer of The Bahamas
now comprising the aforesaid Glentons Primary School (Bahamas Government)
Compound and running thereon (N 168 degrees 16’ 40”) 347.84 feet thence
ON THE SOUTH by an ancient stone wall separating said bpacel from land
said to be land now or formerly the property o: a igman) Burrows

ay and running thereon N 232 degrees 22’ 26” 964.44 feet
thence ON THE WEST again by the aforesaid ancient stone wall ae
said parcel from land said to be land the pepe of Sigismund (Ci man}
Burrows and Alfred Adderley and running thereon N339 degrees 54
thence ON THE SOUTH again by Sigismund (Cigman) Burrows and Alfred
Adderley now or formerly by the property of sigma (Ci an) Burrows
and Alfred Adderley and running thereon partly N 240 degrees 23° 229” 92.46
feet and partly running ( N 234 degrees 04’ 54”) 126.69 thence AND ON THE
WEST by the High Water Mark of the Sea and running thereon (N 350 degrees
08° aha running thereon 1080.05 feet which said ‘piece parcel or Tract
of land has the position shape boundaries markers and dimensions shown on
Registered Plan 163L.1. a copy of which is filed in the above Action in support
hereof and is thereon shown in PINK.

The Petitioner Dr. Calvin A. Adderley Sr. as Attorney By Deed of Power

of Attorney for Hubert Roy Adderley claims to be the owner in fee simple in

ossession of the said land free from encumbrances and has made application

‘0 the Supreme Court of the Commonwealth of The Bahamas under Section 3

of the Quieting Titles Act, 1959 to have his title to the said land investigated

and the nature and extent thereof determined and declared in a Certificate of
Title to be granted by the Court in accordance with the said Act. .

The Petition inter alia recognizes the entitlement the late Rhoda Smith, late
of the said Settlement of Glintons, Long Island or her personal representatives
and assigns to a 2.233 acres parcel being situate within the above said 33,240
piece parcel or tract of land.

A Plan of the said land may be inspected during normal business hours at the
following places:-

. The Resistry of the Supreme Court, Ansbacher Building, East Street,
Nassau, The Bahamas...
_ The Office of the Administrator, Clarence Town, Long Island, The

Bahamas.
. The Chambers of the Petitioner’s attorneys, Messrs. Maillis and Maillis,
Sones, Fort Nassau House, Marlborough Street, Nassau, The
amas

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that any person haying dower or right
of dower or an adverse claim or a claim not recognized in the Petition shall
on or before the 30" day of October A.D. 2008 file in the Supreme Court and
serve on the Petitioner or the undersigned a Statement of his or her claim in
the prescribed form verified by an Affidavit and other prescribed papers to be
filed therewith. Failure of any person to file and serve a Statement of his claim
within the prescribed time will operate as a bar to such claim.

DATED the 26" ty of A A.D. 2008
MAILLIS AND MAILLIS
Chambers, Fort Nassau House
Marlborough Street
Nassau, Bahamas
Attorneys for the Petitioner




PAGE 12B, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2008

THE BAHAMAS CHAMBER OF C@iMMERCE AND
THE BAHAMAS HOTEL ASSOCIAAION IN GOLLABORAZION
WITH THE BAHAMAS MESNISTRY OF FiNANCE ANS THE
INTER-AMERICAN DEVELGIPMENT BANE.
PRESENTS,“ GLOBALIZATION CONFERENCE

“Towards the Future: GiSbalization, F inancing and
Competitiveness”

Thursday, October 2nd, 2008
and
Friday, October 3rd, 2008
~ 8:30am-2:00pm:

he SH, veraton.Gahle Rearh.Recarten,

F ‘dependence Ballroom
‘rade Show Officially G opens @ 2:00pm on Fi riday,

‘Bahamas Business 7

P. by Thursday, September, 25th, 2008
“t Ms. Anastarcia Huyler Tel: 322-2145 i
GEG MEANT TCO eect

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: Rt. Hon. Hubert
Ingraham, Prime Minister of the Commonwealth
of the Bahamas °

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION - Oct. 2nd
“Financing. and Private Sector Development
in The Bahamas” i

THANKS: Yvette Sands,
“Co- Chair Globalization and Foreign Ai
Comnaces BCOC Director, BCOC

Hon. Zhivargo Laing, Minister. of State, a Finance,....
Ministry of Finance i

SESSIONI =
MODERATOR: Oscar Spencer, Representative
Inter-American Development Bank, ee

: of Economic Globalization and Small
Island Sebleping States: Trade NeaoHaten and
the Caribbean Reality” #
Topic: “Report: Roadmap for Improving, SME . ,
Competitiveness” H.E. /Henr f Gill, ees
Philippe Schinecuinn sultant, Inter-A
Development Bank.

SESSION I ;
MODERATOR: I. Chester Caper Hon. Treasu
’ Bahamas Chamber of Commerce *

Topic: “SME Challenges Venture Financitia?

Edison Sumner, Bahamas Venture Capital Fi
Darron Cash, Bahamas Development Bank
Michael Anderson, Royal Fidelity

Frank Davis, Bahamas Cooperative Credit League

to CARICOM Rt
Dave Kowlessar, Tra Consultant, Dykon i
Development Group

» Brian Moree, Senior Partner, McKinney Bancroft
& Hughes

OFFICIAL OPENING CEREMONY - Oct. 3rd
MODERATOR: Philip Simon
Executive Director, Banas Chamber of Commerce

WELCOME REMARKS: Gershan Major. '

Chairperson, Globalization and Foreign Affairs :
. Committee, BCOC : *Caribbean Economies inn. Fra of Free Trade”
REMARKS/ INTRODUCTION OF KEYNOTE

Vincent Vanderpool-Wallace, Minister of Tourism
SPEAKER: Dionisio D’Aguilar, President,BCOC. i ' LR NAT \ a

Dress: Business Attire
Valet Service Available

Sessions are Free
Luuricty; $50.00 per Person



(INN
pr. yy
Ry

QVS,

Scotiabank

_FORGIVE & FORGE

ee em is aes) Coane)

WIN CASH PRIZES
or $1,500, $2,500
ano $10, 000

ited enter

Bly

THE TRIBUNE -





Paulson resists
calls for added
help in bailout

i WASHINGTON
Associated Press

TREASURY Secretary
Henry Paulson is resisting a
Democratic push to add addi-
tional help for households to
the $700 billion bailout bill.

Paulson said Sunday that
because financial markets
remain under severe stress
there is an urgent need for
Congress to: act quickly with-
out adding other measures that
could slow down passage.

"We need this to be clean
and to be quick," Paulson said
in an interview on ABC's "This
Week."

Paulson resisted suggestions

being made by Democrats that
the program be changed to
include further relief for home-
owners facing mortgage fore-
closures and to include an addi-

‘tional $50 billion stimulus

effort. Some Democrats have

‘also suggested capping com-

pensation of executives at firms
who get the bailout help. |
Paulson said he was con-
cerned that debate over adding
all of those proposals would
slow the economy down, delay-
ing the rescue effort that i is SO
urgently needed to get finan-
cial markets moving again. —
"The biggest help we can
give the American people right
now is to stabilize the financial
system," Paulson said.
However, Sen. Charles
Schumer, D-N.Y., said that he
believed there would be
changes to the three-page Paul-
son plan.and that agreement
could be reached quickly.
Schumer said that he was
pushing to get a provision
where the government would
receive stock warrants in return
for the bailout relief and for
creation of a government over-

UR APA A

sight board to: supervise the
huge operation, which under
Paulson's plan would be run
out of the Treasury Depart-
ment. He said Paulson seemed
receptive to changes when he
had discussed his ideas with
him.

"T have told him ... we need
changes related to housing, we
need to put the taxpayer first
ahead of bondholders, share-
holders," Schumer, said on
"Fox News Sunday."

Paulson seid in the interviews
that he had been talking to oth-
er governments about the need
for them to offer similar relief
because the current financial
crisis is global.

"The credit markets are still
very fragile right now and
frozen," Paulson said in an
interview on NBC's Meet the
Press. "We need to deal with
this and deal with it quickly."

Paulson said that the nation's.

outdated regulatory system for
financial markets must be over-

hauled but the first job is to get -

the most sweeping rescue pack-
age since the Great Depression
passed by Congress in coming
days.

Paulson made the rounds of '

the television talk shows on
Sunday to stress the need for
speed in getting the bailout
package approved. The admin-
istration was negotiating the
details of the proposal with
members of Congress with the
expectation that it can be

_ passed in the next week..

Paulson said that "it pains
me tremendously to have the

American taxpayer put in this -

position but it is better than the
alternative."

Both Paulson and President
Bush have argued that the
alternative would be. credit
markets that remain frozen,

“ZERO CASH DOWN IF YOU OWN YOUR PROPERTY

NO MATTER WHAT YOUR GOALS ARE, WE CAN HELP YOU:
‘BUY A HOUSE

‘FINANCE THE CONSTRUCTION OF A HOME

‘REFINANCE A MORTGAGE FROM ANOTHER INSTITUTION
‘RENOVATE YOUR CURRENT HOME

CONTEST ENDS SEPTEMBER 3OTH

_ include relief for homeowners

meaning that businesses will
fail because they can't get the
loans they need to operate and
the economy will grind to a halt

because consumers won't be

able to get loans to make the
purchases that keep the econ-
omy moving forward.

On Saturday, Bush said the
White House is ready to work
with Congress to quickly enact
legislation to allow the govern-
ment to purchase hundreds of
billions of dollars worth of bad
debt linked to the collapse of
the housing market.

Congressional aides and
adrhinistration officials were
working through the weekend
to fill in the details of the pro-
posal.

The Bush proposal that |

would dole out huge sums of

_money to Wall Street firms and

bankers is a mere three pages
in length and is vague in terms
of determining, which institu-
tions would qualify or say what
— if anything — taxpayers
would get in return.

"It's a rather brief bill with a
lot of money," ‘said Sen. Chris
Dodd, D-Conn., the Banking
Committee chairman. "We
understand the importance of
the anticipation in the markets,
but we also know that what
we're doing is going to have
consequences for decades to
come. There's not a second act
to this — we've got to get this
right."

Democrats, who say they will
work with the administration
to pass a plan, ‘are demanding it




struggling with mounting debt
not just for Wall Street.

The proposal would raise the
statutory limit on the national
debt from $10.6 trillion to $14:3
trillion to make room for the
massive rescue,

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